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Full text of "Biographical and genealogical history of Morris County, N.J"

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GENEALO ^ . COLLECTION 



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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/biographicalgenemcnj02lewi 





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Ricximphirn l and Genenloniml 



HISTORY 



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□ORRIS COUNTY 



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THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY. 
New York and Chicago. 
1899. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

±128301 



HON. JOHN HILL. 

No compendium such as the province of this work defines in its essential 
limitations will serve to offer fit memorial to the life and accomplishments of 
the subject of this review, — a man remarkable in the breadth of his wisdom, 
in his indomitable perseverance, his strong individuality, and yet one whose 
entire life had not one esoteric phase, being as an open scroll, inviting the 
closest scrutiny. True his were "massive deeds and great " in one sense, 
and yet his entire accomplishment but represented the result of the fit utili- 
zation of the innate talent which was his, and of the directing of his efforts 
along those lines where mature judgment and rare discrimination led the 
way. There was in Mr. Hill a weight of character, a native sagacity, a far- 
seeing judgment and a fidelity of purpose that commanded the respect of all. 
He carved his name deeply on the records of the state and nation and in 
some of the most trying hours of his country's history he proved a safe and 
wise counselor, whose comprehensive understanding of the national situation 
led him to support measures which time has proven to be of great benefit to 
the Union. 

John Hill was born in Catskill, New York, on the ioth of June, 1821, 
and was a son of Hiland and Mary (Butler) Hill. His father was for nearly 
half a century identified with the Catskill National Bank, of that place, and 
for many years held the position of cashier. Both he and his wife died at an 
advanced age. They had four sons and three daughters, and one of the sons, 
Henry Hill, succeeded his father as cashier in the Catskill Bank. Another son, 
Frederick, was for sixty-three years identified with, and served as cashier of, 
the Farmers' National Bank of Catskill. He is still living, 1898, at the ven- 
erable age of eighty-seven. He also served as county treasurer of Greene 
county, New York, for over sixty years. 

In the schools of his native town John Hill acquired his preliminary 
education, which was supplemented by study in private schools. At an early 

la 



418 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

age he secured a clerkship in the bank in which his father was cashier, acting 
as bookkeeper for his father until twenty years of age, when he came to 
Boonton, Morris county, and entered the employ of the New Jersey Iron 
Company in the capacity of bookkeeper and paymaster. He soon became 
familiar with the business of the house and for some years was connected 
therewith in the capacity of manager. Subsequently he engaged in general 
merchandising in connection with Mr. Voorhees, was afterward a partner of 
Mr. Penfield and still later of William G. Lathrop, under the firm name of 
John Hill & Company, continuing in that business until the Boonton Iron 
Works ceased operation in 1876. 

In the meantime Mr. Hill had come prominently before the public notice 
in an official capacity. In 1852 he was elected one of the township com- 
mittee, and again in 1856 and 1863 was chosen for that position. He was 
postmaster of Boonton from 1849 until 1853, and was elected justice of the 
peace in 1S56, serving five years. At the outbreak of the Civil war he 
became a stanch advocate of the Union cause and his patriotic addresses had 
marked influence on the public and occasioned many young men to enlist in 
the northern arm}'. He took a deep personal interest in these " boys in 
blue," frequently visited them at the front and ministered to their comfort in 
all possible ways. It was largely due to his efforts in securing enlistments 
that no draft was ever made in Pequannock. In 1861 and 1862 he was 
elected to the state legislature and was made a member of the committee 
that received Lincoln when he visited Trenton on his way to Washington to 
be inaugurated president of the United States. In 1865 he was again 
chosen to represent his district in the general assembly and in 1866 was 
chosen speaker of the house. In 1866 he was elected to congress from the 
fourth New Jersey district, serving from 1867 until 1869. His opponent was 
Jack Rogers, and he was the first Republican ever elected in the district, 
which was considered a Democratic stronghold. On the close of his first 
term he was re-elected, and for a third time was chosen for that office, in 
1871 making the memorable canvass which resulted in the defeat of Philip 
Refferty. Accompanied by a brass band he went from place to place, and 
his stirring addresses on the issues of the day will long be remembered by those 
who were fortunate enough to hear him. In 1880 he was once more chosen 
to represent the fourth New Jersey district in the council chambers of the 
nation and served from 1881 until 1883. It was his ambition and desire to 
become governor of the state and few men of his party ever had a stronger 
support than he; but owing to his declining health he was dissuaded by his 
medical advisers from making the canvass. While in congress he served on 
the committee on post-offices and post roads and was the father of the pop- 
ular postal card; also was instrumental in abolishing the then pernicious 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 419 

franking privilege. In 1874 he was elected state senator, being thought the 
only Republican who could carry the county at that time, when the Demo- 
cratic sentiment was very strong. During his fourth term in congress he was 
mainly instrumental in securing the reduction of letter postage from three 
cents to two. He was an enthusiastic advocate of protection to American 
industries, and in support of his belief, as in all other matters, he was an 
indefatigable worker. He was always zealous in support of the measures, 
intended to better the condition of the working men and the poor in general, 
and in all things he put the national welfare before partisanship and the 
general good before self-aggrandizement. Firm in support of his conviction, 
no one was ever in doubt as to his position relating to any question; and the 
sobriquet of " Honest John Hill" was not misapplied. Perhaps he did not 
displace the brilliance of some who have served in congress, yet he possessed 
true statesmanlike abilities and was a forceful, logical and convincing 
speaker who held the attention of the house throughout an address. 

Mr. Hill was married September 27, 1853, to Phcebe J. Carman, daugh- 
ter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Miller) Carman, of New York city. She shared 
in the high regard so uniformly given her honored husband and throughout 
Morris county she has many warm friends. Mr. Hill was a prominent and 
consistent member of the Presbyterian church and a very zealous worker in 
the Sunday-school. The last public act of his life was the delivery of a very 
impressive address before the Presbyterian general assembly in Saratoga, 
New York. He was one of the delegates to the Raikes Centennial (Sunday- 
school) held in London a few years ago, and after his return delivered a 
number of very interesting addresses on subjects discussed in that conven- 
tion; for thirty-nine years he served as elder in his home church; at the time 
of his death was president of the Morris County Bible Society; and was also 
prominent in the work of the Young Men's Christian Association, and usually 
attended its state and national conferences. 

In summing up his life work we note several very strong points in his 
character. He was a student of national issues and his strong mentality 
well fitted him for leadership, but while others might have used their 
influence and power for selfish purposes, in his public acts he was at all 
times governed by a loyal and patriotic purpose that knew no wavering. He 
left the impress of his individuality upon the legislation of his time, the use- 
fulness and wisdom of which the passing years have shown. Nor was he 
content with those labors which were of a general character merely; he was 
a man of keen sympathy and came into close touch with humanity through 
h s labors in the church and different church organizations. He believed 
thorou hly in that practical religion which extends a helping hand to the 
needy, is sympathetic with the distressed and at all times inspires hope and 



420 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

confidence in better days to come. Such was the life of one of the most 
honored and prominent citizens that Morris county has produced, and his 
name is indelibly inscribed on the pages of its history. 



JACOB Z. BUDD. 

Jacob Z. Budd, who follows farming in Pequannock township, is one of 
the leading and influential citizens of his section of the county, and his 
worth and ability have not only won him a place among the leading agricult- 
urists, but have also gained him political prominence. He was born in what 
is now Hudson county, New Jersey, on the 3d of February, 1823, being a 
son of Aaron and Mary (Zabriskie) Budd, who also were natives of the same 
county. His father was born in 1797, and removed to Morris county, on 
the 31st of March, 1836, locating in Pequannock township, where he spent 
the remainder of his days, his death occurring January 6, 1859. His first 
wife, who was born in 1 800, died in Hudson (then Bergen) county, New Jersey, 
April 29, 1829, and he afterward married Mrs. Fannie (Tuers) Harris, who 
died in Morris county, in 1879. Mr. Budd was one of the leading farmers 
in this section of the state and owned and operated large tracts of land. 
By his first wife he had three children: Jacob Z. ; Joanna, who married 
James Crane, and 'after his death became the wife of James L. Tower; and 
Aaron, who died in 1854. By the second marriage there were two children: 
Richard T. , a farmer of Pequannock, township; and Matilda, who died 
in 1855. 

Mr. Budd, whose name introduces this review, came to Morris county 
when thirteen years of age and his youth was largely passed in assisting his 
father in the labors of the farm. In 1857 he began to deal in furs and in 
the interest of his business traveled through northern New Jersey, Pennsyl- 
vania and New York, carrying on that enterprise for fifteen years, with fair 
success. He has also carried on farming the greater part of his life, and his 
place is always neat and thrifty in appearance, indicating his careful super- 
vision and the enterprise with which he prosecutes his labors. For the 
past twenty years he has been agent for the Champion Harvesting Machine 
Company and adds not a little to his income in this way. 

In his political views Mr. Budd is a stalwart Republican and is well 
informed on the issues of the day, giving them earnest attention, as every 
true American citizen should do. His fellow townsmen, appreciating his 
worth, have called him to various public offices the duties of which he has 
ever discharged with marked fidelity and trustworthiness. He served as a 
a member of the house of representatives in 1873-4 and was elected for four 
consecutive terms as a member of the board of county freeholders. He was 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 421 

treasurer of the poor-house committee for two and a half years, was consta- 
ble of Pequannock township for two years, was county coroner for three 
years and from 1875 until 1878 was collector. 

In 1845 M r - Budd was united in marriage to Miss Susan Dodd, daugh- 
ter of John Dodd, and to them have been born two daughters: Marietta, who 
died May 5, 1863, at the age of seventeen years; and Elmyra, wife of Peter 
Vreeland, by whom she has three children: Susan B., Emma and Lillie 
May. Mr. Budd and his family hold membership in the Reformed church, 
of Pompton Plains, in which he is serving as deacon. Honorable in busi- 
ness, reliable in political office, faithful to all the duties of both public and 
private life, his record is unsullied and is well worthy a place in the history 
of Morris county. 



MATTHIAS BURNET. 



One of the well improved farms of Hanover township, located near 
Whippany, is the property of Mr. Burnet, who ranks among the leading 
agriculturists of the community. He is enterprising, progressive and prac- 
tical, and his energetic efforts have transformed his place into a highly 
cultivated and valuable property which well indicates his careful supervision. 

Mr. Burnet is descended from one of the oldest families of Morris 
county. The Burnets are of Norman origin, and emigrated from York- 
shire, England, to America, taking up their residence on Long Island. 
Aaron Burnet removed from Long Island to New York, thence to Burnet 
Station, now Madison, New Jersey, and spent his last days there, dying in 
1755, at the advanced age of one hundred years. Matthias Burnet, the 
grandfather of our subject, was a native of Whippany, and died October 17, 
1783, at the age of sixty years. His son Matthias was born in Whippany 
in 1749, married Phcebe Brookfield, a daughter of Job Brookfield, and reared 
a large family, including Job Burnet, the father of our subject. He wedded 
Mary, daughter of Jonathan and Mary (Osborn) Hedges. 

Thus it will be seen that Mr. Burnet, of this review, represents a family 
whose ancestral connection with the history of Morris county covers a period 
of a century and a half. He was born and reared on the old home farm 
near Whippany and later learned the shoemaker's trade, which he followed 
until after the commencement of hostilities between the north and the south. 
Feeling that his country needed his services, he enlisted, September 3, 1862, 
as a member of Company E, Twenty-seventh New Jersey Infantry, and served 
for nine months. He was assigned to the Ninth Corps, Army of the Potomac, 
under General Burnside, and participated in the battle of Fredericksburg and 
a number of skirmishes in Kentucky. On the 25th of February, 1865, he was 



422 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

drafted as a member of Company G, Fifteenth New Jersey Infantry, and the 
last engagement in which he participated was at Petersburg. At the close of 
the war he was mustered out, August 11, 1865, and returned to his home, 
since which time he has successfully carried on agricultural pursuits. 

Mr. Burnet was married in 1874, to Miss Julia Ann Williams, a daugh- 
ter of Robert Williams, a descendant of Captain Robert Troup. They have 
three children: Eleanor Troup, Sarah Louise and Marion Williams. Mr. 
Burnet votes with the Republican party and attends the Presbyterian chnrch, 
in which he has served as trustee. 



SAMUEL F. PIERSON. 

A civil engineer of distinctive ability, Mr. Pierson is now practically liv- 
ing a retired life, in Morristown. He was born at Morris Plains, Hanover 
township, Morriscounty, September 20, 1823. His father, Ebenezer Pierson, 
was born at Morris Plains, October 3, 1787, and was a son of Samuel Pierson, 
Sr. , whose birth occurred at the same place, in 1738. He served in the war 
of the Revolution, valiantly aiding the colonists in their struggle to secure 
independence from English rule. He married Rebecca Garragus, whose 
brother John was also one of the Revolutionary heroes and fought at the 
battle of Monmouth, where so many of the British died from sunstroke. He 
lived to over one hundred years of age, and his sword, which he carried at 
Monmouth, is now in possession of the Washington Park Association of 
Morristown, having been given them by the subject of this review. Samuel 
Pierson, the grandfather of our subject, had a family of six children, 
namely: Timothy, Stephen, Samuel, Ebenezer, Mary and Hulda. The father 
of this family died May 2, 1790, and the mother died on the 1 8th of Novem- 
ber, 1838. 

Ebenezer Pierson, father of our subject, served in the war of 18 12 for a 
short period and was stationed at Sandy Hook. He was the owner of a 
large farm of three hundred acres, on the Mendham road, a part of which is 
now owned by James Pierson, who occupies the old homestead. Ebenezer 
Pierson was twice married. On the 22d of August, 1812, he wedded Miss 
Permelia Lindsley, and they had three children — Lettie, Julia and Elizabeth. 
He was again married, January 13, 1822, his- second union being with Johanna 
Trowbridge, who was born October 8, 1797, a daughter of Austin Trow- 
bridge, who was born April 19, 1767, and died June 7, 1845. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Freeman, was born May 18, 1775, and 
died April 25, 1845. Mr. Trowbridge was a farmer by occupation and was 
a well known citizen of the community in which he made his home. He was 





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' BIOGRAPHICAL AjYD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 423 

the owner of a clock which is now in possession of our subject, and, although 
more than a hundred years old, it is still in good running order. By the 
second marriage of Ebenezer Pierson were born five children, as follows: 
Samuel F. ; Hannah, who married Charles M. Foster and is now living in 
Chicago, Illinois; Silas, deceased; George, who married Nancy Miller and 
moved to Chicago, where he died; and James, who wedded Catherine H. 
Halsey and is living in Morris township. 

Samuel F. Pierson was only a year old when his father removed to Mor- 
ris township, and there he grew to manhood, assisting in the labors of field 
and meadow and in the other duties of the farmstead. He began his educa- 
tion in the common schools and later entered a private school, conducted by 
Jacob Jenkins. There he remained for two years, completing a course in 
civil engineering. He found that occupation very congenial and has made it 
his life work. There are very few places in the county that have not been 
surveyed by him, and his files contain maps and plats covering nearly every 
part of this section of the state. He has made this a life study, and his work 
is very accurate and satisfactory. 

Mr. Pierson is highly respected throughout the locality in which his 
entire life has been passed and his fellow townsmen, appreciating his worth 
and ability, have frequently called upon him to fill local positions of honor 
and trust. From 1875 until 1885 he served as assessor of Morris township, 
discharging his duties with marked fidelity and promptness. 

Mr. Pierson was married January 14, 1846, to Miss Mary J. Moore, who 
was born April 14, 1826, a daughter of Isaac B. and Elizabeth (Moore) 
Moore, who were natives of Somerset county, New Jersey, and belonged to 
old families of this state. To our subject and his wife have been born the 
following named children: Edna E., born March 25, 1847, now deceased; 
Ella A., who was born January 19, 1848, and is the wife of A. Layton Pow- 
elson, a resident of Brooklyn, New York; George A., born April 17, 1852, 
deceased; Mary Emma, who was born September 18, 1858, and is now the 
wife of George A. Mills, a resident of Morristown; Clara J., who was born 
September 3, 1857, and is the wife of Lewis M. Tuttle, a farmer of Morris 
township; Eugene, who was born July 6, 1859, and married Anna Sayer, 
their home being now in Morristown; Anna L., who was born October 12, 
1864, and is the wife of Charles J. White; and Arthur S. , who was born 
August 1 1, 1866, who married Anna Mason; he is also a civil engineer and has 
an office in Morristown, being the present city surveyor. For three gener- 
ations the Pierson family has been connected with the Presbyterian church, 
and our subject is identified with that organization. His has been an upright, 
honorable, busy and useful life, and now in his declining years he is largely 
resting from the toil of former days. 



424 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVB GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

WILLIAM L. McCORMACK. 

A successful florist of Chatham, Mr. McCormack was born in Chatham 
township, Morris county, in March, 1867, and is a son of John and Bridget 
(Skelley) McCormack, both of whom were natives of Ireland. Emigrating 
to America in the '50s, they took up their residence in Morris county, 
where they spent their remaining days. They had a large family of children, 
as follows: Anna, John, Elizabeth, William L. , Mary (deceased), Julia, 
Marcellus (also deceased), Theresa, Johanna, James and Thomas. 

Under the parental roof Mr. McCormack was reared to manhood and in 
the public schools near his home acquired his education. Entering upon his 
business career, he served an apprenticeship under Mr. Littlejohn, a florist, 
and in 1890 purchased his present place in Chatham, where he has since 
carried on operations on his own account. His energy, well-directed efforts 
and capable management have brought to him success and he is now one of 
the prosperous florists of his section of the county, having ten thousand eight 
hundred square feet under glass. He raises every variety of rose, and his 
greenhouses are marvels of beauty. New York furnishes him an excellent 
market for his flowers and his sales are very extensive. He has made a close 
and careful study of rose-growing and understands all the needs and require- 
ments of his flowers, so that his care of them is most conducive to the 
healthy growth and bearing. 

Mr. McCormack is a member of the Madison Rose Growing Association 
and is one of the progressive men of the town. His political support has 
been given the Democracy previous to 1896, when, becoming convinced that 
the platform of the Republican party contained the measures most adapted 
to the welfare of the progress of the nation, he espoused its cause, and was 
made a member of the Republican executive committee. In the spring of 
1897 he was elected a member of the first council of Chatham and his active 
support and co-operation are given to all measures for the public good. He 
holds membership in the Catholic church and is a liberal contributor to its 
support. 

WILLIAM BROWN. 

Mr. Brown, who is president of the common council of Boonton and 
who has also attained wide reputation as an accomplished and skilled funeral 
director, is a native of Pequannock township, Morris county, New Jersey, 
where he was born on December 5, 1S56, the son of Peter H. and Sophia 
(Blauvelt) Brown. When three years old he was brought to Boonton by his 
parents and here attended the public schools until attaining the age of four- 
teen years, when he entered the butchering business in his father's shop, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 425 

remaining there for several years, and then removed to Newark, where he 
resided for eight years, engaged in the grocery business. Returning to Boon- 
ton he conducted a butcher-shop for three years, and from 1883 to 1S97 he 
was engaged in the coal business, disposing of his interests in the same in 
order to establish himself as an undertaker, accomplishing that object on the 
1st of April, 1897, since which time he has met with pronounced success in 
that line of enterprise. 

Politically Mr. Brown is a stanch Republican, and he is now serving 
his third term as a member of the common council, of which he was elected 
president in 1896. For eight years he has been a member of the Repub- 
lican executive committee, and he is a charter member of the Boonton fire 
department and served three years on the board of engineers. In his social 
affiliations he is associated with • Pequannock Council, No. 1060, Royal 
Arcanum, and with the Masonic fraternity, in the latter of which he 
has attained to the exalted degree of a Royal Arch Mason in Boonton 
Chapter, No. 2 1. 

On the 9th of November, 1880, Mr. Brown was united in marriage to 
Miss Emeline Dixon, a daughter of JosephusE. and Martha Dixon, of Boon- 
ton. Both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. 

Peter H. Brown, superintendent of streets of Boonton, was born in 
Passaic county, New Jersey, on March 22, 1826, a son of Henry and Cath- 
erine (DeBow) Brown, both of whom are of Dutch ancestry and natives of 
Passaic county, the former having been a prominent farmer and a member 
of the West Milford Reformed church. His death occurred in 1S30, and he 
was survived by his widow, who subsequently married a Mr. Frederick and 
died some years later. Ten children were born to them, of which the follow- 
ing record is given : John, deceased ; Garrett, deceased ; Hannah, now Mrs. 
Henry Conklin, of Passaic county; Catherine, who married Stephen Young, 
of Brooklyn ; Jane, now Mrs. Stephen Ferris, of Hoboken ; Sarah, married 
Gordon Richards, of Pompton ; Charles, deceased ; Rebecca, deceased ; 
Margaret, who married Jacob DeBaun ; Peter H., who was reared in Passaic 
county by his uncle. 

Peter H. Brown was educated in the public schools of his native county 
and there learned the butcher trade, which he followed for many years. In 
185 1 he came to Morris county and located in Pompton Plains, whence he 
later removed to Boonton, having resided in the latter city for twenty-six 
years. He is a Republican in his political faith, has served as township 
committeeman and for the past twenty years he has been road supervisor of 
Boonton. 

Mr. Brown was married in 1849 to Miss Sophia Blauvelt, a daughter of 
Joseph N. and Rachel Blauvelt, and of the six childreu born to them, three 



426 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HIS TOBY. 

survive, namely: John H., William and James, all of Boonton. Mrs. 
Brown died on the 13th of January, 1892, and on the 1st of February, 1893, 
Mr. Brown married her sister, Hannah A. Blauvelt. He*is a member of the 
Reformed church and has served as a deacon in the same. 



JOHN H. MILLEDGE. 

Among the prominent and extensive agriculturists of Morris county is 
John H. Milledge, who was born in Montville township on the 30th of May, 
183S, his parents being Abraham and Hannah (Van Ness) Milledge. He 
obtained such an education' as was afforded by the district schools of his day, 
and for four years subsequent to leaving the same he worked at the saddler's 
trade in Newark, eventually turning his attention to farming, in which line of 
industry he has since continued, meeting with that success which invariably 
accompanies intelligent application, perseverance and earnest endeavor. 

Politically considered Mr. Milledge is a stanch supporter of the Repub- 
lican party, and he served for seventeen years as collector of Montville town- 
ship, was a member of the town committee, for several years was commis- 
sioner of appeals, and for twenty years was school trustee. In 1893 he was 
elected a county freeholder, and is now serving his third term, being at the 
present time (1897) chairman of the finance committee. In his religious 
faith he is an adherent of the Dutch Reformed church at Pompton Plains. 

In 1859 Mr. Milledge married Ruth Matilda Peer, who was a daughter 
of Thomas and Esther (Fredericks) Peer, of Morris county. She died on 
April 22, 1S78, leaving three children: Fred W. , who married Cora Vree- 
land, died at the age of twenty-seven years; Alice died at the age of twenty- 
three years; and Jesse B. , who was born February 11, 1871, resides with his 
father. On September 27, 1880, Mr. Milledge contracted a second mar- 
riage, on this occasion being united to Rachel Stager, a daughter of Thomas 
and Rachel (Van Ness) Stager, of Essex county. 

Abraham Milledge, the father of John H. , was born in Montville town- 
ship, on the 29th of December, 1806, and was a wheelwright and saddler by 
trade, but gave most of his time to farming. On September 29, 1831, he 
married Miss Hannah Van Ness, who was born August II, 1807. He died 
January 1, 1888, in the faith of the Dutch Reformed church, and is survived 
by his wife, who is also an adherent of that church. 

John Milledge, the grandfather of our subject, was a native of New- 
foundland, New Jersey, and came to Morris county when a young man, 
locating in what was then Pequannock township; here he married Miss Eliz- 
abeth Van Duyne. He was a tanner and currier, owned a tannery and 
manufactured shoes, besides which he carried on farming to a considerable 





7&L ^ S^tJ^cS<LJL 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 427 

extent. He was a member of the Dutch Reformed church, and died in 1854, 
his wife having passed to her eternal rest in 1852. Five children were born 
to this couple, as follows: Thomas; Abraham; Sarah, who married George 
Cook; Nicholas; and Rachel, who became the wife of Isaac Van Duyne. 
None of the children survive. 

Henry R. Van Ness, the maternal grandfather, was born on the 14th of 
August, 1768, and married Miss Mary Wandle, who was born September 6, 
1 78 1. He died June 27, 1833, survived by his wife until February 27, 1848, 
when she also passed away. Their children were as follows: Hester, Cath- 
erine, Mary, Ralph H., Hannah, Sarah, Jane, Elizabeth, Rachel, Daniel 
H., Borgeio and John H., all of whom are deceased, with the exception of 
Hannah, the mother of our subject, and Elizabeth, who married Martin I. 
Cook, of Boonton, who was born December 30, 18 13. 



GEORGE AUGUSTUS MILLS. 

The American progenitor of the Mills family was George Mills, who 
came from England in 1656 and settled on Long Island. His children were: 
Samuel, Zachariah, Nathaniel, Isaac, Jonathan and Samuel. Samuel mar- 
ried and had two sons, namely: Captain Timothy Mills, of Revolutionary 
fame, and Samuel Mills, both of whom eventually came to Morris county. 
Captain Timothy Mills was born in Suffolk county, Long Island, in 1718, 
and died at Morristown in 1803, aged eighty-five years. He was an official 
member of the First Presbyterian church of Morristown and was highly 
esteemed for his many excellent qualities. Nehemiah Mills, a son of Captain 
Timothy, was born in 1749 and died in 181 2. He married Amy Hedges and 
they had the following children: Nathan, Mahlon, William, Stephen, Deborah 
and Hulda. Mahlon was born in Morris county, in 1797, married Harriet 
Loree, and these children were born to them: Amy Hedges, Sarah Jane, 
Sarah Loree, Harriet Maria and Nehemiah Mahlon. 

Nehemiah Mahlon Mills, the father of our subject, was born in New 
York city on the 1 8th of April, 1829, and in 1854 was united in marriage to 
Miss Susan Slack, a native of Stanhope, New Jersey, where her birth occurred 
on the 28th of June, 1833. The issue of this union comprised the following: 
George Augustus, Frank Eugene, Fanny Jane, Mary Azubah, Harriet Eliza, 
Harvey Loree, Anna Elizabeth, Jane Louisa, Julia Amelia, John Mahlon and 
Clifford. Mr. and Mrs. Mills are faithful members of the Methodist church 
of Morristown and are among the oldest and most highly respected residents 
of the county. 

George Augustus Mills was born in Morris^ county, New Jersey, on the 
23d of January, 1856, and there acquired his literary education in the public 



428 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

schools, after leaving which he learned the trade of carpenter and builder and 
has since continued in that line of enterprise. As a contractor and builder 
he has erected many of the handsome and artistically constructed houses for 
which Morristown is justly noted. In 1893 he built a well arranged and 
completely equipped steam planing-mill on Pine street, and has conducted 
the same with a high degree of success, manufacturing all kinds of cabinet 
work, sash, blinds, doors and moldings. As a business man Mr. Mills is ener- 
getic, enterprising and ambitious and richly merits the prosperity that has 
attended his efforts in the securing of a comfortable competency. 

Politically Mr. Mills is an earnest advocate of Republican principles, and 
for the past twenty-five years he has been an active member and an ardent 
supporter of the fire department of Morristown, and for his valuable services 
rendered therein he has received the highest meed of praise from his fellow 
citizens. 

In 1878 Mr. Mills was united in marriage to Miss Mary Emma Pierson, 
a native of Morris county, and the following children were born to them: 
Arthur Pierson, Freddie T., Susie, Ethel Louisa, Raymond and Celestine. 
Mr. and Mrs. Mills are adherents of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
enjoy most pleasant social relations in their home city. 



THOMAS SHEPPARD. 



The proprietor of the leading harness shop in Chatham is Thomas Shep- 
pard, who is a native of New York city, where he was born on the 26th of 
April, 1845, a son OI J°hn and Margaret (Wagner) Sheppard, both of whom 
were born in Bavaria, German}', whence they came to the United States 
when young, becoming representatives of that sturdy and progressive type of 
German-Americans which has had so potent an influence upon the material 
prosperity of the republic. The father landed in New York in 1839, and 
shortly afterward was married to Miss Wagner. He was an engineer by 
occupation and for a number of years ran the engine in the old Newark tan- 
nery. John Sheppard died in 1886, after a long and useful life, and he is 
survived by his wife and two sons, Valentine and Thomas. The grandfather 
of our subject was Nicholas Sheppard, who retained his residence in the 
Fatherland until his death. 

Thomas Sheppard was less than one year of age when his parents 
removed to Newark, New Jersey, in the public schools of which city he 
received his educational discipline. He was eventually bound out to learn 
the harness-maker's trade, but before the completion of his term of service a 
higher duty devolved upon h*m and he enlisted for service in the war of the 
Rebellion, becoming a member of Company I, Thirty-third New Jersey 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 429 

Infantry, which at once went forward to Virginia, being assigned to the 
Eleventh Army Corps, under General Howard. Later, by consolidation, the 
regiment became a part of the Twentieth Army Corps, serving under General 
Hooker and finally being sent west with General Sherman. Mr. Sheppard 
participated with his regiment in the battles of Knoxville and Atlanta, besides 
doing skirmish duty. After serving for more than two years Mr. Sheppard 
was mustered out, in 1S65, at Newark, and thereafter went to Connecticut, 
where he engaged in business for a brief interval and then returned to New- 
ark. In this city he worked as a journeyman harness-maker until 1873, 
when he removed to Spread Eagle, Chester county, Pennsylvania, where he 
remained until 1876, when he went to Philadelphia and took charge of the 
harness department of the stables of the Centennial hotel. He eventually 
returned to Newark, whence he came to Chatham, where he opened a shop 
and where he has built up a large and lucrative business. He carries a com- 
plete line of horse-furnishing goods and also has a general repair department. 
His success is the logical result of his energy, industry, integrity and honor- 
able business methods. 

Mr. Sheppard is of an inventive turn of mind, and he has devised a 
chest-protector for men, the same being in the form of a shirt-front, to 
which is attached collar, necktie and cuffs. He is now introducing this 
article on the market and there is every indication that it will meet with a 
ready demand. 

Socially Mr. Sheppard is a member of U. S. Grant Post, No. 117, 
Grand Army of the Republic. He is a genial gentleman and enjoys a dis- 
tinctive popularity in the community. 



JOHN D. SMITH. 

There is perhaps no one in Jefferson township more prominent in local 
political affairs than this gentleman, whose influence has been a leading 
factor in a number of campaigns. His well-known devotion to the welfare 
of the county has won him many supporters, and he has been honored with 
public office, wherein he has won the approval and commendation of both 
the Democratic and Republican parties. He is accounted one of the valued 
citizens of the community, and with pleasure we present the record of his 
life to our readers. 

His grandfather, David Smith, was born in Rockaway township in 1 79 1 , 
was a forge workman, and died in 1888. He married a Miss Shawger, 
by whom he had the following children: David, Stephen, Joseph, Levi, 
William, and Mary, who became the wife of Abram Kerns. Joseph Smith 



430 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

was the father of our subject, and his birth occurred in Jefferson township in 
1820. He was a well known forgeman, and for many years was in the 
employ of Pardee & Company at Nolan's Point. He led a quiet and unas- 
suming, but useful and honorable life, and died in 1871. His wife bore the 
maiden name of Sallie Serch, and their children were Ellen, wife of Peter 
O'Brien; Susan, Hester, Theodore and David, all deceased; Laura, wife of 
Aaron Mabey; Lizzie, wife of Arthur Mitchell; John D. , and Ruth, wife of 
Joseph Parliment. 

John D. Smith was born at Milton, Jefferson township, Morris county, 
April 15, 1859, and upon entering his 'teens he quit the irksome task of try- 
ing to acquire an education in the district school, as it was then conducted at 
that place, and became a miner. He worked in the mines, mostly at Ches- 
ter, until the gradual decrease in the price of ore rendered the further opera- 
tion of the mines at that point unprofitable. Therefore he turned his 
attention to farming, which he has since followed, being one of the leading 
farmers of this part of the state. He gives great attention to the rearing of 
Chester White and other fine breeds of hogs. He was married in November, 
1880, to Maggie, daughter of Charles Berry, and three children — Joseph, 
John D. and Eva — now brighten the home with their presence. 

As an advocate of the Democracy Mr. Smith first entered the political 
field, and his influence since that time has grown with each succeeding elec- 
tion, as he has shown his peculiar fitness for leadership in the affairs which 
concern the general welfare. In 1892 he was elected a member of the board 
of freeholders on the Democratic ticket, and in 1894 was re-elected by a good 
majority in a Republican township. While serving his second term he saw 
fit to differ with some of his Democratic brethren on a matter of considerable 
moment, and at the next election he accepted the Republican nomination for 
the office of freeholder, and was elected by a majority of a hundred more 
than was given him as a Democratic candidate, a fact which shows that his 
personal popularity was increasing together with the confidence reposed in 
him by his fellow-townsmen. On the board he served with efficiency on the 
road committee, and his support of the McAdam road work of the county and 
his interests in behalf of the employment of home labor have made him 
hosts of friends and have caused him to be regarded as the proper person to 
aid in the management of the county's affairs at this time. On the reorgani- 
zation of the board in 1897 he was delegated by the Republican members to> 
take the initiative in arranging the best possible terms with the Democrats, 
and did his work in a manner perfectly satisfactorily to his party, at the same 
time preserving harmony in the board. He is now the oldest member of the 
board. For eight months, in 1896, he was a member of the board of state 
fish wardens, and thus became well known throughout the state. For the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 431 

present two-years term he is a member of the Republican county executive 
committee. His loyalty to the county's welfare is most marked, and his 
devotion to what he believes to be right is most commendable. 



NATHAN ANTHONY. 



The substantial and thorough-going farmer is the one who has the confi- 
dence and respect of all men. Not only with those of his own community, 
who know him well, but also with all with whom he meets, whether at home 
or abroad, is his honest, earnest, open, sincere life a sure passport. Among 
this class of worthy citizens in the vicinity of Middle Valley, New Jersey, is 
found the subject of this sketch, Nathan Anthony. 

Mr. Anthony dates his birth in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, May 27, 
1821. His boyhood days were not unlike those of other farmer boys, and 
his educational advantages were those afforded in the country schools. About 
the time of his marriage, which event occurred in the year 1844, he purchased 
the old Dufford homestead, his present farm, and here for more than half a 
century he has lived and prospered. His farm comprises one hundred and 
twenty-one acres and is well improved and under a high state of cultivation. 

Mr. Anthony's forefathers were likewise farmers. Jacob Anthony, his 
father, was born on Schooley's mountain, New Jersey, a son of Philip Anthony 
and his wife, whose maiden name was Moore. Philip Anthony and wife had 
a family of six children, two sons and four daughters. 

Nathan Anthony was married, as above recorded, in 1844, the lady of 
his choice being Miss Annie F. Swackhamer, daughter of Jacob Swackhamer. 
For nearly half a century their lives were happily blended together, until 
December 24, 1891, when death called her to her last home. She was a 
woman of beautiful Christian character, greatly beloved by all who knew 
her. Of their family we record that George W. , the eldest, is deceased; 
James is married to Fannie Huffman and has one son, James, Jr.; and Mary 
L. , wife of John J. Swazey, resides at the Anthony homestead. 

Mr. Anthony is a consistent member of the Lutheran church, as was 
also Mrs. Anthony. Politically, he is a Democrat. In early life he took an 
active interest in political matters and was one of the local lights of his party. 



ANDREW W. AXFORD. 



Among the representative citizens of Naughright, New Jersey, we direct 
attention to Andrew W. Axford, who has long been identified with the inter- 
ests of this place — first as a blacksmith and later as a veterinary surgeon— 
and who now holds the office of freeholder of Washington township. 



432 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Mr. Axford is oT English descent. His ancestors were among the primi- 
tive settlers of Oxford, Warren county, New Jersey. Robert Axford, his 
father, was for many years a merchant of Hackettstown, Warren county, 
New Jersey, and late in life retired to a farm in that county, where he spent 
his closing years and there died. He was born in 1800, son of John M. 
Axford, and his death occurred in 1873, and his wife, whose maiden name 
was Jane Wilson, and who was a daughter of Andrew Wilson, of New Stone, 
Hunterdon county, was born in 1809 and died in 1879. They were the 
parents of six children, three of whom survive, namely: Jacob, Robert and 
Andrew W. 

Andrew W. Axford was born in Hackettstown, New Jersey, October 28, 
1845, and grew to manhood near that village, having limited educational 
advantages. He learned the trade of blacksmith in his native town, and 
continued to reside there until 1868, when he came to Morris county. This 
place has been his home for thirty years. He followed the trade of black- 
smith until fifteen years ago, when he turned his attention to veterinary 
practice, and has since devoted his time to it, enjoying a successful and 
increasing practice. He is a member of the Veterinary Medical Association, 
of New Jersey, being one of the trustees of the same. 

Some five years ago Mr. Axford became interested and active in political 
matters, and was about that time honored with a place on the board of 
election. In the spring of 1896 he was elected freeholder of his township, 
the duties of which office he has performed with fidelity and efficiency. He 
is a Democrat, and is a partisan believer in the efficacy of the doctrines of 
modern Democracy. Other positions of preference occupied by Mr. Axford 
are those of chairman of the Washington township bridge committee, and 
member of the lunacy committee of the board of freeholders in 1897, and in 
1898 of the macadam-road committee. 

Mr. Axford was married in Morris county, New Jersey, August 27, 1870, 
to Catherine Slater, daughter of John Slater, of Naughright, and their only 
child is William Homer, a junior in the University of Pennsylvania, prepar- 
ing for the medical profession. 

Fraternally, Mr. Axford is a Mason and a Knight of Pythias. In the 
local lodge of the latter he is master of finance. 



ABRAM B. BOCKOVEN. 



Among the wealthy and influential farmers of Passaic township, Morris 
county, New Jersey, is found the gentleman to a review of whose life we now 
invite attention, — Abram B. Bockoven. 

Mr. Bockoven is a descendant of George Bockoven, who came from 




<jf^ %}, /SsfrcsL Crtse^L- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 433 

Germany, his native land, to this country at an early day and' settled in Mor- 
ris township, Morris county, New Jersey, where he married and reared a 
family that took first place among the most prominent and active citizens of 
the county. His children, in order of birth, were George, Lizzie, Abram, 
Phoebe, John, and Polly. Of these, George was the father of our subject. 
George Bockoven married for his first wife Miss Mary Smith, and located 
near the old Bockoven homestead, on the Morristown road. This union 
resulted in the birth of four children, Amos, John, Anna and James. Some 
time after the death of their mother he wedded Miss Margaret Smith, who 
bore him twelve children, viz.: Mary, Nancy, Phoebe, George and Mar- 
garet, twins, Abram B. and Lemuel, twins, Gestus, Surah, Gertrude Smith, 
Jane and Adelia. Of this large progeny only two are now living, — Mrs. 
Jane Irving, wife of Peter Irving, of Morristown, New Jersey, and Abram B., 
whose name graces this article. The mother of the last named children died 
some years ago, and the father passed away in 1874, at the age of eighty- 
eight years. 

Abram B. Bockoven dates his birth April 15, 1822. He grew upon his 
father's farm and received his education in the common schools of that day 
and place, and had nothing unusual to mark his boyhood as different from 
that of other farmer boys. When he attained manhood he engaged in the 
occupation in which his father and grandfather before him had passed 
their lives, and as a farmer he has met with a fair degree of success, 
maintaining a position as one of the leading and influential agriculturists of 
his locality. He has been the architect of his own fortune, and has been a 
man of vigorous constitution. He recalls with satisfaction that in his prime 
he could cut in a day nine hundred sheaves of rye with his cradle, — a task 
that would baffle the average farmer of later years. 

Mr. Bockoven was married in 1843 to Miss Nancy DeCoster, daughter 
of Joseph and Catherine (Rickey) DeCoster, the DeCosters having long 
resided in this part of the state. Joseph DeCoster came to New Jersey 
from Santa Cruz. He died in Summit county, New Jersey, in 1864. at the 
age of seventy years, and his wife died in 1866, at the age of sixty-six. Their 
eight children were as follows: Mary E., Nancy, John, Samuel, William, 
Cornelius, Surah and Margaret. All are living except John and William, 
and Surah, who became the wife of John J. Allen, of Basking Ridge, and 
who died in 1898. All the family are residents of New Jersey. Mrs. Bock- 
oven was born February 21, 1823, and became the mother of four children, 
namely: Joseph, a farmer, born August 21, 1843, married Miss Phoebe Mills, 
and has one son, George, born August 4, 1878; Lemuel, born October 22, 
1844, died at the age of three years; Surah J., who married Charles Pru- 
•den, a farmer of Mendham township, has four children, Oscar, John, Lottie 

2a 



434 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

and Louise; and George, born January 19, 1854, is unmarried and resides at 
the old homestead, where he is engaged in farming. 

Both father and sons are Democratic in their political faith and are 
active in their support of public enterprises. Religiously, the family are 
Presbyterians, identified with the church of this denomination at Basking 
Ridge. 

JOHN V. WISE. 

This citizen of Morristown was born in German Valley, Morris county, 
March 23, 1848, and is a son of John H. and Margaret (Wise) Wise, both of 
whom were natives of Washington township, Morris county. The father, 
who was born in 18 10, died in German Valley, at the age of seventy-eight 
years. He was a son of Andrew Wise, one of the pioneers of that place. 
By trade he was a tanner and followed that pursuit up to the time of the 
Civil war, when he turned his attention to farming. He was a successful 
business man and accumulated a handsome property. His political support 
was given the men and measures of the Democratic party, but he never 
aspired to political office. He was esteemed and respected by a wide circle of 
acquaintances, and was one of the prominent citizens of German Valley. His 
widow still survives, being in her ninety-fifth year, and is still well preserved. 

John V. Wise was reared in the place of his nativity, and acquired his 
early educational privileges there. He was afterward a student in Chester 
Institute and then completed a business course in Eastman's National Busi- 
ness College, at Poughkeepsie, New York. His business career began as a 
merchant and farmer, and to these pursuits he continued to devote his ener- 
gies until the fall of 1S86, when he removed from German Valley to Morris- 
town, where he has since resided and where he purchased the business of 
George A. Aber, the leading auction business house in Morristown. He 
formed a partnership with his father-in-law, Joseph Van Dyke, under the 
firm name of Van Dyke & Wise, and has since engaged in the real-estate 
and insurance business and in dealing in second-hand goods. In this line 
they have met with a gratifying measure of success. Mr. Wise is also a 
member of the firm of Foster & Wise, street sprinklers. 

In 1876-7 Mr. Wise spent six months in Iowa, going there to examine 
lands — in four different counties — belonging to his father, which had been 
bought when Iowa was a territory. After his return from the west he taught 
school. 

In the presidential campaign of 1896 he bore a conspicuous part in 
advocacy of Democracy and was an active and firm supporter of the free- 
silver plank of the platform. For three, years, while residing at German 
Valley, he served as clerk of Washington township, and in 1886 was elected 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 435 

a member of the Morris county board of chosen freeholders. He is now 
chairman of the county election board. 

In 1878 Mr. Wise was united in marriage to Miss Ellen H. Van Dyke, 
and they have five children. Her father, Joseph Van Dyke, is the veteran 
auctioneer of northern New Jersey. He was born in Somerset county, 
March 26, 1834, a son of John and Margaret (Cunningham) Van Dyke, both 
of whom were natives of Somerset county, New Jersey. The former was a 
son of James Van Dyke, also a native of the same county. 

Joseph Van Dyke, who was the youngest of a family of six children, was 
reared to manhood in the county of his nativity, and gained a common-school 
education. His father died when he was a lad, and he began the battle of 
life for himself when only ten years of age. For four years he worked on a 
farm, and then followed shoemaking for two years, after which he was 
employed at carpentering for a short period. Through the succeeding eight 
years he was in the butchering business. In 1862 he removed to German 
Valley, Morris county, and in 1864 established a stage line between that 
place and Highbridge, conducting the same for two years, when he sold out. 
He next turned his attention to railroading for the New Jersey Central Rail- 
road Company, and later engaged in the machine business. Since 1879 he 
has been a resident of Morristown, and on his arrival here he accepted a 
position with the Voorhees Brothers, hardware dealers, having charge of the 
machinery department in their establishment until 1892, when he resigned 
his position. In 1886 he formed a partnership with his son-in-law, under 
the firm name of Van Dyke & Wise, and operations were begun as dealers in 
real estate, insurance and second-hand goods. They have been quite suc- 
cessful in this venture, their business bringing to them good financial returns. 
In his early manhood Mr. Van Dyke began auctioneering, and from that 
time until the present has continued in the business. He has cried sales 
throughout Morris and surrounding counties, and is said to be the oldest auc- 
tioneer in northern New Jersey. 

Mr. Van Dyke has always been a stanch Democrat, and has been hon- 
ored with local office. He served for five years as justice of the peace, and 
in 1895 was elected a member of the county board of chosen freeholders. In 
i860 he married Lydia Hoffman, and his children number four. He and his 
wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



WILLIAM E. YOUNG. 



A representative citizen and successful business man of Chester, Mr. 
Young was born in the village which is now his home, January 12, 1852, and 
is a son of Robert E. Young, deceased, whose birth occurred August 5, 1830. 



43G BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

The grandfather was Elias B. Young, who died during the infancy of his son 
Robert, so that we have no authentic history concerning the origin of the 
family. 

Robert E. Young learned the blacksmith's trade, under the direction of 
Bryant Stout, of Chester, and followed that pursuit here until 1853, when he 
removed to Ohio, locating in Cleveland. He remained in that city only two 
years and then went to the south, taking up his abode in Columbia, South 
Carolina, where he continued throughout the period of the Civil war. He 
then returned with his family to Chester, where his death occurred in the 
latter part of February, 1888. His wife bore the maiden name of Mary Ann 
Smith and was a daughter of David Smith. She still survives her husband. 
This worthy couple were the parents of seven children, namely: William 
E., of this sketch; Rosetta, wife of John Riggott, of Rockaway, New Jersey; 
Robert E., of Boonton, who wedded Margaret Anderson; Mary L. , who died 
in youth; Sarah Ann, wife of Dell Benjamin, of Hoboken, New Jersey; Doug- 
las, of Boonton, who married Lydia Skellenger; and Lafayette S., of Wash- 
ington, New Jersey, who married Anna Arndt. 

William E. Young acquired a fair knowledge of the King's English in 
the common schools, which he attended until sixteen years of age, when he 
began life for himself as a farm hand, serving in that capacity for two years. 
He was then employed as a stationary engineer at the mines of the Chester 
Iron Company for one year and spent the succeeding year in Newark in a 
milk store. On leaving that position he returned to Chester, where he was 
employed for one year in carting iron ore for the Chester Iron Company, 
after which he was placed in charge of the hoisting engine and performed his 
duties to the company in that connection until the financial panic of 1873, 
when work was suspended by the company and he was forced to seek other 
employment. He then turned his attention to blacksmithing and spent three 
years in business with his father at Ralston, during which time he completely 
mastered the business. He next opened a shop at Chester Cross Roads, 
where he carried on business for three years, when he entered the employ of 
the Cooper Iron Mining Company, where he passed a similar period. In 
1883 he located his shop in Chester, where he has since resided, and from 
the public he has received a liberal patronage. 

Mr. Young has never been unmindful of the duties of citizenship, and is 
ever ready to promote any cause which tends to advance the general welfare. 
He has been identified with the town government of Chester, in the capaci- 
ties of town clerk, town assessor, and town committeeman, resigning the 
last named office at the end of a year of service. He has served several 
terms on the board of registry and elections, and was endorsed by 
his party — the Democratic — for the office of county collector in 1897, but 



.*ft""*%!Si 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 437 

was defeated through an agreement entered into by a "tie board," to give 
the collectorship to the Republicans and some other office to the Democrats. 

Mr. Young was married October 8, 1872, to Miss Lydia Jane, daughter 
of Andrew J. and Mary Etta (Patrey) Stout. Her father was born in Chester, 
October 30, 1827, and was a son of Thomas Bryant Stout, who was born 
October 14, 1785, while his death occurred July 14, 1861. He married 
Deborah Terry, who was born December 13, 1789, and died September 13, 
1830. Andrew J. Stout was the seventh son and thirteenth child in his 
father's family, and the others who still survive are William N., of Henry, 
Illinois, and Julia H., who is living in Wyoming, that state. In his early 
life Andrew J. Stout was one of the leading and substantial citizens of Ches- 
ter. He was very enterprising and successful in business, widely known 
throughout his section of the state as a leading auctioneer and popular citi- 
zen, winning the respect of all with whom he came in contact. He also 
conducted hotels at Flanders and Chester Cross Roads, and out of these 
various business enterprises made considerable money. His children were: 
Mrs. Young; Bryant, deceased; John P., of Chester; Peter S., deceased; 
and Andrew J., of Chester. 

Of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Young five children have been born as 
follows : Edward G. , who was born February 18, 1874, and died in infancy; 
Charles D., born August 5, 1875; Mary R. , born October 2, 1877; Ada S., 
born November 16, 1879; and Pierson O, born November 4, 1883. Mr. 
Young holds membership in two fraternities, the Odd Fellows and Masonic. 
He is a substantial, worthy citizen, true to all the duties of both public and 
private life. 



ROSEVEAR BROTHERS & COMPANY. 

William Rosevear, the father of the Rosevear Brothers, prominent busi- 
ness men of Morristown, was born in England and acquired his education in 
the schools of his native land. In 1868 he crossed the Atlantic to America, 
taking up his residence in Dover, Morris county, where he engaged in gen- 
eral merchandising. He afterward sold his store and removed to Pennsyl- 
vania, but after a short time came to Morristown, where he has since been 
associated with his sons in business as one of the stockholders in the firm of 
Rosevear Brothers & Company. He was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Burt, who was born in Cornwall, England, January 14, 1833, a daughter of 
Henry and Patience (Rodgers) Burt. To Mr. and Mrs. Rosevear were born 
six children: John H; Elizabeth A., who became the wife of William 
Letcher, and died in 1886, leaving five children, — William, Albert, Charles 
E., Edith Herbert and Annie R. ; Charles R. , who is identified with the firm 



438 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

of Thurston & Braidich, of New York city; E. William; Phillipa J., wife 
of W. K. Muchmore, of Morristown; and L. Ellen, at home. The parents 
are both intelligent members of the Methodist Episcopal church in Morristown. 

John H. Rosevear, the senior member of the firm of Rosevear Brothers 
& Company, came with his parents to America in 1868, and October 15, 
1873, was married to Miss Eugenia Green, of Camden, Maine, daughter of 
Alexander Green, a native of Scotland. They now have two children, — Mary 
E. and John H. 

E. William Rosevear, the younger brother, who is interested in the firm 
of Rosevear Brothers & Company, married Nellie L. Lloyd, of Port Oram, 
and they have one child, Morris. In his social relations, William Rosevear 
is a Mason and is held in high regard by his brethren of the fraternity. In 
his political predilections, John H. Rosevear is a Democrat, taking an active 
interest in politics, yet has never been an office-seeker. At the present time 
he is serving as president of the board of health of Morristown. 

Both gentlemen occupy very prominent positions in business circles, 
and the industry they control is one of the most important in this section of 
the state. The welfare of a community depends upon its commercial activ- 
ity, and such an establishment as the factory of Rosevear Brothers & Company 
not only redounds to the success of the stockholders but also contributes 
largely to the general good by furnishing employment to a large force of opera- 
tives. The brothers and their father are now associated in the manufacture 
of trousers and overalls, and their business is accounted one of the most 
important in the city. The firm was organized in 1887, and the old mill, 
enlarged and remodeled, constitutes the plant. They began operations with 
only six machines, but as their trade has increased they have been forced to 
constantly enlarge their facilities and are now running sixty machines and 
employing seventy-five operatives in the factory. They also employ four 
traveling salesmen and their goods are shipped throughout the New England 
and Middle states. Their capacity is three hundred dozen pair of overalls 
and trousers per week, and these find a ready market, owing to the excellent 
workmanship and the high reputation for reliability which the house sus- 
tains. No industrial concern in Morristown is of more benefit to the city, 
owing to the large force of men and women who are employed. Good 
wages are paid and the employees know that fidelity to duty not only wins 
the confidence of the firm but also means promotion as opportunity offers. 
A well-merited success has attended the enterprise from the beginning, and 
the members of the company are all men of good business ability, enterprise 
and keen discrimination, whose care and foresight in business have brought 
them prosperity. They are ever just and fair in their treatment of employees 
and have strict regard for the ethics of commercial life. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 439 



CHARLES A. MONKS. 

An honored veteran of the Civil war, and a well known resident of New- 
foundland, Morris county, Charles A. Monks was born in Passaic county, New 
Jersey, on the 3d of April, 1842. His grandfather, a native of England, 
founded the family on American soil, and, noting the growing oppression of 
the British government in their treatment of the colonies, he became imbued 
with the idea that America should be a free and independent nation, and 
when the war of the Revolution was inaugurated he valiantly aided in the 
struggle for liberty. This Revolutionary patriot had three sons: James, who 
located in the state of New York; John, who took up his residence at Monks- 
ville, New Jersey; and William, who became a resident of Passaic county. 
The father of our subject also bore the name of William, being so called in 
honor of his father. He was born in 1803, learned the blacksmith's trade 
and followed that pursuit throughout his entire life. He wedded Miss Mary 
T. Fleming, daughter of James Fleming. Her death occurred in 1846, and 
Mr. Monks passed away in 1873. Their children were Sidney, who was 
kiiled in battle during the Civil war; James, also deceased, and Charles A. 

In the common schools near his home Charles A. Monks acquired his 
education, and alternated his work at his books by his labor in the fields, 
thus aiding in the cultivation of the home farm. In his youth he learned 
something of mechanics as a practical machinist, but without completing 
the trade, having decided tc become a house painter. He served an appren- 
ticeship at the latter calling and was working along that line when the 
attack of the south upon the north aroused his patriotic nature and he offered 
his services to the government in protection of the Union, which his great- 
grandfather had helped to establish. He enlisted first at Paterson, in John- 
son's company, but for some reason that command was not equipped and 
started to the front within a reasonable time, as he thought, and his impa- 
tience at the delay and anxiety to get into the field led Mr. Monks, together 
with six others from the same neighborhood, to desert the Johnson organi- 
zation and enlist in Captain H. C. Bartlett's company of the Seventh New 
Jersey Volunteers. The command left Trenton for the field in the autumn of 
1 86 1 and took part in the Peninsular campaign, which continued until the 
spring of 1862. Company C participated in all the battles of the army of 
the Potomac from Bristow Station and Second Bull Run to Appomattox, 
except the battle of Antietam, and Mr. Monks was with his company in every 
engagement. On the expiration of his three-years term he re-enlisted as a 
veteran and served until the stars and stripes floated victoriously over the 
capital of the southern Confederacy. 

In July, 1864, while endeavoring to escape capture, he was severely 



440 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

wounded, but otherwise escaped uninjured and enjoyed good health during 
the greater part of his service, but only he and H. S. Condit, of the seven 
who enlisted at Caldwell, lived to see the 'surrender of Lee, the others hav- 
ing deserted or were wounded or killed. He entered the service as a private 
and left with the rank of first sergeant of his company, was always found at 
his post of duty and endured all the hardships and privations of war, with 
the exception of the horrors of a rebel prison, and to avoid that experience 
he resolved to ask no quarter of the enemy and either escape capture or die 
in the attempt. The Seventh New Jersey was one of the regiments that 
suffered great losses on the battle-field. It was well drilled, and made up of 
men of great courage and bravery, and at the battle of Chancellorsville it 
took five stands of colors, single-handed, and captured more prisoners than 
there were men in the regiment. 

When the war was over and the country no longer needed his services, 
Mr. Monks turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, which he followed 
during the greater part of the time until 1893, when he engaged in the hotel 
business in Newfoundland. In the early 'jos he went to Nebraska and saw 
much of the "wild west " that is now only a matter of history, owing to the 
rapid encroachments of civilization. In 1892 he crossed the continent to the 
Pacific coast, visiting Seattle, Tacoma and other cities, with some view of 
locating in that part of the country; but upon more mature consideration he 
decided to remain in New Jersey, and Morris county, therefore, still numbers 
him among her prominent, influential and representative business men. 

In 1866 Mr. Monks was united in marriage to Miss Susan Bigelow, and 
to them have been born eight children: Luella, wife of William Bross; J. 
Elmer, who married Susie Litz ; Mary E. ; Annie; Milton, who was born 
June 28, 1877, ar >d who died May 8, 1898; and Charles G., Lena and Etta, 
all at home. Mr. Monks has given his attention principally to the interests 
of his home and business, yet has never failed in the faithful performance of 
his duties of citizenship, and has capably served in the offices of coroner 
and constable of Passaic county. His political support is given the men 
and measures of the Republican party, and to every interest or measure 
which he believes will prove of public benefit he gives the same earnest 
service and loyal devotion that characterized his career when on southern 
battle-fields he followed the stars and stripes to victory. 



GEORGE E. HALL. 



A prominent plumber of Chatham, Mr. Hall is a native of Morris county, 
his birth having occurred a short distance from Morristown, on the 7th of 
December, 1855, his parents being Stephen G. and Sarah A. (Lish) Hall, 



1128301 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 441 

both of whom were likewise born in Morris county. The grandfather, James 
Hall, was born in Orange county, New York, where he followed the vocation 
of a farmer until the early part of the nineteenth century, when he moved to 
Morris county and here resided until his death, at an advanced age, in 1878. 
He was of Dutch ancestry. He married Miss Elizabeth Arnold, also a native 
of Orange county, New York, and two children were born to them, namely: 
Stephen and William, the latter of whom is living in Hunterdon county, New 
Jersey. Stephen learned the carpenter trade and followed the same success- 
fully at Morristown and vicinity during his life. He died in 1874, survived 
by his wife and the following children: James S., George E., Carrie L. , 
Emma J., Laura A. and Etta. 

George E. Hall was reared under the parental roof and received his 
literary education in the public schools of Morristown, after leaving which he 
came to Madison and served an apprenticeship in the plumbing trade. In 
1890 he located at Chatham, where he opened a hardware and crockery store, 
in connection with a plumbing department. 

In his social relations Mr. Hall is a popular member of the Junior Order 
of American Mechanics and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, both of 
Chatham. Politically, he is a firm advocate of the principles and policies of 
the Republican party. He is an honorable, conscientious and industrious 
gentleman and richly deserves the high esteem and consideration in which he 
is held by his fellow men. 

The marriage of Mr. Hall was solemnized in 1883, when he was united 
to Miss Emma Adeline Pierson, a native of Chatham and a daughter of Henry 
W. and Melissa (Ward) Pierson, representing one of the old families of Mor- 
ris county, of which mention is made in another part of this work. Four 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hall, namely: James E., Russell 
B., Nelson A. and Carrie L. 



GEORGE E. REEVE. 

This honored resident of Morristown is a descendent of one of the old fam- 
ilies of the county, the members of which came to Morris county at an early 
date and were supposed to have originated from French stock. The father 
of G. E. Reeve, named Fenwick Nelson Reeve, was born July 24, 1827, 
and was a carpenter and builder, also carrying on farming to some extent. 
He married Miss Elizabeth Bonnell, a daughter of Henry C. Bonnell, whose 
ancestors came from New England and were originally of English extraction. 
He was born in Warren county, November 10, 1804, and came to Morris 
county at an early age. He married Miss Mary Dolan, who died July 3, 
1882, aged eighty-four years; and Henry C. Bonnell died February 20, 1890. 



442 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Fenwick Taylor Reeve, the grandfather of G. E. Reeve, was born in 
Morris county, February i, 1790, and followed farming. He married Miss 
Rachel Woodruff, and they became the parents of nine children, both 
parents living to the good old age of eighty-seven and eighty-five, respect- 
ively. By the union of F. N. Reeve and Elizabeth Bonnell were born eight 
children, as follows: Mary E. ; Rachel A., who married Richard Tregise; 
David B. ; George E. ; William K. ; Minnie, who married Lucius Barber; 
Lutie, who married Addis Ridner, and Grace. 

Mr. G. E. Reeve, our subject, was born in Morris county, New Jersey, 
on the 25th of March, 1863, and spent his boyhood days on the farm and 
attended the district schoo', later taking up the carpenter's trade, with his 
father at Morristown, securing work as a journeyman. In 1889 he formed a 
partnership with John R. Burr, under the name of Reeve & Burr, doing all 
kinds of building and contracting in the building line. In the year 1895 the 
firm bought out the entire plant and factory of Greenwood & Hayo, and 
have since carried on all kinds of building mill work in addition to their 
already extensive business, making the largest and most complete establish- 
ment of its kind in the county. The most notable of their contracts were 
those for the New Jersey state hospital for the insane at Morris Plains, this 
state, built in 1896-S, and numerous palatial residences in and about Mor- 
ristown. 

Mr. Reeve was united in marriage with Miss Mary Brant, March 19, 
1890. She is the daughter of William and Emma (Lindsley) Brant, both of 
Morristown, and she died the following November; and December 31, 1896, 
Mr. Reeve married Miss Emma A. Fraser, a daughter of Caldwell and Elize 
(Lawrence) Fraser, formerly of New York city. By the latter union there 
is one daughter, born November 14, 1897, and named Madeolin. 

In his social relations Mr. Reeve is a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
connected with Cincinnati Lodge, No. 3, of Morristown, and he is also an 
active member of the volunteer fire department. 



JOHN R. BURR. 

One of the reliable business men of Morristown, engaged in contracting 
and building, was born in Morris county, on the 2d of August, 1861, a son of 
David A. and Jane E. (Chapman) Burr. Tradition says that the Burr family 
originated in Germany and was founded in America at an early day. The 
father of our subject was born in Morris county, in 181 2, and was a son of 
David Burr, a native of Chester county, Pennsylvania. David A. Burr was 
a blacksmith by trade and one of the worthy citizens of the community, hon- 
orable in his dealings and faithful to his duties in all the relations of life. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 443 

He served in the Union army during the Civil war, enlisting, in 1 86 1 , in the 
Twenty-seventh Regiment of New Jersey Volunteers, and re-enlisting in 1862, 
as a member of the Thirty-third New Jersey Infantry, serving with that com- 
mand until the close of the war. His death occurred at the age of sixty-three 
years, and his wife, who was a daughter of John and Nancy (Cole) Chapman, 
passed away in 1876. They were the parents of seven children: James A., 
of Chester, New Jersey; Joseph E., of Succasunna; George B., of Dover; 
Charles Y. , of Baker City, Oregon; Jennie, wife of William A. Daly, of Los 
Angeles, California; Fannie C, wife of Theodore P. Wagner, of Portland, 
Oregon; and John R. 

The last named spent his youth in the country until seventeen years of 
age and then began learning the carpenter's trade with his brother, in Ches- 
ter, New Jersey. For six years he remained at that place and then removed 
to Rockaway, New Jersey, where he continued to make his home until 1 88 1 , 
since which time he has been a resident of Morristown. Here he engaged in 
business as a journeyman for three years, then began contracting and build- 
ing on his own account, and subsequently became a member of the firm of 
Reeve & Burr. These gentlemen enjoy a liberal share of the public patron- 
age in their line, for their excellent workmanship, their promptness and their 
fidelity to the terms of a contract have secured them an excellent business 
which is constantly increasing in importance and volume. Many of the sub- 
stantial structures of the city stand as monuments to their thrift, skill and 
handiwork. 

Mr. Burr was married in Somerville, New Jersey, on the 3d of June, 
1882, the lady of his choice being Miss Sallie O. Steele, daughter of Cornel- 
ius and Lydia A. (Bird) Steele. Their children are David A., Lydia A. and 
George F. 

Mr. Burr has been a member of the board of fire wardens of Morristown 
for seven years and is a citizen who manifests a deep and active interest in 
all that pertains to the welfare of the community. He is a popular member 
of the Masonic fraternity, affiliating with Cincinnati Lodge No. 3, at Morris- 
town, and is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is 
a man of earnest purpose, upright principles and indefatigable energy, true 
to his duties in all the relations of life. 



BARTHOLOMEW M. HOWLEY, M. D. 

Dr. Howley, a successful medical practitioner of Morristown, was born 
in the city of Greenock, Scotland, June 15, 1871. His early mental training 
was acquired in the parochial schools of his native place, and he came to 
America at the age of fourteen years with his parents, James and Ellen 



444 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

(Maxwell) Howley. His father was born near the town of Sligo, in the 
county of Sligo, Ireland, and his mother was a native of the city of Greenock, 
Scotland. 

Upon coming to America James Howley settled in New York city, 
where he spent the remainder of his life, passing away February 16, 1895. 
His faithful wife survives him, residing still in New York city. Dr. Howley 
read medicine in the office of Dr. T. W. Ring, of that city, for some time, 
after which he entered the New York University, in the class of 1891, and 
graduated in 1894. Next he entered the New York Lying-in Hospital, 
where he operated as an assistant for some time; then he became house 
surgeon at the St. Francis Hospital in New York city, where he practiced 
during the year 1895, and finally, in 1896, he came to Morristown, where he 
has begun a successful practice of his profession. 

He is a member of the Morris County Medical Society. In religion he 
is a communicant of the Roman Catholic church, holding his membership in 
the local Church of the Assumption at Morristown. He is also a member of 
the Washingtonian Council, of the Knights of Columbus and of St. Mar- 
garet's Council of the Catholic Benevolent Legion, both the last mentioned 
being at Morristown. 



RICHARD H. STEPHENS. 



A resident of Mount Olive, New Jersey, Mr. Stephens is one of the most 
prominent and prosperous farmers of his township. A review of his life and 
ancestry gives the following facts. 

The Stephens family in America was founded by Richard Stephens, who 
landed in this country previous to the Revolutionary war, and who was a 
valiant soldier in that war, serving with an official rank. He was the owner 
of three farms near Budd's Lake, New Jersey, one of which is the homestead 
owned and occupied by the subject of this sketch. Richard Stephens mar- 
ried Dorothy Landon and became the father of nine children, one of whom, 
Richard, born October 17, 1779, was the grandfather of Richard H. The 
second Richard Stephens was a militia captain during " training days " in 
New Jersey, and was, like his father, a worthy and honored citizen. He 
married Mary Bell, and died in the year 1820. The children of their union 
were as follows: George W. ; John B. ; and Mary, who married John Skin- 
ner and emigrated to Princeton, Illinois, where she died. 

John B. Stephens, the father of Richard H., was ushered into life in 
1 810, lived to a good old age, and passed away in 1888. He was quiet and 
unassuming, without political ambition, and with a character in every way 
above reproach. A devoted and consistent Christian, he was a deacon of 





c 2>\\~«*... 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 445 

the Baptist church and for fifty years its clerk. His wife was before her 
marriage Miss Permelia Drake, she being a daughter of Sylvanus Drake, and 
their only child is Richard H., whose name graces this article. 

Richard H. Stephens was born May 12, 1844, at the old homestead 
which he now owns and where he has passed the whole of his life, devoting 
his energies to the pursuits common to his worthy ancestors. 

Mr. Stephens has been connected with public matters in an official 
capacity almost continuously from his twenty-first birthday. He has filled 
«very office in the township except that of freeholder; is the present town 
clerk, elected by fifty majority in a strong Democratic township; has been a 
member of the board of education for nearly thirty years and is now its pres- 
ident; and he was appointed postmaster upon the establishment of the Mount 
Olive post-office, his first commission having been issued by Postmaster-Gen- 
eral Creswell, under General Grant's administration. His father before him 
was a Republican, and it is in the ranks of this party that he has been a 
worker, and from Republican hands that he has been shown preference. 
His ancestors were Whigs. 

The religious faith of the Stephens family has been that of the Baptist 
church, and from this faith Richard H. Stephens has not departed. He has 
long been a prominent member of the church, and he is now serving as clerk 
and Sunday-school superintendent. 

Mr. Stephens was married February 14, 1872, to Carrie Smith, daughter 
of Zachariah Smith, of Peapack. Her mother's maiden name was Elizabeth 
Stevens. Mrs. Stephens is the youngest of the family, her brothers and sis- 
ters in order of birth being as follows: Joseph; Margaret, wife of Stephen 
Babbitt; Mollie, wife of Joseph Huffman, of Lebanon, New Jersey. Mr. and 
Mrs. Stephens have two children, — John B. and Elizabeth. 



DANIEL S. VOORHEES. 



The efficient deputy county clerk of Morris county, and an able attorney 
at law of Morristown, Mr. Voorhees has attained a high place in the public 
regard, owing to his ability and fidelity in official service and his enterprise 
and reliability in the affairs of private life. He was born in Somerset county. 
New Jersey, on the 15th of August, 1852, and is a son of Daniel S. and 
Mary L. (Doty) Voorhees. His father was born in Somerville, New Jersey, in 
1808, followed the occupation of farming as a life work, and died in 1878. 
His wife passed away in 1894. Their children were William, of Dover; 
Tobias, a resident of Newark ; Mary, wife of Seaman Williams, of Plainfield, 
New Jersey; Anna L. , wife of William H. Williams, of Elizabeth; and 
Sarah, wife of William Vroom, also of Elizabeth. 



446 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HIST OR 1. 

Mr. Voorhees, of this sketch, spent the days of his boyhood and youth in 
Elizabeth and acquired his education in the Morrow street school. He has 
also learned many valuable lessons in the school of experience and through 
reading and observation, and is to-day a well informed man on all matters 
of general interest. He entered upon his business career at the early age 
of fourteen years as a salesman in a hardware store of Elizabeth, being thus 
engaged for two and a half years. He then removed to Morristown, in the 
year 1870, and the following year accepted a clerical position in the office of 
Richard Speer, then county clerk. He was appointed to the position of 
deputy clerk in 1876 by William McCarty, and was reappointed by his suc- 
cessor, M. S. Condit, in 1878, and again by the same clerk in 1883. Five 
years later he was again chosen for the position of deputy by E. B. Mott, 
and was by him reappointed in 1893, so that he is the present incumbent. 
Thus for twenty-one consecutive years he has filled the office, discharging 
his duties with marked aptitude and faithfulness. He has the unqualified 
confidence of the public and fully merits the esteem in which he is uniformly 
held. 

During the years of his public service Mr. Voorhees, by a systematic 
course of reading, has so familiarized himself with the statutes of the state 
that upon application and examination he was admitted to the bar on the 
24th of February, 1896, and in April, of the same year, was appointed 
master in chancery. 

Mr. Voorhees is one of the leaders of Republican thought and action in 
Morris county and has been a member of the executive committee of the 
county for many years. He is now secretary of the third-ward committee. 
He was very active in his championship of Hon. Mahlon Pitney for congress 
and was influential in a large degree in securing him the splendid pluralities 
which he received in 1894 and 1896. In 1898 he was elected county clerk 
of Morris county by a majority of one thousand and twenty-eight, running 
over two hundred ahead of his ticket and defeating James C. Porter, the 
Democratic nominee. He is an excellent organizer, who marshals the polit- 
ical forces with the precision of a general and at the same tfme with the per- 
suasive force of a diplomat. He is certainly well fitted for leadership in the 
realms of politics and is accounted a most valued factor in Republican circles. 
For five years he acceptably served as clerk of his township. He does all in 
his power for the welfare and advancement of the community, and during 
his two terms as chief of the fire department of Morristown greatly improved 
the service by purchasing a new La France engine and a fire-patrol wagon 
and introducing the new Gamewell fire-alarm system. He has been a mem- 
ber of the board of fire wardens for nineteen years. 

In his social connections Mr. Voorhees is an Odd Fellow and is also a 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 447 

member of the Order of Red Men. On the 18th of January, 1874, he was 
united in marriage to Miss Frances L. White, a daughter of William White. 
They have a wide acquaintance in Morristown and the circle of their friends 
is constantly widening. 



PHILIP JAQUI. 

A prominent grain merchant and highly respected citizen of Morristown 
is Mr. Jaqui, who was born at Morris Plains, New Jersey, on the iithof 
October, 1867, his parents being Frederick W. and Johannah S. (Link) 
Jaqui, both of whom were natives of Germany. Frederick W. Jaqui emi- 
grated to America when a young man and located first in New York city, 
whence he moved to Livingston, New Jersey, and then, about the year 1863, 
he went to Morris Plains, Morris county, where he purchased a farm, subse- 
quently selling the same to the state of New Jersey, and upon it is now 
situated the New Jersey State Hospital. In 1865 Mr. Jaqui became inter- 
ested, with Mr. Johnson, in a flouring mill at Morris Plains, and later be- 
came sole proprietor of the plant, which he operated until 1888, when he 
was succeeded by his son, Philip, and his son-in-law, George Neff, the former 
of whom is now conducting the business. Upon his retirement from active 
life, the father of our subject removed to Morristown and there passed his 
remaining days, his death occurring in 1892, at the age of sixty-six years. 
His widow survives him and resides in this city, at this writing (1897) being 
in her seventy-first year. To Mr. and Mrs. Jaqui the following children were 
born : F. William, Eliza, Minnie, Hannah, Louise, Emma, Fredrica and 
Philip. Although the father came to this country a poor man, by thrift, 
industry and perseverance he acquired a comfortable competency and was 
regarded as an excellent business man, one of undoubted integrity and 
thoroughly honest and upright in all his dealings. 

Philip Jaqui received his fundamental education in the public schools of 
Morris Plains and Morristown, and in Dr. Fitch's Normal School, at Nor- 
walk, Connecticut, supplementing his literary studies by a course in Cole- 
man's Business College, of Newark, New Jersey. His practical business 
career began in 1888, when the firm of Jaqui & Company succeeded to his 
father's milling interests at Morris Plains, and continued to operate the same 
until 1892, when Mr. Jaqui moved to Morristown and established the firm of 
Jaqui & Company, dealers in flour, feed and grain. His elevator has a 
capacity for one hundred and fifty cars ; his business has gradually increased 
until it has assumed large proportions, and, like his father, he has given the 
strongest evidence of unusual business ability, which, combined with his 
energy and probity, has been the factor of his success. 



44S BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Mr. Jaqui has never taken an active part in political affairs, although he 
is keenly alive to the welfare of the community and uses his right of elective 
franchise, and has never sought political preferment, rather choosing the 
career of a business man. In his social relations he is a- member of the 
Masonic fraternity, having been raised to the sublime degree of Master 
Mason in Cincinnati Lodge, No. 3, at Morristown. 

In 1894 occurred the marriage of'Mr. Jaqui; in which year he was united 
to Miss Catherine Cries, of Roseville, New Jersey. 



TIMOTHY F. DRISCOLL. 

As a young man of progressive ideas, enterprising spirit and laudable 
ambition, Mr. Driscoll is, accordingly, a valued addition to the business circles 
of Madison, where he is engaged in general merchandising. His birth occurred 
in this place on the 22d of May, 1866, his parents being William and Cath- 
erine Driscoll, both of whom were natives of county Clare, Ireland. Bidding 
adieu to friends and home, they crossed the ocean to America in 1863, taking 
up their residence in Madison. The father was a gardener by occupation and 
engaged in that line of business up to the time of his death, which occurred 
December 30, 1896. The mother is still living. In their family were the 
following named: Timothy F. , William, Michael, Catherine, Thomas and 
Daniel. 

In his youth Mr. Driscoll was surrounded by good home influences and 
was trained to habits which fitted him for life's duties. He was educated in 
St. Vincent's parochial school, where he was graduated in 1880, and on the 
completion of the course he entered the employ of Paulman Brothers, in the 
capacity of clerk, continuing in their service- for twelve years. In this time 
he completely mastered the principles and practices of mercantile life, and 
on the expiration of that period he entered into partnership with John J. 
Flaugher, under the firm name of Driscoll & Flaugher, a connection that was 
continued for three years, when Mr. Driscoll bought out his partner's interest 
and has since been alone in business. He not alone carries a large, complete 
and well-assorted stock of general merchandise, but also deals in hay and 
grain. He has built up a good business and is a thoroughgoing, reliable 
business man, fully deserving of the liberal patronage he receives. He is 
also a director in the Central New Jersey Building & Loan Association. 

Mr. Driscoll was married October 22, 1897, to Miss Susan C. O'Don- 
nell, a native of Madison and a daughter of John O'Donnell. Socially, he 
is a member of the Independent Order of Foresters, the Catholic Benevolent 
League and the Young Men's Catholic Club. He also belongs to Hose 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 449 

Company No. i, of the Madison fire department, and is a young man whose 
deep interest in the welfare of his town is manifest in the liberal support 
which he gives to all measures for the public good. 



THOMAS MALLEY. 



For many years Mr. Malley has been engaged in contracting and build- 
ing in Morristown. He was born in Basking Ridge, Somerset county, New 
Jersey, August 26, 1852. His father, Peter Malley, a native of county 
Meath, Ireland, was born in 1827, and married Miss Mary Dolan, a native 
of county Kildare, same country. His death occurred October 12, 1892, 
but his widow is still living and makes her home in Morristown. They were 
the parents of the following named: Thomas, of this sketch; Elizabeth, 
wife of William Mooney, Kate and Annie. 

Thomas Malley acquired a fair education in the parochial schools of 
Morristown, and at the age of fifteen secured employment at Washington 
Headquarters, where he spent one season. He then began learning the 
mason's trade of the firm of Shauger & Merritt, and served a three-years 
apprenticeship, after which he worked as a journeyman. In 1879 he was 
appointed to the position on the police force, by Mayor H. W. Miller, and 
served in that capacity two years. He then resumed work at his trade, and 
in 1882 he entered into partnership with Thomas Dempsey and John Cooney, 
under the firm name of Malley, Dempsey & Cooney, mason builders of Mor- 
ristown. Thoughout its existence the firm enjoyed a very liberal patron- 
age and took the contracts for the erection of some of the best buildings of 
the city, including the McAlpin block, the Morris County Savings Bank, the 
building of the Young Men's Christian Association, St. Mary's school, the 
the Farrelly and Welsh store buildings, and the residences of George G. Kip,. 
George S. Wylie, E. E. Goggenshall, Giles E. Taintor, Philip Livingston, — 
all of Morristown, — together with the beautiful homes of R. A. McCurdy, 
C. M. Marsh, R. A. Granniss and R. H. McCurdy, of Morris Plains. These 
are but some of the many excellent structures erected under the supervision 
of Thomas Malley, and they stand in unmistakable testimony of his superior 
skill and ability in the vocation which he has chosen as a life work. His 
labors have also been sought in Harrison, New York, Llewellyn Park and 
Summit, where he has done some very creditable work. In 1897 the part- 
nership of Malley, Dempsey & Cooney was dissolved and our subject has 
since been alone in business. 

When twenty-five years of age Mr. Malley was united in marriage, in 
Morristown, to Miss Margaret Maher, daughter of James and Mary (Hackett) 
Maher. Mr. Malley belongs to the Young Men's Catholic Association, the 



3a 



450 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Catholic Benevolent Legion, the Order of Red Men and the Knights of Honor, 
in all of which he is regarded as a very popular and valued member. He is 
also a member of the board of fire wardens. 

He has taken an active part in political affairs in the town and county 
for the past twenty years, and is an earnest and loyal Republican. For six 
years he was a member of the common council of Morristown, during four 
years of the time was chairman of the committee on streets, and upon the 
resignation of Mayor Werts, who assumed the office of governor of New 
Jersey, Mr. Malley became the acting mayor by virtue of the position he held 
under the city government, and continued as chief executive of Morristown 
for a period of eight months, discharging the duties pertaining thereto with 
signal ability and to the entire satisfaction of the public. He was a member 
of the board of chosen freeholders from Morristown for two years, and took 
a prominent part in the general movement to procure macadamized roads. 
He is now holding the office of county superintendent of roads, and in this 
position, as in all others that he has been called upon to fill, he has dis- 
charged his duties with marked promptness and fidelity. He is a public- 
spirited and progressive citizen and the community regards him as one of its 
most valued representatives. 



STEPHEN H. CONDIT. 



The subject of this sketch is one of the leading and wealthy agricultur- 
ists of Morris county, living at Troy Hills. He was born June 13, 1830, and 
is the eldest son of the late John O. Condit, who was born in Orange, New 
Jersey, in September, 1797, and came to what was then "Troy," in 1800, 
with his father, Stephen Condit. The latter, who died in 1816, married 
Polly Ogden, and their children were: Swain A., who spent his last years 
in Boonton, and left a son, Isaac; and John O., the father of our subject. 
He married Elizabeth Smith, daughter of Benjamin Smith, and they had a 
family of three sons and one daughter, as follows: S. Hobart; Benjamin 
Smith; Susan M., wife of Charles F. Ogden; and John H. The father of 
this family was a very prominent and influential citizen, held in the highest 
esteem throughout the community. He died in 1866 and his wife passed 
away in 1839. 

Stephen Hobart Condit, of this review, has been one of the leading' 
farmers of Hanover township for thirty years. His greatest successes were 
attained during the period of twenty-five years immediately succeeding the 
war of the Rebellion and placed him in a position of independence, finan- 
cially, in which few farmers are found. He has a very pleasant home, pre- 
sided Over by the wife who for almost forty years has traveled life's journey 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 451 

by his side. He was married December 29, i860, to Miss Mary Josephine 
Ogden, daughter of Farrand and Hily A. (Mitchell) Ogden. The children of 
this union are: Elizabeth Smith, wife of Stephen H. Mitchell, by whom 
she has five children — Mabel J., Ruth, Irene, Hobart Condit and Susan Mar- 
garet; John O. , deceased; Judd, who is living at home with his parents;, 
and Harry Hobart, who married Julia A. Osborne and resides in Newark. 

Mr. Condit is a recognized leader in matters pertaining to the welfare 
of his community, whether educational, political or religious, and his advice 
is sought and valued for its wisdom and sincerity. He is prominent in the 
ranks of the Republican party, but has persistently refused to become a can- 
didate for public office. He holds membership in the Parsippany Presbyterian 
church, and is filling the office of church trustee and elder. His well spent 
life makes him one of the valued factors in the social, church and public life 
of the community. 

BENJAMIN S. CONDIT. 

Devoting his energies to agricultural pursuits at Troy Hills, Mr. Condit 
is a representative of one of the honored old families of Morris county. He 
was born February 15, 1832, on the old Condit homestead, now the prop- 
erty of his brother, John H. Condit, and is a son of John O. Condit. His 
childhood was passed in the neighborhood of his birthplace, and after 
attending the public schools he matriculated in Princeton College, where he 
pursued a thorough course of study and was graduated in the class of 1854. 
The first three years after his graduation he taught a select school in Troy 
Hills and was a very capable educator, but he preferred the independence 
and freedom of farm life to the confinement of the school-room, and accord- 
ingly has since devoted his energy and industry to the cultivation and 
improvement of his land, which constitutes one of the fine farms of Hanover 
township. 

He is also deeply interested in all movements affecting the weal or woe 
of the county, and does all in his power to promote its interests. He is a 
man of firm convictions and decided opinions, founded on sound judgment, 
and is therefore a leader in public thought and is active in moulding public 
sentiment. His fidelity to the duties of citizenship makes him one of the 
substantial residents of his township, and in the history of his native county 
he well deserves honorable mention. 

On the 29th of October, 1867, in Newark, was celebrated the marriage 
of Benjamin Smith Condit and Miss Sarah DeHart, a daughter of Charles 
and, Sarah (Cobb) DeHart. They now have two children: Charles and Jean- 
nette. The family is one of prominence in the community* and in the Pres- 
byterian church they hold membership. 



452 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HLSTOBY. 

JOHN H. CONDIT. 

John H. Condit, of Troy Hills, fully sustains the high reputation which 
has always been maintained by his family during their long connection with 
Morris county and its interests. He is the youngest son of the late John O. 
Condit and was born on the 7th of November, 1835, spending the days of 
childhood and youth upon the farm which he now owns. During the winter 
season he attended the schools near by, and through the summer months he 
aided in the cultivation and improvement of his father's farm until he had 
attained an age sufficient to begin farming on his own account. His entire 
life has been devoted to agricultural pursuits and he is a wide-awake, pro- 
gressive farmer, but manages his interests after the most improved methods 
of modern farming. 

On the 7th of November, 1869, Mr. Condit was united in marriage to 
Miss Carrie Bostedo, daughter of John M. and Sarah (Egbert) Bostedo. 
Their children are Howell and Bessie. Mr. Condit is one of the unswerving 
supporters of the Republican party in Hanover township, and has filled the 
office of justice of the peace, discharging his duties with marked fidelity and 
ability. Mrs. Condit is a member of the Presbyterian church at Parsippany, 
where the family attend worship. 



EDGAR C. HOPPING. 



The family of which this gentleman is a representative is one of the old- 
est in Morris county and was in all probability founded in America by John 
Hopping, who located at Elizabeth, New Jersey, where, as the records show, 
he took up a tract of land. He married Miss Mary Primrose and their chil- 
dren were: Ezekial, John, Samuel and Silas, all of whom were in the 
Continental army, as members of the Western Battalion of state troops. 

John, a son of John and Mary (Primrose) Hopping, was the owner of 
extensive lands and was a prominent citizen of Afton, which was formerly 
called Hoppington. He married Miss Elizabeth Luker, and the following six 
children were born to them: Henry, Timothy, Charles, William, Samuel 
and Betsie, the last named of whom married a Mr. Thompkins and moved to 
Ohio. Henry married Miss Abigail Miller and reared these children: James, 
Luetta, Henry, George, David, Charles and Albert. The father followed 
farming as his occupation. Albert Hopping, who was the father of our subject, 
married Miss Mary Cory, and their issue comprised the following: Arthur 
A., Edgar C. and Frederick A. Mr. Hopping lived on the old homestead 
and took a prominent part in public affairs of a local nature. His death 
occurred in 1890 and he is survived by his wife. 




c&ba^. 





BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 453 

Edgar C. Hopping, who is now in possession of the old farmstead, was 
born January 26, 1854, and received his literary education in the public 
schools of Afton. Early in life he learned the carpenter's trade and followed 
the same for twenty years, and in 1888 he embarked in business as a florist, 
since which time he has built up the largest trade in Chatham township. He 
has commodious greenhouses, his entire plant consisting of fifty-five thousand 
square feet of glass, and he makes a specialty of all kinds of roses, which he 
disposes of at wholesale in New York city, where he has attained an enviable 
reputation as a grower of fine flowers. 

May 23, 1876, Mr. Hopping was united in marriage to Miss Frances 
Hampson, a daughter of Francis and Josephine (Clark) Hampson, and a 
native of Paterson, New Jersey, and they have two children, E. Maud and 
Daisy F. 

The subject of this review is a self-made man, progressive and enter- 
prising in character, public-spirited in his aims and patriotic in disposition. 
Politically he is a stanch Democrat and served his township as collector from 
1885 to 1890, rendering the highest degree of satisfaction in that responsible 
office. Mr. and Mrs. Hopping are popular in their neighborhood and enjoy 
the high esteem of all who know them. 



WALTER A. YOUNG. 



The ancestry of Mr. Young had its origin in Holland, whence members 
of the family emigrated at an early day to America, some of them locating 
in New Jersey, from which branch the subject of this mention is descended. 
Cornelius Young, the great-grandfather, was born in Pequannock township, 
Morris county, New Jersey, and married Miss Elizabeth Mandeville, a daugh- 
ter of Anthony Mandeville, of Pompton Plains, later settling in Lower 
Montville and then in Newfoundland, where he died about the year 1830, 
being survived by his wife for several years. Their children were: Sarah, 
deceased, a missionary in the Presbyterian church; Lydia, the wife of Mark 
Sutton, of Elmira, New York; Margaret, now Mrs. Bowlsby, of Hanover 
township, Morris county; Elma, who married John Brown, of New York 
city; Henry settled in the west; Anthony, the grandfather of our subject, 
was born in Livingston township, Essex county, where he farmed for George 
G. Sickles for many years, married Miss Mary Norman, a daughter of David 
Norman, and subsequently moved to South Orange, where he died in 1862, 
his wife having passed away in 1856. Nine children were born to them, as 
follows: Susan, deceased, who married James R. Smith; Eleanor, deceased, 
became the wife of John A. Meeker; John W., the father of our subject; 
Alpheus, deceased, went to California in 1848 with a company of United 



454 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

States troops and died there in 1893; Euphemia, deceased, married Aaron 
Ball; Nathan, deceased; William is a contractor in Illinois; Harrison, 
deceased; and Ezra, a contractor, living in Connecticut. 

John W. Young was born at Oak Ridge, New Jersey, on the 29th of 
April, 1825, and moved to Essex county when eight years of age. He 
learned the shoe business, and for several years was engaged in the manu- 
facture of footwear, after which he embarked in farming, and continued to 
make that vocation his life work. In his political belief he is a stanch 
Republican and has served as a member of the board of county freeholders, 
the town committee, and was deputy sheriff of Essex county. In 1846 he 
was united in marriage to Miss Martha Walker, a daughter of Jeremiah and 
Mehetable (Speer) Walker, of Caldwell, Essex county. She departed this 
life January 23, 1896, leaving three children, namely: Walter A. ; Anna, 
who married George E. Townley, of Newark; and Edward M., of Morris- 
town, New Jersey. 

Walter A. Young was born in Livingston, Essex county, New Jersey, 
on the 24th of September, 1846, and acquired his literary education in the 
public schools of that place. He began his practical business career by 
learning the hatter's trade, and eventually engaged in the manufacture of 
hats, continuing in the same until 1884, when he settled on his present farm, 
in Lower Montville, and has since devoted his entire time and attention to 
agricultural pursuits, in which he has met with pronounced success. Polit- 
ically Mr. Young is a warm adherent of the Republican party, and has 
served as county and township committeeman. 

In 1870 Mr. Young was united in marriage to Miss Bessie Blenkinsop, a 
daughter of Joseph and Nancy Blenkinsop, of Boston, Massachusetts. Mrs. 
Young is a communicant in the Protestant Episcopal church, and both she 
and her husband enjoy the high esteem of a host of friends. 



ELMER KING. 



One of the younger members of the Morristown bar is Elmer King, who 
was born in Stanhope, Morris county, on the 4th of November, 1870, and 
is a son of Owen W. and Maria King, residents of Netcong. Both are 
natives of this county and belong to pioneer families of this region. The 
grandfather, Silas D. King, was born in Morris county and is descended from 
ancestors who came from county Cork, Ireland. He is an influential citizen 
and has been honored with a number of local offices, including that of county 
freeholder. 

In the public schools of Netcong Elmer King acquired his preliminary 
education, which was supplemented by three years' study under the direction 




(A 




S 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 455 

of a private tutor. Determining to devote his life to the legal profession, he 
entered upon the study of law in the office of Judge Williard W. Cutler, of 
Morristown, and at Trenton, in November, 1892, was admitted to the bar as 
an attorney, and in 1895 as counselor. From 1892 until 1897 he held the 
office of deputy surrogate, under Mr. Pierson. He is now successfully 
engaged in the practice of his chosen calling and although a young man has 
already attained an enviable position at the Morris county bar. 

On the 5th of September, 1894, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
King and Miss Ellen Elizabeth, daughter of William H. and Addie (Losee) 
Stackhouse. They have a pleasant home in Netcong, near Lake Hopat- 
cong, but Mr. King maintains his office in Morristown. He is a member of 
the Morris County Bar Association, the Commercial Bowling Club, of Mor- 
ristown, and the Tapkaow Club, of the same city, and attends the Presby- 
terian church. He is very popular in all these organizations, and his cordi- 
ality, genial manner and genuine worth have gained him a large circle of 
friends. 



REV. ELIAS O. VAN DUYNE. 

One cannot study far into the history of this section of New Jersey 
without meeting the name of Van Duyne in prominent connection with many 
of the leading interests which have tended to develop and upbuild this sec- 
tion of the state. In colonial days the ancestors of our subject located in 
this part of New Jersey, and since that time their descendants have been 
important factors in various lines of life, leaving the impress of their individ- 
uality upon the growth and progress of the section. 

Our subject was born in Montville township, Morris county, on the old 
Van Duyne homestead, his parents being Martin R. and Julia A. (Crane) 
Van Duyne. He spent the days of his boyhood and youth under the parental 
roof and acquired his preliminary education in the schools of the neighbor- 
hood, while in the home he was drilled in those lessons of uprightness and 
honor which have influenced his entire career. In 1857 he started west- 
ward and located in Kentucky, where he remained until 1864, when he 
returned to his native county, locating in Boonton. Here he engaged in the 
manufacture of carriages and wagons until 1882, since which time he has 
devoted his life to the work of the ministry. During these years he had 
been a close student of the Bible and had decided to take up the work of 
the church. He began his preparation under the direction of the late Rev. 
J. Y. Debaun, who was a professor in Hackensack, New Jersey, and after 
remaining there for two years was licensed to preach, in 1884. Thereupon 
he accepted a call from the home-missionary department of the Christian 



456 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Reformed church, and continued in that line of labor until 1888, when he 
was ordained. Since that time he has devoted his efforts entirely to his 
chosen calling, and in the discharge of his duties has traveled extensively 
through various districts of New Jersey and New York. He is a man of 
much force of character, great energy and unabating zeal in his work, and 
has won the high regard of all with whom he has come in contact. 

Rev. Elias O. Van Duyne was married in Passaic, New Jersey, March 
4, 1854, to Miss Robina Simms, who was born June 13, 1836, a daughter of 
Hugh and Mary M. (McKachie) Simms, and they have had the following- 
named children: Sarah Elizabeth, born January 21, 1855, and died August 
15, 1861; James L., born November 3, 1862, married Carrie A. Whitehead, 
and has one son, named Carrollton; Ellsworth, born April 23, 1865, mar- 
ried Elizabeth Morrison and has a daughter, Maud A. ; Anna Lucy, born 
September 4, 1872, became the wife of Charles K. Gedney, by whom she has 
a son, named Raymond; and Mary Matilda, born July 11, 1877, is a gradu- 
ate of the Boonton high school and is now at home with her parents. 

In his religious work Mr. Van Duyne has accomplished great good, and 
his influence is widely felt. He is an earnest, forceful and convincing 
speaker, an excellent organizer and a man of character and broad humani- 
tarian principles, and his labors are not only effective within his own church, 
but also command the respect of the people generally. 



HORACE N. VAN DUYNE. 

A well known farmer and miller of Boonton, Horace N. Van Duyne, 
was born in Montville township, Morris county, June 8, 1834, and is a 
representative of an old family of Holland that was founded in America at an 
early period in our colonial history. The first of whom we have authentic 
record is James Van Duyne, who with his parents emigrated from Amsterdam, 
Holland, a location being made on Long Island, where the city of Brooklyn 
now stands. He remained there until he had attained his majority, after 
which he came to New Jersey, locating in what is now Montville township, 
Morris county. Here he erected the house which is still standing and now 
occupied. Here were born his son Richard, and his son Martin, and his sons 
Elias O. and Horace N. James Van Duyne married, and his son Martin was 
the great-grandfather of our subject. Martin Van Duyne had three sons, 
William, Martin and Richard, the last named being the grandfather of 
our subject. He was a prominent farmer and a member of the Dutch Reformed 
church. He married Elizabeth Fredericks, and their children were Martin 
R.; Daniel, who married Phoebe Crane, of Caldwell, New Jersey; Sarah, wife 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 457 

of Joseph Henion; Jane, wife of Nicholas Huyler, of Boonton; and Isaac, 
who married Rachel Milledge, and resided in this county. 

Martin R. Van Duyne, the father of our subject, acquired a good practi- 
cal education in his youth, and then learned the tanner and currier's trade, 
which he followed for a number of years. He also served as a member of 
the militia, and was a public-spirited citizen who did all in his power for the 
advancement and upbuilding of the community with which he was connected. 
After his marriage he located on the farm which is now the home of our sub- 
ject, built a tannery and conducted the same for a number of years. He 
was a prominent and active member of the Dutch Reformed church, and his 
life, which was in harmony with the teachings of the church, won him the 
love and confidence of many friends. He married Julia A. Crane, a descend- 
ant of Jasper Crane, who emigrated from England and located in Branford, 
Connecticut. His wife was Alice, and their son Azariah married Rachel 
Lamson, and their son, also named Azariah, was a deacon in the church 
and married Mary Treat. One of the children of this marriage was Stephen 
Crane, and to him and his wife, Rhoda Crane, was born a son, Benjamin, 
who married Mehitable Dunning. In the family of this worthy couple was a 
son to whom they gave the name Benjamin and who wedded Eleanor Stiles. 
By this last marriage was born Julia Crane, the mother of our subject. 
Martin R. and Julia Van Duyne became the parents of nine children: Rev. 
Elias O., of Boonton; Horace N.; Sarah F., wife of George C. Freeman, of 
Orange, New Jersey; Elizabeth E., deceased wife of John Banta; Harriet J., 
wife of Isaac M. Williams, of Orange; Hettie M., wife of B. R. Hill, of Wil- 
kinsburg, Pennsylvania; Simeon, of Boonton; Lucy A., wife of A. G. Brown, 
of South Orange, New Jersey; and Lewis, who makes his home in Boonton. 
The father of these children spent his entire life in Morris county. Born in 
Montville township, November 27, 1804, he passed away February 7, 1878, 
at the age of seventy-four, and his wife died October 7, 1873. 

Horace N. Van Duyne learned the trade of wheelwright and followed 
that pursuit for sixteen years in Boonton, and during that period he erected 
several business houses which he still owns. In 1872 he returned to the old 
homestead in order to care for his parents and relieve his father of the ardu- 
ous duties of managing the property. He erected a steam gristmill, which 
he conducted for several years in connection with agricultural pursuits. He 
is now engaged in bee culture and is the owner of a very fine apiary. He 
is a man of excellent business and executive ability, sound judgment and keen 
foresight, and carries forward to successful completion whatever he under- 
takes. In connection with his other interests he is a stockholder in the Boon- 
ton National Bank, and is regarded as one of the most reliable and substan- 
tial business men in his section of the county. 



458 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

On the 22d of May, 1858, Mr. Van Duyne was united in marriage to 
Miss Catharine Banta, who was born March 9, 1837, and is a daughter of 
Henry and Catharine (Low) Banta. Their union has been blessed with two 
children. The son, Freeman H., born June 18, 1861, wedded Mary L., 
daughter of Azariah Crane. The daughter, Hattie M., born January 19, 
1865, is the wife of William J. Smith, and they have two children, Clifford 
F., born November 3, 1892; and Julia Catharine, born May 16, 1896. 

In his political views Mr. Van Duyne is a Democrat and is well informed 
on the issues of the day and deeply interested in the success of his party, 
but has never sought or desired political office, preferring to devote his ener- 
gies to his business, in which he is meeting with signal success. He holds 
membership in the Christian Reformed church, of Lower Montville, and is 
serving as one of its elders. 



EUGENE S. BURKE. 

A prominent factor in the business life of Morristown, Mr. Burke belongs 
to that class of progressive, enterprising citizens to whom is attributable the 
commercial activity and consequent prosperity of a community. His life has 
here been passed. He was born in Morristown, on the 21st of July, 1852, 
and is a son of Thomas W. and Mary Elizabeth (Cogan) Burke. His father 
first opened his eyes to the light of day at Rathfarnham, county Dublin, Ire- 
land, December 23, 1810, and died in Morristown January 23, 1896. His 
mother was born in Leixlip, county Kildare. Ireland October 26, 1818, and 
passed away on the 1st of June, 1895, at her home in this city. They were 
married on the Emerald isle and came to the United States in Ma)', 1847, 
locating in Morristown. The father was a farmer by occupation and was a 
quiet, unassuming man of sterling worth. He gave his political support to 
the Democracy, and in religious faith both he and his wife were Catholic, 
holding membership in St. Mary's church, of Morristown. 

Eugene S. Burke was the seventh in a family of eight children. He 
acquired his literary education in Morris Academy and completed a commer- 
cial course in Thompson's Business College in 1870. When his school days 
were ended he turned his attention to the work of the farm and followed 
agricultural pursuits for a time, after which he accepted a position as travel- 
ing salesman for the C. A. Nichols Company, publishers, of Springfield, 
Massachusetts. In 1882 he embarked in the coal business, in Morristown, 
as a member of the firm of Pruden & Burke, and has since carried on opera- 
tions along that line. The patronage of the firm has constantly increased 
and the business is now large and profitable. In addition to this enterprise 
Mr. Burke is a director in several other business concerns, and his sound 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 459 

judgment and keen discrimination make his connection with any industry a 
valuable one. 

In 1886 Mr. Burke was married to Miss Margaret T. Daly, and four sons 
and two daughters have been born to them. The family are connected with 
the Roman Catholic church, and in his political affiliations Mr. Burke is a 
Democrat. From 1886 until 1894 ne represented Morristown on the board 
of chosen freeholders, discharging his duties with marked fidelity and ability. 
He is a man of strong determination and resolute purpose, and these ele- 
ments have been essential factors in his business career. 



ESLI B. DAWSON. 



Recognized as a well-to-do merchant of Boonton and a public-spirited 
citizen, Mr. Dawson has been prominently identified with various important 
movements in his home city for several years. He was born in Somerset 
county, New Jersey, on the 10th of November, 1844, and is a son of David 
and Julia (Norris) Dawson. The father also was a native of Somerset county, 
where his birth occurred in 1822, and after obtaining a common-school edu- 
cation he engaged in the undertaking business. He served in the war of the 
Rebellion as a sergeant of Company G, Twenty-seventh New Jersey Volun- 
teer Infantry. In 1840 he married Miss Julia Norris, and they reared five 
children, namely: Margaret, now Mrs. William H. Nichols, of Hempstead, 
Long Island; Esli B., our subject; Luther, of Rushville, Illinois; Jane, 
who married Richard Garrabrant, of Somerville, New Jersey; and Mary, 
who became the wife of E. P. Smithyman, of Butler, New Jersey. 

Esli B. Dawson came to Boonton with his parents in 1854, and attained 
his education in the public schools of this place. In 1862, at the age of sev- 
enteen years, he offered his services in defense of the Union and enlisted in 
Company G, Twenty-seventh New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, and in 1863 
re-enlisted in Company C, Thirty-third Regiment, New Jersey Zouaves. He 
participated in the battle of Lookout Mountain, marched with Sherman to 
the sea, was taken prisoner at Goldsboro, North Carolina, and confined in 
Libby prison, from which he was paroled on the day previous to that on 
which Grant entered Richmond. He was honorably discharged in 1865 and 
returned to Boonton, where he learned the cabinet-maker's trade, followed 
the same until 1871 and was then appointed postmaster of Boonton, to fill 
an unexpired term of one year, being afterward appointed for three consecu- 
tive terms, implying a total service of thirteen years. In 1873 he engaged 
in the hardware business and carried a larger stock of hardware than any 
other store of its kind in Morris county. He is also president of the Boonton 



460 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVL> GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Lumber Company (incorporated), the largest business of its kind in the 
county. 

A Republican in his political faith, Mr. Dawson is considered one of the 
partv leaders in Morris county. In 1888 he was elected a member of the 
city council and served continuously in that body until 1897, when he de- 
clined re-election. He was largely instrumental in securing for Boonton its 
stone flagging, water-works, fire department and facilities, and electric lights. 
and he advocated and carried to a successful issue the bonding of the town 
for ten thousand dollars in order to erect the town hall, which is utilized by 
the common council, fire department, jail and offices connected with the city 
administration. In the second year of his service in the council he was 
elected president of that body and retained the position until his retirement. 
Mr. Dawson is one of the organizers of the Boonton Building and Loan As- 
sociation and is a director and a member of the appraisement committee in 
the same. He is the worshipful master of Arcana Lodge, F. & A. M., and 
is also the organizer and leader in the Boonton Athletic Association. He has 
extensive real-estate interests in his home city. 

Mr. Dawson was united in marriage in 1867 to Miss Mary E. Jacobus, a 
daughter of Nicholas Jacobus, of Boonton, and they have four children, 
namely: Nicholas J.; Ray, an under-graduate of Columbia University, is 
the intercollegiate champion for the United States, 1898, and also one of 
the fastest of the amateur riders of the world, holding many records to his 
credit, won within the last two years ; Bessie J. and Dudley B. Mr. Dawson 
and his family are faithful members of the Presbyterian church. 



SIMEON VAN DUYNE. 



A good and worthy citizen of Boonton and a descendant of an old and 
prominent family of New Jersey, Simeon- Van Dvyne was born in lower 
Montville township, February 6, 1847, and is a son of Martin R. and Julia 
(Crane) Van Duyne. His early boyhood days were spent on the old home- 
stead and his educational training was received in the "red school-house," in 
his native township.- When a youth still in his 'teens, he displayed special 
aptitude in the use of mechanical appliances, and at the age of seventeen he 
began to learn the machinist's trade in the city of Newark, completing his 
apprenticeship before attaining his majority. During the first year of his 
apprenticeship he designed and perfected a complete working model of a 
steam engine, all the parts of which he made in his own room at his sister's 
home in Orange. This inventive genuis has been noticeable in all his work 
throughout his entire business career. While learning his trade in Newark 
he became a very expert workman and upon the completion of his apprentice- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 461 

ship, he began business on his own account in Boonton, where he has since 
conducted a manufacturing and machine shop, meeting with excellent success 
in his undertakings. He invented and perfected a complete working model 
for a turbine water-wheel, which has been put to the practical test in con- 
nection with other first-class wheels, and in every instance has shown decided 
superiority over all others in many important points. He constructed and 
placed two of his turbine wheels in the works of the Boonton Electric Light 
Company, and these furnish the motive power for the entire works. These 
wheels are models of skill and mechanical ingenuity and indicate Mr. Van 
Duyne's superior ability in the line of mechanical invention. 

Mr. Van Duyne is a progressive and loyal citizen and gives a public- 
spirited support to all measures for the general good. He was instrumental 
in the organization of the South Boonton Volunteer Fire Company, of which 
he became a charter member, and from the beginning has been the moving 
spirit in its affairs. 

On the 25th of February, 1869, in the city of Newark, was solemnized 
the marriage of Simeon Van Duyne to Miss Anna L. Frazee. She was born 
January 6, 1849, and her death occurred on the 18th of April, 1889. Of this 
union three children were born: Bertha F., now Mrs. Taylor, of Orange, 
New jersey; Susie H., born August n, 1873; and Orlin S., born May 21, 
1879. On October 8, 1890, Mr. Van Duyne consummated a second mar- 
riage, being then united to Augusta J. Zeek. He holds membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Boonton and gives his support to all measures 
for the educational, moral, social or material welfare of the community. 



LEWIS VAN DUYNE. 

One of the progressive and substantial citizens of Boonton, Morris 
county, New Jersey, the gentleman whose name appears above was born at 
Montville, this state, on the 2d of April, 1855, and is the youngest son of 
Martin R. and Julia A. (Crane) Van Duyne, the latter being a daughter of 
Judge Benjamin F. Crane. The father of our subject was engaged in farm- 
ing pursuits, with which he combined also the vocation of tanner, and was a 
prosperous man, gaining the confidence and respect of all with whom he 
came in contact. 

Lewis Van Duyne acquired his educational discipline in the district 
schools of Morris county, attending the same during the winter months and 
working on the farm during the summer seasons. In this manner he passed 
his early youth until arriving at the age of sixteen years, when he left his 
parental abode and went to Orange, New Jersey, where he studied surveying 
under the supervision of Mead & Taylor, remaining in their employ for some 



462 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

years. In March, 1878, he purchased a farm in Montville township, and 
resided there for nine years, during which time he was engaged in surveying 
and building up a large and lucrative business which required all his attention 
and energies to maintain. In 1887 he sold the farm and removed to Boonton, 
where he erected his present handsome residence, in 1893, an ^ subsequently 
organized the Boonton Water Company, of which he has since been presi- 
dent. He constructed the Boonton water-works, and is otherwise extensively 
interested in real estate, owning and selling building sites in Paterson, Boon- 
ton, Rockaway, Dover and Trenton, New Jersey, and in Scranton and Pitts- 
ton, Pennsylvania. 

In his political predilections Mr. Van Duyne is a stanch supporter of the 
Republican party, although he has never sought office or participated actively 
in political contests. At one time he was chairman of the township com- 
mittee in Montville township for seven years, and a member of the school 
board of that township; and he was appointed a member of the board of 
education in Boonton, in May, 1896, for a term of three years. 

In society matters Mr. Van Duyne is connected with Arcana Lodge, No. 
60, Free and Accepted Masons, to which he was admitted in 1887, and he 
has been a member of the Royal Arcanum since 1895. 

The first marriage of Mr. Van Duyne was celebrated on the 26th of 
February, 1877, when he was united with Miss Annabella Walker, at Pomp- 
ton, New Jersey. She was born February 24, 1857, and died at Montville, 
Morris county, on the 18th of March, 1879, leaving one child, born August 
19, 1878, and named Bessie Annabella. November 18, 1879, Mr. Van 
Duyne consummated his second marriage, being then united to Miss Mary 
M. Jacobus, at Springfield, Union county, New Jersey, who was born January 
12, 1854, and by this marriage there have been two sons and two daughters, 
namely: Leah Elizabeth, born September 9, 1880; Martin Richard, May 7, 
1882; William Nelson, September 29, 1883; and Mary Frances, April 28, 1889. 

Mr. Van Duyne is an energetic, public-spirited gentleman, always inter- 
ested in anything that has for its object the advancement and welfare of his 
home city, is popular in social circles, and in the business world has gained 
a signal success, the factors of which have been his industry, thrift and unim- 
peachable integrity of character, which have secured to him not only the confi- 
dence, but also the high regard of his many friends. 



COLLINS B. WEIR. 



A progressive and public-spirited citizen of Morristown, Mr. Weir was 
born in Jefferson township, Morris county, New Jersey, on the 4th of Feb- 
ruary, 1845, and is a son of John and Mary (Morgan) Weir, the former of 





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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 403 

whom was born near Hoboken. Hudson county, New Jersey, his death occur- 
ring at Rockaway, Morris county, in 1887, at the advanced age of seventy- 
six years. The mother departed this life, also at Rockaway, in 1890, when 
seventy-six years old. 

Collins B. Weir attended school in his native township until eleven years 
old, and worked on the farm up to the time he was fifteen years old, when 
he entered the employ of Benjamin M. Roome, one of the oldest land-sur- 
veyors of New Jersey, and remained with him one year. In iS6i Mr. Weir 
offered his services in defending the Union, and in September of that year 
he enlisted in Company E, Ninth New Jersey Rifle Regiment, in which he 
served until July 12, 1865. For six months he was a private and was then 
promoted a mounted orderly, remaining as such for a year, when he served 
as right general guide of the regiment during the ensuing year, and on May 
29, 1863, he was promoted to first sergeant of Company E. On the 16th 
of May, 1864, he was wounded at Drewry's Bluff, near Richmond, and on 
April 2, 1865, he was commissioned second lieutenant of Company C, in the 
same regiment, serving in that capacity until honorably discharged. 

Upon the close of the war Mr. Weir came to Morristown and learned 
the carpenter's trade, which, in connection with architecture, he has since 
continued to successfully follow. Politically Mr. Weir is a stanch Repub- 
lican, and in 1879 he was elected assessor of Morristown and has continued 
to act in that capacity, either in the city or in the township, his present 
incumbency being in the city. In 1880 he was elected a member of the 
Morristown common council, serving as such for four terms of two years each. 

Socially Mr. Weir is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, in which he 
has attained the Master Mason degree, and he is a member of A. T. A. Tor- 
bett Post, No. 24, Grand Army of the Republic, Department of New Jersey. 
He is interested in real estate and is a notary public. 

In 1874 Mr. Weir was united in marriage to Miss Gussie Petty, and the 
issue of this union comprised four children, three of whom survive. 



JOHN H. POLHEMUS. 

Fortunate is the man who has back of him an ancestry honorable and 
distinguished, and in this particular our subject is especially blessed. In the 
history of the Netherlands the family name figures conspicuously in connec- 
tion with affairs of state, and its representatives bore an important part in 
many of the public events which are mentioned in the annals of the country. 
The family name was originally Polheem, but the Latin terminus " us " was 
affixed as a mark of eminence, according to a custom more or less observed 
in early days among men of learning and distinction. Anciently some mem- 



464 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

bers of the family enjoyed celebrity in the cities of Antwerp and Ghent, and 
in the former Eleazer Polhemus, a learned jurist, held the office of burgo- 
master in 1 310. 

Johannes Theodoras Polhemus, a minister of the Reformed church of 
Holland, was the progenitor of all the families of the name in America. On 
his arrival in this country he accepted a call from the church in Flatbush, 
where he labored from 1654 to 1665. He was afterward pastor of a church 
in Brooklyn until his death, which occurred June 9, 1676. He married 
Catherine Van Werven, and their children were Theodorus, Daniel, Eliza- 
beth, Adriana, Anna and Margaret. Of this family Daniel Polhemus was 
captain of the troops of Kings county and served as supervisor of Flatbush 
in 1705. He was afterward county judge and was a most important factor 
in the public life of his locality. His death occurred just prior to 1730. His 
family included the following named: Cornelius, Daniel, Hendrick and 
Jacob. The eldest took up his residence in Haverstraw, New Jersey, the 
second in New York, the third in Harlingen, Somerset county, New Jersey, 
and the fourth in Hempstead, Long Island. Hendrick Polhemus took up his 
residence on a large tract of land, extending from Harlingen to the Millstone 
river, and the homestead he established long remained in possession of the 
family. He had a son, Major John Polhemus, who was born in New Jersey 
in 1738, served in the French and Indian wars and rose to the rank of major 
in the war of the Revolution. His death occurred in 1833. 

Daniel Polhemus, son of the captain of troops of Kings county, took up 
his residence in New York. He had a son, Henry, who was the father of John 
H. Polhemus. Henry Polhemus was born in New York and married Helen 
Middleworth, also a native of that state. They removed to Battle Creek, 
Michigan, where John H. Polhemus, the immediate subject of this review, 
was born, on the iithof April, 1856. The mother died in Battle Creek, 
and the father soon afterward returned to the east with his family, locating 
in Somerset county, New Jersey. The son, John H., was then a lad of nine 
years. He completed his education in an elocutionary college in Middle- 
bush, New Jersey, and in 1876 came to Morris county, locating at Whip- 
pany, where he secured a clerkship. Soon afterward, however, he became 
proprietor of a general store, and he has since continued operations in this 
line, with gratifying success. He has studied closely the public taste and 
carried a large and well selected stock fitted to meet the popular demand; 
this, combined with his courteous treatment of his customers and his reliable 
business methods, has secured him a liberal patronage. 

In 1880 Mr. Polhemus married Fannelia Beach Mclntyre, of New York, 
and in the community they have many warm friends. Mr. Polhemus is a 
Republican in his political connections, and he served as postmaster of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 465 

Whippany under President Harrison. He is a director and now president of 
the Whiponong Hall Association, is a member of the Junior Order United 
American Mechanics and its auxiliary, the Daughters of Liberty, and of the 
Royal Arcanum. 



GEORGE A. ALLEN. 



One of the oldest and best known plumbers in Madison, Mr. Allen was 
born in Whippany, Morris county, New Jersey, on the nth of May, 1852, a 
son of John N. and Charlotte (Bruen) Allen, whose history will be found in 
another part of this work. Our subject passed his boyhood under the 
parental roof, acquiring his education in the public schools of his native town, 
after which he was employed on the farm for a while and then learned the 
plumbing trade, which he has almost constantly worked at since 1868, 
meeting with that success that ever characterizes industry, integrity and a 
progressive spirit. His handiwork is shown in many of the fine residences 
and public buildings of Madison, and has gained for him an enviable reputa- 
tion as a man of ability in this line of enterprise. 

Touching upon the social relations of Mr. Allen, we may state that he is 
a member of the Independent Order of Foresters, Lathrop Lodge, No. 3347, 
of Madison, the Daughters of Liberty, and the American Protective Associa- 
tion, No. 58, of Morristown. 

Mr. Allen consummated his marriage in 1875, when he became united 
to Miss Sarah J. Hopping, a daughter of E. M. and Eliza (Shauger) Hopping, 
her father being a well known grocer of Newark. The following four chil- 
dren have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Allen: Frank, George E., Louie J., 
and Katie H. 



GEORGE C. SMITH. 



The subject of this sketch has been identified with the business interests 
of Morristown for the past ten years, and is a native of Morris county. He 
was born in Green Village, on the 1st of March, 1857, and is a son of Theo- 
dore and Susan (Miller) Smith. The father was a native of Ridgefield, Con- 
necticut, and at the age of nineteen he came to New Jersey and engaged in 
teaching school, continuing to follow that vocation for several years. He 
then settled on a farm near New Vernon, and resided there until his death, 
which occurred in 1894. He married Miss Susan Miller, a native of Green 
Village and a daughter of Isaac Miller, who was a representative of one of 
New Jersey's oldest families. Mrs. Smith departed this life in i860. 

George C. Smith was reared and educated in Morris county, near New 

4a 



466 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Vernon, and at the age of sixteen years he moved to Madison, New Jersey, 
remained there for a period of ten years, after which he came to 'Morristown. 
Here he engaged in various mercantile enterprises, finally embarking in the 
grocery business, which he has conducted until the present time. He began 
his practical career with limited capital, to which he added industry, applica- 
tion and perseverance, and these, combined with the strictest integrity of 
character, have resulted in his existing prosperity, his spacious, neatly kept 
and well stocked store being conclusive evidence of his success in this line of 
endeavor. 

Mr. Smith solemnized his marriage in 1883, when he was united to Miss 
Ella F. Stevens, and he and his wife are prominent members of the Method- 
ist Episcopal church. In June, 1892, the Epworth League connected with 
this church began the publication of the Epworth Recorder, a monthly 
journal, and from the time of its inception Mr. Smith has held the position 
of editor. 

In his political faith our subject is a stanch Democrat, and has served 
his party as a member of the Morris township committee and was city clerk 
and city treasurer of Morristown for one term. He was elected a member of 
the board of education of Morristown in 1898. He is public-spirited, ener- 
getic and progressive and retains the confidence and high regard of his fellow 
citizens. 



GEORGE W. FELCH. 



A well known farmer and dairyman of Chatham township, Mr. Felch is 
a native of New York state, having been born in Sullivan county on the 9th 
of November, 1822, a son of Nathan and Rebecca (Shepherd) Felch. The 
father was born in Massachusetts and the mother in Connecticut, of Welsh 
ancestors. The father was ordained a Methodist minister and preached the 
gospel for many years. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Felch were : 
George W., Isaac N., Benjamin M., Julia H., Charles, Mary Anna, who 
married Everett Terrell; and Harriet, who became the wife of Thomas Har- 
ris. The father died when our subject was quite young. 

George W. Felch was reared in his native township, where he attended 
school for a few years, and at an early age he learned the blacksmith's trade, 
serving an apprenticeship under J. Wider, near Hartford, Connecticut, and 
afterward working as a journeyman for a short time, previous to coming 
to Afton in 1844. Here he established a shop, although several 
people had attempted to discourage him by saying that several similar at- 
tempts had been made, all of which had failed. He assured these pessimists 
that he would stay one year if he only got enough to pay his board, and by 




c^- 



& , '^T^O-^A 



y 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 467 

his courteous manners, genial disposition and the high order of excellence 
that characterized all the work done by him, he soon gained many friends 
and his business rapidly increased. In a short time he purchased the prop- 
erty on which his shop stood and later bought a small farm. In 1869 he 
found his health failing him from overwork and he consequently sold his 
place and bought a large farm, and he now possesses one hundred and fifty 
acres of finely cultivated land, on which he has built one of the substantial 
rural homes in this part of the county. Combined with agriculture he 
carries on dairying to some extent. Politically Mr. Felch is a faithful sup- 
porter of the Democratic party and is a strong advocate of any measure that 
will advance the welfare of his community. 

In 1849 Mr. Felch became united in marriage to Miss Harriet T. Ward, 
who died shortly afterward, and in 1851 he contracted another marriage, 
being then united to Miss Adelia F. Roll, a native of Madison and a daugh- 
ter of Jonas and Julia D. (Shipman) Roll, both of whom represented old 
families in the county. Their other children were: Jonas M., Stephen B., 
Chancellor L. , Philetto H., Adelia F. , Henrietta C. and Manning P., the 
last named being a soldier in the late war of the Rebellion. All of these 
children are deceased except Henrietta, who married William J. Carter and 
lives in New York state. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Felch are as follows: Harriet E., 
who married Charles F. Genung, of Chatham; Frank W., who married Miss 
Clara Van Luan, and lives in New York; Georgiana, who became the wife of 
Charles Zuckschwart, and lives in Orange; James W. , who married Louisa 
Shaw and resides in New York; Nathan, who married Miss Nancy Brown 
and makes his residence in Chatham; Augustus; Irving R. , who married Neva 
Williams and makes his home in Connecticut; and George A., who married 
Miss Hattie Engle, and they live on the home place, assisting their parents 
in conducting the farm and the dairy business. Mrs. Felch is a consistent 
member of the Hanover Presbyterian church. 



HENRY A. ROFF. 



He whose name forms the caption of this sketch is a resident of Butler, 
and was born in Washington Valley, near Morristown, December 29, 1838, 
being a representative of one of the old colonial families. The name was 
originally spelled Rolfe, but in recent generations has been modified to the 
present form, Roff. His grandfather was a country tailor, and followed his 
trade in Washington Valley before the war of the Revolution. He obtained 
the title to his land from the British crown. Charles Roff, the father of our 
subject, was born in Washington Valley, in the latter part of the eighteenth 



468 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

century, and aided in the defense of his country in the war of 1 812. In his 
early life he followed the profession of teaching and later devoted his ener- 
gies to agricultural pursuits. His political support was unswervingly given 
to the Democracy, and at one time he was elected justice of the peace, but 
refused to qualify for the office. He married Phoebe Axtell, whose father, 
Silas Axtell, was a colonel in the New Jersey militia, and to Mr. and Mrs. 
Roff were born eleven children, but the one whose name introduces this 
review is now the only survivor. 

Henry Augustus Roff spent the days of his boyhood and youth upon his 
father's farm and to prepare himself for his life's work learned the machinist's 
trade with the Newark Machine Company. He afterward worked for several 
years as a journeyman in Jersey City and Newark, and at the close of the 
Civil war he went west, spending three years in St. Louis, Missouri, where he 
occupied a position as a machinist. Upon his return to New Jersey he 
abandoned that occupation and through the eight succeeding years devoted 
his energies to following the plow, gathering the crops and the other labors 
incident to farm life. When he once more left the farm he accepted the 
position of millwright with the Bloomingdale Soft Rubber Company, of 
Butler, and with the exception of three years spent in the service of the Smith 
Electric Company, of Pompton, he has since occupied the position which he 
to-day fills, being one of the most capable and trusted employes of the house. 
He owns and occupies a farm near the Kackout mountains, the same being 
operated by the members of his family. 

Mr. Roff was married in 1861 to Miss Elizabeth Walker, a daughter of 
Mark R. Walker, and they now have five sons: Sidney M., Joseph W. , 
George M., Herbert A. and Edward. They have also lost two sons and a 
daughter. Mr. Roff in his political preferences is a Republican, but though 
he manifests a deep interests in politics, as every true American citizen 
should do, he is content to leave office-holding to others, while his attention 
is given without interruption to his business interests. 



ABRAM BOCKOVEN. 



A well known resident of Morris county, Mr. Bockoven is a worthy rep- 
resentative of one of the old families of New Jersey and was born upon the 
farm, west of Mendham, now owned by him, on the 8th of July, 1835. His 
father, David Bockoven, was born in Morris township on October 12, 1792, 
and died at Mendham in November, 1889. Early in life he came to the 
farm upon which our subject was born, and there passed the greater part of 
his busy career. He erected a mill on the site of the present "Bockoven 
Mill " and built up quite a lumber industry there. In politics he supported 




-ftfAoxj-Jfr-M. 



'^OCa^y^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 469 

the Democratic party for many years and once served as a freeholder for 
Mendham and at another time was surveyor of the highways. Later in life 
he became a Prohibitionist and remained so until his death. He married 
Miss Phoebe Layton, a daughter of John L. Layton, of Liberty Corners, 
Somerset county, and she died in 1864, at the age of sixty-eight years, being- 
survived by her husband and the following children: Mary A., who is the 
widow of Henry A. Carey; John N. ; Elizabeth, the widow of William F. 
Miller, of Morris county; George and William, deceased; Fannie, who mar- 
ried Israel Lewis, of Morristown; David; Daniel J., deceased; Abram; Theo- 
dore, of Succasunna Plains; and Theophilus, of Mendham. All of the fore- 
going children were living when their father was ninety years old. 

Abram Bockoven, the grandfather of our subject, was a son of Dutch 
parents and was called Major Bockoven, a title attained, no doubt, through 
some connection with the militia of New Jersey. He died in Morris town- 
ship about the year 1850, at the venerable age of ninety years. 

The subject of this review engaged in the battle of life at the age of 
twenty year.-, as a farmer, and in 1864 he took charge of the old mill, rebuilt 
and operated the same until 1896, in which year he retired from both it and 
the farm, and the following January moved into Mendham, of which he has 
since continued one of the most respected citizens. He has always advo- 
cated Democratic principles and has served his township as committeeman, 
a member of the board of education and for fourteen years held the office of 
clerk. He is a faithful adherent of the First Presbyterian church and is a 
trustee of the Cemetery Association. 

Mr. Bockoven was united in marriage on the 20th of November, 1855, 
to Miss Frances L. Axtell, a daughter of Luther and Sarah (Simpson) Axtell, 
her birth having occurred in 1838. The children born of this union are: 
David M., who married Eliza Sharp and resides in Morristown; Phoebe M., 
deceased; George, who married Miss Anna Savage and farms the old home- 
stead; Charles, who married Caroline Sharp and resides in Morristown; Clif- 
ford A., Edward, Frederick, Jennie F. and Albert. 



RICHARD W. McEWAN. 



This well known resident of Whippany represents a family that has 
been long and prominently connected with the manufacture of paper on the 
Atlantic coast, and with his brothers he is now extensively engaged in the 
conduct of a large concern of that character. The name of McEwan is 
known to the paper trade throughout the country and is the synonym of 
honor and straightforward dealing in trade circles. 

The gentleman whose name introduces this review is a native of Bloom- 



> 
470 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

field, New Jersey, born on the 25th of January, 1866. The first seven years 
of his life, however, were spent in Easton, Connecticut, where his father, 
Robert McEwan, was engaged in the manufacture of paper. The latter, who 
is now living a retired life in Whippany, was born near the city of Glasgow, 
in Scotland, September 8, 1828, the son of Anthony and Mary (Coomb) 
McEwan, and Anthony McEwan was also a paper-maker by trade. As a life 
work Robert McEwan took up the business which had been followed by his 
father and grandfather, and in his early manhood crossed the Atlantic to the 
United States. In this country he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah A. 
Walsh, a daughter of John and Ann Emaline Walsh, she being a lady of 
American birth but of English parentage. After carrying on business for some 
time in Easton, Connecticut, Robert McEwan removed with his family to 
Caldwell, New Jersey, and thence returned to his old home in Bloomfield, 
but is now living in Whippany. By his marriage he became the father of the 
following named : Wilson E. ; William W. , a partner in the Stone Brook Paper 
Company; Robert B. ; Jesse L. and Richard W. , who are connected with the 
paper manufactory in Whippany; Mary, wife of W. Q. Wilson; Arthur, who 
married Ella Anderson; Frank, and Fred. With the exception of the young- 
est two, the sons are all married. Robert B. wedded Mary B. Crawford; 
Jesse L. married N. Grace Roe; and Richard W., subject of this sketch, 
wedded Hannah H. Brown,' a daughter of George H. and Martha B. Brown, 
of Washington, North Carolina, by which marriage have been born two 
children: Richard W., Jr., born August 5, 1895, an d Martha Virginia, who 
was born February 27, 1898. 

Robert McEwan, Sr., became one of the best known paper manufactur- 
ers of the county, building up a business of great volume, and the prestige he 
acquired in this line has been maintained by his successors, his sons, in a 
manner to merit the admiration and confidence of a critical public. 

Richard W. McEwan was reared to the business. At an early age he 
left the school-room and entered his father's factory as an employee, passed 
through every department of the concern and mastered the details relating to 
each. Before reaching the age of eighteen he had acquired an interest in 
the business and has since been an important factor in the successful conduct 
of the extensive enterprise. The factory is one of the best equipped in the 
country, being supplied with the latest and best improved machinery, and 
all accessories for the manufacture of the different grades and kinds of paper. 
The house enjoys a large trade, and the success of the enterprise is well 
merited by the partners, who are all men of good business ability. 

In politics the McEwan brothers are all Republicans and have unre- 
servedly supported that organization during the past eight years, being 
champions of a protective tariff and sound-money plank, as defined in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 471 

platform of the St. Louis convention of 1896. Richard W. McEwan is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Cincinnati Lodge, F. & A. 
M., Madison Chapter, No. 12, R. A. M., and the Odo de Saint Aman Com- 
mandery, K. T. He is also a member of the Topkaovv Club, of Morristown. 



THEODORE BROWN. 



A native of Morris county, Theodore Brown was born at the old ances- 
tral home of the Brown family, in Newfoundland, August 19, 1843. For 
more than a century the property had been in possession of his ancestors. 
Hendrick Braun, a Dutchman, whose name had been Anglicized into Henry 
Brown, left the lower point of Manhattan island, walked across the country, 
followed the Pequannock river for some miles in search of a desirable loca- 
tion on which to establish a home, and finally selected the present site of 
Newfoundland. The danger incident to the war of the Revolution caused 
him to seek refuge in New York during its continuance, but when American 
independence had been won he returned to his land, and erected thereon a 
cabin just in the rear of the beautiful and commodious hostelry which is now 
the property of our subject. Among his children was Martin Brown, the 
great-grandfather of our subject, who was born October 10, 1764, and died 
August 23, 1850. 

Peter P. Brown, the grandfather of our subject, was born October 11, 
1790, and died February 14, 1864. On the 15th of December, 181 3, he 
married Elizabeth Ranouse, and in 181 7 removed to the Morris side of the 
river and erected the first section of the now famous Brown Hotel. He con- 
ducted a store, engaged in farming, also operated a forge, and was recognized 
as a successful business man, having accumulated considerable property. In 
1844 he disposed of all the interests just mentioned to his son, John P., and 
turned his attention to the iron business, following that enterprise in Clinton 
for some years, and then in Pompton. In his later life he resumed hotel- 
keeping, as proprietor of the old Passaic Hotel at Paterson, but spent his 
last years on the Kanouse homestead near Newfoundland, where his death 
occurred. His children were: Eliza A., who died in childhood; Harriet, 
who married James M. Allen, and spent the greater part of her life in Ohio; 
John P.; Hannah C, widow of William Howe, and a resident of Winona, 
Minnesota; Susan, who became Mrs. I. J. Allen, and is now a resident of 
Roseville, a suburb of Newark, New Jersey; Julia, deceased wife of Oscar 
Decker; Lydia, widow of C. F. De Camp, and a resident of Morristown; 
Ira, who was with his father in the iron business at Clinton and Pompton, 
and in the hotel at Paterson, after which he engaged in the livery business 
in New York as a member of the firm of Ryerson & Brown, which firm after- 



472 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ward merged its business into that of the New York Cab Company, one of 
the well-known concerns of the city. Chilidn Brown, the youngest of the 
family, died in childhood. 

John P. Brown, the father of our subject, was born August 24, 1817, 
and was called to his final rest December 20, 1893. He was a type of the 
men found in the early history of the country, who disdained to simulate the 
suavity and mildness that the modern man of affairs so often assumes. He 
was stern and exacting, with the sharp corners of his nature wholly visible, 
but he possessed qualities of the greatest worth, which won him the admir- 
ation and respect of all. He abhorred dishonesty and had no sympathy for 
the dissembler, and integrity was the foundation of his own character. If a 
man was honest, however, and tried to do his best, but met failure, he then 
found in Mr. Brown a true friend, who would generously extend to him sub- 
stantial aid, without considerations of friendship. His likes and dislikes were 
strong. He despised the modern aristocrat for his notions about society; 
one man's money counted the same to him as another's, and he courted the 
patronage of the workingman as he did that of the wealthy summer guest, 
and he seated them in the same dining hall. 

John P. Brown was a man of strong physique and of great industry. He 
possessed the ability to conduct more than one business successfully, and 
derived his revenue from the wood and lumber business, the farm and the 
store, as well as from the hotel. He was united in marriage to Miss Maria, 
daughter of Samuel and Ann (Speer) Ryerson, and they became the parents 
of three sons: Theodore; Ryerson, who was born December 4, 1846, and 
died December 22, 1852; and Walter, who was born June 26, 1849, and 
died December 5, 1852. 

Theodore Brown, the present representative of this honored family that 
through a century has been so prominently connected with the history of 
Morris county, received his business training under the direction of his father, 
whom he assisted, from an early age, in the store, home and lumber yard. 
Upon attaining his majority he assumed the entire management of the mer- 
cantile and lumber interests, while his father gave his close attention to the 
hotel and farm. Since the death of his father the management of the entire 
estate has devolved upon Theodore Brown, who is one of the enterprising, 
progressive and capable business men of his section of the county. His keen 
foresight and business sagacity have enabled him to conduct his interests in 
a way that has returned a good profit, and he is proprietor of one of the 
most popular hotels in this part of the state. There is an air of refinement 
and suggestion of home which pervade the place; neatness and comfort char- 
acterize every apartment, and the whole is conducted with a view to the 
greatest convenience and pleasure of the guests. Mr. Brown always wins 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 473 

the esteem and friendship of his patrons, and his circle of well-wishers is 
very extended. 

On the 2 ist of October, 1880, Mr. Brown led to the marriage altar Miss 
Emma Gene Terwilliger, a daughter of Charles V. Terwilliger. She was 
born July 25, 1858, and by her marriage has became the mother of four chil- 
dren: Delos John, who was born May 12, 1882, and is now deceased; 
Theodore E., born December 2, 1885; Ethel M., born October 2, 1887; and 
Elizabeth Gene, November 19, 1889. Mr. Brown and his wife are members 
of the Newfoundland Presbyterian church, and take an active part in its 
work. In politics he is a stalwart Republican and has served in the offices 
of freeholder, town committeeman and town clerk, discharging his duties with 
marked fidelity and ability. 



JAMES J. RYAN. 

Mr. Ryan is one of the sons of the Emerald Isle who has found in the 
New World the opportunities that have enabled him to rise from a lowly 
position in the financial world to one of considerable prominence, as he now 
occupies a leading place in the business circles of the city in which he resides. 
He was born in Ireland in 1853, a son of Thomas and Mary (Cunningham) 
Ryan, who came to America in 1856 with their family of three children, and 
settled in Madison, New Jersey, where the father remained until his death. 
He was a gardener by occupation and followed that pursuit until called to 
his final rest, in 1891. 

James J. Ryan was the sixth in order of birth in a family of eight chil- 
dren and was reared to manhood under the parental roof, acquiring his edu- 
cation in the old Madison Academy. When his school days were ended he 
went. to New York city and learned engineering, which pursuit he followed 
for sixteen years. In 1872 he was made manager of the Kensington Depart- 
ment house and in 1879 assumed charge of the pavilion at Sharon Springs, 
where he continued until 1887, when he returned to Madison and engaged in 
the cultivation of roses, which had become one of the leading industries of 
this section of the state. He met with success in this undertaking and after 
carrying on the enterprise with profit for some time he embarked in the 
plumbing, steam-fitting and gas-fitting business. He has every facility and 
improved piece of mechanism for doing first-class work along these lines and 
has put in the plumbing in some of the finest residences in Madison. 

Mr. Ryan is quite prominent in society circles, both fraternal and other- 
wise, and for three consecutive terms has served as secretary of the Rose 
Growers' Association, an organization for advancing the interests of rose 
culture. He is vice-president of the Catholic Benevolent League and vice- 



474 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

president of the Young Men's Catholic Club. In his political views he is a 
strong Democrat and in 1895 was nominated on the ticket of his party for 
city alderman, but through a political manceuver he was defeated. 

In 188 1 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Ryan and Miss Anna Lene- 
han, a native of Ireland and a daughter of Thomas Lenehan, who is still 
living on his farm in county Roscommon, Ireland. Mrs. Ryan is a cousin of 
John McGuire, who was surveyor of the port of New York during President 
Cleveland's second administration, and is also a cousin of C. J. McGuire, a 
prominent physician of New York city. Three children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Ryan: Joseph, who died in infancy; and Mary and Margaret. 



EDWARD TAYLOR. 



For twenty-eight years Mr. Taylor has held the responsible post of 
engineer on a line of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, run- 
ning between Chatham and New York city, and he is a native of Warren 
county, New Jersey, where he was born February 9, 1847, a son of James 
and Martha (Pittenger) Taylor, the former of whom was born in England, 
the latter in Pennsylvania. James Taylor emigrated from Great Britain 
about the year 1840, came to New Jersey and located at Oxford, Warren 
county, where he followed the blacksmith trade during his active lifetime. 
To him and his wife were born: John; David, who was killed while bravely 
fighting for his country in the Civil war; Edward; Anna, who married Philip 
Vassler, and now lives in New York; Casper; and Mary, who became the 
wife of George Lanning. Mr. Taylor died in 1856, his wife surviving him 
two years. 

Edward Taylor passed his boyhood at home and attended school until 
eleven years old, at which early age he began to earn his own living, and 
four years later he moved to Scranton, Pennsylvania. In 1863-4, during 
the most exciting periods of the Civil war, he was engaged in the railroad 
business in Tennessee, and in 1865 he returned to Scranton, where he was 
employed in a rolling-mill as a stationary engineer. In 1867 he came to 
Chatham and, having acquiring valuable experience in the running of engines, 
he was engaged as fireman on a locomotive engine on the Delaware, Lacka- 
wanna & Western Railroad, a position he retained for two years, when, such 
was his fidelity and ability that he was promoted, in 1869, to the responsible 
place on the right of the cab, and has continued as engineer on the line run- 
ning between Chatham and New York. In this capacity the dominating 
characteristics of Mr. Taylor — faithfulness, caution and the guarding of his 
employers' interests — have insured the highest order of intelligent service, 
and as a logical result but few accidents have occurred while he was at the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 475 

throttle, and he has had the honor of being among the small number of 
engineers who have held an engine so long a time. 

Socially considered Mr. Taylor is a popular member of the Brotherhood 
of Locomotive Engineers, having been affiliated with the same since 1870, of 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and of the Junior Order of Ameri- 
can Mechanics. In his political faith he is an ardent supporter of the Repub- 
lican party and in March, 1897, he was made a member of the first common 
council of Chatham. 

In 1869 Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to Miss Helen E. Pollard, a 
native of Chatham and a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Smith) Pollard, 
and of this union three children have been born, namely: Annabel, deceased; 
May and Florence. Mr. Taylor is an affectionate father and husband and 
has given his children an excellent literary education and has developed their 
natural talent for music, both of the young ladies being highly accomplished 
in that line of art. Our subject has a substantial, comfortable home, fur- 
nished with all modern improvements, and there he and his family extend a 
cordial hospitality to their many friends. 



JOHN SEBALD. 

Mr. Sebald is a resident of Butler, and is one of the honored veterans 
of the Civil war who responded to the call of his adopted country and went 
forth in defense of the Union. A loyal devotion to duty has characterized 
his entire life, whether on the battlefield, in the shoe-shop or in the dis- 
charge of public service. A native of Bavaria, born on the 15th of May, 
1842, he is a son of John and Margaret (Stager) Sebald, who also were natives 
of the same country, whence they emigrated to America after their marriage. 
The father, who was born in 18 14, now makes his home with his son John. 
He has one other son, George, who also resides at Butler. His life has 
been a busy one, devoted to the work of the farm or to other manual labor, 
and for many years he was a resident of Paterson, New Jersey. 

It was during his father's residence in Paterson that John Sebald attended 
the common schools, after which he began learning the shoemaker's trade, 
under the direction of Henry Richet. of Newark. He was thus engaged 
when, in 1862, he was aroused by his country's need for more troops to 
preserve the Union, and joined Company A, Twenty-sixth New Jersey Vol- 
unteers, for nine months' service. He went to the front under command of 
Captain Morris and returned under command of Captain Fordham. His 
company was at once ordered to the front and was under fire for the first 
time at the battle of Fredericksburg, where they were stationed as a reserve, 
but their position was so near the battlefield that they were actually within 



476 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HIS TORI. 

range of the enemy's bullets. Company A actively participated in the second 
battle of Fredericksburg and aided in the capture of Marye's Heights, which 
stronghold had caused to General Burnside a loss of twelve thousand troops 
in one day, in the first engagement at Fredericksburg. Mr. Sebald also 
participated in the hotly contested engagement on the Rappahannock river, 
June 5, 1863, known as Franklin Crossing, in which the Twenty-sixth New 
Jersey, by a remarkable exhibition of courage, captured the force in charge 
of the enemy's batteries, which were costing heavy losses to the advancing 
Federals. Mr. Sebald also took part in the battles of Chancellorsville and 
Salem Church, and, being taken ill on Burnside's famous mud march, was 
discharged on special order of the war department, June 27, 1863. 

Returning to the north he resumed his labors at the shoe-bench, and 
completed his term of apprenticeship under Mr. Richet, of Newark. He 
then resided for some years in Paterson, New Jersey, and in 1874 located in 
Newfoundland, Morris county. Since 1882 he has resided in Butler, and is 
now conducting a lucrative business as a dealer in boots and shoes. He has 
a well equipped store, and his straightforward business methods and excellent 
stock insure him a liberal patronage. 

On the 26th of March, 1866, Mr. Sebald was married, in Paterson, New 
Jersey, to Miss Mary M. Mains, a daughter of James Mains, of Oak Ridge, 
New Jersey. Eight children were born of this union, and concerning them 
we offer brief record, as follows: Maggie is the wife of Isaac Q. Gurnee, of 
Butler. James is at time of this writing (September 1, 1898) serving in 
Company G, First New Jersey Regiment, United States Army, as musician. 
The other surviving children are George, Theodore and Joseph. John died 
at the age of twenty-one years; Charles B. died at the age of eighteen years, 
having been a student in the Bloomingdale school; and Bertha died at the 
age of five months. 

Mr. Sebald is a member of Farragut Post, No. 28, G. A. R., at Paterson, 
and belongs distinctively to that class of citizens who, by the faithful per- 
formance of each day's duties, insure the welfare and continued prosperity 
of the community with which they are connected. 



DANIEL LOSEY. 



He whose name initiates this review is proprietor of the United States 
Hotel Stable, in Morristown, and is a representative of one of the old fam- 
ilies of Morris county. He was born in Mendham township, Morris county, 
on the 3d of February, 1855, the son of Samuel M. and Elizabeth (Ballen- 
tine) Losey, both of whom belonged to pioneer families of this county. They 
had but two children, our subject and Louise. The father died in 1877, 




*"*>*<*AV,, | w r -- 



atue/ 2lo4ei/. 



T 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. All 

aged about sixty-three years, and the mother still survives, residing at Glad- 
stone, Somerset county, New Jersey. The paternal grandfather was Daniel 
Losey, who was born in Mendham township, being a farmer by occupation, 
as was also his father, Colonel Nehemiah Losey, who was a resident of the 
county and a soldier in the war of the Revolution. 

The subject of this mention was reared on a farm and attained his pri- 
mary education in the public schools of Mendham, supplementing the same 
by a course of study at Flushing Institute, Long Island, New York. In 1878 
he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Jane Greer, of Sussex county, 
New Jersey, and they settled on the old homestead in Mendham township, 
where they continued until 1894, when Mr. Losey sold the farm and moved 
into Morristown, engaging in the livery business. His place was destroyed 
by fire a month later, but, nothing daunted, and with characteristic determi- 
nation, he re-established himself and has since continued with a high order of 
success. His stables are first-class in every respect, containing handsome 
rigs, good horses and reliable drivers, beside which Mr. Losey possesses spe- 
cial facilities for receptions, weddings- or funerals, and has the best accom- 
modations for boarding horses by the day, week or month. 

Mr. and Mrs. Losey are the parents of two daughters, Annie G. and 
Elizabeth B. The family attend the First Presbyterian church, of which 
Mrs. Losey is a member. 

In his political adherency Mr. Losey is identified with the Republican 
party, and fraternally he holds membership in Mohuscawing Tribe, No. 216, 
Improved Order of Red Men, at Morristown. 



GEORGE WHITEMAN. 



A liveryman of Chatham, whose residence in Morris county dates from 
1890, Mr. Whiteman is one of the boys in blue who, at the call of their 
country, went forth to battle for the Union, and throughout the years of his 
manhood he has been known as a loyal citizen, whether in days of peace or 
war. 

He is a native of Oswego county, New York, and a son of Abram 
Whiteman, who was of German descent, but was born in the Empire state, 
where he followed the occupation of farming. He was one of a family of 
ten children, the others being: Betsey, who married Isaac Mitchel; Henry; 
Lany; William; Philip; Catherine, wife of John Kenyon; Jacob; Abraham; 
and Sallie, who married Jacob Schultz. To the parents of our subject were 
born five children, of whom he is the eldest. The others are Charles, a 
resident of Philmont, New York; Robert, who is living in Hudson, New 
York; Jarvis, of Ghent, that state; and Frank, of Chatham, New York, who 



478 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

is now holding a lucrative position as a telegraph operator. He is an expert 
in that line, and has made a number of important discoveries concerning 
telegraphy. 

Reared in the state of his nativity, Mr. Whiteman there remained until 
after the inauguration of the Civil war, when, prompted by a spirit of patriot- 
ism, he joined Company A, One Hundred and Twenty-eighth New York 
Infantry. He was first sent to Baltimore, and later participated in a number 
of engagements; but, ultimately, on account of ill health, was sent to the 
hospital and discharged by reason of his physical disability. 

On the 1 8th of February, 1864, Mr. Whiteman married Miss Addie 
Waugh, daughter of John and Sarah (Suchwell) Waugh, natives of Madison, 
New Jersey. His wife died February 3, 1882, leaving one child, Ray; and 
for his second wife he chose Ella C. Rathbun, a native of Madison, New 
Jersey, and a daughter of Amos C. Rathbun. Socially Mr. Whiteman is 
connected with the Grand Army of the Republic, and thus continues his 
military associations and friendships. He votes with the Republican party, 
and is a stanch advocate of its leading measures. In business he is straight- 
forward and reliable, and his courtesy to his patrons, combined with an ear- 
nest effort to please them, has brought to him good success. 



EDWIN P. FELCH. 



The family name borne by our subject is of English origin, his grandfa- 
ther, Nathan Felch, having emigrated from England to the United States, 
probably in the latter part of the eighteenth century. Edwin P. Felch, an 
expert electrician of Madison, — his native town, — was born August 22, 1858, 
and is a son of Benjamin M. and Electa Felch. The father was born in 
Connecticut, in 18 10, and when twenty-one years of age took up his resi- 
dence in Madison, where he was engaged in teaching. He was afterward 
elected superintendent of the schools of Morris county, and also attained to 
considerable prominence in political life, being chosen by the Democratic 
party to represent his district in the state legislature in 1857 and 1858. His 
death occurred in 1889, but his widow, who was born in Madison, is still 
living and makes her home with her son. She is of English descent, the 
family having been represented in America since an early day. There were 
but three children in the family: Edwin P.; Susan M., wife of Samuel 
Mooney; and William S., now deceased. 

Mr. Felch, of this review, spent his early life in Madison, acquired his 
education in the public schools, and later went to New York city, where he 
was employed at various labors, a portion of the time being engaged in 
steam-fitting. In 1888 he began business in Madison as a real-estate and 





J6^ 





Wt^^s**^ 1 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 479 

insurance agent, but is now engaged in electrical work and deals in electrical 
supplies. He has done at least three-fourths of the work in his line in the 
town and has become very proficient, for he is a constant student of every- 
thing connected with the industry; and his research and investigation, com- 
bined with practical experience, have given him an expertness that insures 
him a very liberal and profitable patronage. He is a member of the Na- 
tional Electric Light Association. In political matters he takes no active 
part, but, socially, he is a member of the Royal Arcanum. 

Mr. Felch was married October 28, 1885, to Miss Ester M. McDugal. 
His present wife was Catherine Maxwell, a daughter of George Maxwell. 
Of pleasant, genial manner and sterling worth, he is recognized as a valued 
citizen and companionable gentleman. 



SILAS L. ARMSTRONG. 



A representative of one of the honored pioneer families of Morris county, 
Mr. Armstrong is now numbered among the prominent business men of Mor- 
ristown, and his identification with the industrial interests of Morristown has 
not only proved of individual benefit to himself, but has also advanced the 
general prosperity by furnishing employment to a large force of workmen. 
A well known writer has said that the man who each week pays over his 
counters wages to one hundred men is more deserving of the gratitude of the 
country than he who leads a company forth to battle; for he places in the 
hands of his employes the means of sustaining life, of maintaining homes and 
establishing a pleasant, prosperous community. Mr. Armstrong in his busi- 
ness career has also demonstrated that success is not a matter of genius or 
fortuitous circumstances, but is the outcome of persistent, earnest and well 
directed effort. His labors have brought to him a handsome reward, well 
merited, and he is now numbered among the substantial citizens of his native 
county. 

Mr. Armstrong was born near Morristown, on the 26th of March, 1829, 
being the son of Silas and Betsey (Norris) Armstrong, who also were natives 
of the county and spent their entire lives here, the mother passing away at 
the age of seventy-six years, and the father at the age of seventy-seven. The 
grandfather, also named Silas, and a native of Morris county, was a farmer 
by occupation, and the maternal grandfather was a chairmaker of Morris- 
town. Our subject and his sister Harriet are now the only survivors in a 
family of eleven children. One brother, Miles Armstrong, served for three 
years as a Union soldier in the Civil war. The parents were members of the 
Presbyterian church and were people of the highest respectability. 

Silas L. Armstrong was reared on the old family homestead, which is 



480 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

now in his possession, and received the educational advantages afforded by 
the common schools of the neighborhood. Before he had attained his major- 
ity he had learned the carriage-making trade, and, forming a partnership with 
his brother, carried on business on his farm for eight years, under the name 
of Armstrong Brothers, enjoying a good trade. In 1857 he began the manu- 
facture of brick, and for forty years he has carried on operations along that 
line, building up one of the most extensive and important industries in the 
county. He began his work on a small scale, but his trade steadily increased, 
and his facilities were enlarged, so that at the present time he turns out about 
three million bricks annually, increasing this output from nine hundred thou- 
sand. His plant is splendidly equipped with the latest improved machinery, 
and the quality of the product is such as to secure a continuance of a patron- 
age once obtained. In connection with this enterprise Mr. Armstrong owns 
a valuable farm and carries on agricultural pursuits. 

In 1859 was celebrated the marriage of our subject and Miss Susan 
Overton, a native of Morris county. They now have four children: Addie, 
Eda, Elver and Fred. Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong, together with their eldest 
and youngest daughters, belong to the Methodist church. The Armstrong 
household is noted for its hospitality, and the friends of the family are many. 

In early life Mr. Armstrong gave his political support to the Democracy, 
but on the outbreak of the Civil war he supported President Lincoln, and he 
has since voted the Republican ticket. He is a man of firm convictions and 
ever true to his belief. His business career has been one of the strictest 
honor, and his relations with his employes is ever fair and courteous, so that 
he has their highest respect and allegiance. In all life's relations he has 
been true to every trust reposed in him, and his support of all worthy meas- 
ures for the public good has made him a valued and esteemed citizen of his 
native county. 



SAMUEL M. HOPPING. 



The subject of this review is the oldest representative of the family now 
living in Morris county, and was born March 22, 1822. His father was 
Charles Hopping, who was born on the old homestead, in 1796, attended 
the district schools and later learned the trade of blacksmith and conducted 
a shop in Hanover for some years. He also kept a hotel for a time, and in 
the later part of his career he followed farming. Having received a military 
training in the local militia of New Jersey, he was drafted for service in the 
war of 1 812. Charles Hopping first married Miss Maria Merry, a daughter 
of Samuel Merry, one of the representative citizens of Morris county, 
and three children were born of this union, namely: Luther, Elizabeth A. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 481 

and Samuel M. Mrs. Hopping died in 1822, and for his second wife he 
married Miss Mary Parker, a native of New York, whose parents came from 
Pompton Plains, Morris county. The children of this marriage comprised 
the following: Ann M., Margaret D. , Mary N. , Susan E., Emma and 
William H. Mr. Hopping's death occurred in 1880 and that of his wife in 
March, 1879. His father was John Hopping, of whom incidental mention 
will be found in another portion of this work. 

Samuel M. Hopping was reared and educated at Hanover, New Jersey, 
and passed the days of his minority at home, assisting in the work of the 
farm. In 1847 he purchased his present place, consisting of one hundred 
and seventy-six acres, on which he has erected a substantial residence and out- 
buildings, and for the past fifty years has devoted his time and attention to 
agricultural pursuits. Politically he is affiliated with the Republican party, 
and has served as county freeholder, commissioner of appeals, attorney and 
in several other minor capacities. He is a man widely known throughout 
the county and enjoys that respect and consideration that are merited by 
every man of worth and integrity. 

On the 3d of November, 1846, Mr. Hopping was united in marriage to 
Miss Susan E. Fish, a daughter of Nathan and Justine A. (Berthu) Fish, and 
a native of Morris county whose ancestors came from Long Island. The 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hopping are as follows: Justine Elizabeth, 
Ellen F. , Sumner S. , married Eva Shipman, who bore him two children, 
Hattie E., and Florence C, who died on the 1st of July, 1892. Lucy 
M. and Jane E. (wife of Daniel M. Shipman, of Morris county, New Jersey.) 
The ancestors of Justine A. Berthu were of French descent. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hopping are members of the Hanover Presbyterian church. 



WILLIAM BARTLEY. 



At no time or place do we find a large enterprise, carefully managed and 
running smoothly year after year, furnishing employment to numbers of 
men and proving a benefit alike to employer and employe, without finding 
back of it all a truly great man. Such a one is found in the subject of this 
sketch, William Bartley, who is at the head of the foundry and machine- 
shop industry in the town which bears his name, — Bartley, New Jersey. A 
review of his life is of interest in this connection, and is as follows: 

William Bartley was born in Morris county, New Jersey, in close prox- 
imity to his present location, March 3, 1825. The Bartley family have long 
been residents of this country. John Bartley was a patriot in the Amer- 
ican Revolution, and when not engaged in war was a prominent farmer, well 
known and highly respected. He was a resident of Somerset county, New 



5a 



482 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Jersey, where his son Hugh, the father of our subject, was born. Hugh 
Bartley, like his father, was a prominent farmer, a leading spirit in his 
locality, and was actively interested in the political affairs of his day. He 
was a colonel in the state militia during the days of training and drilling. He 
married Sarah Potter, a daughter of Samuel Potter, and the children born 
to them were as follows: Mary C, wife of J. S. Solomon; Jonathan; Sam- 
uel, who died at Princeton, Illinois; Elizabeth, deceased, who was the wife 
of Aaron Solomon; Hannah P.; William, the immediate subject of this 
review; and Hugh, Jr. 

William Bartley passed his youth and early manhood on the old home 
farm, near the village of Bartley, and acquired the rudiments of his educa- 
tion in the country schools. His knowledge of books gained in the little 
country school-house has, year by year, been supplemented by that broader 
knowledge which is to be obtained only in the school of experience. He 
remained on the farm until he attained his majority. Then he engaged in 
the foundry business under the firm name of Bartley & King, near his pres- 
ent location, and was afterward in the same business at Pottersville, with 
one of the Potters, with whom he remained five years. At the end of this 
time he returned to the valley of his nativity and engaged in business for 
himself, erecting his first building for the purpose in 1861. As necessity 
demanded, he from time to time enlarged his plant until it assumed its pres- 
ent large proportions. To-day it is an enterprise of considerable importance 
to Morris county. Both the factory and' the beautiful little hamlet of Bartley 
are monuments to our subject and reflect his progressive spirit. 

Mr. Bartley is a Democrat, was at one time active in political matters 
in the township, and is an ex-freeholder of the same. Religiously he is a 
Presbyterian. He is an influential member of the church at Flanders and 
contributes largely to its support. Indeed, he is generous to a fault, giving 
freely of his means to any and all worthy causes. 

Mr. Bartley was married in 1850 to Miss Almira Wolfe, daughter of 
Augustus Wolfe, and of their children we make brief record as follows: 
Samuel, who was born September 4, 1856, married Mary L. Slater, and has 
seven children — Edith, Eva, William, Helen, Mabel, Anna and Lila. Augus- 
tus H., whc was born September 1, 1858, married Lizzie N. Sharp, and is 
the father of three children — Meta, Mary and Irenaeus P. William Blauvelt, 
the third child in order of birth, was born August 12,1860, and died in infancy. 
Irenaeus P., the youngest child of our subject, was born December 9, 1861, 
and his death occurred in November, 1888. He was a promising young man, 
being a skilled civil engineer and draughtsman, and was connected with his 
father's establishment for some years. For about two years he held a 
responsible position with an important bridge concern at St. Joseph, Mis- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HIS TOBY. 483 

souri, after which he became associated with his father, as above stated. He 
was a young man of fine character and marked ability, and his untimely 
death was a great blow to those near and dear to him. 



WILLIAM G. SHARP, D. D. S. 

One of the progressive and well known members of the dental profession 
in Morristown, William Green Sharp was born at Budd Lake, Morris county, 
New Jersey, on the 6th of September, 1869, a son of John B. and Emma 
Louise (Green) Sharp, both of whom also were born in Morris county. 
Jesse N. Sharp, the grandfather of William G. , was born in German Valley, 
Morris county, in 1 8 1 5, and died in 1895. He was of German ancestry and 
his father, J. B. Sharp, was an early settler at German Valley. John B. 
Sharp died more than twenty years ago, and his widow married Dr. H. B. 
Andrews, of Morristown, in 1880, and is at present residing in this city. 

William Green Sharp, whom this mention immediately concerns, was 
reared in Morris county, where his early educational discipline was obtained 
in the district schools, and supplemented by a course of study at Morris 
Academy. Upon leaving the latter institution he went to New York and 
entered the dental college connected with New York University, at which he 
was graduated in 1892. For a few years after receiving his diploma Dr. 
Sharp practiced his profession in Freehold, New Jersey, and then, in 1S94, 
he returned to the county of his nativity, locating in Morristown, where he 
soon built up a remunerative practice and gained for himself an excellent 
reputation for his distinct ability in this line of enterprise. He is a bright 
young man, well versed in the technicalities of his calling, and brings to his 
work an enthusiasm and intellectual attainments that have placed him in the 
front rank among his fellow practitioners. He is a popular member of the 
New Jersey State Dental Association and the Central Dental Association. 



LEWIS C. TOMPKINS. 



One of the prominent and well-known business men of Morristown is 
Lewis C. Tompkins, who was born at Littleton, Morris county, New Jersey, 
on the 23d of October, 1843, a son of Uzal P. and Julia Ann (Christian) 
Tompkins, both of whom were natives of New Jersey. The paternal grand- 
father was Jonathan Tompkins, a representative of an old New Jersey family 
and a descendant of one of three brothers who emigrated from England to 
this country at an early day. Uzal P. Tompkins was a hatter by trade, but 
during the most of his life engaged in farming pursuits. He died in Morris 
county in 1863, aged about fifty-two years. Mrs. Tompkins departed this 



484 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

life in 1893, in her seventy-eighth year. They were the parents of six chil- 
dren, namely: Elvira J., Theo D., Eliza S. , deceased, George W. , Lewis 
C. , and Mary L. , deceased. 

Lewis C. Tompkins spent his early days in Littleton, acquiring his 
literary education in the public schools of that place. After leaving school 
he clerked for a while in a store. At the age of seventeen he left home to 
take up life on his own responsibility, and went to Rockaway, where he 
obtained a clerkship in a stove and tinware store, continuing to be thus 
employed for five years, and then came to Morristown, arriving here on the 
1st of January, 1866. May 13, 1867, he entered the employ of J. M. Ben- 
jamin, dealer in stoves and tinware, with whom he remained until his 
(Benjamin's) death, in January, 1875, when he and William E. Welsh pur- 
chased the business, which they have since conducted at the old stand, No. 
17 Market street. Although they began with little more capital than a good 
name and an excellent credit, which was theirs by reason of their known 
reliability and integrity in business circles, they soon acquired a large patron- 
age, and success has attended their efforts in this line of enterprise. They 
occupy the place now owned by them, with a frontage of fifty-two feet and 
a depth of eighty feet, with two floors forty by eighty feet, and they carry a 
complete and varied stock of tin, sheet-iron and copper ware, parlor and 
cook stoves, furnaces and ranges, besides which they do plumbing, gas and 
steam fitting and tin and slate roofing; and the business done by this firm 
requires the employment of fourteen assistants, all of whom are competent 
in their respective departments. 

In politics Mr. Tompkins is for the "best man." He is a member of 
the Odd Fellows lodge of Morristown, and a leading officer in the Golden 
Star fraternity, holding now the second office in the order. He has been a 
member of the Baptist church for thirty-three years, and a trustee of the 
same for more than twenty years. He was married in 1866 to Miss Annie 
E. Vanderhoof, of Denville, New Jersey, and of their five children only two 
survive, J. Hayes and Frank E. The deceased children are Lena A., who 
died at the age of fourteen years; Roy Mills, who died at the age of ten, and 
May Eliza, who lived to the age of nine years. 



JOHN W. HAYS. 

For more than thirty years Mr. Hays was one of the leading contractors 
and builders of Morristown and a prominent factor in the progress and 
improvement of the locality, while a long ancestral history connects him with 
the period of early development in this section of the state. His honored 
father, Joseph P. Hays, who is still living, tells the story of the pioneer times, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 485 

as related to him by the participants in the events. His grandfather, Abial 
Hays, was born about the year 1752, when "the colonies" were still in pos- 
session of Great Britain. As the years passed and the yoke of British oppres- 
sion began to bear more heavily upon them, the spirit of resistance began to 
make itself manifest and at last resulted in an organized opposition known in 
history as the war of the Revolution. Deeply in sympathy with his fellow- 
colonists, Mr. Hays joined the American army and was made a colonel of a 
New Jersey regiment. At the battle of Springfield a record still extant tells 
how he manifested a spirit of bravery by rescuing a friend who had been shot. 
The account says: "At this time, as the army was approaching the meeting 
house, a Mr. Ball had stationed himself behind a shoeshop at the foot of 
Church hill, across the road, to watch the movements of the enemy. As he 
was looking from his hiding place to see how near they had come, a ball 
passed through his head and brought him to the ground. On the opposite 
side of the street Abial Hays and James W. Wade were secreted behind a 
shoe-shop and were witnesses to the fate of Mr. Ball. Not willing to see him 
suffering without offering assistance Mr. Hays crossed the street in the face of 
the enemy and carried away his companion under cover of the shop and 
house behind which the unhappy Ball had fallen, and bore him to the house 
where Joel Searing now resides, in Connecticut Farms." Colonel Hays died 
in 1824. 

His son, West Hays, was born in Irvington, New Jersey, in 1781, and 
married Hannah Smith, a daughter of Stephen Smith, whose wife was a sis- 
ter of James W. Wade, mentioned in the little Revolutionary incident given 
above. West Hays was a sawyer and weaver, following both occupations. 
To him and his wife were born the following named: Keturah, who married 
Thomas Day; Abbie; Sarah, who married Anson Traver; and Joseph P. 

The father of our subject, Joseph P. Hays, was born in Irvington, New 
Jersey, January 13, 1809, and in early manhood went to Westfield, where 
he engaged in shoemaking for a number of years. He afterward established 
a grocery store, which he successfully conducted for some time, and later he 
carried on a grocery in Scotch Plains. In the year 1864 he entered the serv- 
ice of the government, in the quartermaster's department at Hilton Head, 
where he remained until the close of the war. In 1866 he came to Morris- 
town and accepted the position of bookkeeper for the firm of Greenwood & 
Hays, serving in that capacity for fifteen years. He filled the office of jus- 
tice of the peace and that of police justice in Morristown for some years and 
conducted the public business with that fairness and ripe judgment that can 
only come from an extended experience in dealing with men. He has now, 
at the age of eighty-nine, almost the vigor of a man in his prime, and his 
mental and physical faculties have withstood with remarkable strength the 



486 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

inroads of time. His life spans a wonderful period. Even colonial history is 
familiar to him from the accounts of those who participated therein, and he has 
witnessed the wonderful progress of the republic, the introduction of the rail- 
road, the telegraph, the telephone and the marvelous inventions relating to 
all the industrial arts. He has witnessed the downfall of slavery, great 
changes in governmental policy and wonderful advancement in science, let- 
ters and art. He has outlived all his boyhood associates and even the friends 
of his early manhood, and therefore has no one with whom he can review the 
scenes and events of the past, for the younger generation have newer and 
different interests. He has, however, the respect and high regard of many 
of Morristown's citizens, who enjoy hearing him relate his reminiscences of 
days of " auld lang syne." 

Joseph P. Hays married Miss Maria Clark, eldest daughter of Ezekiel 
and Huma (Badgley) Clark. Mrs. Hays died in 1861, leaving the following 
children: John W. ; Anna Eliza, wife of Joseph Blanchard; Abbie G. , wife 
wife of Cornelius B. Willet; Joseph A.; William H.; and Kate M., widow of 
James A. North. 

John W. Hays, whose name begins this article, is a worthy representa- 
tive of an honored old family, and has added new dignity and luster to the 
untarnished name. He was born in Westfield, on the 29th of April, 1839, 
acquired a fair education in the public school, and when fourteen years of age 
began working on a farm. The following year he assisted his father in car- 
rying on the grocery store in Scotch Plains, and when sixteen years of age 
he began learning the carpenter's trade with M. S. Dunn, of Scotch Plains. 
Having mastered the business, he worked as a journeyman in Newark for 
several years, and in 1863 located in Morristown, where he has since made 
his home. In 1865 the firm of Greenwood & Hays was established, and for 
thirty years it continued one of the most popular and reliable concerns in the 
city. They did a very successful and extensive business and many of the 
most important buildings in the city stand as monuments to their architect- 
ural and industrial skill. They received a liberal patronage and their fidelity 
in fulfilling the terms of a contract always insured them a continuance of 
the business of a patron. Mr. Hays was connected with the building inter- 
ests of Morristown until 1895, when he withdrew from that enterprise, and 
is now with the real-estate department of the Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany. 

He has been twice married. In 1859 he was joined in wedlock to Miss 
Eliza Tompkins, of Littleton, New Jersey, who died in 1866, and in 1868 he 
married Miss Eliza S. Tompkins, daughter of Usal Tompkins. She was 
called to the home beyond in 1895. The children of Mr. Hays are Joseph 
A., who married Clara Barrett; Eliza S., wife of D. A. Yauger, of Norwich, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 487 

Connecticut; Harry H. ; Fred O., who married Phoebe Pierson; William B. ; 
Lewis T. and John R. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Hays is a Democrat, and is a prominent 
representative of his party. He has been honored with several offices, — has 
served as a member of the board of freeholders for four years, as a member 
of the town committee for three years, is a member of the Washington Asso- 
ciation and belongs to Washington Engine Company, No. i. Socially he is 
a Royal Arch Mason and in his religious connections is a Baptist. His life 
has been well spent and has been crowned with financial success and the high 
regard of those with whom he has been brought in contact. His business 
career has been characterized by energy, enterprise and progressiveness, and 
by resolute purpose and close application he has worked his way upward to 
a position of affluence. His life, in all its relations, is honorable and straight- 
forward and commends him to the confidence and good will of all. 



JESSE WEISE. 

The subject of this review was born on the 20th of July, 1849, in Ger- 
man Valley, the place of his present residence. His childhood and youth 
were here passed, his business training was here received, and now he is 
numbered among the substantial and progressive merchants of the town. 
His father, the late John H. Weise, was for many years one of the most 
prominent characters in the valley. He operated a tannery and extensively 
carried on agricultural pursuits, owning land not only in New Jersey, but also 
in the state of Iowa. His well-conducted interests brought to him an excel- 
lent and desirable financial return. He married Margaret Weise, who, like 
himself, was of German lineage. Their children were: Edward, who 
resided for some years in German Valley, but is now deceased; Andrew; 
Marilda, widow of William R. Miller; Lawrence, who also has passed away; 
Henry; Elizabeth, wife of John T. Naughright; John; Jesse; Mary, wife of 
Jacob M. Weise, a resident of Morris Plains; and Jacob, who completes the 
family and is living in German Valley. 

On his father's farm Jesse Weise spent the days of his boyhood and 
youth. He assisted in the labors of field and meadow, early becoming 
familiar with all the duties that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. However, 
not wishing to make the tilling of the soil a life work, he entered upon a 
mercantile experience when twenty years of age, accepting a clerkship in the 
store of his brother Edward, in German Valley, with whom he remained as 
an employe for ten years. During that time he mastered the business in 
every detail, learned the methods pursued in commercial life and the ethics 
which should govern the career of an honorable merchant. He also acquired, 



488 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

besides this practical knowledge, a competence with which he resolved to 
engage in business on his own account, and purchased his brother's store. 
He is still conducting this enterprise, and is regarded as a safe, prosperous 
and conservative business man. 

Mr. Weise was married, in German Valley, in September, 1881, the 
lady of his choice being Miss Ella A. Neighbour, a daughter of Silas and 
Lydia (Apgar) Neighbour, the latter a daughter of Frederick Apgar. Mr. 
Neighbour was a prominent and worthy farmer of this locality and a repre- 
sentative of one of the pioneer families of Hunterdon and Morris counties. 
His children are Mrs. Weise; Louise; and Stewart, who married Kate B. 
Hann. 



LEVI D. BABBITT. 



One of the thoroughgoing business men of Morristown, who has climbed 
the ladder of success and gathered the fruits of honorable, earnest toil, is Mr. 
Babbitt, the subject of this sketch. For forty-four years he has been a resi- 
dent of his city, his name inseparably connected with commercial interests 
here. The salient points in his business career are resolute purpose, unflag- 
ging industry and unabating zeal, and to these are attributable the prosperity 
which crowns his life work. 

In the Life and Memories of Charlotte Cushman is found the early 
history of the Babbitt family, from which we glean the following items: 
The Cushmans were among the Pilgrims, Robert Cushman being the founder 
of the family in the United States. Dr. Erasmus Babbitt was a leading phy- 
sician of Sturbridge, Massachusetts, and also a prominent citizen. In 1758 
he married Mrs. Mary (Marcy) Remington, a daughter of Colonel Moses 
Marcy and a widow of Dr. Meshach Remington, the first physician in Stur- 
bridge. The second child, Thomas Babbitt, graduated at Harvard in 1784, 
studying medicine under Dr. Warren in Boston. Erasmus Babbitt, Jr., his 
second son and third child, also graduated at Harvard, in 1790, studied law 
and married Mary Saunders, and they were the grandparents of Charlotte 
Cushman, her mother being the daughter of Mary Eliza, who married the 
seventh Elkanah Cushman, who was the father of the celebrated Charlotte. 

Erasmus Babbitt, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, removed from 
Litchfield, Connecticut, to Morris county and engaged in the manufacture of 
nails in connection with work at the blacksmith's trade. He resided for 
many years in Mendham, New Jersey, and there passed away at the age of 
sixty years. He married Miss Elizabeth Banks, and their children were: 
Elias R., Sarah, Nancy, Martha, Ebenezer, AmziA., John and James. The 
father of our subject, Elias R. Babbitt, was born in Mendham and for many 






-v6£zu 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 489 

years engaged in business there as a merchant tailor, also at No. 3 Chatham 
street, New York (was there in 1828); he did business for the grandfather 
of the present firm of Brooks Brothers, extensive manufacturers of clothing 
in New York city. He married Evelina Bailey, of Middletown, Connecticut, 
who had previously been married. Her first husband was William Louns- 
bury, of Stamford, Connecticut, and to them was born a son, William Louns- 
bury, Jr. To Mr. and Mrs. Babbitt were born six children: Joseph, George, 
Levi D., Louise, Eveline and Hampton M. The father was a Democrat in 
politics and a leading business man of Mendham. He died in 1850, at the 
age of fifty-seven years, and his wife, who long survived him, passed away in 
1 89 1, at the advanced age of ninety-one years. She was a member of the 
Presbyterian church. 

Levi Dayton Babbitt was born at Mendham, New Jersey, December 20, 
1 83 1, and remained in that place until twenty-two years of age, when he 
came to Morristown, where he has since made his home. He has always 
engaged in the clothing business, carries a large stock and has a splendidly 
equipped store. His long continuance in business here indicates his success 
and his standing in business circles. He commenced life with no capital 
save a good knowledge of tailoring and a laudable ambition to succeed, and 
has steadily worked his way upward to affluence. 

Mr. Babbitt was married in 1868 to Miss Sarah M. Cramer, and their 
children are Horace A., William Dayton, Ella A., E. Nelson, P. Paul, 
George E. and Louise Evelina. In his political views Mr. Babbitt is a 
Democrat and has served as a member of the Morristown common council, 
of the township committee and of the board of education for seven years and 
would not serve longer. Socially he is connected with the Masonic fraternity, 
and is also a member of the Memorial Association of Morristown. 



WELLS LAWRENCE. 

The well known citizen of Mendham whose name initiates this review 
belongs to one of the oldest families of Morris county. The ancestral home 
of the Lawrences, which is now his place of abode, was the birthplace of his 
great-grandfather, his grandfather, and his father, and there, on the 4th of 
March, 1843, he first opened his eyes to the light of day. The first two 
generations devoted their attention exclusively to the tilling of the soil, and 
took little part in public affairs aside from the faithful performance of their 
duties of citizenship. The grandfather was buried in the cemetery in 
Chester. 

The father of our subject, Aaron Lawrence, was born in 1800 and died 
in 1873. He learned the carpenter's trade in Mendham and within the time 



490 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

he prosecuted that business he passed two years in New York city. In mid- 
dle life he returned to the old home farm and engaged in its cultivation until 
his life's labors were ended in death. From the time he attained his major- 
ity he gave his unwavering support to the principles of Democracy and voted 
for every presidential candidate with the exception of Horace Greeley, when 
he was endorsed by the Democrats in 1872. Mr. Lawrence married Miss 
Lydia Brown, of Chester, who died in 1889. Their children were: Arnold, 
who at one time served as a freeholder of Morris county and who died in 
1896; Sarah J., wife of Theodore Burnett, of this county; Stephen, deceased; 
Jefferson, of Springfield, Ohio; David, of Kansas City, Kansas; William, who 
has departed this life; Augusta, deceased; Wells; Lemuel, deceased; James, 
who once served as freeholder of Morris county, and has now departed this 
life; Laura, wife of Marius Robinson, of Mendham; Elizabeth, wife of Will- 
iam Vandeveer; and Carrie, deceased wife of Wesley Burd, of Kansas City, 
Kansas. 

Mr. Lawrence received but limited educational privileges. He attended 
the Mountain school to some extent during his youth, and when he had 
attained his majority he started westward, going to Sangamon county, Illinois, 
where he was engaged in farming for nine years, near the village of Virden. 
He next went to Warrensburg, Missouri, where he joined a brother who was 
just starting for Texas. Going to the Lone Star state they took a contract 
for grading on the Southern Pacific Railroad, their work being between Sher- 
man and Jefferson. In 1872, after a year spent in that work, they started 
northward, traveling by team, in company with Victor Hornbeck, driving to 
Warrensburg, Missouri, thence across the state to Alton, Illinois, then on to 
Springfield, Ohio, making a distance of seventeen hundred and fifty miles. 
From Springfield, Mr. Lawrence at once proceeded on his way to his old 
home in New Jersey and has since been identified with the interests of Morris 
county. 

He has since been one of the most important factors in county politics, 
giving an unwavering allegiance to the principles of Democracy. He is 
always seen in the county and state convention halls and his advice and 
counsel carry much weight in the councils of his party. He was elected a 
member of the board of county freeholders in 1887 and again two years later, 
receiving a majority of one each time. At a third election he received a 
majority of twenty-two and for a fourth time was nominated for the office, 
but was defeated. In 1894 he was appointed by Governor Werts to a posi- 
tion on the board of prison inspectors, for a term of five years, and is now 
faithfully discharging the duties of that office. In 1893 Mr. Lawrence served 
as assistant bill clerk in the senate and assembly of New Jersey, having been 
appointed by the senate. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 491 



WILLIAM H. GRIMES. 

A resident of Parsippany, Mr. Grimes is one of the leading builders of 
Hanover township. He was born September 20, 1849, m tn ' s locality, and 
his father, Henry Grimes, also claims Hanover township as the place of his 
nativity, his birth having there occurred on the 4th of March, 1807. He 
spent his life as a farmer and undertaker, and died in 1884. His political 
support was given the Republican party and he served his township as justice 
of the peace. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Ann E. Righter, was 
a daughter of Michael Righter, was born January 25, 1812, and died in March, 
1894. Their children were: Eliza A., wife of S. H. Mackey, of New York 
city; Josiah Q., who died in the army during the Civil war; Jonathan C., who 
died in 1892; William H. ; and Jesse, who died in childhood. 

The paternal grandfather, Jonathan Casper Grimes, was born in Halsey- 
town, Morris county, in 1773, and died in 1845. He was a blacksmith and 
farmer and spent his entire life near Parsippany. He married Miss Hulda 
Leonard, of Pinebrook, and to them were born six children, as follows: 
John, who was a physician; Jerusha, who married Samuel Marshall; Henry; 
James B. ; Mary A., wife of Frederick Stone; and Stephen. In his youth 
William H. Grimes attended the public schools of Parsippany and later was 
a student in the high school of Boonton. As a life work he chose carpenter- 
ing, and learned the trade under the direction of Charles F. Ogden, of Troy 
Hills. Almost as soon as he had completed his apprenticeship he began con- 
tracting, and for the past five years has been a member of the firm of Hopler 
& Grimes. Among the many buildings for which he has taken contracts and 
which have been erected under his supervision are the residences of Philip 
Lozier, Theodore Ringlieb, M. S. Condit and Monroe Howell, all of Boon- 
ton, and the church chapel at Parsippany, the residences of McEwan Brothers 
and Judge Wilson in Whippany, and the first opera house in Boonton. He 
is most reliable in all business transactions and his efficiency in his chosen 
calling, combined with his honorable business methods, has secured to him a 
large and constantly increasing patronage. Mr. Grimes was married May 30, 
1877, to Miss Margaret Van Ness, a daughter of James and Mary Ann (Pier- 
son) Van Ness, and their home is blessed with the presence of three children: 
Henry; Allen K. and Norman V. 

Mr. Grimes has taken quite an active part in political affairs in Hanover 
township and is an ardent advocate of Republican principles. On that ticket 
he was elected to the office of freeholder and by re-election was continued in 
that position for seven consecutive years. While a member of the board he 
served on the committee on miscellany, the insurance and lunacy committee, 
and during the last two years of his service was chairman of the court- 



492 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

house and jail committee. His devotion to the public welfare makes him 
one of the valued citizens of the community and in the business and public 
life of Hanover township he is an important factor. 



HON. ELIAS C. DRAKE. 



Among the most loyal of the citizens of Morris county are many who are 
numbered among her native sons. From childhood they have been inter- 
ested in her welfare and are now largely devoting the best years of their 
manhood to her progress and advancement. To this class belongs Mr. 
Drake, whose interest in his city, county and state is deep and earnest, 
springing from a true desire to promote all matters pertaining to its growth 
and improvement. 

On a farm just north of the village of Chester, on the 15th of Decem- 
ber, 1853, our subject first opened his eyes to the light of day, his parents 
being Simeon and Abbie Drake. His paternal grandfather was Elias Drake, 
a blacksmith by trade and a quiet, industrious citizen of this locality. Three 
of his children still survive: Mrs. Catherine Squier, Mrs. Charlotte Leek 
and Simeon. The maternal grandfather of our subject was Christopher 
Hildebrant, a son of Jacob Hildebrant, a representative of a family that 
removed from Hunterdon to Morris county. Simeon Drake is a prominent 
and well known farmer of Chester township, progressive, enterprising and 
reliable, and his standing in the community is high. By his marriage to 
Miss Abbie Hildebrant he had three children, namely: Nelson H., a sur- 
geon in the United States navy; Elias C. ; and John J., of Mt. Freedom, New 
Jersey. 

Reared in the usual manner of farmer lads and educated in the district 
school, there was nothing out of the ordinary in the boyhood and youth of 
Elias C. Drake. He assisted in the labors of field and meadow, and his first 
business venture on his own account was the establishment of a general 
mercantile store in Chester, which he conducted for nine years. He met 
with good success in that undertaking and when he closed out in that line he 
embarked in the lumber business, which he has since profitably conducted. 
He has an extensive trade in this commodity and his honorable business 
dealing, careful management and untiring industry insure him a continuation 
of success. 

In matters political, in Chester township, as well as throughout the 
entire county, Mr. Drake has long been a very important factor. Since 
twenty years of age he has exerted a wide influence in the councils of his 
party and is well fitted for leadership in this direction and the manipulation 
of the delicate machinery of political management. Democracy has ever 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 493 

found in him a stalwart advocate and on that ticket he has been chosen to a 
number of official positions. He has served his town as committeeman, as 
clerk and as assessor, and in 1884 and 1885 was elected to the lower house 
of the general assembly, where he labored earnestly in support of his views. 
As his party was in the minority his committee appointments were of an 
unimportant character, being confined to miscellaneous business and militia. 
In 1888 and 1889 he was engrossing clerk of the house and his work in that 
capacity earned for him the plaudits of his party and the congratulations of 
the opposition. In 1892 he was elected to the state senate and at that elec- 
tion was the only man in the state who led the presidential candidate in a 
single county, and this he did in Morris county to the extent of one hundred 
and thirty-eight votes. In the senate he was chairman of the committees on 
engrossed bills, lunatic asylums and reform schools for boys. He secured 
the passage of a bill repealing all game laws enacted within the past eighteen 
years, and also secured the passage of some bills of local importance. He 
was one of the most popular members of the senate, and was an industrious 
and untiring worker for his immediate constituents. He secured considerable 
legislation of direct benefit to the county, surpassing any previous senator in 
this respect. 

Senator Drake was married in Chester, in 1878, to Miss Emma R. Burd, 
a daughter of Terry H. Burd, and they now have two children, John A. and 
Mabel V. Mr. Drake is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and has taken the encampment degrees. He is a man of strong personal 
magnetism and attracts others to him by his sincerity and marked sympathy. 
He never forgets a friend and never loses one, but on the other hand has the 
happy faculty of drawing them nearer to him as the years go by. 



WATSON B. MATTHEWS. 

The efficient superintendent of the public schools of Madison is one of the 
successful educators of the state and has attained a wide reputation. His 
labors in Madison have greatly advanced the standard of education here and 
the school system is one of which Madison's residents may well be proud. 
Professor Matthews is a native of the Keystone state, his birth having 
occurred in Bradford county, Pennsylvania, in 1854. His parents, A. G. 
and Sally (Cook) Matthews, were natives of Connecticut, and the former was 
a woolen manufacturer, conducting that industry for a number of years. Later, 
however, he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits in Pennsylvania. 

In the public schools of his native county Watson B. Matthews obtained 
his elementary education and later received private instruction from the Rev. 
D. Cook. He spent two years as a student in Lafayette College, pursued 



f 



494 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

a business course, and also a course in the Normal School in Rome, 
Pennsylvania. Professor Matthews then turned his attention to educational 
work and for a time was connected with schools in Atlantic county. In 1892 
he came to Madison to accept the position of superintendent here and has since 
served in that capactity, to the satisfaction of the public and to the great benefit 
of the school system. There had been hardly any attempt made to grade 
the schools here and with his experience in this line of work Mr. Matthews 
began the task of thus systematizing the work, which is now divided into the 
primary, intermediate and grammar departments and the high-school work, 
which embraces four years and includes both an English and Latin course. 
After graduation from this school, a student is fitted to enter the second year in 
the Normal School, and of the ten graduated in the class of 1895 several en- 
tered the Normal or became college students. The attendance has increased 
until now there is an enrollment of four hundred pupils and in all depart- 
ments the school is doing excellent work as the result of the well-directed, 
practical and beneficial efforts of Professor Matthews, who is an able educator 
having the happy faculty of quickly and clearly imparting to others the 
knowledge that he has acquired. 

In 1877 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Matthews and Miss Ella 
Potter, a native of Bradford, Pennsylvania. Their home is blessed with the 
presence of three children: Bertha, Raymond and Ester, and their household 
is the center of a cultured society circle. 



EDWARD B. LEWIS. 

Mr. Lewis is a general farmer and dairyman, of Randolph township, 
and is descended from one of the old New England families that was founded 
in America by emigrants from England during an early epoch in the history 
of this country. His great-grandfather, Edward, and his grandfather, David 
Lewis, were both heroes of the Revolution, who fought for the independence 
of the colonies. The latter built what is known as the old Lewis sawmill, 
the first in that part of Morris county. The father of our subject was 
Edward Lewis, a native of Randolph township, born in 1793. He made 
farming his life occupation and was one of the leading agriculturists of the 
community. In his political views he was a Democrat and in religious faith 
was a Methodist. His death occurred in 1871. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Susan Lefever, was also a native of Randolph township, and died in 
1864. Her father was James Lefever, one of the pioneer settlers of the 
community. By her marriage she had two sons, one of whom, David M. 
Lewis, is now a resident of Atlantic, Iowa. 

The other, Edward B. Lewis, was reared on the old homestead belong- 




X 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HIS WET. 495 

ing to his father and in the winter season was sent to the old Wolf school, 
where he acquired a fair knowledge of the English branches of learning. He 
continued under the parental roof until he had attained his majority, when 
he purchased the old homestead and turned his attention to agricultural 
pursuits on his own account. He was united in marriage to Miss Phoebe T. 
Merchant, of Randolph township, Morris county, the second daughter of 
Daniel P. and Eliza (Cary) Merchant. Her father was one of the hon- 
ored pioneers of this county and did most of his farming and teaming with 
ox teams. He improved the farm which is now owned by our subject, who 
has here about two hundred acres of rich and arable land, all under a high 
state of cultivation. Mr. Merchant died upon the old homestead in 1880, 
and his wife passed away in 1883, they having spent their last days with Mr. 
and Mrs. Lewis. All who knew them held them in the highest regard and 
their friends were many. 

In 1884 Mr. Lewis purchased the old Merchant homestead, and now has 
one of the best improved farms in his section of the county. He has erected 
large barns for the shelter of his horses and cows, and for a number of years 
he has successfully engaged in the dairy business, which he follows with suc- 
cess, having a large patronage in Dover. He follows the most advanced and 
progressive methods in the management of his farm and dairy, and in addition 
he has upon the place a good fish pond which is fed by never-failing springs. 
Mr. Lewis is assisted in his work by his younger son, Silas M., while the 
older son, David M., is living in Elizabeth, New Jersey. 

In his political views Mr. Lewis is a Democrat and has been honored 
with a number of local offices of trust, having served as township clerk, 
school trustee and treasurer of Randolph township, discharging his duties 
with marked fidelity and promptness. He and his family are members of the 
Mt. Freedom Presbyterian church, and are ever found on the side of all 
questions which tends toward the betterment of mankind. 



JOSEPH D. BUDD. 

Residing in Chester and holding official preferment as one of the assessors 
of the township, Mr. Budd was born in his home city on the 6th of Septem- 
ber, 1857, and is a representative of one of the most prominent families in 
Morris county, a family whose long line of ancestors extends back to colonial 
history and embraces some of the leading local patriots of the war of the 
Revolution. John Budd, the great-great-grandfather of our subject, came 
from Westchester county, New York, and located at Black River, now Ches- 
ter township, Morris county, in the early part of the eighteenth century. He 
was accompanied by a son, Daniel, the great-grandfather of Joseph D., who 



496 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HLSTORY. 

was born in 1722 and died in 1806. He was the father of Colonel John 
Budd, who commanded a regiment of troops in the Revolutionary war, and 
at the conclusion of that international struggle he settled at Budd's Lake 
and was the founder of that branch of the family. His brother, Captain Jo- 
seph Budd, was captain of a company at Sandy Hook during our second war 
with Great Britain, and was born in 1774, his death taking place in 1827. 
His wife was a Miss Joanna Swazy, and his mother, whose maiden name was 
Mary L'Estrange, was a descendant of French Huguenots. 

Hon. Daniel Budd, son of Captain Joseph and Joanna (Swazy) Budd, 
was born June 8, 1809, and was a gentleman of exceptional natural endow- 
ments, possessing a strong intellect and a robust physique. His knowledge 
concerning all current subjects was full and complete, and his capability as 
an expounder of the doctrines of his party resulted in his being conceded the 
leader of Democracy in his part of the county. He was elected to the assem- 
bly and after an honorable career as a member of that distinguished body he 
was chosen state senator. In the senate he was chairman of the committee 
on appropriations. In his township he had served as freeholder for many 
years and wielded a commanding influence on the board. Mr. Budd was as 
successful in business matters as he was in politics and for many years he 
was engaged in the manufacture of malleable iron. He was a state director 
of the Camden & Amboy Railroad, and to him was due in a large measure the 
building of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western branch of railway to Ches- 
ter. He possessed a philanthropic disposition, was kind and sympathetic in 
his treatment of the poor, in whose behalf his purse was ever open, and in 
1869 he erected in Chester a ladies' boarding school which was a popular 
place for the education and training of young women for many years. Mr. 
Budd's death occurred on the 1st of June, 1873. On the 25th of February, 
1847, he married Miss Mary Hunt, a daughter of John Hunt, of Sussex 
count}', and of the children born of this union, two survive, Joseph D., the 
subject of this review, and Anna H., the wife of John D. Evans, of New 
York city. 

Joseph D. Budd has passed his entire life in Chester, obtaining his 
mental discipline in the public schools and in Wilson Seminary, at East 
Hampton, Massachusetts. His preliminary business training was received 
in Eastman's Business College, at Poughkeepsie, after which his first ven- 
ture on his own responsibility was to go to Jefferson City, Montana, where 
he held a clerkship for one year, after which he returned to Chester and 
engaged in merchandising. He continued in this line of endeavor for five 
years and then embarked in the stock-dealing business, combined with which 
he followed farming, and met with a high degree of success. 

In his political faith Mr. Budd is an ardent advocate of Democracy, and 




^y^oLu^c ^^^^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 497 

has devoted his energies and talents to the support of his chosen party. He 
has on numerous occasions been associated with the town of Chester in an 
official way; he was elected collector in 1886, 1887 and 1888, and in 1897 he 
was chosen town assessor. He is a public-spirited citizen, alert and active 
in supporting all beneficent measures, and is accorded that distinguished 
consideration which is merited by all men who possess such exalted prin- 
ciples. 

The marriage of Mr. Budd was solemnized on the 12th of June, 1878, 
when he became united to Miss Jennie Spencer, a daughter of William N. 
Spencer, and two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Budd, namely: 
Mary H. and Daniel S. 



RICHARD BASSETT. 



A general farmer and dairyman, proprietor of the Mine Hill Dairy farm, 
Mr. Bassett was born in St. Austell, Cornwall, England, October 7, 1847, a 
son of John and Mary (Ballin) Bassett. His father, also a native of that 
place, was a farmer by occupation. The grandfather was William Bassett 
and the great-grandfather was John Bassett. 

The subject of this review was reared in the place of his nativity and 
received such educational advantages as the common schools there afforded. 
He continued upon the home farm until he had attained his majority, and in 
1870 came to the United States, landing at New York on October 6, 1870. 
He came direct from that city to Dover and rented a small farm, within the 
city limits, comprising twenty acres. There he began the dairy business, 
having only seven cows. He remained on that farm for a year or two and 
then rented the Mine Hill farm, which at that time was part of an estate. It 
comprised eighty acres, and for nine years he rented the place, at the expira- 
tion of which time he purchased the property, and from time to time has 
extended its boundaries by additional purchase, until it now comprises two 
hundred and thirty acres. Much of this is under a high state of cultivation 
and the remainder is rich pasture land. Good fences divide the place into 
fields of convenient size, and commodious barns, sheds and other neces- 
sary outbuildings have been erected for the care of grain and stock and 
for the successful conduct of the dairy business. These were built under the 
special supervision of Mr. Bassett, who is most progressive. His stalls for his 
cows are splendidly arranged and are supplied with fresh sawdust every day. 
On an average he milks from forty to sixty cows and sells the products of 
the dairy to a large number of patrons in Dover. Since his embarkation in 
the business, a quarter of a century ago, his trade has constantly increased 
and has brought to him a handsome income. He is also successfully engaged 

6a 



498 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

in general farming, and follows most practical methods, as the result of 
which his farm presents a very neat and thrifty appearance. 

September 21, 1870, Mr. Bassett was united in marriage to Miss Sarah 
Opie, a native of England and a daughter of William and Catherine (Penall) 
Opie. She was born April 15, 1844. They now have a family of three 
sons: William J., born in September, 1872, is cashier of the George J. 
Goodrich Bakery Company, of Newark, New Jersey; Thomas O., born 
March 29, 1876, and Richard C. , born July 21, 1878, who are assisting their 
father on the farm. The home is a pleasant residence, supplied with many 
modern improvements and conveniences. Mr. Bassett and his family are 
members of the First Presbyterian church of Mine Hill, and have the respect 
and esteem of their neighbors and friends. He has always been a liberal 
contributor to church and charitable enterprises. 



PETER L. STRUBLE. 



The ancestor of the American branch of this family was Peter Struble, 
a native of Strassburg, Germany, who came to this country with other Hugue- 
nots and soon afterward located in Sussex county, New Jersey, subsequently 
moving to Pennsylvania, where he was accidentally killed by being thrown 
from a colt. He was a remarkable man in many ways, spoke German, 
French and English, and lived to be one hundred and one years old. One 
of his sons was Leonard Struble, who was probably born in New Jersey, 
making his home in Sussex county, where he carried on farming. He was 
an educated man and, like his father, spoke German, French andiEnglish,and 
also taught school in this locality. He was the father of several sons, one 
of whom, Peter L. , was born in Newton township, Sussex county, New Jer- 
sey, and was a cabinetmaker, but passed the last years of his life on a farm. 
His youngest son, Oliver, the father of our subject, has always followed 
agricultural pursuits and now resides on the old homestead in Newton town- 
ship. He married Maria Shotwell, who was born in Augusta, Frankfort 
township, Sussex county, of English-Quaker parentage, and they became the 
parents of eight children. 

Peter L. Struble passed his early youth on his father's farm, receiving a 
limited education at Mount Retirement Seminary. In August, 1862, he 
enlisted as a private in Company D, Twenty-seventh New Jersey Volunteer 
Infantry, and served ten months, and upon his return he accepted a clerk- 
ship in Sussex county and served in this capacity for seven years. In 1875 
he came to Morristown and here became associated with George Fletcher 
Merrell in the undertaking business, this partnership continuing until the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 499 

death of Mr. Merrell, in December, 1896, since which time Mr. Struble has 
been successfully conducting the enterprise on his own responsibility. 

Mr. Struble married Miss Nan E. Strade, a daughter of Joseph H. 
Strade, of Sussex county, and a member of one of the old New Jersey fam- 
ilies. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Struble are: L. Grace and 
Alberta L. 



MATTHIAS T. WELSH. 



Many of the most important interests, business and otherwise, of the" 
town of German Valley, New Jersey, have an able representative in the 
gentleman whose name forms the heading of this article, Matthias T. Welsh, 
who is known for his enterprise and business acumen. 

Mr. Welsh is a native of "the valley" with which he is so prominently 
identified, having been born in the town of Middle Valley, July 27, 1857. 
His early years were passed at Middle Valley, where his father, the late John 
C. Welsh, was engaged in merchandising; and his education was obtained at 
one of the well known seats of learning in New England, Phillips' Academy, 
Andover, Massachusetts, of which he is a graduate with the class of 1880. 
During his vacations young Welsh devoted his time to assisting his brother in 
the store, and thus by the time he reached manhood he had acquired a 
knowledge of men and business as well as books. Soon after his graduation, 
in 1880, he engaged in the lumber and coal business on his own account, in 
German Valley, purchasing the interest of William Dalrymple & Son. For 
eleven years he dealt exclusively in lumber and coal, doing a prosperous and 
increasing business, and in 1894 he purchased property adjoining the station 
grounds, and added hardware and paints to his stock. 

Mr. Welsh is also interested in banking and insurance. He is vice- 
president of the Hackettstown National Bank, with which he has been con- 
nected as a director for the past ten years, and of which he is now one of 
the heaviest stockholders; and he is also a member of the board of directors 
of the Morris County Insurance Company. A warm friend of the public 
schools and deeply interested in higher education, his influence has for years 
been of vital importance in educational lines. For the past twelve years he 
has been a member of the board of education of Washington township, and 
at this writing is president of the board. 

Referring briefly to his family, we state that he was married September 
1, 1882, to Miss Mary E., daughter of the late Jacob M. Hager and his 
wife, nee Adaline Hunt. His four children are Christy, J. Miller, Harrison 
and an infant son. 



500 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

JAMES LONERGAN. 

As a well known contractor, Mr. Lonergan has for the past eighteen years 
been conspicuously identified with the building interests of Morristown. He 
is a native of Ireland, his birth having taken place in county Tipperary on the 
1 3th of March, 1852, a son of James and Bridget (Kennedy) Lonergan. The 
father came to America with his family in 1853 and settled in Morristown, 
where he followed gardening until his death, which occurred June 1, 1876. 
His wife departed this life July 19, 1873. Their two children wereour sub- 
ject and Catharine, who became the wife of Thomas McCarty, of New York 
city, and now a resident of Basking Ridge, New Jersey. 

James Lonergan was reared in Morristown, and there he attended the 
parochial schools until attaining his sixteenth year. The first money he ever 
had paid to him for services rendered came from a farmer, for whom he 
worked. After having spent one and one-half years in the plumbing trade 
with Thomas J. Fitch, of New York city, at the age of eighteen years he 
became apprenticed to the old-time" contractors, Schenck & Young, and upon 
the completion of his term he worked as a journeyman during the ensuing 
eight years, after which he became associated with Mr. Brown, under the 
firm name of Lonergan & Brown, contractors. This partnership was con- 
tinued until 1894, when it was dissolved, and since that time Mr. Lonergan 
has been conducting business on his own responsibility. A few of the best 
structures that display his handiwork are the Catholic school, Young Men's 
Catholic Association building, the Catholic rectory, the Memorial Hospital 
and the residences of Mr. Teabout, Thomas Bushnell and H. F. Taylor. 

Mr. Lonergan is affiliated with the fraternal order known as the Knights 
of Honor, and he is an honorary member of the truck companies of Morris- 
town. In politics he is a stanch Democrat, but does not take an active 
interest in party affairs other than to make use of his elective franchise and 
cast his ballot on election day. 

The marriage of Mr. Lonergan was solemnized January 30, 1893, when 
he was united to Miss Mary Agnes McCarty, a daughter of John and Nora 
(McCarty) McCarty, and of their children two sons survive: James, who was 
born October 2, 1894; and John, whose birth occurred May 7, 1896. Mr. 
and Mrs. McCarty are devout members of the Church of the Assumption, 
Roman Catholic. 



ALBERT BUNN. 



Though well known as a successful and progressive farmer of Parker, 
Mr. Bunn has a still wider acquaintance in the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, in which society he is a most active and valued worker. He was 




^nt^^M^-- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 501 

born in Washington township, Morris county, on the 19th of July, 1851, 
and is a son of the late George W. Bunn, one of the leading citizens of that 
locality, a representative agriculturist and an estimable gentleman. He was 
a native of the same locality, and received only such educational advan- 
tages as were afforded by the country schools of that time, but this was suf- 
ficient to enable a man of his native ability to conquer ordinary obstacles 
and carve out for himself a prosperous and honorable career. He was a 
leader in local Democratic politics and filled nearly all the offices in his town- 
ship. After a busy and useful life he was called to his final rest January 6, 
1880. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Malinda Eick, was a 
daughter of William and Mary (Crater) Eick. By her marriage she had 
three children, two of whom are still living: Albert and Mary E., wife of 
Elias Wack, of Milltown, New Jersey. Theodore, the eldest, died in early 
childhood. 

Albert Bunn spent his boyhood days in Parker, and enjoyed such edu- 
cational privileges as the common schools extended. At the age of sixteen 
he ceased to be a student, so far as actual attendance upon the daily sessions 
of the school was concerned, and took up the occupation of farming, having 
been familiar with this throughout his life. He was married on the 17th of 
September, 1873, to Miss Amy C. Pitney, a daughter of Robert D. Pitney, 
and located upon the farm which he now owns and cultivates. Three chil- 
dren came to bless their home, but Charles P., the eldest, is now deceased. 
The others are Grace A. and John D. In his farming operations Mr. Bunn 
has met with gratifying success. He is an indefatigable worker and his 
careful supervision of his place has made it one of the most thrifty and 
desirable farm properties in the locality. 

Mr. Bunn has followed in the political footsteps of his father and has 
taken an active part in the management of Democratic affairs in his town- 
ship. He was elected a member of the board of freeholders in 188S, and 
during his incumbency of that office was chairman of the committee on mis- 
cellaneous business. He has been a member of the county Democratic com- 
mittee and is generally a delegate to the county and other conventions of his 
party. He was instrumental in securing the location of the postoffice at 
Parker, and has been a member of the board of education for some years, 
being an ardent advocate of the public-school system, which is one of the 
chief bulwarks of this nation. 

Mr. Bunn is a very enthusiastic and consistent Odd Fellow, and exem- 
plifies in his life the benevolent spirit of that fraternity. He joined the 
order on the 5th of March, 1883, at High Bridge, and after about four years 
withdrew from the lodge at that place and organized the Chester lodge, serv- 
ing as its first noble grand. He was elected the same fall to represent that 



502 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

lodge in the grand lodge. He was chosen recording secretary of the Chester 
lodge the same fall, and later was elected treasurer, which position he is still 
filling. He joined Clinton encampment at Clinton, New Jersey, in 1888, 
and immediately afterward withdrew and established the German Valley 
encampment, of which he was a charter member and the first chief patriarch. 
He was elected its representative to the grand encampment and was 
appointed sentinel, and the second year in the grand lodge he was a candi- 
date for the office of grand junior warden. In 1892 he was elected to that 
office and thereafter passed all the chairs through the grand encampment 
and retired on the 16th of November, 1896, as grand chief patriarch. He 
has frequently made public addresses on Odd Fellowship in different parts of 
the state, and is regarded as one of the most zealous and exemplary mem- 
bers of the fraternity in New Jersey, being widely known among the brethren 
throughout the state. He is the first and only grand patriarch of the grand 
encampment of New Jersey from Morris county. He is also a member of 
the Knights of Pythias fraternity, having joined Fidelity Lodge, of Califon, 
on the 1 6th of February, 1891. 



GEORGE W. SQUIRES. 



As a representative of one of the old Jersey families and a well-known 
resident of Madison, there is manifest propriety in according Mr. Squires 
consideration in this compilation. He was born in the city which is still his 
home, on the 12th of November, i860, his parents being George W. and 
Hulda (Day) Squires. The parents were both natives of Squiretown, Essex 
county, New Jersey, the father born July 30, 1825, and the mother born 
December I, 1830. By this union were born four children: Hattie E., born 
May 10, 1852; John R. , born December 27, 1854; George W., of this 
review, and Lillie G., born July 20, 1869. The last named became the wife 
of D. McDuggal, and Hattie married E. N. Condit. The father of this fam- 
ily was a carpenter by occupation, learning his trade in Newark, where he 
worked as a journeyman for some time. He then came to Madison, where 
he engaged in contracting and building and also conducted a livery stable, 
doing a good business. The records show that he also served as chief of 
police of Madison, and during the Civil war he loyally espoused the cause of 
the Union, going to the front as a member of the Fifth New Jersey Volun- 
teer Infantry, in which he served for three years. His death occurred on 
the 7th of April, 1895, and his wife passed away on the 29th of April, 1888. 
The paternal grandparents of our subject, John R. and Abbie Squires, were 
long residents of this state, where the grandfather followed the occupation 




^Mar/in .yL 



ewn/ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 503 

of farming. He was born in 1802 and died July 11, 1880, while his wife, 
who was born in 1803, passed away September 20, 1849. 

Spending the days of his boyhood and youth in Madison, the subject of 
this review attended the public schools and after attaining his majority he 
entered the employ of a transfer company in New York city, continuing in 
that position for seven years He then returned to his native town and for 
twelve years has been in the employ of the express company at this point. 
He is one of the most faithful and trustworthy employes of the company, 
thoroughly reliable in all things and prompt in the discharge of his duties, 
while his uniform courtesy has made him one of the popular representatives 
of the corporation. 

Mr. Squires was married February 4, 1883, to Miss Hattie Waters,, a 
native of Madison and a daughter of John and Sarah (Carter) Waters, the 
former of Scotch descent and the latter belonging to one of the old families 
of New Jersey. Four children grace the union of our subject and his wife, 
as follows: Edward, born August 7, 1885; Mabel, born January 16, 1888; 
Hattie, born November 2, 1891; and Ruby, the youngest. In his social 
elations Mr. Squires is connected with the Order of Foresters and the Royal 
Arcanum, and is also a member of the Madison fire department. 



MARTIN H. BERRY. 



A well known resident of Pompton Plains, Mr. Berry is descended from 
one of the early Dutch settlers of ' ' the Plains " and his ancestors were among 
the patriots who gave an earnest support to the cause of the colonists, both 
at home and on the field of battle. In the days when New Jersey territory 
was first opening to the influences of civilization, Martin Berry located 
within the borders of the state, and in 1692 married Maria Roome, who also 
represented an old Holland family, — a pure-blooded, strong-minded, liberty- 
loving race of people, whose deeds, civil and military, mark them as worthy 
citizens and patriots. Martin Berry (2d), a son of that marriage, and the 
great-grandfather of our subject, was born in 1726, and in the manner of 
colonial days carried on farming. He married Elsie Mandeville, who also 
belonged to one of the old Dutch families, prominent at that time and now 
one of the most numerous families of New Jersey, its representatives still 
being leaders in public life. Martin Berry (3d), the grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was born July 26, 1756, and died in 1S52. He was educated in the 
language spoken by his parents, as well as the English tongue, and resided 
at Riverdale, Morris county, where his father probably located at the time 
of his marriage. The heavy taxes imposed upon the people and the indica- 
tions that further oppression would be felt by the colonists through the 



504 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

demands of the English crown aroused the opposition of the American sub- 
jects and the grandfather of Martin Berry was among the first to protest 
against such measures. When New Jersey sent forth her army of patriots 
to engage in the struggle for independence, he was among the number, nor 
did he lay down his arms until American independence was achieved. 

When the new republic was an established fact he returned to his old 
home and resumed the quiet duties of civil life. Choosing carpentering as a 
life work, he spent seven years in mastering every branch then known to the 
wood-worker's art. He became an expert in that line and all the work which 
came from his hand was pronounced perfect by those who were judges of 
the craft. He married Elizabeth Mandeville, and among their children was 
Henry M. Berry, father of our subject. He, too, followed wood-working as 
a life occupation, and always lived on "the plains," where his death 
occurred in 1855. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Hester Vandle, 
died in 1849. She was a daughter of Captain Vandle, who was also one of 
the patriots of the Revolution, and his valiant and loyal service in the Ameri- 
can army won him an officer's commission. When the country no longer 
needed his services he located at the lower end of the Plains, where he 
spent his life as a blacksmith. To Henry and Hester (Vandle) Berry were 
born six children, as follows: Elizabeth, who was born in 1808, married 
Richard VanNess; John H. M., born in 18 10, married Catherine Duffy, and 
after her death wedded Delia Duffy; Hannah, born in 1813, married Peter 
J. Brown; Rachel, born in 181 5, married Jacob Doremus; Jane, born in 
1818, became the wife of A. P. Roome, and after his death married Francis 
Thompson; and Martin H. completes the family. 

It was on the 26th of September, 1826, that Martin H. Berry first 
opened his eyes to the light of day. He spent his youth on the old family 
homestead, and at the age of eighteen began working at the trade which had 
been the occupation of his ancestors. He served a two-years apprenticeship 
under Peter J. Brown, of Orange county, New York, and then completed the 
trade under the direction of David Bord, of New York city, after which he 
worked as a journeyman with the firm of Bord & Berry until the former's 
death, when he became a member of the firm of John H. M. Berry & 
Brother, with office at No. 60 Cliff street, New York city. Conspicuous 
examples of the work of this firm are shown in the buildings on the Lorillard 
estate and the St. George buildings at the corner of Cliff and Beekman 
streets, New York. The brothers carried on business together until 1892, 
when John H. M. Berry withdrew and Martin H. Berry admitted to a part- 
nership his only son and child, Harry W. Berry, who has carried on the 
business since the father's retirement. 

Mr. Berry was married on the 4th of May, 1859, at No. 155 Prince 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 505 

street, New York, when Miss Catherine A. Kohler, daughter of Samuel and 
Jane Kohler, became his wife. She was born in September, 1838, and her 
death occurred on the 9th of June, 1886. Their son was born February 9, 
1 86 1, in New York city. He was trained to business pursuits under his 
father's direction and is now a prominent contractor, carrying on an exten- 
sive and well managed business. He was married, in 1879, to Miss Amelia 
Werner, of Brooklyn, and to them has been born a son, Albert Delature 
Berry, a clerk in the Market Fulton National Bank, of New York. 

Mr. Berry, of this review, is a stanch Republican in politics, and an 
earnest member of the Dutch Reformed church. He believes that a man 
should have decided opinions on both questions, and he is fearless in the 
expression of his honest convictions. His political views make him a loyal 
citizen, his religious opinions an honest, upright man. He is now living 
retired in the enjoyment of a well earned rest, for years of toil brought to 
him a handsome competence that now enables him to spend his declining 
days in the quiet enjoyment of the blessings of life. 



ANDREW PHILHOWER. 

The subject of this memoir was a man whose long and useful life was 
consecrated to all that was true and good, and his name will be held in 
lasting honor in the community where he lived and labored to goodly ends. 
For half a century he was one of the well-known and influential farmers 
of his locality, having during this entire interval occupied his fine farm near 
Middle Valley, Morris county. There is a marked consistency in according 
in this compilation a brief review of his life. 

Mr. Philhower traced his ancestry back to Germany. Three brothers 
of the name of Philhower came from Germany to this country at an early 
day, and soon after landing here separated, — one settling in New Jersey, 
another at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and the third at Reading, Penn- 
sylvania. From the first is our subject descended, and this branch of the 
family have for the most part resided in New Jersey. John Philhower, 
the grandfather of our subject, lived in Revolutionary times and his brother 
Christopher was a patriot soldier in the American army. Philip Philhower, 
the father of Andrew, was in his day a member of the state militia. He 
was born in 1796 and died in 1878, and by occupation he was a farmer. 
He and his wife, Barbara, daughter of Jacob Teats, were the parents of the 
following named children: Andrew, whose name graces this sketch; Eliza- 
beth, deceased wife of Daniel Sauers; Jesse; Rachel, deceased wife of 
Caspar C. Apgar; Philip, deceased; Elias; Jacob; Margaret, wife of Anthony 
Herzog; and David. 



506 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Andrew Philhower was born in Tewksbury township, Hunterdon county, 
New Jersey, September 21, 18 18, — the same neigborhood in which his father 
was born. Here our subject was reared, with limited advantages, his oppor- 
tunities for obtaining an education being confined to the subscription 
schools. At the age of twenty-five we find him engaged in burning brick 
and huckstering. These occupations he continued for a few years, and then 
he bought his farm of two hundred and eighteen acres, near Middle Valley, 
Morris county, to the cultivation and improvement of which he at once 
devoted his energies, and upon which he passed the remaining years of his 
life. In political adherency he was a Republican. 

Mr. Philhower was married in 1847 to Miss Hannah Moore, daughter 
of John and Esther (McKinstry) Moore. Of the children born to them we 
record that Theodore married a Miss Walters; Mary is the wife of John 
Lance; Gertie is the wife of Willard Apgar; Nathaniel B. wedded a lady of 
his own name, Emma Philhower; Carrie is the wife of Daniel Fleming; and 
Jennie is Mrs. Sidney Lance. 

Secure in the esteem and regard of those among whom the major por- 
tion of his life had been passed, Mr. Philhower was summoned into the 
eternal rest on the 9th of April, 1898, while his cherished and devoted wife 
soon followed him, her death occurring only two months later, — on the 2d of 
June. Mr. Philhower was a man of most sympathetic and kindly nature, and 
he never withheld his aid from those afflicted or distressed. His kindness 
was proverbial, and no better evidence of this is needed than that which is 
shown in the fact that, while he was at one time very well situated financially, 
yet so willing was he to assist his fellow men that he lost much of his 
accumulations through endorsing paper for his friends, — implying in many 
instances his being called upon to pay obligations which had been incurred 
onl)' through his consent to assume them in a philanthropic way. That his 
confidence and faith were sometimes betrayed in this way can not be doubted, 
and yet, such was his inherent sympathy, that he did not repine at losses 
which came to him through extending assistance to those less fortunate than 
himself. His integrity was ever beyond question, and as a man among men 
all honor was accorded him. In his death the community lost a truly noble 
man and valued citizen. 



DAVID S. BRINK. 

A well known merchant and citizen of Morristown, Mr. Brink was 
born in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, on the 19th of November, 1839, and 
is a son of Thomas L. and Elizabeth (Thatcher) Brink. He is of Scotch 
descent, his ancestors having emigrated from the "land o' banks and 





'/-?->--T_y 



.i£-<&*5&^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 507 

braes" and settled in Hunterdon county many years ago. His father fol- 
lowed farming pursuits and our subject was reared on the old homestead, 
receiving his educational discipline in the district schools. At the age of 
nineteen he left the parental roof and began the battle of life on his own 
responsibility, learning the harness-maker's trade at Frenchtown, whence he 
came to Morristown, on the 4th of April, 1863, and here embarked in the 
harness business. For over thirty-five years he has successfully conducted 
an extensive establishment, dealing in harness and all kinds of supplies per- 
taining to horses, and he has attained prosperity and acquired a comfortable 
competency in this line of enterprise solely as the result of his individual 
efforts, his industry, perseverance, integrity of character, and strictly honor- 
able business methods. 

The marriage of Mr. Brink was consummated in 1871, when he was 
united to Miss Julia Welsh, of Germantown, New Jersey. She died in 1891, 
leaving one daughter, Ella M. Mr. Brink is a stanch supporter of the 
Republican party, but he has never sought political preferment. He is an 
adherent of the First Presbyterian church of Morristown, and is highly 
respected by all who know him. 



JOHN D. COLLINS. 

Through thirty years' connection with the building interests of the city 
of Morristown, Mr. Collins has erected many fine buildings, which stand as 
evidence of his handiwork, and he is classed among those business men 
whose energy and enterprise have enabled them to overcome an adverse fate 
and secure for themselves a comfortable competence. 

A native of the Emerald isle, Mr. Collins was born in county Cork, on 
the 24th of June, 1844, and spent there the days of his boyhood and youth. 
He had three brothers and a sister. The names of all the children in the 
family are as follows: Michael, who married and resides in London, England; 
James, married and at present residing in New York city; John D., our sub- 
ject; Jeremiah, married and resided in New York city, where he died in 1896; 
and Ellen, who was the oldest of the children, left London in 1864, bound 
for Australia, but has not been since heard from. 

When a young man of twenty-two years, Mr. Collins resolved to cross 
the Atlantic to the United States and seek amid new scenes that competence 
which incites the laudable ambition of all energetic young men. Accord- 
ingly, in 1866, he sailed for New York, and spent the first winter as a quarry- 
man in Bradford county, Pennsylvania. The following year he entered the 
employ of the prominent old mason builder, Ellis Parcell, then engaged in 
the construction of the Drew Seminary, in Madison, New Jersey. He com- 



508 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

pleted his apprenticeship at the trade under the direction of Mr. Parcell, and 
began contracting on his own account in October, 1873. He erected the 
Babbitt building and the J. B. Dickson mansion, in Morristown, and in Nor- 
mandy Park the residences of Wheeler H. Peckham, Henry C. Howell, 
Henry P. Phipps, H. E. Woodward, Jesse L. Eddy and Thomas Pinckney. 
He was also the builder of the Young Men's Catholic Association building, 
half of St. Elizabeth's convent in Morristown, and the L. A. Thebaud resi- 
dence at Morris Plains. In 1888 the citizens of Morris county contributed 
to the erection of a large stone memorial to mark a historic spot in the 
county, — the site of the famous Fort Nonsense, of the Revolutionary epoch. 
Here the Continental soldiers had thrown up breastworks of stone and rocks, 
and the embankments are still plainly visible. It was signally consistent 
that a proper entablature be created to designate this spot for all time, and 
the massive stone which has been placed upon the embankment has an 
appropriate inscription and stands in evidence of the patriotic spirit of the 
people of Morris county. To Mr. Collins was assigned the work of doing 
the masonry for the foundation of this historic memorial, and he may well 
take pride not only in the finished work, but in the part which was his to 
perform in the connection. In 1896 he built the celebrated St. Bartholomew 
school, near Morristown, completing the entire work in the brief period of 
ninety days. 

Mr. Collins is an enthusiastic worker in the Catholic Benefit Legion, 
and is a firm believer in the efficiency of fraternal insurance. He is chancel- 
lor of Council No. 40, St. Columbanus, and in 1897 was sent as a delegate 
from that council to / the state convention at Belleville, New Jersey, where 
he took an active interest in the advancement and enactment of such legis- 
lation as he believed would prove beneficial to the order. Fraternal insur- 
ance is the poor man's insurance, and realizing that fact Mr. Collins is ever 
working in the interest of the women and children who are unprotected by 
an insurance policy and who might be left widows and orphans by the sud- 
den decease of the head of the family. On various occasions he has 
received the thanks of those whom death had thus bereaved and who were 
left provided for as a result of the influence and aid of Mr. Collins in that 
direction. He also holds an endowment policy in the Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, of New York city. 

Mr. Collins has been married twice. At Madison, New Jersey, in 1867, 
he led to the marriage altar Miss Ann Casey, and the children by that mar- 
riage were Walter J., John D., Jr., J. Frank (an architect in the office of 
Robert C. Walsh, of Morristown), Mary D., Joseph P., James M., and 
Annie, who lost her life by being accidentally burned to death. Mrs. Collins 
died March 4, 1892, and June 19, 1893, Mr. Collins was united in marriage 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 509 

with Bridget Anna Romayne, and the children by this marriage are Agnes 
and Paul Leo. Mr. and Mrs. Collins are devout members of the Roman 
Catholic church in Morristown. 



LEO DeHART. 



Engaged in the livery business in Madison, the subject of this sketch is 
carrying on an enterprise which has been conducted under the name of De- 
Hart since 1838. He is well known in industrial circles here and is a repre- 
sentative of an old family of Morris county. His birth occurred in Madison 
January 7, 1852, and he traces his ancestry back to Moses DeHart, his 
great-grandfather, who was born July 15, 1763. The great-grandmother, 
Sophia DeHart, was born July 8, 1765, and died April 8, 183 1, her husband 
departing this life August 13, 1833. Their children were Moses, Jr.; 
Samuel, born May 9, 1786; Joshua, born April 10, 1788; Edward, born 
September 13, 1790; Mary, born April 11, 1792; Abigail, born January 25, 
1794; Aaron, born March 5, 1796; Rachel, born September 25, 1797; 
Edward, born September 13, 1799; Catherine, born August 17, 1801; Will- 
iam, born August 27, 1803; and Eliza, born October 28, 1810. 

Moses DeHart, Jr., grandfather of our subject, was a veteran of. the war 
of 18 12. He wedded Mary Harris and their children were Luke, John, 
Mary, Albert, Phoebe, Elizabeth and Charles. The parents of our subject 
were Luke and Mary (Spencer) DeHart, both natives of Morris county, the 
former born March 7, 1S05, the latter March 17, 1812. The father opened 
the first livery stable in Madison, in 1838, and carried on the business 
throughout the remainder of his life; his death occurred in 1889. His wife 
departed this life in 1886. They held membership in the Presbyterian 
church of Madison, and reared a family of seven children, as follows: George 
E., William, of East Madison, Anna Augusta, Mary E. , Sarah L. , Sanford 
and Leo. 

Mr. DeHart, whose name introduces this review, acquired his education 
in Madison and spent his boyhood days under the parental roof. In 1874 
he was admitted to a partnership in his father's business, under the firm 
name of L. C. DeHart & Son, a connection that was continued until the 
father's death, since which time our subject has been alone in the conduct of 
the enterprise. He has a well appointed livery barn containing a number of 
fine carriages and horses, and his courteous treatment of his patrons, his 
honorable dealing and his well directed efforts have secured to him a large 
and profitable business. 

Mr. DeHart is a valued and active member of the Masonic fraternity, in 



510 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTOBl. 

which he attained the Knight Templar degree. He exercises his right of 
franchise in support of the men and measures of the Republican party and is 
well informed on the issues of the day. 



CHARLES. A. RATHBUN. 



A well known member of the Morris county bar, Mr. Rathbun was born 
in Madison, Morris county, on the 7th of January, 1867, his parents being 
Amos C. and Phebe A. (Smith) Rathbun. The father, a native of Con- 
necticut, was a shoemaker by trade, and followed that business for a period 
of nearly fifty years. He located in Madison about 1853 and there contin- 
ued his residence up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1896, at the 
age of seventy-three years. During the last twelve years of his life he was 
engaged in the real-estate and insurance business, and in the undertaking 
met with good success. At the time of his demise he was serving as justice 
of the peace, a position which he had held for a quarter of a century, dis- 
charging his duties with marked fidelity and ability. He was once coroner 
of Morris county and in 1864 was elected a member of the Madison school 
board, in which office he continued for twenty-one years, largely promoting 
the interests of the schools through his progressive and earnest labors. He 
was ever on the side of advancement and was prominently identified with all 
measures for the public welfare of Madison. In politics he was a stalwart 
Republican and did all in his power to promote the growth and insure the 
success of his party. In the family were six children, four of whom are now 
living. Mrs. Rathbun, who is a native of New Jersey, is also still living. 

Charles A. Rathbun, whose name introduces this review, has always lived 
in Madison, and was educated in the public schools of that place. He began 
the study of law in December, 1884, under the direction of Hon. John B. 
Vreeland, and in June, 1889, was graduated from the Columbia College Law 
School, of New York city. At the June term of the New Jersey supreme 
court, in that year, he was admitted to the bar as an attorney at law, and 
three years later as a counselor. He began his professional career in the 
law office of Teese & Pitney, at Newark, opening an evening office in Madi- 
son. In May, 1897, he withdrew from his Newark office and came to Mor- 
ristown, retaining, however, his Madison office and residence. Thus far he 
has met with a good success and his prospects are very encouraging. He is 
a firm believer in the principles of the Republican party, and for several 
years has been an active worker in its behalf, but has never held any public 
office except that of counsel for the borough of Madison, to which office he 
was appointed in May, 1896, and which he still holds. 




& Thi. /f&tjfiij 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 511 



ELIAS M. BARTLES. 

With qualifications such as insure success in business, Mr. Bartles holds 
to-day a place among the representative merchants of German Valley, but 
unlike many of our successful business men, he is not wholly wedded to the 
material things of life. He is broad-minded and of kindly nature, and his 
interest in those less fortunate than himself is deep and sincere. Such a man 
cannot fail to win the respect and confidence of the public, and such esteem 
Mr. Bartles enjoys in a large degree. 

The Bartles family was founded in New Jersey by the great-grandfather 
of our subject, who located in Middlesex count)', where he followed farming. 
He was of German descent. The grandfather, Andrew Bartles, was born in 
Middlesex county and married Catherine Plum. His death occurred in 1840, 
when he had reached the age of eighty-five years. His children were Fred- 
erick; Charles; Joseph; Henry; Eliza, who married Joseph Cornish; Phcebe, 
wife of George B. Stoderuff; and Julia. The father of our subject, Frederick 
Bartles, died in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1852. He was twice married, and 
our subject is one of the six children of the first marriage. Only two of this 
family are now living: Catherine, widow of Cornelius Messier, of White- 
house, New Jersey; and Elias M. Those who died leaving heirs were John 
P., who left a son, Charles Bartles, of New Philadelphia, Ohio; Thomas, 
who died leaving a son, John Bartles, of the same place; and Andrew, who 
left five children — Henry, John, Alice, wife of Walter A. Coer, Edith and 
Olive, all living in Flemington, New Jersey, except Henry, who resides in 
New Philadelphia, Ohio. 

Elias M. Bartles, whose name begins this review, is a native of Tewks- 
berry township, Hunterdon county, October 3, 1826, being the date of his 
birth. He spent his youth with his grandfather, Andrew Bartles, and acquired 
his education in the schools of New Germantown. He spent the greater 
part of his youth in assisting in the work of the farm, and on attaining his 
majority learned the trade of carriage-trimming in the village of Naughright, 
with William and Morris Naughright. For four years he followed that occu- 
pation and then began business on his own account as a huckster. His first 
outfit consisted of a one-horse wagon, which he drove through the valley, 
collecting his produce and marketing the same in Newark. In 1855 he went 
to Princeton, Illinois, and during his two-years residence there was engaged in 
the butchering business. 

On the expiration of that period he again engaged in the business which 
he had abandoned on his removal to the west, and for seven years devoted his 
energies to that enterprise, in which he met with excellent success. The 
profits from that business enabled him at length to engage in merchandising 



512 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

in Middle Valley, and in 1863 he purchased the stock of goods of J. C. 
Welsh, of that place, where he carried on trade in that line for seven years. 
He then sold out, removing to German Valley, where for five years he has 
been ranked among the progressive and enterprising merchants. He has a 
well appointed store, supplied with a carefully selected stock of everything 
found in that line, and his honorable business methods and uniform courtesy 
to his patrons have secured him a liberal trade. Nor have the efforts of Mr. 
Bartles been confined alone to one line of endeavor. He is a man of broad 
capability and carries forward to successful completion whatever he under- 
takes. During the building of the railroad through the valley he executed 
large contracts for furnishing supplies of timber to the Central Railroad of 
the New Jersey Company, and after the completion of the road he contin- 
ued in the business and is one of the largest dealers in timber in east New 
Jersey. His chief patrons are the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Rail- 
road Company, the Central of the New Jersey Company and the Western 
Union Telegraph Company. He is a director in the Hackettstown National 
Bank, in which institution he has been a stockholder for many years, and his 
associates in the bank and the business men throughout the valley regard 
him as a man of rare business foresight — capable, accurate and reliable. 

Mr. Bartles was married August 26, 1848, to Miss Sophia Stryker, daugh- 
ter of Martin Stryker, and, after a long and happy married life of forty years, 
she passed away July 29, 1888. Their children were: Henry P., deceased; 
Annie, wife of James A. Cartwright, of Newark, by whom she has four chil- 
dren, — Charles, Frank R. , James A. and Anna; and Kate, wife of Floyd 
Woodhull, of Plainfield, New Jersey, their children being Leroy and Edson. 

Mr. Bartles has always declined to become a candidate for public office, 
but in a quiet, earnest way has always supported the principles of the Repub- 
lican party and is a firm believer in the measures which it advocates. In 
religious belief he is a Lutheran. He is generous and benevolent and never 
refuses to extend a helping hand to a deserving one whom misfortune has 
treated harshly. He is thoroughly representative of the best citizenship of 
Morris county, which has been made what it is by the most sterling men that 
the state has produced. 



MATHIAS M. COOK. 



Agricultural interests claim the time and attention of Mr. Cook, who 
resides in the town of Hanover, where his birth occurred on the 17th of 
March, 1825. He is the fourth generation of the family living at this place. 
His father, John Cook, was born in 1787, and died in 1864. He followed 
the occupation of farming and was a well known citizen of this locality, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 513 

always called by the title of "captain." He was identified with the Masonic 
fraternity. 

On the old family homestead Mathias M. Cook spent the days of his 
boyhood and youth, and early became familiar with all the duties that fall to 
the lot of the agriculturist. He acquired his elementary education in the 
common schools, and later attended the Rensselaer Institute, in Troy, New 
York. On laying aside his text-books he began farming on his own account 
and is now the owner of a valuable farm, comprising two hundred acres of 
rich and arable land, the greater part of which is under a high state of culti- 
vation and yields to the owner a golden tribute in return for the care and 
cultivation he bestows upon it. 

The Cook family have always been connected with the Presbyterian 
church, and in political faith our subject is a Republican, warmly advocating 
the party principles. He is one of the active and wide-awake farmers of 
Hanover township and a well known citizen of the county. 



CARLTON L. DOBBINS, D. D. S. 

For twelve years Dr. Dobbins has been a member of the dental pro- 
fession of Morristown, and he has gained an enviable distinction as a suc- 
cessful practitioner. He is a native of Burlington county. New Jersey, born 
at Mount Holly, on the 24th of October, 1863, a son of John H. and Catha- 
rine B. (Milbine) Dobbins, who were also natives of the same county. The 
paternal grandfather of the Doctor, Samuel A. Dobbins, served as sheriff of 
Burlington county during the war of the Rebellion, and later was a member 
•of congress for two terms, ably representing his district in the council cham- 
bers of the nation. The Doctor's parents now reside in Mount Holly, where 
the father is engaged in the banking business. 

Dr. Dobbins spent the days of his boyhood and youth in his native 
town, his time being given to the duties of the school-room and the pleasures 
of the playground. Having acquired a good literary education on which to 
rest a professional training, he matriculated in the Pennsylvania College of 
Dental Surgery, at Philadelphia, where he was graduated in February, 1885, 
on the completion of a thorough and comprehensive course, which well fitted 
him for his work. He came immediately to Morristown, where he has since 
been engaged in practice. He has a liberal and constantly increasing 
patronage, for his ability commands the public confidence, his superior 
workmanship ranking him among the leaders in the profession in Morris 
county. He followed the most improved methods, and has his office sup- 
plied with the most modern equipment and facilities. 

In the year 1886 the Doctor was united in marriage to Miss Hannah 

7a 



514 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Annes, of Morristown. They hold a high position in social circles, and are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, while the Doctor is a member 
of the Independent Hose Company, of the Morristown fire department. 



GILES E. MILLER. 



A prominent citizen of Hanover township is Mr. Miller, the efficient stew- 
ard of the county poor farm of Morris county and has been an important 
factor in the administration of public affairs. His standing as a citizen is 
among the best and his fidelity to duty is above question. One of the native 
sons of Morris county, he was born at the ancestral home of the Miller family, 
on the old Boonton road, March 20, 1841. His grandfather, John F. Miller, 
who was born April 28, 1754, was the first to occupy the homestead, and in 
addition to the cultivation of his land he carried on blacksmithing. He 
married Jemimah Wiggins, who was born September 4, 1761, and they 
became the parents of twelve children, of whom Aaron Miller, father of our 
subject, was the youngest. He was born on the old homestead and throughout 
his life carried on agricultural pursuits. He was a member of the militia 
company in the old days when they used to train and was an upright and 
honorable citizen. Born on the 30th of March, 1804, he died August 30, 
1868, at the age of sixty-four years. His wife was Lydia, daughter of Nicholas 
Romine, who was born December 24, 1773. Mrs. Miller was born February 
22, 1801, and her death occurred on the 13th of May, 1871. Her children 
were: Lewis, deceased; Nicholas, a resident of Orange; Jane and Delie, who 
have also passed away; Matilda, deceased wife of Robert Campbell; Mary 
Ann, deceased; John R. , of Newark; Giles E. ; and Aaron W. , who is also a 
resident of Newark. 

Giles Edward Miller was reared to manhood on the old homestead, 
which he now owns. He attended the public schools of the neighborhood, 
and through the summer months assisted in the development and cultivation 
of the farm, so that when he began farming on his own account he was well 
fitted for the work by practical experience. His place is well improved, is 
neat and thrifty in appearance and is furnished with all conveniences and 
accessories. 

Mr. Miller has been twice married. On the 28th of February, 1863, he 
wedded Miss Gertrude Amelia Condit, a daughter of John E. Condit, and in 
February, 1868, he was called upon to mourn the death of his wife. His 
second marriage occurred September 18, 1869, Miss Margaret Lish, daughter 
of Seeley Lish, formerly of Sussex county, New Jersey, becoming his wife. 
Their union was blessed with six children, but only three are now living, 
namely: Mary A., who was born July 29, 1870, and is the wife of Harry 





C3? 



&,6 




BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 515. 

O'Niell, of Orange; Bertha C. and Herbert R., twins, born May 29, 1876. 
Those who have passed away are Harry C. , who was born July 1, 1873, an( ^ 
died February 12, 1883; Myra V., who was born January 3, 1875, and died 
February 10, 1883; and Giles E., born April 7, 1880, and died February n, 
1883. The three deaths came within three days, bringing the greatest sor- 
row and gloom to the happy household. 

Mr. Miller is a Democrat in his political views and formerly took a very 
active part in the work of the party, but since his appointment as steward of 
the poor farm he has given his attention entirely to the administration of the 
duties of his office. He, however, believes most firmly in the principles of 
Democracy, but will not allow his views to bias his official acts. He takes 
a very deep interest in the cause of education, and for eighteen years served 
as trustee of the schools, and for ten years was clerk of the board. He was 
appointed steward of the poor farm April 1, 1886, and has since filled that 
position, during which time he has made many excellent improvements in 
the institution and in the care of the inmates. His administration has been 
repeatedly endorsed by his various reappointments by the board of freehold- 
ers, which at times has been Republican and again Democratic. 



WASHINGTON S. BOND. 



The subject of their review is a native of Chatham, his birth having 
occurred on the 20th of May, 1851. He traces his ancestry back 
through several generations to Thomas Bond, who was born in Oak Ridge, 
New Jersey, on the 9th of August, 1766, being probably of English extrac- 
tion. He afterward moved to Chatham and purchased one hundred and forty 
acres of land, which he transformed into an excellent farm, continuing its- 
cultivation until his death. He also followed the occupation of weaving. 
The dwelling, erected one hundred and thirty years ago, has since been in the 
possession of his descendants and is now owned by our subject. Thomas 
Bond was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Bower, and to them was born one 
son, Maxwell L. After the death of his first wife Mr. Bond married Delia 
Goff. 

Maxwell L. Bond was born on the home farm near Chatham and died 
in Jersey, Ohio, in 1871, at the advanced age of eighty-four years. His first 
wife bore the maiden name of Nancy Harris. She died September 4, 1823, 
and their only child was Barnabas B. Bond, father of our subject, who was 
born in Chatham, May 10, 1822. Maxwell Bond married Rebekah Dennis, 
in 1828, and had four sons and two daughters. In youth Maxwell Bond 
learned the painter's trade, which he followed throughout the greater part 
of his life. Barnabas B. Bond was reared to the occupation of farming and 



516 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

always devoted his energies to the cultivation and improvement of his land. 
He married Charlotte Squier, a daughter of George W. Squier, a representa- 
tive of one of New Jersey's old families. He died March 22, 1897, after a 
long, useful and honorable life. His children were, in addition to the 
immediate subject of this sketch, Washington S. who is living in Chatham; 
Thomas Bruen and Mary Baker, both deceased; and Maria, at home. 

The subject of this review has spent his entire life on the ancestral farm 
of the Bond family. He was reared under the parental roof and early trained 
to habits of industry. In his childhood he began to assist in the labors of 
the field and continued to aid his father until the death of the latter, when 
he succeeded to the management of the property, which was eventually sold. 

In public affairs Mr. Bond takes quite an active interest, is a public- 
spirited and progressive citizen, and is a valued member of a number of 
local societies. 



DANIEL E. WHITE. 

A well known florist of Afton, Mr. White is associated with his brothers, 
James and Frederick White, in the cultivation of roses for the New York 
market. This business was established by their father, John H. White, a 
native of Ireland, born October 20, 1829, the son of John and Honora (Hal- 
lahan) White, both of whom were natives of Tipperary county, Ireland. He 
spent his early youth on the Emerald Isle, but when sixteen years of age bade 
adieu to home and country and sailed for America. He made his first loca- 
tion in Newark, New Jersey, where he engaged in clerking for a time. He 
then came to Afton, where he secured a situation in a nursery and after work- 
ing for others for a considerable period he established a fine peach orchard 
of his own and for some years engaged in the cultivation of that fruit, which 
enterprise he successfully followed until 1880. That year witnessed the 
establishment of the business which is now carried on by his three sons. 

John H. White was married February 4, 1854, at St. Vincent Roman 
Catholic church, at Madison, New Jersey, to Miss Mary J. Fraher, a native 
of Ireland, who came to this country when about eighteen years of age. 
She was born September 18, 1830, being the daughter of John and Mary 
Fraher. Mr. and Mrs. John H. White became the parents of five children: 
Mary A., Ella J., James L. Daniel E. and Frederick. The parents held mem- 
bership in the Catholic church and reared their family in that faith. The father 
died on the 17th of September, 1886, and his wife passed to the eternal home 
above September 27, 1892. Mr. White was a Democrat in his political pre- 
dilections, always casting his ballot for the men and measures of that party. 

Upon the death of the father his three sons succeeded to the business. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 517 

They had previously served as his assistants and had thus become well 
acquainted with the work in its various departments. They make a specialty 
of the cultivation of roses for the New York market and have some of the 
finest varieties of the " queen of flowers " to be found in the country. Their 
greenhouses are extensive and splendidly adapted for the purposes for which 
they are used. They have upward of twenty-five thousand feet under glass, 
and their fine plants, with their many-colored blossoms, present a most beau- 
tiful and delightful picture. They have a liberal New York patronage and 
their business is bringing to them excellent financial returns. The brothers 
are all men of good business ability, energetic, enterprising and progressive, 
constantly watching to find some new methods to improve their plants and 
add to the varieties, and all these qualities have secured them a patronage 
which is indeed enviable. The sons, as well as their father, have done con- 
siderable toward the progress and development of their particular line of 
enterprise in their neighborhood. The children are members of the St. Vin- 
cent Roman Catholic church, at Madison, New Jersey. James L. White, 
brother of our subject, was united in marriage, June 23, 1897, to Agnes 
Penney, of New York city. 



MAHLON COLE. 



One of the well known and prominent agriculturists of Morris county, 
Mahlon Cole, was born at Basking Ridge, Somerset county, New Jersey, on 
the nth of September, 1840. He is a son of James and Mary (Ditmars) 
Cole, the former of whom was born near Peapack and followed farming as 
his vocation in life. He was a thoroughly representative citizen; in his poli- 
tics he was a stanch Democrat, having once been a member of the board of 
freeholders, and he passed the latter years of his life near the village of 
Mendham, where he died in 1871, at the age of fifty-eight years. His 
father was Isaiah Cole, a native of Somerset county, where he was a promi- 
nent farmer. He died at the advanced age of seventy-five years. Mrs. 
Cole was a daughter of James Ditmars and died in 1862, being survived by 
the following children: Julia A., who became the wife of William Menagh, 
of Mendham; Mahlon, our subject; Angeline, who married John P. Robert- 
son, of Newark, New Jersey; and Harvey. 

Mahlon Cole attended the common schools and upon attaining manhood 
he engaged in the same occupation as that followed by his father. After his 
marriage he established himself upon the old homestead, and has since 
made that his residence. February 24, 1864, he became united in marriage 
to Miss Nancy J. Van Nest, a daughter of Henry D. and Jane (Beekman) 
Van Nest. The latter was one of Mendham's prosperous farmers and 



518 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

reliable citizens, who married Miss Jane Beekman, and became the father of 
nine children. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Cole are: Lavinia, the wife 
of Emanuel Day, of Morristown, and Miss Nellie Cole. Mr. Cole is a mem- 
ber of the First Presbyterian church, of Mendham, of which he has for some 
time been an elder. In his political adherency he renders stanch support to 
the cause of the Prohibition party. 



GEORGE H. BROWN. 



A newsboy on the streets of New York, a leading business man of the 
city of Morristown, is the summary of the life record of this gentleman. By 
selling newspapers and matches on the streets of the metropolis Mr. Brown 
earned his livelihood in the days of his early youth; to-day he is the efficient 
superintendent of the Morristown Gas Light Company. The history of the 
intervening years shows a continuous struggle to overcome the difficulties in 
his path, and a continuous advancement in life, owing to his energy, his firm 
determination and his honorable methods. He is possessed of a resolute 
purpose and enterprising spirit that has enabled him to turn defeat into vic- 
tory and promised failures into brilliant successes, and thus has he won a 
place foremost among the business men of Morristown, in the business life of 
which city he is now regarded as a valued factor. 

Mr. Brown was born in the city of New York, February 16, i860, a son 
of William and Mary J. (Hull) Brown. His maternal grandfather was a 
master ship-builder in the Brooklyn navy yard for thirty years. In his father's 
family were ten children, but only two are now living, — George H. and his 
sister, Mrs. Frederick Egner, of Norfolk, Virginia. George H. Brown was 
denied the advantages of a good common-school education and was forced, 
by lack of means within his home, to sell matches and papers on the streets 
of New York to supply himself with the necessities of life. At the early age 
of twelve years he went into the United States Navy, aboard the school ship 
St. Mary's, then stationed in New York city and maintained by both the New 
York board of education and the federal government. After leaving that 
vessel he was engaged with the Sutton & Company packet line to San Fran- 
cisco, California, for eight years, closing his services as first officer of the 
clipper ship Samuel Watts, plying between the United States and Europe 
in the grain and general merchandising trade. 

When twenty years of age Mr. Brown left the water and began learning 
the gas business at Norfolk, Virginia, but soon returned to the sea, joining, 
at New York, the crew of the Guyandotte, a vessel belonging to the Old 
Dominion Steamship Company. Circumstances, however, forced him to 
return to the land in a short time, and he entered the service of the Metro- 





^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 519 

politan Gas Company, in New York city. Later he was employed by A. O. 
Granger & Company, builders of water-gas apparatus, and was stationed at 
Coney Island, as superintendent of the Coney Island Gas Light Company. 
He next' went to Chicago, where for five years he was employed as book- 
keeper by the Illinois Light, Heat & Power Company. On the expiration of 
that period he removed to St. Louis, Missouri, and became superintendent 
of the Laclede Gas Company. Upon his return to New York he engaged 
for a short time with the Standard Gas Company, and then went to the 
Central Gas Company, acting in the capacity of superintendent of the con- 
struction of the foundations for their oil tanks on the docks. In January, 
1892, he came to Morristown, and has since acceptably and efficiently served 
as superintendent of the Morristown Gas Light Company. 

While residing in Chicago Mr. Brown was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma E. Young, on the 1st of June, 1888, and their union has been blessed 
with four children: Frederick E., George H., Louis J., and Marietta, who 
died, aged one year. Mr. and Mrs. Brown have made many friends in Mor- 
ristown, and have the high regard of those with whom they have been 
brought in contact. They are both members of the First Presbyterian 
church of Morristown. 



MERRITT B. LUM. 



As the progress or prosperity of a nation is the result of the aggregate 
endeavor of its individual citizens, so the history of a nation, in either a gen- 
eral or restricted sense, is the record of the aggregate achievements of its 
people. Biography thus becomes the very foundation upon which must rest 
all general history. The importance of making permanent record of the life 
of men who are worthy of such distinction can not be overestimated. The 
mere acquisition of wealth is, in itself, a fact scarcely deserving of mention 
by the historian. It is in the distribution of wealth that its power for good 
or evil lies. The individual who, even through private enterprise, applies his 
abilities and acquisitions to the betterment of mankind is a public benefactor, 
and is deserving of all praise. The subject of this review is one of the repre- 
sentative citizens of Morris county, has labored indefatigably for the promo- 
tion of its best interests and has had a potent influence upon its progress in 
many directions, being clearly entitled to distinct representation in this 
compilation. 

A native son of the attractive village of which he is still an honored resi- 
dent, Merritt B. Lum was born in Chatham, Morris county, New Jersey, on 
the 28th of January, 185 1, being the son of Harvey M. and Phebe (Bruen) 
Lum, each a representative of old and prominent families of the state, the 



520 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

father having been for many years a well known and successful carpenter and 
builder of Chatham. Our subject completed his more purely theoretical edu- 
cation in a select school of high grade, in Chatham, after which he began the 
active duties of life by serving an apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, 
under the careful and efficient direction of his honored father. Becoming 
himself a capable workman in due course of time, he engaged in business 
upon his own responsibility, and has ever since been conspicuously identified 
with the building interests of the county, having been for many years recog- 
nized as the leading contractor and builder of this section of Morris county. 

Among the more prominent buildings which he has erected may be men- 
tioned the Fairview Hotel, at Chatham; the Congregational church at Stan- 
ley; the Stanley Felt Mills; paddock stables for Edward Kelly, of Morristown; 
and many of the beautiful homes of Chatham. Mr. Lum is firm in his con- 
victions and adheres strictly to the principles which represent the true ethics 
of life, — principles broad in their humanitarianism, but rigid in their applica- 
tion. He has made it a rule never to give a note and to always meet his 
obligations when due, and when the fact is taken into consideration that his 
annual business operations reach an average aggregate of about thirty thou- 
sand dollars this fact is the more significant. That his success in life has 
not made him unmindful of others has been shown in countless ways. He 
has long made it a portion of his business policy to extend financial loans to 
worthy persons in an individual way, and many men who were otherwise 
prevented from securing homes have been effectually aided by Mr. Lum, who 
has built houses for them and taken his pay on the installment plan. His 
kindness and charity are such that he never presses a creditor who is unfor- 
tunate or unable to promptly meet his obligations. This is the sort of aid 
which the true man wishes to extend and to receive, for the one is not giving 
indiscriminately and the other finds his dignity in no degree compromised 
or infringed. 

Mr. Lum's pronounced energy and public spirit have naturally brought 
him forward as the incumbent of positions of trust and responsibility, and his 
character is such that he has gained and retained the respect and confidence 
of all who know him. He is now serving his sixth term on the board of 
chosen freeholders of Morris county, having for the past three years been 
director of the board, in which connection he was chosen over a strong and 
able opponent. A stanch advocate of the good roads, and realizing how 
great a benefit correct provisions in this line are to any section, he introduced 
a bill for the macadamizing of roads throughout the county, and though at 
the start only two other members of the board were in sympathy with and 
accorded support to the measure, he made a vigorous fight for the same, and 
by his cogent arguments and firm stand eventually secured the passage of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 521 

the bill, and the fine roads of the county will stand in evidence of his wise 
judgment, which all are willing to concede as such since the improvements 
have been made. For six years Mr. Lum served on the township committee, 
and his efforts as an official in this line were equally enterprising and effica- 
cious. In his political affiliations he is a stalwart adherent of the Republican 
party, in the support of whose cause he has long been actively arrayed. 

Fraternally Mr. Lum is identified with the North Jersey Council, No. 
1181, Royal Arcanum, of which he is past regent. He was one of the organ- 
izers and is a prominent member of the Chatham Fish & Game Protective 
Association, whose beautiful club house was erected by him. He is president of 
the Madison Land Improvement Company, and in many other ways is iden^- 
tified with enterprises which have bearing upon the stable prosperity of the 
county. His religious views are those of the Presbyterian church, of which 
he is a member. 

On the 17th of September, 1873, Mr. Lum was united in marriage to 
Miss Sarah E. Genung, a daughter of William L. Genung. She was born in 
Afton, Morris county, and her death occurred in 1886. Shortly after this 
bereavement came to Mr. Lum he made an extended trip through the west, 
visiting every city of importance and also Alaska, where he visited Sitka, 
Juneau, Douglas and Chilkoot, his sojourn being protracted over a period of 
seven months. In 1888 he consummated a second marriage, being then 
united to Miss Valeria Best, a daughter of Seymour Best, of Hudson, New 
York. 



JAMES H. HOPLER. 

Senior member of the firm of Hopler & Grimes, contractors and builders 
of Boonton, our subject was born in Morris county, November 18, 1839, an d 
has spent his entire life within five miles of his present home. The Hopler 
family is of Dutch origin; but was early founded in New Jersey. The grand- 
father of our subject, Conrad Hopler, spent his entire life in Rockaway town- 
ship, Morris county, where he followed the occupation of farming and was 
once steward of the poor farm of his county. He was twice married and his 
children were William, Samuel, Mahlon and Chilion (twins), Peter, Fred- 
erick, Morris, and Charles, of Dover, who married Sarah Van Horn. 

Mahlon Hopler, the father of our subject, was born in Rockaway Valley, 
Morris county, in 181 3, and died in 1850. He was a shoemaker by trade 
and spent his entire life in Montville or its vicinity. He married Sarah Ann 
Peer, daughter of Cornelius Peer, and to them were born the following chil- 
dren: Delia, who was born in October, 1837, and married William E. 
Davenport; James H. ; Alfred B., who was born in January, 1841, and mar- 



522 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ried Fannie Vanderhoof; William B., who was born in February, 1844, and 
died in Troy, Kansas. After the death of her husband Mrs. Hopler married 
his half-brother, Peter Hopler, and the children of that marriage were: Mar- 
garet, who was born in 1853 and married Andrew Kincaid, of Rockaway 
Valley; Frances, who was born in 1856, and is the wife of Thomas Cusick, 
of Boonton; Martin, who was born in 1859 and is a farmer near Parsippany. 

When James H. Hopler had completed his education, acquired in the 
common schools, he began to learn the trade of carpentering, in 1856, under 
the tuition of William E. Davenport, and has pursued that occupation in 
Boonton and vicinity for more than forty years. Many of the best buildings 
in this section of the county stand as monuments to his thrift and enterprise 
and as evidences of his handiwork. These include the residences of Frank 
Bloxam, W. W. Riddle, John A. Wardell, Frank Husk, George Lyons, 
Jacob Vreeland, James Ringlieb, Mrs. Worman, Mrs. Martin, John Booth, 
William Brown, I. L. Lefferts, David Dawson and Jacob Van Ness, — all in 
Boonton. 

During the earlier years of his business career, the labors of Mr. Hopler 
were interrupted by his service in the Union army. In September, 1861, he 
responded to the first call for three hundred thousand men, and enlisted in 
Battery B, commanded by John E. Beam. Mustered in at Trenton, the 
company then went by water from Alexandria, Virginia, to Fortress Monroe 
for operation in the Peninsular campaign, and participated in all the many 
engagements of that movement. When the campaign was ended the battery 
to which Mr. Hopler belonged was ordered back to Alexandria and took part 
in the second battle of Bull Run. Remaining in Virginia until Lee's invasion 
of the north, the command then joined the vast army that opposed the Con- 
federates at Gettysburg, and after the defeat of the rebels there followed the 
shattered army of northern Virginia into its own domains and aided in deal- 
ing the death blows to the Confederacy in the battles of the Wilderness, 
Chancellorsville, Cold Harbor and Spottsylvania Court House. The last 
engagement in which Mr. Hopler participated was at Jerusalem Plank Road, 
after which, with his command, he was stationed at Petersburg until the 
term of his enlistment had expired and he was honorably discharged. 

On the 6th of May, 1865, soon after his return home, Mr. Hopler was 
united in marriage to Miss Lucretia Pierson, daughter of John M. and Lucre- 
tia (Ocboc) Pierson. Her parents had a family of nine children, as follows: 
Sarah, widow of Jacob Emmons, of Oxford, New Jersey; David John, a resi- 
dent of Cleveland, Ohio; Mary A., widow of James Van Ness, of Powerville; 
George Frederick, of Dover; Abraham, who died in Wisconsin; Phoebe 
Louisa, widow of Daniel Peer, of Taylor.town, New Jersey; Susan E.; Nancy 
Amelia, who married Abraham Vreeland, of Boonton; and Mrs. Hopler. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 523 

To our subject and his wife have been born six children, namely: Bertha, 
who was born December 25, 1865, and is the wife of Lewis G. Gallagher, by 
whom she has one son, Harvey L. ; Flora L. , who was born January 22, 
1869, and is the wife of Thomas E. Peer; Etta E., who was born April 22, 
1873, and is the widow of Lenworth C. Peer and the mother of two children, 
Charles L. and Florence L. ; James M., who was born March 4, 1877, and 
is married to Roszella Carr; Amelia May, who was born November 20, 1882; 
and Edna Ruth, born September 14, 1887. 

The Hopler family in an early day were connected with the Dutch 
Reformed church, but James H. Hopler and his family belong to the Meth- 
odist church. With the Federalist, then the Whig, and now the Republican 
party the representatives of the name have been connected, and Mr. Hopler, 
of this review, is regarded as a stalwart advocate of the grand old party which 
was the nation's defense in her hour of peril when war threatened her 
destruction. 



NELSON KELLEY. 

The senior member of the firm of N. Kelley & Son, general merchants 
of Chatham, our subject was born in the town which is still his home, in 
June, 183 1, his parents being William and Nancy (Lum) Kelley. The former, 
a son of Thomas Kelley, was born in Chatham, in 1803, was there reared 
and learned the hatter's trade, which he followed during his active life. He 
married Miss Lum, a daughter of Israel and Phoebe (Pierson) Lum, and they 
became the parents of five sons and'one daughter: Nelson; Harvey, deceased, 
Margaret, who died in infancy; Charles, of Summit; Frank, deceased; and 
William, of Chatham. In his political views the father of this family was a 
Democrat. His death occurred in 1865, and his wife passed away in 1886, 
at the advanced age of eighty-six years. 

Having acquired a good practical education in the common schools, 
Nelson Kelley, at the age of seventeen, entered upon a four-years apprentice- 
ship at the millwright's trade, *and after attaining his majority followed that 
pursuit for some years. He was then obliged to abandon that pursuit on 
account of ill health,. and in 1866 he turned his attention to the grocery busi- 
ness, beginning operations along that line on a very limited scale. He opened 
his store in a little room eleven by fourteen feet, the furnishings of which 
were two barrels and two boards. As his patronage increased he enlarged 
his stock in trade, and in 1878 he was joined by his son, under the firm style 
of N. Kelley & Son. In 1882 they added to their groceries a stock of men's 
furnishing goods and boots and shoes. They have now a very liberal patron- 
age, carry an excellent line of the different commodities which they handle, 



524 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

and well deserve to be ranked among the progressive, enterprising business 
men of this section of the county. 

They have also added to the welfare of the town by erecting a number 
of buildings. They built their house on Main street, a short distance west 
of Fairmont avenue, and later moved their first store-house to what was 
then the corner of Main street and Budd lane, continuing in that building 
throughout the remainder of the year. They then located in more commo- 
dious quarters, having in the meantime erected a new store building, and 
when they vacated the one which they had formerly occupied they rented it 
for a drug store — the first of the kind in the place. The residence of Mr. 
Kelley is now on Budd lane. 

On the 25th of August, 1853, Mr. Kelley was united in marriage to Miss 
Lydia J. Wonderley, a native of Sussex county, New Jersey, and a daughter 
of Silas and Susan (Sanders) Wonderley, the former a native of Chester, 
New Jersey. Her paternal grandfather was lost at sea while returning to 
America from Germany, his native land. Silas Wonderley died in Newark, 
in December, 1881, at the age of sixty-nine years, and his wife was called to 
her final rest in November, 1882, at the age of seventy-one. Mr. and Mrs. 
Kelley became the parents of two children, but Caroline died at the age of 
two years and two months. The son, Frank, is now associated with 
his father in business. Mr. and Mrs. Kelley have been members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church since youth and the former is serving as church 
steward. They take a very active part in church work and are consistent 
and faithful representatives of that denomination. 



FRANK L. KELLEY. 



Progress ever indicates effort; inertia — the lack of effort — is always fol- 
lowed by retrogression. One may drift down stream, but if he would reach 
the headwaters of the river he must pull against the current; so in life the 
upward road is one which demands persistent and wisely directed effort if 
the goal be reached. Among the most progfessive citizens of Chatham is 
the gentleman whose name begins this review, a man whose accomplishment; 
has resulted from determination and energy. He is now connected with the 
mercantile interests of his city and has become a leader in commercial circles 
there. 

Born in Chatham, on the 5th of May, 1858, he is a son of Nelson and 
Lydia J. (Wonderley) Kelley. His elementary education, afforded him by 
the common schools, was supplemented by a course in Bryant & Stratton's 
Business College, of Newark, in which he was graduated in 1878. 

The same year Mr. Kelley entered upon his business career in the bakery 




c: 



rann- ~L. .7/ ffrey. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 525 

business as the junior member of the firm of N. Kelley & Son. In 1882 he 
not only opened a grocery, but also enlarged his store by adding a stock of 
men's furnishing goods, boots and shoes, and his trade in these departments 
is the most extensive in the town. He keeps thoroughly abreast with the 
times, carrying the latest styles, and his business methods, so reliable and 
commendable, have gained him the confidence, good will and patronage of 
a large number of the residents of this community. 

In October, 1884, Mr. Kelley married Miss Lucy V. Lear, of Madison, 
a daughter of William and M. J. (Day) Lear, who were also natives of the 
same place. Her father was a mason by trade and spent the greater part of 
his life in Madison. Five children were born of this union, and with the 
exception of Bessie J., who died at the age of six years and two months, all 
are yet living, namely: Rowland W. , Frank S., Marjory and Nelson. The 
home life is very pleasant and the parents are widely and favorably known 
in social circles. They hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, 
of which Mr. Kelley is serving as trustee and also as secretary of the board 
of trustees. 

Mr. Kelley has always taken a deep interest in the welfare of the city 
and has done much for its improvement and upbuilding. He has here 
erected a number of residences which have added to the attractive appear- 
ance of the town, and he withholds his support from no measure for the pub- 
lic good. His political support is given the Republican party, and under the 
old city government he served as trustee and viliage treasurer, while under 
the present form of government he was a member of the first city council. 
He is a member of Madison Lodge, No. 93, A. F. & A. M. and Chatham 
Lodge, I. O. O. F. He also belongs to the Chatham Fish & Game Associa- 
tion and to the Chatham Bicycle Club. His is a well rounded character, for 
the various social, church, political and business interests all receive their 
due proportion of attention, and thus in these various connections he is well 
known. 



ROBERT SLATER. 



This well known citizen of Riverdale owns and occupies the old family 
homestead and mill property, one of the most beautiful and picturesque spots 
in Morris county, and one worthy the brush of the skilled artist. The water, 
the old mill, the green grass and magnificent trees form a view that cannot 
fail to charm, and it is at this desirable place that the Slater family has 
resided for half a century. 

The father of our subject, Joseph Slater, was born in Oldham, England, 
December 29, 1804, and on leaving the mother country took up his residence 



526 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

in Bloomfield, New Jersey, whence he removed to Orange. He learned the 
trade of cloth-manufacturing while at Bloomfield, Essex county, New Jersey, 
and for some years conducted a successful business in that line at Orange. 
In 1849 he located at Pompton and engaged in the same pursuits until 1861, 
when he took up the fur-cutting business. He passed his declining days at 
his home on the banks of the Pequannock river, near Pompton. 

Joseph Slater married Miss Sarah Moorehouse, and died September 1, 
1 87 1, when about sixty-five years of age, while his wife passed away January 
27, 1873. She was born in Yorkshire, England, December 2, 1807. They 
had a family of four children: Martha, wife of Henry D. Smith, of Pompton; 
Joseph, who is living in Newark; Harriet, wife of William Baxter, of Morris 
county; and Robert, subject of this review. 

In Orange, on the 14th of July, 1844, Robert Slater entered upon his 
earthly pilgrimage. When he was a child of five years he came with his par- 
ents to his present home and in his youth learned the trade of manufacturing 
hatter's furs, under the direction of his father. He has since followed that 
pursuit, and for forty years has been connected with the old mill, whose 
antiquity makes it one of the landmarks in this section of the county; but 
repairs and improvements have kept it so in touch with the progressiveness 
of the times that it does not seem to belong to a past generation. The grounds 
and residence also indicate the same careful supervision, and the Slater home- 
stead is therefore one of the most attractive places in Morris county, the 
works of man adding to those of nature the touch of civilization and progress. 

In December, 1864, was celebrated the marriage which united the des- 
tinies of Mr. Slater and Miss Elizabeth Francisco, who was born September 
10, 1848, a daughter of P. S. and Elizabeth (Fredericks) Francisco, the latter 
a daughter of P. H. Fredericks. Two sons came to the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Slater: Otis R. , born September 10, 1871; and Ellis, born July 16, 1873. 
Both are interested with their father in the mill. Mr. Slater is a safe, care- 
ful and conservative business man, in whose life few mistakes have occurred, 
and owing to his capable management his progress has been continuous and 
he has attained a financial independence which assures to himself and fam- 
ily all the comforts necessary to make the years of life pleasant. In his polit- 
ical views Mr. Slater is a Republican and in religious belief is connected with 
the Reformed church, being an active member of the organization of 
that denomination in Pompton. 



CALVIN ANDERSON, M. D. 
A practicing physician of Madison, Dr. Anderson was born in New York 
city, on the 10th of June, 1841. His father, Rev. William Anderson, a native 
of Jersey City, New Jersey, and a minister of the Dutch Reformed church, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 527 

devoted many years of his life to the work of the gospel. He married Miss 
Sarah Louisa Ryerson, a native of Meads Basin and a daughter of Abraham 
Ryerson. The Anderson family to which the Doctor belongs is of English 
origin and was founded in America in colonial days. His father, reared in 
New Jersey, prepared for the ministry and entered upon his first charge in 
1847, at Peapack, after which he was stationed at Fordham. From 1856 
until 1858, inclusive, he was in Illinois, and then returned to New York, 
where his holy labors effected great good among the people with whom he 
worked. His death occurred in 1887, when he had reached the age of seventy 
years; his widow still survives. They were the parents of ten children, nine 
of whom reached years of maturity, our subject being the second in order 
of birth. 

Dr. Anderson, whose name introduces this review, was liberally educated 
and thus fitted for life's practical duties. He also had the advantages of a 
cultured Christian home, and this helped to develop a strong, sturdy character, 
fitted to do battle in the hard places of life. He was a student in Norwich, 
Connecticut, for some time, being numbered among the graduates of Nor- 
wich Academy, in the class of 1859. He afterward attended Columbia Med- 
ical College, of New York, where he was graduated in 1865. He studied 
medicine under the preceptorage of Dr. E. J. Rapelye, of New York city, 
before entering college, and on the completion of the course put his theoretic 
knowledge to the practical test by opening an office and beginning the 
prosecution of his profession in Hanover, Morris county, New Jersey. In 
r868 he came to Madison, where he has since made his home, and in the 
medical fraternity he has maintained a high standing by reason of his com- 
prehensive knowledge of the science of medicine and his devotion to his 
work. He has been honored by his fellow members of the profession by 
being chosen president of the Morris County Medical Society, and the public 
attests its confidence in his ability and power by giving him a liberal patronage. 

Dr. Anderson was married in 1873 to Miss Mary Bouker, of Jersey City, 
a daughter of John A. and Sarah E. (Simmons) Bouker, both representatives 
of old New Jersey families. They have four children. The home of the 
Anderson family is a hospitable one and a favorite with Madison's best 
citizens. 

The Doctor is a Republican in his political preferences, and keeps well 
informed on the issues of the day, thus giving an intelligent support to the 
principles in which he so firmly believes. He is president of the board of 
health, is also a member of the common council, and is on the medical staff 
of All Souls' Hospital, in Morristown. He is an attendant on the services 
of the Presbyterian church, and is deeply interested in all that pertains to 
the best development of the county. 



528 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



CHARLES J. NEWMAN. 

A resident of Newfoundland, and engineer of the New York Transit 
Company, Mr. Newman was born in Wyoming county, Pennsylvania, on the 
28th of February, 1859, one of the eight children of Josiah and Mary (Tin- 
ney) Newman. His father was born in Wyoming county about sixty-two 
years ago, and lived a quiet, uneventful life, devoted to farm work. His 
children are: Henry T. ; Amanda, wife of Nelson Roberts, of Montrose, 
Pennsylvania; Charles J. ; Fred E., who resides at Black Walnut, Pennsyl- 
vania; Ida, wife of Joseph Pierson, of West Auburn, Pennsylvania; Angie, 
wife of Harvey Loomis, of Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania; Ella, wife of Milton 
Kimball, of Wilkesbarre; and Jennie, wife of Harty Levin, of Silvera, Penn- 
sylvania. 

When twenty years of age Charles J. Newman entered the employ of 
Russell & Company, becoming one of their operatives in the lumber woods 
near Big Shanty, Pennsylvania. He left that work in 1880 and accepted a 
position on the pipe line of the New York Transit Company, starting at Corn- 
ing, New York, as time-keeper or boarding boss, and followed the line through 
to Saddle River, New Jersey. He spent one year in the employ of the New 
York, Susquehanna & Western Railroad Company, as a locomotive fireman, 
and then again entered the employ of the Transit Company. In 1881 
he was returned to the station at Newfoundland to take a position as fireman, 
and in 1890 was promoted to the more lucrative and responsible position of 
engineer. Eighteen years' connection with the company well indicates his 
fidelity to its interests and his prompt and faithful discharge of duty. 

Mr. Newman was married August 18, 1880, at Paterson, New Jersey, 
to Emma Jennings, of Newfoundland, Morris county, New Jersey. She was 
born February 26, i860. By this union there were five children: Frederick 
C. ; Bessie M.; Ethel B. ; Blanche, who died in early life; and Ruth. 

Mr. Newman is a member of the M. E. church of Newfoundland, where 
the family attend worship. Mr. Newman has become a good and worthy 
citizen of Newfoundland, and he has done much to improve the village. In 
1896 he purchased two and one-fourth acres of ground and erected thereon a 
handsome and convenient house and made other improvements. He takes 
an earnest interest in the good and welfare of the community. He was 
prominently concerned in advocating the grading and macadamizing of the 
public road from Newfoundland to Butler, thus insuring one of the best roads 
and most romantic highways in the northern part of New Jersey. 

Mr. Newman has taken quite an active interest in local politics and is 
one of the county executive committee of the Republican party, representing 
Jefferson township. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 529 



SAMUEL F. BEACH. 

The subject of this review is a leading manufacturer of and dealer in 
carriages, wagons and sleighs in Morristown, and has been an important 
factor in gaining for the city her excellent reputation in this department of 
industrial life. His is one of the most complete and extensive establish- 
ments of the kind in the city, and in its able management Mr. Beach dis- 
plays excellent business and executive ability, keen discrimination and sound 
judgment. 

Born in Rockaway, Morris county, on the 5th of December, 1851, he 
is a son of Amzi F. and Sarah (Van Fleet) Beach. His father, a carriage- 
maker by trade, established the present business and shop in 1866 and con- 
ducted the same until his death, in 1876, when he was succeeded by his 
sons. His widow still survives him. In their family were eight children. 
The father was a member of the South Street Presbyterian church and held 
the high esteem of all who knew him. His wife, who also has been a 
devoted member of the same church, has held the esteem and affection of all 
who have known her. 

Samuel F. Beach acquired his education in the public schools of Morris- 
town, where the family located during his early boyhood, and at the age of 
sixteen he began to learn the trade of carriage-making, mastering the business 
in every detail and thus becoming an expert workman. His practical knowl- 
edge of the business is undoubtedly one of the essential features in his pres- 
ent success, as it enables him to direct his men to the best possible advan- 
tage, bringing results favorable both to them and to himself. Upon his 
father's death he and his brother succeeded to the business, under the firm 
name of Beach Brothers, and continued the partnership until 1885, when 
Samuel F. Beach bought out his brother's interest. His trade is constantly 
increasing, and he has therefore been obliged to enlarge his facilities in order 
to meet the growing demand. His factory extends from Market street to 
Bank street and occupies three floors of a building twenty-seven by seventy- 
eight feet. He has the latest improved machinery and equipments, manu- 
factures all kinds of carriages, wagons and sleighs, making the latter to order. 
He also does all kinds of repair work and the house has a reputation for 
reliability and good workmanship that insures it a liberal patronage. 

In 1877 Mr. Beach was united in marriage to Miss Lizzie Graham, a 
lady of English and Scotch parentage, and they have two children: May 
and Bessie. In social circles they hold an enviable position and their home 
is justly celebrated for its hospitality. The daughter, May, is an accomplished 
musician, showing distinctive talent in both vocal and instrumental apprecia- 
tion and interpretation. 

8a 



530 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Mr. Beach is a member of the fire department of Morristown, having 
been connected with the Resolute Hook and Ladder Company for twenty-seven 
years. Socially he is connected with the Royal Arcanum, and in politics is 
a stanch supporter of the Republican party. He takes a lively interest in all 
that concerns the growth and prosperity of his home city, and is one of the 
directors of the Memorial Hospital. The family are members of the First 
Presbyterian church of Morristown. 



THEODORE AYERS. 



The original American ancestor of the Ayers family was John Ayers, who 
was born in England in 1592 and early in the seventeenth century came to 
this country with his family and pastor, Rev. John Woodbridge, first settling 
in Haverhill, Massachusetts. In 1665 he came to New Jersey with some of 
his children and located at Woodbridge, which was named in honor of their 
pastor. Among the children of John Ayers and his wife was a son, Obediah, 
who was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts, in 1636, and who came to Wood- 
bridge in 1668. He was the father of nine children, of whom the oldest was 
John, born in Haverhill in 1663. The latter married Mary Walker and 
moved to Somerset county, New Jersey, in 17 17, their issue comprising seven 
children, including Nathaniel, born in 1700, who became the father of 
Jonathan, born in 1739 and died in 18 14. John Ayers, son of Jonathan, was 
born in 1765 and died in 18 15. He married Mary Ennis and they had three 
children, among whom was David Ayers, the father of our subject. 

David Ayers was born in 1793 and departed this life in 1848. He was a 
civil engine'er and surveyor by occupation and was a prominent and highly 
respected citizen of Basking Ridge. He married Miss Elizabeth Southard, 
who was a member of one of the best known families in New Jersey, and 
seven children were born to them. 

Theodore Ayers, who is one of the oldest and most favorably known 
citizens of Morris county, was born in Basking Ridge, Somerset county, New 
Jersey, on the 22d of June, 1824, and was there reared until twenty years old, 
receiving his educational discipline in the classical schools. In 1844 he came 
to Morristown and for over a score of years thereafter was engaged in the 
mercantile business here. About 1866 he embarked in the real-estate and 
insurance business and conducted the same until a few years ago, when he 
retired from active life and was succeeded by his sons, Theodore and John B. 

Mr. Ayers has always been a public-spirited man and has always taken 
an active part and interest in all movements tending toward public improve- 
ments. In politics he was originally a Whig, later becoming a Republican, 
and he has been an energetic participant in the work of his party, often 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 581 

being a member of the county Republican committee, and he has been con- 
spicuous in many a campaign contest. From the time he attained his 
majority he has never missed voting at an election, with one exception, 
on which occasion he was compelled to remain in the house on account of 
a severe blizzard, and he considers it a duty as well as a privilege to go to 
the polls and cast his ballot. He has held several official preferments,, 
among them being that of deputy internal revenue collector, which he held 1 
from 1862 to 1866, and he also served for several years as a member of the 
county board of chosen freeholders, was recorder of Morristown one term, 
and from 1876 to 1880, two terms, he was mayor of Morristown and as such 
gave a clean, able and satisfactory administration. For over twenty years 
Mr. Ayers was a trustee of the Morristown Female Seminary, and served as 
a member of the Morristown board of education. He is now president of, 
of the board trustees for the Evergreen cemetery and is a trustee of the 
Morristown Park Association. 

Mr. Ayres was united in marriage in 1853 to Miss Ann Elizabeth Bon- 
sall, a daughter of John and Eliza (Ennis) Bonsall. She was born in 
New York city, where her father was engaged in business for many years. 
The latter retired from active life in 1847 and located about a mile and a 
half south of Morristown, where both he and his wife died. Their home- 
stead was known as the Bonsall place and is the present home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ayers, who moved into it in 1881. It was in this old house that their 
marriage took place. Three sons have been born to our subject and his 
wife, namely: Theodore, John B. and Horace Frederick, and they are all 
prosperous and successful business men. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ayers are faithful members of the South Street Presby- 
terian church, of Morristown, in which he was a trustee for many years 
and is now a deacon. He is esteemed and respected by all who have 
become acquainted with him during his long and useful career. 



DAVID H. WILDAY. 



In the establishment of a new town one of the most indispensable and 
important factors is the contractor and builder, and his usefulness in the pro- 
motion of the city never wanes. The work of repair, improvement and 
progress, continually being carried forward, all calls into play his services 
and skill, and in the business life of the municipality he occupies a leading 
position. For twenty-eight years Mr. Wilday, of this review, has been con- 
nected with the substantial development of Morristown, and he ranks among 
the foremost and the prosperous representatives of the building interests of 
the city. 



532 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Born in Whippany, New Jersey, on the 4th day of March, 1847, he is a 
son of John Wilday, who was of Scotch ancestry and birth and came to the 
United States in 1826, with his father, John Wilday, Sr., who first located 
in Paterson, but about two years later removed to Whippany. He was a 
weaver by trade, but his son John became a machinist. The latter married 
Miss Susan Moore, a daughter of Henry and Margaret (McDuffett) Moore, 
and she died in 1890 at the age of seventy-three years. David H. Wilday 
was the fourth in order of birth in their family of six children, of whom only 
four are now living: Mrs. Augusta Woodruff, of Whippany; Mrs. Eliza Hop- 
ping, of Afton; Mahlon, of Whippany; and our subject. 

David H. Wilday spent his youth in his native town and began to learn 
the carpenter's trade in Rockaway, New Jersey, when eighteen years of age, 
serving an apprenticeship to Joseph Bower. He began his career as a jour- 
neyman in Dover, Morris county, where he remained for two years, when, in 
May, 1870, he removed to Morristown, where he has since made his home. 
He was employed by others until February, 1872, when he began contracting 
on his own account, his first contract being for the erection of a house for 
Mrs. Brindley, at the corner of Perry street and McCulloch avenue. He 
has built many of the excellent structures of the city, including the residences 
of Mary C. Smith, on James, South and Perry streets; of Rev. Vanderpool, 
on South street; of Dr. Uebelacker, on South street; of Augusta Bell, Dr. 
Bradford and Mrs. Thomas, all on Maple avenue; of Charles Roberts, Mr. 
Holloway and James Bonsell, all on De Hart street; of Frank Van Orden, 
on Wetmore avenue; George W. Colles, Mary T. Baldwin and Mrs. Hartley, 
on Farragut Place; the George Miller mansion and stables and gardener's 
cottage; the homes of George V. Colles and Daniel Jamison, on Mt. Kemble 
avenue; the residence of Rev. William T. Egbert, on Maple avenue, and his 
houses on Franklin place and Hill street, also on Egbert hill; the Evans 
mansion on Madison avenue and Roberts & Marsh's dwellings on Madison 
avenue. Through twenty-eight years' connection with the building interests 
of Morristown Mr. Wilday has maintained a reputation for trustworthiness 
and efficiency which has not only placed him in the front rank in his business 
and gained him a liberal patronage, but has also won him the unqualified 
confidence and regard of his fellow citizens. 

Mr. Wilday has been twice married. In Rockaway, New Jersey, in 
1869, he wedded Miss Malinda Weir, who died in 1870, leaving a son, Irving, 
who is now associated with his father in business. In 1873 was consummated 
the marriage of our subject and Miss Anna R. Wilson, a daughter of Charles 
and Sallie (Clawson) Wilson, and to them have been born four children, two 
of whom are yet living, namely: Anna May and Mary C. 

For the past eleven years Mr. Wilday has served as a member of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 533" 

board of education of Morristown and has done effective service in the inter- 
ests of the schools. He has also been a trustee of the Evergreen Cemetery 
Association for a period of nine years. A member of the Masonic fraternity, 
he has taken the blue-lodge, chapter and commandery degrees, and in the 
Royal Arcanum he also holds membership. He belongs to the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and is deeply interested in all movements intended to 
advance the moral, material, education, and social welfare of the community. 
His firm purpose, honorable dealing and fidelity to duty are numbered among 
his strongest characteristics and make him a man whom to know is to 
respect. 



STEPHEN BREESE. 



Recognized as one of the influential, energetic citizens of Morristown, 
Morris county, Mr. Breese is a native of the Empire state, his birth having 
occurred in Elmira, New York, on the 4th of April, 1833, his parents being 
Bailey and Sally (Whitenack) Breese, both of whom were born in Somerset 
county, New Jersey, and were members of old New Jersey families. Bailey 
Breese, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was likewise a native of 
Somerset county, and was of German-Scotch ancestry. He engaged in 
tilling the soil of his home county for many years and then moved to Illinois, 
where he died at the advanced age of eighty years. His son, Bailey, mar- 
ried and lived near Elmira, New York, for a short time and then came to 
New Jersey, locating in Somerset county, when Stephen was three years 
old, and there he followed farming and operated a stage line from Morristown 
to Basking Ridge for a while, subsequently, in 1862, removing to Morris 
county, where both he and his wife died, — the mother at the age of seventy- 
six and the father at seventy-seven. Three sons were born to them, our 
subject being the only one surviving. 

Stephen Breese received his mental training in the public schools of 
Basking Ridge, and upon leaving the same he secured employment as a clerk 
in a mercantile establishment in the same town. He was thus employed for 
two years, after which he took a position as clerk in the dry-goods establish- 
ment of I. S. Miller, in Jersey City, — an incumbency which he retained for 
a period of about seven years, after which he was for about two years 
employed in the wholesale dry-goods house of Phillips & Spencer, on Barclay 
street, New York. He then became associated with his father in the express 
business, with headquarters at 162 Broadway, New York, and subsequently 
established the Breese & Company Express on the Delaware, Lackawanna 
& Western Railroad, which was then operated as the Morris & Essex Rail- 
road. The express business thus instituted was the first ever operated on 



534 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HIS TO BY. 

that line, and Mr. Breese continued the enterprise for a period of fourteen 
years. He eventually engaged in the real-estate and insurance business in 
Morristown, where he has successfully carried on operations in this line for 
the past ten years, being regarded as one of the prosperous and progressive 
business men of Morristown. 

In his political adherency Mr. Breese is a stanch Democrat and a firm 
believer in the principles and policies of that party. For seven years he was 
collector for Morris township, resigning that incumbency to accept the office 
of postmaster of Morristown, to which he was appointed in March, 1895, by 
President Cleveland, and in this capacity he has given the fullest satisfaction 
by the capable manner in which he has fulfilled the duties attendant upon 
that position. 

Mr. Breese's first marriage was consummated in 1872, when he was 
united to Miss Henrietta Connett, whose death occurred in 1876. She 
became the mother of two children, Fred S. and Henrietta. In 1891 Mr. 
Breese was married to Miss Susan Van Roden, and of this union one child 
has been born, namely, Isabella. 

Mr. Breese is a self-made man in the fullest sense of the term, his 
present position in life being the logical result of applied industry, ability and 
strict integrity of character. He is quiet and unassuming, popular in busi- 
ness and social circles, and has gained and retains the respect of a host of 
friends. 



THEODORE FRELINGHUYSEN KING. 

A prominent citizen of Ledgewood, New Jersey, Mr. King is one of the 
leading spirits of this place, and belongs to a family whose history is closely 
identified with that of Morris county, his father, the late Thomas L. King, 
having occupied official position in the county for a number of years. 

Thomas L. King was born on the mountain near Drakesville, now 
Ledgewood, New Jersey, in 1809, son of John P. and Christina (Wolfe) 
King, early settlers of that place, the father having located in Roxbury town- 
ship when a young man of twenty-two. He engaged in farming on a portion 
of the London Land Grant, which he acquired by purchase, and on which he 
continued to reside, in spite of the fact that his claim was contested by other 
claimants, until his house and all his household goods were burned. Then 
he was compelled to seek other quarters. Thus handicapped, and with a 
large family, he was unable to provide his children with more than the 
rudiments of an education. But the spirit of determination to conquer 
obstacles was a prominent trait in his character, and this trait descended in 
a large measure to his children. When Thomas L. reached his majority his 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 535 

only capital was his strong arm, persevering industry, and the reputation for 
honorable and upright conduct. He was by the Democrats elected to the 
office of constable of Roxbury, the duties of which he assumed shortly after 
he was twenty-one, and so successfully did he fill the office that he was time 
after time elected his own successor, until he had been constable eleven 
years. After this, in 1843, he was elected county sheriff, and in this office 
also he made an excellent official, and when his term expired he was retained 
in that position to aid in straightening up matters that were unsettled and 
until his successor became familiar with his duties. 

With the proceeds of his official earnings Mr. King bought a farm, 
which is yet in the family, and devoted his energies to its cultivation. Also 
he started a store on his farm, and still later engaged in the lumber business, 
in which he dealt very extensively; and out of all his enterprises he profited 
and became a man of wealth. He continued his hold on politics after his 
retirement from the sheriff's office, and was for many years a leader in party 
affairs. At one time he served as freeholder, and he also filled other town- 
ship offices. He was indeed a remarkable man in many respects, possessing 
superior intelligence, rare judgment and great originality, on his father's side 
coming from witty Irish stock, and tracing his maternal ancestry back to 
honest, industrious German origin. He could prepare any ordinary legal 
document with the accuracy of a trained lawyer, and his penmanship was 
remarkably good for one who knew not the first principles of Spencer. He 
was a man of superior abilities. As his educational privileges were very 
limited, he was sadly handicapped and compelled to rely almost wholly upon 
his own efforts in securing a knowledge of the ordinary branches; but, being 
a man of quick perception and strong mental power, he readily assimilated 
the intellectual nutriment he could reach and he became one of the best 
business men in this part of the country. At any time he could respond to a 
call to address an audience, and he could speak with ease on any subject. 
His success in life generally was a proof of mental capacity and moral force. 

Thomas L. King married Miss Jane Hilts, daughter of Samuel Hilts and 
Margaret nee Caskey, Mr. Hilts being one of the prominent men of Roxbury 
township, owning and occupying a large farm on the mountain two miles 
west of Ledgewood. To Mr. and Mrs. King were born children as follows: 
Margaret, deceased; Theodore F. ; Josephine, deceased; William E. ; Frank- 
lin, deceased; and Ellen, deceased. Mr. King died in 1881 and Mrs. King 
passed away in 1877. 

Returning now to the immediate subject of this review, Theodore F. 
King, we record that he was born on a farm in Roxbury township, Morris 
county, New Jersey, November 14, 1843. The first five years of his life 
were passed in Morristown, where the family home was maintained during 



536 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

his father's official life, and his youth was spent in the vicinity of his birth- 
place. He received his education chiefly in Chester Institute. During the 
whole of his business life he has been engaged in merchandising, beginning 
in his father's store above referred to on the King homestead, and in 1874 
succeeding to the business of his father-in-law in Ledge >vood, which he has 
since conducted, meeting with prosperity on every hand, and having a trade 
that extends into the country for miles in every direction; and in addition to 
this business he also carries on farming and dairying; he has a store at 
Hopatcong, and is interested in boating on Lake Hopatcong, being president 
of the Hopatcong Steamboat Company. 

Theodore- F. King was united in marriage May 21, 1873, with Miss 
Emma L. Riggs, daughter of A. R. and Nancy (Stanburrough) Riggs, and 
one of a large family of children, her brothers and sisters being: Jetur R., 
residing at Milton, New Jersey; John S., Ledgewood, same state; Mary E., 
deceased; Nancy W. , wife of W. E. King; Harriet, wife of Rev. Joseph L. 
Potter, both of whom have been engaged in mission work in Persia the past 
eighteen years; and Alberta, deceased, who married Sidney T. Smith. A. 
R. Riggs was a native of Morris county, was for a period of thirty-five years 
engaged in merchandising in Ledgewood, and was one of the most prominent 
and influential men of the place. He was a large real-estate owner and 
established several furnaces and forges. A brother of his, Dr. Jetur Riggs, 
was at one time a member of congress. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. King, Josephine, deceased, 
and Emma Louise. 

Mr. King, like his father, is a stanch Democrat, and he, too, has been 
shown official preference. He was elected clerk of Roxbury township when 
he was twenty-one, was re-elected and served several years, and almost 
continuously since he attained his majority has he served as a committeeman. 

Religiously he is a Presbyterian, and for many years he has been an 
elder and trustee in the church. 



MARSDEN JACOBUS. 



Recognized as one of the progressive and enterprising farmers of Morris 
county, Mr. Jacobus was born on the present homestead February 23, 1837, 
a son of Abraham A. and Maria (Vreeland) Jacobus. He traces his ancestry 
back to his great-great-grandfather, a native of Holland, who came to this 
country and settled in Morris county, on eleven hundred acres of land, where 
he reared a large family. The great-grandfather's children were Nicholas, 
Cornelius, Abraham, David and others. The grandfather, Abraham, was 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 537 

born on the old homestead and became one of the well known farmers of the 
county and a prominent member of the Dutch Reformed church at Pompton 
Plains. He married Miss Leah Mandeville and their children were: Anthony, 
deceased; Mary, deceased, married Nicholas N. Ryerson, of Passaic county; 
James, a farmer living in Montville township; Giles, a carpenter residing in 
New York city; Abraham A., father of our subject; Wilhelmina, who married 
Martin Van Winkle, of Passaic county; Agnes, now Mrs. Jeremiah Mitchell, 
of Livingston, New Jersey; and Adrian, deceased. 

Abraham A. Jacobus was born on the farm April 25, 1798, and resided 
there until his death, on November 13, 1869. He married Miss Maria Vree- 
land, who departed this life on July 11, 1881. Mr. Jacobus was a progress- 
ive farmer and was solicited to fill several public offices, but invariably refused 
to do so. He was a deacon and eider in the Montville Reformed church for 
many years. He was the father of these children: George, a blacksmith by 
trade, was born October 17, 1826, and died November 19, 1891; Catherine 
A., born September 29, 1829, married Joseph Pienovi, of Newark, New 
Jersey; Leah Ann, born February 28, 1833, married Albert Terhune, and is 
now deceased; Adeline, born September 13, 1835, became the wife of John 
B. Van Saun, of Paterson, New Jersey; Marsden, our subject; Eugene, who 
followed farming, was born June 29, 1839, and died April 4, 1897; and 
Sarah Martha, born September 19, 1841, married Gilbert F. Mersellis, of 
Preakness, Passaic county. 

Marsden Jacobus was reared on the scene of his birth and upon arriving 
at maturity engaged in farming, which he has made his life work. In poli- 
tics he is a Democrat, giving a stanch support to that party, and he has 
served nineteen years as school committeeman. He has on several occa- 
sions been asked by his friends to become a nominee for the state assembly 
and for sheriff, but has always refused, preferring to devote his time to his 
personal affairs. He is an elder and a consistent adherent of the Montville 
Reformed church. 

The marriage of Mr. Jacobus was consummated on the 2d of June, 1869, 
when he was united to Miss Susan E. Van Ness, who was born August 4, 
1844, a daughter of Henry S. and Elizabeth Van Ness, of Pompton Plains, 
and of this union six children have resulted, of whom the following record 
is given: Bertha, born March 18, 1870, was married on the 7th of Novem- 
ber, 1895, to John Myers, of Boonton, and they have one child, Florence J., 
born March 28, ,1897; Maria, was born October 26, 1871, and on the 7th of 
June 1894, became the wife of Harry R. Doremus, of Newark, and they have 
one child, Russell J., born April 16, 1895; Lizzie, born September 13, 1873; 
Abraham A., born June 3, 1875, died June 13, 1895; Henry S., born Feb- 
ruary 28, 1878; and Wilbur M., born March 21, 1883. 



538 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



FRANCIS G. RICHARDS. 

Francis G. Richards was born March 6, 1 8 1 5 , in Amity, Orange county, 
New York, and was a son of David and Ann Frances (Hebron) Richards. 
His maternal grandfather, Davis Hebron, was a successful and enterprising 
farmer of Orange county and donated the ground in Amity upon which the 
court house is still standing. He was a very progressive and public-spirited 
citizen, and did much for the advancement of his locality. He was a con- 
sistent Christian gentleman and his life span covered more than four-score 
years. David Richards, the father of our subject, was a well-to-do farmer 
of Orange county, and was a man of good judgment and integrity above 
question. He married Ann Hebron, also a native of Orange county, and to 
them were born the following children: Mrs. Catharine Stage, of Orange 
county; Francis G. ; William, who married and removed to Illinois, where 
his death occurred; John, who married Elizabeth Beach, of Newark, New 
Jersey, where he followed harness-making for a number of years; Edward, 
who married and reared a family and spent his entire life in Orange county; 
Mahlon, who enlisted and served in the Union army during the war of the 
Rebellion, after which he went to the west and is supposed to have taken up 
a government claim, but nothing has been heard from him for a number of 
years; Jesse, who married and removed to Mount Vernon, where he success- 
fully followed farming and a trade. 

Francis G. Richards acquired his education in the public schools of his 
native county, and in early life served an apprenticeship to the cabinet-mak- 
er's trade, in Newark, New Jersey. He remained there for three years and 
became an expert workman. Aiterward he entered one of the largest estab- 
lishments of the kind in New York city, where his excellent workmanship, his 
fidelity to duty and strict integrity won him promotion from time to time 
until he- had attained the highest position in the works. He afterward became 
foreman in the cabinet-making factory of John Ogden, at Elizabeth, New 
Jersey, and for some time was regarded as one of the most valued employes ever 
connected with that house. After several years passed there, he came to 
Pompton, New Jersey, in 1840, and located at the present home of his widow, 
residing there until his life labors were ended. Here he entered upon a suc- 
cessful career as a cabinet-maker and undertaker, and to-day scarcely a home 
of any prominence can be found within a radius of many miles that does not 
display some of his workmanship in the furnishing of parlor or reception hall. 
There were also many interesting incidents connected with the other depart- 
ment of his business. In those days prices paid for undertaking were very 
small. He made and always kept on hand a large number of coffins, and a 
funeral bill rarely exceeded twelve dollars, which included the price of a waxed 




//Otjs qZ'<zJ, JLuiJ!uui.cJa; Jjbz£^i Cdfa-e^&^x^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 539 

coffin of cherry or walnut, then one of the best kinds of burial cases made. 
On one occasion one of the most prominent merchants of Pompton called 
upon Mr. Richards for a burial outfit, and when told that his bill was eight 
dollars he remarked with a pained expression, " It is very dear times for peo- 
ple to die? " At another time he made a cradle, the father promising to pay 
for the same, but no money was ever received by Mr. Richards. The child 
for whom the cradle was made, grew to manhood, but was rather a worthless 
fellow, leaving Pompton soon after he grew up. He married, and after many 
years again returned to Pompton, where he died. Then his widow came to 
Mr. Richards for a coffin, promising to pay for the same at any early day, but 
no money was ever forthcoming, and thus ' ' from cradle to the grave " it was all 
promises! Another neighbor of Mr. Richards became very indignant because 
he refused to take his measure and make him a coffin which he would retain 
untilthe day of his departure from the scenes of this life. However, Mr. 
Richards did a good business and acquired a comfortable competence. 

While employed in New York he was married in that city, March 17, 
1S38, to Miss Sarah M. Brown, a daughter of Henry and Catharine (DeBow) 
Brown. Mrs. Richards was born January 18, 1824, and is a woman of exem- 
plary character, whose upright life, covering a period of seventy-five years, 
has won her the love and esteem of many friends. She possesses excellent 
business qualification, and often assisted her husband in the store, while at 
the present time she is interested in the business which since her husband's 
death has been carried on by her sons, John and Edward. To the care of 
her eleven children she has devoted herself untiringly, and all of the number 
are yet living with the exception of Jesse, who died several years ago, at the 
age of forty-two, as the result of an accident. 

The record of the family is as follows: Francis, the eldest, is the wife of 
Jacob Vreeland, of Boonton, and has one daughter, Jessie; Emily is the 
wife of J. H. White, of Hoboken Heights, New Jersey, and they have two 
children, — Wallace, who is a practicing physician of Hoboken, and James H. ; 
Chillian D., a resident of Mountain View, Morris county, who married Ella 
Vreeland and has two daughters, — Hester and Julia; he enlisted during the 
Civil war and faithfully served as a defender of the Union. Jesse W., who 
was born June 14, 1846, and died August 19, 1888; he married Emma Mains 
and resided at Lincoln Park, New Jersey; Gordon, a resident of Lambert- 
ville, New Jersey, married, and has one son, David; Zenas married Ida Fran- 
cisco and makes his home in Pompton; they have six children, — Chester, 
Nellie, Sarah, Ida, Alonzo and Russell; Edward, also of Pompton, who mar- 
ried Josephine Sloan, and their children are William, Maud, George and Belle; 
Heman, who married Mary A. Shultz, and they had two children, — Francis 
and Gordon; the mother died and Herman Richards afterward married Eliz- 



540 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

abeth Perry; his elder son is a graduate of the medical department of the 
University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, and is now a surgeon in the 
United States army; Mary F. W., who resides on the homestead with her 
mother; John C. , who is also living with his mother, and is associated with 
his brother Edward in the funeral-directing and cabinet-making business, in 
which his mother is also financially interested; and Catharine Louise, the 
youngest of the family, is the widow of George DuBois, of Brooklyn, New 
York, and their only child, Inez S. , died at the age of thirteen years. 

In his political views Francis G. Richards was an ardent Republican and 
always kept well informed on the issues of the day, but never sought public 
office. He took a deep interest in all that pertained to the advancement and 
welfare of the community and was not slow in giving his support to the meas- 
ures and movements which were intended to benefit his town, county and 
state. He was a member of the West Millford Presbyterian church and lived 
a consistent Christian life, in harmony with the teachings of that denomina- 
tion. He passed away April 12, 1885-, at the age of seventy years, leaving 
to the family the priceless heritage of an untarnished name. 



EDWARD W. ELLIOTT. 



A prominent and prosperous farmer and timber dealer of Morris county, 
Mr. Elliott is a native of Metuchen, New Jersey, where he was born on the 
14th of January, 1855. His childhood was passed in the towns of Cranford 
and Mt. Horeb, New Jersey, his educational discipline being received in the 
public schools of those places, and since attaining manhood his life work has 
been along the lines of his present occupation. Until 1879 his residence was 
in Somerset county, but in that year he came to Mendham and a few years 
later located on a farm near that village. Here he operates a portable saw- 
mill in conjunction with his agricultural pursuits, and his prosperity and 
material stability are measured by and are commensurate with his great 
energy and unflagging industry. His start in life was made without that 
financial aid which would seem necessary to that degree of self-confidence 
that is a sure augury of success. His accumulations have been gradual and 
his possessions, aside from the farm upon which he resides, includes a large 
area of the mountain side to the west of Mendham. 

The marriage of Mr. Elliott was celebrated on the 12th of April, 1882, 
when he was united to Miss Elizabeth Ward, a daughter of C. H. Ward and 
a sister of William H. Ward, of Brookside. The issue of this union com- 
prised the following: Anna May, George W. and Maggie; and two, Albert 
and Harrison, who died in early life. 

John Elliott, the father of our subject, was born in Ireland and came to 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 541 

the United States when about twenty years old. He married Miss Maggie 
Cooper, a young girl who also was a native of the Emerald isle and who, like 
Mr. Elliott, relied upon her industry for sustenance. He departed this life 
in 1880, and she was summoned to her eternal rest three years later, in 1883. 
Their children were as follows: Edward W. ; Frank; Mary, who was a mis- 
sionary in Bombay, India, where she died in 1893; Martha; Maggie, 
deceased; John, a graduate of Yale College, is at present practicing law at 
New Haven, Connecticut; Robert, who is engaged in the florist business at 
Morristown; and James, who is a student in the Hackettstown Seminary, at 
Hackettstown, New Jersey. 

Politically Mr. Elliott is an ardent Prohibitionist, and both he and Mrs. 
Elliott are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Mendham. 



WILLIAM E. WELSH. 



He whose name forms the caption of this review is a member of the firm 
of Tompkins & Welsh, prominent manufacturers of tin, sheet-iron and cop- 
perware, and dealers in all kinds of parlor and heating stoves in Morristown. 
He is a native of Ireland, where he was born in 1837, the son of Moses and 
Alice (McDonald) Welsh. The parents emigrated from the land of their 
birth in 1850, and first located at Quebec, Canada, whence they moved to 
New York city and later came to Morris county, settling in Chatham town- 
ship, where they spent the remainder of their days. The mother died in 
1866, aged seventy-five years, and the father in 1869, when about eighty-five 
years old. Three children were born to them, namely: Mary, William E. 
and Ann, all of whom are living. 

William E. Welsh received his literary education at Union Hill and early 
in life was thrown on his own responsibility. Coming to Morristown when 
twelve years old, he here began to learn silver-plating. One year later his 
employer engaged in the tinware business and our subject continued with 
him, learning the tin and plumbing trade, with which vocation he has since 
been identified. In 1875 he became associated with Mr. Tompkins in the 
tin, sheet-iron and copper-ware business at No. 17 Market street, and this 
firm have acquired a valuable reputation for faithfully carrying out every 
agreement made by them. They occupy two floors, forty by eighty feet, 
where they carry a large and varied stock, necessitating the employment of 
fourteen competent assistants. 

Mr. Welsh was married, in 1868, to Miss Isabella Tracy, and the follow- 
ing children have been born to them: William H., Joseph, deceased, Alice 
and Isabella, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Welsh are consistent members of the 
Roman Catholic church. 



542 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



GEORGE O. CUMMINS, M. D. 

Dr. Cummins, who is engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery 
in Dover, was born near Vienna, Warren county, New Jersey, on the 2d of 
January, 1843, and is descended from one of the pioneer families of the state. 
The first American ancestors of the family came from Flanders, Europe, and 
established homes in this state, being among the first settlers. The great- 
grandfather of the Doctor was born in New Jersey, as were the grandparents, 
George and Susan (Johnson) Cummins. His parents were Johnson J. and 
Matilda W. (Emery) Cummins, both natives of Warren county, where the 
father followed the occupation of farming. The mother was a daughter of 
William Emery. 

Dr. Cummins, of this review, spent his boyhood days upon his father's 
farm and acquired his elementary education in the district schools, after 
which he entered The Pennington Seminary, in Pennington, New Jersey, where 
he prepared for college. In the fall of 1863 he matriculated in Wesleyan 
University, of Middletown, Connecticut, where he prosecuted his studies for 
two years. He then began the study of medicine in the office of Dr. C. C. 
Field, of Easton, Pennsylvania, preparing for the most indispensable of all 
the professions, and a year later entered the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, where he graduated March 13, 1868. 

The Doctor entered upon his professional career in Hackettstown, New 
Jersey, where he remained for a year. In November, 1869, he was married 
to Miss Hattie R. Wade, of that city, the only daughter of Morris Wade. 
She was a pious and accomplished lady. The Doctor and Mrs. Cummins 
removed to Dover, January 1, 1870, since which time he has devoted his 
attention and energies largely to his professional duties and is now well 
established in business. Mrs. Cummins became very popular and much 
respected by a large circle of friends in Dover. In August, 1876, she died 
suddenly, leaving the Doctor and the community to mourn her loss. 

Dr. Cummins is a member of the Morris County Medical Society and of 
the State Medical Society, and is continually carrying forward his investiga- 
tion of medical truths, thus adding to an already large and accurate store of 
knowledge. He is never neglectful, always careful and from the energetic 
and faithful performance of each day's duty gains strength and inspiration 
for the labors of the next. 

From a financial point of view Dr. Cummins has also met with an envi- 
able success and is possessed of considerable means. In 1892 he erected the 
Cummins block, a fine four-story brick structure, with all the modern improve- 
ments, — hot and cold water, and every room having outside light and fur- 
nished and arranged with a view to comfort and convenience. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 54S 

Dr. Cummins has always been a stanch advocate of the principles and 
policies of the Republican party, but has invariably refused to become the 
incumbent of political office. As more purely touching the line of his profes- 
sion, he has held at different times, by appointment, the office of city physician 
of Dover. He has ever manifested a lively interest in all that conserves the 
progress and prosperity of the city, and has lent his influence to all normal 
and legitimate enterprises. 



EDWARD MILLER. 

A member of the firm of Miller Brothers, prominent meat dealers of 
Madison, the subject of this review is a native of Morris county, New Jersey, 
where he was born on the 1 8th of February, 1856. His father, Hezekiah 
H. Miller, was born in Westchester county, New York, where in early life he 
followed farming. Subsequently he went to New York city and there 
engaged in clerking until 1850, when he removed to Hanover township, Mor- 
ris county, there continuing his residence until 1867, when he took up his 
abode in Livingston, Essex county. New Jersey, where he passed the 
remainder of his days, his death occurring in August, 1880. He married 
Miss Euphemia Ball, daughter of John and Nancy (Bagley) Ball, who were 
natives of Morris county and representatives of old and honored families of 
said county. 

Hezekiah H. and Euphemia (Ball) Miller became the parents of the fol- 
lowing named children: John B., born in October, 1852; Laura, who 
became the wife of William Martin; Edward, the immediate subject of this 
sketch; Frederick A., born November 18, 1859; and one other, who died in 
infancy. The grandfather of our subject was Levi Miller, who passed his life 
in Westchester county, New York, and after his death the grandmother 
came to New Jersey with Hezekiah H., and her death occurred in Whippany, 
in the year 1875, her remains being interred in the Whippany cemetery. The 
children of Levi Miller and his wife, whose maiden name was Mary Hull, 
were as follows: Hezekiah H; Sarah; Celinda, the wife of Timothy Cook, of 
Whippany, this county; Eli and Mary. The maternal grandfather of our 
subject's mother was a soldier in the war of the Revolution. 

Edward Miller received his early mental training at home and in the 
public schools of Morristown, after leaving which he entered the employ of S. 
W. Cook, in the meat business at Madison, continuing in the capacity of 
clerk for a period of ten years, when, having become thoroughly proficient 
in the various details of that line of enterprise, he determined to engage in 
the same on his own responsibility, and in 1884 he opened his present shop, 
on Main street, under the firm name of Miller Brothers, his associate in the 



544 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HIS TORI. 

enterprise being his brother Frederick A. His genial nature, combined with 
his long experience and distinct ability, quickly won for him many friends; the 
business increased rapidly and the meat market is now classed as one of the 
leading concerns of its kind in Madison, as well as in the immediate vicinity. 
Fraternally Mr. Miller is an active member of the Royal Arcanum of Madison, 
in which he has attained a high degree of popularity. 

On the ioth of October, 1879, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss 
Jessie Marsh, a native of Madison and a daughter of Charles and Elizabeth 
(Smith) Marsh, both of whom are descendants of old families of Morris 
county. Two children have been born to our subject and his wife, namely: 
Elizabeth and Edward, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Miller are faithful adherents of 
the Presbyterian church of Madison and contribute liberally to its support. 

Frederick A. Miller, the brother of our subject, was born November 18, 
1859, as has already been noted. He is an energetic business man and is 
highly regarded in his home city. He married Miss Jane Brown, and four 
children have been born to them, as follows: Euphemia, Anna, Frederick 
and Richard, — the last named being deceased. Mr. Miller is a stanch sup- 
porter of the Democratic party. 



JOHN H. BROWN. 



For ten years Mr. Brown has been engaged in the drug business in Boon- 
ton and is imbued with a spirit of enterprise that makes him an active factor 
in commercial circles. He was born in Pompton, Passaic county, New Jer- 
sey, November 19, 185 1. When seven years of age he became a resident of 
Boonton, and acquired his education in the public schools of the town and in 
the Boonton Academy. He then entered upon his business career as deputy 
county clerk under Mr. Speer, serving in that capacity for two and a half 
years, after which he entered the drug business in Newark, as a salesman in 
the employ of P. S. Van Patten. He was afterward with Dr. Jeremiah 
Cross, of the same city, where he remained for seven years. He also spent 
one year in Orange, with Thomas Cox, a druggist, and for nine months was 
in the employ of William H. Loveland, in Elizabeth. On the expiration of 
that period he was appointed apothecary of the state hospital for the insane, 
at Morris Plains, under the medical superintendent, Dr. H. A. Rudolph, where 
he continued for eight years, discharging his duties with marked prompt- 
ness and fidelity. He then resigned his position, on the 2d of August, 1887. 

On the 22d of September, 1888, he opened his present drug store in 
Boonton. and has since conducted a successful and constantly growing busi- 
ness. He has a well appointed store, and his honorable dealing and court 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 545 

•eous treatment of all patrons have secured him a liberal patronage. He 
was licensed by the state board of pharmacy, on the 8th of June, 1882. 

In politics Mr. Brown is a stalwart Republican and is now serving his 
third term and fifth year as commissioner of appeals. He supports all meas- 
ures for the public good and his advocacy of such interests has materially 
advanced the welfare of the community. He is a member of Arcania Lodge, 
No. 60, A. F. & A. M. ; of Pequannock Council, Royal Arcanum, and is a 
very active member of the First Reformed church. 



EDWIN W. KIMBALL. 

This well known citizen of Parsippany was born in Stockholm, Passaic 
county, New Jersey, on the 18th of November, 1857. His grandfather, John 
W. Kimball, was likewise a native of the same county, and there married 
Ann Dunn, by whom he had the following children: Ira, deceased; JohnN., 
who removed to Iowa soon after the close of the Civil' war; Elizabeth, 
deceased wife of William Kimball; George, of Clinton, New Jersey; Lydia, 
who married William Webb; Samuel, and one who died in early life. 

The father of our subject, William Kimball, was born in Stockholm, 
New Jersey, in 1834, and spent his entire life there, passing away in Decem- 
ber, 1894. He married Eleanor, daughter of William S. Wright, and their 
children were: Winfield S., who is engaged in the insurance business in 
Paterson; Edwin W.; John W., in Stockholm; Jesse, who is living with his 
brother Edwin W. ; Mary, Marcus, Eugene and Frank. 

Upon his father's farm Edwin W. Kimball spent his boyhood days, and in 
the schools of the neighborhood began his education, which was completed by 
study in Hackettstown Institute, of Warren county, New Jersey. When his 
life as a student was ended he was still connected with educational work as 
a teacher, and thus spent nine years in the public schools of Morris county, 
meeting with excellent success in his endeavors. He then turned his atten- 
tion to merchandising, conducting that business first at Troy Hills and then 
at Parsippany for a period of five years. Upon his retirement from the store, 
he returned to the farm, and in connection with the cultivation of his land 
he is engaged in dealing in milk and in conducting a grain and feed store in 
Boonton, being associated with Charles H. Leonard in the conduct of the 
last mentioned enterprise. He has that resolute purpose and unconquerable 
industry which enables him to overcome all obstacles, and in the management 
of his agricultural and commercial interests he has met with gratifying 
success. 

The home relations of Mr. Kimball have also been very pleasant. He 
was married in Hanover township, October 29, 1891, to Miss Mary E. Bald- 

9a 



546 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

win, daughter of John L. and Mary (Coon) Baldwin, and to them were born 
two sons, Dudley B. and Edwin W. ; but the latter is now deceased. 

A close study of the political questions of the day has led Mr. Kimball to 
give his political support to the Republican party, for he believes that its prin- 
ciples are most conducive to good government. He labors earnestly for the 
growth and success of his party in Hanover township, and has been elected 
on that ticket to several local offices. He served as justice of the peace of 
his township for ten years, discharging his duties with marked fairness, and 
is now commissioner of deeds and notary public. In the spring of 1S96 he 
was elected freeholder by a majority of fifty-four, and is now a member of 
the board, serving on the lunacy committee, and the Boonton, Pequannock, 
Montville and Madison bridge committees. In 1 898 Mr. Kimball was re-elected 
a freeholder by an increased majority of three hundred and fifty votes; which 
fact is significant. He is a popular and worthy gentleman whose public and 
private acts are those of a sincere and honorable citizen. His business efforts 
have met with the reward they merit, and he is ranked among the substantial 
young farniers of the township. 



JOHN H. GUNTHER. 

The present freeholder of the town of Mendham is a native of the 
Fatherland, his birth having occurred in Hessen-Darmstadt, on the 11th of 
October, 1836. His father, George Gunther, also a native of the same 
province, came to America in the latter part of the first half of the nine- 
teenth century, and resided in New Jersey for a time, but spent his last 
days in Pennsylvania. 

The subject of this review, the eldest in a family of seven children, was 
reared in Hessen-Darmstadt, and acquired his education in the schools of 
his native land, where he remained until eighteen years of age, when he 
determined to seek a home in America, having heard very favorable reports 
of the country and the opportunities here afforded to young men who wished 
to advance in the world. Accordingl}' he bade adieu to home and friends 
and sailed for the United States in 1854, landing in New York city, Septem- 
ber 22, of that year. For seven years thereafter he resided in Somerset 
county, New Jersey, and then came to Morris county, locating in Mendham, 
where he engaged in farming. To this industry he added, about the }'ear 1 87 1 , 
carriage and wagon making and repairing. In his native land he had learned 
the trade of cabinet-making, and was also able to do all kinds of wood-work- 
ing. His farm lies partly within thecorporate limits of Mendham, and upon the 
property he also conducts a livery stable. His land is under a high state of 
cultivation and is improved with all the modern conveniences in the way of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 547 

buildings and machinery. The place is neat and thrifty in appearance, and 
the owner is counted one of the progressive and practical agriculturists of the 
community, as well as one of the leading business men in other lines. 

In the spring of 1894 Mr. Gunther was nominated by the Democracy of 
Mendham for the office of freeholder, was elected, and in the discharge of 
his duties was so efficient and faithful that he was renominated and agaion 
elected in 1897, so that he is now filling the office. He is a plain, unassum- 
ing man, free from ostentation, performing his duties in a quiet matter-of- 
fact way, and is always just what it seems, — a worthy and industrious citizen. 

Mr^ Gunther was married in Mendham, in 1859, to Miss Eliza, daugh- 
ter of Jacob Smith, and to them have been born seven children, namely: 
George, Jacob S., Charles W. , Harry, Elizabeth, Retta and Edward. Both: 
Mr. and Mrs. Gunther are members of the Second Presbyterian church, at 
Mendham. Mr. Gunther came to America with the hope of bettering his finan- 
cal condition, and his hope in this regard has been realized, for as the result 
of his energy and perseverance he has acquired a comfortable competence 
and is accounted one of the leading citizens of the community. 



CHARLTON A. REED. 



Mr. Reed is one of the younger members of the Morristown bar, but has 
attained a position of distinction that many an older practitioner might well 
envy. The analytical mind, the logical reasoning and the quick and compre- 
hensive grasp of facts in their true bearing which distinguish the successful 
lawyer are all his, and the triumphs which he has won before court and jury 
point to still greater success in the future. 

Mr. Reed was born in Flemington, Hunterdon county, New Jersey, 
December 23, 1861, and is a son of John C. and Rachel (Higgins) Reed, 
both of whom were born near Flemington and were representatives of old 
New Jersey families. The father was a son of Jesse Reed, who married a 
Miss Hart, also belonging to one of the pioneer families of the state. He 
served as surrogate of Hunterdon county and was a son of Asa Reed, also a 
native of New Jersey, who was an officer in the war of the Revolution and 
valiantly aided the colonies in their struggle for independence. The mater- 
nal grandfather of our subject was John Higgins, a native of this state, who 
spent his entire life in Hunterdon county, where his people had located at 
an early epoch in its history. John C. Reed, father of our subject, suc- 
ceeded to the office of surrogate upon his father's death and filled out the 
unexpired term. He was a merchant of Flemington, and carried on busi- 
ness there for many years. He died at the age of thirty-three, and his wife, 
surviving him some years, passed away in 1893, at the age of fifty-eight. 



548 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Reared in his native county, Charlton A. Reed supplemented his early 
educational privileges by a course in Peddie Institute, of Hightstown, New 
Jersey, where he was graduated in 1 88 r . He is also a graduate of Brown 
University, of Providence, Rhode Island, of the class of 1886, and, thus 
equipped by thorough literary training for the acquirement of that special 
knowledge which would fit him for professional life, he entered upon the 
study of law in Flemington, and in June, 1889, was admitted to the bar as 
an attorney-at-law. In June, 1892, he was licensed as a counselor-at-law. 
He began practice in the city of his birth, and after a year and a half 
became connected with the business department of the New Jersey Hospital, 
at Morris Plains, as assistant warden. On the 1st of September, 1894, he 
located in Morristown, where he has gained a large clientage. His practice is 
constantly increasing and in representative character of business is steadily 
improving. He has taken high rank among the counselors-at-law in this 
city and is meeting with a well deserved success. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Reed is a Democrat and is now serving 
as a member of the board of aldermen of Morristown, to which position 
he was elected in May, 1895, and again in May, 1897, so that his present 
term will continue until May, 1899. He is deeply interested in the welfare 
of the city, and his support is given to all progressive measures for the public 
good. 

In 1 89 1 Mr. Reed was united in marriage to Miss Emily Curtis, of 
Point Pleasant, New Jersey. They are people of genuine worth, holding an 
enviable position in social circles. They belong to the Baptist church in 
which Mr. Reed is now serving as a member of the board of trustees and as 
treasurer. ■ 



JAIRUS J. LANGDON. 

The amount of activity in commercial circles indicates the prosperity of 
a town, the character of its inhabitants and the possibilities of its future 
growth and greatness. The thriving little village of Port Oram has a num- 
ber of well equipped business houses, conducted by men of enterprise, energy 
and marked ability, and to this class belongs Mr. Langdon, who is now suc- 
cessfully engaged in general merchandising there. He is one of the native 
sons of Morris county, his birth having occurred on the old Langdon home- 
stead on the 1 8th of November, 1849. 

As nearly as can be ascertained, the Langdon family is of English origin, 
and the first to locate in this vicinity was Phobus Langdon, the grandfather 
of our subject. He was born in Connecticut, and while a young man removed 
to Morris county, taking an active part in its early development and progress. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 549 

His son, Jesse S. Langdon, was born in Morris county, and during the 
greater part of his active life followed farming. He married Miss Sarah 
Martin, a daughter of John and Elizabeth Martin. John Martin rendered 
valiant service as a soldier in the war of 1812, and his wife also went to the 
front with him and performed a noble and faithful service for her country by 
her able care of the sick and wounded. She was a daughter of a Mr. Bishop, 
of a prominent New Jersey family. The father of our subject was originally 
an old-line Whig in his political views and adherency, and later became a 
stalwart supporter of the Republican party. He held membership in the 
Presbyterian church and died in that faith in 1894. His wife, Sarah (Martin) 
Langdon, who still survives him, is also a member of that church, and is a 
consistent Christian woman, possessing those lovable traits of character 
which endear her to those with whom she comes in contact. 

Their second son, Jairus J. Langdon, spent his youth at Mt. Pleasant, 
Morris county, and acquired his education in Rockaway Seminary. On lay- 
ing aside his text-books he entered the employ of the Mt. Hope Mining Com- 
pany, with which he was connected for four years. On the expiration of 
that time he went to Passaic county, New Jersey, where he formed a part- 
nership with Edward G. Coursen, under the firm name of Coursen & Lang- 
don, dealers in general merchandise. This association was continued until 
1876, when the business was closed out and Mr. Langdon removed to Mt. 
Pleasant. Here he established a store and has since continued the enterprise 
with good success. He also opened a branch store at Hopatcong, under the 
firm name of Langdon & Van Derbeek, and after a short time he purchased 
the interest of his partner and has since conducted the business individually, 
the establishment being in charge of his brother-in-law, Mr. Burkhart. He 
also is engaged in farming, and stands forward as one of the representative 
citizens and business men of the county. Wide-awake and enterprising, he 
has studied the popular taste, and in his purchases keeps in mind the wishes 
of his patrons. His straightforward dealing and his manifest desire to please 
his customers have naturally brought to him a good business, from which he 
derives a fair income. 

In 1874 Mr. Langdon was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Denton, 
of Verona, Sussex county, a daughter of Richard S. Denton. They now have 
one daughter, Elizabeth Denton Langdon. Mr. and Mrs. Langdon are mem- 
bers of the First Presbyterian church of Dover, and fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of Randolph Lodge, No. 130, I. O. O. F. , and of Hope Council, Golden 
Star. He is a member of the Republican executive committee of the borough 
of Port Oram, of which he was appointed chairman, and he formerly served 
as a member of the school board. 

Mr. Langdon's interest in the affairs of the town is of that practical 



550 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

character that prompts him to put forth every effort for the good of the com- 
munity and for the adoption of measures which will lead to its upbuilding and 
substantial improvement. In his business course he is ever honorable and 
reliable, and his success is the well merited reward of his own efforts. His 
sterling worth commends him to the confidence of all, and his neighbors and 
friends entertain for him high regard. 



JAMES B. BOWMAN. 

After a useful and honorable business career Mr. Bowman is now living 
practically retired, at Mendham, enjoying the well-earned measure of rest 
which should always follow years of labor. Though he has to a certain 
extent laid aside business cares, he finds his time and attention well occupied 
in attending to the demands of private and public duties. 

A native of Morris county, he was born in Randolph township on the 
19th of September, 1842, and is a son of Thomas Bowman, whose father, 
Nicholas Bowman, was descended from the old Dutch family of that name 
that was founded in New Jersey during the early days of American develop- 
ment. Thomas Bowman died in 1887, at the ripe old age of eighty-four 
years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Martha Stout, was a daugh- 
ter of Thomas B. Stout, who was a tavern-keeper in Chester, in the early 
days of that village. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bowman, 
namely: Richard T. , of Morristown; Adaline, who is the wife of George P. 
Roy, a farmer and a worthy citizen, of Mendham; and James Briant Bow- 
man, of this review. 

The last named was educated in the public schools of Mendham and in 
his youth began work at the carpenter's bench, thinking to make that occu- 
pation his life work. He completed his apprenticeship and worked as a 
journeyman for a few years, but seeing a more advantageous opening in the 
meat-market business he directed his energies in that line and followed the 
enterprise until 1890, enjoying a large and constantly increasing business, 
which at length brought to him sufficient capital to enable him to lay aside 
the more arduous duties of business life. 

Mr. Bowman was married in Chatham, New Jersey, December 15, 
1869, the lady of his choice being Miss Hannah M. Day, a daughter of W. 
Flavel and Mary (Reynolds) Day. They have but one child, Harry Day, 
who is now in the employ of the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company, in New 
York city. 

In his political preferences Mr. Bowman is a Democrat. He was reared 
in the faith of that party, and his judgment sanctions its principles and policies, 
so that he has continued to give to it his earnest support. He has served as 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 551 

town committeeman, and in 1897 he completed his seventh year's service as 
town assessor, his long continuance in the office well indicating the able 
manner in which he discharged the duties which devolved upon him. He is 
president and a member of the board of trustees of the Mendham Cemetery 
Association, and has shown an interest in everything pertaining to the best 
development of the town in which he makes his home. On May 11, 1898, 
Mr. Bowman assumed the duties of member of the board of chosen free- 
holders of Morris county, having been elected by his party in the spring of 
1S98. He has served as notary public and commissioner of deeds for a 
number of years. 



JOHN D. LINDSLEY. 

The assessor of-the town of Mendham and one of her most worthy and 
highly respected citizens, Mr. Lindsley was born in Passaic township, Morris 
county, on the 5th of May, 1844, a son of Cyrus M. and Elizabeth C. (Kinan) 
Lindsley, the former of whom was born, in Passaic township, September 26, 
1807, and died October 6, 1879. His wife, who was born August 27, 18 10, 
passed away September 23, 1889. They were the parents of the following 
children: Foster H., of Highbridge, New Jersey; George T., deceased; 
John D., our subject; Martha, who became the wife of Clark C. Todd, of 
Bedminster, New Jersey; Caroline, deceased; Henry P.; Albertine, the wife 
of Charles Wilson, living in Passaic township; and Edward H., deceased. 
The grandfather of our subject, John Lindsley, was a native of Passaic town- 
ship, his father having been a soldier in the Revolutionary war. 

The subject of this review continued his residence on the place of his 
birth until attaining his majority, and there engaged in the nursery business 
until 1 8/ 1, when he came to Mendham and established a nursery here. 

In his political faith Mr. Lindsley has always supported the Democratic 
party, and while he has ever been averse to seeking public favors, preferring 
to remain free from the trammels of official preferment, he has yielded to the 
pressure of his friends and has served as town committeeman, tax collector 
and assessor, discharging the duties pertaining thereto with a pronounced 
degree of ability and circumspection. 

On the 23d of November, 1871, Mr. Lindsley was united in marriage to 
Miss Sarah O. Millen, who was born February 25, 1846, the daughter of 
James B. and Elizabeth (Nutt) Millen. The children of this union are: Minnie 
S., who became the wife of J. Wesley Garrabrant, of Mendham; Caleb 
O., Annie E. and John D., Jr. The family are Presbyterians and Mr. Linds- 
ley has served as elder in the church. 



552 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



WILLIAM A. LUM. 

When "Finis " closes the book of life of any individual it is customary 
for his friends and acquaintances to glance in review over the pages of its 
history and ponder over the lessons it contains, treasuring up the good 
as an example of conduct that may well be followed. A study of the 
life record of Mr. Lum shows much to admire and emulate. While 
intensely devoted to business, and a man of very decided views and strong 
convictions, he was by nature of a gentle and affectionate disposition. His 
moral standard was high and he lived up to it. His genial companionship, 
his tenacious regard for the simple truth, his unostentatious generosity and 
large-hearted Christian benevolence were among the qualities that greatly 
endeared him to his friends. 

Born in Morris county in 1808, he was a son of Stephen Lum, a native 
of Chatham. In the county of his nativity he was reared, and early in 
life learned the mason's trade. For some years he followed that business, thus 
gaining his start in commercial pursuits, and later turned his attention to real- 
estate dealing. He made judicious investments in realty and became a large 
property owner. He carried on that enterprise for many years in Newark, 
his name becoming synonymous with the trade in that city. He was not 
only one of the oldest, but also one of the best known and most conserva- 
tive, men in the business. For many years he was active in the handling of 
Newark properties, and his word was taken without question as that of an 
authority in all matters of values and wisdom of investment. His judicious 
investments, his capable management of his interests and his wise judgment 
secured to him a handsome fortune. He was associated with the Franklin 
Building & Loan Association, and through this channel enabled many to 
secure homes for themselves, thus adding to the general welfare and pros- 
perity of the city. ' 

Mr. Lum was married in 1834 to Miss Cedenier Pickett, a native of 
Petersburg, Virginia, and a daughter of Thomas Pickett, who was born in 
the Old Dominion and was of English descent. By this union there were 
born fourteen children, namely: Uzzarella H., now Mrs. Hayward, of 
Rochester, New York; Henrietta, of Madison; David O., deceased; Cede- 
nier E., now Mrs. Denman, of Elizabeth, New Jersey; W. B., who died in 
infancy; Anna E., now Mrs. Griffin, of Los Angeles, California; W. P., of 
Colorado; Frank E. , of Madison, New Jersey; Charles E., deceased; Arthur 
R. , of Madison, Virginia, deceased; May Dodd, deceased; Howard, of New- 
ark; and Catherine P., wife of Harvey B. Frost, of Brooklyn, New York. 

Mr. Lum, while residing in Newark, served for some years as collector 
of arrears, was commissioner of deeds and also judge of elections. He 




*vrf»5 •**!> 




Wu/iam S$. ZLum. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 553 

could be trusted implicitly whether in office or out of it, and his word was 
ever as good as his bond. His political support was given to the Whig 
party in early life, but after the organization of the Republican party he 
espoused its principles and maintained them to the time of his death. He 
and his wife held membership in the First Reformed church of Newark and 
afterward in the Presbyterian church in Madison. They returned to Madi- 
son in 1882 and here Mr. Lum lived a retired life until called to his final 
rest. His days were passed in quiet amid friends and neighbors, surrounded 
by comforts that his former labor had made possible. His estimable wife 
and loved companion, with whom he had traveled life's journey for sixty 
years, passed away on the 19th of June, 1894, at the age of seventy-six 
years, and in less than a year he, too, passed to the world beyond, closing his 
eyes in death March 11, 1895, after a long useful and honorable life of 
eighty-six years. 



W. T. OUIMBY. 



Successfully engaged in the nursery business at Mendham, Mr. Quimby 
has attained to a leading place in industrial circles through his own well- 
directed efforts. Like others, he has not found in his business that all days 
are equally bright; in fact, in his earlier career there were many clouds to 
darken his pathway, but with resolute purpose and unshaken energy he has 
progressed, and has attained to a plane of financial comfort. 

Mr. Quimby was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, January 13, 
1834, and is descended from an old colonial family, of English origin, that 
was founded in America during the troublous times which preceded the war 
of the Revolution. The great-grandfather of our subject was one of the 
heroes who assisted in throwing off the yoke of British oppression. The 
grandfather, John Quimby, was a farmer by occupation, as was Isaac 
Quimby, the father. He was born in 18 10 and died in 1855. He married 
Rachel Frost, a most industrious, faithful and devoted mother to her family. 
She was a daughter of Ezekiel Frost, who passed his life in Bernardsville 
township, Somerset county. Mrs. Quimby, who died in July, 1886, had 
a family of seven children, namely: William T. ; John W., of New 
York city; Mary E. , deceased wife of E. E. Reger, of Succasunna Plains; 
James H., who went west years ago, since which time no news has been 
received from hitn; Susan A., wife of Thomas Allward, of Washington, D. C. ; 
Martha J., widow of Henry Bowers; and Anidie F. , deceased. 

When William T. Quimby was eight years of age, his parents being in 
limited circumstances, he went to live with an uncle, and remained an 
inmate of his household for thirty years. He was married November 7, 



554 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

1857, to Miss Sarah M. Leighton, and in the spring of 1873 'he came to 
Mendham, purchased a farm and turned his attention to the cultivation of 
peaches. In 1866 he added to this industry the nursery business, and to 
the dual occupation is now devoting his energies. His business has con- 
stantly increased and he now enjoys a very liberal patronage, which yields to 
him good financial returns. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Quimby were born three children: Anna F. , the 
eldest and the only survivor, is the wife of Benjamin Benbrook, of Newark; 
Sarah P., who married Joseph P. Sutton, died in April, 1888; and Alva S., 
who had but just entered upon his business career, died January 11, 1895. 
The mother of this family passed away January 8, 1886, and on the 1st of 
March, 1887, Mr. Quimby was again married, his second union being with 
Miss Mary E. Axtell, daughter of Luther Axtell, of Somerset county. 

Mr. Quimby is a leading member of the Methodist church in Mendham, 
in which he is serving as steward and one of the trustees. He is a man of 
public spirit, broad-minded and of generous impulses, and contributes to the 
support of many enterprises whose object is the progress and advancement 
of the community. 



CHARLES J. TRENT. 

The subject of this sketch is superintendent of the Bloomingdale Soft 
Rubber Works, of Butler, and was born in. London, England, June 2, 1845, 
a son of George and Ann (Rogers) Trent, also natives of England. Their 
children were: George, who died in early life; Edward W., now a resident 
of Chicago, who wedded Mary Kusse; Charles J. ; and Joseph, who is still in 
England. The father of this family is a bookbinder by trade, and is now 
living in Brooklyn, New York. The death of the mother occurred in 1853. 

When a lad of eight years Mr. Trent was brought by his father to the 
United States, and spent his boyhood days in Philadelphia, New York city 
and Columbia county, New York. He attended the public schools, and 
when he laid aside his text-books to take up the sterner duties of life, the 
task assigned to him was learning the trade of file-making, in Pompton, New 
Jersey. Later he worked in a mill near Boston for a time, and then went to 
Chicago, where he was employed as a journeyman for three years, after 
which he entered into a partnership and began business on his own account. 
For four years he carried on operations along the line of his trade, and then 
decided to change his business. Accordingly he worked as an engineer of a 
stationary engine, also as a millwright and machinist. For fifteen years he 
resided in Chicago and upon his return to New Jersey, in 1881, he located in 
Butler, where he secured a position in the works of the Bloomingdale Soft 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 555 

Rubber Company. Here he applied himself earnestly to the mastery of the 
business, and when he had gained a practical experience of the work in its 
various departments, he was placed in charge as superintendent, in 1889, 
and for nine years has now occupied that position. Under his capable man- 
agement and wise direction the factory has become one of the successful en- 
terprises of the county, controlling a large and constantly increasing business. 
Mr. Trent was married in Pompton, New Jersey, in March, 1867, the 
lady of his choice being Miss Anna A. Miller, a daughter of Benjamin and 
Margaret (Fredericks) Miller, who were the parents of seven children, 
namely: Emeline E. ; Kate, wife of Hudson Youngs, of Boonton; George, 
a resident of Butler; Mrs. Trent; Sarah J., widow of George Decker, of But- 
ler; Ella, wife of David Kitchell, of Butler; and Munson, also of Butler. Mr. 
and Mrs. Trent have four sons: George W. , of Chicago, who occupies a 
position as salesman for the Rawson & Evans Ornamental Glass Company; 
Robert, who is with his father as engineer in the factory; Benjamin, a vul- 
canizer in the works; and Edward, who operates the farm and homestead. 
Mrs. Trent is a member of the Butler Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. 
Trent has always contributed liberally to church and charitable enterprises. 
Politically he is a Republican. 



ROBERT H. THOMPSON. 

Mr. Thompson is a well known farmer of Mendham, and his home is 
one of the colonial residences erected before the Revolution. The old walls 
have looked down upon the scenes of colonial history, the formation of the 
new republic, its advancement along all the avenues of business and improve- 
ments, and still stand, — mute witnesses of our latter-day progress and'a con- 
necting link between the present and the past. The ancestral history of the 
Thompson family discloses the fact that three brothers, Aaron, Moses and 
Hur, came from Scotland about the year 1686. (They fled from persecution.) 
The youngest brother settled in New England, the two others in Elizabeth- 
town, New Jersey, and their descendants are found in Connecticut Farms, 
Bottle Hill and Mendham. Joseph, the youngest son of Aaron, removed 
from North Farms to Mendham in the year 1739, his son, David, being one 
year old. They lived in the Black Horse Tavern until they built at the head 
spring of the Passaic. Joseph Thompson died in July, 1749, his wife, Lydia, 
having died in March previous. Between the deaths of the parents the most 
of their children died of a prevailing epidemic, called the " long fever." The 
names of the children that died were: Phebe, Hannah, Aaron, Daniel and 
Rachel. Three grandchildren also died, of the same fever, in the month of 
April. Joseph Thompson purchased the farm which is still in possession of 



556 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

his descendants, and which is commonly known as the "old homestead." 
His son, David, some years before the war for independence, erected the 
residence which is now the home of our subject. He was one of the leading 
and influential citizens of the county, was one of the patriot heroes of the 
Revolutionary war and commanded a company, with the rank of captain. 
He did much to mold the public life and interests of Mendham, was very 
prominent in church circles and long served as elder in the Presbyterian 
society. 

Stephen Thompson, son of David and the grandfather of our subject, 
followed in his father's footsteps and had an acknowledged leadership in 
affairs concerning the general welfare. He filled many of the town offices 
and was also an elder in the Presbyterian church. He married Susan Harris, 
of Philadelphia, a daughter of a patriot soldier of the Revolutionary war, and 
to them were born the following children: George H.; David, who became 
a prominent lawyer of Sussex county, New Jersey; Nancy I. ; and Robert H. 

George H. Thompson, father of our subject, was born in 1803, and died 
in Mendham in 1882. His birth occurred near Peapack, but he eventually 
removed to the old homestead,, and devoted his energies to agricultural pur- 
suits. His strong mentality, pronounced ability and sterling worth led to his 
selection for various public honors, and he represented his district in the 
state legislature, was a member of the board of freeholders, filled many of 
the important town offices, was town committeeman and was also judge of 
election. Like his father and grandfather, he was a godly man, devoted to 
the cause of Christianity, and in the Presbyterian church in Mendham he 
served as elder. He married Tempe Leddell McCrea, a grandniece of Jane 
McCrea, who was slain in the Cherry Valley massacre during the Revolution- 
ary war, and whose story is familiar to every student of history. The chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. George H. Thompson were: David, deceased; Alex- 
ander, who resides near Salem, Oregon; Mary, deceased; Philip McCrea, 
who has also passed away; Robert H. ; and Susan, widow of James Law- 
rence. 

Robert Harris Thompson, whose name introduces this review, was born 
in Mendham township, May 30, 1847, and was educated in two private 
schools, — Rankin's and Day's. He received training in agricultural labors 
on the home farm and when he had attained his majority began farming on 
his own account. He now owns the old family homestead, which has been 
in possession of the Thompsons for more than a century. This comprises 
one hundred acres of land, and in addition he has another fifty-acre tract. 
He has placed his farm under a high state of cultivation and its neat and 
thrifty appearance well indicates the careful supervision of the owner. 

Mr. Thompson was married December 19, 1883, to Miss Eliza M. Gar- 




¥<?& fi^umyS-y 



Ce*^T7x* 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 557 

abrant, born July 19, 1853, a daughter of Cornelius and Elizabeth (Pitney) 
Garabrant, and they have one daughter, Nancy I., born June 13, 1886. Mr. 
Thompson is a Republican in his political views, but has never sought or 
desired public office, preferring to devote his energies to his business inter- 
ests, in which he has met with a well merited and honorable success. He is a 
valued citizen of the community in which his entire life has been spent, and 
wears worthily the honored family name. 



SYLVESTER MITCHELL. 

A member of the firm of Coe & Mitchell, contractors and builders, of 
Morristown, Mr. Mitchell has been identified with the interests of this city 
for about a decade and his presence has made itself felt through his connec- 
tion with the improvement and consequent development of the city by reason 
of his efficiency in the line of his chosen occupation. He was born in North- 
ampton county, Pennsylvania, on the 14th of September, i860, and is a son 
of Lewis and Catherine (Evans) Mitchell, both natives of the same county, 
the birth of his father having occurred there February 22, 1834, and that of 
his mother on the 5th of January, 1836. By trade Lewis Mitchell is a car- 
penter. His father, Lewis Mitchell, Sr. , lost his life by drowning in New 
York bay, about the year 1834, and his wife, Mrs. Lavina Mitchell, long sur- 
viving him, departed this life on the last day of February, 1897, at the 
advanced age of eighty-six years. The great-grandfather of our subject was 
a native of Germany and, leaving the land of his birth, he crossed the Atlantic 
to the New World, taking up his residence in Pennsylvania, where represent- 
atives of the family have since been found — industrious, enterprising and 
reliable citizens. The mother of our subject bore the maiden name of Cath- 
erine Evans and is a daughter of Conrad Evans, whose family were pioneers 
of the Keystone state. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell are Mary, 
wife of Simon Felker, of Portland, Pennsylvania; Sylvester, Frank and 
Edward. 

In his early youth Sylvester Mitchell attended the public schools, but at 
the age of thirteen laid aside his text-books and began learning his trade with, 
his father. When he had mastered the business he spent four years working 
as a journeyman for a Mr. Smith in Scranton, Pennsylvania. His twentieth 
and twenty-first years were spent in school, for he had realized how neces- 
sary to success in business is education. He afterward went to Bangor, 
Pennsylvania, where he followed his chosen occupation for six years, on the 
expiration of which period he removed to Morristown, in 1889, and began 
that career which has identified him with the development and upbuilding of 
this city. For three years he had charge of the work of Theodore A. 



558 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Wilson, and in the early part of the year 1894, the firm of which he is now a 
member was organized and is now one of the successful competitors for the 
best work being done in its line in and around Morristown. Among the 
important buildings which Mr. Mitchell has erected are St. Bartholomew's 
school, of Morristown, St. Francis Sanitarium at Denville, and the resi- 
dences of William Smart, John B. Vreeland, Mr. Lusardi and J. H. Hender- 
shoot. At present (August, 1898) he has in course of construction the man- 
sion of George W. Jenkins, on Madison avenue, in Morristown. He is 
thoroughly master of his business, is a progressive, enterprising man, and 
his worthy ambition to succeed has carried him far toward the goal of 
affluence. 

In Bangor, Pennsylvania, on the 24th of December, 1883, was cele- 
brated the marriage of Mr. Mitchell and Miss Ida E. Sandt, a daughter of 
Samuel and Elizabeth (Kunsler) Sandt. They have had three children, — 
Lewis, who died when a year old; Flora, who died at the age of five; and 
Eddie, now nine years of age. 

Mr. Mitchell is a member in good standing of Loanica Council of the 
Royal Arcanum at Morristown; the lodge of the United Order of Foresters 
at Morristown; Nemonock Tribe, Improved Order of Red Men; Tataney 
Council, Knights of Pythias, at Portland, Pennsylvania; and has also 
recently identified himself with the Masonic fraternity at Morristown. 



EDGAR LAYTON DURLING. 

Upon investigating the genealogy of the Durling family in America, it 
becomes apparent that all existing branches spelling their names variously 
Doeland, Dorian, Dorlon, Durland, Derland and Durling, in different local- 
ities, are traceable to one and the same source, namely, Gerrett Dorlandt, 
of Holland, whose two sons, Jan Gerrettse Dorlandt and Lambert Janse 
Dorlandt, emigrated to this country and settled on Long Island in the years 
1652 and 1663 respectively. The first of these sons, Jan Garrettse, also had 
two sons — Elias, who settled at Hempstead, Long Island, and Gerrett, who 
located in Brooklyn. The second son, Lambert Janse, became the father of 
two sons, Gerrett Janse, who settled in New Jersey, and John, who first 
located on Staten Island and then in Philadelphia county, Pennsylvania; and 
it appears from the records that the subject of this mention is a direct 
descendant of the New Jersey settler, Gerrett Janse. 

Amzi A. Durling, father of Edgar L. , was born in Warren county, New 
Jersey, and subsequently moved to Sussex county, where he followed the 
occupation of a miller for many years. He married Miss Theresa Rosencranse, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 559 

a native of Sussex county, and of the five children born to them, the follow- 
ing four survive: Rodman P., Anson R., Edgar L. and Mary. Amzi A. 
Durling died at Morristown in 1896, having attained the advanced age of 
seventy-four years. His wife is now living (1897) and makes her home in 
Morristown. 

Edgar L. Durling was born in Sussex county, New Jersey, on the 22d 
of May, 1859, and there obtained his educational discipline in the district 
schools, after leaving which he began his business career as a grain dealer at 
Baker's Mills, Morris county, when twenty years of age. The ensuing year 
he came to Morristown and here continued in the same line of enterprise, in 
which he has met with more than ordinary success, and now owns and 
operates one of the only two grain elevators in Morristown. When he 
entered upon his business career Mr. Durling had a capital of less than a 
hundred dollars, but his credit was good, his integrity undoubted and his in- 
dustry indefatigable, and step by step he advanced in the mercantile world 
and distinct success followed his' efforts, while at the same time he became a 
well known and popular resident of his home city. He is a member of the 
board of directors of the Morristown branch of the New Jersey Central 
Building Association. 

For fifteen years Mr. Durling has been actively identified with the work 
of the Republican party in Morris county, and in 1888 he was elected a mem- 
ber of the Morris township committee. In 1896 he became the Republican 
candidate for sheriff of Morris county and was elected to that office by the 
decisive majority of two thousand two hundred votes, which was a most fit- 
ting compliment to his popularity, as the county is usually Republican by 
only a few hundred ballots. During the time he has held office Mr. Durling 
has fulfilled his duties in a manner that fully merits the confidence reposed in 
him by his fellow-citizens, who are loud in their praise of his executive ability 
as displayed in conducting his office, and the services rendered by him in the 
capacity of sheriff. He has made a signally excellent record as sheriff, and 
through his effective official efforts has become widely known throughout the 
state, his reputation having been particularly advanced by the strong fight he 
made in the courts in connection with the celebrated case of Anna Morrison 
vs. Thomas Bright, which attracted the attention of the legal eyes through- 
out the Union. 

The marriage of Mr. Durling was solemnized in 1894, when he was 
united in marriage to Miss Emma Louise Eisensmith, of Morristown, the issue 
of this union being one child, Norman Layton, who was born in 1896. 

He has for fourteen years been a member of the Resolute Hook and 
Ladder Company, of the Morristown fire department, and has held all the 
offices in the company. 



560 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



THOMAS K. WILKISON. 

Mr. Wilkison, who is a resident of Ledgewood, is a farmer and carpen- 
ter, and in following the latter calling he treads in the footsteps of his grand- 
father, Beniu Wilkison, who was one of the early contractors and builders of 
this locality, having erected many of the houses and other buildings which 
are still standing in the neighborhood. He also constructed a number of 
forges, but none of these are now in existence. He was exceedingly industri- 
ous, laboring early and late, and by his unflagging perseverance he amassed 
much property. He married a Miss Owen, and their children were Samuel, 
David, Charity, Beniu, Sallie, Eliza, Owen and Daniel. Jonathan Wilki- 
son, the father of Beniu, was the first of the family to locate in Morris 
county, and was the owner of much of the mountain above Drakesville, 
including the site of Ledgewood. 

Owen Wilkison, father of our subject, was born in Roxbury township, 
Morris county, in 1805, and died in 1846. He married Miss Sallie King, 
who was born in 181 1, and to them were born seven children: Jane, 
wife of John Phoenix King, of Ledgewood; Christiana, wife of Thomas Wil- 
letts; Clarkson K. ; Eliza W., widow of Amos Willetts; Annie, deceased wife 
of J. Peaslee, of Haverhill, Massachusetts; Thomas King; and Charles D., 
deceased. The mother of this family was a daughter of John O. P. King, 
whose father, George King, came from Ireland to America during his boy- 
hood and married Mary Phoenix. He died in September, 1799, and lies 
buried in Succasunna. His children were John P. ; William, who married 
Eliza Wilkison, a daughter of Beniu Wilkison and a granddaughter of Jon- 
athan Wilkison; Jacob; Adam; Absalom; George Ralph; Margaret, who mar- 
ried a Mr. Wagoner; Mary, who became the wife of Mr. Grant; and Betsy, 
who married Mr. Potter. • 

Thomas K. Wilkison, of Ledgewood, was born on the Beniu Wilkison 
homestead, March 15, 1843. His boyhood and youth were spent amid the 
surroundings of the country home, and his educational privileges were those 
afforded by the common schools. Between the ages of eighteen and twenty 
years he worked as a farm hand, and then spent one year in the Central 
Market in Newark, New Jersey, in the employ of T. H. Pruden. On the 
expiration of that period he returned to the farm, and after his marriage he 
located on the Codaz farm, near the Hilts mine. On leaving that location 
he resided in Ledgewood for three years, following various pursuits during 
that time, and then purchased his present farm, which has been his home 
continuously since 1879. In the early '80s he went to Haverhill, Massachu- 
setts, and accepted a position in the shoe factory of J. Peaslee, but after two 
years returned to Ledgewood, where he has since carried on carpentering in 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 561 

connection with agricultural pursuits. He possessed considerable mechan- 
ical genius, handling tools with exceptional efficiency and at the same time 
manifesting great care and industry in the cultivation and improvement of 
his land. He was one of the incorporators of the Halsey Island Land 
Company and also of the Byram Cane Land Company, both at Lake Hopat- 
cong, and is now a member of the firm of Wiikison & Scheer, establishing a 
summer resort on the shore of Lake Hopatcong, known as Silver Spring 
Park. 

On the 30th of January, 1869, Mr. Wiikison was united in marriage to 
Miss Anna E. King, a daughter of Reuben and Phcebe A. (Dickerson) King. 
She was born October 22, 1845, and is the youngest in her parents' family, 
the others being Christiana W. , widow of Lewis Messenger; Phcebe M. ; 
George W. ; and Reuben W. , deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Wiikison have one 
child, S. Florence, who was educated in Hackettstown Seminary and is now 
engaged in teaching. 

Mr. Wiikison gives his political support to the Democracy, and has 
served his township on the tax commission. He also belongs to the First 
Baptist church, in which he has filled the office of deacon. He is always 
ready to respond to the call of duty and his loyalty to every interest entrusted 
to his care is most commendable. 



NATHANIEL S. BEST. 



A well known resident of Butler, Mr. Best was born at Saxon Falls, 
Morris county, between Waterloo and Hackettstown, on the 1 5th of October, 
1847. The ancestry of the family can be traced back through several gen- 
erations to William Best, a native of Germany who left the fatherland and 
established a home on American soil. He died in the vicinity of the Best 
homestead, at the advanced age of one hundred and fifteen years. His son, 
Andrew Best, the grandfather of our subject, was born about 1778, following 
farming as a life work and died about 1862. His son, Andrew, the father of 
our subject, was born in Warren county, New Jersey, April 23, 1814, engaged 
in the tilling of the soil in order to support his family, and closed his eyes in 
death in 1894. His father married a Miss Tiger, and their children were 
David; Saxon; George; Herbert; Sallie, who married a Mr. Mooney; and 
Andrew. The last named was united in marriage to Sarah McWilliams, 
daughter of James McWilliams, and the record of their family is as follows: 
George, of Stanhope, New Jersey; Wilson W. , of Dover; Ruhama, wife of 
Abram Harrison, of Tioga county, Pennsylvania; Theodore, deceased; John, 
of Stanhope; Mercy, of Boonton; Jesse, deceased; Nathaniel S. ; William and 
Martin, who have also departed this life; and Elizabeth, of Boonton. 

]0a 



562 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Nathaniel Saxon Best, the well known merchant of Butler, assumed the 
responsibility of providing for his own maintenance at the age of fifteen years, 
at which time he began work as a farm hand. After a year spent in that 
way he determined to change his occupation, and he learned the blacksmith's 
trade, under the direction of A. J. Winters, of Hackettstown. He worked 
as a journeyman in that city, in Cherryville, Washington, Boonton and 
Dover and became very proficient in horse-shoeing and in coach-ironing. In 
1884 Mr. Best came to Butler, where he conducted a blacksmith shop for ten 
years, doing a good business. He then abandoned his trade and purchased 
his brother's bakery, since which time he has conducted the establishment 
with excellent success. In addition to this he is extensively engaged in the 
manufacture of ice cream, and the reputation of " Best's ice cream " extends 
throughout this section of the state. ' So large are the sales that he manu- 
factures the cream by steam process and during the summer season employs 
a very large force of men in this department of his business. The prosper- 
ity which Mr. Best has achieved is due entirely to his own efforts, a fact 
which is indeed creditable. 

Mr. Best was married in Hackettstown, New Jersey, February 26, 1874, 
to Miss Mahala Evelyn Haines, daughter of Lewis and Eliza (Lodore) Haines, 
of Hackettstown. He is a member of Silencia Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of 
Butler, and since the age of twenty-one years has been connected with 
Musconetcong Lodge, I. O. O. F. , of Hackettstown. Mrs. Best is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church, at Butler. 



EDWARD O'DONNELL. 

A member of the firm of Wood & O'Donnell, contractors and builders, 
the subject of this review is one of the substantial and enterprising business 
men of Madison. Born in Parsippany, Morris county, on the 20th of 
November, 1861, Mr. O'Donnell is a son of Patrick and Mary (Stenson) 
O'Donnell, natives of Ireland. His parents emigrated to America in 1855, 
locating in Parsippany, where the father engaged in farming. Their family 
numbered the following: Eliza M., wife of R. F. Mullhall; Nellie T. ; Anna 
and John. The parents are both now deceased. 

On the farm of his father Edward O'Donnell was trained to habits of 
industry and economy, and early became familiar with the duties that fall to 
the lot of the agriculturist. The public schools of Whippany afforded him 
the educational privileges which he enjoyed, and on laying aside his text- 
books he went to Newark, where he learned the carpenter's trade, applying 
himself with great earnestness until he had thoroughly mastered the business. 
In 1888 he began business on his own account in Summit, in partnership 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 563 

« 

with J. H. Wood, under the firm name of Wood & O'Donnell. From the 
beginning their success was marked and gratifying, and during the second 
year they opened a shop in Madison, Mr. O'Donnell taking charge of the 
same, while Mr. Wood continued in charge of the Summit shop. Their 
business rapidly grew in volume and importance, and has now assumed 
extensive proportions. They do general contracting, and many of the fine 
structures in Summit and Madison are their handiwork. They built the 
postoffice in each town, also the fine residences on the Crescent, the new 
Britton block and many other handsome and substantial structures. Their 
patronage has been large and profitable, and they are accounted among the 
leading contractors in their section of the county. 

On the 27th of September, 1889, Mr. O'Donnell was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary T. O'Brien, a daughter of Jeremiah O'Brien, of Madison. 
They had one child, Edward, born September 2, 1892, who was deprived by 
death of his mother on the 30th day of September, 1892. 

Mr. O'Donnell is a member of the Catholic Benevolent Legion and the 
Royal Arcanum. He also belongs to the fire department of Madison. He 
is a progressive and public-spirited man, taking an active interest in the wel- 
fare of the community and all that pertains to its best development. He 
affiliates with the Democracy and has served as a member of the board of 
education from 1894 until 1896, and in the latter year was elected a mem- 
ber of the common council of Madison for a term of three years. He is very 
prompt and faithful in the discharge of his public duties, and is alike mindful 
of the obligations which rest upon him in private life. 



JOSEPH W. EMMONS. 

He to whom this memoir is dedicated was a representative of one of 
the first families that made a permanent location in Morris county. His 
father was Jacob Emmons, his grandfather Nicholas Emmons, and the latter 
was a man of large means, owning an extensive tract of land in what is now 
the Emmons and Wortman neighborhood, south of Chester. Joseph W. 
Emmons was born on that farm, March 1, 1832, and in the usual manner of 
farmer lads of that period acquired his education. After arriving at years of 
maturity he married Miss Esther Leek, a daughter of Daniel and Jane (Chips) 
Leek, the wedding being celebrated on the 2d of July, 1854. He then located 
upon the farm upon which his widow now resides and by his well directed 
business efforts accumulated a handsome competence, which enabled him to 
leave his family in comfortable circumstances. He was industrious and 
energetic and his well tilled fields and carefully repaired fences and buildings 
indicated the oversight of a thrifty and painstaking manager. 



564 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Mr. Emmons was very popular as a citizen and such were the many 
excellencies of his character that the circle of his friends was limited only by 
the circle of his acquaintances. He believed firmly in the principles of Dem- 
ocracy and at the polls supported the men and measures of his party, but 
never held or desired political office, preferring that others should attend 
to the administering of public affairs. He died May n, 1878, and through- 
out the community he was mourned as a loyal citizen, a faithful friend, an 
upright man and a devoted husband and father. 

His surviving children are Elias W., to whom individual reference is 
made in the next sketch, Joseph Austin and Theodore S. The second 
son was born March 11, 1858, was educated in the district school near his 
home and has spent his entire life with his mother on the old farmstead. 
Theodore, the youngest son, was born December 11, 1865, and has spent 
his entire life in the home neighborhood. Like his brothers, he was educated 
in the country schools and, like them, is one of the progressive and substan- 
tial farmers of the township. He was married in September, 1887, to Miss 
Ella Rowe, who died April 19, 1896. 



ELIAS W. EMMONS. 



The subject of this sketch, the eldest son of the late Joseph W. Emmons, 
was born on the old family homestead, December 24, 1862. The duties of 
the farm and the school-room claimed his attention in his youth, and when he 
had attained his majority he became the mainstay of his widowed mother. Even 
before this he rendered her valuable assistance in the management of her 
property. Reared in one of the richest agricultural belts of the state, he has 
always given his attention to farming and is a thoroughly practical and pro- 
gressive farmer, following advanced methods, but at the same time adopting 
no visionary schemes. _ The industry and resolute purpose which lead to 
honorable success are his and have brought him a comfortable income. 

Mr. Emmons was married on the 27th of December, 1889, to Miss 
Emma I., daughter of George Pickle. His wife died August 15, 1891, leav- 
ing an infant that has since died. Mr. Emmons was reared in the midst of 
a community of thrifty and liberty-loving farmers to whom he has attached 
himself by ties of genuine friendship. His life is as an open book which all 
may read, and he has ever walked in the paths of honesty, so that he has 
the unlimited confidence of those who know him. In his political asso-' 
ciation he is a Democrat, and in 1890 was elected on that ticket to the 
office of township collector, but before completing his term he resigned the 
position. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVB GENEALOGICAL HISTORF. 



565 



DORASTUS L. BRYANT. 

Mr. Bryant, the proprietor of the Westmoreland Hotel at the landing on 
Lake Hopatcong, and one of the leading business men of Morris county. New 
Jersey, is a native of the county and a descendant of ancestors long resident 
here. His father was born in 1808, at Ironia, on the original Bryant tract, 
now owned and occupied by his son as a farm residence. 




Dorastus L. Bryant was born April 1, 1840, at Succasunna, New Jersey, 
on premises where he now owns and operates a store and apple distillery. 
His father, Samuel C. Bryant, was reared a farmer and was engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits until near middle life, when he turned his attention to mer- 
chandising, farming and distilling at Succasunna, continuing the same suc- 
cessfully until his death, that event occurring in 1866. He was a son of Elias 
Bryant, who also was born on the homestead farm, and whose father was one 
of the original settlers and a large property owner. Samuel C. Bryant mar- 
ried Phebe A. Garrison, daughter of L. B. Garrison, and two children were 
the fruit of their union, — Dorastus L. and Alonzo, — the latter now being 
deceased. Dorastus L. Bryant grew up in the business established by his 
father, receiving his education in that and the country schools, and at his 
father's death succeeded to the business, which he still continues. About 
1870, at the height of the iron-mining boom, he discovered and operated the 
iron range between Ironia and Chester, in connection with the Bryant mines 
at Succasunna, and in 1873 he formed a partnership with Edmund Canned 



566 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

in the store and lumber business at Ironia, that continued for three years. 
About six years ago he became associated in the construction of the West- 
moreland Hotel, and since September, 1897, ne has been the proprietor of 
the establishment, exercising the same good judgment in the management of 
its affairs that he has shown in his other business enterprises. Mr. Bryant is 
one of those men who seem to be able to take the right step at the right 
time, and succeeds where others fail. 

Politically Mr. Bryant is a Democrat, as well as his father, and both 
have filled numerous places of trust and responsibility in the township. 

Mr. Bryant was married in 1866 to Caroline B. Snelling, and they have 
the following children: Elizabeth M., wife of M. B. Carrel; Augustus S., 
who married Alice Coates and assists in the management of the hotel; Anna 
P., wife of H. H. Jowitt; Dora L., wife of Dolph DeHanne; Robert B. , 
dentist at Dover; J. Frederick C. , in charge of farm at Ironia; and Irving G. , 
who superintends the cider mill and distillery at Succasunna. 



ABRAM \V. COOPER. 



A well known resident of Chester, Mr. Cooper stands a representative 
of the fifth generation of the family of Chester township. The Coopers have 
always been prominent in public affairs, and the name stands conspicuously 
forth on the pages of the history of Morris county. His father was Nathan 
A. Cooper, a successful man of business, who owned an extensive tract of 
land and was numbered among the prosperous and progressive citizens of 
the community. He owned the Cooper mill, at Milltown, which had been 
built by his uncle in 1826, and which by the terms of his father's will was 
inherited by the subject of this review. The school privileges of Nathan 
Cooper were somewhat limited, yet he was a man of broad and practical 
general information. His knowledge of mathematics was gained largely from 
practical work as a surveyor in this county in early life, at which time he 
also became somewhat of an adept in the art of platting or mapping his 
surveys. 

Nathan A. Cooper was united in marriage to Miss Mary H. Leddell, a 
daughter of Dr. Leddell, of Mendham township. He died July 29, 1879, at 
the age of seventy-nine years, and his wife died in January, 1890. Their 
children are Anna E. ; Abram W. ; Beulah, wife of Henry L. Dayton, of 
Chester township, Morris county; Mary L., wife of E. I. Smith, postmaster 
of Chester; Matilda R. and Nathan A., who are living on the old homestead; 
and Laura H., wife of Oscar Babbitt, of Morristown. 

Abram W. Cooper, the second in the family of children, was born March 
28, 1847, and in his youth pursued his studies in the common schools. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 567 

remained upon the old homestead and assisted in its cultivation until the 
death of his father, when he came to Milltown and took charge of the mill 
and other property which fell to him as his share of his father's estate. His 
life had been quiet and uneventful, but upright and honorable, a life devoted 
to his business interests and the requirements of citizenship. He is one of the 
patriotic, loyal men of the community, and fails not in the fulfillment of any 
obligations that rest upon him in public or in private life. Politically he is a 
Democrat, and he is now serving as a member of the town committee. 

Mr. Cooper was married October 12, 1 881, to Mary, daughter of George 
Turner, a prominent citizen and merchant of Hope, Warren county, New 
Jersey. They have one daughter, Mary Denison, who was born November 
28, 18S7. Mr. and Mrs. Cooper are members of the Presbyterian church. 



ELMER H. HARRINGTON. 

A resident of Succasunna, Mr. Harrington was born in East Killingly, 
Connecticut, on the 9th of November, 1861, and is descended from one of 
the old families of New England. His grandfather was John Harrington, 
a son of Jonathan Harrington, who served as a drummer boy in the Revolu- 
tionary war, and left to his descendants his drum used in that struggle, the 
drum now being in possession of our subject. Horace Harrington, father of 
Elmer H., was a native of Connecticut and a farmer by occupation. He 
married Maria Hopkins, a native of England, who came to America on a 
pleasure trip with her parents. Here she became acquainted with Horace 
Harrington, to whom she gave her hand in marriage. The children born of 
this union are: Sophia, wife of Henry Jordan, of Greene, Rhode Island; 
Hattie, deceased wife of Reuben Alexander; Alice, wife of W. D. Gardner, 
of Succasunna; Waity, deceased; Ida, who also has passed away; George, 
of Greene, Rhode Island; and Elmer Horace. 

In his early youth Elmer H. Harrington accompanied his parents on 
their removal to East Greenwich, Rhode Island, where he completed a course 
of study in the public schools. On laying aside his text-books to learn the 
more difficult lessons in the school of experience, the duties assigned to him 
were those of a cotton-mill, in which he spent six years. He then learned 
the carpenter's trade, which he followed in New England until 1883, when, 
owing to the persuasion of his brother-in-law, W. D. Gardner, of Succasunna, 
he came to this place. Mr. Gardner was connected with the powder works 
here, and Mr. Harrington also secured a position with the same company, as 
a mechanic. For nine years he was with that concern, and then withdrew 
in order to engage in business on his own account, as a dealer in timber, 
poles and lumber. In this enterprise he formed a partnership with John S. 



568 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Woodhull, of Dover, and the firm now operates a mill at Ledgewood and 
one at Minnisink, supplying the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad 
Company and the Western Union Telegraph Company with a portion of the 
immense quantities of timber and poles used by those corporations. Their 
business is now a profitable one, and the partners are accounted among the 
substantial and reliable business men of the community. In December, 
1898, the firm of Woodhull & Harrington was dissolved, and our subject 
continues in the same line of business alone. 

The pleasant home of Mr. Harrington is presided over by the lady who 
before their marriage bore the maiden name of Isabell Doering. Their 
wedding was celebrated January 20, 1887, and the lady is a daughter of 
Henry Doering. 

In early life Mr. Harrington took considerable interest in military affairs, 
and served for three years in the old Kentish Guards, one of the oldest regi- 
ments of New England, which has since been reorganized under the name of 
the Third Regiment of Rhode Island. He is a Democrat in politics and has 
served on the election board of this township, but is not active in political 
affairs. Socially he is a Mason, belonging to Dover Lodge, and also to 
Succasunna Lodge, I. O. O. F. He holds membership in the Presbyterian 
church and is highly esteemed by his brethren of all these organizations. 



THEODORE E. GARRISON. 

As the popular deputy postmaster of Madison, Mr. Garrison has for 
twenty years occupied that position, discharging his duties with marked 
fidelity and ability. He is a native of Newark, New Jersey, his birth having 
occurred on the 28th of October, 1849. The Garrison family was founded 
in this state by the great-grandfather of our subject, who was a farmer, fol- 
lowing that occupation near Hanover, and at his death his remains were 
interred in the Hanover cemetery. 

The grandfather, Joseph H. Garrison, was a native of Hanover, and 
after arriving at years of maturity married Miss Sarah Pollard, a native of 
Parsippany, New Jersey. He learned the trade of shoemaking in his youth 
and followed it as a life work. During the war of 18 12 he responded to the 
country's call for troops and aided in the second resistance to Great Britain. 
In church work he was very prominent, and for twenty-five years served as 
an officer in the Presbyterian church. His last years were spent in Madison, 
where he passed away in 1868, at the age of seventy-eight years, his birth 
having occurred in 1790. His children were as follows: Mary E., Theodore 
F., Charles E. and Sarah C. 

Charles E. Garrison, father of our subject, was born at Hanover Neck, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 569 

on the 1 8th of February, 1827, and in his early years prepared for the prac- 
tical and responsible duties of life by learning the carriage-painter's trade, 
beginning an apprenticeship in Newark when seventeen years of age. He 
followed that pursuit in Newark until 1861, when he removed to Madison, 
continuing his labors there until 1864, when, responding to his country's call 
for aid, he joined the boys in blue and served with the Union army as a mem- 
ber of Company C, Eighth New Jersey Infantry, until the close of hostili- 
ties. When peace was restored he returned to Madison, where he engaged 
in carriage-painting until his life's labors were ended by death. He was 
married, about 1848, to Miss Ann L. Pollard, a daughter of William H. 
Pollard. She died December 20, 185S, having been the mother of four 
children: Theodore E., Otto Eugene, Frank, and one who died in infancy. 
In his social relations the father of this family was connected with the Grand 
Army Post of Morristown and with the Masonic fraternity. He was a very 
active member of the Presbyterian church at Madison, and did all in his 
power to promote the cause of religion. His political support was given 
the Republican party, and he served as school trustee and in other township 
offices. His death occurred in 1897. 

The subject of this review received his early training and education in 
Newark, and with his parents, in 1861, removed to Madison, where he has 
since made his home. For twenty years he has filled the position of deputy 
postmaster here, and his thorough understanding of the duties of the office, 
his fidelity to its interests and his uniform courtesy make him a very popu- 
lar official. There is probably no one more thoroughly acquainted with 
the postal service and its requirements than he, and his work is exceptional 
on account of the absence of errors. 

In June, 1890, Mr. Garrison was united in marriage to Miss Catherine 
E. Ferren, a native of New York city and a daughter of John and Anna E. 
Ferren, who are of English descent, the first Ferrens in America having 
located on Long Island at an early day. The same qualities which render 
Mr. Garrison a popular official make him a favorite in social circles, and in 
the high regard in which he is held his estimable wife also shares. 



DENNIS BOWDEN. 



The hospitable and popular proprietor of the Mansion House, at Boon- 
ton, is a native of Ireland, his birth having occurred in county Kilkenny on 
the 20th of September, 1854, his parents being Philip and Johanna (Der- 
mody) Bowden. The father died in Ireland and the mother, accompanied 
by some of her children, came to the United States and located at College 



570 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Point, Long Island, where she was joined in 1865 by our subject and his 
brother. 

Mr. Bowden was able to obtain but a limited education, being compelled 
at an early age to assist in the support of his mother and her other children, 
and his first practical experience in life began as an employe of the Rubber 
Jewelry Factory, at College Point, where he served three years as a marble- 
cutter. He then went to New York, where he worked at the jewelry trade 
for several years, and later he was employed in the rubber works at Butler, 
Morris county. In 1879 he took up his residence in Boonton, and a year 
later became proprietor of the Mansion House, conducting the same until 
1882, when he went to Paterson, and there opened another hotel under the 
same name, retaining charge of it for two years. He returned to Boonton. 
in 1884, re-established himself in the Mansion House and has since continued 
in his former capacity of proprietor. The hostelry is well managed, supplied 
with every convenience necessary to the comfort of its patrons, and those 
who have once enjoyed its hospitality never fail on their return to repeat the 
most agreeable experience. 

In 1887 Mr. Bowden embarked in the bottling business and has the 
most extensive trade in that line of enterprise in the county. He is a charter 
member of the board of trade and is a member of the fire department, in 
which he has served as treasurer. Politically he is a stanch supporter of the 
Democratic party. 

The marriage of our subject was solemnized August 2, 1880, when he 
was united to Miss Nellie Shanahan, daughter of Patrick and Margaret 
(Mulqueen) Shanahan, of College Point, Long Island, and of this union the 
following named children have been born: Philip Walter, William, Mar- 
garet, Harry, Thomas, John, Mary, Dolores and Joseph. Mr. Bowden and 
his family are communicants of the Roman Catholic church, at Boonton. 



THOMAS STARKEY. 



One of the prominent and enterprising merchants of Boonton is Thomas 
Starkey, who was born in Lower Montville, Morris county, New Jersey, on 
the 1 8th of June, 1830. His father, Benjamin Starkey, was a native of 
Yorkshire, England, where his birth occurred in 1798. He came to America 
in 1 8 19 or 1820, and located at South Orange, New Jersey, remained there 
for a short time and then went to Montville, where he purchased a woolen 
mill from Dr. Gaines and Benjamin Crane, and conducted the same until 
1880, when he retired from active, business life. He married Miss Martha 
Fox, of Yorkshire, England, who is now deceased. Mr. Starkey was a dea- 
con in the Lower Montville Reformed church, and he died in 1 891 . 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 571 

Benjamin and Martha (Fox) Starkey became the parents of the follow- 
ing children: John, who lost his life by accident in his father's mill, at the 
age of sixteen years; Charles, who died at the age of twelve years; Henry, 
who died at the age of twenty-one years; Thomas, our subject; Elizabeth, 
deceased, who married John Flury, of Morristown; Sarah Ann, deceased, 
who became the wife of John N. Johnson; Joseph, who resides on the old 
homestead; and Alice, who married Isaac Van Ness, of Pine Brook. 

Thomas Starkey was reared in Lower Montville, and acquired his men- 
tal discipline in the public schools of that place. When about twenty-one 
years old he went to California and engaged in gold-mining until 1853, when 
he went to Australia, remained there two years, then journeyed through the 
South Sea islands to the Louisa diggings and thence to the Victoria mines, at 
Melbourne. After working there for a time he started for the head waters 
of the Amazon river, but, on account of yellow fever among some of the pas- 
sengers on board the boat, he abandoned the trip and took passage for Pan- 
ama, from which place he voyaged to San Francisco and there remained 
eight years, engaged in mining. He subsequently returned to Morris county 
and for one year assisted his father in the mill, after which he found employ- 
ment in Washington Market, New York, for three years. He then erected a 
shoddy mill and conducted the same until 1892, and in 1893 he returned to 
Boonton and established his present business, in which he has met with pro- 
nounced success, being recognized as one of the leading merchants in this city. 

Politically Mr. Starkey is a faithful supporter of the Republican party 
and has served as a member of the board of county freeholders for five years; 
he has also been a school trustee, and in many other ways has he been iden- 
tified with the public affairs of Morris county. Socially he is affiliated with 
the American Legion of Honor, of Brooklyn, New York, in which fraternity 
he has attained a high degree of popularity. 

Mr. Starkey was united in marriage in 1865, to Miss Margaret R. Bird, a 
daughter of Elisha Bird, who for many years was supervisor of the Morris 
canal. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Starkey are: Lewis H., who is 
associated with the City National Bank, of New York; Benjamin, who is con- 
nected with a commission house in New York; Ida, who married Thomas 
Capstick, of Montville; and Sophia B., who is now Mrs. Harry Jacobus, of 
Montclair. Mrs. Starkey is an adherent of the Presbyterian church. 



JOHN B. BURLISON. 

The record of the eventful life of Mr. Burlison cannot fail to prove of 
interest to bis many friends, as it contains experiences on the battlefield, on 
the sea and in the world of commerce. He was born in Ulster county, New 



572 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

York, on the 28th of September, 1844. On leaving school he became con- 
nected with the Merchant Tanners' Line, of New York, engaged in the busi- 
ness of common carriers, and continued in their service until September, 
1862, when he felt that his duty was to his country, and therefore volunteered 
for service in the United States army. Joining Company C, of the One 
Hundred and Fifty-sixth New York Infantry, he was made color-bearer of 
his regiment, which was attached to the Department of the Gulf during the 
first two years of his service. In that command he participated in much of 
the hard fighting and severe campaigning which was required to break the 
enemy's strength on the lower Mississippi and bring that locality again 
under the dominion of the stars and stripes. He was with his company on 
the reconnoitre to Plaquemine, Baton Rouge and Port Hudson. He was one 
of the one thousand volunteers who made the assault upon Port Hudson, 
which occasion is known in history as the forlorn hope of Port Hudson. In 
the latter part of August, 1864, Mr. Burlison was transferred with his regi- 
ment to Alexandria, Virginia, where it joined Sheridan's command, and 
within a few days participated in the battles of Berryville and Poequan 
creek. In the latter engagement Mr. Burlison was seriously wounded in the 
left leg and sent to the general hospital in Philadelphia, where he was forced 
to remain, on account of his injuries, until the close of the war, when he 
received an honorable discharge. He went through many of the hard expe- 
riences of the war, for his patriotism and bravery would permit him to neg- 
lect no duty that might advance the cause of the Union. 

When hostilities had ceased he returned to the employers with whom he 
had served prior to his enlistment, and remained with them for three years, 
after which he engaged in the grain trade in New York city for five years. 
Not content with the outlook in that line, he next went to the south, where 
he joined a company engaged in the coasting trade between Baltimore and 
Savannah. He continued that business with success until March, 1884, 
when he encountered a gale on the Potomac and lower Chesapeake which 
tore his tow to pieces and wrecked his barge off Cape Charles. 

This disaster ended his experiences in the coasting trade, and he went 
to Ellenville, New York, to consider what step he had better take in other 
directions. While there he was prevailed upon to accept the position of 
chief of police of the city, in 1884. Not being pleased with the duties of the 
office of chief of police, he tendered his resignation, which was not accepted, 
and was finally deferred by the mayor, Hon. E. G. Fuller, until March, 
1886, Mr. Burlison having in the meantime established thorough discipline 
in the police department and municipal affairs of the town. He was there- 
after engaged in the grocery business in Ellenville, continuing the enterprise 
one year, after which he disposed of his interest in that line, and on again 






■^^r 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 573 

entering business circles became superintendent of the Demarest & Russell 
Excelsior Works, of Butler, Morris county, New Jersey, which position he 
yet fills, his executive ability, judicious management, sagacity and unflagging 
energy enabling him to conduct the enterprise in a manner that reflects credit 
upon himself and brings a gratifying success to the stockholders of the com- 
pany. He entered upon his duties April 4, 1887, and at once began the 
task of familiarizing himself with the work, not only in principle, but also in 
detail, and after two years had formulated such a perfect system that it has 
ever since been a most easy matter to determine the profits or losses arising 
from any part of the work; and should anything fail to pay it is at once 
improved or done away with, so that the concern has proved a profitable in- 
vestment to the owners. 

In Ellenville, New York, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Burlison 
and Miss Elizabeth Edmonds, February 3, 1867. They now have an 
adopted child, Emery S., a nephew of Mr. Burlison. Our subject and his 
wife are members of the First Baptist church at Butler. 

Mr. Burlison maintains his association with his comrades of the Civil war 
through his membership in J. H. Beam Post, G. A. R. , of Bloomingdale. 
He has also many friends in the Masonic fraternity, holding membership in 
Silencia Lodge, No. 168, F. & A. M., and Warwasing Chapter, of Ellenville, 
New York. On questions of national importance Mr. Burlison supports the 
Republican party, and during the presidential campaign of 1888 he served as 
captain of the Republican club of Butler. At local elections he votes for the 
man whom he thinks best qualified for office, for he rightly regards local 
elections as separate from political questions, — a time when capable men 
should be selected for the administration of the business affairs of the city. 
His life has been one of activity, and in all its relations he has been found 
true and faithful to his duties. His business record is without a blemish, 
and in the industrial circles of Butler he occupies a position that is indeed 
enviable. 



ALEXANDER GILLAND. 



One of the most popular and widely known citizens of Pompton Plains 
is Alexander Gilland, and his life history is one of interest, showing a master- 
ing of expedients and utilization of opportunities that have enabled him to 
conquer difficulties and overcome obstacles in the path to success. Turning 
back the leaves of his life record, we find him when only a lad of nine years 
starting out to make his own way in the world. Tracing his career we note 
the persistent purpose with which he has attended to the duties that various 
positions have entailed upon him and find that his fidelity was rewarded from 



574 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

time to time by increased salaries. At the present he ranks among the pros- 
perous citizens of the county, and his success is indeed creditable, as it has 
been acquired through his persistent, honorable effort and splendid business 
ability. 

Mr. Gilland is a native of New York, his birth having occurred in Che- 
nango county, of the Empire state, on the 18th of October, 1838. His 
father, Alexander Gilland, Sr., was a farmer and spent his entire life in Che- 
nango county, — the place of his nativity. He married Rachel Oliver and 
they became the parents of five children, namely: Eliza, wife of Samuel 
Miller, of Elmira, New York; James, who was married and died leaving a son 
James, who enlisted in the Union army in the Civil war, and was taken pris- 
oner at Andersonville, dying in captivity in Libby prison; Alexander, of this 
review; Ann, wife of Peter Hennion, of Newark, New Jersey; and Margaret, 
wife of John B. Taylor, of Jersey City. The father of this family died at the 
age of forty-five years, and his wife passed away ten years later, their remains 
being interred in the cemetery at Smithville Flats, Chenango county, New 
York. 

The subject of this review, Alexander Gilland, received but limited edu- 
cational privileges. Being the son of a farmer he was trained to the duties 
incumbent upon the industrious tiller of the soil, and when in search of work 
he naturally turned to that occupation. At the age of nine he began to earn 
his own livelihood, receiving as a compensation for his services four dollars 
per month. For four years he followed the plow, gathered corn and raked 
hay, but in the meantime kept on the look-out for a more advantageous posi- 
tion, which he at length secured in the employ of the firm of Root & Shafer, 
of Newburg, dealers in tinware. In the capacity of traveling salesman he 
went upon the road, receiving at first twenty-six dollars per month and his 
expenses; but, dilligently applying himself to the mastery of the business and 
the best methods of conducting the same, he soon made his services of great 
value and his salary was correspondingly increased. For four years he 
remained with that house and on the expiration of that period came to Pomp- 
ton Plains, where he arrived on the 18th of October, 1857. For sixteen 
months he occupied a clerkship in the employ of David M. Berry and then 
returned to farm life. 

On the 24th of November, 1858, Mr. Gilland was married and located 
on the farm belonging t his father-in-law, managing that property through 
the succeeding six years. In 1864 he purchased of Martin J. Berry the hotel 
at Pompton Plains and has since successfully conducted the same, his ear- 
nest desire to please his patrons, together with the pleasing accommodations 
of the house, making it a favorite resort with the traveling public. Mr. Gil- 
land is to be commended for the success which he has achieved. Only a 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 575 

small proportion of those who start out in life empty-handed, as he did, gain 
the position of prosperity in which he is found to-day; but with unconquer- 
able energy he has surmounted all obstacles in his path and won the reward 
of honest endeavor. He is now the owner of extensive real-estate holdings, 
including some very valuable property in Morris county, and in addition to 
the conduct of his hotel he finds in the operation of an apple distillery a prof- 
itable source of income. 

The home life of Mr. Gilland has been very pleasant. As before stated, 
he was married November 28, 1858, Miss Clarissa Demott becoming his 
wife. She was born May 6, 1837, a daughter of Michael H. and Mary (Win- 
ters) Demott. Mr. and Mrs. Gilland are the parents of eight children: 
Charles H., born September 12, 1859, died January 9, 1861; Peter Alfred, 
who was born December 12, 1861, and is a graduate of the Newark Business 
College, married Hester Mandeville, and has two children, Clara and Ruth; 
Annie I., born July 11, 1864, is the wife of Seymour Smith, of Millport, New 
York; Susie M., born June 11, 1867, is the wife of F. L. Lewi, of Newark, 
New Jersey, and has two children, Anita and Irene; John W., who was born 
February 25, 1870, is a graduate of Rutgers grammar school at New Bruns- 
wick, New Jersey; Cora May, born May 1, 1873, is the wife of Joseph F. 
McLean, of Butler; Harry Alexander, born July 10, 1875, was for some time 
a student in the model school of Trenton, New Jersey; and Florence Adele, 
who was born July 14, 1879, completes the family. 

In the political interests of Morris county, Mr. Gilland takes quite an 
active interest. He is a strong defender of the Republican faith, and for the 
past eight years has been a member of the Republican county committee, 
taking an active part in the management of the campaigns and thus materi- 
ally aiding in securing the Republican victories. He has also been honored 
with office, having served as freeholder and assessor of his township. In 
everything that pertains to the public welfare he is deeply interested and is a 
public-spirited and progressive citizen, an enterprising and honorable business 
man, and a faithful friend in social life. 



HARRY W. CYPHERS. 



The lineage of the Cyphers family is supposed to be of German origin. 
That the family has long been established on American soil is evident from 
the fact that Michael Seifers — as the name was originally spelled — settled on 
lands of the West Jersey Society, at Alexandria, Hunterdon county, within 
the decade between 1756 and 1766. He was the father of Philip, whose 
wife was Rebecca. Philip and Rebecca Seifer had two children: Wilhelm,. 



576 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

born January 16, 1769; and Philip. There may have been another son, 
though this fact is not predicated with absolute certainty. Philip had a son, 
Peter, who was born June 20, 1797, and who died August 16, 1888. As 
appears below, said Peter Cyphers was the grandfather of the immediate 
subject of this review. 

Harry W. Cyphers, ticket agent of the Delaware, Lackawanna & West- 
ern Railroad Company, at Chester, and a dealer in coal and lumber at that 
point, was born in the village which is still his home, September 23, 1864. 
His father, James Cyphers, deceased, was a prominent drover and farmer of 
the locality, both before and after the war. He was born on Schooley's 
Mountain in 1832, and came to Chester in 1859, his death occurring here in 
1868. In the early part of the century his father, Peter Cyphers, was a promi- 
nent merchant at Schooley's Mountain and previous to that time con- 
ducted a hotel at Flanders. He was a prominent Democratic politi- 
cian and was regarded as one of the leading men of the community 
with which he was connected. He was twice married, his first union 
being with Elizabeth Dufford, his second with Ann Hann. The children 
of his first marriage were : James; Caroline, wife of William D. Huff- 
man; and Pernina, deceased wife of Moses Hager. The children of the 
second marriage were: Philip, deceased; Jacob, of Hoboken, New Jersey; 
Peter, who has also passed away; Mary, deceased; and Sarah, who is the 
wife of C. M. Muir, of Morristown. 

James Cyphers married Nancy P. Robeson, a daughter of Elisha and 
Mary (Perry) Robeson, whose children, in addition to Mrs. Cyphers, are 
William, who resides in Chester; and John, who is living in Port Murray, New 
Jersey. After the death of her first husband the mother of our subject mar- 
ried Marshal A. Sayre, a conductor on the Chester division of the Delaware, 
Lackawanna & Western Railroad. 

Harry W. Cyphers is the only survivor of his father's family, being one of 
two children, of whom the eldest was Alice, now deceased. He was educated 
in the Chester Institute, in the public schools of Morristown and in the Brew- 
ster Chapel, at Chester. On the 1st of December, 1882, at the age of eight- 
een years, he entered the employ of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western 
Railroad Company. He learned telegraphy on a cigar box, which he still 
keeps as a memento of that early struggle, and since that time he has been 
permanently employed as the operator here. He is the agent of the United 
States Express Company, at this point, and has the unqualified confidence of 
both corporations which he serves. For fifteen years he has been engaged in 
the commission business at Chester, and on the 1st of June, 1897, he 
embarked in the coal and lumber business. He is a capable, thoroughgoing 
business man and his careful management, attention to the details of his busi- 




iUC i 




BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 577 

ness and his straightforward dealings have brought to him a well earned 
success. 

On the 13th of October, 1886, Mr. Cyphers was united in marriage to 
Miss Susie, daughter of James P. Staats, of Chester, an engineer on the Jer- 
sey Central Railroad. The children of this marriage are: James Marshall, 
born October 25, 1887; and Marian Lula, born July 17, 1895. 

He was one of the first members of the school board under the new law, 
serving two years. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian church, of 
Chester, and he is one of the trustees of the same, and also trustee of the 
Pleasant Hill Cemetery Association. Mr. Cyphers is a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Masonic fraternity, — Prospect Lodge, 
No. 24, F. & A. M. He has a wide acquaintance by reason of his business 
interests and his social qualities, and is popular with his many friends. 



JOHN H. SCHMIDT. 

The spur of ambition is the hope of reward, and honorable ambition is 
the keynote to success. Without it business would flag, enterprise and 
energy would stagnate and advancement would be little, if aught, but per- 
meated by this element the world moves on to better things, to greater 
achievements and more enduring successes. It is this same ambition which 
has made Mr. Schmidt one of the leading business men of Morristown. His 
career is one into which has entered many picturesque elements. He went 
forth in his early youth to win a place for himself in the world, leaving home 
and kindred and finally taking up his abode in the land far beyond the seas, 
and there attaining success and honor through well-directed and conscientious 
effort. His long identification with the material interests of Morristown 
renders peculiarly consonant a review of his life in this connection. 

Born in Germany, Mr. Schmidt opened his eyes to the light on the 23d 
of April, 1832, and is a son of John and Margaret (Fiemonn) Schmidt, who 
spent their entire lives in the fatherland. They had three sons and three 
daughters, of whom two sons and one daughter are still living: The sons are 
John H. and George, both of whom reside in Morris county, and only they of 
the family came to America. The subject of this review landed on the 
shores of the New World in August, 1850, and for a time worked at his trade 
of carriage-making in New York city, after which he was employed in that 
line at Liberty Corner, New Jersey, for five years. He next went to Green 
Village, Morris county, where he first began business on his own account, 
embarking in the enterprise with a small capital that he had saved 
from his earnings. About five years later he went to Millington, where for 
four years he was engaged in the grocery business and also operated a saw 

lla 



578 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

and grist mill. His next place of residence was Madison, where he has since 
made his home. He opened a carriage-making establishment in Madison 
and has since conducted business there, but owing to the increase in his trade 
he extended his field of operation by establishing a carriage factory in Mor- 
ristown, where he has a large plant and has built up an excellent and profit- 
able business. He manufactures fine carriages of every description, and the 
products of the John H. Schmidt Company's factory are widely known, the 
house having a reputation which insures a liberal patronage. There is a 
large and handsomely equipped carriage repository and salesroom on South 
street, Morristown, while the shops are located on Bank street. A large 
force of workmen is employed and the enterprise is therefore of benefit to the 
community as well as to the members of the company, who derive therefrom 
a good income. 

In i860 Mr. Schmidt married Miss Margaret Nishwitz, who was born in 
Germany, and by her marriage has become the mother of six children: 
John, Frederick, Edward, Mattie, Elizabeth and Carrie. The parents are 
members of the Presbyterian church and have reared their children in that 
faith. For more than thirty years Mr. Schmidt has been a worthy and 
exemplary member of the Masonic fraternity. He has never sought or 
desired political honors or emoluments, preferring to give his time and 
energies to his business interests, in which he has met with a well merited 
success. Plain and unassuming in manner, he is a gentleman whose sterling 
honesty and worth have gained him uniform esteem. 



FRED R. CASTERLIN. 



The popular proprietor of the Park Hotel, of Butler, was born at Rock- 
port, Sussex county, New Jersey, on the 16th of January, 1856. His father, 
Richard Casterlin, born in 1806, was a wheelwright in early life, and later 
conducted a hotel in Unionville, New York, taking up that enterprise in i860. 
The grandfather of our subject, Nathaniel Casterlin, was a wagon-maker, and 
spent his entire life on the old homestead at Rockport. He married Hannah 
Mandeville and his children were George; Nathan; Thomas; Dennis; Jane, 
wife of Charles Kinsey; Ella, wife of Alford H. Decker, of Paterson; Maggie, 
who married Captain C. H. Tuttle; Sarah, who became Mrs. Jesse Rosen- 
cranse; and Minnie, who is the widow of James Decker. Richard Casterlin 
was united in marriage to Miss Mahala Rogers, whose father, Peter Rogers, 
was one of the veterans of the war of 1812, and died in March, 1892, at the 
advanced age of ninety-six years. His wife was Sallie Scidmore, and their 
children were Cornelius; Floyd; Samuel; Mary, wife of Daniel Davis, of New 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 579 

York; Jane, who married Henry DeWitt; and Nancy, who became the wife of 
Benjamin Heater. To Mr. and Mrs. Richard Casterlin were born three chil- 
dren, namely: Charles, who is proprietor of a hotel in Florida, New York, and 
wedded Mary Kellogg; Fred R. , whose name introduces this record; and 
Ralph, who married Lizzie De Groot, and follows carpentering in Unionville, 
New York. 

Fred R. Casterlin, having acquired his education in the public schools,, 
entered upon his business career as a stage driver for his father, driving the 
stage from Unionville, New York, to Deckertown, New Jersey. At the endi 
of a year he accepted a clerkship in the employ of F. M. Cannon, of Decker- 
town, a prominent druggist there, with whom he remained for two years, 
when he returned to Unionville, to take charge of the office and bar in his 
father's hotel. He spent eight years with his father, and. in the spring of 
1885 embarked in business for himself as a dairy farmer and horse-trainer,, 
devoting his energies to those pursuits until the spring of 1889, when he came 
to Butler and took charge of the Park Hotel, of which he has since been 
the popular proprietor. The Casterlin family seem to have special ability 
for the hotel business, and, like his father and brother, the subject of this 
review is a very genial and successful landlord. Always having due regard 
for the comfort of his guests, and doing all in his power to make their visits 
pleasant, he has made the Park Hotel a popular r-esort with the traveling^ 
public and receives a liberal patronage. 

In connection with this enterprise Mr. Casterlin does a good business as 
a dealer in horses. Having a great fondness for the noble steed, his judg- 
ment of horses is excellent and therefore in trading and purchase he has 
made some excellent bargains. After coming to Butler he soon had enough 
horses on hand to establish a large and well regulated livery barn, and, build- 
ing additions to his stables, he has now one of the best equipped barns in this 
section of the county. He keeps on hand only the best horses for driving 
purposes and is also the owner of Dick R. and NickE., two valuable pacers* 
the former with a record of 2:27, while the latter, yet without a record, has 
made the mile in 2:17. 

On the 24th of December, 1884, in Deckertown, New Jersey, Mr. 
Casterlin was united in marriage to Miss Cora Adams, a daughter of John 
E. and Jane (Davis) Adams and a sister of Mrs. Lewis Morford, of Newton, 
New Jersey. Her father was a farmer and brewer and also operated a 
creamery in Sussex county. Two sons, Richard and Lewis, grace the 
union of Mr. and Mrs. Casterlin, who are prominent people in Butler and 
have a large circle of warm frieds. Mr. Casterlin is also highly regarded in 
business circles, for his genialty, combined with his known reliability, com- 
mends him to the confidence and good will of all. 



580 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



JACOB H. CRAMER. 

To be noted as a central figure in the history of Chester, because of his 
especially high standing as a citizen, his long and uninterrupted residence 
here and the unusual age to which he has attained, Mr. Cramer has long 
since rounded the Psalmist's span of three-score years and ten, but still 
retains much of the vigor of a man in the prime of life. He receives the 
veneration and respect ever due to an honorable old age, and the history of 
this locality would be incomplete without the record of his career. 

A native son of Morris county, he was born in Mendham township, on a 
farm which now is the property of Mr. Bockoven, on the 26th of October, 1 808. 
He is a son of George Cramer, who was born in Hunterdon county, New 
Jersey, in 1770, and a grandson of Morris Cramer, who descended from 
German ancestry. George Cramer was a blacksmith and farmer and came 
to Morris county about the year 1790. He wedded Mary Ann Shriner and to 
them were born the following named children: Mary, who became the wife 
of Abram Seward; Morris S., who married Elizabeth Smith and had four 
children, who are still living; George, now of Yates county, New York; 
Lemuel, of Oxford, New York; John, of Jersey city; James A., of Morristown; 
William, who married Charity Travis; George; Jacob H., and Elizabeth, 
who became the wife of John Smith. 

Jacob H. Cramer was reared to manhood in the locality where his birth 
occurred and attended the district schools of the time with their primitive 
methods and elementary text-books. At the age of twenty-one he sought and 
obtained a position as a farm hand in the employ of Daniel Merchant, with 
whom he remained one year, when he went to New York. He was there 
employed by a farmer for eight months at eleven dollars a month, continued 
with him through the succeeding two years and during the second year received 
twelve dollars per month and in the third year was given sixteen dollars per 
month. On the expiration of that period he returned to New Jersey, and on 
the 13th of November, 1833, began a term of school. On its completion 
the following spring he joined his brother in the cultivation of the old home- 
stead for one season, and on the 11th of December, 1834, he was married, 
and located upon a small farm at Ironia. His wife bore the maiden name of 
Esther H. Lewis. She was born in 181 3, and is a daughter of Captain 
David and Mary (Horton) Lewis, the latter a daughter of Nathaniel Horton, 
who came to Chester from Long Island. 

The farm on which he began his domestic life Mr. Cramer rented for 
two years and in the third year purchased the property, making it his home 
for twenty-two years longer. He then sold out and removed to his new 
purchase, in Chester, — a farm which he operated for fourteen years, at the 





/v t3^~&t^*~^L 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 581 

expiration of which time he disposed of the major portion of this, reserving 
only a small portion for a residence plat, on which, in 1874, he erected his 
present commodious home, where he has since lived in practical retirement 
from the cares and anxieties of the business world. In business transactions 
his name was the synonym of honesty and all who knew him placed the most 
implicit confidence in his integrity and fairness. Such was his reputation 
that he was frequently called upon to administer estates, which trusts were 
invariably executed with a purpose actuated by the highest motives and with 
a determination to fully carry out the expressed will of the testator. In 
1845 he was called upon to serve as executor of the estate of Samuel Doug- 
las; in 1852 was named by Esther Horton as one of the executors of her 
estate, in connection with Judge Logan, and after five years of litigation her 
will was sustained in the courts. In 1862 Mr. Cramer was named as the 
executor of the will of his brother, John Cramer, and in 1874 performed a 
similar service in connection with the estate of Isaac Reger. He was also 
sole executor of the estate of his mother, who died in 1855. He was appointed 
a notary public in 1849 and by successive reappointments was continued in 
that position until 1869, and as commissioners of deeds under the seal of the 
state. 

Mr. Cramer identified himself with the cause of religion in 1840, and in 
i860 was appointed a trustee and treasurer of the Congregational church of 
Chester. He filled the latter position for thirty-six years and paid out over 
ten thousand dollars for the support of the gospel. He was made a deacon 
about the same time he became a trustee and still holds that position. He 
is the largest contributor to the church in Chester and has ever been very 
zealous and active in its work. He and his faithful wife have now traveled 
life's journey together for sixty-three years, sharing with each other its joys 
and sorrows, its adversity and prosperity. They now live quietly in their 
pleasant home in Chester, surrounded by many friends, who respect them 
for their sterling worth and honor them for their many good deeds. 



DAVID A. HOPPING. 



One of the oldest families of Morris county is represented by David 
Augustus Hopping, who was born on the old Hopping homestead near Han- 
over, on the 22d of June, 1867. The original ancestor in America was 
Captain John Hopping, who sailed from England in 1645, and settled on a 
tract of land where Elizabeth, New Jersey, is now located, subsequently 
coming to Morris county, where he owned considerable real estate on the 
present site of Afton, which was formerly called Hoppingtown. Captain 
Hopping married Miss Mary Primrose, and their children were: EzekieU 



582 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

John, Samuel and Silas, all of whom were members of the western battalion 
of state troops in the Continental army. Captain Samuel Hopping was in 
the Revolutionary war and commanded a company at the battle of Mon- 
mouth. He afterward moved to Monmouth county and died there, his inter- 
ment being in the old Presbyterian cemetery at Middletown, Monmouth 
county, New Jersey. Daniel, a son of Captain Samuel Hopping, owned the 
farm and built the old homestead, which is still standing. On November I, 
1832, he was elected judge of the common-pleas court and took a prominent 
part in politics. In 1807 he was a captain in the Fourth Regiment, Second 
Battalion, Morris Brigade, New Jersey state militia. Samuel, a son of 
Daniel, was born October 19, 1796, on the Hopping homestead, and fol- 
lowed farming as his life work. His papers show that he was made ensign 
of Company M, Fourth Regiment, Morris Brigade, state militia, on the 6th 
of November, 18 18. He married Miss Rachel L. Howell on the 20th of 
December, 1821, and their children were Mary Elizabeth, Hannah Maria, 
Martha Sophia, Daniel Primrose, Augustus Stiles and Harriet. 

Augustus Stiles Hopping, the next in the lineal descent and the father 
of our subject, was born on the 15th of July, 1834, and reared to manhood 
on the home farm. On the breaking out of the Civil war he offered his 
services in defense of the Union and enlisted in the Fifteenth New Jersey 
Volunteer Regiment, under Captain Lindsley, August 12, 1862, and his regi- 
ment was attached to the Army of the Potomac. Mr. Hopping was in a 
great many of the battles, and as a result of his courage and efficiency he 
was raised to the rank of corporal on April 9, 1865, and later was detailed as 
an orderly at headquarters. He experienced a great many hardships, was 
slightly wounded on one occasion, and he was ill for many weeks in a hos- 
pital. June 22, 1865, he received an honorable discharge, at Hall's Hill, 
Virginia. 

He was married November 10, 1863, while on a furlough, to Elizabeth 
Ann West, of Flushing, Long Island, who was a daughter of David and 
Mary Ann (Fish) West. The children born of this union were David Augus- 
tus, Estelle, Daniel M. and Walter B. Mr. Hopping was interested in all 
public enterprises of a beneficial nature, and he was one of the pillars of the 
Presbyterian church of Hanover, in which he was a deacon for many years. 
He departed this life August 10, 1876, and was buried in the Hanover 
church-yard. 

David Augustus Hopping, who now owns and occupies the old home- 
stead, is a man of unflagging enterprise and natural ability, and carries on 
his agricultural pursuits on a solid business basis. He is a worthy citizen of 
Morris county and enjoys the high regard of all who know him. 

He was married October 6, 1897, to Miss Emmie E. Schoeneck, a 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 583 

daughter of Charles W. and Katharine (Schafer) Schoeneck. Mr. Hopping 
is an ardent Republican, as was his father and grandfather, and is an active 
member of the Morris Grange, of which he is at present the master. He has 
always been more or less identified with the agricultural organizations of the 
state and county. His brothers, Daniel Miller and Walter Baylis Hopping, 
are members of the Seventh Regiment National Guard of New York. Walter 
B. Hopping is a graduate of the Columbia Law School of New York city, of 
the class of 1896, and is at present practicing his profession as an attorney 
in that city. 



HERBERT K. SALMON. 



Mr. Salmon is one of the enterprising young business men of Ledge- 
wood, New Jersey, and is a representative of one of the most distinguished 
families of Morris county. 

It is two hundred and fifty years since the first Salmon emigrated from 
England to this country and settled in New Jersey, and from him has come a 
large progeny, the various branches of which have ramified and extended 
into probably every state in the American Union. All the Salmons, wherever 
found in this country, are blood of this family. While their efforts have 
been confined in the main to farming and other rural industries, they have 
entered the professions as well, and from this family came one of our greatest 
statesmen and jurists, Salmon P. Chase. All the Salmons have been patri- 
otic and some of them were soldiers in the early wars of this country. Peter 
Salmon, during the war of 18 12, while restlessly riding to and fro, anxious 
to get into the conflict, but being opposed by his wife, who feared for his 
safety, originated the now familiar saying, "Say, old woman, what do you 
know about war ? " Captain Richard Salmon, an officer of a militia com- 
pany in those times, was a brother of Peter, and both were not only true 
and tried soldiers, but also were industrious, prosperous and prominent citi- 
zens. Captain Richard Salmon was the paternal grandfather of our subject, 
and his son, Abram D., was our subject's father. 

Abram D. Salmon was a successful farmer. He established his home 
near Drakesville, on a most charming location, and there surrounded himself 
with all the comforts of life. He died in 1892, at the age of skty-five years. 
Few men have lived a purer or more useful life than he. For many years he 
was a member of the Baptist church, and was a deacon in the same, and 
gave freely of both his time and means toward furthering the interests of the 
church. He gave his support to the Republican party, but never entered 
the field of politics. He married Magdalene, daughter of Henry Messinger. 
The Messingers are of Holland origin and the first representative of the 



584 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORT. 

family landed in this country about two hundred and thirty years ago. To 
Abram D. and Magdalene Salmon were born a large family of children, the 
surviving members being as follows: Edward L. , Kansas City, Missouri, is 
representing the Palace King Heater Company; William M., of the same 
place, has a canning factory at Guthrie, Oklahoma; Jerre B. is representing 
the Eureka Mining Investment Company in the Klondike gold fields; Her- 
bert K., whose name forms the heading of this sketch; Abram D., Jr., who 
manages the interests of the Salmon homestead; Julia S., widow of H. R. C. 
Valentine. 

Herbert K. Salmon, the immediate subject of this review, was born 
March 23, 1868. His early education was received in the village school and 
was supplemented by a course at Coleman's Business College, Newark, New 
Jersey. When he started out in life on his own account it was as a partner 
of Theodore F. King in a general store, After six years in this business, he 
then turned his attention to contracting, in company with his brother Jerre 
B., the firm confining itself to contracts on public works. The first year of its 
existence the brother, Jerre B., built a macadamized road from Netcong to 
Mine Hill, and the firm from Mt. Arlington borough to the boulevard line in 
Dover, and from Ledgewood to Succasunna, making a total of eight miles. 
Jerre Salmon built the Hackettstown reservoir and aqueduct, and the firm did 
the grading for the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad switch from 
Hopatcong. They also operate the Hopatcong Granite Quarry, which fur- 
nished the stone for the new addition to the Morris Plains Asylum. 

Among other enterprises with which Mr. Salmon is connected, we note 
that of the Musconetcong Building & Loan Association, which he helped to 
organize and of which he was the first treasurer. Like his honored father, 
he is an active member of the Baptist church, at this writing being superin- 
tendent of the Sunday-school. In political and fraternal circles, also, he is 
prominent and active. Fraternally, he is associated with Musconetcong 
Lodge, F. & A. M., at Stanhope; Baldwin Chapter, R. A. M., of Newton; 
Ode De St. Amand Commandery, K. T., of Morristown; and Mecca Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine, New York city. 



WARREN J. LANGDON. 

Mr. Langdon was born near Dover, Morris county, on the 2d of May, 
1854, and is descended from an old New England family. His grandfather, 
Darling P. Langdon, was born in New Hampshire, in the latter part of the 
eighteenth century, and in the early part of the nineteenth century removed 
to Pequannock township, Morris county. He was the son of a farmer, but 
learned the hatter's trade, but after following it for a short time he turned 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 585 

his attention to the blacksmith's trade, which he carried on with good suc- 
cess until his retirement from business. In his political views he was a 
Democrat until the rise of the Republicans, when he joined the ranks of 
the new party. His death occurred, at Sparta, in 1859. His wife, who 
died in 1840, at the age of fifty-two, bore the maiden name of Ruth Will- 
iams and was a daughter of Samuel Williams and a granddaughter of John 
Williams, the latter a native of Wales. Both the father and grandfather 
were iron-founders and practical business men, being very successful in their 
line. They were also fine specimens of physical manhood, each of the sons 
of John Williams being more than six feet tall. To Mr. and Mrs. Darling 
Langdon were born eight children: Foster H., who was in the iron business 
and died in 1879; Mary, who married Caleb P. Wilson and is also deceased; 
Sophia, Jessie and David, all deceased; Lewis W., father of our subject; 
Jacob and Samuel, who have also passed away. 

Lewis W. Langdon was born August 18, 182 1, and received but limited 
educational privileges, for at the age of twelve years he started out in life 
for himself, and the fruits of his labor provided him not only the necessities 
of life but also added to the comforts of the family home. Even before he 
was nine years old he drove the "win horse" at an iron mine, and among 
his earliest ventures on his own behalf was the leasing of the Johnson Hill 
mine at Mt. Pleasant. He operated this for eight years and the income 
derived from the mine was supplemented somewhat by the money he made 
by working at the blacksmith's trade, which occupation he had learned in 
Dover, and while working in the mine during the day he would spend many 
an evening at the forge. He had nothing to depend upon but his own labors 
and it was difficult to make a start, but when once he gained a firm financial 
footing his progress was very rapid and satisfactory. In 1870 he came to 
Chester and accepted the position of superintendent of a mine for the Ches- 
ter Iron Company, with which he remained two years. He then bought a 
tract of land and opened the Langdon mine, which he operated until 1893, 
taking out, after he became sixty years of age, fourteen thousand tons of ore. 
He made money rapidly out of this property and acquired a modest fortune. 

Lewis W. Langdon cast his first presidential vote for the Democratic 
candidate, but at the next election voted for the Republican candidate and 
has since affiliated with the Grand Old Party. He has at all times kept 
abreast with advanced thought on political economy and the other important 
topics of the day, and when he gives expression to his views they are full of 
vigorous American sentiment. He was married April 19, 1847, to Miss 
Sarah Strawway, a daughter of David and Mary Strawway. Their children 
are Nelson M. ; Josephine, widow of M. W. Seeley; Warren J.; Louanna; 
Frank E. ; Edwina; and Wilbur H. 



586 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Warren J. Langdon, the immediate subject of this sketch, was reared 
on a farm near his birth-place and attended the country schools until four- 
teen years of age, when he laid aside his text-books and began the mastery 
of the more difficult lessons to be learned in the school of experience. He 
began his business career as an errand boy at an iron mine and from one posi- 
tion to another was raised until, at the age of twenty-three, he was made 
superintendent of the Andover mine, in Sussex county. For nine years he 
was connected with the iron interests in Chester, acting as superintendent of 
different mines, and upon the closing down of the Hacklebarny mines he 
turned his attention to the lumber business. He is now engaged in the 
operation of a sawmill on Black river, is also engaged in farming, and since 
1896 has carried on the Milltown store, — these various important interests 
fully occupying his time and attention. He is a very progressive business 
man, wide-awake and enterprising, and his different industries are conducted 
with the strictest regard to the ethics of commercial life. 

Mr. Langdon was married in November, 1879, to Miss Florence Brown, 
a daughter of Sedgwick Brown, of Mine Hill. He is a man of sterling worth, 
of fidelity to principles, prompt in the discharge of duty and faithful to all 
obligations, and in social and business relations he commands the respect of 
those with whom he has been brought in contact. 



AMOS CHAMBERLAIN. 

Classed with the enterprising and thrifty farmers of Mount Oliver town- 
ship is Amos Chamberlain of Netcong, New Jersey, and for his sterling 
worth he is highly respected and esteemed. 

Mr. Chamberlain is a son of Daniel Chamberlain, who was born in 
Ammel township, Mercer county, New Jersey, in the year 1799. That 
locality was most certainly the home of the Chamberlains for many genera- 
tions. Little, however, is known of their history, since it is not even on 
record who was the father of Daniel Chamberlain. Daniel Chamberlain 
married Miss Mary Ann Rowland, with whom he lived happily for many 
years, and who survived him five years, his death occurring in 1870 and 
hers in 1875. Following are the names of their children, in order of birth: 
Lewis, deceased; Rhymer, deceased; George, deceased; John R., of 
Mount Olive township; Sarah A., wife of Daniel Swackhamer, of German 
Valley; and Amos. 

Amos Chamberlain was born near Hacklebarney, in Chester township, 
Morris county, New Jersey, December 30, 1845. There and at Budd's Cor- 
ners, near Chester, his boyhood days were passed and his educational advan- 
tages were limited to the country schools. When Amos was eighteen his 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 587 

father moved to the Flanders neighborhood, where the family home was 
maintained on a farm until death called the parents away, as above recorded, 
and where Amos Chamberlain resided until 1872. That year he located 
near Mendham, which was his abiding place until 1888, when he purchased 
his present farm of two hundred and five acres and took up his abode on it. 
Here he has lived during the past decade. From a worn-out, run-down 
farm his acres have been converted into a productive tract of land, highly 
cultivated and with everything to indicate thrift and prosperity. 

Mr. Chamberlain was married in June, 1870, to Miss Ann Eliza Hop- 
kins, daughter of Silas Hopkins, and their children are Retta, Sadie, Maggie, 
Silas and Kittie. 

Mr. Chamberlain is highly regarded by histownsmen, and while he takes 
no part in political matters or public affairs as an official, he is nevertheless 
interested in the cause of good, honest and economical administration of 
public affairs. He is a Presbyterian and has served as a trustee of the Stan- 
hope church. 



JOHN E. FENNELL. 

A rising young attorney of Morristown is Mr. John E. Fennell, who is a 
native of this city, born December 7, 1865. His father, Patrick Fennell, 
was a native of Ireland and emigrated to the United States in 1837, locating 
in Morris county, near Morristown, in 1842, and was a well and favorably 
known blacksmith. He died in 1866, when the subject of this sketch was 
but a year old, and his widow is still living, here in Morristown. 

Of intellectual tendencies, John E. graduated at the Morristown high 
school at the age of seventeen years, and he is now a member of the Alumni 
Association of this institution. He studied law under the instructions of Hon. 
Edmund D. Halsey, late president of the National Iron Bank of Morristown. 
In 1889 he commenced the practice of law and for some time had his office 
with his preceptor, and then he opened an office for himself, and at present 
has two spacious and pleasant office rooms on Washington street. 

He is a Republican in his politics, taking a leading part, especially for a 
man of his age. In 1890 he was a candidate for member of the assembly in 
a strong Democratic district, and came within a few votes of being elected. 
In 1892 he was the Republican candidate for the office of surrogate of Morris 
county, but in the wave of Democracy which then swept the country he was 
again defeated, although running largely ahead of his ticket; and since that 
time he has retired from politics and has confined his attention entirely to 
his legal business. 

Mr. Fennell is a member of the Improved Order of Red Men, of the 



588 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Foresters, the Knights of Honor, Knights of Columbus, etc. He is a popu- 
lar young man, industrious in his profession and his practice is becoming 
more and more established. A bright future awaits him. 



AARON S. SUTTON. 



Mr. Sutton, a leading farmer of Parker, Morris county, is especially 
worthy of mention in this volume, not only because of his relation- 
ship to an honored family but also on account of his achievements in busi- 
ness. He was born in Washington township, Morris county, on the ist of 
March, 1832, and is a grandson of Aaron Sutton, who was born about 1782 
and died about 1844. Aaron Sutton, Jr., the father of our subject, was 
born in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, in 1799, and followed the dual occu- 
pation of farming and milling. He was also somewhat prominent in local 
public affairs and in his political views was a Democrat. He married Miss 
Catherine, daughter of Jacob and Charity Able, her father representing one 
of the oldest families in this county. She was born April 24, 1800, and died 
on the 29th of July, 1894, at the extreme old age of ninety-four years. Aaron 
Sutton, Jr., died in 1857. Their children were Julia Ann, deceased wife of 
William Eick; Mary, widow of Richard Stevens, of Milltown; Eliza Jane, 
deceased, wife of George Fleming; Aaron; Elizabeth, deceased wife of George 
Huffman; and Hannah, wife of Philip Scuyler. 

Aaron S. Sutton, whose name introduces this review, acquired his edu- 
cation in the common district schools of the neighborhood, and on starting 
out in business life on his own account he located on a farm west of Parker, 
where he began the marketing of country produce — butter, eggs, etc. He 
began operations on a very small scale, for his capital was exceedingly 
limited, but he was industrious, economical and dealt fairly with his patrons 
and built up a good business, which brought to him a substantial financial 
reward. As from time to time his financial resources were increased he 
made judicious investments in real estate, and is now the owner of five good 
farms, neatly and highly cultivated. He owns five farms and has property 
in Newark and other investments of equal importance. He votes with the 
Democracy, but has had neither time nor inclination for public office. 

Mr. Sutton has been twice married. In 1858 he wedded Sarah, daugh- 
ter of Jacob Anderson. She died June 4, 1874, leaving three children: 
Austin E., who married Edna Van Zelious; Elias, who married Lizzie 
Myers and is engaged in merchandising in Parker; and Dr. Edward, located 
in German Valley. In December, 1876, Mr. Sutton was again married, his 
second union being with Mary, daughter of Isaiah Apgar, and their children 
are Erastus, Eli and Roy. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 589 



THOMAS LOWERY. 

The efficient superintendent of the Ballantine farm, of Bernardsville, is 
Thomas Lowery, who was born in county Donegal, Ireland, December 7, 
1839. His father, Robert Lowery, was a farmer in rather indigent circum- 
stances, and as a consequence the son received very meager educational priv- 
ileges. The latter left the Emerald isle in i860, when twenty-one years of 
age, and, sailing from Londonderry to New York, identified his interests 
with those of the New World. His only acquaintance in America was the 
late Francis Oliver, of Mendham, then a resident of Bernardsville. The lat- 
ter readily secured him employment with Bishop Janes, with whom Mr. 
Lowery remained uninterruptedly for eight and a half years, when he entered 
the service of John Lyons, with whom he remained for four years. He then 
married and became superintendent of the farm of A. V. Stout, the president 
of the Shoe and Leather Bank, of New York, serving acceptably in that 
capacity for eight years. During that period he was enabled to purchase 
the Oliver farm. 

On the expiration of that time Mr. Lowery removed to his farm in Mor- 
ris county, near Mendham, remaining thereon for two years, when he was 
induced to resume the superintendency of Mr. Stout's farm. That gentle- 
man died fifteen months later, and Mr. Lowery then rented the farm and 
purchased the stock and other chattels necessary for carrying on the busi- 
ness, continuing in charge of that property for eight years. His management 
was attended with a high degree of prosperity, and his industry, economy and 
diligence was followed by gratifying financial results. He later sold to 
Mr. Stout. Mr. Lowery is now the owner of two fine and valuable farms 
near Mendham, aggregating one hundred and eighty acres of land, and is 
recognized as one of the substantial citizens of the community. He was in 
charge of the Crowndale farm when Mr. Ballantine purchased it, and has 
since acted as that gentleman's superintendent. He is certainly one of the 
most capable, progressive, wide-awake and enterprising managers of agricult- 
ural interests in the county. He seems to know almost intuitively what is 
wanted and what is best to be done; but this is really not intuition, but a 
judgment resulting from a careful study of the question, keen foresight and 
unremitting watchfulness. It is this that has made him so successful in his 
operations and lifted him from a humble position to one of prominence in 
business circles. 

Mr. Lowry was married in April, 1873, to Miss Sarah, daughter of 
William Stephenson, and to them have been born four children: Joseph A., 
Robert J., William F. and Thomas H. Mr. Lowery is a trustee of the 
Mendham Methodist church, is a liberal contributor to the support of that 



590 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

organization and does all in his power for its advancement. He is a very 
popular man, for his genial manner, uniform courtesy and genuine worth 
commends him to the confidence, good will and friendship of all with whom 
he comes in contact. 



HORACE FORD. 



The first of the family to which the subject of this sketch belongs to set- 
tle in Morris county was John Ford, who located in what is now Hanover 
township, in 1710. He came from Philadelphia, by invitation of a man 
named Budd, who was a surveyor for the British crown and who deeded to 
Mr. Ford about two hundred acres of land in what is now Hanover town- 
ship. Upon this land Mr. Ford settled and made improvements, adding to 
its area from time to time by further purchases. 

He married Elizabeth Freeman and among his children were Samuel 
and Jacob. The latter studied law and practiced his profession as an 
attorney at Morristown. He acquired considerable land in and near Morris- 
town, on a part of which he erected the building that later became Wash- 
ington's headquarters during the memorable encampment of the Continental 
army at Morristown. The building was erected several years prior to the 
Revolution, and has recently been converted into a memorial hall, with large 
additions and extensions, under the auspices of the Washington's Headquar- 
ters Association. 

Samuel Ford, the next descendant in line, passed his life on the old 
Ford homestead, as a farmer. He married Sarah Baldwin and had the fol- 
lowing children: Jonathan; James, the father of the late Rev. John Ford, 
of Parsippany, where he preached for many years; Demas, who married 
Mary Lewis, a daughter of the late Rev. Lewis, of Mendham, and during his 
life became a large land-owner in Morris county; Samuel, who was a farmer 
in this county, residing here for some time, afterward going to England and 
returning to America, when he settled in Virginia, where he again married 
and had a number of children. 

Jonathan Ford, the son of Samuel, also passed his entire life on the old 
homestead mentioned, married Eunice Odell, and had the following children: 
Charles, grandfather of Horace, the subject of this sketch; Henry, who 
became a minister and settled in Broome county, New York, where he was a 
minister the remainder of his life; Odell, who settled at Stockholm, Morris 
county, where he was a successful manufacturer of iron; Charlotte, who 
became the wife of Silas Condit, of this county; and Katie, who married- 
Alfred Wells, of Goshen, Orange county, New York. 



* 



0} 




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f\ 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 591 

Charles Ford, the grandfather of our subject, was a generous and public- 
spirited man, loyal and patriotic, and a good citizen, who served for a num- 
ber of years in the militia, during which time he became known as Captain 
Ford. He was an ardent reader and lover of books, and this fact, along 
with his constant association with men of intelligence, well fitted him for the 
many responsibilities and positions that he filled. For a number of years he 
was county judge. His mother was a daughter of the Rev. Odell, from the 
vicinity of Elizabeth, this state, who married a daughter of Jonathan Dickin- 
son, the president of Princeton College. Elizabeth Odell, a sister, married 
James Ford, and their son John studied for the ministry, and another son, 
Marcus, also studied for the ministry, and followed his calling for a number 
of years. 

Charles Ford was united in marriage with Miss Rachel Burroughs, a 
daughter of Jacob Burroughs, who was of English ancestry and lived in 
Chatham township, near Madison, this county. Charles Ford and wife had 
the following named children: Edwin, who married Jane Pierson, a daughter 
of Benjamin Pierson, of Madison, this county; Caroline, who became the 
wife of J. J. Schofield, also of Morris county; Alfred, the father of the subject 
of this biography; Henry, who married Mary Miller, a daughter of Eliphalet 
Miller; Phcebe and Nancy, twins, the former married a Mr. Patterson and 
the other remained unmarried; and Ellen, who became a noted and well 
known educator in Morris county, remained unmarried and died in the prime 
of life. 

Alfred Ford, the father of Horace Ford, was reared and educated on the 
old Ford homestead, followed farming pursuits and later became an enter- 
prising and successful business man, at one time owning nine hundred acres 
of land in Hanover township, near Morristown, and was also largely inter- 
ested in lands in Michigan and Illinois. He was a loyal and patriotic citizen, 
always taking an active part in the movements designed for the welfare of 
the community. He was born in 1805 and died in 1866; but as to the 
inherited longevity of the family we may add here that his father lived to the 
age of four-score and two years, and his grandfather, Jonathan Ford, reached 
the age of ninety years. 

For his wife he was united in marriage with Miss Mary, a daughter of 
William and Susan (Schofield) Bishop. Her mother was a direct descendant 
of Rev. John Schofield, a Scotch Presbyterian minister who settled at Stam- 
ford, Connecticut, near Bridgeport. The children of Mr. Ford were: Charles' 
W., who married Julia Pierson; Mary, unmarried; Jonathan, who died at the 
age of eighteen years; Julia, who also remained unmarried; Horace, whose 
name heads this sketch; Charlotte, who became the wife of Rev. William W. 
Williams, of Keokuk, Iowa; Leander, who married Laura Tuttle and resides 



592 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

at Whippany, Morris county; and George Odell, who died at the age of fif- 
teen years. 

Mr. Horace Ford was reared to manhood in Hanover township, acquir- 
ing his education at the classical institute at Madison under the tuition of 
Rev. Paul E. Stevenson. He then engaged in agriculture until 1876, when 
he established his present livery, sale and exchange business at Boonton, — a 
business in which he excels, with the success that follows industry and 
fidelity. 

December 26, 1866, he was united in matrimony with Susan Esther 
Crawford, a daughter of James and Thurza (White) Crawford, and they have 
had the following children: Theodore W., who married Emma Dawson, a 
daughter of David and Lucy (Doty) Dawson; Grace C, who became the wife 
of Rev. William Peck, of Corona, Long Island, and has two children, — Gott- 
lieb and Helen Esther; Charles E., who resides at Bridgeport, Connecticut; 
and Alfred, who died in early life. 

Mr. Ford is a member of the South Street Presbyterian church, of Mor- 
ristown, and his wife holds her ecclesiastical membership in the Presbyterian 
church, at Boonton. Politically Mr. Ford cast his first presidential vote for 
Abraham Lincoln, and, like his father, has always been a stanch supporter of 
the principles of the Republican party. He has filled the office of freeholder 
for five years and for ten years was a member of the board of town com- 
mitteemen. 



WILLIAM VREELAND. 



He to whose life history we now direct attention is one of the oldest 
and most favorably known farmers living in Morris county. He was born in 
Montville township, on the 7th of May, 1837, and is a son of Garrett D. 
and Sarah (Fredericks) Vreeland. He received but a limited education, in 
the district schools, after leaving which he engaged in farming and has made 
that vocation his life work, his career being marked by a high degree of suc- 
cess, the logical result of his earnest efforts, his enterprise and his integrity 
of character. Politically he is a firm advocate of Republican principles, cast- 
ing his first vote for Abraham Lincoln, and in his district he has served as 
school trustee. 

Mr. Vreeland was united in marriage October II, 1866, to Miss Mary 
Ann, a daughter of John and Eliza (Decker) Witty, of Montville town- 
ship, and shortly after this event he and his wife moved to the old home- 
stead, where they have since resided. Seven children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Vreeland, namely: Ida, who married Irving Fredericks, of 
Pompton Plains; Ward, born September 13, 1869, married Miss Nellie 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 593 

Decker, daughter of George Decker, and they reside in Butler, New Jersey, 
with their two children, Olive and Eva; John E., born February 16, 1873; 
Annie Agnes; Mary; Ruth and Garrett, who died at the age of sixteen months. 
Mr. Vreeland and his family are faithful adherents of the Presbyterian church 
of Boonton. 

Garrett D. Vreeland was born in Pequannock township (now Montville) 
about the year 18 12 and started in life in most humble circumstances, working 
as a farm hand and charcoal burner, but by industry, application and strict 
integrity of character he advanced along life's highway and in time became 
one of the wealthy and progressive farmers of Morris county, and among 
other interests he was a stockholder in the Morristown Bank. In politics he 
was a Republican, and in religious adherency he was a member of the Pomp- 
ton Plains Reformed church. His death occurred November 21, 1869, his wife 
surviving him but a short time, her death occurring April 9, 1870. They 
were the parents of three children, namely: Jacob I., who was killed by a 
yoke of steers when he was twenty-one years old; William, our subject; and 
Phoebe, who married Emmons Decker, of Rockaway township. 

Jacob Vreeland, the grandfather of our subject, was the first of the 
family to locate in Morris county. He married Miss Maria Debow, of Pomp- 
ton Plains, and settled in Pequannock township, where he reared the follow- 
ing children: Richard, deceased; Garrett, deceased; Henry, now residing 
in Butler; Jacob, deceased; and Maria, who was twice married, her first 
husband being James Scott and her second Charles Smith. 



FREDERICK GORDON. 



A leading merchant of Boonton, Mr. Gordon traces his ancestry 
directly to David Gordon, who was probably a son of Captain William Gor- 
don and a grandson of Joshua Gordon, who died on the 15th of April, 1777. 
David Gordon was born in 1759 and died in July, 1852. He married Miss 
Anna Southward in 1780. He was an iron-worker by trade, a member of 
the militia during the Revolutionary period, and was a private in the Fifth 
Company of Foot, First New Jersey Regiment, from July 24, 1777, 'to 
January, 1783. His son William was born in 1782, married Elizabeth 
Rachels, and is buried in Rockaway, New Jersey. John Harvey, a grandson 
of David, was born October 26, 1805, and was twice married, his first wife 
being Nancy Atno, and his second Mary Ann Fichter. He was a forgeman, 
and conducted the Lower Longwood Forge and the Middle Forge. The latter 
premises are now owned by the United States government, and are used for 
naval purposes and storage warehouses. After his second marriage he 
became a circuit rider in the Methodist church, still continuing his occupa- 

12a 



594 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

tion at the forge. He resided in Boonton for a time, and subsequently 
moved to Montville, where his death occurred October 4, 1855. William 
Gordon, a son by his second wife and the father of our subject, was born at 
Middle Forge, March 6, 1839, and became a mechanic, and for the past 
thirty years he has had charge of the water-works for the Delaware, Lacka- 
wanna & Western Railroad, located between Easton and Hoboken. He was 
married, June 27, i860, to Miss Susan Unangst, who was born September 
14, 1843, a daughter of John Unangst, who was supervisor of the Morris 
canal for a number of years, being now deceased. Four children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Gordon, namely: Laura, born January 16, 1862, is 
now Mrs. C. Byron Dixon, of Rockaway Valley; Frederick; Mary, born 
April 6, 1869; and Harry, born September 27, 1880. 

Frederick Gordon, the immediate subject of this mention, was born in 
Boonton, Morris county, New Jersey, on the 3d of March, 1864, and received 
his education in the public schools of his native city. At the age of thirteen 
years he went to Scranton, Pennsylvania, and became a messenger boy for 
the Western Union Telegraph Company, retaining that position for a short 
time, and then returned to his home in Boonton, where he secured a clerk- 
ship in the grocery store of a Mr. Porter, where he remained for four years, 
subsequently engaging as a fireman on the Delaware, Lackawanna & West- 
ern Railroad. After •serving a few years in that capacity he returned to 
Boonton, purchased an interest in the business of his former employer, Mr. 
Porter, this partnership continuing until 1894, when Mr. Porter retired and 
our subject has since conducted one of the most successful and enterprising 
grocery establishments in Morris county, carrying a complete stock of fancy 
and staple groceries and enjoying the patronage of some of the best people in 
Boonton and vicinity. He began business on his own account in 1894, and 
his trade has so continuously increased that from time to time he has been 
compelled to enlarge the facilities of his store in order to meet the demands 
of his trade. In addition to his grocery and dry-goods departments he has 
now a large and well assorted stock of furniture and house furnishing goods, 
thus making his store one of the largest establishments of the kind in 
Boonton. 

Mr. Gordon is a charter member of the Boonton National Bank and is 
also interested in other enterprises in his home city. He is a stanch sup- 
porter of the Republican party, and socially is affiliated with Arcania Lodge, 
No. 60, Free and Accepted Masons. 

On October 24, 1889, at the Presbyterian church, Rev. Thomas Carter 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gordon and Miss Annie Trimble, whose 
parents, James and Eliza (Curry) Trimble, were born in Scotland. The 
father died in July, 1894. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon have one child, Newell 





.X 



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§1 



Si 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 595 

Trimble, who was born September 26, 1890. They are both members of 
the Presbyterian church, in which he is an elder and an active worker. He 
is a member of the board of trade and occupies a conspicuous place in the 
ranks of Boonton business men. 



DAVID E. QUINBY. 



One whose connection with the agricultural interests of Morris county 
has been both profitable and honorable, Mr. Quinby was born in Halseytown, 
New Jersey, on the 6th of December, 1822, and is a son of Isaac and Sarah 
(DeHart) Quinby. His father was born in Orange, Essex county. New Jer- 
sey, November 2, 1788, and was a son of Josiah Quinby, who located, in 
1797, on the farm where our subject now resides, and erected a gristmill in 
the town of Troy. He later purchased a farm and engaged in the manu- 
facture of shoes for the southern trade. He attended the Presbyterian 
church, and in his political belief was a Whig. He was twice married, lived 
to an advanced age and had a family of children, as follows: James; Isaac; 
David; Moses; Josiah; Rachel, wife of Robert Green; Martha, wife of Daniel 
DeHart; Anna, wife of Sylvanus Howell; and Jemima, wife of William Davis. 

Isaac Quinby, the father of our subject, learned the shoemaker's trade 
in his youth and afterward carried on an extensive business for those days, 
giving employment to a large force of workmen. He also followed farming' 
and was a successful business man. He acceptably served as magistrate for 
about twenty-five or thirty years, was elected to represent his district in the 
state legislature on two different occasions and for three terms was judge of 
the county court, filling all these offices with marked ability. Politically he 
was a Whig and was a man of great influence in the community. He was 
married December 24, 1812, to Miss Sarah DeHart, a native of Hanover 
township, Morris county, and a daughter of John and Jane DeHart, the 
DeHart family having been established in this county in colonial days. The 
original ancestors here located on a grant of land received from King George 
II, of England, which is still in possession of their descendants. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Isaac Quinby were born the following children: Phoebe, who was born 
February 5, 1815, married Davis Vail, and died October 27, 1877; William, 
who was born February 9, 18 17; John Alonzo, born November 27, 18 18; 
Isaac F., born January 29, 1820; David E., born December 6, 1822; Emma 
J., who was born March 6, 1825, and is the wife of George Cobb, of Newark, 
New Jersey; Thomas N., who was born May 27, 1827, and died at the age of 
six years; Dewitt Clinton, born February 8, 1830; George A., born March 
1, 1832; Sarah, who was born August 4, 1834, and died September 7, 1846; 



596 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

and Mary Ann, who was born December 12, 1836, and married William Z. 
Gurnee. The mother of this family was a member of the Presbyterian 
church. Mr. Quinby died January 29, 1866, and his wife departed this life 
in 1878. 

David E. Quinby spent his boyhood days on his father's farm and 
conned his lessons in the public schools of the neighborhood. He remained 
at home with his parents until 1850, when he make preparations for a home of 
his own by his marriage to Miss Sarah Louise Harrison, who was born in 
Hanover township, Morris county, January 16, 1829, a daughter of Samuel 
B. and Betsey C. R. Harrison. Her father was a son of Amos Harrison, 
of Orange, New Jersey. After his marriage our subject settled on the old 
Harrison homestead, where he has since followed farming. Of late years 
he has also extensively engaged in the dairy business and has found this a 
profitable source of income; the products of his dairy, on account of their 
excellent quality, always finding a ready sale on the market. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Quinby was blessed with three children: 
Clara L., who was born November 13, 1852, and is now the wife of Edwin 
S. Wilson, of Whippany, the marriage having been celebrated November 13, 
1872; William H., who was born May 12, 1862; and Harrison, who was 
born May 1 1, 1866. 

Mr. Quinby has been called to public office by those who recognize his 
worth and ability and his fitness for public honors. He has served on the 
county board of freeholders, and all trusts reposed in him are faithfully per- 
formed. He holds membership in the Methodist church, as did his first wife, 
who died in 1895. He was again married October 20, 1896, his second union 
being with Anna Mitchell, a native of Troy Hills, and a daughter of John 
Nelson Mitchell. 

Harrison Quinby, the son of our subject, was reared in his parents' home 
and his primary education, obtained in the common schools, was supple- 
mented by a course in the Fordville Boarding School. He was then con- 
nected with the telephone business in New York city for a time, after which 
he purchased the paper-mill at Hamburg, New Jersey, conducting that enter- 
prise for eight years. On his retirement from that line of business, he 
returned to the old homestead, where he is now engaged in the cultivation 
of roses and carnations for the New York market. His business is 
extensive and is constantly increasing. He is a man of sound judgment, 
keen discretion and energy, and is meeting with good success in his under- 
takings. 

On the 27th of November, 1888, was celebrated the marriage of Harri- 
son Quinby to Miss Eva Edsall, a native of Hamburg, and a daughter of 
Thomas and Elizabeth Edsall. Their children are Clara Lane, who was 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 59T 

born June 13, 1890, and died December 29, 1896; Eugene Edsall, born 
August 26, 1891; and Elizabeth, born March 15, 1893. 

Harrison Quinby is a member of the Patrons of Husbandry, and his 
wife belongs to the Episcopal church. In his political associations he is a 
Democrat, and for six years has filled the office of township clerk, his con- 
tinuance in the office standing in evidence of his fidelity to duty. The 
Quinby family is one of prominence in this section of Morris county, and its 
record is one well deserving of a place in this volume. 



JOHN B. HULSE. 

This gentleman bears a name that has long been identified with Kenvil 
and vicinity, several generations of the Hulse family having resided here. 

Jonas Hulse, the grandfather of John B., was a native of Orange county, 
New York, and removed from there to Morris county, New Jersey. He was 
a foreman on the construction of the Morris and Essex canal. Later he 
located on a farm adjoining the village of Kenvil, and in the quiet of agri- 
cultural pursuits passed the rest of his life. Subsequently a portion of his 
land was sold to the Atlantic Dynamite Company and their factory located 
upon it. Jonas Hulse and his wife had the following named children: Sarah, 
who married John Hance; Margaret; Harriet, wife of Abram Dickerson; 
Effie, who married James Williamson; William, who married a Miss Smith; 
and Hiram, who married Miss Amanda Budd, daughter of John Budd. 

Hiram Hulse was the father of our subject. He was born in 1828 and 
died in 1882. At the time his parents came to New Jersey he was very 
small, and at Kenvil he grew to manhood, obtaining his education chiefly in 
the broad school of experience. In 1867 he engaged in merchandising at 
Kenvil, conducted a successful business, and acquired a fair amount of this 
world's goods, being in good circumstances at the time of his death. He was 
one of the most prominent and influential men of the town, taking an active 
interest in all political and public matters, yet quiet and unostentatious. His 
political faith was that of the Democratic party. He aided in furnishing 
funds to conduct campaigns, and, when called upon, performed his duty as a 
public servant. For a number of years he served his township as a free- 
holder. He and his wife were the parents of two children, — John B. and 
Jonas W. The latter is the leading merchant in Port Morris. He married 
Lizzie Salmon, daughter of George I. Salmon, and they have one child. 

John B. Hulse was born in Kenvil, New Jersey, April 1, 1855, and his 
whole life has been passed. here. When he was eighteen he became a clerk 
in his father's store, soon learned every detail of the business, and remained 
in the store in the capacity of clerk until his father's death. Then, as one of 



598 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

the heirs, he aided in conducting the business for some years, until he and 
his brother, Jonas W. , under the name of Hulse Brothers, succeeded the 
late firm. They were associated under this style until September, 1895, 
when the partnership was dissolved and John B. Hulse became sole pro- 
prietor. He has since conducted business alone, carrying a large stock of 
well-assorted general merchandise, and keeping up the reputation for honor- 
able and upright dealing established so long ago by his father. 

In politics, as well as business, Mr. Hulse has taken the place of his 
honored father. His attachment to Democracy is firm and constant, and 
whatever service he can render in a quiet way is cheerfully given. 

Mr. Hulse has been married twice. His first wife was before her mar- 
riage Miss Ella Halsey, she being a daughter of Major Thomas Halsey. 
Some time after her death he wedded Miss Ella O. Stackhouse. He has 
two children by his first marriage, Halsey and Frank. 



WARREN D. GARDNER. 



Mr. Gardner was born in East Greenwich, Rhode Island, on the 14th of 
February, 1845, and is now a resident of Succasunna, Morris county. New 
England was the home of his ancestors and in the war of the Revolution the 
family was represented by its patriotic members who fought for the inde- 
pendence of the nation. The grandfather was Samuel Gardner, and his 
children were Mrs. Dorcas Arnold; Mrs. Hannah Vaughan; Mrs. Weltham 
Hall; John, who married Mary Parkhurst; and George S. 

The last named was born in East Greenwich, Rhode Island, in the year 
1799, and passed away in 1863. He married Hannah Hopkins, a daughter 
of Joseph Hopkins, and they became the parents of three children. John 
G. , now of Red Cliff, Colorado; George A., of Brooklyn, New York; and 
Warren D., the subject of this sketch. Warren D. Gardner pursued his 
education in the public schools until sixteen years of age. He learned much 
of sea life by engaging in the coasting trade aboard a schooner, on which he 
rose to the rank of mate. When his country became involved in civil war 
and the south attempted to overthrow the government which his ancestors 
had aided in founding, he laid aside the pursuits of civil life and went to the 
defense of the Union. 

It was on the 17th of September, 1861, that Mr. Gardner joined the 
" boys in blue " as a volunteer of Company K, Fourth Rhode Island Infan- 
try, in which command he served for thirteen months. His regiment was 
aboard the transport Arizona bound for the front, when that vessel encoun- 
tered a severe storm in which it was tossed about at the mercy of the wind 
and waves for three days. With his regiment Mr. Gardner participated in 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 599 

the battles of Roanoke, Fort Macon and Newberne, the last named being 
fought on his birthday. He resigned from his command after serving for 
nearly thirteen months and received an honorable discharge September 25, 
1862. Not long after, however, he enlisted in the Third Regiment, Rhode 
Island troops, which joined General Banks' command and participated in the 
Red River expedition and the battle of Pleasant Hill, and for three months 
was stationed at Alexandria, Louisiana, where the command was engaged on 
the construction of Bailey's dam across Red river, being under the enemy's 
fire every day during the entire time. Mr. Gardner was mustered out of 
service on the 29th of November, 1865, and with an honorable war record 
returned to his home. 

He took an active interest in military affairs in his native state and was 
prominently identified with the Rhode Island state militia for some years. 
He enlisted in the Kentish Guards, one of the oldest regiments in the United 
States, the first colonel of which was General Nathaniel Greene, of Revolu- 
tionary fame. Mr. Gardner was promoted from the rank of sergeant 
through the various positions of company and regiment until commissioned 
colonel of the above mentioned guards by Governor Burnside, one of the 
famous war generals. 

In January, 1867, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Gardner and Miss 
Alice L. , daughter of Horace Harrington, and of this union have been born 
five children: Nettie H., wife of Richard FitzHerbert, by whom she has 
three children, Florance, Bertha and Alice; Warren D. , a graduate of the 
New York City School of Pharmacy and of Coleman's Business College, of 
Newark, and now a druggist of Succasunna; Elmer E. ; George D. and 
Hattie R. 

In regard to his business affairs, Mr. Gardner has ever led a busy and 
industrious life. He learned the carpenter's trade in his early years and for 
some time was a contractor and builder in his native city. For some years 
prior to leaving Rhode Island he was connected with the American Mill 
Company, in the capacity of mechanic, and when that firm failed in business 
he was offered a similar position with the Atlantic Dynamite Company, at 
Kenvil, Morris county. For seventeen years he has now served with this 
house, one of its most capable, faithful and industrious employes, having the 
full confidence of his employers and the warm regard of his fellow workmen. 

In politics Mr. Gardner is a Democrat and is well known as an active 
and influential party man in his township. He and his eldest son are mem- 
bers of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he also belongs to the 
German Valley Encampment. In his religious associations he is a Baptist, 
and in church, political, social and business circles he has gained the good 
will and esteem of all with whom he has come in contact by his upright and 



600 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

well spent life. He manifested his loyalty to the government on the tented 
field, and the same patriotic spirit to-day prevails in the discharge of his 
duties of citizenship whereby he upholds the starry banner. 



EDWARD L. BOISAUBIN. 

In both a personal and ancestral way the record of this honored citizen 
of Morris county is of interesting character and he is clearly entitled to dis- 
trict representation in this compilation. Mr. Boisaubin is descended from 
one of the most prominent French families that settled in New Jersey at an 
early day. His father, Amedee Boisaubin, was a native of Morristown, and 
his death occurred in New York city, about 1843 or 1844. During his resi- 
dence in Madison he was recognized as its leading citizen, being a man of 
high character and marked ability. He married a daughter of Edward 
Thebaud, and her death occurred in 1852. Amedee Boisaubin and wife 
became the parents of six sons, of whom one, Vincent, was born in the West 
Indies, where the parents were for some time located, the father having gone 
there to superintend his extensive plantations. He also had large landed 
interests in New Jersey. The other five sons were born in Morris county, 
and were as follows: Amedee and Mark, who were born in Morristown; 
Edward L., the subject of this review; Louis, who died in 1892; and Alfred, 
who is a resident of Brooklyn, New York. 

Edward L. Boisaubin was born in Madison, Morris county, New Jersey, 
on the 1 2th of April, 1837. He passed his childhood days in his native city, 
and has always made his home in the immediate vicinity of that city. 
Early in life he assumed the duties that fall to the lot of the agriculturist 
and he has ever since applied his energies to the cultivation of the soil, being 
a very progressive, enterprising and practical farmer. At length he sold the 
old homestead to Mr. Tomley, a son-in-law of William K. Vanderbilt, and 
since that time he has devoted his attention to the raising of mushrooms and 
the cultivation of roses, for the New York market. In both lines he has 
been very successful, finding a ready sale for both the table delicacy and the 
" queen of flowers," his mushroom garden being one of the finest in this sec- 
tion of the state. For a period of twenty-two years he was engaged in the 
dairy business, and his capable management made that also a profitable 
source of income. His home is beautifully located on the Convent road, one 
of the most attractive and fashionable localities in Morris county. 

In 1862 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Boisaubin and Miss Sarah 
Blanchet, a daughter of Augustus Blanchet, of Madison. They became the 
parents of five children: Caroline; Augustine, deceased; Edward, who is 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 601 

married and has two children — Edward and John; and Helen and Emma, 
who are still at the parental home. 

The family attend St. Vincent's Catholic church, which was established 
and built by Mr. Boisaubin's father at an early day. Our subject was edu- 
cated in Mount St. Mary's College, being a student in that institution 
contemporaneously with Archbishop Corrigan, Bishop McClosky, Father 
McNulty, of Philadelphia, and many other noted men in the Catholic church. 
Mr. Boisaubin is a man of scholarly tastes and strong mentality, and there 
are few who are better informed on matters of general interest. In his 
political proclivities he is a stanch adherent of the Democratic party, and he 
wields a strong influence in local politics, as well as other affairs of a public 
nature, for his ability well fits him for leadership in the realms of thought 
and action. 



JAMES LARISON. 

One of the prosperous farmers of Chester, Mr. Larison is the fifth in 
descent in direct line from the Dane who came to the shores of America dur- 
ing the colonial epoch and established the Larison family in the New World. 
He located on Long Island, whence his son William, upon attaining his- 
majority, came to New Jersey. The latter purchased four hundred acres of 
land in Morris county, a part of which is now comprised within the farm 
owned by our subject. The date of that purchase was January i, 1745, and 
the old transfer, on parchment, is now in possession of James Larison and 
shows the property to have been deeded by " Fretwell Wright to William 
Larason. " A slight change has since been made in the spelling of the family 
name. The eldest son and child of William Larason was James, who was 
born January 1 1, 1763. He was married on the 27th of September, 1785, 
to Miss Sarah Wortman, and their children were: William, who was born 
February 1, 1786; Elizabeth, who was born September 5, 1788, and married 
Joshua Dickerson; Mary, who was born March 22, 1791, and married John 
Sperry; Peter, born October 26, 1794; James, born April 23, 1797; Wort- 
man, born January 15, 1800; Nancy, born August 15, 1803; and Andrew, 
born October 18, 1806. 

Of this family James Larison, the seventh child, became the father of 
our subject. He was married February 16, 1856, to Mary Ann Sharp, a 
daughter of Morris S. and Mary Ann (Thomas) Sharp. Her parents were 
married October 12, 1820, and had seven children, as follows: Eliza, born 
September 4, 182 1, was married October 14, 1841, to George Karr; William 
L., born December 2, 1822, married Matilda A. Karr on the 16th of Octo- 
ber, 1855; Nathan, born June 4, 1824, married Ann Louisa Peare, August 



<302 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

13, 1846; Sylvester, who was born July 1, 1827, was married May 18, 1850, 
to Mary E. Bunn; Davia A., who was born February 5, 1830, was married 
December 23, 1852, to Charlotte E. Peare; and Mary Ann, the mother of 
our subject, was born October 22, 1832, completing the family. Her father, 
Morris Sharp, was born August 10, 1796, and his wife was born September 
19, 1795. 

James Larison, the father of our subject, spent his life on the farm 
which is now the property of his namesake, and was accounted one of the 
leading and substantial agriculturists of Chester township. He died Decem- 
ber 8, 1873, and his wife passed away on the 10th of July, 1896. Their 
children were James, who was born January 4, 1857; Peter, born June 13, 
1858; Joseph, born November 15, 1859; Floyd M., born May 4, 1861; and 
Mary E., born March 7, 1869. 

The schools of Chester afforded James Larison, our subject, his educa- 
tional privileges and in life's school of experience he has learned many valu- 
able and practical lessons that have made him a well-informed man. He 
entered upon his business career as an employe of the Newark trolley lines, 
and after four years of that work returned to the farm, where he has since 
resided. He now owns one hundred and eighty acres of the original tract 
which was purchased by the original Morris county ancestor, and has a finely 
developed farm, improved with all modern accessories and conveniences. 

Mr. Larison was married December 5, 1894, the lady of his choice 
being Lydia J., daughter of William Barton, of Somerset county. They 
have one child, Banas J., born April 30, 1897. Like his ancestors, Mr. 
Larison has been a lifelong Democrat, and is not only regarded as an intel- 
ligent and progressive farmer, but is also known as a worthy and valuable 
citizen. 



ALBERT Z. DURYEA. 



The progenitor of the Duryea family in America was Joist Duryea, who 
came to this country, in 1675, from Manheim, on the Rhine, Germany. He 
was a descendant of French Huguenots who fled from Paris, France, at the 
time of the religious persecutions and located in the north German states. 
Joist Duryea, on coming to the New World, took up his abode at New 
Utrecht, on Long Island, whence he subsequently removed to Newtown. 
Later he went to Bushwick, now a part of Brooklyn, where he died about 
1727. He married and had eleven children, namely: Joist, Peter, Jacob, 
Abraham, Charles, Jacques, Antoinette, Magdalena, Cornelius, Simeon and 
Philip. Jacob Duryea, the third son of the family, was born in 1685 and 
was baptized November 21, 1686. He married Katrina Polhemus, a daugh- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 603 

ter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Havemeyer) Polhemus. Her father was the 
second son of the Rev. Johannis Theodorus Polhemus, who was the first 
Protestant minister on Long Island, having located there in 1676. He 
preached for a time at Flatbush and Flat Lands, and also in Brooklyn. To 
Jacob and Katrina Duryea were born eight children, as follows: Daniel, of 
Jamaica, born in 1704; Joist, of Jamaica, born in 1709; Johannis, Jacob and 
Abraham, all of New York; Cornelius, Hendrick and Magdalena. 

Daniel Duryea, the eldest son of Jacob Duryea, was born February 12, 
1728, and died August 21, 1804. He was married December 10, 1750, to 
Vrontje Van Dien, who was born May 20, 1734, and they had eight children, 
namely: Katrina, born September 17, i75i;Marija, born December 4, 1754; 
Jarmetje, born January 18, 1757; Richard, born July 23, 1760; Peter, born 
January 4, 1763; Hendrick, born February 20, 1765; Samuel, born Novem- 
ber 9, 1767; and Garret, born April 8, 1770. Peter Duryea, the fifth of this 
family, married Rachel Zabriskie, but had no children. Samuel, the seventh, 
and the grandfather of our subject, was married February 18, 1788, to Ann 
Kingsland. He was a carpenter by trade and followed that pursuit for many 
years. With his wife he removed from New York city to Morris county, 
New Jersey, at an early day. Their children were Daniel, who was born 
December 24, 1790, and married Elizabeth Van Orden, December 24, 1812; 
Mary, who was born January 29, 1792, and married Thomas Sturthevant, 
April 13, 1820; Edmund, father of our subject; Richard, born April 17, 1797; 
Peter, who was born December 25, 1800, and married Elizabeth Hobby; 
Isaac, who was born October 19, 1803, and married Ellen Purrain, Decem- 
ber 25, 1827; Garret, born April 23, 1805. 

Edmund Duryea, father of our subject, was born in Montville, New 
Jersey, January 16, 1795, and was reared by his uncle, Richard Duryea. 
He became a farmer, devoting his attention to the tilling of the soil through- 
out the greater part of his life. He was married July 2, 18 14, to Hettie 
Hylor, and they became the parents of five children who reached years of 
maturity: Richard, a resident of Boonton; Maria, deceased wife of James 
Young, of Boonton; Abraham, deceased; Charity, deceased; wife of David 
Jacobus, of White Hall; and Albert. The father of this family was a promi- 
nent member of the Dutch Reformed church and a leading citizen of the 
community. His death occurred July 26, 1892, and his wife passed away 
March 2, 1882. 

Albert Zabriskie Duryea, whose name begins this record, was born 
March 26, 1837, on the farm where he now carries on agricultural pursuits. 
In the district schools near his home he acquired his education and then 
entered upon his business career by learning the carpenter's trade in Newark 
and in New York city. He followed that pursuit for some years, but is now 



604 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

devoting his energies to the farm, which he has placed under a good state of 
cultivation. The fields are well tilled, everything in good repair, and the 
neat and thrifty appearance of the place indicates the careful supervision of 
the owner. 

Mr. Duryea's home is presided over by one of the estimable ladies of the 
township, who in her maidenhood was Miss Mary Matilda Pierce, daughter 
of Henry G. and Emeline (Hicks) Pierce, of Newark. Their marriage was 
celebrated May 2, i860, and four children graced their union, namely: 
Anna Maria, born November II, 1863, now the wife of Charles L. Van 
Duyne, of Union Hill, Hudson county, New Jersey, by whom she has three 
children — Ernest, Mary Matilda and Grace; William A., who was born 
July 29, 1865, and married Elizabeth Seaman, by whom he has two chil- 
dren — Elsie May and Richard Halsey; Edward E., born May 25, 1870, now 
at home; and Raymond P., who was born December 18, 1875, and makes 
his home in Newark. 

In his political associations Mr. Duryea is a Democrat, and for thirteen 
years served as county committeemen, proving a most capable and trust- 
worthy, officer. He has also been school trustee for many years and has 
greatly advanced the cause of education by his earnest, untiring efforts. The 
family attend the Dutch Reformed church and are well known in this com- 
munity. 



SAMUEL L. GARRISON. 



The proprietor and editor of the Boonton Weekly Bulletin, at Boonton, 
Morris county, New Jersey, was born in Deerfield township, Cumberland 
county, this state, February 8, 1845. His father was Jonathan Garrison, 
and his mother, whose name before marriage was Amy Loder, was a daugh- 
ter of Zenas and Barbara Loder, both of whom were descendants from Ger- 
man ancestors, settling in New Jersey before the American Revolution. 

Jonathan Garrison was a son of Ailie and Susanna Garrison, the father 
of Susanna being a descendant from a Holland family; and family tradition 
says that Ailie Garrison was a son of a Scotchman named Daniel, who came 
to America and settled in the southern part of New Jersey. For his life occu- 
pation Ailie Garrison followed the tilling of the soil, and was known to be a 
just and conscientious man in all his affairs of life. He lived to be nearly 
four-score years of age, bringing up seven children to the years of maturity, 
namely: Daniel, who married and had a large family, and passed his life in 
Cumberland county; Jonathan, the father of Samuel L. , the subject of this 
sketch; William, who married and had three daughters, also spending his life 
in Cumberland county; John, who married and had sons and daughters, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 605 

also passed his life in the same county; Ailie, who also had sons and daugh- 
ters, and lived in the same county; Susan, who married Abijah Harris, of 
Cumberland county, and had a number of daughters; and Hannah, who became 
the wife of Abel Garton and had sons and daughters, and was a resident of 
Cumberland county. 

Jonathan Garrison, the father of the subject of this sketch, received a 
common-school education, such as farmers' sons usually obtained in those 
days, and spent his early years of manhood on the farm. Leaving the latter, 
he engaged in business, in which he was successful; and he also worked at 
the iron trade in Bridgeton, Cumberland county, this state, for a number of 
years. He was a well informed man, having acquired a considerable knowl- 
edge by his association with men of intelligence and learning, which well 
fitted him for a successful business career. He was a generous and hospita- 
ble man and a willing contributor to church and charitable enterprises, being 
a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He passed away 
May 12, 1873, aged sixty-seven years. His faithful wife survived him till 
August 4, 1888. Their children were as follows: Mary, now the wife of 
Thomas Fisher, of Bridgeton, New Jersey; Sarah, now Mrs. Samuel Fisher, 
of Morristown; Margaret, unmarried; Jane, the widow of Joseph Acton, of 
Hopewell township, Cumberland county; Caroline, who married Edward S. 
Reeves and is now deceased; Phoebe, who died at the age of seventeen years; 
Susanna, who died at the age of seven years; Samuel Loder, the subject of 
this sketch; and Jonathan, who died in early life. 

Samuel L. Garrison received his early mental training in the schools of 
Bridgeton. When he had arrived at the age of fourteen he engaged for a 
year as a clerk and then learned the printing trade, which he followed until 
1863, when he went to Millville, this state, where he became assistant editor 
of the Millville Republican, which position he filled until 1872. Then he 
came to Boonton and became associated with E. B. Dawson in the publica- 
tion of the Boonton Weekly Bulletin. In 1873 he assumed full control of 
the Bulletin as editor and publisher, and has continued in this position to the 
present time. His master hand is shown in both departments of the busi- 
ness, as his success and popularity have proved for so many years. 

May 9, 1867, is the date of Mr. Garrison's marriage to Miss Mary Fer- 
guson, who was born August 30, 1847, a daughter of Thomas S. and Rhoda 
(Buzby) Ferguson, and they have the following named children: Wilbert, 
who is a graduate of the Boonton high school and is at present the treasurer 
of the firm of Codies, Macy & Company, of New York city, of which firm he 
is also a member; he married Emily Louise Brightman, and his children are 
Wilbert Brightman and Lewis Ferguson. Samuel L. Garrison's second son 
is Samuel Claude, a student in the law department of the New York Univer- 



606 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

sity; his next, Thomas Ferguson, a student at the Boonton grammar school; 
and Mary Florence, also a student at the same school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Garrison and their sons Wilbert and Samuel C. are con- 
sistent members of the Boonton Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Garrison 
is the present district steward of the Paterson district, and one of the vice- 
presidents of the Newark Methodist Episcopal Conference Laymen's Asso- 
ciation. Politically, Mr. Garrison is an ardent supporter of the Republican 
party. He has been mayor of Boonton; a member of the board of educa- 
tion, and has rendered valuable assistance in establishing and sustaining the 
various industries in his town. 



WILLIAM ROOME. 



Maintaining his home in Butler, Mr. Roome is widely known as a sur- 
veyor of eastern New Jersey and is deputy for the Board of Proprietors. He 
was born on the 1st of May, 1834, in Bloomingdale (now Butler), Morris 
courlty, New Jersey. His father, Benjamin Roome, was born in Morris 
county in 1799, and was a son of Joseph Roome, who spent his entire life 
on a farm in the vicinity of Newfoundland, Morris county. He was descended 
from Dutch ancestry, and married Sarah Elyea, by whom he had twelve chil- 
dren. When the war of 18 12 was inaugurated he aided in the defense of his 
country against Great Britain. After a long and useful life of ninety-seven 
years, he was called to the home beyond in 1870. 

Benjamin Roome was reared in Morris county and in 18 16 began sur- 
veying. Some of the important work of his early life was the locating of 
large tracts of land for the Board of Proprietors. Later he became commis- 
sioner for the Rutherford estates in Passaic and Sussex counties, and was 
otherwise closely identified with land lines, locations and measurements over 
a large scope of country in New Jersey. He enjoyed extraordinary health 
and vigor and continued his active labors with compass and chain until he 
had reached the age of ninety years. He served his township as assessor, 
both before and after the division of said township, his last service covering 
the twenty years between 1852 and 1872. His political support was given 
the Whig party until its dissolution, when he joined the ranks of the Repub- 
lican party, continuing one of its earnest advocates until his death, which 
occurred in 1894. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Ann Berry and 
was a daughter of Jacob Berry, died in 1873. 

The sixth in order of birth in a family of eight children, William Roome 
spent his boyhood in his parents' home, and in the winter season mastered 
the common English branches as taught in the common schools of the neigh- 
borhood. Through the summer months, between the ages of thirteen and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 607 

sixteen years, he aided in the work of plowing the fields, raking the hay and 
gathering the corn. He then entered a grocery store of Paterson as clerk, 
and at the age of eighteen, in 1852, he embarked in the lumber trade in 
Newark in connection with a Mr. Van Wagenen. After four years spent in 
that way he made atrip to Minnesota, for the purpose of visiting the country 
and prospecting, and upon his return, in the autumn, he engaged in survey- 
ing, which he followed for two years. He then engaged once more in the 
lumber business, being for three years associated with W. R. & M. Sayre, of 
Newark, and in the spring of 1863 he removed to Plainview, Minnesota, 
where he engaged in mercantile pursuits. 

Mr. Roome was married in the west in April, 1865, and brought his bride 
to New Jersey on their wedding tour, but in September of the same year 
returned to the west, stopping for a visit at Agency City, Iowa, where Mrs. 
Roome's parents had in the meantime located. In the spring of 1866 he 
returned to Plainview, Minnesota, where he accepted a position as book- 
keeper and general superintendent in a large store, acceptably serving in that 
capacity until 1872, when he again came to his old home in Morris county, 
New Jersey, and has since engaged in surveying here. He is the author of 
an interesting pamphlet on the Early Days and Early Surveys of Eastern 
New Jersey, and is one of the best informed men on land surveys in the 
state. He has done the land-surveying for the East Jersey Water Company, 
in New Jersey, is surveyor for ex-Mayor Hewitt, of New York, who owns 
about twenty thousand acres in New Jersey, and has charge of much of the 
Rutherford estate of Passaic and Sussex counties. 

The home relations of Mr. Roome are very pleasant. His wife bore the 
maiden name of Sarah Josephine Burton, and was born in Port Huron, 
Michigan, her parents being William A. and Ann (Carnell) Burton. They 
now have two children: Ella Josephine, wife of Richard H. Lamscha, 
superintendent of one of the postal divisions of Brooklyn, New York; and 
Allison Burton, who was graduated in Rutgers College in the class of 1896, 
as civil engineer, when nineteen years of age, and is now an inspector for the 
Continental Fire Insurance Company, of New York. The family have a 
wide acquaintance in this section of the state, and Mr. Roome commands the 
high regard of those who have known him from boyhood, as well as the 
acquaintances of later years, a fact which indicates a life well spent. 



GEORGE C. COATES, M. D. 

Dr. Coates, who is engaged in the practice of his profession in Butler, 
was born in Warwick, Orange county, New York, on the 22d of May, 1865, 
his parents being Charles W. and Sarah E. (Sprague) Coates. The latter 



€08 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

were married in Orange county, and became the parents of seven children, 
namely: Ada A., who is living in Warwick, New York; Amelia B., wife of 
Richard Schofield, of Warwick; Martha J., wife of James Schofield, of 
Pompton, New Jersey; James W. , of Warwick; Charles W. and Clarence E., 
who are also living in that town; and George C. 

Dr. Coates acquired his literary education in Warwick Institute, in his 
native town, and entered upon his business career as clerk in a grocery store 
in West Milford, New Jersey, where he remained for three years. In the 
meantime he had determined to turn his energies into professional channels, 
and began reading medicine with Dr. Utter, of West Milford, who directed 
his studies until, after thorough preparation, he entered the medical depart- 
ment of the University of the City of New York. He completed the course 
in three years and was graduated in that institution with the class of 1888. 
Immediately afterward he opened an office in Butler, where he has since 
remained, engaged in a lucrative and constantly increasing business. He is 
progressive and enterprising, thoroughly well read on the science of medicine, 
and from the faithful performance of each day's duty he gains inspiration 
and strength for the work of the next. He is accounted one of the successful 
young physicians of Morris county, and his ability insures him still greater 
prominence and prosperity. 

The Doctor was married on the 5th of February, 1888, to Miss Orilla 
Bailey, daughter of Eugene and Harriet (Smith) Bailey, of Butler. They 
now have an interesting little daughter, Olive May. The Doctor is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Red Men. He manifests a patriotic interest 
in the welfare and progress of his adopted county and does all in his power 
for its advancement. His political support is given the men and measures 
of the Republican party, and he once served as coroner of Morris county, 
but has never been an aspirant for official honors. The .family attend the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and give liberal support to church and chari- 
table enterprises. 



CHARLES A. BAKER. 



As an ex-representative to the assembly of this state and as an enter- 
prising business man, Mr. Baker should be accorded special mention in this 
work, devoted, as it is, to a portrayal of the lives of the leading and influen- 
tial men of his day and place. 

Charles A. Baker was born in Roxbury township, Morris county, New 
Jersey, May 2, 1852, and belongs to a family long resident of this locality. 
The venerable Jeremiah Baker, of Kenvil, New Jersey, is now seventy-two 
years of age, and has passed his whole life in the locality where he now lives. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 609 

For many years he was engaged in the hotel business. He served the town 
ship as freeholder some years and also served as town committeeman. His- 
father was Andrew Baker and his grandfather Jeremiah Baker. The older 
members of the family were all farmers, and one of them owned a tannery 
also. Andrew Baker married a Miss Hurd, and their son Jeremiah wedded 
Miss Mercy Salmon, daughter of Richard S. Salmon. The children of 
Jeremiah and Mercy Baker are Charles A., whose name graces this review; 
Richard S., who married Miss Annie Phillips; Mary A., wife of Charles 
Solton; Sylvester G. , who married Sylvenia Merritt; and Nancy, wife of 
Wesley Ryerson. 

Charles A. Baker grew up at his birthplace and received his early train- 
ing in the district schools. At the age of eighteen he entered the employ of 
the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company, with which he 
was connected for fifteen years, his last service with the company being as 
assistant dispatcher at Port Morris. After severing his connection with the 
railroad he engaged in the bottling business at Kenvil, in company with his 
brother, Sylvester G., the firm being Baker Brothers. This business he is 
still operating successfully. 

Mr. Baker, like his father before him, is a stanch Republican. For 
years he has been recognized as a potent influence in local politics, and in 
November, 1893, he was elected a representative to the assembly of the 
state. The following year he was re-elected. During his membership in 
that honored body he rendered valued service on a number of important 
committees. He served on the committees of banks and insurance, game 
and fish, school for deaf mutes and reformed school. He also was on 
the joint committee on federal relations. During his last term he intro- 
duced and secured the passage of a game law that was probably the most 
satisfactory that has been enacted. 

Mr. Baker was married in German Valley, New Jersey, January 1, 1880. 
to Elizabeth A. Trimmer, daughter of Anthony Trimmer, of Middle Valley. 
Their children are Ethel A., Albert W. , Mary T. and Charles A., Jr. 

Fraternally Mr. Baker is identified with the Masons and the Odd Fel- 
lows, having membership in Musconetcong Lodge, No. 151, F. & A. M. , 
and Succasunna Lodge, No. 181, I. O. O. F. 



ANDREW DUFFORD. 



A resident of Middle Valley, New Jersey, Mr. Dufford is one of the 
wealthy and influential farmers of his locality. As such, some personal men- 
tion of him is highly appropriate in this work. Indeed, without the record 
of his life this compendium would be incomplete. 

13a 



610 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Andrew Dufford is a son of George Dufford and was born on the 4th of 
January, 1842, near Parker, Morris county, New Jersey. He was reared to 
farm pursuits, was educated under the direction of the country school-teacher, 
and remained at his parental home until he reached the age of twenty-one 
years. Up to the time he was twenty-one all his earnings went into the 
family coffer. At that age he began farming independently, and has ever 
since been regarded as one of the progressive and prosperous men of German 
Valley. He has acquired considerable property. At Middle Valley he owns 
a large farm upon which he has recently completed a handsome and expen- 
sive residence, complete in all its appointments; and has a farm at Fair- 
mount besides other tracts, the total being about three hundred and twenty- 
five acres. Also he owns a business property in Naughright. Personally, he 
has a supervision over all his land, and its well-kept, up-to-date appearance 
at once stamps the owner and manager as a man of thrift and enterprise. 

Politically, Mr. Dufford is a Democrat; and while he is well posted on 
the issues of the day and takes a commendable interest in politics, he is not 
an active politician. Religiously, he is a Lutheran and is identified with the 
local organization of this church. 

Mr. Dufford was married July 3, 1886, to Miss Laura Philhower, daugh- 
ter of Jesse and Sarah (Huffman) Philhower. Her grandfather was Samuel 
Huffman. Mr. and Mrs. Philhower's children, besides Mrs. Dufford, are: 
Anna, wife of John Moore; Melissa, wife of Charles Sutphen; Ella, wife of 
.William Voorhees; Margaret, wife of John Woodruff; Barbara A., wife of 
Hiram Huffman; Euphiemia, wife of Charles Regar; and Lewis A. Philhower. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dufford have seven children, viz. : Elizabeth N., Raymond C. , 
Sarah H., Laura L., Esther A., Ruth P. and Andrew. 



WILLIAM C. SWENEY. 



Among the substantial and highly respected citizens of Kenvil, New Jer- 
sey, none are more deserving of honorable mention in a work of this char- 
acter than the gentleman whose name appears at the head of this sketch — 
William C. Sweney. He owns and runs the leading blacksmith and wagon 
shop in Roxbury township and has a productive and well-improved farm near 
the village of Kenvil. 

Mr. Sweney was born near Deckertown, Sussex county, New Jersey, 
April 10, 1859, and is of Irish descent. His father, John Sweney, is a native 
of the Emerald Isle, where he spent the first fourteen years of his life, at 
that age emigrating to America and locating in Sussex county, New Jersey, 
where he still resides. Here he married Miss Hannah Little, by whom he 
has four sons, namely: Edward, William C, John J. and Andrew. 





^^~u^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 611 

William C. Sweney spent his early boyhood days on his father's farm, 
receiving a limited education in the common schools, and when nearly fifteen 
years of age left home and came to Kenvil. From that time forward he has 
made his own way in the world. Here he served an apprenticeship to the 
trade of blacksmith in the shop of J. T. Stidworthy, near the Vortman Hotel, 
and soon after he had completed his trade he bought out his old instructor, 
and continued business at the same site until 1891. That year he erected his 
new and more commodious buildings near his residence, which he has since 
occupied, doing a successful and constantly increasing business. Mr. Sweney 
is a skilled mechanic, a man of more than ordinary intelligence, and in this 
community, where he has resided since his boyhood, has built up an enviable 
reputation for integrity and fair dealing. 

, He was married October 3, 1882, to Annie Hill, only child of La Fay- 
ette and Mary (Frome) Hill. Mr. Hill was born in New Jersey in 1824 and 
passed his active life on a farm near Bettsville, Warren county. Mr. and 
Mrs. Sweney's children, in order of birth, are as follows: Mamie, Harry, 
Floyd, Grace and Kenneth. 

Politically, Mr. Sweney is a Democrat; fraternally, a Mason, having 
membership in Dover Lodge, No. 20, F. & A. M. 



JOHN NORWOOD. 

One of Morris county's well known farmers and public-spirited citizens- 
is John Norwood, who was born in Passaic county, New Jersey, on the 17th 
of October, 1827, a son of Joseph F. and Bridget (White) Norwood, natives, 
respectively, of Essex and Passaic counties. They were also the parents of 
two other children, Henry, of Ocean Grove, New Jersey, and Lydia Ann, 
who married Isaac Holt, of Essex county, and died, leaving one child, Nancy,, 
the latter becoming the wife of John P. Van. Winkle, also of Essex county. 

John Norwood passed his youth in Passaic county, subsequently going to 
to New York, where he learned the carpenter's trade and followed the same 
for a period of thirty years, 1844 to 1874, during which time he resided in 
Boonton, Newark and East Orange, finally locating on his pleasant farm in 
1874, and he now owns one of the most ably condqcted and highly cultivated 
sections of land in Morris county. 

Mr. Norwood is an active Republican, taking a deep interest in the 
prosperity of his party, and he served as a member of the county board of 
freeholders from 1876 to 1878, and in 1885 he was elected to the state legis- 
lature, in which he took an energetic part, being chosen a member of several 
important committees, among which may be mentioned those of education, 
soldiers' home, state library and girls' reform school. He has also held 



612 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

various township offices and gives his support to all movements that tend 
toward the advancement and welfare of the community. 

On September 15, 1853, Mr. Norwood was united in marriage to Miss 
Helen S. Doremus, a daughter of Cornelius B. and Catharine (De Bow) 
Doremus, of Montville and Pequannock townships, respectively, and the issue 
of their union comprised four children, namely: Cornelius D. B., who is a 
printer by trade, residing in Orange, Essex county: he married Miss Abbie 
Lindsley, of East Orange, by whom he has three children, — Helen M., C. 
Harland and F. Ogden; Joseph M., deceased, whose sketch appears in this 
work; and John E. and Jennie Bertha, who reside at home. 

In his religious affiliations Mr. Norwood is a member of the Lower Mont- 
ville Reformed church, in the work of which he has rendered material aid. 

Benjamin Norwood, the grandfather of our subject, was born in Essex 
county, New Jersey, and was a cooper by trade. He married Miss Hannah 
Fairchilds, of Whippany, Morris county. His father, Andrew, was a native 
of England, whence he went to Holland and became a Huguenot, subse- 
quently coming to the United States and locating in New York city, where 
he acquired considerable wealth. 



JESSE S. KEYS. 

The proprietor of the box manufactory at East Madison, Mr. Jesse S. 
Keys, is a prominent citizen of that place. He is a native of New York city, 
born June 16, i860, a son of Jesse G. and Mary A. (Anderson) Keys, the 
former of whom is an extensive manufacturer of cooperage stock, his mills 
being located in Kentucky, while Mr. Keys is in charge of the main office in 
New York city. He was at one time lieutenant in the famous Eighth Regi- 
ment, New York Washington Grays, and did service during the draft riots 
in 1863. 

Mr. Jesse S. Keys was reared and educated in the eastern metropolis 
and after receiving his mental discipline in the Mount Washington Collegiate 
Institute, at the age of sixteen years, he entered the employment of William 
Knisely & Company, wholesale dry-goods merchants at 360 Broadway, New 
York city, and remained with them for two years. Next, entering the employ 
of Butler, Pitkin & Company at 356 Broadway, New York, as assistant buyer 
in the white-goods department, he continued with them four years; for a 
short time he was next employed by Whitfield, Powers & Company on Canal 
street near Broadway, as purchasing agent in their white-goods line; but, 
owing to ill health, he was compelled to make a trip abroad. After an 
absence of six months he returned with health recovered and established him- 
self, in 1883, in the present business in a manufactory in New York city, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 613~ 

which he successfully conducted there for twelve consecutive years. In Jan- 
uary, 1895, he moved the plant to East Madison, Morris county, where he 
purchased a part of the old Tunis property and erected thereon his present 
large factory, immediately after which he began the manufacture of boxes, 
and his products now include every variety used in all branches of trade. The 
business has rapidly increased within the past three years, and the factory 
now has a capacity of fifty thousand boxes a day, necessitating the employ- 
ment of twenty-five workmen, who are experts in their calling, as the work 
required is very peculiar. Five traveling salesman attend to Mr. Keys' inter- 
ests throughout the east and west. He is a man of wide business experience, 
an excellent organizer, and possesses a high degree of executive ability, which 
qualities of character have been the medium of his success. In the city he is 
president of Afton Hook & Ladder Company, No. 1. 

In 1892 he was united in marriage with Miss Mary A. Smith, a daughter 
of John D. Smith and a native of New York city. 



ELIJAH DUFFORD. 

Residing in Middle Valley, Morris county, Mr. Dufford is devoting his 
attention to farming upon the old homestead where he was born, in Wash- 
ington township, on the 5th of October, 1828. He bears the name of the 
family that through many generations has been connected with this section 
of New Jersey. His great-grandfather was George Stephen Dufford, who 
lived in the German Valley, by which name not a specific locality but the 
entire valley was then known. He was a farmer by occupation and was 
descended from Holland ancestry. His son, Jacob Dufford, the grandfather 
of our subject, married a Miss Wise, and their son, George Dufford, became 
the father of him whose name introduces this review. He was born on the 
Nathan Anthony farm, in German Valley, in 1795, and was a plain, indus- 
trious citizen, devoting his energies to the tilling of the soil. He married 
Elizabeth Neighbor, who died in 1886, at the age of eighty-six years. Their 
children were: Leonard N., deceased; Stephen, deceased; William G., of 
Warren county, New Jersey; Lawrence, who has passed away; Elijah; Mary 
E., wife of Philip L. Welsh; George, who resides in Barton county, Kansas; 
Catherine, wife of Jesse Smith, of Hackettstown; Henry P., a merchant and 
miller of Middle Valley; Andrew, a substantial farmer of Middle Valley; and 
Martha A., wife of John Wert, of Hackettstown. 

The birthplace of our subject was near Parker and there he spent his boy- 
hood and youth, receiving a limited educational training in the district schools 
of the neighborhood. When twenty years of age he began his business 
career by entering the employ of his brother Stephen, for whom he worked 



614 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

as a farm hand, receiving for his services one hundred dollars a year and his 
board. He remained with that brother two years and then came to Middle 
Valley, where he engaged to work for another brother at one hundred and 
twenty dollars a year and his board. He also continued with him for two 
years, and then rented of his father the old homestead, on which he contin- 
ued as a tenant until 1864, when the farm was left him by bequest. He has 
made farming his life work, and by his careful management, indefatigable 
labor and honorable business methods has acquired a fair property. 

In his political views Mr. Dufford is a Democrat and has been honored 
with a number of local offices. He was town committeeman for nine years, 
town collector for five years and for fifteen years represented Washington 
township on the Democratic county committee. 

The home relations of Mr. Dufford are very pleasant. He was married 
February 1, 1853, to Miss Susan Swackhamer, a daughter of Philip W. 
Swackhamer. They had two children, Philip S. and George S. The former 
married Hattie Suydam and has five children: Edwin, Myrtie, Rena, Elijah 
and Charles C. George Dufford, the younger son, married Eliza Wise, now 
deceased, and his children are Delia C. and Eliza W. He consummated a 
second marriage, being united to Miss Hattie Swackhamer, of Mechanicsville. 
They reside at Plainville, New Jersey. 



JOSEPH M. NORWOOD. 

In the death of the honored subject of this memoir there passed away 
one of the most prominent citizens of Morris county. His influence was 
widely felt and was most beneficent. Long identified with the educa- 
tional interests of the state, his labors advanced civilization, his precepts 
promoted intellectuality and his character taught honor in all things. Pope 
has written that "the proper study of mankind is man;" and where could 
be found a more interesting and profitable subject than the life history of 
one, who at all times had before him high ideals, whose career was actuated 
by broad humanitarian principles and whose labors did so much to prepare 
others for the responsible duties that rest upon every individual ? 

Mr. Norwood was one of New Jersey's native sons, his birth having 
occurred in the city of Newark, Essex county, on the 25th of November, 
1858. He acquired his early education in the schools of Newark and East 
Orange, and displayed special aptitude in his studies, but when nine years of 
age he met with a serious accident on the ice and for some time was unable to 
resume his studies. It was not until sixteen years of age, at which time he 
accompanied his parents on their removal to Montville township, Morris 
county, that Mr. Norwood was again enabled to enter school. He then 





&~3 . 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 615 

spent two years as a student, and in 1876, in acceptation of a written invita- 
tion from Professor E. M. Young, he took an examination at Dover, Morris 
county, and received from the examining board a certificate, having passed 
the examination with a scholarship of ninety-nine per cent. 

Soon thereafter he began teaching and for twelve years followed that 
profession, with marked ability and success, in Morris county. His reputa- 
tion as a most able educator extended beyond the bounds of this locality, and 
in 1888 he received a call from the board of education of Paterson to become 
principal of school No. 14, of that city, at a salary of twelve hundred dollars 
per annum. He accepted the position, and so satisfactory were his services 
that his salary was increased to fifteen hundred dollars the following year. 
In 1890 he was promoted by a transfer to school No. 5, of Paterson, where 
he taught continuously for six years. A man of scholarly attainments, he 
had the ability to impart clearly and concisely to others the knowledge he had 
acquired, and at all times he commanded the respect and confidence of his 
pupils. After eight years' connection with the schools of Paterson, he was 
forced to resign his position on account of being again troubled by the inju- 
ries which he had sustained in his early youth. Returning to the home of 
his parents, he there passed away, February 7, 1898. In 1877 he united 
with the Lower Montville Reformed church, of which he was a member at 
the time of his death. 

Mr. Norwood was loved by his pupils and held in uniform regard 
throughout the entire community. At his death the members of his school 
unanimously passed a resolution to have a tablet placed in the school as a 
tribute of respect, and a large delegation of those whom he had instructed in 
the years of his active educational work attended his funeral and covered the 
bier with beautiful floral offerings. His high moral character, his lofty prin- 
ciples, his kindly and charitable spirit, his helpfulness and his true manliness 
all endeared him to the hearts of those with whom he came in contact. His 
life work was of a very important nature, and his careful direction of the 
mental powers with which he had to do has led to successes in the business 
world which would otherwise not have been attained. He passed away, but 
the memory of his noble life remains as a benediction to all who knew him, 
and its influence will long be manifest. 



THOMAS J. HILLERY. 

Superintendent of the Boonton Water Company and one of the bright 
and enterprising young men of this city is Thomas J. Hillery, who was born 
in Hibernia, Morris county, New Jersey, on the 18th of November, 1871. 
His parents, John and Honora (Sweeny) Hillery, are natives of Ireland, 



616 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

whence they came to America in 1861, locating in Hibernia, where the 
father engaged in mining. In 1895 they moved with their family to Boon- 
ton, where they have since resided. Their children are: James Francis, 
John, Thomas J., Michael A., Nora, Catherine, Margaret and Annie. 

Thomas J. attended the public schools of Hibernia until twelve years 
old, and then spent two years in the Rockaway public schools, at which he 
was graduated, and then entered a mercantile establishment at Rockaway, 
where he remained for four and a half years. During that period he obtained 
the appointment, as alternate, to West Point, but, the regular candidate 
being subsequently named, our subject did not enter that institution. In 
1890 he came to Boonton and entered the office of Louis Van Duyne, city 
engineer, where he has since remained. In 1897 he was appointed superin- 
tendent of the Boonton Water Company. 

In his political faith Mr. Hillery is an active member of the Republican 
party, and successfully passed the examination for deputy United States 
insurance collector, but failed of appointment. Among his other interests he 
is a member of the firm of E. J. Cahill & Company, dealers in shoes. He 
was one of the organizers of the Young Men's Christian Association, of which 
he was the first president; he holds a similar position in the Church Literary 
Society, and he is a member of the church choir. He is a consistent adher- 
ent of the Catholic church of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, and has written a 
history of that institution. 



JOHN FAGAN. 



The leading boot and shoe merchant of Madison and the oldest mer- 
chant of the town in continuous business, with one exception, is John Fagan. 
A native of England, he was born in Manchester, on the 18th of October, 
1846, and is a son of Thomas and Elizabeth Fagan, whose family num- 
bered three children, — Patrick, Thomas and John. 

The last named spent the days of his early youth in the land of his 
nativity and acquired his literary education in the Catholic schools, after 
which he determined to seek his fortune in the New World, and sailed for 
America. Landing at New York in July, 1870, he spent one year in that 
city and then came to Madison, where he has since made his home. Here 
he opened a boot and shoe store. Madison was then a small place, but con- 
tinued to steadily increase in size and importance and Mr. Fagan kept pace 
with the business progress, until he now has one of the largest and most 
complete stock of goods in the city and is doing a profitable business. His 
strict integrity, straightforward dealing and thorough knowledge of his busi- 




":= CtTUSXS &*£■ £?£?■ 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 617 

ness have gained for him the entire confidence of the public and have been 
the salient features in his success. 

In 1873 Mr. Fagan was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Carmady, and 
to them were born three children, but two died in infancy. The surviving 
son is Thomas, who was born January 18, 1878. Mr. Fagan is a stanch 
Democrat in his political views, and always gives his support to the men and 
measures of that party. 



GEORGE T. COBB. 



The subject of this sketch was born in Morristown, New Jersey, on the 
13th of October, 181 3, of Revolutionary stock, his grandfather having been 
a brave and trusted soldier and officer in the Continental army and having 
participated in thirteen battles of the American war for independence, includ- 
ing those of Monmouth and Yorktown. 

George T. Cobb's parents died when he was very young and he was 
left to the care of his grandmother and of his aunts, the Misses Watson. 
While still a lad he became a clerk in the store of Francis Lindsley, at Den- 
ville, and remained there in that capacity for about two years. Afterward 
he was in Parsippany and in the McFarlane Iron Works at Dover. Through 
the influence of Captain William Scott, of Powerville, Morris county, he 
went to New York and entered the service of the firm in which Captain 
Scott was a partner and which was carrying on a large iron business. By 
his fidelity, sagacity and industry he so recommended himself to this firm 
that he was offered a partnership in it, which he gladly accepted. This firm 
was later known as that of D. M. Wilson & Company, and Mr. Cobb 
remained a partner in the same during the rest of his active business life in 
New York, which ended in the year 1854. Some time after becoming a 
member of the firm he went to Europe and traveled in England, Sweden 
and Norway, observing closely the iron industry of those countries. He 
was a sagacious, clear-headed, honorable, enterprising merchant and con- 
quered success as well as gained the confidence and esteem of the business 
community. 

In or about the year 1853, having acquired a handsome fortune, he 
removed to Morristown, where he resided during the remainder of his life. 
He was so public-spirited, so generous and so wise that he soon became an 
important factor in the life of the town. It was mainly through his sagacity 
and great generosity that the town procured the land for its Evergreen 
cemetery just outside of its borders. In fitness of soil and location and 
attractiveness of scenery this cemetery is surpassed by few others. Mr. 
Cobb gave to Morristown the lot on Maple avenue on which the main pub- 



618 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

lie school stands, and contributed largely to the erection and equipment of 
the building. He purchased and gave to the Methodist Episcopal church, of 
Morristown, the lot on the east side of the old " Green," and his gifts toward 
the building were munificent. The beautiful spire and noble stone walls of 
the church are a lasting monument to his memory. In everything that tended 
to improve his native town he was foremost. He took an active part in 
procuring from the New Jersey legislature the charter of the town, in April, 
1865. The first charter election was held on the 8th of May, that year, 
when Mr. Cobb was elected mayor; and he was twice re-elected, his last 
term expiring on the 11th of May, 1870. He was a hard worker and was 
indefatigable in inaugurating and carrying through needed improvements in 
the town. 

During a part of the same time he was a member of the senate of New 
Jersey, having been elected from Morris county in November, 1866, for a 
term of three years, and his term commencing in January, 1867. In the 
autumn of the year i860 he was nominated for congress, by the Democratic 
party of his district, and was elected, his term of two years commencing on 
the 4th of March, 1861, just on the eve of the breaking out of the great war 
of the Rebellion. Probably this was the most critical period in the history 
of the United States. The extreme theory of states' rights took practical 
shape, and its votaries attempted to break up the national union. Certain 
southern states asserted that they had a right to leave the Union at their 
pleasure, formally seceded, raised armed forces and organized a new confed- 
eracy. War came, for no other result was possible, as the president is 
obliged by the constitution to suppress all insurrections against the general 
government. President Lincoln and his advisers recognized the necessity of 
the hour, met force with force and a large majority of the people of the 
north sustained them. Patriotism dominated the party, and loyal Demo- 
crats like George T. Cobb, John A. Dix and Senator Dickinson rallied to the 
support of the man whom they and their party had opposed in the election 
during the previous campaign. 

During his term in the house of representatives at Washington Mr. 
Cobb's course rose to the plane of true statesmanship. Sagacious, ener- 
getic, practical and intensely patriotic, he was of great service to the admin- 
istration in its war measures. President Lincoln more than once acknowl- 
edged the value of Mr. Cobb's services and had a high opinion of him. 
When, in the fall of 1862, the Democratic party in his congressional district 
tendered to him a renomination, which in his case meant re-election, he 
promptly refused it, because of the platform which in the nominating con- 
vention they had adopted and on which they wished him to stand. He con- 
sidered the platform disloyal in its utterances and refused to do or say or 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 619 

countenance anything that would tend to discredit the effort which the gov- 
ernment was making to put down the great rebellion. In common with 
Judge Van Cleve Dalrymple and many other Democrats, he then joined the 
Republican party. He had the confidence and respect of the whole state 
and wielded a wide influence for good. 

While he was traveling in Virginia with his friend, Mr. J. Boyd Head- 
ley, of Morristown, the railroad car in which they were riding, on the 6th of 
August, 1870, was thrown from the track and both he and his friend were 
killed. The news of their sudden death was a great shock to the people of 
Morristown and to the public generally. Mr. Cobb's noble and useful life 
was thus suddenly terminated, and his remains were buried in Evergreen 
cemetery, in the establishment of which he had taken so great interest. 

Mrs. Mary Anna Cobb, his wife, survived him and resided on the Cobb 
homestead in Morristown until her death, on the 17th day of September, 
1883. His daughter Julia was his only child who survived him. She was 
married October 5, 1875, to William B. Skidmore, and resided in Morris- 
town up to the time of her death. Inheriting her father's generous and 
noble qualities, she won and retained the affection and esteem of a large 
number of friends; and when her death came, suddenly on the 1st day of 
November, 1897, the whole town mourned her loss. 



JAMES BROWN. 



The subject of this review holds the responsible position of bookkeeper 
of the Thistle Mills, in Montville. He was born at Pompton, Passaic county, 
New Jersey, on the 31st of March, 1853, and came to Boonton with his 
parents in 1858. He received his elementary education in the public schools 
of this city, and then learned bookkeeping, subsequently becoming associated 
with his father in the latter's meat market for several years. He held the 
position of clerk to the commissioner of pensions in Washington, D. C, for 
four years; was for eight years with the Hygeia Water Company, of New 
York; for two years he was employed by S. Mills Ely, of Binghamton, New 
York; and in February, 1895, he accepted his present position and has since 
continued to fulfill the duties thereof with a marked degree of ability. 

In his political adherence Mr. Brown is a Republican and served as city 
clerk of Boonton for two years. Socially he is a popular member of the Masonic 
fraternity, his affiliation being with Arcania Lodge, No. 60, York Rite, and 
in the Scottish Rite he has attained the thirty-second degree, of Prince of 
Jerusalem, in the consistory. He is also a Noble of the Ancient Order of the 
Mystic Shrine, his membership being in Mecca Temple, at New York. He 



620 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

is a member of the Reformed church, in which he was formerly a deacon, 
while his wife is an adherent of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Brown contracted his first marriage when living in Binghamton, 
New York, in 1882, being then united to Miss Carrie May DePue, of that 
city. She died in 1884, leaving one child, Bessie. For his second wife he 
married Miss Mary N. Esten, of Boonton, and of this union three children 
have been born, namely: George E., Mable N. and Blauvelt E. 



ROBERT M. SCHULTZ. 



A well known and popular florist of East Madison is Robert M. Schultz, 
who is a native of Jersey City, New Jersey, where he was born June 26, 
1873, a son of Michael and Elizabeth (Burge) Schultz, who were natives of 
Germany and among the founders of Jersey City, having settled here in 
1858. The father was a manufacturer of gold and silver leaf, being one of 
the first to engage in that enterprise in the United States, the business at 
that time having been conducted under the firm name of M. Schultz & 
Brother. It is still continued and is one of the largest concerns of its kind 
in the country. Mr. and Mrs. Schultz became the parents of the following 
children: Michael, Edward, Caroline, Estelle, John W. , Frederick, Robert 
M., Katie A., Alexander and Walter S. The father was a charter member 
of the Greenville Reformed church, of Jersey City, in which he was elder for 
thirty-two years and held the office of treasurer for twenty-two years. He is 
at present one of the prominent and respected citizens of Jersey City. The 
grandfather of our subject was an extensive prune-grower in Germany, com- 
ing to this country from Germany in 1835. His last days were passed in 
New York city, where he died in 1854. 

Robert M. Schultz, of this mention, attended the public schools of 
Jersey City and was graduated at the high school in 1890. After leaving 
school his first experience in business was acquired as a clerk in the employ 
of D. F. Foley, on Broadway, New York, and subsequently he came to 
Madison, New Jersey, and served an apprenticeship with L. M. Noe, where 
he learned the art of rose-growing. In 1893 he took charge of the conserv- 
atory on the Myers estate for two years and then, purchasing his present 
place in East Madison, he erected greenhouses, using in their construction 
seventeen thousand feet of glass. Here he cultivates roses only, making a 
specialty of the following varieties: American Beauties, Bride's and Bride's 
Maid. Mr. Schultz has an especial talent for the successful pursuit of this 
line of enterprise and the results of his efforts to produce a special kind of 
this, the queen of flowers, have been most satisfactory and have gained for 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 621 

liim a large and lucrative patronage. He is one of East Madison's enter- 
prising and progressive young men, and he richly merits the high regard in 
which he is held by his numerous friends. 



WILLIAM KIEL. 



William Kiel, of Butler, was born in Hamburg, Germany, September 
19, 1842, and his father, William Kiel, was a native of the same city, where 
he was a general tool-maker. At an early age our subject entered upon his 
business career and secured employment in the rubber factory of H. C. 
Meyer, of Hamburg, an extensive manufacturer of rubber goods. Later Mr. 
Kiel entered the service of the New York & Hamburg Rubber Company, of 
Hamburg, which concern was established by the pioneer rubber man, Conrad 
Poppenhusen, who was not only a manufacturer of rubber goods, but was 
also a promoter, and investigated the highest development in the manufacture 
of rubber goods by employing experts from the leading manufactories of 
Europe to make original investigations and discoveries. Mr. Kiel's con- 
nection with this house gave him access to all the sources of knowledge in 
this line, and he availed himself of every opportunity of mastering the busi- 
ness in principle and detail. 

About 1873 he received an offer from the Franco-American Soft & Hard 
Rubber Company to become the superintendent of their business in Paris, 
and after due consideration he decided to go to that city. This decision was 
reached not alone because the position would yield a better pecuniary return, 
but because he regarded it as a step in the direction of carrying out a 
cherished desire of becoming some day a resident of America; and in this he 
was not mistaken. However, during his connection with the Franco- 
American Company he succeeded largely in building up their business, and 
remained with them until he had the opportunity to come to the United 
States. Though his Paris employers offered him every inducement to remain, 
he believed he could best provide for a prosperous future in America, and in 
December, 1876, arrived in Butler, where he soon took charge of the stock 
department of the Rubber Comb and Jewelry Company. From that time 
the history of Butler has been a bright and prosperous one. The rubber 
factory furnishes employment to the majority of the people of the town and 
success has attended the enterprise. In the early days of Mr. Kiel's con- 
nection therewith capital was needed to maintain the operation of the factory 
while its products were being called to the recognition of the markets of the 
world, and Richard Butler was induced to become a stockholder in the com- 
pany and was made its president. He is one of the well known and wealthy 



622 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

business men of the United States, and has done much for the upbuilding of 
the town which bears his name. 

Mr. Kiel's capable management and thorough understanding of the rub- 
ber business was soon manifest in the improved condition of its trade. 
Until 1888 the factory was operated, as all other factories now are, under 
patents granted to Charles Goodyear, but since that year the Butler Hard 
Rubber Company has manufactured solely under its own patents, the result 
of the invention of Mr. Kiel. The company now controls one of the most 
extensive plants of the kind in the land, and it is this industry which has 
really built up the town of Butler. Employment is furnished to hundreds of 
operatives and the reputation which the house sustains throughout the coun- 
try is most creditable. In 1896 the company erected a large plant for a 
German corporation, the Accumulatoren Actien Gesellschaft, in Westphalen, 
which will manufacture, under license, according to Mr. Kiel's processes. 

Mr. Kiel has led a very busy life and has never turned aside from the paths 
of commerce save when in his youth he served his time in the German army, 
according to the laws of his country. He entered the Hamburg Dragoons, 
a regiment of heavy cavalry, with which he was connected between the ages 
of twenty and twenty-six, taking part in the Austro-Prussian war, and in 
1870-71 the Franco-German war. 

Mr. Kiel was also married before leaving his native land. On the 28th 
of October, 1865, in Hamburg, Miss Wilhelmina Mink became his wife, and 
to them have been born four children: William, who is a draftsman for the 
Garvin Machine Company, in New York city; Frederick, a die-sinker and 
engraver in the employ of the Butler Hard Rubber Company; Henry, a 
machinist with the same company; and Wilhelmina, wife of Paul Witteck, 
chief engineer of the Butler Hard Rubber Company. 

Having located on American soil Mr. Kiel became a true American citi- 
zen. Being ever mindful of the necessity of education, he was mainly instru- 
mental in having the county school officials map out a separate school dis- 
trict for Butler, and in having a ten-thousand-dollar school building erected 
in a prominent locality. He substantially aided the pioneer priests of the 
Franciscan order to erect a forty-thousand-dollar church, known as the 
" Shrine of St. Anthony; " and The Tabernacle, belonging to the Methodist 
Episcopal, was made a possibility largely through his generosity. He was 
instrumental in the organization of the Butler Silver Cornet Band, and set 
apart a room in the factory for its rehearsals. His military interest also called 
into existence a splendid drum corps, which existed sometime. Mr. Kiel is a 
plain, unassuming man, entirely free from ostentation, and one of his most 
admirable qualities is his approachableness, never denying himself to the 
poorest, and listening with patience and courtesy to all. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 623 



EDWARD T. CONDON. 

The subject of this review is proprietor of a large livery barn in Morris- 
town and was born in the county which is still his home, on the 27th of 
August, 1859. His father, William Condon, who was born in county Tip- 
perary, Ireland, in 1812, emigrated to America in 1845, and took up his resi- 
dence in Morristown. He married Bridget Slatterly and died in 187 1. Of 
their ten children only two are now living: Delia and Edward T. One of 
the sons, Maurice E. Condon, became a prominent and influential citizen of 
Morristown, a leading factor in her mercantile interests. He was born in 
the county seat in February, 1857, and in his boyhood and youth exhibited 
those traits of character which so endeared him to the people of his city in 
later years. At the age of seventeen he entered the employ of W. C. Caskey 
& Brother, remaining with that firm for eleven years. During that time, by 
industry and economy, he managed to accumulate a small capital and with 
this he decided to engage in the shoe business. He went to Powell Brothers 
& Company, of New York, stated to their Morristown salesman the object 
of his call, his business experience and the amount of his resources. The 
salesman replied that the house preferred cash customers; also that he had 
three customers in Morristown already, and it would not be honorable to 
place a new competitor in the field without their sanction, but that he would 
consult their wishes in regard to the matter and if no objection was made he 
would be glad to sell to Mr. Condon. Thus the matter was allowed to stand, 
pending such an investigation. The old shoe dealers, instead of raising an 
objection to the new competitor, welcomed him to their midst and encour- 
aged him in his new departure. The stock was sold to him the next week, 
three times the quantity he was able to pay for, and he opened his store on 
the park, at the corner of Bank street. From that time until his death he 
did a prosperous business. 

Maurice E. Condon was a social, temperate and honorable gentleman, 
and by his sterling worth commanded the respect of all who knew him. He 
was one of the charter members of the St. Mary's Young Men's Catholic 
Association, and was its treasurer for ten years, handling, during that time, 
thousands of dollars without bond, and every penny was accounted for. At 
one time he served as a member of the common council of Morristown. He 
enjoyed in a singular degree the confidence and respect of all classes of citi- 
zens, and his death, which occurred September 25, 1896, was mourned as a 
public loss. He never married, but made his home with his mother and 
sister, and at his death he left to them a comfortable property. 

Edward T. Condon was reared in the city which is still his home and 
obtained his education in the parochial schools. His first business venture 



624 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

on his account was in the line of his present interests. At the age of nine- 
teen he began driving a hack, owning then but one horse. He made money 
in this venture, and after accumulating some capital he extended the field of 
his operations by purchasing a small livery stock and opening a stable in 
Morristown. Fortune continued kind to him and his financial resources con- 
stantly increased, so that at length he was enabled to purchase a barn on 
Maple avenue, in 1884. This had a capacity for only twelve horses, but 
his business has steadily grown, and from time to time he has enlarged his 
facilities, until he now has a very commodious barn, splendidly equipped 
with a large number of horses and stylish turnouts. 

Mr. Condon was married on the 3d of October, 1883, the lady of his 
choice being Miss Joanna LaVelle, daughter of John LaVelle, and to them 
have been born four children: William, Edward, Francis and Mary. Mr. 
Condon is a member of the Young Men's Catholic Association, the Holy 
Name Society, and the Rosary Society of the Church of the Assumption, at 
Morristown. He is a member of the Catholic Benevolent Legion, of Mor- 
ristown, and is a charter member of the council at Morristown of the Order 
of the Knights of Columbus. It is no insignificant achievement to rise from 
a humble position and without the aid of wealth or influence, depending 
solely upon one's inherent business qualities gain a position of affluence, but 
this Mr. Condon has done, and in the accomplishment of his purpose deserves 
the highest praise and the unreserved confidence of the public. 



PHILIP H. HOFFMAN. 



Philip H. Hoffman was born at Schooley's Mountain, Morris county, 
New Jersey, on the 28th of July, 1827. His father was Captain Henry I. 
Hoffman, and his grandfather was John Hoffman, of Cokesbury, Hunterdon 
county. He was one of the " minute men" of the Revolution and served 
throughout the entire war. The Hoffmans were early settlers of New Jer- 
sey, having emigrated from Germany about the year 1660. The ancestor of 
our subject located in New Sweden, in the southern part of the state, between 
the years 1663 and 1670. On the maternal side our subject is descended from 
Casparus Steinmets, who left his native Holland and located in New Amster- 
dam, now New York, about the year 1640. In later years he removed to 
Bergen, New Jersey, to take charge of the farm belonging to the East India 
Company, of Holland. He was very prominent in the community, served 
as judge of the court, and captain of a military company, and later was 
elected to the upper house of the first state legislature that met in Eliza- 
bethtown, New Jersey, under Governor Carteret. During the period of the 
Revolutionary war his descendants were residents of New York city, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 625 

during the British occupancy, they were driven frem the metropolis, their 
houses were burned, their property destroyed, and they were forced to seek 
refuge among friends in New Jersey, where some of them eventually made 
permanent location, their descendants being still found in the localities where 
they settled. 

Mr. Hoffman's father was the owner of a large farm on Schooley's 
mountain, and there in his boyhood and early manhood he assisted in the 
labors of field and meadow or spent his time in acquiring his education in 
the schools of the neighborhood. At the age of eighteen he left home and 
went to Morristown to learn the trade of tailor and clothier. On the expi- 
ration of his term of apprenticeship, he began business on his own account, 
in connection with S. B. Ryerson, under the firm name of Hoffman & Ryer- 
son, opening the store on the ist of October, 1849. They sold out, how- 
ever, the following year and Mr. Hoffman removed to Dover, New Jersey, 
where he conducted a tailoring establishment for some time. 

In March, 185 1, he was married to Miss Barbara A., daughter of Man- 
uel N. Byram, Esq., whose ancestors were among the early Pilgrim settlers 
of Bridgewater, Massachusetts.' In March, 1856, Mr. Hoffman removed 
with his family to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and engaged in business there for 
a time, but on account of continued ill health, occasioned by the change in 
climate, he was obliged to return to the east, and again began business in 
Morristown, in the fall of 1857. In the summer of 1863, in connection with 
Abraham L. Cross, he purchased the Duncan House property facing on the 
park, better known as the "Old Arnold Tavern," General Washington's 
headquarters during his stay in Morristown in the winter of 1777: this they 
entirely remodeled in the spring of 1864, making two handsome stores in the 
lower story. The upper stories were used as a boarding-house, for some years 
known as the Losey House. A partnership was formed by Mr. Cross and Mr. 
Hoffman, under the firm name of Cross & Hoffman, and they conducted a dry- 
goods and clothing business, which proved to be very profitable. After 
a few years this partnership was dissolved, Mr. Cross selling his interest and 
removing from Morristown. Mr. Hoffman then carried on the store alone, 
and is still interested in the enterprise, under the firm name of P. H. Hoffman 
& Son, the junior partner being Henry Byram Hoffman, his only surviving son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman had three sons. The eldest, Orlando Kirtland, 
died in infancy. The second is Henry Byram, and the youngest was Joseph 
Reed, who on arriving at years of maturity studied medicine and was grad- 
uated from the New York Homeopathic Medical College. He located in 
Morristown, where he built up a large and lucrative practice. He died, after 
a very brief illness, on the 11th of December, 1893, highly esteemed by all 
who enjoyed his acquaintance. 

14a 



626 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORl. 

Mr. Hoffman, of this review, united with the South Street Presbyterian 
church, in June, 1848, and during the greater part of the time since has 
served as teacher, superintendent of the Sunday-school, trustee of the church, 
and ruling elder. In the latter capacity he has represented the church in the 
presbytery, state synod and general assembly of the United States. He is 
a member of the New Jersey Historical Society, a member and officer of the 
New Jersey Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, and has served 
for several years as a member of the board of education of Morristown. He 
has also been a member of the board of aldermen, and is a member of the 
board of managers of the Morris County Savings Bank. In the spring of 1886, 
in connection with the late Hampton O. Marsh, who at that time was joint 
owner of the Arnold Tavern property, he decided to remove the old building, 
and erected in its stead the present substantial and beautiful structure known 
as the Hoffman Building, of which he is now the sole owner. Although it is 
now fifty years since Mr. Hoffman commenced business, he still takes an active 
part in the management of his store, and in the public affairs of his town. 



JUDGE CHARLES HARDIN. 

One of the leading and prosperous agriculturists of Morris county, Judge 
Hardin, was born in Sussex county, New Jersey, on the 21st of June, 1835. 
His father, John Hardin, was born in the same locality and died there in 
1869, at the age of sixty-four years. He married Miss Mary Bale, a daugh- 
ter of James Bale, who was a representative of one of the old families of 
Sussex county, and her death occurred in 1895, at the advanced age of eighty- 
one years. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hardin, namely. 
William, of Newton, New Jersey; Alfred, deceased; George, of Sussex county; 
Charles, our subject; Elizabeth A., who became the wife of Alvin Hibler, of 
Vienna, Sussex county; Daniel B., deceased; Sylvester J., deceased; and 
Emily C. 

The preliminary education of Judge Hardin was obtained in the district 
schools of his day, supplemented by a course of study in the Chester Institute, 
he having come to Chester township in 1854. After completing his studies 
he began his business career as a clerk in the store of Daniel Budd. Sub- 
sequently, in i860, he purchased the interest of his employer, and with his 
brother, Alfred Hardin, as a partner, he continued in the mercantile business 
until 1868. In that year he bought his present farm, two miles south of 
Chester, and has since, with the exception of the time he has spent in office, 
devoted himself to the pursuit of agriculture. 

As a member of the Democrat party Judge Hardin has been identified 
with the politics of Morris county since attaining his majority, and for years 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 627 

was one of the most effective workers in west Morris county. He was first 
elected to the office of assessor of his town; he was then made a member of 
the board of freeholders, at different times, holding that office for a term of 
six years, and in 1888 he was appointed one of the lay judges of the com- 
mon-pleas court, by Governor Green. At the expiration of his five-years 
term he was re-appointed by Governor Werts, but an amendment to the state 
laws, abolishing the lay judgeship, deprived him of his office, and in the 
spring of 1896 he retired to his farm, where he continues to follow a quiet, 
contented life, held in the highest esteem by his many friends. 

Judge Hardin solemnized his marriage in i860, when he was united to 
Miss Abbie M. Hunt, a daughter of Ralph Hunt, and of this union two sons 
have been born, namely: John R., who is a leading lawyer of Newark; and 
William B., who is associated with Brooks Brothers, of New York city. In* 
his social relations, the Judge is a popular member of the Masonic fraternity, 
in which he has attained the degree of a Master Mason. He is past master 
of Prospect Lodge, No. 24, F. & A. M. 



CHARLES J. MILLER. 

A well known contractor of Chatham is Mr. Charles J. Miller, who was 
born in Myersville, New Jersey, on the 27th of January, 1859, a descendant 
of German ancestors. His grandfather, a native of Germany, emigrated to 
this country and became the founder of the family in the New World. The 
father of our subject, Charles Miller, also a native of Myersville, born March 
12, 1830, married Elizabeth Gibe, also a native of the place, born April 11, 
1833; and they had eight children, namely: Elizabeth, born July 31, 1853; 
Charlotte, October 26, 1854; Jacob, September 23, 1856; Charles J., our 
subject; Philip, born June 30, 1861, died October 31, 1890; Ketie, born Feb- 
ruary 2, 1864; Magdalena, born May 10, 1866, was married May 29, 1889, 
and died December 31 of the same year; and Mary S., born March 17, 1868. 

Mr. Miller, of this review, has resided at several places in Morris county, 
and since 1889 has been a resident of Chatham. In this city and vicinity he 
is doing a good business, receiving from the public a liberal patronage. His 
home is one of the comfortable and tasteful residences of this place. He is 
regarded as one of the public-spirited citizens of the community, taking a 
deep interest in all that pertains to the general welfare and advancement of 
the town and county. His political support is given unswervingly to the 
Democratic party, and on that ticket he has been elected to a number of 
public offices. He was a member of the first common council of Chatham, 
wherein, as in other offices, he labored zealously for those interests which 
pertain to the public good. 



628 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

In 1884 Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss Amelia Parcells, a 
daughter of Ellis H. and Margina (Birmingham) Parcells. Her father was 
born September 29, 1840, and was a son of James' M. and Muna (Pollard) 
Parcells. His grandfather, William Parcells, was one of the heroes who 
fought for the independence of the "great American nation." He was a 
farmer and miller by occupation, and resided in Green Village until his death. 
Mrs. Parcells, the mother of Mrs. Miller, was a daughter of Peter and Amelia 
(Lacy) Birmingham. Mr. and Mrs. Parcells had seven children: Frank, 
born January 2, 1862; M. Amelia, May 7, 1864; Fred A., December 30, 
1866; John A., October 9, 1869; Marietta, July 1.3, 1872; James Harvey, 
May 2, 1876; and Ella Estella, May 8, 1879. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller are the parents of one child, C. Norman Miller, 
whose birth occurred on the 10th of February, 1898. 



JAMES HOLMES. 



When James Holmes passed away, on the 26th of February, 1893, 
Boonton lost one of its most prominent and honored citizens, — a man whose 
name is inseparably connected with its history through the past quarter of a 
century, and whose efforts contributed materially to the improvement and 
progress of the town. He rose from a humble to a prominent position in the 
world of trade, and was a representative of our best type of American prog- 
ress, advancement and citizenship. He was descended from the early 
Puritans who landed on the coast of New England, and possessed many of 
those sterling qualities which led to the founding of the Massachusetts colony 
by the little band of brave men and women who encountered the dangers 
and trials of life in the New World in order to secure freedom of conscience. 

Mr. Holmes was born at Plymouth, Massachusetts, on the 7th of March, 
181 5, and is a direct descendant of the renowned Captain Holmes, who par- 
ticipated in the battle of Dutch Point. The father of our subject was a sea 
captain and the owner of a vessel which he used in trading with the countries 
of South America. While on one of these voyages in the southern waters, 
he was stricken with the yellow fever, and died in a foreign port. His 
widow afterward married again, and her son James, who was then but eight 
years of age, . was put out to work in the Parker Nail Mills, at Wareham, 
Massachusetts. His plucky and determined spirit were soon manifest in the 
way in which he entered upon his work, mastered his duties and familiarized 
himself with every detail of the business. His fidelity and ability won him 
promotion from time to time, until, before he had attained his majority, he. 
was made superintendent of the establishment. He had become an expert 




:£*** 





BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 629 

workman and was well qualified by practical experience, together with innate 
executive power, for the responsibilities which were thus placed upon him. 

In 1836 Mr. Holmes was united in marriage to Miss Margaret H. Nye, 
and to them was born a son, James Franklin, who entered the United States 
Navy and served as an ensign in the war of the Rebellion. His death 
occurred soon after the close of hostilities. The mother died-in 1838, and 
Mr. Holmes afterward married Sarah E. W. Nelson, of Middleboro, Massa- 
chusetts. The son of this marriage, Samuel Nelson, was graduated at West 
Point, in 1873, and lost his life in a fire in 1884. 

The subject of this sketch continued his connection with the Parker Nail 
Mills until 1845, when he removed to Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, where he 
began the manufacture of nails on his own account. He soon won an envi- 
able reputation for efficiency in this line, and enjoyed a good business until 
1850, when he came to Boonton to assume the management of the nail fac- 
tory of Fuller & Lord, a position which he occupied for a number of years. 
He also became identified with various other interests in Boonton. He was 
instrumental in organizing the Boonton National Bank and was the first 
president. Also for several years he was a member of the state board of 
education. From the time of his arrival here until his death he was one of 
the most public-spirited and progressive citizens of the place, and Boonton 
owes to him a debt of gratitude for his efforts in her behalf. He supported 
every measure and movement which he believed would prove of public bene- 
fit, and in his will provided for the establishment of a free public library and 
reading-room. This is now one of the creditable institutions of the town in 
which the citizens take just pride, and it has been an important factor in 
elevating the intellectual tone of Boonton. The poor and needy found in 
him a generous friend, the distressed a ready sympathizer. Although he 
started out in life empty-handed when only eight years of age, he constantly 
worked his way upward until he was the possessor of a fine property, but so 
well was his wealth acquired and so worthily and unselfishly was it used that 
the most envious could not grudge him his success. His life was actuated by 
broad humanitarian principles, and his example is one well worthy of emula- 
tion and should serve as a source of encouragement and inspiration to others. 



MARSHALL A. SAYRE. 



A resident of Chester, and a conspicuous figure in the industrial affairs 
of Morris county, it might be said with propriety that Mr. Sayre is also iden- 
tified with the commercial interests of the county as well, for in his capacity 
of train conductor he has for thirty-five years been engaged in inland com- 
merce. He has been closely associated with the agricultural and fruit- 



630 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

farming interests of Morris county, having owned and operated a farm near 
Chester for many years. 

Mr. Sayre was born in Morristown on the 17th of June, 1832, and is a 
son of William and Hannah (Guerin) Sayre, the former of whom was a 
carriage-maker and farmer, and the latter a daughter of Aram Guerin. Of 
the eight children born to Mr. and Mrs. Sayre the following four survive: 
Aram G., of' Newark; William Y. , of Bernardsville; Theodore, now residing 
on the old homestead; and our subject. The paternal grandfather was Will- 
iam Sayre, the scene of whose active industry was located at Bottle Hill, 
now Madison, New Jersey. 

Conductor Marshall A. Sayre received in Morristown a limited schooling, 
and later learned the carpenter's trade under the instruction of Robert S. 
Roff, and followed the same for some years. In 1856 he began bis railroad 
career as a clerk in the Morristown office of the Morris & Essex Railroad; 
later he went into the Newark office and was assigned to duty in the freight 
and ticket office, besides which he ran a train, continuing thus engaged for a 
period of eleven years. He was transferred to the Chester branch of the 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western road thirty years ago, and has made his 
runs from this point ever since. His long experience in the service, his com- 
prehensive knowledge of all the details pertaining to his department, and the 
fidelity he has shown in the discharge of his duties, have gained for him the 
entire confidence and high regard of the road's executives. 

Mr. Sayre has been twice wedded, his first union being to Miss Sarah 
Elizabeth Roff, a daughter of Charles Roff. His second marriage was 
solemnized in 1872, when he became united to Mrs. Nancy P. Cyphers, a 
daughter of the late Elisha Robeson, of Chester, and three children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sayre, namely: Lillian, Jennie, and Emily, who 
died at the age of two years and six months. 

Mr. Sayre is a member of the Masonic fraternity, holding membership 
in Prospect Lodge, No. 24, F. & A. M. 



EDWARD SUTTON, M. D. 

Maintaining his residence at German Valley, Dr. Sutton holds a com- 
manding position among the young professional men of Morris county and is 
destined to become a leader in advanced thought and practice in the field of 
medicine and surgery in central New Jersey. His abilities, both natural and 
acquired, well fit him for his professional duties, and in the line of surgery his 
success has been particularly brilliant. 

The Doctor is a son of Aaron S. Sutton, of Parker, and was born at 
that place January 7, 1866. He remained with his father on the farm until 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 631 

sixteen years of age and then went to Newark, where he pursued a course of 
study in the New Jersey Business College. Desiring to enter one of the 
higher walks of life, and endowed by nature with an intellectual strength 
well fitting him to pursue this purpose, he began reading medicine in the 
office and under the direction of Dr. Joseph C. Young, of Newark, with 
whom he remained three years. In 1885 he entered the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons and on the completion of a thorough three-years course 
was graduated in that institution. He added to his regular work a micro- 
scopical course, and with a broad knowledge of the principles and science of 
medicine he entered upon his chosen life work as physician and surgeon in 
St. Michael's Hospital, of Newark, to which position he was appointed soon 
after his graduation. He there remained for three years and was also con- 
nected with the City Dispensary for diseases of women, in the same city, 
during that period. He opened an office in German Valley in 1891, and has 
here built up a very desirable practice. As a surgeon he has gained a rep- 
utation second to none in this part of the state, and his success is due to his 
wonderfully minute and accurate acquaintance with anatomy, combined 
with exquisite power of diagnosis, a cool head, steady muscles and great 
mechanical genius. He has performed some most remarkable cures, one of 
which, in the case of Mrs. Emmons, of German Valley, has attracted wide- 
spread attention among the members of the profession. 

Dr. Sutton was married February 26, 1895, to Miss Mary H. Hyde, a 
daughter of Nelson Hyde, of German Valley, and they now occupy a hand- 
some modern residence which has recently been erected after his own design. 
In social circles they occupy an enviable position. In his political views the 
Doctor is a Democrat, and fraternally is a valued member of the order of 
Red Men, in which he is past sachem, and of the Knights of Pythias, in which 
he is past chancellor. 



JOSHUA S. SALMON. 

Joshua S. Salmon, member of congress from the fourth congressional 
district of New Jersey, and a distinguished lawyer of Boonton, was born near 
Mount Olive, Morris county, on the 2d of February, 1846, and is a son of 
Gideon and Jane (Van Fleet) Salmon. The family is of Scotch origin and a 
representative of the name was knighted by Sir Robert Bruce in the four- 
teenth century. While the Highland wars were in progress the Salmon fam- 
ily removed from Scotland and located in Suffolk county, England, whence 
three brothers of the name came with their families to America about the 
year 1640. One brother located in Massachusetts, another in New Jersey, 
on or near the site of the present city of Elizabeth, and the third (William) 



632 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

took up his residence on Long Island, establishing the town of Southold. 
William Salmon, a grandson of the original settler at Southold, came to 
Schooley's Mountain, in Morris county, early in the eighteenth century, and 
became the owner of large tracts of land there. From him the numerous 
Salmons in that county, including our subject, are descended. 

In the seminaries of Charlotteville, New York, and Schooley's Mountain, 
New Jersey, Joshua S. Salmon acquired his literary education, and then 
determining to make the practice of law his life work began preparation for 
the profession as a student in the office of Charles E. Scofield, of Jersey City, 
now deceased. Later he matriculated in the Albany Law School, where he 
was graduated in 1873 with the degree of LL. B. In March, of the same 
year, he was admitted as an attorney and counselor to the bar of New York, 
and at the November term of the supreme court of New Jersey, in 1875, ne 
was admitted as an attorney to the bar of this state. Immediately there- 
after he began practice in Boonton, where he has since maintained an office. 
He afterward became a counselor at law, and on December 21, 1S94, was 
admitted as an attorney and counselor of the supreme court of the United 
States. His professional career has been one of eminent success and covers 
a wide experience in both civil and criminal law practice. In March, 1893, 
he was appointed, by Governor Werts, prosecutor of the pleas for Morris 
county, and during his incumbency in that office conducted several homicide 
cases, exciting considerable interest. The case of the State versus Berge- 
man was carried to the United States supreme court and there decided 
against the prisoner, who was afterward executed, on June 20, 1895. 
Another case was that of the State versus Wilson, which was carried to the 
court of errors and appeals of New Jersey, where the decision of conviction 
was sustained and Wilson was executed June 3, 1897. Mr. Salmon has been 
connected as counsel with numerous very important cases, notably that of 
Miller et al. versus Speer et al., in 1883, in which the sixth section of the 
statute of descents received construction by the court of errors and appeals, 
whereby a large estate was secured for his clients, its possession having been 
taken by his opponents, who were believed by eminent counsel to be secure 
in their right to the property. From the beginning of his career as a legal 
practitioner his efforts have been attended with success. He has mastered 
the science of jurisprudence, and his deep research and thorough preparation 
of every case committed to his care enable him to meet at once any contin- 
gency that may arise. His cause is fenced about with unanswerable logic, 
and his arguments are strong, clear, decided and follow each other in natural 
sequence, forming a chain of reasoning that his opponents find very difficult 
to overthrow. His delivery is graceful, his voice clear and ringing and his 
eloquence is inspired by a sense of true justice of human rights and liberties. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 638 

On the ist of April, 1897, he opened an office in Morristown, and divides his 
time between that and his Boonton office, having a son in each office read- 
ing law and assisting in legal work. 

As a citizen Mr. Salmon has always been active and influential in the 
welfare and advancement of the place of his residence, substantially sup- 
porting its leading institutions and liberally encouraging its worthy enter- 
prises. He has been one of the directors of the Boonton National Bank 
since its organization in 1890. His activity in political affairs has continued 
since his admission to the bar and he is a recognized leader in the Demo- 
cratic party in Morris county. In 1876 he was elected a member of the city 
council of Boonton and held that office for six years. In 1877 he was 
elected a member of the state legislature and served on a number of impor- 
tant committees, and was also a recognized leader on the floor of the house. 
He was counsel for the board of chosen freeholders of Morris county from 
1880 until 1893, has been counsel for the town of Boonton and for various 
townships in Morris county, holding such an incumbency during the greater 
part of the time since his admission to the bar. He was the Democratic 
candidate for county clerk in 1878 and the nominee of his party for state 
senator in 1883. On the 6th of October, 1898, he received the nomination 
for representative of the fourth congressional district of New Jersey, and 
at the election, held on the 8th of November, received a very substantial 
majority. 

On the 13th of October, 1869, Mr. Salmon was united in marriage, in 
Mendham, New Jersey, to Miss Deborah Virginia Emmons, one of the five 
children of Jeremiah and Esther (Stout) Emmons, both of whom had died 
before Mrs. Salmon was nine years of age. Her death occurred March 12, 
1892, and on the 19th of April, 1893, Mr. Salmon wedded Mrs. Emma L. 
(Mains) Richards, widow of Jesse W. Richards, of Lincoln Park, New Jer- 
sey. His entire life has been passed in Morris county, where, by reason of 
his marked ability and genuine worth, he has won distinguished honors at 
the r bar and in political life, while in society he is highly esteemed for 
those commendable qualities which everywhere command respect and win 
friendship. 



FINLAY MACKENZIE. 



The subject of this sketch is the leading painter and decorator of Mend- 
ham. He is one of the native sons of Scotland, his birth having occurred 
in Ross-shire, on the 4th of May, 1866. His parents were Roderick and 
Kennethina (Mackenzie) Mackenzie, who reared a family of several children, 
but only two have crossed the Atlantic to America, Kenneth Mackenzie, 



634 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

now having charge of our subject's store and work in Bernardsville, New 

Jersey. 

Reared and educated in the land of his birth, Finlay Mackenzie, when 
twenty years of age determined to seek a home and fortune in America. 
Bidding adieu to family and friends he sailed for the New World in 1887 and, 
having learned the painter's trade in his native land, he worked for a short 
time as a journeyman in New York. Later he spent three years in Tuxedo 
Park, was in Cornwall fpr a short time and also did some work in Morristown. 
In 1893 he came to Mendham, where he soon established a reputation that 
has placed him in the lead among the painters and decorators in this part of 
the county. It is the painter's art that gives the pleasing effect to the labors 
of the builder and produces the air of thrift and neatness which is ever pres- 
ent in progressive localities. To his skill are attributable many of the most 
artistic effects in a landscape, for the adaptation of color to those supplied by 
nature may produce most harmonious or inharmonious effects, according as 
the painter understands his business. Mr. Mackenzie has done some of the 
most important work in his line in this locality. He painted the McClintock 
and Chapin mansions and also did the work upon the residences of Colonel 
Stephens and Judge Dillon. His business has constantly increased in volume 
and importance and he now furnishes employment to a force of about twelve 
men throughout the greater part of the year. 

Mr. Mackenzie was married in Middletown, New York, on the 9th of 
October, 1890, to Miss Annie Robertson, and to them have been born three 
children, Ina, Kenneth and Margarie. Mr. Mackenzie has won a well mer- 
ited success in business. His hopes of securing a comfortable competence 
in America have been realized and he is steadily working his way upward to 
a position of affluence. 

EDWARD J. CAHILL. 

Engaged in the real-estate and shoe business in his native place, the sub- 
ject of this sketch is one of the representative men of Boonton, Morris county, 
New Jersey, where he was born on the 28th of October, 1862, his parents 
being Michael and Alice (Cunningham) Cahill, who were born in Ireland, 
being natives respectively of the counties of Tipperary and Roscommon. 
The father came to the United States in 1859 and located at Boonton, 
where he was employed in the Boonton rolling mills until they closed down, 
in 1876. 

The subject of this review was the eldest of seven children and acquired 
his literary education in the public schools of his native city, after which he 
learned the cooper's trade and followed the same up to 1895, when he 
engaged in the real- estate business, in which he has met with a high degree of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 635 

success. For ten years he was a resident of Morristown, and while there he 
organized the Daily School Messenger and Sentinel and was also president of 
the Watnong Land Company. In 1897 he engaged in the shoe business in 
company with Thomas J. Hillery. 

Politically Mr. Cahill has been a Democrat, but in 1896 he cast his vote 
for William McKinley, and he has served as a justice of the peace and a 
notary public and is a member of the Republican Club. He is also a member 
of the Boonton board of trade. 

In 1893 Mr. Cahill was united in marriage to Miss Helen Purdy, a 
daughter of Henry and Ellen (Black) Purdy, of Boonton. She is an adher- 
ent of the Presbyterian church, while he is a communicant of the church of 
Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Roman Catholic. While in Morristown he was 
historian of the Young Men's Catholic Association and was elected an honor- 
ary life member of the same. 



WILLIAM DeMOTT. 



Among the leading industrial interests of Morris county is the saw and 
planing mill and factory owned and operated by William DeMott, a wide- 
awake, enterprising business man whose energy has enabled him to triumph 
over the many obstacles that lay in the path between poverty and fortune. 
He makes his home in Green village, where he is conducting an extensive 
lumber business, and his enterprise is one which advances not alone his 
individual success but also promotes the prosperity of the community by the 
impetus which it gives to commercial activity. 

Mr. DeMott was born in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, on the 21st of 
November, 1857, and has spent his entire life in this state. His mother, nee 
Hannah Dunham, was a daughter of the late Benyew Dunham, who spent the 
last twenty years of his life at Basking Ridge. His example as a Christian 
had much to do with Mr. DeMott's success in business as well as the enjoy- 
ment of home. Mr, DeMott was reared to manhood at his grandfather's 
home in Somerset county, residing at Basking Ridge and Liberty Corner, and 
later at Mendham, Morris county. In 1S81, at the age of twenty-four, he 
came to Green Village, where he has since engaged in the lumber business. 
In the meantime, however, he had to put forth every effort to get a good 
start in the business world and has justly won the proud American title of 
"a self-made man." In his early manhood he engaged in burning and sell- 
ing charcoal, and for many years " roughed it " in a charcoal camp, sleeping 
by his fires in the woods or upon a coal wagon, and working early and late in 
order to obtain capital enough to engage in some other labor. After a time 
he was enabled to lease a portable sawmill, and from the beginning of his 



636 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

career as a lumber dealer he has met with success. In the course of time, 
as the result of his industry and economy, he was enabled to purchase a saw- 
mill, and has since cut lumber in five different counties. Since coming to 
Green Village, he has extended his field of operations from time to time, and 
now has one of the largest lumber industries in the county. He has a 
splendidly equipped mill and factory, and annually saws a large amount of 
lumber, also manufactures wagon materials and tool handles on an extensive 
scale, and has from time to time furnished a large amount of timber for rail- 
road purposes. In addition to his mill in Green Village he owns portable 
mills, which he operates in different parts of the country where good timber 
can be found. He thoroughly understands the lumber business in every 
department and detail, and his practical methods have led to very gratifying 
financial results. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. DeMott was united in marriage with Miss Harriet D. Ward, 
a native of Mendham, New Jersey. The children of Mr. and Mrs. DeMott 
are Marietta, William F., Harrison B., Rebecca Ward and Hazel. 

In politics Mr. DeMott is a Republican. While serving as school trustee 
he has done effective work in the interests of education. He is also a trustee 
of the Methodist church, of which he is a member and in whose work he 
takes a very active part. His life has been an honorable and upright one; 
and in his business career, as in his private life, he commands the respect 
and confidence of all with whom he is associated. From limited circum- 
stances in his youth and early manhood he has steadily advanced to a posi- 
tion of affluence; and now, in the control of a large business, he has found 
the just reward of well directed efforts. 



C. HARRISON WARD. 



For many years C. Harrison Ward, now deceased, was a highly 
respected citizen of Morris county, his home being in Mendham. He was a 
native of Bloomfield, Essex county, New Jersey, and more than half a cen- 
tury ago came to this county, where he spent the remainder of his life. He 
was a farmer by occupation and in the development and cultivation of his 
land displayed a very practical and progressive spirit; great energy and care- 
ful management. He was also active in public affairs and was numbered 
among the leading and influential workers of the Republican party in 
his community, but never sought or desired political honors for himself. 

Mr. Ward was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca Thompson, who was 
born in Mendham, Morris county, and was a daughter of Luther Thompson. 
They became the parents of the following named: Amanda, Luther, Anna, 
William, Malinda, Albert, Lottie, Harriet D. and Clara. The son, Luther, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 637 

joined the Union army at the outbreak of the Civil war and served until the 
close of the hostilities, but soon after his return to the north he was drowned 
while swimming. Another son, William, now resides in Brookside, and the 
other members of the family yet living are Mrs. Elliott, of Mendham; Mrs. 
DeMott, of Green Village; Mrs. Taggart, of South Orange; Mrs. Madison, of 
Montclair; Mrs. Elliott, of Mount Horeb, Somerset county; Mrs. Wood- 
house and Albert, who are residents of Colorado. The members of the 
family attended the Methodist Episcopal church, of which the father was 
trustee for many years. May 25, 1889, Mr. and Mrs. Ward celebrated their 
golden wedding, and for nearly sixty years they traveled life's journey together 
as man and wife, sharing with each other the joys and sorrows, the adversity 
and prosperity, which checkers in greater or less degree the career of every 
individual on life's pathway. Mr. Ward died November 3, 1896, the day on 
which Mr. McKinley was elected president of the United States and during 
his delirious moments on that day he was either asking to be taken to the 
polls to vote or praying that his party may be victorious. His wife passed 
away January 21, 1898. 



THEODORE A. WILSON. 



Numbered among the successful contractors and builders of Morristown, 
Mr. Wilson was born in this city, July 29, 1855, and is a son of James H. 
Wilson, a carpenter, who spent his life in Morristown and was for many 
years employed in the pattern shop of the Speedwell Iron Works. His death 
occurred June 10, 1880, at the age of fifty-nine years. He was born in 
Mendham, Morris county, and was married there to Minerva Phoenix, 
daughter of William Phoenix. Her death occurred in 1857 and Mr. Wilson 
was again married, has second union being with Miss Jane Pierson, daughter 
of Lewis Pierson. Our subject had two sisters: Mary E. , deceased wife of 
Findlay Barber; and Sarah A., wife of James A. Vanderhoof, of Newark. 

Mr. Wilson, of this review, is indebted to the public-school system of his 
native city for the educational privileges which he received. During vaca- 
tions and other periods of leisure he engaged in farm work, and at the age of 
seventeen years he began learning the carpenter's trade with the old and 
prominent building firm of Greenwood & Hays. When he had mastered the 
business he secured work as a journeyman and was thus employed until 1882, 
when he began contracting and building on his own account, his first con- 
tract being for the erection of a residence for Richard Bowen on Phoenix 
avenue. Since that time he has put up many of the principal buildings of 
the city, including the residences of H. E. Niese, J. H. Hendershot, Anson 
Durling, Cornelius Hoffman, John K. Boniface, Robert J. Price, John Mc- 



638 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Grath, John Van Doren, S. W. Hastings, Charles Bockoven, J. H. Berry, 
George W. King, Lewis Vismara, Mary J. Foley, E. A. Fleury and James 
Riley. Many other good buildings in Morristown bear the imprint of his 
workmanship and stand as monuments to his skill, thrift and enterprise. He 
has long since taken a leading position among the prominent contractors of 
the city, and an enviable success is crowning his efforts. 

On the 22d of March, 1877, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Wilson 
and Miss Laura A. Bailey, a daughter of Charles Bailey, of near Basking 
Ridge. She died June 30, 1887, leaving two children: Bessie and James H. 
Mr. Wilson was again married February 7, 1888, his second wife being 
Emma E. Havens, widow of Richard Havens and daughter of Levi Drake, 
of Schooley's Mountain. Our subject belongs to Rocksiticus Lodge, I. O. O. 
F., and Enterprise Encampment of the same order, also to Speedwell Coun- 
cil of the junior Order of American Mechanics. He holds membership in the 
South Street Presbyterian church, and is deeply interested in all that per- 
tains to the best advancement of the community along educational, moral 
and material lines. Politically he allies himself with the Republican party. 



CHARLES VAN DUYNE. 



One of the substantial and enterprising farmers of Morris county, Charles 
Van Duyne was born in Preakness, Passaic county, New Jersey, on the 28th 
of April, 1840, a son of John W. and Margaret (Kayhort) Van Duyne. The 
father was born in Pequannock township, Morris county, in 1806, and there 
followed farming, in connection with which he conducted a blacksmith shop. 
In 1 83 1 he married Miss Kayhort, a daughter of Frederick Kayhort, and then 
moved to Montville and there remained until his death, which occurred in 
1870. Mrs. Van Duyne still survives. They reared nine children to matu- 
rity, of whom the following record is given: Malinda, who married Joseph 
Davis, of Montville township; Elizabeth, deceased, became the wife of Abra- 
ham M. Wagner, of Paterson; George, deceased; Charles, our subject; 
Mary, deceased, married John Decker; Sarah is now Mrs. Riley, of Pater- 
son; Catherine is the wife of James Starr, of Newark; Effie married William 
Birchnough, of Preakness; and John W. , who resides in Montville. > 

William Van Duyne, the grandfather of Charles, was a prominent farmer 
of Montville township. He married Miss Elizabeth Doremus and their chil- 
dren were: John W. , Mary, Erne, Abraham, George and William. 

Charles Van Duyne passed his early youth on the farm and in attending 
the district schools, where he obtained a fair education. Later he worked in 
the Boonton rolling mills for sixteen years and then returned to farming, in 
which he has since been engaged with pronounced success. 




4£^Z~. 






BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 63& 

In 1846 Mr. Van Duyne celebrated his marriage, being in that year 
united to Miss Harriet Taylor, a daughter of George and Anna (Gould) Tay- 
lor, of Taylortown. Both the parents of Mrs. Van Duyne have passed away; 
the mother, Anna (Gould) Taylor, died in 1882. 

In his political views Mr. Van Duyne is a stanch Republican. 



ELIAS B. MOTT. 



This gentleman, who is now serving as county clerk of Morris county, is 
one of the popular and influential citizens of his section of the state. He 
resides in Rockaway, where he is prominently identified with the mercantile 
interests, and in his connection with public affairs he has manifested a 
straightforward, manly course that is in keeping with his loyal, progressive, 
American spirit. 

Born in Mott's Hollow (now known as Mill Brook), near Dover, on the 
1 2th of March, 1843, our subject is the son of Samuel and Phoebe A. (Nich- 
olas) Mott, who were married June 27, 1837, the former born in Mott's Hol- 
low (now Mill Brook) in 1808, and the latter in the village of Ironia, Randolph 
township, Morris county, a daughter of Lewis and Sarah A. (Briant) Nicho- 
las, both natives of New Jersey. Elias B. Mott spent his early boyhood in 
the town of his birth and then accompanied his parents to Newark, where he 
attended school. His educational training there was supplemented by a 
course in a private school and he diligently pursued his studies until his 
twentieth year, when he began teaching, in Essex county, following that 
vocation for three years. Then he accepted a position as clerk for R. D. 
Chase, a merchant in Dover, with whom he remained two years, when he 
entered the employ of B. K. Stickle, of Rockaway, with whom he continued 
three years as bookkeeper and clerk. On the expiration of that period Mr. 
Mott resumed teaching, which he followed until 1888. In 1882 he was 
appointed a member of the school board of examiners of Morris county and 
served in that capacity until 1887. In 1878 he was elected assessor of Rock- 
away township and held that position for seven years. In 1887 he was 
appointed by the state board of education to the office of superintendent of 
public schools for Morris county, but the appointment was not confirmed by 
the board of freeholders of this county. In 1888 he was nominated on the 
Republican ticket for the office of county clerk and was elected over the 
Democratic candidate by a majority of three hundred and seventy-one. So 
acceptably did he fill the office that in 1893 he was renominated by his 
party and in that contest, which is a memorable one in the county, was 
elected over ex-Sheriff Oscar Lindsley by a majority of eighteen hundred' 



640 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

and seventy-one; so that he is now serving his tenth year in the office. 
Promptness and the most unquestioned fidelity have characterized his dis- 
charge of public duties and his largely increased vote at the second election 
shows his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in him by those 
who hold the ballot. 

In December, 1869, Mr. Mott was united in marriage to Miss Lauretta 
Mott, and they have three sons and one daughter, namely: Vancleve F. , a 
merchant in Rockaway; Raymond L., a dental student in the Baltimore Col- 
lege, of Baltimore, Maryland, the oldest dental college in the world; Elias 
B. , a member of the firm of Mott Brothers, merchants of Rockaway; and 
Alice May, row in her twelfth year. Mr. Mott and his family are members 
of the Presbyterian church, and their household is noted for its air of culture, 
literary taste and refinement. The members hold a high position in social 
circles and their friends in the community are many. Mr. Mott belongs to 
Citizens' Lodge, No. 144, I. O. O. F. , Bethlehem Encampment, No. 50, I. 
O. O. F., and to the Improved Order of Red Men. Courteous, genial, well 
informed, alert and enterprising, he stands to-day one of the leading repre- 
sentative men of his county, a man who is a power in his community. 

The subject of this sketch came from a long line of American ancestry 
dating back into old colonial times. The progenitors of this branch of the 
Mott family were among the early pioneers whose sturdy hands and stout hearts 
laid the firm foundations of American liberty and carved the grand outlines of 
our present splendid fabric of civilization from the untamed wilds of a New 
World. They were of those who constructed homes in its boundless forests 
and on its rich prairie lands. They were participants or witnesses of the 
long French and Indian wars whose outcome was to decide the question of 
French or Anglo-Saxon supremacy in the New world. They saw the revo- 
lution of 1776 come and go, and witnessed the laying of the foundation 
of the mightiest republic the world has ever seen. Their work is done 
and they have passed away — long ago, transmitting to their descendants 
the same love of right, justice and liberty which they so highly prize them 
selves. 

The Motts are of French origin and were known in their native land as 
De la Motte. Their religious preferences were not in accord with the ruling 
powers, and, when Louis XIV. issued his famous Revocation of the Edict of 
Nantes, which left them without political or legal protection, the De la 
Mottes were among the half million refugees who fled from their native land, 
of whom a French statesman declared that the most industrious, intelligent 
and best citizens of France had been banished by this cruel revocation. 
They sought asylums in England, where they were hospitably welcomed and 
permitted to engage in industrial pursuits. Some of them joined the Friends 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 641 

as their religious preference, and those who did so dropped the French prefix 
and the name became simply Mott. 

Two brothers, descendants of these French exiles, attracted by the des- 
criptions which reached them of the new lands beyond the seas, together 
with the spirit of civil and religious liberty watted from its shores to the 
Old World, determined to emigrate to America. Bidding an affectionate 
farewell to the motherland that had welcomed them in their exile, they 
set sail for the New World and, after a long and tedious voyage landed 
on Long Island at the beginning of the eighteenth century, about the year 
1709. One of these brothers with his family removed to Baltimore, Mary- 
land, and from him is descended the Mott family now living at Baltimore, 
as well as the subject of this sketch, Elias B. Mott. 

About the year 1770, Joshua Mott, born June 8, 1 75 1 , a descendant of 
the Baltimore branch, son of Joshua and Rachel Mott, came to New Jer- 
sey and settled in Amwell township, Hunterdon county. He there married 
Mary (born October 29, 1755), daughter of Samuel and Mary Kitchen, to 
whom were born (in Amwell township) the following children: Rachel, 
born May 5, 1776; Samuel, November 5, 1777; Gershom, October 8, 1779; 
William, November 2, 1780; Joshua, April 28, 1783; Margaret, August 11, 
1785; John, April 17, 1787; and Lucy, April 8, 1789. 

In the year 1799 Joshua Mott removed his family from Amwell township, 
Hunterdon county, to Mott's Hollow (now Mill Brook), and engaged in busi- 
ness. He owns both the gristmill and fulling mill on the banks of the stream 
known as Mill Brook. One son, William, learned the gristmill business; 
another, John, the fulling-mill business. Joshua, having disposed of both the 
gristmill and fulling mill in 1820, retired from active business and spent the 
remainder of his days with his son William on a farm at Pigeon Hill (now 
owned by Chileon Casterline), and there died in 1837, at the age of eighty- 
six, and was buried in Friends' cemetery at Mill Brook, his wife having died 
in 1834, at the same place, at the age of seventy-nine. William also owned 
Shongum Pond and many acres in its vicinity, and after leaving the gristmill 
erected a sawmill at Shawangunk, which he conducted for many years. Having 
disposed of his farm and of the sawmill, he retired to Mill Brook and there 
quietly ended his days in 1855, and was buried also in Friends' cemetery at 
Mill Brook. He (William) was married to Mary Adams and to them were 
born two children: Joseph, born in 1808, and Alexander. Of these Alex- 
ander died at an early age, leaving only one son, Joseph. Joseph married 
Margaret Kilburn, daughter of Abner and Phcebe (Crane) Kilburn, of Orange, 
New Jersey. He died in 1842, at Orange, New Jersey, at the age of thirty- 
four, leaving a widow and two children — Alexander and Harrison; of these, 
Harrison, who never married, died in California, in October, 1887. Margaret, 

15a 



642 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

the widow of Joseph, died at the residence of her son Alexander, at Rocka- 
way, New Jersey, in 1895, aged eighty-four, and was buried at the Friends' 
cemetery at Mill Brook. Alexander was united in marriage in 1865 to Fran- 
ces Morrison, of Mill Brook; he is a machinist by trade, and for several years 
has been employed by Hoagland Brothers, of Rockaway, and is honored and 
respected as one of Rockaway's best citizens and has three children, namely: 
Susie, wife of Percy Hough, an artist of New York city; Joseph, the general 
manager of the lumber-yard at Kenvil, owned by Buck & Company; and 
Benjamin, who married Ada Burd, of Chester, and is engaged in business in 
New York city. 

John Mott, the grandfather of Elias B. Mott, succeeded his father 
Joshua in the fulling mill and successfully conducted that business for many 
years. He was not engaged in active business during the later years of his 
life. He died at the Mott homestead in i860, and is buried in Friends' 
cemetery at Mill Brook. He was married to Mary Briant in 1807, and to 
them were born three children: Samuel, in 1808, the father of Elias B. 
Mott, the subject of this sketch; William, in 1S10; and Elizabeth, in 1813, 
who died at the age of seventeen years. 

William was united in marriage May 10, 1835, to Elizabeth Robarts, 
also of French descent. He was a tailor by trade and first started in busi- 
ness in Mill Brook, his native town. He removed to Rockaway in 1840, 
and for many years continued the clothing business. He was for man}" 
years a member of the board of chosen freeholders of Morris county, and 
such was his popularity that he was repeatedly re-elected in spite of the 
greatest efforts put forth to defeat him. He died at Rockaway in his 
eightieth year, June (6, 1890, and was buried in the Rockaway cemetery. 
His widow, now living at the advanced age of eighty-two, and three sons- 
Charles M., Edward T. and William H. — and five daughters — Jennie, Anna, 
Alice, Lauretta and Matilda — still survive him. Of these all are residing at 
Rockaway excepting Charles M., who lives at Vernon, Sussex county. 

Samuel Mott learned the hatter's trade at Orange, New Jersey, and 
followed that vocation until 1870, when he also retired to his home, the Mott 
homestead at Mill Brook, and then passed away at the age of seventy-three, 
and was laid at rest with his fathers in the Friends' cemetery at Mill Brook. 
To Samuel and Phoebe A. Mott were born, at Mill Brook, four children: 
Theodore F., January 7, 1839; George S. , born January 8, 1 841 ; Elias B., 
March 12, 1843; and Vancleve F. , born July 5, 1846. Of these Elias B., the 
subject of this sketch, needs no further mention here. 

Theodore F. Mott married Laura M. Tuttle, of Mill Brook, February 
13, 1867, a daughter of David Tuttle and sister of Henry D. Tuttle, a mer- 
chant of Rockaway. To them were born three children, — George, Mamie 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 643 

and Harry; of these Mamie, a beautiful, noble and accomplished girl, died at 
Montclair, at the age of twenty-one. George is an unusually bright and 
intelligent young man of twenty-four and has a responsible position in the 
New York custom-house. Harry is an employee of the Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company, of New York, and bids fair to make his mark in his line of 
business. 

After his marriage he resided at Mill Brook on the old homestead and' 
then engaged in the mercantile business, which he successfully conducted 
until the year 1881. He then engaged in teaching until 1889, his last school 
being at Montclair, New Jersey. In the year 1889 he applied for and 
obtained a position in the New York custom-house, having successfully passedi 
a civil-service examination and obtained the highest percentage among sev- 
eral hundred competitors. He still retains the position and bids fair to 
remain during life. 

George S. learned the carpenter's trade, and having married Hattie 
Todd, of Williamson, New York, in 1873, settled in Newark, New Jersey, 
where as a carpenter, contractor and builder he was known as a successful 
business man. He died at Williamson, New York, in 1880, and was buried 
in Williamson cemetery, on the shore of Lake Ontario. His wife soon fol- 
lowed him and lies buried by his side in the same cemetery. They left but 
one child, Mina, who is now married and lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Vancleve F. left home at an early age and went to live with and clerk 
for Judge Joseph Dalrymple in his store at Morristown, New Jersey. Hav- 
ing served him faithfully until advancing age caused him (the Judge) to retire 
from business, he next was employed by B. K. Stickle, of Rockaway, New 
Jersey, where he remained for several years. He then went to Newark and 
entered the firm of Marvin Dodd & Company, and when that firm went to 
Buffalo in 1868 Vancleve went with them as confidential clerk and book- 
keeper. He there met and married Frances S. Shaw, daughter of Charles. 
F. Shaw, one of Buffalo's most successful and honored citizens. He returned 
to Newark with the firm in 1871 and became the junior member of the com- 
pany and continued with them in the mercantile business until the time of 
his death in 1873. He left one child, Vancleve, who was born after the 
death of his father. The son graduated, with high honors, at Cornell Uni- 
versity, in 1896, and is now married and resides in Rochester, having charge 
of the electrical plant in that city. 

Of the six children of Joshua Mott the great-grandfather of Elias B. 
Mott, who have not been specially mentioned in this short history, suffice it 
to say, they all grew to maturity, married and settled some in the adjoining 
states of New York and Pennsylvania and some in the far west, where their 
descendants still live. 



644 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



THOMAS J. CLIFT. 

Holding the office of mayor of Netcong, Mr. Clift is a native of the 
Keystone state, his birth having occurred in Wayne county, on the 28th of 
November, 1844. He is a son of James Clift, who was born in England 
and when a young man crossed the Atlantic to America, where he followed 
the vocation of a mason builder for some years. His later life was devoted 
to farming in Pennsylvania, and he died in 1887, at the age of sixty-eight 
years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Pethic, passed away 
in 1848. They were the parents of five children: William, Samuel, Ezra, 
Thomas J., and Jane, wife of Myron Rood. 

Thomas James Clift, of this sketch, spent the first eighteen years of his 
life in the county of his birth, and completing his education in the common 
schools, about that time, he joined a corps of civil engineers who were in the 
government service. They were attached to Sherman's army, and with that 
command went through Tennessee, Georgia and the Carolinas, building rail- 
road bridges for the transportation of troops and supplies. In this way he 
rendered material assistance to the Union cause until honorably discharged, 
at the close of his term, at Newberne, North Carolina. Upon his return 
home he learned the carpenter's trade and for some years was in the service 
of the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company as a mechanic. He next entered 
the employ of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company, 
serving as bridge and house carpenter for that corporation until 1881, when 
he severed his connection and embarked in general contract work at Net- 
cong. Here he has enjoyed a very good business and has erected a number 
of important structures which attest his industrial skill, including the Stan- 
hope and the Netcong school buildings, the addition to the Methodist church, 
the residence of Isaac Kinnicut, and the Drake opera-house, of Stanhope. 

The home relations of Mr. Clift are very pleasant. He was married on 
the 1 8th of September, 1871, to Miss Caroline Huyler, a daughter of Jacob 
Huyler, and four children grace their union, namely: Grace, now the wife 
of H. W. Woods, of Kenvil, New Jersey; and Charles, Bertha and Edna, 
who are still under the parental roof. Theirs is one of the hospitable homes 
of this section of the county and their circle of friends is a large one. 

Mr. Clift is a leading member in the Methodist church and has accept- 
ably filled the office of trustee. He belongs to the Royal Arcanum and the 
Masonic fraternity and exemplifies in his life the benevolent spirit of those 
fraternities. He has been connected with the public service of Mount 
Olive township, serving as town committeeman, also as commissioner of 
appeals for several years, and in 1897 was elected mayor of Netcong, his 
able administration in that office not only upholding but also advancing the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVL> GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 045 

interests of the borough. In the immediate community in which he resides 
his personality can be seen in all public movements and his influence is 
unmistakable. He is a pleasant gentleman, an interesting companion, a 
stanch friend, open-hearted and generous. 



JAMES K. DAVIS. 

A resident of Chester township, Mr. Davis is a native of Morris county, 
New Jersey, where he was born on the 2ist of January, 1847, and he has 
passed all of his life in Morris county. His grandfather, Sylvanus Davis, 
was a Welshman and was a tailor by trade. He married a Miss Hiler and 
died in New Germantown. Their son, John Davis, father of our subject, 
was born in Hunterdon county in 18 10 and was there married to Ruth, 
daughter of George Pickle. Early in the '40s he removed with his family to 
Morris county and purchased the farm now owned by his son James K. He 
died in 1S89, but his widow still resides on the old homestead. Their chil- 
dren were: Melvina, deceased wife of Isaiah Hoffman; George P., a resi- 
dent of Somerset county, New Jersey; John, who is living in Pottersville, 
New Jersey; Harriet C. , wife of W. H. Vactor, of Somerset county; James 
K. ; Henry P., a resident of Corning, Iowa; Jacob H., of Whitehouse, New 
Jersey; Harvey, who is located in Glen Garden, this state; Martin L., of 
Somerset county; and William E. , of Morristown. 

Upon the farm which his father purchased on removing to Morris 
county, James K. Davis was reared, and during his youth worked in the 
fields, but as he approached manhood he became deeply interested in 
mechanics and turned his attention to the machinist's trade. He also fol- 
lowed carpentering to a limited extent, but about twenty years ago resumed 
the occupation to which he was reared. Soon afterward he added horticult- 
ural to his agricultural pursuits, beginning the cultivation of peaches and 
the establishing of a peach nursery. To this dual occupation he has since 
devoted his energies with excellent success. 

On the 11th of December, 1875, Mr. Davis was united in marriage to 
Miss Elizabeth Crater, a daughter of Amos and Ann (Hoffman) Crater, the 
former a farmer of New Germantown, Hunterdon county. Her parents had 
five children, namely: Jane; Louisa, widow of E. S. Leek; Rebecca, wife 
of Henry Apgar, of New Germantown; and Sarah Crater, also of New Ger- 
mantown. Mr. and Mrs. Davis have three children: Anna M., Clarence S. 
and Florence L. 

The family attend the Congregational church, in which Mr. Davis holds 
membership. He has the unreserved confidence of his fellow men and is 
well worthy of representation among the respected citizens of Morris county. 



G46 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



DE WITT C. QUINBY. 

The name of Quinby figures conspicuously in the history of Morris 
county, and Judge De Witt Clinton Quinby was one who added new luster 
to the family records. A man of strong individuality and mentality, of firm 
purpose and sound judgment, he left an impress for good on the community 
that will long be felt. His reputation in business circles was unassailable, 
and he belonged to that class of representative Americans, who, loyal to 
their country and its principles, support all measures for the public good and 
do all in their power to promote the best interests of county, state and 
nation. 

Judge Quinby was born on the old family homestead, in Hanover town- 
ship, Morris county, on the 8th of February, 1830, and was a son of Isaac 
and Sallie (DeHart) Quinby. The father also was born in Hanover town- 
ship, March 2, 1788, and spent his childhood and youth in that locality, 
acquiring his education in the schools of the neighborhood. His father was 
a shoemaker by trade and for a number of years engaged in the manufacture 
of shoes for the government. In this work he was assisted by his son Isaac 
for some time, and to agricultural pursuits the latter also devoted his ener- 
gies for many years. He was a very energetic and progressive man, qual- 
ities that not only characterized his business career, but also were manifest 
in his discharge of the duties and obligations of citizenship. He took con- 
siderable interest in local affairs and advocated all measures or movements 
which he believed would prove of public benefit to the community. He 
married Miss DeHart, who was born February 3, 1794, and for many years 
they traveled life's journey together, being one in interest, in purpose and in 
good works. They contributed liberally to church and charitable work, and 
their beneficence greatly benefited the poor and needy. 

They became the parents of eleven children. Phoebe, the eldest, mar- 
ried Davis Vail, of Speedwell, Morris county, and became the mother of 
Theodore N. Vail, who for a number of years was superintendent of the 
United States railway mail service, at Washington, D. C. Later he became 
president of the Bell Telephone Company, and is now a resident of Vermont. 
William DeHart, the second of the family, married Sarah Canfield, and 
resided in Morristown, where he practiced medicine for a number of years. 
John Alonzo removed to California about 1862. He married and had a 
family of sons and daughters whose descendants are still residents of the 
Golden state. Isaac Ferdinand, the fourth of the family, married Lizzie 
Gardner and was for some years a resident of Rochester, New York. In his 
youth he became a cadet at West Point, and was graduated in the same 
class of which General U. S. Grant was a member, winning the fourth 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HIS TORT. 647 

scholarship in the class. During the war of the Rebellion he served in the 
Union army and won the rank of general under his former classmate. After 
the close of the war he was appointed a United States marshal by President 
Grant, and subsequently served as a professor of mathematics in a college in 
Rochester, New York, for a number of years. His son, Lieutenant John 
Gardner Quinby, won distinction in the war with Spain, in which he served 
with the rank indicated on the dynamite cruiser Vesuvius. In one of the 
leading dailies of the country appeared the following: " The war with Spain 
has demonstrated the destructiveness of dynamite. The work of the Vesu- 
vius at Santiago was beyond the most sanguine expectations, and yet it is 
acknowledged that the deadly craft did not have half a chance to show her 
merits. The Vesuvius has a battery of three pneumatic guns, mounted in 
the bow at a fixed angle of eighteen degrees. The guns are fifty-five long, 
fifteen inches bore and built rigidly into the vessel. Lieutenant John Gard- 
ner Quinby, who fired the dynamite guns, is the senior lieutenant and ord- 
nance officer on the dynamite cruiser. He is an expert in high explosives. 
For three years he was in charge of the government hydrographic office at 
Norfolk, Virginia, after which he took a course of study in high explosives at 
the Naval War College, at Newport." He certainly made for himself a record 
of which the family may well be proud, for what American is ignorant of the 
gallant part which the Vesuvius played in the destruction of the Spanish 
fleet in the harbor of Santiago ? 

To return to the enumeration and account of the family of Isaac and 
Sallie Quinby, we note that David E., the fifth member, is represented else- 
where in this volume. Emma J. was the wife of George T. Cobb, of 
Newark, New Jersey. Theodore, who was born May 27, 1827, died Sep- 
tember 20, 1833. De Witt Clinton is the immediate subject of this review. 
George Augustus, who married a Miss Sneeden, of Morristown, practiced 
medicine for some time and is now living in New York city. Sarah, born 
August 24, 1834, died September 7, 1846. Mary Anna is the wife of Will- 
iam Z. Gurnee, a resident of Hawthorne, Passaic county, New Jersey. 

Judge Quinby, whose name introduces this memoir, received his early 
mental training in the schools of Hanover township, and remained under the 
parental roof until he had attained his majority. He then turned his 
attention to agricultural pursuits, managing the farm in Hanover township 
upon which his brother, David E. Quinby, now resides. In 1863 he removed 
to the village of Hanover and in 1867 returned to the old homestead farm, 
whereon he spent the remainder of his days, his death occurring on the 12th 
of May, 1 89 1. He managed his business interests with system and precis- 
ion, and his energy, industry and sound judgment brought to him a com- 
fortable competence. 



648 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

He was also quite prominent in public affairs, and was frequently called 
to public office by his fellow-townsmen, who recognized his worth and abil- 
ity. He served for five consecutive years as tax collector, having been elected 
over his Republican opponent by a majority of one hundred and fifty. In 
1887 he was appointed to the office of associate judge of Morris county by 
the governor, and his candidacy for the office received the earnest support 
and recommendation of ex-Governor Werts, who at that time was a senator 
from New Jersey. Mr. Quinby continued to fill the office of associate judge 
until his death, and discharged his duties with such promptness, fidelity and 
ability that he won the high commendation of all concerned. 

On the 6th ol January, 1852, the Judge was married to Miss Adelia S. 
Ball, who was a daughter of Daniel and Parmelia Ball. Two children were 
born of this union, Edwin Clinton, and Mary, who became the wife of 
Charles H. Leonard. The mother died June II, 1888. 

In his home and in all the other relations of life Judge Ouinby was true 
to the duties and responsibilities devolving upon him, and his well spent 
life commended him to the confidence and regard of his fellow townsmen, 
which he enjoyed in an unusual degree. 



EDWIN C. QUINBY. 



Among the old families of Morris county that have long been identified 
with its best development and its substantial progress and improvement is the 
Quinby family, of which the subject of this review is a worthy representative. 
He was born on the old homestead farm May 7, 1857, his parents being 
Judge De Witt Clinton and Adelia (Ball) Ouinby. To the public schools near 
his home he is indebted for the early education which he received. Later 
his preliminary education was supplemented by knowledge acquired in the pur- 
suit of a course of study in the Centenary Collegiate Institute, at Hacketts- 
town, New Jersey. When his school days were over and his text-books were 
laid aside he resumed the labors of the farm, with which he had become 
familiar in his youth, following agricultural pursuits on the old Ouinby farm- 
stead until 1 89 1, when he came to his present home near Malapardis. Here 
he carried on general farming and also conducts a dairy, finding in both 
branches of his business a profitable source of income. The place is sup- 
plied with all modern accessories and conveniences for the successful conduct 
of his labors, and the latest improved machinery, well kept fences and sub- 
stantial buildings all indicate the progressive and enterprising spirit of the 
owner. 

On the 1st of March, 1878, was celebrated the marriage of Edwin 
Clinton Quinby and Miss Lizzie K. Holloway, who was born December 16, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 649 

1856, and is a daughter of John and Elizabeth Holloway. To them have 
been born seven children, as follows: William De Witt, April 1, 1879; Mary 
A., April 15, 1882; Augusta, March 20, 1888; Werts, December 27, 1889; 
Lizzie K. , May 31, 1893; Edwin C. , June 22, 1894; and De Witt C. , April 
8, 1898. 

The Quinby household is noted for its hospitality and the members of 
the family occupy an enviable position in social circles. They attend the 
Presbyterian church of Parsippany. Mr. Quinby is also somewhat promi- 
nent in local political circles and is an enterprising, progressive man, who 
gives his support to all measures which are calculated to advance the general 
welfare. 



MATTHIAS FLEMING. 



Mr. Fleming is identified with the farming interests of Washington 
township, and is one of the industrious and substantial young men of his 
community, his postoffice address being Parker. He is descended from one 
of the old New Jersey families which have been connected with the counties 
of Hunterdon and Morris for more than a century. Our subject was born 
near the place which is now his home May 12, 1863, and is a son of the late 
Henry Fleming, who was born in 1838 and died in 1882. The latter was a 
son of Levi Fleming, of Hunterdon county, a farmer and a man of consider- 
ble local prominence, his political interests being allied with those of the 
Democratic party. His son Henry also espoused the cause of the Democracy 
and never failed at election to uphold his political views by his ballot. He 
married Charity Hildebrant, a daughter of Matthias Hildebrant, of Hunter- 
don county, and the children of this marriage were Matthias, John, Asa, 
Mary and Henry. 

The brothers were all reared upon the homestead farm and received 
their educational training in the district schools of the neighborhood. Our 
subject was married on the 10th of December, 1887, to Miss Annie Thomas, 
daughter of Jacob and Emeline (Apgar) Thomas, of Hunterdon county. 
The latter was a daughter of Addison Apgar. To Mr. and Mrs. Fleming 
has been born one child, Alvah. 

At the time of his marriage Mr. Fleming located on the farm which he 
now owns and cultivates. On attaining his majority he began life independ- 
ent of parental assistance, and has proven himself to be a man of industry 
and energy. Since the death of his mother, which occurred May 30, 1895, 
he and his brothers and sisters have had the management of all matters 
heretofore devolving largely upon older and more experienced people; but if 
perseverance and unceasing devotion to business counts for aught he will 



650 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

acquire an enviable place among the substantial men of Washington town- 
ship. He is an enthusiastic Democrat, and belongs to the Knights of Pythias 
fraternity. 



CHARLES H. LEONARD. 



Born August 20, 1856, in Parsippany, where he still lives, Mr. Leonard 
belongs to one of the early families of the state. His grandfather, Josiah 
Leonard, was a school-teacher and made his home in Orange. He married 
Miss Ogden. His son, William H. Leonard, was born in Orange, April 26, 
1816, and in early life followed the shoemaker's trade, but later engaged in 
the butchering business, being the only butcher in Boonton at the time he 
conducted a store there. In matters affecting the general welfare he took a 
deep interest, and gave his political support to the men and measures of the 
Republican party. His worth and ability were recognized by his fellow 
townsmen, who called him to office; and for some years he acceptably served 
as town committeeman and was also at one time a member of the board of 
chosen freeholders. He married Martha Ann Stetson, a daughter of Stephen 
Stetson and a sister of the renowned John B. Stetson, of Philadelphia. The 
Stetsons were also one of the old and very prominent families of Orange, and 
Stephen Stetson was the father of six sons and six daughters; all the sons 
became successful and well known business men, John B. winning lasting 
fame by producing the celebrated Stetson hat, which is now known through- 
out the entire country. The other two surviving sons of the family are 
Napoleon, of Orange, and Charles, of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. To Mr. 
and Mrs. William H. Leonard were born four children, Kate, William W. , 
Charles H. and George E. The father of this family died March 31, 
1889, and the mother passed away on the 1st of July, 1896. 

It is interesting to note that Charles H. Leonard, of this review, con- 
nected throughout his life with the interests of Morris county, has risen to a 
prominent place in her business ranks. He was reared under the parental 
roof, and before his twentieth year started out in the business world, where 
by his resolute purpose and well directed energies he has achieved a most 
gratifying success. For the past fifteen years he has been engaged in the 
feed and grain business, and for a time carried on a wholesale trade in 
brewers' grains in New York. He still deals in that commodity, together 
with the purchase and sale of other grains, and enjoys a liberal patronage. 

Mr. Leonard has been twice married. In March, 1880, he wedded 
Miss Mary A. Quinby, a daughter of ex-Judge DeWitt C. and Adelaide (Ball) 
Ouinby. Her death occurred March 30, 1881, and in January, 1887, Mr. 
Leonard was again married, his second union being with Miss Phcebe Ger- 





• ^ yf ' 



<£^*-t^ <?4? 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 651 

trude, daughter of Jesse and Gertrude (Bockoven) Pierson. Widely known 
in this community, their courteous bearing and genial dispositions have 
gained them many friends whose esteem indicates their own worth. Mr. 
Leonard has by his second marriage one son, Charles J., born May 23, 
1898. Mr. Leonard is now serving as postmaster of Parsippany and is a 
strong Republican, now serving as committeeman of the county for Hanover 
township. 



WILLIAM R. WILSON. 



For a third of a century Mr. Wilson has been prominently identified with 
the business interests of Whippany as one of the leading representatives of 
the commercial interests of the town and the agricultural interests of 
the county. He was born in Whippany, July 6, 1837, his parents being 
Edwin and Jane Adaline (Shipman) Wilson. His mother also was born 
in Whippany and belonged to one of the oldest families of this section 
of the state. His father was a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
and when a young man came to Morris county. Here he married and 
took up his residence on the property which is now the home of our subject. 
For a time he engaged in the manufacture of paper, but abandoning that 
pursuit he turned his attention to farming and general merchandising and for 
a. number of years was accounted one of the leading business men in his 
district. He died at the old homestead in 1868, at the age of sixty-four 
years, and his wife, surviving him several years, passed away May 24, 1893, 
at the age of eighty-five years. They had four children, as follows: Julia 
Augusta, now deceased; William R., of this review; Isabelle, deceased; and 
Edwin S., now a resident of Whippany. 

During the Civil war William R. Wilson succeeded his father in business, 
thus entering upon his career in the mercantile world. He purchased his 
father's store and by careful management, keen discrimination and unrelax- 
ing energy he has not only been enabled to hold his own but has won a grati- 
fying success. He is a man of superior business ability, and through the 
period of his connection with the mercantile interests of Whippany he has 
never failed to keep a good name and credit. He has also superintended 
the cultivation of two farms which he owns, and he takes special pride in 
keeping them highly improved. The neat and thrifty appearance of these 
places, their well cultivated fields and substantial buildings all indicate the 
practical and progressive spirit of the owner. 

In his political associations Mr. Wilson is a stalwart Democrat and has 
held several positions of honor and trust. He has acceptably served as a 
member of the Morris county board of chosen freeholders and as lay judge, 



652 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

and was appointed by President Cleveland, during his first and second admin- 
istrations, to the office of postmaster of Whippany, a position which he held 
for over eight years, to the entire satisfaction of the patrons of the office. 
Mr. Wilson has been twice married. First he was united with Miss 
Evanna Baldwin, of Parsippany, and again to Miss Sarah Bonnell, of 
Orange, New Jersey. He has a handsome and attractive home, where he 
dispenses a pleasing hospitality to his hosts of friends. 



GEORGE H. LOOKER. 



This well known citizen of Littleton, whose well developed and highly 
improved farm indicates the careful supervision and progressive spirit of the 
owner, was born near Morristown, on the 12th of August, 1824, and is 
descended from good old Revolutionary stock, his grandfather, Eleazar 
Looker, having been one of the colonists whose valor and bravery secured 
to America her independence. The father of our subject was Allen Looker, 
a native of Irvington, New Jersey. He followed the occupation of farming 
and married Miss Lydia Parson, a daughter of Robert Parson, whose family 
name has since been changed to Pierson. Seven children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Looker, as follows: Samuel; Mary, who became the wife of Tunis 
Peer, of Boonton; Sylvester, Jacob, Allen, George Henry and Aaron. 

When a youth of fourteen years, Mr. Looker, of this review became a res- 
ident of Littleton and in the primitive schools of that time acquired his edu- 
cational training. He entered upon his business career as a farmer and dur- 
ing the greater part of his life has followed that pursuit, but for twenty years 
was engaged in the milk business. In 1848 he established a milk route in 
Morristown, being the first to engage in business there after the modern style 
of selling and distributing milk among the patrons. He to-day owns a valua- 
ble farm of one hundred and thirty-five acres, lying very near Morris Plains, 
which he acquired as the result of his well directed energy and unceasing 
industry. He has made many excellent improvements thereon, in keeping 
with the progress of the age, and his labors have returned to him a golden 
tribute. 

In April, 1848, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Looker and Miss 
Caroline H. Johnson, daughter of Isaac and Eunice (Vail) Johnson, who for 
a half century has been his faithful companion and helpmeet on life's jour- 
ney. 

In politics he has been a stanch Republican since the organization of the 
party, and his loyalty to all duties of citizenship has led to his selection for 
various offices. He served his township for fifteen years as commissioner of 
appeals and was postmaster of Littleton for several years. His residence in 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 653 

this village covers a period of sixty years, during which time he has not only 
witnessed the progress and advancement which has marked the county but 
has ever borne his part therein. His truest friends, by reason of his well 
spent and honorable life, are those which have known him from boyhood and 
who regard him highly on account of his many estimable qualities. 



ROBERT D. PITNEY. 



In the death of the honored subject of this memoir Morris county lost 
one of its substantial and worthy citizens. Mr. Pitney was born November 
9, 1826, in the village of Mendham, where he was reared and acquired his 
education. His opportunities for attending school, however, were limited, 
and his privileges in other directions were also meager. He began life with 
no capital, but was dependent entirely upon his own efforts for all that he 
acquired. At the time of his marriage he purchased a portion of the farm 
upon which his sons now reside and made his home there until his death. In 
his earlier years he labored early and late to get a start, and his industry, 
enterprise and perseverance were the qualities which enabled him to win suc- 
cess. As his financial resources increased, he made additional purchases of 
land from time to time until his farm embraced an acreage of two hundred 
and eighty acres. 

Mr. Pitney's relations to the community in which he lived and to the 
public generally were of the most cordial and friendly character. He was 
looked upon as a gentleman of exceptional qualities, in both business and 
social life. In public matters he took little interest aside from supporting all 
measures for the general welfare and voting for those men whose character 
and business capacity were a guaranty that they would properly transact the 
public business. He was at one time a member of the town committee, 
elected by the Democratic party, the principles of which he most strongly 
advocated. He was a member of the Fairmount Presbyterian church and 
regarded as one of its leading supporters and workers. 

Mr. Pitney was married on the 8th of December, 1849, to Miss Elizabeth 
Hoffman, a daughter of Peter F. Hoffman. For forty years they traveled 
life's journey together, sharing with each other its adversity and prosperity, 
its sorrows and its joys, and on the 4th of March, 1890, the wife was called 
to the home beyond. On the 24th of September of the same year Mr. 
Pitney passed away. Both were held in the highest regard throughout the 
community and the loss of two such worthy people was widely felt. They 
had seven children. Maggie, who was born September 8, 1850, married 
George E. Salter, and died in Jul)', 1887, leaving two children, Lewis P. and 
Annetta W. Amy, who was born February 10, 1852, is the wife of Albert 



654 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Bunn, of Parker, New Jersey, and their children are Grace and John D. 
Parker. George E.-, born January 17, 1854, died in childhood. Peter H. , 
born May 14, 1856, died in early life. Barbara M., born May 27, 1858, was 
married to James Van Derveer and died November 8, 1 894. Elwood S. , born 
July 25, i860, was married December 25, 1890, to Lizzie M., daughter of 
George M. and Jane (Beavers) Pickle. Their only child is Olive E. Charles 
B., born August 3, 1863, and Andrew J., born May 31, 1866, complete the 
family. 

The Pitney brothers, Elwood, Charles and Andrew, were given the 
advantages of a liberal education in their home district and upon approaching 
manhood determined to devote their energies to the occupation to which 
they had been reared. Since their father's death they have operated the old 
homestead and are widely known as practical, progressive farmers. Their 
standing as citizens is in keeping with the teaching and example of their 
honored father and while they faithfully perform all public duties, they have 
never sought official preferment, only Elwood having filled a political office. 
He is now one of the committeemen of Chester township and with his 
brothers adheres to the policy and principles of the Democratic party. 



LEOPOLD D. SCHWARZ. 

Much of the civilization of the world has come from central Europe. 
Continually moving westward the promoters have taken with them the enter- 
prise and advancement of their eastern homes and have become valued and 
useful citizens of various localities. In this country especially have they 
demonstrated their power to adapt themselves to new circumstances, retain- 
ing at the same time their progressiveness and energy and to become loyal and 
devoted citizens, true to the institutions of the " land of the free " and untir- 
ing in the advancement of all that will prove of benefit to their adopted 
country. Their enterprise and energy have largely promoted the material 
welfare of the communities with which they are connected, and while attain- 
ing individual successes they have also secured general prosperity. Mr. 
Schwarz is a worthy representative of this class of adopted American citizens, 
and Dover numbers him among her valued residents. 

He was born in a small village called Lautchim, in Bohemia, on April 
18, 1839, being one of seven children born to Jacob and Charlotte (Eisner) 
Schwarz, the former born in Bohemia, January 20, 1800, and the latter in 
December, 1799. The father died July 20, 1867, and the mother passed 
away on Christmas day of 1883. The parents being in moderate circum- 
stances, Mr. Schwarz was compelled from childhood to help provide a sus- 
tenance for himself and his parents, hence his schooling was confined to 




XU AS' xA^A^v^^y 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. G55> 

attending a private school between the ages of five and twelve years, after 
which he studied at Prague, Bohemia, for a short period, and then at Vienna, 
Austria, the Mecca of Bohemian learning, where he spent two years in school. 
At thirteen, through dire necessity, he was compelled to leave school and 
engage in active work in order to help his family along in its struggle, and 
during the next five years his efforts were so well directed and repaid that in 
1857, finding his parents had prospered sufficiently as not to be in need of his 
support, he went to Vienna and for two years engaged in the dry-goods busi- 
ness; but, not being able to make a success of this business, he cast his eyes 
westward to the new land of America, where he thought it possible success 
might crown his efforts; so, bidding adieu to home and native land, he 
embarked on the sail-ship Atlantic, and after a long and stormy voyage of 
sixty-three days landed in New York, on September 19, 1859, a stranger in 
the land and to the English language. Finding that, as he could not speak 
the language, no position was open to him, he had recourse to the trade of 
his people, which many times has proved a blessing to many of our adopted 
citizens in their first struggles for existence upon their arrival in this 
country. 

Mr. Schwarz began peddling, and many old residents in northern New 
Jersey can recall the days when he displayed before their own eyes to the 
best of advantage his wares in the hopes that by so doing something might 
please their various tastes and so redound to his advantage. Naturally quick 
to learn and to take advantage of his opportunities, in the year 1869, he 
bought a patent for the laying of concrete pavements and in the pursuance of 
this business he made his first visit to Dover, where from 1869 until 1876 he 
engaged in this line of business, with good success, and to-day these walks 
still exist in Dover. By the contracts growing out of the laying of these 
walks and through judicious management he was able to accumulate a 
handsome competence, which he very wisely invested in real estate, having 
sound judgment concerning what would grow valuable in the near future 
as the town expanded. In 1874 he extended his field of operations by open- 
ing a wholesale liquor establishment in the building now known as No. 42 
Sussex street, where he still continues the business. In 1877 Mr. Schwarz 
began the buying of green hides, skins and tallow from the butchers through- 
out the counties of Morris, Sussex and Warren, and it is in this business that 
he made his most pronounced success financially, retiring therefrom in 1892, 
owing to the almost complete demoralization of that branch of trade, devot- 
ing his attention to his liquor store and to real-estate operations. To-day he 
is a large real-estate owner in the city of Dover; one of the organizers of the 
Dover Electric Light Company, of which he is at present director and treas- 
urer; and is one of the largest stockholders and property owners at Lake 



656 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Hopatcong, New Jersey. Through his street contracts and real-estate busi- 
ness he has probably done as much to improve and benefit the town as any 
other one man, and has always manifested a deep and commendable interest 
in everything pertaining to its welfare. 

On the 17th of March, 1870, Mr. Schwarz wedded Miss Hannah Keller, 
of Phillipsburg, New Jersey, and now has five sons: Eugene J., now of 
Philadelphia, Sidney S., Irving E., Harry L. , and Mark H. — all of whom 
with the exception of the last are mentioned actively engaged in business. 

Although Mr. Schwarz commenced life -in this country on very limited 
means, he has overcome the difficulties and obstacles in his path and steadily 
advanced on the road to prosperity. He is now numbered among the sub- 
stantial and reliable citizens of Dover and well deserves representation in 
this volume. 



JONATHAN BARKMAN. 

A successful farmer of Parker is Jonathan Barkman, who is a son of 
the late Henry Newman Pohlman Barkman. His grandfather, Jonathan 
Barkman, was born October 21, 1787, and married Sarah Felmly, a daughter 
-of David Felmly. He provdied for the maintenance of himself and family 
by following the carpenter's trade, and passed his entire life in New German- 
town, New Jersey, his death occurring in October, 1867. He was the father 
of five children, of whom Pohlman Barkman was the second. 

The latter was born on the 25th of August, 1822, in Hunterdon county, 
where he was reared to manhood and learned the carpenter's trade under the 
direction of his father. He followed that pursuit for eight years after his 
marriage and then turned his attention to farming, at which time he removed 
from his home near New Germantown, where he had resided for some years, 
to his farmstead in Parker, taking up his abode at the latter place in 1858. 
He was very successful in his business undertakings, owing to his energy, 
industry and perseverance. A highly respected and popular citizen, he died 
November 10, 1882. He was married July 25, 1854, to Merinda Rinehart, 
a daughter of William Rinehart, whose children were John and Merinda. 
John Rinehart, who married Rebecca Huffman, died in 1897, leaving a son, 
William, and two daughters, Mary C. and Emma. Mrs. Barkman was 
born June 6, 1830, and by her marriage became the mother of the following 
named: Mary E. , born January 10, 1850, wife of George Pickle, of Califon, 
New Jersey; Sarah, born July 23, 1851, wife of John Pickle, of Fairmont, 
New Jersey; Andrew S. , who was born October 16, 1852, and died in child- 
hood; William R., who was born May 3, 1854, and married Sarah Welsh; Esther 
A., who was born February 19, 1856; Jonathan, of this review; Morris, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 657 

who was born April 10, 1859, and married Cora Morse, their home being 
now in Chicago; Maggie, who was born November II, i860, and married 
Samuel Reed, a resident of Schooley's Mountain; David H., a resident of 
Ohio, Illinois, who was born February 23, 1862, and married Ida Wood; 
Charlotte, who was born April 23, 1863, and died October 2, 1880; 
Jennie, who was born August 23, 1866, and is the wife of Manning Fisher, of 
Pottersville; and George H., of Whitefield, Illinois, who was born October 
27, 1868. 

Jonathan Barkman was born June 26, 1857, near New Germantown, but 
was feared on the Parker homestead, while in the public schools of the neigh- 
borhood he acquired his education. He has always resided on the farm with 
the exception of a period of five years passed in Hunterdon county, and in 
the management of his property displays a thorough understanding of the 
business. The fields are well cultivated and the place is neat and thrifty in 
appearance. 

Mr. Barkman was married October 4, 1884, to Miss Eliza A. Cregar, 
who, after a happy married life of about ten years, passed away on the 13th 
of April, 1894, leaving four children: Urias, born April 18, 1886; Walter, 
born September 8, 1888; Alice Mabel, born in November, 1891; and Ruth, 
born in October, 1893. Mr. Barkman is quite prominent in local political 
circles, stanchly advocates the principles of the Republican party, and has 
served as a member of the executive committee of the county organization. 



ISAAC VAN NESS. 



A well known and greatly respected resident of Morris county, the hon- 
ored subject of this review is engaged in farming near Pine Brook, and makes 
a specialty of vegetables and strawberries. He was born on the homestead 
where he now resides, on the 21st of November, 1841, a son of Peter W. 
and Mary (Peer) Van Ness. William Van Ness, the grandfather, and first 
of the family to settle in Morris county, came to the farm now owned by our 
subject previous to 1800. He was born in 1770, his parents being Henry 
and Rachel Van Ness, the former of whom died November 19, 18 16, and the 
latter February 14, 1814, and he was twice married, — one union having been 
with Miss Hannah Riker, the name of his other wife being unknown. Two 
children were born to him, Elizabeth, who married Francis Peer, of Mont- 
ville, and Peter W. 

The birth of Peter W. Van Ness occurred on the old homestead May 3, 

1801, and there he continued to reside during his lifetime. He married Miss 

Mary Peer, and they became the parents of ten children, namely: Francis 

P., deceased; William, who lives in Pine Brook; Caroline, deceased, mar- 
ie* 



658 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ried Henry Vreeland, of Montville township; Elizabeth, deceased, married 
Elisha Pierce, of Montville township; John, deceased; Sarah Ann became 
Mrs. George E. Mead, of Essex county; Hettie Maria married Nathaniel J. 
Kent, of Montville; Margaret Jane, unmarried; Rachel, now Mrs. George 
Heisler, of Camden, New Jersey; and Isaac, our subject. Peter W. Van 
Ness affiliated with the Fairfield Reformed church, but later in life trans- 
ferred his membership to the Pine Brook Methodist Episcopal church, whose 
house of worship he helped to build. He died on the 28th of May, 1859, 
and was survived by his wife until March 25, 1871, when she also passed to 
her eternal rest. 

Isaac Van Ness, after acquiring such knowledge as was afforded by the 
district schools, entered upon the active duties of farm life and has continued 
to devote his time and energies to that branch of industry ever since. He 
gives particular attention to general farming, in which he has met with dis- 
tinct success, and each year sends to market a large and varied assortment 
of crops. 

In touching upon the political side of Mr. Van Ness' life, it may be stated 
that he is a firm advocate of Republican principles, believing them to be the 
most conducive to the prosperity of the nation. He has served as tax col- 
lector, a member of the school board and as township committeeman. He 
is a trustee in the Pine Brook Methodist church. 

The marriage of Mr. Van Ness was consummated April 5, 1865, when 
he was united to Miss Alice W. Starkey, born March 11, 1842, a daughter 
of Benjamin and Martha (Fox) Starkey, and one child resulted from this 
union, namely: Benjamin S. , who was born on the 9th of March, 1866, 
and who after completing his education followed teaching as a profession. 
He married Miss Laura A. Van Duyne, daughter of James A. Van Duyne, 
and two children were born to them: Earl Benjamin, born February 11, 
1892; and Floyd Starkey, born January 13, 1895. Benjamin S. died on 
the 16th of March, 1897. 



GEORGE JENKINS. 

George Jenkins was for many years prominently connected with the 
industrial and social interests of Morris county. He was born in the town of 
Llansamlet, Glamorganshire, Wales, November, 1806, and was educated in 
his native land; but, not finding the business opportunities he sought, he 
resolved to seek a home and fortune in America. Accordingly, in 1834, he 
crossed the Atlantic, locating in Philadelphia, where, in 1836, he married 
Miss Hannah Morgan, a relative of David Thomas, the founder of the Crane 
Iron Works at Catasauqua, Pennsylvania. After his marriage he was made 




r 



-^e&ta^ jev/Av 



//// 



S/.J. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 659 

assistant superintendent of Mr. Thomas' Iron Works, and acquired a thorough 
and practical knowledge of the manufacture of iron. In 1848, when the 
New Jersey Iron Company, of Boonton, asked Mr. Thomas to recommend a 
competent man to manage their furnaces, the latter named Mr. Jenkins, who 
was offered the position of superintendent. He served in that capacity until 
his death, which occurred January 7, 1864. His thorough and practical 
understanding of the business well fitted him for his responsible position, and 
he managed the works in a manner that brought success to the company and 
gained him their high regard and unqualified confidence. 

Mr. Jenkins was a very progressive and enterprising man, and was an 
active factor in the development and progress of Boonton along commercial, 
moral, educational and social lines. From the organization of the Repub- 
lican party he was an active worker in its ranks, and was most earnest in his 
advocacy of its principles. He served in a number of local offices, discharg- 
ing his duties with promptness and ability. He contributed liberally to 
church work, and for many years served as elder and trustee of the First 
Presbyterian church of Boonton. 

His wife was to him a faithful companion and helpmeet, and ably 
seconded him in his good work. She was born at Llangued, Glamorgan- 
shire, Wales, February 22, 181 1, and died October 21, 1897. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jenkins had eight children, five of whom are living: George W. Jenkins, in 
Morristown; Frank Jenkins, in New York; and Mrs. A. L. Dennis and sister, 
Miss Mary B. Jenkins, in Boonton; and H. C. Jenkins, the eldest son, is in 
business in New York and resides in Boonton, where he has always taken an 
active interest in the prosperity of the town. 



SAMUEL H. PICKLE. 



The life of Mr. Pickle, though quiet and unobtrusive, yet contains many 
lessons that are worthy of emulation. He has for years been numbered 
among the trustworthy farmers of Washington township. He was born in 
Hunterdon county, New Jersey, on the 23d of July, 1822, and is a son of 
George and Sarah (Howell) Pickle, who were natives of the same county, 
the former born January 14, 1784, and the latter May 7, 1787. Her father 
was Isaac Howell, who died August 19, 1862. The marriage of George 
Pickle and Sarah Howell occurred June 5, 181 1, and the former died Octo- 
ber 18, 1864, while the latter was called to the home beyond June 23, 1852. 
Their children were Marietta, who married John Rowe; Isaac, of Tren- 
ton, New Jersey; Ruth, widow of John Davis, of Hacklebarny; Matthias, who 
lives in Illinois; Alfred, a resident of Fairmount, New Jersey; Samuel H., 



660 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

of this review; George, a resident of Chester township; and Henry, who also 
resides in Morris county. 

The subject of this sketch was reared to manhood on the old Pickle 
homestead, which is now the property of Frederick Pickle, of Hunterdon 
county, and received a limited education in the schools of Pottersville. 
After his marriage he began farming on his own account, locating on the 
old Davis place near Hacklebarny, where he carried on agricultural pur- 
suits for a few years. In 1857 he removed to his present farm and for forty 
years has resided thereon continuously. He has ninety-two acres of rich 
and arable land, well tilled and yielding good crops in return for the labor 
he bestows upon the place. 

Mr. Pickle has been twice married. On the 24th of October, 1846, he 
wedded Deborah Bartles, daughter of Henry Bartles. She died March 8, 
1886, and on the 30th of November, 1889, he was again married, his second 
union being with Elizabeth A. Walters, who died October 29, 1894. Mr. 
Pickle's children, all born of the first marriage, are as follows: Marietta, 
who was born September 27, 1847, and is the wife of Manning Beavers; 
'John, who was born June 12, 1849, and married Sarah Barkman; George 
H. was born February 16, 1853, and is now deceased; Susanna, who was 
born April 2, 1857, and is the deceased wife of Horace Iliff; Catherine, 
who was born July 16, 1862, and is now deceased; and Tamzen Addie, who 
was born July 4, 1865, and is the wife of William I. Hyler, of Hunterdon 
county, New Jersey. 

Mr. Pickle has led a quiet and unassuming life, his chief aim being to 
attain an honorable name and a comfortable competence for his family, 
rather than to secure wealth or political favor. He votes with the Demo- 
cratic party on matters of state and national importance, but at local elec- 
tions, where no issue is involved, supports the men whom he thinks best 
qualified for office without regard to party affiliations. 



ISRAEL P. MILLER. 

This well known resident of Netcong is a man whom to know is an 
honor, for his well spent life has gained him the confidence and respect of 
all with whom he has come in contact. Advancement has been his watch- 
word, and the years have marked a steady progress along business and edu- 
cational lines. He is a man of large affairs and broad ideas, and the cul- 
tivation of his mental powers has made him a leader in thought and action in 
his section of Morris county. 

Mr. Miller is a native of Sussex county, New Jersey, born on the 12th 
of November, 1820. His father, Hiram Miller, was born near Sparta, this 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 661! 

state, and was a wheelwright by trade. He married Elizabeth Conger and 
they became the parents of five children, namely: Maria, deceased, wife of 
Josephus Sands; Israel P.; Matilda B., widow of Archibald Horton; Eliza; 
and Jane, deceased wife of Aaron Chamberlin. The father of this family pos- 
sessed the essential qualities of good citizenship, was a prominent church' 
worker and a devout Christian man. He died at the ripe old age of eighty years. 

In the village of Stanhope, Israel P. Miller spent his youth, and pursued 
his education in the common schools, where he mastered the "three R's," 
but advanced little farther. His tastes, however, were of a scholarly char- 
acter and led him to do much reading and study outside of the school-room. 
In his early life he served an apprenticeship to the machinist's trade, 
became a builder and followed that vocation for fifteen years. At the age of 
thirty-five he retired from that business and devoted his energies to educa- 
tional work, becoming a successful school-teacher. In the meantime he had 
carefully studied Latin and Greek, and had attained a proficiency that 
enabled him to translate the writings in those tongues with accuracy. On 
account of this fact he was dubbed by those who were proud of his achieve- 
ments " old man science." He possessed even a greater fondness for music 
than for the languages, and gave much study to both instrumental and vocal 
music and became a teacher of both branches of the art. He led the church 
choir for more than forty years and also acted as organist for many years. 
Music has always been to him one of his chief sources of delight, while in 
rambling in the field of literature he has passed many pleasant hours. Of 
late years he has also written for the local press, contributing some short 
poems, which are said by people of high literary standing to contain much 
merit. 

Mr. Miller began life on a capital of two hundred dollars and has man- 
aged his business affairs in such a way that he is regarded as one of the most 
affluent men in Mount Olive township. For many years he has conducted a 
coal and lumber business in Netcong, because indolence and idleness are 
utterly foreign to his nature and he could not content himself without some 
active interests. Mr. Miller is temperate in all things and is specially averse 
to the drink habit, believing that in no way are alcoholic beverages necessary 
to the welfare of mankind. 



EDWARD M. SMACK. 



This prominent citizen of Morristown, was born in Morris county, on 
the nth of February, 1859. His ancestral history is one of long connection 
with that of the nation. In the early days, when New York was settled by 
emigrants from Holland and Germany, the Smack family was founded on 



662 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

American soil by those who left their home in Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany, 
and took up their residence in the colony which had founded a town des- 
tined to become the metropolis of the New World. 

The father of our subject, Samuel K. Smack, was born in New York 
city, and in 1857 removed to Morris county, New Jersey, where he spent 
the remainder of his days, his death occurring in Chatham, October 29, 
1879. By trade he was a carpenter. Twice married, his first union was 
with Miss Maria Greer, by whom he had several children, namely: Stephen, 
who married Hattie Courter; he died leaving five children, — Stephen, 
Charles, George, William and Hattie. William C. F., a resident of 
Kearney, New Jersey; he married Phoebe Crane and had three children, — 
William, Bessie and May. Maria L. , who became the wife of James Greer, 
of New York city, and has two children, — William D. and Charles H. After 
the death of his first wife, Samuel K. Smack wedded Miss Mary Herring, 
daughter of Caleb Herring, a commission merchant, and the surviving chil- 
dren by the latter marriage are: Mary, wife of Rev. D. F. McFall, of Mary- 
land; Edward M., the subject of this sketch; Sarah J., wife of Rev. Levi B. 
Salmons, of Guatemala, Central America; Emma R. ; Harry A. B., of 
Montclair, New Jersey; Lizzie G. ; and Winifred, wife of Rev. James Sim- 
ister, now a missionary at Foo-choo, China. The maternal grandfather of 
our subject, Caleb Herring, a basket-maker by trade, was born at Fort Put- 
nam, about the close of the Revolutionary war; and his father, a patriot sol- 
dier, died in that fort. 

Edward M. Smack acquired his education in the schools of Morristown, 
but in his youth his studies were interrupted by intervals of assisting his 
father. When fifteen years of age he was employed as clerk and driver for 
a grocer named Cook. This, however, was not taken as a permanent posi- 
tion, and, having been employed at carpentering by his father previous to 
this time, he concluded to master that trade, which in due time he success- 
fully accomplished. After working as a journeyman for five years he began 
to take contracts for building, his first job being the construction of a resi- 
dence for R. H. Dempsey on Woodland avenue, and since then he has 
erected many of the fine residences of the city, as those of R. H. Williams, 
Mrs. C. S. Banning, W. S. Letchford, A. W. Colgate and Dr. Henriques. 
He is thorough, painstaking and exact in his work, fulfilling the terms of a 
contract to the very letter; and the public, recognizing his trustworthiness, 
has therefore given him a liberal patronage. 

Mr. Smack was married in Newark, on the 3d of February, 1880, to 
Miss Ellen A., who was born August 23, 1861, a daughter of Patrick and 
Mary (Heffernan) Dempsey, natives of Ireland. They now have three chil- 
dren living, — Edward Boyd, Gertrude C. and Cyril; two others are deceased. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 663 

Mr. Smack gives his political support to the Republican party and is 
now serving as collector of taxes in Morris township. He is a member of 
the Catholic Benefit Legion, and, with his family, is connected with the 
Roman Catholic church. He has considerable musical talent and is prom- 
inent in musical circles, being regarded as an accomplished vocalist. -He 
enjoys the distinction of having been a pupil of Signor Ardivanni for some 
time at Steinway Hall, New York city. In 1893, at a public contest, he 
won a free scholarship in the National Conservatory of Music in New York 
city. Here in Morristown he has gratuitously rendered his skillful services 
at numerous charitable and other public entertainments. 



JOHN WESLEY BEAVERS. 

Mr. Beavers, who is residing in Washington township, near Pottersville, 
was born in Lebanon township, Hunterdon county, on the 26th of October, 1 83 1 , 
and is a son of Joseph Beavers, who was born in the same locality and there died. 
He was a farmer by occupation, as were his father and grandfather, and like 
them he supported the Whig party until the organization of the Republican 
party, when he joined its ranks. His father bore the name of Ralph Beav- 
ers, his grandfather was George W. Beavers. The latter owned and oper- 
ated a mill on Spruce Run, above Highbridge, and was a thrifty, enterpris- 
ing business man and a substantial and respected citizen. His son Ralph 
accumulated a modest fortune as a farmer and was prominent in Hunterdon 
county, in both politics and business. He served his township as freeholder 
and supported all measures for the general good. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Christiana Dilch, and to them were born the following named: 
Harmon; Joseph; Elizabeth, who married for her third husband Richard Pil- 
hauer; Mahala; Catherine, who married Jacob D. Fritz; and Naomi. Eliza- 
beth and Catherine are now the only survivors. 

Joseph Beavers, father of our subject, married Margaret Stout, daughter 
of Andrew Stout. She died in 1892. Her children were John W. ; Jane, 
wife of George Pickle, of Chester township; Martha, wife of Theodore Lance; 
Joseph C. , deceased, a soldier of the Civil war; George, who died in the 
military service of his country, during the Civil war, near Falmouth Station, 
his disease being typhoid fever; Christiana, deceased; Ralph, who is living in 
Bennett, Nebraska; Harmon, of Hunterdon county; and Elijah and Andrew, 
both deceased. 

During the first nine years of his life John W. Beavers remained on the 
old family homestead, and then accompanied his parents on their removal to 
a farm in Tewksbury township, Hunterdon county, where he remained for 
thirteen years. The educational privileges which he enjoyed were those 



664 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

afforded by the common schools, which he attended until his twentieth year. 
He located upon his present farm in 1853 and has since devoted his time and 
energies to its cultivation. The fields have ever been well tilled and with 
great care Mr. Beavers has looked after his interests, so that his labors have 
been rewarded with a fair degree of success. 

He was married on the iSthof August, 1855, theladyof his choice being 
Miss Emeline Seavers, a daughter of Abram and Hannah (Manning) Seavers. 
Mr. and Mrs. Beavers became the parents of seven children: Rebecca, deceased; 
Elijah W. , of Hunterdon county, who married Blanche Apgar; Joseph, 
deceased; Georgiana, wife of Peter L. Apgar, of Washington township; 
William S., deceased; Ulysses G., of Morris county, who married Sarah 
Apgar; and Samuel S., of Hunterdon county, who wedded Emma Van Pelt. 

In his political association Mr. Beavers is a Republican and is deeply 
interested in the success of his party, although he has never sought or desired 
official preferment for himself. For twelve years he has served as trustee of 
the Fairmount Methodist church, in which he has long held membership. 
His farm comprises one hundred and six acres, and to its cultivation he 
devotes the greater part of his time. His business methods are honorable 
and reliable and in his intercourse with his fellowmen he has always borne 
himself as a quiet, unassuming gentlemen, his true worth winning him the 
regard of all. 



ARJAY DAVIES. 

Mr. Davies, who is bookkeeper and manager for the firm of Robert F. 
Oram & Company, at Port Oram, was born at Scranton, Pennsylvania, in 
1865, and is the eldest son of John R. and Jane (Eynon) Davies, the former 
of whom was a native of Wales and was chief clerk in the office of the Kings- 
ton Coal Company, at Kingston, where he resided for many years. His wife 
was born in Pennsylvania, the daughter of John Eynon, and she died in 1874. 

The subject of this review passed the greater part of his youth in Scran- 
ton, where he attended the public schools and completed his studies in a pri- 
vate institution, after leaving which he entered the store of Carson & Davies, 
at Scranton, and remained in their employ for a period of fourteen years, the 
latter part of which he was in charge of a branch store at Peckville, Pennsyl- 
vania. In March, 1891, Mr. Davies came to Port Oram and accepted the 
position of bookkeeper for the firm of Robert F. Oram & Company, subse- 
quently being promoted to the office of manager, and he is discharging his 
dual duties with pronounced ability and to the entire satisfaction of his 
employers. 

Mr. Davies is an active worker in the local ranks of the Republican 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 665 

party, with which he is affiliated, and he is a member of the Republican 
county committee. He is secretary and treasurer of the local branch of the 
State Mutual Building & Loan Association, the main offices being located at 
Camden. 

On the 20th of December, 1888, Mr. Davies was united in marriage to 
Miss Alice Watkins, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, where she was born and 
reared, and they have two sons and a daughter, as follows: Ewart G., Rob- 
ert W. and Margaret E. Mr. and Mrs. Davies are popular in Port Oram, 
where they have a large number of friends. 



JOSEPH F. McLEAN. 

As assistant superintendent of the Butler Hard Rubber Works, of Butler, 
and county tax collector of Morris county, Mr. McLean has attained in 
business and political circles a prominence that arises from superior ability, 
great energy and unfaltering fidelity to duty. From the humble position of 
errand boy in a dry-goods house of New York city, he has advanced steadily 
step by step to the important post which he now occupies in connection with 
one of the most important industries of the country. His life demonstrates 
the possibilities that are open to young men of courage and ambition who 
have the will to do, accompanied by an honorable and steadfast purpose. 

Born in the metropolis of America on the 7th of October, 1867, Mr. 
McLean is the youngest child of William and Mary A. (Donovan) McLean, 
the former a native of Belfast, Ireland, the latter born in New York city, the 
daughter of John and Mary (Hayes) Donovan. The father is a shoemaker 
by trade and came to the United States in 1840, locating in New York, where 
he carried on a successful business in the line of his chosen vocation for many 
years. He is now living retired, at the age of seventy, in Hancock street, 
Brooklyn. His wife was born on the present site of the New York Stock 
Exchange. Her father, John Donovan, founded a ladies' seminary, a private 
school at the lower end of Broadway, and was an educator of note in the first 
half of the nineteenth century. He, too, was a native of the Emerald Isle. 
Mr. and Mrs. McLean reared an interesting family, the record of whom is as 
follows: William, who was educated in the St. Francis Xavier Academy, 
which institution conferred upon him the degrees of B. A. and M. A., and later 
attended the Columbia College of Law, then traveled through the south and 
west, familiarizing himself with the operation of railroads in their relation to 
liabilities to claims for damages. He is now chief claim agent for the Southwest- 
ern Traffic Association, of St. Louis, Missouri, and is an able attorney at law. 
He married Miss Irene Van Horn, of Cleveland, Ohio. Kate T. McLean, 
the only daughter of the family, is a well known, cultured and popular teacher 



•666 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

in public school No. 2, of New York. She is a graduate of that school and 
a graduate of the Normal College of New York, in which she has also pursued 
the post-graduate course. A writer of recognized ability, one of her poems, 
the "Ode to Columbus," written in the exposition year, proved a very pop- 
ular production and was recited by the school children all over New York in 
their literary, society and public-school entertainments. 

Joseph F. McLean, who completes the family, finished his preliminary 
education in school No. 2, of New York, attended New York College for a 
short time and then pursued a commercial course in the New York evening 
high school. He entered upon his business career in the capacity of errand 
boy for Halsted, Haines & Company, dry-goods merchants, and remained 
with that house, steadily advancing to higher positions until their failure, in 
1884. He was then offered a position by the Butler Hard Rubber Com- 
pany, and entered its employ in the capacity of shipping clerk. As he mas- 
tered the duties assigned to him and manifested ability and willingness to 
perform any service assigned to him, he was promoted and has filled success- 
ively the positions of order clerk, bookkeeper, cashier and corresponding 
clerk, and in 1891 was made assistant superintendent, with confidential rela- 
tions to the general superintendent. He is also now one of the stockholders 
of the company. 

Mr. McLean was married at Pompton Plains, June 26, 1895, by Rev. 
Charles J. Allen, to Miss Cora May Gilland, a daughter of Alexander and 
Clarissa (De Mott) Gilland. Socially he holds membership relations with 
Silentia Lodge, A. F. & A. M. In politics he is an unwavering Republican 
and has become one of the directors of party affairs in Morris county. He 
has declined offers of nomination to the offices of town committeeman, free- 
holder and representative to the state legislature, preferring to devote his 
time to his business. His knowledge of complicated accounts, gained by his 
experience as bookkeeper of the Butler Hard Rubber Company, commended 
him to the board of freeholders as a most suitable person for the office of 
county collector, and he was appointed during the memorable deadlock of 
1897, after a session of eighteen hours. His bond is one hundred thousand 
dollars. He is filling the position with marked ability and fidelity, and the 
trust reposed in him by his fellow townsmen is well merited. In 1898 Mr. 
McLean entered into partnership with Edwin N. Chapman, of New York 
city, to engage in the manufacture of soft-rubber goods under the firm name 
of Chapman & McLean, and at present they have in course of construction 
an extensive plant, equipped with the latest improved and modern machinery 
for the manufacture of their wares at Butler. Employment will be fur- 
nished to upward of one hundred hands, in the manufacture of soft rubber 
and soft-rubber goods. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 667 

WILLIAM W. ARMFIELD. 

William W. Armfield, of Millington, who was formerly prominent in 
the business circles of America's metropolis, is nowenjoying a quiet, retired 
life in the beautiful Passaic valley. He is a native of England and came to 
the United States in 1845, making his home in New York city and later in 
Brooklyn, where he was engaged for several years in the coal business, build- 
ing up an extensive trade. In 1865 he purchased a tract of land in Mill- 
ington, and erected thereon a beautiful home. 

Mr. Armfield has been twice married. He first wedded Miss Mary 
Winterton, of New York city, by whom he had one daughter, now Mrs. 
Holt, of San Jose, California. He married again in 1895, hi s second union 
being with Miss Augusta Dunn, the youngest daughter of Abram and Cath- 
erine (Cooper) Dunn. Mrs. Warfield descends from two of the oldest fami- 
lies in the state, the Dunns settling in Middlesex county as early 1666, 
and the Coopers in 1695. Her father was the youngest son of Clawson and 
Alice (Coriell) Dunn, and was born at New Market, New Jersey, May 20, 1807. 
He married Catherine Cooper, only daughter of Peter and Susan (Boyle) 
Cooper, and settled in Millington, New Jersey, where he engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits. He was a prominent and influential citizen, one of the 
founders of the Millington Baptist church, and held a number of offices of 
honor and trust, while his advice and counsel were sought by all classes of 
people. In his early life he gave his support to the Whig party, and on its 
dissolution he joined the ranks of the new Republican party. He took an 
active part in public affairs, and in all the relations of his life bore a reputa- 
tion that was unassailable. He died very suddenly February 1, 1874, and 
his wife, surviving him twenty years, passed away July 19, 1894. 

Some years ago Mr. Armfield sold his home in Millington, but after his 
second marriage he again erected a fine residence here. His wife is a native 
of the place, and has spent the greater part of her life here. 



GEORGE BIGALOW. 



A well known citizen and business man of Newfoundland, is Mr. Bigalow, 
who was born on the old family homestead at this place, April 20, 1855. 
His father is a native of the same locality, born in 181 1, and his death 
occurred there in 1891. His educational privileges were very meager, and at 
an early age he began working at the forge and in the iron business, a pur- 
suit which he followed for some years, but finally abandoned in order to 
engage in building. He was a good mechanic and many of the substantial 
structures in this part of the county are his handiwork. He was a man of 
intensely religious nature, a Methodist in belief and was one of the chief con- 



668 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 1IIST0R1. 

tributors toward the support of that denomination in Newfoundland. He 
married Elizabeth Lyon, a daughter of James Lyon, who resided near Boon- 
ton, and they became the parents of seven children, namely: Jeanette, wife 
of Samuel Truax; Jonathan, who was a soldier in the Union army and was 
held as a prisoner of war in Libby prison; Susan, wife of Charles A. Monks; 
Milton, deceased; Daniel, James and George. 

The last named equipped himself for the duties of life by learning the 
carpenter's trade, and soon took up contract work, which he has since con- 
tinued. He is one of the firm of Bigalow Brothers, proprietors of a saw and 
turning mill in Newfoundland, and through their industrial interests they have 
done much to improve and beautify this locality. They have erected a num- 
ber of important structures, including the addition to Brown's hotel, the 
McConnell residence, the addition to the hotel in Stockholm and several 
cottages there, and the residences of William Post, Leo P. Wise, Mrs. Wat- 
kins and James H. Owens, of Newfoundland. 

Mr. Bigalow was married December 28, 1880, to Sarah J. Davenport, 
daughter of Edward Davenport and Sarah (Fredericks) Davenport. Four 
children graced the union of Mr. and Mrs. Bigalow, but their first born, 
Reuben, is now deceased. The others are Bertha, Leonard and Horace, all 
at home. The family attend the Methodist church and Mr. Bigalow has 
been an active worker therein since boyhood. For several years he has 
served as superintendent of the Sunday-school and does all in his power to 
promote the growth and advance the work of the church. In his political 
views he is a Democrat, but has never taken an active part in political affairs. 
He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a kind 
father and good husband, striving at all times to cherish a sweet disposition. 



GEORGE F. McLEAN. 



George F. McLean, of Butler, was born in Essex county, Vermont, Feb- 
ruary 3, 1856, and is a representative of one of the old families of Massachu- 
setts, his father, Alexander McLean, having been a native of Boston, whence 
he removed to the Green Mountain state in his youth. He married Margaret, 
daughter of Lewis Reef, and as a life work followed the occupation of farming 
in New England. The record of his family is as follows: Mary is the wife of 
Joseph Durant, superintendent of the Sparta Iron Works, of Sparta, Wisconsin; 
Margaret is the wife of J. D. Andrews, of Manchester, New Hampshire; Anna 
is the wife of Philip Winsor, a resident of Seattle, Washington; William H. 
is a carpenter in Manchester, New Hampshire; and George F. completes the 
family. 

Our subject spent the first twenty years of his life in his native state and 







^<£**-z>fc~/t ^Z^?> /&?- 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 669 

then removed to New Jersey, locating in Butler. It was at that time that 
he first became connected with the Rubber Comb and Jewelry Works under 
the superintendency of Sonneborne. After spending a year in the factory he 
was induced to make a trip to the west, and spent the greater part of two 
years in Harrisville, Michigan. In 1880 he returned to Butler and accepted 
a minor position in the stock department of the Rubber Company. He knew 
nothing of the Goodyear process of manufacturing rubber, but had the faculty 
of adapting himself readily to his surroundings and to circumstances generally, 
aud was not long in demonstrating the fact that he was a capable, reliable 
young man, who would win advancement by close application and a thorough 
mastery of the duties entrusted to him. He applies himself to his work with 
diligence and energy, making the workshop his school, and when his chief, 
Superintendent Kiel, was called to take the direction and superintendency of 
the factory, his young Vermont assistant was regarded as the best equipped 
and most available man for the place left vacant by Mr. Kiel. Accordingly 
he was chosen and is now serving as chief of the stock-making department of 
the Butler Hard Rubber Works. He stands in confidential relations to his 
superior in all experiments, which are a large part of the work of his depart- 
ment, and has become an indispensable employe of the company. 

Mr. McLean was married in Butler, July 12, 1882, to Mary C. Riley, the 
youngest of the ten children of Mrs. Mary Riley, of Pompton. The others of the 
family are: George, Edward and John, all of Newark; Spencer, of Paterson, New 
Jersey; Isaiah and David, of Butler; Alice, wife of George W. Swift, of 
Elmira, New York; Sarah, wife of Charles Whiteman, of Bloomingdale, who 
is superintending the construction of a rubber plant at Hagen, Germany; and 
Louisa, wife of Levi Brown, of Butler. Mr. and Mrs. McLean are now the 
parents of four children — Wilber S., Clarence A., George Herbert and 
Helen. 



JOHN A. FARREL. 

This gentleman, a manufacturer of paper boxes at Butler, was born in 
Hammersley street, now a part of West Houston, in the city of New York, 
in 1849. He lost his mother when only four years old, but continued to live 
with his father, who was a man of considerable intelligence, highly respected 
by those who knew him. His early youth was passed in much the same 
manner as that of other boys of that period, attending school in his early 
years. Wishing, however, to be independent, he left the school-room for 
business life and at the age of fourteen years secured a position in a paper-box 
factory, where his fidelity to duty and application to the tasks assigned him 
won him constant promotion. After six years he was made manager of a box 



670 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

factory for a cable-cord manufacturer in Sixth avenue, New York. During 
this time, realizing the need of a better education, he attended the Cooper 
Institute and the New York Evening High School, in which institution he was 
graduated. In 1871 he accepted an offer of a position which came to him 
from New Haven, Connecticut, and remained in that state for seven years, 
spending three years in Waterbury. In 1880 'he entered the employ of the 
Butler Hard Rubber Company as foreman of the box department, and served 
there until 1898, when he entered into the business of manufacturing paper 
boxes on his own account. 

Mr. Farrei has taken a deep interest in the movements that tend to pro- 
mote the education, social and material Welfare of the community. At the 
formation of the Butler school district he was appointed school trustee, and 
was afterward elected to that office, and has since played an important part 
in locating and building the present Butler school. While a resident of Con- 
necticut Mr. Farrei became associated with several temperance organizations 
and soon drifted into the Prohibition party, where his enthusiasm caused him 
to receive their nomination for justice. He is now, however, a stanch Repub- 
lican in his political views and is a recognized leader in the local ranks of his 
party, having served as a member of the county executive committee and 
several times as a member of the township executive committee. Socially he 
is connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and is secretary of 
Silentia Lodge, F. & A. M. 

While connected with the Good Templars society Mr. Farrei was first 
introduced to Miss Ella E. Bassett, a daughter of Lewis Allen Bassett, a 
veteran of the Civil war, and a member of an old Connecticut family, and on 
the 4th of July, 1875, the young couple were married, Their union has 
been blessed with three children: Charlotte, Edna and Inez. In Butler the 
family have many warm friends. Mr. Farrei is rather reserved in manner, 
but his friendship once won is highly prized. He is a man of unswerving 
honesty, true to his convictions and in all life's relations is esteemed for his 
genuine worth. 



RUDOLPH GUNTER. 



This highly respected citizen of Butler is the foreman of the control 
room of the Butler Hard Rubber Company, and one of the oldest, in point 
of service, of the employes. He was born in Sulzbach, Baden, on the 11th 
of December, 1842. His father, George Gunter, was a native of the same 
locality, born in 1777, and was a linen-weaver by trade. In his early life he 
saw much of the actual warfare which was carried on by the great Napoleon 
in his conquest of Europe, and served in Spain and other countries with the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 671 

army of the " little Corsican. " He was in that service for eight years, and 
during his stay on the Iberian peninsula learned the language of the Castil- 
ians, so as to be able to speak it fluently. He resided in Baden until 1852, 
when he brought his children to the United States, and spent his remaining 
days in Newark, where his death occurred in February, 1883. He married 
Anna Mary Heinz, who died in her native land. Their children were: 
Frederick, who married Pelogia Belcher and died in Butler, New Jersey, where 
he was for some years in the employ of the Boonton Iron Works; Louisa, wife 
of Adam Berberich, of Newark; Apollonia, wife of Charles Schriver, a resident 
of Scranton, Pennsylvania; Isidore and Wilhelmina, both deceased; and 
Rudolph. 

On arriving in this country Rudolph Gunter attended the night schools 
of Newark jn order to acquaint himself with the English language. His first 
essential effort in the direction of his individual independence was in a har- 
ness-making establishment of that city, a pursuit which he followed in Newark 
until i860, when he went to Boonton and accepted a situation in the nail 
factory there. He worked in that line until the 1st of August, 1861, when 
he offered his service to the government, enlisting in Captain Theodore Feld- 
stein's company, known as Company F, Sixty-eighth New York Infantry. 
On the 27th of August the command left New York for the front and served 
in the First Brigade, Third Division, Eleventh Army Corps, and later in the 
Fourth Division, Twentieth Corps. He was discharged in Lookout Valley,. 
December 31, 1863, but re-enlisted as a veteran volunteer in the same com- 
pany and regiment January 7, 1864, for three years, under command of Colo- 
nel Robert E. Betger. He participated in a number of important engage- 
ments, including the battles of Warrenton Junction, March 29, 1862; Cross 
Keys, on the 8th of June, 1862; Whitehouse Fort in General Pope's cam- 
paign, from the 16th of August to the 11th of September, 1862; Waterloo- 
Bridge, August 24-25; Groveton, August 29; and Bull Run, August 30, 1862. 
He also took part in the battle of Gettysburg on the first three days of July, 
1863; Hagerstown, July 12-13; Manhatchee, Tennessee, October 28-29; the 
Chattanooga and Roseville campaign, November 23 to 27, 1863; and Mission- 
ary Ridge, November 25, 1863. From April, 1864, he served in the district 
of Nashville, department of the Cumberland, in the districts of Atlanta and 
Savannah. He was appointed sergeant January 2, 1864, at Whiteside, 
Tennessee; was captured at Gettysburg and taken to Libby prison, but was 
soon transferred to Belle Isle. At City Point he was exchanged and was 
honorably discharged under Prince Felix Salm-Salm, at Fort Pulaski, 
Georgia. 

While a prisoner of war on Belle Isle, Mr. Gunter became acquainted 
with the Confederate commandant, and cultivated his acquaintanceship. 



•672 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

hoping thereby to secure release from the southern prison with all its horrors, 
famine and uncleanliness. At that time there was an insufficient supply of 
greenbacks in the south and the rebel officers wished to acquire these at the 
expense of the government wherever they could see the opportunity to do so. 
The officer with whom Mr. Gunter carried on his negotiations proposed to 
release the sixty-three men of the one command for six hundred and thirty 
dollars. About this time the Confederate authorities proposed an exchange 
of silver for greenbacks and many of the thoughtless members of the north- 
ern army agreed to do this, thus disclosing to the enemy the fact that they 
possessed money. The identity of these men was noted by the rebels, and 
in a few days, instead of being called upon for the proper exchange, they 
were asked to turn over their money and were forced to do so without return. 
The proposition for release according to the above terms was accepted, but 
before the day fixed for their departure had arrived the prisoners had to 
listen to a speech by the president of the Confederacy, which was even then 
tottering on the verge of ruin. As many of the captives were Germans, he 
directed some of his remarks to them in an effort to show them that inasmuch 
as the United States had, so he affirmed, not shown an. extraordinary appre- 
ciation of them as citizens, but had offered them a mild insult instead, they 
were rendering that government an undue service and should, upon their 
release from prison, lay down their arms and thereby aid the cause of the 
Confederacy. But these remarks touched no sympathetic cords in the hearts 
of the prisoners of Belle Isle, who were as determined to subjugate the rebels 
as to gain their liberty from the rebel prison. 

When the day for departure for City Point came, the little band, hun- 
gry, ragged and dirty, walked out of the stockade and were taken by way of 
Richmond and Petersburg to the place of exchange, where, thirty days after- 
ward, ten dollars for each man was paid to the agent of the Confederacy. 
At Annapolis, Maryland, the released heroes of the " blue " were furnished 
with new suits and were given a thirty-days furlough, after which they 
returned to their command. Mr. Gunter was but once wounded, and that 
at the engagement at Fairfax Court House, where he received a sword cut. 
He was a loyal soldier, ever found at his post of duty and his patriotic devo- 
tion to the cause of the Union entitles him to the gratitude of all true lovers 
of the country. 

When hostilities had ceased he returned to Boonton, where he was 
employed as puddler in the rolling mill for twelve years. In May, 1877, he 
came to Bloomingdale and entered the employ of the Rubber Comb and 
Jewelry Company, and has been with that concern and its successor, the 
Butler Hard Rubber Company, since that time, covering a period of twenty- 
one consecutive years. His diligent application and untiring energy have 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 673 

made him a most trusted employe of the house, and no higher testimonial of 
his faithful service could be given than the statement of his long connection 
with the enterprise. 

Mr. Gunter was married in Newark, in St. Peter's church, in Belmont 
avenue, by Rev. Father Prieth, September 30, 1866, the lady of his choice 
being Barbara, daughter of Nicholas and Anna Maria (Sachs) Sachs, of 
Oberndorf, Bavaria. Her father died in his native land in 1844, and in July, 
1866, his family came to America. His children were: Mrs. Gunter, who 
was born December 7, 1839; Joseph, who died in Newark, July 13, 1893; 
and Rosalea, who died in 1867. To Mr. and Mrs. Gunter have been born 
nine children, as follows: Joseph, deceased; George A., cashier for the But- 
ler Hard Rubber Company, who was married to Barbara Fritz, May 30, 
1892, and has three children, Ferdinand, George and Louis; Barbara M., 
wife of George J. Fritz, of Butler; Annie, who resides at home; Augustin, 
who is also with the Butler Hard Rubber Company, and was married in 
November, 1897, to Ida Card; Otto, deceased; Lewis, a merchant of Butler; 
Rosa, Mary and Cecelia. 

Mr. Gunter and his family hold membership in the St. Anthony's church, 
Roman Catholic, and he belongs to the Catholic Benevolent Legion. He 
was one of the organizers of John E. Beam Post, G. A. R., and during his 
two-years service in the office of commander an indebtedness of six hundred 
dollars was lifted and a surplus was turned into the bank. He has ever taken 
a deep and active interest in this renewal of army relationships through the 
post, and is one of the most valued and esteemed members of the organiza- 
tion. His loyalty and worth as a man and citizen may be measured by his 
fidelity to the Union in the dark days when destruction threatened it. 



JACOB P. STICKLE. 

An honored citizen of Rockaway is Jacob P. Stickle, who was born in 
Pequanac township, Morris county, on the 10th of January, 1819, a son of Bea- 
man and Phoebe (Vandervoort) Stickle. His father was a native of the same 
township, born in 1894; his grandfather, the late George Stickle, was also born 
in Morris county, August 3, 1763, when Pequanac was one of its thriving 
settlements, and was connected with the White Meadow forges during the early 
mining days The great-grandfather, Peter Stickle, was one of the early set- 
tlers of the Rockaway valley, where he carried on farming and reared a large 
number of children. He was of German descent, his ancestors having 
emigrated from the fatherland long before the American Revolution; and the 
father of our subject and several brothers protected their country in the War 

17a 



674 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

of 1 812, as minute men, acting as home guards and being subject to call at 
any time. 

George Stickle was a Whig and a great admirer of John Quincy Adams; 
and in his religious belief he was a Presbyterian, holding his membership in 
the Presbyterian church at Rockaway. He married Sarah Beaman and had 
eleven children, all of whom grew up, married and had children. Peter Van- 
dervoort, our subject's maternal grandfather, was born on a farm in Rock- 
land county, New York, descending from an old Holland family, and married 
a Miss Coe, of French lineage. 

Jacob Parliman Stickle spent his early childhood in a place called Beach 
Glen, and when seven years of age accompanied his parents on their removal 
to Timberbrook, in the mountains, where his father owned a forge. The 
son attended school at that place until his thirteenth year and in his six- 
teenth year he came to Rockaway to learn the trade of carriage-making, in 
the shop of Cummings McCarthy. .After serving a three-years apprenticeship 
he purchased the remainder of his time of his employer and started in busi- 
ness for himself at Lockport, New York, where he remained four years, 
within which time the election of James K. Polk occurred, followed by a 
revision of the tariff; and this affected his business so adversely that he had 
to discontinue it and return to Rockaway. Here he took part in the con- 
struction of the first hard-coal blast furnace in Boonton, which was completed 
in nine months. 

In February, 1849, he went to California by the way of Cape Horn, 
reaching San Francisco September 17, with but fifty cents in his pocket; but 
he soon found employment, at carpentering, for which he received as wages 
twelve dollars a day. After being thus employed for a month he repaired to 
the mines at Jamestown and engaged in placer mining, meeting with fair 
success. Returning to Rockaway he engaged in the grocery trade, which he 
carried on until 1856, when he sold out; then he was engaged in the drug 
trade until 1875, and since August, 1878, he has been engaged in the insur- 
ance business. 

In his political views Mr. Stickle has long been a stanch Republican; he 
has served on the township committee, and has been honored with a num- 
ber of local offices; was postmaster for eleven years, under Presidents Lin- 
coln, Johnson and Grant; served as a member of the common council of 
Rockaway borough, also as a member of the school board, and for a num- 
ber of years as justice of the peace, in which office his administration of jus- 
tice was acceptable. He is a member of Acacia Lodge, No. 20, A. F. & A. 
M., and in religion he is a member of St. John's Protestant Episcopal 
church, at Dover, and Mrs. Stickle is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 675 

On the 6th of November, 1839, he was united in marriage with Miss 
Minerva Hinchman, a daughter of Joseph and Emily (Abbott) Hinchman, 
who was born at Denville, Morris county, and is a representative of an old 
and prominent Connecticut family. 

In all the relations of life Mr. Stickle's career has been characterized by 
fidelity to duty and by intelligence and good judgment in the execution of 
the responsibilities which have officially and otherwise devolved upon him. 



JAMES H. BERRY. 

The subject of this memoir, as a contractor and builder, was long closely 
connected with the material development of Madison, Morris county, New 
Jersey, of which place he became a resident in 1861. Some of the facts 
regarding his life and ancestry are herewith recorded: 

James H. Berry was born at Pompton Plains, Morris county, New Jer- 
sey, June 26, 1833, his birthplace being the same as that of his father and 
grandfather, Henry H. Berry and Henry Berry respectively. The progeni- 
tors of the Berrys in America came to this country from England, landing 
here at an early day, three brothers of that name coming together. Samuel 
settled in New York, Martin in New Jersey, and the name and settlement of 
the third are unknown. From Martin is the subject of our sketch descended, 
Martin being the father of Henry. Henry Berry and his son, Henry H., were 
both prominent men in their day and place, the former serving in various 
local offices, for thirty years being a justice of the peace. Henry H. Berry, 
who was born in 1800, lived to a venerable age, his death occurring in 18S1. 
He, too, filled many local offices of prominence and trust. He married Miss 
Elizabeth Mandeville, daughter of Captain James Mandeviile. Captain 
Mandevifle was an officer in the war of 18 12 and was for a number of years a 
resident of Pompton Plains, where he died about 1840. Mrs. Elizabeth 
Berry died in 1868, leaving two children, namely: James H , whose name 
graces this sketch, and his sister, Sophronia M., who became the wife of Cor- 
nelius Jacobus, who died, and she afterward married Agustus Arford, in Cali- 
fornia in 1893. 

The immediate subject of this review, James H. Berry, passed his boy- 
hood days on his father's farm and early in life learned the trade of brick and 
stone mason, which he followed, as a contractor, up to the time of his death, 
having been a resident of Madison for nearly three decades. Within this 
time he erected many of the business houses and residences of Madison and 
adjoining towns, among which may be mentioned the Mader Block, Wagner 
Building, Allen Block, and residences of George Cook, Dr. Aikman, and Mr. 
Nickson, in Madison, and the new school and bank buildings at Summit. 



676 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

All these and many others are monuments to his enterprise and skill as a 
builder. 

Mr. Berry was in earl) 7 life a Whig and "Know-Nothing," and upon 
the organization of the Republican party became a supporter of its prin- 
ciples, taking a commendable interest in all public affairs. Religiously he 
was a Presbyterian. 

He married Miss Mary Williams, daughter of Jared Williams, of Pomp- 
ton Plains, the Williams, like the Berrys, having long been residents of Morris 
county, there first settlement here being at Boonton. 

Mr. Berry died April 3. 1898, his death being deeply deplored in the 
community where he had so long lived and labored to goodly ends. 



JOHN L. KANOUSE. 

To no one more than to Judge John L. Kanouse is credit due for the 
advancement made in the public schools of Morris county, and in other lines 
of progress also has he been an important factor, leaving the impress of his 
individuality upon the substantial development of this section of the state. 
He is a man of strong mentality, of sound judgment and keen discrimination, 
and, viewing broadly the needs of the public, he has advocated those interests 
which tend to produce the best results in the line of educational, material, 
social and moral improvement. He ranks among the most honored citizens 
of the county, and his history forms an integral part of its annals. 

Judge Kanouse was born at the farmstead of his maternal grandfather, 
John Low, not far from his present home in Boonton, February 17, 181 1, 
and is a son of Abraham and Elizabeth (Low) Kanouse. The paternal 
grandfather, Jacob Kanouse (or ' ' Knauss, " as the name was originally spelled), 
was born in the kingdom of Wurtemberg, Germany, and with his brother 
Heinrich, came to America about 1750. These two brothers, being under 
age, were accompanied by a half brother, son of the same mother by her first 
marriage, and to him was intrusted the care of their money, which, although a 
moderate amount, was sufficient to pay their expenses on the vessel and leave 
enough to give them a start in the New World. When they arrived in New 
York this half-brother, under some plausible excuse, but possibly in collusion 
with the captain, went ashore first and failed to return. They were then 
told their passage had not been paid, and in compliance with the then pre- 
vailing custom they would have to be sold to service to pay their expenses. 
Accordingly they were sold for a term of seven years each. Jacob, after 
serving his term, settled, prior to 1766, near Boonton; the house in which he 
lived is still standing, showing it was a substantial structure. He died in 
1 82 1, at an advanced age. He was twice married, and his son Abraham was 





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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 677 

one of four children born of the second union. The latter received such 
educational privileges as the schools of those days afforded, and then learned 
the carpenter's trade, which he followed throughout his life. He was born 
in 1786 and died in 1868. His children were John L. ; Rachel, who died in 
childhood; and Morris, who also died in early life. The mother, son and 
daughter all died within three weeks, in 18 19, of a prevailing epidemic, 
leaving the Judge and his father to mourn their loss. 

Judge Kanouse acquired his preliminary education in the public schools 
near his home, and when thirteen years of age entered the private school of 
Ezra Fairchild, at Succasunna Plains, where he remained for some time. 
When seventeen years of age he became a student in the Bloomfield Acad- 
emy, at Bloomfield, Essex county, where he pursued his studies for one year. 
He then turned his attention to teaching, but later resumed his studies by 
matriculating in Union College, at Schenectady, New York, in 1830, as a 
member of the junior class. In July, 1832, he was graduated at that insti- 
tution with the degree of A. B. ; his standing in his class was " maximum " 
in all respects. The following year he received notice of his election as a 
member of the Phi Beta Kappa, a literary society, and since has been hon- 
ored with the degree of M. A. He has always maintained a strong feeling 
of interest in the welfare of this college, and has at intervals attended the 
yearly commencement exercises. In 1882 he was present at the fiftieth 
re-union of his class, when seven members met together; in June, 1892, he 
met, at Schenectady, one of his classmates, a clergyman from Long Island, 
who has since died, leaving, to the best of his knowledge, Prof. Charles E. 
West, of Brooklyn, and himself the sole representatives of the class of 1832. 
In 1895 ne attended the centennial of the college, a memorable occasion, 
and at the commencement exercises was the oldest graduate present. While 
a student in Schenectady, in 1830, Mr. Kanousj witnessed the grading and 
building of the first regularly equipped passenger railroad in the United 
States. It was called the Mohawk & Hudson Railroad, and ran from Albany 
to Schenectady, a distance of seventeen miles. 

A few years after leaving college he engaged in mercantile business, in 
which he continued for a period of thirty-eight years in the town where he 
lived. 

He has always been a student of political questions, of social problems, 
and the needs of the country and its people, and his thorough understanding 
of these things have peculiarly fitted him for office. He has always been 
particularly interested in the cause of education, and no man in Morris 
county has done more for the public schools than Judge Kanouse. His 
sterling worth and pronounced ability led to his selection for official honors, 
and in 1849 he was chosen to represent his district in the state legislature, 



678 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

and was again elected to that office in 185 1. During his service in the 
assembly he was a member of the committee on education, and in his first 
term was chairman of that committee. While a member of the legislature 
he was active in urging the increase of the general school fund, that an 
increasing appropriation from its income might be given to schools, and thus 
prepare the way for a general school law, making all the public schools free. 
He certainly deserves great credit for this work, and as long as the school 
system of the state stands his name will be inseparably associated with its 
history. In 1847 he was elected to the office of superintendent of the public 
schools in Pequannock township, Morris county, — a township at that time 
in area nearly as large as Essex county. This position he filled most accept- 
ably for sixteen years, his able administration resulting in the adoption of a 
much higher standard of education than had ever been maintained before. 
In entering upon his duties as superintendent he found a scarcity of books in 
most of the schools, and a great need of a better class of text-books in all. 
To remove this hindrance to improvement he went to the publishers of 
school-books and made a selection of suitable books, which he bought at 
publishers' wholesale prices. These books were placed in the hands of the 
different teachers for sale at the publishers' regular price, and this secured a 
ready introduction of a better class of books. 

The next movement he made was upon the public sentiment in the 
township, by a carefully prepared report of the existing condition of school 
buildings, and the need of improvement in several different ways, to attract 
better teachers and secure more thorough instruction. This report was read 
by the superintendent, in the presence of four or five hundred people 
assembled at an annual town meeting, held in the old democratic way in the 
open air, and voting viva-voce. It was favorably received, as evidenced by 
a resolution unanimously passed before the close of the meeting, ordering 
several hundred copies of it to be printed in pamphlet form for circulation. 
To secure thorough instruction, the superintendent believed it necessary 
that teachers employed should thoroughly understand the subjects taught, 
and the best methods of imparting their information. He therefore, in 
1853, proceeded to organize an association of the teachers in Pequannock, 
with monthly meetings for self-improvement in their profession as teachers. 
At the request of the members, the superintendent acted as their leader, 
which service was rendered gratuitously for one year. This movement was 
attended by good results, and may be considered as a forerunner of what fol- 
lowed fifteen years later, when, in 1867, in the general free-school law, pro- 
vision was made for holding teachers' institutes periodically in different 
counties throughout the state. 

He was elected as one of the two chosen freeholders to represent 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 679 

Pequannock township in the county board of freeholders, and was chosen by 
the board as their director, which position he filled for three years prior to 
1S50. When in the legislature, in 1850, he attended a meeting of the Prison 
Reform Society, the object of which organization was to inspect county 
prisons and make suggestions of some needed practical reform. The mem- 
bership of this organization consisted of leading philanthropic citizens of the 
state, such as the governor, the chancellor, judges of the supreme court, and 
also Rev. Dr. Murray, of Elizabeth, noted as a true Christian and active 
philanthropist. Mr. Kanouse was deeply impressed with what he heard at 
that meeting, and after the close of the legislature returned home and pre- 
pared a report on the condition of the prison in Morris county and the urgent 
necessity of reform, which was presented at the annual meeting of the board 
of freeholders in May, 1850. He stated that the present condition of the 
prison tended to harden in crime rather than to reform, and that it was 
thought by many a remedy would be found in substituting useful labor in 
place of enforced idleness. The report was accepted and approved, and 
action at once taken to appoint a committee to visit prisons in other states, 
where this experiment had been tested, and report with what success. John 
L. Kanouse, Henry Hilliard and William Britten were the committee. The 
investigation was made without delay, report submitted and approved, with 
the result that J. L. Kanouse, Henry Hilliard and Abraham Dunn were 
appointed a committee with power to proceed and erect a work-house adjoin- 
ing the court-house, which was completed in the year following, and brought 
into use under a system of rules and regulations drafted by Mr. Kanouse, 
chairman of committee. This work-house was continued for a few years, 
when a report was made that the work system was not pecuniarily profitable 
and the board of freeholders by vote abolished it. 

In the year 1850, owing to the growth of population in Boonton, the 
school became overcrowded and some were asking for a division of the dis- 
trict. The superintendent, who had the power to do so, hesitated, believing 
it would be most to the advantage of the people to remain in one district and 
have a free school, and, without intimating his purpose, proceeded to prepare 
the draft of a bill suited, as he thought, to meet the wants of the case. In 
November of that year he presented it for consideration at a public meeting 
called for that purpose and accompanied it with a statement of the advan- 
tages of a free school. The proposition and the bill as presented were favor- 
ably received, and after further consideration the bill, accompanied with a 
petition, was presented to the next legislature. It was passed in March, 
1 85 1, and went into effect immediately. In this year (1 851) a suitable build- 
ing was erected, and in July, 1852, the school was opened in it. This was 
the first free school opened in Morris county, and the first by fifteen years 



680 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

before the general free-school law of 1867. Under this law of 185 1, with a 
board of three trustees, the school was operated for twenty-four years, — to 
1875. Owing to the rapid growth of Boonton in the eight or nine years 
after the close of the Civil war much of its population had spread beyond the 
limits of the 'school district established in the act of 185 1, and the increased 
number of departments and pupils and other reasons made it advisable to 
have a new charter, extending the limits and vesting the control and manage- 
ment under a board of education consisting of seven commissioners in place 
of three trustees. To Mr. Kanouse (who was one of the trustees) was assigned 
the work of drafting a new bill providing for the necessary changes and 
the prospective wants of the growing district. He prepared the bill in Decem- 
ber, 1874, and it was passed by the legislature on the 5th of April, 1875, and 
went into effect immediately; and under that act the school is operated now. 

In the latter part of January, 1876, Judge Kanouse, while engaged in 
the court room, was called upon by the county superintendent of Morris 
county, and requested to write a history of public schools in the three town- 
ships of Morris county, Pequannock, Montville and Boonton, for an exhibit 
in the educational department at the Centennial exhibition to open in May at 
Philadelphia. The brief time for the performance of the work caused some 
hesitation in his promising to undertake it; he did, however, prepare it in 
ample time. The county superintendent had it engrossed, and it appeared 
in its proper place at the Centennial. 

In 1 88 1 W. W. Munsell & Company, book publishers in New York, 
urged Judge Kanouse to write up a history of three townships, — Pequannock, 
Montville and Boonton, — to be placed in a history of Morris county which 
they were about to publish. This was a work which, to be of use, should 
be reliable, and consequently required much labor and careful and thorough 
research in the examination of public records and documents, as well as 
inquiry among the oldest living inhabitants. He completed the work in 1881, 
and it appeared in the publication in 1882. In the closing pages of this book 
may be found an appendix containing an analysis of county taxation and 
expenditures for a period of twenty-five years. This was also prepared by 
Judge Kanouse, after much careful examination of county records, and may 
be considered as correct and reliable as a matter of reference. 

In 1872 he was elected an associate judge of Morris county, and effi- 
ciently filled that office for five years. He has served in various township 
offices, and is at present filling the position of tax collector of Boonton town- 
ship, which office he has held for a number of years. He has ever been 
faithful and discharged his duty with a loyalty and promptness that have 
known no wavering, and his service has ever won the warm commendation 
generally of all concerned. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 681 

In early life he gave his political support to the Whig party, casting his 
first presidential ballot for Henry Clay in 1S32. At the formation of the 
Republican party in 1856 he became one of its warm advocates, and was 
chosen president of the first Republican club in Morris county, formed in 
Boonton. He has since marched under its banners, doing all in his power to 
advance and support its principles. During the last presidential campaign 
(McKinley and Bryan) his whole enthusiasm was aroused; he felt the issues at 
stake were vital and important, needing careful scrutiny and analysis. He 
studied them well and thoroughly, and on the eve of election day he made 
the closing speech of the campaign in the opera house at Boonton. He 
spoke for an hour, with force and vigor, to a large audience composed of 
all parties, and at the close of the meeting received the warm congratula- 
tions of the leading citizens; it was conceded by those who heard him to 
have been the speech of the campaign. As a public speaker he has ever 
been forceful, logical and eloquent, concentrating his thoughts and cloth- 
ing his ideas in choice language. His memory for dates is remarkable, as all 
who listen to him as he relates incidents and facts of by-gone days can 
testify. 

The Judge was married at Unionville, Orange county, New York, in 
December, 1837, to Ann S. Chandler; his children by that marriage were 
three daughters: Hannah E., deceased; Ann Augusta, wife of John F. Post, 
of Pompton, New Jersey; and Mary C. , who also has passed away. The 
mother of these children died in June, 1847. In 1852, in Belmont, Alle- 
gany county. New York, he married Eliza Thibou; they have one daughter, 
Adelaide T. , wife of Dr. John L. Taylor. 

Judge Kanouse has long since passed the Psalmist's span of three-score 
years and ten, being now (1898) in his eighty-eighth year, but his is an 
active old age, and his life is crowned with the honors and veneration which 
follow an upright career. 

From 181 1 to near the close of 1898, Mr. Kanouse has lived through a 
most eventful period of our national history, and witnessed great and im- 
portant changes both in political and social affairs, the contest of party for 
ascendancy and the strife of politicians for place and power. As the result 
of his observation and careful thought, he says he has come to the conclusion 
that true great political power is not achieved by cunning artifice and virtu- 
ous pretence, but by an upright and virtuous life; and that evidence of such 
is to be found in a life of practical sincerity in accordance with the living 
principles of moral rectitude. What those principles are, may be found 
plainly stated in the twelfth chapter of Matthew, in the words of Christ, 
" Love to God and love to fellow man." Therein he believes is the founda- 
tion of all true morality and the foundation of all true Christianity. 



682 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

MISS SARAH A. LINDSLEY. 

Miss Lindsley, who resides at the ancestral home of the Lindsleys in 
Passaic township, Morris county, is now the only living representative of the 
family of John Lindsley, who for many years was one of the leading farmers 
and citizens of this section of the state. His father, Captain John Lindsley, 
was one of the original settlers of the soil of this township. He was a brother 
of David and Silas Lindsley, whose father was John Lindsley, — the Christian 
name of John having been a favorite in the family. Four Lindsley brothers 
came to Morris county at a very early period in its development and from 
them are descended the representatives of the name who have formed an 
important part of the population of Morris county and have been active fac- 
tors in its public life. 

John Lindsley, the father of the lady whose name begins this review, 
was born in Passaic township, November 20, 1785, and died in 1853. His 
wife, who bore the maiden name of Martha Tompkins, was born in 1785 and 
died in 1861. They reared four children. Cyrus M., the eldest, born Octo- 
ber 6, 1807, made farming his life work and died in 1879.' He was married 
and reared a large family, of whom three are living: Foster, of Highbridge, 
New Jersey; Henry P., who is living on the old homestead; and John, of 
Madison, New Jersey. Nancy, who was born in 1812, became the wife of 
David Trowbridge, and died November 14, 1885. Benjamin H., born in 
1816, died September 10, 1874. He also had a family, which is represented 
by Mrs. Emma Brant, his daughter, who is now living in Morristown. The 
youngest of the family is Miss Sarah Amanda Lindsley, who was born April 
7, 1 819, and is now residing on the old homestead, where her birth occurred 
and where she has made her home throughout her entire life. This place is 
now her property and she has in her possession many old deeds showing that 
the family were land-owners at a very early day. 

Her father, John Lindsley, was a Democrat in his political affiliations, 
held various school offices and acceptably served as justice of the peace. 
He was a well educated man and always took a deep interest in school affairs. 
He was an honorable business man, a public-spirited citizen, and his well 
spent life commanded the respect of all with whom he came in contact. 
The family has long been prominent in Morris county, and this history would 
be incomplete without specific mention made thereof. 



HENRY C. RAYNOLDS. 

The subject of this sketch, whose identification with the development 
of various interests classes him among the leading representatives of indus- 
trial affairs in Morris county, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, January 22, 1865, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 683 

a son of Henry K. and Sarah M. (Case) Raynolds. His father was a native 
of Kingsland, Essex county, New Jersey, and his ancestors, the Kingslands, 
located here in 1680, being descended from an old English family that dur- 
ing the time of Oliver Cromwell's protectorate fled to America, settling first 
on the island of Barbadoes, and later in New Jersey. King Charles II, after 
his restoration to the British throne, gave the Kingslands a grant of land six 
miles square lying along the Passaic river, near Newark; and the old stone 
manor house, built in 1730, and occupied by the British in 1776-8 as one of 
the official headquarters of that army, is still in possession of the Raynolds 
family. H. K. Raynolds, the father, was a hardware merchant in New York, 
and later in Cleveland, Ohio, but in 1880 returned to New York, where 
in company with his brother, C. T. Raynolds, the paint manufacturer and 
importer of New York, he organized the Diamond Mills Paper Company for 
the manufacture of tissue paper, the plant of which is the most extensive of 
its kind in the country. 

The early life of our subject was spent in attendance at the public 
schools of Cleveland, Ohio, and at preparatory schools in Ballston Spa, New 
York, and Granville, Ohio, having in the latter place carried on his studies 
as far as the freshman work in Dennison University, when he came to Mor- 
ris county, New Jersey, as a representative of the American Swedes' Iron 
Company, of Ro.ckaway. This company was organized by Mr. Raynolds' 
father and uncle, who equipped the old Rockaway Rolling Mill by an outlay 
of some sixty thousand dollars, to make steel billets from ore crushed and 
separated by electricity on much the same principle as that now employed by 
Mr. Edison at his works near Lake Hopatcong. Mr. Raynolds was in charge 
here until 1886, when, the plant being destroyed by fire, he came to Whip- 
pany, as representative of the Diamond Mills Paper Company, and in 1893 
organized "The Lake Hopatcong, Boonton, Morristown & New York Rail- 
road Company," for the purpose of bringing all parts of Morris county and 
certain parts of Essex county into shorter railway communication with New 
York city, the plan being to connect the Erie Railroad system at Montclair 
with the New Jersey Central system at Rockaway and Morristown, and with 
the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western system at Morristown, by which not 
only the cities of Morns county would be brought from three to ten miles 
nearer New York, but would secure the advantages of cheaper freight and 
coal rates, as well as closer interurban connection. Surveys being made by 
a corps of experienced engineers, options were secured by Mr. Raynolds for a 
double-track line, connecting the different systems. Stocks and bonds to be 
issued to the amount of five hundred thousand dollars were authorized by the 
company's charter, and these securities were offered both to the connecting 
railroad companies, as well as to the various capitalists in New York, but 



684 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



were refused on the ground that sufficient traffic was not in sight to justify 
their purchase. Mr. Raynolds always had great faith in the consummation 
of this railroad project on the basis of its great pecuniary benefit to all citi- 
zens of Morris county by placing its towns, cities and outlying farmlands so 
much nearer to the metropolis, and believes that the people of the county 
should have subscribed the bonds and made the proposed connections. He 
still thinks that his plan of extension from Rockaway, Boonton and Morris- 
town to a common point at the proposed tunnel through the Orange mount- 
ains at Montclair will eventually be carried out, the tunnel and much of the 
grading between Montclair and Caldwell being already well under way. 

In 1895 ne organized the Eden Mills Paper Company, which purchased 
the Eden Tissue Mills at Whippany, for the manufacture of carbon, cigarette, 
grass-bleached and celluloid tissues. This plant he improved at an outlay 
of fifty thousand dollars, adding new machinery throughout, besides a new 
steam plant, together with other improved equipments, as well as additions 
of brick and stone buildings. The water power of the mill, dam and races 
were also improved; and in place of the old-time method of carting four 
miles to Morristown, connection was made by switches with the Whippany 
River Railroad. By such improvements the plant is now able to take its 
rank among the best in the country, both for economy in handling its crude 
material and perfection in its production of the higher grade of tissues, and, 
on account of the superior and abundant spring water of these mills, will 
always claim a preference in the production of these papers. 

In 1893 Mr. Raynolds organized the Whiponong Hall and Library 
Association, — a sketch of whose building is herewith presented. 




WHIPONONG HALL. 

This association was organized for the development of educational and 
moral interests in Hanover township, and some five thousand dollars was 
raised for the purpose, and a fine public library was established, known as 
the Mrs. J. W. Roberts Memorial, with which is connected a reading-room 
open daily. This association has decided to cancel its capital stock and 
place its property and interests in the hands of a board of trustees, composed 





^ 



^ 






BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 685 

of Hon. W. C. Bates, W. W. Cook and Mr. Raynolds, under whose direc- 
tion a still wider field of usefulness is contemplated. 

In 1888 Mr. Raynolds was married to Miss Marietta B. Allen, a native 
of Mehdham, New Jersey, and a daughter of James and Sarah J. (Smith) 
Allen. In his political views Mr. Raynolds is a Republican, and has been 
honored with several local offices, having served one term as township com- 
mitteeman, and two terms as township clerk of Rockaway. Both Mr. Ray- 
nolds and his wife attended the Presbyterian church at Whippany, of which 
he has served as trustee and also as treasurer. He has also, during his resi- 
dence in Morris county, opened a reading room and established a street 
lighting system for Rockaway, and was the original projector of the Morris- 
town-Whippany macadam road, which was among the first of this class of 
roads to be built in Morris county. He is also a firm believer in the develop- 
ment of Hanover township as a suburb of New York, lying as it does (by the 
way of the above mentioned railroad tunnel) from twenty to twenty-five 
miles from that city, and is in fact active and zealous in all matters pertain- 
ing to the best development of the community. 



CHARLES F. HOPKINS. 

This well known citizen of Boonton was born in the village of Hope, 
Warren county, New Jersey, on the 16th of May, 1842. His ancestors were 
of the Mayflower stock, a long and honorable line that reaches back to 1554, 
in Coventry, England. The representatives of the name were famed for 
military and naval service. The first admiral of the American navy was of 
the line of Hopkins, as was the English admiral who had command of the 
British squadron at the Columbian naval parade in New York harbor, in 
1892. They were also strong men intellectually, and combative and fearless 
in defense of rights and principles. Stephen Hopkins, the fourteenth signer 
of the Mayflower compact, in 1620, was an ancestor in direct line of three 
brothers who flourished one hundred and fifty years later. These were 
Stephen Hopkins, a lawyer, who settled in Rhode Island and was one of the 
signers of the Declaration of Independence; Francis, an Episcopalian clergy- 
man, who settled in Hunterdon county, near what is now Highbridge, New 
Jersey; and Jonathan Hopkins, a farmer, who located in northern New Jer- 
sey in a section then embraced in Hunterdon county, later Sussex, but after- 
ward divided and known as the township of Parhaquarry, in Warren county. 
It is from this branch of the family that Charles F. Hopkins is descended. 

Jonathan Hopkins had a son, Nathan, who married Esther Dryal or 
Driel, and they had two children, Esther and Driel, the latter born Novem- 
ber 29, 1780. They were orphaned at an early age and left to the guardian- 



686 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ship of Captain Doddy. A considerable estate was left to them, including 
the fine farming land lying between Hope and Belvidere, New Jersey. On 
both sides they were of English and Scotch descent, and were Methodists in 
religious belief. They were carefully educated by their guardian, and after 
arriving at years of maturity Esther married a Mr. Schooley, but had no chil- 
dren. Driel became the grandfather of the subject of this review. He was an 
iron dealer and contractor of Warren county, New Jersey, where he owned and 
operated a large tract of land and was recognized as a very progressive and 
energetic business man. During the war of 1812 he furnished the govern- 
ment with large numbers of cattle. He was also an extensive dealer in iron 
and had in Philadelphia large business interests. There were no telegraphs 
in those days, and the sudden termination of the war left him with a large 
number of cattle on hand which he was forced to dispose of at considerable 
loss. He then went to New York where he successfully conducted a hotel 
and also imported goods. He was noted for his generosity, strong intellect 
and warm friendships; was a man of fine physique, six feet tall and well pro- 
portioned, with an exceptionally fine carriage, and he had an excellent edu- 
cation, was well informed on all matters of general interest and enjoyed the 
confidence and esteem of all who knew him in business or socially. 

Driel Hopkins married Sarah Danley, a daughter of James Danley. 
She was born near Vienna, Warren county, New Jersey, December 10, 1785, 
and her marriage was celebrated November 10, 1800. Although only fifteen 
years of age at the time, she was well developed, tall and of fine presence 
with prepossessing womanly attainments. Her mother was at one time baking 
pies in an old Dutch oven which stood out of doors, when General Washing- 
ton and his staff rode by. All pies that required filling, such as pumpkin, 
custard, etc., were filled by using a long-handled wooden ladle, made of one 
piece of wood, — from the bowl of which the filling was poured into the crust, 
— which was previously placed in the oven. Washington requested the privi- 
lege of filling some of the pies, and when they were baked he and his staff 
feasted thereon. The old wooden ladle which he used is now in possession 
of the subject of this sketch. 

Driel and Sarah Hopkins became the parents of nine children: Juliet 
L., born August 7, 1 801 ; the second died in infancy unnamed; Jonathan, who 
was born December 14, 1803, married and located in Wisconsin, where he 
reared a family of seven children; James was born December 14, 1805; 
Caroline was born June 22, 1807; Anderson was born December 14, 1808; 
Amanda, born March 11, 1810; Nathan, father of our subject, was born 
February 22, 181 1; and Harrison was born March 1, 181 5. The mother of 
this family died May 11, 1821, and Driel Hopkins was married in 1824 to 
Mary Straley. They made their home in Vienna, New Jersey, and became 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 687 

the parents of five children: Esther, born December 26, 1826; Huldah, who 
was born in 1829; Elizabeth, born in 1831; Mary Jane, born November 3, 
1836; and Sorama, who died in infancy. The father of this family lived to 
be four-score years of age, — a consistent Christian gentleman who was highly 
respected by his neighbors and friends. 

Nathan Hopkins, who was born in Succasunna, February 22, 1811, 
learned the trade of harness-making and followed it for sixty-four years, 
including a five-years apprenticeship, and always worked on the same bench 
on which his employer had learned his trade, and which had been used by 
him for fifty-nine years. In addition to harness-making Mr. Hopkins engaged 
in hotel-keeping for eight years and was also proprietor of a store for seven 
years. For many years he resided in Hope, New Jersey, whence he removed 
to Drakesville, now Ledgewood, in 1848. In 1856 he went to Powerville, 
Morris county, and in 1861 to Succasunna, where he died within a few yards 
of his birthplace, November 13, 1889, his remains being interred in the 
churchyard there. He was a man of strong convictions, and one of his 
marked characteristics was his loyalty to his friends. He was a Presbyterian 
in his religious faith, and a Whig in politics until 1856, when he became an 
ardent Republican, continuing his allegiance to the latter party until his 
death. He was also a strong anti-slavery man, and his home was a station 
on the famous " underground railroad," whereby many slaves were conducted 
on their way to freedom. In his business dealings he was successful and 
acquired quite a handsome property at Hope, New Jersey. He attended 
very strictly to business, never being away from his shop a week at any one 
time, and never more than a few weeks, all told, throughout his business 
career. 

On the 1st of June, 1834, Nathan Hopkins married Ann Wilson. Her 
great-grandparents were Robert and Betsy Blair. The former was probably 
a native of this state, and resided in the vicinity of Blairstown. By his 
marriage he had four children, among whom was Robert Blair, Jr., who 
married Betsy Glassiner. By this marriage there were also four children 
born: James, Peter, Mary and Daniel. Mary became the wife of John 
Wilson, and they settled in what is now Luzerne county, Pennsylvania. 
John Wilson was a son of Peter and Mary Wilson, representatives of good 
families of the Keystone state. Unto John and Mary (Blair) Wilson were 
born thirteen children, namely: Elizabeth, Sallie, Ann, Katie, James, Peter, 
Sarah Maria, Robert, Rebecca, John Blair, Margaret, Serenda and Andrew. 
The mother of these children died when about fifty years of age, the 
father at the age of eighty-one. Ann, their third child, was the mother 
of the subject of this sketch. She was a model Christian woman, held 
membership with the Methodist church and was beloved by all who knew 



<38S BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

her. She was generous and benevolent and a leader in all good work, had a 
certainly motherly tenderness for those who lacked the comforts of a home, 
and often won by gentleness where others failed by harsh measures. Unto 
Nathan and Ann Hopkins were born six children: William Emmett, who 
was born June 27, 1835, in Hope, New Jersey, wedded Mary A. Riley, and 
died in Boonton August 11, 1898; Sarah Rebecca, born in Hope, December 
9, 1836, became the wife of Edward Riley, of Dover, New Jersey, and died 
in Dover, July 30, 1881; Abigail Gertrude, born in Hope, September 2, 
1838, is the wife of William Riley, of Dickinson, Michigan; Caleb Swayze, 
born in Hope, June 22, 1840, died November 26, 1 841 ; Charles Ferren 
is the next of the family; John Robertson, who was born in Hope, November 2, 
1844, died in Boonton, October 22, 1885. Nathan Hopkins was again mar- 
ried, in 1856, his second union being with Mrs. Ellen King, widow of James 
King. Their children were Elvie, who was born at Powerville, New Jersey, 
May 6, 1857, and died in Succasunna, March 27, 1873; Ella, who was born 
in Boonton, May 18, 1859, and died in Succasunna, in May, 1876; Elmer 
Ellsworth, who was born in Succasunna, January 15, 1861, and married 
Hattie Reeves, their home being in Succasunna; and Winfield Scott, who 
was born in Succasunna, September 18, 1863. He married Aura Martin, 
and died in Boonton, November 13, 1893. The father of this family, 
Nathan Hopkins, was married again in 1876 or 1877 to Mrs. Mary Hill, a 
widow. No children. 

Charles Ferren Hopkins, whose name introduces this review, was reared 
in the country and for seven years attended the country schools for about 
four months each year. When twelve years of age he began learning the 
trade of harness-making under the direction of his father, and later completed 
his apprenticeship in a large harness-manufacturing establishment of Newark. 
He began business on his own account in Boonton, in i860, and has since 
carried on operations there with the exception of the period which he passed 
in the service of his country. He has secured a liberal patronage by reason 
of his excellent workmanship and well directed efforts, his enterprise and his 
earnest desire to please his patrons. 

On the 3d of May, 1861, Mr. Hopkins donned the blue as a defender of 
the Union, and was the first man in Morris county to enlist for three years. 
He was mustered in at Trenton, New Jersey, June 4, 1861, as a member of 
Company I, First New Jersey Volunteers, which regiment was assigned to the 
famous Kearney's New Jersey brigade. He was in the first Bull Run campaign, 
the peninsular campaign, and in the battle of Gaine's Mills, Virginia, June 27, 
1 862, carried Sergeant Richard A. Donnelly, now quartermaster-general of New 
Jersey, from the field under a terrible cross-fire. Mr. Hopkins had already 
been wounded twice, and was again badly wounded in the head after leaving 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 689 

Donnelly in a supposedly safe place. Later, however, both he and the ser- 
geant were taken prisoner, and Mr. Hopkins was reported among the dead. 
For his act of bravery in caring for his companion he was awarded the con- 
gressional medal of honor. He was not held a captive by the Confederates, 
and on account of his wound was sent to a Union hospital. As soon as 
possible he rejoined his regiment and at the battle of the Wilderness was 
again badly wounded and taken prisoner, only three days before the expira- 
tion of his term of his enlistment. For over ten months he was incarcerated, 
part of the time in Andersonville, Georgia, and the remainder in Florence, 
South Carolina, and while a captive endured the hardships common to all 
whose misfortune it was to be confined in those prisons. He was honorably 
discharged at Trenton, New Jersey, April 21, 1865, and with a military rec- 
ord of which he may well be proud returned to his home and the pursuits of 
•civil life. In 1898 he was commissioned by acting-Governor Voorhees, of 
New Jersey, to erect a monument at Andersonville, Georgia, in commemora- 
tion of the New Jersey soldiers who died there. 

Mr. Hopkins was married in Boonton, January 8, 1867, to Miss Hetty 
Ann Van Duyne, a daughter of Abraham B. and Caroline (Mowerson) Van 
Duyne. She was born February 27, 1847, and on the paternal side is 
descended from the Van Duyne and Husk families, while on the maternal 
side she is descended from the Mowerson and Van Horn families, — on both 
sides a long line of honest and respectable lineage of Dutch origin, and con- 
nected with the old Dutch Reformed church until within the last half cen- 
tury, when the Mowersons became Seceders. Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins are the 
parents of nine children: Alfaretta, born March 16, 1868; Frank Fern, who 
was born August 20, 1870, and died September 11, 1880; Lena Rebecca, 
born March 18, 1872; Carrie, born January 20, 1874; Ella May, born May 
1, 1876; Lizzie, who was born July 22, 1878, and died December 1, 1878; 
Emmett, born December 24, 1880; Charles, born January 24, 1884; and 
Frank Morrison, born March 1, 1887, — all natives of Boonton. 

Mr. Hopkins is recognized as a very prominent and influential citizen of 
Boonton, and has been active in pifblic and political affairs. He served. as 
town committeeman from 1868 until 1873, was a member of the board of 
freeholders from 1871 until 1874; elected mayor in 1880; again filled the 
office of freeholder from 1881 until 1884, when he resigned. He was assist- 
ant sergeant-at-arms of the New Jersey senate from 1882 until 1884, when 
he also resigned from that office, for in that year he was appointed postmas- 
ter of Boonton. He served for a four-years term, and in 1892 was again 
appointed to that office, serving until 1895, when he was removed as a 
partisan. He was elected to the assembly of New Jersey in 1896 and 1897. 
In 1898 he was unanimously elected clerk of the New Jersey assembly, and 

18a 



690 BIOGRAPHICAL AjYD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

served with distinction through the term, gaining many compliments for his 
work from the members. At the present time he is chief of the Boonton fire 
department. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and 
measures of the Republican party and is unwavering in his allegiance thereto. 
He cast his first vote for its candidates and has always labored to advance its 
best interests. 

Mr. Hopkins is an active man in all affairs that pertain to the welfare of 
his town and never shirks a duty that devolves upon a good citizen. He has 
been a Grand Army man since the formation of the order and is active in its 
support. He has many times served as post commander, and is now occu- 
pying that position in John Hill Post, No. 86, G. A. R. He has also been a 
department officer, is a member of the New Jersey ex-Prisoners of War, and 
is always found in attendance at the re-unions of the veterans of the Civil 
war held in New Jersey. He is a man of genial manner, kindly disposition 
and courteous deportment, holds friendship inviolable, is generous and benev- 
olent and quick to forgive. Whether on the field of battle, in public office 
or in the walks of private life he is the same loyal citizen, having the best 
interests of his country and of humanity at heart. 



ELLIS G. MYERS. 



Of the public-spirited citizens of Boonton, among the most prominent is 
Mr. Myers, who has been identified with the interests of the place for a 
number of years. This is his native city, as he was born here November 26, 
1855, a son of John and Sarah A. (Whitehead) Myers. His father was born 
in New York city May 5, 1833, and in 1854 came to Boonton and put in the 
plumbing, etc., for the Boonton Iron Works, also taking charge of the water- 
works department of that concern and remaining thus employed until his 
death, which occurred in 1879. His wife is still living. Of their four 
children, three are living: Ellis G. is the subject of this sketch; George E. 
is a section foreman on the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad; 
and John W. is a clerk in a hardware store at Boonton, and is a member of 
the Boonton Lumber Company, of which he is secretary and treasurer. 
Harry J. is the name of the deceased son. 

Ellis G. Myers was educated in the public and private schools of Boon- 
ton, supplementing his studies by a course at Bryant & Stratton's Business 
College, at Newark. He subsequently learned the plumbing trade, became 
a journeyman at that trade and after the death of his father succeeded him in 
his position at the Boonton Iron Works, being later promoted to the position 
of agent for the general manager, General John S. Shultze. He continued in 
that position until about 1877, when he was appointed general superintendent 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 691 

of the estate of J. Cooper Lord, which situation he has held for the past 
twenty years. 

Mr. Myers is a stanch supporter of the Republican party and takes an 
active interest in political matters. For six years he has served as a member 
of the township committee, and for one term as a member of the school 
board. In May, 1888, he was elected mayor of the city of Boonton. After 
serving one term in this office he was re-elected by a substantial majority. 
During his incumbency he did much to advance the material good of the city, 
and did much toward passing an ordinance to pave and curb Main street, and 
also a great deal to have introduced the electric-light service. In 1894 he 
was again elected, and during this term as mayor he was influential in advo- 
cating the public water-supply system, which had been introduced by his pred- 
ecessor, C. A. Norris. In 1895 he was still again elected, by the unanimous 
support of both political parties. He is one of. the organizers of the Boonton 
Board of Trade, assisted in establishing the board of fire wardens, of which 
he was the first foreman, and has served as a representative to the Firemen's 
Relief Association since its organization to the present time. Since 1895 ne 
has been extensively engaged in the coal business. 

In society matters, Mr. Myers is a popular member of Arcania Lodge, 
No. 60, Free and Accepted Masons, is president of the Boonton branch of 
the Iron Hall, a dictator in the lodge of the Knights of Honor and a member 
of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 

October 14, 1880, Mr. Myers was united in marriage to Miss Fannie M. 
Beddow, born November 15, i860, a daughter of Thomas and Fannie 
(Milner) Beddow, both of whom were natives of England. Mr. and Mrs. 
Myers have had four children — Olivia, J. Ellis, Carrie and Sarah. 

Mrs. Myers and her daughter Olivia are consistent members of St. 
John's church, Protestant Episcopal, of Boonton, in which they are energetic 
workers, and of which Mr. Myers has been vestryman for a number of years. 



MELVILLE VAN HORN. 



For twenty-two years Mr. Van Horn has served as station- agent for the 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company, being stationed at 
Netcong. He is one of the most trusted and faithful employes of the road, 
— a fact which is plainly indicated by his long connection with the corpora- 
tion. He is descended from one of the old families of New Jersey, his great- 
grandfather, a native of Holland, having crossed the Atlantic and founded 
the family near Hoboken, this state. George Van Horn, the grandfather of 
our subject, spent his life as a farmer near Johnsonburg, Warren county. 
New Jersey, and married a Miss Howell, by whom he had five children: 



'692 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

William, Isaac, David G. , Abram S. and George. The grandfather was an 
extensive land-owner, and was a patriotic citizen, who loyally defended his 
country against Great Britain in the war of 1812. 

David Van Horn, father of our subject, was born in 1816 and died in 
1882, at the age of sixty-six years. He was united in marriage to Miss Har- 
riet Young, a daughter of Silas Young, and her death occurred in the year 
1867. Her children were George, a resident of Jersey City, where he is 
engaged in the practice of law; Melville; Marcella, wife of R. T. Johnson, 
of Newton, New Jersey; and Silas Y. , who makes his home in St. Paul, 
Minnesota. 

Reared in the vicinity of Johnsonburg and educated in the common 
schools of the neighborhood, Melville Van Horn entered upon his business 
career in 1874, as a partner of E. M. Wildrick, of Marksboro, New Jersey, 
establishing a general store, which they conducted for two years. Mr. Van 
Horn was then alone in business for a year, after which he removed to Stan- 
hope, where he carried on general merchandising for three years. In 1875 
he entered the employ of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad 
Company as assistant to T. F. Grandon, agent at Stanhope Station, and on 
the 1st of March of the second year — only one year and eleven months after 
becoming an employe of the company — he was appointed agent, and is now 
serving in his twenty-second year in that capacity. He is a man of unques- 
tioned reliability, honor and worth and has the confidence of all with whom 
he has been brought in contact. His genial manner and readiness to accom- 
modate the patrons of the road have made him one of the most popular 
officials along the entire line. 

Mr. Van Horn was married in December, 1866, to Miss Sarah E. Harris, 
daughter of Cummins O. Harris. She died November 18, 1879, and in Jan- 
uary, 1883, Mr. Van Horn was again married, his second union being with 
Mrs. Elizabeth Sutton, a daughter of Robert Simpson, of McAfee, New Jer- 
sey. His children are Etta M. and Harris M., both born of the first mar- 
riage. Mr. Van Horn is a quite prominent Mason, holding membership in 
Muscanetcong Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; Baldwin Chapter, R. A. M., of New- 
ton, and De 'Molay Commandery, K. T. , at Washington. He also belongs to 
Netcong Council, No. 1357, Royal Arcanum. 



DR. HENRY C. WIGGINS. 

Dr. Wiggins is ranked with the prominent and influential business men 
of Succasunna, New Jersey. A resume of his life gives the following facts: 

Henry C. Wiggins was born in Luxemburg, now Port Oram, New Jer- 
sey, June 13, 1844, and is a representative of a family long resident of this 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. G9S 

country. His father, William F. Wiggins, was a native of Mount Hope, 
New Jersey, and was a man of great activity and usefulness. For many 
years he was interested in mining. He opened the Richards mines at Port 
Oram, was foreman of mines for years, and also was superintendent of the 
forge and rolling mills at Dover. He died in Succasunna, New Jersey, in 
1892, at the advanced age of seventy-eight years. His father, David Wig- 
gins, lived to be eighty-four, his death occurring in 1869, in Rockaway town- 
ship, Morris county, New Jersey, where his whole life was passed. David 
Wiggins and wife (nee Guard) had a family of children as follows: Lewis, 
William F. , Jonathan, David, Daniel, and Sallie and Rachel — the former 
the wife of Alexander Norris, and the latter the wife of Abram Shawger. 
William F. Wiggins married Susan H. Dughty. Her death occurred in 18S0. 
Of their children we record that Albert D. was drowned in the Cumberland 
river during the Civil war, while crossing with his command; Euphemia, 
deceased, was the wife of William H. Mase; Sarah Louise, of Succasunna; 
Dr. Henry C. , the im'mediate subject of this sketch; and Mattie D., wife of 
W. E. Coursen, of Succasunna. 

When he was eleven years of age Henry C. moved with his parents to 
Dover, and there he attended the public schools until he was sixteen. At 
this age he became a clerk in his father's store, learned thoroughly the duties 
of a successful salesman, and spent two years behind the counter of his 
father's store. After this he clerked one year for U. H. Struble, a merchant 
of Stanhope, and at the end of that time formed a partnership with John M. 
Knight and engaged in business there, conducting the same successfully for 
three years. About this time he decided to study medicine, and on dispos- 
ing of his interest in the store began reading medicine in the office of Dr. 
Hedges, and there prepared himself for college. Following this he was four 
years a student in the Albany Medical College, Albany, New York, graduat- 
ing in 1874. Immediately after securing his diploma he located at Succa- 
sunna and entered upon the practice of his profession, to which he gave his 
undivided attention for a period of sixteen years, meeting with excellent suc- 
cess in his practice. While thus closely occupied he was overtaken with 
ailments which impaired his constitution to such an extent that an abandon- 
ment of his profession became necessary to the preservation of his life. The 
next six years he was out of business and in that time partially recovered. 
Then, feeling physically able to carry on a business that could be conducted 
with regular hours, he purchased the stock of goods of Josiah Meeker, in 
1896, and has since been having a prosperous trade. 

The Doctor is a man of family. He was married in Wayne county, 
Pennsylvania, September 12, 1872, to Belle M. Northrup, daughter of 
Moses Northrup, and their happy union has been blessed by the following 



694 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

named children: Albert M. , Irene N., Florence L. and William Harold. 
Their eldest son, Albert M., has been associated in business with Austin 
Nicholas, of New York, but is now associated with his father at Succasunna. 
Dr. Wiggins and his family are consistent members of the Presbyterian 
church. He has long been interested in educational matters, for nine years 
has been a member of the board of education, and at this writing is clerk of 
the board. He has been operating the sand quarries near Flanders for the 
past twenty-five years, and has shipped hundreds of thousands of tons 
throughout Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey. He is president of the 
board of trade at Succasunna, being the first elected to that office. 



WILLIAM S. NAUGHRIGHT. 

This prominent citizen of Middle Valley is a man of well-rounded char- 
acter, whose mental, social, moral and business nature have been fully 
developed. He is a citizen of public spirit, a man of sterling purpose and 
indefatigable energy in business, an advocate of the best intellectual progress, 
and a Christian gentleman whose life conforms to the precepts that had their 
origin in Palestine almost twenty centuries ago. 

Morris county numbers Mr. Naughright among its native sons, his birth 
having occurred in Washington township. His father, William Naughright, 
Sr., was a carriage-maker in the village which bears his name, and married 
Anna, daughter of Andrew Wack, and of their children the following are yet 
living: Sarah, wife of Amos Seal, of Highbridge; William S., Andrew W. , 
Jacob K. and Elijah D. Our subject spent his boyhood in Naughright, and 
for his education had access only to the common schools. At thirteen years 
of age he entered upon a mercantile experience as a clerk in the employ of 
L. Hager & Son, of German Valley, and continued with that firm for five 
years. During that time he spent much of his leisure in study, reciting his 
lessons in the evenings to his former teacher, James S. Taylor, and on leav- 
ing the firm of L. Hager & Son he spent one year in the school-room as a 
student. This fitted him for educational work, and he secured the position 
of teacher in the Six Side school-house in the valley. For two years there- 
after he followed that profession, and then, prompted by a spirit of patriot- 
ism, responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting in Company E, 
Thirty-first New Jersey Infantry, with which command he spent one year in 
Virginia, participating in the Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville campaigns. 

On reaching the north in 1863 Mr. Naughright resumed his place at the 
teacher's desk, where he remained for five years, winning an excellent repu- 
tation as an educator by reason of his ability to impart clearly and accurately 
to others the knowledge he had acquired. In 1868 he turned his attention 




>Vf. 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 695 

to merchandising once more, and in that line was connected with Elias M. 
Bartles and his successor, Jacob W. Welsh, for eight years. On the expira- 
tion of that period he disposed of his interest in the store, and for a short 
time had no business connections, but later he repurchased an interest in the 
mercantile establishment, carrying on operations in that line until 1880, 
when he retired permanently from that field of endeavor. Later he became 
interested in the creamery business, and has been the organizer and promoter 
of various creameries, whereby the milk supply of Morris county is taken to 
the city markets. Since 1881 he has operated along the line of the Central 
Railroad in New Jersey, with New York for a market, and in addition thereto 
is now operating north and west of Reading on the Philadelphia & Reading 
Railroad, with Philadelphia as a market, and on the Western Maryland 
Railroad with Baltimore as a market. This enterprise has also proved not 
only a profitable one to its originator but has also materially advanced the 
prosperity of the county, the creameries utilizing the large products of the 
extensive dairy farms made possible by the excellent pasture lands in this 
section of the state. Mr. Naughright has developed a very large business, 
which is constantly growing in volume and importance. The dairy interests 
on the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad are destined to cover the entire line 
and have been the means of revolutionizing the milk business in Philadelphia. 
Through the investigation of our subject it was ascertained that the former 
system of supplying the city with milk brought the product into Philadelphia 
about 9 o'clock in the morning, and thus it was held over for delivery until 
the following day. Under the management of Mr. Naughright, however, it 
is shipped into the city at night in refrigerator cars, and is thus ready for the 
earliest delivery. For twelve years he has given his entire attention to the 
milk business, and always uses the most advanced and improved methods in 
handling and shipping the products of the dairy. His sales have become 
very extensive, and he realizes therefrom a handsome income, which is the 
crowning reward of well directed labor. 

Mr. Naughright" was married in 1S79 to Miss Mary E. Linnell, a 
daughter of R. Linnell, of Granville, Ohio, and their children are Lena, 
Belle, Stanley and Grace. Theirs is a pleasant and hospitable home and 
the members of the family have high standing in social circles. They attend 
the Presbyterian church, of which Mr. Naughright is an active and useful 
member. Socially he is connected with the Knights of Pythias. A recog- 
nized leader in the ranks of the Democracy, he has been called to public 
office by his fellow townsmen, who have thus given evidence of their appre- 
ciation of his worth and ability. In 1889 he was elected to the assembly, 
and so ably and faithfully did he discharge his legislative duties that he was 
re-elected in 1890. During both terms he was chairman of the committee 



696 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

on education, the state hoard of education requesting his appointment the 
second term, a fact which indicates his effective service in the interest of the 
schools. For years he has been an active and influential friend of education, 
and has done much to render the public-school system of New Jersey more 
efficient. The future of the country, the perpetuity of her institutions, as 
every intelligent and patriotic American citizen knows, depends upon the 
wise and careful training of the children, and hence he has shown in educa- 
tional matters a comprehensive, patriotic and influential interest. In 189 1-2 
he was journal clerk of the house of representatives, and in 1893 was the 
reading clerk of that body. In every walk of life he is true to the duties 
that devolve upon him, and on all occasions has shown himself worthy of 
the high confidence reposed' in him by his friends and fellow citizens. 



WILLIAM H. YOUNGS. 



Mr. Youngs was born in the village of Succasunna, in which he is now 
a very prominent business man, in September, 185 1. His grandfather, 
David Youngs, was a farmer of Sussex county, and the father of our subject, 
Richard H. Youngs, was born in this state, and in his early life followed 
farming and teaming alternately. He gave his political support to the Repub- 
lican party and for years acceptably filled the office of constable of Roxbury 
township. He married Catherine McPeak, whose father was well known in 
Sussex county, being accounted one of its successful and leading agricultur- 
ists. Richards H. Youngs died in 1879, an d his wife passed away in April, 
1897. They were the parents of three children: Electa, wife of Thomas 
Sharp, of Newark; William H., subject of this review; and Clarence E., 
of Newark. 

William H. Youngs was sparingly educated in Succasunna, his schooldays 
ending in his fourteenth year, when he began clerking in the store of Josiah 
Meeker, of this village. For eight years and seven months he remained 
with that gentleman as a most trusted employe and for seven years of the 
time also served as assistant postmaster. On leaving his native town he 
went to Dover, where he secured a situation as bookkeeper with the firm of 
Whitlock & Lewis, with whom he remained for seventeen months, when he 
returned to Succasunna and engaged in the butchering business until 1882. 
In that year he made preparation to engage in business as a plumber and 
steam fitter, and although he had not been trained in either line he opened a 
shop and with the confidence of an expert attacked everything that came to 
him to be made or mended. He succeeded in turning out first-class work, 
and as a result he soon earned the confidence of his patrons and secured a lib- 
eral patronage. His store is now one of the most popular business houses of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 697 

the village, and his genuine worth and genial disposition have made him very 
popular with all classes. He has that indefatigable energy and untiring per- 
severance which will carry a man over all obstacles to success; and it is this 
which has enabled him to work his way steadily upward to a foremost place 
in the ranks of the prosperous merchants in his part of the country. 

Mr. Youngs was married November 22, 18S2, to Miss Cordelia Rush, 
and to them were born two children, W. Rush, at home, and one who is now 
deceased. Mr. Youngs is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, belonging to the lodge in Succasunna, while in the Masonic lodge of 
Dover he is a valued member. He has followed in the political footsteps of 
his father and votes the Republican ticket. He was elected tax collector of 
Roxbury township in 1894 by a good majority and again in 1897 by a still 
larger majority, and this in a township which usually gives a Democratic 
majority of about fifty. His second term expires in 1900. Every duty 
devolving upon him is faithfully performed; and whether in business, political 
or social life he has the warm regard of a large circle of friends. 



ROBERT C. SHAW. 



This well known citizen of Succasunna was born near Johnsonburg, 
Warren county, New Jersey, on the 19th of March, 1840. His grandfather, 
Robert C. Shaw, located on a farm on the turnpike between Newton and 
Belvidere, New Jersey, and was a thrifty, enterprising agriculturist, — a man 
whose worth made him a leader in public affairs. He married for his first 
wife a Miss Johnson and for his second a Mi ss Chandler. His six children 
were George, Watson, John, Job J. and two daughters, — Rebecca, who mar- 
ried a Mr. Beemer, and Sarah, who became the wife of George H. Ayres. 

Job J. Shaw, father of our subject, was born in Sussex county, New 
Jersey, in 18 14, and died in Warren county, in 1894, having attained 
the eightieth milestone of life's journey. He was one of four brothers who 
resided near Johnsonburg, all successful men who owned large farms on the 
turnpike berween Newton and Belvidere, — farms which far surpassed the 
average farms of the neighborhood in their excellent improvements, substan- 
tial buildings, modern conveniences and neat and thrifty appearance, the 
Shaw neighborhood being very conspicuous on this account. Job J. Shaw 
married Miss Sarah A. Mott, a daughter of Colonel George Mott, and she 
died during the infancy of our subject, their only child. He afterward mar- 
ried her sister, Caroline Mott, and to them were born four sons: George M. 
and Charles, who are residents of Trenton, New Jersey; Frank W. , of 
Asbury, New Jersey; and Job J., of Stanhope, New Jersey. 

Robert C. Shaw spent his childhood and youth on his father's farm, and 



698 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

in the district school he acquired his elementary education, which was sup- 
plemented by study in the Styles private school in Deckertown, and in the 
Chester Institute. At the age of eighteen he left school to take up the prac- 
tical duties of business life and began farming near Succasunna. In 1861 he 
became connected with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, in their Jersey 
City ticket office, where he remained three years. He then entered the 
employ of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railway Company, and 
was stationed there three years in Dover and thirteen years in Succasunna. 
He retired from the railroad service in 1882, since which time he has been 
variously employed. 

On the 2d of September, 1857, Mr. Shaw was united in marriage to 
Miss Sarah E. Lippincott, a daughter of Rev. C. A. and Elizabeth (Corwin) 
Lippincott. Her father was an itinerant minister of the Methodist church 
for forty-one years and was once a resident of Succasunna, where he owned 
the " four corners " and made his home in the historic old residence which 
is now the comfortable home of Mr. and Mrs. Shaw. Rev. C. A. Lippincott 
was a man of great force and magnetism and enjoyed the distinction of fill- 
ing many of the best pulpits of the state. He officiated for four years as 
presiding elder. He married for his second wife a Miss Mary L. Mann, a 
distinguished educator and the daughter of Jacob Mann, the editor of the 
first paper, the True American, published at Trenton, New Jersey. The 
children of Rev. C. A. Lippincott were Mrs. Shaw; Mrs. Mary H. Stephens, 
of Morristown; Carrie L., wife of M. T. Kink, of Petersburg, Virginia; and 
William M., deceased. Mrs. Shaw was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
in 1840, and is the mother of one child, Carrie L. , now the widow of John 
B. Smith. Mrs. Smith also has a daughter, Madaline F. Mr. and Mrs. 
Shaw hold membership in the Methodist church, taking an active interest in 
its work, and throughout the community in which they make their home they 
command the respect of all, sharing in their confidence and good will. 



HENRY BEACH. 



For many years Henry Beach, now deceased, was connected with the 
agricultural interests of Montville township, Morris county, and was a man 
of splendid business ability, positive character and sterling worth, whose com- 
mendable life won him the regard of all with whom he came in contact. He 
was born in New York city, December 29, 1800, and was a son of Daniel 
and Abbie Beach, of Scotch ancestry. He acquired his education in the 
schools of his native city and when a young man engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits. He joined Mr. Updyke and Mr. Toulain, who owned mercantile estab- 
lishments both in New York and New Orleans, and of the latter Mr. Beach 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 699 

had charge for sixteen years, managing its interests with marked ability and 
fidelity. 

On the 20th of November, 1838, he was united in marriage to Miss Maria 
Louisa, daughter of Ezekiel and Phoebe (Kitchell) Gaines. They began their 
domestic life on the homestead farm in Montville township, and there Mr. 
Beach carried on agricultural pursuits until 1852, when he went to Califor- 
nia, spending two years on the Pacific slope during that period when mining 
excitement was at its height with its attendant dangers, hardships, anx- 
ieties and pleasures. In 1854 he returned to the east and again took up his 
residence on his farm in Montville township, Morris county, where he con- 
tinued to engage in agricultural pursuits until his life's labors were ended in 
death. He built the residence which is now the home of his children and 
made many other improvements on the property. 

Mr. and Mrs. Beach were the parents of five daughters and two sons: 
Adelaide, who is residing with her mother on the old homestead; Antoinette, 
wife of Archibald DeWitt, of Morristcwn; Isabella Ewen; Julia Ely; Laura 
Augusta, who died April 9, 1874; George, who married Martha Christopher, 
and died March 22, 1892, leaving one child, Edwin Ely; Walter Gaines, who 
married Caroline Magie and died July 14, 1866, leaving two sons, Walter 
Herbert and Henry Magie. 

In his political convictions Mr. Beach was a Democrat and took an 
active interest in the growth and success of his party, but would never con- 
sent to become a candidate for office. He held a membership connection 
with the Masonic fraternity and his life was in harmony with the teachings of 
that benevolent order. In all his business relations he was strictly honora- 
ble and commanded the confidence and respect of those whom he met. He 
passed away June 7, 1865, and the community mourned the loss of one of 
its best citizens. His faithful wife, who was born April 5, 18 16, long sur- 
vived him and reached the ripe old age of eighty-one years, her death occur- 
ring on the 22d of January, 1898. 



DAVID C. BEATTY. 



Mr. Beatty is one of the extensive land-owners of Morris county, his 
realty holdings aggregating four hundred and fifty-six acres. His early 
years were passed upon a farm and it is largely through agricultural pursuits 
that he has gained such an enviable financial standing. His homestead com- 
prises one hundred and eighty-seven acres of rich land, and the well tilled 
fields, divided by good fences, the substantial buildings and many improve- 
ments all indicate the progressive and practical spirit of the owner whose 
unaided efforts have brought him a well earned success. 



700 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Born in Warren county, New Jersey, on the 19th of January, 1841, our 
subject is a son of Jacob Beatty and a grandson of John Beatty. The latter 
was also born in Warren county, and residing there among its early settlers 
he worked as a laborer. Jacob Beatty was born in Warren county in 1803 
and in early life was a boatman on the Morris & Essex canal. Later he car- 
ried on business as a huckster and subsequently engaged in farming until his 
death, which occurred in 1855. He married Catherine Hill, daughter of 
James Hill, a Scotchman. She died in 1883, at the age of eighty-four years. 
Her children were David C. and Jacob H., the latter a mason and con- 
tractor and the present mayor of Hackettstown, New Jersey. Fraternally 
he is a Freemason. 

When thirteen years of age David C. Beatty took up the duties of busi- 
ness life as a farm hand, working through the first season for five dollars per 
month. He continued to serve in that capacity until eighteen years of age. 
when he learned the carpenter's trade under the direction of a Mr. Seguine, 
near Little Washington, New Jersey. He followed his trade as a journey- 
man for nineteen years and then, in 1876, purchased the farm upon which 
he now resides. He has been very successful in the management of his 
farm, adding continually to his capital, and from time to time making judi- 
cious investments in real estate. 

On the 6th of February, 1869, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
Beatty and Miss Margaret, daughter of Philip and Euphemia (Pitenger) 
Hence. Her parents had eight children, four of whom are living: Mrs. 
Beatty; Mrs. Wesley Apgar; John R. , of Morristown; and James M., who is 
living in Rockaway, New Jersey. Mr. and Mrs. Beatty have one son, 
George McClellan, who was born October 2, 1869, and was educated in 
LaFayette College, of Easton, Pennsylvania, where he fitted himself for civil 
engineering. He is now employed by the Crane Iron Company, of Johns- 
town, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Beatty is a Democrat in his political affiliations. He and his son 
are members of the Masonic fraternity. Honorable in business, true to his 
duties of citizenship, Mr. Beatty during his long residence in Chester town- 
ship has gained many friends. 



STEPHEN H. WORTMAN. 

Stephen H. Wortman, a well known resident of Chester township, is the 
owner of a valuable farm of two hundred and twenty-four acres, the greater 
part of which is embraced within an extensive peach orchard; and in the 
propagation of this fruit he finds a profitable source of income. He belongs 



BIOGRJPHIC.iL JND GEJVEJLOGICJL HISTORY. 701 

to one of the old families long connected with the farming interests of this 
section of New Jersey. 

He was born in Morris county, on what is now the Emmons homestead, 
August 23, 1827, and is a son of Peter and Mary (Mesler) Wortman. His 
father was born on the same farm, January 15, 1794, and, obtaining a fair 
education for that day, taught school in his early life, and in this way came 
in touch with the public and laid the foundation for a career on the auction- 
eer's block. He was gifted with a fluent and withal an attractive speech, 
and this, coupled with originality and genius in the vocation, made him one 
of the most celebrated auctioneers in this part of the state. He devoted 
his last years to agricultural pursuits, in which also he was success- 
ful. He filled many offices, in both Washington and Chester townships, 
and his fidelity and promptness in the discharge of his official duties made 
him a valuable citizen. In his political views he was a Democrat, and in his 
church associations was a Congregationalist. 

The great-great-grandfather of our subject, on the maternal side, was 
James Mesler, who was born in Chester township, Morris county; his wife's 
Christian name was Jane. Their son Jacob had a son, also named Jacob, 
whose wife was named Frances. The brothers and sisters of Jacob Mesler, 
last mentioned, were Mary Bird, Jane Slaght, Charlotte Wortman and Agnes 
Dickinson. 

Peter Wortman was married April 8, 181 5, to Miss Mary Mesler, who 
was born May 6, 1794, a daughter of Jacob Mesler. Peter Wortman died 
May 11, 1865, and his wife passed away January 1, 1885. They were the 
parents of ten children: Jacob M., the eldest, was born October 31, 181 5, 
was a farmer, and married Ann Emmons, December 1, 1839; his death 
occurred November 4, 1859. Elias, who was born January 8, 1819, was 
married July 1, 1843, to Emeline Leek, and died October 31, 1884. Sarah 
A., who was born January 27, 1821, became the wife of Andrew Rarick. 
Margaret, born August 3, 1825, was married January 2, 1847, to William 
Dorland. Stephen H., of this biographical record, was the next in order of 
birth. Catharine, born February 15, 1830, was married three times, her 
last union being with Tunis V. M. Cox, of Readington, New Jersey. Mary, 
born March 1, 1832, died August 21, 1891. Eliza, born June 26, 1837, is 
residing at Raritan, this state, the widow of Moses Ammerman. Fannie, 
born April 24, 1823, died in September, 1824; and Andrew J., born Decem- 
ber 18, 1834, died February 6, the next year. 

Joseph Wortman, the paternal grandfather of Stephen H., was born in 
Morris county, and died about sixty-three years ago. He was called Cap- 
tain Wortman, from his connection with the military service in one of the 
early wars. He married Margaret Emmons, a daughter of Nicholas Emmons, 



702 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

and their children were: Olive, who became the wife of Henry Dorland; 
Gertrude, who married Stephen Howell; H. Jacob, who married Sarah 
Crater; and the remaining two were Nicholas and Malinda. The mother of 
these children was called to the other world about i860. 

Stephen H. Wortman, whose name begins this record, had but limited 
educational privileges; but he was trained to habits of industry and perse- 
verance on the home farm, and on attaining his majority chose as his life work 
the same calling as that in which he was reared and which had been the occu- 
pation of his ancestors for several generations. He now owns a rich and 
well cultivated farm of two hundred and twenty-four acres, which he has 
largely planted to peaches. His orchard is unsurpassed in the county, and 
the fine varieties of peaches which he raises enable him to secure the high- 
est market prices for his products. 

On the 1 6th of October, 185 1, Mr. Wortman was united in marriage 
with Catherine Melick, daughter of Nicholas Melick. She died January 10, 
1863, leaving the following named children: Mary E., who was born Sep- 
tember 26, 1852, and died August 20, 1854; Ann L. , who was born June 
26, 1855, and became the wife of John Rowe in 1874; Mary, who was born 
May 5, 1857, and was married in 1880 to Aaron Creger; William M., who 
was born December 22, 1859, and married Melissa Pickle in 1883; Martha, 
who was born January 9, 1861, and in 1882 married Joseph Pickle; and 
Kate, who was born in September, 1865, and is the wife of Marshall Rarick, 
to whom she was united in 1886. 

Mr. Wortman was a second time married, August 10, 1871, when Char- 
lotte Barker became his wife; but she died in December of the same year. 
On the 23d of December, 1875, Mr. Wortman married Harriet Henry, a 
daughter of Philip and Susan (McKnight) Henry, of Germantown, New- 
Jersey. Of this union three children have been born: Charley, who was 
born November 12, 1876, and died February 5, 1S88; Robert, also deceased; 
and Stephen H., born May 22, 1881. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wortman are held in high esteem in the community in 
which they live and have an extended circle of friends. In his political views 
Mr. Wortman is an advocate of the Democracy, and in his religious belief is 
aCongregationalist, holding his membership at Chester. 



JOHN WALTERS, M. D. 

A prominent and popular physician and surgeon of Port Oram is Dr. John 
Walters, who is of Welsh descent, although nothing definite is known as to 
the time when his ancestors arrived in this country. His father, William 
Walters, was born in Wales, where he was reared and at an early age came 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 70S 

to America. For a number of years he was employed in the iron mines at 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, but in 1861 or 1862 came to New Jersey, locating 
at Port Oram, where he secured work with the Thomas Cain Iron Company, 
continuing with them up to the time of his death, in 1873. He married Miss 
Deanna Powell, a daughter of William Powell, the latter being a native of 
Wales, who came to the United States in middle life and died at Mine Hill 
at the advanced age of eighty-four years. 

Dr. John Walters, son of William and Deanna (Powell) Walters, was 
born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in 1864, and was three years old when his 
parents came to Port Oram, shortly after which his father's demise occurred. 
Our subject attended the public schools of Port Oram until reaching his 
ninth year, when, his mother having purchased a store, young Walters 
clerked in the same and went to school alternately until he was 
twenty years old and then attended a private school for three months. 
Subsequently he began the study of medicine under the able preceptorage of 
Dr. J. G. Ryerson, of Boonton, and Dr. D. S. Ayers, of Rockaway, and in 
October, 1886, he entered the medical department of Columbia College, at 
which he was graduated in June, 1890. After obtaining his diploma he 
returned to Port Oram, where he quickly built up a lucrative practice, his 
worth, ability and extensive knowledge of his profession soon gaining him 
recognition, not only in Port Oram but also throughout the county, and to-day 
he stands in the foremost rank among his fellow practitioners, who accord 
him their highest respect and consideration. Dr. Walters is a member of the 
Morris County Medical Society and the New Jersey State Medical Society, in 
both of which he is distinctly popular. 

In April, 1897, Dr. Walters was united in marriage to Miss Clara B. 
Richards, an adopted daughter of Captain Joseph Richards, who was formerly 
an old and much respected citizen of Port Oram. The Doctor and his wife 
occupy a handsome residence, which he built in 1897, equipping it with all 
the modern improvements and furnishing it in a most tasteful manner. He 
is clever in his profession, well liked in society and stands high in the estima- 
tion of his numerous friends. 

Captain Joseph Richards, deceased, was a native of England, where his 
birth took place in 1834. Before reaching his majority he was placed in 
charge of some men in a tin mine, but he gave up his prospects of advance- 
ment there in order to seek newer fields abroad, and when twenty years old 
he came to the United States, going direct to Philadelphia, and remaining 
there a short time; then he moved to Georgia, where he secured a position 
in one of the most important gold mines in the state, forty miles from 
Augusta. He had been there only a few months when he was offered a bet- 
ter place in the copper mines of Tennessee, which he promptly accepted, and 



704 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

it was in that state that Mr. Richards met Miss Isabella Andrews, a daughter 
of James Andrews, formerly of Dover, and the young lady became his wife 
on the 12th of May, 1858. In 1861 Mr. Richards came to Port Oram 
and entered the employ of the Mount Pleasant Mining Company, which soon 
recognized his superior abilities and excellent judgment and made him assist- 
ant superintendent, a position he retained until 1880, when he was pro- 
moted to the full superintendency of the company in this section. Nine 
months previous to his death he was compelled to resign on account of ill 
health, but the company, appreciating the value of his opinions, retained 
him as consultant in matters pertaining to engineering. 

In his political faith, Captain Richards was a stanch Republican, but 
did not aspire to official preferment, although he once ran for township com- 
mitteeman and was defeated. For a number of years he was a member of 
the board of trustees of the Port Oram public school, and under the new 
township law he was president of the first board of education for Randolph 
township. He was affiliated with Acacia Lodge, No. 20, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and was a devout adherent of the Dover Presbyterian church 

The death of Captain Richards occurred on the 24th of April, 1896, the 
funeral services being held in the church on Monday, April 27th, Rev. A. M. 
Harris and Dr. Holloway officiating, and the ceremony being conducted by 
Acacia Lodge according to the rubric of the Masonic fraternity. 



HENRY A. BUTTS, LL. D. 

The honored president of the Drew Theological Seminary, of Madison, 
New Jersey, is Professor Henry Anson Butts, one of the most scholarly min- 
isters of the Methodist Episcopal church. He was born in Middle Smith- 
field, Pennsylvania, on the 18th of April, 1835, and when fifteen years of age 
was converted to Christ. Since that time he has followed the teachings of 
the lowly Nazarene and has given his life to the work of uplifting humanity. 
Having acquired a thorough preliminary education he attended Union College, 
and later entered Princeton College, of New Jersey, which institution con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of Arts at the time of his graduation 
in 1858 and honored him with the degree of Master of Arts in 1861. The 
same degree was conferred upon him by the Wesleyan University in 1866; 
he became a Doctor of Divinity of Princeton College in 1875, and ten years 
later became a Doctor of Laws of Dickinson College. 

He began his ministerial work in 1858 and has labored earnestly to 
advance the cause of Christ among men. Joining the Newark conference, he 
served as pastor of the church at Millston in 1858; at Irvington in 1859; in 
1860-1 at Woodbridge, New Jersey; in 1862-3 at Mariner's Harbor, on 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 705 

Staten Island; from 1864 until 1866 at the Prospect Street church, of Pater- 
son, New Jersey; and in 1867 became identified with the Drew Theological 
Seminary of Madison, as a member of its faculty. From 1870 until 1898 he 
was professor of New Testament Greek and exegesis, and since 1880 has 
been president of the institution. Whether as a teacher in the school- 
room or instructing his people from the pulpit, he has the ability to impress 
strongly upon the minds of his hearers the deep truths which he utters. His 
mind is analytical, logical and decisive, and his utterance rings with the elo- 
quence born of his lofty theme. 

Dr. Butts was a member of the general conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal church in 1884, 1888 and 1892, also of the ecumenical conference 
of 1 89 1, and of the Methodist centennial conference of 1884. He has 
studied closely the subjects of church government and policy and has been a 
valued representative to these gatherings of the representative ministers of 
the denomination. He has published a number of important works, includ- 
ing The New Life Dawning, a sermon by B. H. Nadel, together with a 
memoir of that distinguished divine; also the Epistle to the Romans in 
Greek; and is the author of many articles published in pamphlet form and in 
periodicals. He is a fluent and able writer, and his deep research into 
theological fields make his productions of particular value. 

Dr. Butts was married April 11, i860, to Miss Emily Hoagland, of 
Townsbury, New Jersey. Their home life is a strong influence for good in 
the community; and while Dr. Butts is widely recognized in the Methodist 
denomination as an eminent divine and a most able teacher, his kindliness 
and sympathy in private life are also an important element in his work. 



GEORGE T. WERTS. 



Hon. George T. Werts, ex-governor of New Jersey, was born at Hack- 
ettstown, Warren county, this state, March 24, 1846, and lived there until 
his parents moved to Bordentown, in 1849. His father, Peter Werts, died 
when our subject was seven years old. His mother was a sister of Attorney- 
General Jacob Vanatta. 

Governor Werts attended the high school at Bordentown and the State 
Model School at Trenton. At the age of seventeen years he went to Mor- 
ristown and took up the study of law with his uncle, Hon. Jacob Vanatta, 
was admitted to the bar in 1867 and began his practice in Morristown. He 
was town recorder from May, 1883, to May, 1885; mayor from 1868 till he 
resigned in February, 1892; senator from Morris county from 1886 till he 
resigned in February, 1892, to accept the office of judge of the supreme 
court, to which he was appointed by Governor Abbett, and his nomination 

19a 



706 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL EISTORr. 

was at once confirmed by a unanimous vote of the senate; and in assuming 
the duties of this office he took the place of the late Judge Knapp, of the 
Hudson county circuit. 

During the legislative session of 1889 he served as president of the sen- 
ate, where he discharged the duties of that office with marked ability and 
impartiality. While a member of the senate he drafted the liquor and the 
ballot reform laws. He always took a prominent part in legislation and dur- 
ing several sessions he was leader of his party on the floor of the senate. 
He was elected governor in 1892, by a plurality of seven thousand, six hun- 
dred and twenty-five votes over John Kean, Jr., and he occupied his seat on 
the bench during the whole of the campaign and personally took no part in 
it beyond writing his letter of acceptance of the nomination which had been 
unanimously tendered to him by the Democratic state convention. He took 
the seat of office January 1, 1893, and his term expired January 1, 1896. 



JOHN MILEY. 

For twenty-two years Professor John Miley was connected with the Drew 
Theological Seminary, of Madison, New Jersey, in which institution he 
occupied the chair of systematic theology. His life has been devoted to 
the work of the ministry and to the elevation of the race, and the talents 
with which he was endowed have been used for the betterment of mankind. 
He was born on the 25th of December, 18 13, in Butler county, Ohio, and 
at an early age was converted. Throughout his career he has made it his 
study how best to prepare his fellow-men for the responsibilities of this life 
and the glory of the life to come. To this end he has availed himself of 
every opportunity for the acquirement of knowledge, and his scholarly attain- 
ments are indicated by the fact that Augusta College, of Kentucky, conferred 
upon him the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts; the Ohio 
Wesleyan University honored him with the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 
1858 and with that of Doctor of Laws in 1881. 

He began his ministerial labors as a member of the Ohio Conference 
and was appointed to the pastorate of the church in Batavia in 1838. The 
following year he became pastor of a church in Cincinnati, in 1840 was 
located in Hamilton, in 1841-42 in Chillicothe, and through the two succeed- 
ing years occupied the pulpit of the Methodist church in Columbus, followed 
by a two-years pastorate, 1845-6, in Zanesville, Ohio. In 1847 he had 
charge of Wesley Chapel in Cincinnati; in 1848-9 was connected with the 
Wesleyan Female College; in 1850-1 was pastor of Morris Chapel, of Cin- 
cinnati, and was then transferred to the New York East conference. In 
1852-3 he was minister of the Pacific Street church, of Brooklyn; in 1S54-5, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 707 

of the South Second street church, of Brooklyn; in 1856-7, of the Sands 
Street church of that city, and in 1858-9 occupied the Methodist pulpit in 
Danbury, Connecticut. After spending two years, 1 860-1, in the Forsythe 
Street church of New York city, and the two following years in Bridge- 
port, he went to New Rochelle, in 1864, remaining there two years. On 
the expiration of that period he was transferred to the New York conference 
and was assigned to the First Methodist church of Newburg, where he 
remained from 1866 until 1868. He next had charge of the church of Sing 
Sing from 1869 until 1871, in 1872 was pastor of St. Paul's church, of 
Peekskill, and in 1873 accepted a call to become professor of systematic 
theology in the Drew Theological Seminary, of Madison, New Jersey, where 
he continued to fill that position with marked ability until 1895. 

Professor Wiley was a fraternal delegate to the general conference of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, South, in 1887; was a member of the gen- 
eral conference of 1864, 1872, 1876, 1888 and 1892, and was a member 
of the Centennial Methodist conference in 1884. He there presented a 
paper on The Work of the Christmas Conference of 1784. He is the 
author of a number of very important theological works, which treat in a 
most able and exhaustive manner subjects of great interest. These include 
a work call Class Meetings, another The Atonement in Christ, and a third, 
Systematic Theology, which last is published in two volumes, and is the 
standard work on that subject in the Methodist ministers' course of study. 
He has also long been a valued contributor to Methodistic periodicals. In 
his holy calling he has exercised an influence that is immeasurable and which 
will be felt in all its beneficent power long years after he shall have been 
called to the rest prepared for the righteous. 

He married Miss Olive C. Patterson, of Batavia, Ohio, who died in 
September, 1874. 



COLONEL JACOB FORD, Sr. 

Colonel Ford, a son of John Ford, was one of the heroes who aided 
in the establishment of the republic and in securing to America her inde- 
pendence. He was born in Woodbridge, New Jersey, April 13, 1704, and 
was a prominent figure in the early annals of the state, his influence being 
widely felt in public affairs. From 1738 until his death, which occurred 
January 19, 1777, his name frequently appears in the history of the state. 
He was one of the pioneers in the development of the iron industry in New 
Jersey and was otherwise prominent in promoting the material welfare of 
Morris county. He became one of the judges of "the inferior court of 



708 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

common pleas for Morris county " in 1740, and the first session of the court 
convened in his home. For many years thereafter he appears to have deliv- 
ered the charges to the grand jury and was not infrequently a member of the 
lower house in the provincial assembly, and when an old man became a del- 
egate to the provincial congress. It was in 1774 that he built the house now 
famous as Washington's Headquarters, though his son, Jacob Ford, Jr., was 
residing there at the time of his death. In his declining years this son largely 
succeeded to his father's place in business and public life. 

Colonel Jacob Ford, Jr., was the second son of Colonel Jacob Ford, Sr., 
and was not less eminent and distinguished than his honored father. Prior 
to the war of the Revolution, although a young man, he had been entrusted 
with a number of difficult missions by the state, all of which he had faithfully 
executed, but he comes most prominently before the public as the builder of 
an important powder-mill on the Whippany river, near Morristown. Early 
in the year 1776 he proposed to the provincial congress to erect a powder- 
mill in Morris county for the manufacture of gunpowder, an article very much 
needed at the time. The congress agreed to lend him two thousand pounds 
of the public money for one year, without interest, on his giving "satisfactory 
security for the same to be paid within the time of one year in good mercan- 
tile powder," the first installment of one ton of powder to be paid on the 
first of July of that year, and one ton per month thereafter until the loan had 
been thus paid off. This "good mercantile powder" proved a very essential 
factor in winning victory to the American arms; and the fact that the powder- 
mill was located at Morristown was the cause of the repeated but futile 
attempts of the enemy to reach this city. Such an attempt was made only 
a few months after the mill was put into operation. On the 14th of December, 
1776, the British troops reached Springfield, where they were met by Colonel 
Ford and his militia, numbering seven hundred men, who attacked the enemy 
with such spirit and vigor that they readily relinquished their plan of reach- 
ing Morristown. Twenty-four days later Washington reached Morristown 
and went into winter quarters. It was only four days after this that Colonel 
Jacob Ford, Jr., died, — January II, 1777, — at the early age of thirty-nine 
years, his birth having occurred February 19, 1738. 

He was married January 27, 1762, to Theodocia, daughter of the Rev. 
Timothy Johnes. She afterward became the hostess of Washington in the 
Ford house, which the father of his country made his headquarters in his 
second winter in Morristown, and which is now owned by the Washington 
Association. By order of the beloved commander-in-chief of the American 
army Colonel Ford was borne to his last resting place with all the honors of 
war and thus passed away one of the most brilliant, loyal and distinguished 
men that Morris county has produced. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 709 



EDWARD P. HOLDEN. 

There are many men in Morris county — leaders in business circles — 
who have acquired wide reputation as business men, but their energies are 
devoted almost entirely to the acquirement of wealth. In Edward Packard 
Holden, however, we find a gentleman of well rounded character, who amidst 
life's busy cares has found time to devote to humanity, and, recognizing the 
brotherhood of mankind, he has labored for the advancement of the human 
race, being especially active in his work among young men. Realizing that the 
true purpose of life is the development of a noble character, — a character at 
all times worthy of respect, — he has endeavored to assist the young in 
attaining to a higher moral altitude, and is very prominently known in con- 
nection with the work of the Young Men's Christian Association throughout 
New Jersey. In business, too, he has a high standing, for many years has 
been very influential and prominent in the affairs of the village of Madison, 
where he makes his home. 

Mr. Holden was born in New York city, June 19, 1855, and is a son of 
James C. and Sarah D. (Packard) Holden, also residents of Madison. During 
his childhood his parents removed to this village. He acquired his pre- 
liminary education in New York, and this he supplemented by study in 
Princeton College. At the age of nineteen he entered upon his business 
career as an employe in the office of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of 
New York city, and has since been connected with that corporation, where 
for several years past he has filled the responsible position of assistant 
cashier. He is a most energetic business man, of keen discernment and 
unflagging industry. 

Mr. Holden was united in marriage to Miss Ella C, daughter of James 
A. Webb, of Madison, and they have four children, a son and three daughters: 
Margaretta Webb, Eleanor Sandford, Edward Packard and Elizabeth Cebra. 

Mr. Holden, through the years of his majority, has ever taken a deep 
and active interest in the welfare of the village and has been largely instru- 
mental in promoting its best interests. He withholds his support from no 
movement or enterprise for the public good, and is especially active in the 
work of the Young Men's Christian Association. He was one of its organizers 
and for twenty years has served as its president, his spirit and labors per- 
meating the society and largely producing its substantial growth. He has 
also been very prominent in the work of the association throughout the state. 
For twenty-two years he has been connected with the state executive com- 
mittee of New Jersey and throughout that time has served as secretary, treas- 
urer or in some other office in the state organization. He is also very active 
in church and Sunday-school work in Madison, has for a number of years 



710 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL SIS TOBY. 

been an elder in the Presbyterian church there, and for a quarter of a cen- 
tury has been a teacher in the Sunday-school. The cause of education also 
finds in him a warm friend and for five years he has been connected with the 
Madison board of education, while for three years he has served as its pres- 
ident. He is a Republican in politics and is frequently seen in the conven- 
tions of his party, giving his support to those measures which he believes to 
be for the public good. With a just appreciation of the duties and obli- 
gations of citizenship, he labors for the adoption of a policy which will 
sustain the honor of his native land, and ranks among the representative 
American citizens of whom the country may be justly proud. 



JEREMY O'BRIEN. 

For four decades a resident of Madison, Morris county, New Jersey, Mr. 
O'Brien has until recently been actively identified with various improvements 
which have been carried forward in this county, he having long been engaged 
in contract work, doing a large amount of road and park grading. Mr. 
O'Brien, as his name indicates, is of Irish origin, and in his make-up are found 
many of the characteristics which have contributed to the success of his 
countrymen wherever they have sought a home. After a successful career, 
he is now retired from active life, except as he devotes his energies to the 
care of his own private property. 

Mr. O'Brien was born in county Waterford, Ireland, in the year 1836, 
and passed his boyhood in his native land. In 1852 he left the scenes of his 
birth and childhood, and, with the hope of bettering his condition in life, 
came to America, landing in due time in New Jersey. His father, John 
O'Brien, also emigrated to this country and settled in Madison, New Jersey, 
where he spent the closing years of his life and died. 

Jeremy O'Brien worked by the day and month after coming here, until 
1862, when he engaged in contract work, grading roads, lawns and parks. 
Many of the fine roads built in this locality within the past thirty years have 
been superintended by him, and the parks and lawns in and around Madison 
owe much of their beauty to his skill in the direction of grading, etc. He 
did the grading of the parks at the Convent, the State Insane Hospital and 
Drew Seminary, besides grading and beautifying the private grounds of many 
of the wealthy people of this locality. Throughout the whole of his busy 
career he has constantly employed a large force of men. Having acquired 
considerable property, he has of recent years given up his contract work and 
is now occupied chiefly in looking after his own estate. 

Mr. O'Brien has always affiliated with the Democratic party, in his 
earlier life took an active interest in public affairs, frequently attending the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 711 

the conventions of his party, but has never been an office-seeker or office- 
holder. Both he and his family are devout members of the Catholic church. 
Mrs. O'Brien, like her husband, is of Irish parentage. Her father, John 
O'Donnell, was many years ago a resident of Madison, where he died. Mr. 
and Mrs. O'Brien have had five children, namely: John, who died at the 
age of eighteen years; James, who died at the age of eleven; Mamie, wife of 
Edward O'Donnell, died leaving one son; and Maggie and Jeremy, Jr. The 
junior Jeremy O'Brien is one of the most popular young men of Madison. 



NICHOLAS VANSANT. 



One of the most prominent representatives of the Methodist ministry in 
New Jersey is Rev. Nicholas Vansant, of Madison, who after fifty years of 
faithful service as a preacher of the gospel is now holding a superannuated 
relation to the conference. A man of ripe scholarship and marked executive 
ability, his life has been consecrated to the cause of the Master and the 
uplifting of men. He has devoted himself without ceasing to the interests of 
humanity and to the furtherance of all good work, and though he is not now 
actively connected with the ministry, his interest in the work and growth of 
the church is greater with each passing year, and his influence is yet a potent 
force among the people with whom he is associated. His reputation is not 
restricted, and his power in his holy office has been exerted in a spirit of 
deepest human sympathy and tender solicitude. 

Rev. Vansant was born in Absecon, New Jersey, December 7, 1823, 
a son of Nicholas and Mercy Vansant. In writing of his mother he says: 
" Never did a woman's name give more fitting expression to character than 
did this name of my mother. A plain, practical woman, of large common 
sense, with a heart and life sanctified by grace, she was a mother to be 
respected, esteemed and loved. Both she and father had become Christians 
and members of the Methodist Episcopal church before their marriage, which 
occurred December 23, 1808, a marriage followed by their happy, loving 
union as husband and wife for more than seventy years, each of them dying 
at last in the ninety-first year of life, the date of his'birth being November 9, 
1788, and that of his death March 6, 1879, her birth occurring March 13, 
178Q, and her death January 8, 1880." 

Nicholas Vansant was reared in an atmosphere of prayer and piety. He 
attended the schools of his district, and being of a studious nature displayed 
special aptitude in his studies. He also attended the Sunday-schools of the 
"neighborhood. These were rather primitive as compared with the systema- 
tized work done in such schools at the present day, but the lessons which 
were then instilled into his mind were never forgotten and were doubtless 



712 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

a factor in his early conversion, which occurred in 1837. Habitually prayer- 
ful and tenderly conscientious, he reached his fourteenth year in the practice 
of the strictest morality, fearing God and working righteousness, and in the 
year mentioned came the "change of heart," which means conversion to 
God. This was followed by a special desire and effort for usefulness. His 
thirst for knowledge had always been ardent; but now the desire for mental 
culture along with spiritual improvement became intense. He secured addi- 
tional books and availed himself of every opportunity to add to his literary, 
historical and scientific as well as religious knowledge, and throughout all 
the years his life has been characterized by a love of study that has added 
materially to his usefulness. In a semi-centennial address in Morris, March 
30, 1892, he spoke of the beginning of his ministerial labors in this way: 

"Fifty-one years and four months ago a plain, unpretentious youth 
might have been seen wending his way, in true primitive style, on horseback 
and with saddle-bags, toward his first circuit, there to enter upon his life 
work as an itinerant preacher. That red-letter day in my life was December 
4, 1840, three days before I was seventeen years old." 

He was connected with the Medford circuit from 1840 until 1842, the 
Freehold circuit in 1842-3, and in the latter year was appointed assistant to 
Rev. Thomas McCarroll, of Paterson. From that time until his retirement 
his work was continuous. He labored at Dover and Millbrook, in 1844-5; 
at Madison from 1846 to 1847; Bloomfield from 1847 until 1849; Woodrow, 
Staten Island, from 1849 to 1 85 1 ; at Belleville, New Jersey, in 1851-2, and 
in the latter year was assigned to the pastorate of the Methodist Episcopal 
church in New Brunswick, where he remained two years. During that time 
he availed himself of an opportunity to study Greek and became proficient in 
that language. In 1854 he was sent by the conference to Bridgeton, where 
he continued two years. He had voluntarily sought a smaller charge, for his 
arduous labors and close study in former years had largely undermined his 
health and made it impossible for him to assume the duties of a large city 
church, which would have been assigned him had he not requested otherwise. 
From 1856 until 1858 he was pastor of the Trinity Methodist church, on 
Staten Island; was at Haverstraw from 1858 until i860; in the Clinton 
street church, of Newark, in 1860-1; in the First church, of Rahway, in 
1 86 1-2; at Bethel, on Staten Island, from 1862 until 1864, and was then 
appointed presiding elder of the Jersey City district, now the Paterson district, 
serving in that capacity from 1864 until 1868. At the conference which 
made him presiding elder he was also made a delegate to the general confer- 
ence, and in the latter he was appointed chairman of the committee on 
slavery. The Civil war was then fiercely raging, and through the efforts of 
the committee the conference took strong ground against slavery, which 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVJD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 713 

resulted in the conference receiving a sincere letter of thanks from President 
Lincoln. 

At the conference of 1868 Rev. Vansant, at his own request, was not 
again appointed presiding elder, and through the following year served as pastor 
of the church of his denomination in Washington, New Jersey, but in 1869 he 
was made presiding elder of the Newton district, serving until 1873. During 
all these years he held many revival services and added many souls to the 
church; he conducted several conference meetings in the towns in which he 
was located; built and dedicated new churches, erected and repaired parson- 
ages, and advanced the cause of the church both materially and spiritually. 
He was pastor of Trinity church, of Newark, from 1873 until 1876; of the 
Fulton street church, of Elizabeth, from 1876 until 1879; of Trinity church, 
of Staten Island, from 1879 until 1882; of the church of New Providence, 
New Jersey, from 1882 until 1885; of Chatham, from 1885 until 1888; of Port 
Oram, in 1888-9; and of St. John's Methodist church, of Rossville, Staten 
Island, from 1889 until 1892, when he retired from the active work of the 
ministry. 

Rev. Vansant has been twice married. On the 9th of December, 1844, 
he was united in the holy bonds of matrimony with Miss Amelia P. Moses, 
who died August 13, 1883, after thirty-nine years of happy married life. She 
was a most able assistant and helpmeet to her husband in his holy work, and 
their home life was ideal. They brought their children up in the fear and 
admonition of the Lord, and those who lived to mature years have become 
honored and respected Christian men and women. In Madison, December 
30, 1885, Rev. Vansant was again married, Miss Josephine L. Tunis becom- 
ing his wife. After his retirement from the ministry they removed to her 
old home in East Madison, where they remained two years, and then came 
to their present home in Madison. 

In addition to hispastoral work Rev. Vansant has produced many works 
of high literary value, including pamphlets, poems and reviews. His active 
labors in the ministry of the church covered more than fifty-one years, and 
there has not been denied the full harvest nor the aftermath whose garnering 
shall bring the sure reward in the words of the great commendation, " Well 
done, good and faithful servant." 



J. J. VREELAND, Jr. 



The subject of this review, an enterprising citizen of Dover, is a native 
of this city and a son of J. J. Vreeland, Sr. , whose sketch is given elsewhere 
in this work. His education in the public schools here he supplemented by 



714 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



a preparatory course at the Stevens Institute in Hoboken and a special course 
in architecture at the University of Pennsylvania. 

He has recently found scope for the exercise of his native genius and 
acquired abilities in the drafting of a magnificent design for a new city hall 
for the city of Dover, which building is now in process of erection. A 
description of the building, as published in a local paper early in 1898, we 
give in the following paragraphs: 




CITY HALL OF DOVER. 



"The building as he has planned it has a frontage of fifty-six feet, to be 
built of buff brick with brown stone and terra-cotta trimmings, having a slate 
roof. It embraces a basement and three stories in height. The basement is 
divided up with a hallway through the center, eligible rooms on either side 
of the front which could be utilized for police justice's court, police head- 
quarters, etc. In the rear are six cells for prisoners, a place for the heating 
apparatus, lavatories and storage rooms, where the city clerk can put away 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 715 

election booths, etc., and the street commissioner the city's work-tools, ete. 
In the first story would also be a hall through the center, with two large 
rooms on either side, attached to each of which would be a private office, 
furnished with all modern improvements and conveniences. The large rooms 
would be utilized for various purposes in connection with the official business 
of the city. On the second floor would be, one side of the building, a large 
room for the city council with adjacent rooms required by that body. On 
the opposite side of the hallway the architect has provided rooms for the 
mayor's office, city clerk's office, city treasurer's office, etc. The third floor 
can be divided up into offices such as will be demanded by the growing city. 

" Up to the time when such a building might be fully needed by the' 
city, it is Mr. Vreeland's idea that some of the rooms in the basement and on 
the first floor might be rented out for mercantile purposes, which would bring 
a return to the city that would help to pay for the building, or, at least, the 
interest on the money invested in its construction. He further suggests that 
there might be incorporated into the erection of the building the utilitarian 
idea in another direction, and that is, instead of putting up in Dover a special 
soldiers' monument, put that money into the new city hall, making that, in 
part at least, monumental, giving to the Grand Army of the Republic a meet- 
ing place in the hall. Here also a city museum, under certain regulations, 
and the city's public library might, for a time at least, find a habitation. 
The whole structure as it will appear to the eye is artistic and substan- 
tial. There is a place for the city clock and from its flagstaff Old Glory 
would gracefully float. 

" We are glad to be able to place this city hall suggestion before our 
citizens at this time. The very suggestion is an inspiration to hopefulness, an 
attraction toward the future, and will lead to thought on the possibilities of 
our city and to much that will be realized during the twentieth century. Our 
wish is that Architect Vreeland may soon see his beautiful and practical sug- 
gestion a. culmination, with the national ensign floating over the finished 
structure, the pride of the city and the glory of all our officials." 

Mr. Vreeland is deeply interested in the advancement of all the interests 
of his city, and is an efficient factor in all local enterprises in this direction. 



JAMES WHITE. 



For nearly half a century the family of White, of which our subject is 
a representative, has been prominently identified with the paper-manufact- 
uring interests of New Jersey. John White was the first of the family to 
locate in this state, the date of his arrival being 1814. He was born at 



716 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Millham, near Edinburg, Scotland, in 1797, and in the latter city learned 
the paper-making trade, serving a regular apprenticeship in the mills of his 
native land. Upon coming to the United States he located in Millburn, 
Essex county, New Jersey, where he established an extensive paper-manu- 
facturing plant, a part of which, together with the breast walls of the dam, 
are still standing. There he conducted a very large business for a number 
of years, after which he removed to Hohokus, now Waldwich, Bergen 
county, New Jersey, where he spent the remainder of an active and success- 
ful business life, and passed away in 1848. He was a very energetic and 
industrious man, and had the persevering spirit so characteristic of the 
Scotch nation. He was a most charitable man, kindly and generous, and 
his hospitable home was ever the resort of the clergy and visiting church 
workers. 

John White was married in this state to Mabella Hughes, a daughter of 
Jonathan and Elizabeth (Robinson) Hughes, both of whom were natives of 
Manchester, England. She was a faithful Christian woman, a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and was most charitable and benevolent. 
She died at the old White homestead, at Hohokus, New Jersey, in 1875. 
To Mr. and Mrs. John White were born eight children: James, of this re- 
view ; John, who married Electa Ann Brewer, of Elmira, New York; Sarah; 
William, who married Jane Snyder, of Hohokus, New Jersey; Matthew, 
who married Annie Waldron, of this state; Elizabeth, wife of Thomas 
Higham; Charles, who married a Miss Waldron, of this state; and Jonathan, 
who married Maria Billette, of Canada. 

James White, now so prominently connected with the industrial inter- 
ests of Butler, was born in Millburn, New Jersey, on the 19th of April, 1830, 
and when very young accompanied his parents on their removal to Hohokus, 
where he acquired his literary education in the public schools. He learned 
the trade of paper-making under the direction of his father, who died when 
James was eighteen years of age, at which time the latter assumed the 
responsibilities of conducting the business. He was very successful in his 
management of the enterprise, which he carried on for some time. He then 
formed a partnership with his uncle, Matthew Dunlap, and engaged in the 
paper trade in New York city, the connection being maintained and the busi- 
ness profitably carried on until the death of Mr. Dunlap. Mr. White then 
returned to the old mill in Hohokus, where he engaged in the manufacture of 
paper for some time. In 1862 he removed to Bloomingdale, near Butler, 
where he operated the Logan Paper Mills until the failing health of Mrs. 
White caused him to seek a change of climate, and with his family he went 
to Minnesota, where he remained until 1871. He then returned to Bloom- 
ingdale and purchased the Logan Paper Mills, making many improvements 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 717 

in the plant and conducting an extensive business. The volume of their 
trade enabled them to furnish employment to a large force of operatives, 
thus adding materially to the general prosperity of the town. In 1885 Mr. 
White purchased the water power at the present location of the Upper Mills, 
and erected an extensive plant, equipping it with all modern accessories and 
the latest improved machinery known to the paper-making trade. The 
product of this manufactory is fine tissue and manilla paper. The plant now 
known as the Lower Mills also is splendidly equipped with machinery 
especially adapted to the manufacture of the celebrated J. C. Gayetty medi- 
cated toilet paper, and the product of this factory is largely used in supply- 
ing the export trade. Both the Upper and Lower Mills are now being 
operated by Mr. White's sons, and for some time the firm has been known as 
the Pequannock Valley Paper Company. This enterprise has become one of 
the most important in this section of the country, and furnishes employment 
to a large force of men. 

On the 2d of April, i860, James White married Miss Isabella R. 
Brewer, of Elmira, New York, where the wedding was celebrated. She was 
born April 27, 1839, a daughter of Peter and Isabella (Rolfe) Brewer. 
When twenty years of age she became a member of the American Tract 
Society and has always been deeply interested in Christian work. By this 
marriage have been born five children: Fred S., born January 2, 1861, 
married Annie Fair, a daughter of Samuel and Juliet (Cooper) Fair, and they 
have four children, Harold J. F. , Florence, Isabel and Ruth; Clara T. , the 
second of the family, was born September 26, 1863, married Angelo H. 
Knapp, of Paterson, New Jersey, and died July 29, 1893, leaving one son, 
James: she had been a life-long member of the American Tract Society, of 
New York city; Walter C, born January 3, 1865, married Esther Bell, of 
Bloomingburg, New York, and their children are James, DeGray, Walter C. 
and Clara T. ; Frank C, born July 12, 1867, died in infancy; and Joseph 
Billette, born February 9, 1871, was graduated in Princeton College in the 
class of 1895, afi d is now engaged in the manufacture of paper, as a member 
of the Pequannock Valley Paper Company. 

Mr. White and his wife have long been faithful members of the Bloom- 
ingdale Methodist Episcopal church, and for a number of years he has served 
as trustee. He contributes liberally to the support of the church and to all 
charitable and benevolent interests, and is also generous in his financial aid 
to those interests which he believes will prove of benefit to the community. 
His life has been one of great business activity, which has justly earned him 
the rest that he is now enjoying. His business methods were honorable, his 
energy unflagging, his perseverance unwavering and his integrity unassail- 
able, and to those qualities his splendid success is attributable. 



718 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



MAHLON M. SMITH. 

The eventful career of Mahlon M. Smith embraces " a life on the ocean 
wave," travel through various states of the Union, the experiences of the 
gold-miner in the west, of the hunter and trapper in the Rocky mountains, 
and the quiet, peaceful pursuits of the farm; but after many years spent 
away from the scenes of his childhood he is now living upon the old home- 
stead on Union Hill, Morris county, New Jersey, his time and energies being 
given to agricultural pursuits. 

He was born on the 20th of August, 1843, and is a son of John and 
Ruth (Skellinger) Smith. The father was born in 181 5, on the old homestead 
near what was then known as Charcoal Furnace, and later as the old paper- 
mill site, but, by purchase of our subject, it is now known as the Smith 
property. The grandfather, Garret Smith, was one of the pioneer settlers 
of the commnnity and married a Miss Losey. The parents of our subject 
had a family of eight children: Mahlon M. ; Eunice, deceased; George A., 
of Rockaway; Julia L. ; Cornelius L. ; Malinda C. , who is at home with her 
mother; Theodore P., of Dover; and Mary E. , wife of Edward Smith. 

Through the first two decades of his life Mahlon M. Smith remained 
upon the home farm, the routine of that life being varied only by occasional 
service in the Mount Hope ore mines and the Plainfield stone quarries. In 
his early boyhood he assisted in the labors of field and meadow through the 
summer months, while in the winter season he attended the common schools 
and acquired a good practical education. In 1864 he entered the naval serv- 
ice of his country, and was assigned to the United States receiving ship Ver- 
mont. Later he was transferred to the United States gunboat Galatea, of 
the West India squadron, which acted as guard to the mail steamers plying 
between New York and Aspinwall, with headquarters at Hayti. On one 
occasion he was called ashore at Hayti to act as guard to the American consul, 
when the natives were at war among themselves. He also touched at 
Havana, Cuba, at Port-au-Prince and other places of note, returning to New 
York at the close of the war. He then received an honorable discharge from 
the naval service, July 12, 1865. 

Returning to his home in Rockaway township, Morris county, Mr. Smith 
engaged in farming for a time, but not finding that pursuit congenial at that 
period, he went with a number of friends to Colorado, where he secured 
employment in a sawmill on Boulder creek, in Gilpin county. During the 
mining excitement he went to Jamestown, and after buying a lot and build- 
ing a house he began prospecting on what was then called Sugar Loaf Hill; 
but gold was so scarce that he soon sank what capital he had. Abandoning 
that business, he then went with James R. Oliver to Estes Park, at the foot 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 719 

of Long's Peak, where they engaged in hunting and fishing. They some- 
times camped out under projecting rocks, at other times slept in disused 
cabins, and again in the snow by the camp fires. They engaged in shooting 
elk and other game, and caught the spotted trout in great numbers, but the 
business did not prove very profitable and Mr. Smith made his way to Chey- 
enne, and thence with a company of men across the Laramie Plains and the 
Black Hills to a place afterward known as Red Desert. There he began 
work on the Union Pacific Railroad, which was then in process of construc- 
tion across the mountains. Returning from there to Colorado, he assisted in 
operating a threshing-machine during the season of harvest, also engaged in 
pressing hay, in farming and in teaming; and the killing of an occasional 
rattlesnake added zest to his life in the wild districts of the west. 

On again returning to New Jersey, Mr. Smith embarked in farming, and 
has a valuable, though small farm, comprising thirty acres of rich land, 
which is under a high state of cultivation. The place is also improved with 
a good barn, substantial residences and outbuildings in abundance, and 
is surrounded with many comforts which indicate the progressive, practical 
American farmer. 

On the 28th of May, 1873, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma L. Smith, a daughter of Isaac and Margaret (Todd) Smith, and they 
now have one daughter, Laura Estella. In his political affiliations Mr. 
Smith is a Prohibitionist, and has served as a member and trustee of the 
school board for some time. He belongs to the United American Mechanics, 
No. 6, of Dover, and with his wife and daughter holds membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of Rockaway, in which he is serving as steward. 
He is also trustee of Union Chapel, the house of worship being now in course 
of erection near Union school-house. He takes great interest in church and 
Sunday-school work and for a number of years has served as assistant super- 
intendent of the Sunday-school at Union. His wife also shares in these 
labors, and for twenty years has been a valued teacher in the Sunday-school. 
Their well spent lives and genuine worth make them valued members of 
society, and in the community they have a large and constantly growing cir- 
cle of friends. 



FLOYD DECKER. 



The superintendent of the blowing department of the Butler Hard Rubber 
"Works, Mr. Decker, was born in Warwick, ^Orange county, New York, on the 
13th of September, 1859. His father, David Decker, was a farmer and died 
in July, 1897, at the age of seventy-three years. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Mary Margaret Shiner, and died in 1878. The following members 



720 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

of their family still survive: William R.; Mary E., widow of Charles E. 
Smith; John L., and Floyd, all residents of Butler. One daughter, Annie, 
became the wife of De Witt Miller, and died leaving a family. 

Amid the scenes of rural life Mr. Decker, of this sketch, was reared and 
was early trained to habits of industry, and made to understand the value of 
close application to business if one would secure success. Soon after his 
birth, the father removed with his family to Newfoundland, New Jersey, and 
it was from that place that Floyd Decker attended the Boardville school. 
He assisted in the labors of the home farm until seventeen years of age, when 
he secured employment in connection with a livery stable in Warwick and later 
was connected with a hotel in Florida, New York, for three and a half years. 
On the expiration of that period he came to Butler, and in January, 1880, 
entered the service of the Butler Hard Rubber Works as an employe in the 
soapstone rooms. His promotion from time to time has steadily advanced 
him to the position of foreman of the blowing room, of which the soapstone 
room is an adjunct, and in this responsible position he is now serving with con- 
spicuous fidelity and capability. That he has the confidence of his employ- 
ers is shown by the fact that he has served in this capacity for sixteen years. 
His worth and reliability are very marked and he has the respect of employ- 
ers and those who serve under him. 

On the 9th of June, 1883, Mr. Decker was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary E. Taylor, daughter of George Taylor, and their union has been 
blessed with an interesting family of five children, namely: George, Mabel, 
Grace, Floyd and Maud. Mr. Decker has erected a neat cottage on Belle- 
vue avenue and Pearl street, Kiel Heights, Butler, and is in every way a 
worthy and desirable citizen. 



ASA T. COOK. 



Prominently connected with the official, educational and mercantile 
interests of Montville is Asa T. Cook, who is now serving his fellow citizens 
as township assessor. He was born in Lincoln Park, Pequannock township, 
Morris county, September 7, 1844, and is a son of Peter and Elizabeth 
(Henion) Cook. His grandfather, John Cook, was the first of the family to 
settle in Morris county, where he followed farming as a life work. He was 
a native of New Jersey and was of Holland-Dutch extraction. His death 
occurred when he had reached the age of eighty-three years. His children, 
six in number, were Peter, George, John, Daniel, Anna and Mary, and all 
reached mature years, were married and had families of their own. 

Peter Cook, the father of our subject, was born and reared in Beaver- 
town, now Lincoln Park, where in early life he learned the trade of tailor- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 721 

tng, following that pursuit for some years. Later he was employed by 
the Morris Canal Company for more than twenty years, and then followed 
carpentering in Boonton. His death occurred in Montville March 3, 1889, 
and his wife passed away on the 10th of November, 1889. They had ten 
children, namely: Abram, who died single; George S., who married Hettie 
A. Van Duyne; Asa T. ; Charles, who died in childhood; Eletta A., wife of 
Giles M Roome; Horatio H., who married Carrie Donavan; James M., who 
wedded Edith Huyler; John H., who died at the age of thirty-four years; 
Sarah C. , wife of Thomas Gibbert; and William, who married Anna Williams. 

Mr. Cook, whose name begins this biography, is indebted to the public- 
school system for his educational advantages. During his early manhood he 
began merchandising, and also followed farming for some time. In 1876 he 
purchased his present store in Montville, has greatly improved the property 
and now has one of the finest business buildings in the town. He has also 
done much for the progressand improvement of the town, withholding his sup- 
port and co-operation from no movement or enterprise calculated to prove 
of public benefit. He is a public-spirited and progressive citizen, and to a 
considerable degree has been identified with the political interests of the town. 
In 1S76 he was elected assessor of the township and filled that position con- 
tinuously until 1890. In 1892 he was elected township clerk, and in 1897 
■was re-elected to the office of assessor, which position he is now filling with 
marked fidelity. He has also served on the board of education since its 
formation, and the schools have found in him a progressive and ardent sup- 
porter. He votes with the Republican party and is well informed on the 
issues of the day, which thus enables him to give an intelligent support to 
the cause which he advocates. He has always been a public-spirited man, 
and during the Civil war he manifested his loyalty to the government by 
enlisting in Company G, Twenty-seventh New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, in 
which he served for nine months. 

On the 1 2th of October, 1869, Mr. Cook married Miss Lucy A. Kanouse, 
who was born on the 18th of October, 1851. Their children are Frank F., 
Clarence C. , S. Louise, G. Hobart and Peter I. Cook, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. 
Cook are consistent members of the Reformed church of Boonton, and their 
many admirable qualities have won them the high regard of many friends. 



PAUL WITTECK. 



The chief engineer of the Butler Hard Rubber Company is Paul Witteck, 
who was born in the ancient city of Trier, Germany, on the 21st of July, 
1 86 1, being the only son and second child in a family of four children, whose 



2oa 



722 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

parents were Michael and Maria (Hebert) Witteck. His grandfather and 
father were artificers in metals, and after Mr. Witteck acquired his literary 
education in the public schools he began to study under the direction of his 
father, with whom he remained for five years. On the expiration of that 
period, he went to Munich and placed himself under the instruction and 
guidance of the masters in that line, taking a course in an institute known as 
the School of Higher Advancement for Tradesmen. At the time he entered 
upon his studies in Munich he was also subject to the military duties of the 
empire, and in order that he might perform his service to his country, and at 
the same time pursue his course in the institute without interruption, he 
applied for an assignment which would permit of this, and was made a mem- 
ber of the infantry, or body regiment of the king of Bavaria. 

In 1883 Mr. Witteck came to the United States and obtained a position 
with the Whiting Manufacturing Company, silversmiths, of New York city, 
where his uncle, the late Charles Witteck, was superintendent. In 1885 he 
came to Butler to accept a proffered position with the Butler Hard Rubber 
Company. He had spent years in perfecting himself in his profession, had 
had wide experience, and was well fitted for the responsible position which he 
entered upon. That he has given the most perfect satisfaction is indicated 
by his long connection with thie company. 

Mr. Witteck was united in marriage to Miss Wilhemina, daughter of 
William and Wilhemina (Mink) Kiel, her f>Gbther being superintendent of the 
Butler Hard Rubber Company. Mr. and Mrs. Witteck now have three chil- 
dren, viz.: Paul, Wilhemina and Marguerite. There was also one, Virginia, 
who died at the age of five years. 

Mr. Witteck is a thorough American, heartily in sympathy with the insti- 
tutions of the republic, and takes a deep interest in all that pertains to the 
welfare and advancement of county, state and Union. He has an interest- 
ing family and a hospitable home, wherein intelligence and good cheer 
abound. 



GEORGE E. TRUMBOUR. 

Mr. Trumbour was born in Boonton, New Jersey, on the 17th of 
August, 1855, a "d is descended from a family that originally came from 
Holland, but intermarriage with the Pennsylvania Germans has led their 
descendants to be classed among that people. His father, Adam Trumbour, 
has born in South Easton, Pennsylvania, in 1829, and married Susan Decker, 
daughter of Andrew and Phoebe (DeMouth") Decker. Her death occurred in 
1875, but the father is now living in Belleville, Illinois, where he is engaged 






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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 723 

in business as a nail-cutter. Their children are George E. ; Charles, deceased; 
Rosa Ella, wife of Frank Vallentine, of Morristown; Lizzie, who married 
James Glenn, of Bloomingdale; Annie, wife of John Hudson, of Morristown; 
and Kate, wife of Michael Keyley, of Morristown. 

George Edward Trumbour was reared in his native town and is indebted 
to its public-school system for the educational privileges which he enjoyed. 
When the duties of the school-room were to him a thing of the past he began, 
to learn the trade of tack-making in Boonton, which he followed for four 
years, when he turned his attention to nail-making, in which line he was 
employed in Somerset, Massachusetts, and in Montreal, Canada. In the 
latter city he was in the employ of the Watson Rolling Mill Company, and 
on leaving the British domain he returned to his former employer in Somerset, 
with whom he continued until March 29, 1878. In that year he removed to- 
Bloomingdale and accepted a position with the Rubber Comb & Jewelry- 
Company, his duties being to press pistol handles. He has remained in 
continuous employment with that company and its successor, the Butler Hard 
Rubber Company, and his capability and fidelity have led to his promotion 
from time to time, until in 1886, when Mr. Trumbour was recognized by 
Superintendent William Kiel as the chief expert in his line of work and was 
placed in the important position of foreman of the pistol-handle and 
pressing department. His duties were also increased with the management 
of the harness-trimming room and later he was entrusted with the full 
superintendency of the dress-bone and casting department. In this 
position his early training in the iron industry came into practice, and in 
his different positions to which he was assigned he proved himself proficient 
in his art. 

In 1898 the Butler Hard Rubber Company was absorbed by the American 
Hard Rubber Company, and in the general condensation of the factory into 
three departments, Superintendent William Kiel intrusted Mr. Trumbour 
with the responsible position as his chief assistant in the gun and molding 
department. He has shown himself to be one of the most careful and 
efficient workmen in this great plant; he makes his employers' interest his 
own, and all his energies are directed toward securing perfection in the 
department over which he has charge. 

Mr. Trumbour was married in Boonton, April 13, 1878, to Miss Joanna, 
a daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Brady) Frawley, and six children bless 
their union namely: George, Thomas, Maggie, Annie, Edward and Eulalia. 
Mr. Trumbour is a member of the Catholic Benevolent Legion and his love 
of music is manifest by his connection with the Butler Silver Cornet Band. 
He is a man of many pleasing social qualities and is popular in business and 
private life. 



724 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



ISAAC QUINBY GURNEE. 

Of the many employees of the Butler Hard Rubber Company, none 
stand more loyally by the interests of the corporation or labor more zeal- 
ously in the faithful performance of duty than this gentleman, who for 
nineteen years has been an employee of this company and its predecessor. 
Diligence, enterprise and thoroughness are numbered among his conspicuous 
characteristics and commend him to the confidence and good will of his 
employers. 

Mr. Gurnee was born in Parsippany, Morris county, March 3, 1865, and 
is a representative of a family that has furnished to state and nation men 
of considerable prominence. His first American ancestor comes from prim- 
itive colonial stock. His paternal ancestors can be traced backed to 1685. 
That year is noted in the history of France for the great folly and crime 
known as the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. Among the Huguenots 
Avho fled from that country and found here a haven of refuge was Isaac 
Gamier, who settled in New Rochelle, New York, and whose will, dated July 
7, 1727, mentions his wife, Elizabeth, and children Francois, Isaac, Mary 
and Elizabeth. Francois, his son, came to Haverstraw in 1729, and pur- 
chased from Thomas Barker of Cow-neck, Long Island (then a part of West- 
chester county), lot No. 6, in Conkling Range in Kakiat. This region embraced 
a large part of the towns of Haverstraw and Clarkstown, and was a portion 
of the great patent of Kakiat granted in 1696 to Daniel Honan and others. 
Francois and his descendants were the most extensive land-owners in that 
region. As in the case of many French names, the original form has been 
disused and the present descendants of this family now bear- the name of 
Gurney or Gurnee, the latter being the more common form. No family in 
Rockland county has held a higher position than this, and their representa- 
tives are very numerous. Among them may be mentioned General Benja- 
min Gurnee, Abraham Gurnee, member of the assembly from 18 18 to 1825 
and afterward state senator, Colonel William Gurnee and the Hon. Walter 
S. Gurnee, mayor of Chicago in 1851. 

Francis, second son of Francois, died about 1825, leaving two children: 
Anna, the mother of ex-Mayor Hewitt, of New York, and William, who 
resided near the ancestral home of his paternal grandfather at the head of 
the mountain near the town of Haverstraw. This is the junction of several 
highways, and is a locality known from earliest times as Gurnee's Corners. 
Francis Gurnee, grandfather of our subject, was the son of William Gurnee, 
and was born near the spot where the French refugee first settled and there 
passed a large portion of his life as a schoolmaster and merchant. The 
genealogical line runs as follows, and consists of eight generations: Isaac, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 725 

died 1727; children, Francois, Isaac, Mary and Elizabeth. Francois was 
the father of ten children: John, born December 12, 1729; Francis, Ste- 
phen, Isaiah, Isaac, Eli, James, Hester, Elizabeth and Anna. 

The descendants of Francis (son of Francois) are two children: Anna, 
wife of John Hewitt; and William, who married Elizabeth Drummond and 
whose children were Francis, James, Jessie, William, Elizabeth, John, 
Edward and Mary. 

Of these children of Francis (son of Francois) the eldest son Francis, 
who died in 1874, married Leah, daughter of John Demorest and secondly 
Margaret E. Mead; his children are William Z. , Elenor, Elizabeth, Frank, 
Harry, Anna and Myra. 

William Z. Gurnee, the father of our subject, was known for many 
years as a successful merchant of Parsippany and Newark, New Jersey. In 1 860 
he married Marianna Quinby, whose family can lay claim to the respect- 
able antiquity of five hundred years. This family was supposed to have 
come over to England in the Danish invasion, and the surname originating 
at Quarmby or Quermby near Hothertfield in Yorkshire, and the first on 
record was Hugh de Quarmby (1 341) in the reign of King Edward the III. 
Branches of this family moved to Farnham Surry, near London, and in the 
south chancel of the old church at Farnham is a tablet to commemorate 
Robert Quynbe, one of the first bailiffs of Farnham. A rubbing from this tablet 
is in the possession of Dr. G. A. Quinby, of New York city, and reads as 
follows: ' ' Here lyethe the bodye of Robert Quynbe, gentleman, who departed 
out of this world on the tenthe day of September, Anno Domini 1570." 

According to tradition, the Quinbys were early settled at Stratford on 
Avon, and were said to be related to the Bard' of Avon through Judith 
Shakespeare, who married Richard Quinny. Dr. G. A. Quinby, while in 
Europe, had a search instituted by Culleton's Heraldic Office, London, to 
prove this tradition, and after years of researches, Culleton has upset this 
theory and proved conclusively that the Quinbys have never lost the 
letter b in their name, and disproves all the statements which have been 
published in this country. (Bolton's History of Westchester, the Founders and 
Builders of the Oranges.) The coat of arms which has been described in 
various histories in this country is incorrect, as it belongs to the descendants 
of Shakespeare through Richard Quinny. The correct coat of arms is here- 
with described, and the first to be published in this country, as given below: 
Quarmby, Quynbe, etc. Anns, Argent, two bars, sable in chief, a ppr. 
Cornish chough. Crest, a Cornish chough as in arms. Motto. 

The following is an extract from the register of the parish church of 
Farnham Surry, from their commencement in 1539 to A. D. 1660, made by 
J. W. Burringham, parish clerk. 



726 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



"Christened: A. D. 1 5 5 1 , June 13th, Annie Ouinby; 1552, Nov. 28, 
Lathorm Quinbye; 1557-8-9-60, no register kept; 1562, Feby. 24, Henry 
Quenby; Nov. 19, George Quaybe. ? 

"Marriages: A. D. Apr. 29, ?, William Mollyness and Elizabeth Quymby; 
1571, Aug. 27, John Miller and Mary Quymbye; 1572, Feb. 18, Thomas Irve 
and Elizabeth Quynby; 1581, Feb. 6, Robert Winn and Katherine Quimby. 

"Burials: 1563, Francis Quinby. 1566, Richard Alyne Quinby; 1568, 
June 15th, Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Quinbye; Sept. 10, 1570, Robert 
Ouynbye, gentleman; 15*70, Dec. 31, Margarette, otherwise called Mother 
Quinbye; 1582, January 26, Jane Quinby. (J. W. B.)" 






" Also in Culleton's researches are mentioned Rev. John Quinbye, vicar of 
Farnham Surry, Fellow of New Hall, Oxford, 1522-8. Will Aug. 30, 1557, 
proved 12-Nov. '57. John Quinbye of London, will 28 July, 1556, proved 3 
May, 1557, died unmarried. Rev. Anthony Quinbye, of Farnham, fellow of 
New Hall, Oxford, died unmarried 20 May, 1559. Katherine, Elizabeth and 
Andrew, also four children mentioned not by name in their uncle John's will. 
Thomas Allen Quarmby died 14 Feb., 1582. George Quinbye, will dated 
1584. Edward Quinbye, of London, will dated 1596. Thomas Ouinby and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 727 

Goodman Quembye, his descendant, the American ancestor, landed in Salem, 
Mass., about 1630." 

There were two children mentioned, John and Robert.* William, son 
of Robert, took oath of fidelity at Amesbury, New England, 1677. From 
this branch originated the Quinbys of Connecticut, New York and New Jer- 
sey, the older branch remaining in New England. Tradition t says the 
Stratford Company was organized at Wethersfield and Hartford in 1639, 
and contained seventeen families, among whom was William Quemby. He 
came with a wife and two children, John and Thomas. This was the com- 
pany of sturdy Puritans, robust in thought as in person, that came through 
the wilderness to Stratford on foot and horseback, and forded the Housatonic 
somewhere above Stratford. What few household goods which were too heavy 
to bring were doubtless sent around by water. Stratford is supposed to have 
been named by John Ouenby. There is a large tract of land that is called 
Ouemby's Neck and belonged to the Quemby family in early days. The lot No. 
7, where William located, lies in the heart of the present town of Stratford. 
At this period the name was changed to Quenby. Two of his sons, John 
in 1654, and Thomas 1660, appear on the record of the town by this name. 
In 1654 John and William, sons of William, settled in Westchester county, 
New York, and were patentees in the town of Westchester. John was one 
of ths principal proprietors of New Castle in the same county, and was 
appointed a magistrate in 1662 by Governor Stuyvesant. He married a 
Deborah Haight and had five children, — John, Charles, Josias, Mary and 
Deborah. 

Josias (1st), his son, married Mary Mulleneux in 1689, and they had eleven 
children. Their son Josias (2d), born in 1692, married Hannah Cornell, and 
their son Josias (3d) was born in 1726. About this time the name was 
changed to Quimby as Ephraim, born February 7, 1700, and Isaiah, born 
April 11, 1 7 16, sons of Josias and Mary Mulleneux, [who] moved to Anwell, 
New Jersey, and founded the Hunterdon county branch. Ephraim died in 
1767, his will being recorded in Trenton. He married Elizabeth Halliday, 
and his children were Daniel, Samuel, who founded the Ohio branch, 
Ephraim, Mary and Sarah. 

Josias (3d) married, in 1747, Martha Harrison and settled in Orange 
about 1746, and his will is dated 1805 in Essex county. This branch at this 
time substituted the letter n form, and founded the Essex and Morris county 
branch. This Josias (3d) ("Officers and Men of the Revolution," — General 
Striker) was a lieutenant of the Third Battalion of the first establishment of 
the New Jersey Line in 1776, of Captain Potter's company, and owned a 

*Index to New England Families. 
tOrcutt's History of Stratford. 



728 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

large farm in the region of Lewellan Park. He had five sons and seven 
daughters: Aaron, born in 1754 and died in 1824; Moses, born in 1749 and 
died in 1825 (James Moses, ex-mayor of Newark, was a descendant of this 
branch); Dr. Joseph, who died in Westfield, New Jersey, in 1835; John, 
who was wounded at the battle of Brandywine, September II, 1777, served 
in the First Battalion, second establishment, First Regiment; and Josias (4th), 
born in 1762, who married Phceba Harrison, of Orange; the daughters were 
Patty, Jemmima, Sarah (born in 1753), Phoeba, who died February 14, 1789, 
and Hannah. 

Josias (4th) moved to Troy Hills, New Jersey, about 1796 and died in 
1835. His children were Isaac, Colonel James (founder of the Maryland 
branch), Dr. Josias (5th), who settled in Flemington, New Jersey; Phceba, 
Martha, Rachael, Jemmima, David and Moses. 

His son, Judge Isaac Quinby, was born in Orange 1788, died 1865, and 
moved to Parsippany from Troy Hills, and married Sarah Dehart and was 
the father of eleven children. He was a well-to-do farmer and served as 
judge from 1829 to 1836, also a member of the state legislature in 1844. His 
children were Phceba, William, Alonzo, Isaac, Dewitt, Eugene, George A., 
Sarah, Emma, and Marianna, mother of our subject. His sons were all dis- 
tinguished in the walks of life they chose to follow. 

Isaac Quinby, a graduate of Princeton, was appointed a cadet at West 
Point and was a room and class mate of General Grant, and graduated the 
sixth in his class. He entered the artillery service and served with distinc- 
tion under Generals Taylor and Scott in the Mexican war. At the outbreak 
of the Civil war he was appointed colonel of the Thirteenth New York Vol- 
unteers and distinguished himself in the first battle of Bull Run under Gen- 
eral Sherman. He was afterward promoted as brigadier-general and served 
under General Grant in the Vicksburg campaign. After the war he was 
appointed United States marshal of the northern part of New York state and 
was professor of mathematics at West Point and for a period of thirty years 
professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at the Rochester University. 

He married a daughter of Colonel Gardner, of the United States Army. 
Their children were Dehart, lieutenant in the United States Army; Frank, 
Kate, Ruth, Lois, Carrie, Arnott, Edward, and John, who is the senior lieu- 
tenant and ordnance officer on the United States cruiser Vesuvius, and was 
the executive officer on that cruiser during the bombardment of Santiago, 
being assigned to that position on account of his expert knowledge of the 
handling of high explosives. 

Alonzo, son of Judge Quinby, took up the study of law and practiced his 
profession in Morristown under Judge Scofield. In 1849 he emigrated to Cal- 
ifornia and married Minerva Moody, of New York state, was in the legisla- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 729 

ture from 1855 to 1858, and became prominent in state affairs; was an unsuc- 
cessful aspirant to the United States senate and was mayor of San Jose for 
two terms. His children were Frederick, Myra and Minnie. 

William, son of Judge Quinby, entered the medical profession and was 
highly esteemed in Morristown, where he had a large practice. He left one 
daughter, Mary. Dr. G. A. Quinby, a retired physician of New York city, 
who has a son, George T. Quinby, is a son of Judge Quinby. Another son 
was the late ex-Judge Dewitt C. Quinby, of Morris county. The remaining 
son, Eugene, is a highly respected farmer of Parsippany. 

Phceba, one of the daughters, married Davis Vail, and their children are 
Sarah, Eliza, Emma, Theodore N. (one of the founders of the Bell Tele- 
phone Company), Isaac, Alonzo, Mary and Louisa. Emma, another daugh- 
ter, married George Cobb, of Newark, and died without issue. The youngest 
daughter of Judge Quinby, Marianna, was born in 1837 and wedded William 
Z. Gurnee, father of our subject, in i860. Their children are Eugene A. , born 
in 1863, who married Katherine Debaun in 1885 and has two children, — 
Peter Debaun and Bessie. Leah, wife of A. J. Harrison, married in 1887, 
and has three children, — Maud, Clara and Harlowe. Emma married George 
Williams in 1898; William T. ; and Clara, born 1869, died 1890. Eugene 
A. and William T. are connected with the New York Telephone Company. 

Isaac Q. Gurnee, our subject, received his education in the public 
school and devoted himself earnestly to his books and excelled particularly 
in mathematics. He showed an early inclination toward mechanics. At the 
early age of fourteen he finished his studies in the village school and entered 
upon his business career, acting as office boy for the Rubber Comb & Jewelry 
Company, of Butler, and later he was assigned to duty in the turning room, 
having charge of the clerical work there. This is one of the most important 
departments in the factory and one which requires exceptional intelligence 
and mechanical skill in him who conducts its affairs. In 1882, when but 
eighteen years of age, Mr. Gurnee had mastered the duties and many details 
of the work in his department and was given full charge of same as foreman 
on the reorganization of the company into the American Hard Rubber Com- 
pany, in 1898. He was appointed by Superintendent William Kiel as his 
principal assistant in the sundry departments, under whom he has gained his 
practical experience in the hard-rubber industry, in which capacity he now 
serves with credit to himself and his employers. 

On the 30th of May, 1885, Mr. Gurnee was married, in Newark, to Miss 
Margaret Sebald, daughter of John Sebald, a veteran of the Civil war and a 
boot and shoe dealer, of Butler, New Jersey. They have an interesting little 
family of twochildren, — Eugene C. and Charlie Q. Their friends in the commu- 
nity are many, and both Mr. and Mrs. Gurnee are widely and favorably known. 



730 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 



GEORGE H. MAXFIELD. 

This citizen of Butler was born in Boonton, New Jersey, June 16, 1857. 
His father, Charles Maxfield, who has been a resident of Butler since 1866, 
was born at Long Bridge, Deverill, Somersetshire, England, in 1829, and in 
1856 came to the United States. He was attracted to Boonton by reason of 
the fact that it was the home of his uncle, John Maxfield, who was promi- 
nently connected with the Boonton Iron Works, being in the service of the 
company for the long period of forty-seven years. In 1858 Charles Maxfield 
removed to Morristown and from that point enlisted in the Union service 
during the Civil war, becoming a member of Company C, Fifty-eighth New 
Jersey Volunteers, which command was attached to the First New Jersey 
Brigade, Second Division, Sixth Army Corps. He participated in much of 
the hard fighting of the Army of the Potomac up to the battle of Spottsyl- 
vania, in which engagement his left leg was broken and a portion of it carried 
away by a piece of shell. He was then placed in the Mount Pleasant Hos- 
pital, and though afterward discharged as " cured," his injuries have caused 
that limb to shrink until it is now two and a half inches shorter than the 
other. Both before and since the war Charles Maxfield was engaged in 
house-painting, but for a long time has been unable to work, and is now liv- 
ing with his son, George H. 

Before leaving his native land he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah 
Smith, who died in 1865, leaving five children, namely: Sarah A., wife of 
Frank Bullock, of Millville, New Jersey; George H. ; M. Amy, who married 
Harry Fuhrmann, of Trenton, New Jersey; Rachel, wife of Augustus Cramer, 
of New York; and Charles J., a barber, of Port Norris, this state. 

George H. Maxfield, of this review, spent his youth in Vliettown, Som- 
erset county, where he was reared to farm life. On the 26th of February, 
1879, he came to Butler and secured a position in the finishing department 
of the Butler Hard Rubber Works. As he learned the business and became 
an efficient and competent workman he was advanced from time to time and 
in 1S87 was made foreman of the polishing department, and at present has 
full charge of the comb department, in which capacity he has since served, 
winning the commendation of the company and the respect of those who 
serve under his direction. He is diligent, steadfast and trustworthy, and 
while he desires that the men of his department shall do their best work he 
is always just and ever ready to encourage and aid those who wish to secure 
advancement through fidelity to duty. 

Mr. Maxfield is well known as an ardent Republican, being a man of 
firm convictions, which he readily expresses as proper occasion offers. He is 
ever found on the side of such measures as will promote the public good, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 731 

whether secular or religious, and is one of the leading members of the Meth- 
odist church, having heartily co-operated in securing the location of the new 
tabernacle on Bartholdi avenue, Butler. 

In Hunterdon count)', New Jersey, in 1882, Mr. Maxfield married Miss 
Emma, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Sutton, and to them were born 
three children — John S., William E. and Emma J. The mother died in 
1890, and Mr. Maxfield has since wedded Amanda J. Haycock, daughter of 
Peter and Jane Haycock, the marriage being celebrated in July, 1894. Their 
home is a beautiful residence situated on a splendid site at the head of Belle- 
vue avenue, overlooking the city, and was constructed after plans made by 
the subject of this review. 



HON. THEODORE F. RANDOLPH. 

The New Jersey Randolphs — or Fitz-Randolphs, as they once wrote them- 
selves — came to Middlesex county, New Jersey, from Barnstable, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1630, to which place they emigrated from Nottinghamshire, Eng- 
land, in 1622. They were of the emigrants who left England for "con- 
science' sake'' — a portion of those of that name landing at Massachusetts 
Bay and another portion in Virginia, during the years from 162 1 to 1630. 
The Randolphs of England have had a prominent place in English history 
from early in the tenth century, as have those of Scotland, from whom "the 
Bruce" of Scottish history was descended. All of the American Randolphs 
are from English and Scottish stock, and all are directly descended from the 
"adventurers" who, sailing from England in 1621-30, landed in Massa- 
chusetts or Virginia. Most of those who thus came, and who had Scotch 
blood in them, wrote their name Fitz-Randolph, while those of unmixed 
English blood retain the simple name of Randolph. 

Theodore F. Randolph, the subject of this sketch, was born at New 
Brunswick, New Jersey, June 24, 1826. His father, James F. Randolph, 
was the founder of the Fredonian and for forty years its editor. He also 
filled many offices of public trust, among them being that of a representative 
in congress from 1824 to 1830. The mother of Theodore was the daughter 
of Phineas Carman, and his grandparents were active Revolutionists during 
the war for independence. Theodore F. Randolph was educated at Rutgers 
grammar school, New Brunswick; entered upon mercantile life at sixteen 
years of age, and spent the succeeding ten years as a clerk, accountant, and 
principal in business, mostly in southern states. During his school days he 
partly learned, in spare hours, to be a printer, and was also given a subordin- 
ate position in editorial work. In 1852, at Vicksburg, Mississippi, Mr. Ran- 
dolph married a daughter of Hon. N. D. Coleman, a member of congress 



732 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

from the Maysville district, Kentucky. The succeeding year he moved to 
Easton, Pennsylvania, and immediately thereafter to Jersey City, engaging 
in the business of mining coal and transporting iron and ores. In 1859 he 
was elected from the first district of Jersey City to the house of assembly of 
the state legislature. By his party friends he was tendered the speakership 
of the house at this session, and declined it. The session of 1859-60 was the 
one immediately preceding the outbreak of the Civil war. As a "war 
Democrat " Mr. Randolph was put on many important committees, among 
them the committee on federal relations, which reported at his suggestion the 
bill appointing commissioners to the peace congress of 1861. The commis- 
sion was strictly non-partisan, and included the leading statesmen of both 
political parties in New Jersey. Mr. Randolph was also a member of the 
special or war session of 1861, which convened April 30th. On the first of 
May he introduced and had passed the first bill giving relief to families of 
volunteers. He also suggested and advocated many of the principal appro- 
priation bills during this session. 

In October, 1861, Mr. Randolph way elected from the county of Hudson 
to the senate of the state to fill a vacancy, and thereafter was mainly in 
charge of legislation connected with the federal affairs during the session of 
1 86 1 -2. In August, 1862, he was appointed by Governor Olden the com- 
missioner of draft for Jersey City and Hudson county. This office he held 
till the close of the year, sending forward, as volunteers, however, several 
thousand men. In November, 1862, Mr. Randolph was re-elected to the 
senate of New Jersey for three years, receiving six thousand three hundred of 
the six thousand four hundred votes cast. During this term, beginning with 
1863, he was chairman and a member of the committees on finance, federal 
relations, taxation, etc. He began during this term the advocacy of a more 
equitable system of taxation between corporations and the people, resulting 
somewhat later in powerful antagonisms to him. He also led the opposition 
to a scheme by which the state was to be burdened with nearly ten million 
dollars of local bounties; and introduced and had passed the first relief bill 
which extended equal benefits and bounties to white and colored volunteers. 

The office of state controller was created in 1865, at Mr. Randolph's 
suggestion, the bills of the state amounting to many millions of dollars since 
the war had opened, suggesting this additional safeguard. The creation of 
this office is said to have saved half a million of dollars to the state during 
the first few years of its existence. 

In 1867 Mr. Randolph was elected president of the Morris & Essex 
Railroad Company, resigning the position, however, in 1869, upon his elec- 
tion as governor. During his presidency there was completed the main line 
across the state to Pennsylvania; a branch road built to Chester; an extension 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 733 

made of the Montclair branch and the Boonton division branch, and the 
whole line was open to the coal and iron trade, nearly doubling in eighteen 
months the gross tonnage of the company and its money receipts, and 
advancing its securities largely. He then negotiated the existing lease, by 
which the Morris & Essex stockholders and bondholders are guaranteed in 
perpetuity seven per cent, upon par value. 

In January, 1869, Mr. Randolph was sworn in office as governor of New 
Jersey. His term of office — three years — was filled with unusual affairs, and 
they can only be rapidly alluded to. His first message — at once after his 
inaugural — was aimed at the abolition of the so-called Camden & Amboy 
monopoly, which had substantially controlled state affairs during the previous 
thirty years. At the outset of his administration a law was put in force which 
forever abolished the " transit duties" on passengers and freight across New 
Jersey, and substantially concluded the hated railway monopoly agreement 
with the state. The state public treasury, moreover, was largely benefited 
under the operation of the new law. 

An effort, powerfully backed, was made in 1869 to "bond" certain 
cities and townships of the state, ostensibly to aid in railway construction. 
Some favorable legislation had been obtained under a preceding administra- 
tion, and the scheme presented in 1869 was most specious and attractive as 
well as dangerous. After a severe contest and several vetoes all these 
measures, involving many millions, were finally defeated by the governor. 

During 1869 Governor Randolph advocated and appointed the first 
riparian commission. The labors of this body have given an income to the 
the state of over three million dollars. 

In 1870 he urged the passage of a system of general laws by which all 
special legislation should be avoided. This system was finally adopted by 
the state. The more noted recommendation of Governor Randolph during 
1870 was that which was contained in the annual and in special messages to 
the legislature touching the taxation of corporations. In these he urged that 
corporate capital, being the possessor of special privileges, was peculiarly the 
subject of taxation. These messages gave rise to much controversy. Dur- 
ing this period the legislature gave authority to the governor to appoint a 
commission to remodel the state house, and he was the president of that 
commission, which began and completed the work. The state prison inmates 
had been a source of large cost to the treasurer for many years prior to this 
administration. The shops were enlarged, the business carried on in them 
reformed and during this gubernatorial term a saving to the state of more 
than one hundred thousand dollars was effected. A disturbance known as 
the Berger riot occurred during 1870. Large bodies of men were opposing 
each other and hundreds of trains were delayed. The riot was quelled by 



734 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

the governor without serious injury to any one, and the conflicting railway 
companies were brought into court to settle their difficulties. 

The legislative session of 1871 was a noted one, principally on account of 
the passage of "an act to reorganize the government of Jersey City." The 
act was vetoed by Governor Randolph in a message of unusual severity. It 
was finally passed by a strict partisan majority over the veto. Within six- 
teen months its principal advocate was in state prison, and Jersey City has 
ever since been oppressed by wrongs which that charter made possible. The 
"election bribery law," which was most effectively enforced in every county 
of the state by Governor Randolph, was written by him and urged upon and 
passed by the legislature during this session. 

Of other public acts of this period the most memorable one, perhaps, 
is that known as the Orange proclamation. It was occasioned by the decision 
of a body of Orangemen to parade in Jersey City on their anniversary day 
(July 1 2th), which action was promptly met by others proposing to prevent 
the parade. A highly excited condition of affairs in New York city irritated, 
no doubt, the contending parties in New Jersey. Large bodies of men were 
known to be gathering for unfriendly purposes, and Governor Randolph, 
acting upon established information, finally issued the so-called Orange 
proclamation. It asserted the the right of peaceful assemblage by citizens, 
irrespective of nationality, creed or religion. It warned all people against 
interference with such right. It commanded all officers to enforce the laws, 
and, though closing with a rebuke to the Orangemen for reviving an un- 
necessary religious and political feud, of no general interest to Americans, it 
assured the people that the right of assemblage would be asserted and pro- 
tected "at any cost." The proclamation was followed by an order for state 
troops to the number of three thousand. The laws were enforced. No 
serious injury came to any person in New Jersey, although, from causes the 
same and occurring at the same hours, on the New York side of the Hudson 
many lives were unfortunately lost. 

Upon the recommendation of Governor Randolph the legislature during 
1869 gave authority for the purchase, with the governor's approval, of a site 
for a new lunatic asylum. He approved of the site near Morris Plains, ap- 
pointed the commissioners to prepare plans and begin the work, and took an 
earnest and active part in the construction of the great edifice till its com- 
pletion and occupancy. 

The great fire at Chicago occurred during Mr. Randolph's administra- 
tion, and he promptly issued a proclamation which was responded to so 
promptly and generously by the people of New Jersey that car-loads of 
clothing and provisions, and thousands of dollars, were en route to Chicago 
before the flames were subdued. 



biografhic.il and genealogical history. 735 

An interesting and novel case occurred toward the close of his adminis- 
tration. The chancellor summoned Governor Randolph to appear before 
him in court to answer touching the executive action on a certain legislative 
bill, which it was claimed should have been filed with the state department 
and thus become law. The governor denied the power of the chancellor to 
inquire into executive action or non-action; a long controversy occurred, 
the governor maintaining throughout that the executive was amenable alone 
— as to his official acts — to the legislature. 

In 1875 Mr. Randolph was elected to the senate of the United States, 
in which he served the term of six years. Much of this time he was chair- 
man of the military committee, and all the time was a member of the com- 
mittee on commerce. He was on various other committees, as those of edu- 
cation, civil-service reform, and the centennial exhibition, and was also on a 
special senate committee appointed to examine political frauds in South Car- 
olina. His speeches — not many in number — -were upon the count of the 
election vote, the centennial exhibition, the bi-metallic and other financial 
questions, the case of General Fitz John Porter, the use of troops at polling 
places, etc. They are of recent history and therefore do not need special 
reference. The speech upon mono-metalism had an especially large publica- 
tion and circulation. 

Mr. Randolph has filled other positions not herein enumerated: as, a 
delegate to national and state conventions; chairman of the executive 
national Democratic committee; president of the Washington Headquarters 
Association, of which he is one of the founders; trustee of the Rutgers Col- 
lege and other institutions, and director of many corporations and institu- 
tions of which no record has been given us. 



WILLIAM H. BAKER. 



Henry Baker, the grandfather of William H., resided about a half mile 
from Westfield church, in Union county, New Jersey, on the road to Spring- 
field. He married Mary Hedges, of Long Island, and they had six children, 
— five sons and one daughter. Their fourth son, Jeremiah, was the father of 
William H. 

William Hedges Baker, the subject of this sketch, was born January 3, 
1806, and was married June 15, 1848, to Clarissa, daughter of Thomas and 
Maria Dell. They had ten children, — Jeremiah, William H., Mary K. (wife 
of Dr. Samuel D. Johnston), Anna M. (wife of Horace L. Dunham), Andrew 
K. , David, Phebe H., Thomas, Henrietta and Lydia J., — of whom seven 
are now living. The oldest, who was a tanner and farmer, died in 1873. 



736 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

David died suddenly, October 18, 1 88 1, lacking only ten days of his majority; 
and Phebe, November I following, in her nineteenth year. 

Mr. Baker owned, in connection with his brother Henry, the Baker 
homestead, the Valley forge, a gristmill, and two iron mines. The DeHart 
Baker mine, located on Mine Hill, was developed by the Baker brothers, and 
afterward, while under lease to S. T. Scranton & Company, was sold to 
lessees and Messrs. Waterman and Beaver, in 1873. It is now owned by 
Joseph Wharton, of Philadelphia. The other mine, also called the Baker mine, 
in the township of Rockaway and near the homestead, was leased a number 
of years to the Allentown Iron Company and was very productive. Two veins 
cross the property, — the Mount Pleasant and the large vein which is exten- 
sively operated on the adjoining Richards mine lot of the Thomas Iron Com- 
pany. At present they are not operated, having become exhausted. The 
Baker brothers are also owners of other farming, mining and timber lands. 
Probably the most valuable timber land in the county was owned by them. 
Their business operations were extensive and varied. Mr. Baker died June 
27, 1S76, quite suddenly, of heart disease, as he was sitting in his house con- 
versing with a neighbor. 

In politics he was a Democrat. He inherited his father's industrious 
habits and good business qualities. He was an upright, honest, kind and 
obliging man, greatly esteemed in the community, and his loss was deeply 
regretted. He was strongly attached to his home and family, and rarely 
went away from Mount Pleasant, but left all outside business matters to be 
managed by his brother Henry. 

It is a remarkable fact that the Baker homestead has been in the posses- 
sion of the family nearly a century. It was located by Jacob Ford in 1757, 
was known as the Jonah Austen plantation in 1774, and was afterward the 
the property of Josiah Beaman, the iron manufacturer of Dover, by whom it 
was sold in 1792 to Jeremiah Baker, who devised it to his two sons, Henry 
and William H., in 1861. 



HENRY BAKER. 



The Baker family, of which the subject of sketch (as well as William 
Hedges Baker, whose biography appears elsewhere) was a member, is of 
English descent. The earliest history of the family in this country dates 
from the settlement of Easthampton, on Long Island, where Thomas Baker, 
who had emigrated from England, first settled some time previous to 1700, 
and from which place he removed to Connecticut Farms (now Union county), 
where he died. 

Jeremiah Baker, the father of Henry, was born August 28, 1770, near 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 737 

Westfield, New Jersey, where his father, Henry Baker, resided. He learned 
his trade of tanner and currier and also that of shoemaker, with his brother- 
in-law, Ziba Ludlow, at Mendham, New Jersey, and removed to a point near 
Mount Pleasant (in what was then Pequannock township), near Dover, in 
June, 1792. Here, having worked at his trade about three years, he bought 
the property of Josiah Beaman, built a tannery and carried on the business 
until he was succeeded by his sons Henry and William H. In addition to 
his tanning business he was a large land-owner, owning at the time much of 
the site of Dover. He was also extensively engaged in iron manufacture. 
He was a man of great industry, very conscientious and just in his dealings 
with his fellow men. He was a liberal supporter of the Rockaway Presby- 
terian Church, of which he was a member more than forty years. In 1798 
he was married to Mary, daughter of Andrew King. She was born June 9, 
1778. Her children were Andrew K., Henry, Elizabeth (who married James 
B. Carroll), William H., Nancy W. (Mrs. William H. Spencer), Phebe H. 
{wife of John De Hart, of Parsippany), and Margaret. 

Henry Baker was born at the homestead near Dover, April 29, 1801. 
He was reared a tanner and a shoemaker, but as he grew older he engaged 
extensively in other departments of business in partnership with his brother 
William H. They jointly carried on the business of tanning and currying, 
milling and manufacturing iron, as well as farming. They were also joint 
owners of several valuable iron mines. 

Mr. Baker was married October 30, 1869, to Lydia J. Jenners. They 
have no children. He has always been a resident of the town in which he 
was born, and by industry, energy and perseverance he has acquired an 
ample competency. 



MAHLON MUNSON SEARING. 

The eastern states of this republic, in the early days of American his- 
tory, were largely settled by an earnest, thoughtful, intelligent and able 
people, many of whom fled from religious persecution in their own lands 
to seek personal safety and freedom to worship God according to the dictates 
of their conscience in the New World. Among these were many Huguenots 
from France, and this heroic band included within its circle three brothers 
of the name of Searing. One of them settled on Long Island, where ulti- 
mately the town of Searingville sprang up. The other two came to New 
Jersey, locating at Springfield, near Newark, where they were engaged in 
agricultural pursuits at the time of the breaking out of the Revolutionary 
•war, and their farms were devastated and their stock driven off by the Brit- 

21a 



738 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ish, who, stationed in New York city, made raids into the surrounding coun- 
try and took all the supplies they could seize for the army. 

The first of the Searing family to locate in Morris county was John Sea- 
ring, who established a home near Millbrook church. He had six children, 
three sons and three daughters, the former being Samuel, John and Jacob. 
Only the first named married. He had twelve children, five sons and seven 
daughters, and with one exception all married and reared families. Only 
two of these are now living: James S., a resident of Dover, and John S., of 
Millbrook. The grandparents of our subject were Jacob and Mary (Martin) 
Searing, both born and reared in Morris county. Martin V. B. Searing, the 
father of our subject, was born in the village of Millbrook, in Randolph 
township, and married Sarah E. Munson. 

M. Munson Searing, of this sketch, was born in Millbrook, near the old 
Quaker meeting-house, January 16, 1862 and spent the first six years of his 
life on the old homestead, when his parents removed to Dover and he began 
his education there, attending first the public schools and later a private 
school. He then entered Stephens Institute at Hoboken, New Jersey, where 
he pursued his studies two years, and subsequently he took a commercial 
course at Gregory's Business College, in Newark, where he was graduated 
with the class of 1878. Thus equipped with a thorough, comprehensive and 
practical English education, he entered upon his business career in the employ 
of H. P. Sanderson, a merchant, and later he secured a situation with the 
Morris County Machine & Iron Company, of Dover, continuing in that posi- 
tion for nearly three years. On the expiration of that period he entered the 
employ of the Singleton Silk Mills Company, at Dover, as bookkeeper, and 
from time to time had temporary charge of various departments of the 
works until having mastered the business, he became the secretary and treas- 
urer of the company, of which responsible position he is now the incum- 
bent. He has been associated with this enterprise for the long period of 
seventeen consecutive years and is now one of the stockholders in the 
company. 

As Mr. Searing has won success and added to his financial resources, he 
has made judicious investments in other enterprises, being now a stockholder 
in the National Union Bank, of Dover, a director of the local board of the 
State Mutual Building & Loan Association and a stockholder in the Stone- 
braker Chemical Company, of Baltimore, Maryland. He is a very capable 
business man, with keen insight into affairs, great sagacity and unflagging 
industry, and thus has he advanced steadily on the highway of prosperity, 
gathering to himself the well earned fruits of his toil. 

In 1884 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Searing and Miss Man- 
Augustus Pyle, of Hackettstown, New Jersey, a daughter of Felix C. and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 739 

Elizabeth (Sayer) Pyle. They now have one son, Howard C. Their home 
is an elegant brick residence, supplied with all modern appointments, and 
furnished with all the comforts and luxuries that a refined taste can suggest, 
but one of its chief attractions is the charming hospitality extended to all 
people of genuine worth. The circle of their friends is very extensive and 
all who know them hold them in the highest esteem. 



THE CONDICT FAMILY. 



The ancestry of the Condict family, one of the oldest in Morris county, 
can be traced back to John Condict, who is recorded as having purchased 
lands in Newark, New Jersey, in 1689. He was the founder of the various 
branches of the family in America, and tradition says that he removed from 
England to Wales, and thence to the New World. It is certainly known 
that he was of Norman descent, and at one time the name was spelled 
Conduit. One of his relatives married a sister of Sir Isaac Newton, and 
near the monument of that celebrated philosopher in Westminster Abbey, 
London, is that of Johannes Conduit. In the first church graveyard in 
Morristown there is also a monument erected in memory of a member of the 
Condict family. 

In 1 741 Peter Condict is mentioned as one of the members of the First 
Presbyterian church of Morristown. Among his children was Ebenezer 
Condict, a very prominent man, who was married, March 16, 1762, to 
Huldah Byram, a daughter of Ebenezer and Abigail (Alden) Byram, and a 
great-granddaughter of John Alden, of Mayflower memory. Ebenezer 
Condict was a colonel in the Revolutionary war during the period when the 
army was stationed at Morristown. He died of smallpox while in the service, 
and during his last illness was cared for in the old church in Mendham, 
which at that time was utilized as a hospital by the American troops. His 
remains were interred in the' cemetery there, and the monument which 
marks his last resting place may still be seen. 

Silas Condict, son of Ebenezer, was a leading and influential citizen of 
Morristown and an extensive land-owner. He married Charlotte Ford, a 
great-granddaughter of Jonathan Dickinson, the first president of Princeton 
College. The children of Silas and Charlotte Condict were Ebenezer, 
Charles, Julia, Sydney, Marcia, Henry, Silas and Elliot. The only mem- 
bers of the family who continued to reside in Morris county were Marcia and 
Silas. The former married Gordon Burnham, who lived in Speedwell, and 
they had two children: Julia, who is now Mrs. Byram Sherman, and 
Frederick Gordon Burnham. The mother of this family, Mrs. Charlotte 



740 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

(Ford) Condict, together with Mrs. Abigail Byram Lee, in 1S10 established 
the first Sunday-school in Morris county — probably the first in New Jersey — 
in a barn on the farm of Mrs. Condict, at Littleton, New Jersey. 

Silas Byram Condict, the only son of Silas and Charlotte Condict who 
remained in Morris county, lived on the old family homestead near Littleton, 
receiving that property through inheritance. At that time Rev. Albert 
Barnes was pastor of the First Presbyterian church, and preached many 
earnest and powerful sermons to his congregations. His righteous soul was 
stirred to its depths to find that a large portion of his more wealthy parish- 
ioners were regularly distilling apple jack and selling it in large quantities, 
'finding it a prolific source of money-making. The good minister determined 
to overthrow the liquor traffic among his people and preached some very 
searching sermons, for distilleries were then of much more common occur- 
rence than they are at the present day, and were not held in such abhor- 
rence by the better class of people. These sermons had the desired effect 
on many of the parishioners of Mr. Barnes, including Silas Byram Condict, 
then a young man, who had recently come into possession of his property. 
Upon his place were large orchards, and like his neighbors he was accus- 
tomed to making apple jack. After listening to the burning words of his pas- 
tor, he determined to have nothing more to do with such a business, and 
quickly removed all temptation from him by cutting down all his apple trees, 
save enough to supply his own family with fruit. The same upright and 
^practical Christianity characterized his entire life. 

In his early manhood he married Miss Emeline Phillips, of Orange 
county, New Jersey, and to them were born two sons, George Phillips and 
John Elliott. The mother died soon after the birth of the second son, and 
seven years later Silas Byram Condict wedded Mary Johnson, by whom he 
had the following children: Walter, Emeline, Alice Byram, Jonathan Dick- 
inson, Charlotte Ford, Silas Alden, Henry Vail and Winthrop. Of the sons, 
George Phillips and Walter became members of the Union army and val- 
iantly defended the stars and stripes in the Civil war. The latter became a 
Presbyterian minister. He was born March 24, 1841, in Littleton, New Jer- 
sey, and as a student in Phillips Academy, of Andover, Massachusetts, pre- 
pared for Williams College, at Williamstown, Massachusetts. He entered 
the latter institution at the age of seventeen and was graduated in 1862. He 
had no love for war, and no ambition to achieve distinction in that way, but 
in his country's call he heard the voice of God and marched to the front as 
a member of Company I, Twenty-seventh Regiment of New Jersey Volun- 
teers. He lay in the trenches before Fredericksburg and tramped through 
the blue-grass region of Kentucky with true soldierly devotion. On the 
return from the war he spent a year in the Union Theological Seminary, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 741 

two years at Princeton, graduating in 1868. In the same year he was called 
to organize, and become the first pastor of Calvary Presbyterian church in 
Newark, New Jersey. 

In 1870 he married Adelaide Burnet, who died in 1871, leaving one son. 
Later he married Miss Cornelia A. Eames, of Newark, New Jersey. He was 
a scholarly man of great spiritual power, an eloquent preacher, a sympa- 
thetic pastor, a thorough organizer and so catholic in spirit that his love and 
service could not be bounded by his own denomination. His last charge, 
from 1883 to 1888, was the Presbyterian church of Southampton, Long 
Island. His life work was done while fighting the hidden foe of disease. 
He contended for his life that he might serve his generation. He "fell 
asleep " October 24, 1888, leaving a widow and only son, Walter Halsted 
Condict, now a young lawyer of Jersey City, New Jersey. 

Several of the descendants of Silas Byram Condict still reside in Morris 
county, Jonathan Dickinson being a resident of Madison; and Henry V. and 
Charlotte (wife of Joseph M. Lee) both living in Morristown. Jonathan 
Dickinson Condict makes his home in Madison, where he has resided for 
some years, taking an active interest in everything that pertains to its sub- 
stantial development. 



GEORGE J. FRITZ.. 

One of the most popular gentlemen, enterprising business men and 
reliable citizens of Butler is Mr. George J. Fritz, whose well spent life and 
sterling qualities have won him a circle of friends in Butler, that is only lim- 
ited by his circle of acquaintances. He is recognized as a promoter of the 
varied interests which tend to the development of the town, the advance- 
ment of its welfare and the cultivation of aesthetic taste, and he is a valued 
factor in public life. 

Mr. Fritz was born in Gernsheim on the Rhine, Hessen-Darmstadt, Ger- 
many, February 23, 1866, a son of Frank J. and Barbara Fritz (ne'e Pfaff). 
His father was a native of Moerlenbach in Odenwald, born in 1842, and his 
mother was a native of Gernsheim, the birthplace of the inventor of print- 
ing, Peter Schaeffer, of the firm Schaeffer & Guttenberg, the pioneer print- 
ing company. Frank J. Fritz was a civil engineer and surveyor and had 
established a good business whe'n death came to him in 1870. Several years 
later his widow married his brother, Adam H. Fritz, skilled in mechanics, 
who in 1882 brought the family to the United States and located in Butler, 
where he engaged as a mechanic with the Butler Hard Rubber Company, of 
which he is yet a respected employee, in the die-sinking and engraving depart- 
ment. Mrs. Fritz, who was born in 1846, is also living, and her children 



74-2 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

are George J. Fritz, the subject of this sketch; Barbara, wife of George A. 
Guenter, cashier of the B. H. R. Company; Frank J., who is connected with 
the house of Thorburn & Company, Cortlandt street, New York city; Agnes, 
wife of Adam Snyder, cigar manufacturer, Butler; Mary A.; Charles J., 
deceased; and Annie. 

George J. Fritz began his education in a kindergarten, later spent eight 
years in the public and Citizens' high school, at Gernsheim, and laid his text- 
books aside when fourteen years of age. Inclinations then led him to adopt 
his father's profession, and he went into the office of a practical surveyor and 
civil engineer, J. Zoerb, with whom he studied geometry and practical sur- 
veying for two and a half years, when his parents, with the entire family, 
journeyed across the Atlantic. Upon locating in Butler he put aside the 
business he had desired to follow and secured employment in the hard-rubber 
factory of his town, in which he has since grown up to become one of the 
confidential men of the business. He worked in various departments of the 
factory, familiarizing himself thoroughly with his duties, and in 1887 became 
one of the assistants to William Kiel, superintendent of the factory. His 
relations with the company through the number of years have been most 
pleasant, and his long, uninterrupted connection with the business is an 
unmistakable evidence of his fidelity to duty and his efficiency. 

Although his entire energies are solely devoted to his work, he has never 
neglected the development of the mental and aesthetic side of nature, without 
which there can be no well rounded character nor pleasure in life. From 
his early years he manifested his father's inherited fondness for music, and 
about the time he became a student in the public schools his parents afforded 
him every opportunity for the study of music. He spent five years in 
orchestra practice under the direction of Professor J. Rapp, a military band- 
master who for thirty-six years had served in the German army as musical 
director and at length had been retired on a pension. Under such able 
instruction a foundation for a musical career was laid in Mr. Fritz, which 
was faithfully developed by hard study after his emigration to this country. 
Having been well trained in music theoretically, he soon became proficient 
as. a performer on various instruments as well as a writer and arranger of 
music. Almost upon his arrival in Butler he accepted the voluntary position 
of organist in the primitive little St. Anthony's church, which service he has 
faithfully given ever since. He has done much to promote and solemnify, 
by his musical efforts, the services at New St. Anthony's shrine, the well 
known resort of pilgrimages in Butler; and the purchase of a pipe organ was 
largely due to his unremitting labors. As a leading musician, however, he 
has been principally identified with the Butler Silver Cornet Band, of which 
organization he has been the musical director since 1887, and whose excellent 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 743 

musical condition is directly the fruit of his untiring labor. He is a highly 
patriotic citizen and his spirit has thoroughly entered into the band under his 
direction, so that this organization is to-day the pride of Butler. His unselfish 
manner, giving his full energies to the musical development of the band, has 
won the unlimited respect of his band associates, who heartily co-operate 
with him for the success of the organization. 

Mr. Fritz is no politician, though his convictions are known to be in 
favor of protective doctrines and Republicanism. He has also been asso- 
ciated with the Catholic Benevolent Legion since the organization of Morn- 
ing Star Council, No. 72, in Butler. 

On June 29, 1891, Mr. Fritz was married to Miss Barbara Guenter, the 
daughter of Rudolph Guenter. They now have three interesting children: 
Frank A. R. , born April 10, 1892; Agnes Maria, born January 21, 1895; and 
Leo George, born September II, 1898. Both Mr. and Mrs. Fritz are Roman 
Catholics in their religious faith; they are of an amiable disposition and their 
home circle is of quiet happiness. Their courteous, kindly manner to all 
has won them the uniform regard of all whom they have met in business or 
social life. 



EDWARD THEBAUD. 



The above named gentleman was the son of Joseph Thebaud, who when 
a young man came to the United States, in 1792, holding the responsible 
position of agent of the French East India Company, as well as represent- 
atives of several French capitalists and merchants. He first settled in 
Boston, then for a short time in New Haven, finally establishing himself in 
the city of New York, where he soon became one of its leading merchants. 
He died in 181 1, universally respected. 

His son Edward, subject of this sketch, was born in Beekman street, New 
York city, in June, 1 798. When very young he was sent to the Moravian Col- 
lege, at Nazareth, Pennsylvania, for his education. Upon attaining his majority 
he found an ample fortune awaiting him. Being, however.of industrial habits, 
and wishing to lead a mercantile life, he entered as clerk in the leading commer- 
cial house in that city — that of G. G. & S. Howland. He made several voyages 
as supercargo; and upon severing this connection formed a partnership with 
his father's old clerk, under the firm name of Bouchaud & Thebaud, which 
continued in great prosperity for many years. In 1826 he withdrew from the 
house, retiring to his estate near Morristown. 

In 1823 Mr. Thebaud married the accomplished and beautiful daughter 
of the exiled French nobleman, Vincent Boisaubin, a sketch of whose life is 
given in this work. Upon the death of his father-in-law in 1834, Mr. Thebaud 



744 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

removed to New York, having purchased an elegant mansion situated in 
Bleecker street and known as Leroy Place, where he resided for many years, 
retaining, however, a country seat at Morristown. He resumed business 
with his old partner, which continued until the retirement of the former in 
1850. In this year he admitted his eldest son as partner, the firm now being 
Edward Thebaud & Son. In 1858, after a long and industrious business 
career, Mr. Thebaud retired from mercantile life, leaving his vast interests in 
the hands of his two sons (another son having in the meantime been received 
as partner), the firm name being changed to that of Edward Thebaud's Sons. 

Edward Thebaud, soon after his retirement, with his wife and daughter 
visited numerous relatives in Europe. Upon his return he occupied his 
beautiful mansion situated at Madison and now known as Thebaud Place. 

Mr. Thebaud, in his eighty-sixth year, died at his homestead and was 
buried in St. Vincent's cemetery. He was a man of fine personal appearance 
of agreeable manners and of friendly disposition, and was much respected by 
his fellow citizens, who attended his funeral in large numbers and caused the 
town flag to be lowered in his honor. 



JACOB VANATTA. 

Hon. Jacob Vanatta, whose superior mental endowments, splendid 
powers of analysis and brilliant oratorical gifts made him one of the most 
distinguished jurists that New Jersey has produced was born near Washing- 
ton, Warren county, this state, June 4, 1824. He obtained a limited edu- 
cation in his youth, but possessed a love of study that brought to him a wide 
fund of information in later years. He became a man of scholarly attain- 
ments and in the law was one of the best informed jurists of New Jersey. 
He began the study of law in 18415, was admitted to the New Jersey bar as 
an attorney in 1849 and as a counselor in 1853. Locating in Morris county, 
he soon gained a foremost place in the ranks of the legal fraternity, and for 
many years stood at the head of the profession in his native state. He was 
the legal representative of many of the most important corporations of New 
Jersey, including the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company 
and the Central Railroad Company. His clearness of thought, accurate 
and comprehensive knowledge of the science of jurisprudence, his clear and 
cogent reasoning and logical deduction, all gave him a force in this depart- 
ment of the law that made him the peer of the ablest. 

Mr. Vanatta was always a firm and consistent Democrat and was an 
able political leader. In 1856 he was a delegate to the national convention 
which nominated James Buchanan for the presidency, and in i860 he 
endorsed Stephen A. Douglas. He was a war Democrat throughout the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 745 

struggle between the north and the south. He held a few public positions, 
but in 1862 and 1863 was a member of the New Jersey legislature and was 
appointed attorney-general of the state by the governor, but after holding 
that position for about fifteen months was compelled to resign it because of 
the immense pressure of his private practice. 

In 1852 Mr. Vanatta was united in marriage to a daughter of Dr. 
Aaron Dickerson, of Philadelphia. He died at his home in Morristown, 
April 30, 1879, and the city mourned the loss of one of its most honored 
and eminent men. 



THE BLANCHET FAMILY. 

Prominent among the old French residents who settled in Bottle Hill, 
now called Madison, New Jersey, at the beginning of the present century, 
was Monsieur Nicholas du Rest Blanchet. This gentleman was a native of 
Bordeaux, France, where some of his descendants — the de Bragelongnes— 
still reside in the family chateau, which was built several hundred years ago. 
Monsieur du Rest Blanchet came to this country direct from the island of 
Guadeloupe, where he possessed extensive and important interests; he also 
owned considerable property in old Bottle Hill, now Madison, as well as a 
fine estate of some thirty thousand acres in Grant county, Kentucky. He 
kept " open house " in those days, and was considered one of the wealthiest 
men of this locality. In 1812 he was united in marriage to Mademoiselle 
Henriette de la Rousseliere Roux, whose people were from St. Onge, France, 
and among the early French settlers on the island of Mauritius, which at that 
time was called " L'Isle de France." 

To Monsieur Blanchet and his wife were born twelve children, of whom 
the following record is presented: Augustus D., afterward Major Blanchet, 
married Miss Sara Henriques, daughter of Jacob Henriques, a prominent 
New York banker. Henry married Miss Caroline du Puy, the daughter of 
an old and well known French-Swiss New York family. Hyacinth married 
Miss Jane Cooley, a resident of Greenwood Lake, New Jersey, and a sister- 
in-law of the artist, Jasper F. Cropsey: they reside in Blanchet, Kentucky. 
Leo, who promised his father, when the latter was dying, to devote himself to 
the care of his mother, fulfilled his promise, and the more effectually to do 
so remained single. His death occurred in 1893. Two other sons of Mon- 
sieur Blanchet died in infancy. 

The daughters of the family were as follows: Laure Marie Antoinette, 
who, in 1824, at the age of ten years, was one of the delegation of young 
girls selected to welcome General LaFayette to Bottle Hill. In 1837 she 
became the wife of Monsieur Amedee Foignet, who came to America from 



746 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Guadeloupe, in 1834. He was the eldest son of Monsieur Alexandre Foi- 
gnet, a native of Paris, France, who was sent to the island of Guadeloupe as 
procureur du roi, and was decorated by Louis Philippe for distinguished serv- 
ices rendered to the colonies. His wife was a Mademoiselle Marguerite Na- 
dine del Rieu, also a member of one of the distinguished French families of 
the island. Monsieur Foignet, pere, lost the greater part of his fortune in 
consequence of the devastating earthquake of 1843 and subsequent fire, and 
accordingly his son, Amedee, who had not been reared to any business pur- 
suits, found it necessary to replace, by some means, the income he had 
received from the island. Consequently he entered the institute of Dr. 
Francis L. Hawkes, St. Thomas Hall, at Flushing, Long Island, as 
instructor of the French language. Some years later he opened a high-grade 
French academy for the instruction of boys, the principals being Foignet 
and Taylor. The institution was located at No. 739 Broadway, New York, 
and will be remembered by many prominent residents of that city to-day. 
In 1857 Monsieur Foignet formed a partnership with his son-in-law, Robert 
H. Hunter, which connection was continued until the death of Mr. Hunter 
on September 14, 1874. Mr. Hunter was well known in New York business 
circles, and owned a beautiful summer residence in Madison, where he spent 
much of his time. Monsieur Foignet died in New York city, August 24, 
1877. Adele, the second daughter of Monsieur Blanchet, married Alfred du 
Champ de Chastaignier, who also was from Guadeloupe, but a native of 
Toulon, France. For many years he resided in this vicinity, reared a large 
family, and eventually removed to the island of Martinique with his family, 
his death occurring there. Anais became the wife of H. H. Casey, a wealthy 
merchant of New York, and they had four children, the eldest of whom alone 
survives and is the widow of Colonel George Bliss, lately deceased. Cecelia 
married Dr. Gregory Phelan, and they moved with their children to San 
Francisco, California, where they now reside. Louise became a sister of 
charity and is now in a convent in Brooklyn, Long Island. Emma, the sixth 
daughter of M. Blanchet, died in infancy. 



BENJAMIN C. GORDON. 

This resident of Roxbury township, near Port Oram, was born Novem- 
ber 30, 1848. Among the pioneer families of the Berkshire valley were the 
Gordons, who have for many generations furnished their representatives to 
the useful callings which contribute to the material development of a county 
or state. The first of the name of whom we have authentic record is Charles 
Gordon, a well-to-do merchant, distiller and " forge driver " in the vicinity 
of Luxemburg. He had a brother named Joshua, and two sisters, Phoebe 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HIS TOR I". 747 

and Deborah, the latter the wife of Johnson Nichols. Charles Gordon was 
twice married. He first wedded Hannah Perkins, and after her death mar- 
ried her sister, Elizabeth Perkins. He died in 1815, when about forty years 
of age. His children were Lewis; Isaac, who was murdered and robbed by 
one Ackerman; Eliza, wife of John Harvey; Charles; Deborah, wife of 
Michael Dolan; Sallie, wife of John Mills; Stephen; Amanda, wife of John 
Thorn; Mahlon; and Hannah, wife of Godfrey Mann. 

Of this family the first named, Lewis Gordon, was the grandfather 
of our subject. He was born in Morris county, December 14, 1797, and 
as a life work followed the occupation of farming. He married Miss Han- 
nah Gard, a daughter of Daniel and Hannah (Merrick) Gard. Her father 
was a son of Jeremy Gard, who had seven sons in the American army 
during the war of the Revolution. They all served under different terms 
of enlistment for short periods, with the exception of Daniel, who par- 
ticipated in the struggle for independence throughout its entire continu- 
ance. He was wounded in the left arm, and five years later, while 
working at a forge in the valley, his right arm. was crushed by the great 
hammer, which necessitated its amputation! Lewis Gordon, after spending 
his life as a farmer, was called to his final rest in August, 1876. His 
children were William A. , who married Amy C. Dickerson and is now de- 
ceased; Daniel G. ; and Abbie M., who was born in 1824, and is the widow 
of William N. Spencer, who resides in the valley. 

Of this family Daniel G. is the father of our subject. He was born 
January 25, 1824, on the farm which is now the home of Benjamin C. Gor- 
don, and there spent his entire life with the exception of a period of eleven 
years passed in Newark as the engineer in the sash and blind factory of Mr. 
Fredericks. His life was one of industry and uprightness, his dealings 
commanding the confidence and respect of all; and at his death, which 
occurred January 21, 1896, the community mourned the loss of one of its 
valued citizens. His wife bore the maiden name of Sarah E. Corwin, and 
was a daughter of Benjamin H. Corwin, a mason living on Succasunna Plains. 
Their children are Benjamin C. ; George R., a resident of Morristown; Clara 
B., wife of Richard M. Folk, of Sparta; and Ella M., widow of Eugene 
Archer. 

In taking up the personal history of Benjamin C. Gordon, we present to 
our readers the life record of one whose entire life has been passed in Morris 
county, and whose record as a worth}' and honorable citizen is well known to 
his many friends. He is well deserving of a place in a volume devoted to 
the representative men of the county, and with pleasure we present his 
sketch. In his youth he attended the district schools near his home, and at 
the age of eighteen he began to drive a butcher's wagon for his father. On 



748 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

attaining his majority he engaged in the butchering business on his own 
account and has followed that pursuit during the greater part of his life, in 
connection with the occupation of farming. He still lives on the old family 
homestead and the well tilled fields and thrifty appearance of the place indi- 
cate his careful supervision. 

In 1 87 1 occurred the marriage of Mr. Gordon and Miss Jennie M. Tal- 
mage, daughter of Job A. Talmage. She died June 2, 1875, leaving one 
daughter, Lucy I. On the 22d of September, 1880, Mr. Gordon was again 
married, his second union being with Frances, a daughter of Jacob and Ann 
M. (Mackley) Shuster, of Lafayette, Sussex county. Her parents had five 
children: Sarah I., wife of George H. Fitcher; Mary A., wife of Joseph W. 
Jones; Frances; Charles M., who married Ida Chambers; and William H., 
who married Jennie Baldwin. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon have one son, Lewis 
M., born February 17, 1886. 

Mr. Gordon gives his political support to the Democratic party, but is 
not a politician in the sense of office-seeking, preferring that his time and 
attention shall not be taken, from his business interests. He is wide-awake, 
enterprising and progressive, keeping up with the progress of the times, and 
the county numbers him among its valued citizens. 



STUART H. REED, M. D. 

One of the most exacting of all the higher lines of occupation to which 
a man may lend his energies is that of the physician. A most scrupulous 
preliminary training is demanded and a nicety of judgment little understood 
by the laity: Then again the profession brings its devotees into almost con- 
stant association with the sadder side of life, — that of pain and suffering, — 
so that a man capable of great self-control and a heart responsive and sympa- 
thetic are essential attributes to him who would essay the practice of the 
healing art. Thus when professional success is attained in any instance it 
may be taken as certain that such measure of success has been thoroughly 
merited. Dr. Reed is lacking in none of the essential qualifications which 
go to make up the skilled physician, and thus it is that he is now enjoying an 
extended patronage in Madison and vicinity. 

He was born in South Carolina, October 10, 1854, and is a son of Rev. 
Edward and Julia (Blocker) Reed. The maternal grandfather, John Blocker, 
was a near relative of the Hon. Preston Brooks, who represented South Car- 
olina in the United States senate. Rev. Edward Reed was a graduate of 
Rutgers Theological Seminary, of New Brunswick, New Jersey, and became 
an Episcopalian minister. For a number of years he preached the gospel in 
the south, his last charge being the parish of St. John's in the Wilderness, at 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 749 

Flat Rock, North Carolina, where he died at the age of three-score years. 
He was a great student and ripe scholar, a forceful, eloquent speaker and a 
devout Christian whose life taught by example. He was one of the leading 
members of the clergy in his diocese, and was a prominent candidate for 
bishop, receiving an equal number of votes with him to whom was finally 
granted the promotion, Rev. Reed withdrawing in his favor. At his death 
this honored Christian man left three sons and three daughters to mourn his 
loss. One of the sons, James Otey, is now a practicing attorney at Georges, 
South Carolina; and the other, Alexander, is a merchant of New York city. 

Dr. Stuart H. Reed went to the Empire state when twelve years of age, 
and resided with his uncle, Alexander Reed, in Coxsackie, Greene county, 
where he acquired his early education. Later he continued his studies in 
Hudson Academy, at Hudson, New York, and in 1874, on the completion of 
the regular course, he was graduated in Claversack Seminary, of Columbia 
county, New York. In the autumn of the same year he entered Williams 
College, of Williamstown, Massachusetts, and was graduated in that institu- 
tion in 1878. He further continued his education by beginning preparation 
for the medical profession, having determined to make the practice of medi- 
cine his life work. He is a graduate of the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons of New York city, of the class of 1881, and in that year he returned 
to his native state, locating in Spartanburg, where he entered upon his chosen 
vocation. 

In September, 1882, Dr. Reed came to Madison, and it was not long 
before he won a good patronage, which has since constantly increased. He 
has always been a close student of the science of medicine, keeps abreast of 
all new theories and discoveries in connection therewith, and as the result of 
his skill and marked ability to-day enjoys a large and lucrative business. He 
has also taken an active interest in the progress and welfare of the commun- 
ity, and is now a recognized leader in local political circles. In 1888 he was 
elected a member of the board of chosen freeholders of Chatham township 
and served for two years. In 1890 he took an active interest in the organi- 
zation of the borough of Madison, and was elected a member of the first board 
of councilman. He served for one term, during which he advocated all the 
measures which he believed would prove of public benefit, and thereby aided 
materially in the advancement of the city. On the expiration of his term he 
declined a second nomination, owing to the heavy demands made upon his 
time by his constantly growing practice. He has also served for a number 
of years as physician for the board of health of Chatham township. He 
votes with the Democratic party and is unfaltering in his support of its 
principles. 

The Doctor was married on the 6th of October, 1881, to Miss Helen 



750 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Larabee, a daughter of Nelson and Cordelia (Clark) Larabee, of Greene 
county, New York. They now have one son, Stuart Royden, born April 26, 
1884. The Doctor and Mrs. Reed are consistent and influential members of 
the Presbyterian church, of Madison, of which the former has been trustee 
for a number of years. His high standing in professional circles is shown by 
the fact that for some years he has been honored with the presidency of the 
Morris County Medical Society; and his brethren of the fraternity, recogniz- 
ing his pronounced skill and ability, acknowledge him one of the leading 
practitioners in this locality. 



JOHN L. ALLEN. 

This citizen of Lake Hopatcong was born in New York city on the 8th 
of January, 1846, and is a son of John L. and Fannie (Ogle) Allen, natives 
of Belgium who came to the United States in 1841, locating in New York, 
where the father followed his trade of stone-cutting. 

John L. , their only child, attended the city schools until thirteen years 
of age, when he entered upon his business career as a newsboy and sold 
papers in the city of his nativity for three years. It was now 1862 and the 
country was engaged in civil war. The patriotic spirit of the lad of sixteen 
would not permit him to remain quietly at home, and with loyal devotion to 
the Union he offered his service to the government and became a member of 
the One Hundred and Second New York Infantry, serving in the Army of the 
Potomac until his capture at Bristow's Station on Meade's retreat from 
Virginia. Soon afterward he was paroled and immediately enlisted in 
Company F, Seventieth Ohio Infantry, serving in the Atlanta campaign and 
participating in the engagements at Resaca. Kenesaw, Lookout mountain, 
Peach Tree creek, and prior to this was with General Sherman on the Yicks- 
burg campaign. He was captured again sixty-five miles from Savannah at 
Six and One-half station, and after three months' incarceration in Pemberton 
prison, near Libby, and four months on Belle island, he was taken to Char- 
lotte, North Carolina, from which prison he ultimately succeeded in making 
his escape. Twice he made the attempt, but was captured; the third time, 
however, he succeeded in eluding his pursuers, traversed the enemy's country 
for thirty days without communicating with a single individual, finally reached 
Kilpatrick's cavalry, and thence proceeded by way of Wilmington to Wash- 
ington, D. C. He was discharged from Mount Arlington Hospital, Alexan- 
dria, on the 5th of August, 1865, and returned home with a record for 
loyalty and bravery that many a man of twice his years might well have 
envied. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 751 

Upon returning to civil life Mr. Allen became a traveling salesman for a 
New Jersey jewelry house and remained with that firm for nine years, enjoy- 
ing theunlimited confidence of the house and winning the friendship and regard 
of many of its patrons along the road of his travels. During the Centennial 
Exposition in Philadelphia he accepted a position in charge of the agricult- 
ural exhibits: following this service he constructed a rifle range for the New 
Jersey Guards and was appointed instructor for the officers in rifle practice. 
In 1890 Mr. Allen came to Noland's Point and purchased the Pavilion Hotel, 
of which he is now the proprietor. He has made this a popular resort and 
conducts it in first-class style, furnishing to his guests all modern accessories 
and conveniences and putting forth every effort to make their stay with him 
enjoyable. 

On the 2d of April, 1864, Mr. Allen was united in marriage to Miss 
Maggie Kelley, of Pennsylvania. They have two sons: William L. , a 
decorator in Trenton, New Jersey; and Joseph L. Mr. Allen is a member of 
the Odd Fellows Society and of the Columbia Legion, G. A. R. , renewing, 
in the latter organization, the friendship with the old comrades of the battle- 
fields whereon he aided in the defense of our nation's starry banner. 



GEORGE T. BURTT. 



Mr. Burtt, of Port Morris, New Jersey, has for many years been engaged 
in railroading, and now occupies the position of dock foreman, which he has 
filled at this place for over twenty years. His life history, in brief, is as 
follows: 

Referring first to his ancestry, we record that Mr. Burtt's father, Job 
Burtt, was born near Brattleboro, Vermont, in 1787, and died in Roxbury 
township, Morris county, New Jersey, July 8, 1876. He was orphaned at 
an early age by the death of his father, and was "bound out" to a Mr. 
Howell, who went to Youngstown, Ohio, from Basking Ridge, to which 
place the widow Burtt had removed her family in 1793. The laws of Ohio 
not recognizing the relation between guardian and ward, young Burtt, being 
dissatisfied with his new home, deserted his master and returned to New 
Jersey. At Elizabethport he learned the trade of machinist, and worked 
upon the first steamboat that went into commission on Lake Champlain. 
For seven years he was in the employ of Burtt, Cook & Ogden, then for a 
short time he was engaged in blacksmithing at Basking Ridge, and next we 
find him at Succasunna Plains, where he worked for some years at the 
blacksmith's trade. From there he went to Kenvil and bought a farm, and 
carried on both farming and blacksmithing. For a time he was in the 
service of the Morris Canal Company, assisting in the construction of the 



752 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

canal, and he also was at one time engaged in putting in inclined planes. 
After this he purchased a hotel at Succasunna, ran the same for about nine 
years, and in 1857 moved to Drakesville Station, Roxbury township, Morris 
county, where he bought a farm and where he passed the residue of his life 
in agricultural pursuits. His death occurred there July 8, 1876. The 
mother of Job Burtt was by maiden name Miss Eleanor Butler. Some 
years after her first husband's death she became the wife of Thaddeus Minton. 
Her children in order of birth were as follows: Samuel, Jacob, David and 
John (twins), and Job. Job Burtt was married twice. He first wedded 
Susan Harris and had several children. Of those living we observe that 
Captain T. M. Burtt is living in Newark, New Jersey, about eighty years of 
age; Captain Alfred S. Burtt, of Company B, First New Jersey Volunteers, 
is a resident of Corpus Christi, Texas, and is about seventy-five years of age; 
and Elizabeth, now seventy years of age, is the widow of the late Major 
Thomas J. Halsey, of the Eleventh Regiment of New Jersey Volunteers, and 
is now living in Holden, Missouri. For his second wife Mr. Burtt wedded 
Miss Elizabeth Wolverton, daughter of Amos and Mary (Salmon) Wolverton, 
whose life was happily blended with his for many years. She died November 
28, 1897. Of her children, we record that Susan is deceased; George T., 
the immediate subject of this review, was the second in order of birth; 
Theodore, deceased, was an engineer on the Delaware, Lackawanna & 
Western Railroad; Martha, deceased, was the wife of Charles Pratt; and 
Eliza, the youngest, died unmarried. 

George T. Burtt was ushered into life on Succasunna Plains, December 
27, 1846, and passed his youthful days on his father's farm. At the outbreak 
of the great civil war he was a boy in his 'teens and too young to enter the 
service of his country, but before the close of that struggle he was ready 
to offer service, and life if need be, for the Union cause. Ini 864 he enlisted 
as a member of Captain Allen's company, Company K, Thirty-ninth New 
Jersey Volunteers, and was with the Army of the Potomac until the close of 
the war, his regiment being a part of the Ninth Army Corps. He was in the 
engagements in front of Petersburg, at Stony Creek, Hatcher's Run, Poplar 
Grove Church, and others of less importance, and his whole army life was 
marked by that courage which is characteristic of the true soldier. 

In the fall of 1865 Mr. Burtt went to work on a wood train on the 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, under Major T. J. Halsey. 
From January 2, 1866, till June 12, 1872, he was ticket agent and assistant 
dispatcher at Phillipsburg, and on the last named date he took charge of the 
yard, as dispatcher, at Port Morris. Since September, 1875, he has occu- 
pied his present position as dock foreman. 

Mr. Burtt is a man of family. He was married in Phillipsburg, Novem- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 753 

ber 2, 1868, to Miss Hettie A. Merrick, daughter of Hugh Merrick, and they 
have had nine children, namely: Alfred M., Bessie, Paul G., Seeley R., 
Harold J., Hanson M. and Florence, who are deceased; and Allen E. and 
Mable, who are living. 

Mr. Burtt is a Republican, taking a commendable interest in political 
affairs, and giving as much of his time as possible to the advancement of the 
principles of his party. 



JAMES M. FROST. 

This representative of one of the earliest of the prominent old families 
in Morris county was born in Somerset county, near Bernardsville, on the 
9th of July, 1847. His boyhood was passed in Bernardsville, where he was 
educated in the public schools, and for four years, from 1866 to 1870, he was 
engaged in teaching. Subsequently he was employed as a drover for a time, 
then entered mercantile pursuits and continued in that line from 1876 to 1879 
in Bedminster, and in 1881 came to Morris county, where he has since been 
connected with the agricultural interests of Chester township. As far back 
• as the memory of man can recall, the Frosts have supported the Democracy, 
and therefore our subject naturally entered the service of that party upon 
becoming of age and taking upon himself the duties and responsibilities of 
citizenship. In 1882 he was elected constable and served three years; he 
was next elected assessor, and a justice of the peace, and from that incum- 
bency went almost immediately to the office of freeholder, being elected to 
fill an unexpired term in 1887. At the next regular election (in 1888) he was 
chosen as his own successor and was re-elected in 1890. As a member of 
the board he served his first years on the miscellaneous committee, but dur- 
ing his last year of service he served as a member of the finance committee. 

The marriage of Mr. Frost was consummated on the 20th of January, 
1870, when he became united to Miss Helen E. Sturgis, a daughter of Joseph 
J. Sturgis, and these children have been born: Bertha May, now the wife of 
J. W. Tiger; Hervey H., William J., Fred C, Beulah H. and Mary E. 

William S. Frost, the father of our subject, was born in Morris county 
and passed his life on a farm near Mendham. He was an officer in the cav- 
alry department of the state militia commanded by Colonel Kennedy. He 
married first Miss Elsie Smalley, and had one daughter, named after her 
mother, who is now the wife of Thomas Goltra, of Westfield, New Jersey, 
and for his second wife he wedded Mrs. Beulah A. Cole, a daughter of Andrew 
Bird, her birth occurring in 1807 and her death in 1896. Her mother was a 
Miss Nancy Hambler, and her grandmother a Miss Hannah Hambler, and by 
her first husband, Peter Cole, she had one child, who is now Mrs. Henrietta 

22a 



754 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Hall, of Chester. Two children besides our subject were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Frost, namely: Nancy M., deceased, and Thomas B., of Mendham. 
Mr. Frost died in 1885, aged seventy years. His father, Ezekiel Frost, was 
a forgeman in early life, but later engaged in farming. He was a descendant 
of one of the Mayflower's crew and had two uncles who were soldiers in the 
patriot army in the war of the Revolution. He died near Bernardsville in 
1869, at the venerable age of ninety-three years. 



DAVID H. McALPIN. 



David Hunter McAlpin was born in Pleasant Valley, Dutchess county, 
New York, November 8, 18 16. His boyhood days were spent there and in 
Matteawan, New York, during which time he acquired a limited education. 
Necessity and ambition led him, at an early age, to seek employment in a 
cotton-mill of Matteawan, and thus he was employed until his industry and 
economy had brought him sufficient capital to engage in business on his own 
account. In 1836 he began the wholesale and retail cigar business at No. 
84 Catharine street, New York city, in connection with his brother-in-law, 
William H. Hughes, which partnership continued three years. Mr. McAlpin 
was then alone for some time, but subsequently formed a partnership with John 
Cornish and began the manufacture of chewing tobacco, establishing a factory 
at the corner of avenue D and Tenth street, New York. Operations were suc- 
cessfully carried on by this firm for some years, but when an internal revenue 
tax was placed on tobacco, Mr. Cornish, fearing that the business would prove 
unprofitable, sold out to his partner. Mr. McAlpin, however, was more hope- 
ful and, as he anticipated, continued to enjoy a good trade. Gradually his busi- 
ness grew to very extensive proportions and brought to him a corresponding 
financial reward. He continued in active control of the factory until within 
the last few years, when his sons have more and more relieved him of the 
arduous cares of management. 

Mr. McAlpin, however, still goes to the city at least once or twice a 
week to supervise his extensive interests, which are not confined to the 
tobacco trade. He is a man of resourceful ability, of keen discrimination 
and excellent executive power, and has been an active factor in the success- 
ful management of many business concerns. A half century ago he was one 
of the organizers of the Rutgers Fire Insurance Company of New York and 
is the only charter member now living. He is still a director of the com- 
pany and for many years was vice-president, but within the past few months 
resigned. He is also a director of the Manhattan Life Insurance Company, 
of New York, the Home Insurance Company, the Eleventh Ward Bank, the 
Bank of the Republic, the Union Trust Company, the German-American 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 755 

Real Estate Title Guarantee Company, and the Standard Gas Company, — 
all of New York, — and of the National Bank of Morristown. He is widely 
and prominently known in financial circles, and his influence in business 
affairs is acknowledged to be of great worth, owing to his sound judgment 
and thorough reliability. 

Many years ago, on account of ill health caused by overwork, Mr. Mc- 
Alpin came to Morristown and found the climate and situation both so 
delightful and beneficial that he has since continued his residence near this- 
historic city. He purchased the Brooklawn place, at Littleton, comprising 
three hundred acres, and at once began its improvement. There he made 
his home for twenty years, until in 1886 he purchased the site of his present 
home, known as Glen Alpine, — a tract of five hundred acres of land on the 
Morristown and Basking Ridge road about four miles from the former place. 
Large timber covers two hundred acres of this tract and the ruins of the 
old fort built by Washington are still on the place. The natural beauties of 
Glen Alpine are supplemented by the art of the landscape gardener, and the- 
grounds are very extensive and beautiful. 

From the time of his earliest identification with Morristown, Mr. Mc- 
Alpin has been an active factor in its improvement and progress and has ever 
aided materially in all that promotes its interests. His beneficence has 
advanced various moral, social and material movements. In 1891 he pur- 
chased the old Baptist church property at the corner of Speedwell avenue 
and Park Place, and prior to that time purchased what was known as the 
Post-office block and the United States Hotel. In 1890 he built the storage 
warehouse in the rear of the block, and in 1893 completed the McAlpin block, 
the finest business block in the city. He moved to the rear all of the build- 
ings formerly at the front and converted them into barns and storage rooms; 
but in 1894 they were destroyed by fire. He then erected a large new brick 
stable and storage warehouse, known as the Upper Storage Warehouse. He 
now owns from the Huffman block on Park Place to the corner of the 
United States Hotel, also the McAlpin block, that has a frontage of two hun- 
dred and forty-three feet. 

In his political views Mr. McAlpin was formerly a Jacksonian Democrat, 
but when the country became engaged in civil war he stood by the Union 
and has since been an advocate of the Republican party and its principles. 

In 1845 Mr. McAlpin married Miss Frances Adelaide Rose, daughter of 
Joseph Rose, and they became the parents of eight children: General Edwin 
A., of Sing Sing, New York; Joseph R., who died in early manhood; George 
L., who is associated with his father in business; William W. ; Adelaide, 
wife of James T. Pyle; David H., Jr., a well-known physician; Charles W., 
and John Randolph, who died in early manhood. The mother died in 1870, 



756 UIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

and Mr. McAlpin afterward married Mrs. Adelia Gardiner Chamberlain, who 
died in 1891. His present wife, a sister of his first wife, was the widow of 
Dr. Shackelton, of Monmouth county, New Jersey. 



FRANCIS ROSS. 



Francis Ross is a native of Madison, his birth having here occurred on 
the 2 1st of December, 1831. His parents, Peter and Charlotte Ross, were 
both natives of the Empire state, but for many years resided in Madison. In 
the public schools of his native town the subject of this review acquired his 
education, and when a young man went to Connecticut. 

October 21, 1861, Mr. Ross enlisted in Company C, First Connecticut 
Cavalry, and served three years, being honorably discharged October 21, 
1864, at Middletown, Virginia. He effectively participated in the campaigns 
of his regiment in Virginia and Maryland. Later he removed to the south 
and, locating in Kendall county, Texas, engaged in farming and stock-raising 
for a number of years. On his return to the north he once more took up 
his residence in Madison, where he has made his home continuously since 
1884. He entered into partnership with William Wilson in the grocery busi- 
ness and the firm of Wilson & Ross is now enjoying a large trade. They 
have a well appointed store, furnished with a large and choice line of staple 
and fancy groceries, and their honorable methods of business have secured 
them an extensive patronage. 

Mr. Ross was united in marriage to Miss Mary Carter, a daughter of 
Mahlon and Beulah Carter, and a representative of one of the old families 
of Madison. Their only child, Georgianna, is now the wife of William Wil- 
son, a native of Sussex county. Mr. Ross is a supporter of the men and 
measures of the Republican party, but has never had time or inclination to 
seek public office. 



JOHN CROSS. 

Rev. John Cross was the first minister of the gospel known to have 
labored at Basking Ridge, New Jersey. He preached to the people of that 
neighborhood from 1732 until 1741, and from that early period in the his- 
tory of America the Cross family has been prominently connected with the 
progress and substantial development of Morris county. Rev. John C. Ran- 
kin, D. D., pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Basking Ridge from 1851 
until 1895, m an historical address published in 1872, refers to the descend- 
ants of the first minister as being very useful and influential in the congre- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 757 

gation. The family has also sent its representatives into other states, where 
they have won high honors, among whom are Rev. J. B. Cross, of Balti- 
more, Maryland, and Nathaniel Cross, professor in Nashville University, of 
Nashville, Tennessee. 

The Rev. John Cross, whose name begins this review, was united in the 
holy bonds of matrimony to Deborah Oldfield, also a representative of an old 
family, and they became parents of four children. One daughter married a 
McEovven; another married Daniel Cooper; William married Miss Brews- 
ter; and Robert married May Lefferty. The Oldfield family, to which Mrs. 
Cross belonged, came from New Jersey from Jamaica, Long Island, as early 
as 165 1, and her grandfather was John Oldfield, of Basking Ridge. Her 
sister, Mrs. Keziah Ludlow, a widow, married Rev. Timothy Jones, D. D.. 
who was the first pastor of the Presbyterian church of Morristown, New Jer- 
sey, where he located in 1743, his death occurring in 1794. Another sister, 
Mary Oldfield, married Rev. Robert Cross, who was preaching in Jamaica, 
Long Island, in 1723. Sarah Oldfield, the third sister, became the wife of 
Rev. Thomas Poyer, rector of the church of England, in Jamaica. 

Robert Cross, a son of the Rev. John Cross, wedded Mary Lefferty, as 
before stated, and they became the parents of eleven children: Bryan, who 
was born June 6, 1756, and died unmarried; William, who was born Septem- 
ber 23, 1757, and was twice married; Catharine, who was born January 9, 
1759, and is the wife of Joseph Boyle; John, born September 10, 1760; 
Martha, who was born April 16, 1762, and became the wife of Samuel Annin; 
Robert, who was born February 13, 1764, and married Elizabeth Crowell; 
Mary, who was born October 27, 1765, and died unmarried; John Lefferty, 
who was born February 9, 1768, and wedded Mary Kirkpatrick; Henry, who 
was born July 10, 1770, and died March 10, 1 77 1 ; Joseph, who was born 
December 6, 1773, and married Mary Cooper; and James, who was born 
August 11, 1775, and married Gertrude Wyckoff. 

William Cross, the second son of Robert and Mary (Lefferty) Cross, 
married Sarah Larzalier, and had six children: Jacob, who was twice mar- 
ried; Mary, wife of Robert Boyle; Nancy, wife of William Boyle; Robert, 
who married Maria Brown; Alexander, who died unmarried; and Catharine, 
wife of John Appleman. After the death of the mother of this family, Will- 
iam Cross married Sarah Perry, who was born January 31, 1779. His 
death occurred April 15, 1812, and his second wife passed away March 4, 
1 86 1. They had five children, namely: Samuel, who was born May 9, 
1803, married Sarah Lewis and died January 10, 1867; William, born May 
12, 1805; Elizabeth, born January 19, 1807, became the wife of Mahlon 
Cross; Joseph, born February 1, 1809, wedded Mary Haines, and died 
October 10, 1874; and Sarah A., born January 15, 1811, died October 15, 



758 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

1 8 14. Joseph Cross, the fourth of this family, was a physician and pursued 
his preparatory course of study at the classical school in Basking Ridge, then 
conducted with eminent success and popularity by the Rev. William C. 
Brownlee, D. D. He commenced his medical studies in Elizabeth with Dr. 
Davis, who was at that time one of the leading practitioners of the city, and 
after receiving license he opened an office there, and spent his subsequent 
life in that city. We quote an extract from an extended obituary notice 
which appeared in the New Jersey Journal, October 13, 1874: 

" One of the severest trials of journalism ever laid upon us is when we 
are called upon to announce, as at present, the death of one who has been 
for half a century the foremost among us in every good enterprise; such a 
man was Dr. Cross. He came to this city about forty-five years ago, studied 
medicine with the late Dr. Davis, and after graduating at the New York 
Medical College, opened an office here about the year 1830. He soon after 
married the half-sister of the late Richard T. Haines and partially aban- 
doned the practice of his profession for the care of a large landed estate 
which engrossed the most of his time. He was actively identified with vari- 
ous public organizations, was a liberal contributor to Westminster church, of 
which he was an elder; was a friend to the orphan and a benefactor to the 
poor. As a citizen, Dr. Cross was active and public -spirited; as a Christian 
he was sincere and consistent; as a friend firm and confiding." 

William Cross, a son of William and Sarah (Perry) Cross, was married 
December 26, 1832, to Miss Sarah M. Lee, and died November 22, 1879. 
His children were Sarah Elizabeth, Samuel Lee, Mary Jane, Mary Haines 
and Joseph. The mother belonged to a family no less distinguished than 
the Cross family, and a history of its representatives in New Jersey is here- 
with given. 

The family is supposed to have been a younger branch of the Lees of 
Lee-Magna, Kent, England, and at an early period settled at Nottingham, 
England. That they were a prominent family is indicated by the possession 
of a coat of arms: Az. on a fesse between two fillets, or, three leopards' 
heads, gu. Crest: a demi-moor p. p. r. , vested gu., rimmed around the col- 
lar with two bars, or, tied around the waist with a ribbon, or, and gu., hold- 
ing in his dexter hand a gem ring of the third. 

The Lee family was founded in America by William Lee, who emigrated 
from Nottingham to this country in 1675. He married Mary Marvin and 
died in 1724, leaving three sons and seven daughters. The sons were 
Thomas and Joseph, of Long Island, and Richard, who entered the French 
military service in Canada. 

Of this family Joseph Lee had ten children: Joseph, of Yorktown, the 
eldest, died at the age of seventy-seven years, and his family numbered ten 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 759 

children: William, who died at the age of fifty; Joseph, who died at the age 
of fifty; Abigal, who died at the age of forty; Hon. Elijah, who died at the 
age of seventy-eight and was married first to Miss Concklin, secondly to Miss 
Brown, thirdly to Miss Brown, and fourthly to Miss Williamson; Enos, who 
died aged seventy; Anne, who married Captain Samuel Haight and died 
at the age of seventy; Hannah, who married James Brewer, M. D., and died 
aged seventy; Phoebe, who married Daniel Horton, and died at the age of 
seventy-one; Elizabeth, who married Joseph Ingersoll and died at the age of 
sixty; and Sarah, who died at the age of twenty. 

Thomas Lee, second son of Joseph Lee, Sr. , and a resident of Wood- 
bridge, Cortland's Manor, died at the age of eighty years. His children 
were: David, who married Miss Young and died at the age of ninety; Peter, 
of Ohio, who died at the age of eighty; Paul, who died at the age of seventy; 
Israel, of Orange county, New York, who died at the age of eighty; Philip, 
also of Orange county, who died at the age of seventy-four; William, of New 
Jersey, who died at the age of eighty; Thomas, also of New Jersey; Hannah 
and Phoebe, who died unmarried. 

John Lee, the third son of Joseph Lee, Sr., removed from Long Island 
to Yorktown, Westchester county, New York, in 1750. He was born Sep- 
tember 15, 1725, and died in 1816. He was married August 14, 1748, to 
Sarah Perrine, who was born March 1, 1725, and died July 31, 1796. They 
had ten children: Thomas, who was born August 19, 1749, and died June 24, 
1791; Sarah, who was born November 20, 175 1, became the wife of John 
Horton, and died in October, 1827; John, who was born October 18, 1753, 
and will be mentioned farther on in this sketch; Mary, who was born Decem- 
ber 22, 1755, and died in 1844; Hannah, who was born August 23, 1757, and 
died in 1845; Margaret, who was born May 29, 1759, became the wife of 
Jonas Williams and died in 1839; Dinah, who was born December 15, 1760, 
and married Thaddeus Rockwell; Abigail, who was born September 7, 1762, 
became the wife of David Knapp, and died February 1, 1828; Phebe, who 
was born October 8, 1764, became the wife of Francis Colgrove and died at 
the age of seventy-eight years; and Robert P., who was born April 16, 1766. 
A history published in 1848 said of him: " Near the main road leading from 
Crompond to Somers is situated the estate and residence of Robert Lee, 
Esq., for many years one of the leading members of the bar in this county." 

The daughters in the family of Joseph Lee, whose father, William Lee, 
was the founder of the family in America, were: Phebe, who married 
Dennis Combs in 1774, and died at the age of eighty-four; Anna, who 
became Mrs. Martin, and died at the age of eighty; Ruth, who married Job 
Wright, and died at the age of eighty; Elizabeth, who became Mrs. Mar- 
tineau, and died at the age of eighty; Sarah, who died at the age of sixty; 



760 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVL) GENEALOGICAL HISTOEl. 

Mary, who died at the age of sixty-four; and Abigail, who died at the age of 
eighteen. 

John Lee, the second son of John and Sarah (Perrine) Lee, was born 
October 18, 1753, and on the 1st of May, 1781, married Esther Horton, 
who was born February 7, 1763. In the year 1815 they removed to New 
Vernon, New Jersey, purchasing the property just over the hill from the vil- 
lage. The old historic residence was erected in 1776, and both it and the 
hill are yet known by the family name. John Lee died September 22, 1835, 
and his wife departed this life April 2, 1842. They had six children, 
namely: Philip; Phebe, who was born January 18, 1786, married James 
Van Wagner and died May 24, 1808; Sarah, who was born September 25, 
1788, and died December 30, 1789; John, who was born December 24, 1790, 
and died March 29, 1792; Daniel H., who was born August 20, 1793, and 
died June 28, 18 14; and Hester, who was born January 21, 1799, became 
the wife of Daniel B. Overton, and died November 20, 1822. 

Philip Lee, the eldest son of John and Esther (Horton) Lee, was born 
on the 1 2th of February, 1782, and was married on the 1 8th of October, 
1808, to Miss Sarah Bagley, who was born October II, 1789. His death 
occurred August 14, 1865, and his wife passed away June 10, 1811. They 
had but one child, Sarah Maria, who was born October 14, 1810, and was 
married December 26, 1832, to William Cross. Her death occurred June 
9, 1887. 

Such is the history of two families long and prominently connected with 
the history of Morris county. 



HON. OSCAR LINDSLEY. 

One of the extensive land-owners of Morris county is Mr. Lindsley, who 
resides upon his fine farm of three hundred' and seventy-five acres of rich 
land, in Passaic township. Its well cultivated fields, its well kept fences, 
modern machinery and substantial buildings all indicate the progressive spirit 
of the owner, who keeps pace with the advance which marks this last decade 
of the nineteenth century. 

Mr. Lindsley was born in Morris county, August 18, 1832, and is a rep- 
resentative of an honored old American family that has won a splendid record 
by the brilliant service of its members in the war of the Revolution and by 
the fidelity to the duties of citizenship which characterizes all who bear the 
name. The family was founded in America by Francis Lindsley, who was a 
member of the staff of Oliver Cromwell, when the great commoner was in the 
height of his power. He landed thirty miles east of New Haven, and after a 
year's residence in Milford, Connecticut, came with forty families to New Jer- 




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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 761 

sey, locating on the present site of the city of Newark, although at that time 
no town existed there. The Society of Newark gave to the progenitor of the 
Lindsley family a large tract of land on the mountain. He had six sons, — 
John, Benjamin, Joseph, Ebenezer, Josiah and Hamilton, and there were 
also five daughters in the family. His son John was the third white -child 
and the first male child born in Newark, and was the father of Captain John 
Lindsley, the great-grandfather of our subject. Jonathan Lindsley, a son of 
Francis, had a son Jonathan, who gave the land on which was erected the 
first church in Morristown. The building was a log structure, which after 
the Revolutionary war was replaced by a modern building that in 1894 was 
removed by our subject to his farm and is used as a barn, while the old school 
site is occupied by the present house of worship known as the First Presby- 
terian church of Morristown. 

Captain John Lindsley, the great-grandfather of our subject, was born 
in 1728 and died in 1784. He was one of the heroes of the Revolution, 
serving with the rank of captain, and twelve others of the family also vali- 
antly fought for the independence of the nation. On account of his zeal and 
valor he was known as Fighting John, and his death was occasioned by 
wounds received at the battles of Springfield and Trenton, New Jersey. He 
passed away before the close of the struggle and therefore never saw the reali- 
zation of his hopes that America would one day be a free and independent 
nation. He married Sarah Halsey, a sister of Captain Ben Halsey, of the 
Colonial army, and they had eight children, namely: Johanna, John, David, 
Stephen, Silas, Henry, Phoebe and Elizabeth. 

The grandfather of our subject, Silas Lindsley, was born in Morris 
township, this county, in 1776, and married Jane Lindsley, a daughter of Ben 
and Sarah (Kitchel) Lindsley. The father was a son of Jonathan Lindsley, 
whose father was John Lindsley, also one of the ancestors of our subject on 
the paternal side. Benjamin Lindsley served as quartermaster for the 
American army while it was stationed at Morristown. He built the first 
frame church at that place, served as justice of the peace and was a very promi- 
nent member of the community. He reared a large family, but the subject 
of this sketch is now his only living representative. 

Silas R. Lindsley, the father of Oscar, was born in Morris county, 
January 13, 1800, and died March 24, 1887. In his youth he learned the 
tanner's trade, but during the greater part of his life carried on agricultural 
pursuits. He wedded Mary Darling, also a native of Morris county, and a 
daughter of Thomas Darling, whose father, William Darling, emigrated from 
England to Long Island and thence to Morris county. Silas R. Lindsley 
was a progressive man and a public-spirited citizen, but never sought or held 
office. He and his wife were long faithful members of the Presbyterian 



762 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

church, and for many years he served as deacon of the congregation with 
which he was connected. Through all generations the Lindsley family have 
been prominently connected with that church, Benjamin Lindsley being one 
of its trustees in 1787. The parents of our subject had but two children — 
Oscar and Harriet — the latter the widow of John P. Bonnell, of New York. 

Oscar Lindsley was reared on the old family homestead and acquired 
his education in Bloomfield Academy. After leaving school he traveled for 
a time and then turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, which occupa- 
tion he has since followed. For a time he also engaged in merchandising. 
He is a wide-awake, thoroughgoing business man, and his energy has brought 
to him the substantial rewards of labor. 

On the 13th of November, 1855, Mr. Lindsley was united in marriage to 
Miss Sarah Crane, a native of Morris county and a daughter of Benjamin 
Crane, who was a native of Elizabeth, New Jersey. Mr. and Mrs. Lindsley 
are the parents of four children: DeWitt Clinton, of Passaic township; 
Julia, wife of D. F. Sturge; Harriet and Mary. Mrs. Lindsley is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and a most estimable lady. 

In his political views our subject is an earnest Democrat, and his fellow 
townsmen, recognizing his worth and ability, have frequently conferred upon 
him political honors. He has filled all the township offices, served for two 
years as a member of the general assembly of New Jersey, to which he was 
elected in 1881, and in 1890 was chosen by popular ballot for the position of 
sheriff, in which capacity he served for three years in a most efficient 
manner. In all the relations of life, as a citizen, husband, father, and in 
business, his loyalty to duty is above question. 



ALGERNON B. BYRAM. 



The father of our subject, Stephen Ludlow Byram, is the aged repre- 
sentative of an old New Jersey family whose history is interwoven with that 
of Sussex county, where the remote ancestors lived and died. Mr. Byram 
was born in Brookside, on the 16th of April, 1819, and is a son of Japhet 
Byram, the latter of whom was born in Sussex county, July 15, 1794, and a 
grandson of Seth Byram, a farmer, who also was born in Sussex county, 
where he died at the age of seventy-seven years. Japhet came to Morris 
county in 1805, learned his trade, that of a blacksmith, in Mendham town- 
ship, and after a brief service in the war of 18 12 he settled down in Brook- 
side and worked in the smithy during the remainder of his active life. He 
married Miss Mary Ludlow, and died on the 6th of June, 1870, having be- 
come the father of nine children. Stephen L. , the eldest of these, on arriv- 
ing at the proper age, took up the trade of his father and continued in active 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 763 

business until about the year 1882, when he retired. On the 28th of January, 
1S43, he was united in marriage to Miss Jane Brinkerhuff, and their children 
are as follows: John B., cashier of the Iron National Bank, in Morristown; 
William G. , a prominent merchant of Morristown; Elias B., Algernon B. 
and Harry. 

Algernon B. Byram was born in Brookside, Morris county, New Jersey, 
on the 17th of July, 1861, passed his boyhood in that village, attending the 
public schools until seventeen years old, when he began to learn the trade of 
a blacksmith in his father's shop, where he continued until the latter's retire- 
ment in 1882. Then the old stand, with all its associations, dating from 
its establishment, in 1847, together with a few of the first customers who 
still survived, was turned over to him, and he is conducting the business in 
an enterprising and business-like manner, his success and prosperity being 
assured by his recognized ability in the-line of endeavor he has followed for 
so many years. He also conducts the wheelwright and wagon-building busi- 
ness, having succeeded his uncle, Ellis Byram. 

The marriage of Mr. Byram was solemnized on the 17th of November, 
1886, on which occasion he was united to Miss Mollie Morris, a daughter of 
Charles J. and Martha (Hulbert) Morris, of Brookside, whose only other 
child is Alice, the wife of William P. Garrabrant. Mr. and Mrs. Byram 
have one son, Bert A., who was born on October 20, 1890. 



JAMES J. CUTLER. 

A lawyer and farmer and a resident of Chester, New Jersey, Mr. Cutler 
is a representative of a family which has given to Morris county some of its 
ablest legal talent. He traces his ancestry back to England, some members 
of the Cutler family having emigrated to America previous to the Revolution 
and having identified themselves with the interests of the colonies. Through- 
out the history of this country they have taken a conspicuous part in the 
business and legal affairs of their respective communities. 

James R. Cutler, the father of James J., was born at the end of Ridge- 
dale avenue, Morristown, New Jersey, in 1801, and passed his life largely in 
Morris Plains, where he was engaged in farming. In early manhood he 
worked for a time at the carpenter's trade. Politically, he was a Democrat, 
as were his ancestors, and while he was stanch in the support of the party he 
was never an office-seeker or office-holder. His father, " Deacon " Jesse Cut- 
ler, was one of the leading members of the First Presbyterian church of 
Morristown, and for many years resided on his farm on Ridgedale avenue, 
now part of the city of Morristown. James R. Cutler died March 13, 1885. 
His wife, Mary M., daughter of Joshua Hulbert, was born in 1808, and died 



764 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

June 14, 188 1 . Following are the names of their children, in order of birth: 
Joshua M., who died at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, at the age of twenty-seven 
years; William B., who died at the age of twenty-one years; Mary E. R., and 
James Jesse. 

James Jesse Cutler dates his birth September 23, 1850. His youth was 
passed on Morris Plains and his early education was obtained in the district 
schools of that place. After a four-years course in Morris Academy he 
engaged in teaching and spent two years in that occupation, — the first at 
Long Hill and the second in the Chatham school. From school-teaching he 
turned his attention to the study of law, becoming a student in the law office 
of the late ex-Congressman A. W. Cutler, where he remained four years and 
diligently applied himself to a preparation for the practice of law. At the 
end of that time he applied for admission to the bar and was duly licensed as 
an attorney at law, his license being dated June 8, 1 87 1 . Two years later 
he was made a master in chancery. Upon being admitted to the bar he 
opened an office in Morristown and soon established a successful business. 
His second case in court was a criminal one, in which he defended Sarah 
Jane Webb, who was indicted for adultery, and secured an acquittal on the 
grounds of insufficient evidence. " He was counsel for the defense in the trial 
of David Moore for murder, his associate counsel being Stephen Little. In 
this case the client got off with a verdict for second-degree murder. Mr. 
Cutler was also connected with the Earls rape case and many others that 
have attracted attention throughout the country. One of the most impor- 
tant cases with which he was intimately identified was that in which Amzi 
Compton was indicted for forgery, Mr. Cutler appearing for the defense. 
The peculiar feature of the case was that the defendant died while the jury 
were debating the case, the result being a disagreement. Recently, in 1897, 
Mr. Cutler handled the case of the township of Chester against C. Kain, who 
was charged with adultery. Mr. Cutler appeared for the complainant and 
secured a verdict, the case attracting much attention in legal circles. Soon 
afterward he appeared for the defendant in the case of the state against 
Joseph Camisa, charged with keeping a disorderly house. In this case Mr. 
Cutler had all the temperance element arrayed against him, but he secured 
an acquittal for his client. Another interesting case, and one which attracted 
wide attention, was that of the fish commissioners versus Low, Gardner & 
Hager, in which Mr. Cutler secured an acquittal. 

In 1885 Mr. Cutler left' Morristown and for a short time resided in Dover. 
After this he traveled for his health, visiting various parts of the west, sojourn- 
ing for a time in Colorado, New Mexico and Kansas, and spending one winter 
in Kansas City, Missouri. Upon his return to New Jersey he located upon a 
farm and has since been engaged in farming, also giving a portion of his 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 765 

time and attention to the law. Like his father and other members of the 
family, he is a Democrat. He supported the Chicago ticket for president in 
1S96, and stumped the county in its behalf. Mr. Cutler is unmarried. 



ELIAS CARTER. 



Born in Genungtown, East Madison, Morris county, New Jersey, August 
24, t 8 14. Mr. Carter belongs to one of the old families that have long been 
connected with the history of this locality and have taken a prominent part 
in promoting the various measures put forth for the advancement and 
improvement of the county. His grandfather, Jeremiah Carter, a native of 
Scotland, braved the dangers incident to an ocean voyage at that time, and 
came to America, thus establishing the family name in the New World. He 
settled on a tract of land in Morris county, was married here and reared a 
family of two sons and two daughters, namely: Azariah; Asenath, who mar- 
ried Daniel Hopping; Sybil, who wedded a Mr. Tunis; and Senith married a 
Hopping. The father of this family reached the advanced age of one hun- 
dred and three years, and his wife was a centenarian at the time of her 
demise. 

Azariah Carter, father of our subject, was born in Genungtown, Sep- 
tember 20, 1767, was reared on the old family homestead and married Nancy 
Cora, a native of the same town, born December 10, 1770. After his mar- 
riage he purchased a farm adjoining his father's property and carried on agri- 
cultural pursuits for a number of years. He was elected to the office of 
magistrate, in which capacity he served with great fidelity for forty years, 
and for the same period he was assessor of his township. During nearly all 
his active life he served as deacon of the Presbyterian church and was an 
upright, God-fearing man, uniformly respected and esteemed. In his polit- 
ical views he was a Whig, but year after year received the support of both 
political parties for the offices he filled, such was his known honesty and 
faithfulness in the discharge of his duties. His death occurred May 9, 1855, 
and his wife passed away on the 17th of March, 1817. In their family were 
the following named: Wyckliffe, who was born October 18, 1792, and died 
July 28, 1793; Betsy, who was born October 12, 1793, and died November 
6, 1873; Mahlon, born November 18, 1794; Phoebe, who was born April 25, 
1797, and died 1882; Polly, born February 15, 1800, and died May 11, 1852; 
George, born August 23, 1801, and is deceased; Abraham, born April 14, 
1803; Appha, who was born July 3, 1806, and died December 25, 1809; Syl- 
vester, who was born November 18, 1809, and died April 3, 18 10; Azariah 
Wesley, born September 2, 1812; and Elias, born August 20, 18 14. 

Elias Carter was reared on a farm and resided with his father until his 



766 BIOGRAPHICAL AJVB GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

marriage, which was celebrated June 10, 1837, Miss Mary Coleman becoming 
his wife. She was a daughter of William Coleman and was born at Cherry 
Hill. After his marriage Mr. Carter entered the employ of Williams Gibbons, 
with whom he remained for five years, after which he operated his father's 
farm for one year. He then rented a farm for ten years. He planted seven 
acres in corn, six acres in oats, three acres in broom-corn, two acres in wheat 
and an acre and half in rye, and also raised seven hundred bushels of pota- 
toes that year. In the fall after he rented the property it was sold, and the 
new owner, wishing to take possession of it, bought out Mr. Carter's inter- 
est, paying him two hundred dollars besides giving him all the crops. The 
following year our subject built a house in Genungtown, which he exchanged 
for fifteen acres of land on which was a good house and barn. On that 
property he lived five years, when he purchased his brother Wesley's inter- 
est in the old homestead, which he still owns. He carried on agricultural 
pursuits there until 1884, when he laid aside all business cares, and is now 
living a retired life at the home of his son in Chatham. His wife died in 
1864. 

This worthy couple were the parents of ten children: Mary Ann, who 
was born May 16, 1838, and Charles Henry, born August 10, 1839, both died 
in childhood; Sarah Eliza, born October 22, 1841, is the wife of John Waters, 
of Madison; Margaret A., born June 3, 1843, is the widow of Benjamin F. 
Brown, of Madison; Lewis A., born August 31, 1845, IS m Chatham; John 
Wesley, born January 22, 1847, died at the age of ten years; Francis Oscar, 
born April 11, 1851, is a resident of Livingston; Charles Wadlow, born July 
3, 1853, died in Newark at the age of twenty-three; Agnes Ida, born Sep- 
tember 11, 1857, is the wife of Adolph Stiles, of Newark; and Laura Augusta, 
born November 29, 1859, is the wife of Frank Montgomery, of Morristown. 

Mr. Carter is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which 
his wife also belonged. In his early life his political support was given the 
Democracy; later he became a Whig, and on the organization of the Repub- 
lican party he joined its ranks. His life has been characterized by industry, 
enterprise and capable management in business affairs, and as the result of 
his well directed efforts he accumulated a comfortable property. He has 
now reached a ripe old age and his life is crowned with the respect and 
veneration which is ever due to the upright man. 



LEWIS A. CARTER. 



Mr. Carter was born in East Madison on the 31st of August, 1845, on 
the old Carter homestead, and was reared on the farm until sixteen years of 
age, assisting in the cultivation of the fields. He then went to Madison, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 767 

where he secured a situation in a grocery, serving in that capacity for two 
years. He then turned his attention to railroading and for three years was 
brakeman on the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. On the ex- 
piration of that period he went to New York city, where he was employed in 
the wareroom of the Union Printing House until twenty-six years of age. 

In September, 1867, Mr. Carter was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
M. Lanhart Poor, a native of Newark and a daughter of Charles W. and 
Catherine (Dudley) Poor. After his marriage Mr. Carter entered the service 
of the Hill Railroad Company, in Newark, continuing with that corporation 
for about eight years, and in 1874 he entered the employ of the Delaware, 
Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company, with which he has since been 
connected. He began his work for that company as brakeman, but has stead- 
ily worked his way upward and is now serving as conductor. He is a very re- 
liable and trustworthy employe, faithful to the interests placed in his care, and 
is highly regarded by his employers and those associated with him in the ser- 
vice. He is a member of the Mutual Benefit Association of the Delaware, 
Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company, and is a member of the execu- 
tive committee of Chatham. 

In 1892 Mr. Carter was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who 
died on the 22d of August, leaving one child, Charles Frederick Tuse Carter. 
She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and was highly 
esteemed by many friends, on account of her many excellencies of character. 



JOHN H. VAN DERVERE. 

One of the leading and prosperous citizens of Chester is John H. Van 
Dervere, who was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, on the 6th of Octo- 
ber, 1840, the son of the late James Van Dervere and Miriam (Horton) Van 
Dervere. His education was principally acquired in the public schools of 
Chester, after leaving which he entered upon a mercantile career and con- 
tinued in that line of enterprise until the war of the Rebellion, when, in 1862, 
he offered his services to the government and enlisted as second lieutenant in 
Company F, Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteer Infantry. His first experience 
in active field duty occurred at Fredericksburg, Virginia, where, although 
suffering severely from an attack of fever, he participated in that famous 
battle, and upon coming out he was ready for the hospital. He returned 
home and was unable to engage in business again for a year, when he once 
more took up merchandising, and after conducting an establishment for more 
than three years he aided in locating and securing the right of way for the 
Central Railroad, utilizing a part of his time in surveying. He was appointed 
station agent in the service of the Central Railroad Company, a position he 



768 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

retained for eight years, and then, in 1883, resigned the same and since that 
time he has devoted his time and attention to looking after his personal 
interests. Politically considered. Mr. Van Dervere is an adherent of the 
Republican party and is one of the prominent leaders of the same in Morris 
county. 

In March, 1865, Mr. Van Dervere was united in marriage to Miss Martha 
Horton, a daughter of Nathan Horton, and she has since died, leaving no 
issue. 

James VanDervere, father of our subject and ex-sheriff of Morris county, 
was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, in 18 10, and died in Chester in 
1S84. In private life he was a merchant and profitably followed that busi- 
ness in Chester for many years, was liberal in the management of his affairs, 
and bestowed charity where he found it deserving, yet he died possessed of 
a valuable estate. He received an excellent education, being a graduate of 
Princeton College, after which he studied medicine with the intention of fol- 
lowing a professional life, but finding that his tastes were not compatible 
with a successful career in that direction he became a merchant. Politically 
he was conspicuously identified with the Republican party, and was one of 
those active men to whom the leaders looked for a victory at the polls. He 
was elected to the office of sheriff in 1868 and continued as such until 1871, 
acquitting himself most creditably as a faithful and efficient public servant. 
Although not a member, he was a liberal contributor to the Congregational 
church and was one of the trustees of that body. He was twice married, 
his first wife being Miriam Horton, a daughter »f Caleb Horton, who was a 
representative of one of the pioneer families of Chester township. Mrs. Van 
Dervere departed this life in 1861, leaving the following children: Louisa, 
deceased, married William H. Nicholas; Mary P., who married; Annie E., 
the wife of William S. Chardane, of Newark; John H., our subject; Julia, 
deceased; Peter, deceased; and James, a resident of Springfield, Massachu- 
setts. For his second wife Mr. Van Dervere married Miss Mary L. Stearns, 
by whom he had one daughter, Julia H. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject was Peter Van Dervere, who 
was born in Somerset county, a descendant of Holland stock, and was a 
merchant and farmer and one of the prominent men of the county. He 
died about the year 1852, being at that time about seventy-five years old. 



CHARLES A. JOHNSON. 

The subject of this review has done much for the business interests of 
New Providence, his enterprise proving an important factor in the commer- 
cial activity and prosperity of the town, which is his birthplace. He was 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 769 

born March 13, 1858, and traces his ancestry back to Gabriel Johnson, who, 
coming to Morris county, entered from the government a tract of land in 
Chatham township, which has since been known as the Johnson homestead. 
His father was Uzal Johnson. Aaron Johnson, son of Gabriel, was born 
on the homestead farm February 27, 1802, and married Elizabeth Sayre, 
whose birth occurred October 5, 1804. The grandfather of our subject, 
William C. Johnson, was born in Chatham township, Morris county, and the 
father, William C. Johnson, Jr., was born in the same locality, February 
24, 1829. He married Nancy Lum, who was born July 20, 1831. The 
father of our subject was a farmer by occupation and spent his entire life 
on the ancestral farm. Prominent in the public interests of the community 
he efficiently and acceptably served as a member of the board of freeholders 
for four terms and twice represented his district in the state legislature. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Johnson were born two children: Charles A. and Fannie E., 
who died March 22, 1882, at the age of twenty years. The mother was 
called to her final rest March 11, 1862; and the father was again married 
December 27, 1870, his second union being with Miss Mary Durea, by whom 
he had one child, Bessie A., born December 24, 1882. His death occurred 
February 28, 1892, when he had attained the age of sixty-three years. 

Amid the surroundings of the old homestead and occupied with the 
duties of the farm, Charles A. Johnson spent the days of his boyhood and 
youth. He is indebted to the common schools for his early educational priv- 
ileges, which were supplemented by a course in Coleman's Business College, 
of Newark. After leaving school he entered upon his life work, his boyhood 
work of field and meadow being continued through his mature years; but his 
attention has not been confined exclusively to farming. He deals in farm 
machinery, in fertilizers and in sawed wood, also owns and operates a feed 
mill and is largely interested in real estate. These various business ven- 
tures, conducted with strict regard to honorable methods, have brought to 
him an excellent financial return and he is now in very comfortable circum- 
stances. He is the owner of the post-office building in Madison, the old 
homestead which has been in possession of the family for many generations, 
and the farm upon which he now resides, comprising one hundred and fifty 
acres of valuable land, which yields to him a golden tribute in return for the 
care and labor he bestows upon it. 

Mr. Johrson was married November 28, 1884, to Miss Mary D. Will- 
iams, of Brooklyn, New York, a daughter of Edward F. and Mary Williams, 
who were of Huguenot lineage. Mr. Williams was an extensive ship-builder 
in Brooklyn and constructed a number of the monitors used by the govern- 
ment, among them the fleet commanded by Admiral Porter during the Civil 
-war. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have two children: Marion Lum and Hazel. 

23a 



770 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

Mr. Johnson is a warm friend of the cause of education and for four 
years has been a member of the school board, during which time he has 
exerted his official prerogative for the furtherance of the school interest, and 
his labors have not been wtihout beneficial results. He has also been district 
clerk of the board for two years, has been a member of the township committee 
and in 1897 was elected treasurer of the committee. In his political associa- 
tions he is a Republican and in religious belief is a Methodist, both he and 
his wife holding membership in the church at New Providence. 



THE COOPER FAMILY OF MORRIS COUNTY. 

About the year 1700 the first American ancestor of this family came 
from Holland, and a few years afterward one of the number located on Long 
Hill, in Passaic township, Morris county. One of the early descendants, 
Daniel Cooper, married Grace Runyan and lived in Passaic valley, where he 
was a leading man, a justice of the peace and county judge. He located on 
a tract of five hundred acres along the banks of the Passaic river from Ster- 
ling to Long Hill, his deed being signed by William, earl of Sterling and one 
of His Majesty's commissioners in the state of New Jersey. His son, also 
named Daniel, was a sheriff of this county, became very prominent and 
moved from Passaic valley to Long Hill, where he bought a very large tract 
of land, which is still owned by the Cooper family or other descendants. He 
had the following named sons: Peter, Dr. John, of eastern Pennsylvania, 
Daniel, William and Joseph. Peter died on the old homestead, on Long 
Hill, after bringing up two sons; William died in 1880; and Alexander is still 
living on the old homestead. William was married first to Sarah A. Cooper, 
next to Martha Brown and lastly to Martha Cross, and he was the father of 
Mrs. Joseph W. Thompson, who now lives on the old homestead; Alexander 
married Abigail Parrott and had five children, — William, Abraham, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Travis, of Newark, Mrs. Anna Flaker, of Brooklyn; and the 
youngest, at home. 



JOSEPH W. THOMPSON. 

The Thompsons first located at Mendham, Morris county, about one 
hundred and fifty years ago. Candon Thompson, the father of Joseph W. , 
was born in Mendham, March 4, 18-24, grew up in the county, became a 
blacksmith and has passed nearly all his life at Basking Ridge, Somerset county. 
He married Margaret Voorhes and has had the following named children: 
Joseph W., whose name heads this sketch; Louis A., born July 19, 1 S 4 5 ,. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 771 

who lives in Somerville, and has served three terms in the state senate, 
of which he was president one term, is a Republican and active in public 
affairs; Mrs. Anna M. Dunham, of Morris county; Amy, wife of R. C. Rey- 
nolds, of Basking Ridge; Kate, unmarried and still at her parental home; 
Francis E. and Mary, both of whom died young. 

The family have always been connected with the Presbyterian church, 
in which the father is active, having served as superintendent of the Sunday- 
school. 

Joseph W. Thompson was born April 17, 1842, at Basking Ridge, and 
passed his early life there, ending his school days at the high school. In 
1869 he became a clerk in a dry-goods store in Morristown, and acceptably 
filled that position for fifteen years; and since then he has been engaged in 
the insurance business in New York city, being connected with the firm of 
Thompson & Bellows, insurance brokers. About five years ago he moved 
from Morristown to the old homestead on Long Hill, which place he has 
helped to beautify by the erection of several nice residences. He is one of 
the most enterprising men in the southern part of Morris county. Is a 
Republican, active in public affairs. 

For his wife he married Margaret M. Cooper, the only daughter of Will- 
iam and Margaret (Brown) Cooper, born at the old homestead there August 
15, 1852. They have two children, — William C. and Florence M., both of 
bright and vigorous intellect. 



ALLEN M. HUNTER. 



Allen M. Hunter, of Succasunna, New Jersey, is one of the substantial 
farmers and extensive land-owners of his locality. He represents one of the 
old American families that has been identified with this section of the country 
since colonial days. His great-grandfather, Captain Elijah Hunter, was a 
distinguished officer of the colonial army in the war of the Revolution, and 
was entrusted with much important service. Born in Newcastle, New York, 
in 1749, he was early placed in the store of Gilbert Drake, where he thor- 
oughly learned the mercantile business and won promotion by his fidelity to 
duty and his marked business ability. Some years later he married Miss 
Anna Drake, a daughter of his employer, and afterward removed to Bedford, 
New York, where he enjoyed a prosperous mercantile career. At the begin- 
ning of hostilities which brought to the nation her independence, he joined 
the colonial army, and throughout the whole of that conflict fought bravely 
for independence, participating in many important engagements. He was in 
Colonel Holmes' campaign, taking part in the battle of White Plains, and his 
distinguished and meritorious service won him many military honors. In the 



77-2 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

histories of those times he is mentioned as lieutenant and captain, and he also 
figured prominently in various public affairs relating to the general welfare. 
He was chosen to present to the general committee of Westchester county, 
New York, a petition from a sub-committee of Bedford and Poundridge, 
praying for protection against the enemy who were devastating that section, 
by carrying off stock, and even some of the settlers, and jeopardizing the 
lives of all. He is mentioned in the Colonial History of the State of New 
York, volume 15, as " Elijah Hunter, captain of the second battalion," and 
in the Calendar of Historical Manuscripts of New York state mention is made 
of the granting of " a warrant to Elijah Hunter, second lieutenant," while in 
the same volume there appears an account of his being chosen a member of 
the committee for Westchester county to serve from May, 1776, until May, 
1777. These committees were formed for the furtherance of the interests of 
the followers of liberty, — a measure providing for the transaction of business, 
the care of the poor, the payment of debts and the protection of the people, 
and the appointment of Mr. Hunter indicated the prominent position he held 
in the community. Many times the name of this honored patriot appears on 
the pages of the histories of the Colonial and Revolutionary periods, and 
after the war he was no less prominent in public affairs. In 1785 he pur- 
chased a large tract of land at Sing Sing, New York, and became one of the 
founders of that town. He had several sons and one daughter, but the latter 
died in early womanhood. His death occurred in 181 5. 

Others of the family have become very prominent in different walks of 
life. The Hunters are of the same lineage as that of Sir Francis Drake, and 
by marriage became connected with a lineal descendant of Sir William Wal- 
lace. General Robert Hunter was governor-general of New York and con- 
tiguous colonies, by appointment of the English crown, during the period 
when Great Britain held sway over the section of our country bordering the 
Atlantic. By ties of blood and marriage the Hunters were also connected 
with Presidents Edwards and Burr, of Princeton; Governor Dickinson, of New 
York; Chief Justice Chase, and the Greenes and Garners of the same state. 
N. D. Hunter became a very prominent citizen and business man of Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, and the family is now represented there by three of his sons, 
who are leaders in commercial circles. 

Ezra Hunter, the grandfather of our subject, died in the spring of 1806, 
at the age of thirty-two, leaving a widow and two sons and a daughter. 
Before her marriage, Mrs. Hunter was Miss Thew, and in connection with 
her father she owned many thousands of acres of land bordering Thew's 
Pond, now known as Rockland Lake. Her two sons, A. T. and William A., 
were both graduated at medical colleges aud attained considerable eminence 
in their chosen calling. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AJVD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 773 

The former, Dr. A. T. Hunter, the father of our subject, was born in 
Sing Sing, New York, and for many years was a resident of St. John's 
Square, New York city, in which locality he gained an enviable reputation 
as a skilled physician. He married the daughter of an Irish refugee, John 
Morrison, who, during the Rebellion of 1798, fled to the United States in 
company with a brother of the martyred Emmett. Dr. Hunter died of chol- 
era in 1849, leaving to his heirs a large estate. His children, in order of 
birth, are as follows: John Morrison, who was a leading and influential 
citizen of Morristown; Elizabeth, wife of T. H. Butterworth; Catherine S., 
Susan M., Allen M.. and Adaline M., who is the widow of A. S. Gibbs and 
resides in Marietta, Georgia. 

Allen M. Hunter was educated at West Point, New York. At the time 
of the discovery of gold in California he was an ambitious and enterprising 
young man, and with the desire of acquiring a fortune on the Pacific slope 
he joined a number of other young men in the purchase of a vessel, the 
barque Griffin, in which they made the voyage around Cape Horn to the 
new El Dorado. During the long trip they made but one stop, that being at 
the island of Juan Fernandez, where they took on a supply of fresh water, 
and where Mr. Hunter slept in the cave made famous by De Foe's " Robin- 
son Crusoe." After a long voyage of six months, they landed at San Fran- 
cisco, then merely a row of shanties along the beach. Some of the mem- 
bers of the crew had made the trip through a love of adventure and sport as 
well as for gold, and spent some time in hunting in the locality where now 
stands the city of Oakland. The entire country was then covered with a 
forest of live oaks and abounded in various kinds of game, so that the fol- 
lowers of Nimrod had excellent opportunity to indulge their taste. Here 
the party, of which Mr. Hunter was a member, lost their way, and for three 
days they wandered about through the forests, suffering greatly from anxiety 
and lack of food and water, but eventually found their way to camp again. 
From the sea-coast Mr. Hunter made his way to Sacramento, and while out 
on another hunting expedition was severely poisoned by tree ivy, which ren- 
dered his hands useless for some time. Later, while still in that locality, he 
lost all of his belongings in the memorable flood which occurred in the '50s. 
This circumstance, added to his former disasters and hardships, created in 
him a longing to return to " the states; " and, following a suggestion of Con- 
gressman Halstead, whom he met while a guest at the first noted hotel in 
Sacramento, he was enabled to secure the means whereby he could return to 
New York. By way of the isthmus of Panama he made the return trip, and 
in due course of time arrived safely in his native state. 

He then traveled through the eastern states to some extent, but finally, 
in 1855, located in Succasunna, New Jersey, where he has since made his 



774 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

home, successfully engaged in fanning and stock-raising. He has acquired a 
large amount of property and is now one of the extensive land-owners of 
Morris county. His business interests have been carefully directed, and his 
enterprise and industry have been crowned with a well merited prosperity. 

In his political associations Mr. Hunter is a Democrat and warmly 
advocates the principles and policy of the party. In the capacity of dele- 
gate he has rendered good service to his party, has been a delegate to both 
county and state conventions, and has endeavored to aid the Democracy in 
wise statesmanship and the direction of moral issues. He is identified with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and in the latter has served as trustee and steward. 



SAMUEL S. WILLS. 



This highly esteemed resident of Stanhope was born near this place in 
September, 1865, and traces his ancestry back to Daniel Wills, a native of 
England, who came to this country with William Penn. He was a phy- 
sician by profession and had one son, John Wills, who became deputy sur- 
veyor of the western division of New Jersey, and under the proprietary act 
located various tracts of land, one of them comprising seven hundred and 
fourteen acres, lying on the west side of the north branch of the Raritan, 
near Ledell's mill, at Ralston. The southern portion of this tract is owned 
by J. R. Nesbit and a niece. John Wills had three sons, Thomas, John and 
James. The last named inherited the farm of seven hundred and fourteen 
acres at Ralston and spent his entire life on that property. He was not a 
soldier of the Colonial army during the war of the Revolution, but furnished 
supplies to the troops and did other service which effectually promoted the 
cause of independence. His family numbered five daughters and three sons, 
the latter being James, Samuel and Thomas. Of this family the last named 
had two sons, John and James. 

John Wills, the elder, was the grandfather of our subject. He married 
Jane Seward, daughter of John Seward, who was a grandson of Colonel John 
Seward, one of the patriots of the Revolution, who fought on many a battle- 
field for the liberty of this nation. John and Jane (Seward) Wills were the 
parents of John Seward Wills, the father of our subject. He was born in 
Mount Olive township, in 1835, and became one of the best known men in 
Morris county. He became very prominent both in business and political 
affairs, and soon after the organization of the Republican party allied him- 
self with the movement and was one of its leaders in his section of the state. 
For many years he was a member of the Republican county committee and 
was an important factor in planning the campaigns and promoting the work 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 775 

of the party. He had the utmost confidence of his political associates and 
his counsel carried great weight in the party conventions. He was absolutely 
reliable, loyal to his friends, and true to every trust, whether public or pri- 
vate, that was reposed in him. He married Miss Margaret A. Turner, a 
daughter of George D. Turner, and in 1888 passed to the eternal life. They 
were the parents of five children — Samuel S., M. L., John, Edwin T. and 
Elnora. 

Samuel Sayre Wills spent his childhood upon his father's farm, and pur- 
sued his elementary education in the schools of Hackettstown, New Jersey, 
after which he went to Easton, Pennsylvania, where his education was com- 
pleted. On laying aside his text-books in 1887, he resumed farming on the 
old homestead and continued to engage actively in the cultivation of the 
land until 1897, when he rented his farm and turned his attention to the 
operation of the Andover gristmill, of which he is the proprietor. He is a 
progressive, enterprising young business man, altogether practical, and it is 
indeed creditable that much of his success has resulted from his judicious 
management. 

On the 9th of December, 1897, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
Wills and Miss Mary E. Jones, a daughter of A. M. Jones, and the young 
couple hold an enviable position in social circles, for their friends in the com- 
munity are many. Mr. Wills is a member of the Masonic fraternity and is a 
broad-minded man who has gained that culture and experience which only 
travel can bring. He has crossed the continent of North America from east 
to west, visited many of the places of interest in the Mississippi valley and 
the east, and has crossed the Atlantic to the Old World, traveling through 
England, Germany, Switzerland and Italy. He also visited the island city of 
Venice, the ruins of Rome and many of the historic places of the old Byzan- 
tine empire. His mind, well stored with reminiscences of his travels, makes 
him a genial companion, and he is regarded as one of the popular citizens of 
Stanhope. 



JAMES HART. 

Mr. Hart, one of the leading florists of the east, may be termed the pio- 
neer florist of New York city, having established a wholesale business there 
nearly three decades ago, which he still conducts, operating at the same time 
a similar business in Madison, New Jersey. It is of specific importance, 
therefore, that more than a passing mention be made of him in this work, 
and to a resume of his life we now turn. 

James Hart is of Irish birth and parentage. He was born in county Gal- 
way, Ireland, in the year 1841, and there passed his youth and early man- 



776 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

hood. On leaving school, he engaged in work in a hot-house, and in this 
line of business he has ever since continued. He worked in the principal 
greenhouses in the Emerald Isle, remaining there until 1865, when he crossed 
the Atlantic and took up his abode in America, thinking to better his condi- 
tion here; and in this he has not been disappointed. For five years he was 
employed in different hot-houses in this country before he embarked in busi- 
ness for himself, which he did in 1870. It was at that time that he estab- 
lished his wholesale business in New York city. He was the first to put on 
the market the rose named American Beauty. Also he propagated and put 
on the market the Mermaid and the rose known as the "Bride," an out- 
growth of the Mermaid. Indeed, he has given special attention to rose cult- 
ure, and with remarkable success. 

When Mr. Hart established his business in New York city the florist 
dealers of that place could be easily counted; in the past thirty years 
the industry has grown to enormous proportions and the dealers are now 
numbered by the hundreds. Mr. Hart is not only the pioneer wholesale 
dealer, but in all these years has kept to the front in the rapid advancement 
made in the business. After several years of successful operation in New 
York, he came to Madison, New Jersey, and erected his extensive green- 
houses, especially adapted to rose culture, and which constitute the largest 
establishment of its kind in this country. There are nine buildings, each two 
hundred feet long, six being twenty feet wide and three ten feet wide. He 
makes shipment of his plants to all parts of the country, and continuously 
employs a large force of hands. His city business in New York is located at 
No. 120 Thirteenth street, while his residence is in Madison, and each day he 
visits the metropolis in the prosecution of his business. He has a wife and 
eleven children, — four sons and seven daughters. His son John has charge 
of the New York business above referred to; the other three sons are James, 
William and Joseph. 



HON. MAHLON DICKERSON. 

Prominently identified as he was with the commercial and political inter- 
ests of Morris county, Hon. Mahlon Dickerson will for years to come be 
remembered as a man whose beneficent influence extended throughout the 
state of New Jersey and who was conspicuous in his public life for his fidelity 
to the trusts reposed in him, and for his advocacy of any measure that would 
advance or improve the interests of the state. As a judge, a general, a mem- 
ber of the legislature, governor of New Jersey, a member of congress and 
secretary of the navy in the cabinet of President Andrew Jackson, he ful- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 777 

filled the duties of those incumbencies in a faithful, intelligent and circum- 
spect manner and with a high degree of executive ability. As a private citi- 
zen he owned and worked the Succasunna iron mine, now known as the 
Dickerson mine. The following sketch of his life was prepared by Edmund 
D. Halsey, of Morristown, for another purpose, and is inserted hereby per- 
mission. 

Governor Mahlon Dickerson, of whose name it has been well said none 
have been more respected, honored and distinguished in New Jersey, was 
descended from the Puritan Philemon Dickerson, who emigrated from Eng- 
land early in the history of Massachusetts colony and who was among the 
freemen of Salem in 1638. In 1643 he purchased from the Indians a large 
tract of land on the north shore of Long Island and took up his residence at 
Southold. Here he died at the age of seventy-four, leaving two sons, 
Thomas and Peter. 

Peter Dickerson, son of Thomas and grandson of Philemon, came to 
Morris county, New Jersey, in 1741, and on October 20, 1745, married his 
first wife, Ruth Coe, daughter of Joseph Coe. He was an ardent patriot 
and his house in Morristown was from the beginning of the difficulties with 
Great Britain a gathering place for those of a kindred mind. He took an 
active part in awakening and organizing the opposition to the acts of the 
British crown and on the 9th of January, 1775, he was appointed one of the 
"committee of observation" for Morris county. On the first day of May 
following he was elected a delegate to the provincial congress which met at 
Trenton the same month. February 7, 1776, he was commissioned captain 
of a company in the Third Battalion of the first establishment, and on the 
29th of November following captain of a company in the Third Battalion of 
the second establishment. Both the companies he commanded were 
equipped at his private expense, and the money he so advanced stands to his 
credit this day at Washington, unpaid. He died May 10, 1780, in his fifty- 
sixth year. He had eight children by his first wife, one of whom, Esther, 
married Colonel Jacob Drake, who was also a delegate from Morris county 
to the provincial congress of 1775, and who was colonel of the western regi- 
ment of New Jersey militia until he resigned to become a member of the first 
assembly of New Jersey. 

Jonathan Dickerson, the second child and oldest son of Peter, was born 
September 20, 1747 (O. S.), and on the 12th of October, 1768, was united in 
marriage to Mary Coe, daughter of Thomas Coe, by Rev. Timothy Johnes. 
Like his father, he took a prominent part in the politics of his county. He 
also displayed the talent for invention for which many of his descendants 
have been distinguished. The eleventh patent issued by our government, 
bearing the signature of Washington, was granted to him for an improved 



778 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

water wheel. In 1783 he was a member of the state legislature from Morris 
county. The iron mines with which his region of the county abounded, and 
which have added so much to its wealth, were then little regarded. The 
rich ore bed now known as the Dickerson mine was originally returned by 
the proprietors of West Jersey in 171 5 to John Reading, who a year or two 
afterward sold it to Joseph Kirkbride for a mere trifle, though the presence 
of the mineral was so well known even to the Indians that they called the 
neighborhood " Sukahsining," meaning black rock (magnetite), and usage has 
changed this to Succasunna. Jonathan Dickerson seems to have recognized 
its value, and in 1779 we find deeds to him from some of the Kirkbride heirs; 
and in partnership with one Minard Le Fevre he purchased the whole. He 
was not, however, successful in making a fortune from his speculation, and it 
remained for his son, Mahlon, who bought the property in 1807 from the 
heirs of his father and Le Fevre, to develop its wealth, and in his hands it 
yielded a handsome income, which made its owner independent. 

Jonathan Dickerson died November 7, 1805, leaving six children: 
Mahlon, the oldest and the subject of this sketch; Silas; Mary, afterward the 
wife of David S. Canfield; Aaron, John B. and Philemon. His widow sur- 
vived him many years and died March 1, 1827. She was buried with her 
husband at Succasunna. 

Mahlon Dickerson was born at Morris Plains, near the State Hospital 
for the Insane, in Morris county, April 17, 1770. He probably fitted for 
college at Morristown, which at that time possessed a classical school. In 
the manuscript diary of Joseph Lewis, a wealthy gentleman of Morristown 
and clerk of the county, is this entry: " 1786, Monday, 27th of November, 
Jonathan Dickerson's son (Mahlon) began to board at 7s. per week." 

In 1789 Mahlon entered the American Whig Society at Princeton and 
graduated the same year at the College of New Jersey, in the same class with 
Dr. Hosack. He returned to Morristown and engaged in the study of law, 
and in November, 1793, was admitted to the bar of New Jersey. In the 
following year he accompanied Captain Kinney's cavalry company in the 
expedition sent to western Pennsylvania to suppress the whisky rebellion, — 
probably as an unattached volunteer, as his name does not appear in the list 
of that command. He was one of Governor Mifflin's aids during the expe- 
dition. 

During the years 1795 and 1796 he was in active practice in his native 
county, his name frequently appearing in the minutes of the court. In the 
record of a case in the common pleas, July term, 1797, is the quaint entry 
that "Mr. Mahlon Dickerson, the attorney for the above plaintiff, having 
removed to foreign parts and having agreed that Alexander C. McWhorter be 
be substituted, &c, the court ordered the substitution be made." The " for- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 779 

eign parts" were in the city of Philadelphia, where he was admitted to the 
bar of Pennsylvania the same year, and where he entered the law office of 
John Milnor, afterward a distinguished clergyman of the Episcopal church. 
He was shortly afterward elected one of the common councilmen of Philadel- 
phia, and in 1802 he was appointed by President Jefferson, of whom he was 
a devoted admirer, commissioner of bankruptcy. On January 1, 1805, Mr. 
Dickerson was appointed by Governor McKeon, adjutant-general of Phila- 
delphia. His name also appears in the record as quartermaster-general. The 
title of "general" adhered to him through life, and even after his appoint- 
ment as governor it was the one most generally given to him. His resigna- 
tion of the position of adjutant-general was accepted July 22, 1805, and he 
was the same day appointed recorder of the city of Philadelphia. The lat- 
ter office, he used to say, was more congenial to his tastes than any of the 
higher posts he was afterward called to fill. He resigned it, however, Octo- 
ber 2, 1 8 10, to return to Succasunna to develop the mineral property of which 
he had come into possession. 

A very earnest and active member of the Republican party, then in the 
ascendancy, and of popular manners and sound legal attainments, his career 
in Philadelphia was a very successful one. He shared his prosperity with 
the other members of the family and assisted largely in the education of his 
younger brothers. His brother Aaron he enabled to graduate at Princeton 
in 1804, and assisted him in establishing himself in a fair practice in Phila- 
delphia as a physician. The daughter of Dr. Aaron Dickerson is the widow 
of the late Attorney General Vannata, of New Jersey. His brother Silas was 
instantly killed January 7, 1807, at Stanhope, New Jersey, his great coat 
catching a screw in a rapidly-sevolving axle and drawing him into some 
machinery for making nails which he was having erected. Philemon, the 
youngest brother, after his graduation studied law with the General in Phila- 
delphia and succeeded him as judge of the United States district court of 
New Jersey. He was also governor of New Jersey and one of its congress- 
men. His son, Edward M. Dickerson, is one of the most prominent patent 
lawyers of New York city. 

Returning to New Jersey, General Dickerson was not permitted to 
remain in private life, but in the three following years, 181 1, 18 12 and 18 13, 
he was as many times successively elected a member of the state assembly 
from Morris county. The legislature of 18 13 met October 26th, and four 
days afterward Hon. William S. Pennington resigned his position as third 
justice of the supreme court, and Mr. Dickerson was the same day appointed 
to fill the vacancy and was also appointed reporter of the court. He 
declined the latter office, however, on the 9th of February following. At 
the joint meeting of the legislature to elect a United States senator, Novem- 



780 BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

ber 3, 1814, his name was mentioned and he received a nattering vote. No 
choice was made at this meeting, and at the next, held in February, Mr. 
Dickerson's name was withdrawn and Hon. James J. Wilson was elected. 
At the joint meeting held October 26th, 1815, he was unanimously elected 
governor of New Jersey, and was re-elected to that high office without oppo- 
sition October 28, 1816. 

He resigned the gubernatorial chair February 1, 18 17, having been 
elected on the 23d of the previous month United States senator for the six 
years beginning March 4, 1817. So satisfactory was his course in the sen- 
ate to the people of this state that on November 1, 1822, he was elected his 
own successor for another six years, without opposition. His term of office 
expired March 6, 1829. His previous election had been during the "era of 
good feeling," but before the last term expired the strife between Jackson, 
Clay, Adams and Crawford had begun. He had allied himself closely to the 
cause of "Old Hickory" and the legislature to choose his successor was 
strongly Whig. At the joint meeting, which assembled January 30, 1829, 
the resignation of Ephraim Bateman, the other senator from New Jersey, was 
sent in by the governor and was accepted by a vote of only twenty-nine to 
twenty-seven, those voting in the negative being mostly Whigs. The meet- 
ing then proceeded first to elect a senator to fill the vacancy caused by this 
resignation. The names of Theodore Frelinghuysen and Joseph W. Scott 
were brought forward, but withdrawn with the understanding that they were 
to be candidates for the long term. The names of Samuel L. Southard, 
William D. Ewing, William N. Jeffers, Mahlon Dickerson and Garret D. 
Wall were mentioned for the short term. The Whigs, though having a 
majority of the meeting, were divided hetween Southard, the popular secre- 
tary of the navy under Adams, and Ewing, the chairman of the meeting. 
Ten calls of the meeting were had without result. Mr. Southward's vote 
varied from twenty to twenty-five, and Mr. Ewing's from eight to thirteen, 
the Democrats voting for Dickerson and Wall or for Dickerson alone. After 
the tenth ballot Hon. Stacey C. Potts offered the following resolution: 

"Resolved, that in the opinion of this joint meeting the Honorable 
Samuel L. Stouthard is not an inhabitant of the state of New Jersey, and 
therefore not eligible to the office of senator in the congress of the United 
States under the third article of the constitution of the United States, and 
that his name be withdrawn from the list of nominations." 

For this resolution all the Democrats and six of the Ewing men voted, 
and it was carried by a vote of twenty-nine to twenty-six. This made the 
friends of Mr. Southard so indignant that eight of them cast their votes for 
Mr. Dickerson, who was elected on the next ballot but one, by a vote of 
twenty-eight for him, twenty-three for Ewing and two for Wall. Mr. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AMD GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 781 

Frelinghuysen was chosen immediately after for the long term by a vote of 
thirty-five against twenty-one for Mr. Scott. 

In the organization of the senate in the following December, Governor 
Dickerson was made chairman of the committee on manufactures, — a posi- 
tion he was eminently qualified to fill. He was an ardent supporter of the 
tariff, and agreed with the president in protecting American industry, so far 
as legislation could do it. Examining the proceedings of the senate during 
the time he was a member, it will be seen that the subject seldom failed to 
bring him to his feet. All, or nearly all, of his published speeches were 
on this subject. Though not as brilliant or as eloquent as many of his asso- 
ciates, he was scarcely less influential in legislation, through his familiarity 
with his subject, which close study and earnest application gave him. 

The affection of his constituency in New Jersey for him never wavered. 
At a meeting of the Jackson members of the legislature in April, 1832, the 
resolution was adopted "that we recommend our fellow citizen, Mahlon 
Dickerson, as a suitable candidate to be supported by the delegation of New 
Jersey (for vice-president) in convention, and that they be requested to pre- 
sent his name as the first choice of New Jersey." Nor was his name men- 
tioned only by those of his own state: the Jackson men throughout the coun- 
try favored his nomination as a fit successor to Calhoun, who had become 
alienated from them. At this junction Mr. Van Buren's rejection as minister 
to England by the senate made his vindication seem necessary to his party, 
and they resolved to make him vice-president. Mr. Dickerson warmly 
seconded this resolution, and withdrew his own name from the canvass. In 
all the political struggles of the day and the various combinations of parties 
and cliques which characterized that period he adhered most strenuously to 
the principles and policies of Jackson, and possessed his constant friendship. 
His term of United States senator expired in March, 1833, and in the fall of 
that year he was elected by the people of the county to represent them in the 
legislative council of the state. 

On the 20th of May, 1834, he was nominated by the president as minis- 
ter to Russia, and the appointment was confirmed by the senate on the 26th. 
It is said he was persuaded by Mr. Van Buren to decline this position and 
remain in this country to further his (Mr. Van Buren's) plans for the presi- 
dency. Let this be as it may, the position was declined and the president 
shortly after sent his name to the senate as secretary of the navy, to succeed 
Mr. Woodbury, and the appointment was confirmed by the senate on the 
30th of June. He continued to occupy this place in the cabinet during the 
remaining years of Jackson's term and during the first two years of Mr. Van 
Buren's. He resigned his seat in 1838 and again retired to private life. 

While he was in office the difficulty in Boston harbor in regard to the 



782 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 

figure head of Jackson upon the ship Constitution occurred. The modern 
effigy, half sawn in two, and the correspondence in relation to it are still in 
possession of the governor's family. On the 30th of January, 1835, when 
crazy Lawrence attempted to assassinate Jackson in the capitol, Dickerson 
was walking with the president in the procession and shared his danger. He 
was one of the principal witnesses in the trial which followed. 

In September, 1840, he was appointed by Mr. Van Buren judge of the 
United States district court for the state of New Jersey, to succeed Judge 
Rossell. He held the office but about six months, when he resigned (in 1841) 
and was succeeded by his younger brother, Philemon, who held the position 
many years. 

In 1844, when the constitution of his state, framed amid the confusion 
of the Revolutionary war and in great haste, had proved itself ill adapted to 
the wants of the state, Mr. Dickerson was selected by the citizens of Morris 
county to represent them in convention, where his judicial training and prac- 
tical good sense made him a valuable member. 

In 1846 and 1847 General Dickerson was president of the American 
Institute, and in the minutes of the proceedings of that body, October 5, 
1846, and October 5, 1847, ma y be found two addresses delivered by him, 
which are characteristic. The reader is not left in doubt as to what the 
speaker thought of protection, and in the closing sentence of one he speaks 
of free trade as " a system as visionary and impractical as the everlasting 
and universal pacification of the world." 

He was admitted an honorary member of the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society March 7, 1848. 

After his retirement from public life the General spent the remainder of 
his days at the handsome residence which he erected about 1844 near his 
mine, among the mountains of Randolph. His windows commanded a view 
of one of the finest sections of his state, and his large private library afforded 
him constant amusement when his business gave him leisure. On the gar- 
den and grounds about his house he lavished much time and money, planting 
trees and shrubs of every variety attainable. He was never married but 
made his home with his nephew, Frederick Canfield, whose tastes for the 
natural sciences were akin to those of his uncle and whose interesting family 
made his last years comfortable and happy. 

He died at his home on the 5th of October, 1853, the immediate cause 
of his death being a heavy cold, coming during the general breaking up of 
the system by reason of old age, hastened, perhaps, by a stroke of paralysis, 
which came upon him the year before. He was buried in the church-yard 
on Succasunna Plains, where a plain monument marks his grave, bearing the 
inscription, " Mahlon Dickerson, son of John and Mary Dickerson. Born 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL HISTORY. 785 

April 17th, 1770, died October 5th, 1853. His biography is written in the 
legislative, executive and judicial records of his country. Mark the perfect 
man and behold the upright, for the end of that man is peace." 

General Dickerson was of fine personal appearance, standing six feet 
two inches high and showing the possession of a sound, rugged constitution.