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Full text of "Biographical and genealogical history of Morris County, N.J"

97^.901 
M83b 
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11283c / 



M. L. 



IREYNCLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



/ 




3 1833 02232 9616 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2009 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/biographicalgenemcnj01lewi 




T);f,lems PuI'lislanj Co. C!u!' a.go 



BiogroplMcQl and Ciene^nlogirnl 



HISTOPY 



QE. 



nOPRIS COUNTY 



NEW .inpsrv . 



©Tri^,A.TE:D. 






\Jv\ 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY. 

Ni;\v N'ORK AND Chicago. 

1899. 



1128300 
PRBFACK. 



OUT of the depths of his mature wisdom Carlyle wrote: " History is 
the essence of innumerable biographies." Farther than this, what propriety 
can there be in advancing reasons for the compilation of such a work as the 
one at hand? Morris county has sustained within its confines men who have 
been prominent in the history of the state and nation from the early colonial 
epoch. The annals teem with the records of strong and noble manhood, 
and, as Sumner has said, " The true grandeur of nations is in those quali- 
ties which constitute the true greatness of the individual." The final causes 
which shape the fortunes of individual men and the destinies of states are 
often the same. They are usually remote and obscure; their influence wholly 
unexpected until declared by results. When they inspire men to the exercise 
of courage, self-denial, enterprise, industry, and call into play the higher 
moral elements; lead men to risk all upon conviction, faith, ^ — such causes lead 
to the planting of great states, great nations, great peoples. That nation 
is greatest which produces the greatest and most manly men, and the intrinsic 
safety depends not so much upon methods and measures as upon that true 
manhood from whose deep sources all that is precious and permanent in life 
must at last proceed. Such a result may not consciously be contemplated 
by the individuals instrumental in the production of a great nation. Pursuing 
each his personal good by exalted means, they work out this as a logical 
result. They have wrought on the lines of the greatest good. 

Ceaselessly to and fro flies the deft shuttle which weaves the web of 
human destiny, and in the vast mosaic fabric enter the individuality, the effort, 
the accomplishment of each man, be his station that most lowly, or one of 
majesty, pomp and power. Within the textile folds may be traced the line 
of each individuality, be it the one that lends the beautiful sheen of honest 
worth and honest endeavor, or one that, dark and zigzag, finds its way 
through warp and woof, marring the composite beauty by its blackened 
threads, ever in evidence of the shadowed and unprolitic life. Into the 



iv PREFACE. 

great aggregate each individuality is merged, and yet the essence of each 
is never lost, be the angle of its influence wide-spreading and grateful, or 
narrow and baneful. In his efforts he who essays biography finds much of 
profit and much of alluring fascination when he would follow out, in even 
a cursory way, the tracings of a life history, seeking to find "the keynote of 
each respective perso;iality. These efforts and their resulting transmission 
can not fail of value in an objective way, for in each case may the lesson 
of life be conned, "line upon line; precept upon precept." 

Whether the elements of success in life are innate attributes of the 
individual, or whether they are quickened by a process of circumstantial 
development, it is impossible to clearly determine. Yet the study of a 
successful life is none the less interesting and profitable by reason of the 
existence of this same uncertaint}'. So much in e.xcess of those of successes 
are the records of failures or semi-failures that one is constrained to attempt 
an analysis in either case and to determine the method of causation in 
an approximate way. The march of improvement and progress is accelerated 
day by day, and each successive moment seems to demand of men a broader 
intelligence and a greater discernment than did the preceding. Successful 
men must be live men in this age, bristling with activity, and the lessons of 
biography may be far-reaching to an extent not superficially evident. A man's 
reputation is the property of the world. The laws of nature have forbidden 
isolation. Every human being either submits to the controlling influence of 
others, or, as a master, wields a power for good or evil on the masses of 
mankind. There can be no impropriety in justly scanning the acts of any 
man as they affect his public, social and business relations. If he be 
honest and successful in his chosen field of endeavor, investigation will 
brighten his fame and point the path along which others may follow with 
like success. Not alone are those worthy of biographic honors who have 
moved along the loftier planes of action, but to an equal extent are those 
deserving who are of the rank and file of the world's workers, for they are not 
less the conservators of public prosperity and material advancement. 

Longfellow wrote, " We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of 
doing, while others judge us by what we have already done." If this golden 
sentence of the New England bard were uniformly applied, many a man 
who is now looking down with haughty stare upon the noble toilers on land 
and sea, sneering at the omission of the aspirate, the cut of his neighbor's 



PREFACE. V 

coat or the humbleness of his dwelling, would be voluntarily doing penance 
in sackcloth and ashes, at the end of which he would handle a spade or, with 
pen in hand, burn the midnight oil in his study, in the endeavor to widen the 
bounds of liberty or to accelerate the material and spiritual progress of his 
race. The humble and lowly often stand representative of the truest nobility 
of character, the deepest patriotism and the most exalted purpose, and 
through all the gradations of life recognition should be had of the true 
values, and then should full appreciation he manifested. 

In the Biographical and Genealogical History of Morris County the 
editorial staff, as well as the publishers, have fully realized the magnitude of 
the task set them. The work is purely biographical in its province, and in 
the collation of material for the same there has been a constant aim to use 
a wise discrimination in regard to the selection of subjects, and yet to exclude 
none worthy of representation within its pages. Those who have been 
prominent factors in the public, social and industi'ial make-up of the county 
in the past have been given due recognition as far as it has been possible to 
secure the requisite data. Names worthy of perpetuation here have in 
several instances been omitted, either on account of the apathetic 
interest of those concerned, or the inability to secure the information 
demanded. Yet, in both the contemporary narrative and the memoirs of 
those who have passed on to " that undiscovered country from whose bourne 
no traveler returns," it is believed that there has been such utilization of 
material as to more than fulfill all stipulations and promises made at the 
inception of the undertaking. 

In the compilation recourse has been had to divers authorities, including 
various histories and historical collections, and implying an almost endless 
array of papers and documents, public, private, social and ecclesiastical. 
That so much matter could be gathered from so many original sources and 
then sifted and assimilated for the production of a single work without 
incurring a modicum of errors and inaccuracies, would be too much to expect 
of any corps of writers, no matter how able they might be as statisticians or 
skilled as compilers of such works. It is, nevertheless, believed that no 
inaccuracies of a serious nature can be found to impair the historical value of 
the volumes, and it is further believed that the results will supply the demand 
which called forth the efforts of the publishers and the editorial corps. 

To other and specific histories has been left the task of touching the 



vi PREFACE. 

general! history of this county; for the function of this work is aside from 
this, and is definite in its scope, so that a recapitulation would be out of 
harmony with the compilation. However, the incidental references made to 
those who have been the important actors in the public and civic history of 
the county will serve to indicate the generic phases and will shadow forth 
much to those who can " read between the lines." In conclusion we can 
not do better than to quote another of Carlyle's terse aphorisms: " There is 
no heroic poem in the world but is at bottom a biography, the life of a 
man." 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



JAMES AUGUSTUS WEBB. 

The history of the United States is best told in the story of the Hves of 
its individual citizens. The aggregate of such lives is the national life 
exemplified under free institutions. An individual is best studied in the 
environment of his residence, where the observations and opinions of neigh- 
bors receive and retain his conduct for good or evil as a sensitized plate does 
the image cast upon it. Judged by such a test, the life of the subject of 
this sketch is readily written, and worthy of permanent record and careful 
storing as an aggressive force for good, socially, morally and civilly. 

A common test of success is the acquisition of wealth. The true test, 
however, of its power for good or evil lies in its distribution. Money is 
power, and the individual who has gathered wealth and applied his acquisi- 
tions to the elevating of mankind is a public benefactor. Such a man is 
James Augustus Webb, a prominent resident of New Jersey, and a leader in 
the business life of the American metropolis for many years. He belongs 
properly upon that roll oi honored American citizens whose efforts con- 
tribute to the general prosperity of the community. 

Mr. Webb was born in Chenango county. New York, in the town of 

Norwich, February 3, 1830, a son of Augustus Van Horn and Phoebe 

{Baker) Webb, of New York city. Orange Webb, the father of Augustus 

Van Horn Webb, was a prominent merchant and ship-owner in New York. 

and resided at No. 19 Maiden Lane, opposite Little Green street, now known 

as Liberty street. He was an elder in the old brick church at the corner 

of Nassau and Beekman streets. Rev. Gardiner Spring, D. D., being its 

pastor. Orange Webb had two sons, Augustus Van Horn and David; 

and his daughters were Catherine C. , who became the wife of Rensselaer 

Havens, of New York city; Fannie, wife of Rev. Alexander G. Eraser, who 
1 



2 BIOGRJPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

formerly lived in New York, but, being the heir to the Lovett estate in Scot- 
land, removed to that country in or about 1S30; and Sarah A., wife of James 
H. Leverich, whose business interests connected him with both New York 
and New Orleans, he being a very prominent man in the commercial cir- 
cles of the latter city. 

Augustus Van Horn Webb was reared in New York city, and in early 
life engaged in the dry-goods business. He removed to Norwich, Chenango 
county. New York, in 1830, and engaged in the manufacture of woolen 
goods. From his father he inherited considerable inventive genius, and during 
his residence in Norwich he invented a fluid and lamp for lighting purposes, 
• — a substitute for candles and whale-oil, then in general use for illuminating. 
In 1836 he resumed his residence in New York city, and about that time he 
invented "Camphene," and a lamp known thereafter throughout the world 
as "Webb's burner." He established many branches or agencies of his 
main business house in various cities of the United States, his main estab- 
lishment being at 418 Broadway, northeast corner of that and Canal streets. 
For several years his enterprises were attended with success, but afterward 
he met with financial reverses, causing the loss of much of his accumulated 
wealth. He retired from active business ripe in years, and died, honored 
and beloved by all who knew him. 

In writing the personal history of James A. Webb we record the career 
of one who has attained success in business along the tried lines of honorable 
effort, indefatigable energy and perseverance. Educated at the academy of 
Barry & Lockword, at 41 1 Broadway, he began his business career with his 
father, where he remained but a few months. In August, 1843, he entered 
the establishment of Messrs. Doremus, Suydam & Nixon, wholesale dry-goods 
merchants, located at the corner of Nassau and Liberty streets, opposite the 
old South Dutch church. There he continued faithful to the interests of his 
employers until August, 1848, when he entered' the employ of Arnold, 
Southworth & Company, wholesale jobbers and importers of fancy goods. 
He was the accountant for this firm for some five years, when, in March, 1853, 
notwithstanding that his prospects for admission as a partner were most flat- 
tering, he gave up his position in order to embark in business on his own 
account. His father, though in failing health, rendered valuable assistance 
to the young man in his new undertaking, which consisted in the refining of 
camphene and alcohol and the manufacture of burning fluid, the elder man 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJS'D GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 3 

having invented some important improvements in tiie production of tlie arti- 
cles of commerce mentioned. Our subject built and operated refineries in 
Newark, New Jersey, and in New York city, and in 1855 he occupied 
a store at No. 165 Pearl street, in the last named city. He is still located 
there and is pursuing the same business as in former years, with his accus- 
tomed energy and success. Considering the changes necessary upon the con- 
duct of business in the metropolis, the instances are rare where, a firm has 
continued in one location in the same line of business, successivel}' and suc- 
cessfully, for forty-four years. 

As Mr. Webb in his early business years proved faithful and loyal to his 
business superiors, so, in his later life, he has always entertained a proper 
regard for his own employes, recognizing their manhood and ability, and 
providing for them when, by reason of impaired health or advancing years, 
they are incapacitated for further active service. It is quite true to state 
that a clerk has never left his employ, to receive better treatment or higher 
compensation, and it has often occurred that, when an employe of his has 
found opportunity to enter business upon his own account, he has found in 
Mr. Webb a wise counselor, and received at his hands substantial assistance. 
With Mr. \^'ebb business has never been a trade, but rather a profession, in 
which the test was not time service, but a heart}- and wholesome loj-alty to 
entrusted interests, which served to develop all that was best in the individ- 
ual, and tended to develop all that is best in manhood. 

Mr. Webb continued his residence in New York city until 1862, when 
he removed to Madison, where he had been well known for manA- years. He 
was married there to Margaretta Baker, a daughter of Jacob and Anna Maria 
(Brittin) Baker. Mrs. Webb is a native of Westfield, New Jersey. The two 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Webb are Ella Cebra and James- Augustus. The 
daughter was educated at Vassar College and is now the wife of Edward 
Packard Holden, of Madison, who for twenty-four years has been connected 
with the Mutual Life Insurance Compan}', of New York city. They have 
three daughters and one son, namely: Margaretta Webb, Eleanor Sanford, 
Edward Packard and Elizabeth Cebra. The son, James Augustus, Jr., was 
born in New York cit}-, July 11, 1859, and graduated in Princeton College 
with high honors, a member of the class of 1881. He was very popular in 
college and there associated with many who have attained brilliant positions 
in professional and business life. While pursuing his education James Angus- 



4 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

tus Webb, Jr., passed the months of his vacation in his father's office, gain- 
ing a practical knowledge of business methods, and upon completing his colle- 
giate course he entered the establishment as corresponding clerk. In 1884 
he was admitted to a partnership in the business, under the firm name of 
James A. Webb & Son, displaying an energy, enterprise and discretion in its 
management that rapidly won him recognition and commendation among 
leading business men generally. He was a young man of broad, humanitarian 
principles and sympathy and was active in church and benevolent work. The 
poor found in him a friend, bestowing his gifts in such a manner as not to 
destroy the self-respect of the one who received assistance. His kindly tact 
and sympathy were as marked as his beneficence, and many have reason to 
remember him with gratitude for his timely aid. He was a lover of music 
and found one of his chief sources of pleasure through that art. 

In December, 1885, James Augustus Webb, Jr., married Miss Nellie San- 
ford Packard, a daughter of David S. and Eleanor Packard. It was on the 
6th of April, 1887, that the useful and noble career of this worthy young 
man was ended by death. His loss in every honorable walk of life — in busi- 
ness, in social circles, in the home and in Christian work — has been most 
keenly felt. 

" His life was noble and the elements 
So mixed in him that Nature might stand up 
And say to all the world, ' This was a man.' " 

His father, in commemoration of his upright career and devotion to all 
that is truest and best, erected in Madison a beautiful memorial known as 
the Webb Memorial Chapel, a fitting monument to one whose every act was 
prompted by a lofty purpose. 

James A. Webb, Sr., also is active in the work that develops the char- 
acter and lifts man from the sordid things of life to "a purer and broader 
view." He was one of the organizers of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation of Madison, and was its second president. He continues in his efforts 
to promote its interests. A life-long member of the Presbyterian church, 
he has been treasurer of his home church and was superintendent of the 
Sunday-school for more than thirty years, and has ever labored earnestly for 
the advancement of Christianity among men. His belief, too, is evidenced in 
those practical efforts wherein assistance is rendered in tangible form — gifts 
to those who fail to secure success, and the advancement of various interests 



BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GEJ^TALOGICAL HISTORY. 5 

that contribute to the material welfare, the aesthetic culture and the happi- 
ness of the individual. In this way he has been instrumental in promoting 
the interests of Madison. 

The commercial activity of any city contributes to the welfare of all its 
citizens, and realizing this truth Mr. Webb has been an active factor in pro- 
moting a number of her enterprises.. He is a director and vice-president of 
the First National Bank of Madison; was one of the organizers and directors 
of the Morristown Trust Company; a director of the Safe Deposit Company of 
Morristown, a member of the Washington As.^ociation of Morris county, and 




Webb Me.morial Chapel, Madison, N. J. 

is interested in several banking and trust institutions in the city of New York, 
and is a director and officer in several large manufacturing concerns in that 
city. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Webb has been a stalwart Republican 
since the organization of that party, and has been a conspicuous figure in 
local and state politics. Though frequently urged to become a candidate for 
office, both state and national, he has steadily refused, and will accept no 



6 BIOGRJPEICdL AMD GEJ{EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

political office, having served only in positions in Madison when he felt that 
his duties of citizenship demanded his services. He was a Harrison elector 
in 1892, and has served as commissioner of appeals of Madison and Chatham 
townships for more than a quarter of a century. Mr. Webb was closely iden- 
tified with the formation of Madison borough, resulting in the establishing of 
first-class water works and the installing of an electric-light plant of the very 
best order. Through his personal efforts and guaranty, the benefits of a 
metallic-circuit felephone exchange are now enjoyed by the citizens of Mad- 
ison. In short, whenever co-operative effort will inure to the benefit of his 
fellows, Mr. Webb is always at the front. He is the owner of a large 
amount of town property. His own home is located on High and Prospect 
streets, Madison, in the midst of ample grounds, standing on an eminence 
which commands a splendid view of the surrounding country. 

Mr. Webb's prominence in the business world has made him well known 
by reputation throughout the country. He is a familiar figure in Washing- 
ton and in New York, and among his friends are some of the most dis- 
tinguished statesmen of the capital city, the most celebrated representatives 
of the I ress and the most prominent business men of the country, and he is 
accorded that honor and respect everywhere given to true worth. The 
world instinctively pays deference to the man whose success has been worthily 
achieved, who has attained wealth by honorable business methods, acquired 
by merit the highest reputation in his chosen calling, and whose social promi- 
nence is not the less the result of an irreproachable life than of recognized 
natural gifts. 



THE BURNET FAMILY. 



(Bv Mrs. Helen M. Brittin.) 

Some one has said it is as hard to realize the infancy of a city or town 
as for a grown-up man to think of himself as a child, — to go back to the time 
when powers were untrained and habits unformed, and to believe in his 
childish griefs, quarrels, hopes and fears, weakness and dependence. So, too, 
it is hard to look back to the days when Madison was an unbroken forest, 
with no inhabitants but the Indians. The year 1740 is the probable bottom 



BIOGRJPHICAL AKB GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 7 

of our history; but it is so far away that we can only discover a few of its 
general outlines. 

Who first explored this section and brought the desirability of the land 
to the notice of the white people is not certainly known, but from tradition 
and old deeds and records there is reason to warrant the belief that two 
young men (relatives of William Burnet, governor of New York from 17 19 to 
1728) were passing through this valley from Elizabethtown on their "way to 
visit their uncle, Aaron Burnet, at Whippany, when they found a few cleared 
spots used by the Indians in raising corn and tobacco, well watered by 
perennial springs and sheltered by the surrounding hills. They were so 
impressed with the natural advantages of this place that they took measures 
to secure from the Indians a large portion of land. There is a tradition in 
the family that " the boys bought one thousand four hundred acres of the 
Pompton Indians on their first visit, and afterward two thousand acres, 
which comprises all of Madison and its surroundings." Surely the red man's 
title was easily relinquished and for ever and ever quit-claimed! 

David and Daniel returned to Elizabethtown and Southampton, Long 
Island, and at the opening of the year 1740 returned to Bottle Hill, and 
brought with them other pioneer settlers, whose names have a familiar sound 
to-day, — Carter, Miller, Coyle, Genung, Potter, Thompson, Cook, Meeker, 
Bruen, Budd, Howell and Bonnell. These men, with others who came in, 
established the colony. We have authentic history that this is true, and 
also papers, deeds, etc., as well as tradition, to prove the identity of the 
Burhets in the first settlement of Bottle Hill. The above names of the early 
settlers appear on the inde.x at the clerk's office in the court-house at Morris- 
town more than a thousand times, in exchange of property on record back 
in 1700. It is well to remember that Elizabethtown and Newark were set- 
tled long before, and that the sons of the early settlers passed westward over 
the first mountain into the valley of the Passaic, settling in Hanover, Whip- 
pany and Morristown. The principal center of the-e settlements was on the 
Whippany river where the village now stands, and the first church ever 
organized in what is now the county of Morris was formed there, about the 
year 171 8. 

As this is biography rather than history, we will now see that these 
young and early settlers were not reckless adventurers, but were persons of 
substantial character, intelligent, industrious and some of them pious. Some 



8 BWQRAl'lUCAL A,ND aK.KEALOOICAL HISTORY. 

peculiarities they had, — faulty, too, doubtless, — and yet they were men to be 
honored for their bravery and revered for their virtues. I^ikc their brothers 
in Southampton, wherever they went the church and school-house, too, fol- 
lowed in their wake. The first church in this section was built on the site 
of the present cemetery in Whippany. Not until 1738 was a successful effort 
made to erect a church in Morristown, and in 1748 land was given for a 
house of worship, and a church-yard in Bottle Hill, by David Burnet, one of 
the two young nien who first scaled the hills, penetrated the forests and 
looked down upon the beautiful valley of the Passaic. 

"Who were the Burncts.' " Burk's General Armory mentions thirteen 
families in Scotland and Enj^land, of the name of Burnet, as having coats of 
arms. John Burnet, attorney of New York, jircvious to 1792, had a book- 
plate, which contains a coat of arms, as follows: Argent; three holly leaves 
in chief proper, and a hunting horn in base, sable garnished gules; crest, a 
hand issuing out of a cloud about to prune a vine fruited, all proper. Motto, 
" Virescit vulnere virtus." This distinguished family dates back to one 
Robert Burnet, a baron of Leys, who received his commission from King 
James the First. His son Alexander was a Scottish advocate of reputation, 
who had a son, Robert Burnet, constituted by Charles the First one of the 
senators of the College of Justice, and was Lord Chimond. He married 
Rachael Johnston, sister of Sir Archibald Johnston, of Warriston, one of the 
principal popular leaders of the civil war in Scotland. They had three 
S0J1S, Thomas, Gilbert and William. Thomas was physician to King 
Charles, also a clergyman eminent for learning, genius and virtue, who prob- 
ably would have succeeded Tillotson as archbishop of Canterbury had not 
his heterodoxy stood in the way. His will was written at Southampton 
March 16, 1679. Mary Burnet, his wife, was sole executrix, witnessed by 
John Foster and John Laughton. A true copy was made by John Howell, 
clerk of Suffolk county, at the clerk's office, August 28, 1890. The two 
distinguished men. Bishop Gilbert Burnet and Dr. Thomas Burnet, died 
the same year, 171 5, — one seventy-two and the other eighty years of age; 
and there is no doubt as to their relationship to each other and to Gover- 
nor William Burnet.* Gilbert Burnet was the renowned Lord Bishop 



* Since this outline of the liistoiy of tlic HuVnct family was written, 1 have found that his- 
torians differ in regard to the relationship of the three distinguished men, Thomas, Gilbert and 
William Burnet. One says, " They belonged to entirely different families; " another that " they 
were cousins;" another that " two of them were brothers and one a nephew;" still another 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^^D GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. ^ 

of Salisbury, who wrote various theological treatises, among which is an 
Exposition of the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England. He left 
in manuscript his celebrated History of My Own Times, and a full narra- 
tion of what took place from the Restoration to the year 1713, during which 
period the author advanced from his seventeenth to his seventieth year; 
he was married three times and left a family. 

William and Thomas Burnet resided in Yorkshire after they left Edinburg, 
only a short time before coming to Lynn, Massachusetts. William was made 
governor of New York and Massachusetts, and also the second colonial gov- 
ernor and chancellor of New Jersey. He married Mary Vanhorn and had four 
children, — Gilbert, Thomas, William and Mary. His will was executed in 
Boston October 14, 1729, and an inventory of his personal estate covers 
twelve closely written pages, as shown by Abraham Vanhorn, Esq., a copy 
of which is held by William Nelson, Esq., corresponding secretary of the 
New Jersey Historical Society, Newark, New Jersey. 

Dr. William Burnet, son of Dr. Ichabod, was graduated in Newark while 
the College of New Jersey was located at that place, and settled there after 
completing a course of medical studies in New York. Dr. Burnet took a very 
active part in the Revolution, was chief physician and surgeon in an important 
section of the army during the war, and was a member of the congress of the 
United States for 1780-81. In 1754 he married Mary Camp and became 
the father of eleven children, among whose descendants we find the names of 
many of the most eminent citizens of New Jersey. Dr. Burnet was one of 

(who I incline to believe is right), that "they were brothers and children of Robert Burnet 
(Lord Chimond)." The same coat of arms is used by the descendants of each of the three, and 
Dr. Thomas Burnet wrote the Life of Bishop Gilbert Burnet. Who could do this as well as a 
brother? I have read the last will and testament of each of them. Dr. Thomas Burnet's will 
was executed at Southampton, Long Island. Governor William Burnet's will was executed in 
Boston October 14, 1729. In it he mentions his "brother Gilbert" and his son Gilbert, and 
Thomas, Mary and William. Bishop Gilbert Burnet dated his will October 12, 1711. This will 
was proved by his son William, who was executor. It is in Somerset House, London, in the 
prerogative court of Canterbury, in book " Fagg," folio 58. At this distance of time it cannot 
be hoped to construct complete family records. In 1672 he married Lady Margaret Kennedy 
(daughter of the Earl of Cassilis), who was distinguished for her extensive knowledge as well as 
for her beauty. In 1688 Dr. Burnet was advanced to the see of Salisbury, and at this period he 
married Mrs. Mary Scott, a lady as famed for her private virtues as for her wealth and noble 
birth. In 1700 he married Elizabeth (eldest daughter of Sir Richard Blake). She was born in 
1661 and married first Robert Berkley, Esq., who died 1693. .She was distinguished for her 
devotion to her church and charity. Bishop Burnet's first wife was remarkable for her beauty, 
the second for her fortune and the third for her piety. On March 17, 1715, he died of a pleur- 
itic fever, in the seventy-second year of his age. 



10 BIOORAPHICAL AJfD GEJ{EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

the founders of the State Medical Society, and was its president from 1767 
to 1786. Of his six sons, his iirst-born and namesake, WiUiam Burnet, Jr., 
studied medicine with his father and settled in Belleville, where he practiced 
his profession. He inherited the patriotism of his father, and like him gave 
himself to his country as surgeon in the Continental army. He married 
Joanna, daughter of Joseph Ailing, another patriot of the Revolution, who 
commanded a company of minute men in the township of Newark. Dr. Bur- 
net, Jr., had three daughters: Abby, who married Caleb S. Riggs, Esq., a 
lawyer of New York; Mary, who married Chief Justice Joseph C. Hornblower; 
and Caroline, who married Governor William Pennington. 

William Burnet Kinney was born at Speedwell, Morris county, in 1799. 
His grandfather was Sir Thomas Kinney, an English baronet, and his mother 
•was Hannah Burnet, daughter of Dr. William Burnet, a relative of Governor 
Burnet and chancellor of New Jersey. Chief Justice Joseph P. Bradley, of 
the United States supreme court, married a granddaughter of Dr. William 
Burnet and daughter of Judge Abraham Kinney, an officer in the war of 18 12. 
William Burnet Kinney, on June 19, 1851, after occupying the editorial 
tripod of the Newark Daily Advertiser during a period of eighteen years, 
entered on a season of well-earned rest, having been appointed United States 
minister to Sardinia by President Zachary Taylor; and the paper was most 
successfully conducted by Thomas T. Kinney, son of William B. Kinney, who 
had the sagacity to secure eminent editorial assistance. 

Dr. Thomas Burnet, brother of Gilbert and William Burnet, came from 
Edinburg, Scotland, to Lynn, Massachusetts, where he was married, Decem- 
ber 3, 1663, to Mary, daughter of Rev. Abraham Pierson, who was one of 
the early settlers of Southampton, Long Island. They were formed into a 
church organization at Lynn. A few months afterward a settlement had 
been effected in Southampton, so they brought their minister. Rev. Abraham 
Pierson, with them, and erected their church edifice in the second year of 
their settlement. Dr. Thomas Burnet was born in 1635, and died in 1715. 
According to Hon. George R. Howell's Early History of Southampton, page 
206, the names of the children of Dr. Burnet are as follows: John, Aaron, 
Lot, Joel, Dan, Mordecai, Matthias and a daughter, Miriam. Dan and 
Mordecai were of the associate settlers of the town of Elizabeth, New Jer- 
sey, in 1699-1700 (Hatfield's historj-). Dan and Elizabeth Burnet had chil- 
dren, — Daniel and Dr. Ichabod. Daniel was a sea captain, and his enter- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AKD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 11 

prising faculties found exercise in foreign commerce. He built vessels and 
engaged extensive!}' in the West India trade, and married at Port Royal. He 
was a man of ample means and of more than ordinary' intelligence and sagac- 
ity. His wife died in early womanhood leaving two sons and considerable 
property in the West Indies, and he wisely determined to give his children 
as good an education as the times afforded. They were brought from Port 
Royal, after the death of their parents, and placed at school in the small 
town of Elizabeth, and by provision of their father's will their inheritance 
was "to be invested in real estate, under Dr. Ichabod Burnet as guardian," 
who was a noted physician of the times, son of Dan Burnet, son of Thomas 
Burnet. Hatfield says "he was born about 1687 and lived to be ninet}' 
years old. " 

Daniel and David Burnet, acting under the advice of Dr. Ichabod and 
Aaron Burnet, commenced at once to secure and divide the land among the 
colonis s upon their arrival in Morris county; but delay involved the loss of 
a planting season. It is said by the descendants of Luke Carter that he 
drew the first furrow and planted the first land in Chatham township in 1740. 
David Burnet built the first house near " Kallamazue Spring," at East Mad- 
ison, and in 1748 gave land for ''a meeting-house and graveyard." His 
uncle, Aaron Burnet, of Whippany, was the first person buried in this church- 
yard ; he was one hundred years old. Daniel Burnet, son of David, gave the 
land for a new church to the parish in 1S23, as well as much time and 
money, but he did not live to see it dedicated; he died July 12, 1824. It is 
now (1898) called "the old-fashioned Presbyterian church," but to the 
descendants of Daniel Burnet there clusters around it a sacred enchantment 
that no modern edifice can ever fill. 

Daniel Burnet's house, on the Brjxe place, was the abode of a generous 
hospitality. In private life he was a conspicuous figure; he was genial, and 
possessed of humor and a fund of witty anecdote. He had a large family, 
and gave to each of his children a house and considerable land on their wed- 
ding day. The following is taken from the old family Bible record: Daniel 
Burnet was born December 17, 1758, and married Mary Parsells, who was 
born October 17, 1756. Their children were: Catharine, who was born 
September 13, 1781, and married Squire Force; Elizabeth, who was born 
April 9, 1783, and married Enoch Miller; Nancy, who was born February 17, 
1785, and married Daniel Sargeant; David, who was born September 9, 1786, 



12 BIOGRAPHICAL A.YD GE^^EALOGICAL HIS TOUT. 

and married first Lydia Crane and secondly Harriet Bunn; Ichabod, who 
was born November 12, 178S, and married Joanna, a daughter of Captain 
William Day, of Chatham; Abby, who was born September 25, 1790, and 
married David Force; Squire Burnet, who was born December 13, 1793, and 
married Mary Hight; John Burnet, who was born June 20, 1795; and Mary, 
who was born September 21, 1798, and married Collin Robertson, sheriff of 
Morris county, and whose son Alexander was a member of the legislature 
several years, and also senator from Morris county. 

Perhaps there was no trait of the character of the father of this family 
(Daniel Burnet) more pronounced than that of steadfast adherence to princi- 
ple and an unflinching courage in the maintenance of his convictions. In 
1812, amid the excitement of enlistment, this patriot suspected disloyalty in 
one of his sons-in-law, and therefore obtained from him the confession: 
"My father and grandfather were ever loyal to their country and their king: 
how could I be otherwise.'" It is needless to add that he immediately left 
in a hurr}' the comfortable home which Daniel Burnet had so generously pro- 
vided, and espoused the unpopular English side, joining the British army at 
Montreal, where he died within the first year, suddenly, at the dinner table, 
of apoplexy; but as his action was the result of education and an honest 
opinion, there was no personal ill will against him, but rather sympathy for 
his family — a young wife of twenty-nine years and four little girls, — Maria, 
Malinda, Hetty and Adelia, all of whom their grandfather tenderly cared for 
until they were married. Maria married Ezra Howell; Malinda went south 
and died unmarried; Hetty married William Beach, and Adelia married her 
cousin, John P. Force, at Augusta, Georgia, one of the most successful busi- 
ness men in the state. His brothers Miller married Miss Lamar and Ward 
married Miss Julia Harper, of Greensboro, Georgia, members of distinguished 
families in the south. Benjamin Conley, another cousin, was mayor of 
Augusta three terms. He married Miss Semmes, sister to Captain Semmes, 
of the Alabama. At the close of the Civil war Benjamin Conley was presi- 
dent of the senate of Georgia. Governor Bullock refused to "reconstruct 
the state," and therefore was deposed, divested of his high office, and the 
president of the senate, Benjamin Conley, was made governor and led 
Georgia back into the Union. He also founded the university at Atlanta, 
and schools all over the state for the poor, etc. Although Mrs. Conley lost 
one hundred thousand dollars' worth of slaves by the Civil war, and her 



BIOGRJFHICAL AJ^'D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 13 

brother was an officer in the Confederate army, she stood firmly and loyally 
by the side of her noble husband, and for eight days entertained Union 
officers and soldiers at their, beautiful home and on the plantation near Mont- 
gomery, during the " march to the sea," etc. 

Daniel Burnet built a hotel in 1800, that was destroyed by fire in 1870. 
It was located next to Mr. Paulmier's store, and in the days of the stage- 
coach from Morristown to Elizabeth was kept by his son-in-law, Daniel 
Sargeant, who sold out to Robert Albright. One of Mr. Sargeant's sons 
became a noted physician at Somerville, New Jersey, and another a most 
successful business man, whose two sons, " S. S. Sargeant and A. V. Sar- 
geant, established the Sargeant Manufacturing Company in 1869 in Newark. 
Their line is general and special saddlery hardware. The capital of the 
company is seventy-five thousand dollars, and their sales reach the large 
amount of over one hundred and fifty thousand dollars annually (1886)." It 
is worthy of note that the Burnets gave land in 1803 for a brick academy, in 
which two or three generations were educated, and that Ichabod Burnet, son 
of Daniel, was among the first teachers. This land has been given to the 
township by the heirs (since a new public school was established near the 
railroad station) for a public building. 

Judge Joseph P. Bradley, in a sketch of Dr. William Burnet in Penn- 
sylvania Magazine of Histor}', vol. 3, page 308, says: "William was a phy- 
sician of Newark, New Jersey, a graduate of Princeton. He had children: 
William, born about 1756; Ichabod, 1758; John, 1760; Jacob, one of the 
founders of Cincinnati, a judge. United States senator, etc. ; George White- 
field, graduate of Princeton, 1792, of Dayton, Ohio; David G., first presi- 
dent of Texas in 1836; and Hannah, wife of Judge Kinney." 

Matthias, son of James Burnet, was born at Bottle Hill, New Jersey, in 
1747, graduated at Princeton in 1769, and was settled in Jamaica as pastor 
of the Presbyterian church, where, according to Thompson's History of Long 
Island, he continued highly respected and useful until 1785, when he removed 
to Norwalk, Connecticut, and took charge of the Congregational church, and 
there died in 1800. The interment was in his native place, in Hillside ceme- 
tery, Bottle Hill. His wife was Fanny, daughter of Rev. Azel Roe, of Wood- 
bridge, New Jersey. 

From the History of Essex and Hudson Counties, New Jersey, compiled 
by William H. Shaw, vol. i, page 53, the following incident is copied (1884): 



14 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ\^D GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

"At the commencement of the Revolution a committee of safety was 
appointed in Newark, the members of which were Dr. William Burnet, Jus- 
tice Joseph Hedden and Major Samuel Hayes. The committee held daily 
sessions and was presided over by Dr. Burnet. The Doctor was a grandson 
of the distinguished English prelate, Bishop Burnet, and, like his grandsire, 
was a man of great decision and force of character. To serve his country 
he promptly relinquished a lucrative medical practice and abandoned the 
pleasures of a delightful home life. After establishing a military hospital in 
Newark, he became surgeon general of the American army and was stationed 
at West Point at the time of the discovery of Benedict Arnold's treasonable 
compact with Sir Henry Clinton, the British commander. It is also related 
that when the news of Major Andre's capture at Tarr}town was brought to 
the Point, the Doctor sat at the table while Arnold read the note from Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Jameson announcing the fact. Arnold preserved his counte- 
nance but immediately excused himself and withdrew, ' to attend upon an 
urgent and important service.' Very soon he was hurrying with all speed to 
the ship of refuge which lay at anchor in the Hudson below the Point, and 
which, with singular appropriateness, happened to be named the Vulture. 
The Doctor's son. Major Ichabod Burnet, was an aide on General Greene's 
staff, and was selected to bear to Andre, after his conviction as a spy, the 
official announcement of his fate. He also attended the brave and hand- 
some but unfortunate British adjutant general upon his execution at Tappan. 

' ' Dr. Burnet gave to his country, besides his service as a true and valued 
patriot, a posterity distinguished for its public and private worth. Jacob, one 
of his sons, settled in the Northwest territory, when it had but fifteen thou- 
sand inhabitants, and when Cincinnati, where he made his home in 1796, 
contained but fifteen rough-finished houses. Jacob served as a magistrate, a 
legislator and ultimately as a United States senator. Another son, David 
Burnet, achievedeven greater distinction. After filling many important public 
trusts, he finally became the first president of the short-lived republic of 
Texas, now a brilliant star in the constellation of American states. Dr. Bur- 
net, himself upon the close of the war, resumed his practice and filled the 
position of judge of the court of common pleas, and was president of the 
New Jersey State Medical Society. He died suddenly in 1791, in his sixty- 
first year." 

In the record of one hundred and sixty years, we find a few instances of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 15 

official life in the family of Burnets. There have been two chief justices, 
four governors, five judges, five doctors, three colonels, three captains, three 
clergymen, some few deacons, a few merchants at home and abroad, an occa- 
sional justice of the peace, a few lawyers and some good mechanics. For 
the most part the Burnets occupy the post of honor known as quiet private 
citizens. 

" He that holds fast the golden mean, 
And lives contentedly between 

The little and the great, 
Feels not the wants that pinch the poor, 
Nor plague that haunt the rich man's door, 

PZmbittering all his state." 



HENRY WARD FORD. 



One of the popular young men of the city of Morristown and treasurer 
of a large manufacturing corporation of Brooklyn is H. Ward Ford, well 
known in business and social circles. He is a son of Henry William Ford 
and his ancestral history is given at length on another page of this volume. 
His birth occurred in New York city, February 2, 1866, and he was reared 
there and in the summer home of the Fords, in Morristown. He attended 
St. Paul's School in Concord and was a member of the class of i88g in 
Princeton College. While pursuing his collegiate course he also took an 
active part in athletics and was a well known and popular member of both 
the base-ball and foot-ball teams. He won athletic honors while in that 
institution and as a result of his training is a splendid specimen of physical 
manhood. 

In the fall of 1888 Mr. Ford entered upon his business career in connec- 
tion with the manufacturing interest with which he has since been associated, 
and soon demonstrated his ability to capably handle the intricate affairs con- 
nected with the concern. His affairs have always been conducted on strict 
business principles, — conducted with fairness to himself and those with whom 
he has dealings. He is a man of excellent e.xecutive ability, quick to recog- 
nize and reward faithfulness on the part of employes, and he has the confi- 
dence and regard of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



16 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfB GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Mr. Ford was united in marriage to Miss Rosette Suckley, of Morris- 
town, and they have three children: Rosette Suckley, Henry William and 
Emily Ward. The family attend the Episcopal church and are leaders in 
social circles. Their home is in Morristown, where they have a beautiful and 
commodious residence near the Washington Headquarters Association, sit- 
uated on a portion of the old Ford estate. Mr. Ford is a member of the 
Morristown Field Club, the Morristown Golf Club and the Princeton Club of 
New York. He. is a well-rounded character. Though extensive and impor- 
tant business interests claim his attention, he yet finds time and opportunity 
to enjoy field sports; in social circles he is known as a very companionable 
and entertaining gentleman. 



WILLIAM GERARD LATHROP. 

Boonton was known in Revolutionary times; but it was then a mere 
hamlet, hardly deserving even that title. A few straggling farms nestling in 
the valley of the Rockaway, with one or two dwellings at the foot of Sheep 
Hill, served to demand a name for the locality. At the beginning of this 
century a few houses had been added, but no importance was as yet attached 
to the place. A few years later the superior advantages of the location were 
discovered. The Rockaway, as it brawled through the gorge, dashing and 
foaming over its rocky bed, carried away its usefulness, to be lost in the 
placid waters of its greater confluent, the Passaic. 

In 1 83 1 the Morris canal was completed, an"d the appliances it afforded 
for new industries added largely to the advantages Boonton possessed for 
manufacturing enterprises. Two years before this date an iron manufactory 
had been established, which afterward branched out in various forms. The 
success of this enterprise was variant, and at one time failure intervened in 
such a manner as seemed then to paralyze all future efforts in that direction. 

But later on other men viewed the ground and determined that there 
should be no failure, and the Boonton Iron Works were established with new 
energy, and upon a strong financial foundation. 

There was then living at Rahway, in New Jersey, a young man who 
had retired from an active business life in New York to the quiet of a farm. 
He loved the country, he reveled in its peace, he rejoiced in the companion- 



BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 17 

ship of books, and he loved with a rare steadfastness the comfort and solace 
of a home where true affection was supreme. He was fitted to be the 
ruler of men, but he preferred to be the head of a peaceful household. An 
accident led him to accept a temporary position in the iron works at Boon- 
ton. He and his employers never suspected what would be the outcome of 
his accidental presence in Boonton. He had gone there to please a relative 
who was interested in the business; the place he filled for the time was a 
subordinate one, but he remained, soon to be raised to the post of chief man- 
ager of the whole enterprise. This was about the year 1850, and from that 
time until his death he was identified with every movement tending to bene- 
fit the workmen under him, as well as the whole body of citizens in the 
community. 

Boonton at that period had assumed much larger proportions, but by no 
means was the prosperous town that it is at present. Then the houses, occu- 
pied mostly by the men who worked in the mills, were clustered around the 
foot of Sheep Hill. Now this hill is covered with streets, lined on each side 
with dwellings, filled with a busy, industrious population. Stores, factories, 
churches and school-houses meet the various wants of the people. This 
present prosperity is greatly due to Mr. Lathrop, who had much to do with 
the fashioning and molding of the interests of Boonton. 

William Gerard Lathrop was born October 29, 1812, at Norwich, 
Connecticut. He was descended from an ancient English family for whom 
a town in England was named many centuries ago. Among his lineal ances- 
tors was the celebrated divine, the Rev. John Lathrop, D. D., at one time 
a beneficed clergyman of the Established church in England. Becoming 
dissatisfied with the tenets of this church, he identified himself with the 
Independents of his day. This led to persecution and dangers, and finally 
to confinement in Newgate prison. Released from confinement, he came to 
this country with many who held the like faith with himself, and settled in 
New England. From him came that branch of the Lathrop family from 
which the subject of this sketch is descended, he being of the fifth genera- 
tion in a direct line from the intrepid minister who suffered so much for con- 
science's sake. 

Few as were the educational advantages afforded in Norwich at the 

time that young Lathrop needed them, he still could not embrace them. 

He never attended school after he was twelve years old; but his ardent 
2 



18 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL SISTOBY. 

thirst for knowledge enabled him to make the very best use of the few 
facihties at his command. He was an intense lover of books, and books of 
the very best kind; he haunted libraries, wherever he could find them, in 
search of his beloved companions, and in this way he laid broad and deep 
the foundation of an education which well served his purposes in after life. 
The rapidity with which he devoured the books drawn by him from a public 
library he much frequented led the librarian to mistrust the benefit gained 
by the young reader from his reading. So he questioned him and to his 
amazement found that none of the essential contents of the volumes 
returned so quickly had been lost. This love of books led him in after life 
to gather a library of his own, which was a constant source of pleasure to 
himself and others. 

When Mr. Lathrop was eighteen years of age his family removed to 
New York city, where he became a clerk in the well known house of Oli- 
phant & Talbot, extensively engaged in importing Chinese goods. While in 
their employment he was sent to South America on important and delicate 
business requiring prompt decision and intelligent judgment. In this and 
other trusts his employers were never deceived in their estimate of their 
young employe. 

In 1835, when but twenty-three years of age, he became the junior 
partner in the firm of Talbot & Lathrop, which carried on the same kind of 
business in which he had been previously engaged. This was only a little 
more than sixty years ago. New York then had six thousand dwellings and 
one hundred and eighty thousand inhabitants. Its assessable property, 
including thirty-seven million dollars of personal estate, was one hundred 
and fourteen million dollars; its lighted and paved streets extended, on the 
west side, to Thirteenth street, and on the east to Dry Dock. Then New 
England men were prominent in the city's councils and business. An 
author, writing about this time, says: "New York is distinguished for its 
display in the way of signs; every device is resorted to to make them attract- 
ve. I read and considered the nomenclature of the town; I saw that 
strangers had got hold of the business and wealth of the place. The busy 
tribes from New England supplied numerous names, and the names of 
Knickerbockers were almost varieties in their own homes' Judicious persons 
told me they thought full one-half of all the business done ii> New York was 
by the pushing Yankees." It can well be imagined if our Yankee boy had 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 19 

remained in New York he could long before his death have held a distin- 
guished place among the business and political circles of the great emporium. 
The firm of Talbot & Lathrop continued until 1840, when, as has been 
before related, its junior member, soon to be transferred to a larger sphere 
of usefulness, retired to a farm near Rahway. 

In 1837 Mr. Lathrop was married to Charlotte Bracket Jennings, 
daughter of Nathan and Maria Jennings, then of New York, but formerly of 
Windham, Connecticut. Several children were born of this marriage, only 
two of whom survived their parents, viz.: William G. Lathrop, Jr., now 
deceased, who became a successful lawyer in New York, of the firm of 
Brownell & Lathrop. The other is a daughter, still living at Boonton. IntO' 
the privacy of his home life we cannot intrude. Those who have enjoyed its 
hospitality know what it was worth to be there, and never left it without 
feeling a reverence for those who made it so blessed. 

When Mr. Lathrop settled permanently at Boonton he was confronted 
with new duties — duties that he owed to his employers, to the employed 
under him, and to the community in which he had cast his lot. He forgot 
none of them, but set himself seriously to the performance of all. His first 
duty was to those into whose service he had entered. Into that service he 
threw the whole strength of his resolute and forceful nature. He had 
embarked in a business with the details of which he was entirely unac- 
quainted, but he soon mastered every minutia; he left nothing unknown. 
His energy was untiring; he was ubiquitous; prompt, decided, wise, prudent, 
careful, he met every requirement of his responsible position, and the result 
soon showed the wisdom of those who selected him to be the manager of one of 
the largest iron works in the country. The product of its manufacture went 
into every part of this great republic and soon invaded the world. Japan, 
China, South America received the products of the Boonton Iron Works. 
Everything prospered under his management; it became necessary to increase 
the appliances for the production of goods; the factory grew and the town 
grew; the houses of the workmen crept up the hill, the growth of the popu- 
lation invited tradesmen from abroad; shops and mechanics were needed to 
meet the growing demands of the people; streets were opened, churches 
were built and Boonton was established on sure foundations. 

The workmen who came as employes of the Boonton Iron Company 
were of a superior class; they were skilled in their craft: some of them 



20 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

needed no inducement to seek for those higher adjuncts to the increase of 
human happiness. In their manager they found one who was ever ready to 
respond to any proper demand. If a school were needed to meet the 
increasing educational wants of the children, a new school-house was built, 
and he was ever ready to lend his name, his time and energy and his 
purse to make the school a success. . If the religious want of the workmen 
required a church edifice to be erected, he inquired not by what sect the 
building was to be used, but secured the land neccessary, by gift from the 
proprietors of the works; if a library was proposed to meet the reading tastes 
of the workmen, the first man called upon to aid was the manager; if a 
course of lectures was suggested, he secured the speakers. His fertile brain 
was in constant operation devising something to elevate his workmen, and 
they soon learned to know that the quiet, persistent man who always insisted 
on instant obedience to orders and perfect performance of duty by the 
employes was really their best friend. He adopted a plan by which they 
might secure homes for themselves and their families. Through his influence 
the company deeded lots to such of their workmen as were deserving, and 
-who would at once clear off the lot and begin erecting a house. Then a small 
sum was deducted weekly from the man's wages until the property was paid 
for, and in this way most of them secured comfortable dwellings. 

The influence of this management was felt in two directions: it made 
better workmen; and they became more self-respecting. A man owning a 
house and lot has a stake in the community which makes him a better citi- 
zen. The company won the confidence and gratitude of their workmen and 
secured a better return for their wages. There never was a strike at Boon- 
ton while William G. Lathrop was at the head of affairs. 

Another plan was adopted by Mr. Lathrop in the payment of wages. 
The custom, at the works, had been to make monthly payments; a large 
amount of money at one time thus passed into the hands of the men, and 
this led to some waste and extravagance. By this change of plans the men j 
were paid weekly, and this secured more economy in expenditure. The work- i 
men, quick to notice such things, soon learned the real merit of their super- 
intendent. They trusted him and confided in him as they would in their 
very best friend. The following incident illustrates the estimate they formed 
of him. A poor man was relating to a stranger an accident which had 
befallen his pig and ended his story by saying that he was going to tell Mr. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 21 

Lathrop about it. "Pooh!" said the listener; "what will he care? " The 
indignant reply came swift and emphatic: " He cares as much for me as he 
does for the richest man in the place. " 

Mr. Lathrop never sought political preferment. If he had simply put 
himself in the way and had signified his desire to receive office, he would 
have had no difficulty in securing the object of his ambition. He doubtless 
would not have refused office if it had been pressed upon him; but it is not 
the custom of modern times to reward the modest citizen, even though he 
may be deserving both by merit and capability and by long years of service. 
There were other means open to Mr. Lathrop by which he could serve his 
fellow men. So he was found acting as .trustee of school districts, as a 
director in bank and savings institutions and in other fiduciary capacities. 
During the Rebellion he became treasurer of the Pequannock bounty fund, 
and was foremost in attending to the wants of the soldiers in the field. 
When it became necessary to establish another state lunatic asylum, he was 
selected one of the commissioners to choose a site and to superintend the 
building of the edifice, and he took a very prominent part in the performance 
of the important duties intrusted to himself and his fellow commissioners. 

He was a benevolent man. large-hearted in his benefactions, never 
ostentatious, but wise and prudent in his giving. Very few knew the amount 
or extent of his beneficence. His family was the dearest object of his affec- 
tion and his highest ambition was to create a home for them and surround it 
with every comfort. 

But even in the erection of the beautiful dwelling at Boonton, where 
was to be centered his real happiness, in making happy those whom he loved 
best, and where his friends were to be welcomed with that sincere hospitality 
he so loved to extend, he did not forget the claims of others. None but 
Boonton workmen, he declared, should be employed, so far as possible, for 
in Boonton he had made his money and there it should be spent. 

He had the force of his convictions upon every subject which it became 
his duty to examine for the purpose of determining what course he should 
pursue in relation thereto. But he never committed himself to any line of 
conduct until he had strictly scrutinized and fully understood the whole sub- 
ject and could conscientiously subscribe to the demands of his cool judg- 
ment and discriminating intellect. 

He was a Republican and fully believed in the principles of that party, 



22 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

but he did not give his adhesion to it until he fully knew what it demanded 
and upon what foundation it based its policy. So he supported it with his 
full judgment and satisfied conscience, after an exhaustive examination. 

He was open, however, to conviction. His nature was not of that 
sullen, obstinate kind which relishes argument but does not favor conviction, 
even though it may have the worst of the argument. He was sent as a 
delegate from New Jersey to the Chicago convention which nominated Lin- 
coln. He went strongly favoring William H. Seward, but soon became 
satisfied that Abraham Lincoln was the best man to be nominated, and so he 
voted for that great man. From that time to the close of Mr. Lincoln's life 
he believed in him, and never lost his faith in his wisdom and patriotism. 

He died, March 2, 1882, in the beautiful house he had reared for his 
family, having lived in it for nine years. 

Mr. Lathrop in his person was an attractive man, of slight built, but 
graceful, agile and alert in all his movements, with a charm of manner and 
a magnetism which delighted all within his influence; his eye was keen, 
bright and piercing, his features clean-cut and classical; gentle and genial in 
his dealings with all, he inspired his friends with the deepest devotion, which 
he returned with a grip of steel. In all the great trusts committed to his 
charge he showed the greatest faculty in grasping all the circumstances con- 
nected with the situation, and an executive ability to control and move, if 
necessary, with lightning speed; there was no delay in his movements, — they 
were straightforward and with a purpose to the desired result. While he 
was decided in his own convictions, he was careful to respect the opinions of 
others, and never in disputed matters where conscience should be the arbiter 
did he attempt to change the views of others who differed with him. 

He dearly loved children and delighted ever to give them pleasure. His 
constant endeavor during his whole life was in all things to imitate the 
example of the Master. 

The involuntary tribute given to his memory by a neighbor, an old man, 
who had known him long and intimately, was the best estimate of the appre- 
^ ciation of his goodness, of the purity and excellency of his life. When Mr. 
Lathrop was laid away to rest, this neighbor sold his burial lot in another 
cemetery and bought one next to Mr. Lalhrop's, declaring that he wished to 
be laid near to him. Nothing better than this remains to be said of this 
man who was so v/orthy of all praise. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 23 

ALFRED A. LEWIS, M. D. 

For twenty years Dr. Lewis has been successfully engaged in the prac- 
tice of medicine in Morristown. Thorough preparation, close application, 
earnest purpose and deep interest in the profession, both from the scientific 
and humanitarian standpoints, — these are the essential elements of success as 
a medical practitioner, and it has been along these lines that Dr. Lewis has 
won a foremost place among his brethren of the medical fraternity. 

A native of New York city, he was born on the 19th of September, 1849, 
and is a son of Jacob K. and Eliza (Bellis) Lewis. The grandfather, Isaac 
Lewis, was a native of Virginia and belonged to the prominent Lewis family 
of the Old Dominion. His father, Rev. Thomas Lewis, who removed from 
Virginia to New Jersey, was one of the pioneer ministers of Morris and sur- 
rounding counties, and his noble life and kindly manner made him greatly 
beloved. He established the first church in Mendham, and spent his last 
days in that place, his remains being interred in the cemetery there. 

Jacob K. Lewis was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, and after the 
birth of the Doctor removed from New York city to his old home in the 
county of his birth. There our subject was reared to manhood, and in the 
well-known school of Dr. Pingry, at Elizabeth, New Jersey, he completed 
his literary education. As a life-work he chose the medical profession, and 
prepared for this vocation by a thorough course in the New York University, 
where he was graduated in the class of 1872. He entered upon his profess- 
ional career in Basking Ridge, New Jersey, and removed from there to Mor- 
ristown in 1878, since which time he has been an active and prominent rep- 
resentative of the profession in this city. His business has steadily increased 
as experience and further reading have gained him greater proficiency, and 
his practice is now a large and profitable one. He is a member of the Mor- 
ris County District Medical Society and of the New Jersey State Medical 
Society. 



EDWARD PIERSON. 



The death of the subject of this memoir occurred May 29, 1896. He 
was for more than three-quarters of a century one of the most highly 
respected citizens of Morristown, and in the autumn of life he received that 



24 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

veneration and honor which should ever crown old age. His history touches 
an early epoch in the annals of the county and his days were an integral part 
of that indissoluble chain which linked the early formative period with that 
of latter-day progress and prosperity. His ancestors were connected with 
the founding of the county, the progenitor here being Thomas Pierson, who 
settled at Morris Plains, when the work of development was in its incipiency. 
The grandfather, Samuel Pierson, and the father, Stephen Pierson, were 
both natives of Morris county, and Edward Pierson was born in Morristown 
on the 13th of March, 1813. 

He first opened his eyes to the light on the old family homestead owned 
by his father, on South street, and throughout a long and useful career of 
eighty-three years he aided in the progress and upbuilding of the city, being 
imbued with earnest purpose and unswerving fidelity. He was an active 
business man, not only in his early manhood, but throughout his career. In 
his younger years he engaged in merchandising in connection with his brother, 
Samuel Pierson, and later entered into partnership with George Cramer. 
On his retirement from that line of activity he became connected with the 
banking interests of the city, as cashier in the old Morris County Bank, 
which went out of existence during the war of the Rebellion, Mr. Pierson 
continuing with the institution until that time. In 1865 he accepted the 
position of secretary and treasurer of the Morristown Gas Light Company, 
and from 1869 until his death he held a similar position with the Morris 
Aqueduct Company. His business ability never waned with advancing 
years and his duties were discharged with the utmost reliability up to the 
time of his last illness. The strictest integrity and the most unbending 
fidelity characterized all his dealings, and the most painstaking care was evi- 
denced in even the slightest detail of his business life. 

Mr. Pierson was a man of domestic tastes, devotedly attached to his fam- 
ily and home. He was thrice married, first to Margaret Cooper, secondly to 
Miss Elizabeth Guerin, who died early in life, leaving two sons: Dr. Stephen 
Pierson, of whom mention is made in the following article, and Charles E. 
Pierson, who died in 1875, having been an attorney and engaged in active 
practice of his profession for some five years prior to his death. He was a 
young man of distinctive ability and his death was most untimely. Mr. Pier- 
son afterward married Anna Maria Sayre, a daughter of William Sayre, a 
representative of one of the old families of Morris county. She died in 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 25 

1886, leaving the following children: Phil B. ; Laura A.; and Dr. Samuel, of 
Stamford, Connecticut. 

Mr. Pierson was a faithful member of the First Presbyterian church of 
Morristown for more than forty years and was never absent from his place in 
the house of worship. He lived that practical religious life that is mindful of 
the unfortunate, the poor and the needy, and his charity was free, but unos- 
tentatious. In all life's relations he commanded the respect and confidence 
of those with whom he came in contact, and the world is better for his hav- 
ing lived. 



STEPHEN PIERSON, M. D. 

A son of Edward and Elizabeth (Guerin) Pierson, Dr. Pierson was born 
in Morristown, November 8, 1844, and was prepared for college in Morris 
Academy. He entered Yale College in 1861, but left that institution at the 
close of the freshman year in order to go to the defense of his country, then 
engaged in civil war. He enlisted in the nine-months service, in August, 
1862, as a member of the Twenty-seventh New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, 
and participated in the Fredericksburg campaign, under General Burnside, 
and was in service in Kentucky. In July, 1863, he was mustered out with 
the rank of second lieutenant, but in August of the same year re-enlisted, 
becoming sergeant-major of the Thirty-third New Jersey Infantry. Under 
General Hooker he participated in the campaign against Chattanooga and 
was in the Atlanta campaign; he also went with Sherman on the celebrated 
march to the sea. He took part in the campaign through the Carolinas and 
waS' present at the time of General Johnston's surrender. He became adju- 
tant of the regiment and was brevetted captain and later major for gallant 
conduct on the field of battle. On the first of July, 1865, he was mustered 
out as one of the youngest officers of the brigade, and returned home with an 
honorable war record, — one which for valor and fidelity was not excelled by 
that of any time-tried veteran. 

When the country was once more at peace Dr. Pierson again turned his 
thoughts to the school-room, and in September, 1865, re-entered Yale, where 
he remained for one year, when he became a student in the College of Phy- 



26 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

sicians and Surgeons, of New York city, where he was graduated in 1869. 
He next became house physician in Bellevue Hospital and in 1870 located in 
Boonton, New Jersey, where he practiced until 1873, since which time he has 
resided in Morristown. He was soon established in an excellent business 
here and enjoys a very liberal and lucrative patronage, coming from Morris- 
town's best citizens. His knowledge of the science of medicine is compre- 
hensive and accurate and he is a recognized leader in professional circles. He 
keeps abreast with the advancing thought and improvement in medical circles 
through his membership in various societies, including the Morris County 
District Medical Society, the New Jersey State Medical Society, the New 
York Academy of Medicine and the Bellevue Hospital Alumni Association. 
With abundant knowledge and skill as a physician he ranks high among his 
professional brethren. 

In 1880, twenty years after leaving Yale College, Dr. Pierson received 
from that institution the honorary degree of Master of Arts. He has been a 
member of the Morristown board of education for more than twenty years, is 
now a member of the New Jersey state board of education and is medical direc- 
tor of All Souls Hospital, of Morristown. He has served as a director of the 
Morris county board of freeholders and is a director of the Morris Aqueduct 
Company. He is connected with two military organizations, — holding mem- 
bership in A. T. A. Torbert Post, No. 24, G. A. R., of Morristown, of which 
he is past commander, and in the Loyal Legion, U. S. A., New York Com- 
mandery. The Doctor is a trustee and elder in the First Presbyterian church 
of Morristown and gives his support to all measures for the public good. He 
is a scholarly man and deep thinker, a progressive citizen, of kindh' impulses 
and generous nature, and his character is well rounded. 



NICHOLAS S. VAN DUYNE. 

The Van Duyne family originated in Holland, Martin Van Duyne, the 
progenitor of the American branch, having come from that country and set- 
tled in White Hall, New Jersey, previous to 1700. It is known that he had 
one son, named James, who succeeded to the homestead and became the 
father of a large number of children, including seven sons, one of whom was 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 27 

Ralph. John R. Van Duyne, son of Ralph and a grandson of James, also 
succeeded to the old homestead, upon which he passed his entire life. He 
married and had a large number of children, all of whom are deceased with 
the exception of Harrison Van Duyne, a civil engineer of Newark, New Jer- 
sey. Martin, a grandson of Martin, was born on the homestead and followed 
farming, with which he combined the trade of blacksmith. He married Miss 
Ann Parliman, by whom he had one son, Nicholas. After her death he mar- 
ried Miss Catharine Line, and the following five children were born to them: 
Alfred, Martin, Rachel, Ann and Betsy. They were devout members of the 
Dutch Reformed church. Nicholas Van Duyne became a farmer and car- 
penter and located near the old homestead, where he passed the remainder 
of his days. He married Miss Hannah Young and they had the following 
children: Stephen, now living in Boonton; John, deceased; Silas, a resident 
of White Hall; Elijah, also of White Hall; Albert, deceased; Martin, living 
in Pine Brook; James, deceased; and Caroline Ann, deceased. 

Stephen Van Duyne, father of our subject, was born in White Hall, on 
the iSth of April, 1820, obtained his education in the public schools, took up 
farming, with which he combined the trade of carpenter, and resided near 
White Hall until 1895, when he moved to Boonton. He has served as town- 
ship constable, has always been an advocate of temperance, and is a mem- 
ber of the German Reformed church. In 1841 he was united in marriage to 
Miss Harriet Crane, daughter of Benjamin Crane, and she died in 1889, after 
becoming the mother of three children, namely: Nicholas S.; Marietta mar- 
ried Samuel B. Jacobus, resided in Essex county, and is deceased; and Eliz- 
abeth, who is unmarried and lives at Boonton. 

Nicholas S., son of Stephen and Harriet (Crane) Van Duyne, was born 
in Pine Brook, New Jersey, on the 4th of September, 1842, acquiring his 
mental discipline in the public schools and under the instruction of private 
tutors. Upon attaining his eighteenth 3'ear he engaged in teaching and for 
the ensuing thirty years was one of the most successful educators in Morris 
county, and for eleven years taught in Boonton. In 1893 he retired from 
the school-room and engaged in the real-estate and insurance business, which 
he has since conducted with pronounced success. 

In his political faith Mr. Van Duyne was for many years affiliated with 
the Democratic party, but is now prominently identified with the work of the 
Prohibitionists. He served as a member of the board of freeholders, was asses- 



28 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEMEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

sor of Boonton for one term, and was a member of the board of education 
for three years, during which time he was largely instrumental in securing 
appropriations for a school building, which has just been erected. 

Mr. Van Duyne consummated his marriage in 1866, when he became 
united to Miss Sarah Gould, a daughter of Stephen J. Gould, of Caldwell, 
Essex county, and they have had two children, namely: Charles, who died 
in 1894; and Ernest, who lives at home. Mr. and Mrs. Van Duyne are 
adherents of the Presbyterian church, in which he has served as elder for six 
years. He is well known in his home city and stands high in the estimation 
of his many friends. 

Benjamin Crane, deceased, the maternal grandfather of Nicholas Van 
Duyne, was born in what is now Bloomfield, New Jersey, on the 31st of 
August, 1787, the son of Benjamin Crane, a native of Connecticut. He first 
located in Newark, moved to Eagle Rock, and thence to Morris county, set- 
tling near Pine Brook, where he became a prominent farmer and fruit cult- 
urist. In politics he was a stanch Democrat, and was elected judge of the 
circuit court of Morris county, occupying that position for several years. He 
was twice married, his first wife being Miss Eleanor Stiles, daughter of 
Ephraim and a sister of Levi Stiles, and of this union the following children 
were born: Timothy W., of Montville township; Benjamin P., of Newark; 
Julia, deceased, married Martin R. Van Duyne; Hettie M., now Mrs. Abra- 
ham C. Van Duyne, of Pine Brook; Lucinda, deceased, married A. H. Free- 
man, of Orange, New Jersey; Harriet C, deceased, the mother of oursubject; 
Eleanor S. , who became the wife of Enos Martin, of Montclair. Mrs. 
Cra:ne departed this life on the 9th of June, 1836, and in 1836 Mr. 
Crane contracted a second marriage, this time being united to Miss Barbara 
Bowlsby, and their issue comprised two children, namely: Marietta, whch 
married Christopher Woodruff, a practicing physician of Boonton; and B. 
Flora, who is now Mrs. Cornelius Van Wagener, of Bloomfield. 

In 1850 Mr. Crane instituted the custom of holding family reunions, the 
first one of which occurred at his residence near Pine Brook in that year, 
since which time they have been held annually, and from 1858 a grove has 
been utilized for this purpose; and on the 31st of August all the members of 
the family, now numbering some two hundred and twenty people, assemble 
and pass a most enjoyable day, which is filled with exercises, reminiscences, 
and concludes with an open air banquet. 



BIOGRdPHICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 29 

CHARLES E. COOK. 

Long and honorably identified with the annals of American history, 
touching in a conspicuous way the colonial and Revolutionary epochs, and 
tracing down through consecutive generations of worthy men and women to 
an intimate relationship with the affairs of Morris county, New Jersey, it is 
certainly incumbent that specific reference be made in this compilation to the 
genealogy of the family of which the subject of this sketch is a representa- 
tive. The records extant do not establish above all peradventure the name 
of the original American progenitor of the Cook family with which this review 
has to do. The first of the name in New Jersey was Ellis Cook, who came 
hither from Southampton, Long Island. He was the son of Abiel Cook, 
who, in turn, was the son of Ellis Cook, whose name first appears in the 
town records of Southampton in the year 1664. It is predicated with all 
reasonable authenticity that he was a member of a company formed at Lynn, 
Massachusetts, in 1640, by Edward Howell, who gave the name Southamp- 
ton to the Long Island settlement, in honor of Southampton, England, 
whence he was said to have come. The Ellis Cook first above mentioned, 
on June 22, 1747, purchased of Cornelius Drake, of Hanover township, Mor- 
ris county, New Jersey, a farm of one hundred and ten acres, lying on the 
south side of the road to the old "iron works," and extending westerly sixty- 
two chains. This tract has been sold by James and Sarah Ball, and it was 
bounded on the south by the property of John Canfield and the meadow 
belonging to Caleb Ball, and on the west by Mrs. Wheeler's land. 

In the old Hanover burying-ground is to be found a small gravestone 
bearing the following inscription: " Here lyes ye body of Mary, wife of Ellis 
Cook. Died April 19, 1754, aged 38 years;" and in close proximity is 
another, bearing the following record: " Here lyes ye body of John Will- 
iams. Died February 8, 1755, in the yj year of his age." In an old docu- 
ment, dated March 12, 1751, John Williams, of Hanover, cordwainer, gives 
to his daughter, Mary Cook, wife of Ellis Cook, a tract of land estimated at 
forty acres, with dwellings upon it, after the decease of himself and wife. In 
case of her death it was to be given to her five sons; the eldest, named Will- 
iams, to have a double portion of the same. This tract was bounded on the 
east by the Passaic river, west by the lane or road north of John Ball's land, 
and south by Henry Burnet's. The witnesses to the indenture were John 



30 BIOGBJPEICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Burnett and William Dixon. In book No. 2, of wills, page 404, in the 
office of the secretary of state, at Trenton, is recorded the last will and tes- 
tament of Ellis Cook. It is dated March 11, 1756, and was proved August 
31st of the same year. He names his sons Williams, Ellis, Jonathan, Epaf- 
fras and John, and the witnesses were Jonathan Squier, Thomas Bigelow 
and William Di.xon. The occasion of the rendering of the will at this time 
is said to have been on account of the drafting or enlistment of the sons, 
Epaflras and John, in the Jersey regiment which, under General Schuyler, 
was sent to Oswego. Ellis Cook accompanied his sons on this expedition, 
and was killed on the way out, the sons eventually returning in safety to their 
home. The will gave the property in Hanover to Williams and Ellis and 
legacies to the other sons, and much of the land is still held by descendants 
of the honored founder of the family in New Jersey. 

Tracing the lineage from this original ancestor we find that Williams, 
son of Ellis, had three sons, — Ellis, Williams and Calvin. Ellis, son of Ellis 
(ist), of Hanover, married Margaret Griswold Crocker, who bore him the 
following named children: Zebulon, James, Margaret, Matilda, Ruletta, 
Jabez, Ambrose and George Whitfield. The father died April 17, 1797, aged 
sixty-five years. Zebulon, son of Colonel Ellis, had children as follows: 
Clarissa, Margaret, Griswold, Mary, Ellis, John, Jabez and Phebe. Ellis, 
son of Zebulon, had children, — Jabez, Janette and Lindley Guiren, the last 
named being the father of the immediate subject of this sketch. Lindley G. 
Cook lived in Hanover, where he married Jane Van Blarcom, who bore 
him four sons, — Henry Van Blarcom, Charles Ellis, Edward L. and Frank 
P. The father, who was a man of ability and inflexible integrity of character, 
lived to attain the venerable age of seventy-eight years, his death occurring 
on the last day of January, 1894. His wife died September 4, 1893, aged 
seventy-seven years. John Cook, son of Zebulon, lived in Hanover and had 
eight children, — Isaac Munn, David Tichoun, George Hammell, Mary, John 
Henry, Matthias Munn, Sarah Margaret, and Joanna Eliza. David Tichoun 
continued to reside in Hanover, his children being Isaac, George, Samuel H. 
and Sophia. George, son of David T. , lives in Hanover, and his children are 
Rae and Caro. 

Charles Ellis Cook, whose name initiates this review, is a native of the 
city of Newark, New Jersey, where he was born on the 9th of January, 1845, 
the son of Lindley G. and Jane (Van Blarcom) Cook, to whom reference has 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 31 

been already made. The youth of our subject was passed on the homestead 
farm in Hanover township, Morris county, his parents having taken up their 
abode there when he was five years of age. He received his early educational 
discipline in the public schools, and effectively supplemented the instruction 
thus secured by completing a course of study in the Newark Academy. At 
the age of fifteen years he came into touch with the practical activities of 
life, beginning then to serve his apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, under 
the effective direction of his father. For a term of three years, from the age 
of twenty-two to twenty-five, he was located in Orange, Essex county, where 
he followed his trade with a due quota of success. He continued operations 
along this hne for a period of fifteen years, gaining a reputation as a con- 
tractor and builder of marked ability. 

On the 30th of June, 1875, Mr. Cook was united in marriage to Miss 
Susan Elizabeth Watson, a native of New York city, and the daughter of 
Benjamin E. Watson, a prominent business man of the metropolis. Soon 
after his marriage Mr. Cook took up his residence in Madison, and here 
engaged in the lumber business for five years, after which he enlarged his 
field of operations by including the hardware business, continuing the two 
enterprises jointly for a term of three years thereafter. He eventually 
determined that excellent opportunities were offered for successful endeavor 
in a radically different line, and he became identified with floriculture upon 
an extensive scale. His conservatories now show a glass-covered surface of 
twenty-seven thousand square feet and he devotes his attention principally 
to the raising of roses for the New York market. Under his careful and 
effective direction the enterprise has been peculiarly successful, and the prod- 
ucts of his conservatories and gardens find a ready demand. Mr. Cook was 
one of the original directorate of the First National Bank of Madison, in which 
he has a very considerable stock representation. He has been assessor of the 
borough of Madison since its organization, being a stanch Republican in his 
political proclivities. He has been secretary of the board of health for 
seven years and is at the present time superintending the laying out and com- 
pletion of the Madison park, having ever maintained a constant and lively 
interest in all that conserves the progress and substantial upbuilding of his 
home city. He has been a trustee of the Presbyterian church for eighteen 
years, and fraternally is identified with Madison Lodge, No. 93, A. F. &A. M., 
and with the Royal Arcanum. He is honored not less as a representative of 



32 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ€B GEJfEALOGICAL EISIOBY. 

one of the old and prominent families of the county than as a representative 
and public-spirited citizen. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cook are the parents of the following named children: 
Zaidee Watson, Jennie Inez, Van Blarcom, Morris Watson, Carrie Louise 
and Charles Ellis, Jr. 



JONATHAN WILLIAM ROBERTS. 

Among the earnest men whose depth of character and strict adherence 
to principle excite the admiration of his contemporaries, Mr. Roberts is 
prominent. He is a man of distinguished ability, and his character is one 
which is above a shadow of reproach. Many responsible trusts have been 
placed in his hands and the utmost fidelity has marked their full and com- 
plete discharge. Widely known and respected by all who have any knowl- 
edge of his honorable and useful career, the history of Morris county would 
be incomplete without extended mention of Jonathan W. Roberts, who has 
for more than thirty years resided at his ideal country home, known as Glen- 
brook, at Morris Plains, New Jersey. 

Mr. Roberts was born in Hartford county, Connecticut, on the ist of 
September, 1821, a son of William Martin and Maria (McMillan) Roberts. 
The family name of his father was originally MacRoberts, both parents 
being of Scotch-Irish descent. Their ancestors came to America in colonial 
days, and in the war of the Revolution both families were represented by 
valiant soldiers who were numbered among the brave ' ' Green Mountain 
Boys." 

The subject of this review spent his childhood and early manhood in the 
state of his nativity. In 1842, when about twenty-one years of age, he went 
to New York city, where he secured a clerkship in the wholesale dry-goods 
store of Amos R. Eno. Later he became a member of the firm organized 
under the name of Eno, Mahoney & Company, and five years later the firm 
name was changed to Eno, Roberts & Company. Further changes caused 
the assumption of the firm name of J. W. Roberts & Company. Mr. Roberts 
continued in business until 1866, when failing health caused his retirement. 
In the meantime, notwithstanding the heavy losses sustained in consequence 
of the Civil war, he had by well directed effort, keen sagacity, close applica- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEKEALOQICAL HISTORY. 33 

tion, remarkable executive ability and unfaltering determination, acquired a 
•competence, which has since enabled him to live retired, unharassed by the 
cares of an arduous business. 

He became connected with the South Street Presbyterian church of 
Morristown, in 1867; soon after he was made an elder, and later superintend- 
ent of the Sunday-school, president of the board of trustees and chairman 
of the building committee for the erection of the beautiful new church, com- 
pleted and finished largely through his efforts, without leaving a dollar of 
debt. He was one of the founders of the Young Men's Christian Association 
in Morristown, was at three different times its president, and as chairman of 
its building committee erected the handsome new building on South street 
principally from his own designs and without creating a debt, as Mr. Roberts 
has made it the rule of his life to discourage and disapprove of any improve- 
ments, public or private, which cannot be paid for when completed. 

For some years Mr. Roberts was president of the Morristown Institution 
^or Savings. He accepted the office at a critical period of its history, and 
saved it from great loss, if not failure, by his energy and business methods. 
In 1884 he was elected a trustee and made chairman of the executive com- 
mittee of the Washington Association of New Jersey, and in 1887 was elected 
its president, which office he still (1898) holds, and by his untiring efforts has 
increased the membership four-fold; has more than doubled its domain; paid 
off its lage debt, and personally secured a large part of its valuable collec- 
tion of relics, always keeping the association free from the humiliation of 
indebtedness. He has also been vice-president, chairman of the executive 
•committee and, under the new organization, is now one of the most valuable 
members of the board of trustees of the New Jersey Historical Society, and 
has freely given time, effort and means in its aid. 

Mr. Roberts is an earnest Republican, has been a member of the Repub- 
lican state committee and often a delegate to conventions, but he has steadily 
refused all inducements to nominations for political office. Whatever public 
service Mr. Roberts has undertaken has always been a success, and when he 
has done his work he gladly retires from office and gives place to others. 

Since his retirement from business, Mr. Roberts has taken a very active 

part in public interests and has been especially zealous in the support of all 

matters pertaining to the general good. He is a man of broad humanitarian 

iprinciples, of generous impulses and noble deeds, and his upright and well- 
3 



34 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

spent life commend him to the regard of all with whom he has been brought 
in contact. 

Mr. Roberts was married at the age of twenty-eight to Miss Mary King, 
who was eighteen, a daughter of Hezekiah King, a retired gentleman, resid- 
ing on the banks of the Delaware river, at Bristol, Pennsylvania. Mrs. 
Roberts was very lovely in form and features, winsome and graceful in man- 
ner, of bright intelligence and charming in disposition and Christian character. 
She was a delightful companion in her home and on the e.xtensive journeys 
made with her husband in this country and in Europe, during their forty-four 
years of happy married life, which was terminated by her death in 1894. 

Mrs. Roberts was one of the three honorary members of the Washington 
Association, and was the donor of the large number of autograph letters at 
the Washington Headquarters, Morristown, known as the "Roberts Collec- 
tion." 



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Washin-gton's Headquarters, Morristown, N. J. 

WASHINGTON ASSOCIATION OF NEW JERSEY. 

It is certainly consistent that in any compilation touching the history of 
Morris county distinct recognition should be accorded the Washington Asso- 
ciation, which is an organization whose aim has not only been to restore and 
preserve intact the historic building in Morristown which figured as Washing- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJS^D GEJS'EALOGICAL HIS TORT. ' 35 

ton's headquarters during the winter of 1779-S0, but also to keep perpetually 
aflame on the altar the fire of patriotic appreciation. For the foUowino- 
history of the Washington Association we are indebted to the Morris County 
Chronicle, of February 25, 189S: 

The Washington Association had its origin in the thought of a few public- 
spirited and patriotic individuals to whom it occurred that a house which had 
been the headquarters of Washington during one of the most trying periods of 
the Revolutionary war, and around which all the historic associations of three 
years' encampment of the patriotic army had gathered, should be preserved 
in its integrity and be maintained throughout future generations as a memorial 
of the Father cf his Country, and of the heroism and fortitude of the officers 
and enlisted men who here in Morristown withstood the severe hardships and 
sufferings of the winters of 1777, 1779-80, and 1780-81. 

After the death of the Hon. Henry A. Ford in 1872, his heirs-at-law, 
for the purpose of settling or partitioning his estate, caused this, his home- 
stead, and the adjoining lands, to be surveyed and divided into plats, and 
advertised the whole for sale at public vendue, on the 25th day of June, 
1873. The sale attracted the attention of Governor Theodore F. Randolph,, 
Hon. George A. Halsey, General N. N. Halstead, and William V. \'. Lidger- 
wood, Esq. Without preconcert these gentlemen attended the sale; but 
before the property was offered the three first named had agreed to purchase 
the headquarters and the plat on which it stood, and offer it to the state to 
be preserved as " a historic place." In the bidding Mr. Lidgerwood alone 
competed with them, and had bid it up to twenty-four thousand one hundred 
dollars, when Governor Randolph made public announcement of the intention 
of himself and his friends, and their willingness, to give twenty-five thousand 
dollars for the property, and offer it to the state at cost, or make such other 
disposition of it as would effect their purpose. Mr. Lidgerwood stated that 
his object in bidding w^as precisely similar to that of the others, and expressed 
his willingness to be a fourth to carry out the governor's plans. The prop- 
erty was at once struck off to the four gentlemen, who paid, then or soon 
after, thirty per cent, of the purchase money, and deeds were executed to 
them dated July 31, 1873, for the house and lot on which it stood, being 
about two hundred and fifty-three feet front, and about five hundred and 
forty-five feet deep, and containing a little over three acres. With the real 
estate was transferred the furniture of Washington's room, which had been 
carefully preserved, since its occupancy by him, by the Ford family. 

Having secured the property, the next step was to form an organization 
to carry out the design of the purchasers. At the next meeting of the leg- 
islature a charter was applied for and obtained, which gave the association 
perpetuity and secured state aid for its proper maintenance and support. 

Theodore F. Randolph was elected the first president, in 1874, and con- 
tinued in the office until his death in 1883, when George A. Halsey was 
elected to fill the position of president, and he continued to act until 1887, 
when he withdrew and Jonathan W. Roberts, who had been chairman of 
the executive committee for several years, was elected president and has 
since filled that office with marked ability and success. In January, 1884, 

112S3G0 



36 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

about ninety persons had enrolled as members of the association. Many 
of these original members have since died and there are now about four 
hundred and ninety living members, including the successors to deceased 
members. Over eighty per cent, of the increased membership subsequent 
to 1884, together with the removal of the debt, and the restoration and 
improvement of the property, the purchase of more than twenty thousand 
dollars of additional real estate, and erection of buildings at a cost of ten 
thousand dollars, all without debt, is due to the personal efforts of Jonathan 
W. Roberts, who since the time of his first connection with the association 
in 1884 has given it his constant and unwearied attention. 

The increase and formation of the various collections of relics, now 
valued at more than fifty thousand dollars, together with their arrangement 
in the house, has all been done under his personal superintendence, and in 
many cases by his own hands. It is not too much to say that the present 
flourishing state of the association and the excellent condition of its prop- 
erty is verj' largely due to the enthusiastic and indefatigable efforts exerted 
by Mr. Roberts in its behalf, coupled with his shrewd sense and sound busi- 
ness principles in the management of its affairs. 

No more valuable or creditable thing has ever been done by the author- 
ities of the state of New Jersey than the aid given to this association as 
recited by the following extract from its charter: 

"7. And be it enacted, that so long as the building known as the 
Washington Headquarters shall be open to the public free of charge, at all 
proper times, and so long as it shall be held as an historical building, within 
which all the people of New Jersej- may deposit articles of interest con- 
nected with the men and events of our Revolutionary struggle, the treasurer 
of this state shall pay to the president or treasurer of the Washington Asso- 
ciation, on the first days of April and of November of each and every year, 
the sum of tweh'e hund^^ed and fifty dollars, to be used by the trustees for 
the care, maintenance and perpetuation of the Headquarters, and trustees 
shall render to the governor of this state, on the first day of December of 
each year, an account of their expenditures made from the funds thus appro- 
priated." 

Not one dollar of this state appropriation has ever been expended for 
any other purpose than for the necessary care of the Headquarters. 

It is impossible to mention here any considerable portion of the valuable 
relics which have become the property of the association. The following 
are some of the principal ones: Besides the articles of furniture used by 
Washington, and which were obtained with the house, there is, first of all, 
the original commission of Washington as commander-in-chief of the Con- 
tinental forces, the gift of Ferdinand J. Dreer, Esq., of Philadelphia, who 
also presented two order books — one of Captain Nathaniel Webb, of the 
Connecticut Division, extending from September 23, 1778, to January 23, 
1780, containing General Steuben's "Instructions for Manoeuvering the 
Troops;" the other of an officer of the Pennsylvania Line, extending from 
February 10, 1780, to April 29, 1780; the suit of clothes owned by Washing- 
ton and worn by him on the day of his first inauguration as president of the 
United States, with a silver-hilted dress sword and buckles worn with it; a 
large punch bowl, presented by General Washington to an ancestor of Col- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AKB GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 87 

onel Cadwalader J. Pride, and a pair of vases presented to the same person 
by General La Fayette ; a handsome portrait of Alexander Hamilton ; a unique 
marble bust of Washington, by Houdon; full-sized copies in oil of Woolas- 
ton's Martha Dandridge and C. W. Peale's Washington; a chair from the 
library at Mount Vernon; a gun made in Queen Anne's time and captured 
with a British vessel by a party of Jerseymen at Perth Amboy; " Old Nat," 
a gun presented to Captain Nathaniel Camp by General Washington for the 
defense of Newark; "The Crown Prince," a gun captured from the British 
at Springfield, and afterward used as a signal gun; two of the brass cannons 
surrendered by Burgoyne; a number of British muskets captured in the bat- 
tle of Trenton, together with muskets, swords, and uniforms of both Conti- 
nental and Hessian troops; the silk Masonic sash or baldric worn by Washing- 
ton and presented by him to Judge Gunning Bedford, of Delaware; a num- 
ber of articles of china and glass ware, formerly part of the table furniture of 
Washington, and bought at the recent sale in Philadelphia, made by the 
administrators of Mrs. Lorenzo Lewis; the plan and papers relating to the 
proposed capture of Prince William, with the journal of General Matthias 
Ogden in the expedition against Quebec; the original letter-book kept by the 
agents of Lord Stirling at his furnace at Hibernia, during the war; antique 
furniture, side-board, knife-boxes, tables and chairs of the Revolutionary 
period. 

There are many autograph letters of Washington and his contempora- 
ries, among which is one of the few autograph letters of Martha Washing- 
ton, and a large collection of letters, documents, and engraved portraits of 
Revolutionary heroes in separate cases and designated as "The Roberts 
Collection," presented by Mrs. Jonathan W. Roberts. In the kitchen is a 
large number of old-time utensils, and in the hall adjoining, cases filled with 
rare old china. 

On Monday, the 5th day of Jul)', 1875, a large public meeting in honor 
of the anniversary of American independence was held at the Headquarters, at 
which President Randolph made an eloquent address, from which we quote : 

"Morris county is peculiarly rich in Revolutionary reminiscences. 
During two winters, Washington established his headquarters at this town. 
The place where the younger Ford built the powder-mill, the site of the old 
magazine, the Arnold Tavern, the Knox Headquarters, the camps on the 
Wicke farm, the Lowantica Hospitals, and the sacred little 'God's Acre,' 
are all here about us. But peerless among them all stand these old Head- 
quarters within which lived the great commander. 

"The disasters of 1776 terminated in the retreat of Washington beyond 
the Delaware. To the old soldier, this march, through half-frozen mud, so 
terrible to endure, was known as the 'Mud Rounds.' Only about 4,000 men 
followed Washington at this period. Deep gloom had fallen upon the 
country, but joy sprung to every patriot heart as the brilliant victories of 
Trenton and of Princeton closed the year of 1776 and opened that of I777- 
In January, 1777, soon after the victories at Trenton and at Princeton, 
Washington established his headquarters at Morristown — at the Arnold 
Tavern. During this winter he made the acquaintance of the family of 
Colonel Jacob Ford, Jr., the builder and owner of this house, since made 
famous by its illustrious occupancy. 



88 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

•'The powder-mill, which Colonel Ford built at his own cost, not onl}' 
furnished f^ood povv'der and in needful quantities, but became the frequent 
object of the enemy's plans to attack and destroy. In this they never suc- 
ceeded. The powder-mill stood on yonder Whippany river, and not far 
below where we stand. This house had its foundation laid in 1772, and was 
ready for occupancy and was occupied by Colonel Ford's family in 1774. 
They builded well. Sledge, and hammer, and trowel shaped and placed 
these broad foundations before England's king had ceased to rule the land. 
Ax and adze hewed out girder and beam from massive oak that to-day defies 
the full century gone past. 

"The oaken planks that make these outer walls, calked like the frame 
of a great frigate, are as sound to-day as when they sheltered Washington 
from the storms of the terrible winter of 1779-80. The carved work about 
these doors and on these beautiful cornices are rare specimens of elegance in 
wood-work. It would be difficult to e.xcel their chaste design to-day. 

"Those who builded have gone. Not one of all that busy throng that 
laid the base-stone or capped the roof-girder are in life to-day. But they 
builded well. The same oaken doors open to you as they did to Washington; 
the massive knocker his hand was wont to touch yet waits obedient to your 
wish. The floors he trod in anxious thought and with wearied brain, you 
may tread. The century has wrought no change in rafter or beam, or floor, 
or sheltering oak. Is there no significance in the remarkable preservation of 
this house.' 

"This dwelling was for many months the home of Martha, the wife of 
George Washington. Within these rooms, with quiet dignity and grace, she 
received her husband's guests. Never idle, she set a constant example of 
thrift and industry. Under this roof have been gathered more characters 
known to the military history of our Revolution than under any other roof in 
America. This fact is not generally known, to our own people, and conse- 
quently the rich historic value of our old Headquarters has never been prop- 
erly appreciated. Here the elegant and brilliant Alexander Hamilton lived 
during the long winter of '79, and here he met and courted the lady he after- 
wards married — the daughter of General Schuyler. Here, too, was Greene — ' 
splendid fighting Quaker as he was — and the great artillery officer, Knox, the 
stern Steuben, the polished Kosciusko, the brave Schuyler, gallant Light- 
horse Harry Lee, old Israel Putnam, "Mad Anthony" Wa'yne, and, last to 
be named of all, that brave soldier, but rank traitor — Benedict Arnold." 



THOMAS B. PIERSON. 



The subject of this review, a well known and substantial business man 
of Morristown, was born at Mendham, Morris county. New Jersey, on the 
6th of January, 1832, at the old Thompson homestead. His parents moved 
to Mount Freedom in 1838 and there he was reared, obtaining his literary 




SOLDIERS' MONUMENT 
MORRISTOWN 




A MORRIS COUNTY 
MEMORIAL OF HISTORIC SPOT 



BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTOBY. 89 

education in the public schools. He learned the carpenter's trade and 
worked at the same both at Morristown and Newark, and then returned to 
Mount Freedom, whence he came, in i860, to Morristown and soon there- 
after beceme salesman and manager for the plumbing establishment of 
Egbert Searing, doing all the estimating for that gentleman. He continued 
with Mr. Searing for a period of eight years, when his employer died and our 
subject entered into a partnership with Day, Searing & Company, in the 
plumbing, tinning, heating and ventilating business, which was successfully 
conducted for the ensuing five years by this firm, and then Mr. Pierson pur- 
chased the interests of his associates and has since been sole proprietor. Mr. 
Pierson enjoys a large patronage and in the past quarter of a century has 
acquired a comfortable competency, the logical result of his industry, thrift, 
perseverance and that strict integrity of character which insures thorough 
honesty in all his dealings. 

In his political faith Mr. Pierson is a stanch supporter of the Republican 
party, and has served two terms in the city council, where he was a member 
of the street-lamp, license and improvement committees and rendered mate- 
rial aid in securing cheap lights for the city. Socially considered, he is affil- 
iated with the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained the degree of the 
Holy Royal Arch in Madison Chapter, No. 27, and is also a member of the 
Washington Headquarters Association at Morristown. 

Mr. Pierson solemnized his marriage September 11, 1855, when he 
became un-ted to Miss Gertrude P. Loree, a daughter of Samuel A. and Mary 
Ann (Arnold) Loree, and the following named children have been born to 
them: Charles H., who married Miss Margaret Kane; Frank E. , who mar- 
ried Miss Agnes Romaine; and Walter B. , Augustus F. and Laura L. , who 
are single. Mr. and Mrs. Pierson are devout adherents of the Methodist 
church. 

Alpheus Pierson, the father of our subject, was born in Mount Freedom, 
New Jersey, on the 6th of January, 1806, and was a nail-maker by occupa- 
tion, following the same when it was in its primitive condition, before the 
invention of nail-cutting machinery. He was also engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. He was first married to Miss Mary Bowman, and of this union 
three children were born, Thomas B. ; Harriet, who married William Evert, 
of Dover, New Jersey; and Sarah, who died in early life. The mother of 
these children died and Mr. Pierson was again married, his second wife being 



40 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GEJYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Miss Unis Larrison, by whom he had two sons, A. Ebenezer and George W., 
and one daughter, Ehzabeth (Mrs. Floyd Woodhull). The paternal grand- 
father of our subject was Job Pierson, who emigrated from England and 
passed the latter part of his life at Mount Freedom, where he died. He 
also was a farmer and nail-maker. 



JOHN JONES. 



Among those conspicuously identified with floriculture in Morris county 
and one who has attained marked success and prestige in the connection is 
he whose name initiates this paragraph. The fine greenhouses of Mr. Jones 
are located at Convent Station, in the borough of Madison, and he is known 
as one of the representative and enterprising citizens of the county and as a 
man whose sterling characteristics have gained to him the respect and con- 
fidence of the community and of all with whom he has business relations. 

A native of Shropshire, England, Mr. Jones was born in the year 1851, 
being the son of John and Mary Jones. He received his educational disci- 
pline in the schools of his native county and in his early youth became identi- 
fied with an enterprise analogous to that which now demands his time and 
attention. He was reared to the vocation of a gardener and gave to the 
various details of the work a thorough study, which effectively supplemented 
his practical training, which was one of most effective order, making him 
master of his business. 

In the year 1870 Mr. Jones emigrated to America, and he secured a 
position in the employ of Governor Jewell, of Connecticut, his duties being 
in that line of occupation for which he had so thoroughly prepared himself. 
After remaining in Connecticut for a time he finally removed to Flatbush, 
Long Island, New York, where he entered the employ of William Bennett, 
who conducted a florist business, having extensive greenhouses, and Mr. 
Jones retained the position of managing florist for one year, after which he 
entered the employ of Judge Lathrop, at Madison, and severed his associa- 
tion with the Judge only upon the latter's death. After the death of his 
employer Mr. Jones rented the greenhouses and conducted the business suc- 
cessfully for a period of two years. At the expiration of this time, in 1884, 
he purchased his present home, the property comprising nine acres of land. 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJ^D GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 4f 

He has large and finely equipped conservatories and is extensively engaged, 
in raising roses for the New York market, while he also does a large retail 
business as a general florist, raising the finest varieties of roses, carnations, 
violets and other popular floral products. His enterprise has been very suc- 
cessful and has been conducted upon those correct and honorable principles 
which assure consecutive supporting patronage. He is one of the pioneer 
rose-growers of Madison and is a recognized connoisseur in the line. He was 
the first president of the local Rose Growers' Club, is a member of the Gar- 
deners' & Florists' Club, of Morristown, of which he was one of the organizers, 
and maintains a lively interest in all that touches the important line of indus- 
try with which he is identified. 

In the year 1871 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Jones to Miss 
Sarah Annie Taylor, who was born in Staffordshire, England, whence she 
came to America shortly prior to her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Jones became 
the parents of the following named children: Oliver, who died at the age of 
four and one-half years; Henrietta; Arthur, an assistant engineer and drafts- 
man; Florence and Charles. The family enjoy a distinctive popularity in the 
community, and the home is notable for its genial hospitality. 



THE HOWELL FAMILY. 



COMPILED BY GEORGE W. HOWELL. 



It is believed that all of the Howell blood in America may claim their 
origin from Edward Howell, who, in 1640, headed a party which purchased 
a large tract of land from the Indians and settled Southampton on the 
south shore of Long Island. This was the first town settled by the English 
within the present bounds of the state of New York. In commemoration of 
the event, and in memory of the leader, the Howell arms are carved on the 
grand western staircase of the capitol at Albany. 

Researches in England have carried the line back to the early part of 
the sixteenth century. 

William Howell purchased Westbury Manor, parish of Marsh Gibbon, 
Bucks county, England, in 1536; died November 30, 1557. (The old stone 
manor-house, somewhat modernized, is still standing, and is occupied by the 
worthy rector of the parish.) 



42 BIOGBJPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Henry Howell, son of William, buried Jul}' 20, 1625. 

Edward Howell, son of Henry, baptized July 22, 1584. He sold West- 
bury Manor for sixteen hundred pounds, June 8, 1639. Emigrated to Bos- 
ton, where he was made Ffreeman March 14, 1640. He had a grant of five 
hundred acres at Lynn, Massachusetts, but soon organized and planted the 
Southampton colony, of which he was magistrate to the end of his life; also 
member of the colonial legislature at Hartford. He died in 1655. His 
children were: Henry, baptized December 20, 161 8; Margaret, baptized 
November 24, 1622, wife of Rev. John Moore, of Southold, Long Island; 
John, baptized November 22, 1624; Edward, baptized September, 1626; 
Margery, baptized June i, 1628; Richard, baptized 1629; Arthur, baptized 
1632; Edmund. 

The arms of the family, as shown on old documents and on tombstones 
in the old burying-ground at Southampton, are: Gules, three towers triple 
towered, argent ; crest used by some branches. Out of a ducal crown or, a 
rose argent stalked and leaved vert, between two wings, indorsed of the last. 
Motto: Tenax propositi. 

About the middle of the eighteenth century a considerable emigration 
seems to have occurred from Long Island to New Jersey. Descendants of 
the fifth generation from the pioneer Edward settled at Troy, Parsippany, 
Morristown, Chester and Flanders. ( The present sketch refers chiefly to 
the family of Gideon, one of these emigrants.) 

Gideon Howell, whose line is Edward, Richard, Richard, Edward, Gid- 
eon, settled first on the farm now owned by George B. Smith, Esq. , at Troy 
Hills. By the burning of his house he lost everything he had, even to the 
wearing apparel of his family. A subscription for his relief, still e.xtant, 
shows the esteem in which he was held by his friends and neighbors. He 
then removed to the farm at Littleton, which remained in possession of his 
descendants for a century and a quarter. 

Gideon was born at Southampton, January 26, 1728, married April 2, 
1753, died at Littleton January 20, 1803. His wife, Sarah Gordon, was born 
March 25, 1732, died October 22, 1803. Their children were: Sarah, born 
February 15, 1754, married (ist) Jonathan Fairchild; (2d) John Ball, February 
17, 1816; died April 20, 1833. Martha, born June 20, 1756, married (ist) 
Asher Fairchild, (2d) John Ball, January 16, 1787; died February 14, 1S15. 
Ezekiel, born March 27, 1758, married February 16, 1786; died June 16, 



BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GEXEALOGICAL HISTORY. 43 

1 831; his wife, Susannah Hill, was born May 15, 1762; died November 27, 
185 I. Abigail died in infancy. Hannah, born June 20, 1763; married (ist) 
Lemuel Minton, (2d) Thomas Osborn; died March 20, 1829. Daniel, born 
November 29, 1765; died July 6, 1790. Abigail, born December 8, 1767; 
married Henry Badgley, February 4, 1786; died January 5, 1832. Gaius, 
born May 25, 1770. Elias P., born July 8, 1772; married (ist) Rebecca 
Tucker, May 14, 1803, (2d) Hannah Pruden, April 14, 1808; died October 
31, 1829. 

The children of Gideon all settled in Morris county, except Daniel and 
Gaius, who removed to Ohio. From Sarah descended the Fairchild, Gar- 
rigus and Headley families; from Martha and Abigail the Badgleys, Balls and 
Strongs; from Hannah, by her f:rst marriage, the Crane, Minton, Hopkins, 
Mason, Macfarlane, De Forest and Pullman families of Chicago; and the one 
child by her second marriage, Mary, wife of Hiram Smith, was mother of the 
Smith family of Troy, her children being, — sons, Samuel B., Thomas O., 
John Condict, George W., Richard, Henry; and daughters, Eleanor (wife of 
Rev. Elihu Doty, missionary to China), Marcia S. (wife of William Kitchell, 
formerly state geologist of New Jersey), and Mary L. • 

Ezekiel Howell, third child and oldest son of Gideon, had children: 
Anna, born January 6, 1787, married John Ward, of Newark, November 4, 
1809, and died January 8, 1840. She was mother of the late David J. and 
General William Ward, of Newark. Eunice, born June 15, 1789, died at 
Littleton, unmarried. May 28, 1857. Daniel died in infancy. Calvin, born 
October 7, 1792, married Charlotte, daughter of Captain Ezekiel Kitchell, of 
Whippany, August 30, 1821, and died October 8, 1868. Sarah Fairchild, 
born July 2, 1794, married Rev. John M. Carpenter, March 29, 1837, and 
died June 11, 1863. Hannah Minton, born October i, 1800, married David 
Todd, son of Robert Todd, of Morris Plains, February 25, 1830, and died at 
Littleton, January 13, 1884. Edward, born February 27, 1804, married 
Mary, daughter of Major William Lee, of Littleton, April 21, 1831, and died 
May 20, 1878. His wife was born March 5, 1809, and died August 
31, 1896. 

Ezekiel Howell spent his life on the farm at Littleton. He was in the 
New Jersey militia and was present at the battle of Springfield. 

Calvin Howell, son of Ezekiel and grandson of Gideon, in his early life 
followed the carpenter's trade, being engaged in the erection of buildings at 



44 BIOGRAPHICAL AjYD GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Easton, Pennsylvania, and Ogdensburg, New York, and for several years 
had a contract for erecting government buildings on Tybee island. Savannah, 
Georgia. Later he was concerned with his father-in-law in the early experi- 
ments with the inclined plane on the Morris canal, at Rockaway. His home 
after his marriage was at Whippany. 

He enjoyed in an eminent degree the respect and confidence of the com- 
munity. His public life was marked by sound judgment and stanch integrity. 
He was a member of the Morris county board of chosen freeholders, a judge 
of the courts, and a member of the legislature in 1846 and 1847. While in 
the last mentioned office he was chairman of the con^mittee having in charge 
the erection of the lunatic asylum at Trenton, where his practical knowledge 
and business capacity were of great value to the state. 

Joseph Warren Howell, the oldest son of Calvin that reached maturity, 
studied medicine and was a practicing physician at Whippany. He married 
Augusta, daughter of Edwin Wilson; died in 1864, leaving one child, Mary, 
wife of Edward E. Baldwin, of Parsippany. 

William H. Howell, second son of Calvin, was born at Whippany April 
6, 1841, on the family homestead, where he died July 15, 1889. His wife, 
Susannah A., daughter of Captain Timothy Tuttle, of Whippany, survived 
him about six years He was a member of the house of assembly in 1873 
and 1874, his sterling qualities giving him high rank in the legislative body. 
For a number of years he was a member of the board of freeholders of Morris 
county, and for two years was director of the board. In 1881 he was elected 
sheriff of Morris county by the largest majority ever given to a candidate for 
that office. He was an ardent Republican, was a member, and for several 
years chairman, of the Republican county committee. From young manhood 
he was a member of the Whippany Presbyterian church. He left children: 
Francis C. , Rodney H. and Joseph Warren. 

Francis K. Howell, third son of Calvin, was born on the Whippany 
homestead and is a practicing lawyer in Newark. 

Edward Howell, son of Ezekiel and grandson of Gideon, lived and died 
on the Littleton homestead. For many years he was assessor of Hanover 
township, also township school commissioner. In his early life he spent 
several winters in teaching in the district schools. For fifty years he was 
deacon, church clerk and trustee of the Morristown Baptist church. He 
served two terms (1855 and 1856J in the house of assembly. His children 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 45 

were: William Lee and Charles Edward, who died in infancy; George W., 
born December 21, 1835, and Susan, born December 24, 1841. 

George W. Howell, son of Edward and grandson of Ezekiel, was born 
on the Littleton homestead, which he sold in 1885, since which time he has 
resided in Morristown. He entered the New Jersey State Normal School in 
1856, the first year of its existence, as a pupil, and was for several years a 
teacher in that institution. Since leaving the teacher's profession he has 
been engaged in civil engineering, having been connected with the earlier 
surveys for the state, under Dr. George H. Cook, state geologist, with the 
location and construction of railroads in this and other states, bridge engineer- 
ing, reservoir and water-supply designs and construction, drainage and sewer- 
age. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers; Washington 
Association; Sons of the American Revolution; State Sanitary Association, 
and is director and secretary of the Morristown Memorial Hospital. 

He was married December 31, 1862, to Rachel M., daughter of Robert 
B. and Rachel G. Cornish, who were formerly of Otsego county. New York, 
and who settled at Gillette, Passaic township, in 1855. Mrs. Howell was 
born August 22, 1840, and died while on a visit at Providence, Rhode Island, 
April 21, 1898. Their children are: Edward, born January 7, 1866; 
Charlotte K., born June 30, 1868; Suzy, born July 4, 1871; Mary Lee, born 
November 21, 1S72; and Rachel C, born August 14, 1879. 

Edward Howell, son of George W., was graduated at Rutgers College, 
in 1889, in civil engineering, and has since been connected with his father in 
business. He was married November 25, 1890, to Nettie Lee, daughter of 
Theodore F. and Mary (Burnet) French, of Plainfield, New Jersey. Their 
children are Margaret Lee, Edward and Eleanor. 

For four generations this branch of the family has been officially con- 
nected with the Morristown Baptist church. 

Suzy Howell, daughter of George W., was married December 23, 1896, 
to Professor Herrick Piatt Young, of Providence, Rhode Island, and has one 
child, Howell Thomas. 

Susan Howell, daughter of Edward and granddaughter of Ezekiel, was 
married December 29, 1864, to Theodore M., son of Stephen M. Peck, of 
East Orange. Their children are: Mary Louisa, born September 30, 1865; 
Martha B., born January 9, 1867, married E. Fred Knapp; Ellen D., born 
September 28, 1868, married Rev. George Bonsall; Anna H. died in infancy; 



46 BIOGRAPHICAL AJYD GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Margaret F., born July i8, 1876. Theodore M. Peck was born April 25^ 
1837, w.ts engaged in the hardware business at Madison, New Jersey, and 
died at Mentone, California, December 15, 1897. 

About the time that. Gideon Howell came to New Jersey, two brothers 
of another branch, Benjamin and Jeremiah (whose line is, Edward, Edward, 
Jonah, Samuel, of Mecox, Benjamin and Jeremiah), came, the one to Troy, 
the other to Parsippany. 

Benjamin Howell, son of Samuel, of Mecox, was born on Long Island! 
October 10, 1725, and died at Troy, December 26, 1798. 

John Howell, only child of Benjamin, was born October 20, 1759; mar- 
ried Phebe, daughter of Ebenezer Farrand, and died October 5, 1834. Their 
children were: Benjamin, born June 29, 1786, died February 17, 1852; 
Samuel F., born October 18, 1788, died F~ebruary 22, i860; Sarah, borri 
May 6, 1792; Chileon died in infancy; Elizabeth, born January 11, 1800, 
died September 18, 181 5. 

Benjamin Howell, son of John and grandson of the emigrant Benjamin, 
had children (besides some who died in infancy): Susan C, born November 
17, 1812, died January 16, 1862; Phebe F., born October 11, 1816, marriedi 
Louis B. Cobb, and died March 20, 1869; Monroe, born September 9, 18 19, 
married Henrietta Clay Stevens, June 13, 1849, and died March 2, 1883; 
Benjamin F., born October 11, 1822, married Frances H. Willis; Lemuel 
C. , born February 28, 1829, died April 10, 1862. 

Monroe Howell was a life-long resident of Troy, where he was engaged 
in farming and general merchandising, was for years assessor of Hanover 
township; also held other township and county offices, and was, at the time 
of his death, surveyor-general of the eastern division of New Jersey. 



THOMAS M. CARTER. 



America is no less proud of an old family than are the nations of Europe, 
but this pride arises not from a boasted " blue blood;" it is based upon the 
honorable lives of a long line of ancestors, men -who have been true to their 
country, their neighbors and themselves. Of such a family history Mr. Car- 
ter can boast. More than a century and a half has passed since the first 



BIOGRJPEICAL AJ^B GEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 4T 

settlement was made by a Carter in New Jersey. Before the year 1732, 
Barnabas Carter crossed the Atlantic to America and purchased of one Allen, 
an agent for the Indians, a tract of land, the homestead comprising one hun- 
dred and fifty acres, while the other portion embraced over six hundred acres. 
His descendants continued in possession of this property and placed it under 
a high state of cultivation. His son, Luke Carter, there carried on agricult- 
ural pursuits and reared his family, which included Thomas Carter, the 
grandfather of our subject, who was born in 1755. 

Having arrived at years of maturity, Thomas Carter was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Lydia Williams, who was born in 1763. They resided on the 
old homestead and two children came to bless their union: Ashbel and 
Martha, the latter now the wife of Jonathan Oliver, of New Vernon, New 
Jersey. The father was a leading member of the Presbyterian church in 
Madison, served as elder for many years, and was instrumental in erecting 
the old house of worship at that place. He lived to be seventy-nine years 
of age, passing away in 1829. 

Ashbel Carter was born on the old homestead in October, 1796, spent 
his boyhood and \'outh there, attending the public schools of the neighbor- 
hood and assisting in the development and cultivation of the fields. On the 
2 1 St of December, 1824, he led to the marriage altar Miss Mary Ward, who 
was born in 1801, a daughter of Jacob Ward. They resided on the old home 
place and became the parents of two children: Ann Eliza, who became the 
wife of George Allen, of Morris county, and died March 24, 1892; and 
Thomas M., of this review. They also had an adopted daughter, Minnie M. 
Carter, who became an inmate of their home when eight years of age and 
was reared as one of their own children. 

Ashbel Carter was a very prominent and influential citizen and was hon- 
ored with election to several local offices, including those of assessor and 
collector of his township. He voted with the Whig party in early life, but 
when the issues of the day caused a new political division to be formed he 
espoused the cause of Republicanism and was unwavering in support of the 
party principles. For many years he served as elder of the First Presby- 
terian church of Madison and did all in his power to promote the cause of 
Christianity and promulgate its principles among men. His religious belief 
permeated all the acts of his life and made him one of the most honored and 
trusted citizens of the corrmunity. He passed away March 7, 1881, and his 



48 BIOGBJPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

estimable wife, who survived him several years, was called to her final rest 
November 23, 1888. 

The old family homestead of the Carters, situated on Meadow Ridge, in 
Chatham township, was the birthplace of Thomas M. Carter, who entered 
upon life's activities September 3, 1828. The old farm was also his play- 
ground and his training school for the affairs of life. His mental talents 
were stimulated and cultivated in the public schools of the neighborhood, 
and when the schopl year was ended he took his place in the field, aiding in 
the plowing, planting and harvesting. After attaining his majority he more 
and more assumed the management of the farm, and his able direction of 
affairs brought a rich return for the care and labor he bestowed upon it. He 
continued to carry on agricultural pursuits until 1888, when he laid aside 
business cares and removed to Madison, where he is now living a retired life. 
He holds membership in the Presbyterian church — the church of his fathers 
— and exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of 
the Republican party. He is true to all his duties of citizenship, honorable 
in his business relations and faithful to his convictions, and commands the 
respect and confidence of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



HENRY W. YOUNG. 



Mr. Young is descended from Scotch ancestors and possesses many of 
the sterling qualities of that nation, — the resolute purpose, the fidelity and 
the progressiveness. During a period of persecHtion occurring in the reign of 
King Charles the Second, about a hundred men that had been spared the 
sword were put on the Caledonia, an unseaworthy old craft that leaked so 
badly that it was the evident expectation that all on board would go down 
ere they were out of sight of land. But a competent man was chosen as 
captain, and by dint of constant bailing a kind Providence brought the ship 
safely to the shore of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, in 1685. 

These refugees, thus borne to the New World, at once began to make 
homes for themselves, and Robert Young, then nineteen years of age, and 
two associates, respectively named Clisby and Nesbitt, went to Newark, New 
Jersey, while others made their way to Freehold, this state. The first named 



BIOGBJPEICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 49 

married Sarah Baldwin, daughter of Benjamin Baldwin, who belonged to ona 
of the old families of Essex county. Their children were David, Jonathan, 
John, Robert, Stephen and Sarah. The first of these, David, came to Hop- 
pingtown (now Afton), Morris county, before the war of the Revolution. He 
had two sons, Moses and Daniel. Jonathan and his family became residents 
of Orange, New Jersey; Robert (No. 2) settled at Pine Brook, New Jersey, 
and had two sons, Nathan and Amos, the latter being the father of David 
Young, school-master and astronomer, who compiled and published the 
Farmers' Almanac for several years. 

John Young, the great-grandfather of our subject, was for some years a 
resident of the village now called Afton, in Chatham township, Morris county. 
He came here in 1772 and had four children, — Elizabeth, Sarah, John and 
Noah. The last-named presided as chairman of a meeting at which the 
name of the village of Hoppingtown was changed to Columbia. John (No. 2), 
of this family, was the grandfather of our subject. He was reared on the 
old homestead in Chatham township, and when the colonists attempted to 
throw of the yoke of British tyranny he joined the American army and, with 
his brother Noah, did service at Springfield. He married Achsah Crane, of 
Cranetown (now Montclair), and they had five children, — John, Mary, Sarah 
(wife of Timothy Hopping), Elizabeth and Thomas. 

John Young (3d), father of our subject, followed the occupation of farm- 
ing as a life work and was a man of much influence and prominence in the 
community in which he made his home. He was a leading member in church 
work, served for many years as elder of the Presbyterian church in Hanover, 
and accomplished much good in that direction. He passed to his final rest 
in 1875. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Lydia K. Baldwin, was a 
daughter of Stephen Baldwin, of Hanover, and their children were Henry 
W., Mahitabel and Elizabeth. 

Henry W. Young was born on the old family homestead in Chatham 
township, March 4, 1829, and in the schools of the neighborhood familiarized 
himself with the common English branches of learning. After arriving at years 
of maturity he married Charity Coulter, a native of Jersey City, this state, 
and a daughter of William and Charity (Prior) Coulter, of an old family that 
located on Staten Island. Two children came to bless the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Young: Howard E., who is living at home; and Henry M., a carpen- 
ter and builder of Newark, who married Emma J. Tunis. 
4 



50 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Throughout his active business life Mr. Young has followed agricultural 
pursuits, and has a farm, neat and thrifty in appearance, from which he 
gathers good crops, deriving therefrom a fair income. His land is a part of 
the old family homestead. In matters pertaining to the public welfare he 
is deeply interested and he does all in his power to promote those measures 
which are calculated to advance the general welfare. He votes with the 
Republican party, and in 1870 was elected to the office of freeholder. He 
has been township assessor several terms; has served as town committeeman 
and on the election board, and was chairman of the meeting at which the 
name of Columbia was changed to Afton, his great-uncle having occupied a 
similar position when the name of Columbia was adopted. He holds mem- 
bership in the Presbyterian church, and is a prominent factor in political, 
agricultural and church circles in Chatham township. 



JOHN W. HURD. 



One of the oldest farms in New Jersey, the Hurd homestead in Dover, 
whereon our subject now resides, has long been in possession of represent- 
atives of the name. While British and Colonial troops battled, the one for 
the subjection, the other for the independence, of the colonies, and awakened 
the echoes of the neighboring hills, when the work of formulating the new 
republic was being carried on, and through the latter-day progress and devel- 
opment, the Hurds have borne their part in sustaining the interests of Ame- 
rica, and have ever been representative of her best citizenship. 

The family originated in England and was founded in the New World in 
163 1 by John Hurd, who emigrated from Somerset county and took up his 
residence in Dorchester, Massachusetts. The great-grandfather of our sub- 
ject was Josiah Hurd, who lived upon the farm that has since been in pos- 
session of his descendants and is now the property of John W. Hurd. His 
son Moses Hurd was there born, as was the father of our subject, Jacob 
Hurd, whose birth occurred in 1798. He also carried on agricultural pur- 
suits and for many years was proprietor of a hotel, which was known as the 
Hurd House and which was a prominent landmark of eastern New Jerse}'. 
He served as a freeholder for some years and died in 1870. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Mary Hoagland, was a daughter of Peter G. and 




^^^x^^^ y^^^^z^i^-^^-^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD OEMEALOGICAL HISTORY. 51 

Elizabeth (Hurd) Hoagland. Jacob and Mary (Hoagland) Hurd became the 
parents of three children, Elizabeth, Carrie and John W. 

The gentleman whose name introduces this review was born in Dover,. 
August 12, 1827, and spent his early youth in the usual manner of boys of 
the period, conning his lessons in the public schools, and assisting his father 
in the hotel. Later he took charge of the old homestead, which had been 
left him by his father, and throughout his active business career he carriedi 
on agricultural pursuits, but is now living retired, enjoying a rest which he 
has truly earned and richly deserves. His interests were well managed, and 
his business methods were above question, his dealings being characterized, 
by the utmost fairness. 

On the i6th of July, 1855, Mr. Hurd was united in marriage to Miss 
Hester A. Hawley, a native of Connecticut and a daughter of Harmon and 
Emma Hawley. Her death occurred December 14, 1856. By this marriage 
there was one son, Jacob H. Hurd, who died young. Mr. Hurd was again 
married, his second union being with Miss Margaret S. King, a daughter of 
James and Charity King. She was born in Morristown, and by her marriage 
became the mother of four children, but the two sons died in infancy. Car- 
rie v., who died in 1889, at the age of twent3'-two years, was a young 
woman of beautiful character and high accomplishments, gaining and retain- 
ing the love of all with whom she came in contact. Of a buoyant and 
happy nature, unselfish and ever ready to do a kindly act, she was a leader 
among the young people in the church and social circles of Dover, and was 
at all times deeply appreciative of the friendships which came to her, as the 
result of her intrinsic gentleness and nobility. She became a student in Miss 
Kenyon's school, at Plainfield, New Jersey, and was an accomplished 
musician and artist, her distinctive love of nature making her particularly 
felicitous in painting, in which line her art productions show unmistakable 
talent. Her untimely death was deeply mourned by her large circle of 
admiring friends. Mary, wife of Rev. W. W. Casselberry, died in May, 
1897, at her home in Haddonfield. From an obituary in the Dover Iron 
Era we quote the following: 

Mrs. Casselberry was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Hurd and 
was born in the old homestead on West Blackwell street twenty-three years 
ago. She was well known in Dover and the news of her death plunged her 
large circle of friends in mourning. The remains were brought to this city 
on Thursday and taken to the home of her parents, where the funeral will be 



■52 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

held this afternoon. The Rev. W. W. Halloway, Jr., who was her pastor 
for many years and who officiated at her marriage, will conduct the services. 
The death of Mrs. Casselberry was a great shock to her friends in this 
•community, even though not unexpected, because of her known illness. But 
it seemed as if she was so young and fair that even death would be con- 
strained to spare her. Only a few months ago, October 20, 1896, she was 
married to the Rev. W. W. Casselberry, and at that time she was the center 
of brightest hopes and surrounded by all of life's pleasantest possessions. But 
she was really an invalid even then, although she would not acknowledge it. 
Taking up her home in Haddonfield she made a brave fight for her life, and 
never gave up her cheerfulness or hope. She joined the Presbyterian church 
of Dover, by confession, in 1890, and had been a faithful and earnest Chris- 
tian young woman. Her class in Sunday-school loved her. As chairman of 
the social committee of the Endeavor Society three years ago, she gave new 
life to that feature of the society, and by her personality made every enter- 
tainment a success. There was a power about her which drew all to her in 
affection and admiration. If she had lived and had possessed health her new 
position as a minister's wife would have given her an opportunity which she 
would have gladly seized to become useful to a marked degree. Death has 
cut her off in her youth and beauty, but in a fairer clime and under better 
auspices her work will be completed and her character perfected. 

Her loss was an almost unbearable blow to her parents, who received 
hundreds of letters of condolence from her school friends and teachers. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Hurd are consistent and faithful members of the First Presby- 
terian church of Dover, and their many excellencies of character have gained 
them high regard. Mr. Hurd is a modest, unassuming man, but his relia- 
bility in business transactions, his fidelity to the duties of citizenship, and his 
honor in all the walks of life have gained him the respect of all with whom 
.he has been brought in contact. 



HUDSON HOAGLAND. 



In America individual merit can claim a recognition accorded it in no 
•other country on the globe. The power of personality in conquering fate, 
iin utilizing opportunities and taking advantage of possibilities for raising to 
ihiglier planes is here acknowledged, and the man who wins public honor and 
fame is not he who depends upon the reputation of his ancestors or the 
influence of wealthy friends, but upon his own ability, enterprise and honesty. 
Such an example is furnished in the life record of Mr. Hoagland. In his 
_youth serving in a humble clerkship, he is to-day one of the prominent capi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 53: 

talists of the east and a financier whose opinion is regarded as authority on 
matters of investment. His name is a power in the world of banking, and 
his fellow countrymen accord him the honor so justly merited by reason of 
his individual accomplishment. 

From a historic family Mr. Hoagland is descended, being a representa- 
tive of the si.xth generation in America. The founder of the family in the 
New World was ChristoiTel Hoaglandt, who was born in Holland, in 1634. 
When a youth he served as a clerk in a mercantile establishment and on 
attaining his majority he began business on his own account. On emigrating 
to America he located in the section of the country where lived most of his 
countrymen, and built the first brick house in New York city, the site being 
on the Hudson, almost directly opposite the tomb of General Grant. What 
is now Pearl street on the west side of Broad street. New York, was called 
Hoaglandt Corner. He had large realty holdings in the Empire state and 
in New Jersey, and was a very prominent citizen of the Dutch colony. He 
was a member of the Dutch church in New Amsterdam and married Catrina 
Cregier, a daughter of Captain Martin Cregier, and to them were born seven 
sons and a daughter. After the death of Christoffel Hoaglandt, the family 
removed to New Jersey. 

Hudson Hoagland, of the sixth generation of the family, was born m 
Dover, New Jersey, March 6, 1820, a son of Peter Gordon and Elizabeth 
(Algers) Hoagland. His father died when he was five years of age, and 
when sixteen years of age he secured a clerkship in the employ of John M. 
Losey, afterward his partner, the store being a general mercantile establish- 
ment, containing dry goods, groceries, crockery, hardware, and boots 
and shoes. In 1855 he removed with his mother to New Ygrk and 
entered the commission grocery business in connection with Charles Shep- 
pard, the partnership continuing until 1857, when Mr. Hoagland withdrew 
and formed a partnership with William A. Bigelow, his brother-in-law, as 
wholesale dealers in boots and shoes. The house soon won an excellent 
reputation and a fine trade, the business steadily and constantly increasing. 
In 1 86 1 Mr. Bigelow retired, but Mr. Hoagland continued the enterprise 
under the firm style of Hoagland, Du Bois & McGovern, until 1872, when 
he also sold out. Every change in his business has enlarged the field of his 
operations and the scope of his enterprises. 

On his retirement from the shoe trade Mr. Hoagland embarked in the 



54 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HIS TOUT. 

banking business, which he has followed continuously since. He is vice- 
president of the Broadway Bank, of New York city; vice-president of the 
National Union Bank, of Dover; director of the Hanover Bank, of New York 
city, and trustee of the New York Security & Trust Company. His invest- 
ments have ever been judicious and profitable. He is an excellent judge of 
men, is conservative and careful, and yet when his interest and support are 
given to any measure he stands by it until it is carried forward to successful 
completion. 

Mr. Hoagland was married June 30, 1858, to Miss Martha D. Bigelow, who 
died January 5, 1897. His home is in New York, but his interest in the city 
of his birth is often evidenced by the liberal support which he gives to itg 
public measures, calculated to promote the general welfare. In politics he 
is a Republican, but has had neither time nor inclination to seek office. He 
is a man of polished manners and great suavity of demeanor, cited for his 
courtesy and consideration for others, and respected by all with whom his 
busy life has brought him in contact. 



GEORGE Mccracken. 



Written in such indelible characters that time is powerless to obliterate 
their influence, men of marked ability, forceful character and honesty of 
purpose leave their impress upon the communities with which they are con- 
nected, yet there is no ostentation in their manner of thus molding the public 
life; they are rather men of modest reserve, whose influence is the result of 
sterling worth and not of self-seeking. Such a man is the gentleman whose 
name introduces this review and who is now serving as postmaster of Dover. 
He is also a prominent representative of the business interests, connected 
with a number of enterprises which not only add to his individual prosperity, 
but also materially advance the welfare of the community by promoting 
commercial activity. In political affairs he is a chosen leader of the 
Democracy, and in social circles he is also prominent. 

Mr. McCracken was born on the 4th of July, 1840, in Hackettstown, 
New Jersey, a son of William and Anna C. (Clauson) McCracken, who were 
also natives of the same town, the father born September 15, 18 14, the 
mother in 1820. For many years the former was the well-known and popular 



BIOGRJPHiaiL AJ\rD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 55 

proprietor of the Warren House in Hacl^ettstown, but he had been retired 
from active business for five or six years prior to his death, which occurred 
March 23, 1897. The mother of our subject is a daughter of Jacob Clauson, 
a native of New Jersey, and the paternal grandfather was George McCracken, 
a native of New York and an early settler of Hackettstown, where he fol- 
lowed the tanner's trade. 

George McCracken by personal experience knows what it is to work on 
the farm. In his boyhood he assisted in the labors of field and meadow 
through the summer months, and in the winter season pursued his studies, 
being indebted to the public-school system for his educational privileges. 
Not wishing to follow the plow and garner the grain as a means of liveli- 
hood, he entered the employ of E. D. Cramer, in i860, to learn the trade of 
carriage-painting, and remained with that gentleman for seven years, master- 
ing the business in every detail and becoming an expert workman. In 1868 
he formed a partnership with Nelson H. Dykeman and embarked in the 
manufacture of carriages and wagons in Hackettstown. On the ist of March, 
1870, they opened, in Dover, another establishment, under the firm name of 
Dykeman & McCracken, and continued business at both points until 1873, 
when the partnership was dissolved, Mr. Dykeman taking the business in 
Hackettstown, Mr. McCracken that in Dover. For twenty-seven years Mr. 
McCracken has been a leader in industrial circles here and is now conducting 
an extensive manufacturing plant at the corner of Bergen and Blackwell 
streets. In addition to the manufacture of all kinds of vehicles, he does all 
kinds of repair work in his line, and the house has a reputation for good 
workmanship and reliability that insures it a liberal patronage. In connec- 
tion with this enterprise Mr. McCracken carries on a coal and wood yard 
and a livery stable, the last being under the supervision of his brother. He 
is also a director in the Electric Light Works, and the Singleton Manu- 
facturing Company, and is president of Dover's well established and success- 
ful Building Association, whereby the upbuilding of the town has been 
materially advanced. 

On the 20th of March, 1867, Mr. McCracken was joined in wedlock to 
Miss Amanda R. Johnson, a daughter of Samuel Johnson, of Independence 
township, Warren county, New Jersey. During the first year of their resi- 
dence in Dover, their son, Seymour R., died, in the second year of his age. 
Their daughter, Mrs. W. H. Sullivan, resides in Morristown, and the parents 



56 BIOGRAPHICAL AJiD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

live in a pleasant cottage on Bergen street in the midst of many friends 
whose warm regard they have long shared. 

Since attaining his majority Mr. McCracken has given his political sup- 
port to the Democracy, and he has been honored with a number of positions 
of public trust, the duties of which he has ever discharged with the utmost 
fidelity. In 1886 he was elected collector of Randolph township, Morris 
county, and in 1892 was selected by the board of chosen freeholders for the 
office of county collector for a two-years term. In 1894 he was re-elected 
to that position, and in the meantime, by legislative enactment, the term 
was extended to three years. In May, 1893, he was elected mayor of Dover 
and his administration was one in which the best interests of the city 
were well conserved. He was largely instrumental in securing the location 
of the Richardson & Boynton Company's shops at this place, — an industry 
which has proved of immense benefit to the town. Much against his wish 
he was nominated for the position of state senator and made a strong can- 
vass. On the 29th of June, 1896, he was appointed postmaster of Dover 
and his administration is one creditable to the city and to himself. On the 
1st of July this was made a second-class office, so that Mr. McCracken was 
the first postmaster to be appointed directly by the president, his commission 
bearing the signature of Grover Cleveland. He takes an active interest in 
all measures pertaining to the public welfare and withholds his support and 
co-operation from no movement for the public good. Socially he is con- 
nected with Acacia Lodge, No. 20, F. & A. M., and in all the relations of 
life he is highly esteemed by those whom he has met. 



ROBERT F. ORAM. 



This resident of Dover is a self-made man who, without any extraordi- 
nary family or pecuniary advantages at the commencement of life, has battled 
earnestly and energetically, and by indomitable courage and integrity has 
achieved both character and fortune and won the highest respect. By sheer 
force of will and untiring effort he has worked his way upward and is to-day 
one of the wealthiest men of Morris county; but so honorably has his success 
been achieved and so worthily has it been used that he is thus placed above 



If Lew-is Publiahino Ca. CAiaa^s.IlI. 



^/^^(^T^z^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 57 

the envy of those who through some lack of business ability or perhaps of 
industry have not risen to the heights that he has gained. 

Mr. Oram was born in the mining districts of Cornwall, England, in 
October, 1825, and was the youngest son of Thomas and Lovedy (Ford) 
Oram. His father also was a native of Cornwall, and from his early boyhood 
was connected with the copper, tin and lead mines of that locality. The 
father of the last mentioned, Thomas Oram, was born in Wolverhampton, 
England. The mother of our subject, also a native of Cornwall, was a 
daughter of Francis Ford, a native of that county. 

During the first sixteen years of his life, Robert F. Oram remained in 
the place of his nativity and attended private school until thirteen years of 
age. He then entered upon his business career, and the following year he 
was placed in charge of an engine to assist his father, who was an assayer of 
tin, being employed in that capacity till his death. In 1845 the son bade 
adieu to friends and native land and took passage on the sailing vessel Roger 
Sherman, commanded by Captain Nicholson, and after a voyage of forty-six 
days anchor was dropped in the harbor of New York. From the metropolis 
Mr. Oram went at once to Pottsville, Pennsylvania, on the Schuylkill river, 
where, in connection with his brother Thomas, he engaged in mining and 
shipping coal to Philadelphia. The industry was then in its infancy, the 
first coal-breaker ever erected in this country having been put up at Miners- 
ville, not far from that place. 

In 1848 Mr. Oram engaged to go to Dover, New Jersey, and in connec- 
tion with his brother took charge of the Swedes' mine, which was owned by 
John Stanton, William Green, Jr., and Lyman Dennison. It was originally 
the property of Colonel Jackson, of Rockaway, and was sold to the parties 
named above in 1847. In the early part of 1848 the Mount Pleasant mine 
was purchased and placed in charge of Mr. Oram, who began operating the 
same on the i6th of August. In 1849 the company purchased the Burrell 
farm, on which was located the Orchard mine, the works of the Port Oram 
Furnace Company and the village of Port Oram. The following year the 
Mellon mine and the Beach Glen property were purchased. All of these 
properties were sold to Dudley B. Fuller and James Brown, of New York, in 
1852, and soon afterward Messrs. Fuller and Lord became the owners and 
the firm name was changed to Fuller, Lord & Company, so continuing until 
1875. 



58 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

In 1858 Mr. Oram purchased of Fuller & Lord the property on which 
the village of Port Oram now stands, and the following year began to improve 
the same. In 1859 he erected four dwelling-houses, and in connection with 
John Hance built the Port Oram store, where they opened a general stock of 
merchandise, in i860, associated with John Hill and William G. Lathrop, of 
Boonton. A year later Mr. Hill retired and the firm of Oram, Hance & 
Company commenced business. Mr. Oram was the manager of the entire 
business interests of the firm, at the same time had in charge the mining 
interests of Fuller, Lord & Company until February, 1881. In 1892 the firm 
of Oram, Hance & Company was dissolved, since which time the business has 
been conducted under the name of R. F. Oram & Company and managed by 
his son, Robert F. , Jr. Their business has grown until to-day they operate 
a general store, drug store, hardware, plumbing and tin store and extensive 
lumber and coal yards. 

In addition to his other business interests Mr. Oram is a stockholder in 
the National Union Bank of Dover, is a stockholder in the Newark Bank 
and in the First National Bank of Morristown, and is connected with the 
Traders' National Bank, of Scranton, Pennsylvania. He owns a good farm 
of one hundred and twenty-five acres, with a fine house, surrounded with 
natural scenery — no landscape gardening — and a system of water works, a 
reservoir in the mountain above being supplied by a hydraulic ram from 
a brook of pure water which runs through his park and grounds. The lawns 
are beautifully kept, and on the' whole the spot is one of the finest building 
sites in the county. Besides all the properties mentioned, Mr. Oram also 
owns about seventy-five houses in Dover, Rockaway and Port Oram. To 
enjoy life he has traveled to a considerable extent, making frequent trips to 
Europe and to his native country. 

He and his family attend the Presbyterian church. In politics he is 
independent, voting for the men whom he considers the most honest. 

Remembering his own struggle to secure a start in youth, he is ever 
ready to help young men who are willing to help themselves, and the business 
interests he has established have contributed not only to his individual pros- 
perity but have also added to the material welfare of the community. When 
he came to this county there were no railroads, and he walked from Morris- 
town to Dover. The iron industry was carried on with small forges, the 
material being hammered by hand into wagon tires, chains, anchors, etc., 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 59 

and they were carted to New York city, and goods were brought back in 
the same carts, such as pork, fish, groceries, dry goods, etc. There was 
very Httie money. 

As we think of the heights to which he has arisen, Mr. Oram's success 
seems most marvelous; yet it is but the legitimate outcome of well-directed, 
persevering and honorable efforts, of capable management and unflagging 
enterprise, qualities which may be cultivated by all and which are never 
without their fruits. 



CHARLES H. MULFORD. 



The history of this gentleman comprises references to the elements that 
are essential in the successful career of one who, unaided by wealth or influ- 
ence, starts out in life to wrest from fate a share of the necessities and com- 
forts of life. Coming from the farm to the city, he had no capital save 
energy, industry, a resolute purpose and a laudable ambition. Untrained in 
the ways of commercial life, he set to work to master all difficulties, and saw 
the obstacles in his path to success disappear before his earnest, honest 
efforts. Steadily, energetically and persistently he worked his way upward; 
no unusual elements entered into his career; fortuitous circumstances played 
no part therein, and to his own labor alone may be attributed his success. 
Such a career is certainly worthy of both commendation and emulation, for 
it is indicative of the best type of our American citizenship. 

Born at Hanover Neck, Morris county, on the 15th of September, 1822, 
Mr. Mulford comes of a patriotic ancestry that furnished its representatives 
to the colonial army in the war of the Revolution. The grandfather, Chris- 
topher Mulford, was born on Long Island, was married in 1776 to Jane Ross, 
and died in 1795. Their son, Christopher Mulford, Jr., father of our subject, 
was born in 1799, followed the occupation of farming, and died in 1882, at 
the advanced age of eighty-three years. He married Lucretia A. Hopping, 
a daughter of James Hopping. She was born in 1802 and died in 1878. 

Charles H. Mulford, the eldest of five sons, spent his childhood and 
youth in his parents' home, and in 1839 entered upon his business career in 
Morristown, at the corner of Bridge and High streets. He left the farm, 
thinking the field of commerce more attractive, and accepted a position as 
bookkeeper and salesman in the service of Laomi Moore, who carried on a 



60 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJiEALOGICAL HISTOBT. 

general mercantile business, and was also owner of a mill. In 1841 he 
entered the employ of Jason King & Company, on the west side of the park, 
where he remained for four or five years, when with the capital and business 
experience he had acquired through his own labors, he embarked in business 
on his own account. It was in the year 1846 that the firm of Condict, 
Mulford & Company was organized, carrying on business on the present site 
of D. B. McClelland's store. On the ist of September, 1850, Mr. Mulford 
established the first clothing store in Morristown, and conducted the new 
enterprise in a store which is now the office of George H. Ross & Company 
until 1861, when he removed to his new brick building at No. 2 Union Row. 
In the years 1873-4 he carried on a fancy grocery jobbing business in New 
York city, but with that intermission he continuously conducted his clothing 
store in Morristown with his sons from 1884 until 1889, when the business 
was closed out. 

Mr. Mulford was married in Morris county in 1850 to Miss Catherine H., 
daughter of Jonathan H. Smith, also a native of the county, and a grandson of a 
Scotchman, who became the founder of this branch of the family. The chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Mulford are one daughter and four sons, all in good health. 

Mr. Mulford has never been active in political affairs, but was at one 
time chosfen anrl served as treasurer of Morristown. He is connected with 
the South Street Presbyterian church, and for twelve years or more served 
as its treasurer and secretary. He is a loyal, devoted citizen, lending his 
aid and influence to all measures calculated to promote the social, educa- 
tional, material or moral welfare of the community. For a half century he 
was prominently identified with the business life of Morristown, enjoying to 
a great degree the confidence and regard of the public. He has passed the 
Psalmist's span of three-score years and ten, and now in the evening of life 
is resting, in good health, after the toil of former years, enjoying the reward 
which has crowned his labors, and which is the just crown of his work. 



JAMES P. SULLIVAN. 



This gentleman, who has been continuously connected with the grocery 
trade in Morristown for a third of a century, is one of the honored representa- 
tives of the business interests of the city, and his life demonstrates the possi- 



BIOGRJPMICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 61 

bilities that are open to young men of ambition and resolute purpose. These 
qualities have brought to him success and made him one of the substantial 
citizens of the community. 

He is one of the worthy adopted sons that the Pine Tree state has fur- 
nished to Morris county, New Jersey. His birth occurred in Portland, on 
the loth of February, 1837, ^nd on the paternal side he is of Irish lineage, 
while on the maternal side he is of old New England stock. His parents, 
William and Mary (Pierson) Sullivan, were married in Maine and from that 
state removed to Hartford, Connecticut. After a short time, however, they 
went to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where they spent their remaining days. 
When death claimed them they were laid to rest in Fairmount cemetery 
in that city. Their family numbered twelve children, but nine died in 
early life. The three who reached years of maturity were William H., of 
Philadelphia; Sarah, who is also living in that city; and James P., of this 
sketch. 

Our subject was left an orphan when about ten years of age and was 
thus thrown upon his own resources, so that in life's battles the victories he 
has won are especially creditable. Upon the death of his parents he left 
Philadelphia and secured employment with a farmer in Sussex county, New 
Jersey. He received no educational privileges after this time, but experience, 
observation and reading in later life have'made him a well informed man. 
He continued to be employed by the month, as a farm hand in Sussex county 
until 1863, when he removed to Morris county and accepted the position of 
manager of the farm of General Joseph W. Revere, in which capacity he 
served for two years, when, with the capital he had acquired through his own 
industry and frugality, he engaged in business on his own account. 

It was in 1865 that Mr. Sallivan became connected with the grocery 
trade of Morristown, and since that time he has been a leading merchant in 
his line in the city. Without interruption he has carried on the store, and 
from the beginning he has enjoyed a good business, for his honorable deal- 
ings, courteous treatment and reasonable prices enable him to win and retain 
a liberal patronage. That he has the unqualified respect and confidence of 
business men is shown by the fact that he has been honored with an election 
to the presidency of the New Jersey Grocers' Association and is also still 
serving as president of the Morris County Grocers' Association. Of the Mor- 
ris County Building & Loan Association he is president, and the sound judg- 



62 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ment and enterprise which have brought him success in mercantile lines are 
making this one of the profitable business interests of the city. 

In 1867 Mr. Sullivan was united in marriage to Miss Henrietta Mc- 
Gowan, who died in 1892, leaving one child, William Henry, who is now 
associated with his father in the grocery. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Sullivan was a Democrat until 1894, since 
which time he has supported Republican principles. He has been honored 
with local offices of public trust, having served for two years as a member of 
the city council, as alderman; as town recorder for two years; as a member 
of the Morris township committee for five years, and as mayor of the city in 
1888 and 1889. His administration was progressive and was one that 
brought general satisfaction. In the discharge of his public duties he is ever 
true and faithful, and no trust reposed in him has ever been betrayed. 
Socially Mr. Sullivan is a Master Mason, and in his religious belief he is a 
Baptist. For thirty years he has been a member of the board of trustees of 
the church; for twenty-nine years has served as church treasurer; has been a 
deacon for the past six years, and for twenty-seven years has been treasurer 
in the Sunday-school. His has been an active, useful and honorable life, 
characterized by strict fidelity to duty, by energy and activity in business, by 
a loyal citizenship and by devotion to friends and family. 



JACOB J. VREELAND. 



Prominently identified with the building interests of Morris county is 
Jacob J. Vreeland, who stands to-day among those whose well-directed 
efforts have brought to them success. Prosperity comes not to the man who 
idly waits, but to the faithful toiler whose work is characterized by sleepless 
vigilance and cheerful alacrity; and such a man is the subject of this review. 
He is also a leading representative of a family that has been connected with 
the history of the state throughout the nineteenth century. The Vreeland 
family originated in Holland, and was founded in America by three brothers, 
one of whom located at Pompton Plains, one at Newark, and the third, 
Michael, on Staten Island. The grandfather of our subject, who also bore 
the name of Jacob Vreeland, was one of the early settlers of the state, but 
the place of his residence is not definitely known. His son, Richard Vree- 




-^?:^^^'"" " 




BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 6S 

land, was born in Stonybrook, Morris county, on the 15th of June, 1810, 
and followed the shoemaker's trade in Amboy. He participated in the Civil 
war as a private of Company E, Fifteenth New Jersey Infantry, and his 
death occurred in Dover in 1894. He married Miss Catherine Dey, who 
was born at Green Pond, Morris county, in December, 18 12, and died at 
Newfoundland, Passaic county. New Jersey, in 1881. She was the daugh- 
ter of John Dey, who was born in Scotland and was brought to this coun- 
try in early childhood. 

Jacob J. Vreeland was born at Stonybrook, Morris county. New Jer- 
sey, November 2, 1839, and in his infancy was taken by his parents to New- 
foundland, where he passed the first ten years of his life, attending the sub- 
scription schools of that place and continuing his education in a private 
school in Clinton until thirteen years of age. In 1852 he accompanied his 
parents on their removal to Sparta, and from i860 until 1862 was associ- 
ated in business with his brother, who was engaged in the manufacture of 
ship anchors for river and ocean service. In the latter year he began to 
learn the carpenter's trade under the direction of E. Sanford, and in 1866 he 
came to Dover, where he secured employment with the firm of Searing 
Brothers, carpenters and builders, with whom he remained for four years. 
(He was for ten years surveyor of highways in his township.) In 1870 he 
began contracting and building on his own account in Dover, where he has 
since carried on business with gratifying success. He has built many of the 
residences and business houses that adorn the city, and in addition took the 
the contract for the erection of the opera house, naval magazine and guard- 
house at Denmark, New Jersey, a large hotel at Lake View, and numerous 
cottages and summer homes, which were built at a cost of from one to forty 
thousand dollars. Mr. Vreeland has secured a very extensive patronage, his 
thorough reliability and integrity of character, combined with his business 
capacity, inspiring the greatest confidence in all with whom he has dealings. 

In i860 Mr. Vreeland married Miss Martha Cooper, of Sparta, a daugh- 
ter of William Cooper, one of the early settlers of that town. They had one 
daughter and four sons, the former being Frances M., wife of John B. Pel- 
lett. The eldest son, Charles E., is associated with his father in business. 
He married Louise Gregory, daughter of Rev. William Gregory, of New- 
ark, and they have two children, Millie and. William. John Edward, the 
second son, is also engaged in contracting and building with his father. He 



64 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

wedded Miss Maude Marcy, daughter of John Marcy, of Greene, New 
York, and they have one son, Edward. Dr. Robert C. Vreeland, the third 
son, is a prominent dentist of Dover, who, after pursuing a full course in the 
New York College of Dental Surgery, has now engaged in practice in Dover, 
making a specialty of the higher branches of the profession. He married 
Emma E. Burchel, daughter of Jonas H. Burchel, of Dover, and they have 
two children, Robert and Leila. The Doctor is a pronounced Republican, 
active in party work, has served on the town committee and for two years 
was a member of the city council. He is also prominent in fire department 
matters and was formerly foreman of the Protection Hook & Ladder Com- 
pany, of Dover. He is also a member of the board of trade. Jacob J. Vree- 
land, Jr., the youngest son of the family, pursued a special course in the 
architectural department of the University of Pennsylvania, completing his 
studies in 1896. The following year he began business in Dover, where he 
is meeting with good success. He married Miss EUaAbbie Tucker, daughter 
of Matthew Tucker, of Dover. She is a great-grandniece of the noted states- 
man, Daniel Webster. 

In his political faith the subject of this sketch is a stanch Republican, 
and for six years served as a member of the common council. In the spring 
of 1 896 he was appointed by that body to the office of freeholder, and in 1 897 
he was elected for a two-years term, so that he is now the incumbent. He 
was largely instrumental in organizing the fire department, has served in all 
its offices and for years was its chief. He is a recognized leader in the ranks 
of his party, usually serves as delegate to the county and other conven- 
tions and has been a member of the Republican town committee. He 
has served as vice-president of the Dover board of trade and is a leader in 
thought and action, recognized as one of the most prominent and highly 
respected citizens of Dover. 



THOMAS V. JOHNSON. 



The subject of this review, Thomas Vail Johnson, was born in Littleton, 
Morris county. New Jersey, on the 8th of October, 1809, and was the fifth 
son of Mahlon Johnson. He was named for his grandfather, Thomas Vail. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 65 

who was a squatter on land in Morris county, and was the ancestor of all 
the Vails in this countj'. 

In early manhood Thomas Vail Johnson was married and located in 
Newark, New Jersey, where he made his home for many years. He there 
engaged in merchandising on an extensive scale, handling various articles of 
commerce, and also dealing in grain, doing both a wholesale and retail busi- 
ness. He was a man of resourceful business ability, whose efforts were by 
no means confined to one line of endeavors, was very energetic, progressive 
■and far-sighted, and his capable management and thorough reliability in all 
business matters won success and the confidence of all with with whom he 
came in contact. At one time he owned a steamboat and four sailing ves- 
sels, plying between New York city and Newark. In 1846 he was associated 
with ex-Governor Markis L. Ward and others in the organization of the 
American Mutual Fire & Marine Insurance Company, which began business 
without any capital; but the names of Mr. Johnson, Mr. Ward and other 
well known and reliable business men were on the notes of the company to 
cover any loss by fire. To-day the business is still carried on, under the 
name of the American Fire Insurance Compan}^ which has a capital of over 
one million dollars. Later Mr. Johnson purchased a farm near his birth- 
place, — Littleton, Morris county, — where he lived for many years; but for 
•several years prior to his demise he was a resident of Morristown. He there 
passed away March 29, 1879. 

Mr. Johnson was ever a public-spirited and progressive citizen, active 
in reform work, especially in the line of slavery abolition and of temper- 
ance work. He did all in his power to create an abolition sentiment in 
his community, even at a time when it was dangerous to hold such views. 
On one occasion, at a public meeting, he exhibited a lash used in the south 
for whipping negroes, and this so angered the friends of slavery in that 
locality that he was threatened with mob violence. His home became a 
station on the "underground railroad," and he personally conducted many 
a poor negro on his way to freedom. So bitter became the opposition to him 
on account of these humanitarian acts that he often had to have a guard 
around his house to save it from destruction at the hands of the pro-slavery 
men. Mr. Johnson, however, was a gentleman of firm convictions, and 
neither fear nor favor could turn him from a course which he believed to be 

right. He was a friend to the poor and needy and no one who sought his 
5 



66 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

aid was ever turned from his door empty-handed. His life was the exemplifica- 
tion of a true Christian spirit. In his early life he belonged to the Presby- 
terian church, but afterward became an active worker in the Congregational ■ 
church and contributed largely to the building of the house of worship of 
that denomination in Newark. In many other ways he assisted in promot- 
ing the best interests of the city, and was far in advance of the times both in 
humanitarian ideas and business principles. At one time he purchased a farm 
near Newark, and laid off streets and town lots. 

Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to a daughter of Jonathan Cory, one 
of the prominent citizens of Newark at that time. She survived her husband 
a number of years, passing away in 1892. They reared nine children: J. 
Cory, of Bloomfield, New Jersey: Francis C, deceased; Thomas Vail, a resi- 
dent of Madison; Henry M., of Morristown, New Jersey; Edward Payton, 
deceased; Martha F. , of Newark; Mary E., of Morristown; Sarah F. C, 
deceased; and Anna Vail, of Morristown. 



THOMAS V. JOHNSON, Jr. 

One of New Jersey's native sons, Thomas Vail Johnson, now a resident 
of Madison, was born in the city of Newark, November 3, 1840, and bears 
his father's name. He was educated under the direction of his uncle, John 
Henry Johnson, at Blair Hall, of Blairstown, New Jersey, and in Newark. He 
remained upon the home farm near Littleton and assisted in its cultivation 
until twenty-two years of age, when he entered the employ of L. P. Howell 
& Company, of Newark, manufacturers of leather. For twenty-one years 
he remained with that house, during which time he thoroughly mastered the 
business in every department and detail. He then embarked in a similar 
enterprise on his own account, being the senior member of the firm of 
Thomas V. Johnson & Company. They have a large plant in New York 
city where they are engaged in the manufacture of furniture and carriage 
leather on an extensive scale, their patronage coming from all sections of the 
United States. The industry has grown to very large proportions, and under 
the capable management of its president, T. V. Johnson, has become a very 
profitable concern. 

Mr. Johnson married Miss Alexana Mulford, of Parsippany, Morris 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 67 

county, a daughter of Alexander Mulford. They have one daughter, Mary 
Augusta, who resides with her parents at their beautiful home on the Cres- 
cent road, which was built by Mr. Johnson in 1893. He is deeply inter- 
ested in the welfare of Madison, and withholds his support and co-operation 
from no movement or measure for the public good. He exercises his right 
of franchise in behalf of the Republican party, but has never sought or 
desired office for himself. He finds that his time and energies are amply 
engrossed by his business interests, and by his enterprise and executive 
power he has achieved a success which numbers him among the substantial 
citizens of Morris county. 



ROBERT F. ORAM, Jr. 



One of the ablest and best known business men of Morris county is 
Robert F. Oram, Jr., of Port Oram, who was born at the old family home- 
stead at the foot of the mountain between Dover and Rockaway. The day 
of his birth was December 12, 1861, and his parents were Robert F. and 
Hannah (Williams) Oram, the former a native of Cornwall, England, the 
latter of Wales. His early boyhood days were passed on the old homestead, 
and in the district schools of the neighborhood he acquired his elementary 
education, which was supplemented by study in Providence, Rhode Island, 
and in the Flushing Institute, Long Island, New York, where his school days 
were ended. 

Putting aside his text-books to learn the more difficult lessons in the 
practical school of experience, he found that his first task was the mastery 
of the duties of a clerkship in the store of Oram, Hance & Company, at 
Port Oram, a large department store in which an extensive business was 
carried on. With great thoroughness and perseverance he determined to 
become familiar with every detail of the business, and his close application 
and energy at that time was the elemental strength of his character, shadow- 
ing forth a successful future. In 1892 the firm of Oram, Hance & Company 
was dissolved, Mr. Oram purchasing the interests of former partners. The 
business is now conducted under the firm name of Robert F. Oram & Com- 
pany, our subject being the active member of the firm. The firm operates 
a large dry-goods and grocery store, drug store, hardware, plumbing and tin 



68 BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

store, and extensive lumber and coal yards, which are located near the canal 
and the two railroads, the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western and the Jersey 
Central, and thus the best shipping facilities are afforded. 

From this it will be seen that the attention of Mr. Oram has by no means 
been limited to one line of enterprise, for he is a man of broad capabilities. 
He to-day enjoys the reward of his painstaking and conscientious work. By 
his energy, perseverance and fine business ability he has been enabled to 
secure an ample fortune. Systematic and methodical, his sagacity, keen 
discrimination and sound judgment have made him one of the prosperous 
merchants of the city. 

In December, 1885, Mr. Oram was united in marriage to Miss Lidie 
Neighbour, daughter of Hon. James H. Neighbour, a prominent lawyer of 
Dover, New Jersey, where Mrs. Oram was born and spent her early girlhood 
days. They now have two children, Helen and Robert Maxwell. Theirs is 
a delightful home constructed according to the most modern architectural 
designs, while the interior furnishings indicate the refined and cultured taste 
of the inmates. In his political faith Mr. Oram is a stanch Republican, and 
on the ist of January, 1897, was appointed postmaster of Port Oram. The 
progressive and beneficial interests of the city find in him a warm friend, and 
he withholds his support from no movement or measure tending to promote 
the public welfare. In manner he is pleasant and genial, in disposition 
is kindly, and the high regard in which he is uniformly held is well merited. 



NATHAN L. BRIGGS. 



Mr. Briggs, who is now serving his second term as mayor of Boonton, 
was born in Wareham, Plymouth county, Massachusetts, on the 4th of Jan- 
uary, 1845, his parents being Job M. and Rebecca (Holmes) Briggs. The 
father was a native of Nantucket, and was a sea captain, which vocation he 
followed for many years. He and his wife both departed this life in Massa- 
chusetts. 

Nathan L. Briggs was reared in the city of his nativity until 1862, 
receiving his literary education in the public and night schools, until Sep- 
tember, 1862, when he came to Boonton and found employment in the 
Boonton Nail Works, with which he continued until the closing of the enter- 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 69 

prise, in 1876, when tie went to Nortliumberland, Pennsylvania, as superin- 
tendent of Van Alens Nail Works, filling that position for the ensuing ten 
years, when, his health failing, he resigned and returned to Boonton. 

In 1889 Mr. Briggs became one of the organizers of the Boonton Build- 
ing & Loan Association, in which he has since held the office of president. 
He has been active in promoting the interests of the association, and he is 
also a director in the Boonton National Bank. 

Politically Mr. Briggs is an energetic supporter of the Republican 
party, served as a trustee of the village of Boonton, was a member of the 
committee that effected its incorporation as a city, and for two terms has 
held the office of mayor, bringing to that preferment a high order of intelli- 
gence and executive ability and discharging the duties pertaining thereto 
with circumspection and to the fullest satisfaction of the public. Socially he 
is affiliated with Arcania Lodge, No. 60, Free and Accepted Masons. 

Mr. Briggs solemnized his marriage in 1867, being in that year united 
to Miss Amelia C. Norris, a daughter of James S. Norris, of Boonton. He 
and his wife are both faithful attendants of the Presbyterian church and con- 
tribute liberally to its support. They are popular in the social circles of 
their home city and enjoy the warm regard of their numerous friends. 



THE VOORHIS FAMILY. 



^ This well known family, which is so largely represented in eastern New 
Jersey, originated in Holland. It has been determined by years of careful 
research that the Voorhis, Van Voorhis, Voorhees and the Van Vorhees 
families all spring from the same stock and that their original home was in 
the province of Drenthe, town of Ruinen, Holland. They lived in close 
proximity to the village of Hees, as an analysis of the name discloses. The 
English of "van" is "before" and "voor" means village, while "Hees" 
is the name of the village, so that we have Van Voorhees, meaning before 
the village of Hees. In order to distinguish between people from that locality 
and other districts Van Voorhees was invariably added to the Christian name 
•of the individual. It was then customary in Holland to form names similar 
to the manner now in vogue in Sweden and Norway, the surname of the son 
being an index to the Christian name of the father. 



70 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTOET. 

The first of the family of whom we have record was Coert Albertse of 
" Voorhees, " whose son Steven Coerte, of before the village of Hees or Van 
Vorhees, was born in 1600, and in April, 1660, at sixty years of age, came to 
America, locating at Flathead, Long Island. Among the children of Albert 
Stevense was a son, William Albertse Van Voorhees, who was born in 1694, 
and was the father of Petrus Albertse, born in 1706. Another branch of the 
family is descended from Steven Coerte, who had a son Jan Sevense, who 
was born in 1652 and married on Long Island. He was the father of Albert 
Stevense Van Voorhees, who emigrated to Hackensack, New Jersey. One 
of his sons was Albert Petrus Van Voorhees, who removed from Areola to 
Preakness, New Jersey. Since that time the spelling of the name has under- 
gone a change, being simplified to Voorhis, and for this record of the family 
we are indebted to James Voorhis, of Pompton, New Jersey. 



MORRIS COUNTY TUTTLES. 

The Tuttles af Morris county, are mainly descendants^ of the brothers, 
Timothy and Joseph Tuttle, who bought lands in this section about 1725, 
and removed to Hanover in 1733. They were sons of Stephen Tuttle, of 
Woodbridge, New Jersey, who was the grandson of William Tuttle, one of 
the founders of the New Haven colony in 1639, his father, Joseph Tuttle, 
of New Haven, being ^the. sixth child of William Tuttle. The brothers, 
Timothy and Joseph, were prominent in Newark for a number of years before 
their removal to Hanover. 

Joseph Tuttle, the youngest of the brothers, was the purchaser of a tract 
of one thousand two hundred and fifty acres in 1734, at Hanover Neck, on 
the Whippany and Passaic rivers, near their confluence. In the deed he is 
called " Joseph Tuttle, blacksmith." He was also a justice of the peace, a 
colonel of militia and a deacon of the church. He died in 1789, aged ninety- 
one. His tomb in the old Whippany graveyard is inscribed with a poetical 
epitaph from the pen of Rev. Dr. Green. 

Of Joseph Tuttle's eleven children, Ruth married David Kitchell; Sam- 
uel married Rachel Ford, and Moses married Jane Ford, — daughters of 
Colonel Jacob Ford, of Morristown; Joseph married Jemima Haines and was 




C?^^C>::>^^ i^ '^^Cplr^^^^ 




5^ev. ^ode/iA 3^. J/ult/^. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJ{EALOGICAL HISTORY. 71 

the grandfather of Silas Tuttle, of Whippany, and Samuel Tuttle, of Little- 
ton; and David married Sarah Coe, and was the grandfather of John O. 
Tuttle, of Hanover. Timothy Tuttle, the elder of the brothers, was born in 
Woodbridge, and was also a justice of the peace in Hanover, and died in 
1754, aged fifty-eight. Of his family of seven children, Daniel resided in 
Hanover, and Thomas settled in Littleton, where his granddaughter Eunice 
married ^^'illiam Rowe. Daniel Tuttle was the father of fifteen children, 
and with five of his sons enlisted in the army of the Revolution. His son, 
Captain William Tuttle, married Tempe Wicke, and was the father of Mrs. 
Joseph Warren Blachley, of Morristown. Another son, Joseph Tuttle, mar- 
ried Esther Parkhurst, resided at New Vernon, and was the father of William 
Tuttle, of Newark, for many years a prominent citizen, and founder and pro- 
prietor of the Newark Daily Advertiser. Joseph Tuttle was also the father 
of Rev. Jacob Tuttle, who married Elizabeth Ward, of Bloomfield, and who 
was the father of the brothers, Samuel L. and Joseph F. Tuttle, ministers, 
who were widely known in the county. 

The elder of these. Rev. Samuel Lawrence Tuttle, was born in Bloom- 
field, August 25, 181 5, educated in Princeton College and Auburn Seminary, 
was pastor of the Presbyterian church of Caldwell, Essex county, from 1841 
to 1849, and in the service of the American Bible Society until 1853, when 
he became the pastor of the Presbyterian church of Madison. Here, as in 
his former fields, his work was attended with marked success, and he 
became greatly endeared, not only to his own church, but to all classes in 
the community, who recognized in him a man of great public spirit and influ- 
ence. His work in behalf of the town in attracting the attention of New Yorkers 
to its beauties, and also in opening the village to improvements and financial 
prosperity, can never be forgotten. He did much also to collect and preserve 
the interesting historical details connected with old Bottle Hill, and was an 
enthusiastic student of the Revolutionary sites and recollections with which 
the place is so richly endowed. His notes are valuable authorities upon 
these subjects. He resigned the pastorate in 1862, greatly regretted by his 
people, and, after four years' service as assistant secretary of the American 
Bible Society, died in Madison, April 16, 1866. 

The younger of these distinguished brothers, Rev. Joseph Farrand Tut- 
tle, D. D., was born in Bloomfield, March 12, 1818, and removed with his 
father's family to Ohio in 1832; was educated at Marietta College and Lane 



72 BIOGBJPEICAL AJ^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Seminary, and was pastor of the Presbyterian church of Delaware, Ohio, 
in 1846. In 1847 he became the pastor of the Presbyterian church of 
Rockaway, New Jersey, and not only were his labors as a pastor crowned 
with abundant success but he became widely known throughout Morris county 
by his influence and public spirit in all things affecting the interests of the 
people, and also as a historian of this region, collecting and publishing facts 
and reminiscences of Colonial and Revolutionary times which will always be 
of the greatest value. He is looked upon at present as the father of Morris 
county history and an unquestioned authority upon the subjects comprised 
in that history. In 1862 he resigned the pastorate to become the president 
of Wabash College, at Crawfordsville, Indiana, and for thirty years remained 
at the head of that institution. During this time his work in behalf of the 
college was of the greatest moment. He found it poor and struggling with 
difficulties, but under his efforts it was endowed with nearly a million dollars, 
raised principally by his personal exertions, and was enlarged and elevated 
until it is recognized as one of the important institutions of the west and a 
decided feature of the state of Indiana. After the longest term of service 
yet filled by any American college president, he resigned, in 1892. He is 
still living, an honored resident of Crawfordsville, and revered as a father 
by the officers and students of the college which his labors have so greatly 
blessed. 

[These notes were prepared by William Parkahurst Tuttle, of Madison, 
the oldest son of Rev. Samuel Lawrence Tuttle. He has been engaged in 
the banking business in New York city and was a member of the stock 
exchange many years. He has always been interested in the genealogical 
and historical matters pertaining to Madison and Morris counties, and is well 
and prominently known as one of the best citizens of the place.] 



AZARIAH HORTON. 



Rev. Azariah Horton', the first American missionary and the first pastor 
of the Presbyterian church of Madison, formerly Bottle Hill, was a native of 
Southold, Long Island, graduated at Yale College, New Haven, in the year 
1735, and was licensed to preach and ordained as a missionary among the 



BIOGBJPEICAL AJ^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 73 

Indians by the Presbytery of New York in 1741. He had been called to this 
service by a number of clergymen of New York and vicinity; among them 
being Rev. Ebenezer Pemberton, of New York, Rev. Aaron Burr, of Newark, 
and Rev. Jonathan Edwards, of Northampton, Massachusetts, who were 
organized as a commission respresenting the " Society in Scotland for Propa- 
gating Christian Knowledge," and who proceeded to select two men who 
should devote themselves to this work. The first chosen was Mr. Horton 
and the second was David Brainerd. 

From the tenth volume of the works of President Edwards, Editor's 
Advertisement, Brown's History of Missions, vol. 2, pp. 480, 481, and Gillies' 
Historical Collection, vol. i, p. 448, we learn that Mr. Horton was directed 
in August, 1741, to Long Island, "at the east end of which there are two 
small towns of Indians; and from the east to west end of the island lesser 
companies settled at a few miles distance from one another for the space of 
more than a hundred miles." Among these Indians he labored successfully 
for a number of years. His home at that time was in Shinnecock, about 
two miles west of Southampton, Long Island, in which last place he married 
a young woman residing there of the name of Eunice Foster. In addition to 
his labors on Long Island he preached among the Indians at Wyoming and 
the forks of the Delaware, where he did much to prepare the way for Rev. 
David Brainerd, who had just been set apart to this work. He continued 
his work as a missionary until the year 175 1, when he became the pastor of 
the Presbyterian church of South Hanover, located at Bottle Hill, now Madi- 
son, New Jersey. 

The following extract from a letter from Rev. Jonathan Edwards to the 
Rev. John Erskine in Scotland, explains the reason of his retirement from the 
missionary field. Mr. Edwards says: '■ With respect to the proceedings of 
the correspondents, they have dismissed Mr. Horton from his mission of 
Long Island, and he is about to settle in a congregation in New Jersey. He 
was dismissed by reason of his very much failing of employment, many of 
the class of Indians to whom he used to preach having dwindled away, by 
death or dispersion, and there being but little prospect of success among 
others that remain, and some being so situated that they may conveniently be 
taken care of by other ministers." 

The "Congregation in New Jersey," referred to above, was the village 
of Bottle Hill, now known as Madison. To this place he came as a candi- 



74 BIOGRJPHICAL AXB GEXEALOGICJ.L HISTORY. 

date for settlement in 1751, and during the latter part of tfiat year he was 
regularly installed as the pastor of the church. 

His salary was only seventy pounds per annum, and in order to help in 
the support of the large family, Mrs. Horton erected a small store on the 
corner of the roads now known as Kings road and Green Village road, and 
managed it with such thrift and success as not only to provide for the educa- 
tion of her children, but also to lay aside a sum sufficient for the purchase of 
a small farm. She appears to have been a very well educated and energetic 
lady, and in every respect a worthy helpmeet of the excellent pioneer 
pastor. 

After laboring in Bottle Hill most faithfully and successfully for over 
twenty-five years, Mr. Horton resigned the pastorate, in October, 1776, and 
went to live with his son Foster Horton, in the neighboring village of Chatham. 
He was there residing when about three months later the Revolutionary 
army under General Washington, immediately after the victories of Trenton 
and Princeton, came into winter quarters in Bottle Hill. Within a few 
weeks the small-pox began to prevail among the troops and citizens. Mr. 
Horton looked with a compassionate eye upon his flock, as yet without a 
shepherd, as well as the patriotic soldiers who were falling victims to the 
scourge. With the devotion of a true minister and patriot he threw him- 
self again into the work of a pastor, ministering to the dying and performing, 
the last sad offices over the dead, thus exposing himself to the contagion, to 
which he fell a victim. He was seized with the disease and died March 27, 
1777. The event excited the most painful regrets in the minds of all classes 
of the community, and b}' all it was regarded as that of a venerable father. 
He was buried in the cemetery, just bsck of the old pulpit where he had so 
long preached. Over his grave was erected a horizontal slab of free-stone, 
resting upon six uprights of the same material, the tomb being of a costly 
description, quite unusual at that time and indicating a degree of thought 
and interest among his people and perhaps among the officers of the army 
which called for the erection of so massive and beautiful a memorial. It 
may still be seen upon the summit of the cemetery hill in the borough 
of Madison, and upon it may be traced the following inscription: " In 
memory of the Rev. Azariah Horton, for twenty-five years pastor of this 
church: died March 27, 1777, aged sixty-two years." 

About a year and a half after Mr. Horton's death, his wife, Mrs. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ{D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 75 

Eunice Horton, also died, at the residence of her son, Foster, in Chatham, 
and she was buried b)' the side of the remains of her husband. Her name 
also was inscribed upon the slab, her age being tifty-six years. 

Of Mr. Horton's sons, Jonathan was a physician and Caleb was killed 
while serving his country as a soldier in the Revolutionarj' army. Foster 
kept a store in Chatham and accumulated a considerable property, a part of 
which at his death he bequeathed to the general assembly of the Presby- 
terian church. Azariah, the third son, graduated at the College of New 
Jersey, and subsequently kept a store in Bottle Hill. Four daughters also 
survived him. Hannah married Lewis Woodruff, of Elizabethtown, and on 
his death she married Captain Phinney and died July 24, 1844, eighty- 
seven years old, leaving most of her property to the First Presbyterian 
church in Elizabeth. Mrs. Phinney was highly esteemed as a Christian by 
her old pastor, Rev. John McDowell, D. D., as well as his successor, Rev. 
Nicholas Murray, D. D. As a testimony' of their regard for her as a liberal 
donor to the church, the trustees, when they enlarged the church edifice, 
placed in the exterior of the north wall of the building a marble slab with 
the following inscription: "In memory of Hannah Phinney, late widow of 
Capt. Lewis Woodruff, and daughter of Rev. Azariah Horton, who died July 
24, 1844, aged eighty-seven years. She was a liberal donor of and to the 
church, and one of its most zealous members for nearly sixty years. Blessed 
are the dead who die in the Lord." 

Mary married Jacob Morrell, a resident of Chatham, living next door to 
Foster Horton. She died at the age of thirty-three years, about three years 
after her father's decease, and her name may also be found on his monu- 
ment. The Morrell homestead just across the street from the Presbyterian 
church, remains in a good state of preservation. Here General Washington 
was frequently entertained. The Rev. Theodore L. Cuyler, D. D., of Brook- 
lyn, New York, is a great-grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Morrell, also General 
James H. Baker, of Minnesota, and Rev. Clarence Hills, of Indiana; and 
Rev. H. C. Weakley, D. D., of the Methodist Episcopal church, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, is their great-great-grandson. Charlotte, the third daughter, it is 
believed, died unmarried, and the fourth, Eunice, married a Mr. Tuttle, of 
Hanover Neck, or Whippany. 

[The above sketch was furnished by William Parkahurst Tuttle.] 



76 BIOGRJPHICdL AjYD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

REV. ALBERT BARNES. 

The subject of this memoir was one of the early clergymen of his church 
in Morris county. He was ordained and installed February 8, 1S25, and 
dismissed June 8, 1830. Mr. Barnes graduated at Hamilton College, Clin- 
ton, New York, in 1820. His theological studies were pursued at Princeton. 
This was Mr. Barnes' first pastorate, and to his Master's work here he conse- 
crated all his powers. His sermons were close, pungent, discriminating and 
pointed, making no compromises with sin, and fearlessly uttered. The 
greatest commotion was excited in the early part of his ministry by his 
decided and unflinching course on temperance. The great work was begin- 
ning to occupy the thoughts of many. Here he found drinking customs in 
vogue and distilleries dotted all over the parish. Within the limit of his 
pastoral charge there were nineteen places where ardent spirits were made 
and twent.y where they were sold. To arrest these evils that are ever asso- 
ciated with this vice, and remove if possible the curse from the community, 
he early called the attention of the people to the subject by a series of 
sermons in which he appealed to their reason, conscience and religion, and 
sought to lead them to an abandonment of social drinking usages, and of the 
places where intoxicating drinks were manufactured and sold. Some engaged 
in the traffic were first indignant at his interference and radical measures, 
and after listening to his discourse determined never again to be present to 
listen to another; but at the time of the delivery of the next sermon they 
were in their places anxious to hear what he would say, and at last so con- 
vinced were they of the injury they were doing to the morals of the place 
and the happiness of families that soon seventeen of the distilleries were 
closed and not long after his departure the fires of the other two went out. 

Here also commenced that S3'Stem of early rising and literary labor 
which resulted in his well known commentaries of the Bible. He was the 
author of several very elaborate and scholarly theological and religious works, 
but he was most noted as the author of one of the best commentaries on the 
Bible ever written, briefly called "Barnes' Notes," of which more than a 
million volumes were sold prior to 1872. He devoted the hours from four 
to nine o'clock in the morning to this work. Here also was preached and 
published the sermon called "The Way of Salvation," which was greatly 
instrumental in his being called to the First church of Philadelphia, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJYEALOGICAL HISTORT. 77 

which from its statements in regard to certain doctrines led to discussion, 
opposition, censure, trial and finally to the division of the Presbyterian 
church into the old school and new school. 

No man has left his impress upon his congregation more than Mr. 
Barnes. He came to Morris county in his youthful vigor, and God largely 
owned his labors, and few ministers have had a more attached people than 
his parishioners, who loved him for his excellencies, revered him for his piety 
and have follqwed his after life with undeviating interest. 

He was installed pastor over the First Presbyterian church of Philadel- 
phia on the 25th day of June, 1830, where he remained to his death, Decem- 
ber 24, 1870. 



DAVID YOUNG. 



He whose name initiates this review is manager of the Dover Electric 
Light Company, member of the common council and one of the enterprising 
citizens of Dover. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, on the 8th of Feb- 
ruary, 1846, his parents being William L. and Mary (McNaught) Young, both 
of whom were natives of Ireland and emigrated from that country to Amer- 
ica shortly after their marriage, locating in Brooklyn, New York. There the 
father engaged in the baking and confectionery business until 1847, when he 
moved with his family to Dover, established a bakery and conducted the 
same until his death, in 1875. 

David Young received his early education in the public schools of Dover, 
later attended the private academy of William A. Styles, at Deckertown 
and completed his studies in Mount Retired Seminary, in the same place. 
In 1862, at the age of sixteen years, he offered his services in the defence of 
his country and enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Seventieth New 
Jersey Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel J. P. Ivor, the brigade being in 
command of Major Corcoran. He thus gained the distinction of being one of 
the youngest soldiers in the war from New Jersey. The regiment of which 
he was a member achieved considerable renown, participating in all the bat- 
tles with the Army of the Potomac, in Hancock's Second Corps, from 1862 
until the close of hostilities. Mr. Young was severely wounded in front of 
Petersburg, Virginia, and was removed to a hospital, later being transferred 



78 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

to Schuyler Hospital, at Schuyler, New York, where he remained until he 
recovered from his injuries, then rejoined his regiment, with which he remained 
until the surrender of Lee at Appomattox', finally taking part in the grand 
review at Washington, in 1865. He entered the army as a private and when 
discharged, in July, 1865, he was acting sergeant major of his regiment, and 
the story of his three-years service as a soldier is as thrilling as it is 
patriotic. 

After returning to Dover Mr. Young assisted his father for some time 
and then went west, spending nearly ten years in Illinois, Iowa and Missouri, 
where he was identified with the grain business until 1875, when, upon the 
death of his father, he returned to Dover and with his brother continued in 
the bakery business, subsequently purchasing the latter's interests and con- 
ducting the business alone. When the Dover Electric Light Company was 
organized he was made its manager and still retains that position, discharg- 
ing the duties thereof with fidelity and intelligence. 

In his political adherency Mr. Young supports the Republican party on 
state and national issues and he always takes an active part in all the public 
affairs of his home city, as well as of the county. He served as a member of 
the city council for two terms and in the spring of 1897 he became a candi- 
date for mayor, but was defeated by his opponent, Mr. George Pierson, the 
Democratic candidate, by the narrow margin of thirty-seven votes. In 
November of the same year Mr. Young defeated the same gentleman for the 
office of surrogate by a majority of over five hundred. 

Touching upon his social relations we may state that Mr. Young is a 
popular member of Acacia Lodge, No. 20, Free and Accepted Masons; the 
Royal Arcanum; and James McDavitt Post, No. 54, Grand Army of the 
Republic, in which he has rendered valuable service. 

Mr. Young celebrated his marriage in 1871, when he was united to Miss 
Frances Leach, of Illinois, and they are the parents of one daughter, Margaret. 



VINCENT CLASSE VAN SCHAL-KWYCK BOISAUBIN. 

This prominent citizen, born in the parish of Port Louis, island of 
Guadeloupe, French West Indies, April, 1755, died at his residence near 
Morristown, New Jersey, in June, 1834. 




^^O Cyf 'XJ^-<y(t.^t^l/y^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 7& 

Rev. Father Dutertre, an eminent divine and author, in his invaluable 
history of the French West India islands (Histoire des Antilles), has traced 
the history of the island of Guadeloupe from its first settlement in the 
year 1625, under French auspices, to the year 1667, and since that time Des- 
salles and other well known writers have completed the narrative of events 
occurring in the Antilles down to more modern times. We learn from them 
the great hardships these colonists suffered, of their long and terrible wars 
with the native Caribs, how, after many years, those savages were finally 
subdued, and how, in 1674, the island of Guadeloupe was made a colony of 
France, during the reign of Louis XIV. From this time the colonists took 
part in all the great wars waged by the mother country, from which they suf- 
fered severely. Valiant and successful resistance was made by them against 
the attacks of the English in the years 1666, 1691 and 1703, and during most 
of this time they contended single-handed against this formidable foe. 
France, being so engrossed in her vast continental wars, was unable to ren- 
der her colony material assistance, owing to which and other causes the 
island capitulated in 1759 to Great Britain, and remained a British colony 
until the year 1763. After throwing of^ the British 3'oke, in the war of 1794 
they were again captured by their old enemy, who, however, in June of the 
same year was expelled by the colonists from their beloved soil, under the 
leadership of officers sent by the French national convention. In the year 
1 8 10, England was again victorious, holding possession until the treaty of 
1 81 3, when the island was ceded to Sweden. In 1816 the French general, 
Boyer de Peyreleau, obtained a footing in the island when, negotiations inter- 
vening, the English withdrew, from which time the island has remained a 
colony of France. 

This brief rcsuuic of the severe trials and sufferings of this brave people 
is given to show in what heroic mold this valiant race was cast, and how, 
almost single-handed, they defended their country, contending against one of 
the most powerful nations of the world, and how, at last, they secured their 
colonial independence; and furthermore to show that it was from such heroic 
ancestors that the subject of this sketch was immediately descended. Also, 
Mr. Boisaubin was of good old Dutch stock, his father being a Van Schal- 
Kwyck, a lineal descendant of the Van Schal-Kwycks of the town of that 
name (the family ancestral home), situate in the province of Utrecht, Hol- 
land. In 1630 the Baron Van Schal-Kwyck, with his followers and many 



80 BIOGRAPHICAL A^''D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

other compatriots, was banished from his native country for reasons poHtical 
and religious. He found refuge in Brazil, where for several years he and 
his fellow countrymen enjoyed peace and prosperity. War having been de- 
clared between Portugal and Holland, the refugees were again obliged to 
flee, and in their own vessels sailed for the French Antilles. Dutertre thus 
alludes to the arrival of the Hollanders in the island of Guadeloupe: 

"In the beginning of the 3'ear 1654 the Hollanders who had taken pos- 
session of Brazil were in turn driven out by the Portuguese, who it seems 
had prior claims to that country in that they were the first settlers. These 
exiles, embarking in their own vessels, sought asylum in the island of Mar- 
tinique. Duparquet, the governor of that island, profoundly touched by the 
misfortunes of the exiles, was disposed to permit the landing of the unfortu- 
nates, but through the false representations of ignorant and prejudiced advis- 
ers, who represented these people to be the offscouring of the Jews of the 
United Provinces of Holland, refused them permission to land. Thereupon 
they sailed for the neighboring island of Guadeloupe, where the then Gover- 
nor Houel received them most hospitably, and soon thereafter their immense 
wealth was of great and lasting benefit to the island. Duparquet, later, on 
learning all this, was greatly distressed and soundly berated his advisers, who 
had given him such bad counsels. It is solely owing to these exiles that the 
great industries of the island are due, for they brought with them from Brazil 
the sugar cane which was successfully cultivated by them in the island, 
whence it was afterward introduced throughout all the islands of the Antilles. 
They also introduced and manufactured earthenware, proving also a great 
industry." 

The same author also relates that it was a Baron Van Schal-Kwyck 
who led the exiles from Brazil and was most prominent among them in their 
new home. Mr. Boisaubin therefore came naturally by the great qualities 
of mind and heart of which he gave such ample proof in after years, possess- 
ing in an eminent degree the sturdy honesty, energy and perseverance of the 
Hollander, as well as the martial ardor, elevated principles, unflinching 
loyalty, polished manners and courteous bearing of the Frenchman. 

Mr. Boisaubin was born in the year above stated and at the age of seven 
was sent to Paris for his education, after the completion of which, at the age 
of seventeen, he was enrolled as a member of the famous Garde de Corps of 
King Louis XVI, which was composed of the nobility only, being commanded 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEJS^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 81 

by the Duke of Luxembourg. He served therein for sixteen years, attaining 
the grade of first lieutenant. Having obtained leave of absence for the pur- 
pose of visiting his estates in the island of Guadeloupe, he happened there 
when the French Revolution, with its attending horrors, broke out. Its 
emissaries reaching the island, Mr. Boisaubin, being a well known and devoted 
royalist, to save his life, was obliged to flee. Hastily gathering what valu- 
ables he could, he took passage, with his family and body servants, on an 
American vessel bound for the United States. His parting with his slaves, 
some twelve hundred in number, was most affecting. Having been to them 
a kind and protecting master, they were greatly attached to him and wished 
to follow him and share his fallen fortunes. As the vessel on which he was 
to sail was lifting anchor, a negro was discovered in the water alongside. 
Mr. Boisaubin recognized him as one of his slaves; the faithful creature, wish- 
ing to join his master, swam three miles from shore to gain the ship! Mr. 
Boisaubin, in the kindness of his heart, was unable to refuse the appeals of 
the devoted black, and brought him to the United States. 

Morristown, in New Jersey, being a town well known to most French- 
men, by reason of the reports of travelers, and of the French officers who 
had served with Washington, with many of whom Mr. Boisaubin had been 
acquainted in France, he determined to make that place his home, which he 
eventually did, purchasing a tract of land midway between Morristown and 
Bottle Hill (now Madison). Here he settled and began the life which he 
ever after maintained, that of a plain Jersey farmer. The mercenaries of the 
Revolution having seized upon his estates, he found himself impoverished 
and was obliged to earn his living in the same ways as did his farmer neigh- 
bors. Upon his arrival in this democratic country he dropped his titles to 
nobility, and, adopting the name of one of his plantations in Guadeloupe, 
became simply \'incent Boisaubin, which name he bore ever afterward. 

In a few years after Mr. Boisaubin's arrival in America, the great 
Emperor Napoleon, wishing to have it known that he was friendly to his 
royalist subjects, though opposed to the Bourbon family, magnanimously 
restored to them the estates and properties which the Revolutionists had 
confiscated. Thus Mr. Boisaubin entered into his own again and with 
return of wealth he extended aid to neighbors and friends in distress with 
lavish hand. 

Later on, Charles X, king of France, wrote Mr. Boisaubin an autograph 

6 



82 BIOGBAPHICjIL AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

letter, inviting his return to France to resume at his court the high posi- 
tion previously held by him under the good but ill-fated Louis XVI. The 
old Garde de Corps in courteous terms replied " that having found peace and 
justice in this noble land, he was content to abide therein, and devote his 
best energies for its advancement and prosperity!" It was the same king 
who sent him as a reward for his many eminent services, past and present, 
the much coveted honor of Chevalier de St. Louis, together with the insignia 
and jewels of this most ancient and renowned order of knighthood. The fol- 
lowing obituary notice, taken from the Newark Daily Advertiser, of June 
12, 1834, is a just tribute to this grand character and nature's nobleman: 

" Died on the 8th instant at his residence near Morristown, Vincent 
Classe Van Schal-Kwyck Boisaubin, Esquire, in the eightieth year of his 
age. The death of this distinguished citizen and philanthropist is a serious 
loss to the society of which he was an ornament, and will be feelingly 
deplored by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. He was a noble- 
man in the best sense, who exhibited in all his intercourse with society those 
qualities of mind and heart which dignify and adorn the human character. 
Mr. Boisaubin was a native of the island of Guadeloupe, though educated in 
France under distinguished advantages, and emigrated to this country during 
the frightful troubles in that island consequent upon the French revolution. 
He settled at Bottle Hill within about three miles of Morristown, where he 
has lived during a period of forty years, universally beloved and respected, 
conspicuous by his noble form and bearing, his polished and courteous man- 
ners and the munificence of his charities. The respect of the community 
which knew so well how to appreciate these qualities was properly evinced 
on the occasion of his funeral. The stores were closed, and it has been 
remarked to us that nearly the whole adult population were assembled at the 
interment. It was a distinguished expression of feeling that within a mile of 
the cemetery the horses were spontaneously taken from the hearse, which 
was thence drawn by a company of his oldest and most worthy neighbors. 
Mr. Boisaubin leaves a family of six children to inherit his good name 
and virtues." 

His descendants to-day are represented by the families of the Boisaubins, 
Beauplands and Thebauds, of Madison, New Jersey (the latter also of New 
York city), and the Van Schal-Kwyck de Boisaubins and Formons of France, 
most of whom take rank amongst our most distinguished citizens and do 



BIOGRAPHICAL J.J^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 83 

honor to their noble ancestor. The eldest son, named Boisaubin, was a 
graduate at the United States Military Academy at West Point, and died in 
the service of his country. 



CHARLES M. LUM. 



A resident of Chatham, Morris county, and a well known practitioner at 
the bar of Newark, Charles Mandred Lum was born on the 9th of March, 
i860, in the pleasant little city which is still his home. His parents were 
Harvey M. and Phoebe J. S. (Bruen) Lum, both descended from pioneer 
families of Morris county. New Jersey. Our subject also traces his ancestry 
back to Obediah Bruen, one of the first settlers of Newark, and is a repre- 
sentative of the Chandler family, who were prominent in the founding of 
Elizabeth, New Jersey. A number of his ancestors loyally served the col- 
onies in the war of the Revolution and others have been very prominent in 
business life and in the advancernent of ail measures calculated to promote 
the general welfare of the state. 

Excellent educational privileges fitted Mr- Lum for the responsible 
duties of life, and his splendid intellectual endowments and close application 
enabled him to acquit himself with distinction in his college course. In 1881 
he was graduated with honors in Columbia College, of New York, and then 
took up the study of law in the office of Guild & Lum, a well known firm of 
Newark. He was admitted to the bar as an attorney in June, 1884, and as 
a counselor in February, 1889. He then entered into partnership with the 
firm under whose direction his studies had been pursued, and since that time 
has been connected with much of the important litigation that has been 
heard in the courts of Essex county. He is a man of earnest purpose, of 
indefatigable energy and at the same time possesses those qualities of mind' 
which insure success to the lawyer. He has already won an enviable posi- 
tion in the profession. He is counsel for a number of important concerns 
and has charge of numerous estates. 

Mr. Lum is a popular member of the Columbia College Alumni Associa- 
tion and also the Phi Beta Kappa Alumni Association. 

On the 4th of October, 1894, Mr. Lum married Miss Elizabeth S., a 



'84 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

daughter of Jacob H. and Sarah N. (Swinnerton) Kirkpatrick, of Chatham, 
in which city our subject and his wife have a pleasant home, which is a fav- 
orite resort with their many friends. 



T. J. SLAUGHTER. 



The beautiful home of Mr. Slaughter, at Madison, New Jersey, is one of 
the most attractive features of all the landscape in this section of New 
Jersey. He was born in Green River countj', Kentucky, in 1824, a son of 
Thomas S. and Lucy (Bibb) Slaughter, both of whom were natives of Vir- 
ginia and of English descent, their ancestors having located in the Old 
Dominion among its honored first families. In early life the parents of our 
subject removed to Russellville, Kentucky, where he spent the first fifteen 
years of his life. His father was one of the wealthiest men of the county, 
issued his own money, and was extensively engaged in merchandising. Called 
to high civic honor, he represented his district in the state legislature and 
was a member of the electoral college which placed General Andrew Jackson 
in the presidential chair. His death occurred in 1855, and his wife passed 
-away in 1865. 

Before his death, however, he suffered heavy financial reverses, and, 
owing to this circumstance, T. J. Slaughter left school at the age of fourteen 
years and went to work for seventy-five dollars per year. At the age of 
■eighteen he left the state of his nativity, removing to Independence, Mis- 
souri. In 1845, accompanied by some Missouri friends, he went to New 
York city, taking with him a capital of five hundred dollars, with which he 
made a payment on goods to the value of seventeen thousand dollars, which 
they purchased and took back with them to Liberty, Missouri. In 1847 Mr. 
■Slaughter went to Mexico with a train of wagons, laden with merchandise, 
expecting the Mexican war would be prolonged and he could sell to the 
soldiers; but when he arrived the war was ended and the army had dispersed. 
He, however, found purchasers in that locality and was enabled to realize 
enough on his goods to pay for them and meet the expenses of the trip, which 
covered a period of seventeen months. He then returned to Independence, 
Missouri. In 185 1 he went to St. Louis, where he entered the service of a 
large grocery house and was the first traveling salesman to go upon the road 



BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GEMEALOGICAL HISTORY. 85- 

from that city. He started on a salary of one thousand dollars per year and 
his trip proved so successful that his salary was raised and the third year he 
became a partner in the business. On the expiration of ten years he was the 
sole proprietor and thus continually won a gratifying success. In 1863 he 
removed to New York city and opened the house of Norton & Slaughter in 
Broad street, where he carried on business for a quarter of a century, being 
for six years sole owner of the mammoth establishment. In connection with 
his mercantile pursuits he engaged in general banking, which he followed 
until his retirement from business. His commercial career seems most mar- 
velous when we think that he started out in life when only fourteen years of 
age and received but seventy-five dollars per year for his services. His energy, 
close application and sagacity, however, have enabled him to triumph over 
all the difficulties in his path and steadily he worked his way upward to wealth 
and affluence. The most envious cannot grudge him his success, so worthily 
has it been won and so generously does he use it. 

Mr. Slaughter was married in 1844 to Miss Mary Henry, a daughter of 
Major Winston Henry, a representative of an old Kentucky family. They 
became the parents of twelve children, four of whom are now living: Lucy, 
wife of P. A. Morrow, of New York city; Martha, wife of Charles A. McDon- 
ald, of Chicago; Clayton, of New York city, and Gabriel F. , of Chicago. 
Since 1877 Mr. and Mrs. Slaughter have resided in Madison, where they 
have a most beautiful home. The mansion, containing seventeen apart- 
ments, is supplied with all modern improvements, and its elegant furnishings 
are all that wealth, guided by a refined and artistic taste, could procure. 
Ten greenhouses supply the home with .the choicest flowers and also supply 
the table with many luxuries. There are three well kept cottages for the 
servants, and the beautiful residence is surrounded by a magnificent lawn of 
six acres, while the entire grounds comprise fifty -four acres. Two lakes add 
the attraction of fishing and rowing, and the home is in everj' respect an 
ideal one. 



WILLIAM L. KING. 



The first members of the King family who came to this country settled 
in Salem, Massachusetts, about the year 1650, whence one branch removed 
to the east end of Long Island. Frederick King, the grandfather of William 



86 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

L. , removed in 1762 from Long Island to Morristown, where he served as 
the first postmaster, succeeded by his son, Henry; both were well known citi- 
zens of this place. 

William Lewis King, the ninth of the ten children of Henry and Char- 
lotte (Morrell) King, and the last survivor, was born in Morristown, on the 
30th of January, 1806, at the old homestead, where also all his brothers and 
sisters were born, about two hundred feet east of the present railroad sta- 
tion in Morristown. His brothers, Jacob M., Frederick, Henry H. and 
Charles M. King, were well known among the business men of this state and 
of New York. William L. had the advantage of a good English education, 
with some instruction in the ancient classics at the old Morris Academy, 
which was then under the charge of James D. Johnson as principal. In the 
year 1821 he went to New York city, as clerk for Henry Youngs, who was 
then keeping a dry-goods store in Broadway, near Chambers street. He con- 
tinued with Mr. Youngs until 1824, when he went to Richmond, Virginia, as 
clerk for his brother Henry, who was one of the firm of King & Richardson. 
In 1829, on the removal of King & Richardson to New York, he went with 
them to the latter city and remained with them until the dissolution of their 
firm, in 1832. He then entered the office of Naylor & Company, New York, 
that firm being the American branch of the old mercantile house of Naylor, 
Vickers & Company, steel manufacturers, of Sheffield, England. In the year 
1843 he became the American partner of the firm, which was then doing a 
very extensive business in New York and Boston. This position he occupied, 
residing in the city of New York and giving close attention to business, until 
the autumn of 1862, when he withdrew from the firm and retired from active 
business. 

In 1828, while living in Richmond, William L. King connected himself 
with the First Presbyterian church of that city, which was under the pastoral 
care of Rev. William J. Armstrong. After" removing to New York in 1829 
he united first with the Spring Street church, of which Rev. Henry G. Lud- 
low was pastor, and in 1843 connected himself with the Mercer Street Pres- 
byterian church, which was under the pastoral care of Rev. Dr. Skinner. 
In the year 1852 he took an active part in establishing a " boys' meeting " 
for wandering street boys. Several of these " meetings" were about this 
time established in the upper part of the city of New York. To the work 
connected with these assemblies Mr. King devoted a part of each Sabbath for 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 87 

several years. The work thus commenced has grown into the "Chil- 
dren's Aid Society," of which Mr. King was one of the founders, and which 
is now one of the foremost charities of the city of New York. The great 
success of this society is mainly due to its indefatigable and devoted secretary 
and manager, Charles L. Brace. 

William L. King married Mary Dabney Hallam, daughter of Edward 
Hallam, of Richmond, Virginia. They had two children only, — Harriet 
Lincoln King, and Mary Virginia King. In the summer of 1861 Mr. King 
went to Europe with his family, for the benefit of their health. His eldest 
daughter, Harriet L., died on the 8th of March, 1862, at Paris, France. On 
account of the delicate health of their surviving daughter, Mr. and Mrs. King 
remained in the south of France for several years. In the years 1866 and 
1867 Mr. and Mrs. King with their daughter traveled in Italy, Spain and 
Germany, and the}' returned home by way of England in the summer of 1867. 
Mr. King's detention in Europe during the Civil war was very trying to him. 
He took great interest in the progress of the war and the success of the 
national government, and remitted funds to the Sanitary Commission. 

In the spring of 1867 he purchased, through the agency of his brother, 
Charles M. King, the old Lewis place in Morris street, Morristown, and 
moved into it in the autumn of that year. It remained his residence up to 
the time of his death. 

After his removal to Morristown Mr. King took an active part in all pub- 
lic and benevolent enterprises here. In 1871 and 1872 he was a member of 
the common council of Morristown. For a number of years he was a director 
in the National Iron Bank and the president of the Morris County Savings 
Bank. He was a member and trustee of the South Street Presbyterian church 
of Morristown; was one of the founders and incorporators of the Morristown 
Library and Lyceum, which his generosity during his life and the munificent 
endowment made in his last will have placed on a permanent footing. He 
was its first president, and retained the presidency up to the time of his 
death. His portrait, by J. Alden Weir, hangs in the Library's reading-room. 

His daughter, Mary Virginia, married Mr. Albert G. Pearson, of Colo- 
rado Springs, Colorado, and resided with her husband at that place. She 
died there on the 6th day of May, 1887. Mrs. William L. King died on the 
2ist day of July, 1888, and Mr. King died at his residence, on the i8th of 
March, 1897, and his body rests in his family burial plat near the First Pres- 



88 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

byterian church in Morristown. In his unselfish and noble life he earned 

and received the respect, gratitude and love of all who knew him. As they 

stand by his grave they recognize the truth of the two lines that form his 

epitaph, 

" He was a good man and a just. 
His luxury was doing good." 



GEORGE E. POOLE. 



An architect of ability and a well-known resident of Chatham, Mr. 
Poole has been identified with Morris county since 1889. He is a native of 
Newark, New Jersey, his birth having occurred in that city on the 21st of 
October, 1869. His parents were George E. and Caroline F. (Holmes) 
Poole. The former was a native of Long Branch, New Jersey, and a son 
of Richard S. Poole, who was born in Middletown Point, this state, as was 
his father, George E. Poole. The last named was a son of George E. Poole, 
Sr. , also a native of Middletown Point, where the ancestors of our subject 
have been located as far back as the history of the family can be traced. His 
great-grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1S12. His father was a mer- 
chant and when eighteen years of age removed to Newark, where he married 
Caroline F. Holmes, a daughter of Charles M. Holmes, of New York city. 
Mr. and Mrs. Poole had two children: Carrie F. H. and our subject. The 
father was a Republican in politics and supported that party until his death, 
which occurred in 1889. His widow still survives and makes her home with 
her son. 

Educated in the schools of Newark, George E. Poole on laying aside 
his text-books entered the office of Charles A. GifTord, under whose direction 
he studied architecture for four years, gaining a high degree of perfection in 
the work. He then began business on his own account, as the junior mem- 
ber of the firm of Swinnerton & Poole, opening an office in Newark. This 
partnership was continued for three years, when the firm of Poole & Sutton 
was formed, which had a continuous existence until August, 1S97. Mr. 
Poole then withdrew and in association with two others established the firm 
of Karr, Poole & Lum. This firm is now doing an excellent business, having 
a very liberal patronage and maintaining offices in both Newark and New 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEMEALOGICAL HISTORY. 89 

York city. They have taken contracts for furnishing designs for many of 
the fine buildings in this part of the country and all are men of tried experi- 
ence and reliability. The character of their work secures them a large 
patronage, while their honorable dealing wins them the confidence and respect 
of all with whom they are brought in contact. Mr. Poole is a progressive 
business man; one of the most distinctive qualities of his nature is his untir- 
ing energy, and his capable management is another important element in 
his success. 

Since his arrival in Morris county he has been called upon to fill public 
offices, his fellow townsmen recognizing his ability and trustworthiness. He 
was elected collector of Chatham township in 1894, filling that office until 
1897, when he was elected collector of the borough. He was chosen a mem- 
ber of the board of education in 1895 ^"^^ 's still filling that office, and on 
the 1st of June, 1897, he was elected a member of the county committee of 
the Republican party, whose principles he so warmly advocates. In the fall 
of the same year he was elected a member of the general assembly of the 
state and is now serving in the law-making body of the commonwealth, where 
his fidelity to duty and conscientious support of those interests which he 
believes will promote the welfare of the state show his appreciation of the 
duties of the office and his loyalty as a citizen. 

In June, 1893, Mr. Poole was joined in wedlock to Miss S. Jeanette 
Talmadge, a native of Chatham, and a daughter of the late Samuel S. Tal- 
madge. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Their 
home life is very pleasant and their standing in social circles is high. 



HENRY BARDON. 



Identified with the business interests of Madison for the past forty-two 
years, Mr. Bardon is a native of Germany, having been born in what was 
formerly the state of Hesse-Homburg, on the 21st of July, 1827, a son of 
Jacob and Catherine (Heine) Bardon. The early youth of Henry Bardon 
was passed in attending school until he was fourteen years old, when he 
learned the harness-maker's trade, serving three years as an apprentice, after 
which he worked as a journeyman until arriving at his twentieth year, when, 
in 1847, he was drafted into the German army, according to the law of the 



^0 BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

country, and served until 1850, during which time he participated in the war 
with Denmark. In 1850 he emigrated to the United States, the voyage 
■occupying forty days, and landed in New York, where he followed his trade 
for eleven months and then moved to Newark, New Jersey. Here he entered 
the employ of William Wright, with whom he remained for five years. In 
1855 he came to Madison, established a harness shop and has since continued 
to conduct the same with a distinct success, his honesty, industry and genial 
■disposition gaining for him a large and ever increasing patronage, and to-day 
he is recognized as one of the leaders in that line of industry. 

In 1853 Mr. Bardon was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Banghart, 
who was born in Morris county, a daughter of Josiah Banghart. The latter 
-was a native of Morris county and was a son of Barnabas Banghart. Josiah 
Banghart married Miss Sarah Vail, daughter of Thomas Vail, and a descend- 
ant of one of the oldest families in the county. Mr. and Mrs. Bardon 
became the parents of four children, namely: Josiah, who died when two 
years old; Henry, who died at the age of twenty-seven; Fred, and George. 
Mr. Bardon and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Socially he is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, and was one of the organ- 
izers of Madison Lodge, No. 93, in which he has filled nearly all the chairs. 
Politically Mr. Bardon is a stanch Democrat. 



FRED B. BARDON. 



Whether the elements of success in life are innate attributes of the indi- 
vidual, or whether they are quickened by a process of circumstantial develop- 
ment, it is impossible to clearly determine; yet the study of a successful life 
is none the less interesting and profitable b}' reason of the existence of this 
same uncertainty. The march of improvement is accelerated day by day, 
and each successive moment seems to demand of men a broader intelligence 
and agreater discernment than did the preceding. Successful men must be live 
men in this age, bristling with activity, and the lessons of biography may be 
far reaching to an extent not superficially evident. He whose name initi- 
ates this review has been intimately identified with enterprises which have 
conserved the progress and prosperity of Madison; he has been animated by 
pronounced public spirit, and has gained a prestige which demands for him 




J^reJ 9S. iiSari/o 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 91 

distinctive consideration in any compilation purporting to touch upon the 
life records of representative citizens of Morris county. 

Fred B. Bardon, cashier of the First National Bank of Madison, was 
born in the city where he has attained so great a degree of success in his 
business operations, the date of his nativity having been June 2, 1858. His 
parents were Henry Jacob and Catherine (Banghart) Bardon, to whom 
individual reference is made on other pages of this volume. The educational 
discipline of our subject was, in a preliminary way, secured in the Madison 
Academy, and this was supplemented by a course of study in the high school 
at Newark, where he graduated as a member of the class of 1873. After 
leaving school Mr. Bardon secured his initiation into the practical duties of 
life by going to New York city, where for two years he held a position in the 
establishment of C. H. & E. S. Goldburg, dealers in willow-ware. At the 
expiration of this time his ambition was compelled to subordinate itself, 
since he was attacked with inflammatory rheumatism, whose ravages were so 
persistent that for the long term of six years he was unable to give attention 
to business. He finally gained the ascendency over the stubborn disease, 
and in April, 1887, he established the first newspaper ever published in Madi- 
son. To his paper he gave the unique title of the Madison Eye Opener, the 
same being a m.onthly folio edition, with pages 8| x 10.^ inches, and the press 
used for issuing the same being an old-fashioned affair operated by foot 
power. Mr. Bardon had hitherto no definite knowledge of the manifold 
details of the " art preservative of all arts," but with his primitive equipment 
he was enabled to issue a very creditable sheet from the start, continuing the 
paper as a monthly for the first three editions, after which he gave rein to 
his ambition and began the publication of a weekly paper, changing the 
name to the Madison Journal, thus throwing aside the title which had been 
in a measure a sign of amateurship. For a long time Mr. Bardon officiated 
as the head and sole operative in all departments of his newspaper venture, 
working early and late and finding that intrinsic fascination which ever abides 
with one who has touched journalism in any form. The paper met with a 
favorable reception and was continued until March, 1878, when, owing to 
the illness of the editor and publisher, the plant was sold to L. H. Abbey, of 
South Orange, New Jersey, who guided its destinies until August, 1882, when 
Mr. Bardon again resumed control of the enterprise, changing the title of 
•the paper to the Madison Eagle, which has since been retained. The paper 



92 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJfEALOOICAL HISTORY. 

has now become recognized as one of the leading ones in the county, stand- 
ing as exponent for local interests, showing a distinct local coloring, and yet 
offering in condensed form all the important news of the hour. Mr. Bardon's 
effective methods and signal interest in his work gave the Eagle a prestige 
not usually attained by a newspaper whose province is so essentially circum- 
scribed. He conducted the enterprise until July 27, 1894, when it was sold 
to the Eagle Publishing Company, under whose auspices it has since been 
continued successfully. Mr. Bardon's success in the line was due entirely to 
his own efforts, since he never served an apprenticeship at the trade, but 
accumulated a discriminating knowledge of all branches by self-application, 
becoming an expert compositor on "straight matter " and equally efficient 
in the handling of display fonts. 

In addition to conducting his newspaper Mr. Bardon became book- 
keeper of the First National Bank of Madison upon its organization, Sep- 
tember I, 1 88 1, retaining this incumbency until May i, 1894, when he was 
chosen cashier of the institution, which position he has since held con- 
secutively, having proved a capable executive and able financier. 

In his political adherency he is an uncompromising Democrat, and his 
popularity in the local organization of the party may be inferred from the 
fact that he held the appointment as postmaster of Madison during the four 
years of President Cleveland's first administration. He maintains a lively 
interest in all that touches the progress and prosperity of his native town, 
and is now serving his eighth term as president of the Madison volunteer fire 
department, in whose organization he was largely instrumental, in March, 
1 88 1. He was the first collector of the borough of Madison, in 1890, and 
his efficient service in this capacity is evident when cognizance is taken of 
the fact that the entire assessment was collected, — which had never been 
accomplished by any predecessor in a similar office prior to the adoption of 
the borough form of government. For nine years Mr. Bardon served as 
vice-president and director of the Morristown Building and Loan Associa- 
tion, and in March, 1897, was elected a member of the Madison board of 
education, within which time he served as a member of the building com- 
mittee which had in charge the erection of the new school building. 

In May, 1885, Mr. Bardon was united in marriage to Miss Ella Mary 
Baldwin, the youngest daughter of Samuel Baldwin, to whom specific 
reference is made on other pages of this work. Two children have been 



BIOQRJPHICAL AXB GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 93 

born of this union, ^Fred W., born July 26, 1887, and Pearl, born February 
9, 1889. 

In his fraternal and social relations Mr. Bardon is identified with the 
Independent Order of Foresters, in which he is chief ranger; and he is 
treasurer of the Madison Athletic Association. Religiously he is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the local society of which he officiated 
as organist for a term of fourteen years. The family home is one in which 
is ever extended a gracious hospitality to the large circle of friends which 
Mr. and Mrs. Bardon have drawn about them, and it may be consistently 
said that their friends are in number as their acquaintances. 



GUY MINTON. 



A prominent member of the New Jersey bar, and an influential and 
public-spirited citizen of Morristown, Mr. Minton was born in Madison, 
Morris county, New Jersey, on the 2d of June, 1846, a son of Hudson and 
Caroline (Lum) Minton, both of whom are natives of Morris county and 
descendants of old New Jersey families. Hudson Minton's father was William 
Minton, son of Henry, son of Jacob, who was perhaps the first representative 
of the family in New Jersey. The father of our subject was for many years 
engaged in mercantile pursuits, but he has now retired from active business 
life and with his excellent wife resides at Chatham, Morris county, where 
they enjoy the high esteem of their many friends. 

Guy Minton was reared and educated at Chatham, and after completing 
his literary course in the schools of that place he began the study of law, 
under the preceptorage of the late George Gage, of Morristown, and was 
admitted to the bar of New Jersey in 1868. Shortly thereafter Mr. Gage 
died and his practice was virtually succeeded to by Mr. Minton, who, by his 
distinct ability, industry and thorough acquaintance with the law in its various 
branches, has gained a reputation and built up a patronage that fully attest 
his qualities as a legal practitioner, and he has been and is now the executor 
and trustee for several large and important estates. 

Aside from his professional interests Mr. Minton is identified with several 
public enterprises in his home city, among which it may be mentioned that 
he is secretary of the Morris County Insurance Company, manager of the 



94 BIOGRJPHICJ.L AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Morris County Savings Bank, and a director in the First National Bank of 
Morristown. He is interested in any movement that will tend to advance 
the welfare of the community, and is accorded the sincere regard and good 
will of all his fellow citizens. 

In his religious adherency Mr. Minton is a liberal supporter of the Pres- 
byterian church, in the work of which he takes a deep interest. 



HEYWARD G. EMMELL. 



An honored veteran of the Civil war and an enterprising representative 
of the commercial interests of Morristown, Mr. Emmell was born in this city, 
on the 24th of December, 1841, and is a son of Silas B. and Elmina 
(Campbell) Emmell. The former was born in Morristown in 1800, and died 
in the city of his birth, in 1883. His father, George Emmell, was a native 
of Germany and when a young man came to America, taking up his residence 
on the site of the Methodist church of Morristown. He served as a soldier 
under Washington in the war of the Revolution, valiantly aiding in the strug- 
gle for the independence of the colonies. The father of our subject was 
engaged in merchandising in his native city for forty years and through the 
greater part of that period was the owner of the leading dry-goods store. His 
wife, a native of Morris county, and a most estimable lady, died in 1869, at 
the age of sixty-one years. Both were members of the First Presbyterian 
church and were people of the highest respectability, gaining and retaining 
the regard of many friends. 

Heyward G. Emmell spent the days of his boyhood under the parental 
roof and acquired his education in Morris Academy, one of the old and excel- 
lent institutions of learning in the county. He was a young man of nineteen 
years when the Civil war was inaugurated, and with the blood of Revolution- 
ary forefathers coursing in his veins, and with all the patriotic impulses of his 
nature aroused, he enlisted September 15, 1861, in defense of the Union, as 
a member of Company K, Seventh New Jersey Volunteers, serving for a term 
of three years. 

When his time had expired he was honorably discharged, October 7, 
1864, after having participated in many hotly contested engagements, con- 
spicuous among which may be mentioned the following: Siege of Yorktown, 




(J^^cxxJLj/ 



BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HIS TORT. 95 

April and May, 1862; Williamsburg, Virginia, May 5, 1S62; Fair Oaks, June 
I and 2; Bristoe Station, August 27, 1862; Bull Run, August 29 and 30; 
Chantilly, September i; Centerville, September 2; Fredericksburg, Decem- 
ber 13 and 14; Chancellorsville, May 3 and 4, 1863; Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 2 and 3; Wapping Heights, Virginia, July 24; McLean's Ford, 
October 15; Mine Run, November 29 and 30 and December i; Wilderness, 
May 5 to 7, 1864; Spottsylvania, May 8 to 11; Spottsylvania Court House. 
May 12 to 18; North Anna river, May 23 and 24; Tolopotomy creek, Vir- 
ginia, May 30 and 31; Cold Harbor, June i to 5 ; Petersburg, June 16 to 23; 
Deep Bottom, Virginia, July 26 and 27; Mine Explosion, Virginia, July 30; 
engagements on the north bank of the James river, August 14 to 18; Fort 
Sedgwick, September 10, 1864. At the battle of Chancellorsville he was 
wounded, but otherwise escaped injury during his entire term of service. 

After his return from the war Mr. Emmell served as a clerk in the Morris- 
town postoffice for a time, and in 1867 engaged in business as a dealer in 
books, stationery and picture frames. This he has since followed and has 
won a large trade, from which he derives a good income. He has excellent 
business capacity and executive ability, and his careful management has 
advanced him far on the highway to prosperity. 

He was a charter member of the Independent Hose Company, of the 
Morristown fire department, which was organized on the 6th of August, 
1867, and served for two terms of two years each as foreman of the company, 
holding that position longer than any other member. He is still a member 
of the company. He belongs to A. T. A. Tolbert Post, No. 24, G. A. R. , 
and is past commander. He holds membership in the First Presbyterian 
church, and is a member of the Washington Association of Morristown. 
Mr. Emmell enjoys the esteem of a large circle of acquaintances, many of 
whom give him their warm friendship. 



PAUL REVERE. 



Hardly a name in American history is so familiar as to the one which 
begins this review and which is now worthily worn by one of Morristown's 
loyal, respected and honored citizens. The conditions of life are changed 
since his great-grandfather took the famous midnight ride, arousing the sol- 



96 BIOGBJPHICAL AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

diers at the opening of the Revolution; but the same loyalty to country 
characterizes the subject of this sketch. He springs from a family indeed 
prominent in the annals of the nation. Every schoolboy throughout the 
length and breadth of the land knows the story of the hero who watched for 
the signal light in the old North church tower, " One if by land, and two if 
by sea," and then rode through the darkness to villages and farm houses, 
arousing all the people to resist the attack of the British the following 
morning. The next generation of the family had its representative no less 
prominent in the affairs of civil life, for Dr. John Revere, the grandfather of 
our subject, was one of the founders of the medical department of the 
University of the City of New York and did much to advance medical science 
to a point that it had never before attained. He was a very eminent phy- 
sician, the author of many valuable medical works, and at one time was a 
professor in Jefferson Medical College, of Philadelphia. 

General Joseph Warren Revere, the father of our subject, was born in 
Boston in 1812, and at the age of fourteen entered the United States Naval 
School, at New York, thus beginning a long career of service by sea and 
land in almost every portion of the globe, a service full of exciting interest 
and romantic adventure. At sixteen he sailed for a long cruise in the Pacific 
and then joined the squadron employed in suppressing the African slave 
trade. After a trying service in which he often narrowly escaped death from 
disease, wreck and mutiny, he was sent to the European squadron. He vis- 
ited every country of Europe and the Mediterranean shores of Asia and 
Africa, and, being an accomplished linguist, he acted as aid to the com- 
modore and was especially fortunate in meeting the most distinguished per- 
sonages of the day. In Spain he witnessed the exciting scenes of the Carlist 
war. He visited the interior of Algeria with a French force which had a 
fierce fight with the Arabs. (During the Seminole war he served with the 
"Mosquito fleet" on the coast of Florida, and shortly after commanded a 
vessel engaged in breaking up the organized piracy in the West Indies.) In 
1838 he sailed in the first American squadron which circumnavigated the 
globe, and at Bombay he witnessed the departure of the British army for 
the disastrous campaign of Cabul. For saving the British man-of-war, 
Ganges, from shipwreck, he was presented with a sword of honor by the 
governor-general of India. On the coast of Sumatra the squadron bom- 
-barded the towns of Kwala Batu and Muckie, in punishment for the seizure 



BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GEJs'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 97 

of an American vessel and the murder of her crew. After that cruise Lieu- 
tenant Revere again served in the West Indies. 

Throughout the Mexican war he was on the coast of California and at 
Sonoma raised the first American flag north of San Francisco bay, being also 
present at the battles of the Mesa and the San Gabriel, the bombardment of 
Guaymas and the other exciting events of the conquest. After the war he 
went again to California, as government timber agent for the new territory, 
and was an actor in the wild scenes at the time of the "gold fever." A 
book published by him and entitled " A Tour of Duty in California," became 
a handbook for the pioneers and settlers. In 1849 Lieutenant Revere 
resigned from the navy and remained for two years on a ranch he had pur- 
chased. In 185 1 he engaged in the coasting trade, and on the coast of 
Mexico he rescued, after a desperate conflict, the passengers and crew of a 
shipwrecked Spanish vessel from a horrible death at the hands of savages. 
For this service the Spanish government conferred upon him the order of 
Isabella, and he received high testimonials from other governments. Not 
long afterward he became the intimate friend of the president of Mexico and 
accepted a commission as lieutenant-colonel of artillel-y in the Mexican army. 
He reorganized this branch of the service and instructed the officers, among 
them the celebrated Miramon, afterward executed by the side of Emperor 
Maximilian. In a battle with the Revolutionists his skill and valor saved the 
national army from destruction. He was declared to have " deserved well 
of the republic " and received high honors. 

Wearied at last of his adventurous life, Colonel Revere returned home 
and settled with his family near Morristown. He continued thereafter a cit- 
izen of Morris county and served as brigadier-general of the Morris county 
militia. At the outbreak of the Rebellion he at once offered his services to 
the general government and was soon made colonel of the Seventh Regi- 
ment of New Jersey Volunteers. The brilliant record of this gallant regi- 
ment, second to none in the service, has been largely attributed to the 
severe discipline it received under Colonel Revere, whom General Hooker 
pronounced "the best disciplinarian in the service." He fought in the bat- 
tles of the Peninsula campaign and the second Manassas, was promoted 
brigadier-general and commanded the Second New Jersey Brigade, of which 
the Seventh formed a part, until after the battle of Fredericksburg. When 

the army was reorganized under General Hooker, General Revere was 
7 



98 BIOGRAPHICAL AKB GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

assigned to command the New York "Excelsior" brigade, a splendid body 
of fighting men, whom General Hooker felt needed more stringent discipline 
than they had yet received. At Chancellorsville Revere's brigade led the 
van in the desperate struggle after the rout of the Eleventh Corps and was 
in the thickest of this disastrous fight. General Revere was the only federal 
eye-witness of the fatal wounding of "Stonewall" Jackson. For a move- 
ment made just after this fight General Revere was censured by General 
Sickles and was for a time deprived of his rank, but the opinion of the men 
he had commanded, and that of Generals Meade and Sedgwick and other 
high officers, held him innocent of any offense. President Lincoln declared 
he had been unjustly treated, restored him to his rank and he was sub- 
sequently named brevet major-general. 

His health was completely shattered by wounds and diseases incurred in 
service and his existence became one of unbroken suffering. In 1873 he 
published " Keel and Saddle," a retrospect of his stirring life. He was very 
widely read and wrote much for publication. He possessed considerable 
artistic talent, and a picture painted by him is a prominent object in the 
Church of the Assumption, Morristown. In 1862 he joined the Catholic 
church, in which he remained until his death. In politics he adhered to the 
old-time Democratic principles of his youth. 

General Revere married Miss Rosanna Duncan Lamb, of Boston, who, 
with two of his five children, Paul and Augustus L. Revere, survives him, his 
death having occurred April 20, 1880. The Revere homestead in Morris- 
town has been occupied by the mother and sons for about twenty years and 
it is one of the most interesting homes in all New Jersey. In the hall hangs 
a portrait of old Judge Rivoire, who lived in France over two hundred years 
ago, indicating the French Huguenot descent of the family. There are also 
portraits of Paul Revere, the Revolutionary hero, and his wife, and of Gen- 
eral Revere, in military uniform. The house is also filled with curios from 
all parts of the globe, secured by General Revere in his travels. These 
include a rhinocerous-hide shield from the Malay islands; an old helmet sup- 
posed to have belonged to a follower of Cortez; a dagger used by the French 
actress, Rachel; the sword received from the governor-general of India; a 
Turkish cimeter presented to General Revere by Mehemet AH, and a sabre 
presented by the sultan of Zanzibar; California bowie knives, pistols and war 
clubs, and commissions bearing the signatures of famous officials. The old 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D QEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 99 

house was erected in 1807 and within its walls many distinguished men have 
been welcomed to Morristown, including General La Fayette. 

Paul Revere, who is his father's successor as head of this household, was 
born in Morristown September 28, 1856, and acquired his literary education 
in the Morristown Classical School. He read law in the office of Hon. Staats 
S. Morris, of Newark, and ex-Governor Joseph D. Bedle, of Jersey City, and 
was a student in the Harvard Law School. In February, 1881, he was 
admitted to the bar and was actively engaged in practice in Newark until 
1885, when the great demands made upon his time by other business interests 
forced him to put aside the law. He has been connected with some of the 
most important real-estate transactions of this city, is a director in the Morris 
County Savings Bank, the Morris County Mortgage & Realty Company and 
the Morristown Trust Company. He is also president of the Morristown 
Association for Public Improvement, and his wise counsel and able mahage- 
ment in directing the affairs of these concerns have been important factors in' 
the successes which have crowned the enterprises and which not only add tO' 
the prosperity of the stockholders, but advance the general welfare also, 
"Peace hath her victories no less renowned than war," and many of these 
Mr. Revere has also won. 

Twice has he served as a member of the common council of Morristown, 
from 1883 to 1885, and again from 1888 to 1890. In politics he is a stanch 
Democrat and has taken an active interest in political affairs since his boy- 
hood. He has been a delegate to most of the Democratic conventions in 
the past eighteen years, has frequently served as chairman of such conven- 
tions and public meetings, has been president of the Morristown Democratic 
Club, and has been a member of the county board of election. His counsel 
carries great weight in the conventions of his party, and he is recognized as 
a prominent leader in Democratic circles. He supported Palmer and Buck- 
ner in 1896 and was chairman of the Morris county sound-money Democratic 
committee, and a member of the state committee. He has been "on the 
stump " in this part of New Jersey in almost every election since 1880, and is 
an interesting, entertaining, logical and forceful speaker. 

Mr. Revere is also a valued member of several social and fraternal organ- 
izations. He belongs to the Sons of Veterans and served as captain of his 
camp, was one of the founders of the Sons of the American Revolution, was 
treasurer of the society in New Jersey, and was vice-president general of the 



100 BIOGBAPEICAL AMD GEJVEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

national society. He also belongs to the Washington Association of New 
Jersey, to the Aztec Club and the New York Reform Club, and is president 
of All Souls Hospital Association, the Morris County Golf Club, and filled the 
same office in connection with the Morris County Gun Club. He also 
belongs to the Morristown Club, the Morristown Field Club and other organ- 
izations, and his genial manner and courteous deportment make him a popu- 
lar representative of these organizations. He has taken a very active interest 
in fire-department matters, and was three years foreman of the Morristown 
fire wardens. Every enterprise for the public good receives his commenda- 
tion, and his liberal support to many beneficial movements has added to the 
progress and improvement of the city. In his religious connections he is a 
Catholic. 

Mr. Revere is a gentleman of literary taste and scholarly habits, has read 
and studied extensively on the questions of great moment to the nation, and 
has written some very able articles on taxation, public improvement and 
municipal government. His life has been one of great activity in practical 
affairs and has been an important fact.or in promoting the best interests of his 
native city. He has that culture and refinement which only travel can bring, 
and in addition to his visits to many sections of his native land and Canada, 
he made a trip to Europe in 1887, there spending six months in visiting the 
many points of beauty and historic interest in England, France and Italy. 
He comes of a notable family, but is honored for his own sterling virtues and 
upright life, rather than for the heroic deeds of his ancestors. 



GUY M. HINCHMAN. 



Guy Maxwell Hinchman was born in Newtown, Tioga county (now 
Elmira, Chemung county), New York, on November 29, 1795. He was of 
English descent, his grandfather, Joseph Hinchman, having been a surgeon 
in the English navy during the hostilities with the French in 1757, and subse- 
quently married Anna Grifiing and settled on Long Island. Their children 
were: John, James, Nathaniel, William and Joseph. The last named was born 
in Jamaica, Long Island, on the 28th of August, 1762, and was the father of 
Guy M. Hinchman. Joseph Hinchman, Jr., when sixteen years of age, enlisted 
in the partiot army and was in a number of severe engagements. He also 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 101 

suffered the privations and hardsiiips attending the winter encampment at 
Morristown. When his term of enlistment expired he studied medicine with 
his uncle, Dr. James Hinchman, at Florida, Orange county, New York, and 
commenced to practice at Minnisink, in the same county. On the 20th of 
December, 1787, he married Zerviah Seely, a daughter of B. Seely, of Mil- 
ford, on the Delaware. In 1788 he removed to the town of Chemung, in 
the county of Montgomery (afterward Tioga), New York, and in 1793 he 
changed his residence to Newtown (now Elmira) in the same county, having 
the distinction of being the first physician and surgeon to locate in that 
county. By a commission dated February 18, 1895, he was appointed, by 
Governor George Clinton, sheriff of the county of Tioga, which comprised 
within its limits the present counties of Tioga, Chemung, Broome and a por- 
tion of Chenango. On November 13, 1800, he was appiointed by Governor 
John Jay a commissioner to inspect and improve the road leading from Cats- 
kill Landing, in the county of Greene, to Catherinestown, Tioga county. 
Among Dr. Hinchman's warm personal friends was Guy Maxwell, after 
whom he named his second son, the subject of this review. Mr. Maxwell was 
a merchant and a prominent citizen of Tioga county. He originally settled 
there as a trader with the Seneca Indians, one of the tribes in the Iroquois 
confederacy. In consideration of his name he presented his namesake with 
one hundred acres of land at the head of the Seneca lake. 

There were born to Dr. Hinchman and his wife six children, namely: 
Stella, Lesbia, Hiram, Guy M., Zerviah and Felix. Hiram and Zerviah 
died in infancy. Dr. Hinchman died on July 23, 1802, and his widow, 
Zerviah, was remarried, in 1807, to Isaac Baldwin, of Chemung, and died 
May 17, 1 8 10. 

In August, 1 8 10, in compliance with the wishes of his mother, expressed 
shortly before her death, Guy M. Hinchman, in company with his uncle, 
Samuel S. Seely, started for New Jersey, traveling on horseback. A large 
part of the journey he made alone, his uncle parting company with him at 
Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania. The fifteen-year-old lad accomplished the dis- 
tance between Wilkesbarre and Flanders, New Jersey, in less than two days, 
arriving at the residence of his uncle, William Hinchman, late in the after- 
noon of the second day, thus displaying early in life the same energy and 
determination that were his dominant characteristics in later years. After a 
rest of a few days he commenced his business career by taking the position 



102 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

of junior clerk in the store of his uncle, James Hinchman, at Succasunna 
Plains, the senior clerks being William F. Kerr and Chilion F. DeCamp. 
He remained so employed until 1815, dividing his time between-the store at 
Succasunna and a supply store at Brookland, at the outlet of Lake Hopat- 
cong, where his uncle had a four-fire bloomery forge, and a grist and 
saw mill. At the close of the year 18 14 he went to the Mount Pleasant mine, 
near Dover, and took charge of affairs, his uncle having a short time previ- 
ously purchased the mine of Moses Tuttle for the sum of four thousand dol- 
lars, payable in monthly installments of iron ore. In the latter part of 181 5 
he purchased from his uncle and his cousin, John R. Hinchman, their inter- 
est in the mine property, by paying each of them nine hundred dollars, and 
obligating himself to pay to Moses Tuttle the balance due him, on the 
monthly installments of ore, as stipulated in their contract. This he subse- 
quently did, and received from Moses Tuttle a title to the mine. He con- 
tinued to operate the mine for seven years, and in the fall of 1822 he sold 
the property to Nathaniel Corwin for the sum of three thousand dollars. 
During this period Mr. Hinchman could mine as much ore in six months as 
he could dispose of during the entire year, notwithstanding the fact that the 
Mount Pleasant ore was considered equal, and by some superior, to that pro- 
duced by the Dickerson mine at Succasunna. These two mines supplied all 
the demands for ores used in the bloomery forges of this section at that time. 
Money in those days was a scarce commodity in the community, and Mr. 
Hinchman received as pay for ores sold, bloomery iron, drawn into octagon 
bars under the forge hammer. In order to find a market for the iron thus 
obtained he was obliged to haul it by teams to Elizabethtown Point, for ship- 
ment to New York, where he converted it into merchandise or money, as . 
his necessities demanded. The foregoing is interesting in view of the fact 
that within the last thirty years the demand for this ore has always been 
greater than the supply, occasioned in a great measure by its unequaled 
purity and richness. In recent years the output of this mine has reached 
forty-five thousand tons per annum, and has been sold for as much as ten 
dollars per ton. The mine has recently been worked out and abandoned. 

In the spring of 1823 Mr. Hinchman removed with his family to New 
York, where he entered into partnership with William H. Hinchman in the 
wholesale grocery business, at No. 10 South street. He first resided in 
Stone street, then the heart of the city; but, his family increasing, it was 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL HISTOEY. 103 

deemed best for the health of the young children to change his residence to 
the suburbs; so he removed to Broome street, a short distance from Broad- 
way, which at that time was thought to be well in the country. In 1825 his 
partner died and he continued the business alone until 1834, when, his health 
having become impaired, he was compelled to relinquish his business and 
go to the country with his family. He spent the winter of 1835 at Long- 
wood, with his brother-in-law, Chilion F. DeCamp. His health was so much 
improved by the bracing mountan air of that region that in the spring of that 
year, at the solicitation of Henry McFarlan, he accepted the management 
of the Dover Iron Works, owned by Blackwell & McFarlan, but at that time 
rented b\' Henry McFarlan, and subsequently purchased by him. Mr. 
Hinchman entered into his new position on May 5, 1835, a-^d continued in 
the supervision of the works until July, 1869, when the iron business became 
depressed, and Mr. McFarlan, finding himself perfectly easy in his business 
affairs and having no obligations unmatured or outstanding, decided to close 
his business and dispose of his mills. These works were, for their day, quite 
extensive and had an enviable reputation for the quality of their products. 
They consisted of a puddling and rolling mill for the manufacture of refined 
iron; a rivet mill, where boiler rivets and brace-jaws were produced; and a 
steel furnace, where iron was converted into blister steel by the old process 
of carburizing iron bars by imbedding them in charcoal powder and exposing 
them to a temperature above redness. During the thirty-four years of his 
connection with the works, Mr. Hinchman became so closely identified with 
the business and his relations with Mr. McFarlan were so cordial and confi- 
dential that he conducted its affairs as if it had been in fact his own property. 
On January 29, 1841, Mr. Hinchman was elected president of the 
Union»Bank, of Dover, which office he held until 1866, when the tax on the 
issues of state banks became so onerous that it was deemed best by the 
stockholders to discontinue the business and place their capital in other 
channels of trade. This bank had the unique distinction of having its bills 
pass current in every state in the Union, which was at variance with the gen- 
eral run of state banks of the period, whose bills of issue would hardly pass 
current outside of their immediate vicinity, to say nothing of circulating in 
other states. The high esteem in which this bank was held arose from two 
causes, one being its excellent management and the other that its bills were 
redeemed in gold or its equivalent on presentation in New York at the bank- 



104 BIOGRAPHICAL AjYD GEJ'fEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ing house of Vermilye & Company, and the importing house of Phelps,. 
Dodge & Company, the last named being large stockholders in the institu- 
tion. The bills of the Union Bank had an exchange value which made them 
eagerly sought for by bankers and merchants throughout the country. 

On the 1 6th of August, 1816, Mr. Hinchman was united in marriage to 
Miss Susan Grandin DeCamp, a daughter of Joseph and Jane (Tuttle) 
DeCamp, the latter a lineal descendant of the "Widow Ford, who came 
over in the Fortune," in November, 162 1. Nine children were born to them, 
as follows: An infant, who died in childhood; Zerviah and Felix, who were 
born at Mount Pleasant; Augustus, James, Louisa, and Stella, in New York;, 
and Sophronia and another infant (the latter dying shortly after birth), at 
Dover. 

Mr. Hinchman died in the house in which he had resided since 1837, on 
the 13th of February, 1879, being then in his eighty-fourth year. At his 
request his former pastor, Dr. B. C. Megie, preached the funeral sermon, 
taking as his text Genesis xxv,8: " He died in a good old age, an old man 
and full of years." He was buried in the family lot in Locust Hill cemetery, 
in Dover. 

Mr. Hinchman was for many 3'ears the best known man in Dover, and 
one of its most prominent citizens, both in its business and social world. 
During the forty-four years of his residence here he saw it grow from a small 
hamlet into an incorporated city, and he was always actively interested in 
its progress and welfare. He was a man of strong character, positive in his 
tastes and resolute and fearless in the defence of his opinions, yet withal 
generous, frank and lovable. He possessed an artistic temperament, as was 
evinced by his love of flowers. For many years he had the most beautiful 
and carefully cultivated flower garden in this section of the country. He was 
also an adept with both the pen and the brush, and many examples of his 
artistic skill are still preserved which were executed by him after reaching 
the psalmist's limit of three-score years and ten. In personal appearance 
Mr. Hinchman was of short and sturdy build, of a florid complexion and pos- 
sessing the ornate manners of the old-school gentleman of his day. During 
his youth and early manhood he engaged actively in all forms of athletic 
sports, in all of which he displayed great proficiency. His penchant, how- 
ever, was the use of the rifle and fowling-piece, and his quickness, steady 
nerve and accurate eye placed him in the front rank of marksmen and wing 



BIOGRJPEICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL BISTORT. 105 

shots. He was wont to show, with pardonable pride, targets made by him 
with the rifle at the old "Thatched Cottage" garden in Jersey City, which 
were marvels of marksmanship. This famous shooting range was the Mecca 
of rifle-men living in the vicinity of New York, and he once had the honor to 
contest there for supremacy with Davy Crockett, of Kentucky fame. Crockett 
was handicapped by the use of a strange rifle and did not make the showing 
he might otherwise have done. 

Originally, Mr. Hinchman was in politics a Whig, later becoming an 
ardent Republican, taking an active interest in national, state and municipal 
affairs, and always having the courage to express his convictions. He never 
held any political office. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and 
obiained his degrees from the lodge that held its meetings at Berkshire 
Valley. 

Mr. Hinchman retained his mental and physical activity until the time 
of his death, which, in fact, resulted from a cold contracted by him while 
exercising a young horse under saddle during the inclement winter weather. 



DAVID YOUNG. 



[By Wilbur N. Hedges.] 



The career of David Young, the American astronomer, is an example of 
modest merit obscured by circumstances, denied a well deserved fame and 
forgotten by the world; it shows the life of a man without pride or self-con- 
ceit and devoid of arrogant presumption, yet one whose brilliant attainments 
would have brought wealth and distinction to many another thus gifted in 
mind, but more self-seeking in disposition. 

Worthy of being notable among the notables, he is to-day remembered by 
but few, and in the church yard at Hanover, marked by a small and simple 
stone, rests all that is mortal of him " who trod the earth with the step of a 
Newton, and explored the heavens with a Newton's mind." Newton's fame 
is world-wide, but David Young, though endowed with remarkable genius, 
lived and died in almost entire obscurity, lacking even the delayed earthly 
reward and appreciation which come to some great intellects when, after 



106 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

death, their labors on earth are done and their souls pass from material and 
transitory environments into the realm of the spiritual and eternal. 

David Young was born at Pine Brook, New Jersey, in the year 1781. 
The writer has no data concerning his ancestry, nor can anything definite be 
recorded of his youth, except that it is certain that most of his life was spent 
there, during which time he acquired a common-school education. Starting 
out in life, he left Pine Brook and located in Morris county, opening a store 
at the lower end of Rockaway Neck, in a place now called the Simmes estate. 
Having become married, meanwhile, his wife kept the store while he taught 
a private school until he removed to Hanover Neck, where most of the 
remainder of his life was spent and where all of his astronomical calculations 
were made. It is not known where or how he learned astronomy; his knowl- 
edge of this science must have been a natural gift or endowment; when 
questioned on this point, he always said he picked it-up. If he did pick it up, 
it was a great achievement, for surely, few astronomers before his time picked 
up more. 

His most important work was finding the variations in the rising and 
setting of the sun and moon. This, like his other calculations, was always done 
with the utmost facility and exactness, and while he viewed the movements 
of the celestial spheres and penetrated as far as mortals may into the mysteries 
of each planet, constellation and galaxy which emblazons the blue empyrean, 
his mathematical skill enabled him to correctly foretell all their changes, no 
matter how remote. Thus he communed with the stars ^and followed with 
familiar eye each glittering train upon its swinging orbit. 

Mr. Young made calculations for almost all of continental Europe, while 
in this country the practical results of his labors were seen in the well known 
" Farmers' Almanac," a publication which he originated, and which for nearly 
three-quarters of a century has been a welcome annual visitor in the old 
homesteads of Morris county. 

When " Millerism " was at its height some gentleman employed Mr. 
Young to calculate back to the time of the crucifixion of Christ and see if the 
wonderful event of the darkening of the earth, which then took place, was 
caused by any eclipse or a phenomenon. He did so', and declared that there 
was none whatever. At another time, some English astronomers who were 
puzzled over a difficult problem, came to the United States, and visited Mr. 
Young for the purpose of securing his aid in solving the same. Much to the 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 107 

surprise of these foreign scientists, he reached a conclusion after a little 
figuring; when offered a pecuniary reward, he promptly declined pay for what 
he considered a very slight service. 

David Young was a man of marked individuality; many peculiarities and 
odd sayings are credited to him. Referring to his numerous moves, he used 
to say that three moves were as good as a fire and that he had been burned 
out often, for he had lived in no less than four different houses while resid- 
ing in the neighborhood of Hanover Neck. Another idea of his was that he 
never wanted to own but seven feet of land, just enough to bury him in; and 
he surely had his wish. 

When engaged upon his calculations he would see no one nor allow any 
noise about the house that would disturb him in his absorbed and profound 
application to his work. One evening some mischievous boys placed a jack- 
o'-lantern on a post near his house to simulate the moon. When Mr. Young 
saw it he e.xclaimed: "Why, it isn't full moon to-night! I'll get my cal- 
culations and see." When the trick was discovered he threatened to thrash 
the boys soundly, though it is not probable that the serenity of his nature 
was much ruffled by the amusing incident. Another of his distinct peculiar- 
ities was that he had no use for the horse as a means of locomotion; where 
others would ride, he walked. Mr. Young visited New York city frequently, 
on business connected with his astronomical observations, always making the 
journey there and back on foot. 

Mr. Young was quite an author, though but few of his writings survive; 
of these, perhaps the best known is a small volume called ' ' The History of the 
Morristown Ghost," which relates in an interesting manner how a New 
England schoolmaster, assisted by an accomplice, imposed upon the super- 
stitions of many of the worthy inhabitants of the locality. The book is enter- 
taining and of value as a chronicle of a somewhat curious phase of Morris 
county history. Another work of his is a sermon entitled " The Illustrious 
Guest," and is marked by a lofty tone of thought, lucidity of theological rea- 
soning and a spirit of deep and simple piety. 

Mr. Young's manuscripts were examples of neatness and careful prepara- 
tion, while his clear, plain style of penmanship reflected the original character 
•of the man. His astronomical charts and the books containing his calcula- 
tions, also showed marked evidence of methodical and systematic work. 

It is to be regretted that no portrait of Mr. Young is obtainable; prob- 



lOS BIOGRAPHICAL AjYD GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ably none ever existed. Little remains on earth to remind the world of his 
individuality, except the headstone in Hanover churchyard, which marks his 
grave and bears the following inscription: 

IN MEMORY OF DAVID YOUNG, PHILOM. 

Born Jan. 27, 1781. 
Died Feb. 13, 1852. 

On the reverse side of the stone is the following eulogy: 

THE AMERICAN ASTRONOMER. 

He lived like Newton mid yon stars of light; 
He dies to see, with unobstructed sight, 
The works of God in nature and in grace 
And view his God and Savior, face to face. 

Such was the life and death of this humble, yet truly great man. Living 
apart from the world, unmindful of its selfish strifes, untouched and uninilu- 
enced by its ambitious schemes for wealth and power, he pursued the simple, 
even tenor of his way, following the course which the Creator destined for 
him, and passing quietly from earth when his work here was ended to await 
his eternal reward in a higher and more glorious sphere. 



BRITTON D. EVANS, M. D. 

Rising above the head of the masses there have always been a number 
of individuals distinguished beyond others, who by reason of their great 
ability and powerful individuality have always commanded the homage of 
their fellow men, and who have revealed to the world those two bright vir- 
tues of a lordly race, — perseverance in purpose and a spirit of conduct that 
never fails. Such a one is the gentleman whose name introduces this review. 
He has gained distinctive preferment in the medical profession and is a 
recognized leader in thought in action. He now stands at the head of the 
New Jersey State Hospital, at Morris Plains, and his efforts in advancing that 
institution have made it the peer of any of the class in the entire country. 

There is no class of men to whom greater gratitude is due than to those 
self-sacrificing, noble-minded men whose life work has been the alleviation 
of the burden of suffering that rests upon the world, thus lengthening the 



BIOGBJPEICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 109 

span of human existence. Their iniluence cannot be measured by any known 
standard; their helpfulness is as broad as the universe and their power goes 
hand in hand with the beneficent laws of nature that come from the source 
of life itself. Some one has said: " He serves God best who serves human- 
ity most." The skilled physician, then, by the exercise of native talents and 
acquired ability, is not only performing a service for humanity, but is follow- 
ing in the footsteps of the teacher who said, " Inasmuch as ye have done it 
unto one of the least of these, my brethren, ye have done it unto me." 

Dr. Evans is one of the most conspicuous and honored representatives of 
the medical profession in New Jersey, and yet has not attained the prime of 
life. He was born in Caroline county, Maryland, in 1858, and is a son of 
Dr. Louis W. Evans, who was born in Ohio, during a temporary residence 
of his parents in that state. His father. Colonel Britton Evans, had been 
sent there on a government commission. He was a direct descendant of 
Christmas Evans, the eminent Welsh divine. A gentleman of fine military 
attainments, he was commissioned lieutenant of artillery in the war of 18 12 
and served under General Harrison, taking an active part in the battle in 
which Colonel Johnson, afterward vice-president of the United States, is said 
to have killed the chief Tecumseh, and also in the battle of River Raisin, 
where he distinguished himself for bravery. He took part in the war with 
Mexico, the Florida war, and at the time of his death was organizing a com- 
pany to go to Greece to help her in her struggle for independence, against 
Turkey. His original commission, signed by Presidents Monroe and Madi- 
son, and also the original credentials which enabled him to organize a com- 
pany in aid of the Greeks, are in possession of his grandson. Dr. Evans, of 
Morris Plains. 

The most active part of his life was spent in or near Philadelphia, but he 
owned summer residences in the lower counties of New Jersey, where his 
family spent much time and made many warm and devoted friends. He had 
five sons and four daughters, and three of his sons were physicians. 

The second son. Dr. Louis Evans, father of our subject, was a graduate 
of two of the medical schools of Philadelphia and practiced for many years 
in that city. He was twice married, his first union being with Miss Patton, 
of Philadelphia. After her death he removed to Ma,ryland, where he mar- 
ried Miss L. Boone, a direct descendant of Daniel Boone, the celebrated 
Kentucky pioneer. Their eldest child, born October i, 1858, was christened 



110 BIOGEAPHICAL AJ^B GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Britton Duroc Evans. Under the parental roof he was reared and in Mary- 
land acquired an academic education which served as an excellent founda- 
tion upon which to base his professional knowledge. Determining to make 
the practice of medicine his life work, he entered the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons of Baltimore, where he was graduated in the class of 1885. His 
success in his chosen calling was marked and immediate. He first located in 
Millington, Kent county, Maryland, and after two years was appointed upon 
the staff of surgeons of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. Without solic- 
itation on his part, he was called to the position of assistant medical superin- 
tendent of the Maryland Hospital for the Insane, in which capacity he served 
for nearly five years. He then resigned, in order to accept the medical 
superintendency of the Maryland Institution for the Feeble Minded, and after 
a very short period he was offered the position of medical director of the New 
Jersey State Hospital, at Morris Plains. He had made no application for 
this position; it came as the spontaneous recognition of his superior ability 
and a desire to procure excellent service for the institution. His efficiency 
in other hospitals had gained him a reputation which had extended far and 
wide, and he was selected as the most capable man that could be chosen for 
the large hospital near Morristown. 

On the 1st of June, 1892, Dr. Evans entered upon his duties, and for 
more than five years has remained in charge, during which time he has raised 
the standard of the institution until it ranks with the best in the country. 
The patients are the insane of New Jersey, and as a specialist in this line Dr. 
Evans has gained great eminence. He has studied closely, thought deeply 
and carried his investigation far and wide into the realms of medical science, 
thus becoming cognizant of many valuable truths hitherto unknown to the 
profession, the practical utility of which he has demonstrated in successful 
practice. Among the distinguishing feature of his administration at Morris 
Plains is the reduction of the use of mechanical restraints among the patients, 
and the number of patients now under such restraint is less than one per 
cent. Outdoor amusements have been established on a broader plane and 
have become a potent factor in the treatment of the insane. A pathological 
laboratory has also been organized under the direction of Dr. Evans and is 
now second to none in the world. He also established a training school for 
nurses, which has proved an important factor. He became convinced that 
the ill in the hospital needed the attention of a higher grade of nurses and a 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. Ill 

more intelligent service than he was able to command, unless some means 
should be established which would give his nurses and attendants a thorough 
course of training. After carefully investigating the matter and giving it due 
consideration, in the early part of 1894, he presented the subject to the 
board of managers for their approval and support, which was obtained, and 
in the following autumn classes were organized and a course of lectures 
arranged, whereby the nurses could be instructed and thus better qualified 
for the important work which is given to their charge. This meant addi- 
tional work for Dr. Evans and his staff, but it was needed, and he did not 
stop at the personal sacrifice that it would require. The institution is already 
reaping the benefit of the system. The course of training necessary to grad- 
uation in this school is two years, and fifty-two have thus far received diplo- 
mas, of which number forty-eight are still at their posts, rendering to the 
hospital a service noble and commendable. 

Dr. Evans was also instrumental in causing the removal ^f some high 
board fences which shut out the sunlight and also cut off the public view, 
making it possible for the nurses to neglect their charges, leaving them some- 
times untidy in dress, and oftentimes leaving them to their own devices, 
which is often injurious to a disordered mind, which should be occupied by 
healthful, bright thoughts. The Doctor did away with these abuses by the 
removal of the fences, and thus brought about a more careful supervision by 
the nurses. The medical library of the hospital also received his attention 
and has been greatly improved; in fact, advancement and beneficial progress 
have marked every department of tlie institution. 

Dr. Evans has won an enviable reputation as an expert on insanity and 
his ability on its medico-legal aspect has for years been recognized by the 
legal fraternity of this and other states. He has been employed on numer- 
ous important trials in New Jersey and New York since his connection with 
the state hospital at Morris Plains, in all of which his work gave evidence of 
a thorough knowledge of his subject and justly made for him a place among 
the first in this speciality. His contributions to the medical literature of 
the world on nervous and mental diseases have been numerous and valuable. 
He is a member of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of the state of Mary- 
land, one of the oldest and most prominent medical organizations in that 
state, including in its membership the most honored scientific men of the 
Johns Hopkins^University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, University 



112 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

of Maryland and most of the leading private practitioners of the state. He 
belongs to the American Medical Association, the Medical Society of New 
Jersey, the Medico-Legal Society of New York, the American Medico-Psy- 
chological Association, the National Society for the Study and Care of 
Epileptics or Insane, the National Conference of Charities and Corrections, is 
ex-president of the Morris County Medical Society and an honorary member 
of the Temperance Reform League of Boston, a society organized for the 
scientific study and cure of inebriety. 

Of various benevolent and social organizations Dr. Evans is also a mem- 
ber. He is a Royal Arch and Knight Templar Mason, a Noble of the Mystic 
Shrine and is past sachem of the Improved Order of Red Men and a member 
of the Royal Arcanum. In politics he is thoroughly conservative, believing 
in good government and in advocating the candidates who will labor most 
■earnestly for that end. He never allows political or religious preferences to 
bias him in the selection of a member of the hospital corps of physicians or 
attendants. 

In 1889 the Doctor was united in marriage to Miss Addie E. Dill, a 
native of Maryland, but at that time a resident of Wilmington, Delaware. They 
now have two daughters and a son. Mrs. Evans is a daughter of a Methodist 
minister and she and her husband are members of the Methodist church. 
■Outside of his office, as well as in, the Doctor is found to be a man of 
pleasing personality and many social graces, of kindly generous nature and 
superior mental endowments, and his many agreeable traits of character 
have won him a host of warm and admiring friends. His life work is one 
of immeasurable usefulness and his labors have made him worthy to be num- 
bered among the benefactors of the race. 



ENOCH HAMMONDS. 



Mr. Hammonds, who has for several years been conspicuously identified 
with the business and financial interests of Boonton, is a native of England, 
having been born in Staffordshire, on the 30th of August, 1828, a son of 
Thomas and Mary (Wedgej Hammonds, and a grandson of John Hammonds. 
The father was born in Staffordshire, in 1803, and learned the trade of an 
iron puddler, which he followed in his native land until 1830, when he was 



BIOGRJPEICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 113 

sent for by the Boonton Iron Works, the owners of which desired his assist- 
ance. Upon his arrival in Boonton he found the town to consist of but four 
houses, only one of which was completed, and in 1831 he sent for his family 
and they were therefore among the earliest settlers of the town. Mr. Ham- 
monds continued in the employ of the iron works until his death, which 
occurred in 1859, and was survived by his wife until 1896, when she, too, 
passed away, after attaining her eighty-seventh year. She united with the 
Presbyterian church in 1843 and remained a consistent member thereof until 
her demise. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hammonds: 
Enoch; Thomas; Samuel; Mary, who married Joseph Fitzpatrick; Joseph, 
who died in 1867; Benjamin, who died in 1897; Philip; Sarah, who became 
the wife of Thomas F. Rickets, of Keokuk, Iowa; and William, who died 
when twenty-five years old. 

Enoch Hammonds was brought to Boonton by his mother when he was 
but three years old, crossing the ocean on the packet ship St. George, and 
landing at New York on the 19th of May, 1831. In the public schools of his 
adopted town Mr. Hammonds received but a limited education, and at an 
early age entered the Boonton Iron Works, where he learned the trade of a 
heater, and continued as such for nearly thirty years, when he was pro- 
moted to the superintendency of the heating department, retaining that posi- 
tion for the ensuing ten years, when, in 1876, the mill closed down and our 
subject was compelled to find other employment. In 1879 he was elected 
tax-collector of Boonton township and served in that capacity for ten years, 
at the end of that time declining further re-election. He then embarked in 
the real-estate and fire-insurance business, in which he has since continued 
with a pronounced degree of success. He has been connected with various 
enterprises of public interest, is a charter member and a director of the 
Boonton National Bank, and he was the principal promoter of the Green- 
wood Cemetery Company, of which he is president, superintendent and 
director. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and in his political 
faith he is a stanch Republican. 

Mr. Hammonds' first marriage was consummated in 1852, when he was 

united to Miss Caroline Sutton, of Brooklyn, New York, who died in 1875, 

^leaving the following children: Fannie Louise, who married Alfred J. 

Spencer, of Brooklyn; Caroline Augusta, now Mrs. Frank Coe, of Boonton; 

and Frank, the assistant cashier of Greenwich Bank, New York, who mar- 



114 BIOQBAFHICAL AJ^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ried Miss Josie Bowers, of Parsippany, New Jersey. In 1877 Mr. Ham- 
monds was united in marriage to Miss Harriet Coe, a daughter of Alfred Coe, 
of Boonton. Mr. Hammonds is a devout adherent of the Presbyterian church, 
in which he has served as a trustee and elder for nearly fifty years. He was 
one of the charter members of the Boonton Building & Loan Association, 
and served for a number of years as its vice-president and as chairman of the 
appraisement committee. 



EDMUND K. BROWN. 



This worthy citizen of Madison was born in Ossipee, Carroll county, 
New Hampshire, on the 15th of April, 1864, descending from one of the 
pioneer families of the state. It was in 1785 that three brothers — Jacob, 
Captain Moses, and Benjamin Brown — removed from Wenham, Massachu- 
setts, to Wolfborough, New Hampshire, which place later became known as 
Brown's Ridge. During the war of the Revolution Captain Moses Brown 
was captured, together with the ship he commanded, and taken to Halifax, 
Nova Scotia, the vessel being confiscated to the crown. After remaining in 
that country for a long time he was liberated and also received indemnity 
for his ship. He married Lydia Kimball, belonging to a member of a promi- 
nent Massachusetts family of that name, who emigrated from old England to 
New England, in the ship Elizabeth, in April, 1734. 

The father of our subject, Edmund Kimball Brown, Sr. , was born Feb- 
ruary 29, 1826, and on the 14th of July, 1862, married Abby K. Ayers. 
He followed farming as a life work until after the inauguration of the Civil 
war, when he entered his country's service, in April, 1861, as a member of 
Company B, First Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteers. With that 
command he served throughout the war and participated in a number of 
engagements. Near the close of the struggle he was taken ill with typhoid 
fever and sent to Fort Auger Hospital, Virginia, where he died July 13, 
1865. His wife survived him about seven years and managed the farm until 
her death, which occurred October 26, 1872. 

Edmund Kimball Brown, whose name introduces the initial paragraph 
of this sketch, was an only son, and acquired his literary education in the 
schools of his native town, being a graduate of the high school there. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 115 

afterward pursued a business course in Bryant & Stratton's Commercial Col- 
lege, of Boston, Massachusetts, and during the summer vacation received an 
appointment as rodman in an engineering party of the park department of 
that city and was employed in the laying out and construction of Franklin 
park and the Arnold Arboretum. Finding this work congenial, he decided 
to make civil engineering his profession, and for five years he remained in 
the employ of the city government of Boston, during which time he devoted 
his evenings to study in the Boston Evening School of Engineering. In 
April, 1891, through the recommendation of Frederick Law Olmsted, he 
received the appointment of engineer on the estate of H. Mclv. Twombly, at 
Madison, New Jersey, where he was employed in carrying out the landscape 
designs of the Olmsteds, and in drainage and the building of roads. 

In the spring of 1893 Mr. Brown decided to make Madison his home 
and opened an engineering office in the Masonic building. He obtained the 
contract to make a complete survey of the borough and to furnish an atlas- 
of the same, which he completed in the year 1894. During the same year 
he published a property map showing the property owners of the town, which 
map gained a wide circulation. At the beginning of the work of improving 
the roads in Morris county, he was appointed assistant county engineer, and 
had charge of the road-making in Chatham township. His duties as a civil 
engineer are not confined to Madison and vicinit}', he havmg been largely 
and successfully engaged in laying out estates in the state of New York, as 
well as near his home. On the death of F. E. Day, Januar}- 21, 1894, he 
was appointed to the position — then left vacant — of borough clerk and man- 
ager of the light and water plant. He was unanimously chosen by the coun- 
cil to that position, which he acceptably filled until the press of other duties 
forced his resignation, in December, 1894. During his administration the 
water mains were increased and a duplicate Dean pump put in, so that the 
water-works now have a capacity of one million gallons daily. 

In April, 1898, Mr. Brown received the appointment of commissioner of 
deeds for the state of New Jersey by the governor, and in that office is 
called upon to execute deeds for real estate, an important factor in his line of 
work. 

Civil engineers and surveyors are not infallible, but the results obtained 
by the employment of the best obtainable skill in their line are as nearly 
absolutely certain as anything can be, and proof of this may be found in the 



116 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

record made by Edmund K. Brown since he came to Madison, which indi- 
cates the estimate placed upon him and his work by those who know him 
well. 



ALFRED MILLS. 



Mr. Mills was born at Morristown, Morris county, New Jersey, on the 
24th day of July, in the year 1827. He is the son of Lewis and Sarah Este 
Mills. He prepared for college at the Morristown Academy, and in 1844 
entered Yale, where he graduated, with high honor, in 1847. At that time 
Edward W. Whelpley, Esq., afterward well known as Chief Justice Whelpley, 
was practicing law at Morristown. 

Mr. Mills entered Mr. Whelpley's office as a student, and after a clerk- 
ship of three years was licensed as an attorney, in 1851, taking his coun- 
selor's license in 1854. On receiving his license in 185 1, Mr. Mills was 
invited to become a member (as a junior partner) of one of the most promi- 
nent legal firms in the county. Family reasons prevented his acceptance of 
this very tempting offer, and he remained at Morristown. While Mr. Mills 
practice is large and in some respects laborious, it is independent in this, — 
that he selects his cases. Ordinary legal questions that are presented during 
the week are supplemented on Sundays and in vacations by those found in 
that greatest of all law-books, the New Testament. Several editions of the 
Greek text and the works of accomplished scholars assist in this engrossing 
study. 

In 1857 he married Katharine Elmer, daughter of Judge Aaron Coe. 
She died in 1886. Mr. Mills has four children. 



COE FINCH. 



Mr. Finch, who is editor of the Pequannock Valley Argus, published at 
Butler, was born in Finchville, in the township of Mount Hope, Orange 
county. New York, December 14, 1832, his parents being Coe and Mary A. 
(Ketcham) Finch. The former was born in Orange county about 1805, 
and was a son of Judge James Finch, who also was a native of the same 
county and by occupation a farmer. At one time he served as judge of the 





hUl, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJH'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 117 

county court. He married Sarah Tooker, and they became the parents of 
eight children, Coe Finch, father of our subject, being the eldest of five sons. 
For many years he engaged in hotel-keeping in Newburg, New York, and 
died in that city in 1832. His wife, who was a daughter of Joseph Ketcham, 
was married a second time, becoming the wife of Gilbert Moore. 

Mr. Finch, whose name begins this review, obtained his elementary 
education in the common schools and later spent one year in study in Wall- 
kill Academy, in Middletown. When fourteen years of age he started out 
in life for himself, going to Newton, New Jersey, where he entered the 
employ of Victor M. Drake, publisher of the New Jersey Herald. On his 
return to Middletown, some years later, he entered the office of the Tri- 
States Union, at Port Jervis, as a compositor, and later filled a similar posi- 
tion in connection with the Orange County News, published in Middletown. 
This was the only paper there, and on the same he was the only compositor. 
Some time later he purchased the job department of the Middletown 
Mercury, a paper on which he had also worked, aiding in getting out its first 
edition. For a number of years he successfully conducted the job office, 
and later purchased an interest in the Mercury, consolidating the same with 
his job department, after which the business was conducted under the firm 
name of Thompson & Finch. His connection therewith was severed when 
he sold his interest to the present proprietor, C. Macardell. 

After making a trip through the south and west, and spending one year 
in travel, including a six-months residence in Canton, Ohio, he located in 
Easton, Pennsylvania, and purchased an interest in a job office, which he 
sold four years later. He ne.xt went to Portland, Pennsylvania, where he 
purchased' the Portland Enterprise, which he published for nine years, when 
he sold the plant to W. R. Grubb, in 1888, and came to Butler. Here he 
purchased the Pequannock Valley Argus, which was not at the time in a very 
flourishing condition, but he infused new life into the enterprise and has made 
this one of the leading journals in his part of the county. It is published as 
an independent paper, devoted to all the general news, national and local, 
and is found as the ready and earnest champion of all movements for the 
public good. It is a neat and well edited sheet and is now enjoying a liberal 
patronage. 

Mr. Finch was married in Middletown, New York, in January, 1S59, to 
Margaret J. Van Horn, a daughter of Richard and Sarah Van Horn. His 



118 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTOBT. 

wife died in 1872, and in 1873 he married tier sister, Cornelia Van Horn. 
His children born of the first marriage are Theodore S., who is associated 
with his father in business, and Sadie G. , who is likewise in the office of the 
Argus. Marjorie is the only child of the second marriage. 

Mr. Finch is a member of the Royal Arcanum. He has never been 
active in politics, and the only of^ce he has ever held is that of chief burgess 
of Portland, Pennsylvania. 



THOMAS BAKER. 



As conducting a representative real-estate and loan enterprise, Mr. Baker 
has been prominently identified with the business interests of Dover and has 
added materially to the upbuilding and improvement of the city. He was 
born, in 1865, on the old homestead of the Bakers, in Rockaway township, 
Morris county, the place being now included within the village limits of Port 
Oram. He is the youngest son of William Hedges and Clarissa (Dell) Baker, 
whose marriage was celebrated on the 15th of June, 1848. The father was 
born in January, 1806, and was a representative of one of the old and hon- 
ored families of New Jersey. 

Thomas Baker was reared on the old homestead, where he early became 
familiar with all the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist, 
and in the Valley school and Mount Pleasant Academy he acquired his edu- 
cation, putting aside his text-books at the age of seventeen years in order to 
enter upon his business career. He accepted a clerkship in the store of his 
brother, W. H. Baker, with whom he remained three years, after which he 
returned to the farm, following agricultural pursuits continuously until 1894. 
In that year he took up his residence in Dover and bought out the real-estate 
and insurance business of H. L. Dunham. He has platted a part of his land 
and sold a number of lots, while on others he has erected dwellings which he 
rents, thus adding largely to his income. He also does a large insurance 
business, and his enterprise, energy, sound judgment and good management 
are bringing to him a success which he well deserves. At the same time his 
business interests add materially to the welfare of the town, advance its 
improvement and its growth, and as a result he is accounted one of the val- 
ued citizens of the community. 




fSEOIPKSE IRDiSfrQAKJ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJTD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 119 

In April, 1893, Mr. Baker was united in marriage to Miss Hester Hilferty, 
of Port Jervis, New York, and of their union has been born one son William, 
Hedges, and a daughter, Florence D. In 1896 Mr. Baker erected a palatial 
residence, which is situated on the hill and commands a magnificent view of 
Dover and the surrounding country. It is supplied with all modern improve- 
ments and adorned with all that a refined taste could suggest and wealth 
procure. The Bakers at one time owned more than fifteen hundred acres of 
land in this vicinity, portions of which have since been sold. Mr. Baker of 
this review deals in mining property as well as other realty, and few men in 
this section of the state are better informed on property values than he. He 
has made a close study of his business and his capable management has 
advanced him far on the road to success. 

While he has never taken an active part in public affairs, he has always 
been deeply interested in the measures for the public good and to them has 
been a liberal. contributor. By reason of his large success, his unblemished 
character, his just and liberal life and the universal esteem which he here 
enjoys, Mr. Baker might, without invidious distinction, be called one of the 
foremost citizens of Morris county. 



HON. GEORGE RICHARDS. 

To attain distinction in a certain line of enterprise argues the possession 
of those qualities which invariably imply a constant progress toward that 
success which distinguishes the goal of every man's ambition and urges him 
to seek the highest altitude of human endeavor. It is, therefore, a matter of 
particular gratification when one has not only achieved renown in a single 
branch of industry, but has acquired prominence in various lines of business 
necessitating the expansion of more than an ordinary amount of intellectual 
force and executive ability. In this connection it is peculiarly appropriate to 
introduce the name of Hon. George Richards, who stands conspicuously 
identified with the commercial and financial interests of Dover. 

Hon. George Richards, banker, railroad president, mine operator, 
manufacturer and merchant, was born in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, in 1833, 
and is a son of Henry Richards, a mine operator of that city. He received 
a common-school education and, being at an early age thrown upon his own 



120 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL fflSTOET. 

resources, his eighteenth year found him employed in an iron mine at Hurd- 
town, New Jersey, operated by the Glendon Iron Company, which had 
extensive interests throughout northern New Jersey, as well as in Pennsyl- 
vania. It was at the Hurdtown mine that Mr. Richards laid the foundation 
for that practical knowledge which characterized his subsequent endeavors, 
and it was not long before his close attention to the duties assigned to him 
received recognition at the hands of his employers, the logical result of which 
was his promotion from weighmaster to shift boss. This was at that time 
considered a position of great importance, yet it fell far short of the measure 
of young Richards' capacity, and his promotion to the office of superintend- 
ent, in 1853, before he had reached his majority, was a fitting acknowledg- 
ment of the remarkable industry, energy and ability displayed by him in the 
brief time he had been in the company's employ. 

Not long after becoming superintendent Mr. Richards was made manager 
of all the Glendon Iron Company's mining interests in New Jersey, filling 
that position for upwards of forty years. But even the duties of this latter 
post, important as they were, were performed by him with perfect ease, and 
from time to time, as opportunity offered, he identified himself with other 
ventures, or, to be more exact, other ventures were originated by him, as, 
for example, when machinery was needed in the operation of the mines, Mr. 
Richards established a company to build it, and the Morris County Machine 
& Iron Company sprang into existence with Mr. Richards as president; 
lumber was required, and the Dover Lumber Company was formed, Mr. 
Richards being made its president. With this spirit of expansion dominating 
him it was but a step to organize the Dover Iron Company, to work up, in 
part, the product of the mines under his superintendency; to organize various 
branch railroads for the transportation of ores, etc.; to organize a bank, 
which institution the multiplication of mining, manufacturing and mercantile 
institutions made necessary; until finally Mr. Richards' interests became 
diversified to an almost incredible degree, as will be seen by a perusal of 
the following array of posts of usefulness of which he was simultaneously the 
incumbent: President of the Dover Iron Company; the Dover & Rockaway 
Railroad Company; the Morris County Machine & Iron Company; the Ogden 
Mine Railroad Company; the Hibernia Mine Railroad Company; the Hiber- 
nia Underground Railroad Company; the National Union Bank; the Dover 
Lumber Company; the Dover Printing Company; and the George Richards 



BIOGRJPEICAL AKD OEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 121 

Company, controlling four of the largest stores in Dover. He is a director 
in the following: Delaware & Bound Brook Railroad Company; East Ten- 
nessee & Western North Carolina Railroad Company; Cranberry Iron & 
Coal Company; Chester Iron Company; Ross & Baker Silk Mill, at Port 
Oram; the American Sheet Iron Company; and Lincoln Lithia Water Com- 
pany, of North Carolina. These varied interests made Mr. Richards the 
most prominent man identified with iron and other industries in northern 
New Jerse}', and recognition of another kind followed as a matter of course. 

In 1 87 1 Mr. Richards was appointed state director of the united rail- 
roads of New Jersey, his office being to supervise the vast trust funds of the 
state invested in those securities. During his term of office the important 
question of the lease of these roads to the Pennsylvania Railroad arose, and 
Mr. Richards' position in the controversy, as state director, though at first 
decided adversely by Chancellor Zabriskie, was subsequently approved by the 
court of appeals. The point taken by him was that under a somewhat blind 
act of the legislature, passed, however, for the purpose, it was not lawful for 
the old companies to make the lease. The final decision rendered further legisla- 
tion necessary. Mr. Richards labored earnestly against theefforts of the mono- 
poly and its adherents, and not only compassed their defeat, but went much 
further, and the general railroad law now on the statute books, one of the 
most beneficent laws ever enacted by the New Jersey legislature, stands as a 
monument to the unremitting aggressiveness and excellent generalship dis- 
played by Mr. Richards in the great fight of the people against that erstwhile 
dominant monopoly, the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. 

Mr. Richards' political affiliations are strongly with the Republican 
party, and he is the member of the Republican state committee from Morris 
county. In 1872 he was appointed master in chancery by Chancellor Abra- 
ham Zabriskie; in 1873, he was made notary public by Governor Joel Parker, 
and in 1891 Governor Leon Abbett appointed him a member of the board of 
managers of the state lunatic asylums, and, although he was the only Repub- 
lican on the board, his colleagues accorded to him the honor of being elected 
vice-president of the body. In 1894 the board was legislated out of office for 
the purpose of instituting a non-partisan organization, and Mr. Richards was 
the only member of the old board who was honored with re-appointment by 
Governor Werts, officiating under the new regime as president. He was 
appointed a member of the state board of geological survey, he is a life mem- 



122 BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ber of the Washington Association, of Morristown, and his interest in agricult- 
ural matters led him to become a member of the State Agricultural Society. 
The marriage of Mr. Richards was solemnized in i860, when he was 
united in matrimon}' to Miss Elizabeth Ann McCarty, of Morris county, and 
they have one son, George Richards, Jr., who is connected with one of his 
father's numerous mercantile enterprises. Mr. and Mrs. Richards resides in 
a beautiful mansion in Dover, situated on a farm of one hundred and twenty- 
five acres, in the cultivation of which Mr. Richards finds unlimited pleasure. 
His charming and cultured wife presides over the domestic arrangements with 
infinite grace and entertains with cordial hospitalit}' their many friends. 



WILLIAM T. BROWN. 



Mr. Brown has been identified with the interests of Morris county since 
November, 1882, and is now numbered among the leading merchants of 
Madison. He was born in Monmouth county. New Jersey, on the lOth of 
November, 1858, and is a son of William W. and Lydia A. (Thompson) 
Brown, both of whom were natives of Monmouth county. The paternal 
grandfather was William W. Brown, and he was probably of English 
lineage. 

During the greater part of his boyhood and youth our subject was being 
fitted for life's practical duties by good educational training. He was for 
some time a student in Stephensdale Institute, where he was graduated in 
the spring of 1876. He entered upon his business career as a salesman in 
a dry-goods store, where he remained for one year and then engaged in the 
drug business. He came to Madison in June, 18S0, and entered the employ 
of Henry W. Harman, for whom he clerked for a year, after which he went 
to Staten Island, where he engaged in the drug business for a year. In 1882 
he purchased his drug store in Madison and has since carried on operations 
here. He has a well appointed store, equipped with everything found in a 
first-class establishment of the kind, and the excellent line of goods which 
he carries, combined with his honorable dealing and courtesy to his custom- 
ers, has secured him a liberal patronage. 

On the 1 6th of November, 1881, Mr. Brown was united in marriage to 
Miss Emma L. Bergin, a native of New Jersey, and they have two children, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL BISTORT. 123 

Willie C. and Arthur B. They hold membership in the Presbyterian church 
and are well known people of the community, whose circle of friends is 
extensive. Mr. Brown has been honored with public office, and in the 
prompt and faithful discharge of his duties has gained the commendation of 
all concerned. He was a member of the board of health and during Presi- 
dent Harrison's administration was appointed postmaster at Madison, which 
position he filled for four years. He is a member of the state board of phar- 
macy and is serving as its treasurer. He belongs to Madison Lodge, No. 93, 
A. F. & A. M., and to New Jersey Council, Royal Arcanum, and in his polit- 
ical associations is a stalwart Republican. His success in the business world 
has been achieved entirely through his own efforts, and his enterprise and 
energy have been the factors which have led to his prosperity. 



JAMES E. BURNET. 



It is to the successful conduct of enterprising business interests that a 
community owes its prosperity and progress, and through the avenue of his 
mercantile affairs James E. Burnet has contributed not a little to the sub- 
stantial growth and development of Madison, where he is now conducting a 
hardware store. He is one of the leading young business men of the town, 
and was born in this place, May 4, 1872, his parents being Henry and Emo- 
gene (Clark) Burnet. The former was likewise a native of Madison and 
belonged to one of the older families of the county. Of Norman origin, the 
Burnets emigrated to America from Yorkshire, England, Thomas Burnet 
probably being the original ancestor of all the representatives of the name in 
this county. A settlement was made on Long Island and Aaron Burnet 
afterward removed from Long Island to New York. He established a home 
at what was then known as Burnet Station, now Madison, and there spent 
his remaining days, his death occurring in 1755, in his one hundredth year. 
Mathias Burnet, the great-great-grandfather of our subject, was born in 
Whippany, New Jersey, and passed away October 17, 1783, at the age of 
sixty years. His son, Mathias, born in Whippany, in 1749, married Phoebe 
Brookfield, daughter of Job Brookfield of the Laontaka valley. She was 
born May 17, 1750, and died December 10, 1828. 



J24 biogrjphic.il j.yb gejXealogical history. 

Mathias L. Burnet, the grandfather of our subject, was one of a large 
family and was born in Whippany, Morris county, April 13, 1798. He mar- 
ried Nancy Cook, a native of Madison, born in 1799, and a daughter of Ben- 
jamin Cook, whose father, Ellis Cook, came from Southampton, Long 
Island, and was among the pioneer settlers of Morris county, where he had 
Extensive real-estate holdings. In early life Mathias L. Burnet learned the 
wheelwright's trade, which he followed in connection with farming. He took 
an active interest in the educational advancement of the community and in 
the work of the Presbyterian church, to which he and his wife belonged. 
He was also a member of the Masonic fraternity. He died in 1882, aged 
ninety-two years, and his wife's death occurred April 13, 1S69. They were 
the parents of three children: Henry R. , father of our subject; Benjamin 
W., of Madison; and James Edgar, who died of yellow fever, in 1862, 'while 
in the government employ, on the United States ship Rhode Island. 

Henry Burnet was reared and educated in Madison and became a gold- 
refiner. For many years he followed that business in New York city and 
won a gratifying competence. Later he retired to a farm at Madison, where 
he spent his declining days, his death occurring in 1888. He was well 
known throughout Morris county, and was a valued and enterprising citizen 
who gave his support to all measures for the public good. In politics he was 
a Democrat, but never sought office, preferring to devote his time and ener- 
gies to his business interests. Mrs. Burnet, who is a native of Utica, New 
York, still survives her husband and makes her home in Morris county. By 
her marriage she became the mother of two children: James E. and Mabel 
H. The latter is the wife of William H. Apgar, of Madison, and erected the 
Burnet block, which is one of the finest business blocks in the town. 

The son, James E. Burnet, has spent his entire life in Madison, so that 
the place is endeared to him from the associations of 'his youth as well as 
those of mature manhood. One of the first business ventures in which he 
engaged was the taking of contracts for constructing and grading roads. The 
capable management which marked his undertakings made him very success- 
ful, and he carried on operations along that line for a number of years. In 
1897 he opened a hardware store in the Burnet block— the largest store of 
the kind in Madison — and is now doing a good business. His honorable busi- 
ness methods and his earnest desire to please the public have secured to him a 
liberal patronage. In his political affiliations he is a Republican and takes- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 125 

an active interest in local matters, political and otherwise, withholding his 
co-operation from no movement which he believes will prove of public 
benefit. 



ALFRED ELMER MILLS. 

This successful attorney of Morristown was born July 22, 1858, in this 
city, where he has always resided, and is the son of Alfred Mills and Kath- 
arine Elmer, his wife. He received his preparatory education at Trinity 
School at Tivoli-on-the-Hudson, and was graduated with honors at Prince- 
ton College, receiving the degree of A. B. in 1882 and that of A. M. in the 
course of 1885. He read law under the instructions of his father, at Morris- 
town, with whom he has been associated in practice since his admission to 
the bar. He was admitted as an attorney at the June (1886) term of the 
supreme court, and became a counselor at the corresponding term of 1889. 
Mr. Mills is one of the ablest and most prominent of the younger members of 
the Morris county bar, and in a number of important cases has distinguished 
himself as a shrewd and talented lawyer. In 1892- 94 he was corporation 
counsel of Morristown, and is now (1898) prosecutor of the pleas of the state 
in Morris county. He is also an active member of the Washington Associa- 
tion of New Jersey, of which he is treasurer. 



JOHN ALBRIGHT, M. D. 

During the greater part of his long and useful life Dr. Albright resided in 
Madison, his native city. He was born in the year 18 16 and passed his 
earlier years as a clerk in his father's store, which stood near the site of the old 
Session house recently demolished; but preferring professional to commercial 
life, he went to New York when a young rran and entered upon the study of 
medicine under the direction of Dr. Parker, a physician of extensive practice 
and wide repute. Later he returned to Madison, where he was associated in 
practice with Dr. Green, a physician of pronounced ability then living in 
Madison. 

In his chosen calling^Dr. Albright met with good success. In 1836, at 



126 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

the solicitation of John I. Blair, he went to Blairstown, Warren county, 
where he practiced his profession with diligence until 1855, when failing 
health compelled him to put aside the arduous duties which were so taxing 
his strength. He prospered in his profession, and continually gained 
advancement therein, for he studied closely and made marked improvement. 
His skill was therefore rewarded by a liberal patronage, and he was doing a 
very extensive business when forced by ill health to retire. Returning then 
to -Madison, he continued to make his home there until called to his final 
rest. In 1855 he resumed mercantile efforts in New York, where he carried 
on business for twenty years, first in connection with the firm of Charles 
Durrent & Company, while later he was with Chapman, Lyon & Smith, a 
large jobbing and commission house. 

In 1840, while practicing medicine in Blairstown, Dr. Albright was 
united in marriage to Miss Nancy Lock Simpson, a relative of General U. S. 
Grant. They traveled life's journey together for nearly fifty-eight years, shar- 
ing the joys and sorrows, the adversity and prosperity which checker the 
careers of all. His affection for his family was one of the most marked 
traits of his character. It seemed that he could not do too much for his 
wife and children, and he counted no personal sacrifice too great if it would 
enhance their welfare or happiness. The death of his only daughter, in 
1895, was the greatest sorrow of his life, and he never recovered from 
the blow, which left him in poor health. He had two sons, Mayor James 
P. Albright and R. C. , who was formerly postmaster of Madison. 

Dr. Albright was a man of scholarly tastes and studious habits and 
after his retirement from business he found his greatest pleasure in his library, 
which contained all the standard works of ancient and modern times. 
He was familiar with all, and his favorite authors were to him as dear friends. 
His broad literary culture made him a very companionable gentleman to the 
intellectual portion of the community, and he found great delight in social 
intercourse with men of strong mental caliber. The integrity of his heart, 
the purity of his life and the wide scope of his attainments were acknowl- 
edged by all with whom he came in contact. Active duty, charity, truth 
and a sincere love for his fellow men were among his marked characteristics 
and won him the highest regard. He died April 2, 1898, in the eighty-sec- 
ond year of his age, and thus a long, useful and honorable career was ended, 
but his memory remains as a blessed benediction to all who knew him. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AjYD GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 127 

D. W. TUNIS. 

Daniel W. Tunis, of Passaic township, represents a family whose con- 
nection with Morris county covers more than a century. In 1792, when the 
new American republic was passing through the first stages of existence, 
Daniel Tunis purchased a farm within the borders of Morris county, and in 
the manner of that early period tilled the soil and developed his property. 
He was born in Middletown, Monmouth county, New Jersey, July 15, 
1767, removed to Morris county as stated, and in 1793 married Phoebe Linds- 
ley, a native of this county and a daughter of Captain John Lindsley. . 
They began their domestic life on the farm which the husband had previously 
purchased and they there spent their remaining days, Mr. Tunis passing away 
September 18, 1S47, while the death of his wife occurred April 15, 1833. 
He was a tanner by trade, although he engaged in agricultural pursuits for 
many years. A prominent and influential citizen, he served as captain of 
the militia in an early day and gave his political support to the Democratic 
party. His family numbered the following children: Elizabeth, Sarah, John, 
Hannahj Julia, Lindsley, Mary A., Silas D., Emily L., Harriet M. and 
Vincent B. 

Silas D. Tunis, father of our subject, was born in Morris county, 
December 28, 1808, and died in 1890. He was married April 5, 1837, to 
Ellen Baily, who was born February 2, 1820, and was a daughter of Benja- 
min and Hannah (Bennett) Baily, who lived and died in Newtown, Long 
Island. The parents of our subject were married in Brooklyn, where the 
father was then living, but after a short time removed to the farm. He was 
a mason by trade and carried on that pursuit in connection with the tilling of 
the soil. His wife died March 25, 1856. Both were members of the Pres- 
byterian church and enjoyed the warm regard of many friends. In their 
family were six children, as follows: Daniel W. , born January 2, 1838; 
Jane A., who was born January 30, 1840, and died March 15, 1871; John B., 
who was born February 18, 1842, and died February 26, i847r Harriet M., 
who was born February 21, 1846, became the wife of David Bockover and 
died April 3, i875;Emma A. , who was born July 11, 1849, died Febru- 
ary 25, 1890; Stanley D., who was born October 20, 1851, is a commercial 
traveler, living in New York city. 

D. W. Tunis, whose name introduces this article, was reared in Passaic 



128 BIOGBJPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

township and after attending the public schools of the neighborhood entered 
the Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York, where he pursued a 
course of study in the winter of 1S65. In the meantime his patriotic spirit 
had prompted his enlistment in defense of the Union, and on the 29th of 
May, 1861, he had donned the blue as a member of Company H, Second 
New Jersey Infantry, in which he served until September lo, 1862. He 
spent the following winter in merchandising and in 1863 re-enlisted under 
command of Captain George Gage, of the New Jersey militia, serving in 
Pennsylvania, with the rank of sergeant. He was ever loyal to the cause 
which he espoused and is to-day as true to his duties of citizenship as when 
he followed the starry banner on southern battle-fields. Returning to Morris 
county at the close of the war, Mr. Tunis engaged in merchandising for some 
years, but since 1872 has devoted his time and energies to farming, in which 
line he has met with good success. 

He was married May 27, 1868, to Miss Charlotte Davis, a daughter of 
Joel and Sarah (Johnson) Davis, and to them three sons have been born: 
Herbert D., who was born in Morristown, New Jersey, February 10, 1871; 
Henry C. , born October 7, 1874, and Allen D., born January 24, 1878. 
The two younger sons are at home, but the eldest was married April 25, 
1894, to Miss Grace K. Coley, and is now in a home of his own. Mrs. Tunis 
was born March 22, 1842, in Newark, New Jersey. Her father was a native 
of New Milford, Connecticut, born August 29, 1812, and her mother was 
born in Littleton, Morris county, this state, March 10, 181 1. 

Mr. Tunis has spent his entire life in the county of his nativity, and that 
his career has been an honorable one is shown by the fact that his stanchest 
friends are among those who have known him from boyhood. Socially he is 
connected with the Grand Army post, of Morristown, and is an elder in the 
Presbyterian church of New Vernon. 



HON. MAHLON PITNEY. 



Whatever else may be said of the legal fraternity, it cannot be denied 
that members of the bar have been more prominent actors in public affairs 
than any other class of the American people. This is but the natural result 
■of causes which are manifest and require no explanation. The ability and 






^^^^^''^^^ 



<7^<. 




BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEKEALOGWAL HISTORY. 129 

training which qualify one to practice law also qualify him in many respects 
for duties which lie outside the sphere of his profession, and which touch the 
general interests of society. The subject of this record is a man who has 
brought his keen discrimination and thorough wisdom to bear, not alone in 
professional paths, but also for the benefit of the city which has so long been, 
his home, and with whose interests he has been so thoroughly identified. He 
holds and merits a place among the representative legal practitioners and 
citizens of Morristown; and the story of his life, while not dramatic in action, 
is such a one as offers a typical example of that alert American spirit which 
has enabled many an individual to rise from obscurity to a position of influ- 
ence and renown solely through native talent, indomitable perseverance and 
singleness of purpose. 

Mr. Pitney, a son of Vice-Chancellor Henry C. Pitney, was born in 
Morristown, February 5, 185S, and was prepared for college in classical 
schools of the citj', after which he matriculated in the freshman class of 
Princeton University, in 1875. On the completion of the four-years course 
he was graduated, in the class of 1879, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
The degree of Master of Arts was conferred upon him by his ahiia mater in 
1882. He studied law under the direction of his distinguished father, one of 
the most eminent jurists of the state, and in 1882 was admitted to the New 
Jersey bar as an attorney-at-law, while three years later he was licensed tp 
practice as a counselor-at-law. 

In 1882 he opened a law office in Dover, New Jersey, where he practiced 
until 1889, when he returned to Morristown and soon gained a large clientage 
and enviable reputation. He has since been connected with most of the 
important litigation that has been heard in the courts here, and has given 
evidence of his splendid power before court or jury. He is a clear, forcible 
speaker and logical reasoner, and his trial of a cause always shows a thorough 
familiarity with the law concerned therewith. 

In politics Mr. Pitney has long been active, and he is a recognized leader 
of the Republican party in his section of the state. He was temporary 
chairman of the Republican state convention which nominated John W. 
Griggs for governor, in 1895, and in behalf of his party has done much effect- 
ive work. In 1894 he was honored with the nomination for representative 
in congress for the fourth congressional district, composed of Morris, Hun- 
terdon, Warren and Sussex counties. The district was supposed to be and 



130 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTOBT. 

had formerly been strongly Democratic, and the opposition re-nominated 
Hon. Johnston Cornish, who then occupied the position, but the election 
returns showed that Mr. Pitney had won by a plurality of fourteen hundred 
and seven votes. In 1896 he was again nominated, and although the Demo-' 
crats felt confident that their candidate, Augustus W. Cutler, would carry 
the district, Mr. Pitney was again elected, with an increased majority of two 
thousand nine hundred and seventy-seven votes. His course in congress has 
won him not only the commendation of his home district, but also of many 
of the ablest members of the house. During his first term he was appointed 
a member of the comrhittee on appropriations, and did effective service on 
behalf of the people by opposing extravagant and useless appropriations, 
which would have drawn heavily upon the public treasury without benefiting 
the people at large. 

In the campaign of 1896 he made a vigorous canvass and took an uncom- 
promising stand in favor of sound money, as defined in the party platform. 
He is a forcible, earnest and convincing speaker, and is no less accomplished 
as a writer, his pen productions having the literary finish of the scholar as 
well as the eloquence of the orator. His public service is most commend- 
able, for with him the public good is ever before party, and the general v/el- 
fare before personal aggrandizement. 

Mr. Pitney was married in 1891 to Miss Florence T. Shelton, a most 
cultured and intelligent young lady. They hold membership in the First 
Presbyterian church and sustain high social relations. Mr. Pitney is a 
Mason, and among his fellow citizens, although he has won high honor at 
their hands, he is an unassuming man, free from ostentation, which char- 
acteristic makes him very popular. 



ISRAEL D. LUM. 



Born on Cherry Hill, in Chatham township, Morris county, December 
8, 1S41, Israel D. Lum is the eldest son of Charles Lum. His youth was 
passed on the old farmstead and he early became familiar with the work of 
plowing, planting and harvesting. He continued under the parental roof 
until nineteen years of age, and in April, i860, went to Newark, where he 



BIOGBJPHICAL AJfD GEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 131 

learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed until the breaking out of the 
Civil war. 

On the 7th of August, 1862, he joined Company C, Fifteenth New Jer- 
sey Infantry, and served with the Army of the Potomac, his regiment form- 
ing a part of the Sixth Army Corps. With that command he participated 
in many important engagements, including the battles of Fredericksburg, 
Salem church, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, Wilderness 
and Spottsylvania, where he was wounded in the left hip joint. May 9, 1864. 
This disabled him for marching, and he was then put on detached service in 
the amtnunition department, continuing in that capacity until the close of the 
war, when he was honorably discharged, June 29, 1865. The military body 
to which Mr. Lum belonged was distinctively a " fighting regiment," and the 
losses b}' it sustained in battle were thirty-five per cent., — greater than those 
of any other New Jersey regiment. Its proportion killed at Spottsylvania 
was twenty-six per cent, and was exceeded only by the First Wisconsin 
Regiment, at Gettysburg, where the loss to said regiment was twenty-eight 
per cent. The total percentage of loss in killed and wounded, to the Fif- 
teenth New Jersey, was sixty-three. Special mention is made of this regi- 
ment in Colonel William F. Fox's History of United States Volunteers. Mr. 
Lum was president of his regimental association in 1895, being the first 
enlisted man to hold that office in said association. 

After his return to the north Mr. Lum completed his trade, worked as 
a journeyman for a time and then, in 1871, embarked in business on his own 
account as a contractor and builder, doing business in Chatham and Madison. 
He rebuilt the Van Waggoner drug store, in Madison, aft^r its destruction by 
fire, erected the Connett and Davidson residences and the Brower and Heald 
houses in Chatham, the Dunning Club and store building in Madison and 
many other of the leading structures in the two towns. 

On the 20th of November, 1870, Mr. Lum was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary L. Bonnell, a native of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, and a daugh- 
ter of Newell L. and Phoebe (Meeker) Bonnell, of old New Jersey families. 
Seven children have been born of this union, but three died in childhood. 
Those who are still living are Grace, Herbert, Russell and Mabel. The 
mother of this family died October 9, 1886, and Mr. Lum was again married 
June 2, 1890, his second union being with Miss Margaretta McDonald, a 
native of Newark, and a daughter of James and Mary (Mathews) McDonald, 



132 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEXEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

the former a native of Scotland, and the latter of the north of Ireland, and 
of Scotch-Irish descent. Two children grace the second marriage of Mr. 
Lum, Reginald P. and Naomi. Mrs. Lum is a member of the Presbyterian 
church and is a most estimable lady whose friends in the community are 
many. Mr. Lum belongs to U. S. Grant Post, No. 117, G. A. R. , of Chat- 
ham, New Jersey, is a Republican in his political views, and is an ardent 
worker in behalf of temperance. 



JAMES R. RUNYON. 

This honored resident of Passaic township comes of a family whose 
ancestral history has been intimately interwoven with that of New Jersey for 
a period of more than two hundred 3'ears. It is particularly consistent that 
a brief review be here accorded. 

The family is of French origin, and the name has undergone certain 
changes in orthography, having been originally spelled Ronguion, then Runn- 
ion and finally Runyon. On account of religious persecution, representa- 
tives of the name fled from France to America in 1663, and five years later 
the original progenitor of the New Jersey branch of the family took up his 
abode in Elizabethtown. He married Ann Boutcher, daughter of John 
Boutcher, of Hartford, England, and took up his residence in Elizabethtown. 
In 1672 he removed to Piscataway, Middlesex county. New Jersey. His chil- 
dren were Vincent, Dorien, Joseph Reune, Ephraim, Mary, Peter, Jane and 
Sarah; and it is from the first named that our subject is descended. Vincent 
Runyon and his wife Mary had four children: Vincent, Reune, Reuben and 
Reziah; and of this family Reune, who was born in 171 1, and died in 1776, 
married Rachel Drake, and had six children — Mary, Ephraim, Rachel, 
Reune, John and Reziah. 

Of this family John Runyon was the great-grandfather of our subject. 
He was born August 7, 1743, and died in 1792. He married Violet Layton, 
and their family numbered seven children: Reune, Enos, Ephraim, Mary, 
Francis, Thomas, and Rebecca. The grandfather of our subject, Reune 
Runyon, was born July 7, 1766, and died June 19, 1855. He and his wife 
Esther had five children — Benjamin, Violet, Harriet, Asa and David R. The 
The last named is the father of James R. Runyon, of this review, and was 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 133 

born September 21, 1796. January 28, 1S18, he married Esther Ross, 
daughter of John and Martha (Vantile) Ross, and had the following named 
children: Isaac, who was born November 20, 18 18, and died in 1892; Reune, 
who was born October -1 4, 1820, and died in 1838; Martha R. , who was born 
in 1823, and is the wife of Freeman Stelle; Benjamin, who was born in 1826 
and lives in Somerset county, New Jersey; John R. , who was born in [827 
and resides in Morristown; David, who was born in 1831 and died in 1895; 
James R. , the subject of this sketch; and William H. , who was born Sep- 
tember 8, 1837, and died in 1881. The father of this family was a black- 
smith and farmer of Somerset county for many years, and was also for some 
time a leading and influential citizen of Morris county. He was honored with 
a number of public offices, was originally a Whig, being a warm supporter of 
Henry Clay, and was afterward a Republican. His death occurred Decem- 
ber 4, 1886. 

In taking up the history of James R. Runyon we present to our readers 
the life record of one who has long and honorably been identified with the 
interests of Morris county. He was born February 26, 1834, reared toman- 
hood at his parental home, and in 1858 he was married to Miss Susan C. 
Dunn, a daughter of Abram Dunn. She was born in 1836, and by her mar- 
riage has become the mother of the following named: Martha F., Anna M., 
Alletta R. , Abram D., Susan D., and Harriet, who died in childhood. 

Mr. Runyon came to Morris county from Somerset county many years 
ago and has always lived in Passaic township, where he has carried on agri- 
cultural pursuits, with good success. In the affairs of the township he has 
been an important factor, and for twenty-five years has acceptably served in 
the office of commissioner of deeds, his long term well indicating his ability 
and fidelity in the office. In politics he is a stanch Republican, having 
throughout the time of the existence of the party been one of its zealous 
advocates. He is a recognized leader in public matters, and is a progressive 
citizen, whose support is cheerfully and generously given to all triatters per- 
taining to the public welfare. He and his family attend the Baptist church 
and in social circles occupy a prominent position. 

His son, Abram D. Runyon, is a wide-awake young man of the county, 
who was educated in the Millington Academy and is now the general man- 
ager of the manufacturing plant owned by Fred Nishwitz, of Millington. 
He has served in that position since 1892, discharging his duties in a prompt 



134 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

and capable manner, to the entire satisfaction of his employer and with credit 
to himself. Like his father, he is also an earnest Republican and takes an 
active interest in the advancement of his party, and is frequently seen in its 
state and other conventions. 



FREDERICK H. LUM. 



Ceaselessly to and fro ilies the deft shuttle which weaves the web of 
human destiny, and into the vast mosaic fabric enter the individuality, the 
effort, the accomplishment of each man, be his station the most lowly or one 
of pomp and power. Within the textile folds may be traced the line of each 
individuality, be it one that lends the sheen of honest worth and honest 
endeavor, or one that, dark and zigzag;, finds its way through warp and 
woof, marring the composite beauty by its blackened threads, ever in evi- 
dence of the shadowed and unprolific life. Into the great aggregate each 
individuality is merged, and yet the essence of each is never lost, be the 
angle of influence widespreading and grateful or narrow and baneful. He 
who essays biography finds much of profit and much of alluring fascination 
when he would follow out, in even a cursory way, the tracings of a life his- 
tory, seeking to find the keynote of each respective personality, as one gen- 
eration succeeds another. These efforts and their resulting transmission can 
not fail of value in an objective way, for in each case the lesson of life may 
be conned, — line upon line and precept upon precept. The subject of this 
review stands as a representative of old and honored families, not only of 
the state of New Jersey, but of the nation, and in tracing the genealogy the 
record is one which bespeaks noble men and noble deeds; bespeaks the 
unblotted escutcheon and lives significant of honor and usefulness in the 
various relations of life. Not unprofitable can prove even the passing glance 
at the careers of those who have thus conferred dignity upon society. 

The original progenitor of the Lum family, in all its branches in 
America, according to well authenticated record, was Samuel Lum, who was 
born in England, in the year 1619, and who died in 1703. His three sons, 
Jonathan, Matthew and Samuel, emigrated to America in the early part of 
the seventeenth century, taking up their original residence in Connecticut. 
The direct line of descent to the immediate subject of this review traces 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEA'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 135 

through the Samuel just mentioned, his son, Samuel (3d), who died in 1732; 
thence through the latter's son, Samuel (4th), son of Israel, born in 1745, 
died in 1S35, being the father of Samuel D. (1819-1851), who was the 
father of Harvey M. Lum, father of Frederick H., whose name initiates 
this review. 

Harvey M. Lum was born in Chatham, New Jersey, in the year 1820, 
and died at Chatham in 1886, having been engaged. in building and standing 
as one of the honored and influential citizens of the community. He had 
two brothers and four sisters, namely: Charles; Paul; Caroline, wife of 
Hudson Minton; Phebe Ann, wife of Harvey Muchmore and mother of Hud- 
son Muchmore; Rowena, who died unmarried; and Jane, who was the first 
wife of said Harvey Muchmore, father of Alfred Muchmore; and Sarah, who 
became the wife of Jephthah B. Munn. Two of the direct ancestors of our 
subject, Samuel and Israel Lum (father and son), fought side by side in the 
Continental army during the war of the Revolution, being ardent patriots 
and rendering the valiant service of loyal sons of the Republic. The mater- 
nal great-grandfather of Mr. Lum participated in all the battles of the Rev- 
olutionary war, and although he was often where bullets flew thick and fast 
he never received a scratch and was never sick. He died on his way home 
with a fever. 

Harvey M. Lum was twice married, his first wife having been Margaret 
Sturges, who bore him a daughter, Margaret Drake, who became the wife of 
John A. Trowbridge. He subsequently was united in marriage to Miss Jane 
S. Bruen, daughter of Ashbel and Mary (Chandler) Bruen, and they became 
the parents of four sons and one daughter, namely: Frederick Harvey, the 
immediate subject of this sketch; Merritt Bruen, to whom individual refer- 
ence is made elsewhere in this volume; Edward Harris; Charles Mandred; 
and Caroline Elizabeth, the wife of Frank M. Budd, of Chatham. The 
ancestor of all the Bruens in north Jersey was Obadiah, the second son of 
John Bruen, Esq., of Bruen, Stapleford, Cheshire, England, and records 
extant show that he was christened on Christmas day, 1606. He was a 
descendant of Robert Le Brun, A. D. 1230, who came from Normandy to 
England, — undoubtedly with William the Conquerer, — and of whom record 
is made in Domesday Book. 

Mary (Chandler) Bruen, the maternal grandmother of Frederick H., was 
born in 1803 and died in 1889, being the daughter of Jonathan Chandler, of 



136 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJTEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Elizabethtown, New Jersey (1762-1S36). At the age of sixteen years he 
entered the Continental army as a drummer boy, was captured by the British, 
but eventually released. The children ofAshbel and Mary (Chandler) Bruen 
were: Benjamin, unmarried; Phebe Jane, mother of our subject; Elizabeth, 
who married Stephen Bonnel and went to Michigan; Theodore W. ; Caro- 
line, who became the wife of John Baldwin, of Cheapside; Merritt, unmar- 
ried; Francis Marion; and Mary Adeline, who married Joseph Ebling, of 
Harlem, New York. 

Frederick Harvey Lum, the immediate subject of this review, was born 
at Chatham, on the 5th of October, 1848, the son of Harvey Mandred Lum 
and Phebe Jane Smith (Bruen) Lum. He received excellent advantages in 
the way of preliminary education and eventually entered the school of Julius 
D. Rose, Ph. D., of Summit, New Jersey, graduating at this institution in 
1866. He then began the work of preparing himself for that profession 
which has represented his vocation in life, and in which he has attained suc- 
cess and precedence, taking up the study of law under the able preceptorship 
of Judge John Whitehead and William B. Guild, Esq., of Newark, New Jer- 
sey, and securing admission to the bar of the state, as an attorney, at the 
February term of 1870, and as a counselor at the November term of court in 
1873. Upon the day of his admission as an attorney he entered into a pro- 
fessional partnership with his former preceptor, Mr. Guild, under the firm 
name of Guild & Lum, and this alliance has ever since obtained, the firm re- 
taining a representative clientage and touching much of the important legal 
business in their province. The office headquarters of the firm are in the 
Prudential Life Insurance Company's building in the city of Newark, though 
Mr. Lum has retained his residence in Chatham, Morris county, since 1871. 
For twenty-five years he has been the counsel for the German National 
Bank of Newark and a director in the same; and he has also been counsel for 
Bishop Wigger. He is closely identified with Newark and is well known as 
an able lawyer. 

Mr. Lum is well versed in the learning of his profession, and with a deep 
knowledge of human nature and of the springs of human conduct, with great 
discrimination and tact, he has proved to be an advocate of power and influ- 
ence and a wise and conservative counsel. He has never been an aspirant 
for political preferment, though a stanch advocate of the principles and pol- 
icies of the Republican party. His interest in all that touches the welfare 



BWGRAPHIC.il AjYD genealogical history. 187 

of Chatham is constant and vigorous, and his personal popularity in the com- 
munity is signalized in the fact that he served as president of the village of 
Chatham during its entire period of corporate existence, while upon the 
incorporation of Chatham as a borough he became its mayor, and has ever 
since been the incumbent of that offics, — his service at the head of the munic- 
ipal government of the place having thus extended over a period of seven 
years. When he was elected mayor he received every vote irrespecti\'e of 
party, which fact alone evidences his popularity. 

On the loth of March, 1870, Mr. Lum was united in marriage to Miss 
Alice Elizabeth Harris, daughter of Edward C. and Rachel P. (Banta) Har- 
ris, of Nyack, New York. They have an interesting family of six children, 
— Susie May, Charles Harris, Frederick Harvey, Jr., Ralph Emerson, Ernest 
Culver and Lorentha Storms. Susie May is a graduate of Wellesley College 
and a very fine musician; Charles Harris is a graduate of the Columbia Col- 
lege School of Mines and is an architect at No. 70 Fifth avenue. New York 
city; two sons are now in the college, and one ready to enter Princeton Col- 
lege. The attractive family home is one in which are ever in evidence the 
refining amenities which contribute so largely to the satisfaction and pleasure 
of life, and here an unostentatious and gracious hospitality is extended to a 
large circle of friends. 



HENRY WILLIAM FORD. 

On the ancestral homestead of the Ford family — a place historic as the 
headquarters of General Washington in the memorable winter of 1779 — 
this gentleman is spending the autumn of life, surrounded by the comforts 
that an active, useful and honorable business career have brought to him. 
Thirty-three acres of the "old homestead" are embraced within the 
grounds surrounding his residence, and the beautiful lawns, tree-crowned 
hills and shady nooks take on an additional beauty and interest when we 
think that one of the most important acts in the drama of American history 
was here planned and that the immortal Washington graced the scene by 
his presence. 

The past presents a picture of an old-time colonial gentleman, Jacob 
Ford, Sr. , as the owner of this place in the early part of the eighteenth 
century. This country was then a province of Great Britain, paying its 



138 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ<-B GEXEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

tributes into the English treasury. Jacob Ford transformed his property 
into a good home, rearing his family there, and it was there, in the year 
1737, that a son was born, named in honor of his father, Jacob Ford, Jr. 
He grew to manhood in those years in which the oppression of England was 
laid most heavily upon the colonist, until, willing no longer to suffer the 
abuses of a tyrannical monarch, they rose in rebellion. With strong sym- 
pathy for his fellow countrymen, Jacob Ford, Jr., joined the American army 
to fight for the liberty of his nation, and when the movements of the army 
brought the troops to northern New Jersey in the year 1779, he granted the 
Ford homestead to Washington for his headquarters, and thus it became one 
of the places of historic interest of the country. The Ford family were 
devoted patriots, doing all in their power to advance the cause of the col- 
onists and alleviate the condition of those heroes who were valiantly fight- 
ing for freedom and were at that time encamped in their vicinity. 

Gabriel H. Ford, son of Colonel Jacob Ford, Jr., was born there, and, 
turning his attention to the law, practiced his profession in Morristown. He 
was. appointed a judge of the supreme court and served as such about thirty 
years, and to-day his decisions are frequently quoted. The birth of his son, 
Henry A. Ford, also occurred there, and in the Morristown Academy he 
completed his literary education. Preparing for the bar he attained an 
eminent position as a legal practitioner and enjoyed a large clientele which 
came not only from Morris but also from a number of adjoining counties. 
He won many notable forensic triumphs and also gained excellent financial 
returns from his extensive and important law business. His political support 
was given to the principles of Democracy, but he was never an aspirant for 
office. He married Miss Jane Millen, and of the union twelve children were 
born, seven yet living. The father passed away in 1872 and the mother 
closed her eyes in death in 1869. 

Henry W. Ford was born in Morristown, on the 20th of January, 1829, 
and acquired his education in the academy there. He entered upon his 
business career in a humble capacity in the National Bank of the Republic, 
of New York city, in 1849, and rose successively, step by step, through the 
various positions of trust and responsibility until he was made president of 
the institution. His ancestors had aided in establishing the country on 
a firm foundation, and it remains to the present generation to advance the 
prosperity, welfare and happiness of the nation through the legitimate 



BIOGRAPHICAL AKD GE.KEALOGICAL HISTORY. 139 

channels of business. In this work Mr. Ford has borne an important part. 
His rise in the bank indicates the possession of sterHng qualities, — enterprise, 
accuracy, laudable ambition and thorough reliability. He studied closely 
the financial condition of the nation, and guided the bank in accordance 
with a safe yet progressive policy that made it one of the strongest insti- 
tutions of the metropolis. He realized that the banker is in a position of 
trust equaled by few, as in his keeping are placed the earnings of labor; and 
his methods were therefore above question. He continued to act as presi- 
dent of the National Bank of the Republic, — with which he had been con- 
nected throughout his business career, — until 1885, when by resignation he 
withdrew from the office and retired to his beautiful home in Morristown. 

Mr. Ford was married in i860 to Miss Emily L. Ward, and to them 
have been born six children, four of whom are living: Louisa, widow of H. 
G. Parkin; Henry Ward, of Morristown, who married Rosette Suckley; 
Cornelia G. , wife of Thomas H. Burchell, of New York; and Frederick W., a 
student in Princeton College, New Jersey. 

Mr. Ford is a thoughtful, earnest man, possessing a spirit of reticence 
which arises from a dislike of ostentation. His record, however, needs no 
words of praise or commendation. Coming from a distinguished and honor- 
able ancestry, his lines of life have been cast in harmony therewith, and in 
the ancestral home — one of the most beautiful and attractive country 
residences in the state — he is quietly spending his days where nature in its 
ever varying changes brings the restful happiness that should ever crown an 
honorable and useful career. 



REV. B. C. MEGIE, D. D. 

In the death of this gentleman, June 12, 1890, Dover and New Jersey 
lost one of their most prominent and highly respected citizens. As the day, 
with its morning of hope and promise, its noontide of activity, its evening 
of completed and successful efforts, ending in the grateful rest and quiet of 
the night, so was the life of this honored man. His career was a long, busy, 
useful and noble one, and the inspiration of his holy life remains as a 
benediction to all who knew him. This volume would be incomplete with- 
out the record of his life, for through a half century he was prominently 
■connected with all that was best in the history of the community. The 



140 BIOGRAPHICAL AjYD GEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

following record we have taken largely from a copy of The Era' published 
at the time of his demise, which said: 

"Rev. Dr. Megie traced his ancestry to the sturdy old Covenanters of 
Scotland, and he inherited to a large degree the characteristics of piety, 
intelligence and energy that have distinguished that people and their descend- 
ants. His original progenitor in this country was John Megie, who came 
from Scotland to Perth Amboy in 1685. The Doctor was born December 
4, 1813, and was therefore in his seventy-seventh year when he passed 
away. He completed his secular education in the University of the City of 
New York by his graduation in that institution, which fourteen years ago 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity, an honor richly merited 
and worthily bestowed. He pursued his theological studies in the Union 
Theological Seminary and was graduated in 1838. Soon after he was engaged 
to supply the pulpit of the Presbyterian church at New Paltz, on the Hudson 
river, opposite Poughkeepsie, New York, where he continued about a year, 
when he was called to the pastorate of the church in Dover. 

"With the history of the Presbyterian church here Rev. Dr. Megie was 
more closely identified than any other person. The church was organized 
April 3, 1835, by a committee appointed by the Presbytery of Newark, and in 
May, 1S39, Rev. Megie was called to the charge. He began his ministry in July 
and was installed by the presbytery of Rockaway, November 15, 1842, which 
was also the day of the dedication of the new church, which had been built 
under his direction and still stands at the corner opposite the present edifice 
of this congregation. Prior to this time, during the first three years of his pas- 
torate, he conducted religious services in the old stone academy. Under his 
earnest preaching and his able administration of the affairs of the congrega- 
tion, the church grew and flourished to such an extent that it became 
necessary to erect a still larger house of worship, — the present edifice, — which 
was dedicated July 26, 1872. The new church cost about thirty thousand 
dollars, which was all provided for at the time of the dedication, and every 
pew was rented when the church was opened for service. This ministr}', so 
successful in result, lasted thirty-si.\ years, until June i, 1875, when Dr. 
Megie accepted a call to the church of Pleasant Grove, on Schooley's Mount- 
ain. He had succeeded in building up from almost nothing the largest 
church in Dover, and the result of his beneficent labors can never be known, 
to the full extent until the records of the hereafter are read. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMB GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 141 

"He not only served his people in Dover, but ministered to those of his 
faith in Berkshire Valley, Richard Mine, Mine Hill and elsewhere. The Welsh 
Presbyterian church at Richard Mine, organized in 1870, and the Mine Hill 
Presbyterian church, organized in 1874, were offsprings of the Dover church 
and largely the result of the care and nurture of Dr. Megie. His pastoral and 
personal relations to the families to whom he ministered were of a peculiarly 
affectionate and tender nature. For several generations he had united their 
members in marriage, had baptized their children, and had performed the 
burial services for their dead. The relation was so strong that even after he 
had left the community he was frequently called to return and officiate on 
such occasions, as many felt that such ceremonies would not be complete 
and fitting in a family sense unless he was associated with them. 

" Dr. Megie continued as pastor of the church at Pleasant Grove a little 
more than twelve years, until the fall of 1889, when he was appointed by the state 
board of education as superintendent of the Morris county schools. For this 
position he was eminently qualified by his scholarly acquirements, and although 
he had passed nearly three-quarters of a century of life he brought to the 
performance of his duties an energ}^ equal to that of most men twenty years 
his junior, and his ripe experience and natural executive ability enabled him to 
prosecute his work with marked influence upon the many schools under his 
care and to the general satisfaction of those interested in them. By means 
of competitive examinations he elevated the standard of reading in all the 
schools, and in a similar way succeeded in familiarizing the pupils with the 
history and geography of the state of New Jersey and of the county of Morris. 
From his early youth Dr. Megie took great interest in the cause of education 
and was always concerned for the welfare of the schools of Dover. In 1848 
a select school, which he strongly urged and greatly aided, was established in 
the basement of his church. Then another select school, which he fostered, 
was established in 1850, on Prospect street. This was followed by a board- 
ing and day school in the house of Dr. Megie, which was conducted by his 
daughters and is still continued by Miss Abbie Megie. 

" In all matters of local history Dr. Megie was looked upon as an author- 
ity. His researches among our local records were very extensive and he con- 
tributed much in the way of reliable historical matter to various publications. 
His ' Tales of Old Randolph' form a charming compilation of the historical 
facts and traditions pertaining to the township. He was also a contributor 



142 BIOGRAPHICAL AjYD GEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

to some of the leading religious newspapers of the country, and his writings, 
on all subjects, were characterized by ability in composition and terseness of 
expression. 

"In the affairs of the presbytery Dr. Megie always bore a conspicuous 
part. He was the stated clerk of the old presbytery of Rockaway, and when 
the reunion of the old and new schools was effected and the presbytery of 
Morris and Orange was formed, he became its stated clerk, remaining in that 
position until about two years prior to his death, when he resigned on 
account of his heavy duties relating to the office of county superintendent of 
schools. At the time of his death he was holding the position of moderator of 
the presbytery, and presided at one of its meetings in Mendham only days two 
prior to his death. He became widely known throughout the state in connection 
with all religious work, and the general regard in which he was held for his 
usefulness was not confined to the denomination to which he belonged. All 
good causes received his willing and effective support. 

' 'As a citizen of the community he was also greatly revered and his counsel 
in secular affairs was often sought. Possessed of considerable business ability 
and a naturally progressive inclination, he took a considerable interest in the 
affairs of the town, and thus became more familiar with the secular affairs 
of the people than pastors usually do. This trait brought him in close 
relation even to those who were not of his congregation and still further 
increased the general esteem in which he was held.. His regard for the young 
was another predominant trait in his character. It was his custom to watch 
the progress of the young men of his congregation, to give them assistance 
in their studies and ofttimes to render them service in introducing them to 
business or professional careers. 

"In his domestic relations Dr. Megie was peculiarly happy, and the 
respect he enjoyed for his public usefulness was supplemented by all the joys 
of a model home and the ardent affection of his family. His estimable wife 
was spared to share with him a union of unusual duration, and their children 
grew to do them honor in their old age. Upon his twenty-fifth birthday and 
during the first year of his ministi^y — December 4, 183S — Dr. Megie wedded 
Miss Mary Belden, daughter of Rev. William Belden, the ctremony being 
performed by the bride's father. Their removal to Dover occurred about six 
months later, and from that time on they were closely identified with its 
social affairs, as well as its religious and business life. They had six children. 




p^ '•^ 



i 

¥" 




BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ{EALOGICAL HISTORY. 14B 

namely: Susan, wife of Coley James, of Plymouth, Connecticut; Lucy, 
principal of the Prospect Hill school; William E., of New York; Abbie, 
assistant of the Prospect Hill school; Burtis C, a well known educator of 
New York city; and Minnie, wife of Holloway H. Hance, of Stephensbury. 
" Such is the brief outline of a cultured and a capable Christian gentle- 
man. If all of its individual kindnesses, generous deeds and exertions for the 
good of others could be noted, what a record of unselfish devotion to God and 
love for human kind it would present! It is no ordinary loss that the community 
mourns this day. This life was so closely interwoven with the home life and 
most sacred associations of so many families in this community that the 
sudden severance caused unfeigned and universal grief. Words are inade- 
quate to measure it, or portray the sense of love and veneration in which 
Dr. Megie was held by the people he served so faithfully and so long. 
Neither can they estimate the breadth of his character or sum up the total 
of his usefulness; but as long as memory is left to them they will cherish 
the recollections of his helpfulness, his nobility and his noble, inspiring 
life." 



HON. AUGUSTUS W. CUTLER. 

No compendium such as the province of this work defines in its essen- 
tial limitations will serve to offer fit memorial to the life and accomplishments 
of the honored subject of this sketch — a man remarkable in the breadth of 
his wisdom, in his indomitable perseverance, his strong individuality, and 
yet one whose entire life had not one esoteric phase, being an open scroll 
inviting the closest scrutiny. True, his were "massive deeds and great" 
in one sense, and yet his entire accomplishment but represented the result 
of the fit utilization of the innate talent which was his, and the directing of 
his efforts along those lines where mature judgment and rare discrimination 
lead the way. There was in Mr. Cutler a weight of character, a native 
sagacity, a far-seeing judgment and a fidelity of purpose that commanded 
the respect of all. A man of indefatigable enterprise and fertility of 
resource, he carved his name deeply on the records of New Jersey as an 
eminent lawyer and statesman, and to-day he is honored throughout the 
commonwealth by those who recognize his able efforts in her behalf. 

Augustus W. Cutler was born in Morristown, October 22, 1827, and 



144 BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GEJ\'-EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

died in his native city January i, 1897. A representative of a prominent old 
New England family that originated in the mother country, he claimed 
among his ancestors those whose force of character made them leaders in 
public life, and whose acts form a part of the history of the nation. His 
great-grandfather, Silas Condict, who built the Cutler mansion in Morris- 
town, was a member of the first continental congress, was president of the 
committee of safety of New Jerse\' during the war of the Revolution, and 
was speaker of the house of the state legislature of New Jersey for several 
years, the republic having been established in the meantime. The old 
Cutler home, which he erected in 1798, was at the time one of the finest 
residences in New Jersey. The mantels were all of carved hard wood with 
marble slabs, which were brought long distances on horseback. Five gen- 
erations of the Cutler family have been born in that residence. The grand- 
father of our subject, Abijah Cutler, was one of the heroes of the Revolution 
who valiantly fought for the independence of the American colonies. His 
father, Joseph Cutler, was a brigadier-general of the cavalry forces of New 
Jersey. He was born in Morris county and became a prominent and influ- 
ential citizen of Morristown. In early life he was connected with the build- 
ing interests, but later turned his attention to farming. He married a 
daughter of Silas Condict, and they became the parents of three sons and a 
daughter: Silas C, who engaged in the practice of medicine; Abbie S., 
wife of Rev. James Hyndshaw, of New York; James P., a Presbyterian 
minister, who died in early manhood; and Augustus W. The father died 
about 1854, and his wife passed away in 1846. 

Upon his father's farm near Morristown, Augustus W. Cutler spent his 
boyhood days, and pursued his education in the district schools preparatory 
to entering Yale College, but was obliged to leave college before the senior 
year on account of ill health. He acquired his professional education under 
the direction of Governor Haines, of Sussex county, and was admitted to the 
bar in 1849, while in 1852 he became counselor-at-law. Later he was made 
special master and examiner in chancery, and in the line of his chosen call- 
ing he won distinctive preferment, by reason of his marked ability, his keen 
analytical power and his comprehensive and accurate understanding of the 
principles of jurisprudence. 

A close student of the political situation of the day and viewing broadly 
the needs of the country, he became deeply interested in the work accom- 
plished by the political parties, and from 1850 was a recognized leader in 
his party's counsels. He first supported the Whig party, and on its dissolu- 
tion joined the ranks of the Democracy. In 1856 he was elected prosecutor 
of pleas of Morris county, which position he filled until 1861. He served as 
state senator from 1871 until 1874, and was a member of the state constitu- 



BIOGRJPHICAL AND. GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 145 

tional convention in 1873, his knowledge of constitutional law and his 
unselfish devotion to the best interests of the commonwealth making him a 
most valued member of that body. For twenty-one years he was a member, 
and for several years president, of the Morristown board of education, but 
resigned that position in 1875 to take his seat in congress, to which he had 
been elected in 1874, over the late William Walter Phelps. In 1876 he was 
re-elected, and in 1878 declined a third nomination. In 1896, however, he 
was once more nominated, but in that year was defeated by Mahlon Pitney. 
His name was often mentioned in connection with gubernatorial honors, and 
he was recognized as one of the foremost statesmen of New Jersey, honored 
and respected by persons of all political faiths by reason of his unquestioned 
devotion to duty and his fidelity to the principles in which he so firmly 
believed. Any measure which he thought would prove of benefit to the 
majority was not slow in eliciting his support, nor did he hesitate to condemn 
those which he believed would prove detrimental. 

In 1 86 1 he drafted the original free-school bill, and was often called the 
"father of the free-school system of the state." In 1864 he made a fight 
against the railroads in the state, and secured the proceeds of the sales and 
rental of riparian lands for the benefit of the free-school trustees. In 1874 
he introduced into the senate the general railroad bill of New Jersey, which 
authorized any person or persons so desiring, to build railroads in New Jer- 
sey, thus taking the exclusive right of railroad building from those who 
wished to monopolize it and use their right for their own selfish ends. Mr. 
Cutler was also always active in upholding the rights of the colored people, 
and was largely instrumental in securing the passage of the civil-rights bill. 
While in congress he introduced and advocated a bill for the appropriating 
of the proceeds of the sales of the public lands to the different states and ter- 
ritories, according to their population, for the benefit of free schools. Dur- 
ing his first term in congress he introduced a bill providing for the creation 
of a department of agriculture, introduced it during a second term, and in a 
third terrn it became a law, and the secretary of agriculture became a mem- 
ber of the cabinet. Mr. Cutler secured the passage of a bill providing back 
pensions to soldiers, and thus in various ways left the impress of his strong 
individuality upon the legislation of the country. He was earnest, sincere 
and honorable in all the duties of statecraft, won the confidence of his col- 
leagues and the respect of all students of legislation. 

In the intervals when not engaged with official labors he practiced law 

with eminent success in Morristown, and devoted all of his leisure time to 

agricultural interests. He owned farms in eighteen states, and was always 

a close student of agricultural interests, doing all in his power to advance the 

welfare of the farming class, and throughout New Jersey was known as the 
10 



146 BIOGRAPHICAL AJTD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

" farmers' friend." He was a member of the State Grange and Farmers' 
Alliance, and also belonged to the State Geological Society and the Masonic 
fraternity. In accordance with the teachings of the last named institution he 
recognized the brotherhood of man, and his deep interest in humanity was 
manifest by his earnest efforts for the advancement of educational, social and 
moral interests. His charity was of the practical kind that enabled others to 
help themselves, and he not only provided means of improvement along 
material lines but opened to many the broader channels of intellectual 
advancement. Through the various and arduous cares that came to him in 
professional and political life, he never neglected the holier duties that rest 
upon every individual, and his church work was ever near and dear to his 
heart. While in Washington he conducted a Bible class for men, and every 
Sunday afternoon he went to the Reform school, where he addressed the 
boys. He made the personal acquaintance of many of them and largely 
influenced them toward a better future. He was a member of the reform- 
school committee of the District of Columbia, and his labors in connection 
therewith so improved the school that it became almost self-sustaining. Dur- 
ing the time he passed in Morristown he conducted a Bible class in Morris 
Plains. He was very charitable and benevolent, and was entirely free from 
ostentation in his beneiicence. A helping hand was ever extended to the 
poor and needy, and often times food and fuel was sent to the homes of the 
poor, when the recipients knew not who was the donor. He truly followed 
the spirit of the teaching " Let not your left hand know what your right is 
doing," and while the labors of his noble life are immeasurable, we know 
that his influence remains as a blessed benediction and that his memory is 
enshrined in the hearts of all who know him. 

Pleasant, indeed, were the home relations of Mr. Cutler, who was hap- 
pily married, in 1854, to Miss Julia R. Walker, of Albany, New York, a 
descendant of Peregrine White, the first white child born in New England 
after the landing of the Pilgrims from the Mayflower. Mrs. Cutler is a most 
refined and cultured lady, and with her husband has shared the acquaintance 
and friendship of many of the nation's most prominent people. She still 
resides in Morristown, and has a family of three sons who are occupying 
prominent positions in honored walks of life: the eldest is Judge Willard W. 
Cutler, of Morristown; Condict W. , a practicing physician of New York city, 
is the second; and the youngest is Frederick W. , a clergyman of the Presby- 
terian church. 

JUDGE WILLARD WALKER CUTLER, 

of Morristown, was born in the city which is still his home, November 
3, 1856, and attended the Morristown Academy and high school, after which 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 147 

he pursued a two-years course of study in Rutgers College. Determining to 
make the practice of law his life work, he pursued a course of reading under 
the direction of his father, and at the November term of court in 1878 was 
admitted to the bar as an attorney, and in 188 1 as a counselor. Later he 
became special master in chancery and a supreme-court commissioner. He 
has always resided in his native town, and in early manhood became promi- 
nent in public affairs. In December, 1882, he was appointed by Governor 
Ludlow to the position of prosecutor of pleas in Morris county, to fill a 
vacancy caused by the resignation of George W. Forsyth, and in January, 
1883, he was appointed — the appointment being confirmed by the senate 
— for a term of five years. In 1887 he was re-appointed, by Governor 
Green, and in 1893 by Governor Werts, but in the spring of the latter year 
he resigned in order to accept the position of lay judge of Morris county, to 
which he was appointed by Governor Werts for a five-years term. 

During his term as prosecutor of pleas Judge Cutler was connected with 
many important cases of more than local interest, including the murder 
case of James Treglowe. He was for many 3'ears counsel for Morris town- 
ship, and is one of the most able lawyers that the county has produced. He 
is remarkable among lawyers for the wide research and provident care with 
which he prepares his cases. In no instance has his reading ever been con- 
fined to the limitations of the questions at issue; it has gone beyond and com- 
passed every contingency and provided not alone for the expected, but for 
the unexpected, which happens in the courts quite as frequently as out of 
them. His logical grasp of facts and principles and of the law applicable to 
them has been another potent element in his success, and a remarkable 
clearness of expression, an adequate and precise diction, which enables him 
to make others understand not only the salient points of his argument, but 
his every fine gradation of meaning, may be accounted one of his most con- 
spicuous gifts and accomplishments. 

Judge Cutler is also a successful men of affairs. He was one of the 
organizers and has always been the vice-president of the Morristown Trust 
Company and the Morris County Mortgage and Realty Company. Nor does 
he neglect the holier duties of life, being to-day the honored and efficient 
president of the Young Men's Christian Association of Morristown, while the 
South Street Presbyterian church numbers him among its faithful members. 
He was married in December, 1879, to Miss Mary B., daughter of John J. 
Hinchman, of Brooklyn, New York, and they have four daughters and two 
sons. Enjoj'ing the hospitality of the best homes of Morristown and the 
friendship of man}' of her best people. Judge Cutler and his familj' occupy a 
very enviable position in social circles. 



148 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

CONDICT W. CUTLER, 

the second son of Hon. A. W. Cutler, is a well known physician of New 
York city. He was born on the old homestead and was graduated in 
Rutgers College in the class of 1879. He then began preparation for his 
chosen calling in the New York College of Physicians and Surgeons, where 
he was graduated with honor in 1883, winning the five-hundred-dollar prize. 
For two or three years he was house physician in Bellevue Hospital, and now 
has an extensive private practice in New York city, being one of the best 
known members of the profession. His superior ability, his deep research 
and careful investigation into the principles and practice of medicine have 
gained him prestige and eminence that are indeed enviable. At the present 
time he has charge of the New York City Dispensary, in addition to the 
duties of his private patronage. He is the author of a number of very 
valuable medical works, ranks high in medical societies, and is a valued 
representative of the profession. 

Dr. Cutler married Miss Cora Carpenter, of Warsaw, Indiana, and has 
one son, Condict W. , Jr. He is a Democrat in politics, is a man of fine 
personal appearance, and is a recognized leader in social circles. 



FREDERICK WALKER CUTLER, 

the youngest son of Augustus W. Cutler, was born in the old home, March 
24, 1 86 1, and was educated in the high school of Morristown, under private 
instruction and in Rutgers College, in which institution he was graduated 
with high honors in the class of 1883. Feeling that his time and energies 
should be devoted to the uplifting of his fellow men, he prepared for the 
work of the ministry in the Union Theological Seminary, and was graduated 
in 1886. The same year his alma mater conferred upon him the degree of 
Master of Arts. Licensed to preach by the presbytery of Morris and 
Orange, in 1886, he was installed as pastor of the First Woodhaven (Brook- 
lynj Presbyterian church, and occupied that pulpit until 1894, when he 
resigned and took up the study of law in the New York University Law 
School. He is now engaged in practicing law and in managing the estate 
left by his father. His father's death made it necessary for him to abandon 
regular church work for a time, in order that he might look after the interests 
of the property, and his law studies were pursued with the idea of being 
broadened for future ministerial labors, as well as fitted for the conduct of 
his business interests. His work in the church was very successful. He 
was instrumental in the erection of two church edifices while in Brooklyn, 
and he yet preaches almost every Sunday in different pulpits, while in the 




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BIOGRJPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



149 



work of the Young Men's Christian Association he is very active and influen- 
tial. In politics he is also prominent, supporting the Democracy, and is a 
forceful, logical, entertaining and convincing political speaker. 



THE FAIRCHILD FAMILY. 

Since the year 1735 the name of Fairchild has been inseparably inter- 
woven with the history of Morris county. Tlie ancestry is English, and less 
than two decades had passed from the time the Pilgrim fathers landed at 
Plymouth Rock vyhen Thomas Fairchild, a native of England, crossed the 
Atlantic to the colony of Connecticut, taking up his residence in Stratford. 
This was in 1639, and his descendants now number about six thousand. Mrs. 
Annie Fairchild Plant has spent years of labor and research in tracing the 
different branches of the family and collecting data relating thereto, and has 




Fairchild Homestead. 

now ready for publication a history of the family, which will include bio- 
graphical sketches of those representatives who have attained prominence, 
together with matters of historical interest, copies of old wills and deeds, 
together with the place of residence and occupation of the members of the 
family and portraits and views of old family homesteads. 

Caleb Fairchild, the direct ancestor of the branch of the family living in 
Morris county, located in Whippany, New Jersey, in 1735. He was born in 
1693, and died on the ist of May, 1777, at the age of eighty-four years. He 
and his wife were members of the First Presbyterian church of Morristown, 
as early as 1742. In his will he mentioned his wife, Annie, and seven chil- 
dren, appointing two of his sons as executors. He left ten pounds sterling 
to each of his children, and after the death of his widow his executors were 
to receive all real estate and personal property. 



150 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJfEALOOICAL HISTORY. 

Matthew Fairchild, the eldest son of Caleb Fairchild, was born in 1720, 
and died June 5, 1790, at the age of sixty-nine years. He had ten children, 
all baptized in the First Presbyterian church of Morristown; and the seventh 
of the family was Jonathan Fairchild, who was born November 3, 175 i, and 
baptised December 10, 1752. He died August 5, 1813, at the age of sixty- 
three years. On the Sth of September, 1773, he married Sarah Howell, and 
they became the parents of seven children. 

Dr. Stephen Fairchild, their youngest son, was born in Littleton, Mor- 
ris county, New Jersey, October 28, 1792. He was a man of strong men- 
tality, possessed a very studious nature and after acquiring a common-school 
education prepared himself for the practice of medicine. He pursued his 
studies under the direction of Drs. Ebenezer and Charles E. Pierson, of 
Morristown, and also attended medical lectures in Philadelphia. For a year 
he engaged in practice in New York, and then, upon the urgent solicitation 
of many friends, removed to Parsippany, New Jersey, in 18 16, as the suc- 
cessor of Dr. Hartwell, who had recently been removed by death. For 
fifty-six years he successfully engaged in the practice of his chosen calling, 
and his pronounced skill and ability made him a leader in his profession. 
Yet he was not only an eminent physician, but was also an earnest and 
devout Christian. To his patients he brought not only healing remedies 
for the body, but also the consolations of the gospel for the healing of the 
spirit. Few physicians have ever been more loved or honored than Dr. 
Stephen Fairchild. Death came to him after a long illness, marked by the 
greatest suffering, but he bore it all with Christian fortitude and his faith 
never faltered. He died surrounded by his family, July 13, 1872, and was 
laid to rest in the cemetery of Parsippany. 

Dr. Stephen Fairchild enjoyed an ideal home life. He was married on 
the I Sth of May, 18 18, to Miss Euphemia M. BrinckerhofT, born in Mount 
Hops, New Jersey, in September, 1796, daughter of George D. and Euphe- 
mia (Ashfield) Brinckerhoff. Retiring from business, her father purchased a 
home in Parsippany, New Jersey, to which he removed his family in 1797, 
the residence having been a noted tavern in Revolutionary times. It became 
the birth place of the children of Dr. Stephen and Euphemia Fairchild, and 
was destroyed by fire in November, 1874; but in the spring of 1875 it was 
rebuilt by Mrs. R. V. W. Fairchild, on the old site, and continued to be the 
home of Mrs. Euphemia Fairchild through her last years. She passed away 
June 25, 1882. She was a lady of the old school, amiable, educated and 
refined, and a sincere Christian. 

The children of Dr. Stephen Fairchild and his wife were Richard Van 
Wyck, born February 22, 1819; and Eliza S., born October 19, 1820; but 
the latter died in infancy. 




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BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 151 

The only son followed in his father's footsteps, and the two were asso- 
ciated in business for a number of years, a most ideal relation existing 
between them. The son was prepared for college in the classical school 
conducted by Ezra Fairchild, in Mendham, New Jersey, and in 1837 entered 
the junior class at Princeton College, where he was graduated in 1839. He 
studied medicine under the professional guidance of his father, and subse- 
quently under that of Dr. McClellan, of Philadelphia, and Dr. Mott, of New 
York. He entered upon practice with his father in 1843 and attained emi- 
nence in professional circles, for his knowledge was comprehensive and 
accurate, and he possessed exceptional skill in the diagnosis of cases and the 
administration of proper remedies. 

Dr. Richard Van Wyck Fairchild was twice married. In November, 
1852, Elizabeth, daughter of Benjamin Howell, of Troy, New Jersey, 
became his wife, but after a few years they were separated by the hand of 
death, Mrs. Fairchild passing away January 16, 1862. On the 13th of June, 
1866, the Doctor was again married, his second union being with Ruth E. 
Tichenor, daughter of James H. and Lydia T. (Nuttman) Tichenor, of New- 
ark, New Jersey. He died very suddenly, February 24, 1874, and was laid 
to rest by the side of his maternal grandparents and his father, in the burial 
ground at Parsippany. He survived his father scarcely two years, and thus 
they who were united in such close ties of love and interests in life were not 
long separated in death. 

Many admirable qualities endeared Dr. Fairchild to those with whom 
he came in contact. As a friend he was true and steadfast, and to the poor 
and needy he was kind and generous. At Princeton he was recognized as 
the college wit, and this strong vein of humor, combined with his powers of 
imitation and representation, together with his wide and varied information, 
made him a most agreeable companion and entertaining gentleman. He 
was an able writer, his nature was not without its poetic side, nor did he 
lack in musical culture. He was fond of all the arts and interests that 
elevate humanity, and his memory is revered throughout Morris county. 



WILLIAM E. COLLIS. 

An honored citizen of Chester, Mr. Collis has spent his entire life in 
Morris county, and few men occupy a higher place in the esteem of their, 
fellow townsmen. Business, society and politics have had their proper 
share in the distribution of his energies. He has managed the Collis estate 
with care and with due regard to the ethics of business life; he has been a 
leader in the ranks of the Republican party for some years and meets fully 
every obligation of citizenship; he is also observant of the duties that he 



152 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTOBT. 

owes to his fellow men, and in all the relations of life has won the public 
confidence and regard. Such in brief is the life of Mr. Collis as it is known 
to those among whom he has always resided. 

His birth occurred on Pleasant Hill, Chester township, on the i6th of 
September, 1861, his parents being William E. and Mary C. (Harvey) Collis. 
His mother was a daughter of Levi Harvey, a well known farmer of Chester 
township. The father 01 our subject, William E. Collis, Sr. , was born in 
New York city, in the year 1804, and belonged to that class of men whom 
the world has termed self-made, for their own energies, enterprise, perse- 
verance and capable management brought them to the goal of success. He 
was an anchor-maker by trade, and worked his way upward from shopman 
to merchant, becoming a member of the old and well-known firm of Collis & 
Mitchell, extensive and prosperous ship-chandlers, doing business on South 
street. New York. He was married on the 27th of April, 1854, and in 1862 
removed his family to Chester, where he maintained his residence until his 
death, which occurred November 6, 1865. He was a man of splendid busi- 
ness ability and executive force, and his achievements in the world of trade 
were most creditable and satisfactory. 

William E. Collis, whose name introduces this article, was the only 
child of the family who reached mature years. His elementary education, 
acquired in the schools of Chester, was supplemented by a course in Kimball 
Union Academy, at Meriden, New Hampshire, and later he spent three 
years as a student in Princeton College, while his Latin was perfected under 
the direction of Rev. James F. Brewster, the renowned pastor of the Presby- 
terian church of Chester. 

Mr. Collis has never engaged in business enterprises aside from the care 
of his father's estate, and as his inherited property has released him some- 
what from the more active cares of commercial or professional life, he has 
found time to devote to the public interests of his county, and has ever been 
found as an advocate of all measures having for their object the public good.. 
He is a stanch Republican in his political views, earnest and zealous in sup- 
port of the party principles and is a recognized leader among the younger 
Republicans of Morris county. In 1895 he was a candidate for the nomina- 
tion to the office of state senator, and in 1895-6 was chairman of the execu- 
tive committee of the Republican county central committee, and of the 
county organization had previously served as secretary for two years. 

Mr. Collis was married in Newark, New Jersey, September 28, 1885, to 
Anna Louise Warner, daughter of Henry Warner, anEnglishman by birth and 
a hat manufacturer of Newark. His wife was Mrs. Experience Warner, nee 
De Camp. Mr. and Mrs. Collis now have two children, Mary L. and William 
E. Mr. Collis has been a member of the Presbyterian church for many 






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BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJ^'EALOGICAL BISTORT. 153 

years and for some time has served on its board of trustees. He is a cour- 
teous, genial gentleman, whose many social qualities make him very popu- 
lar, and the Collis household is justly celebrated for its hospitality. 



ALANSON A. VANCE. 



For half a century has Mr. Vance been an important factor in the devel- 
opment, upbuilding and substantial progress of Morristown. His history is 
inseparably interwoven with that of the city, and the impress of his strong 
individuality is ineffaceably stamped on its advancement. The modern city, 
in its rapid growth of the past few years, was permeated by the enterprise and 
energy so typical of the American people in the latter part of the nineteenth 
century, and Mr. Vance, possessing these characteristics in a marked degree, 
labored earnestly in the interests of modern improvement. 

One of New Jersey's native sons, he was born in Newton, Sussex county, 
on the 2Sth of January, 1826, and was educated in the public schools and 
academies of that place. He entered upon his business career at an early 
age, and the success that he has achieved is the legitimate result of honora- 
ble and well-directed effort. When a youth of thirteen he was apprenticed 
to learn the printer's trade, in the office of the Newton Herald, and later was 
employed on the Sussex Register, completing his apprenticeship with that 
paper. Leaving the city of his birth in 1847, he sought work at his trade in 
New York, where he remained for a few years, when he was persuaded by 
J. L. Barlow to accompany him to Deckertown, in the home county, and in 
that place aid in establishing a new paper, called the New Jersey Home 
Journal. 

In 185 1 Mr. Vance was united in marriage to Miss Mary Martin, of 
Deckertown, and soon afterward returned to New York city, where he was 
again employed as a printer until May of that year, when he accepted a posi- 
tion on the Fredonian, of New Brunswick, New Jersey. While connected 
with that journal Mr. Vance wrote his first editorial paragraphs, and these 
being accepted he continued to write for the press throughout the Scott cam- 
paign, which was one of the most vigorous and hotly contested in the polit- 
ical history of our country. While thus engaged he was visited by Sheriff 
Van Ness and Jeremiah M. DeCamp, of Morristown, who acted as a com- 
mittee representing the Whig party of Morris county, and desired him to 
purchase the Jerseyman, a newspaper which had been established in 1826, 
but which at the time of the visit was being conducted in a manner very 
unsatisfactory to the Whigs. Mr. Vance listened to their proposition and 
consented to purchase the Jerseyman. Only a short time elapsed before the 
editorials in the journal were attracting widespread notice. He was and has 



154 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEXEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

always been a close and conscientious student of the political situation of the 
country, and his fair and intellig^ent treatment of the problems not only awoke 
great interest, but carried with it a wide influence, which was recognized by 
journalists throughout the state. Nor did Mr. Vance confine his efforts to 
the advancement of the political principles in which he so firmly believed. 
Throughout the long years of his connection with the Jerseyman he was the 
champion of all movements looking to the betterment of the condition of 
Morristown along educational, moral, social or material lines. He advocated 
public improvements, was largely instrumental in forming public opinion in 
favor of the incorporation of Morristown and in the establishment of the pub- 
lic-school system. Churches, industries and social movements claimed and 
received his friendship, and of the Union cause he was one of the stanchest 
advocates. Joining the Republican party, when it was formed to prevent the 
further extension of slavery, ha stood by the government throughout the dark 
days of the Civil war, and has since been found on the side of the party which 
rests upon protection to American industries, reciprocity and a money stand- 
ard that the markets of the world will be ready to receive at face value. 

For fourteen years Mr. Vance acceptably served as postmaster of Mor- 
ristown, being appointed to that position by President Lincoln in 1861, 
and later reappointed by President Grant. He discharged his duties with 
marked fidelity, his service being a credit to himself and the city as well. 
During that time he also continued his editorial work, but in 1869 his news- 
paper labors were lightened by his admitting L. O. Stiles to a partnership in 
the business. This connection continued until the close of 1895, when the 
Jerseyman passed under its present control and Mr. Vance retired from jour- 
nalistic work. In May, 1896, he was elected a member of the board of 
chosen freeholders. He has, however, never sought political preferment, 
and only accepted this position at the urgent solicitation of many friends. 

In April, 1873, Mr. Vance was called upon to mourn the death of his 
wife. He was again married in January, 1876, his second union being with 
Carrie D. Muchmore, a daughter of Joel W. Muchmore. He has one daugh- 
ter and two sons. He holds membership in the South Street Presbyterian 
church, where, with his family, he has long been a regular attendant. He 
is a man of modest and unassuming demeanor, but is very popular with his 
fellow citizens, who hold him in grateful regard for what he has done for the 
city. 

JAMES PARK. 
One of the most attractive features of the borough of Madison is the 
beautiful park which, on the 4th of July, 1898, became public property 
through the munificence of D. Willis James, one of the honored citizens of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GUA'SALOGICAL HISTORY. 155 




]5G BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEJTEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

the town. As long as Madison has an existence will her population hold in 
grateful remembrance this gentleman, whose deep interest in humanity and 
the advancement of the race prompted him to give to his fellow townsmen 
this artistic and lovely spot, which, in its fresh greenness, its trees and vari- 
colored flowers, calls the attention of man from the sordid duties of life and 
makes him forget his troubles and anxiety in the enjoyment of the beautiful. 
Thus his soul expands until the charm of color, of sunlight and of singing 
birds has drowned out all thoughts of the " madding crowd " and the 
"world's ignoble strife," and in contemplation of the works of nature he is 
led " from nature up to nature's God." 

It seemed especially fitting that this park should be given to Madison on 
an anniversary day of our country's independence, when the entire nation 
rejoice in the progress and achievements that are ever characteristic of a 
people who enjoy liberty. On that same day America was also jubilant over 
the victories of its heroes on land and sea, — the capture of Manila, of the 
Spanish flee; in Atlantic waters and the capitulation of the outposts of San- 
tiago. The war was begun in the interests of humanity and civilization, artd 
it was the same spirit of sympathy for his fellow men that led D. Willis James 
to present to Madison this park, which is a triumph of higher civilization, an 
indication of the divinely implanted love of the beautiful which is found in 
every individual. 

Less than a year before the dedication of the park, the land was owned 
by various parties. On portions of it stood tenements and tumble-down 
buildings and other portions of it were swamp lands. Formulating the idea 
of securing this tract and converting it into a public park, Mr. James placed 
the matter in the hands of a representative, who succeeded in buying the 
property. At once work was begun, buildings were torn down or moved 
away, the swampy portion was drained, and improvement was carried steadily 
forward. Over the broad stretches of greensward magnificent trees throw 
their grateful shade, birds and flowers add to the charm of the scene, graveled 
walks and drives are furnished for the pedestrian or the occupant of the car- 
riage, and benches, conveniently placed, enable one to enjoy rest and quiet 
in the midst of beauty. A most artistic bridge and pavilion and a sparkling 
fountain supplement the work of the landscape gardener, and the donor's 
wish that the park " may be a source of amusement, recreation and health to 
the people of Madison " has already been realized. 

The day on which the park wa.s given to the town was made the occa- 
sion of a fitting celebration. A procession of more than one thousand peo- 
ple, consisting of civic societies, municipal organizations, the public and 
parochial school children, drum corps and bands of music, marched to the 
home of Mr. James and after passing in review before him acted as an 



BIOGBAPHICdL AJfD GEJfEdLOGICAL HISTORY. 157 

escort to him on his way to the place where the public exercises were held. 
In speaking of the munificent gift of Mr. James, Mayor Albright, of Madison, 
said: " We assemble to-day, not only to recall those loyal and patriotic 
acts and join in the praise of heroism of America's brave soldiers and sailors, 
but as well to consider and record a signal and generous act on the part of 
one of our citizens. Acts of noble generosity never fail to receive the 
prompt and hearty approval of an intelligent people. Deeds of valor are told 
and recounted through years of time and are carried down upon the pages 
of history. Works of art exist through centuries of time and become the 
monuments of the genius of their creators. The great men of the people 
are the soldiers and orators, and the great men of history are those who 
control events, but the great men of humanity are they who advance culture 
and science. Of the last we have assembled to meet and greet one to-day, 
— D. Willis James. His object is humanitarian; his work is philanthropic; 
his modesty and generosity unparalleled." 



GEORGE P. COOK. 



Living a retired life at his pleasant home on North Ridgedale aivenue, in 
Madison, Mr. Cook enjoys the well earned distinction of being what the pub- 
lic calls "a self-made man." His career has been remarkably successful by 
reason of his natural ability and his thorough insight into the business inter- 
ests which he has managed. His policy commended itself to all by reason of 
its strict conformance to the ethics of commercial life, and in his mercantile 
life this brought to him a patronage that resulted in the accumulation of a 
comfortable competence. 

A native of Scotch Plains, Union county, New Jersey, Mr. Cook was 
born on the nth of March, 1847, and is a descendant of German ancestry. 
His parents, John and Margaret (Miller) Cook, were both natives of the 
Fatherland, and in the early part of the century crossed the Atlantic to the 
new republic, founding a home in New York City. John Cook was one of 
the first brewers in this country and carried on a successful business in that 
line for some time. About 1842 he removed to Scotch Plains, Union county, 
purchased a farm and carried on agricultural pursuits for some years, becom- 
ing one of the substantial citizens of the community. His death occurred in 
1883, and his wife, who survived him some time, passed away in January, 
1897. They were the parents of the following named: Louisa, John, 
Henry, Peter, Caroline, George P., Herman, Lizzie, and Maggie. 

On the home farm in Union county George P. Cook spent his boyhood 
days. He is a bright product of the public-school system of America, which 



158 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEJi'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

has furnished to the majority of the citizens of this country the educational 
privileges which they have enjoyed. On attaining his majority he went 
to New York city to learn the butcher's trade. The salary was small and the 
position he occupied was insignificant, but, like many other brainy, energetic 
young men, he did not wait for a specially brilliant opening. At that time 
he showed conspicuously the traits of character that have made his life a 
successful one. He conscientiously and industriously performed all the duties 
that devolved upon hirn and thus won favor with his employer and gained 
advancement. 

In 1867 Mr. Cook came to Madison, then a small village, and embarked 
in the meat business on his own account. He afterward conducted a bakery 
for a short period, but later opened a meat market and soon won a liberal 
patronage, which constantly grew in volume and importance during the thirty 
years in which he carried on the enterprise. On the expiration of that period 
he disposed of his market and engaged in the produce business in New York 
city. For a few years past he has not been actively interested in the man- 
agement of any business enterprise although he is a stockholder in several. 
He belongs to the Produce Exchange of New York city, is a director of the 
First National Bank of Madison, and has other profitable investments, which 
yield to Kim a handsome income. His strict integrity, business conservatism 
and judgment have always been so uniformly recognized that he has enjoyed 
public confidence to an enviable degree and naturally this brought him such 
a lucrative patronage that, through times of general prosperity and general 
adversity, he witnessed a steady increase in his business. 

In 1879 Mr. Cook was united in marriage to Miss Adelaide De Hart, a 
daughter of John De Hart. He has served as a member of the board of 
registration of Madison and as a member of the common council, and gives 
his political support to the Republican party. He has, however, never 
sought to figure personally before the public in any light or any relation. 
His influence, however, has been felt as a strong, steady moving force in the 
social, moral and industrial movements of the community and he is an impor- 
tant factor in the life of Madison. 



JOHN HENRY JOHNSON. 

The history of this branch of the Johnson family is inseparably woven 
with that of Morris county, for the ancestors made settlements in this section 
of the state when Morris county was still a part of Hunterdon county. This 
work would therefore be incomplete without mention of those who have 
played an important part in formulating the history of the locality. 



BIOGBJPHICJ.L AJfD GEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 159- 

So far as we have been able to ascertain, the first member of the family 
of whom we have a record was Walter Johnson,* who lived in Wallingford, 
Connecticut, prior to 1700 and died in that city. He married a daughter of 
Nehemiah Royce, Jr., of Wallingford, and they became the parents of two 
sons, John and Lambert. The latter died in Wallingford. The former, who 
is known as John Johnson, Sr., was married November 2, 1710, to Mary 
Chatterton, who according to the register of New Haven, Connecticut, was 
born April 28, 1692. They removed to Whippanong township, New Jersey, 
in 1720. The Wallingford town records give the account of the births of six 
children of John and Mary (Chatterton) Johnson, as follows: John, Jr., 
born August 12, 171 1; Hannah, born December 21, 1712; Elisha, born Sep- 
tember 8, 1714; Moses, born July 26, 1716; Caziah, born April 20, 1718; 
and Esther, born April 20, 1720. The seventh child of that family, Alexan- 
der Johnson, was born in New Jersey in 1722, and died in 1788. Neither 
the date of the birth nor death of John Johnson, Sr. , is positively known. 
The evidence also points to the fact that he died intestate, for there is no will 
on record in Burlington, Amboy, or Trenton, New Jersey, but there is a 
record stating that John Blanchard, a preferred creditor of Elizabethtown, 
New Jersey, was appointed administrator of John Johnson, of Whippany, in 
1724, which was probably the year of his death. His widow, Mary Chat- 
terton Johnson, died September 21, 1774, aged eighty-three years. John 
and Mary Johnson were the founders of the family in Morris county, which 
was, however, at the time of their settlement here a part of Hunterdon 
county, the latter having been created from Burlington county, March 11, 
1714, while Morris county was set off from Hunterdon county on the 15th of 
March, 1739. They located in Whippanong township on a farm now in 
Parsippany, known as the Dr. Darby place and subsequently owned by John 
S. Smith. 

John Johnson, Jr., the third in the line of direct descent to our subject, 
married a widow whose maiden name was Abigail Ball and resided near Lit- 
tleton, Morris county. According to his will, they had four sons and four 
daughters, namely: Elisha; Gershom; Joseph, who was born January 21, 1746, 
and married Martha Vail, daughter of Thomas Vail; Jacob, who was born in 
1750, and married Anne Vail, sister of Martha; Ann, who married a Mr. 
Lambert; Keziah, or Caziah; Abigail, who married a Mr. Hall; and Lyddia, 
who married a Mr. Hathaway. 

Jacob Johnson, of the fourth generation, resided at Littleton, New Jer- 

*There is some reasonable doubt as to the truthfulness of the statement that" Walter John- 
son was the first meriiber of the family," etc. A certain John Johnson, son of Wingle, or Will- 
iam Johnson, of New Haven, was born March 3, 1687, and Mary Chatterton was born in New 
Haven, May 28, 1692, making their respective ages November 2, 1710, the time of the marriage,, 
twenty-four and nineteen years. This needs further confirmation. 



160 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

sey, and had three sons: Noah, who married Susannah Day and removed to 
the west; Mahlon, father of our subject; and Jacob, who married a Miss 
Edwards and removed to th.e west. Mahlon Johnson was a builder, farmer 
and distiller. He continued in the distilling business until the time of the 
great temperance revival inaugurated by the Rev. Albert Barnes, pastor of 
the First Presbyterian church of Morristown, when he abandoned the manu- 
facture of whiskey, and afterward gave his attention solely to agricultura 
pursuits. He married Sarah Baker, daughter of Lewis Baker, and they 
became the parents of fifteen children: Jacob, who was born December 3, 
1798, married Hetty Baker Vail, and died March 12, 1865; Chilion, born 
July 24, 1800, married Angelina Woodruff, and died July 12, 1883; Noah, 
born February 17, 1802, was drowned in Speedwell lake; Baker, born Octo- 
ber 23, 1803, married Electa Jackson King, daughter of Rev. Barnabus 
King, and died October 18, 1886; Alfred, born April 5, 1805, married Sarah 
Clark Baker, and died October 12, 1847;- Susannah Day, born August 26, 
1806, became the second wife of Jonathan E. Huntington and died May 6, 
1877; Elizabeth Ann, born February 16, 1808, was the first wife of Jonathan 
E. Huntington, and died December 15, 1863; Thomas Vail, born October 
8, 1809, married Sarah Frances Cory, and died March 29, 1879; Sarah 
Vail, born March 10, 181 1, became the wife of Joel Davis, and died April 
22, 1882; Catharine Wheeler, born July 5, 1812, became the wife of Aaron 
C. Johnson, and died June 14, 1863; Mary, born August 2, 18 14, became 
the second wife of Silas B. Condict, and died June 3, 1878; James Harvey, 
born March 14, 18 16, married Hannah Jellison, and died September 21, 
1852; Davis Vail, born November i, 18 17, married Caroline Mayo, and died 
January 22, 1871; John Henry is the subject of this sketch; and Mahlon, the 
youngest of the family, was born in 1823, and lived only four weeks. 

John Henry Johnson was born at Littleton, Morris county. New Jersey, 
October 28, 1820, and prepared for college in Morris Academy, when it was 
under the superintendence of Joseph Mcl<iee, and afterward of S. R. Sargent. 
Later he entered the College of New Jersey, at Princeton. For a number 
■of years thereafter he devoted his time and energies to the profession of 
teaching, was principal of Upperville Academy, in Fauquier county, Virginia, 
for several years, and afterward taught a private school in Newark, New 
Jersey; subsequently was principal of Blairstown Presbyterial Academy, and 
ended his educational labors as principal of Morris Academy, his alma mater. 
Since 1870 he has been engaged in the real-estate and insurance business in 
Morristown, New Jersey. 

On the 1 6th of March, 1847, in Newark, New Jersey, the Rev. William 
Bradley performed the ceremony which united the destinies of John Henry 
Johnson and Miss Maria Allen, who was born February 10, 1823, the daugh- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 161 

ter of Chilion F. De Camp, and to them were born four children, namely: 
Arthur, born July 22, 1848; William De Camp, born March 24, 1850; 
Charles Alfred, born February 7, 1854, died December 14, 1854; Maria 
Lucy, born November 21, 1858. 

The parents have traveled together for more than half a century, and 
now live in the city of Morristown at this date, 189S. 



NATHANIEL GAINES. 



This early resident of Montville township was a native of Connecticut 
and before coming to Morris county had served in the Revolutionary war as 
a cavalryman, and was with General Starke at the memorable battle of Ben- 
nington, Vermont. He was a nailer by trade, which term was applied to 
one who made nails by hand, hammering each one out on an anvil, as nail- 
cutting machines were not then invented. About the year 1785 he settled 
near Pine Brook, on the old road, where he industriously followed his trade. 
Those were days of comparatively low prices for labor, and the surrounding 
circumstances were such that if a person would support himself and family 
comfortably and accumulate property he must apply himself with unceasing 
industry. 

Mr. Gaines married a daughter of Ezpkiel Baldwin, who lived in that 
neighborhood, and they had several children. His oldest son, Ezekiel Bald- 
win Gaines, was born near Pine Brook, October 10, 1791. He was educa- 
ted for a physician, studied medicine with Dr. John S. Darcy, at Hanover, 
and was licensed in 1814. He first practiced with his former preceptor in 
Hanover, thence went to Parsippany, and for a few years was in partnership 
with Dr. Stephen Fairchild. In 18 18 he removed to Lower Montville, where 
he resided and practiced for thirty-seven years. In 1855 he removed to 
Boonton, and in 1861 was appointed postmaster there, in which capacity he 
served for several years, when owing to advanced age and declining health 
he retired from active life. He died in Boonton, March 31, 1881. 



JOHN R. EMERY. 

As one of the distinguished jurists of New Jersey, the name of the hon- 
ored subject of this sketch is inseparably connected with the history of juris- 
prudence in this commonwealth. His career has ever been such as to war- 
rant the trust and confidence of the public, and his fellow citizens honor him, 
even as he has honored them by a faithful discharge of the duties which 
have been entrusted to him. A state, as well as a nation, is judged by the 
character of its people, and it is such men as Vice-Chancellor Emery that 



11 



162 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GEJVJEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

have gained for New Jersey her proud position in the galaxy of states that 
form the Union. 

Born in Flemington, Hunterdon county, New Jersey, July 6, 1842, he 
is a son of William P. and Ann (Runkle) Emery, both of whom were natives 
of -the same county. For many years the father was a leading and promi- 
nent merchant at Flemington, where he died in 1888, at the age of seventy- 
eight years. For a long period he served as elder in the Presbyterian church, 
and his upright, honorable life won him the esteem of all with whom he 
came in contact. 

John R. Emery was reared under the parental roof and began his edu- 
cation in the schools of Flemington. After preparing for collegiate work at 
Edge Hill, Princeton, under Professor Cottell, and at Lambertville, under 
Rev. Dr. Studdiford, he matriculated in Princeton University, in 1858, and 
was graduated in the class of 1861. His choice of a vocation for a life work 
fell upon the legal profession and, on the completion of his collegiate course, 
he began the study of law; but all personal considerations were put aside in 
August, 1862, that he might answer the call of duty and defend his country 
in her hour of peril. Enlisting as a private in the Fifteenth Regiment of 
New Jersey Volunteers, he served in defense of the Union until February, 
1863, when he was honorably discharged with the rank of second lieutenant. 

Returning to the north, Mr. Emery resumed the study of law in Flem- 
ington, under the guidance of Bennet Van Syckel, who afterward became a 
judge of the supreme court. Later he was a student in the law office of A. 
V. Van Fleet, later vice-chancellor, and in the year 1863-64 was a student 
in the Harvard Law School. In February, 1865, he was admitted to the bar 
as an attorney and in 1868 as counselor-at-law. In the former year he formed 
a partnership with Mr. Van Fleet and practiced in Flemington for a year. 
He then entered into partnership with A. G. Richey and located in Trenton, 
where he enjoyed a large and lucrative clientage until 1874, when, on 
account of failing health, he withdrew from active practice and spent the fol- 
lowing year in Europe. Travel greatly benefited his health, and in the fall 
of 1875 he returned to his native land and located in Newark, New Jersey, 
where as a member of the bar he attained enviable distinction. He prepared 
his cases with the greatest care and provided for every possible emergency, 
so that he was ever ready to meet the argument of his opponent. He is a 
close reasoner, logical in his deductions and a iluent, forcible and convincing 
speaker. His knowledge of the law in its various departments is compre- 
hensive and accurate and his devotion to his clients' interests was proverbial. 
In February, 1895, he was appointed vice-chancellor, a position which he 
has since filled, and in the discharge of his duties he has fully met the expec- 
tations of his most sanguine friends. His broad knowledge of the law, com- 




/C(^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 163 

bined with rare good judgment and foresight and a marked freedom from 
judicial bias, has already won him an enviable reputation on the bench. 

In 1885 Vice-Chancellor Emery was united in marriage to Miss Alia 
MacKie, a daughter of James S. MacKie, of Mount Savage, Maryland, and to 
them have been born four children. In 1891 he removed with his family to 
Morristown, where he has since made his home. His household is the cen- 
ter of a cultured society circle and he and his wife enjoy the hospitality of the 
best homes of the city. They are communicants of the Protestant Episco- 
pal church, their membership being in the Church of the Redeemer, of 
Morristown. 



WILLIAM BRITTIN. 



The progenitor of the Brittin family in Morris county was William Brit- 
tin. The ' ' ensign armorial " of the family has descended from father to son, 
and the seal is, at the present time, in the care of the descendants of Joseph 
Brittin, at Schenectady, New York. It consists of a fine stag's head, and 
the motto, " Virtute, non Verbis" (by virtue, not by words). Tradition tells 
us "the eldest son inherited the title and the manor called ' Brightin,' which 
was standing fifty years ago," and the estate is still in possession of a mem- 
ber of the family of Brittin — which orthography, according to the etymology 
of the Welsh, is probably the correct one, instead of the other forms 
of Briten, Britton or Brittain, which are used by other branches of the 
family. 

William Brittin came to America in early manhood from Sutton, in 
Ashfield-Notts, England, and in this country married Mary Thomas, a native 
of Wales. She was born in 17 14, and died October 14, 1780. At the time 
of their marriage William Brittin and his wife located near Philadelphia, 
where they kept an inn called "The Fox Chase," in which tradition says 
Generals Washington and La Fayette, and probably other patriots of the 
Revolution, were entertained. The fact remains without a doubt that at 
least one member of the colonial army was born there — Jacob Brittin, whose 
birth occurred in 1744, and who served throughout the war as sergeant, 
while his brother Joseph was a member of General Washington's life guards. 
The latter lived to be ninety-six years of age. Through the efforts of the 
Brittin family the Washington Association of Morristown is in possession of a 
most interesting relic of the Revolution, in the form of an antique ordnance, 
a twelve-pound iron howitzer. This cannon, according to the well authen- 
ticated records of the family, was cast in England and brought over to this 
country by the Tories to be used against the Americans in the Revolution, 
and was captured from the British at the close of a hard day's battle — "the 



164 



BIOGRJPEICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



closest of the war," says General Maxwell, — the battle of Springfield, New 
Jersey, in 1780. The cannon was then removed to Short Hills, placed on 
an eminence which commanded a large range, and used as the " alarm gun," 
— a service which it successfully accomplished — to prevent the advance of 
the British in their attempt to reach Morristown. Subsequently the " Crown 
Prince," as the cannon was called, was taken to Morris Green, and its boom- 
ing announced the arrival of General La Fayette on his visit to Morristown. 
At the last training of the militia at that place, General Benonie Hathaway 
presented the cannon to the militia, then commanded by Colonel William 
Brittin. After the war of the Rebellion it was remounted at the Speedwell 
Iron Works and placed in front of the soldiers' monument in the park, July 




The Brittin Seal. 
4, 1871. As it had no relation to the Civil war, William J. Brittin deter- 
mined to present it to the Washington Association, at headquarters, and on 
the 9th of October, 1890, it was removed to the west corner of the associa-. 
tion's building, where it will remain for all time, one of the most valuable 
relics possessed by the society. A suitable tablet, giving its history, was also 
engraved and placed by it. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. . 165 

Jacob Brittin, previously mentioned in connection with his service 
throughout the war of the Revolution, was married March 3, 1774, to Eliza- 
beth Van Sickle, and came to reside in Morris county, near New Providence, 
where he bought one hundred acres of land, Nos. 23 to 27, of the Elizabeth- 
town survey. He possessed great power of endurance and energy. His 
influence in the affairs of the struggling settlers was decided and salutary, 
although he died August 18, 1784, at the early age of forty years. His wife, 
Elizabeth, died July 15, 1795, at the age of forty-one years. Their chil- 
dren were Theodocia, who married Miller Walker, son of Asher Walker; 
William, who was born February 8, 1778, and married Margaret, daughter 
of Daniel Baker, of Westfield; Abraham, who was born February 20, 1780, 
and married Elizabeth Baker, a sister of his brother's wife; Isaac, who was 
born May 6, 1782, and married Abby Ludlow. William Brittin, Jr., settled 
in Auburn, New York, and built the state prison there. His brother John 
was ensign and sergeant in the Revolution, after which he located in Sussex 
county. New Jersey. Joseph, the youngest son of William Brittin, Sr. , 
resided in Philadelphia until the marriage of his daughter, when he removed 
to Schenectady, New York, where his last years were spent. 

The Morris county branch of the Brittin family was founded by the three 
brothers, William, Abraham and Isaac, who came to Bottle Hill, now Mad- 
ison, in 1800. They were enterprising young men, who at once built a store- 
house, which in 1898 was demolished to make room for the enlargement of 
James park. There they opened a country store nearly one hundred years 
ago. The first store in the place was kept by Mrs. Horton, the energetic 
wife of the pastor of the Presbyterian church. The times were hard and 
thus the lady eked out her husband's scanty stipend. The house that Will- 
iam Brittin first occupied was on the site occupied by this little store, and his 
brother Abraham lived just opposite until after 1820, when he purchased the 
large residence on the turnpike, where he died in 1859. William erected his 
house early in 1805, moved his family into it and there remained until the 
day of his death, January 9, 1869. His son, William Jackson, who lived to 
be nearly eighty-two years of age, was born, lived and died in that house, — 
a remarkable fact in this era of constant change. 

During his long life William Brittin held all or nearly all of the local 
offices within the gift of his townspeople. He was commissioned justice of 
the peace and served in that capacity for many years. Possessed of a retent- 
ive memory he could be relied upon to recall the past, to state the prece- 
dents; and his familiarity with the law and its technicalities made him often 
the tribunal to which legal difficulties were taken, without recourse to the 
tedious delays of the courts. He was one of the assistant judges of the Mor- 
ris county court, filling that position for a number of years with dignity and 



166 BIOGBJPHICAL AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

the approval of the public, until disabled by the weight of years. Abraham 
and William Brittin wrote all the deeds for exchange of land and drew up all 
the wills for the people for miles around, and the fact that no will was ever 
contested speaks well for the legal ability of the formulator. No young law- 
yer had the courage to begin practice in Madison during the life-time of 
William and Abraham Brittin. 

Morris county's record in the war of 1812 was alike honorable with that 
it made in the Revolutionary struggle. Responding to. President Madison's 
call on the state for troops, Governor Pennington issued his proclamation, 
as follows: " The commander-in-chief thinks it his duty to remind the militia 
of New Jersey that the crisis calls for a manifestation of public virtue. The 
events of our war in Europe have left America to again contend singly with 
the British empire. The eyes of the world are upon us! Let us convince 
the enemy that the moment they land upon our shores they will be met by 
our men in arms and willing to defend their country. The citizens of New 
Jersey were among the first in our glorious struggle for national independ- 
ence, and in the formation of our national government. They will not be 
the last in arms to maintain what they have so heroically contributed to 
achieve and wisely to establish." 

In response to this stirring call, companies of infantry and light artillery 
and riflemen from every quarter of the state marched to expected points of 
attack on the coast from Paulus Hook, now Jersey City, to Cape May, and 
the coast was speedily lined with block houses. The militia of Morris county 
were posted in force at Sandy Hook, and served three months. Colonel 
William Brittin received a commission which read thus: "The Council and 
Assembly, reposing especial trust and confidence in your patriotism, valor, 
conduct and fidelity, have at a joint meeting appointed you colonel of the 
first regiment of the Morris brigade. You are therefore to take the said 
regiment into your charge and care, as colonel thereof, and duly to exercise 
both officers and soldiers of said regiment in arms; and as they are hereby 
directed to obey you as their colonel, you are likewise to follow such orders 
from time to time as you shall receive from your commander-in-chief or 
other superior officer, and for your so-doing this shall be your commission." 
This document is signed by Isaac N. Williamson, governor from 1809 to 
18 1 2, and until the last training day of the Morris militia Colonel Brittin 
was in command. He was promoted February 13, 18 18. In addition to 
his military service and his service as magistrate and county judge, he was a 
member of the state legislature in 181S, 1819, 1824 and 1832, and was a 
member of the council from Morris county in 1837 and 1838. 

In 1825, when General La Fayette was in the country for the last time 
and visited New Jersey, Colonel Brittin was commander of the military 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 167 

escort from Morristown to Springfield. The General left Morristown, July 
1$, 1825, at an early hour, and arrived at the hotel in Bottle Hill at 7 A. M. 
There the school children and citizens were awaiting him, his arrival in the 
village being announced by the firing of cannon and the ringing of bells. 
Passing under an arch tastefully arranged and decorated with flowers and 
evergreens, he was conducted by Colonels William Brittin and S. D. 
Hunting to the house appointed for his reception, where refreshments were 
bountifully spread. The pastor of the church, the Rev. John G. Bergen, 
gave an address, and thirteen girls, representing the states, sang an ode com- 
posed by the teacher of the school, John T. Derthick, to which the Gen- 
eral very appropriately responded, after which he was conducted by Colonel 
Brittin to where refreshments were served amid an interchange of good feel- 
ing, and then to his carriage, the cavalcade moving off in the direction of 
Newark, where the citizens were awaiting to receive him. As the cortege 
was on Short Hills, the axle gave way and they had to substitute a rail until 
they could reach Springfield. As General La Fayette dismounted, he 
remarked, "When I return to France I will tell my countrymen that Jersey- 
men rode me on a rail!" This is one of the hitherto unpublished incidents 
related by the commander of the military escort at that time. 

The Morris & Essex Railroad Company was incorporated by the legisla- 
ture of New Jersey, January 29, 1835, the incorporators named in the act 
being James Cook and William Nelson Wood, of Morristown, William Brit- 
tin, of Madison, Jeptha Munn, of Chatham, Israel D. Condict, of Millburn, 
John J. Bryan and Isaac Baldwin. Thus did Colonel Brittin interest himself 
and his friends in every good enterprise. In politics he was an old-time 
Whig, and latterly an ardent Republican. In the domestic circle he was a 
kind and indulgent parent, and deeply attached to his friends and those near 
him. He continued in active business life until his earthly labors were 
ended. 

Abraham Brittin first opened his eyes to the light of day in a farm house 
on Longhill, Morris county. He worked on the farm and attended the dis- 
trict school in his youth, and while still in his 'teens started for the west. 
He only got as far as Auburn, New York, however, when he decided to 
remain in the east, and located in Bottle Hill, in 1800, becoming prominent 
in every movement calculated for the good of the early settlers, giving freely 
of both his advice and his time, and never asking for any reward. He 
became a contractor, and in 1804 built a part of the turnpike from Morris- 
town to Newark, also constructed the Morris & Essex branch of the Dela- 
ware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, in 1836, and the stone bridge over 
the Schuylkill river, at Philadelphia. During all of his middle life he was 
continuously engaged on public works, and was very successful, becoming a 



168 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

wealthy man and at the same time enjoying a very enviable reputation for 
integrity and good judgment. 

Like his brothers, Isaac Brittin early in life determined to be independent 
and self-supporting. He attended school for only a short time after the death 
of his father and then entered upon an apprenticeship at the mason's trade, 
serving for seven years. He afterward successfully engaged in contracting 
on his own account until middle life, when an attack of typhoid fever ren- 
dered him an invalid for the remainder of his life. He was always a resident 
of Madison, and by good management, industry, energy and perseverance 
while in health he acquired an ample competency for old age. For years the 
people of Madison had to do their banking in The State Bank, or in the Mor- 
ris County Bank, of Morristown, and for the convenience of his neighbors 
Isaac Brittin began loaning money and doing a banking business in Bottle 
Hill. He died February 19, 1857, in the "Home on the Bank," generally 
known as Webb's Corner, near the railroad station, which place his brother 
William had owned in 1800. After the death of Isaac Brittin's wife the 
property was inherited by their only child, B. Ludlow Brittin, who sold it to 
James A. Webb. The daughter of William Brittin, who was born in that 
house in 1806, died there also in 1881. Mrs. Anna M. Brittin Baker was 
the mother of Mrs. Webb, and was a lady of the old school, amiable, edu- 
cated, refined and a sincere Christian. 

It would not be a complete family history of the Brittins were only men- 
tion made of its male members, and, accordingly, we give a brief account of 
the wives and mothers. Margaret, the wife of William, and Elizabeth, the 
wife of Abraham, were sisters, and granddaughters of Henry Baker, who 
emigrated from England and settled in Westlield. He married Phoebe 
Hedges, of Southampton, Long Island, a lady of Puritan parentage. Daniel 
Baker, the son of Henry, was born in 1753, and married Margaret Osborne. 
He was only twenty-three years of age when he joined the Colonial army for 
service in the Revolution, becoming a private of Spencer's regiment. He 
served for over seven years and during all this time his noble wife, who had 
to bear the equally hard part of quietly waiting at home, did all in her power 
to advance the cause of liberty. In after years at the Brittin fireside this 
" daughter of the Revolution " most eloquently told of the struggles and pri- 
vations of 1776. Women love peace, but when they find themselves face to 
face with war they are patriotic and philosophic enough to accept the situa- 
tion. Neither weather nor weariness nor sickness in any common measure 
could deter this faithful mother from offering her ministrations throughout 
the homes of the community when needed. She had fourteen children, who 
always claimed that "no more gentle, loving and faithful wife and mother 
ever lived." Much of their success in life is due to her companionship and 




y^'^^^^^ic,.^^ ^^^ibz^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 169 

sterling example. Mrs. William and Mrs. Abraham Brittin were true daugh- 
ters of this heroic woman, and, like her, were ever active in good works and 
in all church enterprises, and were also very conversant with the local history 
of this section of the country. 

Colonel William and Margaret (Baker) Brittin were the parents of seven 
children: Sylvester, who was born February 5, 1802, married Parmela, 
widow of Dr. Henry G. Elmer, and died July 21, 1828; Elizabeth, born 
June 4, 1804, married William Woodruff, and died July 9, 1836; Anna 
Maria, born August 6, 1806, became the wife of Jacob Baker, and died 
November i, 1881; Harvey, who was born August 9, 1809, died November 
28, 1832; Mary, born October 29, 1812, married Apollos M. Elmer, son of 
Dr. Moses Elmer, and her death occurred April 9, 1836; William Jackson, 
born April 9, 18 16, died September 14, 1897; Isabella Simmons, born March 
16, 1823, died March 6, 1866. 

The children of Abraham and Elizabeth (Baker) Brittin, four in number, 
were Edwin, who was born February 16, 18 12, was married in the south to 
Rosina Block, and died September 27, 1847, at his father's home in Madison; 
Alfred Bishop, born October i, 18 14, married Emma Dougherty, sister of 
Dr. Alexander Dougherty, of Newark, and died December 11, 1876; Mar- 
garet Osborn, born June 11, 18 19, married Thomas Garthwait, of Newark, 
and after his death became the wife of Thomas Carter, of Chicago, Illinois; 
Mary Walker, born February 4, 1823, became the wife of Joseph P. Turner, 
of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, where she died. 

The only child of Isaac and Abby (Ludlow) Brittin was Benjamin Lud- 
low, who was born November 14, 1807, in Madison, spent nearly his entire 
life in the south, and died in New York city, September 27, 1872. 

No less prominent factors in the later development and advancement of 
Morris county have been the representatives of later generations of the Brit- 
tin family, who, emulating the example of illustrious ancestors, have aided 
materially in the progress and upbuilding of this section of the state. They 
have kept pace with modern advancement, and their lives and deeds have 
had an important bearing on the community. 

William Jackson Brittin, son of Colonel William Brittin, was for many 
years an office-holder and at all times he was true and faithful to the trust 
reposed in him, discharging his duties with marked promptness and fidelity. 
He was born April 9, 18 16, and in early manhood he married Helen Maria 
Howell, daughter of Ezra Howell. For many years they traveled life's 
journey together, but now the wife is left to mourn with her four sons the 
loss of a devoted husband and father. Moral, educational and social interests 
receive his support. For many years he was an efficient member of the 
board of education, for more than twenty years was a member of the 



170 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

town committee, for six years was president of the fire department, and 
time and again was chosen freeholder. He was also a "Son of the Rev- 
olution." He gave to the colored citizens the lot upon which their house 
of worship was erected and to the fire department the site of their truck 
house. The athletic association was met in a liberal spirit at its formation, 
and the grounds, so centrally located, so well adapted for its use, are a 
part, and a very desirable part, of the Brittin estate. Charity and benevo- 
lence were synonymous with his name, and the poor remember him with 
grateful hearts. 

At a meeting of the fire department of Madison resolutions of respect 
and sympathy were passed, and handsomely framed; and a copy of the 
resolutions were presented to Mrs. Brittin. In making the gift a member of 
the committee spoke as follows: "I would say that it is impossible in a 
memoir of this character to give full expression to the feelings of the members of 
the Madison fire department over the loss of one whom they have not only 
honored but loved. No man was richer in his sympathy, kinder in his heart, or 
more genuine in his love for his fellows. Therefore the impulse of eulogy 
arises quickly and spontaneously. In no case could a tribute of praise be 
better deserved, but above all sense of personal loss and readiness to praise 
there must arise the realization that what is best in man survives the incident 
which we call death, and does so not only in some future and distant sphere 
but here and now." 

Alfred Brittin, another of the later representatives of the family, and a 
son of Abraham and Elizabeth Brittin, was a native of Madison and entered 
upon his business career as a clerk in the store of Cook, Vorhees& Company, 
of Morristown, afterward becoming a partner in the business. Later he was 
engaged in the same line in Newark, and subsequently became connected with 
Alfred Bishop, the great railroad king. This led to Mr. Brittin's becoming a 
railroad contractor on his own account and for a time he was successful, but 
later met with reverses. He then became a candidate for state treasurer, 
but the mistakes of some of his friends caused his defeat by only two votes. 
Later he was appointed collector of the county by the board of county free- 
holders, and made a most excellent officer, his service being probably unsur- 
passed by any incumbent ever in the position. He was a stalwart Repub- 
lican and did much for his party. In religious belief he was a devout Pres- 
byterian and gave freely of his means to church and charitable work. He 
had many noble traits of character, and those who had known him longest 
loved him best. At his death, which occurred in December, 1876, the stores 
of Madison were closed and the flag hung at half mast in honor of one who 
had ever been foremost in every good work and whose life was the outcome 
of an upright, honorable character. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 171 



ANDREW E. VOORHEES. 

Originally of Holland stock, the American branch of this family settled 
here some time in the seventeenth century, since which time the members 
have been prominently identified with the various political, professional and 
commercial interests of the country. In the latter part of the sixteenth cen- 
tury there lived before or near the town of Hees, Holland, the first of the 
family to bear the name of Voorhees, which signifies "before Hees." This 
individual was Albert Voorhees. He had a son named Coert Voorhees, and 
the latter became the father of Steven Coert Van Voorhees, who emigrated 
to America. Steven settled on Long Island, where he died in 1684, at the 
venerable age of eighty-four years. He was the first to use the form, " Van 
Voorhees," and his descendants have dispersed to many sections of our 
domain. It is supposed that Steven came to this country about 1657; 
his son, Lucas Stevense Van Voo hees, it being understood, was born in 
Holland in 1650 and attained the age of sixty-three years. He married J»n- 
netje Minnes and among their children was Albert Lucasse, born in 1698. 
He married Catryntje Cornell and died in 1734, and among their children 
was a son, Johannes, born in 1731, who married Anetje Schenck. They had 
several children, one of whom, Ralph, was the father of Jeremiah C, who 
married Margaret Van Dorn, and one of their issue was Andrew Jackson 
Voorhees, who was the first to drop the "Van" from the name. He was 
born in or near Lamington, Somerset county. New Jersey, where his father 
lived and died. Andrew married Esther Eliza Low, and among the children 
born of this union was Andrew Emery Voorhees, the immediate subject of 
this review. 

Andrew Emery Voorhees was born at Lamington, Somerset county, New 
Jersey, on the 4th of November, 1850. His parents resided on a farm until 
their son was ten years of age, and then they removed to North Branch, 
where they conducted a hotel, and it was there that our subject received his 
first experience in the management of a hostelry. Here he grew to man- 
hood, attained a fair common- school education, and in 1874 he entered the 
employ of A. Kershaw, proprietor of a hotel at SomerviUe, New Jersey. In 
1879 Mr. Kershaw took charge of the Maiision House, at Morristown, and 
brought with him Mr. Voorhees, who retained his connection with the Man- 
sion House about two years, by which time he had established for himself a 
good name and had obtained a broad and practical experience in the hotel 
business, so that in 1881 he took charge of the United States Hotel and has 
since continued as its proprietor. He has met with more than ordinary suc- 
cess in this line of enterprise and his establishment has secured an excellent 
reputation and a liberal patronage. 



172 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Several years ago Mr. Voorhees became a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, in Morristown, and has since then attained the degree of Knight 
Templar. 

Mr. Voorhees solemnized his marriage in 1874, when he became united 
■to Miss Frances A. Bennett, daughter of Captain Nelson Bennett, of High 
Bridge, New Jersey, and she has rendered most able and intelligent assist- 
ance in the management of the hotel. Mr. and Mrs. Voorhees have one 
child, a daughter, Minnie A. 



W. WALLACE COOK. 

A resident of Whippany, Mr. Cook is recognized as one of the most able 
business men of Morris county, where he is engaged in dealing in meats. 
His sagacity and foresight enabling him to successfully conduct his enter- 
prise, and his indomitable energy and undaunted perseverance winning him 
prosperity that numbers him among the substantial citizens of the commu- 
nity, he has not only advanced his individual interests, but has done much 
toward promoting the general welfare by encouraging trade and commerce 
along other lines. His career, both public and private, is marked by the 
strictest integrity and he has the unlimited confidence of all with whom he 
has come in contact. 

Mr. Cook was born March 3, 1850, and is a representative of one of the 
oldest families of Morris county. The first of the name to settle here was 
John Cook, whose son, Samuel Cook, the grandfather of our subject, was a 
native of Morris county. He was twice married, his first union being with 
Mary Coe, and after her death he married Elizabeth Johnson. His children 
were John, Samuel, Timothy and William. He was a farmer by occupation 
and died at the ripe old age of eighty-one years. The father of our subject, 
Timothy Cook, was born in Morris county, in May, 18 14, and married Celinda 
Miller, daughter of Levi and Mary (Hull) Miller, who were natives of New 
York city. Mr. Cook followed both farming and butchering, and did a retail 
meat business. His family numbered three children: A. Burnet, born 
August 2, 1847; W. Wallace; and Irena C, who was born February 28, 
1S56, and died April 29, 1891. The family have always been adherents of 
the Presbyterian faith, and on the organization of the church in Whippany 
the father of our subject was chosen elder, filling that office for sixty years. 

Reared on the old family homestead, W. Wallace Cook was married 
September 12, 1877, to Miss Mollie H. Ball, daughter of Henry and Mary 
Elizabeth (Minton) Ball, who resided near Boonton. Two children grace 
this marriage, Helen M. and Charlotte E. They reside on the farm in Han- 
over township, and Mr. Cook follows his father's occupation. His business- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 173 

methods are most reliable and his reputation in all trade transactions is 
unassailable. 

Mr. Cook is a man of good business capacity, and his well-directed labors 
have enabled him to attain a due quota of success. In connection with his 
other interests he is a director of the First National Bank of Morristown, 
also of the Whippany River Railroad Company, is secretary of the New Jer- 
sey State Building & Loan Association and is a director of the Whippany 
Hall Association. All these interests contribute to the material welfare of 
the community, for to its thriving business concerns the county owes its 
progress and prosperity. Politically, Mr. Cook is a Republican, and from 
1 88 1 until 1884 served as a member of the board of chosen freeholders. He 
has been prominent in public affairs and his history should go on record as 
that of one of the worthy and leading citizens of Morris county. 



LOUIS M. NOE. 



A well-known resident of Morris county, Mr. Noe is one of the most 
extensive rose-growers of the country, the mammoth proportions of his 
business making it one of the most important industries in New Jersey. It 
is a creditable fact that his success is the outcome of his judicious manage- 
ment and that the characteristics of his business career are energy, enter- 
prise, progressiveness and unwavering fidelity to justice and right in all trade 
transactions. 

Mr. Noe was born in Madison, Chatham township. May 13, 1847, and 
represents one of the old families of the state. His great-grandfather, Louis 
Noe, was a native of France, and came, as a French soldier, with LaFayette 
to America in colonial days, and served through the war. His grandfather, 
Louis, the second, came to this country previous to this and served for seven 
years and six months as m'usician in the colonial army, his music inspiring 
the soldiers to greater deeds of valor. He married Phoebe Mundy, and they 
became the parents of three sons and four daughters: Frazee, who located 
in Summit, New Jersey; Henry, of Orange; Louis, of Madison; Margaret, 
wife of David French; Phebe, wife of Sanders Campbell; Maria, who mar- 
ried Ellis Coddington; and Esther. 

The father of our subject also bore the name of Louis Noe, and his 
birth occurred on the old family homestead, November 17, 1800. He mar- 
ried Maria Meeker, April 7, 1835, ^ daughter of Isaac Meeker, who was 
born January 27, 1783, and died March 28, 1871. His mother was a mem- 
ber of the Halsey family, who trace their ancestry back to England. He 
was a descendant of Timothy Meeker, the founder of the family in America. 
Isaac Meeker married Jane Wilcox, who was born in December, 1792, and 



174 BIOGRJPEICAL AMD GEJ^TEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

died May lo, 1851, and to their union were born three children; Maria, born 
June I, 1809, died January 5, 1872; Harriet, who was born October 23, 
1812, and married Abraham Valentine in 1840, her death occurring June 16, 
1843; and Eliza A., who was born October 16, 18 19. In 184 1 she became 
the wife of Daniel Noe, and died March 8, 1843. As a means of livelihood 
Louis Noe, father of our subject, carried on agricultural pursuits. He held 
membership in the Methodist church at New Providence, New Jersey, and 
his wife belonged to the Presbyterian church of the same place. They were 
married April 7, 1835, and their union was blessed with three sons: Johna- 
than Meeker, born June 23, 1836, was married, February 22, 1872, to Sarah 
M. Ayers and had two children, — Isaac M. and Delia Marie, both born in 
December, 1872. He died in June, 1873. The second son, Isaac Meeker, 
was born October 5, 1843, and died, unmarried, February 22, 1869. Louis 
Mulford was born May 13, 1847. 

In the common schools Louis M. Noe acquired his preliminary education, 
which was supplemented by one year's study at Fort Edward Institute, New 
York, and later he was graduated at J. H. Landsley's Business College, at 
Rutland, Vermont. He studied law for one year with the firm of Guild & 
Lum, of Newark, but in 1872 turned his attention to the nursery and fruit- 
growing business, forming a partnership with his brothers-in-law, Samuel 
and O. N. Brant, comprising the firm of Brant, Noe & Brant. They began 
operations on a small scale, and in a few years became the largest peach- 
growers in New Jersey, having one thousand acres planted in bearing trees. 
The fruit was shipped to principal markets in the east and commanded the 
highest prices, owing to the excellent quality and flavor, for only the best 
varieties were cultivated. Their orchards were located in Pennsylvania and 
northern New Jersey. Mr. Noe is regarded throughout America as authority 
on any matter pertaining to the cultivation of peaches. He has done much 
to improve the fruit, and has produced some splendid varieties. In the 
spring of 1884 he established his rose gardens, and at that time gave up the 
interest in the peach-growing and nursery business to Mr. Samuel Brant, 
who still continues along the same line in an extensive manner, and at the 
present time Mr. Noe has ninety-six thousand square feet under glass, in 
Madison, New Jersey, and also owns a half interest in the Brant & Noe 
Floral Company in Chicago, of which he is president. This enterprising 
company has eighty-six thousand square feet under glass. In connection 
with rose-growing he is extensively engaged in other horticultural pursuits, 
and has made a close study of everything pertaining to his business, both 
from the scientific and practical standpoints, so that the methods he follows 
are the result of a comprehensive and accurate knowledge of the best manner 
of cultivating fruit and flowers. While the output of his rose-houses is 



BIOGBJPEICAL AJ^D GEJfEJ.LOGICAL HISTORY. 175 

varied, comprising all the popular winter-blooming varieties, his specialty is 
the "American Beaut}-," queen of roses. His success in the cultivation of 
this, the most difficult rose to grow successfully, has been without precedent 
in the rose-growing industry. Whenever he has placed the magnificent 
blooms of this rose on exhibition he has always received the highest honors. 

He owns five hundred acres of land in Morris county, — a part of the 
old Meeker homestead, which belonged to his maternal grandfather, — and in 
his orchards and gardens employs sixty men throughout the year. In his 
connection with his other interests he is vice-president of the New York Cut 
Flower Company. 

In 1870 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Noe and Miss Emily E. 
Brant, a native of Chatham township, Morris county, and a daughter of 
Albert and Phebe (Jennings) Brant. Her father was born December 8, 18 12, 
in Madison, and her mother May 3, 1815, their marriage being celebrated 
January i, 1839. He was a farmer by occupation, following that pursuit 
throughout his active business life. His death occurred November 17, 1895, 
and his wife passed away December 17, 1889. They were the parents of 
five children: Samuel, of Madison, who was born in 1841; Mary E., who 
was born in 1842, and died in infancy; Daniel Wood, born in 1848; Emily E., 
born in 1850; and Oscar N., who was born in 1852. The marriage of Mr. 
and Mrs. Noe have been blessed with four children: Maria, born in October, 
1870, wife of Lincoln Pierson, of Tarrytown, New York, by whom she had 
three children, — Louis, deceased, and Helen and Ruth: Mrs. Pierson completed 
the three-years course at the Centenary Collegiate Institute, located at 
Hackettstown, New Jersey, and was awarded the prize for efficiency in 
drawing; Louis, who was born in 1873, is a farmer and florist, being also a 
graduate of the Hackettstown Institute, in the class of 1891 ; Edith, who was 
born in 1882, died in 1891; and Lillian May, born in 1888. 

Mr. and Mrs. Noe hold membership in the Methodist church and con- 
tribute generously to its support. Their home is a beautiful and commodi- 
ous residence, supplied with all modern conveniences. The house was erected 
in 1879. Mr. Noe has always taken an active interest in the welfare and 
improvement of the county, and constructed a mile and a half of the high- 
way in Chatham township, which bears his name. Socially he is connected 
with the Masonic fraternity, and is also a member of Madison Lodge, No. 892, 
Royal Arcanum. 

MAHLON CARTER. 

Mr. Carter, a representative of one of the families of Morris county whose 
identification with its history extends from colonial days, was born in 
what is now East Madison in the year 1790, and is a son of Azariah Carter, 



176 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

also a native of Morris county, for his people had established one of the early 
homes here and taken their part in the work of its primitive development. 

The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm in a way which now 
forms an interesting story, so different is it from the modes of farm life at the 
present. The people still in their colonial style of dress carried on their work 
with implements and machinery which at the present day seem very crude. 
It was in the formative days of the republic, when our honored forefathers 
were laying the foundation of a country that within an almost incredibly 
short space of time has taken its place among the foremost nations of the 
globe. When America became engaged in the second war with England, 
Mr. Carter, then a young man of twenty-two years, went forth in defense of 
our rights. 

He was united in marriage to Beulah Bradford Genung, a daughter of 
Isaac Genung, one of the heroes of the war of the Revolution. He then 
took up his residence upon a farm in East Madison and gave his attention to 
agricultural pursuits, transforming his land into a richly productive tract. 
There were born to Mr. and Mrs. Carter the following named: Rachel L., 
who became the wife of George C. Emmons; Sylvester, who died in Califor- 
nia; Mary Elizabeth, who became the wife of Frank Ross; Elijah, a resident 
of Madison; MathewA. and Louis H., of New Haven, Connecticut; and two 
who died in childhood. 

Mr. Carter was honored with some local offices, and discharged his- 
duties with marked promptness and fidelity. He filled the position of con- 
stable, also that of justice of the peace. He was a member of the Presby- 
terian church, a man of strict integrity and unswerving honor, who lived up 
to his strong convictions and commanded the respect of all who knew him. 
In his political predilections he was a Jacksonian Democrat. 



PHILANDER B. PIERSON. 

A prominent representative of the business interests of Morristown, 
and one of the native sons of this city, the subject of this sketch was born 
December 30, 1854, his parents being Edward and Anna Maria (Sayre) Pier- 
son. The private schools afforded him his early educational advantages, and 
when his literary training was completed he took up the study of law under 
the direction of his brother, Charles E. Pierson. Later he was a student in 
the law offices of the firm of Pitney & Youngblood, of Morristown, and in 
1877 was admitted to the bar as an attorney at law. Three years later he 
became a counselor, and for the past twenty years he has practiced in the 
courts of Morris county, where he has gained prominence as an able repre- 
sentative of the profession. He is a man of strong mentality, keen discrim- 




^^.*xJ^ a^ y^oi<^ 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJVD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 177 

inatioii and sound judgment. His devotion to his clients' interests is proverb- 
ial, and in the handling of the causes entrusted to his care he displays marked 
forensic ability. His careful preparation, which leaves no assailable point in 
his defense, and his concise, logical arguments and clear reasoning, have won 
him many notable victories, and much important litigation has been presented 
in the courts by him. 

Mr. Pierson is now executor and trustee for several estates and is a lead- 
ing spirit in several business enterprises, which owe not a little of their suc- 
cess to his wise counsel, advice and capable management. He is treasurer 
for the proprietors of the Morris aqueduct, vice-president of the Morris- 
town Gas Light Company, and is a director in the Iron National Bank. 

In 1884 Mr. Pierson married antoinette Smith Freeman, a daughter of 
Rev. James M. Freeman, of Morristown, and they have one child, Marjorie 
Freeman Pierson. Mr. and Mrs. Pierson are members of the First Presby- 
terian church and are prominent people of the community, having the warm 
regard of a large circle of friends. 



DAVID Y. HEDGES. 



Few families have borne a more important part in the events which 
form the history of New Jersey than that of which our subject is a represent- 
ative, and their influence has ever been exerted in behalf of those measures 
and interests which tend to uplift humanity. In an almost unbroken line 
their ancestry can be traced back to Sir Charles Hedges, of England, there 
being only one link lacking in the chain of descent which would entitle them 
to a portion of the vast Hedges estate on the " merrie isle." Tradition says 
that the family was founded in America by three brothers, and it is authen- 
tically known that it took root on American soil at an early period in the 
■colonial epoch of our country. The great-grandparents of our subject were 
Gideon and Prue Hedges, and their children were Frederick, Joanna, Jere- 
miah, Robert and Gideon. 

Jeremiah Hedges, the grandfather, was born in 1766 and became a 
farmer, following that occupation throughout his life. His family took an 
active part in sheltering and protecting the soldiers in the war of the Revo- 
lution, and a number of army relics are now in possession of his descendants. 
He married Martha Rude, who was born May 9, 1768. His death occurred 
March 16, 1S31, and his wife passed away October 27, 1841. 

The father of our subject, Henry R. Hedges, was born June 27, 1802, 

and in his youth learned the trade of a wheelwright, following that pursuit for 

many years. He was also a local minister of the Methodist Episcopal church 

and in that work was largely associated with the Rev. John Hancock, who is 
It: 



178 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

given the credit of being the founder of the Methodist church in New Jersey. 
There are many interesting stories which might be told of those early times 
of church building. There were few church edifices, meetings being mostly 
held in the home of one of the members. In those days the distance was 
never too long or the weather too cold to prevent the people from attending 
divine worship. Rev. Henry R. Hedges presided over charges in Spring- 
field and Monroe and was well I<nown in Morris and Esse.x counties. He 
also held civil office, serving as assessor for some time. He took an 
advanced position on the slavery question and was one of the first to cast 
his vote for abolition in New Jersey. He supported that movement at a 
time when it was very unpopular in the state, and on account of the prejudice 
of his church against it he withdrew and identified himself with the Wesley- 
an church, with which he was connected until after the war, when he returned 
to the Methodist church and was one of its most devoted ministers of the 
gospel and teachers until his death. His work was immeasurable in its far- 
reaching influences. He formed a very wide acquaintanceship and the world 
is better for his having lived. "His neighbors were his friends, and his 
enemies were the enemies of virtue." 

The Rev. Henry Hedges was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Pruden, 
who was born in Hanover, October 6, 1807. Their children were: Mary 
Ann, who was born December 16, 1827, and died February 4, 1848; Charles 
H., born December 27, 1829; John L., who was born March 10, 1832, and 
died February 6, 1884; William A., who was born November 19, 1835, and 
died August 22, 1886; Jane A., who was born January 23, 1840, and died in 
August, 1871; Martha L. , born July 12, 1843; Luther Lee, born November 
21, 1845; David Young, born February 15, 1848; Eliza A., born April 3, 1853; 
and Wilbur, born February i, 1859. The mother of these children died and 
the father afterward married Eliza McCarl, who was born June 8, 1822. 
They had one child. 

David Y. Hedges is a carpenter and builder by trade, and many of the 
buildings of Madison and vicinity stand as monuments to his handiwork and 
his enterprise. He has always received a liberal patronage, for the excellence 
of his work and his honorable dealing and fidelity to the terms of a contract 
have won him the unqualified confidence of the public. Thus in business 
life he has attained considerable success and prominence. 

He is also a leader in church work in this community, being very active 
and influential in the Methodist church, in which his membership is placed. 
He was one of the organizers of the Union Sunday-school of East Madison 
and for twenty-one years was its superintendent, largely advancing its use- 
fulness by his untiring efforts. He is now living in Chatham, where he has 
erected a substantial and commodious residence. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 179 



FRANCIS S. LATHROP. 

No adequate memoir of Judge Francis S. Lathrop can be written until 
many of the useful enterprises which knew his fostering care have completed 
their full measure of good in the world, and until his personal influence and 
example shall have ceased their fruitage in the lives of those who were about 
him when he was yet an actor in the busy places of the world; yet there is 
much concerning him which can with profit and signal propriety be set down 
here as an illustration of what represents the higher values of life, — the 
accomplishments of one who set himself seriously to real labors and responsi- 
bilities and proved faithful in every relation of life. 

Hon. Francis Stebbins Lathrop was descended, in the seventh genera- 
tion, from the Rev. John Lathrop, who came to this country from England 
in the Griffin in 1634, to Massachusetts. He is a native son of the old Bay 
state, born in Springfield, Massachusetts, in the year 1806, being the son of 
Dwight Lathrop and Lora (Stebbins) Lathrop. The date of his advent in 
Madison, Morris county, New Jersey, was about the year 1838, when he 
bought the property known as Pine Tree farm; and he was, from the time 
he came to Madison and until his death, a good friend to rich and poor alike; 
and it is to him that Madison owes many improvements. He had several 
brothers, and all were prominently identified with commercial and mercantile 
operations in the city of New York. The house of F. S. and D. Lathrop 
controlled an extensive trade with the south, being unmistakably one of the 
largest dry-goods concerns in the southern trade at that period. Eventually 
withdrawing from commercial pursuits. Judge Lathrop became president of 
the Union Mutual Fire and Marine Insurance Company, of New York, and to 
his rare executive talent, prescience and discrimination was due in a large 
measure the advancement of this company to a position foremost among 
similar corporations in that great metropolis. He was naturally recognized 
as a great financier and business man, and was called upon to serve in posi- 
tions of distinctive trust and responsibility. For some time he held the pre- 
ferment as treasurer of the Chamber of Commerce of New York city, and 
when the affairs of the Central Railroad of New Jersey became so involved 
as to necessitate the appointing of a receiver for the property, this trust was 
conferred upon him, and he continued to administer the affairs thereof with 
great tact and judgment for a period of seven years, acting in such capacity 
until the hour of his death. In 1869 he was appointed an associate judge of 
the court of errors and appeals of New Jersey, which he retained through life, 
and is best known by this title. As the incumbent of this office he manifested 
the same fidelity, high animating principles and sense of conscientious obliga- 
tion which were characteristics of the man in all the relations of life. His 



ISO BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

was an intellectuality of high order, but it seems that the mind not more 
than the heart dominated a life which was ever consecrated to goodly ends. 
By those with whom he came into closest contact he was beloved and revered 
for his sterling manhood, while his service in public or semi-public capacities 
gained to him the respect and confidence of all who had cognizance of his 
acts and methods. His nature was one intrinsically honorable, and he was 
ever generous in his judgments of his fellow men; his heart was sympathetic 
and responsive, and his benefactions were not only those of counsel and wise 
admonition, but to those also " in any way afflicted in mind, body or estate " 
he was ever ready to offer such succor or relief as lay in his power to accord. 
His popularity was unmistakable, and was as firmly fixed in an objective way 
as was his integrity of character in the subjective. 

It is but natural to infer that Judge- Lathrop was imbued with a deep 
and abiding public spirit, for all that was of human interest and value 
appealed strongly to him. He was not only zealous in forwarding the prog- 
ress and prosperity of his home, city and county, but his ken broadened out 
to include and appreciate all that concerned the welfare of the state and 
nation. 

He was appointed a member of the first riparian commission of the 
state and continued to serve in this capacity until his death. It is a uni- 
formly conceded fact that it was principally through his influence and instru- 
mentality that the proceeds which came to the state through the work of 
that commission were deflected to a channel where the maximum good was 
to be secured therefrom, the funds being applied to the use of the public 
schools of New Jersey. Also he was one of the original members of a party 
to obtain control of Washington's Headquarters and to organize the Wash- 
ington Association. 

He was a member of the directorate of the Morris & Essex Railroad, and 
to him was due in a large measure the carrying through of the expedient 
scheme by which this road was leased to the Delaware, Lackawanna & West- 
ern Railroad Company, as a part of whose system it is now operated, its 
facilities and public value having been greatly augmented through the action 
:thus taken. The city of Madison shows many permanent evidences of his 
■public spirit and mature judgment in the way of public improvements, which 
he devised and was instrumental in bringing to consummation. His liberality 
ever kept pace with his enthusiastic interest, and to him Madison owes the 
honor which should ever be accorded to the benefactor, the true citizen, the 
distinguished public officer, the noble, earnest man. 

In his political adherency Judge Lathrop was strongly arrayed in the 
support of the Democratic party and its principles, his opinions in this, as in 
all other lines, being clearly defined and thoroughly fortified. In his religious 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 181 

views he held the faith of the Protestant Episcopal church, and was a liberal 
contributor to Grace church, of which he was really its founder and for a long 
time its chief supporter. The house of worship was erected almost entirely 
through his personal benefactions in a financial way. 

He was appointed one of a commission to select a site for an asylum for 
the insane, which was located in Morris Plains and is considered a model of 
its kind. It is now known as Morris Plains Hospital, and it is a building 
which has been visited by parties from Europe sent here for the purpose of 
obtaining the best ideas of building. He was president of the board of man- 
agers from the formation until his death. 

In the year 1830 was solemnized the marriage of Judge Lathrop to Miss 
Caroline M'Kinney Gilmour, daughter of John M'Kinney Gilmour, of North 
Carolina. They became the parents of one son and two daughters, namely. 
Frank, who died in 1865; Ellen, the wife of Henry Hopkins, of Philadelphia; 
and Louise G., the wife of Joseph A. Dean, of New York city. The son 
married Miss Isabel Gibbons, who survives him and who still occupies her 
husband's homestead in Madison. They became the parents of one daugh- 
ter and two sons, the surviving son, Francis S., who bears the full patronymic 
of his honored grandsire, being a banker and real-estate owner at Savan- 
nah, Georgia. He is still identified with the interests of Madison, where he 
still retains a large amount of valuable realty. 

Judge Lathrop's death occurred in the year 1882, at which time he was 
gathered to his fathers full of years and of honors, having attained the ven- 
erable age of seventy-six years. The entire community mourned the loss as 
one of almost personal bereavement, and the funeral services drew forth the 
largest concourse of people ever assembled for a similiar observance of 
respect and friendship in this section of the state. Rich and poor alike came 
to mourn the loss of one whose memory they hold as a precious heritage. 
High on the roll of Madison's most honored and beloved citizens will be 
inscribed the name of Francis S. Lathrop. 



ISRAEL REEVE. 



Born in the village of Bloomingdale, February 10, 1825, Mr. Reeve 
spent his entire life there. He passed the seventieth milestone on life's jour- 
ney, and gathered along the way the fruits of honest endeavor. He belonged 
to a family prominent in the history of northern New Jersey, his grandfather 
having been David Reeve, the patriot, who, at the beginning of the war for 
independence joined the American army and with the colonists suffered the 
pangs of hunger, marched barefoot over the frozen ground and slept in the 
open air in the dead of winter, when a fall of snow was a welcome covering 



182 BIOGBAPEICAL AJVD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

from the intense cold, enduring all in order that the colonies might enjoy 
freedom from the British tyranny. He never faltered through all these hard- 
ships, gallantly remaining with his command until victory and liberty crowned 
the American arms. Returning to his home he married Martha Hallock and 
to them were born six children: Abram; David; William; Daniel; Eliza- 
beth, who became the wife of Johnson Gould; and Bethea, who married 
John Allen. 

The father of our subject was Judge David Reeve, who for thirty years 
filled the office of justice of the peace and was one of the most prominent 
citizens of Passaic county, a recognized leader in political affairs. He, too, 
defended his country against England, serving in the war of 1812. A native 
of Pompton Plains, he was reared on his father's farm and after attaining his 
majority married Sophia Pitcher, by whom he had the following children: 
William, deceased; Elizabeth Ann, widow of Richard Sloan; Israel; and 
Margaret S., widow of Peter DeBaum. 

Israel Reeve was reared in Bloomingdale and followed farming as a life 
work. Although his father and grandfather were soldiers, he had no experi- 
ence in arms, but "peace hath her victories no less renowned than war " 
wrote Charles Sumner, and such were those which Israel Reeve achieved. 
He conquered the obstacles that lay in the path of business success and lived 
the life of a quiet, honorable farmer and loyal citizen, his worth winning 
him high regard. He was energetic, progressive and sagacious, and his judi- 
cious management brought to him a very gratifying prosperity. He was 
married in 1859 to Miss Mary F. Woodward, daughter of Colonel Benjamin 
Woodward, and they had one child, Camilla W., now the wife of Abraham 
L. DeBow, of Pompton. Mr. Reeve was a firm believer in Christ and the 
tenets of the Dutch Reformed church and died in that faith November 4, 
1895. 



MELVIN S. CONDIT. 



The first known member of this family was John Condit (Conditt), who 
came to America in 1678 and was a purchaser of lands "in the bounds of 
the town of Newark," in Essex county. New Jersey, in 16S9 and 1691. He 
was either a native of England or Wales, probably the latter, and is the 
ancestor of nearly all those bearing the name of Condit or Condict in the 
United States. He first married in Great Britain, where his wife died, after 
which he came to America with his son Peter, locating in Newark, where he 

married Deborah , and they had a son, named John, who died before 

attaining his majority. 

Peter Condit, son of John, was married, in 1695, to Mary, a daughter 





.//oy;^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 183 

of Samuel Harrison, and this union resulted in the following issue: Samuel, 
born December 6, 1696; Peter, born in 169S or 1699; John, 1701; Nathaniel, 
1703; Mar}', 1705 or 1706; Philip, 1709; Isaac, 171 2. 

Nathaniel, son of Peter and Mary (Harrison) Condit, was born at New- 
ark, New Jersey, and married Elizabeth Ogden, a daughter of Swain and 
Susan (Ackerman) Ogden, of Orange, New Jersey. She was born in 171 1 
and died on the loth of January, 1785, survived by her husband until June 
23, 1846. Their children were as follows: Peter, born in 1731; Nathaniel, 
who died young; Stephen, born in 1738, died in 1765; Timothy, born in 
1740; Mary, who married Mr. Parsonate; Sarah, who became the wife of 
Mr. Harrison; and Susannah, who married Mr. Ward. 

Timothy Condit, son of Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Ogden) Condit, mar- 
ried Elizabeth, a daughter of Benjamin and Mary (Morris) Lindsley, who 
was born April 26, 1749, and died August 19, 1813. Timothy was a private 
in the Revolutionary war, and resided in Orange, where his children were 
born and where he died on the 9th of September, 1791. He became the 
iather of these children: Stephen, born March 18, 1768; Phebe, born Sep- 
tember 10, 1771, died May 22, 1854; Elizabeth, born August 17, 1774; 
Moses, born September 30, 1776; Benjamin L., born October 28, 1782; 
Mary M., born October 29, 1785, died May 27, 1862; Nathaniel O., born 
February 8, 1789; and Timothy D., born October 17, 1791. 

Nathaniel Ogden Condit, father of our subject, was married in 18 10 to 
Phebe Crane, who was born on the i6th of September, 1793, and died on 
the 2d of January, 1824. They were the parents of the following children: 
Isaac A., born on the 4th of September, 18 ri, died April 30, 1812; Timothy 
D. , born March 24, 18 13, died December 17, 1842; Stephen D., born Feb- 
ruary 4, 1815, died August 25, 1839; Mary Ann, born January 5, 1818; Eliz- 
abeth C, born February i, 1820, died May 18, 1847; Susan C, born April 
4, 1822, resides at Troy, Morris county. New Jersey; Sarah, born May 16, 
1824; Charles C, born December 3, 1827, died December 15, i860. On 
the 29th of January, 1831, Mr. Condit married Miss Mary Ann Bedford, who 
was born on the 9th of August, 1804, and their issue comprised the follow- 
ing: Theresa, born March 19, 1833; Melvin S., born September 11, 1834; 
Abby, born January 10, 1836, died May 15, 1S37; Frances Electa, born Octo- 
ber 30, 1837; Alice, born April 16, 1844. The father of these children came 
to Morris county in 181 1 and located at Montville, where he followed the 
trade of a carpenter, and during the war of 181 2 he served for a time as a 
soldier. He built the first water-wheel on the inclined plane of the Morris, 
canal at Montville, and with his brother Timothy he established a tannery at 
that place, conducting the same for many years. About 1826 or 1827 he 
engaged in the hotel business in his home city and was identified with that 



184 BIOGBJPHICAL AJTD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

enterprise for a period of twenty years. He also helped to establish the first 
stage line between Boonton and Newark. The latter part of his life was 
spent in agricultural pursuits, which he followed until his death, on the 7th 
of October, 1862. 

Melvin Smith Condit, the immediate subject of this mention, was the 
son of Nathaniel and Mary Ann (Bedford) Condit, and received his educa- 
tional discipline in the public schools of Montville township. At the age of 
fifteen years he secured a position as clerk in a country store, retaining the 
same for three years and then went to Newark and learned the carriage 
business, which he followed for ten years. 

In 1863 he enlisted in the United States military-railroad service, in the 
car repair department, remaining thus engaged until the close of the war. 
In 1868 he embarked in the mercantile business at Parsippany, remaining so 
employed up to 1872, and serving as assessor of the township from 1870 to- 
1878, in which latter year he was elected clerk of Morris county, fulfilling 
the duties of that office for ten years. In 1890 he became one of the organ- 
izers of the Boonton National Bank, of which he has since been cashier, and 
he was also one of the directors of the First National Bank of Morristown 
for several years. He has been a member of the Boonton school board for 
five years, is treasurer of the board of trade, a member of the Athletic Asso- 
ciation, and in 1890 he was a candidate for state senator but was defeated 
by a few votes. Socially he is affiliated with Arcania Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, and he and his family are prominent adherents of the 
Presbyterian church. 

On the 1st of July, 1866, Mr. Condit was united in marriage to Miss- 
Eliza A. Provost, who was born June 4, 1844, her demise taking place on 
the 28th of January, 1871. The following children comprised the issue: 
Mary E., born July 4, 1867; Alice P., born April 20, 1869; and William S. , 
who died in infancy. On the 26th of May,. 1875, Mr. Condit contracted a 
second marriage, being then united to Miss Alice C. Hendershot, and they 
had the following children: Henry M., born December 15, 1876, died August 
5, 1877; Bertha H., born July 14, 1878; and Louis Ogden, born October 13, 



WILLIAM K. MUCHMORE. 

As one of the prosperous and popular young business men of Morristown, 
it is but consistent that Mr. Muchmore be accorded consideration in this work. 
He was born in Madison, Morris count}'. New Jersey, on the i8th of Sep- 
tember, 1867, and is a son of William Fletcher Muchmore, who is now a 
well known druggist of East Hampden, Long Island, New York. The father 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfB GEJiEALOGICAL HISTORY. 185- 

is a native of Morris county and established and conducted the first drug 
store in Madison, subsequently moving to Morristown, where he continued 
in the drug business for several years and then removed to East Hampden. 
He is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, has attained the degree 
of Knight Templar, and during his residence in Morristown he was appointed, 
grand master of the state of New Jersey. 

William K. Muchmore passed the greater part of his youth in Morris- 
town, where his literary education was obtained in the public schools, after 
leaving which he secured a clerkship in the stationery and book store of H. 
G. Emmell, retaining that position for several years. In 1893 he established 
himself in the stationery business on his own responsibility and a year later 
opened a store at his present location on Speedwell avenue, where he carries 
a complete and varied stock of stationery, periodicals and school supplies, 
and by industry and application he has succeeded in building up a large and 
remunerative business. For nearly a decade and a half Mr. Muchmore has 
been an ardent devotee of " the wheel " and is one of the oldest Morristown 
members of the League of American Wheelmen. In connection with other 
departments of his business he handles the Columbia bicycles. 

Mr. Muchmore celebrated his marriage in 1892., when he was united to 
Miss Philippa Rosevear, a daughter of William Rosevear, of Morristown, and 
one child, Gladys, has been born to them. Mr. and Mrs. Muchmore are 
faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in his social rela- 
tions our subject is a popular member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he 
has attained the degree of a Master Mason, while he is also a member of the 
Royal Arcanum, the Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order of Red Men and 
other social organizations. 



JACOB S. PAULMIER. 

Jacob S. Paulmier, one of the most distinguished citizens of Madison, 
was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, in 1837, and to the public schools of 
that city he is indebted for the educational privileges which he enjoyed. On 
laying aside his text-books to enter upon his business career, he secured a 
clerkship in a grocery store, where he remained for five years. With this 
business experience to aid him in the operation of an enterprise of his own, 
he came to Madison in 1857, and in connection with his brother Stephen 
opened a grocery and dry-goods store, which he has since carried on with 
excellent success, building up a large and remunerative business. Some 
years ago he broached to some of his fellow townsmen the subject of estab- 
lishing a bank in Madison, but met with little encouragement. Nothing 
daunted, however, he purchased a site, erected a building and opened a bank,. 



186. BIUGBAPEICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

on the 1st of September, 1881, and to-day it is in a prosperous condition. 
From the beginning he has served as its president, and its success is due to 
his business and executive ability and careful management. 

For a number of years Mr. Paulmier held the office of commissioner of 
appeals, under the township government, and in reaching a fair valuation of 
property his estimate was always considered a proper one to accept. He is 
now a progressive and able member of the city council, and is serving on the 
finance and light committees. His connection with the latter brings an 
unusual demand upon his time in establishing electric light and pole lines, 
and in looking after the work with his associates. He gives his support to 
all measures for the public good, and is numbered among the valued citizens 
of the locality. 



MAHLON HOAGLAND, Sr. 

This venerable gentleman, who has reached the age of four-score years, 
is numbered among the most honored citizens of Morris county and is one of 
its native sons. He was born in the village of Dover, on the 14th of Novem- 
ber, 18 17, and through a long life of useful connection with the business 
interests of the community he has won and retained the confidence and 
respect of those with whom he has been brought in contact. His parents 
were Peter G. and Elizabeth (Ayres) Hoagland, representatives of old families. 

Mahlon Hoagland spent the first sixteen years of his life in the vil- 
lage of Dover and pursued his education during the winter season in the 
old red school-house, which was one of the landmarks of those days. In the 
summer months he aided in the work of the farm, and thus alternating his 
time between the fields and the school-room he remained until his sixteenth 
year. He then went to Newark, where he learned the carpenter's trade, fo/ 
lowing that pursuit for two years in Newark, after which he went to Jersey 
City, where he completed his trade under the direction of a Mr. Bashaw, a 
native of England. Later he went to Long Island, where he worked at his 
trade, and in 1840 he arrived in Rockaway, New Jersey, where he opened a 
carpenter shop and began contracting and building on his own account. He 
has erected many of the dwellings, hotels and store buildings in this place, 
and his excellent workmanship and skill is attested by these substantial struct- 
ures which are an ornament to the town, adding greatly to its attractive 
appearance. Among the structures which show forth his handiwork are the 
Center House, the B. K. Stickle hardware store, the residence of Thomas 
Green and others. 

Mr. Hoagland continued his connection with the building interests of 
Rockaway as an independent contractor until 1844, when he formed a part- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 187 

nership with James Fuller, under the firm name of Fuller & Hoagland, and 
later they admitted to an interest in the business Freeman Wood. In 1S46 
the firm built a foundry in Rockaway, and to this work Mr. Hoagland gave 
his personal supervision and entire attention. He then took charge of the 
operation of the same and for a number of years conducted this enterprise, 
building and furnishing material for forges and furnaces, there being at that 
time considerable demand for such material. He also manufactured chilled 
rolls and burr mills, and did a good business along that line. Between i860 
and 1865 he erected six rolling mills, two in Jersey City, one in Brooklyn, 
one on Eighteenth street, New York, one at Mt. Haven, New York city, and 
one in Massachusetts, and at the same time he was engaged in manufactur- 
ing and putting up mill machinery, and in building canal locks, plants and 
general machinery. He also put in the machinery in the Rockaway Rolling 
Mill after the Jackson sale, which was operated for a number of years by the 
Jacksons of Rockaway. He also built the mill at Dover, which is now in 
charge of his son, Mahlon, Jr. ; and he put new machinery in what is now 
known as the Jackson Mills. 

In 1846 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hoagland and Miss Anna 
J. Muire, of White Meadow, Morris county, a daughter of Colonel Thomas 
and Susan (Arnot) Muire. The Colonel was a native of Scotland, and his 
wife was born in the Empire state. Mr. and Mrs. Hoagland became the 
parents of seven children, five of whom are now living, namely: Ella, 
widow of James L. Maxton; Thomas H., who is general manager of the 
Rockaway Foundry; Mahlon, Jr., who is bookkeeper in the same business; 
Anna, wife of Morford B. Stuart, a merchant and mayor of Rockaway; and 
Susan, wife of Joseph F. Tuttle, a grocer of Rockaway. Mrs. Hoagland 
passed to her eternal rest in 1894. She was a devoted wife and mother, 
a faithful friend and a consistent Christian, holding membership' in the 
Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Hoagland has long been a stanch Democrat in his political affilia- 
tions, and advocates the Jeffersonian principles. He has earnestly sought 
the success of his party and has always kept well informed on the issues of 
the day. He has been honored with the office of collector of Rockaway 
township, serving in that position for three years, and was nominated by his 
party for congress. He made a strong canvass and polled a large vote, but 
was defeated by a small majority. Socially he is a member of Acacia Lodge, 
No. 20, A. F. & A. M., of Dover, and he and his family are members of 
the Presbyterian church, at Rockaway, in which he is now serving as one of 
the elders. His life has been a busy, useful and commendable one, charac- 
terized by devotion to every duty that has devolved upon him, by honor in 
'business and by fidelity in all social relations. He is a man of fine personal 



188 BIOQBAPEICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

appearance, and although he has now attained an advanced age is still enjoy- 
ing good health, — a blessing which we hope may be his for many years yet 
to come. 



ISAAC R. PIERSON. 



A prominent and respected citizen of Morristown, Morris county, Isaac 
Roseberry Pierson was born at Pleasantville, near New Vernon, Morris 
county. New Jersey, on the 26th of February, 1846. In the same year he 
was taken by his parents to Morristown, where they remained until he was 
seven years old and then moved to Brookside, whence they went to Morris 
Plains, when our subject was fourteen years old, and remained there one 
year. On the 3d of June, 1861, Isaac R. entered the office of the Jerseyman 
as an apprentice, boarding with his employer, A. A. Vance, with whom he 
learned the printer's trade. Subsequently, in connection with C. F. Axtell, 
he became publisher of the Jerseyman, and continued as such for two j-ears, 
Mr. Vance retaining the editorship, and in 1869 the journal passed into the 
control of Vance & Stiles, Mr. Pierson remaining in the capacity of fore- 
man. On the 1st of January, 1896, the interests of the Jerseyman were 
purchased by Mr. Pierson, Herbert C. Rowell and Aldus H. Pierson, and have 
since been conducted under the firm name of Pierson & Rowell, Mr. Pierson 
occupying the editor's chair. 

In 1865 Mr. Pierson became a communicant of the Morristown Baptist 
church, and four years later he was appointed superintendent of the Sunday- 
school, an office he still retains, besides which he is one of the deacons, was 
at one time a trustee and for a quarter of a century held the position of 
clerk. He was one of the organizers of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, in which he has held various offices, at present being an active member 
of the board of directors, and he was one of those who established the Mor- 
ristown Building & Loan Association, of which he has been secretary since 
its inception. In his political faith Mr. Pierson is an advocate of Republican 
principles, but has never held official preferment except those of clerk of 
the board of freeholders and justice of the peace, being elected to the latter 
office in 1897. 

The marriage of Mr. Pierson was celebrated in 1869, in which year he 
was united to Miss Cornelia Humphreyville, a descendant of one of the old 
families of Morristown, and two sons were born to them, namely; Aldus H. 
and A. Vance. 

The paternal ancestry of our subject extends back to Rev. Abraham 
Pierson, who was born in 16 13, in Yorkshire, England, being graduated at 
Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1632. He came to the United States in 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 189 

1639, taking up his residence in Boston and Lynn, Massachusetts, where he 
remained for a year and then moved to Southampton, Long Island, and 
there resided until 1647, in which year he went to Bradford, Connecticut, 
thence to New Jersey in 1666, establishing the town of Newark and organiz- 
ing a Congregational church, which afterward became the First Presbyterian 
church. Abraham Pierson was originally ordained in the Episcopalian faith, 
but later transferred his allegiance to Presbyterianism, and his frequent 
removals and final settlement in Newark were caused by religious difficulties. 
He died at Newark in 1678, leaving eleven children. His lineal descendants 
are traced through seven generations, representatives of the second and third 
of which settled in Morris county. The immediate ancestors of Isaac R. 
Pierson located in Morris Plains and there engaged in sawmilling and farm- 
ing, the property remaining in the family until about twenty years ago. 

Timothy Pierson, the father of our subject, was a wheelwright by occu- 
pation and followed the same in early life, but subsequently conducted a saw- 
mill at Brookside and Speedwell. He was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Blackford, whose grandfather, Benjamin Blackford, came to Morris county 
more than a century ago and was pastor of a Baptist church at Mount Free- 
dom, this county. 



ARMIN UEBELACKER, M. D. 

Among the most skillful and successful physicians of New Jersey is num- 
bered Dr. Uebelacker, of Morristown, whose wide practice well indicates his 
prestige as a member of the medical profession. He began preparation for 
his chosen calling in his native land, Bavaria, Germany, where, after com- 
pleting a course of study in Schweinfurth Gymnasium he was graduated in 
the University Erlangen. 

Determining to seek in the New World a broader field of labor, he then 
crossed the Atlantic to America and continued his studies in the Homeo- 
pathic College of New York city, in which institution he was graduated in 
the class of 1871. Since that time he has practiced in Morris county, and 
for nearly twenty-four years he has been a resident physician of Morristown. 
He has a deep love for his profession, without which the highest success can 
never be attained. He has ever been a close student and keeps thoroughly . 
in touch with the progress and advancement which mark the science of med- 
icine. His proficiency has gained him a very liberal and lucrative patronage 
and assured him not only the support of the public, but also the recognition 
of his professional brethren, who accord him a foremost place in their ranks. 
He is a valued member of the American Institute of Homeopathy and of the 
New Jersey State Medical Society, and for more than eight years has been a 



190 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

member of the New Jersey State Medical Examining Board, of which he has 
served both as president and treasurer. In Morristown he is a member of 
the medical staff of the Memorial Hospital, and as such is much interested 
in the good work of that institution. 

In his practice Dr. Uebelacker manifests the broadest humanitarianism. 
The thought of pecuniary reward never deters him from answering the call 
of a suffering one, and to poor and rich alike he goes without hesitancy, 
alleviating pain and putting forth his best efforts to restore man's most cher- 
ished possession — health. 

In 1867 the Doctor was united in marriage to Miss Mary C. Miller, a 
highly educated and accomplished lady, belonging to a distinguished family 
of French Huguenot origin. He belongs to the First Presbyterian church of 
Morristown, and is a modest, unassuming gentleman, of pleasant, courteous 
manner, and possessing that genuine worth which commands respect in 
every land and clime. 



FREDERICK B. RICHARDSON. 

This gentleman, as president and secretary, stands at the head of the 
Richardson & Boynton Company, of Dover, New Jersey, one of the leading 
industrial concerns of the country. This business was established in 1833 
by Henry A. Richardson, who manufactured the first modern cook stove, 
supported by four legs, made in this country. It was manufactured in Wor- 
cester, Massachusetts, previous to which time Dutch ovens and fire-places 
were used for cooking purposes. 

In 1863 Mr. Richardson removed his business to Brooklyn, where, with 
constantly increasing success, he engaged in the manufacture of stoves of 
various kinds, making continued progress and improvement in his products. 
In 1882 the business was incorporated under the name of the Richardson & 
Boynton Company, the four sons of Henry A. Richardson — Frederick B., 
Henry T., Augustus P. and Dwight S., taking charge of the extensive inter- 
ests controlled by the house. Theirs is without doubt the largest plant of 
the kind in the world. Their business increased so rapidly that they were 
constantly forced to enlarge their buildings and increase their facilities, in 
order to meet the growing demand of their trade, until their plant covered 
the entire block between Commerce, Van Brunt, Bowne and Imlay streets, 
the buildings thereon — twelve in number — being erected between the years 
1878 and 1887. At length these became inadequate and the company 
resolved to transfer its business to Dover. Frederick B. Richardson visited 
various manufacturing centers throughout the country, and at length deter- 
mined upon Dover as the most favorable site for the extensive enterprise. 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJ\rD GEJVEALOGICAL HISTORY. 191 

He came at once to this city, and on the 14th of August, 1895, consummated 
the purchase of forty acres of land. The following day work was begun on 
the new plant, and on the ist of January, 1897, it was put in operation. 
Some idea of the magnitude of the task of constructing the plant may per- 
haps be gained from the fact that it required eleven hundred and twenty-five 
car-loads of materials to construct the plant and the freight bill was twenty- 
eight thousand dollars. There are in all, twenty-one buildings, which are 
known by numbers, and each building has its special purpose. No i is the 
foundry, two hundred and twenty-five by three hundred and four feet, with 
a height from floor to ridge of fifty-nine feet. In connection with this is a 
large cupola in the center of a foundry with a capacity of twenty tons an 
hour. This building has six pneumatic hoists, supported by traveling cranes 
and operated by compressed air, which is also used in elevating the material 
to the cupola. Building No. 2 is used for cleaning the castings, which is 
done by the sand-blast process, the force being compressed air. The first 
floor of building No. 3 is used for nickel-plating and polishing, while the 
second floor is used by the workers in sheet iron. Building No. 4, one hun- 
dred by five hundred feet, furnishes store-room and shipping facilities. 
Building No. 5 constitutes the brick engine and boiler rooms, containing a 
battery of three horizontal tubular boilers with an aggregate horse power of 
two hundred and eighty-five. The engine is a one-hundred-and-fifty horse- 
power Armington & Sims, and a dynamo in the same building furnishes power 
for the entire plant, all machinery being operated by electricity. Building 
No. 6 is utilized as storage room for wooden patterns. Building No. 7, 
which is fifty-six by five hundred feet, is a pattern shop, carpenter shop and 
crating shop. Building No. 8 is a core room, equipped with core ovens. 
The other buildings are used each for its particular purpose, and the com- 
pany has its own electric-light plant, water works and fire department. Tele- 
phones connect all the buildings and there are forty-eight hundred feet of 
narrow-gauge railroad operating between the different buildings, while the 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, and the New Jersey Central 
Road have built on the grounds of the company two and three-fourths miles 
of standard-gauge railroad. All this affords excellent shipping facilities. The 
water supply comes from a stand-pipe, fifteen by one hundred feet, with a 
capacity of one hundred and thirty-two thousand gallons. This is the largest 
and one of the most perfectly and completely equipped plants of its kind in 
the world. The sheet-iron shop is the most extensive of the sort not only in 
this country but abroad, being ninety by four hundred feet in dimensions. 
Employment in that department alone is furnished to fifty-eight men, and in 
the mounting department, which is also very complete, employment is given 
to one hundred and twenty-five men. The entire number of operatives is 



192 BIOGRJPHICJ.L AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

four hundred and fifty, and from fifty-six hundred to sixty-two hundred dol- 
lars is paid out each week to the employes. During an existence of over 
fifty years the company has never once failed to pay its men on the regular 
day, and the fair and courteous treatment shown the employes has gained 
their regard and allegiance. 

On the incorporation of the Richardson & Boynton Company, in 1882, 
the father, Henry A. Richardson, withdrew from the active management of 
the business, and is now living retired in Poughkeepsie, New York. The 
four brothers are still connected with the enterprise, and under various names 
the company has established various branch houses. Under the name of the 
New York State Company they have offices and a store at Nos. 232 and 234 
Water street. New York, where they have been doing business for more 
than thirty-five years. For a quarter of a century they have also conducted 
branch offices and a store at No. 84 Lake street, Chicago. Augustus P. 
Richardson, the vice-president of the New York State Company, is in charge 
-of the Chicago house. There is also abranch establishment at No. 94 Union 
street, Boston, under the management of the New York office. Of the New 
York State Company, Henry T. Richardson is president and general man- 
ager; Augustus P. Richardson, vice-president; and D wight S. Richardson, 
treasurer. The last named also has the superintendency of the salesmen and 
is the inventor of the family, supervising all designs and patterns used. F. 
B. Richardson is secretary of the New York State Company and is president 
of the New Jersey Company, having full charge of the mammoth works at 
Dover. The magnitude of the business is largely due to the capable man- 
agement, keen discrimination and unbounded enterprise and energy of the 
president, who has won for the house a most enviable reputation for relia- 
bility and for the excellence of its products, consisting of furnaces, heaters 
and ranges. In the foundry there is a process used whereby the tempera- 
ture of the iron is reduced so that when ready to run the molds it only takes 
three minutes to lift the iron. In this the Richardson Company leads the 
world. 

Frederick Bliss Richardson was born in Brooklyn, New York, February 
12, 1859, and acquired his education in the Polytechnic Institute there. 
When seventeen years of age he entered upon his business career in a cler- 
ical capacity in the office of Richardson, Boynton & Company, in Water 
street, New York city, and his close application, keen discrimination and 
unflagging energy enabled him to master the business in a short time. 
When the enterprise was incorporated he was chosen to his present position, 
and in his line he stands to-day among the leaders in the world. 

In social relations Mr. Richardson is courteous, affable and genial, and 
is popular with all classes. He is a member of the Veterans' Associa- 



BIOGR.'JPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 193 

tion of the Twenty-third New York Regiment, having served as a private of 
Company C, from 1877 until 1883. Very prominent in Masonic circles, he 
is a life member of Altair Lodge, F. & A. M. ; belongs to Constellation Chap- 
ter, R. A. M. ; Clifton Commandery, K. T. ; and all the Scottish Rite bodies, 
as well as Kismet Temple of the Mystic Shrine, — all in Brooklyn. He also 
belongs to the Hamilton Club, of Brooklyn, and is a member of the Morris- 
town Field Club and the Golf Club, of Morristown. In these he is highly 
esteemed as a genial, companionable gentleman, but it is in the world of 
industrial pursuits that he is best known. His name at once suggests a 
power in the world of trade, — a power that to a large extent controls and 
directs the foundry interests of the east. The day of small undertakings 
seems to have passed and the era of gigantic enterprises is upon us. In con- 
trol of mammoth concerns are men of master minds, of almost limitless abil- 
ity to guide, of sound judgment and keen discrimination. Their progressive- 
ness must not only reach the bounds that others have gained, but must even 
pass beyond into new and broader, untried fields of operation; but an unerr- 
ing foresight and sagacity are demanded to avoid mistake in venturing upon 
uncertain ground. Thus continually growing, a business takes leadership in 
its special line, and the men who are at its head are deservedly eminent in 
the world of commerce, occupying a position that commands the respect 
while it excites the admiration of all. Such a position is now tilled by Fred- 
erick Bliss Richardson. 



JONATHAN M. NOE. 

The honored subject of this memoir was born on the old Meeker home- 
stead, in Chatham township, on the 23d of June, 1836, being the eldest son 
of Lewis Noe, one of the oldest settlers of Chatham township. He obtained 
his early education in the public schools, and when he had mastered the 
fundamental studies entered school at Fort Edward, New York, where he 
completed his course. 

Mr. Noe was married on the 22d of February, 1872, the lady of his 
choice being Miss Sarah Ayres, a native of Middlesex county. New Jersey, 
having been born near Rahway, Union county. Her parents were Ezra and 
Mary A. (Jones) Ayres, the former of whom was likewise a native of Middle-' 
sex county, being a son of Samuel Ayres, who represented, in direct descent, 
an old colonial family. Mr. and Mrs. Noe began their domestic life on what 
was known as the old Meeker homestead, in Chatham township, Morris 
county, — this being the place of Mr. Noe's birth, — and by the energetic pur- 
suit of agriculture, he added considerably to the handsome patrimony inher- 
ited from his parents. He was an intelligent, energetic man, capable in 

13 



194 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJSTEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

management, and his well-directed efforts brought him success in his labors. 
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Noe was blessed with the presence of two chil- 
dren, — Isaac M. and Delia Marie, twins, born December 5, 1872. The 
former is now engaged quite extensively in agriculture and floriculture, prop- 
agating flowers for the city market, and is a young man of much promise. 
The daughter was married on the i8th of November, 1897, when she became 
the wife of C. Frederick Force, son of Charles C. Force, an old and 
respected resident of Madison, New Jersey. 

Mr. Noe followed the political banner of the Democracy, and was 
called to fill a number of township offices, where his faithfulness to duty- 
showed that the trust reposed in him was not misplaced. He was a consist- 
ent member of the Presbyterian church and was zealous in all good works, 
withholding his support from no measure or interest which he believed would 
promote the public welfare. He passed into eternal life oil the 8th of June, 
1873, and the community thereby lost one of its most valued citizens, his 
neighbors a faithful friend, and his family a loving father and husband. 
Mrs. Noe, like her husband, is a Presbyterian in religious faith, and with her 
son she still resides on the old homestead. 



THE KITCHELL FAMILY. 

Two decades had not passed after the landing of the Pilgrims at Plym- 
outh Rock when the Kitchell family was founded in America, by Robert 
Kitchell, who was born in England in 1604. He married Margaret, daughter 
of Rev. Edward Sheaffer, of Cranbrook, Kent county, England, and on the 
29th of April, 1639, they sailed for America, with a company of Puritan 
refugees, on the first vessel that anchored in the harbor of Quinnepiac, now 
New Haven, Connecticut. They soon afterward settled at Guilford, on the 
border of the sound, and Robert Kitchell became a man of considerable 
prominence in the colony. 

His son, Samuel, who was born in England in 1633, was twice married. 
He first wedded Elizabeth Wakeman, of Connecticut; and afterward married 
Grace, daughter of Rev. Abraham Pierson, a leader in the Newark, New 
Jersey, settlement in 1666. By his first wife Samuel Kitchell had six chil- 
dren: Sarah, Elizabeth, Abigail, Samuel, Mary, and Susannah; and by his 
second wife he had two children, Abraham and Grace. The father of this 
family died in 1690. 

Abraham Kitchell, the son of the second marriage and the next in line of 
this family, had seven children as follows: Samuel, Joseph, John, David, 
Grace, Mary and Abigail. Abraham Kitchell moved from Newark in the 
early part of 1700 and in 1724 purchased one thousand and seventy-five 




^-yV^^^-^— --^ -^ , ^^/l^^ 





BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 195 

acres of land from Rebecca Wheeler and lived with his family at Hanover 
Neck. Abraham Kitchell's son Joseph was the father of the Hon. Aaron 
Kitchell, who was the most noted member of the Kitchell famil}'. He was 
born June 25, 1744, and married Phebe Farrand, who was born in 1743 and 
died March 12, 1807. He was one of the most conspicuous figures in the 
history of Morris county. For several years after the Revolutionary war he 
served as a member of the state legislature of New Jersey. From 1799 until 
1807 he was a member of the lower house of congress and from 1807 until 
181 1 was United States senator. 

His brilliant mental attainments, his character, worth and his sound 
judgment on matters of governmental policy, made him a leading figure in 
the council chambers of the nation, and his individuality was strongly 
impressed on the national legislation. His children were : Farrand, Johanna, 
Jemima, Ambrose, Susan, Lucy, Electa, Aaron, Betsy and Mary. 

Ambrose Kitchell, son of Aaron, built him a house a few hundred feet 
away from his early home, in which his son Joseph, the next on the old place, 
spent his life. Joseph Kitchell was married in September, 1826, to Anna 
Maria Ely. Their children were Joseph H., Edward L. , Ambrose Ely and 
George R. His known justice and impartiality in all public matters led him 
to be frequently chosen to serve on the grand jury, and for many years he 
acceptably filled the office of freeholder. He was an elder in the Presby- 
terian church, at Hanover, in which church his father had also filled the same 
office. He died January 11, 1893, leaving two sons, Joseph H. and George 
R. , to survive him. 

George R. Kitchell, who came in possession of the old homestead at the 
death of his father, married Sarah C. Squier, a daughter of John Squier, who 
belonged to one of the old families of Esse.x county. New Jersey. The}- have 
one child, J. Henry Kitchell, who, together with his father, is engaged in 
successfully carrying on the old farm, having it stocked with Holstein-Friesian 
cattle, whose milk is sent every day to the city. 

The family still have the old sheepskin deed given to Abraham Kitchell 
by Rebecca Wheeler, which shows the property to have been in the posses- 
sion of the Kitchell family one hundred and seventy-four years, and J. Henry 
Kitchell to be of the seventh generation who has lived on the farm. 



HENRY C. PITNEY. 



The family of whom this distinguished gentleman is the present repre- 
sentative in Morris county was originally founded in Pitney Parish and Pit- 
ney Hundred, Somersetshire, England, the progenitor of the American branch 
being James Pitney, a manufacturer of London, who came to this country in 



196 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

the eighteenth century, and whose descendants for two hundred years have 
been honored residents of Morris county, New Jersey. His son, James Pit- 
ney, was the great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch and the father of 
Mahlon Pitney, a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Another great-grand- 
father of our subject, David Thompson, and Henry Cooper, the maternal 
ancestor, also participated in that conflict. The parents of Henry C. Pitney 
were Mahlon and Lucella (Cooper) Pitney. 

Henry Cooper Pitney was born in Mendham, Morris county. New Jersey, 
on the 19th of January, 1827, and was graduated at Princeton College in 
June, 1848. His early predilection being for the legal profession, he decided 
to make that his aim in life and took up the study of law under the precep- 
torage of Theodore Little and Hon. Ira C. Whitehead, both of Morristown, 
and was admitted to the bar as an attorney in July, 1851, and as a counsel- 
lor-at-law in November, 1854. He engaged in the practice of his chosen 
calling in Morristown, and such was his ability that he quickly won recogni- 
tion and built up a large practice. His tastes ran largely to scientific ques- 
tions and to the law of equity, and his prestige became so pronounced that 
he was appointed prosecutor of pleas of Morris county in 1862, and served in 
that capacity for five years. He acted as advisory master for quite a while, 
and on April 9, 1889, Chancellor McGill appointed him vice-chancellor, a 
position he still retains, having been reappointed in 1896. In the absence of 
the chancellor he has been three times' constituted, under the statute, a mas- 
ter to act for that official, and he was one of the first ten advisory masters 
appointed by the late Chancellor Runyon in pursuance of a statute passed for 
that purpose. 

Previous to his selection as vice-chancellor Mr. Pitney's law practice had 
become very extensive, and he was frequently called upon to act as counsel 
in important cases throughout the state, his skill in the trial of causes having 
obtained for him an enviable reputation as a barrister. He has given to his 
profession an enthusiastic devotion, which, added to his high mental attain- 
ments, resulted in placing him in the foremost ranks of prominent lawyers of 
the New Jersey bar. His mind is exceedingly analytical; he delights in the 
examination of the most abstruse legal principles, and as a collater of decis- 
ions, as well as in the application thereof, he is without a peer. His argu- 
mentative powers are superb; his addresses to the courts are delivered in a 
■clear and convincing manner and listened to with profound respect, and, 
keen in perceiving the real question at issue in a case submitted to him, he 
rarely fails in at once ascertaining the ground upon which must rest the 
decision of a legal contest. 

Mr. Pitney brought to the office of vice-chancellor many qualifications 
for the proper performance of the duties attendant upon that important posi- 



BIOGRJPHICAL .J.YD GEXEALOGIC\dL HISTORY. 197 

tion, his long experience in the trial of causes enabling him to sift and 
analyze the testimony of witnesses and to group together the salient points 
in the case, while his profound knowledge of legal principles enables him to 
apply them to facts. His alertness of mind foreshadows the end, and his 
keen perception of the difference between the delicate shades of right and 
wrong, give him the ability of making equitable decisions. 

Always ready to respond to any demands that may be made upon him 
as a citizen, Mr. Pitney is keenly alive to matters of public interest, is thor- 
oughly informed on all the leading issues of the day and is a most omnivor- 
ous reader. Public-spirited and patriotic, he is a man of warm sympathies 
and is ever ready to aid a friend by counsel or in a more substantial manner. 
He is identified with several enterprises of local importance, being a director 
and one of the leading spirits in the Morristown Library and Lyceum, with 
which he has been connected since its organization, and he is a director of 
the National Iron Bank of Morristown, at present holding the office of presi- 
dent of that institution. He is president of the Morris Aqueduct Compan3% 
and a manager of the Morris County Savings Bank. In his religious faith 
he affiliates with the First Presbyterian church, of which he is a trustee. 

The marriage of Mr. Pitney was solemnized on the 7th of April, 1853, 
when he was united to Miss Sarah Louisa Halstead, a daughter of Oliver 
and Sarah (Crane) Halstead, of Elizabeth and Newark, New Jersey. 



EUGENE TROXELL. 

Mr. Troxell has been a resident of Madison since 1886, and has been 
active in her business affairs, belonging to that class of enterprising, pro- 
gressive citizens to whom the welfare of the communit}' is due. He was born 
in Easton, Pennsylvania, in 1840, and is a son of William and Sarah (Over- 
field) Troxell, both natives of Germany and of German and French ancestry 
respectively. 

Mr. Troxell of this sketch, was reared to mercantile pursuits, and in i860 
removed to Orange, New Jersey, where he remained until after the inaugura- 
tion of the civil war, when, prompted by a loyal, patriotic spirit, he offered 
his services to the government, enlisting in Company H, Twent3'-sixth New 
Jersey Infantry. His command was assigned to the Armj' of the Potomac, 
and he participated in both battles of Fredericksburg, and in all the other 
engagements in which his regiment took part. He served until the close of 
his term of enlistment, and when honorably discharged returned to New 
Jersey. 

Locating in Mendham, Mr. Troxell there carried on mercantile pursuits 
until his removal to Morristown, where he also conducted a store, doing a 



198 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

large and profitable business until 1886, when he came to Madison. Here 
he took possession of the Madison Hotel, which he later purchased and car- 
ried on until 1897. He was a popular host, and his well appointed establish- 
ment became a favorite resort with the traveling public. The qualities which 
belong to the successful business man are his. His energy and determina- 
tion have enabled him to work his way steadily upward and gain the envi- 
able financial standing which is now his. His honorable methods have won 
him the public confidence, and he is now one of the valued and esteemed 
representatives of the business interests of Madison. 

In public affairs Mr. Troxell has borne a more or less active part, and 
has always given his support to the men and measures of the Republican 
party. He was elected on that ticket a member of the city council of Morris- 
town, acceptably filling the office for one term; was township collector of 
Morristown two terms; was county collector two terms, and in 1896 was 
elected a member of the board of chosen freeholders, an office to which he 
was re-elected in the present year, 1898. He was for many years a member 
of the Morristown fire department, having been for a long period assistant 
chief of the Resolute Fire Company in that city. In the discharge of his 
public duties he has always been prompt and reliable, and has labored for 
the substantial development of the communities he has represented. 

On the 6th of November, 1872, Mr. Troxell married Miss Margaretta C. 
Sharp, a native of Morristown and a daughter of Joseph Sharp, of that city. 
They became the parents of six children: Lillian W., Raymond B., William 
E., Robert M., Dudley B. and Norman. Mrs. Troxell is a member of the 
Episcopal church. Mr. Troxell belongs to the Masonic lodge of Morristown 
and the Royal Arcanum, and both he and his wife have a high standing in 
social circles. 



HENRY P. GREENE, M. D. 

In the first half of the nineteenth century Dr. Greene, the subject of 
this memoir, was one of the most prominent, influential and honored citizens 
of Morris county. His life was characterized by all that is good and true, 
and the splendid characteristics of his nature commanded the respect of all 
who knew him, while his memory is still cherished by those who enjoyed his 
friendship and fiis regard. 

Dr. Henry Prentice Greene was born in Calais, Vermont, December i, 
1798, and was of English descent, belonging to one of the oldest American 
families. In direct line his ancestry can be traced back to Thomas Greene, 
who was born in England in 1606, and emigrated to the New World about 
1635. His son, Captain William Greene, was born in Ipswich, Massachu- 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 199 

setts, in 1635, and was the father of William Greene, who was born in Mai- 
den, Massachusetts, in 1661. The last named had a son, Captain Nathaniel 
Greene, who was born in Maiden, September 28, 16S9, and served as cap- 
tain of the first foot company of Leicester, in 1743. His son, Rev. 
Nathaniel Greene, the grandfather of our subject, was bora in Charlestown 
End, in 172 i, and his son, Rufus Greene, was a native of Leicester, Massa- 
chusetts, born on the 10th of April, 1762. He married Miss Keziah Eddy, 
of Brookfield, Massachusetts, a representative of one of the old New Eng- 
land families. 

Dr. Greene received a thorough preparatory training in public and pri- 
vate schools, and for some years successfully engaged in teaching. Deter- 
mining, however, to make the practice of medicine his life work, he began 
his preparation for his chosen calling in the office and under the direction of 
Drs. Jepthah B. Munn & Whelpley, of Morristown, and was graduated at 
the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, of New York. He then 
began practice in New Vernon, Morris county, in April, 1826, and removed to 
Madison in 1S2S, at the request of the most prominent citizens of the place. 
He continued this practice there for thirty years, and his superior ability in 
the line of his chosen profession brought him a very large patronage. He 
was always a student of his profession, earnestly doing all in his power to 
gain perfection in his work and thus bring relief to suffering humanity. He 
was a man of deep sympathy and had a sincere love for his fellow men that 
led him to do all in his power for those whom he served, and often he was 
found at the bedside of a sufferer from whom no financial reward might be 
hoped. 

Dr. Greene was married on the 15th of August, 1829, to Miss Sarah 
Joanna Crowell, who was born April 12, 1803, a native of Newark and a 
daughter of David and Mehitable (Beach) Crowell, of Newark. They were 
the parents of si.\ children, three of whom grew to maturity: Mary Augusta; 
Everett M., who was born October 5, 1834, and died March 15, 1855; and 
Alice Linden. The Doctor owned a pleasant home in Madison and forty 
acres of land which now lies within the heart of that city. He was a man of 
domestic tastes and found his greatest pleasure in promoting the happiness 
and enhancing the welfare of his family. 

In his political predilections the Doctor was a Whig and was honored 
with a number of local offices. He held membership in the Presbyterian 
church and for a number of years served as a member of its board of trustees 
and took a very active part in promoting its cause in the neighorhood. His 
moral standard was high and he lived up to it. His word was as good as his 
bond; he was the soul of honor, and the better one knew him the greater 
the respect, the warmer the friendship sustained for him. His life was that of 



200 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

a big-souled, large-minded, noble-hearted Christian gentleman. His wife, 
a most estimable lady, also greatly beloved for her many excellencies of 
character, passed away April 20, 185 1, and he passed to the home beyond on 
the 15th of October, 1858. 



CHARLES F. AXTELL. 



The ancestral history of the Axtell family can be very clearly traced 
back over a period of three hundred and fifty years, and beyond that time 
representatives of the family appear here and there in English annals. The 
progenitor of the American branch was Thomas Axtell, a Puritan English- 
man, who set sail for America on board the good ship " Globe," on the 7th 
of August, 1635, and afterward settled in Sudbury, Massachusetts, where he 
died in 1646. About 1740 Henry, the great-grandson of Thomas, moved to 
New Jersey, and located near Mendham, Morris county. Henry, the son of 
Thomas, was killed in the Wadsworth Indian massacre, on the 20th of April, 
1676. Henry, son of the Henry Axtell who came to New Jersey in 1740, 
participated in the Revolutionary war, in which he was major of a battalion 
of New Jersey colonial troops, under command of Colonel Jacob Ford, Jr. 
Major Henry Axtell was the father of Silas C, a native of Morris county, 
who married Elizabeth Loree, and among their children was Jacob T. Axtell, 
the father of our subject. Jacob T. Axtell was born in Mendham, Morris 
county, New Jersey; was there reared and educated and married Miss Rachel 
Enslee, a daughter of William Enslee, whose father, John Enslee, also 
figured in the Revolutionary history of Morris county. Jacob T. Axtell was 
by occupation a contractor and builder. 

Charles F. Axtell was born in Morristown, New Jersey, on the 26th of 
May, 1845, 'ind received a common-school education in the public schools of 
his native town and township. Mr. Axtell learned the printer's trade in the 
office of The Jerseyman, at Morristown, and from 1867 to 1869 he was an 
associate publisher of that paper, subsequently serving for several years in 
the government printing-office, at Washington, whence he went abroad to 
investigate the methods employed in German printing offices, visiting Berlin, 
Leipzig, Frankfort, Mayence, and other continental cities. 

In 1873 he entered the law offices of Messrs. Pitney and Youngblood 
and was admitted to the bar as an attorney-at-law in 1877, and in 1891 as a 
counselor-at-law, and has since followed that calling, establishing for himself 
an enviable reputation and meeting with the distinct success that is ever the 
logical result of fearless integrity, thrift and intelligently applied industry. 
In 1863 Mr. Axtell enlisted his services for the defense of the Union, and 
became a member of Company E, First Battalion, New Jersey Emergency 




'-^J-*^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD QEMEALOGICAL HISTORY. 201 

Men, and he is now an active member of tiie Grand Army of the Republic 
and is past commander and past adjutant of A. T. A. Torbert Post, No. 24, 
Department of New Jersey. 

PoHtically considered, Mr. Axteli has always rendered a firm allegiance 
to the Republican party and has been the incumbent of various minor offices, 
including township collector, clerk and counsel, and city clerk and treasurer 
of Morristown. In the years 1879 and 1880 he was elected to the New Jersey 
legislature and in that honorable body he served as a member of the com- 
mittee on revision of laws and the joint committee on state treasurer's 
accounts. He is now serving his second term as justice of the peace, besides 
which he has a general practice. Mr. Axteli has shown an open frankness 
and fearlessness in the expression of his convictions; by political diplomacy 
and careful judgment he has attained a recognized prestige that has placed 
him in the front ranks of his profession. Touching upon his social relations 
we may state that Mr. Axteli is an affiliate of the Masonic fraternity, in which 
he has acquired a high degree of popularity and has been honored with offi- 
cial preferment. He is a past master of Cincinnati Lodge, No. 3, and pres- 
ent eminent commander of Ode de St. Amand Commandery, No. 12, Knights 
Templar, and he is also a member of the Mystic Shrine, in Mecca Temple, 
New York city. 

Mr. Axteli was married September 26, 1883, to Miss Ella M. Patterson, 
of Stratford, Connecticut, and their children are: Roland P., Rachel E. and 
Merritt F. 

Mr. Axteli is one of the best known men in Morris county, throughout 
which he has a large number of warm personal friends. 



REV. E. R. MURGATROYD. 

The honored pastor of the Presbyterian church of New Vernon, Rev. 
E. R. Murgatroyd, was born in New York city, on the 9th of September, 
1855. and is of English descent. The Murgatroyds are one of the old fami- 
lies of England, their history being traceable through many centuries. The 
parents of our subject, William J. H. and Esther (Middleton) Murgatroyd, 
were both natives of the " merrie isle" and in 1850 emigrated from Lanca- 
shire, crossing the broad Atlantic to the New World. They located in New 
York city, where the father engaged in business as a machinist, a vocation 
that had been followed by his father and grandfather. William J. H. Mur- 
gatroyd continued his residence in the metropolis until called to the home 
beyond, his death occurring in 1895. His wife also passed away the same 
year. They were the parents of eight children, six of whom are yet living, 
their four sons being Frederick W., a machinist of New York; John E., a 



202 BIOGRJPHICAL AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

merchant doing business in that city; and Henry E., a civil engineer also liv- 
ing in that city; and our subject, the well known pastor of the New Vernon 
Presbyterian church. 

The last named attended the schools of his native city until he had 
mastered those branches which are the foundation of all knowledge and 
later matriculated in the College of the City of New York, where he was 
graduated in the class of 1879. Later he studied m the Union Theological 
Seminary of New York and is numbered among its alumni of the class of 
1883. In the same year, he received the degree of M. A. from his alma 
mater. Having been ordained to the ministry of the Presbyterian church, 
he accepted the pastorate of the Calvary church, at Independence, Oregon, 
where he lived and labored for five and a half years, accomplishing much 
good among the people of that locality. 

In the spring of 1889 the Rev. Mr. Murgatroyd returned to the east and 
soon afterward accepted a call from the church of New Vernon, where he 
has now served for nine years. He has made many friends here, not only 
among his own people, but those of other denominations as well, and has suc- 
ceeded in building up the church, which under his guidance has had a steady 
and substantial growth. He is an earnest and entertaining speaker, and his 
scholarly tastes and studious habits are manifest not only in his sermons, but 
also in some very able church papers of which he is the author. 

Rev. Murgatroyd was united in the holy bonds of wedlock, in New York 
•city, to Miss Edith L. Conklin, a native of the Empire state, who is to him 
a most able assistant in his church work as well as in his home and social 
relations. His life has been a useful and noble one, and when he shall be 
called to " wrap the drapery of his couch about him and lie down to pleasant 
dreams" the public opinion will say that the world is better for his having 
lived. 



JAMES A. FERGUSON. 

For nearly thirty years Rev. Mr. Ferguson has served as pastor of the 
Presbyterian church in Hanover. He was born in Oswegatchie, St. Law- 
rence county, New York, on the 12th of May, 1843, and is a son of Rev. 
Archibald Ferguson, a native of Glasgow, Scotland, who during his infancy 
was brought by his parents to America in the early part of the century, the 
family locating in Oswegatchie. His mother bore the maiden name of Mary 
Campbell and belonged to that branch of the family of which the Duke of 
Argyle is a member. Rev. Archibald Ferguson was graduated in the Auburn 
Theological Seminary, of New York, and began his ministry as a missionary 
■of the presbytery of Rochester, New York. He founded the Presbyterian 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEjXEALOGICAL HISTORY. 203 

church in North State street, that city, also one in Charlotte, New York, 
and subsequently became pastor of the latter, continuing his ministerial 
labors there until called to his final home, on the 20th of December, 1856. 
He was united in marriage to Miss Nancy A. Rodgers, who was born in 
Kelso, Scotland, and was also brought to the United States by her parents 
■during her infancy, the family locating in Hammond, New York, in 18 19. 
Her father. Rev. James Rodgers, was one of the pioneer Presbyterian min- 
isters of northern New York, and established the churches in Hammond, 
Morristown and Oswegatchie, serving in turn as pastor of each. Family 
tradition says that he was descended from the Rev. John Rogers, the Eng- 
lish clerical martyr, who was burned at the stake in Smithfield, February 4, 
1555. His wife was Margaret Hill, the daughter of a wealthy Scotch laird, 
who disinherited her on account of her marriage. 

The subject of this review followed in the path in which so many of his 
ancestors had trod. His tastes were always literary, and from early life he 
had a special fondness for the Greek and Roman classics. His elementary 
education was supplemented by a course in Hamilton College, of New York, 
where he was graduated in 1865, with the classical honors. He pursued his 
theological studies in Princeton Theological Seminary, in 1865-6, and then 
entered the Union Theological Seminary, of New York city, where he 
remained from 1867 until 1869, graduating in the latter year. 

Mr. Ferguson united with the Presbyterian church on confession of faith 
in 1858 and entered upon his ministerial labors as supply in the Presbyterian 
church in Morristown, New York, in 1866, remaining there for one year. In 
1868-69 he acted as supply in the church in Manhattanville, New York. He 
was ordained by the presbytery of Rockaway, New Jersey, and installed pas- 
tor of the First Presbyterian church of Hanover, May 18, 1869, and notwith- 
standing he has received a number of calls to other churches he has continued 
to labor among the people here, and has made the Hanover church one of 
the strongest in this part of the state. In 1893 the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity was conferred upon him by the National University, of Chicago. 

On the 27th of May, 1869, in Potsdam, New York, Dr. Ferguson was 
united in marriage to Isabella Rutherford Bell, a daughter of the late George 
R. Bell, of Ogdensburg, New York. She died December 3, 1873, leaving a 
daughter, Bella, born on that day. Dr. Ferguson was again married Decem- 
ber 30, 1875, his second union being with Catharine Elizabeth Parker, a 
daughter of the late Rev. Charles Carrol Parker, D. D., of Parsippany, New 
Jersey, who was a prominent clergyman of Vermont for many years and was 
a trustee of the University of Vermont. By the second marriage there was 
one son, Arthur Edmund, who was born March 10, 1878, and died the 
same year. 



204 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTOBT. 



HON. JOHN B. VREELAND. 

The Vreelands of America are descended from four brothers who came 
from Holland and settled here very early in the histor}' of our republic. The 
name was formerly spelled Vreelandt, but the / has been eliminated for 
many years. George W. Vreeland, the father of our subject, was born in 
Passaic county, New Jersey, on the 22d of February, 1820, and was reared 
to farming pursuits, but subsequently moved to Newark, and there engaged 
in the soda-water-bottling business until May, 1868, when he went to Morris- 
town and continued in the same line of enterprise. The latter part of his 
life has been spent in retirement, and now, at the venerable age of seventy- 
seven years, he is enjoying the respect of a wide circle of acquaintances. 
He married Miss Sarah M. Smith, who was a native of Passaic county, her 
ancestors, who were of English origin, having settled in Orange county. New 
York. She departed this life, in Newark, at the age of thirty-three, leaving 
three children: MaryE., who married James O. Halsey; Isaac S. and John B. 
Mr. Vreeland again married, his second union being to Miss Harriet N. Faitoute. 

John Beam Vreeland was born in the city of Newark, New Jersey, on 
the 30th of December, 1852, and there received a fair education in the public 
schools. When he had attained the age of fifteen years his parents moved 
to Morristown, and young Vreeland became associated with his father in 
business and remained with him until nineteen years old, when his early 
acquired fondness for books and study led him to take up the reading of law, 
and so closely did he apply himself that he was admitted to the bar in the 
November (1875) term of the supreme court of New Jersey, and in the June 
term of 1879 he was made a counselor-at-law. From November, 1875, to 
June, 1876, he was deputy county clerk for his county, resigning that posi- 
tion in order to form a partnership with E. A. Quayle, with whom he was 
associated in the practice of law until 1879, since which time he has pursued 
his calling alone, and he has attained a distinct prestige as a legal practi- 
tioner. He has risen to his present prominence in the profession by reason 
of a high order of ability, thorough honesty and fidelity to the interests of 
his clients, and a zeal and earnestness of purpose that could admit of but 
one logical result — success. A close student of human nature and possessed 
of keen perceptive powers, and keeping well informed on all the leading 
issues of the day, he has acquired a thorough knowledge of the law as well ' 
as distinction as an attorney, and possesses an inexhaustible fund of infor- 
mation on general subjects as well. In the early part of the present year 
he was appointed by the acting governor of the state, Hon. Foster M. Voor- 
hees, to the office of judge of the several courts of Morris county, for a term 
of five years, dating from April, 1898. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 205 

Mr. Vreeland has always been active as a supporter of the Republican 
party, and before Morristown became a separate political body from that of 
the township he served for three years as township clerk. In 1895 his party 
nominated him for the office of state senator, to which he was elected by a 
plurality of fifteen hundred and twenty-six votes, and as Morris county is 
considered a close county from a political standpoint, the plurality received 
by Senator Vreeland was the most conclusive evidence of his popularity. 
While in the senate he introduced the bill known as •' the school-teachers' 
retirement-fund bill," which became a law in 1896, besides which he intro- 
duced many others, but the one mentioned was considered the most impor- 
tant, and was generally accepted as one of great value and merit. During the 
recent session of the senate he served on several committees, the more 
important being that on the revision of laws, and he was also chairman of the 
joint committee on state hospitals for the insane. Senator Vreeland is held in 
high esteem by his fellow citizens and, possessed of a laudable disposition to 
render the most good possible, he is capable of giving valuable service in any 
position to which he may aspire, and thus retains the good will and warm 
regard of his constituents. 

Senator Vreeland is a deacon in the South Street Presb3'terian church, 
of Morristown, of which he is a liberal supporter, and in many other ways he 
has given evidence of his deep interest and concern in the moral, political 
and educational advancement of his community. 

The first marriage of Senator Vreeland was solemnized in 1878, when 
Ida A. Piotrowski became his wife. She was summoned to her eternal rest 
in 1896, leaving two daughters, Eda A. and Vera E. In 1897 the Senator 
consummated his second marriage, being then united to Miss Ida King 
Smith. 



STEPHEN A. GUERIN. 



This retired citizen of Morristown is a son of Stephen and Susan (Kil- 
born) Guerin, and was born on the old Guerin homestead, near the county 
seat, November 26, 1842. He acquired a fair education in the public schools, 
and experience, observation and extensive reading have added largely to this. 
At the age of fourteen he started out in life for himself with no capital, but 
possessed of laudable ambition and a hope of one day achieving success if it 
could be accomplished through resolute purpose and indefatigable industry. 
He secured a clerkship in a hardware store in Newark, where he remained 
until 1856, when he went to New York city and became a salesman in a dry- 
goods establishment. He was employed in that capacity for nine years, when 
he left New York and returned to Morristown, having acquired some capital 



206 SIOGBJPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

by means of his industry and frugality. This he invested in a grocery stock, 
and he carried on operations along that line for several years. From 1885 
until I 890 he held the office of internal-revenue collector, but is now living 
retired, enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves. He 
managed his business interests with great care, closely applied himself to his 
work and by his sound judgment and untiring energy was enabled to secure a 
handsome competence. 

In 1882 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Guerin and Mrs. Julia De 
Mott, a daughter of Andrew B. Cobb. She died in 1894, leaving a daughter, 
Julia Guerin. Our subject is a member of St. Peter's Protestant Episcopal 
church, is a stanch Democrat in politics and is one of the worthy citizens of 
Morristown, giving his hearty co-operation to every movement calculated to 
advance the general welfare. 



EDWARD W. PRUDEN. 



The history of the Pruden family touches the pioneer epoch in the 
annals of Morris county and forms a part of that indissoluble chain which 
Imked the early formative period with that of the latter-day progress and 
prosperity. In the days when the county was but sparsely settled and the 
work of improvement and advancement was in its earliest stages the Prudens 
founded a home within its borders. The grandfather, Peter Pruden, was born 
here, and the father of our subject, Silas Pruden, was also one of the native 
sons. The latter married Ann Guerin, a representative of an old and hon- 
ored family, and of their union were born twelve children, seven of whom 
reached years of maturity, namely: William L. , Amos, Edward W., Delia, 
Harriet, Caroline and Elizabeth. 

Edward W. Pruden, who was born in Morris county, April i, 1837, was 
reared to manhood on the home farm and acquired his education in the pub- 
lic schools. In August, 1862, he manifested his patriotic devotion to his 
country by joining the Union army as a member of Company I, Twenty- 
seventh New Jersey Infantry, with which he valiantly defended the old flag 
and the cause it represented. His term of enlistment then having e.xpired at 
the end of nine months he returned to his home and family. 

Mr. Pruden was married November 2, 1861, the lady of his choice being 
Miss Kate Van Gilder, a daughter of Abraham and Mary (Harrison) \'an 
Gilder. She was born in Morris county, but her parents were natives of Sus- 
sex county. New Jersey, and the Van Gilders are of Holland-Dutch descent. 
Mr. and Mrs. Pruden have two children, Edith and Josephine, and the family 
is one of prominence in Morristown, their circle of friends being extensive. 

The subject of this review entered upon his business career when eighteen 




^ 2^ 




'^C-^as^^ty^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD Gi:jfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 2QT 

years of age. Previous to that time he had assisted in the development and 
cultivation of the home farm, but in 1S55 he left the parental roof and began 
to learn the mason's trade, which he followed for twenty-two years. In 
April, 1877, he embarked in the coal business, which he has since carried on, 
being now the senior member of the firm of Pruden & Burke. He enjoys a 
good trade and derives therefrom a comfortable income. His business 
methods are above question and his trustworthiness has won him the 
confidence and respect of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 

Mr. Pruden maintains his interest in military affairs and his friendship 
for his companions in arms through his membership in the Grand Army of 
the Republic. His political support is given the men and measures of the- 
Republican party, but he has never been an aspirant for office. He and 
his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. 



HON. BENJAMIN CRANE. 

Early in the history of the American colonies, among those who came 
to Boston were Jasper Crane and Alice, his wife, and their children, first 
settling at Sagus, now Lynn. Their names appear in the records of a 
church formed there October 8, 1636. In 1644 they joined with the people 
of Wethersfield in settling Totoket, now called Brantford. In 1665, when 
the New Haven and Connecticut colonies were ordered to unite under one 
government, Mr. Davenport, of New Haven, and A. Pierson, of Brantford, 
greatly opposed the measure. 

About this time the land of New Jersey, bought of the Duke of York b}' 
Lord Carteret and others, were offered in the market. Being brought to 
the attention of Brantford, Milford and Guilford, agents were sent out to 
"view the country, learn the terms of purchase and the state of the Indians 
in the vicinity." The committee were Jasper Crane, Robert Treat, John 
Curtis and John Crane. The purchase included the whole of the ancient 
township of Newark, and the price paid was one hundred and thirty pounds. 
New England currency, twelve Indian blankets and twelve Indian guns. 
Articles of agreement for the government of the new colony were signed 
June 24, 1667, and among the forty-one names of signers those of Jasper 
Crane, Delivered, John and Azariah, his sons, and Thomas Huntington, his 
son-in-law, appear. Jasper Crane was a magistrate and a merchant. His 
autograph appears in a published volume of the Magistrates of New Haven 
and Connecticut. His third son, Azariah, married Mary, daughter of Gov- 
ernor Robert Treat. Their second son married Phebe Lamson (or Samson); 
and their seventh son, Stephen, married Rhoda Halloway, sister of Eliza- 



208 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

beth Halloway, his brother Ezekiel's wife. Ezekiel Crane was taken pris- 
oner at Oswego, New York, by the French and Indians and died in Canada. 
Stephen took to his home a sick and wounded prisoner, who recovered. 
Stephen's third son, Benjamin, married Mehitabel Dunning, of Goshen, New 
York; and their second son, Benjamin, is the subject of this sketch. 

He was born near what is now known as Eagle Rock, Essex county, 
August 31, 1787, and when he was a small lad his father moved to a farm 
on the Rockaway river, about one mile above its junction with the Passaic. 
He learned the mason's trade, and about 1809 made the brick and built the 
house where he lived, near his .father's. His first wife was Eleanor Stiles, 
by whom he had eight children, — two sons and six daughters. For his sec- 
ond he married Mrs. Barbara (Parlaman) Bowlsby, by whom he had two 
daughters. 

In the year 1850 he called all of his family together at the brick house 
and instituted the first family gathering, and for six years they met at one or 
the other of the children's homes, but the family at length grew too large 
to be accommodated at any one house, and it was decided to hold a picnic 
on the patriarch's birthday anniversary, August 31. At these reunions the 
Judge spoke of the trend of current events, and also expressed the wish that 
these yearly meetings should be kept up. 

In March, 1864, he went to Michigan to attend to the settlement of 
important law business. The night before he returned home an accident 
occurred which allowed the gas to escape into his room, and he was found 
dead, April 16, 1864. 

As a man he was energetic and persevering, and had an excellent mem- 
ory. In his judgment he was quick to discern points, either satisfactory or 
otherwise, as the case was presented. Twice he took the census of several 
townships in Morris county. For a time he held the office of judge of the 
court of common pleas, much of the time as the presiding judge, and he 
was postmaster at Pine Brook many years. 

By his first wife the children of Judge Crane were: Julia A., who mar- 
ried Martin R. VanDuyne; Timothy Ward, who married first Jane Martin, 
of Essex county, and secondly Catharine Courter, also of that county; 
Lucinda C, who became the wife of Alexander Hamilton Freeman, of 
Orange; Hetty M., who became the wife of Abraham C. Van Duyne, of 
Morris county; Harriet C. , who married Stephen Van Duyne, also of Mor- 
ris county; Elizabeth, who married "Garret Miller, of Morris county; Eleanor 
S., who became the wife of Enos Wilson Martin, of Essex county; Benja- 
min F., who married S. Matilda Eagles, of Newark, this state, where he 
was president of the North Ward Bank; and by his second wife the Judge 
had two children, namely: Marietta H. C, who married Christopher D. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 209 

Woodruff, Jr., of Union county, this state; and B. Flora Crane, who mar- 
ried Cornelius Van Wagoner, of Bloomfield, New Jersey. 

Concerning Judge Crane, the Morristown Banner, of April 21, 1864, 
says: " Judge Crane has been a leading citizen of this county for over fifty 
years. He held the office of judge, filled many posts of honor and confi- 
dence, and was always considered an able and upright jurist. He was 
endowed with a large share of native ability, and, in the performance of the 
varied duties and employments conferred upon him by the confidence of his 
neighbors and fellow citizens, he displayed skill and efficiency. His place in 
the community in which he lived will not be easily filled." 



JOHN F. VOORHEES. 

Prior to the year 1600 Coert van voor Hees resided in the front of the 
village of Hees, near the town of Ruinen, in the province of Drenthe, Hol- 
land. Translated into English, the word " voor" means before or in front 
of: hence the origin of the name, Voorhees, meaning before Hees, and refer- 
ring to the place where Coert van voor Hees resided. Beyond him the gen- 
ealogy cannot now be traced. The name has changed in form from the 
original, " van " being eliminated, and the latter part of the cognomen, Voor- 
hees, only retained. 

Steven Coert van voor Hees, son of Coert van voor Hees, was born in 
1600, emigrated from Holland in April, 1660, and purchased, on the 29th of 
the following November, a tract of land at Flatlands, Long Island, where he 
settled and finally died, in the year 1684. Among his children was Lucas 
Steven Van Voorhees, father of Jan Lucasse Van Voorhees, father of Isaac 
Van Voor Hees, father of Derrick Voorhees, the last named being the first 
to use the present form of the name, " Voorhees." Derrick Voorhees was 
the father of Abraham Voorhees and the grandfather of John Flagg Voorhees, 
the immediate subject of this mention. 

John Flagg Voorhees was born at Millstone, Somerset county. New Jer- 
sey, on the 19th of July, 1805, and died in Morristown on the 17th of Novem- 
ber, 1S67. He located in Morristown when si.xteen years of age, and secured 
employment as a clerk in a drug store. On December 27, 1826, he was 
united in marriage to Cornelia Ann Emmell, the ceremony being performed 
by Rev. Albert Barnes, author of " Barnes' Notes on the Bible." After his 
marriage Mr. Voorhees moved to New York cit}', where he engaged in mer- 
cantile pursuits, but meeting with indifferent success he finally returned to 
Morristown, in 1830, and opened a general store, which he conducted for a 
great many years, eventually reducing the business to one line of trade, that 
of hardware. His sons, George E. and James R. , succeedeS to the business, 

14 



210 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

« 
James R. finally withdrawing in 1884, since which time George E. has been 

sole proprietor of the business established by his father sixty-seven years ago. 

John Flagg Voorhees was one of the best and most prominent business 
men of Morristown, and for nearly forty years was numbered among the 
influential and worthy citizens of that place, to the upbuilding of which he 
was a valuable contributor. Esteemed for his honesty, he was no less 
respected for his piety. He became a communicant in the First Presbyterian 
church of Morristown in 1822, and throughout the remainder of his life he 
continued to faithfully work in its behalf. He never sought political prefer- 
ment, choosing rather the life of a strictly business man. He was among 
the first to endorse the principles of the Abolitionist party and was identified 
with the "underground-railroad " work of aiding fugitive slaves. Under the 
organization of the Republican party he became connected with the same 
and continued to support its policies during the rest of his days. While he 
resided in New York city, in the latter part of the '20s, he was a member of 
the historic New York Seventh Regiment. To Mr. Voorhees and his wife 
were born the following children: Martha Emmell; Abraham, deceased; 
Mary Emmell, deceased; Sarah Ann, deceased; George Emmell; William S., 
deceased; and James Richards. 

James Richards Voorhees, son of John Flagg and Cornelia Ann (Emmell) 
Voorhees, was born in Morristown, New Jersey, on the 17th of January, 
1849. His education was completed in the Morris Academy, after which he 
entered his father's hardware store, and in 1871 he and his brother, George 
E., succeeded to the business, changed the firm name to Voorhees Brothers 
and conducted the same until 1884, when James R. disposed of his interest 
to his brother. 

In 1896 Mr. Voorhees was appointed treasurer of the Morristown Gas 
Light Company, and is the present incumbent of that office. Since 1871 he 
has been a member of the Morristown fire department, and from May, 1884, 
to May, 1886, he was a member of the Morristown common council. In 
politics he is a stanch Republican and in his religious faith he is an adherent 
of the First Presbyterian church of Morristown. 

The marriage of Mr. Voorhees was solemnized in 1886, when he was 
united to Miss Virginia Lee Redding, of Macon, Georgia, and their children 
are two in number, namely: John Redding and Carl Campbell. 



FRANCIS M. BRUEN. 



Widely known in industrial circles as a leading contractor and builder 
of Morris county, his home being in Madison, Mr. Bruen was born in Chat- 
ham, on the 28th* of December, 1838, and is a son of Ashbel Bruen, whose 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 211 

birth occurred on the old family homestead in 1802. The grandfather, Ben- 
jamin Bruen, was also born there, a son of Joseph Bruen, who was probably 
a native of England and took up his residence in America in the days when 
this country belonged to the nations of the old world. Benjamin Bruen was 
reared in Madison and was a farmer and cooper, following the dual occupa- 
tion in order to provide for his family. He married Arercha Harris, and 
their children were: Isaac H., born in 1797; Ashbel; Elias R. ; Jane J., 
wife of Jedediah Frost; and Caroline, wife of Charles Matthews. The parents 
of this family were members of the Presbyterian church. 

Ashbel Bruen was reared on the old family homestead and served an 
appretniceship at the carpenter's trade, preparatory to making that occupa- 
tion his life work. After he had attained his majority he formed a partner- 
ship with Lewis Carter, and one of their first contracts was for the erection 
of the summer residence of W. C. Wallace (December, 1898), of Essex 
county. He also took the contract for building Belmont Hall, at Schooleys 
Mountain, the Morris County Hotel, of Morristown, and General Joseph 
Revere's residence on the Mendon road. He has also erected many other 
buildings of note and was thus prominently identified with the work of 
improvement in the county. In 1823 he was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Chandler, of North Elizabeth, a daughter of Jonathan Chandler, who 
enlisted in the American army in the war for independence and was captured 
in his first engagement, being held as a prisoner of war in the old Sugar' 
House, in New York city. He was a native of Elizabeth. His wife bore 
the maiden name of Mary Jewell and by her marriage she became the mother 
of six children: Stephen, who was a surveyor and removed to Delaware 
county, Ohio; Jonathan J., who also went to Ohio; Elizabeth, who became 
the wife of John Orr; Permelia, Mary and Sarah. 

Ashbel Bruen, father of our subject, was a captain in the state militia, 
and, a man of much influence, he took an active part in shaping public 
affairs in his neighborhood. He served as judge of elections, was chairman 
of the house meetings and was a trustee and leading worker in the Presby- 
terian church of Madison. His wife, a most estimable lady, also held mem- 
bership in that church. In his early life he gave his political support to the 
Whig party and became an ardent supporter of anti-slavery principles. He 
was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His death 
occurred in 1854, and his wife, long surviving him, passed away in 1889, at 
the age of eighty-five years. The family of this worthy couple numbered 
eight children, four sons and four daughters: Phoebe J., now the wife of 
Harvey Lum, of Chatham; Benjamin, who died at the age of twenty-two 
years; Elizabeth D., who became the wife of Stephen Bunnell and died in 
Michigan; Theodore W. , who died at the age of fifty-two years; Merritt, 



212 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

who served as quartermaster in Company K, Seventh New Jersey Volunteer 
Infantry, and died in the army, at the age of twenty-seven years; Caroline, 
wife of John Baldwin, a resident of Chatham; Francis M., of this review; 
and Adaline, wife of Joseph E. Ebling. 

Francis Marion Bruen was reared on his father's farm and in the com- 
mon schools acquired his education. At the age of sixteen years he began 
learning the carpenter's trade, serving a four-years apprenticeship. He was 
afterward engaged for four or five years as a journeyman and then began busi- 
ness on his own account in Madison. He has erected many of the substantial 
buildings in this part of the county and drawn plans for many of these. He is 
an experienced builder, has made a close study of his business, and by his 
thorough knowledge and skill is enabled to please his patrons and secure a 
a good business. For fourteen years he was a member of the Temple of 
Honor and filled nearly all of the offices of the order. 

In December, iS68, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Bruen and Miss 
Harriet N. Lum, a daughter of John C. Lum, of Connecticut Farms. They 
have a wide acquaintance in this community and the warm regard of many 
friends, while their home is noted for its generous hospitality. In his polit- 
ical views Mr. Bruen is a stanch Republican. While he has never been a 
public man in social or political life, he has always been quite prominent in 
church circles, and there is no good work, either in the name of charity or 
the advancement of religion, which does not find in him an earnest and mate- 
rial helper. He has been for fifteen years a member of the board of trus- 
tees of the Presbyterian church of Madison, and has also advanced the inter- 
ests of education by his effective service as school trustee. 



WILLIAM J. WOLFE. 

Dr. Wolfe is a distinguished physician of Chatham, New Jersey, whose 
connection with the medical profession is one of prominence. Lured by the 
hope of result, he has carried his investigation beyond that of the average 
ipractitioner, and in the field of knowledge has gleaned many valuable truths 
whose practical utility and value to the world he has demonstrated in a suc- 
cessful practice. By the faithful performance of each day's duty and his 
promptness in its execution, he finds strength and inspiration for the labors 
of the morrow, and in the conduct of his large practice he has won the com- 
mendation of both the public and the profession. 

The Doctor was born in Bangor, Northampton county, Pennsylvania, on 
the 28th of April, 1859, and is a representative of an old and prominent fam- 
ily of the Keystone state. The name was originally spelled without the final 
c, but in 1870 the present form was adopted. The family was founded on 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^TD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 21g 

American soil about the year 1759 by George Wolf, a native of Germany, 
who was naturalized during the reign of King George III. He had two sons, 
George and Philip, and the former became eminent in political circles in 
Pennsylvania. He studied law under the preceptorship of Hon. John Ross, 
and during the administration of Thomas Jefferson served for two years as 
postmaster of Easton, Pennsylvania. In 18 14 he was elected to the lower 
house of the state legislature, and in 1824 was elected to congress, where he 
served three terms. In 1829 he was elected the seventh governor of Penn- 
sylvania and held the office for two terms. The treasury of the state was 
then in a very depleted condition and he was instrumental in having a law 
enacted to force the banks to lend money to the state for public improve- 
ments. He was also instrumental, in connection with Hon. Thaddeus Ste- 
vens, in organizing a free-school system of the state, and was the promoter 
of various measures whose beneficial effects the commonwealth is to-day 
receiving. In 1836 he was appointed by President Jackson first comptroller 
of the treasury of the United States, serving for two years, and was appointed 
collector of the port of Philadelphia by President Van Buren. He died 
March 11, 1840, after a long, active, useful and successful public career. 

Philip Wolf, the grandfather of the Doctor, was a farmer and lumber- 
man of Bath, Pennsylvania, and though his life did not call him so much 
before the public notice, it was no less honorable. He married Susanna 
Snyder, and they reared a family of five children, one of whom, William 
Wolf, became the father of our subject. He was born in Bath, Pennsylvania, 
in 18 1 8, and in early life followed the trade of cooper, while in his later years 
he carried on agricultural pursuits, and finally retired altogether from active 
business. In 1836 he was united in marriage to Miss Anna Maria Van Horn; 
her father was a soldier of the war of 1812. Mr. and Mrs. Wolf became the 
parents of fourteen children, all of whom are living. Their father departed 
this life in April, 1889, and his wife passed away in 1893. 

Dr. Wolfe, whose name initiates the opening paragraph of this article, 
obtained his preliminary education in the common schools, and later was 
graduated at Mount Bethel College, in 1880. He taught school in the state 
of his nativity, taking charge of the home school at the age of seventeen 
years, and continuing in that position for two years. He was afterward for 
three years principal of the East Bangor Grammar School. Turning his 
attention to the medical profession, he prepared for practice under the direc- 
tion of Dr. E. D. Collier, of Bangor, Pennsylvania, and in the New York 
University, where he matriculated in 1881 and was graduated in March, 1884. 
He established an office in his native city, and there continued until June, 
1885, when he located in Chatham, New Jersey, where he has built up a 
large and lucrative practice. He exercises the greatest care in his work, and, 



214 BIOGEJPHICJ.L AJfD GEJTEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

believing in constant progress, is still an earnest student, keeping fully 
abreast with the advancement which has characterized medical science the 
past twenty-five years. 

Dr. Wolfe was married December i6, 1885, the lady of his choice being 
Miss Clara Mcllhaney, a native of Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, and a daugh- 
ter of Thomas M. and Catherine (Major) Mcllhaney. Her father was a well 
known attorney and for eighteen years was prothonotary of Monroe county, 
same state. The Doctor and his wife have three interesting children: 
Walter M., Katherine M. and Van Horn D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Wolfe are members of the Presbyterian church of Chat- 
ham, and he belongs to Madison Lodge, No. 93, F. & A. M. ; Chatham 
Lodge, No. 245, I. O. O. F. ; the Junior Order of United American Mechan- 
ics and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is also a member of the 
Morris District Medical Society and the State Pharmaceutical Association. 
He has served as trustee of the schools of the village, was elected one of the 
original five village trustees under the village government, acting in the capac- 
ity of treasurer, and gives a hearty support to all measures calculated for 
the public good. 



JOHN B. AYERS. 

This representative citizen and business man of Morristown, was born in 
his home city on the 30th of July, 1858, and here received his educational 
discipline in the private and public schools. In the summer of 1876 he 
became associated with his father, Theodore Ayers, in the real-estate and 
insurance business. In 1881 he entered into partnership with his father in 
the same line of endeavor, and this was continued until 1884, when our sub- 
ject purchased his father's interest in the insurance business and since then 
has continued alone, meeting with the success that is ever due to industry, 
perseverance and ability, combined with a strict integrity of character and 
honorable business methods. 

Mr. Ayers is a stanch supporter of the Republican party, and in 1892 he 
was elected city tax-collector for Morristown, but declined a second term, 
and in 1895 he was appointed city clerk and treasurer, holding that dual 
office at the present time and discharging the duties thereof with a high 
degree of executive ability and circumspection. In 1877 he was appointed 
secretary of Evergreen Cemetery, a position he has continued to fill with 
efficiency for the past twenty years. 

In touching upon his social relations we may state that Mr. Ayers is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity, the Knights of Pythias, Royal Arcanum 
and the Independent Hose Company of Morristown. He has been connected 



BIOGBJPRICAL AJfB GEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 215 

with the fire department since 1878 and he is now treasurer of the Exempt 
Firemen's Association. 

The marriage of Mr. Ayers was solemnized on the 9th of June, 1886, at 
which time he became united to Miss Caroline Armand Bache, a native of 
Plainfield, New Jersey, and a daughter of Andrew J. Bache. The issue of 
this union comprise the following named children: Caroline Armand, Made- 
line, John Bache, and Theodore Bache. Mr. Ayers is a consistent member of 
the South Street Presbyterian church, and enjoys the warm regard and esteem 
of many friends. 



JACOB GREEN. 

Rev. Jacob Green was the third pastor of the Whippany Presbyterian 
church. While no authentic record is obtainable concerning his early 
history, he was for many years an honored resident of Whippany and exerted 
a wide influence. Early in hisministry, in 1755, it was decided that the old 
meeting house owned by the Presbyterian society should be abandoned, and to 
accommodate the widespread congregation two meeting-houses were erected, 
one at Hanover and the other at Parsippany, in the old burying-ground of 
that place. By order of the presbytery Mr. Green was to officiate at both 
these places, which he did until 1760, when the organization at Parsippany 
was permitted to seek a minister for itself. Mr. Green's ministry continued 
until his death, which occurred May 24, 1790. He was a man of large and 
varied acquirements, learned as well in law and medicine as in theology. His 
salary being small he engaged quite largely in secular pursuits, at one time 
being interested in a gristmill and a distillery. A letter was once received 
by him, addressed as follows: 

To the Rev. Jacob Green, Preacher 
And the Rev. Jacob Green, Teacher. 
To the Rev. Jacob Green, Doctor, 
And the Rev. Jacob Green, Proctor, 
To the Rev. Jacob Green, Miller, 
And the Rev. Jacob Green, Distiller. 

He was buried near the church in which he officiated for so many years, 
and over his grave is placed a horizontal tablet bearing the following 
inscription: 

' ' Under this stone are deposited the remains of the Rev'd Jacob Green, 
A. M., first pastor of this church, who died May 24, 1790, aged sixty-eight 
years, of which forty-four were spent in the gospel ministry in this place. 
He was a man of temper even, firm and resolute; of affections temperately 



216 BIOGRJPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

steady and benevolent; of genius solid, inquisitive and penetrating; of industry 
active and unwearied; of learning curious and accurate; of manners simple 
and reserved; of piety humble, enlightened, fervent, eminent. As a 
preacher he was instructive, plain, searching, practical. As a pastor watch- 
ful, laborious, ever intent upon some plan for the glory of God and the 
salvation of his flock, and by the divine blessing happily and eminently 
successful." 



JOHN D. GUERIN. 

A study of the history of Morris county cannot be carried far before the 
name of Guerin will be found to figure conspicuously in the early annals, for 
in pioneer days a French Huguenot of the name took up his residence within 
the borders of the county, and his descendants have since been active in sup- 
port of the best measures calculated to improve the condition of the county 
along material, moral, educational and social lines. 

Samuel Guerin, the grandfather of our subject, was born in the county, 
and Stephen Guerin, the father, was for many years one of the most promi- 
nent and successful business men and esteemed citizens of Morristown. He 
was cne of a family of two sons and two daughters, his brother being Will- 
iam Guerin. Reared upon his father's farm Stephen Guerin, wishing to fol- 
low some other pursuit, learned the mason's trade and built many residences 
which are still standing in Morristown. He afterward established a meat 
market, which he conducted with profit for a number of years. His home 
was in the country, but conveniently located, however, near the city, so that 
he was enabled to enjoy the pleasures of country life and at the same time was 
not deprived of the advantages afforded by the city. Although never an 
office-seeker, he took an active part in politics and was a public-spirited, pro- 
gressive citizen and popular man, thoroughly honorable in ail trade transac- 
tions and upright in all the walks of life. He died in 1855, when about 
fifty-five years of age. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Susan Kil- 
born, was a native of Morris county and of Scotch descent. She lived to be 
eighty -two years of age, and bore her husband the following children: 
Samuel T., deceased; James A.; John D. ; Byram C.; Stephen A. and 
Susan A. 

John D. Guerin, whose name introduces this article, was born on the 
old Guerin homestead, near Morristown, in 1S32. In 1854 he began work- 
ing in his father's meat market and was soon virtually given charge of the 
business. With the exception of about three years he has since continued in 
control and has won a fair profit by his well directed efforts, his close appli- 
cation and straightforward dealing. 





v;^^^^^^^^^^^^^-^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 217 

In 1854 Mr. Guerin led to the marriage altar Miss Harriet Gar}-, who 
was •born in Warren county. New Jersey, but was brought to Morris county 
during her early childhood by her father, David H. Gary. Two children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Guerin, but the son is now deceased. The daugh- 
ter, Anna, is now the wife of Henry P. VVitte. The parents are members of 
St. Peter's Protestant Episcopal church, and Mr. Guerin is serving as vestry- 
man, having filled the position longer than any other member of the organi- 
zation. In the work of the church he takes a very active part, doing all in 
his power to advance its interests. 

In his political views he is a Democrat and has been honored with vari- 
ous local offices. He served for four years as a member of the board of 
chosen freeholders and for three years as a member of the Morristown com- 
mon council. For twenty-two years he has been a member of the Morris- 
town board of education and for the past seventeen years has served as its 
president. To him more than to any one man is Morristown indebted for 
the excellent public-school system which she possesses, and the beneficial 
efforts of Mr. Guerin in this direction are immeasurable; and he is also a mem- 
ber of the Washington Association. He is a man whom to know is to respect 
and honor. Integrity in business, fidelity in friendship, loyalty in public 
service and trustworthiness in all the relations of life are his typical charac- 
teristics, and he well deserves the high regard which is tendered him. 



SAMUEL B. HALSEY. 



Samuel B. Halsey was the son of Dr. Abraham and Mary Beach Halsey 
and was born at Fishkill, New York, July 24, 1796. He entered Union Col- 
lege in 181 1 and graduated in 18 15. He commenced the study of law with 
Hon. James Talmadge, at Poughkeepsie, and in 181 7 was appointed aid-de- 
camp by Governor Talmadge. 

He was licensed as an attorney by the supreme court of New York,. 
October 30, 1818, and practiced his profession from that time until 1834, 
when he removed to Rockaway. He was twice elected to the legislature of 
New York, from Dutchess county, first in 1826 and again in 1830. At one 
of those elections he was the only candidate on his party's ticket that was 
elected. On his removal to New Jersey he abandoned the active practice of 
the law and engaged in mining, in manufacturing iron, in farming and in 
other business interests. He also assisted his father-in-law. Colonel Joseph 
Jackson, in the management of his affairs. As master in chancery he was 
frequently engaged in the settlement of estates, and from 1846 until 1851 
was one of the judges of Morris county. 

He was twice elected to the legislature of New Jersey, first in September,. 



■2J8 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

1841, and again in 1843. At tlie second election he was made speaker of the 
house. He died in Rockaway September 15, 1871. His strict integrity and 
kindness of heart won the love and respect of all who knew him. 



ANDREW L. COBB. 



Mr. Cobb is a resident of Parsippany, and is a representative of one of 
the old and honored families of Morris county. He was born in Hanover 
township, Morris county, on the 5th of September, 1867, being a son of Hon. 
Andrew B. Cobb, formerly a prominent and well known citizen, whose life 
record forms a part of the commercial and industrial history of the county, 
and whose family is one of the most notable and worthy of mention in bio- 
graphic annals in New Jersey. 

Mr. Cobb, of this sketch, was educated in South Williamston, Massachu- 
setts, being graduated there in 1887. He is now engaged in administering 
the estate left to the family at the father's death, — a valuable and extensive 
property. He has called public attention to himself by the able manner in 
■which he has conducted the business, and is regarded as one of the leading 
and enterprising agriculturists of Morris county. He was married September 
15, 1892, to Mar}' Righter, a daughter of George E. Righter. 

It will certainly be interesting in this connection to note something of 
the family from which Mr. Cobb springs and make more extended mention 
■of his father. His grandfather, Colonel Lemuel Cobb, was born on his 
•father's farm near Parsippany, May 15, 1762, and in early life did not enjoy 
even ordinary advantages for obtaining an education, but his thirst for prac- 
tical knowledge and the indomitable energy of his character supplied the 
■place of these facilities. It is said that he pursued the study of his profes- 
;sion, that of civil engineering and surveying, while working in a sawmill. In 
thus surmounting the obstacles which were in the way of his early advance- 
ment he developed those qualities which fitted him for his subsequent success- 
ful career and which were inherited by his son. Prominent in military affairs 
and in politics, he took a lively interest in the development of the locality, 
and filled positions of trust. He was thrice married. His first wife was 
Mary, daughter of Benjamin Smith, whose only surviving child, Elizabeth, 
became the wife of Benjamin Howell, of Troy. His second wife was Susan 
Farrand, daughter of Ebenezer Farrand, by whom he had six children, only 
two of whom survived him: Julia A., wife of W. C. H. Waddell, and Andrew 
B. His third wife was Elizabeth Shaw, and by that marriage there were no 
children. He died April i, 1830. He was a member of the board of pro- 
prietors of the eastern division of New Jersey, and for many years the sur- 
veyor-general of that division. In the practice of his profession he availed 



BIOGBJPEICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 219 

himself of his opportunities for acquiring land, and left an estate of more 
than ten thousand acres, which he devised to his son, Andrew B. Cobb; to 
Benjamin Howell, who was the husband of his daughter, Elizabeth; to his 
daughter Maria, whose husband was Walter Kirkpatrick; and to his daugh- 
ter, Julia Ann, the wife of William Coventry H. Waddell. Mrs. Kirkpatrick 
and her son, Eugene, died before her father, and the property was divided 
among the other three children. 

Andrew Bell Cobb, father of him whose name begins this sketch, was 
born on the 7th of June, 1S04, at Parsippany, Hanover township, in the 
house where he resided until his death. He received an excellent academic 
education. His youth was passed in assisting his father in the care of his 
landed estate, and on the death of the latter, April i, 1831, he came into 
possession of a large portion of that estate, including the homestead at Par- 
sippany, and commenced the active career which he followed through the 
rest of his life. His attention was mainly devoted to the management and 
improvement of his landed possessions, which steadily increased with the 
lapse of time. Incidentally he was engaged in agricultural pursuits, and to 
some extent in mining. He evinced a deep interest in the development of 
the iron interests of the county, and was at a late period in his life an iron 
manufacturer. He erected a charcoal blast-furnace at Split Rock. He was 
always active in the promotion of local interests and largely advanced the 
material welfare of the community. 

In public and political affairs Mr. Cobb took an active part. He was a 
Whig until about 1853, after which he was a supporter of the Democratic 
party. In 1838 he was appointed judge of the court of common pleas of 
Morris county, which office he held about five years. In 1849 and 1850 he 
was a member of the general assembly from this county and was again elected 
in 1853, though his party was not in the majority in his district. He was a 
leading member of the house in the session of 1854, and was active in pro- 
moting the legislation of that session which resulted in the limitation of the 
monopoly of the "Joint Companies " to the ist of January, 1869. In 1856 
he was elected to the state senate, where he served efficiently during three 
sessions. During many years he was a member of the board of proprietors 
of East New Jersey. 

Judge Cobb was a man of strong individuality, was warm and earnest in 
his friendships, and very decided in the manifestation of his dislikes and 
aversions. He had many devoted and zealous friends, and his unquestioned 
integrity, his manly honor and the generosity of his nature compelled the 
respect of his enemies. He was a man of extensive information and was a 
good citizen. 

Mr. Cobb was twice married. His first wife was Elizabeth P., daughter 



220 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

of Captain David Kirkpatrick. She died December ii, 1857, leaving a 
daughter, Julia Kirkpatrick, who died September 14, 1894. His second wife 
was Frances E., daughter of Nathaniel Ogden Condit. Their children are 
Andrew L. and Elizabeth. In 1871 Mr. Cobb became affected with paraly- 
sis, which gradually increased till his death, which occurred January 31, 1873. 



SILAS H. ARNOLD. 



The first representative of the Arnold family in Morris county was 
Stephen Arnold, who came here about the year 1720 from Woodbridge, this 
state. He is supposed to have been born in Rhode Island, a son of William 
Arnold, who with his brother John came from Cheselbaum, Dorset county, 
England, in 1587, and settled at Providence, Rhode Island. All the Arnolds 
of America, including Benedict Arnold, have sprung from these brothers. 
Stephen Arnold died in Morris county and was buried at Whippan}-. His 
son, Samuel Arnold, was born in Morris county, on the 5th of November, 
1727, and died October 3, 1764. He married Phebe Ford, a sister of 
Colonel Jacob Ford, Sr. , and among their children was Jacob Arnold, born 
in Morris county, on the 14th of December, 1749, his death occurring March 
I, 1827. He was a celebrated man in his locality during the Revolutionary 
war; was commander of the light-horse militia of Morris county, which 
served under Washington in a number of campaigns, and was promoted 
lieutenant-colonel in the Continental army. His light-horse company was 
an independent organization, raised entirely in Morris county, and it won an 
enviable distinction for its long and brilliant career. The Colonel was also 
well known as the proprietor of the Arnold tavern in Morristown, on the 
west side of the public green, where Washington and La Fayette spent one 
winter as his guests, holding many conferences with all the leading men of 
the army, and where also the balls of the officers were held. Colonel 
Arnold was also sheriff of Morris county in 1780 and 1786, and assembly- 
man from the same county in the years 1784, 1785, 1789 and 1790. He 
also was one of the twenty-four gentlemen who organized the Morris Acad- 
emy, on the 28th of November, 1791. 

For his first wife Colonel Arnold married Elizabeth Tuthill, who was 
born September 15, 1753, and died May 7, 1803. The children by this 
marriage who grew up were Hannah, Jacob, Abram, Charles and Eliza M. 
By his second marriage the Colonel was united with Sarah H. Nixon, who 
was born in Morristown, October i, 1783, and died April 9, 1843, and by 
this union there were seven children, namely: Phoebe P., Mary A., Silas 
H., Abram H., Elizabeth M., Samuel D. and Edward A., — all now deceased. 

Silas H. Arnold was born April 2, 181 3, on the old homestead known as 




^ 



•^^■^^^ J^ s-^^^^^^^f-^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEXEALOGICAL HISTORY. 221 

Washington Valley, two and a half miles from Morristown, which has been 
in the possession of the family over two hundred years and is now owned by 
Edwin F. and Willis G. Arnold. He married Miss Martha Louisa Pierson in 
1836, and the following named children were born in their family: Frances 
Caroline, Isaac Gaston, Jacob Ogden, Samuel Pierson, Hannah Isabelle, 
Edwin Finley, Willis Garland, Eliza, deceased, and Emma Elizabeth. Mrs. 
Arnold was born in Morris county. May 7, 1813, and departed this life March 
4, 1S89. Both she and her husband were devout adherents of the Presby- 
terian church. He always lived on the old homestead in Washington Valley, 
held county and city offices and was a Whig and Republican, voting for 
William Henry Harrison for president. He died March 4, 1890, at the age 
of seventy-eight years, having all his life enjoyed the respect of the people of 
Morris county. 

Isaac Gaston Arnold was born in Morris county. New Jersey, on the 12th 
of December, 1838, and received a limited literary education. He left the 
school-room at the early age of fourteen years to become a clerk in a grocery 
at Newark, whence he went eventually to New York and accepted a position 
in a teaware store; but, his health failing, he returned home and there recu- 
perated his energies for a year or so. His next employment was in a Morris- 
town meat market, and in June, 1863, he and his brother, Jacob O. Arnold, 
established a similar enterprise of their own, under the firm name of Arnold 
Brothers, and this has since been continued with distinct success. 

Fraternally, Mr. Arnold is a member of the Masonic order, in which he 
is a Master Mason, and politically he is a stanch supporter of the Republican 
party. Although he has generally refused to accept office, he has served two 
terms as a member of the Morristown common council, and he has been con- 
nected with the Morristown fire department for over thirty years. Being a 
lineal descendant of Colonel Jacob Arnold, who participated in the Revolu- 
tion, he is accepted as a member of the Society of the Sons of the Revolu- 
tion, and he is also a member of the Washington Association, of Morristown. 

In matrimony Mr. Arnold was united with Miss Mary M. Bayles, in 
1869, and of their children four are living, namely, Anna Louisa, Mabel 
Augusta, Edith May and Howard Bayles. George Howell and Charles 
Albert died young. Mr. and Mrs. Arnold are consistent adherents of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in the work of which they are both active. 



THE WARD FAMILY. 

The Wards have been famous as founders and builders from the 
time they came over with the Conqueror, in 1066, to the landing of the Con- 
necticut pilgrims in Newark, in 1666, and the history of this family is inter- 



222 BIOGRAPHICAL AiN'B GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

woven with the growth and prosperity of New Jersey from the latter period 
to the present time. From the coat-armor and motto of one branch of the 
family it is probable they were engaged in the crusades. They bore arms, — 
azure a cross patonce or, a mullet for difference; crest a Saracen's head 
affrontee, couped below the shoulders prr. ; motto, "Sub cruce salus. " 
Among the number who accompanied William the Conqueror from Nor- 
mandy was "Ward, one of the noble captains." The name of William de 
la Ward appears in 1 175 as residing in Chester. From 1349 a succession of 
eleven generations of one family is found there, in each of which the name 
and head of the family was: In the first Ralph, in the second Richard, in 
the third, fourth and ninth, John, and in the eleventh, Thomas, who had 
sons, John and William. One, William Ward, was the first earl of Derby, 
of Dudley castle. 

The Wards of Connecticut and New Jersey are descended from Robert 
Ward, of Houton, Parva, Northamptonshire, England. He married Isabel 
Stapley, of Dunchurch, county Warwick, England. They had a son, — 

James Ward, of the same place, who married Anna or Alice Fawkes, of 
Dunchurch. Their son, Stephen Ward, married Joyce Traford, of Leices- 
tershire. After his death the widow removed with her children to New Eng- 
land, in 1630, and settled, in 1635, in Wethersfield, Connecticut, being 
among the original settlers of that town. She died in 1640. Her will is 
nearly the first in the colony records, and names Edward, Anthony, John 
and Robert as her children. 

John Ward, the fourth child of Stephen, was known as "John Ward, 
Sr.," " Sergeant Ward," "Lieutenant Ward," and "Mr. Ward." He was 
one of the original settlers or founders of the plantation of Totoket, named 
Branford in 1646. Lawrence and George Ward, brothers, who came from 
England with John, and were no doubt closely related to him, were also 
associated in the founding of Branford, which then composed a part of the 
New Haven colony. Lawrence Ward, who took the oath of fidelity at New- 
Haven at the organisation of the government, was employed by the govern- 
ing magistrates to search for the regicides, Whaley and Goffe, at Milford, 
where, of course, he knew they were not to be found. 

George Ward signed the " Fundamental Agreement " of the New Haven 
colony in 1639, and with his brother, Lawrence, was one of the founders of 
Branford. 

John Ward, Sr., Lawrence Ward, together with Josiah and John, Jr., 
sons of George Ward, all came with the pilgrims to Newark in 1666. Law- 
rence died in 1670 without issue. Josiah, brother of John Ward, Jr., mar- 
ried Elizabeth Swaine, who it was said, was the first one on shore at the land- 
ing of the Pilgrims on the Passiac. He died soon, leaving one son, Samuel. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 223 

John Ward, Sr., and John Ward, Jr., the "Turner," received their 
division of home lots near the Passaic river, and lived there for a few years. 
From 1675 to 1679 both took up lands at or near the Second river, in Wat- 
sessing, now Bloomfield, where they soon after settled. Both left many 
descendants. 

John Ward, Jr., son of George Ward, was born in England, and came 
with his parents to this country and was one of the original settlers of the 
New Haven colony. He was one of the founders of Branford, which formed 
a part of the New Haven colony. He came with the Branford colonists to 
Newark in 1666-7, a-nd in the first division of " home lotts" his six acres 
were located between High and Washington streets, adjoining that of Deliv- 
ered Crane. About 1675 he took up land on the Second riverj in what is 
now Bloomfield, but probably did not remove thence until the opening of 

the highway from Newark. He married Sarah , and had children: 

Sarah; John, born 1654; Samuel, born 1656; Abigail, married John Gard- 
ner; Josiah, born about 1660; Nathaniel, married Sarah Harrison; Mary, 
married Thomas Davis; and Caleb, " the honest and pious." 

Josiah Ward, son of John Ward, Jr., and Sarah , was born in 

Branford, Connecticut, about 1660. He moved with his parents to Newark, 
and thence to Bloomfield or what was then known as Watsessing. He mar- 
ried Mary Ivitchell, a descendant of Robert l^itchell, one of the original set- 
tlers of Quinnepiac, or New Haven, and afterward of Newark. They had 
children, Samuel, Robert, Josiah, Lawrence, born 1710. 

Lawrence Ward, son of Josiah and Mary (Kitchell) Ward, was born 
probably in Bloomfield, in 17 10, and died in 1793. He married Eleanor 
Baldwin. In his will, dated May 3, 1775 (now among the papers of the 
New Jersey Historical Society), he gives to his sons, Jacob, Jonas, Stephen 
and Samuel, " all my estate, both lands and meadows, and all my movable 
estate, both here and elsewhere." To his son Cornelius he gives five 
pounds. The will is witnessed by David, Uzal and John Dod. 

Jacob Ward, son of Lawrence and Eleanor (Baldwin) Ward, was born 
in Bloomfield about 1750. He served with the Essex county militia in the 
war of the Revolution, and was a man of considerable prominence in that 
county, as appears by the following entry in the Newark Town Records, 
under the head of resolutions " adopted at an annual Town Meeting held in 
the Township of Newark the i ith day of April, 1808: " 

" 5th. That the next annual election be opened at the house of Jacob 
Ward, in Bloomfield, and continued there during the first day and adjourned 
to the court house in Newark as usual." The same resolution was repeated 
at an annual town meeting held the 9th day of April, 18 10. 

Jacob Ward had among other children a son, Jacob. 



224 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Jacob Ward (2d), son of Jacob Ward (ist), was born in Bloomfield 
about 1780. He was an elder in the Presbyterian church at Bloomfield and 
was one of the early members, if not an original member, of that church. 
He moved to Columbia, now Afton, Morris county, in 1806, where he pur- 
chased a farm. He was an elder in the Presbyterian church at Hanover, the 
nearest church to Columbia, and equally prominent in that community. He 
was married to Abigail Dodd, daughter of Moses and Lois (Crane) Dodd, of 
Isaac, son of Daniel (3d), son of Daniel (2d), son of Daniel (ist), the ances- 
tor. They had thirteen children, among whom were Moses Dodd, Jacob 
and Samuel Davies. 

Moses Dodd Ward, son of Jacob and Abigail (Dodd) Ward, was born at 
the old homestead in Bloomfield, in 1806. He went with his parents when 
six months of age to Columbia, in Morris county, where, like his ancestors, 
he followed the life of a farmer. He was a man of strong character, and 
with a different environment would have succeeded in almost any undertak- 
ing. He was an elder and one of the pillars in the Hanover Presbyterian 
church and a man of strong religious convictions. He raised a family of 
strong, robust children, all of whom have made their mark in the world and 
have developed remarkable business sagacity. Mr. Ward married Justina 
Louisa Sayre, daughter of Elias Sayre, son of Ebenezer, probably the 
grandson of Joseph Sayre, the New Jersey ancestor, who was the son of 
Thomas. 

Thomas Sayre, the ancestor, died in 1671, came from Bedfordshire, 
England, and settled in Lynn, Massachusetts, in 1635. He was one of the 
eight original " undertakers " of the town of Southampton, in 1640. The 
Sayre homestead, built in 1648, which is still in a good state of preservation, 
is said to be the oldest house in the state of New York, and one of the old- 
est in the country. The massive timbers and covering of thick cedar shin- 
gles are sufficient to insure its remaining for years to come as a curious and 
interesting relic of a long past age. At a time of a threatened Indian out- 
break, in 1666, it was one of the rallying places of the inhabitants in case of 
a night attack. The house is still in the hands of the Sayre family, ten gen- 
erations having been born and having died within its walls. The name of 
Sayre is said to be derived from assayer, a crown officer in the royal mint, 
whose duty it was to assay gold and silver. Joseph Sayre, son of Thomas 
Sayre, removed to Elizabeth, New Jersey, in 1667, and was among the earli- 
est of the "associates." In December of that year he united with others in 
the petition to the government to have his land surveyed. Among his chil- 
dren and grandchildren are found the names of Edward, Ephraim, Ezekiel, 
Hannah, Frances, Isaac, James, Jonathan, Joseph, Thomas and Samuel. 

The issue of the marriage of Moses Dodd and Justina Louisa (Sayre) 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 225 

Ward were: Laura J. ; Elias S. married Anna, daughter of Joel M. Bonnell, 
of Newark; Leslie Dodd, who married Minnie P., daughter of James Perry, 
and is vice-president of the Prudential Insurance Company, of Newark; 
Edgar Bethune, who married Harriet, daughter of John P. Jube; and Jacob 
Ewing, who married Maria, daughter of Ambrose E. Kitchell. 



JERRY R. GEORGE. 

This citizen of Dover is a conductor on the Delaware, Lackawanna & 
Western Railroad. He is a man whose nobility of character and genuine 
worth commend him to the confidence and respect of all, has a large circle 
of friends, and is a very acceptable companion among his business associates 
and acquaintances in Morris county. 

He is a native of the Empire state, his birth having occurred in the city 
of Utica, in 1842, and his parents being Even and Elizabeth (Roberts) 
George. The paternal grandfather of our subject, Even George, Sr., mar- 
ried Anna Evans and had eight children, — five sons and three daughters, — 
among whom was Even George, Jr., whose birth occurred in Cardiganshire, 
Wales, whence he was brought to America during his early childhood. He 
married Elizabeth Roberts, who was born in South Wales and came to the 
United States in 1825. He was a stone-mason and contractor and aided in 
the construction of the old custom-house on Wall street, New York city, doing 
the finishing masonry work thereon. He also did the finishing work on the 
columns of the state prison at Trenton, New Jersey, and much of the work 
on the Erie canal through New York, taking contracts for the same. He 
was a man of great energy, force of character and strong convictions, and a 
most pronounced opponent to slavery. In his political views he was a 
Whig. His death occurred in 1848, in his forty-eighth year, and his wife 
passed away in the seventy-third year of her age. 

Jerry R. George spent his boyhood days in Utica, New York, and 
acquired his education in the public schools. He was the youngest of six 
children, and having lost his father when only six years of age he was com- 
pelled to leave school at the age of twelve years in order to provide for his 
own maintenance. He began work in a store at seventy-five cents per week 
and board, and was later employed in various ways until he had attained his 
majority, when he entered the employ of the Delaware, Lackawanna & 
Western Railroad Company. He commenced at the bottom round of the 
ladder to work his way upward, his promotion coming as the result of close 
application, faithful service and ability. In 1873 he was given the position 
of conductor on a passenger train. He has since served in that capacity, and 
is one of the most trusted, capable and popular conductors on the line, being 

15 



226 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ever attentive to the welfare of those in his trains, accommodating and 
gentlemanly. 

Mr. George has been twice married. In 1864 he was joined in wedlock 
to Miss Lavina M. Smith, by the Rev. C. S. Van Cleve. She was a daugh- 
ter of George W. and Caroline Smith, and died on the 19th of October, 
1878, leaving one son, Harry M., who is now teller in the Bank of the 
Republic, of New York city. In 1880 Mr. George was again married, his 
second union being with Miss Sarah Adelaide Ellis, of Dover, the second 
daughter of George W. and Martha (Mills) Ellis. Two daughters grace this 
union, — Bessie M. and Martha E. 

Mr. George votes with the Republican party and keeps well informed on 
the issues of the day, being thereby able to give an intelligent and earnest 
support to the measures of which his judgment approves. He is a consistent 
and active member of the Methodist Episcopal church and his influence for 
good among his business associates is very marked. He is a member of the 
state committee of the Young Men's Christian Association, one of its faithful 
workers, and is especially active in his efforts to benefit young men by moral 
influences. In this capacity he has done much in the interests of railroad 
men and for the benefit of railroad work. In th estate association he is a 
member of the committee on railroad work, and in this he has been con- 
nected with the Tom Keenan and Bennie Locke railroad men, who have 
worked in the association and on the railroad committee. His honorable and 
upright life commends him to the confidence and respect of all, and with 
pleasure we present this record of his life to our readers. 



FREDERICK NISHWITZ. 



The gratitude of the agricultural world is certainly due this gentleman, 
who has given to the farming industry some of the most useful inventions 
that have ever promoted its interests. As the result of his persevering efforts 
and in accord with the spirit of progress of the present age, he has attained 
a pre-eminent position as an inventor that has excited the admiration of the 
entire country; nor is his fame limited by the confines of America. Deep 
thought, earnest study, careful investigation and wide research and experi- 
ment have enabled him to bring forth many useful devices that have largely 
revolutionized the work of the farm. Discouragement met him on every 
side, attempts were made to take his inventions from him, but in the face of 
great difficulties he has persevered, and to-day, in one of New Jersey's beau- 
tiful homes, located at Millington, he is enjoying the fruit of his former toil, 
surrounded by the comforts and luxuries brought to him by the wealth that 
has resulted from his own labors. 








/*=zS^-^c^^ 




BIOGRJPHICJ.L AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 227 

Mr. Nishwitz is a native of Germany, and in 1840, when eleven years of 
age, came with his parents to America, locating on Long Hill, in Passaic 
township, Morris county, where the father, Peter Nishwitz, made his home 
until his death, in 1872. He followed farming and was a very industrious 
and energetic man, of sound judgment and sterling worth. His political sup- 
port was given the Democracy. His wife was called to her final rest in 
1865. They were the parents of five children: Dorothy, deceased wife of 
Charles Hoffman; Catherine, deceased wife of William Wurster and mother 
of F. W. Wurster, who was mayor of Brooklyn when it became a part of 
" Greater " New York; Frederick; Jacob, who has also departed this life; and 
Margaret, wife of J. H. Schmidt, of Madison, New Jersey. 

The early boyhood of him whose name introduces this review was spent 
on his father's farm, and in the summer months he assisted in the cultivation 
of the fields and the harvesting of crops, while in the winter season he 
familiarized himself with the English branches taught in the public schools. 
During this time he gave thoughtful attention to the working of the machinery 
used in the operation of the farm. It was soon seen that his tastes and 
talents lay in the direction of mechanics, and when fifteen years of age he 
was apprenticed for a six-years term to John Hubbs, a manufacturer of agri- 
cultural implements in New York. He displayed such aptness in mastering 
the duties assigned to him, and so rapidly acquired a knowledge of the work- 
ings of machinery, that when nineteen years of age — two years before the 
expiration of his apprenticeship — he was admitted to a partnership in the 
business, and the following year his employer sold out to him. He con- 
ducted this industry with good success for a number of years, manufacturing 
several kinds of agricultural implements, but sold out in 1870. 

In the meantime he had begun his important work of invention and 
entered upon a career that has brought him wealth and renown and at the 
same time has been of lasting benefit to those who devote their energies to 
agricultural pursuits. In 1853 he invented a harvester, and from that time 
until 1880 he took out many patents on improvements for reapers and mow- 
ers. The present style of two-wheeled reapers was originated by him and 
was sold to Walter A. Wood. In 1858 he invented the first disk harrow 
and later made many improvements on this. He met with much difficulty 
and great discouragement in placing this on the market, and it was not until 
1866 that it really came into popular favor, when its merits were called to 
the public attention by the agricultural reports of the United States and by 
Mr. Robinson of the New York Tribune, who recognized its superior worth 
and encouraged Mr. Nishwitz to persevere, assuring him that success would 
ultimately crown his efforts. This prediction proved correct, and the disk 
harrow is now used almost exclusively in the west. During all this time Mr. 



^28 BIOGEJPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Nishwitz carried on his manufacturing business, but in 1870 he disposed 
of it, and having acquired a handsome competence came to Millington, 
where he purchased a large tract of land and erected a beautiful summer 
home. 

He has had to contest his right to many of his patents in the courts, 
unscrupulous men attempting to take them from him, but has triumphed 
over his adversaries and has reaped the golden reward of his labors. He 
sold many of his patents at a good profit and determined to retire from 
active business, but indolence and idleness are utterly foreign to his nature, 
and after locating in Millington he began to think of new fields toward which 
he might direct his energies. Accordingly ,he brought out and patented the 
Acme harrow, which he had invented in 1879, and is now extensively 
engaged in its manufacture, having a large plant in Millington, which fur- 
nishes employment to one hundred and twenty-five men. This harrow is 
known throughout the world, one hundred and twenty-five thousand having • 
been sold. The entire sales are under the supervision of D. H. Nash, a 
very prominent and capable business man, and Mr. Nishwitz has little of the 
active management of the business. He has also invented hay forks and 
many other useful implements, and his inventions are used extensively 
throughout the west, where they have been of great practical benefit to the 
farmer as time and labor saving machines, thereby enabling the farmer to 
handle and cultivate more land and in consequence raise greater crops, which 
materially advances his profits. In connection with his other interests Mr. 
Nishwitz is a heavy stock-holder in, and a member of the directorate of, the 
National Iron Bank, of Morristown. 

In his political views Mr. Nishwitz is a Republican and takes an active 
interest in the success and welfare of the party. Socially he is a Master 
Mason, and is a valued member of the Washington Association, of Morris 
county. He is a public-spirited and progressive citizen, and his labors have 
resulted in the benefit of his adopted county, he having done much to 
improve the roads and advance educational facilities in his locality. He 
gives a generous support to all measures for the public good, and his worth 
to the state is widely acknowledged. 

Mr. Nishwitz has been twice married. He first wedded Miss Doris 
Wenzel, of Brooklyn, and to them were born two daughters: Mrs. Wil- 
helmina Taff, of Millington; and Emma, wife of Roderick Byington, of New- 
ark, New Jersey. The mother of these children having passed away, Mr. 
Nishwitz was again married, his second union being with Miss Cornelia R. 
Baker, of Amherst, Massachusetts. One daughter, Doretta, graces this 
union. Mr. Nishwitz and his family attend the Presbyterian church. Since 
J 873 he has made his home in Millington, and his magnificent country resi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 229" 

dence occupies one of the most beautiful builditig sites in the state, com- 
manding a splendid view of the Passaic valley, its hills and glens, forests 
and plains. 



JOHN WHITEHEAD. 

John Whitehead, of Morristovvn, was born in Jersey, Licking county, 
Ohio, in September, 1819. Deprived by death of a father's care, his early 
years were passed in the home of his uncle, Hon. Asa Whitehead, a leading 
member of the New Jersey bar, practicing at Newark. After receiving a 
thorough academical education he became a student in his uncle's office, was 
admitted to the bar in September, 1840, and began at once the practice of 
law, remaining with his uncle until 1843, when he opened an office for him- 
self. In 1856 Mr. Whitehead was appointed a United States circuit-court 
commissioner for the district of New Jersey. In this capacity it became 
his duty to investigate complaints for the violation of federal statutes. His 
patience and breadth of legal knowledge made him a most admirable com- 
mitting magistrate. 

During his long practice Mr. Whitehead has never sought political or 
other honors outside of his profession, the only temptation to which he 
yielded being the indulgence of his literary tastes. He had a strong sym- 
pathy for the colored race, although never a pronounced abolitionist, and 
took great interest in furthering their efforts to obtain the elective franchise. 
His lectures on history and philology evince deep research and great familiar- 
ity with those subjects, and valuable contributions have been made by him 
to the legal literature of his state. The cause of education has always found 
in him an earnest advocate. He was a member of the "public-school com- 
mittee" of Newark as early as 1845, its meetings being held in his private 
office. In 185 1, after the legislature had enlarged its powers, as the "board 
of education," its meetings were still held at the same place, Mr. Whitehead 
being its secretary and treasurer until 1855. The people of Clinton town- 
ship, of which he then became a resident, immediately availed themselves of 
his devotion to the cause of education by selecting him for their school super- 
intendent, which position he held for four years. He was for a long time 
secretary of the State Society of Teachers and Friends of Education, and in 
the interest of this society spent much of his leisure time visiting different 
parts of the state, endeavoring to rouse the people to a realization of 
the importance of furnishing their children with better educational advan- 
tages. He was also a prominent member of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Education, composed of the most distinguished educat- 
ors and men of learning in the country. When it was decreed by an act of 



230 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL EISTOBY. 

the legislature that school' examiners should be appointed in the different 
counties of the state, Mr. Whitehead was selected for Essex county, holding 
th« office until the act was repealed. 

In 1861 Mr. Whitehead changed his residence to Morristown, where, 
after years of patient labor and unflagging zeal in building up the public 
sentiment so as to render its ultimate success possible, he had the satisfaction 
of seeing the Morristown Library opened to the public August 14, 1876, with 
every prospect of growth and usefulness. With indomitable persistence he 
watched over the youth of this institution, and all of its thousands of books 
were selected under his immediate supervision. 

In 1 89 1 Mr. Whitehead was chosen president of the New Jersey Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, founded in 1889, an outgrowth of 
the patriotic sentiment engendered by the centennial anniversary of the 
inauguration of Washington. During the successive years that he has held 
that position his genial social qualities and enthusiastic patriotism have 
largely increased the membership of the society. In 1893 he was elected 
one of the vice-presidents of the National Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution. 

Mr. Whitehead is still (1897) in the full practice of his profession, and 
his hearty greeting is extended to all, whether they are his brother lawyers 
whom he meets in legal combat or those who gladly avail themselves of his 
wide experience; whether the client who seeks his aid is impecunious or 
otherwise; whether beggar or book-agent, peddler or patriot — all are welcome 
to his time and attention, but he does not permit his thorough enjoyment of 
a passing joke to detract from his dignity when the occasion requires it. 



GEORGE B. SMITH. 



One of the successful agriculturists of Troy Hills, the subject of 
this review was born on the old Smith homestead in Morris county, Decem- 
ber II, 1844, and is a son of the late Andrew J. Smith, whose family was 
one of the first to settle at Troy. Its founder, Richard Smith, was among 
the pioneers of this region some years before the adoption of that "immor- 
tal document, " the Declaration of Independence. He was the father of Benja- 
min Smith, whose son Benjamin Smith, Jr. , was the great-grandfather of our sub- 
ject. Ebenezer, the grandfather, served in the war of 1812, and the father of 
oursubject completes the lineof direct descent. The last named was a graduate 
of the University of Vermont, studied law, and after his admission to the bar 
practiced at the Morris county bar. He resided at Troy Hills and was called 
upon to prepare the wills and other important legal documents of his coun- 
trymen living in that locality. His relations to the public were as cordial 





^^M^^'T^ 



BIOGRAFHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 231 

and sincere as they were to his family. He was once a member of the state 
legislature and held other offices of trust in the county, discharging all duties 
with marked fidelity and ability. In politics the Smiths in the iirst half of 
the century were Whigs and after the organization of the Republican party 
joined its ranks. 

Mrs. Smith, the mother of our subject, bore the maiden name of Caro- 
line E. Braman, and she was a daughter of Dana A. Braman. George B. 
Smith is the first child and only son born to his parents. He attended the 
common schools and later pursued his education in higher institutions of 
learning. He gained a broad knowledge of the world and its ways, however, 
by a number of years' travel through the United States, after which he took 
up his residence in Oswego, New York. When about twenty-four years of 
age he returned to his old home in New Jersey, and has since been identified 
with the life and labors of the farm. He has placed his land under a high 
state of cultivation and the well tilled fields and substantial buildings upon the 
place indicate the supervision of a thrifty and progressive owner. 

On the 1 8th of October, 187C, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary A. Doty, a daughter of the Rev. Elihu Doty, and of their union have 
been born two children: Andrew J. and Eleanor D. Mr. Smith is well 
known in Morris county as a loyal defender of the principles of the Repub- 
lican party, and his fellow citizens", appreciating his worth and ability, some 
years ago elected him to a membership on the board of freeholders. 



HENRY M. DALRYMPLE. 

One of the leading and respected citizens of Morristown is Henry M. 
Dalrymple, whose life has been characterized by honor in business, loyalty in 
affairs of state, and cordiality and kindness in social circles. His genuine 
worth commands the highest esteem and Morris county numbers him among 
her valued representatives. He was born near Dover, this county, April 10, 
1832, and is a son of Henry and Harriet (Hoagland) Dalrymple, also natives 
of Morris county. In 1767 Joseph Dalrymple purchased land in Randolph 
township and established there a homestead, which has since remained in 
possession of the family. He had fourteen children, including Solomon 
Dalrymple, who became the father of nine children, one of these being Henry 
Dalrymple, father of our subject. 

Henry M. Dalrymple was reared on the home farm and acquired a fair 
education in the common schools. At the age of eighteen years he left the 
parental roof and entered the employ of the old Morris & Essex Railroad, as 
assistant surveyor and in that capacity was employed about five years. On 
the expiration of that period he went to the west and entered the employ of 



232 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

the Illinois Central Railroad Company as land examiner and surveyor, but 
before the end of a year returned to Morris county and re-entered the employ 
of the Morris & Essex Railroad Company, whose line afterward became a 
part of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. For a time he 
served as assistant station agent at Jersey City and then was appointed 
station agent at Morristown, where he was located at the time of the break- 
ing out of the Civil war. 

Prompted by patriotic impulses, he enlisted in the Union army, entering 
the service August 7, 1861, and being commissioned second lieutenant of 
Company K, First Regiment of New York Volunteer Engineers, to rank as 
such from December 3, 1861. He was made adjutant of the regiment Octo- 
ber 10, 1862, and first lieutenant December 5, 1862, and in May, 1864, on 
the death of Captain Henry L. Southard, commanding the company, he was 
promoted to the vacancy, his commission dating from June 14, 1864. He 
retained command of the company in the operations in front of Petersburg 
and Richmond and in the other engagements which occurred in the closing 
period of the war. He was brevetted major of United States Volunteers for 
gallant and meritorious service, March 13, 1865, and was mustered out with 
his regiment June 30, 1865, at Richmond, Virginia, at the close of the war. 
This regiment had been organized in New York city to date from September 
27, 1 86 1, and Company K was with it throughout the war. As a part of the 
Department of the South, it was engaged in all the various operations under 
Generals Sherman, Hunter and Gilmore, participated in the siege of Pulaski, 
the battle of Pocataligo, the expedition of Charleston, under Hunter, the 
siege of Forts Wagner and Sumter, and Charleston, under General Gilmore, 
erecting the famous " Swamp Angel Battery," v^hich threw the first mes- 
sengers of death into Charleston. Early in the spring of 1864 the regiment 
was ordered to join the Army of the James, at Fortress Monroe and Bermuda 
Hundred, and did hard work under command of General Grant, in his oper- 
ations in front of Petersburg and Richmond. Major Dalrymple was a most 
valiant and loyal soldier and still maintains his relations with his old army 
comrades through his membership in A. T. A. Torbett Post, No. 24, G. A. 
R. , and the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, being 
a member of the commandery of the state of New York. 

At the close of the war Major Dalrymple returned to his family and 
home in Morristown. In 1856 he had married Miss Frances Jane Wheeler, 
and they have four living children: The Major resumed his position as 
station agent at Morristown, but two years later resigned in order to engage 
in the coal and lumber business, which he has since followed. He was at 
first in partnership with a Mr. Tomkins and later was alone. He then formed 
a partnership with J. Frank Lindsley, an association which was continued for 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 23S 

eleven years, when Mr. Lindsley withdrew and the Dalryinple-Hastings Com- 
pany was organized. This company has a very extensive trade and the enter- 
prise is now on a paying basis, yielding to the stockholders a handsome 
income. The company is well known for the thorough reliability of its mem- 
bers, who are men of good business principles and ability and command the 
respect of the entire public. 

Politically Major Dalrymple is a Republican, and though ardent in sup- 
port of the party principles he has never been an office-seeker. Neverthe- 
less he has several times responded to the urgent solicitations of his friends 
to accept office, and has served for two terms as a member of the Morristown 
common council and some time since was for two years a member of the 
Morris county board of chosen freeholders, to which position he was again 
chosen in the spring of 1897. Socially he is a Knight Templar Mason and 
belongs to the Society of the Army of the Potomac. Both he and his wife 
are members of the First Presbyterian church of Morristown, of which he 
has been an elder for more than twenty years. Both the Major and his wife 
hold an enviable position in social circles and have the warm regard of many 
friends. 



THE HOWELL FAMILY. 

[By Mrs. Helen M. Brittin.] 

The Howell family, one of the most prominent in the history of Morris 
county, is descended from ancestry of sterling worth, — the Puritans of Eng- 
land. In the second edition (page 300) of the Early History of Southamp- 
ton, Long Island, by George R. Howell, M. A., of Yale University, is found 
the following record: 

"Edward Howell, of Marsh Gibbon, Buckinghamshire, England, was 
the ancestor of this family of Southampton. Edward Howell disposed of con- 
siderable estates in Bucks county, in 1639, among which was the manor of 
Westbury, in Marsh Gibbon, purchased by his grandfather, William Howell, 
in 1536. The old stone manor-house is still standing, although the founda- 
tions near it show that some portions of it have been taken down. It is 
large and of three full stories, a double house, and all covered with English 
ivy, like the old churches. Edward Howell came, in 1639-40, with his 
family to Boston. He soon removed to Lynn, where he had a grant of five 
hundred acres. During the year a new settlement was projected on Long 
Island, of which he seems to have been the leader, as the compact of terms , 
of founding the plantation is in his handwriting, as well as the laws adopted 
by the first settlers; and to the last year of his life he was magistrate and 



234 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



member of the colonial legislature at Hartford. The way in which his name 
is mentioned in the old colonial records of New England and New York 
points to the same conclusion." 

Professor Howell further states: " The arms of this family are found 
on an old family seal, now in the possession of one of the descendants, and 
on several old tombstones, of the seventeenth century, in Southampton, as 
follows: Gules: three towers, triple-towered argent; Crest used by some 
branches: Out of a ducal crown or, a rose argent, stalked and leaved vert, 
between two wings, indorsed of the last; Motto, ' Tcnax propositi.' " 




THE HOWELL ARMS. 



William Howell, of Wedon, in the county of Bucks, married Maude, 
who died and left a large family. His will, bearing date November 30, 1557, 
directs his body " to be buried in the parish church of Wingrave, in the 
chancel before the high altar." He left legacies to the poor of Aylesbury 
and the poor of Marsh Gibbon. He gave his second wife, Annie, his lands 
in Watton for her life, and at her death they were to go to the children. He 
gave his eldest son his land in Marsh Gibbon, and made provision for the 



BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 235 

other members of the family in various ways. He died in 1557, and John, 
his eldest son, who inherited the manor, died in 1576, without children. 

Further history of the family we gain from the parish register of Marsh 
Gibbon, as follows: " Henry Howell, Gent., was buried ye 20 day of July, 
1625. Frances Howell, wife of Edward Howell, Gent., buried 2d day of 
July, 1630." Edward, son of Henry Howell, by his first wife, Frances, had 
the following children: Henry; Margaret, wife of Rev. John Moore, of 
Southold, Long Island; John; Edward; and Richard. By Elearior, his sec- 
ond wife, Edward Howell had two sons: Arthur, baptized in 1632, and 
Edmund, in 1636. He then sold his estates in England and came to Boston 
with his family, in 1640. His son, Major John Howell, was a man of dis- 
tinction, and one who, more than any of his contemporaries in Southampton, 
was entrusted with the management of public affairs, especially in the graver 
relations with New England and the colonial government of New York. His 
wife was Susannah, and they had ten children. His death occurred Novem- 
ber 3, 1696. 

Colonel Matthew Howell was a representative for Suffolk county in the 
colonial legislature in 1691-2 and from 1694 to 1706, inclusive. On the 17th 
of April, 1 70 1, he was expelled from that body, by the governor, for pre- 
senting a paper considered "disloyal to his majesty," — a paper which we 
would now regard as simply breathing the sentiments of a larger liberty than 
that vouchsafed to the colonists at that day. Colonel Henry Pierson was 
also a member of the same assembly, and three others, as was also Mr. Van- 
Rensselaer, the head of a distinguished family in Albany. To the credit of 
his constituents, be it said. Colonel Howell was immediately re-elected and 
sent back to the same assembly, where he remained throughout his term of 
office, an able defender of the rights of the colonists! After his death, at 
Newtown, where he had stopped while on his way home, his mortal remains 
were taken to Southampton and interred in the Southend burying-ground, 
where a massive tombstone, remaining to this day and bearing the family 
arms, marks his last earthly resting place. 

Sir James Howell, another member of the family, was one of the most 
intelligent travelers and most pleasing of writers on miscellaneous subjects 
in the early part of the seventeenth century. He acquired his education at 
Oxford and was the traveling companion of a young gentleman in France. 
Later he went to Spain as agent to secure the recovery of an English vessel 
which had been seized^ in Sardinia. His next office was that of secretary to 
Lord Scope, as president of the north; and in 1627 he was chosen, at Rich- 
mond, to be one of the representatives in parliament. Having complimented 
Charles I., in two poems, he obtained, in 1640, the clerkship of the council, 
meantime translating and composing a variety of works. He continued his 



^8(5 BIOGIUPHICAL AJfD UEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

literary work until his death, in 1666, and produced more than forty publi- 
cations. After the restoration he became historiographer-royal, being the first 
who ever enjoyed that title. 

. Captain John Howell was a patriot, serving in the war of tiie Revolu- 
tion for seven years, and his death occurred Jinie 16, 1791. He married 
Desire, a daughter of Ephraim White, and they became the parents of six 
children: John, born in 1743; Henry, born in 1745; Stephen, born Novem- 
ber 23, 1746; James; Nathan; and Mary. Stephen Howell, of this family, 
spent his cliildhood and youth in Southampton; in early manhood he removed 
to Eii/iibelhtown, New Jersey, and in the early days (jf ("hatham married 
Martha Day, widow of Samuel Euin, father of Israel I. urn, ICsq. Colonel 
Israel Day was a colonel of cavalry, justice of the peace, commissioner of 
deeds and ruling elder of the Presbyterian church in Chatham. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of ("ornelius Ludlow, of Long Hill. 

The children of Stephen Howell, son of Captain John and Martha (Lum) 
Howell, were as follows: Luther, who married Miss Young, of Whippany; 
Calvin, who married Mary Sayrc, daughter of Ephraim Sayre, one of the 
chief men in Bottle Hill during the Revolution; David, born December 22, 
1773, married Sally Burnet, granddaughter of James Burnet, one of the 
original settlers who purchased land of the Indians. David Howell first 
erected the house just above the present l£])iscopal church, and it is still 
standing at the date of this writing (i8g8). It was built upon a portion of 
his wife's inheritance, which embraced all the seminary campus and the 
"one-hundred-acre lot " beyond it. Part of this they sold to a Frenchman, 
Durestc Hlanchet, about 1800, and the remainder was sold to William Cib- 
bons, and is now the site of the Drew Seminary. David Howell then built 
a line brick nuinsion on the Convent road, — still on the Burnet propert}', — 
where seven of his children were born, namely: Nelson, Melzar, Tacy, 
James, Matthias, Ambrose and Ebenezer. The first child of this family, 
Ezra Howell, was born January 13, 1798, in the first house built by his 
father, David Howell, who, after the birth of his seven children in this sec- 
ond home, sold that property to a I'^'cnch gentleman, Laville Duberceau, who 
resided thi-re for many years. David Howell then creeled for himself and 
family another residence, further out on the Convent road, and there his 
death occurred on the iQtIi of January, 1844, at which time he had attained 
the age of seventy-one years. His wife had passed away April 14, 1841, at 
the age of sixty-si.\. All the land connected with the two last named is now 
owned by MacK. Troinbly, whose castle, recently completed, is located 
upon a line eminence just behind the old homestead of the long ago, which 
was demolished to make room for improvements. 

One striking feature, apparent at a glance, is the number of men in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfB GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 237 

family of David Howell. This enabled the father to secure, clear and cultivate 
much land, build houses and carry on different industries. Much of the real 
estate still remains in the family, although a large tract has been divided 
among children and grandchildren or sold to friends and strangers. In 1832 
Ezra Howell bought of William Thompson a tract of land adjoining his 
father's property and containing eighty acres. This, too, is embraced in the 
Trombly estate, and F. A. Bell has a fine residence upon a part of the old 
Howell estate, the beautiful modern place being called Bellwood. In 1826 
Ezra Howe married Maria Miller. His death occurred April 9, 1841, at 
the age of forty-four; and his wife died June 20, 1875, at the age of seventy- 
four. Nelson and Melzar, sons in the same family as Ezra, were successful 
business men of New York. Melzar married Rebecca Wood, and his death 
occurred at the age of thirty-seven. His widow subsequently became the 
wife of his brother Nelson, who lived to attain the age of eighty-two years. 
Tacy married Elem Bonnell, and died at the age of eighty years. James 
married Harriet Scudder, and died in California. Matthias married 
Eliza Tompkins, daughter of Captain Tompkins, of Chester, and died at the 
age of eighty-two. Ambrose married Abby DeCamp, of Newark, and his 
death occurred in 1897, at the age of eighty-five. His wife, who is of the 
same age (1898), still survives him. The youngest son, Ebenezer, was drowned 
in Niagara river, before attaining his majority. A daughter died in infancy. 

As before stated, Ezra Howell, the eldest son of David Howell, married 
Maria Burnet Miller, and their children were: Helen, wife of William Jack- 
son Brittin; Augusta, wife of William S. Young; Horace, who married Anna 
Day, died in the war of the Rebellion; Lavinia, wife of Mulford Hopping, 
and Malinda, wife of Lemuel Cramer. 

The children of William J. and Helen (Brittin) Howell are: William, 
who has the care of the farm; Edwin, Henry, Ella, Frederick, Mary and 
John. Edwin Ludlow Brittin was born February 14, 1848, at the home- 
stead, in Madison, New Jersey, where three generations of the family had 
resided. He was graduated in the military academy in Newark and when 
sixteen years of age entered a business college. A year later he began work 
as a clerk for the firm of Redfield & Rice, in the sale of silver-plated ware, 
in John street. New York, and in that capacity gave such satisfaction that he 
■was rapidly advanced, and before he had attained his majority was sent by 
the firm to represent their interests in California. For seven consecutive 
years he made this annual trip to the Pacific coast, and his integrity and 
keen business talent won him the confidence and good will of his employers 
in an unlimited degree. In 1875 he married Mary Hotchkiss, daughter of 
Lewis Hotchkiss, a wealthy citizen of Birmingham, Connecticut, and one of 
the leading representatives of the town. 



238 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Edwin L. Brittin founded the Derby Silver Co., at Derby, Connecticut, 
and afterward organized the Rogers & Brittin Silver Company, at Bridge- 
port, Connecticut. The development of these large and successful manu- 
facturing industries is largely due to Mr. Brittin's wonderful shrewdness, 
pluck and patience. He was appalled at no obstacles, and overcame all 
that lay in his path. His industry and business push were remarkable; his 
will indomitable ! His convictions were positive and he had the courage to 
maintain them. His ambition seemed to be almost wholly in the direction 
of business success, but his brilliant career was terminated in death, result- 
ing from an attack of pneumonia, March 19, 1881, when he was only thirty- 
three years of age. 

His brother, Frederick Brittin, who possessed somewhat similar charac- 
teristics, succeeded him in business and settled up his estate. After a time 
the firm changed, and the business is now conducted, under the name of the 
Silver-Cutlery Mill, by Holmes & Edwards, for whom Frederick Brittin is 
the traveling representative in the entire south. Ambitious of becoming an 
adept in his chosen vocation, he is not only a most enterprising and success- 
ful salesman, but is also a connoisseur in everything pertaining to his special 
line of business. Another brother, John F. Brittin, is not only a skillful 
workman in all lines of the silver trade, but he now holds the position of 
inspector, and in this capacity, in which he has served for nine years, passes 
approval upon every article that is sent out from the Rogers Cutlerj' Mill, 
at Norwich, Connecticut. 

Henry I. Brittin was born April 20, 1850, and, like his brothers, 
attended the Newark Academy and Business College. He made the best 
use of every opportunity for acquiring knowledge, and in the months of 
vacation sought employment, working in various stores of his native town. 
Time, with him, has ever possessed a value which comparatively few place 
upon it; every moment has seemed precious to him, and nothing could annoy 
him so much as the presence of an idle person. From his youth he has 
never been a looker-on, but an energetic worker, ready to do more than his 
share, yet resolutely demanding a little aid, at least, from others. Within 
the year 1868 he entered the store of Hiram Young, in Maiden Lane, New 
York. Like his brothers, he preferred the silver trade, but in 1873 he left 
the metropolis and, associated with his brother Frederick, opened a new 
enterprise in his native town, his father having built the hardware store for 
them. In this new undertaking the brothers met with success, and together 
they carried on the business until 1881, when on the death of their brother 
Edwin, Frederick Brittin went to Bridgeport, Connecticut, to settle up the 
estate. Henry Brittin then established a large general store, which he con- 
ducted with success until 1898, when he removed to the new Brittin build- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 239 

ing, where he has every facility for carrying on a large trade. He is remark- 
able for his reticence, and the motto of the family seal, "Virtute, non 
Verbis," seems singularly appropriate for him as as a " trademark." 

The only sister of the family who reached mature years was Mary 
Elmer, who was born June 26, 1857. She married Rev. George Alfred 
Kerr, of Troy, New York, and her death occurred, at Hinesburg, Vermont, 
December 15, 1885. Ella Hamlen died at the age of six months. 

Richard Howell, another member of this old family, deserves honora- 
ble mention. He was chosen governor of New Jersey in 1793, and was 
re-elected from year to year until 1801. On leaving the gubernatorial chair 
he resumed the practice of law in Trenton, where he died May 5, 1803. 
There are also Judge Calvin Howell and his son. Dr. Howell, of Whippany, 
and George W. Howell of Morristown, who are descendants of the same root 
and tree whose branches have spread far and wide over this country. 



WILLIAM L. R. LYND. 



This gentleman, the superintendent of the Richardson & Boynton Fur- 
nace and Range Works, of Dover, New Jersey, in his responsible position at 
the head of one of the leading industrial concerns of the community is 
accorded a prominent place in business circles. 

Mr. Lynd was born in the city of Albany, New York, October 30, 1856, 
and is descended from one of three brothers, natives of England, who came 
to America in 1698. The paternal great-grandfather of our subject was 
Andrew Lynd, a native of Rensselaer county, New York, and the maternal 
great-grandfather was Nelson Brightman, a native of Massachusetts, who 
removed to Poultney, Vermont, in pioneer days. These two prominent old 
families were united by the marriage of George P. Lynd and Sarah J. 
Brightman, the latter a daughter of Adolph Brightman. The former, the 
father of our subject, is a native of the Empire state and for forty years was 
connected with the Ransom Stove Works, of Albany, in which city he still 
makes his home. His wife, who was a native of Vermont, died in 1887. 

William L. R. Lynd spent the greater part of his youth in Albany and 
attended the public schools. When fourteen years of age he began learning 
the trade of a copper and tin smith in Albany, serving a five-years 
apprenticeship, during which time he became thoroughly acquainted with the 
business in all its departments. After the completion of his trade he was 
employed by the Ransom Stove Works Company, of Albany, for a number 
of years. In 1881 he entered the employ of the Richardson & Boynton Com- 
pany, at Brooklyn, New York, remaining with that house through various 
changes in the proprietorship. When the works were removed from Brook- 



240 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

lyn to Dover in 1895 he came to this place as superintendent and has since 
occupied that position, being thus at the head of one of the most extensive 
enterprises of the kind in New Jersey. 

On the 5th of June, 1878, Mr. Lynd was united in marriage to Miss 
Ella Louise Dennis, of Albany, New York, the eldest daughter of Edward 
and Frances Dennis. They now have seven children, six daughters and one 
son. The son's name is Roy Edward Lynd, and he was born November 15, 
1881. 



BYRAM C. GUERIN. 



The subject of this memoir fully sustained the high reputation of the 
Guerin family of Morris county, having gained a worthy reputation for prob- 
ity, honor in business and loyal devotion to the interests affecting the public 
welfare. He had a very wide acquaintance, and a kindly manner and gen- 
uine worth won him many warm personal friendships. 

A son of Stephen and Susan (Kilborn) Guerin, he was born in Morris 
county, April 13, 1835, and died in Morristown, December 3, 1890. When 
a youth of fourteen summers he began to learn the carriage-maker's trade in 
Newark, New Jersey, and from there went to Springfield, this state, where 
he worked for some time in a carriage-making establishment. His father's 
failing health caused him to return home, in order that he might assist in the 
management of the business. Soon after his father's death he became pro- 
prietor of the Farmers' Hotel, in Morristown, which he conducted for a few 
years, when, in 1864, he purchased the old Mansion House, on Washington 
street, conducting the same until 1878. In that year he tore down the old 
frame structure and erected the present Mansion House, one of the fine hotel 
properties in this section of the state. He leased the hotel for three years 
after it was built and then assumed personal charge. He leased it again in 
1886 and retired from the hotel business, having in the meantime 
made the Mansion House one of the leading hostelries in this part 
of the state. In 1872 he erected a fine private residence, on Washington 
street, where the family lived for some years, though he still conducted the 
Mansion House. He was very successful in his business operations, became 
the owner of a large amount of valuable property in Morristown and did 
much to further the advancement and substantial upbuilding of the city. He 
was for a time prominently concerned in handling real-estate. A long and 
active business career well entitled him to rest. He has been the architect 
of his own fortunes and had builded wisely and well. He was a man of 
sound judgment and possessed excellent executive and business ability, com- 
bined with a resistless energy and resolute purpose. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJS'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 241 

In politics Mr. Guerin was a stanch Democrat, and took quite an active 
part in public affairs, although he never sought political preferment. He was 
popular, however, and could undoubtedly have secured any political position 
he desired. In 1863 he married Leonora Dixon, who together with four 
children survives him. One child has passed away. 

Lamont D. Guerin succeeded his father as proprietor of the Mansion 
House in 1891. He was born in Morristown in 1868 and acquired a good 
education. In May, 1891, when twenty-three years of age, he entered upon 
his business career, as proprietor of the Mansion House, and has since 
remained in that position. The hotel is a modern building, well ventilated, 
handsomely supplied, furnished throughout in modern style and supplied 
with an excellent cuisine. These features make it a very popular resort with 
the traveling public, and Mr. Guerin's capable management has rendered 
it a profitable investment. He was married in 1889, to Miss Bertha 
McCracken, and they are widely and favorably known in Morristown. He 
is a man of pleasing personality, social disposition and genial manner and 
these qualities render him a very popular landlord. 

Craig R. Guerin, the second son of Byram C. and Leonora (Dixon) 
Guerin, was born in Morristown, August 14, 1869, graduated at Prince- 
ton College in 1890, and is now located in New York city. Mabel T. Guerin, 
the only daughter of the subject of this memoir, is a graduate of Vassar 
College and is now the wife of Charles E. Yerkes, of New York city, a son of 
Charles T. Yerkes, the well known street-railway magnate of Chicago, now 
a resident of New York. Byram C. , the youngest of the family, was born 
February 22, 1876, and is now pursuing a classical course in Princeton 
College. 



DUANE H. NASH. 



Business life has its divisions, — the professional, scientific, manufactur- 
ing, industrial and the agricultural, — and the progress which has character- 
ized these different lines has resulted from the efforts of a few. The major- 
ity of mankind are content to walk in the paths marked out by others, but 
occasionally there are men of enterprising, progressive spirit who dare to 
venture beyond the beaten paths and by their advancement learn truths that 
are of advantage to the whole race. Such a man is the subject of this 
review and the same progressiveness has characterized his family. Their 
study, thought and investigation have been particularly beneficial to the agri- 
culturists of the land, and through these means they have reached a position 
far in the foreground of the greater number of men who follow the same 
calling. 

16 



242 BIOGBJPHICJ.L AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Our subject, who is now proprietor of the Passaic Valley Stock Farm 
and is also the sole manufacturer of the Acme pulverizing harrow, clod- 
crusher and leveler, doing business at Millington, New Jersey, was born in 
Massachusetts, on the i8th of December, 1843. His father, Professor John 
A. Nash, was for many years one of the professors in Amherst College, of 
Amherst, Massachusetts, occupying the chair of agriculture, and in educa- 
tional circles had a very extensive acquaintance. He was for many years 
engaged in editorial work in the interests of agriculture. In 1853 he estab- 
lished the paper known as The Farm, and he may be said to be the pioneer 
in journalistic work devoted to the advancement of agricultural interests. In 
1857 he removed to New York city, where he established the American 
Farmer, a paper which had a wide circulation. Later he was the editor and 
proprietor of the Progressive Farmer, and his labors in this direction did 
much to supersede old methods by new and improved ones. He also 
founded Mt. Pleasant School in an early day, an institution that was for 
some time conducted by his son, Henry C. Nash, and is now under the con- 
trol of his grandson, William K. Nash. 

Our subject was thus reared in an atmosphere of progress and thought, 
especially pertaining to agricultural interests. He began life as a clerk, and 
embarked in business on his own account in 1866, continuing in New York' 
city most of the time as a wholesale dealer in agricultural implements and 
supplies. In 1882 he removed to Millington, where he associated himself 
with F. Nishwitz, inventor of the Acme harrow, and since that time he has 
had entire charge of the sale of the Acme pulverizing harrow, clod-crusher 
and leveler, which is sold extensively in this country and in Europe. It is the 
most perfect piece of machinery of its kind on the market and is fitted to do 
the work on the finest ground or the heaviest sod, and can be used for the 
small garden or the broad field, being manufactured in various sizes, rang- 
ing from three to thirteen feet. 

In addition to his commercial interests, Mr. Nash is engaged in the 
breeding of Shetland ponies and Percheron French coach horses. The Pas- 
saic Valley Stock Farm, comprising two hundred acres, is utilized for this 
purpose. The Shetland pony is unsurpassed for the use of children, on 
account of its diminutive size and gentleness, nor is it lacking in the qualities 
of speed and endurance. It seems to have a great affection for people, and 
is therefore a very desirable pet. Mr. Nash has some very fine specimens of 
this horse on his farm, having gone to the Shetland islands and personally 
made the selection of his stock for breeding purposes, and he also breeds 
French coach horses and roadsters. His stock farm is famed throughout 
the country, while he has a most extended and enviable reputation as a 
thoroughly reliable and enterprising business man. 



BIOGRJPRia.lL AJfD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 243 

Mr. Nash married a daughter of Alfred M. Tredwell, of Madison, and 
they became the parents of two children, Anna and Duane, Jr. The mother 
died im 1887. Our subject and his family are people of the highest social 
standing and their friends throughout the community are many, while their 
home is a favorite resort with all who come within its charmed circle. In 
his political associations Mr. Nash is a stalwart Republican, and his 
intelligent support of the party arises from a firm belief in its principles. 



JOHN R. NESBITT. 

This enterprising and progressive agriculturist of Morris county, with the 
interests of which he has been identified for over half a century, was born in 
Bound Brook, New Jersey, on the 21st of November, 1818, a son of Hugh 
Nesbitt, one of the early settlers on the Raritan, and a grandson of the 
founder of Ralston, which bears his name. Hugh Nesbitt was born in Som- 
erset county. New Jersey, in 1796, came to the Raritan about the year 1S20 
and purchased four hundred acres of land, now owned by our subject, and 
died upon his farm in i83r. His father, Thomas Nesbitt, was born in Scot- 
land and sailed from Londonderry, Ireland, just after the close of the Revo- 
lutionary war, his death occurring in Somerset county. New Jerse}-. Hugh 
Nesbitt married Mary Ann Ralston, a daughter of John Ralston, the latter 
being a native of Ireland, who early in life came to America and engaged as 
a merchant in New York. Later he came to Morris county and built a grist, 
woolen and cotton mill, at Ralston, which he operated until his death. 

After the demise of his father, John R. Nesbitt began his career as a 
farmer on the old homestead, has since continued to follow that line of 
enterprise and expects to pass the rest of his days on the place where he 
now resides. In 1850 he built the Nesbitt gristmill, which has attained a 
wide popularit}' in the last forty-seven years, and he is an extensive peach- 
grower, a large area of his land being devoted to the production of that and 
other kinds of fruit, in the propagation of which he has met with a high 
degree of success. Politically Mr. Nesbitt has been a life- long Republican, 
but the failure of that party to give silver a proper recognition at the St. 
Louis convention, in 1896, caused him to waver in his loyalty and support 
of the nominee of that convention, although he admired the personal virtues 
of Major McKinley and recognized his qualities as a statesman. 

By his first marriage Mr. Nesbitt became united to Miss Anna M. Day, 
and after her death he wedded Mrs. Elmira Ross, a daughter of David 
Welsh. Mr. Nesbitt became the father of the following children: Margaret, 
the wife of William Phoenix, of Mendham; Hugh, deceased; Catherine, who 



244 BIUGRAl'lIIUAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

married Frank I.iindy; John; Thomas, who married Miss Abbie Post; Hugh- 
emma, of Boulder, Montana; Harriet, the wife of Andrew Phillips, of Morris- 
town; ;ind Samuel, who married Miss Emma Crane. 



EDWARD A. QUAYLE. 

The present chief executive of Morristown is a gentleman who has 
has attained a distinct prestige in the legal arena of Morris county. He is 
a native son of New Jersey, having been born in this county in iiS54, the son 
of Thomas M. and Charlotte A. (Halleck) Quayle. His father is a Manx- 
man, coming from the Isle of Man to the United States when a young man 
and locating in Morris county, where he has continued to live for many years 
following the trade of a shoemaker. He married Miss Charlotte A. Halleck, 
a native of New York, and of the four children born to them our subject is 
the youngest. 

Mayor Ouayle acquired his educational discipline in the public schools of 
Morristown and in the Morris Academy, graduating at the latter institution 
in liSOS. For two years subsequent to leaving school he clerked in a sta- 
tionery and book store, and then, possessing legal aspirations, he began the 
study of law midcr the preceptorship of the late Augustus W. Cutler, and in 
1874 he was apjiointed deputy county clerk, the incumbency of which he 
retained for one year. In 1875 he was admitted to the bar of New Jersey as 
an attorncy-at-law, and in 1881, as a counselor-at-law. He hail formed a 
partnership, in 1875, with John B. Vreeland in the practice of law, and this 
continued until 1879, after which date Mr. (.)uayle continued alone until 1887, 
when he became postmaster of Morristown, and in the same year formed a 
professional association with Charles T. Axtell, which continued during the 
time Mr. Ouayle served as postmaster. He was commissioned to this incum- 
bency by President Cleveland, and while occupying the same he established a 
free mail-delivery system for Morristown, an innovation that has been of the 
most beneficent results to the residents of this city. He was elected mayor of 
Morristown in 1894, and was his own successor in 1896, his administration 
being marked as one of the best and most cleanly conducted the community 
has ever seen. 

For several years Mr. Quayle has been counsel for the Morris county 
board of chosen freeholders, and he was appointed receiver for the Whippany 
River Railroad Company in November, 1895, and, after liquidating all the 
debts and placing the road on a paying basis, he turned it over to the stock- 
holders in August, 1897. Asa man he is popular and upright; as a lawyer 
he is keen and thoroughly well-informed in that calling, antl as a citizen he is 
public-spirited and always ready to lend his influence to the advancement of 



BIOGRAPRTCAL AJfD GEJVEALOGICAL HISTORY. 245 

the welfare of his home city. In his social relations he is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Independent Order of Foresters, 
in both of which bodies he takes an active interest. 

The marriage of Mayor Quayle was solemnized in 1886, when he was 
united to Miss Carrie Cook, and of this union two sons were born, namely: 
Edward Arthur and T. Harold Quayle. 



JOHN FORD. 

Rev. John Ford was born in Monroe, Hanover township, Morris county, 
in 1787. While still a lad he was apprenticed to the trade of a tanner and 
currier. From childhood he had evinced an insatiable thirst for books and 
study. His hours for recreation and often his hours for rest were devoted to 
reading. In his nineteenth year he was hopsfuUy converted to Christ, and 
his employer, knowing his studious habits, gave him the remainder of his time 
and encouraged him to enter upon a course of study, preparatory to the work 
of the ministr}'. He entered Princeton College, having prepared for the 
senior class; graduated with high honors, and entered into active life as a 
teacher in Bloomfield, where he was eminentl}' successful. In conjunction 
with the duties of his calling he pursued the study of theology and Hebrew. 
He was licensed to preach by the presbytery of Newark, and in 181 5, with- 
out any previous experience in the ministry, he was called to the duties of 
the pastorate of the Presbyterian church, at Parsippany, in which position 
he remained forty years, performing all its duties with Christian zeal and 
earnestness. He died December 31, 1872. 



ALFRED VAIL. 



No historical or biographical record of Morris county would be complete 
without mention of Alfred Vail. The credit and honor of an invention has 
usually come late to those whose genius has given to the world some of the 
most important devices known to the industrial world, and such is the case 
with Alfred Vail, but the facts go to show that he, no less than Morse, is 
deserving of the recognition and gratitude of the world for the invention of 
the telegraph. Indeed the two were long associated in their experiments, 
and Vail was at one end of the line between Baltimore and Washington 
when the first message was sent over that wire. In writing to Dr. William 
P. Vail, Mr. Morse said: "I well remember the trials made at Speedwell 
of the operations of the telegraph. The date, January 6, 1838, -I believe to 
be correct in regard to those experiments. In 1835 the telegraph was opera- 
ted in my rooms in the university, but with only a short line of wire. Alfred 



24G BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Vail was shown my experiments in 1837, he being then a student in the uni- 
versity, and he took from that time a strong interest in the invention, and 
became associated with me in labors and expenses and profits of the inven- 
tion. Through this interest of Mr. Alfred Vail I was furnished with the 
pecuniary means to procure a greater length of wire and more effective 
instruments, which were made under my superintendence, at Speedwell. Ten 
miles of wire, in two spools of five miles each, were prepared at the univer- 
sity to exhibit to congress the operations of the telegraph at Washington, 
and the trial was made at Speedwell when about three miles of the wire was 
completed, at which time it was the longest wire that had been used." 

On the iith of January, 1838, five days after the trial was made at 
Speedwell, the public was permitted to see the wonderful invention and the 
results that could be accomplished thereby. Mr. Vail never received full 
credit for his inventions, either from the public or from Professor Morse, and 
his innate modesty prevented him from claiming from the world a recogni- 
tion of his services in this direction. He produced in the new instrument 
the first available Morse machine. He invented the first combination of the 
horizontal-lever motion to actuate a pen or pencil or style, and the entirely 
new telegraphic alphabet of dots, spaces and marks which it necessitated. 
The new machine was Vail's, not Morse's. To Alfred Vail alone is due the 
honor in the first place of inventing an entirely new alphabet; secondly, of 
inventing an entirely new machine, in which was the first combination of the 
horizontal-lever motion to actuate a pencil or pen style, so arranged as to 
perform the new duties required with precision, simplicity and rapidity; and 
thirdly, of inventing, in 1844, the new lever and grooved roller, which 
embossed into paper the simple and perfect alphabetical characters which he 
had originated. 

In various pamphlets and reliable magazines the proofs that Mr. Vail 
did accomplish what we have just stated are given. In one of these are the 
words: "Surely it is time that Alfred Vail should receive the tardy justice 
of some public acknowledgment of his very ingenious and meritorious inven- 
tions in telegraphy, and of grateful remembrance particularly for his valuable 
contribution to the Morse system of its practically most important element." 

On the 3d of March, 1843, o^s minute before midnight and the adjourn- 
ment of congress, the "telegraph bill" passed the senate, having already 
been acted upon by the lower house. Professor Morse, utterly discouraged 
and wearied out by anxiety, had gone to his lodgings, having given up all 
hope, as at nine o'clock in the evening nearly a hundred bills still remained 
in the docket. The next morning, as he was about to sit down to breakfast, 
the servant announced that a young lady desired to see him in the parlor. 
It was the daughter of Henry L. Ellsworth, a college classmate of Professor 




GnPClm-m P-o-d-Epav^hc Td 



^- 4^l^7x::t^ykjL,..,.^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL BISTORT. 247 

^lorse. She had called, at her father's request, to announce the passage of 
the telegraph bill. As an appropriate acknowledgment of her kindness and 
sympathy. Professor Morse promised that the first message by the first line 
of telegraph between Washington and Baltimore should hz indited by her. 
When the line between those two cities was completed, he apprised her of 
his readiness to comply with his promise. A note from her enclosed these 
words: "What hath God wrought ! " And this was the first dispatch sent 
over the electro-magnetic telegraph, the date being Monday, May 17, 1844. 
Alfred Vail was the operator at the Washington station, and H. J. Rofer at 
Baltimore. The only one remaining of these two original instruments has 
been until recently preserved at the Washington Headquarters in Morristown, 
and is now in the Metropolitan Museum in New York city. 

Mr. Vail died January iS, 1859. At a meeting of the directors of the 
Magnetic Telegraph Company, held at Philadelphia, February 16, 1859, for 
the purpose of giving expression to their feelings, in view of his death, the 
Hon. Amos Kendall said: " If justice be done, the name of Alfred Vail will 
forever stand associated with that of Samuel F. B. Morse in the history of 
the invention and introduction into use of the electro-magnetic telegraph. 
Mr. Vail was one of the most honest and scrupulously conscientious men 
with whom it has ever been m}' fortune to meet." 



AARON D. WHITEHEAD. 

The subject of this memoir was a lifelong resident of Morris count}', and 
so honorable was his career, so commendable his principles, so straightfor- 
ward his conduct that he enjoyed the confidence, esteem and high regard of 
all with whom he came in contact. He was born in Morris county, November 
28, 1829, and by occupation was a farmer. In early life he became familiar 
with all the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist, and was 
thus fitted for his work of later years. So well managed were his interests 
that he became one of the most extensive and successful farmers of his sec- 
tion of the county, his labors bringing to him rich financial returns. He be- 
longed to one of the oldest families in the county, many of whose members 
have figured prominently in public affairs. His parents were Sylvester Rus- 
sell and Abbie (Smith) \\'hitehead. 

On the 1st of October, 1S59, was celebrated the mirriage of Aaron 
Dodd Whitehead and Harriet E. Lee, daughter of Charles S. and Milicent 
(Horton) Lee, the latter a native of Orange county. New York. They 
became the parents of five children, three of whom are now living, namely: 
Charles R., Sarah C. and Mary H. Asa and Ira, the two eldest, are now 
deceased. 



248 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

In his political views Mr. Whitehead was a stanch Republican and 
warmly espoused the party principles, although he never sought or desired 
public office. He was a director in the Iron National Bank, of Morristown, 
and was a member of the Washington Association of New Jersey. For 
many years he held membership in the First Presbyterian church of Morris- 
town, in which he served both as trustee and elder. He took an active part 
in its work, contributed liberally to its support and was an interested advo- 
cate of all measures for the public good. He died on the old homestead, not 
far from Morristown, on the 31st of May, 1897, at the age of sixty-eight 
years, and his death was mourned by a host of friends who had known him 
in life and esteemed him for his sterling worth, his fidelity to duty and 
adhere;ies to principle. His wife still survives him and is living on the old 
homestead. 



CHARLES R. WHITEHEAD. 

A son of Aaron Dodd Whitehead, deceased, and Harriet E. (Lee) White- 
head, our subject was born in Morris county, on his father's farm, not far 
from Morristown, September i, i860, and when he had attained the proper 
age began his education. He attended school at Mendham, Schooley's 
Mountain and Morristown completing his course in Morris Academy, at the 
county seat. No event of special personal importance occurred during his 
boyhood and youth, which were passed. in the usual manner of the farmer's son. 
He followed the plow through the summer months and assisted in gathering 
the crops in the autumn, and after a season of comparative rest in the winter 
season was ready to begin his duties anew with the return of spring. He has 
always made farming his life work, so that his history does not contain inci- 
dents of exciting interest, but his life has ever been marked by fidelity to 
duty and by other characteristics which are well worthy of emulation. In 
1885 he married Miss Elizabeth L. Bryant, who is a daughter of Amidie and 
Elizabeth (Ludlow) Bryant, and they have since lived on the old home- 
stead, which he has placed under a very high state of cultivation. Mr. and 
Mrs. Whitehead have two children, — Russell B. and David L. 

Mr. Whitehead has followed in his father's political footsteps and is a 
stalwart Republican. His fellow townsmen, appreciating his worth and 
ability, have called him to public office and for three years, ending in the 
spring of 1897, he served as a member of the Morris township committee, of 
which he was chairman one year. For several years he was a member of 
the Morris township board of education and served as its clerk. In the 
spring of 1897 he was elected a member of the county board of chosen free- 
holders and is now acceptably and efficiently discharging the duties of that 



BIOGRJPMICAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 2i% 

office. He has shown himself fully worthy of the honors that have been con- 
ferred upon him, and his political record is without a stain. 

In his social affiliations Mr. Whitehead is a Master Mason, and in his 
religious belief he is a Presbyterian, holding membership in the First Presby- 
terian church of Morristown, in which he is serving as trustee, having suc- 
ceeded his father in that office. 



GEORGE W. BALDWIN. 



While the energetic, enterprising business men usually reach the same goal, 
that of success, there are different conditions in the lives of all, — conditions 
that call for individual effort and for certain strong traits of character, to meet 
the many obstacles and difficulties that are sure to come. As the surround- 
ings and conditions of no two individuals are precisely alike, it is impossible 
to lay down any invariable rule for achieving success, and the result must 
depend upon the man, his power of adapting himself to circumstances and of 
overcoming the barriers in his path. Success therefore is a matter of indi- 
vidual merit, and in this particular Mr. Baldwin deserves much credit. 
Beginning business life without capital, he has steadily worked his way 
upward, and now, at the head of the firm of G. W. Baldwin & Sons, of 
Summit, he is prominently connected with the industrial interests of this 
part of the state. 

A native of Morris county, he was born on the old Baldwin homestead, 
in Chatham township, on the ist of February, 1851, and is a son of Samuel 
Baldwin. He was reared on his father's farm and is one of the bright prod- 
ucts of the American school system, which has always furnished the great 
majority of the children with their educational privileges. At the age of 
twelve he left home to engage in clerking in a grocery, for William More- 
house, at the corner of Green and Liberty streets, Newark, and after a short 
time he entered the employ of Richardson & York, at the corner of Pacific 
and Nichols streets, where he continued for four years. On the expiration 
of that period he removed to New Providence, Union county, where he was 
employed in the general store of McEachron & Tompkins, and later with 
William Stavers. After a four-years residence in New Providence he loca- 
ted in Madison, where he engaged in the ice-cream and confectionery busi- 
ness, until failing health caused his retirement from active business. He next 
located in Raritan, Somerset county, in the same business, which he con- 
ducted from 1872 to 1874, when he returned to Madison and dealt in prod- 
uce for nine years. On the expiration of that period he sold out, and, 
removing to Summit, established the Summit Bakery, in 1883. Here he 
built up a good trade, but sold out in July, 1893, and again located in Madi- 



250 BWGBAPHICAL AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTOET. 

son, where he lived about three years. In October, 1895, however, he 
repurchased the Summit Bakery and organized the present firm of G. W. 
Baldwin & Sons, whose trade is a very extensive one. He runs four wagons, 
delivering his goods in Summit, New Providence, Madison and Chatham, and 
the excellent quality of his articles insures him a very liberal patronage. 

On the 1st of February, 1870, Mr. Baldwin was united in marriage to 
Miss Hannah J. Green, a native of Green Village, Morris county, and a 
daughter of John D. and Hannah (Allen) Green, natives of Morris count}'. 
This union has been blessed by the following named children: Clinton W. , 
who married Elizabeth McGregor, and has four children — Edwin N., Harold 
C, Bessie C. and Georgianna; George E., who was killed by accident in 
1883, at the age of ten years; Harry M. and Ada M. 

Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin hold their ecclesiastical membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and the former belongs to Summit Council, 
Royal Arcanum, and to Madison Lodge, No. 93, A. F. & A. M., of which he 
is serving his third term as worshipful master. In his political views he is a 
Democrat, but office has no attraction for him, as he prefers to devote his 
attention to his industrial interests. His strict integrity, business conserva- 
tism and deliberate judgment have always been so uniformly recognized that 
he has enjoyed public confidence to an enviable degree, and naturally this 
has brought him a lucrative patronage. 



ANDREW K. BAKER. 



Among the families of prominence whose connection with the business 
and public life of Morris county has proved a most important factor in its 
substantial development is the one from which our subject springs. The 
name of Baker stands conspicuously forth on the pages of its history, and to 
the honorable record our subject has added new luster by his own well spent 
life. He is numbered among the capitalists of Dover, to which position he 
has attained largely through his own efforts, by reason of close application, 
earnest purpose, diligence and straightforward dealing. 

Born on the old Baker homestead in Rockaway township, August 13, 
1858, Mr. Baker is the third son of William H. and Clarissa (Dell) Baker. 
The place of his birth was his playground in youth and in his parents' home 
he remained throughout the period of his minority. He attended the district 
schools of Dover and later entered Rutgers College, of New Brunswick, 
where he continued his studies three years. On the completion of his education 
he entered the store of his brother, William H. Baker, one of the leading mer- 
chants of Dover, for whom he clerked for a year. He then turned his attention 
to the real-estate business, in which he is largely interested. He has a large 




,/^^/o^^^>'i^<y^.<:^^^c^'-^^:z^yt^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ{D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 251 

amount of property, and has platted and disposed of a considerable amount that 
lies within the corporation limits of Dover. To an extent which few realize, the 
growth and upbuilding of a locality depend upon the real-estate dealer. It is he 
who, by his judicious sales to persons of reliability, largely shapes the course 
of improvement, and peoples a neighborhood with desirable residents. The 
manner in which he lays out a district largely determines its beautiful or 
marred appearance, and all his efforts bring about a general thrift that pro- 
vides for the future prosperit}" of the neighborhood. All these considerations 
have influenced Mr. Baker in his real-estate business and have made him a 
valued factor in the upbuilding of the city. 

In 1 88 1 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Baker and Miss Carrie L. 
Dodge, a daughter of Amos and Ellen (Johnston) Dodge, of New York. She 
was born in New York, November 25, 1859, and died August 17, 1897. She 
was educated in the schools of her native cit}', received special instruction 
in both vocal and instrumental music and had especially fine attainments as 
an elocutionist. These gifts were frequentlj' sought by her church to aid in 
their entertainments, and she was never happier than when she was doing 
something to help on the cause of the church to which she belonged — the 
Calvary Baptist of New York city. In her home she was a loving and devoted 
wife and mother, a gracious hostess and a kind friend. Her children are 
Robert C, EUene D., Harold W. and Marion C. all still with their father, 
and in their loss the family have the sympathy of the entire community. 
Her memory will always remain hallowed, growing more tender and fragrant 
as the years go by. 

Mr. Baker served for four years as a member of the common council of 
Dover and used his prerogative as an officer to advance the best interests of 
the city along educational, moral, social and material lines. He was an 
earnest, intelligent, untiring worker, and the public good, not partisan policy 
dominated his course. His honest}- and integrity in business have ever been 
unquestioned, while time has proved the soundness and wisdom of most of 
measures he has advocated. 



W. HAMMET MARTIN. M. D. 

Widel}' known as an able physician and surgeon of Madison, Dr. Martin, 
was born in Virginia, in 1840, and is a son of Joseph Martin, a native of 
Maryland. His mother was a daughter of John Hammet, who was born in 
Ireland and was of English descent. On the paternal side the Doctor is 
also of English descent, his ancestors having settled on the eastern shore of 
Maryland in 1732. 

The Doctor acquired his literary education in a private school in New 



252 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

York city, and in 1853 matriculated in Columbia College, where on the 
completion of a thorough four-years course he was graduated in the class of 
1857. In 1861 he entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, of New 
York, and the degree of A. M. was conferred upon him by that institution 
in 1863. With an excellent theoretical knowledge he then entered Bellevue 
Hospital, where during his eighteen-months stay he gained the practical ex- 
perience that is necessary for the responsible duties of his chosen calling. 
He was also for eighteen months acting assistant surgeon in the United 
States Army, and in 1865 entered upon private practice in Chester county, 
where he remained until 1874, when on account of his health he went to 
Brooklyn, continuing in that city until 1885, when he came to Madison where 
he has since successfully engaged in practice. He is a member of the medi- 
cal societies of Brooklyn, and the Morris County Medical Society. 

In 1870 was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Martin and Miss S. B. 
Johnson, of New Rochelle, New York, a daughter of Theodore P. Johnson, 
formerly secretary of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, of New York, 
and a granddaughter of James Lee, who for many years was a prominent 
merchant of New York. To the Doctor and his wife were born three chil- 
dren. In his political views he is a Republican and his church relations is an 
Episcopalian. 



WILLIAM L. R. HAVEN. 



The subject of this sketch is superintendent of the public schools of 
Morristown, and one of the successful and popular educators of the state. 
He has attained a prominence in his profession that arises from superior 
ability, strong mentality, great force of character and the facility of impart- 
ing, clearly, concisely and readily, to others the knowledge he has acquired. 

Born in Athol, Massachusetts, on the 24th of May, 1835, Professor 
Haven is a son of Jotham and Hannah (Taft) Haven, likewise natives of the 
Bay state and representatives of early Massachusetts families. The father 
was a farmer by occupation, and Professor Haven early became familiar with 
the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. He attended 
school in Athol and continued to assist his father until, he had attained his 
majority, when he began to work by the month as a farm hand, and in this 
way earned the money with which to educate himself. He attended the 
Athol high school and spent two terms in Bernardstown Academy, after 
which he entered Williams College and was graduated in 1864, when twenty- 
nine years of age. 

He entered upon his educational work when twenty years of age, as a 
teacher in the district schools, and followed that profession through the win- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 253 

ter season during the greater part of the time until after he had completed 
his collegiate course, when he went to the west and was engaged in teaching 
for one year in Beloit, Wisconsin, and one year in Stoughton, that state. 
Returning then to Plattsburg, New York, he was connected with the schools 
of that place for three years, and in 1869 came to Morristown, where he has 
since acceptably served in the capacity of superintendent. There was but 
one school building at the time of his arrival, but now three large and well 
appointed buildings are used in accommodating the pupils. There is a large 
enrollment and the work accomplished in the Morristown schools is most 
creditable to the superintendent and the students. His methods are pro- 
gressive and he keeps constantly in touch with the most advanced thought. 
Earnest study and investigation have enabled him to continually raise the 
standard of the schools, and Morristown may well be proud of the educa- 
tional advantages which she now affords her youth. Professor Haven is a 
member of the New Jersey Council of Education and is now serving as 
its president. He also belongs to the New Jersey State Teachers' Asso- 
ciation. 

Professor Haven has been twice married. On the 24th of December, 
1867, he wedded Miss Florence A. Watson, who died December 6, 1870. 
On the 23d of December, 1873, he married Elizabeth S. Tweed, and to 
them have been born three children: Samuel Caruth; Stuart LeRoy, 
deceased; and William LeRoy. The parents are members of the South 
Street Presbyterian church, of Morristown, and their home is the center of a 
cultured society circle. Their friends are many and they enjoy the highest 
regard of all. Professor Haven has long since won prestige as one of the 
most successful and able educators in the state and is a very popular and gen- 
ial man, highly esteemed in professional as well as social circles. 



JAMES ARTHUR. 

Mr. Arthur, who is the superintendent of the Richards mines at Port 
Oram, — owned by the Thomas. Iron Company, — was born in Cornwall, Eng- 
land, on the 14th of January, 1844, and when a child of two years old was 
brought to America by his parents, John and Jane (Carkett) Arthur. John 
Arthur, who had been employed in the copper and tin mines in his native 
country for a number of years, after his emigration to the United States fol- 
lowed raining in the Durham iron mines of Pennsylvania for some time. He 
died at that place in 1887, and his wife also passed away in Durham, Bucks 
county, that state, in 1892. Of their six sons and two daughters five are 
living. John is employed in the cement mines of New Jersey; W'illiam H. 
is working in cement mines in Pennsylvania; Anna is the wife of William 



254 BIOGRAPHICAL AJTB GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Kemp, a bell-maker in East Hampton, Connecticut; and Jane is the wife of 
John Reynolds, who resides at Irvington, New York, on the banks of the 
Hudson. 

Between the ages of two and nine years James x\rthur remained in Dur- 
ham, Pennsylvania, where he attended the common schools. He then went 
to the West Indies with his uncle, Joseph Arthur, and attended school in 
Jamaica until his twelfth year, when he returned to Durham and entered the 
employ of the Durham Iron Works, working in their mines until his seven- 
teenth year. From that place he removed to Hancock, Michigan, where he 
was employed in the copper mines of Houghton county for nine years. Then 
he returned east, locating in Trumbull, Connecticut, where he was employed 
to take charge of mining operations, and continued in that position for five 
years. The next seven years he spent at Virginia City, Nevada; then, 
returning to Belvidere, New Jerse}', he took charge of the mines owned by 
the Shoemaker Mining Company. 

In December, 1894, he arrived at Port Oram to assume the management 
of the Richards mines of the Thomas Iron Company, and has since acted in 
the capacity of superintendent, having charge of four hundred men. He is 
thoroughly conversant with the business of mining in all its departments and 
is therefore well qualified to fill the position. Under his supervision the 
mine is so worked as to yield a good product, and the enterprise is a profit- 
able one. He merits the unqualified confidence of the company, for his 
fidelity to its interests is above question. His fairness to the employes has 
also won their respect and faithful service, and in business circles in this part 
of the county he is highly esteemed. 

In his political views Mr. Arthur is a Republican, and is now serving as 
a member of the township committee. He is a member of Warren Lodge, 
No. 13, F. & A. M., at Belvidere, and among his brethren of the fraternity 
is regarded as a valued addition to their ranks, owing to his allegiance to the 
vows of the order, and also to his genial, affable nature. 

In matrimony he was united with Miss Angle A. Anderson, of Calais, 
Maine, and they had one son, Kenneth Ray,, who died September 14, 1S93, 
at Belvidere, New Jersey; and one daughter, Angle May, who is now in 
school. 

Mrs. Arthur's father, William Anderson; was born in Portland, Maine, 
was a soldier in the war of 1S12, and afterward a prominent business man of 
Baileyville, Washington county, that state. He married Sarah Ann Thorn- 
ton, whose great-grandfather, Andrew Thornton, was a brother of Matthew 
Thornton, the signer of the Declaration of Independence. Her grandfather, 
Matthew Thornton, named for his uncle just mentioned, was born in Lon- 
donderry, New Hampshire, and was a captain in the colonial army; and her 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 255 

father, Joseph Thornton, was also a soldier in the Revolutionary war. The 
record, or family Bible, giving the data of the Thornton family is in the 
possession of Mrs. McBean, of Calais, a relative, and is one hundred and 
twenty-two years old. 

Of William Anderson's family there are one son and four daughters liv- 
ing. Those besides Mrs. Arthur are: Harris W. Anderson, of Bailey ville, 
who was a soldier in the Civil war; Mrs. E. J. Farrar, of Milltown, Maine; 
Mary Rebekah, the wife of Captain David A. Swain; and Miss Martha L. 
Anderson, of Calais. Mrs. Arthur has a niece, who is the wife of Hon. G. 
M. Hanson. The Bible containing the record of the Anderson family is kept 
by Dr. A. K. P. Meserve, of Portland, Maine, a cousin of Mrs. Arthur. 



ENOS WILDER. 



Mr. Wilder was born September 24, 1844, in Lancaster, Worcester 
county, Massachusetts, where his ancestors settled two hundred and fifty 
years earlier. In 1865 he graduated at Harvard College and entered a 
mercantile house in Boston, which sent him to Buenos Ayres, South 
America, the next year. Here he held the position of United States consul 
for a while, in addition to his business. 

In 1870 he returned to the United States and opened a commission 
house in his own name. He was also the president of the Franklin Bank 
Note Company, and director of a number of other companies. 

He has a beautiful residence on the avenue leading to Morristown, and 
has purchased more than one hundred acres of land suitable for building 
purposes. 



PROF. CHARLES D. PLATT. 

Men of marked ability, forceful character, culture and nobleness leave 
their impress upon the world, written in such indelible characters that time 
is powerless to obliterate their memory or sweep it from the minds of men. 
Their noble acts live long after they have passed away from the scenes of 
their earthly careers and their example remains as an inspiration to others. 
The two words which probably best express the life and well rounded char- 
acter of Charles Davis Piatt are gentleman and scholar. A splendidly 
developed mind has enabled him to take high rank as an educator among 
those who are careful not alone of the mental, but also of the moral progress 
of their students. 

From an historic family of New England Professor Piatt is descended, 
his ancestral history being traced back to Richard Piatt, who came to this 



256 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^TD GEJVEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

country in 1638 and took up his residence in New Haven, Connecticut. 
The following year he removed to Milford, where he was among the iirst set- 
tlers. His son Epenetus is recorded as a landholder in Huntington, Long 
Island, in 1666. He was the father of Major Epenetus Piatt, who was a 
member of the colonial assembl}' from 1723 to 1737. His son, Dr. Zophar 
Piatt, born in 1805, married Rebecca Wood, of Huntington, and died 
in 1792. The next in the line of descent was Ebenezer Piatt, who was 
elected to the legislature for the term of 1784-5, was appointed the first 
judge of Suffolk county, New York, and for many years was employed in the 
custom-house. His son. Rev. Isaac W. Piatt, was pastor of the Presbyterian 
church of Bath, New York, for many years, and was the father of Ebenezer 
Piatt, who was for some years paying teller in the Ocean Bank, of New 
York city, and resided in Elizabeth, New Jersey. He married Anna M. 
Davis, daughter of Dr. Charles Davis, of Elizabeth, a son of Joseph Davis, 
of Bloomfield, New Jersej'. 

One son of this union was Professor Charles D. Piatt, whose birth 
occurred in Elizabeth, New Jersey, on the i8th of March, 1856. Excellent 
educational privileges were afforded him and on the completion of a course 
in Dr. Pingr3''s well known school, in his native city, he matriculated in 
Williams College, and pursued a classical course, graduating in the class of 
1877. Through the six years following his graduation he was employed as 
a teacher in Dr. Pingry's school, and in 1883 came to Morristown to accept 
the position of principal of Morris Academy, where he has remained up to 
the present. He has that peculiar ability which makes the successful teacher, 
— the power not of imparting to others the knowledge that he has acquired, 
but of making the pupils give expression to the knowledge they have acquired 
and thus helping them to a quicker, stronger and better development. 

Professor Piatt was united in marriage to Miss M. J. West, of Williams- 
town, Massachusetts, and to them have been born seven children, namely: 
Eleanor Wilson, Dorothy, Richard Morris, Katharine, Julia, Norman Hunt- 
ington and Margaret. The family attend the First Presbyterian church, of 
Morristown, in which Mr. Piatt is now serving as elder. He is deeply inter- 
ested in all that pertains to the intellectual, moral and social development 
of the community, and is a leader in advancement in Morris county. A 
fluent, graceful and entertaining writer, he has made a valuable addition to 
the literature of the country in his ' ' Ballads of New Jersey in the Revolution. " 
It has received commendatory notices from the press of the country. One 
editorial said : " The author has described the various scenes and events in 
Revolutionary history connected with the soil of New Jersey in a variety of 
metrical forms and with general success in catching the motive and spirit of 
the ballad." Another has written: "Mr. Piatt has followed closely the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 257 

stories as told by the old chroniclers; often, indeed, almost preserving in his 
verse the quaint words in which the tales of heroism and hardship were first 
told. In the main he aims to tell his story in the simplest ballad form, and 
this he does often in effective fashion and sometimes with pleasant humor." 



WILLIAM E. DERRY, M. D. 

For nineteen years Dr. Derry has been engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine in Dover, his native city, and he now occupies a high rank in the pro- 
fession. 

He was born on the 2d of July, 1856, a son of Daniel A. and Sarah A. 
(Francisco) Derry. The Derry family is of French and Irish extraction; the 
great-grandfather of the Doctor was one of the pioneers of the Empire state; 
and the grandfather, John Derry, was for many years a resident of New York 
and a tailor by trade. Daniel A. Derry, who was born in that state, was for 
a number of years a merchant of Dover and is still a resident of that city. 
His wife was a daughter of Robert Francisco, and her grandfather, Robert 
Francisco, Sr. , was the son of a Holland emigrant. 

Dr. Derry spent the days of his boyhood and youth in his native town, 
his time being given to the pleasures of the play-ground and the duties of 
the school-room. After leaving the public schools he went to the Stouten- 
burgh Seminary at Schooley's Mountain, Morris county, and later matricu- 
lated at Wilbraham Academy (Wesleyan), in Massachusetts, where he prose- 
cuted his studies for two years. Subsequently he took up the study of 
medicine, under the direction of Drs. Quinby and Pierson, of Morristown, 
with whom he studied three years and then entered the medical depart- 
ment of Columbia College, where he was graduated as a faculty student in 
the class of 1880. He spent four years in college and hospital work. 

Returning to Dover, he opened an office and was soon established in a 
good practice. For some time his practice was general, but for the past five 
years he has added thereto the specialty of the treatment of diseases of the 
eye, ear, nose and throat. For the past four years he has been clinical 
assistant in the hospital of Dr. H. Knapp, one of the best known men in his 
profession in the world. Earnest and continued study, and close applica- 
tion have made him very proficient in this line. He has given much time to 
the study of medicine, enjoys the personal acquaintance of many of the emi- 
nent men of the profession, and is a zealous reader of the more substantial 
literature of the day. He is now the medical examiner for several leading 
insurance companies. Wealth cannot purchase, nor birth secure, exemption 
from that struggle which alone can give intellectual prowess; and to have 

17 



258 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

gained prominence in any of the learned professions at once indicates persist- 
ent effort in order to gain the mastery which brings distinction in the sciences. 

On the 1st of September, 1887, Dr. Derry was united in marriage to 
Miss Olivia Smith, a daughter of Ford D. Smith, one of the leading lawyers 
of Dover. Their union was blessed with three children, of whom two 
daughters are still living. 

The Doctor is a gentleman of fine physique, pleasing personality and 
affable manner, and stands high both in professional and social circles. 



JOHN J. FAESCH. 

John Jacob Faesch was one of the most noted iron-masters of Morris 
county, and his influence was long and widely felt. He was born in the 
canton of Basle, Switzerland, in the year 1729, and came to America in 
1764, under an arrangement made with Francis Casper Hasenclever on behalf 
of his brother, Peter Hasenclever, the general manager and superintendent 
of the London Company as the manager of their iron-works. The agreement 
was for seven years, and Hasenclever stipulated to pay the passage of Mr. 
Faesch, his wife and servants, and deliver them and their goods and effects 
safely in America, and to pay the expenses of Mr. Faesch from New Wood, 
where he lived, to Remsheid, where the agreement was made; to pay him 
twenty-five hundred guilders per annum, Rhenish, to begin on the first day 
of his journey; to give him a tenantable dwelling-house, with meadow for 
pasturing two or four kine; that he might engage in other business, but not 
to the prejudice of the company's interests; and that he was not to be under 
command of any one except the members of the company, but should have 
direction over all the forges, mines and iron-works that were erected or 
occupied or should thereafter be undertaken. In fact, it was a very liberal 
agreement and proves how valuable his services were thought to be. 

In accordance with this agreement Mr. Faesch came to this county, and 
was first placed by Hasenclever at Ringwood, where he resided and acted as 
manager. In 176S the works of Charlotteburg were placed in his charge, 
and later the works at Long Pond. Trouble arose, however, between Has- 
enclever and other members of the company. He was considered too extrav- 
agant and in other respects a bad manager. At all events Robert Erskine 
was appointed to succeed him, and arrived in this country June 5, I77r. 
Mr. Faesch resented the treatment of his friend Hasenclever, and left the 
service of the company, in June, 1772, his term of seven years having 
expired. He had already made arrangements to take the Mount Hope prop- 
erty, the furnace there being the third built within the limits of Morris 
county. He took a long lease of the lands owned by Jacob Ford, Jr., pur- 



BIOGRJFHICAL AMD OEMEALOGICAL BISTORT. 259^ 

chased from the proprietors the great Mount Hope tract surrounding them, 
and began the building of the furnace. He afterward purchased Middle forge 
and Rockaway forge, leased Mount Pleasant forge and the Boonton mills, 
and carried on the iron business on an extensive scale. 

He is described as a very generous and large-hearted man, but very 
aristocratic in his ideas. He gave liberally to the church, so much so that 
a subscription made in 1781 a prominent man in the Rockaway congregation 
subscribed "as much as any man in the parish except Esquire Faesch." It 
is said, however, that he supported religion only as a means of keeping the 
lower classes in subjection. He was naturalized by a special act of the legis- 
lature, in 1 766. On the breaking out of the Revolutionary war he was an ardent 
Whig, taking an active part in the politics o{ his day. He was a member of 
the convention to ratify the federal constitution, held December 11, 17S7, 
and for many years was one of the county judges. His friendship for the 
cause of liberty awakened the bitter hostility of the Tories during the war. 
Large quantities of cannon, shot and iron utensils were manufactured at his 
furnace for use by the American army. The Tories made many attempts to 
rob his house at Mount Hope and destroy his furnace, but he kept his 
employes armed and no harm was done. It is said that he was a man of 
medium stature, and that he might often be seen passing through Rockaway,^ 
his carriage being driven by men in livery, with outriders also in livery. His 
first wife was Elizabeth Brickherhoff, who died February 23, 1788, in Morris- 
town, where they resided after the war, having converted the old powder 
magazine into a residence. The next month after his wife's death Mr. 
Faesch removed to old Boonton, where he lived until his death. His second: 
wife was Mrs. Susan (Kearney) Lawrence, widow of a brother of Captain. 
Lawrence of the United States Navy. 



THOMAS B. SEGUR. 



Thomas B. Segur, a merchant of Utica, New York, came to Dover in 
1832 at the request of Anson G. Phelps to take charge of the Union Bank 
of Dover, which was organized that year. He continued to be its cashier 
until his death, which occurred in 1854. He was an excellent officer, and 
during the twenty-four years of his service the bank doubled its capital, and 
it is said th^t the institution never lost a dollar while he was cashier. A few 
weeks before his death William E. Dodge called together the directors of the 
bank, who made to the family a donation of five thousand dollars as an 
expression of their appreciation of the cashier's valuable services. 

Mr. Segur was a man of great activity and took a leading part in the 
moral enterprises of the day. His zeal in the Sunday-school department, its 



260 BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

missions, in the Bible cause and especially in the temperance reform was 
untiring. Soon after removing to Dover he organized a temperance society, 
which led to the formation of temperance societies in all the other town- 
ships. He infused such energy into the movement, that it commanded pub- 
lic attention and produced an extensive reformation. Through his zealous 
and persistent efforts the practice of selling liquor in the country stores was 
given up, and intoxicants could only be obtained in the tavern of Dover. 
Through his efforts Dover became known as the banner temperance town of 
New Jersey. John B. Gough and orators of like fame were often there. Mr. 
Segur was himself an eloquent speaker and made frequent addresses at home 
and abroad. He was president of the Dover Society, the Morris County 
Society, and the New Jersey State Temperance Society. He was counted 
among the leading temperance men of the nation, but his zeal was not con- 
fined alone to the temperance reform. He was an earnest Sunday-school 
worker. While superintendent of a Sunday-school he held at his own house 
during the week a Bible class for young men. He took a leading part in the 
missionary cause, obtained in Dover over fifty subscribers for the Missionary 
Herald, and lectured in the interests of missions in many churches in the 
state. He died in 1854, and his loss was a severe one to Dover. 



CHARLES C. DeHART. 



The subject of this sketch is not only one of the extensive land-owners 
of Morris county, prominently connected with the agricultural interests of 
this section, but is a representative of stanch old Revolutionary stock, 
being of the eighth generation of DeHarts in America. He was born in 
Morris county, on the 5th of January, 1825, and is the youngest son of Moses 
and Elizabeth DeHart, both of whom died during his early childhood. The 
DeHart family is of French origin and was planted on American soil by 
members of the Huguenot following, who in order to escape religious perse- 
cution and have freedom of worship, came to the New World. The name 
was originally spelled de Hart. Moses DeHart, grandfather of our subject, 
was a soldier in the war of the Revolution, and his son and namesake, 
Moses, father of Charles C, served in the war of 1812. 

The advantages, educational and otherwise, which our subject received 
in his youth were very limited, and whatever he has accomplished in life has 
resulted from his native and acquired ability. He has cultivated habits of 
industry, economy and perseverance, and these have brought to him desir- 
able financial returns, but the end was not accomplished without great effort 
on his part. He spent the first twelve years of his life in Madison, Morris 




^-^c^.^^.^^ 



BIOGRJPHICdL AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTOEI'. 261 

county, and attended the common schools. He then went to Morristown, 
where he was employed by Alexander Robertson, who was engaged in the 
butchering business. Mr. DeHart continued in his service for five years, and 
in 1S46 removed to Rockaway, where he opened a meat market, beginning 
operations on a very small scale, for his means were very limited. He had 
strong competition during the winter season, but in the summer months the 
shops were shut down and business in that line was practically suspended. 
Mr. DeHart, taking advantage of the opportunity afforded, secured a wagon 
and eac?i day drove to the mining towns with fresh meat. In this way he 
built up an excellent trade and soon enlarged his facilities for butchering and 
for handling his meats. He also bought and sold live-stock during the war, 
when prices were high, and in this manner added considerably to his income. 
He continued in the meat business until 1888, when he turned it over to his 
son for the purpose of devoting his energies to farming. 

In 1858 Mr. DeHart had purchased a farm of two hundred acres, 
and in 1S71 removed from the village of Rockaway to this property, to which 
he has added from time to time as the years have passed until he now owns 
eight hundred and fifty-five acres of rich and valuable land, much of which is 
under a high state of cultivation. He also has a considerable portion 
platted for pasturage, and he still handles a large number of sheep and cattle, 
buying them and then fattening them for the market. He is a very pro- 
gressive, enterprising farmer, believing in adopting all the improved methods 
and machinery, in applying the discoveries of science to practical farming 
and in using every means that will advance his efforts. He also deals in 
hard-wood lumber and timber, and in these various ways has acquired a very 
handsome capital. 

In 1849 Mr. DeHart was united in marriage to Miss Hari;iet L. Pierson, 
who died leaving a son and daughter: Charles R. , an enterprising young 
business man, who is conducting a meat market in Rockaway; and Emma 
A., wife of J. Wright Bruen, a hardware merchant of Rockaway. In 1890 
Mr. DeHart was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Rebecca 
H. Baldwin, formerly of Newark, and the widow of William H. Baldwin. 
Her father was Richard L. Heddenburg. The home of Mr. and Mrs. 
DeHart is an elegant residence, built in modern style of architecture and 
situated in the midst of extensive grounds, beautifully ornamented with 
flowers, shrubs and forest trees, making one of the most attractive country 
seats in Morris county. Mr. DeHart has worked his waj' upward in the 
face of many difficulties. His career has been remarkably successful, chiefly 
by reason of his natural ability and his thorough insight into the business in 
which, as a young tradesman, he embarked. There is one point in his 
career of more than half a century in Morris county to which all old settlers 



262 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

refer, and that is, whether as a merchant or farmer, he has always been 
the same genial, courteous gentleman, whose word no man can call into 
question. 

ABRAHAM OGDEN. 

Abraham Ogden was a son of Judge David Ogden, of Newark, who 
graduated at Yale College, in 1728, and became one of the judges of the 
supreme court of New Jersey. When the Revolutionary war broke out he 
espoused the side of the king and became a distinguished loyalist. His 
son Isaac sided with the father, and his interest in the old Boonton property 
was accordingly coniiscated and sold to his brother by the commissioners. 
Abraham Ogden and his brother Samuel were active and ardent patriots. 
The former was a distinguished lawyer and is said to have had no equal 
before a jury. He was appointed surrogate for Morris in 1768, and after 
the war he returned to Newark, became United States district attorney under 
Washington's administration, and was a member of the legislature in 1790. 
He died suddenly in 1798, when more than sixty years of age. Samuel 
Ogden married a sister of Governor Morris and lived in old Boonton. 



JOHN A. TROWBRIDGE. 

When the country was enshrouded in the gloom of civil war, one who 
donned the blue and went forth in defense of the Union was Mr. Trowbridge, 
now numbered among the progressive and valued citizens of Chatham, where 
he is engaged in business as a contractor and builder. He was born in 
Morris county, on the 28th of May, 1839, and is a son of Elijah Trow- 
bridge, who also was born in this county and is a son of Austin Trowbridge. 
The last named, a native of Morris county, was a son of Shubal Trowbridge, 
of English descent, the original American ancestors locating in the New 
World in early colonial days. Elijah Trowbridge was a farmer, but when a 
young man removed to Brooklyn and was appointed one of the first police- 
men of that city. He married Temperance Muchmore, who was born in 
Bottle Hill, now Madison, New Jersey, a daughter of John Taylor Much- 
more. Eight children were' born of this union, five of whom reached years 
of maturity, while four are still living, namely: Phoebe, Charles, John, 
and Johanna, wife of George Perkins. Frank, who joined the One Hun- 
dred and Forty- seventh New York Volunteer Infantry and served throughput 
the war, was wounded at Cold Harbor and died from the effects of his 
injuries, after the close of hostilities. Three children of this family died in 
childhood. The father died in Brooklyn, in the forty-ninth year of his age, 





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BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ\"EALOGICAL HISTORY. 263 

while his wife lived to be seventy-two years of age. After her husband's 
death she returned to Morris county, but later moved back to Brooklyn, 
where her death occurred. 

Mr. Trowbridge, whose name begins this review, was a child of ten 
years when with his parents he removed to Brooklyn, where he acquired his 
education in the public schools. At the age of eighteen he began to learn 
the carpenter's trade, serving a four-years apprenticeship, in which time 
he thoroughly mastered the business, becoming an expert workman. 
But when he had completed his term his attention was called to other 
things. The question of the extension of slavery had involved the country 
in civil war, and, true to the Union, Mr. Trowbridge enlisted on the iith of 
December, iS6i, being assigned to Company F, First New York ^^olunteer 
Engineers, serving at Hilton Head, Charleston and Morris Island. Later he 
was commissioned second lieutenant of the First Regiment South Carolina 
Volunteer Infantry, Company A, afterward the Thirty-third United States 
Colored Troops, and later was promoted first lieutenant of the Thirty-third 
Regiment of Colored Troops, this being the first regiment of colored troops 
organized during the war. They were engaged in provost, guard and picket 
duty, and were often on detailed service. Mr. Trowbridge continued at 
the front until December, 1864, when he resigned and returned home. 

Again reaching the north, he worked at his trade in Brooklyn until 1866, 
when he came to Chatham, where he has since been engaged in business. 
His thorough understanding of the trade, his reliability and promptness and 
his skillful workmanship have brought him a creditable success. 

On the 26th of April, 1S66, Mr. Trowbridge was joined in wedlock to 
Miss Margaret Lum, a daughter of Harvey Lum, and by their union have 
been born five children: Alfred M., a carpenter of Chatham; Frank L., who 
is engaged in merchandising in Chatham; Charles L. , a mason and carpenter; 
Roy S., a machinist; and Harriett E. The parents hold membership in the 
Presbyterian church, and Mr. Trowbridge is a member of A. T. A. Torbert 
Post, No. 24, G. A. R. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the 
men and measures of the Republican party and is as true to his duties of 
citizenship in times of peace as he was when he followed the starry banner 
on southern battlefields. 

JAMES H. NEIGHBOUR. 

The family of which this citizen of Dover is the present representative 
in Morris county had its origin in Holland, whence Leonhard Neighbour, the 
progenitor of the American branch, emigrated in 1740, coming to New Jer- 
sey and settling in German Valley, Morris county. His son, also named 
Leonhard, took up his residence in German Valley, in 1750, locating on land 



264 BIOGRAPHIC.iL AiMB GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

which is now owned by Silas Neighbour. Leonard Neig;hbour (3d), grandfa- 
ther of the immediate subject of this review, was born in 1762 and died in 
1853, at the venerable age of ninety-one years. 

James Hance Neighbour was born in Lebanon township, Hunterdon 
county, New Jersey, in 1834, and there obtained his preliminary educational 
discipline in the public schools. He then attended Lafa3ette College, at 
which he was graduated in 1848. Having decided to enter the legal profes- 
sion, he then read law for two years at Judge McCarty's law school, in Easton, 
Pennsylvania, where he was admitted to the bar in 1850; but, having deter- 
mined to practice in his native state, he entered the law office of Hon. 
Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, in Newark, New Jersey, and in November, 
1853, was admitted to the bar of the state as an attorney at law, in Trenton, 
New Jersey. In 1869 he obtained the degree of counselor at law, and he is 
also a special master and examiner in chancery and a supreme court com- 
missioner. 

Mr. Neighbour holds the distinction of having been the first permanent 
lawyer in Dover, New Jersey, and he has taken an active and prominent 
part in the political affairs of his home county. He has held several town- 
ship offices and was elected to the first common council of the city of Dover 
in 1869, as recorder, which office he held for two terms, and was afterward 
city treasurer and is the present incumbent as city attorney. He was a mem- 
ber of the New Jersey assembly in 1883 and 1884, during which time he 
served as chairman of the judiciary committee. He has practiced in all the 
courts in the state, has written extensively concerning the history of Morris 
county, and is recognized as one of the leading members of his profession, as 
well as a progressive, enterprising and public-spirited citizen. 

The marriage of Mr. Neighbour was solemnized in June, 1856, when he 
was united to Miss Mary L. Warne, a daughter of Elisha and Eliza (Ayres) 
Warne, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

David Neighbour, father of our subject, was born in German Valley, 
Morris county, New Jersey, on the 25th of November, 1797, on the family 
homestead of his great-grandfather, Leonhard Neighbour, — this being now 
the homestead residence of the eldest son, Silas. David Neighbour moved 
to Hunterdon county in 1825 and entered the mercantile business, in con- 
nection with which he carried on farming. In politics he was a Democrat, 
and he held many offices of trust, as the result of elections, appointments, 
etc. At the time of his death he was the eldest living ex-member of the 
state legislature, in which body he was a representative for two years, from 
1842 to 1844; and he was also a member of the constitutional convention of 
1844, which framed the present constitution of the state. The only members 
of that noted body now surviving are Hon. Robert Laird, of Manasquan, 



BIOGRJPHIC.il AJS'D genealogical history. 265 

who is hale and hearty and takes an interest in everything pertaining to 
politics; and Hon. William Paterson, secretary of the convention, who lives 
at Perth Amboy, aged about seventy-nine years. John Page Fausset, the 
page of the convention, lives at Trenton, aged about si.\ty-six years. 

In 1 83 1 David Neighbour became an elder of the Presbyterian church at 
German Valley, the church at that time under the charge of Rev. Dr. Scott, 
who afterward removed to Newark, New Jersey, and frequently represented 
the church in its presbyteries and general assemblies. About 1S70, David 
Neighbour formed the nucleus of a new Presbyterian church at Lower Valley, 
near Califon, and was largely instrumental in securing the erection of the 
present church edifice and parsonage, and in bringing the church organization 
to its present prosperous condition. He was a member of the session of 
this church at the time of his death, and held the office of treasurer from its 
inception until May, 1891, when he resigned. Although so far advanced in 
years, he was identified with all the work of the church and kept up his reg- 
ular attendance until a short time before his demise, which occurred at the 
residence of his son, Leonard D., near Califon, Hunterdon county, on the 
2 1st of April, 1892, at which time he had attained the venerable age of nine- 
ty-five years. His illness was of short duration, as he had been confined to 
his bed only five days when death set its seal upon the mortal lips and marked 
the close of a long, useful and honorable life — one consecrated to all that 
represented the good and the beautiful. He had always enjoyed excellent 
health and vigor, and, being free from pain or definite disease, he retained 
all his faculties until the last moments, when his life ebbed away without a 
struggle, and so gently that those near him could scarcely note the time of 
his departure. His death brought sorrow not only to his family but to a 
large number of warm friends. As one of the latter truthfully remarked of 
Mr. Neighbour, • ' The world would be better off if there were more like him. " 

In his early manhood David Neighbour was united in marriage to Miss 
Ann Hance, a daughter of James and Elizabeth Hance, who were of Holland 
extraction and personally, as well as by inheritance, zealous adherents of the 
Presbyterian faith. David and Ann (Hance) Neighbour are survived by their 
six children, namely: Mrs. Elizabeth Miller, of Germantown; Silas Neigh- 
bour, of German Valley; Calvin Neighbour, of Plainfield; James H. Neigh- 
bour, of Dover; and Leonard D. and Nicholas, of Hunterdon county. 



FRANCIS F. HUMMEL. 



As senior editor and proprietor, Mr. Hummel has been for twenty-three 
years associated with Lorenzo D. Tillyer in the publication of the Dover 
Index. He was born and reared in Pennsylvania, receiving his educational 



266 BIOGRJPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

discipline in the public schools and St. Mark's Academy. At the age of four- 
teen years he left the school-room to enter the printing-office of the Union 
Flag, published in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania. He followed the printing 
trade and wrote for the local papers, being local editor of the Mauch Chunk 
Democrat before coming to Dover. He has also worked in Philadelphia 
book-publishing houses, and at various times was jobber and foreman in the 
ofBces of different Pennsylvania printing-offices. In February, 1874, he came 
to Dover, and on the 6th of October, 1875, formed a partnership with Mr. 
Tlllyer and established the Dover Index. 

Lorenzo D. Tillyer was born in New Haven, Connecticut, December 27, 
1854, a son of Richard G. and Mary J. (Martin) Tillyer, both natives of New 
Jersey, their son having been born during their temporary residence in the 
Nutmeg state. He acquired a liberal education in the schools of New Jer- 
sey, and at the age of eighteen entered the office of the Dover Mail to learn 
the printer's trade, continuing in that place until March, 1874. He then 
worked at his trade in New York city until October, 1875, when he formed a 
partnership with Francis F. Hummel, under the firm name of Hummel & 
Tillyer. Mr. Tillyer married Miss Rozena Derry, only daughter of Daniel 
A. and Sarah A. Derry, of Dover, and they have one son, Edgar D. 

The Dover Index is a weekly paper that for twenty-three years has been 
the winged messenger carrying the news of the world to the people of the 
city and vicinity. From the beginning its success was assured, for its pro- 
prietors were men of practical experience in the printing business and pos- 
sessed of marked energy, enterprise and resolute purpose. They resolved to 
make this a welcome local newspaper, if this result could be accomplished 
by honorable methods and unremitting application, and to this end paid 
great attention to giving the public a clean, readable sheet which could be 
taken into the family circle and which would, while expressing the honest 
convictions of the editors and publishers, treat the questions of the day with 
fairness and without prejudice or bitterness. While the Index is Democratic 
in politics, it aims to give all the local and general news that is fit to print 
and lay before its thousands of readers. This policy the firm have ever 
adhered to, and the Index is a bright, newsy sheet and is full of articles and 
items of general and local interest. It supports all measures tending to con- 
serve the public good, along educational, moral, material and social lines, 
and its worth and popularity are evidenced in the large circulation which it 
has enjoyed for a number of years, — copies of the paper being placed each 
week in the hands of more than four thousand subscribers. 

In its mechanical appointments, the office of the Dover Index is very 
complete, being supplied with the latest improved machinery and equipments 
in both the newspaper and job-printing department. The press-room shows 



■ J3I0GBAPEICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 267 

a large cylinder press which will accommodate a form forty-four by sixty-six 
inches in dimensions, and which has a folding attachment, while the provis- 
ions for the handling of job work are exceptionally complete, including a 
large and well-selected assortment of type fonts, to which additions are con- 
stantly being made as new and modern faces are brought out, while four job 
presses are demanded in the handling of the large business in this line. 

The paper is an excellent advertising medium, owing to its large circu- 
lation and effective system of display, and for nearly a quarter of a century 
it has been a welcome guest in many of the homes of Dover and other sec- 
tions of Morris county. Its owners are men of excellent business ability, — 
progressive, wide-awake and enterprising, and imbued with the true Ameri- 
can spirit that has placed this nation on a par with those of many centuries' 
growth. 



DAVID F. MOORE. 



A worthy farmer of Morris county, Mr. Moore has rounded the psalmist's 
span of three-score years and ten and is now passing a quiet and honored old 
age at his home near Green Village. He was born near Union Village, 
Somerset county, on the 4th of August, 1822, being a son of Moses and 
Phcebe (French) Moore. His grandfather, Isaac Moore, was born in New 
Jersey, of Scotch parentage, and when the colonists attempted to throw off 
the yoke of British oppression he allied his forces with the American army 
and fought for the independence of the nation. Moses Moore, a native of the 
same township in which occurred the birth of our subject, was a farmer by 
occupation and made that pursuit his life work. His wife, also a native of 
Somerset county, died about 1828, and his death occurred in 1831. They left six 
children: Emeline, who died soon after her father; Lydia, who died at the 
age of seventy-eight years; Harriet, wife of Charles C. Force, a resident of 
Madison; Israel, who died at the age of sixty-two years; David F. ; and Isaac, 
who passed away at the age of thirty-two. 

David F. Moore was left an orphan at the age of nine years, and soon 
after the death of his parents he went to live with Thomas Steed, near 
Plainfield, New Jersey, with whom he continued for fourteen years, receiving 
from his foster parents the utmost care and kindness. On leaving their home 
he went to New York city, where he entered the employ of his brother 
Israel. He was married in 1847 to Miss Catherine Drake, who was born 
near Plainfield, and he then removed to New York, where he continued in 
his brother's employ for seventeen years. In 1863 he came to Green 
Village, where he purchased his present farm, comprising twenty-seven 



268 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GEJ{EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

acres of land. This he has placed under a high state of cultivation and has 
derived therefrom a good income. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Moore were born three children, but only one is now 
living, Howard S. having died at the age of a year and .a half, while Ella 
Medora passed away at the age of twenty years. The surviving son is Sidney 
H., now a resident of California, who has five children, namely: Howard, 
EllaM., Harriett L., Frederick S. and Louise. In 1897 Mr. Moore was 
called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died on the 6th of September. 
Had she lived thirty-three days longer they would have reached the fiftieth 
anniversary of their marriage. Through the long years of their wedded life 
they shared with each other the joys and sorrows, the adversity and pros- 
perity, which checker the careers of all, and as the days passed their mutual 
love and confidence increased. They were both devoted members of the 
Baptist church and in 1842, on the same day, were both baptized in the brook 
near Plainfield. Mr. Moore is still serving as deacon of the Baptist church 
of Morristown and is one of its most honored members. In his political 
views in early life he was a Democrat, but has long been a Republican. 



EDWIN P. BURROUGHS. 

Mr. Burroughs was born in Madison, in 1831, a son of Caleb C. Bur- 
roughs, also a native of the same town, born in 1799. The paternal grand- 
father of our subject, Benjamin Burroughs, settled in Morris county prior to 
the war of the Revolution, and bore his part in the readjustment of public 
interests to the republican form of government. He aided in the develop- 
ment and progress of the county, followed agricultural pursuits as a life work, 
and met his death by being run over by an ox-cart. He had a family of four 
children, namely: . Lucetta, Caleb C, Amzi and Hannah. 

The father of our subject, Caleb C. Burroughs, was reared on the home 
farm until about sixteen years of age, when he abandoned the plow and went 
to Elizabethtown to learn the cabinet-maker's trade under the direction of 
Elihu Britton, his apprenticeship covering a period of five years. On attaining 
his majority he returned to Madison, where he followed cabinet-making and 
undertaking. He was one of the leading business men of the community and 
was prominent in public affairs. He married Miss Hannah Carter, a daugh- 
ter of Captain Luke Carter, who commanded a company in the war of 1S12. 
Captain Carter was a representative of one of the old families of the county. 
He married a Miss Pierson and their children were: Charles; George 
Christie; Hannah; Emeline, wife of Louis M. Browning; and Sarah Ann, 
wife of Elias R. Bruen. 

For many years Caleb C. Burroughs served as deacon in the Presbyte- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEKEALOGICAL HISTORY. 269 

rian church and was very active and influential in its work. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Caleb Burroughs were born six children, as follows: Martha 
C, deceased wife of William Beach; Henry A., who was married in the 
south and resides in Indian Head, Maryland; Sarah E. ; Edwin P.; Timothy 
D., of Madison; and John R. F., who is also living in the south. Mr. Bur- 
roughs died in 1885, and his wife passed away in 1880. 

In the public schools of Madison Mr. Burroughs acquired his education 
and was trained in the habits and methods of the business world under the 
direction of his father. When he had attained his majority he was admit- 
ted as a partner into the cabinet-making and undertaking business which his 
father owned and controlled, the firm name of C. C. Burroughs & Son being 
assumed. This connection was continued until the death of the senior mem- 
ber of the firm, since which time Edwin P. Burroughs has been sole proprie- 
tor of a well appointed furniture store and undertaking establishment. This 
is the oldest enterprise of the kind in Madison and the most reliable. He 
carries a large and well selected stock of goods, which he sells at reasonable 
prices, and from the public he receives a liberal patronage. 

Mr. Burroughs was married in 1859, the lady of his choice being Miss 
Susan B. Pierson, a native of New Jersey and a daughter of David and Sally 
Ann (Scofield) Pierson. Her father was a railroad contractor in early life 
and afterward gave his attention to agricultural pursuits. Mr. and Mrs. 
Burroughs have one child, Preston A., born in 1880. They hold member- 
ship in the Presbyterian church, take a very active part in its work and have 
done much to promote its interests. Mr. Burroughs is now serving as elder, 
having occupied that position for a number of years. He has also served as 
township committeeman, and by his ballot supports the principles of the 
Republican party. 

Timothy D. Burroughs, a brother of the gentleman whose name heads 
this review, was born in 1835, and at the age of sixteen years began clerking, 
which occupation he followed until after the inauguration of the Civil war, 
when he entered his country's service, enlisting on the 2d of October, 1861, 
as a member of Company K, Seventh New Jersey Volunteer Infantry. 
He served with the Army of the Potomac and participated in all its engage- 
ments from Williamsburg until the close of the war. He went to the front 
as a corporal, but in 1862 was promoted to the rank of sergeant and in 1864 
was made quartermaster sergeant. In May, 1865, the south having been 
conquered, he was honorably discharged. 

When the war was over Mr. Burroughs returned to Morristown, where 
he engaged in the dry-goods business until 1875, when he removed to New 
York, and entered into business relations with the firm of Conklin & Chivis, 
an association that was maintained for twelve years, when Mr. Burroughs 



270 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJ^EALOQICAL HISTOBY. 

retired to private life. He was married in 1874 to Miss Susan Harley, of 
Jersey City, and to them was born one child, now deceased. The mother 
died in 1878. Mr. Burroughs is a member of A. T. A. Torbert Post, No. 24, 
G. A. R. and in his political views is a Republican. 



JOEL W. MUCHMORE. 



In an early day three brothers by the name of Muchmore came from 
Wales to the United States, one of them locating in New Jersey, and from 
him the present family originated. Samuel Muchmore, the grandfather of 
our subject, was born in Essex county and there followed farming for several 
years, subsequently moving to Cincinnati and locating on the Miami river, 
near Madisonville. He then went west, remained there for a while, and 
started to return for his son, but died on the homeward journey. Stephen 
Muchmore, our subject's father, was born in Essex county, and, accompanied 
by two of his brothers, went to Ohio, where they located land, in the Miami 
valley, clearing the same and preparing the way for the remainder of the 
family. After about a year had elapsed Stephen Muchmore returned to 
Morris county, where he passed the remainder of his life. He married Miss 
Elizabeth Denman, and devoted his attention to farming during the residue 
of his life. 

Joel W. Muchmore was, like his father and grandfather, born in Essex 
county, his birth taking place on the 26th of April, 181 5. He was reared on 
the farm until attaining his seventeenth year, when he learned the carpenter's 
trade and followed the same for thirty years, and in connection with that 
vocation he took up architecture. In 1840 he came to Morristown, and has 
since made this city his home. After the close of the Civil war, in 1865, he 
engaged in the lumber business, with Francis A. Day, the firm name being 
known as Day & Muchmore, and for nearly twenty years he continued in that 
line of enterprise, at the end of which period he retired from active efforts 
and is now enjoying the fruits of his early labors. Commencing life with but 
little or no capital, he attained success by earnest endeavor and unswerving 
determination, combined with which were natural business qualities and a 
strict integrity of character. Politically he is a stanch Repubhcan, but has 
never sought official preferment. 

Mr. Muchmore celebrated his marriage in 1842, when he was united to 
Miss Sarah Elizabeth Bunn, who was born January 5, 1821, in Springfield, 
which was at that time in Essex county. The issue of this union comprised 
the following children: Caroline Day, Randolph, Frederick, George Vail, 
Hattie and Nellie. Mrs. Muchmore, who was a faithful member of the 





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BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJ\'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 271 

South Street Presbyterian church, entered into eternal rest in February, 
1898, her death being deeply mourned by all who had appreciation of her 
beautiful character and gracious womanhood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Muchmore had not only attained the distinction of hav- 
ing celebrated the golden anniversary of their marriage, but they had passed 
five years beyond the half-century mark, and to commemorate their various 
celebrations they had published a little booklet, in which is printed a record 
of each one of those memorable occasions. 



THE DEMOCRATIC BANNER. 

This, the second oldest paper in Morris county, was founded in 1836. 
by Louis C. Vogt, who conducted it until his death. Afterward his wife con- 
ducted it for a number of years, and then her two sons, E. Le Clerc and 
Louis A,, have since had the management of the paper, that is, for the past 
fifteen years, the firm being known as Vogt Brothers. 



ROSWELL M. HANCOCIv. 

Recognized as a prominent citizen and leading surveyor of Morris county, 
residing in Madison, Mr. Hancock was born on the old Hancock homestead 
in Chatham township, September 24, 1845, and is a son of John W. Han- 
cock, whose birth occurred at the same place August 31, 1805. The family 
is of English origin and was founded in the New World by Richard and 
Margaret Hancock, who left their native England and crossed the Atlantic to 
Nova Scotia in 1760. They afterward removed to New York and sub- 
sequently took up their residence in Elizabethtown, New Jersey. Their son. 
Rev. John Hancock, was born December 6, 1776. His father died when the 
son was only eight months old and later the mother married John Hand, and 
after his demise she became the wife of Robert Forest. John Hancock 
learned the harness-maker's trade in his early life and later his stepfather, 
Mr. Forest, gave him a small farm near Madison, upon which he spent his 
remaining days, his death occurring on the 17th of September, 1854. For a 
half century he was engaged in the work of the ministry, and his life was one 
of the most potent influences for good in the neighborhood. He donated the 
plat of ground on which was laid out the first cemetery in that locality and 
was prominently connected with all good works. On the 3d of April, 1802, 
he married Phoebe Ward, and they became the parents of three children: 
Jane, wife of Vincent D. Budd; John W. ; and Mary. The father was not 



272 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

only connected with the rehgious work of his neighborhood, but was a man 
whose ability called him into prominence in other walks of life, and about 
1829 he represented his district in the legislature. 

John W. Hancock, father of our subject, was a surveyor, following that 
profession from 1827 until his death. For many years he was the only sur- 
veyor in his part of the county and did much of the surveying that led to the 
development of the locality. He also engaged in farming and to some 
extent followed the carpenter's trade, which in early life he had learned of 
Mr. Kitchell, the first contractor in this part of the county. He was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary C. Griswold, a native of Morris county, and a 
daughter of Captain Chauncey Griswold, who located in Chatham township 
at an early day, and by their union were born nine children, six of whom 
reached years of maturity, while three died in childhood. The record of the 
familj' is as follows: Phoebe, a teacher in Newark, New Jersey; John E., a 
Methodist Episcopal minister of the Newark conference; Marvin G. , who 
died November 9, 1874, at about thirty-five years of age, leaving a widow 
and three children; Mary A., wife of the Rev. D. F. Hallock, a member of 
the New York Methodist conference; Roswell M. ; Robert H., who died in 
1872, at the age of twenty-four years; and the three others who died in early 
life. The mother died in 1848, and the father afterward married Eliza 
Riker, of Newark. He was judge of the court of common pleas for five 
years, and was a very prominent and influential citizen, active in shaping 
the public policy in matters social, educational, moral and material. For 
many years he served as president of the board of trustees of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and his death occurred April 18, 1875. 

Roswell M. Hancock attended the public schools of East Madison until 
sixteen years of age and then began learning surveying under the direction 
of his father, with whom he worked from the age of eighteen until the 
father's death, when the son succeeded to the business, which he has since 
followed. Since 1884 he has also engaged in the undertaking business, 
established undertaking parlors in Madison in 1888, and in Summit in 1892. 
He is a good business man, enterprising and honorable, and has met with 
fair success in his work. 

On the i2th of October, 1870, Mr. Hancock was united in marriage to 
Miss Lottie M. Tompkins, a native of Orange, and they had three children: 
Louis D., who was born in 1872 and died in 1874; Louise W. and Jennie E. 
The parents are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church. In 
his political views Mr. Hancock is a stalwart Republican and has served as 
township collector for one year, as surveyor of the borough and as justice of 
the peace for fifteen years, his long continuance in that office plainly indicat- 
ing the prompt, fair and able manner in which he has discharged his duties. 



BIOOBAPHICAL AMB GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 273 

EPHRAIM MARSH. 

Judge Ephraim Marsh was born in Mendham, New Jersey, in 1796, and 
came to Schooley's Mountain in 18 16. For nearly half a century he was one 
of the prominent and most respected citizens of the county. He was long 
active in politics and at different times represented the county in both 
branches of the legislature, being for some time the president of the senate. 
He held the office of judge of the court of common pleas for many years, 
was a member of the convention that revised the state constitution in 1844, 
was a prominent candidate for the governorship at the time of the nomina- 
tion of Mr. Olden, and was president of the national convention in Phila- 
delphia, in 1856, when Millard Fillmore was nominated for president, but 
which nomination he was constrained to renounce subsequently, and gave his 
reasons for so doing in an able letter published in the early part of the cam- 
paign. 

In 1S16 Judge Marsh became manager of the Heath house, the first 
hotel established on Schooley's Mountain, and in 1820 purchased the same. 
For thirty years thereafter he made continual additions and improvements 
until the hotel was capable of accommodating three hundred guests. How- 
ever, he was better and more widely known from his long connection with 
and eminent success in the management of the Morris Canal Company. The 
canal, costing millions of dollars, and designed as one of the great avenues 
for the transportation of produce and merchandise, but chiefly of anthracite 
coal from Pennsylvania to New York city, had become worthless as a public 
work, when Judge Marsh became president of the company. During the last 
sixteen years of his life he devoted all his energy and resources to this insti- 
tution, and he lived long enough to see it become under his management not 
onh' a great business success but one of the most profitable investments of 
capital to be found anywhere. He died in the summer of 1864, in his sixty- 
eighth 3 ear. 



WILLIAM B. LEFEVRE. 



Among the influential citizens of Jefferson, William B. Lefevre, M. D., 
deserves prominent mention. For intelligence, usefulness and weight of 
character, he will long be remembered. His ancestors on both sides can be 
traced to an early date. The first of this name was Hippolyte Lefevre, who 
came to this country in the ship Griffith, in 1675, and landed at Salem. For 
a long period the Lefevre family lived on the island of Tinicum, in the Dela- 
ware river, eleven miles below Philadelphia. From there Minard Lefevre, 
the third in descent from Hippolyte Lefevre, came to Succasunna about the 

18 



274 BIOOBAPHICAL AJfD GEJVEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

year 1750. His son John married Elizabeth Day, a granddaughter of J. 
Jeff, who in 1750 came with his family from England and settled at Eliza- 
bethtown. This Mr. Jeff was a commission merchant and the owner of 
several ships which sailed regularly between England and this country. In 
1775 his three children removed to Succasunna Plains. Mary Jeff, the 
youngest of these three, married Aaron Day, a lieutenant in the Revolution- 
ary war. Their youngest daughter, Elizabeth, married John Lefevre. 



AMASA A. MACWITHEY, M. D. 

One whose identification with the medical profession has been long, hon- 
orable and active, Dr. Macwithey was born in Saratoga county. New York, 
on the 15th of December, 18 19, a son of John and Mary (Jeremiah) Mac- 
withey, also natives of the same county. His father was a contractor and 
builder and was employed on the construction of the Union College, of Sche- 
nectady, New York. 

The Doctor was reared in the latter place and acquired his literary edu- 
cation in its public schools, after which he followed the printer's trade in 
New York city for some years. He studied medicine under Dr. Isaac S. 
Smith, of the metropolis, and attended lectures at the New York University, 
from which institution he was graduated in the class of 1843, his diploma 
being signed by Theodore Frelinghuysen, then chancellor of the university. 
Dr. Macwithey entered upon his professional career in New York city, where 
he remained until 1850, when he removed to Pompton, Morris county, where 
he has since made his home, devoting his energies to the restoration of the 
sick. He has always been a close student of his profession, and by reading 
has kept abreast with the improvements which characterize the science of 
medicine. He has been very successful in his work and is the respected and 
honored family physician in many of the best homes in his section of the 
county. He belongs to the Morris County Medical Society and has been 
examining surgeon for the New York Mutual and the Manhattan Life Insur- 
ance Companies for many years. 

The Doctor is a valued member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to 
Orange Lodge, of Paterson. He is also a member of the United Friends, 
and in his political associations is a Republican, warmly espousing the prin- 
ciples of the Grand Old Party. He is connected in religious belief with the 
Reformed church and is now serving as elder of the congregation of that 
denomination in Pompton. 

The Doctor has been twice married. In 1844 he was joined in wedlock 
to Miss Mary Helen Quinn, daughter of Robert Quinn, of New York. After 
a happy married life of more than a third of a century Mrs. Macwithey was 




-^M 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 275 

called to the home beyond, in 1880. Four children were born of that union, 
but all are now deceased. The son, Edward L. C. Macwithey, was a prac- 
ticing physician of New York city and married Anna Belle Reamer, by whom 
he had one child, Edward Louis, who married Alice Linen, of Pompton. 
The Doctor was again married, on June 21, 1882, to Isabel Nostrand, of New 
York city, a daughter of Andrew and Mary (Pierce) Nostrand, and they have 
one son, Herbert Alonzo. The Doctor and his wife are held in the highest 
esteem throughout the community and their circle of friends is very wide. 



FRANK MARSH. 



Members of the Marsh family, one of the oldest in New Jersey, are quite 
numerous throughout the state and have become conspicuous in mercantile, 
manufacturing and other business enterprises. Theodore W. Marsh, the 
father of our subject, was of English descent and was born in Rahway, New 
Jersey. At an early date he engaged in the grocery business in New York 
city, and conducted this enterprise until 1871, when he retired, being 
at that time the oldest grocer in the city. He was successful in that line of 
endeavor and gained the confidence and respect of all with whom he came in 
contact. 

Frank Marsh, a retired and representative citizen of Morristown, is a 
native of New York, where his birth occurred on the 21st of February, 1854, 
and there he was reared, his education being acquired in the public schools. 
He began his business career as a clerk in the spice store of Ruf us Story & 
Company, of New York, remaining thus employed from 1871 to 1876, and 
for the ensuing eleven years he was engaged in the fire and marine insurance 
business. On account of failing health he retired from active life in 1886, 
removed to Morristown, and has since continued to make this city his home. 

Mr. Marsh is a Republican in his political faith and has been an active 
worker in the ranks of his party, not only in Morristown but in state and 
national affairs. He is an excellent organizer and campaign manager and 
has served as a member of the Morristown city council, which is the only 
official preferment he has ever held. 

In 1876 Mr. Marsh become a member of the Sixth Company, Seventh 
New York Regiment, retaining his connection therewith for ten years, and he 
now belongs to the Veteran Association of the regiment. He is a member 
of the New Jersey Historical Society and of the American Historical Asso- 
ciation. 

The marriage of Mr. Marsh was solemnized in 1879, when he was united 
to Miss Emeline A. Wolf. 



276 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



MARCUS B. CRANE. 

As the leading grocer of Madison, Mr. Crane possesses that spirit of 
enterprise and ambition that forms the keynote of America's marvelous 
progress. A well-earned success crowns his labors, and not only does 
Madison number him among her leading merchants, but also accounts him 
one of her valued citizens, by reason of the loyal interest which he manifests 
in all affairs pertaining to the public welfare. 

Born in Montville township, Morris county, in 1849, he is a son of Jacob 
and Mary (Morrison) Crane. His father was probably a native of Passaic 
county, New Jersey, and his mother was born in that county. The former 
died when our subject was only two years of age, but he was carefully reared 
by his mother and provided with the best educational and other facilities 
which she could offer him. He attended the common schools through the 
•winter season and in the summer months assisted in the plowing, planting 
and harvesting which made the homestead one of the well-developed farms- 
of the neighborhood. At length he determined to devote his energies to 
some other calling, and accordingly, when eighteen years of age, he left 
home, going to Boonton, where he became apprenticed to a carpenter, serv- 
ing a three-years term. When he had mastered the business he began work 
as a journeyman, being employed in that capacity for two years. 

In January, 1872, Mr. Crane came to Madison, and has since been 
identified with the business interests of this city. With the capital that he 
had acquired through his own labors, he embarked in the grocery trade, 
becoming a member of the firm of Hopping & Crane, which connection was 
continued for about a year, when Mr. Crane sold his interest and became a 
member of the firm of Allen & Crane. Since 1877 he has been alone, and 
is now proprietor of the leading house in his line in the town. He carries a 
large and carefully selected stock, his prices are reasonable, and his treat- 
ment of his patrons is ever courteous and his dealings honorable. This has 
insured him a very liberal patronage and has brought to him a well-deserved 
success. 

Mr. Crane has been twice married. In 1S73 he was joined in wedlock 
to Miss Annie Allen, who died in 1880. Two children were born of that 
union: Herbert, who died in infancy, and Clifford, who is now associated 
with his father in business. In 1883 he was again married, his second union 
Ibeing with Miss Julia Van Alst, a native of Long Island, New York, and a 
daughter of Jacob and Julia (Lawton) Van Alst, who were also born on Long 
Island, and were of Holland descent. Mr. and Mrs. Crane have one 
daughter, Marjorie, and the generous hospitality of their home is enjoyed by 
many friends. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 21T 

Mr. Crane has served as township committeeman and commissioner of 
appeals, and in the discharge of his pubhc duties manifests a loyalty to 
American institutions that is most commendable. He exercises his right of 
franchise in support of the men and measures of the Republican party, and 
has a firm belief in the principles which form its platform. He also belongs 
to the Royal Arcanum, and in fraternal, business and political circles has 
gained many warm friends. 



PETER O. HALSEY. 



One who stood as a representative and honored citizen of Morris county 
was Peter O. Halsey, the subject of this memoir, and it is signally consistent 
that in this connection be accorded a review of his life, which has so recently 
ended, after a long and useful career, in which integrity and honor were ever 
in evidence. 

Mr. Halsey was born in Hanover, Morris county, on the 5th of June, 
1822, being the son of William and Maria (Ogilvie) Halsey. His father was 
born in New York city, October 29, 1796, and was a son of Isaac Halsey, a 
native of Pennsylvania. The ancestry of the family can be traced back to 
Remington Halsey, who with his three sons settled in New York in the 
seventeenth century. These sons bore the good old Scriptural names of 
Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. One went to Pennsylvania, the second remained 
in the Empire state, and the third came to Morris county. Isaac Halsey, 
grandfather of our subject, was a contractor in New York city, and in his 
early life William Halsey assisted in the work of building. He was married 
October 17, 18 14, to Miss Maria Ogilvie, a daughter of Peter Ogilvie and a 
native of New York, descended from Scotch ancestry. After his marriage 
William Halsey located in Hanover, where he purchased a farm and devoted 
his energies to agricultural pursuits until 1823, when he returned to New 
York. In the metropolis he carried on the grocery business until 1838, 
when he purchased the old Halsted homestead in Hanover, and thereafter 
he followed farming until his death, which occurred December 31, 1878. His 
wife passed away December 3, 1895, at the very advanced age of one 
hundred and two years. 

William and Maria (Ogilvie) Halsey became the parents of six children, 
and five of the number lived to attain maturity. Their names in order of 
birth are as follows: William; Maria, wife of William H. Oglesby; Peter O., 
the immediate subject of this memoir; Isaac, who died in infancy; Isaac, the 
second of that name; and Ann, wife of Dr. Charles Hunter. 

Peter O. Halsey acquired his early education in the schools of New York 
and completed his literary studies in the Plainfield Boarding School, at 



278 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Plainfield, New Jersey. He then engaged as clerk in a dry-goods store, 
which pursuit he followed for nearly five years, on the expiration of which 
period he removed to Hanover. He ever thereafter devoted his attention 
and energies to agricultural pursuits, being the owner of a valuable farm of 
three hundred and thirty-eight acres, much of which is under a high state of 
cultivation, the place being recognized as one of the finest farms in the county. 
In return for the care and labor he bestowed upon it the farm yielded to the 
owner a golden tribute and he was signally prospered in his affairs. There 
is a beautiful residence upon the place, the same having been erected bj' Mr. 
.Halsey in 185 1, while other substantial improvements add to the value and 
attractive appearance of this desirable country seat. 

In 1843 Mr. Halsey was united in marriage to Miss Mary Jane Gerow, 
a native of Platekill, New York, and a daughter of Bailey and Phoebe Gerow, 
who were of French ancestry. Mr. and Mrs. Halsey became the parents of 
five children, namely: Anna M., wife of Charles McNaughton; William, at 
home; Mary Jane, wife of E. A. Benjamin, of Afton; Phoebe, wife of John 
Genung, of Whippany; and Elizabeth T., wife of Ira Rome, of Troy. Mr. 
and Mrs. Halsey were attendants of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
were zealous in all good works. Mrs. Halsey entered into eternal rest on 
the 8th of June, 1895, at the age of seventy-five years; and the life labors of 
the honored subject of this review were ended in death on the 12th of Sep- 
tember, 1898. 

In his political adherency, Mr. Halsey was in early life a member of the 
Democratic party, but upon the organization of the Republican party he 
identified himself therewith and ever afterward continued to support its prin- 
ciples and policies. He passed the greater part of his life in Morris county, 
and the fact that some of his warmest friends were numbered among those 
who had known him from boyhood, indicates that his was an honorable and 
useful career, such as everywhere commands respect. 

The following paragraph concerning the Halsey genealogy is taken from 
a record which is extant: 

" Mr. Halsey was a descendant of Thomas Halsey, who came from Great 
Gaddensden, England, and was living at Lynn, Massachusetts, in 1637. 
He was one of the founders of the town of South Hampton, Long Island, 
in 1640, the first English town in the state of New York. The family 
remained in South Hampton for nearly one hundred years, when Recom- 
pense Halsey moved to Morris county. His grandson Isaac was born 
in Hanover, and during the Revolution was employed as a wagon boy; 
soon after the close of the war he removed to New York city, where 
he amassed a comfortable fortune in business. His son, William Halsey, 
born in New York, was married to Maria, daughter of Judge Peter 



BIOGRJPEICAL AJVD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 279 

Ogilvie, of that city. After his marriage Mr. Halsey located on a farm 
at Hanover. In 1823 he removed to New York city, where he lived for 
years, attending to his own real estate and that of his wife, which was 
very extensive. Several years before his death he made his permanent home 
on his farm at Hanover, which had previously been his summer residence, and 
here he died. His widow passed away December 3, 1895, at the very 
advanced age of one hundred and two years." 



GEORGE E. LUM. 



A carpenter and builder of Summit, whose identification with the 
industrial interests of this locality has been of material benefit to the neigh- 
borhood, Mr. Lum was born on the old family homestead, in Chatham town- 
ship, July 9, 1854, and is the seventh son of Charles Lum. In his early 
youth he attended school and assisted his father in the work of the farm, but 
when he had reached the age of seventeen years he resolved to turn his 
attention to some other pursuit than that of agricultnre, and learned the 
carpenter's trade under the direction of his brother, I. D. Lum, serving a 
three-years apprenticeship, after which he worked with him as a journeyman 
for two years. On the expiration of that period he engaged in the butcher- 
ing business in Chatham, continuing in that line for five years. He next 
went to Summit, where he resumed work at the carpenter's trade in connec- 
tion with S. R. Mullen. In 18S9 he was admitted to a full partnership with 
Mr. Mullen, and in May, 1894, bought out his employer. He has since con- 
tinued alone in business and has met with gratifying success in his work. He 
has erected many of the finest residences in Summit, which stand as monu- 
ments to the thrift and enterprise of the builder and are evidences of his 
skill and handiwork. He lives up faithfully to the terms of every contract; 
and his well-directed efforts, his honorable dealings and his enterprise have 
brought to him a liberal patronage and secured to him a comfortable com- 
petence. 

In 1878 Mr. Lum was united in marriage to Miss Addie B. Genung, a 
daughter of Isaac and Harriet L. (Spencer) Genung, early settlers of Chat- 
ham township. By this union have been born ten children, eight of whom 
are still living, namely: Irving M., George V. , Edner S., Alfred C, Harold 
D. , Dudley F., Marion Genung and Wallace Burton. Those who have 
passed away are Florence M., who died March 3, 1881, at the age of two 
years; and Eleanor, who died May 28, 1893, at the age of eighteen months. 

Mr. Lum is a member of Summit Council, No. 1042, Royal Arcanum, 
also belongs to Summit Lodge, No. 163, A. F. & A. M., and Summit Court, 
Independent Order of Foresters. He and his wife are faithful and consistent 



280 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

members of the Presbyterian church of Chatham, and in his political views 
he is a Republican, but has never demanded or sought public office in return 
for his service. His life is a busy, useful and honorable one and his worth 
commends him to all with whom he comes in contact. 



JOHN McTERNAN. 

The subject of this review is now living in quiet retirement from business 
cares in his pleasant home in Madison. His has been a busy and a useful 
life and he is now enjoying the rest which should ever follow the energetic, 
consecutive labor of many years. The success that has crowned his efforts 
has been worthily achieved, and his life demonstrates the possibilities that 
America offers to those of her native and adopted sons who will take advan- 
tage of these opportunities and by determined and honorable purpose work 
their way upward. 

Mr. McTernan was born in county Leitrim, Ireland, on the 3d of Novem- 
ber, 1824, and is a son of John and Bridget (Gallagher) McTernan, also 
natives of the same county. Upon a farm he was reared to manhood and in 
the public schools he pursued his studies until thirteen years of age, after 
which his attention was given to the practical duties of the farm. As he 
neared his majority he gave considerable thought to the New World and the 
advantages here afforded young men, and thinking to better his financial 
condition he resolved to seek a home beyond the water. Accordingly he 
bade adieu to home and friends and took a passage on a sailing vessel, which 
left the harbor of Liverpool on the 26th of December, i S46, and dropped 
anchor in the harbor of New York on the 8th of March, 1847, after a voyage 
of seventy-two days. 

Mr. McTernan had no capital, but possessed a resolute spirit and firm 
determination to succeed, and began life on the American continent by work- 
ing as a day laborer, for eighty-seven and a half cents for a day of twelve 
hours. He spent one year in that way, after which he was employed for two 
years on a farm in Connecticut. On the expiration of that period he secured 
a stock of goods which he began selling through the country from a wagon, 
and for twenty-five years he thus traveled through Morris and a part of 
Essex county. He thus became widely known and his visits were looked 
forward to by many customers. He had a large number of regular patrons 
and the volume of his business constantly increased, yielding to him a good 
income. When he had acquired a handsome competence he resolved to 
retire from active life, and accordingly, in 1875, he disposed of all his goods 
and has since passed his time in quiet rest. In the early days he frequently 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 281 

walked to and from Whippany, carrying a package weighing from seventy to 
eighty pounds. He endured many hardships and had many difficulties to 
overcome, but steadily and persistently worked his way upward and at length 
gained a handsome property. 

On the 25th of May, 1846, Mr. McTernan was united in marriage to 
Miss Anna McMorrow, a native of county Leitrim, Ireland, and a daughter 
of James and Mary McMorrow. They were the parents of eight children: 
Patrick, who died at the age of four years; John, of California; James, also 
of California; Mar}', the eldest, now the wife of Edward F. McCarthy; Frank, 
of California; Anna G., at home; Margaret, wife of Dennis F. McCarthy; 
and William, who died at the age of four years. 

Mr. McTernan has been honored by his fellow townsmen with some local 
offices. He was elected collector and treasurer of Madison in 1892, for a 
three-years term, and was re-elected March 12, 1895. He is a member of 
the board of health, and of the election board for the southern district of 
Madison, and in all public affairs has discharged his duties with a promptness 
and fidelity that have won him the commendation of all concerned. His 
vote supports the men and measures of the Democracy. He and his family 
are members of the St. Vincent church, Roman Catholic, of Madison, and 
in the community they are widely and favorably known. 



ROBERT N. CORNISH. 



Ere the first century of American colonization had passed the Cornish 
family had been established in Connecticut. It was in the year 1690 that 
three brothers of the name, bidding adieu to their native land, braved the 
dangers incident to ocean voyaging in those days in order to secure homes in 
the New World. All reared families, and it is from Aaron Cornish that our sub- 
ject is descended. His son, John Cornish, the great-grandfather of Robert N. , 
espoused the cause of the colonies in the war of the Revolution and with great 
valor resisted the encroachments of the mother country upon the rights and 
liberties of her people in the New World. His life was given as a sacrifice to 
liberty, for he was killed at the battle of Saratoga. The family was also rep- 
resented in the war of 1812 when Joel Cornish, an uncle of our subject, aided 
in the second resistance to England. 

In 1794 the Cornish family removed from Connecticut to New York. 
They came of a prominent people of England, one of their ancestors, John 
Cornish, having served as high sheriff of London. Later he was hanged, on 
false political charges. In matters of public importance in America the 
representatives of the name have always taken an active and commendable 



282 BIOGBJPHICAL AMB GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

part, and in his faithful discharge of the duties of citizenship our subject to-day 
■worthily represents those from whom he traces his descent. 

John Cornish, who was killed in the Revolutionary war, reared three 
sons, Daniel, Aaron and Elisha. The last named was a school-teacher and 
Daniel removed to Catskill, New York, where he spent the greater part of 
his life. Aaron also became a resident of Catskill, where he was married, in 
1793. to Rhoda Brown, and the following year they removed to Dutchess 
county. New York. In 1806 they became residents of Otsego county. New 
York, where Aaron Cornish purchased a farm, whereon he made his home 
until his death, in 1827. His wife died in 1856. Aaron and Phoebe Cornish 
had eleven children: Joel, who was born in 1784 and reared a family; 
Aaron, born in 1795; Elisha, born in 1797; Robert, born in 1799; Henry M., 
born in 1S02; Eliza, who was born in 1804 and became the wife of M. H. 
Denton; Abigail, born in 1808; Noah, born in 1810; and Asenath. 

Robert B. Cornish, father of our subject, was born January 28, 1799, 
and married Rachel Gillette. They removed from Otsego county, New 
York, in 185 1, locating in Morris county. New Jersey, settling on a farm 
near the Passaic river and in the vicinity of the town of Gillette. The father 
died in 1862, and the mother passed away in 1875. They had seven chil- 
dren, as follows: Harriet E., born in 1823, is now the wife of John Cooper; 
Aaron D., who was born in 1826, died in 1832; Robert N., born in 1828; 
Rhoda A., who was born in 1831, died in 1851; AlonzoG., born in 1833; 
George B., who was born in 1836 and who died in Denver, Colorado, in 
1896, married Laura Runyon, of Newark; Rachel M., who was born in 1840, 
became the wife of George W. Howell, of Morristown, and is now dead. 

Robert N. Cornish, whose name begins this article, was born in Otsego 
county. New York, July 29, 1828, and spent his youth in the Empire state, 
where he received good educational privileges, attending the Hartwick Sem- 
inary and the Albany Normal School, being a graduate of both institutions. 
On the completion of his educational course he turned his attention to ped- 
agogic work and taught in New York and New Jersey for twelve years. In 
185 1 he accepted a school in Orange, this state, where he remained until 
1856, when he took up his abode in Morris county. 

In 1854 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Cornish and Miss Phoebe S. 
Harrison, a daughter of Abraham Harrison, of Orange, who was one of the 
pioneers of that section of the state. He was born in 1778 and died in 185 1. 
His parents were Jared and Hannah (Baldwin) Harrison, who took up their 
residence in Orange at an early day, Joseph Harrison, the grandfather, hav- 
ing removed from Connecticut to Newark, New Jersey, and later to Orange. 
Mrs. Harrison, mother of Mrs. Cornish, bore the maiden name of Phebe 
Crowell, and was a daughter of Aaron and Abigail (Brown) Crowell. Mrs. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 283 

Harrison had two children, and died January 28, 1874. Hannah S., her 
elder daughter, was born March 30, 1828, and died November 16, 1848, 
while Phebe, the younger, was born July 8, 1830. 

To. Mr. and Mrs. Cornish were born eight children: Professor Robert 
H., who was born September 3, 1857, and is a graduate of Yale College, of 
the class of 1883, now occupfes a chair in the high school of New York city, 
where he makes his home. He married Miss Ida Skilton, and they have 
three children: Margaret, Ruth and Robert. Mary, born January 22, 1S60, 
at home; William A., born November 6, 1862, is a graduateof Yale College, 
of the class of 1887, and is now professor of mathematics in the Normal 
School at Cortland, New York. He married Catherine Baker, and they 
have two children, Cornelia and William. Selina is the next of the family, 
born December 8, 1864. George A., born September 15, 1866, spent two 
years at Cornell University, after which he entered Pratt Institute, at Brook- 
lyn, New York, where he was graduated as a mechanical engineer. He is 
at present spending his time at the parental home bringing out certain patent 
articles of his own invention. Abram H., born December 12, 1869, was 
graduated in Harvard University in the class of 1895, ^^i^ is now an attorney 
of Newark, New Jersey. Charlotte H. , born December 27, 1873, and Emma 
M. , born June 26, 1877, are still under the parental roof. 

Mr. Cornish and his family have a very pleasant home at Gillette. 
Their residence is noted for its hospitality and the members of the household 
occupy a high position in social circles. Mr. Cornish is one of the leading 
farmers of Morris county and has a fine farm and handsome country seat. 
In his agricultural work, as in his teaching, he is progressive and enterprising 
and keeps fully abreast with all im.provements in the industry. In public 
matters he takes a deep interest, and in 1895 was elected, on the Republican 
ticket, to the position of freeholder from Passaic tovvnship. He is a recog- 
nized leader of his party, has served on the county executive committee and 
has attended the county and state conventions. 



FRANCIS H. TIPPETT. 



City assessor of Dover and a member of the insurance and real-estate 
firm of Tippett & Baker, Francis H. Tippett was born in the village of Rock- 
away, Morris county, December 6, i860, a son of Samuel and Julia (Call) 
Tippett. His mother was born in Haverstraw, New York, on the Hudson. 
His father was born December 8, 1826, at Chacewater, in Cornwall, Eng- 
land, and at a very early age, like most Cornish lads, began mining in the 
mines of that part of England, continuing in that industry all his life. He 
•left England in 1848, landed at Quebec, and went on to Lake Superior, 



284 BIOGRAPHICAL AJTD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

where he secured employment in the copper mines of the British North 
American Mining Company. But his native sense and practical knowledge 
of mining prevented him from working long in a subordinate capacity, and he 
was soon promoted to the position of mining boss. He worked for a time in 
the Bruce and North Shore mines on the Canada side, but left there in 
1849, upon the outbreak of cholera in the Lake Superior district, and later 
became superintendent of the working in a mine in Dutchess county. New 
York, about fifteen miles north of Rondout. From there he came to Morris 
county and worked with the late John Hance in the mines of Irondale, 
where he was located when the panic of 1857 came upon the country. 
About this time he went to Hibernia, where he formed a partnership with 
the late Richard Stephens, and under the firm name of Tippett & Stephens 
engaged in contract work for the Glendon Iron Company. Later this firm 
transferred its operations to Mount Hope, but Mr. Tippett did not long 
remain there, the partnership being soon afterward dissolved. In 1859 he 
formed a partnership with Robert Richards, under the firm name of Rich- 
ards & Tippett, and thus associated they continued until the death of Mr. 
Tippett, doing business as contractors under the name of the Glendon Iron 
Company in their extensive mines at Hibernia. At times they had as high 
as seven hundred men in their employ and doubtless raised more iron ore 
than any other firm of mining contractors in New Jersey in the same length 
of time. 

Samuel Tippett was public-spirited and progressive in every sense, and 
his words were always enforced by his deeds, for he never withheld his hand 
when his mind and heart directed the way. While engaged in mining in 
Dutchess county. New York, he married Julia Call, of Haverstraw, January 
20, 1855. They became the parents of six sons, three of whom are living: 
Frank H., Charles E., George F. William died in 1896. For his second 
wife Mr. Tippett married Miss Ellen Rose, also of Haverstraw, New York, 
who survives him with all of her children, namely: Amelia, Edward, Sam- 
uel and Nettie. As a husband and father, Mr. Tippett was most indulgent 
and kind, always giving his wife and children the best advantages, and leav- 
ing them well provided for. 

Francis H. Tippett, whose name begins this article, was reared in the 
village of Rockaway, where he attended the public schools, after which he 
entered the Centenary Collegiate Institute, where he prosecuted his studies 
three years. He was then employed by the Hibernia Railroad Company as 
station agent at Rockana, until November, 1879, when he came to Dover, 
where he accepted the position of bookkeeper for George Richards, in 
whose employ he remained for eight years. He next formed a partnership 
with William H. Baker, under the firm name of Baker & Tippett, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 285 

opened a mercantile establishment, which they conducted two years, when he 
sold out to his partner. Then opening an insurance and real-estate office in 
Dover, he continued alone in business until March 12, 1879, when he formed 
a partnership with Thomas Baker, under the firm style of Tippett & Baker, 
a connection that has since been continued with mutual pleasure and profit. 
They handle both city and farm property and represent a number of reliable 
insurance companies. Their business is large and profitable, and, being 
known as thoroughly trustworthy and straightforward business men, they 
command a liberal share of the public patronage in their line. 

On the 23d of October, 1883, Mr. Tippett was united in marriage to 
Miss Henrietta Baker, a daughter of William H. and Clarissa (Dell) Baker, 
one of the prominent old families of Morris county. Our subject and his 
wife now have one son, Clarence Baker Tippett. 

In his political views Mr. Tippett is a stanch Republican and in 1894 
was appointed city assessor by the common council. He held this office 
consecutively by successive re-appointments up to 1897, when he was elected 
for a two-years term, so that he is the present incumbent, his term to con- 
tinue until September, 1899. He is careful and painstaking in the discharge 
of his public duties, fully meriting the confidence reposed in him by the 
council. He belongs to Dover Lodge, No. 127, K. P., and is one of the 
valued knights. In his business life he pays the strictest regard to com- 
mercial ethics and his reputation in trade circles is most enviable. 



ROBERT BLAKE. 



The duties and quiet pleasures of rural life now occupy the time and 
attention of this gentleman, who owns one of the fine country seats of Morris 
county. The place comprises two hundred acres of rich land, beautifully 
situated, and the home that stands thereon was originally known throughout 
the neighborhood as " The Mansion." Mr. Blake has resided in Morris 
county since 1884. A native of the Green Mountain state, he was born in 
Bridport, Vermont, on the 12th of December, 1826, and is a son of Robert 
Blake, who was born in New York. He was of Scotch-Irish ancestry and 
was a son of James Blake, whose father was born in Scotland in 1753, but 
became a resident of Cambridge, New York, during his childhood. During 
the Revolutionary war he served under General Schuyler in transporting 
goods to Saratoga, one of the military posts. The mother of our subject 
was a Miss Judson, who was born in Lansingburg, New York, and was a 
daughter of Eli Judson, who was born in Stratford, Connecticut, and was 
married in Lansingburg. 

The father of our subject spent the greater part of his life in New York 



286 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

and devoted his energies to manufacturing pursuits. He died at the age of 
sixty-three years, and his wife passed away in 1879 at the age of seventy- 
nine years. They were members of the Presbyterian church. 

During his youth Robert Blake spent the greater part of his time in his 
father's manufacturing estabHshment, in New York, and in 1849, when 
twenty-three years of age, he joined the California argonauts who went to 
the Pacific slope in search of the golden fleece. Mr. Blake spent seven 
years there, working part of the time in the mines. He then returned to the 
Atlantic coast, recrossing the continent, and for many years was engaged in 
manufacturing in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. He did a prof- 
itable business, for the output of his factory was very extensive, as demanded 
by a liberal patronage. His goods were sold in various parts of the country 
and he continued a profitable business in manufacturing interests until 1890, 
when he retired from commercial pursuits and purchased what was known as 
the old Borroughs farm. There, in the quiet enjoyment of many of life's 
pleasures, he is spending his declining days, resting from the more vigorous 
toil of former years which brought him the handsome competence which he 
now possesses. He superintends the operation of his farm, for one whose 
life has been so active as has Mr. Blake's could not content himself with 
absolute retirement from all labor. 

In i860 he was united in marriage to Miss Thorn, a native of New York 
and a daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Morris) Thorn, of New York, and of 
English lineage. Mr. and Mrs. Blake became the parents of seven children, 
four of whom are still living: Emily is the wife of Arthur N. Eagles; Sarah 
is deceased; Eliza; Robert M., deceased; Mary Ellis is the wife of Theodore 
Hopping; Paul married Amy Thompson, and Frank is deceased. 

In his political views Mr. Blake has long been a stalwart Republican, 
but in his active life has had neither time nor inclination to seek public office. 
He is a Presbyterian in his religious belief, and is an elder in the church of 
that denomination in Madison. His has been an honorable life, pervaded by 
earnest purpose, sterling principles and good deeds, and his life record is 
thus worthy of perpetuation. 



EDWIN A. SCRIBNER. 



Within the last half century America has demonstrated her right to the 
leadership of the world in the realm of invention. She, at first, by the 
brilliancy of her achievements, won the attention of the old countries, then 
commanded a respect which rapidly developed in a wondering admiration. 
Though she cannot cope with old masters in the fine arts, Europe has 




g.a/). 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 28T 

acknowledged her pre-eminence in science and useful invention. Mr. 
Scribner was one among those whose inventive genius gave to the world 
some of its most prized articles of utility, and his comprehensive knowledge 
of chemistry and its kindred branches won him in that line a leadership that 
was widely acknowledged. Into the mysteries of nature he delved, and, 
bringing the clear light of reason and broad understanding to bear upon them, 
he learned many of the secrets which had hitherto been kept from man. His 
work was such as to bring benefit to his fellow men, and his name is inscribed, 
among the pioneers who have opened up a new field of labor that will result 
in material benefit to the race. 

Edwin Albert Scribner was born in Topsham, Maine, April i8, 1856, 
and is a son of Charles Edwin and Sarah Ann (Hall) Scribner. He was pre- 
pared for college in the high school of Brunswick, Maine, and pursued the 
general scientific course then offered at Bowdoin College. After his gradua- 
tion the natural trend of his mind and taste led him to continue in the study 
of chemistry, and he devoted his energies to further perfecting himself in 
that science in Brunswick, Maine, in New York city and in Baltimore, Mary- 
land. In January, 1880, he accepted the professorship of natural science 
and chemistry in Ripon College, but in June, 1881, resigned that position to 
become consulting chemist to a company engaged in the manufacture of 
phosphates in the vicinity of New York city and was himself a manufacturer 
of fertilizers and chemicals in Elizabethport, New Jersey, for several years. 
In 1 88 1 he removed to Boonton, Morris county, and as the president of the 
Loando Hard Rubber Company was conducting, at the time of his death, an. 
extensive manufacturing business which owed its success to his own inventive 
powers and untiring energy. 

On the 1 8th of August, 1880, Mr. Scribner was united in marriage to 
Miss Annie Eugenia Thompson, daughter of Charles Woodbury and Jane 
(Whitney) Thompson. His death occurred May 22, 1898, of malarial poison- 
ing, and he left a wife and three children to mourn his loss. They had a 
daughter and two sons: Jessie Harwood, Charles Edwin and ^George Kline. 
Mr. Scribner was enthusiastic, kind-hearted and generous, but his most 
prominent characteristic was the intense loyalty displayed toward his friends,, 
his family and his ideals. He always had the courage to express his convic- 
tions, and those were sometimes so radical as to place him in apparent 
antagonism to those who sought the same ends as himself. Perhaps no bet- 
ter estimate of his character can be given than by incorporating in this 
review of his life the formal expressions of " The Cabinet," a social organi- 
zation to which he belonged, and of the class of 1877 of Bowdoin College. 
The latter sent the following message to the family of Mr. Scribner: 



288 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

IN MEMORIAM. 

Called by the death of Edwin Albert Scribner to mourn again the loss of 
one of our number, as representatives of the class of '77 in Bowdoin College, 
we desire to place on record our high appreciation of the worth and char- 
acter of our classmate and friend. His devotion to all the duties of life, his 
regard for his class, his honor as a man and faithfulness to his convictions, 
all remind us of the loss we have sustained. 

We extend to his wife and children our sympathy in this hour of sorrow, 
and commend them to the comfort of Him who gave them such a husband 
and father. Edgar M. Cousins, 

George L.Thompson, 
George T. Little, 

Committee of the Class. 

The memorial of the Cabinet was as follows: 

In the passing away of Mr. Edwin A. Scribner this community has lost 
an intelligent and public-spirited citizen, his circle of friends a refined and 
noble-minded companion, and The Cabinet a gifted and valued member, ever 
ready to contribute to its interest and success by his intelligent and scholarly 
papers, and also a wise and faithful member of its executive committee. The 
members who heard his last effort before them in the review he gave of Bel- 
lamy's " Equality," will not soon forget it. It was not only admirable, it 
was wonderful in character, revealing a grasp of thought, a clearness of state- 
ment and a fairness of spirit that was beautiful and rare. It is a coincidence 
not unworthy of note that these two men, the author of this book and he by 
whom it was so fairly and ably reviewed, should have been called away upon 
the same day and at almost the same hour of the day. 

Thus bearing testimony to their high regard and appreciation of Mr. 
Scribner, the members of The Cabinet desire to extend to his dear family and 
friends this expression of their unfeigned and heartfelt sympathy. 

M. B. Jenkins, Secretary, 
W. H. WooLVERTON, Chairman. 

While the influence of a life is immeasurable, its effect may yet be 
determined in a measure by the lives of those with whom the individual was 
associated. The friends of Mr. Scribner were those of scholarly tastes, 
refined habits and of true worth of character. He himself was a broad 
student, and a man of strong mental endowments, and while recognized as 
one of the expert chemists, of the country, he never confined his reading to 
that one science; the best authors of the past and present were his friends, 
and his familiarity with literature was a source of wonder to those who 
knew of his busy life. He was a companionable gentlemen, kindly, social 
and entirely approachable, of unassailable integrity in the affairs of business 
life, of unquestioned loyalty to every duty and every trust. 

His life was gentle, and the elements 

So mixed in him that Nature might stand up 

And say to all the world, This was a man. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 289 

WILLIAM DELLICKER. 

The late William Dellicker, of Hackettstown, was one of the leading 
business men of Morris county, and was descended from a family which came 
many years ago into the vicinity of German Valley and were established at 
Springtown, where the father of our subject was a merchant and distiller. 
He married Sophia Neighbour and the subject of this mention was one of 
eight children. He was schooled in the country school and began life as a 
merchant and continued his father's old business in company with a brother, 
Samuel. 

In 1868 he left Springtown and located near Hackettstown, -where he 
purchased a farm and ever after resided there. He was a good business man, 
successful, and many years ago was made a director in the Hackettstown 
National Bank and was its vice-president at his death. He was somewhat 
prominent in politics; was a lifelong Democrat and held many offices of the 
township of Washington. He married Caroline Bruner and died September 
13, 1896, at the age of eighty-two years. Their children are: Augustus H. ; 
Frederick, of Rockport; Harry B., of Hackettstown; Carrie and William. 



REV. TIMOTHY JOHNES, D. D. 

The first pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Morristown was 
the Rev. Timothy Johnes, who entered upon his pastorate August 13, 1742, 
and continued his labors with that congregation until his death. He was of 
Welsh descent and was born in Southampton, Long Island, May 24, 1717. 
He was a graduate of Yale College, of the class of 1737, and in 1783 his 
nliiia mater conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity. 

In his history of the Presbyterian church Mr. Webster says: " Of the 
period between his. leaving college and going to Morristown we have seen 
no notice, except that in that perilous time, when some haply were found 
fighting against God, those who separated from the first parish in New 
Haven worshipped in the house of Mr. Timothy Johnes." From this it 
would appear that he studied theology in New Haven. He was no doubt 
licensed by the Congregational body, and came to Morristown by means of 
the letter of presbytery to the president of the college, or by a subsequent 
request to the same. Tradition asserts that he labored for a short period on 
Long Island in some of the vacant churches. 

He began his labors in Morristown August 13, 1742, was ordained and 
installed February 9, 1743, and continued pastor until his death. In 1791 
he fractured his thigh bone by a fall, which confined him for months to his 
bed and made him a cripple for the remainder of his life. After more than 

19 



290 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEMEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

a year's confinement he was able to attend public worship. Aided by one or 
two of his elders he reached the desk, where seated on a high cushioned 
chair he would occasionally address the people. In this condition, in 1793, 
he preached his half-century sermon to a large congregation, who came from 
all quarters to hear it. His te.xt was, "I have fought a good fight, I have 
finished my course." In the delivery of that discourse he manifested unusual 
animation, and in the closing prayer he seemed to breathe out his whole soul 
in fervent petition for the peace, prosperity and salvation of his people. 

Seldom did he address them after this. In the following winter he was 
riding to church one Sunday morning when his sleigh was upset a short dis- 
tance from his home, and his other thigh bone was fractured. He was never 
able to leave the house after that and died September 15, 1794, in the seventy- 
eighth year of his age, the fifty-second of his pastorate, and the fifty-fourth 
of his ministry. On his tombstone was placed the following inscription: " As 
a Christian few ever discovered more piety; as a minister few labored longer, 
more zealously or more successfully than did this minister of Jesus Christ." 



J. D. BURNETT. 

J. D. Burnett, deceased, who was engaged in rose-growing near Madi- 
son, was born in that town, a son of Samuel Burnett, also a native of that 
place. The grandfather was one of the early settlers of Madison and was a 
farmer by occupation. A man of sterling worth, he was frequently called to 
public office and served as freeholder for many years, discharging his duties 
with marked fidelity. He was a member of the Presbyterian church and for 
some time acted on its board of deacons. 

Samuel D. Bprnett, father of our subject, also carried on agricultural 
pursuits and was one of the valued citizens of the community, whose interest 
in public affairs, manifested by active co-operation therein, led to many pub- 
lic improvements, notably the beautifying of the Madison cemetery. He was 
a very active church worker and a consistent member of the Presb3'terian 
church, in which he long served as a member of the board of trustees. He 
was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Dill, a daughter of James Dill, a sea 
captain, and to them were born seven children, as follows: James D., Sam- 
uel F., Roland C, William I., Mary E., Ruth, who became the wife of 
William Linn, of Chatham, and Martha. 

At his parental home, J. D. Burnett was reared to manhood, and to its 
pablic-school system was he indebted for his preliminar}' education, which 
was supplemented by a course in the Morristown Academy. He then learned 
the carpenter's trade, and, after working as a journeyman for a number of 
years, engaged in contracting in Madison for twelve years; and then for the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 291 

rest of his life devoted his time and energies to rose-growing, finding in this 
industry a profitable source of income. He had some of the finest specimens 
of that beautiful flower extant, and for the products of his gardens he found 
a ready sale in the city markets. His business prospered owing to his judi- 
cious management, and he became one of the well-to-do citizens of the com- 
munity. 

Mr. Burnett was married in 1873 to Miss Ida H. Sniffer, a native of 
Brooklyn, who died in 1880, leaving two children, Frank V. W. and Ida G. 
In 1882 he was again married, his second union being with Clara L. Par- 
sells, a native of Madison and a daughter of George B. and Marietta 
(Loomis) Parsells; and by this marriage there were three interesting children, 
George D. (deceased), Edith M. and James Roy. The second wife died on 
November 26, 1892. Socially Mr. Burnett was connected with the Royal 
Arcanum. Having spent his entire life in the county he formed a wide 
acquaintance, and his commendable characteristics won him the friendship 
and good will of many. He died May 7, 1898, and his many acquaintances 
remember him only in terms of the highest regard. 

Frank V. W. Burnett, of the first marriage referred to above, grew up in 
Madison, attending the public school, and when still young he began to learn 
the carpenter's trade, under the instructions of his father, and later engaged 
in rose-growing, also with his father; and after the death of the latter he 
assumed the management of the entire business, and he now has one of the best 
establishments for rose-growing in Madison. He married Miss Clark and 
lives at the homestead of his father. He is a steady young man. 



WILLIAM J. CARTER. 

An intelligent and prosperous farmer of Madison, Mr. Carter was born 
on the 1 2th of November, 1828, and is a son of Aaron Carter, whose birth 
occurred in Chatham, Essex county, on the 6th of February, 1784. The 
ancestry of the family can be traced back through several generations to 
Nicholas Carter, the great-great-grandfather of our subject and the father of 
Nathaniel Carter, who married Hannah Price, of Elizabethtown. One of 
the children of this marriage was Aaron Carter, Sr. , grandfather of our sub- 
ject, who was born April 30, 1744, and died September 12, 1804. He was 
probably the progenitor of the family in Morris county, and was one of a 
family of seven children, the others being Phoebe; Anna, who married a Mr. 
Beach and after his death became the wife of a Mr. Ball; Mrs. Eunice Cole- 
man; Louis, who married a Miss Lee and afterward a Miss Miller; Mrs. Sarah 
Brown, and Hannah. 

Aaron Carter, Sr. , who was the third in order of birth in the family. 



■292 BIOGRJPHICAL AJ^D GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

married Miss Elizabeth Davis, and they had six children: Hannah, who was 
born February 8, 1776, and married a Mr. Marsh; Louis, who was born 
April 30, 1778, and married a Miss Butler; Mrs. Mary Condit; Caleb, who was 
born February 28, 1782, and married a Miss Johnson; Aaron, who was born 
February 6, 1784, and married a Miss Brown; and Mrs. Sarah Jessup. The 
father of this family, Aaron Carter, Sr., served in the war of 1812 and was 
honored with a number of local civic offices. He and his wife were members 
of the Presbyterian church, of Madison. 

The father of our subject, Aaron Carter, Jr., was united in marriage to 
Sarah Brown, a native of Madison and a daughter of David Brown, who 
followed agricultural pursuits. This wedding was celebrated on the 14th of 
October, 1809. Mr. Carter died July 27, 1855, his wife having passed away 
on the 1 2th of December, 185 i. They were the parents of twelve children, 
as follows: Edward, who was born September 22, 1810, and died April 14, 
1 891; Napthael B., who was born December 28, 181 1, and died March 28, 
1828; Louis, who was born November 15, 181 3, and died September 22, 
1S15; Mary Elizabeth, who was born November 3, 181 5, married Mahlon 
Guerin and died February 28, 1882; Louis, the second of the name, who was 
born July 16, 1817, and died March 12, 1837; Delphine J., who v\as born 
March 12, 18 19, and died on the 6th of May, of that year; Harvey, who was 
born May 15, 1821, and died September 25, 1823; Sarah Ann, born May 6, 
1822; Albert, who was-born August 15, 1824, and died February 8, 1888; 
Emily Condit, who was born September 11, 1826, and is now the widow of 
the late Elias W. C. Vandeveer, of Elizabeth; William Jessup, the subject 
of this review; and Harriet Eliza, who was born July 26, 1831, and is the 
wife of Louis Beach. 

William J. Carter, whose name introduces this article, spent the days of 
his childhood and youth on the old homestead and attended the public 
schools of the neighborhood, where he acquired a good knowledge of the 
common English branches of learning and was thus fitted for the practical 
affairs of life. He has made farming his life work, and is a progressive, 
enterprising agriculturist, who has placed his fields under a high state of cult- 
ivation and has everything on the place in good repair. 

His marriage was celebrated on the 24th of May, 1851, when Miss 
Rebecca Hope became his wife. She is a native of Hunterdon county, New 
Jersey, and a daughter of Samuel Hope, who also was born in this state. 
Mr. and Mrs. Carter now have two children: Frank Pennington, who was 
born February 24, 1852, and William Morris, born March 24, 1854. The 
parents hold membership in the Presbyterian church of Madison and take a 
deep interest in its work and welfare, doing all in their power to promulgate 
the principles of Christianity among men. Mr. Carter is also an earnest 



BIOGRJPEICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 29B 

worker in the temperance cause and is the champion of all movements that 
have for their object the betterment of the race. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican and by his fellow citizens has been called to public office, wherein his 
faithful and prompt discharge of duty has won him high commendation and 
approval. 



JAMES R. MEAD. 

Mr. Mead has for forty years been connected with the mercantile inter- 
ests of Hanover. In 1857 he came to this place and opened a general 
mercantile establishment, which he has since conducted with good success. 
He has always carried a large and well selected stock, keeping up with the 
latest novelties placed on the market, and has closely studied the popular 
taste so as to purchase what will please his patrons. His moderate prices, 
fair dealing and courteous treatment of his customers have secured him a 
good business and he has derived therefrom a comfortable competence. 
The business history of Hanover would be incomplete without his sketch, 
and we therefore gladly reserve a place for his personal record. 

Mr. Mead was born in Caldwell, Essex county. New Jersey, on the 17th 
of July, 1835, and is descended from an old Connecticut family of German 
origin. His great-grandfather was one of the valiant Americans who, tiring 
of the British yoke, resolved to submit to the oppression no longer and 
entered the Colonial army in order to fight for independence. John Mead, 
the grandfather of our subject, was born in Caldwell, and Allen C. Mead, 
the father, first opened his eyes to the light of day in that place, in 1S05. 
He was a farmer by occupation, owning and cultivating a tract of land near 
his native town. He married Miss Lucretia Dayton, a native of Basking 
Ridge and a daughter of John Dayton, who was likewise born there. He 
was an uncle of the first candidate for the vice-presidency on the Republican 
ticket. To Mr. and Mrs. Mead were born nine children, of whom three died 
in infancy, while six are still living. These are: Almira, wife of George 
Canfield; George E., who is living on the old homestead; Joel D., of Man- 
darin, Florida; James R., of this review; John M., who is living in Caldwell; 
and Emily A., wife of Charles Harrison. The parents of these children 
held membership in the Methodist Episcopal church in early life and later 
united with the Presbyterian church of Caldwell. The father died in 1895, 
at the advanced age of ninety-one years, having retained his mental and 
physical vigor to a remarkable degree. His wife, who was born in 1803, 
passed away in 1893. They had long traveled life's journey together, shar- 
ing with each other its joys and sorrows, its adversity and prosperity, and in 
death they were not long separated. 



294 BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

No event of special importance occurred during the boyhood of our sub- 
ject. He remained on the home farm, assisting in the labors of field and 
meadow, and when the crops were harvested in the autumn he entered the 
public schools of the neighborhood, where he remained until returning spring 
again brought to him the duties of the farm. Not wishing to engage in agri- 
cultural pursuits throughout his entire life, at the age of sixteen he left home 
and secured a clerkship in a store in Verona, Essex county, where he remained 
two years. He then went to West Bloomfield, near Montclair, and thence 
to Caldwell, where he continued only a short time. In 1857 he came to 
Hanover, where he established his present business, and for forty years he 
has held a prominent place in commercial circles here. 

In 1 86 1 Mr. Mead was appointed to the position of deputy postmaster, 
and in 1863, during President Lincoln's administration, he was appointed 
postmaster of Hanover, by Postmaster-General Montgomery Blair, in which 
capacity he served with marked fidelity for thirty-six years, and has made out 
every quarterly report sent in from this office since 1861. He is a most pop- 
ular and capable official and his worth is acknowledged by all the patrons of 
the office. 

In 1859 Mr. Mead was united in marriage to Miss Carrie M. Harrison, a 
native of Livingston and a daughter of William and Susan (Howell) Harri- 
son. Her father was connected with one of the oldest and most prominent 
families of Essex county. To Mr. and Mrs. Mead were born four children: 
Harry D., a commercial traveler; William E., a resident of Madison, Morris 
county; Hattie A., wife of Frank Carl, of Madison; and Edna M., at home. 

In his political predilections Mr. Mead has always been a Republican. 
He attained his majority about the time that party put its first ticket into the 
field, and cast his first vote for Fremont and Dayton. He has served as col- 
lector and as a member of the township committee and has ever been loyal 
to his duties of citizenship and prompt in meeting every obligation thus rest- 
ing upon him. He belongs to Madison Lodge, No. 93, F. & A. M., and his 
wife is a member of the Presbyterian church, of Hanover. Both are highly 
esteemed people, widely and favorably known in the community, and their 
sterling worth has gained them the confidence and good will of all. 



CHARLES M. KITCHEL. 



Two decades had not elapsed from the time the first settlement was 
made in New England when Robert Kitchel settled in Connecticut. He 
was born in England in 1604 and died in 1672. He married Margaret, 
daughter of Rev. Edward Sheaffe, and on the 26th of April, 1639, with a 
company of Puritan refugees, sailed for the New World in the first vessel 



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BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 295 

that anchored in the harbor of Quinnipiac, now New Haven, Connecticut. 
They came to this country to seek rehgious freedom, and while crossing the 
ocean Robert Kitchel and twenty-five others signed the " plantation coven- 
ant " to mutually aid and protect one another. They were of the strict 
Puritan sect and after a few years found that there was too great liberty 
allowed in the Connecticut colony, which caused their emigration to New 
Jersey in 1666, Robert K.itchel and his son Samuel being among the leaders 
in the settlement of Newark. 

Samuel Kitchel, who was a son of Robert, was born in England in 1633, 
and died April 26, 1690. He married Elizabeth Wakeman, of New Haven, 
Connecticut, and after her death wedded Grace Pierson, daughter of Rev. 
Abraham Pierson, a leader in the Newark settlement. Their only son, 
Abraham Kitchel, was born in Newark, in 1679, and died at Whippany, New 
Jersey, December 2, 1741. In ijiohe removed with his family to Hanover, 
New Jersey. He married Sarah Bruen, and they became the parents of 
seven children, the fourth being David Ivitchel, who was born in 1723, and 
died December 26, 1753. He inherited the family homestead in Whippany, 
which is still in possession of his descendants. He married Ruth Tuttle, 
who was born in 17 13, and who died April 4, 1780. They had four children, 
the eldest being Uzal I\itchel, who was born in 1746, and married Anna 
Tuttle. They had five children, and Jared, the youngest, was born in 1785. 
He married Sarah Freeman, and this worthy couple were the grandparents 
of him whose name begins this record. 

The second child of Jared and Sarah (Freeman) Ivitchel was Will- 
iam H. Kitchel, who was born on the old homestead at Whippany, and 
for many years was prominently connected with the mercantile interests 
there. He conducted a store from 1836 until 1880, when his life's labors 
were ended by death. His business reputation was unassailable, and through 
the long years of his connection with the commercial interests of the county 
he not only enjoyed a liberal patronage, but also won and retained the con- 
fidence and regard of those whom he met. He married Miss Louisa A. Marr 
and they became the parents of six children: Sarah B., who became the 
wife of Robert A. Haliday; Frances A., wife of Aaron K. Fairchild; Jared Lud- 
low, who wedded Annie E. Crowell, of South Orange; William H. ; Charles 
M. : and Kate L., wife of Albert Van Geisen. 

Charles M. Kitchel, whose name introduces this record, was born in 
Whippany, August 6, 1849, and was the fifth of the family of William H. 
Kitchel. His childhood days were quietly passed, and at an early age he 
became his father's assistant in the store. After the latter's death he con- 
ducted the well known and popular mercantile establishment until 1896, 
when he sold out to his son-in-law, R. R. Perine. His life has been a busy 



296 BIOGRAPHICAL AJYD QEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

and a useful one, and is now crowned with that honorable retirement which 
is the fitting reward of a' career of usefulness. His mercantile interests were 
ably conducted and his thorough reliability and courteous treatment of his 
patrons brought to him a success which he richly merited. 

In public affairs Mr. Kitchel has long been a recognized leader and has 
been honored with a number of offices, in which he has discharged his duties 
with commendable promptness and fidelity. In 1880 he was appointed post- 
master of Whippany, serving for four years. He has also filled the office of 
township collector, was justice of the peace for ten years and township clerk 
for two years. He votes with the Republican party, and his close study of 
the political problems of the day has made him a warm advocate of its prin- 
ciples and policy. 

In 1872 Mr. Kitchel was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Benjamin, 
and their home has been blessed with three children: Louise M., who mar- 
ried R. R. Ferine, a merchant of Whippany; Ross and Helen M. The 
Kitchel home is characterized by a warm-hearted hospitality, and the mem- 
bers of the household occupy a prominent position in social circles. Mr. 
Kitchel as a man and citizen has been found true to every relation of life, 
an advocate of every measure for the public good and substantial develop- 
ment of the county, and is a worthy representative of the ancestry who aided 
.in opening up this section of New Jersey to the influences of an enlightened 
civilization. 



CHARLES W. ENNIS. 



As a worthy citizen of Morristown, ranking among the leading repre- 
sentatives of her industrial interests, Mr. Ennis merits consideration in this 
connection. In his business dealings he is scrupulously exact and fair, and 
has won a success which is most creditable, as it has come to him as the 
result of foresight, executive ability and discrimination. The life of such a 
man, however unpretentious and quiet, is an object lesson of real value to 
the observing and thoughtful. It brings out prominently the characteristics 
that win, offers encouragement to young men who are willing to work with 
their minds and their hands, and affords another proof of the familiar adage 
that there is no royal road to wealth or distinction in this republic. The 
achievement depends upon the man. 

Mr. Ennis was born at Penn Yan, Yates county, New York, January 7, 
1848, and his parents, Sylvanus S. and Caroline (Brown) Ennis, were like- 
wise natives of the Empire state, the father having been born in New York 
city, the mother in Yates county. Sylvanus Ennis was engaged in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEMEALOGICAL HISTORY. 297 

butchering business in New York city for a number of years and then 
removed to Penn Yan, where his death occurred. His widow still makes 
her home there. The paternal grandfather of our subject, Sylvanus Ennis, 
Sr. , was a native of New York and a soldier of the war of 1812, serving as 
clerk in the quartermaster's department until his death, which occurred at 
Sackett's Harbor, the result of exposure. He wedded Miss Mary Dobbs, who 
belonged to one of the best known families of New York, Dobbs Ferry being 
named in their honor. 

In the district schools of his native county Charles W. Ennis began his 
education, and later was a student in Morris Academy, at Morristown, New 
Jersey. On leaving that institution he secured a clerkship in a mercantile 
establishment here and was thus engaged for six years. He then embarked 
in business on his own account, in Somerville, New Jersey, as a member of 
the firm of C. W. Ennis & Company, dealers in men's furnishing goods. 
This partnership was continued for thirteen years and during a portion of 
the time the firm also engaged in the manufacture of shirts, building up the 
most extensive business in this line in the state. In 1885 Mr. Ennis sold his 
interest and removed to Morristown, where he has since resided. Here he 
purchased the interest of the junior partner in the lumber firm of Day & 
Muchmore, and the name was changed to Day & Ennis, the senior partner 
being the father-in-law of our subject. After a time Mr. Ennis purchased 
Mr. Day's interest and the firm name of C. W. Ennis & Company was 
adopted. This firm is extensively engaged in dealing in pine and hardwood 
lumber, sash, blinds, doors, mouldings, trimmings and all kinds of masons' 
materials. The office and lumber yard are on Morris street, opposite the 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad depot, and thus good shipping 
facilities are secured. The business of the concern has now reached a large 
figure, and Mr. Ennis is meeting a well deserved success. He is ever fair in 
his treatment of his employes, honorable in his dealing with his patrons, 
courteous with all and trustworthy in every relation. He is also a director 
of the First National Bank of Morristown. 

In 1872 Mr. Ennis was united in marriage to Miss Emma F. Day, a 
daughter of F. A. Day, one of the oldest and most honored representatives 
of the city. They now have three children: Mabel, Bertha and Mildred. 
The parents and children are members of the First Methodist Episcopal 
church of Morristown, and Mr. Ennis is a very active worker in its behalf. 
He is now serving as trustee of the church and as assistant superintendent of 
the Sunday-school. In politics he has always been a Republican and has 
stanchly advocated the principles of the party. For two terms he was a 
member of the city council and exercised his official prerogatives in support 
of the measures and interests best calculated to promote the city's welfare. 



:298 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 



EDWIN MILL. 

There is something in the spirit of the American government and of the 
American nation which wins the loyal support of almost all of its adopted 
sons. Its freedom from monarchical rule, its advantages for progress and 
improvement, unhampered by caste, seem to call forth the best efforts of 
those who come here to seek homes; and, encouraged by the example of 
many self-reliant and self-made men, they rise by their own labors, becoming 
faithful, valued citizens and often reaching positions of prominence. There 
arrived in Morris county in 1871 a young man destined to win success and 
prominence in business circles. He came from the " merrie isle " and pos- 
sesses many of the strong and sterling qualities of the English race. 

Mr. Mill was born in Pool, Cornwall, England, in 1850, and is a son of 
William M. and Frances Mill. During the greater part of his active busi- 
ness life the father was connected with the operation of the copper and tin 
mines of Cornwall. Both he and his wife spent their entire lives in the land 
of their nativity. Our subject is the youngest of their five sons, only two of 
whom are now living, his brother William being a resident of Swansea, 
Wales, where he is employed as general manager of the Hafod Isha smelt- 
ing works. 

Edwin Mill spent his boyhood days in Cornwall, where he attended the 
common schools, but his educational privileges were somewhat meager, 
resulting from his early entrance into business life. When only eleven years 
of age he began working in the mines and was thus employed until his 
twenty-first year. In 1871 he came to the United States, first locating in 
North Adams, Massachusetts, where he was employed on the construction of 
the Hoosac tunnel for a short time. He then came to New Jersey and 
entered the employ of Robert F. Oram, at Mine Hill, Morris county, contin- 
uing at the place from 1871 until 1876. In the latter year he removed to 
Vermont and securing employment in the copper mines remained in the 
Green Mountain state for four years. 

Returning to New Jersey, Mr. Mill soon afterward went to Georgia, 
where he became manager of an iron mine, serving in that capacity until 
1887, when he returned to Morris county and has since occupied the position 
of superintendent of the New Jersey Iron Mining Company, at Port Oram. 
His ten years' service in this capacity has ably demonstrated his excellent 
ability and trustworthiness, and not a little of the success of the company is 
attributable to his careful and methodical supervision. 

In 1874 occurred the marriage of Mr. Mill and Miss Catherine Williams, 
of Mine Hill, Morris county, a native of Wales and a daughter of Enoch 
Williams. They now have a family of three sons: Edwin P., William H. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMB GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTOEY. 299 

and Charles E. Mr. Mill has been honored with some offices of public trust 
in Port Oram, notably that of member of the common council of the town, 
and also that of member of the Randolph township committee. He is a 
member of Acacia Lodge, No. 20, A. F. & A. M., of Dover, also of Dover 
Lodge, I. O. O. F. , and is a genial, affable gentleman whose social qualities 
have gained him many friends. 



EDWARD KELLY. 



The manager of the Wharton Blast Furnace at Port Oram, Edward 
Kelly, has been identified with the iron industry from early boyhood, and 
has been associated with the above concern for the past fifteen years, it 
having been established in 1868 by Robert F. Oram, who conducted the 
same for a number of years in connection with his general store at Port 
Oram. 

The birth of Mr. Kelly occurred at Oxford, Warren county. New Jersey, 
on the ijth of October, 1858, his parents being Michael and Mary (Rock) 
Kelly, both of whom were natives of Ireland, whence they emigrated to the 
United States at an early age and located in northern New Jersey. The 
father died in 1867, survived by his wife until 1893, when she passed away in 
Passaic county, New Jersey. Seven children were born to them, four of 
whom are still alive. 

Our subject passed the first fifteen years of his life in Oxford, where he 
acquired a fair education in the public schools, and when fifteen years old he 
went to work in the rolling mill located in his native city, where he continued 
until attaining his twenty-first year. He was then employed as time-keeper 
in the blast furnace atBoonton, New Jersey, occupying that situation for some 
time, and subsequently moving to Hackeltstown, New Jersey, where he 
became assistant manager of the Warren Furnace, which position he retained 
for nearly three years. 

In the spring of 1883 Mr. Kelly came to Port Oram in the capacity of 
assistant manager of the Wharton Furnace and Mines, which he held until 
the death of the manager, Tooke Straker, in 1891, when our subject was 
promoted to that responsible place, and has continued as such until the pres- 
ent time, discharging his duties in a manner reflecting credit on his execu- 
tive ability, and to the entire satisfaction of those with whom he is associated. 
In addition to his mining and furnace interests Mr. Kelly is general superin- 
tendent and treasurer of the Morris County Railroad, to which office he was 
appointed in 1892. 

In October, 1895, Mr. Kelly was united in marriage to Mrs. Julia Con- 
Ian, of Boonton, New Jersey, and they reside in a neat and substantial resi- 



300 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

dence located on West Blackwell street, Dover, New Jersey. Mr. Kelly is 
a man of prepossessing personal appearance, is popular with all classes of 
people, and is well and favorably known throughout the county of Morris. 



JOSEPH JACKSON. 

Colonel Joseph Jackson, the founder of the village of Rockaway, was a 
son of Stephen and Mary (Burwell) Jackson, and was born March 8, 1774, 
in the log house on the north bank of the river, a mile above the village, 
where his grandfather, Joseph Jackson, had lived and died. At the time of 
his birth there were but five houses in Rockaway. His early education was 
conducted by George Harris, who taught the first school in Rockaway. He 
was one of the six children of Captain Stephen Jackson, who headed the 
school subscription list. On the loth of December, 1792, his name was- 
entered on the roll of the Morris Academy, of which his father was a proprie- 
tor, and while at the academy he studied French and surveying. He made 
practical use of the latter, and became skilled in the use of the compass. 
Having left the academy in April, 1793, he engaged in his father's business, 
first as assistant and subsequently as a partner. For some years he was 
actively engaged in mining and manufacturing iron. The Swedes' mines 
between Dover and Rockaway were operated by him for several years, and 
in connection with his brother William he was also owner of the Allen and 
Teabo mines. The Rockaway gristmill and sawmill, store and two forges 
were owned and operated by him, with other branches of industry. 

He carried on part of his iron business at Paterson in connection with 
his brother William, and they were the first parties who rolled round iron in 
the United States, which work they successfully accomplished in 1820. In 
that year the government advertised for five tons of American round iron as 
a sample lot to be delivered at the Washington navy yard. The Jacksons 
forwarded the lot, which was found to be superior to that of their competi- 
tors, and the contract to furnish two hundred tons to the New York navy 
yard was awarded to them and filled to the satisfaction of the government, at 
six cents per pound. In 1820 Colonel Jackson and his brother William 
built the Rockaway rolling mills, and continued in joint business until 1826, 
when the Colonel became sole owner, carrying on the business most pros- 
perously until 1834, in the meantime taking many large contracts for 
furnishing iron to the government, and making considerable money there- 
from. 

On the 29th of November, 1796, Colonel Jackson succeeded in getting 
a postoffice established in Rockaway and was postmaster until 1843, when 
removed by President Tyler. On the 26th of February, 1801, he was 





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BIOGRJPHICAL AJ^D GEJ{EALOGICAL HISTORY. 301 

appointed major of the First Battalion, Third Regiment, Morris militia, and in 
1S04 lieutenant-colonel of the Third Regiment, New Jersey militia. As such 
he was ordered into service by the governor in the war of 18 12 and did duty 
with his regiment for two or three months at Jersey City. He resigned his 
commission as colonel in 181 7. In February, 181 3, he was elected, by the 
joint meeting, judge of the court of common pleas of Morris county, and 
held that position until 1832, when he gave up the office of his own accord. 
In 1828 he was elected a member of the New Jersey legislature as a Jackson 
Democrat, and was returned for the two following years. He was a strong 
adherent of General Jackson, but in his later years was a Whig. He was 
elected ruling elder in the Rockaway Presbyterian church, in 18 18. 

On the 13th of May, 1802, Colonel Jackson was married, in New York, 
to Eliza Piatt Ogden, eldest daughter of Robert Ogden, of Sparta, New 
Jersey. She died in 1807, leaving a daughter, Sarah, who married Samuel 
B. Halsey, and two sons, Stephen J. and Robert Ogden. The latter died in 
infancy. The Colonel died January 28, 1855, in his eighty-fifth year, honored 
and respected by all. 



EPHRAIM SANDERS. 



Captain Ephraim Sanders, who for many years resided in Mendham, 
was a general blacksmith and a leading mechanic in iron. He was probably 
descended from Christopher Saunders, who came from London to America 
about 1680, and located at Bridlington, afterward Burlington, New Jersey. 

Captain Sanders married Sarah Rodgers, whose mother was a Sweazy, 
while her father was a direct descendant of John Rogers, the martyr. There 
were born to them numerous sons and daughters. Their eldest daughter 
Nancy married Samuel Loree Axtell. Two of the sons were graduates of 
Yale College. One of them. Rev. E. D. Saunders, D. D., was the founder 
of the Presbyterian Hospital at Philadelphia. 



ISAAC P. GENUNG. 

Born in Chatham township, Morris county, near the village of that 
name, on the 20th of December, 1808, Isaac Parkhurst Genung was a son 
of Isaac and Mary (Crane) Genung. His father, also a native of Morris 
county, died in May, 1846, at the age of seventy-five years. He served 
under General St. Clair in the war of 1812, and in one of the battles sus- 
tained a wound which made him lame throughout the remainder of his life. 

The subject of this review was reared in the usual manner of farmer 
lads of that period. He assisted in the labor of field and meadow through 



302 BIOGRAPHICAL AJTB GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

the summer months and after crops were harvested in the autumn entered ' 
the pubhc schools of the neighborhood, where he pursued his studies until 
returning spring brought with it a new round of farm duties. In 1832 he 
removed to Chatham, purchased land and carried on agricultural pursuits on 
his own account for a number of years, making his place one of the most 
productive and highly cultivated in the locality, but his once fine homestead 
has been divided into town lots and is now adorned with beautiful residences. 
He was an industrious, energetic man, who provided well for his family and 
by his upright life won the respect of his neighbors. 

On the 26th of December, 1830, Mr. Genung was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary W. Meeker, a daughter of Cornelius Meeker, of an old family of 
the county. Eight children were born of this union, five of whom are now 
living, namely: Elizabeth, William E., Julia, Abbie and Charles. The par- 
ents were members of the Presbyterian church, active in support of all its 
measures, and Mr. Genung served as trustee in a most acceptable manner 
for a number of years. His political support was always given the Repub- 
lican party. Mrs. Genung departed this life, March i, 1876, at the age of 
sixty-six years, and many friends mourned her death. Our honored subject 
entered into eternal rest on the 27th of December, 1897, having lived a long 
life consecrated to goodly ends. 



WILLIAM E. GENUNG. 



A resident of Chatham, Mr. Genung is now living a retired life, for his 
untiring and well directed business efforts in former years brought to him a 
competence sufficient to supply him with most of the comforts of life without 
further labor on his part. The rest is well deserved, for his business career 
was marked by great energy and honest}' above question. 

Mr. Genung has spent his entire life in New Jersey and is one of the 
native sons of Morris county, his birth having occurred on the old family 
homestead, February 13, 1834. He is the oldest son of Isaac P. Genung, 
and was reared on the farmstead until seventeen years of age, when he went 
to Newark and began an apprenticeship at the carriage-maker's trade, under 
the direction of Stephen B. Saunders, serving a four-years term, during 
which he completely mastered the business, becoming an expert workman. 
He afterward worked as a journeyman for thirteen years, and then engaged 
in the manufacture of carriages in Newark, following that pursuit until 18S5. 
He built up a big business and conducted a large and paying factory, which 
was classed among the leading industries in that line in Newark. His excel- 
lent workmanship won the public approval and was consequently followed by 
the public patronage, so that his financial resources increased from year to 



BIOGRAPHICAL AjYD GEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 303 

year until at length he was enabled to lay aside business cares. On his 
retirement from business life, Mr. Genung's thoughts again wandered to the 
home of his boyhood and he returned to Chatham, where he resides in the 
midst of pleasant surroundings. 

In 1855 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Genung and Miss Sarah A. 
Russell, a native of Morristown and a daughter of William and Susan 
(Meeks) Russell, the former a native of Paisley, Scotland. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Genung were born four children, as follows: Helen L., who died in infancy; 
Frank C., who died at the age of twenty-eight years; Arthur R., who died at 
the age of twenty-six years, in less than half a year after his brother's death; 
and Mary Alice, at home. The mother of this family died January 16, 1893, 
and Mr. Genung was again married, in June, 1896, his second union being 
with I\ate L. Edwards, a native of Orient, Long Island, New York, and a 
daughter of James and Mary F. Edwards, and niece of the late Hon. Lewis 
A. Edwards, her father being a descendant of Jonathan Edwards. Mr. and 
Mrs. Genung have a pleasant home in Chatham and are highly regarded by 
a large circle of friends. In his political preferences he is a Republican. 
While a resident of Newark Mr. Genung devoted some time to vocal music, 
and he has sung in the churches of Newark, both as soloist and in chorus. 



CALEB S. HUGHSON. 



Mr. Hughson is a well known resident of Randolph township, is 
descended from good old Revolutionary stock, and his ancestry can be traced 
back more than two hundred and fifty years, when John Hughson and his 
wife, Jane (Horton) Hughson, natives of Ireland, left the land of their birth 
and sought a home in the New World. When the colonists attempted to 
throw off the yoke of British tyranny he entered the American army and 
valiantly battled for freedom. His son, Robert Hughson, the grandfather 
of our subject, was born in New Jersey, and his son, Nathan Hughson, was 
born in Morris county on the 14th of April, 1784. He married Mrs. Ester 
(Terry) Horton, who traced her ancestry back to Richard Terry, who came 
from England in 1635 and founded the family in America. She was born in 
Chester, Morris county, October 14, 1793, and for her first husband married 
Daniel Horton, by whom she had two children: Dency Cooper and Daniel E. 
On the 28th of March, 1825, she became the wife of Nathan Hughson, and 
their children are Mervin R. , Caleb S. and Elizabeth J. The father was a 
Democrat in his political associations, and in religious faith was a Presby- 
terian. His death occurred in 1866 and his wife died November 14, 1882, 
in the ninety-first year of her age. 

Caleb S. Hughson spent his boyhood days in the usual manner of farmer 



304 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

lads, the days of his boyhood and youth being quietly passed. He acquired 
a good English education in the common schools, and early became familiar 
with all the duties and labors of the farm. He has since followed farming 
and dairying, and is the owner of one hundred and thirty acres of good land, 
well adapted to the raising of all kinds of cereals. The well-tilled fields, 
substantial buildings, with fences and sheds always in repair — these plainly 
indicate the enterprising spirit of the owner, who is accounted one of the 
leading agriculturists of the community. 

Mr. Hughson was married on the i2th day of November, 1872, the 
lady of his choice being Miss Amanda M. Merchant, a daughter of Daniel 
P. and Eliza (Gary) Merchant. She received a very liberal musical 
education, and for some years has successfiilly engaged in teaching music. 
Mrs. Hughson holds membership in the Presbyterian church of Mt. Freedom, 
and is serving as organist. Mr. Hughson exercises his right of franchise in 
support of the men and measures of the Democracy, but has never been an 
aspirant for office. He and his wife have a pleasant home, noted for its 
hospitality and good cheer, and the circle of their friends is limited only 
by the circle of their acquaintances. 



JOHN D. DeWITT. 

As one of the respected citizens of Chatham, Mr. DeWitt's life history 
contains many interesting chapters of adventure and scenes of thrilling inter- 
est. He was born in the metropolis of America, New York city, on the loth 
of May, 1869, and is a son of Gasherie and Jennie (Dowling) DeWitt. The 
father was for many years engaged in the manufacture of wire in Belleville, 
New Jerse}'. The mother was a daughter of Rev. Dr. John Dowling, of New 
York city. On the paternal side our subject is descended in direct line from 
John DeWitt, the statesman of Holland, who was torn to pieces by a mob of 
his countrymen several hundred years ago! They believed him to be an 
enemy, but in the clearer light and calmer reason of later years they saw that 
the policy which he advocated was for their best good, and they then counted 
him a friend who had suffered martyrdom for his country and its people. 

John D. DeWitt, of this review, was educated in various places. In 
early youth he spent four years abroad with his parents, visiting nearly every 
country in Europe, and the fondness for travel then awakened has never left 
him. On putting aside his text-books and the duties of the school-room, he 
went aboard the school-ship, St. Mary's, at his own desire, and spent two 
years in that service, making two cruises to Spain, Portugal, Gibraltar and 
the Madeira'and Azores islands. On the expiration of that period he went 
to the western section of this country and had many novel and exciting expe- 





/^(ct^^tL^ c/^Zy/^~^^-^ 



BIOGRJPEICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 305 

riences in southwestern Missouri and northwestern Arkansas, in what was 
known as the "Bald Knob" country, then the rendezvous of the famous 
Ku Klux Klan. By that notorious band he was supposed to be a government 
agent, and had he not been able to prove his identity he would have suffered 
badly at their hands. While in that section of the country he became con- 
nected with the Times, of Harrison, Arkansas, where he remained three 
years, and on his return to the east, in 1890, he became identified with the 
Belleville Press, of Belleville, New Jersey, which he published for five years. 
Mr. DeWitt was one of the first to enter the Oklahoma country when it 
was opened up, effecting an entrance by secreting himself upon the trucks 
under a passenger coach! A strict guard was kept to prevent settlers from 
going in by train, so that all might have the same chance. Over ten thou- 
sand people were camped along the borders of the new country, and at a 
given time were to make a rush and stake their claims, and hold them by 
force, if necessary. In 1895 Mr. DeWitt went to Chicago, where he acted 
as manager for a large advertising firm for about two years. In 1897, how- 
ever, he returned to New York and established a weekly paper in Chatham, 
New Jersey, known as the Chatham Press, which he is still editing. He 
seems especially adapted to journalistic work and in that line has attained 
an enviable success. Upon the plains of the west, upon the high seas and 
in the various countries of Europe he has gained his knowledge of the world, 
and his many experiences have made him a most companionable and enter- 
taining gentleman who has a host of warm friends wherever he goes. 



JOHN E. TAYLOR. 

One of the prominent and successful citizens of Morristown is John 

Edward Taylor, who is a native of Brooklyn, New York, where he was born 

in 1S34, the son of John Allen and Sarah M. (Lawrence) Taylor, the former 

of whom was born in Hunterdon county. New Jersey, a son of Robert and 

Sarah (Bartholomew) Taylor. Robert Taylor cams from the north of Ireland 

to America and settled in Hunterdon county, where he became a prosperous 

citizen and large land-owner. His death occurred there in 1821. John 

Allen Taylor was a physician by profession and he died at the age of about 

fifty-two years. His wife was born in New York city and was a daughter 

of Augustine H. Lawrence, a prominent banker of the metropolis and a 

descendant of English settlers who located on Long Island. A short time 

after her husband's death Mrs. Taylor moved to Morristown, New Jersey, 

and there resided continuously, \yith the exception of a brief period during 

the Civil war, when she tobk up her abode in New York city. 

John Edward Taylor received his primary education in private schools 
20 



306 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

of Brooklyn, then attended Columbia College in 1851, and completed his 
studies at Williams College, Massachusetts, where he was graduated in 1854. 
Desiring to enter the legal profession he began the study of law immediately 
after leaving college and in 1857 he was admitted to the bar in New York 
city, where he opened an office and engaged in the practice of his calling 
until his health failed him, when he went to Europe and remained there dur- 
ing the year 1 86 1. Upon his return, his health still being in a precarious 
condition, he never resumed the practice of law, but took up his residence 
in Morristown and has since continued to make this city his home, becom- 
ing an important factor in advancing the moral, educational and municipal 
interests of the community. He has accomplished a considerable amount 
of effective work in behalf of the church and of charity, his religious adher- 
ency being with the Church of the Redeemer, Protestant Episcopal, and for 
one term he served as president of the Young Men's Christian Association 
of Morristown, and is now president of the Morris county branch of the 
State Charities Association of New Jersey, and is also president of the Mor- 
ristown Memorial Hospital. 

In his political relations Mr. Taylor is a stanch Republican and gives 
his support to the principles and policies of that party. In 1875-6 he 
served as recorder of Morristown, and in 1884 he was elected to the honor- 
able office of mayor of the city, serving for one term, and in 1892 was again 
the choice of his party and served his second term. He fulfilled the duties 
incumbent upon the office with distinct executive ability, and to the entire 
satisfaction of his constituents, thus meriting to a high degree the confi- 
dence reposed in him by his fellow-citizens. He was one of the first direct- 
ors of the Morristown Library and Lyceum and is also treasurer of the 
same at the present time and takes a deep interest in everything pertaining 
to the welfare of that institution. 

Mr. Taylor has spent several years abroad, he is a most interesting con- 
versationalist, is well informed on all the issues of the day and possesses the 
respect and warm regard of a large circle of friends. 



JOHN B. TALLMADGE. 

Amonig the residents of Chatham who are engaged in business in Newark 
is Mr. Tallmadge, who was born in New York city October 2, 1862. He is a 
representative of one of the oldest families of America. The ancestry is 
traced back to Hampshire, England, where the name was originally spelled 
Talmach. Subsequent changes made it Talmadge, and later the "1 " was 
doubled. Robert Talmach was a very prominent man in Hampshire. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 307 

flourished about 1523, and had three brothers, John, William and Nicholas. 
The first descendants of Robert Talmach to come to America were William, 
Thomas, Robert and Jane, who crossed the Atlantic about 1630. Robert 
established a home in New Haven, Connecticut, where he died in 1662. He 
married Sarah Nash and they had a family of six children, the fourth being- 
John Tallmadge, who was born in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1654, and: 
died in 1690. He married Abigal Bishop in 1687 and they had two children, 
— Ann, born August 15, 1687, and James, born in June, 1689, at Branford, 
Connecticut. The latter was married in 1 713, to Hannah Harrison, and 
they had a family of eight children, the seventh being Rev. Benjamin Tall- 
madge, who was born December 13, 1725, and died November 5, 1786. In 
1750 he married Susanna Smith, by whom he had three children, Benjamin, 
John and Samuel. Colonel Benjamin Tallmadge loyally served his country 
in the war of the Revolution, and after the establishment of the republic 
represented his district in the congress of the United States for a period of 
sixteen years. Samuel served as captain in the Revolutionary army through- 
out the war, and at its close married and settled at Charleston, New York. 
He had a number of children, one of his sons being Isaac, who was born in 
1800 and died in 1876. He was married to Mary Horton, and reared a 
family of nine children. 

Their third son, Samuel S. Tallmadge, was born in Charleston, New York, 
in 1828, and died in Chatham, New Jersey, in 1876. For a number of years he' 
was a resident of the latter place and was prominent in politics, stanchly sup- 
porting the Republican party. He was a member of the Presbyterian church 
and had the confidence and high regard of all who knew him. He was. 
engaged in the wholesale drug business in New York. In that cit}', in July^ 
1859, he married Miss Mary J. Brodhead, who was born in Ulster county. 
New York. She is still a resident of Chatham, occupying the historic house 
which served as headquarters for Washington during his New Jersey cam- 
paign. Their children are, John B., Frederick and Mrs. George Poole. 

Mr. Tallmadge, whose name introduces this record, early began life in 
the business world. In 1880 he became an employe in the German National 
Bank, of Newark, with which he has since been connected as one of its most 
reliable and trusted employes. His life has been quietly passed in steadfast 
devotion to duty, and he commands the respect of all with whom he has 
been brought in contact. He takes a very active interest in local politics and 
is a member of the Republican committee, his able management of the polit- 
ical interests contributing not a little to the Republican victories. 

Mr. Tallmadge was united in marriage to Elizabeth Dickinson, daughter 
of Bern and Emma (Budd) Dickinson, of Chatham, in June, 1887. They 
have now an interesting family of three children: Inez, Helen and Donald. 



308 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



THE HOFF FAMILY. 

Since the spring of 1775 the Hoff family has been' identified with the 
interests of Morris county. At that date Joseph Hoff removed from Hunter- 
don to Morris county to take charge of the Hibernia works for Lord Stirhng. 
His brother, Charles Hoff, soon succeeded him, and moved to Mount Pleas- 
ant. Charles was a son-in-law of Moses Tuttle. His descendants occupied 
the family homestead continuously until the death of Miss Harriet Hoff, in 
1878, when the last family link with former generations was broken. Her 
will was the subject of a long contest in the courts by some distant connec- 
tions, who sought to set it aside by reason of undue influence and incapacity 
through age. But her mental clearness and sterling good sense were so 
strongly conspicuous in all that she had said and done during her long life 
that her last will and testament was held good. She was the owner of the 
Hoff mine. 

Charles Hoff was a man of prominence in his day, and a good scholar 
and penman. He was appointed a justice of the peace in 1800, and his 
method of keeping his docket shows business habits of the first quality. This 
docket is in the county clerk's office, where it was deposited July 15, 1812, 
No. 40, a strong, well preserved book. The first page contains an acknowl- 
edgment from Robert Hays that Charles Hoff paid him two dollars and a 
quarter on the 20th of November, 1800, for that docket, and says: "This 
docket contains the proceedings of Charles Hoff, Esq., which commenced 
28th November, in the year of our Lord 1800." 

The first suit is that of Abraham Seward versus Reuben Palmer, which 
resulted in a confession of judgment for seven dollars and a half. David De 
Camp was constable, and Experience Turner was a witness. On page five 
is a suit in favor of David Howell against Aaron Broadwell, in trespass, for 
wounding, while shoeing, a certain mare on the loth of October, 1800, 
which plaintiff alleged was the cause of her death in a day or two afterward, 
and demanded si.xty dollars damages. Warrant was granted January ist, 
1801, and given to David De Camp, constable. There was a jury of twelve 
men, and a verdict of sixty dollars was rendered for the plaintiff, and five 
dollars and seven cents, costs. The docket contains the following receipt as 
a settlement of the suit: " Received payment in full for the above judgment 
and costs from David Broadwell and his son Stephen Broadwell, in Cyder 
Spirits Carted by Charles Hoff, team. — David Howell." 

The docket also contains a long list of marriages performed by the 
'Squire from January, 1801, to November, 1805. A dunning letter in the 
fine round hand of Mr. Hoff was also found in the docket, which reads as 
follows: " Captain Matthias Winans to Charles Hoff, Dr. January, 1796, 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL BISTORT. 309 

to balance on ore, 41s., lod. ; interest on ditto, 3s., 8d. ; making ;f 2 5s., 6d. 
Sir, please to pay the above balance immediately to Esquire Hoagland, as it 
has been of long standing. — Your Humb. Serv't, Charles Hoff." 



GEORGE M. LANNING. 



A prominent merchant of Afton, Mr. Lanning has for twenty years been 
proprietor of a general store there and has done much to produce activity in 
business circles, thereby greatly promoting the welfare of the community. 
He was born in Warren county, New Jersey, on the 3d of August, 1854, a 
son of Joseph and Susan (Mott) Lanning, also natives of the same county. 
The father was a farmer by occupation and was a son of Isaac Lanning, 
whose birth occurred in Warren county. The ma,ternal grandparents of our 
subject were George and Anna Mott, the former a son of Colonel George 
Mott, who won his title in the Revolutionary war, while gallantly aiding the 
colonists in their struggle for independence. 

Mr. Lanning, whose name begins this article, on attaining the age when 
one's education is supposed to commence, entered the public schools, where 
he remained until fourteen years of age. He then continued his studies in a 
boarding school and later was graduated in Princeton College, with the class 
of 1875. On completing his literary education he took up the study of law 
in the office and under the direction of the firm of Pitney & Youngblood, of 
Morristown. He then taught school for one year, and in 1877, having 
acquired some capital, embarked in merchandising in Afton, where he has 
since conducted a general store. He has succeeded in this enterprise because 
he wished to succeed, and utilized the means necessary to this end. He 
realized that hard work, close application and energy must -serve as a founda- 
tion, and that courtesy, honorable dealing and earnest desire to please his 
patrons must form the superstructure of success. It was in this way 
that he managed to do away with the difficulties in his path and secure 
prosperity. 

In April, 1878, Mr. Lanning was united in marriage to Miss Etta J. 
Goldsberg, a native of Afton, and a daughter of John S. and Eliza Golds- 
berg. Her paternal grandfather was a native of Germany. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Lanning have been born four children: Carl G., Floyd M., Ernest S. 
and Ethel J. 

It was through the instrumentality of Mr. Lanning that the post-office 
was established at Afton, and within President Hayes' administration he 
was appointed postmaster, which position he has filled continuously since, 
with the exception of a period of four years. He was collector of Chatham 
township in 1881 and 1882, and for nearly twenty years has been a member 



SIC) BIOGRAPHICAL AJTD GEJVEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

of the school board of Afton, serving as president for a part of the time. His 
political support is given the Republican party and he warmly advocates its 
principles. He was a candidate for surrogate, in the fall of 1897, but was 
defeated in the nomination, by four votes. He and his wife are members of 
the Presbyterian church of Hanover and socially he is connected with Madi- 
son Lodge, No. 93, A. F. & A. M. ; Morristown Chapter, R. A. M., and the 
Royal Arcanum. Public-spirited and deeply interested in the educational, 
moral and material welfare of his community, he is loyally devoted to all 
measures for the general good and is accounted one of the most valued citi- 
zens of Afton. 



WILLIAM N. POOL. 



Only twenty years after the landing of the Pilgrims from the Mayflower 
at Plymouth Rock, the Pool family was planted on American soil, the ances- 
tors coming from England. John Pool, the great-grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was a native of Connecticut and when the colonies attempted to throw 
off the yoke of British tyranny he joined the American army and loyally 
fought for the independence of his nation. He it was who established the 
Pool family in Morris county, and for more than a century his descendants 
have been identified with its development and progress. They were con- 
nected with that picturesque and somewhat romantic period when the men 
were attired in the knee trousers, velvet coats and frilled shirts, and when 
traveling was done by means of private conveyance or the stage coach, and 
the way often led through wild regions, where civilization had left untram- 
meled the beauties of nature: 

John Pool secured a tract of land in what is now Randolph township, 
Morris county, and developed there a farm upon which occurred the birth 
of our subject's grandfather, William Pool, who first opened his eyes to the 
light of day in 1 780. He, too, devoted his time and energies to the quiet pur- 
suits of the farm, coming into possession of the old homestead, which he 
operated for many years. His son, Henry Pool, was born at the old family 
residence April 10, 18 10, and having arrived at years of maturity he married 
Miss Charity Clark, the ceremony being performed on the ist of October, 
1837, Rev. Mr. Carpenter, a Baptist minister, officiating. 

Thus were united two of the oldest families of America, for the Clark 
family, also of English origin, was established in the New World at a very 
early epoch in American history. The first settlement was made on Long 
Island, New York, whence the great-grandfather, Nathaniel Clark, removed 
to New Jersey, settling west of Morristown. The grandfather was Ebenezer 
Clark, who was born in Morris county, March 22, 1767, and married Joanna 



BIOGBJPHICAL AJ^D OEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 311 

Newton, born July i8, 1762. Their only son was Ebenezer Clark, the fa- 
ther of Mrs. Pool. He was born in Mendham township, Morris county, 
March 17, 1787, and married Phcebe Blackford, a native of Plainfield, born 
July 22, 1792. Mrs. Pool was their third daughter, and was born in Mend- 
ham township, October 14, 1816. 

To Henry and Charity Pool were born three children, yet living, namely: 
William Newton, the only son and the immediate subject of this review; 
Sibley A., wife of William Alpaugh; and Phoebe, wife of Wesley Bonnell, a 
resident of Morris county. Mr. Pool resided on the old family farmstead and 
their reared his family. His attention was given to the cultivation and im- 
provement of his land, and he was regarded as one of the leading farmers 
and valued citizens of the community. He died August 4, 1891, respected 
by all who knew him. In the Baptist church he held membership and his 
wife also belongs to that organization, attending its services when the 
weather permits. She is now in her eighty-second year, yet is in possession 
of all her faculties and can read and write without the aid of glasses. 

William Newton Pool, whose name begins this review, was born on the 
old family homestead, near Mt. Freedom, where his ancestors located more 
than a century ago, on the 13th of August, 1838. He early became familiar 
with the duties and labors incident to the life of the agriculturist, and always 
assisted his father in the work of cultivating and improving the farm until 
the latter's death, when he assumed the management of the place. He is 
now operating seventy acres of rich and arable land and the well tilled fields 
indicate his careful supervision. He is a worthy representative of two old 
and honored families of the county and all who know Mr. Pool entertain for 
him high regard. 



ELIAS T. HOWELL. 



Mr. Howell is a well known citizen of Chester, residing on the old family 
homestead, where his grandfather maintained his residence and carried on 
agricultural pursuits. A son of the latter, Stephen I. Howell, was there 
born in 1803. Reared to manhood in the community, by his sterling worth, 
ability and fidelity to duty, he won a very enviable place in the esteem of 
all with whom he came in contact and was regarded as one of the most 
influential and prominent citizens of the community. He was a farmer by 
occupation and followed that pursuit throughout his entire life, his labors 
being ended by death in 1890. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Ann 
Davenport and was a daughter of Brom Davenport, died in 1882. This 
worthy couple were the parents of twelve children, eleven of whom reached 
years of maturtry, namely: Harriet, deceased wife of Jacob Willis; Marian, 



312 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

deceased wife of Lewis Ammerman; Virgil, who died in the army; Emily, 
deceased wife of Hugh Poison; George, who was a soldier in the late war 
and is a resident of Chester township: Margaret, wife of Theodore Wortman; 
Melissa, widow of Samuel W. Seals; Albert, who is living in Canton, Illinois; 
Elias T., of this review; Henrietta, deceased wife of John Scribner, who is 
also deceased; and Stephen I., Jr. 

Mr. Howell, of this review, was born on the old family homestead on 
the 23d of August, 1849, and spent his youth and early manhood in the 
house in which he first opened his eyes to the light of day. He is indebted 
to the common schools of the neighborhood for the educational privileges 
which he received. He began his business career as a farm hand and worked 
for wages for about three or four years. He was then married and located 
at his present place of residence, where he now has between ninety and one 
hundred acres of land. This property has been acquired through his own, 
unaided efforts, and the neat and tasteful appearance of his farm well indicates 
his progressive and careful supervision. 

On the 1 8th of March, 1874, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Howell 
and Miss Florence J. McCarty, a daughter of Freedom McCarty. They now 
have five living children: Fannie A., James A., Charles, Mary Ella and 
Frederick. Mr. Howell is a Republican in polities, but is not known as a 
politician. Socially and in a business way he has the confidence and respect 
of his fellow citizens, and his honorable, upright, though quiet, life contains 
many lessons that might well be followed. 



CARNOT B. MEEKER. 



Carnot B. Meeker was born at Columbia (now Alton), Morris count}'. 
New Jersey, November 28, 1836. He is a descendant of William Meeker, a 
native of Essex county, England, who took the oath of fidelity at New 
Haven, Connecticut, July i, 1664, and came to Elizabethtown with the first 
settlers, in 1665. His grandfather, Gabriel Meeker, was a member of the 
Elizabethtown militia, and was one of the number who volunteered to take 
the English ship " Blue Mountain Valley," January 22, 1776. 

His father, Daniel Meeker, was born at Morristown, New Jersey, Sep- 
tember 24, 1787, and in 1826 purchased the farm, at Columbia, known as 
the Eckley place and engaged in agriculture, where he lived until his death 
in January, 1865. In 1831 Daniel Meeker married Sarah A. Richards, 
daughter of Jonathan Richards, a well known and influential citizen of 
Columbia. Four children were born to them, the eldest, a daughter, dying 
in infancy. Josephine E. married Ambrose E. Kitchell; Carnot B. and 
William J. Meeker. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^'EALOGICAL BISTORT. 313 

The subject of this sketch attended the public schools and finished his 
education in the academy of David A. Frame, in Bloomfield, New Jersey, 
and the Woodbridge Institute at Perth Amboy. During the Civil war he 
assisted in raising the Second New Jersey Cavalry Regiment, and in June, 
1863, was mustered into the United States service as second lieutenant of 
•Company B, of that regiment. He served actively in the field with 
the regiment in the southwest under General Grierson, Sixteenth 
Army^ Corps, until the fall of 1864, when he was made first lieuten- 
ant, and soon after appointed aide-de-camp on the staff of Major-General 
Dana, commanding Department of the Mississippi, on whose staff he served 
until the close of the war. 

After leaving the service, he returned to his home at Columbia, and 
with his brother engaged in agriculture. In politics he is a Republican, and 
has been influential in his party for many years, although holding office only 
for short periods. In 1887 he represented the first assembly district of Mor- 
ris county, in the New Jersey legislature, and was re-elected the next year. 
At present he is a member of the Morris county Republican committee, and 
for three years was chairman of that body. He continues the pleasant asso- 
ciations of his army life through membership in A. T. A. Torbett Post, G. A. 
R., and in the New York Commandery of the Loyal Legion. He is a mem- 
ber of the Hanover Presbyterian church, and in all matters concerning the 
public welfare is actively interested. 



CLARENCE D. CARLEY. 



Clarence D. Carley, senior member of the firm of Carley & Forsyth, 
builders and contractors, and one of the substantial citizens of Mendham, 
was born in Sullivan county. New York, on the loth of September, 1844, 
his father, George Carley, dying when our subject was fifteen years old, at 
which time the latter left the old homestead and took the initial step in that 
changeable career which has finally resulted in his present position. He 
first went to Alton, Illinois, where for two years he was employed in various 
ways, subseqOently moving to Chicago and making the western metropolis 
his home for a year; then he returned to New York and located in Steuben 
county, where he worked on a farm for three years. At the end of that 
period he went to Middletown, New York, and learned the carpenter's trade 
with the Lindsley Brothers, but after working at that vocation for three 
years he decided to learn the mason's trade, and with this aim in view he 
placed himself in the hands of Thomas Nolan, of Paterson, New Jersey, 
and upon completing his apprenticeship he moved to Addison, New York, 
remaining there four years. 



314 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Determining to give up mechanical work entirely, he retired to a farm 
and devoted himself to agricultural pursuits for a period of four years, when 
a craving for a change caused him to return to Middletown and again take up 
the saw and plane. There he remained until some five years ago, when 
he came to Mendham and eventually formed a partnership with Mr. 
Forsyth, since which time he has met with the success merited by his per- 
severance, industry and strict integrity of character. His chief work in this 
vicinity, as a foreman for the firm of Lindsley Bros., was the construction 
of the Cromwell mansion, and as a contractor he has had the erection of the 
Eph Day residence; addition to the Catholic church, and the home of Finlay 
McKenzie. By his pronounced ability and careful attention to the details of 
his work, Mr. Carley has secured a liberal patronage, not only in the town 
■of Mendham, but also in the vicinage, and his honorable business methods 
have inspired the greatest confidence in all with whom he has dealings. 

Mr. Carley consummated his marriage on the 26th of October, 1892, 
when he was united to Miss Maggie Van Nest, a daughter of Henry Van 
JSIest, who descended from one of the early settlers of Morris county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Carley are the parents of two bright children, Raymond and 
Willard. 

CHARLES McCOLLUM. 

The subject of this review is numbered among the leading business men 
-of Morristown, and to this position he has attained by perseverance, dili- 
gence and sound judgment. He belongs to that class of America's citizens 
of which she is rightly proud, her self-made men, for at the early age of ten 
years he was thrown upon his own resources and has since made his way in 
the world unaided. 

Born in Somerset county. New Jersey, on the 9th of May, 1848, he is a 
son of James and Hannah (Stout) McCollum, who likewise were natives of 
the same county, where the father followed the occupation of farming. He 
died early in life, aged thirty-six, and his wife is now a resident of Bernards- 
ville. In the family were four children, of whom our subject is the eldest. 
By reason of the early death of the father and the somewhat limited financial 
•condition in which he left the family, Charles was forced to earn his own 
livelihood. He was but ten years of age, and thus denied the privileges and 
pleasures which usually brighten boyhood he began work by the month, as 
a farm hand. His hardships, however, developed a self-reliance and force 
of character which later proved important elements in his success. He con- 
tinued to work by the month in Somerset county until 1865, when he came 
to Morristown and accepted a clerkship in a clothing store, where he remained 
for eight }'ears, a most trusted, competent and faithful employe. 




^!yeorae ^yola/'era. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 315 

On the expiration of that period Mr. McCollum entered into partnership 
with J. W. Babbitt under the firm name of Babbitt & McCollum, dealers in 
clothing and men's furnishing goods. This connection was maintained for 
three years, when the partnership was dissolved, Mr. McCollum taking as his 
share of the business the furnishing-goods department and conducting his store 
until 1882, when he sold out. About that time occurred the death of his 
brother, Alex McCollum, a liveryman of Morristown, and he purchased the 
stable and livery stock belonging to the estate. This was located in the rear 
of the United States hotel, and there he conducted a profitable business until 
1894, when the barn was destroyed by fire. Through the succeeding two 
years he engaged in no enterprise, but in 1896 erected a large brick barn at 
No. 19 Bank street, supplied it with all modern equipments in his line and is 
now successfully conducting a boarding, livery and sale stable, as a member 
of the firm of Howie & McCollum. 

In 1876 Mr. McCollum was united in marriage to Mrs. Minnie Sanborne, 
7tcc Myers, a lady of high culture and education, whose death occurred in 
1893, when she had reached the age of forty-four years. In his political 
views Mr. McCollum is a Republican and has been honored with several 
town offices. Since 1867 he has been a member of the Morristown fire 
department, in which he has held nearly every position up to chief engineer. 
He has served as a member of the city council and is now a member of the 
excise board and the board of health, while of the Evergreen Cemetery Asso- 
ciation he is one of the trustees. His loyalty to the duties of citizenship is 
marked, and Morristown numbers him among her worthy representatives. 



GEORGE GOLDBERG. 



Born in Newark, New Jersey, October 25, 18 18, our subject is a son of 
John C. and Mary (Burroughs) Goldberg. The father was a native of 
Saxony, and when a young man came to America, his marriage being cele- 
brated in this country. Mrs. Goldberg was born in Afton, a daughter of 
Benjamin Burroughs, of Philadelphia, and of Quaker origin. After his mar- 
riage the father engaged in merchandising for some years. He was a very 
highly educated man and was an accomplished musician, and was a church 
organist. His death occurred in 1842, at the age of eighty years, and his 
wife, surviving him for some years, passed away in i860. They were the 
parents of seven children, namely: Mary and Charles, both deceased; Olivia, 
deceased wife of Daniel Mahanah; Charlotte, wife of Reuben DeForrest; 
Mary Ann, wife of \\^illiam Dennis; George and Sylvester. 

George Goldberg, the subject of this review, was about two years of age 
when the family removed from Newark to Afton, where he was reared and 



316 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfB GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

educated. In his early life he became connected with the silver-plating 
industry in Newark and followed that business with good success for a num- 
ber of years. He then turned his attention to the wooden-ware trade in New 
York city and is still connected with that enterprise, which has yielded to the 
members of the firm good financial returns. 

In 1843 Mr. Goldberg was united in marriage to Miss Frances Hopping, 
a native of Afton and a daughter of Timothy and Electa (Kitchel) Hopping. 
The grandfather and great-grandfather both bore the name of John Hopping, 
and the latter established the family in Morris county during its pioneer 
epoch, removing from Long Island. Mr. and Mrs. Goldberg are the parents 
of three children: Electa S. ; Charles Hopping, who was his father's suc- 
cessor in the New York business; and Lillian. Mr. and Mrs. Goldberg have 
resided at their present home in East Madison for half a century, and have 
enjoyed the esteem and regard of all with whom they have been brought in 
contact, while the hospitality of their household has been extended to a 
large circle of friends and acquaintances. Mr. Goldberg also owns a small 
farm in Chatham township, in connection with his town property, and is 
enjoying practical retirement from the arduous cares of business life. It is a 
well earned rest, for during a long period he labored earnestly and assiduously 
in the acquirement of a capital, and thus obtained the means which now 
enables him to spend his declining days in freedom from care. 



JOSEPH H. SHIPMAN. 



Joseph H. Shipman, postmaster of Whippany and an enterprising mer- 
chant, was born in Hanover township, Morris county, on the 23d of March, 
1837, and belongs to one of the oldest families of the county, established in 
Hanover township many years ago. The great-grandfather, Abraham Ship- 
man, and the grandfather, Jacob Shipman, both lived in this locality and 
were respected citizens of the community, bearing their part in the work of 
public improvement. The father, Daniel M. Shipman, also a native of Han- 
over township, married Susan Eliza Hopping, also a representative of one- 
of the pioneer families to whom Morris county owes her early development. 

Joseph H. Shipman acquired his education in the district schools of the 
neighborhood and in his early manhood learned the carpenter's trade, which 
he has followed throughout the greater part of his life. In connection with 
his brother, Walter H. Shipman, he engaged in operating a grist-mill for 
some years, and for a short time was engaged in dealing in coal in Jer- 
sey City, New Jersey. He is now serving as postmaster of Whippany, 
and administers the affairs of the office in a manner creditable to himself and 



BIOGBJPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 317 

satisfactory to his constituents. His political support is given the Repub- 
lican party, and of its principles he is a warm advocate. 

In 1859 Mr. Shipman was united in marriage to Miss Isabelle Hathaway 
Adamson, a native of Morris county, and to them have been born the follow- 
ing children: William M., Florence G., Edward P., Frank L. and Mabel. 
Mr. Shipman and his family are members of the Presbyterian church at 
Whippany. Their home is noted for its hospitality, and the members of 
the household occupy an enviable position in social circles here. Mr. Ship- 
man is a citizen who gives a loyal support to all measures pertaining to the 
public good and his worth is widely recognized by his fellow citizens and 
many friends. 

Walter H. Shipman, who was associated with our subject in business for 
some time, was born in Hanover township, Morris county, November 26, 
1832, and in 1855 married N. Caroline Kitchell. They became the parents 
of four children: Laura, who died in September, 1890; Evaline C. , whose 
death occurred in July, 1892; Daniel N., and Josephine A. Mrs. Shipman 
was summoned into eternal rest in the fall of 1897, her death being deeply 
lamented in the community. 

Mr. Shipman has always resided in his native township and followed the 
occupation of farming. In politics he is a stanch Republican and has held 
a number of township offices, serving at the present time (1897) ^'^ township 
collector. 



WILLIAM N. TUNIS. 



Mr. Tunis, who carries on general farming on the old family homestead, 
near Whippany, was there born August 2, 1829, a son of Samuel and Ruth 
Ann (Boughten) Tunis. The father was a native of Monmouth county. New 
Jersey, and belonged to one of the old colonial families. With his brother 
Stephen he came to Morris county, and together they purchased a large tract 
of land. Samuel Tunis, improving his share of the property, made it a val- 
uable farm and carried on agricultural pursuits until his death. He was 
twice married and had several children by the first union, but our subject is 
the only one born of the second marriage. The father was a devout mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church and died about 1837. His widow 
afterward married Lysander Myer, of Newark, and they had one daughter, 
Mary, now the widow of John Carter, of Monmouth. Mrs. Myer, who also 
was a member of the Methodist church, died at an advanced age. 

The subject of this review was reared on the home farm, and in the 
public schools of the neighborhood acquired his education. He remained 
with his mother until her death and then, purchasing his sister's interest in 



318 BIOGRJPEICAL AJ^D GEJTEALOOICAL HISTORY. 

the farm, became the owner of the old homestead which was his playground 
in youth, his training ground in early manhood and his battle ground in later 
life. He has fifty acres of land under a high state of cultivation and 
improved with good buildings and all the accessories that go to make up the 
model farm of the nineteenth century. He is energetic in his work, pro- 
gressive and practical in his methods, always alertly watching for opportuni- 
ties to improve his farm or his manner of working it, and thus has he con- 
quered success and gained a comfortable competence. 

In 1849 Mr. Tunis was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Burch, who 
was born in 1825, a native of Whippany and a daughter of Rev. Joshua and 
Amy (Sutton) Burch. Her father, who had previously resided on Long 
Island, was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. and Mfs. 
Tunis became the parents of two children: Isabel, wife of Edward P. 
Byran; and Caroline, wife of George W. Pavy, of Morristown. 

Mr. Tunis is a valued and honored citizen of the community and his fel- 
low townsmen have demonstrated their confidence in his ability and worth 
by electing him to the various township ofSces, where he has demonstrated 
his trustworthiness by his prompt and faithful discharge of duty. He votes 
with the Democratic party. His wife is a member of the Methodist church 
and with her husband shares in the regard of many friends. 



JOHN N. ALLEN. 

A resident of Madison for more than a quarter of a century, the subject 
of this memoir was a native of Cornwall, England, his birth having occurred 
on the 1st of April, 181 8. He was reared in the land of his nativity and in 
the days of his youth served a five-years apprenticeship to the tailor's trade. 
He afterward worked with his brother, in England, for a year, and then 
determined to see if the New World would not offer better advantages for 
the young man, who, without capital or influential friends to aid him in life, 
must work his way upward alone, depending entirely upon his own resources. 

Accordingly, in 1844, Mr. Allen bade adieu to home and friends and 
sailed for America. He took up his residence in Whippany, New Jersey, and 
followed his trade there for a quarter of a century. His mental and physical 
activity — the only capital that he brought with him to the New World — com- 
bined with his poverty to make immediate employment a necessity, and he 
at once announced himself in readiness to do all kinds of tailoring. His 
efficiency and trustworthiness were soon manifest, and in the course of time 
he secured an excellent patronage. He continued in business in Whippany 
until 1865, when he removed to Madison and became identified with the 
industrial interests of that city, carrying on a tailoring business until 1881, 




/o/>n Jr. S)^//en. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 319- 

when he retired to private life, and thereafter enjoyed the fruits of his for- 
mer toil. 

Mr. Allen was married in 1849 to Miss Charlotte Bruin, a daughter of 
Alexander Bruin, of Morris county. Two children were born of that union: 
Mary Matilda, wife of Melvin K. Hopping, of Chatham; and George Alexan- 
der, of Madison. The mother died in July, 1853, and Mr. Allen was again 
married in 1856, his second union being with Miss Martha A. Carter, a 
daughter of Mahlon Carter. They had one child, Martha Ann, who 
became the wife of M. B. Crane, and died in 1880, leaving one son, Clifford 

Morrison. 

Mr. Allen was originally a Democrat in his political relation, but in later 
years was not allied with any party, voting his convictions in support of the 
men whom he thought best qualified for office. He took great interest in 
the cause of temperance and did all in his power for the promulgation 
of temperance sentiment and habits among his fellow citizens. He attended 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and his life was pure and clean. He 
advocated all moral measures, and in his own business career set forth 
an example of honorable dealing that is well worthy of emulation. 

Mr. Allen died on Monday, January 31, 1898, of heart failure, superin- 
duced by a severe attack of la grippe, encountered about two years prior to.- 
his death, and leaving him in precarious health. 



JOHN D. JACKSON. 

John Darby Jackson, M. D., the youngest son of Stephen Jackson, was 
born in Rockaway, New Jersey, and there practiced medicine throughout his 
business career. He prepared for the profession under the direction of Dr. 
Pierson, and graduated from the old medical university on Ninth street, 
Philadelphia, in 181 5. He then began practice in Rockaway, and was the 
only physician in the village until his son, Dr. John W. Jackson, began 

practice here. 

On the 24th of October, i8i6, Dr. J. D. Jackson married a daughter of 
General Solomon F. Doughty, of Long Hill, and a sister of Senator Doughty, 
who represented Somerset county, New Jersey, in the state legislature. The 
Doctor was a Democrat in politics, and was a member of the general assem- 
bly in 1835, 1836, 1855 and 1856. In connection with Judge Freeman 
Wood, of Dover, he served as a member of the first board of freeholders 
after the organization of the township, and held many other town offices 
both before and after the division. He died November 17, 1859, at the age 
of sixty-five years. 



S20 BIOOBAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

THE HANN FAMILY. 

The Hann family, now the most numerous on Schooley's Mountain, as 
well as the oldest, traces its line of descent back for many generations. A 
monument in the old grave-yard at Pleasant Grove has the following inscrip- 
tion: "To the memory of William and Elsie Hann, emigrants from Germany, 
and early settlers in this township, who died in 1794, aged 90 years each." 
They came from Germany to Schooley's Mountain about 1730. Samuel 
Schooley, for whom the mountain is named, was the first person who bought 
land of the proprietors. In 1732 he sold a large number of acres to Mr. 
Holloway, and the latter soon after sold it to William Hann, who occupied 
and cultivated it, and transmitted it to his descendants. 

William and Elsie Hann left three sons, Jacob, William and John. The 
last named had no sons to perpetuate his name. Jacob had two sons, Wiliam 
and Philip. The descendants of William are as follows: Maurice, William 
Maurice, Arthur, making seven generations, including the original William. 
Philip had three sons, namely, John, Philip and Jacob. The line from 
John is William, Mancius, Minnie, making seven generations. Philip, son of 
Philip, had a son named Stewart, and a grandson named Miller, making six 
generations. Jacob, son of Philip, had a son named Philip H. and a grand- 
son named Augustus, making six generations; he also had a son named John 
and a grandson named Matthias. William Hann, son of William and Elsie 
Hann, had a son named Lawrence and a granddaughter named Amanda, who 
married the Rev. H. W. Hunt, and was the mother of Holloway W. Hunt. 



WILLIAM V. TUNIS. 



A well known resident of East Madison, Mr. Tunis is a man of resolute 
purpose and energy, conducting a carriage-making establishment and being 
numbered among the leading business men of the place. At an early period 
in the history of the county his people located within its borders. His grand- 
parents, William and Sybil Tunis, lived in Whippany, and the former carried 
on agricultural pursuits. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and was widely and favorably known in the community. His 
children were Joseph M., Charles W. , Phoebe, Maria, Jane and William 
Whitfield. 

The parents of our subject were William Whitfield and Sarah (Shauger) 
Tunis, natives of Whippany. The father engaged in farming as a life work, 
and his well directed efforts enabled him to provide a comfortable home for 
his family. He had nine children, namely: Captain Edward C. ; Phoebe J.; 
Eliza A., wife of J. W. Dey; Harriet N., wife of Hudson Kitchel; Josephine 
L., wife of Rev. N. Vansant; Maria E. ; William V. Tunis; Henry W., 




/fuua/ii (/. Kyu/ii}^. 



BIOGRJPHICAL J.KB GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 321 

•who married Carrie Cooper; and Emma J., wife of Henry Young. The first 
named, Captain Edward C. Tunis, removed to Illinois before the war and 
engaged in clerking there for a time. Afterward he went to Iowa, where he 
purchased land and made his home until the breaking out of the war, when, 
in 1 86 1, he enlisted in Company D, Second Iowa Regiment, serving for 
three years. His bravery and meritorious conduct won him promotion to 
the rank of captain. He served in a number of engagements, including Fort 
Donelson, Corinth, the siege of Vicksburg and the march to the sea under 
Sherman. 

After the close of the war he returned to the place of his nativity and 
for some years resided on the old homestead. In 1883 he was appointed 
postmaster of East Madison, which position he acceptably filled for four 
years. Later he engaged in business in Newark, and finally died in January, 
1893. Captain Tunis was a single man. His mother died April 30, 1879. 

William V. Tunis, after completing his education, learned the trade of 
carriage-making, which he has ever since followed. He was first engaged in 
business in Boonton, and thence removed to East Madison, where he is now 
at the head of one of the leading industrial concerns of the town. Indolence 
forms no part of his nature, and his work has that steadiness and thorough- 
ness which always insure success. 

In March, 1870, Mr. Tunis was united in marriage to Miss Emily Bar- 
nard, a native of Syracuse, New York, and a daughter of Warner and Cath- 
erine (Rouse) Barnard. Their home has been blessed by the presence of 
si.\ children, as follows: William W. , who married Jennie Beekman; Har- 
riet N., wife of Charles H. Genung; Grace B. ; Elmer V.; Edward Harland; 
and Irving Whitfield. 

Socially Mr. Tunis is a member of the Junior Order of Master Mechanics. 
He exercises his right of franchise in support of the Republican party and 
keeps well informed on the issues of the day, but is content faithfully to 
•discharge his duties of citizenship without the reward of public office. He 
has always lived in this locality, and his name is synonymous with honorable 
■dealing in all the walks of life. 



JAMES RICHARDS, D. D. 

Rev. James Richards, D. D., was born at New Canaan, Connecticut, 
October 29, 1767, and was of Welsh descent. He labored first as a licentiate 
at Ballston, New York, and afterward was pastor of two small congrega- 
tions on Long Island. On the 21st of July, 1794, he received a call from 
the First Presbyterian church of Morristown, in which he was offered four 

hundred and forty dollars in quarterly payments, the use of the parsonage 
^1 



322 BIOGBJPHICAL AJfD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

and fire-wood. This was in due time accepted by him, and on the ist of 
May, 1795, he was ordained and installed pastor of the church by the pres- 
bytery of New York. 

In November, 1795, the old church edifice was taken down and sold, 
and on the 26th of that month Dr. Richards preached the first sermon in 
the new house. During his pastorate the old plan of rating and collecting 
was discontinued and in its place the pews were sold and assessed. The 
meagerness of his salary was a source of great perplexity to him as the 
expenses of his growing family increased, and finally led to his accepting a 
call from the First Presbyterian church of Newark, New Jersey. He 
remained in Newark fifteen years, when he resigned his charge to accept the 
professorship of theology in the theological seminary at Auburn, New York. 
In the year 1801 he received the degree of Master of Arts from Princeton 
College, and in 1805, at the age of thirty-seven, was chosen moderator of 
the general assembly of the Presbyterian church. He retained the professor- 
ship at Auburn until his death, August 2, 1843. 



FRANCIS M. MERCHANT. 

In the quiet but honorable pursuit of general farming and market-gar- 
dening, Mr. Merchant has achieved a degree of success that places him 
among the substantial citizens of the community. His faithful performance 
of all public duties also makes him a valued factor in the public life, and 
during his long residence in Randolph township he has ever commanded the 
respect and confidence of those with whom he has come in contact. His 
birth occurred on the old Merchant homestead, October 6, 1840, and in the 
family of Daniel P. and Eliza (Cary) Merchant he is the youngest son. His 
father, who was born in 1805, in Connecticut, came with his parents to 
Morris county when a young man, and here spent his remaining days, his 
death occurring on the 30th of March, 1880, in his seventy-fifth year. The 
Merchants were of Scotch descent and the Carys were of a Holland Dutch 
family. The maternal grandfather of our subject, Daniel Cary, was born in 
Flanders. New Jersey. His daughter, Mrs. Merchant, died in 1885 and was 
laid to rest by the side of her husband in Mt. Freedom cemet.ery. Both 
were members of the Presbyterian church and were people of the highest 
respectability. Their family numbered three sons and three daughters: 
Silas, who was educated for the bar and is now a resident of Washington, 
D. C. ; Amanda M., wife of Charles S. Hughson, of Randolph; Phoebe F., 
wife of E. B. Lewis, a farmer; Ira, a civil engineer residing in Bloomington, 
Illinois; Francis M., subject of this sketch; and Huldah, who died in her 
twentieth year. 




Ql^^rJ^ ^=x^ ^/h^n^iy 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD OEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 323 

Francis M. Merchant was educated in the common schools, pursuing 
his studies in the old Wolf school-house until his eighteenth year, after which 
he took a commercial course in Eastman's Business College, of Poughkeep- 
sie. New York. His life has been devoted to agricultural pursuits, and he 
owns a valuable farm of eighty-five acres of arable land. His careful atten- 
tion to his work and his diligence and thrift have won him success in his under- 
takings. By the rotation of crops, the use of improved farm machinery and',, 
more than all, by his untiring industry he has developed one of the best 
farms in the neighborhood, and one profitable source of income to him is 
his market-gardening, his products finding a ready sale in the surrounding 
towns. 

Mr. Merchant was united in marriage to Miss Lenora Briant, of Ran- 
dolph township, a daughter of Daniel D. and Eliza (Carroll) Briant. They- 
now have a family of six children, as follows: Daniel M., a merchant of Morris 
Plains; Orvilletta, wife of Edwin S. Thompson, who resides at Mt. Freedom 
and is engaged in merchandising at Port Morris; Edward V., who married 
Lizzie R. Rodler, of Morristown, where they now reside; Mary E., who fol- 
lows teaching and resides at home; and Lenora and Charles Piatt, who are 
still under the parental roof. The parents are prominent and consistent 
members of the Presbyterian church at Mt. Freedom, in which Mr. Merchant 
has served as elder for ten years. He was elected to the office of justice of 
the peace, but refused to qualify. He has served on the school board and 
largely promoted the cause of education in his district. He is ever found on 
the side of all moral, educational and other measures tending to the advance- 
ment and progress of the community, and his well spent hfe, commending 
him to the confidence of all, makes him well worthy of representation Ip this 
Tolume among the leading citizens of Morris county. 



DANIEL L. MORRIS. 



The rich agricultural district comprised in Morris county is under the 
care of a number of very prominent and worthy citizens, whose farming 
operations have added largely to the prosperity and material development of 
the region. Chi^f among those whose energies are devoted to the improve- 
ment of the land is this gentleman, whose fidelity to duty in all the affairs 
of life has made him one of the leading representatives of this part of the state. 

Born on the 13th of May, 1832, at Long Hill, Morris county, he is a son 
of David and Eleanor (Layton) Morris. His paternal grandparents were 
Griffith and Margaret (Williams) Morris, who in 1799 took up their residence 
in Basking Ridge, New Jersey, where they spent their remaining days. The 
former, born in Wales, July 27, 1758, died October 24, 1843; and the latter, 



324 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

born in the same country, on Christmas day of 1763, passed away February 
18, 1822. They were people of the farm, who reared eight children; but the 
father of our subject was the onl}' one to locate permanently in this portion 
of New Jersey. 

A native of Wales, David Morris was only four years of age when 
brought by his parents to America. Reared to manhood in Morris county, 
he was married, October 29, 1828, to Miss Eleanor Layton, a descendant of 
the Layton, Runyan and Heath families, all prominent in the early history 
of New Jersey. Her parents were Peter and Margaret Layton, of Liberty 
Corner, the former a son of John and Sarah Layton, and the latter a daugh- 
ter of Daniel and Nellie Heath. The children of David and Eleanor Morris 
were John, Peter L. , Daniel L., Sarah E., wife of William L. Allen, Anthony 
and Nathaniel C. Most of these married, reared a number of children and 
became honored members of society. The political support of the Morrises 
was given to the Democracy in an early day, but later they became stanch 
Republicans. David Morris was prominent in local political circles and 
filled various township and county offices. He died in 1867, at the age of 
seventy years, and his wife passed away in 1877. In social circles they 
occupied a high position, which was a tribute to their sterling worth and 
jpright lives. 

Daniel L. Morris, of this review, was reared at Liberty Corner, New 
Jersey, and early became familiar with the duties that fall to the lot of the 
agriculturist, so that, when he entered upon his business career, practical 
experience had fitted him for the work. He has one of the best farms in 
Morris county, the land being in a high state of cultivation and improved 
with all the modern accessories and conveniences. By his well directed 
efforts, judicious management and diligence, he has acquired an enviable 
success which is recognized among the farmers of the county. In all matters 
pertaining to the public welfare he is deeply interested and lends his hearty 
support to every measure for the public good. A close student of the polit- 
ical situation of the country, he votes with the Republican party, believing 
its principles best calculated to promote the nation's good. Nor does he 
neglect the development of the moral side of nature. He is a consistent 
member of and active worker in the First Presbyterian church in New Ver- 
non, where he is holding the offices of ruling elder and trustee, which offices 
he has held for a score or more years. His nature is kindly and generous, 
and integrity is one of his strong characteristics. 

Mr. Morris was married April 2, 1 861, to Miss Sarah E. Cross, who was 
born February 16, 1834, and they began their domestic life near the old 
homestead,' which latter he purchased six years later, removing to that 
place, where he now resides. He has three children, — Mary E., Ella J. and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AjYD GEJVEALOGICAL HISTORY. 325 

William C. The mother of these children was called to the home beyond 
the grave April 2, iSgt, and her death was widely and deeply deplored, not 
only in her own home, but also in the church and Sabbath-school, of which 
she was for many years a faithful and consistent member, and she was an 
arduous worker in the causes which tend to the upbuilding of Christ's king- 
dom and the uplifting of humanity at home and abroad; and the sweet 
influence of her Christian character will ever be felt by those who knew her 
and be a blessed memory in the years which shall follow. Her deeds of 
generosity were scattered broadcast, and her kindly benedictions upon the 
poor and needy were universal. She was a daughter of William Cross, one 
of the old and influential citizens of the county; and as his family was one of 
great prominence it will be interesting in this connection to give their history, 
which follows. 

WILLIAM CROSS. 

Mr. Cross was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, May 12, 1805, 
married Miss Sarah M. Lee, December 26, 1832, and a few months later 
purchased the homestead near New Vernon, now owned and occupied by his 
son-in-law, Daniel L. Morris, and here he continued to reside until his death, 
November 22, 1879. Thus for almost half a century he resided in this com- 
munity as one of its most prominent, enterprising and influential members, 
esteemed and honored both in the private and more public walks of life. He 
was identified with the Whig and Republican parties successively, and while 
not taking an active part in political affairs was yet elected to various respons- 
ible offices in the county. 

His settlement was contemporaneous with the organization of the Pres- 
byterian church, and his life with its history for almost fifty years: for nearly 
the whole of that period he was a member of one or the other of its official 
boards. He and his partner in life were ever the faithful and devoted friends 
of the church, active in promoting its welfare, liberal in its support and con- 
tributing toward this end in perpetuity by a generous bequest. 

Mrs. Cross survived her husband several years, passing away June 9, 
1887, in the seventy-seventh year of her age. Their children were Sarah 
Elizabeth, wife of Daniel L. Morris (of the preceding sketch), Samuel Lee, 
Mary Jane, who died in infancy, Mary Haines and Joseph. The elder son 
died in early life, leaving a widow, since deceased, and an only daughter. 
The latter, Elizabeth Cross, was married November 19, 1S92, to Charles D. 
Kay, of Morristown. The younger son, Joseph Cross, graduated at Prince- 
ton College in 1865, and was admitted to the bar in 1868. He has since 
resided in Elizabeth, New Jersey, where he is prominent in legal circles and 
in public and church life. 



326 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

The Cross family trace their ancestry back to the days of the persecu- 
tion of the Huguenots in France, the name at that time being De Crosse. 
Those who fled from France went to the north of Ireland, dropping the " De " 
and finally the termination "e." The earliest American ancestor of this 
branch of the family was Rev. John Cross, the great-grandfather of the sub- 
ject of this sketch. He was the first minister of the gospel known to have 
labored in Basking Ridge, New Jersey, and preached to the people of that 
neighborhood from 1732 until 1741. His descendants were numerous, and 
since that early period have been interested in the progress and substantial 
development of this part of the state. The family has also sent its repre- 
sentatives into other states, where they have filled honorable positions. 
Among these are Rev. J. B. Cross, of Baltimore, Maryland, and Nathaniel 
Cross, professor in the Nashville (Tennessee) University. 

The Rev. John Cross was united in the holy bonds of matrimony to 
Deborah Oldfield, and they became the parents of four children. One 
daughter married a McEowen; another became the wife of Daniel Cooper; 
William married Miss Brewster, and Robert married Mary Lefferty. The 
Oldfield family, to which Mrs. John Cross belonged, lived on Long Island 
as early as 1651. She was a granddaughter of John Oldfield, of Jamaica, 
Long Island, and her sister, Mrs. Keziah Ludlow, a widow, married Rev. 
Timothy Jones, the first pastor of the First Presbyterian church at Morris- 
town, New Jersey. Another granddaughter of John Oldfield married Rev. 
Robert Cross, a Presbyterian minister who was a pastor in Jamaica, Long 
Island, in 1723; and her sister, Sarah Oldfield, became the wife of Rev. 
Thomas Poyer, rector of the Church of England in Jamaica. 

Robert Cross, a son of the Rev. John Cross, wedded, as before stated, 
Mary Lefferty, who was born January 19, 1734, and they became the 
parents of eleven children, viz.: Bryan, who was born June 6, 1756, and 
died unmarried; William, who was born September 23, 1757, and was twice 
married; Catharine, who was born January 9, 1759, and became the wife 
of Joseph Boyle; John, born September 10, 1760; Martha, who was born 
April 16, 1762, and became the wife of Samuel Annin; Robert, who was 
born February 13, 1764, and married Elizabeth Crowell; Mary, who was 
born October 27, 1765, and died unmarried; John Lefferty, who was born 
February 9, 1768, and wedded Mary Kirkpatrick; Henry, who was born July 
10, 1770, and died March 10, 1771; Joseph, who was bom December 6, 
1773, and married Mary Cooper; and James, who was born August 11, 1775, 
and married Gertrude Wyckoff. 

William Cross, the second son of Robert and Mary (Lefferty) Cross, 
married Sarah Larzalier and had six children: Jacob, who was twice mar- 
ried; Mary, wife of Robert Boyle; Nancy, wife of William Boyle; Robert, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMB GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 327 

■vvho married Maria Brown; Alexander, who died unmarried; and Catharine, 
wife of John Appleman. 

After the death of the mother of these children, William Cross married 
Sarah Perry, who was born January 31, 1779. His death occurred April 15, 
18 1 2, and his second wife passed away March 4, 1861. They had five chil- 
dren, namely: Samuel, who was born May 9, 1805, married Sarah Lewis 
and died January 10, 1867; William, born May 12, 1805, twin of Samuel; 
Elizabeth, born Januarj' 19, 1807, became the wife of Mahlon Cross; Joseph, 
born February i, 1809, wedded Mary Haines, and died October 10, 1874; 
and Sarah A., born January 15, 181 1, died October 15, 18 14. 

Joseph Cross, the fourth of this family, was a physician who settled in 
Elizabeth, New Jersey. 

William Cross, as stated in the beginning of this article, married Miss 
Sarah M. Lee. 

The Lee family is supposed to have been a younger branch of the Lees 
of Lee-Magna, Kent, England, ind at an early period settled at Nottingham, 
England. That they were a family of distinction is indicated by the posses- 
sion of a coat of arms, as follows: Az on a fesse between two fillets, or, 
three leopards' heads, gu. Crest, a demi-Moor, ppr vested gu, rimmed 
around the collar with two bars, or, tied around the waist with a ribbon ar, 
and gu, holding in his dexter hand a gem ring of the third. The first repre- 
sentative of the family in America was William Lee, who emigrated from 
Nottingham to this country in 1675. He married Mary Marvin and died "in 
1724, leaving three sons and seven daughters. The sons were Thomas and 
Joseph, of Long Island, and Richard, who entered the French military serv- 
ice in Canada. 

Joseph Lee, the second son of William Lee, had ten children. John 
Lee, the third son of Joseph Lee, removed from Long Island to Yorktown, 
"Westchester county, New York, in 1750. He was born September 15, 1725, 
and died in 1S16. On August 14, 1748, he married Sarah Perrine, who was 
born March i, 1725, and died July 31, 1796. They had ten children: 
Thomas, who was born August 19, 1749, and died June 24, 1791; Sarah, 
born November 20, 175 1, became the wife of John Horton and died in Octp- 
ber, 1827; John, born October 18, 1753, will be mentioned farther on in this 
sketch; Mary, born December 22, 1755, died in 1844; Hannah, born August 
23. 1757. died in 1845; Margaret, born May 29, 1759, became the wife of 
Jonas Williams and died in 1839; Dinah, who was born December 15, 1760, 
and married Thaddeus Rockwell; Abigail, born September 7, 1762, became 
the wife of David Knapp and died February i, 1828; Phebe, born October 
8, 1764, became the wife of Francis Colgrove and died at the age of seventy- 
eight years; and Robert P., born April 16, 1766, died November 20, 1848. 



328 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

John Lee, the second son of John and Sarah (Perrine) Lee, was born 
October i8, 1753, and on the ist of May, 1781, married Esther Horton, who 
was born February 7, 1763. In the year 181 5 they removed to New Vernon, 
New Jersey, purchasing the property just over the hill from the village. 
The old historic residence was erected in 1776, and both it and the hill are 
yet known by this family name. John Lee died September 22, 1S35, and his 
wife departed this life April 2, 1842. They had six children, namely: Philip; 
Phebe, who was born January 18, 1786, married James Van Wagner May 24, 
1808; Sarah, who was born September 25, 1788, and died December 30, 
1789; John, who was born December 24, 1790, and died March 29, 1792; 
Daniel H., who was born August 20, 1793, and died June 28, 1814; and 
Hester, who was born January 21, 1799, became the wife of Daniel B. Over- 
ton November 20, 1822. 

Philip Lee, the eldest son of John and Esther (Horton) Lee, was born on 
the I2th of February, 1782, and was married on the i8th of October, 1808, 
to Miss Sarah Bailey, who was born October 11, 1789, and died June 10, 
181 1 ; and his death occurred August 14, 1865. They had but one child, — 
Sarah Maria, — who was born October 14, 18 10, and became the wife of 
William Cross, as mentioned at the opening of this genealogical review. 



BENJAMIN W. BURNET. 

Prominent among the early families of New Jersey were the Burnets and 
the Cooks, from whom the subject of this review is descended. Both were 
of Norman origin and from Yorkshire, England, emigrated to America, tak- 
ing up their residence on Long Island. Thomas Burnet was the ancestor of 
probably all the Burnets in this country. Aaron Burnet removed from Long 
Island to New York and established a home at what was then Burnet Sta- 
tion, but is now Madison, where he died in 1755, in the one hundredth year 
of hjs age. For a long period before his demise he was totally blind. 
Mathias Burnet, the great-grandfather of our subject, was a native of Whip- 
pany, and died October 17, 1783, at the age of sixty years. His son, Matthias, 
was born in W^hippany, in 1749, and married Miss Phoebe Brookfield, a 
daughter of Job Brookfield, who was from Laontaka Valley. She was born 
May 17, 1750, and died December 10, 1828, having reared a large family. 

Among this number was Matthias L. Burnet, father of our subject. He 
was born in Whippany, Morris county, April 13, 1798, and wedded Miss 
Nancy Cook, who was born in what is now Madison, New Jersey, in 1799. 
Her father, Benjamin Cook, was a son of Ellis Cook, who came from South- 
ampton, Long Island, and was among the pioneer settlers of Morris county. 
He was an extensive real-estate holder and a portion of the land which he 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJfD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 329 

once owned is now in possession of our subject. Matthias L. Burnet was a 
wheelwright by trade and in connection with that industry he carried on 
agricultural pursuits. He took an active interest in the educational advance- 
ment of the community and he and his wife were consistent and worthy 
members of the Presbyterian church, in which he served as trustee for many 
years. He was also a member of the Masonic fraternity. His death 
occurred in 1882, at the advanced age of ninety-two years, and his wife 
passed away April 13, 1869. They were the parents of three children: 
Henry R. , deceased; Benjamin W. , and James Edgar, who died in 1862, of 
yellow fever, at the age of thirty-five years, while in the employ of the gov- 
ernment on the United States ship Rhode Island. 

Benjamin Warren Burnet attended the public schools until twelve years 
of age and then secured a clerkship in a store, where he remained for two 
years, after which he resumed his studies. Later, when he had again laid 
aside his text-books for the cares of business life, he went to New York city, 
where he remained for forty years engaged in the clothing business. His 
success is attributable entirely to his own efforts, — his watchfulness, enter- 
prise and sound judgment bringing him prosperity, which he justly deserves. 

In 1873 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Burnet and Miss Caroline 
G. Emmell, of Morristown, a daughter of Silas B. Emmell. They now have 
two sons: Edgar Emmell, a graduate of Stevens College and now a 
mechanical engineer; and Warren Hayward. 

Mr. Burnet takes a very active interest in all that will advance public 
interest and his labors have been very effective in making the undertaking a 
success. Every movement for the general good of the community receives 
his hearty endorsement and support, and the Democratic party, by its prin- 
ciples, has won his hearty allegiance. He is a regular attendant of the 
Presbyterian church, and has served the congregation in the office of trustee. 



EDWARD P. MILLER. 

A well known resident of Chatham, Mr. Miller was born in the town 
which is yet his home, May 3, 1842, and his ancestral connection with the 
history of the state is of long duration. The great-grand-father of our sub- 
ject, a native of Connecticut, was the first of the name to settle in New 
Jersey, establishing a home at Connecticut Farms, Essex county. He was 
of Scotch descent, and traced his ancestry back to those of the name who 
left their home in Aberdeen, Scotland, and, crossing the Atlantic, settled 
among the Puritan families of New England. The paternal grandfather 
of our subject was Smith M. Miller, a native of Connecticut Farms. He par- 
ticipated in the battle of Springfield, in the war of the Revolution, and mar- 



330 BIOGRJPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ried Rachel Miller, who was a native of New Jersey and a representative of 
one of the most prominent families of the state. 

Smith Maxwell Miller, father of our subject, was born in Westfield, 
then Essex, but now Union county. New Jersey, in 1799, and married 
Catherine Coddington, who was born at Mt. Horeb, a daughter of Benjamin 
and Hannah (Coon) Coddington. Her father served for seven years in the 
war of the Revolution, one of the heroes who attained for the country her 
independence, and for eight years he was captain of the Light Horse. He 
was one of the prisoners in the old Sugar House in New York city. He 
owned Mt. Horeb and was one of the most prominent factors in the public 
life. 

The father of our subject was reared on a farm and in his youth learned 
the blacksmith's trade, but never followed the pursuit. He was a natural 
mechanic and could do almost anything with tools. He received a common- 
school education and devoted his life to farming. For several years he 
served as justice of the peace and held other local offices of trust and 
responsibility. He was a member of Madison Lodge of the Sons of Temper- 
ance and he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
His death occurred in 1881 and his wife passed away the following year. 
They were the parents of eleven children, nine of whom reached years of 
maturity: Joseph, a resident of Brooklyn, New York; Jane, widow of F. W. 
Day and a resident of Chatham; Hannah, deceased wife of Elam R. Brant; 
Martha, wife of John Warner, of Elizabeth; Caroline M., widow of Theodore 
W. Bruen and a resident of Ocean Grove; Mary, who died at -the age of 
seventeen years; Minard Farley, who was a member of the One Hundred 
and Eighth New York Infantry and died from the effects of disabilities con- 
tracted in the service; William, of Tarrytown, New York, who also was in 
the Union service and lost an arm at the battle of Gettysburg: he is a mem- 
ber of the Sons of the Revolution; and Edward P. 

Mr. Miller, whose name introduces this review, began his education in 
the schools of Chatham and completed his literary course in Lansing, Michi- 
gan. During his youth he worked on the home farm and later engaged in 
contract work in Springfield, New Jersey, but after a time he disposed of his 
business interests there and returned to Chatham, where he followed various 
business pursuits. In 1882 he embarked in the coal business, which he has 
followed continuously since, working up an excellent trade. His sales often 
amount to as high as six hundred tons per month, and this liberal patronage 
brings him a good income, which has placed him among the substantial 
citizens of the community. His reputation in business affairs is most envia- 
ble, for his interests are conducted with the strictest regard to the ethics of 
commercial life. 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 331 

Mr. Miller's well known ability and marked fidelity to every duty and 
interest entrusted to his care have led to his selection for a number of offices. 
He served for eight years as township assessor, and is now assessor of the 
borough. He has held the position of trustee of the schools for fifteen years 
and is deeply interested in the cause of education and all that pertains to the 
intellectual development of the community. In his political views he is 
independent. He is a member of the Chatham Fish & Game Association, 
the Wheelmen's Club, Madison Lodge, No. 96, F. & A. M., and Morristown 
Chapter, R. A. M. He is an earnest and untiring worker in the temperance 
cause and with his wife attends the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Miller was married in 1865 to Miss Mary L. Brant, a native of Madi- 
son and a daughter of Louis and Rachel (Green) Brant. Her father was 
born in Hackettstown, New Jersey, and was a representative of one of the 
prominent old families of the state. To Mr. and Mrs. Miller have been born 
six children: Louis A., a graduate of a mercantile college of Newark, and 
now a salesman in the Florists' Exchange, in New York; William, who is a 
florist by profession, but is now with his father in business; Jennie D. ; Jere- 
miah Fisher; Charles A. and Hannah May. 



PHILIP COCKREM. 

One of the pioneers of Morris county, now residing in Green Village, 
Mr. Cockrem was born near that place on the ist of November, 1818, a son 
of John and Rachel (Roberts) Cockrem. His parents were early settlers of 
the neighborhood, and there reared their family of four children, — David, 
William, Sarah and Philip; but the only one now living is the subject of 
of this review. David was a resident of Morristown, and William also made 
his home in that city. The early members of the family were farmers and 
mechanics, and the father followed agricultural pursuits in connection with 
weaving. In religious belief the Cockrems were Presbyterians; their political 
support was given the Whig party until its dissolution, when they joined the 
ranks of the Republican party. The mother of our subject was a daughter 
of Daniel Roberts, of Green Village, also a representative of one of the old 
families of Morris county. 

Philip Cockrem, subject of this review, spent his youth in or near Green 
Village, and when about twenty-one years of age learned the wagon-making 
trade, which he followed in Morristown for some years. During the past 
forty years he has carried on agricultural pursuits in Green Village, and his 
well-cultivated farm indicates his careful supervision. 

In early manhood Mr. Cockrem was joined in wedlock to Miss Martha 
5turgus, daughter of Joshua Sturgus. After her death Mr. Cockrem was again 



3a2 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

married, his second union being with Mrs. Phoebe Mastin, a daughter of 
Godfrey Reed, and a native of Morris county, born January 9, 1840. Our 
subject and his wife attend the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics he 
is a stanch Republican, and during President Lincoln's administration served 
as postmaster of Green Village. 



JOHN W. VAN DUYNE. 

One of the properous and enterprising farmers of Morris county is John 
Wilson Van Duyne, who traces his ancestry back to Abraham Van Duyne, 
the progenitor of the family in Morris county. Cornelius Van Duyne, son of 
Abraham, was born on the old homestead about the year 1795 and died in 
1837. He was the father of three children, namely: Abraham C. , father of 
our subject; Catherine, who married Silas H. Coleman, of W^isconsin; and 
Rachel, deceased, who became Mrs. Theodore A. Peer. 

Abraham C. Van Duyne, born in 18 14, in the same house as was his 
father, obtained his education in the district schools and subsequently became 
one of the prominent farmers of the county. He was an active worker in 
the ranks of the Republican party, served one term in the house of repre- 
sentatives and was a member of the county board of freeholders for several 
years. In his religious faith he was an adherent of the Montville Reformed 
church, in which he served as elder for a long time. In 1834 he was mar- 
ried to Miss Hetty M. Crane, a daughter of Benjamin Crane, and they 
became the parents of three children: Martha A., who married James W. 
Collard, of Montville township; Lucinda, now Mrs. Daniel M. Davenport, of 
East Orange; and John W. , the immediate subject of this review. Mr. Van 
Duyne died in 1895, being still survived by his wife. 

John Wilson Van Duyne, son of Abraham C. and Hetty M. (Crane) Van 
Duyne, was born on the farm where he now resides on the 12th of June, 
1844, and received his literary education in the public and private schools of 
the neighborhood. At an early age he became initiated in the duties of farm 
life, and, with the exception of four years spent at the carpenter's trade, he has 
always followed agricultural pursuits, meeting with a high degree of success 
in that line of endeavor. As was his father before him, he is a loyal adher- 
ent of the Republican party and served as assessor of the township for six 
years. In his religious faith he is a consistent member of the Reformed 
church, at Lower Montville. 

The marriage of Mr. Van Duyne was consummated May 20, 1867, when 
he was united to Miss Abbie R. Husk, who was born in 1845, the daughter of 
Abraham Husk, of Essex county. She died in 1878, leaving three children, 
two of whom survive, namely: Milton P., born in 1869, and J. Elmer, born 








^ 







BIOGRJPHICAL AJfD GEMEALOGICdL HISTORY. 333 

in 1874. Mr. Van Duyne contracted a second marriage in 1879, when he 
was united to Miss Ada M. Jacobus, who was born August 30, 1861, the 
daughter of Walter D. and Sarah (Van Duyne) Jacobus, of Montville town- 
ship, and of this union three children were born: Mary Ella, born May 4, 
1880; Etta J., born October 22, 1887; and Amy Annette, born July 11,1893. 



JACOB LOEWENTHAL. 

The progressive faculty possessed by some men stands as one of their 
dominating characteristics and gives to them a distinct advantage in attain- 
ing distinct prestige in any line to which they may confine their efforts. 

One of the prominent and energetic business men of Morris county is 
Jacob Loewenthal, senior member of the firm of Jacob Loewenthal & Sons, 
proprietors of the Liondale Bleach, Dye & Print Works, located at 
Rockaway. Mr. Loewenthal was born in Germany, where he grew to man- 
hood, emigrating to the United States in 1848. 

The owners of the Liondale Bleach, Dye & Print Works are the senior 
and his three sons, Adolph, Simon J. and Emil M., all of whom have been 
brought up in the business and are thoroughly conversant with the details of 
every department connected therewith. The enterprise was inaugurated on 
a small scale in New York city, and as it developed Mr. Loewenthal increased 
its capacity in proportion and in 1 896 the works at Rockaway were estab- 
lished. Mr. Loewenthal and his eldest son, Adolph, conduct the New York 
offices, from which the markets are canvassed, while the younger sons, 
Simon J. and Emil M., attend to the manufacturing end, — Simon J. as 
general manager, and the latter attending to the finances and office work. 

The Liondale Bleach, Dye & Print Works is one of the largest indus- 
tries of its kind in New Jersey and was established at an immense cost, 
neither money nor labor being spared to make the concern complete in every 
detail. The two main buildings which stand on thirty-five acres of land, 
are eighty feet wide by four hundred feet long and are thrown into one by 
connecting bridges. Besides the main buildings used for manufacturing pur- 
poses there are several outhouses, in which are located the iron and steel, 
carpenter, and blacksmithing shops for the building and repairs of all the 
machinery. The tower is six stories high, forty feet square, and is sur- 
mounted by a steel flagstaff sixty-five feet in height, from which floats the 
national colors. On the roof of the tower is a complete weather bureau, 
connecting with the self-recording instruments in the offices on the second 
floor. The top story of the tower contains a Seth Thomas clock of four dials, 
and there also are located the tanks containing the water for the sprinklers. 
The fifth floor is utilized for the storage of various models of castings. The 



334 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

fourth floor is arranged with shelving to hold reference samples of work. 
The third floor is used for designing and the engraving of patterns for print- 
ing. The second floor is occupied by the general and private offices, while 
the superintendent's offices and laboratory are located on the first floor. The 
tower is entirely fire-proof and each of the floors has a fire-proof safe. 

The machinery throughout the buildings is of the newest and most 
improved design, the main power being generated from two large Mcintosh 
engines of four-hundred-horse power each and a smaller engine of two-hun- 
dred-and-fifty-horse power, — all three being connected with five boilers 
and having a total capacity of over twelve-hundred-horse power. The 
machinery in the different rooms is run by electricity and each room is sup- 
plied with one or more motors, which are controlled independently of each 
other, and in each department elevators are used to transport employes and 
freight from floor to floor. The whole building is heated or cooled by the 
Sturtevant air system, which diffuses warm air through the rooms in winter 
and cold air in summer, thus making it pleasant all the year round for the 
many hundreds of employes. An electric-light plant, operated on the prem- 
ises, supplies the light. The buildings have fire-proof partitions and doors, 
and the entire place is protected by the Grinnell system of sprinklers. 

A part of the water supply is obtained from the reservoir fed from 
numerous springs, — a necessary component in the bleaching and other depart- 
ments. These springs are enclosed in a stone wall composed of the best 
masonry and the excavation in some places (thirty-five feet deep) is suf- 
ficient to secure a five-million-gallon supply of pure, fresh, soft water. 

The two main buildings are far enough apart to permit the running of a 
railway siding between them, and the raw material is taken from the cars at 
one end of the buildings and all the manufactured goods are loaded directly 
upon the cars at the other end, thus averting the necessity of extra haulage. 
The raw material comes in bales, from which it is taken, sewed together 
until the weight of from three and a half to four tons is attained, when it 
passes through me different processes which transforms it into the finished 
product. All the goods manufactured at the works are consigned them and 
when finished are returned to these consignors, who then sell them to their 
various trades and one might say that eventually they find their way to the 
markets of the world. 



ENOCH N. SAMSON. 

Our subject was born in the house which is still his home, and through 
a long, useful and honorable life he has been closely indentified with the 
interests of Madison. He opened his eyes to the light of day February 17, 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJ^D GEJ^'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 335 

1817, a son of Abraham and Chloe (Bonnel) Samson. His father was born 
in Morris county, on the 3d of October, 1769, and was a son of David Sam- 
son, who formerly lived at Egg Harbor, on the Jersey coast, and was of 
French lineage. His wife bore the madien name of Hannah Bonnel, and by 
their marriage they became the parents of nine children, Abraham being the 
seventh in order of birth. The parents died during the war of the Revolution, 
both dying on the same day, victims of smallpox. 

In his early life Abraham Samson served an apprenticeship at the tailor's 
trade and followed that business for a few years, after which he turned his 
attention to the distilling business. He married Chloe Bonnel, who was born 
in December, 1779, a daughter of Captain Nathaniel Bonnel, who was born 
in 1 73 1 and died in 1809. His father was Nathaniel Bonnel, Sr. , who resi- 
ded for a time on Long Island and then removed to Elizabeth, whence he 
afterward went to Chatham. The marriage of Abraham and Chloe Samson 
was celebrated March 10, 1799, and was blessed with ten children, of whom 
Enoch N. and Annie Maria still survive. Mr. Samson was an old-line Whig 
in his political affiliations, and held the office of constable. His wife was a 
member of the Presbyterian church, and both were people of the highest 
respectability, having the warm regard of many friends. Mr. Samson died 
in 1 85 1, and his wife was called to her final home in 1866. 

Enoch Nelson Samson spent the greater part of his youth in mastering the 
English branches of learning taught in the public schools, and entered upon 
his business career, when seventeen years of age, as a clerk in a store in 
Dover. He remained at that place from 1835 until 1840, and then turned 
his attention to farming, owning and cultivating a valuable tract of land. 
Some years afterward he sold eighteen acres of this to Mr. Hurty and twelve 
acres to Dr. Pomeroy, and continued in agricultural pursuits, in which enter- 
prise he met with good success and secured good financial returns. 

Mr. Samson was joined in wedlock to Miss Sarah J. Cuplin, a native 
of Morris county, and a daughter of John and Isabella (Winfield) Cuplin, the 
former of English and the latter of Scotch descent. Mr. Cuplin was a rep- 
resentative of one of the old families of the state and resided at the ances- 
tral home, in Sussex county, that for a number of generations had been in 
the possession of the family. Mr. and Mrs. Samson are worthy members of 
the First Presbyterian church of Madison, have done much to promote its 
interests, and he has efficiently served as church trustee. In his early life he 
allied himself with the Whig party and cast his first presidential vote for 
William Henry Harrison. When the slavery question demanded the forma- 
tion of anew political party he indicated his views in regard to that question 
by joining the Republican ranks, and has since been one of the stanch advo- 
cates of the party principles. His interest in public affairs has led him to- 



836 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEMEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

champion many measures intended to promote the general welfare, and the 
community recognizes him as one of its valued citizens. For many years he 
was connected with the business interests of his section of the county, but is 
now living retired on the old homestead, enjoying a rest that he has truly 
earned and richly deserves. 



JEREMIAH BAKER. 

" The study of biography is by nature the most universally profitable, 
universally pleasant of all things, " said Carlyle, and this statement of the 
philosopher is certainly verified when we turn our attention to the life rec- 
ords of such men as Mr. Baker. In considering the growth and develop- 
ment of Madison we find that she owes much of her commercial prosperity 
to him, and that for many years his success in business has not only admin- 
istered to his own happiness but has contributed materially to the advance- 
ment and welfare of the thriving city in which he makes his home. He has 
been identified with this section of the state for many years and has contrib- 
uted to its material progress and prosperity to an extent equaled by but few 
of his contemporaries. Few lives furnish so striking an example of the wise 
application of sound principles and safe conservatism as does his, and his 
record is that of one who has used his abilities in the best possible way, win- 
ning respect and honor by his useful career. 

Mr. Baker is one of New Jersey's native sor.s. He was born in West- 
field, Essex county, October 9, 1823, his parents t sing William and Jane R. 
(Thompson) Baker. The grandfather, William Baker, Sr. , was born August 
5. '759. made his home in Westfield and died December 30, 1833. His 
father, Henry Baker, of East Hampton, Long Island, was a son of Thomas 
Baker, the progenitor of the family in America. The father of our subject, 
"William Baker, was born in Westfield, February 20, 1788, and having 
arrived at years of maturity married Miss Thompson, who was born May 3, 
1790, a daughter of Moses and Esther A. (Bonnell) Thompson, the former a 
son of Hezekiah Thompson, who is mentioned in history on account of his 
valiant service in the war of the Revolution. William Baker devoted his 
energies to agricultural pursuits, and was a well known and influential 
farmer in the community where he resided. Both he and his wife held mem- 
bership in the Presbyterian church, and their many excellencies of character 
■won them high regard. The father died November 25, 1831, and the 
mother, long surviving him, passed away April 5, 1867. Their family num- 
bered six sons and four daughters. < 

Having pursued his elementarj' studies in the common schools, Jere- 
miah Baker completed his education in the University of New York. In 





Z^^^^^i^ /fk^4^ 



^ 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 387 

1838 he entered upon his business career in New York city, where he carried 
on operations until 1842, when, feeling the need of more advanced educa- 
tional training, he pursued his university course. After a time he assumed 
his business cares and responsibilities, being associated with his brother-in- 
law, James A. Webb, in merchandising in New York city until 1869. In 
that year he retired from active commercial life, and has since been con- 
nected with the American Insurance Company, of which he has been a 
director for twenty-five years. He was also one of the organizers of the 
First National Bank, of Madison, and has served as a member of the direct- 
orate Irom the beginning. His executive ability, keen discrimination, sound 
judgment and energy have been important factors in his success, and have 
brought to him a comfortable competence. 

Mr. Baker was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth C. Webb, a native 
of New York city, and a daughter of A. V. H. and Phcebe (Baker) Webb. 
Her father was a native of the Empire state, and was a son of Orange 
Webb, who was born December 8, 1763, and died November 26, 1817. He 
■was one of the largest ship owners of his day, and was one of the first eld- 
ers in what was known as the old brick church, in New York city, serving in 
that capacity about 1812, when Dr. Gardner Spring was pastor. Mrs. Webb 
was a daughter of William Baker, of Westfield. Seven children were born 
to our subject and his wife, but all have passed away. 

Mr. Baker belongs to a family that was connected with the Whig party 
■during the first half of the nineteenth century, and he cast his first pres- 
idential vote for Henry Clay. Since the formation of the Republican party 
he has been one of its loyal supporters, and on that ticket he was elected a 
member of the first city council of Madison, serving most acceptably in that 
office and laboring earnestly for the substantial improvement of the city. 
He was chairman of the finance and water committees, and managed the 
affairs of those departments with great discretion and ability. He is an 
elder in the Presbyterian church in Madison and all interests for the public 
good find in him a friend. He is a man of wide acquaintance in business 
circles, both in the metropolis and New Jersey, and his name is a synonym 
for honorable business dealing. 

At this point it would be almost tautological to enter into any series of 
statements as showing our subject to be a man of broad intelligence and gen- 
uine public spirit, for these have been shadowed forth between the lines of 
this review. Strong in his individuality, he never lacks the courage of his 
convictions, but there are as dominating elements in this individuality a 
lively human sympathy and an abiding charity, which, as taken in connec- 
tion with the sterling integrity and honor of his character, have naturally 

gained to Mr. Baker the respect and confidence of men. 
22 



838 BIOGBJPEICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

CHARLES W. SCARBOROUGH, M. D. 

Power has long since been superseded by usefulness in the estimation of 
man's worth in the world, and he who devotes himself to the good of others 
has first place in the public esteem and regard. The physician in his life of 
sacrifice, working for others with unremitting zeal, has won the gratitude of 
his fellow men and is fully deserving of high encomiums. Little do those 
outside of the profession realize how heavy are the demands made upon the 
time, patience and skill of the physician, but his work is often carried on in 
the face of great difficulties, and the nature of the work is such as to demand 
the utmost care in preparation, extensive familiarity with the principles of 
medicine, calmness in times of danger and a well balanced judgment. Dr. 
Scarborough possesses the essential qualities of the successful physician and 
hence has attained to an enviable place in professional circles. 

He was born in Lambertville, New Jersey, on the i6th of September, 
1866, a son of Charles L. ^nd Mary (Williamson) Scarborough. His literary 
education was acquired in the Phillipsburg high school, in which he was gradu- 
ated in the class of 1S83. For a short period thereafter he was connected 
with business life and then turned his attention to the profession to which he 
now devotes his energies. He began the study of medicine in 1888, under 
the preceptorage of Dr. F. P. McKinstry, of Washington, New Jersey, and 
pursued his first course of lectures in Hahnemann Medical College, of Phila- 
delphia, in which institution he was graduated in 1893. He then began 
practice in Madison, where he has since continued, meeting with good success 
as the result of his enterprise, his knowledge of the science of medicine and 
his peculiar tact and skill in his work. He is a member of the State Homeo- 
pathic Society of New Jersey. 

On the 1st of January, 1890, Dr. Scarborough married Miss Adaline C. 
Alleger, of Washington, New Jersey, a daughter of E. W. and Anne E. 
(Bosenbury) Alleger and a native of Hunterdon county. New Jersey. They 
now have two children, Pauline Oakly and Eugene Wesley. 

The Doctor is a member of the Junior Order of American Mechanics 
and the Knights of Pythias fraternity. He also belongs to the Methodist 
Episcopal church and to the Young Men's Christian Association and in the 
last named is a member of the board of directors, serving as secretary of that 
board. 



JOHN HANCOCK. 

Among the first representatives of the Methodist ministry in Morris 
county was John Hancock, "a unique man of Chatham township, whose 
character may be summed up in the words which describe Barnabas — ' a 



BIOGRJPHICAL AJ^D GEJSTEALOGICAL HISTORY. 8B9 

good man and full of the Holy Ghost and faith.' " He was born in Springfield 
in 1776; left fatherless when eight months old and in his mother's arms he 
was carried from the blackened ruins of the village, burned by the Brit- 
ish, to Madison. His advantages were few but his diligence was great. 
The first book he ever owned was "A New Geographical, Historical and 
Commercial Grammar, and Present State of the Several Kingdoms of the 
World." This he bought for six dollars, all obtained from selling hazel- 
nuts gathered in the evening when his work was done, for at that time he 
was serving as an apprentice in Columbia. He thoroughly mastered the 
contents of that book. He early began to write, and all through his long 
life his thoughts flowed into rhyme as easily as into prose, his works having 
some of the rude quaintness of Bunyan. His early religious exercises were 
genuine and deep. He joined the Methodist Episcopal church in 1801, and' 
learning to speak in the class-meeting he soon went forth into school- 
houses, private dwellings and wherever a door was open, publishing the 
glad tidings. In 1803 he was licensed as a local preacher, in 18 14 ordained 
as a deacon and in 1833 ordained as elder by Bishop Hedding. His own 
house, as soon as it was completed, in 1803, was opened for a regular place 
of preaching and continued to be such until 1832. For the rest of his life 
while still supporting his family by his business and farm, he preached in 
the circuit formed by Flanders, Paterson, Newark, Rahway and New Provi- 
dence, in heat and cold, in sunshine and storm, his expenses generally 
more than his receipts, he continued his work, ever fulfilling the injunction, 
" As ye go, preach." He had a great fund of humor, which, however, he 
kept within bounds. He died in great peace, in full possession of his facul- 
ties, in his seventy-eighth year, leaving blessed memories behind him in all 
these neighborhoods. Close by his dwelling Mr. Hancock had set apart a 
portion of land for a family cemetery, which in his will he made " a public 
burial place." Near the entrance, and in full view of those who pass by, 
may still be seen a square board tablet, sustained by two tall posts, on 
which were painted in large yellow letters, now partly obliterated, some 
homely but practical lines, written by himself and commencing thus: 

" Ye travelers through the vale of strife 
To endless death or endless life, 
Here you may learn midst joy or tears 
The end of worldly hopes or fears." 



GEORGE W. GREENWOOD. 
For more than forty years Mr. Greenwood has been an active participa- 
tor in the improvement and development of Morristown, as a builder and 
contractor. He was born in Paterson, New Jersey, on the 2d of December, 



340 BIOGBJPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

1832. While yet a child he was brought by his parents to Morris county, 
in the district schools of which he acquired his education, and at the age of 
sixteen he began to learn his trade at Boonton, later going to Morristown, 
where he finished his apprenticeship with the firm of Bailey & Loundsbury, 
and continued in this city as a journeyman for ten years thereafter. In 1865 
he arranged a partnership with John W. Hays, under the firm name of 
Greenwood & Hays, and for over a quarter of a century they were perhaps 
the best known builders and contractors and did the largest amount of business 
in and around Morristown. They erected and put in operation a mill at the 
Speedwell Iron Works, and one near the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western 
Railroad station, the latter being now operated by Reeve & Burr; but to 
enumerate even the best specimens of work which this firm has produced 
would occupy much space without adding to the importance or character of 
its members; and it will be sufficient to add that the Baptist church, the 
Farrelly building and the Holbrook and Kipp residences are fair examples of 
their workmanship and will attest to their standing and importance as build- 
ers. After the dissolution of this firm Mr. Greenwood associated with Fred- 
erick H. DeCoster, and the firm now stands Greenwood & DeCoster. They 
have the contracts for the Babbitt building and the Livingston house, and 
they have established an enviable reputation throughout the county. 

Mr. Greenwood's first marriage was solemnized April 5, 1855, when he 
wedded Miss Sarah E. Weir, who was a daughter of Lemuel Howard and 
Elizabeth (Vreeland) Weir. She was born November 5, 1836, and died 
December 22, 1877, leaving three children, as follows: Ida, born November 
26, 1856, married George T. Timmons on November 17, 1880, and has two 
surviving children, namely: Ida May, born November 13, 1881; and Edith, 
born June 11, 1890. The other two children of Mr. Greenwood by his first 
marriage were Georgie May, who died September 3, 1882, aged nineteen 
years; and Lizzie Armstrong, who died June 9, 1881, aged twelve years. 
The mother of these children was a consistent Christian woman and a devout 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Greenwood was again married September i, 1881, his second wife 
being Miss Elsie May Gordon. He maintains a comfortable home, on the 
outskirts of the city, where he owns a tract of land comprising twelve acres, 
beautifully situated for residence plats, besides which he possesses improved 
and valuable real estate elsewhere in the city, all of which has come to him 
as a logical result of his labor, thrift and economy. 

The father of our subject, Richard Greenwood, was a native of England, 
and emigrated to the United States at the age of twelve years, having par- 
ticipated in the war of 18 12, as a drummer boy. He married Miss Lettie 
Van Giesen, and of their seven children but three survive, namely: George 




f^ 




i 



. BIOGRAPHICAL AJs^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 341 

W., our subject; James, who has for some years been a resident of Columbus, 
Ohio; and Charles, who is residing in Welacca, Putnam county, Florida. 
The father of these children, Richard Greenwood, died in 1839, and his 
faithful wife was summoned to her eternal rest in 1883. 



FREDERICK H. DeCOSTER. 

A well-known member of the prominent firm of Greenwood & DeCoster, 
contractors and builders, the subject of this sketch was born in Newark, New 
Jersey, on the ist of January, 1854. His father, John H. DeCoster, was 
born near Basking Ridge, Morris county, and during his life followed the car- 
penter trade in the place of his birth and in Newark. He married Miss Fan- 
nie Bockoven, a daughter of David Bockoven, the prominent old-time resident 
of Mendham, and their children were: Frederick H. ; Anna, who became the 
wife of Stephen Sloat; and Allie, who married Lemuel Hyer, of I^ogansville. 
Mr. DeCoster died in 1858, at the age of thirty-three years. Joseph DeCos- 
ter, the father of John H. and grandfather of our subject, was an orphan 
when he was brought to the United States from the island of Vera Cruz, sit- 
uated in the Gulf of Mexico. He eventually located near Basking Ridge and 
married Miss Catharine Rickey, by whom he had eight children. 

Frederick H. DeCoster was reared in the vicinity of Basking Ridge, 
receiving his literary education in the public schools, and at the age of seven- 
teen he began an apprenticeship at the carpenter trade, under the preceptor- 
age of John J. Allen, with whom he remained for six years. He then went 
into the oil country and followed his trade at different points, including Brad- 
ford and vicinity, until 1883, when he came to Morristown and formed a 
partnership with John Wright, the firm being known as Wright & DeCoster, 
which continued successfully for eight years. Soon after the dissolution of 
this partnership Mr. DeCoster became a member of the firm of Greenwood 
& DeCoster, which has attained a wide reputation throughout Morris county 
for the excellence of the work done and for the strict integrity and honorable 
business methods of its members. Mr. DeCoster has been connected with 
the construction of some of the most prominent buildings in the city of Mor- 
ristown and is rightfully regarded as one of the most capable as well as 
responsible and worthy men who have been identified with the building inter- 
ests of Morris county. He is a man of high principle, upright in all his deal- 
ings and merits the deep respect in which he is held by his many friends. 



THOMAS GEORGE TIMMONS. 
Born in Morristown, February 22, 1858, Thomas G. Timmons is a son 
of James and Maria (Claxton) Timmons, both of whom are natives of Ireland, 



342 BIOGRAFRICAL AJfD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. . 

whence they emigrated to America and took up their residence in Littleton, Mor- 
ris county. They had a family of seven sons and two daughters, of whom the fol- 
lowing are living: James, who married Sarah Whitehead and resides in Morris- 
town, where he is engaged in merchandising: William, who married a lady from 
Canton, Ohio; Edward, who wedded Annie Lynch and resides in New Rochelle, 
New York, where he is captain of the police department of that city; Annie, wife 
of Thomas J, O'Brian, of Morristown, K.atharine,who lives with her sister. The 
parents of this family have both passed away. They were consistent Chris- 
tian people and were respected by all who knew them. 

Thomas G. Timmons acquired his education in the schools of Morris 
county, and after attaining to man's estate learned the carpenter's trade of 
the firm of Greenwood & Hays, of Morristown. Having completed his 
apprenticeship he remained in the employ of that company as a journeyman 
until 1880, when he was made foreman of their establishment, filling that 
position until 1896. He then became foreman for the firm of Reeve & Burr, 
of Morristown, in which capacity he has since served with marked ability, 
and fidelity. He is not only a practical workman, but possesses much executive 
ability and sound judgment and is very able in the control of those who work 
under him. 

On the 13th of November, 1880, Mr. Timmons was united in marriage 
to Miss Ida Greenwood, daughter of George W. and Sarah E. (Weir) Green- 
wood. Their union has been blest with two children: Ida May, born 
November 13, 1881; and Edith, born June 11, 1890. Mr. Timmons and his 
family attend the Methodist Episcopal church. In 1888 he erected their 
pleasant and commodious residence at No. i, Cleveland street, and theirs is 
one of the hospitable homes of the city. Mr. Timmons is a member of the 
Carpenters' Union, of Morristown, and is serving as trustee. In politics he 
is a stanch Democrat, unwavering in support of the principles of the party, 
but has never been an office-seeker. 



WILLIAM H. TONKING. 



The history of such men as our subject proves conclusively that with a 
reasonable amount of mental and physical power success is bound eventually 
to crown the endeavors of those who have the ambition to put forth their 
best efforts, and the will and manliness to persevere therein. Throughout an 
active, useful and honorable business career, he has been watchful of his 
opportunities, utilized them to the best advantage, closely applied himself to 
the work in hand and overcome all obstacles by persistent and tireless pur- 
pose. Depending entirely upon his own ability and efforts, he has achieved 



BIOGBAPRICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 343 

a prominence in the business world that numbers among the leading citizens 
of Morris county. 

Born in Cornwall, England, Mr. Tonking was brought to the United 
States by his parents when three years of age, the family locating in the 
Empire state, on the banks of the Hudson, where he spent the greater part 
of his childhood. He began his education in that neighborhood and later 
pursued his studies in Hackettstown, New Jersey. In 1876 he entered the 
employ of the Thomas Iron Company, at Port Oram, New Jersey, continuing 
his connection with that company from 1876 until 1881, after which he was 
employed by the estate of J. Couper Lord in the capacity of bookkeeper in 
the office. He was thus engaged until August, 1895, when he was made 
assistant general manager of all their mines, with headquarters at Port Oram. 
He is now superintendent of the Mount Pleasant Mining Company, the Hurd 
Mining Company, at Hurdtown, the Boonton Iron Mining Company and the 
estate of J. Couper Lord. Such a position requires superior executive 
ability, keen discrimination and able management, — all of which are num- 
bered among the characteristics of Mr. Tonking. The volume of business 
thus carried on under his supervision is extensive, but his ability enables him 
to successfully control all, and make of each enterprise a profitable invest- 
ment. He is also a stockholder in the National Union Bank at Dover. 

Mr. Tonking is a member of the American Institute of Mining Engineers, 
and in this connection has been brought prominently into public notice. He 
is an exceptionally good salesman, having few equals in this direction, and 
the volume of his business reaches a large number when estimated in dol- 
lars. His business integrity is proverbial and his course demonstrates the 
truth of the old adage that "honesty is the best policy." Fairness charac- 
terizes his every trade transaction, and the name of W. H. Tonking attached 
to any paper indicates that the document is a reliable one. 

Mr. Tonking was united in marriage to Miss Clara A. Hulshizer, a 
daughter of Henry Hulshizer, M. D., and to them were born three children. 
In politics he is a stanch Republican, who gives to the party an intelligent 
and active support, and never requires official reward for his services. Socially 
he is connected with Acacia Lodge, No. 20, A. F. & A. M., of Dover, and he 
and his wife are prominent and leading members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and take a very active part in the work of church and Sunday- 
school, Mr. Tonking frequently serving in the pulpit in the absence of the 
regular preacher, and has been the superintendent of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Sunday-school, the second largest in the county, for the past fourteen 
years. He is a broad-minded man of humanitarian principles, benevolent and 
kindly, and though his business interests are so extensive he can always 
find time to aid in the cause of advancing the moral standard of the race. 



844 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



FRED VAN DUYNE. 

The family bearing this name has for many years been closely identified 
with the interests of Morris county, and its members are numbered among 
the most prosperous and enterprising citizens and farmers in this section of 
the state. The gentleman whose name initiates this review was born in 
Montville township on the 28th of November, i860, and is a son of Aaron 
and Rachel (Jacobus) Van Duyne, his grandfather being John R. and his 
great-grandfather Ralph Van Duyne. John R. married Miss Sarah Van 
Ness and located at White Hall, where he subsequently became one of the 
prominent and well-to-do agriculturists, and reared the following children: 
Aaron, Abner, Harrison, Jane, Julia, Harriet and Mary, all of whom are 
deceased, with the exception of Harrison, who is a resident of Newark, New 
Jersey. 

Aaron Van Duyne was born on the old family homestead February 10, 
1830, and after attending the district schools he embarked in farming. He 
took an active part in politics, his support being given to the Republican 
party, and he served as assessor, township trustee, justice of the peace, and 
in other local offices of like nature. He was an adherent of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, in which he was trustee and a deacon. He married Miss 
Rachel Jacobus, who was born on the 26th of June, 1829, and three children 
were born to them, namely: Harriet Elizabeth, whose birth occurred on 
the 8th of June, 1858, married Oscar Jacobus, of Montville township; Fred, 
the subject of this review, Harry, of Montville township; John Raymond, 
who was born April 18, 1865, and died October 8, 1878; and Newton, who 
died in infancy. 

Fred Van Duyne obtained his early mental discipline in the township 
schools and in time turned his energies toward the cultivation of land, fol- 
lowing that vocation on the old homestead until 1891, when he moved to the 
farm he at present occupies, and has most successfully conducted the same 
ever since. Referring to his political relations we find that he advocates 
Republicanism and has faithfully served his party as commissioner of 
appeals, township committeeman and in other offices of local importance. 
In religion he is a communicant of the White Hall Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Mr. Van Duyne consummated his marriage on April 25, 1892, when he 
was united to Miss Daisy Jacobus, a daughter of Abraham and Phoebe 
(Bott) Jacobus, of Montville, and their three children are: Halsey A., 
Elbert F. and Fred C. Mr. Van Duyne is one of the prosperous residents 
of his township and stands high in the estimation of his many friends. 

Harry Van Duyne, a brother of our subject, was born in Montville 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL EISTOBT. 345 

township oEpJune 19, 1867, and has continued to reside on the old home- 
stead, engaged in his agricultural pursuits. In February, 1897, he was 
united in marriage to Miss Bertha Vreeland, a daughter of John M. and Ida 
K. (Jacobus) Vreeland, of Montville township, and they have one child, 
Zella Alma, who was born November 15, 1897. Mr. Van Duyne is a faith- 
ful member of the Dutch Reformed church and an energetic worker in its 
cause. Mr. Van Duyne is a Republican in politics and gives to that party a 
loyal support. 



EDWIN J. ROSS. 



For the past fifteen years Mr. Ross has devoted his energies to an enter- 
prise that has materially advanced the interests of the' place in which it is 
located. He now stands at the head of the E. J. Ross Manufacturing Com- 
pany, manufacturers of silk goods, and is an important factor in the com- 
mercial life of Morris county. 

The ancestral history of Mr. Ross traces back to the early colonial epoch 
of American annals, for within that period three brothers of the name came 
from their native heath in bonnie Scotland and took up their abode in the 
New World. It is supposed that they resided for a time in New Haven, 
Connecticut; but later one of them settled in New York, another in Ohio and 
the third in New Jersey. From these three brothers are descended the vari- 
ous Ross families in America. The first location of the Rosses in New Jer- 
sey was in the old town of Springfield. The great-grandfather of our subject 
was born in New York city, and the grandfather, Ogden Ross, first opened 
his eyes to the light in Newark, New Jersey. Aaron L. Ross, the father of 
our subject, was born and reared in Newark and was for many years engaged 
in the boot and shoe business in that city. He married Eliza Jane Van 
Clief, a daughter of Jacob Van Clief, a representative of an old family of 
Bergen county, New Jersey, and of Holland descent. The parents of Edwin 
J. Ross died on the same day. The father, who had been ill for some time, 
upon hearing of the death of his devoted and cherished wife, sank rapidly, 
and ere the day had ended he, too, had passed from this life. 

Edwin J. Ross, whose name introduces this review, was born in the city 
of Newark, on the 30th of December, 1851, and spent the days of his boy- 
hood and youth there, acquiring his early education in the primary and inter- 
mediate grades of the public schools. He was first employed by Albert 
Sayre, and afterward by W. V. Snyder & Company, of Newark. In his 
nineteenth year he went to New York city, entering the employ of Adriance, 
Robbins & Company, jobbers in dry goods. His next service was for the 



346 BIOGRAPHICAL AKB GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

firm of Hyde, Ayres & Company, wool jobbers, of New York city„ with whom 
he remained for a number of years. 

In 1880, his industry, enterprise and careful management having enabled 
him to accumulate some capital, he embarked in business on his own account, 
in the importing and commission line, in which he continued until 1883, 
when he became interested in the manufacture of silk goods, as a member 
of the firm of Hopper & Ross, and they began operations in Dover. The 
following year Mr. Hopper died and was succeeded in the enterprise by 
George B. Baker, whereupon the firm title of Ross & Baker was assumed. 
In April, 1897, the E. J. Ross Manufacturing Company succeeded the firm 
of Ross & Baker. In 1887 the works were removed from Dover to Port 
Oram. After a time the company erected their present commodious plant, 
the same comprising a main building, fifty by one hundred and fifty feet in 
dimensions and two and one-half stories in height, with an extension, thirty 
by one hundred and fifty feet, used for the dying department and the finish- 
ing rooms. The machinery utilized is of the latest and most highly improved 
order, and in its manipulation both water and steam power are available. 
The tract on which the plant is located has an area of thirty acres, the site 
being known as the old Washington Forge property. 

The company manufacture broad silk fabrics, a full line of fancy dress- 
silks, black grenadine veilings and neckwear silks. In the silk works 
employment is afforded to two hundred operatives, and the products of the 
factory are sold chiefly to jobbers. The business has grown to important 
proportions, and the income from the capital invested makes the enterprise 
a profitable one, while it also adds materially to the commercial activity, 
general prosperity and public prominence of the community. 

On the loth of December, 1878, Mr. Ross was united in marriage to 
Miss Ella J. Meeker, of Newark, a daughter of Joseph J. Meeker; a native of 
New Jersey and a representative of one of the old and prominent families of 
the commonwealth. The mother of Mrs. Ross bore the maiden name of 
Elizabeth Jane Brittin, and she was born- in Sussex county. New Jersey, 
which was likewise the birthplace of her father. Mr. and Mrs. Ross are the 
parents of ten children, namely: Prentiss de Veuve, Joseph Meeker, Edwin 
J., Jr., Julia M., Elizabeth Brittin, Gaillard Thomas, Ella M., Arabella, Van 
Clief and George Meeker. Mr. Ross and his family are members of the First 
Presbyterian church of Dover, in which he has served as elder for a number 
of years. He has been deeply interested and prominently concerned in the 
work of not only the local organization, but that of the church at large. He 
has served on several important boards and committees of the presbytery of 
Morris and Ora;nge, and has ever shown a lively interest in all that conserves 
the welfare of the church, and has given an unreserved aid and influence to 



BWGEJPHICAL AMD OEJ^-EALOOWAL HISTORY. 847 

all that stands as exponent of the higher values of life. The family home is 
a very comfortable residence, on West Blackwell street, Dover, and not only 
are its surroundings tasteful and attractive, but the household is the center 
of a cultured social circle. 

Mr. Ross is a member of the Merchants' Club, of New York city, and 
of the Silk Association of America, whose headquarters are in the national 
metropolis. He is also a member of the Washington Association of Morris 
county. The business record of Mr. Ross is one which any man might well 
be proud to have accredited to him. Throughout his entire career he has 
been looked upon as the personification of integrity and honor, never making 
an agreement or engagement that he has not fulfilled, and standing to-day as 
an example of what determination and force, combined with a high degree of 
business acumen and integrity, can accomplish for a man of natural ability 
and strength of character. 



GEORGE W. GARDNER. 



George W. Gardner is now living a retired life at his pleasant home on 
the Green Village road, in the borough of Madison. His labors of former 
years and his careful husbanding of his resources now enables him to spend 
his declining days in the enjoyment of a well earned rest, unvexed by the 
worries and cares which inevitably form a part of business life. 

Mr. Gardner is a native of America's metropolis, New York, his birth 
having occurred in that city on the 3d of February, 1825. His father, John 
P., was a native of Prussia, and his mother, whose maiden name was Cath- 
erine Lansing, was a native of Aquackanock (now Passaic) county, New 
Jersey. John F. Gardner emigrated to the New World in the early part of 
the present century. He was a baker by trade and followed that vocation 
throughout his active business life. He was born June 13, 1773, and died 
July 14, 1842, while his wife, who was born August 20, 1786, passed away 
on the 14th of June, 1863. Their marriage, which was celebrated March 5, 
1803, was blessed with nine children, namely: Maria, who was born 
December 12, 1803, and died September 9, 1804; William, who was born 
March 10, 1806, and died July 28, 1832; John F. , born July 4, 1808, and 
died January 31, 1869; Daniel, who was born June 3, 18 10, and died in 
1874; Catherine Maria, who was born January 13, 181 3; Garret Lansing, 
who was born Mjirch 13, 1815, and died April 16, 1834; Henry, who was 
born April 23, 1818, and died April 27, 1862; Charles, born February 20, 
1820; Dorothy, who was born October 31, 1822, and died June 13, 1832. 

George Washington, our subject, born February 3, 1825, spent his 
early life in the city of his birth, and in 1855 removed to Connecticut, where 



348 BIOGBJPEICAL AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

he carried on agricultural pursuits until 1871, — the year of his arrival in New 
Jersey. In 185 1 he was united in marriage to Miss Harriet Sarah Hartley, a 
native of New York city, born December 12, 1833, and a daughter of 
Stephen and Elizabeth (Brockway) Hartley, natives of England, whence they 
emigrated to America in 1833. To Mr. and Mrs. Gardner were born seven 
children, as follows: James Snow, who was born October 24, 1852, married 
Emma Carter; George W. , who was born May 3, 1855, married Lizzie 
Doetschman and is living in Aurora, Illinois; Katie E., born November i, 
1857, is the wife of Lewis H. Munson; Dora Josephine, born February 9, 
i860, is the wife of Smith S. Baldwin; Frederick Lansing, born May 12, 
1862, wedded Mary E. Cory; and Harriet Sarah and Henriet, twins, were 
born October 17, 1864. The latter is now deceased and the former is the 
wife of Alfred I. Harmon. Mrs. Gardner was called to the home beyond 
May 14, 1896. She was a devoted wife and mother, a faithful friend, and 
throughout the community in which she lived her death was deeply mourned. 
In his political predilections Mr. Gardner is a Democrat and has been 
honored with local ofhce. He was chosen for the position of justice of the 
peace in 1888, and in 1892 was appointed commissioner of deeds, filling 
that office until 1897. He has also been called by the vote of the people to 
other local offices, wherein he has proved himself fully worthy of the trust 
and confidence reposed in him. In the spring election of 1898 he was again 
chosen to the office of justice of the peace in the borough of Madison, and 
was duly appointed by the state legislature as commissioner of deeds. 



ADDISON H. DAY. 



A well known resident Chatham, Mr. Day occupies a responsible 
position in business circles in New York city and is one of the most trust- 
worthy and efficient employes of the Bank of the State, in which he has 
acted as receiving teller for seventeen years. His birth occurred in Brooklyn, 
on the 1 6th of November, 1850, his parents being Henry Parsal and Hen- 
rietta Condit (Baldwin) Day. The father was a native of Chatham, New 
Jersey, and for many years he was engaged in the coal business in Brooklyn, 
but subsequently he returned to the vicinity of his birthplace, where he 
engaged in farming for about thirty years. He also dealt in real estate, and 
was a very enterprising and successful business man. He married Miss Hen- 
rietta C, Baldwin, a daughter of Lewis N. Baldwin, one of the heroes of the 
Revolutionary war. He was a son of Stephen Baldwin, whose father Ezra 
Baldwin was a son of Nathan Baldwin, a direct descendant of Sir John 
Baldwin, chief justice of the court of common pleas, in England, from 1636 
to 1645. In the direct line of the ancestry were three Richards, two Josephs, 




K^rtinci(^ &. 



7unt 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 349 

Jonathan and John, all titled gentlemen. Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. Day 
became the parents of four children: Lewis Baldwin, a resident of Eliza- 
beth, New Jersey; Helen Mason, wife of Guy Martin, of Morristown; Addi- 
son H. ; and Clinton Spencer, of Cleveland, Ohio. The father of this family 
was a member of the Presbyterian church of Chatham, and served as one of 
of its elders. His death occurred January 5, 1887, but his widow is still 
living. 

Addison Henry Day, whose name introduces this review, received 
a common-school education, which he supplemented by a course in the 
Newark Academy. On laying aside his text-books to take up the serious 
duties of life he sought and obtained employment as a clerk in the Ninth 
National Bank of New York, where he remained for two and a half years. 
He also spent a similar period in the Metropolitan Bank, and then engaged 
in the stationery business with his brother, but after a time he returned to 
the Metropolitan Bank, where he continued until 1880, when he accepted 
the position of receiving teller in the Bank of the State. His familiarity with 
the banking business in its various departments has made him very capable 
in his work, and he is regarded as one of the most reliable and able employes 
of the company. He has the full and unqualified confidence of the house, 
and is well worthy the trust reposed in him. 

On the 6th of June, 1878, Mr. Day was united in marriage to Miss 
Grace Minton, a daughter of Hudson Minton, and they have had four chil- 
dren: Percy Minton, who died at the age of ten months; Lawrence; Helen 
^finton and Henry Percy. Mrs. Day is a member of the Presbyterian 
church. In his political associations Mr. Day is a Republican, and is well 
informed on the questions of the day, political and otherwise. Their home 
is in Chatham, where they have many friends and enjoy the hospitality of 
the best homes of the locality. 



FRANCIS E. YOUNG. 



Mr. Young is a representative of a family whose members have figured 
prominently in the annals of Connecticut, New York and New Jersey. Quite 
a full record of the family is given in Thompson's History of Long Island, 
and from this source much of the following information was gleaned. Our 
subject is of the sixth generation in America, tracing his ancestry back through 
Stephen, Ephraim, David and Benjamin Young to Rev. John Young, the 
American progenitor. He was a minister of the Presbyterian church in Hing- 
ham, England, whence he crossed the Atlantic to the New World, locating 
in Connecticut in 1638. In October, 1640, he removed toSouthold, on Long 
Island, and was the first minister of the gospel at that place. His wife's 



350 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

name was Mary, and their children were John, Thomas, Gideon and Ben- 
jamin. The father of this family remained in Southold until his death, and 
on his tombstone was placed the following inscription: "Mr. John Young, 
minister of the Word and first settler of the church of Southold, on Long 
Island, deceased the 27th of February, in the year of our Lord 1672, and of 
his age seventy-four. Here lies the man whose doctrine and life, well known, 
did show he sought Christ's honor, not his own. In weakness sown, in power 
shall he, by Christ, be raised from death to life eternal." This stone was 
recut in 1857 by two of his descendants, Deacon Stephen Young, of Morris- 
town, New Jersey, and Captain Selah Young, of Mattatuck, Long Island. 

John Young, the eldest son of Rev. John and Mary Young, commonly 
called Colonel Young, had a son, Zerubbabel Young, who was the father of 
John Young. The last named had a son, named Thomas, who died in South- 
old, February 19, 1873. He had four sons, the eldest of whom also bore 
the name of Thomas, and had four sons, Thomas, Josiah, John and Jacob. 

Thomas Young, the second son of Rev. John and Mary Young, of 
Southold, was born in England in 1627, was brought by his parents to 
America in 1638, and became a resident of Southold in 1640. He died in 
1689. By his second wife he had a son, Thomas, born in 1660, who 
inherited his father's estate, and became the father of four sons, Samuel, 
Jacob, Richard and Jonas. 

The eldest of these, Samuel Young, was born in 1680 and died in 1750. 
His two sons were Thomas, born in 1716, and David, born in 1718. The 
latter became the father of three children, David, Samuel and Penelope. Of 
this family the eldest, David, was born June 21, 1748, and had two sons, 
Samuel, who was born April i, 1777, and became the father of a son, to 
whom he gave the name of David; and David, who was born December i, 
1783, and had three sons, David, William and Thomas. The second son of 
David Young, the senior of that name in this branch of the family, was 
Samuel Young, who was born November 5, 1753, and died November 2, 
1797. His sons were Thomas, John, Harry and David, and of these Thomas 
was born April 10, 1775, and died April 3, 181 5. He had five sons, Samuel, 
Thomas, Henry, David and Alfred. The first named served as colonel of 
militia at Oyster Bay, and in 1840 represented his native county of Queens 
in the New York legislature. His brother David was born January 6, 1791, 
and had a son Edward, who died September 29, 1830. 

The next branch of the Young family was established by Gideon Young, 
the third son «of Rev. John and Mary Young, who were the first of the name 
in America. He was born in 1638 and died December i, 1699, leaving two 
sons, Gideon and Jonathan. The latter died February 23, 1707. The 
former, who was commonly called Lieutenant Young, died in 1849, at the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJTD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 851 

age of seventy-six years. His children were Henry, Reuben, Silas, Abinel, 
Gideon and Walter. In 173 1 the first four removed to Orange county. New 
York, locating near Goshen. Henry, the eldest, had two children, Henry 
and Birdeye, and of these the former had two sons, Henry and Hiram, who 
for many years were merchants in New York city. Gideon Young, also a 
son of Gideon Young, the second, was twice married, and by his first wife, 
Eunice, had one son, Ezekiel, and by his second wife. Miss Rocket, had a 
son, Gideon, the fourth generation bearing that name. 

The fourth branch of the Young family, and that to which our subject 
belongs, was founded by Benjamin Young, the youngest son of Rev. John 
and Mary Young. He was the father of the Rev. David Young, who was 
born in 1719 and was graduated at Yale College in 1741. In 1745 he 
became the minister at Brookhaven, being the third to officiate there in that 
capacity. He remained there until his death, which occurred there in 1753, 
at the age of thirty-four years. His wife was Bethia Young, and they had 
four children, Hannah, David, Ephraim and James. About 1760 Mrs. Be- 
thia Young married Benjamin Halsey, of Morris county, and removed there 
with her four children. Bj' her second marriage she had one son, who, 
when about eighty years of age, resided near Newton, Sussex county. Mrs. 
Halsey died January 23, 1785. 

Hannah, the eldest child of the Rev. David and Bethia Young, became 
the wife of David Wheeler, and died November 15, 1827, at the age of 
eighty years. Her children were David, who married Catherine Baker; 
Sarah, wife of Dr. Ambrose Cook; Stephen and John. David Young, the 
second child of Rev. David and Bethia Young, married Betsey Tucker, and 
died August 31, 1796, at the age of fifty years. Their children were named 
Betsey, Bethia and David. 

The first, Betsey, became the wife of Peter Decker, and removed to Scho- 
harie county. New York, where her death occurred August 2, 1843, ^t the age 
of seventy-five years. Mr. and Mrs. Decker had nine children, namely: David 
Y. , who married Maria Monroe and lived in Canada; Richard H., who mar- 
ried Rosetta Burnett and lived in Schoharie county. New York; Charles, who 
married Ann Ostrander and resided in Canada; Selah, who married Hannah 
Hubbard; Maria, wife of William Monroe, of Canada; Lydia, wife of Edward 
Rowley, of Schoharie county; Electa, wife of John Clark, of the same 
county; Bethia, wife of Henry A. Cleveland, of Schoharie county; and Jane 
Ann, wife of John Prosper, a resident of that county. 

Bethia Young, the second daughter of David and Betsey (Tucker) 
Young, married Jeremiah Havens and they located in Jefferson, New York. 
Mrs. Havens died in April, 1849, at the age of seventy-seven years. She had 
ten children, namely: Jane, wife of Joseph Burnet, of Jefferson; Nathan, 



352 BIOGRJPHICAL AKB GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

who married Mahala Wilson and resided in Saugerties, New York; Abigail, 
wife of Samuel Lewis, a resident of Connecticut; Betsey, wife of Henry 
Reed; David Y., who wedded Mary Ross and lived in Jefferson; Augustus C, 
who wedded Mary Stewart and lived in Jefferson; Dr. Charles, who made his 
home in Summit, Schoharie county; John S., Bethia Ann and Lucinda 
Cornelia. 

David Young, the third child and only son of David and Betsey (Tucker) 
Young, was born January 9, 1780, and was married January 4, 1804, to Polly 
Petty, at Moriches, Long Island. He died April 24, 1829, at the age of fifty 
years, and his wife died April 20, 183 1. They had seven children. Edward, 
the eldest, born February 6, 1807, left Moriches about 1822, going to Jef- 
ferson, Schoharie county. New York, where he followed carpentering. He 
wedded Mary Ann Beard, by whom he had several children, the eldest of 
whom married Peter Zilman and had one daughter, Jane, now deceased. 
David, the second of the family, born September 8, 1808, left Moriches in 
1827, learned the blacksmith's trade in Bridgehampton, New York, and about 
1830 went to sea on board a whaling vessel. He spent thirteen years 
engaged in the whale fisheries and on two voyages was master of the vessel. 
He married Lucy Ann Sears and they had five children. About 1844 they 
removed from Long Island to Jefferson, New York. Selah, the third of the 
family, born in 18 10, left home at twelve years of age, lived in East Hamp- 
ton, New York, for three years and then learned the hatter's trade at Sag 
Harbor. In 1832 he went to sea on a whaling vessel, continued in that 
occupation for seventeen years, and was also master of a vessel during two 
vo3'ages. At Sag Harbor, April 30, 1839, he married Sybil Terry and had 
three children, David, Delah and Sybil, the family making their home at 
Mattatuck, Long Island. William, the fourth of the family, was born in 
181 5, and died in 1818. William, the fifth of the family, was born January 
6, 18 1 8, learned the blacksmith's trade at Jefferson, New York, went to sea 
in 1836, and when last heard from was in California. Mary Jane, the sixth 
of the family, born May 13, 1820, died at Sag Harbor, New York, May 14, 
1834. John H., the last of the family of David and Polly (Petty) Young, 
was born May i, 1823, left home at the age of eight years and went to East 
Hampton, where he learned the blacksmith's trade, which he followed there 
for some years. He wedded Mary Elizabeth Miller and had one' child. 

Ephraim Young, the grandfather of our subject, was the third child of 
Rev. David and Bethia Young, and a more extended account of his family 
will follow the mention of James Young, who was the fourth child of Rev. 
David and Bethia Young. He married Ruth Halsey and their children were 
Samuel, Hannah and Sarah. James Young died September 20, 1783, at the 
age of thirty-two years. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 353 

To resume the history of Ephraim Young, the grandfather of our sub- 
ject, we find that he was born October 26, 1749, and was married February 
2, 1774, to Phoebe Cutler, whose birth occurred December 17, 1745. They 
removed to Whippany, New Jersey, about 1779. He was a carpenter by 
trade and also conducted a sawmill on Whippany river. He met his death 
by falling from a bridge into the water and was drowned, November 18, 
1793. His first wife had died April 7, 1789, and he was afterward again 
married. The children of the first union were: Stephen, born November 
28, 1774; Mrs. Bethia Vail, who was born August 9, 1778, and died Septem- 
ber 17, 1847, at the age of sixty-nine; Abijah, who was born May 2, 1781, 
and died at Drakesville, New Jersey, June 17, 1S57, ^t the age of seventy- 
six years; and Phoebe, who was born May 13, 1785. For his second wife 
Ephraim Young married Mrs. Cutler, a widow, whose maiden name was 
Lee. By this marriage there were three children: Lucinda, born July 3, 
1788; James, born October 12, 1790; and Thomas, born September 28, 1792. 

Stephen Young, the eldest son of Ephraim and Phoebe (Cutler) Young, 
and the father of our subject, was born on the old family homestead near 
Whippany, November 28, 1774, and was reared to farm life. He always 
followed that pursuit, and was a progressive, practical agriculturist, being 
also a carpenter, to which line of work he gave considerable attention. He 
took great interest in public affairs and did all in his power to promote the 
welfare of the community. In his religious belief he was a Presbyterian 
and served as elder in the churcj;i of that denomination at Morristown. He 
married Abagail Baker, a daughter of Lewis Baker, of Westfield, New 
Jersey, and they had ten children, as follows: Ephraim; Benjamin; Eliza, 
wife of Luke Parson; Julia, wife of Austin McLellen; Phoebe, wife of 
Ambrose Howell; Harriet; James; Stephen; Irene, wife of Timothy Cook; 
and Francis E., whose name begins this record. The father died February 
10, 1867, and the mother passed away on the 6th of August, 1838. 

Francis E. Young, who was born at Whippany, April 2, 1817, and was 
reared on the old homestead near Whippany, acquired his education in the 
common schools in that vicinity, and early in life learned the carpenter's 
trade, which he followed for more than forty-five years. He also owned a 
sawmill, in partnership with his brother Ephraim, which they conducted 
until a few years ago. He was thus long and prominently connected with 
the industrial interests of the community, but is now living a quiet life on the 
old family homestead, looking after its cultivation to some extent, but taking 
no very active part in its operation. His rest is well merited, for his life has 
been a busy and useful one. 

In 185 1 Francis E. Young was united in marriage to Miss Mary Shipman, 
a representative of one of the old families of Morris county. Seven children 

23 



354 BIOGRJPHICdL AiMD OEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

graced this union: Abbigail; Virginia, who married H. O. Shelley, who lives, 
in Littleton, New Jersey; Julia; Stephen, who is engaged in business in New 
York city; Susan; Grosvenor; and Arthur, who died in 1895. 

Mr. Young and his family are members of the Presbyterian church in 
Whippany, in which he has served as an elder for a number of years. In 
his political affiliations he is a Republican and warmly advocates the princi- 
ples of that party, which he has supported since its organization. He cast 
his first presidential vote for William Henry Harrison, in 1840, and has voted 
at each presidential election since. By his upright life he has fully sustained 
the high reputation of the family and won for himself the respect and esteem 
of the entire community. 



PROF. J. HOWARD HULSART, A. M. 

Civilization owes its advancement to education, and the progress of a 
nation is in due proportion to the advantages it possesses in training and 
developing the mentality of its people and placing them on a more exalted 
plane of intellectuality. Ignorance in the present age is an almost inexcus- 
able defect, and as " knowledge is power" the proper discipline of the mind 
is a potent factor in annihilating bigotry and prejudice wherever found, the 
greatest instrumentality for good in this direction being the public schools. 
In the United States these institutions of learning have made a remarkable 
advance within the last twenty-five years, and, as at present conducted, they 
will rank favorably with those of any other country in the world. Among 
the zealous and well known educators of New Jersey who have attained dis- 
tinction in this line of endeavor is Professor Hulsart, who has been identified 
with school work for the past eighteen years and was recently honored with 
the presidency of the New Jersey State Teachers' Association, having been 
supervising principal of the Dover schools since the summer of 189 1. A 
brief resume of this gentleman's career will no doubt be instructive as well as 
interesting, and it is therefore presented herewith. 

J. Howard Hulsart was born in Madison township, Middlesex county,, 
near the town of Matawan, New Jersey, on the 31st of October, 1859, a son 
of Cornelius L. and Rhoda (Carhart) Hulsart, both of whom were natives of 
New Jersey, having been born in Middlesex and Monmouth counties respect- 
ively. The paternal grandfather was of Dutch descent and was born in New 
Jersey, being among the first settlers of Middlesex county. The maternal 
grandfather, Joseph A. Carhart, was a descendant of one of two brothers who 
emigrated from England to this country, one of them settling in New Jersey 
and the other in southern New York. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 355 

Mr. Hulstart, our subject, remained on his father's farm until attaining^ 
his nineteenth year, acquiring his preHminary education in the Cedar Grove 
and Mount Pleasant district schools and in Glenwood Institute, attending the 
latter the greater part of the year and assisting his father on the farm early 
in the fall and late in the spring. He found a great attraction in books, and as 
rural life was entirely at variance with his tastes and inclinations he determined! 
toqualifyhimself for other duties; and with this object in view he attended the 
institute for two years, when Professor Jacobus was at its head, exchanging for 
his tuition and board during the first year such of his labor out of school 
hours as was demanded in doing chores about the building. The second; 
year, in addition to his services, he paid one hundred dollars for his school- 
ing, part of which sum he earned and part he was obliged to borrow. He 
was graduated at the institute in June, 1880, but continued his studies, and 
since then he has taken two special courses in the chemical and physical 
laboratories of Harvard University, has completed a non-resident course in 
the Illinois Weslyan University, and, having satisfactorily passed examinations 
on forty books, was granted the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, and later 
upon further examinations that of Master Arts. He is now taking a post- 
graduate course of between forty and fifty works, and when completed willi 
be entitled to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Upon receiving his license to teach Mr. Hulsart began his career irr 
September, 1880, at Seabright, and after remaining there six years he was 
promoted to the Garfield Avenue school at Long Branch, remaining there 
three years, and then for two years he was given charge of the laboratory in 
the Long Branch high school, conducting the department of physics, chemistry 
and physiology. In 1891 he was appointed supervising principal of the 
Dover schools, the offer of which was quite unexpected and entirely without 
solicitation on his part, and he has since continued to fulfill the duties 
pertaining thereto in a most adequate and satisfactory manner. The Dover 
schools require the services of twenty-seven teachers and are attended by 
over one thousand and three hundred pupils, the graduates being admitted 
into the second year at the State Normal School and into the scientific 
department of Rutgers College without examination. 

Mr. Hulsart is a member of the New Jersey Council of Education, an 
organization consisting only of the best teachers in the state, the member- 
ship of which is necessarily limited, and he is affiliated with the National 
Educational Association, the New York Schoolmasters' Club, the Harvard 
Teachers' Association and the New Jersey State Teachers' Association, in 
the latter named having been secretary for the past six years and at its 
annual election in 1896 he was elected its- president. Other of his social 
relations include membership in the Junior Order of United American 



356 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL BISTORT. 

Mechanics, the office of past regent of Morris Council, No. 541, Royal 
Arcanum, and that of orator of the Loyal Additional Benefit Association. 

Politically Mr. Hulsart has supported both the Republican and Prohi- 
bition parties, voting for Garfield two days after he was twenty-one, and for 
Griggs and McKinley in 1895 and 1896. When Dr. T. G. Chattle and Gen- 
eral Fisk were candidates on the Prohibition ticket he worked for them and 
delivered several speeches during the campaign. 

In his religious adherency Mr. Hulsart is allied to the Methodist church, 
of which he became a communicant in 1876. He was superintendent of the 
Seabright Sunday-school for several years and filled a similar position for 
one year in the Simpson Sunday-school at Long Branch. He has held a 
local preacher's license for the past twelve years, and for five years was 
president of the Dover Young Men's Christian Association. 

The marriage of Mr. Hulsart was solemnized on the 27th of December, 
1 88 1, when he was united to Miss Ella Cottrell, of Matawan, and of the 
four children born to them two boys and a girl survive, namely, C. Ray- 
mond, Pierre M. and Esther. 

Mr. Hulsart's rise in life from a school-boy in Madison township, twenty- 
five years ago, to the position of president of the State Teachers' Association, 
was accomplished only as the logical result of ability and hard study, com- 
bined with the affiliation with men of education who recognized his worth 
and advanced him to the exalted pedestal he now adorns, and his career 
should inspire the youths of to-day to higher deeds and loftier ambitions, 
illustrating as it does the fact that merit and perseverance will ever meet with 
a just compensation. 



REV. J. GERARD FUNKE. 

The pastor of St. Mary's Catholic church, of Dover, New Jersey, was 
born in Carppenberg, Germany, in 1848, and was educated in the land of his 
nativity. His elementary training was received at the place of his birth and 
later he entered the gymnasium at Recklinghausen, Germany, where he 
pursued his studies for several years and was graduated in 1870. He next 
entered the acaderhy in Munster, where he studied philosophy and theology 
and was then ordained by Bishop John Bernard, of that place, in 1874. He 
was not given a charge owing to a decree issued by Bismarck, lord chancellor, 
which required all priests to swear allegiance to the famous May laws of 1873, 
and many of the brotherhood, including Father Funke, refused to do this. 
He then determined to come to the United States, and in 1874 sailed for 
New York. Immediately after his arrival on the American continent he 
jnade his way to Newark, New Jersey, where he was received by Archbishop 



BIOGBJPHICAL AJ^D GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 357 

Corrigan, of Newark, now of New York. He was soon afterward appointed 
assistant pastor of St. Peter's Catholic church, at Newark, as assistant to 
Rev. Father Prieth. 

In 1877 Father Funke was appointed to the pastorate of St. Joseph's 
church in Carlstadt, Bergen county, New Jersey, and at the same time 
attended a mission in Lodi, that county, where he served his congregation 
faithfully for eight years. On the expiration of that period, in 1885, he was 
appointed rector of St. Mary's church, at Dover, New Jersey, where he has 
since rendered good service. At the time he took charge of the congrega- 
tion there was quite a debt hanging over the church, but this has been 
greatly reduced. He has also erected a fine school-house, with a capacity for 
four hundred pupils, and the school is now capably conducted by the Sisters. 
In the second story of this building a fine hall has been fitted up. He also 
erected a convent for the Sisters and has made other substantial improve- 
ments. The church edifice is a fine stone structure, built in modern style of 
architecture as well as furnished and decorated. The congregation numbers 
from two hundred and seventy-five to three hundred families. 

The 18th of October, 1896, was the fiftieth anniversary of the establish- 
ment of the church, and the special services which were held were attended 
by the Catholic membership for miles around. The Right Reverend Bishop 
Wigger, of Newark, celebrated high mass, and the Right Reverend Bishop 
Matz delivered the sermon, the church being crowded to its utmost capacity 
on this occasion. The church stands upon a natural building site, the 
grounds are beautifully laid out and ornamented with pines and other trees 
and lovely' flowers. Father Funke, in addition to his other labors, has pur- 
chased grounds for the new Catholic cemetery, had it platted and laid out in 
tasteful arrangement, making it a beautiful " city of the dead." His labors 
have been prosecuted with great zeal and earnestness and have been product- 
ive of great good among his people, his influence being widely and strongly 
felt. He is a man of scholarly attainments, a deep thinker, and his words of 
admonition and exhortation to his people are not without good results. 



HON. JACOB W. WELSH. 

Honored in being the present representative of Morris county in the state 
legislature, Mr. Welsh is a citizen who occupies a place of much influence 
in the community, for he is public-spirited, generous-hearted and ready at all 
times to give aid and influence to any cause that promises benefit to society 
or good to his fellow men. While his extensive business interests have 
necessarily made a steady draft upon his time, thought and abilities, he has 
never forgotten his duty as a citizen. His life is well balanced — business. 



358 BIOGBJPHICAL AMD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

society and politics having their proper place in the disposition of his ener- 
gies — and few men occupy a higher place in the esteem of those who know 
him, — a fact which also results largely from his modesty and lack of aggressive 
self-assertion. 

Mr. Welsh, a resident of German Valley, was born in Washington town- 
ship, on the 19th of March, 1853, and is a son of John C. Welsh and a grand- 
son of Jacob Welsh. The former was a prominent farmer, banker and man 
of affairs, and was an honored citizen. For more than forty years he was a 
member of the directorate of the Hackettstown Bank, and during the last 
fifteen years of his life was president of that institution. In all his business 
undertakings success attended his efforts, and he became one of the most 
extensive farmers and realty-holders in the valley. He was prominent not 
only as a business man, but in the conduct of public matters as well, and was 
a zealous advocate of the Republican party, on whose ticket he was elected 
as town assessor and as collector many years ago. His death occurred in 
1890. His wife, Mrs. Elizabeth Welsh, was a daughter of Mathias Trimmer, 
and by her marriage became the mother of two children: Jacob W. and 
Mathias T. , the latter now one of the leading business men of German 
Valley. 

Jacob W. Welsh was educated at Schooley's Mountain and in Chester 
Institute. He began his business career at the age of eighteen, as a mer- 
chant in Middle Valley, and carried on operations along that line for ten 
years, when he disposed of his stock of general merchandise and for two 
years dealt only in machinery. On the expiration of that period he removed 
to German Valley, where he has since been engaged in business as a dealer in 
carriages and harness, enjoying a large and profitable trade. He has also 
added not a little to his income by the successful conduct of a creamery, and 
he has many other industrial interests, which not only add to his individual 
prosperity but also enhance the welfare of the community by promoting com- 
mercial activity. He has extensive landed interests and his farms yield to 
him a good return. On the 2d of August, 1892, he was elected a director in 
the Clinton National Bank, at Clinton, Hunterdon county, and this position 
he has since retained and has carried to the institution a large volume of busi- 
ness from his home village. On the ist of April, 1898, he purchased the 
Dorland flouring mills, at German Valley, and in the conducting of this enter- 
prise has associated with him his son, John C. Mr. Welsh and his brother 
are the owners of a considerable amount of valuable real estate in divers 
sections of New Jersey. They have some twenty-two residence properties in 
Plainfield, Union county, have two hotels in Hackettstown and property in 
the city of Newark. 

In December, 1874, Mr. Welsh was united in marriage to Miss Emma 



BIOGRAPHICAL AKD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 359 

Latourette, a daughter of Obediah Latourette, and they have two children, 
John C. and Lizzie. Theirs is one of the attractive homes of the community, 
and its hospitality is enjoyed by a large circle of friends. 

Socially Mr. Welsh is connected with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He takes an active interest in public affairs, as touching the wel- 
fare of county, state and nation, and is a keen observer and a wise and con- 
servative counselor concerning the conduct of local affairs. He is firm and 
active in his support of Republican principles, but has never been a politician 
in the sense of office-seeking, and never became a candidate for official 
honors until October 15, 1897, when his name was placed on the ticket as 
the nominee for the state legislature. His personal popularity and the great 
confidence reposed in his ability and trustworthiness by his fellow townsmen 
was indicated by the fact that he won a majority of one hundred and thirteen 
in bis home township, which had never before given a Republican majority, 
and that his election was by eight hundred votes.- In the discharge of his 
legislative duties he shows that he is fully worthy the confidence reposed 
in him. 

In his capacity as elder of his church, Mr. Welsh has ever taken a deep 
interest in religious work and in the temporal welfare of the organization in 
which he holds membership and official preferment. In the spring of 1898 
he inaugurated the movement for the erection of a new parsonage, and not 
only did he give liberally of his time and personal effort to further the enter- 
prise, but he and his brother contributed one-half of the amount required to 
effect the building of the attractive pastoral home, which was erected at a 
cost of about two thousand, five hundred dollars. 



CHARLES GENUNG. 



Few of the old families of Morris county have so many worthy repre- 
sentatives in the locality as the Genung family, long and prominently con- 
nected with the history of this community. He whose name initiates this 
review was born on the Genung homestead, July 23, 1842, a son of Isaac P. 
Genung. He acquired his education in the schools of Chatham, and 
throughout his boyhood and youth remained on the farm, assisting in the 
cultivation of the fields from the time of early planting in the spring until the 
harvest season was past. In fact he carried on agricultural pursuits on the 
old home place until it was divided into building lots. He then went to 
Newark, where he learned the carpenter's trade, remaining in that city for 
five years, since which time he has carried on the same pursuit in Chatham 
and vicinity. His industry, resolute purpose and earnest determination to 



360 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

succeed have brought to him a good competence and made him one of the 
successful men of the neighborhood. 

Mr. Genung was married on the loth of June, 1868, to Miss Orleana 
Meeker, a daughter of Jackson and EHzabeth (Sturgis) Meeker. Her father 
was a native of Morris county, but died in New York during the early girl- 
hood of his daughter. To Mr. and Mrs. Genung were born three children, 
but two died in infancy, William Ernest being the only one now living. 

In his political views Mr. Genung has long been a Republican, and 
keeping well informed on the issues of the day he gives an intelligent sup- 
port to the party principles, and is always prepared with a good argument 
to uphold his ballot. He was offered the appointment of inspector of the 
board of health, but declined to accept it. For several years he has served 
on the election board, discharging his duties with marked promptness and 
fidelity, which plainly indicates his loyalty to America's best interests. He 
and his wife are active and consistent members of the Presbyterian church of 
Chatham, in which he is serving as elder, and in the community where they 
have resided for a quarter of a century they are widely and favorably known, 
possessing many attributes of character which command respect. 



DANIEL L. DALRYMPLE. 

Mr. Dalrymple, a capitalist, now living retired at his pleasant home 
near Mt. Freedom, belongs to that class of representative American citizens 
who by the exercise of their splendid business powers, perseverance, dili- 
gence and sound judgment have overcome all obstacles in the path to suc- 
cess and have reached the goal of prosperity. He was born in Randolph town- 
ship, on the 30th of March, 1826, and is a son of Samuel P. Dalrymple, whose 
birth occurred in Randolph township February 27, 1793, his father being John 
Dalrymple, who was also a 'native of the same township. Samuel P. Dal- 
rymple followed the occupation of farming as a life work and passed away 
on the 4th of March, 1865. He married Eliza A. Lawrence, a daughter 
of Daniel Lawrence, who was one of the early settlers of the county, taking 
an active part in its development and progress. He held membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church. The Lawrence family was first established on 
Long Island, where the representatives of the name followed the quiet pur- 
suits of the farm. 

The boyhood and youth of Daniel L. Dalrymple were quietly passed, his 
attention being devoted to the work of the farm, to the studies of the school- 
room and the sports in which boys of that period most love to indulge. He 
pursued his studies in the stone school-house near Warren Grove, now Mt. 
Freedom, but did much of his studying at nights. After passing his four- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANB GE^~EALOGICAL HISTORY. 361 

teenth year he did not attend school, but performed a man's work on the 
farm. Having arrived at years of maturity, he purchased land for himself 
and has added to his realty holdings from time to time as his financial 
resources have increased. Iron ore underlaid much of this land, and mines 
were developed from which he realized a handsome royalty. At the same 
time he carried on agricultural pursuits, and was widely recognized as 
one of the most practical, enterprising and successful farmers. His well- 
managed interests, judicious investments and honorable trade transactions 
have brought to him a handsome capital, and in addition to his valuable and 
highly improved farm, which he now operates through hired help, he has 
money which he loans on mortgages. He has never been known to show 
cruelty or oppression in the payment of such a debt, but on the contrary 
is forbearing and considerate and at all times fair and honorable. 

Mr. Dalrymple was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Parson, daugh- 
ter of Robert and Esther Parson. In his political views he is independent, 
voting for the man rather than the party. He is now resting after many 
years of arduous and earnest toil and living in quiet retirement on his farm, 
where he is surrounded by all the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. 
His honesty is proverbial, and his success is the just reward of his own 
efforts. 



ABRAM J. DRAKE. 

Abram Johnson Drake, of Netcong, has by nature and training been 
eminently fitted for what we may term business citizenship; he belongs to 
that class of men who by their judicious management have been enabled to 
build up enterprises that not only add to the prosperity of the individual 
stockholders, but also promote the general welfare by the reason of the 
employment given to large numbers, and the commercial activity which is 
thereby advanced. Mr. Drake, as the head of the Drake-Bostedo Company, 
is one of the leading merchants in his section of Morris county, and his worth 
to the community with which he is associated is immeasurable. 

Mr. Drake is descended from two of the oldest families of Morris county. 
His paternal grandfather, Abram Johnson Drake, was born in 1792 and his 
death occurred August 31, 1861. He married Mary Applegate, who was born 
in 1781 and died April 21, 1853. She was the daughter of Moses Applegate, 
who had large landed interests in this locality and was very prominent as a 
citizen. William Drake, the father of our subject, was a farmer, in moder- 
ate circumstances. He was born in Morris county on the 2d of May, 18 14, 
and his death occurred on the 24th of April, 1893. He affiliated with the 
Democratic party, but took no active part in politics. His wife, whose 



362 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

maiden name was Sarah M. Haggerty, was born April i, 1826, and is still 
living. Her father, Christopher Haggerty, whose family was one well known in 
Morris county, was descended from stanch Irish ancestors. Mr. Haggerty was 
a leader in both business and political circles, was a large land-owner and in 
his political connections was a Whig. He was twice married, his first union 
being with Miss Van Kirk, his second with Miss Dusenbury. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Drake were born the following children: Abram J., the immediate sub- 
ject of this review; Charlotte, who married James Drake, of Phillipsburg, 
New Jersey; Henrietta, wife of Theodore Hilta, of Roxbury township; Ber- 
nice M., wife of John W. Sharp, of Netcong; George, deceased; William, 
who is living in Netcong; Ida, wife of James Dill; and Augustus, a resident 
of Netcong. 

Born on the 30th of November, 1846, in Mount Olive township, Abram 
J. Drake spent the first twenty years of his life on his father's farm, working 
in the fields and learning from nature many of her valuable lessons. He 
pursued his education in the common schools of the neighborhood, and on 
leaving the parental roof he took up the sterner duties of life as a carpenter, 
learning the trade under the direction of the firm of Meeker & Hedden, of 
Newark. He spent five years in that city, and in 1871 took ap his residence 
in Netcong, where he engaged in business as a general contractor. He soon 
secured a very extensive patronage, and in the town and surrounding coun- 
try he has erected many of the fine structures which add their charm to the 
landscape and tell of an advanced civilization. By their homes more than 
by any other one thing can a people be judged. It will be permissible in 
this connection to note some of the buildings which are the handiwork of 
Mr. Drake. These include the residences of Rev. J. J. Crane, Warren E. 
Bostedo, I. P. Miller and his own pleasant commodious and modern home, 
while the residence and store of Lawrence & King, of Stanhope, also give 
evidence of his ability in the industrial art. In 1896, however, he withdrew 
from that line of undertaking, having in the previous years been instrumental 
in the organization of the Drake-Bostedo Company, which was incorporated, 
with a capital of fifteen thousand dollars, for the purpose of conducting a 
department store, carrying dry goods, groceries, paints, hardware, lumber 
and coal. Its officers are A. J. Drake, president; Warren E. Bostedo, sec- 
retary; and D. S. Drake, treasurer. The concern is the largest of the kind 
in the county outside of Dover and Morristown and would be a credit to a 
city of much greater size than Netcong. 

Mr. Drake is too broad-minded a man to confine his attention solely to 
business interests and to the exclusion of the development of the other sides 
of his nature. Fully appreciating the duties of citizenship, he has made a 
•close study of the political situation of the country and gives an intelligent 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTOBT. 363 

and lo3'al support to the Republican party, whose principles he believes are 
most conducive to the public good. For some years he has been prominent 
as a leader in political affairs, being one of the guiding spirits in the manage- 
ment of Republican interests in Morris county. He served for eleven years 
as committeeman of his township and for a similar period was township 
treasurer. He was one of the chief movers in securing the separation of the 
borough of Netcong from the township and for two terms filled the office of 
mayor, in a most creditable manner. He also served on the Republican 
county committee for ten years, and his counsel and labors proved an effect- 
ive agency in securing the sCiccesses of the party. He was one of the organ- 
izers of the Muscanetcong Land Compan}' and of the Stanhope Union Ceme- 
tery Association, and is treasurer of both. Socially Mr. Drake is a Knight 
Templar Mason, has passed all the chairs in the Odd Fellows'iodge, and 
was the first regent of Netcong Council, Royal Arcanum. 

Mr. Drake has been twice married. He wedded Nancy E. Haggert}', a 
daughter of Alfred Haggerty, and June 15, 1877, she was called to the home 
beyond, leaving two children, Dorson S., who married Lizzie Scarlet; and 
JSfellie J., wife of Warren E. Bostedo, of the Drake-Bostedo Company. 
May I, 1879, Mr. Drake was again married, his second union being with 
Miss Martha King. Two children grace this marriage, Sarah and Clarence 
C The parents hold a very prominent position in social circles, and it is 
their worth that has won them a most extensive circle of acquaintances and 
friends. Thus it is that Mr. Drake has won a conspicuous place in business, 
political and social circles, — a position to which his ability and merit justly 
entitle him, — but he wears his honors with becoming modesty and his life is 
entirely free from ostentation or display. 



ALEXANDER EAGLES. 



A well known resident of Madison, Mr. Eagles is a native of Newark, 
New Jersey, and a son of Alexander and Mary A. (Harrison) Eagles. The 
former was likewise a native of Newark, and the latter was a daughter of 
Josiah Harrison, who belonged to one of the old and prominent families of 
that section of the state. 

Mr. Eagles acquired his education in the public and private schools of 
Newark, and throughout the greater part of his business career has been con- 
nected with insurance circles. In 1866 he entered the employ of a promi- 
nent insurance company, of New York city, and his reliability, efficient 
service and skill in his work are demonstrated by the fact that he remained 
with that company for sixteen years, or until its retirement from business. 



864 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Mr. Eagles then turned his attention to the brokerage business in New York 
city, and in the new enterprise met with gratifying success, but after a time 
his health failed him and he was obliged to abandon all active business 
interests and lived retired in order that he might recuperate. After a rest of 
two years he came to Madison, where he has since made his home, and 
since his arrival he has been prominently and actively identified with the 
upbuilding of the town. He handles all kinds of realty, and in addition has 
a large clientage in the insurance business. He represents a number of the 
old and reliable companies, including the Mutual Life, of Toronto, Canada; 
the Aetna Life, of Hartford; the Western, of 5Jew York; the Norwich, of 
England; the American, of New York; the Manchester, of England; the 
Westchester, of New York; the Fire Association, of Philadelphia; the 
Orient, of Hartford; the New Hampshire Insurance Company; the Spring 
Garden, of Philadelphia, and the New York Underwriters Association. His 
real-estate business is also extensive and profitable, and his well directed 
efforts have placed him among the substantial citizens of the community. 

Mr. Eagles was united in marriage to Miss Mary Ella Harrison, a daugh- 
ter of John D. Harrison, of Newark, New Jersey, and their union has been 
blessed with four children: Ginevra, Ralph, Alexander and Reginald. Mr. 
Eagles is a very busy man, yet he is ever ready to pause in the midst of his 
business duties to distribute aid to those in need. He is wholly worthy the 
respect that is everywhere tendered him, for his name is synonymous with 
honorable dealings and with all that is elevating and beneficial to the city 
and to the individual. 



GEORGE VAIL. 



Hon. George Vail, son of Judge Stephen Vail, was born in Speedwell, 
Morristown, New Jersey, in July, 1809. He received his education at the 
Morristown Academy, and early in life became interested in the Speedwell 
Iron Works as a partner of his father. The prosperity and high reputation 
of these works were due to the energy, diligence and practical knowledge 
possessed by father and son. It was at Speedwell that Professor S. F. B. 
Morse made his successful experiments in telegraphy through the valuable 
assistance and suggestion of Judge Vail and his sons, George and Alfred. 

Judge Vail was for many years an active and influential Democratic 
leader. He represented his district in the state legislatnre, was twice elected 
to congress, was for several years consul at Glasgow, Scotland, and for five 
years judge of the courts of errors and appeals of New Jersey. He was sent 
as one of the commissioners to the World's Fair in London, in 1851^ 




f/llOjtmt %^lyUn^i;^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AKD GEMEALOGICAL HISTORY. 365 

and was one of the original commissioners selected to procure a site for the 
asylum building. A valued member of Cincinnati Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of 
Morristown, he served at one time as its master and was subsequently senior 
grand warden of the grand lodge of New Jersey. The following written of 
him by one who knew him well, gives a just estimate of the general charac- 
ter of Judge Vail: 

" Although possessed of wealth, which enabled him to gratify the ambi- 
tion for display so inherent in poor human nature, he was always plain and 
simple in his habits and tastes. Never, perhaps, did one pride himself less 
than he on beautiful possessions and surroundings. He loved that others 
should have them. His house was always open to those who approached 
him properly. For the poor and needy he had an open heart and an 
open hand. Not long before his death he contributed a handsome sum to 
the disabled ministers of the Presbyterian church. He had a tender and 
sympathetic nature. This trait revealed itself under circumstances that 
involved considerable sacrifice of time and labor." 

Mr. Vail was of splendid physique, and of quiet, unpretentious disposi- 
tion, quite in contrast to his commanding presence. He died at his resi- 
dence in Speedwell, May 23, 1S75. 



WILLIAM KANOUSE. 



For several generations the Kanouse family has been represented in 
Morris county and the subject of this review is regarded as one of the leading 
and substantial citizens of Montville. His grandfather, Conrad Kanouse, 
was the first of the family to locate in what is now Boonton township, near 
Powerville, taking up his abode there about the time of the Revolutionary 
war. He cleared land and followed farming as a means of supporting his 
family, which numbered five sons and two daughters, namely: Tunis, John, 
Thomas. Daniel, Abraham, Nellie and Annie. The father, Conrad Kanouse, 
lived to be nearly eighty years of age. Thomas Kanouse, the father of him 
whose name heads this article, acquired a common-school education, such as 
most farmer lads of that day enjoyed, and then gave his attention wholly to 
the cultivation of the fields. He carried on agricultural pursuits throughout 
his entire life and died in his eighty-third year. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Elizabeth C. Van Ness and by their marriage were born eight chil- 
dren: Henry, who married Katie Fredericks; William; Jane, wife of Samuel 
Benjamin; Mary Ann, who died at the age of twenty years; Jacob, who went 
to California but has not been heard of for a number of years; Peter, who 
married Emma Peer; Hannah, wife of Peter Earles; and Martha, wife of 



366 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEjYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Charles Conklin. The mother of this family died at the age of seventy-three 
years. 

William Kanouse was reared on the old family homestead near Power- 
ville, and acquired a limited education in the schools of those days. He 
was trained to habits of industry and frugality, which have proven important 
factors in his business career. On attaining the age of twenty-five years he 
began business on his own account and after keeping a public house and 
tavern at Powerville for three years removed to Montville, where he pur- 
chased the land now occupied by the Textile Printing Works. From time 
to time he has sold portions of his farm for building purposes and has 
derived therefrom a good income. He also has valuable realty holdings in 
Boonton, including the Mansion House and City Hotel properties. All has 
been acquired through his own well-directed efforts, his enterprise, sagacity, 
careful management and judicious investment, and certainly his success is 
well deserved. He voted with the Republican party but has neither time nor 
inclination to seek public office. 

In 1853 Mr. Kanouse married Miss Sarah Louisa Decker, daughter of 
John and Deborah (Vanderhoof) Decker. They have one daughter, Lucy A., 
now the wife of Asa T. Cook, of Montville, by whom she has five children: 
Frank Forrester, who married Estella Hickson and has two children, Will- 
iam and Esther; Clarence C, Louisa, Hobart and Peter L, all at home. 
Thus four generations of the family reside in this locality. Mr. Kanouse, 
long numbered among its most prominent business men and representative 
citizens, has a wide acquaintance, and the history of this section of the county 
would be incomplete without the record of his life. 



MENZIES Y. GENUNG. 

For over forty years Mr. Genung has been a progressive and enterprising 
agriculturist of Morris county. He was born in Genungtown, now East 
Madison, on the 4th of November, 1832, and is a son of Amza and Elizabeth 
(Hathaway) Genung. Stephen Genung, his grandfather, first settled on the 
old homestead, the deed of which he received from Iving George, where he 
followed farming and improved a large tract of land. He became the father 
of four children, namely: Drusilla, who married Stephen Wilkinson; Wick- 
liff, Amza and Adelia. Amza was born on the old homestead and followed 
agricultural pursuits all his life. He married Miss Elizabeth Hathaway, a 
native of Whippany and a daughter of Benoni and Triphena Hathaway, the 
former of whom was a general in the Revolutionary war. Mr. and Mrs. 
Genung were prominently identified with the Madison Presbyterian church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL HISTORY. 36T 

in which he served as a deacon for many years and assisted in building the 
present house of worship. In politics he was originally an old-line Whig, 
later becoming a Republican, upon the organization of that party. To him 
and his wife were born seven children, five of whom died in childhood, the 
only one surviving being our subject. Adelia married for her first husband a 
Mr. Jessup, and after his death Edward Sherman, and died November 8, 
1893. Amza W. Genung's demise occurred in 1872, when he had arrived at 
the age of sixty-eight years, his wife surviving him until 1887, when she 
passed away, in her seventy-ninth year. 

The subject of this biographical notice was reared on the Genung home- 
stead and obtained his education in the district school. In 1856 he settled 
on his present farm and has since followed the vocation of agriculture, mak- 
ing a specialty of raising asparagus, in which venture he has made a profit- 
able success. Politically he votes with the Republican party. 

In 1856 he was united in marriage with Miss Susan H. Campfield, who 
was born in Hanover, Morris county, on the 3d of April, 1834, a daughter of 
Jacob T. and Sarah (Hopping) Campfield. Her father was a son of Samuel 
and Mary (Shaw) Campfield. Mr. and Mrs. Genung are the parents of one 
daughter, Elma, who is now the wife of Harry Double, formerly of Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Genung and wife are faithful members of the Pres- 
byterian church, in which he has held the office of trustee. 



JOHN R. DALRYMPLE. 



A well-known and prominent citizen of Dover, Mr. Dalrymple was born 
in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, three miles east of the Delaware river,. 
May 31, 1857, and is a son of George E. and Elizabeth B. (Bloom) Dalrym- 
ple. Both parents were born and reared in Hunterdon county, the mother's 
birth occurring on the old family homestead, now known as Huffdale, in 
1820. Her father, Frederick Bloom, was born in Hunterdon county. New 
Jersey, and died in the eighty-ninth year of his age. The paternal grand- 
father of our subject was John R. Dalrymple, who was a native of New 
Jersey, but whose father was born in Scotland. George E. Dalrymple, 
father of our subject, was born in 181 8 and died in 1895. f^is family num- 
bered eight children, three sons and five daughters: Rev. Fuller P., a 
graduate of Princeton College, New Jersey, and now a Presbyterian minister 
of Chester, Illinois; Sylvester B., who was a soldier in the Civil war; Esther, 
who is residing in Esterdale, New Jersey; Catherine, who married Whitfield 
Rittenhouse, and resides on the old Dalrymple homestead; Susan, wife of 
William Rowett, a resident of Dover; Nellie V., who married Joseph 



868 BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GEJ^EALOGICAL EISTOBT. 

Leonard; Lucretia B., who died at the age of nineteen years; and Lewis B. , 
who died at the age of seven months. 

In the county of his nativity John R. Dalrymple was reared, and to the 
common-school system he is indebted for the educational privileges which he 
received. In 1885 he went to Warren county, New Jersey, where he 
entered the employ of Daniel F. Beatty, an organ manufacturer, with whom he 
remained two years. In 1887 he secured a situation in the car shops of the 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company, his service there 
covering a period of nine years, after which he engaged in the sale of pianos 
and organs in Dover, until 1894. He then formed a partnership with W. E. 
Van Lieu, under the firm name of Van Lieu & Dalrymple, and after twelve 
months purchased his partner's interest. He is now conducting undertaking 
establishments in both Rockaway and Dover and is doing a good business. 

In 1877 Mr. Dalrymple was united in marriage to Miss Ida M. Eick, a 
daughter of Andrew and Thisby (Kline) Eick. They have one son and one 
daughter, William Derry and Gartha B. Mr. Dalrymple is a member of Acacia 
Lodge, No. 20, F. & A. M. ; Royal Arcanum Lodge, No. 541 ; and No. 6, O. U. 
A. M., of Rockaway, New Jersey. He and his wife hold membership 
in the Presbyterian church of Rockaway, and are people of the highest 
respectability, holding an enviable position in those circles where true worth 
and intelligence are received as the passports into good society. The pros- 
perity which our subject has acquired results entirely from his own well- 
directed efforts. He is energetic, industrious and persevering, and has 
steadily advanced during his connection with various business interests. 



REV. GEORGE P. NOBLE. 

The pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Mendham, Morris county, 
George Pleasants Noble, was born in New York city, January 4, 1845, his 
parents being Rev. Mason and Kate (Pleasants) Noble: the latter was a 
daughter of Benjamin F. aijd Isabella (Adair) Pleasants, of Washington, D. 
C. The father of our subject, Rev. Mason Noble, D. D., was a chaplain in 
the United States Navy from 1853 until 1881, and devoted his entire life to 
the work of the ministry, his influence being widely felt. 

Mr. Noble, whose name forms the caption of this article, received his 
early literary training in the Rittenhouse Academy, at Washington D. C., 
and when seventeen years of age entered Williams College in Massachusetts. 
At the age of twenty he matriculated in Union Seminary of New York city, 
and in 1868 was ordained to the ministry by the Third Presbytery of New 
York. Having determined to devote his life to that holy calling, he entered 
upon his labors with a zeal and earnestness that have known no wavering. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 369 

During the first year of his service he was engaged in missionary work in 
Brooklyn, and then spent fifteen months as pastor of the Weehawken, New 
Jersey, church; after which he accepted the call from the church in Maiden, 
New York, where he remained for seven years. Through the twelve suc- 
ceeding years he was pastor of the church in Cornwall on the Hudson, New 
York, and in February, 1890, was called to his present charge in Mendhani, 
where he has remained continuously since, winning the love and confidence 
of his parishioners and the respect of people of all other denominations. 
He is a fluent and earnest talker, logical in argument, in manner kindly and 
courteous, and with a charity for all that has gained him the respect of the 
entire community. 

Mr. Noble was married in Brooklyn, New York, September 15, 1868, 
to Elizabeth Ketcham, a daughter of E. P. and Fanny (Taylor) Ketcham, 
and they have the following surviving children: Herbert; Franklin P.; 
Fanny Iv. and Charles. Herbert resides in Jamaica, Long Island, where he 
is engaged in the practice of medicine, being a graduate of the New York 
Homeopathic College. He married Caroline L. Place, and they have one 
son, George Pleasants. Franklin is a civil engineer, having his home 
address at Mendham. He married Jennie F. Bockoven, of Mendham, 
on June iS. 1898. . The other children are at home. 



EZRA F. GARABRANT. 



He to whose life record we now direct attention is one of the worthy and 
substantial citizens of Mendham, and a representative of one of the pioneer 
families of Somerset and Morris counties. He was born in Somerset county 
on the 13th of September, 1841, a son of Cornelius and Fannie (Bird) Gara- 
brant, being now their only surviving child. The father was born in Somer- 
set count}' in 1816, came to Morris county about 1853 and was for many 
3-ears a well known drover at Mendham, where he departed this life in Feb- 
ruary, 1888. His father, also named Cornelius, was closely related to the 
Garabrants who originally emigrated from Holland and settled in Hunterdon 
county, New Jersey. He married a Miss Smith, and the father of our subject 
was one of eight children. The Smith family have for many years been 
prominently identified with the public and social interests of Morris county, 
as well as other sections of this state. 

Ezra F. Garabrant received his mental discipline in the Union school- 
house in Mendham township, which he attended until ten years old, when he 
was required to assist his father in watching and driving stock, and in that 
manner learned the rudiments of the business which he afterward followed 
with so much success and profit. The first money he ever collected for his 

24 



870 BIOGBAPHICJ.L AJ^D GEJYEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

father was paid him, as he distinctly remembers, by " Tobe " Seaman, of 
Newark, who also made him a present of a gold dollar. On one of his col- 
lection trips, during his boyhood, he lost thirty-four dollars on his way home, 
and the thought of what might be in store for him when he arrived home 
caused him to spend several anxious hours. However, his expectations were 
not realized, but the suspense he experienced impressed the incident indelibly 
upon his mind. 

After attaining his majority Mr. Garabrant began life on his own respon- 
sibility, in agricultural pursuits, but about 1856 he embarked in the stock 
business and continued in that line of enterprise with distinct success until 1 89 1 , 
when, upon the completion of the Rockaway Valley Railroad to Mendham, he 
engaged in the lumber and coal business. Toward the construction of this 
road Mr. Garabrant was the largest cash contributor in town, besides which 
all his influence was brought to bear in securing the right of way and other 
concessions necessary to the assurance of the road's construction, and on the 
30th of June, 1 89 1, he had the satisfaction of selling his first load of coal 
from the car at Mendham. He has continued to follow that business and is 
recognized as one of the trustworthy, honorable merchants of the town, and 
these qualities of character have gained for him an extensive patronage 
throughout Morris county. 

Mr. Garabrant celebrated his marriage on the 28th of November, 1866, 
when he was united to Miss ICate A. Quimby, daughter of Abram and Phoebe 
(Cross) Quimby, of Somerset county. Their children are two in number: 
Marietta is the wife of Dr. Day, of Chester; and Charles Q., of Mendham, 
married Miss Florence Cramer, a daughter of Smith Cramer, and they have 
one son, Maurice. Our subject and his wife are both members of the Presby- 
terian church at Mendham. 



FRED D. STEPHENS. 



A resident of German Valley, Fred D. Stephens is a representative of 
one of the earliest settled families in Morris county, and it has come to be 
one of the most numerous families as well. He was born in Mount Olive 
township May 12, 1857, being a son of the late prominent miller and farmer, 
Richard Stephens. 

He was educated in the Chester Institute, concluding his school career 
with a course in Bryant and Stratton's Business College in Newark. He 
began life for himself in 1878, when he engaged in the mercantile business 
with Lyman I\ice, in German Valley, as the firm of Kice & Stephens. This 
association continued for the term of five years, when Mr. Stephens disposed 
of his interest and spent some time in the Dakotas and Nebraska, being 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GEJs'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 871 

absent about four months. Upon his return he took up the stove and tin- 
ware business in German Valley and conducted it as an individual concern 
till 1893, when it was converted into a stock company, capitalized at $20,- 
000, with Mr. Stephens as the chief official of the corporation, the other 
members being Jacob W. Welsh and Charles B. Hendershot. Mr. Stephens 
is also partner in one of the largest milling concerns in Morris county — the 
old Richard Stephens mill property, near Bartley. This has come to be one 
of the important industries of the western part of the county, made so from 
the grade and amount of product that is manufactured there. For many 
years Richard Stephens, the father of our subject, made the success of this 
mill his chief aim in life, and since his death its operation has come into the 
hands of his son Fred and his son-in-law, A. L. Salmon. 

Richard Stephens was born in Mount Olive township in 1824 and died in 
1895. He not only became prominent in business, but was one of the lead- 
ers of the Republican party and was regarded as one of the chief citizens of 
Morris county. He was a son of one of Morris' distinguished citizens, 
William Stephens, who was the proprietor of a forge and gristmill and saw- 
mill. He was also a farmer, and was on the Tvhole a successful man of 
affairs. He was a Whig in politics and was sent to the assembly of the state 
to represent his county. His father, Daniel Stephens, was one of the pio- 
neers of the name in the county. 

Richard Stephens married Dorothy Salmon and was the father of two 
children: Sarah A., wife of A. L. Salmon; and Fred D. The latter was 
married in German Valley, October 24, 1877, to Louisa, daughter of Morris 
Naughright. They became the parents of two children, but they are both 
deceased. 



JAMES B. DALRYMPLE. 

As a general farmer and dealer in ice, Mr. Dalrymple is a successful busi- 
ness man, whose keen discrimination, sound judgment, diligence and enter- 
prise have brought to him a richly merited prosperity. His dealings are 
conducted with the strictest regard for the ethics of commercial life, and his 
integrity is above question. His entire life has been passed in Morris county, 
and his many excellencies of character have gained him the warm regard and 
confidence of those with whom he has been brought in contact. Born on 
the old family homestead, in Randolph township, on the iith of December, 
1825, he is a son of John and Nancy (Briant) Dalrymple. The ancestry on 
the paternal side can be traced back to Scotland, whence came the first of 
the name to America. He had a family of seven sons, the youngest of whom 
was Joseph Dalrymple, the great-grandfather of our subject, who was born 



372 BIOGRJPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

October 29, 1714- The grandfather was John Dalrymple, a highly respected 
citizen of Morris county. Both he and his wife held membership in the Pres- 
byterian church, and when called to the home beyond their remains were 
interred in the cemetery at Mendham. In his political associations he was a 
Whig. 

John Dalrymple, the father of our subject, was born February 10, 1797, 
and having arrived at years of maturity he married the daughter of John 
Briant. The}^ had four children: Ann, who was born November i, 1824; 
Aaron P., deceased; Mary M., who was born December 22, 1838, and is the 
wife of William Budd, of Chester; and James B., our subject. The parents 
were members of the Presbyterian church, of Mt. Freedom, and were buried 
in Mt. Freedom cemetery. The father held the political faith of the Whig 
party in early life, and afterward joined the ranks of the Republican party, 
marching under its banner up to the time of his death. The Dalrymples 
together owned at one time more than ten thousand acres of land in Morris 
county. 

James B. Dalrymple was reared amid the quiet surroundings of farm 
life, and in the work of fields and meadows bore his part from an early age. 
Practical experience soon made him familiar with all this and fitted him for 
his own useful career after he had attained to man's estate. During the 
winter seasons he attended school, pursuing his studies in Millbrook for a 
time and later in the Center Grove school, where he was a schoolmate of 
Dr. Pierce, who went to New York city and became a surgeon in the Civil 
war with headquarters at Hilton Head, South Carolina, where he died a 
short time before the cessation of hostilities. Mr. Dalrymple continued on 
the home farm until he had attained his majority and then started out in life 
for himself. 

He was married February 23, 1859, the lady of his choice being Miss 
Mary L. Bailey, of Basking Ridge, who was born April 11, 1840. Her par- 
ents, Charles and Mary (Hensley) Bailey, were both natives of Morris county 
and belonged to old and honored Jersey families. Mr. and Mrs. Dalrymple 
have two children, Jerrj' C. and Ella L. The former was born October 11, 
1863, and married Miss Jennie L. Hedden, daughter of Isaac B. and Millicent 
Hedden, of Newark, New Jerse}-. 

Mr. Dalrymple has a valuable and well improved farm of one hundred 
acres, and the fields, being highly cultivated, return to him a golden tribute 
for his care and labor. In 1881 he began dealing in ice, having constructed 
near his home a pond, which is fed by spring water, and thus the ice is of a 
very superior quali'.y. He puts up annual!}' three thousand tons of ice of 
which he disposes in the four summer months, deriving therefrom a good 
income. He is a progressive farmer, an enterprising business man, one 




■^^-^C^c^t^ 



-^ 



BIOGRJPEICAL AJ\rD GEXEALOGICAL HISTORY. 373 

whose methods are honorable and who has not only gained a liberal patron- 
age but has also won the public confidence in an unqualified degree. He and 
his family are members of the First Presbyterian church of Dover, and in 
politics he is a Republican. 



JOHN CHAMBERLAIN. 

This gentleman is a farmer of Jefferson township, Morris county, who 
by means of authentic records traces his ancestry back to Benjamin Cham- 
berlain, of Connecticut, who moved from that state to Sussex county. New 
Jersey. In his early life he learned a trade, but after coming to this locality 
followed farming and was a progressive and enterprising man. His son 
Abraham was born near Sparta, New Jersey, April lo, 1783, and in his youth 
learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed for a number of years. 
Later he became an iron-worker and the owner of a forge in Petersburg, Morris 
county, where he also conducted a distillery, sawmill and store in connection 
with his other interests. He likewise owned land and engaged in the tilling 
of the soil. He married Elizabeth Keepers and his children were: Caroline, 
who died at the age of nine years and eleven months ; Maurice, who wedded 
Mary McCormick ; Horace, father of our subject ; Amos, who married Mary 
A. Lyon ; Lewis, who married Elizabeth Wallace ; Elizabeth, who became 
the wife of George Lyon ; Almeda, wife of J. W. Headley ; and Jane, wife 
of William P. Winterbottom. 

Horace Chamberlain was born on the 12th of September, 181 5, acquired 
a liberal education and in early manhood taught school for a number of 
years. He then prepared himself for the use of the compass and chain and 
made land-surveying his life work. When a young man he was prominently 
identified with the political contests of the county as an able advocate of 
the Democracy, and was elected to represent Morris county in the general 
assembly, where he earnestly labored for the interests of his constituents. 
He was united in marriage to Jane M. Norman, who was born April 23, 1821, 
a daughter of Charles and Sarah (Mackerley) Norman, and by their union 
were born six children, as follows : Sarah E., born April 18, 1842; John; 
Abram, who died in 1888 ; Emily J., who died in 1884; Martha L., who 
passed awa}- in 1887; and Nettie, whose death occurred in i88i. The 
father of this family was called to his final rest on the 4th of October, 1891, 
and the mother still survives and resides on the family homestead. 

Upon his grandfather's farm near Petersburg, John Chamberlain was 
born, August 16, 1844. By a liberal education he was well fitted for the 
practical and responsible duties of life, having pursued a course of study in 
the Newton Seminary and in Bryant & Stratton's Business College, of New- 



374 BIOGRAPHICAL AMB GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ark. For eight years he engaged in teaching in Morris county, and his 
ability in that direction led him to be classed among the able educators in 
this part of the state. Since 1870, however, he has given his entire atten- 
tion to farming, and his fields of waving grain, substantial buildings, well 
repaired fences and other accessories of the model farm indicate his energy 
and industry in the management of his and his sister's estates. 

Mr. Chamberlain has been twice married. On the 12th of September, 
1877, he wedded Miss Thirza S. Wilson, daughter of John Elizabeth (Alli- 
son) Wilson. She ,was born July 18, 1850, and died October 12, 1883. On 
the iith of June, 1896, Mr. Chamberlain was again married. Miss Jennie B. 
Campbell becoming his wife. She was born January 24, 1854, and is a 
daughter of John G. and Maria (Wallace) Campbell, of Brooklyn. She 
now shares with her husband in extending the hospitalities of their pleasant 
home to a large circle of friends, and they attend the Oak Ridge Presbyte- 
rian church, of which Mr. Chamberlain's sister is a member. In politics he 
is a Jef^ersonian Democrat and was appointed a commissioner of deeds by 
Governor Abbett, and re-appointed by Governor Werts for a second term of 
five years. 



JOHN M. BALDWIN. 

A prominent citizen of Chatham, Mr. Baldwin has attained to a leading 
position in the industrial life of Morris county. Years of activity, well 
directed and guided by sound judgment, have brought to him a rich and 
desirable success, and he stands. among those whose energy and enterprise 
have also contributed largely to the material development and welfare of the 
town which he makes his home. 

Born on the old Baldwin homestead, December 27, 1844, he is the eld- 
est son and third child of Samuel Baldwin. His childhood days were passed 
on the farm and his assistance was required in the cultivation and improve- 
ment of the fields. When he had arrived at years of maturity he was mar- 
ried, December 29, 1869, to Miss Emma J. Carter, a daughter of Barnabas 
and Sarah (McCoy) Carter. She has been to him a faithful companion and 
helpmeet, and they have now traveled life's journey together for twenty-eight 
years. For a year after his marriage Mr. Baldwin carried on farming at 
Millington, and then removed to Maplewood, where he farmed on shares the 
property of Louis Pierson, for three years. On the expiration of that period 
he went to Union, where he remained three years, and next spent three 
years at Long Hill and a similar period at Summit, New Jersey. 

In 1877 Mr. Baldwin embarked in the ice business on a small scale, 
supplying the butchers of the neighborhood. From the very first the con- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTOBT. 375 

cern proved a paying investment. In 1879 he removed to Madison and 
gradually extended his business to Chatham and Summit. At the present 
time it is confined to the last two places, and his sales amount to two thou- 
sand tons of ice annually, the enterprise being recognized as one of the lead- 
ing business interests of the community. His aptitude for business, his keen 
discrimination and his untiring energy enabled him to build up an enterprise 
whose financial returns make him one of the substantial citizens of the 
community. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin have been born nine children: Charles S., 
Ida May, Emma B., Dais}' E., Etta S., John C. , Myrtle E., Eva J. and 
Mildred W. The family have a wide acquaintance in Morris county, and 
the members of the household move in the best circles of society. In his 
political views Mr. Baldwin is a Democrat and gives an intelligent support to 
the party, but has never been an office-seeker. He manifests a deep interest 
in all that pertains to the welfare of the communit}', — its progress and 
advancement along all desirable lines, and lends a hearty co-operation in 
the various movements for the public good. 



JOHN C. SCHRADER. 



This capable business man, now serving as general agent of the Atlantic 
Dynamite Company, located at McCainville, in Roxbury township, Morris 
county, is a native of Denmark. He was educated in the schools of that 
country, completing his studies in Techner College, at Copenhagen. In the 
year 1866 he bade adieu to home and native land and sailed for the United 
States, taking up his residence in New York city, where he engaged in busi- 
ness on his own account until i S74. In that year he engaged to take charge of 
the works of the Atlantic Powder Company, which was organized and the 
plant erected in 1871, the work of manufacturing being commenced in 1874, 
and Mr. Schrader came that year to take charge. On the i6th of May, 
1876, an explosion occurred, destroying the mixing house, which, however, 
was soon rebuilt. In May, 1880, a fire consumed the pulverizing house, 
which was a wooden structure, but it was soon replaced by a good brick 
building. All kinds of powder, including dynamite, are manufactured and 
shipped to various points in the United States, a large business being con- 
ducted. Mr. Schrader has been connected with the work from the beginning, 
although several changes in ownership have occurred; yet his services have 
been retained by the various proprietors and for more than twenty-two years 
he has been in charge of the factory, successfully managing the manufactur- 
ing interests carried on therein. In 1882 the name was changed to the 



376 BIOGRAPHICAL AJfD GEJS'EALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Atlantic Giant Powder Company and in 1895 to the present name, Atlantic 
Dynamite Company, of New Jersey. 

Mr. Schrader was united in marriage to Miss Anna Graeffe, of New York 
city, a native of this country. He has a fine residence, well furnished and 
supplied with all modern improvements. He is a man who owes his success 
in life to his own well directed and honorable efforts. His fine personal 
appearance and genuine worth make him a favorite with all with whom he 
comes in contact, and his friends are many. 



JOHN SHIPPEE. 



A well known contractor and builder of Butler, the subject of this review 
was born at Echo Lake, Passaic county. New Jersey, on the 26th of August, 
1843, and is descended from French ancestry, his great-grandfather having 
emigrated from France to America. The grandfather, Nathaniel Shippee, 
was born in Virginia in 1792. He served in the war of 18 12, and died in 
Passaic county, New Jersey, of cholera, in 1848. He married Sarah Titus, 
who passed away in 1878. Their only child, David N. Shippee, the father of 
our subject, was born at Echo Lake, New Jersey, May 8, 18 16. His life's 
journey was ended in April, 1888, and the community thereby lost one of its 
valued citizens. His business interests were those of the farm, and his polit- 
ical preferences were for the Democracy. For the long period of thirty 
years he served as justice of the peace, discharging his duties with marked 
promptness, fidelity and fairness. His wife, Mrs. Catharine Shippee, was 
born in May, 18 18, and died May 27, 1890. Their children were as follows: 
James, of Butler, born December 19, 1839; Julia, who was born August 18, 
1841, and died June 4, 1843; Peter, who was born June 19, 1846, and died 
in September, 1853; Joseph, who was born October 2, 1848, and resides in 
Paterson; Sarah, who was born September 7, 1851, and died September 17, 
1853; Martin, who was born August i, 1854, and is living at Echo Lake; 
David, who was born October 19, 1859, and died October 5, 1880; and 
Rachel, who was born September 5, 1863, and died in 1880. 

John Shippee, the second of this family, remained on his father's 
farm until 1862, when, on the 12th of September, he donned the blue and 
went forth in defense of his country, as a member of Company E, 
Twenty-fifth New Jersey Infantry. He enlisted at Paterson for nine months' 
service and on the organization of the company was made sergeant. 
These troops were mustered in at Trenton and by way of Washington, D. 
C. , went to Fredericksburg, Virginia, where they met the enemy in battle. 
Mr. Shippee was then not again in battle until just before the e.xpiration of his 




Jpimn C/ntJi/iee. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJiD GEJfEALOGICAL HISTORY. 377 

term of enlistment, when he met the rebels in the engagement at Black Water, 
near Newport News, Virginia. When his nine-months term had expired he was 
honorably discharged, and in September, 1864, he re-enlisted and was com- 
missioned second lieutenant of Company K, Thirty-ninth New Jersey Vol- 
unteers. This was one of the regiments that was very actively engaged dur- 
ing the last months of the war, and Mr. Shippee thus saw hard service. He 
participated in the battles of Poplar Grove, South Side Road, Fort Stead- 
man and the siege of Petersburg, where his regiment was one of the first to 
make the charge on the 2d of April, which movement resulted in driving the 
enemy from their fortifications. Then followed the pursuit of Lee's army to 
Appomattox, during which a number of skirmishes occurred as the enemy 
would make a stand to cover their retreat. From the ist of January to the 
9th of April, 1865, the Thirty-ninth New Jersey was under continuous fire. 
Mr. Shippee continued with the command in all its engagements, and two 
months after the surrender of Lee was mustered out. 

Soon thereafter he went to the oil fields of Pennsylvania, where he 
remained for three years. On his return to Morris county, he learned the 
carpenter's trade, which he has since follov^^ed. He worked for some time 
as a journeyman, but for a number of years has engaged in business as a con- 
tractor and builder. His own residence in Butler is one of its best homes 
and amply indicates his excellent handiwork. In addition to this he has 
erected many other buildings, — notably the McCue building and the Catholic 
rectory. He took a large contract for erecting cottages and other buildings 
for S. S. Kinney on his country place, near Butler; a summer cottage for 
Rev. John P. Peters, of New York, at Greenwood lake; and the summer 
home of Jacob Walder, at Newfoundland. The excellence of his work com- 
mends him to the patronage of the public, and his fidelity to the terms of 
a contract and his upright dealing in every particular have won him the con- 
fidence and good will of all. 

At West Milford, Passaic county. Rev. George W. Horton solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Shippee and Miss Elizabeth Brower, a daughter of John 
and Sarah (Cahill) Brower. Of this union four children were born, and of 
them we make brief record, as follows: Fred A., who is a professional 
embalmer and undertaker, is a graduate of the Champion College of Embalm- 
ing, in New York city. He married Miss Mattie Westervelt, a daughter of 
William and Caroline Westervelt, and by this union they had one child, 
Georgianna. The faithful wife and mother died May 25, 1891. Fred A. 
Shippee shares the political convictions of his father, being a true Jef^ersonian 
Democrat. He is carrying on business as an undertaker and embalmer, in 
which enterprise his father is associated. The other children of our subject 
are Arthur N., who follows carpentering; Pauline Z., John H., and Flora 



378 BIOGRAPHICAL AJ^D GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

May, who died at the age of one year. The surviving children all abide at 
the parental home. 

Mr. Shippee is a member of John E. Beam Post, G. A. R., in which he 
has served as commander. He has served as president, collector and treas- 
urer of the Catholic Benevolent Legion and is a member of Neaskeleta Tribe 
of Red Men. His political support is given the Democracy and he is a rec- 
ognized leader of the party in his township. When he came to Pequannock 
township the Republicans were carrying the elections by a majority of two 
hundred. Thinking that it might be possible to change this state of affairs, 
he with other influential Democrats put forth every effort in 1890 to reverse 
the old order of things and nominated and elected what was known as the 
"big four" ticket, with Jesse Ward as collector, John Rogers for assessor, 
George L. Chambers for freeholder and John Shippee for justice of the 
peace. This was the first time in a quarter of a century that a Democratic 
ticket was elected. In the spring of 1896 Mr. Shippee was again chosen for 
the office of justice of the peace and is now filling that position in a most 
acceptable manner. He is a familiar figure in county and state conventions 
of his party and is regarded as a safe adviser and counselor. The family are 
communicants of St. Anthony's Roman Catholic church, at Butler. 



ELBERT H. BALDWIN. 



A representative of the banking interests of Dover, where he holds the 
position of cashier in the National Union Bank, Mr. Baldwin is a man whom 
to know is to respect. His character has always been one of great firm- 
ness and sincerity. Careful, painstaking, exact and conscientious, he has 
deservingly prospered from year to year, and his integrity has become pro- 
verbial. His sterling worth commends him to the public confidence and he 
well deserves mention among the leading citizens of Morris county, the 
record of whose