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Full text of "A biographical history of central Kansas.."

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REY^J05_Q5 ,J 3 1 833 1 095 1 59 ^ 978 1 

OENEALOGY c6LLt.-C i iOM B5 2 c 

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1222721 



A BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY " 



CENTRAL KANSAS 



ILLUSTRATED 



Embellished with Portraits of Many Well-Known People of this Section of the 

Great West, who have keen or are Prominent in its 

History and Development. 



VOL. I. 



NEW YORK AND CHICAGO: 

THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 



1222721 



PRKFACK. 




' ^{f,f\fi1^^f^ UT of the depths of his mature wisdom Carlyle wrote. 
"History is the essence of innumerable biographies." 
Believing this to be the fact, there is no necessity of 
advancing any further reason for the compilation of 
such a work as this, if reliable history is to be the 
^^"^^^^^l^l^t^ ultimate object. 

The section of Kansas embraced by this volume has sustained within its 
confines men who have been prominent in the history of the State, and even 
.the nation, for a century. The annals teem with the records of strong 
and noble manhood, and, as Sumner has said, "the true grandeur of nations 
is in those qualities which constitute the greatness of the individual." 
The final causes which shape the fortunes of individuals and the destinies 
of States are often the same. They are usually remote and obscure, 
and their influence scarcely perceived until manifestly declared by results. 
That nation is the greatest which produces the greatest and most manly 
men and faithful women; and the intrinsic safety of a community depends 
not so much upon methods as upon that normal development from 
the deep resources of which proceeds all that is precious and permanent 
in life. But such a result may not consciously be contemplated by the 
actors in the great social drama. Pursuing each his personal good by 
exalted means, they work out as a logical result. 

The elements of success in life consist in both innate capacity and determi- 
nation to excel. Where either is wanting, failure is almost certain in the out- 
come. The study of a successful life, therefore, serves both as a source of 
information and as a stimulus and encouragement to those who have the 
capacity. As an important lesson in this connection we may appropriately 
quote Longfellow, who said: "We judge ourselves by what we feel capa- 
ble of doing, while we judge others by what they have already done." A 
faithful personal history is an illustration of the truth of this observation. 



PREFACE. 

In this biographical history the editorial staff, as well as the publishers, 
have fully realized the magnitude of the task. In the collection of the ma- 
terial there has been a constant aim to discriminate carefully in regard to the 
selection of subjects. Those who have been prominent factors in the public, 
social and industrial development of the counties have been given due recog- 
nition as far as it has been possible to secure the requisite data. Names 
worthy of perpetuation here, it is true, have in several instances been omit- 
ted, either on account of the apathy of those concerned or the inability of 
the compilers to secure the information necessary for a symmetrical sketch; 
but even more pains have been taken to secure accuracy than were promised 
in the prospectus. Works of this nature, therefore, are more reliable and 
complete than are the "standard" histories of a country. 

THE PUBLISHERS. 



INDKX. 



Abbott, Handsel A., 163 
Ahlberg. G. F., 677 
Ainswiorth. Avery R., 626 
Ainsworth, Jesse, 486 
Albrigbt, M. J.. 378 
Allen, Albert S., 598 
Allison, Burton, 300 
Allison, M. E., 298 
American Steam Laundry, 104 
Anderson, Joel M., 334 
Anderson, Thomas J., 624 
Andrews, Henry G., 142 
Andrews, James A., 560 
Appel, George A., 371 
Appel, William E., 371 
Astle, William, 222 
Avery, George, 474 
Axtell, J. T., 669 

Bain, Millard F., 543 
Bainum, Levi H., 606 
Bainum, William G., 660 
Bainum, William M., 657 
Baker, Ira, 381 
Baker, James F., 715 
Baker, James R., 561 
Baker, James W., 746 
Baker, Lew, 117 
Baker, Willis N., 20 
Banfield, Albert, 736 
Bardwell, John W., 93 
Barkhurst, William, 457 
Bates, Frank A., 517 
Baxter, Jackson B., 505 
Bay, C. M., 288 
Beaman, Alonzo, 693 
Bean, Nathan A. C, 529 
Bean, Robert R., 685 
Beers, Isaac, 1.38 
Bellew, Noah. 269 
Benedict, William H. S., 256 
Bennett, William R.. 192 
Bettenbrook, Frederick, 3.^8 
Birney, David, 325 
Bishop, G. A., 473 
Blackball, John, 515 
Blakely, Henry H., 400 
Blodgett, William C, 689 
Bobb, Aaron, 216 
Bolinger, Jacob, 756 
Boroughs. Bartley C, 391 
Boy, Charles F., 631 



Boyce, David, 477 
Branch, Andrew C., 535 
Branch, Phineas C, 276 
Brinckerhoff, Jermain W., 398 
Bromley. John H., 204 
Brown, G. W., 615 
Brown, Jesse, 45 
Brown, John B., 65 
Brown, Weslev S., 437 
Brown, W. L.. 147 
Bruce, Frederick J.. 29 
Burdick, Barnett, 464 
Burdick, Charks E., 465 
Burke, Laurence, 737 
Butler. John, 220 
Butler, John F., 220 

Caffry, Eugene M.. 557 
Caldwell, A. B., 40 
Calhoun, Joseph W., 491 
Campbell. James M.. 452 
Cannon. William T.. ,304 
Cappis, William. 622 
Carhart, William H., 124 
Carnahan, Elias M., S89 
Chamberlin, David C, 272 
Chambers, Robert R., 620 
Church. Bvron L., 152 
Clark, Ira'H., 663 
Clark, William H., S73 
Clarke. J. W.. 109 
Clayton, W. B., 670 
Cloud, Fred J., 633 
Cole, Baxter, 215 
Colladay. Frank, 539 
Collett, George A., 287 
Collings, Albert W.. 407 
Collingwood. Daniel F., 374 
Combs, Albert, 228 
Conkling, Clark, .v'!8 
Connett. A. H., 712 
Connor, Eugene, 701 
Connor. W. B., 168 
Cook, Fred W., 564 
Cooper, E. C, 632 
Cragun, John A.. 406 
Crawford, John C. F., 21 
Crow, Martin, 329 

Danner, Clark L., 340 
Davis, Caleb R.. 126 
Davis, George T., 75 



Davis, J. C, 343 
Day, Claude D., 310 
Day, John, 100 
Dayhoff, Insley L., 88 
Dean, Albert A.. 520 
Dean, C. A., 408 
Deck, Peter, 720 
Deissroth, Frederick. 237 
Demoret, Joseph, 366 
Demoret, Mrs. Ella, 375 
Dern, B. F., 439 
DeWeese, Carey, 584 
DeWeese, William S., 360 
Dickhut, Charles W.. 174 
Dillman, James M., 353 
Dodge, D. P., 495 
Dodge, E. J., 664 
Dorr, Josephus, 509 
Dtotson. John W., 119 
Doze, George W., 666 
Doze, John C, 709 
Duff, J. R., 654 
Dukelow, James. 28 
Dunham, Jay, 98 
Dunkelberger, Samuel, 611 
Dunkelberger, William, 612 
Durham. LaRue H.. 651 
Duval, Claude, 178 

Easton, Marquis L.. 656 
Ebbert, William, 202 
Elbury, Thomas G., 600 
Elwood, Robert J.. 618 
Endicott, J. S.. 628 
Engel, James P., 46 
Eppley, Josiah T., 394 
Evans, Charles J., 754 
Evans, John G., 703 
Evans, Perry A., 198 
Everett, Elmer, 501 

Paris, Winfield S.. 629 
Fendrick. Andrew, 610 
FInley, M., 208 
Fisher, E. C, 152 
Filch, D. D., 570 
Fitzpatrick, William, 95 
Ford, Patrick O.. 662 
Forsha, Alexander L., 155 
Forsha, Sam W., 158 
Forsyth. John D.. 86 
Forward, M. W., 739 



INDEX. 



Foster, Frank H., 73 
Foster. Frank S., 740 
Fox, David, 648 
Fox, Thomas O., 213 
Franklin, John H., 719 
Freels, W. H., 611 
Freese, James A., 566 
Frisbie, George M., 338 
Fry, Frank A., 392 
Fuller, F. E., 250 
Fulton, Samson, 53 
Funk, James F., 380 

Gardner, John S.. 70 
Giaston, W. E., 577 
George, Joseph S., 450 
Gerber, John, 616 
Gerber, Mike, 466 
Giertz, Joseph, 202 
Gilchrist, John, 166 
Gile, William S., 385 
Giles, Daniel, 33 
Gillett, Preston B., 136 
Ginter* George W.. 526 
Goldsborough, H. J., 695 
Gordenier, Fred B., 493 
Gorman. John. 704 
Grant. David F., 5.28 
Greenfield. Jesse. 608 
Greenlee. Jasper J., 757 
Gregg, Andrew J.. 250 
Gregg, Currence, 63 
Griem, Renning H.. 651 
Griffith, Frederick J., 320 
Griffith, John D.. 751 
Grosvenor, William S.. Z2:i 
Groth. Henry M.. 574 
Grover, Dallas, 758 

Hair, William T., 572 
Hamilton. James W., 743 
Handy, William, 749 
Harbaugh. David. 492 
Harding, John B.. 373 
Harlow. Frank. 324 
Harrison. William J'.. 118 
Hauschild. Jacob. 307 
Hauser. George F., 207 
Hay, Geo. L., 484 
Heath, William V., 405 
Hedden. Elisha, 15 
Hedges, M. T.. 682 
Hedrick. Charles. 454 
Heist, Michael B., 467 
Helm. Wesley B., 308 
Hendry, William F.. 488 
Herren, Isaac W.. 57i 
Heryer, David, 357 
Hibbert. James, 55 
Hill, W. W., 76 
Hilton, James, 621 
Hilyard. W. H., 363 
Himes. Solomon P.. 558 
Hissem., Henry Z., 552 
Hoagland, Martin, 644 
Hodgson, H. C, 122 
Hodgson, William, 314 
Hoesman, H. F., ii 
Holcomb, T. C., 639 



Holland. James M., 44 
Holmes, John B.. 342 
Holmes. John E.. 115 
Holton, Richard H.. 318 
Honey, Henry R., 732 
Hopkins, Isaac A., 332 
Hopkins, James L., 171 
Hopkins, O. E.. 224 
Howard. Daniel H., 533 
Howell. David. 671 
Hoyt. Henry S.. '18 
Hudson. Robert B.. 540 
Huey, Thomas J.. 311 
Huffman. J. R., 387 
Hughes. Robert W.. 446 
Hummel. Peter. 23 
Humphrey. Joseph E.. 35 
Hunter. Alexander S., 246 
Huntington, Frank H.. 726 
Hutton, Emmett. 96 
Hutton & Oswald, 104 
Huycke, George, 445 

Inman, Henry, 506 

Jellison, Charles R.. 227 
Jennings. Charles E., 259 
Jewell, A. M.. 72 
Jewell. Warren D.. 579 
Johnson. DeWitt C. 78 
Johnson, G. B.. 725 
Johnson, Henry, 472 
Johnson, Jacob. 296 
Johnson. William L.. 362 
Johnson. William R.. 247 
Johnston J. E.. 718 
Jones. Edward W.. 525 
Jones. George W.. 536 
Jones. Samuel. 433 
Jordan. James M.. 22 
Judson. John S., 109 

Kabler. L. W.. 696 
Kansas Grain Company. 592 
Kauflfman. Samuel, i^i 
Kelley. Frank. S38 
Kendall. Charles T.. ^12 
Kidd. T. M.. 617 
King. William B., 47 
Kirby. Elisha W., 575 
Kirk, James, 412 
Klose. Edward. 302 
Koons. Simon W.. 239 
Krey. Frederick. 283 
Kunkle, Aaron, 738 

Lackey, John T., 727 
Landis, Levi F., 471 
Lang, John A., 194 
Lash. Albert R.. 60^ 
Lashmet, J. E.. 468 
Latshaw. Joseph. 92 
Lavertv, Lewi-. 146 
Laviellc, P.,ri,.,Nl, y,- 
Lawrence. Willia.n. 43 
Leighty, Steplieii S., 662 
Leonard. C. D., 692 
Leslie, John F.. 141 
Levitt, George L., 568 



Lewis, J. F.. 516 
Lewis, William N., 238 
Libbev. Leon D.. 172 
Libby, William H.. 252 
Light, Jacob W., 27 
Lindsley, Herbert K., 469 
Lippincott, E. M,. 623 
Livingston, Samuel B.. 402 
Logan, David W.. 686 
Long, Gabriel. 293 
Lonnon. F. M.. 42=; 
Love. William R.. 463 
Lucas, William B., 251 
Lydecker, John E., 411 
Lyman, Herbert S., 175 

Maguire. M.. 653 
Majors. Samuel, 431 
Malcolm. John G., 206 
March. John. 158 
Markham. John J.. 500 
Markle. H. C. 7H 
Martin, Andrew B., 128 
Martin. John. 307 
Masters. C. I).. 755 
Mathews. Samuel. 326 
May, James S.. s6 
May, W. L.. 383 
McAlillv. M. L.. 3i8 
McCandless, M. H.. 664 
McClellan, Wylie, 395 
McClelland, George F.. 714 
McConnell. J. A., 680 
McCormack, W. B., 390 
McCracken. Isaac L.. 242 
McDavitt. John L., 344 
Mcllhenny, Henry L.. 706 
McKenry. Joseph F.. 683 
McKinnis. Robert. 312 
McLaurin. John R., 270 
McMillan. W. K.. 594 
McMurphy. Alonzo. 198 
McPeek. Joseph, 478 
McPlicrson. Owen P.. 597 
MtVay. Mrs. Cornelia (Buckles). 

377 
Measer. John J.. 16=; 
Melville. William. ^72 
Meng. Michael. 183 
Miller. Charles P.. 162 
Miller. P. D.. 627 
Miller, Robert C. m9 
Milligan. S. C. 84 
Miner. George H.. 422 
Mitchell. Ida M.. 441 
Mitchell. William H.. 3(10 
Monroe. A. J.. 66 
Monroe. G. A.. 67 
Moon.. James V.. 303 
Morgan. William Y.. 9 
Morris, Harvey. 483 
Morris. Samuel J.. 544 
Morris, T. E., 607 
Morrison, John T.. 508 
Morter. G. W.. 531 
Moscript. Robert O., 623 
Moses, Brothers, 594 
Moses, Clayton L., 594 
Moses, Edward W., 594 



INDEX. 



Moi^es, George N.. 51 


Rose, John W., 120 


Swartz. Simeon, 413 


Mowery, G. H., 555' 


Rose, William A.. 231 


Swingle, Asa S., 636 


Murphy, Will R.. 661 


Ross, William J., 280 


Switzer, Alexander M., 102 


Murray, James, 399 


Russell, F. Vernon, 603 


Sykes, C. T., 393 


Murray, William F. 354 


Ryker, Charles A., 355 




Mustoe, H. A., 710 


Ryther, James, 48 


Tampier, Joseph F., 226 


Mustoe, U. G., 635 




Tanton, Robert E., 31 


Myers, Adolphus F., 569 


Sallee, Samuel, 496 


Taylor, Charles R, 490 




Sample, Charles \V., 403 


Taylor, Ernest A., 244 


Nash, J. T., 200 


Sample, Edward, 711 


Tedrick, William R., 409 


Negley, David M., 708 


Sanderson, Ernest W., 587 


Tellin, Peter, 716 


Nelson, John W,, 189 


Sanderson, Samuel, 587 


Templer, Thomas J., 592 


Nesmith. William L., 13 


Schaet?er, August H., 599 


Teter, Samuel P., 149 


Newk.rk. R. R . 534 


Schall, Harry S., 45O 


Thornley, David M., 273 


Newlm. William. 591 


Schardein, John. 134 


Tibbutt, George, 722 


Newnmn, Henry B., 243 


Schermerhorn, Edward D., 72^ 


Tincher. J. N.. 655 


Nichols. George H.. 532 


Schmidt, William. 368 


Tiln^. Hrnrv. (>)7 


Nickason. G. M., 177 


Seeley, Loren L., 613 


r-Mrn. 1 r„-tiniuil P.. 420 


Norris, F. H., 162 


Sentney, Charles N., 688 


r-uimihl, George. 504 


Nunemaker, J. S., 2^2 


Shaw, Kinsey, 382 


Trao, David B., 2to 


Nutter, John N., 440 


Shaw, Simeon J., 602 


Truesdell, E. R, 255 




Sheriff, William E., 742 


Truitt, George, 39 


Obermowe, Henrv, 135 


Sherman, E. F., 586 




Ogle, B. F., 667 


Shideler, Jacob C, 448 


Van Bibber, Moses H., 234 


O-Hara, Henry C.. 210 


Shiells, John, 171 


Vandeveer, George A., 67 


Oswald, Charley W.. 97 


Shock, Benjamin, 143 


Van Deventer, Cyrus C, 17 


Overton, Benjamin F., 541 


Shuler, Tillman A., 562 


Van Patten, Myndert, 188 




Shuler, William D., 191 


Van Sickle, William J., 498 


Palmer, Daniel, 637 


Shumway, Reuben B., 426 


Vaughan, C. L., 240 


Park, Joseph E., 90 


Shuyler, David M., 419 


Venn, Harry, 752 


Patterson, J. W., 676 


Shuyler, John S., 25 


Vermillion, L. E., 160 


Peckham, Charles W., 4S8 


Siemsen, Henry, 277 


Vincent, Frank, 24 


Pennington, William R.. 284 


Smith, C. B., 235 


Vincent, John B., 218 


Peters, Samuel R., 641 


Smith, Edward B., 447 


Volkland, William, 99 


Pickerill, Walter, 647 


Smith, Edward L., 336 




Pieper, Conrad H., 130 


Smith, Ephraim A., 196 


Walker, John P., 480 


Pierce, William E., 54 


Smith, Francis M., 36 


Walters, Leonard, 679 


Plank, C. v., 17 


Smith, George, 8i 


Ward, Mahlon, 604 


Plankenhorn. David, 416 


Smith, Isaac N., 328 


Ward, William M., 734 


Pollock, William C, 379 


Smith, John L., 186 


Warner, H. C. 113 


Porter, Frank S.. 597 


Smith, Joseph A., 519 


Warrell, Mark, 98 


Porter, William M., 346 


Smith, Louis C, 279 


Warren. William A.. 652 


Potter, Peter B., 125 


Smith, S. J., 429 


Waterman, William H., 482 


Potter, William, 184 


Smith, S. L,, 424 


Watkins, Robert J., 253 


Presby, Solon P., 553 


Smith, William, 523 


Watson, Robert N., 465 


Price, John R., 275 


Smith, Wilson, 279 


Weatherd. John W., 60 


Prigg, Frank R, 11 


Soden, William T., 694 


Weaver, Ezra, 278 


Proffitt, C. G., 219 


Southerland, Charles Y.. 569 


Weigel, Jacob, 233 


Proffitt, J. M., 266 


Sparks, Chauncey C, 350 


Wellman, Edward C, 5SS 


Prose, Joseph B., 495 


Speck, A. D., 435 


Wellman, J. M., 556 


Prouty, F. A., 690 


Sperry, Samuel A., 442 


Wells, John W., 491 




Spickard, Samuel, 205 


Wernet, Herman. 263 


Radcliffe. John C, 6r 


Sponsler, A. L., 106 


Wernet. Xaver. is'i 


Radiol, George V„ 521 


Stahl, C. C, 485 


West. William. 70s 


Ramsev, James M.. si I 


Stephenson, John, 678 


Westerman. Le«,; 11.. 261 


Rankin, lamrs. 77 


Stevenson, C. C, 728 


Westfall. B. S.. 418 


Raiip. W illiaiii, (.40 


Stewart, Henry M., 56=; 


White. C. C. 85 


R;nl, I'liiah, J4S 


Stewart, J. E., in 


Whiteside, Houston. 713 


Reann.r. I'aMl. 41/ 


Stewart. Samuel W., 730 


Wiegel. Louis. 294 


Rrdtiel.l, (ieorge Z., 582 


St. John. J.amc. .53 


Wiggins, Harvey. 167 


keid. Daniel E.. 285 


Stockwdl. b.h.i II.. 00 


Wiggins. John. 349 


Ku-e, Wilbur H.. 352 


Stoltcnl.rr..;. 1 Ionian .\.. 12 


W.ldin. John R. 144 


Rickar.l. J. W., 684 


Stone, Gilbert 11., 476 


Willett. Thomas J.. 514 


Riggs. Eli J.. 700 


Stone, Solomon, 513 


Williamson. Cicero. S4g 


Ritchey, W. F., 438 


Stratmann. Bert. 423 


Wilson. Eli C. 699 ■ 


Robbins, William W.. 546 


Strohmeyer, Henry, 672 


Wilson, J. A.. 301 


Robinson, Charles. 292 


Sturgis. W. D.. 214 


Wilson, James M.. 271 


Roff. John W.. 384 


Sultzbach. Henry, 581 


Wilson, W. Henry, 290 


Root, Edwin S., 58 


Summers, Alvin E., 229 


Winsor, George R., 80 



INDEX. 



Winsor, James, 79 
Wolf, Fred, 396 
Wolfe. Gideon R.. 576 
Wood. C. A.. 5-'7 
Wooddell. Charles N., 124 
Wright, Benjamin, 542 





Wright, Hannah, 264 


Yeoman, J. A.. 71 




Wyer, John W., 721 


Young, Jacob A., 105 




Wyman. David, 550 


Young, John M., 82 
Youngs, Francis L., 675 




Yearout. N. J.. 432 


\ust, Fred. 547 




Yeoman, A. O., 351 


Yust, John, 331 



A BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



OK 



CENTRAL KANSAS. 



WILLIA^I Y. .MORGAN. 

A\'illiam Y. Morgan, president of the 
State Exchange Bank, is one of the lead- 
ing representatives of journalistic interests 
in central Kansas, occup3nng the responsible 
position of state printer. For thirty years 
he has lived in Kansas and has made his 
home in Hutchinson since 1895. He was 
born in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 6, 1866, and 
was only four 3"ears of age when his par- 
ents came to the Sunflower state. His fa- 
ther, William A. ^Morgan, is a native of Ire- 
land but was reared in America where he 
arrived with the family when a little lad of 
four summers, his parents locating in Cin- 
cinnati. Throughout almost his entire life 
he has been connected with the printing 
business, becoming familiar with it in e\-ery 
department. At the time of the civil war 
he enlisted as a member of the Twenty-third 
Kentucky regiment and saw much active ser- 
vice. He has bee* prominent in Grand 
Army circles and takes an active interest in 
everything tending to advance the welfare 
of his ciinu-ades who wnre the blue, when 
upon the southern battle fields they fought 
for the preservation of the union. He is at- 
taining to distinction in civic life and has 
served in both branches of state legislature 



since coming to Kansas in 1871. He makes 
his home in Cottonwood Falls, where he is 
engaged in the publication of the Chase 
County Leader. A man nf .strung mentality 
and marked force nf character, he has left 
the impress of his indixiduality for good 
upon many lines of thought and action. He 
married Minnie Yoast, who is prominent as 
a member of the Woman's Relief Corps. 

William Y. Morgan, whose name begins 
this re\-iew, was well fitted for life's practi- 
cal and responsible duties by a liberal educa- 
tion which he pursued in the state univer- 
sity of Kansas at Lawrence. There he pur- 
sued a special course that prepared him for 
the vocation which he had chosen for his life 
work. At an early date he learned to set 
type in his father's office in Cottonwood 
Falls, and thus became connected with the 
art preservative of arts. The practical work 
which he had done in connection with the 
printing business, gave him a better insight 
into the instruction he received at the uni- 
versity so that he profited much more l)y his 
college training than nthers who had no 
kuDwlcd-c of the business, and in his class 
he to, k high rank. He is a member of the 
Phi Gamma Delta, a college fraternity. 

After his graduation, Mr. Morgan was 
engaged in local work on a Lawrence paper 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



and then purchased a newspaper in Strong 
City, which he edited and published for 
four years. On the expiration of that pe- 
riod he sold out and purchased an interest in 
the Emporia Daily Gazette. His work in 
connection therewith was \-ery successful 
and he conducted a paper, making it a first 
class publication, until 1895, when he sold 
to ^^'illiam Allen ^^'hite, the noted writer 
and journalist, and came to Hutchinson. 
The collapse of the boom at this place had af- 
fected the newspaper interests, as well as 
other lines of business, and the circulatiim of 
the papers was lessened thercl)y. However, 
recognizing the opportunit}* to build up a 
good business here, Mr. Morgan organized 
the News Company, of which he is president 
and the principal stuckliolder. While he 
has followed the plan oi ha\ing his co-work- 
ers interested iinancially in the success and 
thus stimulating them to greater effort, he 
is the manager of the paper and has made 
it one of the leading journals in the state. 
Here, as in all other newspaper enterprises 
in which he has embarked, his own industry, 
capable management and enterprise have had 
marked effect in building up the business, 
increasing the circulation of the paper, and 
making it a paying inxestment. Few cities 
of the size of Hutchinson can boast of a 
daily paper issued with as much general 
news as has the one of which ]\Ir. Morgan 
has charge. He has an efficient corps of re- 
porters in the field and he is a member of the 
Associated Press, thus receiving the latest 
telegraphic news. It has taken much labor 
and experience to place the paper in its ex- 
cellent condition, but he brought to bear his 
long and varied experience in the newspaper 
field together with marked business ability. 
Its patronage has largely increased in every 
department and it is miw the niddel paper of 
central and western Kansas, ]Ta\-ing marked 
effect in moulding public opinion and at the 
same time greatly advancing the interests of 
the Republican party. 

Mr. Morgan has always been a stanch 
supporter of the Republican principles, and 
was only twenty vears of age when he was 
made secretary of the Douglas county con- 



vention. In whatever community he has 
lived since, he has been honored with the 
position of either secretary or chairman of 
the Republican Central committee, and at 
the present time he is serving in the latter 
office here, having acted in that capacity for 
four consecutive years. He has never been 
a candidate for any office himself, outside of 
the line of his profession. In January, 1899, 
he was elected by the state legislature to the 
office of state printer and is still the incum- 
bent. His work is highly satisfactory, ow- 
ing to his thorough understanding of the 
printing business, and his efficiency is indi- 
cated by most excellent workmanship pro- 
duced under his control. 

Mr. ]\Inrg-an was elected president of the 
State Exchange Bank of Hutchinson in Jan- 
uary, 1902. and is deeply interested in all 
matters intended for the general good. He 
is a memljcr . d' the board of managers of the 
Jubilee association, which has done so much 
to advance the musical interests not onlv of 
the city, but of the state. He is a member of 
both the Park and Fair associations, which 
he has since aided to. a considerable extent in ■ 
a financial way. He served for two or three 
years as secretary of the Commercial Club 
and later as its president. In Masonry he 
holds membership in the lodge of Emporia, 
m Reno Chapter. Xo. 34, R. A. M. ; in Reno 
Commandery, No. 26, K. T., and in Wichita 
Consistory No. 2, S. P. R. S. He is an 
active member of the Sons of Veterans and 
has served as its commander in the state leg- 
islature. He is also a member of the grand 
lodge of the Knights of Pythias and belongs 
to the Ancient Order of United \\'orkmen, 
the Modern Woodmen of America, and the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

On the 20th of November, 1891, in 
Strong City, Mr. Morgan married Colie 
Adair, a daughter of Wit Adair of that city. 
He has just completed the erection of a fine 
residence at No. 416 Sherman street, which 
is the highest point on the street. Mr. Mor- 
gan has a wide acquaintance throughout the 
state and is prominent among the best people 
of Kansas. He is known in the legislative 
and business circles, amid the members of 



n 

Sf o 

3 ?a 



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^ z 

2 O 

m 
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BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



fraternal organizations, and wherever 
known, he is held in highest regard. His 
career is imbued with the enterprising spirit 
of the West, and progress has been his 
watchword. Every movement or concern 
with which he becomes connected feels the 
intiuence of his labors and is advanced there- 
l)_v. A natural leader, the impress of his in- 
dividuality has ever been for good, and he 
stands to-day among the leading" men of cen- 
tral Kansas, known and honored for his 
genuine worth. 



FRANK F. PRIGG. 

Few citizens of Hutchinson, Kansas, are 
unacquainted at least by reputation with the 
scholarly, able and successful member of the 
legal profession, Frank F. Prigg, the senior 
memlaer of the prominent firm of Prigg & 
Williams, of Hutchinson, Kansas. Since 
I SS3 he has been identified with the business 
interests of this city. 

The birth of Mr. Prigg occurred in 
^^ladison county, Indiana, on June 5, 1853. 
and he traces an honorable ancestry from a 
worthy Welsh emigrant on down to his loyal 
grandfather, who made the name of William 
Prigg respected in the war of 1812. For 
\-alorous ser\-ices during this war the govern- 
ment granted him land, and he removed 
from his former home at Havre de Grace, 
^laryland, first to Ohio and later to Indiana. 
Here he was a pioneer and entered some 
land in what is now Madison county. By 
trade he was a tanner, but after settling in 
loiHana fdlowed farming. 

Edward C. Prigg. the son of \\"illiam 
the father of our subject, was born during 
the family residence in Ohio, being still a 
lad when removal was made to Indiana. He 
assisted on the pioneer farm and always en- 
joyed agricultural pursuits, although he be- 
canie a successful physician ; for manv years 
he combined the two vocations. He be- 
came active in the Republican party, al- 
thjiugh never an office holder, and was a 
leading member of the Universalist church. 



The first marriage of Dr. Prigg occurred in 
Indiana, to Miss Harriet Curry, and the chil- 
dren of this union are: Frank F., of this 
biography, and Mary F., who is now a Mrs. 
Bryant and a resident of New York. The 
second marriage of Dr. Prigg was to Mar- 
garet Jones, two children also being born to 
this union, namely: Helen M.. who now is 
a i\Irs. Ginn, residing in Indianapolis, and 
Edward R., who is a salesman in New York. 
Dr. Prigg is passing the evening of life in 
his home in Indiana, his years now reaching 
seventy-four. 

The rudiments of our subject's education 
were accjuired in the public schools of Madi- 
son county, Indiana. The natural and ir- 
resistible bent of his mind was in the direc- 
tion of the law, and very ear]\- he f^ iresaw 
that his own efiforts must pro\ide the neces- 
sary education, although he was assisted by 
all that his father could provide, his mother 
having died when he was' but seven years of 
age. Taking a preparatory teacher's course, 
he contributed to his own support by teach- 
ing, in the meantime employing all spare mo- 
ments in study. A scientific course followed 
at Valparaiso, Indiana, and later he was en- 
abled to graduate at the Central Normal 
College, at Danville, Indiana. Beginning 
to teach in 187S, he followed this profession 
for three years in the country schools, and 
four years in the graded schools, continually 
reading law under instruction, both in Dan- 

' ville and Middletown. In 1882 he was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Danville. 

In 1883 he came as a teacher to Hutch- 
inson, Kansas, serving for two years as the 
efficient superintendent of the city schdols. 
a position at that time of great resiKnisibility 
and annoyance, hampered as he was liy exist- 
ing conditions. Although eminently success- 
ful, this was not the career which he had 
marked out for himself and for which he had 
so carefully prepared. Resigning this lucra- 
tive position, he started out upon the untried 
path of the law. In 1885 he opened an office 

i in the some liuilding in which he is now lo- 
cated, where he has since remained. 

From his initial case our subject has been 
successful, his aljilitv receiving immediate 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



recognition, bringing him a large practice 
which has resuhed in social prominence and 
financial prosperity. In 1896 he formed a 
partnership with Charles M. Williams, the 
legal firm of Prigg & Williams being one of 
the strong combinations in the business 
world of Reno county. Both members of the 
firm are men of thorough knowledge and 
judicial mind, and both are thoroughly 
equipped for the legal battles in which they 
are constantly involved. The library pos- 
sessed by this firm needs a passing notice, 
being complete and kept entirely up-to-date 
in all respects, and represents at the present 
time an outlay of over five thousand dollars. 
This gives the firm not only all past records, 
but also the latest decisions, so tliat the 
clients are assured of advice sustained by 
precedent, in every case. Aside from this 
]\Ir. Prigg possesses an extensive library at 
his home, which represents the latest and 
best of the world's literature. While not 
making a .specialty of any branch of the 
law, he has given close attention to real es- 
tate and corporation law and is regarded as 
one of the safest and most. thoroughly in- 
structed lawyers in the state, and is entrusted 
with cases involving ^-ast amounts of money 
and embracing many avenues of business 
activity. 

Although so constantly occupied with the 
cares and responsibilities of his profession, 
Air. Prigg, like his father, has a liking for 
agriculture, and his recreation consists in 
experiments in horticulture, on his farm of 
forty acres, located in the rich Cow Creek 
bottoms, adjoining the city on the east. 
Twenty acres of this tract he has set in fine 
young apple trees, which have just come to 
a bearing age, promising a great fruitage. 
When wearied with business care this is a 
pleasant retreat, although Mr. Prigg has a 
pleasant residence in the city, at No. 509 
Avenue A, east. 

In his political affiliations he has always 
been actively identified with the Republican 
party: but previous to this time, the stress 
of private business has precluded anv ac- 
ceptance of office except that for seven con- 
secutive terms he served as citv attornev, and 



during his administration important ques- 
tions of water works and sev/erage were con- 
sidered and settled. In 1891 he received the 
nomination of the Republican party for 
judge of the district court of the ninth judi- 
cial district. The nomination was unsolicited 
and unexpected, and he was not present 
when the nomination was made. After con- 
sidering the matter the nomination was de- 
clined. 

The first marriage of iMr. Prigg occurred 
in 1879, in Indiana, to Miss Minnie Gar- 
rard, one daughter, Edna ]M., being born of 
this union. Previous to locating in Kansas, 
Mrs. Prigg passed out of life. The second 
marriage of our subject occurred in this 
city, to ]\Iiss Laura A. Van Winkle, three 
children being born to this marriage, name- 
ly: Jesse G., who died at the age of one 
year, Roberta Lucile and Mamie B. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Prigg has been 
as prominent as he is in social and profes- 
sional life, belonging to Reno Lodge, No. 
140, A. F. & A. M.; Reno Chapter, No. 34, 
R. A. M. ; Reno Commandery, No. 26, 
Knights Templar; Byron Lodge, No. 197, 
K. of P. ; La Rue Division, No. 4, Unifomi 
Rank, K. of P. ; and Reno Lodge, No. 99, I. 
O. O. F. He joined the latter order in In- 
diana, and for many years has been active in 
its work, ser\'ing on committees and repre- 
senting it at the higher councils of the order. 
Locally he is connected with the Commercial 
Club, and takes an active interest in all mat- 
ters pertaining to the progress and advance- 
ment of the citv, countv and state. 



HERMAN A. STOLTENBERG. 

In a rapidly de\'eloping country like Kan- 
sas, the hardware merchant and the imple- 
ment dealer are as necessary to the work of 
advancement as any two men who can be 
named. The gentleman mentioned above is 
both a hardware merchant and an imple- 
ment dealer and is a member of one of the 
leading firms of its kind in central Kansas. 
The firm of Stoltenberg Brothers, the part- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



ners in which are Herman A., William and 
Julius Stoltenberg, is the proprietor of one 
of the leading enterprises of Holyrood, Ells- 
worth county, Kansas. The Stoltenbergs 
deal in hardware, implements, silverware, 
tinware, guns, ammunition, pumps and 
windmills, vehicles of different kinds, stoves, 
fence wire and machinery supplies, bicyxles 
and bicycle repairs, and are agents for the 
Crescent paints and oils. Their tine new two- 
story building was erected in 1900, and is 
one of the best for the purpose in this part 
of the state. It occupies a ground space of 
sixty-four by seventy feet and the lower 
story is divided into double rooms extending 
the whole length of the building, the upper 
room being used as a storeroom for imple- 
ments and vehicles, and heavy implements 
are stored in a large shed which has a depth 
of seventy feet and stands at the rear of the 
store. The tirm makes a specialty of the 
Moline Blue Ribbon buggies and Old Hick- 
ory wagons. 

Herman A. Stoltenberg, who is the act- 
ive manager of this enterprise, was born 
near Davenport, Scott crmnty. Liwa, Febru- 
ary 21, 1868, a son of Henry and Annastina 
( 6tt ) Stoltenberg, both of whom were born 
in Holstein, Germany. . ^Ir. Stoltenberg's 
father came to America in 1853, when he 
was nineteen years old. Annastina Ott, who 
became his wife, came over from the father- 
land a ^•ear later and they were married in 
Iowa, where they farmed imtil 1881, when 
they located in Ellsworth county, where in 
1878, Mr. Stoltenberg had bought railroad 
land located in Palacky township. His 
holdings aggregated five quarter sections 
and he farmed successfully until 1888, when 
he removed to^ Holyrood. 

Hemian A. Stoltenberg and his bnitliers 
were reared to farming. They were \iiung 
men (if enterprise and were tlie first in their 
\'icinity to engage in threshing by steam 
priwer. They carried on a business of that 
kind in season for nine years, farming mean- 
time with considerable success. Mr. Stolten- 
berg is the owner of three hundred acres of 
good agricultural land, which he rents to 
tenant farmers. He retired fnim farming 



in 1898, and engaged in the hardware trade 
in a building one-half the size of the Stolten- 
berg Brothers' present store, the original 
building being utilized in the structure which 
has been described. In politics Mr. Stolten- 
berg is a Democrat and has served his fellow 
citizens two years in the office of justice of 
the peace. For one year he was a member of 
the tirm of Siemsen & Company, dealers in 
lumber at Holyrood. He is a member of 
the German Lutheran church. 

Flenry and Annastina (Ott) Stoltenberg 
had twelve children. Tlie following memo- 
randa concerning some of them will be 
found of interest in this connection: John 
is a farmer ; William and Julius are farmers 
and are members of the firm of Stoltenberg 
Brothers; Agnes is the wife of Alexander 
Stratmann, a farmer of Ellsworth county: 
Bertha is tlie wife of Henry Siemsen, a well 
known lumber dealer at Holyrood; Lizzie 
is the wife of A. Besthorn, a farmer of Ells- 
worth county; Gustav and Ferdinand are 
well known in the county. Herman A. Stoi- 
tenberg was married November 22, 1891, to 
Elizabeth A'oss, and they have three children, 
namelv : August, Edward and Mabel. 



WILLIAM L. XES:MITH. 

If those who claim that fortune has 
favored certain individuals above others will 
but investigate the cause of success and fail- 
ure, it will be found that the former is large- 
ly due to the improvement of opportunity, 
thelatter to the neglect of it. Fortunate en- 
vironments encompass nearly e\'ery man at 
some stage in his career, but the strong man 
and the successful man is he who realizes 
that the proper moment has come, that the 
jiresent and not the future holds his oppor- 
tunity. The man who makes use of the Now 
and not the To Be is he who passes on the 
hig"hway of life others who started out ahead 
of him and reaches the goal of prosperity 
far in advance of them. It is this qualit}' in 
!Mr. Xesmith that has made him a leader in 
the Ijusiness world and won him a name in 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



connection with commercial interest? that 
is widely known. 

ilr. Xesmilh is now engaged in dealing 
in groceries, lumber, furniture, hardware 
and coal in \\ ilson and has been a resident 
of Kansas since 1874. He was bom in \"an 
Buren county, April 24. 1S52. His grand- 
father. Henry Xesmith, was a native of \'ir- 
ginia and ser\ed in the war of 1812, while 
his father-in-law was a Hessian soldier. 
\Mien a young man Henr\- Xesmith removed 
to Ohio, becoming one of the pioneers of that 
state. He secured a tract of land and car- 
ried on fanning until the early '40s, when 
he emigrated to Iowa, where he continued 
work as a pioneer. In his later years he re- 
moved to Iowa county, Iowa, where he spent 
his last days, his death occurring when he 
had passed the eightieth milestone on the 
journey of life. In his family of ten chil- 
dren Joseph T. X'esmith. the father of our 
subject, was the eldest. He was born in 
Perr\- counr\-, Ohio, September i, 1S23. and 
was reared to farm work. In the early '40s 
he accompanied his parents on their removal 
to VsLTi Buren county, Iowa, and cast in his 
lot with the pioneer settlers of that portion 
of the countn,-, experiencing all the hard- 
ships and trials which fell to the lot of the 
frontiersmen who established homes there. 
He aided in preparing the countn,- for the in- 
coming tide of emigration. He afterward re- 
moved to Iowa count\-, where he secured a 
tract of land and improved a farm, becoming 
one of the successful and well known agri- 
culturists of that locality-. In his early life 
his political support was given the AMiig 
party, and on the dissolution of its ranks he 
joined the forces of the new Republican 
part}-, with which he was allied until his 
death. He held membership in the [Method- 
ist Protestant church, was long one of its 
officers and was an active worker in its be- 
half. He married Jennie Truscott, a native 
of England, and they became the parents of 
live sons and five daughters, of whom three 
are residents of Wilson, namelv : William L.. 
Mrs. D. W. Tilton and INIrs.'S. E. Barton. 
About 1892 the father came to Wilson, 



where he spent his remaining days, passing 
away December 3, 1898, at the age of seven- 
ty-five. His wife still survives him and is 
living in Iowa. 

William L. X'esmith is indebted to the 
public school system for - the educational 
privileges which he enjoyed in his youth. 
He has added largely to his knowledge by 
experience, reading and observation. He 
was reared upon a farm, and in 1874 came 
to Kansas in order to take advantage of the 
government offer of cheap lands. He se- 
cured a claim upon the flats, intending to 
follow farming here, but did not remain 
long. Returning to Iowa, he was there iden- 
tified with agricultural pursuits until 1877. 
when he came to Wilson and embarked in 
the grocery- business, meeting with success 
in the undertaking from the beginning. 
Later he added a stock of hardware and 
afterward purchased a furniture store and 
undertaking establishment — the only one in 
the town. In 1S89 he purchased a lumber 
T.-ard and has since conducted that industry 
in connection with dealing in coal. He 
handles both eastern and western coal and 
also mines coal on the river here, taking out 
from one hundred to two hundred tons of 
the mineral each month during the mining 
season. He aided in erecting the stone mill 
— the first here — and built the stone store 
building which he now occupies, also one to 
the south, and his residence in the city. In 
many ways he has advanced the material in- 
terests of Wilson. He has three quarter 
sections of land, which is devoted to farming 
and grazing purposes, and on Coal creek he 
owns a section, which is devoted to the pro- 
duction of cereals and to the raising of stock. 
He has both farms well stocked, but does 
not operate them himself. In his business 
affairs he has met with a high degree of suc- 
cess, being a man of capable management, 
keen discrimination and far-sighted sagacity. 
In his work here he has found that his 
knowledge of the German language has been 
to him of great advantage. By the aid of a 
few lessons he acquired the rudiments of the 
tongue and by continuous practice he has 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



increased his vocabularj- unti! he can now 
speak fluently with the German settlers of 
the neighborhood. 

In 1874 ilr. Xesmith was united in mar- 
riage to Clara H. Carhart, a sister of W. H. 
Carhart, and unto them have been bom four 
sons, namely : Edgar L., who is engaged in 
business with his father in Wilson, Kansas; 
Hal J., Verne and Aura, the last three be- 
ing at home. In his pohtica! riews ilr. 
Xesmith is an ardent and earnest Prohibi- 
bitionist, laboring untiringly for the success 
of the part\- and the adoption of temperance 
principles. Whenever the party has a tickrt 
in the field his support is assured. At other 
times, the nominees being of equal capabilitj-, 
he casts his suffrage with the Republican 
part}-. He has been a member of the city 
council and has also filled the position of 
mayor of Wilson. During the greater part 
of his life Mr. Xesmith has been a member 
of the Methodist church, and has served as 
class-leader and as superintendent of the 
Sunday-school. He and his wife, leather 
with W. H. Carhart and his wife, were the 
four charter members of the church on its 
organization in 1878, and he has ever since 
acted as one of its trustees, \\ith the excep- 
tion of a year and a half he served as super- 
intendent of the Sunday-school since its or- 
ganization. He aided materially in the erec- 
tion of the house of worship here and has 
never abated in his zeal or energy in support 
of the cause of Christianit].-. He has been a 
leading factor in the progress of Wilson. 
Educational, church and social interests owe 
their promotion in a considerable degree to 
■-•m. Twenn-four years has this citv" been 

- '-.cnie. vear; largelv devoted to the pub- 

- c:vd. 



ELISHA HEDDEX. 



Hutchinson has no more honored or 
highh- esteemed citizen than the gentleman 
whose name introduces this re^-iew. He v\-as 
born in Shelby countv", Kentucky, on the 
25th of ilarch. 1834, a son of Ellsha Hed- 
den, a native of Xew Jersey. The latter re- 
moved with his father, Jacob Hedden. who 



was also bom in Xew Jersey 2T?d ^. Gerrrsn 
descent, to Kentucky, in a ; _;-. 

He established a hcmesteac -i 

from where General F. J^ _ -i. 

and was osMt of the early pioneers of ihai pari 
of the, country. He was a vnan of mndi 
force and strength of character and became 
one of the most prominent njen in his com- 
munity. He was ver;.- sv::;;;:-^ in his 
agricultural operatic r - . lime to 

time added to his ori^' : until he 

owned about fifteen ':!_:-_., _.:;; ;f land, 
where he followed farming and stock-rais- 
ing on a large scale, his being one of the 
best improved properties in that secti«Dn. 
Such was the estomation in which he was 
held by the people that he was solicited to 
represent his district in the legislature, but 
he cared little for the emoluments of public 
life and refused to allow his name to be used. 
He was an active worker in the Baptist 
church, in which he held the positions of 
moderator and clerk, and was prominent in 
the organization of the First Baptist church 
of that locahty. 

In Shelby county, Kentucky, Mr. Hed- 
den was united in marrage to Mary Carriss, 
a native of the old Bluegrass state and of 
Pennsylvania German parentage. Her fa- 
ther was also one of the early pioneers of 
that locality. His son, Henry Carriss, was 
a soldier in the war of 1812, having fought 
under Jackson at Xew Orleans. The mar- 
riage of Mr. and Mrs. Hedden was blessed 
with eleven children, namely: Elizabeih, 
who died in Shelby coimty. Kentucky- ; Mary, 
who died in Missouri: Rebecca, who also 
died in Shelby county; Simon H-, who 
passed away in Missouri; Jane and Jacob 
H.. both of whtMn passed away in Shelbv 
county: Xancy H.. who died in Missouri; 
John H., who was called to his final rest in 
Shdby county: Henry, who died in Spencer 
county. Kentuckv- ; Thomas, a retired farmer 
of LouisA-ille. Kentucky- ; and Ehsha. the sub- 
ject of this reraw. The mother of :h:= -.r - 
ily passed away on the loth of X . - 
1852, and on the loth of October the : 
ing'year her husband joined her in the spiri: 
world. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



Elisha Hedden remained in the place of 
liis nativity until 1866, receiving his educa- 
tion in the common schools of his locality, 
and his youth and early manhood was prin- 
cipally spent in assisting his father on the 
home farm. After the death of his. father, 
which occurred when he was nineteen years 
of age, the estate was divided among the 
heirs, our subject receiving the old home- 
stead as his share of the property, and there 
he was engaged in agricultural pursuits un- 
til 1886. In October, 1861, he enlisted for 
service in the Civil war, entering Company 
D, Sixth Kentucky Infantry, and on its or- 
ganization, in December of that year, he was 
elected its captain, and as such served until 
January, 1864. At the battle of Shiloh he 
received a gunshot wound in the head, after 
which for a time he was confined in the 
United States marine hospital at Mound 
City, Illinois, and was later sent to Louis- 
ville. After his recovery he rejoined his 
comiiany and took part in the battles of 
Stone River. Chickamauga and many minor 
engagements, and while acting as second in 
command at the battle of Stone River he 
was a second time wounded. He now main- 
tains pleasant relations with his old anny 
comrades by his membership in Joe Hooker 
Post, No. 17, of Hutchinson. In 1886 Mr. 
Hedden sold his possessions in Shelby coun- 
ty and came to Kansas, arriving in Hutch- 
inson on the 28th of October. Soon after 
his arrival here he purchased what was 
known as the Clifton House, and for three 
years thereafter was its genial proprietor, 
his efforts in that line having been attended 
with a high and well merited degree of 
success. During that period he also did a 
good business in a private way as a real-es- 
tate agent of Hutchinson, in which he was 
equally successful. In 1889, however, he 
sold his hotel property, and two years later, 
in 1 89 1, was appointed to the police force, 
filling that position for one year, while for 
the following two years he served as assist- 
ant marshal. His next public office was that 
of marshal, remaining as its incumbent for 
one year. In tlie Republican convention of 
April, 1899, I\Ir. Hedden was nominated for 



the position of city marshal, was afterward 
elected and served therein for one year, and 
was then re-elected, his temr of office ex- 
piring May 20, 1901. While a resident of 
Kansas he was for sixteen years in the 
United States revenue service, beginning on 
the 14th of July, 1869, first as a store keeper 
and afterward as a ganger. His present 
attractive and tasteful residence was pur- 
chased in 1899, and there he now resides in 
the enjoyment of the fruits of former toil. 
In Shelby county, Kentucky, on the 5th 
of October, 1854, Mr. Hedden was united in 
marriage to ^Miranda Harrison, a relative of 
General Harrison, their grandfathers hav- 
ing been first cousins. She is now deceased, 
passing away in Hutchinson on the 31st of 
October, 1892, in the faith of the Baptist 
church, of which she was a worthy and con- 
sistent member. At her death she left six 
children, namely: Charles M., born in 
Shelby county, Kentucky, October 5, 1855, is 
emplo}-ed as clerk for the Kansas City & 
fronton Railroad Company at Lake Charles, 
Louisiana; Ben C, born February 28, 1858, 
is a prominent farmer of Vernon county, 
]\Iissouri ; . Mary Jane, widow of Noah 
Sinder, is a resident of Ansley, a suburb of 
Birmingham, Alabama ; Elisha is an inmate 
of the acyium at Anchorage, Kentucky, his 
affliction having been caused by brain fever : 
Sallie Belle is the wife of P. J. Connolly, a 
carpenter of Ensley, Alabama; and Guthrie 
H., also follows the same occupation in that 
city. Our subject has been a second time 
married, his last union being with Mrs. H. 
C. Carriss, formerly Susan D. Cardwell, a 
native of Shelby county, Kentucky. Her first 
husband, H. C. Carriss, came from that state 
to Hutchinson in March, 1886. and in June 
of the following year was called to his final 
rest. He was a relative of the mother of our 
subject. In politics Mr. Hedden is a life- 
long Republican, and for many years has 
been an active worker in its ranks. He has 
served as a delegate to many county conven- 
tions, and while in Kentucky was a member 
of the state convention that selected the 
Blaine delegates. He has been a member of 
the ^Masonic fraternitv for fortv vears, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



since 1854 has been a member of the Baptist 
church, being a faithful worker in the cause 
of Christianity. 



CYRUS CLARKE A'AX DEVEXTER. 

Mr. Van De\'enter is a native of BufYalo. 
Xew York, born in 1856. and is a son of 
James and Jennie ( Clarke) Van Deventer, 
of the same city. The Van Deventers \Yere 
natives of Holland and took up their abode 
at X"e\v Utrecht, on Long Island, in 1653. 
On the mother's side he was descended from 
Joseph Clarke, who located at X^ewport, 
Rhode Island, in 1638, and was one of the 
founders of that town. His wife was Be- 
thiab. Hubbard, a greal-granddaughter of 
Thomas Hubbard, one of the men burned at 
the stake during the reign of Queen ^lary 
of England on account of their religious l^e- 
lief. 

Peter Van Deventer. the great-grand- 
fatlier of our subject, belonged' to the Xew 
Jersey branch of the family, for whose head 
the British government offered five hundred 
pounds during the Revolutionary war. His 
son, Alajor Christopher \a.n Deventer, was 
a graduate of W^est Point and served as ad- 
jutant general to General Brown in the war 
of 181 2. At the battle of Chippewa creek he 
was captured and confined at Quebec until 
the cldse of the war. For some time he 
served as chief clerk under Calhoun. His 
son, James Van Deventer, the father of our 
subject, was born in Buffalo, X^ew York, 
studied for the bar and became a practicing 
attorney there. He ?er\-ed as major and 
lieutenant colonel of subsistence during the 
war of the Rebellion. He was afterward 
president of the Iowa Railroad Land Com- 
pany and was recognized not onlv as a: most 
prominent and prosperous business man, 
but as a leader O'f public thought and opinion. 
He was a stanch advocate of the Republican 
party and its principles. He married Jen- 
nie Clarke, a daughter of Cvrus Clarke, a 
well-knr'wn merchant of Brffalo, X"ew York. 

Cyrus Clarke Van Deventer was grad- 



uated at Hobart College in 1876, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts, while in 1879 
that of Master of Arts was CDuferrcd upon 
him. He engaged in business in lUiffalo 
from 1876 until 1886, when he came to 
Kingman, where he became one of the pro- 
moters of the Telephone Company. 

Prominent in the affairs of the city of 
Kinginan, his ability and trustworthiness 
being recognized by his fellow citizens, Mr. 
Van Deventer has been several times called 
to public office and for many years served as 
city clerk or city treasurer. He is an active 
Democrat and was a delegate to the Indiana- 
polis convention in 1896. In religious faith 
he is an Episcopalian and was one of the or- 
ganizers of the Episcopal church in King- 
man. He served as its first junior warden 
and upon the death of Dr. Lanning he be- 
came senior warden and has since continued 
in that office. He belongs to Xine Scab 
Lodge, Xo. 230, F. & A. 'M., of which he has 
served for two years as master. He has also 
been high priest of Kingman Chapter, Xo. 
71, F. & A. M. ; and belongs to Kingman 
Commander}-, Xo. 34, K. T. His worth and 
prominence are widely recognized in frater- 
nal, business, and political circles, and he is 
one of the intelligent, enterprising men of 
the west, influential in molding public 
thought, opinion and policy, and standing 
as a high type of our stalwart American 
manhood. 



C. Y. PLAXK 



C. y. Plank, one of the early pioneers 
and leading agriculturists of Rice county, 
was born in Lagrange county, Indiana, on 
the 15th of June, 1852. His father, Isaac 
Plank, is a native of Wayne county, Ohio, 
and of German descent. He was reared on 
a farm in the state of his nativity, and when 
a young man was united in marriage to 
Elizabeth X'ofziger, a native of the Buckeye 
state and a daughter of Valentine X^ofziger, 
of Pennsyh-ania-German descent. After 
their marriage. Isaac and Elizabeth Plank 
removed to Elkhart countv, Indiana, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



five years later located in Lagrange county, 
that state, where they still reside, honored 
and respected by all who know them. The 
father has been a fanner all his life, and 
he also owns a valuable farm of three hun- 
dred and twenty acres in Rice county, Kan- 
sas. He has rounded the Psalmists span 
of three-score years and ten, being now in 
his seventy-ninth year, and his wife has 
reached the good old age of seventy-seven 
years. His political support is given the Re- 
publican party, and both he and his wife hold 
membership in the Amish church. This 
worthy couple are the parents of seven chil- 
dren, namely: Levi, a prominent farmer 
of Harrison township. Rice county; Jacob, 
who resides southwest of Lyons ; Elizabeth, 
who yet resides in Indiana; Christian V., 
the sirbject of this review; David, a resident 
of Idahn; Ephraim, also of that state; and 
Isaac, whii makes his home in Oklahoma. 

Christian Y. Plank was reared on the old 
family homestead in Lagrange count)', In- 
diana, where he was early taught the \-alue 
of industry and economy as a preparation 
for the active duties of life. He remained un- 
der the -parental roof until twenty-one years 
of age, when he began life on his own ac- 
count, and as a companion and helpmate on 
the journey of life he chose Celestia Smeltz- 
ly, the wedding being celebrated in Lagrange 
county. Indiana, in 1877. She was born in 
Ohio, where she was reared until seven 
years of age, and was a daughter of Chris- 
tian and Mary (Lehmer) Smeltzly, who still 
reside in Indiana. The union of our subject 
and wife has been blessed with three chil- 
dren, — Claude, who is now twenty-one years 
of age, Mary and Florence. 

In the fall of 1878 Mr. Plank came to 
Kansas, and in the following spring he lo- 
cated on one hundred and sixty acres of his 
present farm. As the years have passed he 
has prospered in his undertakings and has 
added to his original purchase until he now 
owns four hundred acres, in one body. His 
farm is located on section 27, Victoria town- 
ship, and there he is engaged in the culti- 
vation of the cereals best adapted to this soil 
and climate and in the raising of a good 



grade of cattle, horses and swine. He has a 
good farm residence, a barn thirty-eight by 
forty-eight feet, a beautiful grove and 
orchard, and all necessary outbuildings and 
improvements, and a glance at his well regu- 
lated place indicates to the passer-by the 
careful supervision of a progressi\'e owner. 
He is well versed in all branches of farm 
work, and his life has been characterized by 
energy, perseverance and hard work, quali- 
ties which have won him a high and well 
merited degree of success. 



HENRY S. HOYT. 



The year 1877 witnessed the arrival of 
Henry S. Hoyt in Ellsworth county, and he 
took up his abode on section fourteen, Gar- 
field township, where he yet makes his home, 
•although the farm of to-day, with its splen- 
did equipments, bears little resemblance to 
the undeveloped tract of which he obtained 
possession almost a quarter of a century ago. 
The buildings, including a fine residence and 
large barn, are built of stone, and everything 
indicates the careful supervision of one 
whose methods are progressive, whose ideas 
are practical and whose elTorts therefore are 
crowned with success. 

i\Ir. Hoyt was born in what was then 
Ne-\vburg, now Cle\'eland, Ohio, January 19, 
1834. His father, Lriah Hoyt, was a na- 
tive of Vermont and after spending a short 
time in Canada went to Ohio. He was a 
tanner and currier by trade. In the Green 
Mountain state he married Comfort Day- 
ton, \\ho was descended from one of the Pil- 
grim Eathers. They had eleven children, of 
whon'i Henry S. is the eldest son and the only 
one living in this portion of the country. 
The Hoyts are one of the old families of 
America and the}' have complete records 
back to tlie da}-s when the first of the name 
came to the new world, but the copy which 
our subject possessed was destroyed by fire 
in 1895, his residence being burned at that 
time. The father was a W'hig in his early 
political affiliations and afterward became a 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



Republican. He took an active interest in 
politics and in educational affairs and was a 
member of the Disciples church. Both he 
and his wife died in Ohio. 

Henry S. Hoyt pursued his education in 
the district schools and when young he 
learned the tanner's trade under the direction 
uf his father, while later he mastered' the 
trade of paper-making. He started out upon 
his own account when about nineteen years 
of age, and at the age of twenty he was 
married and began keeping house. In the 
fall of 1855 he removed to Illinois and fol- 
luwed farming in Lake county, that state, 
for six years, after which he returned to 
Ohio and worked at his trade. In the first 
year of the civil war he enlisted, and at the 
close of his three months' term was honor- 
ably discharged. On the 17th of August, 

1864, he again entered the army, becoming 
a member of Company C, Secmd Ohio 
Heavy Artillery, with which he ^aw service 
in Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia. He 
was once wounded by a bayonet thrust 
through the fleshy part of his right leg but 
did not leave the field on that account. He 
suft'ered more from exposure than from 
wounds. At Nashville, Tennessee, July 17, 

1865, he received an honorable discharge. 
Returning to Ohio Mr. Hoyt was con- 
nected with a paper mill for a time and later 
engaged in farming there for three years. 
In 1878 he came to Kansas, arriving in 
April, where he bought out the man who had 
filed a claim on the place where Mr. Hoyt 
now lives. He then started in to get the 
farm in good shape, erected a house and be- 
gan raising both grain and stock. Having 
fine bottom land on the Mulberry he can 
raise corn when others fail. For twenty 
successive years he has raised good corn 
crops in the same field. He raises native 
cattle and always has good grades. He 
owns a pedigreed Durham bull and has thus 
graded his stock. Formerly he was exten- 
sively engaged in dairying, but now that he 
and his wife are alone he has abandoned that 
branch of his business. They made such 
excellent butter that they could always se- 
cure for it twenty-five cents per pound, even 



when the regular price of butter on the mar- 
ket was ten cents. Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt have 
lived through the hard times here, but have 
persevered in their attempt to establish a 
home here and their labors have eventualh' 
been crowned with a high degree of success. 
He now owns twoi hundred and sixty acres of 
valuable land on the south bank of the Mul- 
berry, and his improvements are all of the 
most substantial kind. The stiMie liain. 
erected in SS", is thirty-twn l)y lift_\- fcL-t. 
There are alsu two l;a-ge c .rrals, liuth of 
stone, the walls being built by Mr. Hoyt. In 
November, 1895, he met with a severe loss, 
his dwelling with all its contents being en- 
tirely ilestriiyed by fire, and he and his wife 
having nuthing left but the cfothing which 
they wore. With characteristic energy he 
began the erection of a new home, which 
Phcenix-like rose from the ashes, and the}' 
now have a very comifortable residence. 
Upon the place there is also a good orchard 
and he has planted two acres of mulberries 
and a number of cottonwood trees. He is 
largely engaged in the raising of liogs and is 
the owner of two especially fine teams, his 
driving team, a span of large grays being 
particularly speedy. 

The lady who bears the name of Mrs. 
Hoyt was in her maidenhood Miss Marcia 
F. Oaks, and their marriage w'as celebrated 
July 12, 1854. Her parents were George 
and Eveline (Foster) Oaks, the former a 
native of Massachusetts, whence his parents 
removed to New York when he was ten years 
of age. Tliere he followed farming and also 
carried on the same pursuit after going to 
Ohio, in which state his death eventually oc- 
curred. The family is of English descent 
on the paternal side, but the grandmother 
was of East India Dutch stock. Unto Mv. 
and Mrs. Hoyt have been born three chil- 
dren : Sarah, now the wife of Washington 
Litch, of Topeka ; David Gerard, who also is 
living in Topeka ; and Ellen, who died in 
infancy. 

In his political views i\Ir. Hoyt has al- 
ways been a Republican, but at local elec- 
tions where there is no issue up before the 
people he \-otes independently of party ties. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



He does all in his pOAver, hoavever, to secure 
the adoption of his party principles and liis 
services have been recognized by the party 
which has frequently elected him to office. 
He has served as township treasurer, has 
been treasurer of the school district for nine 
years, was township trustee and assessor, 
was county committeemen for three years 
from the first district, was county commis- 
sioner for three years, and has always proved 
a good and efficient officer. Socially he is 
connected with the Masonic fraternity and 
among his brethren he is held in high es- 
teem — a feeling which is entertained for him 
whereA'er he is known. 



WILLIS X. BAKER. 

A native of Michigan, Mr. Baker was 
born at Battle Creek, on the 20th of Octo- 
ber, 1S60, a son of James and Lucy A. 
(Webster) Baker, the former a native of 
New York and the latter of the Wolverine 
state. The father was reared in his native 
state and in early manhood went to Mich- 
igan, engaging in mercantile pursuits in 
Battle Creek. Leaving that place he went to 
Belle Plaine, Iowa, where lie again conduct- 
ed a mercantile establishment. In 1887 he 
took up his alx)de in Hutchinson, Kansas, 
and engaged in the real-estate and loan 
business, and in 1892 became associated with 
the banking interests of the county. In con- 
nection with his son, ^\'illis N. Baker, he 
organized' the Farmers State Bank at Pretty 
Prairie. Reno county, conducting that insti- 
tution for five years, when in the fall of 1897 
they organized the State Exchange Bank of 
Hutchinson, with the father as president, 
the son as cashier, in which positions they 
had respectively served in Pretty Prairie. 
Here they began doing a general banking 
business, making a specialty of farm loans 
and investments. The father died January 
20, 1900. He was one of the successful busi- 
ness men and respected citizens of Hutchin- 
son who during a comparatively short resi- 
dence in this citv became favorablv known 



in financial circles for his strictly honorable 
dealings and his business ability, and socially 
for his many worthy and estimable quali- 
ties. In his political views he was a stanch 
Republican and in his chifrch relations was 
a Presbyterian. He often held office in the 
church to. which he belonged' and was serv- 
ing as an elder at the time of his death. His 
widonv is still living with her son. 

^^'illis N. Baker was the only child born 
to his parents and was reared under the 
parental roof, acquiring his preliminary edu- 
cation in the public schools of Belle Plaine, 
Iowa. At the age of sixteen he matriculated 
in the State University at Iowa City and was 
graduated in the class of 1883, standing sec- 
ond in a class of forty. After completing his 
college course he joined his father in busi- 
ness, becoming his partner, an association 
that was maintained until the father's death, 
when he succeeded to the presidency of the 
bank. For a number of years he had been 
the virtual manager of the business, his fa- 
ther encouraging him from his boyhood to 
assume personal responsibility and giving 
him all the aid possible that would fit him 
for the conduct of important affairs. As 
the son mastered business methods and 
principles the father more and more re- 
legated to him the control of their banking 
interests and prior to his father's death he 
was the virtual president of the State Ex- 
change Bank of Hutchinson, which is now 
widely recognized as a leading and reliable 
financial institution of this part of the state. 
He served as president of this bank until 
Januan-, 1902. 

On'the 20th of October, 1887, Air. Baker 
was united in marriage to Miss Nellie M. 
Norton, a daughter of George and Frances 
(Stone) Norton. She was born in St. 
Charles, Illinois, and is a most estimable 
lady who has made her hospitable home a 
favorite resort with their many friends. Mr. 
Baker's reputation in banking circles 
throughout the state is indicated by the fact 
that at the state convention of bankers htld 
in 1901 he was elected to the ofiice of vice- 
president for Group 3 of the state asso- 
ciation. His influence and efforts, however. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



have not been confined entirely to business 
matters, as lie has taken an active part in 
educational, religious and social affairs and 
withholds his support from no movement 
or measure which promises advancement 
along- any of these lines. In fact he is a 
leader in such progress and his opinions 
carry weight with the public mind. In the 
jNIasonic order he has attained the Knight 
Templar degree, and of Reno Lodge, No. 
99, I. O. O. F., he is a past noble grand. 
He is an active and official member of the 
Presbyterian church. For several years he 
has served as deacon, has taken a leading 
part in the various branches of church and 
Sunday-school work, and has ser\-ed as su- 
perintendent of the latter. In politics he is 
Republican and while he keeps well in- 
formed on the issues of the day, as every 
true American citizen should do, he has 
never sought or desired political prefer- 
ment. The cause of education has ever 
found in him a warm friend and he is al- 
ways on the side of progress, reform, and 
improvement. 



JOHN C. FREMONT CRAWFORD. 

John C. F. Crawford, who for a number 
of years has occupied a very conspicuous 
place among the leading business men of 
Reno county, was born in Allen county, In- 
diana, on the 20th of November, 1856. His 
father, John Crawford, claimed Ohio' as the 
state of his nativity, his birth there occur- 
ring in Columbiana county on the 6th of 
November, 1820, and in that county his fa- 
ther, Samuel Crawford, lived and died. He 
was probably born in the Buckeye state, and 
was there married to Kate George, a native 
of Columbiana county. The great-great- 
grandfather of our subject reached the re- 
markable age of one hundred years, passing 
away ni Columbiana county. John Craw- 
ford, the father of him whose name intro- 
duces this review was married in that coun- 
ty, in' 1853, to Elizabeth A. Bowman, and 
she, too, was born in Columbiana countv. 



Prior to his marriage, however, Mr. Craw- 
ford had removed to Allen county, Indiana, 
and had purchased a farm of one hundred 
and twenty-three acres of heavily timbered 
land, and with his bride he located in the 
dense forest. At the call of one hundred 
day men during the war of tlie Rebellion he 
nobly put aside all personal considerations 
and responded to the call of duty, and on re- 
turning to his home after the expiration of 
his term of service he found that his loving 
wife had passed away in death just the day 
before his return. About eleven years ago 
he retired from the active duties of farm life 
and since that time has made his home at 
Roanoke, Huntington county, Indiana. His 
political support is given to the Republican 
party, and socially he is a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic and the Odd 
Fellows fraternity. His religious prefer- 
ence is indicated by his membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church. By his first 
marriage he became the father of four chil- 
dren, — Noah Henry, who is engaged with 
the Packard Organ Company, of Fort 
Wayne, Indiana: John C. F., the subject of 
this review; Christian Frank Y., ah agent 
for the Wabash Railroad Company at Catlin. 
Illinois; and Sarah Emaline, the wife of 
Austin Hamlin Lopshire, a hotel proprietor 
of Fort Wayne. About 1867, in Columbiana 
county, Ohio, Mr. Crawford w^as united in 
marriage to Sarah Armstrong, and they had 
three children, — Hattie, who died in child- 
hood; Perr>- M., who is engaged in the hard- 
ware business at Rogers, Ohio; and Effie 
Elma, who died in Allen countv, Indiana, in 
1899. 

John C. Fremont Crawford, of this re- 
view, remained on the home fann with his 
father until he was twenty-si.x years of age, 
after which for a short time he was employed 
in railroad work. In the spring of 1883 he 
took charge of his aunt's, Mrs. Sarah Bow- 
man, farm, and in the following spring he 
came to Kansas, locating first in Saline 
county, where he fomied a partmership with 
his cousin and together they purchased a 
quarter section of land, which they farmed 
during that season. Our subject then be- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



came dissatisfied with the place, as the land 
was hilly and unproductive, and he sold his 
interest to his cousin and came to Reno coun- 
ty in the fall of 1884, where in the following 
spring he purchased the lots on which his 
present residence now stands, erecting a 
small house fourteen by eighteen feet. At 
that time his land was located in the wild 
prairie, there being then but eleven houses 
south of what is now East C street. From 
that time until the spring of 1886 he was 
engaged in teaming, after which he removed 
to Kiowa county, Kansas, and pre-empted 
one hundred and forty -five acres, but after 
a time he abandoned farming and returned 
to Hutchinson, although he still retains pos- 
session of his land. In the spring of 1887 
Air. Crawford took up the trade of carpen- 
tering, which he had learned of David Boyle, 
of Hutchinson, and with him he carried on 
that occupation for the following five years, 
since which time he has been alone in busi- 
ness. He has assisted in building the many 
establishments for the Hutchinson Packing 
Company, having been employed by that 
company long before it engaged in the salt 
busmesS, his work there covering the period 



from 1 89 1 until 



He has tw'ice en- 



larged and remodeled his home, which is 
now a tasteful and attractive residence, and 
has planted his ground with grape vines and 
pear, peach and apple trees. 

On the 3d of April, 1883. at Fort Wayne, 
Indiana, Mr. Crawford was united in mar- 
riage to Anna Hamilton, who was born in 
Allen county, Indiana, a daughter of Will- 
iam A. and Barbara (Scott) Hamilton, the 
father a native of Allen county, Indiana, and 
the mother of Licking county, Ohio. They 
now reside on the farm on which they orig- 
inally located in Allen county. The union 
of our subject and wife has been blessed with 
two children, — Edna, who was born Jan- 
uary 12, 1890, and Jay, born January 4, 
1892, and Ixith are attending the Maple 
school, of Hutchinson. In matters of na- 
tional importance Mr. Crawford gives his 
support to the Republican party, but was 
made councilman of his city against both the 
Republican and Citizens tickets, having been 



elected to the position by a majority of one 
hundred votes, and in 1901 he completed his 
two years" tenn. He is now serving as a 
member of the school board, having been 
elected to that position on the Citizens ticket, 
and he is a member of the building commit- 
tee. He has passed all the chairs and is now 
past grand of the Odd Fellows fraternity, 
and is also a member of the Red Men, while 
both he and his wife are identified with the 
Court of Honor. 



JAMES :\I. JORDAN. 

Few traveling men of Kansas and the 
southwest have a wider acquaintance or 
are more generally esteemed than James i\I. 
Jordan, of Hutchinson, who for se\-enteen 
years has represented upon the road the 
firm of R. L. McDonald & Company, of St. 
Joseph, manufacturers of men's furnishing 
goods. He has been a resident of this city 
since 1872 and has therefore witnessed the 
greater part of its growth and development, 
having become identified with its mercan- 
tile interests in the early period of its up- 
building. 

Mr. Jordan was born in Cabell county. 
Virginia, in 1849, and is a son of Chapman 
Jordan, who was also a native of the Old 
Dominion. Our subject is a representative 
of the fourth generation of the family that 
has resided in America. In 1867 his father 
removed westward with the family to ]\Iis- 
souri and after James ]M. came to Hutchin- 
son he also took up his abode here, but sub- 
sequently removed to Lawrence, Kansas, 
where he spent his remaining days. He 
was married near Gallipolis, Ohio, to -Miss 
Maria Sloan, and they became the parents 
of seven children. John M., who came to 
Hutchinson in the fall of 1871 and started 
in business here, but is now a resident of 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa ; Jackson, deceased : 
James M. ; Margaret A. and \\'illiam M.. 
who have also passed away ; Dallas and 
Emma, who are living in Lea\'enworth, 
Kansas. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



23 



James M. Jordan pursued his educa- 
tion largely in the public schools of Indiana 
and when a young man became connected 
with mercantile life. Joining his brother 
John in Hutchinson in 1872 they made 
plans whereby a branch house was estab- 
lished in Medicine Lodge — this being the 
first general store in that place — and of this 
our subject took charge. After a short time, 
however, he sold out and returned to 
Hutchinson, entering the store here. He 
was thus engaged in merchandising until 
1874, when he disposed of his interests and 
was afterwards associated with different 
mercantile firms until January, 1884, 
when he entered the ser\-ice of R. L. Mc- 
Donald & Company, of St. JosqMi, J\lis- 
souri, with Avhom he has since remained as 
their traveling rq^resentative in the territory 
co\-ered by southern Kansas, northern 
Texas, Oklahoma and Indian Territory. 
Before Oklahoma was opened up he also 
made New Mexico and Colorado. He 
makes four trips annually to the more 
thickly populated districts and Texas he 
visits about twice each year. He is very 
pijpular on the road and with the many pa- 
trons riiat he has secured for the house, and 
the firm which he represents allows him the 
utmost liberty and freedom in carr\-ing on 
his work, for they have implicit confidence 
in his ability and trustworthiness. 

On the 26th of July, 1869, in Missouri, 
INIr. Jordan was united in marriage to Miss 
Alargaret A. Burkhart, a daughter of 
George Burkhart, a farmer of Carroll coun- 
t}-, that state. They became the parents of 
seven children, but only three are living: 
William S., a graduate of the high school 
of Hutchinson, who is engaged in the dry- 
goods business in Pittsburg, Kansas, and 
married Bird Oviatt, of Astoria, Illinois, by 
whom he has one child, Eugene, who is 
with the Star Clothiers, of Hutchinson, and 
Xina 'Ms.y, at home. ]\Ir. Jurdan has erect- 
ed two residences in Hutchinsnn and the 
family now occupy an attractive home. In 
poltics he is a Democrat and served as sec- 
retary of the Duval Campaign Club, but 
has usually taken no very active ixart in 



political work. He belongs to Reno Lodge, 
Xo. 140. F. & A. M.; Reno Chapter, Xo. 
34, R. A. ^I.; Hutchinson Council, X'o. 13, 
R. & S. AI. ; Reno Commandery, Xo. 26, 
K. T. ; Isis Temple of the Mystic Shrine, 
of Salina; and his wife is a member of 
Acacia Chapter, No. 37, O. E. S. She also 
belongs to the Baptist church and is a most 
estimable lady. In addition to his JNIasonic 
affiliation Mr. Jordan is a charter member 
of the United Commercial Travelers" Asso- 
ciation and was the second senior counsel 
of the organization in Hutchinson. He is 
a wide-awake, energetic and enterprising 
man, who in his business life has become 
an excellent judge of human nature. Tact 
as well as industr}- has made him an excel- 
lent traveling salesman and his honorable 
business methods have at all times won him 
the confidence of those with whom he has 
had dealings, while his genial manner and 
friendly disposition render him popular in 
all circles. 



PETER HUMMEL. 

From early in our historv tlie German 
element in our population has been one of 
its best factors. The German character has 
always made for progress and prosperity of 
the most substantial kind. Kansas is justly 
proud of 'its citizens who were born in the 
fatherland, and among those l>est known in 
Ellsworth co'unty is Peter Hummel, who 
lives on Blake's addition to Ellsworth and is 
the owner of a farm of two hundred and 
eighty acres in Noble township and also of 
much town property.- 

Peter Hummel was born at Heiback, 
Germany, October 19, 1843, a son of Lud- 
wig and Catherine ( Clech ) Hummel, both 
natives of Hesse-Darmstadt. Germany, 
where Mrs. Hummel died, when her son, the 
subject of this sketch, was four years old. 
In 1849, ^Ir- Hummel and his seven chil- 
dren came to .-Vmerica, and located in Frank- 
lin county. Pennsylvania, where they lived 
until 1856, when they removed to' Knox 
county, Illinois, where :\Ir. Hummel 
bought a farm of two hundred and forty 
acres, within five miles of Galesburg". 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



The subject of the sketch grew up on his 
father's farm near Galesburg, Illinois, and 
received such education as was afiforded in 
the public schools near his home. Novem- 
ber 9. 1S63, h^ enlisted in Company D, 
Seventh Regiment of Illinois Cavalry, under 
Captain Reynolds and Colonel Prince, and 
saw active service with General Sherman's 
command in Hatch's brigade in Tennessee, 
Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi* At 
Summerville his company was surrounded 
by Forrest's cafalry and did not escape 
without the loss -of forty men. He sen-ed 
continuously until the close of the war and 
his last service was on relief guard duty at 
East Port, near Eureka, Mississippi, when 
General Forrest came in and surrendered to 
the federal commander. He was honorably 
discharged from the United States service 
at Nashville, Tennessee, November 4, 1865, 
and, returning to Illinois, worked for farm- 
ers for wages until he had saved sufficient 
money to buy a team and wagon, when he 
rented a farm in Knox county, which he 
worked successfully until 1873, when he 
drov;e with horses from Illinois to Ells- 
worth, Kansas, where he secured a soldier's 
land claim within the borders of section 6, 
Columbia township. He put one hundred 
acres on his land under cultivation and 
otherwise improved the property and lived 
upon it until 1880, when he traded it for 
one hundred and sixty acres of section i, in 
the same township, where he was engaged 
in sheep raising until August, 1897, when 
he removed to his present home, the old 
Ramonsbury place, at Ellsworth. He has 
a fine two-storv house, surrounded by a 
large yard, nicely laid t)ut and ornamented 
with fruit trees and shrubbery. About that 
time he bought a half section in Enterprise 
township, and he .has altogether six hun- 
dred acres, which he rents to tenant farmers. 
Mr. Hummel is one of the representative 
citizens of the county, and has achieved a 
most worthy success. His public spirit is 
such that he alwa\-s aids every movement 
which in his judgment promises good to 
the people at large. He is especially inter- 
ested in educational matters and has served 
ably as a member of his township school 
board, and he has also filled the office of 



township treasurer. In politics he is a Re- 
publican ^nd in religion he adheres to the 
creed of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Hummel was married February 22, 
1882, to Miss Qara Erdtmann, of Ells- 
worth, Kansas, and has children named 
Amanda, George, John, Elma, Mata and 
Paul. 



HON. FRANK VINCENT. 

Few men in Reno county, Kansas, are 
more widely known than Hon. Frank Vin- 
cent, who has been prominently identified 
with the social, religious, educational and 
political development of this section of the 
state since the spring of 1874. His fellow 
citizens have honored him with many posi- 
tions of trust and responsibility, and he is 
now distinguished as the senator from the 
thirty-sixth senatorial district. 

Tlie birth of Senator Vincent occurred in 
Bro'wn county, Ohio, in May, 1853, ^"d he 
is a son of J. P. and Sophia (Miller) Vin- 
cent. The father was a native of Penns}l- 
vania, but in young manhood moved to Ohio 
and there engaged in business both as a 
merchant and farmer. There he married 
Sophia Aliller, and two children were born, 
Mr. Vincent of this biography being the 
only survivor. Later the father married 
Caroline Morehead, and had a family of 
nine children. In 1854 he moved with his 
family to Lucas county, Iowa, where he was 
a pioneer, and the mother died soon after 
their arrival. Mr. Vincent became a prom- 
inent man in that section and an active work- 
er and leader in the Methodist church. In 
1886 he removed to Hutchinson, Kansas, 
and spent his last days here, dying in 1898. 

Frank Vincent was but a babe one year 
old when the family exodus was made from 
Ohio to Iowa, and until he was seventeen 
years of age he attended school in that state. 
in March, 1874, he made his way to Hutch- 
inson, Kansas, and in the latter part of that 
year took up a one-quarter section in Castle- 
ton township and engaged in farming for a 
couple of years and then turned his attention 



t 




BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



25 



to mercantile pursuits, for three years con- 
ducting a store at Castleton. Having re- 
ceived the appointment of deputy register of 
deeds, he sold his business in Castleton and 
removed into Hutchinson, where two years 
later he opened a business in real estate and 
loans. Until 1888 Mr. Vincent was engaged 
in the above line, becoming then interested 
in the salt business, this having been one 
with which he has been connected ever since, 
holding now the position of general manager 
of the Hutchinson Salt Works. He was one 
of the incorporators of this company, and 
they had but one competitor. The Hutch- 
inson Salt Company started the plant known 
as the Vincent plant, later bought other 
plants and now control ten. In January, 
1900, the business was sold to the Hutchin- 
son, Kansas, Salt Company, a wealthy syn- 
dicate, and Mr. Vincent was retained as gen- 
eral manager. The salt business as now 
managed is the largest industry in the city 
of Hutchinson. The united plant has a ca- 
pacity of • forty-five hundred barrels a day, 
but ships only one million barrels annually. 
Employment is gi\'en to from four hundred 
and fifty to six hundr.ed men, according to 
the season, the business bringing comfort 
into many worthy homes. 

Senator Vincent invested largelv in farm- 
ing property and is among the largest land 
owners in the county, one of his valuable 
farms lying five miles north of the city, to 
which it is our subject's delight to drive. 
This comprises four hundred acres under 
cultivation, also three hundred and* twenty 
acres in pasture land, where are raised thor- 
nughbred Black Angus cattle, the finegt in 
this part of the state. Senator Vincent takes 
a ])ersonal interest and pride in his farm and 
tine cattle, enjoying the management more 
than either the strife of political or the com- 
petition of commercial life. In almost all of 
the various organizations of a public char- 
ricter he has taken a leading position. He 
w as one of the organizers of the Wholesale 
( iroters' Company, and for four }-ears was 
its vice-president, and was not only one of 
the organizers of the Hutchinson National 
I'.ank, but was also vice-president and direc- 



tor. Every educational and religious move- 
ment has had his hearty support, and he 
has liberally contributed to the erection of 
the various edifices. He has always been an 
active worker in the Republican party. For 
six years he served as mayor of the city, 
during which time he reduced the water 
rentals one-half and instituted many reforms. 
He was a delegate to the Republican national 
convention at St. Louis, at which the late 
lamented President McKinley was nomi- 
nated, and has been one of the leading mem- 
bers of his party in this locality. In 1900 
he was nominated for senator and was elect- 
ed by a majority of seven hundred. 

The marriage of Senator Vincent occur- 
red in August, 1874, to Miss Anna C. 
Payne, who was a daughter of Rev. John 
Payne, a farmer in Iowa and for over forty 
years a minister in the Methodist church. 
He now lives a retired life in the home of 
our subject, at the age of eighty-nine years. 
Seven children were born to this union, 
namely : Lizzie, who is the assistant post- 
mistress of this city; Frank, Jr., who is a 
shipping clerk in his father's office; George 
who superintends the farm ; Sophia ; Esther ; 
Louie; and Jay. In fraternal circles Senator 
Vincent has long been active, holding a 
membership in the Ancient Order of L'nited 
Workmen, and in the Alasonic order, be- 
longing to Reno Lodge, Xo. 140, to Reno 
Chapter, No. 38, and tO' the Commandery 
No. 26. The religious connection of the 
family is with the Presbyterian church, 
where Senator Vincent is a liberal contri- 
butor. His record as a politician has been 
unstained, and he stands a true representa- 
tive of the highest class of citizenshii) in 
Reno countv. 



JOHN S. SHUYLER. 

Labor forms the foundation of all pros- 
perity and it is to his enterprising and well 
directed efforts that our subject owes his 
position as a leading and representati\e 
farmer of Enterprise township, Reno coun- 
ty. He was born in Spencer county. In- 



26 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



diana, in 1846. His father, Michael P. 
Shuyler, who was born about the year' 1800, 
died in Spencer county, Indiana, in 1855. 
He followed blacksmithing as a means of 
livelihood, having learned the edge tool bus- 
iness in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and was 
an excellent workman. As a companion for 
the journey of life he chose Elizabeth Cies, 
who was born near Hagerstown, Maryland, 
and they had twelve children, of whom our 
subject was the youngest in order of birth, 
and of that large number, six sons and six 
daughters, all have passed away with the 
exception of John S. and his brother David, 
The latter is engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits in Huntsville township, Reno county, 
Kansas. The mother of this family died 
when our subject was but an infant, and 
the father was again married, the second 
union resulting in the birth of four children, 
of whom two, a son and daughter, still sur- 
vive: Louis, a resident of Boonville, In- 
diana ; and Seleta, wife of John R. Bacon, 
of Topeka, Kansas. The mother is now 
Mrs. Bacon and makes her home at Boon- 
ville, Indiana. 

John S. Shuyler, the subject of this 
review, made his home with his brother, 
David M., from his ninth to his fifteenth 
year, receiving but meager educational ad- 
vantages during that period, as his time was 
principally employed in the arduous task 
of clearing an Indiana farm from the heavy 
timber. At the early age of fifteen years, in 
January, 1862, he enlisted for service in the 
Civil war, entering the Sixty-second In- 
diana Volunteer Infantry, which regiment 
was afterward consolidated with the Fifty- 
third Indiana, and as a member of Com- 
pany G, he served in its ranks for three 
and a half years, during which time he 
participated in the battles of Corinth, Vicks- 
burg and Hatcher's Run, and was also with 
Sherman on his Atlanta campaign. Dur- 
ing his army service Mr. Shuyler also spent 
three months in the Overton hospital, at 
Memphis, Tennessee, where he suffered 
with a relapse of the measles. After re- 
covering his health he veteranized at Camp 



Heborne, Alississippi, and at Louisville, 
Kentucky, in August, 1865, he was honor- 
ably discharged, for the war had ended and 
the country no longer needed his services. 
After returning home he spent one winter 
in school, and afterward engaged in farm- 
ing the old Allen place, where he remained 
for two years, and for the following two 
years resided on a farm in Pike county, In- 
diana. In August, 1872, he began the 
journey westward with his team and 
wagon, working on the railroad and 
at other occupations during the trip, 
and after traveling over one thou- 
sand miles finally arrived in the Sun- 
flower state, where he secured a homestead 
of one hundred and sixty acres, on which 
he located on the 12th of July, 1873. Here 
he has ever since made his home, but as the 
years have passed by and prosperity has 
rewarded his efforts he has added to his 
original purchase until he now owns a half 
section of land, but farms in all three quar- 
ter sections. His principal crop is wheat 
and corn, and in one year he raised fifty- 
five hundred bushels of the latter cereal, 
while in 1901 his wheat crop yielded him 
four thousand bushels. He has planted all 
the fruit and shade trees which add so much 
to the value and attractive appearance of 
his place, and the many other improvements 
upon his farm stand as monuments to his 
thrift and ability. His present beautiful 
residence was erected in 1889, ^"d in the 
same year his large barn was also built, 
which is one of the finest structures of the 
kind in the county. In addition to the rais- 
ing of the cereals best adapted to this soil 
and climate Mr. Shuyler is also extensively 
engaged in the stock business, keeping on 
hand from ten to fifteen horses and large 
numbers of hogs, which are of the Poland 
China breed'. Success has abundantly re- 
warded his efforts since coming to the Sun- 
flower state, but the high position which he 
now occupies among the leading agricul- 
turists of Reno county has been attained 
through his enterprising spirit and his de- 
termined purpose. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



27 



On the 27th of March, 1867, was cele- 
braled the marriage of Mr. Shuyler and 
Miss Julia M. Allen. The lady is a native 
of the state of Tennessee, born in 1848, a 
daughter of \Villiam and Mary (Harden) 
Allen, natives also of that state. The fa- 
ther, who was a farmer by occupation, died 
in Indiana, leaving his widow with their 
tive children, four of whom still survive, — 
:\Irs. Shuyler; Alice, the wife of J. C. Kel- 
lum, a farmer of section two, Enterprise 
township; James L., who for many years 
has held an important position with the 
finn of Fuller & Fuller, in Chicago; and 
Rinda, now Mrs. Ed Behler and a resi- 
dent of Huntington, Indiana. Previous to 
her marriage with the father of these chil- 
dren the mother had wedded Robert B. 
Shaw and by that union had one child. She 
is now the widow of Perry Chinn and 
makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. 
Shuyler, having reached the ripe old age of 
eighty-five years. The children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Shuyler are as follows : W. 
P., wlio is a prominent agriculturist of 
Enterprise township, and has a son and 
daughter; Adella, wife of W. C. Detter, by 
whom she has two children; O. C, a farmer 
near Lerado, this county, and has one son; 
Florence, the wife of Jacob Detter; Harr}' 
A., who is attending the State Agricultural 
College; Mabel, a member of the Linsborg 
Musical College, where she is studying both 
vocal and piano music; Reynolds, a youth 
of fifteen years, who is attending the dis- 
trict schools; Mary Mildred, a maiden of 
ten summers; and Dean M., seven years of 
age. Those who passed away are: Mil- 
lard, who died at the age of nine months; 
Georgia Lee, who also died when only 
nine months old; and Floyd S., who 
died at the age of seventeen years. In his j 
political affiliations Mr. Shuyler is a Popu- 
list, but previous to his identification there- | 
with he was a supporter of Republican prin- 
ciples. He has served his township as a 
trustee for several terms, and for six 
years held the office of justice of the peace. 
He has a wide acquaintance in this section 
of the state, and his honestv in all trade 



transactions, his reliability in discharging 
his duties of citizenship and hs fidelity to 
the interests' of private life have won him 
marked esteem. 



JACOB W. LIGHT, M. D. 

Dr. Jacob W. Light, who has been suc- 
cessfully engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine in Kingman since 1884, was born near 
Fostoria, Ohio, in January, 1859, soon 
after the removal of his parents from Penn- 
sylvania to the Buckeye state. The fam- 
ily is of German lineage and the name was 
originally spelledi Lichte. Felix Light, the 
Doctor's father, was born in Pennsylvania 
and was a shoemaker by trade. He was 
married in his native state to Susan Pef- 
fer, who was of the same family to which 
Senator Peffer belonged. They became the 
parents of eleven children, nine of whom 
attained' years of maturity. The family 
were connected with the United Brethren 
church and were people of the highest re- 
spectability. 

The Doctor attended the district schools 
until eighteen years of age and then entered 
the Ada N'ormal College, at Ada. He en- 
gaged in teaching as a means whereby to 
procure the funds necessary for the con- 
tinuance of his studies, and this determina- 
tion to procure an education no matter 
what the difficulties which stood in the way 
showed forth the elemental strength of his 
character and gave promise of accomplish- 
ment in later life. Before going to Ada 
he made arrangauents to study medicine 
with a physician in Findlay, Ohio, but the 
accidental death of the ph3-sician forced 
him to change his plans, and after teaching 
for several years he became a student in the 
office of a physician in Columbus Grove, 
Ohio, reading under his direction all the 
time between the courses of lectures which 
he took in college. In March, 1884, he 
was graduated in the Pulte ATedical Col- 
lege, at Cincinnati, Ohio, winninL;" the prize 
there for the best work in physiology. 



28 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



Dr. Light then made his arrangements 
to remove to the west, and in June arrived 
in Kingman, which was then enjoying an 
era of marked progress. The railroad had 
just reached here and the Doctor complet- 
ed his journey on the construction train. 
There was only one brick building in the 
town and many conditions were primitive, 
but the western spirit of enterprise was 
soon to dominate the place and produce a 
transformation. Our subject entered into 
partnership with Dr. Yancey, who was the 
owner of a drug store in iCingman, but in 
the autumn following his arrival the part- 
nership was dissolved and Dr. Light en- 
tered upon an independent business career. 
\\'ith one exception he is the oldest resident 
physician of Kingman and his practice is 
proportionate to the length of his stay. \\'ith 
the growth of the town his patronage in- 
creased and from the 1>eginning he has en- 
joyed a successful professional career. Li 
the early days of his location here he was 
called as far as seventy-five miles and had 
to endure many hardships by making long 
drives across the country in storm as well 
as in sunshine, but he never refused to give 
his aid in alleviation of suffering. He is 
now called as far as thirty miles, and in 
Kingman and the immediate surrounding 
district he has a large business. He has 
been particularly successful in treating cases 
of dropsy, having effected cures in cases 
which others had pronounced incurable, and 
thus his reputation has gone abroad and 
won him high standing in his profession. He 
is a member of the Kansas State Medical 
Society and the American Institute of Hom- 
eopathy, and thus he keeps in touch with 
the advanced thought of the day along the 
lines of medical and surgical investigation 
and practice. In order to still further per- 
fect himself in his work he took a course in 
the Polyclinic in Chicago in 1893. 

Just before his 'removal to Kingman Dr. 
Light was married to Miss Aimee Sterling, 
the wedding being celebrated March 20, 
1884. in her home in Columbus Grove. With 
his bride he came to this city and their home 
has been blessed with three children, but 
only one is now li\ing. F. ]\Iarvin. In 1899 



the Doctor erected a fine residence at the 
corner of Spruce street and Avenue F. It 
is an ornament to the city and is the most 
modern dwelling here, being supplied with 
the latest improvements and conveniences. 
He also owns another house which he rents. 
He also has extensive stock raising inter- 
ests, having a fine herd of shorthorns. 

Dr. Light holds membership with the 
Ancient Order of United \\'orkmen and 
was formerly connected with the team of 
Select Knights. He is likewise a worthy 
exemplar of Ninnescah Lodge, F. & A. M. 
He is a member of the pension Ixiard and 
with the exception of four years has held 
the office of its secretary since 1888. He 
served for five years as county health officer 
and has been a member of the school board. 
In politics he has always been an earnest 
Republican, but has ever refused to become 
a candidate for office. He is regarded as 
one of the most skillful physicians of his 
locality. His knowledge and abilif}- in med- 
icine and surgery and all matters pertaining 
to the health of the body, his intelligence 
in other lines of study and his manly char- 
acter alike entitle him to esteem, and he is 
regarded with the highest respect in this 
and other communities. 



JAMES DUKELOW. 

The eminent position which Reno coun- 
ty, Kansas, has attained as a leading one in 
the state is in a large measure due to the 
class of citizens which makes up so large 
a proportion of her agricultural population. 
Among those who have succeeded and be- 
come subsitantial pillars oi the countv 
through their own well directed and intel- 
ligent efforts is James Dukelow, who has 
owned property here since 1880. 

The birth of Mr. Dukelow was in Great 
Britain in 1846, and he came to America 
prior to attaining his majority. For some 
years he was located in New England, trav- 
eling in the interests of the well known firm 
of J. Gould's Sons, tea iniporters of New 
York city, his business taking him through 
Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts, 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



his headquarters being in Boston. His first 
visit to Kansas was made in the interest of 
tiiis firm, being sent hither to make investi- 
gations concerning its fomier representa- 
tive, and wliile here he joined one of the 
tlome Seekers" excursions which went to 
look at land in this territory. The party 
made stops at Newton, at Florence, and at 
Hutchinson, and the greater number went 
on to Larned, but the location of this city 
pleased Mr. Dukelow the best, resulting in 
his buying the claim for the farm upon 
which he now resides, in 1880. He paid 
eight hundred dollars for the one hundred 
and sixty acres,' having the original deed 
made out tO' him. Then he returned tO' the 
east and closed up his business affairs there, 
agreeing with his former emplo}-ers to con- 
tinue to represent their house in this locality. 
This he did until increasing private business 
made it inexpedient. The improvements on 
the place consisted of a small frame shanty, 
and a shed which was made out of a straw 
]3ile. About eighty acres of the land had 
been broken, and after his locating, in 
the fall of that year, he put in wheat, 
and in the following spring began to 
]iut out some fruit trees. No trees of any 
kind were there prior to this, the beautiful 
grove which is one of the adornments of this 
ideal country home having all been planted 
and nurtured by our subject. The soil re- 
sponded so generously that he foimd it nec- 
essary at times to cut down some of the trees 
of his planting, as their spreading branches 
crowded each other. He has made a special- 
ty of fruit trees and he now has two hundred 
and sixteen acres in fruit alone, one hun- 
dred acres in peaches, twenty-five acres in 
grapes and twenty-seven acres in berries. 
Each year he cultix'ates ])iitatoes on fifteen 
acres, although the cereals, corn and oats, 
he considers his jirincipal crops. He has 
}'early added to his land and now owns fi\e 
farms and keeps all under his own supervi- 
sion, having them worked on the share s}-s- 
tem. In stock raising also he has pros- 
pered, and keeps hogs on three of his farms 
and also has about one hundred and fifty 
head of cattle. In the fall of 1899 he 
erected his elegant residence, this being one 



of the most comfortable and attractive 
homes in Reno county. 

The marriage of Mr. Dukelow was in 
September. 1873, to Miss Elizabeth Justice, 
who was born in Boston, Massachusetts. To 
this union three sons have been born, name- 
ly: Herbert L., Elmer R., and Howard ]M. 

Mr. Dukelow has l)een identified with 
almost all of the progressi\-e mii\-enients in 
the county since his locatidu here, and has 
been connected with many enterprises in a 
financial way. He was one of the organizers 
of the Citizens' Bank of Hutchinson, and fo-r 
four years was its president, resigning that 
honorable position on account of stress of 
personal business. The Presbyterian church 
in this locality owes much to his devotion, he 
being one of the pioneer memibers of that 
religious body, ever ready with time, influ- 
ence and means to promote its interests. For 
a long period he ser^^ed as chairman of the 
board of deacons in that church. In politi- 
cal sympathy he has alwavs been an ardent 
supporter of the Re])ulilicaii jiarlv, although 
in no sense a puliii'.-ian, dc-inii^ iiMue of the 
public offices, his .:\vii liUMiicss demanding 
his constant attention. Although he has 
been unusually successful since locating in 
Kansas, there is no mystery in it. He pre- 
pared himself by close attention to business 
for the work he had undertaken and gained 
a thorough- knowledge of the properties of 
the soil and its adaptatidu tn tlie various 
growths, of the scientific lireeding and eco- 
ncniiral feeding of st. ck. and with energy 
and intelligence carried this knowledge into 
practice. He is well and favorably known 
throueh Reno county, where he has hosts 
of friends and many imitators of his 
methods. 



FREDERICK J. BRUCE. 

Frederick J. Bruce is a farmer and stock- 
raiser residing on the east half of section 
14. Garfield township, Ellsworth county, 
and is the oldest settler' in this locality. 
Great indeed are the changes which ha\e 
occurred since his arrival, for he found an 
undeveloped section of the country, the land 



30 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



as yet not claimed for the purposes of civili- 
zation. Buffalo roamed over the prairies, 
and often going out on a hunt he has se- 
cured all that he could bring home with an 
ox team. As men from the east came to this 
portion of Kansas dug-outs and sod houses 
were seen as the homes of the settlers, and 
these in turn were replaced by the more 
commodious and modern frame residences, 
and the district has become the abiding 
place of a contented and prosperous farm- 
ing people, whosie homes surround thriving 
towns and villages where all kinds of manu- 
facturing and industrial interests are car- 
ried on. All these changes Mr. Bruce has 
witnessed since his arrival in Ellsworth 
county, in the fall of 1869. 

The family originated in Scotland but 
]Mr. Bruce of this re\-iew was born in the 
duchy of ^Mecklenburg, Germany, Decem- 
ber 27, 1839. His father, Frederick J. 
Bruce, was also a native of Gennany, and 
in 1852 came to America in the old sailing 
vessel Gibraltar, which was nine weeks up- 
on the water before reaching the harbor of 
Xew York. He was a tishennan in the 
old country and upon landing in the new 
world he went to Cleveland, Ohio, wdiere he 
followed the same pursuit until 1856, when 
he located upon a fann and there spent his 
remaining days. His political support was 
given to the Democracy. He married a 
]Miss Johnson and they became the parents 
of three children, but our subject is the 
only one now living. 

Frederick J. Bruce began work at a very 
earlv age, assisting in the cultivation of the 
home farm, upon which he remained until 
he had attained his majority. He enlisted 
in April, 1861, at the first call for troops, 
becoming a member of the Buckeye Rifles, 
but this regiment was not furnished with 
arms and was discharged without going to 
the front. Upon the three years' call he re- 
enlisted, on the 2ist of August, 1861, be- 
coming a member of Company K, Second 
Ohio Cavalry, which was assigned to the 
Army of the Frontier, thus serving until 
1863, when it was transferred to the Depart- 
ment of the Ohio, and in 1864 became a part 
of the Army of the Potomac. ?*Ir. Bruce 



participated in the battles of Independence, 
Carthage and Newtonia in Missouri; Cave 
Hill, Prairie Grove and White River, Ar- 
kansas ; Monticello and Columbia, Ken- 
tucky; and Greenville, \\'alker's Ford, 
Knoxville, Blue Springs, jNIorristown and 
Bean's Station, Tennessee. The regiment 
then changed its base of operations to \'ir- 
ginia and ]\Ir. Bruce participated in the bat- 
tles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Han- 
over Court House, Ashland, Nottawav 
Creek, Stone's Creek, Ream's Station, Win- 
chester, Berryville, Opequan, Luray Val- 
ley, Tom's Brook, Cedar Creek, Middle 
Road, Lacey Spring, Five Forks, Sailor's 
Creek and Appomattox, Virginia ; and 
Charlestown, West Virginia. On the 9th 
of May, 1864, he was wounded by a minie 
ball in the right breast and left hip, at Spott- 
sylvania. From Augvist, 1864, until dis- 
charged he served as orderly to General Cus- 
'. ter. He was honorably discharged on the 
; 1st of July, 1864, but re-enlisted as a vet- 
eran on the same day, and his final discharge 
was received at Camp Chase, Columbus, 
Ohio, September 11, 1865. 

Mr. Bruce afterward began work upon 
a farm near Chagrin Falls, Ohio, and a year 
later he was married and began farming on 
his own account. It was on the i8th of Oc- 
tober, 1866, at Chagrin Falls, that he mar- 
ried Miss ^lan' Meeker, a daughter of Dan- 
iel Abner and Sidney (Clark) IMeeker. Her 
father was born in New Jersey, whence he 
removed to Ohio, where the birth of Mrs. 
Bruce occurred. Our subject and his wife 
began their domestic life in Ohio, where he 
engaged in the dairy business and the manu- 
facture of cheeses, carrying on that pur- 
suit for three years. During the first year 
of his army service he had visited Kansas 
and the Indian Territory, and believing that 
he would have a better chance to getting 
a home of his own in the west, he came to 
the Sunflower state in 1869 and took up a 
soldier's homestead on the quarter section 
of land where he now resides. There were 
a few settlers living on the creek in Saline 
cotmty, but there was not a house, nor had 
a furrow been turned, between his home and 
Fort Harker. It looked dismal enough, as 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



the prairie liad been burned over and there 
was not a tree or shrub in si,s:ht. There were 
also many snakes on the prairie and Mr. 
Bruce frequently killed rattlers aroiuid his 
home. He erected a small frame house and 
started in to cultivate the g-round, raising 
potatoes and garden vfegetables to sell in 
Ellsworth and Salina, the two nearest mark- 
ets to his home. Later he began raising 
grain and afterward made a start in the 
cattle business by raising a few head of 
stock. He has living water upon his place, 
which makes the fami a good one for stock 
raising purposes. At the present time his 
attention is devoted to the raising of cattle 
and hogs. He owns a thoroughbred Dur- 
ham bull which he is cross-breeding with 
his stock. He has had sixty acres of land 
and has given his daughter eighty acres, 
but cultivates the balance of his farm. He 
has planted all of the trees on his place and 
is now cutting' cordwood. many of the trees 
being from eighteen to twenty inches in di- 
ameter. He has also planted fruit trees, 
which are in good bearing condition. His 
farm is now valuable and especially attrac- 
tive in appearance, and all of the improve- 
ments upon it stand as monuments to his 
enterprise. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce has 
been blessed with four children, but Willie 
and Anna died at the ages of fourteen and 
thirteen, respecti\-ely. \'enelia S. is the 
wife of Eli Bradford, who is engaged in 
fanning in this locality, and Frederick died 
at the age of one year. ^Ir. Bruce has 
served as township treasurer, and for about 
fifteen or sixteen years has been a member 
of the school board. He assisted in the 
organization of the school district, built the 
first school house and was also a member of 
the United Brethren church, the services 
being held in the school house until 18S3, 
when he was largely instrumental in secur- 
ing the erection of the present stone church. 
In former years he conducted services here 
and in other places, but owing to the effects 
of the wounds he sustained in the war, he 
has given up active ministerial work, al- 
though he still holds a license to preach, but 
seldom officiates in that capacity unless 
called upon to preside at some funeral. He 



has always been one of the trustees, and has 
labored effectively to promote the best in- 
terests of moral advancement. Socially he 
is identified with John A. Logan Post, No-. 
127, G. A. R., of Salina. 



ROBERT E. TANTON. 

Robert E. Tanton, who since 1879 has 
made his home in Ellsworth county, is now 
carrying on farming on section 21, Sher- 
man township. He is one of the worthy 
citizens that England has furnished to cen- 
tral Kansas, his birth having occurred on 
the "Merrie Isle" March 12, 1836, his par- 
ents being James and Rebecca ( Brinsmade) 
Tanton. He was reared and educated in 
his native land and when seventeen years of 
age came to the United States, crossing the 
Atlantic on the Rosalind Castle, which was 
five weeks in completing the voyage from 
Plymouth to Quebec. After reaching the 
new world he learned the wagonmaker's 
trade and remained in Canada for a year 
audi a half. On the expiration of that period 
he removed to Boone count\'. Illinois, where 
he remained for two or three \-ears and sub- 
sequently he went to Miimesnta, where he 
engaged in teaching school thmugh the win- 
ter, near Red Wing. He next took up his 
abode at Beloit, Wisconsin, where he re- 
mained for two years, and then went to- Mis- 
souri, spending a similar period in Macon 
City, after which he purchased a farm and 
followed agricultural pursuits for about 
nine years. He then sold that iimperty and 
went to Silver Citv. Coli-radn, Imt was not 
pleased with ;that sectinn of tlie country 
and returned tO' his family in Missouri. 

The year 1879 witnessed the arriwal of 
Mr. Tanton in Ellsworth cnunty, and here 
he purchased eighty acres of railroad land, 
•upon which he has since made his home. 
There was nr;t a tree or bush uimn the ]ilace, 
all being in the nati\-e sod. lie had (lri\'en 
from ]\lissouri in a prairie schooner drawn 
by a team of horses, and with these he be- 
gan breaking ground. Immediately after 
his arrival he erected a small frame house, 
which forms a- part of his present residence. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



He began farmin.s: in a small way and grad- 
ually was enabled to add to his possessions, 
purchasing an adjoining quarter section of 
land. He also engaged in the raising of cat- 
tle, and he usually sells his calves when two 
years old. However, the greater part of 
his attention is devoted to the production of 
wheat, which crop always gives a good yield 
in Kansas and the products of his farm find 
a ready sale on the market. He has sold 
eighty acres of his land, but still owns the 
original tract and another eighty acres. 

On the I2th of April, 1865, in Beloit, 
Wisconsin, Mr. Tanton was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Emma Maxworthy, a daugh- 
ter of George Maxworthy, who was born in 
England and came to America prior to the 
war of 1812, in which he participated. He 
afterward returned to his native land and 
was there united in marriage to Sabina S. 
Huxtable. He located at Statford. Gene- 
see county, New York, where Mrs. Stanton 
was born and reared. Later the family re- 
moved to Wisconsin, but both the parents 
died in Illinois. Mr. Maxworthy had a great 
desire to see the world and traveled exten- 
snvely in Europe, Asia and Africa, thereby 
gaining that knowledge and culture which 
only travel can bring. I\Irs. Tanton was one 
of "five children, two sons and three daugh- 
ters. Her two brothers, Albert and George, 
were both Union soldiers in the civil war. 
The latter enlisted as a member of Com- 
pany D, Second Delaware Regiment, and 
served with with the Army of the Potomac. 
He was captured at the battle of the Wil- 
derness and after eleven months spent in 
Andersonville prison died while thus in- 
carcerated. He was corporal of his com- 
pany. Albert was attending college in Be- 
loit at the time of the inauguration of the 
war, enlisting at that place. Mrs. Tanton 
has one sister living, Mrs. Mary Hinman. a 
resident of Boone coimty, Illinois. In her 
girlhood days Mrs. Tanton received excel- 
lent educational privileges. For one year 
she was a student in Ingham University, in 
Leroy, New York, and subsequently con- 
tinued her studies in the Haughton Sem- 
inary at Clinton, Oneida county. New York. 
She is a member of the ^^'oman's Relief 
Corps and she and her two older sons are 



members of the Baptist church. The mar- 
riage of Mr. and JNIrs. Tanton has been 
blessed with three children, namely: George, 
who is now farming in Oklahoma ; jNIax, a 
resident of Harper coimty, Kansas; and 
Burt, at home. The two elder sons were 
both successful teachers in Ellsworth county 
for three years each. 

In his political views ;\Ir. Tanton is in- 
dependent, preferring to support the men 
whom he thinks best qualified for office rath- 
er than follow the dictates of party. He has 
served as road overseer and as school di- 
rector and is known as a citizen of worth, 
true to the best interests of his county, state 
and nation. The many qualities which are 
characteristic of Mr. and ]\Irs. Tanton have 
gained for them the warm regard of a large 
circle of friends. 



CAPTAIN H. F. HOESMAN. 

Captain H. F. Hoesman is one of the 
honored pioneer citizens of Ellsworth coun- 
tv and veteran of the Ci\-il war, whose loy- 
alty to the Union was manifest upon south- 
ern battlefields. He was born January 15, 
184 1, in Auglaize county, Ohio, his parents 
being John A. and Engle (Klute) Floesman, 
both of whom were natives of Hanover. 
Germany. In the state of his nativity our 
subject was reared to manhood, residing 
there upon a farm' until nine years of age, 
when the family removed to New Bremen, 
where he attained his majority, being edu- 
cated in the German free schools. In his 
youth he learned the carpenter's trade, at 
which he worked until July 8. 1861, when, 
in response to his country's call for troops, 
he enlisted as a member of Company D, 
Thirty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as 
a private. He was soon promoted to the 
rank of sergeant, and on the 14th of April, 
1864, was commissioned captain and sen'ed 
until after the close of the war, receiving 
an honorable discharge on the 24th of April, 
1866. He was first on duty in Missouri, 
going down the Mississippi and taking part 
in the battle of Island No. 10 and in the 
Fort Pillow campaign. He was afterward 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



in the engag-ement at Corinth and the siege 
of that city, his reg-iment being- the first to 
raise its flag; in the town after its evacuation 
by the Confederate troops. His regiment 
was with the Army of the Tennessee and ai- 
terward in the Atlanta campaigii. 

^^'l^e^ the country no longer needed his 
ser\-ices the Captain returned to Ohio, and 
in ]\Iay, 1867, came to Ellsworth county, 
Kansas, where he embarked In the grocery 
business, which he conducted for two years. 
He was then engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness for a time, after which he entered the 
hardware store of J. L. Bell as bookkeeper. 
That connection was maintained until 1881, 
when he established a hardware and imple- 
mem lousiness of his own, which he con- 
ducted until January, 1899. He then sold 
out and has since been engaged in the real 
estate and insurance business, representing 
the Concordia, German, of Freeport, the 
Northwestern National and the Farmers 
and ]\l€rchants insurance companies. He 
writes many policies, and also does a large 
real estate business. In 1899 he was elected 
justice of the peace, in which office he has 
served in a capable and satisfactory manner, 
and for the past two years he has been no- 
tary public. He has taken an active part 
in public afifairs. He was elected the first 
mayor in 1870, was sheriff for two years, 
county clerk one year and township clerk 
one year. In 1872 he was elected to represent 
his district in the state legislature, where he 
served during the Pomeroy-York trouble. 
For tAVO years he was deputy treasurer and 
was chainnan of the board of county com- 
missioners for three tenns, or nine years, 
from 1878. In all his public offices he has 
manifested a liwal an*l patriotic spirit, dis- 
charging his duties with promptness and 
fidelity. In politics he is a prominent Re- 
publican, has been \tvx active in his party 
and has served on various committees, being 
a delegate to many of its conventions, also' 
a chairman of the county conventions. His 
labors have been of material benefit in pro- 
moting the welfare and progress of Ells- 
worth coimty along other lines, for he was 
one of the organizers and the secretary of 
the-EIlswiirth ^Mining Comnany, which was 
the first to make the discoverv of the salt 



deposjt underlying this county, and also as- 
sisted in locating the Midland j\.ddition to 
Ellsworth. He has been interested in resi- 
dence and business property in the city and 
has co-operated in even'thing which he be- 
lieved would prove of general good along 
substantial lines of advancement. 

On the 2ist of February, 1884, Cajitaiu 
Hoesman was united in marriaL;(.' i^ Miss 
Esther B. Lyons, a daughter of Mrs. Sarali 
Lyons, of Ottumwa, Iowa. Her death oc- 
curred December 29, 1898, and she left one 
child to mourn her loss, Sarah E., w'ho' yet 
resides with her father. Socially the Cap- 
tain is connected with Ellsworth Lodge, No. 
146, F. & A. M., and was its first worship- 
ful master. He assisted in organizing Ells- 
worth Chapter, No. 54. R. A. M., of which 
he is past high priest, and also took part in 
the organization of St. Aldemar Command- 
ery, No. 33, K. T., of which he was the 
first conmrander. and in fonning Ellsworth 
Council, No. 9, R. & S. M., of which he is 
a past thrice illustrious master. He is like- 
wise a member of Isis Temple of the Mys- 
tic Shrine at Salina. Wherever he is known 
he is held in high regard by reason of his 
sterling worth, his fidelity to principle and 
bis loyaltv in everv relation of life. 



DANIEL GILES. 



Daniel Giles occupies the important ])iisi- 
tion of foreman with the Kan>as ( ii'ain 
Company. His rise in the business wi irlil is 
due to his determined purpose, unflagging- 
energy and enterprise. He started out for 
himself at an early age without ca])ital, and 
brooking no obstacle that could be oxcrcome 
by resolution, he has \\-oi-kc(i liis \\a\- ^a■ad- 
ily upward until he is now a leading repre- 
sentative of the grain trade in central Kan- 
sas, his home lieing in Hutchinson. He was 
bo-ni in Carroll count}-, Indiana, December 
6, i860. His father, William Giles, was 
born in Kent, England, in 1812, and after 
his miarriage came to America about 1830, 
bringing with him his wife and five chil- 
dren. He landed at Quebec. Canada, but 
soon afterward removed to Rochester, New 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



York, where he remained for more than a 
year and t}jen went to White county, Indi- 
ana, where he followed farming for about 
twelve years. His next place of residence 
was in CaiToll county, that state, where he 
carried on agricultural pursuits until 1861. 
He then returned to White county and 
bought a farm of one hundred acres partially 
improved, continuing its further develop- 
ment until his death, January 15, 1883. He 
was a Democrat in his political affiliations. 
He was twice married and by the first union 
had three children, who are yet living : John 
H., a retired farmer, now engaged in build- 
ing and improving city property in Brooks- 
ton, White county, Indiana ; Mary Ann, the 
wife of John Foster, a fanner of Oklahoma ; 
and Janet, the wife of Gustavus Fewell, an 
agriculturist of White county, Indiana. For 
his second wife William Giles married Han- 
nah Butcher, who was born in Greenbrier 
county, Virginia, about 1821. They were 
married in Carroll county, Indiana, in 1858 
and she is now living on the old homestead 
in \Miite county at the age of seventy years. 
They were the parents oi so'cn children, of 
whom five are living, namely: Daniel, the 
subject of this review; Nelson, a farmer of 
White county, Indiana; Edtwin, a farmer of 
^^'hite county. Indiana, located at Brooks- 
ton; Helen, who died in infancy; Zuillah, 
the wife of Benjamin Rush, a resident farm- 
er of -White county, Indiana; Lillie Belle, 
who married James Shigley. also a farmer 
of White county, Indiana; and Alice, who 
died in infancy. 

In the common schools of White county, 
Indiana. Daniel Giles was educated, and up- 
on his father's fami he assisted in the culti- 
vation of the fields until fifteen years of 
age, when he began work as a farm hand in 
the neighborhood, his time being thus occu- 
pied until he was twenty-two years of age. 
On the 1st of March. 1883, in Carroll coun- 
ty, Indiana, he wedded Ida May Reed, who 
was born in White county and was a daugh- 
ter of Francis Marion and Hellen M. 
(Compton) Reed, both of whom were na- 
tives of the Hoosier state. Mrs. Giles is of 
Scotch and Irish descent. Her father en- 
listed in the Union anny during the Civil 



war and died in the service. His wife 
passed away in White county, Indiana. 

Mr. Giles, abandoning farming, learned 
the carpenter's trade with Cockran Brothers, 
of Brookston, ranaining in their employ 
for two years. In the spring of 1886 he lo- 
cated in Conway Springs, Sumner county, 
Kansas, where he followed carpentering for 
a year, working for a part of the time on 
his own account. He thai removed to Fin- 
ney county, where he secured a homestead 
of one hundred and sixty acres, and during 
his three years' residence in that county 
he also pre-empted another quarter section 
of land and took a timber claim of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, making in all four 
hundred and eighty acres of land which he 
owned there. He lived on the pre-emption 
claim for a year and then removed to the 
homestead, where he continued for two 
years. On the former he built a frame house 
and on the latter a sod house and broke 
about sixty acres of land. In 1889. how- 
ever, he sold his property there and came 
to Hutchinson, where he followed carpen- 
tering until January, 1890, when he began 
working by the day for the Kansas Grain 
Company, being thus anpiloyed until June, 
when he was gi^-en the position of second 
foreman. He served in that capacity until 
June, 1893. when the company was dis- 
solved. It had been organized in Missouri 
and was dissolved on account of a techni- 
cality of the- law which required the prefix 
"the" to the name of all such corporations 
of the state, and a word lacking in the title 
of the Kansas Grain Company. A new com- 
pany was then organized with the article 
prefixed. During the time which elapsed 
between the dissolution and the organiza- 
tion, perhaps six or seven months, Mr. Giles 
again followed carpentering, but in October, 
1893. became foreman for the new company 
and has since served in that capacity. His 
duties are by no means light for he has en- 
tire supervision of all the complicated de- 
tails of the work within the house, inspect- 
ing all of the grain, securing employes and 
in short acting as the real head of the practi- 
cal working of the plant. He has gained 
this position by his thorough and conscien- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



±^ZZ72A 



tious service. Since becoming- foreman he 
has not lost a single day"s paj- and he richly 
merits and enjoys the entire confidence of 
the company. The plant is strictly modern, 
and one feature that is seldom seen west of 
Kansas Citv is the dust collecting system, 
bv means of which the dust is drawn from 
every part of the building to the furnace 
room, where it is consumed, thus greatly 
adding to the comfort and health of the em- 
ployes. ^\'hen the present company began 
business they had only an old building with 
a limited capacity, but in 1895 a large new 
elevator was erected with all modern equip- 
ments. In addition to the purchase and 
shipping of grain, the company manuafac- 
tures two grades of chopped feed, the plant 
being equipped with one set of rolls and one 
steel mill. A regular transfer system 
is conducted in the grain business, 
and all cleaning, mixing and grading 
is here done. The motive power of 
the plant is furnished by a two-hundred- 
and-fifty horse power St. Louis Corliss 
engine. The engine room, sixty by seventy- 
fi\-e feet, was built only two years ago and 
is of brick. The cleaning capacity o-f the 
plant is from twenty to twenty-five thousand 
bushels of grain every ten hours. The offi- 
cers of the The Kansas Grann Company are 
T. J. Templer. president; L. B. Young, sec- 
retary; W. K. Meridian, treasurer; and 
Daniel Giles, foreman. 

]\Ir. and "Sirs. Giles have a pretty modern 
residence on Twelfth Avenue "\\^est, of 
which tliey recently took possession. They 
have three children: Ethel Rosamond; 
Wilbert Claud; and Mary Helen, aged re- 
specti\ely. sixteen, thirteen and eight years. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Giles are members of 
the Christian church, with whicli they have 
been identified for twelve years, and for 
about eight years he has served as deacon. 
Socially he is connected witli^ the Modern 
^^■oodmen and Ivnights and Ladies of Se- 
curity. In politics he is a supporter of Dem- 
ocratic principles and votes with the party at 
state and national elections, but at local elec- 
tions, where no issue is involved, he is in- 
dependent, supporting the men whom he 
thinks best qualified for oflice. He is an 



earnest advocate of the temperance cause 
and does everything in his power to ad- 
vance those interests which tend to uplift 
humanity, giving his support to temperance, 
educational and church work. High and 
honorable principles have actuated his en- 
tire career and have gained him a reputa- 
tion in business which is above reproach. 



JOSEPH E. HUMPHREY. 

A genealogical work in three volumes 
published by Dr. Frederick Humphre}", of 
New York, shows that the Humphreys of 
America trace their ancestry to England. 
Two brothers of the name came from the 
mother country and one located in Virginia 
and the other in Pennsylvania, and from 
them all or nearly all of the Humphrevs in 
America are believed to be descended. A 
prominent representative of the family is 
ex-Governor Humphre}-, of Kansas. 
Another representative of the family well- 
known in Reno county and throughout the 
surrounding country is Joseph E. Humph- 
rey, postmaster at Nickerson. 

Joseph E. Humphrey was born Septem- 
ber 6, .1861, in Athens county, Ohio, a son 
of E. C. Humphrey, who was born in Wash- 
ington county, Ohio, in 1817, and is now 
living in .Athens ounty, that state, aged 
eight_\'-foin- }'ears and is in pn.^session of all 
his faculties. E. C. Humjihrey is a son of 
W. E. Himiphrey. a native of Pennsylvania 
and a pioneer in Ohio, who, while clearing 
up some land was accidentally killed Ijy a 
tree which he was chopping down. E. C. 
Humphrey was a member of Company E, 
Seventy-four Regiment, Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, in which he enlisted from Athens 
county, Ohio, in 1862, and in which he 
served until he was discharged in 1S63 on 
account oif a wound which he had received 
while attending to his duties as a soldier. He 
re-ailisted in the same rcL^iment and was 
detailed to take charge ni a pack train which 
went over the Cumberland mountains. He 
was inactive service until the close of the 
war and long suffered from disabilities 
which came upon him while in service. 



36 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



Tliough often urged by friends to apply for 
a pension, he steadfastly refused to do so, 
but late in life he permitted his son to make 
application in his behalf. His eldest son, 
John E. Humphrey, enlisted at the age of 
sixteen and he was killed in action at the 
age of seventeen years and fills an unkno^vn 
grave on a southern battlefield. He was an 
unusually large youth, being nearly six feet 
in heighth and otherwise well developed 
and, young as he was and brief as was his 
service, he made a record as a brave and de- 
\'Oted soldier, of which any man might well 
be proud. 

E. C. Humphrey-, father of the subject of 
this sketch, married Sarah Rigg, who was 
born at Brownsville, Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1823, daughter of William' 
Rigg. Mrs. Humphrey, who was twenty- 
one years old at the time of her marriage, 
was born at Brownsville, of a Quaker fam- 
ily. Her father, who was also born at 
Brownsville, in 1792, was a boat builder on 
the Ohio and Allegheny rivers and was a 
man of more than ordinary mentality and of 
fine and imposing physique, who was six 
feet and one inch in height and weighed two 
hundred and forty pounds. He reared three 
daughters and two sons, one of whom, Par- 
ker Rigg. is a contractor and builder at Ath- 
ens. Ohio, and another, !Mary, married A. 
Cooley. 

E. C. and Sarah (Rigg) Humphrey had 
four soiTS. The eldest was John E. Hum- 
phrey, who was killed in the Civil war, as 
has been stated. The next in order of birth 
was Charles E. Humphrey, who became a 
coach finisher and died of congestive chills 
at Alaska. Ohio, at the age of twenty-two 
years. He was not married. William E. 
Humphrey, the third son. is a farmer and 
lives at Albany, Ohio. He is married and 
has three children. The subject of this 
sketch is 'tJie fourth son of his parents in the 
order of birth. Their mother died in 
JIarch, 1889, aged sixty-six years. Their 
father was in early life a pattern-maker and 
was later a builder. 

Joseph E. Humphrey gained a high 
school education and then entered the office 
of the Athens. Ohio, Journal, to learn tlie 
printer's trade. He was a compositor in 



that establishment for eight years, and for 
two years filled the position of foreman. In 
1886 he went to Nickerson, Reno cotmty, 
Kanstas, and as a meml>er of the firm of 
Hendry & Humphrey, bought .the Nickerson 
Argosy at sheriff's sale. After publishing 
it about twelve years he was appointed post- 
master at Nickerson and sold his share in 
the publishing enterprise to Mr. Hendry, 
whose wife was ]\Ir. Humphrey's mother's 
sister ayd who had been a mother to him as 
she had to mjany others, who know her as 
one of the noblest women with \\-hom the\- 
have ever met. 

Mr. Humphrey is a member of Nickerson 
Lodge, No. 43, A. F. & A. M., of Nicker- 
son ; of Nickerson Lodge, No. 90, Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows ; and is a Knight 
of Pythias. He is at this time filling the 
office of worshipful master of his Masonic 
Lodge. He is an active and influential Re- 
publican and his appointment as postmaster, 
in 1899, came to him without a contest. He 
has been secretary of the Republican state 
convention several times and held that office 
in the convention of 1900, for the nomina- 
tion of state officers. 

Mr. Humphrey was married at St. Jo- 
seph, Missouri, April 24, 1901, to Miss Nel- 
lie B. McCoy, who was born, reared and 
educated in Ohio, and who for the past six 
}ears has been private secretary to the Ham- 
mond Packing Company, of Omaha. Mrs. 
Humphrey has been a stenographer since 
she was fifteen years old and at seventeen 
filled the responsible position of court ste- 
nographer. She is a member of the Episco- 
pal church. Mr. Humphrey has always taken 
an active part in advancing the prosperity of 
Nickerson and of Reno county. He is a 
man who has a kind word for every one and 
there is not a more popular postmaster in 
Kansas. 



FRANCIS M. SAIITH. 

The record of Francis M. Smith con- 
tains an acconnt of valiant ser\-ice in the 
civil war and of fidelitv to duty in every 
walk of life. He is numbered among the 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



37 



early settlers of Rice county, dating his res- 
idence from 1873. He was born in Cass 
county, Illinois, January 30, 1841, and is a 
son of James Job Smith, one of the oldest 
and most honored citizens of Lyons. The 
father was born in Cumiberland county, Ken- 
tucky, on the 5th of January, 18 13, and 
^\'as a son O'f James Smith, whose birth oc- 
curred in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1782. 
The great-grandfather of our subject was 
Samuel Smith, who removed tb North Car- 
olina about 1792, and therefore his son, 
James, was reared in that state. After ar- 
riving at years O'f maturity he wedded Eliz- 
abeth Job, a native of North Carolina, and 
they became the parents of two^ children 
while residing in that! state. Subsequently 
they went to Kentucky,, crossing the moun- 
tains on horseback. They took up their 
abode in Cumberland county, that state, 
among the pioneer settlers, and aided in 
laying the foundation for the present pros- 
perity and progress of that commonwealth. 
They were the paraits of nine children: 
Samuel and Jane, who were born in North 
Carolina ; Thomas, Levi, Ruth, James Job, 
John and William, who were born in Ken- 
tucky; and Elijah, who was born in Lidi- 
ana, whither the family had previously re- 
moved. After residing for a time in the 
Hoosier state they went to Morgan county, 
Illinois, suljsequently to Cass county and 
afterward to ]\Iadison county, Iowa, where 
James Smith and his wife spent their last 
days, both passing away when about seven- 
t\'-tliree years of age. They were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and were 
earnest and loyal Christian people, rearing 
their children in that faith and doing all in 
their power to^ promote-the cause of Chris- 
tianity among their fellow men. 

James Job Smith w^as reared in Ken- 
tucky and Illinois, accompanying his par- 
ents on their removal to Morgan county, 
of the latter state, in 1829. In 1845 h^ be" 
came a resident of Cass county, Illinois, but 
was married in the former county, at the 
age of twenty-two years, to !Miss Eve Mil- 
ler, who was born in Indiana, a daughter of 
Henry Miller, one of the honored pioneer 
settlers of that state, arriving there at a 
period when all was wild, the work of im- 



provement and civilization being scarcely 
begun. The Indians still lived in the neigh- 
lx)rhood, and he had to tiee with his familv 
to a block house to secure protection from 
the red men. He had removed tO' Indiana 
from Pennsylvania and was of German lin- 
eage. From the time of his first settlement 
in the Hoosier state until his death he aided 
in the work of development and advance- 
ment there. His wife was Hester Miller. 

In 1845 James Job Smith ranoved to 
Cass county, Illinois, and in 1853 went to 
Mahaska county, Iowa, where he remained 
for a }-ear, after which he took up his abode 
in Madison county, that state, casting in 
his lot with its pioneer settlers. In 1873 
he came to Rice county, Kansas, where he 
has since resided, and to-day is one of the 
venerable, honored and respected residents 
of this community. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Smith were born six children: Elizabeth 
Ann, who died at the age of eighteen ; J. 
F., who was a soldier in the Fourth Iowa 
Infantry during the Civil war, and is now 
living in Lincoln township, Rice county; 
Francis ^I., who was also a member of the 
same regiment ; Isaac N., who', with his 
brothers, enlisted in the Fourth Iowa Infan- 
try and is now living in Lyons; Elijah T., 
a resident of Douglas county, Kansas ; Will- 
iam Thomas, who makes his home in Lyons; 
and Mrs. Mary J. Summers, also of Lyons. 
The mother of this family was called to her 
final rest April 2, 1896, at the age of eighty- 
five years. She was loved by aill whO' knew 
her for her kindness of heart and mind, for 
she was a devoted wife and mother, a faith- 
ful friend and her generous and kindly spirit 
were recognized by all with whom she came 
in contact. A noble Christian woman, she 
held membership in the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, and her life was in harmon}- 
with her professions. For sixty-two years 
she traveled life's journey by the side of her 
husband, and as time passed their mutual 
love and confidence increased. Mr. Smith 
devoted his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits throughout his acti\c business career. 
anvl thus provided a CMnilMrialilc support for 
his family. Since the 1 11 ^anizatinn of the 
party he has been a stalwart Republican, 
and his sons are all of the same political 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



faith. For sixty years he has been a zealous 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and for a half century has served as class- 
leader. He does all in his power to promote 
the work of the church in its various lines, 
and his upright life reflects credit upon the 
Christian teachings which he has so closely 
followed. 

Francis M. Smith, whose name intro- 
duces tliis revicAv was a lad of twelve years 
when the family removed to Iowa, and upon 
a farm in that state he was reared. His 
education was acquired in the public schools 
and he was early trained to the work of the 
farm, assisting in its labors tliroughout the 
summer months, while in the winter season 
he pursued his studies. When the Civil 
war was inaugurated his patriotic spirit was 
aroused and in response to President Lin- 
coln's call for 'tliree hundred thousand men 
he enlisted in July, 1861, becoming a mem- 
ber of the Fourth loiwa Infantry, under 
Colonel Granville M. Dodge, afterward 
General Dodge, and one of the most 
prominent statesmen that Iowa has pro- 
duced. He has been very prominent in 
the affairs of the nation, exercising strong 
influence in the national councils. The cap- 
tain of tlie company of which Mr. Smith 
was a member was H. J. B. Cummings. Our 
subject participated in thirty battles, includ- 
ing the engagements at Sugar Creek, Pea 
Ridge, the first attack on Vicksburg, the 
battles of Grand Gulf, Jonesboro, Chickasaw 
Bayou, Lookout Mountain, Missionary 
Ridge and the entire Atlanta campaign un- 
der General Sherman, including the cele- 
brated march to the sea, which proved that 
the Rebel forces had been drawn to other 
c^uarters and were thus almost exhausted. 
He was also in tihe battle of Goldsboro, pro- 
ceeded thence to Richmond and afterward 
participated in the grand review at Wash- 
ington, D. C, where "wave after wave of 
bayonet-crested blue" passed by the stand on 
which stood the president, who watched the 
return of the victorious army after the 
greatest war of that history has ever known. 
'Mr. Smith was honorably discharged, witli 
the rank of corporal in Louisville, Kentucky, 
and was paid off in Davenport, Iowa, after 



whidi he returned to his home in the Hawk- 
eye state. 

In 1866 was celebrated the marriage of 
Mr. Smitli and Miss Maggie Coultrap, of 
Deersville, Ohio, who died in Madison coun- 
ty, Icnva, April 2, 1873, leaving three chil- 
dren, of whom two yet survive, namelv : 
The Rev. James O. Smith, of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, now located in Arizona, 
and Rev. Ernest D. Smith, who is pastor of 
the ]\Iethodist Episcopal church in Lowell, 
Indiana. One son, Walter S., died in in- 
fancy. On the 25th of October, 1877, Mr. 
Smith was again married, his second union 
being with Geneva B. Enoch, a lady of cul- 
ture and intelligence, who has indeed proved 
to her husband a good helpmate. She was 
born in Ohio, but was reared and educated 
in Davis count}% Iowa. Her father, George 
Enoch, was born in Virginia and married 
Persis Cook, a native of Essex county. New 
York, and a daughter of Lewis Cook, who 
was born "near Boston, Massachusetts. The 
last named was a son of James and Persis 
(Newton) Cook. Lewis Cook married 
Anna Peck, who was born in Massachu- 
setts ,and was a daughter of Ebenezer Peck, 
of that city. Mr. Enoch, the father of Mrs. 
Smith, died in Winfield, Kansas, at the age 
O'f ninety years. He was the father of 
eleven children : Henrs-, who is living in 
Winfield; Mrs. Malinda Dodge; I\Irs. Julia 
A. Pierson, of Lyons; Mrs. Louise Kinny,of 
Appanoose county, Iowa ; j\Irs. Mary Mont- 
gomery, also of Iowa; Mrs. Smith, of Ly- 
ons ; Mrs. Clara Cook, of Ellsworth county, 
Kansas; Mrs. Eliza Vermillya, who died in 
Winfield Kansas; and three who died in 
early childhood. The mother of this family, 
however, is still living. She is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, to which 
her husband also belonged. She has reached 
the age of eightj'-eight years and makes her 
home with her daughter, Mrs. Smith. 

By the marriage oi our subject and his 
wife five living children have been born : 
Arthur O., Enoch F., Maggie E., Leora B. 
and Geneva F. TlieA- also lost one daughter, 
Nona B., who was the fourth in order of 
birth and died at the age of thirteen years. 
For many years the family resided in Lin- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



39 



coin township, upon the homestead fann 
which Mv. Smith secured on coming to the 
county in 1873. There he resided until 
1S93, wlien, in order to provide better edu- 
cational advantages for his children, he re- 
moved to W'infield, Kansas, placing his chil- 
dren in the Soutliwest Kansas College, an 
institution under the jauspices of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. In 1898 he re- 
turned to Rice cO'Unty, locating in Lyons, 
where he now makes his hime. He is the 
owner of three hundred and twenty acres 
of ^■aluable land, and the farm yields to 
him a good income. In his political affilia- 
tions he is stalwart Republican, and is a 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
in which he has filled several offices. He 
holds membership in the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, of which he is a steward, and he 
takes a deep interest in everything pertain- 
ing to educational, church and temperance 
work and to the improvement of the com- 
munity along substantial lines of progress. 
He has witnessed almost the entire growth 
and development of his community, and is 
one of the honored pioneers of the county, 
who for twenty-eight years has been iden- 
tified with its progress, and well deserves 
mention in this volume. 



GEORGE TRUITT. 

In almost every town and village in the 
country may be found men of worth who 
have retired from lives of activity on the 
farm to pass in ease and comfort their de- 
clining years, surrounded by the results of 
past labors. One of these respected citizens 
was George TruS'tt, who was one O'f the 
most highly esteemed residents of the pleas- 
ant little village of Langdon, Kansas. 

The birth of George Truitt occurred in 
Rush county, Indiana, on January 28, 1829, 
and was the -grandson of Collins Truitt, who 
was brought by hSs parents from England 
to America, when but a small boy. Grand- 
father Truitt took an active part in the Rev- 
olutionary war, and his wife is remembered 
for many admirable qualities and also for 
her longe\'ity and vigor. At the age of one 



hundred and one years it is related that she 
had the agility of a girl and still attended 
to her household tasks. Of their children 
Elias S. became the father of our subject. 
His birth was at Delaware, in 1786, and his 
death occurred in 1873, at AVorthington, 
Indiana. The motlrer of our subject was 
named Sybil Reeves and she was born in 
Kentucky about 1790, and died in Indiana 
in 1863, while her son, George, was in the 
army. Of her ten cliildren, six sons and 
three daughters grew to maturity, the only 
survivor of the family now being Austin 
Truitt, a bachelor of seventy-six years, who 
was one of the pioneers in the California 
gold fields more than fifty years ago. He 
is a veteran of the Alexican war. and is pass- 
ing his last days in the Soldiers" Home. The 
parents lie buried in Indiana, both in the 
same state, although fifty miles apart. 

On October 22, 1856, our subject, 
George Truitt, was umted in marriage, in 
Monroe county, Indiana, to Miss Sarah E. 
Eller, who was born there on August 12, 
1836, a daughter pf John and Mahala 
(Pauley) Eller, the former a native of 
Pennsylvania, and the latter of Indiana. Mr. 
Eller .was a soldier in the Alexican war, 
where he died of fever, and his body was 
placed in a boat for conveyance home, in 
charge of his brotlier, James, but the boat 
struck a snag in the Ohio river and the body 
was lost. This was in October, 1846, when 
he was but thirtv-four years of age. The 
widow was left with five children. Later 
she married ,Samuel Reeves and two chil- 
dren were born to that union, her death 
taking place in 1853, and her burial was in 
Bloomington, Indiana. The Eller family is 
one of the old, honored and intellectual ones 
of Indiana, and its numerous memljers have 
kept bound together by .establishing a }-early 
reunion, in Monroe county, Indiana, on the 
farm which Grandfather Eller reclaimed 
: from the forest. Early in the settlement of 
I the county he came thither from Kentucky 
I and established a home and bought three 
I hundred and twenty acres of land and here 
I the grandparents died. Their posterity and 
I that of the Pauley's of the maternal side of 
j Mrs. Truitt's familv are all settled within 
ten miles of the old home, and some of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



well-known survivors are Frank A. EUer, 
a minister of the Methodist church; James 
Eller, now an octogenarian, who without 
difficuhy walked the five miles in order to 
attaid the last family reunion and he is a 
veteran of the Mexican and the Civil wars. 
The military spirit has not been lacking in 
any generation of this family, for Grand- 
father Eller was a soldier in the Revolution. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Truitt had some ed- 
ucational opportunities, which they em- 
braced, both possessing bright intellects. 
They settled on their own small farm in In- 
diana and there their seven sons and two 
daughters were born. These were : James 
Albert, on the Kansas homestead fann, who 
has two daughters and four s:ons : Eli Mc- 
Kee, who is a fanner in Indiana, near Jack- 
sonville, and has six children; Elias Edgar, 
who is a farmer in Indiana, and has five 
children; Charles, who is a resident also 
of Indiana, and has one son and one daugh- 
ter : Ella J. was the wife of Samuel H. 
Creig and died in 1896, leaving three chil- 
dren; John O., who is a farmer on two hun- 
dred and twenty acres, two miles north of 
Langdon, and has two sons and one daugh- 
ter; George Homer, who is a farmer near 
Langdon, and has three daughters and one 
son; Carrie, ,who is the wife of Lewis Cat- 
tie, of this vicinity, and they have one 
daughter; and Benjamin, who died at the 
age of two years. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Truitt were reared 
in the Methodist church, and in its faith lie 
passed away in death December 3, 1902, 
at Langdon. 

On August 22. 1862, Air. Truitt joined 
the great army of loyal citizens and became 
a Union soldier, enlisting from Greene 
county, Indiana, in Company I, Ninety-sev- 
enth Indiana Infantry, and faithfully served 
until the close of the struggle, being mus- 
tered out of the service in Washington, in 
June, 1865. Mr. Truitt received a flesh 
wound in the left breast, which fractured 
his rib, thus necessitating a few days in the 
hospital at Barton Iron Works, in Georgia, 
and he was then given a furlough home. 
For several years he was an invalid, the 
privations and exposures of his army life 



having left traces, but he could find no 
more devoted, sdf-sacrificing or capable 
nurse than Mrs. Truitt, who in every sense 
proved a helpmate. In 1^87 he took his 
homestead farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres in Reno county, Kansas, but in April, 
1 90 1, they took up their abode in the vil- 
lage of Langdon. In politics our subject 
was always an active member of the Repub- 
lican party, and before leaving Indiana held 
public office. He was one of the honored 
members of the G. A. R. 



HOX. A. B. CALDWELL. 

Among the old settlers of the state of 
Kansas none possess any better claim than 
does Hon. A. B. Caldwell, of this biography, 
who is now an honored citizen of Hutchin- 
son. His location here was after the close 
of the war and the organization of Reno 
countv. The birth of Mr. Caldwell was near 




Ithaca, Xew York, in IVIarch. 1838, his an- 
cestors having founded the American branch 
of the family shortly after the battle of 
Boyne. In every generation members of it 




Ar^ Ca.tXurtUL. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



became conspicuous in some walk of life, 
notably so was the great-grandfather of our 
subject, Capt. Thomas Cald'weli, who, al- 
though a minister in the Presbyterian church 
was a soldier and officer in the Patriot army. 
His helpless wife and innocent child were 
killed by the Hessian hirelings during the re- 
treat from Philadelphia. 

Asa Caldwell, who was the father of our 
subject, became a clergyman of note in the 
Baptist church, exerting a power and in- 
fluence through the state of New York 
which is still recalled in the annals of the 
church and in the reforms he instituted 
wherever he was given an opportunity to 
exert an influence. He was a man who lived 
up to the highest standard of Christian citi- 
zenship. Always in the front rank, protest- 
ing against oppression and lawlessness, he 
was the first clerg}-man to bring before an 
association of ministers a resolution con- 
demning slavery and endured undeserved ob- 
loquy for it, the time being not yet ripe for 
the opening oi men's eyes. The marriage 
of Rev. Caldwell was to Pamelia Pennell, 
and to this union were born four sons and 
one daughter, our subject and his brother, 
John G., being the only members of the fam- 
il}- to locate in Kansas. The latter served 
tiu-ough the Civil war, in Company A, 
Se\-enty-sixth New York Volunteers, and 
is now located on a farm' in this county. The 
sister, Lydia A., married Barclay Pennock, 
who accompanied the celebrated Bayard 
Taylor during several years of travel. Both 
he and his wife were authors of note, being 
connected with New Yr^-k journals. 

The early education of Air. Caldwell, of 
this sketch, was obtained in the public 
schools, in preparation for a thorough scien- 
tific course of study, but failing health made 
it necessary to abandon this ambition. \\'ith 
a hope of regaining his health he decided to 
make a tri-p to the west, by way of the Santa 
Fe trail, reaching the village of Chicago in 
1850. He v/ent on to St. Louis, thence up 
the Missouri river as far as Westport. where 
was situated an outfitting depot for this 
trail. Here he was engaged as a trailer and 



made se\-eral trips from Leavenworth to 
Santa Fe, and in the fall of i860, he entered 
the employ of the Hudson Bay Company and 
engaged in trapping in British Columbia. 
In that day he lived a life of adventure, hav- 
ing acted as a scout in Minnesota against the 
Sioux Indians in their uprising, and was 
wounded by them, still carrying that bullet. 
While carrying dispatches from Big Stone 
Lake to Fort Zarah, Kansas, it was neces- 
sary to pass through Nebraska, among hos- 
tile Indians, and he dared only travel at 
night. When he bad covered about one- 
half of the trip he was attacked and wound- 
ed, making the remaining four hundred miles 
in this condition. Recalling that time Mr. 
Caldwell says that only his duty supported 
him through the torture he then endured, for 
it would have cost him much less to end his 
life than to prolong its agony. 

When the whole country was aroused 
by the outbreak of the civil war, the loyal 
spirit of his ancestors stirred the blood of 
our subject, and with as little loss of time as 
possible he started on a walk of eight hun- 
dred miles in order to reach the recruiting 
station at St. Paul. At Fort Snelling he was 
taken as one of Berdan's sharp shooters, this 
company making a most enviable record 
during those trying years. With this gal- 
lant band Mr. Caldwell became connected 
with the Army of the Potomac and took part 
in twenty-one of the dangerous engage- 
ments, and at one time spent thirty days con- 
tinuously under fire. The records of history 
tell that at Gettysburg only thirty-one of our 
subject's company of sixty-three men sur- 
vived that day of slaughter, and while these 
gallant soldiers were acting as pidvets they 
discovered Longstreet's advance and were 
told to hold Little Round Top "as long as a 
man is left." and this was literally done 
these brave heroic men fighting until every 
man was either killed or wounded. No re- 
stricted space such as the present can in any 
proper wa}-, tell of the .courage, the daring, 
the prowess of that little band. General. 
Daniel Sickles, himself a brave man, who 
ordered the point held, said later he would- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



rather have lost any regiment than that com- 
pany of Berdan Sharp Shooters. 

The vahied Hfe of our subject was mirac- 
ulously spared, but he received three serious 
wounds and still carries one bullet in his 
person. At Little Round Top Mr. Caldwell 
was first shot through the body and as he 
fell, another bullet entered his neck and 
buried itself in the muscles of the loin, where 
it still remains. Recovering from the shock 
he again picked up his trusty rifle and man- 
aged to fire five rounds, when a third bullet 
hit him, entering his right arm. During the 
night while lying on the field, he heard a call 
from some poor wounded comrade for water 
and he managed to stagger along between 
fainting spells until he reached the soldier's 
side, finding in him an old companion of his 
scouting and trapping life. But recently 
these two, who came back from the very jaws 
of death, had their first meeting since that 
dreadful day, and it was one affecting in the 
e.xtreme, exciting all the noljlcr feelings of 
those of a later generation. During his army 
career Mr. Caldwell participated in many 
hard-fought battles of the war, including 
those of Falmouth, Fredericksburg, Orange 
Court House, Guiney's Station, Rappahan- 
nock Station, Warrington Springs, Bull 
Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Chancel- 
lorsville, Gettysburg and many others. 
Strange as it may appear he shows little oif 
all this stress and strain to-day, his physical 
condition being remarkable. 

At the close of the war Mr. Caldwell re- 
turned tn lii-; nlil hi line in Xew York and 
there \\;is married tn ]\Iiss T.otiisa Brown. 
With his liride he returned to the west, lo- 
cating near Hutchinson, Kansas, just after 
the organization of Reno county. He hauled 
lumber from Newton, took up a soldier's 
claim in the southern part of the county and 
was prospering until the visit of the grass- 
hoppers, an old landmark in Kansas history. 
He recalls the days when he saw in his vicin- 
ity 1x)nes of buffaloes covering acres of land, 
they having been ruthlessly slaughtered for 
their tongues only. Later as they grew 
more scarce their hides were also taken. He 



continued on his farm until 1890, coming 
then into this city, where he has since been 
engaged in the real-estate business, having 
established the same while living in Arling- 
ton, as early as 1880, living there and com- 
ing to Hutchinson to attend to business. Mr. 
Caldwell is the oldest in point of service of 
any man in his line in the county. He is 
now associated in business with Mr. Rick- 
secker, and they handle the greater part of 
country property in this locality, long ex- 
perience making them valuable advisers. In 
politics he has always been a Republican, and 
while living in Arlington, in 1884, was elec- 
ted to the legislature, serving for twO' terms, 
during which time he gave especial atten- 
tion to the bill allowing th'e county commis- 
sioners to have the sum of fifty-five thousand 
dollars to expend in the building of bridges. 
The sum, however, was reduced to two thou- 
sand dollars. He also advocated changes in 
the townships in the county. 

Some ten years after locating in Kansas, 
Mrs. Caldwell passed away. In 1886 our sub- 
ject returned to New York and at Homer, 
in that state, was married to Miss Anna 
Babcock, who was a daughter of Samuel 
Babcock. Mrs. Caldwell is a most estimable 
lady, of great refinement and intellectuality, 
literary in her tastes, and for many years 
was connected with the Detroit News and 
the Detroit Tribune. Her immediate fam- 
ily was sadly bereft during the Civil war, 
one brother, the brave Lieutenant Babcock, 
dying at Gettysburg, and another, General- 
Babcock, at Winchester, while the third 
passed away a prisoner at Andersonville. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell two children have 
been born, Florence and Addie. 

Few citizens have the congenial home life 
that Mr. Caldwell now enjoys, and it com- 
pensates for many of the hard experiences 
of earlier years. His pleasant, genial man- 
ner makes the hospitality he delights to offer, 
all the more acceptable to his wide circle of 
old and devoted friends. For twelve years 
Mr. Caldwell has written short stories de- 
scribing western ife, most of which have 
been published in the Youth's Companion. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



WILLIAAI LAWRENCE. 

Among the pioneer settlers and promi- 
nent agriculturists of Xickerson, Kansas, is 
^\"iiliam Lawrence, who was born in York- 
shire, England. ^Iax 14, 1827. His father, 
^\'illiam Lawrence, was born in 1800 and 
died of smallpox at the early age of thirty- 
eight years, leaving children of Avhom the 
subject is the second child and oldest son. 
His mother was Mary Pocklington, who died 
a widow at the age of fifty-nine years. Our 
subject thus being left an orphan was' bound 
out to a xleep-sea captain and after serving 
for ti\-e years he continued to follow the sea 
until his twenty-second year. During that 
time he was wrecked three times, once on 
Prince Ed-wards Island, once near Yar- 
mouth, England, and the third time in the 
Irish Channel, barely escaping death. He 
was reared on the water, his father being a 
ri\er man, serving as second mate and as 
first mate one year. His mother loved her 
boy and could not bear to have him cxik ised 
to the perils of the sea and for her sake he 
left the sea and came to America in 1849, 
\\-hen twenty-two years of age, the voyage 
from Liverpool to New Orleans consuming- 
eight weeks. After coming to America he 
was for one year on the Mississippi river 
running from St. Louis to Galena, Illinois, 
and on one of these trips he came near dying 
of cholera, but the clerk of the boat gave 
him some medicine which saved his life. 
Till. ugh his money was all gone he finally 
fdimd his uncle, James Pocklington, in Ma- 
coupin county, Illinois, who was rme of the 
earl\" piimeers of the state, locating there 
in 183 J after .spending se\-en weeks in Xew 
York. He \\-as a poor man and saw verv 
hard times at first but afterward became 
well-tr,-,lo. 

^^'hen the Civil war was inaugurated our 
subject. William Lawrence, enlisted as a 
private in August, 1861, in Company B. 
First ^Missouri Cavalry Volunteers, and 
served until Julv, 186c;, when he res-igned 
on account of ill health, and was mustered 
out (if the service as a first lieutenant, hav- 
ing participated in forty-four battles, fear- 
lessly defending the stars and stripes and 



the cause it represented. He has had many 
narrow escapes for his life by land and sea 
because of his fearless daring and faithful- 
ness to duty, and believes that his mother 
is his guardian angel. As a souvenir of his 
experiences on the battlefield he has pre- 
served his sword, and of his life as a sailor, 
a seaman's triangle. 

Mr. Lawrence was first married in Gor- 
laston, Englanil. when twenty-three years of 
age, but his wife died in seven months after 
their marriage, and her loss was so 
deeply felt by her husband' that he 
remained a widower sixteen years and 
then was again married in Illinois, 
in 1866, to ^liss Xancy Joihnson, by 
whom he had four chihlren, but lost one. 
The mother was called to her final rest on 
the nth oif Jul}-. 1873. wheu thirty-five 
years of age. Five years later, in 1878, 
Mr. Lawrence was united in marriage to 
Miss Martha Brigbtenstine, of Mahaska 
county, Iowa, who was born in Ashland 
county, Ohio. Her father, Peter Brighten- 
stine, moved to Iowa in 1848, when this 
daughter was ten years of age. By his sec- 
ond wife, Mr. Lawrence has three children, 
namely : May, wife of Frank Pittman, of 
Argentine, Kansas, and has one son ; Emma, 
wife of \Varren Smith, of the same place, 
and has four sons; and George A., a 
farmer, who has two sons and two daugh- 
ters. Tlie children by 'tJhe firsit marriage 
were Henry, who died in infancy, and 
Freddie, who died at the age of three years. 

Mr. Lawrence owned several fanns in 
Illinois, which he bought and then sold or 
traded to good advantage, and in 1872 he 
drove his mule team from Illinois to 
Kansas, and after his wife's death, in the 
fall of that year, he drove back with 
his children. Later he drove to Iowa 
and then in the spring drove back to his 
farm in Salt Creek township, Kansas, to 
the cabin' home, which was fourtteen by eigh- 
teen feet and the first cabin in the town- 
ship, as hi's present home is the 
fir=it hmise built twai'ty-one years ago. 
His farm consists of two hundred and forty 
acres of excellent land, on which he does 
general farming, meeting with good' success. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



JAMES M. HOLLAND. 

Among the prominent farmers of Bell 
township, residing on section 19, is James 
yi. HoHand who by industry and economy, 
.comJDined with most excellent judgment, has 
become one of the substantial citizens of 
Kansas. His birth occurred in Sangamon 
county, Illinois, on May 27, 1857, and he 
is a grandson of Benjamin Holland, who 
at one time was a large slave owner and 
Kentucky planter. He was twice married, 
rearing two sons and three daughters by 
his first marriage and four children by the 
second marriage. The father of our sub- 
ject was William T. Holland and he was 
born in the Kentucky blue-grass region, on 
February i, 1831, and died in Langdon, in 
December, 1899. One of his brothers, 
Monroe Holland, is a resident of Mis- 
souri. The mother of Mr. Holland, of this 
sketch, was Julia Ann Hurt, a native of 
Menaid county, Illinois, where she was 
married to William^ Holland in 1852. They 
had a family of five sons and two daugh- 
ters, all of whom still survive with the ex- 



the well tilled fields yielding abundant har- 
vests and bringing to him a handsome in- 
come. He is a very generous man and has 
spent much money in helping his friends. 
He also believes that one should enjoy some 
of the ptesures of life as well as its trials 
and labor, so he and his wife spent scnne 
time at the Worldl's Fair at Chicago and left 
the farm for a few years and li\-ed in one 
of the suburbs of Kansas City. l>ut ci includ- 
ing that the dearest place on carili t.i them , 
was the old home on the farm lhe_\ returned 
to it and will there spend their remaining 
days. His wife has been a most faithful 
companion and helpmeet to her husband and 
a devoted mother to his motherless children 
and there are few, if an}', happier couples to 
l)e fnund anywhere than Mr. and Mrs. Law- 
rence. He is a stanch Republican in his 
p<iHtical views and is one of the best known 
and hig-hly respected citizens of Nickerson. 



ception of Homer, who died in Atchison 
county, Kansas, about 1878. W'illiami T. 
Holland was a carpenter by trade and 
came to Kansas from Sangamon county, 
Illinois, when our subject was a lad. He 
preempted one hivndred and sixty acres of 
land in Kingman county, selling the same 
one year later and then bought one hun- 
dred and sixty acres near Langdon, adjoin- 
ing the property of his son-in-law, R. C. 
Miller, and remained on that farm for 
twelve years, moving then into Langdon, 
where for several years he was postmaster 
and a justice of the peace, and was identi- 
fied with the growth and development of the 
town. To the ^lethodist church he was a 
liberal giver and both he and his wife were 
consistent members of the same. The hon- 
ored mother of our subject still resides in 
Langdon. 

James Monroe Holland enjoyed but 
limited school privileges during his youth 
in eastern Kansas, remaining with his fa- 
ther and assisting in the fanm work until 
his majority, coming then to- his! homestead. 
This consisted of one hundred and sixty 
acres of wild prairie land, and to sulxlue this 
wilderness and make of it the beautiful, 
well cultivated and fruitful farm which now 
attracts the eye and consoles the owner, 
Mr. Holland was obliged' to set himself 
some hard tasks. He owned but little capi- 
tal as far as mone}- goes, but he was young,, 
energetic and industrious, owned a pair of 
strong young horses, and during the first 
year he was' a'ble to- break about forty acres 
of his land and sow it to wheat. He also 
built his log house, w'hich was small, but 
snug and warm. He follows general farm- 
ing and raises a considerable amount of 
stock, keeping from forty to sixty head of 
cattle and horses. He Bas been very suc- 
cessful in raising wheat and corn and in 
1896 his land yielded three thoiisand bush- 
els of that grain. Mr. Holland wisely set 
out his orchards early and has one hundred 
and seventy-five bearing trees, thrifty and 
well cared for. He has never made the 
mistake of expecting his farm to do every- 
thing that land in other locations and cli- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



mates might do, but he has studied its i>os- 
sil:iihties and has reaped most satisfactory 
results. The first Httle home is attached as 
an outbuilding tO' his present handsome 
residence. All his life he has worked hard 
and although he has not retired, takes 
pleasure in the honest toil which brings its 
sure reward. 

The marriage of ^Nlr. Holland occurred 
on No'vember 29, 1885, to Miss Ophelia 
Prv, who was a daughter of Rev. John H. 
Pry, a prominent minister of the Baptist 
church, and the children born to this union 
are as foUo-ws: Cora B., thirteen years of 
age; Franklin D., five years of age; Elma, 
se\-en years of age; Raymond; and Nellie, 
who is a babe of seven months, all of them 
bright, intelligent children who promise to 
become the excellent citizens of the future. 

Mr. Holland has been identified with the 
Republican party all his life, and has effi- 
ciently served as constable and road over- 
seer, while socially he is connected with the 
order of Modern Woodmen. The religious 
connection of the family is with the Method- 
ist church, where they are most highly es- 
teemed. 



JESSE BROWN. 

Jesse Brown is a retired farmer and 
civil engineer living in the village of Alden. 
He was born in Israel township, .Preble 
county, Ohio, 011 the 9th of February, 1835, 
and on the paternal side he is of Welsh line- 
age, while on the maternal side he is of 
English descent. His father. Thomas 
Brown, was born in Georgia, in 1785, and 
w hen twenty-one years of age went ti > Ohio. 
The grandfather of our subject was Sam- 
uel Brown, a native of Xnrth Camlina and 
a representative of a family of Friends or 
Quakers. After arriving at years of ma- 
turity Thomas Brown married Miss Re- 
becca Stubbs, who was bo.rn in Georgia, in 
1793, and when a maiden of twelve sum- 
mers was taken to the Buckeye state, where 
she remained until her marriage, which was 
celebrated in 181 t, when she was twentv- 



two years of age. Unto I\Ir. and Mrs. 
Brown were born twelve children, ten of 
whom reached mature years. Of this num- 
ber seven were married and si.x have had 
children. 

Jesse Brown, whose name forms the 
caption of this review, was reared to agri- 
cultural pursuits upon his father's large 
farm and was early inured to the labor of 
the field and meadow.. He was also pro- 
vided with good educational privileges, pur- 
suing a high school course and also studied 
I surveying. For thirteen years he has filled 
the position of county surveyor in Ohio and 
Kansas. Before leaving his native state he 
was married, on the 5th of June, 1866, to 
Miss Margaret McBurne>% a lady of Scotch- 
Irish descent, her people being connected 
with the Presbyterian church. There is but 
one son bj' this marriage, Elmer Brown, 
who is now the railroad station and ticket 
agent at St. John, Kansas. He was agent 
at Alden for twehe A'car?. and in August, 
1900, was transfcrrr,] tn lijs present loca- 
tion. He is married and ha^ iwn children, a 
son and a daughter. 

It was in the spring of 1877 that Jesse 
Brown came to Kansas and purchased a 
claim oif eighty acres for three hundred dol- 
lars. There he engaged in farming for fif- 
teen years, during which time he worked a 
wonderful transformation in the appearance 
of his land. He afterward owned another 
farm, but in 1893 h^ ^°°^ "P '^i^ abode at 
his present home in the village of Alden. 
He entered upon his business career with 
limited capital, owning a small farm in 
Ohio, on which there was an incumbrance. 
His determined purpose and resolute will, 
however, have enabled him to work his 
way steadily upward, overcoming all obsta- 
cles in his path and surmounting all diffi- 
culties. As the years have gone by he has 
addeil tu his capital and to-day he is the 
posse--"!' 'f a comfortable competence, 
which enal)les him to enjoy rest from furth- 
er toil. In his political views he is a Re- 
publican. He is not a professor of religion, 
believing in deeds before creeds. He has. 
hnwe\'er. lived for sixtv-six vears without 



46 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



using wliisky or toibacco, and oaths never 
cross his Hps. He is a man of sterling hc-n- 
or, strict integrity and all who^ know him 
respect him for his genuine worth. 



TAMES P. ENGEL. 



James P. Engel -is an agriculturist and 
stock bi'ceder of Valley tO'wnsliip, now car- 
rying on a successful business. He was 
born in Northampton county, Pennsyl- 
vania, April 13, 1846, and is a son of 
Charles and Ellen f Heller) Engel. The 
father was born about 1810 and died in 
1846. before the birth of their son James, 
who was his only child. The mother was 
a daughter of Adam Heller, a native of I 
Germany. She was thrice married, her first 
union' being with John Bruch, by- whom 
she had three cliildren. rearing two sons, 
Adam and Andrew Bruch, who are yet 
living in Pennsylvania. Her third husband 
was Jacob Godshalk. 

In the state of his nativity James P. 
Engel was reared and the public schools af- 
forded liimi his educatinnal pri\-i]eges. On 
the i8th of November, iSCh, he was united 
in marriage, in Pennsylvania, to :\Iiss Clar- 
issa Gods'^alk, a daughter of Jacob God- j 
shalk. She was born in Northampton ' 
county, Pennsylvania, Decemljer 10, 1847, i 
and at the time of the marriage the groom i 
was in his twenty-first year, wliile the bride ' 
was eighteen years of age. They removed 
to St. Joseph county, Michigan, and were 
connected with farming interests there. Mr. 
Engel continuing the operation of rented 
land for a numljer of years and then pur- 
chased property. He there remained alto- 
gether for twelve years, after which he 
took his family to Indiana, settling in South 
Bend in 1872. Howe\'er, he soon returned 
to Michigan, and in the spring of 1878 he 
came to Sterling, Kansas. Not long after- 
ward he settled on a pre-emption claim of I 
eighty acres north of Alden. and there re- | 
mained for four years, after which he was 
engaged in business in Sterling for six 



years. On the expiration of that period he 
purchased his present farm, comprising one 
hundred and sixty acres of the Santa Fe 
Railroad Company paying eleven hundred 
dollars for the wild land, upon which 
not a furrow had been turned or an 
improvement made. Fourteen years ago, 
in the spring if 1887, he removed to 
the farm and has since made it his home. 
In 1884 he had erected a part of his resi- 
dence thereon and it was occupied' by a ten- 
ant until he concluded to make it his home. 
He has constructed all of the buildings on 
the fami and planted all of the trees, includ- 
ing a good orchard of apple, cherry and 
peach trees. His fine, large red barn was 
built in 1899. He has for a number of 
years been engaged in the breeding of pure 
blooded Shorthorn cattle, carrying on this 
industry for more than two decades. He 
also grows wheat, corn and broom corn, and 
in both departments oi his business he is 
meeting with creditable success. 

Mr. Engel ser\-ed for one }"ear during 
the Civil war, joining the army in the fall 
of 1862, as a member of Cumpau}- I, One 
Hundred and Fifty-third Pennsylvania In- 
fantry. He was taken prisoner at Chancel- 
Idrsville and held in captivity for two long 
months, enduring many ol the hardships of 
prison life. He has always been a loyal 
citizen, as true to the interests of his coun- 
try as when he followed the stars and stripes 
upim siiuthcrn jiattlefields. In his jiolitical 
attiliations he is now a Poptdist and was 
formerh^ a Republican, but he largely votes 
independently. For one year he served as 
township treasurer and for several years he 
was a member of the school board. He be- 
longs to the Grand Army of the Republic 
and for three years was sergeant at arms 
in his post. His religious faith is indicated 
by his connection with the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, in which he has been trustee, 
steward and Sunday-school superintendent 
for se\-eral years. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Engel has 
been blessed with four sons. Elmer 
Franklin, who was born April 7, 1868, in 
Plainfield, Northampton county, Pennsyl- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



47 



vania, pursued his education in the Ster- 
hng high school, after which he engaged in 
teaching for three terms and then took a 
five years' course in the State University, be- 
ing graduated' with high honors in the class 
Oif 1892. He then became an assistant pro- 
fessor in that institution, in which he had 
won the dtegree of bachelor of arts, and after 
pursuing a post-graduate course in 
Harvard College he won the degree 
of master of arts. He is now pro- 
fessor of German in the State Uni- 
versity and' is one of the prominent educa- 
tors of Kansas. He is a man of fine personal 
appearance and of high mental and moral 
worth. On the 27th of June. 1891, he mar- 
ried Miss Essie Powers, and they have two 
sons and two daughters. William Ezra, 
the second member of the Engel famih", was 
born in St. Joseph county, Michigan, June 
lb, 1873, ^"'d is a farmer, living upon a 
tract of land adjoining his father's prop- 
erty.* He has a wife and one daughter. 
Raymond Jacob, who is married and has 
one son, also' resides upon a farm in this lo- 
cality. Frederick Austin, born June 27, 
1882, is a young man at home. He acquired 
a good education and is now of great as- 
sistance to his father in carrying on the 
home farm. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Engel are both 
young appearing people and are justly 
proud of their children and grandchildren. 
Far thirty-seven years they ha\e traveled 
life's journev togetlier, sharing with each 
other in its joys and siirrows, its adversity 
and prosperity, and. though they had to 
work hard in early life, they are now sur- 
rounded by all the comforts and many of 
the luxuries of life. 



WILLIAM B. KING. 

W'illiam B. King is numbered among the 
pioneer settlers of Barton county, Kansas, 
who came to tliis jinrtion of the state when 
the work of progress and development lay 
in tlie future. Only a few enterprising men 
from the east had come to this localitv to 



establish homes and reclaim the wild land 
for purposes of civilization. Throughout 
the intervening years he has watched with 
interest the progress that has been made as 
tlie raw prairie has been converted into 
good farms and as towns and villages have 
sprung up, while churches and school- 
houses have been built and the modern im- 
provements of a thriving and enterprising 
community have been added. He has 
borne his part in tlie work oi development 
and his name is thus inseparably connected 
with the history of the county. 

Mr. King w^as born in Greene county, 
Illinois, near Carrollton, June 19, 1844, and 
is a son of Samuel P. and grandson of 
Isaac King, who was a native of Ireland 
and emigrated to America in colonial days. 
He became one of the heroes of the Re\-o- 
lutionary war and afterward located upon 
a fami in Tennessee, where he reared a large 
family. Samuel P. King was born in 
Knoxville, Tennessee, and about 1836 re- 
moved to Greene county, Illinois, locating 
upon a farm. He died in Carrollton, at the 
age of fifty-two years. On the 14th' of No- 
vember, 1832, he had married' IMiss Eliza- 
beth Sawyer, a native of Alabama, who 
died when about sixty years of age. Their 
children were: Rebecca, Sarah, Mary, Mar- 
tha, Jane, William B., Tletha, John, George 
and Etta. 

In the usual manner of farmer lads of 
the period William B. King spent the days 
of his childhood and youth until 1861, 
when, on the 15th of October, he responded 
to the president's call for troops, although' 
only seventeen years of age, joining Com- 
pany B of the Sixty-fifth Illinois Infantry, 
and remained at the front until honoirably 
discharged on the 25th of October, 1865, 
having in the meantime re-enlisted in the 
same company and regiment an^d partici- 
pated in many hotly contested engagements, 
but Avas only once injured, being wounded 
in the battle of Nashville on the 14th of 
December. T8ri4, when he had the third fing- 
er of his Icfl lian.l sh..t uli. I lis was a most 
creditalile mihtary rccurd, fnr his \-alor and 
gallantry was displayed upon many a south- 



48 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



ern battle-field. When the war was over 
he returned to^ his home in Greene county, 
where he follo-wed farming and railroading 
until June, 1877, when he came to Barton, 
county and pre-empted land in Eureka 
township, thus becoming the owner of a 
quarter section. He at once began improv- 
ing the property and also worked on the 
railroad. After a time he traded his first 
tract of land for ano'ther farm, which is to- 
day owned by C. Samuels, and there he re- 
sided until 1892, during which time he 
erected good buildings and planted a large 
orchard, which was the best in the county 
when he disposed of the property. It con- 
tained one hundred and se\-enty-five bear- 
ing fruit trees and a large amount of small 
fruit. In 1892 Mr. King sold his property 
in Barton county and removed to Califor- 
nia, where he remained' unjtil 1895, when 
he returned and' resumed farming, which 
pursuit claimed his attention for two years. 
He then took up his abode at Hoisington, 
where he conducted the Arlington Hotel un- 
til 1900, at which time he came to Great 
Bend, where he is practically living retired. 
However, he purchased the Arcade Hotel, 
in which he resides but rents out the greater 
part of that property. He also has charge 
of the city park. 

Mr. King was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Pinkerton, a daughter of James 
M. Pinkerton, a native of Tennessee, and a 
granddaughter of James Pinkerton, Sr., 
who was likewise born in Tennessee, but in 
an early day removed to Greene county, Illi- 
nois, where he carried on agricultural pur- 
suits until his life's laljors were ended in 
death when he was about se\-enty years of 
age. His children were: William, Willie, 
Randall, John R, Mary, Martha, Rebecca, 
Rhoda, Paulina and James M. The last 
named, the father of Mrs. King, was 
a cooper by trade, and at an early period 
removed to Monmouth, Illinois, whence he 
afterward went to Iowa, where his death 
occurred in 1883. His wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Jane C. Reynolds, was 
born in North Carolina and died in 1876. 
Their children were: Cecelia Ann, .\nnie 



J., Sarah E., James B., ]\Iary, ]\Iartha, Da- 
vid and John. The marriage of Mr. and 
Mrs. King has been blessed with eight chil- 
dren, namely: Sarah E., wife of George 
Brisbie ; Mary J., wife of Elem Crawford ; 
Calvin, deceased'; twin sons who died in in- 
fancy ; Iva M., who has passed away ; Ger- 
trude, wife of Joseph Woodburn; and Leon 
Pearl, who has departed this life. 

Socially Mr. King is connected with the 
Masonic fraternity, in which he has taken 
the Royal Arch degree, and with the Odd 
Fellows and Knights of Pythias societies. 
In the blue lodge of iMasonry and the 
Knights of Pythias fraternity he is now 
holding office. He is also a member and the 
commander of the Grand Army Post at 
Great Bend and thus maintains pleasant re- 
lations with his old army comrades with 
whom he fought for the preser\ation of the 
Union on the battlefields of the south. 



TAMES RYTHER. 



After a long and honoral>le career as a 
brick and stone contractor, James Ryther 
is no'W practically living retired at his 
pleasant home in Hutchinson, surrounded 
by a large circle of friends, who hold him 
in the highest regard. Born in Erie coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, August 24, 1838, he is a 
son of Hiram A. Ryther, a native of the 
Empire state, his birth having occurred in 
Oneida county, in 1807. The first of the 
family to locate in America was Adijlphus 
Ryther, the grandfather of our subject, who 
came with a brother to this country about 
1780, locating in the Black River country, 
in New York, near \Vatertown, wliere he 
spent the remainder of his days, passing 
away in death about 1814. The family, it 
is belie\-ed. is of pure Englisli descent, and 
as far back as its histor}- can be traced its 
members have Ijeen natural mechanics and 
artists. The name is a very uncommon one, 
and it is therefore believed that Rvther's 
map of the city of London, published in 
1600, a copv of which is now in the posses- 



I 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



sion of our subject, is the work of one of 
his ancestors. A daughter of Adolphus Ry- 
ther, Dorotliy, married David Shell, who be- 
came prominent in the early Canadian re- 
bellion. He was captured by the British and 
banished to the United States. 

Hiram A. Ryther, the father of our sub- 
ject, was only seven years of age when his 
father died, and' at that early age he was 
thrown largely upon' his own resources. 
When a young man he was noted for his 
great strength and endurance, and could cut 
more grain with a cradle in a day than any 
other one person in that locality. He was 
united in marriage to Cynthia Wood, a na- 
tive of the Empire state, but she died at the 
early age of thirty-six years, leaving two 
daughters, — ]\Iary, who became the wife of 
O. S. Boughton and died in Berrien county, 
Michigan, and Martha, who passed away in 
the same locality, and was the wife of J. S. 
liaskins. For his second wife Mr. Ryther 
chose Caroline Stancliff, a daughter of 
Charles Stancliff, and that union was blessed 
with five children, namely: James, the sub- 
ject of this re\-ie\v ; Franklin, who died in 
battle (luring the Civil war; Solon, deceased; 
Alice, widow of Frank Pugh, who was a 
millwright by trade and died in Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota, and in that city his 
widow was a matron for a number of years 
in the St. Barnabas Hospital; and Ellen D., 
the wife of Arthur Grey, a farmer of Lynch, 
Nebraska. 

About 1833 Hiram A. Ryther began op- 
erating a sawmill about twenty miles from 
Buffalo, Xew 'S'ork, which he continued for 
the following ten years, and oiu' subject now 
has in his possession a turning tool used' in 
the first mill built by his father in Edentown, 
that state. On leaving the Empire state in 
1843, ^\''th his wife and five children, Mr, 
Ryther drove to Michigan, spending about 
five weeks on the road, and on their arrival 
in that state the family located in Sodus 
township, Berrien county. There the father 
purchased forty acres of land in the dense 
timber, erected a log cabin and began the 
arduous task of clearing his farm and plac- 
ing his fields under cultivation. In additirn 



to his agricultural pursuits his time was also 
employed as a millwright, ship carpenter and 
house builder. In 1861, at the outbreak of 
the Civil war, he enlisted in Company L, 
Third Michigan Cavalry, entering the army 
in the fall of that year, and in tlie lollnwnig 
spring he was discharged on account ^f dis- 
ability. He was confined in camp during a 
long period, and his death occurred six 
months after he had received his discharge. 
His son Frank also entered the same com- 
pany during that struggle, and was killed 
in a skirmish near Rienzi, Mississijipi. An- 
other son, Solon, became a member of Com- 
pany L, in 1864, and was ordered to the 
front, but died of measles on the way. In 
that year James, our subject, answered to 
the last draft issued, but as his wife and sis- 
ter were both dangerously ill at the time a 
substitute was secured for him. The death 
of the mother of these children occurred in 
Nebraska, in 1890, while residing with her 
daughter, Mrs. Ellen D. Grey, passing away 
in the faith of the United Brethren churcli, 
of which he was a worthy and consistent 
member, Mr. Ryther became an influential 
and prominent citizen of his locaIit\-, and in 
his political afliliations he was first a ^^"hig 
and afterward a Republican, ever taking an 
active interest in the progress and welfare 
of his party and was a great admirer of 
Grant. He held the oHice of justice of the 
peace while residing in ^Michigan, and 
throughout his entire career he did all in his 
power for the advancement and bettemient 
of his fellow men. 

■ James Ryther, the immediate subject of 
this review, enjo}'ed the educational ad- 
vantages aft'or<led l)y the common schools of 
Berrien count). Michigan, and during his 
youth and early manhood he also assisted 
his father in the difficult task of clearing and 
impro\'ing new land. After the close of the 
Civil war he cleared a timber farm on the 
shore of Lake }tticliigan, tlie tract consist- 
ing of forty acres, fifteen acres of which he 
planted with fruit trees, and in 187 1 he 
shipped three thousand Ijaskets of choice 
peaches from his orchard to the Chicago 
market. Shortly afterward. hcwe\'er, a pe- 



5° 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



culiar disease affected the trees of that lo- 
caUty, ahnost ruining liis orchard, and this, 
together with the financial crisis of 1872, 
compelled him to sacrifice his place. In Feb- 
ruary, 1874, he came to the Sunflower state, 
first locating at Emporia, where he was em- 
ployed as a gardener and in stone and brick 
work until Jul_\-, 1876, when he came to the 
city of Hutchinson, and during the first two 
}Tears and a half of his residence here resided 
on East A avenue, subsequently purchasing 
lots adjoining and thereon erected a mag- 
nificent residence, the structure costing thir- 
ty-one hundred dollars. It was located at 
No. 328 A avenue, and was beautifully and' 
tastefully furnished throughout. For a time 
Mr. Ryther conducted a large and profitable 
business in this city as a stone and brick 
contractor, anploying many men, and he 
shipped into Hutchinson nearly all of the 
heavy stone used in the erection ot its liuild- 
ings. He superintended the brick and stone 
work in the erection of the water works, 
built the Atwood flats, and many of the fin- 
est residences and public buildings of the 
town stand as monuments to his skill and 
ability. He also put in the first curb and 
gutter work in the city of Hutchinson. After 
building up a large and lucrative trade in 
this line he admitted a partner into the busi- 
ness, but the latter proved dishonest, and 
Mr. Ryther was again compelled to part 
with his beautiful home. The next resi- 
dence which he erected was on B and Elm 
street, built at a cost of fifteen hundred dol- 
lars, and afterward, on East Fourth street, 
he erected a one-thousand^dollar residence. 
His present residence, located at 328 East 
Ninth street, was erected in 1899, also at a 
cost of one thousand dollars, and is an at- 
tractive and commodious dwelling. Mr. 
Ryther has built in all five or six residences, 
but by a strange and fatal combination of 
circumstances, dishonesty of partners, sick- 
ness of himself and family and the bursting 
of the great boom in Hutchinson, — each one 
has been swept from him in turn, and eight 
years ago, on account of failing health, he 
was compelled to abandon his trade, after 
which he took up gardening, at one time 



having as many as forty lots under his care. 
He has also devoted a portion of his time 
tO' the setting out of shade trees in this city, 
and thus has assisted not a little in adding 
to the atractive appearance of this beauti- 
ful little city. Another branch of his busi- 
ness has been that of a correspcndent to sev- 
eral papers, including the Hutchinson News, 
the Kansas Workman, and the Select 
Knights, During recent years, however, 
he has been greatly troubled with fail- 
ing eyesight, and at one time he spent 
eighty-one days in Dr. Pitt's hospital at 
St. Joseph, where he underwent three opera- 
tions, but his sight is still very poor. 

In 1862, in Berrien county, Michigan, 
was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Ryther 
and Miss Frances A. Millard, a native of 
New Hampshire and a daughter of Na- 
thaniel and Martha (Skinner) Millard, the 
I former a native of Troy, New ^'ork, and 
the latter of Vermont. The grandfather of 
Mrs. Ryther, Charles Millard, was a native 
son of the Empire state, and' his father, 
Jonathan Millard, was the first of the fam- 
ily to locate on American soil, ^^'ith two 
brothers, Nehemiah and' Thomas, he was 
driven from England to France on account 
of his Huguenot principles, and in iC)38 they 
came to this country, locating in Martha's 
Vineyard. The family coat of arms con- 
sisted of a stag feeding on a hill and an 
ermine, and their motto was ''Fortune fa- 
vors the brave." Mrs. Ryther has been 
called to her final rest. She was one of a 
family of eight children, namely : Charles 
O., who served throughout the Civil war as 
a member of the Fourteenth Brooklyn In- 
fantry, but as a result of his army experi- 
ence he became broken in health and his 
death occurred on the loth of June, 1900; 
George B., who served in the Ninth Illi- 
nois Cavalry as a sergeant, and died of apo- 
plexy on his way home from the army; 
Frances A., the wife of our subject, who 
died on the loth of February, 1900; Helen, 
who died at Caswell, New York, at the age 
of nineteen years; Louise, who- is employed 
as our subject's housekeeper: Bessie, wife 
of Rev, S, Hendrick, a retired minister of 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



Hutchinson; David J., who died in Clay- 
viile, New York, in 1852; and Armenia, 
who died when only eleven months old. The 
daughter Louise is a lady of much literary 
ability, and during the past twelve years has 
contributed many valuable articles to both 
eastern and western periodicals. The union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Ryther was blessed with 
three children. The eldest, Charles S., a 
contractor and builder, is now traveling for 
his health. He is known throughout the 
west as big Tex, and since sixteen years of 
age much of his time has been spent in the 
southwest, largely among scouts and hunt- 
ers. At different times he has been em- 
ployed as a cowboy and stage driver, and 
he has also traveled with Buffalo Bill's show, 
encountering many thrilling adventures in 
the west. The second son, H. B., is em- 
ployed as foreman for the Grant County 
Xews, and the youngest child, Fred J., died 
in Hutchinson. 

In political matters Mr. Ryther is an 
ardent Republican, and many times has 
served as a delegate to county conventions. 
Socially he is a member of the Ancient Or- 
der of United Workmen, the Select Knights 
and Ladies, and has attained a degree of 
honor in the Fraternal Aid. 



GEORGE X. MOSES. 

It is the enterprise and character of the 
citizen that enrich and ennoble the common- 
wealth. From individual enterprise has 
sprung all the splendor and importance of 
this great west. The greatest merchants 
have e\'olved from the humblest origins. 
From clerkships have emerged men who 
ha^■e bnilt great enterprises. America is a 
self-made country, and those who have cre- 
ated it are self-made men. No influence of 
birth or fortune has favored the architects 
of her glory. Among those who have 
achieved prominence as men of marked' abil- 
ity and substantial worth in Great Bend is 
the subject of this sketch. George N. INIoses. 
wlio occupies a prominent position. No 



man in this city has been more closely or 
prominently identified with its upbuilding 
and improvement. He has been the pro- 
moter of all of its most important enter- 
prises and from an early day has been a 
potent factor in the progres.s which has led 
to its present prosperity. 

The wise system of industrial economics 
which has been brought to bear in the de- 
velopment of Great Bend has challenged uni- 
form admiration, for while there has been 
steady advancement in material lines there 
has been an entire absence of that inflation 
of values and that erratic "booming" which 
have in the past proved the eventual death 
knell to many of the localities in the west 
where "mushroom towns" have one day 
smiled forth with "all modern improve- 
ments" and practically on the next have 
been shorn of their glories and of their pos- 
sibilities of stable prosperity until the e.xist- 
ing order of things shall have been radically 
changed. In Great Bend progress has been 
made continuously and in safe lines, and in 
the healthful growth and advancement of 
the city Mr. Moses has taken an active part. 

George N. Moses was born in Olean, 
Cattaraugus county. New York, April 15, 
1844, his parents being Anson G. and Mary 
Ann (Bobn) Moses. The father was a 
mason by trade and engaged in contracting 
along that line, spending most of his busi- 
ness life in Philadelphia, New York city 
and at other points in the Empire state. He 
did much contracting for the New York & 
Lake Erie Railroad during the period of its 
construction. In 1855 he removed to Rock- 
ford, Illinois, but died while visiting in New 
York, at the age of sixty-five years. His 
wife passed away at the age of sevent3--nine. 
They were the parents of fourteen children, 
and with the exception of two all reached 
mature years. They are as follows : Lou- 
isa; Lucinda; Francis; Adeline; Reuben H., 
who died in early childhood'; Anson ; Reuben 
H., the second of the name; Theodore; 
Mary ; George N. ; Emma ; Laura ; Charles 
and Edward. 

George N. Moses pursued his education 
in the public schools until 1861, when, at 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



tlie age of seventeen years, he offered his 
services to his country, enlisting as a mem- 
ber of Company I, Fifteenth Illinois Infan- 
try. He was wounded near Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, having the fore finger of his right 
hand shot away. He was then discharged 
on account of disability, but re-enlisted in 
1864, becoming first sergeant of his com- 
pany, and with that rank he served until 
the close of the war. He then went to Se- 
dalia, Missouri, where he was on the police 
force for a time. Afterward he made his 
way to Leavenworth, Kansas, where he 
joined a company en route for Arizona. He 
was then engaged in prospecting from April, 
1867, until 1 87 1. This brought him in con- 
tact with the wild west and he experienced 
all kinds of hardships; several months pass- 
ing in which the men of tlie party did not 
even see a hut. He engaged in hunting 
buffaloes and acting as scout over the plains. 
While in Saline, Kansas, he became ac- 
quainted with Luther Morris, of Quincy, 
Illinois, a man famous as a builder of towns. 
Mr. Morris sought the services of Mr. Moses 
to pilot him over the country, and to the site 
of Great Bend they at length made their 
way. Mr. Moses had ridden all over this 
country hunting buffaloes when these 
animals were seen in herds as far as the eve 
could reach, the herds being so dense that 
it was dangerous to drive through them. 
Our subject conducted Mr. Morris to> Bar- 
ton county and they located on Walnut 
creek, near a spring, and established a town 
site on secton 34. Mr. Moses secured a 
quarter section of land where the town is 
now located and built a fcamdation for a 
building, but a combination of the railroad 
and land site companies was made, and this 
company concluded that Mr. Moses had a 
better tract of land than they could secure; 
so he disposed of his interests to them and 
took another quarter section further west. 
Here the Quincy Township Companv built 
a shed, which was constructed by Lewis Fry. 
The men were then retained to erect other 
buildings, including a hotel,' a store and a 
dance hall. Mr. ]\Iorris had his office in the 
hall. Among the first settlers were ]\Ir. 



O'Dell and P. Sneck, and T. L. Stone was 
proprietor of the first store which was con- 
ducted in the hotel. Thus the work of build- 
ing a town and promoting its interests was 
carried on. Mv. Moses secured the north- 
west quarter of section 32, now o\vned by 
D. W. Heizer, and planted a fine grove of 
shade trees. This was in iSj2. and the grove 
to-day is the finest in the county. In con- 
nection with Samuel Hefty and J. F. Tilton 
he dug a hole, intending to make a dugout, 
and put on a log on which to pile the brush, 
but the work was never completed, although 
Mr. Moses slept in the hole for a long time. 
When it rained he had to sit up, but he never 
caught cold, the free out-door life enjoyed 
by the pioneers bringing to them iron con- 
stitutions. Their principal food was game, 
but as the years passed and the coimtry be- 
came more thickly settled railroads were built 
and all of the comforts of civilization were 
added. After a time Mr. Moses erected a 
house, which he enlarged in 1886, and it still 
stands on the ranch now owned liy Mr. 
Heizer. Since that time Mr. Moses has pur- 
chased and sold and partly improved many 
places, and his own home is a beautiful resi- 
dence of brick built in modern style of archi- 
tecture. This is one of the largest and most 
attractive homes within the county and was 
built by Mr. Heizer. 

Since the time of his arrival in Barton 
county our subject has contributed in large 
measure to the progress and enterprises cal- 
culated to prove of public benefit as well as 
to promote the prosperity cf those financially 
interested. He yet owns much property in 
Great Bend. He established the largest 
hardware store, and in this was as.sociated 
with his brother, Ed R. Moses. After a 
time they added other lines of goods, thus 
introducing a department store, which is 
still carried on by the brother. Our sub- 
ject owns valuable farming lands and is 
connected with the ice plant and manv other 
interests of the city. He is a man of excel- 
lent business and executive abilitv. and his 
wise counsel and sound judgment ha\-e been 
important factors in the successful control 
of many business interests in this place. 






BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



Along another line Mr. Moses has been of 
great benefit to the city, by inducing sub- 
stantial men to locate here and found busi- 
ness interests and promote commercial act- 
ivity, whereon depends the welfare and 
progress of e\'ery town. He is one of the 
prime movers and is financially interested 
in tlie Lake Koen irrigation and navigation 
scheme, whicli will improve land in this vi- 
cinity and will also prove a pleasure resort, 
makin.i; the lake ime of the finest bodies of 
water in central Kansas. 

Mr. Moses was united in marriage to 
Miss Ida A. Mitchell, of Ouincy. Illinois, 
and they ha\'e two adopted children, — Mor- 
ris and Susie. Socially Mr. Moses is con- 
nectetl with the ^Masonic fraternity, in 
which he has taken the degrees of the blue 
lodge and commandery. He is now a past 
master and has filled other offices in those 
organizations, while in the Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows he' is past grand. He 
was a charter member of the lodge and 
ser\-ed for fourteen years as noble grand. 
He also belongs to the Knights of Pythias 
fraternity and to the Fraternal Aid. He 
served as the first sheriff of the county, 
filling the position from 1871 until ■ 1875 
inclusively. He has also been county com- 
missioner and has served as a member of 
the city council and as mayor of Great 
Bend. He is a man of splendid capability 
and broad resource — a typical representative 
of the American spirit which within the past 
century has achieved a work that once 
amuses the admiration and astonishment of 
the world. 



SAMSON FULTON. 

SaniS(in Fulton, the efficient night fore- 
man of the Vincent Salt Works, of Hutch- 
inson, was born in Jackson county, Ohio, 
on the 27th of December, 1857, a son of 
Hugh and Catherine (Dixon) Fulton, and 
a grandson of Hugh Fulton, Sr., who was 
a native of Ohio, and was of Scotch de- 
scent. The father of our subject was reared . 
in the vicinitv of Zanesville, Ohio, and' in 



early life was engaged at the carpenter's 
trade, but later turned his attention to 
farming, in which occupation he is still en- 
gaged, owning a valuable homestead of one 
hundredi and seventy acres in Scioto county, 
Ohio. Throiighout his entire life he has 
taken a prominent part in the affairs of his 
locality, and in political matters he is a sup- 
porter of Republican principles, while in his 
religious convictions he is a Baptist. His 
first wife died when our subject was but a 
child, leaving a son and a daughter, and the 
latter, Lucretia, is now the wife of Frank 
IMartin, an express messenger in Chicago. 
For his second wife Mr. Fulton chose Jane 
Shoemaker, and of their six children fi\e 
are now living. 

Samson Fulton, of this re\-iew, was left 
motherless when only two and a half years 
of age, and from that time until he was 
eight years old his home was in the famih" 
of his grandmother Dixon, in Jackson coun- 
ty, Ohio. He then returned to his father, 
where he remained until sixteen years of 
age, and he then again entered the home nf 
his maternal grandmother, there continuing 
until his twenty-first year. Deciding tn re- 
move tO' the west, he took up his abode in 
Barton county, Missouri, where he was en- 
gaged at farm labor for several years, and 
for the following two years he carried on 
that business on his own account on rented 
land. The year 18S6 witnessed his arrival 
in the Sunflower state, locating at Cimar- 
ron, the county seat of Gray county, where 
for a time he was engaged in the manu- 
facture of brick. For a year and a half 
thereafter he was employed as a salesman in 
a general store ; from that point went to 
Kansas City, where he had charge of a 
tran.sfer company; went thence to Butler, 
Bates county, where for six months he was 
foreman of a livery stable; and from that 
city came to Hutchinson, Kansas. In July, 
1889, ■Mr. Fulton became an employe of the 
Vincent Salt ^^^Jrks, in the packing depart- 
ment, but his energy, perseverance and well 
known reliability soon secured for him a pro- 
motion and for the past eleven years he has 
served as foreman of the evaporating de- 



54 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



partment. This long service with one cor- 
poration ihnstrates in no uncertain manner 
his trustworthiness and ability, and his en- 
tire business career demonstrates what may 
be accomplished' when perseverance and' de- 
termination form the keynote toi a man's 
life. During the past five years Mr. Ful- 
ton has also been engaged on a limited scale 
in the breeding of fine horses. 

In Barton county, Missouri, on the 25th 
of April, 1880, Mr. Fulton was united in 
marriage to Ellen J. Weir, a daughter of 
James and Mary (Hogland) Weir, and the 
parents and daughter are natives of Indi- 
ana. One son has been born unto this union, 
Charles S., who was one of the organizers 
and is now a member of the Globe Coffee 
Company, of Hutchinson. The Republican 
party receives Mr. Fulton's hearty support 
and co-operation, and in his social relations 
he is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of 
America, the Fraternal Aid, and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Red Men. Both he and his 
wife are connected with the Rebekah lodge 
of the Odd Fellows. 



WILLIAM E. PIERCE. 

William E. Pierce, who since 1877 has 
been a resident of Rice county and for for- 
ty-two years has made his home in Kansas, 
now resides on section 20, Wilson town- 
ship, where he owns and operates a good 
farm. He was born in Greene county, Ten- 
nessee, on the 7th of March, 1852, and is a 
son of Isaac M. Pierce, a native of eastern 
Virginia. His mother bore the maiden 
name of Anna Robinson and was a native 
of Tennessee. For some time after their 
marriage the parents resided in the latter 
state, and then came west to Kansas by 
steamboat and rail, locating first at Leav- 
enworth, in 1859. A settlement was made 
in Atchison county, near Pardee, and they 
were pioneer people of that region. Sub- 
sequently the\' removed to Springdale, in 
Lea\-enwnrth county, where they remained 



for two or three years, when they took up 
their abode in Leavenworth city, Kansas, 
there residing until January, 1867. In that 
year the family returned to Tennessee, and 
the parents died at Jefferson county, that 
state, the mother passing away at the age 
of fifty-one, the father at the age of fifty- 
four. He possessed considerable mechani- 
cal ingenuity and was a wagon-maker and 
machinist. Both he and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Society of Friends and were 
people of the highest respectability, enjoying 
the confidence and regard of all who knew 
them. They had eleven children, of whom 
nine are living, namely: Mrs. Mary Rus- 
sell, of Kansas ; Mrs. Amanda Battersby, of 
Saline county; A. K.. who is living in Sa- 
line county and who served as a soldier in 
the Civil war; Mrs. Sarah P. Stanley, of 
Saline; George, who is living in the same 
county; William E., of this review; Joseph, 
of Arizona; Charles E., of Ottawa county, 
Kansas; Nate R., who is a resident of New 
Mexico; Casper, who died at the age of 
twenty-two years ; and iMartha, who died at 
the age of seventeen years. 

William E. Pierce was reared in the city 
and county of Leavenworth and received his 
education in the district and city schools. 
He entered upon his business career as a 
cow boy in the western part of the state of 
Dakota. In the latter place he was employed 
by a Mr. Powers, a well known cattle deal- 
er and drover of Kansas. In 1876 Mr. 
Pierce took up his abode in the southeastern 
portion of Ellsworth county, on ]\Iule creek, 
where he remained for one year. He then 
came to Rice county, locating where the Ira 
Brothers now reside, there making his home 
until 1883, when he sold that farm and pur- 
chased a tract of land on section 20, Wil- 
son township. Here he has two hundred 
and forty acres of land. This is one of the 
farms first settled in the county and is a; 
tract of rich land, splendidly improved with , 
all modern accessories and conveniences. 
The house is substantial and the outbuild- 
ings are kept in good repair. Corn cribs and 
granaries are full of grain and everything 
about the place is neat and thrifty in appear- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



ance, indicating the proigressive supervision 
of the OAvner. Near the house is a good 
grove of five acres, for this was a timber 
claim. There is also an apple orchard con- 
taining three acres. Mr. Pierce follows 
general farming and stock raising, and' 
his labors are attended with a richly mer- 
ited success. He has witnessed the de- 
velopment in the county and has con- 
tributed in a large measure to its sub- 
stantial upbuilding. At an early day he 
spent several weeks on Little river, putting 
up hay on the old Hutchinson cattle ranch. 
He also carried the mail for the United 
States government from Lindsburg to 
Hutchinson in pioneer days, and while 
traversing his route he saw many buffaloes 
on the plains. He has watched with com- 
mendable interest the work oi civilization 
and progress and in every way possible he 
has aided and abetted in the movements for 
improvement and upbuilding. 

In 1882 Mr. Pierce was united in mar- 
riage, in Wilson township. Rice county, to 
]\Iiss Frances Buckles, who was born in 
Lee county, Iowa, near Fort Madison, a 
daughter of Robert and Margaret (Anders) 
Buckles. The father is now a resident of 
Sterling. Kansas, but the mother has passed 
away. In the family were two children, — 
Mrs. Frances Pierce and Libby Rye, the lat- 
ter of Iowa. The father is a mechanic and 
harnessmaker by trade, but for a number 
of years has engaged in farming in Rice 
county. The marriage of ]\Ir. and Mrs. 
Pierce has been blessed with two' children: 
Olive E., who was born January 9, 1883; 
and George H.. bom March 31. i'885. Both 
]\Ir. and Mrs. Pierce hold membership in the 
Wesleyan Methodist church, and they take 
an active part in the church and Sunday- 
school work, doing all in their power to pro- 
mote the cause of Christianity among their 
fellow men. Their support is not withheld 
from educational interests and is given in 
hearty measure to all movements for the 
general good. One of the honored pioneers 
of the county, Mr. Pierce has witnessed its 
development from the days when this por- 
tion of Kansas was upon the frontier, when 



much of its land was unclaimed and the 
greater part of it was still in its primitive 
condition. As the years have passed, how- 
ever, the wild prairie has been transformed 
into richly cultivated fields and the county 
has become the home of a prosperous and 
contented people, whose united efforts have 
gained Rice county a place among the lead- 
ing counties of the commonwealth. 



TAMES HIBBERT. 



Our mother country, England, has con- 
tributed to the United States an element of 
our population which has afforded an ex- 
ample of indnstrious endeavor and well 
earned success that has not been without its 
effect in many wa}'s in our general pros- 
perity. Kansas has had her share of settlers 
of English birth and has been glad always to 
welcome them. One of the most prominent 
citizens of the class in Reno county under 
consideration is James Hibbert. who is a 
farmer on section 2j, Hayes township, and 
whose postoffice is at Sylvia. 

Mr. Hibbert was born in Lancashire. 
England, July 21, 1840, and was early in- 
structed in the engraver's trade, at which he 
worked from the time he was lifteen years 
old until he was twenty-five, in his native 
land. He was married October 27, 1864, 
to Miss Hannah McGillivray, of Manches- 
ter, England, who was torn October 29, 
1841. When he had attained to his twenty- 
sixth year Mr. Hibbert came to the United 
States. He went to Kansas without much 
means and homesteaded one hundred and 
sixty acres of land, on wdfich he lived eight 
years in a box house, one story high and of 
the dimensions twelve by fifteen feet. He 
then built his present large modern house. 
He grows corn, wheat and other grains, but 
gives particular attention to corn and wheat, 
often planting one hundred and sixty acres 
to corn and sowing two hundred acres to 
wheat. For many years he and his wdfe both 
worked hard, early and late, but during the 
last three vears thev ha\-e Iseen resting from 



56 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



their labors. They have taken great pleas- 
ure in planting fruit and shade trees and in 
improving their home farm otherwise, and 
they have given some time to travel and have 
spent some weeks in Chicago, Illinois, where 
three sisters of Mr. Hibbert have lived for 
twenty-six years. ]\Ir. Hibbert is the owner 
of four hundred and eighty acres of fine 
land, of which he cultivates all except sev- 
enty acres. In politics he is a Republican 
and he has ably filled the offices of township 
clerk and justice of the peace. He and his 
good wife are both communicants of the 
Protestant Episcopal church. 

James and Hannah ( McGillivray) Hib- 
bert have had eight children: Salina, who 
died at the age of ten months; Sarah E., 
who married Ferdinand Miller, of Okla- 
homa, and they have had three sons ; Anna, 
the wife of Charles P. ]\Iiller, Jr.; John, 
who is married and lives in Oklahoma; 
\Mlliam Emory, who was killed July 28, 
1890, at the age of twenty-six years, by the 
explosion of a traction engine, and he left a 
widow ; Hannah, who married George Crape 
a farmer of Reno county, and has one son ; 
Matilda, who is a memlber of her father's 
household, as is also the daughter Emilv. 



JA^IES STEVEXS AIAY, ^I. D. 

Few citizens of the city of Hutchinson, 
Kansas, are more highly esteemed than is 
Dr. James Stevens May, of this short biog- 
raphy, who bears the name of being a fine 
scholar, a ready and witty writer, a genial 
companion, ancl one who has long been dis- 
tinguished in the Masonic fraternity. He 
comes of honorable ancestry. His great- 
grandfather, William May, was a resident 
of Kentucky, at the time when Daniel Boone 
was fighting savages and civilizing that state, 
and Mr. May was shot by the Indians from 
ambush, and when his horse galloped into 
camp it carried his dead body. 

Francis May, the son of William and the 
grandfather of our subject, was prominent 
in militarv circles, serving with General 



Harrison. Andrew May, who was the father 
of Dr. May, was born in Kentucky and came 
to Indiana in 1816, the same year that it was 
admitted into the Union. As pioneers he 
and family cleared up a fine farm from the 
timber, succeeding where others failed, both 
on account of fine physical conditions and 
by the industry and energy which have char- 
acterized the whole family. Those were the 
days of rail-splitting, and our subject can 
recall his feat of splitting as many as two 
hundred and fifty in one day, doing twice as 
much as his brothers were able to accomplish 
in the same time. He was much interested 
in educational matters, and he contributed 
an acre of his land for the erection of a log 
schoolhouse, the windows having greased 
paper in place of unobtainable glass and 
puncheon floor and slabs for benches. In 
those days in that locality books were rare 
and it was almost as difficult then to get an 
education as it now is to escape one. The 
alphabet was learned by our subject from 
letters which were cut from paper and pasted 
on a board, other ingenious methods being 
also used. No advance is more marked than 
that which has been made in provision for 
the education of the children in the public 
schools. Mr. May became a local preacher 
in the Methodist church and was a most 
worthy and highly esteemed citizen. His 
marriage was to a most estimable lady, and 
our subject had a number of brothers and 
sisters, seven of the former being loyal and 
patriotic soldiers in the Civil war, two of 
them giving their lives to their country,— 
Simon P., who was killed at Perrysville, 
Kentucky on October 8, 1862, and Henry, 
who was taken prisoner at Shiloh, and died 
about one year later. 

Dr. May of this sketch was born on a 
farm in Orange county, Indiana, on April 
I, 1845, and was a son of his father's sec- 
ond marriage, with ]\Irs. (Stevens) Peters, 
whose first husband was a cousin of the late 
distinguished Judge Gresham, of Chicago, 
and was a brigadier-general in the Civil 
war. Our subject was given the best school 
privileges possible, as related above, and be- 
ing very ambitious applied himself so closely 



I 




-'W- yptoj pjf^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



that at the age of seventeen years he was 
engaged in teaching scliooL, continuing for 
live years, in the meantime studying medi- 
cine, and was enabled to begin practice in 
the spring of 1868. In 1875 he received the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine from the In- 
diana Medical College at Indianapolis. Until 
1877 he followed his profession in Daviess 
county, Indiana, and then decided to try the 
great west, removing to Kansas and locating" 
in Reno county. Here he took up a home- 
stead of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Langdon township, all wild land, and this 
he improved and operated until 1883. He 
has always taken an active part in politics, 
being an active Republican, and in this year 
he was elected register of deeds and is npw 
engaged'in the abstract business. For some 
eight years he has been secretary and chair- 
man of the county central committee and 
has frequently been a delegate to the various 
conventions of his party. During his four 
years" term of office as register of deeds his 
work was so efficient and he became so thor- 
oughly conversant with every detail that he 
has become an authority in the abstract busi- 
ness for Reno county. His personal deal- 
ings in real estate, however, have only been 
in the way of investment. 

The marriage of Dr. May was in Indi- 
ana, in December, 1865, to Miss M. J. 
Crotts. and the children of this union were 
as follows: Ida, who is the wife of J. E. 
Mc]\Ieen, of Chicago : Elmer, who died in 
1900: Lizzie, who died in 1892: Vinnie, who 
is the wife of H. O. Skinner, and resides in 
Hutchinson; James P., a resident of Kansas 
City : Madge, who assists her father in his 
abstract business; and Tressie, at home. 

Dr. I\Iay is a leader in the Methodist 
church, where he is both beloved and es- 
teemed. He is well known in Masonic cir- 
cles throughout the state. His record com- 
menced in Moore Lodge, No. 303, in Indi- 
ana, where he received his first degree on 
April 14, 1870. On his removal to Kansas 
he affiliated with Reno Lodge, No. 140, A. 
F. & A. 'M.. and Reno Chapter, No. 34, at 
Hutchinson, serving as high priest in 1890; 
was annointed to the holv order of high 
4 



priesthood in February, 1890: received the 
cryptic degree in Newton Council, No. 9, 
R. and S. M., in 1885 ; and served as thrice 
illustrious master of Hutchinson Council, 
No. 13, during 1890-91. In 1895 he served 
as most illustrious grand master of the grand 
council of Kansas. He was created a com- 
panion of the order of the Red Cross in 
August, 1884, and dubbed a Knight Tem- 
plar on October 7. of that year, in Reno 
Commandery, K. T., No. 26, being its re- 
corder for ten years; entered the order of 
the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in Isis 
Temple, May 10, 1887; and was a member 
of the Jubilee class of one hundred and sev- 
enty who received the thirty-second degree, 
Scottish Rite, from April 15 to 18, 190 1, 
in \\"ichita. Kansas. He has held the inter- 
ests (if this order as one of the leading ones 
of his life and in its higher circles holds a 
distinguished place. 

From the annual address of Dr. May, 
delivered before the grand council of Kan- 
sas, at its session held in Wichita, February 
17. 1896, and which has been most favor- 
ably commented upon by ]\Iasonic writers, 
we quote the following: 

"Illustrious Companions — Some hun- 
dreds of miles to the westward lie the mighty 
Rockies, from whose glinting tops and rock- 
ribbed sides gush forth the waters pure and 
sweet, as if distilled in the laboratory of 
Heaven, which, rushing on their way to 
the sea, diffusing life and blessings every- 
where, uniting with other streams as pure, 
form the stream on whose peaceful banks 
and in whose fruitful valley sits the Peer- 
less Princess of the Plains — whose guests 
we are to-day, and wjiose hands are out- 
stretched everywhere to extend salutations 
to us as we come at the opening of this, our 
twenty-eighth annual assembly. Not manv 
generations ago where you now sit encircled 
with all that exalts and embellishes civilized 
life, the rank blue stem nodded its tasseled 
head in the wind: tlie sunflower, the em- 
blem of our state, turned its face to the great 
orb of day, and kept watch of his journev- 
ings; here lived and loved another race of 
beings. Beneath the same sun that rolls 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



over your heads, gazing on the same fair 
queen of night, tliat smiles for all alike, an- 
other and far different council was assem- 
bled. To these poor sons of the then desert 
no light of the Bible had come, to them the 
laws of God were not traced on tables of 
stone, but in the book of nature, whose 
teachings are never distorted, in the stars 
that sank in beauty beyond the crimson west, 
where earth and sky touched each other, in 
the midday flame, from the blazing sun, in 
the flower that bloomed in the night-time 
and withered when day had again come, in 
the sighing of the flower-scented breezes as 
they came laden with the perfume of the 
sunny south lands, in his own majestic form, 
on the tablets of his heart — in all these were 
traced the revelations of the universe, and to 
whose mysterious source he bent in humble 
and silent adoration. A traveler, in jour- 
neying westward, came to the base of the 
mountain and saAv before him nothing but 
impregnable rocky fastnesses, which he 
could not climb. But there came also a 
skillful engineer whose cunning was equal 
to the skill of the architect at the building of 
the first temple, and by following the mys- 
terious inclinations of his instrument he 
sought and found a pathway whereby the 
mountain's mighty crest was reached. The 
ribbons of steel were laid, the commerce of 
a continent was transported over what at 
first seemed an impassable barrier. So like- 
wise, in assuming the duties of the station to 
which you elevated me one vear ago I felt 
as if there was no pathway by which I might 
reach the end of the journey, but with the 
assistance of the companions on whose wis- 
dom I confidently relied, the mountain 
heights have been climbed, the difficulties 
overcome, and now have we come to close 
the year's labor." 

Among the pioneer settlers of Reno 
county Dr. May is regarded with approba- 
tion and affection. He is always ready and 
willing to tell the truthful tales of those 
early days, and his articles possess high lit- 
erary merit. It is related that at one time 
he was called upon to deli\'er an address 
upon this subject, his auditors the next day 



scarcely believing that it was prepared over 
night for that occasion. His contributions 
to the press are widely read, his wit and hu- 
mor making them very enjoyable. 



EDWIN S. ROOT. 

Edwin S. Root is now liviiig a retired 
life in Ellsworth. He has reached the ripe 
old age of seventy-three years and until 
1900 he continued actively connected with 
business affairs. Such a record should put 
to shame many a man of younger years, 
who, grown weary of the strife and responsi- 
bilities of Inisiness life, would relegate to 
others the burdens which In. should bear. 
Young in spirit, progressive and energetic, 
jMr. Root could easilv pass for a man many 
years his junior. He has the resi>ect of 
young and old, rich and poor, and wherever 
he goes he wins friends. 

A native of Monroe county, Xew York, 
he was born nine miles west of Rochester, 
on the 24th of February, 1828. His pa- 
ternal grandfather, Thaddeus Root, was a 
colonel in the Revolutionary war, and the 
ancestry of the family can be traced back 
directly to one of the princes of England. 
The family was founded in the new world 
soon after the first settlement was made on 
the shores of New England by the Pilgrims 
w^ho crossed on the Mayflower. Edwin S. 
Root, Sr., the father of our subject, was 
born in Massachusetts and removed to 
Rochester, New York, when that place was 
little more than a marsh. There was no 
mill within forty or fifty miles and the en- 
tire country around about was unsettled and 
gave little evidence of the development 
which would make it a large center of pop- 
ulation. ]\Ir. Root built a tannen,- and also \ 
engaged in farming. He cleared several 
tracts from the timber and Avas thus actively! 
connected with the substantial improvementj 
and development of that section of the coun- 
try. He was also interested in the formation] 
of schools and churches and aided in the' 
erection of the Presbvterian church in Roch- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



ester. His influence was ever given to 
tlie causes which tend to uplift mankind and 
he was a vakied citizen oi his adopted home. 
He married Catherine Ensign, and they be- 
came tiie parents of five sons and five daugh- 
ters, but our subject and one brother are 
the only ones now living. 

Edwin Sheldon Root, whose name in- 
troduces this review, was reared to agricult- 
ural pm'suits and upon the home farm en- 
gaged in raising wheat, cattle and hogs. 
Soon alter reaching his majority he started 
out in life on his own account. In 1862 he 
became a resident of Illinois, locating two 
miles from Dekalb, where he engaged in 
farming for nineteen years. In 1881 he 
came to Kansas and purchased a farm of 
three hundred and thirty-four acres, in Black 
Wolf township, south of the river. He after- 
ward bought a tract of one hundred and 
sixty acres and later purchased eighty acres 
and again one hundred and twenty acres. 
Kansas tested the faith of her people in 
her possibilities and her future. There were 
several years of drouth, when many settlers 
wished to sell and go elsewhere, but Mr. 
Root Ijelieved that a splendid future lay be- 
fore this rich section of country and' he per- 
severed in his efforts, which were ultimately 
crowned with a high degree of prosperity. 
In connection with the production of the 
crops best adapted to this climate and soil 
he carried on the stock business quite ex- 
tensively, both raising and feeding cattle. 
In the spring of 1900 he sold all of his 
land to his son, witli the exception of two 
hundred acres, and retired tn l'',llswi atli, 
where he has purchased a cnmfnrtaljle 
home, in which he and his wife are enjoy- 
ing life quietly, having there a well earned 
rest. l\Ir. Root purchased' a half-section of 
land, which he now rents, and the income 
therefrom provides him and his wife with 
all of the comforts and many of the luxuries 
of life. At the same tin-.e he has a suljstan- 
tial bank account. He carried nn active 
work until 1900, feeding his own stock 
through all the seasons. His is certainly a 
record of a long, useful and honorable ca- 



On the 24tli of February, 1850, in his 
native state, Mr. Root was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Susanna Fenner, a daughter 
■of the Rev. James Fenner, D. D., of Mon- 
roe county. New York, wdio served as pastor 
of one of the churches there for sixteen 
years. Later he retired to New York city, 
where he spent his last days. He sent Mrs. 
Root the first sewing machine used in this 
section of the country west of Rochester. 
Tliey also had the first kerosene lamp. Their 
oil was then crude and the lamp did not 
prove of great success until processes for re- 
fining oil were introduced. Mrs. Root has 
ever proved a faithful companion and help- 
mate to her husband, and he gives her credit 
for much of his success in life. Their home 
has been blessed with twelve children, but 
James F., the eldest, died in early childhood. 
Cara Matilda is the wife of A. L. Johnson, 
of Ellsworth, and has nine children ; Elm^ra 
J. is the wife of James B. Lewis, of Iowa, 
and has four children ; Clarence M. F. died 
in childhood; Cynthia \V. is the wife of C. 
P. \\'agonselIer, of Nashua, Missouri, and 
has one child; William Freeman married 
Louisa Boots, and at his death, which came 
by drowning, he left a widow and two chil- 
dren; Edwin Sheldon, of Brookville, mar- 
ried Addie Stark, and they became the par- 
ents of five children, of whom their eldest 
son, Edwin Sheldon, represents the third 
living generation of that natne; James L. 
married Daisy Carey and is living in Kan- 
sas City; Susa Almina is the wife of J. W. 
Ross, of Herrington, Kansas, and has four 
children; Mary Elizabeth is the wife of G. 
A. Dow, of Burlington, Vermont, and they 
have three children; Frederick F., a farmer 
of Barber county, this state, married Ollie 
Estes and has two children; Albert H. 
wedded Ada Allen and is now a faimer of 
Ellsworth county. There are thirty grand- 
children and two great-grandchildren living. 
In an early day Mr. Root was a silver-gray 
Republican, but is now a Democrat. He 
filled some local offices in both New York 
and Illinois and has served as clerk here. 
He was also a member of the school board 
from the time of his arri\-al in Kansas until 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



he removed to Ellswortli. ]\Ir. and Mrs. 
Root are a genial, hospitaljle couple. They 
ha\'e experienced many difficulties and en- 
countered many obstacles in life, but by de-^ 
termined purpose they have pressed forward 
and are now in possession of a very hand- 
some competence. While in the country 
they always kept open house and entertained 
freely. They have made it a point to have 
a Christmas dinner for many years and an- 
nually have entertained from twenty to thir- 
ty-five guests on that day. In 1900 they 
celebrated their golden wedding, which was 
an occasion greatly enjoyed by their many 
friends and relatives, who wish for them 
many happy returns of the marital anniver- 
sary. At length they decided to leave the 
farm and reside cjuietly in town, and from 
Christmas until the ist of March they were 
never alone for a single day, so freely is 
their hospitality extended to their friends. 
Genial and kindly, this wnrthy couple have 
a circle of friends which is only limited by 
the circle of their acquaintances, and in the 
liistnry of their adopted county they well 
deserve an honorable mention. 



JOHN W. WEATHERD. 

•John W. ^^'eatherd, who is filling the 
office of county commissioner, is one of the 
leading and influential farmers of Kingman 
count}-, his home being on section 4, Vinita 
township. He has been a resident of the 
county since 1883 and has therefore wit- 
nessed much of its development and prog- 
ress, taking his part in the work of ad- 
vancement and doing all in his power for 
the general good. He was born in Heiv 
dricks county, Indiana, near Danville, on the 
loth of October, 1853, and is of French de- 
scent, his paternal grandfather, Thomas 
Wea'therd, being a native of France, whence 
he came to the United States when a }'Oung 
man. He served his adopted country as a 
soldier in the war of 18 12. His son, Syl- 
vester C. Weatherd. the father of our sub- 
ject, was born in Madison county, Ken- 



tucky, and was married there to. Susan 
Bush, also a native of that county, where 
both were reared and educated, she being of 
I German descent. After their marriage they 
removed to Hendricks county, Indiana, and 
in 1 86 1 went to Missouri, settling in Gentry 
county. The father was a farmer by occu- 
pation and at the time of the civil war he 
put aside business and personal considera- 
tions, offering his services to the govern- 
ment. He was assigned to the Fifty-first 
Missouri Infantry, under command of Col- 
onel McPherris' and proved a loyal defend- 
er of the Union. He died in Gentry coun- 
ty, Missouri, at the age of sixty-five years, 
but his widow is still living and has reached 
the age of eighty-two. In his political affili- 
ations he was a Whig in early life, and on 
the dissolution of that party he joined the 
ranks of the new Republican party, which 
he continued to support until his death. Of 
the Methodist Episcopal church he was a 
very active and influential member and was 
a steward in the congregation with which 
he held manbership. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Weatherd were born ele\-en children, of 
whom seven are yet living: Nancy; Sarah; 
Virginia and America, twins ; Thomas ; 
John W. : and P. B., of Borwich, Kansas. 
Malvina and Susan E. both reached adult 
age but are now deceased, while two of the 
family died in childhood. 

John W. Weatherd, whose name intro- 
duces this sketch, was a little lad of eight 
years when he accompanied his parents on 
their removal to Gentry county, Missouri. 
He was reared on the home farm, and prac- 
tical experience soon made him familiar with 
the best methods of producing crops and 
caring for stock. He acquired his education 
in the scliools of Indiana and Missouri, also 
adding to his knowledge through practical 
experience, reading and observation. He 
was identified with agricultural pursuits in 
Missouri until 1883, when he came to King- 
man county, where he has since made his 
home. He owns one of the best farms with- 
in its Ixirders, a tract of three hundred and 
twenty acres of land, on which he erected 
a modern residence, at a cost of two thou- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



sand dollars. It is comfortably furnished, 
indicating the cnltured' and refined taste of 
the owners. There are good barns and all 
necessary outbuildings for the care of grain 
and stock, feed lots, a windmill, orchard, 
pastures, a grove and every modern acces- 
sory for facilitating the work of the farm. 
He is quite extensi\-ely engaged in farming 
and stock raising, and everything about the 
place is neat and thrifty in appearance. 

Mr. ^^'eatherd was married in iS86, to 
Miss Mary Brady, a native of Pennsylvania, 
who was reared and educated in Pennsylva- 
nia and Kansas. She is a daughter of John 
R. Brady and accompanied her parents on 
their various removals, arriving in Kansas 
when a maiden of twelve years. Her fa- 
ther died in Cheney, Kansas, in 1901, at the 
age of eighty-one years, and his wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Catherine Owen, 
is living in Cheney, at the age of seventy. 
The Brady s arrived in Kansas in 1874 aiid 
for a number of years resided in Vinita 
township, Kingman county. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Weatherd were born two daughters : 
Hazel and Elsie. Their onlv son Earl, the 
second horn, died in 1900, at the age of 
eleven years. 

Mr. Weatherd lias manv times been 
called to public office, and his duties have 
been sii faithfully and honorably discharged 
that he has won the commendation of all 
concerned. He was elected county commis- 
sioner and once appointed to fill a vacancy 
and then re-elected for the full term of three 
years. Elected coimty commissioner, he 
filled the position so creditably and satis- 
factorily to his constituents that he was 
chosen f(^r a second term and is the present 
incumbent, and no doubt will be again elect- 
ed, judging from the esteem in which the 
people hold him. He never wavers in his 
allegiance to what he believes to be for the 
public good and is both practical and pro- 
gressive in his endorsement 1 if measures. He 
has served his township as trustee and as 
township treasurer four years, and was 
elected justice of the peace but resigned that 
office when elected county commissioner. 
Like his father, he believes in reform and 



advancement in politics as well as other 
things. He believes in taking all the good 
and rooting out the bad, and the new he be- 
lieves is always the best. He affiliates with 
the reform party, but holds un malice against 
any party. Mr. Weatherd hel.nigs to the 
Independent Order of Odd Eellows and is 
an active and consistent member of the 
Methodist church, in which he has seiwed 
as class-leader and Sunday-school superin- 
tendent. Education, temperance and moral- 
ity are causes dear to his heart, and he does 
all in his power to uplift his fellow men. His 
manner is open and free-hearted, and in his 
life record are no pages which will not bear 
the closest scrutiny and investigation. He 
is one of the most popular and honored cit- 
izens of Vinita township, Kingman county, 
as well as one of its- most prosperous and 
practical agriculturists. 



JOHN C. RADCLIFFE. 

John C. Radcliffe is a retired farmer re- 
siding in Ellsworth, and his rest is well mer- 
ited, for his has been an active and useful 
career, in which he has labored effecti\'ely 
and earnestly for the welfare and improve- 
ment of his adopted county. He has done 
much to promote its horticultural interests, 
and along the lines of intellectual, moral and 
material improvement his work has been of 
marked benefit to those among whom he 
lives. He still owns a farm of six hundred 
and forty acres, on sections 14 and 15, Em- 
pire township, Ellsworth county. 

Mr. Radcliffe is a native of LeRoy. 
Cuyahoga county. Ohio, born on the 6th of 
August, 1830, his parents being William 
and Anna (Halsell) Radcliffe, both of 
whom were natives of the Isle of Man, where 
the marriage was celebrated. In the }'ear 
1833 they came to. America, locating in 
Ohio. The father was an iron molder and 
in 1837 removed to Ontario, Canada, where 
he spent the remainder of his acti\'e busi- 
ness life, his last days, however, being spent 
in the home of his son. b'hn C, in Illinois, 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



where he died in 1879, at the age of eighty- 
seven j-ears. His wife passed away in Can- 
ada, in 185 1. They were the parents of ten 
children, namely: William, who resides in 
Califijrnia: Airs. Margaret Johnson, who 
died in Cuyahoga county, Ohio; John C, of 
this review ; George, who died in Canada ; 
James, a resident of Windsor, Canada ; Jane, 
the wife of Thomas Wallace, also of Can- 
ada; Mary, the wife of Thomas Carson, of 
Indiana ; Kate, the deceased wife of Bernard 
Glattenhof ; Jefferson, who is living in Cuya- 
hog'a county, Ohio; and Sarah, who married 
William Collett, of Wisconsin. 

It was during the early boyhood of John 
C. Radcliffe that his parents removed to 
Canada, Snd he was there reared upon a 
farm until nineteen years of age. He as- 
sisted in the work of the fields and meadow 
and also pursued his studies in the common 
schools. In 1850 he removed to Putnam 
county, Illinois, where he arrived with only 
five cents in his pocket. Soon afterward he 
secured a position as a farm hand, and thus 
entered upon an independent business ca- 
reer. In May of that year he was united in 
marriage to Margaret Kester, a daughter 
of Rev. Jesse Kester, a Baptist minister. 
After his marriage he operated his father- 
in-law's farm on the shares until the spring 
of 1865, and in the meantime he purchased 
a small farm of his own. On selling that 
property he was again employed by others 
for a time and then purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres of desiraljle land, for which 
he paid six dollars per acre. He had two 
thousand dolars from the sale of his Put- 
nam county farm. His new tract was raw 
land, entirely unimproved, and upon this he 
built a house and then began the develop- 
ment of his land. He was somewhat im- 
peded in his labors, for he lost one of his 
horses. He also' had to borrow five hundred 
dollars to complete the payment on his farm, 
but with characteristic energy and deter- 
mination he prosecuted his labors and in 
course of time Se^-eloped a good property. 
He set out a good orchard, placed his fields 
under cultivation, and in 1878 he sold his 
property for thirty-five dollars per acre. In 



May, 1878, he started westward, intending 
to locate in Missouri, but concluded to come 
to Kansas, and, reaching Ellsworth county, 
purchased two hundred and forty acres of 
land, \\-hich he mjw owns, pa}-ing one thou- 
sand d(jllars for the amount. A few acres 
had been broken and a small stone house 
was the only improvement up to that time. 
Returning to Missouri, he then brought his 
family to Kansas, having left them in the 
fomier state while he secured his location 
here. Upon the farm he remained until Oc- 
tober, 1899, when he took up his abode in 
Ellsavorth. Upon his farm^ he erected a two- 
story frame residence, barn and outbuild- 
ings, built fences and added all modern ac- 
cessories and ecjuipments for facilitating 
farm work and making his labors success-- 

I ful. He also planted the first orchard in 
the county, containing seven hundred and 

[ thirty apple trees, together with an abund- 
ance of small fruit. He has also an orchard 
of six hundred peach trees. As the years 
passed he made judicious investments in 
property, adding other land until he now 
owns six hundred' and forty acres. He en- 
gaged in stock and grain raising and now 
keeps one hundred head of coavs and a large 
number of calves, making two hundred in 
all. He has given considerable attention to 
the breeding of draft horses of the Per- 
cheron breed arid' also raised mules. He now 

j has about fifty head upon his place, includ- 
ing some of the best in the locality. How- 
ever, Mr. Radcliiife is best known in connec- 
tion with fruit culture and has demonstrated 
the practicability of raising fruit successfully 
on a large scale in central Kansas. Al- 
though now residing in Ellsworth, he still 
retains an active interest in his farm, upon 
which his son Jesse resides. 

To Mr. and ^Nlrs. Radclifife were Ijorn 
four children, of whom two are living^ Marv 
and Jesse, who reside upon the heme farm. 
The latter married Ellen Adams, a native 
of Pennsylvania, and they have four chil- 
dren, — George, Hubert J., Xorman K. 
and Marie. Felicia and Philander, children 
of OUT subject, died in early life. The 
mother of this familv died December i;. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



63 



1897, and on the nth of October, 1899, Mr. 
RadcHffe was again married, his second 
union being with Mrs. Harriet Burton, the 
widow of Royal Burton and a daughter of 
Rev. Elam Chapin, a minister of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, who was born in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and was edu- 
cated, ordained and spent his life in Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. He married Harriet Olm- 
sted, of that city, born in the old home of 
Samuel Olmsted, her great-great-grandfa- 
ther, who was a captain of a militia com- 
pany in the early days. !\Irs. Radcliffe was 
reared and educated in the city uf Hartford, 
and there gave her hand in marriage to 
Royal Burton, who was born and reared in 
that locality. In 1885 they removed to Ells- 
worth, on account of Mr. Burton's health, 
and here he died on the 18th of December, 
1897. He was one of the first party of a 
hundred members that crossed the plains to 
California for the discovery of gold on the 
Pacific coast. For some time he remained 
in San Francisco and erected the first large 
hotel in that place, at a cost of eighty thou- 
sand (l(illars, but three days afterward it was 
destrii)C(l l>y fire. He remained in Califor- 
nia for nine years and made three fortunes, 
but three times lost all he had by fire. He 
then returned to Boston and enga.ged in 
the general commission business, becoming 
a prominent and enterprising business man 
of that place. I\Irs. Radcliffe is a lady of 
superior culture, refinement and intelligence 
and is an active leader in social and church 
circles. By her first marriage she had one 
daughter, Alice, who died at the age of 
ele\-en months. 

In educational matters Mr. Radcliffe 
has always taken a deep' and active interest 
and was a prime mover in the organization 
of the Radcliffe school district, donating" the 
ground on which the schoolhouse was 
erected. The organization of the district 
was perfected at his residence, and he did 
all in his power to promote educational in- 
terests in his locality, serving on the school 
board for many years. Fie has also^ filled 
the office of justice of the peace and in his 
political affiliations he is a Democrat. Pub- 



lic spirited and progressive, he has withheld 
his support from no mo\'ement or measure 
which he believes will prove of general 
good. He was at the head of the movement 
to erect bridges across the river at Wichita 
Crossing, raising considerable money by 
private subscriptions before any county ap- 
propriation was made. He was the first to 
introduce barb-wire fences into this section 
of the country, securing the same at a cost 
of fourteen cents per pound. He is one of 
the solid, successful and _progres'sive citizens 
of Ellsworth county and is yet deeply con- 
cerned in the welfare and progress of his 
cominunity. His worth is widely acknowl- 
edged and the people recognize that they 
owe much to him for his efforts in behalf of 
this section of the state. 



CURRENCE GREGG. 

Currence Gregg came to Rice county 
nineteen years ago, and through the inter- 
vening period has been a well-known repre- 
sentative of the farming interests of Wash- 
ington township, his home being now on sec- 
tion twenty-seven. He was born in Rush 
county, Indiana, March 6, 1848. His pa- 
ternal grandfather, William Gregg, was a 
Kentucky farmer and removed to the 
Hoosiier state in pioneer days, there carry- 
ing on the work of the farm until his life's 
labors were ended in death, in 1834. He 
was of German parentage. lie reared five 
children, three snn< ami tw" (l:iuL;"!iter-, an.l 
among the numluT \\;i- \\'illi;iiii ( ircgg. jr., 
the father of our subject, who was burn in 
the state of Kentucky, in 1810. Hav- 
ing arrived at years of maturity he wedded 
Mary Hillegoss, also a native of Kentucky 
and a schoolmate of her husband's during 
her girlhood days. They were married in 
the Blue Grass state, but soon afterward 
went to Indiana, where they became the 
parents of ten children, five sons and five 
daughters. They lost one daugliter at the 
age of eight years, but seven of the number 
are now living. The eldest, America, is the 



64 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



wife of James Coer, of Rushville, Indiana, 
where she was born seventy years ago. All 
of the nine children were married and had 
families with the exception of one son and 
one daughter, and the grandchildren num- 
bered from three to eight in each family. 
The fathei- of our subject was a life-long 
farmer and stock-dealer and dealt consider- 
ably with the Indians. About 1857 ^^''^7 ''^" 
moved to Clark coimty, Iowa, where the fa- 
ther died in 1876. The mother survived 
him about three years, passing away at the 
age of sixty-eight. Their remains were laid 
to rest in Clark county, where they had been 
highly esteemed as worthy citizens. 

Currence Gregg received but meager ed- 
ucational privileges in the district schools, 
pu-rsuing his studies in a log school house 
with puncheon floor, seats and desks. His 
services were largely needed upon the home 
farm and thus he had little opportunity to 
master the branches o'f English learning. 
He has been twice married, bis first union 
being with Josephine Piper, whom he 
wedded in 1868. She lived for ten years 
after their marriage and then died, leaving 
four children. In 1882 ]\Ir. Gregg was 
again married, Miss Mattie Thomas, of Rice 
count}-, Kansas, becoming his wife. Her 
parents were Solomon and Ruth ( ]\Iorman) 
Thomas, natives of Indiana, and their 
daughter, Mrs. Gregg, was born in Clark 
county, Iowa. In 1874 they removed to 
Rush county, Kansas, and in 1889 came to 
Rice county, where the mother died in 1894, 
at the age of sixty-three years, leaving seven 
of her nine children. The father is now a 
farmer in Oklahoma and has been again 
married. 

Mr. Gregg came to Kansas nineteen years 
ago, and in the spring of 1893 he removed 
to Oklahoma and made the run to the Chero- 
kee strip. He improved one hundred and 
sixty acres of land, upon which he engaged 
in farming for seven years. He not only 
built a home but added a fine orchard, con- 
taining all kinds of fruit, of which he made 
annual displays each year at the county fairs, 
carrying off many premiums. In one year 
he gained twenty-one prizes and each year 



took the lead among the exhibitors. He was 
the leading man in this enterprise in his sec- 
tion of the country and was one of the most 
prominent shippers of fruit to other states. 
In his home he has several excellent pictures 
of his exhibits and of his Oklahoma prop- 
erty. He there engaged in raising wheat, 
corn and broom corn. He also exported 
watermelons weighing one hundred pounds 
and raised sweet potatoes weighing eight 
pounds each. While residing in Oklahoma 
he made considerable money and at length 
sold his property there for three thousand 
dollars. He then came to Rice county and 
pui chased a half section of land for which 
he gave fifty-five hundred dollars cash. All 
of this he had made himself, for when he 
came to Kansas he had nothing and was glad 
to get fifty cents per day for his services. 
His leading crop is wheat and he now has 
two hundred acres planted to that cereal. He 
threshed five thousand bushels in one year. 
He also has from forty to one hundred acres 
planted with corn and from thirty to fifty 
acres in broom corn, which pays from sev- 
enty-five to one hundred and sixty dollars 
per ton. 

Mr. Gregg had ele^-en children. Those 
of the first marriage are: Homer William, 
of Oklahoma, who has a wife and two chil- 
dren : Lola, now the wife of Charles Geist, 
of Reno county, Kansas : Adblphus, at 
home; and Josephine, now the wife of James 
Ashley, of Clark county, Iowa, by whom she 
has two children. Those of the second mar- 
riage are: Olive M., a youth of sixteen: 
a son who died in infancy; Sulva, a lad of 
twelve summers; Gola, who died in Okla- 
homa, at the age of eight years; Ethel, who 
is now seven years of age; Murray,, two 
years old; and' Alto, who is a year old. Mr. 
Gregg votes with the Republican party and 
is one of its stanch advocates, believing 
firmly in its principles. He has, however, 
never sought or desired office, bis attention 
being given to his farming interests, which 
claim his entire time. He is an example 
of the boys who educate themselves and 
secured their own start in life. — de- 
termined, self-reliant bovs, willing to work 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



6S 



for advantages which other boys secure 
through inheritance, destined by sheer force 
of character to succeed in the face of all op- 
position and to push to the front in one im- 
portant branch or another. As a man his 
business abihty has been constantly manifest, 
showing large possibilities, and the farm of 
which he is now the owner is a monument 
to his exceptional power. 



JOHN B. BROWX. 



Jolin B. Brown was a well-known and 
highly respected citizen of Hutchinson, 
where he was extensively and successfully 
engaged in the real estate busness for a num- 
ber of years. He was born in Seneca coun- 
ty, Ohio, September 24, 1840, and repre- 
sented an old Virginian family. His grand- 
father, Issacher Brown, resided in Londoun 
county, Virginia, where, according to tradi- 
tion, he located a land grant which had been 
given him in recognition of his loyal service 
in the Revolutionary war. He became & 
well-knnwn planter of that locality and ex- 
tensively engaged in raising tobacco, which 
he sold in the markets of Alexandria. He 
lived and died in Loudoun county and like 
the family was connected with the Society 
of Friends or Quakers. 

Giles Brown, the father of our subject, 
was born near Alexandria, Virginia, and in 
Loudoun county was married to Harriet 
Briscoe, also a native of that state, although 
her people were originally from North Caro- 
lina. Giles Brown and his family removed to 
Beaver, Pennsylvania, and about 1827 went 
to Canton. Ohio, and thence to Salem, that 
state. Later he removed to Attica, Seneca 
county, Ohio, where he purchased a tract of 
heavily timbered land. There he cleared a 
space on which he built a log cabin and in 
course of time he erected a good brick resi- 
dence, which is still standing and which is 
known as the Giles Brown homestead. He 
died in 1842, leaving to his w'idow the care 
of their eight children, the eldest being only 
about fourteen vears of age. She remained 



upon the old homestead, superintended the 
cultivation of the farm and reared her fam- 
ily. When her children had reached mature 
j^ears and left home she bought a farm near 
Attica, where she resided, superintending 
her farming interests until her death, which 
occurred in 1880. 

John B. Brown pursued his education 
in the public schools of Attica and early be- 
came familiar with the work of the heme 
fann. At the time of the civil war he re- 
sponded to his country's call for aid, enlist- 
ing in the Fourteenth Ohio Lifantry, with 
which he served throughout the war, mak- 
ing a creditable record as a gallant and pa- 
triotic soldier. He participated in the bat- 
tles of Wild Cat, Mill Spring, Corinth. 
Hoo\-er's Gap, Tullahoma, Chickamauga, 
Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, 
Allatoona, Kenesaw i\Iountain. Peach Tree 
Creek, Chattahoochie River, Atlanta, Jones- 
boro, Milledgeville, Savannah and Raleigh. 
His regiment was always connected with the 
western army and served under Generals 
Tliom'as, Buell, Rosecrans, Grant and Sher- 
man. 

After his return from the war ]\Ir. 
Brown located in Napoleon, Ohio, where 
he engaged in the grocery business for three 
years, when he went to South Carolina with 
Governor Scott. He remained there for one 
year, doing constable duty during the recon- 
struction period, and then returned to Na- 
poleon. On the 15th of February, 1872, he 
was united in marriage to iliss Alma Roff, 
who was born in Stark county, Ohio. Feb- 
ruary 2, 1845, a daughter of Henry and 
Catherine (Frean) Roff, both of whom 
were from Pennsylvania and were descended 
from Holland ancestrv that settled in the 
Keystone state prior to the Re\-oluti()nary 
war. 

Li the spring of 1872 Mr. Brown em- 
igrated westward to Kansas and in Novem- 
ber of that year went into the land office with 
Mr. Bigger. He was practically, thrnughout 
his entire residence here, engaged in dealing 
in real estate. In partnership with L. A. 
Bigger he located two hundred and fifty 
thcusand acres (_;f land under the homestead 



66 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



act. He represented the Santa Fe Railroad 
Company and in 1880 sold over one hun- 
dred thousand acres of railroad land in Reno 
and adjoining counties during the "boom." 
yir. Brown was a very active, energetic and 
enterprising man and contributed much to 
the upbuilding of Hutchinson. He erected 
the Masonic block and other structures in 
the city and he ever enjoyed the confidence 
of investors, being considered the standard 
authority on all real estate matters in Hutch- 
inson. His judgment was always sought 
on matters of public moment and his counsel 
was ever wise, practical and judicious. He 
was an active promoter of many new enter- 
prises which contributed in large measure to 
the general good. When Hutchinson was 
incorporated in 1872 he was elected one of 
its councilmen, in 1874 he was elected mayor 
and also held the office of police judge. In 
politics he was ever a stalwart Republican. 
Socially he was connected with the Grand 
Army of the Republic, attained the Knight 
Templar degree in the Masonic fraternity 
and belonged to the ]\Ien's Commercial 
Club. 

Unto ]Mr. and Mrs. Brown were born 
two children: Catherine, who is employed 
in the pension office in Topeka; and John 
B.,"who is attending school in Topeka. Mrs. 
Brown is still a resident of Hutchinson and 
makes her home with her sister. Airs. Obee. 
Mr. Brown contributed so largely to the de- 
velopment and upbuilding of the city, was 
so prominent in public affairs and was so 
active in all measures for the public good 
that his name is inseparably associated with 
its history and this volume would be incom- 
plete without the record of his life. 



A. J. MONROE. 



A. J. Monroe represents a family that 
came to Rice county among its first settlers, 
arriving here in August, 1871. Here our 
subject has since resided and made his 
home, and his life record illustrates the 
opportunities which the Sunflower state af- 



fords to its settlers. A native of Ohio, his 
birth occurred in Ross county, on the ist 
of August, 1830. His parents were Samuel 
and Mary (Wishon) Monroe, both of whom 
were natives of Virginia, and their marriage 
occurred in Pike county, Ohio. They after- 
ward removed to Ross county, that state, 
where they remained for a number of years. 
They then went to Newton county, Indiana, 
and there the father passed away. The 
mother afterward moved to Irocjuois county, 
Illinois, wdiere she also died. They had six 
children, as follows: John H., Andrew J., 
Mary Jane, George C, Hannah E. and 
George W. 

In the county of his nativity A. J. Mon- 
roe remained until thirteen years of age, 
when the family removed to Warren county. 
Indiana. The labors of the farm occupied 
much of his attention throughout the period 
of his youth and he gained good practical 
experience in the best methods of developing 
and cultivating land. He was married in 
Newton county, Indiana, on the 27th of 
January, 1856, to Miss Julia A. Roberson, 
and through the intervening years she has 
been to him a good wife and helpmate. She 
possessed much exeoutive ability and cour- 
age and was thus well fitted for the experi- 
ences that come to pioneer settlers. Her 
birth occurred in Carroll county. Indiana, 
and she is a daughter of William and Anna 
(Tinkle) Roberson. The father was born 
in the south, the mother in Ohio, and the}' 
became the parents of se^'en children, name- 
ly: Mrs. Monroe, Nancy, "Martha, George 
R., now deceased, Josephine, \\'arren and 
Morgan. The father died in Cowley county, 
Kansas, at the age of eighty. Throughout 
his life he was a farmer and a bard-working, 
upright, honorable man. He held member- 
ship in the Baptist church. His wife passed 
away in Cowley county, at the age of sixty- 
four years, loved b_\- all for her many good 
qualities. 

Mr. and Mrs. Monroe made the oxxrland 
trip to Kansas in 1858, traveling in a wagon 
drawn by ox teams and camped along the 
wa}- where night overtook them. They 
started on July 21, 1858, and arrived at their 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



destination on the iSth of September follow- 
ing. The)- remained in eastern Kansas until 
the 15th of May, 1862, when thej- started 
for Indiana, reaching their old home on the 
27th of July. The return trip was made 
with both oxen and horses. They crossed 
a corner of Nebraska, a large portion of 
Iowa, the southeastern corner of Missouri, 
the state of Illinois and thus reached the 
Hoosier state. Through the following year 
^Ir. Monroe was engaged in farming, but 
in 1863 he put aside agricultural pursuits 
that he might give his country the benefit of 
his services as a soldier in the civil war. He 
enlisted in the Eleventh Indiana Cavalrj', 
with which he served for eighteen months. 
He sustained a flesh wound, but was never 
seriously injured. His regiment was with 
the Army of the Cumberland, under Gen- 
eral Thomas, and he participated in the bat- 
tles of Nashyille, Clarksville and many 
others of lesser importance. When the war 
was over he, was honorably discharged at 
Louisville, Kentucky, and thence returned to 
Indiana, where he remained until 1871. 

In that year Mr. Monroe again started 
for sunny Kansas and cast in his lot among 
the early settlers of Rice coimty. Here he 
built a sod house and afterward a small 
frame house, but to-day he owns a large 
modern residence, built in a good style of 
architecture and containing a number of 
pleasant and well ventilated rooms. It 
stands upon an attractive building site and 
is surrounded by a fine grove and orchard 
containing fifteen acres, and has also erected 
excellent barns. The fann is complete in 
all its equipments. Windmills pump the 
water supply, good pastures afford excellent 
grazing for the stock and the fields bring 
to him a good return. The Monroe farm 
comprises nine hundred and sixty acres of 
wel improved land. It is one of the most 
valuable farming properties in Rice county 
and is a monument to the thrift and enter- 
prise of the owner, whose persistent pur- 
pose and diligence have enabled him to gain 
a prominent position among the substantial 
farmers of his community. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. ]\Ionroe have been 



born three children : ]\Iary Ann. who. was 
born in Kansas, in i860, is now the wife 
of Moses Baker, of Wilson township. Rice 
county. George A., whose birth occurred 
in Wabash county, Indiana, on the i6th of 
April, 1864, was married at the age of 
twenty-se^'en years to Agnes McCabe, a cul- 
tured and intelligent young lady, a daughter 
of Wesley McCabe, of Wilson township. 
She died in 1892, leaving a daughter, Clara 
Belle. George A. Monroe was seven years of 
age when he came to the county, where he 
was reared and educated. Here he follows 
farming. Charles E., the youngest of the 
family, was born September 16, 1878, on the 
old homestead where he yet resides. The 
Monroes were originally Republicans, but 
the sons are now connected with the Pei^ple's 
party. Since coming to Kansas our subject 
has achieved excellent success and is now 
numbered among the substantial citizens of 
Rice county. 



GEORGE A. A'ANDEVEER. 

Probably no citizen of central Kansas is 
better known throughout the county in finan- 
cial and legal circles than George A. Van- 
deveer, the senior member of the law firm 
of Vande\-eer & Martin, of Hutchinson. 
Admitted to the bar he entered upon the 
practice and from the beginning has been 
unusually prosperous in every respect. The 
success which he has attained is due to his 
own efforts and merits. The possession of 
advantages is no guarantee whatever of pro- 
fessional success. This comes not of itself, 
nor can it be secured without integrity, abil- 
ity and industry. Those qualities he pos- 
sesses to an eminent degree and he has been 
faithful to every interest committed to his 
charge. Throughout his whole life whatso- 
ever his hand has found to do. whether in 
his profession or in official duties or as the 
representative of most important interests, 
he has done with all his might and with a 
deep sense of conscientious obligation. Thus 
he has won distinction and prosperity and 



68 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



to-day George A. Vandeveer is one of the 
most honored members of the Kansas bar. 

He was born in Christian county, Illi- 
nois. December 13, 1853. his parents being- 
Aaron and Sarah C. (McWilliams) Van- 
deveer. The father was born July 4, 1830, 
in what is now Christian county, but was 
then a part of Sangamon county, Illinois. 
Throughout his entire life he there -resided, 
taking up his abode in Pana in 1867. There 
he engaged in the grocery trade until his 
death. His widow afterward married again, 
her second husband being Hugh A. Bab- 
cock, of Hutchinson, in which city she yet 
makes her home. George A. Vandeveer was 
one of ten children, of whom four are yet 
living: Mrs. E. N. Maxfield, of Stafford, 
Kansas: Nellie V., the wife of Hon. Frank 
L. ]\Iartin, of the firm of Vandeveer & 
]\Iartin and the present mayor of Hutchin- 
son; Calvin B., a farmer of Clay township, 
Reno county, and George. 

But the ancestry of the A'andeveers may 
be traced back to a more remote period. 
George Vandeveer, the grandfather of our 
subject, was a native of Kentucky and be- 
came a pioneer of Sangamon county, Illi- 
nois. His father, J. Vandeveer, was a na- 
tive of either New Jersey or North Carolina 
and was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, 
while his father, who was born in Holland, 
became one of the early colonial settlers who 
took up their abode at Communipaugh, New 
Jersey. His descendants removed to North 
Carolina and some of them became associ- 
ated with Daniel Boone in his explorations 
of Kentucky, that noted hunter and explorer 
being a relative of the Vandeveers. The 
family name was originally von der Veer, 
meaning "from the Veer." A member of 
the family well worthy of mention was 
Horatio M. Vandeveer, a son of Aaron Van- 
deveer and a cousin of the father of our 
subject. He was an old-school law practi- 
tioner of Illinois, who was the colleague and 
associate of Lincoln, Douglas and r ther dis- 
tinguished men of that time practicing at 
the Illinois bar. \Miile experiencing the 
difficulties and hardships of pioneer life he 
studied law by the light of the fireplace and 



the blaze of hickory bark, and he spent a 
long life engaged in practice in Christian 
county, Illinois. He served his country in 
the war with Mexico. Entirely through his 
own efforts he acquired his education and 
won advancement to a prominent position 
among the noted men of his state, and at 
his death, which occurred in 1892, he was 
worth three million di.illars and possessed 
sixty thousand acres of valuable land in his 
county. He was at cHfferent times judge of 
various courts' and represented his fellow 
citizens in the house and senate of the state 
legislature. His son, ^^■illiam T. Vande- 
veer, was a member of the commission which 
built the magnificent new capitol building. 
He took a very prominent part in molding 
the history of the state at an early day and 
was a notable figure in public affairs. 

The life of this eminent relation has been 
an inspiration and source of encouragement 
to George A. Vandeveer, who in some way 
was deprived of a collegiate %ducation and 
professional training, but who through the 
innate strength of his character has over- 
come difficulties and worked his way upward 
to success. He ranained with his parents 
upon the farm until fourteen years of age 
and assisted in the work connected there- 
with, spending much of the time in the sad- 
dle, herding cattle. The father owned a 
large farm of four hundred acres and kept 
a large herd of cattle, which grazed over the 
prairies, which were unfenced, therefore de- 
manding that some one constantly be on the 
alert lest some of the herd stray away. 
Young George had very little opportunity 
of attending school until the family removed 
to the town of Pana, after which he pursued' 
his studies in the public schools for three 
years. From' the time he was seventeen 
until 1872 he assisted his father in the con- 
duct of the grocers- ?tore, and in the fall 
of that year he accepted the responsible po- 
sition of deputy tax collector of Pana town- 
ship. He did most of the work of his su- 
perior officer, collecting and conveying to 
the bank taxes amounting to over forty-six 
thousand dollars. He was next tendered a 
position in the Exchange Bank of Pana. act- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



69 



ing' in that capacity until the tinancial jianic 
of 1873, \yhen that bank, together with 
many others, closed its doors. On the ist 
of January, 1874, he became assistant cash- 
ier of the Nokomis National Bank, of No- 
komis, Illinois, which position he occupied 
for a year, when his father, in company with 
James P. Walker, established a bank at 
. ;\Iorrisville. Illinois, our subject and Mr. 
\\'alker's son conducting the same from 
February, 1875, until the fall of 1879. 

At that time George A. Vandeveer sold 
his interest and came to the west. While 
in Mcrrisville he was married. Septem- 
ber 5, 1876, to Miss Clara B. Edgcomb, a 
daughter of John Edgcomb, of LaSalle 
county, Illinois, and in the fall of 1879 he 
came to Newton, Kansas. During his resi- 
dence in ^Nlorrisonville, w'hile in the bank 
he had pursued the study of law under the 
direction of his brother-in-law, David F. 
]Murry, now of Tacoma, Washington, and 
in December, 1879. he began practice in 
Newton in partnership with A. B. Knowl- 
ton, which connection was maintained for 
about a year. In 1880 he removed to Burr- 
ton, Har\-ey county, Kansas and established 
a private banking business. When he had 
placed it in successful operation he had an 
opportunity to dispose of it to advantage and 
did so. In the fall of 1862 Hon. A. R.' 
Schebie, of Hutchinson, who had been elect- 
ed to the state legislature, desiring an active 
and capable young attorney in his ofifice, of- 
fered to make Mr. Vandeveer a partner, and 
the law firm of Schebie & Vandeveer was 
accordingly formed, maintaining an exist- 
ence as such until December, 1885, when 
the senior partner died. In July of that year 
Frank L. Martin had come to Hutchinson 
fnim Illinois and succeeding Mr. Schebie 
became a member of the present firm of Van- 
deveer & Martin. They enjoyed a large and 
representative clientage until September, 
1890, when our subject removed to Kansas 
City, where he practiced until the spring of 
1896. In the meantime he drafted the char- 
ter and assisted in the organization of the 
National Surety Company with Charles A. 



Dean as president, the headquarters being 
in Kansas City until the spring of 1876, 
when the business was removed to New 
York city. In March of that year Mr. Van- 
deveer went with Mr. Dean to the eastern 
metropolis to secure additional capital and 
extend the organization. Mr. Vandeveer 
then took an important part in incorporating 
the company and drafted the charter fur the 
New York organization. He became gen- 
eral solicitor for the New York National 
Surety Compam-, with offices at No. 346 
Broadway, in the New York Life Insurance 
building, where he remained until August, 
1900, when he resigned his position and re- 
turned to Hutchinson, where he once more 
entered into partnership with Mr. Mar- 
tin for the general practice of law. Since 
that time he has given his attention exclu- 
sively to his legal work and his devotion to 
his clients" interests is proverbial. 

During his residence in New York city 
Mr. Vandeveer had charge of a large num- 
ber of important cases in the interests of the 
company throughout the principal cities of 
the United States. He prepared a form of 
fidelity bond which was adopted and is now 
used by the American Bankers' Association. 
The success of the National Surety Com- 
pany is largely due to his talent of organi- 
zation as well as control of its afYairs. It 
has become one of the leading institutions 
of the kind in the entire country and is of 
national importance in the business world. 
It bonds the employes of over fifty per cent, 
of all the transportation companies of the 
United States, such as railroad and express 
companies and the employes of the United 
States mail service, also the employes of 
banks, and furnish bonds for guardians and 
executors. To-day Mr. Vandeveer has a 
large and constantly growing law practice, 
which connects him with much of the most 
important litigation tried in the courts of 
this district, while in the supreme court of 
Kansas and the supreme court oi the United 
States he has tigured in connection with 
notable suits. His knowledge of the law is 
comprehensive and accurate, his mind is 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



analytical and inductive and lie has shown 
splendid ability in handling the most intri- 
cate problems of jurisprudence. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Vandeveer have been 
born three children: Cossie, the wife of 
Ernest F. Tietzel, who has business interests 
in New York city and resides in Brooklyn; 
Fred Leroy, a graduate of Yale College and 
an attorney of St. Louis, who married Vesta 
Hardy, of New Haven, Connecticut, a 
daughter of George Hardy, chief engineer 
of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad Company; and Harry D., who was 
admitted to the Kansas bar in 1901, when 
in his nineteenth year and is now a student 
in the law department of Yale University. 
In the school of experience George A. Van- 
deveer has been an apt pupil. Study, earnest 
investigation, close obserA-ation and laudable 
ambition have given to him the capability 
which a college course would have afforded. 
Marked strength of character has been mani- 
fest throughout his entire life ; and the prom- 
inence he has attained, the work he has ac- 
complished, his manly principles and up- 
right career have ever commanded for him 
the admiration and respect of prominent 
men throughout the country. While in the 
localities in which he has resided he has 
gained that friendship which is a tribute to 
personal worth. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. 



JOHN S. GARDNER. 

History chronicles many changes in con- 
dition, in progress, in business and in the 
ways of life. No longer do the annals of a 
country consist of a record of wars and 
conquests, but teem instead with the ac- 
counts of business extension, of commercial 
prosperity and of the consequent progress 
and improvements which appear in every 
walk of life. The conquests now made are 
those of mind over matter, not of man over 
man, and the victor is he wdio can success- 
fully establish, control and operate extensive 
commercial interests. Although a young 
man 'Slv. Gardner has become an important 



factor in the business life of Hutchinson, 
where he holds a responsible position as 
foreman of the Perarsylvania Salt Block. He 
has also been prominent in public affairs in 
the city of South Hutchinson and in mold- 
ing public thought and actii^n his opinions 
have carried weight. 

Mr. Gardner was born in Coles county, 
Illinois, September 20, 1869, and is of 
Scotch-Irish lineage. His grandfather 
opened and operated a farm in Indiana and 
there followed agricultural pursuits through- 
out his entire life. His son, Samuel Gard- 
ner, was born in Scott county, Indiana, June 
13, 1847, and was reared to the work of the 
fann, early taking his place in the fields. 
After his father's death he assumed the 
management of the old homestead, which he 
successfully operated for some time. About 
1865 he was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret K. Weir, who was of German de- 
scent, and was born in Indiana, February 2, 
1849. Her father, James Weir, was a 
farmer by occupation and became one of the 
pioneer settlers of the Hoosier state. Her 
brother, George Weir, served throughout 
the civil war as an officer. About 1866 
Samuel Gardner removed with his family to 
Coles county, Illinois, where he engaged in 
farming until 1875, when he went to Barton 
county, Missouri. There he followed the 
same pursuit until about 1887, when he re- 
moved to Marion county, Oregon. He re- 
sided in Woodburn and Oregon City dur- 
ing his stay there and followed his original 
trade of stonemason and plasterer. In 1889 
he became a resident of Gray county, Kan- 
sas, locating in the town of Cimarron, 
where he engaged in the same pursuits for 
six years, and in 1895 ^^ ^'^°^ "-M^ l^'s abode 
in Hutchinson. Here he accepted the posi- 
tion of foreman in the packing department 
of the Hutchinson Salt Block and he makes 
his home at No. 800 Third avenue East. 
During the Civil war he served as a team- 
ster in the Union army. In his political 
views he is a Democrat and fraternally he 
is connected with the Odd Fellows and the 
Modern Woodmen. Both he and his wife 
held membership in the Methodist church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



In the family of this worthy couple were 
seven children, of whom four are now Hv- 
ing. The record is: George, who died in 
llhnois in childhood; John S., of this re- 
view ; Orrell, who is employed in a grocery 
store in Hutchinson; Anna, the wife of 
Charles Mason, who is engaged in the 
creamerv business in Preston, Pratt county, 
Kansas; Dora, the wife of Harry Mounts, 
who is employed by the Centney Wholesale 
Grocery Company and lives in Hutchinson ; 
Charlie, who died in infancy, while the fam- 
ily were in Missouri; and a son who died 
in infancy in the same state. 

In the common schools of Barton coun- 
ty, Missouri, John S. Gardner began his ed- 
ucatiiin, which was continued in the public 
schools of Cimarron, Kansas, where he re- 
mained with his father until nineteen years 
of age, when he secured a railroad position 
in Greene county, this state. He was thus 
employed for about two years, when he ac- 
cepted a position in the Hutchinson Salt 
Block, but after a year he became foreman of 
the Pennsylvania Salt Block, located on the 
other side of the Arkansas river in South 
Hutchinson and thither he removed his 
family. The Pennsylvania Salt Block was 
built about 1886, its dimensions being two 
hundred by two hundred feet. It contains 
two pans, each one hundred and tifteen by 
thirty-two feet and the capacity of the plant 
is three hundred barrels per day. The pro- 
cess of evaporation by natural heat is used 
and twO' grades of salt, fine and coarse, are 
manufactured. The output is sent mostly to 
packing houses in Omaha, Kansas City, and 
St. Louis. 

On the 24th of September, iSgo, in 
Hutchinsdu Kansas, Mr. Gardner was united 
in marriage to Miss Anna Millhouser, a na- 
ti\'e I if Missouri and a daughter of Fred 
INIillli'iuscr, niiw a resident farmer of Pratt 
county, Kansas. His wife died in Carroll 
county, in 1873, when Mrs. Gardner was 
only three years old. Her uncle. John Mill- 
houser, served as an officer in the Union 
army during the Civil war and on account 
of the wound he sustained now draws a 
pension. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Gardner have 



been born four children: Hubert S., who 
was lx>rn July 30, 1891 ; Dora, born Octo- 
ber 5, 1892: Leslie, January 5, 1895; and 
Orrell, September 22, 1896, All were born 
in South Hutchinson. Mr. Gardner owns a 
pleasant residence just outside the city lim- 
its of South Hutchinson. This he pur- 
chased together with seventeen acres of land, 
in June, 1899. There was a fine peach or- 
chard on the place at the time he bought it 
and he has since set out a new orchard of 
peach and apple trees. The remainder of 
his land he usually plants in corn forage, and 
other grains. 

In his political views Mr. Gardner is a 
Republican when party issues are involved 
but at local elections he votes independently. 
In the spring of 1895 he was elected coun- 
cilman of South Hutchinson on the Citizen's 
ticket, an anti-license ticket, and served out 
his term. The following spring he was 
elected mayor and filled the position for three 
consecutive terms, while in 1899 he was 
again elected councilman. He has been a 
member oi the board of education from 
1895 until 1901 inclusive. Socially he is 
identified with the following orders : the 
subordinate lodge and encampment of the 
Odd Fellows, in which he has passed 
through all the chairs; the Modern Wood- 
men of America and the Modern Tonties, 
in which he has filled all the chairs, and is 
now secretary of Council No. 83, of South 
Hutchinson. In his life history there are 
many elements worthy of commendation and 
of emulation and the high regard in which 
he is held as a man and citizen is indicated 
by the prominence which he has attained 
in social circles and in politics as well. 



J. A. YEOMAN. 

J. A. Yeoman, a well known farmer of 
Kin.gman county, was born in Fa_\ette coun- 
ty, Ohio, on the 2d of February, 1855. His 
father, Eli Yeoman, was a native of the Em- 
pire state, his birth having there occurred in 
Drvden, and in his native state he became a 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



prominent farmer and stock man. His wife 
bore the maiden name of Jane Knox and 
was a daughter of James Knox and a cousin 
of James Knox Polk, president of the Uni- 
ted States. She was a native of Ohio and 
was a member of a prominent and well 
known family of that commonwealth. In 
1856 Mr. and Mrs. Eli Yeoman removed 
from Ohio to Jasper county, Indiana, where 
they spent their remaining days, the mother 
dving in the faith of the Presbyterian 
church, of whicli she was a worthy and con- 
sistent member. They became the parents 
of ten children, nine sons and one daughter, 
seven of whom are now living, and those 
who make tlieir home in Kingman count}' 
are O. A., J. A. and ^l. M. 

J. A. Yeoman, the subject of this re- 
view, was reared on the old home farm in 
Jasper coimty, Indiana, where he waisi early 
inured to the labor of the fields, and he re- 
mained under the parental roof until he at- 
tained to years of maturity. In 1886 he re- 
moved to Greensburg, Kiowa county, Kan- 
sas, where he purchased a farm, but two 
years later he sold his place and went to the 
St. Louis valley, in Colorado, where he was 
engaged in ranching for a time. On coming" 
again to this state he purchased a fine farm 
of three hundred and twenty acres' on sec- 
tion 10, Ninnescah township, two and a half 
miles from Kingman, where he is exten- 
sively engaged in' general farming and' 
stock-raising. 

At the age of twenty-five years iMr. Yeo- 
man was united in marriage to Amy Is- 
rael, who was born, reared and educated in 
Jasper county. Indiana, a daughter of 
Whit Israel. The father was a soldier in 
the Civil war, a member of the Eighty-sev- 
enth Indiana Infantry, and was killed at the 
battle of Chickamauga, Tennessee, leaving 
a widow and two daughters, — Mrs. Maggie 
Kirchner and Mrs. Yeoman. The former 
died in Berry, Oklahoma. The mother was 
killed by lightning at Greensburg, Kansas, 
in 1885. ^Ir. and Mrs. Yeoman became the 
parents of six children, but only two are 
now living, — Don, a lad of seventeen years, 
and Joseph, now thirteen years of age. Guy, 



their first born, died at the age of three 
years; their second child, \'erne, died at the 
age of six months; Frances also died at the 
age of six months ; and Bessie, the 3-oungest 
child, died at the age of fifteen months. Mr. 
Yeoman ^•otes with the Republican party, 
and socially he is a member of the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows and the Work- 
men. Both he and his wife hold manber- 
ship in the Christian church, and the family 
are among the well known and highly re- 
spected residents of Kingman county. 



A. M. JE^^"ELL. 

The real-estate business in the citv of 
Hutchinson, Kansas, has been well and suc- 
cessfully managed by leaders in this line, 
and one of the most prominent is A. '\l. 
Jewell, who since 1886 has dealt very ex- 
tensively in property in this vicinity. His 
birth occurred in I^wiston, Maine, on June 
29, 1850, a son of Benjamin and Ursula 
(Ham) Jewell, both of whom were natives 
of the same state. Both parents have passed 
away and also all of the children of the fam- 
ily with the exception of ^Ir. Jewell of this 
sketch, and one sister. He was but two \ears 
of age when he lost his parents and he was 
reared by his maternal grandparents, obtain- 
ing his education in the schools of iMon- 
mouth, Maine, and graduating at the iMon- 
mouth Academy. His business career began 
in his native state, but a year later he start- 
ed for the west, locating in the state of Illi- 
nois, and there he engaged in railroad work, 
in the transportation department, remaining 
as clerk, train dispatcher and agent for the 
following eight or nine years. Leaving rail- 
road work, he then embarked in the mer- 
cantile business, being associated with part- 
ners for five years and traveling in the same 
line for seven years. 

It was in 1886 that Mr. Jewell's attention 
was particularly called to Kansas as a place 
of residence, and in that year he located in 
Hutchinson, soon afterward being associated 
in the real-estate business with several of 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



the leading- citizens. Three years later he 
purchased tiie interests of his partners and 
since then he has conducted liis very pros- 
perous business alone. He liandles both 
city residences and farm property, has also 
done much toward the improvement and 
building up of many of the subdivisions of 
this city and lias laecome an authority on 
values and the real-estate market. He fre- 
quently buys property and places it in fine 
condition, eventually disposing of it to great 
advantage. His beautiful residence at 209 
Avenue A was erected in 1889, and he also 
has one of the fine farms of Reno- county. 

The marriage of Mr. Jewell occurrecVon 
May 26. 1873, in Springfield. Illinois, to 
Miss Emma C., a daughter of H. M. Wick- 
ham, who was a resident of that city. Four 
children have been born to this union, name- 
ly: Clinton L. ; Helen G., who is the wife of 
Frank H. Battise, a- resident of Hutchinson 
and a conductor on the Hutchinson & South- 
ern branch of the Santa Fe railroad; Edna 
M. ; and Howard M. In politics Mr. Jewell 
supports the Republican party, although he 
is not a politician in the strict sense of the 
word. Socially he is connected with both 
the A. O. U. \\\ and the ^Voodmen of the 
World, while in religious matters he has 
long been a consistent member of the Meth- 
odist church, an official member of the same 
and a leader in its Christian work. Mr. Jew- 
ell stands very high in the estimation of the 
business part of the city, while his pleasing 
personality and courteous manner wins for 
him friends in everv walk of life. 



FRANK H. FOSTER. 

Mr. Foster was born in Allen county, 
Indiana, June 19, 1858, his parents being 
Asher W. and Prudence (Thrasher) Fos- 
ter, both of whom were natives of Virginia, 
where their marriage was celebrated. The 
paternal grandfather of our subject was 
one of three brothers who came from Ire- 
land to America, landing in Boston, whence 
he made his way southward to Virginia. He 



was a tailor by trade and died during the 
early boyhood of his son Asher. The latter 
served an apprenticeship to the cabinet- 
maker's trade, and in 1857 removed to In- 
diana, where he engaged in carpentering, 
following that pursuit until his enlistment 
for service in the Union army, in April, 
1 86 1. He was with the Army of the Po- 
tomac, and after serving for three years 
veteranized and remained with his com- 
mand until the close of hostilities, receiving 
an honorable discharge in August, 1865. He 
joined the army as a private but was later 
detailed as hospital steward, which position 
he continued to fill until the war was ended. 
Much of his service was near his old home 
in Virginia, and he obtained permission to 
go through the picket lines to visit his old 
home. He found that all of his relatives 
were espousing the Rebel cause. He was 
taken in by his brothers and mother, and 
they gave him protection for three days, but 
his mother felt greatly hurt over, as she ex- 
pressed it, his going back on his state and 
the interests of home. He remained at home 
until his command went north, when he left 
with them. He never visited his home again 
and was cut ofif from the estate. Asher Fos- 
ter had but one furlough during his entire 
army service, and that was when he veter- 
anized. He participated in the battles of 
Antietam, the A\'il(lcrness, the seven days' 
fight at .\tlanta and Lonkdut Mountain, and 
was in the detail that sailed to New York 
to enforce army regulations. He was also 
in the fight at Pea Ridge. 

After the war Mr. Foster returned to 
his family in Allen county, Indiana, and en- 
gaged in carpentering, which he followed 
until 1885, when he joined his son Frank in 
Kansas, locating in Alden, Rice county. 
There he worked at his trade until his death, 
which occurred July 27, 1893, when he was 
sixty-four years of age. He was a man of 
medium size, had acquired a fair education 
and had a good memory. His wife died in 
Alden, in January, 1898. She was a daugh- 
ter of a Mr. Thrasher, a prominent farmer 
and slave owner of ^'irginia. who died in 
that state. His children were Mrs. Mar- 



74 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



garet Lipse; John P., who served in the 
Confederate army and died in Virginia; 
George, a Baptist minister, who died in the 
Old Dominion ; Prudence, the mother of our 
subject; Maria; Kate; Adeline; and Henry. 
Unto the grandfather Foster were born four 
children : Asher W. ; John, who removed 
to Missouri and afterward to Iowa, where 
he died; George, who spent his last days in 
Missouri ; and Harriet. Unto the parents 
of our subject were born five children: 
Frank H. ; John, who died at the age of 
eleven years ; Dora, the wife of Lee W. Ar- 
nold, of Burdette, Kansas; Maggie, of In- 
diana; and Nettie, who is attending school 
in Emporia. The mother w^as a member of 
the Evangelical church, and her Christian 
life and teachings had mr.ch influence over 
her children. 

Frank H. Foster remained under the 
parental roof until ten years of age, after 
which he spent three years in the home of the 
Rev. W. Y. B. Pierce, a Baptist minister of 
New York. He then returned home and 
later was employed as a farm hand. Sub- 
sequently he took charge of a livery barn, 
which he conducted for a time, when he ac- 
cepted a clerkship in a, store. He followed 
difTerent lines of business until 1883, when 
he went to Nebraska, where he worked on a 
cattle ranch until the spring of 1884. when 
he removed to Colorado, being there em- 
ployed on a ranch until the following July. 
In that month he came to Rice county, Kan- 
sas, and was first employed in connection 
with the operation of a threshing machine. 
Subsequently he secured a situation as a 
salesman in a store, and in March, 1888, he 
was made a deputy sheriff, occupying that 
position fnr fnur \ears. after which he was 
elected sheriff for a term of two years and 
re-elected for the same period, so that he was 
connected with the office for eight consecu- 
tive years, filling the position with credit to 
himself and satisfaction to his constituents. 
During their long service no complaint was 
ever made and no prisoners escaped. While 
filling the position Mr. Foster purchased a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres, and in 
1896 took up his abode thereon. There were 



only a few improvements and after a time 
his barn was destroyed by fire. He then 
erected a very large barn, remodeled his 
house and has placed his farm in excellent 
condition, his fields being under a. high state 
of cultivation. He also purchased another 
quarter section of land and is now giving 
much attention to the growing of stock of 
all kinds, including short-horn cattle and 
Pel cheron horses. He has a fine Percheron 
stallion, also a saddle-bred stallion and 
roadsters. The stock produced on his farm 
is among the best to be found in Kansas, 
and in this direction he has gained a very 
enviable reputation. 

Mr. Foster was united in marriage at 
Chase, to Miss Minnie M. Smith, who was 
born in Madison county, Iowa, the wedding 
taking place January 20, 1892. The lady is 
a daughter of O. F. and Nettie (Compton) 
Smith, the former a native of Virginia and 
the latter of Iowa, in which state their mar- 
riage was celebrated. During the Civil war 
her father joined the army and was in many 
hotlv contested battles. He received what 
was supposed to be a mortal wound, the top 
of his head being torn away. He was left to 
die, but his strong constitution enabled him 
to recover. A portion of his skull was torn 
off and he lost the sight of one eye. He has 
always been a sufferer since the \Yar, but life 
was spared to him. Later he received an 
honorable discharge and is now granted a 
small pension. He afterward engaged in 
the meat market business and in buying' and 
selling stock. In 1880 he removed to Chase, 
Kansas, where he condiicted a meat market 
until his retirement to private life. He and 
his wife are now living in Chase, where 
they are held in warm regard. In politics 
he is a strong Republican, has served as 
township trustee and in other positions. He 
was the eldest of se\-en children, the others 
being James, Thomas, Howard, William N. 
M., a physician, and Mary, who married 
Rev. A. Hestwood, a Methodist minister. 
He also had a half-brother and sister by his 
mother's first marriage, namely, Rufus and 
Mrs. jNIartha Rowe. L'nto O. F. Smith and 
his wife were born eight children. Charles 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



75 



O. is a resident of Hutchinson. Minnie M. 
is now Mrs. Fo'Ster. C. E. was in Colorado 
when the Spanish-American war ijroke out. 
He there enhsted, was sent to the Philip- 
pines and ultimately was discharged as 
quartermaster, being now a merchant at 
Chase. Ernest is proprietor of a meat mar- 
ket at lola. Carrie is at home. George W. 
served with the Twentieth Kansas Regiment 
in the Philippines. Flora and Albert are 
still at home. The parents are devoted and 
loyal members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Mr. and Mrs. Foster also belong 
to the same church and he is identified with 
the Masonic fraternity, the Knights of Py- 
thias lodge and the Sons of Veterans. He 
was reared in the Republican party and has 
frequently attended the county, state and 
congressional conventions and is a most 
ardent ad\-rcate of tlie party principles. 



GEORGE T. DAVIS. 

A man who has won for himself a prom- 
inent place among the successful agricul- 
turists of Galesburg township, Kingman 
county, is George T. Davis, who resides on 
section 27. He is a native of Callaway 
county, INIissouri, his birth having occurred 
here on the gth of April, 1849. His father, 
James Madison Davis, \v3^ a native of Ken- 
tucky, and in 1810, when a little lad, came 
to [Missouri and was reared and educated on 
his father's farm, the family being one of 
the first settlers in Callaway cijuntv. J\'Ir. 
Davis was married in ^Missouri to Mary 
Ely, who was born in Virginia. Her father, 
Harry Ely, was also a native of the Old 
Dominion. Mrs. Davis died in Callaway 
county, Missouri, at the age of forty-nine, 
but her hnsliand is still liviiip', at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety years, in Grayson coun- 
ty, Texas. They were the parents of five 
children, of which our subject is the young- 
est, as follows: Sally; Benjamin, who 
served in the war; Molly; Amanda: and 
George T. Mr. Davis was married a second 
time, and by this union were born six chil- 



dren, namely: Cynthia, Nancy, James, 
Emma, Lizzie and Charles. During his en- 
tire life, Mr. Davis followed the occupation 
of farming. He gave his political support 
to the Democratic party and held member- 
ship in the Baptist church. 

George T. Davis was reared to farm life 
on the homestead in Missouri, and there 
learned lessons of thrift and perseverance. 
His literary education was received in the 
schools of his native county, and early in life 
was thoroughly acquainted with the duties 
and labors of farming, as well as having 
laid a good foundation for later knowledge 
in the school room. When twenty-six years 
of age he led to the altar Miss Martha Ste- 
venson, who was a native of Kentucky, but 
was reared and educated in Missouri. She 
was a daughter of James R. and Sarah R. 
(Givens) Stevenson. The latter was born 
in Kentucky, where she was reared, and 
died October 8, 1901, at the great age 
of over ninety years. In 1878 Mr. Davis 
removed with his family to Kansas and they 
were numbered among the Missouri valley 
settlement families. Here he purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of Osage Indian 
land to which he has added from time to 
time until he has four hundred acres of high- 
ly cultivated property, constituting one of 
the finest farms in Kingman county. A sub- 
stantial residence and well built barns and 
sheds, together with a fine grove and or- 
chard, are among the salient features of 
this well kept farm, while well tilled fields 
and rich pasture lands show the careful 
work of cultivation. 

The home of Mr. and^ Mrs. Davis has 
been blessed with three girls: Sallie; Mrs. 
Jennie Endicott ; and Eva, the last two of 
whom are twins. They lost one child, Ro- 
salie, in infancy. Politically Mr. Davis is a 
faithful adherent of Democratic principles; 
i and has ser\'ed as road overseer, and also' as 
I a member of the school board. He is a 
; member of the Court of Honor, and he and 
his family hold membership with the Cum- 
berland Presl)yterian church, of which the 
father serves as elder. He has always lived 
an upright and honorable life, and is inter- 



76 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



ested in every movement which will promote 
the welfare of his community along relig- 
ious and educational lines. 



\\'. W. HILL. 



This well known farmer and honored 
citizen of Kinginan county has throughout 
his active husiness career been prominently 
identified with agricultural interests and for 
a number of years has resided upon his pres- 
ent farm. He was born in Essex county, 
New Jersey, in 1840, and in that state his 
father, W. R. Hill, also had his nativity, as 
did his parents, Ed and Elizabeth Hill. The 
grandfather was a loyal soldier in the war 
of 1812. W. R. Hill attained to years of 
maturity in the state of his birth and was 
there married to Caroline Harris, a native 
daughter of New Jersey, where her parents, 
John Harris and his wife, were also born. 
She was the mother of eleven children, 
eight of whom grew to years of maturity, 
namely: Eliza, Mary, Abraham, William 
^\'., Catherine, Charlotte, Uriah and Mar- 
tha. The first named passed away in death 
at the age of sixty-one years, but the remain- 
ing seven are all still living. Li 1856 the 
family left their' New Jersey home for Taze- 
well county, Illinois, and two years later 
they located near Lincoln, Lo_gan county, 
that state, where the father passed to his 
final rest at the age of seventy-eight years. 
He followed both farming and carpentering 
as a means of livelihood, and his political 
support was given to the Democracy, while 
religiously he was a member of the Method- 
ist church. His widow survived until her 
eighty-sixth year, and she, too, passed away 
in the faith of the J\Iethodist Episcopal 
church. 

^V. W. Hill, whose name introduces this 
review, remained in the state of his birth 
until his fifteenth year of age, receiving his 
education in its public schools, and he then 
accompanied the family on their removal to 
Illinois. The year 1868 witnessed his ar- 
rival in the Sunflower state, and for a time 



thereafter he made his home near Quenemo, 
Osage county. Later he became the owner 
of a claim on One Hundred and Ten Creek, 
which he improved and made his home 
thereon until 1883, when he sold that place 
and purchased his present fami on section 
30, White township, Kingman county, one 
hund.ed acres of which had been placed 
under cultivation. His homestead now con- 
sists of one hundred and sixty acres of ex- 
cellent land, where he has a fine bearing or- 
chard of nine acres, devoted to the raising 
of small fruits of all kinds. He has carried 
forward with success the work of an agri- 
culturist and fruit-grower, and is to-day ac- 
counted one of the well-to-do and prosper- 
ous citizens of his community. His capable 

! management, enterprise, well directed 
efforts and honorable dealing have been the 
important factors in his prosperity and have 

; brought to him a very handsome compe- 

' fence. 

'. On the 15th of March, 1869, Mr. Hill 
was united in marriage to Mary A. Hay- 
wood, who was born in Cass county, Illi- 
nois, in 1845, ^nd received her education in 
the city schools of Burlingame, Kansas. Her 
parents, James and Eliza Haywood, were 

1 born near* Sheffield, England, where they 
were married, and there they remained until 
after the birth of their first child, Fredrick, 

' when, about 1843, they emigrated to this 
country, settling in Illinois. The father had 
learned the blacksmith's trade in the old 
country, but after his arrival in America he 
took advantage of the cheap land and en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits, becoming a 
successful and well-to-do farmer. In 1858 
he sold his possessions in Illinois and came 
to Kansas, where he spent the remainder of 
his life, dying in Osage county, at the age 
of seventy-five years. His wife, who bore 
the maiden name of Eliza Farrar, died in 
that county at the age of sixty-six years, in 
the faith of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
She was a daughter of William and Mary 
(Wilkerson) Farrar. Our subject and 
wife are the parents of six children, namely: 
Uriah, of Alvaretta, Oklahoma; Fred, who 
also makes his home in that territorv ; Laura 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



who was formerly a popular teacher in 
Kingman county; Walter; James; and 
Pearl. Mr. Hill gives his poilitical support 
to the "Third party," and socially is a mem- 
ber of the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. Mrs. Hill is a worthy and acceptable 
member of the Methodist church, and the 
family is one of prominence in the locality 
in which thev reside. 



JAMES RANKIN. 

James Rankin is a representative of the 
honored pioneers of a great commonwealth 
who have served faithfully and long in the 
enterprising west He claims Pennsylva- 
nia as the state of his nativity, his birth hav- 
ing occurred in Indiana county, June 27, 
1839. His father, Isaac N. Rankin, was a 
well known citizen of that county and was 
a son of Andrew Rankin, who was born in 
Ireland, of Scotch-Irish parentage. An- 
drew Rankin married Ann Stitt, who was 
also born O'f Scotch-Irish parents, and they 
were members of the Presbyterian church. 
Isaac N., the father of our subject, was 
reared to manhood in his native county and 
was there married to Jane Alcorn, a daugh- 
ter of James Alcorn. They were the parents 
of the following children : Andrew, a resi- 
dent of Bedford, Iowa; James, our subject; 
John, a twin brother of James and a resi- 
dent of Oklahoma ; William, who resides fn 
Rice county, Kansas. Two of their children 
are deceased, — Robert Johnson, who died at 
the age of eighteen months, and Mary, who 
died in Ringgold county, Iowa. In 1874 
the parents came to Rice damty, Kansas, 
where the father died in Harrison township, 
at the age of sixty-seven years. He was a 
carpenter and joiner by trade and was iden- 
tified with the Democratic party. The 
mother, who was born in 1800. survived her 
husliand until 188S. dying at the age of 
eighty-eight years. They were members cf 
the Presbyterian church. 

James Rankin, whose name introduces 
this re\-iew, was reared in his parents' home 



in Pennsylvania. He accompanied the fam- 
ily on their removal to Tl;uicock county, Illi- 
nois, locating near Lali;u-]ic, and later they 
removed to Des Moines count\', Iowa. A 
settlement was made near Middletown, and 
he was there married to Cynthia Duke, who 
was born in Henry county, Iowa, and was 
there reared and educated. Her father, 
James M. Duke, was born in Kentucky, of 
which state the grandfather, John Duke, was 
also a nati\'e. James Duke was but a boy 
when he removed with his father to Iowa. 
He was a sawyer by trade and operated 
j many sawmills in Iowa, Missouri and Ar- 
kansas. His wife bore the maiden name of 
Elizabeth Williams and was a native of 
Ohio, a daughter of Xehemiali and Eliza- 
beth (Borden) Williams. James and Eliz- 
abeth Duke became the parents of five chil- 
dren, but one, Francisca, died in childhood. 
The living are : Cynthia ; David W., a resi- 
dent of Victoria township. Rice county : 
and Mrs. Harriet Holmes, of Lyons, Kan- 
sas. The father of this family died in 
Weiner, Arkansas, at the age of sevent_\--six 
years. In early life he affiliated with the 
Greenbackers, Init later was an advocate id' 
Democracy. His widow now resides with 
her children in Rice county, Kansas, and is 
a worthy member of the Baptist church, with 
which her husband was also identified. 

In the year 1875 Mr. Rankin took up 
his abode in the Sunflower state, casting in 
his lot with the pioneers of Rice county. He 
first secured a timber claim, containing Cot- 
tonwood, box-elder and mulberry trees. He 
now owns a fine farm of one Inmdred and 
sixty acres, known as Grove Land, and this 
is one of the beautiful country seats of Vic- 
toria township. The place is located a half 
mile from Pollard, and is highly cultivat- 
ed, the product>ive fields yielding a golden 
return for the care and labor which he be- 
stows upon them. 

The marriage of ]\lr. and }ilrs. Rankin 
has been blessed with three children, name- 
ly: Andrew J., who married Miss Lizzie 
Gruml)ine, and is a grain buyer, railroad 
agent and postmaster of Pcllard; Hattie P.. 
who is employed as a clerk in a store in Pol- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



lard; and Estella H., a successful and popu- 
lar teacher of Rice county. The children re- 
ceived excellent educations in the Normal 
College at Great Bend. In his political 
views Mr. Rankin was formerly a Democrat, 
but now affiliates with the Populist party, 
but he has never been an office seeker, pre- 
ferring to give his time and attention to his 
business interests. He is a member of the 
[Methodist Episcopal church, and his wife 
and daughters hold meinbership in the Re- 
formed church. In his soaal relations he is 
connected with the Modern Woodanen of 
the World. He is imbued with fine sensibil- 
ities and clearly defined principles. Honor 
and integrity are synonyinous with his name 
and he enjoys the respect, confidence and 
high regard of the community. 



DeWITT C. JOHNSON. 

DeWitt C. Johnson, a conductor on the 
Atchison, Tope'ka & Santa Fe Railroad, and 
a resident of Hutchinson, was born at 
Wayne, \\'ayne county, Michigan, on the 
23d of August, 1843. His father, Stephen 
R. Johnson, was a native of the Empire 
state, and when a young man began work 
on the Erie canal, in which he continued 
until the advent of the railroads rendered 
that business unprofitable and he then be- 
came identified with railroading. He was 
first employed in furnishing telegraph poles 
to the Michigan Central Railroad Con?pany, 
and was later made general roadmaster of 
the division between Chicago and Detroit, 
where he had charge of all construction and 
building. He remained with that company 
for thirty years, or until the time of his 
death, and during that period the road was 
completed from Chicago to Ypsilanti, he 
purchasing and paying for all material used 
in its construction. After the completion of 
the road to that place Mr. Johnson removed 
to Niles, Michigan, where he spent the re- 
maining years of his life, passing away on 
the 20th of March, 1872. He was an ardent 
Republican in his political views and was 



active iii the work of his party. He was 
married in New York, his native state, and 
the union was blessed with ten children, but 
our subject is the only representative of the 
family in the Sunflower state, the others re- 
siding in Niles and Detroit, Michigan. 

DeWitt C. Johnson was only about six 
years of age when he accompanied his par- 
ents on their removal to Michigan, in which 
state he was reared and e'ducated, the first 
school which he attended having been held 
in a log house, but that was about the last of 
those primitive structures. On first locat- 
ing in Wayne county the family lived in a 
log cabin, and many a time our subject has 
hauled a fire log into the cabin with horses 
and wagon. When but sixteen years of age 
he began his identification with railroading, 
and his father, who was much opposed to 
his entering the service, would not assist 
him in obtaining a position, but by his own 
efforts he secured the position of a brake- 
man, which he followed for two years. For 
the follriwing four years he had charge of a 
construction train, and was tlien made road- 
master of the division between Niles and 
Kalamazoo, but, preferring road work, he 
resigned that position after one year. In 
1870 he came west and for a time had 
charge of repairs and building on the Coun- 
cil Bluffs road, from Corning to Council 
Bluffs, after which he was again employed 
as roadmaster, continuing in the latter posi- 
I tion until 1884. In that year he began work 
I on the Santa Fe Railroad, first as brakeman, 
! but a year and a half later was given charge 
of a train in the construction department, 
assisting in building the different branches 
of the road in western Kansas. After their 
completion he became a member of the oper- 
ating department and has the exceptional 
record of running one train on the main 
line for fourteen consecutive years, or up 
to the present time, his run being from New- 
ton to Jetmore, a distance of three hundred 
and six miles, and during that long period 
he hasi been absent from duty only on three 
occasions, one having been to visit 'the 
W^orld's Fair. Mr. Johnson has invested to 
a considerable extent in residence property 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



79 



in Hutchinson, where he has built and re- 
paired several buildings, and his beautiful 
residence is located at No. 219 Fifth avenue. 
On first coming to the Sunflower state Mr. 
Johnson located in Topeka, where he resid- 
ed for aljout two years, and then took up his 
abode in Burdette. While there residing he 
took the first train to Jetmore, where they 
were met with bands of music and many 
other public demonstrations. Nine years 
afterward Mr. Johnson removed' to Nicker- 
son, where he was among the first to plant 
trees and flowers, and during his residence 
there the town was visited by a severe hail 
storm, rendering it impossible for one to 
venture out of the house for three days. His 
home was located on the boulevard in that 
city. In July, 1897, he took up his abode 
in Hutchinson, where he now owns much 
valuable property, and during his absence 
from home his wife looks after their .inter- 
ests and has proved herself a capable busi- 
ness woman. 

The marriage of Mr. Johnson and Miss 
Isabella Frost was celebrated on the 17th of 
April, 1873. The lady was born in Iowa, 
and is a daughter of Thomas D. Frost, who 
was also connected with the Michigan Cen- 
tral Railroad. He was born in Fredonia, 
New York, in 1819, and in early life was 
engaged in the lumber business, selling the 
lumber and rafting it down the Ohio river 
to Cincinnati. He located in Niles, Michi- 
gan, in a very early day, and there spent 
many years of his life, having been princi- 
pally engaged in bridge work. In 1890 he 
came to Kansas, but he was not long per- 
mitted to enjoy a residence in this state, as 
he passed away in death one year later, and 
his remains were interred in a cemetery in 
Niles, Michigan. He was married in the 
latter city to Irene M. Merritt, and three 
children graced th^ir union, but Mrs. John- 
son is now the only survivor of the family. 
Her maternal grandfather, Captain Daniel 
Hicock, was a Revolutionary hero, and 
many of his descendants now reside in 
Cleveland, Ohio. In his political afhliations 
Mr. Johnson is a Republican, and although 
he takes an active and commendable interest 



in all matters pertaining to the public wel- 
fare he has never sought political prefer- 
ment, as his entire time is devoted to his 
railroad interests. His social relations con- 
nect him with the Order of Railway Con- 
ductors, No. II, of Newton. His life has 
been a busy and useful one. He is a man of 
high intellectuality, broad human sympa- 
thies and tolerance ; honor and integrity are 
synonymous with his name, and he enjoys 
the respect, confidence and high regard of 
the community. 



JAMES WINSOR. 



Since 1878 James Winsor has been a 
citizen of the great state of Kansas, and 
since 1880 he has occupied his present fine 
farm of eighty acres, located on section 36, 
Grcne township, Reno county, near the town 
of Turon. His birth occurred in Rensselaer 
county. New York, on June 16, 18 16, a son 
of John and Lydia (Boardman) Winsor, 
the fonner born in England about 1749 and 
the latter in Scotland. John Winsor was 
apprenticed to the carpenter trade in his na- 
tive land, and so faithfully did he perform 
his duties that his employer permitted him 
to leave six months before the contracted 
date, and Mr. Winsor immediately emigrat- 
ed to America. After locating in the new 
country he displayed his loyalty to it by en- 
tering the Patriot army and fighting with 
them to the close of the Revolutionary war, 
and' was one of its pensioners until his 
death. He married Lydia Boardman, and 
they reared four sons and three daughters. 
By trade he was a cooper, and he also owned 
land at the time of his death, which occurred 
in 1829, in the town of Brunswick, Rensse- 

I laer county, New York, in the eightieth year 
of his age. The Winsors belonged to the 
yeomanry class in England, all respected for 
their industry and honesty. 

James Winsor is the only survivor of his 
parents' family, of which he was the sixth 

I child and youngest son. From the age of 
twelve vears he lived awav from home, earn- 



8o 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



ing liis own living by working for farmers 
and then learning a trade, and he was per- 
mitted by his parents to use his wages, 
this being contrary to the general usage 
of the time. In 1838. at the age of 
twenty-two years, James ^^'insor was 
united in marriage to Charity Feathers, 
in Peekskill, New York, and seven of the 
eight children born of this marriage grew to 
maturity, and those still surviving are as fol- 
lows: George; David, who lives near To- 
peka, Kansas: and Mrs. Lydia Ann Austin 
and Mrs. }ilarv Burr, both of whom reside 
in Rensselaer county. New York. Their 
mother died al^out 1859, and the father then 
married Amanda Burr, whose death oc- 
curred on March 29, 1897, in the fifty-sixth 
year of her age. She left these children: 
William, who has one son and one daugh- 
ter; Wesley, single, living at home; Cather- 
ine, who married Benjamin Bush, a farmer 
of Reno county, and they have three chil- 
dren ; and Jennie, who married Cyrus Huff, 
has one daughter, and they reside in the 
Sand Hills, in this county. 

Mr. Winsor entered the service of the 
Union army early in the progress of the 
Civil war, enlisting in the Fourteenth New 
York Infantry as a private, later becoming a 
corporal. In 1862, at Antietam, he was 
wounded in the hip by a shell, this necessi- 
tating a sojourn of fourteen weeks in the 
hospital at Camp Curtin. The injury was 
so serious that he still receives a pension of 
twelve dollars a month from the govern- 
ment. For three years he lived the life of a 
soldier, but gladly returned to peaceful 
times. 

After the close of the war Mr. Winsor 
removed to Otto, Pennsylvania, where he 
remained for seven years, coming to Kansas 
in 1878, where he took up a government 
homestead of ninety acres. Three years 
later he settled on his present eighty-acre 
farm, paying three dollars per acre for raw 
prairie land. In 1880 he lost his all in a ter- 
rible prairie fire that swept over his section 
of the county, saving but two cows. These 
could not take the place of a fine pair of 
horses he had owned, but as a necessity he 



used them for a time to enable him to do his 
plowing. He is now retired from activity, 
his son cultivating the land. In politics he 
is a very pronounced Republican, and he was 
one of the charter members of Fremont 
Post, of Turon. Mr. Winsor, with his sec- 
ond wife, attended the Methodist church, 
with which they had long been connected, 
the former wife having been a member of 
the United Brethren denomination. 

George R. Winsor, a stock farmer in 
Grove township, w-as born in Rensselaer 
county. New York, on May 14, 1840, and 
son of James and Charity (Feathers) \\'in- 
sor, both of whom were born in New York, 
and "the latter died in 1851. Their surviv- 
ing children are as follows: Mary, who 
married Hiram Burr, of Lewis county. New 
York : George R., of this sketch ; David, who 
lives in Lecompton, Kansas; and Lydia 
Ann, 'who resides in Duke Center, Pennsyl- 
vania. Mr. \Vinsor had but limited educa- 
tional opportunities. He was reared to the 
wood and lumber business, but in 1861 he 
became a soldier, enlisting at Boonville, 
New York, in the Ninety-seventh New York 
Infantry, and at his second enlistment en- 
tered the same rebiment, serving his coun- 
try with gallantry for four years lacking but 
forty-one days. On September 14, 1862, he 
Avas wounded in the left thigh, and draws a 
pension for the same at the present time. 
His wound was so serious that he was 
obliged to remain in the hospital for seven 
months, his pluck and good constitution en- 
abling him to finally recover sufficiently to 
return to his regiment. 

Until 1874 he remained in Lewis coun- 
ty, New York, coming then to Butler, Kan- 
sas, and one year later he took his one hun- 
dred and sixty-acre homestead, moving his 
family here in 187(1. A sod house twelve 
by fourteen feet in dimensions was awaiting 
the family, and in it they resided until 1880, 
when Mr. ^^''indsor built his first box house, 
which is now used as an out-building. His 
present residence was erected in 1886, and 
in 1899 it was remodeled and now is one of 
the most comfortable and attractive coun- 
try homes in this neighborhood. jNIr. Wind- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



8i 



sor feeds from thirty to forty head of stock, 
buys corn and fodder, beheving' this the 
most profitable way. He milks sixteen cows 
and raises calves, his herd being Herefords 
mixed with common stock. The productive 
orchards, the small fruits and the beautiful 
shade trees were all planted by the industry 
of our subject. 

The marriage of Mr. Windsor was in 
Turin, New York, on October 21, 1868, to 
Flora C. Perkins, of Lewis comity, New 
York, a daughter of John and Caroline 
(Smith) Perkins, both deceased. Mr. Per- 
kins was a mechanic, and was well known 
as a great deer hunter in the Adirondack 
mountains. Seven children were born to 
this union, namely : John, who was born in 
February, 1873; Arthur, who was born in 
Kansas, on June 12, 1877, and both of these 
sons are married, have families and are en- 
gaged in the well, windmill and pump- sup- 
ply business under the firm name of Wind- 
sor Bros., at Bucklin, Kansas. The third 
son was Charles B., who was born on Au- 
gust 14, and died at the age of four years; 
Mvrtle. who married W^arren Thorp, of 
Pratt county : Fred, who was born on No- 
vember 10, 1886; Fay, who was born on 
April 20, 1890; and Maud, who was born 
on April 22, 1891. The children reflect 
much credit upon the parents. jNIr. Wind- 
sor is a stanch Republican. 



GEORGE SMITH. 

For manv years George Smith has been 
a prominent figure in the annals of Reno 
county and lias nided materially in its de- 
velopment. By a life of uprightness, in- 
dustry and sfjuare dealing, — a life devoted 
to the su.pport of whatever is good and true, 
— he has won the admiration and gen- 
uine regard of a large circle of acquaint- 
ances. He was born in Ross county, Ohio, 
on the 2d of May 1834. His oaternal grand- 
father, Jacob Smith, was employed as a 
sailor on the ocean during his early life, 
but later he located in Ross countv. Ohio, 



where he followed farming for a number 
of years. About 1840, however, he re- 
moved from the Buckeye state to Indiana, 
taking up his abode on a farm in Clinton 
coimty, where he spent the remainder of his 
life, passing away in death in 1855. O"^ 
of his sons, Thomas Smith, was a brave and 
loyal soldier during the Mexican war. 

James C. Smith, the father of him whose 
name introduces this review, was born and 
reared in Ross county, Ohio, and after at- 
taining tO' mature years he was there em- 
ployed as a fuller in a woolen mill. Before 
leaving that locality he was married to 
Maria Thomas, also a native of Ross coun- 
ty. After the birth of their second child 
the parents left their Ohio home and located 
in Warren county, Indiana, where it was 
Mr. Smith's intention to devote his time to 
agricultural pursuits and he accordingly 
rented a farm for that purpose. He next 
removed to Tippecanoe county, and on 
Wea creek was located a woolen mill, 
which was owned and operated by a Quaker 
named Andy Yunts. The latter was in 
need of a competent superintendent to con- 
duct his mill, and a former neighlvir of Mv. 
Smith in Ross county, wlio had also moved 
to Tippecanoe county and found employ- 
ment in the mill, told the owner of Mr. 
Smith's abifity in that Ijne, and he accord- 
ingly offered him a position, the latter to 
receive ninety dolla'-s a month for six 
months in compensation for his services. 
Mr. Smith accordingly hft Ms farm and 
assumed the position of supermtendent ni 
the mill, which he retained for se\en m ei^lil 
years. On the expiration of t' at pemul lu 
removed t:-- Clinton count\ . Indiana, seciii 
ing a farm in the dense woods, but he ^(^ 11 
cleared a space sulficient to erect a cabin 
home and at once began the arduous task of 
placing his land under cultivation. In 1850 
he sold that place and removed to Vermilion 
cornty, Illinois, purchasing a quarter sec- 
tion of land (-n the north folk of Vermilion 
ri\er. A-^ iIk Acars passed by he succeeded 
in phicing his fields under a fine state of cul- 
ti\'ati(in. and there he made his home until 
his life's lal^crs were ended in death, passing 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



to his final rest in 1862. He was survived 
lay his widow for many years, and her death 
occurred at the home of her youngest son 
in Vermilion county in 1880. Mr. Smith 
was a Whig in his political views, and in 
early life he held membership in the 
United Brethren church, but later he be- 
caine a member of the Methodist denomina- 
tion. Unto this worthy couple were born 
eight children, namely: George, the sub- 
ject of this review; William, who died in 
Tippecanoe county, Indiana ; Elizabeth, who 
passed away in Vermilion county, Indiana ; 
Eliza, the wife of John G. Brown, a shoe- 
maker of Newport, Vermilion county, In- 
diana; Laura and John, who died in Ver- 
milion county, Illinois; ]\Iary, who passed 
away in Fountain county, Indiana; and 
INIartha, who also died in Vermilion county. 
George Smith, of this review, received 
his early education in the subscription 
schools of Warren, Tippecanoe and Clinton 
counties, Indiana, attending the primitive 
log structures so common at that early day, 
which were furnished with slab benches and 
pins driven into the wall supported planks 
for desks. Remaining on the home farm 
with his father until his twenty-second year, 
he then began learning the carpenter's trade 
in Vermilion county, following that occu- 
pation until 1862, but in that year his fa- 
ther died and ouf subject then returned 
home and took charge of the farm, remain- 
ing there until his marriage. Soon after 
that event Mr. Smith removed with his wife 
.. to Vermilion county, locating near Danville, 
•Cit, where he was engaged in agricultural pur- 

P suits for four years, and for tlie following 
year he made his home on his father-in-law's 
place. For the succeeding sixteen years he 
was engaged in operating the Collet farm, 
and he then cast in his lot with the early 
pioneers of Reno county, Kansas, securing 
the farm of one hundred and eighty acres 
which he yet owns. At the time of the pur- 
chase the land was but partiallv improved, 
but as the years have passed by he has suc- 
ceeded in placing his fields under an excel- 
lent state of cultivation, and has added many 
improvements, including a commodious and 
well built residence, a large barn and all 



other necessary buildings, and has also a 
beautiful orchard of seven acres. Mr. 
Smith follows general farming and stock- 
raising, and in his pasture he annually keeps 
about thirty head of a fine grade of short- 
horn cattle. 

In 1863 occurred the marriage of Mr. 
Smith and Miss Armina Brown. The lady 
was born on the 26th of December, 1844, 
and is a daughter of Thomas J. and Hanna 
(Wentwood) Brown, natives of Kentucky. 
From that state they removed to Indiana, 
where the father was engaged at his trade 
of shoemaking. Unto our subject and his 
wife have been born six children : Frank, 
who died in Valley township, Kansas ; Ed- 
ward, who also departed this life in Valley 
township ; Flora, the wife of Walter G. Har- 
ris, a farmer of this localitv; George, at 
home ; Bernie, who is attending college at 
Manhattan, Kansas; and one who died in 
Vermilion county in infancy. Three years 
ago Mrs. Smith sustained a severe fall, 
which resulted in breaking her hip. and 
since that time she has been almost an in- 
valid, but she bears the affliction with re- 
markable courage and Christian fortitude. 
In his political affiliations our subject is 
independent and socially is a member of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, while 
his religious preference is indicated In- his 
membership in the United Brethren church. 
His many admirable qualities of heart and 
mind have gained for him a large circle of 
friends, and he is widely and favorably 
known in Reno countv. 



JOHN ^I. YOUNG. 

John ]\I. Young, Letter known as ]Mart 
Young, is a representative agriculturist and 
stock man of Ellsworth county, now resid- 
ing on section eleven. Empire township. 
He there owns four hundred and five acres 
of land, and the richly cultivated fields yield 
to h'm a golden tribrte while his extensive 
stock interests also a profitable source of in- 
come. He is a southern man, possessed of 
the enterprising spirit which characterizes 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



83 



this portion of the country. His birth oc- 
curred in Bates county, Missouri, November 
7, 1846, his parents being Daniel E. and 
Margaret (Hornsinger) Young. The fa- 
ther was a native of Wayne county, Ken- 
tucky, and became a pioneer of Bates county, 
Missouri, where he met and married Miss 
Hornsinger, whose people w^ent to Missouri 
from Pennsylvania. He became an exten- 
sive stock man and farmer and' was engaged '' 
largely in the breeding of horses and mules j 
on the Osage river. During the war he had 
to leave ]\Iissouri, owing to his Union sym- 
pathies, and for four years he remained in 
Illinois, after which he returned to his farm, 
upon which he spent the residue of his days, 
dying in 1878. He was prominent in 
the Republican party and was a Baptist in 
religious faith. His wife died when their 
son John was ten years of age. They had 
three children: Jacob F., who is now a 
prominent farmer of Greene county, Illinois ; 
^ilart: and Tabitha A., the wife of George 
W. Cherry, of Howell county, Missouri. 
After the death of his first wife the father 
was again married, his second union, being 
with Robinett Martin, of Missouri. They 
had seven children, but only two are now 
living, Xathan and' Ingham, both of whom 
are residents of Indian Territory and' with 
them the mother makes her home. 

The days of his minority J. Mart Young 
spent under the parental roof. He acquired 
but limited school privileges, being only able 
to attend school for about three months in 
the year, ^^'hen he had attained his major- 
ity he received forty acres from his father's 
estate and made his home thereon, devoting 
his energies to agricultural pursuits until 
1868, when he sold that property and went 
to Texas, there engaging in the stock busi- 
ness. After a year spent in Grayson county, 
however, he returned to Missouri and rented 
land in St. Clair county, where he remained 
until 1876, when he came to Kansas with a 
horse and mule team and a covered wagon, 
accompanied on the journey by his wife and 
child. At length they reached Smoky river 
and ]\Ir. Young purchased railroad land 
near Venango, securing the southeast quar- 
ter of section thirty-five. He built a log 



house, sixteen by fourteen feet, dug a well 
and broke thirty acres of land, planting a 
crop of wheat the same year. Soon after- 
ward, however, he had to abandon this place, 
for the season was a hard one and the crops 
produced were very small. Removing eight 
miles west, he located on section twenty- 
two. Empire township, EllsAvorth county, on 
Thompson creek. It was a squatter's claim, 
for which he traded a young team and 
wagon. About forty acres of the land had 
been broken, and with characteristic energy 
he continued its further development and 
improvement, remaining thereon for eight 
years, during which time he added another 
quarter section. He broke all of the tillable 
land, made excellent improvements and in 
connection with the raising of grain was 
quite extensively engaged in the stock busi- 
ness, keeping as many as four hundred head 
of cattle, which grazed on the rich pasture 
lands. The ranch of Captain Millett ad- 
joins Mr. Young's farm, and the latter did 
considerable work for the Captain, the 
money thus earned aiding him to carry on 
the work of improvement in his own fields. 
He did more or less work for the Captain 
for fourteen years and their dealings were 
always of the most pleasant character, Mr. 
Young ever retaining the highest regard for 
the worthy Captain, who afterward sufi^ered 
such heavy losses here. After the failure 
of Captain Millett, Mr. Young went to Colo- 
rado and spent one year in the employ of 
D. B. Powers, one of the first as well as one 
of the most exteijsive cattle men of Kansas. 
While in that state his family remained upon 
the home place in order to care for the prop- 
erty. After his return Mr. Young contin- 
ued the development of his homestead, there 
engaging in farming and stock-raising until 
1898, when he disposed of his land and pur- 
chased his present home on section 11, 
township 16, range 8. This was formerly a 
well known sheep ranch and prior to that 
was part of the old Fort Harker reservation. 
Mr. Young has added excellent improve- 
ments to the place and now has a good home, 
supplied with substantial buildings and 
equipped with all modern accessories and 
conveniences for facilitating farm work and 



84 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



making it profitable. He handles from three 
ti ) four hundred head of cattle each year and 
has an excellent reputation as a reliable 
stock dealer. 

In Alarch, 1866, occurred the marriage 
of Air. Young and Miss Samantha Fer- 
guson, a native of Cedar county, Missouri, 
and a daughter of Judge John and Eme- 
line (Patterson) Ferguson, both of whom 
were natives of Virginia. Unto Mr. and 
Airs. Young have been born two children: 
Alaggie, the wife of Fred Baker, of Ells- 
worth county, and Ella, who died at the age 
of two years. They also' have an adopted 
son. Bruce Powers, who came to them when 
three years of age and now assists in the 
cultivation of the home place. In his politi- 
cal views Mr. Young is a Republican, and 
for eight years he served on the school board 
in his ofd neighborhood and has occupied a 
similar position since coming to his present 
home. Socially he is a member of Charity 
Lodge. No. 109, I. O. O. F., and also be- 
longs to the Daughters of Rebekah. Com- 
ing to Kansas in pioneer days, he has 
watched with interest through the passing 
years its development and progress and has 
borne his part in its substantial upbuilding. 
He is known as one of its reliable and pro- 
gressive citizens and a man whose example 
is well worthv of anulation. 



S. C. MILLIGAN. 

There has been no more valuable or im- 
portant element in our national citizenship 
than that furnished by Ireland. From the 
green island of Erin have come men of 
versatility and determination, ready and 
willing to take up any honorable occupation 
that would yield success and provide a com- 
fortable living for themselves and their fam- 
ilies. Of such a nationality came the an- 
cestors of our subject. His paternal grand- 
parents, Mr. and Airs. Robert Milligan, 
cri -seil the Atlantic from Ireland, locating 
in Jefferson county, Ohio, and thence re- 
moving to Guernsey county, where they 
spent their remaining days. At the time of 



their emigration their son Thomas was but 
a youth. He was born in the northern part 
of the Emerald isle and in the Buckeye state 
was reared to farm life. Ha\-ing arrived at 
years of maturity he wedded Alary Camp- 
bell, who was born in Pennsylvania, of 
Scotch-Irish parentage, her father and 
mother having been natives of northern Ire- 
land, whence they came to the United States, 
spending their remaining days in Ohio. The 
following children were born unto Thomas 
and Alary Alilligan : Robert H. ; Jane ; 
Joseph, who was a soldier in the Civil war ; 
Nancy Isabelle : Thomas Clark : Sylvanus ; 
Calvin ; Eliza K. ; and William C. The fa- 
ther died in Ohio at the age of sixty-nine 
years. Throughout his business career he 
had carried on farming and was known for 
his sterling honesty and many excellent 
characteristics. In his political views he 

[ was a stanch Republican, and both he and 
his wife were devoted members of the United 
Presbyterian church. Airs. Milligan passed 
away at the age of eighty yfars, but her 
memory was long afterwarcl enshrined in 
the hearts of those who knew her. 

S. C. Alilligan, whose name introduces 
this record, spent his youth on his father's 
farm in Guernsey county, Ohio, where his 
birth occurred on the 2nd of January, 
1848. His childhood days were passed in 
the usual manner of lads of that period, the 
duties of the school-room and the pleasures 
of the play-ground claiming his attentii'n. 
while during the summer months he worked 
in the fields from the time he was old enough 
to handle the plow. He was married at the 
age of twenty-one to Aliss Elizabeth Con- 

I nell, and since that t'vre she has been an 
able helpmate to him on life's journey. She 
was a native of Columbiana county, Ohio, 
where she was reared and educated. Her 

. parents, Alexander and Alary Jane Connell, 
were residents of East Liverpool, Ohio. The 
mother passed away on February 4, 1902, 
and her husband followed her fifteen hours 
later, she being eighty-eight years of age, 
while he was in his ninetieth year. The fol- 
lowing children have been born to Air. and 
Airs. Alilligan, namely: Airs. Ella R. Bone, 
of ^^■hite township, Kingman county; Em- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



85 



ory C, who lives in the same township; 
]\Iary Anima Hemphill, of Kingman coun- 
ty; Anna Pearl, who has been one of the 
successful and popular teachers of this local- 
ity from the age of sixteen years; and 
Harry C, who completes the family. 

After his marriage Mr. Milligan contin- 
ued his residence in Ohio until 1885, when 
he came to the Sunflower state, and pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of land 
on section 9, White township, Kinginan 
county, where he has since lived. He built 
a little house, fourteen by twenty feet, but 
this has since been replaced by a commodi- 
ous residence, tastefully furnished, and is 
surrounnded by a good lawn adorned with 
shade-trees, an orchard yields its fruit in 
season and annually the fields return a 
golden harvest for the care and labor that 
have been bestowed upon them. By addi- 
tional purchases Mr. IMilligan has extended 
the boundaries of his farm until it now com- 
prises two hundred and forty acres of val- 
uable land. The farm is well supplied with 
the many improvements that go to facilitate 
agricultural work in the twentieth century, 
and this property is a visible evidence of the 
enterprise and the thrift of the owner. In 
his political views Mr. Milligan is an advo- 
cate of Republican principles, and has served 
as justice of the peace. He belongs to the 
United Presbyterian church of Pretty Prai- 
rie, and his wife and two of the children are 
identified with the same denomination, while 
the other children belong to the United 
Brethren church. Theirs is a Christian fam- 
ily, in which high principles permeate the 
conduct of the members of the household, 
and throughout the community they are held 
in high regard. 



C. C. WHITE. 



C. C. White is one of the well known 
early settlers of Rice county who secured a 
homestead here in 1872 and has since been 
acti\-ely associated with the progress of this 
portion of the Sunflower state. He was 
born in Polk countv, ^Missouri, December 



30, 1849, ^"d is a son of Captain William 
White, whose birth occurred in Ohio. The 
grandfather, James A\'hite, was a native of 
New England, but removed to the Buckeye 
state at an early period in its development, 
and there the Captain was reared and edu- 
cated, subsequently removing westward to 
Missouri. At the time of the Mexican war 
he served as a soldier in the regiment com- 
manded liy ("dlonel Price, afterward the 
noteil RelicI ( ieneral Price, of the Civil war. 
In 1S40 Captain White crossed the plains 
and ser\ed under General Fremont in th.e 
western district, remaining a member of the 
United States army in active service against 
the Indians upon the frontier. His gallantry 
and bravery won him promotion to the rank 
of captain in a Missouri, company. A mem- 
ber of the Union army during the war of 
the rebellion, he was captured at Sjiringfield, 
Missouri, and rnic nf the guards placed over 
him \\a-> liis own liruther, who was then a 
member of the Reljel army! Captain White 
made a most brilliant record as a brave and 
loyal soldier and a gallant officer, and his 
own valor often inspired his men to deeds 
of bravery. He has indeed a brilliant mili- 
tary record, for in the Mexican war, upon 
the plains of the west and as a defender of 
the Union he aided his country. He now re- 
sides at Halstead, Harvey county, Kansas. 
He married Emma E. High, who was born 
in Tennessee and was reared and educated 
in Polk county, Missouri. Tliey became the 
parents of the following children: C. C, 
of this review : Sumner, who is living in 
Halstead. Kansas: ^^'illiam, deceased; Mrs. 
Fanny Wonds, of Rice county; Joseph, who 
is living in Virg'inia ; Mrs. Ida Lehman, of 
Halstead, Kansas; Mrs. Rose Chapin, who 
died in Halstead; Mrs. Hattie Southard, of 
Redlands, California. The father of this 
family was a wool carder by trade and after- 
ward de\'Oted his energies to farming when 
not engaged in military service in behalf of 
his country. He is now living retired at his 
pleasant home in Halstead, at the age of 
seventy-six years. His wife passed aAvay in 
the winter of 1900. and her loss was mourned 
by many friends, for she had' manty esti- 
mable equalities which won her high regard. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



C. C. White of this review was reared in 
]\Iontgomery county, Ihinois, and acquired 
a good education, which has been supple- 
mented by the knowledge gained by travel. 
He has visited almost every state in the 
Union, and is thus familiar with his native 
land. In 1872 he came to Rice county, Kan- 
sas, and took a homestead claim. During 
the first season after his arrival he worked' 
on the railroad. Upon his farm he built a 
stone house and dugout and lived alone for 
a time. During the greater part of the year 
he engaged in hunting bufifaloes through- 
out central Kansas, selling the hides, which 
brought him a good return. Large herds 
of those animals were seen in central Kan- 
sas, sometimes a thousand being seen in one 
drove. For three 3'ears Mr. White contin- 
ued hunting and thus gained a good living. 
He afterward turned his attention to the 
development of his farm and erected thereon 
a rock and frame residence, which stands 
upon a natural building site and c'ommands 
a fine view of the river and surrounding 
prairie. None of the equipments of a model 
farm are lacking. A fine orchard of twenty 
acres yields its fruits in season. In addi- 
tion to the development of the fields he is 
operating a quarry, selling much rock. It is 
this which has given the name of White 
Rock Farm to his place. 

In 1875 Mr. White returned to the east 
and was there united in marriage to Miss 
^lartha A. Kellar, who was born in Ma- 
coupin county, Illinois, and was educated in 
Litchfield, that state. Her father was the 
Rev. J. W. Kellar, who for fifty years was a 
minister of the Christian church, a most act- 
ive and zealous worker in the cause of the 
■Master. He died at Mt. Rose, Missouri, in 
1898, and his wife, Mrs. Sarah Kellar also 
passed away in that state. Unto our sub- 
ject and his wife have been born four chil- 
dren : Walter, whose birth occurred April 
I, 1876; Laura, who married Menno Slo- 
bach of McPherson county, Kansas; and 
Ida. Tliey also lost one child in infancy. 
Mr. White is a Republican in his political 
views, and for twenty years he has served 
on the school board. A man of intelligence, 
he keeps well informed on the general is- 



sues and questions of the day and is able to 
suport his political position by strong 
argument. His wife is a member of the 
Christian church, and he advances every 
measure for the uplifting of his fellow men 
and the advancement of the best interests 
of his community along lines of intellectual, 
moral and material progress. 



JOHN D. FORSYTH. 

The record of Mr. Forsyth is that of a 
man who has worked his way upward to a 
position among the substantial men of the 
community in which he lives. His life has 
been one of industry and perseverance, and 
the systematic and honorable methods he 
has followed have won him the support and 
confidence of many. He was born in De- 
catur county, Indiana, on the 14th of July, 
1837. His father, John S. Forsyth, was a 
native of the old Bluegrass state, his birth 
occurring in Louisville, on the 6th of Au- 
gust, 1796. In an early day he removed to 
Indiana, locating first in Decatur county and 
afterward in Boone county, where he held 
the office of sheriff for four j-ears. In the 
fall of 1844 he took up his abode in Marion, 
Linn county, Iowa, where he made his home 
for two years, on the expiration of which 
period he removed to Vinton, Benton coun- 
ty, that state. In the latter place he served 
as a justice of the peace for several years, 
and for a period of four years was also a 
county judge. The death of his wife there 
occurred in 1850, and in 1876 he came tii 
the Sunflower state, locating in Sumner 
county. Mr. Forsyth was a stone mason 
by trade, but after the birth of our subject 
he did not follow that calling. In politics 
he was first a Whig, and after the organiza- 
tion of the Republican party he joined its 
ranks. He became a member of the Chris- 
tian church in his later years, and was an 
active worker in the cause of religion and 
temperance. In his social relations he was 
connected with the Good Templars. 

The marriage of Mr. Forsyth was cele- 
brated in Kentucky, when Miss Jane ]\Ic- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



87 



Coy became his wife. She was born in that 
commonwealth, and her parents were both 
natives of Scotland. The parents of Mr. 
Fors}-th were born in Ireland. Unto John 
S. and Jane (McCoy) Forsyth were born 
the following children : Edwin P., who 
was killed in the battle of Atlanta, July 22, 
1864, while serving in the Thirteenth Iowa, 
his enlistment having occurred in 1861, and 
he had veteranized before his death ; Ana- 
zett, who died in Wellington, Kansas ; Rob- 
ert 'SI., a retired carpenter of Wellington, 
having reached the age of eighty-two years; 
Mary Ann, who died in Benton county, 
Iowa ; Martha Jane, a twin of Nancy Ellen, 
who died in Wellington, Kansas; Nancy 
Ellen, wife of J. S. Epperson; David M., 
who died in Wisconsin ; Christina, who also 
passed away in that state ; John ~D., the sub- ' 
ject of this review; and Lucretia, the wife 
of S. B. Jones, who resides near. Hennes- 1 
se}-, Oklahoma. 

John D. Forsyth was only thirteen years 
of age when his mother died, and for a time 
thereafter he made his home with his broth- 
er-in-law. When about seventeen or 
eighteen years of age he began learning the 
carpenter's trade, working first with Mr. 
Douglas, a prominent contractor of that 
vicinity, and was afterward with his broth- 
er, who was also a carpenter by trade. Dur- 
ing his youth he received but meager edu- 
cational advantages, having only attended 
school a short time in Benton county, Iowa. 
On the 27th of March, 1859, in that county, 
he was united in marriage to Lucinda M. 
Jones, a native of Indiana and of Welsh 
and German descent. She. was a daughter 
of Hugh B. and Mary (Douglas) Jones. 
After his marriage Mr. Forsyth temporarily 
abandoned his trade, and from that time 
until 1861 was engaged, in farming. On 
the 7th of August of the latter year he en- 
listed for service in the Civil war, joining 
Company D, Eighth Iowa Infantry, and was 
first sent to Springfield, Missouri, thence to 
Sedalia, and from there to Pittsburg Land- 
ing, participating in the battle of that city, 
where he was under command of General 
Lew Wallace. A part of ^\'allace■s com- 



mand was sent to the assistance of General 
Prentice, who was being severely handled, 
and with others our subject was captured 
while holding out against overwhelming 
odds. He was taken to Tuscaloosa, Ala- 
bama, where he was .incarcerated for ten 
months, on the expiration of which period 
he was paroled. In the fall of 1862 he was 
exchanged and participated in the Vicks- 
burg campaign, also in the battles of Ray- 
mond and Jackson, Alississippi, and on the 
22d of May, 1862, he was in charge of the 
rebel works at Vicksburg, where he lay in 
the trenches for thirty-two days, acting as a 
sharpshooter. After the surrender of that 
city he was sent to Black River, thence to 
Jackson, Mississippi, participating in the 
siege and capture of that city, and afterward 
was in the battle of Brandon, ^ilississippi. 
Returning to Vicksburg, he was sent from 
there to Memphis, thence to Pocahontas, 
and on the ist of January, 1864, veteran- 
ized and was again sent to Vicksburg. At 
this time Sherman had returned from his 
memorable march to the sea, and with others 
Mr. Forsyth was given a thirtv davs' fur- 
lough and returned to his home. After his 
leave of absence had expired he went to 
Memphis, where he was engaged in doing 
patrol duty for ten months, after which he 
joined Canby at New Orleans and was with 
him on his great expedition against Mobile. 
After participating in the capture of Span- 
ish Fort and Fort Blakely. ^Lv. Fursvth 
was transferred to Canby's headquarters as 
a guard, where he remained until August, 
1865, and then joined his regiment at I\Iont- 
gomery, Alabama, where he was promoted 
to the position of first sergeant. At that 
place he was given charge of the jail. Again 
receiving a thirty days' furlough he went to 
Davenport and from there to his home, 
where he remained until he received a letter 
to rejoin his regiment at Tuskegee, Ala- 
bama, and from that point was sent to Sel- 
ma, there remaining until 1866. At Selma 
he was given charge of the government sta- 
bles, and at that place he was mustered out 
of senice on the 20th of April, 186G, with 
the i-ank of sergeant and with a record of 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



nine hard-fought battles, tlhrty-two days 
under hre at Vicksburg and thirteen days 
under fire at Jackson, ^lississippi. During 
his Ci.tire military career he was never 
wounded. 

After hostilities had ceased 'Mr. For- 
syth returned to his home at Vintcn, Iowa, 
where he was engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits until 1878, and in that year, in com- 
pany with his wife and six children, he made 
the journey with a team and wagon to Kan- 
sas, locating in Sumner county. He spent 
seventeen years in that locality, during 
which time he followed the carpenter's 
trade, and was several times honored with 
positions of public trust and responsibility, 
having for two years served as deputy sher- 
iff, one year as city marshal and two years 
as constable. While there residing, on the 
7th of May, 1894, he was called upon to 
mourn the loss of his wife, and in tlie fol- 
lowing year he removed to Kansas City, 
where he followed his trade for one year. 
In Lawrence, Kansas, he was a second time 
married, choosing for his wife Carrie L. 
Larry, who was born in Ohio and was S 
dress-maker by trade. Soon after his mai- 
riage Mr. Forsyth removed to Hutchinson, 
where his wife owned the property in which 
they now reside, and he sold his property in 
Wellington. They have a commodious and 
attractive residence here, surrounded by 
beautiful and well kept grounds. 

The union of our subject and wife has 
been blessed with six children, as follows : 
Olive, wife of T. T. Robinson, of Kansas 
City ; Christina, wife of Frank E. Phelps, a 
prominent farmer of \\'ewoka, Indian Ter- 
ritory ; Grace, wife of E. R. Deyo, a plum- 
ber of Wellington, Kansas; Marion E., a 
cigar manufacturer of Newton, this state; 
Mary E., wife of W. H. Hart, a machinist 
of Ottawa ; and Nellie, wife of Henry Fehr. 
a miner of Leadville, Colorado. Mr. For- 
syth is a life-long Republican, and in his 
social relations is a member of Joe Hooker 
Post, No. 17, G. A. R., in which he served 
for one year as chaplain. He is one of the 
leading and substantial business men of 
Hutchinson, and many of its finest public 
buildings stand as monuments to his thrift 



and ability, including the new opera-house. 
A man of reliability, lie is held in the highest 
confidence and esteem by his fellow citizens. 



INSLEY L. DAYHOFF. 

Few public officials in the state of Kan- 
sas have displayed more enthusiasm, com- 
bined with energy, than has Insley L. Day- 
hoff, the popular and efficient superintendent 
of the Reno county schools. Although young 
in years he is a man of erudition, ambition 
and business ability and the educational in- 
terests of Reno county are in competent 
hands. 

The birth of Mr. Dayhoff occurred near 
Worthington, Greene county, Indiana, on 
October 17, 1867. The family is an old and 
numerous one, eleven brothers having emi- 
grated to America from the province of 
Hofif, Germany, but are now scattered over 
the United States, many of its members fill- 
ing positions of prominence. It has always 
been a family noted for its longevity also, 
there being no record of any male member 
of it dying before the age of seventy-five 
years, while in occasional instances they have 
reached and rounded out a century. 

The father of our subject was George 
W. Dayhoff, who was born in Indiana and 
began the study of medicine, his education, 
however, being interrupted by the outbreak 
of the Civil war. He ser\'ed with marked 
distinction during the entire period of that 
desperate struggle, having been in over sixty 
battles and skirmishes, often times in the 
thickest of the battle. After serving his 
country well he received an honorable dis- 
charge after the "Grand Review" at Wash- 
ington. After returning home from the war 
he settled down on the farmi near the old 
Scaffold Prairie homestead, near Worthing- 
ton, Indiana. There he lived until 1S87, 
when he moved to Kansas. In 1863 he was 
married to Mary Amanda Johnston, at 
Worthington. Four children were born of 
this union that are now living: Insley L., 
EHa ]M., Tames Emmett and Lenora M. In 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



89 



1876 his first wife died, and since that time 
he was remarried and is now Hving at 
Hondo, Texas. 

The boyhood and early, youth of our sub- 
ject were passed in Worthington, where he 
graduated from the common school course 
into the high school, and later became a stu- 
dent in the Bloomfield Normal school, in 
Greene county. From there he went to De 
Pauw University, and still later to the Kan- 
sas State Normal school, at Emporia. While 
this closed his scholastic career, it by no 
means completed his studies, for while Mr. 
Dayhoff has enriched his mind far beyond 
the average, he is of a class whose ambition 
will continue to ever inspire him to efforts 
for higher culture. Prior to removing from 
Indiana he began what has since become a 
life work, teaching his first school in his na- 
tive state. On March 9, 1887, he reached 
Hutchinson, Kansas, and immediately 
ranged himself with the state educators, 
teaching tw-o temis in Langdon and three in 
Plevna, displaying such ability that in 1896 
he was made county superintendent, and he 
has had the honor of a third consecutive elec- 
tion, this being an unusual occurrence. With 
characteristic determination he immediately 
began his onerous duties, which in this coun- 
ty are exceptionally hard, there being one 
hundred and fifty-seven districts and one 
hundred and seventy-four schools outside of 
the city schools. One hundred and seventy- 
tmir teachers come under his supervision, 
>ixty-seven of these being males and the 
(jther sex numbering one hundred anxl seven, 
the salaries ranging from thirty-five to sixty 
dollars a month, aggregating from sixty-two 
to sixty-three thousand dollars. With the 
oth^r necessary outlay, the county expends 
on her schools the sum of ninety-five thou- 
sand dollars. 

To visit these schools, as the law directs, 
once every six months, compels much driv- 
ing and in this work alone the conscientious 
superintendent covers over four thousand 
miles, aside from trips on the railroad. Mr. 
Dayhoff keeps one hundred and seventy-four 
reports, and the proper keeping of these and 
the selection of teachers, with its attendant 



social and business features, rec[uires not 
only a great deal of physical but also mental 
strain. When the reports of the entire num- 
ber of people connected with this office are 
taken into consideration, it will give some 
idea of the duties of the office of county su- 
perintendent in this state, as beside the num- 
ber of teachers, there are four hundred and 
eighty school offices, and all of the justices 
of the peace report here as well. Since tak- 
ing charge of this office hehas organized and 
reorganized almost every department, and 
now has all of the schools properly graded 
and has had the satisfaction of graduating 
three hundred and fifty-four pupils. He has 
established the system of association work 
and has advanced the standard of teachers' 
examinations, resulting in a higher grade of 
work given and required. Mr. Dayhoff has 
had his heart in this work and has untir- 
ingly pushed it to its present stage, finding 
reward in the appreciation of his patrons. 

Mr. Dayhoff has always been identified 
with the Republican party and has been one 
of the active workers fur its success. He has 
been one of the delegates t<> the various con- 
ventions and as he is gifted in oratory and is 
always thoroughly posted in regard to all 
issues, he is in great demand as a public 
speaker. In the matter of his own election, 
it has been a source of gratification to him 
that his elections have been accomplished 
with increased majorities, the first resulting 
in a majority of three hundred and se^■enty- 
six, the second by five hundred and eighty, 
and the third by nine hundred and fifty-six. 
The only one in this last election w'ho re- 
ceived a greater number of votes was the 
well known Judge Campbell. 

On February 7, 1890, Mr. Dayhoff" was 
united in marriage to Miss A. M. Bordeaux, 
a daughter of R. D. Bordeaux, formerly of 
this city but now a resident of Wichita, and 
the three children born to this union are: 
Lamar, Don Richard, and Helen Mossman. 
The religious connection of the family is 
with the :Methodist church. Socially 'Mr. 
Daylioff' belongs to the iModern Woodmen, 
the Odd Fellows, the A. F. & A. M.. the 
Commercial Club and the Park .\ssociation. 



•90 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



He has also been the president of the Central 
Kansas State Teachers' Association, and for 
the past fi\'e years has had' a place on the 
state association program. A man of read- 
ing, travel, culture and high attainment, his 
life is a strenuous one, given to the advance- 
ment and prosperity of his adopted state. 



JOHN H. STOCKWELL. 

John H. Stockwell, who has passed the 
seventieth milestone on the journey of life, 
is now an honored and respected resident of 
Rice county, Kansas. A native of the Em- 
pire state, he was born in Chenango county, 
August 24, 1830, a son of Reuben Stock- 
well, who was born in Connecticut. He died 
when our subject was but sixteen months 
old, and his wife, who waS' in her maiden- 
hood a Miss Doran, was again married, and 
her death occurred in 1844. 

John H. Stockwell, the subject of this 
review, was reared on his brother-in-law's 
farm in Ohio from the age of ten years. 
In the autumn of 1861, he enlisted for ser- 
vice in the Civil war, becoming a member of 
the Third Ohio Infantry, in which he served 
fcr three years, when he was discharged on 
account of disability. After regaining his 
health he re-enlisted for service, in 1865, en- 
tering the Eleventh Michigan Infantry, in 
which he remained until the close of hostili- 
ties. He was a brave and gallant soldier,, 
and his war record is one of which he has 
every reason to be proud. In 1853 Mr. 
Stockwell was married, and later, in 1864, 
he located with his family in southern Mich- 
igan. In 1878 he took up his abode in Rush 
county, Kansas, where he remained for live 
years, and then located in Rice county. After 
spending a few months in that locality they 
came to the city of Sterling, where he has 
since made his home. Fourteen years ago, 
on the 9th of September, 1886, he was 
stricken with paralysis, and this caused him 
to lose his hearing and his speech, but since 
that time he has been free from chronic 
diarrhoea, with which he was troubled for 
years. His illness has been a long and ter- 
rible affliction to him and to his faithful 



wife, who has been closely confined to his 
care for the past fourteen years. They have 
learned the mute language and are now able 
to converse rapidly and intelligently. He is 
also unable to walk and has to be assisted 
from his bed to a locomotive chair, in which 
he wheels himself about the house and on 
the streets. He now receives a pension of 
seventy-two dollars a month. 

In Williams county, Ohio, on the 2d of 
January, 1853, Mr. Stockwell was united in 
marriage with Miss Lydia P. Palmer, who 
was born in Jefiferson county, New York. 
By the death of her mother she was left an 
orphan at the early age of fourteen years, 
and from that time until her marriage she 
was obliged to make her own way in the 
world. She has indeed proved to her hus- 
band a true and loving companion for the 
journey of life. Their union has been 
blessed with eleven children, eight of whom 
grew to years of maturity and are still liv- 
ing. They also have twenty-three grand- 
children and four great-grandchildren. Mr. 
and ]\Irs. Stockwell are zealous members of 
the United Brethren church, and socially he 
is a member of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public. His political support is given to the 
Republican party. He has ever borne his 
sufferings with Christian fortitude, and his 
life is a beautiful example of patience and 
perseverance. 



JOSEPH E. PARK. 

\\'idely known in Rice county and In 
other portions of central Kansas, Joseph 
Ebenezer Park well deserves mention among 
the leading representatives of agricultural 
interests in this portion of the state. He was 
born in Ford county. Illinois, January 31, 
1863. His father, Thomas Park, was a na- 
tive of Jefferson county, Indiana, born in 
18 19, and the family is of Scotch descent, 
the grandfather. William Park, having come 
from Scotland to America. By trade he 
was a stone mason and followed that pur- 
suit for some time but afterward turned his 
attention to farming. In his native land he 
married Jane Anderson, and in 1821 he 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



crossed the Atlantic bringing with him his 
wife and two children. They were then in 
moderate circumstances. He l« Unwed his 
trade until his sons were grown and then 
cleared and improved a farm in the midst of 
the dense forest. He had one hundred and 
sixty acres and became well-to-do, but his 
children started' out upon business careers 
for themselves without his financial aid. 
They had seven sons and two daughters and 
all married with the exception of the young- 
est son. Three of the sons settled in Jeffer- 
son county, Indiana ; one daughter became a 
resident of Atchison county, Kansas, and 
Thomas also came to Kansas. One daugh- 
ter is now living in Vermilion county, Illi- 
nois, and has two sons and a daughter — 
John, wliO' is living in Vermilion- county 
as is the daughter, while the other son, 
\\'illiam, is now in Nebraska or Idaho. The 
paternal grandmother of our subject died 
about 1867, in the sixtieth year of her age, 
and the grandfather, surviving her about 
nine years, passed away in his seventieth 
year. 

Thomas Park, the father of our subject, 
was reared in the Mississippi valley and 
after arriving at years of maturity was mar- 
ried in Jefferson county. Indiana, Decem- 
ber 28, 1842, to Miss Jane M. Mann, who 
was born in Nova Scotia in 1824, and was 
then nineteen years of age. She is still liv- 
ing, in her seventieth year. Mr. Park, how- 
ever, passed away on his farm near Ster- 
ling, Kansas, in 1900, at the age of eighty- 
one years. She is a daughter of Jabez and 
Mary (Jimmerson) Mann, both of whom 
were natives of Scotland and came to the 
new world in a sailing vessel, the former in 
1822, the latter in 1823. Mrs. Mann was 
six weeks; upon the ocean. They had five 
sons and four daughters, of whom three 
daughters and two sons married. I\Irs. 
Park, the seventh in order of birth, is now 
the only siu'vivor. Her brother, Andrew 
Mann, was very wealthy, making the most 
of his money in farming in Jefiferson county. 
Indiana. In 1880 he came to Kansas and 
died in Sterling in 1884, in the sixtieth 
year of his age. His wife had previmisly 
died in Sterling, and as he had no children 



he left most of his money to his sister, Airs. 
Park. Her uncle. Ebenezer Mann, was in 
the army for aboiit one year during the war 
of the Rebellion and^ died of consumption, 
having contracted the origin of the disease 
while at the front. Mrs. Mann, the mother 
of Mrs. Park, died in Indiana, about 1875, 
wdren eighty-two years of age, and Mr. 
Mann passed away about ten years later, 
when eighty-nine years of age. 

After their marriage Mr. and ]\lrs. 
Thomas Park settled upon his small farm 
in Indiana where they lived for three years, 
and then removed to Laporte, that state, 
where the father carried on agricultural pur- 
suits for eight years. In 1853 he went with 
his family to Boone county. Iowa. For two 
years he conductedi a sawmill there and then 
returned to Kankakee county, Illinois, where 
he was a tenant fanner for six years. On 
the expiration of that period he went to 
Paxton, Ford county, Illinois, thence to 
Vennilion county, that state, and afterward 
came tO' Kansas, settling upon a claim in 
Kingman county. Eventually he came to 
Rice county, where he spent his remaining 
days and where his widow is still residing. 
They were among the most highly respected 
citizens of the community, their sterling 
worth of character winning them warm 
friendship. They had seven children. fi\-e 
sons and two daughters : James Andrew, 
the eldest, served in the Union army during 
the Civil war for more than a year and was 
held as a prisoner at Belle Isle from Janu- 
ary until March. He was then paroled but 
died in the hospital at Annapolis. ^Maryland^ 
in 1864, at the age of nineteen years, his 
remains being interred there. William, the 
second of the family, is a farmer of Jeffer- 
son cornty. Indiana, and is married and has 
five children. Thomas A., who is living in 
Hartshorn in the Indian Territory, has three 
children. King A. died in Kankakee coun- 
ty, Illinois, at the age of ten years ; Mary J. 
is the wife of Henry Lakey, of Kingman 
county. Kansas, and has three children. Mar- 
garet is the wife of W. R. Carter, of Ster- 
ling, and has four children. Joseph, of this 
review, is the yormgest of the family. 

During the first nine vears of his life 



92 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



Joseph Patk was a resident of Illinois and 
then acco:rpanied nis parents on their re- i 
moval to Kingman county, Kansas, in 1872, ■ 
while in 1878 he came with them to Rice j 
county. The father .purchased a hundred 
and sixty acres of land a mile south' of Ster- 
ling and there carried on general farming | 
until his death, our subject assisting him as j 
his age and strength would permit. He re- 
mained at heme most of the time until his 
marriage, which occurred on the 22d of De- 
cember, 1889, the lady of his choice being 
INIiss Annie Schlazer, who was born in 
Cle\-eland, Ohio. Her parents, Jacob and 
Barbara (Alher) Schlazer, now reside about j 
eleven miles from Sterling. They emigrated 
from Germany to Ohio, settling in Cuya- 
hoga county, and in 1873 tl''cy came to Kan- 1 
sas. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Park have been | 
born two children: Ralph Herbert, born { 
October 12, 1893, and Elsie Maud, born 
February 2, 1898. ■ 

For two years after his marriage Mr. 
Park resided upon the old home farm and 
then came to his present place of residence on 
section 16, Washington township, where he' 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres in 
1897. He carries on general farming, rais- 
ing the cereals best adapted to the soil and 
climate. He is also a carpenter and builder 
and a tinner and can construct a house en- 
tire from the cellar to the roof. He has 
built several residences and barns in this lo- 
cality which are monuments to his enter- 
prise and business versatility. On his farm 
he grows wheat, having about sixty-five 
acres planted to this crop, yielding about 
twenty bushels to the acre, while the corn 
yields abi -ut forty Inishels to the acre. He 
also raise- SMme cattle and is now carrj-ing 
on a prMiitalilc business. His political pref- 
erence is for Republican men and measures. 
He has served for two years as justice of the 
peace and is now assessor of Washington 
township, having been elected in 1900. He 
and his wife are members of the United 
Presbyterian church, in which he sen-ed as 
trustee and in its work are actively inter- 
ested. They have many friends, for their | 
characteristics are such as everywhere com- ' 
mand confidence and good will. ,; 



JOSEPH LATSHAW. 

The unostentatious routine of private 
life, although of vast importance to the wel- 
fare of the community, has not figured to 
any great extent in the pages of history. 
But the names of men who have distin- 
guished themselves by the possession of 
those qualities of character which mainly 
contribute to the success of private life and 
to the public stability, and who have en- 
joyed the respect and confidence of those 
around them, should not be permitted to per- 
ish. Their example is more valuable to the 
majority of readers than that of heroes, 
statesmen and writers, as they furnish means 
of subsistence for the multitude whom they 
in their useful careers have emph yed. Such 
are the thoughts that involuntarily come to 
our minds when we consider the life of him 
whose name initiates this sketch. He is en- 
gaged in dealing in grain and coal in Ells- 
worth, where an extensive business attests 
his executive ability, his enterprise and his 
determined purpose. 

Mr. Latshaw is a native of Canada, his 
birth having occurred near Paris, on Grand 
River. The family is of French lineage and 
was founded in America by Joseph Latshaw, 
the grandfather of our subject, who took up 
his abode in Pennsylvania, where occurred 
the birth of Samuel Latshaw, the father of 
Joseph. The latter was a lad of twelve sum- 
mers when with his parents he removed to 
Canada, there spending hjs remaining days, 
his time and attention being devoted to agri- 
cultural pursuits. He held membership in 
the Baptist church, took a very active part 
in its work and frecjuently ser\-ed in a church 
office. He married Cynthia Xellis. and they 
became the parents of six children : John, 
who is engaged in the grain busness in Dur- 
ance, Kansas; Joseph, of this review^; Mary; 
Maria; Edwin, who is a box manufacturer 
at Winston, Wisconsin ; and Alexander, who 
is living in Los Angeles, California. The 
father died at the age of forty-six years, but 
the mother is still living and now makes her 
home with her son, Joseph, in Wilson. 

In the public schools Joseph Latshaw 
pursued his education until it became neces- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



93 



sary for him to assume the management of 
the home farm upon his father's death. He 
was then only thirteen years of age, and he 
and his brother took charge of the property 
and carried on the work of the fields. He 
remained with his mother until iS^S, when 
he went to Kansas City and with his brother 
emlaarked in the dain,- business. Later they 
operated an elevator there, but lost most of 
their earnings througli fire in the fall of 
1S73. ^^1'- Latshaw of this review then em- 
barked in the grain business in this county. 
He was first at Perryville, his brother at 
that time being connected with the grain 
trade in Wilson. Mr. Latshaw remained at 
Perryville for eighteen months and' then 
came to Wilson, where he has since resided. 
The brothers erected an elevator east of the 
depot, but in 1885 removed it to its present 
location. In 1884 Ed and Alexander Lat- 
shaw purchased the mill in Wilson, and 
since that time our subject has carried on 
the grain business alone. He has been very 
successful in the enterprise, making large 
purchases and sales. He has shipped as 
hig"h as four or five hundred car loads of 
grain in a year. His elevator has a capacity 
of twelve thousand barrels and was built so 
as to handle large ciuantities of grain in a 
short time. It is well equiiiped fur this pur- 
pose, having two (h"i\-e-ways and a Ijjdwer 
to blow the grain in the cars, which sends 
it to the further end of the cars witlnjut 
shoveling. The engine, located in a sepa- 
rate engine room, is a new one, of twenty- 
horse power. The arrangements are so 
complete and perfect that forty-five hundred 
barrels of grain can be handled dailw ]\Ir. 
Latshaw is tlie leading grain merchant 'in 
this portion of the county, and his lousiness 
affords a market inv the farmers as well as 
proving a source of re\'eiuie to himself. In 
1900 he also began dealing in cual, handling 
the product from lioth the eastern and west- 
ern coal fields. He is likewise interested in 
mining in Arkansas, and is one of ten men 
who own a tract of land of nine hundred 
and sixty acres, another of eighty acres and 
a third of forty acres. These are underlaid 
with rich coal fields and are promising prop- 
erties. 



Mr. Latshaw exercises his right of fran- 
chise in support of the men and measures of 
the Republican party and is a stanch advo- 
cate of its principles. He belongs to the 
Masonic fraternity and has attained the 
Thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite 
in Wichita Consistory, No. 2, S. P. R. S. 
He is also connected with the Eastern Star 
and with the Knights and Ladies of Secur- 
ity. He aided in organizing the Presby- 
terian church of Wilson and attends its ser- 
vices. As a citizen he is public-spirited and 
progressive, witlihi ilding his support from 
no measure that is intemled toi prove of gen- 
eral good. His life record stands as an ex- 
emplification of the opportunities afforded 
young men in America, where ambition and 
energy are not hampered by caste or class. 
He has worked his way up\\ard, placing his 
dependence upon the reliable qualities of la- 
bor when guided by sound judginent. and 
his efforts have resulted in winning for him 
a place among the substantial citizens of his 
adopted county. 



JOHN W. BARD WELL. 

The subject of this review is a well 
known farmer of Kingman county, whose 
skill and* ability in his chosen calling are 
plainly manifest in tlie well tilled fields and 
neat and thrifty appearance of his place. He 
was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, April 17, 
1853, and is a son of Seth and Talitha 
(Woolen) Bardwell. The father was born 
on the /th of September, 1800, and his 
death occurred on the i6th of March, 1876. 
He was first married November 8, 1821, to 
Nancy Jones, who was born February 25, 
1803, and died on the 30th of June, 1825. 
On the 5th of February. 1831, the father 
was again married, Talitha Woolen becom- 
ing his wife. She was born September i, 
1812, and cHed April 21, 1899. She accom- 
panied our subject on his removal to Kan- 
sas, and for twenty years she made her home 
with him in this state. 

Seth Bardwell. a carnenter and builder 
by occupation, located in Indianapolis, In- 



94 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



diana, when it was but a small village, pur- 
chasing the first town lot ever sold there and 
also erected one of the first hotels of the 
town, known as the Indiana House, which 
he conducted on Market street for several 
years. He also erected the first brick resi- 
dence in the town. In 1857, however, he 
left his Indiana home for Missouri, where 
he purchased a farm near the city of Cali- 
fornia, and for a time was there engaged in 
farming and stock-raising, but finally re- 
turned to Indianapolis. After remaining at 
his old home but a short time he located in 
Jasper county, Indiana, where for ten years 
he was engaged in the tilling of the soil, and 
on the expiration of that period located in 
Clermont, Indiana, there spending the re- 
mainder of his life. He was a prominent 
factor in the early history of Indianapolis, 
where he became an extensive landed pro- 
prietor. While residing in Missouri the 
Civil war broke out, and, being an ardent 
Republican and abolitionist, Mr. Bardwell 
was compelled to leave the state and was 
thus obliged to dispose of his property there 
at a great sacrifice. Religiouslv he was 
prominently identified with the early history 
of the Christian church in both Indiana and 
Missoiu-i, and was ever an active worker in 
the cause of Christianity. By his first mar- 
riage he became the father of one son. Nel- 
son, who was born November 14, 1824. By 
his second' union he had ten children, name- 
ly: John L., who was born on the 6th of 
July, 1833, 'I'ld died September 9, 1834; 
Clarissa, who was born July 13, 1835, and 
was first married to Joseph Sanborn, after- 
ward becoming the wife of James Bice, and 
both are now deceased ; Thomas J., who was 
born August 15, 1837, and is a painter in 
Cincinnati, Ohio; Seth W.j.born October 15, 
1840, and is a resident of Eureka Springs, 
Kansas: Ellen, who was born December 18, 
1843, and was first married to Barnum B. 
Pafif, afterward becoming the wife of D. C. 
Tavlor, of Rensselaer, Indiana; Henry C, 
who was born January 9, 1844, and makes 
his home in Kansas City; MalvinaC., who 
was born January 3. i84r). and is the wife 
of H. Graves, of Wichita ; Azubah, who 
was born on the 7th of September, 1848, and 



is the widow of D. Duval and a resident of 
Denver, Colorado; Emma H., who was born 
December 30, 185 1, and is the wife of Nel- 
son Button, also of Colorado; and John W., 
the subject of this review. 

The latter was only four years of age 
when he was taken by his parents to Alis- 
souri, and he can vividly recall the troublous 
days incident to the Civil war. In the fall 
of 1859, when seven years of age, the family 
returned to Indianapolis, and shortly after- 
ward he accompanied them on their removal 
to Jasper county, his education having been 
received in the common schools of the dif- 
ferent localities in wdiich he resided. . When 
twenty-O'ue years of age he became the real 
head of the household, remaining under the 
parental roof until April 7, 1880, wdien he 
located in Kingman county, Kansas, and im- 
} mediately pre-empted his present homestead. 
One hundred and twenty acres of his land is 
under an excellent state of cultivation and 
he also' farms one hundred and sixty acres 
of rented land and' in his pastures may be 
seen an excellent grade of stock. The first 
dwelling which he occupied after coming to 
this state now forms a part of his present 
residence, which is a commodious and well 
built structure. 

Mr. Bardwell was married on the 25th 
of May, 1886, at Lecompton, Kansas, to 
Miss Jennie Lawrence. She is a native 
daughter of the Sunflower state, her birth 
having occurred in Douglas county, and she 
is a daughter of Joseph K. and Helen Law- 
rence. She was reared in the county of her 
nativity and received an excellent education 
in Lane University, of Lecompton. This 
union has been blessed with six children, — 
Mabel, Nelson, Ira, Seth, Lucy and Walter. 
In political matters Mr. Bardwell gives an 
unfaltering support to the Republican party. 
For three terms he served as clerk of his 
township and he assisted in the organiza- 
tion of school district No. 69, of which he 
has since served as clerk and treasurer, hav- 
ing held the latter office for the past seven 
years. He also bears the distinction of hav- 
ing secured the establishment of the first 
rural mail route of Kingman county, desig- 
nated as route No. i. He circulated the pe- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



95 



tition and througli the assistance oi Post- 
master Harlow, of Kingman, the route was 
granted, and Mr. Bardwell was ' appointed 
carrier, tlie first deUvery being made 
on the 1st of August, 1901. The route now 
covers a distance oi twenty-six miles, ex- 
tending into Reno county,' and at the pres- 
ent time contains sixty-two boxes. Mrs. 
Bardwell is the assistant carrier, and much 
of the time, when the weather permits, 
makes the delivery, probably being the only 
lady carrier in the west. She is a member 
of the United Brethren church, and has long 
served as superintendent O'f the Sunday- 
school. In his social relations Mr. Bardwell 
is a member of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, of Kingman. 



WILLIAM FITZPATRICK. 

The farming interests of Sterling town- 
ship, Rice county, were well represented by 
William Fitzpatrick, who resided' on section 
19, where in 1877 he purchased a quarter 
section of land for fifteen hundred dollars. 
This has many times increased in value 
since he took possession of it, for the place 
was then a tract of raw prairie, not a fur- 
row having been turned or an improvement 
made. There were many wild geese and 
prairie chickens in the neighborhood and the 
successful hunter could thus supply his table 
with game. The work of progress and im- 
provement was in its incipiency, but it has j 
been carried steadily forward by the enter- 
prising and resolute pioneer settlers, among 
which number was ]Mr. Fitzpatrick. 

Our subject was born at Conneautville, 
Crawford county. Pennsylvania, October 16, 
1840. His father. John Fitzpatrick. was 
born prior to 1800. a native of Ireland, 
whence he came to the new world when a 
young man. The voyage across the Atlantic 
consumed seven •\\-eeks and he landed at 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. He was a laborer 
and worked on the capitol grounds at Wash- 
ington, D. C, for some time. About 1837 
he was married, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
and he became the father of three children. 



He died in Erie, Pennsylvania, January 21, 
1857. The childi-en were: John, who was 
born in Pittsburg, July 18, 1839, and died in 
Youngstown, Ohio, October 27, 1870, leav- 
ing three children : William, of this review ; 
and James, who was a soldier in the Civil 
war and was killed Mav jS, \X(^, at Dallas, 
Georgia, while in lii^ second year's service. 
Our subject and his brother buth enlisted on 
the 14th of August, 1862, at Aurora, Ohio, 
becoming mienibers of Company D, One 
Hundred and Fourth Ohio Infantry. James 
was promoted to the rank of corporal and 
after serving for two years vv-as accidentally 
killed by a ball, which struck him in the 
head. An Ohio paper, the Portage City 
Democrat, had a long article in which it 
paid him a high and just tribute. It read : 
"J. P. Fitzpatrick was a young man who 
possessed the qualities and qualifications of 
a true soldier and those that rendered life 
happy and won friendship. He was manly, 
honest and upright, of good habits and in- 
dustrious and with a good share of native 
talents, which he cultivated with care, ren- 
dering him worthy of the best society, and 
such he always chose. Of Irish descent, he 
possessed warm, affectionate, genial traits 
so characteristic of that nation and people. 
A typical soldier, he perfomied his duties 
most promptly and enthusiastically. Though 
warmly attached to his mother and his home 
he went forth to fight for the nation, nor 
did he ask for furloughs or accept any, but 
he was eagerly anticipating his return in 
honor to his dear ones, but the day was not 
to come, and on that fatal 28tli of May, 
1864, he was among the slain with his no- 
ble Captain McHorton, both shot through 
the head by sharpshooters. 'What will be- 
come of mother now' was the burden of his 
dying breath, but he was not afraid to die, 
and thus a noble soldier's career came to an 
end." 

William Fitzpatrick, the subject of this 
review, served for nearly three years or until 
the 1st of July, 1865, and was mustered out 
with the rank of sergeant. He was spared, 
although his comrades fell thick around him, 
including his brother and his captain. The 
remains of his brother were embalmed and 



96 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



buried there, but they have since been trans- 
ferred to Erie, Pennsylvania, and now rest 
by the side of his parents. The father be- 
came a raih'oad contractor in New York, 
Pennsylvania and Ohio, taking contracts for 
the construction of from eight to twelve 
miles at a time. He was very successful iri 
his business, but he ultimately lost heavily 
through investment in the Clinton Air Line 
Railroad. His death occurred in 1857 and 
his wife sur\ived him a number of years, 
passing away in 1873. 

At the time of the father's death Will- 
iam Fitzpatrick began to earn his own live- 
lihood, securing a situation as a farm hand, 
and for seventeen years he was an overseer 
on an estate of fourteen hundred acres. 
Coming to Kansas in 1877, he purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres of land on sec- 
tion 19, Sterling township. Rice county, and 
with characteristic energy beg^n the im- 
provement of a farm of his own. He erec- 
ted all nf the liuildings upon the place, and 
some of them have been built a second time, 
as the first lot were destroyed in a wind 
storm. He owned six hundred and fifty 
acres, divided in three farms, but nearly all 
in one body. He raised from one to two 
tlicusand bushels of wheat each )-ear and 
held over about four thousand bushels. He 
kept from fifty to one hundred and seventy 
head of cattle and ten head of horses, whicli 
were used in working the farm. He fed 
and shipped his nwn st( ^ck and was one of 
the few farmers engaged in the raising of 
sheep in this locality, having a fine flock of 
Shropshire. Everything about the place is 
neat and thrifty in appearance and indicates 
his careful supervision. He was widely 
known as an enterprising and progressive 
farmer and his own eft'orts were the secret 
of his success. 

In 1883, in \\'ooster, Wayne county, 
Ohio, Mr. Fitzpatrick was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Kate Wirt, a most estimable 
lady, who has indeed proved to him a faith- 
ful companion and helpmate on the journey 
of life. She is a native of Ohio and a daugh- 
ter of John and Luretta (Dresser) Wirt, 
both of whom were natives of Germany. In 
his social relations Mr. Fitzpatrick was con- 



nected with the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic, and politically he was a Republican. He 
was reared in the Catholic faith and his wife 
is a member of the Lutheran church. He 
was a man of sterling worth, widely and fa- 
vorably known, his circle of friends being 
almost co-extensive with his circle of ac- 
quaintances. To Mr. and Mrs. Fitzpatrick 
were born three children: Carl, deceased; 
Carl W'illiam and Jay John. 

Mr. Fitzpatrick died at his home near 
Sterling, April 7, 1902, at 4:15 a. m., aged 
sixty-one years, five months and twenty-two 
davs. 



EMMETT HUTTOX. 

Emmett Hutton, a young man of super- 
ior business ability and executive force, 
whose labors are bringing to him creditable 
and gratifying success in industrial circles, 
was born in Bedford county, Tennessee. De- 
cember I, 1866. His father, George D. Hut- 
ton, was a native of Virginia and removed 
thence to Tennessee, where he was united 
in marriage to Mrs. Whiteside, a widow and 
the mother of Houston Whiteside, one of the 
representative citizens of central Kansas. 
Three children were born unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Huttnn : Samuel, who is in the office of H. 
^\"hitesi(le: Emmett: and Leota, the wife of 
Dr. J. L. Conn, of Hutchinson. 

In the schools of his native state Emmett 
Hutton pursued his education and when 
twenty years of age came to Kansas. For a 
short time he was connected with the lumber 
trade and for three years he was employed 
in the postofhce, after which he became in- 
terested in the laundry business and as the 
senior member of the firm of Hutton & Os- 
wald, proprietors of the American Steam 
Laundry, he has a wide acquaintance and a 
very large business, whose profitable return 
has placed him among the substantial citi- 
zens of the county. 

On the 25th of October, 1899, Mr. Hut- 
ton was united in marriage to Miss Lottie 
Bay, a daughter of C. M. Bay, a resident 
farmer of Reno countv. He has remodeled 




FOUR GENERATIONS OF THE OSWALD FAMILY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



97 



their home, which is situated at No. 320 
east Sherman street, and is now one of the 
attractive residences of the city, one of its 
most delightful features being the warm- 
hearted hospitality which pervades the 
place. In his political views Mr. Hutton is 
a Democrat, but the honors or emoluments 
of office have no attraction for him and he 
desires to give his entire attention to his 
business affairs, which he is managing so 
successfully. Socially he is connected with 
Byron Lodge, No. 197, Jv. P.; Hutchinson 
Camp, No. 506, M. W. A. ; and Hutchinson 
Lodge. No. 433. B. P. O. E. He is widely 
known and popular in the city where he has 
resided throughout the period of his man- 
Imod, and his friends are almost as manv as 
his acquaintances. 



CHARLEY W. OS\\'ALD. 

A native of Ohio, Charley A\'. Oswald 
was born in W'ooster, \\'a}-ne county, No- 
vember 3, 1867, a son of Anthony and Ma- 
ria (Ewing) Oswald. The family was 
founded in Pennsylvania during the early 
settlement of that state, the ancestors of our 
subject joining a colony that became active 
in the pioneer de\'eIopment there. In the 
'30s William Oswald, the grandfather of our 
subject, removed from Pennsylvania to 
Ohio and became identified with its pioneer 
interests. He has since been a witness of the 
progress made by the state and has borne his 
part in the work of improvement in his local- 
ity. He has never been ill a day in his life 
and is still living at the advanced age of 
eighty-five years. For fifty years he en- 
gaged in the manufacture of boots and 
shoes. Anthony Oswald, the father of our 
subject, was I»rn in Wayne county, Ohio, 
and during much of his life has engaged in 
speculation and in dealing in real estate, 
while to some extent he has followed farm- 
ing. In 1877 he came to Kansas and for 
twenty years resided in Reno county, after 
which he removed to Texas. He is now liv- 
ing in Beaumont, that state, and is interested 
in the oil business. 



When a lad of ten years Charley Oswald 
accompanied his parents to Kansas and here 
entered the public schools, being graduated 
in the high school of Hutchinson, in the 
class of 1885. For two years he engaged in 
teaching school in this county, after which 
he entered the postoffice and was the first 
letter carrier appointed to the position in 
Hutchinson. He served in that capacity for 
three years, when a change of administra- 
tion caused his removal from the office and 
he entered into partnership with Emmett 
Hutton as priipn'etor of the American Steam 
Laundry, which they have made a very prof- 
itable investment, its business having 
reached an immense volume. 

On the 25th of May, 1896, was celebrat- 
ed the marriage of Mr. Oswald and Miss 
Myrtle Lewis, a daughter of S. C. Lewis, 
and they have two children : Anthony Lewis 
and Charley ^^'alIace. Tbeirs is one of the 
fine residences on Ninth avenue west, located 
at No. 301. In his political affiliations Mr. 
Oswald has always been an active Democrat 
and for the last ten years has been actively 
connected with the organization of that party 
in Reno county. For three years he has 
been chairman of the Reno county central 
committee, and he was sergeant-at-arms in 
the national Democratic convention at Kan- 
sas City in July, 1900. W'hh many fraternal 
and social organizations he is alsn crinnected. 
holding memberslii]> in Reno Lodge, No. 
140. F. & A. ^I.: Rcnn Chapter. No. 34. 
R. A. M. : Hutchinson Council. Xo. iv"^R. 
& S. M. ; Reno Commandery. Nn. 26. K. T.. 
and to the order of the Eastern Star, the la- 
dies' branch of ]Masi:nry. his wife belongs. 
He also has mcniliersiii]) relations with 
Hutchinson Lodge. No. 433, Benevolent and 
Protective Order nf Elks.' and both Mr. and 
Mrs. Oswald attend the services of the 
Methodist church. His life reci rd is an ex- 
cellent example of the opportunities that are 
afforded young men in the new world and of 
the success that can be achieved by deter- 
mined purpose and unflag'ging energy — for 
therein lies the secret of the prosperity 
which has attended our subject in his busi- 
ness career. 



98 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



At a family reunion of the Oswald fam- 
ily recently held in Wooster one of the 
most pleasant events was the taking 
of a photograph of four generations. 
In this group each 'one is the eldest 
son of each family, namely: Will- 
iam Oswald, aged eighty-six years, of Lodi, 
eldest son of the pioneer, George Oswald; 
Anthony Oswald, aged fifty-six years, of 
Beaumont, Texas, eldest son of William Os- 
wald; Charley W. O'swald, aged thirty -five 
years, of Hutchinson, eldest son of An- 
thony Oswald; and Anthony L. Os- 
wald, aged three years, eld>;st son of Charley 
W. Oswald. It is a fine family picture, 
from great-grandfather to great-grand- 
son, covering a period of eighty-six 
years and representing an old and highly re- 
garded family, second to none in the annals 
of esteem and good reputation in all respects. 



DR. JAY DUNHAM. 

In the methods of the treatment of, dis- 
ease great progress has been made in recent 
years ; study and investigation have brought 
forth new rules of procedure in the treat- 
ment of the sick and science has made rapid 
strides. Dr. Dunham is among the younger 
physicians now engaged in the practice of 
osteopathy, being a graduate of the School 
of Osteopathy at Kirksville, Missouri, in the 
class of 1899. 

He was born in Knox county, Missouri, 
near the town of Edina, in October, 1872, 
and is a son of James G. and Edwilda 
(Pugh) Dunham, "the latter a daughter of 
Jacob Pugh, a prominent citizen and early 
pioneer settler of Knox county. She was 
reared and educated at Edina, and the Doc- 
tor's parents are both well and favorably 
known in that portion of the state. The 
father is a farmer by occupation and in fol- 
lowing that pursuit has provided a comfort- 
able living for his family. His children are : 
Jay, of this review; Joseph; Catherine, who 
is engaged in teaching; Bruce; Nora; Ber- 
tha; and James. Mr. Dunham exercises his 
right of franchise in support of the men and 
measures of the Republican party, and both 



he and his wife are consistent Christian peo- 
ple, holding membership in the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Dr. Dunham was reared near Hurdland, 
Knox county, Missouri, and after acquiring 
a good literary education in the public 
schools he began preparation for the medical • 
profession, and, believing in the methods of 
practice promulgated by the school of osteo- 
pathy, he entered the institution at Kirks- 
ville, there completing the course, being 
graduated in the class of 1899. In his chosen 
profession he has been successful, effecting 
many cures among his patients, thus gain- 
ing a merited reputation for skill and abil- 
ity. He is a close student and his compre- 
hensive knowledge, combined with sound 
judgment, has made his efforts of great 
avail. 

The Doctor is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen and also holds membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church. His unfailing 
courtesy and his genial and unassuming 
manner make him popular in the commun- 
ity in which he is now located and he has 
many friends, both in the county of his na- 
ti\-itv and the county of his adoption. 



AIARK ^\■ARRELL. 



An honored resident of the Sunttower 
state for the past eighteen years, Mark War- 
rell is entitled to a prominent place in the 
annals of Kingman county. He was born 
in Coshocton county, Ohio, in 1850, a son 
of John and Nancy (Heaton) Warrell, both 
natives of Ohio. The mother passed away 
in death when her son Mark was but a babe, 
leaving six children, only two of whom are 
now living, the brother of our subject being- 
Isaac, a resident of Howard county, Ne- 
braska. The father died when our subject 
was thirteen years of age, in his fifty-second 
year. He followed the tilling of the soil as 
a life occupation, was a Democrat in his po- 
litical views, and was honored and respected 
bv all with whom he came in contact. 

]\Iark Warrell was left an orphan at an 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



99 



early age, and his youth and early manhood 
were spent on a farm in Ohio, the educa- 
tional privileges which he enjoyed being 
those afforded by the common schools of his 
locality. From a very early age he was 
obliged to make his own way in the world, 
and the high position which he now occu- 
pies in tile business world is due entirely to 
his unremitting toil, his perseverance and his 
close attention to duty. In 1883 ^^^ removed 
from the Buckeye state to Kansas, taking up 
his abode on a farm in Dale township, where 
he made his home until 1893. •'■" ^^^^ J^^^ 
he came to the farm which is yet his home, 
where he owns a tract of two hundred and 
forty acres of excellent and well improved 
land, and here he is extensi\'ely engaged in 
farming and stock-raising. 

In 1 87 1 Susan Wilson became the bride 
of ]\Ir. Warrell. She was born near Ed- 
wardsville, Madison county, Illinois, and is 
a daughter of William and Agnes Wilson, 
both natives of Scotland. The father has 
passed to his final rest, but the mother is 
still living and now makes her home with 
our subject. Unto this worthy couple were 
born six children, four of whom are living, 
namely : James, Susan, William and Peter. 
Eight children, five sons and three daugh- 
ters, have been born unto the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Warrell, — John W., James Ed- 
ward, Mrs. Flora Ellen Calhoun, Isaac C, 
iNIaggie Ann, Edith Belle, Frank and Albert 
Grover. The Democracy receives Mr. War- 
rell's hearty support and co-operation, and 
socially he is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. 



\MLLIAM VOLKLAND. 

As a representative of that class of sub- 
stantial builders i:if a great commonwealth 
who served faithfully and long in the enter- 
prising west, we present the subject of this 
sketch, who is a pioneer of central Kan- 
sas and who has nobly done his duty in 
establishing and maintaining the material 
interests, legal status and moral welfare of 
his communitv. Whatever tends to benefit 



his state and promote the welfare of his 
community is sure to elicit his interest and 
co-operation, and thus his name is insepar- 
ably interwoven with the history of Rice 
county during the past twenty-three years. 

Mr. Volkland was born in Fond du Lac, 
Wisconsin, September 27, 1864, a son of 
William Volkland, who was born in We'i- 
mar, Germany, where he was reared and 
educated. There he learned the carpenter's 
trade and for one year he served in the Ger- 
man army. In 1848 he came to the United 
States and was here married to Pauline 
Roehr, who also was a native of Weimar, 
Germany. For a number of years the father 
engaged in contracting and building in 
Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, and afterward 
came to Rice county, being identified with 
the agricultural interests of Farmer town- 
ship until his death, which occurred in 1888, 
when he was sixty-three years of age. He 
was honored and respected for his integrity 
and upright life and to his family he left 
the priceless heritage of an untarnished 
name. His widow still resides in Farmer 
township. In his political views he was a 
Republican, unswerving in his advocacv of 
the principles of the party, and in religious 
belief he was a Methodist, his wife being 
also a member of the same church. Thev 
had seven children, and those living are: 
Mrs. Ottilia Stehwien. of Bushton ; Will- 
iam ; and Albert, postmaster of Bushton and 
the partner of William in the hardware busi- 
ness. He is one of the well known and lead- 
ing business men of the tnwu. He was born 
in Fond du Lac, Wiscun^ni. I'cliruary i^, 
1867, and acquired hi-; educilidii there and 
in Kansas. He married Matilda Korf, of 
Bushton, who was born in Illinois, a daugh- 
ter of Frederick Korf, deceased. Her 
mother, however, is still living. Unto Al- 
bert Volkland and his wife have been born 
four children: Nettie A. P., Otto F. \\'., 
Oscar and Mabel. In his political views the 
father is a Republican and in religious faith 
is identified wth the IMethodist church. His 
prominence in business circles in Bushton is 
widely acknowledged and in his life he ex- 
emplifies the enterprising spirit of the west. 

William Volkland, whose name intro- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



duces this review, spent his youth in his na- 
tive state, and by improving the educational 
advantages afforded by the piiblic schools 
there lie became a well informed man, well 
fitted for the practical and responsible du- 
ties of life. In 1878 he accompanied his 
parents to central Kansas and here became 
familiar with fami work through actual ex- 
perience in the labors of field and meadow 
upon his father's farm. In 1888 he became 
a factor in the business interests of Bushton 
by establishing a hardware store, which he 
still condiicts in connection with his brother 
Albert. They have a fine store, occupying 
a building twenty-four by ninety feet. Their 
stock is extensi\'e. cniljracing a large line of 
heavy and shelf hardware, and their patron- 
age is continually increasing, owing to their 
relialile business methods, their earnest ef- 
forts to please their patrons and the moder- 
ate prices which they ask for their goods, 
desiring only to make a fair and legitJmate 
profit. 

Mr. Volkland is also president of the 
Bushton State Bank, one of the solid finan- 
cial ^n^titutions of this part of the state, 
designated as the county depository of Rice 
county. A fine bank building has recently 
been erected, twenty-four b^r forty-eight 
feet. It is suitably and tastefully furnished 
and ever>i:hing is in excellent condition for 
carrying on the enterprise. They conduct 
a general banking liusiness, l^uy and sell ex- 
change, pay interest on dep isits and, in fact, 
conduct a banking Inisiness which is profit- 
able and worthv ( f patmnage. The officers 
are popular and relinlile Inisiness men, name- 
ly : William. Volkland, president; William 
Schmidt, vice-jjresident : George F. Hauser, 
cashier; and Heorge Cramm, Frank Shon- 
yo, A\"il!iam Schmidt and William Volkland, 
directors. 

When twenty-five years of aee Mr. \"nlk- 
land was married to Miss Sophia Roehr, of 
Buslitiai, a daughter of Fred Roehr, de- 
ceased. They now ha\e six children, two 
sons and four daughters ; Ella Viola ; Will- 
iam F., Maud G., Florence, Pauline Selma 
and Paul Albert. Mr. Volkland exercises 
his right of franchise in support of the men 
and measures of the Republican party and 



labors earnestly and eft'ectively in its behalf, 
but he is not a politician in the sense of 
office seeking. He and his wife hold mem- 
bership in the IMethodist Episcopal church 
and he is filling the position of trustee of the 
church. For thirteen years he has been 
closely identified with the history of Bush- 
ton as a representative of most important 
business interests. He Is a man of keen dis- 
crimination and sound judgment, and his 
executive ability and excellent management 
have brought to the concerns with which he 
is connected a large degree of success. 



HOX. TOHN DAY, 



Since early pioneer days Jolm Day has 
resided in Kingman county, the year of his 
arrival being 1878, and through many years 
has watched with interest the progress and 
advancement of this section of the common- 
wealth. He has ever borne his part in the 
work of improvement as a loyal citizen and 
as one whose public spirit has been manifest 
in his active co-operation with many meas- 
ures that have contributed to the public 
good. He was born near Bluffton, in Wells 
county, Indiana, on the 29th of September. 
1849. The family trace their ancestry 
through many generations to Englanrl. to 
two brothers who came from that country 
to the United States prior the Revohuion- 
ary war. They were silk merchants in their 
native land. Wilbur Day, the father of our 
subject, was born in North Carolina, and 
was there reared and married. Miss ]Mar- 
garet Sale becomiing his wife. She was 
also a native of Xorth Carolina, and both 
she and her husband were members of prom- 
inent old southern families of that state. 
After their marriage, in 1841, they located 
near Bluffton, in Wells county, Indiana, 
where they were among the pioneer settlers, 
and there they made their home for the fol- 
lowing eight years, on the expiration of 
which period, in 1853, they took up their 
abode in Jasper county, that state. There 
they were also among the earlv pioneers, 
and during their residence on the western 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



frontier they suffered all the privations and 
hardships known only to the settlers of a 
new antl unsettled country. Unto this 
worthy couple were born fourteen children, 
seven sons and seven daughters, namely: 
Lewis, who died at Nashville, Tennessee, in 
1864, while serving as a soldier in the Civil 
war; William, who was a soldier during the 
Civil war, and is now a resident of Indiana; 
Amanda; John, the subject of this review; 
George; Alartha; Jesse, deceased; Louisa; 
Lizzie, deceased; Charles; and four who 
died wdien young. The father of this family 
passed away in death in Jasper county, In- 
diana, on the 4th of March, 1892, at the age 
of seventy-two years. He followed the till- 
ing of the soil throughout his entire business 
career, and in all life's relations he was ever 
found true and faithful to duty. His wife 
has reached the ripe old age of seventy-nine 
years. She is a. member of the Christian 
church, as was also her husband. 

John Day, of this review, was reared to 
manhood on an Indiana farm, both in Wells 
and Jasper counties and in addition to at- 
tending the common schools of his locality 
he was also a student in the Battle Ground 
Academy, where he enjoyed superior educa- 
tional advantages. After putting aside his 
school books to take up the active duties of 
life on his own account he chose as a life 
occupation that to which he had been 
reared, namely, farming, which vocation he 
follo'wed in his native state until 1878. In 
that year he came to Kansas, Irrst securing a 
tract of Osage Indian land and for a num- 
ber of years after coming to this state the 
family resided in a sod house. As prosperity 
attended his efforts he has added to his land- 
ed possessions until he is now the owner oi 
eight hundred and eighty acres of excellent 
and well improved land, on which he has 
erected a large and comfortable dwelling, 
barns and other outbuildings, and has now 
one of the finest homesteads in this part of 
the county. 

In Rensselaer. Jasper county, Indiana, 
on the 4th of March, 1873, '^'^'^s celebrated 
the marriage o-f Mr. Day and Miss Mary 
Ann Burns, who was born in Jasper coun- 
ty, Indiana, July 30, 1849, '"id '^'^'^s reared 



and educated in the Hoosier state. Her pa- 
ternal grandparents were James and Delilah 
(Barnes) Burns, and the former was a sol- 
dier in the war of 1812. Her father, Will- 
iam Burns, was born in Champaign county, 
■Ohio, and was there reared until eighteen 
years of age, when he removed to White 
county, Indiana. He was there married to 
Susanna Barnes, a native of Virginia, and a 
daughter of James and Elizabeth (Rigor) 
Barnes, natives also of the Old' Dominion. 
The father served as judge of the courts in 
Indiana, and was a very prominent man in 
.his locality. Mr. and Mrs. William Burns 
became early pioneers of Jasper county, In- 
diana, and at that time only four families 
resided within the boundaries of the county 
and Indians were still very numerous. They 
became the parents of ten children, eight of 
wdiom grew to years of maturity, namely : 
James I., deceased; Francis Marion, who 
served as a soldier during the Civil war, and 
who died in a hospital at Nashville, aged 
twenty-two years; John M., who died at the 
age of twenty-one years: Vilena, also de- 
ceased; Mary A., the wife of our subject; 
James M., wlio resides on the old home farm 
in Indiana; Margaret, now Mrs. J. W. 
Groom; William, who resides with his 
brother on the Indiana farm. The father of 
this family died at the comparatively early 
age of forty-nine years, his death resulting 
from exposure. He was a Republican in his 
political views, and was a progressive and 
public-spirited citizen. His wife survived 
until sixty-eight years of age, when she 
joined her husband in the home beyond, 
both dying in the faith of the Christian 
church. The union of our subject and wife 
has been blessed with twoi sons, the eldest of 
whom, Ernest F., is a popular and success- 
ful physician of Arkansas City, Kansas. He 
is a graduate nf the Medical University of 
Kansas City, a member of the class of 1900, 
which was the largest ever graduated from 
that institution. The youngest son, E\- 
i art C, is now twenty-one years of age. 
i and is a resident O'f Oklalu mia. He married 
j Lettie Hobson. of Kingman count\-, and a 
! daughter of Newton Hobson. Mrs. Day is 
a member of the Christian church. Mr. Dav, 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



of this review, gives his poHtical support to 
the Populist party, and on its ticket he was 
elected to represent his district in the legis- 
lature of 1 89 1, discharging the duties en- 
trusted to his care in a manner highly satis- 
factory to all concerned. He has, however, 
never sought or desired public honors, pre- 
ferring to give his undivided time to his 
business interests. 



ALEXANDER M. SWIT2ER. 

Alexander M. Switzer, a prominent 
farmer, stockman and fruit-grower of Reno 
county, was born in Tuscarawas county, 
Ohio. March 7, 1849, ^ son of John and 
Elizabeth (Anderson) Switzer. The father 
was a native of Switzerland but when only 
hve years of age he accompanied his parents 
on their removal to the United States, the 
family locating in Ohio, where he spent the 
remainder of his life. He engaged in the 
tilling of the soil as a life occupation, and as 
a supporter of Republican principles he took 
an active part in the public affairs of his lo- 
cality, having served for many years as a 
county commissioner and as a trustee. His 
death occurred when he had reached the age 
of seventy-six years. His wife was a native 
of the Emerald Isle, but she was' brought to 
the United States in childhood, also locat- 
ing in Ohio. She passed away at the age of 
sixty years. Unto this worthy couple were 
born seven children, four of whom grew to 
years of maturity, and three of the number, 
Robert, Eliza and Thomas, remained in the 
Buckeye state. The last named owns the 
old family homestead in that commonwealtli. 

Alexander M. Switzer, whose name in- 
troduces this review, was reared to manhood 
in the place of his nativity, and in the dis- 
trict schools of the neighborhood he received 
his educational advantages. In 1864, when 
but fifteen years of age, he enlisted in the 
one-hundred-day service as a substitute for 
his father, becoming a member of Company 
D, One Hundred and Sixty-first Ohio Na- 



tional Guards. During his military career 
he served four months in the Shenandoah 
valley, under Hunter, Sigel and Sheridan, 
and on the expiration of his term of enlist- 
ment he re-enlisted in Company A, One 
Hundred and Eighty-fifth Volunteers. Go- 
ing with his command to Kentucky, he was 
engaged in guarding Cumberland Gap and 
in suppressing guerrillas. During their first 
campaign in the Shenandoah valley the regi- 
ment started out complete, but they returned 
with only about one hundred men. Mr. 
Switzer still has in his possession a treas- 
ured memento of President Lincoln in the 
form of an autographic letter which was 
presented to each of the one hundred sur- 
vivors of his regiment as a personal recog- 
nition of their gallant service. 

After the close of hostilities Mr. Switzer 
received an honorable discharge at Camp 
Chase, Columbus, and returned to his home 
with a most creditable military record. In 
March, 1866, in Ohio, he was married to 
Jennie Knee, and in the following Septem- 
ber he removed to Champaign county. Illi- 
nois, where he was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits for the following five years. In the 
spring of 1872, with his wife and two sons, 
he came with a team and wagon to Reno 
county, Kansas. Tlie family left their Illi- 
nois home in March, and in the following- 
April they arrived in the Sunflower state. 
Their first residence here was a combination 
of a sod house and a dug-init, Iccated in a 
rather low spot and excavated to a depth of 
about two feet. During the first heavy rain 
the house was flooded and everything within 
was set afloat, and they were thus compelled 
to move to higher ground. Mr. Switzer ac- 
cordingly erected a small box house, eight 
by twelve feet, which was their place of 
abode during that season, and although it 
was only partial!)- enclosed it proved a com- 
fortable residence during the pleasant sun-i- 
mer weather. In the following fall a snug- 
little box house, ten by twelve feet, was 
erected, which at that time was the finest 
residence in the neighborhood. In that early 
day game was plentiful and buffaloes could 
be secured by going only a short distance 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



from their home. There were no clearly 
defined roads across the prairie from one 
town or settlement to another at that time, 
and to mark the way ]\Ir. Switzer during the 
first year of his residence here plowed a fur- 
row nine miles across the prairie to Castle- 
ton. By arduous labor he soon succeeded in [ 
placing about ten acres of the place under 
cultivation, which he planted. with corn, and ! 
in order to secure money he was alsQ obliged 
to break sod for his neighbors. He was one 
of the first in this section of the state to en- 
gage in the fruit and nursery business, hav- 
ing as early as 1876 about forty acres of 
his farm devoted to that purpose, and for 
some years he made that line of work a spe- 
cialty, raising all kinds of the larger fruits, 
but during the past few years he has devoted 
his attention to the raising of small fruits, 
principally grapes and strawl^erries. He 
supplies the Hutchinson market with the 
choicest fruits, and in this enterprise he fur- 
nishes employment to many young people 
during the fruit season. 

There are few men better known in Reno 
and adjoining counties than Alexander 
Switzer. for during his entire residence in 
the Sunflower state he has been actively and 
prominently identified with the affairs of his 
township, county and state. He has served 
in all of the township ofiices, was the first 
overseer of highways of his township, and 
from 1879 until 1885 was an efficient county 
commissioner. Upon his retirement from 
that position he was presented with a beau- 
tiful gold watch by the citizens of Reno 
county, as a recognition of the efficiency 
with which he had discharged the duties de- 
volving upon him while in that office. He 
was a member of the town board when the 
present bridge across the Arkansas river 
was built at this point, and it was largely 
through his persistent efforts, in the face of 
much opposition and adverse criticism, that 
it was built at that time, but those who were 
among the most bitter adversaries now ad- 
mit that the undertaking was a profitable 
one. In 1896 he received the Republican 
nomination for the thirty-sixth senatorial 
district, but with tlft rest of the ticket was 



defeated. No citizen of Reno county has 
rendered more faithful or efficient ser\-ice to 
his party than Mr. Switzer, and he is widely 
recognized as a Republican leader who has 
labored earnestly for its success. He was 
one of the organizers and for many years 
president of the Reno Cnunty Horticultural 
Association, and was al-i > i;e > 1 the prin- 
cipal organizers and the \\\->\ ]ire-ident of the 
Farmers" Institute. He holds memliership 
relations with Joe Hooker Post, Xo. 17, G. 
A. R., with the Court of Honor and with 
the Sons and Daughters of Justice. He is 
also a member of Reno Lodge, No. 140, 
A. F. & A. ]\I. ; Reno Chapter, No. 34; 
Hutchinson Council, Xo. 13 : and Reno Com- 
mantlery, Xo. 2h. K. T., and is also a Scot- 
tish-Rite ]\Iason and a member of the Shrine 
and Eastern Star. He has lieen a ccjnimand- 
ing officer in all of these bodies with the ex- 
ception of the Scottish Rite, and has attend- 
ed the Knights Templar conventions for the 
past fifteen years. His religious preference 
is indicated liy his membership in the 
Alethodist Episcopal church. He was one 
of the organizers of the Elmer Sunday- 
school and for fifteen years was its efficient 
superintendent, while for one year he was 
president of the County Sunday-school As- 
sociation. 

Mrs. Switzer passed away in death on 
the 1 8th of January, 1885, leaving two sons, 
Lawrence P., of Pueblo, Colorado; and 
Percy E., a resident of Oklahoma. On the 
30th of January, 1886, our suljject married 
Annie Ingham, a daughter of "\\'illiam and 
Sarali Ingham. She was born in Massa- 
chusetts, but in childhood she came with 
her parents to Kansas. She was reared near 
Topeka and experienced all the horrors of 
the border trouliles. Tliis union has been 
blessed with two children, Gladys and Ethel. 
Mr. Switzer is a man of strong mentality, 
keen discernment, great tact and resolute 
purpose, and is therefore well fitted for the 
political honors which have been conferred 
upon him. He is ever a generous friend and 
warm advocate of those who are battling 
for the right and of principles and policies 
for the public good. 



!04 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



HUTTOX & OSWALD. 

Tlie held of business is limitless and op- 
portunity is only hampered by the inability 
or negligence of the individual. The man 
who is energetic, determined, honest and 
persevering can always win success and it is 
such qualities that have placed the firm of 
Hutton & Oswald in their present enviable 
position. They are proprietors of a laundry 
business which was conducted by ten com- 
panies or individuals before they took hold 
of it, — this being between the years 1886 
and 1 89 1, but when these gentlemen assumed 
the management there was straightway a 
change in the outlook. They determined to 
succeed, went about getting patrons in a 
business-like way that inspired confidence 
and retained their trade through the excel- 
lence of their workmanship, their prompt- 
ness and reliability. The story seems simple 
but in it lies the secret of enviable success. 

The proprietors are Emmett Hutton and 
Charley W. Oswald and the enterprise is 
known as the American Steam Laundry of 
Hutchinson. They began business here 
April 20, 1 89 1, in a small building, twenty- 
five by seventy feet, and started as successors 
to ten dilTerent parties who had previously 
made a failure of the work. They combined 
the plants of the American Steam Laundry 
and the Hutchinson Steam Laundry. The 
plant had been shut down for three or four 
months, but Mr. Hutton took a mortgage on 
it and began business in connection with 
Willis Brothers. Six months later he and 
Mr. Oswald bought the plant, and from the 
start both gentlemen gave their entire time 
and attention to the business. It was not 
long before they needed more space and 
doubled the capacity within the first three 
years, renting the room on the east. It was 
about two years later when they took an up- 
stairs floor of the same size, giving theni 
three times' the space they first had, but still 
their business grew, demanding more com- 
modious cjuarters, until now their plant occu- 
pies ten times the original space in which 
they began business. In January, 1898, they 
purchased the building in which they are lo- 



cated and by building a large addition in the 
rear have more than doubled their space. 
They first employed four hands, now they 
have an average force of seventy-five em- 
ployes and on rush occasions increase the 
number by ten. They have the reputation 
of payiilg the help better salaries than are 
elsewhere given in the same line of business 
and thus they are enabled to retain their em- 
ployes, some of whom have been with them 
for nine years, while the majority have been 
continuously in their service for five years. 
Both Mr. Hutton and Mr. Oswald have 
given Iheir entire attention to the business 
and their close application has been an im- 
portant factor in their prosperity. They 
have often worked at midnight and some- 
times later, so that their business has ne\er 
got the start of them and they never disap- 
point customers by not having the work 
ready at the time promised. Now they 
make it a point to close the laundry at six 
o'clock, employing a sufficient number to 
make this possible and the majority of the 
time the work of the day is over at the time 
designated. 

From the first they sought trade in the 
surrounding towns and this has grown until 
it is now limited only by express charges. 
They are in receipt of applications almost 
daily for agencies at different points and 
their business reaches as far east as Herring- 
ton and equal distances to the north, south 
and west. In fact it extends into Oklahoma 
and Texas and they are now doing business 
in one hundred towns outside of Hutchin- 
son. They have gained their reputation 
solely on the excellence of the work. In 
their building they have a concrete floor 
twenty-five by one hundred and forty-five 
feet. The building is also specially lighted 
and ventilated. Condensed steam is used 
and no colored goods are washed in anything 
but distilled water ; steam, water, light and 
power come from the Hutchinson W'ater, 
Light & Power Compau}^, and throughout 
Kansas there is no more flourishing laundry 
business than that conducted by the enter- 
prising firm of Hutton & Oswald. To such 
a degree has success attended their enter- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



105 



prise that they have not found it necessary 
to continue all of their capital in the busi- 
ness, but have made judicious investments 
in farm property, .which is well improved and 
now contributes not a little to their income. 



JACOB A. YOUNG. 

The fine farm of three hundred and 
twenty acres on sections 14 and 23, Roscoe 
township, owned by Jacob A. Young is the 
visible evidence of his well spent and useful 
life. His property has all been acquired 
through his own efforts : Industr)- and per- 
severance have fo'fmed tlio fnuiidalion stones 
upon which he has reared the superstructure 
of his success. He is a native son of Penn- 
sylvania, his birth having occurred in Mif- 
Hin count}^, that state, February 4, 1845, 
his parents being John and Harriet (Rudy) 
Young, both of whom were natives of Penn- 
sylvania. The family removed from Penn- 
sylvania to Cedar county, Iowa, in 1864, 
and from Iowa to Kingman county, Kan- 
sas, being among the early settlers there. 
The father pre-empted a claini and through 
his remaining days resided thereon, devot- 
ing his energies to the development and 
cultivation of his farm. His wife died on 
the same farm in 1898, at the age of sixty- 
nine years. In their family were thirteen 
children, ten of whom are living: Jacob 
A. ; Daniel J., a fanner of Roscoe township, 
Reno county; Xoali, of Oklahoma Terri- 
tory; Adam, of Hutchinson; John, a resi- 
dent of Lincoln township, Reno county; 
]\Irs. Amanda Knight; James, of Okla- 
homa; Ella, the wife of Grant Lee; Mrs. Ab- 
bie Brady, of Kingman county; and Alli- 
son, a resident of Pretty Prairie, Kansas. 
Those deceased are: Lewis and Elizabeth, 
who died after reaching mature years; and 
one who died in infancy. 

In his parents' home Jacob A. Young 
spent his boyhood days, and when only 
seventeen years of age he enlisted as a de- 
fender of the L'nion, becoming a member of 
Company I, Twelfth Pennsylvania Reserv^es 
of McCall's Division, which went with Mc- 
Clellan's command into the Peninsular 
7 



campaign. After the seven days' engage- 
ment at Richmond the Union troops fell 
back to the James river, wdiere Mr. Young 
was taken sick, and cfter some time spent 
in the hospitals at Fortress Monroe and 
HaraptO'n Roads he was discharged, in Xcj- 
vemiber, 1862. Not content to thus end his 
military service, he re-enlisted, in February, 
1864, as a member of Company B, One 
Hundred and Forty-seventh Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, and was transferred to 
the Army of the Tennessee, going to Bridge- 
port, Alabama, where he joined Sherman on 
the march to the sea. When that was accom- 
plished, showing that the strength of the 
confederacy had lieen darwn from the inte- 
rior to protect the borders, he proceeded with 
his command to Raleigh, North Carolina, 
then on to Washington, wdiere he partici- 
pated in the grand review, the most cele- 
brated military pageant which the continent 
has witnessed. In July, 1865, be returned 
to his home, having received an honorable 
discharge. 

After the war Mr. Young remained in 
Pennsylvania until February, 1866, when 
he joined the family in Iowa, where he 
worked on his father's farm for a year and 
then rented land in order to engage in farm- 
ing on his own account. He resided in Iowa 
until February, 1874, when with his wife 
and two children he came by team to Kan- 
sas, accompanied by two other families, that 
of George Fisher and of S. M. Hegarty, the 
latter a cousin of Mrs. Young. Reaching 
Reno county he stopped the first season in 
Allii^n i>i\\i;ship, where Alexander He- 
garty. ,1 c-UMu uf S. M., had settled in 1873. 
He raised one crop here and in the spring 
of 1875 came to his claim, constituting his 
present homestead. He secured one hun- 
dred and sixty acres on section 23, Roscoe 
township, and a timber claim, constitutiTig 
the southwest quarter of section 14. He 
lost all of his crop of 1874 on account of the 
grashopper scourage, and like many of the 
other pioneers in the winter of 1874 and 
1875 he had to resort to any available means 
of earning a livelihood. He joined what 
was known as the "horse brigade," engaged 
in freighting to the distant, markets of 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



Hutchinson and Wichita. In tlie fall of 
1874 he had gone to the mill in Sterling, 
then called Peace, driving his team, and 
during his absence his stacks were struck by 
lightning, causing his stable to burn, also 
his cows, hay and grain, his team being for- 
tunately saved on account of the trip he was 
making. He then built a new stable, but 
within two weeks it was destroyed by 
another fire. In the year 1875 Mr. Young 
again made a start and from that time on 
has been more fortunate. He is now en- 
gaged in general farming and stock-raising 
and keeps from fifty to seventy head oi 
cattle. He makes quite a specialty of dairy- 
ing, milking from fifteen to twenty cows, 
and this branch of his business adds mate- 
rially to his income. 

On the 20th of October, 1870, Mr. 
Young was united in marriage to Miss 
Sarah E. Hegarty, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania and a daughter of S. K. and Rebecca 
(Lanborn) Hegarty, who were also born in 
the Keystone state. Unto our subject anil 
his wife have been born nine children : 
Samuel E., a farmer of Roscoe township: 
Albert D., an agriculturist of the same town- 
ship; Paul J., at home; Rebecca A., the wife 
of E. P. Young, a teacher of Roscoe town- 
ship; Rosa, Delia, Pearl, Elizabeth and 
Helen, all yet with their parents. The mem- 
bers of the famih' belong to the United Pres- 
byterian church and in its work take an act- 
ive part, while Albert D. is very prominent 
in temperance work. In politics Mr. Young 
is an ardent Republican and a member of the 
Republican executive committee, while to 
various local and state conventions he has 
been sent as delegate. He has been es- 
pecially prominent in local affairs and has 
filled nearly all of the township offices, in- 
cluding those of trustee, treasurer and clerk, 
at the present time acting as treasurer. He 
has also been a leader in the work of secur- 
ing good schools and his service on the 
school board has been very effective. His 
name is on the membership roll of the OcTd 
Fellows lodge in Pretty Prairie and his 
brethren of the order have honored him with 
various offices. Both he and his wife belong 
to the order of Rebekahs, of which she is 



past grand. He is also identified with Joe 
Hooker Post, No. 17, G. A. R. He is a 
good citizen and gives hearty co-operation 
to every movement for the general good. 
Christian, educational, social and material 
interests have been promoted through his 
eft'orts, and while the county has benefited 
by his labors he has also won for his family 
a comfortable competence and well deserves 
the proud American title of "a self-made 



A. L. SPOXSLER. 



The name of this gentleman is one which 
stands consjjicuously forth on the pages of 
Kansas' political history. He has been an 
active factor in shaping the affairs of the 
government in the west, and is widely recog- 
nized as a Republican leader who has la- J 
bored earnestly for the success of the party I 
and yet has ne\'er placed partisanship before • 
citizenship or self-aggrandizement before 
the national good. Close study has given 
him a keen insight into the important polit- 
ical problems, and his interest in the issues 
of the day that affect the state or national 
weal or woe has ever been of the highest. 

The Sponsler family are of Pennsyl- 
vania-Dutch extraction, and according to 
well founded tradition the first of the name 
to come to the new world was a captain in 
the French army, who came to America 
during the French and Indian war. After 
hostilities had ceased he located in Phila- 
delphia, from which place the Sponsler fam- 
ily in America dates its origin, but in after 
years they spread over the colonies as farm- 
ers, merchants and mechanics. The pater- 
nal grandfather of our subject was Lewis 
Sponsler, who resided in Perry county, 
Pennsylvania, where he was employed in a 
factory, and there his death occurred at an 
early age. Lewis Sponsler, the father of our 
subject, was born in that county, October 
3. 1825, and was there reared to manhood 
and learned the wagon-maker's trade, which 
he followed for a number of ^-ears in Cum- 
berland county. Pennsylvania. In 1849 h^ 
was united in marriage to ]\Iaria ^^'olfe, 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



who was born in Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania, in September, 1827, a daughter of 
Christian and Sarah (Stoner) Wolfe. On 
both the paternal and maternal sides Mrs. 
Sponsler was descended from German an- 
cestry, and her grandfather, Henry Wolfe, 
was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. 

In, 1856 Lewis Sponsler removed wirii 
his wife and four children to Keithsburg, 
Mercer county, Illinois, where for four years 
he was engaged at the carpenter's trade, and 
on the expiration of that period he pur- 
chased a farm seven miles east of that city, 
which he continued 'to operate until 1881. 
In that year he retired from the active work 
of the farm and located in Aledo, Mercer 
county, where he spent the remainder of his 
life, passing away in death on the 4th of 
April, 1893. Throughout his entire life he 
never courted notoriety or sought the honors 
of public office, preferring to devote his 
energies to his business, his church and to 
the ad\-ancement of the principles of Repub- 
licanism. For many years he was a leading 
member of the Presbyterian church, and was 
ever active and earnest in its support. Al- 
though his educational opportunities during 
his youth were limited, in later years he be- 
came a great reader and acquired a most re- 
markable knowledge of Biblical, ancient and 
modern history. He is still survived by his 
widow, who makes her home in Aledo, hav- 
ing reached the seventy-fourth milestone on 
the journey of life. The union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Spousler was blessed with seven chil- 
dren : William J., who came to Reno coun- 
ty. Kansas, in 1S74. and is now a prom- 
inent farmer and sti-ck-raiser of Reno town- 
ship; Sarah, the wife of W. D. Reynolds, 
of Morton Mills, Iowa, where he is engaged 
in the breeding of Angus cattle ; George W., 
who is also a farmer and breeder of Angus 
cattle and resides in Mercer county, Illi- 
nois: Alice M., who makes her home with 
her mother in Aledo, Illinois : A. L., the sub- 
ject of this review; Anna, the wife of L. 
Mc\Mif rter, who ranks among the foremost 
breeders of pure Angus cattle in the United 
States, having held the ofiice of president of 
the National Association of Angus Breed- 
ers in 1900, and his home is in Aledo; and 



John L., who was formerly engaged with 
his brother A. L. in the newspaper business 
in Hutchinson, but is now a journalist of 
Lawton, Oklahoma. 

A. L. Sponsler, whose name introduces 
this review, was born in Mercer county, 
Illinois, April 30, i860, and during his 
youth he was a student in the district schools 
of his neighborhood. Afterward he com- 
pleted the course in Knox Academy, at 
Galesburg, Illinois, after which he entered 
Knox College, of the same city, but left 
that institution after attaining the sopho- 
more year to engage in the study of law in 
the office of John C. Pepper of Aledo, be- 
ing then in his twenty-third year. He re- 
mained with his preceptor for two years, 
and was then, in Alay, 1885. admitted to the 
bar by the supreme court after a written 
examination. This event, memorable to 
him in itself was made doubly so by the fact 
that it occurred the day after John A. Logan, 
whose election he was advocating, was elect- 
ed to the United States senate for the last 
time and after one of the most memoralile 
contests of the kind that has ever occurred 
in the L^nited States. Immediately after his 
admission to the bar Mr. Sponsler beg^an the 
practice of his chosen profession in Aledo. 
under the firm name of Pepper & Sponsler. 
which relationship was maintained until 
1887, wdren he came to the Sunflower state, 
locating in Arlington, Reno county, with 
the intention of practicing law, but with the 
"Lost Heads," who were assembling in Kan- 
sas at that time to pursue a real-estate specu- 
lation, began booming Kansas town prop- 
erty to an extent never before or since re- 
corded. To such an extent did he partici- 
pate in this business that he found no con- 
venient opportunity for following his chosen 
profession, and it required two' or three 
years after its abandonment to settle tlie 
affairs of his partnership. 

In 1888 Mr. Sponsler made a remark- 
able race for the position of state senator, 
the convention meeting at Pratt, and after 
balloting for three days it adjourned to meet 
in Turon, Reno county, wdiere it was also in 
session for about three days, but during this 
time our subject was called to Illinois by 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTOR] 



the sickness of his wife, and the convention, 
finding it impossible to arrive at a conclu- 
sion, adj(_)urned sine die. The next con- 
vention met in August, in Turon, and was 
composed of one delegate from' each voting 
precinct of the counties of Reno, Pratt and 
Kingman. After several hundred ballots 
had been cast, in which Mr. Sponsler came 
within one vote several times and at one time 
within a half a vote of gaining the nomina- 
tion, he withdrew his name from further 
C'jnsideration, believing then that his nomi- 
natii-in was impossible, and Hon. Frank E. 
Gillett, of Kingman, was nominated. In the 
meantime Mr. Sponsler had also become in- 
terested in two newspapers, and in the fall 
of 1889 he removed to Hutchinson, where, 
in company with his brother John L., he be- 
gan publishing the Hutchinson Times, and 
m the following year the Times and Repub- 
lican were c^ns. 'lidated. The brothers con- 
tnuied its pulilicatii in until 1891, when they 
purchased the Hutchinson Daily News, in- 
cluding the job offices and book bindeiy, 
and thus they were engaged until 1895, 
when they sold their interests to W. Y. Mor- 
gan, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in 
this volume. After retiring from journal- 
istic work the brothers engaged in the grain 
business, buying and cribbing corn in vari- 
ous tciwns in this section of the state, in 
which the\- continued for three years, their 
business having been carried on under the 
firm name of E. L. Wolff & Company. They 
were then engaged in various other enter- 
prises until the year 1899, when our subject 
purchased hi^ present farm of four hundred 
and fifty acres and engaged in the breeding 
of registered short-horn cattle. At the time 
of the purchase the farm was raw prairie 
land, but he has since placed his fields under 
cultivation, has erected a good residence and 
has built substantial barns and fences. The 
farm is devoted to the raising of grass with 
'the exception of 'one hundred and seventy 
acres, and he is now recognized as one of 
the leading breeders of registered short-horn 
cattle in the locality. 

During all these years Mr. Sponsler has 
been actively engaged in promoting a num- 
ber of measures for the public advancement. 



It was through his efforts in 1892 that the 
Republican state convention was secured for 
Hutchinson, which was the first time it had 
ever been held as far west. During the pre- 
vious winter by his tireless activity he had 
succeeded in organizing the Hutchinson 
Commercial Club, and when the convention 
was secured for this city it was found that 
no building in Hutchison was large enough 
to meet its requirements. , Then it was that 
the Commercial Club and other citizens 
erected the Auditorium. When Chester I. 
Long was nominated against Jerry Simp- 
son for congress in 1892 there was no one 
man who spent more time and money in the 
support of Mr. Long than Mr. Sponsler. He 
was chairman of the Reno county delega- 
tion to the state convention which met at 
Topeka in 1894, when the vote of Reno 
county nominated Governor IMorrill, was 
a delegate to the National Editors' Associa- 
tion at Asbury Park, New Jersey, in 1893, 
and was a delegate to the Trans-Mississippi 
Congress in 1894. He has been in every 
session of the Kansas Legislature since 1889 
as an observer and student of affairs. He 
! was one of the chief organizers of the Cen- 
tral Kansas Fair Association, which was or- 
ganized in 1 90 1, and of which he is now 
president, and was also one of the original 
promoters of the- Kansas Day Club. 

On the 27th of September, 1887, at the 
home of the bride in Aledo, Illinois, Mr. 
Sponsler was united in marriage to Minnie 
P. Bentley, who was born in the vicinity of 
that city on the 5th of September, 1862, a 
daughter of James L. and Nancy (Smith) 
Bentley, the former a native of Ohio and the 
latter of Aledb, Illinois. About 1855, when 
a ^-oung man, the father removed from the 
Buckeye state to Mercer county, Illinois, 
where he was engaged in teaching in the 
public schools and farming, and was very 
successful in both lines of labor. On both 
the paternal and maternal sides Mrs. Spons- 
ler IS of Scotch and English ancestry, and 
the family located in America in a very early 
day. ]\Irs. Sponsler is active in Women's 
Club affairs and served as president of the 
Women's Club of the city of Hutchinson 
for the }'ear 1899 and 1900. In his social 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



relations ^Ir. Sponsler is eligible to member- 
ship in the following orders, — Ancient Or- 
der of United Workmen, the Woodmen and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
is and always has been most liberal in sup- 
porting and promioting all measures for the 
public good, has always kept fully abreast 
of the times, and his large and well selected 
library contains only the most substantial 
works, in which history, both ancient and 
modern, has a prominent place. He is a 
man of strong mentality, keen discernment, 
great tact and resolute purpose. He com- 
mands the respect of his fellow men by his 
sterling worth, and Kansas numbers him 
among her honored residents. 



T. W. CLARKE. 



J. W. Clarke is the county attorney of 
Barton county and has attained a distin- 
guished position in connection with his pro- 
fession, whicli! stand!s as ):he conservator of 
human rights and justice. His prominence 
is based upon a thorough knowledge of the 
principles of jurisprudence and of accuracy 
in the application of them to the points in 
litigation. Earnest and discriminating in 
his preparation of cases, a strong pleader 
before court and jury, he has won the favor- 
able con:mendation of the public and the 
complete confidence and high regard of his 
pr.fessional brethren. 

Mr. Clarke was born in Liberty. Tennes- 
see, en the 22dof December, 1852. His fa- 
ther, Robert L. Clarke, was also a native of 
that state and a farmer by occupation. He 
learned and hks followed the carpenter's 
trade and yet makes his home in Liberty. 
On the old homestead farm there the sub- 
ject of this review was reared and in the dis- 
trict schools of the neighborhood he acquired 
his preliminary education, which was sup- 
plemented by a course in the Cumberland 
University. He was graduated in the law 
department of that institution with the class 
of 1879, ^'"id thus prepared for his chosen 
profession he at once began practice in 
Smithville, where he secured a good patron- 
age. However, he became interested in the 



great west, and having a desire to visit the 
country and see if its opportunities were 
such as represented, he came to central Kan- 
sas in 1884 in company with his two broth- 
ers-in-law. They went on a prospecting 
tour and visited all portions of the state, 
ultimately deciding that Great Bend was to 
have a bright future lai accuunt of its 
healthful location and natural beauty and 
Air. Clarke concluded to locate here, at once 
opening an office. He was alone in business 
for a time but afterward was associated in 
practice with F. V. Russell for six years. 
He soon secured a large and growing pat- 
ronage as he demonstrated his ability to han- 
dle the intricate problems of jurisprudence. 
He is a fluent and earnest speaker and his 
oratorical ability, combined with his pro- 
found knowledge of the law, has gained him 
enviable and well merited distinction. 

In 1880 Mr. Clarke was unnited in mar- 
riage to Miss Jennie L. Yelton, a daugh- 
ter of John P. Yelton, of New Middleton, 
Tennessee. She died, however, in 1897, at 
the age of thirty-seven years^ — leaving no 
children. ^Ir. Clarke was a second time 
married, July 16, 1901, to ]\Iiss Xettie Ber- 
nis, of Colorado Springs, Colorado, He 
is a prcminent and valued member of the 
Alasonic fraternity, has taken the degrees of 
blue lodge, council, chapter and command- 
ery and is a past master of the lodge. He is 
also connected with the Modern Woodmen 
fraternity. In his political views he is a 
Democrat and takes a very active part in 
political affairs, being an active factor in the 
campaign work. In 1900 he received the 
nomination for county attorney and being 
elected to that officers now discharging his 
duty in such a manner as to win the high 
commendation of the people for his faith- 
fulness and capability. • 



JOHN S. JUDSOX. 



If a society of the sons of New York 
should be organized in central Kansas, sim- 
ilar to a club of the same name which exists 
in Chicago, it is probable that John S. Jud- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



son,' of Kanopolis, would be one of its prom- 
inent members. Mr. Judson, who is man- 
ager of the KanopoHs Land Company, and 
one of the best known real-estate and insur- 
ance men in Ellsworth county, was born at 
Utica, New York, December 12, 1827, a 
son of Silas and Mary (Lunnon) Judson. 
His father was a native of Co-nnecticut, and 
his mother was born at Savannah, Georgia. 
Air. Judson was educated in the common 
schools in vogue in his part of his state in 
bis boyhood and at one of the old-time acad- 
emies once so popular there. In 1849, h^ 
went to South and Central America, in the 
interest of his cousin George Curtis, and 
tilled a responsible position in connection 
with the building of hotels and the establish- 
ment of transportation across the isthmus 
of Panama. After some years spent in that 
tropical and malarial region, he was taken 
suddenly and seriously ill and lay for three 
days helpless and unattended, and after his 
recovery he returned to the United States 
and located at Detroit, Michigan, where he 
remained a year and a half. From Detroit 
he went t(.) the Saginaw valley, to the site of 
the now flourishing city of Bay City, to take 
a position as an accountant for a lumber firm 
which, while he was in its employ, built two 
new sawmills. \\ hile he was at Bay City 
the Bay City Salt Manufacturing Company 
was organized, the second salt company in 
^Michigan, and he became one of its stock- 
holders and its secretary. Later, when the 
Saginaw & Bay City Salt Company was or- 
ganized he became its secretar}' and remain- 
ed with the concern in that capacity until it 
went out of existence. He then accepted the 
position O'f secretary and' treasurer of the 
Saginaw River Towing Association, which 
owned a line of tugs plying on Saginaw 
river and bay, a positioji which he was event- 
ually compelled to resign because of his ill 
health and that of some members of his fam- 
ily. After living two years at Tampa, Flor- 
ida, he returned north and located at Spring- 
field, Ohio, where for several years he was 
in charge of the accounts of dififerent firms. 
Later he was offered a position with the 
Kanopolis Land Company, of Kanopolis, ^as 
its accountant, and in April, 1888, he was 



sent to Kanapolis to act as general manager 
for the company. 

Soon after his arrival at Kancpnlis Mr. 
Judson becamie convincedi that there was an 
immense amount of salt underlying the whole 
region round about the town, and after mi- 
nute exaj-ninations of boring made at E11-- 
worth, he became convinced that salt-min- 
ing there was feasible. At last, after mrch 
correspondence and many earnest confer- 
ences, he succeeded in interesting the di- 
rectors of the Kanopolis Land Company, 
and after a prospect well had been sunk to 
a depth of eight hundred and eiglty-one 
feet, which was accomplished between March 
I and 16, 1889, active operations were I s- 
gun. The Royal Salt Company was organ- 
ized February 4, 1890, in. which the stock- 
holders were m.embers of the Kanopolis 
Land Company and others. A diamond 
drill was brought into requisition and a shaft 
was sunk, taking a core out of the earth to 
the depth of nine hundred feet. Operations 
on this shaft were begun May 12, 1890, and 
the plant was in operation February 28, 
1891. Mr. Judson had charge of the dis- 
bursements of funds, etc., for the sinking 
of the shaft till 1891, since which time the 
\vork has proceeded under James Cowie's 
efficent management. 

The Kanopolis Land Ccanpany was oi-- 
ganized in 1886, with Ross Mitchell as presi- 
dent, J. S.Crowell as secretary, F. M. Brook- 
wait as vice-president. J. H. Thomas as 
treasurer, and General J. Warren Keifer, 
as attorney. Other members of the com- 
pany were F. Halford. of Springfield, Ohio; 
General William Alartindale, H. C. Cross 
and H. C. Whitley, of Empora, Kansas. 
The company purchased about four thou- 
sand acres of land, now in EllsAvorth, Empire 
and Clear Creek townships, Ellsworth o am- 
ty. A portion of this land, at the Fort Har- 
ker reservation, includes the site and build- 
ings of the post. \Mien it beg'an operations 
there the company laid out the city of Kan- 
opolis. It erected the Kanopolis hotel, a 
three-story brick structure containing fifty 
rooms, and also more than a dozen dwellings 
and several other buildings. Since he came 
to Kanopolis Mr. Judson has had entire 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



charge of the general business of tlie com- 
pany, making sales, renting property, leas- 
ing and selling farm lands, and residences 
and attending to other important interests. 
Colonel Snyder preceded ^Ir. Judson as 
manager at Kanopolis. ! 

Mr. Judson believes that Kanapolis | 
would be an excellent location for a sani- 
tarium and he is doing what he can to pro- 
mote a mo'vement to utilize the hotel for that 
purpose. He has devoted his. time and en- 
ergies entirely to the interests of his com- 
pany, which from time to time has given 
him numerous intimations that, his conscien- 
tious ser\-ice is highly appreciated, and Mr. 
Judson has received many testimonials from 
former employers as to his ability and dis- 
cretion. Our subject has one son, William 
B. Judson, of Chicago, founder, proi>rietor 
and publisher of the Northwestern Lumber- 
man, which was merged with the American 
Lumberman, published at Chicago, of which 
]Mr. Judson is manager. Mr. Judson's 
mother died June 28, 1890; she was born 
at Savannah, Georgia, December 20, 1783. 
She married Silas JucIisoot April 19, 1822, 
and went with him to Utica, New York. 
Mr. Judson died in 1838, in Connecticut. 
Mrs. Judson remained at Utica until 1865, 
but passed her declining years at Waverly, 
Iowa. She was a de\'out member of the 
Protestant Episcopal church and wasi highly 
esteemed for her many Christian virtues. 

Mr. Judson was received as an entered 
apprentice in Bay City Lodge, No. 129, A. 
F. & A. M., January 30, 1861, passed the 
fellowcraft degree February 9, 186 1, and 
was raised to the sublime degree of Master 
Mason Februarv 20, 1861, and is a past 
master of that lodge. He was past high 
priest of Blanchard Chapter, No. 59. R. A. 
M., at Bay City, in which he took the degrees 
of capitular Masonry, and was there exalted 
to the august degrees of royal-arch Mason. 
He is past eminent commander, of Bay City 
Commandery of Knights Templar. He is a 
member of Isis Temple nf the Ancient Arabic 
Order of the Nobles of the [Mystic Shrine, of 
Salina. Kansas. He is an honorary member 
of Saint Aldemar Commandery, No. 33, 
Knights Templar, of Ellsworth, and is a 



charter member of Joppa Lodge, No. 315, 
A. F. & A. M., of Bay City, Michigan. He 
is a member of Kanapolis Lodge, No. 321, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is 
one of its past noble grands. He has rep- 
resented his lodge in the grand lodge of the 
state of Kansas and has served three terms 
in the office of district deputy. 



J. E. STEWART, M. D. 

One of the notable institutions of Hutch- 
inson is the Stewart Hospital, conducted by 
the Stewart Brothers, both distinguished 
and capable physicians and surgeons whose 
marked ability has placed them in the front 
rank of the representatives of the medical 
fraternity in this portion of the state. Their 
reputation, however, is not limited by the 
confines of Kansas, for many of their pa- 
trons come from other states and the history 
of their successful treatment is continually 
increasing their practice. This is a utilitarian 
age in which man is judged by bis useful- 
ness in the world. The public lias no place 
for the misanthrope or the individual who 
lives to himself alone, and public opinion 
commends or condemns according as the in- 
dividual has wrought along the lines of 
greatest good to his fellow men or other- 
wise. It is this which has won for the med- 
ical fraternity its high standing, and well 
does the honorable, able and conscientious 
physician deserve the gratitude and respect 
of his fellow men. 

Dr. J. E. Stewart, the senior member of 
the firm, was born in Bedfoi'd county, Vir- 
ginia, March 19, 1857, a son cf Robert B. 
and Angeline (Arrington) Stewart, both of 
whom are representatives of prominent old! 
southern families. The branch of Stewarts 
to which the Doctor belnngs is ilesccnded 
from the Scottish clan nf that name. The 
great-grandfather, emigrating to. America, 
took up his abode in Beaufort. South Caro- 
lina, where he spent his' remaining days. 
His son, the Rev. James Stcwnrt, the grand- 
father of the Dnct'T, wa- a [li. iicer minister 
of the ?kIethodist hlpi^La 'pal chrich and for 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



sixty years was a member of the Baltimore 
conference, the scene of his labors being 
Virginia. There he gave his time and ener- 
gies to ministerial work until 1868 when he 
came to Kansas, and his death occurred in 
Reno county when he had attained the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-five j'-ears. In early 
life he had married Betsey Bush, of Vir- 
ginia. His last years were spent in the home 
of his son Robert. 

Robert Stewart was the father of the 
well known physicians of Hutchinson, wIto 
are cijnducting the Stewart Hospital. He 
was reared on the old plantation in Bedford 
count^■. Virginia, and there resided for inany 
years. He owned extensive landed interests 
and many slaves and in common with other 
property owners of the southern states he 
lost considerable during the period of the 
Civil war. In 1881 he removed with his 
family of seven children to Rice county, 
Kansas, where he purchased a tract of land 
upon which he vet resides — an honored and 
representative agriculturist of the commun- 
ity. In his political views he is a standi 
Democrat and like the other members of the 
Stewart family is a devoted member of the 
Methodist church. He has five children who 
are still living: Samuel W., who operates 
a part of the homestead farm in Rice coun- 
ty: Robert O., an agriculturist of the same 
county; James E., a twin brother of Robert 
and tlie subject of this review; R. A., who 
is in partnership with his brother James ; and 
Olive, the wife of Samuel Steimr.etz, of Rice 
county. 

On the old Virginia plantation Dr. 
James E. Stewart spent his early youth and 
acquired his preliminary education in the 
common schools. He began the study of med- 
icine under the direction of Dr. E. W". Sale, 
of Stewartville, Virginia, who directed his 
reading for two years. He then entered the 
Hospital Medical College, of Louisville, 
Kentucky,- where he remained for one term, 
when he accompanied his parents on their 
removal to Kansas. After a residence of 
six months in Rice county he became a stu- 
dent in the office of Dr. P. P. Trueheart. of 
Sterling, Kansas, and then returning to the 
east entered the Universitv of IMarvland, at 



Baltimore, where he spent one term. On the 
expiration of that period he returned to the 
Hospital Medical College, of Louisville, 
where he was graduated in the sprint- of 
1883. Six months later he established an 
office in Alden, Rice county, Kansas, where 
he engaged in practice for eight years, re- 
moving then to Hutchinson, where he has 
since remained, forming a partnership with 
his brother in the establishment and conduct 
of the Stewart Hospital, which has become 
one of the leading private hospitals in the 
state. 

On the 7th of JNIarch. 1894. Dr. J. E. 
Stewart married Miss Lillian Young, a 
daughter of John \\'. and A. E. ( Furge- 
son) Young. They have two children, 
Helen and William Y. The family attend 
the Methodist church, in which the Doctor 
holds memljership. He is independent in 
his pdlitical views and has never sought of- 
fice, his time and attention being fully en- 
grossed by the demands of his practice. 

Robert A. Stewart, the junior member 
of the firm, was born in Bedford county, 
Virginia, January 20, 1868, and was only 
thirteen years of age when he acompanied 
his parents to Rice county, Kansas, where 
he continued his education which had been 
begun in the public schools of his native 
state. Through the summer months he as- 
sisted his father in the operation of the 
farm until 1888. when he matriculated in 
the Hospital Medical College, of Louisville, 
and was graduated in the class of 1891. 
Immediately afterward he entered into part- 
nership with his brother, Dr. James E. 
Stewart, an association which has since been 
maintained. He was married June 12. 1895, 
to Mary C, daughter of James P. ^McCurdy, 
and they have two children, Margaret and 
John R. Tliey have an elegant residence at 
No. 801 North Main street, which was erec- 
ted by the Doctor. His political views are 
not bound by party ties, his support being 
given to the men and measures that he be- 
lieves will best promote the general good. 
His religious faith is indicated by his mem- 
]>ership in the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Both brothers give their undivided atten- 
tion to their professional duties and their 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



work lias been crowned by a high measure 
of success. Since his graduation Dr. R. A: 
Stewart has taken two private courses of 
study under Professor Reynolds, of Louis- 
ville. Kentucky. In March. 1891. the hos- 
pital was established in Hutchinson, with 
modest pretensions, in a small building on 
West Tenth street. They abandoned gen- 
eral practice, making a specialty of surgery, 
gynecology and the treatment of diseases of 
the eye. ear and throat. It took time to 
demonstrate to the public the worth of the 
institution and for about four years the finan- 
cial outlook was anything but promising, 
but since that time a constantly increasing 
patronage has rendered their business lucra- 
ti\'e and profitable. Well do they deserve 
success. They have founded a hospital just- 
ly meriting the public support. In 1897 they 
purchased their present property at 724 
North !Main street, the location being one of 
the most desirable in the city. It is far 
enough removed from the business portion 
to escape the noise of traffic. The building 
was originally a fine residence, and this they 
liave remodeled' and added to, making it 
well adapted for the purpose for which it is 
now used. The grounds are well kept and 
of attractive appearance and the house is 
bright and cheerful and arranged with ad- 
mirable taste. Perfect sanitary conditions 
exist and the steam heating, electric lighting 
and water systems are equally admirable. 
There are more than thirty rooms in the 
building, each perfectly ventilated. The 
clean white walls and spotless floors in the 
twenty-two rooms fitted up for patients pre- 
clude the possibility of disease germs of any 
nature finding a harboring place. The kitch- 
en is in a separate building soi that no> odors 
of conking reach the rooms of the patients. 
On the ^ec(-ind llonr is located the laboratory 
containing apparatus for making all of the 
delicate tests and analysis so essential to 
correct diagnosis and subsequent successful 
treatment of disease. The institution is well 
equipped with all necessary appliances and 
instruments for the successful. performance 
of all ordinary surgical operations in the 
operating room on the first floor and the past 
four years has demonstrated the fact that the 



percentage of recoveries here is greater in 
proportion than in many of the larger insti- 
tutions. Skillful and scientific methods of 
treatment, salubrious climate, careful nurs- 
ing and perfect sanitary conditions and quiet 
and pleasant surroundings, all doubtless 
contribute their share in accomplishing this 
desirable result. In summing up the value 
of man's work in the world that of the phy- 
sician has a prominent place and no mem- 
bers of the profession are doing more along 
the line of their chosen \j;ocation than the 
Stewart Brothers, whose professional skill, 
high Christian character and individual 
worth have gained them the unqualified re- 
gard of all with whom they have been asso- 
ciated. 



H. C. WARNER. 



H. C. \\'arn€r. president of the Citizens' 
State Bank, is a leading and influential busi- 
ness man of Arlington, not alone ]>ecause of 
his connection with financial circles, but also 
by reason of his extensive farming and 
stock-raising interests. He owns a large 
and valuable ranch on section 34, Arlington 
township, where he resides, dividing his at- 
tention between the bank and the ranch. 
He was born in Union county, Ohio, No- 
"vember 6, 1850, a son of Elijah and Lois 
(Burdick) Warner, the former a' native of 
New York and the latter of Ohio. During 
his boyhood days the father accompanied 
his parents to the Buckeye state, where he 
was reared to manhood and married. He 
then engaged in farming on his own account 
and acquired a good property of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres. This he cleared of 
heavy timber, transformed it into richly 
cultivated fields and made his home thereon 
until his death, which occurred in 1870. His 
widow still survives him and yet resides 
on the old home place at the age of eighty- 
five years. In the family were ten children 
and our subject is the fourth of the surviv- 
ing members, now numbering seven. One 
son, Joshua, came we,st, located in Gage 
county, Nebraska, and there died in 1890. 
The living members are: Pernintha, the 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



wife of I. H. Embry, of Gage county, Ne- 
braska ; Emma, the wife of Foster Graham, 
of Dundee county, Nebraska ; Hezekiah C., 
of this review ; Isaac, who is living; on the 
old homestead in Ohio ; and Nettie and' Ada, 
who reside with their mother upon the same 
farm together with Albert, who also oper- 
ates the home place. 

On his father's farm in Ohio H. C. War- 
ner spent the days of his boylibod and youth, 
and through the short winter terms he pur- 
sued his education in the common schools. 
When he was but twenty years of age his 
father died and as he was the eldest son the 
work U'f the farm and' the managanent of its 
bu^iness affairs devolved largely upon him. 
For twenty-five years he there remained, cul- 
tivating the fields and looking after the in- 
terests of the family. In 1875 he left the 
old homestead and engaged in merchandis- 
ing in Union county, Ohio, in company with 
B. \^'. Evans, the partnership being main- 
tained for fi\-e years, when Mr. Warner sold 
his interest to Mr. Evans, and in 1880 went 
to Gage county, Nebraska. There he en- 
gaged in the stock business until his re- 
moval to Reno county in 1881. Here he lo- 
cated first in the town of Arlington, where 
for a few months he engaged in handling 
and dealing in range horses. He then took 
ch.arge of the Arlington Hotel, which he, 
conducted for about twO' years, and in July, 
1883, in company with J. E. Eaton he en- 
gaged in the real-estate business at Arling- 
ton, buying and selling property for five 
years. During this time, in company with 
Charles Ford and A. B. Crebbs, he founded 
the Arlington State Bank, of which he be- 
came a director. This was the first bank in 
the town. Later the Citizens' State Bank 
was organized and the Arlington State Bank 
sold out to them, for there was not enough 
business tO' enable two- banfe to profitably 
continue here. Subsequently Mr. Warner 
and other prominent business men purchased 
the Citizens' Bank, in May, 1896, and he 
was made its president, in which office he 
has since served, capably controlling the af- 
fairs of the institution and' making it one 
of the most substantial financial concerns 
of the county. 



While engaged in the real-estate business 
Mr. Warner embraced the opportunity he 
had! of making judicious investments in 
farming land and thus became the owner of 
considerable property. When he arrived in 
Reno county in the fall of 1881. he pre- 
empted the southwest quarter of section 35, 
Arlington township, which he improved, 
gaining the title thereto from the govern- 
ment. He still owns this, it constituting a 
part of his present extensive ranch. In 1884 
he took up his residence on the place, which 
was then a tract of raw prairie, but he has 
transformed it into one of the best stock 
ranches of the county. Within its boundar- 
ies are comprised fourteen hundred and 
forty acres, of whidi six hundred acres is 
under cultivation. The entire amount is 
under fence and substantial buildings pro- 
vide shelter for grain and stock, while the 
home is a very pleasant and commodious 
residence. Mr. Warner keeps on hand three 
hundred or more cattle, feeding from one 
to two hundred head each year. While he 
raises a great deal of feed on his place he 
annually buys from one to ten thousand 
bushels of corn, which he purchases from his 
neighbors. His affairs are capably mjnn- 
aged and' his thorough understanding of the 
best method's of caring for stock and of 
raising crops has made him a very successful 
farmer of Reno county. 

On the 15th of June, 1884, ^Mr. \'\'arner 
was united in marriage tO' Miss Rose D. 
Crane, whose father gave his life to his coun- 
tr\-, falling in the war of the Rebellion. ]\Irs. 
AVarner is a nati\'e of Kentucky and rqjre- 
sents an old and distinguished family of the 
south. Unto our subject and his wife have 
been born four children: Harold, Chester, 
Don and Raymoiid. In public matters Mr. 
\\'arner takes an intelligent, interested and 
active part, but is not an aspirant for office 
as his varied personal interests occupy his 
attention completely. He has, however, 
done effective work in the interests of the 
Republican party, has been a member of the 
Republican county central committee and a 
delegate to> the county and congressional 
conventions. He is a charter memberof Ar- 
lington Camp, Modern Woodmen of Amer- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



ica, and is a progressive, public-spirited man 
whose worth makes him a valuable acquisi- 
tion to the citizenship of Reno county. His 
business record is: without a blemish and 
through his unaided efforts he has advanced 
steadily to the goal of success. 



JOHN E. HOLMES. 

John E. Holmes, a retired farmer of 
Hutchinson, was born in Bradford, York- 
shire, England, March 3, 1847. His father, 
Edward Holmes, was born in Northumber- 
land, England, in 1813, and was a miller 
by trade. The latter came toi America with 
his family when our subject was nine years 
of age, the voyage being made on the sail- 
ing vessel, Frances P. Sage, and during the 
trip severe storms and coiUrary winds were 
encountered and they were beaten back sev- 
eral hundred miles. At one time, when the 
storm was at its height, the passengers were 
locked in the hold and immense waves swept 
over the deck. After six weeks spent upon 
the ocean the passengers were finally land- 
(-1I at Castle Garden, and from that place 
.Mr. Holmes made his way to Macoupin 
cijinity, Illinois, where he secured einploy- 
ment with N. Howard, a prominent miller 
of that place, with whom he remained for 
two or three years. He then removed' about 
five miles into the country, purchasing what 
was known as the Boggis grist and saw 
mill, together with about five acres of land, 
on which his family resided while he en- 
gaged in the operation of the mill. After 
about two years thus spent he soki his prop- 
erty there and removed to Alton, Illinois, 
where for the following two or three years 
he was employed as a miller by the Schuy- 
ler Distillery Company, going thence to 
Jersey county, Illinois, where for three or 
four years he worked in the Haycroft & 
Herdman mill at Eidelity. Mr. Holmes' 
next location was at Jerseyville, in Jersey 
county, Illinois, where he was employed in 
a large mill until 1865, when he removed to 
Greene county, that state, and' purchased a 
mill on ;\Iacoupin creek, which was oper- 



ated by water power. There ]Mr. Holmes 
spenfthe remainder of his life, passing away 
in the fall of 1865. I" P"litical matters he 
gave his support to- the Democratic party. 

In England, his native country, he was 
united in marriage to Mary A. Fox, who 
was born near Leeds, England. Ilcr father, 
who was also a miller bv > iccupatii m, met his 
death while oiling niachincr}-, his necker- 
chief having caught in the machinery and he 
was drawn into the wheels and crushed to 
death. After lii> death his widnw came to 
America, .'uhl hor (k\-ith dccurrcd in Jersey 
county, IlliiK'i-, in 1^53. The ni' ither of our 
subject is still li\ing, and now makes her 
home at Springfield, Illinois, having reached 
the ripe old age of eighty-two years. Unto 
this worthy couple were born nine children, 
namely: Jane, the wife of Matthew Wil- 
kinson, a retired miller of Alton, Illinois ; 
Alfred, a prominent farmer oi RenO' coun- 
ty, Kansas; Susanna, the wife of Manning 
F, Price, a carpenter of Springfield, Illinois; 
Edward and a sister, lji>tli 'if win mi died in 
England in childhDod; Jdlni E., the subject 
of this rcA-iew ; William H., a retired fanner 
oi Hutchinsiin, Kansas: I'lKcbe, wife of 
George Parker, a saw \er of Alton, Illinois; 
and Mary, widijw nf Ralph Smith, and a 
resident of Sterling. Kansas. 

John E. Holmes received his early edu- 
cation in the schools of his native land, and 
after coming tO' this coimtry he attended 
school at Fidelity and Alton, Illinois, When 
only about fifteen years of age, however, 
he laid aside his text-books in order to as- 
sist his fatlKr in the mill and on the farm, 
and he alsi> dr^ i\-e a coal and flour wagon. 
At the time of the Civil war our subject was 
but seventeen years of age, but he valiantly 
ofifered his service in the protection of the 
stars and stripes, becoming a member of 
Company B, One Hundred and Fifty-fourth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and in the 
spring of 1865 was sent to Fort Rosecrans, 
located' on the battlefield of Stone River, 
wdiere he did garrison duty until the follow- 
ing July or August. Between Louisville 
and Nashville, while on his way tO' the front 
and while traveling on a freight car, he was 
shot frQm ambush, the ball grazing his lip. 



ii6 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



He would have fallen between the cars and 
probably have been killed but for the brave 
act of his comrade, John McGee, who saved 
him from the fall. He was sent to Tulla- 
homa, Tennessee, thence to Nashville, and 
at the last named place he was taken sick 
and was confined in the hospital for several 
weeks. He has never fully recovered from 
the exposure and hardships endured during 
his army career, and has ever since been dis- 
qualified from performing active work. Re- 
ceiving his discharge at Nashville, Tennes- 
see, in the fall of 1865, he was mustered out 
of service at Springfield, Illinois, and re- 
turned to his home in Greene coimty, that 
state, near CarroUton, but his home-coming 
was attended by a sad event, as his father 
passed away in death only two weeks after 
his arrival. In the folloaving spring our 
subject, in company with his mother, sisters 
and two brothers, removed to Alton, Illi- 
nois, where he secured employment in the 
roundhouse of the Chicago & Alton Rail- 
road, but after a short time thus spent he 
began work on the road as a fireman. After 
his father's death he became the head of the 
fainily, and nobly did he perform his duty 
toward his mother and sisters, although he 
received able assistance from bis: younger 
brother William. After about six months 
spent upon the road INIr. Holmes removed 
to ]\Iacoupin county, Illinois, where for the 
following year he was employed as an agri- 
culturist, and at the end' of that time, in 
company with his younger brother, he leased 
a farm for a term of five years, receiving all 
the crops raised in return for caring for the 
place and clearing off a portion of timber. 
After his term had expired he and his broth- 
er purchased eighty acres of land, also rent- 
ing a tract adjoining, but after a time the 
brother married and our subject then began 
farming by himself, on the eighty-acre tract. 
After a time, hcwever, he sold that land and 
went to Litchfield, Illinois, where he rented 
a farm for one year, paying five dollars per 
acre cash rent; but becoming dissatisfied 
w'ith this exorbitant rate he decided toi come 
to the Sunflower state, arriving in Reno 
coimty in the fall of 1881. where he home- 
steaded one hundred and sixtv acres of land 



in Huntsville township, on the southeast 
quarter of section 28. Mr. Holmes made 
the journey from Illinois to Kansas with 
three horses and a few household goods, and 
on his arrival here he had just ten cents in 
money, but he soon began work in earnest, 
erecting a sod house, and in a short time he 
had eighteen acres planted with wheat. At 
the close of his third year he had prospered 
to the extent that he was able to purchase 
an adjoining one hundred and sixty acres 
from the railroad on the northeast quarter 
of section 33. Several years later he extend- 
ed his landed possessions by purchasing one 
hundred and t\\enty acres in Plevna town- 
ship, eighty acfes on section 9 and forty 
on section 16, adjoining the town of Plev- 
na, and on the forty-acre tract he erected a 
magnificent residence, twenty-eight by 
thirty-six feet, and containing nine rooms, 
and this is regarded as one of the finest 
dwellings in the township. On his original 
one hundred and sixty acres he has also 
made many valuable improvements, erect- 
ing a good residence, barns, granaries and 
all other necessary outbuildings, while a 
beautiful orchard and a grove of mulberry 
and Cottonwood trees further add to the 
value and attractive appearance of the place. 
He has principally devoted his attention to 
grain farming, making a specialty of wheat 
and corn, and in his operations he has been 
remarkably successful and is now the owner 
of a comfortable competence. In 1886 he 
traded his forty acres in Plevna for his 
present commodious and beautiful residence 
in Hutchinson, and in this city he also' owns 
lots on Sixth avenue, and has a house and 
two lots in Nickerson. He still retains pos- 
session of his four hundred acres of farm- 
ing land, which is operated by tenants, but 
from' his city residence in Hutchinson he 
keeps a general oversight over his entire 
possessions. 

Mr. Holmes was married in Montgom- 
ery county, Illinois, near the town of Ray- 
mond, in 1883, to Jennie Anderson, a na- 
tive of that county and a daughter of Peter 
and Elizabeth Anderson, both of whom 
were born in Scotland. Unto this union 
were born four children. — Elizabeth. Mar- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



garet, Murray and John Logan, all of whom 
are attending the Fourth Avenue school in 
Hutchinson. In 1892, while residing at 
their beautiful residence in Plevna township, 
the wife and mother passed away in death, 
and on the 19th of December, 1893, at 
Springfield, Illinois, our subject married 
Carrie M. Robbins, who was born in Chau- 
tauqua county. New York, near Jamestown, 
a daughter of George W. and Phoebe 
(Sweet) Robbins, the father a native of 
Scotland and the mother of Germany. Mrs. 
Holmes was employed as a dress-maker be- 
fore her marriage. For many years Mr. 
Holmes has been identified with the Repub- 
lican party, and while residing in Hunts- 
ville township he served for two terms each 
as road overseer and school clerk, and dur- 
ing his residence in Plevna township he was 
the efficient township treasurer for one term, 
ever discharging his public duties with fidel- 
ity and honor. In his social relations he is 
a member of the G. A. R., Joe Hooker Post, 
No. 17, and previous to his connection there- 
with he was connected with Sylvia Post, No. 
386, in which he held every office up to and 
including that of senior vice commander. 
He was formerly a member of the Knights 
of Pythias fraternity. His religious prefer- 
ence is indicated by his membership m 
the First Methodist church of Hutchinson, 
of which denomination his wife is also a 
valued member. The business career of Mr. 
Holmes is one that should encourage others 
to press on, for when he came to Kansasi he 
was without money and without influential 
or wealthy friends to aid him, but he set to 
work to overcome all difficulties that might 
lay in his path to success. Earnest labor, 
unabating perseverance, good management 
and a laudable ambition, — these are the ele- 
ments which brought him prosperity and 
have made him one of the influential citizens 
of the locality. His career has ever been 
such as to warrant the trust and confidence 
of the business world, for he has ever con- 
ducted all transactions on the strictest prin- 
ciples of honor and integrity, while his de- 
votion to the public good is unquestioned 
and arises from a sincere interest in his fel- 
low men. 



LEW BAKER. 

Upon section 21, Wilson township. Rice 
county, resides Lew Baker, who follows ag- 
ricultural pursuits and is engaged in the 
raising of stock. He is well known as an 
enterprising citizen and has made his home 
in Rice county since 1880. He was born 
in Norwalk, Huron county, Ohio, October 
4, 1863, and is a son of Ansel Baker, whose 
birth occurred in the Empire state in 1818. 
When :a young man the father emigrated 
westward to Ohio, and in that state was 
united in marriage to Miss Martha Foster, 
who was born in Vermont. She was greatly 
beloved for her kindness of heart and mind. 
Her death, which occurred when she was 
fifty-five years O'f age, was mourned by all 
who knew her. Mr. Baker, the father of our 
subject, was born in 1818, and died April 
14, 1890, at the age of seventy-two years, 
after devoting his attention to agricultural 
pursuits as a life work. In politics he was 
a Republican and in religious belief was a 
Methodist, holding membership in the 
church of that denomination in his boyhood. 
His children are: Mrs. Frances Robbins, 
of Huron county, Ohio; M. F., one of the 
prominent early settlers of Wilson town- 
ship. Rice county ; Norman, who is also liv- 
ing in Ohio; Charles, who makes his home 
in Chicago, Illinois ; Lew, whose name in- 
troduces this review ; and Thomas, who is 
likewise a resident of the Buckeye state. 

The boyhood days of Lew Baker were 
quietly passed. He worked upon the home 
farm during the summer months and was 
trained to habits of industry and economy. 
In the winter season he pursued his studies 
in the public schools and by business experi- 
ence has also added to- his knowledge. At 
the age of seventeen he made his way west- 
ward to Kansas, locating in Rice county, 
where his brother, M. F., resides. Here he 
engaged at farm work, and by industry and 
economy he secured a capital sufficient to 
purchase a small tract of land and thus 
g-ained a start. As time has passed he has 
added to his property until he now owns a 
valuable tract of three hundred and twenty 
acres, upon which are splendid buildings. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



and his excellent pasturage affords golden 
opportunities for stock-raising. There is an 
orchard upon the place and he has every fa- 
cility for raising and feeding cattle. Besides 
being a splendid judge of cattle, he is a good 
manager, and in his business efforts he has 
wi;in creditable success. 

In the year 1893 Mr. Baker was united 
in marriage to Miss Lulu Black, a lady of 
intelligence and culture, who has spent her 
entire life west of the Mississippi river. She 
was born in Lee county, Iowa, near Fort 
Madison, where she was reared and educat- 
ed. She is a daughter of A. and Frances 
Black. Her father is now a resident of 
\\'ilson township, but her mother departed 
this life in Lyons, in 1901. The marriage 
of our subject and his wife has been blessed 
with two children. Foster M., whose birth 
occurred December 23, 1897, and Everett 
Lewis, born April 2, 1902. Mr. Baker is a 
man of strong mentality, of splenchd' busi- 
ness ability and is frank and genial in man- 
ner. His business associates find' him relia- 
ble and trustworthy and he is an enterpris- 
ing and successful farmer. 



WILLIAM J. HARRISON. 

Among the citizens that Illinois has fur- 
nished' to the Sunflower state is William J. 
Harrison, who resides in Sterling township. 
He was born in Lagrange, Cook county, Illi- 
nois, October 3, 1851. His father, John 
Harrison, was a native of England, born 
near Carlysle, in 1818, and there he was 
reared to farm life. In 1845 he married 
]\Iiss Jane Burrow, who was born in June, 
1824, and they became the parents of ten 
children, five sons and five daughters, all 
born in America with the exception of three. 
One born in England died ere the emigra- 
tion to the new world. In June, 1851, Mr. 
Harrison with his family sailed for the Uni- 
ted States, and after thirteen weeks spent 
on the bosom of the Atlantic reached the 
American harbor. He arrived in Chicago 
with only eighty-four cents in his .pocket. 
He went into the countrv and worked as a 



fann hand for a dollar a day and thus gained 
a start, after which he purchased a farm on 
credit. His indefatigable labor and econ- 
omy, however, enabled him to soon dis- 
charge his indebtedness and not long after- 
ward he bought a farm of one hundred and 
seventy acres, where he prospered, owing to 
his marked diligence and the increase in 
realty values. His farm' was at length sold 
for two hundred and fifty dollars per acre. 
On it was located a valuable stone quarry. 
His wife died December 24, 1889, at the age 
of seventy-five years, and his death occurred 
in 1892. 

William J. Harrison, whose name begins 
this record, received but meager educational 
privileges. He attended the district schools 
during the winter months and in the sum- 
mer, from the time he was seven years of 
age, he worked in the fields. When a youth 
of fourteen he did a man's work, for he was 
strong and rugged. At twenty-two years 
of age he left home to make- his own way in 
the world, and, as usual with young (men' 
starting out for themselves, he sought a com- 
panion and helpmate for the journey of life. 
On the 30th of October, 1883, he was united 
in marriage to Harriet Selfridge, of Ran- 
dolph county, Illinois, a daughter of J. S. 
and Susan Jane (Woodside) Selfridge. the 
former a native of Ohio and the latter of 
Kentucky. The father was born in August, 
1825, and their marriage was celebrated in 
Illinois, in 1844. He was a carpenter and 
builder by trade, following that pursuit in 
order to provide for the support of his fam- 
ily, which as the years wart by grew in 
numbers until he was the father of five sons 
and four daughters. One daughter. ]\Iary 
Ellen, died at the age of fourteen years. The 
sons were reared to assist in the work of 
carpentering and farming, and eight chil- 
dren are now living. The parents also sur- 
vire and are now residents of Sterling, where 
they located in 1876. The marriage of Mr. 
and Mrs. Harrison was celebrated at the 
home of the bride, after yhich they took up 
their abode six miles northwest of the vil- 
lage of Sterling, where Mr. Harrison pur- 
chased a half section of improved land. He 
afterward made other purchases, paying six- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



teen hundred dollars for one hundred and 
twenty acres and twenty-seven hundred and 
thirty dollars for two hundred acres. He 
has a tenant upon the last mentioned farm. 
In the sijring of 1899 he took up his abodte 
at his present home, where he has twoi hun- 
dred and forty acres, and he also owns a 
forty-acre farm near Sterling. He has three 
valuable tracts of land, supplied with gKx>d 
buildings, and he is extensively and success- 
fully engaged in the raising of cattle, horses 
and hogs. He breeds polled Durham cattle 
— registered stock — the most of them being 
one-half or three- fourths Durham. For 
eight years he has been engaged in the stock 
business and is now breeding Norman 
horses. He grows from three to five thou- 
sand bushels of wheat and from two to four 
thousand bushels of corn annually. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Harrison have been 
born four children : Mabel, who is now 
sixteen years of age; John Logan, fifteen 
years old; Benjamin, a lad of ten summers; 
and Lorenzo, who is eight years of age. In 
his political views Mr. Harrison is a Repub- 
lican and has served on the school board, 
but has never sought or desired office, pre- 
ferring to give his time and energies to his 
business affairs, in which he is meeting with 
signal success. He belongs to the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, holding member- 
ship in both the subordinate lodge and en- 
campment. He is also identified with the 
Congregational church and his wife is a 
member of the Reformed Presbyterian 
church. The secret of his success is not 
difficult to ascertain, for in the legitimate 
lines of busines he has met with prosperity, 
placing his dependence upon the sulistantial 
■cjualities of energy and resolution. 



JOHN \\-. DOTSOX. 

Among the worthy citizens that Ken- 
tucky has furnished to the Sunflower state 
is John W. Dotson, who is successfully en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits on section 25, 
Raymond township, Rice county. The year 
■of his arrival here \\-as 1879. and he has 



since been one of the county's most substan- 
tial and reliable citizens. He was born No- 
vember 21, 1836, and is a son of George 
Dotson, a native of Virginia and a repre- 
sentative of a prominent family of that state. 
When a young man the latter remo\-ed to 
Kentucky. In Mason county, that state, he 
was united in marriage to Miss Ellen White, 
who was l)orn in North Carolina, and. they 
became the parents of seven children, name- 
ly: Elizabeth; John W. ; Mary; Al>salom, 
who was a loyal soldier in the Cnnfederate 
service; Saphronia: George, who aided in 
the defense of the L'nion in the Ci\'il war : 
and James. Tlie father of this family was a 
blacksmith by occupation and in his political 
views was a Democrat. His death occurred 
in Fleming county, Kentucky, at the age of 
fifty-one years. His wife died at the age 
of fifty-four years, and both were faithful 
members of the Baptist church. 

John W. Dotson, whose name intro- 
duces this review, was reared to farm life 
in the state of his nativity, and there received 
his education in the common schools. In 
1861, at the outbreak df the Civil war, he 
enlisted for ser\'ice in tlic I'nidn army, join- 
ing the Sixteenth Kentucky Volunteer In- 
fantry. He became a member of Company 
A, and was a loyal defender of the Union 
for three years and eleven months. He par- 
ticipated in seventeen battles and many 
skinnishes, including the engagements at 
Franklin, Nashville, Toivn Creek, I\'}- 
Mountain, Kingston, Resaca, Lookout 
Mountain, Mossy Creek, King's Hill, Pine 
Mountain, Atlanta, Lost Mountain, Kene- 
saw Mountain, Jonesboro, Columbia, Fort 
Anderson. W'ilmington and many others. 
During his service he was sick in a hospital 
for eight or ten months, but was ne\-er 
wounded. He was honorably dischar.ged in 
July, 1865, returning to his home with an 
honorable military record. 

In the year 1867 Mr. Dotson was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary Seever, a lacty of 
intelligence and culture, who has proved to 
her husband a faithful companion for the 
journey of life. She was born in Fleming 
county. Kentucky. July 13. 1849, ^^rid is a 
daughter of Helms and Eliza (Choate) 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



Seever, also natives of Kentucky, but both 
are now deceased, the mother dying in mid- 
dle life and the father at the age of sixty 
years. They were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, six of whom still survive : Charlotte, 
Elizabeth, Henry, George, Peter and Mary. 
The sons were all members of the Confed- 
erate army during the Civil war. The chil- 
dren who'have passed away are Edward and 
Hannah. There is also a half brother, 
Tames Seever. The father of this family fol- 
io'wed the occupation of farming and af^Ii- 
ated with the Democratic party. Both he 
and his wife were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. The union of our subject 
and his wife has been blessed w'ith seven 
children, as follows : ]Mrs. Ellen Boes, a 
resident of Oklahoma; Henry and George 
Casper, also O'f Oklahoma: Elizabeth; 
Vaughn McCanlass, of Raymond, Kansas; 
Bessie; and Absalom. 

Mr. Dotson located on his present farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres in 1879, and 
here he is now engaged in general farming. 
He . has made many substantial improve- 
ments upon his place, including the erection 
of buildings and the planting of an orchard 
and grove. His fields are under a high state 
of cultivation and evers'thing about the place 
is neat and thrifty in appearance. Mr, Dot- 
son is a stanch advocate of Democratic prin- 
ciples. In all relations of life he has been 
upright and honorable, and he gives his 
hearty support and co-operation to every 
movement and measure for the public good. 



JOHN W. TiOSE. 

This is an age of specialization, for busi- 
ness interests have become so complex that 
it is almost impossible for one man to be 
thoroughly proficient in every department of 
a profession, and, therefore, gaining a gen- 
eral knowledge of the fundamental princi- 
ples he devotes his energies to some special 
line, thereby advancing to a prominent posi- 
tion as a representative of his chosen field of 
labor, which he could nut do if his efforts 



were disseminated over a broader field. Such 
a course has John W. Rose pursued and to- 
day his reputation as a corporation and coni- 
mercial lawyer is not limited by the confines 
of this state, but extends widely throughout 
the country. He maintains an office in the 
First National Bank building of Hutchin- 
son, from which points'fie controls the prac- 
tice which conies to him from an extensive 
clientele, including many of the most import- 
ant corporations in this city and throughout 
the state. 

Mr. Rose was born near Valparaiso, In- 
diana, May 13, 1857, his parents being X, 
B. and Esther A, (Price) Rose, both of 
whom were natives of Ohio. His paternal 
grandfather, N. B. Rose, Sr., was born in 
Pennsylvania and, emigrating westward, 
took up his abode in the Buckeye state. He 
was a farmer by occupation. His son and 
namesake became a pioneer preacher of the 
Christian church. In the early '40s he lo- 
cated in Indiana and when gold was discov- 
ered in California he was among the first to 
make his way to the Eldorado of the west. 
There he engaged in mining with some suc- 
cess but eventually returned to Indiana and 
devoted his attention chiefly thereafter to 
the work of the church. In addition to his 
ministerial labors, however, he managed his 
investments, being an extensive owner of 
farm lands. He spent his later years near 
Henderson, Kentucky. In his political views 
he was first a Whig and on the dissolution of 
that party became a Republican. In his fam- 
ily were seven children, of whom only two 
are now living: John W., of this review; 
and A. B., a well known and successful dry 
goods merchant of Abilene, Kansas. 

John \y. Rose was born on his father's 
farm within eight miles of Valparaiso, In- 
diana, and when a lad of three years accom- 
I panied his parents on their removal to that 
I city. There he was reared to manhood and 
its educational system provided him with the 
knowledge that prepared him for the practi- 
cal duties of life. Desiring to engage in the 
practice of law, when nineteen years of age 
he became a student in the law office of X. 
J. Bozarth, of Wilparaiso, who directed his 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



reading for two years, and on the 20th of 
^lay, 1878, he was admitted to the Indiana 
bar. Prior to this time, in the intervals of 
study, he had. engaged in teaching school 
and thus provided the means necessary to 
the prosecution of his course of reading. 

Mr. Rose at once opened an office in Val- 
paraiso and after being alone in business for 
a year entered into partnership with his 
former preceptor, ISIr. Bozarth, with whom 
he was associated for a year. He then be- 
came a partner of J. H. Skinner and estab- 
lished the law firm' of Rose & Skinner, his 
partner being a son of J. N. Skinner, a prom- 
inent resident and mayor of the city. That 
firm maintained an uninterrupted existence 
until 1883, when Mr. Rose entered into part- 
nership with the Hon. ]\lark L. De^L>tte, a 
member of congress, under the firm style of 
De]^Iotte & Rose. In September, 1884, this 
connection was dissolved by mutual consent 
and Mr. Rose came to the west, locating first 
at St. John, Kansas, where he was alone in 
practice until 1886. He then entered into 
partnership relations with T. W. Moseley, 
and after practicing thus for several years 
;\Ir. Dixon was taken into the firm, under 
the style of Rose, Moseley & Dixon. In 
1889 Mr. Rose withdrew, for in August of 
that year he was induced to accept the Re- 
publican nominatiim for judge of the twen- 
tienth judicial district, including Rice, Bur- 
ton and Stafford counties, and entered upon 
the canvas's. His personal popularity and 
the confidence reposed in him by those who 
knew him best is indicated bv the fact that he 
receixed almost the entire vote of his own 
ciiy. Init in the general Populistic landslide 
of that year he was defeated. From 1890 
until 1893 li^ then engaged in the practice of 
law alone. 

In the latter year 'Sir. Rose came to 
Hutcliinson. where he opened an oflice. and 
in March, 1894, formed a partnership with 
John \V. Roberts under the firm name of 
Rose & Roberts, a relation that was main- 
tained for three j-ears. when, in Octuber. 
1897, lie became associated with \\'illiam 
^^'itelaw, the firm of Witelaw & Rose con- 
tinuing until April, 1899, when it was dis- 



solved. Mr. Rose was then alone in business 
until the ist of June, 1901, when Howard 
Lewis, city attorney of Hutchinson, became 
his partner and the firm of Rose & Lewis 
now exists. In 1885-6, while residing in 
St. John, Mr. Rose served as deputy attor- 
ney of Stafli'ord county and the greater part 
of the district work devolved upon him. His 
practice is and has been of a very important 
character. He was assistant general attor- 
ney for the Hutchinson & Southern Railroad 
Company for two years prior to its consoli- 
dation with the Santa Fe Railroad system 
and is at present general attorney for the 
Texas & Southern Railroad Company, hav- 
ing occupied the position since March, 1901. 
He is also general attorney for the Delaware 
Construction Company, engaged in the 
building of one hundred and fifty miles of 
railroad in Oklahoma. Mr. Rose has given 
his attention almost entirely to corporation 
and commercial law in recent years and in 
this department of the profession has be- 
come widely known and has built up an ex- 
! tensive and important practice, his reputation 
being not confined to Kansas, especially in 
the department of banking law and the trial 
of banking cases. He has one of the most 
complete law libraries in the city, including 
over fifteen hundred volumes on law. His 
clientage includes some of the most import- 
ant corporations and business firms in the 
city and vicinity, among these being the 
Sentney Wholesale Grocery Company, the 
St. John Trust Company, the Monarch Mills 
Company, the L. J. "\Vhite Lumber Company 
and ten different banking houses. He yet 
retains all of his Stafford county business of 
that class and is attorney for the National 
Bank of Commerce, of Kansas City, while 
for the Phoenix Insurance Company, of 
Hartford, Connecticut, he is attornev for 
Kansas. The character of his business and 
the important concerns which he represents 
is a guarantee of his superior abilitv, his 
c< luprehensive knowledge and of the care 
with which he handles the intricate problems 
which arise in connection with corporation 
and conmiercial law. 

On the 20th of September, 1881, was 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



celebrated the marriage of Mr. Rose and 
Wiss Winifred Fnrness, the wedding taking 
place in Furnessville, Indiana. The lady is 
a daughter of the Hon. E. L. Furness, a 
prominent citizen of Indiana, living at Fur- 
nessville. He is extensively interested in 
agricultural pursuits and is regarded as 
authority on such matters. Three sons have 
been born unto Mr. and Mrs. Rose : Arthur 
B., Fred F. and Dwight, and the eldest two 
are students in the State Agricultural Col- 
lege of Kansas. The family occupy a prom- 
inent place in the social life of Hutchinson 
and the hospitality of the best homes is freely 
extended to them. Since coming here Mr. 
Rose has purchased an elegant residence, 
containing ten rooms and supplied with all 
modern conveniences. It is located at No. 
802 Avenue A, east. In his political views 
Mr. Rose has always been an inflexible ad- 
herent of the Republican party, has attended 
many of its conventions and his opinions 
carry weight in its councils. Socially he is 
identified with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen and with the Masonic fraternity. 
In a profession where advancement depends 
upon individual merit he has attained to a 
position of distinction. He is a man of schol- 
arly attainments, of liberal culture, broad 
minded and public spirited, and Kansas ac- 
counts him among her representati\-e men. 



H. C. HODGSOX. 



One of the most prosperous farmers and 
horticulturists of Rice county is H. C. Hodg- 
son. Indefatigable energy has been the key 
which has unlocked for him: the portals of 
success and from its storehouses he has gar- 
nered rich fruits. He came to the county 
in the epoch of its primitive development and 
as the years have passed he has not only 
added to his individual prosperity but has 
alsri largely promoted th& v/elfare and prog- 
ress I if the community, co-operating in all 
measures and movements which tend to con- 
tribute to the general good. Classed among 
the representative citizens of the commun- 



ity he well deserves mention in this volume 
and with pleasure we present his record to 
our readers. 

He belongs to a Virginian family honor- 
able and prominent. His birth occurred in 
Frederick county, Virginia, November 4, 
1843, and his yotmger days were spent on 
his father's plantation and -in the school 
room. He is a son of Samuel and Rebecca 
(Beam) Hodgson, both r.epresentatives of 
prominent families of the Old Dominion. 
The father was a son of Abner and Rebecca 
(Johnson) Hodgson, also of Virginia, the 
fomier a leading and influential farmer who 
died in his native state. During the war 
of 1 812 he sent a substitute to the army. 
He had three children, Elizabeth, Mary and 
Samuel. 

The last named was born, reared and 
spent his entire life in Virginia, where he 
was a well known and successful farmer and 
slave owner. He was identified \\ith the 
farming interests of Frederick county and 
his work netted him a good financial return. 
During the war of the rebellion he was loyal 
to the Union, although he knew that the 
success of northern arms meant the loss of 
his slaves. His home was in the path of 
the contending armies, but his house was 
searched by neither, although he suffered 
heavy losses in his farm products and stoCk. 
He, however, was never harmed, for he was 
widely and favorabh- known and command- 
ed the respect of all. Politically he was a 
Whig and later a Republican. He lived the 
life of an honest, unostentatious planter and 
never aspired to political preferment. His 
wife yet survives him and is li\-ing at the 
old homestead in Virginia, at the age of 
ninety years. Her father, James Beam, was 
an extensive farmer of the Old Dominion, 
in which he spent his entire life. His chil- 
dren were: Nathan, who died in McPher- 
son county, Kansas; Uriah, who departed 
this life in Missouri ; Eliza. Judith, and Re- 
becca. Unto Samuel Hodgson and his wife 
were born eight children : Abner. who died 
in Virginia ; James, who died in Iowa; John 
R., who passed away in West Virginia ; H. 
C. of this review ; Ann E., the wife of A. J. 
Howard ; George, a leading farmer of Rice 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



county, Kansas; Mary R., who is with her 
mother; and Mrs. Florence Willis. The 
mother is a consistent and worthy member- 
of the Presbyterian church and into the 
minds of her children she instilled the prin- 
ciples of right living. 

H. C. Hodgson was reared in the Old 
Dominion and remained at home until twen- 
ty-five years of age. During the rebellion 
he was enrolled in the militia and was thus 
forced into the Rebel service, but after nine 
days succeeded in obtaining his release and 
like the others of the family remained loyal 
to the Union cause. In 1869 he married 
Miss Hannah Wright, a lady of intelligence 
and, culture, who was born in Virginia in 
1845, a daughter of Amos and Rachel (Lup- 
ton ) Wright, both of whom were natives of 
Virginia. They were prominent people and 
members of the Friends society. Her father 
would take no part in the Civil war and the 
secessionists therefore put him in prison, but 
after a short time he was. released. He was 
opposed to the w^ar and' therefore woiild 
take no part in the fighting. His death oc- 
curred in Virginia, after which his wife 
found a good home with her daughter, Mrs. 
Hodgson, in Kansas, where she died. They 
had four children. Rebecca, whoi gave Gen- 
eral Sheridan the information concerning 
the situation at \\'inclie>ter before the fight, 
was rewarded for that service by an ap- 
pointment to a position in the treasury de- 
partment at Washington, where she has re- 
mained for thirty-three years. She is now 
the wife of W. C. Bonsai, and resides in 
\\'ashington, D. C. George, the second of the 
family, was killed while serving in the Rebel 
army: Hannah, now Mrs. Hodgson, is the 
next of the family ; and John T. is a resi- 
dent of Ohio. All are members of the So- 
ciety of Friends. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hodg- 
son have been born five children : Jo^hn W., 
at home; Edward H., who is attending 
school in Manhattan, Kansas; Frederick E., 
also at ^Manhattan; Mary B. and Henry C., 
at home. 

After his marriage Mr. Hodgson en- 
gaged in farming the old homestead until 
1871, when he came to Kansas, locating in 
Rice countv, where he filed a hom.estead 



claim in the valley of Little River. His 
first work was to build a dugcnt, in which 
he settled his family and then began the 
improvem'ent of his land. Like most of the 
pioneers he had limited capital and had to 
endure many trials and dif^culties. He 
bought a team and when winter was over 
his mioney was gone and terd work lay 
before him, but he soon began the develop 
men of his fields and from that time his 
fami has been self-sui)porting. Li 1874 he 
sufferedi the loss of his corn crop and \-ege- 
tables by the grasshoppers, but he had wheat 
and other supplies and did not suffer as 
many of his neighbors did. He worked hard 
and prosperity followed his indefatigable 
labors. He early began setting out fruit and 
shade trees and finding that the fruit would 
grow and mature he kept extending his or- 
chards until he is now one of tlie leading 
horticulturists of the state. Li .1886 he 
planted a large orchard and now has about 
five thousand bearing apple trees and aliout 
two thousand peach trees besides other 
smaller fruits. He has the largest and finest 
orchard in Rice county, if not in central 
Kansas. He was reared in a good fruit 
country, always took an interest in horticul- 
tural pursuits and determining to make the 
venture in Kansas he found that he could 
succeed here as a fruit grower, and this 
branch of his business has proved quite suc- 
cessful. He has had some short crniis, Init 
many years his trees have yielded lunnti- 
fully and his fruit sales have t'uis materially 
increased his income. He also manufactures 
pure cider vinegar quite extensively and 
finds a ready market for all the products 
which his farm yields. His farm and or- 
chards are fenced with hedges and he has 
planted many forest trees, having fine groves 
for windbreaks. As his financial resources 
have increased he has added to his home- 
stead and now owms eight hundred' acres of 
valuable land without any incumbrance. His 
land is undfer a high- state of cultivation and 
he raises and handles stock bes'des carrying 
on general farming. In 1888 he erected a 
large barn and in 1899 he built a commodi- 
ous two-story frame residence, supplied with 
all modern conveniences and situated upon 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



a natural building site and in the midst ot 
beautiful groves of evergreen, fruit and for- 
est trees, miaking liis' place one of the best 
improA-ed farms in the state. He started 
with his dugout and, sod house, two years 
later erected a small frame d^velling and 
now has a most beautiful residence. These 
homes indicate his steady progress on the 
highroad to success. He is ever reliable and 
straightforward in business, commanding 
the respect and confidence of all with whom 
he is associated and winning the high re- 
gard of manv friends. 



\\'ILLIA^I H. CARHART. 

^^'illiam H. Carhart, deputy county 
treasurer, is a native of Ellsworth county, 
born April ii, 1875, near Wilson. His par- 
ents, A\'illiam H. and Hettie Carhart, came 
to Kansas from Iowa, in 1872, and here the 
father engaged in farming for a time, but 
afterward became connected with mercan- 
tile interestsi in Wilson, where he is now re- 
siding. The son pursued his education- in 
the public schools of Wilson and in the 
Kansas Wesleyan University, at Salina, 
where he was a student for four years. He 
also spent one year in the University Medi- 
cal College, at Kansas City, intending to 
make the practice of medicine his life work, 
but upon the breaking out of the war with 
Spain he enlisted in his country's service 
and was made sergeant of Company I, 
Twenty-first Kansas Infantry, and the regi- 
ment was sent to- Chickamauga and then to 
Kentucky. He is still interested iu military 
affairs and is now first lieutenant of Com- 
pany H of the Second Regiment of the Kan- 
sas National Guard. 

When his brother-in-law, G. L. Banner, 
was elected county treasurer he chose IMr. 
Carhart as his deputy, and -as ]\Ir. Banner, 
on account of his extensive bus'ness inter- 
ests in Wilson, finds it impossible to locate 
at the county seat, the managerial part of the 
duties of the office devolves upon our subject, 
who is now capably serving and winning 
high commendation bv his faithfulness and 



ability. He has filled the office since Au- 
gust, 1899, during which time the detail 
work has de\'ol\'ed upon him. In politics 
he is a Republican and takes an active in- 
terest in the success of the party. 

In November, 1900, Mr. Carhart was 
united in marriage to Miss Minnie, daughter ' 
of Rev. Br. J. H. Lockwood, presiding elder 
of Beloit district. He has since made Ells- 
worth his home and has purchased an at- 
tractive residence here, the large house be- 
ing surrounded by beautiful shade trees and 
the well kept lawn. The young couple are 
popular in social circles and enjoy the hos- 
pitality of many friends. Mr. Carhart is 
identified with the lodge of Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, at Wilson, and is treas- 
urer of the Ellsworth Club, in which he 
takes great pride. 



CHARLES N. WOOBBELL. 

Charles N. Wooddell, one of the most 
prominent dealers in coal, grain and feed 
in Nickerson, Kansas, is a native of Ohio, 
his birth having occurred in Highland 
county, June 8, 1861. His father, J. M. 
Wooddell, was born in Virginia about 
sixty-five years ago. He married Miss 
Catherine Ellen Stout, a native of High- 
land county, Ohio, and the daughter of John 
Stout and a jMiss Nailor, who died aljout 
the time Catherine was born. Her parents 
were married in Higliland county, Ohio. 
She and her husband had nine children, 
seven of whom grew to years of maturity. 

Charles N. Wooddell, the subject of this 
review, is the third child and second son 
of his parents. He was reared in his native 
village and attended the district schools un- 
til sixteen years of age, when he left home 
and the following year he went to Urbana, 
Ohio, as an employe of the United States 
Rolling Stock Company, engaged in car 
manufacture, and remained with them two 
years. He then accepted a position with the 
Lim'a Car Works, of Lima. Ohio, and later 
with the Chicago & Atlantic road, now the 
Chicago & Erie, at Huntington, Indiana, 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



and for one sumlmer worked for the Pull- 
man Company, at Pullman, Illinois. In 
1884 he went to Hutchinson, Kansas, where 
he worked on the Methodist Episcopal 
church and other buildings, and made his 
home there several years with his uncle, 
I. N. Wooddell, now in Garden City, Kan- 
sas. For one year he worked for the Santa 
Fe Railroad Company, and then with the 
St. John & Marsh Company, of Great Bend, 
Kansas, from the fall of 1885 until 1889, 
when he went tO' Nickerson and was with 
the same fimi in the lumber yard there. On 
Ma}' 28, 1890, he went to work in the round 
house there, being thus engaged two years. 
He was then made a locomotive fireman, 
and, being a member of the Order of Loco- 
motive Firemen, he went out in the Ameri- 
can Railway Union strike in 1894. He then 
located in Nickerson and bought out the 
lumber, coal and grain business of S. M. 
Cooper, which he has conducted since Sep- 
tember, 1894, though in 1899 ^^^ discon- 
tinued the sale of lumber. 

Mr. ^Vooddell was married at Topeka, 
Kansas, on the 15th of September, 1886, 
to i\Iiss Georgetta AlcCoy, of Highland 
county, Ohio, and their union has been 
Ijlessed with three children : Dorothy, who 
died of diphtheria when four years of age; 
Earl, a bright boy of fourteen years; and 
Helen, now four years of age. The parents 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in which he is serving as an officer. 
His father was an invalid in his later years 
and our subject gave his earnings to the 
family from the time he was seventeen years 
of age until he was twenty-five, but he has 
been very successful in his business and he 
now owns his own home and place of busi- 
ness. He buys grain at Wherry, Lorraine 
and at Fruit Valley, and is doing the lead- 
ing business in Nickerson. 

Mr. Wooddell is a great admirer of 
horses, has shipped many and has a \'aluable 
Wilkes stallion, Alashtar, register number 
25>598, a ver)^ fine animal of high breeding. 
Fraternally Mr. Wooddell is a Mason, an 
Odd Fellow and also a member of the Re- 
bekah Degree, the Modern Woodmen of 
America and the Ancient Order of United 



Workmen. In his political affiliations he is 
a stanch Republican, does everything in his 
power to promote the growth and secure the 
success of his party, and was elected a mem- 
ber of the city council, in which capacity he 
served two years in a most acceptable man- 
ner to his constituents, and by his consci- 
entious and faithful performance of his 
official duties he did much for the substan- 
tial upbuilding and progress of the city, 
thus well deserving the confidence and higli 
esteem which is uni\-ersally accorded him by 
his fellow citizens. 



PETER B. POTTER. 

The people of Norwich, Kingman coun- 
ty, Kansas, and vicinity have come to con- 
sider the store of Peter B. Potter, of that 
town, as headquarters for dry goods, cloth- 
ing, furnishing goods, hats and caps, boots 
and shoes, notions, millinery, groceries and 
queensware. Mr. Potter is a native of 
Dodge county, Wisconsin, born December 
12, 1856. His parents were Peter and 
Sophronia (Coles) Potter. His father was 
born in the state of New Y(jrk, his mother 
in Ohio. The former settled in Dudge 
county, Wisconsin, before their marriage 
and took up a timber farm, on which he 
made some improvements and on which he 
died when the subject of this sketch was 
about one year old. After his death the 
farm was sold and the family broken up. 

Peter B. Potter, the youngest of the five 
children of his parents, literally made his 
own way in the udrld after he was ten years 
old. He found emplnynient at farm work, 
for a time recei\ing fur his services only his 
board and clothes. When he was twenty- 
two years old he hired out to work in a saw- 
mill, and a year later became clerk in a store 
at Merrillan, Jackson county, Wisconsin, 
where during six years' continuous service 
he obtained quite a practical knowledge of 
mercantile life and affairs. In October, 
1885, he went to Cowley county, Kansas, 
and opened a general store at New Salem 
in a building which he erected at that 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



point. A year later he traded his store 
building for land and removed his stock of 
goods to Norwich, which town was then 
only one year old. For a year he was a 
tenant in the building which he now occu- 
pies and which he bought at the expiration 
of that time. From the first he has kept a 
stock of goods fresh and up-to-date and 
from time to time he has enlarged it until 
he has brought it to its present goodly pro- 
portions, and throughout all the territory 
tributary to Norwich he has an enviable 
reputation for honesty and fair dealing. 

Mr. Potter has taken an active part in 
public affairs, and as a Republican has been 
elected mayor of Norwich and has served 
three terms as a member of the common 
council and four years as a member of the 
board of education of that city. He has been 
an active worker in his church, in which he 
has filled the office of Sunday-school superin- 
tendent for many years; has passed the 
chairs in the local branch of the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, and is also a 
member of the orders of Royal Neighbors 
and ]\Iodern Woodmen of America. 

December 19, 1881, Mr. Potter married 
at La Crosse, Wisconsin, Miss Ella B. 
Nash, daughter of Edmund and Catharine 
(\\'ilkenson) Nash, the former of English, 
the latter of Scotch extraction. Mrs. Pot- 
ter, who was born at Delafield, \\'aukesha 
county, Wisconsin, has borne her husband 
children as follows : Nina F., who died at 
the age of eight years and eight months; 
Inez C, who is a student at Winfield Col- 
lege, Kansas ; Harrison E., Grace E. ; and 
Donald C. 

Rufus Coles, Mr. Potter's grandfather 
in the maternal line, was a practicing physi- 
cian in Ohio and a pioneer physician in 
\\'isconsin, and Captain Coles, of the 
United States army, is a cousin of Mr. Pot- 
ter's mother. Peter Potter, Sr., the father 
of our subject, v/as active in the political 
life of Dodge county, and in 1855 he was 
elected by the Democratic party as a mem- 
ber of the state senate, but he died during 
his ,term of service. Mrs. Potter is one of 
nine children of her parents, seven of whom 
survive. Her brother, John Nash, who is 



an architect, carpenter and builder, lives in 
the state of Washington. Richard Nash is 
a farmer and mechanic and lives on the old 
family homestead at Camp Douglas, Wis- 
consin. Henry Nash is a citizen of ]\lil- 
waukee, Wisconsin. Edward Nash is as- 
sociated in business with his brother in 
Washington. Ralph Nash lives in New 
York city. Dennis Nash lives on the Nash 
homestead in Wisconsin. Anna Nash died 
at the age of eight years. Michael Nash, 
who was a railroad man in the service of the 
Chicago & Northwestern Railway Com- 
pany, was killed by a railroad accident at 
the age of twenty-four years. Edwin Nash, 
the father of Mjrs. Potter, was born in York- 
shire, England. His father died when he 
was a child, and when he was sixteen years 
old he came to America with his mother and 
her four youngest children. They remained 
for a time in New York city, whence they 
moved to Waukesha county, Wisconsin. 
After his marriage Mr. Nash worked at the 
cooper's trade and improved a farm which 
he sold in order to remove to Juneau coun- 
ty, Wisconsin, where he bought a large 
farm, on which he died in 1891, aged fifty- 
eight )-ears, and on which his widow is liv- 
ing at the age of seventy-four. He was 
active in public affairs and for fifteen years 
held the office of assessor of his township, 
and was a member of the Protestant Epis- 
copal church. 

Mr. Potter has recently remodeled his 
family residence at Norwich, and it is one 
of the pleasantest and most hospitable ones 
in that city. He is not only a progressive 
merchant but a progressive citizen, who 
takes a helpful interest in all movements 
for the public good and whose public spirit 
may be safely depended upon in any emer- 
gency. 



CALEB R. DAVIS. 

The subject of this sketch is widely 
known as a pioneer in central Kansas, and 
he is one of the oldest settlers in Rice coun- 
ty. When he came to the locality the land 
was in the possession of Indians and buft'a- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



loes and no counties had been organized, 
and there were no settlers within forty miles 
of the place in Ellsworth county, where he 
and two other families located. Through 
all the growth and de\-elopnient of Ells- 
worth and Rice counties he has been promi- 
nently identified with their interests. 

Caleb R. Davis, who is an honored resi- 
dent of Little River, Rice county, KanSas, 
was born in W'arren count}', Indiana, De- 
cember 23, 1835, a son of Andrew and Zella 
(^ Grant) Davis. His father was born in 
Massachusetts and reared in Xew Jersey, 
and he was married in Ohio. Joseph Davis 
came from Wales to America when a small 
boy and was brought up in Massachusetts 
and bravely served the cause of the colonies 
during the entire period of the Revolution- 
ary war, during a portion of which he was 
one of Washington's most trusted personal 
attendants, looking after his wardrobe and 
baggage and attending to many important 
matters under his direct supervision. He 
returned to Massachusetts after the war and 
later removed to Xew Jersey, where he lived 
out the remainder of his days. He was a 
prominent farmer and an influential citi- 
zen. His children were named Andrew, 
Joseph, Asher, Elijah, Amelia and Pris- 
cilla. Andrew grew to manhood in New 
Jersey, where he entered the army and 
ser\-ed through the war of 18 12, doing gar- 
rison duty much of the time at Sandy 
Hook. After the war he lived for a time 
at Trenton, New Jersey, whence he re- 
moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, then an unim- 
portant village, where for a time he worked 
at the carpenter's trade. Subsequently he 
located in Montgomery county, Ohio, not 
far from Dayton, where he farmed and 
worked at his trade to obtain money with 
which to secure his homestead. He was 
married there and remained until 1833. 
From 1833 until 1867 he lived in Warren 
county. Indiana, where he developed a good 
fanu, which he sold in order to remove to 
Kansas. He bought a small tract of land 
near Manhattan, Kansas, and built on it a 
good residence and improved it into a good 
farm, which he sold in order to remove to 
his life. He was a broad-minded and intelli- 



gent man, of great charity and public spirit 
and of unswerving integrit}-, who was most 
worthily successful in life and acquired a 
good property. His wife was the daughter 
of James Grant, who was a distant relative 
of General U. S. Grant, and who became a 
well-to-do farmer in Ohio, where he died. 
Mr. and Mrs. Grant had children as fol- 
lows: Susan, Zella (Mrs. Davis), Charity, 
Alice and John. The following facts con- 
cerning the children of Andrew and Zella 
(Grant) Davis will be of interest in this con- 
nection: Elizabeth married George Little. 
J\Iary married N. Farden. James died in 
Illinois. Joseph was captain of a c(3mpany 
in the Fifty-third Regiment, Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry, and was later promoted to 
the command of his regiment, with the rank 
of colonel. He was made a prisoner of war 
at Jackson, Mississippi, and was soon after- 
ward paroled. Some time after the close 
of the war he went to California, where he 
died. William is living in Missouri and 
Thomas in California. Evaline married 
John Curran. Andrew lives in Oregon. 
Amelia is the wife of R. Stone. Caleb R. 
is the immediate subject of this sketch. 
John fought in the Union army three years 
during the rebellion and lives in southern 
Kansas. 

Caleb R. Davis passed his childhood and 
youth in Warren ctumty. Indiana, and after 
he had attained to his majority went to Illi- 
nois, where he worked on a rented farm for 
two years, meantime returning to Indiana 
to be married. After that he rented a farm 
in Newton county, Indiana, for six years, 
and in 1865 removed to Kansas. He passed 
the winter of 1865 and 1866 at Manhattan, 
and in tlie spring of 1866 he and his wife 
and twO' other families located within the 
present borders of Ellsworth county, on 
Thompson's creek, squatting on land which 
they afterward pre-empted and held, thus 
effecting the first settlement in that portion 
of Kansas. There was no other settlement 
nearer than forty miles, but Camp Ells- 
worth, the site of Fort Harker, was twelve 
miles distant and Mr. Davis could buy sup- 
plies from the army settler at the military 
post there, and he remembers that on one 



i?.S 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



occasion he paid fifteen dollars per hundred 
weig'ht for floiu". There was no market 
nearer than the Missouri river and no grist 
mill was available. Game was plenty and 
]Mr. Davis killed many buffaloes and some 
antelopes. There were many Indians in the 
country, but they were not at that time 
dangerous. He built a small dugout house, 
broke some land, and as soon as possible got 
to farming in a small way. It was not long 
before he was well embarked in the cattle 
business, in which he has continued to the 
present time. After the little band of pio- 
neers had become established in Ellsworth 
county the Indians began stealing their 
stock and such depredations became so fre- 
cpient that at times the settlers would band 
together for mutual protection against their 
raids. More than thirty men, women and 
children passed one winter under the pro- 
tection of a fort, but no member of their 
colony was killed by the savages. About 
1866 emigration set into that quarter of the 
state and in 1867 ™ost of the creek land 
was claimed and within a few years about 
all the prairie land had been taken up and 
the development and improvement of cen- 
tral Kansas had begun in earnest. Mr. Da- 
vis improved a good farm there, which he 
sold in 1875, when the filed homestead and 
timber claims in the Little River valley, on 
the Rice side of the county line. Later he 
gave the timber claim to his daughter and 
in 1893 he sold the homestead claim and 
bought one hundred and sixty acres of land 
in Rice county, where he now lives and to 
which he has added by subsequent purchase 
until he owns eight hundred acres, mostly 
in Little River valley, all well improved and 
under profitable cultivation. He has been 
successful as a general farmer and cattle- 
raiser and is one of the well-to-do farmers 
of the county. Few improvements had been 
made on his home farm when he bought it, 
but he has built an expensive and attractive 
residence on a natural elevation that over- 
looks the valley and a wide stretch of sur- 
rounding country. This beautiful home, 
three miles northwest of Little River, is 
provided with ample outbuildings, barns and 
appliances for successful farming. 



]\Ir. Davis is an influential Republican 
and is regarded as a citizen of public spirit, 
who may always be depended upon to fa- 
vor to the extent of his ability any move- 
ment promising to benefit the general pub- 
lic. He was married January 20, 1858, to 
Miss Catherine Byard, of ^\'arren county, 
Indiana, who was born in Benton county, 
same state, a daughter of John and Margaret 
(Smith) Byard, natives of Ohio. John By- 
ard was the son of John Byard, Sr., of 
Ohio, who was a prominent farmer and who 
had children named David. Mary and John, 
Jr. Mary married Mr. Collins and John, 
Jr., was the father of Mrs. Davis. John 
Byard. Jr., was reared to manhood on his 
father's farm in Ohio, and married Mar- 
garet Smith, a daughter of James Smith, 
who removed from Ohio to Indiana and 
unproved a farm in Benton county, became 
prominent there as a citizen and died there. 
His children were Margaret ([Mrs. Byard), 
James, Thomas and Henry. John Byard, 
Jr., and his wife, Margaret Smith, who 
were earnest Christians of the Baptist faith, 
had children as follows : James ; Thomas ; 
Henry; Catherine, who married the subject 
of this sketch: and Margaret, who died 
young. Caleb R. and Catherine (Byard) 
Davis have a daughter, Margaret, who is 
the wife of John L. Smith, a prominent 
farmer of Rice county, Kansas. Mrs. Da- 
vis is a worthy and helpful member of the 
Christian church. 



ANDREW B. -MARTIX. 

For many years Andrew Black !\Iartin 
was one of tlie intelligent and popular citi- 
zens and reliable business men of Rice coun- 
t}-. and his loss to the community was widelv 
felt. He was a representative of that class 
of American citizens who while advancing 
their individual interests also promote the 
general good. While carrying on business 
for himself he contributed to commercial 
activity, whereon depends the growth and 
development of every community. His name 
was always an active factor in cluuxli circles. 





? 






BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



129 



and wherever he was known he was highly 
esteemed, for he possessed those quaHties 
which in every land and in every clime 
command respect and admiration. 

Air. Alartin was licrn in Kirkwood, 
Warren connty, Illincis, June 3, 1853, '^'''cl 
is a son of James P. Martin, whose birth 
occurred in the east and he was of Scotch- 
Irish lineage. The members of the family 
perhaps were never distinguished for prom- 
inence in political or military life, but they 
belonged to that sturdy class of citizens 
whose reliability and devotion to the public 
good formed the bulwark and strength of 
the nation. The mother of our subject was 
Miss Alaxey Talcott. She had received a 
good education and was a lady of intelli- 
gence, whose innate culture was manifest 
in her home and in her influence over her 
children. She died at Des Moines, Iowa, 
and Mr. Alartin, the father, passed away in 
\\'arren county, Illinois. 

In the state of his nativity Andrew 
Black Alartin spent his youth, and his pre- 
liminary education acquired in the common 
schniils was supplemented by collegiate 
training in Alonmouth College, of Mon- 
mouth, Illinois, an institution under the 
auspices of the United Presbyterian church. 
In connection with his brother, John Mar- 
tin, he afterward established the Galesburg 
Business College, which became one of the 
best knijwn and popular schools for business 
training in the state. This^they conducted 
successfully for some time, but at length 
our subject abandoned educational work 
and turned his attention to commercial pur- 
suits. In the enterprise he was connected 
also with the firm of S. K. Martin & Com- 
pany, lumber dealers of Chicago, where 
they carried on operations until 1883, when 
Mr. Martin became identified with the in- 
terests of Rice county, establishing his 
home in Lyons. Here he opened a lumber 
yard and was soon in command of a good 
trade, for he carried a complete line of all 
kinds of lumber, and in his business dealings 
he was so reliable and straightforward that ' 
those who once became his customers re- j 
mained as his regular patrons. He possess- ' 



ed excellent and executive ability, keen dis- 
cernment and strong sagacity, and these 
qualities rendered him well worthy of the 
splendid success which crowned his efi^orts. 
On the 17th of January, 1882. Air. 
Martin was joined in wedlock to Aliss 
Mary Newman, who was born in Burling- 
ton, Iowa, but was reared and educated in 
Galesburg, Illinois , a daughter of Isaac 
and Salina ( Patrick) Newman. Her fa- 
ther was a representative of a prominent 
southern family and her mother was born 
in IMichigan, her ancestors having removed 
from New York to the Wolverine state. 
Unto Mr . and Mrs. Martin were born 
three children: A. Newman, now a young 
man of eighteen years; A. B., a lad of ten 
summers; and Ruth Maxim, a bright little 
girl of five years. After the father's 
death Mrs. Martin removed with her chil- 
dren to a farm three miles southwest of 
Lyons, where they ha^•e a fine modern resi- 
dence, tastefully furnished in a manner that 
indicates the refinement and culture > if the 
inmates. Both Mr. and Mrs. Martin held 
membership in the Presbyterian church, of 
which he was a very active and earnest 
worker. He served as leader of the choir 
and was also Sunday-school superintendent. 
His love of children was one of his most 
marked characteristics, and his superior 
manhood was indicated by the free confi- 
dence given Inm liy the little ones. There 
is an intuiti.in which seems to teach a child 
where its confidence can be placed, and this 
quality is more reliable than the judgment 
of our mature years. It was the most easy 
matter for Air. Martin to win the love of 
children on account of the deepi love which 
he bore for them and the interest which he 
took in their welfare. He was a man of 
strong temperance principles, and by pre- 
cept and example promoted the cause. So- 
cially he was identified with the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, and in his po- 
litical \-iews he- was a Republican. He 
found his greatest happiness in the midst 
of his family and counted no sacrifice too 
great that wmild promote the welfare of his 
wife and children. In business life he sus- 



130 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



tained an unassailable reputation, and in so- 
cial and home relations he was the soul of 
honor, so that he left to his family not only 
a handsome competence, the rich reward of 
his labors through many years but also the 
priceless heritage of an untarnished name. 
His death occurred February 13, 1900. 



COXRAD H. PIEPER. 

Conrad Pieper, a farmer, thresher and 
liveryman of Nickerson, Kansas, was born 
in Lippe, Germany, December 7, 1841, and 
when three years of age accompanied his 
parents, Antone and Dora (Hillkirk) Pie- 
per, to America in a sailing vessel. They 
landed at New Orleans and then came by 
river to Evansville, Indiana. The father 
was a cabinet maker by trade but after com- 
ing to America was mostly engaged in 
farming. He came to this country with 
scant means and borrowed money to begin 
life here. He proved up on a small claim of 
thirty-six acres and made several additional 
purchases until he owned one hundred and 
eighty acres, improved a good farm and 
stocked it with horses, cattle, sheep and 
hogs. Unto this worthy couple were born 
seven children, six sons and one daughter, 
and four of the number were born in Ger- 
many. The daughter and one son died in 
childhood and the other five sons are: 
Fred, a farmer living in Bicknell, Indiana ; 
Conrad, the subject of this sketch ; Her- 
man, who is living in Pratt county, Kan- 
sas, and has three sons ; Tlieodore, a farmer 
living in Indiana, who has a family of sons 
and daughters ; and Charles, who died in 
Indiana in December, 1900, leaving a wife 
and four children. The mother of this fam- 
ily died in Indiana in 1872, at the age of 
fifty-six years, her birth having occurred in 
18 1 6. and the father died in 1896, at the age 
of eighty-seven years. 

Conrad H. Pieper. whose name forms 
the caption oi this sketch, was reared to 
farm life and labored at grubbing the land 
■ when a lad of ten years, and he and two 
of his brothers drew rails and wood bv hand 



on the little truck wagon, made by their fa- 
ther, before they had their first team of 
steers, which they raised. His educational 
privileges were very meager. He went to 
the little log school-house, with puncheon 
floor, seats and desks, the windows being 
single panes of glass rudely placed in space 
where a part of two logs had been cut out. 
The books were very few, reading, writing 
and arithmetic being the principal studies 
taught, and the methods of teaching were 
the most primitive and simple. He re- 
mained at home until August, 1862, when 
he enlisted in Company C, Eightieth Indi- 
ana Volunteer Infantry, and served three 
years or until the close of the war. He was 
wounded in the left side at Perryville. Ken- 
tucky, and was in the hospital seven weeks. 
At the battle of Atlanta, Georgia, he was 
taken prisoner while he was with Sherman 
and was held fifty-six days in the Ander- 
sonville pen in 1864, being captured on the 
22d of August and not paroled until Oc- 
tober, when he joined his company at once. 
When the war closed he returned from 
Mosely Hall, North Carolina, to the old 
homestead farm near Bicknell, which is now 
owned by his brother Theodore. Mr. Pie- 
per has been a thresher since his youth, 
when the power and the separator had to be 
loaded and unloaded by hand, but now he 
owns two steam threshers in -complete ruii- 
ning order. He purchased his first land, 
one hundred and sixty acres, in Linn coun- 
ty, Kansas, in April, 1866, paying four 
hundred and sixty dollars for it. and he later 
sold it for one thousand dollars. That in- 
vestment proved so profitable to him that 
eighteen months later he bought a quarter 
section in the same county, for four hundred 
dollars, which he sold in 1880 for fifteen 
hundred dollars, which amount he was 
offered for it within one year after 
purchasing it. His next venture was 
in Sedg-wick county, Kansas, where 
he purchased a quarter section for 
seven hundred dollars, which he sold in less 
than a year for eleven hundred dollars. He 
then went to the western part of Reno 
county and bought a claim of a half section 
for four hundred dollars, and proved up on 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



131 



one quarter at a, dollar and a quarter per 
acre and sold the claim to the other quarter 
for four hundred dollars. In 1888 he pur- 
chased a quarter section for sixteen hun- 
dred dollars, in 1890 another quarter ad- 
joining for sixteen hundred, and in 1S93 
eighty acres for eight hundred dollars, and 
in 1 90 1 bought one hundred and six^- acres 
more, so that he now owns seven hundred 
and twenty acres in four farms, all improved 
with guod buildings and the fields are under 
a high state of cultivation through the en- 
ergetic efforts and good management of tlie 
owner and his two sons. 

On the 4th of December, 1858, in Linn 
county, -Kansas, Mr. Pieper was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary Jane Sproul, wdio 
was born in Iowa in 1849 ^"d is a daughter 
of Thomas Sproul, a native of Ireland, who 
went to Ohio, thence to Iowa and then to 
Kansas in 1856, becoming one of the first 
settlers, driving over the country in a wagon 
with two yoke of cattle, and was one of the 
best farmers in Linn county. His wife died 
in 1863, leaving five children, two daugh- 
ters and three sons, all living but one daugh- 
ter. He died in 1894, at the age of seventy- 
two years. Mr. and Mrs. Pieper lost one 
daughter when she was seventeen years of 
age, and they have six living children, 
namely : Byron E., a dealer in groceries, 
farm implements and grain in Kingman 
CL'Unt}', Kansas, in which business he is 
making mnney ; Theressa, the wife of 
Charles \\'ells, wlio is now living in King- 
man county and has three children; Thomas 
A., a farmer of Reno county, who' was mar- 
ried in March, 1901 ; Laura E., who mar- 
ried John Woodson, by whom she has three 
children, and they are living in Kingman 
county ; William Theodore, whoi is on the 
home farm; and Leonard S., also on the 
home farm. 

Mr. Pieper is a stanch Republican in his 
political views and is a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. He has never 
sought or desired political office, but his fel- 
low townsmen, realizing his fitness for lead- 
ership and positions of trust, have elected 
him at different times as justice of the peace, 
road overseer and a member of the school 



board, all of which positions he has filled 
with entire satisfaction to his constituents. 
He began the livery business in Nickerson 
in December, 1900, has since taken his son 
intO' partnership, under the style of Pieper 
& Son, and they are doing a fine business, 
keeping many rigs and boarding horses. 



SAMUEL KAUFFMAN. 

Samuel Kauffman, one of the well- 
known citizens of Rice county, who is de- 
voting his energies to agricultural pursuits 
and whose efforts in that direction result in 
making him one of the substantial citizens 
O'f the community, came to this locality in 
1878, and here he has since made his home. 
He was born in Lehigh county, Pennsyl- 
vania, December 2, 1842, a son of Samuel 
Kauffman, Sr. The latter's father, Abra- 
ham Kauft'man, was likewise a native of 
Pennsylvania and was of German descent. 
He married Miss Sarah Shantz, a native of 
the Keystone state, and both died on the old 
home farm in Lehigh county. Samuel 
Kauffman, Sr., was reared and educated in 
the state of his nativity, and was there mar- 
ried to Esther Musselman, who was born in 
Lehigh county, Pennsylvania. Their union 
was blessed with seven children, namely : 
Mrs. Sarah Gehman; Mrs. Susanna \\'3.x- 
ner ; Elizabeth ; Abraham, who* was a min- 
ister of the Mennonite church and is novv^ 
deceased ; Samuel ; Milton ; and Mrs. I\Iary 
Ann Moore. The father of this family fol- 
lowed farming as a life occupation, and was 
honored and esteemed by all who knew him. 
He was an elder in the Mennonite church, 
and in his life exemplified his Christian 
faith. Politically he was an advocate of 
Republican principles. He was called from 
this earth in 1853, ^''"^ '''is widow sundved 
until 1894, when she. too, was called to the 
home beyond, at the age of eighty-nine 
years. 

Samuel Kauffman, whose name forms 
the caption of this review, was reared on a 
farm in Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, 
where he was earlv taught lessons of in- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



dustry, perseverance and economy. The 
public schools afforded him his educational 
privileges, but he has largely supplemented 
this training by practical experience, read- 
ing and observation. The year 1878 wit- 
nessed his arrival in Rice county, Kansas, 
whither he came from Michigan. He lo- 
cated on a tract of unimproved land, but his 
farm is now one of the finest and best im- 
proved places in the county, coiiiprising 
seven hundred and twenty acres of rich and 
productive land. Here he not only folloAvs 
general farming but is also extensively en- 
gaged in the raising of cattle, horses and 
hogs, and in both branches of his business 
he is meeting with a well-merited success. 
As time has passed he has secured all oi the 
improvements and accessories of a model 
farm, erecting a good residence, large barn 
and all necessary outbuildings, and the 
school-house also is located on a portion of 
his place. 

In the year 1866 ^Ir. Kauffman was 
united in marriage to Caroline Godshalk, 
who was born in NoTthampton county, 
Pennsylvania, a sister of the Hon. A. J. 
Godshalk. of Alden, Rice county, Kansas. 
On the 1 8th of October, 1874, in St. Joseph 
county, Michigan, Mrs. Kauffman was 
called to the home beyond, and her loss was 
deeply mourned, for she was loved and re- 
spected by all who' knew her. In 1878, in 
St. Joseph county, Michigan, Mr. Kauff- 
man wedded Savilla, a daughter of John 
W. and Mary (Hile) Kline. The father, 
a native of Snyder county, Pennsylvania, 
is a well-known and honored citizen of Cen- 
ter township. Rice county. The mother 
died at her home in Center township. June 
19, 1900. She was an affectionate wife and 
mother and was loved by all for her kind- 
ness of heart and mind. At her death she 
left six children, namely: Charles. Mrs. 
Savilla Kauffman, Mrs. Jilla Coonfer, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Rathbun, Mrs. Catherine Miller 
and Albert W. Mrs. Kline was a worthy 
member of the Evangelical church, in which 
her husliand also hiMds membership. Unto 
j\Ir. and ]vlrs. Kauffman have been born 
three cliildren. — Eva Grace, Rov L. and 



Floyd Earl. The family are members of the 
Evangelical church. 

On the 5th of April, 1882, their resi- 
dence was completely destro)-ed by a cy- 
clone, and although the family were in the 
house at the time, none of the members were 
injured. Mr. Kauffman casts his ballot in 
favor ^of Republicanism, stanchly advo- 
cating the principles set forth by the party. 
His fellow townsmen ha\-e recognized his 
worth and ability and have called him to 
the office of trea^irer of the school district 
in which he resides, and in this position he 
has served with credit and ability. He is 
a warm advocate of education, temperance 
and religion, and in all relations of life he 
has been true to principle and to duty. 



BYRON L. CHURCH. 

Among the leading and substantial citi- 
zens of Holyrood, Ellsworth county, Kan- 
sas, is Byron L. Church, farmer and stock- 
man, and also president of the Holyrood 
Bank. Mr. Church was born in Jackson 
county, Michigan, on January 26. 1854, 
being a son of Munson Church, who \\as 
born in New York, in 1825, and Charity 
(Glark) Church, who was born in Ohio, in 
1827, and died in 1862. 

Thomas Church, the grandfather of our 
subject, was a pioneer of Jackson county, 
Michigan, and was active in its early or- 
ganization, spending his whole life there. 
He married Mary Warner, and the five sur- 
viving members of his family are these : 
Munson. the father of our subject; Eli. a 
farmer in California ; Alonzo, a farmer in 
Michigan ; Bolona. the widow of Leonard 
Cutler, of Eulton, Illinois ; and Sarah, the 
widow of Alonzo Cutler, of Laporte, In- 
diana. 

While still a child INIunson Church, the 
father of our subject, accompanied his par- 
ents to I\Iichigan and there grew to man- 
hood and married. He was there engaged 
in farming until 1858, when he moved to 
Fulton countv. Illinois. Here also he was 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



133 



engaged in farming for about six years and 
then returned to Michigan, locating in Cal- 
houn county, where he remained until 1879 
and then foIloAved our subject to Ellsworth 
county, Kansas. Mr. Church located on 
section 33-16-9, in Lincoln township, buy- 
ing one-half section of land, and here he 
carried on agriculture until 1884, moving at 
that date to the city of Ellsworth. Five 
years later he removed to a farm belongmg 
to our subject, in Genesee, where he now 
resides. His second marriage was to Mrs. 
Amelia Eldred. Through life Mr. Church 
has been one of the active members of the 
Methodist church and is a much-respected 
citizen. Five children have been born to 
Mr. Church, and our subject was the sec- 
ond in order of birth, the others being as 
follows : Lydia, the wife of C. G. Thomas, 
of Kalamazoo, Michigan; Mary, the wife of 
Charles Chase; -Edward, of Ithaca, Michi- 
gan ; Emma, who died at the age of twelve 
years ; and Richard, a stock dealer of Holy- 
rood. 

Byron L. Church, who is the subject of 
this sketch, was about five years oi age 
when he came to Illinois with his parents, 
and he was reared on a farm in that state 
until he was seventeen years of age, when 
he went to Grand Rapids, Michigan, where 
he found employment in a stove foundry, 
and remained there until he was twenty-one 
years old. Mr. Church was too ambitious 
and energetic to settle down to this life 
when adventure and land were awaiting 
courageous men in Kansas, and in 1876, 
with about one hundred dollars which he 
liad been able to save, he bade his friends 
farewell and started out in the world to 
make a career for himself. His reading 
and investigation had given him a pretty 
fair idea of the part of the state in which 
he wished to locate, and upon reaching Ells- 
worth county he took up homestead and 
timber claims, the west one-half section of 
32-16-9, and settled right down to hard 
work. This was in April, and during the 
first year he succeeded in breaking fifty 
acres, thirty of which was ready in time to 
put in wheat that same year. 

For a home Mr. Church constructed a 



dug-out of dimensions ten feet by sixteen, 
and in this place he kept what was termed 
"bachelor's hall" for about three years, 
working with all the energy and industry of 
which he was capable. He was fortunate 
in raising a good' crop of wheat the first 
year, and in the second year was able to 
utilize the whole fifty acres for wheat, this 
also proving productive, and this encour- 
aged him tO' continue for seven years rais- 
ing wheat. It was some five years after lo- 
cating in the county before he had saved 
enough to buy another one-half section of 
land, and since that time he has done con- 
siderable land buying and selling, his ex- 
cellent judgment being rarely at fault in the 
matter. Mr. Church still retains five hun- 
dred acres of land in the home farm and 
owns eight hundred acres in other parts o{ 
Ellsworth and Rice and Barton counties. 

In 1885, in company with his brother, 
our subject entered into the cattle business, 
in Ness county, where they fenced five thou- 
sand acres of good land, upon which they 
conducted an extensive business for six 
years, or until the law requiring the removal 
of fences from large grazing tracts made it 
impracticable. Mr. Church then continued in 
the cattle business to a large extent on the 
home farm, keeping some two hundred 
head, but during late years has nidre closely 
confined his attention tn his farming inter- 
ests, mainly wheat, raising this cereal en 
four hundred acres, and renting out the re- 
mainder of his land. 

Mr. Church is a man of large ideas and 
progressive spirit, and in 1888 he purchased 
a controlling interest in the Holyrood Bank, 
which institution was founded by H. S. 
Westfall, and since that time our subject 
has served as president, his policy placing 
it among the safe, reliable and conservative 
institutions of the county. The capital of 
the Bank of Holyrood is twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars, and its officers are as follows : 
B. L. Church, president ; H. C. Trevert, vice- 
president ; F. W. Thomas, cashier, and 
Philip Church as assistant cashier, and there 
is probably no business concern in this coun- 
ty doing a more satisfactory business. Lo- 
cated as it is in the heart of one of the best 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



wheat producing sections of the state, and 
at a distance from other banks, it is not 
only a convenience but a necessity to the 
farmers, stockmen and business citizens. 
During the shipping season, when thousands 
of bushels of wheat are handled daily, the 
business amounts to an almost incredible 
sum. Then it is that an honest, reliable and 
conservative concern like the Bank of Holy- 
rood is appreciated. 

In public affairs Mr. Church has always- 
taken an active part in promoting all en- 
terprises for the improvement and advance- 
ment of the county and has been identified 
with ever}^ progressive movement. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican, but a desire for ofifice 
has never disturbed the even tenor of his 
way, and he has accepted only that of town- 
ship trustee, for three consecutive terms, 
and has acted as treasurer of the school 
board. His interest in educational matters 
has been sincere and he has ever done his 
duty in promoting every measure looking 
toward any improvement. 

Fraternally Mr. Church is a Knight 
Templar Mason, belonging to chapter, con- 
sistory and council in Ellsworth, and is a 
charter member of Wichita Consistory, No. 
2, and Ho'lyrood Lodge, No. 362. 

The marriage of Mr. Church was on 
December 29, 1879, to Miss Mary Durr, 
who v/as a daughter of John P. and Catji- 
erine Durr, and she was born in Sheboygan 
county, Wisconsin. Seven children have 
been born to our subject and wife, namelv : 
Ray, who was assistant cashier of the Bank 
of Holyrood and now carries on the work 
on the farm ; Philip, assistant cashier ; Max ; 
Levi : Mimson ; James ; and Donald. 

The home of the Church family is lo- 
cated five miles northeast of the town of 
Holyrood and attracts attention on account 
of the fine improvements and excellent cul- 
tivation. 

Mr. Church is in a great measure a self- 
made man. He came when but a boy to 
this state and by the application of energy 
and industry founded his own fortune. He 
is held in high esteem in Ellsworth county 
and is justly regared as a thoroughly repre- 
sentative citizen of Ellsworth county. 



JOHN SCHARDEIX. 

A work purporting to give an account 
of the leading citizens of Reno county, Kan- 
sas, could not well omit adequate mention 
of John Shardein, a prominent farmer who 
lives on section 20, Salt Q-eek township, 
not far from Nickerson. He is a native of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and was born August 24, 
1837. Bernard Schardein, his father, was 
a native of Alsace or Lorraine, Germany, 
who some time after 1820 came from his 
native land to New York city, making the 
voyage in one of the old-fashioned sailing 
vessels. He had then just been married, 
and he and his young bride went west as 
far as Ohio. He was a weaver by trade, 
but went to Louisville, Kentucky, in 1837 
or 1838 and became a groceryman there. 
Later he went to Clarke county, Indiana, 
and became a farmer there and prospered. 
Mr. and Mrs. Schardein reared five sons and 
two daughters, all of whom grew to ma- 
turity and with exception of one son and 
one daughter all had children. Three of 
the sons fought for the Federal cause in" the 
Civil war. Philip died of disease at Savan- 
nah, Tennessee, and is buried at Shiloh. 
Adam was wounded in the Shenandoah val- 
ley and died at Williamsport, Maryland. 
John, who is the immediate subject of this 
sketch, volunteered August 31, 1861, in the 
-Eleventh Indiana Infantry, and served three 
years or until he was mustered out, August 
31, 1864, at Harper's Ferry, Virginia. 
During the three years he was in the hos- 
pital at New Orleans, a sufferer from oph- 
thalmia. Though often urged to apply for 
a pension, he has never done so. He is an 
ardent Populist and is now the treasurer of 
his township and has served his fellow citi- 
zens as township trustee. He and his wife 
are members of the Christian church, in 
which he is an elder. 

Mr. Schardein was married in Clarke 
county, Indiana, April 20, 1857, to Miss 
Nancy McKinley, who died in the fall of 
1862, while Mr. Schardein was in the army, 
and left a daughter named Luella, whO' mar- 
ried James Miller and lives in Floyd count}-, 
Indiana. In 1865 Mr. Schardein married 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



135 



^liss Eliza J. Grady, who has borne him 
eight cliildren, se\-en of whom are living. 
Their son, John A. Schardein, is a merchant 
in Orange county, Indiana, and has one 
daughter. Their daughter, Emma Ade- 
laide, who married Frank Green, of Salt 
Creek township, has two sons and a daugh- 
ter. Their son Charles B. is a farmer in 
Salt Creek township and has two sons. 
Their daughter Clara L. married George 
Gillock. of Salt Creek township, and has 
two daughters. Their son William E. 
Schardein, of Nickerson, has three sons. 
Their daughter Hettie M. is the wife of 
Frank Johnson, of Medford township, Reno 
county, Kansas. Their son Fred G., a 
youth of sixteen, is a member of his parents' 
household. 

After the war Mr. Schardein went to 
Macoupin county, Illinois, where he was a 
tenant farmer for thirteen years. In 1878 
he went to Sterling, Rice county, Kansas, 
by rail and arrived there August 31. He 
brought Avith him stock and a cash capital 
of five hundred dollars and his belongings 
were conveyed in a cliartered car. He 
bought a claim to a quarter sccticn of land 
and proved up a soldier's claim on it, mak- 
ing a cash payment of one thousand dollars. 
The place was in a state of nature and his 
first honse was a shanty, twelve by fourteen 
feet in size. The man who had lived on the 
claim before he had bought it had occupied 
a leaky shed of the same dimensions. For 
some time his style of living was primitive, 
l)ut better things' were in store for him and 
his family. His present residence is a sub- 
stantial and attractive farm cottage, built 
in tlie midst of a group of shade trees and 
an orchard of fruit trees. This sightly and 
rural home, with the large barn and other 
commodious buildings near by, stands some 
distance from the dusty street and alto- 
gether presents a very inviting appearance. 
]\Ir. Schardein takes pride in breeding good 
stock and he ?lways has fine horses and 
good cattle. In every sense he is a pro- 
gressive and up-to-date farmer, who farms 
in a thoroughly business-like way and reaps 
a substantial and satisfactory reward. He 
has a wide acquaintance among the leading 



business men of the county and while quiet 
and unassuming is influential in public 
matters and helpful to all worthy local in- 
terests. 



HEXRY OBERMOWE. 

Emerson has written: "Knowest thou 
what argument thy life to thy neighbor's 
creed has lent?" The influence of a man 
is immeasurable by any of the known stand- 
ards of the world, but its potency is no less 
marked, and the New England poet, writing 
along the same line, has said again that 
every individual in greater or less degree, 
but always to some degree, leaves an im- 
press upon the lives of those whom he 
meets. If this be true, and the great minds 
of all ages acknowledge it to be so, then the 
question propounded in old Judea, "Am I 
my brother's keeper?" is answered. It is 
this everlasting truth of the brotherhood of 
man and the fatherhood of God that has led 
to the religious work of the world. A most 
potent factor in church circles in Ellsworth 
coimty is the Rev. Henry. Obermowe, now 
pastor of St. Paul's church, in Sherman 
township. His labors have been attended 
with excellent results and a visible evidence 
of his work is found in the splendid house of 
worship which has been erected under his 
direction and as the result of his untiring 
efiforts. 

Mr. Obermowe was born in Westphalia, 
Germany, October 2, 1857, a son of Chris- 
topher and Christine Obermowe. He pur- 
sued his education in the state schools and 
then took up a course in theology that he 
might fit himself either for teaching or the 
ministry. He was connected with educa- 
tional work for a short time in Germany 
and in 1883 he came to America, making 
his way to Spring-field, Illinois, where he be- 
came a student in the German Lutheran Col- 
lege, studying in both English and German. 
He there pursued a four years' conrse and 
was graduated in 1887. Soon afterward he 
came to Kansas, and the same year was or- 
dained, in ]\ritchell county, as a minister of 
the German Lutheran church. For one vear 



36 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



and seven months he served as pastor of a 
congregation there, and on the ist of No- 
vember, 1888, he received and accepted a 
call to come to Ellsworth county and take 
charge of St. Paul's church, in Sherman 
township. At that time there was a mem- 
bership of forty families, but the number 
has since been increased to sixty. Mr. Ober- 
mowe placed the church on a good working 
foundation, and soon marked advancement 
was seen along its various lines of labor. 
Deciding that a new edifice was needed here, 
and after considerable solicitation, and en- 
treaty, he let the contracts for the building 
and saw it actively under way in June, 
1898. In six months it was completed. It 
is a fine stone edifice, forty by seventy-eight 
feet, with a side wall eighteen feet high and 
a spire one hundred and eight feet. The 
foundations are four feet wide at the bot- 
tom and five feet high and the wall of the 
church is two feet thick. It has fine win- 
dows of cathedral glass and has other mod- 
ern equipments and adornments. The 
church was erected at a cost of eight thou- 
sand dollars and has a seating capacity of 
six hundred. The old church was used as 
a school-house until 1900, when the pastor 
secured the erection of a more moderii 
school building, twenty-four by forty feet. 
The students come from a radius of over 
seven miles. The term covers nine months 
during the year and the attendance is be- 
tween sixty-five and seventy, ■ instruction 
being given in both German and English. 
The church building is a very handsome 
one, being one of the finest in central Kan- 
sas, and the congregation is connected with 
the Missouri synod. 

On the 28th of October, 1887, Mr. 
Obermowe was united in marriage, in Lake 
county, Illinois, to Miss Louise Knigge, and 
they now have five children. — Christina, 
Lena, Amelia, Mary and Alfred. Their 
home life is extremely pleasant and Mrs. 
Obermowe heartily co-operates with her 
husband in his work for the uplifting of 
their fellow men. Their home is celebrated 
for its gracious hospitality, which is freely 
extended to all. In his political views ]\Ir. 
Obermowe is a Republican, believing firmlv 



in the principles of the party, although he 
takes no active part in political work. In 
the pulpit he is forceful, earnest and con- 
vincing, using arguments deduced from the 
word of God, and firmly impressing his 
points upon the minds of his audience. His 
language is well chosen, showing his mas- 
tery of the art of rhetoric, and underneath 
all is a substratum of thought, feeling and 
truth which never fails to arouse the atten- 
tion and thus awaken conviction in the 
minds oi those who sit under his teachings. 



PRESTON B. GILLETT. 

A well known jurist of Illinois said, 'Tn 
the American state the great and good law- 
yer must always be prominent, for he is one 
of the forces that move and control society." 
Public confidence has generally been repos- 
ed in the legal profession. It has ever been 
the defender of popular rights, the cham- 
pion of freedom regulated by law, the firm 
support of good government. In the times 
of danger it has stood like a rock and breast- 
ed the mad passions of the hour and firmly 
resisted tumult and faction. No political 
preferment, no mere place, can add to the 
power or increase the honor which belongs 
to the pure and educated lawyer. Judge 
Preston B. Gillett, of Kingman, is one who 
has been honored by and is an honor to the 
legal fraternity of central Kansas. He 
stands to-day prominent among the leading 
members of the bar of his district — a posi- 
tion to which he has attained througli mark- 
ed ability, and as jndge of the twenty-fourth 
judicial district he has made a most credit- 
able record. 

Judge Gillett was born in Saybrook, 
Ohio, July 9, i860, but has spent almost his 
entire life in the Sunfllower state. 'On the pa- 
ternal side his ancestry can be traced back 
to Jonathan Gillett, who was one of the 
hundred and forty Puritans who formed a 
company in Dorsetshire, England, and 
started' on the i\Iary and John for this coun- 
try, :\Iarch 30. 1630, landing at Nantucket, 
on the 30th of :\Iay, exactly two months 




PRESTON B. GILLETT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



137 



after setting sail. In 163(3 he remc\-ed to 
Connecticut and numerous branches of the 
family which he there founded are still liv- 
ing in that state. Many representatives of 
the name became prominent in professional 
life and in the Revolutionary war the Gil- 
letts were enrolled among the private sol- 
diers and the officers of the American Army. 

Asa Gillett, the father of the Judge, was 
born in Connecticut, but during his early 
boyhood his parents removed to Ohio, where 
he was reared. After attaining to man's 
estate he followed merchandising there. In 
Ohio he married Miss Cornelia Fisk, whose 
ancestry can be traced to Sergeant James 
Fisk. who was born in England and crossed 
the briny deep to the new world in 1637. He 
too took up his home in Connecticut, and 
records show that he joined the Salem 
church in 1642. He was descended in di- 
rect line from Lord S_\auond Fisk, of the 
county of Suffolk, England, who was born 
in 1399. The Fisk family has also been 
well represented in the professions, the 
name figuring conspicuously in connection 
with the church, law and medicine, while 
in every war into which the country has 
been engaged the Fisks have stood as loyal 
defenders of this land, fighting on hotly 
contested battlefields as officers or privates, 
but always with the same determined and 
patriotic spirit. 

Some years after his marriage Asa Gil- 
lett removed with his family to Kansas, and 
in 1861 secured a homestead at Emporia, 
as scon as it was decided whether Kansas 
should be a free state or a slave 
state. Emporia was laid out shortly 
before, and his claim lay adjoining 
the corporation limits, which part he 
improved and engaged in business at 
the same time, becoming a leading resi- 
dent of that locality. He was a warm per- 
sonal friend of Senator Preston B. Plumb, 
who was visiting at the home of Mr. Gillett 
at the time of the birth of the Judge, who 
was named in his honor. Mr. Gillett was 
a most ardent Abolitionist and when the 
new Republican party was formed to prevent 
the further extension of slavery he joined 



its ranks and remained one of its stalwart 
supporters until his death. He was alsO' 
a devoiit Methodist and aided in organiz- 
ing the church of that denomination in Em- 
poria. He served as one of its officers, con- 
tributed generously tO' its support and did 
all in his power to advance its interests. He 
died of pneumonia at the age of fifty-seven 
years, and his wife passed away June 15, 
1865, after which Mr. Gillett was again 
married, his second union being with Bar- 
bara Campbell. By the first marriage he 
had five children. Frank E.. the eldest, is 
now a prominent attorney of Oklahoma, and 
for many years he was nuniliered among 
the distinguished lawyers and statesmen of 
Kansas. He was educaterl in llie State Nor- 
mal School at Empdria, and after prepar- 
ing for the bar practiced law in Hutchinson 
and later with our subject in Kingman. He 
was elected and served for six years in the 
state 'legislature and for four years in the 
state senate and was a most influential and 
active member of the general assembly. He 
studied closely the questions which arose 
for the settlement in the law making body 
of the commonwealth and his broad judicial 
and his practical mind made him a very 
valued member of both divisions of the 
house. Charles E. Gillett. the second mem- 
ber of the family died in 1874. Nellie G. 
is now the wife of ^^'. C. Fullem, of Em- 
poria. The Judge is the next younger, 
while Guy R., the fifth memfier of the fam- 
ily, is living in Hennessey. Oklahoma. By 
the father's second marriage there was one 
son, Don A. , 

Judge Gillett was reared on the home 
farm adjoining Emporia and pursued his 
early education in the schools of that city, 
later continuing his studies in Cottonwood 
Falls and in the State University, at Law- 
rence, Kansas, where he remained as a stu- 
dent for three years, his studies being large- 
ly directed toward preparation for the bar. 
Upon his return home he read law in the 
office of his brother, Frank E. Gillett and 
subsequently went to Washington, D. C, 
and entered the Cclumbia Law College 
and was graduated in Tune. 188^. Return- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



ing to Kansas he located in Kingman and en- 
tered into general law practice with his 
brother, continuing an active and leading 
member of the bar until November, 1898, 
when he was elected district 'judge of the 
twenty-fourth judicial district, comprising 
Kingman. Harper. Barber and Pratt coun- 
ties. While the district had a nominal Dem- 
ocratic majority of several hundred, his per- 
sonal popularity and the confidence of the 
public in his legal ability enabled him to 
overcome this and win the election by one 
hundred and thirty-five votes. Before his 
elevation to the bench his law practice was 
large and remunerative and connected him 
with most of the important litigation heard 
in his county. He won for himself very 
favorable criticism for the careful and sys- 
tematic methods which he followed. He 
has remarkable powers of concentration and 
application, and his retentive mind ha§ often 
excited the surprise of his professional col- 
leagues. As an orator he stands high, es- 
pecially in the discussion of legal matters be- 
fore the court, where his comprehensive 
knowledge of the law is manifest and his 
application of legal principles demonstrates 
the wide range of his professional acquire- 
ments. On the bench his course has fully 
justified the confidence manifested in him 
by the large vote given him. His decisions 
are models of judicial soundness, and he is 
largely without that personal bias or mental 
prejudice which ofttimes rather darkens a 
judicial career. 

The Judge has always been an active 
member of the Republican party since at-' 
taining his majority, but is not a politician 
in the sense of office seeking and has never 
sought preferment outside the strict path of 
his profession, save where his fellow towns- 
men have conferred upon him local ofifice. 
He has served on the city council and on the 
school board and is ever alert to the best in- 
terests and progressive measures of King- 
man. 

On the 19th of August, 1887, Judge Gil- 
lett married ^liss Etta A. Goodson. the wed- 
ding taking place at Deansboro, New York. 
She is a daughter of Caleb Goodson. a farm- 



er of the Empire state. They now have 
two children, Wilber G. and Josepliine. 
Mrs. Gillett belongs to the Presbyterian 
church and the Judge attends its services. 
He. is past chancellor, and representative to 
the grand lodge of the Knights of Pythias 
fraternity, belongs to the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen and to the ]\'Iodern Wood- 
men of America. As his financial resources 
have increased he has made judicious in- 
vestment in country and city property, but 
has disposed of the former although he yet 
owns much valuable real estate. He has 
witnessed' almost the entire development of 
Kansas from a border country to its present 
proud position in the Union and has been an 
active factor in the upbuilding of Kingman 
and the countv. 



ISAAC BEERS. 



Reno county, Kansas, and the city of 
Hutchinson have been fortunate in the char- 
acter of their progressive, yet conservative, 
business men whO' in shaping successful 
careers for themselves have had much to do 
with insuring the success of the community 
with which they have been identified. Isaac 
Beers, a retired farmer and merchant, who 
lives at No. 514 East Fourth avenue. Hutch- 
inson, is a worthy representative of the class 
of substantial men of affairs referred to. 

Isaac Beers was born in Cayuga count}-. 
New York, March 11, 1826, a son of Lewis 
Beers, who was born in Redding, Fairfield 
county, Connecticut, March 20, 1798. Isaac 
Beers, father of Lewis Beers and grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch, was born 
in Connecticut about 1765 and served dur- 
ing the last four years of the Revolutionary 
war as a soldier in the American army, and 
his grandson has an iron ramrod with 
which his grandfather loaded his gun dur- 
ing that period. When Lewis Beers was eight 
years old. about 1806, his parents moved to 
Cayuga county. New York, where his father 
had bought a piece of land in a densely tim- 
bered region in the town of Aurelius. \\hich 
he improved until it was as good a farm as 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



any in the vicinity. Lewis Beers was a 
member of his father's household until he 
attained to the age of twenty-four years and 
after that he farmed on his own account un- 
til 1826. He was married in Caj'uga coun- 
ty, New York, in 1824, to Eliza C. Lane, 
who was born in Coos county. New Hamp- 
shire, in 1804, a daughter of Stephen and 
Lois ( Currier) Lane, both of whom were 
hern in Xew Hampshire. This family of 
Lanes has in all generations been one of un- 
usual ability and has given to our country 
se\-eral statesmen and scholars, one of 
whom became the incumbent of the high 
office of governor, and Homer Lane, a lirst 
cousin of Mr. Beers''. mother, gained a na- 
tional reputation as a mathematician and 
-Mine time before. 1850 entered the employ 
"f the United States government in connec- 
tion with coast surveys. Few men have 
more reason to be proud of their family cnn- 
nection than has the subject of this re\-iew. 
When the latter was three months old, 
in 1826, the father removed from Cayuga 
county, A^ew York, to Livingston county, 
that state, where he bought a farm of one 
hundred acres, on wdiich some little im- 
jir. vement had been made. He built a fine 
1 ^ -idence and improved the place until it 
was known as the best farm in the county 
and doubled its area by the purchase of 
mere land. There he farmed until poor 
health compelled him to retire from active 
life. Politically he was a ^^ hig. and while 
he took an active interest in political affairs 
iie was not in the ordinar\- sense a politician 
ami neither sought n^r accepted office. An 
' ■ i-school Presbyterian, he was one of the 
-lees of his church and was thoroughly 
ted to all its interests, never failing to 
i l.t his place in his pew promptly at any 
-iittd service and giving to the church lib- 
Li-.-lly of his means. His wife died July 13, 
i.^,;-, and in course of time he married 
I i:iiinah Thorp, a native of Cayuga county, 
\\\v York. By his first marriage he had 
:u- children, as follows : Isaac, who is the 
ipediate subject of this sketch; Lois, who 
i> living unmarried at Fort Collins, Col- 
orado: Emily C, who married John Rich- 
ardson, of Ohio, a farmer and dealer in 



wood and grain; and Jane, who died in 
Kalamazoo, Michigan. By his second mar- 
riage he had three children : Hannah, who 
is the wife of a Mr. George, a farmer at 
M'.junt Morris, Livingston county. New 
York; William L., who was a member of a 
Xew York volunteer regiment in the Civil 
war and was killed at the battle of An- 
tietani; and Charles L., who died in child- 
hood. Lewis Beers died at his homie in 
Livingston county. New York, September 
18, 1845. 

Isaac Beers was a member of his father's 
household until he attained the age of 
twenty years, receiving a meagre educa- 
tion in the public schools and was brought 
up to farm work. He was possessed of a 
consuming desire for knowledge. He made- 
many plans by which he hoped to secure a 
liberal education, but they were thwarted 
one after another by circumstances over 
which he had iiO' control, such as sickness 
in the family and financial losses. So well 
known was his hope to the whole comimun- 
ity that all who knew him sympathized with 
him deeply and mourned with him when it 
became evident that it was never to be 
realized; but he was a great reader and 
trained himself to close and exhaustive 
study at home and for fifteen years after he 
left school to read and studied patiently 
and systematically and in time became 
really belter posted than many men who had 
enjoyed superior educational advantages. 
At the present time he takes sixteen news- 
papers and periodicals and has gathered to- 
gether the nucleus of what he hopes will 
be a fine library, it being one of the ambi- 
tions of his life to leave a library to his 
children. He buys well-selected books from 
time to time, gives all his spare time to read- 
ing, and, possessing a retentive memory and 
a logical mind, he is a man of thorough and 
varied infonnation. 

In 1846 Mr. Beers began active life for 
him/self as a teacher of district schools in 
Livingston county. New York. He taught 
there in 1846 and 1847 and then went to 
Michigan and engaged in farming on new 
land. When not bus)' with his home work 
he found emplojiiient in season with cthei' 



[40 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



farmers and taught schoul during the whi- 
ter months. He was married in Michigan, 
March ii, 1849, to Aliss PolHe H. Blanch- 
ard, a native of Cayuga county, New York, 
born July 9, 1828, a daughter of Adonijah 
and Pollie (^Leberteaux) Blanchard. Mr. 
and Mrs. Blanchard were both natives of 
New York state and Mrs. Blanchard was of 
French descent. In 1852 Mr. Beers gave 
up farming and located at Marshall, Michi- 
gan, where he entered the service of Charles 
Dickey, a manufacturer of fanning mills, 
by whom lie was employed for three years, 
until he became a clerk in a hardware store, 
which he bought four years afterward and 
conducted until 1866, and after that he re- 
mained in Michigan, engaged in a variety 
of pursuits, until 1873, when he removed to 
Iowa. There he was engaged at farming 
until 1886, when he went to Hutchinson, 
Kansas, as bookkeeper for the firm of Beers 
& Lee, dealers in horses and mules, in wdiich 
his son was a partner. He was thus em- 
ployed for two years and since then he has 
been practically retired from business. 

Mr. Beers" first wife died at ^Marshall, 
Michigan, October 2. 1S65. He married 
Amanda G. Olin, of that town, January 7, 
1866. Miss Olin was born in Calhoun 
county, Alichigan, a daughter of Charles 
and Scynthia. (Hopkins) Olin, both of 
whom were born in Rhode Island. She was 
educated in a female college at Albion, 
[Michigan, and after her graduation, in 
i860, she taught school until her marriage. 
By his first marriage Mr. Beers had four 
children, all of whom are living, with the 
exception of the oldest, who died in in- 
fancy. By his second marriage ^Ir. Beers 
has one son. Herbert Eugene Isaac, 
who is now twenty-one years of age 
and is a member cf his father's family. 
His son Herm.an M. was born at Marshall, 
Michigan, July 8. 1853, and was educated 
in the high school at Marshall. He went to 
Reno county, Kansas, in 1879, and began 
dealing in mules and horses and he soon 
took in a partner and the firm was known 
as Beers & Lee. In 1890 the firm of Wal- 
cctt. Beers & Company was organized and 
did a good business at Hutchinson until 



1897, when the business was removed to 
Kansas City, Missouri, and associated with 
two other firms, those of Erwin Grant & 
Company and Hendrick & Ryan, and jointly 
the three firms practically controlled the 
horse and mule market of Kansas City, 
handling as many as fifty thousand head a 
year. In the great sales, which occur every 
two weeks and last several days, an average 
of one head of stock per minute is sold. 
Herman M. Beers married, in 1883, Frances 
Tibbetts, of Reno county, Kansas, but a na- 
tive of Michigan, and they have two daugh- 
ters, Frances and Louise. He is now worth, 
fully one hundred thousand dollars and is 
adding to his wealth rapidly. ]\Ir. Beers' 
daughter, Louise A., was educated at Mar- 
shall, Michigan, and- Corning, Iowa. She 
has been a teacher for twenty-five years, 
having taught twelve years in Iowa and 
thirteen years in the public sciiools of Hutch- 
inson, during the last ten years in the sev- 
enth grade. Mr. Beers' third son, Licester 
M., remained with his father until he was 
twenty-one years old, then he engaged in 
farming and in speculation. He was mar- 
ried in Reno county, Kansas, to Mary 
Libby, and has two children, Florence an'J 
Maud. He holds the pi.>sitiun of shipping 
clerk and foreman in a wholesale produce 
iiouse at Wichita, Kansas. 

Mr. Beers was formerly a Republican, 
but is now a Democrat. He is a member of 
the Episcopal church. He was received as 

j an entered apprentice, passed the fellow 
craft degree and was raised to the sublime 

I degree of Master Mason in St. Albans 
Lodge, No. 20, A. F. & A. M., in Michi- 
gan; also took the Mark Master's degree, 
the Past Master's degree and the JNIost Ex- 
cellent Master's degree of capitular Mason- 
ry and was exalted to the august degree of 
Royal Arch ]\Iason in Lafayette Chapter, 
No'. 4, R. A. :\I., in [Michigan, and has filled 
all the chairs in his blue lodge and all in his 
chapter except that of high priest. Mr. 
Beers had never known that he possessed 
much mechanical ability, especially such as 

j w-ould ena1>le him to do creditable carpen- 

j ter work, until the fall of 1900. In the sum- 
mer of that vear he bought his present home. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



which consists of four lots, on which was 
a fine residence. There being no barn on 
the place, he determined to build -one by 
himself. He laid out a building eighteen 
by twenty-eight feet in area, and fourteen 
feet to the ea\'es and began its construction. 
He had about completed his task in a work- 
manlike manner when he was so seriously 
injured by a vicious horse that he was com- 
pelled to forego any active work for many 
nionlhs. Xow almost recovered, he declares 
that he will complete the barn, and those 
who' know him best believe that though he 
is seventy-six years old he will yet complete 
his task. His hair is scarcely beginning to 
lose its color, he is quick and agile in his 
movements, possesses a remarkable mind 
and memory and is in many ways a man of 
nil re than ordinarv note. 



JOHN FRANK LESLIE. 

Missouri, a sister state of Kansas, has 
given to Kansas a considerable percentage 
of its leading citizens in different walks of 
life. Prominent among- its farmers of Mis- 
Sdurian nativity in Rice county is John 
Frank Leslie, who lives on section 7, Wal- 
nut township, and whose postoffice address 
is Thurber. 

John Frank Leslie was born in Clark 
county, Missouri, August 28, i860, a son 
of Alexander Leslie, wlm was born in Mont- 
gomery county, Xcw ^'urk. December ig, 
1804, and died in ^Valnut township. Rice 
county, Kansas, July 2, 1878. Alexander 
Leslie settled on one-half of section 30, 
township 22, range 9, in the mu.nicipal 
township mentioned, February 16, 1876. 
His father, Daniel Leslie came tO' America 
with his brother, Benjamin Leslie, when a 
young man. He married and was left a 
widower with four children. He afterward 
married Elizabeth (Carmen) Butts, widow 
of Edmund Butts, who had two daughters 
by her first marriage. Mr. Butts was born 
October 20. 1807, and died September 19, 
1843. Mrs. Leslie, who was born in Hardin 
county. Kentucky, Julv 29, 1824, is now \\\- 



ing, aged seventy-seven years. She is a 
daughter of Joseph and Alartha (Duncan J 
Carmen. Joseph Carmen was born in the 
year 1800, and died in his seventy-ninth 
year. His wife was born in 1806, and died 
in her fiftieth year. Joseph Carmen was a 
native of France.- Of their eleven children 
he and his wife reared nine. Their daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Leslie, reared ten of eleven chil- 
dren and has four sons and -four daughters, 
thirty-one grandchildren and nine greal- 
grandchildren, and one of her great-grand- 
sons and one of her great-granddaughters 
are grown to manhood and womanhood. 

John Frank Leslie \yas the oldest son of 
his parents, Daniel and Elizabeth (Car- 
men) (Butts) Leslie, who had eight chil- 
dren, and he was reared to farm life and 
was given a meagre schooling. He lived 
on his father's farm until he was twent}- 
years old. May 14, 1882, he married Mary 
A. Geist, a native of Pennsylvania and a 
daughter of William Geist, deceased, and 
they have five children : Pearl, wdio is 
eighteen years old, is a student at Cooper 
College ; Frank Leslie is fifteen years old : 
Ethel is nine years old ; Vernie is six years 
old; and Eston is two }-ears old. In Mr. 
Leslie's home farm there are three hundred 
and twenty acres and he leases five and half 
sections. Giving attention principally to 
stock farming, he feeds and ships annually 
one hundred and fifty head of cattle and 
usually from fifty to sixty head of horses 
and mules. He gi\cs liis attention largely 
to Hereford cattle, with special reference 
to registered stock. At this time he owns 
one hundred and seventeen head of grown 
stock and owns altogether six hundred head 
of cattle. His manner of stock farming has 
in certain respects commended itself to the 
emiulation of neig'hlioring farmers and his 
influence upon the develnpnient of the in- 
terest in his locality has nut been inconsid- 
erable. Realizing the fact that it costs no 
more to feed fine stock than ordinary stock 
and that fine stock is much more profitable 
than ordinary stock, his aim has been con- 
stantly to improve the standard of his cat- 
tle, and other farmers desiring to sell as 
advantageously as Mr. Leslie and farmers 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORj 



of his school have been Hkewise iDrogress- 
ive. He is pubHc-spirited and enterprising 
and exerts a recognized influence in local 
affairs. He is an independent voter and has 
never yet been prevailed upon to accept any 
public office. He is a Knight Templar Ma- 
son and' is fa\-orably known to a wide circle 
of acquaintances. Airs. Leslie and their 
children are members of the United 
Brethren church. 



HENRY G. ANDREWS. 

For twenty-eighf years Henry- G. An- 
drews has been a resident of Ellsworth coun- 
ty and is now a \\-cll known representative 
of its agricultural interests. He successfully 
follows fanning on section 28, Sherman 
township, where he has a valuable and high- 
ly productive tract of land. He was born in 
St. Lawrence coimty, New York, in 1836. 
His father, Orin Andrews, was a native of 
Veniiont,- born March 4, 1801, and as he 
was left an orphan when only four years of 
age he was reared by his maternal grandfa- 
ther, early becoming familiar with the du- 
ties and labors which fall to the lot of the ag- 
riculturist. Throughout his entire life he 
followed farming as his chief occupation. 
When a young man he removed to New 
York and was there married. In early life 
ht supported the men and measures of the 
Democracy, but when the abolition move- 
ment resulted in the formation of a party to 
oppose slavery he joined its ranks and was 
one of its well known advocates, becoming 
one of the leaders of the Republican party, 
and voting for its candidates until the close 
of his life. In early days he was connected 
with the close-communion Baptist church 
and at all times he lived a consistent Chris- 
tian life, commanding the respect of all by 
his fidelity to principle. He attained the very- 
advanced age of eighty-five years and then 
his eyes closed in the eternal sleep, but the 
memorj- of his upright life remains as a ben- 
ediction to all who knew him. He married 
Miss Sallie Remington and they became the 



parents of two sons and six daughters, but 
the youngest, one of twins, died in infancy. 
Henry G. Andrews is the only member 
of the family now living in Kansas. He pur- 
sued his education in the district schools and 
i as soon as able began work upon the home 
j farm, following the plow when scarcely 
large enough to manage the heavy farm im- 
: plement. When about eighteen years of 
age he went to Boston and became connected 
with seafaring life on a merchant vessel, re- 
maining on the briny deep for two years. 
On the expiration of that period he made a 
trip to the west and after a few months spent 
in Michigan removed to Illinois, where he 
w-as engaged in farming for several years. 
But when the tocsin of war soimded he put 
aside all personal considerations in order to 
respond to his country's call for aid, and on 
the 15th of September, 1861, he enlisted as 
a member of Coanpany H, Fifty-seventh Illi- 
nois Infantry.' He learned of the realities 
of war in the battle of Fort Donelson and 
also participated in the engagement of Shi- 
loh and in the siege of Corinth, and was 
present at the capture of the city. There he 
was stationed until the fall, guarding trains 
and keeping the lines of communication open 
until Generals Price and Van Dorn, the Con- 
federate commanders, attempted to.recap- 
j ture the place, in October. From Corinth 
I\Ir. Andrews proceeded with the regiment 
j to Chattanooga and afterward participated 
; in the entire Atlanta campaign, being with 
Sherman's advance troops. He was sta- 
tioned at Rome, to guard the road from 
Kingston, and partof his regiment was in the 
se\-ere battle of Allatoona Pass, where an 
effort was made by the Confederates to break 
the line and capture or destroy a large load 
of supplies that belonged to Shemian's army. 
Having the advantage of position and being 
aided by the veil of the mountains they with- 
stood the charge of a body of rebel trops 
numbering about seven or eight to their one, 
yet the carnage was so great that ]Mr. An- 
drews says that after the battle he could 
have walked half a mile without putting foot 
on the ground. With his command he after- 
ward proceeded from that point to Savan- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



143 



nah, where he was mustered out on Christ- 
mas day of 1864, having served his country 
in a most loyal manner for almost three and 
a half years. 

After winning an honorable discharge 
;\Ir. Andrews returned to Illinois and 
through the succeeding three years was Upon 
the road as a traveling salesman. He then 
went to Iowa and was engaged in fanning in 
the northern part of the state, where his fa- 
ther was living. His parents were then weH 
advanced in years and ]\Ir. Andrews assisted 
them in placing the fann in good shape. In 
the spring of 1873 he came to Kansas to 
make a start in life, and homesteaded the 
southeastern quarter of section 28, Sherman 
township, Ellsworth county. The shanty 
which he first erected is still standing and is 
now used as a granary. His present resi- 
dence was erected in 1884 and is an attrac- 
tive home. Mr. Andrews is engaged princi- 
pally in the raising of wheat, and the ricih 
land enables him to annually harvest large 
crops, the sales of which bring to him a good 
income. He is enterprising and progressive 
and his diligence has won for him a com- 
fortable competence. In the winter of 1900 
Henry G. Andrews erected a new barn .upon 
his farm with stanchions for ninexows. The 
floor is boarded and drained and the barn 
affords ample shelter for the stock. He also 
keeps seven head of horses and has some 
pure-blooded Poland-China 'hogs. 

On the iSth of June, 1875, was celebrat- 
ed the marriage of 'Mr. Andrews and ]\Iiss 
Susan Schock, a daughter of Henry and 
jMagdaline Shock. Unto them were born 
three sons and three daughters, but the old- 
est son died at the age of two years. The 
others are: Charles H., who enlisted for 
ser\-ice in the Spanish-American war as a 
member of Company I, Twenty-first Kansas 
Infantry : Laura ; Minnie, Florence Gertrude 
and Frank, who are still under the parental 
roof. In his politics Mr. AndreAvs has al- 
ways been a Republican, and, like every true 
American citizen should do, takes an active 
interest in the work of his party. He is a 
recognized leader in the ranks in that local- 
ity and has frequently served as a delegate 
to cijuntv. congressional, senatorial and state 



conventions, being a member of the state 
convention which first nominated Governor 
Stanley. He has seiwed on the township 
board, but his party service has never been 
perfonned with the hope of receiving the 
rewards of office. He is a member of the 
school board and is now seiwing as its clerk 
for the third term. He has also sensed as 
treasurer and has long been connected with 
the board, which has charge of the educa- 
tional interests of this locality. Socially he 
is identified with Ellsworth Post. G. A. R. 
Mr. Andrews is not only an enterprising 
farmer and valued citizen of the community 
but is also an honored pioneer. When he 
came to the county there were only two set- 
tlements between his home and Ellsworth, 
and none to the north until Lincoln county 
was reached. He has therefore witnessed 
much of the growth and de\-eloi5ment of 
this portion of the state and can relate many 
interesting incidents of the early daj^. He 
is a hospitable, genial man and his many ex- 
cellent qualities render him a favorite with 
a large circle of friends. 



BENJAMIN SHOCK. 

Benjamin Shock, who is engaged in 
farming and stock-raising on section 4, Ells- 
worth township, has been a resident of Ells- 
worth county for almost thirty years, the 
time of his arrival here being in 1872. He 
was born in Canton, Ohio, February 5. 1854. 
His father, Henry Shock, was a native of 
the same place, and his grandfather, Lucas 
Shock, was born in New Bavaria and came 
to America when about eighteen years of 
age. He located in the northern part of 
Maryland, near Hagerstown, where he fol- 
lowed farming, and there he resided until 
about 181 6, when he removed to Ohio. 
There he cleared some land in the midst of 
the forest, and upon his farm reared his 
children, seven in number, Henry being the 
youngest. His childhood and youth were 
soent in the homestead in this state and his 
education was here acquired. He followed 
farming until i860, when he removed to 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



the town and was engaged in the mannfac- 
turing business in Canton for four years. 
He also spent nearly three years in Bucyrus. 
During the succeeding five years he was at 
Ottumwa, Iowa, where he operated a coal 
mine. He then again turned his attention 
to manufacturing, which he followed until 
1872, when he came to Kansas and pre- 
empted the land upon which our subject 
now resides, althottgh Mr. Shock of this re- 
■^-iew proA-ed up on it. The father carried on 
the place until 1878. when, owing to his suf- 
fering from rheumatism, he retired from 
active business life. He was reared in die 
German Refomied church, but after coming 
to Kansas united with the Presbyterian 
church. On the 4th of April, 1S44. in Can- 
ton, Ohio, he was united in marriage to 
Magdalena Triem, a daughter of Peter 
Triem, who emigrated from Germany to 
Canton. Ohio, in 1831. Mr. and Mrs. 
Shock became the parents oi nine children: 
Suj^an, the wife of Henry G. Andrews; 
Henrv, who remained in Ohio; Emma, de- 
ceased; Marv, the wife of Olden Flanders, 
of Ellsworth; Benjamin, of this review; 
Louisa M., of Canton, Ohio; Luke, who is 
living in Ellsworth ; Ferdinand, who died at 
the age of three years; and Laura E., who 
also has passed a'way. The father of this 
family died August 29, 1890, but the mother 
is still living, making her home with our 
subject. 

Beniamin Shock pursued his education 
in the public schools of Ohio and also con- 
tinued his studies for tw-o years after the 
(family removed' to Ottumwa, Jowa. He 
there learned the blacksmith's' trade, but 
worked at it for only two years before com- 
ing to Kansas. Here he turned his attention 
to" farming, and thus when his father was 
obliged to abandon that pursuit the son took 
charge of the home place and has since con- 
ducted it. Some stray buffalo were seen in 
the county after his arrival and he has killed 
antelope and other game. He broke about 
half of the land on the home place and has 
kept e\^erything about the farm in good 
shape. He raises wheat and corn, having 
some good bottom-land, for there are two 
creeks that cross his place. He makes a 



specialty of raising high grade Poland-China 
hogs, having l^rought some good stock from 
Illinois. He was one of the firstto intro- 
duce a high grade of hoigs into this part of 
Kansas and "has raised some animals that 
have weighed eight and nine hundred 
pounds. His business affairs are conducted 
with diligence, enterprise and perseverance, 
and his labors are attended with gratifying 
success. There is considerable timber upon 
the place and he has sold cord-wood grown 
since he came to the count\-. In his polit- 
ical views Mr. Shock is a Republican, vot- 
ing with the party, yet never seeking office. 
He has served as road supervisor but has 
declined to accept official preferment, save 
that of school director, having been a mem- 
ber of the board for fifteen or sixteen years. 
He has in his possession one of the old 
"grandfathers' clocks" that was purchased 
by his grandfather in ^laryland. 



TOHN F. WILDIN. 



John F. A\'ildin. the son of George and 
Caroli-ne \\'ildin, was bcrn November 13, 
185 1, in York county, Pennsylvania, where 
he lived with his parents until he was seven 
years of age, when they ranoved back to 
Pike county, Ilii;iois. He learned to till 
the soil at an early age, commencing to 
plow -when he was but ten years old. He 
worked on the farm in the summer and 
went to school in the winter until he was 
twenty years of age, receiving a common- 
school education. He remained with his 
parents until twenty-five years of age, farm- 
ing partly for himself and also helping his 
father. 

J. F. ^^'ildin was married to IMiss Electa 
Hoskin March 11. 1877, she being the 
daughter of Isaac and Mary Jane Hoskin, 
wdio also resided in Pike county, Illinois. 
^Irs. Electa A\'ildin was born January 7. 
1854, in that county. After their marriage 
they removed to a tenant house on his fa- 
ther's place, farming his father's land until 
the fall of 1880; but in the meantime he 




^Aeta W^/M^ 




Jl J/ ^^.^l^^/:^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



was trying to purchase land of his own for 

the purpose of farming and stock-raising. 

Thinking land too high priced in Pike 

county, he concluded to go west, and in 

August, 1879, ^'^'itli liis father and several 

friends took a trip to Emporia, Kansas, 

lucking over Lyons county. They not be- 

r ing satisfied with the land there, his father 

[ returned home while he and his cousin went 

I on to Wichita, and, after looking over 

Sedgwick county and not finding a suitable 

location, returned to old Pike. 

Then the fall, following his father took 
a trip to Rush county, visiting some friends 
there, and was well pleased with the devel- 
opment of the country for farming and 
stock-raising. His father returned home 
and reported to his son that he was 
satisfied he had found the place which they 
had been looking for. Then in the spring 
of 1880 J. F. concluded to go to Rush coun- 
ty and see for himself, his father and cousin 
accompanying him. After looking over the 
country and seeing the cattle being win- 
tered on the buffalo grass without any other 
feed, they concluded that was certainly the 
place to buy; so J. F. purchased a half sec- 
tion of land on Walnut river, four miles 
west of Rush Center. His father also pur- 
chased two hundred and forty acres ad- 
joining his farm. On account of having a 
large crop of wheat sowed in Pike county 
he decided not to move to his new farm un- 
til fall, and rented it to his cousin for that 
summer. 

• In November, 1880, J. F., with his fam- 
ily, moved to his new home in sunny Kan- 
sas, where he engaged in farming and 
stock-raishig. handling as many as three or 
four hundred headi of cattle each year. Be- 
ing in need of more pasture he bought one 
hundred and sixty acres more, making him 
in all four hundred and eighty acres. 

In the spring of 1889, renting out his 
farm and putting out his cattle on the 
shares, which he still continues, he conclud- 
ed to move to Reno county, Kansas, resid- 
ing in Hutchinson two years, being en- 
gaged in real-estate business. In the fall of 
1889 he purchased a half section of land in 



Enterprise township and rented the same un- 
til the spring of 1891, when he concluded 
to go to farming again himself and mo\-ed 
to this farm. 

The following August, not being satis- 
fied for several years with Kansas,' — always 
liaving for a saying, he "wanted to ga 
back where the red clover grew," — he sold 
this farm and in January, 1892, took a trip 
back to Pike county to visit his parents and. 
with a view of buying. He looked at quite 
a number of farms, but he remained only a 
few days when he made up his mind that 
sunny Kansas was good enough for him! 
After visiting his parents and friends for 
two weeks he returned home and bought his 
present farm of two hundred and sixty-two 
acres deeded land and one hundred 
acres of river-made land, made by the 
changing of a channel in the river, situ- 
ated four and one-half miles northwest of 
Hutchinson on sections 5 and 6. He pur- 
chased this farm with the intention of farm- 
ing, stock-raising and fruit-gowing, in 
which he is engaged at the present time. 
The farm being run down when he came 
here, there being only six aces of orchard 
and improvements being very poor, he built, 
in the fall of 1892. his present residence, 
and in the spring of 1893 planted thirty- 
four acres of apple orchard, making in all 
forty acres of apple orchard, alsn quite an 
orchard of peaches, pears, plums, apricots 
and cherries also a three-acre vineyard, 
which has proved to be a profitable invest- 
ment. 

In the fall of 1896 Mr. Wildin built a 
large barn and in the spring of 1897 con- 
cluded to rent out part of his farm, there- 
fore erecting a tenant house on his farm. 
In the spring of- 1898 he concluded to en- 
gage in the dairy business and erected a 
dairy barn in connection with his tenant 
house, found an experienced dairyman and 
furnished him with cows and equipments 
for running a dairy. After engaging in 
this! business for six months and finding 
it not a profitable business he sold out. 
.Vfterward he rebuilt this dairy barn and 
put in a self-feeder especially fr-r full-feed- 



[46 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



ing cattle, in which he is now engaged, and 
finds it a profitable business in connection 
with his farming and fruit-raising. In the 
summer of 1901 J. F. purchased the old 
homestead in Pike county, having it rented 
out at present. 

. Mr. and Mrs. Wildin's family consisted 
of seven children, — five daughters and two 
sons, namely: Mary E., Orville H., de- 
ceased. Carrie E., Susie V., Janie L., Electa 
H. and John F., Jr. 

On the 13th of January. 1902. ]\Ir. and 
Mrs. Wildin and family united with the 
Methodist Episcopal church and our sub- 
ject is a member of the' board of trustees 
of Poplar church, three miles south of his 
farm, which he w-as active in erecting. 

In his political views he is a Democrat, 
never holding any office except as a member 
of the school board for the last twenty 
years. His life has been characterized by 
unflagging industry and strong purpose, 
and, overcoming all difficulties and ob- 
stacles in his path, he has worked his way 
upward to prosperity. 



LEWIS LA VERT Y. 

Lewis Laverty is one of tire representa- 
tive merchants of Kingman, where he is 
successfully conducting a carriage and im- 
plement business. His btisiness qualifica- 
tions have won him a place among the lead- 
ing representatives of the niercantile inter- 
ests of this city, and his honorable career has 
gained him uniform confidence and regard. 

Mr. Laverty is a native of the Hoosier 
state, his birth having occurred in Wabash 
county, Indiana, on the 27th of June, 1861. 
His paternal grandfather, James Laverty, 
was the first of the family to come to Amer- 
ica., and after his arrival in this country he 
located' in Boston, Massachusetts, where he 
became well known as a weaver. He subse- 
quently moved to South Carolina, there re- 
maining until some time in the '30s, when 
he journeyed to Tennessee. From the latter 
state he went to Indiana in 1850. His son 



and the father of our subject, George S. 
Laverty, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
in 1809. When eighteen years of age he 
assisted in the work of preparing the ne- 
groes for emancipation, visiting many of the 
southern states while engaged in that work 
and encountering many exciting experiences. 
He was arrested at Island No. 10, in Mis- 
sissippi, but made good his escape to the 
north, where he was engaged in farming in 
Indiana for a time. In 1871 he came to 
Kansas, securing a claim in Reno county on 
which the Reformatory is now located, and 
there began the arduous task of improving 
new land with ox teams. He passed through 
all the trying experiences which fall to the 
lot of the frontiersman, but he bravely sur- 
mounted the obstacles W'hich lay in his path- 
way and eventually his efforts were crowned 
w-ith a high and well merited degree of suc- 
cess. During the winter months he engaged 
in hunting, often making trips as far as 
Texas, and he always found a read}' sale for 
his game. In 1878 he sold his land in Reno 
county and came to Kingman county, his 
sons having preceded him tO' this locality 
and taken up claims on sections 25 and 36, 
Hoosier township. Here Mr. Laverty again 
underwent the trying ordeal of improving 
new land, but eventually his fields were 
placed under a fine state of cultivation and 
all the improvements of a well regulated 
fanB added, his becoming one of the fine 
country seats of the locality. There he 
made his home for six years, on the expira- 
tion of which period he removed to the city 
of Kingman, where the remainder of his 
days were passed in quiet retirement, bis 
Hfe's labors being ended in death in 1896, 
at the age of eig'hty-seven years. 

Mr. Laverty was twice married, his first 
union being with Polly Collier, and they 
had three children, all now deceased. His 
second marriage occurred in Indiana. Eliza- 
beth Dorsey becoming his wife, and that 
union was blessed with five children, only 
two of whom. Lewis and George, attained 
to years of maturity, and the former is the 
only one now living. The mother of these 
children passed away in death on the 26th 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



of January, 1896, and April 10 of the same 
year her husband joined her in the spirit 
world. He was an active worker in the 
ranks of the Republican party. The cause 
of education also' found in himi a strong 
sympathizer and willing worker, and while 
in Reno county he took an active interest 
in the establishment oi schools. Of the 
Christian church he was a worthy and con- 
sistent member. 

Lewis Laverty, whose name introduces 
this review, was but ten years of age when 
he removed with his paretits to Reno county, 
and at that time there were but six families 
residing within its borders, — Captain Bell, 
Robert Ekll, John Shahan, James Freese and 
his two sisters, Hannah and Mary. Our 
subject and a sister of Henry P. Miller, who 
now resides in Hutchinson, were the first 
to attend school in the county. After com- 
pleting his education in the common schools 
of that locality Mr. Laverty followed farm- 
ing in that county until his removal to King- 
man county, which occurred in 1877, and 
with his brother he engaged in farming in 
Harrison township. In the following year, 
hijwevcr, he removed to Marion county, 
where he learned the trade of stone cutting, 
fallowing that occupation there until 1886, 
when he again came to Kingman county. 
For a number of years after his return to 
this locality he found employment at his 
trade, and from 1893 until 1898 took con- 
tracts for moving buildings. In the latter 
year he became identified with the grain and 
implement business in the city of Kingman, 
and as the years have passed success has 
abundantly rewarded his efforts and he is 
now known as one of the leading implement 
d.calers in Kingman county. He occupies 
two store buildings, twenty-five by one hun- 
dred and fifty feet, and also has a large ware- 
h'jrse. He handles the Canton and Pea- 
body line of buggies and implanents, the 
J. I. Case thresher, has a large and com- 
plete line of harness and saddler)-, and car- 
ries two tubular pump outfits and the Wood- 
mansee windmills. During the year of 1900 
there was but one engine and not over four 
separators brought into the county which 
were not purchased at his store. He is a 



wide-awake, energetic and progressive busi- 
ness man, and the pro.sperity that has come 
to him is the result of his own well directed 
efforts. 

In Marion county, Kansas, on the 25th 
of March, 1885, was celebrated the mar- 
riage of Mr. Laverty and Miss Tula McAl- 
lister. The lady" was a daughter of James 
McAllister, a prominent early settler of 
Marion county. One daughter, Olive, who 
died at the age of fourteen years, came to 
bless the union of our subject and wife. On 
the 2d of November, 1900, Mr. Laverty was 
a second tim-e marriecl, Maggie L. Castle- 
man becoming his wife. She is a daughter 
of Rev. A. Castleman, of Lyons, Kansas. 
The Republican party receives Mr. Laver- 
ty's active support and co-operation, and for 
one year he served as marshal of the city of 
Kingman. Socially he is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen 
of the World. 



MAJOR W. L. BROWN. 

There is no resident in Kingman county 
who has borne a more important part in re- 
claiming this section of the state for pur- 
poses of civilization than has Major. Brown. 
He has been actively a'ssociated with the 
work of developing wild land, of instituting 
horticultural and stock-raising pur.-;uits and 
has been the promoter of many movements 
for the common good. He was for a num- 
ber O'f years a representative of its journal- 
istic interests, is prominent in social, fra- 
ternal and political circles and at the present 
time is largely aiding in the settlement of 
this portion of he state as a member of the 
Kingman County Colonization Compan}-. 
His residence in the county covers a period 
of more than twenty years and since settle- 
ment in the state dates from 1876. 

A native of Steuben county. New York, 
the Major was born January 28, 1854. His 
father, Solomon Brown, was a native of the 
same state and there followed agricultural 
pursuits. The family is of Scotch origin but 



148 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



was early planted on American soil and has 
furnished its loyal representatives to all the 
wars in which the United States has been 
engaofed, including that which brought in- 
dependence to the nation. One of the num- 
ber served under General Ethan Allen and 
was sergeant at the battle of Ticonderoga. 
In Steuben county, New York, Solomon 
Brown was united in marriage to Miss Ruth 
E. Carpenter, a daughter of James Carpen- 
ter, who was one of the pioneer settlers of 
western New York. They became the par- 
ents of three children but with the exception 
of our subject the only surviving member 
of the family is a sister of the Major, who 
lives in the Empire state." The father died 
when his son W. L. was only twenty months 
old. The latter has not a single relative 
west of the Mississippi river. The ancestry 
of the Carpenter family can be traced back 
to the time of the landing of the Mayflower 
when the first of the name in this country 
settled at Plvmouth Rock. One of his de- 
scendants was a major in the Union army 
during the war of the Rebellion. 

Wlien quite young Major \V. L. Brown 
was left an orphan. He enjoyed but meager 
educational advantages, save what his own 
determination and industry won for him. 
Realizing the value of education he resolved 
to prepare for the responsible duties of life 
hv acquiring a good knowledge of the Eng- 
lish branches of learning at least. He 
worked his way through schooi, attending 
Woodhull Academy, now known as the 
Western New York College, in which he 
pursued the regular collegiate course and 
fitted himself for teaching, a profession 
which followed for a number of years. As 
he was only fourteen years of age when he 
won his certificate and the laws of the state 
forbade one teaching under eighteen years 
of age, he made his way westward and for 
three vears engaged in teaching in ]\Iissouri, 
where his years were no bar to his work. 
He then returned to New York and while 
teaching in the Empire state hp also com- 
pleted his own education. 

In 1876 Major Brown arrived in Kansas 
and was for six months engaged in hunting 
on the buffalo range south of Dodge City, 



and afterward in Texas along the Red river. 
Returning to Pawnee county, Kansas, he 
there took up a claim and also engaged in 
teaching. Later he removed to ]\IcPherson 
county, where he continued his educational 
labors and resided for two years, coming to 
Kingman in 1881. In White township, 
Kingman county, he secured a claim, which 
was^ two and a half miles from the nearest 
dwelling. He at once began to break and 
improve this tract of wild prairie, and while 
thus engaged lived in a dugout. He also 
taught a select schoo'l, taking his pay in 
whatever his patrons fotmd' most con\'enient 
to give. Some of his land he left fur pas- 
turage purposes and gradually got this 
stocked up with cattle. Soon afterward, 
however, he disposed of that property and 
purchased his present ranch of six hundred 
and forty acres, seven miles north of King- 
man and just over the line- from Reno coun- 
ty. Here he again started in with raw land 
and gave all his time to getting this in shape. 
He engaged both in raising grain and stock 
and also devoted some time to the cultiva- 
tion of fruit. He has spared no' expense or 
effort to make this one of the finest ranches 
in central Kansas and has succeeded in the 
undertaking, having his farm well improved 
with all modern accessories, while a fine or- 
chard of forty acres yields good crops of 
apples, peaches, apricots, plums and grapes. 
He has a grove of fifty acres which he plant- 
ed, and as there is running water upon his 
land the place is well adapted for stock- 
raising. He owns a number of cattle, 
horses and hogs, and altogether has one of 
the best farmis in this portion of the Sun- 
flower state. 

The Major made his home thereon until 
1890, when he built his present residence in 
Kingman. He purchased the Kingman 
Journal and started to build up the paper, 
which was considerably run down. It had 
been a seven-column folio but he trans- 
formed it into a six-column quarto and soon 
added materially to its business and circu- 
lation. His entire attention was given to 
the paper, which soon became recognized as 
one of the leading fusion journals in the 
state. This he edited and published until 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



149 



Janiia-ry, 1891, when he sold it and has been 
an active factor in the Kingman County 
Colonization Company. For a year and a 
half previously he had been interested in 
the real estate business, and there is no man 
in the county better qualified to- carry on the 
work which he is now- undertaking, for he 
has a most comprehensive knowledge of 
realty values. 

Until 1890 }vIajor Brown was a sup- 
porter of the Republican party, but in that 
}'ear he felt that he could nut conscienti- 
ously support its platform and has since 
acted with the Fusionists. He has taken a 
\ery active part in political work and has 
held a number of state offices, but has de- 
clined the nomination for state senator. 
From 1893 until 1895 he served as secre- 
tary of the Kansas state senate, and in April, 

1897, was made president of the state board 
(if charities, an office which he resigned in 

1898, two years before the expiration of the 
term, in order to enlist in the army being 
raised for the Spanish-American war. He 
organized a regiment and was the first inan 
in the state to be sworn into the service. He 
was first commissioned adjutant and later 
major. In 1901 he was a candidate for the 
nomination for congress, but when within 
two \'Otes he withdrew his name. His 
prominence in political aft'airs is equaled 
only by his high position in social circles. 
He is a leading member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and has filled all the 
chairs from the minor offices in the subor- 
dinate lodge to the highest in the grand' 
lidge of the state. He was grand master 
in 1898, in 1899 was elected representative 
til the sovereign grand lodge for two years 
and in ]\lav, 1901, was again chosen tO' that 
position, the first time the honor of a re-elec- 
tion to that office had ever been conferred 
in Kansas. He is also .a member of the' 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and 
of the Modern Woodinem of America. Foir 
three years he was an officer in the State Ed- 
itorial Association and for the past eight 
years has been one of the directors in the 
State Historical Society. 

In July, 1 88 1, was celebrated the mar- 
riage of ^lajor Brown and ]\Iiss Sadie J. 



Blake, a daughter of Madison Blake, a 
farmer of McPherson county, in which place 
the wedding occurred. They have three chil- 
dren; Maud, Wayne and Harlow, and also 
an adopted daughter, Hallie. Mrs. Brown 
is an oificer in the Rebekah State Assembly 
and is one of the charter members: of the 
Shakesperean Club of Kingman. Like her 
husband she shares nn the high regard of 
many friends. His active life has brought 
tO' him a wide acquaintance, his labors have 
made him a valued citizen of the community 
and his name is inseparably interwoven with' 
the history of progress and improvemient 
along material, social, and intellectual lines 
in Kingman county. 



SAMUEL P. TETER. 

Samuel P. Teter, a leading and influen- 
tial agriculturist of Reno county, maintains 
his residence at 15 17 North Main street, in 
Hutchinson, and in this city which has for 
so many years been his home he has made 
many friends, who esteem him highly for 
many excellencies of cliaracter. A native 
of the Old Dominion, he was born in Pen- 
dleton county, on the 22d of February, 1842. 
His father, Laban Teter, was a native of 
the same locality, born about the year 1810, 
and he followed the tilling of the soil as a 
life occupation. The paternal grandfather 
of our subject was a native of the fatherland, 
and after coming to this county located ui 
Virginia. He was a brave and loyal soldier 
during the terrible struggle for liberty. In 
the Old Dominion he spent the remaining 
years of his life, having followed the trade 
of a blacksmith. Laban Teter was one of 
a family of eleven children, all of whom have 
long since passed to the home beyond. \Mien 
about twenty- four years of age he was united 
in marriage to Sarah Wayman, a native also 
of Virginia. In 1849 Mr. Teter emigrated 
with his family to McLean county, Illinois, 
making the journej- with one two-horse 
team and one five-horse team, and, having 
started in the fall, they encountered very 
severe weather during- the trip, at times the 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



sirnw ha\-ing fallen to a great depth and they 
suffered many hardships and privations. Be- 
fore starting on the long, wearisome jour- 
ney Mr. Teter had sold his farm of one hun- 
dred acres in Virginia for fourteen hundred 
dollars, and a part of this money he invested 
in a one hundred' and sixty acre tract in 
McLean county, Illinois, then raw prairie 
land. As time passed, however, he im- 
proved his land an J added to his original 
purchase until his landed possessions con- 
sisted of six hundred acres, on which he 
made many substantial improvements, and 
upon this valuable tract he spent the remain- 
der of his earthly pilgrimage. At the time of 
his death he was residing with his youngest 
son, Reuben, who had taken charge of the 
farm. Mrs. Teter had passed to the home be- 
yond about two years prior to her husband's 
demise. He w'as a very prominent man in his 
community, having filled many of the local 
ofifices, and in political matters he was identi- 
fied W'ith the Republican party. He was a 
stanch Union man, anil was a prdininent and 
worthy member of the Methruilist church, in 
which he long served as a deacon. His 
death was occasioned from lib k id' poisoning, 
caused by having his finger pricked by a 
hedge thorn. Unto this worthy couple 
were born thirteen children, of whom our 
subject wasi the fourth in order of birth, 
but several of the children died in infancy. 
Those who reached mature years were : 
]\Ialinda. who died in McLean county, Illi- 
nois ; Jonathan, also deceased; Huldah, the 
wife of Will .Edmunds, a farmer of Hutch- 
inson, Kansas; Laban C, deceased; Samuel 
P.. the subject of this review; Sallie E., 
wife of Solomon Phillips, a veteran of the 
Civil war and now a prominent farmer of 
McLean county, Illinois; Reuben D., who is 
engaged in fruit farming near Salem, 
Oreson; Sina. wdio makes her home 
with her sister in McLean county; Almeda, 
who died in Haven township ; and Hezekiah 
B., also deceased. The second son, Jonathan, 
was a member of Company F, Ninety-fourth 
Illinois Infantn,', during the Civil war, 
but after nine months' service wasi discharged 
on account of disability. He took part in 
the battles of Prairie Grove and Spring Hill, 



and in the last named engagement suffered 
the loss of one of his eyes. His death oc- 
curred in Hutchinson, Kansas, in 1899. La- 
ban C. also rendered valuable service to his 
country during the war of the rebellion, be- 
coming a member of Company K, Twent}-- 
sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, his mili- 
tary career covering a period of three years, 
nine months and twenty-one days. He was 
wonnded in a charge made on a fort in front 
of Atlanta. He was loved and honored 
among his fellow soldiers; for his strict ad- 
herence to the standard of Christian man- 
hood, and all who knew him entertained for 
him the highest respect and esteem. He 
passed to .the home beyond about 1885, 
while residing near his father's home in Mc- 
Lean county. 

Samuel P. Teter, whose name introduces 
this review, received only meager educational 
advantages during his youth, having attend- 
ed school but twenty days in all. and that 
having been during his absence from the 
army on a furlough. \\'hen only fifteen 
years of age he performed a man's work in 
the harvest fields, and after the close of the 
day's labor in the field it wonld be his task 
to feed the horses, cattle and hogs and milk 
the cows, his work extending until late in 
the evening. His father was at that time 
extensively engaged in the stock business, 
owning about one hundred head oi cattle and 
one hundred and fifty hogs, while his landed 
possessions consisted of six hundred acres. 
In this manner our subject spent his youth 
and early manhood. When the trouble be- 
tween the north and south culminated in cixil 
war he nobly ofifered his services to the 
Union cause, enlisting, in 1861. at Blooming- 
ton, in Company K, Twenty-sixth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, On account of sick- 
ness, however, he was unable to accompany 
his regiment on their march to the south, 
but he joined it in St. Louis, and from there 
the regiment was sent to Madrid, its first en- 
gagement being at Island No. 10. For 
about four months thereafter Mr. Teter was 
absent from duty on account of sickness, 
caused by typhoid fever, but in the spring of 
1862 he rejoined the army at Holly Springs, 
Reaching La Grange, he was among the one 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



luindred who were left there to hold the fort. 
Pie was at that time ir.uch broken in health 
and was daily expecting liis disdiarge, but it 
was delayed and when it final!}- arrived he 
had grown so strong and rugged that his 
captain burned the paper without telling him 
of its arrival, nor was he acquainted of the 
fact until the war had closed. Mr. Teter en- 
tered the sendee as a fifer, but after regain- 
ing his health he demanded a place in the 
ranks as a soldier, and the request was 
granted him. From La Grange they went 
to Memphis and participated in tlie Irikiiii:- "f 
that city, and was next statj'm.d in the 
Yazoo river, where they were engaged in 
guarding the city of Vicksburg. On the 
4th of July followimg the regiment started 
for Jackson, Mississip]>i, waded I'lack river, 
camped on the opposite side during the niglit 
and in the morning proceeded on their way. 
Durin-g that engageiuent the regiment of 
which our subject was a member charged 
and finally captured the deep ditch, but dur- 
ing- the combat Mr. Teter was struck in the 
back, probably by a piece of shell, and' was 
teiuporarily disabled for ser\-ice. After the 
capture cf Jackson he retnrned with his reg- 
iment to Black river, where lie was taken 
sick with chills and fever, and with many 
other soldiers was sent to Vicksburg, where, 
in company with five hundred sick and 
wounded comrades, he was placed on a hos- 
pital beat bound for ]\Ie;uphis, and a few 
days later his regiment jiassed tint citv on 
their way to luka. Afterremaining in the 
hospital for two days he and a comrade start- 
etl to rejoin the regiment, and on reaching 
luka they were infonned that in three day^ 
the regiment would start on a forcedmarch 
t(i Chattanooga. Witli I'lliers who were too 
weak to walk Mr. Teter was taken to that 
city in wagons, where he was engaged in 
doing guard duty far one month, and during 
that time witnessed the taking of Lookout 
Mountain and Missionary Ridge, after 
which the armv set out to the relief of Burn- 
side at Knoxville, where with n^any other 
invnhds he was statinr.cd fm- a' tin-ie at 
Whiteside Station. There they suffered 
severely for the want of ]>r>tatoes. as gueril- 
las had infested the countrv and had cut off 



all suppihes. For eleven days those there 
stationed subsisted on a half an ear of corn 
each per day, but they finally organized a 
party and set out on a foraging expedition, 
their first find having been a half bushel of 
flour, which the immediately converted into 
flapjacks and ate until their appetites were 
satisfied. 

From that point they proceeded to 
Scottsborough, Alabama, after which IMr. 
Teter returned home on a thirty days' fur- 
lough, on the expiration of which period he 
rejoined his regiment near A'tlanta and was 
engaged in the battle on the 22d of July, 
1864, where the beloved McPherson fell, 
and his death was mourned by the entire 
army. During Hood's attack on the Fif- 
teenth Corps, Mr. Teter was struck in the 
face by a spent ball, inflicting a slight wound, 
and on the 26th of August following, while 
fitting within alxmt ten feet of the enemy's 
lines and while waiting for his mail, he was 
again wounded, a minie ball striking him in 
the left side of the head, crushing tiie skull 
and inflicting a very severe Wdund. After 
being treated for a time in the field hospital 
he was put in an ambulance and taken to 
Marietta, Georgia, where he was confined 
in Mother Beckerdyke's ward, there receiv- 
ing excellent care. Although so severely 
wounded, his recovery was rapid, and after 
sufficiently regaining his health he returned 
home on a thirty days;' furlough, but his 
absence from the army extended over a 
period of two months. Rejoining the army, 
he went first to New York, thence to Hil- 
ton Head and next to Beaufort, and ten miles 
from that city, on the march to Raleigh, he 
once more entered the ranks. During their 
journey to that city' they were informed by 
Logan that Lee had surrendered, and the 
long, continued and deafening cheers which 
followed the announcement can better be 
imagined than described. . From Raleigh 
they proceeded to Goldsboro, where Mr. 
Teter, on account of wounds and having no 
shoes, was mounted and with the regiment 
made foraging expeditions. From there 
they proceeded to ^\'ashington, D. C, where 
they participated in the grand review, the 
grandest military pageant ever witnessed in 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



this country. He was mustered out of ser- 
vice at Louisville, Kentucky, and at Spring- 
field, Illinois, received his honorable dis- 
charge. 

Returning to McLean county, Mr. Teter 
once more took up the quiet and peaceful 
duties of the farm, remaining with his father 
for one year. The home farm was then di- 
vided, he receiving as his share a seventy- 
acre tract, which he farmed until 1887, and 
in that year came to Hutchinson, Kansas. 
During his first year's residence in this lo- 
cality he was employed at various occupa- 
tions, but he then purchased a team and en- 
gaged in farming two and a half miles north- 
west of Hutchinson, where he remained for 
two years, and fox a time thereafter was en- 
gaged in the dairy business in Newton. His 
next place of residence was in Oregon, but 
after six months spent in that state he re- 
turned to Kansas and resumed the dairy bus- 
iness. After a time he again went toi Ore- 
gon, where he remained for nine months, 
and since that time he has followed' farming 
in Reno^ county, Kansas, during a portion of 
which period he also served on the police 
force. 

Ii: McLean county, Illinois, Mr. Teter 
was united in marriage with Phcebe Jane 
Stewart, a native of the Old Dominion and 
a daughter of John and Phoebe Jane (Hun- 
ter) Stewart. Ten children have blessed 
this union, namely: Dicey Albert, who is 
engaged in farming five miles north of 
Hutchinson ; Allie Estella, who died in in- 
fancy ; Ira J., who is engaged in fanning 
near the old homestead ; jNIaggie G., wife of 
Robert Reed, a stone mason of Hutchinson; 
Jonathan Edwin, a farmer of this county; 
Nancy I\Iay, wife of O. Archer, who aho 
foHows agricultural pursuits in this county; 
Jesse, Samuel Carl, Jennie Alyrtle and Al- 
fred, who are still at home. Mr. Teter 
casts his ballot in favor of the men and meas- 
ures of the Republican pnrtv. and nn its 
ticket has been elected to niaiiv puMti. ns of 
honor and trust, including that of school 
director. He maintains pleasant relations 
with his old army comrades through his 
membership with joe Hooker Post, No. 17, 
G. A. R., and for efficient service which he 



rendered his country in her time oi trouble 
he now draws a pension of twenty-four dol- 
lars a month. His has been a well spent life, 
true to all public and private duties, and his 
scrupulous regard for the right has gained 
him the esteem of a large circle of friends. 



E. C. FISHER, M. D. 

In an analyzation of the character and 
life work of Dr. Fisher we note many of 
the characteristics which have marked the 
English nation for many centuries — the 
perseverance, reliability, energy and imcon- 
rpierable determination to pursue a course 
that has been marked out. It is these ster- 
ling qualities which have gained Dr. Fisher 
success in life and made him one of the 
substantial and valued citizens of Lyons, 
where he is actively engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession. 

A native of England, the Doctor was 
born in New Castle on the Tyne April 25, 
1844, and is a son of John Fisher, whose 
birth occurred at Newcastle on the T}-ne, 
in 1816. He represents a well-known and 
prominent English family. After coming 
to America he was for many years engaged 
in mining on the Ohio river, but now he 
is living- in retirement, at the age of eight}'- 
five years, making his home with his son, 
the Doctor. In early manhood he wedded 
Ann Combie, and for many years they trav- 
eled life's journey together, the labors of 
one supplementing and rounding out the 
work of the other. Mrs. Fisher was also 
born and reared in Newcastle on the Tyne, 
and it was after their marriage that thev 
cr^'-'-ril llie briny deep tn the new world, 
liccM-niii-^ rrMilciits of the Buckeye state. 
Her death occurred at ]\Iiddleport, in Meigs 
county, Ohio, at the age of seventy-three. 
In his political opinions Mr. Fisher is a Re- 
publican, and in the Methodist Episcopal 
church he holds membership, as did his 
wife, who was an earnest Christian, kind- 
hearted, true and loyal. This worthy coui)le 
were the parents of four children, nameh- : 
E. C. of this review: Joseph, who is living 
in Braman. Oklahoma: }ilrs. Ann Ee:'ler. 




&,6. ^aXiyrlh.^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



53 



of Buffalo, Xew York; and John, who is 
connected with mining interests in Seattle, 
Washington. 

Dr. Fisher was reared in the county of 
^leigs, Ohio, and completed his literary ed- 
ucation by a high school course in Aliddle- 
port, Ohio, but put aside his text-books in 
order to respond to his country's call for 
aid. He volunteered on the 12th of May, 
1862, as a member of the Fifth Ohio Cav- 
alry. This was a noted cavalry regiment, 
under CLimniaud of Colonel Judson Kilpat- 
rick, and with that organization he served 
for three years, being with General Sher- 
man's army. He took part in the Atlanta 
campaign and went with Sherman on the 
celebrated march to the sea. All through 
tlie war he w-as loyal to the cause which he 
espoused, faithfully following the old flag 
upon the battlefields and pro\-ing his loyalty 
both upon the picket and the firing lines. 
When the war was over he returned to his 
home and resumed his studies in Athens 
College, the oldest college in the state of 
Ohio. Believing that he would prefer pro- 
fessiojial life, he took up the study of med- 
icine in the State University of Michigan, 
at Ann jVrbor, and on the completion of the 
prescribed course was graduated with the 
class of 1871. 

Dr. Fisher then returned to IMiddleport. 
Ohio, opened an office and was a represent- 
tive of its medical fraternity until 1874, 
when he visited Europe. While there he 
was married, in 1876, to JMiss Stella Reiche- 
nau, a lady of highly cultivated mind and 
many natural graces of character and dis- 
position. She was born on the Rhine, in 
Germany, and was a daughter of Charles 
Reichenau, wlm bt-l' mi^ed tn oue of the dis- 
tinguished families nf that country. She 
obtained her education at Deitz, Germany, 
and was a popular and successful teacher 
in Scotland at the time when she formed 
the acquaintance of the Doctor. Return- 
ing with his bride to his native land. Dr. 
Fisher became a resident of Racine, Ohio, 
in 1876, but on the solicitation of his par- 
ents he returned to the old home in Mid- 
dleport. where he remained until 1884. In 



that year he came to the Sunflower state 
and took up his abode in Lyons, where he 
has since remained. His broad knowledge 
and his marked ability have secured for 
him a liberal patronage, and his name is en- 
rolled among the representatives of the 
medical fraternity in this portion of the 
state. 

The marriage of the Doctor and Mrs. 
Fisher has been blessed with six children, 
namely: Charles A., who is now a student 
in Lawrence University, of Kansas ; Anna 
Florence, who received a good musical ed- 
ucation in Cologne, liermany, where she 
was a student for six years, attaining high 
proficiency in that art ; Wilhelm and Thekia, 
both of whom are students in the high 
school of Lyons; and Elsie Nancy, who 
completes the family. The Fisher house- 
hold is celebrated for its gracious Hospi- 
tality, and the Doctor and his wnfe occupy 
a very enviable position in social circles. 
In his political views and affiliations he is 
a Republican, and is now serving as presi- 
dent of the school board of Lyo^ns, his. 
labors proving of value and benefit to the 
cause of education here. He has also been 
a member of the city council and takes a 
deep interest in everything pertaining to the 
progress and material advancement of his 
adopted county. A valued Mason, he has 
passed all the chairs in the blue lodge, and 
he is likewise a member of the Lyons Post, 
No. 20, G. A. R. The familv attend the 
services- of the Methodi-t i;]i;-r-|)al church. 
His fine personal appearance is an indica- 
tion of his character. He is easily approach- 
able and his unfailing courtesy wins him 
friends where\"er he goes. To-day he stands 
among the valued and respected citizens of 
central Kansas and is well worthy of men- 
tion among the representative residents of 
the state. 



JAMES ST. JOHN. 

The life of James St. John — pre-emi- 
nently that of a business man — has been 
crowned with success and shows the power 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



of untiring energy and industry in over- 
coming obstacles, meeting competition and 
gradually advancing to the goal of prosper- 
ity. He is now the president and manager 
of the Huthinson Lumber & Planing Mill 
Company, a leading industry which contrib- 
utes to the commercial activity of the city 
as well as to the individual success of its 
stockholders. The company was organized 
under the present form in 1897 and its large 
trade indicates that the business methods of 
the house commend it to public patronage. 
James St. John was boi n in Preble coun- 
ty, Ohio, June 5, 1838. Tradition says that 
the family is of French lineage but the orig- 
inal American ancestors came to this coun- 
try from England. The grandfather of our 
subject was another James St. John and was 
born, in Dutchess county, New York, April 
4, 1788, his parents being John and Ann 
(Lockwood) St. John. In 1807 he married 
Elizabeth Payne, a native of Culpeper coun- 
ty, Virginia, and to provide for his family 
he followed agricultural pursuits. Remov- 
ing to Ohio his son, Seth St. John, was there 
born and reared. He learned the tanner's 
trade, which he followed in the Buckeye 
state until 1840, when he ranoved to Van 
Buren county, Iowa, where he established a 
tannery, which he conducted for some timie. 
He took an active part in public affairs dur- 
in the early history of the county and for 
two terms served as sheriff. After his elec- 
tion to that office he removed to Keosauqua, 
the county seat, where he spent his remain^ 
ing days, his death occurring in 1865. He 
was a man of pn ni' unccil character and' fear- 
less in defen-o ■ t" hi- Imnest convictions. He 
gave a stalwart siip|hirt to the principles of 
Democracy and was an active and' consistent 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Fraternally he was connected with the Ma- 
sonic lodge and Independent Ordter of Odd 
Fellows. His wife, who was a native o'f 
Peimsylvania, died at the home of her 
daughter, Mrs. Sarah Kreigh, of Johnson, 
Kansas, in February, 1888. They' were the 
parents of nine children, seven of whomi 
reached mature years, while five are still liv- 
ing, namely : Carlisle, who is a sheet metal 
worker in Des iMoines, Iowa; Jacob M., an 



attorney of Des ]\Ioines : James of this re- 
view: Sarah R., wife of L. H. Kreigh, post- 
master of Edwin, Stanton county, Kansas; 
John F., who served through the entire 
Civil war as sergeant of Company K, Tenth 
Iowa Volunteer Infantrv', and died at the 
Soldiers' Home in Kansas, in 1891 ; Mary 
A., the wife of M. C. Davis, for many years 
special examiner in the pension department 
in Washington, D. C. ; and Seth, who for 
many years was engaged in business in Os- 
ceola, Iowa, and died in Texas in 1891. 

James St. John was only two years old 
when his parents went to Iowa, where he 
was reared to manhood under the parental 
roof. He attended the public schools until 
thirteen years of age and then entered upon 
an apprenticeship to the tinner's trade at 
Keosauqua, Iowa, where he remained for 
eight years, when, having attained his major- 
ity, he -entered into partnership with his 
father iathe establishment of a stove and 
tinning business in Keosauqua, Iowa. He 
was there located for four years and on the 
expiration of that period he removed into 
the country in that county, where he im- 
proved a new farm and engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits for about two years. He 
next went to Bloomfield, Iowa, where he 
conducted a lumber yard for about six years 
and in 1877 he removed to Kansas, locat- 
ing at Burrton, Harve}- county, where he 
was connected with the lumber trade for a 
year. In 1878 he arrived in Hutchinson and 
organized the Hutchinson Lumber Company, 
a stock company, of which he became pres- 
ident and manager, conducting the enterprise 
until 1885, when the company was merged 
into the St. John & IMarsh Company, busi- 
ness being carried on under the latter name 
until 1887 when Mr. St. John disposed of 
his interest to the Marshes. In 1889, in con- 
nection with Mr. McCandless, he purchased 
the banking business of J. F. Redhead & 
Company-, and continued it under the name 
of James St. John & Company until 1897, 
when the bank was sold. Tlie following 
year Mr. St. John established the Hutchin- 
son Lumber & Planing ]\Iill Company, with 
which he has since been connected as its 
president. It was established on nnich the 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



same plan that is now followed, but the trade 
has constantly grown in volume and impor- 
tance and the enterprise is now accounted one 
ri the leading industrial concern."- of the 
city. In addition toi the manufacture and 
sale of lumber the company does a large 
building contract business, employing a 
number of competent mechanics, as many 
as from twenty to twenty-five during the 
building season. The office o<f the 'company 
is at No. 13 Sherman street, west, ancl the 
plant on Avenue A, west. The present of- 
ficers are James St. John, president; M. H. 
Wagner, vice-president: A. W. McCandless, 
secretary and treasurer. The firm carries 
a complete line of lumber and building ma- 
terials of every description and in the plan- 
ing mill employs fifteen operatives. Every 
branch of their business is well managed and 
is profitable. Tlie partners are men of en- 
terprise, practical, progressive and reliable, 
and the house sustains an unassailable repu- 
tation in trade circles. 

Mr. St. John is pre-eminently a Ijusi- 
ness man, devoting almost his entire time 
and attention to his industrial and commer- 
cial affairs. He has never sought or desired 
office and has seldom ever consented to 
accept political positions. His fellow towns- 
men, however, elected him to the ofifice of 
city coimcilman while he resided in Bloom- 
field and much against his desire he was 
compelled to accept. In a cpiiet way, how- 
e\er, he aids largely in the city's progress 
and improvement and endorses^ every raeas- 
lu'e for the general good. He votes inde- 
pendently, supporting by his ballot the men 
and measures which he thinks will best ad- 
vance the welfare of the city, state and na- 
tion. 

On the .25tli of December, 1861, Mr. St. 
John was married to Miss Margaret Trebil- 
cock, a daughter of Frank and' Anna (Dow- 
erick) Trebilcock, both of whoni were na- 
tives of England, while Mrs. St. John was 
born in Ohio. By her marriage she has be- 
ciime the mother of three children : Frank 
T., who is controlling a brancji of the lum- 
ber business, located at FredericT<, Kansas ; 
Agnes, the wife of A. W. ]\IcCandless, the 
secretarv and treasurer of the Hutchinson 



Lumber & Planing Mill Company ; and Mary 
who died in infancy. The parents hold 
membership in the Presbyterian chur.ch, con- 
tribute liberally to its support and take an ac- 
tive part in its work. Mr. St. John is one 
of the oldest, best known andi most highly 
respected business men of Hutchinson, hav- 
ing been an active factor in the trade circles 
of tliis city for twenty-three years. While 
in lo'wa he was one of the organizers of the 
Fort Madison Chair Company, which is still 
in existence, and was one of the organizers 
and the first president of the Valley State 
Bank of Hutchinson. Besides; his other in- 
terests in this city he owns valuable fruit 
lands in the stjate of California. He 
is a man of superior business force and exec- 
utive power, t<irnis l^is plans readily and is 
determined in their execution. He has keen 
foresight and his judgment is rarely, if ever, 
at fault. His treatment of his employes is 
just and considerate and his reputation is 
Oine over which there falls no shadow of 
wrong. His splendid success has been 
worthily achieved and his career excites the 
admiration and respect of all. 



ALEXANDER L. FORSHA. 

One of the most notable places in Reno 
county is the ranch and milling property 
owned by Alexander L. Forsha. a very 
prominent business man whose success is 
the result of his own earnest labors, directed 
by sound business judgment. His life his- 
tory again proves the truth of the old adage 
that "the achievement depends upon the 
man." It is not he who waits for opportu- 
nity to aid him, but the individual who can 
make his opportunity, wh6 can make condi- 
tions serve his purpose that gains wealth. 
Such has been the career of Colonel Forsha, 
who' now residtes at a beautiful home in 
Hutchinson and yet spends much of his time 
upon his ranch, his beautiful country seat 
proving a most attractive feature of the land- 
scape. 

The Colonel is a native of Oxford. Ohio, 
born on the 27th of December, 1832. his par- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



ents' Iseing William and Elizabeth (Louis) 
Forsha, the latter a native of Xew England. 
The father was Ixjrn and reared in New York 
and was a ship carpenter by trade. In early 
manhood he remo^•ed to Ohio, where he was 
married and soon afterward, in 1S36, went 
to Scotland count}-, Missouri, casting in his 
lot among its early settlers. He became an 
extensive land owner and stock raiser and a 
well known and popular citizen actively iden- 
tified with pubHc and ofiicial affairs in Scot- 
land county. He spent the last years of his 
life in retirement from business cares in 
Monticello, ^Missouri. In his family were 
five children ; Mary, the wife of J. M. Fish, 
a wealthy merchant of Eddyville, Iowa; 
Siles E., who is engaged in the real estate 
business in Los Angeles, California ; Alex- 
ander L. ; Lizzie J., wafe of William F. 
Staples, of Los Angeles : and William B., 
who died at the age of eighteen years. 

The Colonel was only three years old 
when the family took up their abode in the 
new home in Missouri and there amid the 
wild scenes of pioneer life he was reared, 
early becoming familiar with the work of the 
farm, while in the common schools he pur- 
sued his educatioji, also attending St. 
Charles College. At the age of twenty-two 
years he engaged in business on his own ac- 
cornt as a merchant in EddA-ville, Iowa, 
where he remained for six years, when he re- 
turned to ^Missouri, locating in Schuyler 
county, that state, where he had large landed 
interests. There he engaged in farming 
and milling until 1883. He had previously 
purchased a large tract of railroad land in 
Reno county, and in that year he disposed of 
his iNIissouri property and removed to 
Hutchinson in order to superintend his 
growing business interests here. He had 
first purchased ten sections of land and here 
he devoted his attention to the real-estate 
business. A man of resourceful business 
ability, he extended his operations to other 
lines and became one of the founders of the 
Hutchinson Street Railway Company. In 
December, 1889, he began improA-ements on 
what has become widelv known as the For- 
sha Ranch, then comprising sections 7, 17, 
19 and 29 Castleton township, to which he 



has added until the place now comprises over 
four thousand nine hundred and eighty acres. 
It is conducted as a stock ranch, where they 
graze and feed about one thousand head of 
cattle and sell each year from four to five 
hundred head. Since developing- the ranch 
Mr. Forsha has given his chief attention to 
it, disposing of many of his other business 
interests. He has a fine residence in Hutch- 
inson, at No. 317 Sherman street, east, which 
he considers his home, although he spends 
much of his time on the ranch. 

In his political views ^Ir. Forsha is an 
ardent Republican and keeping well inform- 
ed on the issues of the day is able to support 
his position by intelligent argument. His 
first vote was cast for John C. Fremont and 
in this he did. not follow the example of his 
father, w"ho was first a Whig and then a 
Democrat, favoring the slavery position of 
the soulth. In his fraternail relations the 
Colonel is a Mason, having been made a 
member ef the craft many years ago. 

On the 13th of February, 1862, at Eddy- 
ville, Iowa, Colonel Forsha was united in 
marriage to Miss Jean Irvin, a daughter of 
James M. and Louisa (Castell) Irvin. She 
was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and 
during her infancy was taken by her parents 
to Nodaway county, Missouri. Later the 
father removed with his family to 
Doniphan county, Kansas, and took an ac- 
tive part in the border difficulties attendant 
upon the settlement of this state. When the 
Civil war w^as inaugurated he became a colo- 
nel in the Union army and was a brave and 
•loyal officer. He served as a member of tlie 
first senate of Kansas and left the impress 
of his individuality upon the early history 
of the state. He died March 7, 1900, at his 
home in Pasadena, California, where for 
several years he had lived a retired life. In 
his family were six children, of whom four 
are now living: Frank, of Los Angeles, 
California; Mrs. Forsha; Flora, the wife of 
E. E. W^ard, a business man of Chanute. 
Kansas; and Emma L., the widow of Jo- 
seph L. Barbee, of Chicago. One son, Wal- 
ter, who was connected with railroad service, 
died 'in West Virginia in 1898. Unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Forsha have been born two sons: 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



Fred A., who is vice president of tlie Na- 
tional Live Stock Company, of Kansas City, 
Chicago and Omaha, and resides in the first 
mentioned' place: and Sam \\\. who carries 
on the Forsha ranch. 

This ranch has become a \-alual)le and 
remunerative property under the personal 
supervision of Sam. ^^'. Forsha, whoi since 
its establishment has been in charge of the 
place. His ability as a financier and man- 
ager is amply demonstrated by the success 
and profitable results of one pi the largest 
and most completely equipped and systemat- 
ically conducted stock ranches in southern 
or central Kansas. One thousand acres are 
planted to alfalfa, about three hundred and 
fifty are cultivated in forage crops and the 
remainder is pasture land. The first im- 
provement was made on the ranch in 1889, 
a small house being erected, in which Sam 
\y. Forsha slept for the first time on the 
24th of December, althorgh the house was 
not completed until the 2d of January, 1890. 
Business was first carried on exclusively as 
a stock ranch and cribs were erected for one 
hundred thousand bushels of corn which 
would be required for feeding purposes. In 
July, iSps, a new department was added to 
the business by the erection of a mill, which 
was built largely for their own use in grind- 
ing feed for the cattle, but an increasing cus- 
tom trade induced them to erect a modern 
mill and in iNIay and June, 1899, work on 
the Forsha Roller IMills was carried forward 
to completion, the plant constituting a three- 
story building, equipped with the latest im- 
proved machinery, and having a capacity of 
one hundred and seventy-five barrels per 
da}-. ]\Ir. Forsha and his son have demon- 
strated their abilitv to manufacture as good 
flnur as can be pr- ilrr. ' '^- ■'- ■ "iitry and 
they have a large a;i:l ■ creasirig 

patronage. Their prii:>: • ,:re Peer- 

less, Standard and Takers' Delig t, and 
these are well known throughout central and 
southern Kansas and in the Indian Terri- 
tory. They also ship largely for the export 
trade, and in addition to the merchant trade 
they have a large custom trade^and exchange 
covering an area of from twenty-five to 
thirty miles. The mill is operated by power 



I furnished from a large Corliss engine. In 
j connection with the mill is a large storage 
room for mill products, fifty by seventy-two 
i feet, steel covered. The mill in all its equip- 
I ments is strictly in line with all general im- 
; prcvements and is in keeping with the mod- 
ern stock ranch on which it is located. Since 
it has been remodeled it grinds from eighty 
to one hundred thousand barrels annually. 
They sell at the door all coarse mill prod- 
ucts, besides shipping frorii twenty to thirty 
car Irads each year. The Forsha mill and 
ranch creates a good demand and excellent 
local market for both wheat and corn. The 
feed lots and yards are arranged with a vie\v 
to convenience and economizing time. There 
are large roofed feed sheds and a large dou- 
ble barn for winter feeding, while substan- 
tial pens and yards are arranged in the man- 
ner of city stockyards. \\'ater is piped' from 
an eighty-foot standpipe mounted on a steel 
tower and thus the feed lots, outbuildings, 
mill and residence are supplied. There are 
also two fire plugs with hose attachments, 
furnishing adequate fire protection. The 
place is equipped with a modern blacksmith 
shop where a competent mechanic does the 
work in his line for the ranch besides the 
custom work of the neighborhood. In the 
yards is a dehorning chute and a sixty thou- 
sand pound Fairbanks stock scale. A well 
drilling apparatus is kept for sinking their 
own wells, which are located in different 
parts of the pasture lands. There are alto- 
gether ten wells and Avindmills. which fur- 
nish abundant water supply. The feeding is 
conducted in the most careful and systeni- 
' atic manner, and account being kept of all 
feed consumed, and the cattle are weighed 
everv thirty days. The care and precision 
which is manifest in the conduct of this large 
ranch with its varied interests are a credit to 
I the executive ability of Sam W. Forsha. the 
genial and hospitable manager and host. 
The office and residence at Hutchinson are 
connected with local and long-distance 
phones with the ranch, and few conveniences 
i of the modern city home or office are missing 
at Forsha. The elegant and comfortable 
residence is three stories in height with base- 
ment, and is furnished in a manner that is a 



5S 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



supervision and is justly accounted one of 
credit to the good taste of the host. It has 
all modern conveniences, including furnace 
heat, hot and cold water, toilet and bath and 
gas is furnished by their own gas plant. The 
ranch presents an inviting prospect and the 
Colonel and his wife spend much of their 
time there in the summer months in prefer- 
ence to their elegant city home. 

In public affairs Sam W. Forsha has 
taken an active part since locating upon the 
ranch. He is identified with the Republican 
party and is a member of the township cen- 
tral committee. He has also been a delegate 
to the county, state, congressional and na- 
tional conventions, and his opinions carry 
weight in the councils of his party. Frater- 
nally he is a thirty-second degree Mason, 
holding membership in Friendship Lodge, 
No. 208. F. & A. M. : Resjo Chapter, R. A. 
^L: and \A'icliita C. -iisistory. No. 2, A. A. 
S. R. He i> aL~i' cimected with the Com- 
mercial Travelers' Association. Since tak- 
ing charge of the ranch, however, he has 
given his attention almost exclusively to its 
the most capable and reliable business men 
in Reno co-unty, possessing sound judgment, 
keen foresight and earnest purpose. He 
forms his plans reachly and yet not without 
mature dmsideratinn. and Is determined in 
their exrcntii 11. The Fi^rsha ranch is indeed 
a creditalilc nii'iuiment to the business ability 
and w ' 'Tth ■ 'f lt^ i< under and its manager. 



JOHN ^lARCH. 



For almost a quarter of a century John 
Alarch has resided upon the farm which is 
now his home, having taken up' his abode 
here in 1877. Kansas tested' the bravery, 
endurance and' faith of her early settlers in 
the }-ears of pioneer life here, but those who 
had the coura^^e and the resolution to meet 
hardships and tliniculties have ultimately 
been rewarded. "Hard times," occasioned 
by droughts and grasshoppers, are now no 
longer knoavn. The advent of the railroad 
has bought all the comforts of civilization 
known to the older east, and moreover has 



afforded shipping facilities so that the citi- 
zens are in direct contact with the great 
market centers of the country to which an- 
nually millions of bushels of grain and thou- 
sands of heads of cattle are sent. Mr. March 
is one among the brave pioneers who- faced 
the trials to eventually win success and he 
is now in very comfortable circum- 
stances financially. Moreover, he has won 
the high regard of his fellow townsmen and 
one of the popular residents of Ellsworth 
county is John March. 

He was born October 29, 1837, in Wel- 
lingborough, Northamptonshire. England, a 
son of John and Dinah ( Chamberlain) 
March. The father, who- was connected 
with the railroad service there, died during 
the early boyhood of our subject, and when 
fourteen )-ears of age the latter came to 
America with his uncle, crossing the ocean 
on the ship Leviathan, wdiich was forty- 
nine days in making the New York harbor. 
Mr. ^larch went west to Columbus, Ohio, 
and remained with his uncle until twenity- 
one years of age, when he offered his aid to 
his adopted country for military service, en- 
listing July 22, 1861, as a member of Com- 
pany E, Twentieth Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry, which was assigned to the Army of 
the Potomac. He participated in the battles 
of Hatteras Inlet, North Carolina, where 
he served as a sharpshooter during the fight 
between the ]\Ierrimac and the ]\Ionitor. He 
was also in the battles of Fair Oaks, \\'hite 
Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, JManassas, the 
second battle of Bull Run. Chantilly, Fred- 
ricksburg, Chancellorsville and many minor 
engagements and skirmishes. He was 
wounded by a minie ball when before Rich- 
mond and was confined in St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital, Washington, D. C, where his 
thumb was amputated. He was also wound- 
ed at Fair Oaks. He received an honorable 
discharge at Camp Pitcher, Virginia, De- 
cember 24, 1862, on a surgeon's certificate 
of disability, and then returned to Ohio. 

From there Mr. March went to Iowa 
with the intention of following farming 
there, but finding that a regiment was being 
raised, and the war spirit being still strong 
within him, he re-enlisted at Newton, Iowa, 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



159 



for three years' service, being mustered in 
at Davenport, November 30, 1863, as a 
member of Company L, Xinth Regiment of 
Iowa Cavah-y. The command was assigned 
to the army at the frontier, and be was 
mostly on detached service in Arkansas, tak- 
ing part in a number of engageinents with 
the bushwhackers. They lost one hundred 
and ninety-four men by death from wounds, 
and disease. At Little Rock. Arkansas, on 
the 3d of February, 1866, Mr. March re- 
ceived his final discharge, and with a most 
commendable record for faithful military 
ser\-ice and for bravery he returned to his 
Ohio home. 

Renting a farm in Delaware countv, that 
state, he continued its operation imtil 1877, 
when he came to Kansas, and bought out the 
man who had pre-empted the land upon 
which Mr. March now resides, giving him 
one hundred and fifty dollars for his right. 
He then purchased a yoke of cattle with 
which he brcike the land, and here he has car- 
ried ijii his farming- pursuits ever since. He 
raised ci insiderable corn at first, as he had a 
tract (if liottom land that never entirely 
failed cjf yielding a crop. He has given most 
of his attention, however, to the production 
of wheat. He has added sixty acres to his 
land and with the exception of seventy-five 
acres all is under the plow. The other is 
I largely used for pasturage, for he raises 
some cattle. 

On the 20th of September, 1866, Mr. 
March led to the marriage altar Miss Mary 
-V. Dickinson, a daughter of Edward \V. 
Dickinson, a farmer of Ohio. He was born 
in Northamptonshire. England, and came to 
America in tlie spring of 185 1. spending ten 
ycai-- ill ."^aral^ ,L;"a c>iUntv. New ^'nrk, after 
which he renmved tn Ohio. Untn Mr. and 
Mrs. March have been born seven children: 
Emma J.; John H. : Edward A., who is 
farming in Illinois ; Margaret, the wife of 
Bert Story, of Ellsworth township. Ells- 
worth county ; Samuel E.. a resident farmer 
of Illinois: ^lelvina and Charles j\I.. at 
home. For eleven or twelve years after 
coming to Kansas the family lived in a small 
house of only two rooms, but additions were 
made to this and thev now have a nice home. 



while all modern imprc\-ements, in the way 
of good buildings, are found uix)n the place. 
Mr. March continued the acti\-e manage- 
ment of the farm until 1900, since which 
time he has lived practically retired in the 
enjoyment of a well merited rest. In his 
political views he is a Rqjubhcan, and for 
twelve years he has served as treasurer of 
the school district. He belongs to Ellsworth 
Post, No. 22, G. A. R., and attends the ser- 
vices of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
The years of his life have passed in activity 
mostly gi\-en. to business, yet he has never 
neglected his duties of citizenship or the ob- 
ligation of private and social life. 



ROBERT C. MILLER. 

Among the well known citizens of the 
floiirishing town of Langdon, Kansas, is 
Robert C. Miller, a farmer and merchant, 
who was born in AVasliin-iMn c< nntx. Indi- 
ana, on June 16, 1844. n ^nn nt W illiam and 
Susan (Truman) Miller. William Miller, 
the father of Robert C, was; born in Ten- 
nessee, in 1819, and he died in Georgetown, 
Indiana, in 1892, at the age of eighty-three 
years. He married Susan Truman, who was 
born in Kentucky in 1818, the marriage tak- 
ing place in Indiana about 1839. and there 
they have followed a farming life. They 
reared these children : Louise, who married 
Thomas J. Teaford, of Indiana: Robert C, 
our subject; John N., who is a farmer in 
KingTnan county, Kansas ; and Charles A., 
who resides in Reno county. Kansas. Both 
piarents had been previously married and 
each had one son. William Bright, who lives 
in Martinsburg. Indiana, and Thomas Mil- 
ler, who died in \'ermilion county, Illinois. 
After the death of the mother of our sub- 
ject, in 1867. the father again married. 

Robert C. Miller was reared to farm life 
and had but few educational opportunities. 
At the age of eighteen years he left home 
to become a soldier, enli-tiiig for service in 
the Civil war in tlie l-"ighty-hrst Indiana In- 
fantrv, becoming a private in Company C, 
and remained faithful to dutv feir three 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



years, being mustered out at the close of the 
war. He did not escape all of the disasters 
of war, having been captured by the enemy 
at Lookout ]\Iountain and confined for six 
and one-half months at the military prison 
on Belle Isle. 

On April 8, 1875. Mr. Miller was united 
in marriage to Fannie E. Holland, who was 
born in Sangamon county, Illinois, a daugh- 
ter of \\'illiam T. and Julia A. (Hurt) Hol- 
land, the fomier born in Kentucky and the 
latter in ^lenard county, Illinois. Mr. Hol- 
land was a carpenter and also a farmer and 
lived to be sixty-nine years of age, dying 
on December 14, 1899. They caane with 
their six children to Atchison county, Kan- 
sas, in 1873, and in 1879 removed to Reno 
county, ]\Irs. Holland still enjoying vigor- 
ous health. 

;\Ir. and ^Irs. ]\Iiller began farming as 
tenants, thus continuing for one year in 
Atchison county, but in 1874 our subject 
took up a quarter section of homestead land 
on section 29, in Langdon township, and in 
1876 he and wife moved out to their land. 
The first house was what is locally known 
as a "dugout" and its dimensions were 
twelve by twenty feet, with a dirt roof and 
board floor, and here industry and happiness 
made it a most comfortable home. This 
home was succeeded by a small frame build- 
ing, fourteen by twenty-four feet in dimen- 
sions, but the contrast is great between it 
and his present commodious residence, a 
story and a half in height with an annex of 
twenty-six by sixteen feet. One of the feat- 
ures (if the place which testifies to the pros- 
perity that reigns is the large red barn, which 
was erected in 1882. As a reward for his 
persevering industry Mr. Miller now owns 
two hundred and fourteen acres of fine, pro- 
ductive land, and here carries on a general 
line of farming. He keeps fifty head of cat- 
tle, milks nine or ten cows and' always owns 
from eight to ten horses. He uses one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of his land for the rais- 
ing of wheat and seventy acres for corn. The 
fine shade trees which adorn the landscane 
and the two hundred and fifty apple trees he 
planted here, and has thus benefited the lo- 
cality l)y turning unproductive land into a 



veritable garden, pleasant to the eye of the 
public and remunerative to its owner. Since 
18S7 he has alsoi been engaged in the mer- 
cantile business, his establishment being the 
first opened in the village proper. Until 
1900 his brother was associated with him, 
but since that date he has successfully con- 
ducted it alone, having a very lucrative trade, 
retaining the customers whom he first served 
fourteen years ago. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller had a familv of nine 
children born to them, two dying while in- 
fants, the others being as folloAvs : \MlIiam 
T., a railroad official, living at home: Lou- 
ise, a resident of St. Joseph, Missouri : Frank 
B., in cliarge of the store: Stella A. : Helen 
Gertrude; .Jessie B., a little lady of nine 
years : and Howard, a lad of five. In politics 
Mr. ]\Iiller has never wavered in his alle- 
giance to the Republican party, and has serv- 
ed as the efficient township trustee for two 
terms, in 1890 was census enumerator, and 
for twO' years has been a justice of the peace. ? 
Mrs. Jones, of this village, is the postmistress 
and Mr. Miller is the assistant, the office be- 
ing located in his store, this being the most 
centrally located and appropriate building 
in the town, and is Mr. Miller's own prop- 
erty. Socially he is a member of the G. A. 
R., while the religious connection of the fam- 
ilv is with the Christian church. 



L. E. VER^IILLIOX. 

For almost a quarter of a century Dr. 
Vermillion has been a resident of Kansas 
and to-day he ranks with the ablest physi- 
cians and surgeons of this portion of the 
state. He was born in Loudon county, Yiv- 
ginia. A]iril 30, 1850, his liirthplace being- 
near Euckland. the family residence. On 
l>oth the paternal and maternal sides he is 
descended from old and prominent families 
of his native state, his ancestors having lo- 
cated in the Old Dominion prior to the Re^■- 
olutionary war. Jonathan \^ermillion. the 
Doctor's father, \\as a miller by trade, and 
in his business affairs won a high degree of 
success. He was born in \"irginia. and 




>>,^^^^-i-<- y^S). 



BIOGJ^APHICAL HISTORY 



there wooed and won Miss Elizabeth War- 
ford, who was connected with the Lees and 
other prominent families of Virginia. She 
acquired her education there and was a lady 
of culture. \\h( iini\-ed to her husband a 
faithful ci'iiipaiii"!! >'\\ tlie journey of life. 
In his political views Jonathan A'ermillion 
was a stalwart Democrat, and his religious 
belief was indicated by his membership in 
the Methodist Episcopal church. He was 
active and- zealous in its work and had much 
influence among the young people by .rea- 
son of his genial ways' and hearty sympathy 
and the interest which he took in the boys 
and girls through youth -as they approached 
manho(^d and womanhood. Socially he was 
identified with the Masonic fraternity. He 
died in 1868, at the age of forty- four years, 
and his wife passed away at the age of fort)-- 
eight, loved and respected by all who- knew 
her by reason of her many good qualities 
of head and heart. This worthy couple 
were the parents of three children : Louin 
E., of this review; Oscar, of Sullivan coun- 
ty, Indiana ; and Mrs. Annie Pascoe, of 
Great Bend, Kansas. 

In taking up the personal history of Dr. 
Vermillion we present Im i hu" reailers a life 
record which cann^'t fail to proxx- "f interest, 
for the subject is so widely and favorably- 
known in this portion of Kansas. He was 
reared in \'irginia and in Clark county, 
Illinois, near York, pursuing his educaton 
in the common schools and in the high 
school and academy near his home. De- 
termining to make the practice of medicine 
hi.s"life work, he began study under the di- 
rection of Dr. Beard, of Rice county, Kan- 
sas, and further continued his studies in the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Keo- 
kuk, Iowa, where he was graduated with 
honor in the class of 1890. In the mean- 
time, however, in 1890, he had begun prac- 
tice in Mitchell, where he remained until 
1892. when he came to Lyons and opened 
an office. From the beginning of his prac- 
tice here he has met with' a high degree of 
success. When called upon to attend some 
difficult cases he soon demonstrated his abil- 
itv to handle the intricate prolilems that fall 



to the lot of the medical practitioner and 
has since enjoyed a constantly increasing- 
success. By reading and study he keeps in 
touch with the advanced thought and prog- 
ress made by the medical science as exem- 
I)lified in the work of the fraternity, and 
his labiirs ha\-e been of great value to the 
Cduimunity in which he is located, as well 
as pr(i\-ing a source of good income to him- 
self. 

In 1871 Dr. \'ermillion was united in 
marriage to ]\Iiss Amelia G. Ball, who was 
born in York, Clark county, Illinois, a 
daughter of Aaron and Susan (Bennett) 
Ball, the former a native of Xew Jersey and 
the latter of Xew Y'-rk. Her fatJier is n. iw 
deceased. Untn Dr. and :\lr>. Wrmillion 
were born four childr.en: Jonathan, of Kan- 
sas City, Missouri ; Carl, who is living in 
Lyons; Mrs. Mary Suttle. of Rice county, 
Kansas; and Clyde, who is yet under the 
parental roof. Llrs. Vermillion died Feb- 
ruary 19, 1883. and October 5, 1887. Dr. 
Vermillion was united in marriage to Miss 
Ida Nichcsls, of Kingsville, ]\Iissouri. To 
this tmif-jn ha\-e been bo+n six children. \\z. : 
Archie, Harry Percival, Grace, Charlie, 
who died at the age of three years, Louin 
Edgar, Jr., and Frank. The Doctor exer- 
cises his right of franchise in support of the 
men and measures of the Democracy, and 
socially he is connected with the Masonic 
fraternity and with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, exemplifying in his life the 
beneficent spirit of those orders, which 
recognize the hrotherhix^d of mankind and 
the claims of humanity for fcrbearai-ice, 
charily and aid.. He is likewise a repre- 
sentative of the Ancient -order of United 
Workn-icii. Beth he and his wife hold mem- 
bership in the IMethodist Episcopal church, 
of which he i- 'Serving as trustee. The Doc- 
tor is now acting as physician for the INIis- 
souri Pacific Railroad Company and his 
standing in his profession is indicated by the 
fact that he is chairman of the Rice County 
Medical Society. He is a man of fine per- 
sonal appearance, being six feet and two 
inches in height and weighing two hundred 
and thirty pounds. His manner is frank and 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



courteous, and he wins friends wherever he 
goes. As a citizen he is public spirited and 
progressive. The causes of education, of 
temperance and of morality are all dear to 
his heart, and he is a champion of every 
measure calculated to prove of . general 
g"Ood. 



CHARLES P. DULLER. 

One of the best known farmers of Ger- 
man birth in Renoi count}', Kansas, is Charles 
P. Miller, of section _:;, Ilunts\ille town- 
ship, whose post office address is lluntsville. 
Like most American citizens of his nation- 
ality he is a man of enterprise and thrift 
who believes in doing for the community in 
which he lives as much as the comnumity 
can possibly do for him. 

Charles P. Miller was born in the old 
family home of the ^Millers on the Rhine, in 
Germany, July 29, 1835, a son of John Mil- 
ler, who owned lands and mill property and 
who died in Germany in 1837, leaving a 
widow and five chilcjfen, three of whom are 
sons. Mrs. Miller disposed of her property 
in her native land and with some little cap- 
ital came to America with her children about 
1S43. She located in Cuyahoga county, 
C)hiii, and died at the residence of her son, 
George E. Miller, a successful farmer in 
Franklin county, Missouri, in 1872, aged 
se\-enty-five years. The subject of this 
sketch received a fair education in Germany 
and was reared on a farm about five miles 
from Cleveland, Ohio, which was owned by 
his mother. In 1857 she sold her land in 
Ohio, and with many othft's went to Mis- 
souri, where cheap and good land was pro- 
curable at that time and- where they bought 
one hundred and eighty acres' and later 
eighty acres. This property was purchased 
bv Charles P. Miller and his brother. George 
F., and is located in Eranklin county, Mis- 
souri, fifty-four miles west of St. Louis. 

Augaist 16. i860, Mr. Miller married 
Sophronia Paulina Woodland, who was 
born in Missouri, in 1835, a daughter of 
James \\'oodland. August 23, 1863, cur 
subject enlisted in Company D. Eleventh 



Regiment, Missouri \"olunteer Infantry, 
with which he saw active service until he 
was honorably discharged, January 15, 
1866. He went into the service as a private 
and came out Avith the rank of a corporal. 
He went to Stafford county, in western Kan- 
sas, in 1879, and in 1883 removed to Hunts- 
ville township, Reno county, where he 
bought one hundred and sixty acres of un- 
improved prairie land, in the following year, 
for ten hundred and forty dollars. He had 
previously sold his eighty-acre farm in ]\Iis- 
souri. Mr. and Mrs. -Miller ha\-e had three 
sons and three daughters, all but one of 
wdiom are married. , Their son, John Thom- 
as Miller, who is unmarried, manages his 
father's homestead. Ferdinand, born May 
8, 1861, is a farmer in Oklahoma, and has 
three sons. Eliza Jane married Jacob Dean 
and has two children. She lives in Kansas 
City, Kansas. Charles Miller is a farmer hi 
Oklahoma territory. He is married but has 
no children. Amelia married John Speniol, 
of Livingston county, Illinois, and has two 
sons and a daughter. Emma married Oron 
Saxton, and lives in Hayes township. 

\\'hen Mr. Miller entered the army as a 
volunteer it was not without a good knowd- 
edge of the perils he would be called upon 
to endure, for he had seen acti\e service in 
the home g"uard, and his services in behalf 
of the flag were so well appreciated that he 
is the recipient of a pension of seventeen 
dollars a month. Politically he is an inde- 
pendent voter. He is a Protestant and has 
been guided through life by the Golden 
Rule. A man of much public spirit, he has 
given an active and liberal support to every 
movement which in his good judgment has 
promised to benefit his township and county. 



E. H. NORRIS. • 

Among the enterprising business men of 
Gene;eo is E. H. Norris, who is at the head 
of an extensive mercantile establishment. He 
was born in Van Buren county, Iowa, Jan- 
uary 8, 1856. a son of S. M. Korris, who 
was called to the home beyond in 1900, at 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



■63 



the ripe okl age of eiglity-five years. He 
was a member of a prominent and influen- 
tial Indiana family. His wife bore the maid- 
en name of Rachel JNIoore, and they were 
the parents of seven children, five sons and 
two daughters. One son, R. ^l. Xorris, is 
now an enterprising business man of Paw- 
nee county, Kansas. 

F. H. Norris w^as reared under the pa- 
rental roof and received a good common- 
school educatiijn. He came to Kansas in 
1884, locating in Hodgman county, where 
he was engaged in business for three years. 
On the expiration of that period, in 1887, 
he took up his abode in Rice county, where 
he has since been identified with its mercan- 
tile interests. He is now recognized as one 
of the leading merchants of Geneseo. His 
large store is located in the bank block, and 
there he carries a large line of dry goods, 
boots, shoes, groceries and everything tO' be 
found in a first-class establishment of that 
kind. 

When twenty-four vears of age he was 
united in marriage with ]\Iiss Viola Brook, 
a lady of intelligence and culture, who was 
born, reared and educated in loiwa. Her 
father, ^^'illiam Brook, is now deceased. 
Three children have come to bless the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Norris, — Earl F., Cecil B. 
and Fern. Our subject is a Mason and a 
member of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. In politics he is a Republican, 
and has served as a member of the school 
board, the cause of education e\'er finding 
in him a warm friend. He is a public-spir- 
ited and progressive citizen, lending his aid 
and co-i iperation to every movement for the 
pulilic giiud an is a reliable business man 
who fullv merits the confidence reposed in 



HANDSEL A. ABBOTT. 

Kansas, which before the Civil war was 
the theatre of dire sectional strife, is now 
ground common to both federal and confed- 
erate where they may not only talk over the 
events of those days of battle and of death 
from 1 86 1 tO' 1865, but where they meet as 



friends and live together as brothers. This 
thought is suggested by the fact that Kansas 
contains a large percentage of citizens from 
the south, and these are among her most 
progressive, successful and highly appre- 
ciated business men. Of the prominent citi- 
zens of Reno county of southern birth and 
experience none is known more widely or 
more favorably than the gentleman whose 
name is above, and none has better reasons 
for remembering the Civil war and the sec- 
tional hate and personal animosity which 
were engendered by the causes which led to 
it and were fostered by its strenuous activ- 
ities. 

Handsel A. Abbott, of the firm of Abbott 
& Henshaw, dealers in lumber, hardware, 
grain and coal, at Plevna, Reno county, 
Kansas, was born on Lookout Mountain, 
Franklin county, Tennessee, May 26, 1853, 
and his earliest recollections are of those 
days and scenes which so sorely tried men's 
souls in every part of the United States. His 
father, Thomas Henry Abbott, was born 
near Atlanta. Georgia, in 1818. and died at 
East St. Louis, Illinois, in June, 1899. His 
mother was Huldah L. Simmons, and she 
came of an old Georgia family. Thomas 
Henry and HuUIah L. ( Simmons ) Abbott 
had four sons and three daughters, of whom 
in order of birth the subject of this sketch 
was the third son and fourth child. All of 
their children except two of the daughters 
are living. Monrr.c, who is a cattle rancher 
in northwest Texa>. wa^ thr'iui;h the whole 
period^ of the Ci\il war caplain >•{ a mili- 
tary company in the Confederate service. 
Louisa Elizabeth died at the age of 
twenty-seven, leaving one son. George B., 
a dealer in lumber and coal at East St. 
Louis, Illinois, has two daughters. Handsel 
A. is the immediate subject of this sketch. 
Lorenzo Dow, a dealer in lumber and coal 
at East St. Louis. Illinois, has a daughter. 
Julia Ann died at about the age of thirty 
years and left one daughter. Lydia N. is 
the wife of a Mr. Doyle, of McPherson 
I county, Kansas. The mother of these chil- 
I dren was born in 1819 and' died at East St. 
1 Louis, Illinois, in 1896. 

Thomas Henr^■ Abbott was bv nrofes- 



i64 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



sion a dentist and was the owner of a sec- 
tion of land and of about three slaves, and 
his \\ife's parents were planters and slave 
owners. Notwithstanding the fact that his 
financial interests might have appeared to 
be jeopardized by such action, he enlisted in 
the federal army at Nashville, Tennessee, in 
1861. and served much of the time for three 
years as a scout and as a guidfe to the Union 
froces. He was twice captured, and once, 
with a rope around his neck, was threatened 
with a speedy death, but was saved through 
recognition as a member of the Masonic 
order by some of the leaders of these would- 
be executioners. Once, while he was) on a 
visit to his old home, enemies approached 
and he was obliged to flee and was pursued 
by bloodhounds. He managed to climb into 
a mulberry tree, from which he fired at the 
dogs until they were all dead, after which 
he escaped to the Union camp at Huntsville, 
Alabama. So strong was the feeling against 
Union men in his vicinity that he found it 
impossible to remain there and, sacrificing 
all his property, including several blooded 
horses and considerable other fine stock, he 
escaped with his family, and they made their 
way to Mattoon, Illinois, where he joined 
them at the close of the war. Mr. Abbott 
who was a well educated man of gentle- 
manly bearing- and' was known as a temper- 
ance advocate, was an outspoken abolition- 
ist before the war began and was averse to 
the war. Two attempts were made to con- 
script him and compel him to do duty as a 
Confederate soldier, but those who made 
them were outwitted and as has been stated 
he did everything in his power to aid the 
federal cause. 

Handsel A. Abbott was married ]\Iay 26, 
1S82, to ]Miss Ida Campbell of Ple\-na town- 
ship, Reno county, who was born at Bay 
City, !^Iichigan, a daughter of N. R, and Al- 
mira( Dickson) Campbell, natives of the state 
of New York, and early settlers at Bay City. 
In. August, 1S73, ^Ii'- Campbell went 3:0 
Plevna township and secured three hundred 
and twenty acres of land, partly on a home- 
stead claim and partly on a tree claim, and 
his son. J. W. Campbell, took up one hun- 
dred and sixtv acres on a homestead claim. 



At that time no one lived where the village 
of Plevna has. since grown up, and the 
Campbells had but one neighbor within four 
miles. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell reared six 
children, all that were born to them and all 
are living in central Kansas. ]\Ir. Campbell 
died in January, 1892, at the age of seventy- 
two and his widow removed from their farm 
to Plevna, where she is living, aged sixty- 
nine years. 

Mrs. Abbott's mother. Mrs. Almira 
(Dickson) Campbell, was born in Taberg. 
Oneida county, New York, June 30, 1832. a 
daughter of George and Sarah (Smart) 
Dickson. Her father, who was a foundry- 
man, reared seven children to years of ma- 
turity and five of them married. At this 
time there are living Mrs. Abbott's aunt. 
Adelia (Dickson) Berry, in Lebanon coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, and her uncle, O. A. Dick- 
son, of West Alton, Missouri. N. R. Camp- 
bell, Mrs. Abbott's' father, was born in Erie 
county. New York, in 1820, and was mar- 
ried in Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, in 
1850, to Almira Dickson, audi they settled 
at Bay City, Michigan, where he was em- 
ployed in lumiber mills.. N. R. and Almira 
(Dickson) Campbell had six children, as 
follows: J. W., a farmer near Plevna, and 
has two sons; Ida, the wife of Handsel A. 
Abbott; J. J., of Hutchinson, Kansas, and 
has four children ; Dean, who married John 
W. Hanon, who lives near Plevna, and they 
have four children; Julia, who married A. 
T. Dunham, of Plevna, and has six children : 
Georgia, who married \^^illiam H. jMitchell, 
and has two children. Mr. Campbell went 
from Oakland county, Michigan, to Plevna 
township in the fall of 1872 and_was a suc- 
■cessful fanner until he was stricken by par- 
alysis, which for two years before his death 
made him a helpless invalid. 

Mr. and Mrs. Abbott have a daughter of 
eighteen years who is now securing an edu- 
cation and giving much attention to music, 
being an accomplished musician on the 
piano. She is taking lessons from one of the 
best teachers in. Hutchinson. Mr. Abbott is 
a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of the ^Modern \Voodmen of Amer- 
ica and of the ffiood Templars. He is a man 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



165 



of much public spirit and is well and witlely 
known through central Kansas. He came 
to the state with his parents in 1870. locat- 
ed in Plevna township in 1880 and bought 
a half section of land and engaged in stock- 
raising. He located in Plevna in 1885 and 
bought out the Knapp, Stout & Company's 
enterprise for three thousand dollars. He 
now does a prosperous business, aggregat- 
ing about twenty thousand dollars annually. 
His lumber plant is a good one, with a com- 
modious office and ample sheds for dry lum- 
ber. His hardware store is one of the best 
in his part of the state, and besides selling- 
much hardware and building material he 
sells a considerable number of buggies and 
wagons every year. He built his modern 
two-story residence in 1886, and his home 
is one of the pleasantest in Plevna. He owns 
about five acres of village property, on which 
he has built several houses for sale and lease. 
An enterprising, successful man, he is re- 
garded as one of the prominent citizens of 
his county and is highly respected by a wide 
circle of acquaintances. 



JOHN J. 2^IEASER. 

If a special blessing awaits the one who 
makes two blades of grass grow where one 
grew before how many blessings should be 
showered upon one who has turned acres of 
sandy and unproductive land into fruitful 
orchards, delightful both to the eye and to 
the palate! This has been accomplished by 
one of the prominent and deser\-edly suc- 
cessful cy:izens of RenO' township, Reno 
county, Kansas, who has been a resident of 
the state since 1881; 

John J. Measer, the subject of this re- 
view, was born in Tioga county. New York, 
near Owego, on June 16, 1839, a son of 
Peter and Dora (Stauf¥) Measer, the form- 
er of whom was born in Germany but after 
their marriage came to America and located 
upon wild land in Tioga county, New York. 
There he cleared a fine farm and there the 
parents passed the remainder of their lives, 
dving consistent members of the Lutheran 



church. Air. JNIeaser was the se\enth and 
youngest member of their famih' and re- 
mained at home, in attendance at school and 
at work on the farm, until he was twenty- 
one years of age. During a part of the Civil 
war he was connected with the construction 
department, with headcjuarters at Chatta- 
nooga, Tennessee, and assisted in the build- 
ing of the bridge at Loudon and helped to 
rebuild all the britlges between Chattanooga 
and Atlanta, Georgia. He was on his way 
home at the time of the assassination of 
President Lincoln. After his return from 
the war he remained at his old home in New- 
York for one year, after which for the fol- 
lowing three years he was engaged in farm- 
ing in Kendall county, Illinois, and he then 
came to Kansas, securing a homestead in 
Pottawatomie county. He had wisely 
brought his team with him, and he broke his 
land and engaged in grain sowing and in 
planting nursery stock, continuing in that 
line until he came to Reno county, in 1881, 
the former county not yielding sufficient re- 
ward for his effort on account of its hilly 
and rocky character. After locating in this 
county, upon a quarter section of land pur- 
chased from' the Santa Fe Railroad, he be- 
gan in the same industrious way which had 
partially rewarded him at his former home. 
This was then wild prairie and he under- 
went all his former pioneer experiences. At 
first he cultivated grain, but his inclinations 
were in the direction of nursery planting, 
and with his knowledge, observation and ex- 
perience he believed he could grovw as fine 
fruit on his land as on any other. His 

i neighbors gave him much advice upon the 
subject of a very discouraging nature, but 
Mr. Measer persisted and soon had his sandy 
acres covered with flourishing peach, app'le. 
cherry and plum trees, which have never 
failed to produce the best and most luscious 
fruit to be found in the county. He owns 
two hundred and forty acres of land and 
raises corn, wheat and oats, but forty acres 

I of his land is covered with his orchard. The 
only fruit he does not attemj)t to raise is 
pears, as he has found they blight in tliis 
climate. !\Ir. Measer has been quite a trav- 
eler, going from one ocean to the 1 tlier and 



!66 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



far both north and south, and has been a 
close observer in every locajity. In addition 
to his other industries lie has an apiary, con- 
sisting of seventy colunies of bees, and has 
a local market for all of his honey. Mr. 
Measer is also a breeder of fine poultry and 
owns some of the finest specimens of geese 
in the state, having imrported them from 
Iowa, and they are known as the Toulouse 
breed. 

The marriage of Mr. Measer occurred 
in New York, in 1862, to Jane Wiggins, a 
native of that state and a daughter of Henry 
Wiggins. Seven children were born of this 
marriage, one of whom, Charles, died at the 
age of seventeen. The others are: William, 
who is a farmer in this township; Mar}-, the 
wife of Carl Jacobson, of Portland, Oregon ; 
Sadie, now Mrs. Casey, and a resident of 
Iowa; Jessie, the wife of E. M. Corrie and 
resides on the homestead: Freda, who lives 
in Hutchinson; and Millie, at home. In 
1899 "Sir. Measer remodeled "and rebuilt his 
residence and now owais one of the most 
attractive and delightful homes in Reno 
county. His success has been so remark- 
able and his surroundings are so delightful 
that the Orange Judd Farmer, a large agri- 
cultural journal, devoted its front page in 
its issue of March 2, 1901, to a picture of 
Mr. Measer and his beautiful home. In pol- 
itics he is in sympathy with the Republican 
party, but has never consented to accept of- 
ficial position. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, while he has long been a leading mem- 
ber and a cheerful and liberal supporter of 
the Presbvterian church. 



JOHN GILCHRIST. 



Among the honored pioneers and repre- 
sentative citizens of Kingman county none 
are more highly respected than John Gil- 
christ, who now owns a fine farm on sec- 
tions 14 and 15, Ninnescah township. He 
is a native of the land of hills and heather, 
his birth having occurred in the county of 
Argyle, Scotland, in November, 1842, the 



same year in which King Edward was born. 
The parents of our subject were Neal and 
Isabella (Gillis) Gilchrist, also natives of 
the highlands of Scotland, and they spoke 
the Gaelic language. The father was acci- 
dentally killed while yet in the prime of life, 
passing away at the early age of thirtv-seven 
years. He was honored and respected by all 
who had the pleasure of liis acquaintance, 
and at his death he left a widow and four 
children, — John, of this review; Duncan, of 
Canada ; Dugald, who was accidentally killed 
at a barn raising: and Jane McLean, of Can- 
ada. 

John Gilchrist, whose name introduces 
this review, was but a lad of twelve years 
when with his parents he left the land of his 
nativity for the new world, the family locat- 
ing in St. Thomas, County Elgin, Canada. 
At the age of fifteen years he was appren- 
ticed to learn the shoemaker's trade, and 
during the greater part of his business career 
he has followed that occupation. In 1864 
he came to the United States, and for some 
years thereafter he resided in different local- 
ities, traveling through Michigan, Illinois 
and Indiana, and at Detroit, Michigan, he 
was employed by McGraw, Smith & Bald- 
win. The latter afterward became governor 
of that state. For a time he also worked at 
his trade in Monrovia, Indiana, and was 
there married. Mr. Gilchrist remained in 
the Hoosier state from 1867 to 1878, during 
which time he made a \-isit to his old home 
in Canada, and tlien came to Kansas in the 
latter _\ear, where he secured a claim' and also 
followed his trade in Wichita and Kingman 
for a number of years. In recent years, 
however, he has abandoned the sltoemaker's 
trade and now devotes his entire time and 
attention to the farm, which consists of 
three hundred and twenty acres of excellent 
and well cultivated land on sections 14 and 
15, Ninnescah township, Kingman county. 
In addition to the raising of the cereals best 
adapted to this soil and climate he is also 
engaged quite extensively in stock-raising, 
and in both branches of his business he is 
meeting with a high and well merited degree ' 
of success. 

The ladv who now bears the name of 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



167 



Airs. Gilchrist was in her maidenhood Aliss 
Saraii Brown. She is a daughter of Stephen 
and Ann (Wass) Brown. Six children have 
blessed the union of our subject and wife, 
four sons and two daughters, namely : Ste- 
phen, of Gary, Oklahoma: Neal, in the res- 
taurant business in Alva, Oklahoma ; Bruce, 
at hiinie: Finley, who is now twenty-one 
vears (jf age: Lula J., a prominent and suc- 
cessful teacher of this county ; Laura, a 
maiden of sixteen years. Two of their chil- 
dren have also passed away in death, — Belle, 
who died at the age of eight years ; and Du- 
gakl, who died at the age of six months. 
Mr. Gilchrist gives his political support to 
the People's party, and religiously his wife 
is a member of the ^Methodist Episcopal 
church. He holds to the old Presbyterian 
faith of his fathers. 



HARVEY WIGGINS. 

The agriculttiral interests of Rice couhty 
are well represented by Harvey \Viggins, 
who devotes his time to farming and stock- 
raising in Atlanta township. For twenty- 
six years he has resided in this locality. He 
was born in Coshocton count}-, Ohio, No- 
venaber 3, 1849, 'i"'! 'S a son of Benjamin 
^^'iggins, whose birth occurred on the same 
farm, and he is now eighty-one years of 
age. The grandfather, Edward Wiggins, 
was born in the panhandle of West Vir- 
ginia. His parents, however, were natives 
of Ireland, and when young people left the 
Emerald Isle for the new world. Remov- 
ing from his native state Edward Wiggins 
took up his abode in Coshocton county, 
Ohio, on Wills creek, a branch of Muskin- 
gum river. There he cleared a tract of land 
and developed a farm, upon which he made 
his home from 1807 until his death. His 
son, Benjamin \\'iggins. was there reared 
amid the wild scenes of frontier life and 
became familiar with pioneer experiences 
in Ohio. Having attained man's estate he 
married Jemima Magnus, who was born in 



Coshocton county, a daughter of George 
Magnus. Unto Mr. and Airs. Wiggins 
were born ten children, of whom si.x are 
living, namely : Edward, who was a sol- 
dier in the Union army and is now living 
in Coshocton county; Samuel, who has a 
similar record for army service and is also 
a resident of Coshocton coimty: John, who 
wore the blue during the Civil war and now 
makes his home in Rice coimty, Kansas; 
Harvey, of this review; Mrs. Alary Will- 
iams, of Coshocton county ; and Airs. Aman- 
da ^Vorkman, who is living in the same 
county. Those who have passed away are : 
Seth. who died at the age of thirty years; 
Benjamin, who died at the age of ten years ; 
and two who died in infancy. The mother 
reached the psalmist's span of three-score 
years and ten and then departed this life, 
honored and respected by all who knew her.. 
The father, however, has reached the age 
of eightv-one years and is still living on the 
ancestral home in Coshocton county, where 
throughout his active business career he 
carried on farming and stock-raising. In 
politics he was a stanch Republican and 
gave three of his sons to the Union dur- 
ing the Civil war. Like him they were all 
stanch admirers of Lincoln. Honored and 
respected he has lived an upright life and 
enjoyetl the confidence and esteem of young 
and old, rich and poor, wherever he is 
known. 

Harvey Wiggins, the well known resi- 
dent farmer of Atlanta township. Rice coun- 
ty, was reared on the old homestead, and 
the plowing-, planting and harvesting be- 
came familiar to him in youth. His liter- 
ary training was received in the public 
schools of Ohio. At the age of twenty-two 
years he was united in marriage to Isabella 
Sturtz, who was born in Muskingum coun- 
ty, Ohio, a daughter of Adam and Jane 
(W'iggins) Sturtz, of that state. The young- 
couple began their domestic life in his na- 
tive county, where they resided until 1875, 
when they removed to Jefiferson county, Ne- 
braska, but after five months there passed 
came to Rice county, Kansas. Here Air. 
Wiggins purchased a homestead claim, upon 
which he yet resides. He has greatly im- 



[6S 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



nroved it, making it one of the valuable 
farms of the count)-, and his tract of land of 
three hundred and twenty acres yields to 
him a good return. Its improvements are 
modern and indicate his progressive spirit. 
A comfortable residence, a substantial barn, 
sheds, an orchard and richly cultivated fields 
give evidence of his thrift and care. He also 
has three hundred and twenty acres of fine 
land in IMitchell township. Rice county, and 
is thus extensively engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. Stock-raising has also proved to 
him a profitable source of income. 

In 1884 Mr. Wiggins was called upon 
to mourn the loss of his wife, who died Sep- 
tember 21. of that year, in tlie faith of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which she 
was a consistent member. She was also a 
devoted wife and mother and a kind neigh- 
bor. She had three children : Ada, now the 
wife of David Foreman, of Harrington, 
Kansas; Ella, wife of Daniel Bru'baker of 
\\'ashita county, Oklahoma; and Jesse, who 
married Delia 'Monroe and resides in Mitch- 
ell township. Rice county. On the 22d of 
February, 1888, Mr. Wiggins was joined in 
wedlock to Alary E. Brubaker, an estimable 
lady, who was born in Greene county, Ten- 
nessee, her parents being Jonathan and Mar- 
garet (Carter) Brubaker. Her father was 
Ijorn in Virginia and has now passed away, 
Ijut her mother is living in Rice county. He 
devoted his energies to agricultural pur- 
suits until his life's labors were ended in 
death, when he had attained the age of sixty- 
three. In politics he was a Democrat, and 
was an elder in the German Baptist church, 
in which his wife also held membership, 
while his children are of the same religious 
faith. In the Brubaker family were four 
daughters and three sons, namely: Nancv, 
Mary E., ^Margaret, John, Benjamin, Will- 
iam and Lucy. The marriage of Mr. and 
Mrs. Wiggins has been blessed with four 
children, — John F., Leora M., Blanche and 
Har*-ey Stanley. In his political views Mr. 
Wiggins is a Republican, and has served as 
township treasurer, while for fifteen years 
he has labored earnestlv and effectively as 
a member of the school board. His wife 
belongs to the German Baptist church. His 



landed possessions comprise six hundred and 
forty acres in Rice county, and his property 
is the visible evidence of a life of usefulness 
and activity. He is a champion of educa- 
tion, temperance and morality, and is re- 
garded as one of the valued, progressive and 
upright citizens of his adopted county. 



JUDGE W. -B. CONNER. 

Judge \\\ B. Conner is an honored pio- 
neer settler of Rice county. He came to 
this portion of the state many years ago 
and found the broad prairies unmarked by 
the homes of settlers, the land being in its 
primitive condition. \\'ild prairie grass, 
waving in the wind, resembled a billowy sea 
of green. Bufifaloes, antelopes and other wild 
animals found here excellent pasturage, 
and the most far-sighted could not have 
dreamed that within a brief interval of time 
a great transfomiation couJd have taken 
place, changing the broad prairies into rich- 
1}' cultivated farms. In the work of im- 
provanent and progress .-Ir. Conner has 
borne his part, and his name is thus insep- 
arably' interwoven with the history of cen- 
tral Kansas, in whose advancement and im- 
provement he feels just and commendable 
pride. 

He was born in Butler county, Ohio, 
April 7, 1825, and was reared to the hon- 
est toil of the farm, while in the common 
schools he pursued his education. His par- 
ents, James and Jane (Brooks) Conner, 
were both natives of Susquehanna county, 
Pennsylvania, and were there married, while 
the grandfather. Caliph Conner, was born 
on the green isle of Erin. Crossing the 
Atlantic to the new world, he took up his 
abode in the Keystone state and became 
a prominent farmer there, following that 
pursuit until life's labors were ended in 
death. He had but two children, the elder 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



169 



dying- in Pennsylvania. Both the grandfa- 
thers were soldiers of the Revolutionary 
war. 

James Conner, the father of onr subject, 
remained in that state until his marriage 
and soon afterward removed to Butler coun- 
ty. Ohio, becoming one of the pioneer set- 
tlers there. He entered land from the gov- 
ernment, developed a farm and there re- 
mained until 1829, when he removed to 
Montgomery county, Indiana, where he 
again purchased land and carried on farm- 
ing. On selling that property he went to 
Kankakee county, Illinois, where he pur- 
chased a farm, but after his children were 
married and had left home he broke up 
housekeeping and went to live with a daugh- 
ter in Iroquois county, Illinois, where he died 
in 1863, at the venerable age of eighty-eight 
years. In early life he had learned the 
trade of a stone and brick mason, and also 
weaving, but during the greater part of 
his business career he carried on agricult- 
ural pursuits. In politics he was a stanch 
Democrat, yet never aspired to office. 
Reared in the faith of the Presbyterian 
church, ihe always adhered to that doctrine, 
and was a man of stern disposition and 
sturdy integrity. His children were: James, 
who died in Xess county, Kansas ; Eleanor, 
deceased wile of E. Richardson: Agnes, 
who married L. Tender and after his death 
became the wife of Rev. E. Sargent : Su- 
sanna, the wife of J. R. Frogg; Elizabeth, 
who married A. R. Frogg; ]Mary, the wife 
of J. Wadkins ; W. B., of this review ; John, 
who died in Iowa ; and iMartha, who died in 
childhood. 

W. B. Conner was reared in Indiana, 
where his parents remained during his early 
childhood. He remained at home until eight- 
een years of age, when he went to Will 
county, Illinois, and secured a claim. Subse- 
quently he sold that property and entered 
another tract of land, on which he made 
improvements. On again selling out he re- 
moved to Iowa and entered land in ^Mahaska 
county, making it his ho>ne for two years, 
when he disposed of the same and returned 
to Will county, Illinois. There he purchased 
and sold a farm and bought another one, 



and on the second place he remained until 
1872, when he again disposed of his prop- 
erty and came to Kansas, locating in Rice 
county. Here he secured three claims and 
homesteaded a pre-emption and a tree claim, 
all of which he proved up and still owns 
the land, yet residing on the old homestead 
claim. At difTerent times he purchased 
other property and has sold four hundred 
acres, but still owns a tract of more than 
four hundred acres. He was first to lo- 
cate upon the farm which has since been 
his place of abode, and it was then five 
miles distant to the home of any neigh- 
bor. He hauled lumber from the town 
of Ellsworth in order to build his 
house. Game of all kinds was plenti- 
ful, and from his own doorway he has 
shot bufifaloes. Wild geese and other kinds 
of game were also in the neighborhood. !Mr. 
Conner brought with him horse teams and 
soon began breaking his land, carrying on 
stock farming. His home became self-sus- 
taining, although at times crops have not 
been very good, and in 1874 the grasshop- 
pers destroyed nearly everything raised in 
this sectioai of the country. Many people 
became dissatisfied and left Kansas, but it 
was a time of merely temporary depression, 
as almost uniformly the fields yield good 
crops, so that the farmers have a splendid 
return for the labor and time which they 
bestow in cultivation. j\Iany years have 
passed since Judge Conner first won a place 
among the substantial citizens of the county. 
In addition to general farming he has en- 
gaged in stock-raising, and his labors in this 
direction have been crowned with pros- 
perity. 

\\'hile residing in Indiana the Judge was 
united in marriage, in 1846, to Miss Betsy 
A. Mullen, who was born in Ohio, but was 
reared in Indiana, and was a daughter 
of Samuel Mullen, of New Jersey. Her 
father was a cooper by trade, but followed 
farming through much of his life. He died 
in Indiana. His children were: Asenath, 
who became the wife of P. Mitchell; Betsy 
A., wife of Judge Conner; William, a 
banker, who died in Winfield, Kansas; Al- 
nivra, who married H. Harlan and after his 



170 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



death became the wife of John Rose, while 
her third husband was John Funk; and 
Kelsey, who completes the family. The 
parents were members of the Methodist 
church. By his first marriage Judge Con- 
ner had five children: James, now of Chi- 
cago; John, who died in Rice county; Mrs. 
Matilda J. Rife; ^Mary, the wife of James 
Pogue; and Abraham L. The mother was 
a consistent member of the Methodist 
church from the age of eight years. She 
was called to the home prepared for the 
righteous in September, 1872. In 1873 the 
Judge married Mrs. Sabine Ambrose, a 
widow, and a daughter of Owen Johns, of 
Ohio, who removed to Illinois and in 1872 
came to Kansas, locating in Rice county. 
He built a hotel at Atlanta, which he car- 
ried on for some time. He also owned a 
farm, and when Lyons was made the county 
seat he remo\'ed his hotel property to that 
place and there resided until his death. 
He voted with the Democracy. His chil- 
dren were: Owen, a resident of Wilson 
county, Kansas; William; Mrs. Jane Chis- 
on ; ]\Iattie, the wife of a ^Methodist mis- 
sionary minister; Sabine; and Belle, the 
wife of John Keys. The marriage of the 
Judge and ]\Irs. Conner has been blessed 
with four children : Cora, now the wife of 
E. Wilson; ]\Iary, who is attending college; 
Frank B., at home: and Hugh, who is a 
student in \Mnfield College. 

Judge Conner has ever been known for 
his marked loyalty to his. country and its 
interests, and during the war of the rebel- 
lion he enlisted as a defender of the Union, 
joining the army in Will county, Illinois, 
in 1862, for three years' service or during 
the war. He became a member of the One 
Hundredth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, un- 
der command of Colonel Fred Bartleson, 
and was assigned to the Army of the Cimi- 
berland, with the Fourth Corps, Second 
Division, Third Brigade. He saw much 
arduous service, was in many skirmishes 
and in eighteen hotly contested battles, 
went on many long and tedious niarches 
and was with General Thomas on the 
campaign after General Hood. On the 
19th of September. 1S64, at Chickamauga, 



he was struck by a minie ball in the right 
shoulder. He acted as chief sergeant of his 
company and was detailed to serve as com- 
mander at Gallatin for four months. His 
wound troubled him and he ^\■as granted 
a forty days' furlough, but as he had not 
recovered on the expiration of that period 
the time was extended to eighty days. He 
then joined his command, with which he re- 
mained until the close of the war, and was 
at Bull's Gap at the time of General Lee's 
surrender. Mustered out at Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, he then returned to Chicago, where 
he received an honorable discharge, after 
which he made his way home. He had 
been reared in the Democratic faith, but in 
1856, when the Republican party Avas or- 
ganized, he voted for Fremont and contin- 
ued with the party until Grant's second 
term, when he joined the Greenback party. 
Later he assisted in organizing the Reform 
or Populist party, attending its conventions 
and doing everything in his power for its 
progress. He was a delegate to the first 
county Republican convention in Rice coun- 
ty, but he there bolted and had many fol- 
lowers and admirers who nominated him for 
the office of probate judge, to which he 
was elected by a large majority, being the 
second person chosen to that office in Rice 
j county. During his term he resided in .\t- 
1 lanta, then the county seat. He has always 
; been a leading factor in political circles, has 
been active in naming successful candi- 
dates and his opinions carry weight and in- 
fluence in party councils. During his early 
life he studied law and was the first young 
man admitted to the bar in Rice county, but 
he has never engaged in practice to any ex- 
tent. He has filled many local offices of 
honor and trust, including that of township 
treasurer, in which he served for two terms. 
He is indeed a citizen of worth, loyal and 
faithful to every trust reposed in him. On 
account of advanced age he does not take 
an active part in public affairs as he for- 
merly did, but in 1900 he attended the Pop- 
ulist convention at Clay Center, where he 
was heard with interest. He is yet a mem- 
ber of the county central committee of his 
party. His acquaintance is ^-erv wide and 



il 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



the circle of his friends is ahnost co-exten- 
sive therewith. His hfe has been an hon- 
orable and upright one, commending hiai to 
the confidence and respect of all. 



JAMES L. HOPKINS. 

Among the representative citizens of the 
county none are more desendng of repre- 
sentation in this volume than James L. Hop- 
kins, who' has for many years been connected 
with its agricultural interests. For ovef 
twenty years he has made his home in the 
Sunflower state, and throughout this long 
period he has ever borne his share in the 
work of development and improvement nec- 
essary to produce the wonderful change 
which has here taken place. He has re- 
mained true to its interests when the dark 
clouds of adversitj have swept over the state, 
and as the years have passed by prosperity 
has abundantly rewarded his efforts, he be- 
ing now the owner of a fine farm of two 
hundred and forty acres. 

Mr. Hopkins was born in Putnam coun- 
ty. Missouri, in 1853, a son of James Laban 
Hopkins, a native of Kentucky, and a mem- 
ber of a prominent old family of the Blue- 
grass state. The mother of our subject bore 
the maiden name of Emily Wade, and was 
a daughter of Richard Wade. She was also 
a member of a prominent old southern fam- 
ily, and prior to the trouble between the 
north and the south thej- owned matiy slaves, 
but on account of that conflict they removed 
to Missouri. The father of our subject 
passed away in middle life, at the age of 
fifty-one years, and the mother reached the 
psalmist's span of three score years and ten. 
Ten children were born unto this worthy 
couple, eight of whom are now living, name- 
ly : Elijah, who was a soldier in the Civil 
war and is now a resident of Emporia, Kan- 
sas : ]\Iartha : Sarah ; Elizabeth ; George ; 
James L., our subject; Mary; John J., a 
resident of Unionville, Missouri ; Dennis, of 
Hilgard, Oregon; and Thomas Fletcher, 
who received the honor of being the first 
governor of Missouri, and is now a resident 
of Billings, Oklahoma. 



James L. Hopkins, the subject of this re- 
view, was reared in the state of his nativity. 
where he was early inured to the labors of 
field and meadoiw. After attaining to vears 
of maturity he chose as a life occupation tjie 
vocation to which he had been reared, and 
he was engaged in the tilling of tlie soil in 
Missouri until 1879, the year of his arrival 
in Kansas. Soon after coming to^ this state 
he secured a claim of two hundred' and forty 
acres in Evans township, Kingman county, 
where he has ever since made his home. As 
time has passed he has placed his fields under , 
a fine state of cultivation, has added all the 
improvements foimd upon a well regulated 
farm, and is now the owner of one of the 
best and most productive properties in his 
adopted county. Two hundred acres of his 
place is planted with wheat, which annually 
yields handsome returns. 

Mr. Hopkins was married at the early 
age O'f nineteen years. Miss Margaret C. 
Franklin becoming his wife, and during the 
many years in which they have traveled 
life's journey together she has ever proved 
to her husband a loving companion and 
helpmate. Ten children, four sons and six 
daughters, have blessed their union, name- 
ly: Mrs, Sarah Emily Summers, Jonathan 
Laban, Mrs. Lillie Terry, Oliver Tucker, 
Laura, Ralph, Albert, Nettie, Zena and Her- 
bert. Mr. Hopkins is an active worker in 
the ranks of the Republican party, and his 
last presidential vote was cast for McKin- 
ley. The cause of education also receives in 
himi a warm friend, and for seventeen years 
he has served as a member of the school 
board. 



JOHN SHIELLS. 

John Shiells, one of the extensive and 
progressive agriculturists of Rice county, 
has beeii a resident of this section of the Sun- 
flower state since 1882. He is a member of 
a prominent Scotch family, whoi trace their 
ancestry back to the warlike days of that 
country, members of the family having ta- 
ken an active part in the historic battles of 
the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Our 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



subject was born in Newcastle, on tlie Tyne, 
in Xorthiimberland county, England, on tlie 
25th of March, 185 1. His father, John 
Shiells, was a native of East Lothian, Scot- 
land, born on the farm on which the famous 
battle was fought by Prince Charles against 
the English crown. It w-as an old farm, and 
was noted far and near as a historical bat- 
tlegroiind. John Shiells, Sr., grew to man- 
hood there, and after reaching mature years 
he was united in marriage to Marian Flem- 
ing, who was also a representative of an old 
Scotch family. She was born and reared' in 
the same iu'iL;hl» 'rh(.iijd as her husband. They 
became the parents uf four children, — John, 
the subject uf this sketch; Janet, who still 
resides in England ; Mary, \vho was former- 
ly a resident of Rice county, Kansas, but now 
makes her home in England : and Alice, also 
of the old country. In 1882 the family bade 
adieu to home and native land preparatory 
to seeking a home in the new world, and 
after landing in the United States they took 
up their abode in Gait township. Rice coun- 
ty, Kansas, where the father purchased a 
farm from the Union Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany, lie became the owner of three hun"- 
dred ami twenty acres, and there his death 
occurred m 1893, passing away at the age 
•of sixty-five years. He followed farming as 
a life occupation, and his political support 
was given to the Democratic party. His re- 
ligious preference was indicated by his 
membership in the Presbyterian church. He 
was a man of fine physique, and at one time 
weighed over two hundred pounds. The 
mother survived her husband until 1900, 
when she, too, was called to the home be- 
yond, having reached the ripe old age of 
seventy-two years. 

John Shiells, the subject of this review, 
accompanied his parents on their removal to 
the new world. He was reared to the hon- 
est toil of the farmer in his native land, and 
his education was received in the schools of 
South Durham, Eilgland. At that place, at 
. the age of twenty-four years, he was united 
in marriage to Miss Emeline Hankey, who 
was born, reared and educated at South 
Durham. She is a daughter of John and 
Caroline (IMorrisou) Hankev, the former 



a native of South Durham antl the latter of 
Gloucestershire, England. The father was 
called' to his final rest at the age of forty- 
seven years, and his wife survived him a 
number of years, passing away at the age of 
sixty-one years. He was a mason by trade. 
This worthy couple were the parents of five 
children, — Thomas, Emeline, Harriet, Car- 
oline and Jane Ann. The family were active 
and zealous members of the ^Methodist Epis- 
copal church. Seven children have graced 
the union of IMr. and ]\Irs. Shiells, two sons 
and five daughters, — Robert, Emeline, ]Mar- 
ian, Mabel, Herbert, Caroline and Hilda. 

Mr. Shiells now owns two hundred and 
forty acres of the best land to be found in 
central Kansas, and his place is improved 
with all the improvements and accessories 
known to the model farm. He formerly 
volted with the Democracy, but in the last 
election cast his ballot in support of McKin- 
ley, and in his religious views is a member 
of the Presbyterian church. He is a fine 
type of the hardy Scotchman, being six feet 
in height and weighing two hundred pounds-. 
As a man and citizen he enjoys the added 
popularity which comes 'to those genial 
spirits who have a hearty shake of the hand 
for all those with whom- they come in con- 
tact from day to day, and who seem to throw 
around them so much of the sunshine of 
life. 



LEON D. LIBBEY. 

Among the successful, energetic and 
representative citizens of Hutchinson, Kan- 
sas, is Leon D. Libbey, who is the capable 
superintendent of the ]\Iorton plant for the 
Hutchinson, Kansas, Salt Company, which 
is one of the largest of its kind in the United 
States. Leon D. Libbey comes of New 
England parentage, where distinguished an- 
cestors took prominent parts in the Revolu- 
tionary and Colonial wars and filled offices 
of trust and responsibility. Jacob Libbey, 
who was the grandfather of our subject, was 
born in New Hampshire and in his early 
days was a stage driver, later being one of 
the first railroad conductors in that locality. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



^71 



He became well known in political circles, 
• Avas a colonel of the local militia and repre- 
sented his district in the legislature. His 
marriage was to Harriet Wadleigh, who was 
a daughter of a Revolutionary patriot. 

George A. Libbey, the father of Leon 
D.. of this sketch, was born in Laconia, New 
Hampshire, on November 25, 1836, and in 
1855 he came west to Madison, Wisconsin, 
residing there for some five or six years, dur- 
ing which time he became a skilled machin- 
ist" Then he moved to Black Earth, Wiscon- 
sin, returning later to Madison, where he 
bought a printing office. From there he re- 
moved to Palmyra, Wisconsin, and engaged 
for a time in fanning, still later working in 
a factory in Farmington. On August 25, 
1S64, he enlisted in Company E. First Wis- 
consin Heavy Artillery, and during the re- 
maining years of the Civil war, was sta- 
tioned in the neighborhood of Washington 
and Alexandria. Returning then to Wis- 
consin, he followed his trade in Palmyra, 
but later moved to Janesville, that state, and 
for twelve years was a resident of that city. 
In the fall of 1883 he went to Kansas City, 
where he entered into the business of con- 
tracting on a large scale, being so occupied 
until compelled to give it up on account of 
impaired health. 

]\Ir. Libbey was united in marriage, in 
Madison, Wisconsin, to Mary A. Hadley, a 
daughter of Isaac and Abigail (Seavey) 
Hadley, both of whom were natives of New 
Hampshire, the fomier having been a prom- 
inent man in his locality and a representative 
in the legislature. Isaac Hadley was a son 
of Moses Hadley, the family having been 
founded in America in 1600. The grand- 
mother of our subject, Abigail Seavey, jvas 
a daughter of John Seavey, who served gal- 
lantly in the war of 181 2 and who was a 
I son of a Revolutionary father. The childreu 
born to George and Mary (Hadley) Libbey 
w^ere: Leon D., of this sketch; Abbie H., 
now ]\Irs. \\'alter Helms, of Janesville, Wis- 
consin ; George H., of Burlington, Iowa; 
and Ella May, \\\\o died at the age of four- 
teen years. 

Leon D. Libbey was born in Madison, 
Wisconsin, on ]\Iarch 15, 1857, and acquired 



his education in the schools of Janesville. He 
resided with his father, assisting him in his 
various business , enterprises, until he at- 
taned his thirty-second year. About this 
time he embarked in street contracting and 
building in Duluth, Minnesota, and began 
the practical study of mechanical engineer- 
ing. He was very successful in this line, an 
evidence of his excellent and enduring work 
being- afforded by the water works plant at 
Madison, Wisconsin. Later he followed 
contracting and building in Kansas City, but 
in the spring of 1897 he came to Hutchinson, 
Kansas, to take charge of the Hutchinson 
Packing Company's plant, which was then 
operated by the Salt Company. This man- 
agement continued for three years, but aliout 
one year ago Mr. Libbey became superin- 
tendent of what is known as the Morton 
plant of the Hutchinson, Kansas, Salt Com- 
pany, and since then has made many im- 
pro\"einents in machinery JiKiking to greater 
capacity nf prdduction. This is the largest 
plant of its kind in the United States and is 
a model one in all respect's. It has ten evap- 
orating tanks, one hundred and twenty liy 
twenty-six feet and seven feet in depth, 
which are kept in operation^ day and night, 
the output being eleven hundred barrels 
daily. About one hundred tons of coal are 
consumed in a day, there 1>eing two batter- 
ies of boilers, under which the fires have 
never been banked for more than eighteen 
months. Some eighty hands are employed 
here, although the principal work is d ;ne by 
machinery, all modern appliances Ijein^s' in 
use. The finished product is shipped in 
sacks, barrels and bricks, and over as wide 
a territory as the freight rates will allow, 
principally through Kansas, Xeliraska, In- 
dian Territory, Oklahoma, Cr-]i:ra(lo, Ari- 
zona, New Mexico ami Texas. As an or- 
ganizer and manager Mr. Libbey has dis- 
played wonderful ability, good judgment 
and thorough knowledge, this business be- 
ing now one of the most imjinrtant in the 
industrial world of Hutchinson. 

The marriage of Mr. Libbey occurred 
on July 5, 1891, in Superior, Wisconsin, to 
Mis's Mallei R. Burrill, a daughter of Jobn 
H. Burrill, who was a farmer in Hawlev, 



174 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



Clay ci^unty, Alinnesota. The birth of Mr. 
Burrill occurred in Fitz WilHam, New 
Hampshire, and he was a pioneer to Minne- 
sota in 1871. He became' prominent in his 
section and was a county judge. 

In politics Mr. Libbey has always been 
an ardent Republican, and' he has been ac-. 
tive in the social order of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order O'f Elks, where he is highlv 
valued. Mr. and Mrs. Libbey are among 
the most esteemed residents in Hutchinson 
and are devoted members of the Episcopal 
church. 



CHARLES W. DICKHUT. 

Charles W. Dickhut is the owner of a 
valuable farm on section 18, Miami town- 
ship. Many years of his life have been 
passed in Reno coimty, and he is therefore 
widely known to its settlers. He was born 
in the far-off state Oif Pennsylvania, his 
birth having occurred in Pittsburg, on the 
2d of March, 1833. The family is of Ger- 
man descent, and the grandfather of our 
subject, Zachariah Dickhut, was a wool 
dealer in the fatherland, where he spent his 
entire life, and for a number of years he 
served in the German, army. Three of his 
sons came to this country, namely : Chris- 
tian, the father of our subject; Christopher 
A., who died leaving two sons; William, 
who was a lumber dealer in Quincy, Illi- 
nois, and his death occurred in 189'! ; and 
Zachariah, who remained in Germany. 
Christian G. Dickhut was born near Mei'l- 
housen, Genuany, in 1804, and in his native 
land, in 1S31, he married Johanna E. Smith, 
who was born in the fatherland about 18 14, 
and they became the parents of ten children, 
but their first born, a son, died during the 
voyage to this country. The other children 
are: Charles W., the subject of this re- 
view; George, city colletetor in Quincy, Ifli- 
nois: William, who was feorn in 1837, and 
died in Quincy, Illinois, in 1898, leaving one 
daughter; Elizabeth Webber, who also 
passed away in that city, leaving one daugh- 
ter; Emily Bentle, of California, and she is 
the mother of one child ; Christian G., a drav- 



man of Quincy, Illinois; Caroline Bentle 
who makes her home in Montana ; Matilda 
Smith, of California; and Albert, who lost 
his life while on a hunting expedition in 
California. The father of this family passed 
away in death in Quincy, Illinois, August 
12, 1878, and was survived by his wife until 
1881, when she joined him in the home be- 
yond, dying in California, and her remains 
now He at rest in the beautiful Golden state. 
Charles W. Dickhut, the immediate sub- 
ject of this review, received such educational 
privileges as were afforded by the public 
schools of Quincy, Illinois, to which place 
his father had removed in 1836, but at that 
time it was only a small hamlet. \\'hen the 
trouble between the north and south resulted 
in Civil war, Mr. Dickhut nobly offered his 
service in defense of the. Union cause, join- 
ing the army in February, 1862. He be- 
came a member of Company H, One Hun- 
dred and Eighteenth Illinois Volunteer In- 
fautry, serving in its ranks until hostilities 
had ceased and the country no longer needed 
his services, having been mustered out at 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in October, 1865. 
During his career as a soldier he was wound- 
ed in battle. After his discharge he returned 
to his home in Quinc}'. where he remained 
until his removal to the Sunflower state, 
which has been his home since the 9th of Oc- 
tober, 1878. He made the trip from Illinois 
to Kansas with two double teams and cov- 
ered wagons, seventeen days having been 
spent upon the road, and after his arrival 
here he pre-empted one hundred and sixty 
acres of raw prairie land. During the erec- 
tion of his residence the family lived in 
tents, and their house, which was completed 
in the fall of 1878, was one of the first in 
the locality, their only neighbors between 
their farm and Turon at that time having 
been G. W. Slatar, M. Lamont and T. W. 
Hickmian. Since coming to this favored 
section success has abundantly rewarded the 
well directed eft'orts of Mr. Dickhut, and- he 
is now the owner of a valuable and highly 
improved farm. His home is surrounded by 
a beautiful grove of cottonwood, walnut, bux 
elder, Ri>ssian mulberry and coffee nut 
trees, and a large and productive orchard 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



yields its fruit in season. Everj-thing about 
the place indicates the supervision of a prac- 
tical and progressive owner, and in the lo- 
cality where he has so long made his home 
he is recognized as a progressive and leading 
agriculturist. 

Mr. Dickhut was married in Quincy, Illi- 
nois, on the 23d of March. 1856, to Mar- 
^■aret C. Stork, who was born in southern 
Illinois November 9, 1837, a daughter of 
John Stork, a native of the fatherland. Ten 
children have blessed the union of our sub- 
ject and wife, namely: Oliver B., a prom- 
inent farmer of Miami township. Reno coun- 
ty, and the father of two sons ; Cora, wife 
of F. A. Lamont, of this county, by whom 
she has eight children; Charles W., who 
makes his home in Scott county, Kansas, 
and has three sons and one daughter ; Eliza- 
beth, wife of R. Hafeman, of Xew Jersey, 
by whom she has six children; Clara, wife 
of Max Lamont, also of New Jersey, and 
they have four children; Archibald Grant, 
who is still at home, but is engaged in farm- 
ing for himself; Emma Thatcher, who 
makes her home in Oklahoma, and has three 
children; Maggie Hinds, whose husband' is 
engaged in farming in Miami township, and 
they have two children; Albert E., a grain 
buyer and drayman of Turon; and Ida, a 
young lady of twenty years who is in Den- 
ver. Colorado. The children have all re- 
ceived excellent educational advantages, and 
Albert, who was a student for a time in the 
normal school at Nickerson, followed the 
teacher's profession for two terms. The Re- 
publican party receives Mr. Dickhut's" act- 
ive support and co-operation, and on its 
ticket he was elected to the office of township 
trustee, in which he served for four years. 
His social relations connect him with Fre- 
mont Post, No. 403, G. A. R., of Turon, 
which was organized ten years ago, and for 
two years he served as its commiander, while 
during the remainder of the time he has 
held the office of senior vice commander. 
For the past fifty-one years he has been a 
member of the !\Iethodist Episcopal church, 
joining that denomination when only sev- 
enteen years of age, and has ever since been 
an active worker in the cause of Christian- 



ity. His wife is also a devoted member of 
that church. His life has been exemplary 
in all respects, and he merits and receives the 
confidence and respect of his fellow men. 



HERBERT S. LY^^IAX. 

Herbert S. Lyman, a prominent and 
well known agriculturist of Reno county, 
was born in Lewis county, New York, on 
the 13th of January, 1856. His father, 
Hamilton Lyman, was also a native of that 
locality, his birth having there occurred on 
the 28th of January, 1832. The latter's fa- 
ther, Samuel Lyman, lived and died in Lewis 
county, his death resulting from his team of 
oxen running away and throwing him from 
the wagon. He was of English descent and 
was related to the celebrated novelist Dick- 
ens. He was united in marriage to Amy 
Allen, a descendant of Ethan Allen, and* her 
death also occurred in Lewis county,. New 
York, w'hen she had reached the age of 
eighty years. She was a second time mar- 
ried, becoming the wife of Jeremiah Bib- 
bins. 

Hamilton Lyman was reared to years of 
maturity on his father's farm in Lewis coun- 
ty, and was Ijut seventeen years of age at 
the time of his father's death. On the nth 
of October, 1853, in Lewis county, he was 
united in marriage to Lucinda Lampher, a 
native of that county and a daughter of 
Jonathan Lampher, a prominent farmer of 
that locality, where his widow by a second 
marriage is still living. In 1861, when the 
Civil war was inaugurated, ]Mr. Lyman of- 
fered his services to his country, entering 
the Fifth New Y'ork Volunteers on the 9th 
of August of that year. During his military 
career of three years he saw both cavaln,- and 
artillery service, and on the 26th of June, 
1864, at Harper's FeriT, he was honorably 
discharged with the rank of sergeant. Re- 
turning to his liome in Lewis county, he 
there followed farming until 1868, when he 
removed with his wife and three children 
to Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, where 
the familv made their home until the fall of 



176 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



1870. In that year they removed to Atch- 
ison county, JMissouri, but in the spring of 
1 87 1 they came to Kansas, securing a home- 
stead claim on the northeast quarter of sec- 
tion 20. Valley township, Reno county, 
u'here the father made his home during the 
remainder of his life, passing away in death 
on the 26th of February, 1873. The jour- 
ney from Wisconsin to Missouri was made 
with a team and wagon as was also the trip 
from Missouri to Kansas. On their arrival 
here this portion of the state was an un- 
broken prairie as far as the eye could reach, 
and buffaloes, antelopes and other wild ani- 
mals roamed at will over the vast plains. 
Their fir^t rcMiknce in the Sunflower state 
was a si.'d hi u-e, witli a hay roof, and in 
this primiti\e abode the family made their 
home for a number of years. Their nearest 
neighbor at that time was located seven miles 
away. A little circumstance worthy of men- 
tion in this connection is that C. C. Hutchin- 
son, when starting on his journey to locate 
the city which now bears his name, secured 
a horse from Mr. Lyman with which to 
make the trip. Mr. Lyman gave his politi- 
cal support to the Republican party, and for 
a time he served as a clerk of his township. 
His wife passed away in Hutchinson, on the 
2d of :\Lirch, 1894. in the faith of the Bap- 
tist church, of which both she and her hus- 
band were worthy and consistent members. 
Lmto this couple were born three children, — 
Herbert S., the subject of this review: Har- 
low A., who was born August 10, 1859, and 
at the present time is living in Hutchinson, 
Kansas ; and Howard E.. who was born De- 
cember 27, 1869, ^nd is employed as a clerk 
in that city. 

Herbert S. Lyman attended the common 
schools of Lewis county. Xew York, during 
his early life, but he was onlv thirteen years 
of age when his parents remo-\-ed from that 
locality. Four years afterward his father 
died, and he was then obliged to take charge 
of the home farm. On the 9th of February, 
1879. lie was united in marriage to IMary i 
McArthur. who was born in Canada, a [ 
daughter of Dougal McArthur. Her par- 
ents were both natives of Scotland, and after 
coming to the L'nited States thev eventualiv 



took up their abode in Reno cr.unty. where 
they resided on a farm, which they after- 
ward sold and removed to Hutchinson. 
There the mother passed away in death. The 
father died at Burrton, Harvey county, Kan- 
sas, a few years later. By this marriage 
three children were born : Grace, who is a 
young lady of twenty-one years, and is liv- 
ing at home: William M.. who died at the 
age of fifteen months: and Eddie D.. de- 
ceased in infancy. Shortly after his mar- 
riage Mr. Lyman removed from the old 
family homestead to his 'present farm, and 
here his wife died on the 13th of May. 1884. 
For his second wife he chose Addie Schmidt, 
their wedding having been celebrated on the 
30th of June, 1886, in Burrton. She was 
born at Bunker Hill. Boston, and is a daugh- 
ter of Augustus Theodore and Priscilla 
(Blanchard) Schmidt. The father was 
born in Berlin, Germany, and came to Amer- 
ica aljout 1850. locating in Boston, where 
he first followed his trade of a cooper. After 
a time, however, he turned his attention to 
the study of chemistry, and his researches 
along that line resulted in his giving to the 
world the process of manufacturing color- 
less carbon oil. while later he also discov- 
ered the art of making \-ulcanized fiber pa- 
per. Li 1 86 1 he removed to Pittsburg and 
engaged in refining oil. remaining in that 
city until 1885, when he came west to Valley 
township. Reno county, Kansas, purchasing 
one hundred and twenty acres of land on 
section 16, and there his death occurred on 
the 17th of December. 1890. while living a 
retired life. Li his political views he was a 
Republican, and while living in Pittsburg lie 
held the position of assessor for a number of 
years. His religious ^•iews connected him 
with the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Schmidt married Priscilla J. Blanch- 
ard, who was born in Falmouth. J^Laine, June 
23. 1829. a daughter of Captain Samuel and 
Rebecca ( ^^lerrill) Blanchard. The father 
was born in IMaine, on the 28th of March. 
1 78 1, and was master of a vessel, brrt on 
one occasion he was shipwrecked oft' Cape 
May and his ship was lost. He then re- 
tired from the active duties of life, becoming 
the owner of two farms, and he also donat- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



ed the land on which tlie town hall and the 
Congregati(Mial church of Falmouth were 
located. He served in the war of 1812, dur- 
ing which time he took part in the defense of 
Portland. On his side the family is of Pur- 
itan stock, his ancestors ha\'ing emigrated 
from England to France during the time of 
^^'illiam the Conqueror. About the time of 
the arrival of the Mayflower there came to 
this country a family consisting of the fa- 
ther, surnamed Joshua, his wife and five sons 
and they became the founders of the Blanch- 
ard family in America. The mother died 
during the royage, but the father and sons 
located in New England. On the JNIerrill 
side the family is also^ descended from old 
New England ancestry. The great-grand- 
mother of Mrs. Lyman lived prior to the 
Revolutionary war, and she frequently rode 
to church on a pillion behind her husband, 
who, in common with the other settlers of 
that day. carried his gun to church to protect 
them from the Indians. Their daughter, 
Mary Merrill, was born, reared and married 
in Falmouth, Maine, Priscilla Blanchard, 
the mother of T^Irs. L^tnan, is of the six 
generation in which a daughter of the fam- 
ily was named Priscilla. George Blanchard, 
a ciiusin on her father's side, received an 
excellent education in Germany and for a 
number of years served as an alderman of 
Boston. 

Bv his second marriage Mr. Lyman, of 
this review, has become the father of one 
son, Raymond S., who was born on the i8th 
of July, iSSg. Li political matters our 
subject gives his support to the Republican 
party, and on its ticket he has been elected 
to a number of positions of honor and trust. 
He was first made road overseer, was justice 
of the peace, constable, trustee, and has in 
fact held every township' position within the 
gift of the people. For sixteen years he 
was a member of the sdiool board, and the 
cause of education has ever found in him- a 
warm friend and active worker. Socially 
his is a member of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, and religimisly he is a 
member of and an elder in the Prec^byterian 
church. He is indeed a manlv man, and the 



honor and esteem in which he is held by all 
who have come in contact with him is but 
a just tribute to his worth. 



G. M. NICKASON. 

G. 'SI. Nickason, who follows agri- 
cultural i>ur-uit< iin section eleven. Black 
W'oU townsliip, KlI>worth county, has re- 
sided here since 1S7S. He is a native of the 
Empire state, his birth having occurred in 
\\"alden. Orange county, on the 8th of I\Lay, 
1830. He was only eleven years of age 
when he started out on his own account, be- 
coming a driver on the Erie canal. He was 
thus employed for about seven years, when 
the New York & Erie railroad was built 
and he secured work in preparing the road 
bed. Later he worked on the laying of the 
track, serving as section boss when he was 
only eighteen years of ap-e. He had a nat- 
ural aptitude for mechanics and decided to 
follow this line of business. Accordingly, 
in April. 1849, ^^ began learning the car- 
penter's trade and that of a house joiner. In 
those days sash, doors and blinds were most- 
ly manufactured by hand, and Mr. Nicka- 
son entered the employ of a firm engaged in 
that business, remaining with them for 
twenty-five years. He became the main re- 
liance of the house, and soon after he sev- 
ered his connection therewith their business 
had to be abandoned. 

In September, 1861, Mr. Nickason re- 
sponded to the country's call for aid, enlist- 
ing in. the Twentieth New York Infantry, 
in which he served for fifteen months. Fle 
then joined the Fourth New York Heavy 
Artillery. He was unacquainted with all of 
its members and jijined the regiment 
as a private, but was steadily pro- 
moted until he held the office of 
quartermaster sergeant of the regi- 
ment, al.-o serving on the non-commissioned 
staff of General Hancock. He participated 
in many engagements, among which were 
the battles of Centerville, the second battle 
of Bull Run, South IMountain and Antietam, 



178 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



where General George B. IMcClellan saved 
the Union cause. He then went on south 
to Ream's station. ]\'Iuch of the time he 
was in the commissary department and can 
relate many interesting anecdotes, concern- 
ing- his experience in foraging. On the 3d 
of September, 1864, he was wounded at Pe- 
tersburg and was taken to Lincoln Hospital 
on the 8th of October, there remaining until 
the army was discharged, in July, 1865. 

Mr. Nickason then returned to his na- 
tive state and again resumed work at his 
trade, carrying on business with his brother. 
They were xtry successful, owing to the im- 
provements in machinery which our subject 
was enabled to introduce as the result of his 
thorough knowledge of mechanics. At 
length he determined to come to Kansas and 
disposed of his interests in the east. Mak- 
ing his way to this state in 1878, he pur- 
chased a quarter section of land in Black 
Wolf township, where he now resides, and 
all the improvements on the place are his 
work and stand as monuments to his energy. 
In 1900 he erected a handsome new resi- 
dence. In 1890 he built a fine shop in FJli- 
worth, equipped it with the best machinery 
and carried on business along that line for 
a few years, but ultimately resumed farm- 
ing, to which he now devotes his entire at- 
tention. Throughout his entire life he has 
been a hard worker, although for the past 
thirty-seven years he has suffered with an 
open wound. His diligence and energy 
enabled him to triumph o\-er an adverse 
fate, and he is now one of the substantial 
citizens of his community. 

Mr. Nickason has been twice married. 
In 1855 he wedded Ellen Mance, and unto 
them were born two children : Marietta, who 
is nn\v in an Indian school, in Pahuska ; and 
Frederick. Both have been well educated. 
The mother died and' in August, 1867, Mr. 
Xickason was again married, his second 
union being with JNIargaret Tice, by whom 
he has two children, — Ellen and Lemont. 
In his home our subject has a grand roller 
organ, and in his leisure hours greatly en- 
joys plaving thereon. His accomplishment 
in this direction has also enabled him to af- 
ford much pleasure to others. In politics 



clerk of the township board and as township 
he is independent, but has served as clerk 
of the township board and as township treas- 
urer. His advancement in business affairs 
has been creditable and gratifying since he 
came to Ellsworth county and he has never 
had occasion to regret the fact that he allied 
his interests with those of the Sunflower 
state. 



CLAUDE DUVAL. 



Claude Duval, who for fifteen years has 
been a resident of Hutchinson, is widely 
known throughout Kansas as a traveling 
salesman, and is no less honored and dis- 
tinguished in business circles than he is in 
the ranks of the Democratic party, of 
which he is leading member. He was 
born in Morganfield, Kentucky, May 
19, 1859, and not only can he claim 
descent from one of the honored pio- 
neer families of that state but also from 
those who were among the first permanent 
settlers on the Atlantic coast. The first of 
the Duval famiily in America were two 
brothers, who came fniui France with Gen- 
eral La Fayette. Both served in the Revo- 
lutionary war and one settled in Maryland 
and the other in Virginia. It is from the 
latter that our subject is descended. 
Through his paternal grandmother, who 
bore the maiden name of Jane E. Russell, 
the family history can be traced back 
through several centuries to about 1000 A. 
D. The first of the name in America was 
William Russell. It has always been under- 
stood from tradition that he was a member 
of the family of Russell in England, rep- 
resented by the ducal house of Bedford, but 
of which particular branch of the family is 
not known. However, it is known that the 
Russell family in England is one of great 
antiquity and came originally from Nor- 
mandy, where the name was Du Rozel. 
\\'ift:n, in his memoir of the house of Rus- 
sell, says: "It derived its distinctive ap- 
pellation from one of the fiefs which the 
first chieftain of that name possessed an- 
terior to the first conquest te England. In 




^A- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



lower Xormandy in the ancient bourey of 
Briquebec, in 1066, they occupied the castle 
and territory of Du Rozel, which was a 
portion of their appanage, as a younger 
branch of the Bertrands, barons of Brique- 
bec, a house the head of which took the title 
of sire, being accounted second only in rank 
to the barons of St. Sauvenr, who were 
styled vicomtes of La Manche. Hugh Du 
Rozel, who appears to liave been the first of 
the name, was born about 102 1. Soon after 
the Norman conquest the Du Rozels crossed 
the channel into England, where land was 
assigned to them in Northumberland and 
\\ here the name was anglicized into Russell. 
In 1 141 Robert De Russell led his company 
of knights into the battle of Lincoln and 
distinguished himself in that conflict. The 
earliest coat of arm's of the family in Eng-- 
land bore a lion rampant; gules on a chief 
sable : three escallops argent." 

William Russell, the first representative 
of tha family in America, crossed the 
Atlantic with Sir Alexander Spotts- 
wood in 1710, arriving within the capes 
of Virginia on the Deptford, a man 
of war, of which Tancred Robinson 
was commander, the landing being ef- 
fected on the 20th of June. The following 
day they proceeded up the James river in 
the Bedford galley, commanded by Captain 
Lee. who landed his beat at Jamestown. 
William Russell soon became a prominent 
character in the early history of the col- 
onies. \Mien he left England for Virginia 
he was a young lawyer from the inner tem- 
ple of the court in London. As he. was at 
that time twenty-fi\-e years of age, the year 
of his birth must have been 1685. Before 
embarking for America he obtained a com- 
mission in the British army. The old ac- 
c< lunt says he "was an officer in the British 
army of occupation and defense in Vir- 
ginia." Tradition says that he was one of 
the party of cavaliers who accompanied 
Governor Spottswood on his expedition 
across the Appalachian mountains, and that 
in consequence thereof he became one of the 
famous Knights of the Golden Horse Shoe. 
The old account savs that he obtained lare;e 



! grants of land from the British government 
and the records show that in 1735 two 
tracts of land in Frederick county, Virginia, 
one containing forty-nine hundred and fifty 
acres and the other thirty-six hundred and 
fifty acres, were patented to him from the 
King's office; also other tracts in Augusta. 
The records of the Virginia land office also 
show that in 1712 he purchased from Lord 
Fairfax several thousand acres located in 
several counties of the Old Dominion. He 
belonged to the church of England and was 
an active member of the old colonial church 
known as Buck Run, in St. ]\Iark"s parish. 
The Rev. Mr. Slaughton, in his history of 
St. Mark's parish, says: "C/olonel William 
Green and Culoncl WiUiani Russell were 
made church wardens for the ensuing year 
(1756) ; also that payments were made by 
the church to William Russell, Charles Mor- 
gan, R. D. Parks and others for providing 
for certain poor persons." In 1730 he was 
married to Man- Henley, and their children 
were William, Henry and Catherine. Will- 
iam Russell died after a few days' illness, 
October 18, 1757, when about seventy-two 
years of age. He was buried in the Buck 
Run church yard. 

His son and namesake. General William 
Russell, was born in Virginia in 1735 and 
acquired a classical and scientific education 
in William and Mary College, at \\'illiams- 
burg, Virginia, the oldest seat of learning 
in the United States, with the exception of 
Harvard University. He educated himself 
for the practice of law, but, owing to his 
marriage shortly after leaving college, he 
changed his plans and settled on a planta- 
tion in Culpeper county, Virginia. He early 
became active in military operations and the 
greater portion of his life was spent in act- 
ive service, defending the colonies from In- 
dian attacks. The year 1775 found him 
captain of a company of rangers, serving 
under General Braddock. In 1765 Captain 
Russell was sent by the British authori- 
ties on some mission among the Indians in 
the section fi cnuntrx' wlierc Chattanooga, 
i Tennessee, i< now located. It t^ nk twelve 
■ months to execute the trust, during which 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTOR] 



time he endured great hardships among the 
Creek Indians. Captain Russell was soon 
called into public service. At the battle of 
Point Pleasant, October lo, 1774, he led 
his company; and of this engagement Col- 
lins, in his History of Kentucky, says: "It 
was probabl}' the most se\-erely contested 
conflict ever maintained with the northwest- 
ern Indians. The action continued from 
sunrise to sunset and the ground for half 
a mile along the bank of the Ohio was al- 
ternately occupied by each of the contend- 
ing parties in the course of the day. So 
sanguinary was the conflict that blood was 
found on each of the trees behind which the 
combatants were posted. The Indians un- 
der the celebrated chief Comstock aban- 
doned the field under cover of the night. 
Their loss, according to official report, ex- 
ceeded that of the Americans, the latter 
amounting to sixtj'-three killed and eighty 
wounded. This report was drawn up by 
Captain Russell, reported to be the best 
scholar in the camp." 

In 1776 Captain Russell was promoted 
to the rank of colonel, commanding a regi- 
ment of mounted men. He was constantly 
engaged in repelling the attacks of the In- 
dians on the frontier of Virginia and Ten- 
nessee. It was during this year that Col- 
onel Russell lost his beloved' wife, who in 
her maidenhood was Tabitha Adams. On 
his return from active service to his family 
he found that the home was left desolate 
through the death of the faithful wife and 
mother. Owing to the Revolutionary Avar 
Colonel Russell was again called into active 
service. ^ In the section of the country in 
whicli Ills family of children resided the' In- 
dians were carrying on the work of devas- 
tation Ijy fire and massacre, so he removed 
his children to a farm which he purchased, 
adjoining the Aspenville tract, belonging 
to Colonel William Campbell, near the seven 
mile ford. He placed his children in charge 
of an old negro man and his wife, whom he 
selected from among his slaves because of 
their faithfulness and devotion to his fam- 
ily, and after committing the little ones to 
their care Colonel Russell gave his service 



to the cause of liberty. The negro couple 
proved most faithful to the trust reposed 
in them, and though the children were many 
times in danger of capture by British raid- 
ers, yet the caretakers managed to keep them 
free from harm. In the winter of 1776-7 
Colonel Russell received the appointment of 
colonel in the regular army and took com- 
mand of a Virginia regiment, which he re- 
tained until the close of the war. He was 
one of the colonels in the Virginia line in 
continental establishment and was brevetted 
on that account. He took an active and 
prominent part in the liattles of Brandy- 
wine, Germantown, ]\Ionmouth, and the 
siege of Charleston, and when that place 
w^as captured was made prisoner and sent on 
a British prison ship to one of the ^^"est 
India islands. Subsequently he was released 
on parole and sent to Virginia, where he 
was exchanged and again took the field. 
In 1777, 1778 and 1779 he was in Wash- 
ington's army. He was also with the army 
at Yorktown and witnessed the surrender 
of Lord Cornwallis. October 19, 1781. 
There is abundant evidence that he exhib- 
ited great bravery and military tact as an 
officer and retired from the service with an 
honorable record. Because of having 
served through the entire Revolution he 
was brevetted to the rank of general and re- 
tired on half pay for life. For his services 
he was entitled to large grants of land, 
much of which was located in the Green 
river section of Kentucky. In his honor 
Russell county, Virginia, and Russellville, 
Kentucky, were named, the latter being 
built upon land originally owned by him. 
After peace was restored giving integrity to 
the republic, he returned lo ci\il life and 
was soon elected to the A^irginia senate, of 
which he was a leading and influential mem- 
ber for many years. He was a hig'h type of 
the gentleman of the old school "without 
fear and without reproach." 

After his return home General Russell 
was married, about 1783, to ]\Irs. Elizabeth 
(Henry) Campbell, the widow of General 
William Campbell, of Kings mountain 
fame, who died a few weeks before the 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



siege of Yorktown, in 1781. She was the 
daughter of John Henry and a sister of 
Patricia Henry, whose words of burning 
eloquence probably did more than any 
other agency to arouse the people to 
resistance of the oppressive measures of 
the mijther country at the opening of 
the war. It was in 1788 that General 
Russell became a convert to the Meth- 
odist faith, uniting with that church. 
The Rev. T. Ware, speaking of this, said: 
"Our tirst conference in Holston was held j 
in ^Nlav, 1788. As the road by which Bishop | 
Asburv was to come was infested w'ith hos- 
tile savages so that it could not be traveled 
excejit bv considerable companies together, 
he was detained for a week after the time 
to commence it, but we were not idle and 
the Lord gave us many souls in the place 
where we were assembled, among whom 
were General Russell and Lady, the latter 
a sister of the illustrious Patrick Henry. I 
mention this particularly because they were 
the first fruit of our labors in this confer- 
ence." It appears from the complete ac- 
count of Rev. Ware that when General Rus- 
sell enlisted' as a soldier of the cross he did 
so with his whole heart and soul. Both he 
and his wife were zealous in their faith and 
consistent in their devotion. Family pray- 
ers were offered night and morning and 
they frec]uently had preaching at their house. 
Bishop Asbury was a frec^uent visitor and 
he says in his journal : "General Russell's 
home is one of the harbors of rest for the 
weary JMethodist preacher." 

Within a year or two from thetime of 
his conversion the entire household, both 
white and black, were converted and' brought 
into cl urch. After an active life spent in 
serving his country- as a legislator and spl- 
dier, he passed away Monday morning at 
four o'clock, January 14, 1794. His death 
was caused by exposure on his journeying 
to and from Richmond, where the general 
assemblies were held in the winter months. 
In his letters he expressed a dread of such 
exposure and when finally he contracted a 
severe cold on going to Richmond, and the 
next day became worse, so that a physician 



was summoned, he fel^ that the illness 
would be his last. At the close of his hon- 
orable and useful life he exhorted his fam- 
ily and those around him to live according 
to God's word and frec|uently prayed that 
the grace of God might rest on all. 

His son, John Coats Russell, the great- 
grandfather of Claude Euval, was born in 
Culpeper county, Virginia, in 1768, and in 
1793 was mariied to ]\liss Amy Clay, of 
Chesterfield county, \ ir^inia. In 1880 he 
removed with his fani;l_\ to Kentucky and 
settled on a portion of '"Russell's Green 
river survey," which he inherited from his 
father. In 1809 he was elected and served 
as a member of the house of representatives 
from jMuhlenberg county, Kentucky, and 
later he removed to Butler county, that state, 
where he spent the remainder of his life, 
passing away November 17, 1822. 

His daughter, Jane E. Russell, was born 
July 30, 1794, in Virginia, and died in 
Union county, Kentucky, January 10, 1861. 
She became the wife of Claiborn Duval, 
one of the pioneer ministers of Kentucky, 
who was bcn-n in the Old Dominion, but at 
an early date went to the Blue Grass state 
to preach the gospel among the first settlers 
there. 

H. C. Duval, the father of our subject 
and a son of the Rev. Claiborn and Jane 
(Russell) Duval, was a native of Kentucky 
and a farmer by occupation, following agri- 
cultural pursuits up to the time of the Civil 
war. He owned a large number of slaves 
and of course lost all at the time of the hos- 
tilities between the north and the south. 
For two terms he served his county as 
sheriff". He was a member of the ]\Ieth- 
odist church and was long regarded as one 
of the most prominent residents of the com- 
munity. He married Miss Mobley, a rep- 
resentative of an old southern family and 
they became the parents of ten children, 
eight of whum are living, ime having died 
in infanc}' and Claibourn 'SL, who was a 
member of Company K, Twenty-first Kan- 
sas Volunteer Infantry in the Spanish- 
American war, died at Phoenix. Arizona, 
December 13, 1901-. His body -was brought 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



to Hutchinson for interment. Our subject 
is the eldest of the family.' One brother, 
W. J. Duval, is grand chancellor of the 
Knights of Pythias fraternity of the state 
of Kansas, with headquarters at Wichita. 
A daughter, ]\Irs. K. B. Ringle, the wife of 
a well known stockman, is living in Reno 
county. The father died in 1894. 

Born upon his father's farm in Ken- 
tucky, Claude Duval, whose name breads this 
re\-iew, spent his early youth- in his native 
state and for three months in the winter 
season attended the public schools, while in 
the summer months he assisted his father 
upon the farm. At the age of sixteen he 
entered college in Morganfield, where he re- 
mained for three years, and then putting 
aside bis text books he entered upon his 
business career as an employe in a mercan- 
tile bouse, where he remained until he went 
upon the road as a traveling salesman. For 
the past twenty-one years he has thus been 
engaged with the exception of a brief in- 
terval of two years. From 1882 until 1886 
be was traveling representative for the Ohic 
& IMississippi Railroad in Illinois, Kentucky 
and Tennessee and at the latter date he came 
to Hutchinson, where for two years he was 
engaged in the retail grocery business. He 
was then one of the promoters in the or- 
ganization of the Hutchinson Wholesale 
Grscery Company, for which he traveled 
continuously until Apriri2, 1900, largely 
augmenting its business through his 
introduction of its goods. At the last date 
he accepted his present position with the 
Springfield Hat Company, which has its 
headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, and 
its factory in Orange, New Jersey. He 
represents this company throughout the en- 
tire state of Kansas, and has already se- 
cured a large patronage for the house. In. 
business affairs he is energetic, prompt and 
notably reliable, always courteous and' ge- 
nial and succeeds not only in winning cus- 
tomers but also in gaining'their high regard. 

Mr. Duval has long taken a deep and 
active interest in political questions and is 
a well known factor in the councils of the 
Democracy. He is an entertaining, force- 



ful and logical speaker, endowed with supe- 
rior gifts of oratory and his campaign ad- 
dresses are very effective. He always takes 
an active part in selecting delegates' for the 
county, congressional and state conventions, 
so that competent men may be nominated for 
office and the principles of the party firmly 
upheld. In 1900 he received the party nom- 
ination as candidate for congress, and al- 
though Kansas gave a very strong Repub- 
lican majority, he made a remarkable race 
for the office — acknowledged so to be by 
even the western Republican press. He was 
defeated, but it was a defeat that amounted 
almost to victory for he ran fifteen hundred 
ahead of his ticket, after making a canvass 
through thirty-six counties covering one- 
third of the area of the state. He assumes 
no credit for this, but modestv says the re- 
sult was due to the effective "leadership of 
Hon. George T. Pitts, of Wellington, Kan- 
sas, chainnan of the congressional commit- 
tee, and to the unswerving loyaltv of 
Mr. Duval's personal friends, regardless 
of party; but his friends all believe and 
know that it was the personal popularity 
of the man aad confidence so uniformlv re- 
posed in him that gained for him such a 
flattering vote. He has the respect and 
confidence of many prominent men of 
the opposition, for his loyaltv to Ameri- 
can institutions and his honest convictions 
are above question. ]\Ir. Duval is 
a valued member of Byron Lodge, No. 197, 
K. P. and Hutchinson Council. No. 34. 
United Commercial Travelers. He has filled 
all the offices of the local U. C. T. Council, 
for three terms was grand treasurer of the 
state, has been elected grand counselor and 
takes a deep and helpful interest in the move- 
ments tending to advance the interests of the 
traveling men. He likewise holds mem- 
bership with Reno Lodge, No. 140, F. & A. 
M., and with the Iowa Accident Insurance 
Company. Fourteen years ago he joined the 
First Presbj-terian church of Hutchinson, 
Kansas, and has ever since been an active 
working member, taking special interest in 
the Sunday-school work, and is now servmg 
his third year as superintendent of the First 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



183 



Presbyterian church Sunday-school. Under 
his management the school has prospered 
and grown and is to-day one of the best and 
most active working schools in the city. 

On the 26th of April, 1882, in Kentucky, 
Mr. Duval was united in marriage to Miss 
Cora White, a daughter of H. \V. White, 
formerly a merchant of McLeansboro, Illi- 
nois, and later a traveling salesman out of 
St. Louis, Missouri. They have one 
daughter, Clara, who is giving considerable 
attention to the study of vocal music, in 
which direction she manifests pleasing tal- 
ent. Their home is noted for its cordial 
hospitality and their friends throughout the 
community ai>e many. Reliable in busi- 
ness, considerate in the home, genial and 
/riendly in social circles, loyal in citizenship, 
and above all without ostentation in manner 
—these qualities have gained for Claude 
Duval the respect and in many instances the 
warm friendship of those with whom he 
comes in contact. 



MICHAEL MENG. 

One of the prosperous and progressive 
farmers of Galesburg township, Kingman 
County, has so ably conducted his business in- 
terests that success has crowned his efforts 
and given him a place among the substantial 
citizens of his community. He was born in 
Seneca county, near Bellevue, Ohio, in 
1850. His father, Martin Meng, was born 
in Alsace, on the Rhine, Germany, in 18 18, 
and in his native country he atten'ded school 
until his fourteenth year. He then learned 
the weaver's trade, following that occupa- 
tion for four years. On the expiration of 
that period, being then eighteen years of age, 
he left his home and native land" for the new 
world, and after his arrival in this country 
he located near Bellevue, Ohio. In Seneca 
county, that state, he was united in marriage 
to Agnes Fritz, who was born in Alsace, 
Gern:any, but came to America when six- 
teen years of age, locating in the Buckeye 
state. Seven children were born unto this 
worthy couple, four sons and Soiree daugh- 



ters, namely : Michael, Lena, Anna, Mar- 
tin, Philip, Joseph and Mary. Philip and 
Joseph are twins, and the former now resides 
in Evans township, this state, and the latter 
still makes his home in Ohio. The parents 
are also living in that commonwealth, the 
father having reached the ripe old age of 
eighty-three years, while the mother died at 
sixty-three years of age. 

Michael Meng, whose name introduces 
this review, was reared to manhood on an 
Ohio farm, and in that state he received his 
early educational privileges. He remained 
in the state of his nativity until 1880, and in 
that year located near Decatur, Adams 
county, Indiana, where for the f-'Ih'wiiiL; -ix 
years he was, engaged in agriciiltural jiur- 
suits. The year 1887 witnessed his arrival 
in the Sunflower state, and in Kingman 
CL.'unty he first purchased a tract of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land, to which he 
later added another tract of one hundred 
and sixty acres located one mile south of his 
original purchase, and still later he bought 
eighty acres on the southeast, being now the 
possessor of four hundred acres of excellent 
and productive land. As the years have pass- 
ed by and prosperity has rewarded his efforts 
he has placed many substantial improve- 
ments upon his place, and this is now one 
of the finest homesteads of the locality. Mr. 
Meng is also operating a threshing machine. 
which is the, second one he has owned and 
operated in Kansas. 

At the age of twenty-eight years Mr. 
Meng was united in marriage to Philopena 
Gerber, a daughter of Jacob and Barbara 
(Heitz) Gerber. The father is still 
liA-ing, making his home in Ohio, but 
the mother has passed to her final rest. 
They became the parents of six chil- 
dren, four of whom are now living, 
namely: Jacob, a prosperous farmer 
of Evans townsihip, Kingman county ; Mary, 
a resident of Ohio; John, who makesi his 
home Ih Galesburg township, Kingman 
county; and Philopena, the wife of our sub- 
ject. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Meng has 
been blessed with ten children, as follows : 
Leo, Christina, Otto, Charles, Emma, !Mary, 
Minnie, Lucv, William and Lizzie. The 



1 84 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



last named died when twelve years of age. 
The Democracy receives Mr. Meng"s active 
support and co-operation and of the Catholic 
church he is a worthy and acceptable mem- 
ber. He served as a trustee of the build- 
ing committee for the new church, which 
was erected at a cost of thirty-live hundred 
dollars, and in 1901 he took an active part 
in the building of the fine new edifice at 
Waterloo. As a citizen he is- public-spirited 
and progressive, withholding his support 
from no measure or movement which he be- 
lieves will prove of public benefit. 



WILLIA^I POTTER. 

\\"illiam Potter, superintendent of the 
Reno county poor farm, has been a resident 
of the locality since 1877, and during that 
period he has so lived as to gain for himself 
by his honorable, straighforward career the 
confidence and resided rf tlie entire com- 




munit}- in which he li\es. He was born in 
Drake county, Ohio, September 28, 1840. 
His paternal grandfather, Daniel Potter, 
was one of the very early pioneers of the 
Buckeye state, where he cleared a farm from 
the native timber. His son, Daniel Potter. 
Jr., also improved a farm in that state, and 



became one of the prominent and infiuential 
! early settlers of his locality. When he was 
1 nine years of age the Indians forced the 
family to take refuge in a fort and every- 
thing was then new and wild, while game of 
all kinds was so numerous that they would 
at times almost destroy the corn crops. The 
i family made their sugar and spun and wove 
; the material for their clothes, and if they 
j raised crops sufficient to pay taxes and pur- 
chase their salt they were considered suc- 
cessful. Mr. Potter married Catherine 
Crumrine, of Pennsylvania, and our subject 
is the eldest of three living children. The 
father died at the age of fifty-two years, 
i while the mother was called to the home be- 
yond at the age of forty-three years. 

\\'illiam Potter, whose name introduces 
this review, was reared on the home farm 
until he had nearly reached mature years. 
September i, 1861, he enlisted for service 
in the Civil war, becoming a member of 
Company G, Fortieth Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry. In 1862 he joined the army of the 
Cumberland, was with Garfield of the Big 
Sandy, took part in the Atlanta campaign, 
and was five times wounded, though never 
seriously. At the battle of Chickamauga, 
he was in the thickest of the fight, and in all 
the engagements in which the regiment took 
part he nobly did his duty as a brave and 
103-al soldier. On the expiration of the term 
of enlistment the army was disbanded, but 
Mr. Potter \-eteranized. and before the last 
fight at Xash\-ille his regiment consolidated 
with the Fifty-first Ohio and went to Texas, 
remaining in the Lone Star state from July 
until the following October, when they were 
mustered out at Victoria, that state, and 
were discharged at Columbus, on the fifth 
of November, 1865. That y-ear, while in 
Texas he was ill with a fever, which finally 
settled in his ankle, and from that time to 
the present he has ne\'er been free from 
pain. During his illness he was cared for 
at the home of a Texan, who was a southern 
sympathizer. For meritorious service 
during- his military career, Mr. Potter was 
appointed corporal of his company and was 
afterward made first lieutenant. At the 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



185 



battle of Resaca his only brother. John D., 
who was a member of Company K. Xinety- 
foLirth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, was killed. 
Returning to his home with an honor- 
able military career, our subject again took 
up the quiet and peaceful duties of the farm 
in Drake county, where he continued to re- 
side until 1S76, and in the spring of that 
year came tO' Kansas, locating on a home- 
stead quarter section of timber land in Ar- 
lington township and also took a home- 
stead claim in Lodi township. In the fol- 
lowing fall, however, he returned to Ohio, 
and in the spring of 1877, brought his fam- 
ily to his Kansas home. Buftaloes still 
roamed over the country at that time, and 
for three or four years afterward antelope 
were numerous in this section. Mr. Potter 
improved one-half of his three-hunclred-and 
t s cnty-acre tract, his principal crop being 
wlieat, and he continued to cultivate 
the place until 1895, when h^ sold his farm 
and afterward assumed the duties of super- 
intendent of the Reno county farm, being 
a member of the town board at that 
time. When he was given charge of the 
office his only instructions were to conduct 
the place as he would his own, and that he 
has do>ne so^ is evinced by the fact that dur- 
ing each succeeding year he has been re- 
elected. The number of inmates now num- 
ber twelve, but at one time as many as 
thirty-four made their home upon the 
farm, and two servants are CDiistaiitly em- 
pliiyed. The principal crops rai'-u 1 are wb.cat 
and corn. In 1901 the latter C( nimiidity 
a\'eragcd thirty-se\'en luishels to the acre, 
while tlie 1 ats en -p yielded an average of 
furty-six and a half bushels to the acre. Few 
public institutions are conducted so profit- 
ably as this, and for many years the sale of 
the crops not consumed upon the place and 
that of the stock have been sufficient to meet 
the other expenses. The greatest revenue of 
the farm is derived from the sale of stock. 
About three hundred head of hogs and from 
ten to fifteen head of cattle are sold each 
year, while apples and grapes al-^n are mar- 
keted. A fine grade of stock is rai-cd upon 
the place, a beautiful orchard yields its fruit 
in season, and evervthing about the farm in- 



dicates the supervision of a progressive and 
thrifty agriculturist. Since assuming the 
duties of this responsible position his salary- 
has been increased from eight hundred to 
twelve hundretl dollars, thus showing the 
higii regard in which he is held by those in 
authority. 

In Ohio, on the 12th oi April, 1866, Mr. 
Potter was united in marriage with Miss E. 
J. Ryan, a daughter of Rudolpk Ryan, who 
was born in Germany, but when nine years 
of age was brought by his parents to Amer- 
ica, the family locating in Virginia. He 
was there married to Ellen Hamilton, a na- 
tive of Maryland. She was married in that 
state and later located in the Buckeye state. 
Rudolph Ryan was a farmer by occupation, 
and became an early pioneer of both Ohio 
and Indiana. He passed away in death 
when Mrs. Potter was only eight years of 
age, but his wife reached the ripe old age of 
seventj'-odd years. Five of their sons were 
brave and loyal soldiers during the Civil 
war. John Alexander, \\-ho was a member of 
the Ninety-fourth Ohio, , was wounded and 
captured at the battle of Resaca and died in 
Andersonville prison: G. W. and F. L., 
twins, the former a member of the Fourth 
United States Cavalry, was also wounded in 
battle, \A-hile the latter was a member of the 
Thirty-fourth Ohio Zouaves; Daniel T., was 
a member of the Ninety-fourtTi Ohio; and 
William, a member of the One Hundred and 
Flfty-^ccond Ohio VcIrnttn->, died of meas- 
les at (amp Chase. Unt. . Air. and Mrs, Pot- 
ter ha\-e been born seven children, namely: 
Catherine Ellen, wife of D. C. Banks, of 
OklalK.nna : Alary Annatta. wife of William 
Banks, cf Ledi township. Reno ciauntv: 
Sarah Olive, wife of Charles Vaughn, also 
a resident of Lodi township: John D.. who 
proved a claim in the "Strip," but now re- 
sides' in this county, and he married Mary 
Amanda Wilburn, a daughter of John Will- 
iam Wilburn; Emma Jane, wife of M. A. 
Minor, Arlington township, Reno co'unty; 
Rosa Lee, wife of Fred Vaughn: and on 
daughter who died when a year and a half 
old. Mr. Potter maintains pleasant relati.^ns 
with his old army comrades through his 
membership with the Grand Armv'cf the 



i86 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



Republic, Perryville Post, Xo. 222, at Ar- 
lington, Kansas, and of the Christian church 
he has been a worthy and acceptable member 
for a half century and I\Irs. Potter has been 
a member of same church for thirty-nine 
years. She is now serving as matron of the 
county home and is a woman whose pure life 
and most amiable manner admirably fit her 
for the great trials and increasing responsi- 
bilities of the home, and wherever she is 
known she is highly respected and loved. 
Mr. Potter's political support is given the 
Republican party, and in 1886 he was elected 
to th.e office of county commissioner, which 
he has served for four years. For twelve 
years he was a justice of the peace in Lodi 
township, and for twenty-two years both in 
Ohio and Kansas, he was a member of the 
school board. He is widely and favorably 
"known, and has the respect and confidence 
of all with whom he comes in contact, either 
in business or social life. 



TOHX LAFAYETTE S^IITH. 

Among the business and professional 
men of Hutchinson, Kansas, none are more 
closely identified with the growth and best 
interests of the Sunflower state than John 
Lafayette Smith, familiarly known among 
his friends as "Fay," having been a resident 
of Reno county since 1872, locating south of 
the city of Hutchinson. At that time the 
city could Ijoast of but one store and very 
few residences, and between the farm of Mr. 
.Smith and the city there were but two resi- 
dences, indicating the unsettled condition 
of the country at that time. The paternal 
grandfather of cur subject, Alexander 
Smith, was a native of the south, as was also 
his wife, who was born in North Carolina. 
He was of English-Irish lineage, and she of 
Dutch. Two of his sons were soldiers in 
the Civil war, one fighting for the preserva- 
tion of the union, and the other taking up 
arms in favor of the Secessionists, and in 
the l_iattle of Gettysburg thev fought against 
each other. John Lowrv Smith, the father 



of our subject, although born in North Car- 
olina, was reared in Tennessee, and in 1839 
went to Iowa. The following year he 
brought his family from White Oak 
Springs, Illinois, to Iowa, where he took up 
a timber claim and partially improved it, 
but later made a home for his family out on 
the prairie. He was an important factor 
in the organization of the county in which 
he resided, and it being a time of Indian out- 
breaks, he showed great courage in protect- 
ing the citizens of the surrounding country. 
He took part in the B^llevue war, being a 
member of the vigilance committee, and the 
old building in which he and a number of 
brave men helped to protect the settlement, 
is still standing. His clothes were pierced 
with seven bullets, but he escaped without a 
wound. He aided in the formation of 
schools and churches, and gave his support 
to any movement tending toward the ad- 
vancement and development of the commun- 
ity in which he lived. He worked at Galena, 
Illinois, and was obliged to go there for sup- 
plies. In those primitive days travel was 
tiresome and dangerous but lie made his 
journeys with comparatively little trouble. 
Mr. Smith luiilt the first frame house in that 
part of the country, and deer and wild geese 
were so abundant that they were driven off 
the farm in order to permit of the cultiva- 
tion of the land. ^\'hile in Illinois. ]\Ir. 
Smith was married to ^Nlary ]\I. Smith, a 
second cousin, by whom he had eight chil- 
dren, four sons and four daughters, five of 
whom are now living, namely : Nancy R.. 
the wife of 'M. N. Sisler a resident of Jack- 
son count}-. Iowa: Rufus P., a farmer of 
Taylor county, Iowa; IMary I\I., the wife 
of S. J. Matthews, of South Hutchinson: 
John L., the subject of this review: and 
Susie, the wife of John H. Kingkade, of 
Norman, Oklahoma. ^Irs. Smith was a 
helpful companion to her husband in these 
early days, faithfully performing all the 
duties of the primitive household. She 
made the cloth, as well as the garments, that 
was worn by her familv and endured the 
hardships of frontier life with courage and 
fortitude. The father spent his remaining 
days in his adopted state, and passed away 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



187 



at the age of fifty-nine years. He liad be- 
come a successful grain and stock raiser, 
having acquired alx)ut five hundred acres of 
land. He started with nothing in life but 
wilhng hands and a stout heart, and won all 
through his industry and perseverance. 

John Lafayette Smith, whose name in- 
troduces this record, was born November 
27. 1852 in Jackson county, Iowa. He. re- 
ceived his preliminary education in a little 
log school house in his native cuunty, but 
later, as the country de\'eloped, the schools 
became more advanced, and after complet- 
ing the school work here, he attended col- 
lege at Clinton, Iowa. He spent his boy- 
hood days on the farm, assisting in the work 
in the manner of the times. His father was 
the owner of the first reaping machine in the 
country, an old fashioned INIanny, but as 
this did not prove successful, he abandoned 
it for the scythe. His father was also the 
possessor of "the first spring wagon, and also 
subscribed for the only weekly paper taken 
for a long time in that part of the count^\^ 
and this paper was loaned to the neighbors 
until it was worn out. When fourteen years 
of age, the parents of Mr. Smith died and he 
lived with his brother until he decided to 
start out on life's journey for himself. The 
pioneer spirit of his family being strong 
within him, he started for the west. At 
Independence, Kansas, he purchased a yoke 
of oxen which he drove over the prairie until 
he arrived in Reno county, where he decided 
to locate, taking up a claim in the southeast 
cpiarter of section eight, township twenty- 
four, range five. The country was sparse- 
ly settled, there being no railroad nearer than 
Xewton, and the buffaloes were so abundant 
they could always be seen in droves on the 
prairie, and their meat was very plentiful. 
J\Ir. Smitli liogan the task of breaking the 
open prairie w ith liis team of oxen and plant- 
ed ^-(:me ciirn, but his main source of revenue 
was derived from buffalo hides and bones. 
In 1874 he traded this claim, upon which he 
had erected a sod house and a few outbuild- 
ings, for a claim owned by a man by the 
name of Robinson, upon which he located. 
He greatly impro\-ed this land, devoting the 



greater part of his time to the raising of corn 
and wheat. In 1874 and again in 1876 he 
lost all his crops. In 1878 he was appointed 
deputy sheriff and this brought him to the 
city where he resided most of the time, ha\-- 
ing rented his farm. He became quite ac- 
tive in ix)litical circles after his removal to 
the city, and in 1885 was elected sheriff and 
served for a term of four years. In 1897 he 
was elected to the office of clerk of the dis- 
trict court and served in that capacity for 
four years. His duties were discharged in 
a most acceptable manner, winning to him 
many friends. He was an advocate of Re- 
publican principles until 1892, when he 
joined the Populist party, and his election 
in 1897 was largely owing to his own fol- 
lowing, who re-elected him in 1899. 

John Lafayette Smith was joined in 
marriage on the 2d day of June. 1886, in 
Troy township, Reno county, Kansas, to 
Alice B. Lewis, a daughter of S. C. Lewis, 
who resides in Hutchinson. This union 
was blessed with two children: Harry L., 
and Susie Louisa. 

Mr. Smith while attending tO' his official 
duties has also been engaged to a great ex- 
tent in real estate, and has also retained the 
possession of his farm property, which he 
rents. In the organization of schools and 
churches he has been an important factor, 
always taking an active intere^^t in any 
movement tnward the advancement of his 
community. He is identified with the An- 
cient Order of United Worknnen, and until 
recently was a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of which he was a 
trustee, and was also a charter member of the 
Knights of Pythias, luit has withdrawn from 
the two latter societies. While a resident of 
Hutchinscin he occupied the office of con- 
stable. He is verv active in the support of 
the Methodist Episcopal church of which his 
wife is a member, and has ever been a loyal 
defender ( f all that is true and holy. A 
man of strong purpose and untiring energy, 
he has won to himself a place among the 
prominent citizens of Reno county, and a 
reputation of high worth among those with 
whom he is associated. 



i8S 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



MYXDERT VAX FATTEN. 

Myndert \'an Patten is a prominent 
physician engaged in practice in Sterling, 
and in his profession is meeting with a very 
high degree of success, owing to his capable 
control of business affairs, his comprehen- 
sive knowledge of the underlying principles 
of the science of medicine and his deep and 
abiding interest in humanity aside from his 
profession. He was born in Sterling, Cay- 
uga county. New York, in 1835. His fa- 
ther. Christian Van Patten, was a native jof 
Albany county, New» York, born May 4, 
1 80 1, and the grandfather, John Van Pat- 
ten, was born in the Empire state, about 
1765. His death occurred in 1845, ^vhen he 
had attained the age of eighty years. He 
reared three sons and three daughters. 
Among this number was Christian Van Pat- 
ten, who after attaining years of maturity, 
married I\Iiss ]\Iary Relyea, who was born 
January 20. 1835. and gave her hand in mar- 
riage to I\Ir. Van Patten when nineteen 
years of age. She died in Sterling, Kansas, 
when almost ninety-seven years of age. They 
were the parents of fourteen children, of 
whom five sons and seven daughters reached 
mature years, while four sons and four 
daughters are yet living, namely: David, 
a farmer residing in Sterling who has one 
son and two daughters; Herman, an agri- 
cultuiist of the same locality who has one 
son; Alyndert, of this review; James, who 
resides on the old homestead where the 
grandfather located more than one hundred 
years ago; Nancy, the widow of Charles 
Lyon, of Sterling; Susan, wife of George 
Blackwell, of Kankakee. Illinois; Mrs. Ra- 
chel Marvin, of Sterling; and ]\Irs. Isabell 
Duncan, a widow, also living at Sterling. 
The father of this family died in Sterling, 
in 1893. ^6 followed farming as his life 
work and thus provided a good home for 
his family, also giving to his children edu- 
cational advantages that well fitted them for 
life's practical duties. He took an active in- 
terest in public affairs and was greatly es- 
teemed for his genuine worth of character. 

Dr. Van Patten was educated in \\'ayne 
countv academy, and after completing his 



literary course he prepared for professional 
life in the Albany ^Medical College, in which 
he was graduated with the class of 1864. 
He first began practice in Hannibal, New 
York, in 1865, and a year later raiioved to 
Sterling, where he resided for three years. 
His. next place of business was in Chats- 
worth, Livingston county, Illinois, where he 
was associated with Dr. Hunt in practice 
and in the drug business for eight years. 
For four years he was a resident of Peoria, 
Illinois, where he engaged in practice as a 
regular. For the past twenty-twn years he 
has ministered to the needs if sut-fcring Ini- 
manity as a homeopathic pliy>ician in Ster- 
ling. Kansas, coming to this place from 
Peoria. Illinois, in 1868. 

In the meantime Dr. Van Patten had en- 
gaged in military service. He enlisted at 
Sterling, New York, as a member of Com- 
pany F, One Hundred and Tenth New York 
Infantry, in 1862, but in February, 1863, 
was honorably discharged on account of 
physical disability. After his return home 
he was united in marriage, in Hannibal, 
New York, in 1865, to Miss Ada Foot, who 
died in Kansas about 1874, leaving five of 
her six children, four daughters and one son, 
namely: Isabelle L.. wife of Cassius Elli- 
ott, of Farmington, New ]\Iexico, by whom 
she has six children ; George, who is living 
in the same place; Mamie, the wife of Riley 
Peterson, of Hodgman county, Kansas, by 
whom she has two children ; Fernette and 
Winnie, who are still under the parental 
roof. The Doctor was again married in 
1887. his second union being with ]Miss Let- 
tie M. Muse, of Greenfield. Ohio, a daughter 
of a Presbyterian minister, and his first wife 
was a daughter of a Baptist preacher. The 
children born to Dr. Van Patten by his sec- 
ond marriage are : Myndert, who is now 
thirteen years of age; Guy, a lad of nine 
years ; and Lowell, who is seven years of 
age. Socially the Doctor is connected with 
the Grand Army of the Republic and is now 
serving his third year as commander of 
Mead Post. No. 14. a fact which indicates 
his present personal popularity. fiT the of- 
fice is not usually accorded to one man for 
s.:) long a time. In politics he is a Repub- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



lican and has senxd as school director and 
as mayor of Sterling, exercising his official 
prerogatives in promoting the best interests 
of the city. In the campaign of 1900 he was 
chairman of the Republicani committee and 
labored earnestly in the interest of McKinley 
and Roosevelt. For twenty-two years he 
has occupied his present residence in Ster- 
ling and is recognized as one of the most 
capable physicians and prominent citizens of 
the neighborhood. His devotion to his pro- 
fession is marked and arises not only from 
his love of scientific research, but also from 
his desire to be a benefit to the world. His 
public and private relations are alike above 
reproach and as' a friend and physician he 
has won the high regard of all and become 
a popular resident of his adopted county. 



JOHN W. XELSOX. 

Though no land is richer in opportuni- 
ties or offers greater advantages to its citi- 
zens than America, success is not to be ob- 
tained through desire, Init must be persist- 
ently sought. In America "labor is king," 
and the man who resolutely sets to work to 
accomplish a purpose is certain of success if 
he has but the qualities of perseverance, un- 
tiring energy and practical common sense. 
John \V. Xelson is one whose career ex- 
cites the admiration and gains the respect of 
all. fur through his diligence and persistent 
purpose he has won a leading place in the 
business circles of Hutchinson and classed 
among the most prosperous citizens of Reno 
county. He is a member of the firm of Nel- 
son Brothers, dealers in hardware, stoves, 
farm implements and vehicles. They also 
engage in the manufacture of pumps and 
pump fixtures and are the proprietors of the 
Hutchinson Machine Shops. Their business, 
constantly growing in volume and im- 
portance, has brought to them a hand- 
some income and the most envious can- 
not grudge tliem their prosperity so worthily 
has it been won. 

John \\'. Xelson was born near Emhutt, 
Sweden, ]March 29, 1S61, a son of John and 



Xellie (Benson) Xelson. The father was 
born in southern Sweden. July 3, 1835, and 
was a son of Nels Anderson, for according 
to the custom of that land the son's surname 
is formed by attaching the word son to the 
father's last name. The great-grandfather 
of our subject was Ander Hult, an officer 
in the Swedish army, who served for five 
years in the war with Germany. John X'el- 
son, the father of our subject, was a farmer 
and land owner in the old country, but be- 
lieving America offered better opportunities 
for advancement he came to the United 
States in 1869. He left his family in Swe- 
den and came alone in search of a home for 
his wife and children. After landing on 
the Atlantic coast he made his way across 
the country to Winnebago county, Illinois, 
where he was employed as a farm laborer 
for two years, when he was joined by his 
family. In the spring of 187J, accompanied 
by his two sons, he started for the west, 
making the journey bv wagon. In May of 
that year he reached Reno county and locat- 
ed a homestead in Lincoln township, where 
he built a small house of one room and 
broke a little sod. He planted some corn 
that first spring and broke alti.igether fifteen 
acres oi the land. After a year he s.>Id his 
first claim and purchased another two miles 
west on the southeast Cjuarter of section 28, 
township 24 range 6. Of this, eighty acres 
had been taken as a homestead and the other 
eighty acres as a timber claim. Both of 
these he proved up and placed under a high 
state of improvement and cultivation. The 
family resided upon this farm until 1S84, 
when they removed to a farm in Castleton 
township which the father had purchased. 
Two years later, however, he went to his 
present home in South Reno township, just 
outside the city limits of Hutchinson. Here 
he owns a valuable tract of land. Through 
his economy, industry and perseverance and 
the aid of his faithful wife he has pros- 
pered, now occupying a place among the 
leading and successful agriculturists of 
Reno county. He endorses the principles 
of the Republican party and supports its 
candidates by his ballot. In religious faith 
both he and his wife are Lutherans. Thev 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTOR] 



are now living happy en their excellent 
farm, Mr. Nelson at the age of sixty-four 
years, while his wife has attained the age of 
fifty-seven. 

John W. Nelson was a lad of only eleven 
years when he came with the family to Kan- 
sas. Here he soon became familiar with the 
experiences incident to the establishment of 
a home ui>on the frontier. He shared with 
the family in the hardships and privations 
of pioneer life and assisted his fatlier in im- 
proving new farms and in herding cattle. 
His cducaticnal privileges were those afford- 
ed liv thr di-lrict schools of the neighbor- 
hood through the winter months. He re- 
mained under the parental roof until twenty- 
four years of age, when he took charge of 
one of his father's farms, which he was al- 
lowed to operate rent free. There he re- 
mained for a year, after which he went to 
Kingman and entered a blacksmith shop 
with the intention of ultimately establishing 
a machine shop, but after six months he 
abandoned that idea. 

In company with his; brother, Peter A. 
Nelson, who was born January 4, 1863, and 
with wli'-ni he has long been associated in 
business, he went to Finney county, Kansas, 
where each pre-empted a quarter section of 
land. After breaking some sod and making 
some improvements on the place they re- 
turned to Reno county but are still owners 
of their claims in Finney county. In 1887 
he established a hardware business in South 
Hutchinson, which he carried on for a year, 
when he admitted his son to a partnership, 
under the firm name of Nelson Brothers. 
In 1889 they removed across the river to 
Hutchinson and began business in what was 
then the Hegner but now the Rock Island 
block and at present occupied by the Parker 
Creamery Company. For a year they re- 
mained at that place and then went to No. 
4 South Main street, where they also con- 
tinued foi- a year, after which they occupied 
the Welsh building for four years and then 
returned to Main street. In the fall of 1899 
they purchased their present three-story 
brick building at No. 6 Main street, the di- 
mensions of the structure being twenty-five 
by one hundred and fiftv feet. It is a fine 



modern business block, of which they occu- 
py the entire space except the front part of 
the upper floors, which are arranged for 
office purposes. The>^ also own the build- 
ing at No. 3 Sherman street, east, — a good 
two- story structure, twenty-five by one hun- 
dred and sixty-five feet. They have like- 
wise purchased another lot, on which they 
will erect a storage building. In 1898 they 
estabiisiied the Hutchinson Machine Shops 
on lots 14 and 16 Sherman street, west, and 
have since conducted the enterprise. Four 
years before, in fact, they had established a 
shop on Sherman for the manufacture of 
irrigating pumps. The quesfion of irriga- 
tion was. then receiving much attention in 
Kansas and Mr. Nelson meant to be ready 
to supply the demand if they should be gen- 
erally brought into use. The sihop is now 
used as a general machine and repair shop, 
in which four workmen are employed. The 
business of Nelson Brothers has grown from 
a small beginning in 1887 to one of the 
most extensive concerns in this line in Reno 
county, their trade amounting to fifty thou- 
sand dollars per annum. Their reputation 
for reliability and business integrity is sec- 
ond to none in this part of the state and in 
financial circles they are rated with the best. 
Their prosperity seems almost phenomenal, 
but at the same time it is well cleserved, be- 
ing the logical result of straightforward 
business methods, directed by intelligence 
and discretion. 

The brothers own a number of fine resi- 
dence properties in the city, ha\ing made ju- 
dicious investments in real estate. They are 
equal partners in all property and business 
operations and in addition to their half sec- 
tion of land in Finney county they have an 
equal amount of valualjle farming land in 
Reno county, while in the year 1901 they 
had three hundred and fifty acres planted in 
wheat. 

On the 8th of October, 1890, John W. 
Nelson was married in RenO' county, to Miss 
Pearl M. Stevenson, a daughter of James 
and Elizabeth (AIcKinney) Stevenson. She 
was born near Lawrence. Kansas, her father' 
having been one of the honored pioneer resi- 
dents of that community. In public aft'airs 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



lie was quite prominent. In 1S73 he came 
tO' Reno county and was therefore also iden- 
tified with its early development. Unto Mr. 
and ]Mrs. Nelson have been born two chil- 
dren, Nellie A. and James B. Their home 
is an elegant residence at No. 407 East First 
street. It was purchased in 1899 by Air. 
Nelson and is pleasantly situated on one of 
the most' desirable residence streets of the 
city." Such in brief is the life history of 
one of the most active and influential busi- 
ness men of Hutchinson, and his record' 
should serve as a source of encouragement 
and inspiration ,tO' others, proving wdiat it 
is possible to accomplish through indefati- 
gable labor when guided by sound judg- 
ment. That "honesty is the best policy" is 
demonstrated in his career, for his integrity 
stands as an unquestioned fact in his life 
work. 



WILLIAM DAVID SHULER. 

This well known citizen and fruit grow- 
er of Reno county. William David Shuler. 
is a nati\'e of the Old Dominion, his birth 
having occurred in Page county, on the 
Shenandoah river, on the 23d of June, 1833. 
His father, George Shuler, was Ijnrn im the 
same farm December j;. 1794. and his death 
there occurred on the 28th of April, 1873. 
The grandfather, John Shuler, was born in 
Germany, but in early life, in company with 
his brother Alichael, he came to the new 
world, locating in Pennsylvania. He was 
married to a Miss Keyser, who was one of 
five daughters, and after Mr. Shuler's death 
she married a Mr. Stepp, bv whom she had 
three children. Her death occurred in Illi- 
nois, at the age of ninety-fi\'e years. The 
mother (if nur subject, who was former! v 
Tal)itha Dovel, was' also a native of the Old 
Dominion, her birth occurring in 1795. 
Their marriage was celebrated in 1813, and 
was blessed with eight children, five sons 
and three daughters, namely : John, who 
on the 19th of August, 1901. will celebrate 
his eighty-sixth birthday: Diana Dovel, who 
is now a widow and is eighty-one years of 
age; Noah ^^'., a resident of Rockingham 



county, A'iroinia; Elizabeth Ann, who be- 
came the wife of a Mr. Aylshire and died 
at the age of twenty-four years ; George W., 
who resides in Page county, Virginia ; An- 
drew Jackson, of the same county; William 
D., the subject of this review- ; and Sarah 
Jane, who has been tw-ice married, her first 
husband having been her brother-in-law, C. 
W. Aylshire, who was killed in the winter 
of 1862, during his service in the Ci\'il war. 
Her second husband was James E. Morris, 
and her death occurred in Reno county, Kan- 
sas, in 1895, she being the mother of six 
children by both marriages. The mother of 
our subject was called to her final rest in 
Virginia, June 8, 1857, '^'ifl the father after- 
ward married the widow Kite. 

\\'illiam David Shuler was reared on the 
home farm in \"irginia. and when a boy was 
there engaged in gardening. His education 
was received in the subscription schools, his 
j tuiton therein amountng from one dollar 
and a half to two dollars a month, and he 
attended' school from five to six months dur- 
ing the year. He remained' under the par- 
ental roof until his marriage, which occurred 
on the gth of August, 1865, the lady of his 
choice being ]\Iiss Sarah A. Koontz. On the 
1st of September, 1875, they left the Old 
Drmiinion and journeyed tO' Kansas. In the 
vear previous, however, Mr. Shuler had 
heard favorable reports concerning the pos- 
sibilities of the Sunflower state, and he came 
here on a prospecting tr;ur in 1874. He 
found Ijut r;ne A'irginian in tliis Incality. and 
he remained in Hutcliin-iai i^v i:ne numth, 
when he purchased the north eighty acres 
of his present farm, paying four hundred 
dollars for the tract. Two years afterward 
he bought the remaining eighty acres, for 
which he paid three hundred and fifty dol- 
lars. His last purchase was enterecl as a 
tree claim, and he has planted ten acres to 
Cottonwood and box elders. Since locating 
in the county ]\Ir. Shuler has purchased five 
farms, aggregating seven hundred and twen- 
ty acres, and has given to each of his sons 
oue hundred and sixty acres. He has one of 
the finest orchards to be found in this lo- 
cality, fifteen acres of which is planted to 
apples and small fruits, including two acres 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



of grapes and two of peaches. His oldest 
orchard is about twenty-one years old, and 
he also has some apple trees that are twenty- 
three years old and are still in a good bear- 
ing condition. 

In 1896 Mr. Shuler was called upon to 
mourn the loss of his wife, who died on the 
19th of October of that year, aged nearly 
fifty-eight years. She left five sons, namely : 
Philip P., who resides in Harvey county, 
Kansas, and has three sons and a daughter; 
Jacob O., who is engaged in farming on 
the one hundred and sixty acres which was 
given him 'by his father, and he has three 
sons and a daughter; William' Lee, who is 
engaged in agricultural pursuits one mile 
west of Hutchinson, and has two sons and 
one daughter; Alartin B., who follows farm- 
ing near the old homestead, and' has one 
son; and Walter A., who was married Jan- 
uary 25, 1901, and is engag-ed in merchan- 
dising at Blackwell, Oklahoma. On the 
26th of May, 1808. ^Ir. Shuler was again 
married, his secnnd union being with Mrs. 
Laura A. Sours, ncc Price, who was born, 
reared and married in Page county, Vir- 
ginia. She had been a widow about s'ix 
years prior to her marriage to our subject, 
and was the mother of five children, as fol- 
lows : Susan C, the wife of Jacob Foster, 
of Virginia ; Anna Bell, wife of Henry Koll- 
hoff , of Grant township, Reno county ; Gro- 
ver Clevelandi, a resident of Virginia ; Lena 
Blanche, a twin of Grover Clevdand; and 
George W., who is now ten years of age. 
Mrs. Shuler' SI mother is still living at her old 
home in Virginia, having reached the ripe 
old age of eighty-one years. Her husband, 
Abigail Price, died about 1886, leaving her 
with the care of six daughters and two sons, 
all of whom are married excepting one. 

Mr. Shuler was reared in the faith of the 
Democracy, and has voted for ten presi- 
dents, but James Buchanan wast the only one 
of these who was elected. In later life he 
has voted with the Greenback and Populist 
parties. During the Civil w-ar he entered 
the Confederate service, serving nine months 
as lieutenant of a militia company, under 
Governor \\'ise. He then hired a substitute, 
for which he paid one thousand dollars, and 



he was one of twelve who voted against 
secession in his precinct. After the war he 
was elected to the office of justice of the 
peace. In A'irginia, at the age of seventeen 
years, Mr. Shuler became a member of the 
United Brethren church, and after coming 
to tljis state he became a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church by letter, his 
first wife having also been a member of that 
denomination. In iS~() he assisted in estab- 
lishing the first Sun(!:iv-:;ch'iMl here, which 
was held in the old sch^ M,lh,lu^e, and before 
leaving the Old Dominiun he was superin- 
tendent of a Sunday-school there, where he 
built a church of logs. The cause of Chris- 
tianity has ever found in Mr. Shuler a warm 
friend and supporter, and he gives of his 
time and means to all charitable and benevo- 
lent purposes. 



CAPTAIN WILLIA:\I R. BENNETT. 

A valiant soldier of the Civil war and 
now a successful business man and prom- 
inent citizen of Hutchinson, Kansas, Cap- 
tain ^^'illiam H. Bennett is regarded as one 
of the representative residents of Reno coun- 
ty, Kansas. His grandfather, Amos Ben- 
nett, was born in England, but brought his 
wife to this country and located in Connecti- 
cut, where he engaged in farming, took part 
in the war of 1812, and reared a family of 
eleven children. The parents of Captain 
Bennett of this sketch were Eli and Eliza- 
beth (Crance) Bennett. The former born 
in 1 80 1, but later moved to New^ York state, 
where he engaged in teaching school and 
later took the contract for l^uilding a part of 
the Delaware division of the Erie Railroad. 
in later life he engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits in Wurtsboro, Sullivan county. New 
York, and became one of the leading citizens. 
He also bore the title of captain in the state 
militia, and served in almost all of the local 
offices, declining to accept any office which 
prevented his remaining at home. In poli- 
tics he was a Whig until the formation of 
the Republican party, when he identified him- 
self for life with it and ardentlv supported 




>r^v^6U..^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



193 



its men and measures. He reared his fam- 
ily in the faith of the Presbyterian church. 
The mother of our subject, nee Elizabeth 
Crance, was born in New York, in i8jo, and 
by^ her marriage with Captain Bennett four 
sons and two daughters were horn, our sub- 
ject being the only member of his family in 
Kansas. The father died at the age of seven- 
tv-six vears. but the mother still survives 
and resides with her eldest son in the old 
homestead. 



the army. The leading engagements in 
which Captain Bennett took part were Get- 
tysburg, Lookout Mountain. Missionary 
Ridge, Resaca, and all the other battles on 
down to Atlanta. During the fierce fight 
at Peach Tree Creek he displayed a courage 
and bravery which well deser\-es recording. 
At this, place Captain Bennett held an import- 
ant position and though thev were flanked 
nn brtli sides he h"d net the least idea cf 
retreating. Both the ma'cr and adjutant 





William R. Pjennelt cf this sketch was 
reared on the farm and attended the district 
schools, his father having purchased an es- 
tate near the village where he engaged in 
his mercantile business. At the age of 
twenty-one years William started out to 
make a career for himself, and for a couple 
of years was engaged in the milling busi- 
ness, and later went to Xew York city and 
carried on a grocery business. In April, 
1862, he entered the Union army and was 
engaged in building bridges with the Army 
of the Potomac, but in August of that year 
he returned home and raised a company 
which later became Company E, One Hun- 
dred and Forty-third Xew York, of which 
he was made first lieutenant. Until 1863 his 
regiment was with the Army of the Potomac 
and was then sent with General Sherman 
and opened up the roads for the passage of 



came to h'ni and r.rged Inm i- . withdraw 
his men, and while they 'were expostulating 
with him i ne was shot down to his right and 
the other t.j his left! He held the pnsitii ;n 
until reinforcements came and drove the 
i enemy back. 

I At Atlanta Captain Bennett served 
gallantly, and in ]March, 1863, was pro- 
moted to be captain and was honored by be- 
ing placed in charge of the color company 
I of his regiment. From Atlanta the regi- 
\ ment made the march to the sea and did 
good work in the fight at Savannah, where 
I it remained until in the spring cf 1865, when 
I it started through the Carolinas. met Gen- 
I eral John^ston at Averysfcoro and took part 
in the heavy fight at Eentonville, this be- 
ing the last engagement befor^ the surrender 
of General Lee. Captain Bennett was per- 
mitted to take part in the grand triumphal 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



review in Wajhingtrn and was lioncu-ably 
discharged in Xew York city nn July 20, 
1865. 

From the effects of privation and ex- 
posure Captain Bennett left tlie army in im- 
paired health, and it was not unt 1 the follow- 
ing year that he felt able to embark in busi- 
ness. Then locating at To\yanda. Pennsyl- 
vania, he opened i p a bottling establishment, 
which business he sold four years later and 
rem.ived tn ^Nleadville. in the same state, and 
there continued in the same line. In 1887 
he sold this plant also and came to Kansas 
and, locating in this city, at 406 North Main 
street, opened up a similar business. In the 
following winter lie built where h.e is now 
li'cated, liis estalilishment being a brick 
structure, twenty-live by seventy-tive feet in 
dimensions, with a basement. He is a care- 
ful and skilled chemist and all of his prepar- 
ations are made under his own supervision. 
The business has grown enormously and he 
now ships his products all over western Kan- 
sas, east as far as Florence, and south into 
the Territory and as far as Texas, manufact- 
uring on an average two hundred cases a 
day, and his product is of uniform excel- 
lence. During the summer seasons when 
there is a greater demand he manufactures 
on an extensive scale. 

Captain Bennett has long been an active 
and valued member of the Repulilican party, 
has served in the city council and frequently 
as a member of conventions, always being 
a delegate. Being a great sufferer from 
rheumatism, as a result of army exposure, 
he is net able to accept many prominent 
official positions, but is a member of Byron 
L' d-e. Xo. 197, Knights of Pythias, and 
miL- Mt the charter members of LaRue divi- 
-ii n. Xo. a. Uniform Rank, and was its first 
captain. He has served as delegate a num- 
ber of times to higher orders, and for four 
years was colonel of the Fourth regiment of 
the order. He was also commander of the 
Meadville Post for three years and is a mem- 
ber of the Joe Hooker Post, G. A. R., No. 
19, of which he has served as adjutant, and 
is a member also of Reno Lodge No. 99, 
I. O. O. F. 



In 1S75, in Xew York, Captain Bennett 
I was married to ]\Iary E. Brown, a daughter 
I of James Brown, wdio was then a farmer of 
I that state, but now resides with our sub- 
] ject, at the age of eighty-three years. The 
five children born to this union are as fol- 
lows : Adelaide, who is the widow of Craw- 
ford R. Thoburn, a son of Bishop Thoburn, 
I and a resident of Oregon; Charles G. ; Eliz- 
abeth; Helen and Josephine. Much of the 
management of the business has lately de- 
volved upon Charles G., as our subject is 
much incapacitated at times with rheuma- 
tism, and he has proven himself a very able 
assistant. Captain Bennett has lately re- 
built and remodeled his residence on Avenue 
A, and he also dealt considerably in city lots 
soon after locating here. He was one of the 
company that built the Penns\-l\-ania Salt 
Company's works. 



JOHX A. LANG. 



To a student of biography there is noth- 
ing more interesting than to examine the 
life history of a self-made man and to detect 
the elements of character which have en- 
abled him to pass on the higbwav of life 
many of the companions of his youth who 
at the outset of their careers were more ad- 
i vantageously ec|uipped or endowed. The 
subject of this review has through his own 
exertions attained an honorable position and 
marked prestige among the representative 
men of the west, and with signal consistency 
it may be said that he is the architect of his 
own fortunes and one whose success amply 
justifies the application of the somewhat 
hackneyed but most expressive title, "a self- 
made man." 

John A. Lang is one of the jirominent 
and enterprising business men of Ellsworth 
county, and is now vice president of the 
Bank of Wilson. He also has extensive 
grain, farming audi stock-raising- interests 
and is one of the prosperous men of the 
Sunflower state where he has made his home 
I since 1879. He was born near Appleton, 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



Missouri, in Xoveniber, 1840, and is of Ger- 
man lineage, his father having been a native 
I if W'urtemberg, whence he came to America 
in early manhood. He was a graduate in 
medicine in Germany and afterward prac- 
ticed in Missouri, where he acquired an ex- 
cellent reputation as a skillful physician. He 
married ]\Irs. Dorothy (Schrumpf) Bruihl-, 
a widow, and unto them were born three 
children: John A., William E., deceased, 
and Emily, wife of \\'illiam H. Bedwell, of 
Missouri. 

The father died when the eldest son was 
only seven years of age and as soon as he 
attained sufficient strength and growth John 
A. Lang was" forced to assume the work of 
the home farm. He was thus engaged until 
the inauguration of the Civil war, when he 
responded to the country's call for troops, 
enlisting as a member of Company E, 
Eighth ^lissouri Infantry. For three years 
he was with General Sherman and partici- 
pated in the battles of Donelson, Shiloh and 
Pittsburg Landing and in the siege of Vicks- 
burg, in which he was wounded. He was 
then taken to the Fifth street hospital in St. 
Louis and afterward sent to Jefferson Bar- 
racks, where he remained for four months. 
On the expiration of that period he rejoined 
his regiment and participated in the opera- 
tions around Chattanooga, though his lack 
of strength was such as to make it very hard 
for him to keep up with his comrades on the 
long marches. He remained with the army 
until the close of his term of enlistment, and 
then, owing to his physical condition, did 
not re-enlist and so returned to ]\Iissouri. 
He had manifested his loyalty and fidelity 
to dutv on many a southern battlefield, and. 
like the other lioys in lilue. deserves the meed 
of gratitude from the country. 

^^"hen he had again reached ^Missouri 
I\Ir. Lang followed farming for a short time, 
but soon became interested in merchandis- 
ing and afterward operated a sawmill. In 
1879 I's- was advised by the doctors to leave 
^Missouri, for military sendee had un£ler- 
mined his health, and he therefore took up 
his abode in Kansas. Securing a tract of 
land in Russell countv he began farming and 
stock-raising. He had little capital when 



he arrived there but carefully husbanded his 
resources and made judicious investments in 
other land and was the owner of a large 
tract in Russell, Lincoln and Ellsworth coun- 
ties. He then began selling portions of his 
land, but now has about four thousand acres. 
His main ranch is a bodv of twenty-four 
hundred acres in Lincoln county and on this 
he is extensively engaged in the raising of 
wdieat and stock, making a specialty of short 
horn cattle. He personally operates this 
ranch, and in 1881 came to \\'ilson and pur- 
chased his present home. He has made ad- 
ditions and improvanents and the house is 
now" one of the attractive residences of the 
city. In the business affairs of Wilson he 
has taken a prominent part, his labors con- 
tributing in large measure toward the pro- 
motion and successful conduct of many en- 
terprises. He was one of the incorporators 
of the State Bank of Wilson, and about a 
year after-'N'ard was elected vice-president, 
which position he has since filled and has 
contributed in no small measure to the suc- 
cess and growth of the institution. He has 
also been one of the board of directors from 
the organization. He has erected two mills 
in the city and is one of the directors of the 
present milling company. He is also inter- 
ested in the grain business, handling the 
farm products raised in this portion of Kan- 
s'as, and for seventeen years he was inter- 
ested in merchandising in partnership with 
E. D. Schennerhorn. and they did a profit- 
able and extensive business. 

Mr. Lang has been twice married. He 
first wedded Miss Caroline Nussbaum. in 
1867, and their only child died in infancy. 
After the death of Mrs. Lang he was a.gain 
married, his second union being with Lizzie 
Luker. In his political views Mr. Lang is a 
Republican and in Ellsworth county takes an 
active interest in the growth and success of 
the party. He was the first mayor of ^\'il- 
son and has occupied that position for sev- 
eral terms, exercising his official preroga- 
tives in support of all measures for the gen- 
eral good. Socially he is connected with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
with Wilson Post, Xo. 115, G. A. R.. in 
which he has been commander and has also 



196 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



been quartermaster for fifteen years. He at- 
tends the services of the Presbyterian and 
Methodist churches and contributed largely 
to the support of both. Mr. Lang is a most 
genial man, easily approachable by all who 
may have occasion to seek an audience with 
him. He recognizes the value of persever- 
ance in the business affairs of life and be- 
lieves also that 

"He who wishes strong enough, 

He who works hard enough, 

He who waits long enough, 

Will get what he wishes. 

Works and waits for." 
His character and position most hap- 
pily illustrate the fact that if a young 
man but possess high attributes of mind 
and heart he can readily attain to a 
point of unmistakable precedence and gain 
for himself a place among the leading busi- 
ness men of his community, and it proves 
that the road to success is 0{>en to all young 
men who have the courage to tread its path- 
way. His life record should serve as an in- 
spiratiou' to the young of this and future 
generations and teach by incontrovertible 
facts that success is ambition's answer. 



EPHRAIM A. SMITH. 

More than twenty-nine years have 
passed since this gentleman: arrived in 
Hutchinson and he is therefore numbered 
among her honored pioneers as well as lead- 
ing citizens. He has been actively and prom- 
inently identified with the upbuilding and 
progress of central Kansas and his name is 
inseparably associated with many events and 
enterprises which have contributed to the 
development of this part of the state. Long 
since has he passed the Psalmist's span of 
three score years and ten, being now eighty- 
six years of age, but he is still engaged in 
business and his activity in the affairs of life 
should put to shame many a man of less 
resolute spirit, who in the prime of life, hav- 
ing grown weary of -the cares and struggles 
of business life, would relegate to others the 
burdens that he should bear. Throughout 



a long, useful and h.onorable career, Mr. 
Smith has enjoyed the high regard of his 
fellow men, and this work would be incom- 
plete without the record of his career. 

Captain Smith — for by that title he is 
uniformly known — was bcrn in AMiiting- 
ham, ^^■indham county, Vermont, April 25, 
181 5, and represents a fam.ily that was 
founded in America in early colonial days. 
His great-grandfather, Ephraim Smith, 
came from England, and on the maternal 
side the ancestry of the Captain were Scotch. 
Ephraim Smith, the grandfather, was a sol- 
dier in the Revolutionary war and when the 
country became again involved in war with 
England, in 1812, the father of our subject, 
oltered his services to the government and 
went forth in defense of the republic. He 
was born in Danvers, Massachusetts, and in 
the war of 1812 served as sergeant of ma- 
rines. Throughout his business career he en- 
gaged in merchandising. He was married in 
Salem, Massachusetts, in 1812, to Martha 
Ireland, and subsequently removed to Vev- 
mont, where he remained until 1835, when 
he took up his abode in what is now Living- 
ston county, \ew York. Later he removed 
to Indiana and erttered land from the go\-ern- 
ment in Whitley county, where he remained 
until his death, which occurred when he was 
eighty-five years of age. He was a strong 
anti-slavery man, took an active interest in 
political affairs, and while residing in Ver- 
mont was elected to the state legislature. 
In religious faith lie was a Presbyterian and 
for many years served as elder in his church. 

Captain Smith is the second child in a 
family of three sons and three daughters 
and was the eldest that reached maturity. 
He acquired the greater part of his educa- 
tion in Massachusetts and was graduated in 
an academy there in 1834. After leaving 
school he engaged in merchandising with 
his father until his health failed, when he 
turned his attention to outdoor pursuits, be- 
lieving that he would be benefited thereby. 
After the removal of the family to Indiana 
he lived upon the farm and aided in clear- 
ing sixty acres of land. That was long 
l>efore the Pittsburg Railroad w.as built and 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



197 



the family huine was ia a pioneer settlement. 
Af the time of the Civil war he enUsted, 
but his services were not accepted on ac- 
count of his health. He remained as one 
of the most active supporters of the Union 
cause throughout the struggle and at home 
rendered very efficient aid to the govern- 
ment, in fact was so active and energetic in 
behalf of the Union that a price was set 
upon his head by the Knights of the Golden 
Circle. 

Owing to an injury Captain Smith was 
tinallv oljliged to abandon farm wi:'rk and 
bcL;an merchandising in Pennville. Indiana, 
where he remained until April, 1872, when 
!ie sold his store and came to Kansas. No? 
until the following June was the Santa Fe 
Railroad built through Hutchinson and the 
entire country was in its primiti\e condition, 
giving little evidence of the wonderful trans- 
form.ation soon to be wrought. Soon after 
his arrival he began work with the county 
•surveyor and was later elected to that office. 
Sherman and Main streets were at that time 
laid out, but he did the work on most of the 
other thoroughfares of Hutchinson and in 
the performance of his duties visited every 
section of the county, thus becoming 
thoroughly posted concerning land values. 
His knowdedge and advice in such particii- 
lars were greatly sought and he aided many 
in securing desirable homes. For nine years 
he filled the office of county surveyor, and 
going to Kingman county he located the 
ti 'wn of Kingman. Buffaloes were so numer- 
I us at that time they were frequently obliged 
t^. suspend work to get out of the way of 
the animals. For many years 'Mr. Smith 
engaged in the real estate and insurance 
business, and handled much valuable prop- 
ertv and conducted many important real- 
estate transactions. He is still engaged in 
the fire insurance business to some extent, 
although he has largely laid as'ide business 
cares. Indolence and idleness are utterly 
foreign to his nature and his life has been a 
busy and useful one in which he has acquired 
a competence. 

During the twenty-eight years of his res- 
idence in Indiana Captain Smith was an ac- 



tive worker in the ranks of the Republican 
party and after coming to Kansas he took 
a deep interest in its gr.nvth and success and 
was honored with several local offices. For 
four years he w'as a member of the city coun- 
cil, and for nine years was treasurer of the 
board of education, wdiile for three years 
he served as deputy county treasurer in ad- 
dition to his long incumbency in the office 
of .county surveyor. He is a prom- 
inent Mason, holding membership in RenO' 
Lodge, No. 140, F. & A. M. ; Reno Chap- 
ter, No. 34, R. A. M., in wdiich he served 
as the first high priest; Hutchin.son 
Council, No. 13, R. & S. M. ; and Reno 
Commandery, No. 26, K. T. He was 
treasurer of all the bodies for twelve years. 
In religious faith he is a Universalist. 

A very important event in the life of 
Mr. Smith occurred on the 14th day of Oc- 
tober, 1840, — his marriage to. Miss Phoebe 
Root, wdio was born December 7, 18 ly, 
and is the daughter of Joseph H. Root, 
of New York. Her father, however, was 
a native of Maine and for many years 
engaged in the lumber business, coasting his 
lumber while he resided in the Pine Tree 
state and after removing to New York oper- 
ated a sawmill and floated the logs down the 
Genesee river. Mr. and_ Mrs. Smith are 
the parents of two sons and' three daughters : 
Ephraim, who was a member of Company 
B, Seventy-fourth Indiana Infantry, died 
during the war at Gallatin, Texas ; Hattie E. 
who engaged in teaching the first public 
school in Reno county, married James T. 
Norman and died in February, 1886; Alida 
is the wife of William R. Underwood, who 
w^as city clerk for seven years and who in 
the Civil war enlisted in Company F, Seven- 
tv-fifth Indiana Infantry, and Company E. 
Seventh Indiana Cavalry, serving for three 
years in Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississip- 
pi as a member of the First Brigade, Sixth 
Division, Sixteenth Army Corps; Alexan- 
der is in the railroad service in Louisiana ; 
and Caroline is the wife of Charles L. Chris- 
topher, of Hutchinson. The parents are the 
oldest married couple in Hutchinson if not 
in the county. They are now aged eightx- 



I9S 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



six and eighty-two years respectively, and 
for sixty-one years they have traveled life's 
journey together, their mutual love and con- 
tidence increasing as year by year they have 
together met the joys and sorrows, the ad- 
versity and prosperity which checker the 
careers of all. Uniformly respected and 
venerated, amid a large circle of friends, they 
are now spending the evening of life quietly 
in their pleasant home in Hutchinson. • 



PERRY A. EVANS. 

Perry A. Evans, who is clerk of the dis- 
trict court in Rice county, Kansas, and 
makes his home in the city of Lyons, was 
elected to the office in November, 1900. He 
is regarded as one of the popular and worthy 
residents of the community, in which he has 
made his home since 1877, coming here in 
his bov'hood days. He was born in Wayne 
county, Ohio, near the city of Wooster, Oc- 
tober 12! 1866, and traces his ancestrv- back 
to Revolutionary stock. His great-grand- 
father. Tames Evans, was a native of Wales, 
and in colonial days sought a home in the 
new world. When the attempt was made 
to throw off the yoke of British oppression 
he joined the American army and loyally 
served in the cause of independence under 
General Washington and General Lafayette. 
James S. Evans, the father of our subject, 
now resides in Sterling, Kansas. He was 
reared, however, in Ohio, and there made 
his home until 1877, when he came to Rice 
county. In the Buckeye state he wedded 
Lamenta Swan, a daughter of J. S. Swan 
and a native of Ohio. In their family were 
but two children, the brother of our sub- 
ject being D. G. Evans, a resident of Ster- 
ling. 

Perry A. Evans was a lad of only eleven 
summers when brought by his parents to 
Kansas. He acquired a good education in 
his youth and for some years was engaged 
in the grocery business in Sterling, where 
he made many friends and gained success 
by his honorable dealing, his earnest desire 
to please his customers, his pleasant manner 



and Ills reliability. In 1900 he was elected 
to the office of clerk of the district court 
and his business and executive force well 
qualified him for the position. He is regard- 
ed as an active factor in Republican ranks, 
keeping well informed 011 the issues of the 
day and thus being able to support his posi- 
tion by intelligent argument. As a politi- 
cal worker he is faithful, zealous and capable 
and his labors in recent years have contrib- 
uted to the success of the public in this por- 
tion of the county. 

In Rice county, in 1887, Mr. Evans 
wedded Miss Bernice Williams, of Brook- 
lyn, Iowa, and unto them have been born 
three children, namely: Glenn, Lamenta 
and Lorena. Mr. Evans is a representative 
of the Knights of Pythias, the Modern 
Woodmen of America, and Ancient Order 
of United Workmen. He is an intelligent, 
well informed young man, who is foimd re- 
liable in public and private life and whose 
many excellent characteristics, manifested 
from his boyhood days to the present time, 
have gained for him the esteem and con- 
fidence of all with whom he has been asso- 
ciated. 



ALONZO McMURPHY. 

Alonzo McMurphy, a prominent farmer 
on section 31, Sterling township. Rice coun- 
ty, claims Indiana as the state of his nativ- 
ity, his birth having occurred there in Por- 
ter county, on the 20th of November, 1846. 
His father, Moses McMurphy, was born in 
Vermont, in 1810, and died in Kankakee 
county, Illinois, in 1858, at the age of forty- 
seven years and six months. He wedded 
Ruth Hulinger, of Ohio, the wedding being 
celebrated in Norwalk, that state, August 
I, 1833. His bride was born in Perry coun- 
ty, in 1 81 1, and was a daughter of Jacob 
and Sarah (Stronsnider) Hulinger, repre- 
sentatives of high Dutch fanners of Penn- 
sylvania. They were numbered among the 
pioneers of the Buckeye state, and there 
reared four of their ten children. The moth- 
er of our subject was first married in 1828. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



'99 



to Jesse Cain, who died in 1832, leaving 
two children, but one passed away soon 
afterward. In 1833 ]\Irs. Cain became the 
wife I'f ]Mr. 3,Ic]\Iurp*liy. His death oc- 
curred in 1857, and in 1862, in Lake county, 
Indiana, she was married to David Weed, of 
New York, who was then engaged in farm- 
ing in Lake county, where he had located 
at an early da}?. His death there occurred 
in 1875, when he had reached the ripe old 
age of eighty-two years. Mrs. Weed has 
been the mother of ten children and with the 
exception of one all reached years of matur- 
ity and were married.' Thev are: James, 
who died in infancy ; Eliza, who became the 
wife of Robert Ingram and died at the age 
of twenty-five years, leaving an infant son, 
who soon afterward passed away; Polly, who 
became the wife of Walker Ross and died 
in November, 1899, ^^ the age of sixty-five 
years, after becoming the mother of ten 
children ; Harriet, who became the wife of 
Azariah \\*eed, a son of David Weed, and 
after his death in' the service of the Union 
army she married Sherman Drury andl is 
now living in Tennessee; Helen, who be- 
came the wife of Fred Westernian, who was 
her second husband, and died in Lake coun- 
ty. Indiana, leaving three children; jNIelissa, 
who became the wife of Robert Ingram and 
died in 1S93, being survived by three of her 
four children : Amy, who died at the age of 
nine years ; Alnnzo, of this review ; Martha, 
who died in August, 1866, at the age of six- 
teen years ; and Emma, who became the wife 
of j\iorgan Kelly and died in Sterling, in 
1884, while their two children have also 
passed away. Mrs. Weed has had fifty-four 
great-grandchildren and has one great- 
great-grandson, Clarke Hayden. She has 
been three times married and has now been 
a widow for twenty-six years. From Indi- 
ana she removed to Kansas in 1884 and re- 
sided in Sterling until 1893. when she came 
to the home of her son Alonzo. 

Mr. ]\Ic^Iurphy of this re\iew was an 
only son and his father died when he was 
twelve years of age. He recei\ed luit a mea- 
ger education, owing to the fact that it was 
necessary for him to provide for his own 
living. He worked as a farm hand for five 



dollars a month and in the winter he re- 
mained with his mother, assisting her in the 
work of the fanii. In Julv, 1863, in Lake 
county, Indiana, he enlisted for three years' 
service in the Seventh Indiana Cavalry, re- 
maining at the front until March, 1866, 
when he returned home. He was in the 
C]uartermaster"s department much of the time 
and was wagon-master under General Cus- 
ter. He was never wounded, but was large- 
ly broken down in health when he left the 
army, and is now a pensioner, recei\-ing 
eight dollars a month. 

On the nth of February, 18G7, ilr. 
McMurphy was united in marria.o;e to Ruth 
Mitchell, who was born in Montgomery 
county, Indiana, a daughter of Daniel and 
Asenath (Mullin) INIitchell, the former a 
native of Kentucky and the latter of Ohio. 
His birth occurred in 182 1, his wife's in 
1823, and they were married in Indiana in 
1846. Subsequently they became farming 
people of Will county, Illinois, and IMr. 
Mitchell died in Kankakee county, that state, 
April 20, 1886, leaving his widow and three 
of their five children to survive him. Their 
children were: Ruth, now Mrs. Mc^NIur- 
phy; Mary, who became the wife of Loren- 
zo Smith and died in Illinois, at the age of 
twenty-four years, leaving one child : Rebec- 
ca, who became the wife of John Reed, of 
Buchanan county, Iowa, by whom she has 
seven children; Samuel, who died at the age 
of se\-en years ; and \\'illiam, a farmer of 
Waterloo, Iowa, and he has two children. 
Unto ]\Ir. and Mrs. Mc^Iurphv has been 
born but one child. Pearl Ethel, now the 
wife of James J. Leatherman. of Iowa. 

For one year Mr. JMcINIurphy engaged in 
farming in Will county, Illinois, on land be- 
longing to his father-in-law, and then rent- 
ed a tract on Grand Prairie, after which he 
settled on a f^ .rt\ -acre farm in Kankakee 
county, Illimis. making it his home for two 
years. In 1871 he sold that property and 
took up his alwde in the northern part of 
Rice county, Kansas, upon a homestead farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres, which he 
cultivated for three years, after which he 
returned to the Mitchell farm for the winter. 
In 1876 he again came to Sterling. Kansas. 



UOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



where he engaged in the Hvery business as 
a member of the firm of iVIcMurphy & 
Hughes, and they also owned a stage route 
from SterHng to Ellsworth. They did a 
larg-e business in staging, in renting teams 
and vehicles and in shipping horses and 
mules from Missouri to Kansas. Their oper- 
ations annually brought in- many thousand 
dollars, but the business was terminated in 
1881 and Mr. McMurphy became a ranch- 
man in Reno county, Kansas, where he re- 
mained for two years. In 1883 he pur- 
chased one thousand acres of railroad land 
in Rice county, for which he paid from two 
dollars and eighty cents to nine dollars and 
sixty cents per acre. Subsequently he added 
to this and was the owner of fourteen hun- 
dred acres, but he sold a portion to his son- 
in-law. He is one of the leading stock- 
farrners of the township, keeping on his 
ranch as high as fifteen hundred head of 
cattle at a time for himself and others. He 
has fattened as many as four hundred head 
a year, and as he ne\-er places his stock upon 
the market unless it is in excellent condition 
he has secured there fr: an a gc ud return on 
his investments. When he came to his pres- 
ent farm it was a tract of wild and unim- 
proved prairie and when he located in the 
connty bufi^aloes, antelopes and wild horses 
were still seen, Indians also being numerous 
in the locality. Upon his place he has a 
splendid farm residence, large barns, excel- 
lent corn cribs, and cattle sheds, all of which 
he has erected and which are therefore a 
monument to his enterprise and thrift. He 
also has a fine orchard and groves of shade 
trees, which were planted by him. He has 
grown seventeen thousand bushels of corn 
in a single year and his granaries will con- 
tain fifteen thousand bushels of wheat. 

Mr. McMurphy is a Chapter Mason and 
is an exemplary representative of the craft. 
He votes with the Republican party and has 
served as road master. His wife is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church, in 
which Mr. ]\IcI\Iurphy has' served as one of 
the officers. Both his mother and wife are 
veteran members of the church. Mr. and 
]\Irs. McMurphy have reared two adopted 
-;ns, — Luther, who came to them when four 



years of age and is now eighteen, and Ed- 
ward Herman, who came to them when ten 
years of age. Our subject and his wife are 
people of sterling worth, of broad humait- 
itarian principles, of deep human sympathy, 
and of genuine kindness and wherever they 
go they win friends. Mr. McMurphy well 
deserves the splendid prosperity which has 
come to him, for his life has been one of 
unfailing industry and in all his dealings he 
has been straightforward and honorable, so 
that his record will bear the closest investi- 
gation. 



J. T. XASH. 

The safety of the republic depends not 
so much upon methods and measures as 
upon that manhood from wliose deep sourc- 
es all that is precious and permanent in life 
must at last proceed. Macaulay has said 
that the history of the nation is best told in 
the lives of its individual citizens and it is 
the men of prominence in a community by 
which that community is jud'ged. Among 
the representative and highly respected resi- 
dents of Rice county is J. t. Xash. who is 
now occupying the position of register of 
deeds, to which office he was elected in No- 
vember, 1897, on the Republican ticket. He 
has served continuously in the position since 
that time and his marked fidelity to duty, 
his abilitv and his faithfulness have won him 
the commendation of all concerned. He has 
been a resident of the county since 1887 and 
his identity with the Sunflower state dates 
from i86g. 

Mr. Nash is a native of Kentucky, his 
birth having occurred at Concord, on the 
Ohio river in Lewis county, July 5, 1841. 
His father, Jesse Nash, was also a native of 
Kentucky, but the family was of German 
lineage and was founded in America by 
James Nash, the grandfather of our subject, 
who was born in Ccrniany and spent his 
last days in Evansville, Indiana. He was a 
farmer' by occupation and upon the family 
homestead Jesse Nash grew to manhood. 
After arriving at years of maturity he mar- 




'/>f«^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



riLi! Aliss Cynthia A. Sparks, who was born 
in Fleming county, Kentucky, and was a 
representative of one of the old and worthy 
families of that state. The young people 
lievan their domestic life in Kentucky, where 
11 ey remained until 1866, when they re- 
lieved to Jasper county, Indiana. For 
ni.iny years of his active business career 
-Mr. Nash. engaged in dealing in lumber. He 
eventually returned to his native state, 
where his death occurred in 1884, but his 
\\i;'e passed away in Franklin county. Kan- 
>,i^. when sixty-eight years of age. She was 
:i ir.emfcer of the Christian church, and in 
111- political views Mr. Nash was a Repub- 
lican. Tliey became the parents of the fol- 
li wing children: G. W., Eliza, Elizabeth, 
jair.es H., John T., Jesse, Sarah, Mary B., 
Adolphus S. and Theophilus. The last 
r,:aned died in Sterling, Kansas, aged fifty- 
fix e years. He had followed merchandising 
in Rice county, had served as a county offi- 
■• ! and was well known in that portion of 
. itate, being an active factor in business 
I public affairs. 

J. T. Nash, whose name introduces this 
rd, was reared in Kentucky ar.d ac- 
, iired his education in the subscription 
schouls. In his youth he became connected 
with the lumber business. At the time of 
tlie Civil war he offered his services to the 
.ui'vernment, enlisting in June, 1861, for 
three years as a member of Company A, 
'i bird Ohio Infantry. He remained at the 
fn'ut for two years, serving in West Vir- 
i.;inia, Kentucky and Tennessee. At Mur- 
freesboro he was wounded, after which he 
received an honorable discharge. Later he 
raised a company, which became Company 
A, of the Forty-fifth Mounted Infantry of 
Kentucky, and was its orderly sergeant. 
Later he was commissioned first lieutenant 
' t Company I, but refused tb.e lieuten- 
ancy, preferring to remain with his old com- 
rades of Company A. With that command 
he participated in the engagement at King's 
Salt Works against the forces of General 
Morgan. He was also in the battle of Lex-. 
ington ard Cynthiana, Kentucky, and in 
other engagements. Wherever ^uty called 



he was found at his post and was always 
faithful to the starry banner of the nation. 
\\ hen the war was over he received an hon- 
orable discharge and gladlv returned to his 
home. 

Mr. Nash afterward went to Lafayette, 
Indiana, where he resided from 1865 until 
1869, his time and attention being devoted 
to carpentering and contracting. In the lat- 
ter year he emigrated to Kansas, taking up 
liis abode in Franklin county. He lived in 
Ottawa until 1887, when he came to Lyons, 
Kansas, becoming an active factor in the 
building interests of the city. Here as a 
carpenter and contractor he carried on oper- 
ations until elected to public office, and erec- 
ted many of the substantial structures cf 
the city, which still stand as monuments of 
his thrift and enterprise. He lived i;i ' t 
faithfully up to the terms of his contracts 
and the reputation which he enjoys in the 
business circles is anunassailable one. 

Mr. Nash was united in marriage ii 
Frankrn county, Kansas, in 1872, to Miss 
Mary A. Alford, of that county, who was 
born in Wocdsfield, Monroe county, Ohio, 
and was reared and educated, there. She 
had one brother who was a soldier in the 
Civil war and died of wounds received in 
battle. Three children grace their union: 
Warren ; Ella, who is assisting her fatlier as 
dteputy register of deeds in the office at Ly- 
ons; and Daniel, who is a student in the high 
school. The family is one widely and fa- 
vorably known in this community and the 
members of the household occupy prominent 
positions in social circles. Mr. Nash is an 
advocate of Republican principles and does 
all in his power to promote the growth and 
secure the success of the party. His fitness 
for office, his reliability and his devotfon to 
the general good led to his selection for the 
position of register of deeds, in which in- 
cumbency he is now serving, by re-election 
in the fall of 1899. He is a member o-f the 
Grand Army of the Republic, belongs to the 
Masonic fraternity; the Royal Arch degree 
of Sterling Chapter, No. 50. He is also 
identified with the Knights of Pythias fra- 
ternitv, and his wife is a member cf the 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



Methodist Episcopal cliurch. A man of in- 
telligence, straightforward in business, gen- 
ial and approachable in manner, J. T. Nash 
ranks among the popular and \-alued citi- 
zens of Lyons. 



JOSEPH GIERTZ. 



The deserved reward of a well spent life 
is an honored retirement from business in 
which to enjoy the fruits of former toil. To- 
day, after a useful and beneficent career, 
;Mr. Giertz is quietly living at his beautiful 
home in Kingman, surrounded by the com- 
forts that earnest labor has brought to him. 
He was born in Mecklenburg, Prussia, on 
the 1st of January, 1825, a son of Joseph and 
Mary (Kippert) Giertz, also natives of 
Prussia, where the father had charge of 
large estates. Joseph was early inured to 
farm labor in all its departments. When 
twenty years of age he entered the German 
army, in which he sei-yed for three years, 
and during two years of the time he was 
engaged in the war with Denmark. After 
the close of the struggle he again resumed 
the quiet and peaceful duties of the farm, 
continuing that occupation in his native 
country until i860, when he crossed the At- 
lantic to America, locating first in Mason 
county, Illinois, where for the following two 
years he was employed as a farm laborer. 
From that time until 1883 he rented land 
in that county, but in the latter year he came 
to Kansas, locating on land belonging to a 
Mr. McGleason in Kingman county, whom 
he had known in Illinois. In the following 
year he went to Seward' county, Kansas, and 
secured a homestead in Liberal township, 
which he improved and made his home for 
fourteen years, his first residence there hav- 
ing been a one-story frame Iniilding four- 
teen by sixteen feet. He alsn secured timi- 
ber claims of a lialf section of land, which 
he placed under cultivation, and there erect- 
ed a frame dwelling, sixteen by fourteen 
feet. In i8g8 he sold his possessions there 
for six hundred dollars, receiving only fifty 
dollars for his timber claim, although he had 
placed about two thousand dollars' worth 



of improvements on both places, including 
the erection of a windmill. In the spring of 
1900 he purchased his present home, consist- 
ing of a residence and one hundred acres of 
land, the purchase price being twenty-four 
hundred dollars. His residence is now one 
of the good ones in the city of Kinginan, 
substantially built upon a beautiful eminence, 
thus commanding a splendid view of the city 
and surrounding country. The land is 
farmed by his eldest son, but the place is 
principally devoted to pasturage, in which 
they keep from one hundred to three hun- 
dred head of cattle annually. 

Mr. Giertz was married in 1861, Miss 
Emma Studiman becoming his wife. She is 
also a native of Prussia and came to Amer- 
ica with the Giertz family. Thirteen chil- 
dren have blessed their union, only eight 
of whom still survive, namely : John, who 
carries on the work of the home place: Em- 
ma, the wife of Charles Newland, a farmer 
of Ninnescah township; Eliza, the wife of 
James Goddard, of Indiana ; Frank, a prom- 
inent farmer of Seward county, Kansas; 
Minnie, the wife of Harry Heath, also of 
that county ; and Laura, \\'ill and Sophia, at ' 
home. i\Ir. Giertz casts his ballot in favor 
of the men and measures of the Democracy, 
and he has served as overseer of highways in 
both Illinois and Seward county, Kansas. 
He is a worthy and acceptable member of 
the Lutheran church, and those who know 
him personally have for him high regard. 
A man of great natural ability, his success 
from the beginning of his residence in King- 
man county has been uniform and rapid. He 
has persevered in the pursuit of a definite 
purpose and has gained a most satisfactory' 
reward. His life is exemplary in all respects 
and he has ever supported^ those interests 
which are caluculated to benefit and uplift 
humanity, while his own high moral worth 
is deserving of the highest commendation. 



WILLIAM EBBERT. 

There are not many sections of middle 
Kansas where the name of \\'illiam Ebbert 
is not familiar, for as r ne of the leading 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



cattle men of the state, he is widely known. 
The Ebbert farm and cattle ranch is situated 
on section 34, in Ninnescab township, King- 
man county, Kansas, and has a reputation 
which extends over all this section of coun- 
try. 

The birth of William Ebbert was in 
Pennsylvania, in York county, in 1859, ^"^ 
he is a son of John and Susan (Bowser) 
Ebbert. His father was a native of Ger- 
many, who came tO' the United States when 
•a young man, having been educated in his 
nati\"e country. He was an excellent farmer, 
a kind father and devoted husband and was 
sincerely mourned when his death occurred 
in Illinois, at the age of sixty-four. In pol- 
itics he had been attracted to the Republican 
party, and he liberally supported the German 
Baptist church, in which both he and wife 
were leading members. He married Susan 
Bowser, who was born in Maryland and be- 
longed to a highly esteemed family of that 
state. She died also in the state of Illinois, 
at the age of fifty-five, and is still remem- 
bered with tender affection. She was the 
mother of eight children, and six of these 
still survive, namely: Joseph, William, 
Samuel, Lydia, Rebecca and Mary, and all 
of them were reared in a home atmosphere 
which was of a character to make them use- 
ful and honored members of society. 

When William Ebbert was about se\'en 
years old the family removed to Schuyler 
county, Illinois, where the father settled on 
a farm and was assisted by his sons. Will- 
iam learned all of the practical details of 
farming, in the thorough way which is the 
custom of German agriculturists, and in 
later life no doubt often felt glad that his 
father had been so exacting. One branch of 
the liusiness, that of the scientific and. tcon- 
omical management of stock, he has devel- 
oped to the highest degree and through, tiiis 
has become one of the most substantial and 
reliable cattle men of this county. 

In 1885 Mr. Ebbert came to Kingman 
county, Kansas, possessing but limited 
means, which he used to begin his business 
in an humble way. From the first he had 
faith in the promises held out by the appar- 
ent fertilitv of the soil of this section, and 



he was far-sighted enough to see how good 
management could make this the finest cattle 
country in the Union. Accumulating land, 
he continued until he was in possession of 
twelve hundred and eighty acres, which he 
stocked with fine cattle, and by careful man- 
agement and excellent judgment he has 
built up a business which reflectsi upon him 
great credit. His elegant residence was 
erected at a cost of eighteen hundred dollars 
and all his impro\-ements are in agreement 
with it, in finish and completeness. Mr. 
Ebbert keeps from three to four hundred 
head of cattle and has one of the largest 
ranches in the county. 

At the age of twenty-one Mr. Ebbert 
took to himself a wife, who has been a true 
helpmate through all these years and who 
is still spared to enjoy with him the success 
which she assisted him to attain. Her cheer- 
ful ciinipanidn^hip. loving care and \\-ise 
housewifery did much tii encourage and help 
him in Ins endeavors. She was Miss Eliza- 
beth, Schuman, who was born in Eulton 
county, Illinois, where she was reared and 
educated. She was a daughter of George 
and Annie ( Baer ) Schuman. lioth of whom 
were born in Bavaria, Germany, the latter 
being reared and educated in Baltimore, 
Maryland. Mr. and Mrs. Schuman moved 
to Schuyler county, Illinois, in 1858, and the 
father died there at the age of seventy years. 
Mrs. Schuman is still a resident of that 
place. Their children were as follows: 
Leonard, John, George, Michael. Henry. 
Samuel, Noah and Elizabeth. The latter is 
now Mrs. Ebbert. A family of nine children 
'was born to Mr. and i\Irs. Elil^ert. these be- 
ing: George, who assists his father: .\nna, 
who is a student in }ilcrhersion College; 
Amanda, who lives at home, and her twin 
sister, Mary, is a student at the above named 
college; Ella, who is at home, as are also thq 
younger members, — Inez, Samuel S., Jessie 
May and Goldie A. 

In politics Mr. Ebbert has been more or 
less active, being an ardent Republican, and 
exerts considerable influence in the county. 
Of the German Baptist .church :\Irs. Ebbert 
is a member and in that faith her children 
have been reared. Eew citizens have taken 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



a deeper or more sincere interest in educa- 
tional matters in this townshipi than Mr. Eb- 
bert, and he has been a patron of progressive 
ideas which have been of value to the cause 
of education. Mr. Ebbert is a well read, in- 
telligent man, who by no means devotes all 
of his time to his large farm and stock busi- 
ness, great as they are, but is an important 
factor in almost every enterprise which 
promises to be of benefit to his county and 
state. In fact Mr. Ebbert has faith ini the 
great future awaiting Kansas, and Kansas 
has every reason to feel just as much faith 
in this, her representative adopted son. 



JOHN H. BROMLEY. 

John H. Bromley is one of the pioneer 
merchants of Kingman coimty now success- 
fully carrying on business in Waterloo. He 
became a resident of Galesburg township in 
1877. but for almost twenty years has been 
identified with the business interests of the 
city, and his industry, enterprise and hon- 
orable dealing have secured to him a liberal 
patronage. Widely and favorably known, 
the history of his life cannot fail to prove of 
interest tO' many of our readers. 

Mr. Bromley was born in Tennessee, 
representing an old' and respected family of 
that state, living just across the division line 
from Lafayette, Kentucky. His natal day 
Jas November 3, 1837. His father, John 
Bromley, was born in Nashville, Tennessee, 
while the grandfather .of our subject, John 
Bromley, Sr., was one of the heroes of the 
Revolutionary war and aided' in laying the 
corner stone of the capitol of Tennessee. His 
son, the father of our subject, was exten- 
sively engaged in dealing in stock, handling 
cattle, horses and mules. He also carried 
on farming and was a man of extensive 
business ability. He married Rebecca Mul- 
lin. who was born in Tennessee, but her 
father was of Irish lineage and her mother 
was of Scotch descent Mr. and Mrs. Brom- 
ley had a family of eight children, namely : 
Jefferson ; Tennie C. ; Jessie : John H. : Jack- 
son ; Jason ; Thomas ; and Laura E. Of this 



number, Jason served in the Confederate 
army for two w«eksi, but the service was 
compulsory, and managing to make his es- 
cape at the end of that time he journeyed to 
Hopkinsville, Kentucky, where he enlisted 
in the Union army, serving for three years 
as a gallant soldier in defense of the stars 
and stripes. He is now a resident of Mont- 
gomery, Tennessee. The father of our sub- 
ject gave his political support to the Democ- 
racy, but was a strong Union man who op- 
posed the secessionist attitude of the south. 
Both he and his wife died when seventy-four 
years oi age. They were people of the high- 
est respectability and were valued residents 
of the community in which they made their 
home. 

John H. Bromiley, whose name intro- 
duces this record, was reared in Tennessee, 
and early became inured to the work of the 
farm. His education was acquired in the 
schools there and has been largely supple- 
mented by reading, experience and observa- 
tion. Leaving the farm, he learned the 
trade of an engineer, spending three years 
at Nashville, after which he was employed 
in that capacity on the river. He later gave 
his attention to blacksmithing for a number 
of years, and his work along that line 
brought to him a fair degree of prosperity. 
In public affairs he also took an active inter- 
est and while living in Henderson count}-, 
Kentucky, he served as deputy sheriff, mak- 
ing a competent and trustworthy officer. 

.After his removal to Illinois Mr. Brom- 
ley was married at Shawneetown, tliiat state, 
on the 7th of October, 1873, to Miss Sarah 
Warren, who was born in Christian county, 
Kentucky, and spent her maidenhood days in 
th^ state. Her parents were Booker and 
Martha (Ladd) Warren, and both died in 
Tennessee. 

In 1877 Mr. Bromley and bis wife came 
to Kingman county, settling in Galesburg 
township, where for five years he carried on 
general farming and blacksmithing, but for 
the past nineteen years he has been an en- 
terprising merchant of Waterloo. He car- 
ries a large and complete line of general mer- 
chandise and his earnest desire to please his 
patrons, his honorable dealing, and his un- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



205 



flagging enterprise, have secured to him a 
large trade, which is constantly increasing 
and which brings to him a merited financial 
reward for his labor. He has ever been a 
citizen of worth, public-spirited and progres- 
sive. When in Tennessee, he was connected 
with military affairs as captain of the Home 
Guards, and became quite familiar with the 
art of arms and General Hardee's manual 
of drilling. He has a soldierly bearing, in 
manner is frank and genial, and his cour- 
teous address and generous hospitality be- 
speak a true southern gentleman. Waterloo 
numbers him among its popular citizens, and 
he well deserves representation in this vol- 
ume. 



SAMUEL SPICKARD. 

Samuel Spickard, one of the wealthy 
and honored residents of Hutchinson, was 
born in Harrison county. Kentucky, on the 
1 2th of June, 1864, a son of John and Mary 
J. (M'cClure) Spickard, the latter of Scotch 
descent. The father, who followed farming 
as a life occupation, was accidentally killed 
soon after the close of the Civil war. 

When the subject of this review was 
but a lad of ten years he was; bound put to 
a hard master, with whom, he reinained for 
three years, and soon after\vard he went to 
Lawrence county, Indiana, where for the 
following four years he was engaged at farm 
labor during the summer months and in the 
winter seasons he attended the district 
schools. In 1884 he came with friends to 
Remi ci.iunty, Kansas, locating at Hutchin- 
son, but a short time afterward he went into 
the country and' for six months was engaged 
in the tilling of the soil. In the following 
fall he removed to Edwards county, where 
he secured employment on a ranch until the 
spring iif 1885. wlien he purchased a claim 
of one hundred and sixty acres, but after 
residing on his land for six months he re- 
linc|uished it and' for a time thereafter was 
engaged in the livery business at Garfield, 
Pawnee county. For two years, from the 
spring of 188,7, ^^ rented a farm of one hun- 
dred acres in that county, on the expiration 



of which period he went to ^Montgomery 
county and for the following year was em- 
ployed on a ranch. Returning thence to 
Reno county, for the succeeding two years 
he followed agricultural pursuits in Clay 
township. Mr. Spickard then formed a [lart- 
nership with R. H. Holton, a progressi\-e 
and enterprising 3-oung farmer and stock- 
raiser and a sketch of whose life will be 
found on another page of this volume, and 
together they purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of land, the southeast quarter 
of section 8. Valley township. This rela- 
tionship continued through a period of about 
eig'ht years, during which time they were 
engaged in both farniing and the stock busi- 
ness. In the latter line they soon built up a 
large trade, which rapidly increased to such 
enormous proportions that they began in- 
vesting the proceeds in farming lands, and 
the rapidity with which they made money 
and added to their landed possessions was 
a miarvel to their friends and acquaintances. 
For a numlber of years they did the largest 
business in buying and shipping cattle of any 
firmi in Reno county, their shipment in one 
season often running as high as four thou- 
sand head, while they usually wintered about 
one thousand head, and thus they fed about 
five thousand bushels of grain annually. 
They usually cultivated from eight to nine 
hundred acres and also rented aliout five 
thousand acres of pasture land. During this 
time they made many improvements on their 
place, including the erection of an excellent 
barn, sixty by forty-eight feet, large cribs 
and other outbuildings, and they also added 
to their landed possessions until they were 
the owners of about ten hundred and forty 
acres of fine farming land, located in Clay 
and Valley tuwnships, besides several hun- 
dred acres of grazing land in Sumner t-wn- 
ship. In 1901, however, Mr, Sitici;:!! ^I , •],] 
his interest to his partner, wh. > cirrie- ' ^n 
business under the name of R. H. Holton. 
Since dispn-ing of his interests our subject 
has made lii< Imnie in Hiitclfinson, where 
he is engaged in buying .'n^d ^lii]i]iing stock. 
On the-'4ili ni X(i\eml.ier, iSNo, occurred 
his m.arriage to Maggie B. Reger. who was 
born in Hancock county, Illinois, a daugh- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



ter of P. C. and Susan ( Booth )Reger. When 
fourteen years of age she left the place of 
her nativity and accompanied' her parents on 
their removal to Bates county, Missouri, and 
from there the family went to^ Pawnee coun- 
ty, Kansas, where her marriage occurred. 
Mr. and Mrs. Spickard now occupy a beau- 
tiful residence at No. 724 East Sherman 
street, Hutchinson, where hospitality reigns 
supreme. In matters of political importance 
our subject supports the Democracy, but at 
local elections he casts his ballot in favor of 
the men whom he regards as best qualified 
to fill positions of honor and trust. He is 
one of the successful and self-made men of 
central Kansas, but the height which he has 
reachedl in the business, world is due to his 
own individual eiTorts. In studying the lives 
of both 'Mr. Spickard and his former partner 
it is interesting to note tlie many points of 
similarity in their lives. Both practically of 
the same age, thrown upon their own re- 
so'urces at an early age. each f(jllowing the 
same line of work and residing in many lo- 
calities, shifting from state to state until 
both e\'entually located in Reno county, and 
bv a happy chance these kindred spirits be- 
came united in a partnership that made them 
the most famous stock men iii this section of 
the state and secured for each a handsome 
competence. 



JOHN GILMORE MALCOL:^!, M. D. 

Prominent among the original thinkers 
and progressive and scholarly professional 
men of Kansas was Dr. John Gilmore j\Ial- 
colni, who won much more than a local rep- 
utation. He was born in Aberdeen, Scot- 
land, in 1830. His father, Francis Mal- 
colm, was also born in Scotland, where he 
resided until early in the year 1832, when 
he came with his family to Ontario, Cana- 
da, locating in Oxford county. He was 
a man of education and progressive ideas, 
and was instrumental in a large degree in 
the establishment of schools in his neighbor- 
hood, and contributed liberally to the Bap- 
tist church, of which he was a member. 



He was married to a Scotch maiden, 
Janet Mitchell, and four sons were born to 
them, our subject's eldest brother being the 
only survivor. The death of the father was 
in 1866, but the mother survived until 1878, 
and possessed almost the vigor of youth, 
although she had reached her ninety-third 
year. During her last years she enjoyed the 
walk of nine miles through the woods to 
the market at Woodstock. 

The educational advantages of our sub- 
ject were those obtainable in the country 
schools and the Normal school of Toronto. 
Undecided for a time what vocation in 
life to adopt, he at length decided to 
be a farmer, and it was only the un- 
warranted advance in the price of desirable 
land' that prevented him from becoming a 
tiller of the soil instead' of the leader of 
many lines of modern research, both in and 
out of his profession. His first instruction 
in the science of medicine was under a phy- 
sician in Woodstock, and later in London, 
Canada. At the latter point he remained 
one year and then went to Ann Arbor, 
IMichigan, and later to the Plomeopathic 
College of New York, at whicli he graduat- 
ed in the spring of 1866. Dr. Malcolm 
first located for practice in ]\Iichigan, and 
continued practice there fc;r the succeeding 
eighteen years, at the end of which period 
the failing health of his wife induced him 
to trv the eft'ects of the climate of Kansas. 
This advantage caused the location of our 
j subject, in the fall oi 1884. iii Hutchinson, 
Kansas, and he remained in active and 
successful practice here until the time of his 
death. 

The marriage of Dr. ]\Ialcolm occurred 
in 1861, to Miss Margaret Mathewson, a 
daughter of Joseph Mathewson. Her death 
occurred in October. 1892. her two chil- 
dren being: Oliver F., who is a broker in 
New York city ; and Margaret, who is the 
wife of Frank V. Barton, of Hutchinson. 

As previously noted. Dr. Malcolm was 
an original thinker as well as a convincing 
speaker. While not a follower in full of 
Henry George, he believed, in the truth of 
manv of his theories. On finan'i^l questions 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



he held advanced ideas, and one of these he 
claimed would do away with the incentive 
to crime and the accumulation of riches by 
the few at the expense of the many. He ad- 
vanced some excellent argaiments in support 
of this theory, and did a great deal of writing 
along this line. He was but a hn\ when, in 
experimenting, he proved the princiiile which 
has been later demonstrated i_:f u^e in w ire- 
less telegraphy. He was a correspundent f<:)r 
a number of medical journals and issued a 
number of works which met with marked 
approval by the profession. In 1895 he 
brought out a work entitled "A Regional 
and Comparative ^lateria Medica," which 
has a classification concerning the use of 
medicines in use in certain cases, different 
diseases and medical agents, and in 1898 he 
issued a supplement, which covers new ma- 
terial in tlie same line. Dr. ^Malcolm's 
death occurred December 22, 1901, and in 
this connection the Detroit (Michigan) 
Times, of December 28th, contained the fol- 
lowing in its telegraphic news : 

" Dr. ]. G. Malcolm, a former resident of this city, 
is dead at his home in Hutchinson, Kansas. He 
became prominent in Michigan medical circles by 
diagnosing- the location ot the bullet which was tired 
into the body of President Garfield and caused his 
death. When the post mortem was held Dr. Mal- 
colm's statement as to the location of the leaden mis- 
sile of death was found to be correct. He was the 
author of several medical works." 



GEORGE F. HAUSER. 

Banking interests are the heart of the 
commercial body and indicate the healthful- 
ness of trade. In times of financial depres- 
sion the bank wdiich continues business along 
safe yet progressive lines di es nn ire to estab- 
lish public confidence than anv otlier agency, 
and at all times it is a power in tlie business 
world whqse influence can scarcely be exag- 
gerated. One of the reliable financial con- 
cerns of central Kansas is the Bushton State 
Bank, of which George F. Hauser is cashier, 
and in his official capacity he has become 
widely known, commanding uniform con- 
fidence by his straightforward methods. He 



has been a resident of Bushton since 1887 
and of central Kansas since 1874. 

Like many of the leading citizens o-f this 
ponion of the state Air. Hauser is a nati\c 
of Germany, his birth having occurred in 
the village of Langenau, Baden, on the 22d 
of November, 1858. He is a representative 
of a good family whose salient characteris- 
tics are integrity, industry and morality. His 
father, Fritz Hauser, was born in Baden, 
July 6, 1822, ac(iuired his education there 
and after arri\ing at years of maturity mar- 
ried Elizabeth Obser, who was born July 
8, 1826, and whose childhood w'as also 
passed in Baden, the place of her nativity. 
Their son George was a lad of ten summers 
when the family came to the United States, 
settling at Columbus, Platte county, Ne- 
braska, in the spring of 18(19, where they re- 
mained until 1874, when tliev came to cen- 
tral Kansas, locating at Ellinwood, Barton 
county. The father was a farmer by occu- 
pation and carried on that pursuit in Bartori 
county until his death, which occurred July 
31, 1884, wdien he was sixty-two years of 
age. His wife died in Ellinwood, October 
6, 1900, W'hen seventy-four years of age. 
Both were honored and respected for their 
many good qualities and for their fidelity to 
the principles of right living. Fi\'e children 
sun-ived the mother : Ernest, of Ellinwood ; 
William F., a resident of McMinnville, Ore- 
gon; George F., of Bushton; Ludwig F., a 
resident of Nashville, Kansas ; and August 
F., of Bushton. They also lost one daugh- 
ter, Elizabeth, who died at the age of seven 
years and is buried at Columbus, Nebraska. 

Leaving the fatherland at the age of ten 
years. George F. Hauser was principally 
reared in Nebraska and Kansas, pursuing 
his education in the schools of the two states 
and gaining practical experience in farm 
work by assisting his father in the field. At 
the age of eighteen he began teaching school 
in Barton county, Kansas, and later he was 
employed as a clerk in the postoffice at El- 
linwood. He afterward went to New Mex- 
ico in the service of the Santa Fe Railroad 
Company and was also employed by the 
Adams and W'ells-Fargo Express Compan- 
ies, while later he had charge of the freight 



208 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



department of the Santa Fe Railroad at EI- 
linwood. This was followed by a period de- 
voted to the real-estate business, and in 1887 
he came to Bushton. wliere he was interested 
in a hardware and implement store. On re- 
tiring, in 1893, from that line of trade, he 
managed a private bank in Bushton, and^ in 
1898 took up his abode upon his farm' of 
two hundred and forty acres adjoining that 
village. The place is known as Cedarlawn 
Farm and is one of the best places in Farmer 
township, improved with an attractive resi- 
dence, large barns and outbuildings and all 
modern improvements. There is a granary, 
a windmill, an orchard and a beautiful grove 
of cedars, from which the place takes its 
name. EX-erything is neat an J thrifty in 
appearance, indicating the careful supervi- 
sion of an enterprising owner, who in addi- 
tion to his agricultural interests fills the ofifice 
before mentioned! — that of cashier of the 
Bushton State Bank. Also, he is specially 
interested in his orchard and select herd of 
shorthorn cattle. During the years 1874-6 
he herded cattle on the plains in the sum- 
mer, being in the saddle day after day, rafn 
or shine, and attended school during the 
winter months. 

March 28, 1883. ^vhen twenty-five years 
of age. Mr. Hauser was united in marriage 
to I\Iiss Bianca Volkland, who was born in 
Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, June 17, 1858. a 
daughter of William and Pauline Volkland. 
She died near Bushton, August 12, 1887, 
■leaving two children: Willie E., born in 
Ellinwood, February 9, 1885; and Lola 
Florence, born in the same city Februarv 27, 
1886. On the 29th of November, 1888, in 
Bushton, Mr. Hauser was again married, 
his second union being with Emma Swartz, 
who was born in Bettsville, Sandusky coun- 
ty, Ohio, January 9, 1859, and she is a lady 
of intelligence who has made his home very 
pleasant and attractive. She is the second 
daughter of the Rev. S. and Sarah Swartz, 
the former and honored pioneer and well 
known minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He was for many years a leading 
and influential citizen of this community, 
but is now living in Oklahoma. Unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Hauser have been born two sons : 



Ernest S.. born June 17. 1897. and Theo R., 
born July 22, 1901. In his political opin- 
ions our subject is a Republican, and he and 
his wife are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, in which he is serving as one 
of the trustees. His name is synonymous 
with honorable dealing in all business af- 
fairs; he is uniformly courteous and consid- 
erate, and wherever known is esteemed for 
his genuine worth of character. He, how- 
ever, gratefully acknowledges that whatever 
success he may have attained in life is largely 
due to the teachings of Professor J. R. Bick- 
erdyke, his former preceptor, whom he 
holds in high regard and gratefully remem- 
bers as a teacher and a proven friend. 



M. FINLEY 



M. Finley is a prominent and represent- 
ative farmer and stock-raiser of Rice coun- 
ty, where he located at an early day, and 
throug'hout the intervenmg years he has 
been known as an enterprising business man 
of the community. He was born in Ross 
county, Ohio, November 30, 1846, and was 
reared to the honest toil of the farm. His 
parents were Isaac and Mary (Henness) 
Finley, the former a native of Ohio and the 
latter of Virginia. The paternal grandfather 
was John Finley, a native of the Green Isle 
of Erin, in which country he was 'married, 
and all of his six children were there born 
with the exception of the father of otir sub- 
ject.- By occupation John Finley was a 
farmer, and in following that pursuit pro- 
vided for the support of his wife and chil- 
dren. Tbe following is the list of his sons 
and daughters,— John, Moses, \\'illiam, 
Mary, Jane and Isaac. 

The last named was reared to manhood 
in the Buckeye state and learned the car- 
penter and cooper's trades, which he fol- 
lowed for many years. In Ohio he married 
Miss Mary Henness, and there they spent 
the residue of their days, the father passing 
away in 1862. He was a Whig in his po- 
litical affiliations in early life and afterward 
joined the ranks of the new Republican 




y^ ^-^^^^-w^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



209 



party. Ho\\-ever. he ne\-er aspired to office, 
preferring that his attention should be given 
to his business affairs. His wife survived 
him only a short time, passing away the 
same year. It was the mother who practi- 
cal)}- reared the children and instructed 
them, for the husband was away from home 
working at his trade in order to provide for 
their support. She was- a devoted and lov- 
ing wife and mother, who^e gentle counsel 
and kind words had marked influence over 
the lives of her children. She early im- 
pressed upon their minds lessons of integ- 
rity and industry, and they have become an 
honor to her name. Of the Baptist church 
she was a consistent and honored member, 
and her Christian faith permeated her entire 
life. John Finley, her eldest son, was 
among the first to enlist at the call of the 
president for troops to aid in crus'hing out 
the rebellion. He received a wound and 
then returned home on a furlough, but after 
recuperating his health rejoined his com- 
mand and continued at the frcxnt until after 
the close of the war. He then once more 
took up his abode in Ohio, w'here he after- 
ward died. William, the second son. en- 
listed as a member of the Twenty-sixth 
Regiment of Ohio Volunteers and was 
killed at the battle of Chickamauga. James 
also served as a Union soldier, and, becom- 
ing ill, was brought to his home, where he 
died not long afterward. The next of the 
familv is he whose name introduces this 
review, and the younger members are Scott, 
who also wore the blue in the Civil war; 
Isaac, who is living in Ohio; Mrs. Mar- 
garet Guess ; Nancy, who died at the age of 
eighteen years; Airs. Martha Wilson, of 
Ohio; Mary, who died in childhood; and 
Mrs. Ida Hurst. 

Mr. Finley acquired a knowledge of the 
elementary branches of English learning in 
the public schools, and by reading and study, 
as well as practical experience in later life, 
he has added largely to his knowledge and 
is now a well informed man. He is the only 
memjjer < if his father's family who left Ohio. 
His father died when he was quite young 
and he was then thrown upon his own re- 



sources, being strictly a self-made man. 
Soon after the death of his parents he was 
employed by the month as a farm hand, and 
continued to serve in that capacity until his 
marriage, except during the period when he 
aided in the defense of the Union. He was 
only seventeen years of age when, in 1S64, 
he enlisted in the Ohio militia, and after 
serving there for a short time he joined the 
United States volunteer serAdce as a mem- 
ber of .Company E, One Hundred and Fcrt)-- 
ninth Ohio Infantry. • This regiment was 
assigned to the Army of the Potomac, un- 
der the command of General Thomas, and 
saw some hard service. The troops were 
sent on long and difficult marches and were 
almost daily engaged in skirmishing with 
the Confederates. Mr. Finley participated 
in the battle of Frederick, Maryland, where 
the Union troops were repulsed' and made a 
retreat of forty miles. After his second- en- 
listment he was engaged in guardng the 
White House at Washington, and on the 
expiration of his term of service he received 
an honorable discharge, in September, 1864. 
After returning to his home Mr. Finley 
learned the carpenter's trade, which he fol- 
lowed in connection with farming. In 1868 
he went to Illinois, where he was employed 
as a f.irm hand, and after his marriage he 
rented a tract of land, which he cultivated 
for six years. With the capital he had ac- 
quired in the meantime he then purchased a 
small farm, which he continued to operate 
until 1887. He then sold that property and 
removed to the new Eldorado, for at diat 
time the attenion of the country was direct- 
ed toward Kansas and its possibilities. He 
settled in Rice county, where he leased three 
quarter sections of land, upcn which he yet 
resides. It was then a tract of raw prairie 
and he has made all of the improvements 
upcn the place, including the erection of a 
commodious house and barn. He has the 
entire place under fence and the land is de- 
voted to the raising of crops and to grazing 
purposes. In connection with general farrn- 
ing he makes a specialty of handling stock, 
keeping on hand only high grades^ He has 
a herd of fine Hereford cattle and a large ' 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



herd of cows, well graded, owning several 
fnll-blooded animals. He has a reputation 
for the excellent grade of stock which he 
places upon the market, and he finds a ready 
sale for all of the calves of which he wishes 
to dispose, receiving high prices. For many- 
years he has always purchased and bunched 
cattle and he always has a good bunch on 
hand on his farm. His business ability has 
made him widely recognized as a capable 
financ'er, and his enterprise and thrift have 
won for him a \ery desirable competence. 
He has purchased a well improved farm, 
which he rents, and he also owns two resi- 
dence properties in Lyons, the rental from 
which adds materially to his income. 

Air. Finley was first married in 1869, to 
Aliss :\Iary W'ood, who was born in San- 
gamon county, Illinois, and was a daughter 
of Solomon and Mary (Preston) Wood, the 
former a native of Vermont and the latter 
of New York, in which state they were mar- 
ried. At an early day they removed to Illi- 
nois, where her father fullowed the black- 
smith's trade until his life's lalxTs were end- 
ed in death, in May, 1852. Only a few days 
elapsed between the deaths of the parents. 
The mother was a consistent an] worthy 
member of the Methodist church. Their 
children were Harriett, of Iowa; Harvey, 
who died in Illinois in 1901 ; Aurilla, who 
is the present wife of Mr. Finley: Franklin 
H., of Iowa : Alary, the first- wife of our sub- 
jeit: \ii-clia. now Mrs. Connor, of Illi- 
ni.^is; l-.Imira, of Iowa; and Scott, who is 
Hving in Lawrence. Kansas. By his first 
marriage Mr. Finley had two children, Will- 
iam I. and Scott, but the latter died in early 
childhood. The former is still at home and 
assists his father in the conduct of the farm 
and in his stock-raising interests. He is also 
township clerk. The mother, who was a 
loyal and devoted member of the Alethodist 
Episcopal church, passed away on the loth 
of February, 1876, and in July. 1877, Mr. 
Finley was again married. She was born 
and reared in Illinois. Mr. and' Mrs. Finley 
and their son William are identified with the 
Alethodist Episcopal church, in which the 
last named has held membership since the 



age of ten years. i\Ir. Finley joinedi the 
church at the age of eighteen and has lived 
a consistent Christian life. He has been a 
liberal contributor to the support of the 
church, has served as class leader and has 
filled all other positions and does all in his 
pc'wer to promote the work of the church and 
Sunday-school. For fourteen years he has 
been superintendent of the Sunday-school in 
this district and has done much to promote 
the cause of religious education through this 
channel. He has also been president of the 
township Sunday-school organization for 
six years and has given freely of his means 
toward the building of many houses of wor- 
ship. In his political views he is a stalwart 
Republican, using his influence for and fur- 
therance of the party's good. He has at- 
tended township and county conventions, 
has filled the office of township treasurer and 
has served in many other local positions. 
Socially he is connected with Kit Carson 
Post, No. 20, G. A. R., of Lyons, and in 
political, social and business, circles he is 
widely and favorably, known, his salient 
characteristics being such as command con- 
fidence and respect and awaken the favor- 
able consideration of all with whoni he 
comes in contact. To-day he occupies an 
enviable position among the men of prom- 
inence in his adopted county, and his life 
demonstrates the advantages which Kansas 
offers to her citizens, for he came here with 
little capital and all that he now possesses 
has been won through his persistency of pur- 
pose and unflagging diligence. 



HENRY C. O'HARA. 

Since the days of pioneer development 
in Reno county the name of Henry Clay 
O'Hara has figured conspicuously and hon- 
orably in connection with progressive meas- 
ures which have contributed to the improve- 
ment and progress of this portion of the 
state. He was for some time identified with 
agricultural pursuits and is now engaged in 
general merchandising in Partridge, where 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



he also owns and conducts a livery stable. 
His life record began in Evansville, Indiana, 
where he tirst opened his eyes to the light of 
day on the 17th of February, 1841, his par- 
ents being John and Elizabeth 0"Hara. His 
father was engaged in steamboating on the 
Ohio and ^Mississippi rivers, devoting his 
entire life tij that vocation. He died in 1849, 
when our suliject was only eight years of 
age. In the family were three children: 
James E., now deceased; Henry C, and 
Alice E., the wife of Hugh Hampton, who 
resides at the old Hampton homestead in 
Memphis, Tennessee. 

Soon after his father's death Mr. O'Hara 
of this review went to Hancock county, Illi- 
nois, to make his home, and there grew to 
manhood. When twenty years of age, in 
response to the first call for Union men to 
serve three years, he enlisted, becoming a 
member of the Black Hawk Cavalry, August 
I'.i, 1S61. The cjuota was full and there- 
fore he went to jMissouri where he did scout- 
ing and other service until February, 1862, 
when his regiment was consolidated with 
the Seventh Missouri Cavalry, under com- 
mand of Colonel Schofield. Previous to this 
time he had received nO' pay for his services. 
After the organization was etTected he did 
service in Missouri and Arkansas, pursuing 
bushwhackers and guerrillas. At Lone Jack 
his command encountered Price, Ouantrell 
and Coffee with their troops, arbout eight 
hundred Federal troops being surrounded 
by some five thousand Confederates. Sev- 
enty of his. company survived and some of 
them w-ere wounded. Other companies of 
the regiment suffered as severely. This was 
on the i6th of August, 1862. Another se- 
vere engagement was at Prairie Grove, Ar- 
kansas,, December 7, 1862, when his com- 
mand went on a forced march to reinforce 
General Blunt, but before they reached him 
the enemy turned on them, inflicting severe 
loss. They succeeded, however, in reaching 
Blunt and dispersed the TJebels. In this en- 
gagement twenty of the company to which- 
I\Ir. O'Hara belonged were captured. The 
enemy retreated to Fort Smith with prison- 
ers, where the following day the Union 
forces overtook tliem and. succeeded in res- 



cuing all of the captured Union troops. Air. 
O'Hara had been wounded at Lone Jack, 
and on account of his injury he was mus- 
tered out at Springfield, Missouri, February 
23, 1863. He enlisted as a corporal but was 
made orderly sergeant, and thus command- 
ed the company a portion of the time. 

After leaving the service Mr. O'Hara re- 
turned to Hancock county and for one season 
took charge of a large farm owned by a Mr. 
Chandler, near Warsaw. The following- 
winter he became a student in the high 
school of that town with the intention of 
pursuing his studies longer, but in the spring 
he entered a recruiting office wdiere he con- 
tinued for some time. He afterward lo- 
cated in the southeastern part of the count}-, 
where he engaged in farming, and while 
there residing he was married to Durella 
Dilly, a daughter of the Rev. Samuel Dilly, 
of the Congregational church. She was 
bornj in Illinois. For a year after their 
marriage they resided upon her father's 
farm and then removed to Lewis county, 
Missouri, where Mr. O'Hara purchased a 
tract of land, upon which he remained for a 
year. He then sold and returned to Han- 
cock county, Illinois, where he Imught forty 
acres of land in Wythe t. i\\ n.-hip. making 
his home thercdu for three }cars. Again' he 
disposed of his property and this time re- 
moved to Galesburg, Illinois, where he en- 
gaged in the transfer business. He next ac- 
cepted a position in the freight office of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy Railroad, and 
after three years spent in Galesburg returned 
to Bowen, Hancock county, where for eight 
months he conducted a grocery and meat 
market. On the expiration of that period 
he sold his store and went to Clay county, 
Arkansas, where he followed agricultural 
pursuits for three years and in the mean- 
time he became interested in the manufac- 
ture of candy in Galesburg, Illinois, dividing 
his time between the two places. 

On the 20th of September, 1873, Air. 
O'Hara arri\-ed in Reno county and located 
a homestead claim in the northwest quarter 
of section 24. township 26, range 7. This 
he at once began to cultivate and improve. 
His first home was a dugout in which he 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



lived for two years wlien he built a frame 
house, walhng the cellar with rock. _The 
first year he broke some sod and in the spring 
of 1874 planted thirty acres to corn, but the 
grasshoppers entirely destroyed his crop. 
This left him destitute and he had to go 
away from home and find work to support 
his family. That fall he planted about sixty 
acres of wheat but the grasshoppers ate the 
seed wheat in the ground. The following 
spring he sowed a small amount of spring 
wheat. He resided upon the homestead for 
seven years and in the meantime he pur- 
chased the south half of section 16, township 
24, range 7. To this place he removed in 
the spring of 1880, building a good house of 
seven rooms. Improving the place he made 
it his home for some time, but when the rail- 
road was built through the locality he sold 
to the company one hundred and twenty 
acres oi his land for the town site of Part- 
ridge. In the meantime, in 1880, in com- 
pany with C. Bussinger and others, he be- 
came largely interested in the cattle business, 
grazing about a thousand head or more in 
the Indian Territory, with winter quarters 
at Mule creek, in Barber county, where they 
had land for the purpose. After disposing 
of their interests in the territory he contin- 
ued with Mr. Bussinger in the same line of 
business in Reno county for two years, graz- 
ing and feeding some two hund'red and fifty 
head of cattle. After the town was estab- 
lished on his land in Center township, Mr. 
O'Hara remained at that place for a number 
Oif years and engaged there in the real-estate 
and insurance business until 1891 when he 
took charge of the Farmers' Alliance store 
in Partridge, which heiater purchased. The 
business was at first an exclusive grocery 
trade, but in 1899 he added a general stock 
of goods, including dry goods, men's fur- 
nishing gooids, queensware and in fact every- 
thing found in a first-class general store. He 
still carries on the real-estate and insurance 
business, representing the old Hartford In- 
surance Company, of Hartford, Connecticut. 
In addition to his other interests he is pro- 
prietor of a livery stable and in the various 
departments of his business he is meeting 
with excellent success. 



Unto Mr. and Mrs. O'Hara were born 
ten children : Levi A., a member of the 
Twenty-first United States militia, now in 
the Philippines; Hugh S., a resident farmer 
of Reno county; Henry P., who owns the 
old homestead ; Asaph, who died at the age 
of five years; Alice G.,_ the wife of W. M. 
Hemphill, a farmer of Reno county; Ina, the 
wife of Harry Lusk, postmaster of Part- 
ridge: Elsie; Don C. ; Seth, who died at the 
age of three years; and Veazie. Mr. O'Hara 
has given his children good educational priv- 
ileges and his daughter Elsie is an accom- 
plished musician and teacher of music. 

Mr. O'Hara has always taken a deep in- 
terest in public and political affairs and al- 
ways gave his support to the Republican 
party until recently when he has voted with 
the People's party. He has served in nearly 
all the township offices, was postmaster of 
Reno Center for five years, and for four 
years has served as postmaster of Partridge. 
His service on the school board covers a 
period of sixteen years, during which time 
he did much to raise the standard of educa- 
tion in his district. Fraternally he is identi- 
fied with the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. In Partridge he ij a most valued citi- 
zen and has been identified with nearl_v everv 
movement that has contributed to its up- 
building and progress. He assisted in the 
building of the elevator and creamery and 
was a mernber of the building committee of 
the school board when the qew school house 
was erected. Since 1886 he has been agent 
for the Santa Fe Town Company, transact- 
ing their business and looking after their in- 
terests in Partridge. He has erected alto- 
gether eight residences and business blocks 
in the town and he was one of the organizers 
of the Congregational church here, both he 
and his wife becoming charter menfbers in 
the fall of 1873. He has since served on 
the official board and has also been active 
in Sunday-school work as teacher and super- 
intendent. In the fall of 1888 he was com- 
missioned notary public and for twelve years 
served in that capacity ; he has also been jus- 
tice of the peace, and thus in official, busi- 
ness, church and social life he has contrib- 
uted in large measure to the ad\'ancement 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



and upbuilding of the town, deserving men- 
tion among its most prominent and enter- 
prising men. 



THO^IAS O. FOX. 



Thomas O. Fox, who is carrying on ag- 
ricultural pursuits on the southeast corner 
of section twenty-twn. tnwii^liip fifteen, 
range nine, Ellsworth ii;\vii>hip, claims 
Ohio as the state uf hi^- nativity, for his birth 
occurred there in Ashland county on the 8th 
of March, 1850. On the paternal side he is 
of Geiman lineage, for his father, David 
Fox, was a native of that country. When a 
lad of fourteen years he crossed the Atlantic 
to America, locating in Ohio, where he form- 
Q'\ the acquaintance of Matilda Watson, who 
was reared in Ohio. They were married 
and began their domestic life in the Buck- 
e\e state. The father was an attorney-at- 
1' w, but devoted much of his life to farming 
iid stock-raising, making a specialty of the 
eeding of fine stock. His death occurred 
1'; Ohio, in' 1884, and his wife passed away 
m 1898. He was prominent in public and 
Iticial life, and his opinions carried weight 
'Pong his fellow townsmen, who recog- 
ized his devotion to the public good. 
Thomas O. Fox was one of five children, 
Mt whom four are now living, namely: 
James W., a policeman in Wichita, Kansas; 
Allan C, who is living on the old' homestead 
at Hayesville, Ohio; Mrs. Elizabeth Far- 
shing, of Cleveland, Ohio; and Thomas O., 
J who was the third of the family. 
* Under the parental roof at Hayesville 

\ our subject was reared and when he was 
i quite young the care of the farm devolved 
f largely upon him, for his older brothers had 
enlisted in the service of their country as 
members of the Union army. He pursued 
his education in the common schools and re- 
mained at home until iSj.^, when, in the 
month of March, he started with three com- 
panions for the Sunflower state, where he 
arrived on the anniversary of his birth, the 
Nth of March. He continued in Ellsworth 
c unty until the following September, when, 
in company with his brother, J. W., and a 



Mr. Zimmerman, he engaged in the stock 
business, going to Iowa, where he purchased 
ten hundred and sixty-five head of sheep, 
which they drove across the country, being 
seventy days upon the road. Until 1897 
Mr. Fox engaged in the conduct of his sheep 
ranch. In 1875 he purchased his present 
home property, comprising one hundred 
and sixty acres, to which he added until he 
had' eight hundred acres in one body, and 
upon this he anniially kept from fifteen to 
thirfy-five hundred head of sheep. He also 
engaged in the raising of grain, having 
about three hundred acres of land under cul- 
tivation. In 1897 he severed his connection 
with the sheep industry and' has since de- 
voted his attention to the raising of cattle, 
keeping O'U hand about one hundred head. 
He has also given sO'me attention to fine 
stock, making a specialty of thoroughbred 
Poland China hogs. On his place is one of 
the finest buildings in the county, a long 
stone barn which was built for defense 
against the Indians. At one time "Wild 
Bill" made his home on this place for a con- 
siderable period. In his political views Mr. 
Fo'.x is a Republican, and takes an actixe in- 
terest in the growth and success of his party, 
which he believes to contain the best ele- 
ments of good government. Official prefer- 
ment, however, has had no attraction for 
him, although he has served on the central 
committee and was active in the organiza- 
tion of school district No. 49, serving as a 
member of the school board during the 
greater part of the time since. Fraternally 
he is connected with Ellsworth Lodge, No. 
146, F. & A. M. 

Mr. Fox. has been twice married, hav- 
ing in Ohiii, in 1872, wedded Miss I\Iary L. 
Rankin, who died in June, 1873, leaving one 
son, James O., who is a soldier in the regular 
army, now serving in the Philippines with 
the Twenty-second United States Infantry. 
In 1S75 Mr. Fox was married, in Ellsworth, 
to Emma A. Green, who was born in Au- 
gusta, Georgia, and is a daughter of M. 
Green. Her death occurred in July, 1889. 
By the second marriage there were four sons 
and a daughter : Edward, who is in the em- 
ploy of the Union Pacific Railroad Com- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



pany ; \\'illiani C. ; Herbert ; Harry, who is 
in the emply of the 'Frisco Raih^oad Com- 
pany at Joplin, Missouri ; and Nellie, who is 
in school. Mr. Fox is one of the respected 
pioneer citizens of Ellsworth county. For 
almost thirty years he has shared in the for- 
tunes and aided in the development of cen- 
tral Kansas. He has thus manifested his 
faith in the future, a faith which time has 
justified, for through the labors of its pro- 
gressive citizens the counties of central Kan- 
sas have taken rank among" the best in the 
state. 



W. D. STURGIS. 



The firm of Kreider & Sturgis occupies 
an enviable position in commercial circles 
in Kanopolis. The junior member in con- 
trol of this well equipped hardware and im- 
plement establishment is W. D. Sturgis, 
whose name heads this review and who is 
a man of sterling worth, well deserving of 
mention among the representative citizens 
of central Kansas. He was born in Smith- 
field, Jefferson county, Ohio, February 22, 
i860, a son of the Hon. William and Kesiah 
(Beresford) Sturgis, both of whom were 
also natives of the Buckeye state. The 
father was a school teacher by profession 
and resided upon a farm in the east. He 
took a ^•ery active part in public affairs and 
was honored with a number of offices. In 
1865 he removed to Moniteau county, Mis- 
souri, where he served as superintendent of 
the county schools. He is also a recognized 
leader in public thought and opinion and has 
the confidence and high regard of the citi- 
zens among whom he lives. They have 
manifested their confidence in his ability 
and trustworthiness by electing him to the 
office of representative to the state legisla- 
ture in 1900. Hehas given careful thought 
to the questions which have come up for con- 
sideration in the general assembly and has 
labored earnestly for the best interests of 
the commonwealth. His wife is also sur- 
viving, and in their family of thirteen chil- 
dren our subject is the second in order of- 
birth. The record is as follows : J. T., a 



prominent attorney of Newton county, ]\Iis- 
souri, and a partner of the Hon. M. E. Bur- 
ton; Horatio Edward, who is living at 
Neosho, Missouri ; George, who is principal 
of the schools of Windsor, Missouri ; Reed, 
who makes his home in Clarksburg, Mis- 
souri; Stewart, who is engaged in teaching 
at Clarksburg; Alfred Elmer; Ella, who is 
the wife of Homer Henry, of Latham, Mis- 
souri; Irene, the wife of J. H. Seaver, of 
Springfield, Missouri; Corrine, the wife of 
Budd Osborn, of Deepwater, Missouri: 
Kate, and Mary. Three of the sisters ha\-e 
l.ieen successful teachers. 

\\'. D. Sturgis, whose name introduces 
this record, remained at home until seven- 
teen years of age, and was a little lad of five 
summers when the family removed to ]^Iis- 
souri. He pursued his education in the 
public schools, and in Central College of 
Clarksburg. At the age of seventeen he re- 
turned to the old home in Ohio and was en- 
gaged in teaching in the district schools of 
that locality for three years. At the age of 
twenty he went to Stanwood, ^Nlichig'an, 
where he accepted a position as teacher in 
the public schools, acting as principal for 
two years. He afterward served as prin- 
cipal in Blufifton, Indiana, and in 1885 he 
came to Kansas, after visiting his family 
in Missouri. In this state he engaged in 
teaching in the district schools for two terms 
and then accepted a position in the city 
schools of Kanopolis, being thus identified 
with the educational interests of the city 
until 1888, when, in connection with Henry 
Kreider, he established the firm of Kreider 
& Sturgis and bought the small hardware 
business owned by Mr. Hallenstein. Since 
that time he has been connected with the 
harware and implement trade. The firm has 
increased its stock, enlarged its facilities and 
is now enjoying a liberal patronage." In 
January, 1886, Mr. Sturgis was united in 
marriage to Miss Mattie Kreider, a daughter 
of his partner, and they now have six inter- 
esting children: Ethel, Fay, Kate, Ruth, 
Alfred and Emily. Mr. Sturgis is a mem- 
ber of Kanopolis Lodge, No. 324, I. O. O. 
F., and is a charter member of the Camp of 
Modern ^^'oodmen. in which he lias filled all 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



215 



of the offices. In 1893 1^^ ^^'''^ made post- 
master of tlie town, under President Cleve- 
land, and served for about five years. He 
has also been a miem-ber of the city council 
and of the board of education since his ar- 
rival in the town. His worth as a business 
nian and citizen is widely acknowledged and 
he has li;id marked iiilluonce upon public 
prui^rc-s alnii-- iiuclleciual, ^Mcial, moral and 
material lines in this place. 



BAXTER COLE. 



The stock interest^ arc amung the lead- 
ing ones in many ]iart^ ^f the great west 
and are particularl} impmtant in Reno coun- 
ty, Kansas, where conditions are so favor- 
able for men of ability and good judgment 
to pursue this line with the greatest success. 
One of the leaders in this locality is Baxter 
Cole, member of the well-known and pros- 
perous firm of Cole & Bigger, of Hutchin- 
son, Kansas. 

Mr. Cole is not a native of this state, his 
birtli having taken place, on April 11, 1873, 
in Darke county, Ohio. His parents were 
William and Clarissa (Alexander) Cole, the 
former of whom was born in Darke county, 
Ohio, on March 3, 1849. His fa- 
ther was Samuel Cole, a native of New- 
Jersey, and he is still residing on the farm 
where he settled as a pioneer, and when 
the country was still the home of various 
tril)es of Indians. , The marriage of Samuel 
Cole was to Elizabeth Cox, also of New 
Jersey. Soon after their marriage they 
moved to the reputed ricli lands in Ohio, 
located on a heavilv timbered tract and 
through hard work and tireless energy, 
changed the wilderness nf the forest into 
the smiling landscape, which is not only a 
pleasure to the eye Init which is the equiva- 
lent of an immense anmunt nf money. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cole were ]:]csscd with health and 
strength, and the kind fatlier was able to 
pro\-ide each son with a farm nf eighty acres, 
while the }-i:)ungest has the hnme place, con- 
sisting of one hundred and sixt>- acres. Ten 
children were born into this pioneer home. 



eight of whom inherited the robustness and 
\dgor of their parents, two of their sons also 
rearing large families. The youngest, El- 
mer, is the only one unmarried. 

The mother of our subject was a daugh- 
ter of Samuel Alexander, of Union City, 
Indiana, and there at the age of eighteen 
}"ears she was married to William Cole, who 
at that time had just reached his majority. 
They settled on a farm near Greenville, and 
there Mr. Cole still owns a valuable farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres, its selling 
price being not less than ten thousand dol- 
lars. In the spring of 1886 they left their 
Ohio home to make a new one in the state 
of Kansas, and on IMarcli ](]. nf that vear 
they reached the farm tlicv imw nccupy, in 
Lodi township, near Ijimespriiigs, in Reno 
county. Here Mr. Cole owns four hundred 
and eighty acres of valuable land. Twelve 
children were born to \\'illiam Cole and his 
wife, ten of wdiom still survive, as follinvs: 
Baxter, Samuel. John, George. Clifford. Liz- 
zie, Perry, Burley, Rosa, and Hobart. Those 
who have passed away are \Mllie, who died 
at the age of two years, and Elmer, who 
died in January, 1901, at the age of fifteen. 

Baxter Cole, of this sketch, was well ed- 
ucated in the common schools, at first with 
the idea of becoming a teacher, in which his 
brother Clift'ord has succeeded well, but later 
this idea was abandoned in preference for a 
business life. He made his home with his 
parents until his marriage, which took place 
on March i, 1897, to Josie Lee Brown, who 
was born in Iowa, a daughter of Robert 
Brown, who is now a farmer in Osage coun- 
ty. Oklahoma. One son was boiMi to this 
union, Robert Leoto, wlio died ;il tlie age of 
thirteen months. 

The extensive stock operations of Cole 
& Big'ger are carried on on four hundred 
and eighty acres and they have the same 
amount of land under cultivation. At pres- 
ent they have three hundred head of stock 
cattle and two hundred and fifty head of Po- 
land-China hogs, and considering that but 
four years have been occupied in the ven- 
ture their success has been remarkable. The 
corn crop in 1901 was not up to their ex- 
pectations, but it was more than compensat- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



ed by the enormous yield of wheat. ]Mr. 
Bigger is the manager of a mercantile busi- 
ness in Hutchinson, while Mr. Cole looks 
after the management of the farm and stock 
He is thoroughly conversant with every de- 
tail understands the properties of the soil 
and has studied and put into practice the 
scientific breeding and economical feeding of 
cattle and stock. He takes an intelligent in- 
terest in politics and is one of the leading 
Republicans in his locality. Socially he is 
connected with the order of Odd Fellows, 
and is regarded as one of the rising young 
men of the country. 



AARON BOBB. 



The name of Mr. Bobb is inseparably 
interwoven with the history of Rice county. 
He is one of its honored pioneers and most 
esteemed and worthy farmers. He was the 
first man that plowed land and put in a crop 
in Rice county, and from that time his labors 
have continuously demonstrated the possi- 
bilities that lie before the agriculturist in 
this portion of. the Sunflower state. He 
arrived here in January, 1871, bought a 
tract of land and planted a field of potatoes 
in March. His first home was a sod house, 
in which he resided for two years. Buffa- 
loes roamed over the prairies in large herds, 
deer and antelope could always be killed, 
and the animals furnished an abundance of 
meat to the early settlers. Ind'ans were 
still in the neighborhood, spending much of 
their time in hunting bufifaloes, after which 
they would tan their hides and use them for 
clothing or sell to the white men. Such were 
the conditions which Air. Bobb found when 
he emigrated westward and took up his 
abode in Rice county, here to become an 
active factor in the development and prog- 
ress which has since placed the county on a 
par with any community in the state. 

A native of Union county, Pennsylva- 
nia, he was born Maixh 7, 1830, and is a 
representative of a family of Pennsylvania 



Dutch people, whose chief characteristics 
were energy, perseverance and fidelity to 
their word. Daniel Bobb, the father, was 
born in the Keystone state and> was a son of 
Peter Bobb, also a native of Pennsylvania 
and a son of a German emigrant, who was 
the founder of the family in the new world. 
Daniel Bobb was united in marriage to Sa- 
rah Close, also a native of Pennsvlvania, and 
a daughter of Solomon and Sophia (Gift) 
Close. Their marriage was blessed with 
seven children, namely: Marj^; Aaron, who 
is now living in Kansas; Phebe; Levi; Jo- 
seph, now deceased ; Samuel ; and Amelia. 
In 1847 the Bobb family removed from the 
Keystone state to Illinois, locating in Ste- 
phenson county, that state, near Freep'ort, 
where the parents spent their remaining 
days, the mother passing away April o, 
1892, in her eighty-fourth year, while tlie 
father's death occurred May i, 1893, in the 
eighty-seventh year of his age. Throughout 
his entire business career he devoted his en- 
ergies to farming, and thereby piovided a 
comfortable living for. his family" Like his 
ancestors he was indentified with the Lu- 
theran church, to which his wife also e- 
longed. They were people of genuine worth, 
honest, faithful and reliable, and wherever 
known their sterling characteristics won 
them high respect and confidence. 

Aaron Bobb, whose name introduces 
this review, was reared in Pennsylvania 
until seventeen years of age and was early 
taught lessons of industry, honesty and per- 
sistence. He acquired his education in the 
public schools, and at the age of nineteen he 
began serving an apprenticeship to the car- 
penter's trade, which he mastered. bec(!m- 
ing a good mechanic. After the removal of 
the fam.ily to Illinois he followed that occu- 
pation, and has always been identified with 
the building interests of Rice county since 
coming to Kansas. His knowledge of car- 
pentering proved of great value to him in 
this state, for, far from towns and rail- 
roads, he had to depend largely upon his 
own efforts for everything which he wished 
not only in an agricultural but also in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



217 



mechanical line. Hi$ use of tools enabled 
him to secure improvements much more 
easily than many of his neighbors who were 
not familiar with such departments of work. 
Mr. Bobb was married in 1856. in St. 
Joseph, Alickigan, to Amelia Ann King, 
who was born in Unio.n county, Pennsyl- 
vania, a daughter of James King. He died 
in Rice county, Kansas, at the age of 
eighty-seven years, and his wife. Mrs. So- 
phia King, passed away in ^Michigan, at the 
age of seventy-four. They were farming 
people and were consistent Christian-, h^ld- 
ing membership in the Lutheran church. 
Mr. and ]\Irs. Bobb took up their dcmestic 
life in ^lichigan. where they remained until 
1869, when, believing that better opportun- 
ities could be secured in the west, they went 
to Daviess county. Missouri, where they re- 
mained for two years before coming to Kan- 
sas. ^Ir. Bobb walked tw-j hundred miles 
on making the journey to the Sunflower 
state, and after viewing the countrv, being 
pleased with its prospects, he returned to 
Missouri for his family, his team and his 
carpenter tools. Here he secured a tract of 
wild land and immediatelv l;egan the im- 
provement of his claim, for not a furrow 
had been turned. A sod house gave shelter 
to the family, and there hospitality reigned 
supreme, the latch-string being always out. 
A cordial welcome was ever extended to the 
weary wayfarer, and many of the new com- 
ers thrciugh Rice county enjoyed the good 
cheer which pervaded the Bobb home. In 
September, 1893, Mr. Bobb removed to his 
present farm, where he new has a large and 
attractive residence and a commodious 
barn, together with extensive granaries, 
containing three thousand busliels of wheat. 
There are also sheds fur tlie slielter of stock, 
cribs for the stc ring , f grain, feed lots, ver- 
dant pastures and highly cultivated fields. 
In fact, everything about the place is in ex- 
cellent cr-ndition, the farm being one of the 
finest in this portion of the country. It com- 
prises seven hundred and twenty acres of 
rich land, whirh yields to him an excellent 
return for the grain that is each spring plant- 
ed in the fields. Good groves and orchards 



add to the value of the place and no im- 
provement of the model farm is lacking. 

The home of Mr. and ]\Irs. Bobb was 
blessed with a family of nine children, six 
Sills and three daughters, namely: James 
a farmer who is residing near Noble, Kan- 
sas ; ]\Iary A., the wife of John Altman, of 
Rice county : Frank S.. who is living in At- 
lanta townslii]*. Rice county: Oscar David, 
a carpenter cf Denver, Colorado; Joseph 
Calvin, wild is enipli:iyed as a salesman in 
th^.t city; Charles Alfred, who is living in 
Oakland. Californina; Anna S., wife of 
Clark ]McFarland, of Miami county, Kan- 
sas : John Peter, who was a soldier in the 
Spanish-American war, and is also engaged 
in clerking in Denver, Colorado; and Ida 
Louise, who is now at home wdth her father. 
The greatest loss which Mv. Bobb ever sus- 
tained was in the death of his wife, wliich 
occurred June 16. 1888. She had indeed 
been a faithful companion and helpmate to 
him on life's journey through a period of 
; thirty-two years. She was of even temper- 
! anient, always genial, never complaining, 
and was widely loved for her kindness of 
heart and mind. Her neighbors knew her 
for a kind and faithful friend, and to her 
husband and children she was a devoted 
wife and mother. She belonged to the 
Lutheran church, and the principles of 
Christianity permeated her career. 

Formerly Mr. Bobb was a supporter of 
Democratic principles, but is now a Popu- 
list. He has reached the psalmist's span of 
three score years and ten. but possesses the 
vigor and appearance of a man much 
younger. He came to the countv with lim- 
ited means, but as the years have passed has 
acquired a handsome competence. He owes 
nr: man. lias a valuable farm free from debt, 
anil lii- w.inl is as good as his bond, for in 
all Im-iiie-s transactions he is found straight- 
forward and reliable. He possesses the ster- 
ling qualities of the sturdy pioneers who 
bravely faced the trials and hardships of life 
on the plains in order to make homes for 
their families and thus aided in laying the 
foundation for the prcient prosperity and 
progress of this portion of the state. 



2l8 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



JOHX B. MXXEXT. 

John B. \'incent. tlie efficient postmaster 
of Hutchinscn, was born in Franlvfort, Ken- 
tucky, on the 5th of December, 1845, his 
parents being Leonard and Laura ( Kackby) 
Vincent, the former a native of New York 
and the latter of Virginia. In early life the 
father went to the Old Dominion, where he 
was married, and later removed to Franklin 
county, Kentucky, where he engaged in con- 
tract work. In 1858 he became a resident 
of Knox county, Indiana, where he spent his 
remaining days, passing away in 1876. In 
his family were 'seven children, of whom 
three are yet living, the sisters of our sub- 
ject being Catherine, the wife of George \\'. 
Martin, of Bruceville, Indiana, and Carolina, 
the wife of William McEnder. of Frankfort, 
Kentucky. 

When only thirteen years of age J^hn 
B. Vincent accompanied his parents to Indi- 
ana and there he remained until sixteen 
years of age, when his patriotic spirit was 
aroused by the attempt of the south to secede 
and at the first call for troops for three years' 
per\ice he enlisted in Company H, Fifty- 
first Indiana Infantry. The regiment was 
attached to Rosecrans' division of the Four- 
teenth Army Corps and he participated in 
the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Stone River 
and ether engagements. In the raid of Sand 
mountain he was captured near Rome, 
Georgia, by General Forrest and was sent 
to Libby prison and afterward to Belle Isle, 
but was soon paroled and a little later was 
exchanged. Returning to his regiment, he 
took part in the battles of Franklin. Tennes- 
see, and Nashville, and after the surrender 
of General Lee his regiment was sent to 
Texas, doing duty on the frontier until the 
CI inmand was discharged, on the 13th of 
January, 1866. Although so young when 
he entered the service, his military record 
was creditable and he displayed valor equal 
to that of many a veteran of twice his ^-ears. 

Returning to. his home in Indiana, Mr. 
A'incent began work at the carpenter's trade, 
which lie followed until Aord, 1878. when 
he came to Reno county. Kansas, to secure 
a claim. He located on schorl land in Ros- 



coe township and there made his home for 
two years, during which time he broke sixtv 
acres of land and made other improvements. 
He then removed from the farm to Nicker- 
son. where he accepted a position in the 
shops of the Santa Fe Railrpad Company, 
there remaining until the fall of 1884, when 
he was elected clerk of the district court. 
He filled the position for three consecutive 
terms and was nominated for the fourth 
term, but the Populist movement swept over 
the country that year and together with the 
other members of his party in this locality 
he was defeated. He, however, retired from 
office as he had entered it, with the confi- 
dence and good will of the public. 

On laying aside official cares Mr. ^^incent 
engaged in business at Galena. Kansas, in 
operating mines and developing mining 
property. Later he was engaged in business 
in Polk county, Arkansas, and there became 
interested in coal mining in connection with 
W. E. Burns, under the firm name of ^^■. E. 
Burns & Company. He continued in that 
position for only six months, for the exces- 
sive freight rates entirely consumed the prof- 
its on coal. On the first of April, 1896, :\Ir. 
Vincent was appointed by Governor Morrill 
to a position as a member of the live stock 
sanitary board of the state of Kansas, a 
board established to stamp out and prevent 
the spread of disease among live stock. He 
served in that capacity for a year and on 
the 1st of July. 1897, was appointed post- 
master of Hutchinson by President McKin- 
ley, in which capacity he has since served, 
his administration of the afifairs of the office 
being practical, business-like and commend- 
able. He has resided in Hutchinson since 
May, 1887, and is numbered among the lead- 
ing citizens. He has served as justice of the 
peace in his township and in politics has al- 
[ ways been stanch Republican. 
I On the 25th of December, 1870, in 
! Bruceville, Indiana. Mr. Vincent was united 
in marriage to Miss Alice Bruce, a represent- 
ative of an old and prominent family of the 
Hoosier state. She is a daughter of H. J. 
Bruce and her grandfather. Major Bruce, 
after serving as an officer in the war of 1812, 
secured a land warrant which he located in 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



Indiana, the tract includino; the present site 
of Brucexille, which town was named in his 
honor. Socially Mr. Vincent is connected 
with Joe Hooker Post, No. ly, G. A. R., of 
Hutchinson, is a past commander and has 
represented the local post in the encamp- 
ment. In the Masonic fraternity he has at- 
tained the Knight Templar degree, and' he 
has also belonged to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias 
fraternity. Few men are better or more 
widely known in Reno county and through- 
out the state than Mr. Vincent, whose long 
ofticial service has gained him a wide ac- 
quaintance, while his per<Mn;i1 (|u;ilities have 
won for him the friend^lnp ami respect of 
those with whom he lias licen a>50ciated. 



C. G. PROFFITT. 

One of the finest ranches in Rice county 
— known as Sunn.y Ridge Stock Farm — is 
the property of C. G. Proffitt, a leading and 
enterprising" farmer and stock-raiser of Ray- 
mond township. Here he owns and oper- 
ates eleven hundred and twenty acres of 
land, his energies being devoted to the culti- 
vation of the crops best adapted to this soil 
and climate and to the raising of the best 
grades of stock. He was born in Sullivan 
county, Tennessee, in 1855, a son of John 
M. Proffitt, a prominent early settler of Rice 
county. The grandfather, William Proffitt, 
was a native of Virginia, and was a son of 
Robert Proffitt, who was born in England. 
John M. Proffitt, the father of our subject, 
married Ellen Smith, who died in this coun- 
ty in 1874, loved and respected by all who 
knew her. The father is still living, and 
his history will be found on another page of 
til is volume. 

C. G. Proffitt, whose name initiates tliis 
review, was 'a lad of eleven vears when he 
accompanied his parents on their renio\-al tn 
Marion county, Iowa, taking up their abode 
near Pleasantville, where he assisted in the 
labors of the farm. His education was re- 
ceived in the public schools of Tennessee 
and Iowa. He first came to Rice county. 



Kansas, in .1873, t)ut shortly afterward re- 
turned to Iowa. In 1885 he again took up 
his abode in this county, where he has since 
remained, proving an active factor in the 
upbuilding and improvement of his adopted 
county. He now owns eleven hundred and 
twenty acres of the best land to be found in 
the locality, it being improved with a good 
residence, large barns, wind-mills, feed lots 
and all other necessary improvements. In 
addition to the raising of the cereals best 
adapted to this soil and climate lie is exten- 
sively engaged in stock raisni.;. dL-alini^- in 
cattle and hogs. He keeps on hand from fnur 
hundred tO' one thoiusand head of cattle on 
his large fami, and is also an extensive grain 
buyer. His Polled Angus cattle are among 
the finest to be found in central Kansas. He 
lias been largely instrumental in improving 
the grade of stock raised in the state, and 
his efforts have therefore been of public 
benefit, for the improvement of stock adds 
to its market value, and the wealth of the 
agricultural class is therefore augmented. 

In- IMarion county, Iowa, in 1876, oc- 
curred the marriage of Mr. Proffitt and Miss 
Sarah Elizabeth Schirner, who was born, 
reared and educated in Marion county, a 
daughter of Andrew Schirner, a native of 
Germany. After coming to the new world 
lie ser\ed as a soldier in the Unioai army 
during the Civil war, enlisting in the Iowa 
Graybeard Regiment, and served for three 
years. He was married in Indiana to ^lar- 
garet Titus, who was burn in Knox cuunty. 
Ohio, and her death occurred in 1876, at 
the age of sixty-two years. She was twice 
married, her first husband being James 
Walker, and they had four children: Jesse 
D. ; F. M., who was a soldier in the Union 
army during the Civil war; Emily J.; and 
Eliza. Unto 3.1r. and ]\Irs. Schirner were 
born five children, namely: Margaret, Si- 
las, Haniiali. Sarah E. and Lawrence. ]\Ir. 
Schirmr wa- called to his final rest in 1876, 
when se\ cntN-fiiur years of age. The union 
of our subject and wife has been' blessed \\-itli 
six children : ■ Leonard, who was married, 
October 8, 1899, to Bertha Wood, by whom 
he has one daughter, Frances Margaret, and 
they reside in Raymond township: Everett, 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



Ralpli, Frank, Esta and Beiyl. In his po- 
litical affiliations ]\Ir. Proffitt is'a Democrat, 
and he has served as a member of the school 
board. His life has been a success, but all 
his achievements are the result of patient ef- 
fort, unflagging industry and self-confi- 
dence. During his residence in the Sun- 
flower state he has so deported himself that 
as a citizen and as a man of business no 
man has a cleaner record or is more highly 
esteemed than he. 



JOHN AND JOHN F. BUTLER. 

Few citizens of Ellsworth county, Kan- 
sas, are better known or have been more suc- 
cessful in farming and stock raising, than 
John and John F. Butler, uncle and nephew, 
who operate a ranch of eight hundred and 
forty acres in this county. This is one of 
the most desirable stock farms in this part 
of ihe state, being located on both the 
Smoky Hill river and on Thompson creek. 
This noted ranch is owned and managed by 
Tohn Butler, jr., and his nephe^v, John F. 
Butler. 

The Butler family is of Irish extraction. 
John Butler was born in New York'city, on 
December 22, 1839, ^nd ^'^^ '^^'^s a son of 
James and Margaret (Hister) Butler, both 
of whom were born in Ireland, but lived a 
few years in New York after their emigra- 
tion, dying when their sons, John and James, 
were but three and five years of age. An 
aunt took charge of the orphans for some 
four years and then our subject, John, was 
bound out to a farmer, in Sullivan county. 
New York, and remained in his employ until 
he was of age. At this time he received fifty 
dollars in money and a suit of clothes in 
payment for his twelve years of service. 

A stirring life followed. In December, 
1863, our subject enlisted in the United 
States navy, from Brooklyn, on board the 
frigate Niagara, which was the flagship of 
Commodore Somers. The ship remained 
in harbor until the following June, starting- 
just one day too late to witness the engage- 
ment between the Alabama and the Kear- 



sarge. The cruise extended to Antwerp, Bel- 
gium, the port being reached in thirty davs, 
and until September, 1865, the vessel was 
engaged in cruising along the French and 
Spanish coasts and along the English chan- 
nel, in search of privateers. 

In September of this year the vessel re- 
turned to New York and our subject was 
discharged in October. Starting westward 
in search of a permanent career, Mr. Butler 
reached St. Joseph, ^Missouri, which was 
then the terminus of the Hannibal & ]^Iis- 
souri railroad. Here he spent a short time 
working on the construction of the Hanni- 
bal & St. Joe road, going thence to Leaven- 
worth, where he was engaged as a govern- 
ment teamster on the overland Sante Fe 
trail. Mr. Butler started in as a driver in 
a train of thirty wagons, with thlrty-fi\e 
other men, and they reached Kit Carson 
Crossing of the Arkansas river and there 
they were snowbound. It was necessary 
for them to go into camp here and it was 
not until the following March that they were 
released, an eastbound train then coming 
to their rescue. This unfortunate band was 
by that time reduced to almost the last ex- 
tremity, their provisions being e.xhausted 
and their clothes so worn out that "gunny- 
sacks" were made use of in place of neces- 
sary articles. For a considerable period their 
only food had been parched corn, which 
they used in all forms. The whole party, 
however, survived, and although exhausted 
and ill, safely reached Leavenworth. 

In the spring of 1867 Mr. Butler went 
to the Delaware Nation, south of Leaven- 
worth, and engaged in farming and railroad- 
tie making for some three months, return- 
ing then to Leavenworth and hiring his 
services to a Mr. Bausman for a period of 
four months. In the following September 
our subject went to what is now Valley- 
Falls, but which then was called Grasshop- 
per Falls, and there engaged " for eighteen 
months in farm work, going then to Atchi- 
son, w-here he reinained during the succeed- 
ing two years. 

In July, 1869, Mr. Butler came to Fort 
Harker, in Ellsworth county, and was en- 
gaged as a driver in a wagon train from 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



Fort Harker to Fort Sill, returning in De- 
cember of the same year. In the following 
I\Iarch he located a homestead claim on the 
Dry Fork of Thompson Creek, on section 
34-16-7, a strip which was eighty rods wide 
and one mile long. Here he made his home 
until 1874, engaging in stock raising in a 
small way at first, and gradual!)' increasing 
until he owned some eighty head. In 1875 
he sold out his claim for four hundred dol- 
lars, and during the next two ^-ears. he con- 
tinued grazing his own herd and also took 
I in stock for others. In 1882 Mr. Butler 
I bought two hundred acres of land from Eli- 
, jah and Samuel Johnson, this being a part 
' of his present home. A year or two later, his 
brother and two children joined him in Kan- 
sas. At this time his brother was a widower, 
in Xew York, his two children being : Ella, 
who w.as the wife of Edw^ard Peary, but now 
deceased, a farmer and stockman of Mitchell 
county, and John F., who is at present asso- 
ciated with our subject in his large opera- 
tions. As sooni as the latter reached his 
majority, he was takeu into partnership by 
his uncle. 

Since this firm was formed the entire of 
section 2.3 has been added to the original 
tract, making the present estate to comprise, 
eight hundred and forty acres, some three 
hundred of which is under cultivation, while 
from two to three hundred head of cattle 
are continually kept. All of the excellent 
imprO'Vements on this estate have been made 
by ]\Ir. Butler, the fencing alone being an 
enormous expense. 

In all public, matters Mr. Butler has 
taken an intelligent and public spirited inter- 
est, always doinp- his full share to promote 
enterprises for the advancement nf Ells- 
worth ci/iunty. In politics he has always 
l;een a Democrat, but has never accepted any 
I 'fhce except a membership on the school 
l:oard. on account of his interest in educa- 
tional matters. Fraternallv he is connected 
with Ellsworth Post. G. A. R. 

John F. Butler was born in New 
York city ou October 22. 1869, and he was 
deft motherless at the age of ten years. In 
1883 he accompanied his father to Ellsworth 
countv to make his heme with his uncle 



John, recei\'ing a hearty welcome and later 
becoming his partner in business. On De- 
cember 6. 1 89 1, he was united in marriage 
to Rebecca E. Brown, who was a daughter 
of James and Rebecca (Evans) Brown. 
Airs. Butler was born in Harrison county, 
Ohio, and came to Kansas with her parents 
in 1889. Mr. Butler ha)s developed into 
one of the leading stockmen of this county, 
is universally esteemed, and is prominentlv 
identified with the Masonic fraternity, with 
the A. O. U. W. and the M. \V. A., of Kan- 
opclis. In politics he adheres to the prin- 
ciples of the Democratic party. The home 
is brightened by the presence of one beauti- 
ful little daughter, named Ella M. 

James Butler, who is the other mem- 
ber of this family, and the father of 
John F. Butler, was born in New York city 
on February 28, 1835. and on February 28, 
1867, was married to Catherine McGovern, 
who was also born in that city. During the 
Civil war he was connected with the Armv 
of the Potomac and took part in the battles 
of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, and 
after faithful service was honorably dis- 
charged in June, 1863. Until the fall of 
1865 he was engaged in New Jersey at his 
trade and then accepted a position as freight 
agent for the N. Y. & N. J. railroad, latter 
traveling in the interests of the firm of 
i Kemp, Day & Co., frdm 18^.7 until 1870. 
He then engaged in Inulding until 1883. 
when he came to Kansas to make Ins home 
with his brother and since that time has as- 
sisted on the ranch. 

Mr. Butler has taken an active part in 
Democratic politics, has frequently been a 
delegate to congressional, state and county 
conventions, and has most acceptably filled 
the oftice of overseer of liighways. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with Ellsworth Post, 
G. A. R., and has been sergeant in that body 
at the state encampment. 

The ho.me life enjoyed by this family 
elicits good natured envy from the neigh- 
borhood. Mr. John Butler. Sr., after an 
early life of so much adventure and struggle, 
is able now to enjoy some of its fruits, sur- 
rounded bv those of nearest kindred, by 
whom he is bel(n-e<l and appreciated. The 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



famil}- is one of the most highly respected 
in Ellsworth county, not only on account 
of the business ability it displays, but for 
its estimable domestic virtues and exalted 
citizenship. 



WILLIAM ASTLE. 

A worthy representative of one of the 
most prominent ' and honored pioneer fam- 
ilies not only of Haven township, but of 
central Kansas, is William Astle. They 
have ever borne their part in the upbuilding 
and development of this region and have 
invariably been exponents of progress and 
liberal ideas upon all subjects. In 1872 the 
Astle family, consisting of the father, moth- 
er and eight sons and daughters, located in 
the Sunflower state, where they were among 
the very earliest settlers of what' is now 
Haven township, and from that time to the 
present no famil)- has been more prominent- 
Iv identified with the various interests of 
the community than the Astles. 

William Astle, of this review, was born 
in Derbyshire, England, on the 21st of No- 
vember, 1840, a son of Richard Astle, who 
was a native of the same locality, his birth 
having there occurred on the 15th of Febru- 
arv. 181 1. In his native land the latter was 
united in marriage to Sarah Hibbert, also 
a native of Melbourne, Derbyshire, Eng- 
land, born on the 3d of February, 1810, and 
there twelve sons and daughters were born 
unto them, but three of the number, Sarah, 
Harriet and Mary, died in infancy. In 1852, 
after several of the children had grown to 
years of maturity, and the two oldest, John 
and Elizabeth, had married and located in 
Derbyshire, England, the family, consisting 
of the father, mother and seven children, em- 
igrated to America, and after their arrival 
here they located near Quincy, Illinois, 
where the father was engaged principally in 
gardening until 1861. In that year the fam- 
ily removed to Godfrey, Illinois, near Al- 
ton, where they follcrwed agricultural pur- 
suits until 1866, and then removed to the 
eastern portion of the county, at Alhambra. 
In 1872 Mr. and ]Mrs. Astle and several of 



their children took up their abode in what is 
now Haven township, Reno county, Kansas, 
and in the following fall they were here 
joined by the remainder of their children, 
consisting of six sons and two daughters, 
and the father and each of the children se- 
cured claims. The father's land was located 
on section 20, and there he spent many years 
of his life, during which time he greatly im- 
proved his land and took a very active and 
prominent part in the public affairs of the 
locality. He served as a justice of the peace 
during the early days of Haven, was very 
prominent in the organization of the First 
Methodist church in Haven township, of 
which he was long one of the leading mem- 
bers, was an ardent supporter of RqDublican 
principles and was a member of the old 
Manchester Union of Odd Fellows. His 
death here occurred on the loth of June. 
1883, and his wife survived him sfeveral 
years, passing away January 22, i8qi, 
aged eighty years and eleven months. Like 
her honored husband she, too, was a mem- 
ber oi the Methodist Episcopal church. Unto 
this worthy couple were born thirteen chil- 
dren, ten of w'hom grew to years of matur- 
ity : John, who was born November 17, 
1832, was a gardener by occupation and died 
in England, September 2. 1896, aged sixty- 
three years ; Elizabeth, who was born JMarch 
15, 1834, and died September 28. 1899, was 
the widow of Henry Barber and resided in 
Melbourne, England; Richard, born Feb- 
ruary 15, 1836, is a retired farmer of Haven 
city, where he has served as marshal and 
street commissioner; William is the subject 
of this review; George, born October 21, 
1842, is a prominart farmer and stock raiser 
residing two miles north of Haven, and dur- 
ing the Civil war he served for three years 
as a member of the Ninety-seventh Illinois 
Infantry, Company I; Joseph, born April 
27, 1845, died in Haven in 1899. where he 
was one of the leading hardware merchants ; 
Sarah, born February 16, 1847, is the de- 
ceased wife of Henry Challacombe, a farm- 
er of Cornelius, Oregon ; Marv, born Feb- 
ruary 20, 1849, is the wife of G. \\'. \'an . 
Buren, a prominent early settler and farmer 
residing one mile nortlieast of Haven ; 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



Harry, born January 21. 1S51. is a success- 
ful farmer and stock raiser northwest of 
Ha\-en; and Charles W'., the youngest of 
the family and the only one born in America, 
iiis birth occurring on the 21st of Novem- 
ber, 1854, in Ouincy, Illinois, is a retired 
farmer of Haven, where he has served as 
postmaster and mayor. 

William Astle. whose name introduces 
this review, received his early education in 
England, and after coming to this countrv 
he attended school for three months in the 
vicinity of Ouiiicv, Illinois. He assisted his 
father in the work of the farm until 1858, 
when he learned the blacksmith's trade in 
Ouincy, Illinois, following ^that occupation 
until 1862. In that year he enlisted for 
service in the Civil war, entering Company 
I, Xinety-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
tr}-. at Alton, Illinois, and in August he was 
mustered into service at Camp Butler. 
Springfield, Illinois, first under command of 
Colonel Rutherford, and later the regiment 
was under the command of Colonel Vif- 
quain, who' commanded Bryant's regiment 
during the Spanish-American war. From 
Spring-field the regiment was sent to Ken- 
tucky, where it formed a part of the amiy 
under Buell in the campaign against Bragg,, 
participating in the battle of Perryville. The 
regiment then went by boat from Louisville 
to Alemphis, and from there was taken by 
boat to Vicksburg in Xovember, where 
they formed a part of Sherman's army and 
attacked Vicksburg from the north at Chick- 
asaw bayou. This attack being unsuccess- 
ful, the army then fell back and was taken 
by boat to Arkansas Post, the army being 
then commanded by John A. AlcClernand. 
The pest was captured in the following Jan- 
uary, after which the army was sent to 'M\\\i- 
ken's Bend, just across the river from Vicks- 
burg, where it remained' camped until in 
April, 1863. The regiment of which ]\Ir. 
Astle was a member then participated in the 
campaign against A'icksburg, was also in the 
battles of Pert Gibson, Champiun Hills 
and Black River, and on the 19th of 
]May they drove the enemy into the forts 
around Vicksburg. On the 22(\ of that 
month he participated in the assault on 



the works and afterward in the siege 
of the city until it surrendered. The 
regiment then formed a part of the army 
that went to the capture of Jackson, Mis- 
sissippi, starting on the march on three 
o'clock of the 5th of July, and after besieg- 
ing the city for three or four days it was 
finally evacuated and they then returned to 

I Vicksburg, from which place the regiment 
was sent by boat to Xew Orleans, remain- 
ing in camp in western Louisiana until the 

' Red river expedition, with General Wash- 
burn in command, after which they were or- 
dered to Xew Orleans to be fitted out as 
ntounted infantry. On the way, however, the 
train was wrecked, leaving less than two 
hundred men fit ior duty, and these were 
put on provost duty for ten months in Xew 
Orleans, during which time the regiment 
was recruited and participated in the expe- 
dition against Mobile. They embarked on 
a ship at X'ew Orleans for Pensacola. ad- 
vancing thence by the ^Mobile & Charleston 
railroad to Fort Blakely, and on the 9th of 
April, 1865, the fort was caried by storm, 
but during the assault the regiment. suffered 
greatly. From Alobile they proceeded up 
the Alabama river to Selma and ]\Iontgom- 
ery : thence on to the coast, where they em- 
barked on a ship for Galveston. Texas, 
where they were discharged in July, 1865, 
and at Camp Butler, Illjnois, on the 19th of 
August, 1865, they were mustered out of 
the service. 

After the close of the war Mr. Astle re- 
turned to Alton, Illinois, where he was en- 
gaged in agricultural jiursuits until 1872. 
and in that year he came to Kansas, locating 
in Haiven township, Reno cnunty, and at 
that time only about eight families resided 
in the township. He immediately secured 
a homestead claim on the southwest quar- 
ter of section 32, also a timber claim on the 
southwest quarter of section 34, and 
this section of- the state was then inhabited 
principally by Indians, buffaloes and ante- 
lopes. At one time Air. Astle killed a buf- 
falo ten miles east of where the city of Ha- 
ven noAv stands. He began life on thie 
western frontier in a small way, first erect- 
ing a small two-rcom house, but as time 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



passed by he gradually improved his claim 
and has also spent some time at his trade 
of blacksmithing. having a shop on his farm. 
As he prospered in his undertakings he has 
added to his original purchase until he is 
now the owner of about twelve hundred and 
forty acres in Haven and Castleton town- 
ships, but much of this, however, he has 
given to his sons. He still carries on general 
farming on his original soldier's homestead, 
which he secured on coming to this state, 
and which now almost adjoins the town of 
Haven on the north, where he maintains his 
residence. On this old homestead in 1885 
he erected one of the finest country residences 
in Reno county, the structure costing about 
four thousand dollars, and his residence and 
groimds aire among the most beautiful to 
be found in this section of the state. He 
also has one of the largest barns in Haven 
township. In addition to the raising of 
the cereals best adapted to this soil and cli- 
mate, Mr. Astle gradually worked into tll"e 
stock business, aud in 1886 he became ex- 
tensively engaged in the grain and live stock 
business,- establishing an office in Haven, 
where business is carried on under the firm 
style of \\'illiam Astle & Sim. Thev have 
a well furnished dfhce lucated near the ]Mis- 
souri Pacific railrnad ijn Kansas avenue, 
where they are extensively engaged in buy- 
ing and selling grain and live stock. In the 
spring of 1901 Mr. Astle erected a magnifi- 
cent grain elevator, the largest in the town, 
having a capacity of twenty thousand busli- 
els. Shortly after his return from the war. 
on the 25th of December, 1866. and while 
residing at Alton, Illinois, :\Ir. Astle was 
united in marriage to Louisa L. Tisius, a 
native of Wisconsin and a daughter of 
Henry and Louisa ( Fraink) Tisius, both na- 
tives of Germany and now deceased. The 
father, who was a shoemaker by trade, 
passed away at Alton. Illinois, several years 
ago, and the mother died in Haven in 1900. 
The union of our subject and wife has been 
blessed with five children, namely: Henry 
J., who is engaged with his father in the 
grain and li\-e stock business ; T. F., a farm- 
er near Haven: William R.. who is a farm- 
er and stockman near this citv: ]. W.. who 



makes his home with his parents : and Rose, 
the wife of O. P. Gilmore. In political mat- 
ters ]\Ir. Astle was formerly a Republican, 
but in recent years he has supported the 
People's party, believing it to represent the 
best interests of the American people. In 
1875 he \^'3S elected to the position of county 
commissioner, and for the past fourteen 
years he has served as a justice of the peace 
and also as a notary public. He was one 
of the original memljers of the town com- 
pany, of which he was \'ice-president for 
several years, and he still retains a number 
of lots in Haven. The town is located on 
railroad lanxl originallv owned bv Mr. As- 



tle, and it was laid < 
year in which the ^11 
was coustructeJ thr.a 
social relations he ha; 



ut in 1886, the same 

-souri Pacific railroad 

gh this place. In his 

lieen an Odd Fellow 



for the past thirty-fixe years, in which he 
has passed all the chairs, is a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, of Haven, 
and carries a life insurance in the Ancient 
Order of Pyramids. He has given his aid 
in many generous ways to the perpetuation 
of those forces which conserve the best in- 
terests of the coniiuunity. and the course 
that has followed in political, business, social 
and home circles commends him to- the high- 
est esteem of all. 



O. E. HOPKINS. 



The law stands most prominent among 
our learned professions because it is the only 
one that involves the study and pursuit of 
a stable and exact science. Theplogy, it is 
true, was once considered an inimitable 
science, but in these modern times we see 
the props of every creed attacked and new 
denominations multiplied. So it is with med- 
icine, for its practice and theories succeed 
each other in rapid revolution. But amidst 
them all the science of law remains un- 
changed, its principles as finn as the rock of 
Gibraltar. Is it any wonder then that men 
who follow the legal profession claim more 
than a passing interest from their fellow 
men? .A.nd this is especially true when they 




^^^€<^-/i-^i<f^^i.J^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



225 



have, through their own efforts acquired 
more than ordinary prominence and are 
known to exercise more than ordinary care 
in sifting the contents of fact and brain, well 
knowing that it is only on the anvil of discus- 
sion that the spark of truth can be struck. 

One of the most prominent legal practi- 
tioners at the bar of Rice county is O. E. 
Hopkins, wlm is iiow occupying the posi- 
tion of county attorney, to which ofHce he 
was elected on the Republican ticket in No- 
vember, 1898. He stands as an able repre- 
sentative of his profession in central Kan- 
sas, his ability being widelv recijgnized. He 
was born in ^^'arren county, Indiana, near 
\\'illiamsport, on the 26th of November, 
1868, ancl is a son of W. H. Hopkins, whose 
birth occurred in Illinois, where the grand- 
father of our subject located in pioneer days. 
A^^ H. Hopkins, the fathei", was reared in 
Indiana, and at the time of the Civil war he 
manifested his loyalty to his country by don- 
ning the uniform of the nation and joining 
the Thirty-third Indiana Infantry, with 
which he served until hostilities had ceased 
and the preservation oi the Uninn was an 
assured fact. He married Su-aii ."^cIim, Cl- 
over and' in 1871 came westward with his 
family to Kansas, securing a homestead 
claim in Farmer township, Rice county. 
This was before the county was organized, 
and in the work of its establishment Mr. 
Hopkins took an active part. He still owns 
the homestead, and is one of the leading and 
valued citizens of Rice county. In his po- 
litical views he is a Republican, and was the 
choice of his partv for sherifif in 1896, but 
was defeated by a fusion ticket. Socially 
he is connected with the Grand Army of the 
Republic and with th.e Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and in his religious belief 
he is a ]\Iethodist, taking an active interest 
in the work of the church. His life has been 
honorable and upright, and he is as faith- 
ful to all duties cf a civil nature as he was 
to the military duties which devolved upon 
him when he followed the stars and stripes 
through the south. He had but two children 
O. E., and Bertha, who is with her parents. 

Mr. Hopkins, whose name forms the 
captiijn of this review, was reared upo 



the 



homestead farm and there develojjed the 
physical strength which formed the founda- 
tion cf his success in life. He was early 
taught lessons of industry and honesty and 
was trained in the common branches of Eng- 
lish learning in the common schools, after 
which he pursued his studies in Salina, Kan- 
sits. For a time he engaged in teaching 
school, and. with the intention of making the 
practice :' ' ' ' ''i'e work, he matriculated 
in the 1 Mt of the State Univer- 

sity of A I ■ , , : I Ann Arbor, where he 
was graduated with honor in the class of 
1894. He is still a student and prepares 
his cases with great thoroughness and pre- 
cision. From the beginning of his profes- 
sional career he has met with a fair degree 
of success, and his clientage is now of a 
distinctively representative character. 

In October, 1897, was celebrated the 
marriage of Mr. Hopkins and Miss Lura 
C. Collins, of Salina, a lady of superior in- 
tellectual culture and refinement and a 
daughter cf S. W. Collins, who is now de- 
ceased. Socially Mr. Hopkins is connected 
with the ^Masonic fraternity, with the Inde- 
pendent Order cf ( )(M Fellriws and with the 
Knights of Pythias ledge, being a valued 
representative of those organizations. In 
pilitics he has ever been a stanch Republi- 
can and takes an active interest in the 
growth and success of his party. At his 
second election in November, 1900, to the 
position of county attorney he received a ma- 
jority of five hundred and fifty-six votes, a 
fact which indicates his personal popularity 
and the confidence reposed in his ability and 
ofificial integrity.- He discharges the duties 
of the ofhce i;i a nf'-^mpt and reliable manner. 
He is a -!i' v.; :i'l\ icate before the jury and 
concise in In- ;i] iic:ils before the court. He 
is Si I till rinL;hl\- well read in the minutiae of 
the \:'.:\\- tl-ai he is able to base his arguments 
upiui tlic-fi ugh knowledge of and fainiliar- 
ity with precedents and to present a case 
upon its merits, never failing to recognize the 
main points at issue and never neglecting to 
give a thorough preparation. His pleas 
have been characterized by a terse and de- 
cisi\-e logic and lucid presentation rather 
than by flights of oratory, and his power is 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



the greater betcre cuurt ur jury from tlie fact 
that it is recognized that his aim is ever to 
secure justice and not to ensliroud the 
cause in a sentimental garb of illusiijn which 
thwarts the principles of right and equity 
in\'olved. 



JOSEPH F. TAMPIER. 

In the past ages the history of a country 
was the record of wars and conquests ; to- 
day it is the record of commercial activity, 
and these whose names are foremost in its 
annals are the leaders in business circles. 
The conquests now made are those of mind 
over matter, not of man over man. and the 
victor is he wiio can successfully establish, 
control and operate extensive commercial 
interests. Joseph F. Tampier is one of the 
strong and influential men whose lives have 
become an essential part of the history of 
Ellsworth county. Tireless energy, keen 
;ierception. honestv of purpose, genius for 
devising and executing the right thing at 
the right time, joined to e\-ery day common 
sense, guided by great will power, are the 
chief characteristics of the man. As mana- 
ger of the leading grocery house in Wilson 
the place that he occupies in business circles 
is in the front rank. 

Mr. Tampier has been a resident of Kan- 
sas since the spring of 1880. He was born 
across the water, November 15, 1864, and 
came to America in 1867 with his parents, 
]\Ir. and ?vlrs. Joseph F. Tampier. The fam- 
ily located first in \\'isconsin, and for a 
year the subject of this review was con- 
nected with the farming interests of the 
state. They afterward removed to Saginaw, 
Michigan, and while residing there the 
mother died. In 1880 the father, with his 
son and daughter, came to Kansas, and the 
three now occupy a fine residence in Wilson, 
which was erected in 1893. 

On coming to Kansas Joseph F. Tam- 
]jier secured a quairter section of land in 
Russell county, and for some time devoted 
his attention to the cultivation and improve- 
ment of the tract. After three years, how- 
ever, he sold the farm and ijurchased a stock 



of goods in Wilson. The building in which 
I he began his mercantile enterprise stood on 
the east oi his present location, and there he 
I carried on o|>erations until 1887. In 1887 
! he erected a two-story business block, in^ 
which he now conducts his store. He is a 
well known and highly esteemed resident of 
the county, having been actively connected 
with its mercantile interests for many years, 
and in business circles he sustains an unas- 
sailable reputation for reliability. 

Joseph F. Tampier, whose name intro- 
duces this record, pursued his educjitiMU in 
the public schools of Saginaw am! accMm- 
panied his father on the removal ni the fam- 
ily to Kansas in 1880. A year later he. 
cajme to Wilson and has since been asso- 
ciated with mercantile interests in this city. 
He induced hs father to dispose of the farm 
and enter commercial life here. From the 
beginning Mr. Tampier has met with a high 
degree of success in his efforts. He is the 
manager of the store and carries a large line 
of hardware and queensware, as well as gro- 
cries. As the years have passed his trade 
has constantly and steadily increased as die 
result of the enterprise and honorable efforts 
of Mr. Tampier, and to-day the volume of 
business amounts to forty thousand dollars 
annually. He also engages in shipping' eggs 
to both eastern and western markets, hand- 
ling that product to the value of about twelve 
thousand dollars each year. In connection 
with other interests he is a partner in a 
general store in Sterling. He is a vei'v prac- 
tical, enterprising and progressive business 
man, manifesting keen discrimination in the 
control of his affairs, and at all times com- 
mandng the confidence and respect of those 
with whom he is associated. Air. Tampier 
donated half of the west wall of the building 
and eight feet of the lot to the Turners, who 
erected a lodge room and onera house ad- 
joining his business block on the east. 

Ill his political views Mr. Tampier is a 
stalwart Republican and keeps well informed 
on the issues of the day. He has several 
times served as a member of the city council 
and has given his support to all measures 
of reform and progress. Socially he is iden- 
tified with Samaria Lodge, No. 298, F. & 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



227 



A. :\I.; Ellsworth Chapter, Xo. t,^, R. A. 
M. : Ellsworth Council, R. & S. M. ; and in 
\\'ichita Commandery, No. 20. has attained 
the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. 
He is likewise identified with the Knights 
of Pythias fraternity and with tlie Knights 
and Ladies of Security. He withholds his 
co-operation from no movement that is cal- 
culated to prove. of benefit to the city and 
is justly regarded as one of the valued resi- 
dents of Ellsworth. In manner he is pleas- 
ant and genial, in dispositi(jn is kindly, and 
the high regard in which he is uniformly 
held is well deserved. His success in life 
may be ascribed tcj positive, determined pur- 
suit of business and to the fact that he is 
a man of hones^v and integritv. 



CHAI^LES R. JELLISOX. 

Charles R. Jellison is a lumber merchant 
of Wilson and is accounted one of the lead- 
ing representatives of business interests in 
the city. He is a native of Illinois, his birth 
having occurred on the 8th of February, 
1871, in Apple River, that state. He. was 
not yet four years of age when the family 
came to Kansas, and in the schools here he 
began his education, which was afterward 
supplemented by study in the ^^' esleyan Uni- 
versity, at Salina, Kansas, where he pursued 
a commercial course and was graduated 
with the class of 1890. Not long afterward 
he entered upon his business career', and in 
1893 formed a partnership with his brother, 
A. C. Jellison. in the lumlicr Ijusiness. This 
connection was maintained and the business 
carried on with a eood degree of success un- 
til the fall of 1897. when I\Ir. JelHson, of 
this revie^v, sold his interest, and from that 
time until the summer of 1900 devoted his 
attention to the operation of a farm adjoin- 
ing \\'ilson, which he had purchased. ■ He 
has one hundred and sixty acres of land, 
of which one hundred acres is under culti- 
vation, the remainder being devoted to pas- 
turage. He makes a specialty of the rais- 
ing of fine stock, having some very vain- 
able Heref(jrd cattle and draft horses. This 



enterprise proved a very profitable one, and 
to it he gave his undivided attention until 
1900, when he again became interested in 
the lumber business with his brothers, W. 
D. and A. D. Jellison, since which time he 
has acted as manager of the lumber yard 
in Wilson, in addition to supervising his 
farm. He has made many improvements 
upon his place, which is now in excellent 
condition, and his lumber yard also indi- 
cates the superintendence of a man well 
accjuainted with business and in touch with 
the progressive spirit of the times. It is 
located- on the railroad, which affords ex- 
cellent shipping facilities, and he handles 
hard wood as well as pine lumber, buving 
direct from southern and northern mills. 
His trade extends over a wide area, sales 
being made to a distance of forty miles to 
the north and ten:- or t\\-elve miles to the 
south, and over a radius of ten miles to the 
east and west. In addition to lumber he 
handles brick, lime, cement and other build- 
ing materials, and has a large and growing 
trade. His sales have already reached a 
proportion that brings to him a very hand- 
some income, making the business one of 
the most important in this line in this sec- 
tion of the county. 

On the Jjth of September, 1803, ^Ii"- Jel- 
lison was united in marriage tn ]\Iiss Iva 
Bertie, daugliter of W. H. and flattie J. 
Humphrey, of Wilson. Their union has 
been blessed with two children. Arthur A. 
and Marion Lucile. In his pi'litical views 
Mr. Jellis(jn is a stawart ReiniliHcan. giving 
an inflexible support to the principles of the 
party. His fellow townsmen, recognizing 
his worth and ability, have called him to 
public oflice, and he has ser^^ed both as city 
alderman and as city treasurer. He is iden- 
tified with the Pyramids and with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a 
consistent and faithful member of the Pres- 
byterian church, in which he is now choris- 
ter, having been a member of the choir since 
he was fourteen years of age. Personally 
Charles Reynard Jellison is the most genial 
of men. and, though his time is fully occu- 
pied by the details of his large business inter- 
ests, he awax's finds time to de\-ote to those 



228 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



of his friends wliose calls are purely of a 
social character. He is a thorough exem- 
plification of the tpyical American business 
n:an and e'entleman. 



ALBERT COPIES. 

Almost a quarter of a century has 
passed since Albert Combs came to Kingman 
countv. He took up farm work here, and 
throughout the intervening years has been 
engaged in the tilling of the soil, ranking 
among the leading agriculturists. He was 
horn in \"an Buren county, Tennessee, June 
9, 1S31. and is a son of Simon and T^Iartha 
( Murrill) Combs, who were also natives 
of the same state. The former died in 1833 
and the latter in 1839. leaving the following 
children: :\Iahala; Ella; Theresa; Nancy; 
Elizabeth: Athelia : Julia; Gideon; and Al- 
bert. They also had a daughter who died in 
her childhood. 

Albert Combs was left an orphan at the 
early age of eight years and when a little lad 
cf ten vears began earning his own livelihood 
bv working for twelve cents per day and 
his board. He was industrious, honest and 
reliable and therefore could always obtain 
emplovment, but the necessity of earning his 
living made it impossible for him to attend 
school. His youth was largely passed upon 
a farm in Camden county, IMissouri, and in 
185 1 he was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Ellen Kelley, a native of Missouri, 
and a daughter of Jesse H. and Lavina 
( \Miitenburg) Kelley, both of whom are 
now deceased. Her father was a native of 
Tennessee. I\Ir. and Mrs. Combs became 
the parents of three children, but two died in 
earlv life. The surviving daughter, jSIar- 
garet Lavina. became the wife of William 
^IcKee, of \Miite township, Kingman coun- 
ty. Th.e mother died in the fall of i860, in 
the faith of the ^lethcdist Episcopal church, 
01' which she was a consistent member, and 
for a second wife Mr. Combs chose Mrs. 
Nancy A. Vestal, a widow. ThcA- were 
married in 1865. but she died eight months 
later. Li 1869 he wedded :N[rs'! Sarah E. 



(Smith) Newman, a widow of Samuel G. 
Newman, who was a soldier of the Civil 
war and (^ed in Libby prison, January 5. 
1865. To his widoAv he left the care of 
three children, namely: Edward A., of 
Wichita. Kansas; Mrs. !Mary J. Corv, of 
\\'atonga, Oklahoma; and Albert E.. of 
Texas City, Texas. J\Irs. Combs was a 
daughter of J. ^^^ Smith, who died in 
Spring-field. Missouri. Her mother is still 
living and makes her home in Newton coun- 
ty. Missouri. Unto Mr. Combs and his 
present wife have been born two children: 
Eliza, who married W. F. Winfrey, and Al- 
man Ernest. Both are residents of White 
township, and the latter is serving as town- 
ship trustee. He married Almeda Herald, 
who died in Mav, 1891. leaviung a son 
Herald Albert. 

At the time of the Civil war Mr. Combs 
of this review offered his services to the gov- 
ernment, becoming a member of Company 
D, Sixth Missouri Cavalry, with which he 
served for three years under command of 
Captain Crockett and Colonel Wright. He 
was with the battalion of scouts in Spring- 
field, Greene county, Missouri, and was 
largely" engaged in figthing the bushwhack- 
ers and guerrilla bands in the woods and 
swamps of Missouri and Arkansas. He was 
present at ^^'ilson Creek when General Lyon 
was killed. He was also with Colonel 
Wright at Springfield, Missouri, and was in 
General Davis" command. Li a number of 
battles and skirmishes he displayed his brav- 
ery and loyalty, and at the expiration of his 
term of enlistment recei\-ed an honorable 
discharge at St. Louis, Missouri, returning 
to his home with a creditable military record 
for gallant service. 

Mr. Combs continued his connection with 
the farming interests of Llissouri until 1878, 
when he came to Kingman county and here 
secured a claim which he cultivated and im- 
proved until 1892, Avhen he purchased his 
present farm of one hundred and fifty acres 
in White township. Upon the place is a 
pleasant residence and substantial barns and 
outbuildings. He has a good vineyard and 
orchard and the well tilled fields promise a 
golden harvest. His thorough knowledge of 




MR. AND MRS. ALBERT COMBS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



229 



farm work and his progressive spirit have 
made him a capable and prosperous agricul- 
turist. His political support is given with 
unswerving loyalty to the Republican party. 
He is a member of the Baptist church, and 
his wife belongs to the Presbyterian church. 
For thirty years he has been a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic and main- 
tains pleasant relations with his comrades 
of the blue. In manner he is frank and gen- 
ial, in business straightforward, and at all 
times is known as a good citizen well worthy 
of mention among the representative men of 
his adopted county. 



ALMX E. SU^niERS. 

Among the prominent and enterprising 
agriculturists and stock raisers of Rice coun- 
ty, Kansas, is numbered Alvin E. Summers, 
who was born in Putnam county, Indiana. 
January 30, 1872. his parents being William 
C. and Mary ( Lake ) Summers. The pa- 
ternal grandfather of our subject was a 
native of Kentucky and a minister of the 
Cumberland Presbyterian church who came 
to Indiana at a very early day and settled 
in Putnam county, where he improved a 
gririd farm, which he carried on in connec- 
tion with his ministerial duties until called 
to his final rest. He was the father of five 
chldren, namely: James H., of Mitchell 
county, Kansas; Daniel T., deceased; Will- 
iam C. the father of our subject; Amanda 
and Almaza. William' C. Summers, the 
father of our subject, was born in Kentucky, 
in 1830, but was reared in Putnam county, 
Indiana, where he married and engaged in 
farming until 1872, when he came to Kan- 
sas, locating a homestead in Rice county, on 
which our subject now resides, and in the 
spring of 1873 he built a farm house upon 
it and moved his family into it. He then 
commenced making permanent improve- 
fnents. There were few permanent settlers 
in that locality at that time and the land 
was a vast unbroken prairie, but with char- 
acteristic energy he plowed and prepared 
a portion of his land for cultivation and in 



1874 he planted his first crop, but the grass- 
hoppers appeared and destroyed all vegeta- 
tion. This was enough to discourage most 
men, but with determined purpose he per- 
severed in his effoiis to make an honest liv- 
ing and finally his labors were crowned with 
success. He engaged in general farming 
and stock raising and became well and fa- 
vorably known, commanding the respect and 
confidence of all that knew him. In 1861 he 
enlisted in Company C, Fifty-first Indiana' 
Volunteer Infantry, under command of Cap- 
tain J. W. Sheete for three years' service or 
during the war. His regiment was assigned 
to the army of the Tennessee and he partic- 
ipated in some of the most important battles 
of the war, Shiloh, Stone River and Day's 
Gap in Alabamaj and many other minor 
battles and skirmishes. He was never 
wounded but was made a prisoner and 
placed in Libby prison, where he suffered 
from hunger and disease so severely that he 
never recovered his health. Later he was 
exciianged and at the expiration of three 
years received an honorable discharge No- 
vember 12, 1864. For a few years after his 
return home from the war he was not able 
to perform any manual labor and ne^-er re- 
gained his full strength and vigor. For 
this sacrifice to his country he receives 
from the government a small pension. He 
was married in Putnam county, Indiana, to 
Miss Alary Lake, a native of that state, born 
in 1833, and a daughter of Elisha L. Lake, 
of New Jersey, who' became a farmer and 
early settler of Indiana, remaining on his 
homestead there until his children married 
and scattered to homes of their own, and 
his wife died, when he came to Kansas, find- 
ing a good home among his children, and 
died in this state at the home of his daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Wright. 

Unto Elisha Lake and his wife were born 
the following children : Caroline, who mar- 
ried Dr. Collings, and he died in the INIexi- 
can war; Mary, the mother of the subject 
of this sketch; Hannah, the wife of S. 
Wright ; and INIartin, who died in childhood. 
William C. Summers was a very energetic 
\ and progressive agriculturist and by his hard 
' labor and honest dealing accumulated a 



230 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



handsome competence. In manner he was 
ven- genial and delighted in gathering 
around him his friends and neighbors for 
social converse. He was kind-hearted and 
charitable, ever ready to lend a helping hand 
to the needy or distressed. Socially he was 
connected with the Masonic fraternity and 
with the Grand Amiy of the Republic. He 
and his wife were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and were actively inter- 
ested in all of its work. Their home was 
blessed with eight children, namely : Ethan 
B., of Indiana; Elisha L., also of Indiana; 
Daniel T.. nf Chicago, Illinois: flattie F., 
the wife of E. N. Curts; William C, a 
druggist of Wheaton. Kansas; Laurel A., a 
ph)-sician and surgeon of \\'heaton, Kansas ; 
Sarah E.. the wife of -F. ^\. Becker; and Al- 
\'in E.. the subject of this sketch. The fa- 
ther of this family died November 26. 1898, 
and was liuried in Lyons cemetery, but his 
wife still sur\-i\-es him and has a good farm 
and home in Kansas. 

Ah-in E. Summers, whose name intro- 
duces this review, was about a year old when 
his parents moved to Kansas, where he was 
reared among the pioneers of Rice county, 
where he still makes his home. He was ed- 
ucated in the common schools oi Kansas 
and remained under the parental roof, assist- 
ing his father in the work of the home farm, 
until the latter's death, when the property 
was divided and our subject received eighty 
acres of the original homestead tract and 
later he bought the other eighty from his 
brother and now owns the original one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of the homestead. His 
father had also' given' eightv acres of land 
to each of his other children, and built his 
residence on another quarter and the home- 
stead land had no buildings upon it. In 
1895 our subject married and settled on one 
of his father's farms and after the latter's 
death he l^uilt a good house, barn and out- 
buildings on the homestead and is carrjdng 
on the work inaugurated by his father. He 
has placed the fields under a high state of 
cultivation, and carries on general farming 
and stock raising. 

In 1895 our subject was united in mar» 
riage to Miss ?ilina M. Hill, a ladv of in- 



telligence and culture, born in Sullivan coun- 
tv, Indiana, October 3, 187s, a daughter of 
W. F. and Elizabeth (Xorrick) Hill. Her 
father was a nati\'e of Pennsylvania and her 
mother of Ohio, where they were married. 
He was a carpenter by trade aiid also en- 
gaged in farming. In 1864 he enlisted for 
service in the rebellion and served until the 
close of the war, when he received an hon- 
orable discharge and returned tO' his home 
in Ohio, there remaining until 1872, when 
he removed to Sullivan county, Indiana, and 
bought a farm. In 1878 he sold the farm 
and moved to Kansas, locating in Rice coun- 
ty, where he rented a farm and later bought 
a farm, upon which he remained a number 
of years. He then again sold his place and 
moved to Oklahoma, where he took up a 
claim, which he has since sold and is now 
living among his children in Oklahoma. His 
wife died in Rice county, Kansas, in 1888. 
She was a consistent manber of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church and a most estima- 
ble woman. He is an industrious, honest 
farmer and mechanic, plain and unassum- 
ing and does not desire notoriety or public 
otSce, though he was formerly a Republi- 
can and now votes independently. He is a 
class leader in the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which he is a consistent member. 
He and his wife were the parents of ten chil- 
dren, namely: Serepta J., the wife of R. 
D. Hall ; Ida, who married J. W. Tarr : 
Daniel N., of Lyons; George W'., deceased: 
Stewart, of Lyons; Grant, now living in 
Perry, Oklahoma; Rose R., who marrried 
George W. Pancoast ; Anna E., who is }'et 
siingle; Mina M., the wife of our subject: 
and Jessie B.. who became the wife, of C. 
Bailey. 

Mr. Summers, of this review, is one of 
the most prominent agriculturists and stock 
raisers of Rice county, who by his unflag- 
ging industry, determined purpose, enter- 
prise and capable management has won a 
comfortable competence for himself and 
family. As a citizen he takes a deep and ac- 
tive interest in everything pertaining to the 
welfare of the community. He and his wife 
are consistent and worthy members of the 
IMethodist Episcopal church and take an 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



^31 



active interest in the work of the church and 
charitable and benevolent enterprises. They 
have no children, but their pleasant home is 
noted for its gracious hospitality and the 
circle of their friends is co-extensive with 
that of their acquaintance, and they well de- 
serve the respect and high regard in which 
thev are held bv all who know them. 



WILLIAM A. ROSE. 

One of the most highly respected, intel- 
ligent and valued citizens of Reno county is 
\\'illiam A. Rose, the pastor of the German 
Baptist church of Lincoln township and a 
well known and enterprising farmer who 
since pioneer times in the history of this 
county has been identified with its agricul- 
tural interests. He owns and operates three 
hundred and twent}- acres of land and there 
is not in the township, if in the county, a 
better impoved place than the property of 
our subject. 

Mr. Rose is a native of Franklin county, 
Ohio, born July 16, 1844, his parents being 
S. G. and Jane (Ogden) Rose, both of 
whom were natives oi the same county. He 
accompanied them on their remo\-al to Lu- 
cas county, Iowa, and assisted his father in 
the work of the home farm until sixteen 
years of age, when, in September. 1861, he 
offered his services to the government as a 
defender of the Union, whose destruction 
was threatened by the spirit of secession in 
the south. He became a memher of Com- 
pany C. Thirteenth Iowa Volunteer Infan- 
try, and took part in the battles of Shiloh, 
Pittsburg Landing and tlie siege and battle 
of Corinth. He was also in the campaign 
with Grant througli central ]\Iissi^sippi, then 
back to ^Memphis and liy wa}- of the river 
to Vicksburg, participating in the siege of 
that city. After that campaign he marched 
to Meridian and then returned to \'icksburg. 
He then returned home on a thirty days' 
furlough, and after rejoining the army he 
partici]iated in the Atlanta campaign from 
May until the 23d of August, being contin- 
U(!usly under fire with the e.xception of but 



two days. Mr. Rose also went with Sher- 
man on the memorable march to the sea, 
which proved that the strength of the Con- 
federacy was broken, and was detached for 
forage duty on that jnarch, running many 
narrow escapes from being captured by the 
enemy, ^^'ith his command he afterward 
went north by boat from Savannah to Beau- 
fort, South Carolina, and was present at the 
capture of Columbia, the capital of that state, 
his regiment pulling down the Rebel flag 
I that waved from the dome of its capitol 
building. Mr. Rose carried the flag and pre- 
sented it to General Sherman's wife at South 
Bend, Indiana. He served throughout the 
war as a non-commissioned officer — cor- 
poral and sergeant — and his valor and brav- 
ery was equal to that of many a veteran of 
twice his years. He participated in the 
grand review in Washington, where "wave 
after wa\e of bayonet-crested blue" swept 
by the stand from which the president 
watched the march of his victorious armies. 
Returning to Iowa Mr. Rc^e entered 
JMount Pleasant University to resume his in- 
terrupted studies w itli tlic pm-pose of prepar- 
ing for a teacher's pii 1 i'e->i« n. He afterward 
spent four years in teaching in Iowa and 
after his marriage turned his attention to 
farming. As a companion and heljjmate for 
the journey of life he chose Miss Kate Cut- 
ler, a daughter of Joel Cutler. She was 
l>orn in Licking county. Ohio, and with her 
parents went to Iowa in 1859, the marriage 
being celebrated in the latter state on the 15th 
of October, 1868. 

After his marriage ]Mr. Rose j^urchased a 
farm of eighty acres of brush land in Iowa, 
and clearing it he continued its cultivation 
until March, 1873, ^vhen he came to Reno 
county. Kansas, and located his present 
claim. He then returned to the Hawkeye 
state, and in September came by team and 
wagon to his new home. All was still wild 
and unimproved in this region, buffaloes 
could still be shot in this locality, and Mr. 
Rose could eount not less than forty car- 
casses within sight of his home. He built a 
residence that was somewhat in advance of 
the prevailing style of the country at that 
time — a two-story frame dwelling, twelve by- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



sixteen feet, one story being under ground. 
In the spring of 1874 he planted sixteen 
acres in corn, but his crop was entirely de- 
stroyed by the grasshoppers. Discouraged 
he returned to Iowa, where he renTained for 
a year, engaged in farming. ' The following 
year, with a replenished exchequer and new 
courage, he again came to Reno county, and 
this time was more successful. He rapidly 
improved his place and the rich fields soon 
returned to him a golden harvest as a re- 
ward for the care and cultivation he be- 
stowed upon them. He purchased the south- 
west quarter of section 29, Lincoln town- 
ship, adjoining his first purchase — one hun- 
dred and sixty acres on section 32, so that 
he now owns an entire half section in one 
tract. He has intelligently followed farm- 
ing, his methods being practical and pro- 
gressive and his efl:'orts have therefore been 
attended with success. He feeds a large 
number of cattle, selling usually two hundred 
head each year, and buying a large portion 
of the grain used for feeding- purposes. The 
grounds which surround his home are the 
most tastefully arranged in the township, 
and his farm is one of the finest and most de- 
sirable in the county. He has a comfortable 
and beautiful residence and his orchard com- 
prises ten acres. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Rose has 
been blessed with five children: ^^'alter L., 
whO' is now a practicing" physician of Har- 
per, Kansas; John G.. a student in Xicker- 
son College ; Loda, the wife of Alonzo Rob- 
erts, of Oklahoma ; and Frank and Lena, 
who are still under the parental roof. The 
family hold membership in the German Bap- 
tist church, of which 'Mr. Rose has been a 
minister since 1889. This church was or- 
ganized by Lemuel Hillery and Abraham^ 
Shipler in 1886, with a membership of about 
twenty, including Benjamin Shester, A. F. 
Miller, John Young. Amos Hartman. Peter 
Hartman. Hetty Engle, William' A. Rose 
and wife. George Rexrood and wife. ]\Iinnie 
Negley, now Mrs. L. P. Smith, David Xeg- 
ley and wife, William Rexrood. and wife. 
John Showalter and wife. Catherine Al- 
bright. G. W., Keedy and wife, Levi Hertz- 
ler and wife and daughter Rhoda, now the 



wife of Guy MclMurry, Samuel Kechler and 
wife. Ella 'Miller and Mrs. IMary Gardner. 
The building was erected that year on the 
southwest quarter of section 27, Lincoln 
township, at a cost of about eleven hundred 
dollars. The first regular ministers were 
Lemuel Hillery and Abram Shipler. who 
were followed by Enoch Eby and A. F. Alil- 
ler, the latter the present elden-. He has rt- 
mained in charge for the last three years. 
The congregation has increased to a mem- 
bership of ninety-five. 

Mr. Rose has not only been an active 
worker in the interest of the local church 
but gave his aid and influence toward the 
establishment of the state institution of that 
church — The Old Folks" & Orphans" Home, 
which is situated on section 27. Lincoln 
township, and is sin'rounded by eighty acres 
of land belonging to the institution. Mr. 
Rose has led a busy and active life aside 
from his ministerial duties and the care of 
his farm, for he has taken an active part in 
promoting the general good along many 
lines of progress. The cause of education 
has found in him a warm friend and for a 
number of years he has served on the school 
board, acting as its clerk for some time. His 
life has ever been honorable and upright and 
his influence has been widelv felt for good. 



J. S. XUXEMAKER. 

J. S. Xunemaker is a leading represen- 
tative of the agricultural interests of King- 
man county, where he owns and operates 
a' most desirable farm. Of excellent busi- 
ness ability and broad resources, he has at- 
tained a prominent place among the sub- 
stantial citizens of his part of the county 
and is a recognized leader in public affairs. 
He has won success by his well directed and 
energetic efforts, aitd the prosperity that 
has come to him is certainly well deserved. 

Mr. X'unemaker was born in Clinton 
county, Indiana, forty--four years ago, and 
is of German lineage, his grandfather, 
James X^'unemaker, having been born in the 
fatherland. His father, Joseph X^unemaker, 



I 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



was born and reared in Hocking county, 
Ohio, and after reaching years of maturity 
he was there married to Clarissa Taylor, a 
native also of that county and a daughter 
of William Taylor, who claimed Pennsyl- 
vania as the state of his nativity and was 
of English parentage. Soon after their 
marriage ^Ir. and Mrs. Nunemaker re- 
moved to Clinton county, Indiana, where tlie 
-former died at the age of fifty-three years. 
He fullnwed the vocation of farming- as a 
means of livelihood, and in political mat- 
ters he upheld the Democracy. His widow 
was called- to^ the home beyond while re- 
siding in Kansas, passing away at the age 
of seventy-four years. A family of ten chil- 
dren were born unto this worthy couple, 
namely : Lovina Jane, Elizabeth, Clarissa, 
Daniel, Amanda, Thomas, Joseph S., 
Rachel, George and Alice. 

Joseph S. Nunemaker, whose name intro^ 
duces this review, was reared to years of 
maturity on an Indiana farm, and his edu- 
cational advantages were those afforded by 
the common schools of Clinton county. He 
remained in his native state until 1885, in 
which year he came toi Kansas, and after 
his arrival here he purchased the quarter 
section of land which he yet o-wns, located 
on section 26, Ninnescah township, and 
on this place he has ever since been engaged 
in general farming and stock-raising. When 
he took possession of the farm only a small 
amount of the land had been placed under 
cultivation by its former owner, William 
Weiler, but he has since improved the entire 
place, and his fields now annually yield tO' 
him a handsome financial return for the 
care and labor which he bestowes upon 
them. Substantia] and commodious build- 
ings adorn the place, and everything about 
the farm bears evidence of a progressive 
and thrifty owner. 

In 1880 was celebrated the marriage of 
^Ir. Nunemaker to ^Nliss Elda Lamberson, 
who was born in Clinton county, Indiana, in 
1857, a daughter of William Lamberson and 
a granddaughter of Levi Lamberson, both 
natives of -Alaryland and of English descent. 
The mother of Mrs. Nunemaker bore the 
maiden name of Marv Frver, and both she 



and her father, James Fryer, were also 
natives of Maryland. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
\Villiam Laniiberson were born sevei: chil- 
dren, — Ira, John, Sarah, Phcebe, Elda, Levi 
and William. The father was a life-long 
farmer, was a Democrat in his political 
views, religiously a Baptist, and his death 
occurred in Clinton county, at the age of 
seventy-one years. His Avife reached the 
age (if se\ciUy-eight years, dying in the faith 
it the Cliristian church, and she was loved 
and hdniired Ijy all who knew her. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Nuneanaker have been born 
seven children, six sons and one daughter, 
namely: Ernest J., William E., Mittie 
Alice, Dennis A., Schuyler and John and 
Joseph, twins. Mr. Nunemaker casts his 
ballot in favor of the men and measures of 
the Democracy, and for many years he 
served as a member of. the school- board, 
the cause of education ever finding in him 
a warm- friend and active worker. Such is 
the record of one who has been an important 
factor in the public improvement as well 
as the business interests of his adopted coun- 
ty. His code of morals is such as to impel 
him to a just consideration of the rights 
of all with whom he has been brought in 
contact and toi a conscientious observance of 
all proprieties of life. Thus he has retained 
throughout his career friendships which 
have grown stronger with more intimate ac- 
c^uaintance, and all who know him estean 
him for his sterling worth. 



JACOB WEIGEL. 



Nearly every state in 1 le Union has sent 
her quota of men to Kr.nsas. and among 
those that Pennsylvania h.as furnished to the 
Sunflower state is Jacob Wcigel, who was 
born in Erie county, Pennsvlvania, .Septem- 
ber 19, 1843, 'lis parents being Nicholas and 
Margaret (Iseworth) Weigel, both of whom 
were natives of Germany. The father was 
born about 1808, and when twenty-eight 
years of age came to the United States. In 
Pennsylvania he met and married Miss ise- 
worth, the wedding being celebrated about 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



1837. He was a farmer and took up his 
abode upon one hundred and twenty acres 
of land, where he and his wife spent their 
remaining days. Unto them were born thir- 
teen children, eight of whom reached years 
of maturity, and two, of the five sons served 
in the Union army. John, the eldest of the 
family, was for three years a member of the 
army and was wounded January 15, 1865, at 
Fort Fisher, North Carolina, his injuries 
being very severe and causing him much 
suffering for several years. Mrs. Weigel. 
the mother, died \\-hen about forty-fix-e 
years of age. The father ever remained true 
to her memory, living as a widower until 
1898, when he passed away, at the age of 
ninety years. He was in good' financial cir- 
cumstances and was a strong man physically, 
mentally and morally. Both he ant! his wife 
were reared in the Catholic faith, but sev- 
ered their connection with that clmrch. 

In his parents' home Jacob Weigel spent 
his youth. In 1864 he responded to the 
country's call for assistance to aid in preserv- 
ing the Union, enlisting as a member of 
Company I, Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania In- 
fantry, with which he remained until the 
close of the war, when he was mustered out 
at Raleigh, North Carolina. He nnw draws 
a pension of twelve dollars a month. 

On the 4th of July. 1868. after return- 
ing from the war, Mr. Weigel was joined in 
wedlock to Miss Henrietta C. Stricklin, of 
Richland. Michigan, in which place the wed- 
ding was celebrated. The lady is a daugh- 
ter of James Stricklin, now of Michigan. 
The young couple began their domestic life 
upon a rented farm in Kalamazoo county, 
where Mr. Weigel carried on agricultural 
pursuits for thirteen years. On the 26th of 
March, 1878, he arrived in Sterling, Kan- 
sas, and soon afterward took a soldier's 
"homestead in Reno county, near Sterling. 
His wife was in poor health, and on this 
account they returned to Michigan, where 
she died December 31, 18S0. at the age of 
thirty-five years. She lost her first daugh- 
ter at the age of eighteen and her second 
•daughter ako died at the same age. For 
the* past twenty-one years Mr. Weigel has 
resided in the Kimliall familv and has en- 



gaged in the operation of the Kimball farm 
as well as his own. He has always been a 
hard working man. industry being one of 
his marked characteristics, and though he 
has acquired a competence he does not be- 
lieve in idleness and therefore continues in 
the active control, of his farming affairs. In 
politics he is a Republican, giving a stal- 
v\-art support to the principles Oif the party. 
Socially he is connected with the Grand 
Army of the Republic and with the Benev- 
olent Association of St. Louis. He is a man 
of sterling worth, of strong convictions and 
unquestioned honesty, holding his word as 
obligatorv as his bond. 



MOSES H. VAN BIBBER. 

Moses H. Van Bibber is a well known 
agriculturist of Huntsville township, Reno 
county, Kansas, and the success which he 
has achieved' is the merited reward of his 
own labor. He has worked his way stead- 
ily upward, overcoming all the difficulties 
and obstacles in his path by determined pur- 
pose, and to-day he is recognized as one of 
the most substantial citizens of the cimi- 
munity, his labors having brought to him 
a handsome competence. 

Mr. Van Bibber was born in Nicholas 
county. West Virginia, on the 7th of Feb- 
ruary, 1828, of which countv his father, Da- 
vid C. R.'Van Bibber, was also a native. 
The latter held the rank of captain in the 
militia. The grandfather of our subject. 
Mathias A'an Bibber, was the first white male 
child born in a fort in Greenbrier county. 
West Virginia, and he held the rank of cap- 
tain in the militia, while his father, Jnlin 
Van Bibber, served as a colonel therein. 
About 1824 David C. R. Van Bibber, the 
father of our subject, wedded Jane Will- 
iams, who was born in Greenbrier county. 
West Virginia, December 12, 1804, and they 
became the parents of ten children, seven 
sons and three daughters, and eight of the 
number still survive. The mother passed 
away in Nicholas county. West \'irginia, in 
1872, and in '1889, from that county, her 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



235 



liusband joined her in the spirit world, dy- 
ing at tlie age of about ninety years, liis 
liirth having- occurred on tlie i6th of Xo- 
vember, 1799. 

Moses H. Van Bil>ber, whose name in- 
troduces this review, enjoyed but limited ed- 
ucational advantages chiring his youth, but 
since putting aside his text-books he has 
largely added to his knowledge by observa- 
tion, reading and study, and has thus be- 
come a well inf</rnied man. In early life 
he learned surveying In- himself, and for a 
number of years followed that occupation in 
his native state. On the iitli of May, 1874, 
he left his home in the south and with a 
team of horses and a covered wagon made 
the journey to the Sunflower state, arriving 
in Walnut township. Reno ciuiiitv. in the 
following June, and was at that time almbst 
without means. He secured eighty acres of 
land, to which he afterward added another 
eighty-acre tract, lint in 1884 he sold that 
place for fourteen hundred dollars and pur- 
chased the farm which he now owns. It 
then consisted of one hundred acres of rail- 
road land, and the purchase price was five 
hundred and ninety dollars. The principal 
•crop which he raises is corn and wheat, an- 
nually harvesting about two thousand bush- 
els of corn, and during the year of 1901 his 
wheat crop yielded a return of two thou- 
sand one inmdred and sixty bushels. His 
beautiful orchard and shade trees were 
planted by his own hands, and the many 
substantial and valuable improvements here 
seen stand as monuments to his thrift and 
ability. 

In the Old Dominion, on the 14th of Sep- 
tember, 1858, Mr. Van Bibber was united 
in marriage to Joanna Pierson, a native of 
that commonwealth, and they had a family 
of four children, namely: David, who re- 
sides in Peoria, Illinois, and has two chil- 
dren : Franklin, who makes his home in 
^\'est A'irginia; Margaret Jane, wife of 
Henry Jones, of Peabody, Kansas, and they 
have five children; and Lizzie IMcClintosh, 
who died leaving one daughter. For his 
second wife I\Ir. Van Bibber chose \'irginia 
Ann Hrilt. who was born in Charleston. 
AA^est \^irginia. and was married' September 



14, 1867. and by this union there were also 
four children: John, who is married and 
revsides in Oklahoma; Ulysses Simpson 
Grant, who makes his home in Huntsville 
township, and has one daughter, and one 
sou; ;\Iinnie, wife of O. C. Andel, by whom 
she has two daughters, and they reside with 
her parents : and Fred, at home. The mother 
of this family died on the 27th of October, 
1892, at the age of fort3--nine years. On 
questions of national importance Mr. Van 
Bibber casts his ballot in favor of Repub- 
lican principles, but at local elections he votes 
for the men whom he regards as best quali- 
fied for pulilic office. He has ever been a 
loyal and public-spirited citizen, and during 
the Civil war he served for two years as a 
corporal in the state service. He is also a 
worthy member and active worker in the 
Missionar\' Ba|jtist church. As a citizen he 
is 1:' ,11 !. and loyal, as a business man 
str;!i;:; I 1 .\ , lil and honorable, and as a 
fricinl lie 1^ laithful and consistent. 



C. B. SMITH. 

C. B. Smith is extensively engaged in 
farming and stock-raising. Success in any 
calling is an indication of close application, 
industry and faithfulness, qualities which 
are numbered among the leading character- 
istics of our subject, and the greatest re- 
ward of the successful man is his conscious- 
ness of having acted well his part. This Mr. 
Smith has ever done, and to-day he stands 
among the highly respected citizens of his 
community. 

A native of Canada, Mr. Smith was born 
at Port Stanley. July 24, 1847, 'i"tl is a son 
of Alvin and Eleanor (Clark) Smith, the 
former a native of Massachusetts and the 
latter of Nova Scotia. Their marriage was 
celebrated in Canada. The paternal grand- 
father of our subject, Grove Smith, was a 
member of an old and prominent Massa- 
chusetts family and was a soldier in the war 
for American independence. He was a 
mechanic bv profession, and his death oc- 
curred in Canada. His children were : Su- 



236 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



sail, who married Janies Tobime. he being 
a member of an old pioneer family of Illi- 
nois; Moses, Aaron, Zenos, George W., 
Montgomer}', 'Alvin and Safronia, who be- 
came Mrs. Benedict. Alvin Smith, the fa- 
ther of our subject, was reared to manhood 
in the state of his nativity. He afterward 
emigrated to Canada, going the entire dis- 
tance on foot, walking on an average of 
sixty miles a day, and there he settled with 
his father and family. They bought land 
and improved a farm from the native tim- 
ber. In 1833 Mr. Smith removed to Illi- 
nois, locating in Boone county, where he 
rented a farm, but death claimed him four 
years later and he passed away in 1857. His 
wife survived him for many years and nobly 
succeeded in keeping her family together and 
providing them with the necessaries of life. 
After many years she came to Kansas, and 
her death occurred at the home of her son, 
our subject, in McPherson county. Both she 
and her husband were Free Will Baptists. 
They were the parents of ten children, 
namely: Hiram, who died in Minnesota; 
Lucy A., who was twice married, first to J. 
Moss and afterward to D. Thurston ; Mary 
E., who became Mrs. Higbee, and after his, 
death she wedded W. Phelps; Harvey J., 
who died in Arkansas; Henry T., a resident 
of Rockford, Illinois ; Alvin M., who makes 
his home in Arkansas; Ella G., the wife of 
G. H. Irish; Sarah J., who married C. A. 
Wing; Charles B., the subject of this re- 
view; and Carrie V., who married A. C. 
Church and died at Belvidere, Boone county, 
Illinois, about 1864. The mother of this 
famijy was twice married, her first husband 
having been a Mr. Johnson, by whom she 
had one son, William Johnson. He was 
reared by Mr. Smith, and on reaching his 
majority the latter gave him a good farm, 
he being at that time in good circumstances, 
but afterward misfortune overtook him and 
his own children were obliged to begin life 
for themselves without assistance. 

C. B. Smith, whose name introduces this 
review, was only six years of age when he 
accompanied his parents on their removal 
to Illinois, where he grew to manhood, re- 
ceiving his education in tne common schools. 



After the death of his father he remained 
j with his widowed mother and, with his 
I brothers, Alvin M. and H. J., assisted her in 
j the support of the family. In 1870 he left 
I that state and made his way to Kansas, first 
j locating in McPh.erson count}-, where he se- 
cured a homestead claim. His mother after- 
ward joined him in this state and he nobly 
cared io.r her (luring the remainder of her 
life. He remained in jMcPherson county 
until 1885, when he sold his property there 
and came to Rice county, settling on the 
farm on which he now resides. Only eighty 
acres of this place had then been broken, 
there were no fences and a small frame dwel- 
ling stood upon the land. Mr. Smith has 
since enlarged and remodeled his residence, 
which is two stories in height, and has a 
large barn and all necessary outbuildings. 
The place is located five miles southeast of 
Little River and is one of the well improved 
and valuable farms of the county. In addi- 
tion to his general farming and stock-rais- 
ing Mr. Smith also operates a threshing 
machine. 

In McPherson county, Kansas, in 187S, 
he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
Pinkerton, who was born at Kirksville, Mis- 
souri. June 7, 1855, a daughter of Thomas 
and Harriet ( Normanl Pinkerton, both na- 
tives of Ohio. They were married in the 
Buckeye state, and in 1855 removed to Mis- 
souri, where the father followed farming. 
During the Civil war he fought for the 
preservation of the Union in a Missouri 
regiment, having enlisted at Kirksville, that 
state, and during his military career he saw 
much hard service. He was never wounded 
or captured, and on the expiration of his 
three years' service he received an honor- 
able discharge and returned to his family in 
Missouri. He subsequently removed to No- 
komis, Illinois, where he followed farming 
until 1873. That vear witnessed his arrival 
in Kansas, where he purchased a tract of 
raw prairie land and began the improvement 
of a farm. He was only permitted to enjoy 
his new home for a short time, however, as 
death claimed him the following year. He 
was a loyal and patriotic soldier, a success- 
ful business man and a true friend, and he 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



won the love and esteem of all with whom 
he came in contact. His family carried on 
the work wliich he had begun and remained 
there until 1885, when they sold that prop- 
erty and removed to Kingman county, Kan- 
sas, where they pre-empted one hundred and 
sixty acres of land, and there began the work 
of improving another fann. where the ninth- 
er lived until her death, which occurred in 
1 89 1. Both she and her husband held mem- 
bership in the Free Methodist church, in 
which he served as a minister for many 
years, using his influence in behalf of Chris- 
tianity and in the uplifting of his fellow 
men. He was a well educated man and was 
a competent school teacher in early life. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Pinkerton were : 
Amanda, the wife of J. E. Stanley; Lewis 
W., deceased; Marg-aret, the wife of our 
subject ; A. P., a resident of Kingman coun- 
ty, Kansas; Joanna, the wife of J. C. Fair- 
childs; Rhoda, who married D. Hess; and 
Sarah J-, the wife of B. Durr. The union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Smith has been blessed with 
three children, — Arthur D., who was born 
Augiist 25, 1880; Hattie E., born Novem- 
ber 27. 1881 ; and James L., born September 
12, 1884. Of the Methodist church Mrs. 
Smith is a valued and active member. In 
his social relations Mr. Smith is a member 
of the \\'oodmen of the \\'orld. He form- 
erly voted with the Democracy, but is now a 
stanch advocate of the Reform party. He 
has served as trustee and assessor of his 
township and has filled many other minor 
offices, and in all his public duties he has 
been true to the trusts reposed in him. 



FREDERICK DEISSROTH. 

It is a fact to which due recognition is 
not always acd^r^lcd that the German ele- 
ment of our nati'i'ial commonwealth has 
been a very impnriant mie in advancing the 
material interests of the nation, but on in- 
vestigation it will be found that a large per- 
centage of the successful business men are 
of German birth or lineage. Mr. Deissroth 
is a representative of the fatherland and is 



now one of the leading^ and enterprising 
merchants of Wilson, where he is engaged 
in dealing in dry goods, clothing, boots and 
shoes. He was born in Guntersblum, Darm- 
stadt, Germany, July 11, 1846, his parents 
being William and Elizabeth Deissroth, the 
former a carpenter and builder. In the fam- 
ily were seven children, of whom Frederick 
is the eldest and the only one living, and his 
parents have also passed away. 

Frederick Deissroth was educated in the 
common sclionls rmd pur-ucd a course in 
drawing and iiKitlH'iiiatic^ preparatory to 
learning the trade which his father had fol- 
lowed. He was then instructed in the study 
of architecture .and carpentering, and en- 
gaged in work along that line until nineteen 
years ot age, when he came to America, 
crossing the Atlantic in the winter of 1864- 
5, on the steamer Saxonia, which was nine- 
teen days upon the trip. The vessel was 
commanded by Captain Meier, who said that 
it was his thirty-fifth voyage and that the 
storm which they encountered was the worst 
he had ever experienced. The vessel was 
driven about by the gale, its staterooms were 
damaged and the berth occupied by Mr. 
Deissroth was also broken down. However, 
in safety they at length reached New York, 
and, landing in the eastern metropolis, Mr. 
Deissroth proceeded thence to Philadelphia 
where he was engaged in carpentering for 
fifteen years. He came to Kansas with the 
intention of following farming, believing 
that his health would be benefited thereby. 
The exhibit made l)v the Sunflower state in 
the Centennial Kxpnsition liad favorably itn- 
pres^ed him and was the thing which in- 
duced him to seek a home here. In the spring 
of 1877 he came on a prospecting tour to 
the west and upon his return organized a 
colony of forty families with whom he came 
to Wilson. Six of them, however, settled 
in Russell and Lincoln counties. 

Mr. Deissroth secured a homestead in 
Russell county and also established a gen- 
eral mercantile store in Wilson, in connec- 
tion with J. H. Claussen. their partnership 
being maintained for five years. On the ex- 
piration of that period Mr. Deissroth sold 
his interest in the store and at a sheriff's 



238 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



sale purchased the store formerly owned by 
W. G. Thompson, and which he has since 
conducted. He resided upon his farm for 
many years, driving back and forth daily 
to his place of business. He first carried on 
mercantile operations at the corner south of 
his present location and there suffered a loss 
by fire in 1879, but, phenix-like, a new store 
arose from the ashes. The day following 
the fire he had seventeen carpenters^ at work 
on the ground clearing away the debris and 
making- preparations for the erection of a 
new structure. Five years were there passed, 
after which, in February, Mr. Deissroth sold 
his interest in the establishment, as before 
mentioned, and purchased the Thompson 
store. He was for three years on the oppo- 
site corner and then rented his present site. 
In 1898 he purchased the entire corner where 
he is now located and erected the two-story 
building, having- a frontage of seventy-five 
feet facing the railroad and one hundred and 
fifty feet on Main street. This building is 
divided into six stores. The one occupied 
by Mr. Deissroth is forty by fifty feet and 
contains a large stock of drv goods, cloth- 
ing, boots and shoes. Mr. Deissroth has 
been very prosperous in his undertaking. He 
gives personal attention to the business and 
has the unique record of never having had a 
bill presented to him or a draft made on him 
for payment of his accounts. He makes it a 
point to discount all bills. He sustains an 
unassailable reputation in business circles, 
his honesty being proverbial, his v/ord being 
as good as any bond that was ever solemiiT 
ized by signature or seal. He has added to 
his landed possessions and now Operates 
four hundred acres, mainly planted to grain, 
raising Ijetween nine and ten thousand 
bushels of wheat each year. He is also one 
of the directors of tiie \\'ilson bank. 

On the nth of July, 1869, in Philadel- 
phia, Mr. Deissroth was united in marriage 
to Miss Ernestina Linsenbarth. They have 
nine children : Frederick is the foreman of 
Hook and Ladder Company No. 4, of New 
\ ork city. On one occasion he saved the 
life of Mr. Rajanond, the president of the 
Home Insurance Com|)any, who was in the 
\\'indsor Hotel fire, and for this he received 



a gold medal and a gift of five hundred dol- 
lars. The other members of the family are : 
August R.. who is engaged in farming; 
Ernestina. deceased ; Charles, who also car- 
ries on agricultural ] ursuits ; Grace, Frank, 
George, Otti ami Kinli. who are still with 
the parents. Tlic family home is a fine resi- 
dence which was erected by Mr. Deissroth in 
1897. It extends from one street back to the 
next and the grounds are attractive and well 
laid out. There is also a good stone barn upon 
the place. His farm is equipped with all 
modern accessories and improvements, in- 
cluding a good grain barn and sheds, and it 
is characteristic of Mr. Deissroth that every- 
thing about him shall be neat and thrifty in 
appearance and thoroug-hly up to date. 

Mr. Deissroth exercises his right of fran- 
chise in support of the men and measures 
of the Democratic party. He has served as 
mayor of Wilson antl as a member of the 
city council, while for three years, from 1880 
until 1883, he was county commissioner for 
the third district. He belongs to Samaria 
Lodge, No. 298, F. & A. M., of which he 
was the first master, serving in that capacity 
for several vears. He also belongs to Ells- 
worth Chapter. No. 54, R. A. M. :"Ellsworth 
Council, No. 9. R. S. M. : St. Aldemar Com- 
mandery. No. ^t, : and Isis Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is also connected with 
Wilson Lodge, No. 225, I. O. O. F., and is 
a miember of the German Lutheran church. 
He has. every reason to be proud of his rec- 
ord, which indicates his business ability to 
be of a high order, combined with unflag- 
ging perseverance and keen discrimination. 
His entire life has been one of unusual activ- 
ity and industry and his methods have al- 
ways been in keeping with the highest prin- 
ciples of fair dealing and with conscientious 
regard for the rights of others. 



WILLIAM N. LEWIS. 

A leading business citizen of Hollyroocl, 
Kansas, who conducts one of the impiortant 
lines of sale and manufacture in this little 
city, is William N. Lewis, a native of Penn- 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



s\lvaiiia, Ijorn in Cumberland county, on 
November 21, 1863. He was a son of Nich- 
olas and Margaret ( Finkenbinder) Lewis, 
the former of whom was born in Germany, 
and the latter of whom was a nati\'e of 
I'ennsylvania. 

Nicholas Lewis was a shoen^^aker by 
trade, and until 1872 was located at Stone- 
ham, Pennsylvania. At that date he re- 
niioved to Ellsworth county. Kansas, with 
his family, and located at Wilson, opening 
up at this place a shoemaking shop. A short 
time later he removed to what is now Russell 
county, where he purchased three hundred 
and twenty acres of railroad land which was 
entirely unimproved. ^Iw Lewis was one of 
the early pioneers and spent five years in the 
improvement of his land, in farming and 
stock-raising, selling" out at that date and 
again engaging in work at his trade, in Wil- 
son. Until 1893 ^J^''- Lewis conducted a 
business in this line but failing health urged 
a return to the more active life on the farm, 
and he purchased a desirable tract of land in 
Barton county and carried on general farm- 
ing there until 1899. returning at that time 
tn Russell county, where he now resides. 

The children born to the parents of our 
subject numbered eight, and five nf these 
still survive, as follows: Fred R.. \\h>i is 
in the harness business in Wilson: William 
N.. who is the subject of this sketch; Daniel 
A., who is in the employ of the government ; 
Jennie B.. who is the wife of R. Powell, a 
farmer of Ellsworth county ; and Samuel A., 
who resides at home. 

\A'illiam N. Lewis of this sketch was a 
lad of nine years when his parents came to 
Kansas, and he acquired his education in 
the public schools of his district. As soon 
as C'Ul enough to learn a trade, he was in- 
structed by his father and' thus gained a 
knowledge of leather and other necessi- 
ties of the shoe and harness trade, which 
later in life, wdien he was prepared to estab- 
lish a business for himself, proved of the 
greatest value. 

As early as eighteen year- Mr. Liwis be- 
gan the business of grain Ijiiyir.g, in ;;sso- 
ciation with his eldest brother, and this was 
carried on with success for two vears. In 



1889 our subject came to Holly rood and 
started the first business in his line, in this 
town, offering to the public a complete line 
of both heavy and fancy harness, plain or 
ornamental, with all modern designs and 
conveniences, anil soon began the m;mufac- 
ture of the same, this branch of the business 
being satisfactory both to himself and his 
many patrons. He has given close atten- 
tion both to the management and promotion 
of his business and has gained the confidence 
of the public over a large extent of terri- 
tory. In additii n i. » his manufactured arti- 
cles, which arc ci iiiiilete and entirely up-to- 
date, he has on sale an excellent line of less 
expensive harness and horse furnishings. 

In politics Mr. Lewis has always, been 
an adherent of the Democratic party, but has 
ne\er accc'iited any iiftice except that of con- 
stable. Iii> >er\ ice in that position being sat- 
isfactory to both parties, although he re- 
tained the office but one term. He is well 
and favorably known in a number of frater- 
nal orders, the leading ones being : F. & A. 
]\I.. of Hollyrood ; R. A. M., E. M. Chapter, 
of Ellsworth; and has filled many official 
positions and has been a representative to 
the grand lodge; is also- a thirty-second de- 
gree Mason and belongs to Wichita Con- 
sistory : Hollyrood Lodge, No. 380. I. O. 
O. F., in which he is past grand; and 
in the Knights of Pythias, where he has 
passed the chairs and has been a representa- 
tive to the highest lodge. 

]\Ir. Lewis is highly regarded in his local- 
ity and is recognized as a man of high char- 
acter who conducts hi-^ Iui-uk-- ( n princi- 
l)les which reflect honor ,iim1 lund'n not only 
upon himself, but alsii np^ r. In- lown. Our 



SniON W. KOONS. 

Simon W. Koons was born in Wayne 
county. OhiO', March 12. 1848. and is now 
engaged in farming on section 2. Valley 
township. Rice county, Kansas. His par- 
ents were John and Rebecca (Gesleman) 
K( ons. The former was born in Lancaster 
county. Pennsylvania, in 1797. and died 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



upon tlie farm there in October. 1872. By 
his marriage he became the father of eleven 
sons and four daughters, of which number 
ten sons and three daughters reached adult 
age and all were married with the exception 
of one daughter. The youngest daughter of 
the family was accidentally poisoned when 
one year old. and they lost' an infant son. 
The parents began life in humble circum- 
stances and in the midst of the heavy forest 
the father cleared and developed a farm of 
one hundred and si.xty acres and the rich 
fields yielded to him a golden, tribute for the 
care and labor he bestowed upon them. He 
served in the war of 1812 and was ever a 
loyal and devoted citizen. He and his wife 
were members of the United Brethren church 
and the latter died in 1884. being an octo- 
genarian at the time. 

Simon \\". Koons spent his youth in the 
usual manner of farmer lads of the period. 
He acquired a good common-school educa- 
tion, such as was given to the other mem- 
bers of the family. The nine sons engaged 
in teaching school and two of them, Samuel 
and Isaac, became ministers of the gospel, 
the former now preaching in California, 
while the latter is located in ^\"ichita, Kan- 
sas. Joseph was the inventor of the Min- 
nesota Chief Thresher and makes his home 
in Glencoe, ^linnesota. Jacob was a soldier 
for four years in the Civil war and now 
resides at New Auburn. Minnesota. He has 
a son who is engaged in military service in 
Ithe Philippinies. During foul'teen winter 
terms Simon W. Koons engaged in teach- 
ing school in Ohio and Kansas and was a 
capable educator, who imparted clearly and 
concisely to others the knowledge he had ac- 
quired. He remained at home until his mar- 
riage, which was celebrated on the ist of 
December, 1870, Miss ^Minerva Grady be- 
coming his wife. She was born in Ohio. 
August II, 1850. Her parents came to 
Kansas in the fall of 1884, but both are now 
deceased. Mr. Koons of this review arrived 
in the Sunflower state on the 23d of August, 
1877, settling on a quarter section of land. 
He homesteaded eighty acres and paid two 
thousand dollars for the other eighty. He 
has since carried on general farmincr. his 



principal crop being wheat and corn. He 
has raised twenty-three hundred and fiftv 
bushels of wheat and three thousand bush- 
els of corn in a single year and has kept on 
hand from six to ten head of horses, most 
of which he has worked in the operation of 
his land. He also keeps about thirty-five 
head of cattle and an equal number of hogs. 
In 1 901 he erected a good residence upon his 
farni and to-day he has a well improved 
place, neat and thrifty in appearance, the 
richly cultivated fields bringing to him a 
splendid return for his labor. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Koons 
has been blessed with six children : Frank- 
lin Walter, who married Bertha Talbott, is a 
graduate of the Kansas City Medical Col- 
lege and is now engaged in practice in 
Chase, Kansas; Xola ]\Iaud is the wife of 
Bruce Burrows, and they have two children : 
Carrie !May is the wife of \\'illiam Coldwa- 
ter, a farmer living near Chase, Kansas, by 
whom she has one son : Guy Grady assists 
his father in the operation of his farm; and 
Lena Catherine and Bryson are both at 
home. Mr. Koons is a member of the sub- 
ordinate lodge and encampment of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows and has 
membership relations with the Ancient Or- 
der of United Workmen. He supports the 
men and measures of the Republican partv, 
has been township trustee for one term and 
has served on the school examining board. 
He and his family are members of the 
United Brethren church and he is a public 
spirited and progressive citizen who gives 
all bis aid and influence to support every 
measure which he believes will prove of gen- 
eral benefit. 



COL. C. L. \'AUGHAX. 

An im];ortant business interest of Hutch- 
inson. Kansas, is the insurance line, and a 
leading representati\'e is the ^'aughan-Font- 
ron Agency, tlie senior member of the firm 
being Col. C. L. Vaughan of this biog- 
raphy. Although long identified with the 
interests of this state. Colonel \'aughan was 
born in ^Medina, Ohio, on September 18, 




Cti^fli- 



'/ 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



1845. He comes of a pioneer ancestry and 
also belongs to a family which has been cori- 
spicuoiis in the military life of the country 
from the time when Orlando X'aughan was 
a distinguished soldier in the war of the 
Revolution down to the brave young soldier 
who worthily bore honors in the Spanish- 
American war. 

The early family records tell of three 
English brothers of this name coming to 
America and settling, one in Rhode Island, 
one in Massachusetts and the third in Con- 
necticut. The ancestor i<\ the Vaughan 
branch under consiikiMiiMii was Orlando, 
and after the close of the Kevnlutionary w'ar 
he moved to New York and took part in 
the Indian wars of the period. His son 
Rufus. who was the grandfather of Colonel 
\'aughan. was a loyal soldier in the war of 
1812-14 and at that time was a resident of 
Ohiii, having l>een one nf the pioneers in 
that state. In 1848, fi'llnwing the example 
of his ancestors. Chauncy Vaughan, who, 
although born in New York, was reared in 
Ohio, migrated to WiscOinsin and settled 
near the present town of Oiilton, in Calu- 
met county, before that great state was ad- 
mitted to the Union. Whatever prompted 
these early pioneers, whether it was a spirit 
of adventure or a desire to better provide 
for their ofifspring. the life brought with 
it exacting conditions which required great 
ph\'sical courage and robust constitutions. 
At the time of settlement Chauncy Vaughan 
and wife fonnd a forest surrounding their 
little log cabin and Indians were their 
only neighbors. Sometimes these children 
of the woods were friendly, but occasionally 
they were savage. Colonel Vaughan recalls 
one occasion when his mother was badly 
frightened l:)y finding three Indians grinding 
knives at her husband's grindstone, near 
the spring where she had gone for water. 
Greeting them in a friendh- way she escaped 
injury bv giving tlieni fnod, but it required 
strong nerves in these pioneer mothers tO' 
enable them to go abmit their daily tasks 
under such conditions. The mother of our 
subject was Amanda (Hyatt) Vaughan, 
wdio was born in Ohio, and she passed away 
in 1863. The father survived until March 



28, 1893. Their surviving children are: 
Col. C. L., who is the subject of this sketch; 
Mrs. Mary Walsh, who lives in Seymour, 
Wisconsin ; Rufus, who is the talented editor 
of the Jewell County "Monitor,"' at Man- 
kato, Kansas, and Ida, who is Mrs. \\'alsh 
and lives at Antigo, W'isconsin. 

The subject of this biography was reared 
on the pioneer farm in Wisconsin and was 
attending school in Chilton when, at the 
age of seventeen years, he, in the wake of 
his ancestors, also became a soldier. Enlist- 
ing on July 14. 1863, in Company F, New 
York lieavy Artillery, he took part in the 
operations of the Army of the Potomac until 
Aug-ust, 1864, when he was made prisoner 
and was confined in Libby prison, and was 
later transferred to Belle Island. While there 
he cemented a friendship with a colored man 
by the gift of a pipe, who frequently suc- 
ceeded in getting him somjething to eat, 
which was a matter of vital importance. By 
this means he was able to keep his strength : 
and when the poor victims of imprisonment 
became so desperate that they would even 
commit murder to obtain something and 
it became necessar\- to police them, he 
was the one placed in charge of thirty-eight 
of the most desperate characters. This posi- 
tion Cokjuel \"aughan had forced upon him 
by Lieutenauit Ballou, the officer in charge, 
and he was promised a parole at the winter 
break-up if he would consent, and with this 
understanding our subject took the dista.ste- 
ful p -iti'ii. Like many of the promises 
made in tiiat dreadful place, this was not 
fulfilled, and even President Davis refused 
to notice it, as the idea was to only parole 
or exchange those who were unfit for ser- 
vice. However, in this emergency. Lieu- 
tenant Ballou privately gave him medicine 
which made him temporarily sick and in 
this way he secured parole. After his ex- 
change, however, he suddenly grew better 
and lost no time in rejoining his regiment 
at Fort Steadman, only to again sufi^er cap- 
ture, in March, 1865. and was again sent 
to Libby prison, and was exchanged again 
at Aiken's Landing, on April 2. He was then 
given a furlough home of thirty days, return- 
ing thence to his regiment, and with it went 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



i 



to Washington, where it was stationed until 
July, 1866, being- discharged in Rochester, 
^s"ew York. On account of his excellence 
as a drill master, our subject obtained his 
honorable title, having had charge of a 
batallion at New York, his instruction in- 
cluding both officers and privates. 

After his return to civil life. Colonel 
Vaughan was successfully engaged in the 
manufacture of wagons and carriages in 
Wisconsin until his property was destroyed 
by a disastrous fire. In 1871 he made a 
trip to Kansas, but did not permanently 
locate in this state until 1873, when he took 
up a quarter section on Buffalo creek, in 
Jewell county, and here did some farming, 
but was principally engaged at work at his 
trade in Beloit. In 1875 he invented and 
patented a breaker, which was a success, bivt 
about this time he received an injury which 
incapacitated him from active work physi- 
cally and he then entered into the real-estate 
business at Mankato. In 1885 the Com- 
mon\\-ealth Loan and Trust "Company, of 
Boston, was organized and our subject was 
made one of the three district agents in this 
state, the location being first at Millbrook, 
then at Wakeeney, where the United States 
land office was located. In 1887 the three 
agencies were consolidated and Colonel 
Vaughan was gi\^en charge o-f the entire 
state and also of Texas. In 1889 he moved 
to Dallas, but in 1891 returned to Kansas 
in order to close up the afifairs of this busi- 
ness, on account of the prevaihng hard 
times. Before accomplishing this the Phce- 
nix Insurance Company of Hartford, Con- 
necticut, offered him the position of western 
manager, covering the states of Kansas, Ne- 
braska and North and South Dakota, prac- 
tically all of their investments in this section. 
They had at that time three-quarters of a 
million dollars in western investments, but 
thrO'Ugh defaulting creditors their business 
was in bad shape. Colonel Vaughan en- 
tered into this with characteristic energ>' 
and enthusiasm, and has managed so well 
that two-thirds of the amount has been paid 
and the balance has been so arranged that it 
is now profitable. In 1896 a partnership 
was formed and in 1898 Judge Fontron he- 



came a partner, the firmi style being the 
Vaughan-Fontron Agency, and they repre- 
sent some of the oldest and most reliable 
insurance firms in the United States and 
England. 

Colonel Vaughan was married on Au- 
gust 4, 1867, to Miss Eliza Jane Godding, 
a daughter of Joseph O. Godding, and a son 
of this marriage, A. E., is associated with 
the business of his father. In political life 
Colonel Vaughan has been actively identified, 
with the Republican party as far as good citi- 
zenship extends, and has done his civic duty 
in the city council, but his tastes are not in 
the direction of political honors. In this 
city he stands high in public esteem and is 
reco'gnized as one of its most reliable and 
capable business factors. 



ISAAC L. AIcCRACKEN. 

Isaac L. McCracken is now living re- 
tired in Sterling, the rest which crowns hon- 
orable, continued and well directed efforts 
having been vouchsafed to him, and now as 
he approaches the evening of life be is en- 
abled to enjoy quiet retirement. He was 
born in Butler county, Ohio, July 18, 1836. 
His father, the Rev. S. W. McCracken, was 
born in Hamilton county, Ohio, near Cin- 
cinnati, in 1800, and was a son of Wilson 
McCracken, but aside from this little is 
known concerning the remote ancestral his- 
tory. During the greater .part of his life the 
Rev. McCracken devoted his labors to gos- 
pel work as a minister of the United Pres- 
byterian church, and was at one time pro- 
fessor of mathematics in the Miami Univer- 
sity, of Obio. He married Miss Catherine 
E. Monfort, who was born in Butler coun- 
ty, Ohio, about 1809, and was a daughter 
of Peter and Anna Maria (Spinning) Mon- 
fort. The parents of our subject were mar- 
ried in Oxford, Ohio, and the mother died 
at ]\Iorning Sun, Preble county, that state, 
in 1S49, while the father, surviving her 
about ten years, passed away in" the same 
ci'unty, in October, 18:9. He was for twen- 
ty years the pastor of Hopewell church in 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



tliat county and his remains were laid to rest 
in the churchyard there. They were the par- 
ents of nine children, but only four reached 
years of maturity, namely.: John Calvin, 
who is now a merchant in Urbana. Ohio; 
Isaac L. ; Charlotte A., who became the wife 
(if W. Craig- and died in Oxford, Ohio. 
April 23, 1893, at the age of forty-nine 
years, leaving four children: and Samuel, 
who was killed at the battle ^f Resac:i, and 
sleeps in the soldier's cemeter\ at Atlanta, 
Georgia. He left the jMianii L'iii\trsity at 
President Lincoln's second call for troops, 
served for three years and on the expiration 
of that period, when his first term_ of enlist- 
ment had expired, he re-enlisted, meeting 
death upon the battlefield. 

Isaac L. McCracken. the immediate sub- 
ject of this review, and the memlier of the 
family in whom the citizens of central Kan- 
sas are most interested, was a student in the 
Morning Sun Academy, after which he en- 
gaged in teaching for one term. He volun- 
teered for service in the Union army August 
8, 1862, becoming a member of Company G, 
Ninety-third Ohio Infantry. He joined the 
army as a private and' was sergeant when 
mustered out. He was never wounded, but 
was accidentally injured while on the sick 
list. Brave and loyal he was ever found at 
his post of duty and' with a creditable mili- 
tary record he returned to his home. 

Mr. McCracken was united in marriage 
October 27. 1857, to Miss Ella ^^■. Stewart, 
of Preble county, Ohio, born Deccmlier 9. 
1835, her parents being Joseph and Xaomi 
(Hart) Stewart. Eight children have been 
born of this union: Alia ]\I., wife of A. D. 
Ramsey, of Sterling, and they have three 
living children and have lost one: Frank 
M., who died at the age of two years, while 
his father was in the service of his country : 
Myrta C, who is the wife of X. C. Elliott, 
of Union county, Indiana, and they have 
two living children ; Charley S., who is now 
a ranchman in Texas: Lee S., a resident of 
Sterling, who is married and has four chil- 
dren : Gilbert G.. who is married and also 
resides in Sterling: Josiah C, who graduat- 
ed in the University of Pennsylvania with 
the class of 1901, and was for four years a 



member of the football team and one of the 
finest athletes of the school, while he is also 
renowned for his mental superiority and his 
moral worth ; and Daisy E., whoi is the wife 
of O. B. Johnson, of Lyons, Kansas. 

Mr. McCracken continued to reside in 
Ohio until the- fall of 1872, when he re- 
moved to Lincoln county, Tennessee, going 
thence to Emerson county, Kansas, in the 
fall of 1884. He fHll,.\'ve(l farming and 
milling. In the spring nf iSSd he went to 
Ness county, Kansas, wlicre he secured four 
quarter sections of land and thereon carried 
on farming for five years. In i8gi he came 
to Sterling, taking up his abode in his pres- 
ent good residence, and is now living re- 
tired. Socially he is connected with the 
Grand Army of the Republic and has been 
junior vice commander. He has served as 
street commissioner for four years and is a 
stanch temperance man. He also belongs 
to the L'^nited Presbyterian church, in which 
he is a trustee, and he is deeply interestd in 
all moral work calculated to uplift his fellow 
men. 



HENRY B. NEWMAN. 

Henry B. Newman is a progressive 
farmer residing one mile north of the city 
of Sterling. He was born in Rising Sun, 
Indiana. October 30, 1854. His father, 
Henry B. Newman, was accidentally 
drowned when the son was only six months 
old. He was a cripple, and in falling from 
a boat at Rising Sun was unable to help him- 
self and thus found death in a watery grave. 
He left three sons and two daughters. The 
mother bore the maiden name O'f Mary Wal- 
ton and died in Rising Sun in the fall of 
1893. at the age of sixty-seven years. The 
father of otir subject was a native of Eng- 
land, but was brought to America during his 
childhood. His crippled condition was 
caused from a white swelling. At the time 
of his death he was engaged in the drug bus- 
iness in Rising Sun. and to his family he 
left a comfortable home and a small prop- 
erty. His children were: Charles, now a 
painter of Rising Sun : Oliver, a farmer of 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



that locality ; Sarah Frances, wliO' became the 
wife of A. R. Talbott and died when about 
thirty years of age, leaving tAvo children; 
Harriet, who died wheil about twelve years 
of age; and Henry B. 

Mr. Newman, o^f this review, received a 
fair common-school education, continuing 
his studies until thirteen years of age, when 
he began working in a woolen mill, where 
he was employed for six years. He subse- 
quently worked in a brick yard, receiving 
but small wages. At the age of twenty- 
three years he left home and came to Rice 
county, Kansas, reaching his destination on 
the 27th of February. 1877. He made his 
way to the home of his brother-in-law, A. 
R. Talbott, a miller of Rising Sun, Indiana, 
and later came to Rice county. After his 
arrival here Mr. Newman formed the ac- 
quaintance of Miss Isabel Heter, and their 
friendship ripened into love, their wedding 
being celebrated on the 20th of April, 1879. 
The lady was born in Bellevue, Ohio, a 
daughter of Levi and Marv (Schock) Heter. 
The mother was a native of Pennsylvania, 
born in February, 1834, but was reared in 
Ohio. The father was born in the latter 
state on the 17th of April, 1829, and was 
married in Ohio in 1852. Their daughter. 
Mrs. New^Tlan, was the eldest of their eight 
children, of whom four sons and three 
daughters reached mature years, and all are 
yet living and are married with one excep- 
tiiin. The parents still reside in Bellevue, 
Ohio, where the father for many years con- 
ducted a large farm, but ij now retired. 
Mr. and Mrs. Newman took up their abode 
six miles northwest of Sterling, remaining 
for two years upon the Talbott farm, after 
making a purchase of one hundred and sixty 
acres of land for one thousand dollars. The 
former owner had been Mr. Heter, the 
father of Mrs. Ne\\nnan, who had come to 
Kansas on a prospecting trip and purchased 
tliis land as an investment. There were a 
few improvements on the place and Mr. 
Newman has added maoy others, mak-ing his' 
farm a very desirable property. The home 
has been blessed with four children : Ralph 
A., who was born June 27, 1884. and is 
ucAv a student in the high school in Sterl- 



ing: jNIay Gladys, born May 3. 1886; Rose 
Fern, born December 21, 1889; and Winnie 
Belle, born October 28, 1891. All are stu- 
dents in the schools of Sterling. 

Mr. Newman carries on general farm- 
ing, making a specialty of the production 
of wheat and corn and also raises cattle and 
horses. At one time he was extensively en- 
gaged in raisiiog hogs, but cholera rendered 
this unprofitable and he now devotes his 
energies to other lines of farm work. He 
is a man of marked industry, energy and 
determination. His home is embowered 
amid many ornamental shade trees and he 
has also planted many fruit trees, which have 
reached a bearing condition and add to the 
value of the place. Few farmers starting 
out in life without cash capital have in so 
short a space of time achieved as creditable 
success as has crowned the efforts of Mr. 
Newnvan. He is now the possessor of a 
handsome competence, which will enable him 
to carry over his crops for better markets 
if he does not desire to dispose at the pre- 
vailing prices. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Congregational church and en- 
joy the warm friendship of many with 
whom they have come in contact, for their 
many sterling characteristics liave ever com- 
manded the res])ect and regard of those 
with whom they have been associated. They 
have labored together earnestly, the work of 
the one supplementing and rounding" out the 
work of the other, and their attractive home 
is a fitting monument to their labors. 



ERNEST A. TAYLOR, M. D. 

Prominently identified with the inter- 
ests of Reno county, Kansas, and one of 
the most highly esteemed citizens ol Hutch- 
inson, is Dr. Ernest A. Taylor, who' since 
1886 has been in the active practice of his 
profession in this city. He is a resident of 
the \\-est by choice, for his birth occurred in 
the east, in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, 
on August 13, 1834. Prior to the Revolu- 
tionary war some of his ancestors founded 
the great industrv known still as the Tav- 




^, ^, .2z^m/^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



lor Iron Works, at Highbridge, Xew Jer- 
sey, and it was from these great fo'undries 
that the army of General Washington ob- 
tained man}^ of the cannon balls which so 
eiTectually enforced the demands of o-ur pa- 
triot fathers \\-'hen they called upon the 
British troops and the Hessian hirelings to 
depart from our shores. 

Archibald Taylor was the grandfather 
of our subject, and during the progress of 
the Revolutionary war bought this iron busi- 
ness, in association with his sons. Some 
members of the family are still connected 
with it. John B. Taylor, the father of Dr. 
Taylor, was not b}- nature a worker in iron. 
He became a teacher, was a man of higli 
attainment, but never accumulated large 
means. His marriage was to Susan Ade- 
line Bray, a distant relative and a daugh- 
ter of John Watsom Bray, who traced an 
honorable descent from Scotch ancestors. 
These came among the early settlers to 
New Jersey, where the name still represents 
public-spirited and financial stability. He 
served in the war of 1812, was identified 
with many public affairs and was the orig- 
inator of the idea oi the feasibility of the 
building and success oi the New Jersey 
Central railroad. His son. Augustus, made 
a trip to Salt Lake, Utah, in the early days 
of the reign of Brigham Yoimg, driving 
the entire distance with six yoke of oxen. 
He was employed by the great Mormon 
prophet and later took out one thousand 
head of cattle. Still later he went to Cali- 
fornia, where he sold cattle for a time and 
then engaged in milling, becoming both 
prominent and wealthy. Our subject was 
the fourth n^ember of a family of five chil- 
dren born to his parents, namely : Robert, 
who has passed away; John, who^ lives in 
Boulder county, Colorado: Alexander, who 
is our subject's twin brother; and IMary C, 
who married Byron Bliss and died in 
Boulder county, Colorado. 

In 1840 Air. Taylor removed with his 
family tof Missouri, and continued to fol- 
low his profession of teaching. Our sub- 
ject \\-as instructed by his father, whom 
lie afterward remunerated, the latter being 
in limited circumstances. \"erv earlv in 



his career he engaged in farming, and was 
j so occupied at the outbreak of the Civil 
war. The family became divided on this 
great question. Dr. Taylor becoming a mem- 
ber of Con-qjany F, Seventh Missouri State 
Cavalry, on April 11, 1862, while his twin 
brother espoused the other side. Governor 
Crittenden was lieutenant-colonel and Judge 
Phillips was coiloijel oi the regiment of 
which Dr. Taylor was a member. His serv- 
ice was principally in Missouri, Arkansas 
and Kansas. For forty-one days he was 
on- Price's raid, and was captured on the 
third day of the battle of Lexington, Mis- 
souri, but just afterward he was paroled. 
Some eight months later he re-enlisted and 
soon afterward was appointed by the col- 
onel as fifth sergeant of Company F, and 
later was made hospital steward. This po- 
sition he held until the close of the war, 
and this' determined his future career. The 
practical experience that he had received in 
medicine and surgery during these \-ear5 
of strife awakened in him an enthusiasm 
for the profession which he has adorned 
for so many years. 

W'ith about a tliousand dollars which. 
he had saved. Dr. Taylor entered the Uni- 
versity of New York and took his first med- 
ical course, returning then to Misisouri and 
locating for one year in Leesville, in Henry 
county. A favorable opending presenting 
itself both for practice aaid study at Cole- 
camp, he removed thither, remaining for 
six years at that point. Then he entered 
the St. Louis Medical College, remaining 
until graduation in 1871. A short time was 
again spent in Colecamp, when removal 
was made to Aullville, in La Fayette coun- 
ty, Missouri, where he remained for two 
years, opening tfhen a practice in Concordia, 
I where he remained for eleven years. In 
1886 he came to this city and since that 
j timie has built up a lucrative and still in- 
{ creasing practice, due to his skill, medical 
ability and the possession of those personal 
attributes which go so far to incite confi- 
dence in a physician. During the first term 
of the late President McKinley, Dr. Taylor 
was appointed by him a member of the 
pension examining" board, and ever since 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



then he has retained this position. He is 
serving his third term as county coroner, 
liaving made it his aim ever since taking 
charge of this important branch of the coim- 
ty business to niai<e the costs as httle as 
win subserve justice. In poHtics he is a 
stanch, Repubhcan and is fraternahy con- 
nected with Joe Hooker Post, No. 17, G. 
A. R. For many yeai;s our subject has 
been pron:inent in the Presbyterian church, 
for fifteen years serving as retiring elder. 
Dr. Taylor has been twice married, first 
in Ouincy. Illinois, to Miss Florence Mc- 
Kee. and ten children were born to^ this 
union, eight of these still surviving, namely : 
Adeline, who' married James H. Stratton, 
of Hutchinson; Alberta, who married Bert 
j\I. Iver, of Abbey ville, Reno county; Ern- 
est, who is a tobacconist, in Preston, Colo- 
rado; Robert, who is in the insurance busi- 
ness with W. S. Thompson, in this city; 
Grandon. who is a resident of Creston, Colo- 
rado ; Clarence, who is a resident of Hutch- 
inson; Josie, who lives in St. Louis; and 
Augustus A., who was born on his father's 
birthday. The second marriage of Dr. 
Taylor was to Mrs. Samantha (George) 
(Newcomb) Scott. The children born to 
her first marriage are: James Newcomb, 
who served in tlie Spanish-American war; 
Mae, who is Mrs. Thorpe; and Guy New- 
comb, who is now in the army in the Philip- 
pine Islands. The children of her second 
marriage are: Orville, Fairy. Hattie and 
Annie. 



ALEXANDER S. HUNTER. 

The subject of this sketch is a man who 
in his progressive career has demonstrated 
the \-alue of a good name in the business 
world, which is worth more than cash. As 
a merchant and man of affairs he has not 
only prospered in a substantial manner but 
has won a name which stands for business 
stability and insures him a high standing. 

Alexander S. Hunter, of Norwich, King- 
man county, one of the prominent merchants 
of southern Kansas, was born in the state 
New York, January i, 1831, a son of Sam- 



uel and Mary A. (Calvert) Hunter. His 
father was born in the state of New York 
and was descended from an old New Eng- 
land family, the founder of which in Amer- 
ica was Mr. Hunter's great-grandfather, a 
Scotch-Irishman, who came to the colonies 
a British soldier to help subdue the patriot 
insurrection of 1776. but who, soon recog- 
nizing the injustice of the British cause, 
transferred his allegiance to America and in 
the army of Washington fought for Ameri- 
can liberty. After the Revolution he lived 
for a time in Connecticut and later removed 
to New" York state, where he was a farmer 
and where he died within the recollection 
of his great-grandson. 

Samuel Hunter, in 1842. emigrated from 
New York state to^ McHeiary county. Illi- 
nois, where he died in 1872. aged seventy- 
three years. In politics he was a Democrat 
until the organization of the Republican 
party, with which he afterward acted. In 
religion he was an old-school Presbyterian. 
He had ten children, the following informa- 
tion concerning some of whom will doubt- 
less interest readers of this article. His 
daughter, Mary, married a Mr. Shearer, 
and, now a iwidow. lives at Woodstock, Illi- 
nois. His son, S. H., lives in Kansas City. 
Missouri. His daughter. Sarah, married a 
Mr. Austin, and lives in ^Missouri. His 
daughter, Martha, is Mrs. Furney, of Genoa, 
Wisconsin. His son, \A'. H., lives at Gow- 
ens, Iowa. His son, Thomas G., lives at 
Los Angeles, California. Three others of 
his children died in childhood and youth. 

When his father removed with his fam- 
ily to ^IcHenry county. Illinois, Alexander 
S. Hunter was eleven years old. He ac- 
quired some education as was available to 
him in public schools near his home, and 
when twenty-one 3-ears old he began farming 
on rented land. In 1854 he bought land 
in Bremer count}-, Iowa, which he owned 
until 1857, but on which he never lived. In 
1856 he opened a general store at Crystal 
Lake, Illinois, which, five years later, he re- 
moved to Algonquin. Illinois. After trad- 
ing two years at Algonquin he removed his 
stock of goods to Elgin. Illinois, where he 
sold dry goods and groceries until 1866. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



247 



From' that time until 1873 he was 
in his old home in WcHenry county, 
looking after his parents and attend- 
ing- to his father's farm. After the death 
of his father in Septemlier r.'f the year 
mentioned, he went to W'ynniing-. where for 
two ytors he operated mines and looked 
after mining investments. In 1875 he lo- 
cated at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, where he 
was a leading merchant until 1886, when 
be removed to Norwich, Kansas, which had 
been founded the previous year, where he 
opened a general store, which he has man- 
aged successfully toi the present time. He 
has invested tO' a considerable extent in town 
proijerty, owning several dwellings in Nor- 
wich and the Norwich flouring- mill, and 
has accjuired eight hundred acres of good 
land in Bennett township, which he leases. 
As a member of the People's party he has 
l^een active in public afTairs and has been 
elected justice of the peace and a member 
of the city council. Since 1883 he has 
owned mining interests in southern Colo- 
rado and in 1900 he became financially in- 
terested in the Norwich flouring mill, al- 
ready mentioned, which has a capacity of 
seventy-five barrels of flour a day, and which 
has recently been equipped with up-to-date 
machinery and is under his own manage- 
ment. He is a member of tUe Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. 

December 12, 1855. Mr. Hunter was 
married, in Illinois. tO' I\Iary A. Lynd, and 
they have four children : Viola, whO' is the 
wife of William E. Haynes. a merchant of 
Emporia. Kansas: Fannie, who married Dr. 
Frank Boyington. (^t Oiariton. To\va; Albert 
O., who lives at Wichita. Kansas; and Jay 
Alexander, who assists his father in the man- 
agement of the store. As a merchant Mr. 
Hunter has made it the rule of his life never 
to procrastinate in any business affair or to 
depend on another to attend to matters of 
importance about which he felt any solici- 
tude. During his many years active career 
he has never asked for an extension of time 
on any obligation and has discounted all 
bills, and his thoroughness and carefulness 
have carried him safely through several fi- 
nancial panics which have wrecked many of 



his competitors. His friends rejoice with 
him in his success because they know that it 
has been fairlv won. 



WILLIAM R. JOHNSON. 

Among the successful and prominent 
farmers and stockmen of Ellsworth county, 
Kansas, as William R. Johnson, who resides 
on the east t ne-half of section. 32, in Gar- 
field townsbi;;. ^Ir. Jchhscn has a ranch 
of ten hundred and thirty acres in cultiva- 
tion and raises some enormous crops of corn, 
Kaffir corn and sorghum, employing eight 
men. 

The birth of Mr. Johnson occurred in 
Lawrenceburg, Anderson county, Kentucky, 
on December 6, 1858, and he is a son of 
Berry W. and Elvira (Mountjoy) Johnson, 
both of wdiom are natives of the same state. 
The father followed farming in that state 
until 1869, when the family removed to Bates 
county, Missouri, where the parents remain- 
ed until 1895, at which period they returned 
to tlieir (.1(1 Kentucky home, wdiere the fa- 
ther died in April. 1899, but the mother still 
survi\-es. 

Mr. Johnson of this sketch was the eldest 
in a family of eight children, two of his bro- 
thers, James and John, also being residents 
of Ellsworth county. His school days had 
to be shortened in order that he might also 
become a wage-earner, as he was the eldest 
of :i lai-L^e family, and when only eleven 
>■ ■ le started out, securing work 

■.\ : ig farmers, and spent thirteen 

yc..i. ;;..; , ,, (irking for four years for one 
man, J. C Farrar. Industrious and provi- 
dent, our subject accumulated means and 
bought a one-half interest of Mr. Farrar. 
One year he spent in Arkansas, but not lik- 
ing tiie country, he returned to Missouri, 
where he remained until October, 1895, 
when he came to Ellsworth county. Prior 
to this Mr. Johnson had been engaged in 
farming and later in mining for coal, but 
the vein gave out. and he decided to move 
to Kansas. 'Mr. Johnson shipped the first 
coal, over the Kansas Citv & Southern rail- 



248 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



road, wliich was ever sent south of the 
INlarais des Cygnes and the Cypress rivers. 

Upon coming to Ellsworth county Mr. 
Johnson could not at first find and buy a 
place that suited him, so he leased the Mc- 
Lennan ranch, consisting of nine sections. 
This extends for four miles on the creek, 
with luxuriant pasture on both sides, seem- 
ing to be especially adapted to stock-raising. 
He buys almost exclusively western cattle, 
both on the ranges and in Kansas City, and 
at the present writing he is feeding six 
hundred and forty head of his own, and 
wintering two hundred head for another in- 
dividual. This is not the extent of the cat- 
tle interests Mr. Johnson is a large farmer, 
Johnson, for he buys and sells from two 
thousand to three thousand head, his plan 
being to buy in large numbers and to sell in 
small lots to other feeders, who do not do 
so extensive a business. Aside from his cat- 
tle interests Mr. Johnson is a large farmer, 
cultivating ten hundred and thirty acres. 
The amount of energy and' ability required 
to manage all these large interests, is abund- 
ant proof that j\Ir. Johnson is gifted with 
great executive force and the most excellent 
judgment. 

The marriage of our subject was solem- 
nized in Bates county, Missouri, on October 
12, 1881, to Miss Ruth Woodfin. who was 
the daughter of John and Emily Woodfin, 
the former of whom was born in Vermont 
but became one of the pioneer settlers of 
ilissouri, and one of the most extensive 
farmers of that state. Two children were 
born to the marriage of Mr. and ]\Irs. John- 
son, one son and one daughter, namely: 
Samuel F. and Emma V. 

In his political sympathies 'Mr. Johnson 
has always been a Democrat, but he has 
ne\-er consented to accept office, with the 
exception of membership on the school board, 
on account of his interest in education, al- 
though few men in this locality are more 
fitted to assume such responsibilities. Fra- 
ternally he is high up on the roll of worthies 
both in the I. O. O. F., of Brookville, and in 
Ellsworth Lodge, No. 146, A. F. & A. M., 
as well as the chapter, commandery of 



Knights Templar, and Consistory No. 2. 
S. P. R. S., at Wichita, and of Isis Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine, at Salina. Mrs. John- 
sen is a devoted member of the Christian 
church, and our subject is an attendant and 
liberal supporter. He is widely known in 
this part of Kansas, his large busmess op- 
erations bringing him into contact with many 
residents of all sections, and he most worth- 
ily represents that type of the progressive 
and successful western business citizen who 
has done so much to build up the interests of 
the great state of Kansas. 



ELIJAH RAYL. 



Diversified interests claim the attention 
of Elijah Rayl, who is now successfully en- 
gaging in stock-raising, horticultural pur- 
suits and the nursery business, and each in- 
dustry returns to him a good income. Since 
1874 he has resided in Reno county and has 
aided in its development from i>rimitive 
conditions and surroundings to its present 
advanced stage oi progress. 

]\Ir. Rayl was born in Howard county, 
Indiana, January 27, 1861. His father, 
Thomas Rayl, was a native of Kentucky 
and \\'hen a boy removed with his parents to 
the Hoosier state, where he was reared 
upon a farm amid pioneer surroundings. 
He began farming upon his own account 
when entering upon an independent busi- 
ness career and was thus engaged until the 
close of the Civil war, when he removed to 
the town of Kokomo, and began general 
contracting, making a specialty, however, 
of the building of streets. In his political 
\-iews he was a Democrat and for several 
termSi he served as councilman and once 
as mayor of the city. His administration 
was a practical and beneficial one and he 
was widely regarded as one of the repre- 
sentative and influential residents of his 
community. He was deeply interested in 
the cause of education and while serving 
on the school board exercised his official 
prerogative to advance the interests and 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY. 



249 



efficiency of the schools and raise the stand- 
ard of inteUectual attainment. In Kokomo 
he married Miss Julia Ann Connell, and 
unto them were born seven children: Will- 
iam, a farmer of Clay township, Reno coun- 
ty. Kansas : Harless, who is living in Hutch- 
inson; Katie E., the wife oi William Brown, 
of ArHngton township, Reno county; 
Elijah; Mary Jane, the wife of Fred 
MaJick, of South Reno township; Levi ajid 
Thomlas, who are also living in the same 
township. 

In 1874 the family came to Kansas and 
railroad land was purchased, upon which 
Levi Rayl now resides. The tract com- 
prised a half section, and here in pioneer 
style the family began life in the Sunflower 
state. Prairie was broken, crops planted 
and in course of time good harvests were 
garnered and the family also aided in the 
work of development and improvement, in- 
cluding, the organization of the schools. 
The father died in 1890. He was a man 
of upright principles, who did what he be- 
lieved to be right; and so fair and just was 
he in all things that it is dijuhtful if he ever 
had an enemy. In his business career he 
was successful and in ailditi'in to his farm 
made investments in real estate and in busi^ 
ness interests in Hutchinson. His widow 
still sun-ives him. 

In the public schools of Kokomo Elijah 
Rayl began his education, which he has 
largely supplemented through practical ex- 
perience and observation. When fourteen 
years, of age he came with the family to 
Kansas and here bore all the hardship and 
trials of frontier life which came to the 
household. His youth was a busy one, as 
he aided in breaking prairie and in per- 
forming all the tasks incident to the develop- 
ment and cultivation of a new farm. He 
remained on the old homestead until thirty- 
one years of age, and long prior tO' that 
time the management and operation of the 
farm largely devolved upon him. In 1880 
he made a trip to the mountains and helped 
to build the railroad from Albucjuerque to 
California, continuing in the west for two 
years. He prospered in his work there and 
upon his return he purchased the old home 



place, and when his youngest brother, Levi, 
became of age, deeded one-half of it to him. 
They continued in business together for 
some time and invested largely in property 
west of the old farm. Tliey had seven 
hundred and twenty acres when they di- 
vided their interests.. In connection with 
general farming they engaged in raising 
and handling cattle and also began the culti- 
vation of fruits, their specialty being apples. 
Since the brothers divided their business in- 
terests Elijah Rayl has continued in the 
same line of activity, and is the owner of 
one oi the finest farms in the river bottom. 
He has one hundred acres in fruit, includ- 
ing apples, peaches, pears and grapes, and 
liad forty acres in nursery stock, fruits, 
shrubbery and other plants. His business 
in this direction is constantly in