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Full text of "A Biographical and genealogical history of southeastern Nebraska"

gc M. L! 

978.2 
B51 
v. 2 
12 71403 



GENEALOGY 'COLLECTION 



3 1833 01065 6970 



A 
Biographical and Genealogical History 

; OF 

Southeastern Nebraska 



VOL. II 



ILLUSTRATED 



CHICAGO NEW YORK 

THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1904 



r\ 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 

1271403 

SIDNEY B. LUTGEN, M. D. 

Sidney B. Lutgen, M. D., who is an old-established practitioner 
of southeastern Nebraska, is a veteran member of the medical profes- 
sion, having begun practice fifty years ago. He came to Brownville, 
Nebraska, in 1874, and with the exception of three years has practiced 
in this vicinity, having been located in or near the town of Brock 
nearly twenty-five years. He is a man of varied attainments and capa- 
bility, and during the seventy years of his life has seen many phases 
of activity and in many ways been useful to society and his fellow men. 

Dr. Lutgen is a physician both by adoption and inheritance, and 
is a representative of the third generation to contribute one member 
to the art of healing. His grandfather, James Henry Lutgen, was a 
native of Luxemburg, was a physician and surgeon, and was one of 
Napoleon's body guards during a part of that soldier's career in 
Europe. He afterward came to America and served in the war of 1812. 
He married Ann O'Hara, and they had one son and one daughter. 
They disagreed on religion, she being a Catholic and he a Protestant, 
and the daughter was placed in a convent and became a nun. He was 
again married, and had six children by his second wife. 

James H. Lutgen, the son of the first marriage of James Henry 
Lutgen, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and after his father's 
second marriage was bound out to a man by the name of Rowell. He 
was reared and educated at Athens, Ohio, and had a liberal schooling 



546 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

and became a physician. He volunteered for service in the Civil war, 
in the Seventy-seventh Ohio Infantry, and was made captain of a 
company. He was wounded at the battle of Shiloh, and this injury 
caused his death two years later. He was also second lieutenant in 
the Mexican war. He married, in Morgan county, Ohio, about 1830, 
Alvena McGrath, of Maine, who died in 1884, having drawn a pension 
of twenty dollars since her husband's death. They had eight children, 
as follows: Mrs. Caroline B. Rogers, born August 23, 1832, died in 
1893, leaving three children; Sidney B. is the next; Lorinda is the 
wife of John Hook, in Ohio, and has three living children; Julia Ann 
is the wife of Henry Outkelt, of Ohio; Athenitus, born in 1840, was 
killed by lightning after his return from the Civil war and left eight 
children; Alvena A., born October 17, 1842, is the wife of Henry 
Patterson, and their four sons are all physicians; Mary C, born May 16, 
1845, was the wife of Willard McDonald, and she died leaving three 
children; James C, born April 30, 1848, was a carpenter and cabinet- 
maker and died leaving three children. 

Dr. Sidney B. Lutgen was born in Ohio, June 30, 1834, and was 
educated for his profession at the Physio-Medical Institute in Cin- 
cinnati, and entered upon the active practice of his profession over fifty 
years ago. In 1861 he enlisted in the Seventy-seventh Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, and was wounded at the battle of Shiloh, and was discharged 
from the hospital at Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio, being now the 
recipient of a small pension. He came out as a second sergeant. He 
has been active in Grand Army matters, and is a charter member of 
Robert Post No. 104, G. A. R., at Brock, and has filled all the higher 
offices of his post. Dr. Lutgen was in practice in Ohio until 1874, 
and then came to Brownville, Nebraska, where he had an office for 
seven years. He was in Thomas county, Kansas, for three years, and 
during that time served as coroner. Since his return from Kansas he 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 547 

has had his residence in or near Brock, and has actively engaged in 
practice. He owns a nice farm and mill property near the town. 

January 15, 1856, Dr. Lutgen married Miss Margaret Porter, of 
Ohio, and she died in Brock in 1896, leaving three children: James 
R. an engineer in the state of Washington, and has a wife and one 
son and two daughters; Vena B. is the wife of Julius Peterson, at 
Breemer, Nebraska, and has three children; E. S. is a fruit grower in 
Oregon, and has one daughter. In 1897 Dr. Lutgen was married to Mrs. 
Ella Stout, nee Varney, and she has two children by her first husband, 
Elmer Stout; E. E. Stout, who has a wife and two children; and Ella, 
a girl of thirteen years. Dr. Lutgen is a thirty-second degree Mason, 
and has affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows since 
1862. In politics he is a loyal Republican. 



JOHN LONDON. 

John London, who has been a resident of Jefferson county, Ne- 
braska, since 1890, is one of the foremost farmers and business men, 
and a man with a fine record in matters of citizenship and private 
affairs. He was born in Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, October 
19, 1845. His great-grandfather was an Englishman, but Isaiah and 
John London, his grandfather and father, respectively, were both na- 
tives of Pennsylvania. John London married Trephena Estes, who 
was born of an old New York family. In 1854 the family moved to 
DeKalb county. Illinois, near Sycamore, being early settlers of that 
county. They afterward moved to Bates county, Missouri, where 
John London died at the age of seventy-three. He was a farmer and 
mason by trade, and in politics a Republican. His wife died in Jeffer- 



548 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

son county, Nebraska, at the age of sixty-five. They had five children : 
John; Joseph, in Diller, Nebraska ; Samuel; Mary, who died in Bates 
county, Nebraska; and James. 

Mr. London was reared on the farm in DeK'alb county, Illinois, 
and remained there until he went to California in 1864. August 20, 
1864, he enlisted at Sacramento, California, in Company F, Second 
California Cavalry, under Captain Starr and Colonel McGary. The 
regiment saw a great deal of active service in protecting the settlers of 
northern California from the Indians. The latter were on the warpath 
during most of the Civil war period, and ran off stock and raided and 
killed the settlers wherever the latter were not defended. The regi- 
ment made many forced marches and suffered much from cold, hunger 
and exposure. They were stationed in Posey county, California, for 
a time, were then in service in Chico; were in Sacramento valley two 
or three months ; were then sent to Surprise valley in northeastern Cal- 
ifornia, where the Indians had driven off many head of stock and 
murdered some of the settlers. In this campaign they suffered severe- 
ly, both from lack of food and from the cold of the mountains. They 
had to go to Fort Crook through four feet of snow, and in the nine 
days of wandering many had their feet and hands frozen, while the 
horses were without hay and the men for three days without food. 
They had a half-breed scout for a guide, and they were all in a sorry 
condition when they reached the fort. They made battle with the bad 
Indian "Jim," and captured many of the braves besides some of the 
squaws and children, and after many such fights drove the redskins 
hack to the mountains away from the settlements. He was in a battle 
with the Indians on February 15, 1866, in which eighty-one Indians 
were killed. They were again in Surprise valley for a time, and thence 
back to Sacramento, where Mr. London received his discharge June 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 549 

28, 1866, after a creditable record as a soldier, although he was not 
yet of age. After returning from California he lived in Butler county, 
Iowa, for some time, and in 1877 came to Bates county. Missouri, 
thence to Smith county, Kansas, where he lived twelve years, and then 
sold his farm and moved to Jefferson county. Nebraska, settling five 
miles northwest of Diller. He has been continually prosperous, has 
managed his affairs wisely, and has small complaints to make about the 
way fortune has treated him. 

Mr. London was married in Chickasaw county. Iowa, in February, 
1873. tn Miss Jane Slaight, who was born in Illinois, a daughter of 
Stephen and Caroline Slaight, both deceased and the latter died at 
the age of eighty-eight; their son W. M. Slaigbt is in South Dakota and 
Frank lives in Illinois, and Miranda (Mrs. Johnson) in Iowa. Mr. and 
Mrs. London have had a happy married life of thirty years, and have 
many friends in Jefferson county. They have four children : Marshall 
is a farmer, and married Viola Marshall, by whom he has a daughter, 
Alice V. : Daisy is a successful teacher in Jefferson county, and has 
been engaged in this work for nine years; Llewellyn and Ira. the younger 
children, are at home. Mr. London is an active member of Nickajack 
Post, G. A. R., at Diller, and also affiliates with the Masonic bodies. 
He is a frank and genial character, popular with his fellow citizens, 
and deserves the success which has rewarded his efforts. 



550 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

JOHN H. FRIDAY. 

John H. Friday, a well known and successful carpenter and con- 
tractor of Steele City, Nebraska, has been a resident of Jefferson county 
for over a third of a century, 'having come here before there was a 
Steele City, so that he has been a witness of and a worker in the de- 
velopment of all this part of the state. He has been an upright and 
honorable citizen, with a full share of public spirit in all worthy enter- 
prises, and has won the confidence and esteem of all with whom he 
has been associated. 

Mr. Friday was born in Ithaca, Darke county, Ohio. October 7, 
1842, a son of George Jacob and Sophia F. (Hess) Friday, both natives 
of Germany, whence they came to this country; the former died in 
Ohio, and the latter in Nebraska. Mr. Friday was their only son. He 
was reared to manhood in Ohio, and taught the lessons of industry 
and honesty from an early age. He received a good education in the 
public schools of his native state, but was only eighteen years old when 
he enlisted at Greenville, Ohio, on September 9, 1861, in Company G, 
Forty-fourth Ohio Infantry, for three years' service. The first captain 
of the company was J. M. Newkirk, and later J. Shaw was captain, 
and the colonel was Samuel Gilbert. He was in a number of battles 
of the war: at Lewisburg, West Virginia, May 23, 1862; the regiment 
was on detail duty much of the time in Virginia, and also in active 
service in Kentucky and Tennessee, participating in the siege of Knox- 
vflle. While in Virginia Mr. Friday was wounded by a ball in the 
ieft leg and one in the right, also in the head, and two buckshot struck 
him in the back, all the wounds being received within a few minutes' 
time. He was taken prisoner and held in Andersonville for eight months, 
during which he suffered all the well known hardships of that prison 
pen. He weighed one hundred and sixty-four pounds when he was 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 551 

captured, and only ninety-four when lie escaped. He was taken by 
transport to Baltimore, and was sent home to Ohio for sixty days, after 
which he joined his regiment at Parkersburg, Virginia, where he re- 
ceived his honorable discharge on account of disability. He came out 
as a corporal, and during his service suffered much for his country and 
gave full proof of his loyal devotion. 

He returned to Ohio after the war, and in 1867, with his young 
bride, came to Jefferson county, Nebraska, and took a homestead east 
of Endicott, where he farmed for six years. He had learned the trade 
of carpenter, and he moved from his farm into Steele City, where he 
has had a busy career as builder and contractor. Many of the houses 
of the city and this part of the county are monuments to his work, and 
he has the reputation of being a first-class workman. He has a good 
home in Steele City, and is in prosperous circumstances. 

Mr. Friday was married in Darke county, Ohio, in 1867, to Miss 
Rebecca Foreman, who was born in Pennsylvania, a daughter of Henry 
Foreman, also of that state. Twelve children have been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Friday: Lillie M. Lambert; Elmer L., a railroad man in Colo- 
rado; Myron, in Kansas; Miss Bertha A., of Steele City; Ida Z. Woods, 
of this county; Ruthelia M. Blair, of Chicago, Illinois; Pearl Beckwith ; 
and Harry S., at home ; and four who died in childhood. 

Mr. Friday was postmaster of Steele City for one term. He was 
chairman of the school board, and has done much for the cause of edu- 
cation ; and has been town trustee for ten years. He is a member of 
the Grand Army post, and affiliates with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
They have both been interested in temperance and moral works, and 
are useful as well as highly esteemed members of society. 



552 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

ROBERT CRINKLAW. 

Robert Crinklaw is one of the oldest settlers of Steele City, Ne- 
braska, where he took up his residence over thirty-five years ago. Al- 
though now in the main retired from active pursuits and in poor health, 
his past years have been exceedingly useful ones, and he has had a 
career of which he may well be proud. He has experienced pioneer 
conditions in Nebraska, and went through it all to prosperous circum- 
stances. Likewise as a citizen and soldier he has perfermed his part. 
avid is honored and esteemed by all his friends and associates. 

Air. Crinklaw was born near London. Canada, April 16, 1837, in 
a family known for its uprightness and integrity. His ancestors -were 
Scutch, and of warlike disposition, having taken part in many of the 
wars of that nation. James Crinklaw, his father, was born in Scotland, 
and grew up there and was married to Miss Tanette Smith, who was 
also born and reared in Scotland, and was of an old family in the heart 
of Scotland. They left Scotland and came to London, Canada, where 
he was a prosperous farmer. He died at the age of eighty-three, and 
his wife at seventy. He had been married twice, and by his first wife 
had two sons and three daughters, and by his second wife had six sons. 
One son, David, lives in St. Joseph, Missouri. 

Robert Crinklaw was reared on a Canadian farm, and there de- 
veloped a vigorous constitution by chopping wood and clearing land 
and making rails. At the age of eighteen he went to McHenrv county, 
Illinois, near Marengo, and worked at farm labor until the Civil war. 
In [862 he responded to Lincoln's call for sixty thousand men. and 
enlisted in Company A, Ninety-fifth Illinois Infantry, under Captain 
Avery and Colonel Church, and later Colonel Humphreys, who was 
killed in Mississippi. He participated in many battles in Mississippi 
and Aalabama, was at the long siege of Vicksburg until the final sur- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 553 

render on July 4. 18G3; was at Natchez; in the Red River expedition 
and the battle of Sabine Cross Roads; at the siege and capture of Mobile 
and Fort Blakelv, and numerous other engagements. He served as 
corporal, and was a fine-looking soldier, standing six feet three in his 
stocking feet. After the war he returned to McHenry county, and later 
to Canada. In 1867 he came to Nebraska and took up a homestead. 
He lived in a log cabin for a time near Steele City, or rather where that 
town now stands. There were Indians in the vicinity, wild game abun- 
dant, and the entire country was primitive and untouched by man's 
civilizing hand. He still owns one hundred acres of his homestead. 
He came to Steele City and was in the implement business for a num- 
ber of years. He was also postmaster during Grant's administration, 
being Steele City's first postmaster. During the Indian massacre north- 
west of Steele City he went to the assistance of the settlers and helped 
bury those killed and take care of the living and helpless. For a num- 
ber of years he has been retired from business, partly because of his 
poor health, and is living in the enjoyment of the esteem and appre- 
ciation of his friends and neighbors. 

Mr. Crinklaw was married in Jefferson county, Nebraska, to Miss 
Ida Flowers, a native of Michigan and a daughter of Mr. C. Flowers, 
of New York. Mr. and Mrs. Crinklaw have two sons : Frank is pro- 
prietor of the Steele City meat market, and he married Anna Kelly; 
Robert is a single man. in Chehalis. Washington. Mr. Crinklaw is a 
man of strong opinions on matters of politics and public interest, but 
is genial and popular in all his relations with others, and has hosts of 
friends. 



554 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

CHARLES LEE FOWLER. 

Charles Lee Fowler, the present popular and efficient postmaster 
of Steele City, Nebraska, is one of the best known men of southeastern 
Nebraska, and with a reputation pretty well diffused over the entire 
west. He is an old-time editor, having begun in the most humble 
capacity years ago, and is acquainted with newspaper business from 
bottom to top. He has also the honor of being a veteran of the Civil 
war. For a number of years he was a pioneer actor and performer in 
the traveling shows and circuses which made the one phenomenal red- 
letter day of the western communities before and after the introduction 
of railroads. All these varied experiences have been crowded into a 
life of sixty-three years, and indicate him to be a man of resourceful 
ability, versatile and popular with all classes of citizens, such as he has 
proved to be since coming to Jefferson county a little over a decade 
ago. 

Mr. Fowler was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, in Union- 
town, September 30, 1840, of an old and well known eastern family. 
W. Emory Fowler, his father, was a cousin of the late well known 
writer and publisher, Professor O. S. Fowler, of New York city. The 
former was a tinsmith by trade, and followed that pursuit for a num- 
ber of years in the east, and about 1850 became one of the early settlers 
of the state of Iowa, being in business in Des Moines for a time, and 
was also at New London, Henry county. He died at the age of seventy- 
eight, having been a Democrat in politics and libera] in religion. 
His wife was a Miss Van Every, of an old New York family, and her 
father was a relative of President Van Buren. She died at New Lon- 
don, Iowa, at the age of seventy, a member of the Christian church. 
They were parents of nine children. 

Charles Lee Fowler was educated in the town schools, but most 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 555 

of his wide acquaintance with history and literature was gained by his 
own self-imposed study and the exigencies of his profession. He was 
helped by a very retentive memory, and his versatile nature soon dis- 
played itself. He began learning type-setting in Uniontown, Pennsyl- 
vania, being connected with the Genius of Liberty. He afterward went 
to Monmouth, Illinois, and then to Muscatine, Iowa. He was a young 
printer in a newspaper office there when the news of the rebellion first 
arrived. He and two or three others went out on the streets and made 
up the first drum corps, and enlisted recruits for the first Iowa volunteer 
regiment. He has the honor of being the first one enrolled from Iowa for 
service in the war, his enlistment dating in April, 1861, a few days 
after Sumter was fired upon. Captain Mason, of Muscatine, com- 
manded the company, and Colonel Bates, of Dubuque, the regiment. 
They were sent south to the Hannibal and St. Joe Railroad, and took 
part in many of the conflicts in Missouri during the early period of 
the war. He was with General Lyon at Booneville. also at Springfield, 
and at Wilson Creek, where Lyon was killed, and in the campaign 
against Price. He helped publish the first Union paper in the south, 
at Macon, Missouri, on June 15, 1861, and it sold for one dollar and a half 
a copy. The other editors were F. B. Wickel, E. G. Upham, S. T. 
Orr and Joseph Biles. Mr. Fowler was honorably discharged, and then 
returned to Iowa, where he engaged in more peaceful pursuits. 

He continued as a type-setter in Iowa for a time, and in 1865 
went to Colorado, where he worked on the Rocky Mountain Nezvs. He 
had already displayed his genius as an actor and clown, was possessed 
of a good voice, and these qualifications soon led him into the most 
exciting part of his career. He was offered a good salary to become 
an actor in Denver, and from this beginning- he traveled over most 
of the west and south, entertaining hundreds of delighted audiences. 



556 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

He was a good singer of comic songs, and popular in minstrels and 
variety shows. He received one hundred dollars a week as end man 
with Heatly and Chase, and he played with John Dillon and other 
well known actors. He was later with Fanny Hernandez, lessee of the 
Larimer Street theatre in Denver, and as general utility man received 
a good salary. He took a leading part in "All is not Gold that Glit- 
ters." The Fanny Hernandez troupe played at Fort Sedgewick, Colo- 
rado, in an adobe house, tickets at a dollar apiece. At the government 
post at Julesburg they put up cottonwood posts, shut in the sides with 
tarpaulin, and with the blue sky as their roof played to a large audi- 
ence. This was the first company to make the rounds of government 
posts, and at Fort Kearney they remained a week, following the re- 
turn of the soldiers from the Powder River expedition. They then 
came on to Columbus, Nebraska, then to Fremont, where they played 
in a storeroom, and at Omaha the only available hall was the court 
house. At Oftnaha Mr. Fowler took the management of the Dallows 
Concert Hall for the winter, and then went down the Missouri river 
with a party to St. Joseph and Kansas City. At Olathe, Kansas, he 
joined, in 1866. the Johnson and Van Yleck Circus Company, and was 
a comic singer and clown for them at a salary of twenty-five dollars a 
week. He was taken sick at Waverly, Iowa, in September, 1866, and 
in May, 1867, he joined the McGinley and Carrol Circus of Fond du Lac, 
Wisconsin. On April 27. 1868, he joined the Cramer and Hampson 
Circus at Albia. Iowa, as a clown and singer, and was with them in 
the same capacity during the following year. On May 14. 1870. he 
joined O'Conner's Great Western Circus at Galesburg Illinois, and he 
was now receiving fifty dollars a week, and refusing many good offers. 
In [871 he joined the same circus at Hiawatha. Kansas, and during 
the winter was with the Empire City Circus, of Mobile. Alabama, all 



SOUTHEASTER* NEBRASKA. - ? - ? j 

through the south. April 8, 1872, he joined, at Lincoln, Nebraska, the 
Saxby, Dunbar, Brooks and Ensign International Circus. He later 
joined Dr. Backenstoes' Cosmopolitan Circus at Keithsburg, Illinois, 
and went on steamboat with it up to the headwaters of the Mississippi 
and back to Memphis, Tennessee. In 1873 he was with W. \Y. Cole's 
Circus, of Ouincy, Illinois, and in the following winter was in the 
south with Norton and Haight. In 1874 he was with the Great Eastern 
Circus, as also in 1875. In 1876 he was with G. G. Grady Circus Com- 
pany, and in the following year ended his circus business. He then 
accepted a partnership in -a printing office at Stewartsville, Missouri. 
He played in the first two-ring circus ever on the road, and was also 
with the first railroad show that ever traveled. He came to Steele City, 
Nebraska, in 1892, and was a publisher and editor for several years. 
He received his appointment as postmaster in 1898. and has given 
satisfactory service to the people of the town where he is so popular 
as a man. 

In June, 1870. Mr. Fowler was married in Fairfield, Jefferson 
county, Iowa, to Miss Lou Moore, who has been his faithful companion 
through all the up and downs of his career for thirty-three rears. She 
is a lady of more than ordinary ability and culture, and is beloved at 
home and popular abroad. She was born, reared and educated in Iowa, 
a daughter of Dr. B. N. Moore, who was a successful physician of the 
old school, coming from Ohio to Iowa, where he died at the age of 
sixty. Dr. Moore was a Democrat, a liberal in religious belief. He 
married Rebecca Shellenbarger. of an old Dutch family, and they had 
four children, two sons and two daughters, the son George Moore hav- 
ing been a soldier and now residing at Mount Pleasant, Iowa. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fowler have one daughter, Florence Currie, who is the mother of 
two children. A son, Ralph D., died at the age of eight years. Mr. 



558 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Fowler is a stanch Republican, and has been an active worker for the 
party all his life. 



J. S. TAYLOR, M. D. 

Dr. J. S. Taylor, physician and surgeon of Steele City, Jefferson 
county, Nebraska, has been successfully engaged in practice here since 
1888, and has gained the confidence of the people in his ability and their 
patronage. He was a very young man when he settled here for prac- 
tice, and he still has the greater part and most useful part of his! 
career before him. He is a well read man in his profession, and his 
success as a practitioner has not kept him from advancing in knowledge 
as well as experience. 

Dr. Taylor was born in Huntington county, Indiana, in 1866, a 
member of one of the oldest and most prominent families of the county. 
His great - grandfather, Robert Taylor, and his great - grand- 
mother both came from Ireland. The former fought in the Revolu- 
tionary war in South Carolina. They lived about twenty-five miles from 
Charleston, near Laurens Court House, from which place after the death 
of the great-grandfather the great-grandmother, in 1808. emigrated to 
Indiana, which was then a territory. In that commonwealth she reared 
her family of four sons and one daughter, and all lived and died there. 
Dr. Taylor's grandfather died in Franklin county, Indiana, about fifty 
miles west of Cincinnati, in 1867. Richard T. Taylor, the father of Dr. 
Taylor, was born in Franklin county, Indiana. He came to Huntington 
county in early manhood, and married Miss Salinda A. First, of Bluffton. 
Wells county, Indiana, a daughter of Jacob First, who came from Pennsyl- 
vania to 'Wells county in 1833. Richard T. Taylor and wife moved from 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 559 

Indiana to Nodaway county, Missouri, near Maryville, where the former 
died. He affiliated with the Masonic order, and was a member of the Bap- 
tist church for forty years. His wife is still living in the old home in 
Nodaway county. They had three children: James A. is on the old 
farm in Missouri; J. S. ; and G. O., who is in the drug" business in 
Steele City. 

Dr. Taylor was reared on a farm, where he developed ample 
strength for his present arduous profession. He was educated in the 
public schools and in the high school at Maryville. He was a student 
for some time under Dr. Hockendon at Maryville, who is now a well 
known physician of Gallia, Ohio, and he attended the College of Medi- 
cine at Louisville, Kentucky, where he was graduated in the class of 
1888, standing high among the one hundred and two graduates. Since 
coming to Steele City he has been faithfully attentive to his duties and 
has gained a creditable reputation for skill and sympathetic counsel. 

In 1889 Dr. Taylor was married at Maryville, Missouri, to Miss 
Rosa Alexander, who was born, reared and educated in that city, a 
daughter of John Alexander and Lucinda (Poole) Alexander, the 
former of whom died in 1900. Dr. and Mrs. Taylor have one son, 
Lloyd S., eleven years old. Dr. Taylor has a fine home in Steele City, 
with a beautiful lawn and shade trees, and is surrounded with many 
comforts. He is a lover of fine horses, and his horse Aldentier No. 
35285 is a fine specimen of roadster, and he owns others of standard 
breed. Dr. Taylor is a member of the State Medical Society, and stands 
high in Masonic circles in this vicinity. 



5 6o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 



WILLIAM HENRY CRANE. 



William Henry Crane, of Steele City, Nebraska, has a wide ac- 
quaintance in Jefferson county and receives the favorable regard of 
his fellow townsmen. His has been an active and useful business ca- 
reer, in which he has found time to faithfully perform the duties of 
citizenship, and at the time of the Civil war he manifested his loyalty 
10 the government by enlisting for service in defense of the Union 
cause. He was born upon one of the pioneer dairy farms of Illinois 
in McHenry county on the 9th of November, 1848. The ancestry of 
the family can be traced back to England and to Scotland, and its 
identification with America dates from 1637. The Cranes are de- 
scended from Lord Arruhdel, who was a lineal descendant of Charle- 
magne and of Hugh Capet. In the early wars of England the Cranes 
won distinction, one of the name served as an officer and \vas afterward 
given a banner and coat of arms, on which were the words, "God 
feeds the Cranes." Sir Francis Crane received a grant of land from 
the English crown of seventy-five thousand acres in Vermont. 

The first of the name in America was Jasper Crane, who came from 
England to the new world in 1637. His wife, Alice Crane, and they 
had a son, Jasper, Jr., who was a very prominent and influential citizen 
of New Haven, Connecticut, belonging to the council of safety in 
Revolutionary times. Another member of the family, Abenezer Crane, 
was a gallant officer of the Revolutionary war, and Benjamin Crane 
was also a distinguished citizen of the Bay state. Sir Francis Crane, 
the great-grandfather of our subject, married a Miss Teople, repre- 
sentative of a prominent Holland family and a granddaughter of Ad- 
miral Teople, of Antwerp, who won his title in connection with service 
in the Holland navy. She died in Canada. Captain Francis Crane, 
the grandfather of our subject, was born at Berkshire. Massachusetts, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 561 

and removed to Canada, where occurred the birth of his son, George 
Crane, the father of our subject. 

George Crane was born at St. Thomas, Canada, and there spent 
the days of his boyhood and youth. In 1832 he came to the United 
States and was one of the early settlers of Rockford, Illinois. He after- 
ward removed to Belvidere. Illinois, living there at the period of the 
Black Hawk war. He was married at Algonquin. Illinois, to Mrs. 
VanOrsdol, a widow, and a lady of much intelligence and culutre, who 
proved to him a devoted wife and excellent helpmate in those pioneer 
days. She was born in Erie county, New York, and was a grand- 
daughter of John C. Seymour, a prominent citizen of that county and 
a representative of an old English family. He served as quartermaster 
in General Washington's army in the Revolutionary war. 

In the year 1854 George Crane and his wife removed to Jackson 
county, Iowa, becoming pioneer settlers there, where they made their 
home fur nine years. He enlisted for service in the Civil war as a 
member of Company B, Ninth Iowa Infantry, and was wounded at the 
battle of Lookout Mountain. Because of his injuries he was granted 
an honorable discharge and returned to his home in McHenry county, 
Illinois. He afterward operated a meat market and sutler store for 
some time, and later he went to Santa Monica, California, where he 
died at the age of sixty-one years. His wife, surviving him, passed 
away in Buchanan county, Iowa, at the age of seventy years. Both 
were honored and respected people, and they reared their large family 
of children as a credit to their name. By her first marriage Mrs. Crane 
had four children, James, Wright S.. Alexander and Sarah V. Van 
Orsdol. The daughter is now Mrs. Waggoner, of Omaha. Nebras- 
ka. The son Alexander was a soldier of the Ninth Iowa Infantry in 
the Civil war. To Mr. and Mrs George Crane were born four chil- 



562 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

clren. William H, George Francis. Airs. Alice Vargason, of Hazelton, 
Iowa, and Airs. Amanda Vargason, of Hazelton. 

William Henry Crane spent the days of his early boyhood and 
youth in his parents' home, but when a lad of only fifteen years he 
responded to his country's call for aid and enlisted in 1863 in the 
Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry, serving until April, 1866. With the 
blood of his Revolutionary forefathers flowing in his veins his patri- 
otic spirit was aroused and he gave earnest support to the Union cause 
upon the field of battle. He was on thirty-six different occasions en- 
gaged with the enemy in skirmishes or pitched battles, and served for 
a time as orderly on General Pleasanton's staff. At the close of the 
war he received a commission as second lieutenant in recognition of 
his gallantry and meritorious conduct on the field of action. In 1867 
he accompanied his father to Virginia City, Montana, being sixty days 
on a boat between St. Joseph, Missouri, and Fort Benton. Five thou- 
sand Indians were on the warpath in that locality at that time. Mr. 
Crane joined a company of Galitan scouts which he commanded to 
fight the Indians and saw some severe service in the attempt to sub- 
due the red men on the western frontier. Later he was associated with 
his father in the operation of a meat market and sutler's store. He 
had a varied and remarkable experience in the northwest in pioneer 
times. He became a pack trader and operated pack trains over the 
mountains from Helena, Montana.- to Kootenai, British Columbia, 
and other points. His experiences if written in detail would fill a 
volume with more thrilling incidents than fiction ever recorded. He 
was one of the first interested in the Anaconda mine at Butte, Montana, 
and he became familiar with all of the varied pioneer experiences in- 
cident to the settlement and development of that section of the country. 
In 1869 Mr. Crane came to Jefferson county, Nebraska, where 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 563 

lie secured a homestead claim, upon which he resided for two years. He 
then went west to Colorado, and at Rosita engaged in the dairy busi- 
ness for one year. He afterward returned to Nebraska and during the 
greater part of the time in the years which have since come and gone 
he has made his home in this state. As a companion and helpmate for 
life's jorney he chose Miss Hester Pickering, their marriage being 
celebrated in Washington county, Kansas, October 1, 1871. She was 
born in Fulton county, Illinois, was reared and educated in that state 
and is a daughter of John Pickering, who was of a prominent old 
English family. Her grandfather, Daniel Pickering, resided at Ports- 
mouth. Xew Hampshire, and was a soldier of the war of 18 12. being 
wounded in an engagement. He established his home in West Vir- 
ginia, and it was there that John Pickering was born. The latter mar- 
ried Miss Sophia Turner, a native of Kentucky and a daughter of 
Samuel Turner, one of the first settlers of Fulton county. Illinois, and 
a prominent and influential resident of that localitv. Mrs. Pickering's 
mother bore the maiden name of Carver and belonged to an old and 
distinguished family of Xew England. John Pickering becoming a 
strong abolitionist was known as one of the conductors on the famous 
underground railroad and assisted many a slave on his way to free- 
dom in the north. In 1875 he and his wife came to the west and spent 
their remaining days in this portion of the country. The father died 
on a farm in Washington county, Kansas, at the age of seventy-one 
years and the mother's death also occurred when she had reached the 
age of seventy-one. His political allegiance was given to the Repub- 
lican party and his religious faith was that of the Methodist church. 
He was a man greatly beloved for his many excellent qualities, for his 
generous hospitality, his honor in business and his faithfulness in 
friendship. In the family were eight children, namely: Mrs. Sarah 



564 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Miller, Mrs. Hester Crane. Charles Newton, Elizabeth. Laura, John, 
Airs. Martha Dean, of Omaha, Nebraska, and Ben E., who is a well 
known and popular traveling man of Omaha, connected with the Stand- 
ard Oil Company. 

Captain C. N. Pickering, a cousin of Airs. Crane, was commander 
of the Kearsarge, and was relieved only a short time before the battle 
with the Alabama. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Crane has been blessed with four 
children: Olive, who is the wife of Theodore Reiber, of Steele City, 
Nebraska: Howard J., at home: Horace H., who is married and lives 
in Steele City; and Agnes M., the wife of W. L. Wright, of St. Joseph, 
Missouri. The sons are members of the National Guard of Nebraska, 
and one is six feet and one inch in height, while the other is six feet 
and two inches. They are both fine specimens of stalwart manhood 
and are popular with their many friends in this portion of the state. 
There are also three grandchildren, Mrs. Reiber having two children, 
Alexander Lauren Crane and Doretta, while Horace has one child, 
Lyndall Crane. 

Mr. Crane is the owner of forty acres of land in Newton precinct, 
where he has a good home celebrated for its generous hospitality. His 
place is splendidly improved, and be has a peach orchard comprising 
fourteen acres. In his business he is energetic and progressive, and all 
that he possesses has been acquired through his own well directed ef- 
forts. He votes with the Republican party, has frequently been a 
delegate to the count}- and state conventions and has served as justice 
of the peace. His many excellent traits of character have gained him 
high regard, and he certainly deserves mention among the representa- 
tive men of Jefferson county. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 505 

DAN L. LITTRELL. 

Dan L. Littrell, a prominent and highly esteemed citizen of Endi- 
cott, is one of the oldest settlers of Jefferson comity, having settled 
here thirty-five years ago. He is one of the few remaining veterans 
of the Civil war, having shown the utmost degree of loyalty to his 
country before he had reached his majority, and nearly all the years 
of his life since then have been spent in honorable activity in Nebraska. 
He is a man of enterprise and business ability, popular among friends 
and associates, and public-spirited in his relations to the general wel- 
fare of town and county. 

Mr. Littrell was born in Clermont county, Ohio, March 9, 1845, 
a grandson of George Littrell, who was a native of Switzerland. His 
father, William Littrell, was born in Virginia, and married Miss Marie 
Jackson, a native of Ohio, and a daughter of a Revolutionary soldier. 
These parents are both deceased, having passed away in Jefferson 
county, Indiana, the mother at the age of thirty-eight and the father at 
seventy-two. The latter was a farmer, a Democrat in politics, and 
was a much respected man in his community. They had nine children, 
eight sons and one daughter, and the following sons were soldiers in the 
Union army: George, in the Sixth Indiana Infantry; Liness, in the Thir- 
teenth Indiana ; Sam, also in the Thirteenth ; Dan L., in the Second Indi- 
ana Cavalry; and Luther, in the Second In. liana Cavalry. The parents 
were both members of the Baptist church. 

Dan L. Littrell was reared in Ohio, and after full attendance at the 
public schools taught for awhile. In September, i86j, when seventeen 
years old, he enlisted at Indianapolis, Indiana, on Lincoln's call for sixty 
thousand troops, in Company D. Second Indiana Cavalry, Captain Barn- 
ett and Colonel Robert Stewart. He was in General Mitchell's command 
at the battle of Murfreesboro; he was with General Wilson's splendid 



566 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

cavalrymen in his most famous raid of the Civil war through the south, 
when that general captured Selma and Montgomery, Alabama, besides 
other fortified towns. He was also at the battles of Resaca, Rome, New 
Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain, Franklin, and the battle at Nashville, 
which is considered the hottest of the war considering the number en- 
gaged. He received a flesh wound in the right ankle, and was also con- 
fined for a time in Louisville with the typhoid fever. He received his 
honorable discharge at the close of service, and went home conscious of 
having rendered gallant service to his country. In 1868 he came to Ne- 
braska and homesteaded a place eight miles north of Fairbury, Jefferson 
county, where he farmed successfully for some years, and came to Endi- 
cott twenty-one years ago. 

Mr. Littrell was married in Jefferson county, Indiana, in 1867, to 
Miss Nancy J. Gardner, who has been his noble and devoted helpmate 
for thirty-seven years. She was born and reared in Indiana, a daughter 
of William and Asenath (Shorte) Gardner; the former was born in 
Meigs county, Ohio, February 14, 1817, and died in the same state at 
the age of seventy-eight, and the latter was horn in Ohio and died aged 
seventy-five. Two of their sons were soldiers, Ben H. Gardner in the 
Fifty-sixth Indiana, now deceased, and William Gardner in the Eighty- 
second Indiana, now lives in Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Littrell have had 
nine children, and all are living: Hattie, Carrie, Denmer, Maud, Mattie, 
Liness, Pearl, Addie and Xellie. Mr. Littrell is a stanch advocate of 
Republican principles, and is a member of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 567 

JOHN W. CARMONY. 

John W. Carmony, who has been a dealer in grain and a popular 
and well known business man of Endicott, Jefferson county, Nebraska, 
for a number of years, has made an honorable record as a man, citizen 
and soldier. His sixty odd years of life have been busy ones, and he has 
been constantly engaged in some honorable activity, in the prosecution 
of his private enterprises, in discharging the duties of public office or fol- 
lowing the flag of the Union on the battlefields of the south. 

Mr. Carmony was born near Shelbyville, Shelby county, Indiana, 
June 29, 1841. His grandfather, John Carmony, was a native of Penn- 
sylvania. His father, Peter Carmony, was born in Ohio, and his wife 
was Anna Myers, a daughter of William and Mrs. (McKenzie) Myers, 
the latter the daughter of a Revolutionary soldier. Peter and Anna Car- 
mony were parents of the following children: John W. ; Dan, a soldier 
in the Twenty-sixth Illinois during the Civil war; James, a soldier in the 
Eighth Illinois Infantry; Eva; Mollie; Isaiah; Rebecca; Cynthia; and 
Lulu. Peter Carmony removed to LaSalle county, Illinois, in 1849, anc ^ 
died in Hollenburg. Kansas, at the age of sixty-five. He followed the 
occupation of farming, and was a good and respected citizen wherever 
he lived. He was a Republican in politics, and as a stanch abolitionist 
helped free the slaves and was a friend of the abolition martyr Lovejoy. 
His wife died at the age of sixty-three. 

John W. Carmony was reared in Illinois, where he received a com- 
mon school education. In August. 1862, he responded to the president's 
call for sixty-thousand men and enlisted at Ottawa, Illinois, in Company 
D, One Hundred and Fourth Illinois Infantry, Captain Collins command- 
ing the company and Colonel A. B. Moore the regiment. He was or- 
dered to Jeffersonville, Indiana, and thence went to Kentucky, where he 
was with General Bragg at .Shelbyville, and in the engagement at Harts- 



568 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

ville, Tennessee, was wounded in the shoulder and neck by a ball, and 
also had three ribs broken. He was sent to the field hospital, and then to 
the hospital at Gallatin. Tennessee, whence he was removed to the hos- 
pital in Chicago, where he remained three months. In August, 1863, 
he received his honorable discharge on account of disability, and then 
returned home. In 1869 Mr. Carmpny went to Hamilton. Iowa, where 
he remained for eighteen months, and for the following five years was in 
Allerton, Wayne county, Iowa. He then went to Russell county. Kansas, 
and took up some school land. He lived there for four years, and was 
kept in some public office all the time, being county trustee, bridge in- 
spector, etc. He came to Endicott, Jefferson county, Nebraska, in 1890, 
and from that date to the present has been successfully engaged in the 
grain business, buying and shipping in large quantities. 

Mr. Carmonv was married in Morris, Grundy county. Illinois, in 
t8m_|. to Miss Mary J. Batten, who. was born in Pennsylvania and was 
reared and educated in Illinois, and was a daughter of Thomas A. and 
Alice (Atkins) Batten, both deceased. Mrs. Carmonv has a brother in 
Endicott. Toseph P. Batten. Four children have been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Carmonv: Sherman, of Shawnee. Oklahoma; Thomas A., a 
railroad man of Oklahoma; Frank, who has been county superintendent 
of -chools of Jefferson county for three terms, elected by a handsome 
majority; and Lou. the wife of O. E. Biggie, of Jefferson county. Mr. 
Carmonv is independent in political affiliations, and has voted the Pop- 
ulist ticket. He is a member of the Methodist church, and of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 569 

LUTHER S. BAKER. 

Luther S. Baker, the well known insurance and real estate man of 
Endicott, Nebraska, is counted among the old settlers of this part of 
Southeastern Nebraska, since a third of a century nearly measures the 
time that this state has been the seat of civilization. He has been a 
citizen of prominence and public spirit since coming here, and while work- 
ing for his own material prosperity lias given a due share of his time and 
thought to the demands of society in general. He is esteemed not only 
in these connections, but also for the part he played as a gallant soldier 
in the Civil war, in which he was at the front in many a battle, and 
still bears on his body many scars of grim and desolating war. 

Mr. Baker was born in Allegany county, New York, March 22, 1839, 
a son of Daniel and Abigail (Strong) Baker, the former of whom died 
in 1856, aged fifty-three, and the latter at the age of fifty-three in Penn- 
sylvania. They were parents of fifteen children ; five of the sons were 
Union soldiers, Alanson, who was wounded at Cedar Mountain, Hiram, 
David, who was killed at Cedar Mountain. Luther, and Amandon, who 
was in the war, but not at Cedar Mountain battle. 

Luther S. Baker lived at home in New York until 1856, and then 
went with his parents to Yirginia. In May, 1861, he enlisted at Roulette, 
Potter county. Pennsylvania, for three months' service, but did not leave 
the state of Pennsylvania. September 28, 1861, he enlisted in Company 
H. Forty-sixth Pennsylvania Infantry, Captain Alexander W. Selfridge 
and Colonel Joseph F. Knight, his term of enlistment being for three 
years, and he received his honorable discharge at Alexandria, Virginia, 
July 16, 1865. He was in the battle at Ball's Bluff, where Colonel Baker 
was killed: at Winchester, May 25, 1862; at Chancellorsville and Antie- 
tam; and at Cedar Mountain, August 9, was taken prisoner, and held 
at Belle Isle until the following November, when he made his escape and 



570 SOUTH EASTERN NEBRASKA. 

joined his regiment; he suffered from the scurvy while in prison. He 
was once wounded by a fragment of shell in the right foot, and at the 
great battle of Gettysburg was wounded in the left leg. He was with 
General Hooker at Lookout Mountain, and in all the battles of that cam- 
paign, during which he was wounded in the right leg, and still carries 
the bullet. He was at Peach Tree Creek, at Rome, Kenesaw Mountain, 
Atlanta, thence to Savannah, north to Bentonville. on to Richmond, and 
participated in the grand review down Pennsylvania avenue, Wash- 
ington, at the termination of most praiseworthy and noble service for 
his country. He returned home to Potter county, Pennsylvania, where 
he remained until 1870, when he came to the state of Nebraska and took 
a homestead in Jefferson county. He has since been engaged in farming 
and other lines of activity, and now has a large business in insurance 
and real estate, which nets him a prosperity of which he is well worthy. 
On August 11, 1872, Mr. Baker was married in Nebraska to Miss 
Amanda M. Wells, who came here in 1867, a daughter of one of the old 
settlers, James A. Wells, who was a soldier in the Twentieth Iowa In- 
fantry and now lives at Lamar. Missouri. Ten children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Baker, as follows: Alvin, Adella, Andrew, Florence, 
William, James. Maud, Rosetta, David, and Wanda, who is deceased. 
Mr. Baker is a strong Republican, and is a Grand Army man. having 
been commander of his post. He is frank and genial with all, and loved 
in his domestic circle and popular with all his associates. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 571 

EDWARD ROBINS< >N. 

Edward Robinson is a well known stockman of Fairbury, Nebraska, 
and bis business interests carefully conducted have resulted in making 
him one of the prosperous citizens of bis community. He is numbered 
among the old settlers of Jefferson county, coming to this portion of the 
state at a time when much of the land was still in possession of the 
government. He arrived in March, [868, and secured a homestead, and 
since that time he has been active in agricultural interests. 

Mr. Robinson was born in Middlesex county, Canada, on the 9th of 
April, 1847. His father, William Robinson, was a native of county Ar- 
magh. Ireland, belonging to an old family of the Protestant faith, 
He was reared in the Church of England and remained a resident of the 
green isle of Erin until twenty-one years of age, when he crossed the 
Atlantic to Canada, settling in Middlesex county, where he engaged in 
genera] farming. He was married there to Mrs. Sarah 1 Foute) Shoebot- 
ham a widow, who by her former marriage had two children, namely: 
Henrv Shoebotham, who is now living in Fairbury, Nebraska; and 
Eliza, who makes her home in Canada. Mrs. Robinson was born in 
county Armagh. Ireland, and died at the age of forty-seven years. 
while William Robinson departed this life at the age of sixty-three 
years. Both were of the Episcopalian faith and their many excellent 
traits of heart and mind won them the respect and good will of those 
with whom they were associated. They became the parents of six chil- 
dred: William, a prominent stockman of Richland precinct; Edward, a 
twin brother of William: James, who is living at McCook, Nebraska; 
Mrs. Mary Jenkins, of Fairbury; John A., a prominent farmer of Rich- 
land precinct; and Mrs. Sarah Ball, also of McCook. Nebraska. 

Edward Robinson was reared upon the old home farm and instructed 
in practical methods of farm work, while in the district schools of the 



57-' SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

neighborhood he acquired his literary education. The habits of indus- 
try, economy and honesty, which lie formed in his youth, proved potent 
elements in his later success. In March, 1868, he came to Nebraska, 
hoping that he might find better business opportunities in this then 
largely unsettled district. He located a homestead claim in Richland pre- 
cinct and lived alone until the 7th of May, 1870, when he won a com- 
panion and helpmate for life's journey, being married on that date to 
Miss Elsie Conger, an intelligent lady of good family, who has been 
to him a faithful and devoted companion on the journey of life. She 
was born in LaSalle county, Illinois, a daughter of William Conger, 
who was a native of Wayne county. New York, and a cousin of Hon. 
E. H. Conger, minister to China. Her mother bore the maiden name 
of Mahala Cooper, and was also born in Wayne county, New York. 
In 1847 her parents removed to LaSalle county, Illinois, and the father 
died in that state, when thirty-five years of age. He had devoted his 
entire life to agricultural pursuits, thus providing for the wants of his 
family. His political allegiance was given to the Republican part}', and 
his religious faith was that of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which 
he held membership. At his death he left a widow and two children, 
Allen and Elsie. Mrs. Conger later became the wife of Henry Ward 
and had seven children by that marriage, of whom two are now living: 
Thomas Ward, who makes his home near Gladstone, Nebraska ; and 
Frank, who is living in Lincoln. Nebraska. Mrs. Ward came to Jefferson 
county in 1874 and was thus early identified with the pioneer interests 
and development of this portion of the state. Her daughter, Mrs. 
Robinson, acquired her education near Ottawa. LaSalle county, Illi- 
nois. She came with her mother to this county and here gave her hand 
in -marriage to Edward Robinson. Four children have been born of this 
union: Mary Edna, who is now the wife of Charles McCoy, of Richland 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 57 t, 

precinct; John Henry, who married Bertha Clark and lives in Richland 
precinct of Jefferson county: Anna Belle, the wife of Cecil Bosley, of 
Jefferson county; and George Edward, who married Carrie Moser, and 
resides upon the old homestead farm. They also lost three children : 
Elizabeth, who died at the age of seven years; Flora May. at the age 
of four years; and William J., when ninteen months' old. 

The first home of Mr. Robinson in Jefferson county was a dugout 
fourteen by sixteen feet. In this he lived for three years and then 
built a log cabin, which he occupied for eighteen months. He afterward 
erected a farm house and also built a modern and commodious home in 
Fairbury, where he and his family now reside. He owns six hundred 
and forty acres of as good land as can be found in Nebraska. This is 
well improved, being equipped with all modern conveniences, and he 
keeps on hand one hundred and fifty head of cattle and a large number 
of hogs. He had but limited financial resouces at the time of his mar- 
riage, but he and his wife have worked courageously and harmoniously 
together, and they have now a very valuable property and are numbered 
among the substantial citizens of Jefferson county. They hold member- 
ship in the United Brethren church, and Mr. Robinson is serving as one 
of its board of trustees, while both take an active part in church work. 
His political allegiance is given to the Populist party. The family home 
is noted for its generous and cordial hospitality, and both Mr. and Mrs. 
Robinson have the warm regard of many with whom they have been 
brought in contact during their long residence in this locality. Mr. Rob- 
inson as one of the early settlers is entitled to mention in this volume, 
and, moreover, he has taken an active and helpful part in the work of 
improvement as the county has emerged from its pioneer conditions to 
take a place among the leading counties of this great commonwealth. 



574 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

JASPER HELVEY. 

For almost a half century Jasper Helvey has been a resident of Ne- 
braska, and since 1859 he lias made his home in Jefferson county, so 
that few if any of its settlers have a more intimate knowledge of its 
history from a personal recollection of events than has Mr. Helvey. His 
name should certainly he inscribed high among the honored pioneers, 
for he has contributed in large measure to the work of reclaiming the 
state for the purpose of civilization, and Jefferson county owes him 
much for its development along agricultural lines. He is the proprie- 
tor of the Pioneer Stock Farm and is one of the leading stock-raisers 
and dealers of southeastern Nebraska, while through his well directed 
labors he has achieved very gratifying success. 

Mr. Helvey was born in Huntington county, Indiana, on the 10th 
of December. 1842, a son of Joel Helvey and a grandson of Jacob Hel- 
vey. Both were natives of Virginia, representatives of a family noted 
for industry, integrity and courage. Joel Helvey was born in 1801 and 
after his removal to Huntington county. Indiana, he was married to 
Miss Mary Fonts, who was born in Ohio and belonged to an old Penn- 
sylvania German family. In the year 1846 they removed to Missouri, 
settling in Atchison county, near the Missouri river, at Sonora. After 
two years he went to Fremont county. Iowa, where he continued until 
the fall of 1855. when he brought his family to Nebraska, casting in his 
lot among the pioneer settlers of Otoe county. Indians were numerous 
in the state at that time, and for miles one could ride over the prairies 
without coming to a fence to impede his progress. The land was still 
in its primitive condition, and deer, antelope and buffalo roamed over 
the country at will. In 1859 the family came to Jefferson county, set- 
tling at Little Sandy on the old military road, which was General Fre- 
mont's old trail. Joel Helvey was a typical pioneer, brave and resolute, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. jj- ? 

undeterred by the hardships and privations of frontier life, and his 
labors proved of value in the early development and upbuilding of the 
state. He was a man firm in his opinions of right and wrong, yet 
■possessed a kindly manner and generous sympathy, and in all his busi- 
ness dealings was strictly honorable. He died in 1864, in the sixty- 
fourth year of his age, and his wife passed away in this county at the 
age of seventy-one years. He was a man of fine physique and vigorous 
constitution, and was thus well qualified to meet the conditions found 
upon the frontier. To him and his wife were born ten children : Thomas, 
of Jefferson count) - ; Henry \Y.. who was in the war and who died in the 
same county; Benjamin F., of Daykin; Jasper, of this review; Albert, 
who is living in Oklahoma ; George, who is state solicitor of Nebraska : 
Hiram P., who is living in Fairbury; Joanna, of Daykin; Mrs. Sarah 
Guilford; and Caroline, who died in Otoe county. 

Jasper Helvey was but five years of age when his parents removed 
to Missouri, and he remained a resident of that state and Iowa until 
thirteen years of age, when he went with the family to Otoe county, 
Nebraska. It was on the 25th of May, 1859, when seventeen years of 
age, that he arrived in Jefferson county. He was an expert hunter in 
an early day and many deer, turkeys and buffalo fell before his sure 
aim. He spent a number of years upon the plains, making trips to gov- 
ernment forts, and he has had some narrow .escapes from the Indians. 
One one occasion he stopped to eat wild grapes on Blue river and look- 
ing across the stream he saw an Indian hiding in a patch of willow trees, 
drawing his bow to shoot him. Mr. Helvey, however, dodged under 
ci iver and managed to make his escape. Later he saw some government 
soldiers, to whom he reported the incident, but they refused to cross the 
river in pursuit of the red men, saying that they had lost one of their 
number in that patch of willows. 



576 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Mr. Helvey followed the plains for seven years and then turned his 
attention to farming interests in Jefferson county. He was married No- 
vember i, 1868. in Saline county. Nebraska, to Miss Sarah J. Powell, and 
they have traveled life's journey together most happily for thirty-six 
years, their mutual love and confidence increasing as the years have gone 
by, while the labors of Mr. Helvey have been ably supplemented by 
the careful management of his wife in her houshold affairs. She was 
born in Graysville, Ohio. June 10, 1853, a daughter of John and Amelia 
(Blair) Powell, both of whom were natives of Ohio and died in Jeffer- 
son county, Nebraska. They came to Nebraska in 1865. While living 
in the Buckeye state her father engaged in business as a packer of and 
dealer in tobacco, and in this state he followed farming. He was a 
Populist in his political faith and his religious belief was that of the 
Christian church. He died at the age of sixty-seven years and his wife 
passed away at the age of seventy-eight years. In their family were 
seven children, of whom four are living: Lucy: Mrs. Helvey: Thomas J., 
of Powell, Nebraska; and Emma. Those who have passed away are 
Reuben, who was a soldier of the Civil war: James D.. who also be- 
longed to the Union army; and Lucinda. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Helvey four children have been born: H. \Y.. who 
married Ada Shaw and has four children — Ethel. Hazel, Mabel and 
Lena; Ida, the wife of U. S. Moore, of White City. Kansas, by whom 
she has two children. Bertha and Alfred; Ora, who died at the age of 
three years ; and Emma, who passed away at about the same age. They 
were bright little girls and their loss was deeply felt. 

It was in the year 1878 that Mr. Helvey took up bis abode on the 
farm which he now owns. His landed possessions comprise thirteen 
hundred acres, and on his home farm is a fine country residence. There 
are good barns and sheds for the shelter of grain and stock, feed lots 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 577 

and pasture lands, a windmill, large scales for the weighing of the grain, 
the latest improved machinery, and in fact all modern equipments. 
There is also a natural grove of forest trees. The Pioneer Stock Farm 
is one of the best in southeastern Nebraska, and upon the place Mr. 
Helvey has from one to three hundred head of cattle. He also owns 
two mammoth Kentucky jacks and some fine Norman horses, and is 
one of the leading stock dealers of the state, carrying on a business 
which is now very extensive and profitable. For twenty years he was 
also engaged in buying stock with his brother, B. F., buying at Dayken, 
Powell, and K. C. and O. Junction. 

In politics Mr. Helvey is a stalwart Republican. He has frequently 
been a delegate to county and state conventions of his party, and has 
served as county clerk with credit to himself and satisfaction to his con- 
stituents in 1866 and 1867 and part of 1868, but while he is never re- 
miss in citizenship and in fact has been a co-operant factor in many 
measures for the public good, his attention is chiefly given to his busi- 
ness affairs, which are so capably and honorably managed as to bring 
to him a very desirable and gratifying financial return. 



GEORGE Y. SMITH. 

The life history of George Y. Smith demonstrates what can be 
accomplished through determined purpose and well directed and forceful 
energy. He has in his business career steadily advanced along lines of 
progress which have led to prosperity, and is to-day the owner of one 
of the finest farms in Richland precinct of Jefferson county. The land, 
rich and arable, quickly responds to the care and cultivation he bestows 



578 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

upon it. and yet it lias not been without much hard labor that it has been 
brought to its present state of productiveness. 

Air. Smith was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, on the 3d of 
Jul} - , 1849. His father, George C. Smith, was a native of the same 
province and a representative of an old and honorable German family. 
In his home neighborhood he was reared and educated, and in early 
manhood he married Miss Margaret Hoffman, who was also born in 
the same locality. They continued to reside in the fatherland until April, 
1865, when they crossed the Atlantic on a westward-bound steamship, 
arriving about the time that President Lincoln was assassinated. From 
New York they went by rail to Alton, Illinois, where the father pur- 
chased land and improved a good farm near Alton Junction. His en- 
tire life was devoted to agricultural pursuits, and his business dealings 
were characterized by the strictest integrity. Both he and his wife 
were members of the Lutheran church and reared their children in that 
faith. The father died at the advanced age of eighty-eight years and 
the mother passed away when seventy-seven years of age. They were 
the parents of four children: Henry, who is living in this county; Mrs. 
Anna Young, of California; George Y; and Mrs. Margaret Herman, 
of Alton, Illinois. 

In his native country George Y. Smith spent the first sixteen years 
of his life and during that period acquired his education in the public 
schools. He then accompanied his parents to the new world and con- 
tinued his studies in Alton, Illinois, thus becoming familiar with the 
English language and gaining broad knowledge that has well fitted him 
to cope with the practical and responsible duties of a business career. 
He worked upon the home farm in Madison county, Illinois, until twenty- 
one years of age, when he went to Leavenworth, Kansas, where he fol- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 579 

lowed the carpenter's trade for a time, and thus started out upon an in- 
dependent business career. 

Mr. Smith was married at Springdale, Leavenworth county, Kan- 
sas, to Miss Eudora Way, who was born near Richmond, Wayne county, 
Indiana, and was a daughter of a well known and prominent citizen 
of that county, Anthony Way, who was born in North Carolina in 1808 
and removed from there to Wayne county, Indiana, in 1828, becoming 
one of its pioneer settlers. He aided in its early development and was 
closely connected with its progress and improvement for many years. 
He married Ruby Lane, who was born in 181 4 and belonged to a well 
known family of Indiana, being a cousin of Colonel James Lane, who 
took so prominent a part in public affairs in Kansas prior to the Civil 
war, when the attempt was being made to secure the admission of the 
Istate into the Union as a slave state. Mrs. Way died when her daugh- 
ter Eudora was but four years of age. There were thirteen children in 
the family, of whom five are living: Dr. Susanna W. Doods, who is 
proprietor of the Hygiene Sanitarium, of St. Louis, Missouri ; Dr. 
Rachel Swain, proprietor of the Hygiene Sanitarium, of Indianapolis, 
Indiana ; Dr. Anna Lou Morton, of St. Louis, Missouri ; Mrs. Esther 
Barker, of Kansas; and Mrs. Eudora Smith. 

In the year 1873 Mr. Smith removed from Illinois to Nebraska 
settling in Meriden precinct, Jefferson county, securing a homestead 
claim where the town of Powell now stands. There he built a dugout, 
sixteen by twenty-four feet. He had then but two dollars in cash, in 
addition to which he possessed a hunting clog, a shotgun and a chest of 
carpenter's tools, but he possessed health, resolute will and strong de- 
termination, and these stood him in stead of capital. He set to work 1o 
make for himself and family a good living, and lie has ever had the 
hearty encouragement and sympathy of his wife. They lived on their 



5 8o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

first farm until 1880, when Mr. Smith sold that property and purchased 
land west of Daykin in Thayer county, Nebraska, there living until 1882, 
when he returned to Madison county, Illinois, continuing to make that 
district his place of residence for four years, when he came again to 
Nebraska and lived in Eureka township for some time. He purchased 
the town site of Daykin, laid one nine hundred and eighty town lots and 
sold them. He then bought one hundred and sixty acres of land in 
Richland precinct, and has since devoted his energies to the develop- 
ment of what has become one of the best farms of the locality. He 
built a modern residence, twenty-eight by thirty-two feet and two stories 
in height. It stands in the midst of a natural park on an excellent and 
elevated building site, and the lawn has been planted to blue grass and 
is adorned with fine oak trees. Shrubs and flowers also add to the beauty 
and attractive appearance of the place, and the home is tastefully and 
handsomely furnished, while within its walls an air of refinement and 
cordiality abounds. There is a large rock cellar and a spring-house 
upon the place, and the excellent spring water is piped to the residence 
and also to the barns for the use of the stock. There is a fish pond on 
the farm, besides all the necessary buildings, which are substantial, com- 
modious and always kept in good repair. The farm is of rich bottom 
land and woodland and a creek crosses the place, which is well watered 
thereby. For twenty-five years he has operated a steam thresher and has 
found this profitable work, in addition to which he derives a good income 
from his own richly cultivated fields. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Smith have been born four children: Frank, the 
eldest, is married and lives upon a farm of his own near the old home- 
stead ; Lizzie, the wife of George Stewart, of Powell, Nebraska, died 
August 21, 1904, at Indianapolis, Indiana, and she was buried in 
Keenev cemetery, near Powell; Mollie is the wife of Homer Bacon, of 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 581 

Eureka precinct; and Charles, who is in the railroad service, makes his 
home in Alton, Illinois. They also adopted a daughter, Viola. Their 
children were carefully reared and have become useful and valued mem- 
bers of society in the various communities in which they reside. Mrs. 
Stewart had two children: Mira Eudora and Cameron Stewart, while 
Mrs. Bacon has a daughter, Mary Elizabeth Bacon. 

Mr. Smith is a Republican in politics, and belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd FelloAvs 2nd to the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. He is a patriotic, public-spirited citizen, deeply interested in 
the welfare of his community and doing whatever he can for its im- 
provement. His business career demonstrates the possiblities which 
this state offers to the man of determination and energy, for through 
well directed activity Mr. Smith has won a very desirable measure of 
success. 



JAMES S. MOLES. 



1271403 



James S. AToles is numbered among the first settlers of Jefferson 
county. He secured a homestead claim here in 1869 and for many 
years has resided in Meriden township, where he has carried on agri- 
cultural pursuits and as a public-spirited citizen has contributed to the 
general welfare, taking deep and helpful interest in everything that has 
calculated to benefit his community. 

He was born in Carroll county, Ohio, in 1842, a son of Francis 
Moles, who was a native of Ireland and was reared in that country. 
After coming to the United States he married Miss Rebecca Fresh, 
who was born in Germany, but died in Muscatine county, Iowa. Francis 
Moles departed this life at the advanced age of seventy-nine years, 
while his wife passed away at the age of sixty-eight years. In politics 



582 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

he was a Republican, and in religious faith his wife was a Methodist. 
This worthy couple became the parents of ten children, five sons and 
five daughters, namely: Mary A., William, Sarah, John, Margaret, 
Frank, Eliza, Harriet, James S. and Wilson. Of this number Frank- 
was a soldier of the Thirtieth Ohio Infantry, Wilson was a soldier 
of the Sixth Ohio Heavy Artillery and James S. Moles was also an ad- 
vocate of the Union cause, so that the family was well represented in 
the Union troops, to whom the country owes an unbounded debt of grat- 
itude. 

James S. Moles was reared in Jackson county, Ohio, upon the home 
farm, and is indebted to the public schools of that locality for the edu- 
cational privileges which he enjoyed. He enlisted in Jackson county, 
Ohio, in February, 1862, in response to the president's call for sixty 
thousand men and was assigned to duty with the boys in blue of Com- 
pany C, Fifty-third Ohio Infantry. The company was commanded by 
Captain Jacob Davis and the regiment by Colonel Apler, who 
later was succeeded by Colonel Jones. They were for a time 
at Camp Diamond, Ohio, and thence were sent to Paducah, Ken- 
tucky. Mr. Moles was first under fire at the battle of Shiloh and 
he later participated in the siege of Corinth and the battles of Memphis 
and the raid near Vicksburg. The troops afterward returned to the 
Black River bridge at Jackson, Tennessee, and later aided in besieging 
Vicksburg until the fall of that city on the 4th of July, 1863. Mr. Moles 
was also at Chickamauga, and took part in the battle against General 
Pemberton's division at Scottsville, Alabama. Later he was granted 
a veteran furlough, which he spent at home, and when his term of rest 
had ended he returned to the south and took part in the engagements 
at Lookout Mountain, New Hope Church, Burnt Hickory and Resaca. 
He was also in the battle of Atlanta when General McPherson fell and 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 583 

later he went to Savannah and participated in the capture of Fort Mc- 
Allister and the battles of Jonesboro and Richmond. He likewise par- 
ticipated in the grand review in Washington, D. C, the most celebrated 
military pageant ever seen on the western hemisphere, and then went to 
Little Rock, Arkansas, on reconstruction duty. On more than one occa- 
sion his clothing was pierced by bullets, and he had many narrow escapes, 
but was never wounded. He received an honorable discharge and with 
a most creditable military record returned to his home. 

Mr. Moles was married on the 1st of March, 1864, to Miss Abigail 
Hilighass, who was born in Pennsylvania, but spent her girlhood days 
in Ohio. Her mother died when Mrs. Moles was twenty-seven years 
of age, leaving four children : William, who was a soldier of Company 
K, Thirty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry; Sarah E. ; and John, deceased. 
Her father was Jacob Hilighass. 

In 1866 Mr. Moles removed to Muscatine county, Iowa, where he 
remained for three years, and in 1869 he came to Jefferson county, Ne- 
braska, where he secured a homestead claim. Upon this he built a house 
fourteen by twenty feet and later this was supplanted by a better resi- 
dence. He now has a good two-story dwelling well furnished and 
situated upon a good building site. There is a grove around the place, 
and in the rear are substantial barns and sheds for the shelter of grain 
and stock. There is also a good wooden mill, and the greater part of his 
farm, comprising one hundred and sixty acres of land, is under a high 
state of cultivation. He keeps both cattle and hogs, and his sale of stock 
as well as of grain brings to him a good financial return annually. He 
was for five years in business in Fairbury, after which he returned to the 
farm and has since made it his home. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Moles have been born the following children: 
Mary Frances; Sarah Ellen; William Edward, deceased; James Wilson, 



584 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

who has also passed away ; Adrianna ; Annette Candace, deceased ; Don 
Pedro; Charles J.; Thomas R. : Roscoe; and C. K. 

Mr. Moles is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and with the Modern Woodmen of America and he also belongs to the 
( irand Army of the Republic. His life has in a way passed unevent- 
fully, yet it has been characterized by many qualities that are worthy of 
the highest commendation and of emulation. As a soldier he was true 
and loyal, never faltering in his allegiance to the old flag and the cause 
it represented, and in business life he has been found reliable, accurate 
and energetic. 



WILLIAM M. GILMORE. 

William M. Gilmcre, proprietor of the Gilmore fine stock farm, is 
extensively engaged in the raising of Chester White hogs and Southdown 
sheep. Through his business activity he has contributed not only to his 
individual success, but also to the prosperity of the county, for by rais- 
ing fine stock he has also advanced the prices paid and thus the entire 
county has benefited thereby. He has resided in Jefferson county since 
1877, a °d It's business ability and enterpise have made him one of the 
substantial citizens of this part of the state. 

Mr. Gilmore was born in Harrison county, Ohio, near Cadiz on 
the 17th of August, 1837, and belonged to an early family of that part 
of the state. His father, Cyrus Gilmore, was born in the east and was 
a son of William Gilmore, who removed to the west in 1797 when 
blazed trees were used to mark the way. One of the Gilmores was an 
officer in the war of 1812, serving under General Harrison and was also 
with Commodore Perry at the battle of Lake Champlain. Another mem- 
ber of the family served in the Revolutionary war. The family is of 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 585 

Scotch extraction and of Protestant faith. Cyrus Gilmore. the father, 
married Miss Hannah Moore, who was horn on the 13th of April, 1813, 
in Harrison count)-. Ohio, and was a daughter of William Moore, who 
died in Cadiz, Ohio, at the age of sixty-six years. In order to provide 
for his family Cyrus Gilmore followed the occupation of farming. He 
gave his political allegiance to the Democracy and died at the age of 
seventy-two years. His wife, who is a consistent member of the Bap- 
tist church, is npw living in Illinois at the age of ninety years. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cyrus Gilmore were the parents of nine children, five sons and 
four daughters, of whom six are living. 

William M. Gilmore was reared in Harrison county, Ohio, upon 
the home farm, and early became familiar with all the duties and labors 
that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. His education was acquired in 
the public schools and in the fall of 1857 he removed to Marshall county,, 
Illinois, where he was employed at farm labor for some time. During 
the period of the Civil war, however, he put aside all business and per- 
sonal considerations in order to espouse the cause of the Union and 
enlisted in August, 1862, as a member of Battalion A, of the Third 
Regiment of Light Artillery, under command of Captain D. F. Vaughn. 
The regiment went into camp at Camp Butler, Springfield, Illinois, and 
thence was ordered south to Jackson, Tennessee. Mr. Gilmore partici- 
pated in an engagement with General Forrest's troops at Bolivar, Ten- 
nessee, and was on duty in guarding railroad bridges until the 4th of 
July, 1863, when he went to Helena, Arkansas. Later he fought the 
troops under General Price at Arkansas Post, and he was captured at 
Little Rock, Arkansas. Subsequently he took part in the battle at 
Prairie Du Ann, and at Condoin, Arkansas, and later returned to Little 
Rock. He participated in the battle of Duvalls Bluff and in two en- 
gagements near the railroad in that vicinity. He was also in other 



586 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

important engagements of note in Arkansas and saw active service in 
the arrest and pursuit of prisoners. He faced many of the hardships of 
war, and when hostilities were over was honorably discharged and re- 
turned to his home. He was a lieutenant of the company and made for 
himself a gallant record as an officer. 

On the 30th of November, 1865, Mr. Gilmore was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary Campbell, who has been a devoted wife and help- 
mate to him. She was reared in Illinois for twelve years and attended 
the public schools there. Her father, Aaron Lyle Campbell, was born 
near Uniontown, Ohio, and was of Scotch parentage. He married Miss 
Mamie McAdam, a daughter of George McAdam, who was a soldier of 
the war of 1812. On leaving the Buckeye state Mrs. Gilmore's parents 
removed to Illinois and the father died at Ford county, that state, at 
the age of seventy-two years. He was a farmer by occupation and al- 
ways carried on agricultural pursuits in order to provide for his family. 
His political allegiance was given to the Republican party, and in relig- 
ious faith he was a Presbyterian and served as an elder of the church. 
His widow still survives him and is now living in Lewiston, Illinois, at 
the age of eighty-five years. In the family were seven children, six of 
'whom, two sons and four daughters, reached years of maturity. 

Mr. Gilmore removed from Illinois to Nebraska in 1877. and set- 
tled upon his present farm twenty-four years ago. He has two hundred 
and eighty acres of fine land, constituting one of the best improved 
farms in this portion of the state. Upon his place is a good house, a 
very extensive barn, a fine orchard, good groves and. in fact, all mod- 
ern improvements, representing an investment of thirty-five hundred 
dollars. He raises Chester White hogs and has won many premiums 
at the state fairs. He also raises Southdown sheep. In his business 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 5S7 

he has been very successful owing to his unremitting industry, laudable 
ambition and well directed efforts. 

To Mr. and Mrs Gilmore have been born thirteen children : Hetta 
E., who is a successful teacher in the public schools of Fairbury; Deda 
M., who is also engaged in teaching in Fairbury; James C. ; Edward 
D.; Charles E. ; Ella M. ; Luletta E. ; Ella M.; Garfield; Wallie Birney; 
Harry; Pearl; and John V. One of the sons, Edward Gilmore, was a 
soldier of the Spanish-American war, serving with the Second Nebraska 
Regiment under command of Colonel A. J. Bills and Captain Mc- 
Donald. 

Mr. Gilmore is a stanch Republican in his political views and has 
served as a member of the school board. He also belongs to Russell 
Post, G. A. R., of Fairbury, and he and has wife hold membership in 
the Presbyterian church. He has a wide acquaintance in the county 
where he has now lived for more than a quarter of a century, and where 
he has so directed his efforts as to overcome all difficulties and obstacles 
in his path and work his way steadily upward to success. 



JACOB K. DILLER. 

Jacob K. Diller is numbered among the pioneer settlers of Jeffer- 
son county, Nebraska. He came to this state in October. 1870, secured 
a homestead claim and took up his abode thereon in July, 1872. He has 
since devoted his energies to its improvement. He found here pioneer 
conditions such as are always met with by the frontiersman. The land 
was wild and unimproved, the homes were widely scattered, and there 
were many difficulties and hardships to be borne in reclaiming the dis- 



588 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

trict for the purposes of civilization and planting the seeds of progress 
and improvement. 

Mr. Diller is a native of Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred 
in Cumberland county near Carlisle, on the 17th of January, 1845 
His paternal grandfather, Francis Diller. Sr., was born in Pennsylvania, 
but was of German ancestry. He served his country as a soldier in the 
war of 1812 and both he and his wife died in the Keystone state. Fran- 
cis Miller. Jr., the father of our subject, was born in Cumberland 
county. Pennsylvania, was reared under the parental roof and early be- 
came familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the 
agriculturist. He chose farming as a life work, and it was through 
his industry and enterprise in that direction that he was enabled to 
provide for his family. He married Miss Nancy Kamory, who was 
also born in Pennsylvania and was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mathew 
Kamory. both of whom spent their entire lives in the Keystone state. 
Francis Diller and his wife came to Jefferson county. Nebraska, in 1873, 
establishing their home in Fairbury, where they continued to reside un- 
til called to their final rest; the father passing away in Fairbury at the 
age of sixty-seven years, while the mother's death occurred when she 
was eighty-one years of age. She held membership in the Methodist 
church and lived a consistent Christian life. In their family were ten 
children: Henry; Susan; Eliza; Amanda; Jacob; Andrew, who was a 
soldier of the Civil war; Mary A.; Levi; Matilda; and Mattie. 

Jacob K. Diller was reared in the usual manner of farmer lads. 
At an early age he began work in the fields, and the summer months 
were devoted to the task of plowing, planting and harvesting, while 
in the winter seasons he attended the public schools. Experience and 
observation in later life have largely added to his knowledge, making 
him a well informed man. He was a very voting man at the time of the 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 589 

outbreak of the Civil war, and on the 6th of April, 1S65, he donned 
the blue uniform of the nation and became a member of the One Hun- 
dred and First Pennsylvania Infantry under Captain Wolfe. The regi- 
ment was stationed at Roanoke, and at Newbury, North Carolina, and 
he was with the army until the 25th of June. 1865. For a time he was 
ill prior to his return, and was then on detail duty at the hospital for 
some weeks. After the close of hostilities he returned to his old home 
in Pennsylvania, where he remained until 1869, when he went to Cham- 
paign county, Illinois. There he worked at the carpenter's trade with 
his brother Henry at Rantoul, but afterward turned his attention 
to farming in that portion of the state. At a later date he again went 
to Pennsylvania, but subsequently returned to Champaign county, Illinois. 
Mr. Diller was married near Rantoul in that county on the 9th of 
June, 1870, the lady of his choice being Miss Mary A. White, who 
was born in Jersey county, Illinois, and spent her girlhood days there, 
the public school system of the state affording her her educational privi- 
leges. Her father, George White, was born in New York and mar- 
ried Mrs. Matilda Daugherty Ott, who was a widow. She was born in 
Mississippi, and was a daughter of Thomas Daugherty, a farmer who 
belonged to an old southern family. Mr. White died in Nebraska at 
the age of sixty-nine years. He was a worthy member of the United 
Brethren church and was honored and respected by all who knew him. 
His wife, who passed away at the age of sixty-one years, was loved for 
her many good traits of heart and mind and her generous hospitality. 
In their family were eleven children, seven of whom reached adult age. 
To Mr. and Mrs. White were born seven children: Mary; Arvilla, now 
deceased; Lucy, who is living in St. Joseph, Missouri; Joseph, William 
and Addie, all deceased; and George White, who resides in Missouri. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Diller were ten in number: George F. ; 



59° SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Mattie Eliza; Levi S. ; Anna M. ; Odella ; Ina ; William H. ; Charles 
Edward; and Robert Carlyle; and Mina May, who was a bright girl 
of genial and affectionate nature and died at the age of twelve years. 

As before stated Mr. Diller became a resident of Jefferson county, 
Nebraska, in 1872. He had many difficulties and hardships with which 
to contend in the early days of his residence here. The hot winds of the 
summer, the blizzards and the intense cold of winter all served to ren- 
der his efforts of little avail, but as the years progressed he triumphed 
over the hard conditions of frontier life and is now the possessor of 
a valuable and productive farm. In 1892 he erected a fine modern resi- 
dence at a cost of thirty-five hundred dollars, and in its furnishings it 
indicates the cultured and refined taste of the family. It is supplied with 
all modern equipments and underneath the house is a cement and brick- 
cellar. The residence is heated by furnace, and diamond window panes 
add to its attractive appearance as well as serve the purpose of lighting. 
The house stands upon a natural building site and is indeed one of the 
attractive features of the landscape. Upon the farm is an orchard of 
four acres, an excellent grove and everything about the place is in 
splendid condition, indicating the careful supervision of the progressive 
owner. Both Mr. and Mrs. Diller possess many sterling traits of char- 
acter which have rendered them so popular with a large circle of ac- 
quaintances and have gained them many warm friends. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 591 

ISAAC N. THOMPSON. 

Isaac N. Thompson is an honored veteran of the Civil war and is 
now prominent in Grand Army circles. He is one of the honored pio- 
neer settlers of Jefferson county, where he has made his home since 
March, 1868, and in this state he is a recognized leader among those 
who fought for the Union at the time of the country's peril. He was 
born in Ridgefarm, Vermilion county, Illinois, on the 25th of February, 
1838. The family is of Scotch-Irish lineage, and the grandfather of 
our subject was John F. Thompson. The father, James W. Thompson. 
was born in Tennessee and after arriving at years of maturity wedded 
Irena A. Davis, who was born in North Carolina and was a cousin of 
Jefferson Davis, the president of the southern Confederacy. Her father 
was a soldier of the war of 1812. and was killed in the battle of New 
Orleans, while serving under General Jackson. For many years Mr. 
and Mrs. James W. Thompson resided in Illinois, and the father's 
death occurred in that state in 1864, while his son Isaac was absent in 
the army. The mother passed away in 1901 when eighty-five years of 
age. Both were honored and respected by all, and their memory is yet 
enshrined in the hearts of many who knew them. James W. Thomp- 
son was a stanch advocate of abolition and of the Union cause, and in 
an early day he was a personal friend of Abraham Lincoln, Owen Love- 
joy and many others of the prominent and distinguished opponents of 
slavery. On the organization of the Republican party to prevent the 
further extension of slavery he joined its ranks, and he was ever most 
loyal to his political convictions and to his honest opinions, bearing 
upon every question. To Mr. and Mrs. James W. Thompson were born 
eight children: Henry C, who was a soldier of the Twenty-fifth Illi- 
nois Infantry and is now living in Colorado ; Isaac N. ; Mrs. Maria L. 



592 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Rhode, of North Dakota; Mrs. Mary J. Frazier, of Colorado; John F., 
who was a soldier of the Seventy-ninth Illinois Infantry and is now 
probate judge of Washington county, Kansas, where he settled at an 
early day; Mary J., who is living in Liberty, Colorado; Laura E., of 
Newkirk, Oklahoma; and Charles D., of California. 

Isaac N. Thompson was reared upon the old home farm, and les- 
sons of industry and economy were early instilled into his mind. His 
literary education was acquired in the public schools, and he has greatly 
supplemented his knowledge by reading, observation and experience in 
later years. On starting out in life on his own account he followed the 
pursuit to which he had been reared, and has always been an agricul- 
turist. He sought as a companion and helpmate for life's journey Miss 
Julia A. Haworth, and they were married at Danville, Illinois, on the 
31st of March, 1859. She has been to him a faithful companion and 
helpmate on life's journey for forty-five years, her encouragement and 
aid being of great assistance to him. She was born, reared and educated 
in Illinois. Her parents were Eli and Lydia (Dillon) Haworth, the 
former a native of Ohio, while the latter was a representative of an 
old Tennessee family. Both, however, died in Illinois. 

At the time of the Civil war Isaac N. Thompson put aside all busi- 
ness and personal considerations in order to espouse his country's cause. 
Leaving his family in Vermilion county, Illinois, he enlisted on the 12th 
of July, 1862, as a member of Company A, Seventy-ninth Illinois In- 
fantry, under command of Captain T. Clark, who was later promoted 
to lieutenant-colonel. The regiment was commanded by Colonel Gunip 
ami went into camp at Mattoon, Illinois, but after twenty days was sent 
to Louisville, Kentucky, and Mr. Thompson was first under fire at 
Perryville. Later he participated in the battles of Crab Orchard, Edge- 
field and Stone River. He served for a time under Generals McCook 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 593 

and Rosecrans and he took part in the Tullahoma campaign, participat- 
ing in the battles of Chickamauga, Fayetteville, Missionary Ridge, 
Chattanooga and Knoxville, going to the latter place in order to relieve 
the troops under General Burnside. Later his regiment was ordered to 
Loudoun. Tennessee, and he participated in the battles of Buzzard's 
Roost.. Pulaski, Tennessee, Frankfort and Nashville.. Lie participated 
in the severe fight with General Hood's forces at Frank fort and later 
the regiment was ordered to Decatur, Alabama. He also was at Re- 
saca, siege of Atlanta and Jonesboro and other battles. He was 
wounded at Liberty Gap June 25, 1863, was wounded at Chickamauga 
September 19, 1863, and was captured at Stone River December 31, 
1862, by General Joe Wheeler, but was recaptured on the battlefield by 
his own command. Mr. Thompson was honorably discharged from the 
service on June 12, 1865, at which time he held the rank or orderly ser- 
geant. Fie was brave and loyal, never faltering in the performance of 
any duty, and his military record is one of which he has every reason 
to be proud. 

Following the close of the war Mr. Thompson rejoined his family 
in Illinois and lived for a time in Iroquois county, that state, but in 
1867 came to Nebraska, and in March, 1868, secured a homestead 
claim in Antelope precinct, Jefferson county. ■ Here he began the de- 
velopment of his farm, and although surrounded by pioneer conditions 
he bravely met the hardships which devolved upon him and in course of 
time his labors were rewarded with gratifying success. In the year 
1869 he was elected to the position of county clerk and served two 
years. He was then nominated again, but a fusion element defeated 
him. After two years, however, he was again before the public as a 
candidate for the office and he was elected for a term of two years, 



594 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

during which he served with credit to himself and satisfaction to his 
constituents. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thompson have been born six children : Homer 
II., who is now a railroad conductor; Alice, the wife of Gross Nicklaus; 
Mrs. Lillie I. Spence, of Fairbury, Nebraska; Edward P., who is also 
in the railroad employ; Charles G., a railroad man; and Anna L. They 
also lost two children: Samuel S., who was born in October, 1862, 
during his father's absence at the war. and died ere his return; and 
Abbie E., who married J. E. Burge, died September 9, 1894. The 
family is well known in Fairbury and Jefferson county and their friends 
are many. Mr. Thompson is particularly well known in political and 
Grand Army circles, and is a stanch Republican who takes a very deep 
and active interest in the welfare and success of his party. He has served 
as commander of Russell Post No. yy, G. A. R , and he was indentified 
with the Sixth Grand Army post of the United States, which was lo- 
cated at Loda, Illinois. Mr. Thompson served as quartermaster under 
General C. F. Steele when the latter was state commander of Nebraska, 
and he is now a member of General Black's staff. He served as ser- 
geant of arms in the state legislature in 1886-7, anc ^ at a h times he is 
loyal and true to every trust reposed in him, whether it is of a public 
or private nature. His friends know him to be a man of sterling worth 
and of the utmost reliability, and he enjoys the unqualified confidence 
and the respect of all who know him. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 595 

ALMON M. AKIN. 

Almon M. Akin, who formerly filled the position of county com- 
missioner in Jefferson county, is one of the old pioneer settlers of Ne- 
braska, having first come to this state in 1856, when it was still in the ter- 
ritorial period of its existence. He was born in Ontario county, New- 
York, at Allen's Hill on the 30th of April, 1833. His father, Almon 
G. Akin was also a native of the Empire state and was of Scotch line- 
age. He served as a soldier of the war of 1S12, and during his active 
business carreer followed the occupation of farming. He married Miss 
Mary Bentley, also a native of New York and a representative of an 
old family of that state. At a later date he removed with his wife and 
children to Indiana and subsequently went to Michigan, where his 
death occurred when he was fifty-one years of age. He voted with the 
Republican party, and he and his wife were communicants of the Epis- 
copal church. Mrs. Mary Akin departed this life at the age of eighty- 
seven years, and her death was deeply regretted, for she possessed many 
good qualities of heart and mind that had endeared her to a large cir- 
cle of friends. They were the parents of six children, five sons and a 
daughter, of whom five are now living. 

Almon M. Akin spent his early boyhood days in New York, then 
accompanied his parents on their removal to Vigo county, Indiana, and 
sebsequently went with them when the family home was transferred to 
Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin. He is indebted to the public school 
system of the country for the educational privileges which he enjoyed 
in his youth. He first came to Nebraska in 1856 and made his way to 
Brownville, this state. In 1859, he started for California, making the 
overland journey with an ox team and arriving at his destination after 
three and a half months of travel over the hot sandy plains of the west 



596 SOUTHEASTERN XE BR ASK A. 

and through the mountain passes. He saw many Indians while en 
route and experienced many of the hardships and privations incident 
to a trip to the Pacific coast at that time. 

While residing in California Mr. Akin was united in marriage to 
Miss Mar}- Mayor, who was descended from old families of both the 
highlands and lowlands of Scotland. She was born in the land of the 
heather, a daughter of William and Margaret (McCorbie) Mavor, both 
of whom were natives of Scotland, where the father's death occurred. 
The mother afterward came to this country and died in the far west 
at the very advanced age of ninety-six years. The marriage of Mr. and 
Mrs. Akin was blessed with six children : Lucy I., Alice and Grace, who 
have been popular school teachers ; Bertha, who is also successfully en- 
gaged in teaching school; Malcomb M.. who was formerly a teacher 
and is now in Fairmount, Nebraska, where he is successfully engaged 
in the practice of dentistry; and Almon G., who is engaged in the 
operation of a part of the home farm. The children were all provided 
with good educational privileges and have become respected members 
of society. 

Mr. Akin owns four hundred and eight) - acres of land, and came to 
this farm in the winter of 1871. Mr. Akin gives his political allegiance 
to the Republican party, but on the Greenback ticket he was elected 
county commissioner, in which position he served most creditably, dis- 
charging his duties with promptness and fidelity. He belongs to the 
Presbyterian church, of which his wife and daughters are also mem- 
bers. He has ever been honorable in his relations with his fellow men. 
never taking advantage of any one in a trade transaction, and he has 
the unqualified confidence and respect of all with whom he has been 
associated. Culture and refinement are characteristic of his home, and 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 597 

the family occupies an enviable position in social circles of Jefferson 
county. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE C. VANCE. 

Captain George C. Vance, whose residence in southeastern Nebras- 
ka dates from August, i860, was born in Baring, Maine, on the 22d 
bf April, 1816. He is descended from Scotch-Irish ancestry, and his 
grandfather settled at Londonderry, New Hampshire, at a very early per- 
iod in the colonization of the new world. William Vance, the father of 
Captain Vance, was born at Londonderry, New Hampshire, and became 
a prominent attorney of that state. He served as a soldier in the 
Revolutionary war under General Benedict Arnold before that com- 
mander proved a traitor to his country, and during his services sus- 
tained five bullet wounds. He was a man of much influence in political 
circles and bis opinions carried weight concerning many matters which 
affected the general progress and public welfare. He married Charlotte 
Holland, also a native of New Hampshire, who died when her son 
George C. was twelve years of age. leaving five children. The others 
are Nancy; Robert, who was a soldier of the Mexican war and a suc- 
cessful business man, whose death occurred in New York; William, 
who was a soldier of the Mexican war, a sergeant in a Massachusetts 
regiment; and Charlotte, the wife of United States Senator Morrill, 
of Maine. 

Captain George C. Vance was reared in the Pine Tree state and 
had the advantages of the influences and surroundings of a good home 
and helpful parental training. He was trained to habits of industry 
and honesty and remained witli his parents until seventeen years of 
age, when in 1833 he went to sea upon a whaling vessel, which rounded 



598 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Cape Horn and which returned with forty-two hundred barrels of sperm 
oil. In 1849 ne sailed on a California packet carrying two hundred and 
forty-seven passengers for the gold fields. This vessel also rounded 
Cape Horn. The vessel stopped at Rio de Janeiro, thence after sailing 
for one hundred and sixty days reached Valparaiso and sixty days later 
arrived at San Francisco. Mr. Vance spent some time in California. 
On his voyages he has seen many parts of the world, visiting the Sand- 
wich Islands in 1834. He also visited the Fiji Islands, the Society Is- 
lands. New Zealand, Morenzee Island, Sunday Island, the island of 
Pitcairn, sailed on the Arctic ocean, visited Japan, China, the Philippines 
and Manila, and, in fact, has sailed on all the seas on the face of the 
globe. He was at Japan when the United States opened its ports. 
He bought a sailing vessel for trade with the Sandwich Islands, and 
he took the first shipload of sweet potatoes to California. He was en- 
gaged in trading for some time there and later he returned to the east, 
where he took charge of a ship loaded with corn for Ireland. This 
vessel, however, was wrecked off the coast of Italy. Captain Vance then 
returned to the United States. From the time that he first sailed upon 
the whaling voyage he was continuously advanced until as commander 
of vessels he became an important representative of marine interests. 

At the time of the Civil war Captain Vance espoused the cause of 
the Union and served in General French's division. He acted as quar- 
termaster of the brigade, ranking as captain and his commission was 
signed by Abraham Lincoln and Edwin Stanton. He served most ac- 
ceptably, discharging the duties that devolved upon him with the ut- 
most lovalty and when the war was over he received an honorable dis- 
charge. 

Captain Vance later went to England in the mercantile trade, and 
then located at Readfield, Maine, near Augusta, where he conducted a 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 599 

good business for a number of years. In 1869 be came west to Nebras- 
ka, at which time Fairbury contained one shanty. He secured land in 
Jefferson county and also purchased a large tract in Gage county. Ne- 
braska, southeast of Beatrice, where he engaged in farming for eigh- 
teen months. He then came to Jefferson county, where he bought and 
operated over eight hundred acres of land, placing five hundred acres 
under a high state of cultivation. He always had great faith in the 
future of Nebraska and did much to improve Richland precinct and 
promote its substantial development. About fifteen years ago he retired 
from active business, built a nice home in Fairbury and is now enjoying 
the comforts of life which come to him as the reward of his earnest and 
well directed labor. 

Captain Vance was married at the age of twenty-two years to 
Susan F. Hanscom, of Mount Vernon, Maine, who was one of a family 
of twelve children. She died at the age of eighty-two years. She was 
greatly esteemed for her kindness of heart and mind. She possessed 
a sunny disposition and lovable nature, and through sixty years of mar- 
ried life she never spoke an unkind word to her husband. She was 
loved by all who knew her and her entire career was in harmony with 
her professions as a member of the Baptist church. In her life she 
indeed exemplified her Christian faith, and all who knew her held her 
in the highest esteem and entertained for her warm affection. She 
left six children: Mrs. Jane Dearborn, who is a widow residing in 
Beatrice, Nebraska; Mrs. Mary Converse, of Grand Island, Nebraska; 
George H. ; Mrs. Lydia Tinkham ; Mrs. Emma Wells, of Rockdale, 
Massachusetts; and Phronie, Readville, Maine. Captain Vance is a 
strong Republican, having supported the party since casting a ballot 
in 1856 for its first candidate, John C. Fremont. He is now the oldest 
member of Fairbury Post, G. A. R., and is one of the most honored and 



600 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

respected citizens of Jefferson county. Like many who sail the seas 
and have faced its storms and its calms he has an abhorence for all that 
is sham and ostentatious in life and is ever true and reliable. Although 
now so well advanced in years he has a soldierly bearing and frank- and 
Sfenial nature which have endeared him to many friend?. 



NATHANIEL E. DAVIS. 

Nathaniel E. Davis, one of the intelligent and highly esteemed 
citizens of Fairbury, is widely known throughout Jefferson county, hav- 
ing taken an active and helpful part in its improvement and upbuilding. 
For long years he served as county surveyor, and he has always been 
the advocate of progress along educational, material, social and moral 
lines. He was born in Niagara county. New York, on the 21st of 
January, 1834. his parents being Nathaniel and Sarah A. (Holmes) 
Davis, the former born near Saco, Maine, while the mother's birth oc- 
curred in Cazenovia county. New York, on January 19, 1812. The 
father followed agricultural pursuits throughout his business career 
and gave his political allegiance to the Whig party. He died at the 
age of seventy-one years, while his wife passed away at the age of 
sixty years. In their family were the following children: Sarah; Sam- 
uel, who was a soldier in an Illinois battery and died at LaGrange, Ten- 
nessee, of a fever; Nathaniel E. ; Henry; Eliza, deceased; Daniel 
Holmes, who was a soldier of the Twenty-eighth New York Infantry 
and died in the service; Mary E. ; Luther C. ; and William E. 

Nathaniel E. Davis was reared upon his home farm and early be- 
came familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agri- 
culturist. He acquired a good education and when eighteen years of 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 60 1 

age began teaching. In 1855 he removed to Ogle county, Illinois, where 
he worked at the carpenter's trade through the summer months and in 
the winter season was employed as an instructor in the public schools 
of that locality. He was there residing at the time of the outbreak 
of the Civil war. and his patriotic spirit being aroused he enlisted in 
Ogle county, Illinois, near Rockford, in the month of August, 1862. 
in response to President Lincoln's call for sixty thousand men. He 
was assigned to duty with Company K, Ninety-second Illinois Infantry, 
in command of Captain Woodcock and Colonel S. D. Atkins. The reg- 
iment went to Rockford. Illinois, and was subsequently sent to Ken- 
tucky and thence to Tennessee. Mr. Davis participated in the battle 
of Chickamauga, and he served for some time as division postmaster. 
He went with General Sherman on the celebrated march to the sea 
and at one time acted as one of General Rosecran's body guard. Tie 
was also in the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, Resaca, Peach Tree Creek, 
Burnt Hickory, and proceeded on to Atlanta. There he was captured 
by six rebels just before the battle on die 6th of September, 1864. He 
was afterward taken to Andersonville, to Black Hawk and to Florence, 
where he was exchanged. He suffered the hardships of rebel prison 
life to a greater extent than tongue can tell. He was so ill at the 
time that he was exchanged that he did not realize that he was granted 
his liberty. He was then taken on a transport to Annapolis and on to 
Baltimore, Maryland, where he lay ill in a hospital for some time. 
When he was able to be moved he was honorably discharged at the 
close of the war at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and returned to his home 
with a most creditable military record. 

Once more Mr. Davis went to Illinois for a short time. He did 
not remain in that state for any length of period, however, but came to 
Nebraska, and in 1865 secured a homestead claim and established his 



602 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

residence here, locating in Antelope precinct, Jefferson count)'. Here 
he built a log shanty with a dirt roof, but though the home was small, 
hospitality always reigned supreme there and the latch string ever hung 
outside. There were many hardships and difficulties to be met. There 
were the hot winds of summer, the blizzards of winter and there was 
also a grasshopper scourge in 1874, but Mr. Davis persevered and with 
courageous spirit worked on year after year until he had developed a 
line and paying farm of two hundred acres. To this he added many 
modern improvements, and he now owns a valuable farming property. 
He also has a modern home in the town fitted up in good taste. For 
twenty years he served as county surveyor, and in this capacity he 
came to know almost every man in Jefferson county. He was the first 
county surveyor. 

In 1869 Mr. Davis returned to the east for his bride, and on the 
1st of December of that year was married in Niagara county to Miss 
Harriet E. Holden. a well educated lady, who had formerly been a 
successful teacher. She was born, reared and educated in Niagara 
county, and was a daughter of Ezra S. Holden, a native of Massa- 
chusetts. The paternal grandfather, Ezra Holden, Sr., was also born 
in Massachusetts and married Mrs. Deborah Hoar, a relative of the 
United States Senator Hoar, of Massachusetts. Their son, Ezra S. 
Holden, was reared in New Hampshire and was there married to Eliza- 
beth Davis, a native of that state and a daughter of Jason Davis, of 
New Hampshire. To Ezra S. and Elizabeth Holden were born twelve 
children, of whom one died in infancy. The others are Mrs. Nathaniel 
Davis ; Ezra, who was a soldier of a New York regiment and was 
killed while defending the Union cause; Orlando, who was also one of 
the boys in blue in the Union army; Evander; Martha; Jason D. ; 
Abner ; Deborah ; Lucinda ; Relief, deceased ; and Josephine, who died 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 603 

in childhood. The father passed away when fifty-six years of age. 
His early political support was given the Whig party and he afterward 
endorsed the principles of the Republican party. His life was ever 
honorable' and upright, and he was a worthy Christian gentleman, who 
held membership in the Presbyterian church and served for many years 
as one of its elders. His wife, also a member of the Presbyterian church, 
died at the age of sixty-seven years. To Mr. and Mrs. Davis have 
been born the following children : Lucinda, who died at the age of nine 
months; Jabez E.. a resident of Canada; Robert E., who is a student 
in Hastings College at Hastings, Nebraska ; Jason, who is living in the 
old homestead farm ; and Sarah E., who is one of the successful and 
popular teachers of Jefferson county. 

Mr. Davis is a member of Fairbury Post, G. A. R., and his wife 
belongs to the Relief Corps. She is also a member of the Presbyterian 
church and the family is prominent and popular in Fairbury and 
throughout Jefferson county. Mr. Davis is a man of genial nature, 
cordial and friendly, and those who know him entertain for him warm 
regard. 



SETH WILSON DODGE. 

Dr. Seth Wilson Dodge, physician and surgeon of Fairbury, and 
also mayor a second term of the same municipality, has been a resident 
of this part of Nebraska for over thirty-five years, and has made a fine 
record in his profession and as a citizen. He was a successful teacher 
before he entered upon the practice of medicine, and since taking up 
the latter career has devoted 'himself assiduously to its study and prac- 
tice. He is a man of great popularity among the citizens of Fairbury, 



604 . SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

as his place as their executive head would indicate, and in private and 
public life has been capable and public-spirited. 

Dr. Dodge was born in Utica. Xew York, September 4, 1840, and 
comes of a good family. His grandparents were Calvin and Nancy 
(Eddy) Dodge, the former a native of Massachusetts and the latter 
of New York. His father was W. E. Dodge, born in New York and 
a farmer of that state. He married Matilda Kane, a native of New 
York and a daughter of Peter and Mehitable Kane, the former of 
whom was a soldier in the war of 1812. W. E. and Matilda Dodge 
had six children, three sons and three daughters, and four of them are 
living, the son Peter being a veterinary surgeon of Polo, Illinois. The 
mother of these children died at the age of seventy-five, and the father 
at eighty. He was a Republican, and both were members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 

Dr. Dodge was reared until the age of sixteen in New York, and 
then came to Rochelle, Ogle county, Illinois, where he completed his 
common school education. He afterward took a course in the state 
Normal in Peru, Nebraska, and at the State University of Nebraska. 
He taught for a number of years, and was in the schools of Beatrice, 
Nebraska. He began the study of medicine with Dr. D. A. Walden at 
Beatrice, and was graduated with his medical degree from the Uni- 
versity of Iowa in 1882. He has served as city physician in Fairbury 
and was on the school board for five years. He is a Mason and also 
affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a repre- 
sentative to the grand lodge of the state. He has gained a good and 
representative patronage since locating in this city, and enjoys the com- 
plete confidence of friends and associates. He took a post-graduate 
course in medicine in Kansas City in 1893. 

Dr. Dodge was married in Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1875, to Miss 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 605 

Lotta V. Giles, a lady of education and refinement, and she was born in 
Peoria, Illinois, a daughter of Joseph and Susan Giles, both of whom 
are deceased. They have two sons : C. W. G. Dodge is a graduate of 
dental surgery at Chicago, in 1899, and is now practicing at Hastings, 
Nebraska; Guy L. graduated from the Creighton Medical School, 
Omaha, in 1902, and is now practicing with his father. Both sons 
were educated in the Nebraska State University, and they also served 
during the Spanish war in the Second Nebraska Regiment. 



ROBERT A. CLAPP. 

Robert A. Clapp, one of the foremost lawyers of Fairbury, Jef- 
ferson county, Nebraska, has been located in practice here for ten years, 
and has made rapid progress in his profession since his admission to 
the bar in 1892. Besides devoting himself studiously to his individual 
work, he has taken a prominent part in the affairs of his adopted city, 
has been interested in politics, and in every line of work in which he 
has engaged has made good. 

Mr. Clapp was born in St. James, Minnesota, January 31, 1872, 
a son of Rev. Robert A. Clapp, a Baptist minister well known in the 
west, having performed his duties with zeal and energy for the long 
period of half a century. He was a native of New York, and married 
Miss Velina Knickerbocker, who came of one of the oldest New ^ ork 
and eastern families. She died in 1896, at the age of sixty-one, leav- 
ing three children: John, of Wenatchee, Washington; Miss Mamie K., 
of Chicago; and Robert A. 

In consequence of his father's frequent changes of residence, Mr. 
Clapp was reared and received his education in various places. He 



606 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

attended the schools at Fox Lake and Darlington, Wisconsin, and lived 
for a time in Kansas City, Missouri, and Salt Lake City, Utah. He was 
in the Normal and Collegiate Institute at Fairfield, Nebraska. He 
was admitted to the bar in 1892, and finished his legal education in 
1893, at the Nebraska State University. He was attorney for the Farm- 
ers' Mutual Insurance Company at Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1894. He 
has been a resident of Fairbury since 1897. He is a stanch Republican 
in politics, and has been mayor of Fairbury, and popular among all 
classes of citizens. 

Fraternally he affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. He has been a delegate to the local, county and state conven- 
tions of his party since taking up his residence here, and has always 
been found ready to aid with advice and means any matter undertaken 
for the general welfare. On May 26, 1897, Mr. Clapp was married 
at Columbus, Nebraska, to Miss Alphonsine Cushing, an educated and 
cultured young woman, and they have two children. Alphonsine B. 
and Robert C. 



JOHN B. WELSH. 

John B. Welsh is a retired farmer living in Fairbury, Nebraska, 
and is also a self-made man who in his business career has depended 
entirely upon his own efforts and has thereby worked his way upward 
from a humble position to one of affluence, so that his capital is now 
sufficient to supply him with all of the necessities and comforts as well 
as many of the luxuries of life. He has made his home in Jefferson 
county since 1871. 

Mr. Welsh is a native of Canada, his birth having occurred near 
the Vermont line in 1842. His father, Morris Welsh, was born in Ire- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 60/ 

land, acquired his education there and in early life crossed the Atlantic 
to Canada. He worked until he had money sufficient to send back to 
Ireland that he might have his promised bride, Miss Julis McGuire, 
join him in the new world. She was born and reared in his old home 
neighborhood on the Emerald Isle and after reaching America they 
were married. Subsequently they removed to Knox county, Ohio, and 
in that state both spent their remaining days, the father passing away 
at the age of sixty-seven years, while the mother died at the age of 
sixty-six years. They were Protestants in religious faith, and in his 
political views Morris Welsh was a stanch Republican. They had six 
children : Ed, who was a soldier of the Fourteenth Indiana Infantry 
in the Civil war and was killed at the battle of Gettysburg; William, 
a member of the Twentieth Ohio Infantry; Mathew, who belonged to 
the Second Ohio Heavy Artillery ; John B. ; Morris, who was an orderly 
under General Kilpatrick for two years and enlisted for service with 
the Ninth Ohio Infantry; and Mrs. Joanna Sapp. All of the five sons 
were soldiers of the Civil war. This is a record of which the family 
has every reason to be proud, for few families can show a record for 
greater loyalty or bravery. 

John B. Welsh was reared on the old family homestead in Ohio 
and in the public schools there acquired his education. He was hardly 
more than a boy when on the 23d of August, 1861, he responded to the 
country's call for aid, enlisting at Toledo, Ohio, as a member of Com- 
pany C, Third Ohio Cavalry, under command of Captain Howland 
and Colonel Zahm. Mr. Welsh participated in the battles of Shiloh, 
and for twenty-one days was connected with the siege of Corinth. He 
afterward went into Huntsville, Alabama, and was in all of the skir- 
mishes and engagements of that raid. Later the command proceeded 
to Memphis and on to Charleston. He was also at Woodville, Ala- 



60S SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

bama, and later returned to Kentucky. He participated in the battle 
of Crab Orchard, Kentucky, and of Franklin, Tennessee, and was with 
General McCook's division of the Army of the Tennessee at the bat- 
tle of Stone River. At length Mr. Welsh was honorably discharged 
on account of physical disability at Louisville, Kentucky, in 1863, and 
returned to his home in Mount Vernon, Ohio. Afterwards he again 
enlisted on the 21st of February, 1864, joining Company I, of the 
Second Ohio Heavy Artillery under command of Captain Alonzo J. 
Thompson and Colonel Gibson. Going to the south he was at Cleveland 
and at Knoxville, Tennessee, and was also engaged in garrison duty 
until the close of the war, when he was again honorably discharged at 
Columbus, Ohio, on the 23d of August, 1865. He held the rank of 
corporal and made for himself a gallant record as a brave and efficient 
soldier. 

In the year following his return from the army Mr. Welsh was 
married, on the 6th of January, 1866, in Mount Vernon, Ohio, to Vis> 
Blanche Moxley, and they have traveled life's journey together as man 
and wife fur thirty-eight years. She was born and reared in Knox count- 
tv, Ohio, and is a daughter of Caleb and Margaret Moxley. the former 
a native of New England. In their family were eight children : Otto, 
Joanna, Elizabeth. Caleb, Risdon S., Ellen, Savilla, and Mrs. Welsh. 
The father of this family was a farmer by occupation and always en- 
gaged in the tilling of the soil in order to support his wife and children. 
Both were members of the Methodist church, and because of their fidel- 
ity to the teachings of that denomination they enjoyed the warmest 
regard and confidence of their fellow men. The home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Welsh was blessed with six children: Mrs. Emma Noble; Walter, 
who is living in Jefferson county, Nebraska; William, who resides in 
Endicote precinct; Mrs. Alice Boggs, also of Endicote precinct; Mrs. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 609 

Myrtle McCord, who is living on the old homestead ; and James, who 
is clerking in a hardware store in Fairbury. 

It was in the year 1870 that Mr. Welsh came to Nebraska and in 
the following year he secured a homestead claim in Antelope township. 
On this he built a log cabin, ten by ten feet. In it he had a window 
formed of but a single pane of glass. He came to found a home, and 
though it required energy and courage to do this he bravely faced the 
situations and conditions of pioneer life. He was enabled to supply 
the table during the first few years with wild game, for buffalo, deer 
and turkeys were to be found in this portion of the state. For months 
he would use no money, but depended upon game and the products of 
the garden for all that the family needed. Hot winds parched the crops 
and there was a grasshopper scourge in 1874, blizzards made the win- 
ters almost unbearable, but with great courage and resolution Mr. Welsh 
and his family continued in the work of making a home upon the 
frontier. At length he sold the homestead farm and purchased two 
other tracts of land. He now has a fine modern residence in the town, 
furnished in good style with a view to comfort as well as beauty. He 
likewise owns two other good town houses, and one of his farms is sit- 
uated in Antelope precinct, while the other is in Endicote precinct. He 
is a good business man, enterprising and progressive, and whatever 
he has undertaken he has carried forward to successful completion. 
He certainly deserves great credit for what he has accomplished, as he 
has met hardships and difficulties which would have utterly discouraged 
man_\- a man of less resolute spirit. In politics he is a Republican and 
he belongs to Russell Post, G. A. R. His name is honored throughout 
the community as that of a self-made man and a pioneer resident, who 
while promoting his own success has also contributed to the general 
progress of the community. 



610 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

MILLS LOUDERBACK. 

Mills Louderback, who is residing in Thompson, Nebraska, was 
burn in Brown county, Ohio, November 13, 1828, and is a son of 
Thomas Louderback, whose birth occurred in the same county, while 
the grandfather, Michael Louderback, was a native of Germany and 
became the founder of the family in America. Thomas Louderback 
was reared in Brown county, Ohio, acquired his education there and 
was married in that county to Miss Sarah Springer, who was also a 
native of the Buckeye state and was a daughter of Uriah Springer, 
whose birth occurred in Pennsylvania. To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Louderback were born eight children, namely: Liberty, Mills, Levi, 
William, Mary, Theresa, Martha and Flora. Of this number William 
was a soldier of the Civil war, belonging to the Thirty-third Illinois 
Infantry, and died at home while on a furlough. Thomas was like- 
wise a member of the same regiment. He lost his health while par- 
ticipating in the military engagements of the northern army and died 
soon after the close of the war. The father of this family was a Dem- 
ocrat, in his political views strongly endorsing the principles advo- 
cated by Jackson. In religious faith he was a Baptist, and his life was 
ever upright and honorable. Both he and his wife died in Illinois, 
where they had made many warm friends, being highly respected for 
their excellent traits of heart and mind. 

Mills Louderback was brought by his parents to Illinois, and upon 
the home farm he was reared, being early instructed in the value of 
industry, integrity and economy in the active affairs of life. The fam- 
ily home was established in Livingston county near Pontiac, and he 
acquired his education in the public schools there. He was married 
in that county in 1853 to Miss Harriet Corbin, who was born and 
reared there and died at the age of thirty-five years. She left five 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 611 

children: Mathew, W. E., Mary C, Sarah Isodene and Martha Jane. 
Mr. Louderback was again married, in 1876, in Livingston county, Illi- 
nois, his second union being with Mrs. Sarah J. Bradfield, the widow 
of Joseph Bradfield. who died while serving in the United States army. 
He left two children, Mrs. Zephur A. Long and Joseph. Mr. Bradfield 
was a native of Ohio and became a most loyal citizen of his adopted 
country. At the time, of the outbreak of the Civil war his patriotic 
spirit was aroused and he enlisted in the Firty-third Illinois Infantry 
as a member of Company G. He participated in the siege of Vicks- 
burg and afterward died in the Marine Hospital of New Orleans, 
Louisiana. 

Mills Louderback also left his home at the time of the Civil war, 
enlisting at Pontiac, Illinois, on the 12th of August, 1862, in response 
to President Lincoln's call for sixty thousand men. He joined Com- 
pany C of the One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Illinois Infantry under 
command of Captain Perry, while later Captain A. McMurray was in 
command of the company. The regiment was equipped and sent south, 
being ordered to Louisville, and Mr. Louderback participated in some 
engagements and skirmishes in Kentucky and Tennessee. He was 
afterward under the command of General Sherman in the Atlanta 
campaign and the march to the sea, participating in the battles of Res- 
aca, Kenesaw Mountain, Lookout Mountain, New Hope Church and 
Burnt Hickory. He also participated in the engagement of Peach Tree 
Creek not long before the capitulation of Atlanta. He was with the 
Twentieth Army Corps under General Thomas, and with that Division 
of the army went to Savannah, Georgia, and participated in the Caro- 
lina campaign and in the battle of Bentonville. which was the last en- 
gagement in which General Sherman fought. With his command Mr. 
Louderback proceeded to Raleigh, North Carolina, and later he par- 



612 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

ticipated in the grand review in Washington, D. C. Throughout the 
greater part of the war he was at *he front, proving a devoted and 
loyal soldier to his country's welfare, and in June, 1865, he received 
an honorable discharge at Washington, D. C. 

After the war Mr. Louderback continued to make his home in 
Illinois until 1878, when he came with his family to Nebraska, settling 
in Jefferson county, where he secured eighty acres of land, which he has 
developed into an excellent farm. He gives his political allegiance to 
the Prohibition party, and is a member of the Freewill Baptist church, 
to which his wife likewise belongs. He favors religion and higher ed- 
ucation, and in fact is found as a champion of all measures for the gen- 
eral progress and improvement. He is a man of fine appearance, weigh- 
ing two hundred and fifteen pounds, is frank and jovial in manner and 
his word is as good as his bond. 



WINFIELD SCOTT WILLOUGHBY. 

For twenty-one years Winfield Scott Willoughby has been a resi- 
dent of Nebraska and makes his home in Reynolds. He is a valued 
citizen of this community, for like most veterans of the Civil war he 
is as true to his country in days of peace as he was when he followed 
the old flag upon the battlefields of the south. He was born in Iroquois 
county, Illinois, on the 7th of May, 1847, a representative of one of the 
old families of that locality, his father, John Willoughby, having lo- 
cated in that county in 1839. He was a native of Tennessee and in 
early life was left an orphan, after which he was bound out to Bishop 
Roberts, of the Methodist Episcopal church. The Bishop removed 
from Tennessee to Lawrence county, Indiana, and there John Wil- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 613 

loughby was reared to manhood upon a farm, continuing to reside there 
until eighteen years of age. He then went to Illinois, and when nine- 
teen years of age he was married to Miss Polly Brock, who was born 
and reared in Lawrence county, Indiana. They are both now deceased, 
the mother having passed away in 1854, while the father died in 1892, 
at the age of seventy-five years, upon the old homestead farm which 
he had purchased from the government for a dollar and a quarter per 
acre. For many years he had given his time and energies to its culti- 
vation and improvement, and he developed it from a wild tract into 
one of rich fertility, yielding to him golden harvests. He gave his 
political allegiance to the Whig party in early clays, and upon the or- 
ganization of the new Republican party he joined its ranks and continued 
one of its stalwart supporters until his demise. In his religious faith 
he was liberal, and belonged to no church. In their family were seven 
children, but only two are now living, Winfield Scott and Mrs. Polly 
Reynolds. 

Mr. W. S. Willoughby was reared upon the old home farm in 
Illinois, spending the days of his boyhood and youth in the usual man- 
ner of farm lads of the period. He worked in the fields through the 
summer months and attended the public schools in the winter seasons, 
and at the age of eighteen years he put aside all personal considerations 
that he might aid his country as a defender of the Union cause. It was 
in February, 1865, that he enlisted at Ash Grove, Iroquois count}', be- 
coming a member of Company D, One Hundred and Fiftieth Illinois 
Infantry under Captain Hiram B. Venom, Lieutenant-Colonel C. Spring- 
er and William Keener. The regiment was ordered to Camp Butler at 
Springfield, Illinois, and not long afterward Mr. Willoughby was taken 
ill with typhoid fever, being very sick for six weeks. Later the com- 
mand was ordered to Bridgeport, Alabama, and afterward went to 



614 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Cleveland, Tennessee. With his regiment Mr. Willoughby joined 
General Sherman's army at Buzzard's Roost and was in all of the en- 
gagements to Atlanta, Georgia, proceeding afterward to Griffin, Geor- 
gia, and to Jackson. He took part in a number of battles and skirmishes 
and was fortunate in that he was not wounded. It was some time 
after the actual close of the war that he was honorably discharged, for 
following the cessation of hostilities, there came an order for the es- 
tablishment of a provost marshal government in the south, and his regi- 
ment was kept on duty in that section of the country to suppress all 
riots and disturbances that might occur. It was on such duty that Mr. 
Willoughby was at Griffin and at Jackson, Georgia, until about the 
close of his term. Later the regiment was ordered back to Atlanta, 
Georgia, where it was reorganized, for in the meantime it had been sep- 
arated into different sections and the company stationed at different 
points in the south. Returning to the north Mr. Willoughby was mus- 
tered out of service at Camp Butler, Illinois, on the 16th of February, 
1866. He was then but eighteen years of age, and yet he had done faith- 
ful service as a soldier in defense of the Union. 

Following his military experiences Mr. Willoughby took up his res- 
idence in the county of his nativity and was married there to Catherine 
Crow, who has been to him a most faithful companion and helpmate on 
life's journey for thirty-four years. She was born in Philadelphia. 
Pennsylvania, and is a daughter of Thomas and Ann (Campbell) Crow, 
both of whom are now deceased. Her father was a native of Ireland. 
Mrs. Willoughby has a half brother, Asel McFarland. Mr. and Mrs. 
Willoughby have six children : Mrs. Cora Snow, of Reynolds, Ne- 
braska : Nellie, who is a popular and successful teacher of Reynolds; 
John, at home; Earl; Scott; and W. J. Bryan. They also lost two 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 615 

children, Nora, who died at the age of three years, and one that died in 
infancy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Willoughby began their domestic life in Iroquois 
county, Illinois, where they remained until 1883, and then came to 
Reynolds. He has a fine property adjoining the town, and in public 
affairs here he has been prominent and influential. He is independent 
in his political views, and he belongs to the Grand Army of the Re- 
public, Major Potter Post No. 147, in which he has served as quarter- 
master and also as vice commander. He likewise has membership re- 
lations with the Masonic fraternity. He has served as township asses- 
sor of his precinct and is a member of the school board. He favors 
every movement that tends to promote the welfare and progress of 
his adopted county, and is well known as a man honorable in business, 
faithful in friendship and loyal in citizenship. 



BENJAMIN WALKER. 

Benjamin Walker is one of the representative, enterprising and pro- 
gressive business men of Reynolds, Nebraska, where he is conducting a 
drug store. He came here in the period of early development of the 
town, and has made for himself an enviable record for meriting and 
enjoying the esteem and good will of his fellow men. Moreover, he 
deserves special credit because of the fact that from early boyhood he 
has been dependent entirely upon his own resources, and he has justly 
won the proud American title of a self-made man. 

Mr. Walker was born in England, January 27, 1844. and is a son 
of George Walker. He was left an orphan at the age of six years and 
commenced life for himself as a bootblack and news bov. He made 



616 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

his way in the world from that time forward, and the hardships and 
trials that face a friendless boy as he battles with the world became 
familiar to him. He labored diligently, however, making the most of 
his opportunities, and the inherent force of his character enabled him 
to work his way upward. Although reared amid the most unfavorable 
circumstances and surroundings, he has developed a strong and honor- 
able manhood and has accomplished success such as many a man reared 
with more favorable conditions might well envy. At the age of thirteen 
he hid in the hold of a vessel bound for New York, and as a stowaway 
started for the new world. Soon after the vessel started he was found 
in his hiding place, but the captain befriended him and made of him a 
cabin boy for the trip. For three months he was upon the way and then 
arrived in New York city. Not long afterward he proceeded to Buffalo, 
where his father was living. He remained in that city for a period and 
afterward proceeded to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, by the way of the lakes. 
In the latter place he worked at different occupations that he could 
secure that would yield him an honest living. For some time he was 
employed at farm work, and during this period he devoted many of his 
evenings to reading and study that he might broaden his education, which 
has been acquired entirely in this way and through practical experience. 
He was a youth of seventeen years of age when he became a soldier of 
the Civil war. 

Mr. Walker had been deeply interested in the course of events 
which preceded hostilities and resolved that if the country needed his 
aid to preserve the Union he would enlist in its defense. Accordingly 
in 1 86 1, in response to the call for three hundred thousand troops, Mr. 
Walker donned the blue uniform of the nation and became a member 
of Company K, Sixteenth Wisconsin Infantry. With his command he 
went to the front, and at the battle of Shiloh, on the 6th of April, i86j, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 617 

he was wounded, being shot through the lungs and the left side. His 
severe injuries caused him to be honorably discharged in the fall of 
that year. After spending this winter at Shiloh he was for three days 
without food. He lay alone in the garret of a private house. Later 
he was taken to Keokuk, Iowa, by boat, and was there placed in a hos- 
pital, where he received the usual army medical treatment. One day 
a lady, the mayor's daughter, visited the hospital, and she became inter- 
ested in Mr. Walker and took him out riding and to her father's house. 
She enlisted her father's sympathies in his behalf, and the mayor se- 
cured a permit whereby he was enabled to go by boat to his home. He 
arrived in a very weak condition, but his natural robust constitution trii 
umphed over wounds and disease, and in a comparatively short space of 
time he had recovered from the severe injuries he had sustained in behalf 
of his adopted country. Still his patriotic spirit was undaunted, and 
he enlisted in the Twenty-fifth Wisconsin Infantry under command of 
Colonel Orff. He was stationed in the south for a time, being at 
Burnside, Texas. He participated in the battles of Spanish Fort and 
of Mobile, Alabama. He made for himself a splendid military record, 
and the gratitude of the country is certainly due him for what he ac- 
complished in defense of the old flag. 

Following his military service Mr. Walker engaged in business, at 
Colby, Wisconsin, for a time. Later he sold out and came to Jefferson 
county, Nebraska, where he again engaged in business, conducting a 
general hardware store for about two years ; then eng-aged in the 
drug and furniture business. By fair and honorable dealings he has 
built up a large business and now occupies a commodious brick block 
which he owns. This is filled with a large line of drugs and furniture, 
and through his honorable business methods and earnest desire to please 
his patrons he has secured a very liberal patronage and thereby received 



6:8 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

each year a good income. For a number of years he was in partnership 
with A. H. Bothwell, but is now alone in his undertakings. His busi- 
ness block is twenty-five by sixty feet, one of the substantial buildings 
of the city. 

In 1866, in Wisconsin, Mr. Walker was united in marriage to Miss 
Annie C. Daggett, who was born in New Brunswick, but was reared 
and educated in Wisconsin. They have many friends in Reynolds and 
throughout the surrounding locality and both are members of the Bap- 
tist church, taking an active part in its work. Mr. Walker is one of the 
church officers, and he has also held official relations with the Grand 
Army of the Republic, being at the present time senior vice commander. 
He is also identified with the Masonic fraternity. In matters of citizen- 
ship he is public-spirited and progressive and his co-operation has been 
given to many measures for the general good. He is a man who, 
in the every-day walks of life, is found faithful to its principles and a 
high standard of conduct, and Jefferson county numbers him among its 
representative and valued citizens. 



REV. JOSEPH D. MASTERS. 

Rev. Joseph D. Masters, who has largely devoted his life to the work 
of the Christian ministry and is now living at Thompson, Nebraska, was 
born near Athens, in Athens county, Ohio, April, 28, 1845, a representa- 
tive of an old family of that locality. His father was Amos Masters and 
grandfather Levi Masters. The latter was born in Pennsylvania and 
his parents were from New Jersey. He married Miss Susan Rickey, 
also a native of the Keystone state, and both died in Athens, Ohio. 
Amos Masters wedded Miss Eliza Stout, of Athens county and a 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 619 

daughter of Noah Stout, who was born in Pennsylvania and was of 
Scotch descent. Amos Masters is now living at Hibbardsville, Ohio, 
at the advanced age of eighty years, while his wife passed away at the 
age of seventy-three years, in the faith of the Baptist church, of which 
she had long been a member. He is yet identified with that church and 
he gives his political support to the Prohibition party. In their family 
were four children : Joseph, of this review ; Henry, who was a soldier of 
the One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Ohio Infantry and also served for 
six months with a cavalry regiment of Ohio; Angie; and William. 

Rev. Joseph D. Masters was reared upon the home farm and pur- 
sued his early education in the public schools. He afterward con- 
tinued his literaiy studies at Albany, Ohio, and later began prepara- 
tion for the ministry. On putting aside his text books he began preach- 
ing and in his holy calling has done effective service for the cause of 
Christianity. He served as state evangelist for several years in Ne- 
braska and also in Kansas and Colorado, and the seeds of good he has 
sown have borne rich and plenteous harvests. 

At the time of the Civil war Rev. Masters offered his services to his 
country and enlisted at Athens, Ohio, on the 1st of June, 1862, as a 
member of the Union army. He joined the Eighty-seventh Ohio In- 
fantry for three months under the command of Captain McVey, and on 
the expiration of his term of service was honorably discharged. He af- 
terward re-enlisted on the 9th of November, 1863, at Athens, Ohio, and 
then became a member of Company K, One Hundred and Twenty-fifth 
Ohio Infantry, under command of Colonel Manchester and Colonel 
Opdyke. In September, 1865, he was mustered out, the war having 
been brought to a successful termination. He participated in a num- 
ber of important battles, including the engagements at Rocky Faced 
Ridge, Dalton (Georgia), Buzzard's Roost, Marietta, Rome, Kenesaw 



62o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Mountain, where his captain was killed, the siege of Atlanta, and Jones- 
boro. He was also in the battle of Strawberry Plains, Knoxville, Blue 
Ridge and later returned to Nashville, after which the regiment was 
sent across the Gulf of Mexico to Texas and was stationed at Mata- 
gorda Bay, and on the Rio Grande river. On the 25th of September, 
1865, he left Texas and in the fall of that year reached Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He was with the Third Brigade of the Second Division of the 
Fourth Army Corps, and was for a time under command of General 
Stanley. 

In 1867 Rev. Masters was united in marriage to Miss R. A. Bor- 
der, a lady of intelligence and good family, who was reared and edu- 
cated in Athens, Ohio. Her father, Joseph Border, a native of Penn- 
sylvania, was a soldier of the Civil war, serving with the Fifty-third 
Ohio Infantry. He died on the 15th of June, 1870, and her mother, who 
was born in Virginia, died at the age of fifty years. In their family 
were eleven children. To Mr. and Mrs. Masters were born six children : 
Ed Grant, who is living in Auburn, Nebraska; Elsie E. Fike, of Thomp- 
son, Nebraska: Myrtle, who is the wife of Bishop Fairbury; Artie R., 
of Auburn, this state; Charles, also of Auburn; and Amos Ray, at home. 
They also lost two children, Riley, who was killed at the age of fifteen 
years; and Orley, who died at the age of thirteen years. 

Rev. Masters came to Thompson, Nebraska, in 1880, and has here 
since made his home. He is a Prohibitionist in his political faith, and 
he served as postmaster of Thompson for three terms of four years each. 
He belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic and is chaplain of his 
post, being now associated with Major Potter Post, No. 147. of Reyn- 
olds. He is also identified with the Ohio Veterans' Association of Ne- 
braska. He has traveled extensively over the United States, spent con- 
siderable time in California and thus has a comprehensive knowledge 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 621 

of this country. He has a strong attachment for his native land and her 
free institutions, and in citizenship he has always been loyal and pro- 
gressive. 



GEORGE A. ROGERS. 

The prosperity of any community, town or city, depends upon its 
commercial activity, its industrial interests and its trade relations, and, 
therefore, the real upbuilders of a town are those who stand at the head 
of its leading enterprises. Among this class George A. Rogers is num- 
bered, being the proprietor of the Reynolds Mills at Reynolds, Nebraska. 
In all his business affairs he is so thoroughly reliable and progressive 
that he has come to be known as one of the representative citizens of 
the community. He has resided in this state since 1867, and has there- 
fore been the witness of its growth and progress through a long period 
covering more than one-third of a century. 

Mr. Rogers was born in Tioga county, New York, on the 14th of 
December, 1843. His paternal grandfather was John H. Rogers, and 
his father was John Rogers, who on arriving at years of maturity mar- 
ried Eliza Spencer, a native of New England. Mrs. Eliza Rogers died 
when her son George A. was five years of age. In the family were 
six children, three sons and three daughters. The father was a basket- 
maker by trade and followed that pursuit for a time, but afterward 
turned his attention to farming and by this means provided for his 
family. He held membership in the Methodist Episcopal church and 
lived a consistent Christian life. He died at Reynolds, Nebraska, at 
the age of eighty-four years, while his wife had passed away in New 
York at the age of thirty years. 



622 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

George A. Rogers was reared in the county of his nativity and in 
Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and the public school system of these 
localities afforded him his educational privileges. He was a young man 
of only about nineteen years of age when in August, 1862, he responded 
to President Lincoln's call for troops to aid in crushing out the rebellion. 
Offering his services to the government he was assigned to Company 
E of the One Hundred and Forty-first Pennsylvania Infantry, under 
Captain Clark and Colonel M. E. Dills. He participated in the second 
battle of Bull Run and at different times was under Generals Buell, 
Sickles and Hancock. He took part with the Army of the Potomac in 
the battles of the Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Spottsylvania and other en- 
gagements leading up to the attack on Petersburg. At one time he 
was struck by a spent shell, and he was ill with lung fever at Washing- 
ton, D. C.j for about six months. He made for himself a good war rec- 
ord and became a corporal and received an honorable discharge in June, 
1865. 

Mr. Rogers returned to his home in Pennsylvania following the 
close of hostilities and remained in the east until 1867, when he came 
to Nebraska. For two years he worked at the carpenter's trade in Omaha 
and in 1869 he came to Reynolds. He took up a homestead in 1869, 
was there until 1873, when he bought a mill at Rose Creek city. In 
1887 he built a roller mill there, conducting it until 1891, when he moved 
his mill to Reynolds, where he has been ever since. He is an expert 
miller and the flour which he manufactures is second in quality to none 
made in the state. His mill now has a capacity of thirty-five barrels 
per day and is supplied with four double rollers and one feed roller. 
His practical experience enables him to carry on business along progres- 
sive lines, and his earnest desire to please his customers and his honorable 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 623 

business methods have secured to him a patronage which is very desira- 
ble, making him one of the substantial citizens of his community. 

Mr. Rogers was married in 1871 to Miss Jennie Kimberly, of Iowa, 
a daughter of Jesse Kimberly, who was a soldier of the Civil war, 
belonging to an Iowa regiment. To Mr. and Mrs. Rogers have been 
born three chrildren : Hattie, who is a proficient music teacher ; Alice ; 
and Earl. They also lost two children, Fred and William, both of whom 
died in earl}' childhood. 

Mr. Rogers is a stalwart Republican in his political views and soci- 
ally he is identified with the Reynolds Lodge No. 121, I. O. O. F., which 
he has represented in the grand lodge. He is also connected with the 
Grand Army post and maintains pleasant relations with his old army 
coinrades through his association with this organization. He belongs 
to the Methodist Episcopal church, and is a man of strong purpose, of 
laudable ambition and unremitting diligence, and these have been the 
qualities which have entered into his successful business career. 



EDWIN J. ROGERS. 

As long as memory remains to the American people and as long as 
the history of the country is recorded, so long will the soldiers of the 
Civil war be held in grateful remembrance. When the attempt was 
made to overthrow the Union, loyal men from all walks of life flocked 
to the standard of the nation. They came from the workshops, the 
offices and the fields, all actuated by a common impulse of patriotism 
and with strong resolve to perpetuate an undivided union. Mr. Rogers 
was among the number who proved a loyal defender of his country, 



CJ4 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

and as such and also as one of the worthy agriculturists of Jefferson 
county he deserves mention in this volume. 

A native of Bradford county, Pennsylvania, he was born on the 
8th of February, 1841, and is a son of John H. Rogers, a native of Con- 
necticut. The latter married Eliza Spencer, who died when her son 
Edwin J. was but eight years of age. She left six children : Beulah ; John 
P.: Hnlda and Mary, both deceased; Edwin J.; and George A., who 
is living in Reynolds, Nebraska. The father came to this state in 1872, 
but his death occurred in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, when he was eighty- 
five years of age. His political support was given to the Republican 
party. 

Edwin J. Rogers was reared in Pennsylvania and New York and 
acquired a good education by attending the public schools. He was thus 
well fitted for life's practical duties, and he has added to his knowledge 
by reading and observation in later years. He was but twenty years 
of age when, on the 6th day of May, 1861, he enlisted at Elmira, New 
York, for service as a soldier of the Union army, becoming a member of 
Company F, Twenty-third New York Infantry, under Captain W. W. 
Dingleday and Colonel H. C. Huffmann. He went into camp at Wash- 
ington Hill near Washington, D. C, and was first in battle at Ball 
Crossroads in Virginia. He afterward took part in the engagements 
at Cedar Mountain, in the Rappahannock raid and in the battles of 
Sulphur Springs, Gainesville, the second battle of Bull Run, South 
Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg. In the spring of 1863 he was 
sent home to Elmira, New York, and was honorably discharged with a 
military record. He afterward helped raise a company which was 
mustered in in September, 1863, as Company B, First Battalion New 
York Cavalry, the captain being John Whitley, Jr., while Colonel Tay- 
lor was in command of the regiment, which was sent to Washington, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 625 

D. C. With this command Mr. Rogers took part in tire campaign in the 
Shenandoah valley and was under command of General Sigel at New 
Market, forming a part of an independent brigade. He was also with" 
General Sheridan, the regiment being connected with the forty thou- 
sand cavalry troops under that intrepid leader. 

Mr. Rogers participated in the battle of Winchester, Virginia, where 
General Mulligan was killed. Later he was under General Pope and 
participated in the battle of the Wilderness. He was under General 
Hunter at the engagement of Piedmont and in August, 1865, received 
an honorable discharge. He never faltered in the performance of any 
duty whether upon the firing line or the picket line, and at one time 
he had charge of the recruiting services at the barracks in Elmira, New 
York. He was discharged as commissary sergeant, acting as quarter- 
master. 

Mr. Rogers returned to his home in Pennsylvania, where he re- 
mained until 1869, when he came to Nebraska and secured a homestead 
claim in Buckley township, Jefferson county, upon which he has since 
resided. His time and energies have been devoted to the development 
of his farm and his labors have been attended with good results, so that 
he now has one hundred and sixty acres of valuable land, upon which he 
has erected a substantial house and barn. He has also planted a good 
orchard and has tilled his fields until they have returned to him excellent 
harvests. 

In Omaha, Nebraska, in 1870, Mr. Rogers was united in marriage 
to Miss Theressa Christ, who died in 1876. leaving a daughter, Mrs. 
Martha Flagle, who is now living in Jefferson county. Mr. Rogers 
afterward married again, his second union being with Mary Ellen An- 
drews, the wedding being celebrated April 21, 1878. She has been a de- 
voted wife and helpmate to him. She acquired her education in Mis- 



626 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

souri and Nebraska and has been most careful in the management of her 
household interests. She is a daughter of James Andrews, a well known 
early settler of the county, prominent in its early development and prog- 
ress. The children of the second marriage are : James, Millie, George, 
Edgar and Mary. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Rogers are well known in the locality in which 
they reside. He is a frank and genial in manner, reliable in business, 
cordial in his treatment of his fellow men, and as a citizen is as true and 
loyal to the interests of his country as when he performed the soldier's 
full duty on the battlefields of the south. 



FRANCIS GREEN, D. V. S. 

Francis Green, one of the skilled representatives of veterinary surg- 
ery in this part of Nebraska, maintaining his office and also his residence 
in Reynolds, was born in Lowville, New York, in the year 1846, his 
parents being Francis M. and Polly (Stevens) Green, the former a 
native of Vermont and the latter of Massachusetts. The son was a 
small lad when his parents removed to Midland county, Michigan, and 
later he accompanied them to Illinois and afterward to Iowa, where they 
lived until 1861. when they returned to Michigan. In Illinois they had 
been residents of Sheffield, Bureau county, and in Iowa their home was at 
Chariton, Lucas county. On again going to Michigan they settled in 
Midland county, and the father devoted his energies to agricultural pur- 
suits. 

Dr. Green accompanied his parents on their various removals until 
after they had again become residents of Michigan. He was indebted 
to the public school system of the country for the educational privileges 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 627 

which he received, while upon the home farm under the direction of his 
father he obtained training at farm labor and also made himself familiar 
with many practical business ideas. He enlisted in Midland county, 
Michigan, in February, 1865, in response to his country's call for aid, 
being at that time only eighteen years of age. He became a member of 
CompanyB, Seventh Michigan Cavalry, under Captain R. Glover. The 
regiment went south to Virginia and was engaged in special duty in the 
vicinity of Washington, D. C, during most of the period of his enlist- 
ment. He was stationed, however, for a time at the mouth of the 
Chesapeake bay and was detailed for special guard duty in the capital 
city. He participated in the grand review in Washington, in 1865 and later 
was, ordered west to St. Louis. Missouri. Subsequently he was sta- 
tioned at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and afterward at Denver, Colo- 
rado. He then saw active service at Julesburg, Colorado, at Fort Col- 
lins and later at Salt Lake City, Utah, after which he went with his 
command up the Snake river in Idaho, where the soldiers were engaged 
in some fighting with the Indians. Dr. Green was one of the soldiers 
who were captured by a band of five hundred Indians, but he managed 
to make his escape, although he was wounded three different times by 
Indian arrows and the scars of his injuries are still to be seen. His 
arm was broken and he sustained a wound in the left leg and one in the 
body. After a hard campaign against the Indians in Utah, Idaho and 
other sections of the far west the troops returned by way of Colorado 
to Kansas, marching or riding back to Fort Leavenworth, where in De- 
cember, 1865, Dr. Green was honorably discharged. 

After the war Dr. Green remained for five or six years longer in 
Michigan and then made his way to western Kansas, settling at Beloit. 
He took up the study of veterinary surgery and pursued his investigation 
along this line under some of the most skilled representatives of the 



628 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

profession, so that when he entered upon the work lie was well equipped 
for the practical duties which devolve upon him. While living in Be- 
loit his profession extended over a wide area, and he met with excellent 
success there. During twenty-eight years he continued to reside at that 
place, and then came to Nebraska, where he has continued in his chosen 
life work. Here he has also secured a liberal patronage, which is ac- 
corded him in recognition of his ability and also by reason of his honor- 
able business methods. 

Dr. Green was first married in Midland county, Michigan, in Febru- 
ary, 1866, to Miss Judith McCollister. By this marriage they had six 
children, five of whom are living, namely: Mrs. Arrena Peavey; Sher- 
idan, who is a minister of the gospel of Nebraska ; Oakley, who is living 
in Michigan; Evelina, whose home is in Mitchell county, Kansas; Ray, 
who resides in Beloit, Kansas. For his second wife Dr. Green chose 
Mrs. Emma Bruce, a lady of intelligence and culture who is widely and 
favorably known in Reynolds. It was here that their marriage was cele- 
brated on the 13th of January, 1903. Dr. Green is connected with the 
Grand Army of the Republic, belonging to Beloit Post, at Beloit, Kan- 
sas. He is also a member of the Masonic order and his wife belongs 
to the Methodist Episcopal church. He has the characteristics of a man 
who has traveled and met many people, being broad-minded and intelli- 
gent, while in manner he is genial, frank and courteous. He has gained 
many friends during his residence here as well as made for himself an 
enviable prefessional reputation. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 629 

U. S. AMMERMAN, M. D. 

In the practice of his profession Dr. Ammerman has made an 
excellent reputation by reason of skill and ability, continually making 
advance in a profession where progress is secured only as a result of 
marked and comprehensive knowledge. He is a young man who has re- 
sided in Reynolds only since 1898, and he is in close touch with modern 
methods and the latest improvements and discoveries known to the 
medical science. During twenty-five years he has made his home in 
Nebraska, having come to this state in his boyhood days. 

He was born in Decatur county, Iowa, near High Point, January 
5, 1865, and is a son of Dr. W. S. and Mrs. (Ritter) Ammerman. His 
father was for thirty years a successful physician of Decatur county, 
Iowa. His death occurred about ten years ago in Plymouth, Jefferson 
county, Nebraska, when he was sixty-five years of age. He was a 
graduate of the Keokuk Medical College of Keokuk, Iowa, was a popu- 
lar and capable physician, and his success in this profession was due to 
his thorough understanding of medical principles and correct application 
to the needs of his patients. At the time of the Civil war he served as 
a surgeon in an Iowa regiment. His wife, who was born in Ohio, died 
in Iowa. Of their seven children four are now living, namely: Wilda 
Maurer, who resides in Los Angeles, California; Mrs. Emma Gasford, of 
Rogers, Arksansas : Winfield AY., of Plymouth, Nebraska ; and U. S. 
Those who have passed away are Alice, who died about the age of 
twenty-two ; Jennie, who was the wife of Colonel Bishop, of Beatrice, 
Nebraska ; and Martha, who married T. L. Ewing. 

Dr. U. S. Ammerman was brought to Nebraska in pioneer times 
when still but a boy, the family home being established in Plymouth. 
He received his early education in the public schools here and later con- 
tinued his studies in Keokuk, Iowa. Determining to make the practice 



6 3 o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

of medicine his life work he began preparation for the calling under the 
direction of his father, and later matriculated in the Keokuk Medical 
College, from which he was graduated in 1898 with a class of eighty 
students. He then came to Reynolds, opening his office here in 1898, 
and has since been engaged in practice in this town, meeting with con- 
stantly growing success. He is a close and discriminating student and 
one whose knowledge is being continually broadened by investigation, 
research and practical experience. Already he has obtained a good 
patronage and has won the favorable regard of the profession as well as 
of the general public. 

Dr. Ammerman was married April 21, 1889, in Plymouth, Ne- 
braska, to Miss Orpha Shindall. a daughter of Jacob Shindall, of Beatrice, 
Nebraska. Her death occurred at Dakin, Nebraska, in 1894. at the age 
>>t twenty-two years. The one child by his first marriage died in infancy. 
In 1899 Dr. Ammerman was again married, his second union being with 
Miss Mildred Parker, a lady of intelligence and culture and a daughter 
of Walter Parker, one of the early settlers and business men of Rey- 
nolds. He has one child, Helen, now four years of age. Mrs. Am- 
merman is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. They have a 
pleasant home in Reynolds and the Doctor owns this property in ad- 
dition to other real estate, a farm of one hundred and sixty acres near 
Reynold. He is a man of strong intellectual powers, of marked in- 
dividuality, of laudable ambition and strong determination, and in his 
profession he has already attained a creditable position while his genial 
manner and unfailing courtesy have gained for him an enviable social 
pi isition. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 631 

HON. W. H. DILLER. 

Hon. W. H. Diller, whose name will be perpetuated through suc- 
ceeding generations as one of the founders and foremost men of the 
town of Diller, Jefferson county, Nebraska, came to this part of the 
count)- in 1878. He has taken a leading place as a farmer and business 
man. has participated actively in politics and public upbilding and prog- 
ress, and the entire county has benefited by his worth and energy as a 
man and citizen. 

Mr. Diller was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, May 7, 
1846, being a descendant of a substantial native of Switzerland, who, 
spelling his name then as Tuellar, came to America in 1754, and his 
transport was signed by the king of Saxony. Several generations have 
succeeded this original American progenitor, and the family has always 
held an honored place in the communities where they made their home. 
Samuel Diller, the father of Hon. W. H. Diller, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, and married Catherine Bear, who was born in Cumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, and they removed to the state of Nebraska in 1877. They 
had four children : Rebecca Longnecker, who died in Pennsylvania in 
1861 ; John B., who died in 1902, leaving a widow and children; Wil- 
liam H. ; and Joseph S., who is a graduate of Harvard, a Doctor of 
Divinity, and a prominent and well known geologist in the government 
service at Washington. Samuel Diller was a miller in early life, and 
after coming to Nebraska bought a large tract of land two and a half 
miles north of ■Diller; he lived in Fairbury until a short time before his 
death, which occurred when he was sixty-six years old. He was a man 
of fine business judgment, and his knowledge of equity often brought 
his services into requisition as an adjuster of estates in Pennsylvania. 
He was a Whig and a Republican in politics, and a Presbyterian in re- 



632 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

ligion. His wife, who was a member of the Presbyterian church, died 
in 1892 at the age of seventy. 

W. H. Diller was reared in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, re- 
ceived a good education in the public schools and academy, and remained 
at home until the Civil war. While still in his teens he volunteered in 
Captain Sharp's company, but his father did not permit him to serve out 
his term. He came to Jefferson county, Nebraska, in 1878, and engaged 
in farming and stock-raising for a few years. He still owns a fine farm 
of three hundred and twenty acres. He came to Diller in 1884, and be- 
gan dealing in grain, building an elevator there, and the town was named 
in his honor, as he was the most prominent and active of the business 
men of the village at its incipiency. He also served with honor and 
credit in the state legislature for two terms. He has been justice of the 
peace and a member of the school board of the town, was instrumental 
in gaining the establishment of the postofhce and also the rural mail 
routes since then, and has aided in every way possible the educational, 
material and moral advancement of his adopted place. 

In 1867 Mr. Diller was married in Cumberland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, to Miss Anna C. Hacks, who was born and reared in that county, 
a daughter of George Hacks, and a granddaughter of John Hacks. Mr. 
and Mrs. Diller have had eight children : George H., deceased, left a 
widow : Sam is a railroad man in Tobias, Nebraska ; Emma P. Wag-" 
ner lives in Menden, Iowa; William S., former county clerk of Jefferson 
county, died January 30, 1904; J. S. is a farmer of this county; Miss 
Rebecca is at home; and Charles and Frederick are also at home. 

Mr. Diller founded the Grand Army post at Diller in 18S7, and 
has been its commander, and has also assisted in the formation of a 
Sons of Veterans post. He was a delegate to the national encampment 
at Boston in 1890. He affiliates with the blue lodge of the Masons, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 633 

with Silvam chapter at Fairbury, with Mt. Herman Commandery at 
Beatrice, and with the temple of the Mystic Shrine at Lincoln ; and his 
son Sam is also a Mason. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian 
church, and he and his family are held in the highest esteem throughout 
the county, both for their social worth and for the useful part they have 
all played in everything that pertains to the general welfare. 



W. M. RIDDLE. 

W. M. Riddle, living in Newton precinct of Jefferson county, is 
one of the active and influential farmers of his community and one who 
has ever been a loyal citizen, manifesting the same patriotic devotion to 
his country in days of peace that he showed when a soldier of the Civil 
war defending the old flag upon southern battlefields. He was born in 
eastern Tennessee on the 23d of June, 1844. His father, George F. 
Riddle, was a native of South Carolina and a son of John Riddle, whose 
birth occurred in North Carolina. The mother of our subject bore the 
maiden name of Rachel Alford, and was born in Tennessee of an old 
family of that state. In 1854 Mr. and Mrs. George F. Riddle removed 
from Tennessee to Macoupin county, Illinois. They were among the 
early settlers of Palmyra and became greatly respected in that commun- 
ity because of their excellent traits of character. The mother died there 
at the age of fifty-three years and many friends mourned her loss. The 
father passed away at the age of seventy, and his community was thus 
deprived of a representative agriculturist and honorable business man. 
He had given his political allegiance to the Whig party until the time of 
its dissolution, when he joined the ranks of the new Republican party. 
Both he and his wife held membership in the Cumberland Presbyterian 



634 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

church, and he served as one of its leaders for a number of years. To 
this worthy couple were born nine children, three sons and six daughters, 
namely: William, Eveline, Martha E., Jane, Charles, Lou, George, 
Raney, and a daughter deceased. 

W. M. Riddle was a boy when he accompanied his parents on their 
removal from his native state to Illinois. He was reared upon the home 
farm, where he early began work in the fields, and his father's practical 
training prepared him for the duties of life, while the public school sys- 
tem afforeded him his educational privileges. He was a youth 
of eighteen years when in response to his country's call for aid he 
enlisted in the Union army in August, 1862. He was enrolled as a 
member of Company H, One Hundred and Twenty-second Illinois 
Infantry, under Captain Ben Lee and Colonel John I. Reniker. The 
regiment was ordered south and spent some time in Tennessee. The first 
battle in which he participated was an engagement with General Forrest's 
troops at Parkers Crossroads. He also participated in other skirmishes 
and battles in that locality and later did service in Missouri and Arkan- 
sas. He was also in the Kansas line fighting against General Price and 
General Marmaduke. He also participated in the engagement at Tupelo, 
Mississippi, at Nashville and in the Red River campaign under General 
A. J. Smith. Later he went south to Xew Orleans and afterward to 
Mobile, Alabama, and took part in the siege and capture of Spanish 
Fort and Fort Blakely. The command was then ordered back to Xew 
Orleans, where it took passage on transports bound for St. Louis, Mis- 
souri. From there Mr. Riddle made his way to Springfield, Illinois, 
where he received an honorable discharge. He had several narrow 
escapes, his clothing being pierced with bullets on more than one occa- 
sion. He suffered a sunstroke in the Tupelo engagement, and from the 
effects of it he has never fully recovered. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. ' 635 

Following the close of his military service Mr. Riddle rturned to 
his home in Illinois, and in 1869 he was united in marraige to Miss 
Elvira Gooch, a lady of many excellent traits of character, who has 
been to him a devoted wife for thirty-four years. She was born in 
Macoupin county, Illinois, and spent the days of her girlhood there. She 
is a daughter of John Gooch, win 1 was born in Kentucky and was a son 
of Clayburn, a native of Virgina. John Gooch wedded Miss Juriah 
Jones, whose birth occurred in Morgan county, Illinois, and who made 
her home with Mrs. Riddle till her death, March 14, 1904. at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-three years. Her father was also a native of Vir- 
ginia. To Mr. and Mrs. John Gooch were born nine children, but only 
two are now living, Mrs. Riddle and Mrs. Emma Hayes, the latter of 
Lincoln, Nebraska. Three of the children died in early youth and three 
others reached mature years, including W. T. Gooch, who was a soldier 
of the Forty-ninth Illinois Infantry at the time of the Civil war. His 
death occurred at Oquam, Virginia. To Mr. and Mrs. Riddle have been 
born four children: John, who now makes his home in Diller, Nebras- 
ka; Charles, who is living in Meriden, Idaho; and William, at home. 
They also lost one son, Walter, who died in infancy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Riddle continued to make their home in Illinois until 
1887, when they came to Nebraska. Here he has a fine farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres, splendidly equipped with modern accessories 
and improvements. In addition to the comfortable residence there are 
good barns and other necessary outbulidings, a fine grove and a bear- 
ing orchard. The home is pleasantly located about three miles south of 
Diller, and Mr. Riddle is recognized as a progressive agriculturist, win- 
ning success in his chosen field of labor. He votes with the Republican 
party, and belongs to Diller Post, G. A. R. He also has membership 
relations with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Independ- 



636 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

ent Order of Odd Fellows, and both he and his wife are members of the 
Presbyterian church. They are well known in the community where 
they now reside, and the circle of their friends is extensive. 



WASHINGTON STEWART. 

For more than three decades Washington Stewart has been a resi- 
dent of Jefferson county, and his home is in Newton precinct. He has 
been actively identified with the work that has resulted in the upbuilding 
of the great west, and is a typical representative of the agricultural class 
of Nebraska — enterprising in his business and progressive in his citizen- 
ship. 

He was born in Maysville, Kentucky, on the 16th of August, 1829, 
and is a representative of a family noted for integrity, courage and hos- 
pitality. His father, George Stewart, was born in Pennsylvania and was 
a representative of one of the old families of that state. The ancestors 
were from Scotland, living in the highlands of that country, and were 
of Protestant faith. The family was established in America at an early 
day, and George Stewart was reared in the Keystone state, where he was 
married to Miss Eliza Smiley, who was born and reared in Pennsylvania. 
They afterward went to Kentucky and in 1839 became residents of 
Washington county, Indiana, where the subject of this review was 
reared. The mother's death occurred in that county when she was forty- 
eight years of age. She was greatly loved for her good qualities of 
heart and mind, and her loss was an occasion of deep regret on the 
part of many friends as well as her immediate family. The father long 
survived her and died at the advanced age of eighty-three years. His 
political allegiance was given to the Republican party, and in his relig- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 637 

ious faith he was a Baptist, and he enjoyed the confidence and good will 
of all with whom he came in contact. In the family were seven children, 
namely : James, Mary J-, Washington, Margaret, Martha, Eliza Ann 
and Amanda. 

Washington Stewart was reared on the old homestead in Indiana, 
where he was early trained to habits of industry and economy. His 
education was acquired in one of the old-time subscription schools held 
in a log building furnished with slab seats. He attended through the 
winter months, while throughout the remainder of the year he assisted 
in the work of the home farm, taking his place in the fields at the time 
of the early spring planting and continuing his labors until crops were 
harvested in the late autumn. At the age of twenty-three he married 
Miss Hulda Wright, who has been a faithful companion and helpmate 
to him on life's journey. She was born and reared in Putnam county, 
Indiana, near Greencastle, and acquired her education in the public 
schools. Her parents were Hosea and Susan (Johnson) Wright, both 
of whom were natives of Tennessee and representatives of old families 
of that state. In their family were nine children, as follows : Thomas, 
who was a soldier of the Civil war and died in 1901 ; Mrs. Stewart; Mary 
E. ; Anna Jane; William J.; Phoebe L. ; Sarah; Nancy Ellen; and 
Susan. 

Mr. Stewart continued to make lhs home in Ijidiana until 1864, 
when he removed to Harrison county, Iowa, settling at Harris Grove. 
He was among the early residents of that part of the state and was 
identified with its pioneer development until 1872, when he sold his 
property there and came to Jefferson county, Nebraska. He bought one 
hundred and sixty acres near Plymouth. There he resided for a number 
of years, after which he disposed- of his property, and about ten years 
ago he purchased his present farm comprising one hundred and twenty 



638 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

acres of good laud in Newton precinct, Jefferson county. This has 
since been his place of residence, and he now has an excellent farm, 
improved with a good house, barns and orchard and a fine grove. He 
engages in general farming, stock-raising and dairying, and his various 
branches of his business being well conducted have brought to him very 
gratifying success. In all of his business dealings he is straightforward 
and reliable and has never been known to take advantage of the neces- 
sities of his fellow men in any trade transaction. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Stewart have been born five children : Austin, who 
is living in Newton precinct; Mrs. Ella McQueen, who prior to her 
marriage was a popular and successful school teacher of Jefferson county 
and now lives in Fairbury, Nebraska; Alva, who is living on the old 
homestead ; Thomas, at home ; and Susan, who completes the family. 
They also lost two children : C. Edwin and Hosea, the latter dying in 
infancy. In his political views Mr. Stewart is a stalwart Republican, 
giving an unfaltering support to the principles of the party. His wife is 
a member of the Baptist church. He has never been an active politician 
in the sense of office-seeking, but served as postmaster in Harris Grove, 
Iowa, under General Grant's administration. Mr. Stewart is a man of 
fine physique, six feet and one inch in height, and intelligent, frank, 
and social gentleman, whose home is noted for its hospitality. 



GEORGE T. HAGGARD. 

George T. Haggard is the proprietor of Lawndale stock farm, 
which was established in 1880 and comprises four hundred and eighty 
acres of very rich land in Washington precinct, Jefferson county. It 
is numbered among the fine farms in southeastern Nebraska, and is 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 639 

stocked with a large herd of shorthorn cattle. The owner is most pro- 
gressive in his business methods, and his resolute spirit and honorable 
methods enable him to carry forward to successful completion what- 
ever he undertakes. He was wrought along modern business lines, and 
belongs to that class of representative American citizens who advance 
the general prosperity by promoting their individual success. 

Mr. Haggard was born in Winchester, Scott county, Illinois, on the 
28th of November, 1849, an< 3 is a son of David J. Haggard, who was 
one of the early settlers of Illinois, coming to that state in 1840. He was 
born in Kentucky and was a son of David Haggard, Sr., who was a 
native of Virginia and was a representative of one of the old and dis- 
tinguished colonial families of that state, the ancestors having settled in 
American prior to the Revolutionary war. The family has ever been 
noted for patriotic devotion to the welfare of America, and has been 
represented in every important war of the country, including the early 
Indian wars, the Revolutionary war, the war of 1812, the Mexican war, 
die Civil war and the Spanish-American war. Certainly this is a most 
creditable family record, and close investigation into the history of the 
Haggards will show unfaltering fidelity to duty and principle. 

David Haggard, Jr., was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Ed- 
mundson, who was born in Kentucky. Her ancestors had lived in 
Maryland for several generations. She is descended from Henry Ed- 
mundson, of Scotland, who was connected with several of the chiefs of 
the Scottish highlands prominently connected with the history of that 
country. David and Sarah Haggard became the parents of four chil- 
dren : Dr. J. R. Haggard, who is a well known practicing physician of 
Lincoln, Nebraska; Mrs. Sarah E. Shaw, who is living in Western, 
Nebraska ; Z. W., a resident of Lawndale, Nebraska ; and George T. 
The parents came to this state in 1880, and the father followed the occu- 



640 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

pation of farming up to the time of his death, which occurred when he 
was seventy-three years of age. His political allegiance was given to 
the Republican party, and his religious faith was that of the Baptist 
church. His wife survived him for some time and died at the age of 
seventy-nine years. They were well known in this county- and enjoyed 
in high measure the respect and good will of those with whom they were 
associated. 

George T. Haggard was reared in Scott county. Illinois, on the old 
home farm, and through the winter months attended the public schools 
while in the summer seasons he assisted in the work of the fields. He 
was married in that county in 1871 to Miss Hulda Pierce, an intelligent 
and cultured lady, whose parents were Byron and Maria Pierce, of Illi- 
nois. To Mr. and Mrs. Haggard has been born a daughter, Myrtle. 

Mr. and Mrs. Haggard came to Jefferson county in 1880, and he 
has since been engaged in general farming and stock-raising. He and 
his brother Z. W., own the Lawndale .stock farm, comprising four hun- 
dred and eighty acres of rich land in Washington precinct. Mr. Hag- 
gard is extensively engaged in the raising of a high grade of shorthorn 
cattle, having one hundred head upon his farm, the herd being a rival of 
the famous herds of the Blue Grass state. Mr. Haggard invested a 
great deal of money and expended much care in starting his herd, and is 
known as one of the leading shorthorn dealers of the state. He is also 
engaged in the breeding of Berkshire hogs and raises bronze turkeys and 
light brahma chickens. The live stock upon the place belongs to Mr. 
Haggard in person. Upon the farm Mr. Haggard has built two large 
barns, one forty by fifty-six feet, the other forty by sixty-four feet, and 
these afford ample shelter for his stock and hay. There are also good 
windmills upon the place, a substantial residence, a fine orchard cover- 
ing five acres, and a good grove. There are twenty-two acres planted to 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 641 

alfalfa, eighteen acres to blue grass and clover. The pastures are rich, 
the grain fields yield good crops, the farm is pleasantly located six 
miles south of Western, and Mr. Haggard is doing a very profitable busi- 
ness, which ranks him with the leading stockmen of the state. 

In his political affiliation Mr. Haggard is a Republican, active in the 
work of the party, and has served as a delegate to various county and 
state conventions. He has never been an office-seeker, caring not for the 
rewards of office in recognition of his party fealty, but does all in his 
power to promote the political interests of his friends and for fifteen 
years he has been the efficient chairman of the Republican committee of 
Washington precinct. He is a man of firm purposes, of laudable ambi- 
tion and sound business judgment and whatever he has undertaken he 
has carried forward to successful completion. 



W. F. DOWNEY. 

W. F. Downey is capably and efficiently managing the Jefferson 
county poor farm as its superintendent. He has had charge thereof 
for eleven years and has conducted the business of the firm in an intelli- 
gent, practical and energetic manner that has given general satisfaction. 
Mr. Downey is a native of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Craw- 
ford. His father, John Downey, Jr., was born in Ohio and was of Scotch- 
Irish lineage, while the paternal grandfather, John Downey, St., was 
also a native of Ohio, whence he removed to Illinois, where his death 
occurred. John Downey. Jr., was one of the early settlers of Crawford 
county, living near the Wabash river. He married Miss Phoebe Watts, 
who was born in Illinois and represented an old Kentucky family that 
was established in the Prairie state at an early epoch in its development. 



C<42 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Mr. Downey carried on agricultural pursuits and thus provided for the 
needs of his family. He died at the age of fifty-four years, leaving a 
widow and two sons. Mrs. Downey died in Lincoln. Nebraska, at the 
age of fifty years. 

W. F. Downey was reared in the state of his nativity, attended the 
public schools and has added largely to his knowledge through experi- 
ence and observation. He became a resident of Nebraska in 1871, at 
which time he made his way westward to Lincoln and soon afterward 
took up his abode in Gage county. He was married in that county to 
Miss Mary E. Fuller, a lady of culture and intelligence, whose parents 
were A. F. W. and Ludencia Fuller. Her father was one of the pioneer 
residents of Gage county and died in 1892, having for several years 
survived his wife, who passed away in 1884. Mr. and Mrs Downey 
began their domestic life in Gage county and after a number of years 
came to Jefferson county, where they arrived in 1886. Three years later 
Mr. Downey took charge of the poor farm, which he conducted for ten 
vears. He then resigned on account of the ill health of his wife, but re- 
sumed the position in March, 1904. He has held the office altogether for 
eleven years and has given entire satisfaction to the people of the county 
by the faithful and capable manner in which he has discharged his 
duties. The poor farm comprises three hundred and twenty acres of 
good land, and the first house, built in 1892, was twenty-four by twenty- 
four feet. There is now a large two-story house and basement with an 
L twenty-eight by thirty-six feet and there are twenty-six room in all. 
This is well arranged and everything about the place is kept in excellent 
condition. There are from five to eight inmates most of the time. A 
barn was built in 1903 sixty-four by eighty-four feet, affording ample 
room for the shelter of stock and grain. Forty acres of the farm are 
planted to alfalfa and various kinds of grain are raised. Upon the 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 643 

place are from fifty to one hnudred head of hogs and fifty head of cat- 
tle and ten horses. Mr. Downey has placed everything about the farm 
in excellent condition, managing all the affairs with the same devoted 
interest which he would give to the farm if it were his own. On June 
29, 1904, he bought a one hundred and sixty-acre farm adjoining the 
poor farm, where he expects to make his future home. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Downey have been born three children : Amy, who 
is now the wife of S. L. Record, of this county; Willie, who is a student 
in the Agricultural College of Nebraska, at Lincoln, and is now nine- 
teen years of age ; and Harold, a lad of nine summers. They also lost 
three children in early life. Mr. Downey stands as a supporter of the 
Republican party and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, in which he has filled all the chairs and has served as a 
representative to the grand lodge. He has taken a very active part in 
the work of the order and has done much to promote its interest in 
southeastern Nebraska. He is likewise connected with the order of 
Rebekahs and with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and has 
been its representative to the grand lodge. Mr. Downey in now a man 
in middle life, intelligent, enterprising and progressive, standing as a 
high type of American citizenship and of a progressive agriculturist. 



HON. JOHN B. SKINNER. 

Hon. John B. Skinner, one of the leading lawyers of Hebron, ex- 
county judge and ex-member of the state legislature, has been a resident 
of Thayer county for nearly a third of a century, during which time he 
has taken rank among the foremost attorneys and legal minds of the 
county and this part of the state. He began his career humbly enough, 



644 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

as a tinner, and his progress to his present high place in his profession 
and in the esteem of his fellow citizens has been almost entirely the re- 
sult of self-achievement and honest endeavor. His legal abilities have 
been called into requisition in many of the important causes of this part 
of the state, and his private practice has been gratifyingly large. His 
public career began in early life, and since coming to Thayer county he 
has more than once been chosen by the people to a place of responsibility 
and trust, in which his course has always been marked by conscientious 
fidelity to the highest interests of those he served and to the cause of 
right and justice. 

Judge Skinner was born at Troy, Ohio, November 6, 1840, of Eng- 
lish descent, and his paternal ancestors came to this country before the 
Revolutionary war. His grandfather, George Skinner, was a soldier 
in that struggle for independence, and the musket that he carried is still 
preserved among the family heirlooms. Azel Skinner, the father of 
Judge Skinner, was a native of Pennsylvania, but came to Ohio as early 
as 181 1. He followed his trade of saddle and harness maker in Troy 
for many years, and he also owned and operated a canal-boat on the old 
Maumee canal. During the Civil war he was a soldier in Company D, 
One Hundredth Indiana Infantry, having enlisted in September, 1862, 
but was discharged the following year on account of general disability, 
and his death occurred January 8, 1864. His wife was Frances J. Blue, 
a native of Ohio, and her family were among the early and influential 
settlers of western Ohio. She survived her husband until April 14, 1882. 
They were the parents of five children. 

John B. Skinner, the oldest of the children, moved with the 
family to Indiana in 1844, and passed his boyhood on a Hoosier state 
farm. He learned the trade of tinner at an early age, and followed it 
as a journeyman for about two years, then went into business for him- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 645 

self, continuing for four years. He began the study of law with Judge 
James H. Carpenter, of Warsaw, and was admitted to the bar and began 
his professional practice in that place in 1869. He remained there until 
1 87 1, and then took up his residence in Thayer county, Nebraska, where 
he has been in constant practice ever since with the exception of six 
years. During that period he was engaged in proving up a half section 
of land which he had taken up near Carleton, and on which he set out 
an orchard of about two thousand fruit trees and some fifty thousand 
forest trees, so that he takes rank among the most enterprising arbori- 
culturists in the state, and has given inception to an industry which is 
of untold benefit to tbe vicinity as well as a source of profit to him- 
self. 

Judge Skinner has always been a true-blue Republican, and while 
residing in Pierceton, Indiana, was appointed postmaster by Abraham 
Lincoln. Since coming to Thayer county he has served two terms as 
county judge, and was also elected to the office of county attorney, serv- 
ing from 1892 to 1896. In 1884 he was elected a member of the state 
legislature. In the state convention of 1872 he had the pleasure of ren- 
dering valuable service to his old friend and fellow townsman, ex-Govern- 
or Furniss, in the latter's contest for governor. Jefferson and Thayer 
counties held the balance of power, and Judge Skinner was instrumental 
in swinging their votes toward Mr. Furniss. 

Judge Skinner affiliates with the Free and Accepted Masons at 
Hardy, and the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Modern 
Woodmen of America at Hebron. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
church, and a worker in the Sunday-school. He was married in Indiana 
December 24, i860, to Miss Sarah Richardson, who was born in Ohio 
and was a daughter of Thomas Richardson, also a native of the same 



646 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

state and a descendant of an old Virginia family that came to Ohio 
before the war of 1812. Mr. and Mrs. Skinner have one son, Morris W. 



HON. WILLIAM L. WHITNEY. 

Hon. William L. Whitney, county judge of Thayer county and num- 
bered among its leading citizens, has been identified professionally and 
by residence with this county for nearly twenty years. It was an aus- 
picious day when he was chosen to the county judgeship. His gravity and 
and poise of character, his judicial mind without tendency to bias or 
partiality, have rendered his incumbency of this office one of honor to 
himself and of marked advantage to the county. Judge Whitney has the 
energy and devotion to his profession which make for close investiga- 
tion, and furthermore has the talent and legal equipment for judgment 
by the facts and the law, so that his decisions have gained for him a 
deserved reputation, and his high honor and integrity of character have 
never been impugned. 

Judge Whitney was born at Groveland, Tazewell county, Illinois, 
January 19, 1861. His father, Isaac S. Whitney, was a native of Mas- 
sachusetts and followed farming as an occupation. He came to Illinois 
about 1840, and in that state married Miss Arabella H. Allen, a native 
of Ohio and of an old and influential southern family. 

Judge Whitney, the eldest of the four children of his parents, 
passed his boyhood days upon the farm in Illinois, and in 1SS1. at the 
age of twenty vears, began the study of law. He entered upon this 
course through his admiration of Judge T. N. Green, of Pekin, Illi- 
nois, an eminent and able jurist of that section of the state, but never 
read law with Judge Green. He completed his course at Peoria, but did 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 647 

not immediately take up practice, but went into merchandising instead. 
He had a hardware business at Brimneld, Illinois, but in 1886 this was 
broken up by fire, and as he had little insurance his loss was quite heavy. 
In the fall of that year he came to Alexandria, Thayer county, Nebraska, 
and opened an office for law practice and collections. He enjoyed a good 
and steadily increasing practice there until 1901, in which year he was the 
choice of the Republican party for county judge, and was elected for two 
years, and was re-elected in 1903. He has always been a stanch Re- 
publican, and, as far as comports with judicial dignity, takes an active 
interest in party affairs. 

Judge Whitney was married at Alexandria, Thayer county, De- 
cember 25, 1889, to Miss Kate M. Pluss, one of the prominent social 
leaders of the town and county and esteemed for her womanly graces 
and cultured refinement. Her father. Captain J. C. Pluss, was a native 
of Pennsylvania, and at the outbreak of the Civil war, in 1861, enlisted 
in the Forty-seventh Illinois Infantry, and served throughout the entire 
struggle, being mustered out with the rank of captain. He married 
Margaret L. Baird, a native of Ohio and of Scotch stock, her father 
having been born at Edinburg, Scotland. Captain Pluss brought his 
family to Thayer county, Nebraska, in 1868, and located a claim of one 
hundred and sixty acres on the old government trail across the plains, 
on the Big Sandy river. Mrs. Whitney was the third of the seven 
daughters of this family. Mr. and Mrs. Whitney have four children: 
Harold E., Verneda J., Ernest L. and A. Louise. Fraternally the Judge 
affiliates with the blue lodge No. 46, F. & A. INI., at Hebron, and also 
is a member and an official in both the chapter and commandery of the 
order; he belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He and his wife are members of the 
Order of the Eastern Star. 



6 4 S SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

HON. ASHBEL P. HAZARD. 

Hon. Ashbel P. Hazard, justice of the peace and prominent in the 
business and political life of his community, has resided in the city of 
Hebron since 1886, and has been acquainted with Nebraska both as a 
territory and a state for many years, having been a permanent resident 
for over forty-four years. He is now approaching the seventieth mile- 
stone of his life, but his years of usefulness are by no means ended. 
He has had an active career from an early age, and has experienced 
many of the phases of life, mingling the sweet with the bitter and 
fortune with adversity, in various parts of the country and in various 
capacities. He knows the life of the western plains from actual partici- 
pation in some of its most arduous undertakings, and from mining and 
freighting turned his attention to mercantile pursuits, and then to affairs 
of a public nature, in all relations of his career being noted among his 
fellows for his integrity and true manhood. Left an orphan at an 
early age, he was compelled largely to shift for himself, and it can 
be said to his credit that he has taken advantage of the slender thread of 
opportunities offered him and drawn himself to a position of influence 
among his fellow citizens and a substantial place in the business world. 

Mr. Hazard was born in Lyndon, Illinois, March 31, 1838, being 
the fourth of the six children of his parents, Elisha and Pamilia (Par- 
sons) Hazard, both natives of New York state. Ancestcrs on both 
sides of the house were soldiers in the Revolution and the war of 181 2, 
and his father's ancestry went back to some of the earliest English set- 
tlers of the Atlantic coast. His mother's lineage was French, and the 
family had left France and gone to Holland in 1540, and thence seventy 
years later were among the earliest emigrants to America, where mem- 
bers of successive generations took part in Indian wars and other great 
events connected with the founding and development of this republic. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 649 

Mr. Hazard was taken to Freeport, Illinois, when a young boy, 
and for a few years his labors alternated between those of the farm and 
those of the schoolroom, but the primitive educational surroundings 
of that day and generation were far from ideal and not conducive to 
scholarship of high grade. He took a clerkship in a store, and some years 
later, in company with a half brother, took the western trail to Central 
City, Colorado, where he engaged in mining for a year. At the end of 
that time he had more experience for money, and the worst of it was that 
his experience was not negotiable. For the following five years he acted 
in the capacity of supply agent in the employ of the Western Stage 
Company, covering the line from the Missouri river to Salt Lake City. 
Afterward, for thirteen years, he was engaged in merchandising in Beat- 
rice, Nebraska, and during that time also held the office of sheriff of the 
county. He took up his residence in Hebron in 1886. He served one 
term as clerk of the district court, and has filled the office of justice of 
the peace for about five years. He also conducts a land and loan agency. 

Mr. Hazard married, September 20, 1871, Miss Sarah I. Caudy, 
a native of Illinois and a daughter of Harvey Caudy, who settled in Ne- 
braska in 1869. Mr. and Mrs. Hazard have an adopted daughter, Jessie, 
who is now the wife of J. S. Schwentker, of Kansas City, Missouri. 
Judge Hazard has always voted the Republican ticket and been active 
in the affairs of his party. He affiliates with the Free and Accepted 
Masons, in which he has passed all the official chairs of his lodge, and he 
and his wife are members of the Eastern Star degree. 



650 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

ANDREW G. COLLINS. 

Andrew G. Collins, president of the First National Bank at Hebron, 
has been a resident of this city for over twenty years, and has from the 
first been one of its most progressive and enterprising business men 
and financiers. The First National Bank was established in the early 
eighties, and, as is the case with every conservatively yet progressively 
managed bank, has exerted a powerful influence on the financial and 
business interests of this town and the surrounding country. It has 
been the medium for most of the transactions requiring money backing, 
and the fact that it has always kept the confidence of the people in its 
integrity and soundness is the main ground for its continued prosperity 
and usefulness. Mr. Collins, besides having given his best efforts to 
building up this institution, has also been interested in other public 
matters and enterprises, and has gained a wide and useful influence 
throughout Hebron and Thayer county. 

Andrew G. Collins was born in York county, Pennsylvania, April 
24, 1847, an d was reared and educated there. He was the eldest of 
the children of Cornelius and Elizabeth (Gordon) Collins, both natives 
of Pennsylvania. His father was descended from Scotch ancestors 
who came to America in the early years of the nineteenth century, and 
some of whom were soldiers in the war of 1812. His mother was of 
Irish parentage. 

Mr. Collins passed his boyhood days on the farm. He completed 
his schooling at the age of nineteen, and at once entered upon the career 
which he has made his life work. He was assistant cashier of a bank 
for three years, and for the following twelve years filled the position 
of cashier in the bank at Shrewsbury, Pennsylvania. He came to Ne- 
braska in 1882, and for the first eighteen months was cashier of the 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 651 

People's Bank at Beatrice, Gage county, and thence came to Hebron, 
where he and his associates purchased the First National Bank and have 
conducted it ever since. The present officers of the bank are A. G. Col- 
lins, president, W. B. Liggit, vice president, and W. B. Liggit, cashier, 
and the directors are A. G. Collins, W. B. Liggit, W. H. Wilson, C. M. 
Liggit and John Carhart. It has a paid-up capital of seventy-five 
thousand dollars, and has correspondence with all the principal cities 
and does a general banking business. 

Mr. Collins owns considerable farm property in this state, and is 
also interested in various enterprises of the vicinity, being a stockholder 
in the electric light plant of Hebron. He was married in Pennsylvania 
in 1882 to Miss Rosa Beck, and they have three children : Grace ; Gertrude, 
who holds a clerical position in the bank; and Cornelius, at college. 
Mr. Collins is a stanch Republican, and is progressive and public-spirited 
in all matters pertaining to the general or local welfare. 



JAMES A. SNYDER. 

James A. Snyder, clerk of the district court and one of the popular 
officials of Thayer county, is a Nebraskan of nearly thirty years' standing 
and his record in official position and as an educator is one of the best 
in southeastern Nebraska. While still a boy he was thrown 
on his own resources, and his career has been that of a self-made man. 
He engaged in teaching soon after taking up his residence in this state, 
and for many years made this the principal occupation of his time and 
efforts. His long continuance in the work is a mark of his success in 
the calling, and many of those whom he influenced and whose minds he 
developed and sought to elevate are now numbered among the worthy 



652 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

citizens of the state and other communities, where their lives are in 
part evidence of the conscientious work of Mr. Snyder. He has also 
filled other positions in the community, and for some years has been the 
incumbent of some office in Thayer county, where he is held in high 
regard and esteem for his work in the past and for his upright and 
worthy character. 

Mr. Snyder was born near Rockwood, Pennsylvania, September 3, 
1857. He is of Holland Dutch stock, and members of the family on 
both sides were in this country previous to the Revolutionary war, and 
his grandfather, Adam Snyder, was a soldier in the war of 1812. His 
parents were Solomon and Mary (Ankney) Snyder, and he was the 
fifth of their nine children. His father was a farmer and also followed 
the occupation of lumberman. 

James A. Snyder was reared to the pursuits of his father, and 
at the age of seventeen virtually began the battle of life on his own ac- 
count. He had gained a good education, however, and when he left the 
old homestead and came to Nebraska in 1875, he began teaching in 
Richardson county. He followed this vocation in Richardson county 
for nine years, and then moved to Thayer county, where he was also 
numbered among the local educators. His record as a teacher covers 
a period of twenty-two years, and the value of his services in this im- 
portant calling cannot be overestimated. He was enthusiastic in his 
work, and always stood for progress and advancement in educational 
ideals. He took the census in his district during 1890, and has also 
had twenty-seven months' experience in the railway mail service. He 
was elected sheriff of Thayer county in 1897, and filled the office for 
two full terms to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned — except those 
he went after in his professional capacity. He was elected to his present 
office of clerk of the district court in the fall of 1903. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 653 

Mr. Snyder gives his allegiance to the Democratic party and its 
lofty principles as expounded by Jefferson and Jackson. He affiliates 
with Davenport Lodge, No. 129, I. O. O. F., having passed all the offi- 
cial chairs, and is also a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge at 
Carleton. He was married at Carthage, Missouri, December 16, 1897, 
to Miss Louisa Ucker, a native of Ohio, and they are the center of a large 
circle of friends in this and adjoining counties. 



WILLIAM GALLANT. 

William Gallant, one of the long-established and honored citizens 
of Thayer county, Nebraska, is at present engaged in the real estate 
and insurance business at Hebron. His career has been most praise- 
worthy and honorable from every point of view, and he has gained the 
unequivocal esteem of all his business associates and friends. He has 
been identified with the growth and prosperity of Thayer county from 
the early period of its history, and has always taken a public-spirited 
interest in its upbuilding and progress. 

Mr. Gallant was born in Vermilion county, Illinois, on a farm. 
September 30, 1849, the second of the seven children of John and Mar- 
garet (Brown) Gallant, the former a native of Ohio and of one of the 
old and influential families of that state, and the latter a native of Ten- 
nessee, and her father was a pioneer to that state from Virginia and 
had taken part in the war of 1812. John Gallant moved from Illinois 
to Polk county, Iowa, where he resided about four years, and in 1863, 
came to Thayer county, Nebraska, and took up a homestead claim of one 
hundred and sixty acres. The county was then almost a wilderness, 
and the family lived in frontier style for some years. John Gallant was 



654 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 



in farming in this county for many years, but it at present 
residing in Illinois. 

William Gallant passed his boyhood on the farms in Illinois, Iowa 
and Nebraska, and was engaged in the work of farming for some years. 
He later became a stationary engineer, and made that the principal 
means of his livelihood for many years. In 1903 he located in Heb- 
ron, and since then has conducted a growing and satisfactory real estate 
business, and is also representative for several of the old-line insurance 
companies. 

Mr. Gallant has always voted the Republican ticket, but is not active 
in practical politics, nor is he allied with any fraternal orders. He was 
married in Thayer county to Miss Nellie R. Bridenbough, a native of 
Ohio, and they have five children : Margaret E., Florence E., Dorothy, 
Richard B. and Kathleen. 



JAMES HOUCK. 

In taking up the personal history of James Houck we notice that 
there have been many elements and incidents in his life record that are 
worthy of commendation and of emulation. He was a soldier of the 
Civil war and at all times has been loyal to the best interests of his lo- 
cality and of the nation at large. He has resided in Nebraska since 
1886, making his home in Eureka precinct, Jefferson county, where he 
has a well developed farm that indicates his careful supervision and 
practical business methods. 

Mr. Houck was born in Licking county, Ohio, October 31, 1844. 
He is descended from an old Pennsylvania family. His grandfather, 
James Houck, was a native of the Keystone state, and with four brothers 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 655 

removed to Ohio, establishing the family in that portion of the country 
more than a century ago. They located in Knox county and there 
founded a colony which became known as Houck's settlement, its mem- 
bers all being Pennsylvania Germans. It was in that locality that 
James Houck, the grandfather of our subject, died at the very advanced 
age of one hundred years. His son, Jacob Houck, the father, was born 
in Ohio on the old family homestead and was reared amid the wild 
scenes of frontier life. After attaining his majority he married Eliza 
Critton, who was born in Lancaster, Fairfield county, Ohio, and was of 
Irish lineage, her parents having removed from Maryland to the Buck- 
eye state at an early day. The family was of the Protestant faith. 
Jacob and Eliza Houck became the parents of six children : Julia ; Amy ; 
James ; Gabriel ; William, now deceased ; and Sarah. The father devoted 
his life to agricultural pursuits, thus providing for the wants of his 
family. He gave his political allegiance to the Democracy, and in his 
religious views was liberal. He died in Licking county, Ohio, at the 
age of eighty-six years, and his wife passed away in that state at the age 
of eighty-four years in the faith of the Christian church, of which she 
had long been a member. 

James Houck was reared on his father's farm and was early taught 
lessons of industry, integrity and perseverance — qualities which have 
been manifested throughout his entire career and have contributed in 
large measure to the success that has attended his business life. His 
education was acquired in the common schools. He was a youth of only 
seventeen years when he responded to the country's call for aid to crush 
out the rebellion in the south. He enlisted on the 5th of August, 1861, 
at Columbus, Ohio, and was assigned to Company D, First Ohio Cavalry, 
under command of Captain B. Moore, who was afterward succeeded by 
Captain Hamilton. The first commander of the regiment, Colonel Ran- 



656 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

som, resigned and Major Millikin then took command, but he was 
killed at the battle of Stone river, and Colonel Cupp then succeeded him. 
The regiment went into camp at Columbus, Ohio, and was sent south to 
Louisville, Kentucky, afterward to Mills Springs, that state, and then 
marched to various places in the south, participating in many important 
engagements. Mr. Houck took part in the battles of Nashville, Tennes- 
see; Liberty; Shiloh; Corinth; Booneville, Mississippi; Rushville and 
Cortland, x\labama; Barnestown, Kentucky; Perryville, Kentucky; 
Franklin, Tennessee; Stone River; Tullahoma and Elk River, Tennes- 
see; Alpina and Chickamauga, Georgia. He was also in the engage- 
ments at Murfreesboro and Shelbyville, Tennessee; at Point Rock, 
Alabama; Missionary Ridge; Tunnel Hill, Georgia; Buzzard's Roost; 
Decatur. Alabama; Kenesaw Mountain; Chatahoochie River; Peach Tree 
Creek ; the siege and capture of Atlanta ; and in General Kilpatrick's raid 
around Atlanta. Later he met the enemy in engagements at Freeborne, 
Georgia, Lovejoy Station and Rome, Georgia, and was in General Wil- 
son's raid. He was also at Montvalo, Alabama, Ebenezer Church, Selma, 
Georgia, Columbus, Georgia, West Point and Macon, Georgia, and alto- 
gether he participated in forty-nine battles. At the last named place he 
received the news of the surrender of General Lee, which meant that the 
war had been brought to a successful termination. Mr. Houck was 
mustered out at Hilton's Head, South Carolina, September 13, 1865, and 
received an honorable discharge at Columbus, Ohio, on the 28th of 
September, after which he returned to his home. He was a non-com- 
missioned officer, serving with the rank of colonel, and his military 
record was a most creditable one. He was always loyal to the stars 
and stripes, and never faltered in the performance of any duty, whether 
it led him into the thickest of the fight or stationed him in the lonely 
picket line. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 657 

Mr. Houck was first married in 1864 when home on a veteran fur- 
lough. After he had served for three years he re-enlisted and was then 
granted a thirty days' furlough. During this period he wedded Miss 
Emily Dixon, who was born in Ohio and was a daughter of Archibald 
and Eliza (Peters) Dixon, both of whom died in the Buckeye state. 
In the year 1869 Mr. Houck removed with his family to McLean county, 
Illinois, and there in 187 1 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his 
wife, who died in October of that year at the age of twenty-eight years, 
leaving three children, Mrs. Amy Clett, who is now deceased; Abel, a 
barber of Ohio; and John, who is also living in the Buckeye state. On 
the 22d of October, 1873, Mr. Houck was again married, his second 
union being with Miss Mary J. Campbell, who was born in Kentucky 
and is a daughter of Archibald Campbell, whose birth also occurred in 
Kentucky as did that of his father, Audley Campbell. His ancestors 
lived in the highlands of Scotland, and he was there kidnapped and put 
aboard a vessel on which he was brought to New York. Archil tald 
Campbell was married to Miss Margaret Witt, who was also born in 
Kentucky, a daughter of William Witt, a native of Virginia. Mr. 
Campbell departed this life in McLean county, Illinois, at the age of 
sixty-three years, and his wife passed away at the age of twenty-eight 
years, leaving three children : William Campbell, who is in the govern- 
ment service; Archibald; and Mrs. Houck. To Mr. Houck and his wife 
have been born ten children, nine of whom are yet living : Adin, a res- 
ident of Daykin; Noah; Flora, the wife of Nathaniel Shefstall, of Eureka 
precinct, Jefferson county; Pearl; Mrs. Eliza Woodman, of Thayer 
county, Nebraska ; William : Mrs. Cora Heston, of Thayer county; Fern; 
and Alta. One daughter, Laura, died at the age of nine months. 

After his marriage Mr. Houck continued to make his home in Illi- 
nois until 1886, when he resolved to come to Nebraska, and made his 



658 : SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

way to Jefferson county, locating in Eureka township. Here he pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres for fifty-five hundred 
dollars, and has since devoted his time and energies to its further culti- 
vation and improvement. He has a good house and barn upon his place, 
the latest improved machinery and many modern equipments, which 
constitute his property one of the valuable and desirable places of Eureka 
precinct. His political allegiance is given to the Democracy, and he is 
a strong advocate of free silver and other principles set forth by W. J. 
Bryan. He has been a member of the school board for a number of years, 
and the cause of education found in him a warm champion. He belongs 
to Newton Post, G. A. R., of Daykin. and the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, and is held in high regard by his brethren of these fraterni- 
ties as well as by those with whom he has come in contact through 
business and social relations. 



MARCUS STAINBROOK. 

Thirty-four years have come and gone since Marcus Stainbrook 
arrived in Jefferson county to identify his interests with the agricul- 
tural affairs in this part of the state. He has since labored indefatigably 
and earnestly, and all that he possesses has been acquired as the result 
of his untiring efforts and perseverance. He certainly deserves credit 
for what he has accomplished, and his life indicates the opportunities 
that the great west furnishes to its citizens. He was born in Mead- 
ville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, April 16, 1843, and is a son of 
Frederick Stainbrook, also a native of the Keystone state. The family 
is of German descent, and the grandfather, John Stainbrook, was born 
across the water. He came to the United States in early manhood and 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 650 

proved his loyalty to his adopted country by serving in the war of 1812. 
His death occurred in Pennsylvania, Frederick Stainbrook was united 
in marriage to Miss Agnes Hillings, who was born in Pennsylvania 
and was a daughter of Marcus Hidings, who was of French and Scotch 
descent and represented an old and well known family of Pennsylvania. 
Both he and his wife died in that state. Frederick Stainbrook and his 
wife removed from the Keystone state to the middle west and established 
their home at West Paw Paw, Lee county, Illinois. There the father 
purchased land and made a good home, continuing to reside in that lo- 
cality until his death, which occurred at the very advanced age of ninety- 
six years. He was a Democrat in his political views and in his religious 
faith was a Methodist. His widow is now living at the age of eighty- 
eight years, making her home in Chicago, Illinois. There were twelve 
children in the family, two of whom died in early life, while ten reached 
adult age, namely: Almeda, Alfred, Marcus, Elizabeth, Charlotte, 
Charles, William, Oscar, James and Lewis. Maria died in infancy and 
George died in childhood. Charles was a soldier of the Civil war, en- 
listing in an Illinois regiment, and his death occurred during his ser- 
vice at Louisville, Kentucky. Three of the family, Marcus, William and 
Oscar, are now residents of Nebraska. 

Marcus Stainbrook spent the first eleven years of his life in Penn- 
sylvania, and then accompanied his parents on their removal to Lee 
county, Illinois. He was early trained to active labor on the home 
farm, becoming familiar with all the duties and tasks that devolve upon 
the agriculturist in connection with the raising of grain and stock. He 
assisted his father through the period of his youth and at the age of 
twenty-six years he was united in marriage to Miss Julia Shefstall, who 
was born in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, and is a daughter of 
Daniel Shefstall. who is mentioned on another page of this volume. 



C6o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

In the year 1870 Mr. Stainbrook came to Nebraska, traveling by rail 
to St. Johns, Iowa. He spent three months on Logan Bottoms, and 
then secured a homestead claim on which he has since lived in Eureka 
township. In this place he built a sod house, twelve by sixteen feet, and 
occupied it for four years. The roof was made of hay and dirt baked 
hard. There were hot winds and blizzards, also grasshoppers to destroy 
the crops and render his efforts as a farmer of little avail, but he perse- 
vered in his determination to make a home in the west, and he has won 
success as the result of his labors. Buffalo meat was to he had in abun- 
dance, as was also venison, for large number of deer roamed over the 
prairie and smaller game was also plentiful. Assisted by his good 
wife, who has done her full share in the work of making a home, Mr. 
Stainbrook has labored on year after year, and his efforts have at length 
been crowned with very commendable and desirable success. He is 
the owner of three hundred and sixty acres of rich and arable land, 
constituting one of the best farms of Jefferson county. It is well im- 
proved, and everything about the place is indicative of his careful super- 
vision and progressive ideas. He built a second house sixteen by twenty- 
four feet, and his home at the present writing is a modern one. well 
furnished, comfortable and attractive in appearance. He has built a large 
barn, forty by forty-four feet, with eighteen feet posts, and there are 
a commodious granary and corn cribs upon the place. The windmills 
pump the water for the stock, and there are good pasture lands, while the 
fields are richly cultivated. Mr. Stainbrook is one of the most success- 
ful farmers in Eureka precinct, and his prosperity has come to him as 
the legitimate reward of his own labors, his life having been a busy one, 
in which strong purpose and careful management have been important 
elements in bringing to him prosperity. 

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Stainbrook are as follows : Clarence 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 66 1 

W., who was born on the family homestead in Jefferson county and is an 
able assistant to his father in the operation and management of the 
farm; Lottie L., the wife of William McCurty, of Fillmore county, 
Nebraska; and Myrtle M., the wife of William Greve, of Fairbury, 
Nebraska. Mr. Stainbrook is independent in his political affairs, while 
his son Clarence W. is a Democrat. The family is prominent in the 
community, having many warm friends, and Mr. Stainbrook is highly 
respected as a man of noble purpose and sterling worth, whose word 
is as good as his bond. The household is noted for its hospitality and 
the good cheer which there abounds, and the Stainbrook family is cer- 
tainly deserving of honorable mention in this volume. 



W. B. STAINBROOK. 

In a history of Jefferson county mention should certainly be made 
of W. B. Stainbrook, who has resided in this portion of the state since 
1884, and has ever been active in promoting the public welfare while 
advancing his individual prosperity through well conducted business in- 
terests. He is a native of Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred near 
Meadville in Crawford county on the 14th of April, 185 1. He is a 
son of Frederick Stainbrook, who was born in the Keystone state, while 
the grandfather, John Stainbrook, was a native of Germany, whence he 
emigrated to America at an early day. He manifested his loyalty to his 
adopted land by active service as an American soldier in the war of 
1812. 

After arriving at years of maturity Frederick Stainbrook married 
Miss Agnes Hidings, who was of Scotch and French ancestry. Both 
of her parents died in Pennsylvania. Frederick Stainbrook removed 



662 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

with his family from that state to Illinois, settling in Lee county, where 
for man}- years he made his home, his death there occurring at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-six years, and his widow now resides in Chicago 
at the age of eighty-eight years. In their family were twelve children, 
two of whom are now deceased, Maria and George. The others are 
Almeda, Alfred, Marcus, Elizabeth, Charlotte, Charles, William B., Oscar, 
James and Lewis. The son Charles was a soldier of the Civil war and 
died at Louisville. Kentucky. Three of the children now reside in 
Nebraska, Marcus, William B. and Alfred. 

William B. Stainbrook was only three years old when in 1854 he 
accompanied his parents on their removal to Lee county, Illinois. There 
he was reared upon the home farm and was early trained to habits of 
industry and economy. His education was acquired in the district 
schools and through reading and practical experience. In November, 
1874, he was united in marriage to Miss Frances Emma Bunvell, who 
was born in LaSalle county and is a daughter of Joseph and Ann 
(Ames) Bunvell. Her father was born in Pennsylvania and both he and 
his wife died in Lee county, Illinois. He devoted his energies to agri- 
cultural pursuits and lived an upright honorable life, being ever fair 
and just in his business dealings. In politics he was a Republican, and 
rns Christian faith was manifest by his membership in the Presbyterian 
church. Nine children, two sons and seven daughters, were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Burwell, and of those, the following are now living: 
Cornelia, Jane, Albert, Hettie, Charles and Mrs. Stainbrook. Those 
who have passed away are Harriet, Elizabeth, and Nancy, two of whom 
died in Illinois and one in Kansas. The parents also passed away in 
Illinois. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Stainbrook has been blessed with six 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 663 

children : Charles, Agnes, Mrs. Maude Kinsey, of this county, Mattie, 
Eva and William McKinley. 

In the year 1877 Mr. Stainbrook went with his family to Miami 
county, Kansas, settling near Paola, -where he remained for three years. 
He took up his abode upon his present farm in 1884 and has since de- 
voted his energies to agricultural pursuits in this part of the state. His 
labors have resulted in the development of an excellent farm, well im- 
proved, and he annually harvests good crops as the return for the care 
and labor which he bestows upon his place. He is a member of the 
Ancient Order of United "Workmen, and of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and is a man always reliable in business affairs, his word 
being as good as any bond that was ever solemnized by signature or 
seal, lie deserves great credit for all he has accomplished, as from early 
life he has been dependent upon his own resources, and he may well 
be called a self-made man. 



E. H. DAY. 

Among the many citizens of Jefferson county who proved their 
loyalty to their country upon the battlefields of the south during the 
Civil war is numbered E. D. Day, now living in Washington precinct, 
where he follows agricultural pursuits. He was horn in Jamestown. 
Ohio, October 26, 1831, a son of Joseph Day, a native of Hartford, 
Connecticut, and a grandson of Joseph Day. Sr., who was one of the 
government guards at Boston in 1776 when the tea was thrown into 
the Boston harbor by a band of American patriots disguised as Indians. 
Joseph Da}- was reared in New England, and after arriving at years of 
maturity he wedded Miss Mary A. Griffith, who was born in Virginia 



664 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

and represented one of die old families of that state. She held mem- 
bership in the Baptist church and lived a consistent Christian life and 
died in Indiana at the age of fifty years. Mr. Joseph Day long- survived 
her and departed this life in Iowa at the advanced age of eighty-four 
years. He was a shoemaker by trade and afterward engaged in the 
manufacture and sale of shoes. His political allegiance was given the 
Republican party, and he was a member of the Episcopal church. To 
him and his wife were born four children, three sons and a daughter, 
but the latter died at the age of eighteen months. One son. John, died 
in Indiana. 

Edward H. Day was a young man when taken by his parents to 
Indiana, where he was reared, remaining upon the old home farm until 
twenty-three years of age, during which time he gained practical know- 
ledge of all departments of farm labor. His education was obtained in 
a log schoolhouse such as was common in frontier settlements. He 
removed to Iowa in 1854, living in Poweshiek and Mahaska, near Gri- 
nell and Oskaloosa. He was married in Poweshiek county to Miss 
Louisa Dalbey. who was born in Greene county, Ohio, a daughter of 
Jacob and Deliah (Johnson) Dalbey, the former a native of the 
Buckeye state. He died in Fremont county, Iowa, at the age of 
fifty-one years, and the mother died in Nebraska at the age of seventy- 
eight years. They were the parents of twelve children, and two of the 
sons, Walter and Simeon, were soldiers of the Civil war, the former 
serving with the Fourth Iowa Cavalry. 

Mr. and Mrs. Day began their domestic life in the Hawkeye state 
and remained residents of Fremont and Faragut counties for several 
years, or until their removal to Jefferson county, Nebraska. Here Mr. 
Day has purchased a farm of eighty acres, upon which he has a good 
home. An orchard also yields its fruits in season, and, in fact, modern 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 665 

improvements and accessories have been added until this is now an 
excellent farm. The home has been blessed with the following children : 
Frank, who is at home; Mrs. Carrie Hudson, of Fremont, Nebraska; 
and Mrs. Cora Waymire of Adams, Nebraska, whose children are 
Lulu Glen, Merrill F.. Roland and Marguerite. 

Mr. Day's family is held in high esteem throughout the community 
in which they reside, the members of the household occupying an enviable 
position in social circles. He is a progressive citizen, and has always 
been as loyal to the interests of his community, state and nation as he 
was when he followed the old flag upon southern battlefields. He made 
for himself a creditable military record at the time of the Civil war, 
serving for three years. He enlisted at Iowa City, Iowa, in August, 
1S62, in response to President Lincoln's call for sixty thousand volun- 
teers, becoming a member of Company B, Fortieth Iowa Infantry, under 
command of Captain Campbell and Colonel Garrett, of Newton, Iowa. 
The regiment went into camp at Iowa City, later was ordered to Colum- 
bus, Kentucky, and thence to Paducah, where a skirmish occurred. 
For two months Mr. Day participated in the siege of Vicksburg. He 
was under General Steele and was in Arkansas for some time. He 
afterward went on the Red River expedition. Becoming ill he was 
taken to the hospital at Keokuk, Iowa, where he remained for six 
months, suffering with vericose veins in the left leg. In May, 1865, he 
received an honorable discharge and returned to his home. Such in 
brief is the life record of Mr. Day, and during the years of his resi- 
dence in Jefferson county he has won favorable regard from his many 
friends. He is a member of the G. A. R. at Western. Nebraska. Mulli- 
gan Post No. 209. In politics he is a Republican. 



666 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

J. P. BROWN. 

J. P. Brown, one of the intelligent, progressive and public-spirited 
citizens and representative farmers of Jefferson county, living in Eureka 
precinct, has made his home in this section of the state since 1878, and 
with its development and improvement has been actively identified, being 
numbered among those who have laid the foundation for the present 
prosperity and future advancement of the county. 

A native of Pennsylvania, Mr. Brown was born in Wayne county, 
not far form the Delaware river, a representative of one of the sub- 
stantial families of the northeastern section of the Keystone state. His 
grandfather, John Brown, was a native of Connecticut and was the 
father of D. O. Brown, a well known citizen of Wayne county, who 
married Miss Martha Dickens, who was horn in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, and was a daughter of Richard Dickens, who came from Eng- 
land. Mr. D. O. Brown was connected with the railroad service for 
twenty-two years, and then engaged in farming for twenty years, when 
he retired from active business life. He was a Democrat in politics, 
and served as a justice of the peace. In his religious belief he was a 
Presbyterian, and both he and his wife were respected by all who knew 
them. They became the parents of live children, of whom three are 
living: Fred W., Joshua P. and Nettie Orr. Those who have passed 
away are Emma and George. 

Joshua P. Brown spent the days of his boyhood and youth in 
Wayne county, Pennsylvania, and excellent educational privileges were 
afforded him, for after attending the public schools he attended a normal 
school, and was thus well qualified for teaching, a work which he took 
ur- in early manhood. He followed that profession for a number of 
years, imparting readily and clearly to others the knowledge he ac- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 667 

quired, and after coming to Saline county, Nebraska, he followed both 
teaching and farming. 

On the 18th of May, 1879, Mr. Brown was united in marriage to 
Miss Belle Karscher, who was born in Lee county, Illinois. Her father, 
Levi Karscher, was born in Columbia county, Pennsylvania, in 1837, 
and was a son of Michael Karscher, also a native of the Keystone state. 
The former married Marinda Brittain, who was born in Lycoming 
county, Pennsylvania. He was a soldier of the Civil war, serving with 
an Illinois regiment, and the rigors and hardships of war undermined 
his health. In the year 1870 he removed from Lee county, Illinois, 
where he had made his home for over twenty years, and came in 1870 
to Jefferson county, Nebraska. He now makes his home in Phelps 
county, this state, near Wilcox. He was an honored member of Norton 
Post, G. A. R., of Daykin, and be has many warm friends in this part 
of the state. To him and his wife were born the following named : 
Mrs. Etta Church, of Ragan, Nebraska; A. A., who is living in Phelps 
county; Mrs. Belle Brown; George, also of Phelps county; and Mrs. 
Bessie Brown, of Ragan, Nebraska. 

Since 1898 Mr. Brown has resided upon his present farm in Eureka 
precinct, his home being pleasantly located three-quarters of a mile from 
Daykin. He has a large fine dwelling, a good barn, a windmill, a fine 
grove, bearing orchard and the latest improved machinery upon his 
place. The farm comprises two hundred acres of land, which is rich 
and productive, and his methods of farming are modern, and therefore 
are factors in his success. He raises both grain and stock and his fields 
are well tilled, the rotation of crops perpetuating the fertility of the soil. 
Not far from his home are churches and schools, and all of the con- 
veniences of a progressive farming community are by him enjoyed. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brown have two living children: Harry R., who at 



668 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

the age of twenty-one years is a student in the Marion Sims Beaumont 
Medical College of St. Louis, Missouri ; and Merle, six years of age. 
They also lost two children: Orrin E., who was their first born and died 
at the age of fifteen years; and Helen B., the third child, who died at the 
age of fifteen. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Brown are active and consistent members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, deeply interested in its welfare and the ex- 
tension of its influence, and in matters of citizenship he is loyal. The 
cause of education has found in him a warm friend, and he has done 
effective service in its behalf during fifteen years' connection with the 
school board. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and both he and his wife 
are connected with the Degree of Honor. Frank and jovial in manner, 
reliable in all things, he is ever true to the duties and obligations of life 
and to high ideals. 



THOMAS JEFFERSON DeKALB. 

Thomas Jefferson DeKalb, who is living in Eureka precinct, Jef- 
ferson county, was one of the pioneer settlers of this portion of the 
state and broke the first land in his township. From that time to the 
present he has been actively identified with agricultural pursuits, thus 
contributing to the success of the farming interests, which have largely 
been the source of Nebraska's prosperity and progress. He arrived 
here in 1869 and secured as a homestead the farm upon which he now 
lives. Prior to this time he had made a splendid record as a soldier 
of the Civil war. 

Thomas J. DeKalb was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 669 

2d of April, 1845. His father. John DeKalb, was a native of Baron 
DeKalb, of Germany, and was born in Alsace. He received excellent 
educational privileges in his native country, being a graduate of Heidel- 
berg University. In early manhood he came to the United States, and 
for a number of years was a traveling representative of a mercantile 
house of Philadelphia. He then returned to Europe and was married 
in Amsterdam, Holland, to Miss Gertrude Topp, a representative of a 
well known and prominent family of that country. He brought his bride 
to the new world and then became identified with mercantile interests 
in Philadelphia. Subsequently he removed to Sullivan county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he secured a farm and was connected with agricultural 
interests up to the time of his death, which occurred at Bellasylva, 
Pennsylvania, in 1867, at the age of sixty-seven years. He was a man 
of fine address and of scholarly attainments, and could speak fluently 
four different languages. He possessed splendid business ability, keen 
discernment and marked enterprise. He manifested strong attachment 
for the land of his adoption, taught his children lessons of patriotism 
and love for the old flag. His political allegiance was given to the 
Democracy as set forth by Andrew Jackson, and in his fraternal rela- 
tions he was a Mason. His widow died in Pennsylvania in 1876 at the 
age of sixty-seven years. She was a lady of culture and refinement, 
and graces of her heart and mind were such as endeared her to many 
friends. To Mr. and Mrs. John DeKalb were born eight children : 
George, who was a soldier of the regular army of the United States, 
lost his life in the everglades of Florida in the Indian war of 1852; 
Chester A. is living in Xew Jersey; Caroline is deceased; Susan, of 
Lynchburg, Virginia, is the widow of John Fouerquereau, who was an 
officer in the Confederate army in the Civil war; John, who was a 
member of General Baker's cavalry regiment during the period of hos- 



670 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

tilities between the north and the south, now lives in Philadelphia ; 
Frank is living in Philadelphia. 

Thomas J. DeKalb remained a resident of his native city until twelve 
years of age, when he accompanied his parents to Sullivan county, Penn- 
sylvania. He continued under the parental roof until after the out- 
break of the Civil war, when at the early age of seventeen years he re- 
sponded to his country's call for aid and on the 12th of September, 1861, 
became a member of Company L, Second Pennsylvania Volunteer Cav- 
alry, under the command first of Captain R. T. Woods and afterward 
of Captain Charles A. Taylor, of Osceola, Pennsylvania. The regiment 
was first at Camp Curtin, Pennsylvania, and later at Point Breeze Park 
near Philadelphia, whence it was sent to Baltimore, Maryland, and on to 
Washington, D. C, where the command was stationed for about three 
months. In 1862 it was attached to the Army of the Potomac, becom- 
ing a part of the Second Brigade of the Second Division. With his 
regiment Mr. DeKalb participated in the battle of Cedar Mountain and 
several skirmishes against the troops under General Mosby, the second 
battle of Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg. Chancellorsville and Get- 
tysburg, which was considered the decisive battle of the war. There 
the regiment was detailed to act as guard for rebel soldiers. Later the 
Second Pennsylvania joined General Grant's army as it moved toward 
Richmond and was in various actions of the Union army in and around 
Petersburg. It was there that Mr. DeKalb received an honorable dis- 
charge on the 12th of September, 1864, by reason of the expiration of his 
term of enlistment. He had been promoted from the ranks to the posi- 
tion of a non-commissioned officer, being sergeant of his company at the 
time he was mustered out. Later he became connected with the L^nited 
States government service in the quartermaster's department as clerk 
or assistant quartermaster with the Army of the Cumberland stationed 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 671 

at Nashville, Tennessee. There he continued until June, 1865, when he 
returned to the north, the war having ended. 

After hostilities Mr. DeKalb engaged in teaching school for sev- 
eral years in northeastern Pennsylvania, and in 1869 he came to Jef- 
ferson county, Nebraska, hoping that he might find in the conditions of 
the great west the opportunities he sought for business advancement. 
He secured a homestead claim on which he made a dugout, and he 
brought the first lumber into his township or precinct. He lived 
upon his farm three years and then went to Furnas county, Nebraska, 
being one of the first settlers in that part of the state. In 1876 he re- 
turned to his homestead farm in Jefferson county, where he has two 
hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land, which lies along 
Little Sandy creek. His farm is well improved. He has a good home 
well furnished, substantial barns and commodious corn cribs and other 
shelter for his grain and stock. He has a windmill, and in fact all mod- 
ern machinery and equipments necessary to facilitate the work of the 
farm. He has planted an orchard, which is now in bearing condition, 
and there is considerable timber upon his place. In fact, he has made his 
farm a model one, and has one of the tine rural homes of Jefferson 
county. 

In 1867 in Pennsylvania Mr. DeKalb was united in marriage to 
Miss Margaret Raugh, who was born and reared in Sullivan county, 
tliat state, and who has been to him a faithful companion and help- 
mate on life's journey for thirty-seven years. She is a daughter of 
Henry and Margaret (Henry) Raugh, and her father was an officer 
of the war 1812. The Raugh family was established in Pennsylvania 
at a very early epoch in the colonization of that state, and its members 
have been prominent in public affairs there. The grandfather, Wil- 
liam Raugh, resided in the Keystone state and was of the Quaker faith. 



672 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

To Mr. and Mrs. DaKalb have been born six children : Anna Laura, 
who is a capable and popular teacher of Jefferson county; Henry 
Leonard, who is engaged in the practice of law in Lewiston, Montana; 
Bertha, Samuel, Frank and Lizzie, all at home. 

Mr. DeKalb gives his political allegiance to the Democracy where 
national questions are involved, but at local elections where there is no 
issue before the people he supports the candidates whom he thinks best 
qualified to carry on the business of town or county. He has been 
notary public, and in local office has always been true and loyal to the 
trust reposed in him. He well deserves mention among the pioneer 
settlers of this part of the state, and his interest in the public progress 
and improvement is indicated by the active co-operation which he Ins 
given to measures for the general good. 



TOLIVER P. BLACK. 

Toliver P. Black, for twenty-two years a resident of Nebraska, 
has manifested a patriotic devotion to the best interests of his adopted 
county and state and is accounted one of the enterprising business men, 
who through the improvement of his opportunities and by unflagging 
industry has steadily worked his way upward. 

Mr. Black is a native of Indiana, his birth having occurred in 
Pike county, on the 19th of December, 1841. The family is of Irish 
and English lineage. The grandfather was John Black, the father 
Robert Black, and the latter was born in Virginia, spending the days of 
his booyhood and youth in that state and Tennessee. He was twice mar- 
ried, and by the first union he had two sons — John and James, who were 
soldiers of the Civil war. For his second wife Mr. Robert Black wedded 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 673 

Martha Moulton, who was born in Kentucky, and was a daughter of Jo- 
seph Moulton, also a native of that state. They became the parents of the 
following children : Letha, oldest ; Henry, who was a soldier of the 
Union army; Toliver P., of this review; Joseph, who was also a mem- 
ber of the army; Thomas; Elijah, deceased; Bettie; Nancy, who 
passed away ; Mima ; and one child that died in infancy. The father 
gave his political allegiance to the Democracy. He resided for many 
years in Indiana, spending his last days in that state, and he died at the 
age of sixtv-seven years in the faith of the Baptist church, of which 
he had long been a member. His wife, who also belonged to the same 
church, died at the age of eight-one years. 

Toliver P. Black spent the days of his youth upon his father's farm 
fin the usual manner of lads of that period, and enjoyed the educational 
advantages afforded by the common schools. When he had attained 
to man's estate he sought a companion and helpmate for the journey 
of life and was united in marriage to Miss Winey Whitehouse, who 
was born on the 1st of March, 1842, in Fairfield county, Kentucky, 
a daughter of James Whitehouse, also a native of that state, while 
his father was James Whitehouse, Sr. Her mother bore the maiden 
name of Nancy J. Morgan and was a daughter of William Morgan, 
whose father was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Black have been born nine children, seven sons and two daughters : 
Josephus S., Samuel G., George B., William Henry, Thomas N., Clar- 
ence W., Charles A., Mrs. Nettie Watson and Mrs. Martha J. Fisher. 
They also lost a son, Joseph Robert, who died at the age of fourteen 
months. 

After his marriage Mr. Black continued to reside with his family 
in Indiana until 1S82, when he came to Jefferson county, Nebraska, 



674 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

where he has since lived, devoting his energies to agricultuarl pursuits, 
and he lives a bus}' and useful life. 

Mr. Black is a stanch Republican in politics and is connected with 
Norton Post, G. A. R. He is entitled to membership therein by reason 
of his service in the Civil war. He was a young man of only about twenty 
years when the country became engaged in hostilities resulting from 
the attempt of some of the southern states to withdraw from the Union. 
His patriotic spirit was aroused, and he enlisted at Petersburg, Pike 
county, Indiana, in September. 1861, joining the boys in blue of Com- 
pany I, Furty-second Regiment of Illinois Infantry, with which he 
served until the close of the war. The regiment went into camp on the 
fair grounds near Evansville, Indiana, and soon afterward crossed 
the river into Kentucky, proceeding to Bowling Green. Kentucky, 
Mr. Black participated in the battle of Shelbyville and was also at 
Nashville and Huntsville, and then returned with bis command to 
Perryville, where the troops were engaged in a running fight for some 
•time. Mr. Black was ill in the hospital for three weeks, after which 
lie was ordered to Stone River, where he was detailed for service with 
the artillery, as a member of a battery command. Later he went to 
Georgia, and to him and some comrades was assigned the task of 
■ taking eighteen hundred steers through to Sherman's army to be 
slaughtered for beef. They had several fights on the way with rebels, 
who thought that they also might enjoy a plate of beef, and they were 
fired upon by bushwhackers. Mr. Black received an honorable discharge 
in Georgia. His health was greatly impaired by the rigors and hard- 
ships of war, and he even yet feels the effect of his severe military serv- 
ice, but he has never regreted the sacrifice he made for his country 
and the preservation of the Union, and certainly he deserves the grati- 
tude of the nation for what he accomplished. He now maintains pleas- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 675 

ant relationship with his old army comrades through his membership 
in the Grand Army post. Both he and his wife are faithful members of 
the Presbyterian church, with which they have been identified for forty 
years. 



HENRY W. HELVE Y. 

Henry Whitman Helvey, now deceased, became one of the pioneer 
settlers of Jefferson county and for many years was identified with its 
farming interests. He so conducted his efforts as to win prosperity 
and at the same time gain and retain the respect and confidence of his 
fellow men. He was a native son of Indiana, born in 1842. His 
parents were Joseph and Mary Helvey, who became early residents of 
the state and are represented elsewhere in this work in connection with 
the sketch of Jasper Helvey. They first, however, went to Missouri 
and later to Iowa, settling in Flint county, that state, in 1855. Subse- 
quently they located in Otoe county, Nebraska, when the Otoe Indians 
were still residents of that part of the state. 

Henry W. Helvey was reared amid the wild scenes of pioneer life, 
accompanying his parents on their various removals, and the work of 
the farm early became familiar to him. He became a soldier of the 
Union army in the Civil war, enlisting in the Fifth Missouri Cavalry, 
in which he served with credit and honor. He was a member of Captain 
Van Zant's company, and the regiment was commanded by Colonel 
Pinnich, of St. Joseph, Missouri. It was organized at Nebraska City 
and Hamburg, and was composed of stalwart men who, loyal to the 
cause they espoused, made for their regiment a most creditable and 
honorable record. Mr. Helvey was at the front for thirteen months 



676 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

and saw active service. He was then honorably discharged and re- 
turned to his old home. 

It was in the year 1861 that Mr. Helvey was united in marriage 
to Miss Rachel Hughes, a lady of culture and of good family. She 
was born in Missouri and is a daughter of John and Malinda (Craig) 
Hughes, the former a native of Illinois and the latter of Indiana. They 
were residents of Missouri, however, for many years, and were long 
known as worthy citizens of Nebraska City. The father devoted his 
attention to agricultural pursuits and in that way provided for his 
family. His death occurred at the age of seventy-eight years, and his 
wife passed away in Jefferson county, Nebraska, when seventy-eight 
years of age. They held membership with the Methodist church, were 
deeply interested in its growth and upbuilding and Mr. Hughes in his 
political views was a Republican. In their family were seven children : 
Harriet ; Henry, who was a soldier of the Civil war and died at Daykin, 
Jefferson county, Nebraska; Ellen; Benjamin; Mrs. Helvey; Lizzie; 
and Priscilla, now deceased. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Helvey were born five children : John, who is an 
industrious and active farmer now residing upon the old homestead, 
married Miss Martha Lightbody, a daughter of Isaac Lightbody, who 
was a soldier of the Civil war, and became a prominent citizen of Ne- 
braska. Mrs. Martha Helvey died in 1895, leaving two children, 
Bessie Levina and Dorca Dale. The other members of the family of 
Mrs. Rachel Helvey are Mrs. Mamie Baker, Mrs. Lydia Smith, Mrs. 
Nellie Chapman, and Emma, the latter at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Helvey continued to make their home in 
Missouri until 1872, when they removed to Jefferson county, Nebraska. 
Here he entered a homestead claim which is now occupied by his widow 
and son. It comprises one hundred and sixty acres of rich and arable 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 677 

land, and Mr. Helvey continued its cultivation up to the time of his 
death, transforming it into a productive tract, the well tilled fields yield- 
ing to him a golden crop for the care and labor he bestowed upon it. 
He voted with the Republican party and was a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. His death occurred when he was but forty 
years of age. and was the occasion of deep regret among his many 
friends as well as his immediate family. He was honored by all for 
his sterling worth, his life having been characterized by manly princi- 
ples and by unfaltering devotion to duty. He was ever fearless in 
advocacy of his honest convictions, and manifested in citizenship the 
same patriotic spirit which prompted him to join the boys in blue at 
•the time of the Civil war. After her husband's death Mrs. Helvey took 
up the work of managing the farm ,and rearing the family. She care- 
fully guided her children in all the things which go to make honorable 
manhood and womanhood, and they became a credit to her. She is a 
member of the United Brethren church, and she instructed her chil- 
dren in that religious faith. Her marked devotion to her family is 
most commendable and worthy of emulation. By all who know her 
she is held in the highest regard, and it is with pleasure that we present 
her record to our readers because hers is a wide and favorable acquain- 
tance in Jefferson county. 



ISAAC LIGHTBODY. 

When pioneer conditions existed throughout Nebraska, Isaao 
Lightbody became a resident of Saline county and secured one of the 
homesteads of that portion of the state. He arrived in 1869, and all 
to him was an unbroken prairie, not a furrow having been turned or 



678 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

an improvement made. With resolute spirit he set to work to conquer 
the frontier conditions and to utilize the possibilities of the state in the 
acquirement of a comfortable competence, and in his work he has 
succeeded. He is a native son of Illinois, his birth having occurred in 
Peoria county on the 30th of March, 1845. His father, John Light- 
body, was born in Ireland and was of the Protestant faith. When 
eighteen years of age he came to the United States and established 
his home in Peoria county, Illinois, in 1840. He was there married 
to Miss Caroline Ticknor, who was born in New York. She is now 
deceased, but John Lightbody is still living and makes his home with 
his son Isaac, at the age of eighty-six years. Throughout his business 
career he followed the occupation of farming. His political allegiance 
has been given to the Democracy, and his religious faith is that of the 
Methodist church. In the family of this worthy couple were nine chil- 
dren. 

Isaac Lightbody acquired his education in the schools of Peoria 
county, Illinois, and was reared in that locality. He was among the 
brave soldier boys, being a youth of but eighteen years when in response 
to his country's need he enlisted at Peoria in November, 1863, donning 
the blue uniform of the nation. He went to the south as a member 
of Company E, Twelfth Illinois Cavalry. He had previously en- 
listed in the Eighty-sixth Illinois Infantry, and went to the south, par- 
ticipating in the battle of Perryville, Kentucky, but because of his 
youth he was sent back to Illinois. He joined the Twelfth Illinois Cav- 
alry under the command of Captain. Strong, who was later succeeded 
by Captain Redman, while Colonel Davis commanded the regiment. He 
went to Camp Butler at Spring-field and later to St. Louis, Missouri, 
being stationed at Camp Jackson, when with his comrades he was put 
on transport boats and proceeded in that way to New Orleans. The 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 679 

regiment was a rough rider cavalry, and the men did gallant service 
in scouting and fighting, making a record second to none in the entire 
country for bravery and loyalty. The Davis raid from Baton Rouge 
to Liberty, Mississippi, was a notable event, being made in ten days 
and resulting in the capture of three hundred prisoners and three 
pieces of artillery. The next day the troops participated in a hard 
fight with two rebel regiments and returned with a large number of 
Confederate prisoners. Fifteen hundred negro contrabands followed 
them back on foot or on mules, this being one of the wonderful sights 
included in the war pictures. Later Mr. Lightbody was in General 
Davis" raid from Baton Rouge to Mobile. Alabama, which occurred 
in December, 1864. He participated in many engagements and skir- 
mishes in that part of the country and later returned to Pasagula Bay 
and to New Orleans. Subsequently the regiment was at Baton Rouge 
until January 1, 1865, and on the 7th of January, of the same year, 
arrived at Vicksburg, Mississippi. The troops were engaged in scout- 
ing in Vicksburg and in Memphis, Tennessee, and afterward partici- 
pated in the Osborn raid at Gaines Landing, Arkansas. Mr. Light- 
bodv saw some very hard service and became familiar with all the 
rigors and hardships of war. He afterward did scouting duty in Ten- 
nessee and in Alabama, later returned to Memphis and afterward went 
to Alexandria, Louisiana. In August of that year he went to Houston, 
Texas, and was without rations for five days at Cypress creek in the 
vicinity of Houston. Following war orders, he proceeded to Hemp- 
stead, Texas, and on the 18th of September, he was promoted to a 
position on the staff of General Imboden, engaged in reconstruction 
duty. At Waverly, Texas, he had charge of artillery which was shipped 
to Houston, Texas, and at the latter place he had charge of government 
horses and mules. In the Red River expedition Mr. Lightbody partici- 



68o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

pated in the battles of Sabine Crossroads, Narraganza Bend and Yel- 
low Bayou. He was honorably discharged on the 29th day of May, 
1866, and with a most splendid military record he returned to his home, 
for through three long years he had faithfully served his country as 
a defender of the old flag, performing every task that devolved upon him, 
\vhether it led him into the thickest of the fight or called him to the 
lonely picket line. 

Mr. Lightbody continued to make his home in Illinois, and in 
1868 was married there to Miss Arminda Clark, who was born in 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and went to Fulton county, Illinois, 
with her parents, Richard and Hannah (McFeeters) Clark. Her 
father was born in Pennsylvania and died in Illinois, while the mother, 
also a native of the Keystone state, passed away in Stark county, Illi- 
nois, at the age of seventy years. In their family were three children, 
of whom two are living. 

In the year following his marriage Mr. Lightbody came with his 
young wife to Nebraska, settling in Saline county in 1869. He se- 
cured a homestead claim and was one of the organizers of the county, 
voting at the first election. He also served as a member of the election 
board as its clerk, and was a member of the first school board of his lo- 
cality. He took a very active and helpful part in the improvement and 
upbuilding of that portion of the state, and is numbered among the 
pioneers who laid broad and deep the foundation for the present pros- 
perity and progress of the community. His home was a combination 
of a dugout and log cabin and in that he lived for some years, and then 
went to Lyon county, Kansas, settling near Emporia, where he remained 
for six months, and then returned to Saline county, Nebraska, where he 
continued to reside for two years. On the expiration of that period 
he sold his property there and came to Jefferson county, securing one 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 68 1 

hundred and twenty acres of land. His farm is now a valuable one, 
and is well improved with good houses, substantial barns and all mod- 
ern accessories in the way of good machinery. The fields are under a 
high state of cultivation and he has good grades of stock. In addition 
to this property he owns another tract of eighty acres about three 
miles south of the town of Daykin. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Lightbody have been born seven children : 
Emma : George McCellan; Harvey; Grace Adela Black; Grover C. ; 
Frank Folsom ; and Isaac Alonzo. They also lost several children, 
namely : Martha Helvey ; John Allen, who died at the age of nineteen 
years; and three that died in childhood. 

Mr. Lightbody is independent in his political views, voting for the 
men rather than the party. He is identified with the Grand Army of 
the Republic; holding membership with Daykin Post No. 266, and he 
is a Mason, belonging to Aldrich Lodge No. 4, F. & A. M. He is 
also connected with the Modern Woodmen of America, and in these 
fraternities enjoys the high regard of his brethren because of his fidel- 
ity to the beneficent teachings of the different orders. He is a well 
informed man, public-spirited and progressive, and has taken an active 
part in the early development of Nebraska as well as in promoting its 
later-day progress and improvement. 



CALEB M. BACON. 

Caleb M. Bacon is the owner of one of the finest farms in Eureka 
precinct, Jefferson county, comprising two hundred and forty acres of 
valuable land, which is rich and arable and has been placed under a 
high state of cultivation, so that it yields to the owner a golden tribute 



682 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

for the care and labor he bestows upon it. In the midst of his well 
tilled fields stands an attractive and commodious country home, and 
near by are excellent outbuildings, including a large barn, sheds and 
cribs. There is a grove upon the place and a good orchard, while the 
latest improved machinery facilitates the farm work. In the pastures 
are seen high-grade stock, and the place is divided into meadows, past- 
ure lands and tilled fields by well kept fences. 

Mr. Bacon is one of the representative citizens of the county. He 
has visited many parts of the world, and in this way has gained a com- 
prehensive knowledge of foreign countries such as the ordinary man 
does not possess. He was born in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, April 
23, 1826, and is a representative in the sixtli generation of the family 
in America, the ancestral home having been established at Wethers- 
field, Connecticut, at an early period in the settlement of the new world. 
The family is of English lineage. Nathaniel Bacon as far back as 1739 
was a prominent man of the Middletown parish, and Daniel H. Bacon 
was a man of influence in his community at Farmington, Connecticut. 
Daniel Bacon, the grandfather of our subject, became a soldier of the 
American army in the Revolutionary war, and being captured by the 
British died while held as a prisoner of war on the prison ship Jersey. 

Daniel H. Bacon, the father of our subject, was born in Wethers- 
field, Connecticut, and in early manhood married Lydia Ellis, who was 
born in Hampton county, Massachusetts, February 1, 17S3. The fol- 
lowing children were born of this marriage: Chauncy, deceased; Oli- 
ver; Eunice; Nancy; Lewis; Hannah; Chloe; and Daniel E. For his 
second wife Daniel H. Bacon married Mary Zuber, who was born in 
Canton Bern, Switzerland, August 10, 1789, and was one of a family 
of four children, one son and three daughters. Her father was Moritz 
Zuber, who came with his family to America during the early girlhood 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 683 

of Mrs. Bacon. Her death occurred in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, 
in September, 1836, when she was forty-seven years of age, and because 
of her many excellent qualities her friends felt that they had suffered 
a great loss. She left five children : Caleb ; John Harvey and Lucy, 
both deceased; Hector, who died in Kansas in 1899; and Homer, who 
is living in Delevan, Morris county, Kansas. The father died on the 
old home farm in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, May 26, 1850, at the 
advanced age of eighty-four years. His entire life had been devoted 
to agricultural pursuits, and thus he had provided for the wants of his 
family. His political allegiance was given to the Whig party, and for 
many years he served as captain of a company of the state militia of New 
York state. He was a man of fine physique, strong powers of endur- 
ance and was also a man of firm convictions, unfaltering in support of 
what he believed to be right, either in matters of citizenship or in those 
things which affected his business and social life. 

Caleb M. Bacon was reared on the old home farm and attended 
the public schools. After the death of his mother he went to live with 
relatives, and when nineteen years of age he went to sea, going to New 
Bedford, Massachusetts, where he joined the crew of a whaling 
vessel, and upon such voyages he sailed for thirteen years. 
He visited many parts of the globe in this way; went to the 
Indian ocean, rounded Cape Horn, cruised in the waters of the Pacific 
and visited the Sandwich Islarjds. He also visited the island of St. 
Helena, on which Napoleon spent his last days, and he sailed in the 
Polar seas. He was gone upon one voyage for twenty-nine months. 
By visiting various ports he gained a broad knowledge of different 
countries and their people. The life of a man engaged in whaling is 
fraught with many dangers, and Mr. Bacon had many escapes while at- 
tempting to capture the leviathan of the deep, and on other occasions he 



684 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

was in severe storms in which it seemed that the vessel would never 
again reach harbor. 

Mr. Bacon saved the money he earned on these different whaling 
voyages, and when he had acquired sufficient capital he made in- 
vestments in land, purchasing property in Lee county, Illinois, in 1851, 
1852, and later in 1858. He took up his abode upon a farm in that 
county in 1858 and carried on agricultural pursuits there with good 
success until 1883, when he sold out and spent the succeeding year in 
Cherokee county, Iowa. In the fall of 1883 he arrived in Jefferson 
county, Nebraska, and purchased the homestead farm of Samuel P. 
Kellcy, on which he has since resided, and which he has developed 
until it is one of the finest country properties of this part of the state. 

Mr. Bacon was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Brittain, who 
was born in Columbia county, Pennsylvania, in 1833, a daughter of 
William Brittain, whose birth occurred in the Keystone state and who 
was a son of William Brittain, Sr., who was born of English parentage. 
The mother of Mrs. Bacon bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Oman 
and was also born in, Pennsylvania. Mr. Brittain followed farming 
as a life work and died in Illinois, where his wife also passed away. 
He voted for the men and measures of the Republican party, and gave 
his religious support to the Methodist church, of which he was long a 
faithful member. In the family were three sons and seven daughters, 
and one of the sons, John Brittain, who was a soldier of the Civil war, 
is now living in Morris county, Kansas. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Bacon have been born five children, of whom 
but two are living. Rhoda M. is the wife of John Edwards, who re- 
sides near Alexander, Nebraska, and they had six children, one of 
whom died in infancy, while the others are Lulu, Caleb Dudley, Sarah 
Ann, Ada and Vadna. Homer O. Bacon, who was born in Lee county, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 685 

Illinois, and is now upon the homestead farm, married Anna Smith, 
of Jefferson county, and they have a daughter, Mary E. Bacon. The 
three children of the Bacon family who have passed away are : Daniel, 
the first born, who died in Nebraska at the age of eighteen years; 
Elizabeth, who died in Illinois, at the age of two years; and Mary, 
who died at the age of fifteen. 

Mr. Bacon is a ruling elder of the Presbyterian church, and he 
gives his support to all measures that tend to uplift humanity, includ- 
ing the causes of education, temperance and religion. He has now 
reached the seventy-eighth milestone on life's journey, and his has 
been an honorable and upright career in which he has won creditable 
financial success and also gained an excellent reputation for high and 
manly principles. 



DANIEL AXTELL. 

Daniel Axtell is a man of excellent business ability now engaged in 
general farming and stock-raising in Jefferson county. His landed pos- 
sessions aggregate eleven hundred and twenty acres, all of which has 
been acquired through his capable efforts, careful management and strong 
determination. He has been a resident of Nebraska since 1870, having 
in November of that year taken up his abode on a homestead claim in 
Fillmore county. He was then in limited financial circumstances, but 
he has steadily advanced in the path of prosperity and is now one of 
the substantial residents of his portion of the state. 

Mr. Axtell was born in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, near Mer- 
cer, on the 29th of May, 1846. The family is of English lineage and 
was founded in America in colonial days. The great-grandfather of 



686 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

our subject was a patriot of the Revolutionary war, and Amzi Axtell 
was a soldier of the war of 1S12. Strete Axtell, the father of Daniel, 
was born in Pennsylvania and there spent the days of his boyhood and 
youth. He was married in Mercer county, that state, to Miss Mary 
A. Boyd, who was born in Ireland and was a member of a Protestant 
family of that country. Her father, James Boyd, also a native of the 
Emerald Isle, brought his family to America in her girlhood days and 
she was, therefore, reared and educated in Pennsylvania. After his 
marriage Mr. Axtell removed with his bride to Trumbull county, Ohio, 
settling near Warren ; afterwards moved to Athens county, Ohio, in 
i860, where Mrs. Axtell died in 1865 at the age of fifty-two years. 
She was his second wife. He was afterward married in Ohio, and by 
that union there were five sons, and the later years of his life were 
spent in Jefferson county, Nebraska, and throughout his business ca- 
reer he followed farming, engaging in that pursuit in Pennsylvania 
and Ohio and in this state. His political allegiance was given to the 
Republican party and he was a consistent member of the Presbyterian 
church. By his second marriage he had seven children, namely : Mar- 
tha, James A., Robert, Daniel, Jane, Joseph and William. Of the five 
sons born of his third marriage one of these, George Axtell, is now- 
living in Fairbury, Nebraska. 

Daniel Axtell was a youth of eleven years when he accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Trumbull county, Ohio. He was reared 
to farm life, early becoming familiar with the duties and labors incident 
to the development of the fields. During the period of the Civil war, 
when but fifteen years of age, he went to Athens county, Ohio, and 
there enlisted in the Ohio National Guard, becoming a member of 
Company C, Thirty-sixth Ohio Infantry, under Captain Thomas 
Angel. He was in the service for about two years and was in active 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 687 

duty at the time of Morgan's raid through Ohio. On the expiration 
of the war he was honorably discharged. 

On the nth of February, 1869, in Athens county, Ohio, Mr. Ax- 
tell was united in marriage to Miss Hester D. Howard, who was bom 
in Meigs county, Ohio, and spent her girlhood days in Athens county, 
her education being acquired in the public schools. She is a grand- 
daughter of Zadock Howard, also a native of Ohio, and a daughter of 
Lieutenant A. J. Howard, who was an officer of the Civil war. He 
was born in Morgan county of the Buckeye state and at the time of 
the hostilities between the north and the south he offered his services 
in defense of the old flag and became a member of Company D, Sixty- 
third Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He now resides in Ohio at the age 
of seventy-six years. Throughout his business career he has carried 
on farming. Politically he is a Republican, socially is connected with 
the Grand Army of the Republic and religiously with the United 
Brethren church. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Catherine 
Clark, was born in Virginia, was a daughter of John Clark, also a 
native of that state, and died in Ohio in 1880 at the age of fifty-two 
years. By her marriage she was the mother of ten children : Sarah 
J.; Hester D., now Mrs. Axtell ; Mary E. ; Charles P.; Alcinda E. ; 
Philip A.; Mary A.; Alma; Ida; and Edith. 

After his marriage Mr. Axtell continued to make his home in 
Ohio until 1870, when he came with his family to Fillmore county, 
Nebraska. There he homsteaded one hundred and sixty acres of gov- 
ernment land, and that he has had faith in the future of this state, its 
development and progress, is shown by the fact that he has since made 
investment in realty to the extent of twelve hundred and twenty acres. 
His home is now in Richland precinct, Jefferson county, and his 
farm is a very valuable and productive estate. Upon it he has erected 



688 SOU THE ASTERN NEBRASKA. 

a good house and has erected good barns and other necessary outbuild- 
ings. He has feed lots, rich pasture lands and highly cultivated fields. 
There is considerable timber on the place in the shape of a good grove, 
and he has a fine bearing orchard. A windmill pumps the water for the 
stock, and the latest improved machinery facilitates the farm work, 
and, in fact, in all modern accessories and improvements the farm is 
well supplied. In addition to his property here Mr. Axtell owns a good 
ranch in Holt county, upon which he has a large number of cattle. He 
also owns two fine residences in Fairbury, and he has lived to see 
many changes in the county. When he came here it was necessary 
for him to go fifty miles to mill. The homes of the settlers were widely 
scattered and few of the improvements known to the older east could 
be enjoyed here upon the frontier, but all pioneer conditions have passed 
away and Nebraska furnishes splendid opportunities to its agricultur- 
ists. As a business man he is enterprising and progressive, and he 
carries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. He 
has become widely known as a farmer and stock-raiser, and his enter- 
prise and industry have enabled him to gradually work his way up- 
ward until splendid success has rewarded his labors. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Axtell have been born eight children: James A., 
a successful and popular teacher of Jefferson county for fifteen years, 
who is now superintendent of the Jansen schools ; Ida Jane, deceased ; 
William B., who passed away at the age of thirty years; Charles O. ; 
Linga E., who is engaged in conducting a stock ranch in Holt county, 
Kebraska ; Frank D. ; Joseph E. ; and Idella M. The children have all 
been provided with good educational privileges, thus preparing them 
for life's practical and responsible duties. Mr. Axtell keeps well in- 
formed on the questions and issues of the day, gives his allegiance to 
the Republican party, has frequently served as delegate to its conven- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 689 

tions and has filled the office of justice of the peace. His wife is a mem- 
ber of the United Brethren church, and they are both widely and fav- 
orably known throughout the community. He has found in the oppor- 
tunities of the great and growing west the advantages which he sought for 
business success, and has worked on persistently and energetically until 
he is now the possessor of very valuable realty holdings and is num- 
bered among the heavy tax-payers of Jefferson county. 



W. H. AVERY. 

On the list of pioneer settlers of southeastern Nebraska appears 
the name of W. H. Avery, who took up his abode in Jefferson county 
in 1866. He had but recently been discharged from the army after 
serving his country as a soldier of the Civil war. He then came west 
to fight the battles of the frontiersman, who finds an enemy in the pio- 
neer conditions with their incidental hardships and trials. During the 
years which have since passed away he has come off conqueror in the 
strife, and is to-day one of the representatives and well-to-do citizens 
of Jefferson county. 

Mr. Avery was born in Summit county, Ohio, on the 4th of April, 
1837. His father, James Christopher Avery, was born in New York 
and was a son of James Avery, Sr., whose birth occurred in Massa- 
chusetts. The ancestry of the family can be traced back to Nathaniel 
Avery, who resided in Groton, Massachusetts, at a very early period 
in the development of this country. James Christopher Avery was 
united in marriage to Miss Ruth Coleman, who was born in Connecti- 
cut, and was a daughter of Joseph and Sarah (Bishop) Coleman, who 
were likewise natives of that state. Mr. James C. Avery was a Whig 



690 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

in his political views in early life and afterward endorsed the principles 
upon which the Republican party is founded. He died in New Orleans, 
Louisiana, at the early age of thirty-five years, and his wife is still 
living aged eight-seven years. She is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and her Christianity forms a part of her everyday life. 
To this worthy couple were born six children, of whom four reached 
mature years: Edward, who has lived in Sabetha, Kansas, since 1858; 
W. H., of this review ; Sawyer, of Woodson, Kansas ; and Myron, who 
died while serving as a soldier of the Civil war as a member of the 
Seventy-first Indiana Infantry. 

William H. Avery spent the days of his early boyhood in Sum- 
mit county, Ohio, and when ten years of age accompanied his parents 
on their removal to Wayne county, that state, where he pursued his edu- 
cation. In 1855 he went to Vermilion county, Illinois, settling upon 
a farm, and in course of time his labors resulted in the development 
of an excellent property. In 1859 he was united in marriage in Dan- 
ville, Illinois, to Miss Clarissa Waggaman, and they have traveled life's 
journey happily together for forty-five years, their mutual love and 
confidence increasing as time has passed by. Mrs. Avery is a native 
of Illinois who spent the days of her girlhood in that state, acquiring 
her education in its public schools. Her parents were Andrew and 
Tabitha (Lyons) Waggaman, and the latter was a daughter of Jotham 
Lyons. Both Mr. and Mrs. Waggaman remained residents of Illinois 
until called to their final rest, and the father devoted his energies to 
agricultural pursuits, while his political allegiance was given to the 
Democracy and his religious faith was that of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, to which his wife also belonged. He died at the age of seventy- 
three years and his wife when about fifty-nine years of age. In 
their family were seven children, one of whom, Samuel, was a soldier 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 691 

of the seventy-ninth Illinois Infantry and died in Barton county, Kan- 
sas, in 1903. The others are Harriet, now deceased; Isabella; Frank, 
who was a soldier of an Illinois regiment and was reported missing 
after an engagement, so that it is supposed he was killed as he has 
never been heard from since; Hannah, who is living in Oklahoma; 
Rose Ann, deceased; and Mrs. Avery. 

After his marriage Mr. Avery began farming in Illinois and was 
identified with agricultural pursuits there until the 23d of July, 1863, 
when he enlisted in Vermilion county, Illinois, for service in the Union 
army, becoming a member of Company E. One Hundred and Fifteenth 
Indiana Infantry, under Captain Edward Swanders and Colonel Mahon. 
The regiment was ordered south and was attached to the Army of the 
Cumberland under General Burnside. Mr. Avery was in active serv- 
ice against the troops under General Joseph Wheeler. He was sta- 
tioned at Bull's Gap for six weeks, and took part in an engagement 
with the troops under General Longstreet. He was afterward in the 
battles of Knoxville, Tennessee, of Cumberland Gap and Strawberry 
Plains. For a time he lay ill in a hospital at Nicholsville, Tennessee, 
and was detailed for a time as hospital steward at Camp Nelson near 
Nashville. In January, 1864, he was ordered back to Indiana and was 
honorably discharged in February. 

After his return from the army Mr. Avery continued to engage in 
farming in Illinois until 1865, when he went to Kansas, and came to Jef- 
ferson county, Nebraska, in the spring of 1866, securing a homestead 
claim on which he built a log cabin, fifteen by fifteen feet. For seven years 
he continued his farming operations here, and then in 1873 returned to 
Wayne county, Ohio, where he remained for eighteen months. He 
then again came to Nebraska, and was once more identified with agri- 
cultural pursuits here until 1897, when he took up his abode in Lin- 



692 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

coin, in order that he might provide his children with better educational 
privileges. There he resided for four years, and then took up his abode 
in Fairbury, where he has a fine modern residence. He still owns the 
old homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, and in addition has a 
quarter section near Reynolds, so that he owns altogether three hun- 
dred and twenty acres of valuable land, which is well improved and re- 
turns to him an excellent income. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Avery have been born five children, Edward 
W., who is a traveling salesman living in Chicago, Illinois; Frank, of 
Glen Rock, Wyoming, and a railroad employe; F. Roy, of Minneapolis, 
Minnesota; Mrs. Florence Dunham, of Summerfield, Kansas; and May. 
Miss May is an accomplished musician, and was educated in the musi- 
cal department of Lincoln University. She is also a member of Uni- 
vera Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. The 
three eldest children have all been successful and popular school teachers. 

Mr. Avery is a Republican in his political views, strong and in- 
flexible in his advocacy of the party principles. He has served as 
county commissioner and has been a delegate to the conventions of his 
party. He belongs to Russell Post, G. A. R., and he and his family 
are all members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he has 
served as class leader. He is very active in the work of the temperance 
cause and has frequently been a delegate to temperance conventions held 
in Lincoln. He and his wife are hospitable people, whose home is 
always open for the reception of their many friends. The circle of their 
friends is extensive, and they are well known in the county which has 
been so long their place of residence. An analyzation of the life record 
of Mr. Avery shows that there are many elements in it which are worthy 
of the highest commendation, for he has ever been honorable in busi- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 693 

ness, patriotic in military service, loyal in citizenship and faithful in 
obligations of home and of friendship. 



HENRY T. BOWER. 

Henry T. Bower, who has only recently retired from the personal 
conduct of one of the best farming and nursery enterprises in southeast- 
ern Nebraska, is a man, who, though not yet to be considered old in 
either years or vigor, has had a long career of prosperous activity. He 
has been successful mainly because he has recognized and embraced the 
opportunities that have come in his way. He has displayed much en- 
terprise in the management and development of his business, and 
through his diligence and constant application has gained a degree 
of material prosperity of which he may well be proud. He has like- 
wise been a good citizen wherever his life has been cast, and especially 
honored as a veteran of the Civil war. 

Mr. Bower was born in Ashtabula county, Ohio, June 3, 1845, 
being the eldest of the seven children born to Paul and Hannah (Bow- 
man) Bower, both natives of Germany. His father, who was born 
in 1820, emigrated to America and located in Ohio in 1833. He was 
married in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and he and his wife resided in 
Ohio till their deaths, which occurred in the respective years of 1889 
and 1857. 

Mr. Bower was reared in Ohio and received his education in the 
common schools. At the age of seventeen, in 1862, he enlisted in the 
Fourteenth Ohio Battery, was sent south to the western armies, and 
under Sherman participated in several of the famous battles of the war 
and was on the famous marches through Georgia until after Atlanta, 



694 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

and at the engagement at Kingston, Georgia, was wounded and com- 
pelled to remain on crutches over five months, but was with his com- 
mand all this time. He was a gunner, and was called the best of the 
Sixteenth Army Corps. He was discharged in August 1X1.5. In 1869 he 
removed from Ohio to Nebraska and took up a claim in Jefferson coun- 
ty, near where the village of Bower now stands, this place having been 
named after the family. After much hard work he was possessed of a 
fine farm and a thriving nursery, and the latter department of his busi- 
ness has since become one of the finest and most reliable in the state. 
He gave his personal attention to this enterprise until 1899, and then 
moved into the city of Fairbury, leaving the farm and nursery to the 
control of his son Perry, who has ably carried it on since that time. 
They have a large trade throughout the surrounding counties and even 
into the adjacent states, and the reputation of their products is first 
class and above disparagement. 

February 3, 1870, Mr. Bower was married, in Michigan, to Miss 
Mary A. Norman, a native of Ohio and a daughter of English parents, 
who came to America in 1840. Three children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Bowers : Perry L., mentioned above ; Lavina, who died February 
23, 1899; and Rena, at home, and a proficient devotee of the arts of 
music and painting, drawing and decorating, being a most charming 
young lady. Mr. Bower resides on K street, between Seventh and 
Eighth, in a beautifully situated home, surrounded with shrubbery and 
ornamental trees, and there he is spending his quiet and happy days 
with his wife and daughter. He affiliates with the Grand Army of the 
Republic and with Fairbury Lodge No. 35, F. & A. M. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 695 

EDWIN J. BILL. 

Edwin J. Bill, a retired farmer and ex-soldier of the Civil war, 
has lived in Jefferson county, Nebraska, for the past fifteen years. He 
has passed the seventy-fifth milestone on his life's journey, and has 
devoted his best efforts and greater part of his years to useful work, 
so that he deservedly enjoys the esteem and high regard of his many 
friends throughout the country. 

Air. Bill was born in that part of Genesee county afterward known 
as Wyoming county, New York, on May 30, 1828, of a family whose 
strong traits were honest individuality and moral character. His 
grandfather gave seven years' service in the Revolutionary war, so that 
the present descendants might have membership in the Sons and Daugh- 
ters of the American Revolution. Joseph Bill, the father of Edwin J. 
Bill, was a blacksmith in New York, and a strong Whig and Republi- 
can in politics. He married Esther Tracy, who was born in Mohawk 
Flats, New York, of an old family of that state. He lived to be 
eighty-four years old, and his only child was Edwin J. Bill. 

Mr. Bill was reared on a farm near Jamestown, Chautauqua 
county, New York, and in 1855 went to Grant county, Wisconsin, near 
Boscobel, where he lived until the war came on. In July, 1861, at 
Lincoln's call for thirty thousand troops, he enlisted at that place in 
Company H, Seventh Wisconsin Infantry, under Captain Mark Fina- 
cam. He was sent to Virginia, and took part in many of the most 
important battles of the war. He was in the second battle of Bull 
Run, at Antietam, was wounded in the breast and leg at Gaines Mills, 
carrying a bullet in his breast for six weeks. He belonged to General 
McDowell's corps. He received his honorable discharge in February, 
1863, and after a furlough veteranized and enlisted in Company C, 
Ninth New York Cavalry, under Captain Cheney. He belonged to 



696 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

General Sheridan's gallant troopers, and was with that famous leader 
in the Shenandoah valley, at Winchester, when Sheridan made his 
famous ride, at Fisher's Hill, at Stone River, and many other engage- 
ments of the war. He received his honorable discharge in Virginia 
in 1865, and returned home after a most creditable army record. He 
was regimental orderly most of the time he was with the Ninth New 
York, and had many hairbreadth escapes. 

After the war he returned to Wisconsin, was in Minnesota for a 
year, was in Sauk county, Wisconsin, for six years, and in 1872 went 
to Ottawa county, Kansas, locating near Minneapolis, where he was 
successfully engaged in farming until 1888. He took up his residence 
in Jefferson county, Nebraska, in 1888, and has lived on one farm 
since that time. 

Mr. Bill was married in Randolph, New York, while he was home 
on his veteran's furlough in 1863, to Miss Amanda Emery, who has 
been his faithful and constant companion for forty years, and they share 
equally in the honor of their accomplishments in life. She was born 
in Chautauqua county, New York, a daughter of Noah and Irene (Mor- 
gan) Emery, who lived and died in New York state, having been the 
parents of thirteen children, three sons and ten daughters; one of the 
sons was major in the Ninth New York Cavalry, and was killed at 
Meadow Brook, before Richmond. Mr. and Mrs. Bill have no chil- 
dren, but have adopted a daughter, Elma Phillips, whom they reared 
and educated as their own, and she now lives at Aurora, Brookings 
county, South Dakota. Mr. Bill is a dyed-in-the-wool Republican, and 
in politics as well as in moral questions has strong convictions as to the 
right and wrong. He is a member of the Congregational church. He 
is a well informed citizen, taking much interest in matters affecting 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 697 

the public welfare, and is held in high esteem for his manhood and worthy 
qualities. 



I. S. GARDNER. 

In the early days when this section of Nebraska was thrown open 
to settlement and men from various parts of the country secured claims 
in Jefferson county I. S. Gardner obtained a homestead and has since 
been identified with agricultural interests and has been a helpful factor 
in the upbuilding and substantial progress of this community. He ar- 
rived here on the 18th of April, 1868, and secured the northwest quar- 
ter of section 12 in Richland precinct. He was born in Jefferson 
:ounty, Indiana, near Madison, in June, 1845. His paternal grand- 
father, Samuel Gardner, was a native of New York, whence he re- 
moved to Ohio and there spent his remaining days. His son, William 
Gardner, was born in Clermont county, Ohio, was reared in that state 
and there married Asenth Short, also a native of the Buckeye state and 
a daughter of Isaac Short, who died in Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. William 
Gardner removed to Jefferson county, Indiana, and subsequently re- 
turned to Ohio, where they remained for a number of years. The 
father then came to Nebraska and secured a homestead in Richland 
precinct in 1868. Here he carried on agricultural pursuits until 1900, 
when he retired from farm life and returned to Clermont county, Ohio. 
There he died at the age of eighty-six years. He was a devoted mem- 
ber of the United Brethren church, as was his wife, who passed away 
at the age of eighty-three years. Their children are as follows : Elisha 
B., who was a veteran of the Civil war, serving for four years and 
died in Arkansas ; William, who was a soldier of the Eighty-second Ohio 



698 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Regiment during the war of the rebellion, for three years; Mrs. Sarah 
A. LaFever, of Ohio; Isaac S. ; Mrs. J. Littrell, of Endicott, Nebraska; 
Mrs. Mary Eberstine, of Kansas; and Perry, who is living in Ohio. 

Mr. I. S. Gardner was reared to manhood on his father's farms in 
Ohio and Indiana and had the advantage of good home training, being 
taught to labor industriously and to follow honorable, straightforward 
methods. His education was acquired in the public schools o£ the states 
mentioned, and after reaching years of maturity he was married in 
1867 in Jefferson county, Indiana, to Miss Viola Bacon, a native of 
Jennings county, Indiana. Her parents were Hiram and Malvina 
(Davis) Bacon, and the former died in Indiana, while the latter passed 
away at Nebraska. The year following their marriage Mr. Gardner 
came to Nebraska and located on the northwest quarter of section 12 
in Richland precinct.. He built a sod house eighteen by twenty-four 
feet, and with characteristic energy began the development of his farm. 
There he carried on agricultural pursuits for many years, and in 1896 
he sold his property and went to northwestern Missouri, where he lived 
for six years. On the expiration of that period he returned to this state 
and bought city property. He now has three good houses in Fairbury, 
and his own home is a modern and model residence, very comfortable 
and indicating in its pleasing appointments the refined tastes of the 
owner. 

In the earlv days the Gardner home, which was one of the best 
pioneer homes of the township, was the scene of many revival meetings, 
and it was the headquarters for most of the religious services of those 
days. Mr. Gardner has long been a very active church worker, doing 
all in his power to promote the growth and extend the influence of his 
(denomination. In 1898 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his 
wife, who died on the 26th of March, of that year, in Monroe county, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 699 

Missouri, at the age of forty-eight years. She was a devoted Chris- 
tian woman and a faithful companion and helpmate to her husband. 
There were two children by that marriage. Mrs. Eva Pantier, who is 
now living in Canada; and Amos, at home. In 1899 Mr. Gardner was 
again married, his second union being with Miss Mary Bowers, a daugh- 
ter of Charles Bowers. Her father died in this county in 1892, leav- 
ing three children : Rev. Edward Bowers, who is a minister of the 
United Brethren church at Shelby, Nebraska; Mrs. Gardner; and Mrs. 
Cora Bradshaw, of Fairbury. The mother now lives with Mrs. Gard- 
ner, and prior to her marriage was a successful and capable teacher 
and is a lady of superior education and refinement. In his business 
career Mr. Gardner has met with gratifying and creditable success, 
for he had limited capital when he started out in life on his own ac- 
count. He has made the most of his business opportunities, however, 
and his careful management and well directed efforts have resulted in 
making him one of the substantial residents of Jefferson county. 



THADDEUS TRIMMER. 

Thaddeus Trimmer, one of the prosperous residents of Island 
Grove township, Gage county, Nebraska, and an honored veteran of 
the Civil war, has spent nearly all of his mature years in this state, 
and is known throughout his community for his integrity and personal 
worth. 

He began his career as a soldier by his enlistment in Nebraska in 
1862 in the Second Nebraska Cavalry, under Colonel Furnas and Cap- 
tain Lewis Hill. He became one of the Rough Riders of the northwest. 
This regiment made for itself a gallant record in fighting the hostile 



700 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Indians of the northwest. For a time they were stationed at Omaha, 
later at North Platte and Sioux City, Iowa, and they participated in 
the engagement at Big White Stone Hills, Dakota, where eighteen hun- 
dred Indians were either killed or taken prisoners in battle. Mr. Trim- 
mer received his honorable discharge at Omaha, Nebraska, and returned 
home. 

The birth of Mr. Trimmer occurred in Ohio, August 8, 1840. He 
is a son of Chester and Phoeba Trimmer, of New York, and a grand- 
son of Isaiah Trimmer, of German extraction. Mr. Trimmer's mother 
was a native of Vermont. His parents were married in Ohio, and in 
1856 moved to Clayton county, Iowa. 

Mr. Trimmer was reared in Clayton county, Iowa, and learned 
to work upon the farm. After attaining to mature years he moved in 
i860 to Nebraska, and in 1880 took up his residence at Pleasant Hill 
and established the Park fruit farm. He now has one of the finest 
farm homes in Gage county, and raises all kinds of fruit and has made 
a great success of his enterprise. 

In 1868 Mr. Trimmer was married to Louise Smith, who was born 
in Pennsylvania, a daughter of Alfred Smith, both her parents being 
now deceased. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Trimmer: Albrose, who married Ella Losy and now resides at Repub- 
lican City, Harlan county, Nebraska; Bessie, at home; and two who 
died at the ages of four and twelve years. Mr. Trimmer is a Repub- 
lican in politics, and has served as supervisor of the township for six- 
teen years and is a recognized factor in local matters. Both he and 
his estimable wife are very highly respected throughout the entire 
county, and the success which has come to them is well merited. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 701 

. WILLIAM JAMES JOHNSTON. 
William James Johnston, the veteran mail carrier of Crete, who 
for thirty years has carried the mail daily from the postoffice to the 
Burlington & Missouri depot, has made his home in Nebraska for 
more than a quarter of a century, arriving in this state on the 12th of 
May, 187 1. He was born in Stanbridge, Lower Canada, January 25, 
1846. His father, Alexander T. Johnston, was born in Ireland in 
1814, and went from his native country to the West Indies as a mis- 
sionary, he and his first wife spending five years there in Christian 
Work. He was called upon to mourn the loss of his first wife after their 
removal to Canada, and was afterward married again. A daughter of 
his first marriage, Sophia E. Johnston, was for twelve years a teacher 
in Crete, and is now living in Long Beach, California. Alexander T. 
Johnston was married in Canada to Miss Margaret Maria Arde, of 
Ireland, and they became the parents of six children : William James 
?s the eldest. J. R. Johnston, who resided in Crete for twenty-five 
years, now makes his home in Riverside, California. He is married 
and has four children. A. T. Johnston, named for his father, resides 
in Toronto, Canada. He is married and has five children. Sarah J. 
Johnston is the widow of Charles D. Doll and has two children. An- 
drew G. Johnston died in Beatrice, Nebraska, at the age of forty-three 
years, leaving one son. Julia H. Johnston died in Crete at the age 
of twenty-eight years. The father died in Crete in 1885, and his widow, 
surviving until 1899, passed away at the advanced age of eighty-three 
years. The first member of the family to come to Nebraska was J. R. 
Johnston, who arrived in 1870, and was followed by the other members 
of the family in 1871. One son, A. T. Johnston, was in the Civil war 
for fourteen months and, being captured, was incarcerated in Ander- 



7 o2 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

sonville prison for three months. He joined the army when but four- 
teen years of age. 

William J. Johnston was reared under the parental roof, but owing 
to his eyes being injured in infancy he was not able to acquire any edu- 
cation. During all of his residence here he has been connected with the 
mail service. He has handled many thousands of tons of mail, taking on 
an average of eight hundred pounds per day on his hand wagon from 
the depot to the postoffice. He was also in the government employ for 
twenty-four years, and since the postoffice has been removed to the 
vicinity of the depot he has been in the employ of the Burlington & 
Missouri Railroad Company. 

On the first of March, 1899, Mr. Johnston was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary Vance, who was born in Seward county, Nebraska, 
in 1871, a daughter of Alexander and Lucy (Wright) Vance, the 
former a native of Washington county, Pennsylvania, while the latter 
was born in Hocking county, Ohio. Their marriage was celebrated 
in the Keystone state and^ they became the parents of nine children, 
five sons and four daughters. They removed from Pennsylvania to 
Nebraska in 1869, and the father is still engaged in farming in Seward 
county, this state, but the mother died January 18, 1904, at the age of 
fifty-nine years. They came to the west with some means. Mr. and 
Mrs. Johnston started upon their married life with only a modest httle 
home. In 1903. however, he built his present residence in Crete, and 
in addition he owns five vacant lots in the city. The home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Johnston has been blessed with two little sons, Ralph Alexander, 
born March 28, 1900, and Dean, born December 13, 1902, bright and 
interesting little boys. 

In his political views Mr. Johnston is a Republican and is interested 
in the success and growth of the party, but has never been an office- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 703 

seeker. He belongs to the Bankers' Union, an insurance organization, 
and he is a member of the Episcopal church, in the faith of which he 
was reared, his parents being active and earnest workers of that denom- 
ination, his father serving as senior warden of his church for many 
years both in Canada and Crete. A residence of a third of a century 
in Crete has made Mr. Johnston familiar with its history, and he has 
a wide acquaintance among its older settlers as well as the more recent 
arrivals, and he deserves classification with the honored pioneers. 



MRS. CATHARINE MUFF. 

Mrs. Catharine Muff occupies one of the finest residences in Crete, 
and has been a witness of the development and progress of Saline county 
for many years. Her first home here was a primitive pioneer cabin, 
but as the years passed her husband prospered in business, leaving her 
in comfortable financial circumstances, and since his death her own 
excellent business management and enterprise have enabled her to in- 
crease her possessions and business interests. 

Her husband, Joseph L. Muff, died in Crete, May 11, 1891, at the 
age of forty-five years, nine months and nine days. He was born in 
Canton Luzerne, Switzerland. His father was a carpenter by trade 
and a master mechanic. He was a man of large and fine physique, and 
he narrowly escaped death on the field of battle, being run over by a 
cannon carriage, but he recovered and enjoyed many years of useful- 
ness and business activity. He died in Switzerland in middle life. His 
two sons, Joseph and Frank Muff, afterward came to America, cross- 
ing the Atlantic about 1865, and they arrived in Scranton, Pennsylvania, 
with a capital of only about twenty-five dollars. Although they saw 



704 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

some hard times they were never without money, owing to the careful 
husbanding of their resources and their strict economy in early years. 
Joseph was a house painter by trade, while Frank was a carpenter. 
They were willing, however, to engage in any employment that would 
yield them an honest living until they could gain a start, and both be- 
came coal miners in Pennsylvania. They saved their money, and after- 
ward removing to Tennessee they there invested their capital in eighty 
acres of timber land and engaged in furnishing wood and ties to the 
railroad company, employing choppers to cut the timber. They kept 
bachelor's hall in that state for a year and a half, and thus working on 
earnestly and untiringly laid the foundation for future successes. The 
parents had been in comfortable circumstances in Switzerland, but had 
met with financial losses there. The father died when Joseph Muff 
was but seven years of age, leaving his widow and her three sons 
and one daughter in straightened financial circumstances, and the young 
lad then began the battle of life for himself. Later he followed the emi- 
gration to America, the voyage lasting for five months, and during 
that time their food supply became largely exhausted and they were 
on limited rations for many days. Their residence in Tennessee and 
Kentucky covered three years, and they then came to Nebraska, where 
they arrived with a capital of three hundred dollars, which was their 
profit after selling their eighty acres of land in Tennessee. Joseph 
Muff then came to this state, and six months later was again joined by 
his brother. They soon secured homestead claims of eighty acres each, 
paying for this with the three hundred dollars' capital which they had 
brought from the south. Frank Muff was married first, and Joseph 
then boarded with him, the brothers working and living together in per- 
fect harmony for about two years. Joseph was employed in the grading 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 705 

for public buildings and Frank worked as a carpenter on the same, 
being employed in the capacity of a boss carpenter. 

On the 20th of July, 187 1, Joseph Muff was married in Seward, 
Nebraska, to Miss Catharine Hier, who was born in Prussia, Germany. 
Her father, Bernard Hier, was a stage driver, and acquired some prop- 
erty there through his wife. His wife bore the maiden name of Mary 
Ann Heisling. When they sailed for America in 1864 Mr. and Mrs. 
Hier had ample means. Landing in Chicago Mr. Hier then started for 
the interior of the state with several thousand dollars, after paying one 
hundred and ten dollars each for passage for ten persons. Mrs. Hier 
went to Peoria and remained with her brother there while her brother 
and father prospected for a desirable property in or near Chicago. Had 
Mr. Hier invested in that land he would have been a. Very wealthy man 
to-day, for he was offered land at forty-five dollars per acre that is now 
worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. He purchased eighty acres 
of land near Peoria in the spring of 1865 and for this paid fifty dollars 
per acre. There he carried on general farming until 1870, and in the 
late fall of that year came to Nebraska, making the journey with teams 
in emigrant style. The company numbered nine people and they were 
six weeks upon the way, passing through Iowa to Nebraska City, 
where the family remained, while the father went to Beatrice and en- 
tered one hundred and sixty acres of land in Franklin county. That 
district was then considered the far west. In the spring of 1870 the 
family took up their abode upon the place which was seventy-five miles 
from Grand Island, the nearest trading point. Because of fear of hos- 
tile Indians, who were upon the war path, they returned to Lincoln in 
the fall of 1 87 1, but while on their way were terrified upon seeing 
several hundred red men, but the old chief assured them they were 
"good Indiajis" much to the relief of the party. On their journey to 



-o6 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Franklin county they saw but two white men, and but three settlers 
were in their dugouts. They became the parents of eight children, 
five sons and three daughters, of whom Mrs. Catharine Muff is the 
eldest. Benjamin, the second child, is on a farm near Crete, Nebras- 
ka, and has six children. Henry, who is an engineer in the gold mines 
at Varia, Colorado, has a wife and one child. Herman is a farmer of 
Crete and is married and has one daughter. Elizabeth is the wife 
of John Ackerman, and they have three sons and three daughters, their 
home being on a farm near Birch, Nebraska, which is operated by Mrs. 
Ackerman and her sons, while Mr. Ackerman follows the carpenter"? 
trade. William Hier, who is married and follows farming in Franklin 
county, Nebraska, upon the old family homestead, has five children. 
Fred is living with his parents in Crete and is a justice of the peace. 
Mrs. Mary Ann McCowan has two daughters. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Muff were born eight children: Mary F., born 
in Crete, February 23, 1873, became the wife of John G. Hengen, and 
died at the age of twenty-five years when a bride of ten months. Anna 
Mary, born September 24, 1874, died in St. Louis, Missouri, at the age 
of twenty-three years. Both daughters displayed considerable skill as 
pianists, and Anna was a member of a choir in Crete and in St. 
Louis. She was also a teacher and a sister in the covnent of St. 
Agnes of the Precious Blood. Joseph Muff, the third of the family, 
is living with his brother William and they are engaged in farming to- 
gether. Morris, born February 29th, died on the 20th of July, of 
fhe same year. Benjamin (who was named Bernard Joseph) spent two 
years as a soldier in the Philippines, going there when eighteen years 
of age. He is now a commercial traveler, residing in Denver, Colorado, 
and is married. William is married and resides upon a farm. Clara 
Frances, a young lady of eighteen years, is quite proficient in both 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 707 

vocal and instrumental music, and she won the gold medal and two 
other prizes on graduating from the St. Elizabeth Institute in St. Louis. 
John Garret Muff, a youth of fifteen years, is attending school and 
expects to make a specialty of the study of electricity, and he also pos- 
sesses considerable talent in drawing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Muff began their domestic life in a humble way in 
Lincoln, living in a three-room house. Mr. Muff took the contract to 
raise the hay for the first state fair, and he did that work for several 
years after putting in his crops. In the fall of 1872 they removed to 
Crete, having then a cash capital of nine hundred and fifty dollars, 
'which Mr. Muff invested in the ice business, which he carried on for 
more than twenty years. He also dealt in real estate during a part of 
that time. Houses were few in Crete at the time of their arrival, and 
they rented rooms with another family, until Mr. Muff built his ice 
house. He then erected a small lean-to of two rooms. Their second 
home was a little frame cottage of three rooms, and they afterward 
had a small frame house of four rooms. Their fourth home, however, 
was more pretentious, containing eleven rooms. It was situated on 
the north side of the town and is still in possession of Mrs. Muff. Her 
present residence is one of the finest in this part of Nebraska, being a 
very extensive and palatial residence, built of brick and stone. It is 
situated in one of the most desirable residence portions of the city, and 
contains eighteen rooms, supplied with every modern convenience. It 
occupies a fine building site, commanding a splendid view of the town 
and the farming districts to the northwest and south of the city. The 
house is surrounded by beautiful and well kept lawns, shaded with 
ornamental trees, while upon the place is an orchard of five acres. The 
grounds cover, altogether, fifteen acres, and most effective effort has 
been put forth to benefit the home which in its furnishings indicates the 



7 o8 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

cultured and refined taste of the inmates. Mrs. Muff purchased this 
home in 1892 of R. J. Johnson, the banker, and it cost twenty thousand 
dollars. 

Mrs. Muff has seen periods of adversity as well as prosperity dur- 
ing her residence in Nebraska. She can remember when the entire 
country around about was devastated by a grasshopper scourge in 1874, 
1875 and 1876. Many settlers became discouraged because their crops 
were entirely destroyed, and they returned to old homes, but Mr. and 
Mrs. Muff remained in Nebraska, having firm faith in its future, and 
they prospered as the years went by. He built up an extensive busi- 
ness as an ice dealer, developing a wholesale as well as retail trade and 
employing many men. He also operated on a large scale in real estate, 
and the county benefited by his business enterprises, while his own finan- 
cial resources were greatly increased. Since her husband's death Mrs. 
Muff has carried on important business interests in addition to the 
settlement of her husband's estate. She has purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in York county, Nebraska, one hundred and 
sixty acres in Lancaster county, and sixteen lots in South Lincoln. She 
has also built a brick store in Crete and an iron-clad frame store. She 
owns the railroad hotel, a restaurant and bakers', a meat market, several 
tenement houses and twenty-three vacant lots. In the control of her 
property interests she displays superior business and executive abili- 
ties, and at the same time has those attractive womanly qualities which 
win esteem at all times, and in social circles of Crete she is a recognized 
leader. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 709 

FRANK KARTEN. 

Frank Karten, who is following farming near Crete, is one of the 
pioneer settlers of Saline county, coming to Nebraska from Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin. He arrived on the 15th of May, 1865, having traveled 
by rail to St. Joseph, Missouri, and thence up the river to Nebraska 
City, and on by ox-team to his destination. Since that time he has 
been one of the enterprising citizens and active business men of Saline 
county, and the success which he has achieved is the just reward of 
his labors. 

Mr. Karten was born in Bohemia, May 29, 1836. His father, 
Thomas Karten, was born in the same land on the 29th of December, 
1778, was a farmer and freeholder, and died in his native country at 
the advanced age of eighty-nine years, leaving five children, two sons 
and three daughters. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary 
Michowsky. died in 1856, at the age of sixty-five years. 

The first of the family to come to America was Mr. Frank Karten, 
who crossed the Atlantic in 1857 upon a sailing vessel, being sixty- 
ithree days in making the voyage from Bremen to Baltimore. He 
landed in the latter city with one hundred and sixty dollars in his 
pocket. He had enjoyed good educational privileges, and at the age 
of twelve years he began to learn the blacksmith's trade. In 185 1, when 
fifteen years of age, he went to Germany, and worked for three and a 
half years in Dresden and other places, following which he came to 
America, believing that he would have better business opportunities in 
the new world. He started here with little cash capital, and all that he 
has acquired has come to him as the reward of earnest purpose and untir- 
ing labor. 

In 1857, in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, Mr. Karten was married to 
Miss Rosa Bruza, who was born in the same neighborhood in which 



7 io SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

her husband's birth occurred. She came to America at the same time 
he did, and they were married by a justice of the peace, Wence Schune- 
macher, who had been Mr. Kartell's teacher in Bohemia. After his 
marriage Mr. Karten worked as a journeyman blacksmith in Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin, and later he engaged in selling dry-goods and notions 
from a wagon drawn by two horses. He thus conducted a mercantile 
business in Wisconsin, where he was fairly successful, and when he 
came to Nebraska he had a capital of six hundred dollars. He secured 
a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres three miles from 
Crete, improving it and continued to engage in general farming from 
1865 until 1892. About twelve years ago he purchased fifteen acres 
near Crete, for which he paid thirty-seven hundred dollars. In 1901 
he sold his farm of two hundred and fifty-six acres to his son-in-law, 
Stephen Kowrick, not wishing to be burdened with the care of so ex- 
tensive a property. He is, however, cultivating his small farm near 
Crete, and it is a fine property, well improved. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Karten have been born five children : Mrs. 
Mary Vowrecheha, who has seven children ; Mrs. Anna Stadre, of 
Broken Bow, Nebraska, who has five children ; Joseph, who is engaged 
in the practice of medicine in Oregon, and is married and has one 
daughter; Frank, who is engaged in farming in Greeley county, Ne- 
braska; and Emma, the wife of Charles Burrows, of the same county, 
by whom she has two sons. The mother of these children died in 1879, 
and Mr. Karten was afterward married to Mrs. Anna Huedeck, the 
widow of Joseph Huedeck. Both Mr. and Mrs Huedeck were natives 
of Bohemia. By her former marriage Mrs. Karten has one daughter, 
Mrs. Barbara Saponek, whose husband is a farmer of Saline county, 
and who has eight children. 

Mr. Karten is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 711 

In politics he is a stanch Republican, and his worth and capability have 
been recognized by his fellow citizens, who have frequently called him 
to public office. In i860, he was elected county commissioner, but would 
not qualify. In 1888, however, he was again chosen for that office and 
served for three years. He was the first tax-payer at Swanton, having 
been assessed there in 1877, and although he has never been an office- 
seeker he has always been deeply interested in the welfare and progress 
of his county. Mr. Karten owns several vacant lots in Crete, and his 
modest and pleasant home stands on an elevation commanding an ex- 
cellent view of the city, being just outside the eastern boundary. His 
life has been a busy and useful one, and his strong purpose and unfalter- 
'ng energy have been the salient features in his success. He is now 
largely living a retired life, in the county which has so long been the 
-cene of his labors, and in which he is classed with the worthy pioneer 
settlers. 



HORACE M. WELLS. 

Horace M. Wells is filling the position of postmaster of Crete and is 
editor of the Vidette. He stands as a high type of American manhood, 
alert, enterprising and progressive, successfully conducting his business 
affairs and at the same time having ready recognition of the possibilities 
of the county, its needs and requirements. As a citizen his efforts have 
been so directed as to lead to good results for the substantial upbuilding 
and improvement of the locality, and he has thus left his impress for 
good upon the history of Saline county, where he has made his home 
since May, 1873. 

Mr. Wells came to Nebraska from Madison, Wisconsin. He was 
born in W'aukesha countv, that state, in the town of Summit on the 



7 i2 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

3d of October, 1847 — before the admission of the state into the Union. 
His paternal grandfather, Horace Wells, was in the battle of Platts- 
burg, New York, and was a man of nerve, being very fearless in pres- 
ence of danger. His maternal grandfather, Martin Meade, was a 
fifer in the naval battle of Lake Champlain, and was also one of General 
Stark's men. His father, Samuel M. Wells, was born in Hinesburg, 
Vermont, in February, 181 5. and his death occurred in the summer 
of 1903 at York, Nebraska. In early manhood he married Miss Caro- 
line Meade, of Jericho, Vermont, who was bon\ on the 16th of June, 
1816. and was a daughter of Martin and Freewill (Love) Meade, who 
were also natives of the Green Mountain state. The maternal grand- 
parents of Mr, Wells were pioneers of Vermont, where they spent their 
entire lives and at length passed away. Their home was at Camels 
Hump mountain in what is one of the beautiful districts of that state. 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Wells were married in Vermont in 1837. and 
in 1840 they emigrated westward to the territory of Wisconsin, settling 
in Waukesha county. The father was a mason by trade and after his 
removal to Wisconsin conducted a tavern upon his farm, which com- 
prised one hundred and twenty acres of land. He was also an auc- 
tioneer of high repute. He had one brother. H. N. Wells, who was 
one of the early judges of Milwaukee county when it embraced the ter- 
ritory that is now comprised within several counties of that state. He 
was also president of the last territorial council. In the family of 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Wells were three children : John N. Wells, the 
eldest, was a miner of Colorado and Montana. He was born in 1838 
and died in Los Angeles, California, in 1875, leaving a wife and three 
children. Eusebia Wells is the wife of C. C. Cobb, of Summit. Wis- 
consin, where they were married in 1866. In 1870 they located in 
Butler county, Nebraska, and since 1874 Mr, Cobb has been one of 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 713 

the leading merchants of York. His first home was a sod house rather 
superior to that of most of the early settlers, it being papered and car- 
peted, and on one occasion Governor Butler was a guest there. He and 
his wife are now making a tour through Jerusalem. They have one 
daughter who is married and resides in San Francisco, California. 

Horace M. Wells was educated in the district schools of Summit. 
Wisconsin, where he pursued his studies until sixteen years of age, 
when he put aside his text books and volunteered for service in the 
Thirty-fifth Wisconsin Infantry as a member of Company C. He 
joined the army in December, 1863, and served until April, 1866, when 
he was mustered out with his regiment at Madison, Wisconsin. He 
served in the Mississippi valley, taking part in engagements in Louis- 
iana, Tennessee, Alabama and Texas, and fortunately he escaped the 
missiles of death showered upon the Union troops by the rebels, nor 
was he ever in a rebel prison, nor confined in a hospital, but came out 
as an "orderly" and returned home with a creditable military record. 

When the war was over Mr. Wells went again to Wisconsin, but 
in May, 1866, started for Colorado, where he was engaged in mining 
and freighting, having latterly purchased a span of mules. He was 
engaged in mining in Russell's Gulch near Black Hawk and Central 
City and met with fair success there. He reached Colorado with only 
fifteen cents in his pocket and six days later he had twenty-four dollars 
earned through mining. When he left that state in November, 1867, 
he had eight hundred dollars and an interest in a gold mine which 
brought him one hundred and fifty dollars. He then returned to Madi- 
son, Wisconsin, and entered the State University, wishing to acquire 
a more complete education. He was graduated from the scientific de- 
partment of that institution in 1872 and from the law school in 1873. 
He and James W. Bashford for three years owned and published the 



7 i4 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

University Press, a college paper. Mr. Bashford is now a Methodist 
Bishop. In 1873 Mr. Wells came to Saline county and, turning his at- 
tention to journalistic interests, became the publisher of the Saline 
County Post, the first paper published in this county. He was a mem- 
ber of the firm of Hoyt & Wells until 1876, when Mr. Hoyt sold his 
interest to J. W. Allen, editor of the Saline County News. The two 
papers were then consolidated under the name of the Saline County Union, 
with which Mr. Wells was connected until 1881, when he was elected 
to the Nebraska senate. He then sold the paper to M. B. C. True, and 
the name was afterward changed to the Globe. The paper is now pub- 
lished under the name of the J'idette Herald, and its editors and 
proprietors constitute the firm of Goodwin & Wells. Mr. Wells was 
in the senate for one term and then returned to the publishing business. 
In 1 89 1 he was appointed state bank examiner, serving four years or 
two terms, and in 1898 was appointed postmaster of Crete by President 
McKinley and re-appointed by President Roosevelt in 1902. 

Oh the 9th of October, 1875, Mr. Wells was united in marriage 
to Harriet Code, of Crete, who was born in Canada and was a daughter 
of Henry Code, a prominent hotel man. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Mary Sample, who like her daughter was a native of Canada. 
The Code family is of Scotch-English descent. Henry Code came to 
Nebraska in 1869, settling in Crete in 1871. His death occurred in 
California in 1902, when he was about eighty years of age, and his 
remains were interred in the cemetery at Crete. His wife had departed 
this life in 1898, leaving two daughters and one son. Mrs. Wells was 
called to her final rest in November, 1896, after traveling life's journey 
happily with her husband for twenty-one years. She left four children : 
Harlan Wells, whose health was impaired in the Spanish-American war, 
is now in Riverside, California, hoping to be benefited by his sojourn in 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 715 

that sunny land. He married Gertrude Crockett, a grandniece of David 
Crockett, the celebrated pioneer of the west. Mary Wells, a young lady 
of twenty-two years, is acting as her father's housekeeper. Gertrude is 
attending school and also assists in the postoffice. Conrad, a youth of 
fourteen, is likewise in the public schools. The home of Mr. Wells 
was formerly the old Code home, which was built by Mr. Code and was 
left him with an incumbrance. He also owns his first home, which he 
built in 1874 before his marriage. He has made all that he now possesses, 
and his strong purpose, capable management and determination have 
been the salient features in his success. 

He is a Royal Arch Mason and is a past master of Crete Lodge No. 
2,7, A. F. & A. M., and was made a Mason in Madison, Wisconsin, in the 
ilodge of which Governor Fairchild was a prominent member. He is 
also connected through membership relations with the Knights and 
Ladies of Security and with Holland Post No. 75, G. A .R., of which 
he has been commander for two terms. In community affairs he takes 
a very active and helpful part, and has served as a member of the school 
board for six years and as a member of the council for two terms and 
mayor of the city for two terms. He is not only a popular man in Crete 
and Saline county, but is widely and favorably known throughout the 
state as a gentleman of ability and one who is most genial, entertaining 
and trustworthy. 

MICHAEL SULLIVAN. 

Michael Sullivan, the well known and popular agriculturist resid- 
ing about a mile and a half north of Friend in Saline county, is a stanch 
and thrifty Irish-American citizen, one who has acquitted himself ex- 
ceedingly well in his life career. He has lived in this country since early 



/i6 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

manhood, is one of the veterans of the Civil war, and in the pursuits 
peace lias made as creditable a record as he gained while a soldier in the 
service of his adopted country. 

He was born in Ireland in 1846, nearly sixty years ago, being a 
snj, of Timothy Sullivan, who attained the advanced age of eighty-four 
years before he was summoned from earth. Both his parents were devout 
members of the Catholic church, and were honored and respected citi- 
zens. The son Michael was reared and received his education in his 
native land, but was still a boy in years whe he emigrated to America. 
From New York he went west to Lockport, Will county, Illinois, where 
he remained until" he entered the services of the Union. In August, 
1862, when Lincoln called for sixty thousand volunteers, he enlisted at 
Joliet, Illinois, in Company C of the One Hundredth Illinois Infantry, 
under Captain Bacon and Colonel Bartleson. The regiment was or- 
dered to Louisville. Kentucky, and then to Nashville, and was assigned 
to the command of General Rosecrans. At the battle of Murfeesboro 
Mr. Sullivan was severely wounded by a grapeshot which struck his 
right arm, and was taken first to the hospital at Louisville and then to 
Chicago. He later returned to the service, and did not receive his dis- 
charge until the winter of 1864, when he was stationed at Lookout 
Mountain. He returned home With a gallant record as a soldier. After 
{the war he lived for a time in Illinois, being located at the cities of 
Streator, Ottawa and Pontiac. In the latter place he was married to 
Miss Alice O. Hair, who throughout the remainder of her life in countless 
ways proved her devotion to her family and was a helpmate and wife 
such as not many men are fortunate enough to find. In 1884 Mr. 
Sullivan removed from Illinois to Nebraska, and for ten years success- 
fully followed farming in Fillmore county of this state. He then bought 
his present nice farmstead a mile and a half north of Friend, consisting 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 717 

of eighty acres of land, and well improved with a neat house, sur- 
rounded with fruit and shade trees, and with all the accompaniments 
and refinements of a modern country home. Mr. Sullivan is held in 
the highest esteem by his neighbors, and is one of the thrifty and worthy 
citizens of this community. 

Mr. Sullivan has three children: William, who is married; Hattie, 
who makes her home with her father and is a successful teacher; and 
Nettie, who is a popular clerk in a mercantile establishment in Friend. 
These bright and energetic young people received good educations, 
and are worthy members of the society of Saline county. The greatest 
loss the family has had to sustain was in the death of the wife and 
mother, who was summoned above in 1894, when forty-two years of 
age. She had endeared herself to all by her goodness of heart and 
worthy deeds, and her place can never be filled in tbe family circle. She 
was a member of the Catholic church, and Mr. Sullivan and the daugh- 
ters are adherents of the church. 



H. W. SHUFELDT. 

H. W. Shufeldt is the owner of a fine farming estate near Friend 
in Saline county. He is one of the old settlers of this part of the state, 
for he cast in his lot with the primitive conditions of Saline county as 
long ago as 1870, and during the subsequent third of a century has been 
an efficient, honored and successful citizen in all departments of his activ- 
ity. He has had a broad experience with the world, was from the first 
blessed with industry and energy, and has not been found wanting when 
the varied responsibilities of life have come to him. Farming has been 
his life's work, and despite the many hardships and struggles through 



7 i8 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

which the early Nebraska fanners had to pass he persevered to a success- 
ful culmination of his labors and is now one of the most prosperous and 
substantial men of Saline county. 

He was born in Albany county, New York, March 10, 1849, of one 
of the good old families of the state. His father, Harmon Shufeldt, 
settled in Lake county, Illinois, in 1854. The Shufeldt family was repre- 
sented in the wars of the country from the time of the Revolution to 
,the Civil war, and in the latter conflict there were thirty soldiers of the 
name. Harmon Shufeldt married Mary E. Jones, a native of Philadel- 
phia and of Welsh descent. Harmon Shufeldt died in Kansas, but his 
widow is still living, making her home at Barrington, Cook county, 
Illinois. There were nine children, six sons and three daughters, in their 
family, and the following three sons were soldiers in the Civil war: 
Henry, of the Fifteenth Illinois Cavalry; H. W., and Theodore, of the 
One Hundredth and Thirteenth Illinois Infantry, and who sleeps in a 
soldier's grave at Vicksburg, Mississippi. The father of the family was 
a strong Republican, and by occupation was a farmer, and his widow is 
a member of the Baptist church. 

Mr. H. W. Shufeldt was reared on the Illinois farm, where he was 
taught the value of work, and his schooling was received In the country 
schools. In November, 1863, he enlisted at Marengo, Illinois, in the 
Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry, under Captain Chapley and Colonel Hines. 
He was at Benton Barracks in St. Louis for a time, and was then all 
over southern Missouri, Arkansas, among the Iron mountains engaged 
in fighting Price's, Marmaduke's and Joe Shelby's Confederate troopers, 
and this was among the most perilous and trying service of the entire 
war. From Fort Leavenworth he was ordered to Fort Dodge, Kansas, 
and then was on duty which took him within sight of Pike's Peak, re- 
maining in the west until December, 1865. He received his honorable 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 719 

discharge at Springfield, Illinois. After his soldier life was ended he 
spent some time in northern Wisconsin, and in 1870 came out to south- 
eastern Nebraska. He took up a homestead in Saline county, and his 
first home here was built of lumber brought from Lincoln. Among the 
trials which he had to endure before reaching his present prosperity 
were the grasshoppers, hot winds; winter blizzards, drouths, and many 
others, but he never gave in to discouragement, and the victory has been 
on his side, as anyone can witness who passes by his fine estate of three 
hundred and twenty acres, situated a mile and a half from Friend. Here 
he has a nice modern residence, a commodious barn, a windmill to sup- 
ply water for all purposes, a grove and orchard which form a beautiful 
background for his home, and everything in the best possible condition 
and evidencing the highest degree of progressiveness and thrift. 

Mr. Shufeldt was married in Saline county, February 20, 1872, to 
Miss Margaret E. Love, who has been a devoted and inspiring help- 
mate to him for more than thirty-two years. She was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, being a daughter of Alexander U. and Lyda (Sherman) Love, 
who were early settlers of this part of Nebraska, and who are now both 
deceased, having been the parents of four sons and one daughter. Two 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Shufeldt are deceased, and they have 
three sons living: Harmon and Alexander W., who are both residents 
of Saline county; and H. W., Jr., at home. Mr. Shufeldt is a Repub- 
lican in politics, and is affiliated with the W. T. Sherman Post No. 130, 
G. A. R., at Friend, and has held office in the post. He is also a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



7 2o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

SAMUEL TIGARD. 

Samuel Tigard, who is well known throughout Saline county as 
Sam Tigard, the prosperous and progressive farmer and veteran soldier 
of the Civil war, is one of the oldest citizens of Pleasant Hill precinct. 
He came to this state as long ago as 1868, and has ever since tilled a 
useful place in the affairs of his community besides providing well for 
his own and his family's material welfare. 

He was born in the famous Shenandoah valley, near Winchester, 
Virginia, on December 15, 1841. the same year in which King Edward 
was born. He was a son of Jesse and Sarah (Michael) Tigard, the lat- 
ter of whom was born in Ireland of Protestant family. Both parents 
died in Nebraska, the father at the age of sixty-four, and the mother 
at seventy-eight. His father was a farmer, a Republican in politics. 
and both father and mother were members of the Methodist church. 
There were ten children, four sons and six daughters, and Simeon, 
who was a soldier in the Tenth Virginia Infantry, is also a resident 
of Saline county, Nebraska. 

Mr. Samuel Tigard was reared and educated in Virginia. His 
youth was spent on the battleground of the coming Civil war, and he 
was just arrived at young manhood when the war clouds broke upon the 
country. His sympathies and training were all with the Union cause, 
and in November following the beginning of the conflict he enlisted 
in Lewis county, West Virginia, in Company C, of the Tenth West 
Virginia Infantry, under Captain Hall and Colonel Harris. The regi- 
ment saw much active service all through the Virginia country, fight- 
ing guerillas, repelling rebel cavalry and especially Mosby's troopers. 
They were at Harper's Ferry under General Milroy. were in the Shen- 
andoah valley campaign, at Opequan creek, where Mr. Tigard received 
a bullet in the forearm, the wound keeping him in the hospital for some 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. .721 

time. He did not receive his honorable discharge from service until 
November 22, 1866, and he went home with the consciousness of hav- 
ing well performed his duty as a soldier and with a gallant record. 

Mr. Tigard married Miss Ellen McCarty, who has been a most 
excellent wife and mother and a useful member of the community. They 
have seven children, William, Grace, George, Jessie, Frank, Ralph, 
deceased, and Jonathan B. Mr. Tigard has a beautiful little farm of 
eighty acres in Pleasant Hill precinct, where a cosy residence furnishes 
the home of the family, there is a good barn, and orchard and grove af- 
ford coolness in summer and warmth in winter, and everything bears 
evidence of thrift and enterprise. Mr. and Mrs. Tigard are members 
of the Methodist church, and they have reared their children under 
good influences and given them good advantages. Mr. Tigard is a 
member of Coats Post, G. A. R., of Dorchester. 



JOSEPH TEALE. 

Joseph Teale is a well known and highly esteemed resident of 
Dorchester, Saline county, and has made his home in this part of south- 
eastern Nebraska since 1882. He is a man of much capability and worth, 
has been very successful in his efforts, and as a man and citizen com- 
mands the high regard of all with whom he comes in contact. 

He was born in Hampshire, England. August 21, 1840, being a 
son of Frederick and Charlotte (Holmes) Teale, both natives of Eng- 
land. His father died in England when the children were small, and 
in 1843 the widow brought her family to America. From New York 
state they went and made settlement near Waukesha, Wisconsin, then 
to Bedford, Cuyahoga county, Ohio, and in 1855 took up their abode 



722 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

near Warren, in Jo Daviess county, Illinois. There were in all seven 
children: Fred, who was a soldier in the Fourth Iowa Infantry, and 
is now a resident of Los Angeles, California; James, a former member 
of the Thirteenth Illinois Cavalry, who died at Davis City, Iowa, in 
1900; Joseph; Hon. Thomas Teale, of the Fifteenth Illinois Infantry, 
now at Leon, Iowa; George, who was a soldier of the Ninety-sixth 
Illinois, now a resident of Lamoni, Iowa; Eugene, of the Seventeenth 
Illinois Cavalry, also at Lamoni ; and Albert, of Kellerton, Iowa. Four 
of these brave and patriotic sons of a single family were wounded during 
the course of the war, and two of them received two wounds. The 
mother of this fine family died in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, at the age of 
sixty-two. She and the children were communicants of the Episcopal 
church, or Church of England. 

Mr. Joseph Teale spent most of his youth in Bedford, Ohio, where 
he received his education in the public schools. He was nearly of age 
when the Civil war broke out, and on May 4, 1861, only a few days 
after Sumter was fired upon, he enlisted at Warren in Company E of 
the Fifteenth Illinois Infantry, under command of Captain Raney and 
Colonel Turner. He was mustered in at Freeport, Illinois, and was in 
camp at Alton. His first battle was Shiloh, in which his regiment lost 
one hundred and ninety-two men in killed and wounded. He then par- 
ticipated at Holly Springs, and was at the siege of -Vicksburg for forty- 
seven days, during which he was shot through the body and was in the 
hospital some time. He received his honorable discharge on June 14, 
1864, having served for three years and twenty-one days, and coming 
out of the war with a gallant record and with his courage and stead- 
fastness tested and found true for all his future career. 

After the war he engaged in farming in Illinois, and in 1867 was 
married to Miss Mary Pryor, whose strength of character and devotion 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 723 

to family and home have been a contined inspiration to her husband for 
now more than thirty-five years. She is a native of England, a daugh- 
ter of William and Sarah (Peach) Pryor, the former of Lancashire and 
the latter of Derbyshire, England. They came to America in 1857 
and made settlement in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, where her father 
was a farmer and nurseryman, in politics an adherent of the Republican 
principles, and where he passed away at the age of sixty-eight. Her 
mother is still living in Warren, being eighty-four years of age and 
bearing her years with health and comparative vigor. Mrs. Teale is 
the oldest living of ten children, two of whom, Rosa and Ayres, died 
at the respective ages of nine and two years, and the others are Sarah, 
Byron. Howard, Ira, Willard, Inez, and John. Mr. and Mrs. Teale 
have one son, Albert H, who is a resident of Kenesaw, Adams county, 
Nebraska, and who by his wife, formerly Miss Edith Jones, has a little 
daughter, Doris N. Teale. The greatest bereavement that has come 
to Mr. and Mrs. Teale was the death of their daughter Lettie, in 1892, 
from scarlet fever. She was born in 1874, had received a good public 
school education and also in Doane College, was a member of the 
Christian church, and her sunny disposition, fondness for the good 
things of life, and her loveable character made her taking off a lament- 
able event in the community of which she was so bright a part, and the 
chair thus vacated in the family circle can never be filled. 

After his marriage. Mr. Teale lived two years in Fayette county, 
Wisconsin, was then engaged in farming in Victoria county, Texas, for 
three years, after which he returned to Warren. Illinois; he was in 
Decatur county, Iowa, two years, later moved to Dixon, Illinois, and in 
1882 came out to Saline county, Nebraska, and began farming south of 
Dorchester. He still owns his nice estate of one hundred and sixty acres, 
on which he has a nice house and all the modern improvements. He 



7 2 4 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

has been residing in town for a number of years, and has pleasant 
surroundings and many friends and companionships in which to pass 
the remaining years of a well spent life. He is a popular member of 
the W. T. Sherman Post, G. A. R., at Dorchester, and he also affiliates 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, having passed all the chairs 
in his lodge. He is a strong Republican, and he and his wife are es- 
teemed members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



JAMES JOHNSON. 

James Johnson, who is engaged in raising vegetables and plants at 
Crete, is numbered among the pioneer settlers of Saline county, and few 
of its residents have more intimate knowledge concerning its settlement 
and growth, for he arrived here about 1858 or 1859. He came from 
Doniphan county, Kansas, where he had located in 1856, and previous 
to that time he lived at Ashpoint, Gage county, four years. He was 
born in Montgomery county, Ohio, April 10, 1833, and was reared 
to manhood upon his father's farm. He is a son of William Johnson, 
who was born in North Carolina in 1805, and died in Iowa in 1861, 
after a residence of ten years in that state. He wedded Miss Elizabeth 
Hinshaw, also a native of North Carolina, and they became the parents 
of eight children, of whom four were sons. James is the eldest. Pris- 
cilla is the wife of Elijah Johnson, a resident of Wapello, Iowa, and they 
have seven children. 'Mrs. Elizabeth Barnhart, a widow, is residing in 
the state of Washington and has several children. William Johnson, 
the youngest living member of the family, is residing in Iowa, upon the 
old home farm upon which the father settled in 185 1. The mother died 
in Ohio when past middle life, and the father afterward married again, 
but there were no children by the second marriage. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 725 

James Johnson received fair educational privileges in Ohio, and 
also had ample training in farm work, assisting in the labors of the 
fields from early boyhood. In the fall of 1853, when twenty years of 
age, he was married in Iowa to Miss Sarah Eliza Houck, who was born in 
Illinois about 1838. They became the parents of eight children. 
Aquilla Johnson, the eldest, has spent the last two years in the Klon- 
dike. Tie has been married twice and has three children. Hibbert, 
who has been engaged in the milling business in Crete for twenty years, 
is married and has two living sons. George, a farmer residing in the 
Red Willow district of Nebraska, is married and has five daughters. 
James, a resident of Crete, is married. R. H. Johnson is employed in 
a brickyard in Saline county. John N. resides in Crete. Annie is 
the wife of Walter Kimball and has two children. Charles, residing 
in Crete, completes the family. 

For many years James Johnson has followed farming and he now 
owns a little tract of land of four and a half acres within the corporation 
limits of Crete, upon which he grows plants and is engaged specially in 
the raising of sweet potatoes. In this he is particularly successful and 
has produced as high as four hundred bushels in a single season. 

In his political views, Mr. Johnson is Republican, unfaltering in his 
advocacy of his party, and in public office he has been most faithful and 
prompt in the performance of his duty. He has been constable and was 
road overseer for twenty years. Both he and his wife are Methodists 
in religious faith and have led honorable, upright lives. 



726 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

NAOH HOCKMAN. 

Noah Hockman is a prosperous farmer at Dorchester, Saline county, 
and is an old-established citizen, with residence dating back to 1877. 
He is an ex-soldier of the Civil war, and it is the judgment of all who 
know him that he has been as efficient, faithful and reliable in all 
the duties and obligations of life as a civilian as he was a good and 
trusted soldier when the country was involved in internal strife. He is 
a frank, genial and interesting man, and has a wide and extensive ac- 
quaintanceship throughout Saline county. 

Mr. Hockman was born in Hocking county, Ohio, August 29, 
1836, being a son of Abraham and Catherine (Fought) Hockman. His 
father was born in Virginia in 1806, being a son of Christian Hockman, 
also of Virginia birth. Mrs. Catherine Hockman was born in Ohio, 
was married in 1835, and died in Hocking county, Ohio, in 1878. Abra- 
ham Hockman was a farmer by occupation, believed in Democratic doc- 
trines as to politics, and he and his wife were members of the Pres- 
byterian church. There were six children in their family : Christian, 
who served in the Civil war; Noah; Andrew, who was a soldier and 
died of the smallpox ; May ; Leah ; and Abraham. 

Mr. Noah Hockman was reared on the Ohio farm and received his 
education in the district schools. At the age of seventeen he moved to 
Piatt county, Illinois, and four years later went to Hancock county in the 
same state. In 1862, when Lincoln made his call for sixty thousand 
volunteers, he enlisted at Keokuk, Iowa, in Company C, Seventeenth 
Iowa Infantry, under Captain Archer and Colonel Rankin. He was at 
Benton Barracks in St. Louis for a time. He was a participant in the 
battles of Iuka, Corinth, Jackson, the siege of Vicksburg for forty- 
seven days, at Champion Hills, Missionary Ridge and other places. He 
was captured by a part of General Hood's Confederate forces, and after 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 727 

being held for some time in several places in Georgia he was taken to 
that dread place of Andersonville, where for seven months he endured 
the misery incident to a great civil war. When time came to be ex- 
changed he paid five dollars in order to be allowed to be among the first 
thousand who were placed aboard the cars and herded together and 
guarded like cattle until the neutral ground was reached. He was sent 
to St. Louis and later received his honorable discharge, with a gallant 
record as a soldier. He received two slight wounds at Champion Hills, 
one in the left wrist and the other in the left shoulder. 

He returned from the war to his Illinois home, and in 1865 was 
married to Miss Julia A. Huff, who has made him a loyal and devoted 
wife for nearly forty years. She was born in Hocking county, Ohio, 
being a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Huff, the former a native 
of Loudoun county, Virginia, and the latter of Ohio. Her parents 
came to Hancock county, Illinois, where her father died at the age of 
seventy-seven, and her mother at the age of seventy-five. Her father 
was a farmer, a Republican in politics, and was a member of the Method- 
ist Episcopal church. One of her brothers, Henry Huff, was a soldier 
in the Seventeenth Illinois Infantry, and her brother Thomas, also of 
an Illinois regiment, lives at Dorchester, Nebraska. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hockman have had nine children, but Thomas died at the age of ten 
and John at the age of three years. Those living are George, Lewis, 
Ernest, Frank, Bert, Daisy, and Irvin. 

Mr. Hockman owns and resides on a nice farming estate of one 
hundred and sixty acres south of Dorchester, and manages it in a very 
profitable manner. He is a Republican in politics, and he and his wife 
are members of the Christian church. He is a member of the G. A. 
R. Post No. 107, of Dorchester. 



7^8 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

GEORGE H. HASTINGS. 

Hon. George H. Hastings, classed with Nebraska's distinguished 
citizens by reason of his ability as a member of the bar and his able 
service in public office, having twice served as attorney general of the 
state, as well as in many local offices, was born in Marengo, McHenry 
county, Illinois, August 26, 1849, an d is descended from English ances- 
try. The Hastings family, of which he is a representative, was founded 
in America by two brothers of the name who came from the north of 
England to the new world and settled in Connecticut about the year 
1640 upon what has since been known at Hastings Hill. George W. 
Hastings, grandfather of George H. Hastings, was born at Suffield, 
Connecticut, April 13, 1794, and having spent the forty-four years 
of his life there, passed away March 17, 1838. 

His son, Carlisle Hastings, was born at Suliield, April 25, 1815, 
and throughout his business career followed the occupation of farming. 
He went to Illinois about the time of the close of the Black Hawk war 
and settled in McHenry county, entering from the government the 
land upon which he atterward lived. The western land office was then 
located in the little town of Chicago, and Fort Dearborn was still gar- 
risoned by United States troops. Mr. Hastings not only aided largely 
in reclaiming the wild land of McHenry county for the purposes of 
civilization, but also took an active part in public affairs resulting in 
permanent good to the county. He was the officer who organized the 
county into school districts, and he also served as sheriff of McHenry 
county, Illinois, at an early day. He died at Coral, Illinois, March 4, 
1902, and his wife, who bore the maiden name of Hannah Granger, and 
was born April 16, 1817, passed away March 19, 1903. 

George H. Hastings, son of Carlisle and Hannah Hastings, com- 
pleted his literary education by graduation from the high school of 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. t 729 

Marengo, Illinois, with the class of 1865, and was afterward employed 
for a year or two as clerk in a mercantile establishment in Marengo, 
thus securing the funds that enabled him to prosecute his law studies. 
His leisure hours during this period were devoted to reading law, and 
on the completion of a thorough law course he was admitted to the 
bar in 1870. 

In September, 1869, Mr. Hastings had come to Nebraska and en- 
tered the office of Seth Robinson, then attorney general of the state, with 
whom he remained until June, 1871, his practical experience there prov- 
ing of great value to him in his later professional career. On severing 
his connection with Mr. Robinson he went to Pleasant Hill, then the 
county seat of Saline county, Nebraska, and a thriving village. In 
1876 he came to Crete, where he has since made his home, practicing his 
profession save when official duties have claimed his time and attention. 
A careful, conscientious preparation, a strong analytical mind that en- 
ables him to readily grasp the points in a case, and a clear, cogent reas- 
oning and forcible argument have been the salient features in his ca- 
reer. He has enjoyed a large private practice and has been the legal rep- 
resentative of a number of important business concerns, being now at- 
torney for the Crete State Bank and the Conservative Investment Com- 
pany, of Crete, being thus connected with these two great corporations 
since their organization. 

For many years Mr. Hastings served as city attorney of Crete, 
and for two terms was county attorney. He was also county judge 
of Saline county and was filling that position when in 1874 he was 
elected to represent the county in the state legislature, where he served 
for two years. In 1888 he was chosen presidential elector of Nebraska 
and was selected as messenger of the electoral college, carrying the 
Nebraska vote to Washington and casting it for Benjamin Harrison. 



730 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

In 1890 he was elected attorney general of the state, and that the con- 
sensus of public opinion concerning his service was most favorable was 
indicated by the fact of his re-election in 1892. In 1902 he was chosen 
mayor of Crete and again in 1903, giving a practical and businesslike 
administration that promoted the substantial growth and improvement 
of the city. He has always been unfaltering in his allegiance of the 
Republican party, and has studied the questions and issues of the day 
with a thoroughness that has well qualified him for leadership in po- 
litical thought and action. 

Mr. Hastings is well known in Masonic circles in southeastern Ne- 
braska. He has been master of Crete Lodge No. 37, A. F. & A. M. ; 
high priest of Mount Zion Chapter No. 17, R. A. M., and at the present 
time is serving a third term in the latter position. He is also a Knight 
Templar Mason. On the 28th of December, 1874, at Aurora, Illinois, 
he was married to Miss Helen M. Richardson, and they have one son, 
Robert Richardson, who was born at Crete, November 27, 1888. 

Mr. Hastings has engraved his name deeply on the judicial history 
of the state through the assistance he has rendered in framing and en- 
forcing the laws, and his public spirit has been manifest in tangible 
ways through his conscientious performance of the various public duties 
entrusted to him. 



THEODORE H. MILLER. 

Theodore H. Miller has during a lifetime of intense and well di- 
rected activity been one of the most forceful factors in community affairs 
in Crete. He entered upon the active duties of life unaided by influen- 
tial friends or advantitious circumstances. He has been the sole archi- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 731 

tect of his own fortunes, molding his own character and shaping his own 
destiny. He has come to be a business man of commanding ability, yet 
his labors have not been restricted to the advancement of his own per- 
sonal interests. He has extended his efforts to various fields, in which, 
as an acknowledged leader, he has championed the highest interests of 
the municipality and of the people at large, and with such success that 
his name has come to be held in high honor. He has controlled im- 
portant and extensive business affairs, and while he is yet financially 
interested in many leading enterprises he is now practically living re- 
tired, his residence in Nebraska dating from May, 1867. 

Mr. Miller is a native of Hanover, Germany, his birth having oc- 
curred in Lengede in that province on the 8th of April, 1846. He spent 
his early life upon a farm until fifteen years of age, and during that 
time attended the common schools. He afterwards became a student 
in the high school of Hanover, and subsequent to his fifteenth year was 
for two years a college student. When twenty years of age he deter- 
mined to seek a home and fortune in America. In the early part of 
October, 1864, he had enlisted in the Queen's Hussars, and at the close 
of the war of 1866 between Prussia and Austria he received his dis- 
charge from the King of Hanover. Prussia demanded that he re- 
enlist in the service, and to escape this he left the country on the 4th of 
December, 1866, going to England, where he remained for a month. 
Desiring to establish his home in America, he sailed for the United 
States and arrived in New York on the 21st of January, 1867. Almost 
immediately after reaching this country he resumed military service, 
enlisting in the Thirty-sixth United States Infantry, and with the reg- 
iment he went west to Omaha, Nebraska, in April, 1867. During the 
three years of his service his regiment was stationed at Fort Kearney, 
Fort McPherson, Fort Bridges, Camp Douglas and Fort Brown in 



732 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Wind River valley, Wyoming. The regiment journeyed westward from 
Omaha on the Union Pacific Railroad to the end of the line, which had 
been completed to the town of what is now Fremont, and from there 
the troops went overland in freight wagons drawn by government 
mules. 

After his service in the army Mr. Miller returned to Omaha and 
subsequent to this time went to St. James, Missouri, to secure a home- 
stead claim, but within a month he returned to Omaha and obtained a 
situation in the hotel DuNorth. He had filled that position for but 
five months, however, when he secured a more remunerative position 
as a dry-goods clerk with the firm of Tootle & Maul, who paid him fifty 
dollars per month, and he remained in that service for a year. On the 
expiration of that period Mr. Miller went to Grand Island, where he 
took charge of a general store at a salary of sixty-five dollars per month, 
continuing in that position until November, 1871, when he came to 
Crete. 

Mr. Miller's first experience in business for himself was in Omaha. 
When he left the army he had two hundred and seventy dollars back pay 
due him, which he received from the government on the 28th of January, 
1870. This money he loaned on property which is to-day among the 
most valuable in the business portion of the city, but he never received 
a cent in return for either principal or interest. This would have utterly 
discouraged many a man of less resolute spirit, but he did not hesitate 
to invest in real estate again, and his investments in this regard have 
been a source of very gratifying income to him. Shortly after his mar- 
riage he bought a farm near Crete for seven thousand dollars, for the 
greater part of which he gave his note, but since that time he has ac- 
cumulated property rapidly. After selling his farm in 1875 ne na cl 
twelve hundred dollars in cash. In 1875 he went to Omaha and on to 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 733 

Chicago to purchase a stock of general merchandise valued at eighty- 
three hundred dollars. He then opened a store in Crete, which he con- 
ducted until May, 1884, In that year he turned his attention to real 
estate operations, and opened an office which he conducted until 1896. 
In August of that year he associated himself with C. B. Anderson and 
opened the Crete State Bank and on the same day organized the State 
Bank of DeYVitt. He has since been closely associated with financial 
interests in Nebraska, and his wise counsel and sound judgment have 
proved important factors in the successful conduct of various enter- 
prises. In 1899 he was one of the organizers of the Conservative Invest- 
ment Company of Crete, Nebraska. In June, 1904, he retired from 
active business, but is financially interested in many moneyed concerns, 
and is to-day president of the Crete Bank, vice president of the Invest- 
ment Company, a director of the Ord State Bank, and Scotia Bank, vice 
president of the Conservative Investment Company, of Blackwell, Okla- 
homa, and is also interested in various banks and business enterprises. 
Mr. Miller was married in Crete in February, 1872, to Miss Mary 
George and their union has been blessed with five children, three sons 
and two daughters. The eldest son and two daughters are graduates 
of Doane College and have spent one year as students in Germany. 
They speak both the English and the German languages fluently. The 
Miller residence is one of the finest in Nebraska. It is a beautiful man- 
sion containing twenty rooms built in substantial style of light brick and 
castle rock Colorado stone. It is most attractive in appearance and 
was completed at a cost of not less than twenty thousand dollars. The 
interior finishing is all hardwood. Around the front and sides are 
broad verandas, and in its furnishings it indicates the culture and artistic 
taste of the family. There is no lavish display, but due regard has been 
paid to comfort, convenience and beauty. Mr. Miller is a most unas- 



734 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

suming man, a thorough gentleman without any of the pride of purse. 
He has never allowed the accumulation of wealth to affect in any way 
his relations toward those less fortunate financially, and he has been 
most generous of his means in assisting others, while the city of Crete 
has benefited greatly by his liberality. Among his recent gifts to the 
city was one of ten thousand dollars, which was made as a Christmas 
present to Crete for the erection of a public library. This is but one 
indication of his kindly, helpful spirit. While his business career, hon- 
orable and straightforward, is such as to win the confidence and admir- 
ation of his fellow men, it is the traits which he displays in his relation 
with his fellow men that have so endeared him to those with whom he 
has been associated and made him one of the most valued, honored and 
loved citizens of Crete. 



WHITAKER BROTHERS. 

Whitaker Brothers, consisting of J. M. and J. B. Whitaker, conduct 
a prosperous real estate, insurance, money lending, brokerage and dry- 
goods business at Falls City, Richardson county. They are men of 
known business integrity and reliability, and their enterprise and pro- 
gressive methods give them a large leverage in trade circles of the town 
and county. This business was established in Falls City on April 13, 
1898, by J. B. Whitaker. the junior member, and in July, 1901, he was 
joined by his brother. They have built up a large patronage, and are 
both successful men. That their careers have deserved large rewards 
will be understood from the history of the elder of these brothers, who 
are both natives of Tennessee and who outgrew the narrow limits in 
which they were reared and pushed forth in a bigger world outside the 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 735 

confines of their native state, finding both opportunity and a worthy 
place in life. 

James M. Whitaker was born on his father's farm in Tennessee, 
May 22, 1861, a son of John H. and Amanda (Welch) Whitaker, who 
were both born in the same part of Tennessee, the former in 1843. 
There were ten children in the family. The youngest, Jesse, died at the 
age of three years, having been named for his uncle, Jesse Crook, one of 
Falls City's worthy citizens and a pioneer to this county in 1854. 
Neither Mr. Whitaker nor his brother had more than the most meager 
schooling during youth, three months in the poor and ineficient public 
school during the winter and supplemented by a very brief subscription 
school. 'He often contrasts conditions in his native state with those 
prevailing in Nebraska when he arrived here. In Tennessee he re- 
ceived only eight dollars a month for hard work, and half of that was 
in store pay. and as to advantages, he was able to do only long division 
in arithmetic at the age of twenty-three. 

Mr. James M. Whitaker was the first one to leave the old home, 
which he did in 1880, and went to Texas, where he entered the employ 
of a wholesale and retail firm engaged in the grain, hide and fur 
business. He remained three years, but returned home because of 
a brother's serious illness. Soon after his brother's death he told his 
parents that prosy old Tennessee was no place for him, and that he . 
was going west. Accordingly, in February, 1884, he arrived in Richard- 
son county, Nebraska. He began his career in this state by working 
on a farm, which was, however, only a means to an end, for he was not 
at all satisfied with his educational equipment, and determined to get 
at least a tolerable training for life and business. During the winter 
he attended a select school in Falls City taught by Professor Corey, 
and then during the other seasons of the year he labored on the farm. 



736 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

He soon obtained employment from F. W. Ingham, who was among 
the first to introduce the manufacture of pumps and windmills in this 
part of the country. For four years he alternated this employment 
with going to school during the winter. He attended the Morrell Nor- 
mal College of Kansas under Principal J. M. Real, and for his last 
school the normal at Enterprise, Kansas. He received forty-five dol- 
lars a month while working at the windmill business, which was almost 
a fortune to what he had earned by manual labor in his native state. 

His father gave the boys part of their time each year after they 
were eighteen years old, and the first money that he had worth men- 
tioning was sixty-five dollars received for a little mule, which he had 
bought by clearing a patch of timber on his father's sterile farm and 
growing corn thereon, using the proceeds to trade for his mule. When 
he reached Texas he had but thirteen dollars of that sum, and his first 
outlay was one dollar for a poor breakfast. Those days of privation 
and even hardship have long been past, but Mr. Whitaker takes much 
comfort from his present situation by comparing it with his early life. 

In 1892 he came to Falls City and engaged with Cook and Com- 
pany to learn the hardware business, receiving his board in compensa- 
tion. A short time later he bought in with Julius Schoenfeldt, publisher 
of a Nebraska journal, and Mr. Whitaker added a job printing outfit, 
which enterprise he conducted very successfully for a year, and then sold 
to his partner. He returned to the hardware business, which he con- 
tinued until 1896. In December of that year he got mixed up some- 
what in politics. He went to the Republican state convention and 
helped nominate J. H. Cornell for state auditor, and on the latter's 
election to that office he was appointed one of the deputies. He lived 
during the four years' term in Lincoln, and during the last two years 
was chief clerk in the insurance department. In 1897 he was the prime 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 737 

mover in having Nebraska represented at the Tennessee Centennial, 
which he attended in company with the distinguished W. J. Bryan, 
Senator Allen, Governor Holcomb and staff, and others. He was a 
Republican in politics for a number of years, but is now a Bryan Dem- 
ocrat. He and his brother each resides in his own home, and they own 
other town property and farm lands. 

Mr. J. M. Whitaker was married in July, 1894, to Miss Margaret 
Deachy, of Morrill, Kansas. Her father, Mahlon Deachy, was a pio- 
neer of Kansas, coming from Somerset county, Pennsylvania. 



VICTOR GERALD LYFORD. 

Victor Gerald Lyford, proprietor of one of the leading department 
stores of general merchandise in Falls City, has been in business here 
for five years, with steadily increasing trade and profitable patronage. 
He is a man of more than ordinary ability, both in business and in the 
general affairs of life, and for a time was a young Nebraska attorney, 
with good prospects for success in that vocation had he desired to con- 
tinue it. He has an assured place in the regard and esteem of the 
citizens of Richardson county and Falls City, and takes a public-spirited 
interest in all matters pertaining to the welfare and progress of the 
community. 

Mr. Lyford is a member of one of the oldest American families, 
the history going back in unbroken line many generations to men of 
mark in the early New England colonies. He was born in Bureau 
county, Illinois, August 16, 1859, a son of Joseph and Josephine (Hin- 
man) Lyford. The first Lyford in America was the Rev. John, who 
came from England to the Plymouth colony in 1634, and by his efforts 



73* SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

to win over the dissenters to the Established Church of England in- 
curred the displeasure of the colonists to such an extent that he was 
compelled to move to Nantucket. He was a minister at Salem and 
other places, and, according to his last will and testament, died about 
1642. A generation or so later, Thomas Lyford was born in Boston 
in 1672, and died in 1727 at Exeter, Massachusetts. His son John was 
born in Exeter and died at Canterbury, New Hampshire, in March or 
April, 1798. A son of the latter, and the great-grandfather of Mr. V. 
G. I.yford, was born in Epping, New Hampshire, in February, 1765. 

Joseph Lyford, the grandfather of Mr. Lyford, was born at Can- 
terbury, New Hampshire, July 11, 1792. He was a farmer by occupa- 
tion, and in 1836 joined a colony of settlers and drove an ox team 
through to Bureau county, Illinois. In that early day he knew all 
his. neighbors within a radius of forty miles, and the market place was 
Peoria, with no beaten highways leading to that place. He died shortly 
after arriving in Bureau county. His widow, who survived him until 
1868, being nearly eighty years old at the time of her death, was of the 
maiden name of Charlotte Dow, also of Canterbury, New Hampshire. 
All their children were born at Canterbury, as follows : Augustus, was 
a merchant of Galesburg, Illinois, where he died leaving one son and 
one daughter; Alfred, born in 1818, was a Bureau county farmer, and 
died at Sheffield, Illinois, at the age of eighty-four ; Mrs. Caroline Craig 
died at Walnut, Iowa, in 1895, leaving two sons and one daughter ; 
Joseph is mentioned below; Moses died at the age of twenty-five, un- 
married. 

Joseph Lyford, the father of Mr. V. G. Lyford, was born in Can- 
terbury, New Hampshire, in 1828, and died in Bureau county, Illinois, 
in March, 1900. For many years of his life he was a grain merchant 
at Neponset, Illinois. He married, February 15, 1855, at Groveland, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 739 

Illinois, Miss Josephine Hinman. who was horn at Groveland, April 
22, 1837, a daughter of Charles and Sarah Ann (Whitcomb) Hinman, 
both of Connecticut. Her father was a machinist and carriage manu- 
facturer in Illinois and Iowa, being one of the early settlers to the latter 
state, and he and his wife both died there and now rest in the burial 
plot at Clarinda. There were five children in the Hinman family. 
Joseph and Josephine Lyford had eight children : A son, born May 7. 

1856, died at the age of one year; Charles Edgar, born November 4, 

1857, is a salesman in Chicago, and is married; Victor G. is the next 
of the family; Leo Lincoln, born November 30, i860, married Jane Ot- 
ley in February, 1883; Sarah Lottie, born June 16, 1862, married, 
February 15, 1882, Carlos B. Craig; Nellie Ella, born October 1, 1865, 
married Robert Rounseville; Grant Hinman, born April 8. 1868, died 
March 11, 1869; and Joseph Hinman, born in 1870, died in 1871. The 
mother of these children died in Illinois January 20, 1870, and on May 
7. 1872, Mr. Joseph Lyford married Mrs. Mary Jane Quinby, nee 
Gasten, who was born in Canada, April 22, 1845, an d by this marriage 
had six children: Florence Josephine, born March 12, 1873 ; Luella Rose, 
born May 11, 1875; Moses Herbert, born August 24, 1877; Scott Dow, 
bom May 18, 1879; Mattie Delia, born November 3, 1880, died October 
14, 1881 ; and Bertha Winifred, born April 29, 1883. The family resi- 
dence is still at Neponset, Illinois. 

Mr. Victor G. Lyford was educated in the public schools, and from 
youth up had experience in a store. He was educated, however, for 
the law, at Hedding College, in Abingdon, Illinois, and at the Union 
College of Law, in Chicago, being a fellow student with W. J. Bryan. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1883, and practiced for one year in 
Lincoln, Nebraska. It was the firm of Lyford and Talbot for a time, 
and this was succeeded by Talbot and Bryan (W. J.). Mr. Lyford 



740 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

returned to Illinois, and from 1884 to 1890 was engaged in the general 
merchandise business at Neponset, and the following eight years in 
Humphrey, Nebraska. In 1899 he opened his establishment in Falls 
City. There are five department stores in Falls City, and his business 
has steadily increased until he holds the front rank among similar enter- 
prises in the city. He carries a full line of dry-goods, carpets and 
groceries, employs from ten to twelve clerks, and carries a stock worth 
about twenty-five thosand dollars. 

September 16, 1885, Mr Lyford married Miss Florence N. Willets, 
who was born in New Boston, Illinois, September 24, 1861, a daughter 
of William and Mary (Alyen) Willets, both of Indiana. Her parents 
were farmers near New Boston, and are now deceased. They had each 
been married twice, and had in all eighteen children. Mrs. Lyford 
was educated in Hedding College, where she met her future husband. 
Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Lyford: Mabel, born in 
Neponset, August 1, 1886, graduated in the Falls City high school in 
1904; Grace and Gertrude, born April 22, 1889; Helen Mary, born at 
Humphrey, Nebraska, March 15, 1894; Constance, born in Humphrey, 
September 20, 1895; and Florence Willets, born in Humphrey, Febru- 
ary 2J, 1898. Mr. Lyford affiliates with the Knights of Pythias. He 
is a stanch Republican, and served in minor offices while a resident of 
Illinois, and in 1904 was candidate of the prohibition element for the 
office of mayor. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 



ARTHUR E. HILDEBRAND. 



Arthur E. Hildebrand, who has been principal of the schools of 
Johnson for the past two years, is one of the enterprising and progressive 
educators of this section of the state. He has been engaged in this 
line of work since he was eighteen years old, and has manifested both 
talent and taste for the profession. In addition to his devotion to the act- 
ual work of the classroom and the performance of his duties as between 
teacher and pupil, he has shown much ability in school organization and 
system and all the duties of management and control which devolve 
upon the head of an institution of learning. He has effected some im- 
portant reforms and changes since taking charge of the Johnson schools, 
and has also been interested in the work of general education through- 
out the county. 

Mr. Hildebrand was born in Ottumwa, Iowa, June 30, 1878, and 
has lived in Nebraska all his life with the exception of one year. He 
is a grandson of Henry Hildebrand, a farmer, who emigrated to Keo- 
kuk county, Iowa, in the early fifties, and about 1870 came to Pawnee 
county, Nebraska. He was a prosperous man, and owned several farms 
in Nebraska and Kansas, all of his property having come to him through 
his own diligent efforts and careful management. He died in Pawnee 
county, near Dubois, in 1896, in his eightieth year, having reared eight 
sons and one daughter, all of whom had families. 

Junius Hildebrand, the father of Arthur E Hildebrand, was born 
in Pennsylvania in 1845. His wife was Mary McElroy, born in Pennsylva- 
nia in 1847, and her father, Henry McElroy, was a soldier in the Civil war 
and a farmer in Pennsylvania and in Iowa, in which latter state he died 
in 1902, when an octogenarian, having reared six daughters and two 
sons. Junius and Mary Hildebrand were married in Ottumwa, Iowa, 
in 1870, and had five children: Charles died at the age of six years; 



742 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

James G. P. is a farmer in Pawnee county, Nebraska, and has one son 
and two daughters ; Lizzie was educated in the Pawnee Academy and 
graduated from the training class of the Peru Normal, and has been 
a teacher in Pawnee county for the past eleven years ; Myrtle and Arthur 
E. were twins, and the former graduated from the Dubois high school 
and the Peru normal, and has been a teacher for the last six years. 

Mr. Hildebrand graduated from the Dubois high school at the age 
of eighteen years, with honors for scholarship, and in 1901 graduated 
from the State Normal at Peru. He began teaching a district school 
in Nemaha county after his graduation from high school, and was also 
principal of the Brock schools before coming to Johnson. He takes an 
active part in teachers' institutes and associations, as well as in the 
farmers' institutes and the summer schools. He is a Democrat in poli- 
tics, but has been too zealous in his professional work to care for partici- 
pation in practical politics. His fine appearance and winning ways 
make him popular in all circles, and as a young man he seems to stand 
on the threshold of a worthy and useful career. 



REV. JOSEPH M. HORNEY. 

Rev. Joseph M. Horney, who has devoted many years to the 
active work of the ministry and is now living in Olive precinct in 
Saline county. Nebraska, was born in Fayette county, Ohio, on the 
7th of September, 1833. His paternal grandfather, Daniel Horney, 
was a native of North Carolina and removed thence to Ohio. He mar- 
ried Miss Margaret Caloway, a representative of an old Quaker family, 
and among their children was John C. Horney. who was born in Ohio. 
The latter, after arriving at years of maturity, wedded Nancy A. Chany, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 743 

who was born in Greene county, Ohio, and was a daughter of Edward 
Chany, of North Carolina. His wife bore the family name of Jackson 
prior to her marriage, and she too was identified with the Society of 
Friends or Quakers. The mother of our subject passed away in 1849, 
and the father died at Iuka, Pratt county, Kansas, when seventy-two 
years of age. He was a farmer by occupation, always following that 
pursuit in order to provide for his family. His political allegiance was 
given to the Whig party until its dissolution, when he joined the ranks 
of the Republican party, and his religious faith was that of the Chris- 
tian or New Light church. In the family of this worthy couple were 
seven children besides Joseph M. : Charles; I, A., of Pratt City, Kansas, 
who was a soldier of the Fourth Iowa Infantry during the Civil war 
and went with Sherman on the celebrated march to the sea ; Sarah J. ; 
Henry; Daniel: Phoebe; and one that died in childhood. 

Rev. Joseph M. Horney was reared upon the home farm amid good 
home influences, and lessons of industry, integrity and morality were 
earl)- instilled into his mind and have borne fruit in his later life. His 
literary education was acquired in the public schools, and he is a self- 
made man who owes whatever success he has achieved entirely to his 
own efforts. In 1854 he removed to Logan county, Illinois, settling near 
Lincoln, where he engaged in farming and also in preaching the gospel. 
He was thus engaged until after the inauguration of the Civil war, 
when his loyal spirit prompted his enlistment, and in August, 1862, he 
responded to President Lincoln's call for sixty thousand men, becoming 
a member of the One Hundred and Sixth Illinois Infantry, with which 
he served until the close of hostilities. He was in active duty at the 
siege of Vicksburg, where his hearing was largely destroyed by the roar 
of the cannon. He was also in the battle of Duvalls Bluff, and when 



744 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

the war was over he was honorably discharged, returning to his home, 
where he resumed the occupation of farming and preaching. 

Mr. Horney had been married in Jeffersonville, Ohio, in 1853, to 
Almira A. (Harvey) Golsberry, the widow of Calvin Golsberry, a 
tailor, who died at Midway, Ohio, and left a daughter, Medora, who is 
now living near Lincoln, Illinois. Mrs. Horney was a daughter of John 
Harvey, who was born in Delaware and was a soldier in the war of 
1812. He suffered many hardships during his military experiences, 
walking barefooted over the mountains with bleeding and wounded 
feet. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Susan Jones, was of 
English lineage and was a descendant of Lord Jones, who was lost at sea. 
She was a representative of old and prominent English and Welsh fam- 
ilies. John Harvey died in St. Joseph county, Indiana, near South Bend, 
when seventy-three years of age. He was a man of liberal education 
and scholarly attainments, and was engaged in teaching in select and 
high schools for a number of years, thus leaving his impress upon the 
intellectual development in the various communities in which he made 
his home. His religious faith was that of the Baptist church and his 
support was also given to every progressive measure along moral, social 
and material lines. He became one of the pioneer residents of Indiana, 
settling there when the Indians were still numerous in the state. His 
wife also died in Indiana, and her loss was greatly mourned among 
those to whom she had become endeared by reason of her many ex- 
cellent traits of character. In the family were the following children : 
Mary; Andrew; Margaret; John; Amanda and Elizabeth, both de- 
ceased ; James ; Lydia ; Susan ; Mrs. Horney ; Daniel ; and Mary. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Horney have been born five children : Alice, who died at 
the age of thirty-four years ; John, a resident of Lincoln, Illinois ; Joseph- 
ine, who is the wife of Rev. A. L. Bulkley, who was a missionary to 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 745 

Burmah, India, for seven years and is now living in Denver, Colo- 
rado; Mrs. Minda Darsey, of Denver, Colorado; and James H., of 
Tobias. 

Mr. Horney made his home in Logan county, Illinois, from 1854 
until 1884 and conducted two farms in that locality. He then came to 
Saline county, where he had located land in 1874 by means of a land 
warrant which had been granted to his father-in-law, John Harvey, in 
recognition of his services in the war of 1812, Mr. Horney now has 
one hundred and twenty acres of rich land constituting what is known as 
the Fruitdale farm. It is one of the best farming properties in the town- 
ship, and is well equipped with modern accessories and with all the 
machinery that facilitates farm work. There is a good grove and 
orchard upon the place, barnyards and feed lots, well kept fences, sub- 
stantial buildings for the shelter of grain and stock, a windmill and a 
comfortable residence. The farm is pleasantly located a mile and a half 
east of Tobias, where Mr. Homey and his family now reside. He has 
engaged in preaching the gospel in this county for twenty years and is 
a zealous and active worker in the cause of the master. He has been a 
member of the Baptist church for forty years and for fourteen years has 
acted as pastor of the church at Tobias. His first presidential vote was 
cast for Fremont in 1856 and he has since voted for Lnicoln, Grant, 
Garfield and McKlinley, in fact, has never faltered in his allegiance to 
the Republican party. He is public-spirited in an eminent degree, de- 
voted to the national interests and local welfare, contributing liberally 
to all that is calculated to upbuild his adopted country. At the time of 
this writing (October, 1904) Rev. Mr. Horney is seventy-one years of 
age, and his wife in seventy-four, both being past the Psalmist's limit, 
and none are more highly esteemed in the vicinity of Tobias than they. 



746 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

WILLIAM JACOBS. 

William Jacobs, who is engaged in general farming and stock- 
raising in Jefferson county, being proprietor of the Ash Grove stock 
farm, was born in Hancock county, Illinois, near Carthage, in August, 
1857. His father, J. H. Jacobs, was a native of Prussia, Germany, 
was reared and educated in that land and when twenty-eight years of 
age crossed the Atlantic to the United States. He married Miss Bar- 
bara Wallmer, who was born in Bavaria, Germany. Her death oc- 
curred when she was seventy-two years of age, but J. H. Jacobs is still 
living and makes his home with his son William, at the advanced age of 
eighty-three years. He was a soldier of the Civil war, enlisting in the 
Eleventh Missouri Light Artillery. He was largely engaged in military 
duty in St. Louis and other parts of Missouri, and after remaining with 
the army three years he veteranized. His military record is most credit- 
able, and his loyalty to his adopted land has ever been above question. 
In his political views he has always been a stanch Republican from the 
organization of the party. In his religions belief he is a Protestant. In 
the family were but two children, the daughter being Mrs. Elizabeth 
Egley, of Hoklridge, Nebraska. 

William Jacobs was reared upon the home farm in Illinois, and 
no event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm 
life for him in his youth. He was taught the value of industry and 
perseverance in business life, and these have characterized his career 
since he attained man's estate. He is truly a self-made man, having 
been dependent entirely upon his own efforts for the property he has 
acquired. He has made his home in Nebraska since 1879, and when he 
arrived here he had but limited means. For three years he resided upon 
a tract of school land of one hundred acres. To-day, having carefully 
saved his monev and made judicious investment thereof, he is the owner 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 747 

of six hundred and forty acres of valuable land, of which he has placed 
three hundred and fifty acres under a high state of cultivation. There 
are rich pasture and meadow lands and broad fields of alfalfa. He 
also raises grain, and he is making a specialty of breeding and raising 
red-polled cattle and Poland China hogs. In this branch of his business 
he has been quite successful, and he now has some fine specimens of 
both upon his farm. His property is also well improved with modern 
equipments. He has a barn forty-eight by sixty feet, which was erected 
at a cost of twelve hundred and fifty dollars. He has a crib sixteen 
by forty-eight feet, and there is a good windmill and water tanks. There 
is also a well equipped blacksmith shop upon the place. His residence, 
thirty-two by sixty-four feet, is well furnished and was erected at a 
cost of two thousand dollars. There is a grove of ash trees, covering 
ten acres, which gives the name to the place, and in fact the entire farm, 
complete in its appointments, constitutes one of the best rural homes of 
the county. It is pleasantly located five miles from Daykin, and it is 
the visible evidence of the life of thrift, industry and enterprise led by 
the owner, who came to this count}' in comparatively limited circum- 
stances, but has since improved his opportunities and has steadily ad- 
vanced from a humble financial position to one of success, being now 
the possessor of a very handsome competence. 

In 1883 Mr. Jacobs was united in marriage to Miss Mary Bockholdt, 
who was born in Germany, but spent her girlhood days in Illinois and 
Nebraska. Her father, Martin Bockholdt, is a prominent and wealthy 
retired farmer now living in Plymouth, Jefferson county, and his life 
history demonstrates what can be accomplished through determined and 
well directed effort. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Jacobs has been blessed 
with seven children : Elsie, who is attending school in Plymouth, Ne- 



748 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

braska; Eveline; Harrison; Edwin; Ida; and Irene. They also lost 
one son, William, who died at the age of twelve years. 

Mr. Jacobs formerly gave his political support to the Republican 
party and afterward became a Populist. He now votes the fusion ticket, 
believing in and supporting the platform which seems to contain the 
best elements of good government for the majority of the people. He 
filled the office of county commissioner for three years and was most 
faithful, prompt and reliable in the discharge of his duties. He was 
renominated and carried his own district, but was not re-elected. In 
his citizenship he is always found progressive and practical, and he has 
the welfare of the community close at heart. In his business career 
he has been careful, painstaking and straightforward, and his life record 
proves that success may be attained through such means and does not 
depend upon genius or fortunate circumstances. 



PETER D. STARR. 

Peter D. Starr, an honored veteran of the Civil war and one 
of the early settlers of Jefferson county, where he has made his home 
since 1869, was born in Gallia county, Ohio, on the 13th of February, 
1839. His father, Peter Starr, Sr., was born in Virginia in 1797 and 
was a representative of an old family of that state. The paternal 
grandfather, Henry Starr, was born of German parentage. The mother 
of our subject bore the maiden name of Catherine Houdescheldt and 
was born in Virginia in 1807 and was also of German lineage. On 
leaving the Old Dominion, Peter Starr, Sr., removed with his family 
to Ohio, where he followed the occupation of farming. He voted 
with the Democracy, and in his religious faith was a Methodist. He 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 749 

died at the age of seventy-four years, while his wife passed away in 
Nebraska at the advanced age of eighty-five years. When in the south 
she was taken prisoner at Haines Bluff and then taken to Jackson, 
Mississippi. General Grant captured her with other prisoners at Jack- 
son, Mississippi. Afterwards the south recaptured Jackson and also 
recaptured her. Afterwards she was taken to Richmond, Virginia and 
there confined in Libby prison, afterwards was taken to Belle Isle, 
where she was paroled with other prisoners. She was in military 
prison something like five months. 

In the family of Peter and Catherine Starr were six children : 
Rosena; George; Levi; Peter D. ; Henry; and Andrew J., Andrew 
was forced to join the rebel army. He suffered great hardships and 
privations. He was sent home on a sick furlough and was afterwards 
murdered, for fear he would desert and go and join the northern 
army. Peter Starr, Sr., at this time (1861) lived in the state of Missis- 
sippi. 

Peter D. Starr was reared upon the home farm in Ohio and 
attended the public schools. On the 10th of July, 1862, he enlisted at 
Memphis, Tennessee, as a member of the Fifth Tennessee Cavalry, 
known as the First Middle Tennessee Regiment of Cavalry. He 
served for eight months and was at Gallotin and Nashville in the 
hospital. At the close of that time he was honorably discharged. Go- 
ing to Iowa, Mr. Starr was married in Mills county, that state, to Miss 
Mary C. Tresler, who was born in Indiana and is a daughter of 
William and Nora (Donnelly) Tresler. In their family were four 
children: Mrs. Sarah J. Mizner, of Sherman county, Nebraska; Wil- 
liam F., of Jefferson county; John H., of the same county; and Addie 
I., deceased. Mr. Starr was called upon to mourn the loss of his first 
wife, who died at the age of twenty-four years, and in 1879 he was 



750 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

married again, his second union being with Louisa C. Houdescheldt. 
She has been very helpful to him in his business career through the 
careful management of the household and its expenses. Her father 
was one of the first settlers of Mills county, Iowa, removing to that 
state from Virginia in 1856. He was a soldier of the Civil war, en- 
listing in the Fifteenth Iowa Infantry. He held membership in the 
Christian church and died in that faith in 1872, when fifty-two years 
of age. His wife passed away in Mills county, Iowa, on the 22A of 
February, 1869, when forty-five years of age, loved and respected by 
all who knew her. To Mr. and Mrs. Starr have been born three chil- 
dren ; Mrs. Mary Julia Bellinger, who is now living in Sherman county, 
Nebraska ; Asa W.. and Arthur Leroy. 

Mr. Starr owns a good farm of eighty acres, on which he has 
a substantial dwelling and good buildings; his farm is well improved 
and his land is under a high state of cultivation, yielding to him a 
good return for the care and labor he bestows upon it. He exercises 
his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the Re- 
publican party and he has served as constable and as a member of 
the school board. He is also a charter member of Alexander Post, 
G. A. R., and he belongs to the Presbyterian church. In his life he 
displays sterling qualities and is ever found loyal to honorable principles 
and to every interest which tends to benefit his county along substatial 
lines of progress. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 751 

WENCIL VILDA. 

Wencil Vilda, justice of the peace of Wilber, Saline county, and 
a retired and successful farmer, has lived in this county since the 29th 
day of May, 1866, so long that he is counted among the pioneers and 
old-time settlers. He is a Bohemian by birth, but came to this country 
when a boy of twelve years, and is one of the sterling foreign-born 
Americans who are an honor to both their native and their adopted 
land. He successfully carried on farming until August, 1892, twelve 
years ago, and since then has been living in town, mainly retired from 
the strenuous toil of his former years. His public-spirited and genuine 
citizenship is shown by his election to his present office, and that is 
also evidence of how thoroughly he possesses the confidence and esteem 
of his fellow citizens. 

Mr. Vilda was born in Bohemia, July n, 1843. His father Joseph 
Vilda, was born in the same place February 14, 1807, and married 
Anna Barta, who was born in the same neighborhood in 1814, and their 
marriage was celebrated in 1835. They had two children, but the 
elder, a son, died in Bohemia at the age of two years. Joseph Vilda 
was a blacksmith by trade, and followed it most of his life. He brought 
his family by sailing vessel to America, being nine weeks less two 
days on the passage from Bremen to New Orleans, in which latter port 
they landed October 2, 1855. The family possessed but small means. 
They arrived in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, on December 4, and there 
Joseph opened his shop and did business for nine and a half years. In 
the early part of May, 1866, he accompanied his son Wencil to Nebraska, 
and they took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres of raw 
prairie in Wilber township. Joseph Vilda died on this homestead about 
1888 and his wife in 1884. They were members of the Catholic church. 

Mr. Wencil Vilda lived with his parents till their death. He 



752 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

was reared and received some of his schooling in Wisconsin. He was 
a prosperous farmer for many years, but in 1892 sold his farm and 
moved to town, where he built a residence, which he has also since 
sold, and now lives in the home of one of his sons. He and his noble 
wife both suffer much from the rheumatism, especially the latter. Mr. 
Vilda is an intelligent and broad-minded man, reading much. In matters 
of religion he is free-thinking and prefers to reason out questions of 
faith, wearing no shackles of dogma, and by many of his neighbors is 
accounted an agnostic. He is a Master Mason, and in politics is a 
socialist. He was recently elected to his present office of justice of the 
peace, and in 1868 was elected assessor of Wilber precinct, serving two 
terms. He was county commissioner for three years, and was chair- 
man of the board at the time the court house was being built. 

Mr. Vilda was married in Wisconsin, May 5, 1866, to Miss Mary 
Libal, who was born in Bohemia in 1846, or '47, being one of six 
children, five sons and one daughter, born to Wencil Libal and his wife, 
who were farmers in fair circumstances, and both died in Wisconsin 
in old age. Mr. and Mrs. Vilda lost two children, Edward at the 
age of eleven years and Charles aged eighteen months, and their eight 
living sons are as follows: Joseph, single, in Colorado; Anton, who is 
married and living in Wilber; Stephen, who trained himself to be a 
stationary engineer, and is unmarried and living in Wilber precinct; 
Fred, unmarried, in Colorado; Adolph, who is married and lives in 
Wilber; Vincent, of Colorado and single; John and Edward, at home. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 753 

DAVID UPTON. 

David Upton, to whom has been vouchsafed a well earned rest 
after many years of honorable and untiring business activity, is a 
prominent and influential citizen of Tobias, where he has made his 
home since 1891. His has in some respects been an eventful career, 
an ' he saw especially hazardous service during the period of the Civil 
war. He has always been progressive and loyal in citizenship, re- 
liable and industrious in business, and his career is one Avhich is 
worthy of commendation. 

Mr. Upton was born near Moores Junction, Clinton county, New 
York, on the "th of February, 1833, his birthplace being in the beauti- 
ful Lake Champlain region upon the old battle ground of Plattsburg. 
He was thus reared in a neighborhood which aroused his patriotic 
spirit, and this was manifest in later life when the country needed his 
military service. His father, Edward Upton, was born at Loch Naugh 
in county Antrim, Ireland, and was of Scotch-Irish lineage, his an- 
cestors being of the Protestant faith. He married Sydney Porter, 
who was of English lineage. Her people belonged to the Episcopal 
church, but she became a member of the Presbyterian church, in which 
her husband held membership. On becoming residents of New York 
this couple won the respect and esteem of neighbors and friends, for 
they manifested those sterling traits of character which in every land 
and clime awaken friendship and deep regard. Mr. Edward Upton 
passed away at the advanced age of eighty-eight years, and his wife 
at the age of ninety years. They carefully reared their family, instilling 
into the minds of their children lessons of morality and honesty and 
bringing them up to habits of industry. They were the parents of 
eight sons, but David is the only one now living. Two of the sons 



754 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

were soldiers in the Civil war. Walker was a member of the army, 
doing service in a mechanical capacity. 

David Upton was reared under the parental roof, spending his boy- 
hood days in his native county, where he acquired his education in the 
public schools. He afterward learned the carpenter's trade and con- 
tinued in that business in the east until twenty-two years of age, when 
he went to Mahaska county, Iowa. In 1855 he removed to Oskaloosa, 
Iowa, and in 1856 to Poweshiek county, and there in 1857 he chose a 
companion and helpmate for life's journey, being united in marriage to 
Miss Lucy Bangham, an intelligent lady. They have now lived as man 
and wife for forty-seven years, sharing with each other the joys and 
sorrows, the adversity and prosperity of life. Mrs. Upton was born 
in Clinton county. Ohio, a daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Jen- 
kins) Bangham. The father was a native of Ohio, and both he and his 
wife died in Iowa. Their religious belief was that of the Society of 
Friends or Quakers. 

For twenty years Mr. Upton engaged in building and contracting 
in Poweshiek and Mahaska counties, Iowa, and then removed to Saline 
county, now making his home in Tobias. He has lived retired since 
1891, enjoying the fruits of his former toil. He built a good resi- 
dence at the cost of twenty- four hundred dollars, this being one of 
the attractive, pleasant and hospitable homes of the town. All that 
he possesses has been acquired through his own efforts, and his life 
proves what can be accomplished through determination and honorable 
purpose. 

Mr. Upton was a soldier of the Civil war and he made a good 
record as a gallant warrior. He enlisted at Montezuma, Poweshiek 
county, Iowa, on the 2d of August, 1862, when President Lincoln called 
for sixty thousand more troops to aid in the defense of the Union. He 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 755 

joined Company B of the Fortieth Iowa Volunteers, with Captain 
Frank Campbell in command of the company and Colonel John A. 
Garrett, of Newton, Iowa, in command of the regiment. The rendez- 
vous was at Iowa City, and under orders the Fortieth Iowa thence 
proceeded south to Columbus, Kentucky, afterward to Paducah and on 
to Vicksburg, defending the breastworks there. The regiment was en- 
gaged in besieging the city for forty-seven days or until its surrender 
on the 4th of July. 1863. A week later the command went to Helena, 
Arkansas, under General Steele, took part in the Little Rock expedition, 
and in that city Mr. Upton was detached as General Steele's special 
messenger ; this was a position of much responsibility and importance 
and was also a hazardous one. It was necessary that a man of good 
judgment, calm in thought and courageous in action should fill the place, 
and because of these qualities Mr. Upton was chosen. He did his full 
duty regardless of the danger to which he was exposed. He acted as 
mail agent from Little Rock to Memphis. Tennessee, going by way 
of Duvall's Bluff on the White river. His life was many times en- 
dangered, as he carried mail and papers of much importance. He had 
orders if captured to burn or destroy the papers and dispatches that he 
might be carrying. Later he was appointed hospital steward in charge 
of eighty convalescents and afterward was assigned to duty to take these 
men back to Iowa. Again he displayed excellent judgment in perform- 
ing the task assigned him, and he did valuable service in behalf of his 
ill and wounded comrades, whom he conveyed to the north and placed 
in charge of Adjutant General Baker at Davenport, Iowa. There Mr. 
Upton was honorably discharged after long and faithfull service. He 
has every reason to be proud of his military record, and it is such as 
entitles him to rank with the brave defenders to whom the Union owes 
her perpetuation and present prosperity. 



756 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Upton have been born nine children, six living: 
Mrs. Emma Tallon, who is living in Tobias ; Ada, the wife of Rev. W. 
W. Hull, of Bircher, Nebraska; Albert, who is a banker of Mahaska, 
Washington county, Kansas; F. C, who is engaged in the hardware 
business in Belvidere, Nebraska; L. K., who follows fanning in Tobias; 
and Garfield, who is a partner of his brother, F. C. Upton, in Belvidere. 
Mr. Upton votes with the Republican party and he served as justice of 
the peace in Iowa for several years. He belongs to the Grand Army 
post at Tobias and for many years he has been a devoted Mason, having 
become identified with the fraternity in Oskaloosa, Iowa, in 1872. 
Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
His life has been a success. His entire career is illustrative of the 
fact that certain actions are followed by certain results. As a business 
man he was energetic and successful, as a soldier he displayed bravery, 
sagacity and true patriotism, and as a citizen he is an illustration of the 
high type of our American manhood. 



HENRY C. WELCH. 

Henry C. Welch, who is now filling the position of commander of 
J. W. Moorehouse Post No. 188, G. A. R., at Tobias, Nebraska, well 
merits representation in this volume not alone because of his excellent 
army record but also because he is one of the early homesteaders of the 
county, having established his residence here on the 20th of May, 1871. 
He secured a tract of land from the government, and with the agricul- 
tural interests of the county has since been closely identified. 

Mr. Welch was born in Lake county, Illinois, about forty miles 
north of Chicago, where Zion City now is, and is a son of Daniel and 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 



757 



Caroline (Parker) Welch, both of whom were natives of Vermont, in 
which state they spent the days of their childhood. After their mar- 
riage they came to Illinois in 1846, settling in Lake county upon a 
farm, and subsequently they removed to Will county, Illinois, residing 
near Joliet, and in 1853 they removed to Iowa, settling near North 
English, in Iowa county. The father devoted his energies to agricul- 
tural pursuits throughout his entire life. In politics he was a Repub- 
lican, and as a citizen was always loyal to the best interests of the 
community in which he made his home. He died in Iowa at the age 
of seventy-five years, and his wife passed away in Iowa at the age of 
thirty-three years. She left seven children, three sons and four daugh- 
ters, namely: Henry C, Albert, Clarissa, Emma, Almeda, David H. 
and May. 

Henry C. Welch was reared in the usual manner of farmer lads, 
spending the days of his childhood and youth in Illinois and Iowa. He 
attended the public schools through the winter months and in the sum- 
mer seasons assisted in the work of the fields. Experience, reading and 
observation have added greatly to his knowledge and made him a well 
informed man. He was a resident of Iowa until 1871, when he came 
to Saline county and secured a homestead near where the town of Tobias 
has since been built. He has here one hundred and sixty acres of land 
constituting a very desirable farm. Its splendid appearance is due to 
his efforts, for when the property came into his possession it was un- 
improved. The place is located on section 10, township 6, range one 
east, in Atlanta township. The first house was a little board shanty 
eight by sixteen feet, and in the succeeding fall he built a sod house 
twelve by sixteen feet. Many hardships and discouragements were to 
be faced, but with resolute spirit he met all the difficulties that lay in 
the path to success. In the year 1874 the grasshoppers entirely des- 



758 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

troyed all crops, and droughts were caused by hot winds, while the 
blizzards of winter also proved detrimental, but Mr. Welch never 
faltered in his determination to make a good farm in Nebraska and his 
labors were at length crowned with a gratifying measure of success. 
He continued to reside upon his farm until 1890 and he still owns the 
property, upon which is a substantial residence, good barns, an orchard 
and grove, and many other modern accessories. His residence is a 
modern structure comfortably furnished, and hospitality there reigns 
supreme. He owns in all two hundred and forty acres. 

Mr. Welch was married in Marengo, Iowa, in 1865, to Miss 
Malinda J. Baldwin, a daughter of Noah and Lydia E. Baldwin, of 
Iowa, who removed from Ohio to the Hawkeye state in 1854, becoming 
early residents there. The father's death occurred in the Buckeye state, 
and the mother is still living in Ohio. To Mr and Mrs. Welch have 
been born five children : Cora M. Hall, who is now living near Friend, 
Nebraska ; Mrs. Caroline A. Porter, a resident of Atwater, Ohio ; Elmer 
S., who is serving as cashier of a bank in Cameron, Illinois; Mrs. Mellie 
A. Upton, of Tobias, Nebraska; and Marietta, at home. The children 
were all provided with good educational privileges, and Elmer S. 
finished his course in Elliott's Business College at Burlington, Iowa. 

Mr. Welch is numbered among the veterans of the Civil war, 
for on the 31st of October, 1864, he enlisted at Grinnell, Iowa, as one 
of the boys in blue of Company K, Fifteenth Iowa Infantry. He 
served under Captain William McDowell and Colonel George P. 
Premott. He went from Iowa City to the south and marched through 
Georgia with General Sherman's army. He was also at Columbia, 
South Carolina, took part in the Carolina campaign and was in the 
battle of Bentonville when General Joe Johnston surrendered. He after- 
ward marched on to Richmond, thence to Washington, D. C, where he 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 759 

participated in the grand review, which was the closing ceremony of the 
long and great struggle which was necessary to preserve the Union in- 
tact. He was then honorably discharged in the capital city on the 26th 
of Tune, 1865. He votes with the Republican party and has filled a 
number of local offices. He has also been a delegate to the county 
conventions and is active in support of the interests of his friends. A 
leading member of the Grand Army of the Republic in southeastern 
Nebraska, he is now serving as commander of the post at Tobias, and is 
popular with the members of that organization, and with the citizens 
in general throughout this portion of the state. As and energetic, up- 
right and conscientious business man and a gentleman of attractive 
social qualities, he stands high in the estimation of the entire community. 



JOSEPH D. WILSON. 

Joseph D. Wilson, of Atlanta precinct. Saline county, has been 
a resident of this particular portion of southeastern Nebraska for twenty- 
five years, and is numbered among the successful and influential citizens 
of his locality. Farming pursuits and country life have always appealed 
to him, and his long career spent in agricultural enterprises has brought 
him prosperity that is well deserved. 

Mr. Wilson was born on the Monongahela river, in Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, November 27, 1842, and comes of a family noted 
for honesty, industry and integrity. His grandfather Robert Wilson 
was born of Scotch-Irish Protestant parents. His father, Robert. Jr., 
was reared in Pennsylvania and was a shoemaker by trade, keeping a 
shoe store. His wife was Phebe Baker, daughter of Joseph Baker, of 
Scotch-Irish stock. Robert and Phebe Wilson both died in Pennsyl- 



760 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

vania, the latter at the age of thrity-eight, the former when seventy- 
two years old, and they were both of the Presbyterian faith, and the 
former was a Republican in politics. They had five children : Joseph 
D., John A., Charles, William and Ida. 

Mr. Joseph D. Wilson was reared in Pennsylvania, received his 
education in the district schools, and after the death of his mother took 
up the battle of life on his own account. On February 10, 1863, he 
enlisted in Company H of the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, under 
Captain Greens and Colonel Sipes, and he was in General Stoneman's 
division and in General Wilson's famous cavalry. He was in the Army 
of the Cumberland, and saw much service in Tennessee, Georgia, Ala- 
bama and the swamps of Florida. He was among the rough riders, 
and took part in the great cavalry raid made by General Wilson through 
the south. He received his honorable discharge at Macon, Georgia, 
September 2, 1865, and returned home with a good soldier's record to 
his credit for all the rest of his life. 

He was married in 1865 to Miss Sarah Hull, who has played her 
part equally well with her husband for the subsequent period of nearly 
forty years and is devoted to her home and family and is an esteemed 
member of social circles in the community. She was born in Mahaska 
county, Iowa, near Oskaloosa, her parents, John and Levina Hull, being 
among the first settlers of that part of Iowa. Her maternal grandpar- 
ents were among the first settlers of Wayne county, Indiana. John 
Hull died at Tobias, Nebraska, in 1901, aged eighty-three years, and 
his widow is still living at the age of eighty-one, making her home 
with her son in Tobias. Mrs. Wilson was one of a large family of 
children, and the others were named as follows : F. T., Anna, Elizabeth, 
Solomon, George, Don, Charles, John F. and William W. 

In 1867 Mr. Wilson located in Iowa, and remained there until 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 761 

his removal in 1879 to Saline county of this state. He has a fine farm- 
ing estate of eighty acres, on which are a nice grove and orchard, a good 
residence, barn, windmill, and all the appurtenances and equipments 
so necessary to progressive and up-to-date agriculture, which is, of 
course, the kind of enterprise Mr. Wilson carries on. This beautiful 
rural home is located five miles northwest of Tobias, and whether for 
its social charms or the industry and worth of its inhabitants this home 
is one of the most delightful in the entire neighborhood. Six children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Wilson : Ida May, who died at the age 
of sixteen years; Elmer W., Robert B., Carrie L. Crouch, Frank B. 
and Harry E. Mr. Wilson is a Republican in politics, and he and his 
wife are active in church and religious work. 



LUMON CHASE. 

Lumon Chase, living in Atlantic precinct in Saline county, not far 
from the town of Tobias, secured a homestead claim here in 1873 and 
has since made it his place of residence. He was born in Hartford, 
Litchfield county, Connecticut, on the nth of May, 1846. His paternal 
grandfather, Charles Chase, was a native of the Empire state, and as 
a soldier of the war of 1812 participated in the battle of Plattsburg, 
one of the important engagements in the second war with England. 
Timothy Chase, the father of our subject, was born in York State 
and after arriving at years of maturity he wedded Lucy Irene Howe, 
a native of Connecticut and a representative of one of the old and dis- 
tinguished families of that state. On leaving the east Mr. and Mrs. 
Timothy Chase removed to Ohio, establishing their home in Ashtabula 
county at South Dorset, when their son Lumon was a youth of four 



762 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

years of age. When he was a youth of thirteen they removed to Mer- 
cer county, Illinois. The mother died near Crete, Nebraska, in 1872 
treatment and charitable in her judgment of others. The father, who 
devoted his life to agricultural pursuits, died at the age of sixty-four 
years. He was a Jackson Democrat, interested in the success and wel- 
fare of his party, but he had neither time nor inclination to seek public 
office. To him and his wife were born fourteen children, eleven of 
whom reached adult age, namely : Sarah, Crawford, Wells. Ralph, Jane, 
Emily, Lumon, Marsh, Delila, Hattie and Buchanan. 

Mr. Lumon Chase was reared in Ohio and Illinois, spending his 
boyhood days in the usual manner of farmer lads. He early became 
familiar with the duties of field and meadow and when not engaged 
with the work of the farm he devoted his attention to the master}- of 
the branches of learning taught in the public schools. He was married 
at Viola, Illinois, to Miss Lucy Elizabeth Pratt, who was born near 
London, England, and in her girlhood days came to America, where 
she was reared and educated, spending part of the time in Canada and 
part in Illinois. Her parents were John and Eliza Jane (Harrison) 
Pratt, both of whom were natives of London, England. They resided 
in Illinois for many years and died near Alexis, that state, the mother 
passing away at the age of fifty-five years, while the father died at 
the age of fifty-nine. She was an earnest Christian woman, true to the 
teachings of the church in which she held membership. Mr. Pratt 
carried on agricultural pursuits until his life's labors were ended in 
death. Interested in the condition of his adopted land, he studied its 
political questions with the result that he gave an earnest support to 
the Democracy. In the family of this worthy couple are seven chil- 
dren : Charles. Lucy E., Mary. William. Frank. John and George. 

It was in the year 1873 that Mr. Chase came to Saline county, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 763 

making the journey westward with team and wagon after the primitive 
manner of travel at that time. He secured a homestead claim of one 
hundred and sixty acres and began the development of a farm. On 
this he built a sod house twelve by sixteen feet, and later another 
fourteen by twenty feet. He now has a well improved property with 
a good orchard and grove, the former covering twelve acres. He set 
out the trees himself and they are now in bearing condition. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Chase has been blessed with six 
children: Fannie Irene, Charles H., Sarah Jane, Mary A., Hattie and 
Harry. The daughters are all married now. The parents are both 
intelligent and hospitable people, having many warm friends in this 
part of the state. Mr. Chase is a Democrat in his political views and 
fraternally is connected with Tobias Post, G. A. R., while his wife is 
identified with the Society of Friends. 



DAVID FRANKFORTER. 

In the early days when much of the land in Saline county was 
still in possession of the government, David Frankforter came to this 
state and secured a homestead within its borders, taking up his abode 
here in 187 1. In the years which have since intervened he has given 
his attention to agricultural pursuits and what he has accomplished is 
indicative of his excellent business ability and sound and reliable judg- 
ment. 

Mr. Frankforter is a native of Ohio, his birth having occurred 
at Lima in Allen county on the 17th of July, 1841. His paternal grand- 
father, Philip Frankforter. was born of German parentage. He made 
his home in Maryland, and in that state occurred the birth of Andrew 



764 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Frankforter, the father of our subject. Andrew Frankforter, married 
Elizabeth Swartz, who was born in Pennsylvania and was also of 
German parentage and ancestry, representing one of the old German 
families of the Keystone state. Her death occurred in Ohio when she 
was forty-five years of age, and the father, long surviving, passed away 
at the age of eighty-six years. He voted with the Democracy, and 
both he and his wife were Lutherans in religious faith. They were 
the parents of seven children, and by a second marriage the father 
had three chidren. Five of his sons were soldiers of the Civil war — 
certainly a most creditable military record of which the family has every 
reason to be proud. These sons were Henry, Andrew, Samuel, Jacob 
and David, all of whom served in Ohio regiments and three of the 
number were wounded in battle. 

David Frankforter was reared in Mahoning county, Ohio, to the 
age of ten years, and then removed with his parents to Wood county, 
Ohio, where he spent his youth upon the home farm, while in the public 
schools of the neighborhood he acquired his education. He continued 
to assist his father in the care and cultivation of the old homestead until 
August,i86i, when being unable to content himself longer at the plow 
he put aside farm work and enlisted at Tiffin, Ohio, as a member of 
Company H, Forty-ninth Ohio Infantry. The regiment was commanded 
by Colonel W. H. Gibson, the company by Captain O. B. Hayes and 
was formed in response to President Lincoln's call for sixty thousand 
volunteers. The Forty-ninth Ohio went into camp at Tiffin and was 
afterward ordered south to Louisville, Kentucky. The first battle in 
which Mr. Frankforter engaged was at Shiloh, and later he took part 
in the battles of Corinth, Liberty Gap and Chickamauga, where many 
of the company were killed, including the lieutenant. At Missionary 
Ridge Mr. Frankforter was wounded in the upper lip. He was after- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 765 

ward in the battle of Hopewell church, Lovejoy Station, Pulaski, 
Columbia and with General Hood's army at Franklin. At different 
times he was under the command of General Wood, General Howard 
and General McCook. Returning to Nashville he was engaged in picket 
duty there, and took part in the battle of Nashville, where General 
Hardee was killed. He afterward went to Columbia and on to Hunts- 
ville, Alabama, after which the regiment returned to Nashville, and was 
then ordered to Texas under General Willick. They crossed the gulf 
to Indianola, Texas, and marched to Green Lake and on to Gonzales. 
Mr. Frankforter was honorably discharged in the Lone Star state on 
the 30th of December, 1865. He had done a soldier's full duty, never 
faltering in his allegiance to the old flag and the cause it represented, 
and for nearly four years he remained at the front in defense of the 
Union cause. 

When the war was over Mr. Frankforter returned to farm life in 
Ohio. He was married in 1868 to Miss Martha Caroline Bower, who 
was born in Ohio and died in Saline county, Nebraska, in 1887. She 
had been a devoted companion and helpmate to her husband for nine- 
teen years, and her loss was deeply regretted by her family and many 
friends. She left eight children : William, Ellen, Lewis, Loren, Dora, 
Lydia, John and Clarence. In 1893 Mr. Frankforter was again mar- 
ried, the second union being with Mrs. Amanda Nuttingham, the widow 
of George M. Nuttingham, who was a member of Company I, of the 
Fifty-sixth Ohio Regiment of Volunteers, in the Civil war. He was 
wounded in battle and died at Fort Gibson as the result of the ampu- 
tation of his leg. He left a widow and three sons of whom two 
are living — James and John. The other son, Reginald, died at the 
age of twenty-seven years. Mrs. Frankforter was born in Mercer 
county, Ohio, a daughter of Benjamin and Julia A. (Corkle) Nichols, 



766 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

both of whom are deceased. The father, a soldier of the Union army, 
died at Sbiloh when fifty-two years of age, and the mother passed 
away in Mercer county at the advanced age of eighty-four years. 

One third of a century has passed since David Frankforter be- 
came a resident of Saline county, and that he has led a very busy use- 
ful and active life is indicated by the splendid appearance of his farm, 
comprising one hundred and sixty acres. There is a substantial house 
upon the place, and a large barn, twenty-four by thirty-two feet. There 
are also good corn cribs, a windmill, the latest improved machinery and 
good fences. Mr. Frankforter is interested in all that pertains to 
gtneral progress and improvement in his adopted county. He belongs 
to the Grand Army post at Tobias and his wife is a member of the 
Methodist church. He is a splendid type of the self-made man, one 
who has so carefully directed his endeavors that they have proved a 
strong element in a successful and honorable career. 



XOAH FRANKFORTER. 

Noah Frankforter is proprietor of the Orchard Hill farm and one 
of the thrifty and enterprising agriculturists of Saline county, dating 
his resilience here since 1871. A native of Ohio, he was born on the 
24th of January, 1849, upon his father's farm near Lima in Allen county, 
and is a son of Andrew and Elizabeth (Swartz) Frankforter. His 
paternal grandfather was Philip Frankforter, a representative of an 
old German family. In the maternal line he is also descended from 
German ancestry, for the Swartz family was established in Pennsyl- 
vania by German emigrants at an early day, and there Mrs. Andrew 
Frankforter was born. She proved to her husband a good wife, to 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 767 

her children a loving mother and to her neighbors a kind and helpful 
friend. She died in Ohio at the age of forty-five years and the father 
afterward married again. There were eight children by the first union 
and five of the sons, Henry, Andrew, Samuel, Jacob and David, espoused 
the Union cause and followed the stars and stripes upon the battle- 
field of the south. There were three children by the second marriage. 
The father died at the age of eighty-six years in the faith of the Lutheran 
church, to which the mother of our subject had also belonged. He was 
a good citizen, a reliable and industrious business man, and he trained 
his sons to habits of industry and economy. 

Noah Frankforter was but five years of age when the family re- 
moved to Wood county, Ohio, and there he began his education in the 
public schools, continuing his studies through the winter months for 
a number of years. His training at farm labor was not meager, for 
he was early instructed in the best methods of cultivating the fields 
and caring for the stock. He continued with his father until he had 
attained his majority and was then married and started out in life 
on his own account. He wedded Miss Sallie A. Paulin, an intelligent 
and estimable lady, who has done her full share toward making theirs 
a successful as well as happy married life. She was born in Wyandot 
county, Ohio, and is a daughter of Peter and Lydia Paulin, both of 
whom were natives of that state and there spent their entire lives. 
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Frankforter has been blessed with the fol- 
lowing children who are yet living: Harry, Eliza, Hogue. Lennie, 
Archie and George. They also lost four children in infancy and early 
childhood. 

In 1871 Mr. Frankforter removed to Saline county, Nebraska, 
journeying westward by rail to where the line ended at Lincoln, and 
thence proceeding by team to Saline county. He secured a tract of 



768 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

land under the homestead law and built thereon a sod house, twelve by 
sixteen feet. They also bought a cow and a calf, raised chickens and in 
the early days sold butter and eggs. Later he purchased and raised a 
steer team. He had been a resident of the county for only a brief period 
when grasshoppers destroyed his crops. Again, that which he planted 
was killed by droughts and the hot winds. In the winter great blizzards 
occurred, the storms sweeping over the prairie with nothing to break 
their force, but though hardships were to be faced and trials and diffi- 
culties were to be met Mr. and Mrs. Frankforter possessed the deter- 
mination to overcome this, and are now in comfortable circumstances 
as the result of their perseverance and untiring labor. They now have 
a very attractive home, which was erected at a cost of twelve hundred 
dollars. Flowers and shrubs adorn the lawn together with beautiful 
shade trees. In the rear of the house is a large barn twenty-four by 
thirty feet, and there is a windmill upon the place and good improved 
machinery. The farm comprises two hundred and eighty acres of rich 
land and yields a good tribute for the care and labor bestowed upon 
it. The property is now worth fifteen thousand dollars and constitutes 
one of the best farms of the county. It is well known as the Orchard 
Hill farm, and is one of the attractive features of the landscape and the 
visible evidence of the life of thrift and industry which the owner has 
led. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and 
measures of the Democracy, and in religious faith he and his wife are 
Lutherans. Tireless energy, industry and ability have made his a suc- 
cessful career, and he is well entitled to mention among the representa- 
tive men of Saline county. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 769 

HENRY BINGER. 

Among those who have come from foreign lands to become promi- 
nent in business circles of Wilber is Henry Binger, the well known 
lumber merchant. His success in all his undertakings has been so marked 
that his methods are of interest to the commercial world. He has based 
his business principles and actions upon strict adherence to the rules 
which govern industry, economy and strict, unswerving integrity. His 
enterprise and progressive spirit have made him a typical American in 
every sense of the word, and he well deserves mention in this history. 
What he is to-day he has made himself, for he began in the world 
with nothing but his own energy and willing hands to aid him. By 
constant exertion, associated with good judgment, he has raised him- 
self to the prominent position which he now holds, having the friend- 
ship of many and the respect of all who know him. He is now engaged 
in dealing in lumber and coal and all kinds of building- materials at Wil- 
ber, Nebraska, and has secured a very gratifying trade. 

Mr. Binger is one of the early settlers of this portion of the state, 
having arrived here on the 3d of July. 1862 He came from Meck- 
lenburg, German} - , which was the place of his nativity, his birth having 
there occurred on the 25th of December, 1856. His father. John Bin- 
ger, was born in the same locality on the 20th of February, 1820, and 
having arrived at years of maturity he wedded Mary Runcler, of Meck- 
lenburg, born about 1832. Their marriage occurred in 1849, anf l ^ ie y 
became the parents of thirteen children, among them the following who 
reached adult age: Nettie, the wife of William Klinger, of Diller, Ne- 
braska; Sophia, the wife of Louis Smith, of Lincoln, Nebraska, by whom 
she has six children, three sons and three daughters: John, a farmer of 
Rokebe, Nebraska, who has four children ; Mary, the wife of Fred 
Johnson, of East Lincoln, by whom she has two daughters; William, 



770 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

of Lincoln, who has one son and two daughters ; Mrs. Lena Johnson, 
who died in Lincoln in 1900, leaving tAvo daughters ; and Minnie, the 
wife of Henry Gerdies, of Lincoln, by whom she has two sons and three 
daughters. The mother, Mrs. Mary (Runcler) Binger, died in 1877, 
but the father is still living and makes his home with his children. 

Henry Binger was reared to farm life, but at the very early age of 
seven years he left home and began earning his own living. He worked 
fi >r two years for his board and clothing and the third year he re- 
ceived his hoard, clothing and a cow. The fourth year he was 
paid six dollars per month and his clothing, and afterward he re- 
ceived twelve dollars a month and his board and clothing. His wages, 
however, went to his father until he was twenty years of age. In 1876 
he began farming on his own account, securing eighty acres of land. 
He kept bachelor's hall during that year and then sold out at a good 
profit of four hundred dollars. In the spring of 1877 he went to 
Steven's Point, Wisconsin, where he worked in connection with the lum- 
ber trade. 

While at that place Mr. Binger was married to Miss Eliza A. Beers, 
of Portage county, Wisconsin, the wedding being celebrated on the 20th 
of March, 1877. Mrs. Binger is a daughter of Elisha B. and Mary 
(Hynek) Beers. To Mr. and Mrs. Binger have been born eight chil- 
dren: Clarence, who died at the age of eleven months; William F., 
who is engaged in the flour, feed and produce business at Nelson, Ne- 
hraska, and is married and has one son and one daughter; B. E., who 
is a partner of his brother William in Nelson, Nebraska, under the firm 
name of Binger Brothers; Gardner R., who is in his father's employ; 
Harry, who at the age of twelve years is attending school ; Mabel, nine 
vears of age; Jessie, four years of age; and Minnie, who died in in- 
fancy. The children were all provided with good educational privileges, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 771 

and Gardner was educated in the Lincoln Business College after attend- 
ing the public schools. 

Mr. Binger was a resident of Wisconsin until 1883, when he came 
to Wilber and accepted the position of yardman with the firm of Foster 
& Edwards. He was afterward manager of the lumber yard for the 
National Lumber Company for four years and subsequently spent a 
year and a half in the same capacity, with the Wilber Lumber Company. 
In 1890 he purchased an interest in the business conducted under the 
name of C. C. Funnell & Company, and three years later the firm be- 
came Crumb & Binger. A subsequent change in partnership led to the 
name of H. Binger & Company being adopted, and under this style the 
business is now carried on. The stock is valued at from six to eight 
thousand dollars and they do an annual business of from forty-five to 
fifty thousand dollars. By straightforward business methods, unfaltering 
enterprise and strong determination Mr. Binger has gained success in 
the business world and is now the owner of an excellent lumber yard 
and in addition has a pleasant residence in Wilber. 

Fraternally Mr. Binger is a chapter Mason, is also connected with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and with the Modern Wood- 
men of America. In politics he is a Republican and has served on the 
town board for four terms. Both he and his wife were members of the 
First Baptist church of Lincoln, there being no church in Wilber of the 
Baptist denomination. He is thoroughly in sympathy with the interests 
and institutions of his adopted land, is patriotic and progressive in cit- 
izenship, reliable in business, and among those who know him his word 
is as good as his bond. 



772 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

BERNARD L. CASTOR. 

Not to know Bernard L. Castor in Saline county is to argue one- 
self unknown, for almost from the beginning of the county's develop- 
ment he has here resided and has borne an active and helpful part in the 
work of progress and improvement. He has assisted in promoting 
many measures which have had for their object the public good, and 
his business interests, toe, have been of a character that have proved of 
value to the community. He has become one of the wealthy citizens of 
the county and his career excites the admiration and has won the re- 
spect of his contemporaries, and at all times his history is such as will 
bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. 

Bernard L. Castor was born in Vinton, Iowa, October 14, 1859, 
and is a representative of one of the old families of Ashland county, Ohio, 
his great-grandfather having settled there during early pioneer times. 
He followed the occupation of farming in that locality and there reared 
-his family. The family was of English lineage and was established in 
America at an early period in the colonization of the new world. Tobias 
Castor, grandfather of Bernard L. Castor, was reared to farm life in 
Ashland county, Ohio, followed that occupation for many years and died 
there in 1897 at the age of eighty-four years. He married a Miss 
Miller, who also belonged to one of the old families of that locality, and 
they became the parents of five children, three daughters and two sons, 
all of whom reached years of maturity, were married and had families 
of their own. 

Tobias Castor, Jr., the father of Bernard L. Castor, was born in 
Ashland county, Ohio, October 22, 1839. He married Miss Catherine 
Hunt, who was born in Coshocton, Ohio, June 2, 1843, a daughter of 
Jacob F. Hunt, of Pennsylvania. This marriage was celebrated October 
22. 18^8, at Vinton, Iowa, on the anniversary of the birth of Tobias Cas- 





0^Z^*X^ 




SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 773 

tor. Four children were born to them, of whom Bernard L. is the eldest. 
Rosamond Bertie, who was the first white girl born in Saline county, is 
now the wife of E. M. Westervelt, of Lincoln, Nebraska, and has one 
daughter and one son. Carrie is the wife of C. L Tahnage, of Chicago, 
and has one son. George T. Castor, of Wilber. is married and is con- 
nected with business interests in this city. The parents came to the old 
Castor homestead a mile and a half south of Wilber on the 3d of Novem- 
ber, 1862. There Mr. Tobias Castor secured a squatter's claim, consti- 
tuting a quarter section of land. This was a year before the homestead 
act was passed, whereby the land was placed on the market. The jour- 
ney to Nebraska was made in a covered wagon drawn by a team of 
horses. They brought with them all their earthly possessions and the 
sum of nineteen dollars in money. They began life here in a dugout, 
which was near the site of the present cottage. This was twenty by 
sixteen feet, with a log siding and was covered with a clapboard roof. 
It had a dirt floor and remained their residence for about six years. 
Tobias Castor broke land here and planted his field and set out an or- 
chard. During the first winter he trapped both otter and mink, and the 
hides brought him between three and four hundred dollars for his win- 
ter's work. In his business affairs he prospered, and in course of time 
developed an excellent farm, to which he added until he was the owner 
of four hundred acres, so that he left his family in comfortable circum- 
stances at the time of his death on the 12th of December, 1891. 

In his political views he was a Democrat, active in local political 
circles and having much influence. He was a national committeeman 
from Nebraska during the Cleveland campaign, and was a great ad- 
mirer and a stanch supporter of that president. He served as the first 
county treasurer of Saline county and was the first postmaster. He 
often carried the mail on his back, and hence was the first rural deliverer. 



774 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 



The first postoffice was near Blue Island. He had charge of the right 
of way of the Burlington Railroad for twenty-eight years, and he was 
closely associated with many business measures and public improvements 
that have contributed to the progress and upbuilding of this portion of 
the state. His life was so closely interwoven with the history of the 
county that no record of this part of Nebraska would be complete with- 
out mention of him and acknowledgment of his value here as a citizen. 
A self-made man. he deserved great credit for what he accomplished, 
as he started out in life empty-handed and at his death was worth about 
one hundred thousand dollars. The last resting place of Tobias Cas- 
tor is marked by a unique yet modest monument on the old homestead, 
and it is one of the landmarks of this part of the state, often pointed out 
to the traveler who journeys by rail or on the highway. The maternal 
grandfather of Bernard L. Castor — Jacob F. Hunt — was the first white 
settler here within a radius of five miles, Abraham Cox at that time liv- 
ing five miles to the west. Mr. Hunt built a large two-room dug-out 
just back of the present barn on the old home place, and took a helpful 
part in the early work of development here. 

Bernard L. Castor received very limited school privileges, for the 
schools of Nebraska were in very primitive condition during the period 
of his boyhood. He was only three years of age when brought to Saline 
county. He studied in a little dug-out which stood on the present town- 
site of Wilber. His training at farm labor, however, was not meager, 
and he worked earnestly and persistency, assisting his father in many 
ways. At the age of nineteen years he left school and became a sales- 
man in a store which his father had taken in payment of a debt. In 
1883, however, Bernard L. Castor turned his attention to the insurance 
business, which he followed continuously until 1903. He also extended 
his effort to real estate operations and to mining, and in 1900 he en- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 775 

gaged in gold mining in Cripple Creek, Colorado. He also bought coal 
interests in Colorado the same year, and his property there comprises a 
large tract of valuable coal lands in which are heavy veins of the best an- 
thracite and bituminous coal. He owns other real estate, including valua- 
ble property in Nebraska. He is a two-thirds owner of the National Bank- 
building, the best brick building in Wilber. He has farm lands in this 
state and Kansas. 

On the 14th of October, 1880, Mr. Castor was united in marriage 
to Miss Kate A. Grimes, of Scioto county, a daughter of John and Mary 
E. (Hartman) Grimes, both of whom are still living. Mr. Grimes be- 
ing now in Saline county, while Mrs. Grimes is with her son in Cali- 
fornia. Mr. and Mrs. Castor have lost two children, but have three 
who are yet living. Ada M., living with her parents, is pursuing the 
study of vocal and piano music and has a fine soprano voice. Markella 
died at the age of three months, and the third child died in infancy. Gay- 
lord C, born July 11, 1891, is now a student in the public schools, ami 
Bernard, born January 26, 1894, completes the family. 

Mr. Castor is a stalwart Democrat, but has never sought or desired 
office, preferring to give his entire attention to his extensive and import- 
ant business interests and to the enjoyments of home. He has a pleasant 
residence near the court house, and it is noted for its generous and warm- 
hearted hospitality. Mr. Castor certainly deserves mention in this vol- 
ume, for the entire history of Saline county is familiar to him. and with 
the work of upbuilding he has been closely associated. When about 
fourteen years of age he helped to survey Wilber, assisting his father, 
who was the surveyor, and he surveyed the second addition alone. He 
is deeply interested in all that pertains to the moral and intellectual de- 
velopment of his community. 



776 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

JOHN F. SPIRK. 

John F. Spirk, president of the National Bank of Wilber, also en- 
gaged in business there as a dealer in real estate, dates his residence in 
the town from May, 1876, and throughout the intervening period has 
taken a deep and commendable interest in community affairs, his labors 
proving a factor in the development and progress of the locality. He was 
born in Bohemia on the 27th of July, 1858, and came to America 
in 1 87 1. His father, Joseph Spirk, crossed the Atlantic a few years 
later. He was a merchant, carrying on business along that line for a 
number of years. His birth occurred in 1812, and in 1845, when he was 
about thirty-three years of age, he was united in marriage to Miss Bar- 
bara Brabec, who was also a native of Bohemia, born in 1825. Her 
father came to America at a very early day, and was nineteen weeks upon 
a sailing vessel in making the voyage to the new world. The ship en- 
countered severe storms, and it was thought by all on board that they 
could never reach harbor. Many died of hunger and exposure, but Mr. 
Joseph Spirk was one of the few survivors. He became a resident of 
Dayton, Ohio, about 1840. and there he followed the shoemaker's trade, 
which he had followed in Bohemia. His death occurred in Dayton, 
when he was sixty-five years of age. To Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Spirk 
were born eleven children, of whom three daughters and four sons 
reached adult age, but only fixe are now living. Those who grew to 
maturity are Joseph, who is foreman painter in the car shops at Daven- 
port, Iowa, and is married and has three living children ; Mary, who 
became the wife of C. Duras and died in Wilber, Nebraska, in the spring 
of 1904. leaving four children; John F. and E. J., who are living in 
Wilber: V. C, who is assistant cashier in the National Bank at Wilber; 
Bertha, the wife of Frank Stepanek, of Crete, Nebraska, by whom she 
has four children ; and Anna, who died in Crete at the age of nineteen 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. ~" 

years. The father's death occurred in Crete in 1900 and the mother is 
now living in Wilber at the age of seventy-nine years, active in mind 
and body. 

John F. Spirk was educated in the common schools of Bohemia, 
which he attended until thirteen years of age, when he completed the 
common branches. His studies were also pursued in the public schools 
of Dayton, Ohio, and Chicago, Illinois, and subsequently he learned the 
printer's trade in Chicago. Later he went to Omaha. Nebraska, where 
he secured a position as compositor in connection with a Bohemian paper 
and also publications of city and county. At nineteen years of age he 
entered the Davenport Business College and was graduated in the spring 
of 1878. For four years he filled the position of deputy county treas- 
urer of Saline county, and in the fall of 1881, having demonstrated 
his capability and his loyal citizenship he was elected county treasurer. 
He served for one term of two years and was unanimously re-nominated 
by the Republicans, but declined to serve longer on account of ill health. 
In 1884 he turned his attention to his present business, that of real estate 
dealing, in which he has been successfully engaged in the past twenty 
years. The real estate dealer of the present time must be alert, enter- 
prising and progressive, and to no one man is due in greater degree the 
improvement and substantial progress of a community. While conduct- 
ing his business affairs with profit to himself. Mr. Spirk has at the same 
time contributed to the substantial development of Wilber and has done 
much for its best interests. 

On the 26th of July. 1879. in Wilber, Mr Spirk was married to 
Miss Anna Schuessler, who was born in Bohemia and was brought to 
America when two years of age, being a daughter of Joseph K. and 
Aloisie Schuessler, nee Anderle. Her father was a professor of music 
and a stage manager and gave her good educational opportunities. Mrs. 



778 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Spirk has one sister, Mrs. Bohumila Herman, the wife of Fred Herman, 
a member of the firm of Herman Brothers, of Lincoln, Nebraska. The 
mother died in Racine, Wisconsin, when Mrs. Spirk was but nine years 
of age, and the father died at the home of his daughter in Wilber, on the 
26th of September, 1903, when about seventy years of age, his birth 
having occurred in 1833. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Spirk has been 
blessed with three children, but they lost their first torn, Lillie, who 
died at the age of nine years from diphtheria. Irene was graduated 
from the high school of Wilber when eighteen years of age, spent one 
year as a student in the Lincoln University and is now devoting her 
time to the study of the piano. Felix J., a youth of eleven years, is now 
a student in the sixth grade of the public schools. 

Mr. Spirk belongs to the Knights of Pythias fraternity, the Modern 
Woodmen camp, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and has filled 
positions in all of these. He also belongs to Bohemian lodge, C. S. P. 
S., of which he is president. He is not connected with any religious 
denomination, has strong ideas of his own and forms his life to 
high moral ethics. In 1884 he erected a pleasant residence upon a 
half block of ground and has there lived for twenty years. The 
house is a two-story structure and contains ten large rooms, well 
lighted and tastefully furnished. It is the visible indication of his life 
of energy and business activity, and he stands to-day as one of the lead- 
ing and representative men of his city, widely known and respected by 
all with whom he has come in contact. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 779 

THEODORE M. WHEELER. 
At an early period in the development of Saline county Theodore 
M. Wheeler secured a homestead claim here, and has since been identi- 
fied with the development and progress of the county, taking a very 
active interest in all that has pertained to the welfare of the community 
and its substantial improvement. He is a native of New Fairfield, Con- 
necticut, born on the 4th of February, 1837. He represents an old 
family of that state, his grandfather, Lyman Wheeler, having there 
been born. His father. Nathan Wheeler, was a native of the same 
county in which the birth of the son occurred, and after arriving at 
years of maturity he was married in the Charter Oak state to Miss Lo- 
visa Beardslev, who was born in England, but spent the days of her 
girlhood in Connecticut, where she acquired her education. She died 
in New Jersey in 1863, leaving seven children, five sons and two daugh- 
ters. Sylvester, one of the sons, was a soldier in a Connecticut regi- 
ment during the Civil war and died in camp. The father, who came to 
Nebraska and died at the age of eighty-four years, was a lumberman 
and conducted a sawmill and also a woolen factory for many years, car- 
rying on the latter business while in the east. In his political views he 
was a Whig, and his wife held membership with the Methodist church. 
He was a man of many estimable and admirable traits of character. 

Theodore M. Wheeler was reared under the parental roof, acquired 
his education in the public schools of his native state and through the 
period of his boyhood assisted his father in the factory and sawmill there. 
Tie put aside business considerations, however, after the outbreak of the 
Civil war, and enlisted at Danbury, Connecticut, in August, 1862. for 
nine months' service, becoming a member of Company B, Twenty- 
third Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, under Captain James H. Jenkins 
and Colonel Holmes. The regiment went in General Banks' expedi- 



;8o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

tion and also went to the relief of General Benjamin Butler at New- 
Orleans, and later to Ships Island. Air. Wheeler was with his com- 
mand at New Orleans and did active service in Louisiana in guarding 
railroad bridges. He afterward returned to St. Charles, Louisiana, 
and thence to New Orleans. Being taken ill with typhoid fever he was 
sent to the hospital at New Orleans, later was transferred to a hospital 
in Indianapolis, Indiana, and subsequently home to Fairfield, Connecti- 
cut, where he was honorably discharged, returning then to his home in 
that state, after about one year's service. 

Air. Wheeler removed to the middle west in 1865, settling in Ogle 
county, Illinois, where he remained until 1870. when he came to Saline 
county, Nebraska. This was then largely a frontier district, in which 
the work of improvement and progress had been scarcely begun. He 
secured a homestead and began the arduous task of developing a good 
farm. As the years passed his labors wrought a great transformation 
in this place, and resulted in making his farm one of the most valuable 
in Saline county. It comprises two hundred and twenty acres in South 
Fork precinct near Western, and he still owns the property. Upon it is 
a good residence, substantial barns and many modern accessories. He 
has also planted a grove and has placed everything on the farm in ex- 
cellent condition. In recent years he has erected a modern residence 
in Western at a cost of two thousand dollars and is now occupying this 
pleasant home. 

In 1858 Air. Wheeler was united in marriage with Miss Rheua 
C. Beardsley, a native of Ohio and a daughter of Walter Beardsley, 
who died in 1886. She has one brother. Rev. John W. Beardsley, who 
is a professor in the Reform Hope College at Holland, Michigan. To 
Mr. and Airs. Wheeler have been born the following children : Walter 
B., deceased; Flora Agatha; Gertrude Salina ; Lloyd N., who is operat- 




WILLIAM L. OZMAN 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 781 

ing the homestead farm; Dora M. ; and Lena Ann. The children have 
all been afforded good educational privileges, pursuing their studier in 
Lincoln, Nebraska. Mr. Wheeler lived for three years at University 
Place, Lincoln, in order to educate his children, and the daughters havt 
been successful and popular teachers. The three eldest are now mar- 
ried and the son wedded Anna McClaue. Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler hold 
membership in the Methodist church and are honored and respected 
citizens of Saline county, giving their influence in behalf of every meas- 
ure and movement which tends to elevate their fellow men. He is a 
member of the Milligan Post No. 209, G. A. R., of Western. His life 
has been well passed and he has accomplished what he has undertaken. 
The story of his achievements should inspire all young men who read 
his history with a truer estimate of the value and sure rewards of 
character. 



WILLIAM L. OZMAN. 

William L. Ozman, a prominent and highly esteemed citizen of 
Beatrice, Nebraska, and a veteran of the Civil war with a record of 
which he and his family may be proud, is an old-time resident of the 
state of Nebraska, having lived within its boundaries since July 14, 1871. 
He belongs to a family some of whose members have participated in every 
war of this great republic from the Revolution to the last Spanish- 
American war. Mr. Ozman has the substantial qualities which make the 
ideal citizen at home or abroad. He is vigorous and energetic, and in 
life's passing years has always been able to pull more than his own 
weight, in other words, to be of assistance to family and friends in this 
pilgrimage on earth. He is beloved in the circle of his own family, who 
have been reared to fill honorable places in the world, and as a citizen 



782 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

and man of affairs has gained the entire respect and esteem of his asso- 
ciates because of his integrity and personal worth. He believes in educa- 
tion, and his children's lives and success demonstrate this. 

Mr. Ozman was born at Lansing, Tompkins county. New York, 
September 15, 1837, and comes of an old and substantial family of that 
state. His father, Lemuel Ozman, was a farmer, and died at the age of 
seventy-three years, while his mother died at the age of sixty-five, they 
having been the parents of seven children, those now living being Amy 
Ann, Rachel. Maria and William L. Mr. Ozman was educated at Ithaca, 
Tompkins county, New York, and at the age of seventeen commenced 
teaching school in Steuben county, New York. 

On August 10, 1862, he enlisted at Lansing, Tompkins county, 
New York, in Company G, One Hundred and Ninth New York Volun- 
teer Infantry, under Colonel B. F. Tracy and Captain A. \V. Knettles. 
His company and regiment were sent to join the Army of the Potomac. 
After being at Washington for a time he, with his regiment, was sent 
on to participate in the Petersburg and Richmond campaign under 
Grant, and took part in many battles and skirmishes during that fierce 
struggle to capture Lee. Mr. Ozman received his honorable discharge 
with the regiment on June 25, 1865, having been in the war for nearly 
three years, and returned home to Tompkins county. 

While Mr. Ozman was stationed at Washington, D. C, during the 
war, he met Miss Mary A. Phillips, who was born in Monmouthshire. 
England, in 1840, a daughter of Edward Phillips, who died in England, 
after which event his widow and four children came to the United States 
and settled in Maryland, near Washington, D. C. On December 25, 
1866, Mr. Ozman was married to Miss Mary A. Phillips, in Vernon 
county, Wisconsin. Immediately after their marriage they settled in 
Albany, Green county, Wisconsin, where they lived until June, 1871, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 783 

when they started to Nebraska, reaching Gage county on July 14, 1871, 
and settled on a homestead. Mr. Ozman was engaged in farming for 
seventeen years, undergoing many privations during the grasshopper 
years of 72 and 73. While on his farm he taught school for ten years 
in Gage and Lancaster counties. For the last fourteen years he has 
been United States pension attorney and notary public. He has secured 
many pensions for soldiers and widows. 

In politics Mr. Ozman is a stanch Republican, and takes a deep in- 
terest in national, state and local affairs. He has been a delegate to 
county, district and state conventions many rimes. He is often called 
upon to address Fourth of July assemblages and Grand Army and politi- 
cal gatherings, and is a forceful and popular speaker. In 1876, the cen- 
tennial year, he delivered a Fourth of July oration in Beatrice, Nebras- 
ka, that was highly praised and complimented and which was published 
in the papers at Beatrice. He, his wife and children, are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and he is a member of the Masonic frater- 
nity and the Grand Army of the Republic. 

There were born to Mr. Ozman and his wife, Mary A. Phillips, the 
following named children: Mrs. Elizabeth O. Paine, who was educated 
in the high school at Beatrice, commenced to teach school when she was 
only sixteen years old and continued to teach for several years prior to 
her marriage. Agnes N., who is a prominent missionary worker and 
has attended a missionary school at Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Kan- 
sas City, Missouri, and who has been ordained as deaconess, is now in 
the work at Lincoln, Nebraska. Edward G. was educated in the high 
school at Beatrice, and is now in California interested in a fruit farm. 
Mary Ella graduated from the Beatrice high school in May, 1898, after 
which she taught one year in the Freeman district, Gage county, and 
then attended the Missionary Institute at Kansas City, Missouri ; in 



784 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

December, 1901, was sent as a missionary to Equador, South America, 
where she died on August 31, 1903. Roscoe C. graduated from the 
high school in April, 1898, and enlisted in Company C, First Nebraska 
Regiment, Volunteer Infantry, and served in the Philippine Islands until 
discharged with his regiment, he receiving bis muster out and pay in 
Manila; he soon helped to organize the Manila Lumber Company, of 
which he was elected secretary and treasurer ; about the commencement 
of 1902 he was appointed as chief clerk in the prosecuting attorney's 
office of the first judicial district of Manila — a fine and praiseworthy 
career for a young man. A. Blaine was educated at the high school at 
Beatrice, taking up farming as his business, and was married to Miss 
Ida Brown, of Pickrell township. Gage county. 

After the death of his first wife, Mr. Ozman married Miss Mary A. 
Davis, of DeWitt, Nebraska, and one child. Walter D., now ten years of 
age, was born to them. In April, 1899, Mr. Ozman and Aliss Louette 
May Kitchen were married and they have two children, Earl J., three 
years old, and Theodore R.. four months old. Mr. Ozman and his wife 
are members of the Loval Mystic Lesion of America. 



JOHN F. BLANDIN. 

John F. Blandin is one of the enterprising business men of Western, 
and follows progressive methods in all his undertakings. He has for 
many years occupied a leading position in financial and commercial 
circles, and his record will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny, 
for he has worked along modern business lines, taking cognizance of 
everv opportunity and utilizing the same in an honorable and successful 
business career. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 785 

Mr. Blandin was born in Steuben county, New York, on the 23d 
of July, 1846. and is a son of John and Parthenia (Fisher) Blandin. 
The father was a native of Vermont, representing one of the old families 
of that state of English origin. The mother was born in New York 
and represented one of the early families of the Empire state. In the 
year 1850 the parents removed from the east to Kenosha, Wisconsin, 
and were among the early residents of that part of the state. The 
father developed a good farm in the midst of the forest, and was identi- 
fied with agricultural interests there until i860, when he removed to 
Iowa, taking up his abode in Washington county, where he carried on 
agricultural pursuits until his life's labors were ended in death, when he 
was sixty-five years of age. His wife passed away at the age of fifty- 
four years. His political allegiance was given to the Republican party, 
and both Mr. and Mrs. Blandin were consistent members of the Meth- 
odist church. In their family were eight children, three sons and five 
daughters, and their son William W. Blandin was numbered among the 
valued soldiers of the Civil war, enlisting in a Michigan regiment. He 
made a good record as a gallant soldier and is now living in Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

John F. Blandin was a little lad of only four summers when his 
parents removed to Wisconsin, and in that state and in Iowa he was 
reared. The home farm was upon the frontier, and he became familiar 
with the arduous task incident to the development of new land. His educa- 
tion was acquired in the public schools, and he was trained to habits of 
industry, perseverance and integrity, thus developing a character which 
has ever commanded respect and confidence. He was only about seven- 
teen years of age when on the 20th of October, 1863, prompted by a 
spirit of patriotism, he offered his services in defense of the Union cause, 
and was assigned to duty with the boys in blue of Company D, Ninth 



7 S6 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Iowa Volunteer Cavalry. He went to the front under command of 
Captain J. F. McCutcheon and Colonel M. M. Trumbull. The regi- 
ment went into camp at Davenport, Iowa, was then sent to St. Louis, 
Missouri, and on to Scott county, Arkansas. Mr. Blandin was with 
the forces under General Steele and saw active service at Duvall's Bluff, 
Fort Smith and other places in that portion of the south. He wore 
the blue uniform of the nation until after the close of hostilities, when 
he was honorably discharged on the 28th of February, 1866, at Little 
Rock, Arkansas. He had never faltered in the performance of any duty 
and his military service was characterized by valor that would have been 
creditable to many a veteran of twice his years. 

When the war was over Mr. Blandin returned to Iowa, where he 
continued to make his home until 1883, largely identified with agricul- 
tural interests in that state. He then removed to Western, Saline county, 
and was engaged in merchandising and banking for fourteen years in 
connection with the conduct of the Saline County Bank, of which he 
is now vice president. He thus formed an extensive acquaintance in his 
part of the county, and was recognized as a very reliable business man 
who met every obligation and discharged his business duties with prompt- 
ness and fidelity. 

Mr. Blandin was married in Washington county, Iowa, in 1873, 
to Miss Arta Watters, a daughter of Samuel A. and Arena (Bivens) 
Watters. The father, who was born in Indiana, is now living in Har- 
lan, Iowa, and the mother is deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Blandin have 
been born four children. Elsie M. and Alma are the two living. The 
former was at one time a successful teacher in the schools of Pawnee 
City, Nebraska, and is now a member of the faculty of the Wisconsin 
State University and a fellow 1 in English literature. She is a graduate 
of the University of Nebraska in the class of 1902, complet- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 787 

ing her course there with honors. The younger daughter is now a student 
in the public schools. Mr .and Mrs. Blandin lost two children : Walter 
J., who died at the age of ten years; and Olive L., who was the second 
born and died at the age of eighteen years. She was greatly loved for 
her good qualities of heart and mind and a genial, kindly disposition. 

Mr. Blandin is now serving as a commander of Mulligan Post, No. 
209, G. A. R., and takes great pleasure in meeting with his old army 
comrades and recalling experiences and reminiscences of the early days 
when as a soldier boy he followed the old flag on the southern battle- 
fields. His wife holds membership in the Methodist church, and he 
gives his political allegiance to the Republican party, believing firmly in 
its principles. He has frequently served as a delegate to city, congres- 
sional and state conventions, but has never been an active politician in 
the sense of office-seeking. He is a stockholder and manager and sec- 
retary of the Western Lumber Company, at Western. Keen and clear- 
headed, always busy, always careful and conservative in financial mat- 
ters, moving slowly but surely in every transaction, he has few superiors 
in the steady progress which invariably reaches the objective point. 



AUGUSTUS DEFFER. 

Augustus Deffer is proprietor of the Deffer Hotel, of Western, 
Saline county, and is one of the well known early settlers of this part of 
the state, where he has made his home for a quarter of a century. He 
was born in Frederick, Maryland, in 1845. His father, Frederick Def- 
fer, was a native of Saxony, Germany, and belonged to an old family of 
that country, having industry, honesty and courage as its strongly marked 
characteristics. He was educated in his native country and when twenty- 
one years of age came to the United States. He had previously learned 



-88 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

the tailor's trade and was thus well equipped for a business career. He 
was married in Frederick county, Maryland, to Miss Charlottle Sauer- 
man, who was born in Hanover, Germany, where the days of her girl- 
hood were passed and her education was acquired. After their mar- 
riage they removed to Harpers Ferry, Virginia, in 1845, an d m that 
state they spent their remaining days, the mother passing away at the 
age of fifty-three years, the father when seventy-three years of age. In 
politics he was a Jacksonian Democrat, and in religious faith was a 
Lutheran. In their family were nine children, five sons and four daugh- 
ters, and two of the sons, Fred and Augustus, were soldiers in the Civil 
war. 

Upon the home farm Augustus Defter spent the days of his boy- 
hood, but attended the town schools, and when fifteen years of age he 
began earning his own living by working on the canal, walking the tow- 
path. He was thus engaged until about eighteen years of age, when he 
entered upon military service as a defender of the Union, enlisting at 
Washington, D. C, in January, 1864, as a member of Company A, of 
the First District of Columbia Regiment, with Captain McGraw in com- 
mand of the company and Colonel Graham in command of the regi- 
ment. They saw much service and were for a time engaged in provost 
duty in Virginia. Mr. Defter was always loyal to the cause he espoused, 
and faltered not in the performance of any task assigned him in con- 
nection with a soldier's lot. 

When hostilities had ceased Mr. Deffer returned to his home and 
soon afterward went to Ohio, where he worked in a sawmill in Seneca 
county. Later he filled a position in the government insane asylum 
at Washington, D. C, for a year, and in 1869 removed to Tama county, 
Iowa, where he carried on general farming for about twelve years. On 
the expiration of that period he removed to Jefferson county, Nebraska, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 789 

and established his home in Washington township, where he developed 
a good farm, but in so doing underwent all the hardships and privations 
incident to making a settlement upon the frontier. At length he sold 
his farm and purchased a tract of land about two and a half miles from 
Thomson and five miles from Fairbury. This place comprises one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land, on which are a substantial house and a 
barn, a large orchard and grove of forest trees, and many modern acces- 
sories and conveniences. In 1903 he erected his hotel in Western at a 
cost of three thousand dollars. It is thirty-two by sixty feet, and con- 
tains eighteen rooms. It is well constructed, tastefully and comfort- 
ably furnished, and a successful business is now carried on, for he has 
secured a good patronage by reason of his earnest efforts to please those 
who become his guests. 

Mr. Deffer was married in Tama county, Iowa, in 1876, to Miss 
Emma Hill, who was born in Iowa City, Iowa, a daughter of Penolpy 
Hill, who became an early settler of Johnson county, Iowa. Both her 
parents died in Tama county. Mrs. Deffer spent her girlhood days 
under the parental roof and is indebted to the public school system of 
Iowa for the educational privileges she enjoyed. By her marriage she 
became the mother of six children : Belle, the wife of Rex Clark, of Kan- 
sas City, Missouri ; Fred, who is upon the home farm ; Frank, who is prin- 
cipal of the schools of St. Edwards. Nebraska : Melvin, who is a carpenter 
of Western. Nebraska : and Bessie and Flossie, who are still in school. 
Desirous that their children should be well prepared for life's responsi- 
ble duties, the parents have provided them with good educational privi- 
leges, and during twenty years' service as a member of the school board 
Mr. Deffer did much to raise the standard of the schools here by em- 
ploying competent teachers and advocating progressive methods. He is 
a Democrat in his political views, and his wife, in religious faith, is a 



79Q SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Baptist. Mr. Deffer through his business interests both as an agricul- 
turist and hotel proprietor, has become widely known and has won favor- 
able regard through honorable methods, straightforward dealing and 
consideration for others. 



FERDINAND WENDORFF. 

Ferdinand Wendorff, living in South Fork precinct, Saline county, 
has made his home in this part of the state since 1871. He was born 
in the province of Prussia, Germany, in 1840. His father, John Wen- 
dorff, was also a native of Prussia, born in 1799. He married a Miss 
Miller, and they became the parents of two children : William and Fer- 
dinand. After the death of the wife and mother the father was again 
married and had other children by the second union. He followed the 
occupation of farming in order to provide for his family. His religious 
faith was that of the Lutheran church, and he died at the age of sixty- 
one years. 

In accordance with the laws of his native country, Ferdinand Wen- 
dorff attended school until fourteen years of age, and remained on a 
farm there until 1857. He was but seventeen years of age when he de- 
termined to seek a home in the new world, believing that he might have 
better business opportunities in this country. Accordingly in 1857 he 
bade adieu to friends and native land, and crossed the Atlantic to the 
United States, being thirty-five days upon the water. After reaching 
the Atlantic coast he made his way to Kenosha, Wisconsin, where he 
followed fishing, and there lived until 1861, when his patriotic spirit 
was aroused in behalf of the Union cause and he enlisted in Company 
C of the Ninth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. This was largely com- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 791 

posed of German people, and the company was commanded by Captain 
Eckhardt, and the regiment by Colonel Solomon. They went into 
camp at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and were afterward sent to Fort Scott, 
Kansas, and subsequently to Little Rock, Arkansas, participating in the 
battle there and at Helena, that state. They were also in the battle near 
the Sabine river under General Steele, and Mr. Wendorff was wounded at 
Saline River, on the 30th of April, 1864, being shot in the left leg. 
He was afterward taken prisoner and sent to Tyler, Texas, where he 
suffered greatly with varicose veins. His health was also undermined 
in other ways, and he has never again been as strong as he was before. 
He was, however, a loyal and devoted soldier, ever true to the Union 
cause, and throughout his entire residence in America he has been most 
true to the stars and stripes. 

After the close of the war Mr. Wendorff returned to the north and 
engaged in fishing in the lakes of Michigan. He was married in 1866 
to Miss Harriet Kickhover, who died fourteen months later, leaving a 
daughter, Mrs. Rosa Schlahensky, who now lives in Kenosha. Wiscon- 
sin. Mr. Wendorff was again married in 1868. his second union being 
with Miss Caroline Batz, who was born in Germany In 1878 they re- 
moved to Nebraska and Mr. Wendorff secured a homestead claim. He 
built a sod house and began the development of his farm. He was doing 
well when in 1874 the grasshoppers destroyed all of his crops. The hot 
winds of summer and the blizzards of winter also proved very detri- 
mental to him in his work, but he persevered and continued his labors 
as best he could. Through conjunction with a half brother he owned 
one horse and also had a half interest in a wagon, but he possessed little 
else when he came to Saline county. As the years advanced, however, 
his untiring labors were crowned with a fair measure of prosperity. 
After a time he sold his original property and purchased the farm upon 



792 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

which he now lives. He has two hundred and forty acres of rich and 
productive land and yearly harvests good crops. The place is pleasantly 
located about a mile and a half from Western, and upon the farm is a 
large residence, a big barn, extensive corn cribs, a windmill and the latest 
improved machinery. He raises considerable alfalfa, and he also has a 
bearing orchard upon his place. There is a good grove, and well kept 
fences surround the farm and divide it into fields of convenient size. His 
property now constitutes one of the best farms in the township and is 
worth fifty-five dollars an acre. 

In 1902 Mr. Wendorff was called upon to mourn the loss of his 
wife, who died on May 6. She had indeed been a faithful companion 
and helpmate to him on life's journey. In the early days of their resi- 
dence here she not" only performed the duties of the household but also 
assisted him in the fields. She also carefully reared their family of 
nine children. She held membership in the Evangelical church, and her 
life showed forth her Christian faith, being characterized by many good 
deeds, so that her loss was deeply mourned throughout the entire com- 
munity as well as by her immediate family. The children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Wendorff are Louisa, Mary, August, Paul, Lena, George, Henry, 
Fred and Hannah, the last named being now eleven years of age. Mr. 
Wendorff is a member of the Grand Army post at Western, and belongs 
to the Evangelical church. He is a man whose word is as good as his 
bond, and his many sterling traits of character have made him a valued 
citizen of Saline countv. 



GILES H. MEAD. 

On the list of the boys in blue who are now residents of southeastern 
Nebraska appears the name of Giles H. Mead, of Olive precinct, Saline 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 793 

county. Twenty-two years have come and gone since he located within 
the borders of this county, and twenty years prior to that time he had 
served his country as a loyal defender of the Union cause. He was bom 
in Logan county, Ohio, near Richland, on the 25th of August, 1839, and 
is a representative of one of the old families of Vermont. His paternal 
grandfather, Ezra Mead, was one of the first settlers of the Green Moun- 
tain state. Stillmon Mead, the father, was born in Vermont and served 
his country as a soldier of the war of 1812. He was a miller by trade 
and also followed the occupation of farming, his life being characterized 
by untiring industry and perseverance. In 1854 he removed with his 
family to Iowa, settling in Webster county, near Fort Dodge, among 
the pioneer residents of that portion of the state. The following year 
the Indian massacre occurred at Spirit Lake, Iowa. Pioneer conditions 
prevailed largely throughout the state, and in his locality Stillmon Mead 
assisted in reclaiming the district for the purpose of civilization. He 
secured a tract of wild land from the government and with character- 
istic energy began its development into a good farm. He voted with 
the Free Soil party and also with the abolition party and was deeply in- 
terested in the question of freeing slaves. Both he and his wife held 
membership in the Presbyterian church and were most honorable people. 
Mrs. Mead bore the maiden name of Sarah Packard, who was born 
in Chittenden county, Vermont, a daughter of George Packard, of that 
state. Mr. Stillmon Mead passed away in August, 1885, at the very 
venerable age of eighty-seven years, and his wife died in 1878 at the age 
<■>{ seventy-five years. In the family were eleven children, three sons and 
eight daughters, and two of the sons were valiant soldiers of the Union 
arm}' in the Civil war, R. B. Mead, having been a member of the Seventh 
Iowa Cavalry. His death occurred in Republic count}', Kansas. 

Giles H. Mead was a lad of about fifteen years when he accompanied 



794 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

his parents on their removal from Ohio to Iowa, and there he was reared 
upon the home farm, assisting materially in its development and im- 
provement. He left the plow, however, in August, 1861, donned the 
blue uniform of the nation and shouldered his musket in defense of 
the Union. It was in August, 1861, at Jefferson, Greene county, Iowa, 
that he responded to the president's call for fifty thousand-men, and was 
enrolled with the members of Company H, Tenth Iowa Volunteer In- 
fantry, under the command of Captain Orr and Colonel Pursell. The 
regiment went into camp at Iowa City, thence proceeded to St. Louis, 
Missouri, and afterward to Cape Girardeau, where Mr. Mead was 
under fire. He also participated in the battles of New Madrid, Island 
No. 10, Fort Pillow, Shiloh, the siege of Corinth, Iuka, the second 
siege of Corinth, Grand Junction and Coffeyville. He afterwards re- 
turned to Memphis, Tennessee, and was for forty-seven days engaged 
in besieging Vicksburg. At Champion Hills he was injured by a limb 
of a tree falling upon his shoulder. This dislocated and broke some of 
his bones, and he was sent to the hospital at Memphis, Tennessee, after 
which he was transferred to the general hospital at Indianapolis, Indi- 
ana. Subsequently he returned to Keokuk, Iowa, where he was honor- 
ably discharged in January, 1864, after nearly three years of active ser- 
vice, during which time he had on many occasions displayed his loyalty 
to his country and his valor upon the field of battle. 

Mr. Mead was married in Lee county, Iowa, in 1865 to Rebecca 
Pickard, who for almost forty years has been a devoted companion and 
helpmate to him on the journey of life. She was born in Indiana and 
when four years of age went to Iowa with her parents, James and Amy 
(Dixon) Pickard, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter 
of Illinois. The maternal grandfather, James Dixon, was one of the 
early settlers of Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Pickard became residents of 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 793 

Lee county, Iowa, in 1849, casting in their lot with its early settlers, and 
the former died in Henry county, Iowa, at the age of eighty years, pass- 
ing away on the 4th of March, 1896. His religious faith was that of 
the Society of Friends. His wife died in 1857 at the age of forty-two 
years and left many friends to mourn her loss. In their family were 
eight children. William was a soldier of the Company D, Seventh Iowa 
Infantry, and was killed by a rebel bayonet thrust at Belmont, Missouri ; 
John D. was a member of the Seventh Iowa Infantry; Henry J., who 
belonged to the same regiment, died at Cottonwood, Lee county, Iowa, 
in 1900. The other children of the family are Mrs. Rebecca Mead, 
Catherine and Mrs. Mary J. Divine, of Stewart, Iowa. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Mead began their domestic life 
upon a farm in Webster county, Iowa, near Dayton, and there they lived 
until 1882, when they came to Saline county and purchased the farm 
which is now their home. This comprises one hundred and sixty acres 
of land and is one of the best farms in Olive precinct. The first house 
was sixteen by twenty-four feet, to which he made an addition, sixteen 
by twenty feet. He has planted an orchard of five acres and has a good 
grove of four acres. There is a substantial barn, good feed lots and pas- 
ture lands and well tilled fields, and a glance at the place indicates to the 
passerby that the owner is a most progressive man who gives much time 
and attention to the operation of his farm. 

The home of Mr. and. Mrs. Mead has been blessed with thirteen 
children : James L. ; Lennie J., who has engaged in teaching; Stillmon C. ; 
Oscar R. ; Amy ; Joel C. ; Henry A. ; Vesta B. ; Minnie M. ; Albert L., who 
died at the age of two and a hall years; William E. ; Giles Wright; 
and John Earl. The family is one of prominence in the community, 
members of the household occupying an enviable position in social 
circles. Mr. Mead is a Republican in his political views, and belongs 



79 6 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

to Tobias Post, G. A. R. He and his wife hold membership in the 
United Brethren church, in which he is serving as class leader and Sun- 
day school superintendent, and Mrs. Mead is also very active in the 
church work. He is truly a representative American citizen, and a 
worthy representative of that type of American character that promotes 
the public good in advancing individual prosperity. Prosperity has 
come to him as a natural consequence of industry and application, and 
his splendid success bears testimony to his rare judgment in business af- 
fairs. 



LOUIS WALDTER. 

Louis Waldter, one of the prominent old settlers of YYymore, Ne- 
braska, and a veteran of the Civil war, has been a resident of this state 
since 1857. His career as a soldier began with his enlistment Novem- 
ber 11, 1862, in Company E, Second Nebraska Cavalry, Colonel R. N. 
Furnas and Captain Lewis Hill commanding. After thirteen months 
of hard service, he was honorably discharged, and returned to his home. 
During a portion of that time he was confined in the hospital, and has 
never fully recovered from the effects of the exposure and hardships. 

The birth of Mr. Waldter took place in Rhenish Prussia, on Feb- 
ruary, 1 83 1, and he is a son of Henry Waldter and Mary Waldter. 
both of whom died in their native land. There were three sons in their 
family. By trade our subject was a painter, and in 1848 and 1849 he 
served in the German Revolution, in the ranks In 1S53 he came to 
the United States, the voyage consuming forty days. He landed in New 
York. From there he went to Cleveland, Ohio, and thence to Chicago. 
From that city he made his way to St. Louis and then to St. Joe, and still 
later to Nebraska. During these days he experienced many stirring 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 797 

adventures, and once came very near being lynched, his oppressors going 
so far as to place a rorje around his neck. 

While residing in Missouri he was united in marriage with Emma 
Thomas. She died in Nebraska in 1863, aged twenty-one years, leaving 
three children, namely : Alary Margaret, Theodore and Lewis. On 
December, 24, 1864, Mr. Waldter married Elizabeth Sherfey. In 1873 
our subject located in Richardson county, Nebraska, and in 1885 he took 
up a homestead in Trego county, Kansas, but later returned to Nebraska. 
In politics he is a Republican, and represented his party in the state 
legislature at Lincoln, Nebraska, from 1867 to 1869. 



THOMAS MOORE. 

Thomas Moore, of Wymore, Gage county, Nebraska, one of the 
honored citizens of that locality, came to this state in 1868 after an 
honorable career as a soldier during the Civil war. He enlisted at 
Springfield, Illinois, in 1864, in the One Hundred and Forty-fifth Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry, Company H, Captain Bogardus commanding, 
and he served until the close of the war, participating in several engage- 
ments. 

He was born May 10, 1847, at Chatham, New Hampshire, and is 
a son of Taylor Moore, who was born in the highlands of Scotland. His 
wife was Adalaide Carson, a daughter of Ivory Carson, a native of Maine. 
The parents of our subject moved to Illinois and from thence to Ne- 
braska, settling at Blue Springs, where the father died at the age of 
eighty-six years, having been a farmer all his days, and a Free Will 
Baptist in religious faith. The mother passed away at the age of sev- 



79 8 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

enty-two years. The children born to these parents were: James T., 
Thomas. Harriet, E. E., and Ellen, deceased. 

Mr. Moore was reared in Illinois, and received his education in the 
district schools. After leaving Illinois he lived for one year at Tecum- 
seh, Johnson county, Nebraska, from which place he came to Wymore. 
While residing in Tecumseh he married Frances Eberhardt, of Illinois, 
a daughter of Henry and Mary (Trumbull) Eberhardt, both of whom 
are deceased. Henry Eberhardt was a soldier in an Illinois regiment. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Moore are as follows: Belle; Ella Clay- 
ton, of Keith, Nebraska; and Osman, at home. In politics Mr. Moore 
is a Republican, and is a blue lodge and chapter Mason, having joined 
the lodge at Tecumseh. He is a man of high purposes, upright in living, 
honored by all who know him, and one who makes and retains friends. 



GADDIS P. HAGEMAN. 

Gaddis P. Hageman, of Wymore, Nebraska, is one of that city's 
most highly respected citizens and a veteran of the Civil war. He en- 
listed September 16, 1861, at Sidney, Shelby county, Ohio, in a com- 
pany of the Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Among other engagements, he 
participated in the siege of Vicksburg, and was honorably discharged 
in 1865. He was wounded at Fort Donelson and has never fully recov- 
ered from his long and gallant service. 

The birth of Mr. Hageman occurred at Milford, Hamilton county, 
Ohio, November 17, 1841, and he is a son of Simon Hageman. Simon 
was a son of Christian and Deliah (Wooden) Hageman, of German 
ancestry who came from Hamilton county, Ohio. The father died at 
the age of eighty-six years, and the mother is seventy-eight years of 
age. They had eight children, five sons and three daughters. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 799 

Gaddis P. Hageman was married in Mercer county, Ohio, Novem- 
ber 19, 1867, to Mary J. Hawkins, who was born in Butler county, Ohio, 
a daughter of Richard and Lydia (Davis) Hawkins, the former of whom 
died in Ohio aged sixty-four years, having been a chair-maker by trade, 
while the mother died at the age of sixty-three years. Thirteen children 
were born to this worthy couple, two of whom served in the Civil war, 
namely : John Hawkins, of the Fortieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, who 
died a few years ago; Corbly Hawkins, of the Fifty-sixth Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry, is also deceased. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Hageman are as follows : Adelaide, Lulu, Christian, a railroad engineer, 
Arthur, Albert, Susan, Grant and Rose, all of whom are grown to ma- 
turity and married. 

Our subject is a Republican in political faith, and also is very prom- 
inent in G. A. R. matters. His wife served during the war as a nurse, 
and both enjoy recalling the stirring events of those days when heroes 
were developed on every side, and men and women showed their bravery 
in even- action. Both are consistent members of the Methodist church, 
and are highly respected not only in church circles, but throughout the 
entire community. 



ROBERT BRUCE PARKS. 

Robert Bruce Parks, of Lincoln precinct, Saline county, is a well 
known citizen of this portion of southeastern Nebraska, where he has 
made his home since 1884. He has made the tilling of the soil his voca- 
tion in life, and is a wide-awake and progressive farmer who has elevated 
his daily toil from the realm of mere drudgery and found it a pleasant, 
profitable and most honorable occupation. 



8oo SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Mr. Parks was born in Lee county, Illinois, near Dixon, December 
13, 1844, being a son of Hiram and Martba (Moon) Parks. His 
fatber was born in New York state, and was an early settler of Lee 
county, Illinois. He was at Chicago when that present great city was 
a small village, with a few stores set on the swampy land about the Chi- 
cago river. He bought a claim of government land near Dixon, Illi- 
nois, and he farmed there the remainder of his life, passing away at 
the age of seventy-five, and his wife at the age of ninety. Their daugh- 
ter Rebecca was the second child born at Dixon. These parents were 
members of the Baptist church, and he was a Republican. There were 
eight children in trie family : Mary, Eunice, Rebecca, Wayne, an officer 
in the One Hundred and Fortieth Illinois, Robert Bruce, Henry, Fred, 
and Abner. 

Mr. Robert B. Parks was reared on the old farm in Lee county, 
Illinois, receiving his early education in the district schools. When he 
was twenty years old, on May 10, 1864, he enlisted at Dixon in Company 
D, One Hundred and Fortieth Illinois Infantry, in Captain Smith's 
company and Colonel Whitney's regiment. They were encamped at 
Dixon, then at Springfield, and from there were sent south to Memphis. 
They were engaged in fighting General Price's troops in southern Mis- 
souri, and saw considerable campaigning during the later months of 
the war. They were finally ordered to St. Louis, and thence to Chicago, 
where Mr. Parks received his honorable discharge from the service of 
the Union, on October 2~, 1865. 

Mr. Parks was married in Lee county, Illinois, August 23, 1868, 
to Miss Ellen Deck, who has been a faithful and inspiring companion 
and helpmate for the succeeding thirty-six years. She was born in 
Northampton county, Pennsylvania, and at the age of nine years, in 
1856, she came to Lee county, Illinois, with her parents. Elijah and Han- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 80 1 

nah (Heller) Deck, both natives of Pennsylvania. Her father, who was 
a farmer, a strong abolition Republican in politics, and a member of the 
Presbyterian church, dieJ at the age of sixty-nine, and her mother passed 
away at the age of eighty. Mrs. Parks was one of nine children, as 
follows : Valentine, a soldier in the Thirteenth Pennsylvania, Susan, 
Mary, Joseph, in the Thirty-fourth Illinois for four years, William, in 
Company E of the Tenth Illinois, John, in Captain Cheney's Illinois 
battery, Ellen, George, and Martha. Mr. and Mrs. Parks are the 
parents of six children : Harry W.. Sidney E.. Bert M., Walter. Irvin, 
and Fanny F., the wife of G. Gerdis, of Seward county, Nebraska. 

Mr. Parks came out to Nebraska and settled in Saline county in 
1884, and has been a prosperous farmer here ever since. He owns a 
beautiful estate of two hundred and forty acres, on which are excellent 
improvements of all kinds, both residence and outbuildings being in evi- 
dence of the thrifty management of the owner. The farm is situated 
six miles northwest of Dorchester, and is one of the model farmsteads 
of the precinct. Mr. Parks is a Populist in politics. He takes much 
interest in the question of local education, not only for the benefit of his 
own children but for the entire community, and is a member of his dis- 
trict school board. He is a member and a past commander of the W. T. 
Sherman Post of the Grand Army of the Republic at Dorchester. He 
and his wife are members of the Evangelical church, and he serves on 
the board of trustees. He is a sincere and reliable man and citizen, and 
is a valuable factor in compassing the welfare of his community. 



PETER WHITLOW. 

Peter Whitlow, a retired resident of Auburn, is one of the pioneer 
settlers of Nemaha county, Nebraska. He was born in Barren county, 



802 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Kentucky, November 2, 1826, and is a representative of an old Kentucky- 
family. His grandfather Whitlow died in Kentucky in 1833, in the 
sixtieth year of his age, after an active and useful life as a well-to-do 
farmer, and after having reared a family of five sons and two or three 
daughters. The sons were Daniel, Greenville, Solomon, Pleasant and 
Willis. Daniel Whitlow was born in Barren county, Kentucky, about 
1794; married a Miss Runyan, and in 1834 moved with his family to 
Tennessee and thence, about 1841, to Greene county, Illinois, where he 
became the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of land, and where 
he carried on agricultural pursuits for a number of years. He died at 
the home of one of his sons in Jersey county, Illinois, in 1876. He was 
the father of three other children besides Peter, namely : Tabitha, Wright 
and Willis. Tabitha was the wife of a Mr. Overton. She died in 
Cass county, Illinois, when past middle life, without issue. 

Peter Whitlow grew up on his father's farm and had a fair school- 
ing. On leaving the home place, he went to Cass county, Illinois, where 
he worked out as a farm hand until his marriage, that event occurring 
in the fall of 1843, when he wedded Miss Melinda Overton. As the 
years passed by sons and daughters to the number of ten were given to 
them, of whom we record that Mary is the wife of August Reiners, of 
South Auburn, Nebraska; Perry, a resident of Auburn; Louisa, wife 
of Benjamin Bryan, also of Auburn; Daniel, a farmer of Douglas pre- 
cinct; Charles, engaged in farming near Auburn; Amos, a resident of 
Oregon; Theodore, a gold miner of California; Emma B., wife of Albert 
DeWitt; Alice, married and living in California; and Ellen, deceased. 

Mr. Whitlow has been a farmer all his life, has spent nearly half 
a century in Nemaha county, and is therefore entitled to rank with the 
pioneer farmers of the county. He landed here in November, 1854, 
and took up one hundred and sixty acres of land in Douglas precinct, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 803 

on which he lived and labored until a few years ago, and a part of which 
he still owns. He is now living, retired from active life, in his pleasant 
home in Auburn, still enjoying the companionship of his faithful wife, 
and with children and grandchildren around him. 

Politically Mr. Whitlow is a Democrat. He is not a church mem- 
ber nor has he ever identified himself with anv secret organization. 



ROBERT COULTER. 

Robert Coulter, who is a prosperous farmer on section 27, River- 
side township, Gage county, Nebraska, with postofifice at Beatrice, has 
been a resident of this county since 1878, and during this quarter of a 
century has enjoyed excellent success in his business matters, and at 
the same time has gained the esteem of all his fellow citizens. He is 
an old soldier of the Civil war, and his record as a soldier is by no means 
the least honorable and interesting part of his career. In general, he has 
been successful in all his undertakings, and while he is now drawing 
toward the limit of his years on earth he is happy and contented with 
what he has accomplished for himself and his fellows and is able to 
enjoy the pleasant circumstances with which his past endeavors have 
surrounded him withal. 

Mr. Coulter was born near Belfast, Ireland, September 13, 1835, 
a son of Martin and Margret Coulter, who were born and died in Ire- 
land. Of their nine children, three came to the United States, namely : 
John, who died in New England; William, who lives in Ohio; and Rob- 
ert. Mr. Coulter was reared in Ireland, and did not come to the United 
States until he was twenty-one years old, in 1856. He was six weeks and 
three days on the voyage, and after landing he came to Ohio and was en- 



804 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

gaged in different occupations until the war. In August, 1862, he enlisted 
in Portage county, Ohio, and was assigned to Company I, One Hundred 
and Fourth Ohio Infantry, under Captain "Wells and Colonel Riley. 
The regiment was sent south and took part in some of the great battles 
of the armies of the Cumberland and Tennessee. He was under General 
Thomas at Chickamauga, and was then sent with the army under Thomas 
against Hood in Tennessee, taking part in the engagements culminat- 
ing in the crucial battle of Nashville. He was then sent up the Ohio 
to Cincinnati, thence to Wheeling, West Virginia, and to Washington, 
and from there by boat to Fort Fisher. After the capture of this strong- 
hold he was sent into North Carolina, and at Greensboro was honorably 
discharged. June 17, 1865. 

Following this creditable career as a soldier for his adopted land, 
Mr. Coulter returned to Portage county, Ohio, and remained there 
some time, then spent a year in Indiana, and in 1878 came to Gage 
county, Nebraska. He bought seven hundred acres of land, and since 
then his farm has received all the up-to-date improvements and acces- 
sories, in the manner of barns, windmills and machinery, so that it is 
conceded to be the best place in the township, and worth several times 
what Mr. Coulter originally gave for it. 

In 1881 Mr. Coulter was married in Henderson county, Illinois, to 
Miss Martha Brooks, a lady of much intelligence and amiability, devoted 
to her family, and a valued member of society. She is a daughter of 
Sherrod and Mary Brooks, the former of whom was a native of New 
York and during the Civil war a soldier in Company C, Eighty-fourth 
Illinois Infantry, and the latter was born in Georgia. There were 
five children in the Brooks family: Frank, Eva, Manirva, Mrs. Martha 
Coulter and Garett. Mr. and Mrs. Coulter have two sons, William Rus- 
sell, aged twenty-two, and R-.lph D., aged nineteen, who are both energetic 




w 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 805 

young men of this county. William Russell is a member of Company 
C, Nebraska National Guard, has served three years and enlisted again 
for three more years. Mr. Coulter is a member of the local Grand 
Army post, and his wife is a member of the Women's Relief Corps 
No. 92. 



ALEXANDER BELL. 

Alexander Bell, a well known and prominent citizen of Jefferson 
county, Nebraska, has been in this locality for many years, and has done 
more than his proportionate share in the work of progress and upbuild- 
ing. Although now well advanced in life, he is far from being at the 
limit of his usefulness to society and the world in general, and has 
enjoyed a career of which he may well be proud. 

He was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, November 6. 
1843, tne Bells having long been identified with the history of that 
state. George Bell, a native of the state and the father of Alexander, 
was the son of a soldier of the war of 1812. and the progenitor of the 
family had come from the highlands of Scotland to America during the 
Revolutionary war, and was killed in the Wyoming valley massacre. 
George Bell married, in Pennsylvania, Margaret Anderson, who had 
a brother in the Mexican and Civil wars, so that the family on both sides 
of the house has been well represented in the armed conflicts in which 
this republic has been engaged. George Bell was a successful farmer 
and stockman, and voted with the Democratic party. He died at the 
age of sixty-four, and his wife at the age of seventy-two. They were 
the parents of five children: James T., mentioned below; one who died 
in infancy; Alexander: Anderson, a twin brother of Alexander, is now 



8o6 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

a business man of Atlantic, Cass county, Iowa, and in the Civil war 
served as a member of Company H, One Hundred and Twenty-fifth 
Pennsylvania Infantry; and Calvin, who belonged to the militia of 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, during the war. 

Mr. Alexander Bell, on August 8, 1861, enlisted in Company H, 
One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Pennsylvania, under Captain Gregg and 
Colonel Hayes, and gave loyal service to his country during some of the 
important engagements of the war, and received an honorable discharge. 
He has been a resident of Jefferson county, Nebraska, since 1878, and 
his career has been successful throughout, both in what he has accom- 
plished for himself and for the public welfare. On October 13, 1870, 
he was married in Iowa to Miss Mary C. Green, a daughter of William 
Green, who came from Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, in 1850, 
and was one of the early settlers of Iowa, and in 1878 moved to Ne- 
braska. He had nine children, five of whom grew up, three sons and 
two daughters. Alexander Bell and wife have had the following chil- 
dren: William G., in Whatcom, Washington; Harry A., of Diller; 
Bertie A.; Maud Irene; Bessie M. ; Grace Mary; Orpha B. ; Beulah; 
Olie; Hayes J., who died at the age of three; and two that died in 
infancy. 

Mr. Bell is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. He affiliates with the Masons, with Lodge No. 
151, I. O. O. F., with Diller Court No. 1668, M. W. A., and with Diller 
Lodge No. 133, A. O. U. W. 

Mr. Bell's brother, James T. Bell, who died June 21, 1904, was a 
well known retired railroad man of Diller. He had been reared and 
educated in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and in early life took 
employment with the Erie Railroad Company. He was stationed at 
Altoona, Pennsylvania, in the employ of the Pennsylvania Central for 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 807 

years. During the "Civil war he was in the service of the United States 
government at Culpeper, Virginia, assisting in the transportation of 
soldiers. He was once taken prisoner by the rebels at Bristol Station, 
Virginia. After the war he was engaged in railroading throughout the 
middle west ; was with the Union Pacific for a while as conductor, was 
stationed at Shenandoah, Iowa, for a long time, and at the time of his 
death was one of the best known ex-railroaders of the west. He was 
a shrewd business man as well, and owned a large and valuable farm in 
Jefferson county, and was one of the organizers, the vice president and 
one of the stockholders in the Diller State Bank. He stood high in 
Masonic circles, affiliating with the blue lodge, with Robert Bums Chap- 
ter No. 464, with Pilgrim Commandery No. 11, and Tangier Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine at Omaha. 



CLAUDE P. HENSEL. 

Claude P. Hensel, sheriff of Thayer county, has for a number of 
years been prominently identified with this county in a business and 
official capacity, and is one of its most esteemed and influential citizens. 
He has engaged in various lines of work, with a creditable degree of suc- 
cess in each enterprise, and in his relations with his fellow citizens has 
won their esteem and confidence both through his own personal achieve- 
ments and his worthy character and manhood. He has given unstint- 
ingly of his time and efforts for the welfare and prosperity of his county, 
and as sheriff has made a reputation for efficiency and has placed the 
management of the office at a standard which will prove advantageous to 
the best interests of the county among its future incumbents. 



808 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Mr. Hensel was born at Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1873, so 
that lie is numbered among tbe younger class of citizens, although his 
broad experience with the ways of the world consists with a greater am- 
plitude of years. He is the third in order of birth of a family of seven 
children born to Frederick C. and Elizabeth J. (Patrick) Hensel, both 
of whom were natives of Ohio and of old families of the state, although 
their lineage in both cases is German. 

Mr. Hensel was for many years connected with the stock-raising 
industry, and also held some clerical positions. For some time he was 
a traveling salesman, representing the famous McCormick machines in 
the west. At the outbreak of the Spanish-American war he was among 
the gallant young men who offered their services to Uncle Sam, and, 
unlike the majority of those who were fired with patriotic zeal to fight 
in the country's cause, was really sent to the seat of the war and saw 
nineteen months of active service in the Philippines. He was a member 
of Company G, First Nebraska Volunteers, and participated in a number 
of the well known engagements during the course of hostilities. He was 
elected to the office of sheriff in 1902, and is now giving to the citizens a 
second term of most efficient service. 

Mr. Hensel is a stanch and active Republican, and has been of the 
rank and file of the party for some years. He was married at Hebron, 
January 2, 1902, to Miss Mildred M. Pratt, a daughter of G. G. Pratt, 
one of the old and respected pioneer residents of Nebraska. Fraternally 
Mr. Hensel affiliates with the Knights of Pythias and the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen at Hebron. 

HENRY A. ALLPRESS. 
Hairy A. Allpress is the proprietor of Orchardale farm in North 
Fork precinct, Saline county, and is one of the intelligent, representa- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 809 

tire, well known agriculturists of this part of the state. He was born at 
Chatteris, Cambridgeshire, England, on the 12th of December, 1847, a 
son of James and Frances (Stocks) Allpress, also natives of that country. 
In the year 1855 the parents bade adieu to friends and native land and 
with their family came to the United States, embarking on a sailing 
vessel which was eleven weeks in making the voyage from Liverpool to 
New Orleans. The family proceeded up the Mississippi river and on 
to Evansville. Indiana, and after two years removed to Sterling, White- 
side county, Illinois. The father was a miller and farmer. He died at 
Sterling, Illinois, when sixty-six years of age and his wife passed away 
at the age of fifty years. His political allegiance was given to the aboli- 
tion party in ante-bellum days, and when the Republican party was 
formed to prevent the further extension of slavery he joined its ranks 
and continued one of its stanch advocates until his death. His religious 
faith was that of the Congregational church, to which his wife also 
belonged. By that marriage there were two sons and six daughters. 
After losing his first wife Mr. James Allpress was again married, and by 
the second union there was one daughter. 

Henry A. Allpress, coming to America with his parents when a lad 
of eight years, was reared in Illinois and largely acquired his education 
at Stewart College in Clarksville, Tennessee, where he lived with an 
uncle. Later he returned to Illinois, where he engaged in teaching, and 
he followed that profession for twenty-six years, with excellent success 
in Illinois, Iowa and Nebraska. He had the ability to impart clearly, ac- 
curately and concisely to others the knowledge that he had acquired, and 
was also a good disciplinarian and thus in his educational work he gave 
entire satisfaction. He put aside the studies of the schoolroom during 
the Civil war and enlisted in his seventeenth year on the 27th of Sep- 
tember, 1864, in Sterling, Whiteside county, becoming a member of 



810 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Company H, Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, under command of Captain Isaac 
Conroe and Colonel Hasbrouk Davis. He went south, joining his regi- 
ment at Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The regiment was there engaged in 
rough riding service, often going forty miles a day in Louisiana, Missis- 
sippi and Tennessee. The command was engaged in fighting bush- 
whackers and guerillas, in doing scouting duty and in guarding govern- 
ment transports and railroads. They often met General Forrest's troops 
in battle, and Mr. Allpress participated in the engagement at Liberty, 
Mississippi, where seven hundred rebels were captured. After the cessa- 
tion of hostilities he was honorably discharged at Memphis, Tennessee, 
on the 1 6th of June, 1865. 

Returning to his home in Illinois he resumed his studies, and grad- 
uating from the Sterling high school, began teaching, and in 1869 went 
to Allamakee county, Iowa, where he accepted a school. It was while 
teaching there that he became acquainted with, and was married, in 1871, 
to Miss Susan A. Hartley, who was also a popular and capable teacher, 
and is a lady of marked culture and intellectual attainments. She was 
born in Columbia county, Wisconsin, and is a daughter of Francis and 
Hepzibah (Sneesby) Hartley. Her father, a native of England, is now 
living in Waukon, Allamakee county, Iowa, but her mother is now de- 
ceased, having passed away in the Hawkeye state. In their family were 
nine children, four sons and five daughters. Two of the sons were 
soldiers of the Civil war. John W. Hartley belonged to Company F, 
of the Sixth Iowa Cavalry, while Joseph Hartley belonged to the same 
company and regiment and died while in the service of his country. The 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Allpress was blessed with a family of ten children, 
of whom nine are yet living, namely : Hepzibah F. ; Bessie M. ; Henry 
H., who is a good mechanic, and is now carrying on a blacksmithing 
shop in Jansen, Nebraska ; Angeline M. ; John M. ; Anna E. ; Thomas H., 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 811 

who is a student at Bethany College in Lindsborg, Kansas, and has at- 
tained marked proficiency as a violinist ; Frank W. ; and Alice M. 
One son, James F., the first born, died in his second year. The children 
have all been provided with good educational privileges, and four of the 
daughters have graduated from their home high school, and have been 
capable and successful teachers. Hepzibah, the eldest daughter, is, at 
present, a teacher of piano and organ music. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allpress began their domestic life in Allamakee 
county, where they resided from 1871 until 1886, and then came to Saline 
county, where they have since made their home. He is proprietor of 
Orchardale farm, a valuable tract of land of one hundred and sixty acres. 
The land is situated on a small creek, has fine native timber of walnut, 
oak, ash and elm, a large orchard, from which the farm is named, is well 
fenced, the fields are well tilled and modern improvements are found upon 
the place. There is a windmill, a blacksmith shop, a large barn, cattle, 
carriage and machine sheds and a modern residence, in fact, all the equip- 
ments and accessories known to modern farming are there seen and 
everything is kept in excellent condition. 

In his political views Mr. Allpress is an uncompromising Republican, 
having supported the party since attaining his majority. He keeps well 
informed on the questions and issues of the day, has frequently attended 
the county and state conventions as a delegate and has been untiring in 
behalf of the interests of his friends. He belongs to the Grand Army post 
at Western and has served as its adjutant, senior vice commander and 
commander. His wife holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which their daughters are also members, and he has given his 
aid and influence in behalf of religion, temperance, patriotism and mor- 
ality. He is also a prominent Modern Woodman of America and has 
held several offices of trust in the lodge in Western, and is, at present, one 



812 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

of the board of managers of that camp. His brother, Martin Luther 
Allpress, was a soldier in the Spanish-American war, and served in the 
Cuban and Porto Rican campaigns, and is now living in Cleveland, Ohio. 



EVERARD MARTIN. 

Everard Martin, whose influence in behalf of temperance, religion 
and education as well as the substantial and material development of 
Gibson precinct has made him a valuable factor in Jefferson county, is 
also deserving of mention in ibis volume because he was one of the 
soldiers of the Civil war. A native of Vermont, he was born in Addison 
county on the 21st of October, 1838, and is descended from an old family 
of New England. His father, William Martin, was born in Canada 
and became a soldier of the Civil war, enlisting in the First United States 
Cavalry. He served for three years as a loyal soldier, unfaltering in his 
performance of duty. He died in Iowa at the age of forty-four years. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Phoebe McGinnis, belonged to 
an old family of Vermont, in which state her birth occurred, and died 
at Odell, Gage county, Nebraska, when seventy-five years of age, be- 
loved and esteemed by all who knew her. They had two sons who were 
valiant defenders of the Union cause, one of these being Henry Martin, 
who now resides in Fairbury, Nebraska. 

Everard Martin spent the days of his boyhood and youth in 
Vermont and New York. He is indebted to the public school system 
of the country for the educational privileges he enjoyed and which 
prepared him for life's practical duties. After the outbreak of the war 
of the rebellion he offered his services to the government, enlisting at 
Elizabethtown, Essex countv, New York, in 1861, as a member of 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 813 

Company K, Thirty-eighth New York Infantry, for two years' service. 
He was under the command of Captain Dwyre and made a good war 
record, participating in eight important battles. He took part in the 
first battle of Bidl Run, also the siege of Yorktown in Virginia and the 
battles of Williamsburg and Fort Richmond. He was under General 
McClellan in the seven days' fight on the peninsula, and was with his 
regiment in the engagement at Chantilla in September, 1862. Being 
wounded lie was in the hospital for ten months, and was then honorably 
discharged on the 23d of June, 1863, at expiration of service. He never 
faltered in the performance of any task assigned to him. doing his full 
duty as a soldier, and in days of peace he has been equally loyal to his 
country and her welfare. 

In 1865 Mr. Martin removed westward to Iowa, but returned to the 
east and on the 12th of February, 1866, was united in marriage to Miss 
Eunice Hanchett, of Elizabethtown, New York, a daughter of Howard 
and Jane (Smith) Hanchett, also residents of the Empire state. Her 
father died at the age of thirty-two years, leaving a widow r and five 
children : Annis; Philemon H., a resident of Fairbury; Eunice; Philetus; 
and Wesley. Both of the latter died, one at the age of seventeen and 
the other at twenty-three. The mother died in Fairbury, Nebraska, at 
the age of sixty-eight years. 

Mr. Martin took his bride to Tama county, Iowa, where he resided 
until 1868. He then came to Jefferson county, Nebraska, and secured 
a homestead claim, which he began to cultivate and improve. He had 
to labor under the disadvantages caused by the hot winds of summer 
and the blizzards of winter. The grasshoppers, too, for several seasons 
destroyed his crops, but he persevered and at length overcame the diffi- 
culties and obstacles in his path and has worked his way upward to 
success, in fact, he is now numbered among the prosperous citizens of his 



8i4 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

community and is the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of well 
improved land. Upon this is a good home, and the barns and sheds are 
filled with large crops, while in the pastures are seen good grades of 
stock. Evergreen and other shade and ornamental trees and flowers 
adorn the lawn, and there is a good orchard and all modern equipments. 
Mr. Martin well deserves to be classed among the representative agricul- 
turists of his community and certainly deserves great credit for what he 
has accomplished. 

To. Mr. and Mrs. Martin have been born six children : Mrs. Cora 
Collier, who is living in Fairbury, Nebraska; Minnie, who is engaged 
in teaching in Lincoln; Mattie; Earl, of Montana, who was a soldier of 
the Second Nebraska Regiment during the Spanish-American war; 
Delia Seaton, of North Dakota ; and Ray, who is sixteen years of age. 
The children received good educational privileges and have been trained 
to habits of industry, economy and honesty, so that they are valued 
factors in the various communities in which they reside. 

Mr. Martin belongs to Strain Post, No. 201, G. A. R., of Plymouth, 
and both he and his wife are members of the Christian church and take 
an active and helpful part in its work. They favor temperance and, in 
fact, all interests that tend to advance the moral standard of humanity, 
and their influence is ever on the side of right, progress and reform. 



HARRY HOUSEMAN. 

Harry Houseman, a well known citizen or Barnston, Nebraska, and 
an honored veteran of the Civil war, was born on the 24th of August, 
1844, in Newark, Licking county, Ohio, and is a son of Lewis and Susan 
(Buskirk) Houseman, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania and 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 815 

were of German descent. The father spent his last days in Michigan, 
where he died at the age of seventy-six years. Politically he affiliated 
with the Republican party, and religiously he was identified with the 
Methodist church, to which his wife also belonged. She died at the 
age of seventy-two years. This worthy couple were the parents of 
eleven children, and three of their sons were soldiers of the Civil war, 
George being a member of an Illinois regiment, and Upto* 1 of an Ohio 
regiment. 

Much of the boyhood and youth of our subject was passed in 
Cuyahoga county, Ohio, where he received a good practical education 
and where he also learned the barber's, painter's and paper-hanger's 
trades, which he followed for many years. In February, 1862, feeling 
that his country needed his services, he put aside all personal interests 
and enlisted in Company A, Fifth Ohio Volunteer Sharpshooters, which 
regiment became noted for its gallant and fearless service. Mr. House- 
man remained at the front for three years, and was first under the 
command of Captain G. M. Barber, and later under Captain D. W. 
Bottsford. He participated in many important battles, including those 
at Stone River, Nashville, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain and Resaca. 
He was with General Sherman all through the Atlanta campaign, and 
was in the battle of Kenesaw Mountain. At Chickamauga he was 
wounded in the left leg, and was confined in the hospital for some 
time. On the cessation of hostilities he received an honorable discharge 
in August, 1865, and returned to his home in Ohio to resume more 
peaceful pursuits. 

In 1866 Mr. Houseman removed to Newaygo county, Michigan, 
where he spent five years, and then became a resident of Atlantic, Cass 
county, Iowa, which was his home for seventeen years while he worked 



8i6 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

at his trade. At the end of that time he came to Gage county, Nebraska, 
and has since followed his chosen occupation at Barnston. 

Mr. Houseman was first married in Cass county, Iowa, to Miss 
Frances Thornton, who died at Marne, that county, leaving one son, 
Roy. In 1898 he was again married, his second union being with Mrs. 
Mary Sadolika, a native of Bavaria, Germany, who was a widow at the 
time of her marriage to our subject and had four children, Dora, Peter, 
Augustine and Mary. One son has been born of the second union. 
George Housman. 

Mr. Houseman is a member of Coleman Post, No. 115, G. A. R., 
and in politics is a strong Republican. He has made many friends since 
coming to this state, and wherever he has lived he has gained the con- 
fidence and respect of his fellow citizens. 



WILLIAM EDGERTON. 

William Edgerton is a well known and successful resident of 
Adams, Nebraska. He has been in this state since June, 1880, and has 
been esteemed as a man and citizen in whatever community he has made 
his home. He is one of the honored veterans of the Civil war, having 
given the full measure of his devotion to the country in his youth, and 
he has been self-reliant and capable in all his career. 

Mr. Edgerton was born in Grant county, Indiana, January 15, 
1845. His great-grandfather was born in England, and he and his 
brother, after coming to the United States, were soldiers in the Revolu- 
tionary war. Thomas Edgerton was the grandfather of Mr. Edgerton, 
and Samuel his father. The latter was born in Ohio, and married 
Winnie Lytle, who was born in South Carolina, of a southern family 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 817 

and of Quaker stock. Samuel Edgerton and wife came from Indiana 
to Fremont county, Iowa, in 185 1. The former was for four years a 
soldier in the Twenty-ninth Iowa Infantry. He now lives at Goodland, 
Sherman county, Kansas, in his eightieth year, and his wife is seventy- 
nine. They were parents of the following children, nine of whom grew 
up : Thomas, deceased ; William ; Richard, deceased ; Daniel, deceased ; 
Frank ; Mary A. ; Erastus ; Elmer ; Samuel ; Winnie ; Elnora. Then- 
father is a Republican, and has been class leader and steward in the 
Methodist church. 

William Edgerton was reared on his father's farm in Iowa, and 
received a fair amount of schooling and early learned the value of in- 
dustry. He was eighteen years old when he enlisted, in June, 1863, at 
Sidney, Fremont county, Iowa, in Company A, Eighth Iowa Cavalry, 
a regiment that made a gallant record during the war. His captain was 
G. W. Burns and colonel, J. B. Dor, the latter of whom died in the 
service at Macon, Georgia. The regiment was sent south to Nash- 
ville, was in the battles at Dalton, Georgia, Buzzards Roost, Horse 
Bend, Rome, Kingston, fought against General Hood"s forces at Pu- 
laski and Franklin, Tennessee, was at Nashville again, thence went to 
Macon, Georgia, after General Joe Johnston. Mr. Edgerton received 
his honorable discharge in September, 1865. He lived in Fremont 
county, Iowa, until 1880, then came to Otoe county, Nebraska, and 
lived at Dunbar four years, and at Talmage until 1891, when he came 
to Adams. He has six good lots in the city, a fine orchard of all 
kinds of fruit, and his beautiful home is the abode of hospitality and good 
cheer all the year round. 

Mr. Edgerton was married at Sidney, Iowa, in September, 1867, to 
Miss Emily Conkle, who was born in Defiance county, Ohio, was reared 
and educated in Logan county, Illinois, and thence came to Fremont 



818 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

county, Iowa. Her father, George Conkle, was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, and her mother, Beulah A. Vale, was born at Bucyrus, Ohio, and 
both are now deceased, the former in Iowa at the age of sixty-six, and the 
latter in Hamburg, Iowa, at the age of eighty-two. They had nine 
children : Catherine A., Frank, Peter, Eli, Emily, Willard, Etta, and 
Martha, who died at the age of seven, and one that died in infancy. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edgerton have four children: Martha Etta Garrett, of 
Leon, Iowa ; George, who is married and has two children ; William, 
unmarried; and Thomas, at home. Mr. and Mrs. Edgerton are mem- 
bers of the Methodist church, and in domestic and social life are popular 
and hospitable, enjoying many friends and a happy home. 



FRANCIS D. DARR. 

Francis D. Darr, a leading farmer of Pleasant township, Jefferson 
county, Nebraska, is an old settler of this part of the state, having come 
here in 1878 and taken up his residence on some wild land in the county. 
His sixty-five years have been devoted to industry and the accomplish- 
ment of worthy ideals, and ( he has made a record of honest success in 
every sphere of life. 

Mr. Darr was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, December 
6, 1838, of a well known and honored family of that state. His grand- 
father was a soldier in the war of 1812. His father, John Darr, was 
born in Pennsylvania, and married Elizabeth Diller, who was a native 
of Pennsylvania and a daughter of Francis Diller, son of Sam Diller, 
the Dillers being one of the most prominent families of Cumberland 
county, and well known and highly connected with Jefferson county, 
Nebraska. The progenitor of the family came to America from the 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 819 

republic of Switzerland before the Revolutionary war. John and Eliz- 
abeth Darr had eight children : David, Joseph, Elizabeth, Francis, Re- 
becca, Anna, Catherine and John. The father of these died in 1863, 
at the age of seventy-three. He was a miller by trade, and was a Re- 
publican voter. His wife survived until 1886, when she was eighty-one 
years old. 

Francis D. Darr was reared in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, 
and taught to work and earn an honest living from boyhood. February 
28, 1865, he enlisted from Cumberland county in Captain Wolf's com- 
pany of the One Hundred and First Pennsylvania Infantry. He was at 
Camp Curtin, Harrisburg, for ten days, then went by railroad to Balti- 
more, thence to Roanoke Island, by boat, where he remained five 
weeks; was then at Newbern, North Carolina, for a month, at Morehead 
City for ten days, and then returned to Baltimore, and from there to 
Harrisburg, where he received an honorable discharge, after a clean 
and creditable record. Mr. Darr came to Nebraska in 1878, and has 
since acquired a fine lot of farming property about one mile and a quarter 
from Diller. "He has two farms amounting to two hundred and forty 
acres, with two good houses, orchards, barns and groves, and all other 
needful accessories. He has spent about forty-five hundred dollars in 
the improvement of his places, and they would not suffer by comparison 
with any farm in the county. He keeps high-grade cattle, horses and 
hogs, and is enterprising and prosperous in all his undertakings. 

Mr. Darr was married in 1867 to Sarah Elizabeth Rhoads, who 
has been his devoted partner in life for thirty-six years, and is a woman 
of fine characteristics and keen intelligence. She was born in Cumberland 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1845, a daughter of Jacob and Susanna (Myers) 
Rhoades, both natives of Pennsylvania, and the former of German 
ancestry, and the latter a daughter of John and Eve Myers, a respected 



820 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Pennsylvania family. Jacob and Susanna Rhoads had the following 
children: John; Angeline; Sarah; Samuel; Rebecca; Florence. Six 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Darr : Clara J. is the wife of 
George M. Myers, of Diller, and has two children. William F. and 
Grace Myers; Charles E. Darr is on the homestead farm; Fannie E. is 
at home ; the daughter Anna died when about ten years old ; and two boys 
died in infancy. Mr. Darr is a Republican in politics. He was on 
the school board for six years. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
church, and one of the trustees, and belongs to Nickajack Post of the 
G. A. R. In his home he is noted for his hospitality, and his worthy cit- 
izenship gives him a place of esteem among all his friends and associ- 
ates. 



JOHN H. WOODMAN. 

John H. Woodman has been a resident of Jefferson county since 
1885 and now makes his home in Eureka township. Many of the 
citizens of this portion of the state are numbered among the honored 
veterans of the Civil war, and of this class Mr. Woodman is a repre- 
sentative, having for three years faithfully fought in defense of the 
Union cause, making for himself an honorable military record and doing 
effective service in behalf of his country. 

Mr. Woodman is a native of New York, his birth having occurred 
in North Hoosick, Rensselaer county, on the 29th of December, 1845. 
His father, John Woodman, was born near Windsor Castle in England, 
and married Miss Margaret Argraves. whose birth occurred in Lincoln- 
shire, England. They came to the United States in early life and were 
married in Massachusetts. Both the father and mother are now de- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 821 

ceased, the latter having passed away in New York when fifty years of 
age, while the father died in Bennington, Vermont, at the very vener- 
able age of eighty-five years. He was extensively engaged in merchan- 
dising, developing an excellent business which brought to him a good 
financial return. In the family were five children: Anna; Sarah; Ruth, 
deceased; Man', who is living in Louisville. Kentucky; and John H., 
of this review. 

In his early boyhood days John H. Woodman went to Lee county, 
Illinois, to live with an uncle, who was a farmer of that locality. He 
acquired his education in the public schools and his youth was largely 
devoted to labor. He watched with interest the progress of events in 
the south which brought on the Civil war. and his patriotic spirit was 
aroused by the attempt of the advocates of slavery to overthrow the 
Union cause. He was not yet seventeen years of age when he enlisted 
for service in the army, being enrolled among the boys in blue at Paw- 
paw in Lee county, Illinois, on the nth of August, 1862, in response 
to President Lincoln's call for more men to aid in crushing out the 
rebellion. He joined Company K, of the Seventy-fifth Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry, under command of Captain George Ryan, who was mus- 
tered as colonel, and D. M. Roberts captain. The regiment went into 
camp at Dixon, Illinois, and after a short time was ordered to Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. Soon Mr. Woodman was familiar with all the experi- 
ences of war, participating in the battles of Perryville, Toloma cam- 
paign, the engagements at Stone River, and Chickamauga. He was 
taken prisoner by the rebel forces at Chickamauga and was first sent 
to Libby prison at Richmond, where he remained for seven days. He 
was then transferred to Castle Thunder, and while there the greater 
part of the prisoners suffered from smallpox, but Mr. Woodman did 
not become infected by that contagious disease. Later he was taken 



822 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

to Andersonville, and afterward to Florence. The period of his incar- 
ceration covered about fifteen months, during which time he suffered 
all the hardships known to those rebel prison pens — hardships which 
were greater than any tongue or pen can describe. He was five months 
without either shoes or shirt, and because of the dampness and crowded 
conditions of the prisons he became seriously afflicted with rheumatism, 
so that he could not walk upon his feet but used his hands for crutches, 
and when he was released a sailor took hold of one arm and he was 
brought like a child to the transport at Annapolis, Maryland. Making 
his way northward to Columbus, Ohio, and afterward to Chicago, he 
was granted a furlough, which he spent at home. On the expiration of 
that period he rejoined his regiment at Nashville, Tennessee, and later 
he returned to Camp Douglas at Chicago, where he was honorably dis- 
charged in June, 1865. He sacrificed much for his country, but he did 
it willingly, and he certainly deserves the gratitude of all lovers of the 
stars and stripes. His constitution, however, was greatly impaired and 
it was some time ere he recovered from the hardships of his army life. 
In early manhood because of ill health lie traveled quite extensively in 
the south, visiting Texas and Mexico. He saw the Mexican and French 
troops engaged in battle at Acrapulco, Mexico, and later he went to Cali- 
fornia where he remained for two years, and then returned to Lee county, 
Illinois. 

Mr. Woodman was married in 1870 to Miss Jane L. Craddock, of 
Illinois. Her parents, James and Susan (Brooker) Craddock, were both 
natives of England, and after coming to the new world they established 
their home in Illinois. Later they removed to Saline county, Nebraska, 
where the father retired. He died at the age of eighty-two years, and 
his wife passed away at the age of seventy years. They were the 
parents of twelve children, four sons and eight daughters. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 823 

After his marriage Mr. Woodman removed to Stone county, Ar- 
kansas, hoping that his health would be benefited by a sojourn in the 
south. He afterward went to Fitzgerald, Georgia, living in a colony 
of ex-soldiers there. In 1885 he arrived in Jefferson county, Nebraska, 
and purchased here his farm of one hundred and twenty acres. He 
built a good house at a cost of eight hundred and fifty dollars and at once 
set to work to improve his place and equip it with modern conveniences. 
He now has a well developed farm and everything about his property 
indicates his careful supervision and enterprising methods. He is justly 
accounted one of the representative agriculturists of his community, 
and he deserves great credit for what he has accomplished. He had a 
handicap of ill health for many years, but with persistent purpose he has 
labored on and is now in comfortable circumstances. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Woodman have been born four children : Leonard, 
who is living in Thayer county, Nebraska ; Emerson, who makes his 
home in Hall county, this state; Arthur, who is living in Jefferson 
county; and Grace, at home. Mr. Woodman is a strong Republican in 
his political affiliations, and he belongs to Norton Post No. 266 G. A. 
R., at Daykin. He has filled all offices of the post except that of com- 
mander, and he maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades 
through his connection with this organization. As a citizen he is as true 
and loyal to-day to his duty to his country as he was when he followed 
the old flag on southern battlefields. In the war his health became 
impaired and he has never been a well man since, but he has made 
the best use possible of his opportunities and his life has ever been 
honorable and upright, commending him to the confidence and good 
will of his fellow men. 



824 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

A. D. McCANDLASS. 

A. D. McCandlass, attorney at law at Beatrice, Nebraska, and city 
attorney for Wymore, located in this state in 1882. He was born 
in McDonough county, near Macomb, Illinois, August 27. 1849. He is 
a son of William Wallace McCandlass. one of the early settlers of the 
county, who purchased bis laud of the government for one dollar and a 
quarter per acre. He came from Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, and 
was in turn the son of William McCandlass, the latter of whom was 
born in Scotland of an old Highland Scotch family. William Wal- 
lace McCandlass, father of our subject, was born in 1820. He came to 
Illinois in 1833 right after the Black Hawk war, and was a carpenter 
and contractor. His wife bore the maiden name of Sarah Duncan, and 
was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, a daughter- of J. and 
Sarah (Swearinger) Duncan, of Scotch and German ancestry. Both 
parents are now deceased, the father being killed in Stone River Decem- 
ber 21, 1862, in middle life while serving in the Eighty-fourth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry. After the death of her gallant soldier husband the 
mother did her best to bring up her family which consisted of these chil- 
dren, namely: Mrs. Mary Ward, of Nebraska; A. D.. our subject; Mrs. 
Anna J. Cornell, of Creston. Iowa; Hallie Johnson, of Nebraska; 
Thomas, of Nebraska; Addie Ruth; William, of California. In politics 
the father was a stanch Republican, and voted for General Fremont, 
in 1856. 

Our subject was reared in McDonough county and received an ex- 
cellent education in the common schools. After pursuing his legal studies 
for some years with Bassett and Cornell, at Aledo, Illinois, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar at Ottawa. Illinois, and since then has proved himself 
a leading light of the profession. In 1873 he was married at Aledo. 
Illinois, to Miss G. Cabean, a daughter of Richard Cabean, who died 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 825 

at Wayne, Nebraska, at the age of eighty years. Fraternally Mr. Mc- 
Candlass is a member of the Order of Elks of Beatrice and of the Knights 
of Pythias. He possesses the faculty of winning friends outside of his 
professional duties and is a close student, being well versed in all the 
technicalities, especially those relating to the practice of law in Ne- 
braska. His library is one of the finest in Gage county, being valued 
at three thousand dollars. When addressing a jury Mr. McCandlass' 
powers are best shown, for he possesses a personal magnetism which 
makes his arguments irresistible, and his success, while remarkable, is 
not surprising, considering his attainments. 



ANDREW DILLER. 

Andrew Diller is one of the extensive landowners of Jefferson 
county, living in Richland precinct. His possessions aggregate 
four hundred and eighty-five acres, and he is accounted one of the most 
prosperous and enterprising agriculturists of his section of the state. 
He has resided in Nebraska since 1873, an d m tne years which have since 
come and gone he has borne an active and helpful part in the substantial 
improvement and development of the great west. 

Mr. Diller is a native of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, born 
on the 16th of December, 1846. His father. Francis Diller. was born 
in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and the grandfather, Francis Dil- 
ler, St., was also a native of that state and served his country as a 
soldier in the war of 1812. After arriving at years of maturity Francis 
Diller, Jr., was married to Miss Nancy Commery, whose birth occurred 
in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and who was a representative of 
one of the old families of that locality. In 1874 they came to Jefferson 
county, Nebraska, and here both spent their remaining days. Francis 



826 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Diller gave his political support to the men and measures of the Repub- 
lican party and was a man whom to know was to respect and honor 
because he lived an upright life and in all of his business transactions was 
fair and straightforward. His wife was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. In their family were the following children who 
reached mature years; Henry; Susan, now deceased; Eliza; Amanda; 
Jacob; Andrew; Mary A.; Malinda; Martha; and Levi, who died at the 
age of nineteen years. 

In the usual manner of farmer lads Andrew Diller spent the days of 
his boyhood and youth under the parental roof in Pennsylvania. No 
event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm life for 
him until he was about sixteen years of age, when he displayed a brave 
and loyal spirit by enlisting in 1863 in response to the country's call 
for men to aid in crushing out the rebellion in the south. He beame a 
member of Company F of the First Battalion of Pennsylvania troops, 
and was under the command of Captain Ega. He served for six months 
with this battalion and then re-enlisted as a member of Company K, 
Two Hundred and First Pennsylvania Infantry. One of the first en- 
gagements in which he participated was the hotly contested battle of 
Gettysburg. He was afterward at Alexandria, Virginia, and at Fair- 
fax Courthouse and engaged in fighting the rebel troops under General 
Mosby, and took part in several skirmishes with the bushwhackers. 
This regiment was also detailed to guard Governor Stevens. Mr. Diller 
was at length honorably discharged from the service at Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, in June, 1865, and returned to his home with a creditable 
military record. He was always found at his post of duty, and his 
valor and loyalty were equal to that of many a veteran of twice his years. 

Mr. Diller continued to remain in Pennsylvania until 1866, when he 
started westward, settling in Champaign county, Illinois, near Rantoul. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 827 

There he was identified with agricultural pursuits, and in 1872 he 
sought a companion and helpmate for life's journey, being united in 
marriage to Miss Ellen Pitts. They have lived together as man and 
wife of thirty-two years, their mutual love and confidence increasing as 
time has passed by, and Mr. Diller has found in his wife a faithful com- 
panion and helpmate. She was born in McLean county, Illinois, near 
BlooMiington, and is a daughter of Henry and Margaret (Wright) 
Pitts, the former a native of Kentucky, while the latter was born in North 
Carolina and was a representative of an old southern family. They 
became pioneer residents of McLean county. Illinois, and both died in 
Champaign county, that state. Mr. Pitts had always carried on farming 
as a life work and his energy and determination were numbered among 
his strongest characteristics. He voted with the Democracy. In his 
family were fourteen children, twelve of whom reached years of ma- 
turity, namely: M. L., Susan C, Mary Hannah, Sarah Miranda, Amanda 
M., William Henry, Thomas A., Jane B., Nancy E., Ellen L., Iola A. 
and John R. Those who have passed away are Martha Ann and one 
that died in infancy. Two of the sons were soldiers of the Civil war. 
William H. Pitts, who served with an Illinois regiment in defense of the 
Union, is now living in Cloud county, Kansas. Thomas A. Pitts, who 
wore the blue uniform as a member of an Iowa regiment, is now living 
in Champaign county, Illinois. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Diller has been blessed with four 
children : Dora Allen, the wife of William Beannus, who carries on 
agricultural pursuits on the Diller farm and by whom she has one daugh- 
ter, Lottie Arvilla ; Anna, who died at the age of five years, one month 
and twenty days ; Willie Henry, who died at the age of three years, five 
months and twenty-six days; and Minnie, who died at the age of nine 
months and fourteen davs. 



828 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

The year 1873 witnessed the arrival of Andrew Diller in Nebraska. 
He cast in his lot with the pioneer settlers of Jefferson county, and during 
years which have since elapsed he has not only faced the conditions of 
frontier life but has ever borne his part in reclaiming wild districts for 
the purpose of civilization. Year after year he has worked on earnestly 
and persistently, and he is now the owner of four hundred and eighty-five 
acres of valuable land. Upon his farm is a windmill, a good grove and 
an orchard. Not far away are the schoolhouse and the church, and he 
is pleasantly situated where he is thus enabled to enjoy good advantages. 
His attention is given to general farming and stock-raising and his life 
record proves the force of industry and enterprise in business affairs. In 
politics he is a stanch Populist and a warm advocate of W. J. Bryan. 
He has. served as justice of the peace, and he belongs to Fairbury Post, 
G. A. R., to the Masonic fraternity and to the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. The Diller household is noted for its gracious and pleasing 
hospitality, and both Mr. and Mrs. Diller have a very large circle 
of warm friends in Tefferson county. 



DAVID BRA1NERD PERRY, D. D. 

David Brainerd Perry, president of Doane College, Crete, was born 
in Worcester, Massachusetts, March 7, 1839. His ancestors on his 
father's side came from England to Massachusetts at a very early date, 
and the old homestead farm bordering on the city of Worcester was for 
many generations a permanent and noted family possession. 

John Perry, the emigrant ancestor, with his son bearing the same 
name emigrated from New Farnham, England, to this country in 1666 
or 1667, and settled in Watertown, Massachusetts. Josiah, the seventh 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 829 

son of John Perry, Jr., with his son Nathan, moved from YYatertown to 
Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1 75 1 . Father and son bought a large farm 
one and a half miles south of the center of Worcester, on what is now 
known as Vernon street, which has been in the family ever since, although 
the greater part of it has recently been covered with city residences. 
Nathan Perry's son Moses was the grandfather of Dr. Perry, who is 
in the sixth generation from John Jerry, Sr., the line being as follows: 
John Perry, Sr., John Perry, Jr., Josiah Perry, Nathan Perry, Moses 
Perry, Samuel Perry, David Brainerd Perry. Grandfather Moses Perry 
married Hannah Hall, and lived to be over eighty; his wife died at the 
age of ninety-three. The Perry ancestors were weavers in England, and 
for the most part farmers in this country, and they were men and women 
to be proud of, whether their individual characters or their usefulness to 
the social world are considered. 

Samuel Perry, the father of President Perry, was born November 26, 
1796, and died February 12, [878. He inherited the sturdy characteristics 
of the family, and was a thrifty farmer. Possessing the respect and con- 
findence of his neighbors to a rare degree, he was an important member 
of the community in which be lived, and a generous supporter of religious 
and educational enterprises near and far. The aid he rendered to Doane 
College at an early and critical period in its history was invaluable. He 
married Mary Harrington, who in addition to the the care of her own 
family of ten children, was an efficient and much loved medical adviser 
f< t the neighborhood. She was born March 20, 1804, and died February 
18, 1869, being a daughter of Francis and Lydia (Perry) Harrington. 

In his early boyhood Brainerd Perry preferred work on the farm to 
attendance at school. Perhaps few boys have been more fond of an out- 
door active life. Few boys took more interest in the great anti-slavery agi- 
tation with which New England was at that time all alive. As lie was too 



830 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

young to go in person to Kansas to take part in the struggle for freedom, 
he did the next best thing — he sent his small earnings to buy Sharp's 
rifles. When at the age of seventeen his life work had been chosen he gave 
himself with intense purpose to making amends for lost educational time. 
He fitted for college in the Worcester high school, an institution of high 
grade. He went to college for the purpose of preparation for the Chris- 
tian ministry. His high school teachers, who were recent graduates of 
Yale, did much to determine his choice of a college. He entered Yale in 
1859 and graduated in 1863 with the degree of A. B., taking second rank 
in scholarship in a class of one hundred and twenty-two. During his 
training at Yale the freshmen and senior college societies were in high 
javor, but he carefully avoided the sophomore society, and used that of 
the junior year simply as a stepping stone to the senior society. The war 
for the Union was being fought out while he was in college, and he would 
gladly have thrown himself into the conflict, but he was held back by the 
ad 1 ice of friends. 

Immediately after graduation from Yale he took one year of theo- 
logical training at Princeton Seminary, New Jersey. For an interval 
during this year he was able to give himself to the service of the Chris- 
tian Commission in Virginia, where he saw the camp fires of the enemy. 
He spent the following year at Union Theological Seminary, New York 
city, and engaged in religious work in Iowa during the summer vacation. 
He had gone to Andover, Massachusetts, for a third year in the theolog- 
ical seminary at that place when he received an invitation from President 
Woolsey to become a tutor in Yale, which led him to change his plans 
and to take his third seminary year in the Yale Divinity School during 
the two years of his college tutorship. 

President Perry graduated from the Yale Divinity School in 1867 
with the degree of S. T. B. In the following year he went abroad and 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 831 

continued his study and travel for fourteen months. Upon his return he 
was engaged for nearly two years again as a tutor in Yale. At the end 
of his student life his health, which had always been exceptionally good in 
his college days, was so much impaired that he asked the Congregational 
Home Missionary Society for a frontier parish, where he could have 
outdoor life and breathe the high, dry air of the plains. Superintendent 
O. W. Merrill assigned him to Hamilton county, where he lived near 
Aurora from April to September, 1872. In a short time the north half 
of Clay county was added to his parish, and he was then in charge of 
three little churches. 

Efforts that had been put forth for some time to establish a Congre- 
gational college in the state culminated in June of this same year, and 
Mr. Perry was at once urged to take up educational work in the new in- 
stitution soon to be known as Doane College. During his first year of 
service at Doane, 1872-73, he was sole instructor with the title of tutor, 
and was engaged in preparing a few students to enter a freshman class. 
Then he became professor of Latin and Greek, and afterwards successive- 
ly senior professor, acting president, and, in 1881, president. He re- 
ceived from Yale the degree of A. M. in 1866, and of D. D. in 1898. 

His sympathies have always been with the Republican party, but he 
has taken no active part in politics, and has neither held nor sought public 
office. He is a member of the Crete Congregational Club, the oldest 
organization of its kind in the state, and the Schoolmasters' Club, which 
was organized in 1898. He was married, July 3, 1876, to Helen Doane, 
and five children were born to them : Thomas Doane, born May 27, 1877; 
Brainerd Clark, August 13, 1879 (died July 21, 1880) ; Charles Boswell, 
January 25, 1884; Helen Clark, February 17, 1888; Henry Eldridge, 
October 8, 1889. 

If, contrary to expectations, the college educator speedily took the 



832 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

place of the frontier home missionary, President Perry has never for- 
gotten the missionary work that drew him to Nebraska, and he has lost 
no opportunity to identify himself with the religious life of the state. He 
has sought to come in close touch with every phase of school life whether 
public or private. It has seemed to him that there should be no divorce 
between education and religion, but that each should help the other to 
what is highest and best. The college of which he has been the head 
for thirty years has taken a high rank, and it is his ambition that he may 
be a part of its vitalizing power in the generations to come. He still fills 
the office of president of Doane College acceptably to all who are con- 
cerned in its welfare. 



Doane College. 

Crete, Nebraska. 

Congregationalists have always put emphasis upon education. They 
have a genius for building colleges. The institutions that bear their 
name from the Atlantic to the Pacific shine out like bright constellations 
in the heavens. 

What Congregationalism had done in other states it sought to do 
in Nebraska. 'When there were but three Congregational churches in 
that part of the territory of Nebraska which subsequently became the 
state, and ten years before statehood, the General Association of Congre- 
gational churches was organized, and at its first session, held at Fremont, 
October, 1857. it made declaration in favor of proceeding at once to lay 
the foundations of an educational institution of high order. 

The General Association of 1871 passed the following resolutions: 

"Resolved, That we believe the time has come to take measures for 
the establishment of two or more academies." 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 833 

"Resolved, That it is the sense of this Association that we should 
concentrate our educational efforts on our academies and our one 
College for our order in the state." 

At the next meeting in June, 1872, held in the First Congregational 
church of Omaha, the General Association accepted the report of its com- 
mittee on education and thereby located its college at Crete. Doane 
College came into corporate existence July 11. 1872. 

No name was attached to the college when it was located. Mr. 
Thomas Doane had brought into Nebraska not only the fame of an 
excellent civil engineer but also a reputation for sterling worth. Tn 
virtue of his generous aid, his active co-operation in every good enter- 
prise, but more especially because of his character as a man. with no 
pledge on his part, the corporate body wrote his name into the articles of 
incorporation and the institution was called doane college. Dur- 
ing his life Mr. Doane was a constant and liberal giver, an invaluable 
adviser and colaborer. Since his death his estate has yielded more than 
$70,000 and made it possible to advance the endowment of the college 
to $165,000. Other property, such as lands, buildings and equipment, 
would carry the total assets of the college to nearly $300,000. 

What motive wrought in the minds of the founders of Doane Col- 
lege? It is the story of old Yale which has just celebrated its two hun- 
dredth anniversary. Said the Congregational ministers of Connecticut: 
We plant a school "Wherein youth may be instructed in the arts and 
sciences, who through the blessing of Almighty God may be fitted for 
public employment in church and civil state." Said Nebraska Congrega- 
tionalists : "No order of Christians can hope to be respectable or useful 
which neglects its educational interests. The order, under God, which 
embodies the most Christian thinkers will be the molding power of the 
age and nation and will do most for God and Humanity." 



834 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Doane College is the center of a Congregational educational system 
that has four academies which stand to it in the relation of feeders, 
though there is no organic connection. These academies arc at Chadron 
in the northwest corner of the state, at Neligh in the northeast, at Frank- 
lin in the southwest and at Weeping Water in the southeast. These 
volunteer agencies, supported by the benefactions of far-sighted, large- 
hearted men and women, seek to strengthen our magnificent public 
school system at a point where it is professedly weak. State institutions 
can put little emphasis upon the very important religious element in 
education. 

Doane College early adopted for its motto, "We build on Christ," 
that it might point to the noblest ideal of manhood, to the source of the 
highest educational inspiration, to the light and the life of the world. 

The government of the college is in the hands of a self-perpetuating 
board of trustees who serve for three years but are eligible for re-election. 
The college has at all times sought to keep in close touch with its con- 
stituents. For this reason the trustees increased their number, at first 
fifteen, to eighteen, and then to twenty-seven, the maximum allowed by 
the articles of incorporation. To extend still further the responsibility 
and privilege of caring for the institution, in June, 1893, they invited 
college graduates to nominate each year one or more of their number, 
that the board might annually elect one from the list to serve three years. 
At the same time a like invitation was extended by the trustees to mem- 
bers of Congregational churches in every part of the state with a view to 
the yearly election of three to be special representatives of the Nebraska 
Congregational churches. 

The institution has had a healthy growth in student attendance, in 
faculty and in facilities for instruction. There were fifteen students and 
one teacher the first year; forty students and two teachers the second; 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 835 

sixty students and three teachers the third. At present it has an annual 
attendance of about two hundred students and a corps of ten permanent 
instructors. There are four substantial brick buildings : biological, chem- 
ical and physical laboratories ; a library that contains 9,000 volumes and 
5,300 pamphlets; a well equipped observatory; a time service; a museum 
with varied collections of plants, minerals and animals. 

Three carefully prepared collegiate courses of study lead to the 
baccalaureate degrees of arts, literature and science. Each course covers 
a period of four years, although the longer period of five years has had 
its advocates as against any shortening of the time to three years, a re- 
duction which finds favor in some institutions. Trustees and faculty 
have from the first insisted upon high standards. The elective principle 
has a good place in junior and senior years. Laboratory methods of 
teaching are extensively employed. An academy organized in 1871, and 
reorganized in 1893, has two courses each of three years, which prepare 
for college. There is also an excellent music department. 

The college early came into possession of six hundred acres of high 
table-land, over looking the city of Crete and the beautiful valley of the 
Big Blue. The campus of ninety acres rises in knolls and falls away in 
slight ravines which contain choice springs of water. These ravines have 
been filled with groves while the high grounds have their winding drives 
bordered with shade trees. A more beautiful college site cannot easily 
be found. 

It is an important feature in the history of the college that a great 
number of people within the state have given generously to it from 
their limited means. On the other hand by far the largest gifts have 
come from outside Nebraska, especially from Massachusetts and Connec- 
ticut. 

As the college has always sought to perpetuate the names of benefac- 



836 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

tors the buildings and professorships are called after those who stand in 
close relation to the life of the institution. 

Expenses that students must incur have been kept down, the charge 
for tuition hardly equaling one quarter of the actual cost of instruction. 
Every possible inducement is offered to encourage deserving students who 
must largely depend upon their own earnings. 

The graduates of Doane have won distinction in all the learned 
professions, also as teachers, editors, writers of fiction, and in the spheres 
of home and business occupations. 

These and the much larger student body, that has not taken a full 
college course, have gone out into active life to make the world better 
by reason of their educational training and well formed character. 

It is the full purpose of the trustees to go on increasing the facilities 
for imparting instruction and to bring the advantages of a good educa- 
tion within the reach of every capable and deserving young man or woman 
in the state. Opening its doors alike to young people of both sexes, thor- 
oughly identifying itself with educational and religious progress, suc- 
cessful in the past, hopeful for the future, Doane College seeks to fill a 
good place in developing the best interests of Nebraska. The outlook 

for the institution was never better. 

— D. B. PERRY. 



E. P. GRIFFIN. 

E. P. Griffin, clerk of the district court of Jefferson county, Nebras- 
ka, being now in his second term, has been a resident of this state since 
1880. He has had a very successful career, both in what he has accom- 
plished as a man and citizen and in the degree of prosperity he has attained 
in material things. He has acquired considerable property in this county, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 837 

and his public-spirited endeavors in matters affecting the general welfare 
make him one of the best known and most popular of the long-time resi- 
dents of the county. 

Mr. Griffin was born near Richmond, Wayne county, Indiana, July 
9, 1848: His grandfather was one of the early settlers of Henry county, 
Indiana. His father, Jacob Griffin, was burn in Henry county, and was 
one of six brothers. He married Rebecca Harvey who was born in Henry 
county, and some time after their marriage they moved to Lee county," 
Iowa, where they were farmers. They are both now deceased, the 
mother having died in Iowa at the age of sixty-three and the father in 
Kansas, in Douglas county, when seventy-one years old. They had 
five sons and five daughters, and one son is in Iowa, one in San Francisco, 
California, one in Kansas, and one deceased. 

Mr. Griffin was eight years old when he went to Iowa, and he 
was educated in the graded and high schools there, in Whittier College, 
Salem, Iowa, being graduated from there in 1871, and subsequently 
graduated from the State University of Iowa at Iowa City. He taught 
in Henry county, Iowa, and was a principal and teacher in Iowa, follow- 
ing this profession altogether for twenty years. After coming to Jeffer- 
son county, Nebraska, he taught school in the winter and farmed during 
the summer. He has been a more successful teacher from the material 
point of view than the great majority, and by his good management and 
industry has acquired two good farms in this county. He was appointed 
clerk of the district court to fill a vacancy, and was then elected to the 
office and has since been re-elected, having given excellent satisfaction in 
the discharge of his duties. 

Mr. Griffin was married in Salem, Iowa, in 1875, to Miss Ella 
Frances Phar, who was born in Boonville, Warrick county, Indiana, a 
daughter of Colonel V. K. (state militia) and Z. J. (Armstrong) Phar, 



838 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

both deceased. A brother of Mrs. Griffin, Dr. W. W. Phar, lives in 
Minden , Nebraska, and a sister, Miss Anna Phar, is in Colorado Springs. 
Mr. and Mrs. Griffin have three children: Max, Miss Anna, who was 
educated at the State University of Nebraska, making a specialty of 
music, and her sister Lelia, also educated at Lincoln. Both daughters are 
talented musicians and skilled performers. Mr. Griffin affiliates with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Knights and Ladies of Security, 
and he and his family are members of the Baptist church. 



DANIEL SHEPSTALL. 

Daniel Shepstall, now deceased, was numbered among the honored 
pioneer settlers of Jefferson county, arriving in this portion of the state 
in 1870, and through the remainder of his life he was actively connected 
with the progress and improvement of his community, taking a deep 
interest in everything that pertained to its advancement along its mate- 
rial, social and moral lines. He was a native of Pennsylvania, his birth 
having occurred in Dauphin county, that state. His parents were Peter 
and Carrie (Hoffman) Shepstall, who were also natives of Pennsylvania 
and died there. They were highly respected people, and Mr. Shepstall 
enjoyed the advantages of a good home in his youth. He was reared 
under the parental roof and early learned lessons of industry and economy 
which have proved of value to him in his later years. After arriving at 
adult age he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Klinger, who was to 
him a faithful companion and helpmate on life's journey. She, too, was 
born and reared in Pennsylvania, and was a daughter of Daniel and Mar- 
garet (First) Klinger, both of whom were natives of the Keystone state. 
For a number of years Mr. and Mrs. Shepstall continued to make their 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 839 

home upon a Pennsylvania farm, but, believing that he would have better 
business opportunities in the west, Mr. Shepstalll then made arrange- 
ments to come to Nebraska and in the year 1870 arrived in Jefferson 
count)-. He secured a homestead claim according to the laws for pre- 
empting land, and, although not a furrow had been turned or an improve- 
ment made upon the place at that time, he began its development and 
with characteristic energy continued the work until rich fields returned to 
him golden harvests. He was a man of much energy and strong force of 
character, and his integrity stood as an unquestioned fact in his career. 
All who knew him trusted him because of his upright dealing, and he 
won the respect of his fellow townsmen to a high degree. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Shepstall were born eight children, namely: Mrs. 
Julia Stainbrook; Adelaide; Sampson, who died in childhood; William; 
Clayton; George and Nathaniel I., who were partners in farming and 
building enterprises in Eureka precinct; and. Rose, who completes the 
family. Mr. Shepstall died in 1894 respected by all who knew him, 
and in his death the community lost one of its valued pioneer settlers. His 
widow is now living on the hold homestead at the age of seventy-nine 
years, and she retains her mental and physical faculties to a remarkable 
degree. 



GEORGE W. SHEPSTALL. 

George W. Shepstall is residing in Eureka precinct, Jefferson 
county, where he follows both farming and carpentering, being a member 
of the firm of Shepstall Brothers, well known in business circles in this 
part of the state, his partner being Nathaniel Shepstall. 

George W. Shepstall was born in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, 
near the city of Meadville, on the 24th of July, 1863. His father Daniel 



8 4 o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Shepstall, now deceased, came to the west at an early period in the devel- 
opment of Nebraska and secured a homestead claim in Jefferson county, 
thus casting his lot amid its pioneer settlers. His son, George, was then 
but seven years of age, and upon the home farm he was reared. He be- 
came familiar with the work of developing a new tract of land and of car- 
rying forward the work of cultivation and improvement. He also 
learned the carpenter's trade, which he has followed for a number of 
years with excellent success. His life is characterized by unabating 
energy and unfaltering industry and as a representative of farming in- 
terests and also through his connection with building operations he has 
become widely and favorably known in this part of the state. In addi- 
tion to these interests, he and his brother Nathaniel, as partners, have 
for the past fifteen years conducted a steam threshing outfit, and are 
well known throughout the county for their energetic and successful 
prosecution of this enterprise. 

George W. Shepstall was married in 1886 to Miss Ollie Harrold, a 
native of Jefferson county and a daughter of John L. and Phoebe (Tur- 
ner) Harrold. Her father was a soldier in the Civil war, serving with 
an Indiana regiment. Her mother is now deceased. In their family 
were four children, Mrs. Shepstall, Laura, Calvin and George. To our 
subject and his wife have been born two interesting children, Cora and 
Dessie. George W. Shepstall and his family reside upon the old home- 
stead, and in addition to its cultivation he is working at his trade in a 
successful manner. He is well known in the community where his 
entire life has been spent, and where he has so directed his energies that 
he stands to-day among the progressive and prosperous young business 
men of Eureka precinct. 

Nathaniel I. Shepstall, who is associated with his elder brother, 
George W. Shepstall, in farming and carpentering, first opened his eyes 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 841 

to the light of day in Meadville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, on 
the 27th of September, 1865, and was a little lad of only five summers 
when brought by his parents to the west, so that in his childhood days 
he became familiar with the experiences of pioneer life. A public 
school afforded him his educational privileges. He studied during the 
winter months and in the summer seasons aided in the development of 
the home farm. He also learned the carpenter's trade with his brother, 
George W., and they have since been associated in their building opera- 
tions. He now has a good farm and when not engaged in the cultiva- 
tion of the fields he gives his attention and energies to carpentering, 
and he and his brother have gained an excellent reputation by reason of 
their skillful workmanship in that direction. He possesses considerable 
mechanical ingenuity and ability, and the firm has built many of the 
best houses in this part of Jefferson and Saline counties. 

N. I. Shepstall was united in marriage to Miss Flora Houck, an 
intelligent lady of good family, who was born in Illinois and reared and 
educated in Nebraska. She is a daughter of James Houck, who is 
mentioned on another page of this work. Their union has been blessed 
with four children : Lee, Ethel, Fay and Cecil. Mr. Shepstall is identi- 
fied with no political organization, but keeps well informed on the 
questions and issues of the day and casts his ballot in support of the 
candidates whom he thinks best qualified for the office. 



ALEXANDER SHEPHERD. 

Alexander Shepherd, who is serving as a member of the board of 
county commissioners of Jefferson county, to which position he was 
elected in 1902, is a representative citizen, active and influential in public 



842 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

affairs and prominent and successful in business life. He has resided in 
Jefferson county from boyhood, and has a wide acquaintance among the 
leading people of this part of the state. 

He was born on the 13th of August, 1863, in Miami county, Indiana, 
and is a representative of a family noted for industry, sobriety, morality 
and hospitality. The ancestry of the family can be traced back to Thomas 
Shepherd, the great-grandfather of our subject. His son, Jonathan 
Shepherd, the grandfather, was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Leath- 
erman, who was born in Ohio. They resided for many years in Indiana, 
and there Jonathan Shepherd passed away at the age of sixty years. His 
wife died in Saline county, Nebraska, when more than seventy years of 
age. They were consistent and faithful members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, and their influence was ever on the side of justice, right and 
truth. In their family were seven children, three sons and four daughters. 

Of this number John Shepherd, father of our subject, was born in 
Fountain county, Indiana, on the 14th of August, 1832. He was reared 
in the state of his nativity, and was there married when twenty-two years 
of age to Miss Rachel Keyes, who was born in Pickaway county, Ohio, a 
daughter of James and Elizabeth (McHenry) Keyes. Her father was 
born in Virginia and died in Indiana at the age of sixty-six years, while 
his wife passed away in the same state at the advanced age of eighty- 
nine years. They, too, held membership in the Methodist church, and in 
their family were three sons and four daughters. Mr. and Mrs. John 
Shepherd established their home in Indiana, where they continued to 
reside until 1870. In that year they emigrated westward to Kansas, 
and Mr. Shepherd secured a homestead claim in Endicott township, 
Jefferson county, Nebraska. He had previously espoused the Union 
cause, enlisting at Peru, Indiana, in 1865, and serving until the close of 
the war. In all matters of citizenship he has ever been loyal and progres- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 843 

sive, and has proved a valuable factor in the development and progress 
of southeastern Nebraska. Here he became closely identified with agri- 
cultural interests and continued to engage in farming until 1903, when 
he took up his abode in Fairbury, where he is now living. He gives his 
political allegiance to the Republican party and keeps well informed on 
the issues and questions of the day. He holds membership with the 
Grand Army post at Fairbury, and both he and his wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church there. They are worthy people, 
enjoying the warm regard of many friends, and all who know them 
entertain for them the highest respect. In their family are four sons : 
Albert, who is a section foreman on the Chicago, Rock Island & 
Pacific Railroad; William, who follows farming; Thaddeus, who is an 
engineer on the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad; and Alex- 
ander. 

In taking up the personal history of Alexander Shepherd we pre- 
sent to our readers the life record of one who has resided in Jefferson 
county from the days of his early infancy. He was reared on the 
old homestead farm where he early became familiar with all the duties 
and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist in the cultivation and 
development of the fields. His education was acquired in the district 
schools and at Mount Vernon, and his knowledge has also been broad- 
ened by practical experience. On starting out on his business career 
he sought a companion and helpmate for the journey of life, and at the 
age of twenty-three years was married to Miss Anna Campbell, an 
estimable lady who was born in Canada and was reared and educated in 
Jefferson county, Nebraska. She is a daughter of Donald Campbell, 
who was of Scotch ancestry and who became one of the earliest set- 
tlers of Jefferson county, securing a homestead claim here in 1867. 
He lived an upright, honorable life and died in Endicott precinct on the 



844 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

nth of December, 1888. Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd began their domestic 
life upon a farm, and he has since carried on agricultural pursuits, 
having a valuable tract of land of eighty acres which is well improved. 
There are a good house and substantial barns, and everything about 
the place is neat and tasteful in appearance, suggesting comfort and also 
indicating the careful supervision of the owner. His pastures contain 
good stock and his fields are annually returning excellent crops. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd has been blessed with three 
children : Madge, Roy and John. The household is celebrated for its 
hospitality, which is enjoyed by many friends. In his political views 
Mr. Shepherd is a Republican, zealous and earnest in his advocacy of 
the principles of the party. He has frequently served as a delegate to its 
conventions, where he has labored earnestly for his friends and to pro- 
mote the welfare and growth of the party. He was elected on the 
fusion ticket to the office of county commissioner by a majority of three 
hundred, which indicates his popularity in the county, where he has so 
long made his home. On the board he has proved a valuable member 
and his views of public questions are sound, his judgment reliable and his 
efforts have been effective in promoting the welfare of this community. 
He has done much to advance the interests of the poor farm, also for 
the building of good bridges and, in fact, has labored untiringly for the 
best interests of the county. He is a man of fine physique, weighing 
two hundred and twenty-five pounds, large and well proportioned. His 
manner is cordial, and he is found trustworthy in all relations, so that 
he has gained in high degree the good will and respect of his fellow 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. S45 

NEEDHAM BRYANT WHITFIELD. 

Needham Bryant Whitfield, a retired farmer of Peru, has lived 
in Nemaha county for thirty-five years, and is one of the oldest men 
in the county. He has had a successful and worthy career, has been 
industrious throughout his life, has been known among all men for 
his uprightness and integrity, and is honored and esteemed in all 
the relations of life. His long span of life gives him a personal ac- 
quaintance with the principal events of the last century, and he is 
familiar with all the crude fashions and mode of living prevalent in the 
early half of the last century as well as with the comforts and con- 
veniences of the progressive present. 

Mr. Whitfield was born in eastern Tennessee, June 20, 1822. His 
grandfather, William Whitfield, was born near Sheffield, England, and 
was a farmer and plantation owner in South Carolina. He owned num- 
erous slaves, and could ride for forty miles on his extensive cotton, 
sugar cane and rice fields. His wife was a Miss McKillen, also a native 
of England, and they reared seven children, four sons and three daugh- 
ters. 

Charles Whitfield, the father of Mr. Whitfield, was born in South 
Carolina in 1782, and died in Bureau county, Illinois, at the age of 
sixty-five. He settled in Tennessee, and from that state brought a 
colony of about thirty families, in 1824, to Marion county, Illinois, 
which was then considered the great west. He was married in Ten- 
nessee in 1800 to Miss Hester Whitfield, who was born in South Caro- 
lina in 1782. They had five children: Charles, a printer, died in Bu- 
reau county, Illinois, in 1848, aged thirty years, leaving no children; 
John, born in 1820, died in Illinois aged thirty-five, was a farmer and 
had one son and two daughters ; Needham B. is the third in the family ; 
Birthright Whitfield went across the plains to California in 1853 and 



846 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

while seeking gold died, at the age of twenty-five, and was buried 
there; Burton died in Illinois at the age of six years. The mother of 
these children died at Vandalia, Illinois, sixteen years before her hus- 
band. 

Mr. Whitfield enjoyed but very meager schooling in the primitive 
schools which it was his privilege to attend in the new state of Illinois, 
but managed to learn to read and write. He learned the cabinet-maker's 
trade at Vandalia, Illinois, and worked at it for three years. At the 
outbreak of the war with Mexico he left his position at forty dollars a 
month to accept that of a soldier with the government, and after a year 
re-enlisted, so that he was away for two years. He came home without 
money, and for some years worked at his trade. In 1868 he came to 
Nemaha county, Nebraska, and has since done well with his farming 
and fruit-raising. He had an eighty acre fruit farm near here, but 
has since given that to his sons, and has done well by all his children. 
He still owns and resides on his village farm of twenty acres, in the 
outskirts of Peru, and most of this is in orchard. It is a beautiful place, 
especially when nature has clothed it all in green, and affords a com- 
fortable and quiet retreat for his last years. 

Mr. Whitfield was married in Illinois in 1857 to Miss Margaret 
McKinney, who was born in Marion county, Illinois, July 13, 1828, 
a daughter of Jeremiah and Catherine (Resner) McKinney, farmers, 
who came to Nebraska and settled in Nemaha county in 1863. There 
were six sons and six daughters in the family, and two sons are living 
in Oklahoma and a sister of Mrs. Whitfield lives in Peru. Her father 
died in 1878. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Whitfield: 
William Miles lives in Peru and has eight children ; Henry is postmaster 
of Peru, and has one son and one daughter; Mrs. Hester Shriner, a 
widow, lives in Alliance, Nebraska, and has four children; Charles, the 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 847 

eldest of the children, died in Peru at the age of eighteen; and a son 
and a daughter died in infancy. Mr. Whitfield votes for the man and 
not for the party representative. He and his wife have been connected 
with the Methodist church for years. He has been an example and 
exponent of temperance all his life. For the past six years he has 
drawn a pension of twelve dollars a month for his services in the Mexi- 
can war, and is one of the very few surviving veterans of that war 
which added so much territory to the American Union. 



ALLEN COLMAN. 

Allen Colman is an honored veteran of the Civil war and one of the 
pioneer settlers of Nebraska, having come to this state in its territorial 
days, the year of his arrival being 1858. He was then a youth of twelve 
years, his birth having occurred in Noble county, Indiana, in 1846. 
His father, Hart well Colman, was born in New York near Rochester 
and was a son of Asa Colman, who was of English descent. The mother 
of our subject bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Engle and was born 
in Pennsylvania of an old Pennsylvania German family. In the year 
1858 Hartwell Colman came with his family to Nebraska and spent 
his remaining days in this state, his death occurring in Cass county. 
To him and his wife were born eleven children, six sons and five daugh- 
ters, of whom ten are now living. Five of the sons were soldiers of the 
Civil war, namely: Adam D., who is now a jeweler of Diller, Nebras- 
ka; Asa, who was a member of a Nebraska regiment; Allen; Andrew, 
who is now in the Black Hills of Dakota; and Arthur. One of the 
daughters of the family resides at Seward, and Mrs. Powell, another 
daughter, is living in Diller, this state. The father devoted his entire 



848 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

life to agricultural pursuits and thus provided for his family. He gave 
his political allegiance to the Whig party until its dissolution, and then 
joined the ranks of the new Republican party, with which he was identi- 
fied up to the time of his death, which occurred when he was sixty- 
five years of age. 

When Allen Colman was a child of only four years he was taken 
by his parents from Indiana to Jones county, Iowa, where they resided 
from 1850 until 1858. In that year they came to the territory of Ne- 
braska, and he was thus reared in this state when it was a frontier dis- 
trict. The Indians were numerous in Iowa during the period of his 
residence there, and he early became familiar with pioneer conditions. 
He acquired his education in an old log schoolhouse, which was fur- 
nished after the primitive manner of the times, and in his youth he be- 
came familiar with farm work. During the period of the Civil war he 
went to Colorado, in 1863. At that time there was a government camp 
at Denver made with log cabins. He enlisted there in response to the 
country's call for aid, becoming a member of Company H of the First 
Colorado Cavalry, under Lieutenant Cramer, Captain Sanburn and 
Colonel Shavington, the last named being a minister of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mr. Colman served for two years fighting the Indians 
in the far west, and in one engagement the red men lost eight hundred 
of their number. He participated in a number of battles and skirmishes 
and did much valuable service in protecting frontier settlers, thus sav- 
ing many lives which would have been sacrificed to the treachery of the 
red men. Later with his command he rode from Colorado to Fort 
Lyon at Council Grove, Kansas, afterward to Fort Reilly and subse- 
quently to Fort Dodge. He received an honorable discharge in 1865 
and returned to his home with a good military record. 

Mr. Colman made his way to Cass county, Nebraska, where he 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 849 

resided for many years. In 1866, however, he made an overland trip 
to Denver with an ox team, taking a load of freight. He continued to 
reside in Cass county, however, until 1900, and was for many years 
engaged in merchandising there. He then came to Jefferson county 
and settled upon his present farm near the postoffice of Diller. Here 
he is devoting his energies to agricultural pursuits Throughout his 
entire business career he has maintained a reputation for reliability and 
straightforward dealing that is indeed enviable and commendable. 

In 1878 Mr. Colman was married to Miss Nancy J. Swindle, a 
native of Missouri and a daughter of John Swindle. The children of 
this marriage are Sarah, Roscoe, Daisy, Maria, Andrew and Allen. 
The parents are members of the Christian church, and Mr. Colman 
gives his political support to the Republican party, being an earnest ad- 
vocate of its principles. He is a man fearless in defense of his honest 
convictions and ever true to any cause which he espouses. 



JOSEPH E. ROE. 

Joseph E. Roe, who is living in Cub Creek township, has made his 
home in Jefferson county since 1871 and has therefore been a witness of 
much of its development and upbuilding. He was born in Virgil, Court- 
land county, New York, on the 28th of October, 1844, a representative 
of one of the old families of that portion of the country, distinguished 
for loyalty in citizenship and for honor in business life. His paternal 
grandfather, Ira Roe, was one of the defenders of the American liber- 
ties in the Revolutionary' war. The father, Erastus G. Roe, was born 
in New York, and was a cousin of the well known author, E. P. Roe. 
After arriving at years of maturity he married Miss Catherine Morse, 



850 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

who was born in Cortland county, New York, and in 1846 they emi- 
grated westward to Illinois, settling in Fulton county among the early 
residents who took up their abode in the vicinity of Virgil. The father 
died at Avon, Illinois, when seventy-nine years of age, and the mother 
passed away at the age of seventy-six years. They were the parents of 
but two children, the daughter being Elizabeth Chatterton. who is now 
living at Avon, Illinois. 

Joseph E. Roe was only about two years of age at the time of his 
parents' removal from the Empire state to Illinois, where he was reared 
upon the home farm, working in the fields and meadows, when not oc- 
cupied with the duties of the schoolroom. He has followed agricultural 
pursuits throughout his entire life, continuing in that business in Illinois 
until 1 87 1, when he came to Nebraska and purchased a deed to land. 
Here he has since resided and is devoting his time and energies to agri- 
cultural pursuits in Cub Creek township. Many difficulties and dis- 
couragements had to be faced and overcome. Great blizzards occurred 
during the winter months, and the hot winds of summer proved very 
detrimental to the crops. Grasshoppers, too, came down upon the 
country in great swarms and for several seasons entirely destroyed the 
fields of grain, but Mr. Roe persevered, making the most of his oppor- 
tunities and to-day he is the owner of a rich and arable farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres. He has considerable land planted to alfalfa, 
and he also raises many kinds of grain adapted to soil and climate. 
He now has a large barn thirty by forty feet, and a pleasant home 
which was erected at a cost of three thousand dollars. It is located five 
and a half miles northeast of Jansen in a good neighborhood, and alto- 
gether the farm is regarded as one of the best in the locality. 

At the time of the Civil war Mr. Roe manifested his loyalty to the 
Union cause by enlisting at Avon, Illinois, in August, 1862, as a mem- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 851 

ber of Company I, Seventy-second Illinois Infantry. He became a 
member of the Chicago Board of Trade Regiment, which made a most 
creditable record in the Civil war. He was under Captain Harvey, who 
was the gfandson of an old Methodist circuit rider of Illinois in pioneer 
times, Richard Harvey. The colonel was F. A. Staring, of Wheaton, 
Illinois, who was succeeded by Colonel Wright, who had formerly been 
lieutenant-colonel. The regiment was ordered to Cairo, Illinois, and 
after two weeks went to Paducah, Kentucky, later proceeding to Colum- 
bus, Kentucky, and on to Moscow, Tennessee. Mr. Roe was in the en- 
gagements at LaGrange. Tennessee, and Holly Springs, Mississippi, 
was at Yazoo Pass, subsequently proceeded to Helena, Arkansas, on 
transports, and returned later to Miliikin's Bend, and participated in the 
siege of Vicksburg under General Grant, aiding in the capture of 
that important point; also saw service in the commissary department 
for a time and in the provost department. Subsequently he returned 
to Vicksburg and joined General Thomas' troops at Nashville, Tennes- 
see. He went to Columbia, Tennessee, to meet General Hood's forces 
and was in the battle of Franklin, one of the most hotly contested engage- 
ments of the Civil war. He was also at the siege of Nashville for eigh- 
teen days and was later in tbe hospital there. He came to know the 
full meaning of war with all of its hardships and sorrows, but he never 
faltered in the performance of any duty and was ever most loyal to the 
starry banner of the nation. At length he received an honorable dis- 
charge on the 4th of July, 1865, and returned to his home. The country 
owes a debt of gratitude to the Union soldiers that can never be repaid 
and their memories will be honored as long as this nation endures. 

Mr. Roe was married in 1869 to Miss Almira M. Edon, who was 
born in Pike county, Illinois, and was reared and educated in that state. 
Her parents, John and Emeline Edon, were natives of England and both 



852 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

died in Illinois. Two years after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Roe 
came by team and wagon to Jefferson county, and their first home here 
was a sod house eighteen by twenty-four feet. They have one son, 
Arthur C. Roe, who assists in the operation of the home farm. They 
also lost a daughter, Minnie, who died at the age of thirty years. She 
had been a successful and popular music teacher, and she was greatly 
loved for her many good qualities of heart and mind, for she possessed 
a loving disposition and her life was characterized by many kindly acts. 
Mr. Roe is a Republican in his political views, and socially he is 
connected with the Knights of Pythias fraternity. In 1895 he made a 
trip to California, but soon afterward returned to Jefferson county and 
has remained continuously in this part of the state, his residence here 
covering over a quarter of a century. He stands to-day as a respected 
and honored citizen of the community, for at all times he has been an 
advocate of its best interests and as a citizen he is as true and loyal 
to his country to-day as when he followed the old flag on southern 
battlefields. It is his present intention to soon leave Nebraska to settle 
somewhere upon the Pacific coast. 



EBENEZER MOSES. 

Ebenezer Moses, a retired farmer of Beatrice, Nebraska, and a 
veteran of the Civil war, was born near Richmond, Union county, 
Ohio, March 30, 1842, and he is a son of Joseph Moses, born in Ver- 
mont, where he married Jane Boyce, of Scotch parentage. Both par- 
ents are now deceased, the father at the age of seventy-three years and 
the mother in 1878 at the age of seventy-two years. In religious faith 
he was a Methodist. He had six children, five of whom grew up : Enoch 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 853 

R. was in an Illinois regiment; Samuel, deceased; Ebenezer; John B. ; 
and Thomas C. 

Ebenezer was reared upon the old farm and was but a boy when 
the war broke out, but he enlisted in May, 1863, in Company B, One 
Hundred and Thirty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Colonel Ewing 
and Captain Hiram Trimton commanding, and participated in the bat- 
tle of Seven Pines and did considerable railroad guard duty in Macon, 
Georgia. He re-enlisted January 29, 1865, in the One Hundred and 
Eighty-seventh Ohio Infantry, in Company B, and was discharged in Jan- 
uary, 1866. He returned to Mercer county, Ohio, and remained for a time, 
and while there was married, February 27, 1868, to Mrs. Mahala (Hoo- 
ver) Crowder, a widow of an ex-soldier and a daughter of Jacob and Han- 
nah Hoover. Mr. Moses removed to Nebraska and took up a homestead, 
farming it successfully. In 1887 he lost his wife, after she had borne 
him six children, namely : Mary Leach ; Cyrus E. ; Laura Leach ; and 
Emory, and two deceased. In 1889 Mr. Moses married Mrs. Julia 
(Harpster) Sluch, who was born at Flat Rock, Ohio, being a daughter 
of Thomas Harpster. The Harpster family came to St. Joe by railroad 
in 1859, from thence by boat to Falls City, Nebraska, and became very 
prominent people of the state. Mr. and Mrs. Moses have a daughter, 
Millie, nine years of age. Mr. Moses is a prominent member of the 
Rawlins Post No. 35, and his wife belongs to the Women's Relief Corps, 
and both are very well and favorably known throughout the entire com- 
munity. 



854 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

EDWARD M. BOYD. 

Edward M. Boyd, cashier of die Carson National Bank, and Robert 
C. Boyd, assistant cashier of the same bank, are prominent factors in 
the business and social life of Auburn, Nebraska. 

Edward M. Boyd was born in Upton, Franklin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, May 4, 1857, son of Robert James Boyd, a resident of Upton, 
whose birth occurred near that place January 4, 1835. Pennsylvania was 
also the native state of grandfather Boyd, who was a blacksmith by 
trade, and whose wife, Catherine Catron, was a native of the north of 
Ireland; she was born in 1802, and died in Emmetsburg, Maryland, 
April 7, 1895, at the age of ninety-three years. Her mother died in 
Mercersburg. Pennsylvania, at the age of ninety-seven years, and her 
grandmother lived to the advanced age of one hundred and three years 
and died in Ireland. It was about the year 1814 that the Catrons emi- 
grated to this country, landing here after a voyage of seven weeks. 
They were protestants. 

Robert James Boyd was one of a family of three children, two 
sons and a daughter. His brother, Thomas A. Boyd, was a college 
man, a veteran of the Civil war, and a prominent citizen of Fulton 
county, Illinois, which he represented in the state senate. Also he 
served as county judge and as a member of the United States Congress. 
He was noted as an orator, and both physically and mentally he was a 
fine specimen of manhood. While delivering one of his masterly and 
patriotic speechs, suddenly his voice faltered and to the astonishment 
of his audience, with tears in his eyes and rolling down his cheeks, 
he silently left the room. He lived eight years longer but he never re- 
covered his speech. Robert James Boyd made his own way in the 
world, became a merchant and banker of Greencastle, Pennsylvania, 
and won financial success. For years he was and yet is president of 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 855 

the First National Bank of Greencastle. During the Civil war he ren- 
dered valued service as a soldier in the Union ranks. 

The mother of our subject was Susan C. White, a native of Fulton 
county, Pennsylvania. Her father was a skilled physician who volun- 
teered his services during an epidemic in the far south, to which place 
he went and where he evidently met his death while trying to alleviate 
the sufferings of his fellows; he was never afterward heard from. 

Robert James Boyd and Susan C. White were married in May, 
[856, and of their eight children Edward M. was the first born. The 
others in order of birth are as follows: Mary Jane, wife of William J. 
Zacharias, an attorney of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, by whom she 
had six sons and one daughter, all now living; Kate Elizabeth, deceased 
wife of Thomas H. Gillan, passed away in the prime of life, leaving 
two daughters; a son that died in infancy; a daughter that died in in- 
fancy; Robert C, further mention of whom will be found in this work; 
John, who is in railroad employ at Hagerstown, Maryland; and Estella 
W. Angle, of Welshrun, Pennsylvania. The mother of this family 
died August 20, 1877, at tne a 8' e 0I sixty-two years. 

Edward M. Boyd was educated in Mercersburg College, wdiere he 
graduated with the class of 1879. He prepared himself for the practice 
of law- and was admitted to the bar of Franklin county, Pennsylvania. 
In the early spring of 1882 he came to Auburn, Nebraska, and that year 
received admission to the bar here. He soon identified himself, as 
manager, with the bank with which he is now connected, and has been 
cashier of this bank ever since, with the exception of one year after the 
Brownville bank was brought here, when Captain Davison filled the 
position. The Carson National Bank was established by John L. Car- 
son, as a private bank, in 1857, and soon became the First National 
Bank at Brownville, Nebraska. In August, 1882, the bank at Auburn 



856 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

was opened as a branch, by the same company, under the name of John 
L. Carson & Company. In 1887 it was reorganized as a national bank. 

Edward M. Boyd was married October 27, 1891, to Anna Dye, 
daughter of James R. Dye, a native of New York state who came to 
Nebraska as one of the pioneer settlers of this state. Mr. Dye is now 
a resident of San Diego, California. Mr. and Mrs. Boyd have three 
children, namely: Robert James, bo'rn in October, 1892; Edward Dye, 
born in January, 1894; and Carson Boyd, born April 29, 1904. 

Mr. Boyd is a thirty-second degree Mason and has been officially 
honored by his Masonic brothers. He is a past master, past high priest 
and past commander. Also he is identified with the B. P. O. E., the 
A. O. U. W. and I. O. O. F. He and his wife are among the leading 
members of the Episcopal church, in which he was for several years 
the reader. Mrs. Boyd, in addition to her other accomplishments, is 
musical. Their pleasant home is one of the pretty cottages of Auburn, 
and is located on the corner of Major and High streets. 



GEORGE DARNELL. 



George Darnell, of Beatrice, is another of the brave veterans of the 
Civil war who command our respect and admiration. He enlisted at 
Galesburg, Knox county, Illinois, in August, 1862, and after serving 
three months enlisted again in Company G, Eighty-third Illinois Vol- 
unteer Infantry, but later was transferred to the Sixty-first Illinois Vol- 
unteer Infantry. The regiment was sent to participate in the battles of 
Fort Henry and Donelson, Shiloh, Lookout Mountain, Corinth and 
Fredericksburg. He received a slight wound on the left hand near 
Fort Henry, but this did not incapacitate him and he served until his 
honorable discharge February 28, 1865. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 857 

George Darnell was born in Knox county, Illinois, February 24, 
1846, a son of W. M. and Priscilla (Thurman) Darnell, tbe former 
of whom was born in the Highlands of Scotland and the latter in Ire- 
land of Scotch-Irish and Welsh ancestors. These two parents died 
in Illinois in 1863 within two weeks of each other, the father aged 
sixty-three and the mother aged fifty-eight years. They had thirteen 
children, six of whom served as soldiers in the war, namely : Joseph, 
William, Sumner, James, Allen, George; all served bravely and returned 
to their homes. 

George Darnell was born in Illinois and received an excellent edu- 
cation in the public schools, but early began work in coal mining and 
later on the railroad. In 1880 he moved to Nebraska, settling first in 
Jefferson county and then in Gage county, Nebraska; also lived a time 
in Washington county, Kansas. He was married in Iowa to Miss 
Celestia Davis, who is a daughter of William Davis, born in Illinois 
and died at the age of forty-two, while the mother died in Kansas at the 
age of sixty-seven. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Darnell are as 
follows: Marinda; Joseph B. and Bonnie are twins; Nettie; Benjamin 
Harrison; Alfred McKinley. Mr. Darnell is very prominent in G. A. 
R. work, is a good Christian man and a worthy citizen of the flourish- 
ing town of Beatrice. 



JOSEPH W. GRIMES. 

Joseph W. Grimes, one of the veteran residents of Beatrice, Ne- 
braska, came to this city in 1870 and has resided here for thirty-three 
years. He was born in Meigs county, Ohio, February 23, 1849. He 
is a son of Edward H. Grimes, of Wilkesville, Ohio, a government 



858 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

soldier in the Civil war who was wounded in the battle of Missionary 
Ridge, but lived until December, 1868. He was a member of General 
George Crook's old regiment, which had a record second to none. One 
of his sons, John S. Grimes, was killed at Missionary Ridge when he was 
only sixteen years of age, and another son, Andrew J. Grimes was a 
member of the First Ohio Light Artillery, enlisting when only fifteen 
years of age. The father was very prominent in politics in Ohio for 
years, and held offices of trust and honor in the community in which 
he lived. Joseph W. Grimes also had a war record of which he may well 
be proud. The other members of the family were John S., ex-soldier, 
now deceased': Andrew ]., an ex-soldier, of Columbus. Ohio; Emily 
is now deceased ; Jehial, now deceased ; Royal E. ; James ; Edward E. ; 
George, deceased ; and Elizabeth. The mother died in Ohio and was a wom- 
an loved by all who knew her. Joseph A". Grimes was reared on a farm 
until he was thirteen years old, when he enlisted on August 12, 1862, 
in the Second A'est Virginia Cavalry, and served until June 27, 1865, 
when he was honorably discharged, and was then only sixteen years of 
age. His war record shows that he served under some of the great 
generals of the war, including General Custer, and participated in some 
of the most daring and hard-fought battles of the war, including An- 
tietam, Gettysburg, the campaign of the Shenandoah valley, the siege 
of Petersburg and many others. After the war was over Mr. Grimes 
returned to Ohio, and in 1867 located at Alexandria, Missouri, but in 
1870 he emigrated to Gage county, Nebraska, and opened a store in 
Beatrice. At that time the place was little more than a trading post, 
and buffalo hunts were exceedingly common. Mr. Grimes always took 
a great deal of interest in all kinds of sports and became a very expert 
hunter. 

In 1878 he was married in Beatrice to Anna Holt, a native of Eng- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 859 

land and a daughter of Eli Holt, who located in Beatrice in 1870, he 
having been a soldier in the Crimean war. Three children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Grimes, namely: Almira, wife of Charles D. Roseberry, 
of Omaha ; Albert C, of Beatrice ; and Edna C. In politics Mr. Grimes 
is a stanch Republican, and for some time acted as constable, proving 
himself an efficient and popular official. He is a member of the G. A. R. 
Post No. 30 and the Knights of Pythias. Mrs. Grimes is a member 
of the Episcopal church; both Mr. and Mrs. Grimes are very highly 
respected in Beatrice and they have many friends not only in the city 
itself, but in the surrounding community where they have made their 
home for so many years. 



W . H . PHILLIPS. 

W. H. Phillips, general blacksmith and wagon manufacturer, of 
Filley, Gage count}', Nebraska, is one of the reliable business men and 
veterans of that locality. Mr. Phillips enlisted at Freeport, Illinois, in 
1862, in Company E, Forty-sixth Illinois' Volunteer Infantry, for the 
period of three years. Colonel John A. Davis commanding. Among the 
battles in which our subject participated may be named those of Shiloh. 
Corinth, where Colonel Davis was killed, battle of Holly Springs, three 
skirmishes in Mississippi and Tennessee as well as several small battles, 
then he was present at the siege of Vicksburg. at which he showed loyalty 
and valor. Rejoining his regiment he was sent to Memphis and from 
there by boat to New Orleans, and was stationed in Dauphin Island; was 
at Blakely and Spanish Fort, after which he was returned to New Orleans, 
then on the Red River expedition, and back to Shreveport, Louisiana. 
The next order was to Marshall, Texas, and from there they were 



860 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

ordered to Illinois and were honorably discharged at Camp Butler, July 
12, 1866. 

W. H. Phillips was born in Stephenson county, Illinois, nine miles 
north of Freeport, October 8, 1840, and he is the son of Christopher 
Phillips, one of the early settlers who came to that locality in 1839, 
having been born in England and emigrated to America when a young 
man. After coming to the United States Christopher Phillips married 
Amanda Snyder, born in Ohio and who died in 1858. Six children 
were born to this marriage, three sons and three daughters. Our sub- 
ject grew up on the farm and attended the common schools of his 
neighborhood, and at the same time learned the trade of blacksmith 
and carriage manufacturing. After serving an apprenticeship, he be- 
came a journeyman workman in iron. The marriage of Mr. Phillips 
took place in Trenton, Missouri, to a Miss Roland, who was born in 
Lee county, Virginia, of an old Virginia family. Three sons were born 
to them, namely: Omer, who works in the machine shops of Beatrice; 
Roy and L. E. In 1872 Mr. Phillips came to Lancaster county, Ne- 
braska. At Fort Worth, Texas, he worked at his trade for eleven years. 
Later he decided that Beatrice was better adapted to the purposes of his 
business and made his home in that city. Fraternally he is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of the Masonic lodge, and 
is very popular in the above organizations. Politically he is a Democrat, 
but has never taken an active part in affairs. Mr. Phillips' reminiscences 
of the war are exceedingly entertaining and are worthy of publication, 
for they give a true and unbiased account of the saddening events of 
those days from one who assisted in preserving the Union and adding 
to its glory. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 86 1 

LEWIS CALEY. 

Lewis Caley, a prominent stock dealer and successful business 
man of Filley, Gage county, Nebraska, has resided in this locality since 
1881. He is a distinguished veteran of the Civil war, having enlisted 
at Platteville, Grant county, Wisconsin, in August, 1864, when only six- 
teen years of age in Company B, Forty-third Wisconsin Volunteer In- 
fantry, Colonel Amos Cobb (later judge of the supreme court of Ne- 
braska) and Captain Shaw commanding. The regiment saw active 
service in Kentucky and Tennessee, and after the battle of Nashville they 
were ordered to guard the railroads and to maintain law and order in 
Tennessee, Mississippi and Alabama. Mr. Caley served until the close 
of the war and was honorably discharged, having made a record of which 
• both himself and his family may well be proud. 

Lewis Caley was born in Grant county, Wisconsin, July 12, 1848. 
He is a son of Samuel Caley, who was born in Pennsylvania and was 
there reared to manhood, and married Catherine Boussman, who was 
born and reared in Pennsylvania and came of Dutch stock. The father 
came to Grant county, Wisconsin, in 1842. He worked in the lead mines 
at Galena, Illinois, and later at Potosi, Wisconsin, where there were 
also lead mines. Both parents d ; ed in Nebraska, the father at the age 
of seventy-five years. In early life the father was a miner, but spent his 
declining years as a farmer. In politics he was a Republican, and his 
religious affiliations were with the Methodist church. Twelve children 
were born to these parents. The father also served in the Civil war in 
the Thirty-ninth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and a son Samuel served 
in the Second Wisconsin Cavalry, and after he received his honorable 
discharge re-enlisted in the Forty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. 

Our subject grew to manhood in Grant county, Wisconsin, and 
learned to be a successful farmer on his father's property. On return- 



862 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

ing home to Wisconsin after his war experience he resumed farming 
and thus continued until 1870, in which year he was married to Amelia 
J. Walker. She was born in Erie county. New York, near Buffalo, and 
is a daughter of Andrew Walker of that county, who was born in Ver- 
mont, and his wife Louise (Holly) Walker, a native of New York. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walker moved to Grant county, and both are now de- 
ceased. In politics he was a Democrat and became quite prominent in 
local affairs. Five sons and four daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Walker. In 1878 our subject removed to Decatur county, Kansas, and 
took up a homestead, where he resided for four years, and then in 1881 
located in Gage county, Nebraska, where he has since resided. He is a 
man who stands exceedingly high in the estimation of his fellow towns- 
men. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Caley: Earl, who died 
at nine years; Luke, who died at six years; Roy, deceased at age of 
three: Andrew J., deceased in infancy; and Rose, the only survivor, a 
young lady at home. 



J. O. JEFFREY. 

T. O. Jeffrey, of Wymore, Nebraska, a prominent dealer in coal 
and wood, has resided in this community since 1888, when he came 
from Marshall county, Kansas. His birth took place near Connersville, 
Fayette county, Indiana, April 16, 1846, and he is a son of Lewis John- 
son Jeffrey. 

The early life of Mr. Jeffrey was spent upon his father's farm 
and his education secured in the public schools. When he was twenty- 
five years of age he married Rose Penton, who was born in Ohio and 
reared and educated in Iowa, being a daughter of 'John Henry Penton 
of Ohio, who now resides in Taylor county, Iowa. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 863 

In 1883 Mr. Jeffrey moved to Maryville. Marshall county, Kansas, 
but in 1888 decided to remove to Wymore, and has since made that city 
his home, becoming one of its most worthy citizens. Among other 
things he bought and remodeled the Hotel Jeffrey, which is now one of 
the best hotels in the county, and this he leases to other parties. He has 
also erected a pleasant residence for himself and family, of seven rooms 
fully supplied with all modern appliances and furnished in a manner 
which reflects credit upon his taste and that of his wife. Four children 
have been born to tbis happy couple, namely: Mrs. Alice Stevens, of 
Wymore; Charles, of Wymore; Forest and Fenn, twins. By pursuing 
honorable methods in his business dealings, Mr. Jeffrey has built up a 
large and flourishing trade, and is one of the leading coal and wood 
dealers of the city. In politics he has always taken an active part, sup- 
porting the principles of the Democratic party, and served for two years 
on the city council and for seven years on the school board. He and 
his family are all connected with the Methodist churcb, and they are 
justly regarded as very important factors in the social life of Wymore. 



JOHN M. TOUT. 

John M. Tout, one of the leading residents of Wymore, Gage 
county, Nebraska, is a veteran of the Civil war. and began his career 
as a soldier in 1861, when he enlisted at East Germantown, Wayne 
county, Indiana, in Company D, Eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
under Colonel Benton. He served bravely for three years, and was 
honorably discharged. 

Our subject was born August n, 1840, near Richmond, Wayne 
county, Indiana, and he is a son of Joseph Tout and a grandson of 



864 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

John Tout, both of Pennsylvania. The maiden name of the mother of 
our subject was Fanny Echternich, and she was born in Pennsylvania 
of Irish parents but died in Indiana. In politics the father was a 
Democrat, while in religion both he and his wife were Protestants. 
They had fourteen children in the family, four being soldiers : Joseph, in 
an Indiana regiment; John M. ; V. K. ; and Robert. 

The early life of our subject was spent in Indiana, where he learned 
the trade of carpenter. From Indiana he went to Lee county, Iowa, 
and thence to Lincoln, Nebraska, and took up a homestead ten miles 
southeast of that city, where he lived five years, and then sold his 
property and located in Gage county on Elm creek, but later removed 
to Wymore, where he engaged in contracting and building. Still later 
he became postmaster of Wymore and conducted a general store in 
conjunction, discharging the duties of his office with credit to himself 
and to the satisfaction of all. 

Mr. Tout was married in Nebraska City, Nebraska, in 1868, to Mary 
C. Muzzy, who was born in Indiana, a daughter of James Muzzy, de- 
ceased. The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tout is Mrs. Maud Pratt of 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Mr. Tout is a member of Coleman Post 
No. 115 of Wymore, in which he takes an active part. In politics he 
is a Democrat and an important factor in local affairs. He and his wife 
reside in their beautiful home and dispense a gracious hospitality to 
a large circle of friends. 



WILLIAM WESTON. 

One of the leading agriculturists of Riverside township, Gage 
county, Nebraska, is William Weston, who makes a specialty of water- 
melons and produces some of the finest raised in this state. Like many 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 865 

men who have become prominently identified with western affairs, he is 
a native of Ohio, born in Morgan county, June 24, 1839, and is a son 
of Jeremiah and Matilda (Andrews) Weston. His father was born 
in Maine of early New England ancestry, the family having been found- 
ed in this country in 1632, and it has been well represented in all of 
our wars commencing with the Revolution. Our subject's paternal 
grandfather, and his maternal grandfather, Augustus Andrews, were 
both soldiers of the war of 181 2, the latter holding a captain's com- 
mission. To Jeremiah and Matilda Weston were born the following 
children : Matilda, Lois, Charles, George, John, Mary J., Amzi, Wil- 
liam and Robert. The father of this family, who was a farmer by oc- 
cupation and a Whig in politics, died at the age of seventy years, and his 
wife, who long survived him, passed away at the advanced age of 
ninety-two years. She was an earnest member of the Presbyterian 
church. 

On the old home farm in Morgan county, Ohio, William Weston 
spent his boyhood days much like other farmer boys of his time, but 
at the age of sixteen he commenced learning the blacksmith's trade, 
which he followed for three years, and then resumed farming. 
Prompted by a spirit of patriotism, he enlisted in Morgan county, 
Ohio, May 2, 1864, in Company B One Hundred and Sixty-first Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, under the command of Captain Fulton and Colonel 
Taylor. He remained in the service until the close of the war, taking 
part in the Lynchburg raid in Virginia and in other raids and skirm- 
ishes. General Hunter commanded the regiment a part of the time. 
When the term of his enlistment had expired Mr. Weston was discharged 
on the 2d of September, 1864. and returned home. 

Previous to entering the army he had been married in 1862 to 
Miss Lucy Sawyer, who was also born, reared and educated in Ohio, 



866 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

a daughter of David and Diadama Sawyer. She had one brother, 
David Sawyer, Jr., who was a soldier of the Civil war, being a mem- 
ber of the Ninth Virginia Cavalry. Mr. and Mrs. Weston have be- 
come the parents of nine children, namely : Mrs. Florence Adams, now 
a resident of Missouri ; Mrs. Nevada Stonebaugh, of Whiting, Kansas ; 
Dell, deceased; Jeremiah, a resident of Wyoming; Robert, a ranch- 
man at Casper, Wyoming; William, deceased; Lincoln S, an engineer 
now residing in the state of Washington; Irene; and Ray. 

In 1869 Mr. Weston removed to Henry county, Illinois, and sub- 
sequently resided in Stark county, that state, for a time. Later he 
was for three years a resident of Washington county, Kansas, and in 
1886 came to Gage county, Nebraska, purchasing a farm in the Blue 
river valley. He has become widely known as the champion watermelon 
raiser of southeastern Nebraska, and no better melons are to be found 
anywhere than those produced on the West Valley Melon Farm, as 
the place is now called. Mr. Weston is a man of progressive ideas and 
keeps well posted on the leading questions and issues of the day. By 
his ballot he supports the men and measures of the Republican party, 
and he never withholds his aid from any enterprise which he believes 
will prove of public benefit. 



WILSON S. LILLY. 

Wilson S. Lilly, who is now successfully engaged in farming and 
stock-raising in Sherman township, has been a resident of Gage county 
for almost a quarter of a century, and has therefore witnessed much of 
its growth and development, at the same time bearing his part in the 
work of improvement. His early home was in Ohio, for he was born 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 867 

near Columbus, Franklin county, that state, January 3, 1842, his parents 
being Samuel and Mary (Coffman) Lilly, who were natives of Penn- 
sylvania and of German descent. They were early settlers of Ohio, 
where the mother died when our subject was only four years old, and 
the father subsequently removed to Michigan, where he passed away at 
the ripe old age of eighty-eight years. He was an expert carpenter and 
fine mechanic, being one of the best workmen in Branch county, Mich- 
igan. He was a member of the Methodist church and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and was a supporter of the Republican party. 
He was always true to his convictions of right and was honored and 
respected by all who knew him. Our subject had two brothers, Henry 
and Samuel A. Lilly, who were also soldiers of the Civil war, the for- 
mer having been a member of a Michigan cavalry regiment and the 
latter of an Ohio regiment. Henry is still living in Branch county, 
Michigan. 

During his boyhood Wilson S. Lilly accompanied his father on his 
removal to Branch county, Michigan, where he commenced work at an 
early age, so that his education has been mainly acquired in the school 
of experience. He was numbered among the boys in blue who so gal- 
lantly fought for the old flag and the cause it represented in the war of 
the rebellion, enlisting at Coldwater, Branch county, in August, 1862, 
at President Lincoln's call for sixty thousand more troops. As 
a member of Company H, Nineteenth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, 
he was under the command of Captain G. H. White and Colonel H. C. 
Gilbert, who was killed in Georgia on the march to Atlanta. He was 
also under Major Shaffer, who as a general took a very prominent 
part in the Spanish-American war in Cuba. Mr. Lilly participated 
in the battles of Murfreesboro, Spring Hill and Franklin, Tennessee. 
He was captured and incarcerated in Libby prison for thirty days, after 



868 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

which he was granted a furlough of thirty days which he spent at home. 
He rejoined his command at Nashville, and went with Sherman on 
the march to the sea, participating in the battles of Resaca, New Hope 
Church, Rome and Lookout Mountain. He assisted in the capture of 
Atlanta on the 22A of July, 1864, where General McPherson was 
killed, and then proceeded with Sherman up through the Carolinas. 
He was in the battle of Goldsboro and then marched on to Raleigh, 
where he was when General Johnston surrendered, and then on through 
Richmond to Washington, D. C, participating in the grand review in 
that city. As the war was over he was then honorably discharged at 
Detroit, Michigan, in July, 1865. 

Returning home Mr. Lilly engaged in farming in Branch county 
for five or six years, and was there married in 1868 to Miss Eunice 
W. Tripp, who was born in New York and spent her girlhood in that 
state and in Michigan. Her parents were natives of the Empire state, 
and in their family were two sons, William and Edward Tripp, who were 
members of a Michigan regiment in the Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lilly have eight children, namely: Mary, Harvey, Nelson, Frances, 
Jane, Myrtle, Louie and Lester McKirby. 

In 1870 Mr. Lilly came to Nebraska and took up a homestead in 
Franklin county, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, to the 
improvement and cultivation of which he devoted his energies for nine 
years. He then came to Gage county and bought a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Sherman township, on which he has since made 
many good and substantial improvements. In connection with general 
farming he gives considerable attention to the raising of stock, making 
a specialty of Black Hawk Morgan horses, which he considers one of 
the best breeds for general purposes. He is a thrifty, enterprising farmer 
and has met with well merited success in his operations. His right 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 869 

of franchise is exercised in support of the men and measures of the 
Republican party, and he is an honored member of Rawlins Post, G. A. 
R., of Beatrice, Nebraska. His home is noted for its hospitality and 
good cheer and he has a host of warm friends throughout his adopted 
county. 



ADAM McMULLEN. 

Adam McMullen, of Wymore, Nebraska, is one of the younger 
members of the Gage county bar, but his prominence is by no means 
measured by his years ; on the contrary he was won a reputation which 
many an older practitioner might well envy. Prominence in his pro- 
fession comes through merit alone and the high position he has attained 
attests his superiority. 

Mr. McMullen is a native of Allegany county. New York, and 
a son of John H. and Mary (Harbouse) McMullen, both of whom 
were natives of Scotland, the former born near Edinburg and the latter 
at Glasgow. The McMullens were highlanders and were a prominent 
old family. The parents of our subject were reared, educated and 
married in their native land and on coming to this country located in 
Allegany county, New York. In their family were six sons and three 
daughters. 

The early life of Adam McMullen was spent in the east and he 
was provided with good educational advantages. At the age of twenty 
years he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and entered the State 
University, where he was graduated in the class of 1896. Later he 
attended law school at Washington, D. C., completing the course there 
in 1899. Previous to this time he had accepted the position of secretary 
to Senator Dietrich, of Nebraska, and in that capacity spent six years 



870 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

in the capital city. He was admitted to the bar in 1901, and is now 
successfully engaged in the practice of his chosen profession at Wymore. 
He is thoroughly versed in the law, is a close student, a logical reasoner 
and has a ready command of English. He also has a good presence and 
a clear voice, which makes him popular as an orator, and he is often 
called upon to deliver public addresses. He is a thirty-second-degree 
Mason, belonging to Albert Pike Lodge, of Washington, D. C, and 
stands high both in social and professional circles. 

In June, 1901. Mr. McMulIen was united in marriage to Miss 
Cora Greenwood, a young lady of culture and refinement, who was 
born in Wisconsin and was educated at the College of the Sacred Heart 
in Omaha, Nebraska, and at Boston, Massachusetts. Her father, H. 
A. Greenwood, is one of the most prominent business men of Wymore, 
having been an important factor in the upbuilding and prosperity of 
that city, where he located in 1881. He was born on the 24th of Feb- 
ruary, 1840, at Abbott, Maine, and is a worthy representative of an old 
New England family, some of his ancestors having aided the colonies 
in their struggle for independence as soldiers of the Revolutionary war. 
His parents were Horace and Cornelia (Gowe) Greenwood, also natives 
of the old Pine Tree state. In 1858 the family removed to La Salle 
county, Illinois, and later to Woodford county, that state, where Horace 
Greenwood died in 1863, at the age of fifty-four years. His wife 
long survived him, passing away in 1895, at the age of eighty-four 
years. In their family were five children. H. A. Greenwood was 
reared and educated in Illinois, and during the dark days of the Civil 
war enlisted in the Eighth Illinois Cavalry, which was known as one of 
the best cavalry regiments of the north and composed of black abolition- 
ists. At Washington it was often said that it was the finest body of 
cavalrymen in the United States and it made for itself a glorious rec- 




W. H. EDGAR 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 871 

ord in defense of the Union cause. It was commanded by Colonel E. 
J. Farnsworth, who was killed in the battle of Gettysburg. They were 
also in the battle of Antietam and many other important engagements. 
Mr. Greenwood was married at Loda, Iroquois county, Illinois, to Miss 
Mary Cavanaugh, a native of New York. Two children blessed this 
union : Cora, now the wife of our subject, and Ivy, wife of Bridill 
Thall, of Wymore. Mr. Greenwood was the first banker to engage 
in business in Wymore, and he has been identified with a number of 
other business enterprises. He erected the Greenwood block and is 
the owner of much valuable real estate, including several farms in this 
state. He also owns a number of lumber yards which. he has estab- 
lished at various places, and is to-day one of the most successful and 
prosperous business men of his adopted city. In business affairs he 
is prompt, energetic and reliable and usually carries forward to suc- 
cessful completion whatever he undertakes. 



W. H. EDGAR. 

W. H. Edgar, postmaster at Beatrice, was born September 10, 
1840, near Burlington, Iowa. His parents moved to Collinsville, Illi- 
nois, when he was three years old, and seven years later moved to St. 
Louis, Missouri, where they remained until 1855, when they moved to 
Jacksonville. Illinois. Mr. Edgar attended the public schools of the 
last named city, and later was a student in Illinois College, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1860-1. 

In the fall of 1861 he enlisted in Company K, Thirty-third Illinois 
Infantry, and after six months' service was discharged on account of dis- 
ability. He afterwards re-entered the service as second lieutenant of 



872 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Company E, Thirty-second Illinois Volunteers. After his army service 
he went to work for the Adams Express Company, and was located at 
various times at Vicksburg, New Orleans and Mobile in the employ of 
the company. In 1864 he went to Aurora, Illinois, and after due prepar- 
ation was admitted to the bar of that state. In 1867 he became city 
editor for the daily Jacksonville Journal, and in 1869 was sent to Jersey- 
ville, Illinois, to take charge of a paper owned by the Journal Company. 
After a couple of years he bought the paper at Jerseyville and became 
sole owner. He conducted the Jerseyville Republican until 1887, when 
he left the state. In 1890 he took charge of the Pike County News, at 
Louisiana, Missouri, and at the end of two years was offered the editor- 
ship of the Daily Express, at Beatrice, Nebraska. He accepted this posi- 
tion and held it for ten years, until the ownership of the paper changed. 
Mr. Edgar has held a number of positions of trust and honor. 
During the incumbency of Governor Cullom of Illinois, he was commis- 
sioned as colonel and aide on the personal staff of the governor. In 1880 
he was the Republican candidate for Congress in the Twelfth Illinois 
district, and was defeated by General Singleton, of Quincy. Mr. Edgar 
received the full Republican vote in the banner Democratic district of 
the state. In 1881 Mr. Edgar was appointed postmaster at Jerseyville, 
Illinois, and served as such four years. In 1900 he was elected state 
senator for the twenty-seventh session of the Nebraska legislature, from 
Gage county, and, so far as majorities go, was the "high man" in the 
senate. He served on a number of prominent committees, brought sev- 
eral important measures before the body, and succeeded in getting in- 
scribed upon the statutes a good law relating to blackmail. In 1902 Mr. 
Edgar was appointed postmaster at Beatrice for four years, and in Feb- 
ruary of that year took charge of the office, which he holds at this 
writing. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 873 

Mr. Edgar is the eldest of five children, four brothers and one sister, 
all but one now living and married. His father, Dr. W. S. Edgar, was 
the son of William Edgar, of Rahway, New Jersey, who, with his wife 
and seven sons and two daughters, emigrated to Illinois at an early day. 
Of this family, only one son survives, Timothy B. Edgar, a man now 
in the eighties, living at St. Louis. The mother of Mr. Edgar was the 
daughter of Judge Janes, of Pittsford, New York, who at an early day 
moved to a farm near Burlington, Iowa. Judge Janes had three daugh- 
ters and two sons, Mrs. W. S. Edgar being the youngest of the daugh- 
ters. Dr. Edgar was for many years a prominent physician in St. Louis, 
and died in that city in 1877, while his wife died at Jerseyville, Illinois, 
in 1880. 

Mr. Edgar was married in 1890 to Mrs. M. E. Davis, at Lincoln, 
Nebraska ; they have no children. 



CHATFIELD H. BUTLER. 

Chatfield H. Butler, one of the highly respected citizens of Glen- 
wood township, Gage county, Nebraska, and a veteran of the Civil war, 
enlisted in October, 1861, in Company I, First Nebraska Cavalry, Cap- 
tain Jacob Butler (his brother) commanding. For some time the regi- 
ment was under General Fremont. After a hard and gallant campaign, 
our subject was honorably discharged in 1864. 

Mr. Butler was born near Richmond, Wayne county, Indiana, 
in 1833, and he is a son of Samuel Butler, a Quaker. Samuel Butler 
had two children, namely: Our subject and Jacob Butler, now a capi- 
talist of Iowa. Our subject was reared in Wayne county, Indiana, but 
in 1857 removed to Iowa. In 1869 he was there married to Louisa 



874 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Annon, who was born in Jackson county, Indiana, and is a daughter 
of John and Catherine Annon, natives of Germany who located in Page 
county in 1855 and are still residents of that locality. In 1887 our 
subject left Page county and settled in Gage county, Nebraska, three 
and one-half miles from Odell, and has continued successfully there 
engaged in farming. The children born to himself and wife are as 
follows: Charles C. of Portland, Oregon; Eva; Albert, on the home- 
stead; Lizzie J.; Dora Belle; John and Nellie. The mother has passed 
away, having been a devout Christian woman and a devoted wife and 
mother. In politics Mr. Butler is a Republican and takes an interest 
in local affairs. He is a member of the G. A. R., and also a member 
of a Masonic lodge in Iowa, having joined that order in 1866. Mr. 
Butler is cordial to all, and is a man who makes and retains friends. 
His pleasant home is open to all, and none are ever turned away. 



ORLANDO T. RANDALL. 

Orlando T. Randall, one of the prominent farmers of Logan town- 
ship, Gage county, Nebraska, came to this section of southeastern Ne- 
braska in 1886, and has proved himself a worthy and enterprising 
citizen, capable in business matters and as an agriculturist, and loyal 
and devoted to' family and friends and upright and sincere in all the 
relations of life. He has had an honorable career from his entrance 
into real activities, and has to his credit service in the Civil war, as a 
Union soldier. 

Mr. Randall was born at Pillar Point, opposite the historically 
memorable Sackett's Harbor, in New York, on August 14, 1843. His 
grandfather, Thomas Randall, was a soldier in the war of 1812, and 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 875 

during the battle at Sackett's Harbor his wife, with her son Asil in her 
arms, sought shelter in the woods near by. Her maiden name was 
Field, and she lived to the great age of one hundred and six years. 
This son Asil was reared in New York, and married Jane Brown, who 
was also born in Jefferson county, New York, a daughter of Joseph 
Brown. In 1854 Asil Randall and his family came west to Illinois 
by way of the lakes and railroad, and settled in Warren county, where 
he fanned until his death at the age of seventy-seven years. By his 
first wife there are two children living, Dillie E. Stone, of Pillar Point, 
New York, and Orlando T. ; and by his second wife, Mary Mathews, 
there are children as follows : Edward, Emma, Eva, Frank, William, 
Homer and Mary. 

Mr. Randall was reared in his native place and in Illinois, and ob- 
tained a common school education. He was at home until May, 1864, 
when he enlisted, at Quincy, Illinois, in Company C, One Hundred and 
Thirty-eighth Illinois Infantry, under Captain J. N. Reese and Colonel 
Goodwin, and saw six months' service in Missouri. Arkansas and 
Kansas, against the Confederate leaders Price and Marmaduke and 
against the bushwhackers and guerillas. He was stationed at Fort 
Smith, Kansas, for two months, was then returned to Springfield, Illinois, 
thence was sent for service on the Iron Mountain Railroad, and was 
discharged with an honorable record and returned home. He con- 
tinued to farm in Illinois until 1886, and then came to Gage county, 
Nebraska. He has an excellent farm, improved with good orchard, 
barn and other conveniences for profitable farming, and has some of 
the finest horses in his stable to be found anywhere within the bounds 
of the county. He has made his present prosperity almost entirely by 
his own efforts, and is fully deserving of the confidence and esteem which 
his neighbors and friends show for him. 



876 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

In 1873 Mr. Randall was married to Miss Jane M. Robertson, 
who was born, reared and educated in Warren county, Illinois, a daugh- 
ter of James Robertson, who is still living at a ripe old age. Her 
mother died in 1886. Mrs. Randall died in 1892 at the age of forty- 
one years. She was a noble, Christian woman, graced with many do- 
mestic virtues. Their son Earnest R. died in October, 1901, at the 
age of twenty-seven years, after giving promise of a useful career and 
bright future ; Carrol is still living ; and Myron died at the age of five. 
In 1896 Mr. Randall was married to Florence Reedy, who was born 
and reared in Kansas and Nebraska, and was a daughter of an old 
soldier, Andrew Reedy, of Blue Springs, Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. Ran- 
dall have three children. Morrell, and Lester and Leslie, twins. 



TASPER M. SYKES. 

Jasper M. Sykes, who has been a resident of Gage county, Ne- 
braska, for over thirty years, is not only one of the old-time citizens 
but a prominent man and successful in his life's enterprises. He has 
had a career of nearly seventy years, and while he has been steadily 
progressing and winning a better foothold in the world, his life has 
not been altogether uneventful or prosaic. The very fact that he is one 
of the honored veterans of the Civil war, in which he took a brave and 
dutiful soldier's part, gives his record more than ordinary interest and 
charm. Since his battles and marches have been ended he has been 
worthily pursuing the arts of peace, and has become noted for his 
efficient citizenship and excellencies as a man and farmer. 

Mr. Sykes was born in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, December 
14, 1836, a son of Charles and Susan (Waldron) Sykes, the former 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 877 

of whom was born in Delaware county, New Jersey, and is now deceased, 
while the latter is living in Hobart, Indiana. Mr. Sykes was brought 
to Lake county, Indiana, by his parents, and was reared there and re- 
ceived his education in the public schools which were then provided for 
the children of a comparatively new county. In April, 1862, he enlisted 
at Centerville, Indiana, in Company A, Ninety-ninth Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry, under Captain Sawyer and Colonel Fowler. After going 
into camp at the rendezvous he was sent to Louisville, Kentucky, and 
then took part in the battle at Memphis, and was later with the troops 
engaged in the siege of Vicksburg. He was one of the expedition sent 
up the Yazoo river in the rear of Vicksburg. He was in the battle 
at Jackson and Black River, opposed to General Joe Johnston's forces, 
was at Lookout Mountain and the battles of the following Atlanta 
campaign under Sherman, thence to the sea, and up through the Caro- 
linas to Bentonville, and at the close of the war participated in the mag- 
nificent grand review at Washington, after which his company was 
sent to Indianapolis, Indiana, where he received his honorable discharge 
in June, 1865. He had served creditably and made a good record, and 
was now willing to perform his duty as a civilian. 

After the war Mr. Sykes was married in Chicago, Illinois, to Miss 
Mary Debbeth, who has been a noble helpmate and companion to him 
during all the remaining years. She was born, reared and educated 
in Lake county, Indiana, and is of German ancestry. They have three 
children, Harriet Boyd ; George Sykes, of Gage county ; and Charles 
Sykes, of Gage county. 

Mr. Sykes came to Gage county in 1873, and has been one of the 
prosperous fanners here ever since. He owns eighty acres of fine farm- 
ing land in Clatonia township, not far from the town of Clatonia, and 
this makes a beautiful farmstead, productive of excellent crops and 



878 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

furnishing a comfortable home. Mr. Sykes is a stanch Republican, and 
as a soldier of the late rebellion has membership in the Grand Army 
of the Republic. 

HENRY C. BRIDGES. 

Henry C. Bridges, owner of one of the finest farms in Gage county, 
situated on section 15, Riverside township, postoffice Beatrice, has been 
an honored resident of this county since 1878. His enterprise and 
thrift have made him unusually prosperous in his business matters, 
and he is a farmer who takes immense pride in what he does, so that 
his place deserves to be ranked as a model in appearance and in produc- 
tivity. While he has made for himself a satisfying degree of material 
prosperity, he has not been recreant of his privileges or duties as a 
citizen, and it is to his honor and an immemorial heritage to his des- 
cendants that he made a creditable record as a soldier in the Civil war, 
in which he served almost from the very beginning to the end and rose 
from the ranks to the place at the head of his company. 

Mr. Bridges was born in Milford, New York, October 2, 1838, 
a son of Alonzo and Fidelia (Barber) Bridges. The former was born 
in New York, and was the son of a soldier in the war of 1812. He was 
a life-long farmer, was prominent in his community, believing in the 
political doctrines of Andrew Jackson and being a worthy member of 
the Presbyterian church. He died at the age of sixty-eight years, 
and his wife was forty-nine years old at the time of her death. They 
were the parents of the following children : Dexter, Elizabeth, Lucy, 
Albert, Julia, Henry C. and Anna. 

Mr. Bridges was reared on a farm, where he learned first of all 
the value and dignity of manual labor, and he received a common school 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 879 

education. On the 20th of September, 1861, he offered his services 
at the call of Lincoln for troops, and was enrolled as a member of 
Company D, Eighth New York Cavalry, under Captain Frisbee and 
Colonel Davis, the latter meeting death at Beverly Ford. The com- 
pany was at Harper's Ferry for a time, and took part in most of the 
cavalry operations along the Potomac, and James river valley, at An- 
tietam, Gettysburg; made sixteen trips up and down the Shenandoah 
valley, being present at Winchester when Sheridan made his famous 
ride; was during the war part of the commands of Generals Kilpatrick, 
Custer and Sheridan. He enlisted as a private, was promoted to ser- 
geant, to second lieutenant, and left the army as captain. He was 
wounded on the arm by a spent ball, and had a horse shot from under 
him, and in one battle his comrade on each side of him was killed. 

After receiving his honorable discharge he returned to peaceful 
pursuits in New York state, and in 1866 took up his residence at Odell, 
Livingston county, Illinois, where he engaged in farming until 1878. 
He came to Nebraska and bought one hundred and sixty acres in Gage 
county for six dollars an acre, and this farm, with its many improve- 
ments, is now worth many times its purchase price. He has two 
houses on the farm, barns and outbuildings in abundance, a nice orchard, 
and, situated as it is only three miles from Beatrice, it is considered as 
fine a farm as there is in the township. He carries on general farming 
and stock-raising. 

Mr. Bridges was married in LaSalle county, Illinois, in 1869, to 
Miss Anna Hotchkiss, who was a native of Ottawa, LaSalle county, 
a daughter of Benjamin and Delia (Baldwin) Hotchkiss, who both died 
at the home of Mr. Bridges, having owned an adjoining farm. Mrs. 
Bridges was a successful teacher before her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bridges have had six children, but Benjamin and Nellie died in child- 



88o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

hood, the others being: Dexter F., who married Nellie Kinman and has 
one child, Bernice; Harvey, at home; Bessie; and Margery, in school. 
Mr. Bridges is a Republican in politics, and served as township trustee 
for fourteen years. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic, and he and his wife are members of the Congregational church. 



M. M. BROWN. 

M. M. Brown, who is living in Washington precinct, Jefferson 
county, purchased his present farm in 1874 and took up his abode thereon 
in 1880. His well directed efforts and intense business activity well 
entitle him to distinction as one of the leading business men and 
farmers of his community. He was born near Warsaw in Kosciusko 
county, Indiana, on the gth of September, 1847. His father, E. K. 
Brown, represented an old Maryland family and was born in that state 
and was a soldier of the Civil war. The days of his boyhood and youth 
were largely passed in Maryland and Indiana, where he worked in the 
woods and aided in the development of a farm in pioneer days. In 
the paternal line he was of Scotch descent. In Kosciusko county, Indi- 
ana, he was married to Miss Sabra Lattimer, whose birth occurred in 
Ohio. In 1852 the family removed to Illinois, settling in Henry county 
near Geneseo, upon a farm, which the father developed and cultivated, 
making it a very productive farm. In response to the president's call 
for aid to crush out the rebellion in the south he enlisted as a member 
of Company A, One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois Infantry, under 
command of Captain Tohn Low and Colonel Henderson. He served 
for two and a half years and then received an honorable discharge. 
He never faltered in the performance of any duty, whether it called 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 88 1 

him to the scene of battle or stationed him upon the lonely picket line, 
but was always found loyal to the cause which he espoused. He con- 
tinued to engage in farming until his death, which occurred when he 
was seventy-two years of age. He voted with the Republican party, 
being unfaltering in his advocacy of its principles, and he was a mem- 
ber of the Christian church. He passed away at the age of seventy- 
two years, and his wife died in Henry county, Illinois, at the age of 
sixty-one years. She was also a member of the Christian church and 
was greatly beloved for her many good qualities of heart and mind. 
In the family of this worthy couple were eight children: M. M., John, 
Emeline, George, Emily, Sabine, L. L., and Elmer. Of this number 
L. L. Brown is now living in Jefferson county. 

M. M. Brown was reared on the old family homestead in Henry 
county, Illinois, and in his youth attended the public schools. He worked 
in the fields during the period of his boyhood and continued to assist 
his father until he had passed his minority. In 1874 he purchased 
land in Nebraska, but that was the year of the great grasshopper scourge. 
In 1888, however, he returned to this state, making the journey by rail, 
and has since resided in Washington precinct upon a farm which is 
now his home. Here he has developed a good home. His farm is 
neat and thrifty in appearance and indicates his careful supervision and 
management. There is a good house tastefully furnished, he has planted 
a grove and orchard, has a windmill and a good barn and corncribs and 
feed lots and well kept fences. He follows general farming and stock- 
raising, and his business affairs are well managed and result in bring- 
ing to him a very gratifying competence. 

In 1875 Mr. Brown was united in marriage to Miss Lavina Stag- 
ner, who was born in Franklin county, Ohio, near Columbus, and when 
eight years of age went to Illinois, being reared and educated in Bureau 



882 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

county, that state. She is a daughter of Joseph and Mary (Althouse) 
Stagner, the former a native of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, 
while the latter was also born in the Keystone state. Both are now 
deceased. The father was a farmer by occupation, was a Whig in 
politics and a Baptist in religious faith. He died in Ohio at the age 
of thirty-seven years, leaving a widow and four children : Lewis, who 
was a soldier of the One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois Infantry, serving 
throughout the war; Henry, who died in childhood; Sarah, who is liv- 
ing in Austin, Texas; and Mrs. Brown. The mother, long surviving 
her husband, died in Bureau county. Illinois, at the age of seventy-five 
vears, passing awav in the faith of the Baptist church, in which she 
long held membership. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Brown has been 
blessed with three children : Alice Olive, Elisha Kirk and Nellie Angie. 
The son is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Brown exercises his right of franchise in support of the men 
and measures of the Republican party. He was reared in that faith 
and his mature judgment endorses the party platform, and he has never 
wavered in his allegiance thereto. He belongs to the United Brethren 
church, as do his wife and elder daughter, and they have been active 
in church and Sunday-school work. He endorses every movement which 
he believes will benefit his fellow men, is an advocate of temperance and 
of intellectual and moral development, and he has been the champion 
of many interests which he believes are for the public good in Jefferson 
county. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 883 

W. B. LOWERY. 

As long as memory remains to the American people the soldier of 
the Civil war will be honored by his fellow men because of the personal 
bravery which he displayed and the loyalty which he manifested to his 
country in her hour of need. Mr. Lowery was one who wore the 
uniform at the time of hostilities between the north and the south. He 
is well known in Nebraska and northern Kansas and has been a resident 
of Jefferson county for twenty-one years or since 1882. He was born 
in Ashland county, Ohio, while his father. Walter Lowery. was a native 
of Ireland and was of Scotch-Irish descent. He married Margaret 
Thornton, who was born in the north of Ireland and was of Scotch lin- 
eage. They came to the United States at an early day, settling in 
Ohio, where both spent the remainder of their days. They were honest, 
hardworking people, intelligent and industrious, respected by all who 
knew them. Their religious faith was in harmony with Protestant 
views. In their family were nine children and two of the sons were 
soldiers of the Civil war, namely : W. B. ; and Walter Lowery, who 
offered his life upon the altar of his country, dying on the field of battle. 

W. B. Lowery was reared in Ohio and in his youth worked in a 
shop and in a store. He enlisted at Ashland, Ohio, at the time of the 
Civil war. becoming a member of the Union army in August, 1861, 
when he was but eighteen years of age. His weight at that time was 
only ninety-six pounds. He became a member of Battery D, of the 
First Ohio Light Artillery, under the command of Captain A. J. Conkle. 
He went into Camp Denison, September 1, 1861. The regiment was 
ordered south and went at once into active service. He served under 
General Nelson in the campaign of eastern Kentucky; also General Du- 
mont and under General Burnside, at the siege of Knoxville; under 
General Corse, at the battle of Alatoona Pass; served under General 



884 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Scoffield, in the Atlanta campaign; and in Sherman's march to the sea. 
The principal battles in which Battery D was engaged were : Fort Dbn- 
elson, Stone River, Chickamauga, Iuka, Pittsburg Landing, Murfrees- 
boro, Mills Springs; and in all the battles of the Atlantic campaign 
from May 5 to September 2, 1864; from Atlanta to the sea, November 
15, 1864, with sixty thousand men, marching in four divisions, taking 
in a territory forty miles wide. They went into Camp Denison with 
full battery of one hundred and sixty-five men, were mustered out at 
Columbus, Ohio, in September, 1865, with sixteen of the original men of 
the battery. He was present when General Joe Johnston surrendered 
his troops at Raleigh, South Carolina. He afterward went to Rich- 
mond, Virginia, and on to Washington, D. C, being there at the time 
that President Lincoln was assassinated. He was always found at his 
post of duty, whether it called him to the picket line or the firing line, 
never once faltering in his allegiance to the starry banner of the nation 
and the cause it represented. Following the war Mr. Lowery returned 
to Ohio and remained a resident of that state until 1882, when he came 
to Kansas. He has here two hundred and forty acres of rich and arable 
land, constituting a fine and well improved farm. Upon his place he 
has a good residence, a barn, a fine grove and an excellent orchard. Ev- 
erything about his place is kept in good condition, and in addition to 
the raising of the cereals best adapted to the soil and climate he is also 
engaged in the raising of cattle and hogs. His business activity also 
extends to auctioneering, and he is recognized as one of the popular 
and successful auctioneers of Nebraska and Kansas. 

Mr. Lowery was united in marriage to Miss Mattie Newby, and to 
them have been born five children, namely : Mary, Walter, Effie, Artie 
and Mattie. Mr. Lowery cast his first presidential vote for Abraham 
Lincoln during the period of the Civil war, but is now independent 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 885 

in politics, casting his ballot in support of the men whom he thinks best 
qualified for office. He belongs to Reynolds Post No. 157, G. A. R., 
has been very active in its work, and has filled a number of its official 
positions. He is also identified with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. His characteristics are such as have won for him warm 
regard, and he is justly accounted one of the progressive and enter- 
prising agriculturists of Jefferson county. 



M. C. HURLBURT. 

One of the most attractive features of the landscape in Richland 
township is the home of M. C. Hurlburt, an enterprising farmer whose 
residence is a monument to his life of enterprise and well directed effort. 
The house contains ten rooms and stands upon a natural building site. 
Forest and fruit trees are also seen upon the farm together with substan- 
tial buildings for the shelter of grain and stock. The latest improved 
machinery facilitates the farm work, and everything about the place is 
in keeping with modern progressive ideas of agriculture. Mr. Hurl- 
burt, moreover, is entitled to mention in this volume as one of the 
pioneer residents of southeastern Nebraska, having made his home in 
this part of the state since 1869. He drove to the county with two teams 
and a wagon, bringing with him some household goods and, securing 
land, he began the development of a farm and has steadily maintained 
a place in the foremost ranks of the leading agriculturists of his com- 
munity. 

Mr. Hurlburt was born near St. Albans, Vermont, and belonged 
to an old patriotic family of New England. His natal day was the 9th 
of January, 1832. His paternal grandfather, Elijah Hurlburt, was also 



886 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

a native of the Green Mountain state, and the father, Calvin Hurlburt, 
was born in Rutland, Vermont. After a number of years of happy mar- 
ried life the mother passed away, leaving five children, and by the sec- 
ond marriage the father had four children. He devoted his energies 
to agricultural pursuits throughout his business career, gave his political 
support to the Democracy and indicated his religious faith by member- 
ship in the Methodist church, in which he was an active and zealous 
worker. 

M. C. Hurlburt remained in Vermont until thirteen years of age 
and then went to Canada, where he spent two years. On the expiration 
of that period he removed to New York, where he spent two years, and 
during these different periods he attended the public schools. Attracted 
by the opportunities and business possibilities of the west he made his 
way to the Mississippi valley in 1864, settling in Lafayette county, Wis- 
consin, in the midst of a lead mining district. 

Mr. Hurlburt had been married in Oswego county, Xew York, to 
Miss Martha Turck, an estimable lady, whose family was well known in 
western New York. Her birth occurred in that state and she pursued 
her education there. Her father, Charles Turck, was born in the 
Empire state and was a son of Jonathan Turck, who was a soldier of the 
war of 1812, and a representative of one of the old Knickerbocker fam- 
ilies of the Mohawk valley, living near Albany, New York. His 
grandfather was one of the first circuit riders and pioneer preachers of 
western New York, and his name is closely interwoven with the history 
of the religious development of that section of the state. Charles Turck, 
reared in New York, was married there to Magdalena Turck, his cousin. 
She was a daughter of Jonathan Turck, also a native of the Empire 
state. The father of Mrs. Hurlburt died in Oswego county, New York, 
at the age of sixty-two. The mother made her home with Mrs. Hurl- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 887 

burt after the death of her husband and died at that home in Jefferson 
count)', Nebraska, in 1881, aged seventy-seven years. The father was 
a Douglas Democrat and his religious faith was that of the Methodist 
church, to which his wife also belonged. They left five children: Peter, 
Jonathan, Henry, Julia and Mrs. Hurlburt. The last named is the only 
one now living. One son, William, served in the army during the 
Mexican war and when the Civil war broke out he again enlisted in the 
Union army and was killed at Shiloh. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hurlburt continued to make their home in Wiscon- 
sin until 1869, when they started for Nebraska, driving two teams. On 
reaching their destination Mr. Hurlburt secured a homestead and built 
a house sixteen by sixteen feet. Here in true pioneer style he began life 
in Nebraska, and they suffered many hardships and privations, but made 
the most of their opportunities and as the years passed they prospered. 
Mr. Hurlburt now has a good farm of eighty acres, on which he erected 
a modern residence, which was built in 1888 at a cost of fifteen hundred 
dollars. It contains ten rooms and is furnished in an attractive manner. 
There is an orchard in good bearing condition, and shade and ornamental 
trees add to the attractive appearance of the farm, which is indeed a de- 
lightful rural home. It has been blessed with the presence of three 
children : Charles, who is now a prominent nurseryman of Nebraska, 
conducting a very successful business; Llewellyn A., who is a popular 
conductor on the Burlington & Missouri Railroad in Nebraska and lives 
at McCook ; and Mrs. Mildred Burbridge, who was formerly one of 
the capable teachers of the county. They also lost one child, Magdalene, 
who died at the age of two years. The children were all provided with 
good educational privileges and are a credit to their parents. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hurlburt have long been earnest and zealous mem- 
bers of the Methodist church, and in pioneer times their home was the 



888 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

headquarters for people of the denomination visiting this region. In the 
early days they attended the camp meetings held at Red Cloud, Nebraska, 
and while there in 1872 their supply of provisions gave out. Mr. Hurl- 
burt, accompanied by J. B. Maxfield and others, went on a buffalo hunt 
and returned with a goodly supply of meat after which the 
religious services were resumed. In i860 he cast his vote for Abraham 
Lincoln and has since been a stanch Republican. His greatest activity 
aside from his farming interests, however, is manifest in his religious 
work, in which he is ably assisted by Mrs. Hurlburt. Her mother was 
a member of a Methodist class of only four members, which was held 
in Richland township in 1871 in a sod cabin. Mrs. Hurlburt has mani- 
fested her Christian spirit in her helpfulness to neighbors and friends 
in time of sickness and need. Kindhearted and sympathetic, her willing 
hand has been of great service in this way. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hurl- 
burt are held in the highest esteem because of their lives of honesty and 
uprightness. 



ANDREW MOFFITT. 

Andrew Moffitt is the owner and active operator of one of the 
finest farming estates in Saline county, situated not far from the town 
of Dorchester. He is among the old settlers of this part of the state, 
and bought the land where he has since developed his beautiful farmstead 
in 187 1, although he did not become a permanent resident until 1875. 
He is an up-to-date, twentieth century agriculturist, has made a success 
of his life work, and as a man and a citizen commands the highest es- 
teem of his associates in business and social circles. 

He was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, January 4, 1828, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 889 

and would perhaps be accounted an old man, but with him "age is a 
matter of feeling not of years," and he is still, notwithstanding a life of 
great activity, a vigorous and useful man of affairs. He is a son of 
James and Alice (Douler) Moffitt. His father was born in Ireland, of 
Scotch-Irish ancestry and Protestant in religion. He accompanied his 
parents to the United States and grew to manhood in Washington county, 
Pennsylvania. He married, first, Mary Turner, by whom he had two 
children. His second wife, Alice Douler, was born in Pennsylvania of 
an old Pennsylvania Dutch family, and she died in Fayette county, that 
state, in 1836, leaving three children: Thomas, Andrew and Henry. 
James Moffitt, the father, brought his family out to LaSalle county, Illi- 
nois, in 1842. He died at the age of eighty-three years. He was a ship 
carpenter and ship contractor by trade, and in politics was a Democrat 
and in religion a Methodist. 

Mr. Andrew Moffitt was fourteen years old when he went to Illi- 
nois, and most of his schooling had already been obtained in his native 
state of Pennsylvania. He was reared on a farm and early taught to 
work. He began farming on his own account in Illinois, and in 1849 
he was married in Putnam county, of that state, to Miss Ruth Blackburn, 
and they journeyed along life's highway together for many years. She 
was born in Pennsylvania and was reared there and in Illinois. 

Mr. Moffitt was living in LaSalle county, Illinois, when the Civil 
war broke out, and in August, 1862, at Lincoln's call for sixty thousand 
men, he enlisted at Rutland in Company I of the One Hundred and 
Fourth Illinois Infantry. The company had during the war two cap- 
tains, Wadley and Proctor, and the colonel of the regiment was A. B. 
Moore, of Ottawa. The regiment was in camp at Ottawa, was then 
ordered to Louisville, Kentucky, took part in the battle at Tompkinsville, 
helped drive Bragg' s troops from Tennessee, was at Chattanooga, Chick- 



890 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

amauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge and Taylor Ridge. Mr. 
Moffitt got a veteran's furlough, and when he was seven miles from home 
he met with a railroad accident in which he broke his leg. He afterward 
rejoined his regiment in Georgia, and for part time was on detached 
duty in the baggage and warehouse department at Bridgeport, Alabama. 
At the close of the war he took part in the grand review, and on receiv- 
ing his honorable discharge returned home with a gallant record as a 
soldier of the Union. While in Georgia he had been once taken prisoner 
but was soon released by Captain Hamilton of the rebel forces. He 
was sergeant of his company at the time of his discharge. 

After the war Mr. Moffitt continued farming in Illinois until he 
came out to Nebraska in 1875. He had purchased a tract of land in 
Saline county in 1871, and resided on it continuously from 1875 until 
very recently, but his present home is at 551 Gunison avenue, Grand 
Junction, Colorado. He owns four hundred and seventy-four acres of 
as good soil as there is in the county, and all the equipments and improve- 
ments of the place indicate the progressive and successful farmer. He 
takes much pride in his blooded stock, having some high-grade short- 
horn cattle and plenty of draft horses for all departments of his enter- 
prise. 

His first wife died December 3, 1886, and on May 24, 1894, he 
married Mrs. Elizabeth C. Moore, his present wife. Mr. Moffitt has 
three living children : Mary E. Leach, of Saline county ; Sam B., a suc- 
cessful lumber merchant of Dorchester; and Sarah E. Peterson, of 
Grand Junction, Colorado. One daughter, Mrs. Alice J. Pratt, is de- 
ceased. Mr. Moffitt is a strong Republican, and has held several local 
offices in Illinois and this state. He is a member of the Coutsman Post 
of the Grand Army at Dorchester. He is an active church worker and 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 891 

is steward and class-leader of the Methodist church. He is one of 
the oldest Odd Fellows in Nebraska, having joined that order in 1852. 



ALBERT F. SMITH. 

Albert F. Smith, proprietor of the big brick livery barn at the 
corner of F and Fourth streets, Fairbury, Nebraska, has for a number of 
years been one of the most prominent citizens of this town, has been 
enterprising and alert in business affairs, and, in a public-spirited manner, 
has taken an active part in political matters. He has led a busy life, 
and at the same time has gained the esteem of fellow citizens and friends 
and been a beloved and revered father and husband. He and his wife 
have an unusually interesting genealogical history, and the names and 
achievements of their ancestors connect them with all periods of the 
nation's glorious annals, giving them all the honors and titles to mem- 
bership in the orders and societies which have been established to per- 
petuate and place in proper historical perspective the deeds and names 
of the great and noble men and women of past generations in America. 

Mr. Smith was born in Ogle county, Illinois, November 17, 1847, 
and came to Fairbury, Nebraska, in 1879, so that he is one of the old 
settlers. During the administration of President Harrison he was ap- 
pointed postmaster of Fairbury, and served for four years. Since that 
time he has been identified with the creamery business and other enter- 
prises, and in 1898 established his livery business. He has first-class, 
up-to-date rigs, which he lets at reasonable rates, and makes a specialty 
of furnishing prompt and quick transit across the country to commercial 
travelers. Mr. Smith is a stanch Republican and takes an active part 
in political matters, while fraternally he affiliates with the Masons, the 



892 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Modern Woodmen of America and the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men, being a member of the lodges in this city. 

February 8, 1877, Mr. Smith was married at West Salem, Wis- 
consin, to Miss Anna Richardson Palmer, who was born in LaCrosse 
county, Wisconsin, February 24, 1854. They have two sons, Palmer 
and Francis A. 

The important data concerning the family history of Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith, gained from various authentic sources, are given in the 
following paragraphs. 

Mr. Smith was one of the nine children of Francis Adams Smith 
and Sarah (Brown) Smith, and is in the sixth generation from the James 
Smith who came to the Massachusetts colony in 1718. Members of eight 
generations of the family have been buried from the old Massachusetts 
homestead. 

Francis Adams Smith's mother was Hannah Hoar. The Hoars 
came to America prior to 1643. Hannah Hoar's father was Lieutenant 
Joseph Hoar, Jr., and was in the northern army of General Gates in 
1777, during the Revolution, and also commanded a company against 
Shay's rebels in 1787. 

Sarah (Brown) Smith, the mother of Mr. Smith, was the daughter 
of Colonel Dauphin Brown and Sila (Patrick) Brown, both natives of 
Brimfield, Massachusetts. Jonathan Brown, the ancestor, came to Amer- 
ica in 1739, and settled at Brimfield about the same time. He was a 
sergeant in the French and Indian war under the command of Daniel 
Burt, and was captain from March 30, 1755, to January 3, 1756. He 
was a sergeant at Lexington, April 19, 1775, and was a lieutenant in 
May, 1779. His son Bartholomew took part in the battle of Lexing- 
ton as a boy of seventeen years. 

Sila (Patrick) Brown was a descendant of Mathew Patrick, who 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 893 

came to America in 1724 and settled with his family in the town of 
Western (now Warren), Massachusetts, on land which continued to 
be the Patrick homestead until 1870. 

Mrs. Anna (Palmer) Smith was the eldest of four children born 
to Monroe Palmer and Martha Bigelow (Coolidge) Palmer, the former 
a native of Royalton, Vermont. Monroe Palmer was a descendant of 
Walter Palmer, who came from England in 1629, was a citizen of 
Charlestown and Rehoboth, Massachusetts, and one of the foremost 
men of Stonington, Connecticut. From him a large and illustrious 
line of Palmers descended. 

Monroe Palmer's father, Alden Palmer, married Anna Richard- 
son, whose father, Godfrey Richardson, was at the battle of Bunker 
Hill and through most of the subsequent service of the Revolution, and 
was a pensioner until his death in 1854, his wife receiving it then until 
her death. 

Martha Bigelow (Coolidge) Palmer was descended from the Cool- 
idge family that came from England in 1632 and settled at Charlestown. 
At the outbreak of the Revolution her great-grandfather was treasurer 
of the township of Watertown, Massachusetts. On the morning of 
April 19, 1775, three or four men came to him and asked to be directed 
to the place where the British were reported to be gathering, near Lex- 
ington. He went into the house, gave his wife, Eunice (Stratton) 
Coolidge, what money he had and started for Lexington with the men. 
He was one of "the embattled farmers who fired the shot heard round 
the world," and on that afternoon was killed, one of the first to shed 
his blood for his country. One hundred years later, April 19, 1875, 
his venerating descendants erected a monument to his memory in Water- 
town. His son Joseph was a youthful soldier before the close of the 
Revolution, and a member of the Fourteenth Regiment of the Conti- 



894 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

nental army, under Colonel Bradford. He was a pensioner until his 
death in 1842, and his wife, Mary Adams Coolidge. until her death, 
in 1852. Their son, Joseph Coolidge, Jr., migrated to Jay, Maine, in 
1790, settling in that part which became Canton. 

Martha Bigelow (Coolidge) Palmer was also descended from John 
Bigelow, who married Mary Warren on August 30, 1642, this event 
being thus recorded on the Watertown records : "John Bigulah and Mary 
Warin joyned in maiiag before Mr. Nowell." On the return of soldiers 
who were in the service from November 25, to December 3, 1675, IS 
found the name of "John Bigulah, St., children — thirteen." Mrs. 
Smith's line heads with Joshua Bigelow. who was born in November, 
1655, and married Elizabeth Flagg. He was soldier in King Phillip's 
war, in which he was wounded, and in consideration of his services 
received a grant of land in Naragansett. Late in life, in his eighty- 
seventh year, he removed to this grant, which is now the town of West- 
minster, and he was the first adult that died in that town, in 1745. 

Mrs. Smith's great-grandfather was John Bigelow, who married 
Polly Hayward, and their daughter, Polly Bigelow, married Mrs. Smith's 
grandfather. Aaron Coolidge. the son of Joseph Coolidge, Jr. 



JOHN CARMICHAEL. 

John Carmichael, one of the most prosperous farmers of Gage 
county, near the postoffice of Filley, has been a resident of this section 
of southeastern Nebraska for seventeen years, and has shown himself 
to be a man of fine qualifications as a citizen and business man, and 
has been found true to all the responsibilities which have been imposed 
upon him. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 895 

Mr. Carmichael was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 
28, 1845, a son °f Robert and Jane (McKim) Carmichael, both natives 
of Ireland, where the) were reared and married. The former was a 
member of the Church of England. He was a tanner by trade, and 
after settling in Philadelphia conducted the tanning business for some 
years. He died at the age of thirty-eight years, leaving his widow and 
three children, Eliza, John and James. His widow died in Rochelle, 
Illinois, at the age of sixty-seven years. 

John Carmichael was reared and educated in Philadelphia until 
he was fourteen years old, and then came to Ogle county, Illinois, where 
he was reared to manhood and finished his education. He enlisted from 
Ogle county, although still in his teens, and was assigned to the quar- 
termaster's department. He afterward entered the ranks as a private 
in Company H, Forty-sixth Illinois Infantry, under Captain Pike. He 
was sent south, and took part in the battles in Mississippi, notably the 
Vicksburg campaign and siege, and later the operations about Mobile, 
Alabama, and was then ordered to service in Louisiana, where he re- 
mained till he received his honorable discharge in November, 1865. He 
had seen his full share of actual conflict on the field, of marching toils 
and exposures of all kinds, and returned from the war with a full con- 
sciousness of duty performed for his country before he had arrived at 
the age of manhood. 

He went to farming in Illinois, and while living in Ogle county, 
was married to Margaret O'Rourke, who has stood by him in all subse- 
quent endeavors and been his greatest helper at all times. She is of 
Irish parentage. Her father. Hugh O'Rourke, died in Jewell county, 
Kansas, and her mother in Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Carmichael have 
six children, Robert, Hugh, John, Carson, Edward and Mary. 

Mr. Carmichael came to Gage county seventeen years ago, and is 



896 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

now engaged in farming four hundred acres of land. He is an enter- 
prising and thorough agriculturist, and has been satisfactorily success- 
ful in all his endeavors. In politics he is a strong Democrat, and is a 
Grand Army man. His family are members of the Catholic church. 
He affiliates with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Wood- 
men of the World. As a man he presents a fine physical appearance, 
and is genial, frank and popular with hosts of friends and acquaintances. 



SEYMOUR HOWE. 

Seymour Howe was an honored resident of Nemaha county for 
many years, and his death on May 25, 1904, was an occasion for sin- 
cere mourning and a great loss to the entire community in which he 
had lived and played his part of usefulness. His birth occurred in 
Steuben county, New York, near Hornellsville, on the 30th of March, 
1841. He was a grandson of John Howe, a native of Connecticut, in 
which commonwealth his ancestors had long resided. He served as a 
soldier in the ranks of the patriots throughout the entire period of the 
Revolutionary war, being a non-commissioned officer. He married a 
Miss Clauson, and his death occurred during his residence in New York, 
in middle life. His widow was again married, and she lived to a good 
old age. This worthy couple reared six daughters and one son, the lat- 
ter being Seymour Howe, Sr., the father of the late Nebraskan. 

The senior Howe was born in New York state, May 28, 1805. He 
was a farmer and carpenter by occupation, and his life's labors were 
ended in death on his farm in Nemaha county, October 21, 1875. From 
Steuben county, New York, he moved to Wisconsin, residing in Dodge 
and Outagamie counties, whence in 1855 he went to Steel county, Min- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 897 

nesota, and in i860 came to Nemaha county, Nebraska. In his native 
state, July 19, 1824. he was united in marriage to Eliza Pomeroy, who 
was born February 11, 1804, and twelve children were born of their 
union, seven of whom, three sons and four daughters, grew to years 
of maturity, namely: Phebe Ann, who was born September 15, 1827, 
and became the second wife of R. G. Wood, by whom she has one 
daughter, and they reside in Blue Earth county, Minnesota; Joshua P., 
who was born July 4, 1829, and died in Oregon, August 11, 1903, 
leaving three sons and a daughter ; Samuel, who was born in November, 
1830, and has one son living, is a resident of Santa Cruz, California; 
Betsey, born March 16, 1832, is the widow of Alonzo Corey, by whom 
she has four sons and two daughters living, and is a resident of Clay 
county, Nebraska ; Eliza, born June 2, 1837, is the wife of George Withee, 
of Dayton, Oregon, and of their eight children six are living; Seymour, 
of this sketch; Martha, born September 12, 1844, is the widow of Lind- 
ley L. Preston, her second husband, and she is now an invalid and re- 
sides in Dayton, Oregon. 

Seymour Howe spent the days of his boyhood and youth on his 
father's farm, attending the district schools of the neighborhood and 
remaining there until fifteen years of age. In Owatonna, Minnesota, 
he learned the cabinet-maker's trade, which continued his occupation, 
in that state and Nebraska, until he was thirty years of age. His first 
farm in Nemaha county consisted of one hundred acres, and at the time 
of his death he owned one hundred and eighty acres in his home place, 
for which he had paid twenty-six hundred dollars, and three miles away 
he had one hundred and twenty acres for which he had given two thou- 
sand dollars, so that his entire estate amounted to three hundred acres. 

January 26, 1870, in Richardson county, Nebraska, Mr. Howe 
was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Hagadorn, a native of Michigan 



898 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

and a daughter of Jonathan and Amanda (Hogle) Hagadom, both 
natives of the state of New York. Her father was a millwright by- 
trade. Mr. and Mrs. Hagadorn resided in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio, 
and from the latter state came to Nebraska in 1863. They were the 
parents of seven daughters and one son, and by his second marriage the 
father had three children. His death occurred in Nemaha county, July 
27, 1883, at the age of seventy-six years. 

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Howe has been blessed with eight 
children, as follows : Adelia, who was born in Nemaha county September 
3, 1872, is the wife of C. L. Russell, and. they have one son and a 
daughter; Charley, born July 14, 1875, and who is engaged in farming 
on the old homestead, married Minnie Russell; Eugene, born July 27, 
1877, is a teacher in the public schools at Exeter, Nebraska; Eolon 
Ambrose, born December 18, 1880, is married and is a farmer in Nemaha 
county; Emery Church was born August 2, 1883, and is at home; Sey- 
mour J. died when three months old ; and two daughters died in infancy. 
All of the children received college educations, and Eugene, a graduate 
of the Peru normal, has been a successful teacher for the past five years. 

Mr. Howe was a stalwart supporter of Republican principles, and 
for two terms served in the office of assessor, while in 1896 he was a 
candidate for representative of his district in the legislature, but was 
defeated at the following election. On account of ill health he had 
of late lived retired from the active duties of a business life, and passed 
his last days comfortably and quietly at his pleasant home farm on the 
fertile Nemaha flats, within sight of the town of Nemaha. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 899 

WILLIAM PICKRELL, 

William Pickrell is one of the foremost farmers of Johnson county, 
living three and a half miles from Crab Orchard. He is an old resident, 
having come here over eighteen years ago, and for that reason and 
because of his successful conduct of business affairs and his loyal and 
substantial citizenship, he is held in universal esteem throughout the 
township and county. He has made farming a life-long pursuit, and 
has succeeded beyond the ordinary owing to his methodical and enter- 
prising ways of prosecuting this great industry. His life's work has 
also been enriched by his gallant service throughout the Civil war, hav- 
ing belonged to the great armies of the Union for nearly four years. 
He has been conscientious and upright in all the relations of life, and 
has made his influence felt wherever his lot has been cast. 

Mr. Pickrell was born in Logan county, Ohio, April 11, 1841, a 
son of Jacob and Rachel (Marmon) Pickrell, the former a native of 
Ohio and a son of William Pickrell, who was born in Pennsylvania. 
Jacob Pickrell and his wife in later life moved to Johnson county, Ne- 
braska, where they spent their last years, the latter passing away at the 
age of seventy-four and the former at the age of eighty-two, both loved 
and respected by all. Tacob Pickrell was a tanner and harnessmaker ; 
in politics was a Republican and a Whig, and was a Quaker in religious 
belief. There were eleven children in their family, eight sons and three 
daughters. 

Mr. Pickrell was reared in Indiana, and in August, 1861, when 
twenty years of age, he enlisted at Crawfordsville, Indiana, in Company 
I, Eleventh Indiana Infantry, the crack regiment headed by the brilliant 
author-soldier, General Lew Wallace. This regiment made one of the 
best records in the war. It participated at Shiloh, was at the siege of 
Vicksburg and Jackson, was then south to New Orleans; thence was 



900 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

sent to Virginia, being at Cedar Creek when Sheridan made his ride; 
and in many other battles and operations until the war was over. 
Mr. Pickrell received his honorable discharge on July 26, 1865. In 
1866, after his marriage, he settled near Redfield, Dallas county, Iowa, 
and was engaged in farming there for twelve years. He came to 
Johnson county in 1886, and has been actively connected with the 
farming interests of this vicinity ever since. He owns a farm of eighty 
acres, which is many times more valuable now than when it came into 
his hands. There is an ample barn, an orchard and grove, and the place 
is well stocked with cattle, horses and hogs. 

Mr. Pickrell was married in June, 1866, to Miss Catherine Michael, 
a woman of strong character and devoted to family and home, and who 
has been a chief factor in the success which has come to her husband. 
She was born and reared and educated in Indiana, a daughter of Corne- 
lius and Catherine (Coons) Michael, the former a native of Pennsyl- 
vania and the latter of Tennessee. Both died in Montgomery county, 
Indiana, at the respective ages of seventy and fifty-eight years. Corne- 
lius Michael was a soldier in the war of 1812, and in political belief was 
a Whig and Republican, and a member of the Christian church. His 
wife was married twice, and by her first marriage had a son, Ben- 
jamin McKee, who was a soldier in the Eleventh Indiana Infantry. 
She had only two children by her marriage to Cornelius Michael, and 
the son, Harvey, was a soldier in the Fortieth Indiana and lost his 
health during the war. Mr. and Mrs. Pickrell have had six children, 
but Emma, the second born, died at the age of six years, and Harland, 
the third child, died aged three years. The others are : Minnie Trout, 
of Johnson county; Raymond, of Crab Orchard; Leona Reeder, of 
Johnson county; and Elsie, in school. Mr. Pickrell is a prominent 
Grand Army man, and has been commander of his post. He and his 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 901 

wife are members of the United Brethren church, and he is a trustee. 
He affiliates with the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is a man 
of firm convictions, is broad-minded and progressive and interested in 
religion, temperance and education. 



OLIVER FREEL. 

Oliver Freel, an honored veteran of the Civil war and one of the 
pioneers of Nebraska, now living in Island Grove township, Gage county, 
is a western man by birth and training, for he was born on the Des 
Moines river near Keosauqua, Van Buren county, Iowa, December 5, 
1841, — the year in which King Edward of England was also born. His 
father, William S. Freel, was a native of Champaign county, Ohio, and 
a son of Charles Freel, who was of Irish ancestry and was a soldier of 
the war of 1812. William S. Freel grew to manhood in the state of his 
nativity and from there removed to Indiana, where he married Miss 
Mary Prince, a native of Xew York state. Some years after his mar- 
riage he went to Iowa, being one of the first to locate on the Des Moines 
river in Van Buren county. Subsequently he removed to Mahaska 
county, the same state, and still later to Warren county, Iowa, taking 
up his abode near Indianola. He finally came to Nebraska and located 
near Falls City in Richardson county, where he and his wife both died, 
the former September 19, 1867, and the latter on the 9th of July, i860. 
By occupation he was a blacksmith, and in politics was an ardent Re- 
publican. In his family were the following children, namely: Austin, 
who served for twenty-five months as a soldier in the Union army during 
the Civil war; Thomas; John and Charles, who were also numbered 
among the boys in blue during that struggle, being both members of the 



9 o2 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Second Nebraska Cavalry ; Oliver, of this review. It will thus be seen 
that four of the sons were among the defenders of the Union during 
the dark days of the rebellion. 

Oliver Freel was reared on the frontier of Iowa, that state being 
still a territory during the first five years of his life, and he is indebted 
to its early schools for the educational privileges he enjoyed in boy- 
hood. In i860 he came with the family to Nebraska and settled in 
Richardson county. On the 2d of October, 1862, he enlisted in the 
Second Nebraska Cavalry', which was assigned to duty in the northwest, 
the Indians being then on the warpath in Dakota. For some time the 
regiment was stationed at Omaha and later at Sioux City, Iowa. They 
saw much active service and were in an engagement at White Stone Hill, 
Dakota, where four hundred Indians were killed and about the same 
number taken prisoners, this being the result of the massacre at New 
Ulm, Minnesota. During his service Mr. Freel had his eyes so seri- 
ously injured that he is now almost blind and is unable to engage in any 
kind of work. He was at length honorably discharged in November, 
1863, and returned home with a war record of which he may be justly 
proud. He continued to make his home in Richardson county until 
1886, when he removed to Gage county, and has since made his home 
in Island Grove township. 

In Atchison county, Missouri, Mr. Freel was first married to Miss 
Lydia Bradley, who died in Richardson county, Nebraska, leaving 
five children, four of whom are still living, namely : Jasper, Theodore 
Thomas, Luenna and Rosa May. Felix Freel died at the age of four 
years. Mr. Freel was again married in 1889, his second union being 
with Mrs. Urvilla Jane Nicholson, a native of Morrow county, Ohio, 
and a daughter of Cornelius and Ruth (Hayden) Corwin. Her mother 
died in Morrow county, but the death of her father occurred in Jeffer- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 903 

son county, Nebraska. Mrs. Fred was first married in Gage county, 
this state, in 1871, to Robert Nicholson, who died in Missouri, leaving 
three daughters, Kate, Mary and Mrs. Sarah Nadinger. Helen Nad- 
inger, a daughter of the last named, now makes her home with her 
grandmother Mrs. Freel. 

Both our subject and his wife are earnest members of the Christian 
church, and he is also connected with the Grand Army of the Republic. 
By his ballot he supports the men and measures of the Republican party 
and has always been found as true to his duties of citizenship in times 
of peace as when fighting for the Union cause in the Civil war. He is 
a man highly respected and esteemed by all who know him, and he has 
many friends in his adopted county. 



C. P. FALL, M. D. 

C. P. Fall, M. D., who since 1888 has been one of the leading citi- 
zens of Beatrice, Nebraska, has established a reputation for medical and 
surgical skill second to none in this part of the state. Dr. Fall is a 
graduate of the class of 1888 of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Chicago, Illinois. He is a native of die state of Indiana, where he 
was born, in Boone county, in 1863. He is a son of David and Anna 
(Kernodle) Fall, the former of whom was born in Tennessee and the 
latter in Virginia. The Fall family claims the same ancestry as Daniel 
Boone, and some of its early members were pioneers in Kentucky and 
later in Indiana. When the father of Dr. Fall located in Boone county, 
he erected one of the first log cabins in his locality. 

Dr. Fall secured a good education in Indiana and came to Nebraska 
in 1 88 1. For six years he was a resident of Aurora, Nebraska. He is 



9 04 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

engaged in conducting a general hospital and sanitarium at Beatrice. 
He served with credit for a time as superintendent of the state institution 
for feeble-minded persons. He was also acting assistant surgeon in 
1898 for the United States soldiers at Camp Thomas. 

In 1885 at Aurora, Nebraska, Dr. Fall married Miss Anna Kemper, 
who was reared at Plattsville, Wisconsin, a daughter of George and 
Anna (Womelstorf) Kemper, both of whom are natives of Germany. 
One daughter has been born to Dr. and Mrs. Fall, Hazel, a student in 
the local schools. Dr. Fall is a valued member of the State and County 
Medical Societies, and the American Medical Association. 



ANDREW D. BARCLAY. 

Andrew D. Barclay, a leading merchant and the postmaster of 
Bookwalter, Pawnee county, Nebraska, has been a resident of Nebraska 
during most of his adult life, and is one of the best known and most 
successful business men of Pawnee county. Being now in the very 
prime of his life and powers, he is conducting his business with marked 
energy and is foremost in all that concerns the upbuilding and welfare 
of his town and county. He is essentially a man of business capacity, 
enterprising and progressive, and is possessed of all the qualities needed 
to build up a mercantile establishment such as that of which he is a co- 
partner. 

The present business of Barclay Brothers, dealers in general mer- 
chandise, was founded some years ago* and its executive head was the 
late James M. Barclay, whose memory will always be revered as that of 
a leading and prominent citizen. He was postmaster before his brother 
Andrew took the office. He was born and reared in Will county, Illi- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 905 

nois, and at his death left three children, Fred, Alice and Fanny, who 
had been deprived of their mother several years before. He was a 
worthy member of the Masonic fraternity, and was buried with the rites 
of that order. 

Andrew D. Barclay was born near Joliet, Will county, Illinois, 
in 1857, a year after his father, James Barclay, had settled there. The 
latter was born in Scotland, of an old highland family that had partici- 
pated in some of the early Scottish wars. He was married in Scotland, 
and his wife's name was Rachel McMicken, who died in Illinois. He 
died February 6, 1904. 

Andrew D. Barclay was reared on an Illinois farm and received his 
education in Will county. He was one of five children, the others 
being James, mentioned above ; William, of Kansas City ; Thomas, of the 
firm of Barclay Brothers; and Agnes, deceased. Mr. Barclay had some 
business training before leaving Illinois, and at the age of twenty-one 
went west to Colorado for two years. He was then in Hitchcock county, 
Nebraska, for a year, and then settled on a farm in Pawnee county, 
where he successfully carried on agricultural pursuits until 1897, when 
he was appointed to the office of postmaster and at the same time en- 
gaged in the merchandise business with his brother. They have gained 
a large patronage in the town and surrounding country through their 
honorable methods of dealing and enterprising ways of building up 
trade, and the establishment is one of the best in the county. Mr. 
Barclay is a bachelor, and popular with all associates. He is a strong 
Republican, and he is solid and stanch in his opinions so that the 
people know where he stands on questions affecting the public welfare. 



9o6 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

ARNOLD W. GROUT. 

Arnold W. Grout is one of the well known residents of Wymore, 
Nebraska, and a veteran of the Civil war. He began his career as a 
soldier when he enlisted at St. Charles, Minnesota, in August, 1862, 
in Company D, Seventh Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, Colonel Wil- 
liam R. Marshall and Captain Rollo Banker commanding, being ordered 
to Fort Abercrombie. 

Mr. Grout was born in Canada, August 17, 1835, and is a son of 
Ebenezer Grout, of Scotch descent. Ebenezer married Rhoda Stone, 
who was a daughter of George and Elizabeth Stone of Revolutionary 
stock. The Grout family went to Fox Lake, Wisconsin, in 1854, and 
to Minnesota in 1856, and located there among the early settlers of their 
locality. The father died in 1865, aged sixty-one years, while the 
mother died at the age of sixty-eight years. Both were Baptists. 

Arnold W. Grout was reared in Canada and educated in the schools 
of his vicinity. In January, 1869, at St. Charles, he was married to 
Sarah B. Ramsden, who was born in Manchester, England, February 
22, 1836, being a daughter of Rev. John Ramsden, a Baptist preacher. 
Her father is also a manufacturer of bolts and nuts. He is recog- 
nized as a man of education and great piety. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grout have two children now living, namely : Lisette 
and Hattie. The latter married R. T. McCall and has a daughter Mable. 
In politics Mr. Grout is a Republican and is interested in local affairs. 
He is also a member of Coleman's Post, No. 115, G. A. R. His wife 
is a prominent member of the Women's Relief Corps. In religious faith 
both are Baptists and very good church workers. They are kindhearted 
people, very hospitable and well liked by all who know them. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 907 

FRANKLIN MILLER. 

Franklin Miller, of Lincoln precinct, Saline county, has resided 
and wrought in this portion of southeastern Nebraska since 1877, and 
during this twenty-seven years or more his substantiality as a man 
of affairs and his influence and worth as a citizen have kept pace with 
time and brought him to a position of prominence in the life of his com- 
munity. In his early years he gave his service to his country as a sol- 
dier, and now for many years has devoted himself successfully to the 
cultivation of the soil, which, in the words of Daniel Webster, "is the 
most important labor of man." 

Mr. Miller is not yet sixty years old, but his life has been a very 
busy one from youth up. He was born in Medina county, Ohio, Sep- 
tember 29, 1846, and comes from an old family of Pennsylvania. His 
grandfather Peter Miller was bound out when a child, but made him- 
self so useful and showed so much capability that when he was of age 
his employer gave him one hundred and sixty acres of government 
land in Summit county, Ohio, and this estate is still owned in the Miller 
name. Samuel Miller, the son of this Ohio settler and the father of 
Franklin, was a native of Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, and married 
Elizabeth Baughman, a native of Northampton county, Pennsylvania, 
both of whom are now deceased. In 1861 they moved to Christian 
county, Illinois, Samuel Miller died in 1879 at the age of sixty. He 
had followed carpentering and farming for a life occupation, and in poli- 
tics he was a Whig and a Democrat, and in religion a member of the 
Reformed church. He and his wife were parents of eight children, four 
sons and four daughters. 

Mr. Franklin Miller was reared in Summit county. Ohio, near Ak- 
ron, but in 1861 accompanied his parents to Christian county, Illinois. 
He had only a fair education, and is a man of self-attainment and 



9 o8 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

has gained what he possesses by his own efforts. He remained at 
home until October, 1864, and then entered the United States regular 
army as a recruit, being assigned to Company B, First Battalion of the 
Thirteenth United States Infantry, Captain Duffy and Colonel Reeves 
commanding. This regiment had been organized in 1861, and Mr. 
Miller joined it at Nashville, Tennessee, was sent to St. Louis, thence 
to Fort Riley, Kansas, and was on general and special duty in the 
west for some time. He was sent, in 1866, to Camp Cook, sixty miles 
from the headwaters of the Missouri river, and remained there until 
August, 1867, when he received his honorable discharge, after having 
given full and faithful service to his country. He returned to Chris- 
tian county, Illinois, and engaged in farming for some years. 

In 1869 he was married to Miss Fyetta E. Kammerer, a lady of 
worth and singular strength of character. She was born in North- 
ampton county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Joseph and Matilda (John- 
son) Kammerer, the former of whom died in Illinois at the age of 
sixty-eight and the latter at the age of fifty-four. Her parents were 
members of the Reformed church, and there were fifteen children in 
their family, five sons and ten daughters, all of whom grew up. Those 
living in Saline county besides Mrs. Miller are Savannah Henshue. 
Alice Krider, and Mrs. Tohn Loutzenhiser. Mr. and Mrs. Miller have 
four children, and lost one, Milton, when three years old. Those liv- 
ing are: Alice, who is a successful teacher; Melvin; Myron, who has a 
homestead in the state of Washington; and Roy, at home. 

Mr. Miller came to Saline county in 1877, and in 1892 he purchased 
his present fine estate of two hundred and forty acres in Lincoln pre- 
cinct. He also owns eighty acres on Johnson creek, and this is farmed 
by his son. He has a nice modern residence, built at a cost of twelve 
hundred dollars, and the improvements and general cultivation and ap- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 909 

pearance of the place indicate a master hand at the agricultural busi- 
ness and a thrifty and successful manager. The house and the buildings 
are almost hidden during the summer in a fine grove of fruit and shade 
trees, the barns and stock and grain buildings are well placed and ample, 
the fences are kept in excellent repair, and one would have to search 
the township through to find a prettier or more productive farmstead. 

Mr. Miller takes much interest in the public welfare of his com- 
munity. He is a stanch Populist, has been justice of the peace in his 
precinct, was assessor for five years, is a member of the school board, 
and in all things a thoroughly good citizen. He is a man of large 
and rugged physique, and is genial and of a happy temperament and 
wide-awake and interested in all that transpires both locally and na- 
tionally. He is a member of the Grand Army post, is affiliated with 
the Modern Woodmen, and belongs to the Evangelical church. 



TOHN L. TIDBALL. 

John L. Tidball is the president of the First National Bank of 
Crete, in which city he has made his home since June, 1870. He was 
therefore one of the pioneer settlers of Saline county, became one of the 
founders of Crete and from its early development has taken an active 
and helpful part in its progress and upbuilding. Although an old set- 
tler he is not an old man, but is still in the prime of life, an active, 
useful factor in the business circles of Crete. His birth occurred in 
Newcastle, Pennsylvania, October 6, 1844. Thomas Tidball, the founder 
of the family in America, was a seafaring man, who came from Eng- 
land, arriving in Philadelphia, on the nth of August, 1714. On the 
6th of July, 1 71 5, he was married to Elizabeth Brownhill, also a native 



910 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

of England, and they became the parents of eleven children, six sons 
and five daughters: Richard, who was born May 27, 1716; Thomas; 
John; Sarah; Mary; Elizabeth; Alice; James; Joseph; William and Ra- 
chel, who was born on the 1st of June, 1740. William Tidball, the next 
to the youngest of the family, was born November 23, 1736, and died 
in 1814. He settled in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, near Pittsburg, 
about 1760. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Miss Sheely, 
was the mother of John Tidball, the grandfather of him whose name 
introduces this review. ]ohn Tidball was born in Virginia, May I, 
1766, and died at Newcastle, Pennsylvania, October 22, 1846. Our 
subject has in his possession a manuscript giving a full and complete 
list of his ancestors from the time of the founding of the family in 
America down to 1889. 

James Tidball. father of our subject, was born June 5, 1801, and 
married Cynthia Dunlap, whose birth occurred in Warren, Ohio, August 
1, 1812, the wedding being celebrated October 12, 1836. They became 
the parents of eight children, four sons and four daughters, of whom 
two sons died in early life. Clayton Tidball, born August 20, 1837, 
died March 28, 1855, at the a?e of eighteen years. Mary, the second 
member of the family, is the wife of Rev. William D. Patton, a Pres- 
byterian minister of Omaha, Nebraska, and they had three sons. Sarah 
C. is the widow of Rev. David Patton, who was a captain in the Civil 
war, going forth to battle in the Union army soon after he was ordained 
to the ministry, and after the war he served as pastor of the churches 
at Pine Grove and Petroleum in central Pennsylvania. He died at 
the age of forty years, leaving a widow and three children, of whom 
Mrs. Patton and the eldest daughter now survive. John is the next 
member of the Tidball family. Louisa J. is the widow of Rev. Cowgill 
G. Cooper and resides in Crete with two sons and one daughter. Charles 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 911 

M., born March 5, 1849, died September 26, 185 1. Margaret is the 
widow of Rev. Alonzo Lawrence, of Lincoln, Nebraska, and has one 
daughter. Riley, born September 26, 1854, is a lumber merchant of 
Lincoln, Nebraska. The father died at Moberly, Missouri, September 
5, 1883, and the mother, who was born on the 1st of August, 1812, died 
in Crete, May 25, 1886. Her father was James Dunlap, who was 
twice married. He was a farmer by occupation and removed from 
Pennsylvania to Ohio, becoming one of the pioneer settlers of the latter 
state. There his death occurred at the advanced age of eighty years. 
He lived an upright and honorable life, and long served as deacon of the 
Presbyterian church in which he held membership. 

John L. Tidball pursued his education in the high school at New- 
castle, Pennsylvania, and at twenty-cne years of age went to Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, where he entered the Duff Commercial College, in 1865. 
He afterward located in Warren, Ohio, where he was employed as 
bookkeeper in a wholesale grocery house for four years. He settled in 
Ashland, Nebraska, June 19, 1869, and was there engaged in the 
lumber business as a member of the firm of Tidball & Iddings. In 
June, 1870, he came to Crete, where he engaged in general merchan- 
dising as a member of the firm of Vollantine, Tidball & Company, the 
silent partner being William Hain. Mr. Tidball built the first store in 
Crete. The firm had the contract to furnish the supplies for the rail- 
road and had several places of business, but made Crete their head- 
quarters. They continued in business together for three years, and in 
1873 the firm of Tidball & Fuller, lumber merchants, was formed and 
had a continuous existence until 1895, during which time they established 
many yards, having business in from eighteen to twenty places. Mr. 
Tidball is a man of excellent business ability and keen foresight, and 
readily recognizes an opportunity. On the 22d of May, 1882, he or- 



912 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

ganized the First National Bank at Crete and has been its president 
continuously since. In the incorporation he was associated with John 
R. Clark, who was the cashier of the First National Bank of Lincoln; 
H. S. Fuller, who became vice president ; John P. Clarey, who became 
cashier; and R. M. Tidball, a brother of our subject, who was one of 
the directors. The bank was capitalized for fifty thousand dollars 
under the name of the First National Bank of Crete. It has had a 
steady growth and has become one of the strong, reliable financial insti- 
tutions of the state. 

Mr. Tidball was married on the ioth of October, 1871, to Miss 
Emma S. Fuller, of Warren, Ohio, a daughter of the late Judge Ira L. 
Fuller, who was the leading lawyer of the northern part of Ohio. 
Judge Fuller married Miss Mary B. Stevens, and they became the 
parents of eight children, three sons and five daughters. His death 
occurred in Warren, Ohio, October 8, 1874, when he was about sixty 
years of age, his birth having occurred in Broome county, New York, 
in November, 18 14. He was married at Newton Falls, Ohio, October 
12, 1840, to Miss Mary B. Stevens, whose birth occurred in Warren, 
Ohio, October 25, 1822. She is now a widow residing in Crete, and 
although she is an octogenarian she retains her physical and mental 
faculties to a remarkable degree. To Mr. and Mrs. Tidball have been 
born five children. Clayton Fuller, born January 22, 1873, is a dealer 
in coal and lumber. He married Bessie Murphy and they have four 
children, two sons and two daughters. Mary Tidball is the wife of Rev. 
Lucius F. Reed, a Congregational minister now located at Montpelier, 
Vermont. Katherine L. is the wife of A. D. Johnston, assistant cashier 
of the First National Bank at Cheyenne, Wyoming, and they have one 
daughter. John L. Tidball, Jr., is now attending Doane College as a 
member of the class of 1905. Harriet P. Tidball is also a student in 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 913 

Doane College, and the married daughters are both graduates of that 
institution. 

Mr. Tidball has been identified with the Masonic fraternity for 
thirty-seven years, became a charter member of the lodge at Crete and 
is now a past master. He also belongs to Mount Zion Lhapter, No. 17, 
R. A. M. ; Mount Morah Commandery, No. 4, K. T., of Lincoln, Ne- 
braska ; and to Gesostris Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Lincoln. He 
is also connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen. In 
politics a Republican, he has served for twenty-one consecutive years 
as a member of the school board and is also a trustee of Doane College. 
He is a member of the Congregational church, of which he is a trustee, 
and he takes a deep and active interest in everything pertaining to the 
substantial, intellectual and moral development of this community. His 
large brick residence was erected in 1882, and is one of the best homes 
of Crete, standing in the midst of a plat of ground covering eight lots, 
shaded by beautiful trees. It is approached from the north over a pictur- 
esque bridge. His first home was a modest frame dwelling, in which 
he lived from 1871 until 1882, but as his financial resources increased 
he took great delight in providing his present fine residence for his 
family- He is well known and highly respected not only as one of the 
successful business men of Crete, but also as one whose career will 
bear the closest investigation and scrutiny, and whose life record has 
always been characterized by those things which are honorable and 
commendable between man and man. 



9 i4 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

DR. ISAAC M. FRY. 

Dr. Isaac M. Fry, who is the leading dentist of Hebron, Nebraska, 
has practiced his profession in this city for over a quarter of a century, 
and is thus ranked among the old-time residents. He is one of the capa- 
ble and skillful representatives of a profession which has kept pace 
with the wonderful progress made in the allied science of surgery, and 
which has done so much to alleviate many of the ills of man and served 
to increase his health and happiness manifold. Dr. Fry is a product of 
the school of experience and hard effort, for in the main he has relied 
on his own toil and the study of dental literature and books to bring 
him to the front in his occupation. He has gained the high esteem of 
his associates in business and social life, and is honored for the part 
he has played in advancing the welfare and prosperity of the citizens 
of Hebron and Thayer county. 

Dr. Fry was born in Seneca county, Ohio, February 3, 1842, and 
is descended on the paternal side from old Holland anestors. His 
father, Enoch Fry, was born in Maryland in 181 1 and died in 1892. 
He married Miss Rhoda Wolf, who was born near Columbus, Ohio. 
Her father, John Wolf, was a native of Pennsylvania, whence he re- 
moved to the Buckeye state and became one of the influential men of 
his community. 

Dr. Fry, the third of eleven children in the family of his parents, 
spent the years of his youth in the labor of the farm in Ohio, and was 
educated in the public schools. His first experience on his own account 
was acting as a nursery salesman, and then he taught school for awhile. 
In 1864, when twenty-two years old, he set out for the west via the 
overland route, and on this trip first became acquainted with his future 
home in the state of Nebraska. He went through Montana and Salt 
Lake City, to California, and remained there two vears. At Suisun, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 



9i; 



California, he took up the study of dentistry under Dr. Howe, and laid 
the foundation for his later training. He returned to Ohio by the 
water route, and then took a collegiate course of one year. He began 
the practice of his profession in the state of Missouri, and while there 
met with an accident in which he lost a leg. He took up his perma- 
nent residence in Hebron in 1875, and has since carried on a most satis- 
factory practice. At the same time for a few years here he farmed 
ami raised stock, but has since devoted his time and energy to his pro- 
fession. 

Dr. Fry's first wife was Miss Clementina West, who was born in 
Vermont and reared in Ohio. She was the mother of one child, Ezra W., 
who died in infancy. Dr. Fry was afterward married in Kansas to Mrs. 
Ellen Ellis, a native also of Ohio, and they have had six children, as fol- 
lows : Rhoda R., Paul B., Cora B., Maggie A. and Beulah M., and Emma 
L., deceased. 

During the Civil war Dr. Fry enlisted in the One Hundred and 
Twenty-third Ohio Infantry, but was discharged by reason of physical 
disability. He was afterwards enlisted with the Ohio state militia, but 
owing to his trip across the plains he did not engage with them in actual 
service. He has always been identified with the Republican party, al- 
though without seeking political preferment. He affiliates with the 
Knights and Ladies of Security and with the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church at Hebron when it had only six members. He was licensed to 
preach as a local minister, and held regular services at different school- 
houses for some years. He was appointed as supply to a circuit in Fill- 
more county for one year, and was later appointed as a supply to finish 
three-fourths of a year at Reynolds, Nebraska. 

Dr. Fry's character is versatile and broad, and from the serious rou- 



916 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

tine of gaining a livelihood he has often turned aside into more pleasant 
paths and allowed his intellectual and spiritual nature to browse upon 
the less common interests of the world. His father often called him a 
genius on account of his tendency, when a boy on the farm, to do mechani- 
cal work in his own original way. In later life he has come to believe 
there is no genius except that of honest toil in the use of every faculty 
of his being for the glory of God and the good of his fellow men, but 
nevertheless his originating faculty has given him two practical devices 
for which he has patents, and there is another patent pending on a tooth 
crown. He is also developing other inventions that he hopes to patent 
and introduce, among them being an improvement in artificial limbs. 
Since he has worn a limb of his own make for many years past, he has 
been able to experiment at his own expense, and turn his own misfortune 
to account for his fellow men. 

One day in his young manhood, while he was teaching a school in 
of his native state, a lady friend visited his school and gave him a puzzle 
written in rhyme. During the following evening he was able to find a 
correct solution for the puzzle, but it was a matter of surprise to him 
that he could express the answer likewise in rhyme. With this clue to a 
new power, he has, from that time, on various occasions expressed his 
thoughts in that way. During his struggle with the realities of life, 
while subject to the disadvantages above mentioned, he was constrained 
to set forth his thoughts in a poem entitled "My Pocket Book," which 
though written in a vein of humor contains some solid facts. We can- 
not do better than complete this history of Dr. Fry by appending this 
poem and also one that shows his sincere convictions concerning - the tem- 
perance movement. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 



9 l 7 



MY POCKET BOOK. 



My pocket book is lank and lean, 
The change therein cannot be seen. 
Demands are large and income small, 
I'll stir myself or I will fall. 

For every dollar that comes in 
Two fellows stand, and, with a grin, 
Would like to have that dollar paid, 
And credit to their bill be laid. 



The assessor asks from year to year, 
Of all the chattels we have here, 
And taxes on them all are laid. 
And in the fall they must be paid. 

The editor would not think well 
If we his fortune did not tell, 
By helping buy his ink and oil 
And add a little for his toil. 



So I am in a dreadful strait 
(As all those hungry fellows wait.) 
I study hard to know the way, 
That I my honest debts may pay. 

I strike the keys of fortune's bell 
The best that I can surely tell, 
And yet the music that I hear 
Grates with discord on my ear. 



The preacher asks no tax at all, 
(And yet from grace we'd surely fall) 
If for his wants we did not care. 
And get a credit away up there. 

And thus the pile must not be small 
— If we should have a pile at all — 
To divide and subdivide. 
Betwixt the lot on every side. 



Demands are made that are too great, 
I'm sure to be a little late; 
In raking up the solid wealth, 
So needful to the public health. 

The hungry six must all be fed, 
With food ; they ask for daily bread ; 
Their backs be clothed, their feet be shod 
As up the road of life they trod. 



So just to make the laugh go round, 
Of gold we need about a pound. 
And have some change of silver made 
So debts both large and small be paid. 

Now there's the man that chews the weed 
And pays for smoke to help his speed, 
How he can raise the extra fee, 
Is more than I can fairly see. 



And when they're sick, the doctor's fee 
Must very surely canceled be, 
And though the six are very sweet 
That will not all expenses meet. 



And if to that we add the beer 
That some do drink, their souls to cheer, 
Where will the extra fee come in. 
As in the race they try to win? 



9 i8 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 



HE BARROOM UNION. 



Whilst travelling as a book agent in 
California, I found that every hotel had 
a bar where men would gamble with a 
dice box for the drinks and on seeing a 
man lying dead drunk on a Sunday I was 
constrained to write "Bar Room Union." 
It was written before the Crusade com- 
menced and is, doubtless, a true proph- 
esy concerning woman's power and influ- 
ence in the much needed temperance re- 
form. 

Young men and maids I'll speak to you 
Before I on my way pursue, 
For I have got a work to do 
Against a bar-room union. 

There is a certain class of men 
That I of all the rest condemn. 
And I would warn my friends of them 
And of a bar-room union. 

The worst of all the rest is he 
That always at the bar you see. 
For he to poison does agree, 
All those that join this union. 

They will invite you to the dice 
And if you yield, you'll pay the price, 
And it will seem so very nice 
To all this drinking union. 

This is the game that must be played, 
The one that's beat must treat the crowd 
That always does the bar enshrowd 
That seek this drinking union. 

Young girls I will to you this speak, 
And tell you, if a man you seek, 



You must not love a lazy sneak. 
That loves this drinking union. 

Now, I will tell you how to know, 
The men that to these places go 
And spend what they might give to you 
If ere you join their union. 

Their eyes are red and rather sheepish 
And for a nose they have a raddish 
And they forever long and wish 
To be within this union. 

Oh ! Mothers, try and save your sons, 
For you are God's own chosen ones, 
To save a race from whiskey chains 
And from a whiskey union. 

Oh ! sisters, lend a helping hand 
To save your brothers from this band 
By making home a brighter land 
Than the cursed bar-room union. 

\ oung men, I lastly say to you, 
If you expect a woman true. 
And one that has her senses too. 
You must torsake this union. 

Young men and maids, I'll speak to you, 
Before I on my way pursue, 
For I must bid you all adieu, 
And say forsake this union. 



The worst of all the rest is he 
That always at the polls you see 
To cast his vote that there may be 
A legal bar-room union. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 9 J 9 

STEPHEN R. EASLEY. 
Stephen R. Easley, who is residing in Alexandria precinct, Thayer 
county, Nebraska, arrived here on the 19th of March, 1870, and secured 
a claim under the homestead laws. He has since been identified with 
agricultural interests, and his carefully directed efforts have resulted in 
bringing to him very desirable and creditable success. He was born on 
the 4th of November, 1838, in Sullivan county, Tennessee. He spent 
his boyhood days upon the old homestead farm in Tennessee and in 
Iowa, removing to the latter state in 1848. He lived first in Henry 
county and afterward in Marion county. In 1861 he responded to the 
country's call for aid and joined Company G, of the Tenth Iowa Volun- 
teer Infantry, enlisting on the 10th of August, 1861, at Indianola, War- 
ren county, Iowa. The regiment was commanded by Colonel Pursell. 
The troops went into camp at Iowa City and later were sent south to 
Benton Barracks, St. Louis, and on to Cape Girardeau. Mr. Easley 
participated in the engagement there, also in the battles of 
Bird's Point, New Madrid, Island No. 10, Fort Pillow and 
afterward went to Shiloh, but was too late to participate in 
the battle there. The Tenth Iowa was also at Farmington and in the 
siege of Corinth and under Grant participated in the siege- of Vicksburg. 
Mr. Easley likewise encountered the enemy in battle at Port Gibson, Ray- 
mond, Jackson and Champion Hills, where the company lost fifty-three 
men in killed and wounded, including all of the officers. He was like- 
wise in the battle of Black River Bridge, of Chattanooga and Missionary 
Ridge, and went to Knoxville, Tennessee, to relieve General Burnside. 
Later the regiment returned to Chattanooga and participated in the 
Atlanta campaign, and in the skirmishes against the troops under General 
Forrest at Parker's Crossroads. Mr. Easley was in the battles of Decatur 
and Huntsville, Alabama, and on the 21st of January, 1864, he re-enlisted 



9 20 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

and was granted a veteran's furlough. He then returned home and when 
the time of his furlough had expired rejoined his regiment. He saw, 
however, much active service in Georgia, Tennessee and Alabama. He 
went with General Sherman on the march through Georgia to the sea, 
and was also in the Carolina campaign and proceeded to Raleigh, North 
Carolina, where General Joe Johnston surrendered. He was also in the 
battles of Bentonville and at Richmond, and when hostilities had ceased 
his regiment went north with the army and participated in the grand re- 
view in Washington. Mr. Easley was honorably discharged as corporal 
on the 15th of August, 1865. 

When the war was over Mr. Easley returned to Marion county, 
Iowa, and was married in 1868 in Knoxville, Iowa, to Miss Mary E. Mc- 
Elroy, who was born in Holmes county, Ohio, near Millersburg. In 
1870 they came to Thayer county and secured a homestead claim of 
one hundred and sixty acres. Their first home was a sod house ten 
by twenty feet with a board roof. Grasshoppers entirely destroyed their 
crops in 1874, and at other times the climate proved detrimental, hot 
winds and blizzards destroying what they had planted and rendering 
their efforts of little avail. They saw hard times, but they worked 
earnestly and persistently and at length they gained the sure reward 
of labor. Mr. Easley is now the owner of an excellent farm of two 
hundred acres. The pleasant home is well furnished and there is a 
good grove and orchard upon the place, the trees having been planted 
by him. A substantial barn and windmill, the latest improved machinery 
and many other modern facilities and equipments indicate the progres- 
sive and practical spirit of the owner. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Easley has been blessed with two sons : 
John R. and William M. Easley. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 921 

CONOWAY LEEDOM. 

Conoway Leeclom, editor and proprietor of the Hebron Register, 
is one of the most prominent newspaper men of southeastern Nebraska. 
Since his entrance into independent life he lias followed the several 
occupations of farming, teaching and journalism in its various depart- 
ments, and he is well fitted both by training and disposition for the 
successful conduct of a paper so influential to the interests of all classes 
as the Register. He has likewise spent the greater part of his life — 
over a quarter of a century — within the confines of this state, and is 
thoroughly imbued with the Nebraska spirit of enterprise and cognizant 
of its most important history and traditions, political and otherwise, 
which are in themselves valuable assets to one who would succeed 
in the responsible quasi-public position of editor and newspaper propri- 
etor. The Hebron Register has for a number of years been accounted 
among the progressive journals of the state, and has enjoyed a con- 
tinuous existence of over twenty years. It was established in 1883 
as a state-line journal, and was conducted by Clute and Vinton for 
about a year at Hubbel. It was then removed to Hebron and pub- 
lished by Scott and Clute for a time, until it passed into the hands 
of Mr. Leedom. The Register is a large, eight page journal, publish- 
ing full Associate Press news in addition to local items of city and 
county. Mr. Leedom has the power of writing vigorous English, argu- 
mentative and to the point when matters of importance are involved, 
and, being a man of strong convictions, his editorials have been a power 
for reform and progress in the county. 

Mr. Leedom was born at Bentonville, Ohio, in 1850. His grand- 
father, Aaron Leedom. was a soldier in the cavalry branch of the 
United States army in the war with Mexico, serving under General 
Scott. David C. Leedom. the father of our editor, was also a native 



922 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

of Ohio, and of old Virginia stock. He brought his family and located 
at Pontiac, Illinois, in 1867, and about ten years later moved to Thayer 
county. Nebraska, where he engaged in farming during the rest of his 
life, which was brought to a peaceful close on June 5. 1891. His 
wife's maiden name was Elizabeth Johnston, a native of Ohio and a 
descendant of the Pennsylvania Dutch. Her death occurred in 1886. 

Conoway Leedom was the eldest of the six children of his parents. 
He was reared and educated in Ohio and Illinois, and in 1876 came to 
Nebraska, where he engaged in farming and taught school for about 
nine years, and then began his connection with the Register, which has 
continued so successfully ever since. He is allied with the progressive 
wing of the Democratic party. He served the county as deputy county 
clerk for two years, and was then elected to the office of county clerk 
in 1891. 

He was married at Des Moines, Iowa, October 1, 1891, to Miss 
Elizabeth Kleppinger, a native of Pennsylvania and of the thrifty Dutch 
stock of that state. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
church, and stand high in the social circles of the city. He affiliates 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Hebron, and has passed 
all the official chairs and represented the local lodge at the grand lodge. 
He is also of the uniform rank of the Knights of Pythias, and was for 
four years representative to the state grand lodge. He is also a mem- 
ber of the local Castle, Royal Highlanders. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 923 

WALTER H. WILSON. 

Walter H. Wilson, city councilman of Hebron and one of the 
influential and prominent residents of the city and Thayer county, has 
made his career of a little more than a half century one of usefulness 
and steady and persistent effort toward a higher goal. He has lived 
within the confines of this county for over a quarter of a century, 
and has made farming and stock-raising the industry to which he has 
devoted his best efforts. He has been remarkably successful as his 
present estate and operations would indicate, and in this occupation 
or in the practical duties and responsibilities of citizenship and his own 
home he has gained the esteem and high regard of all for his industry, 
integrity and personal worth and character 

To all intents and purposes Mr. Wilson is a bred-in-the-bone 
American citizen, but the place of his birth was across the sea in the 
old shire of Lanark, Scotland, and his jirthday the national holiday 
of his future home, the 4th of July, 1853. His parents, Robert and 
Jane (Harkness) Wilson, both natives of Lanarkshire, in the same 
year and a few months after the birth of their son, left Scotland and 
emigrated to Canada, where they remained ten years, and then took 
up their residence in northern Michigan, where they lived for fifteen 
years. In 1878 they came and made settlement in Thayer county, 
Nebraska, where they passed the remainder of their useful and upright 
lives. 

Mr. Wilson, who was the fourth of their six children, spent his 
young manhood days on a farm, and had the advantages of such schools 
as were in the neighborhood. He has been a practical farmer ever 
since coming to Nebraska, and his present holdings consist of three 
hundred and twenty acres of good land four miles north of Hebron. 
Fifty acres of this land still remains untouched by the plow and just 



9 2 4 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

as it was when the Indians and buffaloes roamed across it, but the rest 
of the farm is highly cultivated and devoted to general farming. 
About 1900 Mr. Wilson gave up actual participation in the conduct 
of his farm, and moved into Hebron, making his residence on a promin- 
ent street in Eads addition. He still directs his farming interests, and 
is regarded as one of the most successful and progressive of the farming 
element of Thayer county. 

Mr. Wilson was married November 6, 1891, to Miss Sarah Keever, 
who was born in Indiana. She is a most estimable lady, popular in 
social circles and kind and helpful as a mother and wife. Her parents, 
John and Elizabeth R. (May) Keever, were born in Pennsylvania, 
being descendants of old and influential families of that state, and moved 
a est and located near Monticello, Indiana, as early as 1850. They are 
both dead. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have one son, Robert K. Mr. 
Wilson is a stanch and steadfast Republican, and is now serving his 
second term as a member of the city council. He affiliates with Hebron 
Lodge No. 43, A. F. & A. M., and he and his wife are members of 
Hebron District Court of Honor, No. 748. They are active workers 
in the Presbyterian church, and she is a member of the missionary 
society. 



JOHN MILLER. 

John Miller, of Lincoln precinct, Saline county, has the well de- 
served reputation of being one of the most progressive and enterpris- 
ing farmers of southeastern Nebraska. He is proprietor of the Maple 
Grove stock farm, an estate which is both a thing of beauty and of 
profit, and is a credit to the entire county. This fine enterprise is in 
itself an excellent memorial to the life work of any man, but Mr. Miller 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 925 

has also made his influence felt in various other ways during his career 
in this part of the state. He is a worthy and public-spirited citizen and 
an old soldier of the rebellion, has lent his aid to many affairs 
of material good to the community, has a family of which he may well 
be proud, and is withal an upright, sincere and esteemed man, working 
daily with an honest will and purpose and striving to do what is right. 

Mr. Miller was born in Lee county, Illinois, on March 4, 1845, 
on the same day that Tames K. Polk was inaugurated president of the 
United States. His father, John J. Miller, was born in Germany in 
1806, was reared and educated there, and came to the United States 
when a young man, and in Pennsylvania was married to Mary Weaver, 
who was born in Germany in 181 1, and who died near Dixon, Illinois, 
in 1890, having been the mother of seven children, four sons and three 
daughters, the son Frank being also at the present writing a resident 
of Saline county, Nebraska. Mr. and Mrs. John J. Miller were among 
the earliest settlers of Lee county, Illinois, where he bought govern- 
ment land at a dollar and a quarter an acre. He was a very successful 
farmer, and he lived to be more than threescore and ten years of 
age, passing away in 1879. He and his wife were members of the 
Catholic church, and he was a Democrat in politics. 

Mr. John Miller was reared to manhood on the old Illinois farm, 
and among the lessons he learned on the home place and in the dis- 
trict schools of the neighborhood none were more valuable than the 
discipline in hard work and honorable labor which became his share. 
In May, 1864, when he was nineteen years old, he enlisted at Dixon, 
Illinois, in Company D of the One Hundred and Fortieth Illinois In- 
fantry, under Captain Frank Smith and Colonel Whitney. The com- 
pany was encamped at Springfield, Illinois, was sent south to Memphis, 
about which city it served on special and detached duty for six months, 



926 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

was then sent to St. Louis and Sulphur Springs, thence to Camp Doug- 
las in Chicago, where Mr. Miller received his honorable discharge in 
November, 1864. In 1874 Mr. Miller came out to Saline county, 
Nebraska, and has resided here ever since, for a period of thirty years. 
He paid three thousand dollars for his first place, but its value is prin- 
cipally due to his subsequent labor and effective management. The 
Maple Grove farm now comprises three hundred acres of as finely cul- 
tivated land as is to be found in the county. He also owns two hun- 
dred and forty acres on Turkey creek, and this place is under the man- 
agement of his eldest son. On the Maple Grove place is a beautiful coun- 
try residence, erected in 1893 at a cost of twenty-five hundred dollars, 
and it is built and furnished in a modern, attractive and comfortable 
style, and is such a place as friends delight to honor with their fre- 
quent presence. There is a bluegrass lawn about the residence which 
in summer gives the appearance of coolness and comfort, and a grove 
of two acres of cedars and firs besides large numbers of fruit trees 
afford a picturesque setting to the whole estate. Wherever one looks 
he finds some convenience in the way of machinery or other accessory 
which adds to the ease and profit of the twentieth century agriculturist. 
Of cattle there are some of the finest grade shorthorns; the favorite 
hogs of the owner seem to be the Poland China, and for driving and 
work purposes there are excellent horses. All in all, no stock farm in 
Saline county could be considered more of a model than this one of 
Mr. John Miller, to whose enterprise and thrift such an establishment 
is clue. 

In the success that has come to him through a lifetime of endeavor 
Mr. Miller never fails to include his noble wife as a sharer and helper, 
and for over twenty-five years now they have wrought side by side in 
the affairs of the world. He was married at Lincoln, Nebraska, in 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 927 

1877, to Miss Sarah Buckingham, who was born in Rock Island county, 
Illinois, and before her marriage had been a successful school teacher 
in Saline county. Her parents were John and Rebecca (Dillene) Buck- 
ingham, both natives of Ohio, and who were early settlers of Nebraska, 
having come to Saline county in 187 1. Her father died in Saline 
county at the age of sixty-two and her mother at the age of forty-five. 
Her father was a Republican in politics, and in religious faith was a 
United Brethren. Mrs. Miller is one of five children, three sons and • 
two daughters, all of whom are living at the present writing. Three 
sons make up the family circle at the Miller home. The eldest is John 
Irvine, who is on the Turkev creek farm mentioned above; the other 
two sons are Roy B. and Harold H., both at home. Mr. Miller is a 
strong Republican in politics, and is a member of the Grand Army post 
at Friend. 



OSW1N S. HUTCHINSON. 

This well known and popular citizen of Sherman township, Gage 
county, first came to Nebraska about twenty-four years ago and has 
since taken a deep interest in the prosperity of his adopted state. He 
is a native of Indiana, born in Logansport, in 1869, and is a son of 
Oswin Hutchinson, a prominent railroad man, who made his home in 
Wymore for some years. The father was born in Rochester, New 
York, and in early life married Miss Frances Wayward, a native of 
Scotland. She died at the age of thirty-three years, leaving three 
children, namely : Elva May, Doras and Oswin S. 

During his boyhood and youth the subject of this sketch accompa- 
nied his father on his various removals, and his early education was 
principally obtained in the schools of Red Oak, Iowa, and Wymore, 



928 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Nebraska. For some years he was engaged in railroading in this state, 
in Colorado and New Mexico, but finally abandoned that vocation on 
account of his eyes and turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, 
being now engaged in farming in Sherman township, Gage county. 

Mr. Hutchinson married Miss Mary C. Wilkinson. Her father, 
George C. Wilkinson, was born in England, and in early life learned 
the butcher's trade in his native land, and on coming to the United 
States located in Rochester, New York, where he followed that pur- 
suit for a time. Later he worked at his trade in New Orleans, Louisi- 
ana, and from there went to Whiteside county, Illinois. The Civil 
war being thai in progress, he joined Company F, Ninety-third Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, and was in a number of battles. Mr. Wilkinson 
married Miss Rebecca Jane Burton, and they had two children : Mary 
C, now the wife of Oswin S. Hutchinson; and Thomas E , who lives 
on the old home farm in Sherman township, Gage county, Nebraska. Mr. 
Wilkinson is now an honored member of Blue Springs Post No. 37, 
G. A. R., and is held in high regard by all who know him. His estimable 
wife died in 1893. 

Mr. Hutchinson is the owner of a fine farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres in Sherman township, which he has placed under a high 
state of cultivation and improved in a commendable manner. He has 
a very pleasant home, well and tastefully furnished, his barns and out- 
buildings are good and substantial and everything about the farm indi- 
cates the progressive spirit and good business ability of the owner, who 
is regarded as one of the leading citizens of this community. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 929 

JUDSON PERCIVAL. 

Judson Percival, a prominent resident of Clay township, Pawnee 
county, Nebraska, was born in Oswego county, New York, February 
11, 1844. He is a son of Stephen D. Percival, who was born in Ver- 
mont, and a grandson of Stephen, who was a connection of General 
Percival. Roxana (Blanchard) Percival, the wife of Stephen D., was 
born in Vermont. The marriage occurred in Oswego county, New 
York, and in 1847 the family went to Kendall county, Illinois. The 
father died in 1872, and the mother died in 1867. The following 
children were born to the parents, namely : Alonzo ; Edgar, of the One 
Hundred and Twenty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, deceased; 
Judson ; Stephen, of Company B, Eighth Illinois Cavalry, now residing 
in Washington county, Kansas; Eleanor, deceased; Eleanor (2); De 
Witt; Philo, of Nemaha county, Kansas; Mar)-, deceased; Mary Tryon; 
Belle Brewer, of Nemaha county; Charles and August A., twins; Wool- 
bert and Myrtle M., deceased. 

Mr. Judson Percival was reared upon a farm in Illinois, and en- 
listed at St. Charles, Kane county, Illinois, in August, 1862, in Com- 
pany B, Eighth Illinois Cavalry, Colonel John Farnsworth command- 
ing. The regiment was at Gettysburg, and participated in numerous 
battles following. He was captured at Muddy Branch, Maryland, but 
made his escape, and rejoined his regiment on December 17, 1864. 
The following July, 1865, he was honorably mustered out at Camp 
Douglas. He was wounded at Monocacy July 9, 1864, and was sent 
to Baltimore for six weeks to recuperate. 

In 1865 Mr. Percival went to Cedar county, Iowa, and there in May, 
1872, he married Amanda Schnepp, a native of Lafayette, Indiana. 
She is a daughter of John and Deliah (Leslie) Schnepp. John Schnepp 
had been educated for the priesthood, and spoke seven languages. He 



93° SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

and his wife located in Cedar county, Iowa, in 1847. They had thir- 
teen children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Percival are well and favorably known throughout 
the neighborhood, and they never refuse to extend hospitality to the 
unfortunate. Honest, enterprising and public-spirited, Mr. Percival, 
who has made Clay township his home since 1872, is one of the old 
settlers of the county, and one of its most representative men. They 
have a family of seven children : Nova Odell ; Febura Odo ; Judson 
Oredus; Stephen Denver; Louisa Leona Shaffer; Earl Leslie; and Ag- 
ness Pearl. 



REUBEN S. PITTENGER. 

Reuben S. Pittenger is a prosperous and enterprising farmer, re- 
siding about a mile from the town of Crab Orchard, Johnson county, 
and during his residence here has gained the esteem and respect of 
all his fellow citizens. He is an industrious and intelligent agricul- 
turist, able to bring about results in whatever he undertakes in that 
line, and in this his life work has made a satisfactory success. He 
is also a public-spirited citizen, and his patriotism was shown in the 
days of the Civil war when he fought in the Union ranks and went home 
with a good record. 

Mr. Pittenger was born in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, August 
17, 1 84 1, a son of Absalom and Marie (Chapman) Pittenger, both 
natives of Pennsylvania. In 1845 the family moved west to Kane 
county, Illinois, and a few years later further west to Chickasaw county, 
Iowa. Absalom Pittenger was a farmer by occupation, was a Repub- 
lican and a member of the Methodist church, and during his long life 
of seventy-six years gained the respect of all around him. His wife 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 



93 J 



died in Iowa at the age of seventy-six years. They had thirteen chil- 
dren, and two of the sons were soldiers in the Civil war. Henry seeing 
service in an Illinois regiment and being now a resident of Hardin 
county, Iowa. 

Mr. Pittenger was a boy of four years when the migration was 
made from Pennsylvania to Illinois, and his boyhood was spent in that 
state and in Chickasaw county, Iowa. The schools which he attended 
were very primitive, built of logs, with rough seats and desks, and 
the lessons learned were more practical than intellectual. He after- 
ward returned to Illinois, and on August 17, 1861, enlisted at Syca- 
more, Dekalb county, Illinois, in Company B, Eighth Illinois Cavalry, 
under Colonel John Farnsworth, one of the state's most prominent men 
and politicians. This was the best regiment of cavalry sent out of the 
state, and was composed of the flower of the youth of Illinois, the men 
all being of fine physiques. It was known as the Black Abolition Reg- 
iment. It did rough rider service, and perhaps no other regiment of 
the Union army saw more fighting and skirmishing and hard work 
than the Eighth Illinois. The regiment was in camp in St. Charles, Illi- 
nois, for a time, and was then sent to Washington, and from there to 
its great field of activity in Virginia. While there Mr. Pittenger wat, 
attacked by typhoid fever, was confined in the hospitals at Alexandria 
and Washington, and in May, 1862, was discharged on account of dis- 
ability. He returned to Illinois, and from there to Chickasaw county, 
Iowa, and after his marriage, in 1870, moved to Mitchell county, Kan- 
sas, where he took up a homestead, near Beloit. He remained here 
until 1882, was then in Floyd county, Iowa, two years, returned to 
Kansas and was in Graham county two years and a half, and in Atchison 
county, Missouri, near Tarkio, for a like period, after which he came to 
Johnson county and bought his farm of eighty acres one mile out of 



932 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Crab Orchard. This is a beautiful farmstead, well improved, having a 
good barn, nice residence, and fruit orchard, and all things necessary 
for a model farm. 

Mr. Pittenger was married in Chickasaw count)*, Iowa, in 1870, 
to Miss Ellen Simpson, who was born in Wabash county, Indiana, and 
was a successful school teacher before her marriage. Her father, 
George Simpson, was a native of Henry county, Indiana, his parents 
having come from Kentucky, and he was a soldier in the Civil war, 
in the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Iowa Infantry. He is now liv- 
ing in Graham county, Kansas, at the age of seventy-seven, and his wife, 
whose name was Caroline Johnson, a native of Illinois, is now seventy- 
one years old. He is a retired farmer, in politics is Republican and a 
member of the Baptist church. Mrs. Pittenger is one of thirteen chil- 
dren, four sons and nine daughters, all of whom grew up and were 
married. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pittenger have seven children : Orlos, Cora M., Lee 
W., Clyde C, Dean Carl, Milton and Ruth. Mr. Pittenger is a strong 
Republican, and is a member of the L. Mason Post No. 69, G. A. R. 
He and his wife are members of the Baptist church. 



JOSEPH WEST STARR. 

Joseph West Starr came to Nebraska and settled on the farm, 
W Yi of sec. 4-1-4, of Jefferson county, where he still resides, in August, 
1880, from Richmond, Indiana, where he was born April 4, 1838. His 
father was Charles West Starr, a native of Philadelphia, who came 
to Indiana in 1824, and bought a farm now covered by that part of the 
city lying between Fourth and Sixteenth and Main and North "F" 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 933 

streets. C. W. Starr was a house carpenter by trade, and having great 
faith in the outcome of the town he made proof of it by building num- 
erous houses, including a hotel building corner Eighth and Main. His 
building propensity running ahead of the needs of the town he labored 
under a load of debt from the hard times in the early 40's till the renew- 
ed growth of the city, consequent upon the incoming of railroads, put 
him in good shape in the 50's, by sale of improved and unimproved real 
estate. He was an active and enterprising citizen, treasurer of the branch 
of the Whitewater canal built from Brookville to Richmond (washed out 
by flood as soon as finished) and, according to his means, a liberal 
subscriber to the stock of the railroads as they came. 

C. W. Starr's father was John Starr, druggist, of Philadelphia ; 
and his grandfather was James Starr, cordwainer, on whose old books 
the names of George Washington, Green, Benedict Arnold, and other 
"rebel" officers are in evidence both for the quality and style of his 
"top boots." 

In 1819 C. W. Starr married Elizabeth Wilson, daughter of John 
and Catherine (Milner) Wilson, of Hockessen. Delaware. Captain 
Starr is of pure Quaker blood from way back. His mother sat for years 
at the "head of the meeting," but his father, though often invited to the 
gallery by the overseers of the meeting, preferred to sit in the "body" 
of the meeting. C. W. Starr was "disowned" by the society for allow- 
ing Elias Hicks to preach in his big barn after the meeting-house had 
been closed to him: and his wife, though the visiting committee "found 
no fault in her," was advised "to go with her husband," and was accord- 
ingly disowned also. So it happened that the captain's "birthright" 
was with what were called "Hicksite Quakers." He is glad of it and 
only wishes he was a better sample of the body, now known as the 
"Religious Society of Friends." C. W. Starr died May 1. 1855, aged 



934 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

sixty-two years; his widow surviving until July 10, 1884, reaching the 
age of eighty-six years. 

Captain Starr was educated in Quaker schools and college. He went 
into the jobbing grocery business with his brother James M. Starr, in 
Richmond, Indiana, 1859, and was member of firm of Beard, Starr & 
Company, plow manufacturers, Richmond and Indianapolis, 1860-1. 
He and his brother "Ben" were sworn into the United States service 
August 21, 1861, in what was to be an "independent" cavalry company. 
At final organization J. W. Starr was elected first lieutenant (James 
Conner, captain) and as such was mustered-in by Major Thomas Wood, 
September 13, 1861, and became captain of the company May 17, 1862, 
Conner being major. The "independent" company became Company C, 
Second Indiana Cavalry, with wbich good regiment it served in the 
Second Brigade, First Division of Cavalry, command of the "Army of 
the Cumberland" till October 4, 1864. The last year and a half of 
service he was on continuous duty as judge advocate of successive divi- 
sion court-martial. He was surrendered twice by commanding officers 
at Gallatin and Hartsville. Tennessee. The first time he led two com- 
panies off the field to Nashville. The second time he received special 
parole from General Morgan partly by request of a rebel friend. He 
was captured by the enemy May 9, 1864, but escaped, running the fire 
of a rebel regiment at short range. 

After the war he was real estate agent, and with the gas company 
at Richmond, 1864 to 1875; in lumber business '75 to '80, and then 
moved to Nebraska, "to put an Indiana farm on a Nebraska prairie." 
Looking out from his house upon the bluegrass pastures, and upon the 
orchards and the catalpa and hard maple groves that shut out the 
world, you could not tell but what yon were in "old Wayne county" 
where he was born. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 935 

Captain J. \Y. Starr was married January 24, 1865, to Eliza Mor- 
gan Burr, daughter of William P. and Lydia (Moorhead) Burr, of 
Hamilton county, Ohio. Mrs. Starr's grandparents were Samuel and 
Phoebe (Dodge) Burr, who came to Ohio from New York in 1817, and 
Matthew and Esther (Campbell) Moorhead, of Oxford, Ohio. Three of 
Mrs. Starr's great-grandparents fought in the battle of Long Island, and 
two out of three brothers were in the Union armies in 1861-5. Captain 
Starr's brothers were William C. Starr, Lieutenant-colonel Ninth West 
Virginia Infantry (loyal) ; James M. Starr, owner for many years of 
Richmond gas and electric system, and of the Starr Piano company; 
Nathan H. Starr, farmer, near Middletown, Indiana; and Benjamin 
Starr, who served a year in Second Indiana Cavalry till discharged for 
disability, then farmer, store dealer, superintendent gas works, and finally 
manager of Star Piano Company, whose successful career is the re- 
sult of his labors. "Ben" was commander of the Indiana department, G. 
A. R., at his death. The captain has but one sister. Mrs. H. A. Leeds, 
widow of Noah S. Leeds, and mother of W. B. Leeds of tin plate fame. 
Mrs. Leeds, now of New York, and J. W. Starr are the only survivors. 

Mr. and Mrs. Starr have five surviving children : Elizabeth, wife of 
E. A. Wheatley, of New York; Lydia B., wife of Jacob Stucker, of 
Diller, Nebraska; John Vernon, Oilier : William B., married to Elsie 
Jeffreys, of Arvado, Colorado; and Robert F., married to Lilly Brandt. 
of Diller. Nebraska. 

The captain enjoys his books and friends. He has a large circle 
of acquaintances, to whom, and to the world, his word is "come and 
see me." 



936 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

TOHX VOLLBEHR. 

John Vollbehr, deceased, made his home in Gage county, Nebraska, 
for over twenty years and was numbered among its honored and highly 
esteemed citizens. Although born on the other side of the Atlantic he 
was a thorough American in thought and feeling, and that he was patri- 
otic and sincere in his love for the stars and stripes was manifested by 
his service in the war of the rebellion. 

A native of Germany, he was born in Schleswig-Holstein, on the 
2 ist of June. 1829, and belonged to a good old German family noted 
for honesty and courage. He received a good education in his native 
tongue and served for five years in the German army ; which well fitted 
him for the part he bore in our Civil war. It was in 1854 that he 
emigrated to the United States, and for some years he made his home 
in Clinton county, Iowa. 

It was while residing there that Mr. Vollbehr enlisted, on the 20th 
of August, 1862, at President Lincoln's call for volunteers, becoming a 
member of Company E, Twenty-sixth Iowa Infantry. He participated 
in a number of important engagements, including the battle of Arkansas 
Post, the siege of Vicksburg, the battles of Chickamauga, Chattanooga, 
Lookout Mountain. Missionary Ridge. Ringgold, Resaca, Kenesaw 
Mountain, Xew Hope Church, the siege of Atlanta, and the battle at 
Ezra Church. He was with Sherman on the memorable march to the 
sea and up through the Carolinas. taking part in the battle of Bentonville, 
North Carolina. He then marched on to Richmond and Washington, 
D. C, and participated in the grand review in the latter citv. At the 
close of the war he was honorably discharged June 9, 1865. with the 
rank of second lieutenant, having been commissioned by Governor Wil- 
liam Story of Iowa. Two brothers, Frederick and August Vollbehr, 







JOHN VOLLBEHR 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 937 

were also in the service and were members of Iowa regiments. The 
latter is now deceased, bnt the former is still living in Iowa. 

In 1866 John Vollbehr married Miss Louisa Bussing, who was to 
him a faithful companion and helpmate as long as he lived. She was 
born, reared and educated in Xew York city, where her parents, Fred- 
erick and Sophia (Walchian) Bussing, had located on coming to this 
country from Germany — their native land. Three children blessed the 
union of Mr. Vollbehr and his wife, namely : Ella, now the wife of G. 
Heltman, of Cresco, Nebraska; Etta A., who lives with her mother in 
Gage county, and is one of the popular and successful teachers of the 
locality ; and Mattie, wife of E. P. Andrews, of Filley, Gage county. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Vollbehr made their home in 
Sabula, Jackson county, Iowa, until 1878, when they came to Gage 
county, Nebraska, and settled on the farm where Mrs. Vollbehr and 
her daughter Etta still live, consisting of eighty acres of well improved 
and valuable land. Here the husband and father died May 20, 1899, at 
the age of seventy years, honored and respected by all who knew him. 
He used his right of franchise in support of the Republican party, was a 
Lutheran in religious belief, and was a member of Liberty Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic. His wife is a member of the Baptist church 
and is a most estimable lady, whose circle of friends and acquaintances 
is extensive throughout Gage county. 



JAMES K. PERRY. 

James K. Perry is well known in business, political and social cir- 
cles in Thayer county, Nebraska. He is numbered among the defenders 
of the Union cause, and when the tocsin of war sounded became an 



938 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

advocate of the central government and its rights to hold all of the 
property included within the boundaries of the United States. For three 
years he faithfully aided in defending the old flag and the cause it repre- 
sented, and is now numbered among the honored veterans of the Civil 
war, to whom the country owes a debt of gratitude that can never be 
fully repaid. 

Mr. Perry was born at Belle Plaine, Marshall county, Illinois, on 
the 4th of March, 1845. a representative of one of the old pioneer 
families of that county, his parents. Pierce and Charity (Lucas) Perry, 
having settled there in 1832, when that district was largely wild and 
unimproved, the work of development having scarcely been begun. 
Both were natives of Kentucky and representatives of old families of 
that state. The father was a farmer by occupation, thus providing for 
the support of his wife and children. He gave his political allegiance 
to Jacksonian Democratic principles, and he belonged to the Baptist 
church. His death occurred when he was fifty-three years of age. He 
had been twice married, and by the first union had four sons, while the 
children of the second marriage were ten in number, four sons and six- 
daughters. Of these Daniel S. was a soldier of the Civil war. enlisting 
in the One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Illinois Infantry. He died at 
Belle Plaine, Illinois, in 1882. 

No event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of 
farm life for James K. Perry in his youth. He was reared in his par- 
ents' home and at an early age began working in the fields, aiding in 
the early spring planting and in harvesting. In the public schools he 
acquired his education, attending the district schools and also studying 
for a time in Minonk, Illinois. In addition to farm work he engaged in 
milling to some extent in his early life. He enlisted at Minonk, Wood- 
ford county, Illinois, in August, 1862, in response to President Lincoln's 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 939 

call for three hundred thousand volunteers, and was assigned to Com- 
pany B, Eleventh Illinois Infantry, under command of Captain Shaw. 
He afterward served under Captain H. C. Vore and Captain I. D. Vore. 
He continued with his command until the close of hostilities. In a short 
time after his enlistment the regiment was ordered south to Paducah, 
Kentucky, and he was first under fire at Chatahoochie. He partici- 
pated in the battle of Champion Hills, the battle of Black River Bridge 
and the siege of Vicksburg, the city surrendering on the 4th of July, 
1863. His regiment was a part of the command of General Ransom and 
later of General John A. Logan. From Vicksburg the regiment was 
ordered to Natchez and afterward participated in engagements at Port 
Hudson and Yazoo City. At that time the Eleventh Illinois was com- 
manded by Colonel J. H. Coates, a brave man and most gallant officer. 
From Yazoo the troops returned to Vicksburg for garrison duty and 
later were ordered out to participate in the battle at Fort Gaines, Fort 
Morgan, Spanish Fort and Port Blakeley. the Eleventh Illinois being 
chosen to charge the breastworks of the fort and which it did with severe 
loss. Later Mr. Pern,- participated in the siege of Mobile, Alabama, 
and was engaged in garrison duty there for a time. Subsequently he 
did garrison duty at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and then returned north 
to Springfield, and the war having closed he was honorably discharged. 
His health had become greatly impaired during his long and arduous 
military service, and he has never fully recovered. Although the sacrifice 
of his life was not required he has never full}' regained his old strength, 
and thus his service in behalf of his country was one of great sacrifice. 
Following the close of the war Mr. Perry remained in Illinois for 
some time, and was married in Marshall county, that state, in 1867 to 
Miss Olive A. Taylor, an estimable lady, who was born in Morgan county, 
Illinois, and spent the days of her girlhood there. Her father, John A. 



940 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Taylor, belonged to an old Kentucky family. Mr. and Mrs. Perry be- 
gan their domestic life in Illinois, where they resided continuously until 
1883, when they came west to Nebraska, settling first in Jefferson 
county near Reynolds. There they lived for five years, at the end of 
which time Mr. Perry sold his farming interests in that locality and took 
up his abode in Thayer county. He afterward lived for three years in 
Sheridan county, Kansas, and in 1890 he traded his property there and 
again came to Nebraska, purchasing a farm of eighty acres of valuable 
land. Upon his place he has a good house and substantial barn, together 
with richly cultivated fields, rich pasture lands and a good grove. The 
place is well watered, and everything is kept in excellent condition in 
harmony with the progressive and modern ideas of agriculture. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Perry was born one child, Fred, a farmer, residing 
near Adams, Nebraska. They have an adopted daughter, Ida, a young 
lady at home. In 1902 Mr. Perry was called upon to mourn the loss of 
his wife, who died on the 16th of June, that year, at the age of fifty- 
five years. She had been a devoted companion, a tender and loving wife 
and mother and a faithful friend, and her many good traits of heart and 
mind endeared her to all who knew her. She belonged to the Baptist 
church, was active and zealous in its work, and her death was the occa- 
sion of a great loss to her family, her church and to society. 

Mr. Perry is a Republican in his political affiliations, unfaltering in 
his allegiance to the party and its principles. While living in Sheridan 
county, Kansas, he served as assessor of his township. He is now the 
county assessor of Thayer county, and is a very popular official, dis- 
charging his duties with promptness and fidelity. He has been :i 
Mason since 1867, and is now identified with the lodge at Reynolds. 
He belongs to the Baptist church, of which he is a deacon, and his life 
is at all times actuated by honorable, manly principles. Mr. Perry is 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 941 

five feet and ten inches in height and has a soldierly appearance. He is 
the champion of all the educational, material, social and moral develop- 
ment of his community, and receives from his fellow townsmen the 
respect and good will which is ever accorded to genuine worth through- 
out the entire land. 



MILTON HILEMAN. 

Milton Hileman, present superintendent of the Gage county poor 
farm, in Midland township, has lived in this county since 1871, so that 
he is one of the oldest residents, and his ability as a business agriculturist 
and manager is indicated by his incumbency of his present responsible 
office. The management of public eleemosynary institutions is always 
one of the most important duties assigned to a citizen, and is a position 
of great delicacy as well as responsibility. Mr. Hileman has proved 
the wisdom of his choice by the county board, for everything about the 
farm is in first-class shape, no charges of neglect or abuse have ever 
been registered, and at the same time the institution is conducted as nearly 
on a paying basis as is possible. The farm consists of one hundred and 
sixty acres, one hundred and twenty acres of which are devoted to 
agricultural purposes. There is a large house of fifteen rooms, besides 
cottages and lodges for the inmates and various necessary buildings for 
an establishment of the kind. There is a good barn, a garden where 
the vegetable supply is raised for the entire year, and there are plenty 
of horses, cattle and hogs. The entire premises will compare favorably 
with those of any similar institution in the state. 

Mr. Hileman was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, in 1849, 
a son of Edward and Elizabeth (Glass) Hileman, both natives of Penn- 
sylvania. When Milton was a child the family came west and settled 



942 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, and in 1871 the parents came to Gage 
county, Nebraska, and both died in Beatrice, the father at the age of 
ninety-two. being one of the oldest men in Gage county, and the mother 
at the age of eighty-eight. Edward Hileman followed the occupation 
of farming, and was a Republican in politics and a member of the 
Methodist church. There were nine children in the family : George, 
who was a soldier from Illinois and now lives in Iowa; Mary; Eliza- 
beth; Ellen; Milton; Amanda : Jessie; and two, Timothy and Michael, 
who died in childhood. 

Mr. Hileman was reared in Jo Daviess county, and after coming to 
Nebraska in 1871 followed farming until he was appointed to his present 
position. On April 28, 1872, he was married to Miss Delia Hudson, 
who was born near Attica, Fountain county, Indiana, and has been a most 
capable helpmate to her husband in all his endeavors and has been espe- 
cially efficient in assisting with the conduct of the county farm. She is 
a daughter of Elijah Hudson, who was born in Ohio and died in McLean 
county, Illinois, at the age of fifty-six. He was a Republican in politics, 
and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. His wife, who died 
in Illinois at the age of forty-eight, was the mother of the following 
children: Sarah, William. Esther, deceased; Jane, deceased; Christine, 
Catherine, Mrs. Delia Hileman and Mary Ann; of these children Wil- 
liam was a soldier in the Civil war, and now lives in Hamburg, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hileman have become the parents of the following 
children : Wilbert, who was a gallant soldier in the Spanish-American 
war, seeing service in the Philippines, and now lives near Colby, Thomas 
county, Kansas; Grace, who is the wife of D. Hoyle, of Gage county; 
Florence, the wife of George Gifford, of Illinois; Paul; and Percy 
Dayton. Mr. Hileman is a strong Republican, and affiliates with the 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 943 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mrs. Hileman is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



S. T. COWPERTHWAIT. 



S. J. Cowperthwait, one of the prominent residents of Clay town- 
ship, Pawnee county, Nebraska, was born in Canada, July 31, 1850. 
He is a son of R. G. Cowperthwait, one of the early settlers of south- 
eastern Nebraska, who came from Novia Scotia and was born of Scotch 
ancestors. This family traces back to the Highlands of Scotland, and 
its representatives were hardy and thrifty. The father of our subject 
was reared in the schools of Nova Scotia, and when a young man located 
in Toronto, where he married Amelia Elizabeth Brian. She is a daugh- 
ter of Dr. James Brian, of French extraction. In 1854 Mr. and Mrs. R. 
G. Cowperthwait came to the United States, and after a year they settled 
in Missouri, but later removed to Pawnee county, Nebraska. The 
father died in Abilene, Kansas, at the age of seventy-two years. He was 
a Republican. The mother died at the same place when sixty-three years 
of age, and she was a member of the Methodist church. The family 
born to these parents was as follows : Seth T., of Jefferson county, Kan- 
sas; S. J., our subject; G. W. ; H. R. ; Albert; Charles; Sarah; Clara; 
Ida; Dora and Anna. 

Our subject was but a boy when the family moved to the United 
States. His education was received in the pioneer log schoolhouses of 
his day, and he has supplemented these limited advantages with study 
and close observation. In 1870 he Was married to Matilda Howard, 
who was born in Douglas county, Missouri. She is a daughter of 
Philip J. and Winnie Howard, both deceased. Mrs. Cowperthwait died 



944 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

at the age of twenty-six, leaving two children, namely: John H., of 
Pawnee county, and Mrs. Maggie May Crawford, of Pawnee city. In 
1880 Mr. Cowperthwait married Mrs. Jane (Sage) Leper, the widow of 
Sam Leper, who died in 1878 in Nebraska, leaving four children, two 
now living, namely: John Leper and Mrs. Nancy Brown, of Pawnee 
county. By her second marriage she had three children : Myrtle, Arthur 
Clyde and Minnie Pearl. She died and Mr. Cowperthwait was again 
married, to Sarah Hollinsaid, who was born in Pennsylvania. Her 
parents left that state for Indiana and for a time resided in Bureau 
county, Illinois, near Princeton, where her mother died at the age of 
thirty-two, leaving four children, of whom Mrs. Cowperthwait is the only 
one living, the other three being George W. ; Matilda and John. The 
father of Mrs. Cowperthwait died in Nebraska. He had been married 
twice. 

Mr. Cowperthwait located in Howell county, Missouri, in 1871 and 
remained there for a short time then moved to Dickinson county, Kan- 
sas, where he made his home for two years. In 1890 he located on his 
present home in Clay township, where he owns two hundred acres of 
some of the best farming land in Nebraska. He devotes it to general 
farming and stock-raising, making a specialty of blooded horses. His 
entire property is surrounded by the best grade of hedge fences and the 
premises indicate a good manager. His home bears the name of 
Pleasant Mound, and is one of the most inviting rural homes of this 
part of the state. Both he and his wife are very hospitable, and their 
many friends are made welcome within their gates. Mr. Cowperthwait 
is a stanch Republican and has served as delegate to county conventions 
and always may be depended upon to take an active part in local affairs. 
Mrs. Cowperthwait is a consistent member of the Union Baptist church, 
and her husband and family attends its services. Successful themselves, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 945 

Mr. and Mrs. Cowperthwait always generously give of their plenty to 
those less fortunate than themselves and never turn anyone away. 



GEORGE F. LITTLE. 

George F. Little, one of the prominent men of Beatrice, Nebraska, 
and an honored veteran of the Civil war, has been a resident of Gage 
county since 1880. His war record commenced September 17, 1861, 
when he enlisted, when only fifteen years of age, in Company C. Seventy- 
fifth New York Volunteer Infantry, Colonel John A. Dodge command- 
ing. He was taken prisoner and confined at the rebel prison at Camp 
Tyler, Texas, for five months. In addition to his sufferings as a pris- 
oner, he was wounded three times, once at Port Hudson in the breast. 
He was honorably discharged November 25, 1864. 

The birth of Mr. Little occurred in New York state, January 19, 
1846, and he was a son of Isaac and Mercy (Merrill) Little, both 
of whom were born in New York, and the latter a daughter of a soldier 
of the war of 1812. Another ancestor on the Little side of the house was 
a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Isaac Little was also a soldier in 
the Civil war, serving in the One Hundred and Sixtieth New York 
Volunteer Infantry. Of his seven children there is the following record: 
Henry was in the Nineteenth New York Volunteer Infantry, served 
for four years and died in Rochester, New York ; Ellen Clark is deceased ; 
George F. is our subject; Ettie, of Rochester, New York; Elizabeth 
died at the age of ten years; one child who died in infancy. The mother 
died at the age of seventy-eight years, and the father passed away at 
the age of eighty years. By occupation he was a teacher, fraternally 
he was a Mason. 



946 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

George F. Little was reared and educated in New York state, and 
after the war was over he returned home, but in 1866 removed to 
Iowa, and for two and one-half years lived in Buchanan county. His 
next change was made when he located in Kansas City, Missouri, but in 
1868 he returned to New York. In 1874 he located in Ellis county, 
Kansas, and took up a homestead, and also worked as foreman on the 
stonework of the Union Pacific Railroad until 1881, when seeing a good 
opening he located at Odell, Gage county, and found plenty of employ- 
ment at his trade of mason. Soon after he finally settled in Beatrice, 
where he has since made his home. 

When twenty years of age he was married at Auburn, New York, 
to Annie Boscomb, a daughter of William Boscomb. Three children have 
been born to them, namely : Frank E., secretary of the bricklayers' union 
at Beatrice; Jessie married Abe Homer, of Beatrice; Georgiana married 
H. J. Kemp, of Rockford, Nebraska. In politics our subject is a Repub- 
lican, and voted for Abraham Lincoln when only sixteen years of age, 
at Harper's Ferry, Virginia. As is only natural, he is one of the ac- 
tive members of the G. A. R., Rawlins Post No. 35. In religious 
affiliations he is a Methodist, and in that body as throughout the city, 
he is very well and favorably known, and his family are a credit to him 
and the several communities in which thev reside. 



J. H. F. ROGGE. 

J. H. F. Rogge, or Fred Rogge, as he is known among his ac- 
quaintances, is one of the most extensive farmers and stock-breeders in 
Nemaha county, and now when he has nearly arrived at the seventieth 
milestone of his life's journey he can look back on a career of grati- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 947 

fying prosperity and most useful endeavor. He is a stanch American 
transplanted from Germany, where he spent the first half of his life. 
Although he had some money when he arrived in this country, the 
greater part of his prosperity has heen gained in this land of opportunity, 
where his industry, capable management and faithful endeavor have re- 
sulted in much greater fruit than in the old country. His home farm 
of three hundred and twenty acres in Washington precinct, with post- 
office at Auburn, is one of the model places in this vicinity, and is a 
delightful spot in which to spend the years of retirement which he has 
so richly merited through his earlier toil. He has been a resident of this 
county since 1870, and is classed as a pioneer and representative citizen 
of a county whose organized existence does not antedate by many years 
his arrival. 

Mr. Rogge was born in Hanover, Germanv, August 6, 1835, a 
son of Jonas and Annie Kathrina (Hopeman) Rogge, the former of 
whom was burn in the same place in 1803, and was a freeholder farmer 
in Germany, where he died at the age of fifty-eight and his wife at the 
age of forty. Mr. Rogge was one of their seven sons who were reared 
to manhood. He had a fair education in his native place, and from an 
early age has been accustomed to the duties of farm life. He was a 
tenant farmer in Germany for some years, and in 1868 brought his fam- 
ily to the new world, lauding in New York, August 4th. He and his 
wife then possessed eight hundred dollars in gold, and they began as 
tenant farmers in Scott county, Iowa, where they remained two years. 
In 1870 they started for Nebraska, taking the boat at Quincy, Illinois, 
and going by way of the Missouri river to Leavenworth, Kansas, whence 
they arrived in Nemaha county in April. For the first three years he 
rented land, and then bought one hundred and twenty acres near Au- 
burn : paying three hundred dollars for the twenty-year lease and seven 



948 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

dollars an acre for the land. That farm remained his home for nine 
years, and he then bought a quarter section where he now lives, and 
two years later the other quarter section, paying sixteen hundred dollars 
for the first and twenty-one hundred for the second. In all he now 
owns six farms, aggregating one thousand acres, with eight sets of build- 
ings, of which he has built four sets. His leading enterprise has been 
the raising and the fall-feeding of stock. He has shipped about two 
cars each year, and has fed some fine shorthorn stock. He has also 
marketed from fifty to one hundred hogs each year. Over one hundred 
acres have annually been devoted to the raising of corn, producing from 
fifty to eighty bushels an acre, and about eighty acres of wheat, some 
of which has gone as high as thirty-five bushels to the acre, while from 
fifty to seventy-five tons of hay have been put away each year. He has 
also planted several orchards on his place. Since coming to this coun- 
try Mr. Rogge has cast his vote with the Republican party, ami he and 
his family have adhered to the Lutheran religion. 

Mr. Rogge was married in Germany in 1863 to Miss Anna Marie 
Boling, who was born May 28, 1838, in Hanover, a daughter of John 
and Anna (Eggis) Boling, farmers and landowners of Germany. Mr. 
and Mrs. Rogge have had six children : Henry, born in Germany, is a 
farmer in Washington precinct, and has a wife and a son and a daugh- 
ter; Emma, the wife of William K'inkal, of the same precinct, has three 
children ; William F. is a bachelor farmer on one of the one hundred 
and sixty acre farms ; John, who is running the home farm of three 
hundred and twenty acres, married Anna Mary Boehlin ; Anna Mary 
is at home ; and Frederick died in Iowa when one year old. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 949 

WILLIAM SMITH. 

William Smith, a leading farmer at Filley, Gage county, Nebraska, 
has lived in southeastern Nebraska for about thirty years, so that he is 
classed among the old citizens, both in point of years of residence and 
of life. While now past the threescore and ten mark, he is active and 
capable withal, still bearing the responsibilities of life, and enjoying 
with a zest the comforts which his past labors have provided. 

Mr. Smith was born in Rush count}-. Indiana, near Rushville, May 
9, 1833, a son of Peter and Alice (Smith) Smith (not related by blood). 
Peter Smith was of German parentage, and followed the trade of 
wagon-maker until his early death at the age of thirty-five years. His 
wife was born in Virginia, of an old family of that state and originally 
from England. They were parents of six children, four sons and 
two daughters, and two sons, Thomas and William, were soldiers, the 
former serving in both the Mexican and Civil wars and dying in Indiana 
at an advanced age. The parents were both members of the United 
Brethren church, and the mother lived to be seventy-five years old. 

William Smith was reared on a farm in Indiana, and learned the 
mason's trade, which he followed for many years. He moved to 
Grundy county, Missouri, in 1858, and worked at his trade there until 
the war. Although he was living near the Iowa line, he was in a hot- 
bed of bushwhackers and guerillas during the war, and he and his fam- 
ily were in constant danger. He served for nine months in the state 
militia, and then enlisted in Company G, Thirty-third Missouri In- 
fantry, under Captain Murphy, and the regiment was commanded suc- 
cessively by Colonels Fisk, Pyle and Heath. After remaining in the 
barracks at St. Louis for several weeks, they were sent into Arkansas, 
taking part in the battle at Helena; was in the Yazoo river expedition, 
and saw much hard fighting as a part of the Sixteenth Army Corps 



950 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

of the Western Army ; was in the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, and sev- 
eral other engagements of the same campaign; was then ordered back 
to Tennessee, and from then until the end of the war was in the south- 
ern fringe of states, participating in the operations about Mobile and 
Fort Blakely and Spanish Fort. Mr. Smith received his honorable dis- 
charge at St. Louis in August, 1865, and, with the consciousness of duty 
well performed to his country, returned home and took up the peaceful 
pursuits of the civilian. In 1872 he left Missouri and came to Lancaster 
county, Nebraska, and was located near Lincoln for a few years, was 
then near Sterling, Tohnson county, and then came to Gage county. In 
1897 he moved to Phillips county, Kansas, near Phillipsburg, but four 
years later returned to Filley, Gage county, where he at present resides. 
He has four lots in the town, besides some land near by, and has a most 
comfortable home in which to spend the evening of his life. 

Mr. Smith was married in Grundy county, Missouri, to Miss Nancy 
J. Williams, a daughter of David and Elizabeth (Esty) Williams, the 
former of an old Kentucky family, and both died in Missouri. Mrs. 
Smith was one of seven children, three sons and four daughters. Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith have had eight children, and the five now living are: 
Alice, the wife of Charles Kay, of Auburn, Nebraska; David, who lives 
near Republican City, Franklin county, Nebraska; Thomas, of Austin, 
Texas; Jewell, the wife of Steven Holbrook, of Filley, Nebraska; and 
Kate, the wife of Frank Parker, of Filley. The children that died were 
Judy, at the age of two months ; James, at eighteen months ; and Steven, 
at the age of thirty-three years, in Austin, Texas. Mr. Smith is a 
stanch Republican, and affiliates with the Grand Army post at Phillips- 
burg, Kansas. Mrs. Smith is a member of the Christian church. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 951 

JOHN NIDER. 

John Nider, the proprietor of Fair View, one of the beautiful 
country seats of Jefferson county, has resided in Nebraska for forty- 
two years, and has been closely identified with the development and im- 
provement of this part of the state. He has had considerable influence 
in community affairs and is now serving for the second term as county 
commissioner, his capability and promptness winning his re-election. 
He is also an extensive landowner, and his property holdings are now 
quite valuable. 

A native of New Jersey, John Nider was a son of Bartholomew 
Nider, whose birth occurred in Switzerland and who was a representa- 
tive of an old Swiss family noted for integrity, industry and patriotism. 
He was reared in his native country, learned his trade there and on com- 
ing to America settled in New Jersey. Subsequently he removed to 
St. Louis county, Missouri, thirty miles west of the city of St. Louis, 
and in 1862 he went to Gage county, Nebraska, being one of the first 
settlers to establish a home within its borders. Afterward he settled in 
Jefferson county near Plymouth. He was a carpenter, displaying excel- 
lent mechanical ability, and this enabled him to keep everything upon his 
farm in excellent condition and repair. His wife died at the age of fifty- 
five years. In their family were nine children, of whom three are liv- 
ing : Mrs. Bertha Coffin, John and Leander. 

John Nider was about ten years of age when his parents removed 
to Gage county, Nebraska, and he was reared upon a farm there and in 
Jefferson county, learning to do all the work in connection with the 
operation of a farm, and receiving valuable instruction also concerning 
industry, perseverance and honesty. His literary training was received 
in the public schools. 

Mr. Nider was married at the age of twenty-four years to Miss 



952 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Eldora Harvey, who was born in Wisconsin and spent her girlhood days 
in that state and in Nebraska. Twenty-four years ago Mr. Nider set- 
tled upon his present farm. It was a tract of wild land that came into 
his possession, but the improvements he has made upon the place cause 
it to be appropriately called Fair View. His is one of the beautiful 
country seats of this part of the county. He has a fine residence well 
furnished and standing upon a natural building site. Shade and orchard 
trees have been planted and have now attained to good size, and there 
are substantial barns, sheds and outbuildings ; while the fields are highly 
cultivated. Here Mr. Nider has two hundred and forty acres of land in 
the Cub Creek precinct, in addition to which he owns one hundred acres 
of land in Richland township and other lands elsewhere, making a total 
of eighty hundred and twenty acres of rich land, which yields to him 
a very gratifying financial return. He has a large barn sixty by forty- 
two feet, with wagon and carriage sheds and a fine hay house. He 
pastures one hundred and fifty head of cattle and raises and feeds a large 
number of horses and hogs. He has made a success of all that he has 
undertaken and is one of the most progressive agriculturists of this part 
of the state. He understands thoroughly the possibilities of the state 
as an agricultural district, and by making practical use of his knowl- 
edge has prospered in his business. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Nider have been born eight children, seven sons 
and one daughter, namely: Charles, William, Frank, Bessie, Leslie, 
Claude, John and McRinley. The family is well known in Jefferson 
county and the Nider household is justly celebrated for its hospitality. 

In his political views Mr. Nider is a very stanch Republican and 
is recognized as one of the leaders of the party in this section of the 
state. He has served as a delegate to county and congressional conven- 
tions and has been an enthusiastic worker for his party and friends. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 953 

In 1897 he was named as the strongest candidate for the position of 
county commissioner and after a service of three years was re-elected, and 
is now the incumbent. His course has been characterized by the utmost 
loyalty to duty, and the confidence reposed in him by the public is indi- 
cated by the fact that he was re-elected by a largely increased majority 
over an independent and a Democratic candidate. He is a man of broad 
views, whose progressiveness is tempered by conservatism, making him 
a safe public official as well as reliable and trustworthy business man. 
His long residence in southeastern Nebraska has given him a wide ac- 
quaintance, which his sterling worth has rendered a favorable one. 



DAVID A. SHERWOOD. 

For a number of years David A. Sherwood has made his home in 
Alexandria, where he is well and favorably known. In him we find one 
who has labored most effectively in public office for the public good, and 
is now accorded that recognition which is justly due the public-spirited 
and progressive citizen whose unselfish efforts in behalf of the general 
welfare have been attended by splendid results. He is a native son 
of the Empire state, his birth having occurred in Chenango county, New 
York, on the 7th of February, 1844, and he is a son of George Sherwood, 
a Pennsylvanian by birth and a member of an old and prominent family 
of that commonwealth. The father remained in the last named state 
until twenty-five years of age, when he removed to New York and was 
there married. In 1852 he took up his abode in Green Lake county, 
Wisconsin, being numbered among the early pioneers of that section, 
and in Madison, that state, Mrs. Sherwood was called to the home be- 
yond. He followed the occupation of a farmer through life; was a 



954 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Republican in his political affiliations, and both he and his wife were 
worthy members of the Methodist church. In their family were nine 
children, and three of the sons were soldiers in the Civil war : Jacob, 
who served as a member of the Thirty-second Wisconsin Infantry; 
Erastus, a member of a Minnesota regiment; and David A., of the 
Thirty-seventh Wisconsin Infantry. 

David A. Sherwood spent the early years of his life on his father's 
farm, and his educational training was received in the schools of Wiscon- 
sin. For a time he made his home in Mankato, Minnesota, but later 
returned to Green Lake county, Wisconsin, and in 1874 came to Alex- 
andria, Nebraska, where for many years he was engaged in business as 
a merchant and blacksmith. When the Civil war was inaugurated Mr. 
Sherwood nobly offered his services to his country, enlisting at Mar- 
quette, Wisconsin, in March, 1862, in Company C, Thirty-seventh Wis- 
consin Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel Samuel Harriman and Cap- 
tain H. W. Belden. After remaining in camp at Madison, Wisconsin, 
the regiment was ordered south to Baltimore, Maryland, and thence to 
Arlington Heights, Washington, D. C, where Mr Sherwood joined the 
Army of the Potomac, becoming a member of the Ninth Army Corps, 
under General Parks and General Meade. He was under fire at the bat- 
tle of Cold Harbor, also took part in the engagements of White Horse 
and Weldon Railroad, and at the battle of Petersburg, under General 
Burnside, his regiment made the famous charge, and was present at the 
great mine explosion where so many lives were lost. They were stationed 
at Petersburg until the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox Court 
House, and the regiment was later ordered after General Johnston, and 
thence on to Washington, D. C, near which city Mr. Sherwood served 
on provost duty until August, 1865, when he was discharged. He en- 
tered the ranks as a private, but was later made sergeant and was subse- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 955 

quently promoted to a lieutenancy, as a reward of gallant conduct on the 
field of battle. 

The marriage of Mr. Sherwood occurred in 1871, in Kenosha, 
Wisconsin, when Miss Mary Hitchcock became his wife. She is a 
daughter of Amasa Hitchcock, of Wisconsin, and a member of an old and 
well known family of New York. Two children have been born of this 
union : Leon, a prominent merchant of Daykin, Nebraska, and Lillie, 
the wife of C. N. Ross, a banker of Alexandria. Mr. Sherwood main- 
tains pleasant relations with his old army comrades of the blue by his 
membership in the Grand Army of the Republic. Fraternally he holds 
membership relations with the Masonic order, being master of Lodge 
No. 74, of Alexandria, and is a member of the Masonic Chapter of 
Hebron. His political support has ever been given to the Republican 
party and in 1898 he was its choice for the office of county commis- 
sioner of Thayer county, in which position he is now serving his second 
term. His public duties have ever been discharged by marked prompt- 
ness and fidelity, and during his long residence in Alexandria he has 
been closely connected with its progress and advancement, supporting 
all measures for the public good. 



STERLING P. GLASGOW. 

For a decade and a half the subject of this review filled the office 
of postmaster of the town of Auburn, Nebraska, and there is probably 
not a man in the town better known than he. 

Sterling P. Glasgow was born in Peru, Nemaha county, Nebraska, 
August 7, 1863, son of William Gilbert Glasgow. The latter, a native 
of Ohio, was born in 1834, and died on his farm near Peru, Nebraska, 



956 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

in 1900. Grandfather Sterling P. Glasgow was an Ohio farmer, who 
became one of the early pioneers of Washington county, Iowa, where 
he died about 1875, after having lived more than threescore years and 
ten. He had a large family, four sons and four daughters, and of the 
former two were soldiers in the Civil war, one of these two being John 
M. Glasgow, M. D., who was a practicing physician in Auburn and 
afterward in Omaha, where he died in 1901. at about the age of sixty 
years. William Gilbert Glasgow married, in Iowa, about fifty years 
ago, Miss Sarah Majors, who was born in Libertyville, Iowa, daugh- 
ter of S. P. Majors and sister of Thomas Majors. And soon after 
their marriage they came to Xebraska and settled on a farm in Xemaha 
county, near Peru, where, as already stated, he died. During the 
Civil war period he was engaged in general merchandising, in addition 
to carrying on his farming operations. And he spent four years in the 
sheriff's office, to which position he was elected by the Republican party, 
of which he was all his life a stanch member. During the last twenty- 
five years of his life he was afflicted with rheumatism and was a great 
sufferer. To his widow and children he left a good estate, all of which 
he had accumulated by his own earnest and honest efforts. His widow 
still resides in Peru. Of their seven children, four daughters and three 
sons, we record that Alice, wife of J. F. McReynolds, died at the age 
of thirty-five years, leaving an infant son; Ida is the wife of Thomas 
B. Simpson, of South Dakota, and has a family of sons and daughters; 
Joseph E., a brick manufacturer at Peru, is married and has six child- 
ren, two pairs of twins being included in the number; Sterling P. is 
the fourth in order of birth ; W. G. has charge of the farming opera- 
tions at the home place near Peru ; Jessie is the wife of Dr. Houston, a 
dentist of Nebraska City, and they have two children; and Sadie, 
a popular and successful teacher. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 957 

Sterling P. Glasgow was educated in the Nebraska State Normal 
School. As a boy he was employed as clerk in his grandfather Majors' 
store at Peru, and later when the store was moved to Ainsworth he 
went with it. 

December 31. 1884, at the age of twenty-one, Mr. Glasgow mar- 
ried, in Peru. Miss Hattie Perry, who was born in Peru. Nebraska, in 
1868, daughter of Milton and Frances (Faulkner) Perry, both natives 
of Missouri. Her father died about the year 1873, leaving his widow 
with five children, viz.: John D. Perry, at this writing a foreman in 
the B. &. M. freight office at Denver, Colorado; Anna, wife of Jefferson 
Poe, died in 1898, leaving one son; Belle, wife of Frank Shadley, of 
Reynolds, Nebraska, has four children living: Hattie; and Robert Perry, 
a barber at Hebron. Nebraska, has a wife and two children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Glasgow have five children, as follows: Irene, Ster- 
ling P., Jr., Annabel, John and Robert McK'inley. The eldest is six- 
teen years of age and the youngest three — a most interesting family. 

Like his father before him. Mr. Glasgow has ever been an ardent 
supporter of the Republican party. While at Peru, he was appointed 
postmaster, under President Harrison's administration, and served a 
term of four years in that office. Also while at Peru he served two 
terms as sheriff. He was made postmaster of Auburn in May, 1888, 
and served efficiently as such for many years. That same year, 1888, 
Mr. Glasgow built his pleasant home in Auburn, mi Maxwell street, 
where he has five and a half lots. 

Fraternally. Mr. Glasgow is identified with numerous organiza- 
tions. He is a member of the Woodmen of the World, the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, the Highlanders, the Knights of Pythias, 
and the Masonic order. In Masonrv he has learned the mvsteries of 



958 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

blue lodge chapter and commanderv, and he is past master of the lodge 
at Peru. Also he is a member of the Mystic Shrine. 



AMOS T. D. HUGHES. 

Amos T. D. Hughes, a retired merchant and farmer of Howe, 
Nemaha county, Xebraska. is one of the oldest of the living settlers of 
this county. He came to the site of Brownville on May 2, 1857, ten 
years before Xebraska became a state, and he has witnessed all the 
development of the community from pioneer stages to one of the centers 
of civilization and business and social advancement. Besides the honor 
and esteem which are the just reward of the old and useful settler, he 
also enjoys, in the years of his age, the comforts of life which he did 
not look to have when Xebraska life was more primitive and farther 
from the center of population. As a citizen, father of a family and 
individual worker, he has done well, and his career is honorable from 
every point at which it may be viewed. 

Mr. Hughes is a grandson of Levi Hughes, who was born in 
Philadelphia in 1763. and was a boy when the battle of Brandywine 
was fought not far away. He was a ship carpenter, a master workman 
and foreman in Philadelphia. By his two wives he had sixteen child- 
ren, of whom six sons and four daughters were married and had 
families. George Hughes, the father of our Nemaha county pioneer, 
was born in Delaware in 1805, and died in Howe, Nebraska, at the 
age of seventy-six. He had the following children : William, born in 
1826. died in Howe in 1891, and had a large family; Richard, born 
in 1828, died in Brownville in 1888, leaving five children living; John 
died in Oregon in 1896; Amos T. D. is the next; Levi, born in 1833, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 959 

died at Howe in 1895, leaving four children; Hannah, Mrs. Edward 
Smith, died at Washington, D. C, in 1873, leaving three children; 
Mary, wife of Tom Scott, a printer in the government printing office 
at Washington, died.at Crawfordsville, Indiana, in 1868, aged about 
thirty-five, leaving five children : Amariah, who died in this county 
about the close of the Civil war. was the wife of James Drewell, who 
was a soldier four years and was killed by the Indians at Plum Creek, 
Nebraska, in 1864, and they left three children; Mary, wife of Herbert 
Howe, in Auburn, has three sons; and George died in Bainbridge, 
Indiana, in 1888, leaving one son. 

Amos T, D. Hughes was born in Clinton county, Ohio, April 7, 
1832, and was reared at Crawfordsville, Indiana, where he had only a 
meager schooling. In 1857 he came to Nebraska from Pike county, Indi- 
ana, and settled on one hundred and sixty acres near the present town of 
Howe. The railroad and the townsite have taken part of this land, and 
he now owns one hundred and eighteen acres, on which he has placed 
all the improvements and made it a productive place out of a stretch 
of raw prairie. His first residence was a board shanty twelve by four- 
teen, of one room, but that has long since been replaced by a six-room 
frame house. He built a fine new barn in 1902, and everything about 
his farm looks fresh and well kept. The old orchard which he 
planted years ago and which has borne fruit for many years, is now 
decaying and is being replaced by the new orchard of one hundred 
trees, which is just beginning to bear. He has an osage hedge of two 
miles which is four years old. He keeps a mixed herd of from twelve 
to fifty head of cattle. In the past he has made much money in pork 
and other enterprises, but is now in the main retired and only following 
active pursuits to the extent that his rest may not be rust. During the 
Civil war, in October, 1862, Mr. Hughes enlisted in Company C, 



9<3o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Second Nebraska Cavalry, and saw eleven months' service at Fort 
Kearney and Cottonwood, Nebraska. 

Mr. Hughes was married in January, 1857, to Miss Caroline P. 
Smith, who was born in Lafayette, Indiana, in 1839, and was a daugh- 
ter of Stephen J. Smith, a farmer and tavern-keeper and father of ten 
children. Airs. Hughes died in March, 1864, while her husband was 
in the army, leaving three children: Margaret, the wife of James 
Cowell, died in Auburn, Nebraska, leaving four children ; Mary Jane, 
present wife of James Cowell, lives in Montana and has four children; 
Caroline, wife of Samuel Stitzel, lives in Idaho and has nine children. 
Mr. Hughes was married in June, 1865, to Mrs. Martha Robins, nee 
Gray, who was born in Preble county, Ohio, a daughter of Dr. William 
B. Gray, deceased. The following children have been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Hughes: Levi, at home and single; William, agent for a 
harvester company in Omaha, has three sons and one daughter; Thomas, 
a railroad brakeman in Indian Territory, has one son ; Mrs. Susan 
Davel, a widow, has two children; Miss Catherine, in Howe; Miss 
Anna Belle, at home ; the daughter Grace died at the age of seven years, 
and Martha aged ten months. 

Mr. Hughes is a Jeffersonian Democrat, and has taken an active 
part in politics and public matters. He was justice of the peace for 
eight years, and altogether has been postmaster of Howe for eight years. 
He is such a citizen as honors any community, and his long career of 
honorable endeavor in this county of southeastern Nebraska is an orna- 
ment to himself and the public. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 961 

MRS. EMERETTA ROOT. 

Mrs. Emeretta Root, residing in Crete, Nebraska, is the widow 
of Alonzo D. Root, who died at his home here on the 8th of February, 
1903. He was born April 3, 1836, in Portage county, Ohio, and was 
graduated from the Cleveland Medical College, in which he won his 
degree. His life thereafter was devoted to the practice of medicine. 
He located first in Hartford, Wisconsin, where he went as a young 
man and read medicine with Dr. E. Conant, a physician of skill and 
prominence. After his first year in college he practiced in Hartford 
and later returned to continue his studies. Not long after his grad- 
uation he settled in Kekoskee, Wisconsin, where he practiced for five 
years, and in the fall of 1872 he came to Crete. 

Dr. Root was married to Miss Emeretta Root in Hartford, Wis- 
consin. Though of the same name they were not related, but they had 
been acquainted from childhood, and a long standing friendship had 
existd between their respective families. Their marriage was cele- 
brated November 29, 1857. Alonzo Root, the father of Dr. Root, was 
born in New York and became an early settler upon government land 
in Ohio, where he spent his remaining days. He had four children: 
Gad, who is residing in Hartford, Wisconsin, and has two daughters 
and one son; Wallace, who owns the old homestead left by his father 
and also other farms and who has one son and also some grandchildren ; 
Mrs. Augusta Wing, a widow living in Crete, and Mr. Root, of this 
review. 

Dr. Root was a very conscientious and able member of the medi- 
cal profession. He was devoted to his business duties, was a close stu- 
dent of everything that tended to promote his knowledge and increase 
his efficiency in the line of his chosen calling, and in his practice he 
won creditable success. He was also a man of strong domestic tastes, 



962 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

devoted to his family, and his greatest happiness was enjoyed when 
with his wife and children at his own fireside. He held membership in 
the Congregational church, to which his family also belonged. To Dr. 
and Mrs. Root were born eight children. Frank, whose birth occurred 
in Hartford, Wisconsin, was graduated in medicine in Cleveland, Ohio, 
and afterward engaged in practice in Crete with his father. During 
the past thirteen years he has been a regular practitioner of medicine 
in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he lives with his wife and three child- 
ren, a daughter and two sons. Susan is the wife of Captain T. B. 
Rhodes, who is in the government employ at Washington, D. C. She 
has a daughter by her first husband, who was Dr. Benjamin Root, 
a distant relative, and by her second marriage has one son, Thomas 
Brown Rhodes. Wallace W. Root died in the Philippines, February 
15, 1904, while serving there as veterinary surgeon in the employ of 
the government. He was a young man of scholarly attainments and 
high character worth, and at his death the government forwarded his 
remains and effects to his mother. Clara T. Root, who is a graduate 
of the Crete high school and of Doane College, has engaged in teaching 
in both Salt Lake City and in Crete and is now living with her mother. 
Mrs. Addie Root Farr, who was formerly a successful teacher, is now 
living in Oklahoma Territory and has one son and one daughter. Gad 
B. Root, a commercial traveler, also living in Oklahoma, is married, 
but has no children. Mrs. Root also lost two daughters, both dying 
at the age of four months. She resides in a pleasant home which was 
erected by Dr. Root in 1873. In manner she is modest, unassuming, 
but she possesses strong intellectual force and many admirable traits 
of character, having displayed a spirit of heroism in meeting the trials 
and adversities of life. She was obliged to go to Washington and 
see the government officials there in order to secure the return of her 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 963 

son's remains and effects from the Philippines. In Crete she has won 
many friends by her true worth of character, and she is held in high 
esteem, as was her husband, Dr. Root, whose life was one of usefulness. 



HARRY A. DAY. 

Harry A. Day, resident manager of the Fairbury branch of the 
Fairmount Creamery Company, has been connected with the great but- 
ter-making industry since he was a boy. The operations of the cream- 
ery business over large areas of territory form what is perhaps the 
most interesting phase of modern agricultural development, and a won- 
derful problem and wonderfully solved is the collection of milk from 
innumerable individual producers on each day, and the subsequent manu- 
facture and disposal of its products at points far distant from the orig- 
inal source of the supply. Of all the large creamery companies operat- 
ing in the United States, the Fairmount Creamery Company is prob- 
ably the largest single concern. Its business reaches from the Atlantic 
to the Pacific, and its factories are located in Omaha, Seward, Crete, 
Aurora, Fairbury, York, in Nebraska, and at Denison and Manning, 
in Iowa, but each of these places is but the center of a vast collection 
district, covering a large part of each state. Iowa and Nebraska now 
rank among the foremost milk-producing states of the Union, and any- 
one connected with this industry is an integral part of one of the most 
important and valuable enterprises of the world. The Fairmount Cream- 
ery Company was organized in 1884, and on June 14, 1887, was in- 
corporated with an authorized capital stock of three hundred thousand 
dollars, with a paid-up capital of one hundred and fifty-one thousand 
dollars. The present officers are J. H. Rushton, president, E. T. Rec- 



964 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

tor, vice-president, E. F. Howe, secretary, and Charles E. Walters, 
treasurer, with general offices at Fairmount, Nebraska. 

Mr. Day was born at Aledo, Mercer county, Illinois, June 8, 1865, 
a son of William B. and Mary (Brouchtel) Day, both natives of Ohio. 
His father was a descendant of the New York Days who came to 
America before the Revolution. The grandfathers on both sides were 
in the great war for independence. His mother was of Holland Dutch 
ancestry established in this country many generations. 

The family on both sides has been noted as a long-lived and 
prolific race, and Mr. Day was the fifth of twelve children in his par- 
ents' family. In 1879 he moved with his parents to Fremont, Dodge 
county, Nebraska, and he lived there and continued his schooling and 
engaged in farming until he was eighteen years old. He then went to 
Beatrice and got his start in the creamery business, and later was in 
the same lime at Omaha. He came the Fairbury in 1901 and took the 
management of the factory here, in the conduct of whose affairs he has 
displayed excellent ability, and his management has pleased the officials 
of the company and been entirelv satisfactory to the many patrons. 

Mr. Day was married at Fremont, Nebraska, to Miss Mary Sutliff, 
a native of Michigan, and they have one son, Clifford E. Mr. Day is 
a stanch Republican, standing by the old-established principles of that 
party. He affiliates with the Modern Woodmen of the World and the 
Royal League at Omaha, and with the Independent Order of Red Men 
and the Order of Eagles in Fairbury. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 965 

JOEL T. JONES. 

Joel T. Jones, a retired farmer of Humboldt, Richardson county, 
is one of the old-timers of this part of the state, and has been identified 
more or less intimately with the prairies of Nebraska since the 31st 
of March, 1855, when he arrived in Richardson county from Missouri. 
He has been a very successful man during his long career of seventy- 
five years, and has been called into various spheres of activity and 
experienced an eventful course of years. In such a life he has of course 
found many uneventful places and more or less losses and hardships, 
but the outcome has been happy and resulted in a secure place in the 
esteem and regard of his fellow citizens, and he lias sufficient of the 
world's goods to be free from care and able to take life easily during 
his last years. 

Mr. Jones was born in Warren county. Kentucky, below Bowling 
Green, February 7, 1829, and belongs to one of the old and patriotic 
families of America. He is of Scotch and English descent, and the 
first American ancestor was his great-great-grandfather, who settled 
in Virginia in the colonial epoch. His grandfather, John Jones, was 
a soldier in the Revolution, serving from Virginia, his native state. 
Thomas Jones, the father of J. T. Jones, was born in O'range county, 
Virginia, in 1788, and died in Kentucky in 1883, at the extreme old 
age of ninety-five. He was well preserved to the last, barring his be- 
ing blind for two years. He was a fanner in both Virginia and Ken- 
tucky, and was in moderate circumstances. He was a soldier in the 
war of 181 2. He married Eleanor Martin, a widow with one daugh- 
ter, and she was born in Virginia in 1783. They had eight children: 
Rebecca Howard, who left two sons, at Edgar, Nebraska; Elizabeth 
Cook, who died in Kentucky at the age of thirty, leaving two chil- 
dren; John, who died unmarried in eastern Oregon, at the age of fifty; 



966 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Margaret Benton, who died young, leaving one daughter; Mary Cook, 
who left one son ; Joel T. ; Jeremiah, who lives on the old farm in 
Kentucky; and Jesse A., who died in eastern Oregon, leaving five child- 
ren. 

Mr. Joel T. Jones was reared to farm life and labor, and learned 
to read, write and cipher. At the age of twenty he left home and went 
to Independence, Missouri, and then began the life of adventure which 
has left him so many interesting reminiscences of the years that have 
flown. At Independence he engaged to drive a stage coach and fol- 
lowed that hazardous occupation for four years, and for three years 
of that time drove between Independence and Salt Lake City. The 
schedule time was thirty days each way, and his wages were at first 
seventy-five dollars a month and later one hundred and fifty. The 
first year he lost nearly all his wages, having trusted his employer, Bill 
McGraw, who, however, failed, and Mr. Jones suffered with the other 
creditors. After this first year Mr. Jones drove the stage and carried 
the mail for Colonel S. B. Miles, who had received the government 
contract to the amount of one hundred and ninety-five thousand dollars 
a year. The distance between Independence and Salt Lake City was 
twelve hundred and fifty miles by stage road, and Mr. Jones usually 
drove either six horses or six mules to the stage. The Indians were 
often rather pestiferous, and he drove through the Indian country when 
first the Sioux and later the Cheyennes were on the warpath. Two of 
his brothers, Jesse A. and John J., were also stage drivers, and were 
on the same route or other roads of the far west. Mr. Jones earned 
and saved some money at this occupation, and he afterward engaged 
in mining at various points in the west for fifteen years. He has seen 
Brigham Young many times, and once heard that famous Mormon preach 
in the temple. In 1861 he and his brother Jesse and three others fitted 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 967 

out an expedition in Richardson county, consisting of three wagons 
with two teams to each wagon, and started for Idaho. They went up 
the Snake river to Powder river, where they spent the year in mining 
and prospecting, and in the course of the winter they made a trip for 
provisions to Fort Walla Walla. From Idaho Mr. Jones went to Oregon, 
and in and about Baker City he spent some years in the various phases 
of mining. During his western experiences he has paid as high as 
fifty dollars for a hundred-weight of flour, twenty-five cents a pound 
for potatoes, fifty to seventy cents per pound for bacon, two dollars 
for a single chicken, a dollar and a half for a dozen eggs. He once 
paid ten dollars for a hen and her brood of ten small chicks, and by 
good fortune raised these and found them very valuable later on. In 
1868 he returned to Kentucky for a visit to his parents, making the 
journey by stage, and he once more went back in 1878. 

Mr. Jones has been interested in the farming areas of southeastern 
Nebraska since 1855, and for twelve years lived in Edgar, this state. 
He moved into Humboldt in 1896 and bought an acre plot on which 
he has erected a good home in which to pass his last years. He owns 
two farms in Richardson county, consisting of one hundred and eighty 
acres, and has eighty acres in Clay county. 

Mr. Jones married, April 8, 1884, Miss Euphemia Garrison, who 
was born in Hartford, Ohio county, Kentucky, November 13, 1850, 
a daughter of Samuel A. and Sarah Owen ( Barret) Garrison, both of 
Virginia. Her father was a farmer and also operated a tannery. 
There were the following children in the Garrison family: Samuel, 
who lives in Nebraska and is single; Mary Jane Barnett, who died at 
the age of thirty-six, leaving five children ; James W., at Shickley, 
Nebraska; Mrs. Jones; and Owen J., who is living in Nebraska, and 
is unmarried. The father of these children died in Kentucky at 



9 68 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

the age of sixty, and the mother in 1891 at the age of eighty. 
Mrs. Jones was well educated. Mr. and Mrs. Jones have two children : 
Alberta May. at home and in her eighteenth year, is taking piano 
lessons and has musical tastes; Thomas Miles was born January 26, 
1895, and is in school. Mr. Jones affiliates with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and in politics is a Democrat. His wife is a member 
of the Presbyterian church. 



ALBION GRAVES. 

From pioneer times down to the present Albion Graves has been 
a resident of Saline county, Nebraska, having arrived here in 1870, 
when pioneer conditions were to be faced, the work of improvement 
and progress having been scarcely begun. As the years have advanced 
he has improved his opportunities for business advancement, and is 
to-day one of the extensive land owners of the county, having a valu- 
able property of nine hundred and twenty acres, which is the visible 
evidence of his life of thrift and industry. 

Mr. Graves is a native of Kennebec county, Maine, his birth hav- 
ing occurred near Augusta in 1849. The ancestral history of the family 
states that five brothers of the name came from England to America 
at a very early day in the colonization of the new world. They estab- 
lished homes at various places in the Atlantic states, and their descend- 
ants are now very numerous in this country. The paternal grandfather, 
Jacob Graves, was born in New Hampshire, where the family had long 
been represented. He was the father of Gerry Graves, who was born 
in Maine and was reared to manhood in the Pine Tree state. He mar- 
ried Miss Mary Moore, who was also born in Maine, to which state 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 969 

her parents removed from New Hampshire. Mr. and Mrs. Gerry 
Graves became the parents of six children, two sons and four daugh- 
ters, and four of the number are now living. The father was a wagon- 
maker by trade, and his early political support was given to the Whig 
party, while later he joined the ranks of the new Republican party 
and continued to give it his support until his death, which occurred 
when he was seventy-eight years of age. His religious faith was that 
of the Baptist denomination and his wife belonged to the same church. 
She was a member of a family noted for longevity and her death oc- 
curred at the very advanced age of ninety-two years. 

Albion Graves was reared in Kennebec county, Maine, and pur- 
sued his education in the public schools. At the age of eighteen he 
crossed the continent, going to California, where he remained for three 
years, working in a sawmill. Then returning eastward he stopped in 
Saline county, Nebraska, and secured his homestead claim, on which 
he made a home, which was partly a dug-out and partly a sod 
shanty. Herds of Buffalo were frequently seen along the Salmon 
river, as were deer and antelopes, and much smaller game was to be 
had in abundance. All was wild and unimproved and there were many 
hardships and difficulties to be borne in the establishment of a home 
upon the prairies of the west, but Mr. Graves persevered and success 
has at length crowned his efforts. He is now the owner of a valuable 
property of nine hundred and twenty acres lying in Saline and Jef- 
ferson counties, returning to him an excellent income. His home place 
comprises four hundred and eighty acres. In 1895 he erected a fine 
home at a cost of two thousand dollars, and it is furnished in a man- 
ner which indicates the refined and cultured taste of the family. There 
is good shade upon the place, a windmill, the latest improved machin- 
ery, a good barn and other necessary outbuildings, and good grades 



97° SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

of stock are found in the pastures. In all of his work he is practical 
and progressive, and well merits the prosperity which has come to 
him as the years have gone by. 

In 1874 Mr. Graves was united in marriage to Mrs. Angeline 
Wood, the widow of H. Wood, who by her first marriage had one 
son, Charles Wood. Her parents were William and Catherine (Shet- 
ler) Munich, the former a native of Pennsylvania. Both died in Iowa, 
and it was in Guthrie county, that state, that Mrs. Graves was reared, 
ah hough she is a native of Ohio. To Mr. and Mrs. Graves were 
born four children who are yet living: Elsie, Viola, Myrtle and Ches- 
ter. They also lost four sons, of whom two died in infancy, while 
Fred died at the age of seventeen years and Calvin at the age of thir- 
teen years. Mr. Graves exercises his right of franchise in support of 
the men and measures of the Republican party and has frequently 
been a delegate to its conventions, but while he keeps well informed 
on the issues of the day and is deeply interested in the success of 
his party, he has never been an aspirant for public office. He belongs 
to the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and he has many friends 
both within and without the lodge, for the strong traits of his char- 
acter are such as command respect and confidence in every land and 
clime. The Graves home is noted for its gracious, cordial and pleas- 
ing hospitality, and both Mr. and Mrs. Graves are popular people of 
this community. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 971 

H. L. WARD. 

H. L. Ward, senior member of the large mercantile firm of Ward 
Brothers, at Pawnee city, Nebraska, is a leading citizen who is held 
in high esteem in this community. He was born October 20, 1841, 
in Harlan county, Kentucky, and comes of a family which has been 
conspicuous in the military life of the country. His great-grandfather 
fought for freedom in the Revolutionary war, his grandsire protected 
his country's interests in the war of 18 12, his father bravely served 
his country in the Mexican war, and he himself has an honorable record 
as a soldier in the Civil war. 

The parents of H. L. Ward were John M. and Nancy J. (War- 
ren) Ward, natives of Tennessee. In politics Mr. Ward was former- 
ly a Clay Whig, later a Republican. They were the parents of thir- 
teen children, and a number of the sons took gallant part in the Civil 
war. The sons were: James; John was a captain in the Forty-ninth 
of Kentucky, and Thomas S. was a lieutenant in the same regiment, 
and H. L. was also a member of it; Alexander; Isaac S. ; Franklin; 
George E., junior member of Ward Brothers. The daughters of the 
family were : Mahala, Mary, Eliza, Sarah and Susan. The mother 
died at the age of forty-nine years, but the father survived until his 
eighty-second year. Both were consistent members of the Baptist church. 

Our subject was reared in Kentucky and was educated in the 
local schools. In August, 1861, he volunteered his services in the 
Civil war struggle, enlisting in Company F. Forty-ninth Kentucky In- 
fantry, under his brother, Captain J. A. Ward, the regiment being 
under the command of Colonel Eve and in General Hancock's divi- 
sion. During his term of service he participated in a number of 
battles, the most notable ones being Richmond, Kentucky, Chattanooga 
and Franklin, Tennessee, and Florence. Alabama, and also many skir- 



972 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

mishes. He was injured at Somerset, by a fall from a horse, and was 
honorably discharged at Louisville, Kentucky. Mr. Ward then located 
at Craig, Missouri, where he engaged in an extensive mercantile busi- 
ness, and remained there from 1873 tintil 1902, when he settled at 
Pawnee city. He is associated with his brother, and the firm is one 
of the leading dry-goods and general mercantile houses in this part 
of the state. They carry a large and well selected stock of dry-goods, 
clothing, boots and shoes, and in every way are prepared to meet the 
demands of a constantly increasing trade. 

In 1877 Mr. Ward was married to Miss Frances Sharpe, who is a 
daughter of Abraham and Matilda Sharpe. Four children have been 
born to this marriage, the two younger ones being still at home, while 
George Custer and Jacob, the older ones, are located at Craig, Missouri. 

Mr. Ward has always taken an intelligent interest in public mat- 
ters, and during his residence in Missouri served four years as county 
judge of Holt county. He is identified with the Masonic bodies and is 
prominent in the Grand Army post in this city. He is one of the progres- 
sive, reliable business men of Pawnee city and in every way is a represen- 
tative citizen. 



GEORGE E. WARD. 

George E. Ward, junior member of the prominent business firm 
of Ward Brothers, of Pawnee city, Nebraska, and a much respected 
citizen, was born in Kentucky, and is a son of John M. and Nancy J. 
(Warren) Ward, who for many years were old and honored residents 
of Harlan county, Kentucky. 

Mr. Ward prior to coming to Pawnee city and entering into a mer- 
cantile partnership here with his brother H. L., conducted a store at 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 973 

Rulo, Richardson county, Nebraska. The firm is a strong one and the 
line of goods handled meets with the approval of a large and constantly 
increasing trade. 

In 1885 Mr. Ward married Miss Emma Ocamb, who is a daughter 
of Charles and Mary (Priestey) Ocamb, of Kansas City. Five children 
have been born to this union, namely : T. E., Samuel G., Mary Hope, 
G. F., and Paul. The religious connection of the family is with the 
Methodist church. Fraternally Mr. Ward belongs to the order of Odd 
Fellows. He is recognized in Pawnee city as a business man of integ- 
rity and in every way is a first-class citizen. 



G. A. HARRIS, M. D. 

G. A. Harris, M. D., a prominent young physician and surgeon of 
Beatrice, Nebraska, whose skill and professional ability have gained 
him a leading position in the county, was born August 7, 1871, in 
Macoupin county, Illinois. He is a son of the late Dr. W. J. Harris, 
who was for years one of the most esteemed physicians in Beatrice. 
His death occurred in January, 1901, at the age of sixty years. 

Dr. W. J. Harris was born in Canada of Welsh ancestry, and was 
an unusual type of the race, being six feet in stature and weighing two 
hundred pounds. He was a man of genial presence and brought cheer 
into the sick room. For many years he was a consistent member of the 
Methodist church. Fraternally he was both a Mason and an Odd Fellow. 
The three sons born to him were : Dr. G. A. ; D. H., of Valentine, Ne- 
braska; and Wylie. 

Dr. G. A. Harris attended the schools in Illinois until his thirteenth 
year, when his father removed to Nebraska. He then entered a private 



974 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

school and later the University of Illinois, at Champaign. After three 
years devoted to teaching he began the practice of his profession. He 
served as house physician at the city hospital at St. Joe, Missouri, and 
at Omaha, Nebraska, for seven years. He is now associated with Dr. 
Fall in conducting the Beatrice sanitarium, an institution which stands 
very high in public esteem in Gage county. 

In 1898 Dr. Harris was married to Myrtle Parks, a daughter of 
Colonel F. M. Parks, who for some years was identified with the busi- 
ness interests of Shenandoah and Woodbine, Iowa. One son has been 
born to this union, William D. Dr. Harris is a Republican in his political 
affiliation, and is fraternally connected with the Elks and the Odd 
Fellows. 



W. P. WILSON. 

W. P. Wilson, of Wymore, Gage county, Nebraska, is a well 
known and very popular railroad man of the Burlington road and has 
been a resident of the state for thirty-three years. He is also a veteran 
of the Civil war and a man highly esteemed by all who are associated with 
him. His enlistment took place at Newton, Jasper county, Iowa, in 
August, 1861, in Company I, Tenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, Colonel 
P. P. Henderson and Captain J. A. Garrett commanding. He was in 
the following events of the war : Iuka, Corinth, Port Gibson, Raymond, 
Jackson, Champion Hills, siege of Vicksburg, Missionary Ridge, siege 
of Atlanta, with Sherman to the sea and north to Richmond and Wash- 
ington. He was discharged September 1, 1865. 

Mr. Wilson was born in Elkhart county, Indiana, December 27, 
1840, and is a son of Reuben and Catharine (Miller) Wilson. When 
but a boy of sixteen years Mr. Wilson was taken by his parents to the 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 975 

wilds of Iowa, where he lived until the breaking out of the war, and 
upon his return home he resided in that locality until 1870, when he 
removed to Hubbell, Thayer county, Nebraska, and has made that state 
his home ever since. For seventeen years he has been in the employ 
of the Burlington road, and is one of its most trusted locomotive engi- 
neers, running from Lincoln, Nebraska, to Concordia, Kansas. Some 
years ago in a railroad accident he lost a foot, but manages to attend to 
his duties exceedingly well. 

In 1866 he was married in Iowa to Mary S. Street. She was 
born in Wayne county, Indiana, near Richmond, but was reared and 
educated in Iowa. She is a daughter of David Street, who died in 
Iowa. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Amanda Tout, was born 
in Pennsylvania, and is living at the age of eighty years. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilson have the following children, namely: Mrs. Josephine 
Stuff, of Seattle, Washington ; Lena, wife of A. G. Smart, of Wymore, 
Nebraska; Edward, of Iowa; and John, of Seattle. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wilson have a beautiful home and show a gracious hospitality to all 
their friends. They are much respected in the community and their suc- 
cess in life is well merited. Their children are a credit to them and they 
ha ve cause to be proud of them. 



JOHN H. BRANDT. 

John H. Brandt, of Glenwood township, Gage county, Nebraska, 
is one of the well known citizens of this locality, and also one of the 
honored veterans of the Civil war. His career as a soldier commenced 
with his enlistment at Waverly, Bremer county, Iowa, in the Thirty- 
eighth Iowa Volunteer Infantry Company. Among the other engage- 



976 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

merits, Mr. Brandt participated in the siege of Vicksburg and was as- 
signed to the Department of the Gulf. He crossed the Gulf of Mexico, 
was at Brownville, Texas, and was finally discharged at Galveston that 
state, in the fall of 1865, after a hard and gallant service. 

The birth of Mr. Brandt occurred in Bedford, Pennsylvania, July 
3, 1844, and he is a son of Jacob and Mary (Long) Brandt, and a 
grandson of Benjamin. The father of Benjamin was in the Revolutionary 
war, and his sons in the war of 1812, and the family originated in 
Germany. Jacob Brandt removed in 1850 to Adams county, Illinois, 
but later located at Bremer county, Iowa, and still later at Palmyra, 
Missouri, where the mother died. The father passed away at Summer- 
ville, Illinois, at the age of seventy-eight, a man of honor who attained 
to prominence in the several communities in which he resided. Among 
the children born to himself and wife were : Lydia, deceased ; John, James 
Philip, Charles, Perry, Anna, Lizzie, Albert and Alfred, twins, one of 
whom died young. 

John H. Brandt was reared upon his father's farm and educated 
in the schools of Pennsylvania. In March, 1884, he removed to Gage 
county, Nebraska, and developed one of the best farms in that locality, 
consisting of two hundred and forty acres, upon which he has erected a 
comfortable house, big barn and excellent other buildings. He carries 
on general farming and raises considerable stock, and is recognized as 
one of the leading farmers and stockmen of Gage county. 

Mr. Brandt was married in Adams county, Illinois, to Adalaide 
Bethel. She was born in Illinois and is a daughter of C. Bethel. Mrs. 
Brandt died in January, 1884, having borne her husband twelve chil- 
dren, eight of whom are now living, namely : Loretta, George, William, 
John, Jessie, Tola, Nettie and Lizzie. In 1888 Mr. Brandt married 
Susanna Foltz, who was born in Nebraska, a daughter of Solomon Foltz. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 977 

The following children have been born to Air. and Mrs. Brandt, namely : 
Arthur, Margette, Nimrod, Allie, Homer, Maude and two who died in 
infancy- For many years Mr. Brandt has been prominent in G. A. R. 
work. The entire family is highly respected in the neighborhood, and 
Mr. Brandt himself stands high among his associates and friends, as a 
man of integrity, hardworking and reliable in every respect. 



JESSE B. CALLISON. 

Jesse B. Callison is numbered among the pioneer settlers of Saline 
county, Nebraska, having resided in this portion of the state since 1870. 
He is, therefore, familiar with the history of its development, and he 
has borne a helpful and important part in the work of progress and im- 
provement as the years have gone by. He was born in West Virginia 
on the 1st of August, 1834, and is a son of Joseph Callison, whose birth 
occurred in Virginia. The father represented one of the early families 
of the Old Dominion, his ancestors having located there about 1790. 
His father was Anthony Callison, also a native of Virginia, and he and 
his wife both died in Pocahontas county, that state, at an advanced age. 
Joseph Callison was reared under the parental roof, and after attaining 
his majority was married to Miss Elizabeth Bright, who was born in 
Virginia and was a daughter of Jesse Bright, whose birth occurred in 
Pennsylvania and who was a representative of an old Pennsylvania 
Dutch family. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Callison removed from West Vir- 
ginia to Knox county, Illinois, and later to Iowa, settling in Davis county, 
near Bloomfield. In the year 1873 tne )' came to Nebraska, spending their 
last days in Richardson county near Falls City, where the father died 
at the very advanced age of ninety-three years. Throughout his entire 



9/8 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

life he had followed agricultural pursuits, and his persistency, industry 
and well directed labor brought to him a good living. His early politi- 
cal support was given to the Whig party and upon its dissolution he 
joined the ranks of the new Republican party. His wife, who was to 
him a faithful companion and helpmate on life's journey, died at the 
age of seventy years. They were the parents of nine children, of whom 
Anthony was a soldier of the Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. He served 
for five years with the army and is now deceased. Addison F. was a 
member of the Fifty-fifth Regiment of Illinois Volunteers and now re- 
sides in Idaho. 

Jesse P. Callison spent his early boyhood days in Greenbier county, 
Virginia, and when still a young lad accompanied his parents on their 
removal to Knox county, Illinois, the family home being established 
near Abingdon, where he lived until 1867. In the meantime the country 
became involved in Civil war, and his patriotic spirit was aroused, prompt- 
ing his enlistment as a soldier of the Union army. It was on the 6th of 
August, 1862, that he enrolled his name among those who had offered 
service to the government, becoming members of Company I, Eighty- 
third Illinois Infantry for three years' service. A. Harding was placed 
in command of the regiment and later was succeeded by Colonel Smith. 
The regiment went into camp at Monmouth, Illinois, and after a short 
time spent in drill they were ordered south, proceeding to Fort Donelson, 
Tennessee, and later to Nashville. Mr. Callison participated in the battle 
of Nashville and Clarksville, and was in active service in Tennessee dur- 
ing the greater part of his enlistment. He was mustered out on the 28th 
of June, 1865, and gladly returned to his home, although he had been 
a devoted and loyal soldier, never faltering in performance of any mili- 
tary duty assigned him. Making his way northward after the cessation 
of hostilities he continued to reside in Abingdon, Illinois, until 1867. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 979 

In the meantime Mr. Callison was united in marriage to Miss Jane 
Grumble, an estimable lady, who for thirty-seven years has traveled 
life's journey with him and has been of great assistance to him. She 
was born in Hancock county, Illinois, and is a daughter of John and 
Maria (Davis) Grumble. Her father was born in New York city, while 
her mother's birth occurred in Jersey City, New Jersey. Mr. Grum- 
ble is still living and now makes his home near White City in Morris 
county, Kansas, at the age of eighty-eight years, but his wife passed 
away at the age of seventy-two years. She was a devoted member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, to which he still belongs, and his upright 
life has ever been in consistent harmony with his Christian principles. 
To this worthy couple were born nine children, five sons and four 
daughters. One son, William Grumble, was a soldier of the Civil war 
and is now living in Arkansas. He was taken prisoner by the rebel 
troops and for nine months was held in captivity, but then managed 
to make his escape and rejoined the Union army. 

After his marriage Mr. Callison removed to Davis county, Iowa, 
and in the spring of 1870 came to Nebraska, where he secured a home- 
stead claim, upon which he is still living. His first home was a log and 
sod house, which he occupied for seven years, and then he replaced this 
by a more modern and commodious residence. Although he has pros- 
pered here his course has been beset by many difficulties and obstacles 
as the years have advanced. There have been hot winds and blizzards 
and also a scourge of grasshoppers. In the early days buffalo meat 
and other wild game largely furnished the table of the early settlers. 
He saw hard times for years, but his resolute purpose and energy at 
length triumphed over these various difficulties, and he is now the pos- 
sessor of an excellent farm of eighty acres valued at sixty dollars per 
acre. On the place is a good house, a substantial barn, a windmill, well 



980 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

improved machinery, and, in fact, various modern equipments and ac- 
cessories which go to facilitate farm work and render agricultural labor 
profitable. The home is pleasantly located about three miles north of 
Daykin. 

Mr. Callison and his wife are the parents of eight children: Robert, 
Mrs. Anna Higgins, Pauline, Mrs. Bertha Pointer, Flora, Nettie, Oliver 
J. and John C. They also lost two children, one dying in infancy, while 
Nellie passed away at the age of thirteen years. Mrs. Callison is a mem- 
ber of the United Brethren church. Mr. Callison gives his political 
allegiance to the Republican party and in matters of citizenship is public- 
spirited and progressive, manifesting the same loyalty to his country 
and her welfare that he displayed when defending the old flag on 
southern battlefields. He is a man of strong and honorable principles, 
and in his business life has never been known to take advantage of the 
necessities of his fellow men in any trade transaction. As one of the 
pioneer settlers and respected citizens of his county he well deserves 
representation in this volume. 



SAMUEL PETTIT. 

Samuel Pettit, who has been living retired from his long career of 
farmer and building contractor since 1897, has been a resident of 
Nemaha county for nearly fifty years. He is not only one of the 
honored pioneers and old-timers, but has been foremost in all the activ- 
ities in which he has engaged. While desiring and taking no part 
in practical politics, he was one of the earliest representatives of this 
county in the territorial legislature, and was there when Lincoln was 
assassinated. For this half century he has quietly performed his duties 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 981 

as a citizen and man, has been always reliable and capable, has won 
friends and kept their high esteem, and now at the age of more than 
fourscore has passed a life of worthy activity and creditable performance 
and can enjoy his remaining years as befits the true workman whose 
labors have been well done. 

Mr. Pettit was born about five miles from Batavia, New York, June 
3, 1823, and from his native state, in 1833, went to Logan county, Ohio, 
and thence, in 1850, became a pioneer of Wisconsin, and in October, 
1856, took up his permanent residence in Nemaha county, Nebraska, 
which has proved the last stage of his earthly pilgrimage. David 
Pettit, his father, was born in Albany, New York, in 1783, and died 
near Lima, Allen county, Ohio, in 1853. He was a non-commissioned 
offcer in the war of 1812, and was a teacher in Batavia. The family 
is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. In 1820 he married Scenia Elms, who was 
born in France about 1803, and who had three brothers that served under 
Napoleon at Moscow, only one ever returning to his native land. David 
Pettit and wife had five sons and two daughters, one son dying in child- 
hood, and Samuel being the only survivor. The son Rodolphus was 
for many years a teacher in Logan county, Ohio, giving his most en- 
thusiastic efforts and best years to this profession, and for several years 
before his death served as clerk of the district court; he died in 1900 
at the age of eighty years, and had been twice married, rearing three 
children; he was not a money-getter, but gave all his children good 
educations. Jonathan Pettit, another son, was a carpenter, and met his 
death as a Union soldier at the siege of Vicksburg, filling an unknown 
grave ; he had a wife and three children. Mrs. David Pettit was a widow 
for many years, and died in Henry county, Indiana, when past the age 
of eighty. 

Samuel Pettit had all his schooling before he was eleven years old, 



982 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

and since that age has been dependent on his own resources. He lived 
at home until he reached his majority. At the age of twenty-one he 
learned the carpenter's trade, and served four years for board and 
clothes alone. He was a mechanic and contractor and builder in Ohio, 
then in Wisconsin, and also after coming to Nebraska. He bought his 
first farm land in 1862, paying a thousand dollars for three hundred and 
twenty acres situated on the west bank of the Missouri river. Within 
four years this land had all been swept away by the currents of the Big 
Muddy. He saved some of the timbers from this place, and with them 
built his house on the one hundred and twenty acre tract which he bought 
in 1868 and which is still his home farm. He bought nine lots in Peru 
in 1 87 1, and still owns three of them. He has built many of the dwell- 
ings in this vicinity, and has worked on all the fine school buildings in 
this town. 

On December 12, 1843, Mr. Pettit was married in Logan county, 
Ohio, to Miss Mary A. Knox, who was born there in 1823. Her father, 
Leonard Knox, came from Virginia to Ohio in 1804. He was a scout 
under Daniel Boone, Benton McCarthy and General Cox during the 
Indian wars. Mrs. Pettit's family were all intense pro-slavery advocates, 
but she was on her part much opposed to the institution. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pettit had eleven children, two of whom died in childhood. James, born 
in Ohio in 1844, was a teacher, postmaster and followed other occupa- 
tions, and is now living in Iowa, having three sons and one grandson ; 
George Pettit, who is the grain dealer and owner of the elevator in 
Peru, has several sons and daughters ; Alfred is a farmer and prominent 
Republican of Thayer county, Nebraska; Mark is a railroad agent in 
Kansas and has three sons; Lincoln is a carpenter and contractor in 
Eagle, Nebraska, and has three sons; Greely died in Nemaha county at 
the age of three years; Mary is the wife of Booker Morrison, a farmer 




J^^vw^w^-^- (#L m -%"^J-- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 983 

in this county, and lias three children; Esterline and Emeline, twins, 
the former the wife of Frank Rigwald and the latter of Jesse Robinson, 
both farmers on Mr. Pettit's place near Peru, and Mrs. Rigwald has two 
daughters and Mrs. Robinson has four sons and one daughter. Mr. 
Pettit lost his noble wife and the mother of these children, on Novem- 
ber 15, 1897, and he has since then lived alone, keeping his own house 
and passing his days in sweet and quiet simplicity. He is a strong Re- 
publican, and during the Civil war was a member of the home guards. 
He has been a member of no church, but his wife was a Methodist. His 
children were all educated in the normal school, and the oldest was a 
teacher. 



EDWARD D. GAGE AND FAMILY. 

Edward Downs Gage, whose death occurred in Jefferson county, 
March 22, 1890, was for twenty years connected with the agricultural 
and business interests of this county, and was a man whose integrity, 
reliability and personal worth were unquestioned wherever he went. 
He was one of the oldest men in the county at the time of his death 
and his long career had been useful in its work and wholesome and 
kindly in its influence. While he was persevering and assiduous in 
gaining a due amount of material prosperity, he never neglected the 
responsibilities laid upon him as a citizen of a great republic or as 
father and head of a family, whose different members gave him true- 
hearted devotion while he was living and now revere his memory as of 
one who was true to his convictions and sincere and earnest in the per- 
formance of life's duties as he saw them. He was unselfish, devout, 
religious, a "friend of the church, friend of the neighborhood, friend of 
humanity, friend of God." 



984 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Some generations before the nineteenth century three brothers 
came from England and settled in New York. A descendant of one 
of these, James Gage, settled early in the nineteenth century on the 
"Dock Road" in Madison township, Lake county, Ohio, when this coun- 
try was almost a trackless wilderness. This, until his death in 1859, 
continued to be his home. 

He married Charlana Turney in February, 1818. 

To them were born three children: Edward D., the subject of this 
sketch, born June 7, 1819; David W. and James Alfred, the latter dying 
in infancy. On July 10, 1827, occurred the death of Mrs. Gage, and 
on June 29, 1829, he was married to Lucing Wright. To them were 
born five daughters and one son, namely : Helen C., A. Eliza, Charlotte 
M., Ardelissa V., Henry W. and Alta L. 

David W. became a successful lawyer, practicing mainly in Cleve- 
land, Ohio. He did some work in behalf of the anti-slavery cause and 
has ever been much interested in all reform and church movements in 
behalf of which he has spent some little time both as a lecturer and in the 
preparation of articles for the press. He was for about three years state 
organizer of the Prohibition party in Ohio, in which time the vote of 
that party in the state increased threefold. He is now living in Ober- 
lin, Ohio. 

Henry Warren responded to the first call for recruits in the war 
in behalf of the Union, and was one of the three-months men, taking 
part in the battle of Laurel Hill. He enlisted and served again for 
three years at the end of which time he enlisted again for three years, 
or until the close of the war. He was mustered out in the fall of 1865 
at Little Rock, Arkansas. He died as the result of a railroad accident 
in the winter of 1882. 

A cousin of James Gage was identified with the ministry of the 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 985 

Methodist church, and in the early days was sent out to Nebraska as 
a missionary, and it was from this devoted man of God that Gage 
county received its name. 

The Turneys on the maternal side are among the oldest American 
families. They were of French Huguenot origin, and after the terrible 
religious persecutions culminating in the St. Bartholomew massacre in 
August, 1572, they joined the thousands of other expatriated Protes- 
tants and took up their abode in England. Thence, along in the days 
of early colonization, four brothers of the name started to this country, 
one locating at Bridgeport, Connecticut, one in what is now West Vir- 
ginia, one in South Carolina, and one in Tennessee. 

Asa Turney, the grandfather of Edward D. Gage, was born in 
Fairfield, Connecticut, October 15, 1759, and was married to Polly 
Downs, who was born at Reading, Connecticut, December 2, 1768. Asa 
Turney was a Revolutionary patriot, enlisting first in 1777. He was 
in the fight at Danbury, Connecticut, when that town was burned by the 
British; when each of the small force of two hundred Americans had 
but two bullets and two charges of powder with which to repel the 
enemy, and not till thirty patriots had fallen did they retreat. Asa Tur- 
ney voted twice for George Washington as president. During his resi- 
dence in Connecticut he served for a time as a sailor on merchant ves- 
sels trading with the West Indies, and in 1809 he started west to find 
a home in the Western Reserve in Ohio, which territory was originally 
claimed by Connecticut and was the seat of a prosperous colony from 
that state. He placed his wife and older children in two carts, one 
drawn by oxen and the other by a span of horses, and this journey to 
the then far west consumed fifty-three days. He bought a hundred 
acres of wild land in Madison township of Lake county, and after mak- 
ing a well improved farm from this, he purchased an additional hun- 



986 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

dred and sixty in Perry township of the same county, and later seventy 
more in Madison township, making three hundred and thirty acres alto- 
gether. His political principles were those of the Federalists and old- 
line Whig parties. He served as a trustee of Madison township. He 
and his wife were members of the Baptist church. His death occurred 
April 5, 1833. 

Edward D. Gage remained at the old home in Lake county, Ohio, 
until his marriage, in 185 1, and then continued his activities in that 
state for some twenty years, during which time he cleared, fenced and 
built a fine residence and buildings on a sixty-two acre farm on "Dock 
Road" not far from his early home. He also cleared and improved a 
farm he owned on the lake shore at the north end of Wheeler Creek road 
in Geneva township in Ashtabula county, Ohio. These he sold in 1868 
and in 1870 removed with his family to Jefferson (then known as 
Jones) county, Nebraska. There was in that year no railroad in south- 
ern Nebraska west of Nebraska City, and after arriving there the re- 
mainder of the journey was made overland, with a company of others, 
in covered wagons. Among the household effects of the Gage family 
was a piano, the first musical instrument of the kind to find its way into 
Jefferson county, and for some time it was regarded as one of the novel- 
ties and attractions of the county. Fairbury was then an isolated town, 
with very few houses, and between this town and Mr. Gage's farm at 
Bower, there was visible one lone cottonwood tree. Mr. Gage bought 
fourteen hundred and forty acres of land near the present postoffice of 
Bower, and at the time of his death his estate still comprised twelve 
hundred and eighty acres in this county. In order to build his house he 
freighted lumber from Nebraska City and Waterville, Kansas. Neither 
grasshoppers, drought, nor high taxes during the first few years were 
sufficient to rout him from his secure position among the agriculturists 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 987 

of southeastern Nebraska, and he continued to follow, with much suc- 
cess, farming all his active life, and by his thrift and industry and 
indomitable perseverance, assisted so nobly by his wife, he accumulated 
more than a competency. Nothwithstanding his energy in business 
affairs, he was modest and retiring in disposition, and attracted men to 
him more by his personal worth and substantiality than by an aggres- 
sive friendship. 

He was always faithful to the welfare of Jefferson county, and 
took an active interest in the educational affairs of the county. His 
sympathies always went out to the oppressed and weak, and his assist- 
ance, whether by political ballot or personal effort, was directed along 
that line. His first vote was cast for Tom Corwin, the candidate for 
governor of Ohio, and he was only a few months past his majority 
when he gave his vote to William Henry Harrison for president, and 
his presidential vote for Benjamin Harrison was cast only two years 
before his death. He was strongly opposed to slavery, later allied him- 
self with the temperance movement, and during the closing years of 
his life often assisted the Prohibition party, and, furthermore, his oppo- 
sition was always directed against the power of monopoly, at present 
the dominant issue before the country for settlement. 

For over thirty years his influence went consistently and steadily 
for religious uplift and growth. He was baptized on October 3, 1858, 
and was a member of the Christian church until his death. He loved 
the Bible and studied it for knowledge and guidance. His Christian- 
ity was best exemplified in his home, which is recalled not alone by the 
children but by the many others who ever sojourned therein for its 
harmony, mutual helpfulness, self-sacrifice and interdependence. His 
patience was shown during his last days of suffering and his great 



988 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

faith in his final hour, when, in the words quoted by a friend, his end 
"was rather a happy departure from life than a mere death." 

Edward D. Gage was married on March 12, 185 1, in Ohio, to 
Samantha M. Morse, and for nearly forty years their lives blended in 
mutual esteem, concord and happy fruitage of their efforts. She was a 
woman of great energy, interested in the affairs of the world, and the 
scope of her efforts made her influence felt not only in her happy 
domestic circle but in the community around her. She was born in 
Kingsville, Ashtabula county, Ohio, October 11, 1826, and she died at 
her home in Fairbury, March 11, 1901, when nearly seventy-five years 
of age. 

Samantha M. Morse was a descendant of one of seven brothers 
who came to this country from Wales (the Morse of telegraph fame 
being of the same stock), and the name in this country has been inter- 
changeably spelled as Moss or Morse. Samantha Morse was the 
daughter of Amos and Annie (Abbott) Morse, and she was the third 
child and eldest daughter in a family of eleven children, nine of whom, 
five sons and four daughters, were reared. 

The youngest of this family, now S. Adelle Bates, is the only liv- 
ing representative. She is a person of literary and artistic tastes, but 
having especial musical ability. She was for many years a teacher of 
music and at one time spent two years in Germany in the study of 
music and German, graduating in the former from the Musical Con- 
servatory at Leipsic. She, with her husband, now live at Madison, 
Ohio, where they have some little business interests in the furniture 
and musical as well as other lines. 

Samantha Morse's grandfather, Squire Abbott, was originally 
from Massachusetts, but removed to New York at an early day. He 
was a Baptist minister, and in the pioneer times was sent out as a mis- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 989 

sionary by the Baptist board, going- from New York to Ohio on horse- 
back. In 1820 he located in Ashtabula county, and five years later 
moved to Henrietta township, Lorain county, where he died December 
18, 1853, aged eighty-three years. 

Samantha M. Morse spent her early life in her birthplace home 
until her marriage, and thereafter for half a century her life went on 
in simple usefulness and in working out the duties which came to her 
day by day. She felt her first obligations to be in her home, and in 
its ordering and in the rearing to true and successful manhood and 
womanhood those entrusted to her care, lies her greatest reward. But 
her expansive energy found many outlets into fields of usefulness. It 
was mainly due to her planning and work that a part of their Nebraska 
home — a large house for the time — was arranged for store purposes, 
in which was carried for a few years the usual stock of a country gro- 
cery. From about 1872 to 1886 the postoffice, earlier known as Bower- 
ville and later as Bower, was located in a part of the house and attended 
to by the family. In the early days a sign proclaimed this house to 
the public as the Pioneer House, and, while this signal did not long 
remain standing, wayfarers continued to find here a temporary home 
as long as the family remained. 

The personal circle at this ideal home was seldom small, and 
within it at almost any time might have been found, besides the family, 
two or three orphan children, and preachers, teachers, relatives and 
others made this their abiding place for various lengths of time. Dur- 
ing her long lifetime Mrs. Gage was the blessed mother to eleven 
orphan children, and some of these have since grown to maturity and 
have children of their own. Mrs. Gage united with the Baptist church 
when a young woman, but later became impressed with the faith of 
the Disciples and remained a true adherent of the Church of Christ till 



990 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

the day of her death. Outside of her other engaging- activities, she 
found time to devote herself with true Giristian zeal and piety to the 
works of religion and charity, and the church and community owed 
much to her efforts continued to the last years of her life. She lies 
buried in the beautiful cemeterv near the little country church at 
Bower, resting beside her husband and two daughters. 

The own children of Mr. and Mrs. Gage were five in number: 
Annie C, James A., Lida H.. who died in infancy. Xora E., and Miss 
Susie D. Miss Susie D. Gage, the youngest of the family and the 
only daughter now living, resides in her beautiful home at 911 Eighth 
street, Fairbury. Miss Gage is a lady of culture and true refinement. 
She was for several years engaged in teaching, and has always taken 
an active interest in educational affairs. She enjoys intellectual com- 
panionship and the beauties and depths of literature, and has found 
much opportunity in a quiet way to be useful and happy in her com- 
munity. 

James A. Gage, the only son, is a person of genial manner 
thoughtful and conservative. On reaching his majority in 1876 he 
was presented by his father with a quarter section of land in section 
13 of Richland precinct. This, together with other large property 
interests in the county, including three other quarter sections which 
are from the original family estate, he still holds. On finishing his 
school life he remained at home with his parents for several years, then 
going into the nursery business with a partner, under the firm name 
of Carpenter and Gage. This enterprise soon developed into a trade 
of from fifty to one hundred thousand dollars annually, doing busi- 
ness in all parts of the United States and often beyond its borders. In 
1890 Mr. Gage sold out his interest in this firm, but soon was again 
in the same line, making a specialty of the apple-seedling trade. In 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 991 

the spring of 1899 lie moved to Beatrice, Gage county, where he also 
has property interests and is engaged in the general nursery trade. 
He was married in November, 1887, to Miss Emma E. Lasch, of 
Lincoln. Nebraska. Their three boys are Albert Edward, Vernon 
Lasch and James Wendell. 

The oldest child and daughter. Annie C, died at Fairbury. Jan- 
uary 5. 1893, being the wife of Postmaster John M. Fitchpatrick of 
Hebron. Mrs. Fitchpatrick was born in Madison, Ohio, May 24, 
1853, being seventeen years old when she came to this part of Nebraska 
with the rest of the family. Before her marriage she was one of the 
successful teachers of Jefferson county, and taught at Fairbury when 
the schools had but two departments. She possessed talent in music 
and painting, especially in the latter, but was best known for her pro- 
ficiency in both plain and ornamental penmanship, which in her case 
was one of the fine arts and which she sometimes taught. At one time 
she was a pupil of Piatt R. Spencer. She also had literary inclina- 
tions and ability, occasionally letting her rich fancy run to poetical 
composition, but made no attempts in this direction other than in a 
modest way at local functions. She was quick at repartee and a gen- 
eral social favorite, and her life devoted to Christian ideals and do- 
mestic happiness remains as a bright memory to those she loved and 
worked for. October 11, 1880. she was married to John M. Fitch- 
patrick, of Hebron, which town remained her home till her death. She 
had two children, Neil Gage Fitchpatrick. who is now, after nearly 
three years of successful service in the employ of the Nebraska Tele- 
phone Company, a student in the State University of Nebraska ; and 
J. Roy, who died in infancy. 

Nora E. Gage, the other daughter, who passed away June 13, 
1894, had a wide sphere of influence and work in this part of 



992 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Nebraska, and her helpfulness and charm of manner and beauty of 
spirit gave to her life a range of usefulness unusually large. She was 
born in Ohio, February 26, 1859, and from the time of her removal 
to Nebraska in 1870 she regarded the homestead at Bower as her prin- 
cipal and best loved home. She united with the Christian church 
when she was thirteen years old, and conformed the subsequent acts 
of her life to its high ideals. From the district school at Bower she 
passed to the public school in Hebron, and then attended a seminary 
in Ohio for a time, after which she began teaching in Jefferson 
county. In the fall of 1882 she entered the University of Nebraska, 
where she spent four years. There her strength of Christian charac- 
ter was a source of inspiration to her fellow students, and while devel- 
oping her own powers her spirit flowed out in beneficence to those 
around her. She was devoted to her literary society, and was highly 
honored by being chosen for two successive years as essayist at the 
annual exhibition. Her class standing was always of the highest, and 
she completed five years' work in four, being chosen as one of the class 
speakers at commencement. After graduation she held the position 
for one year of assistant principal of the Hebron high school, and in 
1887 she accepted the position of lady principal and head of the de- 
partment of Latin and Greek in the Christian College at Fairfield, 
Nebraska, this work especially appealing to her because of the rare 
opportunity for Christian service and influence, but also since she had 
given much attention to Latin and Greek while in the university. At 
the time of her graduation from the university she stood second in 
grading of all who had passed through the institution up to that time. 
During her work at Fairfield College she was regarded as an ideal 
not only as a teacher, but as a broad-minded woman. In addition to 
her other duties in the college she was president of the Nebraska C. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 993 

W. B. M., and directed its work with earnestness and success. But 
after two years of these happy and fruitful labors she was attacked by 
disease, and thenceforth to the end it was a struggle for existence, in 
which as she gradually grew weaker she was compelled to lay aside 
one after another her cherished plans and duties, and after five years 
divided more and more unequally between work and bodily suffering 
her noble spirit found rest, leaving a lasting remembrance of her as 
"the dutiful daughter and sister, the faithful friend, the helpful 
teacher, the noble, unselfish, true-hearted Christian woman." 

The various genealogical branches of the Gage family tree, as 
fully as could be compiled from the data immediately at hand, are 
indicated in the following paragraphs : 

James Adams Gage, born May 31, 1766, and Eunice Watkins 
Gage, born August 13, 1768; grandparents of E. D. Gage. Children: 
Judah, born February 26, 1788; Moses, February 3, 1790; George, 
October 12, 1791 ; James, January 31, 1793; John, February 28, 1795; 
Lucy, February 6, 1798; Eunice, December 6, 1799; Gaylord Grizzle, 
May 4, 1804; Theodore Rodman, May 24, 1806; Timothy Munson, 
January 8, 1809. 

Moses Gage, born February 3, 1790; uncle of E. D. Gage; wife, 
Lavina Judson Gage. Children : Ethan A., born April 28, 1822 ; 
Lucy Ann, born October 13, 1828, died November 24, 1871; Adaline, 
born September 18, 183 1 ; Myron W., July 8, 1834. 

Ethan A. Gage (cousin of E. D. Gage), born April 28, 1822, 
died — . Wife, Kate C. Herrick Gage, born January 18, 1830. Lived at 
Geneva, Ohio. Children : Ida Irene, born March 4, 1850, died March 7, 
1872, married C. E. Green, born September 12, 1843, an ^ na d children, 
Minnie Green, born November 27, 1867, and Ida Maud Green, born Sep- 
tember, 1871. Myron E., born January 7, 185 1. Kittie, born December 



994 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

29, 1854, married P. A. Cook, born 1856, and had children, Ida Delia 
Cook, born July 5, 1880, and Maud Cook, born January 16, 1883. Annes 
E., born June 3, 1863, married J. Wilbur Holt, born i860. 

Lucy Ann Gage Peck (cousin of E. D Gage), October 13, 1828, 
November 24, 1871, married Francis Henry Peck; lived at Geneva, Ohio. 
Children: Alice Peck, born April 26, 1852, married Hiram Breakman, 
born 1848, and had children, Carrie Breakman, September 29, 1875, 
Frank Breakman, 1878, and Roy Breakman, 1881. Elliott H. Peck, 
born April 16, 1855, died August 9, 1872. Charles W. Peck, born Jan- 
uary 15, 1862. Edgar E. Peck, born September 12, 1863, died June 29, 
1871. 

Adaline Gage Amidon (cousin of E. D. Gage), born September 18, 
1831, married John E. S. Amidon, born March 12, 1827. Children: 
Adda Lucy Amidon, born December 4, 1855, married, January 31, 1883, 
Julius Morgan Brydle, born August 4, 1855, and lived in Perry, Ohio. 
Kittie A. Amidon, born March 29, 1859, married, March 16, 1880, 
Charles Luce, born December 28, 1852, and lived in Painsville, Ohio. 

Myron W. Gage (cousin of E. D. Gage), born July 8, 1834, married 
Jennie McClintock, born April 4, 1843, died — . Address, Geneva, Ohio. 
Children: Mary L. Gage, March 28, 1867; Alma Lucy Gage, February 
13, 1869; Elliott Judson Gage, September 26, 1873; Bertie Rae Gage. 
April 16, 1877. 

George Gage (uncle of E. D. Gage), bom October 12, 1793, died 
September 24, 1870; wife, Phebe Hatch Gage, born November 17, 1799, 
died November 24, 1863. Children: Albert Gage, born April 28, 1825, 
lives at Centerton, Huron county, Ohio. Adelia, born 1829, lives at 
Toledo, Ohio. Sarah Louisa, born December 16, 1834, lives in Geneva 
township, Ohio. 

Albert Gage (son of George Gage and cousin of E. D. Gage), born 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 995 

April 28, 1825; wife, Elizabeth Van Horn Gage, born May 17, 1836. 
Children : Henry T. Gage, born September 29, 1856, married Libbie 
Reams, born December, 1857, lives at Detroit, Michigan. Eugene Gage, 
born October 13, 1858, lives at Toledo, Ohio. Stanley Gage, born July 
29, i860, married Carrie Niver, born July, 1863 Fred Gage, born Nov- 
ember 22, 1870. Bertie Gage, born October 11, 1872. 

Adelia Gage Moore (daughter of George Gage), born 1829, married 
William Moore, born 1829. Child : Inez Moore, born 1865, married — ■ 
White. 

Sarah Louisa Gage Joiner (daughter of George Gage), bom Decem- 
ber 16, 1834, married W. Augustus Joiner, born June 22, 1823, died— 
Children: Frank Joiner, June 27, 1859. Elmer, September 7, 1863. 
Eugene, July 1, 1865. Willis, March 18, 1869. 

Tames Gage, January 31, 1793, February 9, 1859, and Charlana 
Turney Gage, August 20, 1799, July 10, 1827, married February 26, 
1818, — parents of E. D. Gage. Children: Edward Downs Gage, June 7, 
1819, March 22, 1890. James Alfred Gage, July 19, 1822, March 2, 
1823. David Watkins Gage, September 26, 1825. living (1904) at 
Oberlin, Ohio. 

James Gage (second marriage) to Lucina Wright, born April 10, 
1805, died June 12, 1876, married June 29, 1829. Children: Helen 
Charlana Gage, November 29, 183 1. Ann Eliza Gage, April 4, 1833, 
died 1900. Charlotte Melissa Gage, September 24, 1836. Ardelissa 
Victoria Gage, February 24, 1840. Henry Warren Gage, March 28, 
1842, February 26, 1883. Alta Lucina Gage, April 10, 1850. 

Edward Downs Gage, June 7, 1819, March 22, 1890. Samantha 
M. Morse, October u, 1826, March 11, 1901 ; married March 12, 185 r. 
Children: Annie Charlana Gage, May 24, 1853, January 5, 1893. James 
Amos Gage, February 11, 1855. Lida Helen Gage, August 30, 1857, 



996 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

May 5, 1858. Nora Eliza Gage, February 26, 1859, June 13, 1894. 
Susie Dell Gage. 

Annie C. Gage Fitchpatrick, May 24, 1853, January 5, 1893 (lived 
at Hebron, Nebraska), married, October 11, 1880. John M. Fitchpatrick. 
Children: Neil Gage Fitchpatrick, September 2, 1881. John Roy Fitch- 
patrick, April 10. 1887, February 1, 1888. 

James Amos Gage, February 11, 1855; married, November 19, 
1887, Emma E. Lasch; live at Beatrice, Nebraska. Children: Albert 
Edward, July 16, 1887. Vernon Lasch. September 30, 1892. James 
Wendell, May 26, 1894. 

David Watkins Gage (brother of E. D. Gage), born September 26, 

1825 ; wife, Mary Jane Cole Gage, born , died ■ . Children : Cora 

B., October 3, 1858. Mattie, March 11, i860, lives at Oberlin, Ohio. 
Julia, 1863, lives at Oberlin, Ohio. 

Cora B. Gage (daughter of D. W. Gage), born October 3, 1858, 

lives at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Married, first, Newton, born , 

died , had child, Mame L. Newton, born February 26. 1883. Mar- 
ried, second, Frank Treat ; a little daughter. 

Mattie Gage Street (daughter of D. W. Gage), born March 11, 
i860: married John W. Street, born February 24, 1837, died . Child- 
ren : George T. Street, married and living in Salt Lake City. Julia Gage 
Street, married- Johnson, has a little daughter. Jessie Street. 

Julia Gage Gerrish (daughter of D. W. Gage), born 1863, mar- 
ried Gerrish. Children: Martha Gerrish, 1891. Dorothy, 1893. 

Alary, 1897. 

Helen Charlana Gage Viall (half-sister of E. D. Gage), born Nov- 
ember 29, 1 83 1, married Viall, lives at Preston, Minnesota. Child- 
ren: James Gage Viall, July 13, 1859. Bard Ellsworth Viall, April 25, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 997 

1861. Harry Lyman Viall, June 29, 1862. Ralsy Edward Viall, April 
5, 1870. 

James Gage Viall, born July 13. 1859. married, August 2, 1885, 
Clara L. Baker. Children : Louis Viall, September 20. 1886. Calla 
Viall, September 25, 1888. Baby, . 

Bard Ellsworth Viall, born April 25, 1861, married, November 30, 
1887, Susie Copple. 

Charlotte Melissa Gage (half-sister of E. D. Gage), born Septem- 
ber 24, 1836, lives (1904) at Spring Valley, Minnesota; no children. 
Married, April 12, 1882, Stephen Rossman, born , died 1887. 

Ardelissa Victoria Gage Turney (half-sister of E. D. Gage), born 
February 24, 1840; married, April 5, 1859. Lafayette M. Turney 
(cousin of E. D. Gage on mother's side), born April 6, 1838. Lives at 

Grand RapiJs, Ohio. Children: Jennie E., married Browning, no 

children, lives at Toledo. Ohio. Edith, married Parks, one daugh- 
ter, lives in Ohio. Ernest lives in Toledo, Ohio. 

Henry Warren Gage (half-brother of E. D. Gage), born March 28, 
1848, died February 26, 1883, lived in Geneva township, Ashtabula 
county, Ohio. Married. February 22, 1864, Kate James, born April 7, 
1843. Children: Harry Hoburn Gage, born September 21, 1866, mar- 
ried April 18. 1886, no children, and lives in Collinwood, Ohio. Thomas 
Hugh Gage, born August 8, 1870, married and has one daughter, lives in 
Collinwood, Ohio. 

Alta L. Gage (half-sister of E. D. Gage), born April 10, 1850, 
married, December 5, 1866, Peter Laughlin. Children : Leon Lee Laugh- 
lin, born February 15, 1870, is married. Eva Lucina, born December 
1, 1871, is married. Archie Adair, born July 5, 1877. Lottie Maud, 
July 11. 1879. Rollo Rolf, April 29, 1882. Jennie June, June 6, 1884. 

Lucy Gage Bingham (aunt of E. D. Gage), born February 6, 1798, 



998 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

died , her home in Rochester, New York ; married Bingham, a 

hatter of Rochester. Children : Harry Bingham. George Bingham, 

a major in the Civil war ; went west. One daughter married Parker, 

lives in Boston. One daughter married , lives in Boston. 

Eunice Gage Geitner (aunt of E. D. Gage), born December 6, 1799, 

died . Lived at Parkman, Geauga county, Ohio. Married 

Geitner. Children : Frank, went to California. Orphana, went to Cali- 
fornia. Sarah, married and settled in Kansas, her husband a sutler in 
the Civil war. Margaret. 

Gaylord Grizzle Gage (uncle of E. D. Gage), born May 4, 1804, 
married . Went to Indiana. A carpenter and joiner. 

Theodore Rodman Gage (uncle of E. D. Gage), born May 24, 1806; 

married , a carpenter and farmer; Son: T. M. Gage, Sand Lake, 

Michigan. 

Timothy Munson Gage (uncle of E. D. Gage), born January 8, 
1809, married Polly Burns; lived at Painsville, Ohio. 

The following notes detail the Turney genealogy : — 

Asa Turney, born at Fairfield, Connecticut, October 15, 1759, died 
April 5, 1833, and Polly Downs Turney, December 2, 1768, October 9, 
1835, — grandparents of E. D. Gage. They formerly lived in Connecti- 
cut, but moved to Ohio in 1809, to Madison, Lake county, and are buried 
in the cemetery at Madison. Children: Daniel Turney, born May 21, 
1788, died March 9, 1841, in Lake county, Ohio, whither he had come 
on foot from Connecticut, and where he was a farmer. Phebe Turney, 
born March 9, 1791, died March 4, 1852, in Lake county; was married 
to Erial Cook. David Turney, born December 25, 1794. died March 5, 
1826, in Lake county, Ohio. George Washington Turney, born March 
13, 1797, died February 19, 1830, in Lake county. Charlana Turney 
(mother of E. D. Gage) born August 20, 1799, married James Gage, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 999 

and died July 10, 1827, in Lake county. Asa Squire Turney, born March 
20, 1804, died February 16, 1886, in Lake county; was a farmer and 
minister of the Disciples church. Marvin Turney, born in Connecticut, 
August 11. 1807, died April 28, 1893, in Dearborn township, Wayne 
county, Michigan, where he had resided since 1834. Eli A. Turney, 
born March 23, 181 5, died . 

Phebe Turney (aunt of E. D. Gage), born March 9, 1791, died 

March 4, 1852; married Erial Cook, born , died ; had a 

son, George Cook (cousin of E. D. Gage), born 1820, died ; lived at 

Madison, Ohio. George Cook married Louisa Genung\ born 1819, and 
had children. Albert J., 1850; Wilber, 1853; Harry, 1851 ; Flora, 1863 
(died 1899). Albert J. Cook married Gracie Bidnell, born in 1853; 
lives in Cleveland, Ohio. Wilber Cook married Genevieve Bidnell, born 
1855; lives at Madison, Ohio. Harry Cook married Gennie Nettleton, 

born 1853; live at Madison, Ohio. Flora Cook married Strock; 

had three sons. 

Asa Squire Turney (uncle of E. D. Gage). March 20, 1804, Feb- 
ruary 16, 1866; lived at Madison, Ohio; married Laura . Children: 

Almira Turney, born , died . Nancy C. M., born February 24, 

1826. Polly A., July 19, 1829, died . Amanda, born , died 

, unmarried. Laura, born 1838. Carlos. Louisa. 

Almira Turney married Henry Norton, and lived at Perry, Ohio. 
Children : Kate Norton, married B. A. Durfee, a minister of the Christian 
church, and had one daughter. A son, married . 

Nancy C. M. Turney, born February 24, 1826, Married, first, 
Frank Wyman, March 2, 1823, August 9, 1876, lived at Madison, Ohio. 

Married, second. Wadsworth, and live in California. Children 

(all by first marriage) : Francis Wyman, died young. Ida Wyman, 
born September 1, 1852, married Griswold, had daughter Pearl 



iooo SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Griswold, July 9, 1873. Eva Wyman, born August 6, 1853, married 
David Palmer, and live in Seward, Nebraska ; have children, Gay Palmer, 
January 27, 1872, Franc Palmer, October 19. 1877. 

Polly A. Turney, born July 19, 1829, died , married Frank F. 

Fellows, born February 9, 1828: lived in Madison township, Ohio. 
Children: Ima L, Fellows, born February 8, 1852, married Albert F. 

Cooper, born . died November 24. 1879, and had children, Altha L. 

Cooper, September 24, 1876, and Albert F. Cooper, September 24, 1879. 
Arl Turney Fellows, born December 12, 1854, married Elva Gaines, born 
December 3, i860, and had a child, Asa D. Fellows, April 22, 1883. 
Eda P. Fellows; born December 15, 1868. 

Laura Turney. born 1838. married Willard Martin. Children: 

Ellen Martin, born i860, died . Will Martin, born December 22, 

1861, married Jessie Carter, and had a son, Charles, June 6, 1887. Es- 

telle, born 1863, died . Bertha Ellen Martin, born September 14, 

1876, married , has one son and one daughter. All the Martins live 

in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Carlos A. Turney married Carrie W. Winchester, born in 1842. and 
they live on his father's place at Madison, Ohio. Children : Omer A., 
born in 1866, lives in Phoenix, Arizona. Cora Maud, born in 1876, lives 
at Madison, Ohio. John Hubert, born in 1879, nves at Madison. 

Louisa Turney married . Children : Roy and Arthur, deceased, 

and Florence. They live in California. 

Marvin Turney (uncle of E. D. Gage). August 11, 1807, April 28, 
1893; married, first. Abigal Fairchild, and, second, Maria Rossiter. 
Children (all by first marriage) : Martha C. Turney. James M. Turney, 
1837. John I!. Turney. 1839. Orris A. Turney, 1841. Amy Rosilla 
Antoinette Turney. David Wilson Turney, 1853. 

Martha C. Turney married Robert Hollingworth, and lived at Nel- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. iooi 

son, Nebraska. One daughter: Emma Yates Hollingworth, born in 
1878, married, June, 1899, Nathaniel Moore, and had children, Robert, 
1900, a daughter, July 7. 1901, and a son, September 20, 1903. 

James M. Turner, horn 1837, married Mary E. Eastman, born 1845. 
Son: William Turney, born 1862, lives at Detroit, Michigan. 

Otris A. Turney. born 184 1, married Clara M. Mapes, born 1847, 
and live at Detroit. Michigan. Children : Theo Belle, 1878. Charles M. 
Turney. 1880. 

A. R. Antoinette Turney married Isaiah Burrows. Children: Es- 
ther, Alonzo, Alsina, Benjamin Lewis. 

David Wilson Turney, born 1853, married Mary Emmeline Lantz, 
born 1859, and they live at Detroit. Michigan. Son : Frederick Marvin 
Turney, 1883. 

Eli Turney (uncle of E. D. Gage), born March 2^. 1815, died . 

Married, first Minerva Seely, September 15. 181 5, May 29, 1868, and, 
second, September 11, 1869, Mrs. Arvilla (Crocker) Branch. He lived 
in Amherst, Lorain county, Ohio. Children (of the first marriage) : 
Albert A. Turney, 1834. Cyrena R. Turney, born , died i860. La- 
fayette M. Turney, 1838. David M. Turney, born March 20, 1848, a 
railroad man living in Kansas. Mary Turney, July 10, 1853. Henry 

Turney, born , died October 21, 1858, in Lorain county. Charles 

Wesley Turney, October 1, 1841, died December, 1842. 

Albert A. Turney, born 1834, married Hannah Harris, born 1835; 
live at Bowling Green, Ohio. Children: Sophia Turney, born 1857. 
married Josiah Winton, born 1854. Cora Turney, born 1863, married 
George Bradshaw, born 1855. 

Cyrena R. Turney, born , died i860, married Perry Belden; 

lived at Amherst, Ohio. 

Lafayette Turney married A. V. Gage. (See Gage genealogy). 



I0O2 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Mary Turney, born June 10, 1853, married Frank Bissell, and live 
at Columbus, Ohio. 

The Morse family connections are as follows : 

Ives Morse, March 9, 1767, August 9, 1846, and Elizabeth Lord 
Morse, April 24, 1768, April 6, 1859. were the grandparents of Saman- 
tha M. Morse (the wife of Edward D. Gage). Ives Morse was one of 
the earliest settlers at Kingsville, Ohio. Children : Huldah, August 1, 
1790, August 19, 1828. Susan, August 10, 1792, April 3, 1833. Phi- 
neas, March 3, 1795, July 2, 1878. Amos, October 29, 1799, May 26, 
1852. Charlotte, May 6, 1803, July 30, 1861. Hannah. August 14, 
1808, May 26, 1856. 

Susan Morse (aunt of S. M. Morse), August 10, 1792, April 3, 
1833, married Erastus Todd, 1786, February 5, 1863. Children: Asen- 
ath Todd, August 1, 1810, October, 1872. Martha Gier Todd, Novem- 
ber 5, 181 1, October 12, 1872. Mary Haynes Todd. April 11, 1816, 
April 12. 1891. William Todd. July 1, 1817, 1900. Julius Todd, 
March 3, 1819. John Todd, July 26, 1821, May 15, 1864. 

William Todd (son of Susan Morse), July 1, 181 7, 1900, married. 
May 14, 1842, Huldah Morse (daughter of Phineas Morse), born Sep- 
tember 17, 1819 (both cousins of S. M. Morse). They lived in Ashta- 
bula county, Ohio. Children: Susan Adel Todd. April 14, 1845, Juty 
4, 1846. Adaline M. Todd, born May 2, 1847, unmarried. Almond M. 
Todd, June 24, 1849, married, April 4, 1883. Ella Fassett, no children. 
Melzo L., May 28, 1854, married, February 2, 1873, Mary Santer, and 
has two sons. Bertha M. married, May 31, 1878. Delos Vanslyke, and 
has three children. 

Phineas Morse (uncle of S. M. Morse), March 3, 1795, July 2, 

1878, married Abagail , born August 12, 1798, died January 17, 

1891. They lived at Kingsville, Ohio, half a mile from his brother Amos, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1003 

who was the father of S. M. Morse. Children : Huldah, born September 
17, 1819, still living. Hiram, September 27, 1820, still living. Mary, 
September 7, 1822, died January 5, 1892, was twice married. Almira, 
September 10, 1826, still living. Angeline, February 14, 1828, still 
living, and married but no children. Almon, August 28, 1829, married 
and had children, and died September 1, 1890. Laura, August 10, 
1832, living. Alden. September 28, 1835, married and had children, 
and is still living. George W., April 8, 1837, is living, unmarried. 

Huldah Morse (daughter of Phineas) married William Todd, as 
previously given. 

Hiram Morse (son of Phineas and cousin of S. M. Morse), born 
September 2j. 1820, married Louisa Colgrove, born October 27, 1824, 
and lives in Ashtabula county, Ohio. Children : Charles H. Morse, born 
July 5, 1850, married Marcia Bushnel, born August 7, 185 1 ; no child- 
ren; live in Ashtabula county. Albert W. Morse, born March 17, 1853, 
married Jennie Gee, born June 19, 1855, and had A. Lida Morse, March 
19, 1875. 

Mary E. Morse (daughter of Phineas), September 7, 1822, January 
5, 1892, married, first, Hammond, and, second, B. F. Butler. Child- 
ren, first marriage: Isadore Hammond, born April 3, 1850. married Sey- 
mour Gier, and had daughter, Mary Gier, 1880. Children, second mar- 
riage: Sarah Butler, born April 26, 1861, married S. B. Shaylor, born 
1857, and had children, Bessie Shaylor, 1879, and Kittie Shaylor, 1881. 
Albert N. Butler, born November 4, 1862, married and had children, and 
lives at North Kingsville, Ohio. Will H. Butler, born October 18, 1865, 
married and had children, and lives at North Kingsville. 

Almira J. Morse (daughter of Phineas), born September 10, 1826, 
married Samuel Hough, born December 19, 1819, died 1900. He was a 
foundryman, and she lives at Kingsville. Children : Herbert B. Hough, 



1004 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

born May 21, 1851, lives near Ashtabula; married Libbie W. Smith, born 
February 15. 1850, and had children, Harry Hough, December 15, 1877, 
and Millie Hough, February 9, 1880. Hattie M. Hough, born August 13, 

1852, married Blakeslee, no children, and lives at Ashtabula, 

Ohio, Sara Hough, born July 7, 1856, unmarried. Mary Hough. August 
2, 1859, December 29, 1859. Carey Hough, born May 20, 1866, married 
Hattie C. Newell ; three children, and live at Ashtabula. 

Laura Morse (daughter of Phineas), born August 10, 1832. married 

Levi Brainard, born February 4, 1829, died . She lives in Ashtabula 

county. Children: Charles Brainard, December 21, 1854, married Alice 

Mills, born 1851). Jennie Lind Brainard. born March 15, 1867, died , 

married . Fred Brainard. May 28, 1869, married Adelle Lillie, 

born September 22, 1864. 

Amos Morse, October 29, 1799. May 26, 1852, and Anna Abbott Morse 
born July 26. i8oq, were the parents of Samantha M. Morse. They were 
married June 7, [821, and they lived at Kingsville, Ohio. Children: Lu- 
man Morse, born July 9. 1822, died in the west July 15. 1848. Luther 
Morse, born March 12. 1824, died in North Kingsville, Ohio, April 7, 
1879. Samantha Maria Morse, born October 11, 1826, died at Fairbury, 
Nebraska. March 11, 1901, (the wife of E. D. Gage). Sarah A. Morse, 
born February 8. 1829, died in Madison. Ohio, August 20, 1874. Jud- 

son Morse, born January 23. 1832. married Diantha by whom 

there were no children, and he died at Zumbro Falls, Minnesota, in 1887. 
Simon Morse, born September 14, 1833, died at Kingsville, Ohio, No- 
vember 1, 1864. Eliza Ann Morse, born May 15, 1837, died at Kings- 
ville, Ohio, March 4, 1882. Amos Orlando Morse, born March 11, 
1840, died at Kingsville, March 12, 1840. Marshall Morse, born July 
13, 1 84 1 . died at Kingsville, July 3. 1889. Susan Adell Morse, born 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1005 

in 1846, is the only one living- in 1904; she resides at Madison, Ohio; 
she married Charles Bates. 

Luther Morse (brother of S. M. Morse), March 12, 1824, April 7, 

1879, married Samantha Shaw, born January 3, 1829, died . 

Children: Edwin A. Morse, born 1856, died February 19, 1891. Louise 
Morse, born September 7, 1857, died September 26. 1896; married Ralph 
Hood, and had Nellie Edna Hood, August 17, 1887, and also a younger 
daughter. 

Sarah Agnes Morse (sister of S. M. Morse), February 20, 1821, 
August 20. 1874, married Samuel K. Holbrook, born February 20, 1821, 

died . Children: Ella Holbrook, born February 10, 1851, and living 

at Lima, Uhio, married Judson M. Waugh, born June 30, 1852, died 

, and had children, Lillian Emma, January 2T,, 1880, and Ernest 

Judson, January 11, 1882. Emma Holbrook, born February 10, 1851, 
and living at Centralia, Washington, married Homer L. Mead, and had 
children, Florence (married), Edith, and a son. Agnes G. Holbrook, 
born April 23, 1854, lives at Madison, Ohio, unmarried. Sarah Hol- 
brook, born June 15, 1859, and died January- 25, 1904, at Lima, Ohio; 
married, first, A. D. Chapman, who died three years later, and mar- 
ried, second, in June, 1903, Albert Deming; no children. S. Arthur 
Holbrook lives at Lima, Ohio, is married and has two children. 

Eliza Ann Morse (sister of S. M. Morse), May 15, 1837, March 4, 
1882, married Edwin S. Preston. Children : Stiles Preston, born July 
20, 1859, died August 1, 1861. Eva, went to Connecticut in childhood. 

Charlotte Morse (aunt of S. M. Morse), born May 6, 1803, died 

July 30, 1861, married Benton. One daughter: Susan Benton, 

born April 27, 1833, and living in Geneva township, Ohio, married 
H. W. Boree, born February 21, 1832, and had children, Edward C. 
Boree, July 2, 1869, George A. Boree, September 28, 1872, Curtis M. 



ioo6 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Boree, June 12, 1874. George A. Boree, born September 28, 1872, 

married Ethel Bates, an adopted daughter of Charles and S. Adell Morse 
Bates, and had two daughters. 

There follows the Abbott genealogy, as the history of the maternal 
line of Samantha M. Morse Gage: 

Squire Abbott, born June 19, 1770, died December, 1853, and Anna 
Spafford Abbott, born March 27, 1770, died January 27, 1845, were the 
grandparents of Samantha M. Morse. They lived in Massachusetts 
until past the age of twenty, and then moved to Ohio. Children: Jus- 
tin, born March 23, 1801, died in Minnesota. Anna, bom July 26, 
1802, married, June 7, 1821, Amos Morse, and died in 1888 in Fair- 
bury, Nebraska. Susan, born December 14, 1803, married Ferris Web- 
ster, and died at Jefferson, Ashtabula county, Ohio. Orlin, born January 
17, 1806, moved to Kansas. Alanson, born August 24, 1807, died June 

26, 1816. Thirza, born April 30, 1809, married Orlando Holcomb. 
Wealthy, born September 22, 181 1, married Almeron Stedman. Mary, 
born March 29, 1813, married William Hawkins, and died at Kipton, 
Ohio. Lucy, born April 18, 1814, died May 2, 1814. Eli, born March 

27, 1815, moved to Iowa and then to California, dying in the latter state. 

The descendants of Anna Abbott, the mother of Samantha M. Morse, 
are given above. 

Susan Abbott (aunt of S. M. Morse), born December 14, 1803, 
married Ferris Webster. Her daughter, Diantha W , born July 13, 1834, 
lives at Norwalk, Ohio. She married Obadiah Prentiss, a physician, 
born November 4, 1818, died , and had children, Chalmer Pren- 
tiss, May 29, 1858, Corrinne Prentiss, August 25, 1861 and three 
daughters deceased. Chalmer Prentiss married Belle Stone, born 1859. 
Corrinne Prentiss married Louis Lindsly, born March 20, i860. 

Wealthy Abbott (aunt of S. M. Morse), born September 22, 181 1, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1007 

married Almeron Stedman and lived in Henrietta township, Lorain 

county, Ohio. Children : Stedman, a daughter ; Thankful ; Wealthy, 

born 1836, unmarried; George; Emma; Will; Edna, born 1850. 

The eldest daughter of Wealthy Abbott Stedman married 

Van Dusen. Children : Charles Van Dusen. Minnie Van Dusen, born 
i860, married Frederick H. Kropf, born 1861, and lives in Elyria, Ohio. 

Thankful Stedman married Charles Rice and lives at Long Beach, 
California. Children : Aimer Rice, of Riverside, California, married and 
has two children; Gertrude Rice married Alfred E. Slater, and lives 
in California, have children, Earl Slater, Alfred Slater, and two sons and 
a daughter. 

Will Stedman married , and had a daughter, Edith, deceased. 

Edna Stedman, born 1850, married John McCullom, born 1846. 
A son, Roy McCullom, born 1879. Emma Stedman married Ansel 
Hales, and lives in Englewood, Illinois. Children : Lillian Hales, Earl 
Hales, Vernon Hales, Corra Hales. 

Mary Abbott (aunt of S. M. Morse), born March 29, 1813, mar- 
ried, April 22, 1835, William Hawkins, born July 2, 1804, died Septem- 
ber 6, 1888. Children: Eliza Hawkins, born March 3, 1836, died Feb- 
ruary 23, 1886. Hannah Hawkins, born September 27, 1837. Maria 
Hawkins, born April 15, 1840 unmarried. Vesta Hawkins born July 19, 
1842. Mary Hawkins, born October 19, 1844. Anna Hawkins, born 
December 6, 1846. Charles Hawkins, April 22, 1849. Naomi Hawkins, 
born August 1, 1851, unmarried. Alice Hawkins, born August 5, 1854. 

Eliza Hawkins, March 3, 1836, February 23, 1886, married, Janu- 
ary, 1864, Egbert Ingersoll. 

Hannah Hawkins, born September 27, 1837, died , married, 

October 6, i860, J. B. Cook, born 1831, died ; lived at Elyria, Ohio. 

Children: Clara Cook, born 1861, married R. D. Williams, born 1851, 



1008 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

and they live at Elvria, Ohio, and have a daughter, Stella Williams, 

born 1881. Mary Cook, married Sterns, and lives at Elyria, Ohio. 

Elsie Cook, married Ely, and live at Lorain, Ohio. 

Vesta Hawkins, July 19, 1842, May 23, 1863, married Oscar Tan- 
ner, on September 12, 1861, and they lived at Ruggles, Ashland county, 
Ohio. 

Mary Hawkins born October 19, 1844, married, October 17, 1872, 
Luman A. Andrews, born 1840, and they live in Toledo, Ohio. Chil- 
dren: Willie Andrews, born 1874. Lola Andrews, 1878. One daughter, 
born 1883. 

Anna Hawkins, born December 6, 1846, married, December 12, 
1876, Simeon Hales, born 1843; Hve m Henrietta, Ohio. Children: 
Jessie Hales, born 1878. Iva Hales, born 1880. 

Naomi Hawkins, born August 1, 1851, married, October 5, 1873, 
Elber H. Wing, born 1848; live in Barrington, Illinois. 

Alice Hawkins, born August 5, 1854. married, March 11, 1882, 
Henry Hales, born 1849; live at Kipton, Ohio. 

Eli Abbott (uncle of S. M. Morse), born March 27, 181 5, married 
; lived in southern California in later years and until death. Chil- 
dren; Dell and Ella, living in southern California. 



ROBERT THOMPSON McADAMS. 

Robert Thompson McAdams, a retired farmer and vice president 
of the Peru Bank, has been a resident of Nemaha county for forty years. 
He has been a prosperous farmer, and from the small tract of land 
on which he began life developed an estate of considerable magnitude, 
most of which he has since distributed to his children. He has always 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1009 

displayed excellent business ability, and this combined with his in- 
dustry has given him a substantial place in material affairs. He has 
likewise been as successful in other relations of life, both in the per- 
formance of his duties as a citizen and as the head of his family, to 
which he has always been devoted, making his home his first thought and 
the mainspring of his best efforts. 

Mr. McAdams was born in Washington county, Tennessee, March 
3, 1834. His father, William S. McAdams, was a cabinet-maker and 
owner of the farm on which he lived in Tennessee. He was born in 
1809 and died in Tennessee in 1841, leaving but a small estate. In 
183 1 he married Eleanor McNeal, of the same part of Tennessee. She 
was born in 1810 and died in Peru, Nebraska, in 1865, in the religious 
faith of the Cumberland Presbyterians. She was the mother of five 
children : John, who died in Fremont county, Iowa, in 1862, at the age 
of thirty years, leaving a wife; Robert T. ; James Madison, who was born 
in Tennessee, went to Colorado in 1859, to Montana in 1866, engaged 
in gold mining, and in failing health returned to die in the Ainsworth 
Hospital at St. Joseph, Missouri ; William Montgomery, a farmer in 
Atchison county, Missouri, and his seven sons are all teachers in different 
parts of the country ; Anna Elmira, the deceased wife of Hugh Lockard, 
left three children. 

Mr. McAdams received a meagre schooling in a log schoolhouse, 
and has made his own way from an early age. In 1853 the family 
all came to northwestern Missouri, and entered a quarter section of 
land just across the river from Nebraska. Mr. McAdams entered forty 
acres of land in Missouri in 1854, built a small frame house and improved 
and cultivated this land for several years, finally adding another forty 
to it. He fenced it in with rails which he had made on Snow island. 
In 1864 he traded his eighty acres for one hundred and seventy-seven 



ioio SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

acres near Peru, Nebraska. He settled on this for a time, but then sold 
and bought one hundred and twenty acres, to which he gradually added 
land until he owned four hundred and eight acres, one hundred and sixty 
of which was in Johnson county. He has given his children all but 
eighty acres of timber land adjoining Peru. He bought his present 
home in Peru in 1889. 

In 1856 William S. Horn and family moved from Missouri, where 
they had taken up their residence in 1850, coming from Bureau county, 
Illinois, and located in Nebraska. His daughter, Nancy E. Horn, had 
been born in Illinois in 1842, and after she moved to Nebraska Mr. Mc 
Adams frequently crossed the river for the purpose of enjoying her 
pleasant companionship. On August 7, 1859, they were married on the 
Horn farm near Peru, and they traveled life's journey together for 
over forty years, until her death on March 19, 1900. She was a noble 
Christian woman, and a wife, mother and friend who could be ill spared 
by her bereaved family. They had four children: An infant daughter 
that was born and died in Missouri ; James W., a farmer in Nemaha 
county, and unmarried; Otis F., in Peru, and owning a farm in John- 
son county, Kansas, has one son ; Sadie, who has been keeping house 
for her father since the death of her mother. Mr. McAdams is a gold 
Democrat, and has served twelve terms in the village council. He is one 
of the original stockholders and is now vice president of the Peru Bank, 
and is otherwise prominent in the financial and social life of the com- 
munity. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. ion 

JOSEPH JELINEK, JR. 

Joseph Jelinek, Jr., of Crete, Nebraska, is a wholesale and retail 
dealer in wines and liquors, conducting the Old Homestead saloon in 
Crete. He was born in Brown county, Wisconsin, November 2, 1861. 
His grandfather recently died in Saline county in 1902, at the age of 
ninety years, and his wife, who was born in 1814, passed away in 1900. 
Both were well preserved and displayed strong intellectual as well as 
physical powers in their later years. 

Joseph Jelinek, Sr., the father of our subject, was one of the 
early settlers of Saline county and was extensively engaged in farming. 
His birth occurred in Bohemia in March. 1837, and he came to America 
with his parents in 1854, the family numbering three sons. The voyage 
was made in a sailing vessel, and they were nine weeks upon the water. 
The grandfather was a freeholder of Bohemia and came to America with 
small capital. He started for Iowa, but on the trip westward was induced 
to go to Wisconsin and establish his home between Manitowoc and Green 
Bay. There be purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land from 
the government, and the family still has two hundred acres there. The 
three sons, Francis, Joseph and Vit. took contracts in the lumber woods 
and delivered sawed logs, and in the winter they made and shaved shin- 
gles, and many years later when Joseph Jelinek landed on a visit in 
Wisconsin he found there a large barn, sixty feet long, which he had 
built of sawed pine timber and roofed with these heavy shaved shingles, 
as sound as ever. Joseph Jelinek, Sr., married Miss Anna Kozlousky, 
who was born in Bohemia, in 1839, the marriage taking - place in Wis- 
consin in 1858. They became the parents of twelve children, of whom 
ten are now living: Frank, who resides in Crete and has one son; Joseph, 
of this review; Mary, who died at the age of a year and a half; Adolph, 
who is engaged in business; Anna, the wife of Frank Jananouch; 



1012 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Louisa, the wife of William Warneke, of Lincoln, Nebraska, by whom 
she has two children; Vesta, who is the wife of A. E. Warneke and 
has two children, and whose twin sister died at the age of eight weeks ; 
Edward, of DeWitt, who is married and has two sons and one daughter ; 
Fred and Emma, at home; and Henry, who is in the First National Bank 
at Crete. 

The old home farm comprises three hundred and twenty acres of 
land and is situated two and a half miles south of Crete, including the 
pre-emption claim, which was secured in 1865. 

Joseph Jelinek was educated in the common schools and in Doane 
College, where he spent two years. He afterward engaged in teaching 
school for two winters and was upon the home farm until twenty-five 
years of age, when he began dealing in horses, buying, selling and breed- 
ing. For the latter purpose he had three imported English shire stal- 
lions worth five thousand dollars. In 1890 his uncle, -Vit Jelinek, died, 
and Joseph Jelinek, Jr., purchased his saloon business in 1891. He 
began attending bar and in 1893 ne opened his present saloon. Since 
1895 the firm of Jelinek & Dredla has conducted the leading saloon 
in Crete. Mr. Jelinek owns the frame store in which the Old Home- 
stead saloon is located. This building was erected in 187 1 for a hotel, 
and was afterwards used as a lodging house, being one of the first 
buildings put up in Crete. He deals in wines and liquors, and imports 
Annheuser-Busch beer on a very extensive scale. 

On the 8th of April, 1891, Mr. Jelinek was married to Miss Mary 
Nedela, who was born in Crete and is a daughter of F. Nedela, of 
this city, who was one of the early settlers and is a wealthy resident 
of Crete. They became the parents of five children, of whom three 
daughters and a son are now living, Erma having died at the age of 
two ve;irs and eight months. The others are Ruth, twelve years of age; 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1013 

Hugo, aged eight years; Lillian, who was born July 17, 1898; and Mar- 
guerite, born in September, 1902. Mr. Jelinek erected his present resi- 
dence in 1895, and he has twenty-two lots in the city. He also owns 
an eighty-acre farm two and a half miles southeast of Crete, worth five 
thousand dollars. In the present year he took his wife and two children 
to St. Louis, visiting the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. He has made 
money and spends it freely, doing everything in his power to promote 
the happiness and welfare of his wife and children. He has always 
been a stanch Republican in politics, and while residing on the farm he 
served as township clerk. He is well known in Crete, and through his 
business activity has accumulated a comfortable competence. He rep- 
resents one of the oldest families of Saline county, his parents having 
come direct from Wisconsin after Lincoln signed the homestead bill in 
1864. They were accompanied by eight families and these were the 
first Bohemian settlers of this portion of the state. Joseph Jelinek of 
this review has witnessed much of the progress of Saline county and 
takes much interest in what has been accomplished here. 



MRS. LAURA D. KIRK. 

Mrs. Laura D. Kirk, who has long been a resident of Crete, was 
born in Otsego county, New York, on the 16th of February, 1827, and 
spent her early life in that state, her girlhood days passing quietly and 
uneventfully. She attended school and also became familiar with the 
household duties, and in 1852 she left her father's home for a home of 
her own. It was on the 14th of March, of that year, near Charlotteville, 
New York, that she gave her hand in marriage to Jacob J. Wayman, 
who was also a native of the Empire state, born January 5, 1827. After 



ioi4 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

the death of their only child they removed to Pennsylvania, settling near 
Carbondale, but in 1863 they returned to New York to take care of 
Mr. Wayman's aged parents. His mother died in that state, and in 
1869 Mr. Wayman and his wife removed to Nebraska, arriving in the 
month of September. They settled four miles south of Friend on a 
homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres, upon which Mr. Way- 
man carried on general farming until his death, which occurred January 
5, 1879. He left all of his property to his worthy wife, who had indeed 
been a helpmate and faithful companion on the journey of life. 

Mrs. Wayman lived a widow for over thirty years, but on the 8th 
of June, 1904, was married, in her seventy-eighth year, to Rev. William 
Kirk, D. D., who is in his eighty-first year. He had five children, 
eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Mrs. Kirk has lived 
in Crete ten years and occupied her pretty vine-embowered home for three 
years. She is well known as a woman of sterling worth, well preserved 
in mind and body. Both Rev. and Mrs. Kirk have many friends in 
Crete, who extend to them best wishes that the evening of life, which 
they have chosen to spend together, shall pass quietly and happily and 
that the years of their earthly pilgrimage may yet continue for some 
time to come. 



MELCHIOR KECHELY. 

Melchior Kechely, one of the well known and highly respected resi- 
dents of Glenwood township, Gage county, Nebraska, and a veteran of 
the Civil war, has been a resident of the state since 187 1. His soldier's 
life commenced August 13, 1862, when he enlisted at Bellevue, Ohio, 
in Company H, One Hundred and Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
Colonel Myers commanding, for three years or until the close of the 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1015 

war. At that time he was receiving fifty dollars a month working as a 
carpenter, but he cheerfully left it all to defend his country. During his 
term of service he participated in many engagements, among which may 
be mentioned the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, three charges 
on Fort Wagner, at Jacksonville, Florida, was stationed near Fort 
Sumter, and finally August 10, 1865, he was honorably discharged and 
returned to his home with a good record as a soldier. 

Our subject was born in Bavaria February 8, 1841, the same year 
as King Edward of England. He is a son of John and Barbara Kechely, 
the former of whom came to the United States in 1855, his wife and 
children following in 1857. 

Our subject went to school in Ohio and there learned the carpenter's 
trade, which he followed successfully until the war broke out. After his 
return home, he again engaged in the same line, but, finding his old 
home too confined for his new aspirations, he finally in 187 1 emigrated 
to Gage county, Nebraska, where he has since found a very pleasant 
home, and opportunity to exercise his ability as a carpenter. Many of 
the finest residences in the locality have been built by him, but in 1893 
he retired to his fine farm of one hundred and twenty acres, on which 
he has a comfortable house and substantial barn and outbuildings. 

On January 1, 1867, in Ohio, he was married to Catherine Cook. 
The following children have been born to them, namely : Emma, Frank, 
Elizabeth, William, Don, Herbert, Edward, studying for the ministry 
of the Christian church at Lincoln; Anna, John, Pearl, Clarence and 
Clara, the last being twins. Mr. Kechely is a Republican and very 
stanch in his support of party measures. In religious faith he is a 
Lutheran and is very well informed on the bible and church creed. Like 
all the veterans he takes an active interest in G. A. R. matters, and is a 



ioi6 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

cordial, genial gentleman and one who has many friends throughout the 
neighborhood. 

WILLIAM A. ELLIS. 

William A. Ellis, of Glenwood township, Gage county, Nebraska, 
is one of the well known and highly respected residents of this locality 
and a veteran of the Civil war. He enlisted in Stark county, Illinois, 
August 12, 1862, in Company E, One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, Colonel T. J. Henderson and Captain C. S. Ottman 
commanding 

Our subject was born in Stark county, Illinois, April 1, 1837, a 
son of Simeon Ellis, a native of Tennessee. Ellisdale, Illinois, was 
founded by the Ellis family in the early days of the state, when Simeon 
and his wife Matilda Bunch located in the state. After many hardships 
they became prosperous. She died in 1841, aged about forty years, 
while he survived until he was sixty-eight years of age. They had a 
family of eleven children. 

William A. Ellis was reared in Illinois and after returning from 
the war he settled in his old home and remained until 1883, when he 
came west and located in Gage county, Nebraska, and has become one 
of the influential men of that vicinity. He purchased one hundred acres, 
which he has developed, and upon which he has erected a comfortable 
house, substantial barn and other buildings. In the grounds he has 
planted shrubs and trees, and flowers bloom about the door. Mr. 
Ellis married Miss Adaline Davis, November 18, 1865, and they have 
seven children, as follows: Alberta, of Liberty, Nebraska, married 
Frank Bunnell; Martha, of Odell, Nebraska, married Henry C. Colwell; 
Paulina Rathburn; Harry C, of Norton, Kansas; Leonie, at home; 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1017 

B. M., at home; Lora, in the high school of Odell. In politics Mr. 
Ellis is a Republican, and he is also very active in G. A. R. matters, 
and is very highly esteemed in the home post. Both he and his estimable 
wife are very charitable and make all welcome at their pleasant home. 



ALFRED McKINNEY. 

Alfred McKinney, chaplain of Coleman Post No. 115, at Wymore, 
is one of the well known and highly respected residents of that locality 
and a veteran of the Civil war. His career as a soldier commenced with 
his enlistment at Peoria, Illinois, August 14, 1862, Company D, One 
Hundred and Eighty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Captain Hitch- 
cock and Colonel Dave McGee in command. 

The birth of Mr. McKinney occurred at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
May 24, 1831, and he is a son of David McKinney, who in turn is a son 
of Irish parents, who emigrated to the United States, settling in Penn- 
sylvania. In that state David grew to manhood and married Abigail 
Ensley, after which he removed to Ohio and made his home in the 
wilderness, when Indians were very numerous. He took up govern- 
ment land and made a home, but returned in 1842 to Pennsylvania, 
from whence he finally moved to Peoria county, Illinois, and there he 
died in 1878. His wife lived to be one hundred years of age, and was 
one of the oldest women in the state. This worthy couple had nine 
children, three of whom grew to maturity, and two were soldiers, our 
subject and David, who was in the Forty-seventh Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry and served three years. 

Alfred McKinney was eleven years of age when he came with his 
parents to Illinois, and in addition to working upon the farm, he learned 



ioi8 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

the cooper's trade, at which he later worked and also at teaming. While 
residing in Peoria county, September 18, 1851, he married Louise Pric- 
tor, born in Sangamon county, Illinois. She is a daughter of Reuben 
Prictor, a farmer who died in Iowa at the age of seventy-five years. In 
politics he was a Democrat. The mother died at the age of eighty-four 
years, and both were Methodists. They had twelve children. 

In 1867 Mr. McKinney moved to Warren county, Iowa, and in 
1879 settled in Gage county, on one hundred and twenty acres of land 
which he has greatly improved and upon which he has excellent buildings. 
His land is creek bottom and well watered, and his acres yield a good 
profit. Five children have been born to himself and wife, namely: 
Mary Fosler, of Fort Scott, Kansas; Nancy Ellen Edwards, of Russell, 
North Dakota; Julia May Shroff, of Sheridan, Wyoming; Amy F. 
Tollman, of Wymore, Nebraska; Reuben Edward, of Gage county, 
near Beatrice. Five other children died in infancy. Mr. McKinney 
is a Republican in politics and has always been interested in political 
affairs. For nine years he was a member of the Nebraska State Guards, 
and for seven of that time served as second lieutenant. He made two 
of the gun carriages for the battery, and one is still in use. He has 
also been most active in G. A. R. work, and is now serving his post as 
chaplain. In appearance he stands six feet and one and one-half inches 
in height, and looks like a soldier. In manner he is genial and courteous, 
and makes welcome every visitor to his pleasant home. Needless to say 
that he is one of the most popular men in Gage county, as well as one 
of the representative farmers of that locality. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1019 

FRANCIS LAFAYETTE PROUTY. 

Francis Lafayette Prouty, now a retired merchant in Peru, is one 
of the first-comers to this part of Nebraska, having been acquainted 
with it as a territory and a state for nearly half a century. He has had 
a career both eventful and prosperous. Beginning- the battle of life at 
the age of nine years, he earned his living as a child factory operative for 
six years, with little pay and long hours of drudgery; learning a trade, 
he followed it in the east, then came to the Missouri river and soon after- 
ward to Nebraska ; thence had experience as a gold-seeker m the western 
wilds ; returned to Nebraska, and with the enterprise, the business ability 
and force of character which are his natural gifts entered upon a business 
career which has long since put him above the daily struggle for exis- 
tence and allowed him the repose granted the later years of the aspiring 
and successful. This epitome but deals with his material prosperity, but 
he has also played a useful and worthy part as a citizen, soldier and 
public official. However much individual success he has gained, in 
winning it he has not been compelled to "look down on the hate of those 
below," for trustfulness and helpfulness have been keynotes in his char- 
acter, and more than once he has suffered financial loss because of this 
willingness to aid others. His long life of seventy years has developed 
in him a well rounded character, a matter of satisfaction to himself, of 
pride to his friends and family, and an example worthy of emulation by 
all. 

Mr. Prouty was born in Vermont, October 28, 1834. His father, 
Lewis Prouty, was born in Guilford, Vermont, in 1796, and died in 
Petersham, Massachusetts. He was a tanner and engaged in that busi- 
ness in Vermont, but in 1838 reverses in business caused him to move 
over into Massachusetts to North Adams. His first wife was Sarah 
Warner, a granddaughter of the Colonel Seth Warner who was with 



io2o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Montgomery at Quebec and in other noted battles of the Revolution. 
They were the parents of ten children ; seven sons being born in succes- 
sion : Mrs. Elizabeth Peete, the eldest, born in 1815, lives in northern 
Ohio and had nine children by her two husbands, and is still active in 
mind and body at the age of eighty-eight. Ann, wife of Lewis Goddard, 
died while he was in the war and left two living children, her husband 
being now an inmate of a soldiers' home. Francis Lafayette, the first 
of the name, died young. Lewis and Lorenzo, twins, the latter dying 
at the age of twenty-six. Lyman sailed before the mast and was captain 
of a coasting vessel for many years, and as a coasting merchant lost 
heavily during the war; he was no ordinary seaman, but a refined and 
intelligent man; he was born in 1832 and died in Nebraska in 1891. 
Francis Lafayette, who was named after the first son of that name, 
comes next of the children. Horace is a retired farmer of Hebron, Illi- 
nois, and has six children. Albert, the seventh successive son, resides 
at Genoa Junction, Wisconsin, and has three children. Sarah, the tenth 
child, died at the age of four years. The mother of these children 
died in North Adams, Massachusetts, in 1844, an d Lewis Prouty was 
afterwards married to Roxalvania Harrington, by whom he reared four 
of five children. 

Mr. Prouty was put to work in a cotton mill in North Adams, 
Massachusetts, when he was nine years old, so that he has recollection 
of but one schoolroom in that town, and his mental training was meagre 
and short. He began in the factory as bobbin boy and was advanced t< 
fifth place, but his highest pay was four dollars a week and he spent from 
thirteen to sixteen hours in the mill. In the cold winter days he had to 
light up and work a long time before breakfast, and had but twenty 
or thirty minutes for meals. This continued until he was fifteen year? 
old, and he then began as helper to a tinsmith, being bound out for 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1021 

board and clothes, with wages at thirty dollars for the first year, forty 
for the second and sixty for cue third. He worked a year at his trade 
in Meriden, Connecticut, at one dollar and a half a day, and in the 
spring of 1850 went to Warren county, North Carolina, where he fol- 
lowed his trade a year; returning to his father's home in Cheshire, Mas- 
sachusetts, he worked at Westfield a year. 

In 1856 he came west to St. Joseph, Missouri, and from there walked 
up the Missouri river fifteen miles. He then bought a team of horses, 
and in company with twelve men started for Colorado, but stopped at 
Nebraska City. He had left Massachusetts with three hundred dollars 
and arrived in Nebraska City with two hundred and fifty, but most of 
this had been spent to help his comrades sick with smallpox. He was 
in Nebraska City and Minersville until the fall of 1857, and then, in 
company with two hundred and ninety others, in a train of six covered 
wagons, each drawn by five yoke of oxen, he set out for the mines and 
mountains of Colorado. After an interesting journey they arrived at a 
point fifteen miles from where the city of Denver afterward arose, and 
there went into winter quarters in log cabins. In squads of five each 
they prospected for gold and thirty-five miles from Boulder found it but 
not in paying quantities. In April Mr. Prouty returned to Nebraska, 
without money, prepared to begin anew. 

He worked at his trade and in a sawmill and broke the prairie 
sod until the 8th of June, 1861, when he enlisted in Company C, First 
Nebraska Infantry. He served in Missouri against Price, was at Fori 
Donelson, Shiloh, the siege of Corinth, and was then attacked with the 
lung fever and sent to Jefferson barracks at St. Louis and discharged 
for disability, in June, 1862. He came home, but soon re-enlisted, as 
second sergeant of the Twenty-seventh Nebraska Infantry, with which 
he served a year under General Sellers in the frontier campaigns against 



1022 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

the Indians, helping to clean up Little Crow and his band. He was 
mustered out at Brownville in 1864. He was wounded slightly in the 
left leg. 

Mr. Prouty was a successful hardware merchant in Peru for twenty 
years, and made money, although he lost much by signing notes and be- 
ing accommodating. He owns his nice residence in Peru, as well as one 
which he rents. He also has town property in New Mexico, South 
Dakota and Wyoming and has stock in a Wyoming railroad. He has 
mining stock in Old and New Mexico and Wyoming. He has done much 
for his children, but still has a comfortable competence for his declining 
years. 

In November, 1859, Mr. Prouty was married in Peru to Miss Jessie 
Rugg, who was born in Leominster, Massachusetts, in 1836, a daughter 
of Wright Rugg. Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Prouty: Herbert Winchester is clerk of court in Denver, Colorado. 
and has a wife and two sons and a daughter: Kate Alberta is the wife 
of Seth Bowers (her second husband), in Centennial, Wyoming, and 
has five children ; Eloise is the wife of Fred Miller, at Laramie, Wyom- 
ing, and has one daughter: Sarah Ann is the wife of M. F. Reed, of 
Centennial. Wyoming, and has one son; Mamie is the wife of Elias 
Conkle, of Peru, and has three sons: Francis L. died at the age of 
three months, and the second of the same name died at the age of five 
months; Lewis, the eighth child, died in 1891 at the age of nineteen, 
having been located in business in Lincoln, Nebraska, for three weeks 
before his death. 

Mr. Prouty is past commander of the Martin Stowell Post, G. A. R., 
at Peru. Since 1876 he has drawn a pension of from four to thirty 
dollars a month, and his noble wife, who was a field nurse during the war 
and was with her husband at Fort Donelson, her oldest child being a 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1023 

baby at the time, is also a pensioner of the government. Mr. Prouty 
is a Republican in politics, and has been in the town council for many 
years; was treasurer of the school board many years, and was also 
elected judge. He bought his present home place of an Indian agent 
many years ago, and about ten years ago he remodeled the house and 
made it the comfortable and pleasant dwelling where the many friends 
of the family now delight to gather and honor their host. 



DANIEL MATHER. 

Daniel Mather, who follows farming in South Fork precinct, Saline 
county, is one of the old settlers of southeastern Nebraska. He was born 
near Marysville in Union county. Ohio, on the 26th of December, 1832. 
His father, William Mather, was born in Ross county, Ohio, and was a 
son of Daniel Mather, whose birth occurred in Pennsylvania and who 
was of Scotch-Irish ancestry. Reared in the state of his nativity, Wil- 
liam Mather afterward married Phoebe Allen, who was born in Ohio 
and was a daughter of Isaac Allen, who served as a soldier of the war of 
18 12. He was noted for his strength, his activity and also for his genial, 
jovial nature. William and Phoebe Mather became parents of several 
children, namely : Daniel ; Allen ; John, who was a soldier of Company 
I, Tenth Iowa Infantry, during the Civil war and is now living in 
Denver, Colorado ; Myra ; Ebenezer, who was a soldier of Company E, 
Fortieth Iowa Infantry, in the war of the rebellion and was wounded 
at Sabine creek; Wesley; Job; Frank; and Eliza. The father of this 
family removed to Iowa in 1850 and spent his remaining days in that 
state, passing away at the age of fifty-seven years. He endorsed the 
principles of the Republican party after its organization and gave his 



1024 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

influence not only to political measures which he believed would benefit 
the community but to all matters pertaining to the general good along 
educational and moral lines. For many years he was a local minister of 
the Methodist church, a godly man whose upright career was well worthy 
of emulation. His wife, who was also a consistent Christian, died at 
the age of seventy-three years, loved and respected by all who knew her. 

Daniel Mather spent his early boyhood days upon the old home farm 
in Union county, Ohio, and in 1850 went to Iowa, settling in Jasper 
county. He has since engaged in agricultural pursuits save that at the 
time of the Civil war he put aside all business and personal considerations 
and prompted by a spirit of patriotism enlisted in August, 1862, as a 
member of Company E, Fortieth Iowa Regiment of Volunteers. The 
company was commanded by Captain J. W. Sennett and the regiment 
by Colonel John A. Garrett. They went into camp in Polk county, 
Iowa, were afterward sent to Cairo, Illinois, thence to Paducah, Ken- 
tucky, and subsequently participated in many campaigns and engage- 
ments in the south. Mr. Mather was in the battle of Mechanicsville and 
went to Helena, Arkansas, under General Steele. He was also at 
Little Rock, Arkansas, and at Fort Gibson. Being taken sick he was 
sent to the hospital at Overton, Tennessee, and later to Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, where he was honorably discharged in May, 1865. 

When twenty-one years of age, Mr. Mather was united in marriage 
to Miss Nancy Bennett, who died in December, 1867. She was a 
daughter of George and Elizabeth Bennett. The former, who died in 
Illinois, was a son of Wesley Bennett, and served his country as a 
soldier in the Fifteenth Iowa Infantry. His death occurred in 1882. 
To this union four children were born: William Albert; John Emery; 
Lizzie T., who died in July, 1887; and Daniel E. The boys are all 
married. Mr. Mather was again married, in October, 1868, to Miss 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 10^5 

Mary E. Worley, who was born in Union county, Ohio, in July, 1847. 
To this union were born thirteen children, five of whom died in infancy 
and one at the age of sixteen. Seven remain : Martha Adelia, who lives 
in Denver, Colorado; Susan Eva, who lives in Tobias, Nebraska; C. J., 
who lives in Rockford, Illinois; Harvey, who lives near Spring Ranch, 
Nebraska; Uriah B., who lives in Aurora, Nebraska; Effie Mae, who 
lives in Kenesaw, Nebraska ; all of whom are married, and Clara 
Myrtle, who still remains at home. 

Mr. Mather has provided his family with a good home. He has 
eighty acres of well improved land in South Fork precinct, Saline county, 
on which are a comfortable residence and substantial barns and other 
outbuildings. A grove and orchard are also among the attractive 
features on the place, and modern equipments indicate his progressive 
spirit and careful supervision. Both he and his wife are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and the children are also identified with 
the same denomination. Fraternally he is connected with the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and with his army comrades he delights in recalling 
reminiscences of the days which were spent upon southern battlefields 
or in military camps in the south. 



THOMAS B. POE. 

Thomas B. Poe is one of the successful farmers of Paddock town- 
ship, Gage county, Nebraska, and has been a resident of this portion of 
southeastern Nebraska since 1878, a worthy and energetic worker, 
a public-spirited and enterprising citizen, and a man commanding the full 
esteem of all his fellow citizens. 

He was born in Hamilton county, Ohio, November 9, 1840, the 



1026 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

year of the famous Harrison campaign. He was just of age when 
the Civil war came on, and he gave three years of patriotic service to 
his country in defense of the Union. August 4, 1862, he entered the 
Union army in Company D, One Hundred and First Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, the regiment being commanded by Colonel Fox. He was in 
various campaigns and engagements of the war, and was with Sherman 
on the famous march to the sea. He received his honorable discharge 
at Washington, D. C, and then returned home and gave his efforts to 
civic duties as generously as he had previously offered his service to 
his country. In 1878 he came out to Nebraska, and in Gage county 
bought the one hundred and sixty-three acres which comprise his present 
beautiful farm, paying three dollars and a half an acre for it, but to-day 
it is worth fifty dollars an acre. He has brought this property into a 
very high state of cultivation, and upon it has erected a comfortable 
house, substantial barn, and made many other improvements. The farm 
is well stocked, and Mr. Poe is justly regarded as one of the leading 
farmers of the township. 

In 1879 Mr. Poe was married to Miss Ethel Beaver, who was born 
in Ohio, being a daughter of Daniel and Mary (Iker) Beaver. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Poe are as follows : John Edgar, Fred W., 
Vernie W., Thomas Harrison, John Raymond, and Walter, who died 
at the age of eighteen years. Mrs. Poe comes of a family of the follow- 
ing children : Sylvia, Charles, Delbert, Dottie, Gracie, besides four that 
are deceased. 

In politics Mr. Poe is a Republican, and is prominent in G. A. R. 
circles, belonging to Odell Post. He and his wife are much esteemed by 
all who know them, and have many friends not only in the township but 
throughout the entire county where they have made their home for 
so many years. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1027 

GEORGE W. PYLE. 

Among the representative citizens of Gage county none stand higher 
in public esteem than George W. Pyle, who is now successfully engaged 
in farming in Island Grove township. He was born on this side of the 
Mississippi, his birth having occurred near Chillicothe, Livingston 
county, Missouri, December 3, 1842. His father, Joel C. Pyle, died 
in Carroll county, that state, in 1855. In 1840 he had been married in 
Indiana to Miss Mary A. Livingston, who was born in 1822 and was 
reared in the Hoosier state. She survived her husband many years, 
dying in Pawnee county, Nebraska, on the 31st of January, 1899. Our 
subject is the oldest of the three children of the family. Jeremiah, 
now deceased, was born in 1847 an d when the country became involved 
in civil war entered the service. He was taken prisoner at Lexington, 
Missouri, during General Price's raid. Joel C, the youngest son, is 
now a resident of Gage county, Nebraska. 

George W. Pyle was only thirteen years of age when his father died, 
and as his mother was in rather limited circumstances he had to help 
in the support of the familv. In this way he was deprived of the 
usual educational advantages afforded boys, though he attended school 
to some extent. At the outbreak of the Civil war he was in White 
Cloud, Kansas, and from there went to Omaha to enlist, becoming a 
member of the Second Nebraska Cavalry, under the command of Captain 
Ed Patrick and Colonel Furnas, who was afterward governor of Ne- 
braska. The regiment was stationed for some time at Omaha, North 
Platte and Sioux City, Iowa. Mr. Pyle was ill with lung fever during 
his service but was able to take part in the engagement at White Stone 
Hills, where about eight hundred Indians were captured and about five 
hundred were estimated to have been killed. Some of these red men be- 



1028 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

longed to the band that massacred the white settlers at New Ulm, Min- 
nesota, a short time previous. 

At the close of the war Mr. Pyle received an honorable discharge 
and for some time thereafter made his home in Nemaha county, Nebraska. 
In 1866 he removed to Pawnee county, this state, where he took a home- 
stead, making his home there for the following ten years. Subsequently 
he resided in Chautauqua county, Kansas, but in 1901 returned to Ne- 
braska and settled in Gage county, where he now owns and operates a 
good farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Island Grove township. 
There is a nice orchard and grove upon the place and the buildings are 
of a neat and substantial character. 

On the 29th of June, 1865, Mr. Pyle was united in marriage to 
Mrs. Elizabeth (Hansbury) Bohn, widow of Charles Bohn, who was 
also a soldier of the Civil war and died leaving three children, Mary, 
Frank and John C. Fremont. The last named entered the service of 
his country during the Spanish-American war and was stationed for a 
time in the Philippines. He is now living at Muskogee, Indian Terri- 
tory. Mrs. Pyle was born in Ohio, and is a daughter of J. D. and 
Elizabeth (Nichols) Hansbury, both natives of Pennsylvania, whence 
they removed to Ohio, and later to Wabash county, Indiana, but their 
last days were passed in Custer county, Nebraska, where the father died 
at the age of seventy-eight years and the mother at the age of seventy- 
nine. They were faithful members of the Christian church and most 
estimable people. They had five children who reached years of ma- 
turity, namely: Mary, Elizabeth, William, Joseph and Albert. All 
of the sons were in the Union army during the rebellion, Albert being 
only sixteen years of age when he entered the service. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Pyle have been born five children who are still living, as follows : 
William C, a resident of Pawnee county, Nebraska; Mrs. Rilla Mason, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1029 

of Oklahoma ; Mrs. Louisa Randall, of Liberty, Nebraska ; Eli, of 
Pawnee county; and Mrs. Rebecca Pierce, of Oklahoma territory. A 
son, James, died at the age of twenty-one years, and nine children died 
in infancy. 

By his ballot Mr. Pyle usually supports the men and measures of 
the Republican party. He is an honored member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic, and both he and his wife are consistent and faithful 
members of the Christian church. His life has been most exemplary, 
and the causes of temperance and morality find in him a stanch supporter. 



PHILLIP GOIN. 

Phillip Coin, who was one of the defenders of the Union cause 
during the dark days of the rebellion, is now a prominent and successful 
farmer of Gage county, Nebraska, his home being in Island Grove 
township. He came to this state in 1869 and has therefore witnessed 
almost its entire development and upbuilding, in the work of which he 
has borne an important part as an agriculturist. 

Mr. Goin was born on the 15th of August, 1846, in Claiborne 
county, Tennessee, and is a worthy representative of a prominent old 
family of that locality, his paternal grandfather being Levi Goin, of 
Tennessee. His parents, Sterling and Mary (Keck) Goin, were na- 
tives of the same state. The latter died in 1868 at the age of forty- 
five years. She was a loving wife, a tender mother and kind neighbor, 
and was withal a true southern woman in the best sense of that term. 
The father is still living in Tennessee at the advanced age of eighty- 
five years. By occupation he is a farmer. His political support has 
always been given the Whig and Republican parties, and during the 



1030 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Civil war he was a strong Union man, and many sufferings was he 
called upon to endure on account of his loyalty to the United States, as 
he was surrounded on all sides by secessionists. In his family were 
sixteen children, fifteen of whom reached manhood and womanhood. 
James K. Goin, one of the number, who was a Union soldier in the 
Civil war, is now living in Island Grove township, Gage county, Ne- 
braska ; Proctor is also a resident of this county ; and one lives in Mar- 
shall county, Kansas. All of the others, with the exception of our sub- 
ject, still make their home in the south. 

Upon the home farm Phillip Goin passed the days of his boyhood 
and youth, and he received a limited education in the schools of Ten- 
nessee, but his time was mainly devoted to the labors of the farm. On 
the 30th of October, 1864, at the age of eighteen years, he joined the 
boys in blue of Company B, First Tennessee Light Artillery, and was 
under the command of Captain Beebe and Colonel Crawford. He was 
in the battle of Ball's Bridge, Virginia, and in the engagements at Cum- 
berland Gap and Strawberry Plains, together with others of lesser im- 
portance in Tennessee and Virginia. At the close of the war he re- 
ceived an honorable discharge at Nashville, July 20, 1865, and returned 
home with a fine military record for so young a man, being not quite 
nineteen years of age. 

In 1868 Mr. Goin was united in marriage to Miss Elinor Bolinger, 
and a year later they came to Nebraska, locating in Pawnee county, 
where she died in 1888, loved and respected by all who knew her for 
her sterling worth and many excellent traits of character. Besides her 
husband nine children were left to mourn her loss, namely: Sterling, 
Florence M., Emeline, Matilda, Hugh, Proctor, Andrew, Lionel and 
Clyde. 

Mr. Goin now owns an excellent farm of four hundred and fifty 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1031 

acres of rich bottom land in Island Grove township, Gage county, con- 
veniently located one mile east of Liberty. The place is under a high 
state of cultivation and is improved with good and substantial buildings, 
which stand as monuments to his thrift and enterprise. In connection 
with general farming, Mr. Goin carries on stock raising to some extent. 
He is a man of excellent business ability and thoroughly reliable, his 
word being considered as good as his bond. True to the principles for 
which he fought, he continues to support the Republican party, and he 
is a prominent member of Barry Post, G. A. R., in which he is serving 
as senior vice commander. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity. 



JAMES HAMERSHAM. 

James Hamersham, of Paddock township, Gage county, Nebraska, 
and one of the well known and highly respected veterans of the Civil 
war, has a record of which he may well be proud, he having enlisted at 
Joliet, Will county, Illinois, October 1. 1863, for three years or until 
the close of the war. He was placed in Captain White's company, 
Chicago Battery, and was honorably discharged in July, 1865. He 
served in the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, as well as numerous skir- 
mishes in Arkansas and Texas, and was wounded at the first engage- 
ment, but not seriously. Returning from New Orleans, where he was 
discharged, to Illinois, he resumed his more peaceful pursuits. 

His birth occurred in county Kent, England, July 12, 1831, and 
he is a son of Thomas Hamersham, a farmer of that locality, and his 
wife Margaret (Tegg) Hamersham, both of whom were members of 
the Established Church. James, our subject, remained in England for 
some years, marrying at the age of twenty-three years, in county Kent, 



1032 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Hannah Hobday, and soon after the young people emigrated to the 
United States, settling at Lockport, Illinois, where they remained until 
1866, when they removed to Johnson county, Illinois, and in 1880 they 
took up their residence in Marshall county, Kansas. The next change 
was made when they sold their farm of one hundred and twenty acres 
in that county and purchased the present home in Paddock township, 
Gage county. Nebraska. There the property is in excellent shape, and 
twelve acres is in small fruits suitable to the climate. The house and 
other buildings are well kept up. and on every side may be seen that 
a man of good management is in charge. 

Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hamersham, namely: 
Margaret, Fred, William, Agnes and Henry, that are living, and one, 
George, who died at the age of eleven years. The family are members 
of the Christian church, and the children have been reared after the 
teachings of the Divine Master. Both our subject and his good wife 
are very hospitable, and make welcome every guest who enters their 
home. They are highly respected in their community, and they and 
their children are citizens of whom any neighborhood may well feel 
proud. 



SAMUEL D. VERTREES. 

Samuel D. Vertrees, one of the best known farmers and residents 
of Blakely township. Gage county, took up his home here in 1886, and 
has taken rank with the progressive, public-spirted and energetic citi- 
zens who have contributed so much to the development of this section 
of southeastern Nebraska. He is a veteran of the Civil war. in which 
he served with credit, although he was but a boy in years during the 
entire period of his enlistment. He has been successful in his farming 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1033 

operations and business affairs, but at the same time lias gained the 
esteem and respect of all his fellow citizens and associates through his 
worth and upright character, manifested in all his dealings and relations 
at heme and in business. 

Mr. Vertrees was born in Scott county, Illinois, in 1846. His father 
was Thomas Vertrees, a native of Kentucky. Mr. Vertrees was bereft 
of his mother when he was but three years old, and his father died 
two years later, so that he and the other children were left alone at an 
early age. 

Mr. Vertrees grew up on a farm in Illinois, and attended the 
public schools and was taught the value of manual labor. He enlisted 
at Springfield, Illinois, in Company F, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth 
Illinois Infantry, under Captain Horton and Colonel Flynn. He was in 
several battles and skirmishes. He returned to farming, which he con- 
tinued until he came to Gage county in 1886. He has a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres, conceded to be one of the best in the township. 

In 1868 Mr. Vertrees was married in Scott county, Illinois, to 
Miss Sarah Berry, who was born, reared and educated in Illinois, a 
daughter of Alexander Berry, of Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Vertrees have 
four children living. The son William was accidently killed in Scott 
county. The others are George; Newton; Carrie May, the wife of 
James Lester, of Omaha; and Fred. Mr. Vertrees is a stanch Repub- 
lican, and served as county commissioner one term. He is very much 
interested in the raising of fine Poland China hogs, and has some of as 
fine specimens as are to be found in Gage county. Mrs. Vertrees is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, has been a noble helpmate 
to her husband in all his endeavors, and they are both the recipients 
of the highest esteem from their many friends in the township and 
county. 



io 3 4 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

PETER W. FEATHER. 

Peter W. Feather, a well known citizen of Adams, Gage county, 
Nebraska, having spent a quarter of a century in Gage county, deserves 
the appellation of old settler, with the honor and respect which that title 
brings. He is also an old soldier of the Civil war, and in many ways 
has given a good citizen's attention and devotion to the public welfare, 
besides performing his individual labors. Mr. Feather is a young old 
man, and his seventy years still sit lightly on him, so that he is by no 
means beyond the time when he can be of service to himself and others. 

Mr. Feather was born in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, in 1833. 
The family is of German extraction, and his father, William, was born 
in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He married Catherine Rus- 
sell. Among their children were: John, Johanna, Wheeler, Peter, 
William, Steve, Jefferson, who was a soldier ; Joseph, James, and Henry, 
a soldier in Company K, Twenty-second Wisconsin Infantry, and 
now lives in Ottawa county, Kansas. 

Peter W. Feather was reared in Green county, Wisconsin, where 
he lived until the war. He enlisted from that county in 1862, in Com- 
pany K, Twenty-second Wisconsin Infantry. He was in camp at Ra- 
cine, Wisconsin, was then ordered south to Covington, Kentucky, and 
served against General Bragg's forces, and was in General Buell's com- 
mand for a time. He was taken prisoner and confined in Libby prison. 
He was sent home, but recuperated and rejoined his regiment, serving 
as sergeant orderly until the close of the war. He took part in the grand 
review at Washington, and received an honorable discharge with a 
creditable record. Mr. Feather came to Nebraska in 1868, and first 
settled in Johnson county, near Sterling, where he lived until 1876, 
when he came to Gage county, and has been a permanent and respected 
resident here ever since. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1035 

Mr. Feather was married in Athens, Ohio, to Miss Mary Wagner, 
who was born in Ohio, a daughter of George and Christine Wagner. 
Mrs. Feather died at the age of sixty-three, in Gage county. She was 
a member of the Methodist church, and a true and devoted wife and 
mother. She left six children: Lillie, Christine, Alice, Emma, William 
and Ida. Mr. Feather later married Mrs. Rebecca Eliza Bennett, the 
widow of James Bennett, a mason and builder, and who was born in 
New York and died in Nebraska in May, 1897, at the age of fifty-six, 
leaving his wife and two children. Mrs. Feather was born in Saratoga 
county, New York, a daughter of Raymond and Pauline (Crandall) 
Betts, both natives of Saratoga county. The former, who was a 
farmer and a member of the Baptist church, died in Saratoga county, at 
the age of forty, and the latter at the age of fifty-one. Their children 
were: Morgan, Mary, Lucy, Jane, Walter L., Rhoda and Eliza. Mr. 
Feather is a strong Republican, is a popular member of the Sergeant Cox 
Post No. 100, G. A. R., at Adams, and holds the office of court chaplain. 
He and his wife are both members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and have a large number of friends throughout the county. 



JOHN D. JUMP. 

John D. Jump, a prosperous farmer near Vesta, in Vesta township, 
Johnson count)-, Nebraska, has been engaged in agricultural pursuits here 
for fifteen years, having taken up his residence in this county in 1889. 
He is an intelligent, well informed and enterprising citizen, diligent and 
up-to-date in matters of farming, and in his relations with his fellow men 
has always shown himself upright and honorable, and deserving of 
implicit confidence and esteem. That he has performed the part of a 



1036 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

loyal and patriotic citizen is evident from the fact that he served for 
nearly three years in the rebellion, and this highest mark of patriotism 
has been maintained by his subsequent public-spirited attitude in all 
matters affecting the general welfare. 

Mr. Jump was born in Greenville. New York, July 23, 1835, a 
son of Morris and Mary (Calderon) Jump. His father was a native 
of New York and a soldier in the war of 181 2, drawing a land warrant 
for his services. He followed farming, and was a Whig in politics. He 
died in 1850 at the age of fifty-four, honored and respected by all. His 
wife was born in Edinburg, Scotland, and reared and educated in that 
country. After her husband's death she came to Illinois, in 1858, and 
her death occurred there. They had eleven children, and two sons were 
in the Civil war, James being a member of the Fifty-third Illinois In- 
fantry. 

Mr. Jump was reared on a farm in New York, and attended the 
public schools. In 1858 he came to Illinois and settled in Marshall coun- 
ty, where he was engaged in farming until the war. August 7, 1862, 
he enlisted from Marshall county in Company C, Eighty-sixth Illinois 
Infantry, under Captain James F. Thomas and Colonel Irons. The 
regiment was mustered in on August 27, 1862, and was sent to Buell's 
forces at Louisville. It participated in the battle of Perryville, Nashville, 
Stone River, Chickamauga ; was then under Sherman in the great Geor- 
gia campaign, taking part in the historical engagements of Resaca, Kene- 
saw Mountain, New Hope Church; thence on the march from Atlanta 
to the sea, up through the Carolinas to Bentonville, and after the sur- 
render of Johnston went to Richmond and to Washington, where the 
Grand Review was held as the closing scene of the mightiest conflict 
of mortal arms. Mr. Jump was discharged at Camp Douglas, Chicago, 
June 6, 1865, and then returned to his family and farm. He farmed 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1037 

for some years in Livingston county. Illinois, and in 1889 came to 
Johnson county, Nebraska. He has one of the best farms in Vesta 
township, one hundred and sixty acres of rich and well improved land, 
a comfortable dwelling and an orchard and grove of twelve acres. It 
is situated two miles from Smartville. 

Mr. Jump was married in Marshall county, Illinois, in 1861, to 
Miss Elvira Leigh, who was born in Tazewell county, Illinois, a daugh- 
ter of Elisha and Sarah (Bowman) Leigh, the former a native of New 
Jersey, and both died in Illinois, the former at the age of seventy and 
the latter aged eighty-six. They were members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, and he was a Republican. Mrs. Jump is one of six child- 
ren. Mr. and Mrs. Jump had six children : Ethel M. Whitney, of Indian 
Territory ; Fred Morris, near Tecumseh, Nebraska ; Flora B. Benner, in 
Canada: Clinton, of Republic county, Kansas; J. Wilber and Myra, at 
home. All the children received good educations, and the daughters 
were successful teachers. Mr. Jump is a stanch Republican. He affil- 
iates with Sill Post No. 99, G. A. R., at Sterling, Nebraska. He and 
his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



WILLIAM VIETTE. 

William Viette, a successful retired farmer of Steele City, is an 
honored veteran of the Civil war and has been among the progressive 
and enterprising citizens of Jefferson county, Nebraska for twenty-six 
years. He has met with a good share of worldly prosperity in his under- 
takings, and is honored by all for his worth and character. 

Mr. Viette was born in Washington county, New York, March 
20, 1 841, of a highly respected family of that county. Francis Viette, 



1038 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

his father, was born in England, and in early life came to this country 
and participated in the battle of Plattsburg, during the war of 1812, 
when he was but sixteen years old. Elizabeth Viette, his wife, was 
born in France, and came to America an orphan, being reared by an 
aunt in New York. Francis Viette was a former, and in politics a Re- 
publican, and they were both members of the Catholic church. He died 
at the age of sixty-five. They were parents of eight children : Julian, 
Frank, Carlis, Peter, Eliza, Matilda, William and Isaac. 

William Viette was reared in New York, being taught to work and 
also receiving a common school education. In early manhood he went 
to Wisconsin, and while there joined a company of seventy men, at 
Lone Rock, who went to St. Louis, Missouri, and on July 10, 1863, 
were enrolled in the service of the United States government. He was 
kept in camp at St. Louis for five days, and then sent to Little Rock, 
Arkansas, where he was detailed for government work with the engi- 
neers and machinists corps. He did garrison duty for five months, 
and during much of the time suffered from dumb ague. He was finally 
discharged for disability, and had to spend the winter in a more northern 
climate, at Minneapolis, for recuperating his energies. He came to 
Jefferson county, Nebraska, in 1877, and began farming on one hundred 
and sixty acres. He also owned at one time eighty acres in Wabaunsee 
county, Kansas. He has a nice home in Steele City, well furnished 
and tastefully ornamented, where he is now passing the later years of 
his life. 

Mr. Viette was married in Wisconsin to Miss Abigail Thompson, 
who was born in that state, a daughter of Richard Thompson, of Great 
Bend, New York. Mrs. Viette died in this county in 1897, at the age of 
forty-two, leaving three children : Albert, of Washington state ; Ernest, 
of Washington state; and Miss Jessie, of Saline, Kansas. Mr. Viette 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1039 

was later married to Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Ferry, the widow of Dr. Ferry, 
a late prominent physician of Reynolds, Nebraska, and their daughter, 
Mary Ferry, died at the age of thirteen years. Mrs. Viette was born 
in Harrison county, Ohio, a daughter of Daniel and Mary (Ackerman) 
Hilbert, the former of whom was born in Wheeling, Virginia, and 
lived for many years in Ohio. Mrs. Viette was one of five daughters, 
the others being Mrs. Lee, Mary, Louisa, and Alice, who is deceased. 
Mr. Viette is a stanch Republican, and he and his wife are members of 
the Congregational church, and she belongs to the Women's Christian 
Temperance Union. 



DR. F. W. WINTER. 

Dr. F. W. Winter, who is engaged in practice in Adams, Gage 
county, Nebraska, is one of the best known physicians of the county, 
and has gained the utmost confidence of the people in his skill and 
reliability. He has shown himself conscientious and sympathetic in his 
work, and whether as a man or in a professional relation he is held in 
high esteem and is popular with all. 

Dr. Winter was born in Wapello, Iowa, in 1852, a member of one 
of the pioneer families of the state. His father, William Winter, was 
a native of Germany, and after his emigration to this country he enlisted 
in the army and served in the Mexican war. For his services he received 
a land warrant, and with this came to Iowa and took up land. He died 
at the age of fifty-six in Davenport, Iowa. His wife was Mina Filgen- 
baum, who was born, reared and educated in Germany. 

Dr. Winter graduated from the high school in Muscatine, Iowa, 
and was a student in the Iowa Wesleyan College. He also taught 



io 4 o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

school at Garner, Hancock county. He graduated from the medical de- 
partment of Iowa College at Iowa City, Iowa, in the class of 1880. 

Dr. Winter was married in 1885 to Miss Lyda P. Bennett, who was 
born in New York state, a daughter of James Bennett, who died in 
Adams, Nebraska. Dr. and Mrs. Winter have five children : Ralph 
Bennett, May Irene, W. Waldo, Lewis Emerson, Elzie A. Dr. Winter 
is a strong Republican. He is a member of the State Medical Society, 
and of the Nebraska Valley Medical Society, and was secretary of the 
former for three years. He affiliates with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, the Modern Woodmen and the Knights of Pythias, and Mr* 
Winter is a member of the Eastern Star. They are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and he holds the office of steward and take- 
an active part in church work. 



JAMES A. WILLIAMS. 

James A. Williams, proprietor of the well known Brick livery barn 
at Hebron, was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, in 1853, a son of George 
W. and Mary J. (Little) Williams. Both these parents are now de- 
ceased. They moved to Indiana, during the childhood of James, and 
fifteen years later went to Iowa, where they resided some twenty years, 
and then located in Kansas, where they had their permanent residence 
until their death. 

Mr. Williams was reared to manhood in these several places, and 
enjoyed a common school education. He took up farming while in 
Kansas, where he homesteaded a claim and remained until 1891, in 
which year he located in Hebron. In addition to his livery business he 
has also engaged in stock dealing. 

Mr. Williams has always been allied with the Republican party, and 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1041 

on its ticket was elected a member of the city council, being now in his 
second term in that office. He was married in Jackson county, Iowa, in 
1873, to Miss Elizabeth M. McCarty. Her parents, John and Annie 
(Beatty) McCarty, after coming- to this country were married in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, whence they moved to Illinois, from there to Iowa, and 
are now residents of Republic county, Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. Williams 
have four children : George E. ; Annie, now Mrs. David H. Lloyd, of 
Hebron; Cora E., at home; and Frederick E. The family belong to the 
Christian church, and fraternally Mr. Williams affiliates with Hebron 
Lodge No. 25, T. O. O. F., and with the Modern Woodmen of America. 



JOSEPH FORNEY. 

Joseph Forney, a citizen of Richardson county of nearly fifty years' 
standing, has a long and active life crowned with success and prosper- 
ity, and with length of years have come likewise honor and veneration 
from all around him. His span of life has been stretched over eighty 
years, and from a very youthful period he made his own way in the 
world, also helping to support the rest of the family, he being the oldest 
child. Accordingly he had little education, six months in a school room 
altogether, but his industry and perseverance have none the less had 
their deserved reward. He has been retired from activity for several 
years, and has been living in Falls City for a number of years, and his 
fine home was built here twenty-two years ago. 

Mr. Forney was born in Harrison count) - , Ohio, in 1S24, the family 
being of Swiss descent. His father, Peter Forney, was born in West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, and died in Holt county, Missouri, at 
the age of eighty-nine years. Peter Forney was married to his second 



1042 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

wife, Fanny Grundy, of Ohio, in Harrison county, in 1823, and Joseph 
was their oldest child. 

Mr. Joseph Forney was married in Ohio, when about twenty 
years old, to Miss Mary Brannier, who, with one child, died of the 
cholera in St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1851. and left two children. By his 
present wife Mr. Forney has the following children : Peter, of Custer 
county, Nebraska, and has two daughters ; George died in Chase county, 
Nebraska, leaving four children : Thomas died in Richardson county, 
leaving two sons; Miss Nettie May remains at home and faithfully cares 
for her aged parents, her mother having been almost a helpless invalid 
for several years. Mr. Forney has always been a Republican, and has 
held various school offices. 



FRANK L. MARRS. 

Frank L. Marrs, a well known and popular citizen of Island Grove 
township, has spent most of his life in Nebraska and has been a resident 
of Gage county since 1886. He was born near Newtonia, Newton 
county, Missouri. May 14, 1862, and on both the paternal and maternal 
sides comes of old Tennessee families. His father, Alexander Marrs, 
was, however, a native of Newton county, Missouri where the grand- 
parents settled at an early day in the development of that state, but the 
mother of our subject, who bore the maiden name of Susan Rice, was a 
native of Tennessee. The father was a strong Union man during the 
Civil war, and on account of the persecution he sustained at the hands 
of the rebels he came north in 1864 and settled in Johnson county, Neb- 
raska, northeast of Tecumseh, becoming one of the pioneers of that 
locality. In his political affiliations he was a Republican and in religious 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 



1043 



belief was a Methodist, while fraternally he was connected with the 
Masonic order. Upright and honorable in all things, he gained the res- 
pect and confidence of those who knew him. He died at the age of 
fifty-four years. His first wife was Susan Rice, and to them were born 
four children: Catherine; Frank L., of this review; Henry C. ; and 
Lizzie, who died at the age of fourteen years. The father was again 
married, and by the second union had two children : William and 
Maggie. 

Frank L. Marrs was reared amid pioneer surroundings in Johnson 
county, Nebraska, being only two years old when the family located 
there. He attended the public schools, and the knowledge there acquired 
has been greatly supplemented by reading and experience in later years. 
In Johnson county he was married January 3, 1884, to Miss Mattie 
Morton, who was horn in Otoe county, Nebraska, but was principally 
reared and educated in Johnson county. Her father, Wilburn Morton, 
was a native of Tennessee, and from there went to Illinois with his par- 
ents when a child, living in Pike county, that state, till the age of twen- 
ty-six years. There he married Susanna Brown, a native of Ohio. Later 
they came to Nebraska, becoming early settlers of Otoe county, and 
from there the}- removed to Johnson county, this state, where Mrs. 
Morton died at the age of fifty-three years. The father now makes 
his home in Wa tonga, Oklahoma, where he carries on farming. He was 
formerly a Republican, but now supports the Populist party, and he is 
a member of the Christian church, but Mrs. Morton held membership 
in the Methodist church. Their family consisted of twelve children, 
four of whom are now deceased, namely : Mary L., May, Helen and 
Ed. The living are William, Charlie, Mattie, Lizzie, Edith, Dora, 
James and Andrew. 

In 1886 Mr. and Mrs. Marrs came to Gage county, and he pur- 



1044 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

chased eighty acres of land in Island Grove township. He has a good 
orchard of five acres, and the buildings upon his place are neat and sub- 
stantial, everything being in first-class condition and indicating the pro- 
gressive spirit of the owner. He has been called upon to serve as as- 
sessor of his township for five terms, being elected three times in suc- 
cession, and his official duties have been promptly and faithfully dis- 
charged and to the satisfaction of all concerned. Politically he is a 
Republican. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Marrs : Elmer 
A. and Susie E. Marrs. Mr. Marrs is a member of the Modern Wood- 
men of America. His religious belief is Methodist, and Mrs. Marrs 
is a member of the Methodist church. 



JOHN I. FRIEZE. 

John I. Frieze, senior vice of Coleman Post No. 115, of Wy- 
more, Gage county, Nebraska, is one of the well known and highly 
respected men of this locality, and he has a good record as a soldier 
during the Civil war. His enlistment took place in Newton county, 
Indiana, September 7, 1863, when he entered Company A, One Hun- 
dred and Twenty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, under Captain 
Joseph Bissell. 

Mr. Frieze was reared in Livingston county, Illinois, near Pontiac. 
He was first married to Henrietta Farmer, who died, leaving two chil- 
dren, John Wesley and Bertha. On March 26, 1878, Mr. Frieze 
was married to Susan E. Holmes, who was born in Delaware county, 
Indiana, being a daughter of Henry Holmes, a native of Balti- 
more, Maryland, and Anna (Dale) Holmes, who was born in Ohio. 
The father of Mrs. Frieze is an engineer, but is now retired and is sev- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1045 

enty-seven years of age. In religion he is a Dunkard. Mr. and Mrs. 
Frieze have had three children, but they all died in infancy. Formerly 
Mr. Frieze was a Republican, but he is now a Populist and believes in 
the same rights for all. Both he and his excellent wife are members 
of the Christian church, and they are very highly esteemed by a large 
circle of friends. 



ROBERT T. TURNER. 

Robert T. Turner, living in South Fork precinct, Saline count)', 
where he is now conducting a well improved farm, is one of the pro- 
gressive, practical and wide-awake agriculturists of this part of the 
state. He was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, near Harrison- 
burg, on the 31st of January, 1847, anf l belonged to one of the old 
and honorable families of that portion of the country. His parents 
were James and Susan Turner, also natives of the Old Dominion, and 
the mother was the daughter of a Revolutionary soldier who was of 
English descent but fought against the mother country in the effort to 
obtain independence for the colonies. James and Susan Turner became 
the parents of twelve children, eight sons and four daughters, and two 
of the sons were soldiers in the Civil war. John R., who was a mem- 
ber of the same company and regiment to which his brother Robert 
belonged, died in Colorado about thirteen years ago. One brother, 
Henry, is now living in West Virginia, and two sisters are also resi- 
dents of that state. These are the only ones now living with the 
exception of our subject. The father, who had made farming his life 
work, died at the age of sixty-two years, and his wife passed away at 
the age of seventy-six years. They were members of the Methodist 
church, and in his political faith he was a Republican. Their home 



1046 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

was noted for its generous hospitality, and they were widely and favor- 
ably known for their good deeds and many excellent traits of character. 

Robert T. Turner spent his early boyhood days in his parents' 
home and attended the public schools. When still but a lad he of- 
fered his services to the government in defense of the Union, and at 
the age of sixteen became a member of Company C, Fourth Virginia 
Cavalry, under command of Captain Robert C. Arbuckle. This was in 
1863. He went into camp at Webster, West Virginia, was afterward 
at Parkersburg, Virginia, and was first under fire at Salt Lick, West 
Virginia, taking part in an engagement with the troops under General 
Stonewall Jackson. He was also at Petersburg. He was honorably 
discharged, but re-enlisted as a veteran in Company F, Seventeenth 
Virginia Infantry. The regiment was engaged in scouting duty in 
West Virginia, and in fighting bushwhackers and small bodies of 
Confederate troops. He did gallant service, never faltering in the 
discharge of any duty that came to him in his military service, and well 
does he deserve mention among the honored veterans to whom the 
country owes a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid. 

When the war was over Mr. Turner engaged in the oil business 
in Virginia, and then entered the railroad service in the capacity of 
brakeman, and subsequently was promoted to conductor. He continued 
in the employ of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company as one of 
the most trusted representatives of its operative department for twenty- 
two years. He was always most careful and painstaking in his work, 
was obliging and courteous to the patrons of the road and while thus 
engaged he made many warm friends. On account of his health he at 
length resigned his position and came to his farm in Nebraska. He has 
a good modern house which was erected at a cost of a thousand dollars 
and is furnished with a regard to both taste and comfort. It stands 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1047 

upon a natural building site in the midst of a grove of trees. Mr. 
Turner also built a barn with a rock basement at a cost of six hundred 
dollars, and has added many other modern improvements indicating 
him to be a progressive agriculturist. 

In 1868, at Webster. West Virginia, Mr. Turner was married 
to Miss Zeda Pierce, who was reared in that state. Her parents 
were Adam and Mary Pierce, of the Old Dominion. Mr. and Mrs. 
Turner now have two children in their home, Dessie and Gertie, the lat- 
ter a niece of Mrs. Turner. 

Mr. Turner cast his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln 
while serving as a soldier of the Civil war, and has since been un- 
faltering in his loyalty to the Republican party. He belongs to the 
Masonic fraternity and exemplifies in his life its helpful, brotherly spirit. 



THOMAS C. MARSHALL. 

Thomas C. Marshall, who has been numbered among the prominent 
lawyers of Hebron, Nebraska, for the past fifteen years, has had a 
career of unusual activity from an early age and has achieved through 
his earnest and steadfast efforts an honorable degree of success in his 
profession. He took up the study of law after earning his living for 
a number of years by other occupations, and has gained in experience 
and acquaintance with men and affairs which are essential qualifications 
in any profession. Since his admission to the bar he has advanced 
rapidly in the esteem of his associates and has gained a liberal patronage 
and served in several offices of trust, so that he ranks among the repre- 
sentative attorneys and citizens of Thayer county. 

Mr. Marshall was born at Richland, Wisconsin, November 14, 



1048 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

1862, of an old and respected family having its original seat in Vir- 
ginia, and connected by blood relationship with the family of Chief 
Justice Marshall. His grandfather, Moses Marshall, was a soldier 
of the war of 18 12, and served throughout the campaigns of General 
Jackson. Joseph H. Marshal], the father of Thomas C. Marshall, was 
born in Ohio, whither the family had removed from Virginia, and he 
died at Ruskin, Nuckolls county, Xebraska. in 1893. His wife was 
Mary J. Darst, a native of Ohio and of German extraction. They had 
nine children, of whom Thomas was the seventh in order of birth. 
The family removed from Wisconsin to Des Moines, Iowa, where they 
resided for seven years, and thence came to Nebraska, where Joseph 
H. Marshall took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres near 
Alexandria. 

After completing his schooling, Mr. Marshall became chainman 
with a surveying party, and was engaged in the construction of the 
Chicago, Burlington and Ouincy lines through Colorado. He next 
went to Chicago and learned telegraphy and shorthand, and was an 
operator on the board of trade. From there he went to Janesville, 
Wisconsin, where he completed a commercial course and began the 
study of law. He was admitted to the bar, and in 1887 located at Bel- 
videre, Nebraska, where he formed a partnership under the name of 
McKee and Marshall and engaged in practice for two years. He 
then took up his permanent location in Hebron, where he has conducted 
a successful practice to the present time. In 1903 he formed a part- 
nership, known as Marshall and Birkin. Mr. Marshall was elected 
county attorney and served for two years, giving a most efficient and 
satisfactory administration. He is a stanch Democrat and allied with 
the progressive element of the party. 

Mr. Marshall was married at Trenton, Missouri, April 10, 1887, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1049 

to Miss Louisa S. Martin, a daughter of Thomas Martin, who settled 
in Missouri in 1845. Mr. and Mrs. Marshall have one child, Zona B. 
Mr. Marshall is a high degree Mason, affiliating with the blue lodge, 
chapter and commandery at Hebron, and with the Mystic Shrine at 
Lincoln, and also with the Eastern Star; he belongs to the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, the Modern Woodmen of America, the 
Sons and Daughters of Protection, the Court of Honor, and was one 
of the organizers of the Imperial Sheiks of Damascus. 



REUBEN J. TOWNE. 

Reuben J. Towne, ex-sheriff of Thayer county, and at present one 
of its well known and successful farmers and stock-raisers, residing 
northwest of Hebron, has, during over a quarter of a century's identi- 
fication with the county and its institutions, become one of the most 
popular and substantial citizens. He is especially prominent because 
of his efficient record as sheriff for two terms, and he became noted 
as a man who never gave up the chase for a criminal, no matter how 
far and into what dangers it might lead him. He was thus one of the 
best conservators of the peace in the history of the county. There 
is no record that he ever failed to land his criminal, once he started 
in pursuit. On one occasion he trailed a criminal through Georgia, 
Florida and a number of other southern states, and finally, at the end 
of thirteen months' dogged and persevering chase, overhauled him and 
arrested him in Texas. Whether in the discharge of official duties, 
in the conduct of his private business enterprises, or in his home and in 
social intercourse with friends, Mr. Towne has proved himself a man 
of abili 1 '/ and worth and upright character. 



io5o SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Mr. Towne was born in Ogle county, Illinois, December 2, 1859, 
aii'i is a descendant of ancestors who made their arrival on American 
soil in the early year of 1640. His parents were William A. and Dor- 
othy (Blair) Towne, both natives of New York state. His father was 
a carpenter by trade, although the greater part of his life was passed 
in farming. He moved west to Nebraska in 1876, locating near Heb- 
ron, where he remained until his death, in 1885. His widow still sur- 
vives and resides at Belvidere. 

Reuben J. Towne was the second in order of birth of the nine 
children of his parents. He was reared to farm life, and has given 
his best efforts and years to the successful prosecution of the great in- 
dustry of tilling the soil and raising stock. He now has his home on 
a half section of land seven miles northwest of Hebron, where he makes 
a specialty of breeding blooded saddle horses, mules, Durham cattle and 
the noted O. I, C. strain of hogs. 

Mr. Towne was married at Belvidere, Nebraska, July 2, 1883, to 
Miss Bertha D. Cornell, a native of Kansas and a daughter of Henry 
W. Cornell, who was a Kansas early settler of 1869. Mr. and Mrs. 
Towne have four children: Harry L.. Chester L., William B. and Ber- 
nice. In politics he is allied with the progressive wing of the Demo- 
cratic party, and on its ticket was elected to the office of sheriff for two 
terms. He affiliates with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and 
the Modern Woodmen of America at Carleton. 



JOHN H. LYNCH. 

John H. Lynch, who has held the position of cashier in the First 
National Bank of Hebron since 1884, when he first took up his perma- 
nent residence in this city, is one of the most enterprising and well 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1051 

posted financial men in this part of the state. He has devoted his en- 
tire career from boyhood to the theoretical and practical side of banking, 
and he is an expert in its details as well as in the general scope of 
money operations. He is esteemed not only for his competent and ef- 
ficient work in this capacity, but also for the part he has taken in other 
business affairs of Hebron and in its general progress and upbuilding. 
The bank with which he is connected is one of the soundest and most 
influential institutions in southeastern Nebraska, and its directors and 
officers are men in whom the public have the utmost confidence and who 
are most pleasant and genial men to deal with. The officers of the 
First National are A. G. Collins, president, W. B. Liggit, vice presi- 
dent, Mr. Lynch, cashier, and the directors are A. G. Collins, W. B. 
Liggit, W. H. Wilson, I. J. Holcomb and J. J. Maloney. 

Mr. Lynch was born in Pennsylvania, December 11, 1856, and 
was the only child of Daniel and Mary E. (Hemler) Lynch, both 
natives of the same state and the former of Irish lineage. At an early 
age John H. Lynch entered, in a clerical position, a banking house at 
Hanover, Pennsylvania, where he remained six years and became thor- 
oughly versed in all the departments of the business. For two years 
he was in Montana, where he was half owner of a stage line running 
out of Helena, and in 1884 he permanently located in Hebron and ac- 
cepted the position which he has even since filled with so much credit 
to himself and general satisfaction to the directors and public. He 
has also held other positions of trust and responsibility, among them 
being that of city treasurer and secretary of the building and loan asso- 
ciation which was organized and transacted business in this city for 
some years. 

Mr. Lynch was married in Hebron, June 14, 1888, to Miss Estella 
S. Furguson, who was born in Iowa and was a daughter of Reid I. 



1052 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Furguson, a pioneer of that state. She traces her ancestry back to the 
well known New England Furgusons, who resided there -during the 
colonial period of this country's history. 



MORTON O. CROOP. 

Morton O. Croop, one of the progressive and prosperous farmers 
of Thayer county, has resided in this county for over a quarter of a 
century, and is thus entitled to the name of an old settler. He has 
from the first taken a prominent part in the development of the agri- 
cultural interests of the southeastern part of the state, and has been 
allied with that element of farmers who make for the material, moral 
and intellectual betterment of their communities, and thus form the sub- 
stantial and fine-grained class of citizens in which this country takes 
the most pride. He was a young man, almost at the outset of his career, 
when he took up his residence in this county, and it can be said to his 
credit that he has abundantly improved his opportunities and gained 
a prosperity which is one of the deserved rewards of a life of intelli- 
gent effort. 

Mr. Croop was born at Lancaster, Erie county, New York, Janu- 
ary 14, 1853, a son of Peter and Lydia (Cunningham) Croop, both 
natives of New York state and descendants of old and respected fami- 
lies of the Empire commonwealth. His parents removed from New 
York to Michigan in i860, and five years later took up their residence 
at Floyd, Iowa. Thev now live in Omaha. Nebraska. 

Morton O. Croop was the second of their six children, and was 
reared to farming pursuits, which he has ever since followed. He 
came to Thayer county shortly after his marriage, and his present 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1053 

place is located about two miles east of Chester. He owns one hundred 
and sixty acres of first-class farming- land, all under cultivation and 
devoted to the raising- of the crops for which this part of the state is 
noted. Mr. Croop is active in the affairs of the Democratic party in 
his locality, and takes a public-spirited interest in all matters affecting 
the general weal. 

While a resident of Floyd, Iowa, September 21, 1875, Mr. Croop 
married Miss Cora Thompson, one of the refined and cultured ladies 
of that locality, and she has proved a most capable wife and helpmate 
in the years that have thus passed. She was born in Illinois, a daughter 
of William and Mary (Cleveland) Thompson, who were natives of 
New York state and moved to Illinois in the early year of 1838. Mr. 
William Thompson was of Scotch-Irish lineage, and his ancestors came 
to America in the early part of the seventeenth century. In early 
manhood he went to St. Charles, Missouri, and for a number of years 
was engaged in rafting on the Ohio river. Mrs. Croop's mother was a 
relative and of the same branch of the family as former President 
Cleveland. William Thompson died in 1903, and his wife had passed 
away in 1890. Mrs. Croop was the second in order of birth of their 
seven children. Mr. and Mrs. Croop have three children, Mariam E., 
David E. and Albert B. 



HIRAM P. HELVEY. 

Hiram P. Helvey, who is one of the progressive and public-spirited 
citizens of Fairbury and is connected with the real estate and loan bus- 
iness of that city, has the distinction, which few men of middle age 
can claim, of being a native son of Nebraska. He began life in this 



io54 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

state only a year after the territory had been organized under the famous 
"squatter sovereignty" act of Douglas, so that he has been contempo- 
raneous with almost every act bearing upon the progress and develop- 
ment of the country into one of the greatest commonwealths of the 
Union. And while his birth state has thus advanced, he has also been 
growing to fullness of powers, and has taken his place with the solid 
and substantial citizens, alert and enterprising in business and dis- 
charging promptly and efficiently the duties of citizenship. 

Mr. Helvey was born in Otoe county, Nebraska, February 26, 
1855, a son of Joseph and Mary Helvey. His father was one of the 
state's earliest pioneers. He and his wife were natives of the state of 
Indiana, and in 1854 came west and located in Nebraska territory. 
They made their home on Sandy river, and established a cattle ranch 
which in a few years became known to all western travelers as the 
Helvey Ranch or Station. It was located on the main emigrant trail 
to the west, and did not lose its importance until the advent of the 
iron horse displaced the prairie schooner. Joseph Helvev was a noted 
stock dealer in this section, and was also a freighter across the plains. 
He died in August, 1864, and his wife survived until 1882. She left 
a family of nine children, five of whom are still living: Thomas, Hiram 
AY., Benjamin F., Jasper, Albert, George \Y., Johanna, Sarah (the wife 
of John Grissom. a prominent farmer of Jefferson county), and Hi* 
ram P. 

Mr. Helvey lias always voted the Republican ticket and takes an 
active interest in political affairs. June 8, 1874, he was married at Fair- 
bury, Nebraska, to Miss Alice Kelley, a native of Illinois and a daughter 
of Samuel P. Kelley, a prominent pioneer of the state. They have three 
children : Samuel R. ; Ira L. ; and Maud, the wife of A. Chamberlain, 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 



of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Mr. Helvey has never become connected with 
fraternal orders, but is popular in all social circles. 



JULIUS TRAMBLIE. 

Julius Tramblie. who is owner of a fine farm about two miles 
from Cortland, in Gage county, has resided here since 1879, and is 
well known and esteemed for his excellent qualities of citizenship and 
manhood and his enterprise and ability as an agriculturist. He is an 
old soldier of the Civil war, where he gave loyal service and made a good 
record, and as a business man and farmer since the war he has taken 
rank with the best in his community. He is sincere, frank and popular, 
and his industry and good management have not failed to gain a fair 
share of worldly prosperity. 

Mr. Tramblie was born in Canada, August 15, 1843. His grand- 
father was a general in the French army under Napoleon in the battle 
of Waterloo. Jonas Tramblie, the father of Mr. Tramblie, was also 
French born, and came to Canada after arriving at manhood. He mar- 
ried Sophia Janey, who was born in France of an old family of that 
country. When Julius was three years old the family moved to Janes- 
ville, Wisconsin, and Tonas Tramblie, who was familiar with the shoe 
business, continued that occupation in that city. He afterward moved 
to Wichita, Kansas, where he died at the age of seventy-four years. 
He was a Republican in politics. His wife died in young womanhood, 
after becoming the mother of seven children, of whom six sons were 
soldiers in the Union army, namely : David, in the Second Wisconsin 
Infantry; Joseph, in Company D, of the same regiment, and he was 
killed on the battlefield of Antietam ; Lewis, of the Forty-ninth Wis- 



1056 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

consin ; Philip, of the Eighth Wisconsin ; Julius, of the Eighth Wis- 
consin ; and Jonas, Jr., of the Eighth Wisconsin. This is one of the 
unique family war records of the country, and should be a matter of 
pride to all future generations of these patriots. 

Mr. Tramblie was reared and educated in Janesville, Wisconsin, 
and on August 15, 1861, enlisted in Company G, Eighth Wisconsin 
Infantry, under Captain Charles Brither and Colonel Murphy, the latter 
afterward succeeded by Colonel Robins. This was one of the crack 
regiments of the Union army, and it had a national reputation because 
of the old eagle "Abe" which perched on its banners and went screaming 
in triumph and belligerent fervor through every battle and after the 
war was retired as an honored guest of the government at Wash- 
ington, where it spent its last days. After the regiment was equipped at 
Madison, it was sent to St. Louis, and thence to southern Missouri, 
where it took part in some battles and skirmishes. It then took part 
in the operations about Grand Gulf in Louisiana and the siege of 
Jackson, and after the fall of Vicksburg was sent into Tennessee. In 
the operations back and forth until the west was completed}' subdued, 
in the Red River expedition, and from then on till the end it was 
employed in the campaigns in Louisiana and the Gulf states. Mr. 
Tramblie received his honorable discharge jn September, 1864, with an 
honorable record in all departments of his service. He returned home 
to learn the carpenter's trade and the shoe business. He afterwards 
went to Sandwich, Dekalb county, Illinois, and remained there until 
1879, when he came to Gage county, and took up a homestead of one 
hundred and sixty acres, and this land is now worth fifty dollars an 
acre, and has good improvements, a nice home, and is an ideal country 
place. He engages in farming and stock-raising and has done well in 
his ventures. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1057 

Mr. Tramblie was married in Sandwich, Illinois, in 1874, to Miss 
Nettie Blagg, who was born in the south but was reared and educated 
in Illinois. Her father, Henry Blagg, was a native of Vermont and 
died before the war, having followed the occupations of teaching and 
farming; he was a Republican in politics, and he and his wife were 
members of the Methodist church. Her mother, Mary (Nix) Blagg, 
died in 1900 at the age of seventy-two, having been the mother of eight 
children, of whom two sons and four daughters grew up, and one of 
the sons was a soldier. Mr. and Mrs. Tramblie have a most delightful 
and hospitable home, and have hosts of friends throughout the com- 
munity in which they have lived for twenty-five years. He is a prom- 
inent Grand Army man, and has always voted the Republican ticket. 



STEPHEN F. HOLBROOK. 

Stephen F. Holbrook, one of the successful business men and a vet- 
eran of Filley, Gage county, Nebraska, has resided in this state for thirty- 
three years, and materially assisted in its development. He enlisted at 
Lamoille, Bureau county, Illinois, September 17, 1861, in Company B, 
Fifty-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Colonel John S Wilcox com- 
manding. The regiment participated in a number of battles including 
those of Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, and Corinth. He veteranized 
December 25, 1863, at Pulaski, Tennessee, and was honorably discharged 
from the service, at the end of the war, July 6, 1865. Mr. Holbrook 
entered the service as a private and left it as a sergeant, having been pro- 
moted for gallantry. 

Mr. Holbrook was born at Lamoille, Bureau county, Illinois, April 
14, 1838. He is a son of Enos Holbrook, one of the early settlers of the 



1058 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

county, who went there in 1833 from New Hampshire, where lie was 
born, a son of Enos, Sr., the latter of whom was also born in New- 
England, and the family traces back to the historic Mayflower like many 
other old families. The Holbrook family was founded by three brothers 
who came from England. Enos, Jr., married Jerusha Barrows. She 
came of Scotch ancestry. Enos, Jr., died at the age of seventy-eight 
years, having been a farmer by occupation, and a Whig and abolitionist 
in politics. The mother died in Vesta, Nebraska, at the age of seventy- 
seven years. The children born to these parents are as follows: Joseph 
D., deceased ; Hiram, deceased ; Eliza, deceased ; Henry, deceased ; George 
W. was a soldier under General Fremont and was killed in the battle of 
Springfield, Missouri; and Stephen F., our subject. 

The latter w-as reared in Illinois. He learned the trade of black- 
smith, which he followed for a number of years. Mr. Holbrook, in 
1870, removed to Gage county, Nebraska, from thence he went to 
Rockport, Atchison county, Missouri, where for twelve years he worked 
at his trade , and then returned to Nebraska, settling in Johnson county. 
His next place of residence was in Keyapaha county, and helped to or- 
ganize that county. He finally settled at Filley, Gage county, where 
he is now extensively engaged in the buying and selling of stock and has 
become very successful. 

He was first married in Bureau county, Illinois, to Malvina Per- 
kins, a daughter of Stephen Perkins. She bore him one child, Joseph 
L. Holbrook, of Lamoille, Illinois. Mrs. Holbrook died about eighteen 
years ago in Illinois. Our subject was married at Filley, Nebraska, 
in 1895, to Miss Jennie Smith, the daughter of William Smith, who 
served during the Civil war in the Thirty-third Missouri Volunteer In- 
fantry. Of this marriage one son has been born, Arthur D., a bright 
little fellow of six years. Our subject is a very active and intelligent 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1059 

Republican, and a member of the G. A. R. post. While living at La- 
moille, Illinois, he joined the post there, but after settling in Filley he 
transferred his membership to the local post. He is also a member 
of the Masonic fraternity, Temple Lodge No. 175, of Filley. 



GEORGE M. PLACE. 

George M. Place, of Pleasant precinct, Gage county, Nebraska, 
is one of the prominent old settlers of the state and a noted veteran 
of the Civil war. His career as a soldier started when as a boy of 
thirteen years he ran away from home and participated in the battle 
of Missionary Ridge, but he was returned to his home, and there 
remained until in February, 1864, when he enlisted in Company H, 
Fifteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and bore the name of "Kid" of the 
regiment, then under the command of Colonel Wallis, Captain Gibson 
having charge of the company. This regiment saw service in Texas, and 
did good service for the Union, serving until the close of the war and 
was retained until 1866. when it was disbanded, and our subject, one 
of the youngest soldiers, received his honorable discharge, returning 
home. 

The birth of Mr. Place occurred in Delaware county, Ohio, in 
1849, July 4 tn - This was the year of the great gold exodus to Cali- 
fornia. He is a son of Lewis Place, a soldier of the war of 1812, who 
came of Irish extraction. The mother bore the maiden name of Christine 
Foust, and she was born in Ohio, and she is a daughter of Jacob Foust, 
of German ancestry. The father died in Ohio at the age of fifty years. 

George M. Place was reared on the farm of his father and secured 
a somewhat limited education in the schools of his neighborhood, his 



1060 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

head being- filled with the stirring events of the times. In 1878 he 
moved to his present home where he owns and operates a fine farm of 
two hundred acres, on which he has built a comfortable house, barn and 
other buildings, and his property is valued at ten thousand dollars. 

Twenty years ago, he was married in Jefferson county, Nebraska, 
to Emma D. Mills, who was born in Kentucky and is a daughter of 
G. P. Mills, of Diller. Five children have blessed this union, namely: 
Perry L. ; Ira L. ; Riley R. ; Hazel M.; and Ethel. Mr. Place is a Re- 
publican, and has always taken an active interest in local affairs and 
lent his influence toward forwarding all improvements calculated to prove 
beneficial to the township and county. He is a member of Nickajack 
Post, G. A. R., of Diller, and is one of the leading men of his locality. 



DANIEL A. SHADE. 

Daniel A. Shade is one of the well known agriculturists, pioneer 
settlers and veterans of the Civil war, now living in Jefferson county, 
where he has made his home continuously since 1870. He is a native of 
Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred in Perry county, that state, on 
the 20th of February, 1844. He has an ancestry back of him noted for 
integrity, industry and upright purpose, and it is said that the word of any 
member of the Shade family was as good as a bond solemnized by sig- 
nature or seal. His father was George Shade, his grandfather, John 
Shade. The latter was a native of Hessen, Germany, and was a mem- 
ber of the Hessian army that was hired by the British government to 
come to America to aid in what was considered the rebellion of the 
colonists. He was, however, taken prisoner at the battle of Brandywine 
by the forces under General Washington, and later he joined the Amer- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1061 

ican troops and fought for the cause of liberty, becoming one of the 
patriots of the colonial army. George Shade was united in marriage to 
Miss Hannah Bauer, who was born in Pennsylvania and belonged to an 
old family of that state. In the year 1851 they removed from the 
east to Peoria county, Illinois, where the father followed carpentering 
and also engaged in farming. His political support was given to the 
Democracy, and both he and his wife were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and lived consistent Christian lives. He died at the 
age of seventy-eight years, while her death occurred when she was 
seventy-five years of age. The father was twice married, and by the 
first union had five children, all of whom are now deceased. By his 
second marriage to the mother of our subject he had sixteen children, 
five sons and eleven daughters, and with one exception all reached years 
of maturity. One son, William, is now living in Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Daniel A. Shade was reared in Peoria county, Illinois, and in early 
life learned the cooper's trade, which he followed for many years. He 
was twenty years of age when he became a Union soldier, enlisting in 
February, 1864, at Peoria for one year's service. He became a member 
of Company B, Seventh Illinois Mounted Infantry, under Captain Cos- 
grove, and as the regiment was already in the south he was sent to that 
section of the country to join this command. He took part in all the 
battles and skirmishes up to the time of the close of the war and was 
present at Raleigh when General Joe Johnston surrendered his army. 
He received an honorable discharge at Louisville, Kentucky, July 9, 1865, 
and then returned to his home. 

When twenty-three years of age Mr. Shade was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Sadie Lightbody, a representative of a good family, and to 
him she has been a devoted wife and helpmate. She was born at 
Plainfield in Coshocton county, Ohio, on the 30th of June, 1843, an <3 is 



1062 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

a daughter of Isaac Lightbody who was born in Ireland and was of 
Scotch-Irish ancestry. He was reared on the Emerald Isle, but resided 
for many years at Manchester, England. By trade he was a weaver, 
following that pursuit for a long period in order to provide for his family. 
He married Miss Ann Jane Jenkinson, who died in Ohio leaving a 
family of five children. His second wife was Elizabeth J. Watson, 
who was born in Ohio, while her father was a native of the highlands 
of Scotland. Mr. Lightbody, the father of Mrs. Shade, came to Jeffer- 
son county, Nebraska, where he died at the very advanced age of 
ninety-seven years. His wife passed away in Nebraska, when fifty-three 
years of age. By his second marriage there were four children : Mrs. 
Sadie Shade, Jane, Minerva, and Mollie. Mr. Lightbody was a Demo- 
crat in his political views and was of Protestant faith, holding mem- 
bership in the Methodist Episcopal church. 

In the year 1870 Mr. Shade and his wife came to Nebraska and 
established their home in Eureka township, Jefferson county. They lived 
in a dugout and sod house, twelve by twenty- four feet, until 1876, but 
as the years have advanced they have been able to add to their farm all 
the modern improvements, Mrs. Shade being an* able assistant to her 
husband in all of his work. The farm now comprises two hundred 
acres of valuable land a mile and a quarter from Daykin, and is supplied 
with all modern equipments. Mr. Shade gives his political support to 
the Republican party, and socially is connected with the Grand Army of 
the Republic. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in the work of which they take a very active part, and he is 
now serving as church steward. They are pleasant, genial people, having 
gained many warm friends in Nebraska during the years of their resi- 
dence here, and he is a man whose integrity is above question and whose 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1063 

upright, honorable life commends him to the confidence and good will 
of all. 



J. A. BEELER. 

J. A. Beeler, of Liberty township, Gage county, Nebraska, has been 
a resident of the state since 1870, and he is also one of the veterans of 
the Civil war. His enlistment took place at Mt. Vernon, Kentucky, in 
April, 1862, when he entered the Eighth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, 
Company C, and served two years and six months. In his first skirmish 
he was taken prisoner and confined at New Prospect, Tennessee, but 
later was transferred to Richmond, whence he made his escape. Owing 
to his terrible hardships, he was very ill after he managed to escape, 
but as soon as able he rejoined his regiment, which was then stationed at 
Fort Fisher, North Carolina. Later he was at Raleigh, that state, and 
finally honorably discharged June 30, 1865. 

Mr. Beeler was born in Claiborne county, Tennessee, November 
28, 1844, and is a son of Daniel Beeler, of Tennessee, who was a son 
of Peter Beeler. Daniel married Rachel Rogers, and she was a daughter 
of David Rogers. One of her brothers was one of the early settlers of 
Pawnee county, Nebraska. The parents of our subject died in Union 
county, Tennessee, the father at the age of fifty and the mother at 
seventy-three years of age. Two sons were soldiers : Daniel, of the 
Eighth Tennessee Regiment: and J. A. 

While residing in Tennessee, J. A. Beeler married Elizabeth Honey- 
cut, of the same state, who died in Gage county, leaving four children, 
namely: Sally, Matilda, Rebecca and Daniel. The second wife of Mr. 



1064 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

Beeler was Esther Lynch, also born in Tennessee, and she is a daughter 
of J. B. and Anna Lynch. By his second marriage our subject has these 
children, namely : John, Eli, Bertha, Anna, Archie, Frank, and one child 
deceased. Mr. Beeler is a prominent member of the G. A. R., W. F. 
Barry Post. 

The farm of Mr. Beeler consists of forty acres of good land which 
he devotes to general farming, he making a specialty of raising good 
horses. Both he and his estimable wife are very hospitable and they are 
very highly spoken of by their neighbors and friends. The services 
rendered by Mr. Beeler to the country are such as should never be 
forgotten, and those who know and appreciate him, admire his many 
excellent traits of character, and kindly, genial manner. 



PRESTON W. CARR. 

Preston W. Carr, principal of the Shubert public schools, is a young 
and rapidly rising educator of Richardson county and southeastern Ne- 
braska, with talent and fitness for the work, and has obtained excellent 
results in both places where his profession has called him. 

Mr. Carr was born in Otoe county, Nebraska, near Julian, on 
February 12, 1876, a son of John and Millie (Windyard) Carr. His 
father was a native of Illinois, and died in Richardson county in 1878, 
at the age of twenty-six, leaving his widow and two small children with 
little meaii.j. Mrs. Millie Carr was born in Otoe county in 1856, a 
daughter of John and Ann (Michel) Windyard, both of whom were 
of Broome county, New York, whence they came to Illinois and then 
to Otoe countv, Nebraska, where their four daughters were born. They 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1065 

were farmers. Mr. Windyard died in the prime of life, and his widow 
had one daughter by a second marriage. Mrs. Millie Carr is now the 
wife of John Meek, a fruit farmer near Unadilla, Nebraska. Mr. P. W. 
Carr's brother, O. F. Carr, is a student in Kansas City. 

Preston W. Carr was educated in the State Normal at Peru, and 
taught his first school in Nemaha county. He has just finished his 
third year in Shubert, and this is his second school. The school has 
nine grades, and he has two lady assistants. 

He was married, July 16, 1902, to Miss Donna King, who was 
educated in Lincoln, where her parents lived for the purpose of edu- 
cating their children. Her father is John P. King, the well known 
citizen of Shubert whose life history is given on other pages of this work. 
Mrs. Carr is an accomplished pianist, and she and her husband have a 
delightful home. He is a Republican, and was reared in the Presbyterian 
faith. 



HENRY W. SHUBERT. 

Henry W. Shubert, farmer, horticulturist, large land owner and 
a leading citizen of Nemaha county, helped found the town that bears 
his name and at which his present beautiful homestead is located, and 
is one of the oldest settlers in this portion of southeastern Nebraska. 
He has lived a long and useful life of more than threescore and ten 
years, in the early part of which he became acquainted with both hard- 
ships and strenuous toil ; he has remained true to the best purposes and 
ideals of his young manhood, and for nearly forty years has remained 
an honored and esteemed resident of this part of Nebraska. 



1066 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

He was born in Bath county, Kentucky, June 2, 1834. His grand- 
father, Nicholas Shubert, was born in one of the eastern states in 1780, 
and came west to Kentucky during the early history of that state. He 
was a charcoal burner, in humble circumstances, but mained the re- 
spect of his fellow men throughout his long life. His death occurred 
in Illinois when he was ninety years of age. He was married in Ken- 
tucky to Elizabeth Meyers, who was born in that state in 1785 and who 
died in Mason county, Illinois, in i860. They reared a large family of 
children. 

Mr. Shubert's father was John Shubert, who was born in Kentucky 
in 1806, and he also attained a good old age, passing away in Nebras- 
ka, in 1879. His early occupation was that of iron molder in the 
Licking furnaces; but in 1835 he built a flatboat at the headwaters of 
the Licking river and with his family floated down into the Ohio, and, 
landing at Madison, Indiana, advanced eighteen miles into the wilder- 
ness and hewed out a home and farm in the forest, and he also kept a 
country store at that place. In 1843 the family moved to Mason county, 
Illinois, making the journey in covered wagons, and on that occasion 
the son Henry W. went afoot and drove a bunch of cows to their future 
home. John Shubert moved from Illinois to Nebraska in 1873, and 
spent the few remaining years of his life in this state. His wife was Re- 
becca Shrout, who was born in Kentucky in 1810 and died in Nebraska 
in 1883. They were married in 1828, and eleven children were born 
to their union : Rachel, the widow of T. Harmon is a resident of Rich- 
ardson county; Elizabeth is the wife of George Vanlansingham, of 
Nemaha county; Henry YV '. is the third in order of age; Mary A. 
married O. Vanlansingham and died in Johnson county, Nebraska, 
leaving a large family of children ; Eliza Jane died at the age of eigh- 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1067 

teen; one died in infancy; J. M. met death by accident in Nemaha 
county in 1880, being thrown from a wagon by a runaway team; John 
W. is a resident of Spokane, Washington; the next child also died in 
infancy; William M. is a retired farmer of Shubert; and Rebecca is 
the wife of Charles Pond, an ex-soldier of the Civil war and now a 
farmer near Shubert. Two of these children were born in Kentucky, 
four in Indiana and the rest in Illinois. John W., the first of those born 
in Illinois, was born in 1844, for twenty-five years was employed as a 
school teacher in Illinois, Missouri, Nebraska and California, and after 
his marriage located on a farm near Stella, this state, and subsequently 
moved to Lincoln to educate his children, being now a resident of 
Spokane, Washington. 

Henry W. Shubert was one year old when the flatboat voyage to 
Indiana was undertaken, and up to the age of nine he lived at the 
Indiana home. When eight years old he was privileged to attend for 
a few weeks a log schoolhouse, and then in Illinois he enjoyed some 
attendance during the winters at a subscription school. When he was 
sixteen years old he wielded the axe in preparing the timbers for the 
first log schoolhouse in Mason county, Illinois. A desire for knowl- 
edge was one of the actuating principles of his life, and, like some 
other successful men who have passed their youths in primitive sur- 
roundings, he employed every spare moment in reading and studying. 
He even went to the extent of carrying for years a pocket dictionary, 
and whenever a moment of leisure chanced, out would come the book, 
from which custom came his title of "walking dictionary"; and which 
and like efforts made him a well informed man, able to appreciate 
the beauties of literature and to use effectively the language of his 
countrymen. From early youth he had a special liking for the forests, 



1068 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

became skilled in hunting and all manner of woodcraft, was a splendid 
shot with the rifle, and his love for nature has remained a source of joy 
and solace throughout life. 

In his occupation and pursuits Mr. Shubert has remained close 
to mother earth, and has made his success by farming and fruit-grow- 
ing, principally. From 1856 to i860 he operated a grain separator and 
corn-sheller in Illinois, and at the same time carried on farming. In 
1865 left his interests in Illinois and set out for Nebraska, which was 
then a territory. He located in the extreme southeastern corner of the 
commonwealth, on what was known as the Half-breed reservation, in 
Richardson county. The countrv was just being developed then, and 
he paid less than five dollars an acre for his first lot of land, although 
it would now sell fur at least ten times that price. After he had made his 
decision as to a permanent location he returned to Illinois, and the family 
made the entire journey by wagon to their Nebraska home. For 
twenty-five years Mr. Shubert was engaged in farming and the raising 
and feeding of cattle, hogs and sheep, carrying on the business on a 
large scale and also very successfully. 

In 1884 he became associated with the Lincoln Land Company 
and the B. & M. R. railroad in establishing the town which now bears 
the name of Shubert, which was located on his land and is now a pros- 
perous village of four hundred inhabitants. Mr. Shubert has at various 
times owned large tracts of land in southeastern Nebraska, and much of 
it still remains in the hands of himself or his children. From farming 
and stock-raising he turned his attention, in his latter years, to horti- 
culture, which he has made an enterprise of considerable magnitude and 
a source of profit. This part of the state has been proved, through 
the efforts of such men as Mr. Shubert, to be a fruit-growing belt par 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1069 

excellence. He set out some large apple orchards on his farms, and en- 
couraged his sons to do likewise, with the result that this has since 
become their leading line of business. At the present date the residence 
of Mr. Shubert is perfectly embowered on three sides with fruit trees, 
there being a hundred acres of apple orchard besides cherry, peach and 
other varieties, and there are several acres of fine walnut groves sodded 
with a smooth velvet of bluegrass. There is no prettier landscape pic- 
ture in the county than is to be seen in the homestead of Mr. Shubert, 
and from early spring to late autumn it is a scene of varying and in- 
teresting beaut)-. The spacious grounds in front of the residence afford 
the most pleasing variation of arboreal charm, for there one may delight 
in the cool shade and fresh beauty of trees of almost every description 
natural to the country. 

Mr. Shubert cast his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln, 
and has been a Republican and a stanch supporter of those principles 
to the present date. He has been a member of the Masonic order since 
1866, and in attending his first lodge he had to drive some sixteen miles 
at every meeting. He later became one of the charter members and took 
an active part in forming a lodge at Hillsdale, Nebraska, acting as sec- 
retary of that lodge a number of years. In religion he holds member- 
ship in the Christian church. Mr. Shubert is a man of much force and 
energy of character, as will appear from his successful conduct of affairs 
and his substantial place among his fellow citizens. Such men form the 
bulwark of any community against the restless and changing forces 
which are continually assaulting the social structure, and their con- 
servatism combined with constructive ability and moral uprightness 
insure the world for progress towards right ideals. From his busy 
application to practical affairs he has often found time to turn aside 



io70 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

and spend a winter, now in the south, now in the west, for the recrea- 
tion and benefit of himself and family, and not one of the younger ones 
enjoyed hunting and fishing and camping out in free nature more than 
he. Several winters were spent in southern California with his wife 
and two youngest sons. 

May 7, 1858, Mr. Shubert was married, in Illinois, to Miss Mary 
Griffin, who died suddenly, in Nebraska, in 1879. September 27, 1881, 
he married his present life companion, Miss Mary B. Skeen, a daugh- 
ter of A. D. Skeen, and her family history will be found under the 
caption of Thomas B. Skeen, elsewhere in this work. By the first mar- 
riage there were seven children, as follows : John D., born in Mason 
county, Illinois, February 29, i860, is now engaged in farming, fruit- 
growing and the ice business at Shubert. M. Fannie, born in Illinois 
in 1862, is the wife of E. F. Burson and the mother of four children, 
their home being near Shubert. M. Etta, born in Nebraska, in 1866, 
is the wife of J. L. Speece and the mother of three children, her hus- 
band being a farmer and fruit-grower near Shubert. Arthur M., born 
in Nebraska, in 1868, is a farmer and fruit-grower, and has two daugh- 
ters and two sons. J. Frank, born in Nebraska, in 1870, lives at home 
in Shubert, and is the father of one daughter. Henry Walter, born in 
Nebraska, in 1874, is a farmer near Shubert, and has a wife and two 
children. A. Grant, born in 1878, is on a farm near Shubert, and is 
married and has one daughter. By Mr. Shubert's second marriage 
there is one son, Leon Willard, Avho was born August 1, 1882, and is 
now studying law at Kansas City, Missouri. 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1071 

REV. DANIEL FORREST RODEBAUGH. 

Rev. Daniel Forrest Rodebaugh, after many years of devoted and 
useful ministerial labor with the Methodist Episcopal church, has re- 
tired from the active pursuit of the profession and has been a resident 
of Peru since 1899. He began his work in the Master's vineyard over 
forty-five years ago, most of which time has been spent in Nebraska, 
and that too during the period of development of this state's resources. 
The life of a minister in the most advanced communities and where all 
the comforts and conveniences and wealth of the twentieth century facil- 
itate the ministering of the gospel, is by no means a sinecure; but the 
ardent preacher of a generation ago, with his field in the new state of 
Nebraska, had to meet and overcome difficulties almost unknown now 
in any part of this country. The founding and building up of new 
church communities, the resuscitating of old ones, the increasing of 
the power of the spiritual leaven to comprehend all the souls within 
reach; traveling from place to place after the manner of the itinerant 
minister, visiting the sick, comforting with sympathy and advice or 
helping with more material aid, — all this and much more fell to the lot of 
the early ministers of the state of Nebraska, and in such work Rev. Rode- 
baugh took no small part during twenty years or more of active efforts 
in the cause of religion. 

Rev. Rodebaugh was born in Medina county, Ohio, thirty miles 
south of Cleveland, in 1836. His grandfather, Thomas Rodebaugh, a 
native of Pennsylvania, was the owner of a large farm, on which he 
employed many men. He reared a large family, among whom were 
the following: Thomas, who settled in Michigan; John, near Akron, 
Ohio; Peter, who was a sailor until middle life; Daniel; Samuel; Adam, 



1072 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

at Fort Wayne, Indiana. Some of these children followed the profes- 
sions of ministry and medicine. 

Joseph Rodebaugh, the father of Rev. Rodebaugh, was born in 
Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, in 1802, and died in Beaver City, Ne- 
braska, in 1888. He was a shoemaker by trade and also a shoe mer- 
chant. He was married twice, and his first wife was the mother of 
Rev. Rodebaugh. He was married in 1823 to Miss Mary Rhodes, who 
was born in Pennsylvania and died in 1847. They had ten children, 
but one son died in infancy and another at the age of two years; the 
others were as follows: Susan, the wife of Reuben Blank, died in Illi- 
nois when past middle life, leaving three children ; George is a business 
man and attorney at Toledo, Ohio ; Christopher died on the plains while 
en route to California in 1855, and now fills an unknown grave; Daniel 
F. is the next of the family ; Abram J. is a barber in northern Kansas 
and has a large family; Thomas was a minister of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church in Oregon, where he died leaving several sons and daugh- 
ters; Samuel H, in northern Kansas, has a wife and family; Mary 
M. Kelley lives in Indiana and has four children. Of the sons, George, 
Thomas, Abram and Samuel were soldiers in the Civil war, Abram be- 
ing a first lieutenant and George also an officer. 

Daniel F. Rodebaugh passed only the first nine years of his life 
under the parental roof, and was then bound out for six years to a 
farmer by the name of Bills in Boone county, Illinois, who at the end 
of his service gave him a yoke of steers. In 1854 he started from 
Belvidere, Illinois, in a company of thirty men and ten women, and was 
six months in crossing the plains. He took his steers with him, and for 
three years engaged in farming, milling and stock-raising in the Scott 
valley, California. He was fairly successful, and in the fall of 1857 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1073 

returned, by way of the isthmus, to Boone county, Illinois, and thence 
went to Bureau county, the same state. He spent two winters in 
Wheaton College, and was also a student in Adrian College, Michigan, 
one year, but failing health compelled him to leave. He was licensed 
to preach and joined the Rock River conference in Illinois, and his first 
ministerial efforts were in Bureau county, at Bureau Junction. Rev. 
Rodebaugh was a teamster in the construction of the first railroad west 
of Chicago, now the Galena division of the Northwestern road, and was 
also similarly employed on the Burlington road, having engaged in 
this work while preparing himself for his life labors. He spent four 
years in the Rock River conference, and was at Seneca, Kansas, from 
1869 to 1872, and since then has been in Nebraska. He was treasurer 
of the West Nebraska conference for ten years, and has been engaged 
in the revival work much of his life. He has unusual ability as a pulpit 
orator and exhorter, and his earnestness and conscientious zeal have 
resulted in the conversion and saving of many souls. He was presid- 
ing elder of the Beatrice district for one term, and this was the most 
arduous service that he rendered his church. He traveled seven thou- 
sand miles, preached seven times a week during the first year and five or 
six times during the remaining three years. He has gained the record 
of being a "little giant" in mind and body, and his career has been cred- 
itable to himself and of untold benefit to the church. 

June 8, i860. Rev. Rodebaugh was married in Bureau county, 
Illinois, to Miss Minnie E. Cowan, who was born in Princeton, Illinois, 
in 1841, a daughter of William and Emeline (Kirby) Cowan, farmers, 
and the former of New York and the latter of Kentucky. Emeline 
Kirby was the first or one of the first teachers in the schools of Chicago 
and the first in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Cowan had 



IO/4 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

a large family of children, and gave them good educations, four or five 
becoming teachers, and all making prosperous and worthy careers. 

Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Rodebaugh : Mary E. 
is the wife of A. L. Stonecypher, who has a job printing establishment 
in Omaha, but the family reside in Lincoln, and they have four children; 
William H. is foreman of a printing house in Omaha and has a wife 
and six children ; Nellie E. is a student in the normal school in Peru, 
and has especial talent in art and music : J. Forrest was in the class of 
1903 in the normal school and is a teacher. The children have all in- 
herited taste and talent for music and art, and the granddaughter, Helen 
Stonecypher, at the age of fifteen, showed her artistic tendency by 
taking an unbaked brick and with a case-knife modeling an Indian head 
which is natural and lifelike. The death of the mother of these chil- 
dren occurred October 14, 1900, and the bereaved family still feel the 
loss of one who was so close to them in their affections and so helpful 
and inspiring, a devoted wife and mother and a character of beauty and 
true usefulness. Her death resulted from paralysis, as she was on her 
way home from the West Nebraska conference, which she had at- 
tended with her husband. Since her death Rev. Rodebaugh has lived 
at home largely retired from active participation in ministerial work. 



HON. THOMAS E. HIBBERT. 

Hon. Thomas E. Hibbert, an ex-member of the state legislature 
of Nebraska, an old soldier of the Civil war, and a pioneer and popu- 
lar citizen of Gage county, Nebraska, took up his present homestead 
in Hooker township in 1869, so that the thirty-five years spent here 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1075 

entitle him to be classed as one of the old-timers. Besides being <i 
witness to the phenomenal development and progress which have taken 
place in Southeastern Nebraska, he has been an active participant in 
that work, and in his individual enterprises and his public career has 
proved himself a man of ability, worth and high character. 

Mr. Hibbert was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1846, of 
a family known for its honesty, industry and integrity. His father, 
Edward R. Hibbert, was born in England, and landed at Philadelphia 
when he was nine months old. He married Mary Graham, a native of 
Philadelphia and a member of a Scotch family whose early representa- 
tives had served under Cromwell. Both parents were Presbyterians 
in faith. They had four children, Thomas E.. Martha, James and 
Edward, the two latter dying in infancy, and Martha Smith is now a 
widow living in Philadelphia. 

Mr. Hibbert was reared and educated in Pennsylvania, and when 
a boy of fifteen, weighing but one hundred and five pounds, he enlisted 
from Wayne county, at Salem, in Company A, One Hundred and Thirty- 
seventh Pennsylvania Infantry, under Captain J. M. Buckingham and 
Colonel Bossert, in the Third Brigade, Second Division and Sixth Army 
Corps, or Hancock's brigade, Baldy Smith's division, and Franklin's 
corps. He was at the battles of Poolsville, Maryland, September 10, 
1862, South Mountain, September 14, 1862, Antietam, September 17, 
1862. The One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Regiment buried almost 
two thousand rebels on the Antietam battlefield. He was then trans- 
ferred to the Third Brigade (Paul's), First Division (Wadsworth's), 
First Corps (Reynolds'), and was at the battles of Fredericksburg, 
December 13, 1862, on Burnside's mud march, and at Chancellors- 
ville, April 28 to May 12, 1863. His was a nine months' regiment, 



1076 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

and he was mustered out of service on June 6, 1863, but at once re- 
enlisted, being assigned to Battery C, Second Pennsylvania Veteran 
Artillery. He served in the Twenty-second Army Corps in the defenses 
around Washington until May, 1864, and then went to the front and 
served in the Eighteenth Army Corps. He was in the Cold Harbor 
battles in June, 1864, and leaving that place on June 12, took a trans- 
port at White House Landing and sailed down the York river to 
Chesapeake bay, past Fortress Monroe, thence up the James river to 
City Point, Virginia, and on June 15 was in the movement to Peters- 
burg. His regiment made the first attack on that city, capturing the 
outside fortifications, and he participated in all the engagement of 
the Eighteenth Army Corps. At the organization of the Twenty-fourth 
Corps the Second Pennsylvania Artillery was part of the Third divi- 
sion of that corps until Lee's surrender, after which until the muster out 
it did provost guard duty, being finally relieved by the Twelfth 
United States Infantry. His services continued until February 
6, 1866, and despite his youth he carried the heavy musket of Ci.il 
war days and performed the same service in camp and field as 
was expected of his comrades. He was reported killed at Chapin's 
Farm, but wrote to his father that he was alive and well. In fact, he 
was neither dead nor sleeping, but was reported among the dead be- 
cause a shell from a gunboat exploded so close to him that he was 
knocked senseless for a few minutes. He was offered a commission 
in a colored regiment. He was color guard, and on the return of the 
regiment he carried the state flag home, and on July 4, 1866, in 
person handed the flag to Governor A. G. Curtin, the famous war 
governor of Pennsylvania. This stand of colors went out in 1861 and 
came back in 1866, and during that long period rebel hands never 



SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 1077 

touched them. In the general orders he was mentioned for making 
the three best shots at a target with a 24-pound howitzer, while serv- 
ing on the defenses at Washington, he being the gunner and having 
sighted the piece. When the rebels made an attack on Redoubt Car- 
penter below Dutch Gap, Virginia, on January 25, 1865, his services 
were loaned to a battery of the Thirteenth New York Artillery, and 
he was complimented for the assistance rendered by his howitzer in 
repulsing the enemy. 

After his discharge from the service, with such a creditable record, 
Mr. Hibbert lived in his native state for three years. In 1869 he came 
to Gage county, Nebraska, and took up one hundred and sixty acres 
of land, which his subsequent diligence and good management have de- 
veloped into one of the finest farms in the county. He has a grove 
and orchard of seven acres, a good house and all improvements neces- 
sary to a model farm. 

Mr. Hibbert was married in Gage county, March 19, 1874, to Miss 
Nannie E. Fuller, who has been the companion and sharer of his joys 
and sorrows for thirty years. She was born in Indiana, February 23, 
1856, and came to Nebraska on July 4, 1864. In the autumn of the 
same year she and her parents and brothers and sisters and the few 
neighbors in the vicinity were obliged to flee for their lives to escape 
the dreaded Indians, but the alarm subsided in a few days and they 
all returned to their homes. She was reared and received her educa- 
tion in Gage county, and she has lived almost all her life upon the 
same section where her father's homestead was and where she now 
resides with her husband and family. Her father, John Fuller, a 
descendant of the John Fuller who came over in the Mayflower, was 
one of the Nebraska early settlers of 1864, and died here in 1869. He 



1 078 SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA. 

was a native of Massachusetts, and his wife, Nancy Whiteman, was 
born in Ohio, being of Pennsylvania Dutch descent, and one of their 
sons, George Fuller, was a soldier in the Seventy-third Indiana In- 
fantry. Mr. and Mrs. Hibbert have had the following children: Mary 
Pearl, born April 11, 1875; Anna Josephine, born December 15, 1876, 
Charley Edward, born July 21, 1878; Guy, born October 11, 1881 ; Ila 
Emma, born March 25, 1884; Roscoe Conklin, born September 18, 
1885; Thomas Edwin, born March 28, 1887; Benjamin Harrison, born 
May 9, 1889; Martha Carrie, born June 24, 1892; James Graham, born 
March 21, 1894; George Dewey Oscar, born May 26, 1897. Anna 
Josephine, died April 6, 1877; Charley Edward died January 30, 1880; 
Mary Pearl, died February 17, 1880. 

Mr. Hibbert is one of the most active Republicans in Gage county, 
has been identified with that party all his life, and has strong convictions 
of the right and wrong in politics and statecraft. He has been dele- 
gate to many state, judicial and county conventions, was elected to the 
office of constable four times, assessor five times, justice of the peace 
two times, and is now serving his fourteenth year as school director. 
He served in the state legislature during the twenty-sixth and the 
twenty-seventh sessions. He is on the visiting and examining board 
of the State Soldiers' Home, and was supervisor of the census for 1900 
for the fourth congressional district ; was assistant superintendent of 
the Nebraska exhibit at the Pan-American exposition at Buffalo, and 
has held various other places of trust and responsibility. He stands 
high in G. A. R. circles; is a past post commander; was delegate to the 
national encampment at Philadelphia, and was adjutant of Sergeant 
Cox Post No. 100, department of Nebraska, on the department com- 
mander's staff at Cleveland, Ohio, and was on the staff of Commander- 
in-chief Thomas Seward at San Francisco. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



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