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Full text of "Biographical and historical record of Ringgold and Union counties, Iowa"

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1613359 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



3 1833 01085 5630 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/biographicalhistru02lewi 



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Containing Portraits of all the Presidents or the United States from Washington tc 
Cleveland, with accompanying Biographies of each ; A Condensed History of the 
State of Iov\ - a ; Portraits and Biographies of the Governors of the Terri- 
tory and State; Engravings of Prominent Citizens in Ring- 
gold and Union Counties, with Personal Histories of 
many of the Leading Families, and a Concise 
History of Ringgold and Union 
Counties and their Cities and 
Villages. 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY, 



113 Aiv.Mb Street, Chicac 
1887. 

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PROPRIETOR OF 

THE RINGGOLD RFCOKD 

MT. AGE, IOWA 






B/OGh\ ! PHI CAL SKE TCIfES. 



school education, after which lie taught 
school about four years. In 1S73 ' ie came 
to Ringgold County. In [$76 he purchased 
a half interest in the Ringgold Record, the 
Republican newspaper of the conn! v. In 
about a year his partner expressed a will- 
ingness to buy or sell. .Mr. Stephens con- 
cluded to buy. lie has remained in this 
busme ; s ever since. He started withouta 
dollar, and has made his way entirely un- 
aided. Me has evinced that kind of perse- 
verance that never fails to win success. 
The Record, under his administration, has 
grown, from a poorly-printed little sheet, 
with a very poor outfit indeed, to the 
dignity of a fine-looking paper, occupying 
a two-story brick building of its own. Mr. 
Stephens was married in Litchfield, Con- 
necticut, in 1S76, to Miss Adelia Morse, 
and they have one child. 






£f AMES M. SIMPSON, section 17, Jef- 
Jufl ferson Township, was born in Greene 
ipj Count}-, Tennessee. December 26, (832, 
his father, John Simpson, being a native of 
Montgomery County, Virginia, and was a 
miller by trade. The father was a Lieu- 
tenant in the war of 1812. The grand- 
father of our subject, Allen Simpson, was 
a Captain during the war of the Revolution 
arid was wounded at the battle of Mon- 
mouth. Our subject passed his boyhood 
days on a farm in Fountain County, In- 
diana, to which county his parents removed 
in 1836, his mother dying there the same 
year. His father died in 1S44, after , liich 
he lived with a farmer, named John Starns. 
His education was received in the schools 
of Fountain County, he attending tin- log- 
cabin subscription schools, and in 1S42 be- 
gan at!' tiding the free schools which were 
organized there about that time, lie be- 
gan teaching school at the age of sixti -;i 
years, and taught till he had bought his 



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! tim ■ for which he paid §150, receiving $12 
: a month. He then attended school at 
Bloomingdale, Indiana, where he wasa fel- 
j low student with Hon. Joe Cannon, Con- 
gressman for Illinois, after which he taught 
a select scho >1 in Montgomery, Indiana. 
: He went to Rock Island, Illinois, in 1853, 
J and taught a subscription school on Buffalo 
; Prairie until March, 1S54, and while there 
I he saw the first train that reached the Mis- 
sissippi River. He then went to Oberlin 
College, Ohio, and while there wa.s taken 
! sick. On recovering his health he taught 
i in his former school for a time. In Au- 
gust, 1S55, he went over part of Iowa on 
; foot, and while on this tramp, was overtaken 
! by General Crocker who took him into his 
buggy. He returned to Indiana in Sep- 
tember, 1S55, where he taught till the 
spring of 1858. lie was married June to, 
1S56, to Jane E. Gilkey, a native of Mont- 
gomery County, Indiana, and a daughter 
of William Gilkey. They have had nine 
children born to them, of whom six: aie liv- 
I '"S— Maggie, Allen, Myra, Martha, Ella 
J and Nancy E. He went to Ford County, 
Illinois, in the spring of 1S58, and there en- 
gaged in farming and stock-raising. While 
j living in Ford County he had his barn 
I blown down, and his horses killed by a 
tornado. He returned to Indiana the same 
year, and in the spring of 1861 returned to 
■ Ford County, Illinois, where he worked on 
I his farm, and at nights wrote for the Craw- 
fordsville Journal, of which he was editor. 
He helped to organize the Republican 
party, and was the Republican candidate 
for Montgomery County, Indiana, in 1874, 
and although his township was largelyDern- 
ocratic, he carried it bv eighty majority. 
He became a resident of Ringgold Coun- 
ty. Iowa, in September, 1S75, when he 
ittled on his present farm. Since coming 
j to this county he h is been very succc: ful 
■<- ' Si .; ■; uitur d pu su ■• ■ md has m hi; 
j home farm 480 acres of well-iniprove< 

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HISTOItl" Or RINGGOLD COIWT2'. 



and in 1876 to section o, Athens Township. 
In [879 lie moved upon his present farm, 
which was then in a wild state. He has 
improved it until he has brought it to its 
present condition. He has a fine resilience, 
and a barn, 32 x 36 feet, an orchard of 
eight v treesand small fruits, and is engaged 
in general farming and stock-raising. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bradley are the parents of live 
children — Keziah, Joseph, Louis, Seigel 
and Zephina. Mr. Bradley is a member 
of the Grand Army of the Republic 
wer.e William H. and Maria (Bell) Bradley, j post at Mt. Ayr, and also a mem- 
the former a native of Ireland, and the lat- ber of the Independent Order of Odd 
ter of Washington County. They reared ; Fellows, Lodge 6 9 . By honest deal- 
a family of four children— William H., ! mg he has won the confidence and respect 
Mary, Ellen, Margaret. William was the j of all who know him. Postoffice, Keller- 
oldest child, and when he was four years of j ton. 



He is still engaged in general farming and 
stock-raising, paying special attention to 
graded stock. He still devotes a little 
time to literary pursuits, and is at present 
correspondent for the Creston Gazette. 



-;'■ \ TILL] AM H. BRADLEY, farmer, 
: :-\/\k section 5. Athens Township, was 

l^xrj born in Washington County. Penn- 
sylvania, October 14, 1829. His parents 



age his parents removed to Brownsville, 
Fayette County, Pennsylvania, where he 
received his education. He attended the 
same school with James G. Blaine for a 
time. In 1839 the family removed to Jef- 
ferson, Greene County, where they re- 
mained until 1845, thence to Washington j County, Ohio, born June 14, 1834, a son of 
County, thence to Allegheny County in j George and Agnes ^ Dickson. He was 
three years, and in 1852 removed to Wayne 



GEORGE DICKSON, one of the early 
|!vfV. settlers of Union Township, living on 
^n, section 9. is a native of Crawford 



County, Ohio. He was married October 
16, 1856, to Miss Catharine Stair, a native 
of Germany, and daughter of John and 
Christina (Mosses) Stair. In the fall of 1856 
Mr. Bradley came to Iowa, and settled in 
Poe Township, Ringgold County. At that 
time Mt. Ayr had only eight log houses. 
In the spring of 1857 he located on the B. 
B. Dunning place, where he resided until 
the fall of 1S60, then removed to section 
21, Poc Township, where he remained un- 
til the breaking out of the civil war. He 
enlisted August 10, 1862, in Company G, 
Twenty-ninth Iowa Infantry, and was en- 
gaged in the battle, of Helena, Little Rock, 
Camden, Mobile, and several minor en- 
gagements. He was honorably dischat 
and returned to his home in Ringgold 
County. In 1870 he removed to seel ion I, 



reared a farmer, and has made that the 
avocation of his life, and by his own efforts 
has acquired a competency, and become 
the owner of a good and comfortable home. 
Mr. Dickson came to Ringgold County, 
Iowa, in April, 1S59, and the same season 
visited Kansas, and looked over a part of 
that State. He then returned to this county 
where his brother John had located in 
1S56. He remained in Union Township 
until July 4, 1861, when he was married to 
Miss Eli/a J. Ambrosier, a daughter of Ja- 
cob Ambrosier, of Crawford County, Iowa. 
Mr. Dickson having returned to his native 
county for that purpose. In September 
following he left Crawford County with 
Svdvester Beaver, returning to Ring del 
County with Coo sheep, which they owned 
between them, two months being occupied 
in driving the sheep to this county. The 



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BrOGRAPHICAI. SKETCHES. 373 >'='• 



first year of his married life was spent on 
his brother John's farm, when lie removed 
10 the farm where he has since followed 
agricultural pursuits. When lie first set- 
tled on his present farm nine acres had 
been cleared and a small cabin built. The 
homestead now contains 2Q3 acres of im- 



proved land, with 
buildings, which 
toil and industry, 
are the parents 
daughter — Willis 



mod 

s the result of years of 
Mr. and Mis. Dickson 

if three sons and one 
married to Ruth Lilcs 
and living on part of his father's farm ; Em- 
ma Agnes, wife of Jerry Chit wood, of 
Union Township; Jacob and Homer living 
at home. Mr. and Mrs. Dickson are mem- 
bers of the Christian church. In national 
politics Mr. Dickson votes the. Democratic 
ticket, but in local elections casts his vote 
for the man whom he considers best fitted 
for office. 



\t>RCULUS LENT, residing on section 
where he has a 
:o acres, was born in 
Holmes County, Ohio, February 17, 1S34, 
a son of John and Sarah (Miles) Lent. 
Both parents are deceased, the father dying 
in Creston, Iowa, and the mother in Ohio. 
Mr. Lent has been a resident of the 
Hawkeye State for thirty-one years, and 
for almost eighteen years has made his 
home in Ringgold County. In 1855 he lo- 
cated in Clarke County, Iowa, and the first 
two years worked in a saw-mill at Ilope- 
villc. He then engaged in farming and be- 
fore leaving that count}- became the ownei 
of two farms, and commenced the improve- 
ment of both. He was married March 8, 
1857, to Miss Catherine Miller, who was 
born in Brown County, Ohio, May 1. 1S36, 
a daughter of Henry and Sarah Miller, who 
were among the early settlers of Doyle 
Township, Clarke County, Iowa. Of the 



nine children born to Mr. and Mrs. Lent 
six arc living— John 1 1., Thomas M., Alfred 
T., Charles \V\, Mina E. and James W., all 
living at home except Thomas, who resides 
in Kansas. Three daughters, Sarah E, 
Libby R. and Alice E., died in infancy. In 
April, 1869, Mr. Lent brought his family to 
sidence and farm | Ringgold County and commenced improv- 
ing his present farm, which he has converted 
from a state of nature to one of the best 
farms in his neighborhood. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lent are members of the Christian church. 
In politics Mr. Lent is independent, voting 
for men, not parly. 



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: i V; 3, Union Township, 
—'y^ fine farm of ir~ 



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DfOHN C. SINCO, section f, Riley 
**fj Township, was born in Greene Coun- 
-:<i ty, Indiana, January 12, 1839, a son of | 
Henry and Jane Sinco, the former a native 
of Virginia, and the latter of South Caro 
lina. They were married in Indiana, and 
when our subject was four years old moved \ \ 
to Jefferson County, Iowa, being among 
the pioneer families of that count)-. Sub- 
sequently they moved to Decatur County, 
and there the father bought 300 acres of 
land, and laid out a town which he named 
Paris, but which is now called Hig-h Point. 
Selling that property thev moved to Ring- 
gold County, in 1835, and settled on section 
2, Riley Township, and there the father •' 
died in 1874, aged seventy-four years. The v ; 
mother is now living at Kellerton. Their \, 
family consisted of seven children — John % 
C; Columbus B., who died while serving 
his country, in the twenty-first year of his 
age; Mary Ellen, wife of Frank Scott, of '* 
Decatur County; Martha, deceased, wife 
of Gilbert Mark; Caroline, wife of I. H. : 
Johnson, of Nebraska; Charlotte, wife ol : 
Dell Ferguson, of Decatur County ; Mar- ;< 
garet, wife of William Barnes, of Rih . 
Township. John C. Sinco was married 
May 24, 1863. to Caroline Cling, who was 



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HISTORT OF RINGGOLD COUNTY 



born in Huntington County, Indiana, April 
27, 1S46, daughter of J. \V. Cling, who 

moved to Illinois in 1S50. and in 1857 lo 
Harrison County, Missouri, and is now a 
resident of Decatur County, Iowa. Mr. 
and Mrs. Sinco have seven children — 
Sarah, wile of A. I. Paullin; Lawn Dora, 
Florence Mary, Lulu Lillian, John H., 
Nancy Anna and Jessie Maud. The fine 
farm property of 300 acres owned by Mi'. 
Sinco was entered and entirely improved 
by himself. In politics he is a Republican. 
He has served his township acceptably and 
efficiently in several public positions, and at 
present is school treasurer. 



^rfOHN D. MOORE was bom in Greene 

V j 

Wi Count)-, Indiana, June 10, 1S44, a son 
*?& °f Jacob and Rebecca (Sparks) Moore, 
natives of Virginia and Ohio respectively, 
the father going to Indiana when about 
four years of age. The parents left Indi- 
ana for Cedar Count) - , Iowa, when he was 
about ten years old, where the father fol- 
lowed farming till he retired from active 
life. The mother is still living in Cedar 
County. Of the five children born to the 
parents only two are now living — John D., 
and Sarah, wife of M. S. Gaddord, now 
living in Clinton County. John D. Moore, 
our subject, was the eldest child in his fa- 
ther's family . Hcreceived good educational 
advantages, attending the district schools, 
and later entered Oskaloovi College, where 
he pursued his studies for one year. On 
leaving school he entered the Union army, 
enlisting in Company E, Eleventh Iowa In- 
fantry, and was a member of the Army of 
the Tennessee, Seventeenth Army Corps, 
under command of General Blair. lie 
participated in the battles of Kenesaw 
Mountain, Atlanta campaign, and at Ben- 
tonville, North Carolina, being in the serv- 
ice eighteen months, lie was honorably 



: discharged, and was mustered out in Jul}', 
\ 1S65. Alter the war he returned to Cedar 
, Count)-, and engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. He was married in 1867 to Miss 
Elizabeth C. Goodwin, of Greene County, 
I Indiana, a daughter of Abner Goodwin. 
' They have seven children — Jacob H., Will- 
1 iam'll.. Lillie B.. Frank M., John A., Sadie 
j E. and Paul R. Mr. and Mrs. Moore be- 
gan married life on a farm in Cedar Coun- 
\ ty, Iowa, where they lived till 1874. They 
: then came with their family to Ringgold 
! County, and lived on a farm south ol 
Tingley for four years. They then re- 
turned to Cedar County, coming again to 
Ringgold County in the fall of 1884, when 
they settled on section 10, Tingle)' Town- 
ship, their farm containing 320 acres of 
improved land, all under fence and seeded 
down to grass. He is one of the success- 
' ful farmers of his township, where he is 
also engaged in the manufacture of cheese. 
] He milks thirty cows, and sends out about 
i 400 pounds of cheese a week. He and his 
wife arc active members of the Christian 
church, of which he is an elder. He was 
1 licensed as an evangelist eight years ago, 
j and has since been engaged in the ministry, 
his church being at Tingley, ol which he 
was one of the organizers. 

v -7 ILLIAM QUINN,one of the old pib- 
: \ \|- neers of Ringgold County, Iowa, 
?Hi>feS now living in Jefferson Township, 

I was born in Fleming Count}*, Ohio, the 

j date of his birth being September 29, 1S30. 
His father, Joseph Quinn, was a native of 

i Kentucky, and was one of the earl)- settlers 
ol Fleming County. William Quinn was 
reared to agricultural pursuits, receiving 
such education as the rude log. cabin sub- 
scription schools of that early day affoi e 1. 
He ! ft his native State with his parents 

j when about four years of age, they locating 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



in Shelby Count)-, Indiana, in 1854. There 
he remained till the fall of 1S54, when he 
came to Iowa, living in Marion County un- 
til the following spring, since which lie 
has been a resident of (his county. On 
coming to the county lie settled in Jeffer- 
son (then Washington) Township, on wild 
land, when Indians and wild animals were 
the principal inhabitants of the surround- 
ing country, and there he experienced many 
of the hardships and privations incident to 
life in a new country. lie was always been 
a hard-working citizen, and by his per- 
severing industry he has converted his 
land into a well-cultivated farm, and is now 
engaged in general farming and stock-rais- 
ing. His farm is located on section 15, 
Jefferson Township, and contains 100 acres. 
Mr. Ouinn was married May 7, 1862, to 
Miss Sarah J. Hunter, a daughter ol An- 
drew Hunter. Of the eight children born 
to this union but three are living —William 
A., Clarinda B. and Minta, all at home. 
Mrs. Quinn died May 21, 18S5. She was 
an earnest Christian, and a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Ouinn 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

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JARVIS, superintendent and buildc 



of bridges, residing on section i_, 
-£' ° Benton Township, was born in Perry 
County, Ohio, August 22, 1S32, son of 
Phillip and Mary (Woolf) Jarvis. He redded 
in his native county until eighteen years of 
age, assisting on the farm and attending the 
common schools. He was married Febru- 
ary 28,1856, to Miss Anna Lewis, after which 
he resided in Hocking Count}'. The fol- 
lowing year he came to Clarke Coun- 
ty, Iowa, and later removed to Lucas 
County. In 1865 he came to Ringgold 
Count)- and settled on section 12, Benton 
J ownship. He located on his farm where 
he now resides July 19, 1875. He owns 



137 acres in a high state of cultivation and 
well improved. He has a good residence, 
a corn barn, orchard, small fruits, and has 
been engaged for several years in contract- 
ing for and building bridges. He has 
erected all the county bridges in Ringgold 
County for several years. He is the invent- 
or of the Jarvis patent for bridges, patented 
March 4, 1879 ; he is also the inventor and 
proprietor of the Jarvis wagon-brake, pat- 
ented March 2, 1S80. The bridges built on 
the Jarvis patent are considered the best in 
use. Mr. and Mrs. Jarvis are the parents 
of ten children — Rebecca, John, Ellen, 
Catherine, Levi, James, Phebe, Christopher, 
Samanthaand Margaret. Moses isdeceased. 
Mr. Jarvis is a member of the Missionary 
Baptist church, and politically is a Demo- 
crat. 

"ILL T. LAUGH LIN, senior mem- 
m/Vl b er °f triC * aw fi rm > Laughlin & 

;' M Campbell, of Ml. Ayr, Iowa, is a 
native of De Witt County, Illinois, born at 
Clinton, March 24. 1840, a son of Thomas 
and Nancy (Lowry) Laughlin, his father a 
native of North Carolina, and his mother 
of Kentucky. His father was a physician, 
practicing in Springfield and Clinton, but 
died in the prime of life, in 1S45, of pul- 
monary consumption. The mother is still 
living. Their family consisted of three: 
children — two sons and one daughter, of 
whom only the sons are living. The boy- 
hood of our subject was passed in Clinton. 
Illinois, where he attended the graded 
schools, and when seventeen years of age 
he began teaching, which he continued 
three terms, and in the meantime began the 
study of law with Hon. L. Weldon, of Clin- 
ton, now judge of the Court of Claims at 
Washington. He was admitted to the bru- 
in 1S61, and in the fall of the same yeai 
located in Mt. Ayr, and opened an office for 
| the practice of his profession. Two years 



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n/STOJcr of nrxcGOLD coujvrr. 



Inter he formed a partnership with I. W. 
Keller, which continued over five year.-. ( 
in 1S73 he was elected district attorney for 
the Third District, comprising the counties 
of Page, Montgomery, Taylor, Adams, 
Rinjrsrold, Union, Decatur and Clarke. At 
the expiration of three years he resigned, 
and resumed his practice, becoming asso- 
ciated with Judge Henry, under the firm 
name of Henry & Laughlin. Four years 
later this partnership was dissolved, and the 
firm of Laughlin & Campbell was formed. 
In 1 863- '4 Mr. Laughlin was superinten- 
dent of schools of Ringgold County. He 
was' appointed county judge in 1S62, vice 
Judge Keller, resigned. He was married 
March 10, 1861, to Louisa J. Bates, daugh- 
ter of Ansel Bates. They have two children 
— Lora B. and L. Weldon. Mr. Laughlin 
is a member of both the Masonic and Odd 
Fellows orders. 

p|ETER A. WHEELER, farmer and 
Kt ,.i stock-raiser, living on section 9, Lib- 
"**£ erty Township, was born in Jefferson 
County, New York, May 17, 1S40. When 
he was four years of age his parents, Peter 
and Polly (Millard) Wheeler, removed to 
Fulton County, Illinois, and there he was 
reared on a farm, his father being a farmer 
bv occupation. His parents lived till their 
death in Fulton County, the father dying 
in the year 1S76, and the mother in 1S84. 
Peter A. enlisted in the service of his coun- 
try at the age of eighteen years, becoming 
a memb?r of Company H, .Seventeenth 
Illinois Infantry, in which regiment lie 
served about six months, when he was 
transferred to Company F, Eighth Illinois 
Infantry, in which he served (ill receiving 
his discharge, a period of two years and 
four months. He to -k part in liie raid from 
Vicksburg to Meridian, Mississippi, and 
was at the battle of Mobile, and had his 



clothing cut in many places, but was not 
wounded. He was mustered our at Baton 
Rouge in May, [S65, when he returned to 
Canton, Fulton County, Illinois, and the 
same fall was married to Miss Louisa J. 
Mariner, of Canton. They are the parents 
of four children — Henry E., Lewis L., Hat- 
tie 1. and Flora Adell. " Mr. Wheeler fol- 
lowed farming in Fulton County for three 
years after his marriage, when he removed 
to Minnesota, and after spending five years 
in Cottonwood County, that State, re- 
turned to Canton, Illinois. In the spring of 
1883 Mr. Wheeler cameto Ringgold County, 
Iowa, when he located on his present farm, 
which contains 480 acres of well-improved 
land under high cultivation. He devotes 
considerable attention to stock-raising, mak- 
ing a specialty of Poland-China hogs, 
which are of the purest breed and are all 
entitled to registry. He has on his farm 
eighty-three head of thorough-bred cattle, 
and twenty-three horses, and as a stock- 
raiser Mr. Wheeler ranks with the best of 
his township. He is an active and enter- 
prising citizen, and during his residence in 
J Liberty Township has won many friends 
' by his genial manners and fairand honorable 
I dealings. 

^BmS^f- " ' 

\ 'GEORGE W. LESAN, an early settler 

[ ■-/■- of Ringgold County, and an enter- 

- . prising farmer of Poe Township, is a 

native of Penobscot County, Maine, born 

I February 11, 1830, a son of John and Eliz- 

; abeth (Brook--) Lesan, also natives of 
Maine. In 1 831 his parents moved to Ohio, 
and in 1836 to Illinois, where the mother 

; died in 1852. George W. is the sixth of 
twelve children, six of whom are living. 
He commenced the battle of life for him- 
51 II when twenty years 0! age, and in 1853 

! was married to Mar)' M. Leasure. In the 
Spi ing of 1855 he came to Iowa, and entered 
280 acres of kind from the Government. 






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BIOGRAPHICAL S KETCHES. 



377 



llis first dwelling in the county, which was 
also the first one in Mt. Ayr, was a round- 
log cabin, 16x18 feet, covered with clap- 
boards, with the ground for the floor for 
some time, until one oi puncheon could be 
substituted. He lived in this house ten 
years, and opened up his farm. His pres- 
ent residence is commodious, and his farm 
buildings are large and comfortable. Be- 
fore the railroad was built the town was 
laid out and called Lesanville, but on the 
advent of the railroad the name was 
changed, and both village and postofneeare 
called Lesan. He established the first 
store in the place, which at present is con- 
ducted bv his nephew, Arthur L. Lesan, his 
son, O. L. Lesan, being postmaster, ap- 
pointed in April, 1884. Mr. Lesan has had 
a family of seven children, but four are liv- 
ing — Laura E., wife of A. F. Beard ; Owen 
L., Burrett M. and Cassius T. Mr. Lesan 
has served his township as justice of the 
peace, trustee and supervisor. He is an 
intelligent, public-spirited citizen, lending 
his influence to the side of law and order. 



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1IOMAS STAMPER, engaged in 
\ J \ : 'f farming and stock-raising on sections 
^p' 20 and 21, Grant Township, where 
he has 720 acres of good land, is a native 
ol England, born September 30, 1S32, a 
son of Thomas and Mary Stamper, who 
were also natives of England. On first 
coming to America Mr. Stamper located 
in Michigan, whei c he remained two years— 
He then removed to Illinois, and for thirty- 
five years made his home in Kendall 
Count}'. On leaving Illinois he came to 
Ringgold Countv, and settled on the farm 
where he now resides, which is one o! the 
best farms to be found in the count)*. I lib 
residence is large and commodious, and 
his barn and out-buildings are noticeably 
frood, and his orchard covers twelve acres 



i o! land. In connection with his general 
farming he is extensively* engaged in fecd- 
: ing stock, and is one of the best farmers in 
j Grant Township. Mr. Stamper was united 
in marriage to Miss Anna Turbey, who 
j was born in the year 1840, a daughter of 
j William and Mary Turbey, natives of Eng- 
land. They are the parents of seven chil- 
dren, six sons and one daughter — William, 
Frank, John, Edward, Richard, Minnie and 
Thomas. In politics Mr. Stamper casts 
his suffrage with the Republican party*. 

$p^ M. BAUMANN, engaged in farming 
(■ ) and stock-raising on section 4. Lin- 
\~ _:(. ,° coin Township, is a native of Penn- 
sylvania, born April 20, 1852, a son of J. 
G. and Hannah (Klingensmith) Baumann, 
who were natives of Germany and Penn- 
sylvania respectively, the father being the 
oldest settler of Ringgold County. Our 
subject was brought by his parents to 
Iowa in an early day. locating first in Jef- 
ferson County, and a short time later came 
to Ringgold County, and there he ex- 
perienced many of the privations as well 
as the pleasures of pioneer life. The sur- 
rounding country was then in a state of 
nature, and Indians and wild animals were 
the principal inhabitants. H. M. Baumann 
was reared to agricultural pursuits, and re- 
ceived his education in the district schools, 
lie has lived on his present farm since 
coming to tlii^ countv, and is the owner c>f 
320 acres of choice land, which has been 
acquired by years of toil and industry, and 
he is classed among the prosperous agri- 
culturists of Lincoln Township. He was 

united in marriage to Miss Emma A. 

who was born in Pennsylvania, December 
15, 1852. They' have seven children — 
Harry* R., born May 1, 1876; Laura E-, 
born April 21, 1878; E. M., born July 18, 
1S79; J° mi A -> born December 28, 1S80: 



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:• ■ 
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:., - 



ji/STonr or Jt/l\*<;<;i / d countt 



Ida L., born October io, [SS2; Ada II., 
born April 26, 1SS4, and an infant yel un- 
named, born March 19, 1SS6. In politics 
Mr. Baumann affiliates with the Repub- 
lican part)-. Mr. Baumann has on his 
farm a very line orchard covering three 
acres. His residence and farm buildings 
arc comfortable and commodious, and 
everything about his place betokens the 
thrift and care of its owner. 

-i ^2*^1^?^-- 1- 

V ' jDGAR J. PRATT, a member of the 
\r;l firm of Cole & Pratt, lumber-dealers, 
ofcj*» was born in Cayuga County, Xew 
York, September 17, 1S41, a son of Joseph 
L. and Amy S. (Fox) Pratt. When he was 
three years old he was taken by his parents 
to Whitewater, Wisconsin, where the father 
followed his business, that of a carriage 
manufacturer, for main' years. He died 
in 1S7S, his wife surviving him a few years. 
The)- were the parents of three sons and 
four daughters, Edgar J. being the sixth 
child. He passed hisyouth in Whitewater, 
receiving a limited education in the schools 
of that place. At the age of nineteen 
years he enlisted in Company H, Thirteenth 
Wisconsin Infantry, and was assigned to 
the Army of the Cumberland. He partici- 
pated in the battles of Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, and Chattanooga, under General 
Thomas, besides other engagements, serv- 
ing faithfully nearly four years. He was 
mustered out of the service at Xew Or- 
leans, in July, 1865, when he returned to 
Whitewater, Wisconsin. He then formed 
a partnership with his brother, John H. 
Pratt, in the mercantile business, which 
continued two years, when Edgar Pratt 
went to White Hall, Michigan, where he 
was engaged in buying and selling shii gl 
ties and lumber for two years. Mr. Pratt 
was married in 1864 to Miss Jennie S. Cole, 
of Whitewater, Wisconsin, the only 1 daugh- 



tei ol W. Cole, Sr. The)' have two daugh- 
ters —Emma S. and Edith May. In 1869 
Mr. Pratt removed with his family to 

Mason City, Iowa, where he engaged in 
the mercantile business, remaining there 
about seven years. He then formed a 
partnership with W. W. Lyons, thev or- 
ganizing the Poweshiek Count)' Bank, at 
Brooklyn, Iowa, of which Mr. Pratt was 
cashier. In 1S79 Hr. Pratt came to Mt. 
Ayr. where lie was engaged in mercantile 
pursuits for two years. In iSSohe became 
associated with W. Cole, Jr., thus forming 
the present lumber firm of Cole, ec Piatt. 
Mr. Pratt is one of the active and public- 
spirited citizens of Mt. Ayr, and during his 
residence in Ringgold County has gained 
the confidence and respect of all who know 
him. In the fall of 18S3 he was elected a 
member of the Board oi Supervisors, of 
which he is at present chairman, and is also 
president of the School Board. Mr. Pratt 
is a member of the Masonic fraternity, be- 
longing to the lodge at Mason City. He 
is also a member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic. 



m 



JASPER K. DEXHART, an early set- 
tler and prominent citizen of Wash- 
A ington Township, lives on section 30, 
where he has a good farm of 14; acres, all 
well improved, with a comfortable resi- 
dence and farm buildings. He was born 
in Germany, March 1 5, 1839, a son of George 
and Christina W. (King) Denhart. When 
he was two years o! age his parents came 
to America, being four weeks in making 
the journey from Havre de Gras to Xew 
York. They wcnl direct to Cincinnati, 
Ohio, where thev lived two years, and 
then went to Pickaway County, the same 
State, where the father was employed on 
the canal, and there died. The mothersub- 
sequently married again. He remained 



' 

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■ 
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 879 



with his mother until manhood, in his youth 
being employed in a brick yard. On leav- 
ing home lie went to Harrison County, 

Indiana, and thence, in 1852, to Marion 
County, Iowa, and three years later to 
Ringgold County, locating first at Mt. Ayr, 

where he was living at the breaking- out of 
the war of the Rebellion, and in 1 86 1 he en- 
listed in the defense of his country, and was 
assigned to Company G, Fourth Iowa In- 
fantry. He served four years, participating 
in many severe engagements, among others 
being the battles at Pea Ridge, Vicksbnrg, 
and Atlanta, and accompanied Sherman to 
the sea. He was mustered out at Daven- 
port, Iowa, in August, 1865, and returned 
to Mt. Ayr, where he lived until 1866, when 
he located on his present farm. He was 
married in May, 1S66, to Rachel M. Miller, 
daughter of J. D. Miller, of Ringgold 
County. The)' have a family of nine chil- 
dren — Mary, James, George W ., Clarence, 
Maud, Howard, Jennie, Lora and Julia. 
One son, Thomas, died aged six years. 

— <*H33>-« 

m B. EDWARDS, farmer, section 22, 
'% Clinton|Towuship, is a native of Han- 
<£ a cock County, Tennessee, where he 
was born April 22, 1S36, son of William 
and Mary (Bishop) Edwards. He was the 
second of seven children, and when four- 
teen years of age his father removed to 
Davis County, Iowa where the family re- 
sided three years, then removed to Clarke 
Count v. lie was reared a farmer, and re- 
ceived his education in the common schools. 
He was married January 26, 1S60. to Miss 
Sarah Miner, a native of Jefferson Count)-, 
Indiana, and daughter of R. H. and Sarah 
A. (Wright) Miner. In December, 1863, 
Mr. Edwards enlisted in Company B, 
Eighteenth Iowa Infantry, and was on post 
duty at Fort Smith, Arkansas, most of the 
time. He was honorably discharged in 



August, 1865, and returned to Clarke Coun- 
ty, where he resided a few mouths, then 
removed to Worth County, Missouri, 
where he lived until 1S82, then located upon 
■ his present farm, where he has since re- 
I sided. He purchased this land of one 
, Jacob Huntsman, lie owns 194 acres in a 
good state of cultivation and well improved, 
I located one mile smith of Redding. lie 
: has a good one-and-a-half story residence, 
j well furnished, surrounded by native shade 
j trees, a good orchard and small fruits, and 
i everything about, the premises indicates 
J the thrifty farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Edwards 
j have two children living — Oliver Id., born 
! October 31, 1861, and Elbert E., now thir- 
j teen years of age. Oliver IT. was reared a 
I farmer, and educated in the common 
[ schools. He is a member of the Missionary 
, Baptist church. lie was married Novem- 
] ber 26, 1884, to Miss Mary E. Abarr, born 
1 in Rinsfgrold County, and daughter of Dan- 
, iel and Ann M. Abarr. 1 hey have one 
I child — Orville R. Mr. Edwards is a mem- 
ber of the Missionary Baptist church, and 
! in politics is a Republican. He is a man 
j very highly esteemed and is considered 
: one of the leading men of the township. 
I Postoffice, Redding. 



•; T. LEE, farmer and stock-dealer, sec- 
tion 28, is numbered among the en- 

~^° terprising and successful business 
men of Athens Township. He was born 
in Henry County, Iowa, July 1, 1854, son 
of S. M. Lee, a native of Illinois, who came 
to Henry County in 1838, when Burlington 
had but one log store. His mother was 
E. Carter, a native of West Virginia. His 
parents reared a family of eleven children, 
and all are living. Our subject was the 
third child, and when two years of age his 
father removed to Union County, where 
the family resided four years. They then 



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HISTORY OF RINGGOLD COUNT!'. 



380 

returned to Henry County, where they 
lived eight years, thence to Union County 
again. In 1874 the family came to Ring- 
gold County. Mr. Lee received his edu- 
cation at Mt. Pleasant and New London. 
He was married November 15. 1877, lo 
Miss Marv Livermore, of Ringgold Count)', 
daughter of A. Livermorc, and a year 
later settled upon his present farm which 
was then wild land. He purchased eight) 
acres, and has since added to his first pur- 
chase until he now has 213 acres under a 
high state of cultivation. He has a good, 
c-.mifortable residence surrounded by shade 
and ornamental trees, an orchard of 200 
trees and small fruits, a barn, 40 x 44 feet, 
and out-buildings for stock, etc. He is 
engaged in stock-raising, feeding, and ship- 
ping stock. Mr. and Mrs. Lee are the 

parents of live children Leslie, Ray, 

Lucy, Frank and Charlie. Politically he 
is a Greenbacker. Although a young man 
he has gained a good position both socially 
and financially, and is classed among the 
best citizens of the county. Postoffice, 
Kellerton. 



fW. WILLIAMS, postoffice, Goshen, 
engaged in fanning and stock-raising 
JjjA® on section 25, Lincoln Township, 
was born in Maryland, November 7, 1827, 
a son of William and Anna (Corson) Will- 
iams, the father being a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, and the mother of Mar viand. G. 
YV., our subject, was reared to agricultural 
pursuits, which he has followed the greater 
part of his life. At the age of twenty-one 
years he began clerking in a dry-goods 
store, which he followed three years. De- 
cember 5, 1 S 5 1 , he was united in marriage 
to Miss Henrietta Nulph, who was born in 
Pennsylvania, February 6, 1831, her par- 
ents, George C. and Barbara Nulph, being 
natives of Pennsylvania. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Williams have been born nine children - 



Francis A., born April 4. 1852 ; George A., 

born April 3, 1855; M. C, born April 3, 
1855. Martha L„ born May 5, 1857; Alice 
H.. born February 4, 1830; Mary F., born 
January 2j, 186.1 ; John, born February iS, 
1S63 ; A. II.. born February [6, 1S65; and 
C. A., born March 30, 1867. Mr. Williams 
came to Ringgold County, Iowa, in an 
early day, being- among the first settlers of 
Jefferson Township, where he first located. 
There he endured many of the hardships 
and privations incident to the life of a pio- 
neer, going to St. Joseph, Missouri, for 
provisions, which took six days to make 
the trip, grinding his flour (buckwheat) in 
a coffee mill, the nearest mill being at Osce- 
ola. His first house in Ringgold County 
was a rude log cabin with puncheon floor. 
He came to Lincoln Township with his 
family in 1878, when he settled on the farm 
where he has since made his home ; here 
he has 160 acres of well-cultivated land, and 
good residence and farm-buildings, and is 
now classed among Ringgold County's best 
farmers. In politics Mr. Williams isa Demo- 
crat. Since coming to Lincoln Township 
he has served as school director, and also as 
president of the School Board. Mrs. Will- 
iams is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 

.♦#= ~B|g|s~ °&» 

11 ) WARD STL'CK, farmer, section 4, 
rj'. Lott's Creek Township, is one of the 
'7.7- 1 , old pioneers who has been identified 
with the interests of Ringgold County for 
the past thirty years, and is well worthy of 
a notice in its history. He was born in 
Union County, Pennsylvania, October 10, 
1825. son of Jonathan and Elizabeth Stuck, 
lie was reared on a farm, and received his 
education in the common schools of that 
day. When he was about twenty-one 
years of age, his parents removed to 
Henry County, Ohio, where they remained 



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BrOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



381 



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■ 



one year, thence to Lucas County, remain- 
ing two years, thence to Seneca County, 
then returned to Lucas County, thence to 
Sandusky County. He was married De- 
cember 14, 1851, to Miss Catharine Walter, 
:i native of Stark Count)', Ohio, and daugh- 
ter of John and Sarah Walter. In 185411c 
came to Keokuk, Iowa, and in the spring 
of 1S55 removed to Davis County, Missouri. 
In September of the same year he came to 
Ringgold Count v. and located in Lott's 
Creek Township. In'the spring of 1856 he 
came to his present farm, where he has since 
"resided. It was then in a wild state, and his 
first residence was a log cabin, which still 
stands as a landmark of pioneer days. His 
farm contains 100 acres, and is in a good 
state of cultivation. He has a fine story- 
and-a-half residence, erected in 1878, mod- 
ern style and well furnished, a good orchard 
of 100 trees, small fruits, and a grove of 
native maples. He is engaged in general 
farming and stock-raising. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stuck have one child — John E., born Oc- 
tober 23, 1852. He is a young man of in- 
telligence and good business qualifications. 
He resides at home and assists in the care 
and management of the farm. Mr. Stuck 
started in life without means, but by indus- 
try and economy he has acquired a fine 
property. Politically he is a Republican. 
Posfoffice, Caledonia. 



RA A. PALMER, an active and suc- 
cessful agriculturist of Liberty Town- 
ship, is a 11. .live of Canada, his parents, 
Wilkinson and Nancy (Hurde) Palmer, 
moving from Rhode Island to Canada a 
short time prior to his birth, which oc- 
curred January 21, 1835. At an early age- 
lie was taken by his parents to Warren 
County. Illinois, and in that county he 
grew to manhood, being reared on a farm. 
He ens:aLred in the manufacture of two- 



horse cultivators at Monmouth, Illinois, 
which he followed for several years. Dur- 
ing this time he was married to Miss Sarah 
J. Morris, ol Monmouth, who died in 1S68, 
leaving six children, who are all doing for 
themselves. Mr. Palmer was again married 
in 1883, to Mrs. Ella Nicholas, a daughter 
of James Spencer, who had two children 
bv her former marriage. In 1871 Mr. Pal- 
mer came to Ringgold County, since which 
time he has resided on his farm on section 
5, Liberty Township. His farm contains 
32oacrcs all under fence and well-improved, 
and during his residence here he has fol- 
lowed general farming and stock-raising, 
paying special attention to a good grade of 
cattle and hogs, in which pursuit he is 
meeting with success. Mr. Palmer has held 
the office of justice of the peace of Liberty 
Township for six years. He has been presi- 
dent of the Ringgold County Agricultural 
■ Society for some eight years, and by his 
strict and honorable dealings has gained 
the confidence of all who know him. 

ffOHN F. PAGE, is a native of Ring- 

;old County, Iowa, born in Rice 

'' Township, September 19, 1861, a son 

; of Edward Page, who was a native of the 

! State of New York. The father came to 

j Ringgold County, Iowa, in 1856, and set- 

! tied on wild land, where lie built a log 

' cabin in which our subject was born. He 

i was a soldier in the war of the Rebellion, 

[ and lost his life while in the service of his 

country. John E. Page, the subject of this 

sketch was reared to farming pursuits. 

• which he has made the principal avocation 

of hi-, life. J lis education was obtained in 

the common scho T, of this county. His 

mother died when he was three years old, 

! and his father dying not long after he was 

thus early in life left an orphan. In [877 

! he went to Dakota where lie remained for 



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383 HISTORT OF RINGGOLD COUWT1'. %*. 



'? ft 



five years, most of which time he was en- years of toil. Alpheus M. Gustiii, the 
gaged in herding cattle, and while there subject of this sketch, was reared amid 
was deputy marshal in Deadwood Cityfor pioneer scenes, and his youth was spent in 
one year.' lie returned to Ringgold Coun- assisting to clear and cultivate the home 
ty, and is now devoting his attention to farm. lie was married June 4, 1S65, to 
general farming, on section 5, Jefferson Miss Catherine T. Harvey, and of the six 
Township, where he is numbered among children born to this union two are de- 
the enterprising young farmers of his ceased — Emmitt and Oscar. The names 
neighborhood. Mr. Page was united in j of those yet living are — William, Charles, 
marriage August 19. 18S4, io Miss Martha '. Blanch and Fred. Mr. Gustin has met 
Kurtz, a daughter of John Kurtz, of Henry , with success in his agricultural pursuits. 
County, Iowa. They are the parents of ( and has now a well-cultivated farm, where 
one child, a daughter — named Ina M. Mrs. '■ lie resides, containing 340 acres of valuable. 
Page is a member of the Methodist Epis- laud, which is farmed by himself with the 
copal church. I assistance of his two sons, besides which 

I they thresh and shell corn for the neighbor- 
"^"Clf"^' 5 "^ J hood. He has the latest improved ma- 
chinery on his farm, and good farm build- 
^mLPHEUS M. GUSTIN, an old settler [ ings for the accommodation of his stock. 
, l\; of Ringgold County, and an active : Mr. Gustin takes an interest in any enter- 
feM and enterprising farmer and stock- prise for the advancement of the cause of 
raiser of Jefferson Township, living on j education or religion. He has taught 
section 7, was born in Adams County, , school himself, following that vocation dur- 
Ohio, February 25, 184;. His father, Jere- j ing seven winters, and was president of 
miah Gustin, brought his family to Iowa j the School Board for two terms. He has 
in 1S55, when he located in Marion County, , held the office of justice of the peace one 
coming to Ringgold County in the spring ' term, was township trustee two terms, and 
of 1S57. The family settled on wild land ! has also served as road supervisor. He is 
and the first night camped on their new | a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
homestead, while the wolves howled all \ church, and is superintendent of Morti- 
around them. Their house was the first mer Sabbath-school, 
frame dwelling in Ringgold County, the i 

frame-work being hewed from the timber, [ — 0-J33*- 10 — -tiggS'" — = > ~ < HS~ ; ' — 

and the siding, doors and fooling being 

hauled from Marion County, a distance of j gmDDISON C. PAYNE, one of the lead- 
100 miles. For two years they went to Ma- . L\ ing agriculturists of Ringgold Coun- 
rion County lor provisions, and their near- *z0s> ty, now living in Mt. Ayr, is a native 
est mill was in Missouri, fifty miles from of Vermillion County, Illinois, born Febru- 
their home. The father at one time was ary 29, 1844. a son of John and Eetta 
snow bound while going to mill, and was j (O'Neal) Payne. The grandfather of our 
unable to return home for three weeks. ; subject, John Payne, was a native of New 



jjpjj They tramped their grain out, and some- | York, and one of the early settlers of Ver- 
ity limes flailed it out, on a dirt floor. Such j million County. Illinois, where his son John 
were some of their experiences of pioneer was born. Addison C. was left an orphan 
life, but their hardships and privations are t at an early age, his mother dying when he 
, over, and they now enjoy the fruits of their was about four year- old, and his fat' 



ler 



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BlOGRAPilH M. SKETCHES. 



:> : 



being killed during the late war;:: ri ■ ; 
;■• Danville, Illinois. At thi age of five 
years he was bound oul I ■ John E. Coop r, 
a practical farmer and stock-trader ol Ver- 
million C iunt) . wiili whom lie 
for sixteen y ears, and during this time re- 
ceived a limited e lu( ation in th 
schools. O.i attaining o! twenty- 

one years he started out in life himsel 

without means, and the two yc follow 
ing was empl vyed on a farm, rec iving s • 
a month the first year, and the s cond 
year his wages were in , ■ ised in .it S3 5 
a month. He was marrie 1 in Ss mb 
1S67, to Miss Sarah H. Guymon, of Ver- 
million Countv. her fal her, Fi ank G uym m, 
being now a resident of Carroll Count} 7 , 
Missouri. 1 n jy are the parents of two 
children — Aha and Ora V. In the spring 
of 1867 Mr. Payn ■ wc nt to Count)-, 

Iowa, and during thai summer broke prai- 
rie, and the same fal! bought wh ' I whi :h 
he sold at 1) - Moines. Me then began 
dealing in cheap land, in which enterprise 
he made his first money. After his mar- 
riage he removed from Madison to Adams 
County, where he purchased a farm, and 
after breaking his land sold it. In 1S69 
he assisted in laying the Chicago, Burling- 
ton 6c Quincy Railroad, and acted as pay- 
master of three divisions of surveying 
companies, locating the road from Afton to 
Council Bluffs. He also furnished supplies 
for the three c impanies of surveyors, each 
company composed of twenty men. and 
furnished his team for the --aim of $TOO a 
month. In January, 1871, Mr. Payne pur- 
chased a farm in the east part of Ringgold 
County 7 , which he sold in the fall of the 
same year, and bought land in Grant Town- 
ship, this county, and to his original eighty 
acres he has added until he now owns 640 
acres of choice land and was there 
actively engaged in dealing in cattle 
until March, 1S64, when, on account 
of failing health, he left his farm 



and remo' to Ml. \ vr. where he 

incc lived somewhat 1 ctired, tho 
still Iool r his busines - interests . nd 

o tock on n sm I ?i al< . Mr. 
be classed am ., he self-made 
mi 11 of this 1 ounty, having •'. his own en- 
ergy and i trii >us habit: .1 cumnlati d a 
n 1 :lei 1 . for his di clining years. Be- 
sides his large farm in Grant Township he 
Other land in the county, his real 
e •;.•!■ . 1 iv ring i .- 3 acres. 



VlTJAX MILLER, farmer, section 
\ J 22. Middle Fork Township, is one of 
— '] the well-known and worthy citizens 
of Ringgold County, and was born in 
Rockbridge County, Virginia, April \~, 
[82 j.. 1 [is father was Henry Miller, whose 
sk tch appears elsewhere in this volume. 
' early lil was spent as: ; -.ing on the 
farm and attending the common sch.o 1 
his native Sate. December o, 1S47. he 
was married to Miss Sarah M. Sha 
daughter of Jacob and Margaret (Ale- 
Henry) Shaffer. IT:- resided in Rock- 
bridge Count)' until September 1 _\ I -, ;. 
when, with wife and live children he 
started for Iowa, with horse team and 
wagon. He arrived in Louisa County 
October 2j, where he spent the winter, and 
the following March came to Ringgold 
County and located upon his present farm 
in Middle Fork Township. He first pre- 
empted the land from the Gcvernnn t. 
His first residence was a log cabin, 14 x 16 
feet, with puncheon floor and clapboa d 
roof, and the furniture was of home man- 
uf cture. In November, 1S62. he was 
elected Captain of Company B, Third Bat- 
talion, Home Guards. He held the office 
1 litably until it was disbanded, in [864. 
Mr. Miller has added to his original 160 
acres until lie now owns 32D acres of land 
in a gfoo i state of cultivation and well 



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384 



MSTOnr OF RINGGOLD COUNTT, 



proved. He has a good story-and-a-half 

residence envied in 1875 and furnished 111 
a manner that betokens the refinement of 
the family. He has a good orchard ol two 
acres and a variety of small fruits, out- 
buildings for stock and grain, and every- 
thing about the farm indicates the thrift 
of its proprietor. He is engaged princi- 
pally in stock-raising and feeding. Mr. 
and Mrs. Miller are the parents of eleven 
children — Mattie Showalter, Arskine, 
Henry, Virginia B. Dagger, Nettie Rec- 
tor, Alice Bailey, Ella Showalter, Jacob, 
Paroda, Lulu and Hugh. Maggie Stevens 
and Herbert are deceased. Mr. Miller has 
served as township clerk, assessor, member 
of the School Board and county supervisor. 
He is a worthy member of the Advent. 
Christian church, and politically is a Re- 
publican. He has given his children good 
educational advantages, and they are well 
fitted to take responsible positions in life. 
Postoffice, lngart. 



m W. BROCKETT, of the firm of 

Brocket! & Bcvis, dealers in real 
i^ ° estate, abstracts, municipal securities, 
etc., is a native of Connecticut, born in 
New Haven, October 2, 1.843. When six- 
years of age lie was brought by his parents. 
E. E. and Jane (Bradley) Brocket t, to 
Davenport, Iowa, and (here he grew to 
manhood, receiving his education in the 
public schools of that city. He began 
teaching school at the age of eighteen years, 
a vocation he followed some six years, and 
in the meantime studied law with the firm 
of McComas & McKighau, of Fort Scott, 
Kansas. Completing his law studies he was 
admitted to the bar in 1873 alK ' commenced 
the practice of law at Fort Scott. Kansas, 
where he remained till 1S79, a ' the same 
time being connected with the mining in- 
terests of the place. Mr. Brockett was 



married in May, 1872, to Miss Catherine 
Vidal, of Fort Scott, a daughter of John E. 
• Vidal, whose father was a Cuban tobacco 
merchant. John L. Vidal married the 
; mother of our subject, and is now a resident 
! of Mt. Ayr. Mr. and Mrs. Brockett have 
; live children— John, Frank, Cassie, Eleanor 
I J. and Thomas. Mr. Brockett removed 
with his family to Mt. Ayr, Ringgold Coun- 
ty. Iowa, in November, 1S79. ann ' immedi- 
| ately opened a law office. In February, 
i 18S3, he formed a partnership with M. L. 
Bevis, thus forming the present reliable 
I firm Of Brockett & Bevis, Mr. Brockett be- 
i ing the attorney for the firm, and by their 
1 honorable and upright dealing's they have 
I established a good business, and have 
gained the confidence and respect of all 
j who know them. 

I 

I 

§MACK GORSUCH resides on .sec- 
tion S, Riley Township, where he oc- 
! "K. cupies the finest farm residence in the 
j count)', which he built in 1SS4, at a cost of 
j $2,800. His home farm contains 200 acres 
J of as fine land as can be found in Ringgold 
1 County, all under a good state of cultiva- 
tion. He also owns a farm of 250 acres on 
; sections 14 and 15 of the same township, 
where he first established his home in 
; Ringgold County, in [871. Eighty- aci-es 
of that farm were entered by his father in 
i 1S53 anc ' reserved for him, butno improve- 
, ments had been made. Thus he com- 
menced life with a deed of the eighty- 
acres and a span of horses, and what he has 
' besides this lie has made by his own indus- 
, try and good management. He lived on 
i section 14 from 1S71 till 1SS4, and then 
moved to the farm where lie now lives. 
' lie is ranked among the solid agriculturists 
of Ringgold County, and is one of Riley 
Townships most influential citizens. He 
was born in Beaver Count)', Pennsylvania, 



■ 



i ; . ■ ' 






j;JOGA\ iril/i VI L SKE TCI1ES. 



March 2, \S\q, a son of John and Ann 
Gorsuch, also natives ol the Ke)'Stone 
State, ihe son and father being born in the 
same house. The family moved to Mon- 
roe County, Iowa, in 1S5S, and in that coun- 
ty the father improved four farms. He 
was an active, useful man and much re- 
spected by all who knew him. His death 
occurred in Monroe County, Jul)' 8, 1S78, 
at the age of fifty six years. The mother 
still lives on the homestead with five of her 
children — Mary, Elizabeth E., Sarah E., 
George W". and Perry E. Two sons besides 
our subject, Robert and Thomas C, live 
in Riley Township. One son, William C, 
lives in '■Hastings, Nebraska, and another, 
Esli T., lives in Beadle. County, Dakota. 
Amanda and David A. are deceased. J. 
Mack Gorsuch remained under the home 
roof until twenty-two years of age, and 
then, as before stated, came to ^.Ringgold 
County. He was married March 12, 1S72, 
to Agnes A. Farmer, who was born in 
Henry County, Iowa, May 25, 1853, a 
daughter of James and Rebecca Fanner, 
her father a native of Ohio, and her mother 
of Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Gorsuch have 
two children — Minnie M., born February 
28, 1874. and Charles E., born May 13, 
18S0. Mr. Gorsuch has served his town- 
ship as school director and road supervis- 
or. He and Ins wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



•,'A'RON YV. COFFIN, engaged in agri- 
• j '■>% cultural pursuits on section 10, Ting- 
^7 lev Township, was born in Mahaska 
County, Iowa, near Oskaloosa, January 22, 
1856, a son of Jacob F. and Maria (Mc- 
Clain) Collin, the father being a pioneer of 
Mahaska County. Our subjeel was reared 
to agricultural pursuits, his lather being a 
farmer by occupation, and his education 
was obtained in the common schools of his 



native county. He was married in June, 
187S, to Lvdia Shoemaker of Mahaska 
County, and to this union have been born 
two children — Charles and Arthur J. In 
the spring ol 1882 our subject came with 
his family to Ringgold County, and settled 
in Tingle) - Township em part (if his father's 
farm, of 320 acres, he having eighty acres 
o! well-improved land. Jacob F. Coffin, 
father of our subject, was born in Jackson 
County, Indiana, June 7, 1834, a son of 
Samuel and Sophia (Fisher) Coffin, the 
former born in North Carolina in 1809. 
Jacob F. was nine years of age when his 
parents settled in Lee County, Indiana, and 
a year later moved to Mahaska County, 
Iowa, where he was married to Maria Mc- 
Clain who was a native of- that count)'. 
They have four children living. Mr, and 
Mrs. Jacob F. Coffin now make their home 
in Ringgold County, Iowa, where they 
own a fine farm of 320 acres located on 
section 10, Tingley Township. 



/fT'EREMlAH C. GUSTIN, farmer and 
"'.'. 1 stock-raiser, living on section 6, Teffer- 
V<f son Township, is a native of Ohio, born 
in Adams County, June 14, 1S46, a son of 
Jeremiah W. and Rachel (Maddox) Gustin, 
who were natives of Kentucky and Vir- 
ginia respectively. The father settled with 
his family in Marion County, Iowa, in [! 55, 
and in 1857 came to Ringgold County, at 
which time Indians and wild animals were 
the principal inhabitants, and here the 
father entered 1,000 acres of uncultivated 
land, where the family endured all the 
hardships and privations incident to pioneer 
life. The father died in this county May 
16, 1880, and the mother is still living, mnk- 
)!i r hi 1- home with her son, Alpheus M.. in 
Jefferson Township. They were the par- 
ents of nine children, of whom five are yet 
living— Mrs. Hannah Cov, Mrs. Vienna 



~ .■.■--' ■ ' 



3S6 



HISTOlir Or RINCGOT.D COUXT1'. 



Dunlap, Mrs. Rosetta Ford, Alpheus M. 
and Jeremiah C. Jeremiah C. has always 
followed farming', in which he has met with 
success, being n >w the owner of 280 acres 
of well-improved land. lie was married 
November 1 1, 1S75, to Miss MattieA. Page, 
a daughter of Edwin Page, who was killed 
in the late war, having been a member of 
Company G. Fourth Iowa Infantry. Mr. 
and Mrs. Gustin have live children— Cary 
E., Oriental J., Edwin P., Pearl and Violet. 
Mr. Gustin has served as school director 
for several years. lie and his wife arc- 
members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

-i •^-^^.^•^y^C^f- E- 

SS&BS. BAIRD resides on section 1, Clin- 
' ( \ . ton Township, and is one of the well- 
4 5:.-3? known and leading pioneers of Ring- 
gold County- He was born in Putnam 
County, Indiana, December 4, 1831. His 
father, John Baird, was a son of Samuel 
Baird, a native of Scotland, and was born 
in Virginia. His mother, Martha (Moore) 
Baird, was a native of Kentucky. They 
were married in Indiana and were pioneers 
of Putnam Count)', locating in the heavy 
timber near Putnamville. They reared a 
family of six children — Samuel, Sarah Jane, 
Hartley, Mary, Absalom and Martha. Abs. 
resided in Putnam County until he grew to 
manhood. His early life was passed in as- 
sisting on the farm and in attending the 
common schools in the log school-houses of 
that day. After reaching his majority he 
was engaged in clerking in a store for four 
years. In 1856 he came to Iowa bv team, 
and was on the road thirty days. He fust 
located upon 120 acres of wild land that: his 
father had entered from the Government 
in 1853. He was marrii d January 1, 1860, 
to Miss Isabella Poor, a lady of high culture 
and education, who w as asuccessful teacher 
and taught the first school in Clinton and 
Middle Fork townships. She was a daugh- 



ter of Alvin Poor, a prominent pioneer of 
Ringgold County. A short time after his 
marriage Mr. Baird built a frame house, 

16 x 16. the first frame house built in the 
t iwnship. Here he has since resided and 
improved his land from time to time as his 
means would permit, and has added to his 
acres until he has a splendid farm of 565 
acres. It is divided into fields for the con- 
venience of stock, and a modern wind-mill 
furnishes his stock with an abundance of 
pure water. He has a good, well-furnished 
house, barn, out-buildings for stock, an or- 
chard of 150 bearing trees, and small fruits. 
He makes a specialty of stock-raising and 
feeding, usually keeping from 100 to 150 
head of cattle. Mr. and Mrs. Baird are the 
parents of ten living children — William A., 
Ida R.. Julia B., Alice E., Samuel C, Ber- 
tha M., James Claude, Charles L., A. Roy 
and Day. Two are deceased : John E. died 
at the age of twenty-one years, and Rufus 
died at the age of twelve years. Mr. Baird 
has served creditably as township trustee, 
assessor, member of the Board of Supervis- 
ors, and was township clerk ten 3'ears. He 
has been a Republican since 1S56. Post- 
office, Redding. 



— 0— £« 



G«- 



?'.*,'■ '5 > 



T7RANC1S SMITH ROBINSON.one of 

i.rl Ringgold County's pioneer men, settled 
~.-. j on section 7, Union Township, where he 
now lives, in the spring of 1S57 ; his 
family consisting of his wife and five chil- 
dren. Mr. Robinson was born in Mel- 
bourne, Derbyshire, England, Julv 30, iS jo, 
and came to the United Slates with his 
father and family in 1821, landing at Phila- 
delphia. The following winter they spent 
in Pittsburg, and in 1822 the family estab- 
lished their residence in Richland County, 
( >hio. There the father, Francis Robinson, 
followed agricultural pursuits the rest of 
his life, dying at his homestead many years 



■ ':■ <' vv;. - ■ . 



■ 
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. ;;s7 



> » 

< ♦ 

;♦ »; 

'* '.-. 



ago. Hi? first wife, Mar)' Tomlinson, 
died in England, in 1S18. His second wife 
was Jane Dickens, to whom he was married 
in Pittsburg, in 1822. Oursubjecl had two 
brothers — James, died at Philadelphia a 
few months alter landing', and the other, 
Samuel, died many years later. By his 
'father's second marriage our subject has 
two half-brothers, William and James S. 
The latter is Secretary of Stale in Ohio. 
The subject of our sketch, up to eight- 
een years of age, was reared to a farm life, 
and then spent four years in a cooper's 
shop. His educational advantages were 
limited to sixty-six days of schooling, but 
he availed himself of all means for self- 
culture. His spare moments were applied 
to stud)- during the da)', often working 
with an open grammar in sight ; his nights 
were spent in the same indefatigable study. 
No obstacle could daunt or hinder him in 
his resolve to become possessed of the 
power brought, only to the cultured. In his 
twenty-second year he commenced teach- 
ing school, and taught twenty-one terms. 
He married Miss Joanna M. Watson, in 
Richland County, Ohio. November 2 1, 1833. 
This union was a happy one. Nearly one- 
half a century they trod life's pathway to- 
gether through hardships of pioneer life, 
the toil, trials and deprivations neces- 
sarily attendant upon making" a home in a 
new country. The enjoyment of hopes 
realized, and in all things harmony and 
love, was their every-day life. She died 
February 21, 1882, in her sixty-ninth year. 
She had been a member of either the Meth- 
odist or United Brethren church from the 
age of twenty-one years. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Robinson were born seven children — 
Anna Sophia, wife of John Clark, died at 
S inlaCruz, Colorado, and her two children, 
Wiibur and Maggie, were reared by their 
grandparents. Melvin, lives at Los An- 
geles, California.; William W., enlisted in 
the Fourth Iowa, and died from fever and 
2 a 
• '■ i* »•'»"•/•»"♦"*"<•">"»"•»; '<■ s>v> ■ 



! wounds received at the battle of Pea 
' Ridge; Oliva J., wile of II. D. Crawford, 
i lives at Ottumwa ; Amelia 1., wife of George 
! Bayles, of Seward, Nebraska; Allie Mary, 
1 wife of W. II. Critchfield ; Amandus, 
I died at Shelby, Ohio, in infancy. Mr. 
Robinson is a member of the United 
Brethren church, and the author of the 
j " Triune Theology," a work published in 
! 1 88 1, and is also preparing additional mat- 
ter for publication under the same title. 



ARON RUSH, farmer, section 



; ,Vu Middle Fork Township, was born in 
— .^ Monroe County, Kentucky, Decem- 
ber 8, 1S26. His parents were Benjamin 
and Rachel (Springer) Rush, the former a 
native of Virginia, and the latter of South 
Carolina. Thev w ere married in Kentucky, 
and reared a family of thirteen children — 
James, Ezekiel, Martha, William, Dennis, 
I Desire, Hiram, Joshua, Benjamin, John, 
Aaron, Rachel and Isaac. Aaron was 
i reared on a farm, and obtained his educa- 
' tion in the common schools. He was mar- 
j ried in September, 1S47, to Miss I farmer, 
born in Monroe CoiuiLy, New York, daugh- 
' ter of John and Sarah (Miller) Harmer. 
t In 1S49 ne removed to Fayette County, 
; Illinois, where he lived four years, thence 
to McDonough County, where he resieled 
until the fall of 1865; then came lo Ring- 
1 gold County, locating in Rice Township, 
where lie improved 160 acres of wild land. 
In i860 he sold out and purchased his pres- 
! ent farm,' which had been partially im- 
: proved. lie has 120 acres, consisting 
largely of rich bottom lands on the west 
fork of Grand River, and il is one of the 
1 best stock farms in the vicinity. He has a 
! good story-and-a-half residence, out-build- 
1 ings for stock, a good bearing orchard and 
! small fruits. Mr. and Mrs. Rush are the 
1 parents of twelve children — James, John, 

■ 



■ 



' 



3sS 



JflSTOJtr OF li/XGGOLD COUNT!' 



Martha, Sirastus M., Rosetta, Loretta, Jo- 
siah Grant, Ella M., Emma 0., Peter, 
Isaac, Narcissa. The deceased arc — Sarah 
Elizabeth and Thomas Jefferson. Mr. 
Rush lias been a worthy member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church for forty years. 
Politically he is a Republican and a strong 
Prohibitionist. Postoffice, Delphos. 

4PAMES P. PRICE, a leading farmer and 

'Y\ stock-raiser of Tingle}- Township, is a 
S^f native of England, burn in Hereford- 
shire, September 10, 1S32, the second of 
seven children of Thomas and Anna 
(Prjtchard) Price. In 1848 his parents im- 
migrated to America, coming on an Eng- 
5»:M lish sail vessel, and were thirty-one days 

SKSS making; the trip. They landed at New 

■ 
[♦:3j York City, and from there went to 

■*!* Toliet, Will County, Illinois, and made that 

."?■. w . J 

;♦:■■** county their home the rest of their lives. 

The mother died in November, 1863, and 
the father in April, 1877. Two of their 
sons, George and Thomas, were soldiers in 
the war of the Rebellion, members of the 
One Hundredth Illinois Infantry, and 
George was killed at the battle of Chicka- 
mauga. James P. was reared on a farm, re- 
ceiving but limited educational advantages, 
as his father was ton poor to pay for his 
schooling, and when sixteen years old was 
unable to read. After that age he went to 
school four winters, and thus learned the 
rudiments of an education. He remained 
with his parents until twenty-two years of 
age, when he went to Wisconsin, and was 
employed in a saw-mill, and afterward 
learned the cooper's trade, which he fol- 
lowed until failing health bad:; him seek out- 
of-door employment, and accordingly he 
engaged in farming. In 1871 he returned 
to Will County, Illinois, and lived on the 
home farm until after the death of his 



father, and the following year, r8/8, moved 
to Ringgold County, Iowa, and settled on 
the farm where he now lives, on section 26, 
Tingley Township, where he owns 160 
acres of choice land, under good cultiva- 
tion. His farm buildings ai e comfortable 
and commodious, and his stock of cattle 
and hogs are of the best varieties. Mr. 
Price was married in Wisconsin, July 4, 
1S63, to Elvira I T . Higday.a native of Rock 
County, daughter of Henry and Polly 
(Potter) Higday. They have three chil- 
dren — Grant B.', Ada M. and Flora M. In 
politics Mr. Price has always been a Re- 
publican, casting his first Presidential vote 
for John C. Fremont, and Ids last for James 
G. Blaine. 



: 
; : 

; . . 



- T 7TLLIAM S. McANINCH, a pros- 
\\] \/V perous agriculturist of Jefferson 
! rMyibrj Township, living on section 9, was 
[ born in Putnam County, Indiana, March 5, 
iS^t, a son of Samuel McAninch, who was 
j a native of Kentucky, and an early settler 
I of Putnam County, settling there in 1829. 
Our subject was reared on the home farm, 
I and received a common-school education in 
the rude, log-cabin subscription schools of 
I his native count) - . He was married Feb- 
| ruary 1, 1 S59, to Miss Mary M. Johnson, a 
1 daughter of Isaac Johnson, of Kirkville, 
' Iowa. To this union have been born nine 
I children, of whom three are deceased. 
Those living are — Elmina A., Alvin \\\, 
Oval IF, Ottis G, Arietta M. and James 
A. Mr. McAninch during the war of the 
Rebellion, was a member of the Eighteenth 
Indiana Battery three years, and was in 
the battles of Stone River and Chicka- 
mauga. lie was with Sherman to Atlanta, 
returning with General Thomas and fought 
at Nashville and Franklin and in other en- 
gagements, being under lire 167 days, and 
traveling over 11. 000 miles while in the 






. ■ • 

■...■■'._ 



HI OCR. I P/i/CA I. Sh'E TCIJES. 



service. lie was promoted to Sergeant 
while in the service, and received an hon- 
orable discharge. He located in Keokuk 
County, Iowa, in the fall of 1S65, and in the 
fall of 1S70 became a resident ol Ringgold 
County. He settled on his present farm 
in .April. 1SS3, where he owns 200 acres of 
well-cultivated land, and is engaged in 
general farming and stock-raising, making 
a specialty of Poland-China hugs. Mrs. 
McAninch is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



. '"^EORGE D. FULLERTON. one of j 
\ (- the active and enterprising farmers ! 
'§T\ of Tingle)' Township, residing on sec- ■ 
tion S, is a native of Indiana, born in Mon- : 
roe County, near Bloomington, November ! 
5, 1 S.i 5, a son of John and Mary Fullerton, 1 
Ids father being a native of Tennessee. His j 
mother, whose maiden name Mas Mary 1 
Daugherty, was twice married, marrying 1 
for her first husband a man named Rob- j 
erts. She was a native of Kentucky. The 
parents were among the early settlers of , 
Indiana. The) - had a family of seven sons ! 
of whom five arc yet living, our subject j 
being the fifth child born to them. When ! 
lie was eight years old his parents moved 
to Monroe County, Iowa, and settled on 
a farm near Albia, where they still make 
their home, the father being now seventy- 
six years of age, and the mother in her : 
eightieth year. George D. Fullerton was i 
reared to manhood on a farm in Monroe 
Count)', Iowa, receiving a comi ion-school 
education in the schools of the di trict. Ik- 
enlisted in the late war, af the age of eight- 1 
een years, a member of the Third Iowa J 
Battery, lie was in the service about two 
years, most of the time being on garrison 
duty, and was mustered out at D; ve.nport, 
Iowa, in November, 1865. After his dis- 
charge he returned to his hom< in Monroe 

- 



County, and was engager! in farming with 
his lather for two years. He was then 
married, in 1S6?, to Miss Martha E. Mc- 
Gaw of Monroe Count) 7 , who was born and 
reared in Coshocton County, Ohio, a 
daughter of John McGaw, Mrs. Fullerton 
was left an orphan when quite young, her 
mother dying when she was four years 
old, and her father when she was eleven 
years, after which she lived at the home of 
her uncle. Mr. and Mis. Fullerton have 
five children — Carl C, John, Burt, Inez 
and D wight. After his marriage Mr. Ful- 
lerton rented a farm on which he lived till 
1S70, when he came to Ringgold Count) 7 , 
locating on his pit sent farm, where he has 
160 acres of choice land under good culti- 
vation, and has since been successfully en 
gaged in raising grain and stock. Mr. 
Fullerton has held the office of trustee 
of Tingley Township for six years. Both 
lie and his wile aie worthy members of 
the United Presbyterian church, of which 
he is a trustee. He has also been acting 
as superintendent of the Sabbath-school. 

§B. FISHER resides on section 1, Clin- 
ton Township, and is one of the 
^ a leading citizens of Ringgold County, 
lie was born in Mercer Count), Kentucky, 
Jul) - 15, 1831, son of James and Elizabeth 
(Brisco) Fisher, natives also of Kentucky. 
J. B. was the third of a family of sevi n 
children. When he was two years old his 
parents removed to Vermillion County, 
Indiana, and were among the pioneers of 
that county. His early life was spent at 
farm work and in attending the common 
schools. At the age of twenty-two he was 
married to Miss Mary Ann Wilkinson, a 
native of Vermillion Count)-, and daughter 
of Joseph and Sarah (Tipton) Wilkinson. 
1:, 1855 he removed to Marion Count 
Iowa, where he resided two years, ii 



- 






31UI 



HISTOltr OF RTXGGOLD COUNTT. 



proving a piece of wild land. He then 
removed to Worth Count)', Missouri, 
where he improved a farm and resided un- 
til 1864, then came to his present farm in 
Clinton Township, which was then partly 
improved. Thirty acres were in cultiva- 
tion and a small house had been built. He 
has added to the improvements until the 
Fisher farm is known as one of the best 
farms in the township, lie has 330 acres, 
a good story-and-a-half house, modern 
Style, surrounded with shade trees, out- 
buildings for stock, and a fine orchard. A 
wind-mill furnishes the stock with pure 
water, and he has every convenience for 
stock-raising and feeding. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fisher have three children — James R., who 
resides in Benton Township ; Sarah, now 
Mrs. J. C. Abarr, residing in Nebraska, and 
George, who resides at home. Mr. Fisher 
is a member of the Masonic order, Mt. 
Ayr Lodge, No. 179, and in politics is a 
Democrat. Postoffice, Redding;. 



• -;\ H. SHOWALTER, residing on sec- 
i tion 7, Middle Fork Township, has 

^pn been identified with the interests of 
Ringgold County over twenty years. He 
was born in Augusta County, Virginia, 
April I, 1843, son °f Nimrod and Sarah 
(Shambaugh) Showalter, natives of the 
same State. He was the third of a family 
of ten children. When three years of age 
his parents removed to Putnam County, 
Indiana, where he passed his early life as- 
sisting on the farm and attending the com- 
mon schools. In 1863 he removed to 
Fayette County, Iowa, where he resided 
three years, then returned to Putnam 
Countv for a short time, and the same year 
came to his present home in Middle Fork- 
Township. He purchased 120 acres of 
wild land, and has since added to his orig- 
inal purchase until he has a farm of 200 



• -. 



acres of well-cultivated and well-improved 
1 'ii i lie has a comfortable, well-furnished 
house, surrounded with shade trees, an or- 
chard of 200 trees, and a good barn and out- 
buildings for feeding stock. He was married 
September 29, 1S67, to Miss Mary Jane 
Shambaugh, daughter of C. D. and Sarah 
Shambaugh, and they have live children — 
Sarah Lena, Charles Walter, Cora Pearl, 
John William, and Avis Maud. Mr. Sho- 
walter has served as township trustee and 
as member of the School Board. He is a 
worthy and consistent member of the 
Christian church, and in politics is a Dem- 
ocrat. He is classed among the leading 
citizens of his township. Postoffice, Red- 
ding. 

— ~*«H&1N~ — 

•'. FOSTER, proprietor of the Foster 
yp House, and also of a harness shop, 
~ry?-~ Caledonia, was born in Muskingum 
Count) - , Ohio, October 16, 1S42, son of 
James and Anna (Burgess) Foster. He 
was the second of a family of six children. 
When two years of age his parents re- 
moved to Holmes County, Ohio, where he 
was reared and educated. At fourteen he 
commenced work at harness-making, serv- 
ing an apprenticeship of three years. He 
then learned ornamental painting, and af- 
terward, boot and shoe-making. February 
20, 1864, he enlisted in Company B, Six- 
i tieth Ohio Infantry. His regiment was at- 
tached to the Army of the Potomac. In 
the engagement before Petersburg, .Au- 
gust 17, he was wounded and taken pris- 
oner, and was held the greater part of I lie 
time at Andersonville. He was paroled 
November 26, 1864, and held at Parole 
Camp until honorably discharge'! May 8, 
1865, at. Camp Chase, Ohio, then returned 
! ; 1 loimes Countv. In 1872 he removed to 
Ringgold County, locating at Caledonia, and 
engaged in the manufacture of harm 
He keeps a good assortment, and sells at 






< 
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' ■ : . - 

■ . ' ' ' ' 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 391 



reasonable prices. He also manufactures 
boots and shoes. The Foster House is 
truly a place where the weary traveler can 
fine! food and rest. Mr. Foster is a 
member of the Independent Older of 
Odd Fellows, Lodge 293, Caledonia, 
and also of the Christian church. He was 
married February 7, 1864, to Miss Sarah 
Ellen McLain, and they have five children 
— Deanna, George William O, Margaret 
Emma, Etta Ehnina, and Orpha Adella. 
Mrs. Foster died June 5, 18S0, and August 
1, 1SS1, Mr. Foster was. married to Loretta 
Small, of Harrison County, Missouri. 
Their two children are — Florence Edith 
and Rachel Ellen. 



fOHN C. McCLURG, recorder of Ring- 
gold County, Iowa, is a native of Car- 
roll County, Indiana, born November 
22, 1840, a son of A. J. and Isabel (Cham- 
bers) McClurg, his father a native of 
Cumberland Count}", Tennessee, and his 
mother of Ohio, a daughter of John Cham- 
bers. His father was one of the first grand- 
jurors of Ringgold Counly, Iowa. The 
parents moved to Monroe County, Iowa, 
where the mother died, in thespringof 1855, 
and the father subsequently moved to Ring- 
gold County and located on a farm in 
Washington Township, where he died in 
1879. Thefamily consisted of four children, 
John C. being the eldest son. When thirteen 
years old he was afflicted with bone erysip- 
elas, which destroyed the bone in the up- 
per part of his light arm, leaving about 
four inches entirely boneless. When sev- 
enteen years old he began working on a 
farm, and followed that vocation until 18S2, 
when he was elected to his present office 
'and moved to Mt.Ayr, assuming the duties 
of his office January I, 1883. He was re- 
elected to the same office in 1884, having 
proved himself a reliable and efficient pub- 



w> 



lie servant. He has served seven years as 
justice of the peace of Riley Township. 
October 22, 1S64, Mr. McClurg was mar- 
ried to Mary J., eldest daughter of Abraham 
and Lucinda Johnson. The}' have a family 
ol seven children— -one son and six daugh- 
ters. Mr. McClurg is a member of Mt. 
Ayr Lodge. No. 169, I. O. O. F. He and 
! his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

ACOU A. SAV1LLE, farmer, section 
9, Middle Fork Township, was born in 
Rockbridge Count}', Virginia, Januar} 
17, 1841, son of John and Sarah (Shaffer) 
Saville, natives of Virginia. He was the 
fifth of a family of nine children, and his 
early life was spent on the farm and in at- 
tending the common schools. When fif- 
teen years of age his parents removed to 
East Tennessee, Knox County, where he 
lived until 1864, when he removed to 
Greene County, Ohio, thence to Cass Coun- 
ty, Illinois, thence to Moigan County, same 
State, lie was married October iS, 1S66, 
to Mary E. Henderson. In the fall of 1871 
he came to Ringgold County, and resided 
a few months at Mt. Ayr. In February, 
1872, he settled upon a portion of his pres- 
ent farm. His fust purchase was forty 
acres. A rude log cabin had been built and 
two or three acres had been broken and 
fenced. He has improved and added to his 
farm until he now has 120 acres in excellent 
condition. He has a good one-and-a-half 
story residence, modern style and well 
furnished, surrounded with shade trees, 
native oaks, a good orchard, barn, out- 
buildings for stock, and everything about 
the place indicates the thrift of the owner. 
Mr. and Mrs. Saville are the parents of 
nine children — Sarah Etta, Joseph H., John 
I S., Jacob, George, Blanchie, Elmer, Belle 
! and Guy. Mr. Saville has been a worthy 



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ir/sro/n- or kinggoi.d county. 



member ol the Methodist Episcopal church 
over twentv-i wo years, and a local preacher 
of that church for several years. He is 
an active worker in the cause of religion 
and temperance. Politically he is a Demo- 
cra! of an independent order. Postoffice, 
Ingart. 

-T'~T/lf- A. M ILLS A P, section 12, Pen ton 
'". l/.\/j Township, is one of the pioneers 
\~_.~\ 9 of Ringg-old County. lie is a 
native of Lawrence County, Indiana, born 
November 10, 1827, son of Bela and Eliza- 
beth (McGuire) Millsap. lie was the fourth 
ol six children. Mis early life was spent 
on the farm and attending the common 
schools. In 1S53 ne removed to Mc- 
Donough County, Illinois, where he re- 
sided two years, and in the spring of 185; 
came to Ringgold County, and settled on 
section 5, Rice Township, where he built a 
log house. This house is now used bv a 
family for a residence. He remained on 
this farm four or live years, then removed 
to Marshalltown, in Rice Township, and 
resided until 1S66. During the Rebellion 
he went, forth in defense of Ids country, en- 
listing August 9, 1862, in Company G, 
Twenty-ninth Iowa Infantry, and was in 
the service three years. lie was in the 
battles of Helena, capture of Little Rock, 
and was in General Steele's Camden expe- 
dition, where the regiment was engaged 
thirty-seven days in fighting. He was 
honorably discharged at Davenport in 
August, 1865, and return.! to his home. 
In 1866 he removed to section 12, upon his 
father's old homestead, where he resided 
about eight years. En 1874 he came to 
his present home, where he has since re- 
sided. His farm contain 167 acr :s ol land 
in a high state ol cultivation and well im- 
proved. He has a comfortable story-and- 
a-half residence, 1 1 h I of four acre 3 — 
one of the best in the town ! i ip a barn and 



out-buildings for stock, and is engaged in 
general farming, stock-raising and feeding. 
1 le is a Republican and has served as coro- 
ner (wo years, member of the School Board, 
and is a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church ; has served as class-leader and 
steward about fifteen years. Mr. Millsap 
was married to Miss Oglesby, a native of 
Kentucky, and reared in Indiana. They 
are the parents of eight children — Eliza- 
beth M., Isaac M., Thomas J., Anna A., 
Mary Ann and William E. (twins), Alex- 
ander H. and Hattie B. Ferdinand, Alonzo 
P. and Willie A. are deceased. - * 






W. POORE, farmer, section 23, Clin- 
ton Township, is one of Ringgold 
County's most worthy citizens, and 
has been identified with its interests for 
! many years. He was born in Washington 
I County, Indiana, October 2S, 1S46, son of 
] Alvin and Julia (DeWitt) Poore, who were 
the parents of nine children. In 1S50 the 
I family removed to Pike County, Indiana, 
, thence to this county in 1856, locating in 
I Clinton Township. They were among the 
first settlers of the county. Mr. Poore 
! passed his early life on the farm and was 
' educated in the common schools. In 1866 
lie removed to Worth Count}", where he 
attended school for a time at Grant City. 
lie was married August 15. 1869, to Cath- 
arine E. Williams, of Worth County, Mis- 
souri, daughter of Harmon and Marv 
(Brothers) Williams. In 1S75 he removed 
to Harrison County. Missouri, and in 1S70 
; returned to Ringgold Count)', locating in 
Clinton Township. In 1SS2 he engaged in 
the mercantile business until July 5, 1S83, 
1 when his storehouse and most of his goods 
; were destroyed by fire. He settled upon 
his present farm in the fall of 1.883. He 
owns sev< nty acres of land situated one- 
half mile south of Reddinsr, and it is well 



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. 






R/OGRA J '///<. '. i L SK E TCHES. 



393 



cultivated and well improved. April 14, ; 
1S64, he enlisted in Company A, Forty- | 

sixth Iowa fnlantry, ami served lour i 
months; was honorably discharged and ' 
returned to his home. Mr. and Mis. Poore 
are the parents ot five children — Lillie, 
Mary Ann, Susan Edith, Roscoe W., and i 
Clark Stanley. Mr. Poore is a member of . 
Post No. 51, G. A. R., Redding, and is a ! 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and steward of the same; is also superin- 
tendent of the Sabbath-school. Politically 
he is a Republican. Postorfice, Redding. 

MOHN FOLTS is the pioneer settler of 

;■'" ' , . . ... 

Ju Union Township, and is still living on 
Vgf the same ground on which he first lo- 
cated in April, 1S55, where lie now has 150 
acres of well-improved land under fine cul- 
tivation. Mr. Folts is a native of Jefferson 
County, New York, born near Watertown, 
June 12, 1S14. a son of John and Catharine 
Folts, who were also born in the State of 
New York, both now deceased. The father 
was a soldier in the war of 1S12. Our subject 
was the second of a family of twelve child- 
ren. Four of the sons and two daughters 
are still living — John, Josiah, Isaac and 
Jacob, Margaret and Amy. One son was 
killed on the anniversary of his birthday, 
February 22, 1881, by the explosion of a 
steam boiler at Stockton, California. John 
Folts, the subject, remained under the 
home roof till twenty -one years of age, 
when he went to Ohio, where he remained 
two or three years. He then lived in 
Michigan for a time, working on the first 
railroad built in that State, from Toledo, 
Ohio, to Adrian, Michigan. Mr. Folts is 
one of the pioneers of Iowa, coining to this 
State during the Territorial days. He set- 
tled in Van Buren Count}, Iowa, in 183 i, 
making his home in that county until he 
became a resident of Ringgold County, 



and there worked at his trade, that of a 
millwright, and helped to build several pio- 
neer mills. Ho was married in Van Buren 
County, August 13, 1843, to Miss Louisa 
Lewi--, born in Trumbull County, Ohio, 
February 13, 181S, a daughter of Thomas 
Lewis. They are the parents of three chil- 
dren — Elvira, Caroline and Martha, wife of 
Francis M. Waller, of Union Township. 
Mr. I*ol!< never followed farming till lie 
came to Ringgold County, since which he 
has made that his principal occupation. He 
is a man of industrious habits, and is strictly 
honorablein all his dealings, and these, with 
his excellent neighborlv qualities, have won 
for him the respect of all who know him. 
In politics Mr. Folts affiliates with the 
Greenback party. He became a member 
of the Odd Fellows order early in life, and 
has passed through its degrees to the en- 
campment. 

f^ARLTON SNYDER, farmer" and 
I V. stock-raiser, section 5 , Jefferson Town- 
' -"\ ship, was born February 10, 1841, in 
Platte County, Missouri, a son of Andrew 
Snyder, a native of Richland County, 
Ohio. He came with his parents to Iowa 
in 1847 and located in Warren County, 
eight miles south of Des Moines. Our sub- 
ject was reared to agricultural pursuits, and 
was educated in the common school of 
YCarren County and at the graded school 
at Wi'nterset, Iowa. He enlisted during 
the late war in Compauv H, Thirty-fourth 
Iowa Infantry and was with the regiment 
at the battles of Yicksburg or Chickasaw 
Bayou and Arkansas Post. He was dis- 
charged for disability in 1863. He weir to 
Central City, Nebraska, in 1871, remaining 
there till 1875. He was married March 31, 
1874, to Miss Amanda J. Shawver, a daugh- 
ter of George Shawver, who live- neat 
Maxburg, Madison County, Iowa. Mr. and 



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394 



W/STOR2' OF RINGGOLD COUMTl'. 



Mrs. Snyder have had three children, two 
still living — George A. and Elbert. They 
have taken a boy to bring up named Clyde 

A. Hop;-. Mr. Snyder located in Madison 
County, Iowa, in 1S75, and in 1876 came to 
Ringgold County, when he settled on his 
present farm, which contains [20 acres of 
choice land. Since coming to Jefferson 
Township Mr. Snyder has served as trustee 
and school director. Both he and his wife 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

.|PEN.ERAL S. MOORE was born in 
'\r Pickaway Count}', Ohio, April 10, 
W> lS 3°- His father, Riley Moore, was 
a native of Virginia, of Irish parentage, 
and died in 1S47, while in the service dur- 
ing the Mexican war. His grandfather, 
Riley Moore, was a soldier of the Revolu- 
tion, and died in 1844, aged 101 years. Mis 
mother, Mary Ann (Dyer) Moore, was a 
native of Virginia. His parents had a 
family of eight children — Isaac W., Owen, 
Elizabeth, Andrew Jackson, General S., 
Sarah, John and Nancy. Mr. Moore re- 
sided in his native 'county until twelve 
years of age, then came to Moultrie Coun- 
ty, Illinois, thence to Champaign County, 
where he lived about fifteen years. He was 
reared on a farm, and received his educa- 
tion in the common schools and at home. 
He was married April 17, 1851, to Miss 
Elizabeth Johnson, a native of Indiana, 
daughter of James and Juriah Johnson. In 
September, 1.855, Mr- Moore, with wife and 
one child, came to Iowa, locating in Mon- 
roe County, until April, 1056, when he came 
to Ringgold County, and settled in Lott's 
Creek Township, on section 5. He im- 
proved the land and resided upon it until 
August, 1862. August 10, 1862, he enlisted 
in Company G, Twenty-ninth Iowa In- 
fantry. While in the service he received 
a wound which fractured a knee joint, an 



injury from which lie has never recovered. 
He was honorably discharged Mav 31, 
1865, at Memphis, Tennessee, and returned 
to his home. A short lime after his return 
he engaged in the mercantile trade at Cale- 
donia, starting with a capital of $450, which 
he conducted in such a successful manner 
that in a few years the annual sales of the 
establishment were over $20,000. In 1S67 
he was appointed postmaster and served 
until 18S2, when he resigned. In 1SS4 he 
closed out his business. He was elected 
county supervisor and took his seat Jan- 
uary 1, 1S82. He was one of -the board 
that purchased the poor farm and erected 
the court-house. lie has served in several 
township offices, lie is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and one of 
its most liberal supporters. Mr. and Mrs. 
Moore arc the parents of six children — 
Mary Helen, Brewer, Owen F., Isaac W., 
Florence and Cordelia. James H. and 
Frederick A. are deceased. Mr. Moore has 
a valuable residence in town, a one-and-a- 
half-story building, surrounded with shade 
and ornamental trees, and well furnished. 
He owns 144 acres of land adjoining the 
town, and twenty-seven town lots. He has 
given his children a good education, and 
they are well fitted to take part in the active. 
duties of life. He commenced life without 
means; but by industry and good manage- 
ment he has acquired a fine property. 
Politically he is a Republican. 

fff C. BULLARD, farmer, section 15, 
3 i Monroe Township, was born in Up- 
Vi '°' per Canada, October 26, 1842. His 
parents, Reuben and Caroline M. (Marvin) 
Bullard, reared a family of ten children, J. 
C. being the fifth child. When seven years 
of age his parents removed to Knox Coun- 
ty, Illinois. lie was reared on a farm and 
his education was obtained in the common 






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• 



BIOGRAPHIC A I- SKETCHES. 



1613359 



395 



schools. In 1S50 the family came, to De- 
catur County, locating in Center Town 
ship, near Leon. Here Mr. Dullard resided 
two years, then returned to Knox County, 
Illinois. August 6, 1S62, he enlisted in 
Company 11, One Hundred and Second 
Illinois Infantry, and participated in all the 
battles of his regiment, from Resaca to At- 
lanta; attended the grand review at Wash- 
ington, and was honorably discharged in 
June, 1S65, at Camp Fry, in Chicago, Illi- 
nois. He was married November 9, 1865, 
to Hannah Jennette Daniels, of Knox Coun- 
ty, daughter of Alexander Daniels. He 
then returned to Decatur County, where 
he resided about five years, then removed 
to Henry County for two years, thence to 
Decatur County again, where he lived until 
18S2, and finally came to his present home 
in Monroe Township. His farm contains 
140 acres of well-cultivated and well-im- 
proved land. lie has a comfortable house- 
shade trees, an orchard, out-buildings for 
stock, raid is engaged in general farming 
and stock-raising. Mrs. Dullard died Sep- 
tember 29, 1877, leaving four children — 
James Reuben, John C, Enos Cordell and 
Royal Harley. October 16, 1S7S. Mr, 
Dullard was married to Miss Sarah Ellen 
Butts, of Leon, daughter of John Butts. 
They have four children — Minnie Caroline. 
Frankie, Lizzie May and Elnora. Mr. Bul- 
lard is a member of Decatur City Lodge, 
No. 102, 1. O. O. F., and is a worthy member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. Post- 
office, Kellerton. 



', 1S33. His mother, Mary (Gray) Horn, was 
also a native ol Switzerland County, Indi- 
; ana, her parents being natives of Scotland, 
! but early settlers of Indiana. When lie 
was live \ ears of age the parents of our sub- 
ject moved to Delavan County, Illinois, and 
there he was reared and educated. When 
j nineteen years of age he began the study of 
I medicine, with Dr. G. W. Slack, of York- 
i town, Indiana, and subsequent!} 7 entered 
1 the Chicago, Illinois, Medical College, from 
i which he graduated in 1S66. After his 
' graduation he located in Monmouth, 1 1 1 i — 
! nois, and in February, i860, came to and 
located in Mt. Ayr, where he now has a 
large and lucrative practice. He stands at 
', the head of his profession in the county, 
1 where he has lived nearly a score of years. 
He is a close student, being deeply inter- 
ested in anything that pertains to his 
profession. He is a member of the South- 
western Medical Association and the 
Decatur County Medical Society. lie 
was married December 14, 1869, to Miss 
Mary Law, of Warren County, Illinois. 
The}' have two children — Minnie and 
James Otto. 



►4ft^ 



, v mjALAY MCDONALD, retired farm- 



II 



ILL! AM HORN, M. D.. is the old- 
s' est practicing physician in Ring- 
^pH gold Coun!\. He is a native of the 
State of Indiana, born in Switzerland Coun- 
ty, in December, 1843. His father, W. S. 
Horn, was a native of Lanarkshire, Scot- 
laud, born in [81C, and came to America in 



: f.\\7 V: er, was born in Madison County, 
A - Ohio, May 16, 1S23. His father, 
James C. McDonald, was a son of Thomas 
McDonald, a native of Scotland, and was 
born in Botetourt County, Virginia. 
He married in Tennessee, Mary Ann 
Melvin, also a native of Virginia, and 
they removed to Kentucky. About the 
year )So6 they removed to Ross Coun- 
ty, Ohio, and three or four years 
later to Madison County. They had a 
large family of children, seven of whom 
lived t" be grown — Mary, bom in 1801; 
George, born in 1S03; Phebe, born in 
1 15; Elizabeth, born in 1S08; Charity, 



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" 

SOC HTSTORr OF RIXGGOLD COUNTY. ■ 



horn in iSn: John, bom in 181.5:. and 
Malay, the subjecl of this sketch. Mr. Mc- 
Donald's earlv life was spent in assisting 
his father on the farm and in obtaining 

his education at the subscription schools. 
He was married March 9, 1S43, to Miss 
Mary Ferguson, born in Franklin Count}', 
Ohio, November 13, 1S24, daughter of 
Thomas and Mary (Biggert) Ferguson. 
He resided in Madison until 1S50, when, 
with wife and three children he started 
for Iowa. The first winter he spent in 
Muscatine, and the following spring moved 
on a farm five miles west of the city, where 



modern s! vie and well furnished. Mr. and 
Mrs. McDonald have had four children — 
Margaret Ann, of Tuskeega ; George, de- 
ceased ; E. YV., of Tuskeega, and an infant 
not named. Mr. McDonald has served 
one term as county supervisor under the 
old law, and three terms as township trus- 
tee and assessor, lie is a member of the 
Odd Fellows order of Decatur City, and 
politically is an independent Republican. 
He started in life without means, but by 
industry and good management has ac- 
quired a fine proper ty. Among the enter- 
prising and successful pioneers of Decatur 



he resided four years. May 22, 1S55, he j County, none is better known or more 
arrived in Bloomington Township, Decatur | highly esteemed than is Mr. McDonald, 



and he is classed among the leading citi- 
zens of Ringgold County. 



County, and bought a claim of Matthew 
McClain, paying $200 for the pre-emp- 
tion. The land is described as fol- \ 

lows: South half section 29, southwest j ~* *->£>;?;,? vS\F^F«^-» t- 

section 28, south half northwest 28, west j 

half southeast, south half northeast 28, ! ;'^L1 LAND RETH, an enterprising and 

township 60, range 27 west. There were | '■ pi successful agriculturist, of Liberty 

living in Bloomington Township at that j "'$?i Township, is a native of Indiana, born 

time about seven families : Mr. McClain, j in Owen County, March 5, 1837. His par- 



John Mercer, Aaron Myers, F. M. Scott, 
Widow Scott's family, W. M. McDonald, 
John Wion and J. K. 
McDonald commenced 



ents Zachariah and Elmo (Fender) Lan- 

dreth, were natives of Kentucky and North 

Tapscot. Mr. ' Carolina respectively, and were among the 

immediately to earlv settlers of Indiana. They lived in 



make permanent improvements. The first Owen County till 1852, when they re- 
house was alogcabin, 16 x 16 feet, with moved with their family to Mercer County, 



sod chimney, that had been erected by Mr. 
McClain. He improved from time to time 
until the McDonald farm was known as one 
of the best improved farms in Decatur 
County. At one time he owned i,CO0 
acres. His house was built in 1866 and 
was sided with black walnut ; it was one of 
the best buildings in the township. He 
was extensively engaged in stock-raising, 
feeding and dealing in stock. He resided 
on the old homestead in Bloomington 
Township until October 29. 1855. when he 
removed to Kellerton where, he has 15S 
acres of improved land adjoining the town 
plat. He has a nice residence, built in 



Illinois, where both died. They were 
the parents of ten children — six sons and 
four daughters, of whom seven still sur- 
vive. Two of their sons died in the late 
war. Eli Landreth, the subject of this 
sketch, was reared on a farm and educated 
in the common schools, principally in Mer- 
cer County, Illinois, to which county lie 
removed with his parents when fourteen 
years old. He was married in 1S59 to Miss 
Mary E. Phillips, a native of Michigan, but 
at the time of her marriage living in Mer- 
cer County, Illinois. To this union were 
born ten children — Fannie, Jennie, Clisby, 
Dora, Henry, Frank, Finn, Thomas and 



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HI OCR A PI 1IC A I. S KB TCHES. 



two who died in infancy. After his mar- 
riage Mr. Landreth settled on a farm in 
Mercer County, where lie resided till the 
fall of 1S74. He then came to Ringgold 
County, Iowa, and settled on his farm on 
sections 2 and 1 1, Liberty Township, where 
he has since followed farming and stock- 
raising, his cattle being of a high grade. 
He devotes some attention to raising fine 
horses, and in February, 1SS6, he sold a 



number of good animals. His farm, which 
is well-improved and under good cultiva- 
tion, contains 360 acres, and his residence 
and farm buildings arc noticeably good. 

! Politically Mr. Landreth formerly affiliated 
with the Republican party, but is now a 

I Grcenbacker. He has served his township 
as trustee for nine years. Both Mr. and 

I Mrs. Landreth have been members of the 

■ Baptist church for man)" years. 



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■'•X/V. ^y/^gflE fact that Iowa is 



tuated near the geo- 
cal center of the 
d States, be- 
\ tween the two great 
. - , rivers of the continent, 
and on the line of the 
great trans-continental rail- 
ways, presages for her a 
future in the development of 
her resources which it does 
not require the prevision of 
-Ik. a prophet to see, and will at 
-^ no distant day place her in an 
&M$v3* eminent position among the 
V *%>°/oH J ' States of our Union, winch 
natures 'assisted by the energy, thrift and 
enterprise of her citizens has so abun- 
dantly fitted her to occupy. 

When we call to mind the fact that the 
present greatness of Iowa is all the growth 
of little more than fifty years, we ma\ ell 
anticipate the grandeur that await- her in 
the future — now that she is provided with 
all the means necessary for the more rapid 
developmentof her inexhaustible resources. 
In her healthful climate, productive soil, 
railroad and water-tra is] irtation facilities, 
an i her intelligent, enterprising people, we 
have the best guaranty that her future 
progress will be unpi i edented. 




The pioneer work has been done in most- 
parts of the State, and railroads, public 
buildings, churches, school-houses, etc., are 
provided, so that the citizens of Iowa now 
enjoy all the comforts, conveniences and 
advantages obtained in the older States, 
and Iowa offers to-day proportionally 
: greater inducements to capital, enterprise 
: and labor. Incalculable wealth lies hidden 
j in the inexhaustible coal mines, furnishing 
, motive-power, and the unused water-power 
I forming natural mill-sites, in almost every 
county in the State for manufacturing in- 
: dustries. Iowa, for agricultural and manu- 
i facturing resources, has no superior among 
all the States, while her channels of trade 
radiate in all directions. 

Next to the fertility of its soil, its excel- 
i lent climate, and the energy of its indusl rial 
classes the prosperity of the State is due 
! to wise legislation, by which its financial 
! credit has been maintained, internal im- 
provement em ourage 1, public instruction 
j rapidly advanced, and immigration and 
capital attracted. Thirty-eight years have 
elapsed since Iowa was admitted asaState, 
! and during that time wonderful changes 
! have taken place. Then savage beastsar.d 
, savage men contended for the supremacy 
in this fair domain, but both have retreated 
1m fee the white man, and to-day civiliza- 



•>••-— v -"s .. » .V ». ..«. 



■ 

■ 






HISTOUr OF RTNGGOLD COUNTT. 



tion has left its mark in numberless school- she is seventh, and in the amount of postal 

receipts sixth, being one < >f the eight North- 
ern Stales which contribute two-thirds of 

the entire national revenue. 

BOUNDARIES AND DIVISION'S. 

This empire is composed of ninety-nine 
subdivisions, or little republics, called coun- 
ties, of which Ringgold is one. It is 
bounded on the north by Union Count) - , on 
the east by Decatur County, on the south 
bv the State of Missouri, and on the west 
bv Wavne Count} 7 . It contains about fif- 
teen congressional townships, or. to be 
exact, twelve whole and four fractional 
townships. These are numbered from 67 to 
70 north, in ranges 28 1031 west. Theareaof 
the county is a little over 540 square miles. 
For organic purposes the county is divided 
into seventeen townships. 

TOPOGRAPHY. 

The county is well supplied with living 
water in ever) - part, and admirably drained 
by the Platteandthe several forks of Grand 
River and their numerous affluents. The 
general trend of the streams is southward, 
and they flow to the Missouri River. 
Water is also readily obtained on the up- 
lands by digging. The principal streams 
acquire considerable volume before they 



houses and churches, and in the prosperity 
an ! happiness winch everywhere abound. 
Of Iowa, whose name is a synonym (01 ■ 
prosperity, an 1 her high rank in the sister- ' 
hood of States in respect of moral and 
material greatness, it is unnecessary to 
speak at length. Aside from the experi- I 
encesof the civil war, in which the State 1 
.furnished her full quota of men — and no \ 
braver men were sent to the front — the his- ! 
tory of Iowa is that of one uninterrupted 
march of progress in the paths of peace, 
and she has risen from the condition of a 
Territory to one of the principal States of 
the Republic, in population, wealth and 
moral greatness. 'With these elements of 
empire inherent in it, it is not surprising 
that Iowa is making strides which must 
soon place her where she will be recog- 
nized as one of the foremost in manufactur- 
ing and other industrial pursuits, as well as 
in agriculture. 

In order of admission into the Union, 
Iowa stands twenty-ninth ; in number of 
square miles she is fifteenth ; in population 
tenth, while in acres of tillable land her 
place is first. She is the third State in the 
amount of corn raised, while she is second 
in number of hogs raised, third in cattle, 
fifth in wheat, sixth in oats, fifth in barley, 
fifth in flax, seventh in hay, third in milch 



cows, fifth in number of hogs packed, fifth j leave the county, and afford good mill-sites 

and sufficient water power for the uses of 
the county. The valleys are interesting 
from the fact that they are the deepest and 
largest purely drift valleys in Iowa. They 
are eroded by the action of the water from 
a depth of 150 feet to more than 200 feet, 
and yet, except at one or two points, no 
rock is to be seen in their valley sides, which 
arc drift material from top to bottom. 
From these and other indications the drift 
is estimated to r ach a depth of about 200 
feet. This is the deepest portion of the 
drift deposit in the Stale. The he. 



in value of farm implements, sixth in value 
of farm products, fourth in extent of coal 
area, and fifth in number of banks and 
newspapers. In religious, educational, 
charitable and benevolent institutions Iowa 
stands among the foremost. In regard to 
healtbfulness her rank is fourth, while in 
point of the intelligence of her pcoj le she 
ii t. having a less percentage of illiter- 
acy than any other State. Twenty-one 
States have more persons in prison, and 
thirty-two States more female prisoners 
that. Iowa. In the numbei of postofliccs 



• . . . - 






■ ■ . ■ . 

mTRODUCTORT. m 



ridge of land in Southern Iowa, a branch 
of the great watershed that separates from 
it in Adair County, passes down into 
Missouri through this county. The highest 
point, which is in the northwestern part of 
the county, is i , 1 3 -j feet higher than Keo- 
kuk, and that city is 444 feet above the level 
of the sea. Although this county is upon the 
Missouri slope, the bluff deposit of Western 
Iowa docs not extend so far eastward. 

There is considerable timber in the val- 
leys of the streams ; elsewhere the surface 
of the county is almost all prairie, and its 
general aspect 'is peculiar and interesting. 
A stranger passing through the county by 
the ordinary routes of travel is quite un- 
conscious of the presence within the range 
of his vision of the deep valleys with their 
wooded banks, for the general surface upon 
which his eye rests is apparently all an 
undulating prairie. Upon approaching the 
streams he sees them winding through 
rather narrow valleys, their banks lined 
with a border of trees, but: after crossing 
them they arc soon lost to view again 
among the general undulations of the sur- 



face, and not even the tops of the tallest 
trees appear in sight. 

Only two exposures of rock are found in 
the county. One of them is in a deep val- 
ley in the extreme northeast corner of the 
county, and the other is near its southern 
boundaiy, consisting in each case of a few 
layers of limestone belonging to the up- 
per coal measures. It makes a good quali- 
ty of quick-lime, and some of it is suitable 
for building purposes. Good materials for 
the manufacture of brick are found in va- 
rious places. 

COAL. 

Coal is supposed to exist throughout the 
county, but no mines are yet in operation. 
The only attempt to find the desirable 
mineral was in 18S4, when Francis Ellis. C. 
13. Morse, H. A. White and J. CAskren 
sunk a shaft two and a half miles east of the 
station at Mt. Ayr. They bored through 
sixty feet of solid rock, and in all went 326 
feet below the surface, finding a little coal, 
but not in paying quantities. This experi- 
ment cost its promoters $1,200. 






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HISTOIir OF RINGGOLD COUXTT. 



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[HE continuous history I 
of Iowa as the abode | 
of white men begins j 
with May I, 1833. i 
Previous to that date 
every acre was in the j 
legal possession of the | 
Indians. As a result of the 
Black Hawk war of 1832, a 
strip of land facing the 
Mississippi, and about fifty 
miles deep was opened to j 
settlement after April 30, 1 
1S33. It was not long, of 
course, before the advent- 
urous pioneers began to 
encroach upon the domain j 
reserved to the Red Alen, and many an iso- 
lated cabin was built in the interior in vio- 
lation of the laws. These were frequently 
removed by the use of the military. In 
1836 a treaty was made, ceding another 
large tract for the uses of civilization, but 
the rights of the Indians to the lands re- 
served to them were very strictly guarded, 
no white person being allowed to settle on 
Indian lands. By the treaty of 1842 the 
whites were again prohibited from settling 
on the lands purchased in that year, until 
May 1, 1843, or even to carry an ax into 
the Indian country. It was by the terms 



■ ; 

; 



of this last treaty that the land embraced 
in Ringgold County was opened to settle^ 



ment. 



THE BOUNDARY DISPUTE. 



The southern part of what is now Ring- 
gold County was involved in the famous 
dispute between Iowa and Missouri, which 
began in the autumn of 1S39 and was set- 
tled ten years later. In the meantime the 
general supposition was that the strip be- 
longed to Missouri, or would be so de- 
cided. 

Joint Resolution No. 7 passed in Febru- 
ary, 1844, recites that in the autumn and 
winter of 1839 an unjust claim was made by 
the Governor of Missouri to a portion of 
territory lying within, the limits of Iowa; 
that the marshal of Iowa, acting by Na- 
tional as well as by Territorial authority, 
had called for an armed posse to preserve 
peace and to resist the encroachment of 
Missouri authority within the well-known 
limits of Iowa; that several hundred patri- 
otic citizens had obeyed the marshal's 
summons late in 1S39, marching in an in- 
clement season ; that an account of the ex- 
penses had been taken by a United States 
official, but had not then been liquidated. 
These things having been recited, Hon. A. 
C. Dodge," then Territorial delegate in 









GENERAL ItlSTORr. 



Congress, was called upon, not only to se- 
cure pay for the volunteers, but for the 
marshal's services as well, "in preserving 
the peace and protecting the southern 

boundary of Iowa." 

Chapter 23, Laws of 1846, approved Jan- 
uary 17, recites the fact of Lhearrest of the 
sheriff of Davis County by the authorities 
of Missouri, and the probability of litiga- 
tion arising from the dispute between Iowa 
and Missouri. The Governor was, accord- 
ingh/; authorized to draw upon the Ter- 
ritorial treasurer for $1,500 to defray counsel 
fees in cases where either the Territory or 
its citizens might be a party against Mis- 
souri. 

Chapter 3, Laws of the First General' 
Assembly, approved January 16, 184.7, au - 
thorizes the Governor to agree with the 
State of Missouri for the commencement 
and speedy termination of a suit in the 
Supreme Court of the United States to de- 
termine the true location of the boundary 
line between the two States. The. sum of 
$1,000 was appropriated to defray the ex- 
penses of the same. 

This dispute arose in consequence of two 
surveys having been made of the northern 
boundary of Missouri, the first begun at the 
head of the rapids in the river Des Moines, 
and the second at the foot of the Des 
Moines rapids, in the Mississippi. The dif- 
ference between the initial points wasnearly 
nine miles. Missouri basing elected to as- 
sume the northern line as her boundary, and 
Iowa, the southern line as hers, there was, of 
course, a conflict of jurisdiction over a strip 
of country nearly nine miles in width, it 
being claimed by both States. The vexed 
question was settled in Iowa's favor, in 1S50, 
when the boundary was established by 
commissioners, who had the line carefully 
surveyed. Posts were erected a mileapart, 
every tenth post being of iron. This in- 
creased Ringgold County's area by one- 
fourth. 



FIRST SETTLEMENT. 



Charles 11. Schooler and family, the first 
residents of Ringgold County, settled in 
the southeastern part in 1S44, For two 
years his was the only white family in the 
vicinity. In 1847 Manoah B. Schooler was 
born, the first white child born in the coun- 
ty. In [846 James M. Tethrow settled near 
Mr. Schooler, but for several years there- 
after there appears to have been no further 
immigration. These two families thought 
they were living in Missouri, until the 
survey of 1850 made them citizens of 
Iowa. 

In the spring of 1854 the population of 
the county was increased to nine families, 
and the following autumn and spring of 
1855 saw a brisk immigration, foui or five 
settlements or neighborhoods being formed, 
in as man)' different portions of the coun- 
ty. The names of these are mostly given 
further on, in the account of the organic 
election of the count}-. In the biographical 
department of this volume are given such 
personal histories of mairy of the pioneers 
as can be obtained. 

CIVIL HISTORY. 

The territory in Ringgold County was 
technically a part of Des Moines County 
from 1834 to 1S36, under the Territorial 
Government of Wisconsin. Then the Ter- 
ritory of Iowa was organized, and for some 
years this region remained undesignated, 
unsurveyed, and unsettled. In 1847 the 
boundaries of the county were established, 
and the name Ringgold given, in honor of 
Major Samuel Ringgold, who was mortally 
wounded in the battle of Palo Alto, fought 
a little more than a year before, in the 
Mexican war. For the next four years 
Ringgold was included within the tem- 
porary county of Pottawatomie. Then it 
was attached to the newly-organized coun- 
ty of Decatur. 






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HISTORY or RINGGOLD COUNT)'. 



By an act of the General Assembly, ap- ' 
proved February 4, 1S51, John W. Ellis 
and Reason Wilkinson, of the county of \ 
Davis, and H. B. Notsoii, of the county of j 
Decatur, were appointed commissioners to ! 
locate and establish the county seat, for J 
which purpose they were to meet at the | 
house of H. B. Notson. On the 26th of ! 
June of the same year, they reported to the I 
Board of Commissioners of Decatur Coun- | 
ty— as they were required to do by la w— that 
they had selected a place for the county 
seat of Ringgold County, and had desig- 
nated the location by setting a stake about 
four miles south of the center of said coun- 
ty, and that they had named said county 
seat Urbana. They further reported that 
they could not give a more particular 
description of the place for the reason 
that the land had not yet been surveyed 
into sections. Probably at this day no- 
body knows the exact location of Urbana. 
This first attempt to organize the coun- 
ty was not a success, for the reason 
that it did not contain a sufficient popula- 
tion. 

On the 16th of October, 1852, the coun- 
ty judge of Taylor County, ordered that 
Ringgold County be a separate election 
precinct, to be called Schooler Township, 
and that the place of voting at the presi- 
dential election be at the house of Lot 
Hobbs. This was in the southern part of 
the count}-, where there is now a creek that 
bears the name of Lott's Creek, which de- 
rived its name from this early settler. 
Charles H. Schooler, Abncr Smith and 
Jesse Harper were appointed to act as 
judges of this election. Charles II. School- 
er was elected justice of the peace, and 
Lot Hobbs constable of Schooler Town- 
ship. The latter was also appointed super- 
visor of roads, and one Littleton Allen, a 
commissioner to locate a road from the 
State line, in 
the county. 



S. 



LOCATION* OF COUNTY SEAT. 

January 5, 1S55, another legislative act 
was approved, appointing commissioners 
to locate the county seat of Ringgold 
County. They were George \V. Jones, 
Robert W. Stafford and George A. Haw- 
ley. Joel Chambers was then acting as 
I justice of the peace in " Schooler Town- 
! ship" (Ringgold County), and the com- 
I missioncrs were sworn by him. Their 
I obligation is in the following words, and 
1 is the oldest record in the court-house at 
Mt. Ayr : 

State of Iowa, 
Ringgold County. 

Personally appeared before me, an act- 
ing justice of the peace within and for the 
county and State aforesaid, George W. 
Jones, Robert W. Stafford and George A. 
Hawley, commissioners appointed by the 
act of the Legislature of the State of Iowa, 
approved January 5, 1855, to locate the 
county seat of Ringgold County, Iowa; 
who upon oath depose and say that they 
will faithfully and impartially discharge 
the duties assigned, to the best of their 
ability and judgment. 

George W. Jones, 
R. W. Stafford, 
George A. Haw lev. 
Sworn to and subscribed this 16th day 
of April, 1855. 

Joel Chambers Justice of the Peace. 

The report of these commissioners was 
made to the county judge of Decatur 
County, on the iSth of April, in the follow- 
ing terms : 

"We, the undersigned commissioners ap- 
pointed by act of the General Assembly of 
the State of Iowa, approved January 5, 



1855, to locate and name the seat of justice 

of Ringgold County, and report to the 

northeast direction across : county judge of Decatur County in case 

j there should be no county judge in said 






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GENERAL ///STOR2~. 



407 



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county of Ringgold, respectfully submit 
to you the following; report, to wit: That 
we have examined the different portions of 
said con nty of Ringgold, after having been 
duly qualified, and have made selection of 
the southwest quarter of section 6, town- 
ship 68 north, range 29 west, for the seat 
of justice of said count)- of Ringgold, and 
given it the name of Mt. Ayr, and the said 
Mt. Ayr is by the authority vested in us 
hereby declared to be the seat of justice of 
said county of Ringgold." 

John S. Sheller, of Lucas County, was 
the owner of the land on which the coun- 
ty seat was to be located, and as an induce- 
ment to the Commissioners he executed a 
bond to convey to the count)' the east half 
of the quarter section chosen, so that he 
and the county would each own half of 
the town lots. The bond was as follows : 

" Know all men that I, John S. Sheller, 
of. the county of Lucas, in the State of 
Iowa, am held and firmly bound in the 
penal sum of $2,000, to the county of 
Ringgold, in the State of Iowa, to make, 
or cause to be made, a good and sufficient 
deed, with general warranty, to said coun- 
ty to the east half of the southwest quarter 
of section 6, in township 68 north, range 29 
west. Now the condition of the above, obliga- 
tion is such that whereas the commissioners 
appointed to locate the county seat of Ring- 
gold County, Iowa, have located the same 
upon the land of said Sheller, to wit : 
Upon the southwest quarter of section 6, 
in township 68 north, range 29 west, he, 
the said Sheller, hereby obligating himself 
in the consideration of the said location, to 
convey to the said county the aforesaid 
premises upon the condition that the said 
county seat shall be laid off into lots, streets 
and alleys, that the said line shall consti- 
tute the center of the town in connection 
with the west half of said quarter section, 
making the public square one hall on either 
side. Said deed to be executed and de- 



livered on or before the 1st day of May 
next, in witness whereof I hereunto sign my 
name, this, iSth day of April, A. D. 1855. 

" John S. Sheller." 
Mr. Sheller also agreed to have the sur- 
veying done at Iris own expense, and gave 
a bond of $100 for that purpose. On the 
9th of June Mr. Sheller delivered to the 
county the following deed, the first made 
and recorded in Ringgold County : 

" For and in consideration of the location 
of the county seat of Ringgold County, 
upon the southwest quarter of section 6, 
in township No. 6S north, of range No. 29 
west, we hereby convey to the county of 
Ringgold, State of Iowa, the east half of 
the southwest fractional quarter of section 
No. 6, in township No. 63 north, of range 
No. 29 west, and warrant the title against 
all persons whomsoever. Witness our 
hands, this 9th day of June, A. D. 1835. 
" Edward A. Temple, 
" Jane E. Temple." 
This was attested in the usual form by 
the clerk of the District Court of Lucas 
County. William McCormick was em- 
ployed to survey the town, according to 
plans furnished by Sheller and Judge 1 la- 
gans. The survey was made in the latter 
part of June. 

ORGANIZATION OE COUNTY. 

Before t his, however, May 14, 1855, 
Ringgold County had been formally organ- 
ized. William N. McEfee was appointed 
organizing sheriff, and given instructions 
as to tiie proper mode 'of procedure. 

Mr. McEfee was required to take the 
following oath before assuming the duties 
of his office : 

" I, William X. McEfee, do solemnly 
swear that I will support the Constitution 
of the United States, and the State of Iowa, 
and faithfully and impartially demean my- 
self in office as organizing sheriff of Ring- 






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Jj>: .ins niSTORT OF RINGGOLD COUNT!'. 



gold County to the best of my ability 
help me Gocl. 

" Subscribed and sworn to before me, a 
justice of the peace of said county, May 
14, 1855. 

•' Joei. Chambers." 

David Enyart, L. S. Terwilliger and 
William Lovewcll were chosen judges of 
the election, and subscribed to the follow- 
ing obligation : 

"We, L. S. Tcrwilliger, David Enyart, 



So I B. Brown, John Summers, Henry Rowlan, 
I Wendell Poor, Ephraim Cofer, Solomon 
Lovewell, E. L. Sales, Henry Snyder, E. 
lmus, John Tyler, William Shoemaker, 
Peter Doze, James C. Magans, Joseph W. 
Cofer, Henry Boston, Henry Miller, Will- 
iam Lovewell, David Enyart, L. S. Ter- 
williger and A. S. McBride. 

The result of this election was: James C. 
Hagans, County Judge; Matthew B. 
Brown, District Clerk : Joseph W. Cofer, 
Treasurer and Recorder; Hiron lmus, 



Kj! and William Lovewell, do solemnly swear 

|3 that we will impartially, and to the best of I Sheriff; Charles II. Schooler, School Eund 

%M our knowledge and ability perform the I Commissioner. At the first regular elcc- 



duties of judges of this election, and will 
studious!}- endeavor to prevent fraud, de- 
ceit and abuse in conducting the same. 

"Subscribed and sworn to before me on 
this, 14th clay of May, 1855. 

" William N. McEfee, 
"Organizing S fieri])' of Ringgold County, 
I oiv a. 
Joseph W. Cofer and Andrew S. Mc- 
Bride were appointed clerks, and took a 
similar obligation, in these words: 

" We, Joseph W. Cofer and Andrew S. 
McBride, do solemnly swear that we will 
impartially, and to the best of our ability 
and knowledge perform the duties of clerks 
of this election, and will studiously en- 
deavor to prevent fraud and abuse in con- 
ducting the same. 

"Subscribed and sworn to before me on 
this, the 14th day of May, 1 S55. 

"William N. McEfee, 

"Organizing Sheriff of Ringgold County, 
Iowa." 
Thirty-four citizens voted at this organic 
election, and their names are worthy of 
record in this place. They were: 

William Barber, Hiron lmus, Reuben 

Morris, John A. Lesan, Nathaniel Curtis, 

Alexander S. Wiley, Stewart Barber, Jo- 

;•: seph A. Stratton, Joel Chambers, Jacob 

'i Case, Thomas Lovewell, James Tethrow, 



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Thomas Huerhes, C. H. Schooler, Matthew 



tion, in August following, ninet}'-one votes 
were polled. Judge Hagans and Mr. Cofer 
were re-elected ; Peter Doze was chosen 
Sheriff, and Wendell Poor, School Fund 
Commissioner. Thus the county govern- 
mental machinery was set running in its 
entirety. 

SETTLEMENT WITH TAYLOR COUNTY. 

It will be remembered that up to this 
time, since 1S52, Ringgold County had 
formed a township of Taylor County. On 
the 29th of June, 1855, the judges of the 
two counties met and made a settlement of 
financial accounts. There was in the hands 
of the Taylor County judge, $19.96, which 
had been collected by Charles H. Schooler 
for the following purposes: County tax, 
S5.00; State tax, $3-26; school tax, $6.35; 
bridge tax, $5.35 ; total, $19.96, 

The warrants outstanding on account of 
Ringgold County at this time were as fol- 
lows: D. B.Wilson, $8.16; James M. Tcth 
row, $1.02; William Barber, $1.37; Joel 
Chambers, $2.96; James M. Tethrow, $5.00; 
total, $18.51. 

The net capital with which Ringgold 
County began business was therefore, $1.45. 

FIRST TERM OF COUNTY COURT. 

The first formal meeting of the county 
officers was held at the house of Ephraim 

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Cofer, about six miles south of Mt. Ayr, 
July z, 1S55. There were present James 
C. Hagans, County Judge; .Matthew R. 
Brown, Count}' Clerk; Hiron Imus, Sher- 
iff; and Joseph W. Cofer, Treasurer. 

The first business taken up was to extend 
the time of Peter Doze, Assessor, to enable. 
him to complete his work. He was given 
until Jul}* 16. 

Levi S. Terwilliger was appointed a jus- 
tice of the peace in and for the civil town- 
ship of Ringgold County, Iowa, until the 
first Monday in August next, and until his 
successor is chosen and qualified. 

The county was then divided into quar- 
ters by the range line between 29 and 30, 
and the township line between 6S and 69. 
Each of these quarters, comprising four 
townships, formed an election precinct, or 
township. The northeast precinct was 
numbered 1, and named Sand Creek. The 
house of Stanbury Wright was designated 
as the place of holding elections, and Stan- 
bury Wright, Levi S. Terwilliger and 
Spencer Dady were appointed judges of 
elections. 

The northwest precinct was numbered 
2, and named Piatt. The house of Garrett 
Bird was designated as the place of hold- 
ing elections, and Garrett Bird, Norval 
Bridges and Rowland Andrews " be and 
they are hereby appointed judges of elec- 
tions." 

The southwest precinct was numbered 3, 
and named West Fork. John McGaughey's 
house was named as the place of holding 
elections, and John McGaughcy, Joel 
Chambers and William Lovewell were 
chosen judges of elections. 

The southeast precinct was numbered 4, 
and named Lott's Creek. Joseph Strick- 
land's house was selected as the place of 
of elections, and Joseph Strickland, Will- 
iam J. Merritt .and Ephraim Cofer were 
named as judges. 

Charles II. Schooler resigned as school 



fund commissioner. Harvey Waugh was 
appointed in his place, but failed to qualify. 

The next entry on the judge's record is 
really funny: 

" It appears that the judge has received 
as fees, Si -75. and the clerk has received, 
25 cents, and the recorder has received, 
$7.60, total, $9.60. 

" The dividend being struck, each offi- 
cer's share is $3.20." 

What would the officers of the county 
think to-day of adding together the fees of 
all the officers and then dividing the same, 
share and share alike? 

A regular election for county and town- 
ship officers was ordered held the first 
Monday in August, and the election returns 
were directed to be taken to the house of 
Ephraim Cofer, to meet again at which 
place the court adjourned. 

SUBSEQUENT PROCEEDINGS. 

July 13 the report of Peter Doze, As- 
sessor, was received and he was allowed 
$45 for assessing, being employed thirty 
days. 

August 7 it is recorded that no appeals 
were made from the assessment. Each of 
the four precincts was declared a road dis- 
trict, and entitled to a supervisor. 

August 8 the only business transacted, 
besides appointing Wendell Poor' school 
fund commissioner, was fixing the bonds 
of various officers as follows: Justices, $1,- 
000; constables, $500 ; treasurer and sheriff, 
$5,000 each. 

September 4 the fees were again 
pooled. The judge contributed SS.75 : the 
clerk, $1.00; and the recorder, $7.00; total, 
$16.75. Each officer was awarded $5.58, 
which, added to his former dividend, made 
$S-78. The record adds, "leaving a bal- 
ance due each office from the county for 
the quarter's service, ending August 8, 

1S55, f ' f $3-5 6 - 
October 1 the tax levy was fixed as fol- 



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If/STOfir OF RINGGOLD COUA'Tr. 



lows: County purposes, four mills on the 
dollar; State purposes, one and one-fourth 
mills on the dollar; school purposes, one- 
half mill on the dollar; road purposes, one- 
half mill on the dollar ; road poll tax, $i.oo; 
poll tax, 50 cents. 

On petition of Mar)- Imus George W. 
Lesan was appointed guardian of the minor 
children, Daniel, Clark, Seth, Andrew, 
Luke, Sarah, Leonard O., Lewis B. and 
Luther N., of Horatio M. Imus, deceased. 

On the following day a settlement was 
made with Charles H. Schooler, collector, 
appointed by Judge Low, of Taylor Coun- 
ty, to collect taxes of Ringgold County for 
1S53 and 1S54. He was charged with 
§104.46, and credited with $80.46, leaving 
$24 cash on hand. This term of court was 
the first held at Mt. Ayr. 

November 5, appears the following entry : 

" The first business taken up was the 
disposition of certain property in the hands 
of Peter Doze, belonging to the Indians, 
to wit: Three guns and sixteen steel traps. 
It is therefore ordered that the sheriff, Peter 
Doze, after giving legal notice thereof, 
make sale of said property for cash or 
count)- orders, and pay the proceeds into 
the county treasury, to be applied on the 
payment of county expenses for removing 
said Indians from said county in the year 
1S55. Which said sale is to be on the first 
Monday in December, 1885, at Mt. Ayr." 

November 6, the first marriage license 
was issued from the Count v Court, to James 
O. Lockwood and Lucy A. Goer. 

The estate of Horatio M. Imus was in- 
ventoried at $2,471.91. 

December 24, the second marriage li- 
cense was issued, to Josiah Turner and 
Eliza Ann Scott. The ceremony itself was 
performed by Judge Hagans, on the same 
day. 

February 27, 1856, a license was issued 
to William Cavin and Mary Imus. 

March 4, 1856, Township No. 5 was 






created in the center of the county and 
named Mt. Ayr. It comprised sections 1, 
2, 3, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15, township 68 
north, range 30 west ; sections 36, 35, 34, 
25, 26, 27, 22, 23 and 24, in township 69 
north, range 30 west; sections 31,32,33, 
2S, 29, 30, 19, 20 and 21, township 69 north, 
range 29 west; and sections 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 
16, 17 and 18, in township 6S north, range 
29 west. 

CIVIL TOWNSHIP. 

At different times within the next three 
years Middle Fork, Washington, East Fork 
and Jefferson townships were organized, 
so that there were nine townships when 
the government of the county passed un- 
der the control of the Board of Super- 
visors. In 1869 a re-arrangement was made, 
and each civil township made to comprise 
exactly one congressional township. This 
is the present and permanent division, ex- 
cept that Mt. Ayr Township (making sev- 
enteen in all) is carved out of Poe and 
Rice. It is two square miles in extent. It 
is coincident with the corporation of Mt. 
Ayr. The townships are named as follows: 
Union, 70 north, 2S west ; Tinglcy, 70 
north, 29 west ; Jefferson, 70 north, 30 west ; 
Lincoln, 70 north, 31 west; Grant, 69 north, 
31 west; Washington, 69 north, 30 west; 
Liberty, 69 north, 29 west ; Monroe, 69 
north, 28 west; Athens, 68 north, 28 west; 
Poe, 68 north, 29 west, except section 6 
and the northwest quarter of section 7; 
Rice, 68 north, 30 west, except the east 
half of section 1 and the northeast quarter 
of section 12; Benton, 68 north, 31 west; 
Clinton, 67 north, 31 west; Middle Fork, 
6j north, 30 west : Lett's Creek, 67 north, 
29 west; Riley, 67 north, 2S west; Mt. 
Ayr, section 6 and the northwest quarter 
of section 7, township 6S north, range 29 
west, and the cast half of section 1 and the 
northeast quarter of section 12, township 
6S north, range 30 west. 



- 



■ ■ ■ 

■ .. • ■ - ■ 



GENERAL 1USTORT. 



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As to (he naming of the several town- 
ships : Monroe, Washington, Jefferson, Lin- 
coln and Grant were named for the Presi- 
dents; Benton for the illustrious Senator, 
Thomas II. Benton, of Missouri; Clinton, 
from Clinton Addington, an early settler ; 
Rice, from Captain Rice, of the Fourth 
Infantry, and one of Ringgold County's gal- 
lant volunteer soldiers; Middle Fork, from 
the creek of that name; Tingley, from the 
postoffice of that name (the postoffice was 
named for a person) ; Liberty and Union 
were common names for townships formed 
during and soon after the war ; Foe was 
named (or Edgar Allen Poe, the poet ; 
Lott's Creek was named for the creek, and 
that derived its name from an early settler ; 
Athens was named in admiration of the 
ancient seat of learning, the capital of 
Greece ; and Riley was named for L. D. 
Riley, a member of the Board of Super- 
visors. 

SLAVES IN RINGGOLD COUNTY. 

One authentic instance is known of slav- 
ery in this county. L. P. Allen, a native of 
Buncombe County, North Carolina, came 
to this county in the spring of 1852, and 
settled in what is now Middle Fork Town- 
ship, lie possessed at that time and for 
six months after two young negroes— a 
boy and a girl, aged about fourteen and 
sixteen respectively. In the autumn he 
sold them to a man from near St. Joseph, 
Missouri, for $1,100: William Fletchall, 
now of Worth County, Missouri, was a 
witness of this sale, and saw $600 of the 
money paid. Allen lived in Ringgold 
Comity thirteen years, removed to Jackson 
County, Missouri, became insane, and af- 
terward died in an asylum. 

A TRAGEDY OK EARL 1 *' LAYS. 

In the spring of 1855, two men, by- 
name Driggs and Male, settled with their 
wives in Ringgold County, just south of 



the Union County line ; they were young 
men of pleasant address, and seemed to be 
greatly attached to each other, a circum- 
stance readily accounted for by the fact 
that they were brothers-in-law. Appar- 
ently they, like the other settlers of the 
county, were here to make homes for them- 
selves and their families, and nothing pe- 
culiar or strange about either them or their 
wives attracted the attention of the neigh- 
bors. 

One morning in the autumn of the same 
year the two men started out to hunt deer 
and turkeys, which at that time were very 
numerous in the woodlands along Grand 
River. About noon, Hale, apparently panic 
stricken, rushed into the cabin of one of 
the neighboring settlers, and with great 
trepidation communicated the fact that his 
companion was dead, killed by the treach- 
erous Indians, and that he had barely es- 
caped with his life. 

The excitement was intense, messengers 
being at once dispatched, notifying the 
neighborhood for thirty miles around of 
the impending danger, a company of men 
gathered at once to go to the spot and se- 
cure the body of their neighbor. Led 
by Hale, the party proceeded cautiously 
until, finally arriving at the scene of trag- 
edy, they beheld the dead body of Driggs, 
shot through the heart. He had fallen in 
his tracks, and had not been mutilated or 
disturbed— treatment unusual for Indians, 
who often risk their lives to secure a scalp. 
Close examination revealed the fact that 
the murderer was very close to his victim, 
whose shirt was blackened and burned by 
the powder. v 

The still, cold face of the dead man, as 
he lay weltering in his blood, created a 
thrill of horror in the hearts of the behold- 
ers. The recollection of their own homes 
and families exposed to similar dangers de- 
cided in their minds the proper course to 
pursue, and, with one accord, they vowed 



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vengeance against the Indians. Settlers 
soon gathered together (or a fight. Wo- 
men and children were sent to a place of 
safety, and in a few instances the able- 
bodied head of the family had important 
business to attend to just at that time, and 
betook himself to parts unknown. 

The settlers being- reinforced by a coin- 
pan}' of militia from Chariton, everything 
was made ready for the approaching con- 
flict, and the Indians, who at that time 
were encamped on Twelve Mile Creek, sec- 
tion 34, Pleasant Township, Union County, 
were surrounded, and their surrender de- 
manded. 

Having had some intimation of the 
trouble brewing, they were not surprised 
at the demand, wisely determining to re- 
main and refute the charges, and after a 
short parley the)" stacked their arms and 
surrendered under protest. 

A council was at once called, and the 
trial, though necessarilv conducted in an 
informal maimer, was proceeded with, the 
first step being to find the gun which the 
ball, taken from the body of the murdered 
man, would fit. One by one each gun was 
tried, until no more were left, but none 
were found which carried a ball of that 
caliber. 

The whites then consulted aside; the In- 
dians and their guns were all there, yet 
though generally believed to be the mur- 
derers of Driggs, it was impolitic to resort 
to extreme measures in the face of the facts 
developed. 

At this point an old Indian, swarthy and 
muscular, by name Wanwoxen, stepped 
forward, and, in broken English, presented 
the cause of his people; recounting the 
friendly relations they had always sus- 
tained with the pale faces of the settlement, 
and expressing his sorrow and disapproval 
of the murder of Driggs, he pressed the 
point that the bullet would fit the gun of 
no Indian of the tribe. Gathering confi- 



dence, he became more eloquent, and with 
uncouth gestures argued their entire inno- 
cence, and called particular attention to 
the fact that the murderer's gun had 
burned the clothing of the dead man. Said 
he: "No Indian there! No Indian there! 
Indian never shoot when he can strike ! " 
at the same time significantly touching his 
tomahawk. At the conclusion of his ha- 
rangue he stepped out from hisfellows, and 
throwing off his blanket and baring his 
breast, said: "Indian no shoot Driggs; 
shoot Indian if you want to." 

These 'words, with their previous peace- 
able reputation, and more than all, the last 
self-sacrificing act of the warrior in offer- 
ing himself a sacrifice to appease the wrath 
of the pale faces, created a diversion in 
their favor. Some of the whites were still 
disposed to believe the Indians guilty, 
while others took the opposite view. Hale 
was then subjected to a more searching 
examination. He manifested much hesi- 
tancy in testifying, and his stories failed 
to show that there were any Indians there, 
he claiming that he heard the shot fired 
and saw Driggs fall, but did not see who 
fired at him, but supposed it to be Indians. 
After obtaining all the testimony possi- 
ble, it was decided to restore the arms to 
the Indians, as no case had been made out 
against them. A feeling of apprehension 
| obtained a foothold with many of the set- 
| tiers, and the final result was the removal 
J of the tribe to the Indian reservation in 
Kansas, about 1856. 

Hale did not remain in the ncighbor- 
! hood, but soon after took his own and 
! ^* r 'ggs' ^'if c an( 3 removed to Bear's Set- 
I tlement, thirty-five miles south, in Mis- 
1 souri, and the sequel to the murder of 
I Driggs showed the Indians to be entirely 
! innocent of his death. The winter follow- 
! ing, Mrs. Hale suddenly sickened and died, 
J and rumors gained ground thai everything 
was not right; it was then remembered 



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GENERAL HISTORY 



that the ball which failed to fit the Indians' 

rifles was the exact caliber of that used by 
Hale, and the opinion became current that 
he and not the Indians was the murderer; 
but the settlers, without exception, exon- 
erate the Indians from all complicity in the 
matter. 

Some property of the Indians, consisting 
of three guns and sixteen steel traps, was 
sold at auction by the sheriff, Peter Doze, 
the first Monday in December, 1S55, toward 
defraying the expenses of the removal. 
November 6, 1S55, the county judge issued 
warrants to several citizens to pay for pro- 
visions, used while removing the Indians 
to Kansas, as follows: 

Catherine Mimes, $3.50; Mary" Imus, 
$3.50; Henry Rowlan, $3.00; Henry Broad- 
water, $2.50; Peter Doze, $5.00; Wendell 
Poor, §2. 50; N. H. Dewitt, S3.00; F. A. 
Millsap, "$33.10; Josiah Aldrich, $2.50; 
Henry Skidmore, $1-75 ; J onn Skidmore, 
$11.75; William Haviland, $i./5; David 
Edwards, $3.00; Barton B. Dunning, $10.00. 

The Indians had no legal right to resi- 
dence in this county, but had lingered for 
a time after the departure of the mam 

body. 

FIRST COURT. 

The first district court for Ringgold 
County convened at Mt. Ayr, May 25, 
1857. Judge John S. Townsend presided; 
Randolph Sry being the Clerk. John VY. 
Warren was appointed Prosecuting At- 
torney. The following were the petit. 
jurors: Sanford Harrow, David M. Lc- 
san,JohnC. Stuart, William Skinner, Will- 



iam Francis, Henry Roland. John L. Rush, 
C. G. Rowell, Thomas Marshall, Henry 
Crabbs, William M. Water, A. W. Tice, 
Samuel Allison, A. J. McClerg, and L. S. 
Terwilligcr. Luke Shay was naturalized 
at this term, this being the first business 
transacted after organizing the court. The 
first grand jury empaneled was at the 
October term of the same year, and was 
composed of the following persons : John 
Shields, William C. Harvey, William Tur- 
ner, Michael Stahl, Isaac Oliver, Thomas 
M. Hall, Henry Arnett, John Morgan, 
John Carman, Gabriel Huffman, Henry J. 
Dewitt, William Arnett, Reuben B. Moul- 
ton, E. W. Rice, Anderson W. Tice. 

RINGGOLD'S FIRST COUNTY JUDGC. 

One of the most prominent men in the 
early history of the county was Judge 
Hagans, who wielded great influence from 
the time of his first election as county 
judge until his death. He came to the 
county from McDonough County, Illinois, 
in June, 1854, and was a native of Ken- 
tucky. He served the people three terms 
in the office of county judge, and was 
elected State Senator at the general elec- 
tion of 1S57, from the district composed of 
the counties of Ringgold, Taylor, Adams, 
Union and Clarke. He served with ability 
in the Eighth and Ninth General Assem- 
blies. He discharged his last senatorial and 
official duties at the extra session of Sep- 
tember, 1862. Soon after this time his 
health began to fail. He died September 
7, 1863, at his home in Mt. Ayr. 



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il|l POLITICAL HISTORY. IIP 



^ ::f ARTY government is 

-;fiVy <''>.;; the present, and p'os- 
•:'-'. ■■',' sibly the future, though 
C not the ideal, feature of 
.' :\ our so-called republic, 
I ~' : .<r. '.P-i and men have, in 
Ajyjpixfc' ^-k'Ck. Amenca,becn divided 

%'-t-Sj~) %ini -° political parties for 120 
<^f years. Upon the passage of 
JP& tne Stamp Act in 1765, parties 
for the first time began to take 
definite shape and manifest open 
antagonisms, and the words, 
Whig and Tor}', then had a 
plainer meaning in America 
than in England. The Stamp 
Act was denounced by the 
Whigs as direct taxation, and so general 
were the protests that for a time it seemed 
that only those who owed their livings 
to the Crown, or expected aid and comfort 
from it, remained with the Tories. The 
Whigs were the patriots. 

Alter independence was achieved, of 
course, all Americans were Whigs. In the 
first years of the United States as a federal 
union, under President Washington, there 
came about a division into " Particularist" 
and " Strong Government " Whigs, these 
soon adopting the more euphonious desig- 



nations of Anti-Federals and Federals. The 
former, under Jefferson's lead, afterward 
became known as Republicans, which 
name was in the early part of 1806 dropped 
for that of Democrats. Hence Jefferson is 
often referred to as the founder of the 
Democratic party. If, however, this dis- 
tinction can be claimed for an}' one man, 
the friends of Andrew Jackson have per- 
haps a stronger case. 

The Democrats were in power in this 
country from 1S01 to 1825, when John 
Ouincy Adams, "the last of the Federal- 
ists," was chosen by Congress to fill the 
office of President, the people having 
failed to elect. General Jackson, however, 
had received a plurality of the popular 
vote, and the remembrance of this fact was 
one of the chief causes of Jackson's subse- 
quent election in 1828. The elevation of 
General Jackson to the presidency was a 
triumph over the high protective policy, 
the federal internal improvement policy, 
and the latitudinous construction of the con- 
stitution, as well as of the Democracy over 
Federals, then known as National Republi- 
cans. This election was also the permanent 
re-establishment of parties on principle, 
according to the landmarks of the early 
years of the Government. For although 



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POLITICAL JfJSTOH): 



Mr. Adams had received confidence 
and office from Mr. Madison and Mr. Mon- 
roe, and had classed with the Democratic 
party during the "era of good feeling," yet 
he had previously been a Federal; and on 
the re-establishment of old party lines 
which began to take place after the elec- 
tion of Mr. Adams in the House of Repre- 
sentatives, his affinities and policy became 
those of his former party; and as a part}', 
with many individual exceptions, they be- 
came his supporters and his strength. 

The Democrats re-nominated Jackson in 
1832, while in December preceding the 
National Republicans nominated Henry 
Clay. The hero of New Orleans was 
elected a second term by a goodly ma- 
jority. 

The Democracy being in power, the fol- 
lowers of Clay gradually adopted the name 
of Whigs, which was suggested by the fact 
that in England the opposition to the Gov- 
ernment was known by that appellation. 
Hence, more than any one man, Henry Clay 
is looked upon as the founder of the Whig 
party, which played an important part in 
American politics for some twenty years. 
In 1S36 they nominated General William 
Henry Harrison, who was defeated by 
Martin Van Buren, the choice of the Dem- 
ocratic party. In the closing year of Jack- 
son's administration, however, a step had 
been taken which ultimately brought about 
the temporaiw downfall of his party. This 
step was the distribution of revenue among 
the States in 1837, which was designed to 
enhance the value of the State stocks held 
by the United States Bank. The result 
was far different, however, and thousands 
are still living who can tell of the financial 
crisis of 1837 and the general stringency 
following. 

If is natural for the people to charge fi- 
nancial and other troubles, from war down 
to crop failures, upon the party in power. 
So it was in those times, and the result was 



the ascendency of the Whigs after the next 
election, in 1840. On the Whig ticket, 
General Harrison, of Ohio, was the candi- 
date for President, and John Tyler, of Vir- 
ginia, for Vice-President. Mr. Clay, the 
most prominent Whig in the country, was 
not deemed available, and the leading men 
in the party were again put aside to make 
room for a military man, a step prompted 
by the example previously set bv the Dem- 
ocrats in the case of General Jackson. The 
men who managed presidential elections 
believed then as now that military renown 
was a passport to popularity and rendered 
a candidate more sure of election. The 
contest before the people was a long and 
bitter one, the severest ever known in the 
country up to that time, and scarcely 
equaled since. The whole Whig party 
and the large league of suspended banks, 
headed by the bank of the United States, 
making its last struggle for a new national 
charter in the effort to elect a President 
friendly to it, were arrayed against the 
Democrats, whose hard-money policy and 
independent treasury schemes were met 
with little favor in the then depressed con- 
dition of the treasury. The Democrats 
worked for the re-election of President Van 
Buren, with Richard M. Johnson, of Ken- 
tuck)-, as Vice-President, but the Whigs 
were ultimately successful. 

The question of extending slave territory 
by the annexation of Texas was the prin- 
cipal one in the campaign of 1844, and 
avowedly so in the platforms. The Dem- 
ocracy nominated James K. Polk for 
President, and George M. Dallas for Vice- 
President. The Whigs nominated their 
great leader, Henry Clay, with Theodore 
Frelinghuyscn for Vice-President. Owing 
largely to the influence of a third party, 
the Free-Soilers, Clay was defeated in one 
of the closest elections ever held. 

Another presidential year brought for- 
ward new men and new issues. The Dem- 



■■..■■.■•. .- 






410 



HISTOItr OK RINGGOLD COVNTT. 



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ocrats nominated General Lewis Cass for 
President, and George William O. Butler 
for Vice-President. The Whigs took ad- 
vantage of the popularity of General 
Zachary Taylor, for his military achieve- 
ments in the Mexican war, just ended, and 
his consequent "availability," nominated 
him for the presidency over Clay, Webster 
and Scott, who were his competitors be- 
fore the convention. The party which had 
been made by the greatness of the latter 
won an easy victory. 

The presidential election 0(1852 was the 
last campaign in which the Whig part)" ap- 
peared in National politics. It nominated 
a ticket with General Winfield Scott as its 
candidate for President. His opponent on 
the Democratic ticket was General Frank- 
lin Pierce. A third ticket was placed in 
the field by the Abolition party, with John 
P. Hale as its candidate for President. The 
political see-saw now brought the Demo- 
crats in power again. 

Thus, at the beginning of the civil history 
of Ringgold County the Democrats were 
in control, with Franklin Pierce as Presi- 
dent, and the Whig party was disintegrating 
as a National organization. The citizens 
of Ringgold Count} - having come from 
those Eastern States where the Whigs 
were strongest, retained their politics after 
settling here, so that this was a Whig 
county during its infancy. There was, 
however, never a fair test of strength, 
for in local elections personal popularity 
went much farther than partisanship, and 
before the county's politics was settled by 
a presidential election, the death of the 
Whig party was an accomplished fact, and 
.a new organization, the Republican party, 
arose from its ashes. Henceforth thegiant 
parties were Democrats and Republicans, 
the latter absorbing all the elements then 
existing opposed tu the further extension 
of slavery. The new party was born in a 
number of places almost simultaneous!)', 



but in each case with the same motives and 
with similar constituent elements. The 
movement assumed definite shape in the 
summer of 1854, when, for Governor of 
Iowa, James W. Grimes was nominated by 
the Republicans to oppose Curtis Bates, 
the choice of the Democracy. Iowa had 
hitherto been under the control of the latter 
party, but the Republicans now carried 
it, in their first campaign, and it has since 
remained in the ranks of Republicanism, by 
majorities sometimes running as high as 
80,000. ' Mr. Grimes' personal ability had 
much to do with the successful organiza- 
tion of the Republicans in Iowa. 

In the organic election of Ringgold 
County, May 14, 1855, and also in the Au- 
gust election following, National politics 
played no part. Candidates were favored 
or opposed solely for personal reasons. 
However, all the successful ones were 
Whigs, except Peter Doze, the first sheriff, 
and afterward assessor, who was and is a 
zealous Democrat. County Judge Hagans, 
Treasurer and Recorder Cofer, and School 
Fund Commissioner Poor, were all Whigs, 
and afterward Republicans. The total 
vote in May, 1855, was but 34; in August 
it was 91. 

The year following, 1856, party lines 
were for the first time marked out in Ring- 
gold County, and they have since been 
pretty generally regarded, though for the 
local offices a not inconsiderable voting ele- 
ment has always manifested an independent 
spirit — a willingness to " scratch " the 
ticket on personal grounds. 

The first National convention of the Re- 
publican party nominated JohnC. Fremont 
for President, and Wm. L. Dayton for Vice- 
President. Its platform consisted of a 
series of resolutions, of which the most 
important was ihe following : 

" That we deny the authority of Congress, 
of a Territorial Legislature, of any individ- 
ual or association of individuals, to give 



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/ •( II. 1 TICA L ms TORT. 



legal existence to slavery in any Territory 

of the United Slates, while the present 
Constitution shall be maintained." 

The Democratic convention nominated 
James Buchanan for President, and John 
C. Beckinridge for Vice-President. It 
adopted a platform which contained the 
material portions of all its previous plat- 
forms, and also defined its position to the 
new issues of the day, and declared (i) 
that the revenue to be raised should not 
exceed the actual necessary expenses of the 
Government, and for the gradual extinc- 
tion of the public debt; (2) that the Con- 
stitution does not confer upon the General 
Government the power to commence and 
carry on a general system of internal im- 
provements; (3) for a strict construction of 
the powers granted by the Constitution to 
the Federal Government ; (4) that Congress 
has no power to charter a National bank; 
($) that Congress has no power to interfere 
with slavery in the States and Territories, 
the people of which have the exclusive 
right and power to settle that question for 
themselves; (6) opposition to Americanism. 

That Buchanan was elected was in no 
degree due to Ringgold County, which 
gave Fremont a plurality of 28, in spite of 
the fact that a large element of the Repub- 
lican following was drawn into support of 
the American, or " Know Nothing " party, 
whose candidate was Millard Fillmore, and 
who received almost as many votes in 
Ringgold County as Buchanan. The vote 
was: Fremont, 92: Buchanan, 64; Fill- 
more, 52. The county officers elected this 
year (clerk, school fund commissioner and 
sheriff), were all Republicans, and re- 
ceived little opposition. The county's 
part in politics since has been in the 
same line. It has been monotonously 
faithful to the Republicans. It has here 
never been a serious question of which 
part)', but merely how much majority. 

At the August election, in 1857, a full 



county ticket was put in the field by the 
Republicans, which had no organized op- 
position. The majorities were all over 
100. Lowe's majority for Governor, in 
October, was but 47, however. In 185S 
two full tickets were run, the Republican 
majority being about 100 in a total vote of 
330. In 1859 Kirkwood's majority for 
Governor was 125 in a total vote of 395. 
The county officer's had a close contest, and 
the vote was remarkably close, the majori- 
ties ranging from 1 to 23. 

The four years of Buchanan's adminis- 
tration were rife with political discussions 
on the slaver)- question, the status of the 
negro and the troubles in Kansas. The 
Southern Democrats, true to the supposed 
interests of their section became more ag- 
gressive in their demands in behalf of slav- 
er)-, while their brethren in the North 
followed the lead of Douglas in endeavoring 
to compromise the slavery question. The 
two wings differed more and more widely, 
and in their national convention at Charles- 
ton were unable to agree upon a platform 
or a candidate, so that the Southern Dem- 
ocrats withdrew in a body. The conven- 
tion re-assembled at Baltimore, and after a 
protracted struggle nominated Stephen A. 
Douglas and Herschel V. Johnson. Their 
platform declared that the decisions of the 
Supreme Court, respecting the status of 
slavery in the Territories, should be re- 
spected. The Southern Democrats, how 
ever, held another convention and nomi- 
nated John C. Breckinridge and Joseph 
Lane. The platform adopted contained in 
regard to the main question at issue the 
statement that slaves in the Territories 
should be recognized by the Government 
as property. 

The Republicans nominated Abraham 
Lincoln and Hannibal Hamlin, and resolved 
that Kansas should be admitted as a free 
State, and that the Government should ef- 
fectually prohibit slavery in the Territo- 









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ries. A so-called Constitutional Union 
Convention was also held, which nominated 
John Bell and Edward Everett. 

The conclusion of this many-sided politi- 
cal tight was the election of Lincoln, who 
received, however, but two-fifths of the 
popular vote. In this county the canvass 
was exceedingly warm, and Lincoln re- 
ceived 348 votes to 1S2 for Douglas, and 
three for Bell. " The third and fourth par- 
ties received very little favor here. This 
was the heaviest vote yet cast in the coun- 
ty. The majorities on the State ticket 
were all over 160. But two county officers 
were chosen, a clerk by 42 votes, and a 
surveyor by 91. 

In the State and county election of 1S61, 
a very light vote was drawn out. The 
Democratic ticket received less than 100 
votes, and the Republican majorities ranged 
from 186, for clerk, up to 290 for Congress- 
man. In 1S62 the majority on the State 
ticket was 1S0. For clerk it reached 221, 
Thomas Ross being the popular man ; for 
treasurer and recorder John T. Williams' 
majority was 127, and for count}' judge 
Wendell Poor r~~eived but 103 votes more 
than his competitor. 

The war seemed to strengthen the Re- 
publicans in this State so that it was almost 
perfunctory that any other party made 
nominations. Colonel William M. Stone 
had made himself so popular by his serv- 
ices in the field that in the summer of 1863 
he was nominated for Governor against 
James M. Tuttle. Not a very full vote 
was cast in Ringgold, but this was more 
than three to one in favor of the Republi- 
cans. Stone received 353 votes to 114 for 
Tuttle, or a majority of 239. Even this 
was the smallest majority given an}" man 
on the ticket (except for representative, 
237), the county officers being elected with 
little or no opposition. 

In iS64the war was being waged on a 
scale never before seen in history, at vast 



///STOAT OP RINGGOLD COUNT! 



expense, and it was uncertain how long the 
Confederacy could maintain armed resist- 
ance. The Republicans were generally 
unanimous in supporting the coercion pol- 
icy of the Government, while the Demo- 
crats, on the other hand, were in favor of a 
change of policy, and of peace on any 
terms that would save the Union. The 
Republican convention of 1S64 therefore 
re-nominated Abraham Lincoln by a unan- 
imous vote, save Missouri, whose delega- 
tion voted for Ulysses S. Grant. Andrew 
Johnson was nominated for Vice-President. 
The platform approved the emancipation 
proclamation, declared slavery dead, 

j pledged support for the further prosecution 
of the war, and demanded the unconditional 

I surrender of the rebellious States. The 
Democratic convention nominated George 
B. McClellan and George H. Pendleton, 
and adopted a platform criticising the 
methods of the administration. Lincoln 
received 212 electoral votes to McClellan's 
twenty-one, the people indorsing the old 
maxim "that it is dangerous to swap 
horses while crossing a stream." In Ring- 
gold County the Lincoln ticket received 
a majority of 243, in a total vote of 395. 
The Democratic vote was from fifty-nine 
to seventy-six. They made no nominations 
for county offices. 

Equally one-sided was the general elec- 
tion of 1865 for State and county officers; 
but in certain respects tilings were rather 
"mixed." Governor Stone, a candidate 
for re-election, was so pronounced in favor 
of negro suffrage that he ran behind his 
ticket, and in this county received 336 
votes, against 152 for T. II. Benton. No 
contest was made for the county offices ex- 
cept for sheriff, in which case the vote was 
close. D. B. Marshall, the successful 
candidate, had but thirteen votes more 
than his opponent. The situation was 
about the same in 1S66, no contest being 
made for county officers, and the Deino- 



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POLITICAL HISTORY. 



cratic vote being; less than a fourth of the 
total for State officers, In 1S67 the Demo- 
crats organized and made a vigorous cam- 
paign, the result of which was that they 
polled nearly half as man)- votes as the 
Republicans, or a little over 200 votes. 
They nominated candidates for most of the 
local offices, and gave them the full party 
vote. Both parties desired to nominate 
General Grant in 186S, but the Republi- 
cans stole a march on their opponents by 
holding their convention first. Schuyler 
Colfax was named for Vice-President. The 
Democratic convention was for a long time 
unable to decide between Pendleton, Plan- 
cock, Hendricks and others; but on the 
twenty-second ballot Horatio Seymour, 
whose name had been scarcel}-- mentioned 
before, was unanimously nominated, to- 
gether with Francis P. Blair for Vice- 
President. An active canvass followed, in 
which the brief expression, " Let us have 
peace," in Grant's letter of acceptance, 
was liberally employed by Republican 
journals and orators to tone clown what 
were regarded as rapidly-growing~ race 
and sectiona." differences, and with such 
effect that Grant carried all of the States 
save eight, receiving an electoral vote of 
2i4against 80. His majority in this count}' 
was 262 in a total vote of 774. This was the 
largest vote cast in the county up to this 
time. The majorities were about the 
same for all the offices. 

In 1S69 the Democrats nominated another 
list of candidates, who were defeated by 
the usual vote — a little more than two to 
one. The majorities ranged from 200 to 
400. In 1S70 the disproportion was still 
greater, on State ticket. Xo contest was 
made for county offices. In 1S71 the Re- 
publican majority in this county for Gov- 
ernor was 432. The Democrats tried to 
elect their leaders for several county of- 
fices, and came nearer doing it than since 
1859. 



An issue raised in Missouri gave imme- 
diate rise to the Liberal Republican party, 
though the course of Horace Greeley had 
long pointed toward the organization of 
something of the kind, and with equal 
plainness it pointed to his desire to be its 
champion and candidate for the presidency. 
In iS7othe Republican party in Missouri, 
then in control of the Legislature, split on 
the question of the removal of the disquali- 
.fications imposed upon rebels by the State 
Constitution during the war. Those favor- 
ing the removal of disabilities were headed 
by B. Gratz Brown and Carl Schurz, and 
the} T called themselves Liberal Republicans. 
Those opposed were called and accepted 
the name of Radical Republicans. The 
former quickly allied themselves with the 
Democrats, and thus carried the State, 
though Grant's administration " stood in " 
with the Radicals. The liberal movement 
rapidl)' spread, and its leaders at once be- 
gan to lay plans to carry the next presi- 
dential election. Horace Greeley was 
nominated for President, and B. Gratz 
Brown for Vice-President. The Demo- 
cratic convention indorsed these nomina- 
tions, but a few dissatisfied Democrats 
named Charles O'Conor and John Ouincy 
Adams. The Republicans re-nominated 
General Grant, with Henry Wilson for 
Vice-President. The Republicans were 
overwhelmingly successful, not so much 
from the popularity of Grant as from the 
unpopularity of Greeley. The vote in 
Ringgold County was: Grant, 805; 
Greelev, 215: O'Conor, 1 ; Grant's plural- 
ity, 590. The Republican State ticket re- 
ceived about 30 less majority, as did their 
candidate for clerk of courts. Their man 
for recorder received 234 majority, while 
the candidate for surveyor got in by only 
9 votes. 

A heavy vote was brought out in 1873, 
the Republican majority averaging 100 less 
than in 1S72 for State officers. The candi- 



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HJSTOni' OF RINGGOLD COUNTY. 



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dates for the local offices received all sorts 
of majorities, and one office, the treasurer- 
ship, was captured by the Democrats, or 
rather the fusion ticket, for the Democrats 
and "Anti-monopolists" pooled their is- 
sues. Allen Higgins was the lucky candi- 
date. In 1S74 the Republican majority 
averaged about ioo, the reduction being due 
to the fusion of opposing elements. In 1S75 
the Republican majority for Governor was 
373. The county officials were elected b) r 
figures from 166 to 290. 

The troubles in the South and the almost 
general overthrow of the " carpet-bag " 
governments impressed all with the fact 
that the presidential election of 1876 would 
be exceedingly close, and the result con- 
firmed this belief. The Republicans nom- 
ated Rutherford B. Hayes and William A. 
Wheeler, and the Democrats, Samuel J. 
Tilden and Thomas A. Hendricks. A 
third party had sprung into existence, 
called at first "Greenbackers," but latterly 
" National Greenbackers," who desired to 
relieve the financial crisis of 1S73 and the 
hard times following by a large issue of 
irredeemable p?, n _er money They nomi- 
nated Peter Cooper and Samuel F. Cary. 
After a contest for months over the returns 
of this election, Hayes was declared elected. 
The vote in this county was: Hayes, 1,- 
245; Tilden, 422; Cooper, 245; Hayes' 
plurality, S23. The same figures obtained 
on the State ticket. The Greenback vote 
increased from this year until about 1881. 

The Republican majority for Governor 
in 1877 was 293. The majorities for county 
offices were from 52 to 335. In 18;' the 
contest was closer, the Republican majori- 
ties being from 100 to 200 on State ticket, 
and about the same on local issues. In 
1879 tnc majorities were all the way from 
20 to 253. 

In 18S0 James A. Garfield, Winfield S. 
Hancock and James B. Weaver were the 
standard-bearers of the three National 



■ _ 



praties. The vote in this county was: 
Garfield, 1,450; Weaver, 525; Hancock, 
436; Republican plurality, 925. It will be 
noticed that the Greenbackers polled nearly 
100 votes more than the Democrats. For 
the county offices these two parties have 
fused every year recently, though their 
combined strength is much less than the 
Republican vote. The Republican ma- 
jority for county offices was in 1S80 about 
500. 

In 1SS1 Governor Sherman's plurality 
was 602. The Greenback vote outnumbered 
the Democratic more than two to one, and 
the Republicans were more than twice as 
numerous as the Greenbackers. The fusion- 
ists carried one county office, John W. 
Been being elected sheriff. The Republican 
majorities for the remaining offices were 
much less than that for Governor. At the 
special election of June 27, 1S82, on prohi- 
bition, the question stood in this county, 
1,640 for, and 570 against ; majority, 1,070. 
In 1882 the Republican plurality on State 
ticket was 550, and between 300 and 400 on 
county ticket. In 1883 the Greenback 
strength fell off, in comparison with the 
Democratic, and it has since remained the 
smaller of the two parties in opposition to 
Republicanism in Ringgold Count)-. Gov- 
ernor Sherman's plurality was S45. The 
majorities on the local ticket varied from 
five to 473. 

The presidential campaign of 1S84, with 
its personal animosities and bitter discus- 
sions, is fresh in the minds of all. James G. 
Blaine stood for the hitherto successful 
party ; Grover Cleveland was supported 
by the Democrats and the " Mugwumps," 
or protesting Republicans; Benjamin F. 
Butler was the nominee of the Greenback 
and Labor conventions, and John P. St. 
John was the candidate of the Prohibi- 
tionists. Cleveland was elected by about 
i,iod votes in New York State. In Ring- 
gold County the vote was: Blaine, 1,677; 












■ 



POLITIC A L HIS TOR ) '. 



Cleveland, 1,096 ; Blaine's majority, 581. 

This was the average majority of the whole 
ticket. In 18S5 Larrabee's plurality for 
Governor was 552. The majorities for 
county officers were from 334 to 693. 

Of the seventeen civil townships in Ring- 
gold County, the Fusion party can usually 
carry Union, Benton, Middle Fork and 
sometimes Athens and Monroe. The others 
are safely Republican. 

Political campaigns in this county have 
always been marked by good nature on the 
part of the candidates, and good order on 
the part of voters. The count}' offices haA'e, 
as a rule, been filled by industrious, capa- 
ble and honest officials. 

OFFICIAL REGISTER. 

The following register of the names of 
those who have held office in Ringgold 
Count}', with years of service, has been 
prepared from the records of the county. 

COUNTY JUDGES. 

James C. Hagans, 1S55— '9 ; Isaac W. 
Keller, 1S60-'".- resigned in September, 
1S62; Wendell Poor, appointed to fill va- 
cancy, then elected to office, 1862-'$ ; Isaac 
W. Keller, i866-'7; John T. Williams, 
i868-'9. The office of county judge was 
abolished at the end of 1S6S, and the duties 
chiefly devolved upon the newly-created 
office of auditor. During Judge Williams' 
second year as county judge he performed 
only the duties of auditor. 

AUDITORS. 

John T. Williams, 1S69; John McFar- 
land, i8/0-'5 ; R. F. Askren, 1876-9; J. C. 
Askren, i88o-'i ; J. E. Doze, 1882-5 ! Henry 
M. Ross, 18S6-. 

CLERKS OF COURTS. 



vacancy, then elected to office, 1855— '6; 
Randolph Sry, iSso-'oo; T. F. How, 1S61, 
died in office ; Ith S. Beall, iS6i-'4; Thomas 
Ross, 1S65-70; H. C. Andrews, 1S71-2; 
George S. Allyn, iS73-'8 ; Thomas Liggett, 
iS79-'S4; James II . Burke, 1SS5-. 

TREASURERS AND RECORDERS. 

Joseph W. Cofer, i855-'7; A. G. Beall, 
1857-9; John Birkhimer, i86o-'i; Alex.Z. 
Muggins, 1862, resigned in September; 
John T. Williams, appointed to fill vacancy, 
then elected to the office, iS62-'4. The 
offices of recorder and treasurer were 
separate from Januar}- 1, 1S65. 

TREASURERS. 

John T. Williams, 1S65-7; C. W. Dake, 
1 S68— '71 ; Allen Higgins, 1872-':; ; Henry 
Todd, 1S76-9; A. M.Poor, iSSo-'5; Thomas 
Campbell, 1S86-. 

RECORDERS. 

Wendell Poor, 1865-6; Warren R. Turk 
i867-'72; Hugh A. White, 1S73-4; B. F. 
Day, 1875-6; H. H. Parsons, 1877-S2 ; 
John C. McClurg, 1SS3-. 



Hiron Imus, 1 S 5 5 , May to August ; Peter 
Doze, 1855-6; Charles IT. Schooler, 1856- 
'S, resigned ; Samuel Allison, appointed to 
fill vacancy, then elected, 1S5S— '9 ; John 
D. Carter, i86o-'i ; John McGaughey, 
1862-3 ; Luther Tillotson, 1864-5; D. B. 
Marshall, i866-'7; John A. Lesan, 1868-9; 
D. B. Marshall, i8;o-'3; J. R. Henderson, 
1874-5; H. A. White, i876-'9; W. A. 
Delashmutt, i88o-'i; John H. Been, 1882- 
'3; James Beard, 1S84. 

SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONERS. 



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Mathew B. Brown, 185;, resigned Octo- j Charles II. Schooler, 1855, resigned July 
bcr 10; Andrew W. Tice, appointed to fill 2; Wendell Poor, appointed to fill vacancy. 



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then elected to office, 1855-'/. Office abol- 
ished and duties devolved upon 

SUPERINTENDENTS OF COUNTV SCHOOLS. 

Wendell Poor, 1858-9; A. G. Beall, 
1S60-1; Edgar Sheldon, 1862-3; W. T. 
Laughlin, 1S64-5 ; Andrew Johnson, 1S66- 
'7; Henry II. Ross, 1S6S, resigned in Sep- 
tember; H.C.Andrews, appointed to fill 
vacancy, then elected to office, 1868-9; 
William J. Buck, iS/O-'i; R. F. Askren, 
1872-5; W.J. Work, 1S76-V); W. E. An- 
drews, i8So-'i; T. E. Dubois, 1S82. 

SURVEYORS. 

James White, 1855-6; Isaac B. Tall- 
madge, 1S56-9; Samuel Allison, appointed 
to fill vacancy caused by S. J. Hall, who 
had been elected, not qualifying, 1S60-3; 
A. G. Beall, 1864-9; Henry H. Ross, 
i870- , 3; E. B. Heaton, 1874-9; Henry H. 
Ross, i88o-'3; Edgar Sheldon, 18S4. 

SUPERVISORS (TOWNSHIP SYSTEM). 

1S61.— Randolph Sry,Mt. Ayr,Chairman; 
Charles H. Schooler, Lett's Creek ; Parks 
Brittain, Piatt; Martin Patrick, Athens; 
Andrew Johnson, East Fork ; James Rich- 
ards, Jr., Sand Creek ; L. N. Lewis, West 
Fork ; John T. Williams, Washington, and 
Allen Higgins, Middle Fork. 

1862. — Thomas Ross, Mt. Ayr, Chair- 
man ; James Richards, Jr., Sand Creek ; L. 
N. Lewis, West Fork; John T. Williams. 
Washington; Allen Higgins, .Middle Fork; 
John Gard, Piatt ; Charles H. Schooler, 
Lott's Creek; Andrew Johnson, East Fork, 
and .Martin Patrick, Athens. 

1863.— Ith S. Beall, Mt. Ayr, Chairman; 
Silas Tedrow, Athens ; Charles II. School- 
er, Lott's Creek; Absalom Baird, West 
Fork; John Gard, Piatt; Nathan Miller, 
Middle Fork; I radell Cooper, Ea^t Fork; 
G. C Nulph, Washington, and Standbury 
Wright, Sand Creek. 



1864.— Ith S. Beall, Mt. Ayr, Chairman ; 
G. C. Nulph, Washington ; Absalom Baird, 
West Fork ; James T. Blades, Lott's Creek ; 
D. F. Sellards, Athens; John A. Lesan, 
East Fork; John Gard, Piatt; E. M. Den- 
nis, Middle Fork, and Standbury Wright, 
Sand Creek. 

1865.— D. F. Sellards, Athens, Chairman ; 
Standbury Wright, Sand Creek ; John Gard, 
Piatt; Absalom Baird, West Fork ; James 
T. Blades, Lott's Creek; John A. Lesan, 
Mt. Ayr ; A. F. Talbot, Washington ; A. C. 
Tardy, Middle Fork, and Hiron Imus, East 
Fork. A. F. Talbot was chairman after the 
resignation of D. F. Sellards, whose place 
as supervisor was filled by L. R. Larue. 
Michael Stahl, of Piatt, succeeded John 
Gard. 

1 866.— -A. F. Talbot, Washington, Chair- 
man ; Standbury Wright, Sand Ceeek ; 
Absalom Baird, West Fork ; A. C. Tardy, 
Middle Fork; Hiron Imus, East Fork; 
Jesse Thompson, Lott's Creek ; L. D. Riley, 
Athens; Green B. Reynolds, Piatt, and E. 
G. Martin, Mt. Ayr. Absalom Baird, was 
chairman during the latter part of the year, 
Mr. Talbot having removed from his town- 
ship, and James H. Ruby was appointed 
supervisor from that township to succeed 
Talbot. 

1867.— E. G. Martin, Mt. Ayr, Chairman ; 
Standbury Wright, Sand Creek; Green 
B. Reynolds, Piatt ; John D. Carter, West 
Fork; Jesse Thompson, Lott's Creek; 
Josiah Vorhies, Washington ; A. C. Tarcl}-, 
Middle Fork; L. D. Riley, Athens, and 
John A. Lesan, East Fork. 

1868.— John D. Carter, West Fork, Chair- 
man ; Standbury Wright, Sand Creek; 
Isaac A. Tally, Piatt; Jesse Thompson, 
Lott's Creek; A. G. Beall, Mt. Ayr; A. C. 
Tardy, Middle Fork; L. D. Riley, Athens ; 
A. Lorimor, Liberty; Job Rush, Monroe; 
James H. Ruby, Washington, and Josiah 
Vorhies, Jefferson. 

1869. — Absalom Baird, Clinton, Chair- 



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POLITICAL HISTORY. 



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man : Edgar Sheldon, Sand Creek; Josiah 
Vorhies, Jefferson ; Isaac A. Tally, Piatt ; 
James H. Ruby, Washington; AsherLori- 
mor, Liberty ; L. T. Long, Monroe ; L. D. 
Riley, Athens; A. G. Bcall, Mt. Ayr ; John 
Stevenson, Benton; Allen Higgins, Middle 
Fork, and Jesse Thompson, Lott's Creek. 

1870.— Edgar Sheldon, Tingley, Chair- 
man ; John Dixon, Union ; Josiah Vorhies, 
Jefferson; J. P. Lambert, Lincoln; Green 
B. Reynolds, Grant; James H. Ruby, 
Washington; Ashcr Lorimor, Liberty; 
Lewis T. Long, Monroe ; Milton Rey- 
nolds, Athens; J. F. Mount, Mt. Ayr; John 
Stevenson, Benton ; Absalom Baird, Clin- 
ton ; Allen Higgins, Middle Fork, and 
Jabez E. Varney, Lott's Creek. 

SUPERVISORS (PRESENT SYSTEM). 

1871.— Andrew Johnston, Chairman; N. 
Miller and J. F. Mount. Mr. Johnston re- 
signed in October. His place as a member 
was filled by Edward B. Heaton, and 
Nathan Miller was chosen chairman. 

1S72.— Nathan Miller, Chairman; Absa- 
lom Baird and Edward B. Heaton. 

1873. — Absalom Baird, Chairman ; Aaron 
Nash and C. K. Pierson. 

1874. — Absalom Baird, Chairman ; Aaron 
Nash and Isaac W. Keller. 

1875. — Aaron Nash, Chairman; Isaac 
W. Keller and W. H. Barnes. 

1876.— Isaac W. Keller, Chairman; W. 
H. Barnes and James A. Miller. 

1877. — W. H. Barnes, Chairman; James 
A. Miller and S. England. 

187S.— James A. Miller, Chairman; S. 
England and A. Goodell. 

1879. — S. England, Chairman ; A Good- 
el! and James A. Miller. 

1880. — A. Goodell, Chairman; James A. 
Miller and Alexander Beard. 

1SS1. — - James A. Miller, Chairman ; Alex- 
ander Beard and Thomas A. Stevenson. 

1882. — Alexander Beard, Chairman; 
Thomas A. Stevenson and G. S. Moore. 



18S3. — Thomas A. Stevenson, Chairman ; 
G. S. Moore and E. J. Price. 

18S-). — G. S. Moore, Chairman; E. J. 
Price and E. J. Pratt. 

1SS5.— E. J. Price, Chairman; E. j. 
Pratt and Andrew Johnston. 

1SS6.— E. J. Pratt, Chairman; Andrew 
Johnston and L. D. Riley. 

SENATORS. 

Samuel Dale, 1S56-9; James C. Hagans, 
iS6o-'3; L. W. Hillyer, iS6 4 -'5 ; C. G.' 
Bridges, 1S66-7; Isaac W. Keller, 1S6S- 
'71; Elisha T. Smith, 1872-5 ; Fred Teale, 
1876-9; Isaac W. Keller, iSSo-'3; A. P. 
Stephens, 1S84-. 

REPRESENTATIVES. 

Samuel II. Moer, 1S56-7; W. B. Davis, 
1858-9; Reuben A. Moser, i86o-'3; Will- 
iam Elliott, 1864-5; Alexander Z. Hug- 
gins, 1S66-7; Leonard T. McCoun, 1S6S- 
'71 ; Andrew Johnston, 1872-5; S. W. Mc- 
Elderry, 1876-7; Allen Higgins, 1878-9; 
Charles C. Bosworth, i88o-*3 i Tohn Coie, 
1SS4-. 

CONGRESSMEN. 

Augustus Hall, 1855-7; Samuel R.Cur- 
tis, 1857-62; James F. Wilson, 1862-3; 
John A. Kasson, 1863-7; Grenville M. 
Dodge, 1867-9; Frank W. Palmer, 1869- 
'731 James W. McDill, 1873-7; W". F. 
Sapp,iS77-'8i ; William P. Hepburn, 1881- 

DISTRICTS. 

Ringgold was in the First Congressional 
District (then half of the State), until 1S63, 
then for ten years in the Fifth District, and 
since 1873 in the Eighth. 

Until the adoption of the present Consti- 
tution the county formed a part of the 
Sixth Judicial District, except one year, 
when it was attached to the Ninth Dis 
trict. Since 1858 it has formed a part of 
the Third Judicial District, which now in- 



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HIS TO R 7' OF RINGGOLD COCYTi: 



eludes Adams, Clarke, Decatur, Mont- 
gomery, Page, Ringgold, Taylor and 
Union counties. 

For Senatorial purposes, beginning with 
1856, Ringgold was joined with Fremont, 
Mills, Taylor, Page, Montgomery, Adams 
and Union counties as the Eleventh Dis- 
trict. Four years later.with Taylor, Adams, 
Union and Clarke counties, it made the 
Sixth District. Two years later Clarke 
was detached, and Page and Montgomery 
added. In i866-'7 Ringgold and Decatur 
formed the Sixth District. This arrange- 
ment endured four years, when Taylor was 
added, and (he district numbered the Sev- 
enth. In 1884 it was again put in the 
Sixth, with Taylor and Union counties. 

For representation in the lower branch 
of the General Assembly no arrangement 



endured any great length of time. In 
1 S56— *7 it was with Mills, Taylor, Page, 
Montgomery and Adams counties as the 
Fourteenth District. In 1 S5S— '9 it was 
joined with Adams, Union, Page and Tay- 
lor, in the Forty-fourth District. Then for 
two years Ring-gold and Taylor formed the 
Seventh District. Next, Union wasadded. 
and the district numbered the Sixty-second, 
Two years later Union was taken away 
again, and Ringgold and Taylor became 
the Sixty-sixth District. In 1S66-7 the 
same counties composed the Sixty-seventh, 
in 1868-9 the Sixty-fifth, and in iS70-'3 the 
Fifteenth. Then Ringgold was joined 
with Union to make the Fourteenth Dis- 
trict, for four years. Since 1878 Ringgold 
County has formed the Fifteenth District 
by itself. 



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p HE people of the North- 
ern States have just 
reason to be proud of 
. the glorious record 
the)' made during 
the dark and blood) 7 
days when crimson- 
handed rebellion threatened 
the life of the nation. When 
war was forced upon the 
country by rebels in arms 
against the Government, 
the people were quietly pur- 
- - \$ suing the even tenor of their 
ways, doing whatever their 
hands found to do — work- 
ing the mines, making farms, 
or cultivating those already made, erecting 
homes, building shops, founding cities and 
towns, building mills and factories — in 
short, the country was alive with industry 
and hopes for the future. The people were 
just recovering from the depression and 
losses incident to the financial panic of 1857. 
The future looked bright and promising, 
and the industrious and patriotic sons and 
daughters of the free States were buoyant 
with hope, looking forward to the perfect- 
ing of new plans for the insurement of 
comfort and competence in their declining 
years; they little heeded the mutterings 
and threatenings of treason's children, in 
the slave States of the South. True sons 






and descendants of the heroes of the 
" times that tried men's souls " — the strug- 
gle for American independence — they 
never dreamed that there was even one so 
base as to dare attempt the destruction of 
the Union of their fathers — a Government 
baptized with the best blood the world 
ever knew. While immediately surrounded 
with peace and tranquillity, they paid but 
little attention to the rumored plots and 
plans of those who lived and grew rich 
from the sweat and toil, blood and flesh of 
others— aye, even trafficked in the offspring 
of their own loins. Nevertheless, the war 
came, with all its attendant horrors. 

April 12, 1861, Fort Sumter, at Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, Major Anderson, U. S. 
A., Commandant, was fired upon by rebels 
in arms. Although basest treason, this first 
act in the bloodv reality that followed was 
looked upon as a mere bravado of a few 
hot-heads — the act of a few fire-eaters 
whose sectional bias and freedom and 
hatred was crazed by the excessive indul- 
gence in intoxicating potations. When, a 
day later, the news was borne along the 
telegraph wires that Major Anderson had 
been forced to surrender to what had first 
been regarded as a drunken mob, the pa- 
triotic people of the North were startled 
from their dreams 01 the future, from un- 
dertakings half completed, and made to 
realize that behind that mob there was a 



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dark, deep and well-organized purpose to 
destroy the Government, rend the Union 
in twain, and out of its ruins erect a slave 
oligarchy, wherein no one would dare 
question their right to hold in bondage the 
sons and daughters of men whose skins 
were black, or who, perchance, through 
practices of lustful natures, were half or 
quarter removed from the color that God, 
for his own purposes had given them. But 
the) - "reckoned without their host." Their 
dreams of the future, their plans for the 
establishment of an independent confeder- 
acy, were doomed from their inception to 
sad and bitter disappointment. 

Immediately upon the surrender of Fort 
Sumter, Abraham Lincoln, America's 
martyr President, who, but a few short 
weeks before, had taken the oath of office as 
the nation's Chief Executive, issued a proc- 
lamation calling for 75,000 volunteers for 
three months. The last word had scarcely 
been taken from the electric wires before 
the call was fdled. Men and money were 
counted out by hundreds and thousands. 
The people who loved their whole Govern- 
ment could not give enough. Patriotism 
thrilled and vibrated and pulsated through 
every heart. The farm, the workshop, the 
office, the pulpit, the bar, the bench, the 
college, the school-house, every calling 
offered its best men, their lives and fortunes, 
in defense of the Government's honor and 
unity. Party lines were for the time ig- 
nored. Bitter words, spoken in moments 
of political heat, were forgotten and for- 
given, and, joining hands in a common 
cause, the) - repeated the oath of America's 
soldier-statesman : " By the great Eternal, 
the Union must and shall be preserved! " 

Seventy-five thousand men were not 
enough to subdue the rebellion. Nor were 
ten times that number. The war went on, 
and call followed call, until it began to look 
as if there would not be men enough in all 
the free Stales to crush out and subdue 



the monstrous war traitors had inaugu- 
rated. But to every call for either men or 
money there was a willing and ready re- 
sponse. And it is a boast of the people that, 
had the supply of men fallen short, there 
were women brave enough, daring 
enough, patriotic enough, to have offered 
themselves as sacrifices on their country's 
altar. Such were the impulses, motives 
and actions of the patriotic men of the 
North, among whom the sons of Ringgold 
County made a conspicuous and praise- 
worthy record. Of the offerings made by 
these people during the great and final 
struggle between freedom and slavery it is 
the purpose now to write. 

April 14, A. D. 1S61, Abraham Lincoln, 
President of the United States, issued the 
following : 

PROCLAMATION. 

" Whereas, The laws of the United 
States have been and now are violently 
opposed in several States, by combinations 
too powerful to be suppressed in the ordi- 
nary way ; I therefore call for the militia 
of the several States of the Union, to the ag- 
gregate number of 75,000, to suppress said 
combinations and execute the laws. I ap- 
peal to all loyal citizens to facilitate and aid 
in this effort to maintain, the laws and the 
integrity of the perpetuity of the popular 
Government, and redress wrongs long 
enough endured. The first service as- 
signed to the forces, probably, will be to 
repossess the forts, places and property 
which have been seized from the Union. 
Let the utmost care be taken, consistent, 
with the object, to avoid devastation, de- 
struction, interference with the property of 
peaceful citizens in any part of the coun- 
try ; and I hereby command persons 
composing the aforesaid combination to 
disperse within twenty days from date. 

" I hereby convene both Houses of Con- 
gress for the 4th day of July next, to deter- 






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77//T CIVIJ. WAR. 



mine upon measures for public safety which 
the interest of the subject demands. 

" Abraham Lincoln, 
" President of the United States. 

" Wm. H. Seward, 

" Secretary of State." 

The gauntlet thrown down by the trai- 
tors of the South was accepted — not, how- 
ever, in the spirit with which insolence 
meets insolence, but with a firm deter- 
mined spirit of patriotism and love of coun- 
try. The duty of the President was plain, 
under the Constitution and the laws, and 
above and beyond all, the people, from 
whom political power is derived, demanded 
the suppression of the rebellion, and stood 
ready to sustain the authority of their rep- 
resentatives and executive officers. 

The absence of the files of newspapers 
in this county, from 1861 to 1S65, renders 
it impossible for the historian to do full 
justice to the spirit and patriotism of this 
people in the early days of America's gigan- 
tic and bloody struggle against rebellion, 
and their liberal contributions to maintain 
the integrity of this nation. 

Though remote from the capital and 
large cities which were made rendezvous 
for volunteers, Ringgold Count}' was 
prompt in responding to demands made 
upon it. The first few volunteers from 
the county did not go as a body, but were 
scattered in different commands. The 
first large body of Ringgold County volun- 
teers was raised in June, 1S61, and went 
into quarters July 4. They were re-in- 
forced by about a score of volunteers from 
other counties, and then, August 15, mus- 
tered into the service of the United States 
as 

COMPANY G, FOURTH IOWA INFANTRY. 

The Ringgold volunteers in this com- 
pany were : 
Edmund VV. Rice, Lovena Hopkins, 



Randolph Sry, Ellis C. Miller, John A. 
Miller, Peter O. James, Nathan B. Mand- 
lin, Francis Bennett, Eli Drake, William 
Fn.shwat.cr, William W. Robinson, Na- 
thaniel T. Marshall, Joseph S. Robinson, 
Benjamin W. Talbot, John W. Johnston, 
Samuel R. Jacobs, Branson L. Addington, 
Robert Shields, Charles Hag-gins, David 
B. Marshall, Michael Danelly, Joseph C. 
Addington, William C. Arnett, James P. 
Abbie, Francis Bennett, Lcander II. Bar- 
ton, Myron Barton, Russell Bailey, Lo- 
renzo D. Baker, Francis Cossairt, Henry 
Cossairt, Samuel Castcel, William Casteel, 
Caspar Denhart, Joseph L. Dugan, John F. 
Garrison, G. W. Garrison, William H. 
Glendenning, Joseph C. Gilliland, Jasper 
Hagans, Thomas V. Hustin, William H. 
Irvins, Samuel R. Jacoba, Gustavus Kind- 
blade, John Marshall, Nathan B. Maudlin, 
John N. Moulton, James M. Millsap, 
William H. Nobles, Bernard Preston, 
Henry Platner, John W. B.Parker, Charles 
W. Powers, Thomas Phillips, Preston Run- 
yan, Joseph B. Russell, Elias W. Russell, 
Alexander Rogers, Ferdinand B. Soles, 
Daniel B. Smith, William Smith, Robert 
Shields, George Trask, Hilery M. Thomp- 
son, Charles H. Warlord, Elijah Walden 
and Standbury Wright, Jr. 

There afterward enlisted in this com- 
pany from this county George W. Cos- 
sairt, John W. Johnson, Edwin D. Page, 
William Rile}', Esuc L. Soles, Theodore 
P. Trusk and Isaac Hcnsley. 

Edmund W. Rice was the first Captain 
of the company ; Lovena Hopkins, First 
Lieutenant, and Randolph Sry, Second 
Lieutenant. Captain Rice resigned Sep- 
tember 5, 1S61, and Lieutenant Hopkins 
succeeded him, while Lieutenant Sry was 
promoted to Hopkins' rank, and Sergeant 
Ellis C. Miller became Second Lieutenant. 
Sry subsequently became Captain, and 
Francis Bennett, First Lieutenant. 

The Fourth Infantry became one of the 



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HISTORT OF RIXGGOLD COUNTT. 



most famous Iowa regiments in the service. 
It was made up of volunteers from South- 
ern Iowa — one company from Mills Coun- 
ty, one from Pottawatomie and adjoining 
counties, one from Guthrie, one from 
Decatur, one from Polk, one from Madi- 
son, one from Ring-gold, one from Wayne, 
one from Page and Taylor counties, and 
one from Union, Cass and Adams coun- 
ties. 

The Fourth Infantry left the State of 
Iowa, August 9, 1 36 1, went immediately 
to Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, and staid 
there until August 24, when it went to 
Rolla, Missouri. The regiment left Rolla 
January 22, 1862, with the Army of the 
Southwest, and was continually on the 
march, save now and then a few days, un- 
til its arrival at Helena, Arkansas, July 14, 
1862. The regiment fought at Chickasaw 
Bayou on the 28th and 29th of December, 
then embarked and went up the Arkansas 
River, and fought at Arkansas Post on the 
10th and nth of January, 1863; then re- 
turned to the front of Vicksburg, landing 
at Young's Point, January 22, 1S63. April 2 
the regiment embarked, and went 150 miles 
up the Mississippi River to Greenville, 
whence it went on the celebrated raid in 
the Deer Creek Valley, returning again by 
the river to Milliken's Bend, from whence 
it started on the active campaign against 
Vicksburg, on the 2d of May, via Rich- 
mond, Louisiana, and Grand Gulf, Missis- 
sippi, to Jackson, where two days were 
spent in tearing up the railroad. Thence 
the Fourth moved on Vicksburg, arriving 
on the 8th, and commencing the memorable 
siege of that stronghold. 

July 4 the regiment again started to 
Jackson, and there participated in what is 
known as the battle of Jackson. Return- 
ing, it went into camp on the 29th of July, 
on Black River, fourteen miles in rear of 
Vicksburg. The regiment lay in camp at 
this place until September 22, when it em- 



barked on steamer and went to Memphis, 
where it landed and immediately set out 
on the campaign to Northern Georgia, via 
Corinth, Tuscumbia, Eastport, Iuka, and 
intermediate points to Chattanooga, where 
it arrived, after a long, weary march, on 
the 23d of November. It participated in 
the battle of Lookout Mountain on the 
24th, and in the battle of Missionary Ridge 
on the 25th, and again in the battle of 
Ringgold, on the 27th. 

December 3 the regiment went into 
camp at Bridgeport, Alabama, and moved 
from thence to Woodville, where it re- 
mained in camp until February 26, when 
it started home on veteran furlough. In 
April the regiment again left Iowa to re- 
turn to the field; staid at Nashville a few 
days to get an outfit, and then started on 
the campaign against Atlanta, and only 
halted in line of battle until its arrival at 
East Point, Georgia, September 7. 1S64, 
From this time on the Fourth was with 
Sherman's army in its memorable cam- 
paign before Atlanta, through Georgia and 
the Carolinas, and the final review in 
Washington. It was mustered out of serv- 
ice at Louisville, Kentucky, July 24, 1S65, 
and paid, and disbanded at Davenport. 

A few weeks before this, however, 
Colonel Williamson was made a Brigadier- 
General; and from an eloquent farewell 
address, made to his fellow soldiers in the 
Fourth, the following extract is taken: 

" In taking leave of you, I deem it but 
right to brief! 3^ allude to our past associa- 
tion as soldiers. Four years ago we left 
our homes and loved ones to fight for the 
Union cause. Then we numbered 1,000 
men. We were undisciplined and knew 
nothing of war, but we did know that our 
countr}' needed our services, and that was 
enough. Since then we have had more 
than 300 added to our ranks. To-day our 
whole number is less than 400. Where are 
the 1, coo of our missing companions"' Most 



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THE CIVIL WAR. 



of them have fallen on the battle-fields from 
Pea Ridge to Columbia. Some have been 
discharged on account of wounds received 
in battle; but the saddest thing of all re- 
mains to be told — some were starved to 
death in Southern prison pens. An enemy I 
claiming to be chivalrous and brave com- 
mitted the dark, damnable deed of starving 
our brave men to death ! God alone can 
avenge these ' murders most foul.' To us 
the work is not fully given. Human means 
are inadequate. You, the survivors of our 
glorious old regiment, will, I hope, very 
soon be permitted to go home and enter 
again upon the duties and assume the 
responsibilities of citizens of the Republic, 
and of yours, the young State of Iowa, for 
which you have helped to make so glorious 
a name during the war. 

" It need not be said to men like )'ou — 
who have fought on more than thirty dif- 
ferent battle-fields ; who, under Curtis won 
immortal honors at Pea Ridge, and made 
the memorable march through Missouri 
and Arkansas in mid-summer; who were 
ordered by General Grant to inscribe 
' First at Chickasaw Bayou ' on your ban- 
ners ; who were under Sherman at Chicka- 
saw Bayou and Arkansas Post ; who were 
under Grant through the entire campaign 
of Vicksburg, including Brandon ; who 
marched from Vicksburg to Chattanooga 
under Sherman; who fought with Hooker 
above the clouds at Lookout Mountain, 
and were with him at Missionary Ridge 
and Ringgold ; who were under Sherman 
through the entire Atlanta campaign, and 
participated in every battle, and who again, 
under your great leader, made the famous 
' march to the ocean,' and thence to Wash- 
ington — to be good citizens. 

" Whatever may be said to the contrary, 
none can appreciate peace and civil gov- 
ernment better than those who have so 
freely offered lives in war to secure these 
blcssiiicfs." 



TWENTY-THIRD MISSOURI INFANTRY. 

In October, 1S61, the following enlisted 
from Ringgold County in the Twenty-third 
Missouri Infantry: William M. Johnson, 
Thomas J. Cullison, James Johnson, 
Richard H. Alderson, Samuel P. Cullison, 
J. W. Crawford, Preston Crawford, Robert 
Hedges, Robert Johnson, Elias Kesler, 
William T. Martin, William Snecd, Abra- 
ham F. Walter, Andrew F. Walter, Peter 
F. Walter and Henry M. Whittier. 

FOURTH CAVALRY, MISSOURI STATE MILITIA. 

In February, 1S6.?, there enlisted in the 
Fourth Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, the 
following Ringgold men: Franklin For- 
rester, James Hankins, Thomas Edmond, 
John L. Cavett, Thomas Drake, Robert 
H. Drake, Henry Foster, James W. Glen- 
denning and Francis M. Simpson. 

TWENTY-NINTH IOWA INFANTRY. 

August 9, 18G2, Company G, Twenty- 
ninth Iowa Infantry was organized, though 
it was not mustered in until November iS, 
following. It was composed, with six 
exceptions, entirely of Ringgold volunteers. 
The following was the roster: Alexander 
Z. Huggins, Andrew Johnston, John Mc- 
Farland, Isaac W. Keller, Charles W. Dake, 
John McGaughey, Henry C.Grim, Thomas 
J. Carman, George J. Nulph, Daniel W. 
Poor, Solomon B. Lesan, William E. Ben- 
nett, John D. Carter, George Mathews, 
William L. Carlile, John M. Poor, Thomas 
B. Poor, Noah Addington, James H. Arm- 
strong, Sylvester H. Addington, Peter 
Agler, Davenson Amarine, Robert M. Arm- 
strong, Hezckiah R. Armstrong. Parks Brit- 
tain, Charles Barton, William H. Bradley, 
Dempscy Brown, Jesse T. Bennett, Daniel 
L. Barker, Samuel II. Cling, David Cooper, 
James Conley, John Casteel, Joseph Craw- 
ford, William Casner, Jacob Davis, Walter 
Dunning, Daniel Dodge, Benjamin F. Day, 



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Henry Edinger, John B. Fishback, Henry 
Fraizer, James Fraizer, Hcman C. Gray, 
Ariel Gleason, Benager Gustin, Bird Ha- 
gans, James W. Huff, John W. Huff, Elon 
I. Imus, Andrew J. Imus, Aaron S. Jones, 
Chaney L. Jones, Andrew R.Jordan, Alma 
Kent, Amos R. Long, William R. Moler, 
Elihu G. Martin, James Money, General 
S. Moore, John A. Miller, Miles D. Money, 
William A. Millsap, Samuel C. Nash, John 
E. Nulph, Thomas J. Nickles, William 
Nickles, Samuel Oliver, Russell Pealer, 
Aquilla D. Powers, John M. Parker, Alvan 
M. Poor, James II. Quinn, Thomas Ross, 
Jr., Charles Russell, Isaac Runyan, William 
Smith, Charles B. Sheldon, David D. Shep- 
ard, Robert W. M. Shafer, John Stoops, 
George W. Smith, Thomas W. Smith, John 
W. Smith, George C. Thompson, John B. 
Thompson, Daniel Turner, William D. 
Thrift, James W. Vandivere, James Walden, 
James H. Walker, Nathaniel P. Wright and 
William White. 

There afterward enlisted in this company 
Jonathan C. Baker, Freeman W. Nash, 
Adam Been, Isaac Brown, William H. 
Chance, Andrew Hines, Samuel Jemison, 
Daniel R. Jones, Isaac Marshall, Henry H. 
Parsons, J. L. Terwilliger, Samuel Adam- 
son, William Coons, Sylvester Conic}', Ezra 
Conley, Rienza Conley, Samuel Coombs, 
Elijah Campbell, John H. Damon, Samuel j 
Eaton, Nathan Fraizer, Abraham Jenkins, 
James W. Olvey, Vance Wilson and Pierce 
J. Wisdom. 

Alexander Z. Huggins was the first Cap- 
tain of the company; Andrew Johnston 
was First Lieutenant, and John McFarland 
Second Lieutenant. Johnston was after- 
ward promoted to Captain, McFarland be- 
came First Lieutenant, and Isaac W. Keller 
was made Second Lieutenant. 

The Twenty-ninth Iowa Infantry was or- 
ganized at Council Bluffs, and was com- 
posed of men residing on the Missouri 
slope. Colonel Thomas II. Benton, Jr., was 



its commanding officer. He received his 
commission as Colonel on the ioth day of 
August, 1862, and nearly all the men were 
enlisted, and the companies organized be- 
fore the 1st of October; but owing to the 
distance of the rendezvous from railroad 
communication, the regiment was not mus- 
tered into the United States service until 
December 1, 1S62. R. F. Patterson, Adju- 
tant of the Fifth Iowa Infantry, was 
appointed Lieutenant-Colonel ; C. B. Shoe- 
maker, of Page County, Major; Joseph 
Lyman, Corporal Company E, Fourth Iowa 
Cavalry, Adjutant ; W. W. Wilson, of Pot- 
tawattamie County, Quartermaster; W. S. 
Grimes, Assistant Surgeon Fourth Iowa 
Infantry, Surgeon ; N. L. Nicholson, of 
Webster County, and David F. Aiken, of 
Mills Count} 7 , Assistant Surgeons; and the 
Rev. J. M. Conrad, Chaplain. 

It had been intended that this regiment 
should form part of the command, which, 
under General W. T. Sherman, made the 
assault upon the w r orks at Vicksburg, in 
December, 1862 ; but before it was mustered 
into the United States service, the naviga- 
tion of the Missouri River was closed, and 
this object was abandoned. The regiment 
marched by detachments, between the 5th 
and 9th of December, 1862, to St. Joseph, 
Missouri, and reported by telegraph to 
Major-General S. R. Curtis, commanding 
Department of Missouri. Thence it pro- 
ceeded by rail to St. Louis, and entered 
Benton Barracks on the 20th of December, 
900 strong, all in good health and spirits. 
The next day the regiment went to Scho- 
field Barracks, in the city, and was assigned 
to the duty of guarding the various mili- 
tary prisons. It remained here but a few 
days. 

On Christmas day it embarked under 
orders to proceed to Helena, Arkansas, re- 
porting for temporary duty at Columbus, 
Kentucky, which place was at that time 
threatened with an attack. Lieutenant- 



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THE CIVJL WAR. 



Colonel Patterson now assumed command, 
Colonel Benton remaining at St. Louis, for 
the purpose of transacting certain business 
connected with the regiment. 

Arriving at Columbus, it was assigned to 
the right wing, under Brigadier-General J. 
M. Tuttle. On the Sth of January, it pro- 
ceeded on its way to Helena, having been 
assigned to a brigade commanded by Briga- 
dier-General C. B. Fisk. The command 
did not disembark at Helena, but immedi- 
ately received orders to join an expedition 
then organized by General Gorman to go 
up White River. This expedition resulted 
in no good to anybody, but on the con- 
trary, was the cause of much suffering to 
the troops. 

When the regiment returned to Helena, 
on the 26th of January, it had been 1S0 
miles up the White River to Du Vall's 
Bluff and back, without disembarking. In 
the meantime, it had been attacked with 
the measles, and had over 400 men on the 
sick list. Asa consequence of the exposure 
upon this trip, the regiment lost no less 
than 200 men. From this time forward, 
however, the health of the regiment was 
uniformly good. 

The Twenty-ninth formed part of the 
memorable expedition through the Yazoo 
Pass, and Cold Water and Tallahatchie 
rivers, to Fort Pemberton, at the head of 
Yazoo River, in March and April, 1863.' It 
embarked at Helena on the steamer, Emma 
No. 2, but on reaching the Cold Water 
River, the vessel was found to be so badly 
injured as. to render it necessary to aban- 
don her, and the regiment was transferred 
to the Key West, on which vessel it made 
the voyage to the fort and back to Helena. 

From this time until the Little Rock 
expedition, it remained at Helena, perform- 
ing ordinary garrison duty, except when 
absent on scouts. 

ft bore a glorious part in the battle of 
Helena, Arkansas, on the anniversary of 



our national independence, whipping an 
entire brigade, and capturing many prison- 
ers. General Samuel A. Rice, in his report 
of this battle, gives high praise to the 
Twenty-ninth Iowa for its part in this en- 
gagement, mentioning especially Colonel 
Benton, Lieutenant-Colonel Patterson and 
Major Shoemaker. The regiment lost in 
this engagement thirty -one killed and 
wounded. 

Between the 1 ith of August and the 10th 
of September of this year, the army, under 
command of General Steele, marched from 
Helena to Little Rock. The weather was 
excessively hot and dry. The command 
halted one week at Clarendon, at which 
point the White River was crossed. Thence 
the route lay up that stream as far as Du 
Vall's Bluff, at the crossing of the Mem- 
phis & Little Rock Railroad, where a depot 
of supplies and a hospital were estab- 
lished. 

The Twenty-ninth was attached to a divi- 
sion, commanded by General Samuel A. 
Rice, the brigade being under command of 
Colonel Benton. There was nothing worthy 
of note between Du Vall's Bluff and Browns- 
ville, except the exceeding difficulty of the 
march. Almost the entire way is occupied 
by Grand Prairie, which is entirely destitute 
of water. Each man carried a supply in his 
I canteen. Many were sun-struck on the 
i march, and it was impossible to get all the 
j sick into the ambulances. The ambulances 
! would be loaded up and drive ahead of the 
1 column as far as it was safe to go, leave 
their burdens by the road-side and return 
I for others. In this way those unable to 
: walk, were, by turns, conveyed in ambu- 
J lances, and left to suffer under a boiling 
sun for the greater portion of two d^v;. 
; During a halt of a few days at Brownsville, 
j General Rice's division made a rapid march 
! to Bayou Metoe, to cover a movement of 
General Davidson's cavalry in another di- 
; rection. Both commands, having- skir- 






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432 



msTonr or ringgold county 



mished with the enemy, soon returned to 
the main army. 

Price commanded at Little Rock and oc- 
cupied a strong position four miles from 
the city, his right being protected by the 
Arkansas River, and his left by an impen- 
etrable cypress swamp. General Steele 
determined to turn his position ; therefore, 
leaving the direct route, he struck the 
Arkansas River eight miles below Little 
Rock. Here a pontoon-bridge was thrown 
across the river, and on the morning of 
September 10, the cavalry division crossed 
to the south side, and moved rapidly on the 
enemy. The infantry continued its march 
up the north bank, momentarily expecting 
a general engagement. The enemy, how- 
ever, offered no resistance, except to the 
left wing, which was assisted by the artil- 
lery from the north bank. Davidson con- 
tinued his march with more or less resist- 
ance until evening, when he entered the 
city*, Price having retreated before an army 
vastly inferior to his own in numbers, in 
such haste as to leave the arsenal, etc., in a 
good state of preservation. The infantry 
remained on the north side of the river 
until the next day, when the army en- 
camped round the city. 

In November General Rice was sent out 
with the brigade to which the Twenty- 
ninth Iowa was attached, to endeavor to 
intercept Marmaduke, who had been re- 
pulsed in an attack upon Pine Bluff with 
heavy loss. The command marched as far 
as Rockport, on the Washita River, but did 
not succeed in overtaking the rebel trooper. 
This ended the active campaigning of the 
regiment for the year. 

It remained at Little Rock during the 
winter of iSG3-'4, and until General Steele's 
column moved to the Southwest, on the 
morning of March 23, 1864. The object of 
this expedition was to co-operate with 
Banks, who was moving up Red River. 

On the return of the army to Little Rock, 



. : 
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a reorganization was effected, and the 
Twenty-ninth was assigned to the First Bri- 
gade of the First Division. It was soon 
afterward transferred to the Second Bri- 
gade, Second Division, where it remained 
until the end of the year. 

The regiment remained at Little Rock 
nearly a year after the Camden campaign, 
exeep tabout one month (from the latter part 
of July to the latter part of August), when 
it was stationed at Lewisburg, on the Ar- 
kansas, fifty miles above Little Rock. In 
November, of the same year, it was ordered 
to move to Pine Bluff, Arkansas, but the 
order was countermanded, and the regi- 
ment was assigned to duty as City Guard 
of the post of Little Rock, which duty it 
continued to perform until its departure 
for other fields of operation. 

When General J. J. Reynolds assumed 
command of the Department of Arkansas 
there was another reorganization of the 
army. The Twenty-ninth was assigned to 
an organization known as the " Detached 
Brigade of the Seventh Army Corps," 
Brigadier-General E. A. Carr commanding. 
About the 1st of February, General Carr 
received orders to proceed to New Orleans, 
but owing to the want of transportation, 
this regiment did not march until the 9th. 

After a tedious voyage the regiment 
reached New Orleans, one wing, under 
command of Colonel Benton, on the 14th, 
and the other under Adjutant Lyman, two 
days after. The regiment was quartered 
in an old foundry at Algiers, opposite the 
" Crescent City." On the 20th the regi- 
ment moved by rail to Lakeport, on Lake 
Ponchartrain, and thence by steamer to 
Mobile Point, Alabama. The vessel ran 
aground in Grant's Pass, and the troops 
were transferred to another steamer. They 
were disembarked on the 23d, and without 
tents or baggage, went into bivouack on the 
sands at Navy- Cove, three miles in rear of 
Fort Morgan. 






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TUB CIVIL WAR. ..,„ 



The preparations for the Mobile cam- 
paign at once began. On the i;th of March 
the army began its toilsome and difficult 
march on Mobile. On the 25th it found 
itself under the guns of Spanish Fort, and 
at once began the investment of that forti- 
fication. It is unnecessary to say more, 
than that in this campaign, both on the 
march and during the siege, the Twenty- 
ninth bore its full part, and in no un- 
diminished the unsurpassed reputation of 
the Iowa soldiery. Its loss during the cam- 
paign was twenty-two men. 

After the capture of Spanish Fort, which 
took place on the 9th of April, the regi- 
ment marched to the assistance of General 
Steele, who was investing Fort Blakely, 
another of the defenses of Mobile, five miles 
above Spanish Fort. The command arrived 
just in time to witness one of the most brill- 
iant and successful charges of the war, the 
assault of General Steele's command on the 
works at Fort Blakely, on the evening of 
Sunday, April g, 1S65. 

On the 1 2th the regiment entered Mobile, 
and the next day marched witli the division 
to which' it was attached under orders to 
proceed to Mount Vernon arsenal, on the 
Tombigbee River, forty miles above Mo- 
bile. On its way thither it had a lively 
skirmish with the enemy, the last in which 
the. regiment was engaged, and among the 
last of the war. 

On the 22d Colonel Benton assumed com- 
mand of the arsenal, his regiment forming 
the garrison. On the retreat of the rebel 
forces much of the property belonging to 
the Government had been destroyed, and 
much more carried away by the neighbor- 
ing inhabitants. Hence the arsenal, once 
one of the most pleasant and beautiful 
pieces of property owned by the Govern- 
ment, was found by Colonel Benton in a 
dilapidated condition. He immediately set 
to work to renovate it, as far as possible, 
and succeeded in restoring it to much of its 



former beauty. The regiment returned to 
Mobile on the 12th of May. 

On the 1st of June part of the regiment 
sailed for Texas, and arrived at Brazos 
Santiago on the 9th, where the rest of the 
command joined it in a few davs. 

\\ hen General Sheridan assumed com- 
mand of the Military Division of the Gulf, 
he directed the immediate muster-out of 
the Twenty-ninth Iowa. Consequently the 
regiment sailed for New Orleans in the 
latter part of July, and on the 10th of the 
following month was honorably discharged 
from the service, and ordered to Davenport, 
Iowa, for final payment and disbandment. 
It arrived at Davenport on the 19th, and 
then numbered 765, officers and enlisted 
men. Of these only 415 were originally 
attached to the Twenty-ninth. The re- 
mainder were recruits of the Nineteenth, 
Twentieth and Twenty-third I'owa regi- 
ments, which had been assigned to Colonel 
Benton's command a few weeks previous, 
when these regiments returned home for 
disbandment. On the 25th of August, 1S65, 
the Twenty-ninth was disbanded, and its 
members dispersed to their several homes 
in the Far West. 

The regiment was unfortunate in being 
kept so long in the Department of the 
v\rkansas, away from the more brilliant 
fields of action. It was one of the best 
disciplined regiments in the army, never 
shrank from any duty required of it, and 
only needed the opportunity to make a 
record equal to that of any Iowa regiment. 
The Twenty-ninth never tarnished the fame 
of Iowa ti oops. 

Colonel Benton was a brave, high-minded, 
and intelligent officer, and exerted a fine 
influence over the men of his command. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Patterson had few su- 
periors as a commander among the field 
officers of the army. In the opinion of the 
writer, one star at least, should have hon- 
ored his shoulder. That he drilled and 



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II1STORT OF lilNGGOLD COUXTV. 



disciplined the regiment to a high degree 
of efficiency is evidenced by the favorable 
reports of various inspectors. The staff 
and line officers labored zealously to pro- 
mote the efficiency of the command, and 
there was ever a ready and cheerful sub- 
mission to' discipline on the part of the 
entire regiment, hence, at Helena, Terre 
Noire, Elkin's Ford, Prairie d'Anne, Cam- 
den, Jenkins' Ferry, Mobile and on every 
other occasion where it had been called 
upon to meet the enemy, it responded with 
a degree of alacrity, soldierly skill and 
courage unsurpassed by the troops of any 
of the armies that have borne a pail in the 
great struggle for the Union. 

SOUTHERN BORDER BRIGADE. 

The General Assembly, at the extra ses- 
sion of 1862, with almost entire unanimity 
directed the organization of the Northern 
and Southern border brigades. The for- 
mer, numbering 250, was a precaution 
against Indian disturbances, and the latter, 
numbering 794, was raised to protect the 
State from incursions from lawless citizens 
of Missouri. Company C, Third Battalion, 
was a Ringgold Count}- organization, 
Nathan Miller being Captain, and Harvey 
Waugh, First Lieutenant. Ten men were 
kept on duty patrolling the southern bor 



John Mordecai, Henry C. Andrews, Will- 
iam R. Abarr, John Bear, James A. Benson, 
John Boyer, Elijah Conley, William Con- 
lev, John C. Hunter, Orlando Kirkham, 
Rodolphus Kirkham, Benjamin Keller, G. 
M. D. Morrison, William A. McMullen, 
Giles J. Nobles, B. F. Ruby, Addison S. 
Ruby, Thomas Shey, T. P. Trask, Corne- 
lius B. Trask, Jesse H. Thompson, Benja- 
min A. Wiley and Peter Weeks. 

The Eighth Cavalry was organized at 
Davenport, and October 17, 1863, left the 
State by railroad for Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee, to report to Major-General Rose- 
crans. Before reaching there, however, 
Major-General Thomas had succeeded 
Rosecrans, and the regiment was assigned 
to duty on the Nashville & Northwestern 
Railroad. For some time it was busied in 
clearing that region of the guerrillas under 
Colonel Hawkins, in which it met with 
gratif}dng success. During the first part 
of 1864 the Eighth Cavalry was engaged in 
the usual duties of cavalry organizations — 
in scattered guard duty, in minor raids, and 
in police duty. During the summer and 
autumn, however, it joined in the extensive 
operations around Atlanta, in which it saw 
about as hard and continuous service as 
fell to the lot of any command in the same 
time. Besides skirmishes, it took part in 
der oi the county, and these were relieved j fifteen engagements, the casualties amount- 
every ten days. This was kept up for three ing to 16S, not including over 200 men and 
months. No disturbances worthy of rec- j officers taken prisoners. Similar duty oc- 



ord occurred. Many of the membersafter- 
ward entered the active military service. 

EIGHTH IOWA CAVALRY. 

This regiment was raised in Southern 
Iowa in the summer of 1S63. and Company 
D included the following from Ringgold 
County : Lovena Hopkins (formerly First 
Lieutenant and subsequently Captain of 
Company G, Fourth Infantry). John H. 
Huff, Thomas M. Gregory, William V. 
Culver, William S. Smith, RossMcKendree, 



cupied the regiment during the first half 
of 1865, and the Eighth was mustered out 
at Macon, Georgia, August 13, 1S65. 

FORTY-SIXTH IOWA INFANTRY. 

This was a ioo-days regiment, raised 
in May, 1864. Company E, which was 
made up principally of Linn County vol- 
unteers, contained the following from 
Ringgold : 

William Calvin, Benjamin H. Rush, 
William White, George W. Myers, Will- 



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THE CIVIL WAR. 



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iam Q. Lucas, James Andrews, Adam 
Beal, Ira M. Cooper,' Henry F. Jacob}-, 
William T. Laughlin, Joseph F. Ledger- 
wood, Samuel McFarlancI, Samuel McCord, 
James B. Nobles. Christopher Platner, 
Valentine G. Ruby, Joseph II. Ruby, 
Isaiah Skinner, John Schlapia, David 
Thompson and Joseph Whitmer. 

The following history of the Forty-sixth 
is from the pen of its Colonel, D. B. Hen- 
derson, now a member of Congress from 
Iowa : 

"The Forty-Sixth Iowa Infantry was or- 
ganized at Davenport, Iowa, and mustered 
into the United States service on the ioth 
day of June, 1S64, to serve for the term of 
one hundred days. 

"On the nth of June, the regiment was 
armed and clothed, and on the 14th we 
took the cars for Cairo, Illinois, at which 
place we arrived on the 15th. Immediate- 
ly upon my arrival in Cairo, I dispatched 
a letter to Major-General Washburn, com- 
manding at Memphis, and on the morning 
of the 17th of June, I received orders from 
General Washburn to report with 1113- regi- 
ment at Memphis. 

" On the evening of the 17th of June, I 
embarked the regiment upon the John D. 
Perry, and arrived in Memphis on the 
morning of the 20th, when I was ordered 
into camp two miles cast of the city. We 
remained in camp at Memphis until the 27th, 
performing heavy picket duty during that 
time. On the morning of the 27th of June, I 
was ordered to move my regiment to Col- 
liersville, Tennessee, take command of that 
post, and throw out detachments east and 
west on the railroad, and was also ordered 
to guard the railroad against the interfer- 
ence of the rebels who had recently been 
firing upon the trains in the vicinity of 
Colliersville. 

"On the 28th ol June. I sent Lieutenant- 
Colonel L. D. Durbin, with two compa- 
nies—A and I, Captains Guilbert and Wolf, 



to Camp Look Out. a post three miles west 
of Colliersville, and situated 'on the Mem- 
phis & Charleston Railroad. On the same 
day, Major George L. Torbert, with Com- 
panies E and K. Captains Harrison and 
Palmer, moved to Camp Henderson, two 
and a half miles east o! Colliersville. Both 
of these detachments performed their 
duties faithfully, and not another train was 
disturbed while they guarded these posts. 
While the regiment was stationed at Col- 
liersville and outposts, the men performed 
very heavy picket duty, being upon guard 
each alternate day. ! partly compensated 
the men for this by inaugurating a gener- 
ous system of foraging. 

" The enemy did not disturb us but once 
during the two months that we were 
stationed at Colliersville. The event that 
1 allude to occurred about the middle of 
August. Lieutenant-Colonel Durbin was 
informed that a band of guerrillas had cap- 
tured two men of the Sixth Illinois Cav- 
alry near his camp. He promptly sent out 
Captain Wolf with sixteen men. to relieve 
the prisoners if possible. When about a 
mile from camp, the party was tired upon 
by some thirty guerrillas lying in ambus- 
cade, and Captain Wolf and three of his 
men were brought down at the first volley, 
the Captain and one man serious- 
ly wounded ; the others slightly. The 
men returned the fire, killing one and 
wounding three of the rebels. The Cap- 
tain having been shot and supposed to be 
killed, and being outnumbered two to one 
the men retreated to camp. 

" On the 1st of September we were or- 
dered to Memphis, where we remained un- 
til the ioth, when we were ordered to 
embark on the Golden Era for Cairo, at 
which place we arrived on the 14th of 
September. Taking the cars the same 
day, we started for Davenport, Iowa. 

•• On the evening of the iGlh of Septem- 
ber we reached Davenport, at which place 



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HISTOnr OF RINGGOLD COUNTT. 



we were mustered out and paid off, <>n the 
23d of September. 1 

THE VETERANS. 

For four years and more the notes of 
the fife and drum and bugle and the tramp 
of armed hosts were continuallv 'near!, 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific, from the 
Gulf of Mexico to British North America, 
and the clash of arms was borne north- 
ward on every breeze from the sunny but 
blood-drenched plains of the south. For 
four years and more " grim- visage d war" 
had waved its crimson banners over the 
fair fabric the fathers had erected, in a 
vain endeavor to hurl it from its founda- 
tions. In this terrible and gigantic 
struggle, Ringgold County had borne its 
full part, and many a brave volunteer 
from its beautiful prairies had lain down 
his life on the battle-field, or starved to 
death in the rebel slaughter pens of Ander- 
sonville and Macon. 

But now Sherman and his " brave boys 
in blue" had made their memorable and 
historic march to the sea, Lee had sur- 
rendered to the victorious Army of the 
Union under Grant, the war was ended, 
peace restored, the Union preserved in its 
integrity, and the patriotic sons of Ring- 
gold County who were spared to witness 
the. final victory of the armies of the Union 
returned to their homes to receive grand 
ovations and tributes of honor from friends 
and neighbors who had eagerly and jeal- 
ously and anxiously watched and followed 
them wherever the varying fortunes of war 
had called them. 



Exchanging their soldiers' uniforms for 
j citizens' dress, most of them fell back to 
I their old vocations, on the farm, in the 
1 mines, at the forge, the bench, in the shop, 
; in the office, or at whatever else their hands 
found to do. Their noble deeds in the 
j hour of their country's peril are now, and 
1 always will be, dear to the hearts of the 
I people whom they so faithfully served. 
j Brave men are always honored, and no 
! class of citizens are entitled to greater re- 
i spect than the brave volunteers of Ring- 
I gold County, not simply because they were 
j soldiers, but because, in their association 
I with their fellow men, their walk is upright, 
; and their character and honesty without 
j reproach. 

"Their country first, their glorv and their pride; 
Land of their hopes — land where their fathers died; 
When in the right, they'll keep their honor bright; 
When in the wrong, they'll die to set it right.'' 

The wondrous deeds of daring and 
glorious achievements of the Army of the 
j Union during the war of the Rebellion 
; will always be cherished by all patriotic 
j hearts. But there are scenes, incidents and 
; accidents the memory of which will shade 
with sadness the bright reflections engen- 
1 dered by the contemplation of a heroism, 
devotion and sacrifice the like of which 
I the world never saw before. But the 
1 memory of those who fell in the stupen- 
; dous struggle is stili familiar to the present 
I le of Ringgold County; and fifty years 
hence, when the fathers and mothers of to- 
day shall have passed on to their eternal 
i home, they will be remembered by poster- 
; ity more as matters of tradition than asab- 
I solute written history. 



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tr^"? 'v^lTH the exception of 

• \ ■ ' ■*>- , the public schools, 

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- . ' ■ , there is no agency 

y . ; 1v .; /' ;/""■" so educational as the 

i:-. \ ': : ' ''■-•' (P local press. Journal- 
£ • ' ■ ' ,.-j. ;sm itself has passed 

/ I V \\ through several 

stages of development, and has but 
recently found its true position. A 
paper of the style of those publish- 
ed thirty years ago would now 
have but few admirers. Local 
news was then not thought worthy 
of being printed, and the county 
press, was filled with learned dis- 
quisitions on national politics and foreign 
wars. Now these things are wisely left to 
the more widely circulated city papers, 
which are by fast mail trains distributed 
throughout the West on the same day with 
their publication. Ringgold County takes 
many hundred papers each week from Chi- 
cago, DesMoines, St. Joseph and other 
cities, and also supports four weekly papers 
of its own. These are all edited with more 
than average ability, and all have a good 
circulation. 

The first newspaper published in the 
county was the 

MOUNT AYR REPUBLICAN, 

which was established in the spring of 



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1861, by P. O. J: 



is publisher, 



and 



George Burton as editor. It was continued 
only about six months, when both publisher 
and editor entered the military service, the 
former as a private ; the latter as a Captain. 
Ringgold County was then without a 
local paper until April, 1865, when the 

RINGGOLD RECORD 

was established, with Warren R. Turk as 
publisher, and Ith S. Beall as editor. They 
were succeeded about the first of June, 
1866, bv George H. Roby, as editor and 
publisher, by whom it was sold to D. D. 
Pratt, in June, 1S70. In 1876 it was bought 
bv George R. Stephens, the present owner 
and editor. The Record is a newsy, enter- 
prising Republican sheet of four pages, 
eight columns to the page, published 
weekly, and enjoys a prosperous and 
liberal patronage. It is published on Thurs- 
days. 

THE MOUNT AYR JOURNAL 

was founded in 1873, by C. C. Bartruff, 
from Creston. This was the first attempt 
at Democratic journalism in Ringgold 
County. Bartruff published the paper for 
ten years, changing its name to the Free 
Press, in the meantime. In 18S3 the office- 
passed into the hands of J. W. Burly, who 
restored the former name. In November, 
1S85, J. S. Shepherd, the present proprie- 
tor and editor took charge. The Journal 



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HISTOR2" OF RIXCOOLD COVNTr. 



is published on Thursdays, and is a paper 
of considerable influence, being the organ 
of the Democracy of Ringgold County. 

THE HEADLIGHT 

was established in 1S77 by a stock com- 
pany, and published for a year or so, 
chiefly to arouse interest in the north and 
south narrow-gauge railroad which was 
then proposed. The Headlight was suc- 
ceeded by 

ONWARD, 

in 187S, and this paper was published for 
seven years, as a Republican sheet. It 
changed hands very often, and died in De- 
cember, 1SS4. 

THE RINGGOLD COUNTY REPUBLICAN 

was established July 16, 1SS5, by Messrs. 
Wisdom & Williams. The former retired 
at the close of the first volume, and Rev. 
J. II. Tedford became a partner. The firm 
is now Williams & Tedford. The Republi- 
can has a good following among the people 
of Ringgold and adjoining counties. It is 
an eight-column folio, published on Thurs- 
days, at $1.00 per year. 

THE KELLERTON MEN ["OR 

was established in 1 SS 1 , by Kendall Broth- 
ers, as a Republican paper, six-column 
folio in size. In 1SS2, George R, Stephens, 
of the Ringgold County Record, became pro- 
prietor, and a year later he suspended its 
publication. Soon after, B. W . and F. W. 
Richards came here from Lucas. Lucas 
County, and started the 

KELLERTON INDEPENDENT. 

This was independent in politics, and 
lived nearly two years before going the 
way of its predecessor. Kellerton is now 
without a paper. 

THE REDDING REPOR1 1 !. 

was the first journalistic venture at the vil- 
lage of Redding. F. M. Wisdom was the 



editor and owner, and 1SS5 the date. In a 
j few months the Reporter was discontinued. 
: In December of the same year Burrell & 

I Noble issued the first number of the 

REDDING INDEPENDENT. 

S: G. Burrell was afterward sole pro- 
I prietor, and Clayburg Brothers were the 
owners when publication was sus- 
' peuded, in the summer of 1SS6. The Inde- 
1 pendent was true to its name, in politics, 
i and was published on Thursdays, at the 
I rate of Si. 50 per year. The 

TINGI.EV TIMES 

was started by J. Gettinger, in 1SS2. He 
j sold to L. O. McKinley, and he to Ray 
1 Brothers. In the meantime the name was 

changed to the 

NEWS. 

j Then one Noah became owner, and moved 
! the office to Wirt. Tinglev was then with- 
out a paper until Jul}-, 18S5, when the 

BATTLE ANE 

I 

i was swung over the heads of the inhabi- 
tants, by E. B. Garretson, of Lenox. The 
Axe ceased to swing in December follow- 
big- J. J- Clark, of Gravity, published the 

INDEPENDENT 

for six months, in 1886, and then this paper 
went the way of its predecessors. The In- 
dependent was a six-column paper, Si. 50 per 
year, and was a valuable factor in the busi- 
ness of the place. Mr. Noah, above men- 
tioned, issued the 

WIRT WASP 

regularly for six months, and then went to 
Nebraska. He sold to John Abrams, who 
changed the name to the 

NEWS. 

This afterward passed into the hands of 
John Thrall, who suspended publication in 
1884, and Wirt now depends upon Chicago 
for its news. 



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THE BAR. 



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->.;>.,■/_. SHEbiograph.es. 
'Kf^S^&—'-i' » P resen * members 




of the 
present memoersof the 

bar are given in the 
biographical portion of 
this work, and in this 
pT place it is only de- 
signed to mention 
them, and also those attor- 
neys who have died or re- 
moved. Most of these, of 
course, were residents of 

MOUNT AYR. 

Thomas M. Bowen came 



A- ■ W,^&- to this point in 1S57, from 



^w *w? Cor v don, and remaine 
^■'& about three years. Thoug 



ed 

h 

married, he was quite a young man. Cory- 
don was his first location as a lawyer. He 
was recognized as a shrewd man, and in 
some degree gave promise of the reputa- 
tion for the "scheming" ability that he 
now possesses. He went from hereto Ne- 
braska. There he entered the volunteer 
arm}', in which he became a Brigadier- 
General. After the war he located at Lit- 
tle Rock, Arkansas, where he became a 
supreme judge. Thence he went to Col- 
orado, from which State he was elected to 
the United States Senate, in 1883. He is 
reputed to have made great wealth out oi 
silver. In politics he is a Republican. 



A man bv the name of Marsh came here 
from Ohio in 1858, and remained two 
years. He was taken sick, and returned 
to Ohio, where he died. 

John A. Miller came about the same 
time, from Indiana. He practiced until 
1S62, and then enlisted in Company G, 
Twenty-ninth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. 
He was killed at Terranoir Creek, Arkan- 
sas. In political inclination he was a Dem- 
ocrat. 

Ezra C. Miller, his brother, also came 
here in 1858. In June, 1S61, he enlisted in 
Company G, Fourth Iowa Volunteer In- 
fantry. He was promoted to First Lieu- 
tenant, and while holding that rank was 
killed at Chickasaw Bayou, near Vicks- 
burg, in 1863. In politics he was a Repub- 
lican. 

Isaac W. Keller came to the county in 
1855, but did not commence the practice of 
law for five years. He enlisted in 1862 
and served three years, attaining the rank 
of Second Lieutenant. He served as 
county judge one term before and one af- 
ter his military service. He was then 
elected Senator for one term of four years. 
From 1870 to 1873 he was engaged in farm- 
ing near Eugene, and in 1879 began another 
four-years' term as Senator. In 1884 he- 
was chosen justice of the peace, which of 
fice he now holds. With these numeroi 



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itrsrour or rtxggold couxrr. 



exceptions, he has practiced law since 1S60. 
He is a Republican. 

\V. T. Laughlin has now been in contin- 
uous practice for twenty-five years, at Mt. 
Ayr, and stands high in the profession. He 
was district attorney one term, but re- 
signed before the expiration of the same. 
He was a Republican until recently, and 
now is a Democrat. 

R. C. Henry located here after the war, 
and has been in continuous practice since, 
except three years, while district judge. 
Previous to this, he was for a time recorder, 
by appointment. He is at this writing 
candidate on the Republican ticket for dis- 
trict judge. 

Robert F. Askren has been in practice 
for eleven years. He has been county su- 
perintendent two terms, auditor one term, 
and is now Republican candidate for coun- 
ty attorney. 

John W. Warner came here from Leon 
about 1S70, and farmed and practiced law 
for two or three years. He then returned 
to Leon, and afterward moved to Coloardo. 

C. D. Morris came here from Decatur 
County, in 1872, and was engaged in the 
real-estate business and the practice of law 
until the summer of 1SS6, when he removed 
to Denver, Colorado. He was a Republi- 
can. 

Jacob F. Mount came from Indiana in 
1868, and after teaching school a year or 
two began the practice o! law, which he 
has since followed. He served one term on 
the Board of Supervisors, under the old 
system. He was at that time a Republi- 
can, but now votes the Democratic ticket. 

R. H. Spence took a course of law at the 
State University, and commenced practice 
with R. F. Askren. He was successivelv 
in partnership with Ezra C. McMasters, 
Isaac W. Keller and R. C. Henry, with 
whom he is now associated. 

Ezra C. McMasters read law with Ask- 
ren and Spence, and was admitted here. 



His business is principally loaning and note- 
brokering. 

M. A. Campbell read law with W. T. 
Laughlin, and has now been in practice ten 
years. John Scott, the present mayor of 
Mt. Ayr, has been 'in practice since 1876: 
J. W. Brockett since 1S79. and F. F. 
Leathers since 1SS0. 

OTHER VILLAGES. 

\V. K. Brown located at Kellerton in 
1SS0, and has been in practice since. He 
has been a resident of Ringgold County 
for seventeen years, and read law at Leon. 

George Spence was at Redding for two 
or three years, and in 1SS4 moved to Da- 
kota. 

J. E. Ray located at Tingley in iSS3,and 
practiced a year or so, then went to the 
western part of the State. 

L. O. McKinley, of Tingley, practices in 
justices' courts. 

THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 

The members of the profession of medi- 
cine who are now practicing are given 
full biographical mention in the main por- 
tion of this work, and in this chapter it is 
proposed to make some record of those who 
were once well known as physicians in 
Ringgold County, but are dead or living in 
other localities. The first phvsician of the 
county was Alexander McCartney, who 
lived three miles southwest of where Mt. 
Ayr is, as early as 1853. He farmed, and 
did what little doctoring was required by 
the sparsely-settled community of that 
period. 

MOUNT AYR. 

The first physician here was E. Keith, 
who came in 1S56. He was a good doctor. 
He was here ten years, and then removed 
to Mason County, Missouri, where he died. 

Dr. Pressley came 111 1 S57 or 1S5S, and 
left during the war. 



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Alexander Z. Huggins came to Mt. Ayr 
shorilv. before the war. He enlisted in the 
Twenty-ninth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, 
and became Captain of Company Or, His 

health failed him, however, and he resigned 
ami returned home, where he resumed 
his practice. He was a representative 
to the General Assembly, in 1864. In 1866 
he died. Dr. Kacklev was here a year and a 
half during the war, after which he settled 
in Missouri. Dr. Stephenson was here one 
year during the war. 

The oldest physician at Ml. Ayr is John 
T. Merrill, but he has retired from prac- 
tice. He located at Ringgold City, on the 
State line, ten miles south of Mt. Ayr, in 
1S56, and came to Mt. Ayr in 1S66, prac- 
ticing here until 1SS0. Much of his time, 
however, was given to banking. He is 
now a druggist. 

D. F. Seliards graduated at Rush Medi- 
cal College, in Chicago, in February, 1S66, 
having previously studied with Dr. Hug- 
gins, and then located permanently at Mt. 
Avr, where he practiced until his death, 
in 1879. He was a good physician. His 
widow and three sons live at Mt. Ayr. 

William Home, from Monmouth, Illinois, 
came to this place in February, 1S69, and 
has practiced continuously since. Bird 
Hagans, a son of Judge James C. Hagans, 
the first county judge, studied with Dr. 
Merrill, was admitted in 1871, and practiced 
a few years. He labored under the serious 
disadvantage of poor health, however, and 
died at Mt. Ayr. He had no diploma, 
having attended but one course of lectures. 
Had health permitted, he would have com- 
pleted his professional training and made a 
most useful member of the fraternity. I lis 
widow lives ten miles south of Mt. Ayr. 
J. \V. Campbell came to this place in the 
spring of 1S71, originally from Florida, but 
directly from Missouri. His family had 
preceded him here several years. He 
practiced with Dr. Home three years, spent 



one summer in Nebraska, returned, and 
with Dr. Home ran a drug store for three 
years. He then resumed the exclusive 
practice of his profession. . In the autumn 
of 1SS6 he removed to Ottumwa, intending 
to make a specialty of the eye. 

A physician named Calkins came from 
Illinois in the spring of 1S71 and practiced 
until his death, a few years later. A. J. 
Willey came here from Osceola in 1S72. 
He had been Surgeon of the Tenth Iowa 
Volunteer Infantry during the war. He 
practiced here until 18S2 since which date 
he has been in Nebraska. Frank Cornwall 
was here several years, and is now in San 
Francisco. J. II. White, C. B. White and 
S. Bailey have located at Mt. Ayr in the 
last few years, and are now in practice. 

AT OTHER PLACES. 

At Kellerton L. P. Thayer was the first 
physician. He remained three years and 
then went to Davis Count)-. Dr. Jewell 
was here one year and then went to Mis- 
souri. A. and M. Camp, brothers, have 
been here since 1SS0. R. Tripp was here 
several years anel is now in Jasper Count)'. 
W. L. Gleason has been here since 1S84. 

Thomas Kenworthy lived on the site of 
Redding before a village was proposed at 
that point. He moved to Oregon in 1881. 
H. C. Dukes was here a year and moved to 
Ciarke County. Dr. McLean was here a 
year and then moved to Missouri. The pres- 
ent practitioners are A. F. King, Thomas 
H. Humphrey and W, E. Lawhead. 

L. E. St. John was the first physician at 
Tinglcv. He remained two years and then 
went West. James Nichols and R. W. Sel- 
by are now in practice at this point. 

The first physician at Wirt was named 
Lloyd. He remained a year or so, and 
then went to Dakota. Rev. F. S. Lock 
came in 1882. and practices medicine and 
preaches the gospel. J. P. Maxwell is also 
in practice. He succeeded Lloyd. 



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442 



HJSTOlir OF RINGGOLD COUXTr. 






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NDER this not very 
specific heading will be 
treated the subjects of 
education, agriculture, 
public buildings, rail- 
roads and statistics of 
<ep population. 

EDUCATIONAL. 

The pioneers of Ringgold 
'V— County brought with them an 
S& abiding faith in free schools. 
Pe- Each settlement, as soon as pop- 
'..: ulous enough to support one, 
built a house and established a 
neighborhood school, and in time 
organized districts of suitable 
size. These were larger when the county 
was sparsely settled, but now are generally 
four square miles in size, the school-house 
being in the center, or at the corner of the 
fou j- sections. The public schools were 
under the supervision of the school-fund 
commissioners until 1858. which office was 
superseded under the new Constitution by 
thatof countv superintendent of schools. 

No college, academy, or select school has 
ever existed in the county, the school sys- 
tem consisting simply of the common dis- 
trict school in the country, and the graded 
school in the villages. 



The best idea of the progress that has 
been made, and the present condition ot the 
schools of the county, may be obtained 
from the following summary of the last pub- 
lished report, for 1SS4: 

There arc in the county thirteen district 
townships; thirty-three independent dis- 
tricts, and 100 sub-districts. The ungraded 
schools number 133. and there are nine 
rooms in the graded schools. The average 
duration of school is 6.7 months in each 
year, which is a little less than the average 
for the whole State. Sixty-seven male 
teachers and 162 female teachers are em- 
ployed, at average compensations of $34.45, 
and $26.35 per month respectively. 

The number of males between live and 
twenty-one years of age is 2,493 ; females, 
2,424; enrollment in public school, 1,616 ; 
average attendance, 1,082 ; average cost of 
tuition per month, per pupil, Si. 82: value 
of school-houses, $55,980. The amount 
paid for school-houses and sites during the 
year was $2,478.77; paid for teachers, 
829,515. 

The school fund loaned in Ringgold 
Countv amounts to $33,843.70. This is 
1 1 m :d to farmers on mortgage, at eight per 
cent. There have been no losses of conse- 
quence since 1874. In .that year the losses 
reported were $1.22 1.62, and the previous 



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MISCELLANEOUS. 



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year $446.37 was lost. The fund ami united, 
in 1S74, to S25.2S3.10, and the county then 
had unsold. 240 acres ol land. It now has 
120 acres. The greater part of the increase 
in the fund is due to transfers from other 
counties, which have been made as fol- 
lows: 

Tama Count v, Si, 000, June 1, 1SS0; 
Mahaska County, $1,000, August 16, 1S80; 
Cass County, $1,000, December 23, 18S1 ; 
Linn County, $1,000, March 16, 1SS2; Cass 
Countv, $1,000, May 30, 1SS2; Black Hawk 
County, $2,000, November 29, 1SS2. Total, 
$7,000. The natural increase of the fund, 
from sales of lands, escheated estates, etc., 
is very slow. 

AGRICULTURAL. 

No ponds of stagnant water or wet, 
marshy land arc found in Ringgold County, 
and it is particularly well adapted to agri- 
cultural purposes. The soil is the common 
deep, rich, drift soil characteristic of South- 
ern Iowa, capable of producing abundant 
crops of all products adapted to the climate 
of that latitude, of corn especially. The 
native grasses formerly yielded large crops, 
but as population increased have been 
gradually superseded, to a large extent, by 
the tame grasses which are propagated 
easily and thrive abundantly. Timothy, 
clover and blue grass are extensively culti- 
vated. This has become a prosperous and 
prominent stock-raising county, including 
cattle, horses, mules, sheep and hogs. Of 
late years considerable attention has been 
given to fruit-growing, with excellent suc- 
cess. Apples, pears, cherries and all the 
small fruits thrive with proper cultivation. 
Grapes may be produced in great abun- 
dance. 

The great rural industry, however, is 
sto< '.-raising. There is no finer region for 
stock anywhere, and more and more ai'< n- 
tioii is given to it every year. Prophets 



are not wanting who say that this is to 
become entirely a stock country. That 
certainly seems to be the tendency, and the 
small farms are disappearing before the 
large stock-growers. The population will 
not increase if this continues to be the rule. 
The following statistics are from the State 
census, prepared in 1SS5, and apply to the 
year 1SS4: 

Average size of farm, 125 acres ; acres im- 
proved land, 206,391 ; acres in cultivation, 
135,873: acres unimproved land, S2.S34; 
acres of pasture, 55,267; rods of hedge, 
224,794; rods of barbed-wire fence, 667,052 ; 
rods of other fence, 187, 1S1 ; farms man- 
aged by owner, 1,402; farms under man- 
ager, 19; farms rented for share of crop, 
103; farms rented for money, 302 ; acres 
of corn, 63,641 ; bushels of corn, 2,212,060; 
j acres of wheat, 6S0; bushels of wheat, 
; 6,252 ; acres of oats, 30,812 ; bushels of oats, 
1 667,515; tons of straw, 13,953; acres of rye, 
1 120; bushels of rye, 11,754; tons of straw, 
j 79S ; acres of barley, 27 ; bushels of barley, 
228 ; acres of buckwheat, 457 ; bushels of 
i buckwheat, 5,170; acres of sorghum, 671 ; 
j gallons of sorghum syrup, 45,192 ; acres 
( of potatoes, 910 ; bushels of potatoes, 80,771 ; 
acres of planted timber, 1,015; acres of 
j natural timber, 19,627; cords of wood cut 
i in 1884, 10,828; apple trees, bearing, 60,- 
i 458; bushels of apples, 47,704 ; other trees, 
bearing, 12,62s ; bushels of other fruit, 
2,499; trees not bearing, 68,046 ; acres in 
timothy, 46.526; tons of hay, 44,986 ; bush- 
i els of seed, 5,858; tons of hay from wild 
I grass, S,24o; acres in other cultivated 
grasses, 3,730: tons of hay, 6,871 ; bushels 
of seed, 4,8.44; acres of llax, i,8So; bushels 
of seed, 8,720; thorough-bred cattle, 288 ; 
graded, 1,431 ; work oxen, 3; milch cows, 
! 8,196; other cattle. 20,285; horses, 8,507; 
mules and asses, 596; hogs, 36,679; sheep; 
3,649; pounds of wool, 16,186; common 
: chickens, 86,818; improved chickens 10,- 
082 ; average value of farms, $4,135. 



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444 



J/JSTORT OF RINGGOLD COVNTT. 



AGRICUL1 URAL SOCIETY. 

As early as 1S59, Ringgold County or- 
ganized an agricultural society. On the 
1 8th of June ol that year a formal organiza- 
tion was completed, with the following 
board of officers: I. \Y. Keller, President; 
E. Sheldon, Vice-President ; A.Z. Huggins, 
Secretary; and J. C. [lagans, Treasurer. 
Eight directors were also elected. The 
first annual fair was held October 14, 1S59. 
The society purchased a beautiful fortv- 
acre tract of land about one mile north- 
east of Mt. Ayr, on which they located 
their fair grounds, and have made good 
improvements. The property is valued at j 
$1,500, and the society is in debt just about 
that amount. For the last five years the 1 
society has paid its'premiums in full, with- j 
out reference to the ratio of receipts to ex- 
penses. The hall, 24x130 feet, is usually 
crowded with machinery, produce, etc. 
The customary races and other features 
usually found at county fairs are sustained. 

The constitution of the society is as fol- 
lows : 

Article I. This society shall be known 
as the Ringgold County Farmers' and Me- 
chanics' Agricultural Society, having for 
its object the dissemination of all useful 
knowledge applicable to agriculture, 
horticulture, mechanism, the arts, rural 
and domestic economy, and all industrial 
pursuits connected therewith. 

Art. II. The officers of this society shall 
consist of a president, secretary, corre 
spending secretary, treasurer, and execu- 
tive committee of three members, and a 
board of five directors — three of whom 
shall constitute a quorum for the transac- 
tion of business. 

Art. 111. The annual meeting for the 
election of officers, who shall serve for one 
year, shall be held in Mt. Ayr, Iowa, on 
the last Saturday in December of each 
year. Any vacancy that may occur, may 



be filled by the Board of Directors until 
the next regular election. 

Art. IV . The officers elected as above 
shall assume their duties on the first Mon- 
day of January following, and it shall be 
incumbent on the retiring Board to settle 
up the business of the year, and shall have 
the time above specified to perform that 
duty. 

Art. V. The duties of the president 
and vice-president shall be such as are 
usually attached to such offices. 

Art. VI. The secretary shall keep a 
faithful record of all the proceedings of the 
society and the Board of Directors, and 
shall attend, with all his records and papers 
at all regular meetings of the society and 
its annual fairs. 

Art. VII. It shall be the duty of the 
treasurer to receive all moneys due the so- 
ciety, and pay them out on the order of the 
president, countersigned by the secretary, 
and he shall execute a bond to be approved 
by the Board of Directors, for the faithful 
performance of his duties, and to pay over 
all moneys, property and effects in his 
hands at the expiration of his term of office. 
Fie shall keep a regular account current 
with the secretary, and render an abstract 
thereof to the executive committee, and 
report the financial condition of the society 
at its annual meeting. He shall also attend 
all regular meetings of the society and its 
annual fairs. 

Art. VIII. It shall be the duty of the 
corresponding secretary to respond to all 
letters of inquiry concerning the society, 
and render such assistance to the Secretary 
as may be required. 

Art. IX. The president, secretary and 
treasurer shall be ex-oflicio members of 
the Board of Directors, and said board 
shall have power to make all necessary 
prudential rules and regulations for the 
government of this society, to all its prac- 
1 tical and beneficial operations: to call spe- 



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cial meetings of the society and board; 
to designate premiums to be awarded at 
the (airs, and to appoint committees — not 
appointed by the society at its annual 
meeting — necessary to carry out the objects 
of the society, and shall perform such other 
duties as properly belong- to such bodies. 

Art. X. It shall be the duty of the ex- 
ecutive committee to carry out the orders 
of the Board of Directors, and to have 
the general supervision of the society's 
grounds. 

Art. XL The principal place of busi- 
ness shall be in Mt. Ayr, Iowa, and no cap- 
ital shall be required other than the amount 
received from the Slate and county and the 
proceeds of the annual fair, which can only 
be invested in grounds and fixtures neces- 
sary to the accommodation of the society, 
the payment of premiums and the usual 
expenses of the society. 

Art. XII. This society shall hold an 
annual fair at such a time as the Board of 
Directors may determine. 

Art. XIII. Any person may become a 
member of this society by paying the an- 
nual sum of Si-oo to the society, which 
entitles him to a vote at the annual meet- 
ing in the election of officers. 

ART. XIV. The Board of Directors 
shall annually— prior to the ist of May- 
establish a list of premiums to be award- 
ed at the next fair, and adopt rules and 
regulations for its government, which shall 
be published as provided by law. 

ART. XV. At the election of officers, 
any member receiving a majority of all 
votes cast for any office, shall be declared 
elected. 

Art. XVI. Voting by this society for 
the election of officers shall be by ballot, 
and in all other case; may be by '-aye" or 
"nay." 

ART. XVII. In all case; of adjourned 
meetings or special meetings of the society 
— provided live days' notice has been given 



— three members shall constitute a quorum 
for transaction of business. 

Art. XVIII. This constitution and by- 
laws of this society may be altered at any 
regular meeting thereof, by a vote of the 
majority of the members present. 

The payment of $1.00 annually entitles a 
person to membership and a family ticket. 
In 1885 over Coo tickets were sold. In 1886 
the experiment of charging $2.00 for a 
membership and family ticket was tried, 
and but eighty-three tickets were taken. 
Single admission tickets arc 25 cents. 

Theofficersof the society for i886are: I. A. 
Palmer, President ; John Beaty. Vice-Presi- 
dent ; Henry Todd, Secretary ; J. W. Scott, 
Joseph Robinson, D. C. Tidrick, I. M. 
Long and Daniel Huffman, Directors; J. 
M. McGorsuch, L. O. Imus and James W. 
Spencer, Executive Committee. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

In the spring of 1S56 the county judge 
caused the erection of a hewed-log house, 
at Mt. Ayr, for the use of (he county 
officers. It was fourteen feet square, and fur- 
nished with two tables, two desks or book- 
cases, and a small rough-board box or safe 
for the public revenue. If was occupied 
by the county judge, clerk, treasurer and 
recorder, surveyor, and one physician, as 
regular occupants. This first court-house 
was blown down by a high wind, and the 
records scattered far and wide. Some 
papers were never recovered. Pieces of 

! money were found two weeks afterward. 

I The ruined building was superseded in 
1S59 by a frame one erected on the east 
side of and fronting the public square, two 
stories high, with tour office rooms in the 
first, and court and jury rooms in the sec- 
ond story. It cost 83,500, which was paid 
from the proceeds of the sales of town 
lots. This old building isyet standing, and 
is used for mercantile purposes. 



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HlSTORr OF RINGGOLD COUNTY, 



Though the need (or a better place to the top of the roof is about fifty feet. It 
keep the valuable documents and accum- j is 102 feet to the top of the tower. The 
iilating records, and mure suitable accom- : foundation walls are seven feet, below the 
modal ions for the county offices, and the | surface of the ground, and are five feet 
terms of court was felt for many years, it | thick at the base The basement story is 
was not until 1SS1 that the matter was ; a net-work of heavy, intersecting walls 



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taken up, and a petition presented to the 
Board of Supervisors, asking that an elec- 
tion be called for the purpose of voting on 
the question of issuing bonds to build a 
house, within a limit of $30,000. The 
election was called, but the proposition 
was defeated by a large majority. The 
matter was again brought before the Board 
in 1SS2, and another special election was 
called for June, which resulted as before, 
but the majority against the proposition 
was very small. It was again submitted 
at the regular election in the autumn of 
that year, and this time the vote was favor- 
able. The limit was placed at S-P.ooo. 

During the remainder of 1882 the work 
of selling the bonds, looking up plans, etc., 
was done. The contract was let to R. K. 
Allen, of St. Joseph, Missouri, for $35,445, 
under the plans and specifications of Eckel 
& Mann, in March, 1SS3. As the Board 
had sold the bonds at a premium, there 
was $40,527 in their hands, leaving a bal- 
ance of over $5,000. Out of this it was 
determined to expend sufficient to put in 
steam-healing apparatus, a large clock, a 
gas machine, and other improvements. 

Ground was broken early in 18S3, but 
the continuous wet weather prevented 
them from making brick, and no work was 
done on the building until the middle of 
August. The work progressed sufficiently 
to enclose it by the time extreme cold 
weather set in, and the inside work was 
done during the winter ami spring. The 
building was occupied in .April, though 
not entirely finished that soon. 

\\\<z court-house is seventy-seven and 
one-half feet wide, north and south, and 
ninety-eight feet long, east and west, and to 



forming a large number of small rooms. 
Several of these are arranged for the 
steam-heating apparatus. On the first 




#M^ 



COURT-HOUSE, MT. AYR. 

floor are the rooms used bv the clerk, 
treasurer, recorder, grand jury, grand 
jury witnesses, sheriff, superintendent of 
schools, Board of Supervisors and auditor, 
besides five vaults and a well-equipped 
wash-room and water-closet. A tessellated 
or checkered marble floor is laid in the 
halls. The grand stairways are located on 
both sides of the eastern entrance. There 
is also a smaller single stairway in the 
western pan of the building. The in t 
story is fourteen feet high inside. 



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MISCELI.A.YEO US . 



■147 



On the second floor is the court-room, 
clerk's room and vault, and rooms for the 
prosecuting-attorney, jury, surveyor and 
coroner. The court-room is 40 x 68 feet, 
and capable of seating about 500 persons. 
The clerk's upper and lower rooms are 
connected by an elevator or dummy, bv 
which books and documents may be trans- 
ferred quickly and easily. A winding- 
stair leads up inside the tower, from which 
one can get a commanding view of the 
surrounding country for a distance of 
twenty' miles. 

The building is located in the center of 
a square 280x280 feet, filled with trees. 
It is a matter of great pride to the citizens 
to have so fine a building, honestly con- 
structed and well arranged. It is large 
enough to answer all purposes during the 
lives of all present residents of Ringgold 
County. 

The county has never had but one jail. 
The Board of Supervisors in June, 1876, 
appointed E. G. Martin and Charles 
Arndt to draft specifications. The con- 
tract for building the jail, was awarded 
August 12, 1S76, to Charles Arndt, for 
$1,258. It is south of the southeast corner 
of the square, is iS x 20 feet in size, and ten 
feet high. It is built of square timbers, 
with an iron roof, and contains four rooms. 
The two cells are constructed of half-inch 
boiler iron. 

The count)' farm is 240 acres in size, and 
includes the south half of the southwest 
quarter of section 17, the east half of the 
northwest quarter of section 20, and the 
west half of the northeast quarter of sec- 
tion 20, township 69 north, range 29 west. 
The farm was bought of John A. Under- 
hill, October 6. 1S82, for $5,000. The 
count}' put up a building the next spring, 
at a cost of oyer $2,003, and other improve- 
ments have cost another §1,000. There 
are now seventeen inmates ol the county 
house. 



RAILROADS. 

The county was without these wonder- 
ful aids to development until 1879. In 
that year the Leon, Mt. Ayr & Southwest- 
ern Railroad Company was organized, and 
a road built from Bethany Junction, De- 
catur Count}', to Mt. Ayr, 23.1 miles. The 
townships crossed voted from two to five 
per cent, taxe?, and contributed $48,000 
and the right of way. They received 
stock for this amount, but the stock was 
absolutely worthless. In 1880. the branch 
was extended to Grant City, 22.3 miles 
from Mt. Ayr. The line is officially known 
as the Chariton & Grant City branch, and 
is 45.4 miles long. The stations in this 
county, with distances from Bethany 
Junction are: Kellerton, eleven; Lesan, 
sixteen; Mount Ayr, twenty -three ; Del- 
phos, twenty-eight: Redding, thirty-four. 
One mixed train a day runs from Grant 
City to Bethany Junction and return. 

The Humeston & Shenandoah Railroad, 
in the northern part of the county, crosses 
the northern tier of townships east and 
west, and also Grant and Monroe Town- 
ships. It was built in iSSo, bv the Burling- 
ton & Wabash Companies, in partnership, 
and extends from Humeston to Shenandoah, 
a little over ioo miles. The stations in 
this count}-, and distances from Hume- 
ston, are: Beaconsfieid, thirty-three; Wirt, 
thirty-seven; Tinglev, forty-two; Kew, 
forty-eight; Goshen, fifty-three. Two trains 
a day are run in each direction. 

STATISTICS OF POPULATION. 

The population of Ringgold County has 
been, at the dates given, as follows: 1854, 
12S; 1S56, 1.472; 1859,2.507; 1860, 2,923: 
1S63, 3.05S; 1S65, 3,089; 1S67, 3,888; 1S69, 
5,029: 1S70, 5,691 ; 1S73, 6 >S5o; 1875, 7.546; 
1880. 12.085 : 1S85, 12.730. 

Below !•= given the population by town 
ships in i860. 1S70, 1880 and 1885: 



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///STOAT OF RINGGOLD COUNT}'. 



CENSUS OF i860. 

Athens, 241; Easi Fork, 257 ; Lou's 
Creek, 476: Middle Fork, 191 ; Mi. Ayr, 
386: Platte, 182; Sand. Creek, 22T; Wash- 
ington, 614; West Fork, 354. 

CENSUS OF 1870. 

Athens, 502; Benton, 56;; Clinton. 341 ; 
Grant, 290; Jefferson, 527; Liberty, 243: 
Lincoln, 205; Lott's Creek, 709; Middle 
Fork, 457; Monroe, 26S ; Ml. Ayr, 827 ; 
Tingley, 112; Union, 325; Washington, 
518. 

CENSUS OF iSSo. 

Athens, 834: Benton, 760; Clinton, 831 ; 
Grant, 655 ; Jefferson, 833 ; Liberty, 574; 
Lincoln, 815; Lott's Creek, 779; Middle 
Fork, 704; Monroe. 545 ; Mt. Ayr, 1,275 : 
Poe, 552; Rice, 566; Riley, 404; Tingley, 
516; Union, 623 ; Washington, S17. 

CENSUS OF 18S5. 

Athens, 712 ; Benton, 649; Clinton, G53 ; 
Grant, S43 ; Jefferson, 734 : Liberty, 642 ; 
Lincoln, G54 ; Lott's Creek, 71S; Middle 
Fork, 661 ; Monroe, 680 ; Mt. Ayr, 1,274; 
Poe, 536 ; Rice, 675 ; Riley, 370 ; Tingley, 
G19; Union, 844 ; Washington, 7S4. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Number of dwellings, 2,524. Number of 
families, 2,550; males, 6,685 ; females, 



6,045 ; native-born, 12,207; foreign-born, 
5-3- 

NATIVE POPULATION, BY STATES. 

Arkansas, 5 ; California, 5; Colorado, 3 ; 
Connecticut, 20; Delaware, 5 ; Florida, 3 ; 
Georgia, 1 ; Illinois, L3S7; Indiana, S26 ; 
Iowa, 6,307; Kansas, 81; Kentucky, 146; 
Louisiana, 2; Maine, 40 ; Maryland, 2^,; 
Massachusetts, 2^,; Michigan, 35; Minne- 
sota, 23 ; Mississippi, 3 ; Missouri, 351 ; Ne- 
braska, 21; Nevada, 4; New Hampshire, 
5 ; New Jersey, 40 ; New York, 236 ; 
North Carolina, 82 ; Ohio, 1,533; Oregon, 
2; Pennsylvania, 633; Rhode Island, 4; 
South Carolina, 1 ; Tennessee, 55; Texas, 
2; Vermont, 20; Virginia, 141; West Vir- 
ginia, 38; Wisconsin, 86; Dakota, 6 ; Utah, 
6 ; Washington, 3. 

FOREIGN POPULATION, BY COUNTRIES. 

England, 94; Scotland, 16; Ireland, 181 ; 
Wales, 1 ; Canada, 62 ; Sweden, 1 1 ; 
France, iS; Germany, 62; Bohemia, 36 ; 
Denmark, 1; other countries, 41. 

POSTOFFICES. 

There are in Ringgold County twenty 
postoffices, as follows: Beaconsfield, 
Blackmore, Caledonia, Clipper, Delphos, 
Eugene, Goshen, Ingart, Kcllerton, Kcw, 
Lcsan, Maloy, Mortimer, Mt. Ayr, Red- 
ding, Riley, Ringgold, Thomas, Ting-lev 

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MOUNT Ai'R. 



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iHIS place is 



gasantly 

situated on a high, 
rolling prairie, near 
the head of the Mid- 
dle Grand Rive r, 
three-quarters of a 
mile south of the geo- 
graphical center of the coun- 
ty, and within a mile and a 
quarter of Walnut Creek. 
The nearest timber is about 
one mile distant. The site 
' of the town commands an 
^^•^VJ^t^ extensive view of the sur- 
ft|»S? rounding country, in differ- 




ent directions. 

Before the location of the 
county seat by the commissioners appointed 
by the General Assembly, the residents of 
Ring-old County had discussed the ques- 
tion, and in a sort of caucus or conference 
had fixed on a site on the land of Jesse 
Thompson, four miles south, and a little 
east of the present Ml. Ayr. That place 
was to be called Avon. Most of the first 
residents were in the southern parr of the 
county, hence they desired to have the 
seat of justice as near to them as possible, 
The circumstances of the location of the 
county seat upon the land of John S. Shel- 
ter, and the naming of the same Ml. Ayr, 



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in April, 1S55, are narrated in full under 
the head of Early History. The southwest 
: quarter of section 6, township 6S north, 
1 range 29 west, was selected, John S. Shel- 
| ler, the owner, conveying the east half to 
' the count)', and agreeing to sustain the 
expense of the surveying. The county and 
Mr. Sheller were thereby made half owners 
of the original town, the division line run- 
ning through the center of the public 
square. William McCormick, of Chariton, 
was employed to survey the town, which 
he did in the latter part of June, 1S55. H' s 
report to Judge Hagans was made July 3, 
1S55, in the following words: 

" 1, William McCormick, surveyor, ap- 
pointed by the county judge, of Ringgold 
Countv, Iowa, hereby certify that the an- 
nexed plat of the town of Mt. Ayr, in said 
comity, corresponds with and is a true plat 
of the survey of said town, as surveyed by 
me on and after the 22d clay of June, 1855, 
by order of the count}' judge of said 
countv and Edward A. Temple, who is part 
proprietor on the southwest fractional 
quarter of section 6, township 6S north, 
range 29 west. That I planted a stone in the 
center and one at each corner of the town 
plat, and a stone at the southeast corner 
of each block. Border streets are thirty- 
three feet wide: all other streets are sixty- 



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iusronr of r^ggold covxrr, 



six feet wide. All alleys are sixteen and a 
half feci. wide. Lots fronting on the public 
square arc forty-four feet fronl bv 132 feet 
deep; all other lots sixty-six feet front bv 
132 feet deep, except those on the outer 
tier, which arc fractional, and arc marked 
on the plat as such." 

The first settlement was made in 1S55, 
bv David Edwards, Oran Gore, Chester 
Standcliff, 13. 13. Dunning- and A. G. Beall. 
.In the spring- of 1856 the county judge, 
clerk and treasurer made their homes in 
Mt. Ayr, and about the same time Henry 
Crabb, a merchant, and Dr. E. Keith, set- 
tled in the place, being respectively the 
first merchant and physician. Other pio- 
neers were E. G. Martin, a blacksmith. John 
Romans, Samuel Dickey, Isaac W. Keller 
and D. C. Kinsell. By i860 the village is 
said to have reached a population of about 
250. During the war it was about sta- 
tionary, but from 1S65 to 1870 it grew 
steadily, and in 1870 there were 422 in- 
habitants. The growth was very light 
then until the railroad was projected to this 
place, when it grew rapidly for a couple of 
years. In 1880 the Federal census gave 
the town 1,275, and at that figure it has 
since remained. The State census in 18S5, 
showed 1,274. 

KIRliS AND FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The first serious fire occurred in 1879, 
when four firms were burned out, at the 
northeast corner of the square. Sellards & 
Ross were the principal sufferers. In 1S81 
a building was destroyed at the southeast 
corner of the square, near the postoffice. 
In the autumn of 18S5 the Crawford House 
and Mrs. Allaway's boarding-house, north- 
east of the court-house were burned. The 
most serious fire of all occurred October 30, 
1SS5, when James Aslcren & Co.'s grocery, 
Stewart Berkey's bunk stoic, Offenhauser's 
grocery, I. Frank & Co.'s clothing estab- 
lishment and F. F. Leather's law office, a 



row of buildings on the south side, were 
burned. The Hook and Ladder Company 
of Mt. Ayr was organized in 1880, and two 
years later was provided with suitable 
apparatus — ladders, buckets, axes, etc. 
Thomas Leisure is chief. 

INCORPORATION". 

The incorporated town of Mt. Ayr dates 
from 1S75. The first meeting of the coun- 
cil was held July 5, of that year, at the 
office of the mnyor, E. G. Martin. The 
officers elected that and subsequent years 
have been as follows: 

1S75. — Mayor, E. G. Martin ; Councilmen, 
Isaac W. Keller, Thomas Ross, A. Ingram, 
J. D. Miller and N. VY. Clark; Recorder, 
R. F. A.skren, resigned and succeeded by 
A. J. Johnson, and he by J. C. Askren ; 
Marshal, J. B. Elliott, resigned, and D. B. 
Marshall appointed ; Street Commissioner, 
John Romans; Treasurer. Walter Dun- 
ning. 

1S76. — Mayor, E. G. Martin ; Council- 
men, N. W. Clark, J. D. Miller, John Cur- 
rie, Charles Arndt and W. H. Alexander; 
Recorder, J. C. Askren ; Treasurer, Henry 
Todd ; Street Commissioner and Marshal, 
D. B. Marshall ; Attorney, J. F. Mount. 

1877. — Mayor, E. G. Martin; Council- 
men, George T. Young, A. Ingrain. 1. W. 
Keller, Thomas Liggett and Z. T. Kinsell ; 
Recorder, C. B. Morris; Attorney, J. F. 
Mount; Street Commissioner, M. T. Mcln- 
tyre. 

1878. — Mayor, E. G. Martin; Council- 
men, Isaac W. Keller, Z. T. Kinsell, Day 
Dunning, B. R. Baker and Thomas Lig- 
gett; Recorder, D. E. Thomas; Treasurer, 
Henry Todd; Assessor, J. T. Williams; 
Street Commissioner and Marshal, E. L. 
Williams. 

1879. — Mayor, R. F. Askren : Council- 
men, B. R. Baker, Day Dunning, J. S. 
Kirbv. A. Nash, Isaac W. Keller, resigned, 
and succeeded by M. S. Campbell and W. 



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MOUA' 

M. Struthers; Recorder, E. G. Martin; 
Treasurer, Henry Todd; Marshal, J. D. 
Gilliland ; Street Commissioner, C. Ewan. 

1SS0. — Mayor, E. G. Martin ; Council- 
men, M. S. Campbell, J. VV. Ward. W. H. 
Struthers, j. S. Kirby, A. Nash and Day 
Dunning; Recorder, H. C. Markham ; 
Treasurer, A. M. Poor; Assessor, J. T. 
Williams ; Street Commissioner, E. L. Will, 
iams ; Marshal, John McFarland. 

1881. — Mayor, II. C. Markham: Council- 
men, John S. Everett, Z. T. Kinsell, 
Thomas Liggett, Day- Dunning, J. W. 
Ward and M. S. Campbell ; Recorder, W. 
H. Struthers: Treasurer, George S. Allyn; 
Assessor, Thomas Ross; Street Commis- 
sioner, E. L. Williams; Marshal, Aaron I 
Nash. 

1882.— Mayor, R. F. Askren ; Council- 
men, C. B. Morris, E.W. Critchfield, M. S. j 
Campbell, John S. Everett, Thomas Lig- 
gett and Z. T. Kinsell ; Recorder, W. H. 
Struthers ; Assessor, Thomas Ross: Treas- 
urer, George S. Allyn ; Street Commis- 
sioner, E. L. Williams; Attorney, Isaac W. 
Keller; Marshal, W. A. De Lashmutt. 

1883. — Mayor, A. J. French ; Council- 
men, C. B. Morris, E. W. Critchfield, 
Thomas Liggett, John S. Everett, Z. T. 
Kinsell and J. B. Tracy- ; Recorder, J. P. 
Lesan; Attorney, Isaac W. Keller; Mar- 
shal, W. A. De Lashmutt. J. P. Lesan 
was elected Mayor in place of A. J. French, 
and N. A. Parker was chosen Recorder to 
succeed Mr. Lesan. 

1SS4. — May-or, J. P. Lesan; Councilmen, 
G. C. Muir, A. O. Ingram, E. W. Critch- 
field, Thomas Liggett, J. B. Tracy and C. 
B. Morris; Recorder, N. A. Parker; Treas- 
urer, George S. Allyn; Assessor, Thomas 
Loss; Marshal, Alexander Holland ; Street 
Commissioner, Henry H. Ross; Attorney, 
Isaac W. Keller. 

1885.— Mayor, J. E. Scott; Councilmen, 
E. W. Critchfield, Thomas Liggett, A- O. 
Ingram, Henry Todd. G. C. Muir and G. 



1;"/?. 



A. Slentz; Recorder, N. A. Parker; Mar- 
shal, A. E. Holland; Treasurer. George S. 
Allyn; Street Commissioner, II. H. Ross; 
Assessor, Thomas Ross; Attorney, Isaac 
W. Keller. 

1S86. — Mayor, J. E. Scott; Councilmen, 
A. O. Ingram, G. A. Slentz, J. F. Wall, C. 
Ewan, H. A. White and S. Bailey ; Record- 
er, J. Paris; Attorney, Isaac W. Keller; 
Treasurer, Henry Todd; Street Commis- 
sioner and Marshal A. E. Holland; Asses- 
sor, Thomas Ross. 



A common district school was maintained 
until 18S0, when a course of study was 
adopted, and the school put on a city basis. 
Up to 1S79 there were in use two frame build- 
ings, each containing one room, located on 
the same lot, (wo blocks northeast of the 
square. In 187S a brick building was 
erected in the eastern part of the town, 
containing four rooms, and costing $8,500. 
In 1S81 an addition was built, containing 
two rooms, and costing $3,000. A room is 
also rented in the business part of town, 
near the postofhee. Eight teachers are em- 
ployed, including the principal. The corps 
for iS86-'7 is : J. W. Wilkerson, Principal ; 
Lucy Plants, Lora Laughlin, Vina A. Sul- 
livan, Hettie I. Dubois, Nora M. White, 
Winnie Kirby and Louie Ellington. The 
enrollment is 47S ; average attendance, 400. 
For i885-'6the expenditures were : Teach- 
ers' fund, $3,467.40; contingent fund, $1,- 
392.90; school-house fund, $1,504.37 ; total, 
$6,364.67. The School Board for the pres- 
ent year includes : E. G. Pratt, President; 
George S. Allyn, R. C. Henry, Day Dun- 
ning, Thomas Lewis and John German. J. 
P. Lesan is Secretary, and G. A. Slentz, 
Treasurer. 

CHURCHES. 

Methodist Episcopal Church..— -The first 
preacher stationed on this circuit was Rev. 



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HISTORY OF RINGGOLD COUNT!'. 



Jesse Sherwood, who visited every charge 
in the county once in three weeks, 
preaching in the log school-house, sixteen 
feet square, which was usually well filled. 
He spent two years on this circuit, begin- 
ning with the autumn of 1856. As soon as 
the court-house was built, in 1S59, that was 
made the place o( worship. Rev. C. E. 
Spooner was here from 1858 to i860. Revs. 
B. Shinn, Jerry Hughes and Oliver Will- 
iams filled up the next two years. Then 
came, in succession. Rev. George Bennett, 
one year; Dr. U. P. Golliday and Rev. 
Collins, one year ; Rev. D. B. Clary, one 
year ; Rev. Baker, two years ; Revs. Cal- 
fee and C. A. B. Watson, one year; Revs. 
E. M. King and Walker, one year, and 
Rev. Burris, one year. During Rev. Bur- 
ns' stay the church was commenced, 1870, 
and it was completed and dedicated during 
the pastorate of Rev. W. T. Smith, who re- 
mained two years. Rev. M. Miller was 
here from 1872 to 1874, and his time was 
finished by Rev. B. D. Himebaugh. In 
1874 the parsonage was completed. It is 
now used as a residence by D. W. Cole. 
Rev. II. W. Deshler was here 1874-5 ; Rev. 
Hayes, 1875— '6; Rev. Bartholomew, 1876- 
'7; Dr. U. P. Golliday, 1877-80; Rev. 
Jacob Miller, 1880-1; Rev. Moore, 1SS1- 
'2 ; Rev. Chambers, l882-*4 ; Rev. Vollmar, 
iSS4-'7. During Rev. Miller's stay here 
the present parsonage was built. The 
membership is now 200. Robert Williams 
is superintendent of the Sunday-school, 
which has an average attendance of 130. 

United Presbyterian Church. — The church 
of this denomination was built in 1S70. It 
is a frame structure, in the northeastern 
part of the town, and cost in all §3,500. 
The membership at this time was about 
forty. Meetings had been held for several 
years in the court-house. Rev. William 
Brown served the church five years; Rev. 
B. F. Mustard, three years, and Rev. J. II. 
Tedford, seven years. No services have 



been held since July, 1885. The member- 
ship is about ninety. The trustees are: 
M. R. McClanahan, P. A. Hunter, W. J. 
Buck, D. E. Lavvhead and Thomas Liggett. 
The elders are: W. J. Buck, William Max- 
well and Thomas Liggett. George A. 
Slentz is superintendent of the Sunday- 
school, whose attendance is about sixty. 

Presbyterian Church. — In 1S67 Rev. S. A. 
McElhiney, of Bedford, was directed by the 
Presbytery to come monthly to this place. 
He soon after organized the Mt. Ayr 
Church, with twelve members. In 1873 
a frame house of worship was erected at 
a cost of §3,600, including furnishings, one 
block east of the public square. The mem- 
bership had by this time reached fort)', and 
it is now not less than fifty. Services are 
held every Sunday by Rev. G. P. Wood, 
who commenced his work here in June, 
18S4. The attendance at Sunday-school, of 
which the pastor is superintendent, is 
about seventy-five. The elders of the church 
are: William Tennant, John G. Faris, 
John Blauer and William Snedakcr. 

The Baptist Church was organized in 
1871, by Rev. C. Tilbury, of Illinois. He 
remained two or three years, during which 
time, in 1872, the church was built, two 
blocks northwest of the court-house, at an 
expenditure of §2,200. Since Mr. Tilbury's 
time the pastors have been : Revs. Morris, 
Funk, Edwards and Peter Andrews, who 
began here in 1S79. The membership is 
about fifty. The pastor is superintendent 
of the Sunday-school, which has an attend- 
ance of forty. The deacons are : William 
Timby and Noah Brock. Mrs. R. C. Henry 
acts as clerk. 

Christian Church. — This society was or- 
ganized in 1 88 1, by Rev. William Gadd, of 
Ottumwa, who remained until 1884. In 
1S83 the house of worship was built, one 
block east of the northeast corner of the 
public square, at a cost, including lot and 
furnishings, of §2,700. Rev. J. P. Lucas 



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came here monthly, from the spring till 
August, 1884, and the present pastor, Rev. 
J. C. White, began his labors in October of 
that year. The membership at time of or- 
ganization was twenty-three; it is now 
sixty. The ciders are: M. J. Donahoe and 

A. 13. Radcliffe. Trustees: ~ E. W. Ci itch- 
field, II. II. Espey and D. S. Baker. A. 

B. Radcliffe is superintendent of the Sun- 
day-school, which has an attendance of 
about fifty. 

The Episcopalians had a mission here, 
which is no longer active, and the Catho- 
lics are accumulating funds preparatory to 
building. 

SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Mt. Ayr is well supplied with branches 
of the several secret orders. 

Faith Lodge, No. 179, A. F. & A. M., meets 
Friday evening on or before each full 
moon. 

Salem Cliapter, No. 75, R. A. JL, meets 
Friday evening after each full moon. 

Mount Ayr Lodge, No. 169, /. O. O. F, I 
meets every Saturday evening. 

Delta Encampment, No. 69, meets the sec- 1 
ond and fourth Wednesday evenings of j 
each month. 

Mount Ayr Lodge, No. 91, /. 0. G. T., \ 
meets the first and third Monday evenings ! 
of each month. 

Fidelity Lodge, No. 26, Daughters of Re- \ 
bekak, meets the first and third Wednesday ■ 
evenings of each month. 

Thcta Lodge, No. 1S9, A. 0. U. IV., meets ; 
the first and third Monday evenings of I 
each month. 

Subordinate Lodge, No. 20, A. II. T. A., \ 
meets at the court-house, the Saturday 
evening on, or before each full moon. 

Ellis C. Miller Post, No. 96, G. A. R., 
meets the second and fourth Tuesday 
evenings of each month. 

T here are also organizations of the Sons 
of Veterans, and Woman's Relief Corps. | 



BANKS. 

The first bank in Mt. Ayr, was that of 
Dunning. Sellards & Co., established in 
1S69. In 1874 the firm became Dunning 
<S; Co., and in 1S7S they purchased the 
Ringgold County Bank, which name they 
adopted. This had been established in 
1S72, by Merrill, Kinsell & Co. The Ring- 
gold County Bank was bought afterward 
by Dr. J. T. Merrill, who conducted it till 
January, 1SS5, at which date it went out 
of business. 

Morris & Allyn began business in 1880, 
and the firm became Allyn Brothers, May 
1, 18S6. This is known as the Ml. Ayr 
Bank. Its capital is $50,000. George S. 
Allyn is Cashier, and John H. Allyn, 
Assistant Cashier. 

The Citizens' Bank was established in 
1880, with C. B. Dunning as Cashier, and 
Day Dunning as President. The former 
died in the course ol a few months, and 
Da)- Dunning has since been sole proprie- 
tor. 

PROFESSIONAL. 

The following firms are attorneys, most 
of them being also loan agents and real 
estate dealers: Henry & Spence, R. F. 
Askrcn, G. W. Carnes, Brockett & Bevis, 
J. E. Scott, Isaac W. Keller, J. F. Mount, 
F. F. Leathers, Ezra C. McMasters and 
Laughlin and Campbell. 

The physicians are Drs. S. Bailey, C. B. 
White and William Home; dentists, E. 
Stiles and D. H. Killingsworth. 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

Following are the business firms of Mt. 
Ayr, in the autumn of 1S86: 

Allyn Brothers, Mt. Ayr Bank; W. 
S. Berkey, books and news; Melvin 
Bennett, bakery ; William Been, meat 
market; H. Bastow, livery ; Miss Minerva 
Cattern, millinery; C. J. Chance, grocery; 






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HISTOnr OF Jt/XGCOLD COUNTr, 



A. F. Collins, restaurant; Cole & Pratt, 
lumber; Rufus Conkling, livery; Clark & 
Shepherd, harness; Crawford & Wall, 
blacksmiths; John Currie, Mt. Ayr House ; 
Critchfield & Fry, agricultural implements ; 
Ira Day, livery ; Dowling & Freshwater, 
blacksmiths; Doze, Peter & Co., agricult- 
ural implements; W. A. De Lashmutt, 
grocery ; Disbrow & Moore, shoe shop ; 
Day Dunning, Citizens' Bank; Francis 
Ellis, Ellis Plouse and livery; [. C. Paris, J 
restaurant; J. W. Gray, blacksmith; Gill- 
iland, Diebert & Co., agricultural imple- j 
ments; E. B. Hay ward, lumber; C. L. | 
Harper, photographer; Huggins, Saville I 
& Co., dry-goods and millinery ; John ■ 
Home, drugs; Harper, Bedwell & Co., 
hardware; A. Ingram & Sons, general ! 
store; Ingram & Todd, grocery ; Imus & I 
Woodmansee, barbers; II. V. Johnson,! 
sewing machines ; Z. T. Kinsell, hardware ; ! 
D. C. Kinsell & Co., dry-goods ; Thomas < 



Liggett; grocery; John Lineberg, boots 
and shoes, and American Express; ]. H. 
Lester, boots and shoes; Mt Ayr Furni- 
ture Co., furniture; M. G. Maxwell, pho- 
tographer; Mrs. J. T. Merrill, millinery; 
J. T. Merrill, drugs; Fred. Offenhauser, 
grocery; J. W. O'Neal, barber; Rogers & 
Rush, furniture ; W. A. Reger, book store; 
J. H. Richardson, jewelry, sewing ma- 
chines and musical instruments; Anna 
Schultz, dressmaking; George A. Slentz, 
dry-goods; George. R. Stephens, Ring- 
gold County Record; C. W . Schoch, meat 
market; J. S. Shepherd, Mount Ayr Jour, 
nal; William Towle, boots and shoes ; J. 
L. Thompson & Co., harness ; B. W '. Vard- 
aman, jeweler; I. X. Watson, carpenter; 
Adam Warner, undertaker ; H. Ii. Wil- 
son, grocery ; G. W. Watson, watch and 
gun repairer; Williams & Tedford, Ring- 
gold County Republican; Wail Brothers, 
grocery. 



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§N Ringgold County, 
b c si d e s Mt. Ayr, 

there are several 

**"*" smaller towns, which 

form convenient mar- 

A kets and shipping 

" '';-' J points. The largest 

of these, is 

KELLERTON. 

In 1S79. when the Leon & 
Southwestern Railroad was 
built from Bethany Junction to 
Mt. Ayr, some of the leading- 
capitalists interested in the road 
formed a company, and laid out 
the village which they named 
Kellerton, in honor of Judge Isaac W. 
Keller, of Mt. Ayr. The company bought 
eighty acres of Samuel Fetrow, and 160 
of John Fetrow, on section 10, Athens 
Township, and laid off seventy acres in 
lots. The site, is well chosen, on high, but 
level ground, commanding a view on clear 
days of both Mt. Ayr and Leon. A fine 
agricultural district surrounds Kellerton. 
F. S. Rhodes built the first store, in 
18S0, and immediately afterward Captain 
Thomas E. Scott built a dwelling, A. H. 
Teale a store and dwelling, Richard Emer- 
son and John Hammond, a store and 
dwelling, W. P. Johnson, a store and 



dwelling, Hugh White, a hotel, and David 
Stafford, a drug store. Others rapidly fol- 
lowed, and by the end of the first season 
there were not less than thirty houses. 
The census of 1SS0 gave the place 169 in- 
habitants. Since then the growth of Kel- 
lerton has been more moderate. In 1SS5 
there were 261 inhabitants, and in 1SS6 
there are about 300. 

BUSINESS DIRECTORV. 

The firms doing business at Kellerton in 
October, 1SS6, are: 

II. Gerber, general merchandise; Camp 
& Brother, druggists and physicians; 
James F. Mason, genera! merchandise ; 
W. W. Peasley, Kellerton Bank; A. II. 
Teale, general merchandise ; M. Haught, 
general merchandise; Richard Emerson, 
general merchandise; Frank Smith, po t- 
master; Scott & Co., elevator; S. Ockerman, 
station agent; David Aldridge, lumber 
and coal; Henry Shott, lumber and coal; 
Richard Emerson, agricultural imple- 
ments; R. L. Brown, barber; William 
Ballard, barber; Martin Enochs, livery; 
Thomas E. Scott, justice of the peace. 



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HISTORT Or RINGGOLD COUNTT. 



18S1, by Kendal] Brothers, who sold to ! last, named commenced his labors here in 
George R. Stephens, of the Ringgold County j September, 18S6. Services are held every 
Record, in 1882. It was published another three weeks. The membership is about 
year, by him, and then suspended. It was thirty. H. J. Shott is superintendent of the 
a Republican paper, six-column folio in Sunday-school. 

size. The Independent soon started up, in j The Catholic Church was built in 18S3. It 

is situated in the southwest corner of the 
village, and cost $600. Services are held 
monthly by Father Williams, of Mt. Ayr. 
Preceding him was Father Fealey, who 
built the church. About fifteen Catholic 
families worship here. 

The Christian Church, in the northwest 
part of the town, was built in 1SS4, at a 
cost of $1,500, and is 36 x 40 feet in size- 
The membership is not far from fifty. Serv- 
ices are held every Sunday, by Rev. 
Wilkerson. Preceding him, irregular serv- 
ices only had been held, by Revs. Lemon, 
of Leon, and White, of Mt. Ayr. G. M. 
Lesan is superintendent of the Sunday- 
school, which has an average attendance of 
sixty. 

SCHOOL. 

The school-house was built in the au- 
tumn of 18S0, at a cost of §1,300. It is a 
two-story frame building. Two teachers 
are employed, usually for nine months. C. 
S. Palmer and G. M. Lesan are the present 
teachers. The School Board includes D. 
N. Aldridge, President, J. F. Mason and C. 
L. Goss. C. S. Palmer is Secretary, and 
M. Haught, Treasurer. 

SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Topaz Lodge, No. 43S, A.F.'&A. JIL, was 
organized under dispensation, March 1, 
1SS2, with these members and officers : I. 
P. Wiley, Worshipful Master; W. K. 
Brown, Senior Warden ; E. W. McDonald, 
Junior Warden ; John Wiley, D. P. Math- 
ews, D. Stafford, A. M. Jackson, F. C. 
Smith, H. J. Shotts, John Litterell and A. 
Camp. The charter was issued in June, 
1884. The officers for 1886 are: E. W. Mc- 



1S83, under the management of B. W. and 
F. W. Richards, who came here from Lu- 
cas. The paper was independent in poli- 
tics, four pages in size, and lived nearly 
two years, then going the way of its pred- 
ecessor. 

PROFESSIONAL. 

The only attorney here is W. K. Brown, 
who has been a resident of this neighbor- 
hood for seventeen years. He read law at 
Leon, and began practice at Kellerton, in 
1 8 80. 

The first physician here was L. P. 
Thayer, who came in 1880, remained three 
years, and is now in Davis County. Dr. 
Jewett was here one 3'car, and is now in 
Missouri. A. and M. Camp, brothers, have 
been here and in practice since 18S0. R. 
Tripp was here several years and is now in 
Jasper County, this State. W. L. Gleason 
came in 1SS4, and has been in practice 
since. 

POSTMASTERS. 

The postoffice of Kellerton was estab- 
lished soon after the location of the village, 
and F. A. Brown was appointed the first 
postmaster. Succeeding him the incumbents 
have been: J. W. Kendall, C. W. Prindle, E. 
M. Carpenter and Frank Smith. 

CHURCHES. 

The Methodist Church, in the southeast 
corner of the village is not vet completed. 
It was begun in 1885, is 36x42 in size, and 
will cost $1,200. Services have been held 
by this denomination since 1879, by Revs. 
W. W. Danner, two years; Johnson, one 
vear ; Throckmorton, one year ; Main, one 
year; Faucet, two years, and Willey. The 



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VILLAGES. 



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Donald, Worshipful Master; A. Ca:np. 
Senior Warden; F. C. Smith, Junior War- 
den; W. K. Brown, Secretary; A. M. 
Jackson, Treasure]. The membership is 
twenty-five. Meetings are held Wednes- 
day, on or before each full moon. 

Kcllcrton Lodge, No. 425, /. O. O. F., was 
organized May 27, 1SS1. The present offi- 
cers are: M. Camp, Noble Grand; M. 
Haught, Vice-Grand; J. J. Barker, Past 
Grand ; J. F. Mason, Recording Secretary; 
William King, Treasurer. There are now 
but thirteen members. Meetings are held 
eveiy Thursday evening. 

Kellerton Lodge, No. 90, L O. G. 71, was 
organized early in 1SS5. with over sixty 
members. There are now not as many. 
The officers at present writing are : George 
M. Lesan, Lodge Deputy ; D. N. Aldridge, 
Chief Templar; Mrs. N.J, Lillie, V ice-Tem- 
plar ; Captain Thomas E. Scott, Chaplain ; 
Eli Ham, Past Chief Templar; Sherman 
Aldridge, Financial Secretary; Mrs. Mary 
Reynolds, Secretary ; George M. Lesan, 
Assistant Secretary; George Smith, Inside 
Guard ; Ed. Harris, Outside Guard. 

OTHER ORGANIZATIONS. 

The Kellerton Band of Hope was organ- 
ized in the spring of 1SS0, and now includes 
forty-six little ones. 

The Kellerton Brass Band was organized 
August 1, 1SS5. The membership includes 
fourteen pieces: B. F. Briley, leader and 
E-flat cornet ; Fred Buck, E-nat cornet ; J. 

F. Mason, first B-flat; \V. W. Peasley, 
second B-flat; James Brauhart, solo alio; 

G. M. Lesan, first alio; John F. Scott, 
second alto; F. C. Higgins, first tenor; 
Eddie Scott, second tenor ; R. Piant, bari- 
tone ; R. L. Brown, B-flat bass; A. H. ! 
Tcalc, tuba; B. Harriman, snare drum; H. 
J. Sholts, bass drum. 

INCORPORATION. 
Kellerton was incorporated in January, 
1882. The officers chosen to ser\e from 



January until March were : Mayor, Thomas 
E. Scott; Recorder, \Y . K. Brown; Coun- 
cil, A. II. Teale, F. S. Rhodes, A. L. Mar- 
tin, D. C. Johnson and C. W. Prindle; 
Treasurer. A. II. Teale. The officers 
chosen in March of each year since have 
been : 

18S2.— Mayor, F. A. Brown; Recorder, 
Thomas Struthers; Treasurer, A. H. Teale; 
Council, .A. II. Teale, A. L. Martin, C. \V. 
Prindle, Isaac Hughes, J. F. Mason and W. 
K. Brown. 

1SS3. — Mayor, J. A. Stone; Recorder, J. 
L. Hughes ; Treasurer, A. H. Teale ; Coun- 
cil, J. F. Mason, A. H. Teale, C. W. Prindle, 
A. L. Martin and Isaac Hughes. 

1SS4.— Mayor, J. A. Stone; Recorder, 
George M. Lesan ; Treasurer, A. H. Teale ; 
Council, J. L. Hughes, Isaac Hughes, J. L.' 
Scott, A. H. Teale, J. F. Mason and C W 
Prindle. 

1885.— Mayor, W. W. Peasley ; Recorder, 
C. S. Palmer; Treasurer, A. H. Teale; 
Council, G. M. Lesan, James P. Brauhart. 
J. F. Scott, J. F. Mason, A. H. Teale and 
Isaac Hughes. 

1886.— Mayor, W. W. Peasley ; Recorder, 
C. S. Palmer; 1 reasurer, A. H. Teale; 
Council, G. W. Hampton, M. Haught, G. 
M. Lesan, J. P. Brauhart, Isaac Hughes 
and J. F. Scott. 

TINGLEY. 

The postofnee of Tingley was established 
a number of years ago, five miles northeast 
of the present village. In 18S1 a town 
company laid out the village of Tingley, 
on section 21, Tingley Township, on the 
line of the Humeston & Shenandoah Rail- 
road, which was then building. Cars com- 
menced to run in the spring of 18S2, but 
the autumn previous quite a village had 
sprung up. The town company bought 
200 acres of land of Avenill Brothers, F. 
W. Hardingand George Swain. Mr. Swain 
built the first store and sold the first go 1 
in the place. Next were HowJand & Mc- 



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Creight. Other early comers were: John 
Haver & Co., general store; Parrish & 
Taylor, hardware: John Kelly, grocer}' ; 
V. D. Colles, drugs; J. I. Berry, livery and 
feed stable; J. R. and W. L. Embree, lum- 
ber ; Alexander Beard & Son, lumber; R. 
E. Burke, contractor and builder ; Levi 
Coon, blacksmith ; C. C. Bosworth, coal; 
and John Rowell, harness. By the close of 
1SS2 there were nearly 200 inhabitants. 
Since then the growth has been slow. The 
State census of 1885 credited the place with 
211 inhabitants. Tingle}' was incorporated 
in 1S85, and now claims 250 people. It is 
in a fine agricultural region, from which it 
draws a profitable trade. 

The Tingley Times was started by J. Gel- 
tinger, in 1882. He sold to L. O. McKinley, 
and he to Ray Brothers. It the mean- 
time the name was changed to the News. 
Then one Noah became owner, and moved 
the office to Wirt. Tingley was then without 
a paper until July, 1885, when the Battle 
Axe was begun, by E. B. Garretson, of 
Lenox. This warlike paper suspended in 
December following. J. J. Clark, of Grav- 
ity, published the Tingley Independent for 
six months, in 1886, and then went the way 
of his predecessors. The Independent was 
a six-column paper, $1.50 per year, and was 
a valuable factor in the business of the 
place. 

J. E. Ray, one of the proprietors of the 
News, was an attorney. He practiced a 
year or more, and then went to Western 
Iowa. L. O. McKinley has been here four 
years, and practices in justices* courts. 

The first physician here was L. E. St. 
John, who staid two years and then went 
West. James Nichols and R.W. Selbyare 
the present physicians of Tingley. 

The first postmaster was George Swain. 
Mrs. S. E. Pease was then the incumbent 
until her death, in the summer of 1886, wh.cn 
John Haver was appointed. Maggie Pol- 
lock is in charge of the office, as deputy. 



ringley lias a line two-story frame school- 
house, built in 1885, at a cost of $3,000. 
It contains two school-rooms below, the 
upper story being used for religious meet- 
ings by the United Presbyterians. Nine 
months school is taught. The teachers for 
iS86-'7 are Gertrude Miller and Mary 
Gray. The attendance is about seventy. 
The School Board includes J. Haver, Pres- 
ident ; J. J. McCreight and Jacob Frane. 
James Nichols is Secretary, and A. T. Han- 
cock, Treasurer. 

CHURCHES. 

The Cliristian Church has been organized 
about ten years ; meetings were held in 
the Tingley Center school-house until 1882, 
when they built a church in the northeast 
part of town. Rev. E. W. Miller preaches 
every two weeks. W. C. Smith is super- 
intendent of the Sunday-school. 

The Methodists have likewise been organ- 
ized about ten years, and met in the Tingley 
Center school-house until 1885, when they 
built a house of worship in the north part 
of the village. Their membership is now 
sixty. Services are held every Sunday by 
Rev. George Nixon, of Afton. A union 
Sunday-school is maintained, attended by 
about seventy pupils. 

The Baptists organized two years ago, 
and hold services every four weeks in the 
Christian church, Rev. Andrews, of Ml. 
Ayr, officiating. 

The United Presbyterians hold services 
every two weeks in the school-house. They 
have been organized two years, and have 
forty members. Rev. William Brown, of 
Eugene, is the present pastor. William 
Laughery is superintendent of the Sunday- 
school, which about seventy attend. 

SOCIETIES. 

Ben Talbot Pest, No. 2S6, G. A. P., was 
organized in 1883. Andrew Stephenson is 
Commander; James Pollock, Adjutant, 



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VILLAGES. 



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Alonzo Goodel!, Senior Vice-Commander ; 
Frank McGugin, Junior Vice-Commander. 

The post lias a membership of forty, and 
meets the second and last Saturdays of each 
month. 

Tempest Lodge;No. 164, K. of P., was organ- 
ized in June, 1SS6. George Hale is P. C; 
Ken. Stewart, C. C; E. N. DeWitt, V. C; 
O. C. House, K. of R. & S.; Wal. Stewart, 
Prel.; Henry Garside, M. at A.; John Kel- 
ly, M. of F.; Richard Metters, M. of E.; J. 
J. Truman, I. G.; Lou Stewart, O. G. The 
lodge has fifteen members, and meets every 
Thursday evening. 

Lodge No. 72, A. II. T. A., has twenty-six 
members, and meets the first Saturday of 
each month, at Tingley. George Swain is 
President; J. S. A venill, Vice-President ;J. 
S. Williams, Secretary ; Andrew Stephen- 
son, Financial Secretary ; Jacob Franc, 
Treasurer. 

The business firms of October, 1886, are: 
George Swain, J. Haver & Co., Jones & 
Wilcox and T. A. Fisher, general mer- 
chandise; J. M. Dunbar, clothing; J. R. 
Stewart, jewelry ; Taylor & Swain and 
Garside & Son, hardware; R. W. Sclby & 
Co. and T. P. Asbury, drugs ; House & 
Carney, farm implements; E. N. DeWitt 
and Peter Smith, livery; Charles Carmichael, 
meat market; E. M. Stevens, restaurant; 
Mrs. Sadie Johnson, millinery ; D. B. Alley 
and McClaskey & Wines, barbers; John 
Wines, shoe shop ; John Rowell, harness ; 
A. A. Elder, furniture ; Willis Karr, Pacific 
Hotel; Estell & Metters, contractors and 
builders; Levi Coon, blacksmith; C. H. 
Funis, lumber; George Hale, station agent; 
J- J. McCreight, grain buyer; Levi Flow- 
land & Co., poultry buyers ; E. C. Edging- 
ton, sewing machines ; Mrs. E. C. Edging- 
ton, dressmaker. 



Redding, in Clinton Township, is twelve 
miles from Mt. Ayr, en the Grant City ; 



Branch of the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad. It was laid out in 1880, 
by a town company composed of railroad 
capitalists. J. W. Crouch built, the first 
house, which is now the Redding Hotel. 
Immediately after, and all about the same 
time, Wilson & Conine built a store, W. C. 
Wilson a dwelling, N. B. Allen a restaurant, 
Watson a store, Al. Silvers a store, George 
Dennis a blacksmith shop, and Oliver Wool- 
man a wagon shop. The village obtained 
most of its growth the first year. By 1SS2 
the population was 300, and the village was 
incorporated. The officers for 1SS6 are: 
Mayor, L. P. Milburn ; Council, W. E. 
Lawhead, Loren Gee, Thomas Demcy, F. 
M. Wisdom, Milton Sullivan and Joseph 
Allbee ; Recorder, J. M. Baird ; Attorney, 
F. M. Wisdom; Marshal, J. M. Baird; 
Treasuier, J. T. Bernard. In 1S84 the vil- 
lage met with two serious reverses, in the 
shape of fires. The first, in April, de- 
stroyed five buildings at the northwest cor- 
ner of the square. July 5, following, the 
whole north side was swept away, includ- 
ing William Anthony's general store, P. B. 
France's general store, B. J. Conine's hotel, 
Samuel Warden's dwelling, C. S- Pugsley's 
general store, G. M. Smith's grocer}' and 
hardware store and D. W. Poor's grocerv. 
The business portion of the village has 
been partially rebuilt, but the population is 
less than formerly. The State census of 
1SS5 gave it 210 ; they claim 250 now. 

The business firms of 1SS6 are: P. B. 
France, J. M. Smith, D. M. Smith and 
Muggins, Saville, Lawhead & Co., general 
stores ; J. '1 . Bernard, lumber and furniture: 
F. Russtli. drugs ; Dennis & Castillo, black- 
smiths; P. Moler, grocery ; George Hunts- 
man, livery : D. Martin, Union Hotel ; 
Joseph Shaw, Redding Hotel; W. T. 
Smith, livery ; J. W. Crouch, postmaster: 
Henry 11. Rokes, harness; M. T. Falkner, 
Nation agent. 

Two papers have been published at Red- 






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J/ISTOHr OF RINGGOLD COUNTT. 



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ding. The Reporter was started in 1885, by 
F. M. Wisdom, and run for a few months. 
The Independent was started in December, 
1SS5, by Burrell & Noble. The latter with- 
drew after a time, and again, later, Clay- 
burg Brothers became proprietors. The 
paper suspended in the summer of 1SS6. 
It was independent in politics, and pub- 
lished on Thursdays, at a $1.50 per year. 

The only lawyer who has lived and prac- 
ticed at Redding was George Spence, who 
was here two or three years. He went to 
Dakota in 18S4. 

The first physician here was Thomas 
Kenworthy, who lived near the village site 
when the latter was selected. He soon 
moved to Oregon. H. C. Dukes was here 
a 3'ear or so ago and then went to Clarke 
County. Dr. McLean was here one year 
and then went to Missouri. The present 
physicians are A. E. King, Thomas H. 
Humphrey and W. E. Lawhead. 

The Methodist church at this place was 
built in the spring of 1884, at an expenditure 
of about $1,200. The society is an old one, 
and formerly worshiped in the school- 
house south of Redding. Services are held 
in this church nearly every Sunday, by one 
denomination or another. Rev. Withers 
preaches here for the Methodists, and Rev. 
Golding for the Missionary Baptists. D. 
W. Poor conducts the Sunday-school, the 
usual attendance of which is seventy-five. 

Thomas Huston Post, No. 51, G. A. R., 
was organized in March, 18S3, with Will- 
iam Anthony as Commander; A. Aniick, 
as Adjutant; L. W. Parsons, Officer of the 
Day and S. Oliver, Quartermaster. The 
officers for 1SS6 are: M. A. Waugh, 
Commander; D. W. Poor, Senior Vice- 
Commander; I. T. Owens, Junior Vice- 
Commander; Rev. William Golding; 
Chaplain; A. Amick, Adjutant; David 
Hillhouse, Officer of the Day; J. T. Meda- 
ris, Quartermaster ; F. M. Oliver, Officer 
of the Guard; J. P. Parker, Surgeon; J. 



W. Athev, Quartermaster-Sergeant. The 

membership is now thirty. Meetings are 
held on Friday evening on or before each 
full moon. 

The Women's Christian Temperance 
Union and the Cold Water Army are the 
only other organizations that are active. A 
lodge of Good Templars was here, but is 
now defunct. 

GOSHEN. 

Goshen is situated a mile and three-quar- 
ters west of the west fork of the Grand, 
and two miles and three-quarters east of 
Platte River. It is twelve miles from Mt. 
Ayr, and is on the Humeston & Shenan- 
doah Railroad. The population is about 150. 
The name of " Goshen " was selected by 
Henry Stahl,who settled in Ringgold Coun- 
ty in 1836, and was from Goshen, Elkhart 
County, Indiana. The first postmasterwas 
Michael Stahl, who served until 18S1, keep- 
ing the office in his dwelling. In that year 
the railroad came through the northern 
part of the count} 7 , and a station was estab- 
lished in the southeast corner of Grant 
Township. To this station the name pre- 
viously in use for the country postoffice 
was now given. There are now two gen- 
eral stores, one hardware store, one lumber 
yard, postoffice, two blacksmith shops, one 
hotel and the Methodist church. J. T. 
Todd built the first general store, and was 
postmaster until 18S3. B. F. Talley suc- 
ceeded him in this position, and held it 
until relieved by theDemocratic administra- 
tion, in the spring of 18S6. The hard- 
ware store was formerly kept by Hartman 
Brothers. The firm name is now Hartman 
& Bailey. D. D. Pratt and Pratt have the 
two general stores ; L. L. Bauman the lum- 
ber yard ; Miller Brothers buy grain, and 
G. W. Morrison is proprietor of the hotel. 
The church was built in 1882. The first, 
preacher was J. E. Evans. First trustee:-: 
I. A. Tulley, D. E. Bement, A. M. Bent]-;, 
and John Bently. 



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I' i LL AGES. 



461 



When the Humeston & Shenandoah Rail- 
road came through the county Dr. John 
Davis and Abner Goodell desired a station. 

The railroad company at first refused, but 
yielded when Dr. Davis gave the company 
the right of way for about two miles. Thcy 
agreed to give a switch for this. In March, 
1882, Dr. Davis, at Dayton, Ohio, sold his 
interests to the company, and Mr. Goodell 
soon after did the same, on condition that 
the embryo village be given as full facilities 
as other stations. Goodell and Davis had 
platted twenty-eight acres north of the 
track. In 1884 a few lots were surveyed 
south of the track. Mr. Goodell acts as 
agent for the town company. 

Before the survey of the village, even, 
Cochran & Le Fever built a store and be- 
gan the sale of general mercandise. They 
were in business from July, 1881, to Janu- 
ary, 1882, and then failed. Hughcy & Son 
bought the store. The second mercantile 
establishment was opened by David New- 
ton & Son, from Ilopeville. 

The nearest postoffice was Union Hill, 
three miles northeast. William Cone was 
postmaster. The office was moved to Wirt, 
and the name of the latter adopted, and F. 
E. Newman appointed postmaster. The 
present incumbent, Mrs. Wisteria House, 
succeeded him, in January, 1S85. 

A fine two-story frame school-house was 
finished in January, 18S6, at a cost of about 
$2,000. School is taught for nine months, 
and two teachers are employed. These arc, 
for i8S6-'7, F. R. Porter and Louie Camp- 
bell. The enrollment, of the school is about 
sixty. The present School Board is com- 
posed of W. H. Waller, President ; J. M. 
Hughe}' and James Baker. James Baker is 
Secretary, and Abner Goodell, Treasurer. 

The Wasp was a paper published- by a 
man named Noah, for about six months. He 
sold to John Abrams,who changed the name 



to the News. The last proprietor was John 
Thrall, who ceased publication in 1884. 

The first physician here was named Lloyd. 
He remained a year or so and then went to 
Dakota. He was succeeded by J. P. Max- 
well, who is yet in practice. Rev. F. S. Lock 
is both a minister and a physician. 

The Evangelical church of this place was 
organized some ten years ago, and met in 
various school-houses. In 18S3 they built 
a good white frame house of worship at 
Wirt, at a cost of $1,600. Rev. Worth 
preaches every Sunday. Frank Newman 
is superintendent of the Sundaj'-school. 

Banner Lodge, 1V0. 437, A. J 7 . & A. M., was 
organized at Grand River, in 18S2, and 
moved to Wirt in July, 1886. The present 
officers are: H. B. Brothers, Worshipful 
Master; J. P. Maxwell, Senior Warden; J. 
W. Johnson, Junior Warden; Henry Wal- 
ler, Secretary ; Henr} T Stanley, Treasurer. 
The lodge meets on Friday evening on or 
before each full moon. 

A lodge of the Anti-Horse Thief Associ- 
ation meets monthly, alternately at Wirt 
and at the Ozier school-house. 

Following; are the business films of 18S6 : 
Hughey &Son, general store and creamer}': 
A. M. Bruce is manager of the creamery; 
M. Buck & Son, hardware ; Mrs. Wisteria 
House, postmistress ; F. F. Newman, gro- 
cery and notions; Oliver Scott, general 
store; W. II. Waller, grocery and meat- 
market; A. J. Hess, Ohio House; F. F. 
Houke, blacksmith; W. L. Embree, lum- 
ber; C. F. Cone, blacksmith; A. J. He«s, 
livery; C. A. Jackson, station agent; Will- 
iam House, barber. 

BEACONSI IELD. 

This is a station on the Humeston & 
Shenandoah Railroad, and was laid out as a 
village by a town company in 1881. It has 
one store and postoffice, blacksmith shop, 
Grocery and United Brethren church. 



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This little village is on the Grant City 

13 ranch. between Ml. Ayr and Redding-, five 
miles from the latter and eight from the 
former. It was platted in 1880, by the rail- 
road company, and Frank Jordan was the 
first to locate here, putting up a residence 
and blacksmith shop. M. Rush was the 
first merchant. There are now three stores, 
kept by J. W. Bowman, M. Rush and M. 
Evans. I. M. Long has an elevator, M. 
Harringtonablacksmithy, T. Bolt a wagon 
shop, and D. Schlappie a hotel. Frank 
Leaton is postmaster, and jW. II. Palmer 
is station agent. The Baptists have a 
church here, erected in 1SS3, at a cost 
of $Soo. Services are held every two 
weeks, by Rev. William Golding, of Red- 
ding. 

RINGGOLD CITY 

was laid out in 1855 by Sanford Harrow, 
who started a general store and did a very 
extensive business for a number of years. 
The credit system, however, caused his 
final failure. A postoflice was established 
here, in 1S58, which has been maintained 
since. There was a store here until four 
or five years ago, but now there is nothing 
in the way of business — only three or four 
farm houses. The site is on section 28, 
Lott's Creek Township. 



CALEDONIA. 

This village was also laid out in 185?, by 
Peter Walters, and a postoffice established 
soon alter. Walters was postmaster until 
his death, some years later. There have 
usually been two stores here. -They arc 
now owned by -Andrew Poster and G. S. 
Moore. There is also a harness shop and 
blacksmith shop. Caledonia is on section 
11, Lott's Creek Township. Some of the 
first settlers of Ringgold County located in 
this vicinity. 

LESAN. 

This is a station on the Grant City Branch 
of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Rail- 
road, five miles east of Mt, Ayr. There is 
no side track here, and no village. There 
is a combined residence, store and post- 
office. Arthur Lesan sells merchandise 
here on commission for George A. Slentz, 
of Mt. Ayr. 

OTHER I'LACES. 
Kew is a station and postoffice on the 
Humeston & Shenandoah Railroad. Wil- 
son Dunlap has the store and postoffice. 
There arc two or three residences. Eugene 
is a postoffice northeast of Kew, and con- 
tains two residences. James Milligan has 
the store and postoflice. Blackmore, Clip- 
per, Ingart, Maloy, Mortimer, Riley and 
Thomas are postoffices, some in farm 
houses, and some at solitary stores. 






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BIOGRAP1UCA L SKETCHES. 



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§AMES BIKNEY HAKSH was born in 
Clinton Comity, Ohio, September S, 
; 1845. lie was named for James Gr. Bir- 
ney, of Michigan, candidate of the Abolition- 
ists for President, in 1840, and again in 1S44. 
He retained the initial letter "G" in his 
name until after his tenth year, when he dis- 
continued its use as a part of his name. His 
mother's uncle, Francis J. Le Moyne, of 
Pennsylvania, was the candidate for Vice- 
President on the ticket with Mr. Birue}', 
which fact doubtless had something to do 
with the selection of the name. 

While James was yet a prattling child his 
father, Daniel Harsh, died. Soon after his 
father's death his widowed mother moved to 
Bureau County, Illinois. The famil3 T con- 
sisted of the mother, five boys and two girls. 
The country was new and the schools poor, 
but the subject of this sketch managed to 
acquire a fair education. He, in common 
with other boys in the neighborhood, worked 
on the farm in summer and attended the dis- 
trict school in winter. At the age of sixteen 
he taught a term of school, and thereafter 
made teaching his principal business during 
the fall and winter months, and was employed 
at farm work in the spring and summer. 

"While yet in his teens and as soon as his 
age entitled him to do so. he enlisted as pri- 
vate in Company K, One Hundred and 
Forty-eighth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer 



Infantry. He was mustered out as Orderly 
Sergeant with his company in September, 
1S65, and immediately resumed teaching 
school. He had made teaching his business 
principally to allow himself the opportunity 
of pursuing certain studies. It was his habit 
to devote all of hie leisure time during a 
term of teaching to the close study of some of 
the higher branches of an English education. 
So successful had he thus been in acquiring 
knowledge contained in books that his serv- 
ices were sought by the trustees and school 
directors of the best schools in the towns and 
villages. Desiring to further improve his 
mind he entered Lombard University, at 
Galesburg, Illinois. This institution was, and 
is, one of the most desirable places for higher 
education to be found in the West. Having 
finished the studies he desired to pursue at 
the university, he sought and obtained em- 
ployment in a commercial school of that city. 
The school had but a limited patronage, but 
where known was recognized as one of the 
best of its class. Mr. Harsh at this time con- 
ceived the idea of making a business of this 
kind of school work for a few years to enable 
him to support himself while engaged in the 
study of law. 

Acting on this idea, he founded what was 
then, and is still, known as "The Western 
Business College." The small school before 
named was merged in the new institution, a 



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competent force of instructors employed and : diately opened a land office in Creston under 

a system of advertising inaugurated that \ the style and firm name of J. 13. Harsh & i 

brought students from all [.arts of the coun- \ Co. At that time it was the generally-ac- & 

try. To give an idea of the importance of j cepted opinion that the land around Creston £ 

the school and the character of the work it is j was of inferior quality. Air. Harsh had pre- & 

only necessary to state that during the school ! viously satisfied himself that the soil was of £ 



year 186 7-'8 there were upon the rolls the j excellent quality and unsurpassed as grass 
;*:;♦; names of 1,352 students, and the graduates I and farming land, ne at once set about 
i readily found positions in the stores and j changing public opinion. He advertised ex- 



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banks not only of Galesburg but wherever 
the school was known. During the time Mr, 
Harsh was president of the Western Busi- 
ness College he prepared and published: 
"Harsh's Bookkeeper's Manual" and 
" Harsh's Business Arithmetic," works which 
are still in use. Incidentally it may be men- 
tioned that more than a score of his former 
£>■ students are citizens of Union and adjoining 

counties. 

§M In the early part of 1869, Mr. Harsh re- 

. signed his position in the college to accept a 

■ : position in the office of E. C. & C. L. David- 

| son, private bankers and land brokers, at a 

salary of $2,000 per annum. At the time 

j Creston was laid out he became acquainted 

Sgjjj with the future prospects of the embryo city 

£>; and determined to locate at this point. Ac- 

■ cordingly, he arranged his affairs and set his 

| face toward Union County, Iowa. He 

I arrived at Afton in the last days of the year 

; 1870, only to find that the fire which had 



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tensively and conducted a voluminous cor- 
respondence. His wide personal acquaintance 
in Illinois and the reputation he had ac- 
quired through his school throughout the 
Northwest enabled him to reach the ears and 
get the attention of many persons contem- 
plating moving "West. He attracted hun 
dreds to this locality and settled them upon 
the farms they now occupy. As a result 
there are but few tracts of land within a 
radius of twenty miles of Creston that have 
not at one time or another passed through 
his hands. Nor did he confine his operations 
to farm lands. He has been instrumental in 
laying out and selling eleven additions to- 
Creston, and thus became as well acquainted 
with the inhabitants of the town as with 
the citizens of the surrounding country. 
" He has helped many a man to a home " is 
a saying of him, heard many times by the 
writer hereof. 

He was admitted to the bar of Union 
County soon after becoming a resident, and 
had consumed all his household goods and j enjoyed for many years a large and lucrative 
\ his private and law libraries, as well as his ; law practice. it was his intention, when he 
wearing apparel, except that contained in two ! came to Iowa, to make this his exclusive 
trunks. A telegram was handed him offering j business, but circumstances decreed other- 
him his former situation at increased salary. ! wise. In 1874 he opened, in connection with 
Before him was the bleak, frozen prairie and : Mr. M. T. Perrin, a private bank under the 
strangers; behind him the warm, snug, cozy j firm name of Harsh & Perrin, bankers and 

land brokers. After two or three years he 
bought his partner's interest, and the busi- 
ness was continued under the firm name of 
J. B. Harsh & Co. In December, 1882, the 
private bank was merged into The Creston 



suite of offices at Galesburg, with an assured 

j income. A few hours were spent in consulta- 
tion with his plucky wife (his family at this 

. time consisted of his wife and one child, hav- 

'■ ing been married something over a year) end 

the decision was reached that " they had | National Bank, with Mr. Harsh at its head. 

: come to Union County to stay." He irame- ; At this date, August, 1886, J. B. Harsh is 

•: 



i 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKE 7 CUES. 



4G'J 



known in business and social circles as fol- 
lows: President of the Creston National 
Bank; president of the Orcston Loan ec Trust 
Co.; president of the Creston Library Asso- 
ciation; president of the Association of 
Veterans of Southwestern Iowa and North- 
western Missouri; editor of the Creston 
daily and weekly Gazette; and treasurer of 
the Union County Coal and Gas Mining 
Company. Many of the above institutions 
■were founded by him, notably the Creston 
Gazette, which was started as a weekly news- 
paper, in 1S73. 

In public matters Mr. Harsh has ever been 
prominent, and public-spirited. His voice 
and influence have always been on the side of 
law and order. He held the office of justice 
of the peace during the. pioneer days of 
Creston, and did much to organize society and 
lift it above the lawlessness and Sabbath- 
breaking so common in new communities. 
During his first term as mayor of Creston 
the present fire department was organized, 
and the Babcock fire extinguisher pur- 
chased. The high license, which was in 
vogue before the present prohibitory law, was 
also a measure of his creation during that 
time. Though an ardent prohibitionist in 
principle lie became convinced that high 
license for that time and people was the best 
thing obtainable, and the liquor and billiard 
license was fixed at §1,000 per annum. 
Succeeding city administrations increased the 
sum until $1,6P0 was reached, which is be- 
lieved to have been the highest in the world. 
"When, however, the hour came to act on 
prohibition as a State measure, Mr. Harsh 
voted and worked for it, as he afterward gave 
of his influence, money and voice to enforce 
it. In 1882 he was again called to the may- 
oralty against his expressed inclinations and 
wishes. On the occasion of his last election 
he received a greater majority than did his 
opponent, though his competitor was a 
popular — j iiotly so — and distinguished citi- 
zen. It was concededi that the year was 



signalized by work of unprecedented mag- 
nitude. The finances of the city were 
put on a linn basis, and the debt funded at 
a lower rate of interest. Provision was made 
for effectual quarantine against contagious 
diseases; water mains and hydrants so placed 
and provided with water as to protect the 
city from fire; a safe, healthy place for petty 
criminals secured; the city surveyed and 
grade established, most of the streets in bus- 
iness portion placed at grade; new laws en- 
acted, arranged and indexed, and a system of 
municipal bookkeeping provided. He was a 
member of the School Board of Creston for a 
number of years, and lent valuable aid in 
forming the present course of study. He 
resigned as a member of the Board of Edu- 
cation so soon as he felt that the schools 
were on a firm and enduring basis. 

Mr. Harsh was married July 1, 1869, to 
Miss Anna E. Slater, daughter of Dr. S. D. 
Slater, of Galesburg, Illinois. They have 
living, a son, Samuel D., and a daughter, 
Grace S. ; a younger daughter, Clara, died at 
the a<;e of four years. Mr. Harsh is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic order and of the Grand 
Army of the Piepublic. In politics he is a 
Republican. In religion he is a Universal- 
ist, he and his estimable wife both being 
members of the First Universalist Church 
of Galesburg, Illinois, with which they 
have never severed their connection for the 
reason that there has been no church of that 
denomination in their present place of resi- 
dence. Mr. Harsh has a pleasant home at 
the corner of Pine and Fremont streets in 
Creston. 

fOHN J. THOMPSON, a prominent farm- 
er and stock-raiser of Jones Township, 
resides on section 31, where he owns 400 
acres of well-cultivated land. He was born in 
Parke County, Inciiana,October 22,lSo6. His 
father, Nathaniel Thompson, was a native of 
Kentucky, and his mother, Lucy (Jones^ 



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Thompson, ofVirginia. S!io died when he was 
but a year old. He was brought upon the farm, 
and when he attained the aye of sixteen years, 
he accompanied his father and stepmother to 
"Wapello County, Iowa, where they remained 
one year, when they settled in Union County. 
His father died in 1S64. Mr. Thompson was 
married in 1860, in Afton, to Miss Melissa J., 
daughter of Benjamin and Melinda Shepard, 
natives of Ohio. Mr. Thompson and his wife 
are members of the Evangelical church; he is 
a Democrat, and has held most of the school 
and township offices, and has also been a di- 
rector of the Agricultural Society. Tic is es- 
teemed as a social gentleman, an enterprising 
and successful farmer and a valuable citizen. 
His seven children, six of whom are living, 
— Lizzie, deceased ; Malinda A., George 
N"., Emma M., Estella M., Hattie L. and 
Morris C. 



§s 



-; y/^jk merchant, Creston, Iowa, settled here 
l^jv 1 ] in 1S7-1-, and engaged in the mercan- 
tile trade with Mr. Becker, now of the Sum- 
mit House, as partner, the firm being Kelley 
& Becker. In 1S79 Mr. Kelley purchased 
Mr. Becker's interest and conducted the busi- 
ness alone, successfully, two years. In 1SS1 
Mr. Hopkins became a partner, and the firm 
name was Kelley & Hopkins. At the expira- 
tion of about two years this partnership was 
dissolved, and Mr. .Kelley again resumed 
business alone. He was compelled to 
start on a small scale, but his experience had 
been of great value to him. lie is active and 
energetic, and possesses a thorough knowl- 
edge of the business in which he is engaged. 
He believes in liberal, judicious advertising; 
his store is a model for neatness, order and 
system. His location is on North Maple 
Street, Nos. 122 and 12-1. He first opened 
his business on Pine Street, and still owns the 
building he occupied there. He built that 
portion of the brick block on Maple Street 



which he owns and occupies, at a cost, of 
£29,000. He lias done considerable toward 
building up and improving the town. He 
owns a tine residence on Adams Street, which 
lie erected, digging the basement with his own 
hands, and also doing much of the carpenter 
work; he also built two other residences on 
Adams Street. In 1880 he and his brother, 
M. L. Kelley, built the Pearl flouring mill in 
that city, the whole of which he at one time 
owned. lie owns several valuable business 
lots in town. Mr. Kelley has been connected 
with several enterprises of public interest; he 
was prominent among those who were instru- 
mental in establishing the telephone at 
Creston. He was born in Butler County, 
Pennsylvania, in 1S52. When sixteen years 
of age he went to Allegheny City, and was 
two and a half years connected with the drug 
business, and for two years was cashier and 
bookkeeper for Boggs & Buhl. He then 
came "West, accompanied by Mr. Becker, and 
when he arrived here his cash capital was 
only S250, having been unfortunate, in his in- 
vestments. September 14, 1S76, Mr. Kelley 
was married to Miss Clara V. Hopkins, of 
A-llegheny City, Pennsylvania. They have 
three children — John, William N., Jr., and 
Olive V. Their second child, Clara N., died 
in infancy. 

-i •^«3*^^?<?to-~ i- 

'ACOB BALLY, one of the leading agri- 
, culturists of Lincoln Township, living on 
section 3, is a native of Germany, born 
near the river Rhine, April 6, 1820. In 1S32 
bis father, Samuel Bally, immigrated to Amer- 
ica with his family, and settled in Ashland 
County, Ohio, where he died, May 9, 1846. 
Our subject, Jacob Bally, received a fair 
common-school education, attending school 
in Germany, and also in this country. He 
grew to manhood in Ashland County, where 
he was reared to agricultural pursuits, remain- 
ing in that county till 1849. He then went 
| to Woodford County, Illinois, and in 185C 



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BIOGRAPHIC. I L SA'E TCI IPS. 



-171 



came to Iowa, locating in Adair County, 
eight miks north of his present farm. He 
was married, in 1S5S, to Miss Christina But- 
ler, a daughter of the late Peter Butler, who 
died in Mahaska County, Iowa. Of the three 
children born to this union two arc living-, 
Joseph T. and Emma S. , both being prom- 
inent teachers. Joseph married Miss Clara 
Hayden. Mr. Bally came to Union County 
in IS72, settling on the farm where he has 
since resided, which he lias converted from a 
state of nature into a well-cultivated farm. 
lie was one. of the first settlers of Adair 
County, settling there when the surrounding 
country was in a wild state, deer, wolves, and 
other wild animals being numerous. lie has 
met with success in his agricultural pursuits, 
and is now the owner of a fine farm of 160 
acres. Both he and his wife arc members of 
the Evangelical Association, and respected 
members of society. 



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£fAMES M. BARE, partner of S. J. Bayles 
' ' i in a general mercantile business at Crom- 
7^ well, was born in La Salle County, Illinois, 
in 1857. His father, Henry W. Barr, is a 
native of Pennsylvania, and his mother, 
Elmira (Grable) Barr, was born in Ohio, and 
died in 1S73, at the age of thirty-seven years. 
His father is living in Missouri, where he is a 
land speculator, owning about 3,000 acres of 
land. Mr. Barr, of this sketch, is the eldest of 
six children in his father's family. When he 
was ten years old his parents moved to Adams 
Count}*. Iowa, where he resided until 1S71. He 
then resided in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, 
until 1S7-1; next in Allegheny County, Penn- 
sylvania, until 1876, when he finally settled in 
Union County. He pursued agriculture, the oc- 
cupation of his youth, until 1871, when, his 
lather being engaged in mercantile business, 
he entered the .tore as clerk. At present he 
and his partner carry a general stock in their 
line, and are commanding a g;ood trade. Mr. 



Barr owns a house and lot at Cromwell; is a 
member of Cromwell Lodge, jS'o. 237 , 
J. O. O. F., a! Cromwell, and is highly re- 
' spected as a good citizen. In 1S82 he married 
I Miss Susie L., daughter of Pressley 0. and 
' Lncinda Wright, who reside in Cromwell; 
, she was born in 1S61. Mr. and Mrs. Ban- 
have one child, named Buena E. 



SAAC REYNOLDS, farmer and miller, re- 
sides on section 3G, Pleasant Township, 
where he owns a farm of 217 acres, and 
also a grist-mill. Postoffice, Hopeville, Clarke 
County. He was born in Hendricks County. 
Indiana, and reared on a farm in Morgan 
County, that State, until he became a youug 
man. In the last-named county his parents, 
Henry and Mary (Jones) Reynolds, died. He 
immigrated west, to Keokuk, Iowa, in 1848, 
and a short time afterward removed to Mahas- 
ka County, where he managed a mill one year; 
next he was in Keokuk again a short time, 
then two years in Jasper County, then in 
Keokuk the third time, then, in 1S54-, he set- 
tled in Ringgold County, Iowa, where he. 
resided nine years; and finally, in 1863, he 
located at his present place. Being a self-made 
man and starting in life without a dollar, he 
has exhibited marvelous talent in his lines of 
business, meeting with the losses he has and 
yet has his head far above the waves of vicis- 
situde. The mill which he bought when he 
came to Union County burned down, leaving 
him $11,000 in debt. He has held the office of 
road supervisor, and other township and 
school offices; is a member of the order of 
Freemason?, of Concordia Lodge, No. 215, 
and both, himself and wife are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. She relates 
that in pioneer times she had to "paddle" 
the Indians out of her house; they were such 
lazy beggars that they were a constant pest. 
She can talk in the language of two different 
tribe: — the ^Pottawattamie and one other. 






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HISTORY Or UNION COUNTY, 



Her maiden name whs Lavina Costeol, being 
the daughter of John and Mary (Hardesty) 
Costeel, natives of Ohio. She was born in the 
State of Indiana, in 1829, and her parents sub- 
sequently moved from that Stale to Missouri, 
in 1840, then to Iowa in IS12- Her marriage 
to Mr. Reynolds took place in lS13,in Mahaska 
County, Iowa, where the marriage license was 
No. 150 for that county. Their children are — 
John II.; William li., who married Susan 
Arnold and has five children — William, 
Thomas, Lata, Pearl andElva; Mary E., wife 
of Charles Lawrence, and has four children 
— Henrietta, Emma, James C. and Nina J.; 
Emma married George Chew, and they have 
three children — Ethel, Frances M. and Floyd 
B.; Eliza J. is the wife of Edward Arnold, and 
they have one child, Fredrick R.; Cynthia Ann 
is'thewife of Wesley Chew and they have one 
child, named Isaac; Josephine married Samuel 
Swank and has two children — Nora and Elger; 
the remaining children of Mr. and Mrs. Rey- 
nolds are Isaac A., Charles F. and James W., 
ton in all. 

^4i-P i ~ 2 ~ 

T~--;URR FORBES, farmer and stock-raiser, 
*|5ji section 17, Sand Creek Township, was 



born in the town of West Union, Steu- 
ben County, New York, in the year 1S42. In 
1S50 he was taken by his parents to Bureau 
County, Illinois, with whom he remained till 

twentv years of age, when he went to Alfred j 

Center, New York, and attended school at j 

that place for two years. The following five j 

years he spent teaching school, working on : 

the farm by the month, and on the road as con- ; 

trading agent, visiting twelve different States, j 

He then came to Iowa, and after farming one j 

year in Jasper County he came to Union ! 
County, where he has since resided. He was 

married in Illinois, to Miss Melinda Urn- ! 

barger, whose father was born in Peunsylva- ' 

is now living in j 

Her mother was \ 
is now deceased. 



Mr. and Mrs. Forbes have three children — 
J' rank E., aged sixteen years; Lenora K., 
aged eleven years and Lillie C, aged nine 
years. Mr. Forbes is one of the prominent 
farmers and stock-raisers of his township, and 
in his agricultural pursuits he has met with 
good success. His farm is among the lincst 
in the township, and contains -ISO acres of 
choice land, and his barns and farm build- 
ings are large and commodious. In politics 
Mr. Forbes is a Republican. 



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nia, June 25, 1803, an< 
Putnam County, Illinois. 
born October 23. 1805, anc 



;"y>BRAUAM E.KEITH, the present mayor 
j (■ \-j of Creston has been identified with its 
~;r? interests since February, 1S76. He is 
engaged in the boot-and-shoe trade, and is 
one of the most successful business men of 
Creston. His location is on Front or Adams 
street, and his stock of goods, in extent raid 
completeness is probably the finest in Marion 
County. Mr. Keith is a native of Columbiana 
County, Ohio, born in December, 1S32. His 
father, Alexander Keith, was a native of Vir- 
ginia, and was one of the pioneers of Colum- 
biana County. He died in 1SS2. His mother, 
Eliza (Ball) Keith, resides in Muscatine 
County, Iowa, at the advanced age of eighty- 
three years. There were nine children in the 
family of Alexander Keith, three sous and 
six daughters, all of whom grew to maturity. 
Mr. Keith came to Iowa in 1853, first settling 
in Linn County, thence to Cedar County, 
thence to Muscatine County, where the great- 
er part of his life in Iowa was spent, previous 
to coming to Creston. He was a soldier in 
the war of the Rebellion, enlisting in August, 
1862, a member of Company II, Eleventh 
Iowa Infantry, and rose from a private to the 
First Lieutenancy. Hi; regiment was attached 
to the Army of the Tennessee in the Seven- 
teenth Army Corps. He participated in many 
of the important events of the war, including 
the siege of Atlanta and Sherman's march to 
the sea. At the c!o;e of the war he returned 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



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to Muscatine County. I n the fall of 1S65 ho 
was elected sheriff of that county, and served 
in that capacity six years, he then engaged in 
the lumber and hardware trade at West Liberty, 
in which lie continued until he came to Cres- 
ton. Air. Keith has shown great ability as an 
executive officer, ';uul his success in this direc- 
tion is admitted by all. lie was married in 
AVest Liberty, January 1, 1S60, to Margaret 
Miller, a native of Virginia. They have four 
children— Edwin G, Wilford IL, George M. 
and Louisa J. In politics Mr. Keith is a 
lie publican. 

7r-TT;ILLIA.M M. WIOKHAM, section 1, 
t ; 1/ -V) Highland Township, was born in 

It^^M Hancock County, Ohio, March 1, 
1835. His father, Minor T. Wickham, was a 
native of Seneca, New York, and when a 
child ten years old, accompanied his parents 
to Portsmouth, Ohio, and after reaching man- 
hood, went to Hancock County, and helped to 
raise the first cabin in Findlay. "When our 
subject was three years old his parents moved 
to Champaign County, Ohio; in the fall of 
1S51 to Dubuque County, Iowa, and thence, the 
following June, to Union County, where he 
has since lived. At the time of his coming to 
Union County, there were but two houses in 
Aftou, and the deer and wolves roamed at will 
on the present site of Crcston. He slept for 
some time in his wagon, until he could build 
a house, and his visits by the wolves were of 
nightly occurrence. There were no mills in 
the county, and he was obliged to go to Mis- 
souri, a distance of about seventy miles, to buy 
corn and buckwheat, which constituted their 
breadstuff. For some years after coming to 
the. county he sold his hogs to drovers who 
took thorn to Keokuk. He has often sold 
corn in Alton for 15 cents a bushel, and but- 
ter for 3 cents a pound, taking the proceeds 
in goods. He was a poor man when he came 
to Iowa and split rails to get the money with 



which to pay for his land, lie .was ambitious. 
ami persevered in spite of the obstacles he en- 
i countered, and to-day has a fine farm as the 
reward for his toil, and the many hardships he 
was obliged to undergo, he and his wife to- 
gether owning 21S acres of choice land. lie 
is engaged in general farming, but makes a 
specialty of stock-raising, having some of the 
best grades on his farm. He enlisted in the 
defense of the Union in the war of the Rebell- 
ion, and was assigned to Company H, 
Twenty -ninth Iowa Infantry, and served three 
years, participating in the battles at Helena, 
Little Hock, Little Missouri, Poison Springs, 
Jenkins' Ferry, siege of Mobile and others of 
minor importance. He was married, March 
11, 185S, to Lucretia Emerson, daughter of 
Jasper Emerson, of Highland Township. To 
them were born seven children, but four of 
whom are living — Jasper E., "Willie G., 
Walter L. and Nannie M. Mrs. Wickham 
died October 1, 1871, and January 9, 1876, 
Mr. Wickham married Arietta F. Philbrick, 
a native of Hillsboro, New Hampshire, daugh- 
ter of Josiah Philbrick. Mr. Wickham is a 
member of the Christian, and his wife of the 
Fiee-Will Baptist church. 



■;'ft~\ S. REX, lumber-dealei 1 , is one of the 
■ ', ., early settlers of Creston, the date of 
%M 3 ' his advent being August 1, 1S70. He 
is also one of the successful business men of 
the town, which was less than two years old 
when he came, and but few of the present 
residents date their coining as early as Mr. 
Rex. Colonel Swan was then keeping the 
Creston House, and Mr. Rex engaged to work 
for him, receiving §1 a day for his services. 
During the following spring he was employed 
as clerk for the ticket agent. He then em- 
barked in the drug business with Colonel 
Swan, and about a year later bought out the 
Colonel and was for some time engaged in the 
drug trade. But Mr. Rex is better known as 



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I 471 HISTOni" OF UXIOX COUNTY. 



a business man by liie connection with the 
lumber trade of Crcston, with which he be- 
came identified in 1874. Two years later he 
sold out and engaged in the coal trade for a 
time. He was next employed as clerk for 
O. Q. Ilolman about three years, when Mr. 
Holinan told out to the White Pine Lumber 
Company, and Mr. Rex conducted the busi- 
ness for the company about eighteen months, 
when the Rex Lumber Company was formed. 
This company was composed of Mr. Rex and 
Messrs. Anderson & White, of Montrose, 
Iowa. In August, 1886, Mr. Rex became 
sole proprietor of the business, having pur- 
chased the interests of his partners. He was 
the owner of but a few dollars when he came 
to Creston, but he possessed good health, 
energy and a determination to succeed. Do- 
ing whatever he could find to do to earn an 
honest dollar, and improving business oppor- 
tunities as they presented themselves, he has 
risen to the front ranks among business men 
of Creston . Mr. Rex has been twice married. 
He was first married at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, 
January 10, 1SG5, to Miss Eliza Payne, a 
graduate of the Wesleyan University of that 
town. She died July 13, 1SG9, leaving a son 
and daughter — George, who is in the office 
of his father, and Blanche, who died at the 
age of twelve years. In October, 1S74, Mr. 
Rex married Sarah Kitchen, of Mount Pleas- 
ant. This union has been blessed with four 
children — Annie, Harry, Edna and C. S., Jr. 



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7TLLIAM F. PATT, real-estate dealer 
Vv V' an( ^ ' Iisuranc0 agent, also agent for 
tTl-w'J the sale of land and lots for the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quiucy Railroad Com- 
pany, established his business at Creston, in 
October, 1SS1. He is located in Patt's block, 
on Adams Street. He has been a resident of 
Creston since 1880. He does a large business 
both in real estate and the insurance business. 



brother of J. LI. Patt, and was born in Rhode 
Island. When thirteen years of age here- 
moved with his parents to Tiski'.wa, Bureau 
County, Illinois. In 18G9 he went to Brad- 
ford, Illinois, and was engaged in the mer- 
cantile trade until he came to Union County. 
He was married in Illinois to M. J. New- 
man, a native of Chautauqua County, New 
York. They have five children — William 
N., in a bank in Kansas City; Herbert, assist- 
ing in his father's office; Charles E., Ralph 
H., and Edith Pearl. James and Geneva 
are deceased. 

rriOBERT J. McKEE is the senior mem- 



'Yx, her of the firm of McKee & Etncr- 
^sj^ son, dealers in boots, shoes, clothing, 
and gentlemen's furnishing goods, at Aftou. 
In 18S0 Mr. McKee engaged in business under 
the firm name of George Brown & Co. In 
February, 1884, he purchased the interest of 
his partner, and in September of that year, 
sold a half interest to his present partner, Mr. 
Bait Emerson. He has been a resident of 
Union County since March 22, 18G7. He was 
born in Brown County, Ohio, in January, 
1843. His father, Peter McKee, is also a 
native of Ohio, and now resides in Adams 
County, same State. Robert was reared on a 
farm in Adams County. In October, 1861, 
he enlisted in Company B, Seventieth Ohio 
Infantry, for three years; at the end of that 
period he veteranized, and served until the 
close of the war. His entire term of service 
covered a period of four years. His regiment 
was attached to the Fifteenth Army Corps, 
and participated in many of the most impor- 
tant battles of the war. His first battle was at 
Shilch, in the whole of that two days' terrible 
fight, his regiment being in General Sher- 
man's division; thence to Corinth, partici- 
pating in the siege of that place. Here he was 
slightly wounded. Thence to Memphis, Ten- 
uis city patronage is large. Mr. Patt is a j nessee. Then followed the siege of Yicksburg, 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 






where his regiment assisted in protecting 
the rear of Giant's army from the Con- 
federate Genera] Johnson. After Vicksburg, 
followed the movement to Jackson, Missis- 
sippi, thence to Chattanooga, taking part in 
the battle of Mission Ridge, under General 
Sherman, thence to Knoxville to relieve the 
troops at that place, thence to Scottsboro, 
Alabama. At the battle of Kenesaw Mount- 
ain he was wounded in the arm. July 28, j 
1S64, he was severely wounded in the left hip 
at Ezra Chappell, General Logan being then 
in command of the Fifteenth Corps. In con- 
sequence of this wound he was unable to 
undergo the fatigue of the march to the sea, 
and was sent home. In February, 1864, he 
had so much improved that he was enabled to 
rejoin his regiment at Beaufort, South Caro- 
lina. He was at the burning of Columbia, 
South Carolina, and took part in the severe 
battle of Bentonville, marching on to Wash- 
ington and taking part in the grand review; 
thence to Louisville, Kentucky, and on to 
Little Bock where he was mustered out with 
his regiment in September, 1865. He has 
never fully recovered from the effects of his 
wound, and receives a pension therefor. At 
the close of the war he returned to Ohio, and 
came to Union County in March, 1867. He 
settled in Grant Township, and engaged in 
farming. Mr. MeKee was elected Sheriff of 
Union County in 1877, and served four years, 
making a popular and efficient officer. Air. Me- 
Kee was married to Edith M. Lavy, daughter 
of Hinton Lavy, of Alton. They have two 
children — Edgar and "Walter. 

"; .IRMAN MIELKE, farmer, resides on 
section 5 of Pleasant Township, where 
he owns 240 acres of finely-cultivated 
land. Born in Germany in 1842, he came in 
1SC7, to America, settling where lie at present 
resides. He started in life a poor man, 1 av- 
ing only twenty-live cents when he landed in 




America; but by hard labor, and fair dealing, 
and good management, he has amassed a 
handsome property. He is withal a liberal 
man, never refusing to contribute to any and 
all enterprises he considers worthy of patron- 
age. He is classed among Die ''solid" men 
of Union County. He is a Democrat, and 
both himself and wife arc members of the 
Evangelical church. Postoilice, Aftou. Mr. 
Mielke was married in 1867, to Mary E, 
Shilling, who was born in Germany, in 183S. 
Their three children are — Emma, Charles and 
Nellie. Mrs. Mielke has two children by a 
former marriage — Henry and Lou. 



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"'f^ILLIAM W. BARBER, section 11, 
; ' \l\j'' < Highland Township, was born in 
ir^ri Licking County, Ohio, January 16, 
1839, a son of James and Anna (Williams) 
Barber, his father a native of Virginia, and 
his mother of Muskingum County, Ohio. He 
was reared and educated in his native State, 
remaining there until twenty years of 
age, and in 1S59 came AVest, as far as 
McLean County, Illinois, and in 1SG1 came 
to Iowa and located in Union County. After 
the breaking out of the war of the Rebellion 
he enlisted in the defense of the Union, and 
was assigned to Company H, Twenty-ninth 
Iowa Infantry, and served three years, lie 
participated in the battles at Helena, Arkan- 
sas, Little Rock, Jenkins' Ferry, Camden, 
Spanish Fort, Mobile, Fort Blakely and 
others of minor importance. He was a brave 
soldier, always at his post when duty called, 
but escaped uninjured, save a slight wound. 
After his discharge from the army he re- 
turned to Iowa and has since given his atten- 
tion to farming. He now owns eighty-five 
acres of good land, with a pleasant residence 
and comfortable farm buildings. He was 
married June 28, 1866, to Mrs. Nancy L. 
Deuel, daughter of Jasper P. and Eliza Emer 
son, and widow of James II. Deuel. She is a 



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/f/STO/cr OF UNION COUNTY, 



native of Licking County, Ohio, whore she 
was reared. She is a refined, cultured lady, 
and before her marriage to Mr. Barber was a 
school-teacher, and taught, several years in 
Union and Madison counties. She taught 
the first school in District No. 1, then a part 
of Lincoln Township. The noted Indian 
chief, John "White, was one of her pupils. 
She has one son by her first marriage — 
Harry J. Denel, now manager of Lombard's 
Investment Company, of Larncd, Kansas. 
The only child born to Mr. and Mrs. Barber, 
James W., died in the fourth year of his age. 
Mr. Barber is a member of the Grand Arm}' 
of the Republic. 



^iS'*s3^ 

^STEPHEN J. BAYLES, senior member 
V,"->i of the general mercantile firm of Bayles 
i =sp & Barr, of Cromwell, was born in Adams 
County, Ohio, February 15, 1845, a son of 
James Bayles, who was a native of the same 
county. lie accompanied his parents to 
Henry County, Illinois, in 1S55, and there 
grew to manhood, receiving his education 
in the common schools and at the Academy 
at Monmouth, Illinois. In 1867 he left 
Henry County, coming to Union Count}', 
Iowa, when he located at Afton, and engaged 
in the mercantile business at that place for a 
time, when he went on a farm, locating in 
Douglass Township, in 1874. Mr. Bayles 
was first married in the fall of 1SGS, to Afiss 
Louie M. Abbey, a daughter of Ebenczer Ab- 
bey. She died November 11, IS", i, leaving 
one son — Adelbert F. Mr. Bayles was again 
married December 2, 1875, to Miss Jennie M. 
Ingham, a daughter of Charles Ingham, of 
Afton, and to this union have been born four 
children — Lula M., Sylvia G., Frank L. and 
Bert L. Mr. Bayles went to Barber County, 
Kansas, in the fall of 1S84, where be remained 
one year, returning to Union County and 
locating at Cromwell in the fall of 1885. He 
engaged in his present business with his part- 



ner, Mr. Barr, in August, 18S6. They carry 
a full stock of general merchandise, and have 
the finest store in the village, and by their 
gentlemanly manners and strict attention to 
the wants of the public they are building up 
a good trade. Mr. Bayles still owns his farm 
on section 16, Douglass Township, which con- 
tains ICO acres of choice land. 



(. fAMES F. CREEL, merchant at Afton, is 
M [I one of the early settlers of Union County, 
^ having been engaged in business at Afton 
since 1859. At that time he became man- 
ager of the mercantile business of Howe & 
Richards. In 1864 Mr. Richards became 
sole proprietor, and Mr. Creel remained in 
charge of the business until 1867, when he 
purchased an interest, and the firm became 
Richards & Creel. In 1S71 I. JN". Rice be- 
came a partner, and the firm name was S. 
Richards & Co. In 1874 Mr. Creel retired 
from the firm and it became Richards & 
Rice. In 1878 Mr. Richards again became 
sole proprietor, but Mr. Creel continues to 
manage the business, assisted by G. L. Bar- 
naul. Mr. Richards is a non-resident, and 
seldom indicates by his presence that he is an 
interested party in the business. At one 
time an interval of nine years elapsed be- 
tween his visits, showing emphatically his 
confidence in the management of the business. 
This is one of the largest as well as one of the 
oldest mercantile firms in Union County. 
Mr. Creel has been a resident of Afton since 
September 29, 1S59. No railroad had reach- 
ed the city at that time,and the old-fashioned 
stage was the vehicle that enabled the trav- 
eler to go to nnd fro. Mr. Creel was born 
at Culpeper Court-House, Virginia, May 
29,1831. His father, Matthew Creel, was a 
native of Fauquier County, same State, where 
he was reared, removing to Culpeper 
County when a young man. In IS J 7 he re- 
moved to Taylor County, West Virginia, 



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where he passed tlio remainder of his life. 

Mr. Creel's mother, Aim (Adam?) Creel, was 
also a native of Fauquier County, and died 
when her son was three years of age. The 
father was three times married. To the first 
marriage were born lour children, three sons 
and one daughter, of whom James F. was 
the second son and third child. The oldest 
son, Charles W., died in Grafton, Taylor 
County, Virginia; the sister is now Mrs. 
Sarah A., widow of John Towles, and re- 
sides near Grafton, Virginia. Her husband 
was killed by the railroad cars. Matthew 
J., the youngest, is a resident of Richmond, 
Kay County, Missouri. To the second mar- 
riage were born eleven children, six of whom 
are living, and to the last marriage one child 
was born. Our subject was reared in his na- 
tive State, and in IS 5-1 came to JBentousport, 
Van Buren County, Iowa, and here lie met 
Seth Richards, with whom he has been asso- 
ciated so many years, He was married in 
Bentonsport, August 2S, 1S56, to Lucy F. 
Newlon, born in Virginia, and when five 
years old, removed with her parents to Mans- 
field, Ohio, where her father died, in 1851. 
She then removed to Bentonsport with her 
mother's family. Mr. and Mrs. Creel have 
had six children, five of whom are living — 
Charles A., Frank E., Seth W., James" C. 
and Carrie. The second son, Albert B., died 
in infancy. 

^Nf-ILLIAM M. WILSON, farmer, re- 
; , \j \l;' sides on section 13, Spaulding Town- 
1^._— I ship, where he owns 100 acres of 
well-cultivated land. lie was born in Eng- 
land, February 10. 18-13, the son of John and 
Sarah (Merritt) Wilson, natives also of that 
country. The father at present resides in 
Denver, and the mother died in England. 
Mr. Wilson immigrated to America in 1850,in 
company with a sister, and settled for a short 
time in Canada: from 1852 t>> 1872 here 1 . 1 
in La Salle Countv, Illinois, and finally came 



to Uuion County. Here he stands high in the 
esteem of his fellow citizens, having served 
as justice of the peace several terms. In re- 
ligious belief he is a Unitarian, and he seems 
to be a gentleman well informed on general 
subjects. In the late war he enlisted, in 
August, 18G2, in Company E, One Hundred 
and Fourth Illinois Infantry Volunteers, and 
6erved two years and seven months, partici- 
pating in the battle of Ilartsville, Tennessee, 
and was taken a prisoner by Morgan's men, 
being held by them three weeks. Ho took 
part also in all the engagements from Mur- 
freesboro to Chattanooga, Tennessee, and also 
at Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Dal- 
las, Kenesaw Mountain, Resaca and Peach 
Tree Creek. July 20, 1864-,be received a wound 
through the left shoulder, requiring the re- 
moval of the entire joint. But eighteen sur- 
vived a similar operation during the war. 
Mr. Wilson was married in La Salle County, 
Illinois, in 1869, to Minerva R. Gricr, who 
was born in that county, in 1S50, of parents 
who were pioneers there. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wilson's children are five in number — Lavina 
E., Minerva E., Walter R., William and 
Raymond A. 



rfk^ifESLEY J. STALCUP, one of the ' 
: ;. \i '\< ; active and enterprising citizens of 
t 5 r4,jc?i' Dodge Township, residing on section 
24-, was born near Torre Haute, Indiana, 
July 20, 1S30, a son of Stephen Stalcup, who 
was a native of East Tennessee. Wesley J. 
grew to manhood on a farm, and has always 
followed agricultural pursuits. He rv< '■• 
his education in a subscription school, and 
helped draw the logs to build the log-cabin in 
which school was held. He left his native 
State in 1859, going to Davis County, Mis- 
souri, and in the fall of 1800 removed to 
Clarke County, Iowa, thence to Madison 
County, Iowa, in May, 1861. October 5, 
1861, he was married to Miss Mary E. 



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Spurgin, a daughter of Philip Spurgin. Nine 
children have been born to this union, of 
whom eight are still living — Maggie, Emma, 
Philip and Stephen (twins), Lillie, John, 
Lemon and James. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Stalcup are members of the Baptist church. 
Mr. Stalcup came to Union County, Iowa, 
with his family, in April, 1866, settling on 
his present farm, where lie has 21S acres of 
valuable land. He is engaged in farming and 
stock-raising, making a specialty of graded 
cattle, and is also paying some attention to 
dairying, and in his farming pursuits is meet- 
ing with success. The father of our subject 
left his native State when a young man and 
located at Bloomfield, Greene County, Indi- 
ana. He was at one time a noted detective. 
During the war lie was an enrolling officer. 
The Copperheads tried to compel him to 
promise not to vote for Lincoln's second elec- 
tion, but he vowed to vote for Lincoln if he 
lived to go to the polls. The Copperheads 
then burned his barns and fences, killed his 
hogs, and finally beat him nearly to death, 
from the effects of which he died, but not 
until he had cast his vote for Abraham 
Lincoln. 



'-' ;-;.AROX LEE, farmer, apiarist and horti- 
; 1A-- culturist, on section 35, Jones Town- 
■nr.-t? ship, postofhee Thayer, was born 
October 8, 1832, in Massachusetts. His par- 
ents were James and Betsy Lee, natives of 
Massachusetts and England respectively. His 
father was a noted horticulturist and farmer, 
and his grandfather participated in the battle 
of Lexington, and served as a privateersman 
along the Eastern coast, engaged in the capture 
of several British vessels and cargoes, which 
were shared among the captors. He once 
visited his home, near the coast, during the 
winter months, taking with him sugar, mo- 
lasses and rum, of each one hogshead, which j 
were freely used to entertain visitors. Was 
afterward captured and sent to Canada as a [ 



prisoner of war, where lie remained until its 
close. While there, in drinking from a spring, 
he took some insects into his stomach, which 
caused his death after several years. A post 
mortem examination revealed the fact that 
over a quart of these insects were inclosed in 
a membrane within the stomach. Mr. Lee, the 
subject of this sketch, was reared to manhood 
by the seashore, and began the battle of life 
empty-handed. Possessing naturally a high am- 
bition, and having but limited opportunity 
(or educational and financial advancement, he 
energetically applied the physical forces of 
his nature to the attainment of success. When 
twenty-two years old he went to Southern 
Minnesota, where he tried fruit-raising, which 
proved to be not a very successful venture. In 
1864 he entered Company C, First Minnesota 
Infantry, and was with the regiment that was 
in the last battles of the Rebellion, participat- 
ing in the engagements at Fort Rice, in front 
of Petersburg and Richmond, and others of less 
note. He stood on guard between the oppos- 
ing armies the night after the surrender at 
Appomattox. Subsequent to the close of 
the war, he clerked in a wholesale and general 
store in Boston for six months. In 1S76 he 
came to Union County, locating on the 
section above, named, where he owns forty 
acres of land, the greater part of which is 
used as a nursery for all kinds of fruit trees. 
Of bees he has eighty stands, one-half of 
which are the pure Italian breed. Mr. Lee 
has taught five terms of school, and continues 
his unabated interest in educational, charitable 
and public enterprises; is social, genial, and 
never too proud to notice the needs of the 
poor and oppressed. As a neighbor and 
friend he is held in particularly high estima- 
tion. His political affiliations are with the 
Anti-Monopoly party. He married Miss 
Louisa Buyer in 1S5S. She was born in New 
York State in 1832, her parents being John 
L., a musician in the war of 1812, and Eliza- 
beth Hover. Of Mr. and Mrs. Lee's eight 
children seven are living, namely: James 









BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



W., who married Alice Medley and lias one 
child, Louisa; John, now a school-teacher, 
who married Angcline Groves; Edward, 
Alary K, Oris, Samuel L., and Ada R. Otis 
is a prominent and well qualified young 
teacher, having taught several terms. 



S. G BOTES, M. D., one of the lead- 
,';? i n g pbysiciansand surgeons of Southern 
i rr—f- Q Iowa, was born in Perry County, Ohio, 
February 20, 1S3J-, son of Frederick and Har- 
riet (Selby) Groves. His paternal grandfather 
emigrated from Virginia to Ferry County 
when Frederick was about fifteen years of age. 
Our subject worked upon his father's farm in 
the summer and attended the district school 
during the winter until he was fourteen years 
■old, when lie commenced to learn the. carpen- 
ter's trade of an elder brother who resided in 
a neighboring village. He also attended school 
during most of the winter months, dividing his 
time betweeii books and the jack-plane. A few 
j-ears later he taught school, and subsequently 
attended the University of Ohio at Athens. 
He taught school and worked at his trade to 
pay for his tuition and board during the first 
two years at the University. The last two 
years in school were passed at the University 
at Delaware, Ohio, assuming the duties of 
janitor and otherwise assisting the faculty to 
pay his expenses. He kept up with his classes 
all through, but failing health prevented his 
graduation and he left the University for 
recuperation. His necessities soon compelled 
him to seek employment, and he opened a 
select school at Deavertown, Ohio. At the 
same time he commenced to read medicine 
with Dr. Kennedy at that place. One year 
later he entered the office of Dr. W. II. 
Holden, at Millerstown, Ohio, and subse- 
quently attended a course of lectures at the 
Starring Medical College at Columbus. He 
graduated at the Medical College of Ohio at 
Cincinnati in March, 185S. lie then located 



at Dunean's Falls and enraged in the practice 
, of his profession. During the first year of his 
! medical college course lie married Miss Mary 
I E. Cherry, of Deavertown, a very intelligent 
! and highly cultured lady, the oldest, daughter 
of Judge I. X. Cherry, now of Afton. lie 
continued his practice until 1S64 , when he was 
appointed by Governor Stone to the position 
of army surgeon, where he served until the 
close of the war. When he came to Afton he 
united the drug business with his practice, 
which he continued several years, but now 
I devotes his time exclusively to his profession. 
' His practice is large and lucrative and he has 
won an enviable reputation both as a physi- 
cian and as a surgeon. He has not engaged in 
I public affairs to any great extent, but has 
! always manifested a great interest in the cause 
i of education, and was long an active member 
: of the School Board, serving as its president 
and otherwise. He is a member of the Blue 
I Lodge of Masons, and politically is a zealous 
i Democrat. lie has been a member of the 
j Methodist, church since he was seventeen 
years old. Dr. Groves is a man of domestic 
habits, and is never so happy as when sur- 
| rounded by his family. He has a beautiful 
home in the outskirts of Afton, with cultivated 
I grounds, while within are those evidences that 
ever characterize the man and woman of re- 
finement. He has, a fine library of first-class 
literature, and main- treasures of art are 
among the attractions of his home. The first 
board of pensions organized at Creston was in 
July, 1SS2, and the doctor was made its pres- 
ident, serving three years, when he was 
removed, and in December following was re- 
appointed and placed on the Chariton board 
as secretary, a position which he still holds. 
Doctor and Mrs. Groves have had seven chil- 
dren — four daughters and three sons. "William 
0. died at the age of four years, and L F. 
died in infancy. The eldest daughter, Allie 
II., is a graduate of the Iowa Wesley an Uni- 
versity, having taken the classical course. Since 
that time she has been engaged as teacher in 



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one of the schools at Creston. She is also a 
graduate in music and a teacher of that art. 
SIk- has recently boon appointed postmistress 
at Afton, vice 0. K. Ingham, removed. 

Their second daughter, Mattie, is a graduate 
of the high school at Afton, and is a teacher 
in the schools at Creston. The eldest son, 
Arthur, is a graduate of the Afton high 
school, and is now assistant postmaster at Af- 
ton. Mollie graduated at Afton, and was a 
student of Simpson College at Indianola, and 
is now teaching in public schools of this place. 
Lottie is the youngest, child. All have re- 
ceived superior advantages for education and 
culture, and are being well fitted to take any 
position in life they desire. 



:- v YENRY MUPPHY, general merchant, 
! j ) Cromwell, is a native of County Down, 
\-7 Ireland, born April 4, 1847. 11 is father, 
Patrick Murphy, was also born in County 
Down, Ireland, and in 1S54 immigrated with 
Iris family to America, and settled in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. He was a day laborer 
in limited circumstances, and died when our 

subject was very young. After his father's \ spected in the community i 
death Henry was sent to the sisters of charity, 
remaining there till about eight years of age, 
when he commenced blacking boots and sell- 
ing newspapers which he followed for some- 
time, the latter part of this time being on a 
boat as bootblack and newsboy. He was 
soon after employed by the engineer to grease I It. was before the days of railroads, when the 
the engine. lie was subsequently promoted ; Erie Canal ami the great, lakes afforded the 
to engineer, which position lie held several 
years, and when twenty-three years old was 
receiving S21 a week for his services, lie 
followed engineering till within the last thir- 
teen years, most of the time being employed 
in a rolling mill near Cincinnati, where he re- 



for tl rec years, and in 1SSI he engaged in his 
present business, carrying a stock of dry- 
goods, groceries, boots and sines, hats and 
caps, queensware and glassware, valued at 
$4,500, his annual sales amounting to $13,000. 



\"X LI3ERT C. WHITE, the present deputy 
.' ( \ sheriff of Union County, is a son of 
— — - Stephen "White, au early settler of Union 
County, who was born in New Hampshire in 
1810. and, when a child, removed with his 
parents to Vermont, near Montpelier, where 
he was reared. He was married in Nashua, 
New Hampshire, to Matilda Cheney, a native 
of Vermont. His occupation was that of a 
railroad-bridge builder, an occupation which 
he followed until he came West. In 1S56 he 
removed to Union County, Iowa, and located 
on a farm on section S, Jones Township, 
known as the Pisgah farm. He purchased 
300 acres, 100 of which had been broken and 
a small frame house had been erected. He 
lived upon this farm until his decease, which 
occurred November 20, 1872. His wife died 
October 10, 1S7S. He was a man highly re- 



n wliicli lie lived, 
and made the Golden Pule the measure of 
his life. He was a consistent and life-long 
member of the Umversalist church. Quite 
early in life Stephen White took a tour 
through the West, stopping in Chicago when 
that great and thriving city was but a hamlet. 



ceived a certificate to the effect that he was a 
first-class engineer. lie came to Union 
County, Iowa, July 24, IS72, locating at. 
Cromwell, after which he followed farming 



means of emigration for the New-Englauder. 
He also visited Kankakee, Illinois, but the 
country there possessed no attractions for 
him, and he returned the same year. Mr. 
and Mrs. White had five children, four of 
whom grew to maturity, and three are now 
living— Albert 0., Ida, wife of Theodore 
Depue, and Fred. The last two named are 
residents of Montana. The deceased are 
Clarence and Frank; the former enlisted in 

■ • ■ 






BIOGRAPUFCAL SKETCHES. 



4M 



• 



Company II, Twenty-ninth Iowa Infantry, and 
died at island .V>. 10, at the ago of sixteen 
years, and the latter died when ten years of 
age. Albert G. the subject of this notice, is 
the only representative of his father's family 
now living in Union County. He was born 
in Washington County, Vermont, March 17, 
1 y It. He has lived in Union County ever 
since he came with his father in 1856. His 
general occupation is farming and stock-rais- 
ing. He owns the Pisgah farm, which con- 
tains 207 acres, and he also owns ninety acres 
near by. He is engaged in feeding Holstein 
cattle. In 18S2 he purchased a pair of this 
famous breed of cattle, and from these sprung 
all the cattle of that blood in Union County. 
He has about 100 grades of this breed. The 
Pisgah farm has a history. It was the seat 
of Mormon settlement. These people were 
attracted to the place by a fine spring. The 
name Pisgah was given to the settlement, and 
the name is still applied to the farm and 
spring. Mr. White married Miss Ellen Bnrd, 
daughter of Isaac Burd, of Jones Township, 
who came in 1856. Mrs. White was born in 
Perry County, Pennsylvania. They have two 
children — Gertie and Bertie. 






were lorn two children — Ivo Estella, who 
died December 17. 1SS5, aged fourteen years, 

and Francis Glenn, aged twelve years, who 
lives with his widowed mother on the old 
homestead on section 12. Lincoln Township. 
Mr. Thornton came to Union County, Iowa, 
in 1869, and made his home in Lincoln Town- 
ship till his death. He was an active and en- 
terprising citizen and gave botli time and 
means to the support of all charitable enter- 
prises and benevolent institutions. He served 
a= township trustee a few years, besides hold- 
ing other local offices of trust. He was a quiet, 
industrious citizen, strictly honorable in all 
his dealings, and during his residence in this 
county gained the confidence and respect of 
all who knew him. He left at his death a 
good farm containing -JOG acres, which is now 
owned and occupied by his widow. 



'AMES M. THORNTON, deceased, late 
jf section 12, Lincoln Township, was born 
in Louisa County, Iowa, March 8, 1S4-5, 
and died March 16. 1SS5. When he was 
quite young his parents, Lot and Frankie 
(Long) Thornton, died, and he was reared by 
his uncle, Amaziah Thornton, of Rock Island 
County, Illinois. He was a soldier in the 
war of the Rebellion, serving for one year in 
Company I, Twenty-eighth Illinois Infantry. 
September 2, 1S69, he was united in marriage 
to Miss Viola Seiver, who was born in Rock 
Island Count}, a daughter of Jacob A. and 
Clarissa (Reynolds) Seiver, the father still 
li ing in Rock Island County, an i the ; loth 
er deceased. To Mr. and Mr-. Thornton 



c#»- 



, ,UARLES BAXTER & BROTHER are 
\ ; the leading farmers and stock-raisers in 
' . Grant Township, where they have lived 
since 1SS0. They came West in 1863, settling 
first in Illinois, where they followed stock- 
raising until they settled in Union County, 
Iowa, in 1880. They are active and enter- 
prising business men, and by their good busi- 
ness management and persevering energv 
have met with excellent success in their busi- 
ness. They at present own 711 acres of choice 
land, all of which is under cultivation. They 
have on their farm a large number ot fine 
cattle and horses, and are devoting consider- 
able attention to the raising of stock. The 
BaxterBrothers are much respected through- 
out the county, where they have made many 
warm friends. They were horn in Muskingum 
County, Ohio — Charles, born May 3. J- 7, 
and Joshna. the junior of the firm, born May 
14, ISio. Their 'parent?, Samuel and Actus 
Baxter, were native- of Virginia and Marc- 
land respectively, living most of their lives in 
Ohio, where the father followed farming and 



'. wy, • . . 

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483 



msronr of i.r/ox countt. 



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stock-raising. The}" subsequently removed 
to Knox County, Illinois, where they lived 
till their death. Charles Baxter was united 
in marriage, in 1S77, to Miss A. Martin, 
daughter of \V illiun and Drusilla (Pope) 
Martin, natives of Pennsjlvania and Vir- 
ginia, now living in Illinois. They have 
one child, Ethel, horn October 13, 1SS0. 
Mrs. Charles Baxter is a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, born March 30, 1S46. Charles Baxter 
has one of the hest residences in his neighbor- 
hood, being large, comfortable and convenient. 
His commodious barn, 80x44 feet, and his 
other farm buildings arc among the. best in 
the county. Both brothers, in their political 
views, affiliate with the Republican party. 



JONATHAN F. 1CKIS, the present county 
treasurer, came to Union County, in 1854. 
5^ He was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, 
June 11,1824. His parents are John and 
Rachel lekis, of Afton. He lived upon his 
father's farm until about thirteen years of age, 
when the hitter sold and engaged in the mer- 
cantile business, with his son, Jonathan, as 
clerk. In 1S52 the family immigrated to Lee 
County, Iowa, and settled upon a farm. In 
April, 1854, our subject and George Christie 
cams together from Lee County to Union 
County. Mr. lekis male a location on sec- 
lion 20, proceeded to Chariton, and made his 
entry, then, with his companion, returned to 
Leo County to make preparation for locating 
upon the land. He returned in June of that 
year, and found that one John D. Wright, 
who afterward became a prominent citizen of 
the county and its first surveyor, had made 
a claim of his land, and had already located 
on the place, having built a log cabin and had 
broken about forty acres. In the fall of 1S54 
Mr. lekis pre-empted a quarter-section of 
land on section 31, and also purchased eighty 
acres of timber on see. lion 7, Union Township. 
Timber land ivas then regarded as a necessity 



by the settlers, and the prairie laud was not 
fully appreciated. A log house had been 
built on the eighty acres. Soon alter making 
this location Mr. lekis returned to Lee County, 
and in November of that year returned, ac- 
companied by his parents and brother, Alonzo 
F. They came to make a home, on the land 
.Mr. lekis had located. They removed the 
log cabin to the land on section 31, and this 
was the first home of the family in Union 
County. In January following the father and 
mother returned to Lee County, and Mr. lekis' 
daughter, a girl seven years of age, aud his 
sister Catherine, came to his home. Indians 
were then numerous; about 300 were near 
them engaged in hunting and trapping- during 
that winter. The settlers who had preceded 
Mr. Ickis in Union Township, and those that 
came the same year he did were Wright, Hus- 
band, John Smith, George Smith, Nathaniel 
Thompson and Joseph Peck. Cyrus Temple 
was also located on the present site of Afton. 
Of these pioneers, all that remain besides the 
Ickis family are Mis. Husband and a son of 
Nathaniel Thompson. In 1857 Mr. Ickis 
located in Pleasant Township wheie he oper- 
ated a saw-mill. In 1865 he settled upon a 
farm in that township which is still his home, 
his residence at Afton being temporary, or 
during his official term. He has been con- 
nected with the official business of Union 
County ever since became. In the spring of 
1S55 he was appointed to the office of school- 
fund commissioner, and at the same time he 
acted as deputy county clerk, lie also served 
as county surveyor, and has twice been on the 
Board of Supervisors. He is now serving his 
second term as county treasurer, his first elec- 
tion having been in the fall of 1883. Politi- 
cally Mr. Ickis is a Democrat. Ho cast his 
first presidential vote for General Lewis Cass, 
iii 1S-18. His first vote was for Governor 
David Tod, of Ohio, in 1846. lie has been 
twice married. His first wife was Miss Mary 
Osborn, daughter of Elijah Osborn, of Ohio. 
She died in Lee County, in 1852, the same 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKE TCHES. 



year tiro family came to Iowa. In 1S59 lie 
\va> married to Mariom Rimey, a native of 
Ohio, born in 1841, and came to Iowa with 
her parents in 1845. By his first marriage 
lie had throe children — Elmedorns IT., David, 
in Nebraska, and Finn J., who married J. 
M. Meham. of Des Moines. By the second 
marriage Mr. Ickis has three children — Efiie 
D. , wife of Joseph Allen, Nettie and John S. 



-»-^i^«-^i?vir^g?<e-*>s : ** 



'ROMAS CORT, son of Join 



Mi 



'■;, jf A. (Garter) Corf, is a native of England, 
tpJ horn August T, 1837. He spent the 
first ten years of his life in his native country, 
and in July, 1848, in company with his par- 
ents, hoarded the ship, "Wyoming, at Liver- 
pool, and August 22, following, landed at 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He remained 
in that State until 1S56, when he went to 
Illinois, where he lived on a farm till 1S57. 
He then immigrated to Iowa, remaining in 
this State but a short time, when lie returned 
to Illinois. In 1864 our subject enlisted in 
Company K, Fifteenth Illinois Infantry, and 
after serving one year received an honorable 
discharge, at Leavenworth, Kansas, in Octo- 
ber, 1865. After the war he returned to 
Illinois, where he lived till 1869, when he 
came to Union County, Iowa, and has since 
resided on his present farm where he now has 
120 acres under the best of cultivation, and 
his residence and farm buildings arc comfort- 
able and convenient. Mr. Cort was united in 
marriage to Miss Anna Borland, a daughter 
of James and Mug net (Adam-) ..Borland, 
natives of Pennsylvania. To this union have 
been born nine children — Florence M., born 
October 9, 1867; Myrta M., born May 4, 
1869, died April 16, 1S71; James It., born 
December 31, 1870; Mary A., born January 
6, 1S73; Mirgaret E., bom December 15, 
1874; Charles H., born March 9, 1S77; 
Thomas C, born June 20, LS79, and Alma 
and Laura (twins), born August 13, 1883. In 



politics Mr. Oort casts his suffrage with the 

Republican parly. Since coming here he has 
served acceptably as township assessor and 
school director, and is at present holding the 
office of county supervisor, in which he is giv- 
ing the best of satisfaction to his constituents. 



"ROBERT MAXWELL, an enterprising 

: ^\! farmer of Lincoln Township, living on 
\ section 10, was burn in Harrison County, 
Indiana, August If, 1S25, a son of Joseph II. 
Maxwell, deceased, who was a native of South 
Carolina, and a pioneer settler of Indiana. 
He was a wheelwright by occupation and 
followed his trade for many years. Our Eub- 
ject, Robert Maxwell, received good educa- 
tional advantages in the common schools and 
seminaries. In 1S42 he accompanied his 
parents to Clay County, Illinois, removing to 
Knox County, Illinois, in 1S48, where he made 
his home until 1S75. He learned surveying 
and navigation, and also studied medicine, 
which he practiced during the war. He was 
married August 13, 1846, in Clay County, Illi- 
nois, to Sarah Maxwell, a daughter of William 
Maxwell, and of the six children born to this 
union, five are yet living — Eva, Joseph. 
Josephine, Maude and William A. Joseph 
married Eliza Duval and lives in Knox 
County, Illinois. They have four children. 
Josephine married J. A. Rusk, of Washing- 
ton Territory, and has two children. Maude 
married J. M. Dillow, of Union Comity, Lin- 
coln Township, and has one child, and Will- 
iam A., living in Lincoln Township, married 
Lois Smelser, and they are the parents of 
one son — Seth. Mr. Maxwell enlisted, August 
Ik 1862, in Company B, One Hundred and 
Second Illinois Infantry, being in the service 
until May 19, 1865. He was dispensing 
clerk and hospital steward in Hospital No. 1, 
Gallatin, Tennessee, from the fall of 1862 
until the last of June. 1863, when he was 
sent back to his regiment and was on guard 



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ff/STO/ir OF UNION COUNTl'. 



duty principally until January, 180-t. Ho '• 
was then detailed to hospital duty in the 
same capacity as before at the hospital in 
Smyrna, Tennessee. In February, 1S64, he 
was sent to the Rrigude Hospital, at Chatta- 
nooga, Tennessee, remaining' there till May 
10, when lie was sent on the Atlanta cam- 
paign with the hospital department, and was 
with Sherman to the sea. lie then went 
with Sherman to Columbus and Raleigh, 
where he left the hospital department and 
took charge of the sick and wounded en route 
to New Yurie, serving in this capacity until 
his discharge. lie left. Knox County, Illinois, 
April 7, 1S75, when he came to Union County, 
Iowa, by team, reaching here April 22. He 
settled on his present farm in October of the 
S"mc year, where he owns forty acres of choice 
land, and within the last ten years has planted 
every tree, including both forest and fruit 
trees, on his place. Air. Maxwell has served 
one term as county surveyor. He is a mem- 
ber uf the Farmers' Alliance. 

*H-3~ 



ht-s I. NANCE, physician and surgeon at 
fflfl Creston, was born in LaFayette, Stark 
^.P County, Illinois, March 21, 1851. His 
father, Dr. Hiram Nance, was a native of 
Indiana. In I860 the family removed from 
Stark County to Kewanee, Illinois, where 
the father continued the practice of his pro- 
fession uutil his decease, which occurred April 
6, 1886. He was a prominent and well-known 
physician. Dr. II. I. Nance was educated at 
Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois. He read 
medicine with his father and graduated at 
Rush Medical College, Chicago, in 1S76, 
coming to Creston the same year. The par- 
ents of Dr. Nance had twelve children; three 
died in infancy, and seven sons and two 
daughters are still living. The oldest son, 
Albums Nance, was Governor of Nebraska 
from 1878 to 1SS2. The doctor is the only 
one of the family residing in Iowa. He litis 



a large practice and is a popular and success- 
ful physician, lie is a member of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association and of the Society of 
Physicians and Surgeons, of Southwestern 
Iowa. He is independent, both in political 
and religions sentiments, though he generally 
votes the Republican National ticket, lie 
married Miss Sarah C. Mann, daughter of 
Joseph Mann, of Montgomery County. Iowa, 
May 1, 1884, and they have one son— Willis, 
bom June 3, 1SS6. 



-E>- 



"HS«~ 



. TAMES H. CRAWFORD was elected 
V, I recorder of Union County in 18S0, and 
^sf has been twice re-elected to that position 
now serving his second year of his third 
term. His continuance so long in this office 
is a sullicient indorsement by the people of 
his faithfulness and elliciency. He is a na- 
tive of the Empire State, born near Geneva, 
Ontario County, in 1S3T. His parents, 
James A. and Clarissa (Malony) Crawford, 
also natives of New York, the former of 
Scotch-Irish ancestry. His paternal grand- 
father was a soldier in the war of the Revo- 
lution, and his father in the war of 1812. 
Mr. Crawford lost his mother by death at 
the early age of twelve years. When seven- 
teen years of age he went to Danville, 
Illinois, where he learned the carpenter's 
trade, and in 185(3 he went to Champaign 
County. June 2, 18C2, he enlisted in Com- 
pany K, Sixty-seventh Illinois Infantry, in 
the three-months service, but served four 
months. He was engaged with his regiment 
in guarding the prisoners confined in Chi- 
cago who were captured at Fort Henry and 
Fort Donelson. From the time of the ex- 
piration of his term of service until coming 
to Union County he was engaged in various 
pursuits — teaching, carpentering and farm- 
ing. He came to Union County in 1872, 
locating at Creston, and for five years was 
employed in the car shops of the Chicago, 









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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. l' c "> 

Burlington & Quiney Railroad. Ec was ! Tort, where he graduated, and then con tin- | ; t; 

t j lCI , engaged as contractor and builder nn- ucd in the college as teacher of mathematics, 

til elected To his present position. Politically in the meantime pursuing the study of law-. 

]. f . i s a Republican, and c ist his first vote for He then entered the law office of his brother, 

Owen Lovejov for Congress, in 1S58. Mrs. 0. C. Wilson, of Kewanee, Illinois, where lie jg; 

Crawford was formerly Miss Rachel W. prosecuted his studies for some time. He >;;♦; 

Crawford, though not a relative. She was a ■ was admitted to the bar in Illinois in 1865, 

native of Kentucky. Her parents were John and in 1S66 he was admitted to the Iowa bar 

and Mary (Suiter) Crawford. The mother at Burlington, Judge Francis Springer pre- 

is deceased and the father resides with his siding. Judge- Wilson has had considerable 

son-in-law at Afton. Mr. and Mrs. Craw- experience as a journalist. In the summer 

ford have had six children, viz: Augustus \ of 186S he was the proprietor and editor of 

II., John A., Florence M.,' Nora A. and Bes- , the Henry County Dial, Illinois, and at 

sic.' Dora died in infancy. In the fall of Afton, in 1870, he was interested in the pub- 

1S44 Mr. Crawford's father removed from | lication of the Afton News. After coming 

the State of New York to Danville, Illinois, to Creston he established the Creston Bern- 

where he died in 1S55. Be and his wife had \ ocrat, which he published for several years, 

twelve children, seven daughters and five | He was elected Judge of the Superior Court 

sons. The daughters were all older than j in the spring of 1S76. Politically, Judge 

any of the sons. James was the youngest ' Wilson affiliates with the Republican party, 

member of the family. Only three are now I lie was married in Poughkeepsie, New York, 
living— Mrs. Eliza Ward, resides in Peoria, j in 18G3, to Miss Mary Potter, a niece of 

Illinois; Joseph, whose residence is unknown, , Bishop Potter, of New York. His wife died 

and James II., the subject of this sketch. , in 1865 at Kewanee, Illinois. In 1866 he 

j married Miss Elizabeth Doyle, of Woodhull, 

««eeotS^«-^S ffef§i-w®S®<Wn*i j Illinois, and they have three children— Fred, 

■>.-^w « | born - n 1^569; John L., bom in 1871, and 

<?f ODGE GEORGE P. WILSON, the first ! George E, born in 1S79. Judge Wilson is 

m and present Judge of the Superior Court ' an active earnest Mason, and at the present 

Q'i- .^ i rr • n f rw-^ ' time is d eon tv grand master of the btate or 

M of Creston, came to Union County, Octo- i UUJL J ~ ucp ULJ r s 

, . , r 11 Towa and is n-enerallv oved and respected bv 

ber 16, 186S, locating at Afton. where he en- , ">wa, ana a s enerd i 

gaged in the practice of his profession. _ In | his fraternity and by Ins associates. 

1872 he came to Creston, where he has since ; 

resided. Judge Wilson is a native of Aor- "^yv*i u ,v 3 uu 

folk County, Massachusetts, born September | 

3 1841. Bis father, Enoch Wilson, died | T^AYID A. PORTER, attorney, has been 



when 



.. his son was seventeen rears of age. At 1 | 1 engaged in the practice of his profession 
the earlv age of sixteen he commenced lit.- -^ at Creston since 1879. For one year he 
for himself 'and his success has been due en- , was the law partner of Judge George P. Wil- 
tirely to his own efforts. In 1S60 he went to \ son, and since that time has been alone in his 
New York City, where his elder brother was practice. Mr. Porter was born in A\ arren 
enwed in dentistry. There he remained County, Illinois, in 1854. Be was educated 
three" years, working for his brother during at Monmouth College, and in 1877, imme- 
thedav and attending Cooper Institute in the : diatcly after completing ins college course, 
evening In 1863 he entered the Eastman - came to Winterset, Madison County, and en- 
Commercial College, at Poughkeepsie, New I tered the law office of Ruby & Wilkins as a 



- 



" • '■■ . ■ ■ 



ursTORr of ux/ox county 



student. lie was a imittc 1 to the bar at Afton 
in September, IS7S, Judge Gregory presiding. 
He then returned to Winterset, and was for a I 
time employed on a salary in the law office j 
where he had been a student, Mrs. Porter 
was formerly Miss Mary Murphy, daughter of 
John Murphy, of Creston. Politically, he is 
a Republican. 



•• ILLIAM 0. McDON ALD, proprietor 
w'/A'/l of the Cromwell Mills, at Cromwell, 
iT^n is one of the self-made men of Union 
County, having commenced life entirely with- 
out means, and. by diligence and persevering 
energy, become one of the prosperous citi- 
zens of Cromwell. lie was born in Center 
County, Pennsylvania, March 1, 1857, a son 
of Dr." John G. McDonald, a native of Ohio. 
His father has practiced medicine over fifty 
years, and is now living in Albia, Monroe 
County, Iowa. Oar subject received but 
limited education:.! advantages, beginning 
lite for himself at the early age of nine years. 
He came with his parents to Iowa in 18G5, 
they locating in Albia, where he lived till 
1SS3. He learned the miller's trade with 
Edwards Brothers, remaining in their em- 
ploy for nine years, and has followed milling 
since seventeen years of age. He was united 
in marriage May 17, 18S1, to Emma E. Mc- 
Fadden, a daughter of the late James Mc- 
Fadden. They are the parents of two 
children — George W. and Floy May. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. McDonald are members ot the 
Presbyterian church. lie is a member of 
the Odd Fellows' 1 order. The Cromwell j 
Mills, which are now owned and operated 
by Mr. McDonald, were erected in 1S73, 
by a Mr. Rankin, who soon after sold it 
to J. C. Williams & Co., the elevator 
department being added by them in 
1S7S. Mr. McDonald [purchased the mill 
from this firm, and has since operated it 
successfully. The mill building is 30x40 feet 



in '. e and has two ami a half stories above the 
basement and an addition 26x10 feet, twenty- 
sc en feet high. The mill is supplied with the 
■ burg, Illinois, boiler, and has five run 

of burrs, including one Reprople set patented 
!'\ Sinker, Davis o: Co., of Indianapolis, this 
burr being used for grinding middlings. 
The engine is forty-horse power, and the mill 
turns out both custom and merchant work. 
The mill has a capacity of seventy -five barrels 
of flour daily, which is of the be;t quality, be- 
ing as white and clear as any roller process, 
and of better grade. 

• A. PAGE. — Prominent among' those 
; , .' '■; who have, by their energy and pub- 
j ^*TJg spirit, contributed so largely to 
the building-. up of the city of Creston stands 
the nafe&ffe Mr. Page, the subject of this 
sketch. He came here from Boone County 
in the fall of 1875, with a view of locating 
here should conditions be favorable. Decid- 
ing in the affirmative he returned to Boone, 
and the following spring established his pres- 
ent business here, which is the hide and 
rendering business. He commenced in a 
small way, but it has grown to be one of the 
most important enterprises of Creston. An 
additional branch of industry was added in 
1886, which consisted in the erection of a 
soap factory by the firm of Page, Derr & Co. 
Tiiis factory has a capacity of -10,000 pounds 
per week ami employs from fifteen to twenty 
hands. Mr. Page has been identified with 
several other enterprises. Do assisted in or- 
ganizing the Creston Savings Bank and was 
made its first president, a position he still 
holds. He is now e-ole proprietor of the 
Creston fair-grounds, which he purchased in 
1S81. The citizens of Creston are much in- 
debted to Mr. Page for improving and beau- 
tifying these ground?. A full account of his 
connections with them will be found elsewhere 
in this work. Mr. Page is a native of Susque- 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



489 



ban n a County, Virginia, where he was born 
July 23, 1850. His father, AmasaA. Page, 

was a native of the fame count}', and his moth- 
er, Mary (Miller) Page, was a native of Massa- 
chusetts. She died March 19, 1S70. Three 
sons and one daughter were born to these par- 
ents. The father remarried, and had two 
children by the second marriage. Mr. Page 
left home in 1871, just as he had attained his 
majority, and began life for himself. In ]S7C 
he settled permanently in Oreston. Mrs. 
Page was formerly Miss Annie Robbins, 
daughter of C. E. Dobbins, of Creston. They 
have two sons — Ralph and Bayard. 



4<X»« 



J^HELBY WILLIS, farmer and stock- 
■^•N raiser, residing on section 21, Pleasant 
•^5^ Township, was born in Shelby County, 
Kentucky, February 29, 1S52, his parents 
being Toliver M. and Sarah J. (Porter) Willis, 
natives also of that State. His mother died 
when he was but three years of age, and at 
the age of four he was taken to Marion 
County, Indiana, where lie lived till lie arrived 
at the age of twelve; from that time until he 
was seventeen he lived again in his native 
county, next in Fountain County, Indiana, 
then Marion County, Iowa, then Jefferson, 
and finally, in 1SC1, lie settled in Union 
County. Having but little property with 
which to start out in the world, he has suc- 
cessfully applied his energies until he has ; 
made for himself a comfortable home. Feb- j 
ruary 25, 1864, he enlisted in Company L, 
Third Iowa Cavalry, and served til! the close j 
of the war, participating in the battles of ; 
Sclina, Alabama; Columbus, Georgia, and Lb- j 
enezer Church, Alabama, etc. At home lie has \ 
served as township trustee, road supervisor, j 
school director, etc. He is a member of the ; 
Eaptist church, and also of the Grand Army j 
of the Republic. Mr. Willis was married j 
March 22, 1855, to Sarah J. Bradley, a native j 
of Illinois. Their oight children : re named j 



Mary E.. John A., Etha S., Lucy A., Sarah 
E., .fames S., Ima F., and Hattie M. Mary 
E. married George W. Wilson, November 
14, 1881, and their two children are — Lyman 
E., born October 31, 1SS3, and Laura G., 
December 13, 1SS5; John A. married Mary 
E. Mewhirter, December 25, 1SS2, and their 
daughter, Addie C, was born June 5, 1SS5; 
Etha S. married Alfred V. Wain, February 
11, 1SS6. 

iEE GREEN GALBREAT1I, section 18, 
? Dodge Township, was born in Henry 

r County, Kentucky, January 23, 1836, a 
son of Samuel and Phoebe (Biankinship) Gal- 
breath, the father born in Henry Count}-, 
Kentucky, in 1808. and the mother a native 
of West Virginia, born in 1812. They were 
married August 20, 1S29, removed to South- 
ern Indiana in 1S36 with their family, remain- 
ing there till 1854, when they settled in Des 
Moines County, Iowa, and in 1857 came to 
Union County, and settled near Afton. They 
are still living in Union County, residing on 
the farm which is occupied by our subject. 
They had a family of ten children bom to 
them, of whom seven are living. Lee G. Gal- 
breath, whose name heads this sketch, was 
reared on the home farm in Indiana, receiving 
his education in the common schools. In 1S5S 
he came to Union County, Iowa, and made 
his home near Afton. He was married Jan- 
uary 5, 1SC0, to Miss Sarah Meharry, a daugh- 
ter of the late Samuel Meharry, who was 
among the early settlers of Highland Town- 
ship, Union County. Mrs. Galbreath was 
born in Licking County. Ohio, May 20, 1844, 
coming with her parents to Washington 
County, Iowa, in 1S55, thence to Monroe 
County, in 1856, and in the spring of 1858 
to L'nion County, where she still lives. Of 
tiie seven children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Galbreath only four arc- living — Samuel L., 
Charles G., Howard E. and Ross. Mr. Gal- 
breath and wife went to the Rocky Mountains 



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in April, I860, returning in October the 
same year to Union County. In 1So2 lie 
settled on his farm of forty acres on secti m 
4, living there fourteen years. In 1876 
he settled on his f-irui on S3ction IS, which 
contains 255 acres of well cultivated land, 
where he Juts sine..' followed farming and 
stock-raising. Mr. Galbreath has held the 
office of township clerk for fifteen years, was 
secretary of the School Board about twenty 
years, and lias ser red as township assessor, 
besides filling other local offices. 



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who married Louisa Bishop, and has four 
children, namely — Roy W., Harry A., Charles 
II. and Horace. Sixth, Sarah C, who mar- 
ried Charles Cooper, they have one child 
named Ethel G. Seventh, James M., and 
eighth, Cora D. 



^mitTIirjR ALLISON, postoffice, Thayer, 
j k.Y is a prominent farmer and stock-raiser 
; ~ -~ on section 21 of Jones Township, where 
he owns 100 acres of well-cnltivated land. 
lie was born near Washington, in old Vir- 
ginia, in the year 1S23, son of Benjamin and 
Mary (Bishop) Allison. The latter was born 
in Morgan County, Ohio, in which county, 
in the year 1S4S, Mr. Allison was' married 
to Sarah Bolinger, who was born in Pennsyl- 
vania in 1S25. Mr. Allison came to Union 
County in 1863, where he is now classed 
among the solid, influential citizens. He is 
very liberal and sympathetic, and of this ex- 
cellence of his nature some unappreciative 
men have taken undue advantage, causing 
him many losses. Mr. Allison has eight 
children, as follows: First, George W., who 
married Deborah Slutz, had two children — 
Dora and Nora M. His wife died and he 
subsequently married Elizabeth Weeter, by 
whom he also had two children — Artie and 
Clyde. Second, Mary, now the wife of John 
Reed; their children are five in number, 
namely — Chester, Ettie A., Sarah, Wallace 
and Maud. Third, Abrani, who married 
Elizabeth Forgey, and has live children — 
Zoa, Lillie, Wilber, Sarah E. and James. 
Fourth, Henry, who married Mary Moler, 
and their live children are — John, Ollie, 
Bertie, Dellia and Stella. Fifth, John A., 



-~5-<r-m 






'GEORGE MILLER, section 25, Highland 

t Township, was horn in Addison County, 
Vermont , September 5, 1S3T, a son of 
Marshall Miller, a native of Williston, Ver- 
mont, who was a farmer and surveyor, and 
helped survey the Western Reserve, in Ohio. 
Our subject was reared on a farm and was 
given the advantages of the best schools of 
his neighborhood, attending the Williston 
Academy. He taught school two terms in 
Vermont, and in 1S59 went to Texas 
County, Missouri, where he remained until 
1861, when he was obliged to leave on ac- 
count of his Union sentiments. He returned 
to Vermont and enlisted soon after in the 
First Vermont Cavalry, Company L, and 
served three years. He participated in the 
battles at Hanover, Gettysburg, Boonsboro, 
Hagerstown, Fallen Waters, Culpeper Court 
House, Raccoon Ford, Brandy Station, Wil- 
derness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Appo- 
mattox and others of minor importance, lie 
was a brave and gallant soldier, always at his 
post when duty called, and although he had 
many narrow escapes, at one time having his 
horse shot from under him, he was uninjured. 
After his discharge he returned to Vermont 
and engaged in farming for some time, and 
subsequently for five years was in the mer- 
cantile business in Williston. In the fall of 
1878 he came to Iowa and iocated in Union 
County, on a tract of wild land, which he at 
once went to work to improve and make a 
home. He now owns a line farm of 010 
acres, and also 300 acres in Southern Mis- 
sonri. He makes a specialty of stock-rais- 
ing, having a fine herd of short-horn cattle. 






... .-. . 



:: 



BIOGRAPHICAL UK'S TC1IES. 



401 



J!r was married August 25, 1SG9, to Hester 
Clark, a native of Williston, Vermont, 
daughter of Piiilo Clark. They have four 
chil Iren — William Jl.. George 0., Martha I. 
and Mcnvin B. Mr. and Mrs. Miller are 
members of the Presbyterian church at Af- 
ioii. 

^HARLES K. INGHAM has been aresi- 
\_ ; dent of Afton since 1S05. lie was born 
'''vj-\ in Warren County, New Jersey, March 
8, 1SI2. His father, Samuel D. Ingham, emi- 
grated to Huntington County, Indiana, with 
his family in 1849, where Charles K. was 
reared. April 24, 1861, he enlisted in Com- 
pany F, Ninth Indiana Infantry, for three 
months, in response to President Lincoln's 
call for 75,000 men. He served his term of 
enlistment in West Virginia. September 21, 
186.1, he re-enlisted in Company G, Thirty- 
fourth Indiana Infantry, and September 23, 
1S64, he veteranized and served until August, 
1865, serving altogether four years and two 
months. His first service in the Thirty-fourth 
was in Kentucky under General Nelson, and 
he participated in the battle of Mill Springs, 
where the Confederate General, Zollicoffer, 
was killed. Immediately after this battle he 
was put on detached service and made a gun- 
ner in a battery, and took part in the second 
day's battle at Shiloh. After this battle one 
gun of the battery was disabled and he 
returned to his regiment at New Madrid, 
Missouri. He participated in the capture of 
Fort Pillow, and the Thirty-fourth was the 
first to enter Memphis in the capture of that 
city; their flag being the first to li sat over the 
Government buildings there. Soon after this 
event his regiment was sent up White River 
to meet General Curtis, and operated between 
that river and Vicksburg until that campaign 
was inaugurated. Ue. participated in the en- 
gagements at Port Gibson and Champion 
Hills, where his regimen; lost heavily. After 
the siege of Vicksburg he returned with his 



regiment to Jackson, Mississippi, thence to 

the Department of the Gulf. At the time of 

| Panics' Perl River campaign he was home on 

! a veteran furlough. After the regiment had 

i veteranized it was sent to the Rio Grande in 
J Texas. Here they fought the last battle of 
the war. known as the battle of White's 
| Ranch, near where the battle of Palo Alto 
| was fought during the Mexican war. Previous 
j to his service in Texas, Mr. Ingham had 
I enjoyed excellent health, and had been con- 
j stantly in the field from the time of hisenlist- 
| ment. lint his health failed dining the Pio 
Grande campaign, and he was discharged for 
disability in August, ISo'o, his regiment serv- 
ing some time longer. He was a gallant 
soldier and made an honorable record. He has 
i never regained his former health and vigor. 
: In 1864 his lather removed to Union County, 
, Iowa, and upon leaving the army he came 
I directly here. lie first engaged in farming 
I for three or four years; but his health being 
J still precarious, he went into the farm imple- 
ment business at Afton, and later in the insur- 
ance business, having been special agent for 
the Phoenix Insurance Company for several 
years. In business matters Mr. Ingham ie 
accurate, and reliable, and as an official, both 
competent and popular. He was married in 
1870 to Emma Ballard, a daughter of S. P. 
Ballard, who came to this county in 1856. 
Mrs. Ingham is a native of Ohio, born in 
1844. They have two children — Lena and 
Stephen M. February 28, 1883, Mr. Ingham 
was appointed postmaster and served credit- 
ably; but he has recently been removed, for 
political reasons only. 



-S=— SOO>«3K= 



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SjILLIAM GROESBECK, residing on 

,/ section JO, New Hope Township, is 

": one of the most enterprising and 

prosperous agriculturists of Union County, 

where he has made his home since the spring 

of 1854. He is a native of Ohio, born in 



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493 



HISTORY OF UNION COUNTY. 



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Portage County, July 2, 18-2-0. » son of Gar- 
rett L. Grocsbeck, who died in this township 
in 1876. Our subject has lived in the State 
of Iowa since 1838, his parents coming here 
in that year, when they settled in Lee County. 
He received the rudiment? of an education, 
attending in his boyhood (lie rude log-cabin 
schools, with their puncheon floors, slab seats 
and stick and clay chimney. He grew to raan- 
, hood on the home farm, and early in life 
learned habits of industry and perseverance, 
which have been of much benefit to him 
through life, and have helped him'to become 
one of the largest landholders in Ids town- 
ship, and one of the most respected citizens 
as well. lie has made his home in New Hope 
Township, on the farm where he still resides, 
since corning to Union County, and is now 
the owner of 1,000 acres of choice laud. In 
connection with his farming and stock-raisins 
he has of late years been engaged in the 
manufacture of cheese in which he is meeting 
with success,, his cheese being of a fine qual- 
ity, and suld at reasonable price. Air. Groes- 
beck was united in marriage in the spring of 
1855 to Miss Susan C. Fenner, a daughter of 
Joseph Fenner, deceased, and to this union 
have been born ten children, of whom four are 
deceased. The names of those yet living are: — 
Mercy, Adam F., Walter II., Ruth, Frederick 
L. and William. Mr. Grocsbeck is a member 
of theDunkard church, in which ho is an elder. 
Since coming to Union County he has several 
times been elected to the office of county 
supervisor. He has also served several years as 
justice of the peace, and in both offices he has 
served with credit to himself and to the satis- 
faction of his constituents. 

^fjfAMES SYP, an enterprising agricultur 

j- n ist of Sand Creek Township, residing j 
-;- on section 10, is a native of Ohio, born i 
in Miami County January 2, 1830, and there j 
he was reared on his father's farm till twenty 
years old. He then came with his parents to i 



Henry County, Iowa, and soon after com- 
menced life on his own account, beginning on 
about six acres of land given him by his father. 
He was married, April 6, 1854, to Miss Ross, 
daughter of John and Mary (Perd'a) Ross, who 
were both natives of Pennsylvania, the. father 
being a farmer by occupation. Her parents 
subsequently went to California, where both 
died. This union has been blessed with five 
children. Laurena, born Juno 10, 1S55, is the 
wife of P. Owens; Logan P. was born July 
7, 1857; Mary E., was born September 13, 
1859; Nettie A., born August 30, 1863, and 
Yilna R was born Octobers, 1S6S. Mr. Syp 
remained in Henry County seven years, and 
in 1S57 came to Union County, and settled 
southeast of Afton, living there a short time, 
when he removed to his present farm, where 
he has since followed farming and stock-rais- 
ing. His homo farm contains 2S0 acres of 
choice land. In his religious views Mr. Syp 
believes in the doctrines of the Seventh-Day 
Adventists. In politics he affiliates with the 
Greenback party. The parents of our subject 
were both natives of Warren County, Ohio, 
the father born March 7, 1807, died April 
31, 1884; the mother born March 27, 1812; 
died August 9, 1871. 



^ V. HOAKISON, farmer and stock- 
* | raiser, resides on section 1, Spaulding 
-"i Q Township, where he owns 160 acres of 
good and well cultivated land. He was born 
in Sweden, in 1842, the son of Jonas and 
Carrie. Hoakison, who emigrated from Sweden 
to America in 1849, settling in DesMoines 
County, Iowa. Jonas Hoakison died Decem- 
ber 5, 1865, and his wife, Carrie Hoakison, 
April 6, 1871. The subject of this sketch 
lived for awhile in Jefferson County, Iowa, 
and in 1870 he located where lie now resides. 
lie has always been a farmer, and has been 
successful in his vocation. Commencing in 
life without a dollar, by the steady habits 



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BIOGRA1 >MCA L . SKE TCI I EX. 



characteristic of his nationality, lie lias ac- 
quired a nice property. He is a member of 
the Grand Armv of the Republic and of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. He enlisted ia 
the late war in 1S61, Company 0, Fourth Iowa 
Volunteer Cavalry, and served three, years, 
participating in the battle and siege of Yicks- 
burg, Jackson, .Mississippi, Guntown, etc., 
where he was severely wounded. He is a 
patriot and a highly respected citizen. He 
was married in 1878, in Jefferson County, 
Iowa, to Miss Jemima, daughter of Elias and 
Catharine Rubey, who was born in Pickaway 
County, Ohio, in 1845. .Mr. and Mrs. Iloaki- 
son are the parents of three children, named 
Nellie, Lillie and Alice. 

| OBERT M. McKNIGHT, an active 
4'Kk fanner and stock-raiser, living on scc- 
*^t_\ tion 26, Lincoln Township, was born 
July 25, 184:4, in Washington County, In- 
diana, a son of William McKnight, who was 
a native of Kentucky, and an early settler of 
Indiana. Our subject was reared to manhood 
on a farm in his native State, receiving in his 
youth the benefit of the district schools, where 
he obtained a common-school education. 
During the late war lie enlisted in the war 
of the Rebellion in Company B, Sixteenth 
Indiana Infantry, to serve three years. He 
participated in twenty hard-fought battles, 
including Richmond, Kentucky, Arkansas 
Post, Port Gibson, and was through the 
Vicksburg campaign, and on the Red River 
expedition. He was wounded at the battle 
of Arkansas Post, and to this day carries 
three small shot in his body which he re- 
ceived there. He was taken prisoner at 
Alexandria and was kept at Tyler, Texas, 
thirteen mouths, leaving that place in an al- 
most naked and starved condition. Mr. 
McKnight came to Union County in 1S66, 
when he settled in Lincoln Township, and in 
1869 settled on his present farm, where he 



has 130 acres of choice land, and in connec- 
tion with his genera] farming he is devoting 
considerable attention to raising graded 
stock. Mr. McKnight was united in marriage 
November 7, 1SGS, to Miss Rachel Dillow, a 
daughter of Frederick Dillow, who is de- 
ceased. To this union have been born five 
children, of whom three are living — Isadora, 
Inistelle, and Myrta M. Flora and Hugh 
are deceased. Mr. McKnight has served his 
township as assessor for three years, and has 
also served as school director and road super- 
visor for several years. 



-o— <DesSs}>-»- 



oJ}5» 



IP^DWARDP. WRIGHT, residing on sec- 
\rr] tion 16, Sand Creek Township, is a 
cipi native of Illinois, born in Fulton County 
January 24, 1S34. When eight years old he 
moved with his parents to Stark County, 
Illinois, and there he was reared and educated 
in the common school. He was married in 
Toulon, Stark County, February 25, 1856, 
and to Mr. and Mrs. Wright have been born 
eight children, six of whom are yet living — 
Freeman P., bom in November, 1856; Elva 
Maria, born in September, 185S; Samuel II., 
born in October, 1860; Julia M., born on .New- 
Year's Day, 1863; William A., born in May, 
1868; Charles 0., born on Christmas, I860; 
Edward E., born in January, 1872, and Alva 
M., born in October, 1877. Mr. Wright was 
a soldier in the late war, being a member of 
Company G, [One Hundred and Twelfth Illi- 
' nois Infantry. He took part in twenty battles 
I and was in ninety-seven skirmishes, receiving 
j a slight wound at the battle of Nashville, 
j Tennessee. He is now a member of Henry 
! Keating Post, No. 211, G. A. R., of Afton. 
Mr. Wright made his home in Stark and 
'; Henry counties, Illinois, until 1SS5, when lie 
removed with his family to his present farm 
in Union County, Iowa, where he has 320 
acres of tillable land on sections 16 and 21 of 
Sand Creek Township. In connection with 



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IIISTOTtV OF UNION COUNTT. 



his general fanning he has devoted consider- , the first laud sales in Iowa, after which he 
able attention to stock raising, and has on his ' returned to the State of Ohio, and in 1S3S 
farm a large number of line cattle and horses. settled in Lee County , Iowa, remaining there 
Mr. Wright is already classed among the best, till he removed to Union County in the spring 
fanners of Union County, lie has always ! of 18W. He was married April -t, 1821, to 
been a hard-working citizen, and his success j Miss Mercy Bosworth, who was bom March 
in life is due to his industrious habits and j 13, 1803, in Oneida Count), New York, 
good business management. In his political | daughter of Dan Bosworth, who went to Ohio 



sentiment he is an ardent Republican 
Mr. and Mrs. Wright are members 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



Both 
of the 



JSAAC BURD, a prominent farmer and 
stock-raiser on section 22, Jones Town- 



to look at land as early as 1S12. Nine children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Grocsbeck, and, of 
this number, seven arc living— Adelia, 
Henry, Maria, William, Amelia, Dan V. and 
Cordelia A. Mr. Groesbeck died Jan uary 1 1 , 
1S76, his death causing universal regret- 
throughout the township where he had made 
his home for so many years. Hewasamera- 
■V ship, is a son of Jacob and Sarah (Lera) I ber of the Methodist Episcopal church over 
Burd, natives of the State of Pennsylvania, forty-six years, and was a well-known and 
and of German descent. tate | highly respected citizen. His widow is still 

living, aged over eighty-four years, and is 
making her home with her son, William 
Groesbeck, of New Hope Township. She is, 
likelier husband, a consistent member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

|p|DWARD SCHIFFERLE, M. D., Ores. 
P.'-. ton, Iowa, was born in Delvalb County, 
'^. Illinois, August 29, 1S57. His parents, 
Herman and Margaret Schifferle, are natives 
of Switzerland. His father is engaged in the 
boot and shoe trade at Somonauk, DeKalb, 
County. Dr. Schifferle received his prelim- 
inary education in his native town, gradu- 
ating at the high school at Somonauk. In 
1S7S he entered the University of Noire 
Dame, Indiana, where he pursued the study 
of medicine one year. The institution was 
destroyed by fire, and he entered St. Francis 
College, at Milwaukee, where he pursued a 
classical course one year, then engaged in 
teaching in his native town one year. He 
graduated at Rush Medical College, Chicago, 
in ISSi, after taking a three years' course of 
lectures. Dr. Schifferle is a thorough stu- 



that Mr. Burd grew to manhood on a 
farm, learning the noble vocation which he 
has since so successfully followed. He com- 
menced in life a poor man; but by his energy 
and good management, assisted by his esti- 
mable wife, he has acquired a large property, 
now being the owner of 190 acres of land, in 
a state of high cultivation, and furnished with 
good residence and farm buildings. He was 
married in Pennsylvania to Margaret Reis- 
dorff, and they are now the parents of eight 
children, namely, James, Ellen, Jacob, John, 
Malinda, Carrie, Fannie and Lettie. In his 
political views Mr. Burd is a Democrat, and 
he has held ail the offices of his township. 
Postoffice, Thayer. 

•"■;A1!I;K'1T LEWIS GROESBECK, late 
fx of New Hope Township, was born at 

v 7-i Scliaghticokc Point, New York. Febru- 
ary 1, 1795, his father, Lewis Groesbeck, being 
born in Holland. G. L. Groesbeck was a 
millwright by trade, which he followed for 
many years in Ohio. He also helped to in- 
vent the Mel lonnell Water Wheel. lie came 
to Lee County. Iowa, in 183G, and attended 






■ 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



dent and hns a natural liking for the med- 
ical profession — elements that arc essential 
to the successful physician. Although he 
has graduated from one of the best medical 

colleges in this country, his intention is, at 
no distant day, to enter the celebrated Heidel- 
berg University, Germany, to more fully per- 
fect himself in his profession. He has 
already- established a good practice, and is a 
member of the United States Board of Pen- 
sion Examiners. 

§S. POWER, a prominent farmer of Jones 
Township, residing on section 15, where 
«5^ a he is the owner of 700 acres of land in 
a high state of cultivation, was born in Brack- 
en County, Kentucky, in 1813, the son of 
Joseph and Nancy (Ballenger) Power. The 
parents, who were, natives of old Virginia, 
moved to Kentucky in a very early day, the 
lather followed boating on the river. The 
subject of this sketch grew to manhood on the 
farm in his native State ; but at the age of 
sixteen years he began to work at gunsmith- 
ing. At the age of twenty-one he moved to 
Milton, Wayne County, Indiana, continuing 
at his trade three years longer ; thence lie 
moved to Morgan County, Illinois, and thence 
to Burlington, Iowa, carrying on the first 
gnnshop in that city for about three years. 
Selling out, he removed to Wayne County, 
Iowa, in 1843, and one year later he came to 
Union County. Mr. Power has been twice 
married — the first time in Whitehall, Greene 
County, Illinois, in 183S, to Miss Elizabeth, 
daughter of Peter and Mary Frank, natives 
of Pennsylvania and of German descent. By 
this marriage there were live children, four 
of whom are living. The names of all are: 
Nancy A., deceased, Samuel K., Mary, James 
and Robert. Nancy A. married John Van 
Busk irk, and had three children — Francis M., 
Jeremiah and George; Samuel K. married 
Sophia Bishop, and had three children — 



William J., Felix R. and Ralph C. : Mary 
married William Benedict, and their children 
were four — Charles, Harvey, Jndson and 
Myrtle; and .lames married Christona C. 
Janson, and their two children are Estella P. 
and an infant not named. Airs. Power died 
November 5, 1S05, and the following year Mr. 
Power married, in Afton, Iowa, Mrs.Mary M. 
Bishop, daughter of James and Rachel Mes- 
senger. She was born in Morrow County, 
Ohio, October 2S, 1S34. By this marriage 
there is one child, Leona M., who married J. 
B. La Pavre. and has one child, George C. 
Mr. Power has held the ofliceof justice of the 
peace four .years, township treasurer and 
minor offices in his township, lie is. truly a 
self-made man, commencing in the world 
with no means but his hands ajid brain, and 
a will to use them. He has accordingly ac- 
quired a large estate, and has contributed 
liberally to all the enterprises that have been 
inaugurated in his vicinity. Ills grandfather 
was a Captain in the Revolutionary War, and 
his father was in the war of 1SI2. The former 
was shot through the body, and through the 
wound, from one side ot his body to the 
other, a silk handkerchief was drawn seven 
times, and yet he recovered! At another 
time his horse jumped a ditch with him thirty 
feet wide! Mr. Power, the subject of the 
foregoing sketch, is a clear-headed business 
man, and socially he is an affable gentleman. 
Politically he is a Democrat. 



-*-■ &«pp£« 4-0 



,\-1 W. MAYIIEW, retired farmer, resid- 
ing on section 10, Sand Creek Town- 
ship, is a native of New England, 
born May 22, 1803. At the, age of nine 
years he was taken by his parents to Mt. 
Pleasant, Jefferson County, Ohio, where they 
remained one year, removing thence to 
Washington County, Ohio. G. W. May hew 
remained at the home of his parents til! 
twenty years of age, when he went to Illinois, 



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whore he followed (he avocation of a farmer 
till 1S33. He came to Iowa in that year and 
settled on the farm in Union County where 
he lias since made his home, where he has 
forty acres of well improved land under a 
high state of cultivation. Tie has followed 
farming till of laic years, when he retired 
from active life, and is now taking that rest 
which is the reward of his years of toil and 
industry. He has two sons living — Morris, 
the eldest, now living in Montgomery County, 
Iowa, and Sheldon, who farms the old home- 
stead, on section 10, Sand Creek Township. 
The latter was a soldier in the war of the 
Rebellion, serving three years in the defense 
of his country. He is a member of the 
Grand Army Post at Afton, and is in politics 
a staunch Greenbacker. He was married 1o 
Miss Rosa Dickinson, and they are the 
parents of six children — Jessie, Hattie, Hud- 
lex-, Bessie, Mamie, and Grant and Grace 
(twins). 



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^=7 AMES D. TURNER is a native of 
V North Carolina, born in Guilford County, 
z^ April 8, 1S25, a son of Abraham Turner, 
who was also a native of the same State. 
The parents of our subject removed to Mor- 
gan County, Indiana, in the year 1S35, and 
there he was reared to manhood, on a farm, 
his education being obtained in the log-cabin 
subscription school of that early day. He was 
united in marriage December 4, 1S51, to Miss 
Elizabeth A. Woodward, she being a daugh- 
ter of William Woodward, who is a resident 
of Indiana. To this union were born fifteen 
children, thirteen of them still living. The 
names of those yet living are — John S., Will- 
iam A., Wesley D., Jesse E., Mary J.. Ira 
M., Edgar S., Lyman C, Albert E.,'Ora W., 
Nancy E., Charles M., and Carl 1'. Mr. 
Turner came to Union County, Iowa, with 
his family in September, 1SG0, and has since 
made his home on section 10, of Dod<re 



Township, where he has a good farm, and is 
meeting with fair success in his agricultural 
pursuits. He has always been an industri- 
ous, hard-working man, and has by his quiet 
and unassuming manners gained the respect 
of all who know him. He is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 



T=?|AYID COFFEEN, a prominent farmer 
'il A of Spanlding Township, resides on sec- 

k>0 tion 35, where he owns 1G0 acres of 
choice land under a high state of cultivation. 
He was born in Jefferson County, New York, 
in 1S3-1, a son of David and Mahala (Hovey) 
Coffeen, natives also of the Empire State. He 
remained in his native state until manhood, 
and subsequently moved to Wisconsin, where 
he was living at the breaking out of the war 
of the Rebellion. In 1863 he enlisted in re- 
sponse of his country's call, and was assigned 
to Company I, Fifth Wisconsin Infantry, 
Sixth Army Corps, and was afterward trans- 
ferred to Company B, same regiment. He 
served eighteen months, and was honorably 
discharged at Madison, Wisconsin, in 1SC5. 
He participated in the battles of Cold Harbor, 
the Wilderness, Appomattox, Spottsylvania 
Court-House, Petersburg, Winchester, Har- 
per's Ferry, and many others of less note. After 
his discharge he returned home and lived in 
Wisconsin until 1809, when he moved to 
Iowa, and settled in Adair and Union coun- 
ties where he has since lived. He is in every 
sense a self-made man; starting in life poor, 
he has by hard work and economy accumu- 
lated a good property and now has a compe- 
tency for his old age. In politics Mr. Coffoen 
is a Greenbacker. Ho was married Septem- 
ber 30, 1855, to Julia A. Byer, a native of 
Jefferson County, New York, born in 1837, a 
daughter of Solomon and Sarah Byer. Her 
father died November 29, 1SS0, aged eighty- 
four years, and her mother is still living, 



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making her home with .Mrs. Coffeeu. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Colleen have been born five chil- 
dren; but three are living — Frank, Jason and 
Emma. 

— e-£3>- 



. (TANFORD A. BREWSTER, editor 
'• K "N\ and proprietor of the daily and weekly 
V.- Advertiser, of Creston, and manufact- 
urer of blank books, is a son of George AY. 
and Sarah Maria (Fells) Brewster, natives of 
Massachusetts and New Hampshire, respect- 
ively. Mr. Brewster died in Illinois, and 
Mrs. Brewster, who yet survives, resides at 
Creston. Stanford A. was born April 27, 
1853, at Wellington, Ohio, and was but eleven 
years old when his father died. He received 
very few educational advantages, and was 
early faced with the necessity of gaining his 
own livelihood. Taking advantage of the first 
opening, at thirteen years of age, he entered 
the office of the Lorain County lYeios, at 
Oberlin, Ohio. He had previously learned 
something of the printer's trade in his father's 
printing office, so that he now received wages 
from the start, though amounting to only 
$2.00 per week. After six months in this 
office he went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, 
desirous of bettering his condition, and for 
three months was newsboy on a short railroad 
line extending from Minneapolis to St. Paul. 
This employment suited him but three months. 
For about an equal time he was employed in 
a furniture factory, and for nine months more 
he filled the position of bell-boy in the Nicho- 
let House. He returned to Oberlin to re- 
enter school, but very soon found himself 
back at his trade, which he followed at Ober- 
lin nearly a year, this time. He came to Chi- 
cago and was apprenticed to a job printer, but 
when thegreat lire came he left for the country. 
Working for some time in different places, 
he returned to Chicago, perfected himself in 
a knowledge of job printing, and came to 
Creston in January, 1S7G, possessed of but 



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75 cents. He was for one year employed 
as foreman in the Gazette office, and then 
leased the Democrat office, in partnership 
with W. M. Fatton. Three months later he 
bought Pattou's interest in the lease-hold, and 
then formed a partnership with Ed. C. Puis- 
sell, proprietor of the establishment. The linn 
of Russell & Brewster existed but one year, 
when Mr. Brewster purchased a plant in 
Omaha, mostly on credit, brought it: to Cres- 
ton and started a job office. In due time he 
established the Advertiser. First a free ad- 
vertising sheet, it is now a profitable and im- 
portant daily and weekly local newspaper. A 
blank bouk manufactory was added later, and 
now Mr. Brewster owns an extensive, busy 
printing establishment in Liberty Block, and 
also a nice home on Maple street. lie is 
every whit a self-made man, and the results 
he has achieved with no capital but 
his own pluck and perseverance are worthy 
of the highest praise. Mr. Brewster was mar- 
ried September 1, 1S7S, at Creston, to Clara 
A. Hoffman. Of two children, the first died 
in infancy, and Nellie May is now six years 
old. Mr. Brewster is a member of the An- 
cient Order of United Workmen. 

H st^^^^s-*- — j- 

HJ|NDREW J. BIVENS has been a resi- 
jjjM dent of Creston since October IS, 1S74. 
~!~- He has been engaged in the real estate 
and insurance business since 1675. Hewas 
born in Washington, Daviess County, In- 
diana, in 1837, where he resided until twenty- 
two years of age, and where he was reared to 
the occupation of a farmer. His father, Israel 
Bivens, was a native of Lexington, Kentucky, 
and married Mary Hendrick, removing to 
Indiana, where he passed the remainder of 
his days. His wife is still living. In 1859 
Mr. Bivens married Miss Susan McBride, 
and soon after removed to Warren County, 
Illinois, where he engaged in farming. Fail- 
ing health compelled him to change location 






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find occupation, and lie accordingly came to 
Iowa and engaged in his present business. 
His health was soon restored. Mr. and Mrs. 
likens have ten children — five sons and five 
daughters. The)' lost their oldest son in 
Illinois. Politically Mr. Bivens is a Demo- 
crat. His parents had ten children, eight 
daughters and two sons. ;V sister, Mrs. 
America McBride, resides in Creston. No 
other members of the family reside in Iowa. 
The parents of Mrs. Bivens were John and 
Elizabeth McBride. They removed from In- 
diana to Illinois with Mr. and Mrs. Bivens, 
with whom they lived until their decease. 
Mrs. Bivens was the only daughter. There 
were three sons, one of whom, Samuel, resides 
in Creston. 



/CTACOB GEIEB, engaged in agriculture and 
"j\\ the raising of domestic animals on section 
)?£ 18, Douglas Township, was born in the 
State of New York, October 20, 1846, the son 
of John M. and Elizabeth (Winkle) Geier, 
natives of Bavaria; mother died in 1853, and 
father resides in Minnesota. The subject of 
this notice was reared on a farm, and has thus 
far in life pursued the vocation of agriculture. 
In 1SG5 he enlisted in Company K, First 
Wisconsin Volunteer Cavalry, and was mus- 
tered out at Nashville, Tennessee, July 29, 
1SC5. In 1S70, in Benton County. Iowa, he 
married Miss Cordelia, daughter of Jacob and 
Elizabeth (Hart) Betts, of Pennsylvania: : 
parents are now living in Black Hawk County, ! 
Iowa. She was born in Pennsylvania, in j 
1S51. Mr. and Mrs. Geier have three children ; 
— George E., Minnie M. and Edna E. Mr. • 
Geier has eighty acres of land, in a fine state i 
of cultivation. His comfortable home he has j 
earned by the honest toil of his own hands, j 
lie has considerable property besides his 
farm. He is a kind neighbor and friend, and j 
a respected citizen. Religiously, his views j 
are liberal, and not hedged about by the doc- 



trines of any particular creed, lie maintains 
that religion consists in the religion of human- 
ity, and that we cannot add to the happiness 
of an infinite God, but can to the happiness of 
man. Politically, he is a Greenbacker, and 
has been always ready to advance every public 
enterprise which in his judgment is calculated 
to benefit mankind. Postoflicc, Cromwell. 

H -=»s2»£^£?«?tf- i- 

■T-EWIS J. WILLIAMSON.— Among the 
y.\0s wealthy and influential farmers and 
%Sr stock-raisers of Jones Township is the 
gentleman whose name heads this sketch, who 
resides on section 19, the owner of 530 acres 
of fine farming land, in a good state of culti- 
vation. His parents, Lewis and Catherine 
(Wise) Williamson, were natives of the Key- 
stone State, the former of Scotch, the latter 
of German descent. His ancestors have all 
been in America for six generations. Mr. 
Williamson's mother's great-grandfather, Mr. 
Wise, when a boy, came to America, and was 
sold for his passage. His parents were born 
and reared in East Pennsylvania, and soon 
after they were married emigrated to the then 
very new settlement of West Pennsylvania, 
near Pittsburg, where the father died in 
1832. Our subject grew to manhood in dif- 
ferent counties in Ohio, working at the 
blacksmith's trade two years when j'oung. In 
1S52 he came West and settled in Van Bureu 
County, Iowa, where he followed milling two 
years; in 1S5G he removed to Union County, 
bringing a saw-mill with him, becoming one 
of the first settlers north of Afton; indeed, 
there were but very few settlers in the county 
at that time. After manufacturing lumber 
near Afton for about three years, he, in 1S59, 
purchased his present farm, on which there 
was but little improvement, and which, under 
his prudent management, has been brought 
to its present valuable condition. In 1862 
he enlisted in Company II, Twenty-ninth 
Iowa Infantry Volunteers, and served in the 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. ia a 






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war three years, participating in the battles 
tit Helena and Little Rock, Arkansas, Jenkins' 
Ferry, Mobile, Alabama, siege of Spanish 
Fort, etc., etc. Mr. Williamson is a Spirit- 
ualist in religious belief, liberal, allowing all 
others what he claims for himself — the ri^ht 
to do his own thinking. He is well informed 
on scientific subjects, is social, and therefore 
one whose companionship is desirable. Mr. 
Williamson's first marriage took place in Van 
Buren County, Iowa, in 1S51, when Amelia 
B. Douglass became his wife; she was born 
in Ohio, in 1S29. By that marriage there 
were six children, four of whom are living, 
namely— Eva L., the wife of Sylvester Carter, 
who have one child, Lewis; Albert J., Olive 
A. and Horace E. Their mother died in 
January, 1875, and Mr. "Williamson was mar- 
ried, in 1878, to Mrs. Sarah E., widow of the 
late Henry Allen, and by this marriage there 
has been one child, Victor Leroy, now de- 
ceased. Mrs. Williamson is a daughter of 
Jacob and Anna (Merrill) Eoudebush, and was 
born May 28, 1843. She was first married to 
John Holdren, by whom she had two chil- 
dren—Anna E. and Ida. The latter is now 
the wife of William D. Moore, of Creston, 
and has two children — Alice and Merrill. She 
has also a daughter by her second marriage — 
Jennie Allen. 

.' ! OH.N BEXXISOX, merchant at Creston, 
"M\ was born in Shullsburg, Wisconsin, in 
•t 1857, a son of John Bennison. The latter 
was born in Manchester, England, in 1819, 
and came to this country in 1845 and located 
at Pittsburg. Pennsylvania, and there was mar- 
ried to Miss Lizzie Diinick in 1818, and in 
1850 removed to Shullsburg, Wisconsin, 
where he engaged in the mercantile, lead and 
ore business until the fall of 1865. He then 
removed to Kewanee, Illinois, where he en- 
gaged in the mercantile trade with his 
brothers, in the firm name of Bennison Broth- 



ers. As the sons grew to manhood and desired 
to engage in business, the father purchased 
his brothers' interest and took his sons as 
partners. After a time the father retired from 
the firm and left his sons in charge, who re- 
tained the name of Bennison Brothers. Their 
business is still continued at Kewanee, and 
they have also established a store at Omaha, 
Nebraska. The dry goods house of Bennison 
Brothers was established at Creston May J, 
1S82. They first located at Xo. 113 Montgom- 
ery street. They are now on the corner of 
Maple and Montgomery streets, Xos. 12G and 
205, respectively. This firm started business 
in a small way, but have enlarged their stock 
and .increased their patronage until they now 
have the largest dry-goods house in Creston. 
Their salesroom is 30 x 100 feet, with an ell 
30 x 50 feet. Their stock of goods is complete 
in every department. John Bennison has 
sole charge of the business at Creston. He 
was married in Illinois, in 1SS2, to Miss 
Bessie Whitmore, and they have one son — 
Faye, who was born in 1S83. 



;T~tT; M. JAMES, a successful farmer and 
\.l/ V/,} stock-raiser, living on section 2. 

itv-~5° Grant Township, is a son of C. 11. 
and Julia James, natives of Pennsylvania, the 
father born in August, 1816, and the mother 
in 1821. They are still living and are making 
their home in Lucas County, Iowa. Mr. 
James was reared to the vocation of a farmer, 
which he has made his life work, having been 
engaged in agricultural put suits from his 
youth, with the exception of three years spent 
in the army during the war of the Rebellion. 
He enlisted in Company E, Thirty-fourth 
Iowa Infantry, and took part in the battles 
of Vicksburg and Arkansas Post, and others 
of less note. He was honorably discharged 
at St. Louis, Missouri, May 25, 1865, when 
he returned to his home, which at that time 
was in Iowa. He was married, September 17.. 



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500 HISTORY OF UNION COUNT)-. 



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1868, to Mi6s Amanda Laycock, who was i heavy hardware, stoves, tinware, hardwood 



born May 28, 1815, a daughter of Jacob and 
Rebecca Laycock. Mr. and Mrs. James have 
three children — Jennie R., born June 17, 
1S69; Everette C, born September 1, 1S7S, 
| and Eva J., born May 6, lS7i. .Mr. James 
t] •• lived two yean, at Grand River, Iowa, during 
which time he dealt in agricultural imple- 
ments; then, selling out his business, he re- 
turned to Afton, Union County, and from 
there to his farm, where he now resides. He 
is numbered among the well-to-do farmers of 
Grant Township, where he has a good farm 
containing eighty acres, on which he has a 
commodious and convenient house, and good 
farm buildings. Mr. James is a member of 
Henry Keating Poet, No. 211, G. A. R, of 
Afton. Both he and his wife and eldest 
daughter belong to the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 



V~~*% S. KEITH, who, in partnership with 
\\ r \] John A. Evans, is proprietor of the 
^.V 7 lumber, hardware, wagon and carriage- 
stock establishment at 2SS North Pine street, 
was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, in 
1850. His parents were A. F. and Eliza 
Johnson) Keith, natives of Ohio and Penn- 
sylvania, and of Scotch and German ancestry. 
In 1S53 the family moved to Linn County, 
Iowa, where they remained a year; were next 
in Cedar County two years, and Mr. Keith 
was then in Muscatine CountyTuntil their re- 
moval to Union County, in October, 1879. 
Mr. Keith was reared in the hardware busi- 
ness, attending school a portion of the time 
of bis youth. At the age of nineteen years 
he learned the tinner's trade. On commenc- 
ing in business he had but $75, and he bor- 
rowed $1,000, and proved worthy of his trust 
by his faithful business management. The 
firm now cany about §10,000 worth of stock, 
and their sales amount annually to about 
$25,000. Their stock comprises shelf and 



• 



lumber, wagon and carriage wood stock and 
hardware, bar iron and steel. Tlnce hands 
arc constantly employed, sometimes four. 
Mr. Keith was married in Muscatine Coun- 
ty, Iowa, in 1874, to Miss Lizzie M., daugh- 
ter of Zenas Barnes; she was born in Geauga 
Comity, Ohio, in 1852. Mr. Keith owns his 
residence, besides other real estate. In his 
political action he votes with the Republicans. 

-»&= »-=3^e^-c- c$5«. 

"pvANlEL A. WYCOFF resides on section 
in S, Union Township, where he settled iu 
t-3? the spring of 1857. He purchased his 
farm of 160 acres of Joseph Peck, who was 
one of the early settlers of Union County. 
About thirty acres had beeu fenced, and 
twenty or twenty-five acres had been broken; 
a part of his present residence had also been 
built. Mr. Wycoff was born in Mercer 
County, Kentucky, March G, 1811, son of 
Nicholas Wycoff, a native of New Jersey, who 
removed to Kentucky with his family several 
years before the birth of our subject. Late in 
life he and his wife removed to Indiana and 
resided with their eldest son until the death 
of the father; the mother then went to Johnson 
County and lived with a daughter until her 
demise. Mr. Daniel "Wycoff is the youngest 
of fifteen children — nine sons and six daugh- 
ters. All are now deceased except two sons. 
He is the only one of his father's family that 
settled in Union County. He was married 
in his native State, to Miss Ann Wilson, and 
about 1810 removed with his family to 
Switzerland County, Indiana, thence to Deca- 
tur County, and finally to Union County. Mrs. 
Wycoff died in Indiana, in 1853. She was 
the mother of nine children— six sons and three 
daughters; two sons and one daughter are 
now living. For his second wife Mr. Wycoff 
married Catherine Riggor, who died May 28, 
1 3S5. They had four children — two sons and 
two daughters. Ills present wife is Margaret 



■'■■ 






BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



Wilson. Cut few people are now living in 
this township who resided here when Mr. 
Wjcoffcarae. He lias witnessed the growth 
of the county from its primitive state to its 
present improved and attractive condition. 
While his sympathies have, politically, been 
with the Republican party, he has not allowed 
party prejudice to influence bis better judg- 
ment, and be intends to vote for the best 
men, whatever their political views may be. 
He has been a member of the Methodist 
church for forty years. 



]f\D. A. ALDRICH is engaged in the 
Yr). drug business at Creston, and is lo- 
"upi cated on Montgomery street, his store 
being in the brick block known as the Eagle 
Block. Mr. Aldrich succeeded Morrow & 
Co. in May, 1886. The business was estab- 
lished by J. N. Tremain, on Pine street, in 
18S0. Mr. Tremain was succeeded by J. W. 
Timmerman, who continued on Pine street 
until the Eagle Block was built, since which 
time it has been conducted in its present lo- 
cation. In September, 1S83, Mr. Timmer- 
man died, and Black & Wells succeeded to 
the business. The next change was to Mor- 
row & Co., and then Mr. Aldrich became 
proprietor. He came to Creston in 18S0, and 
has considered this place his home ever since, 
although be was absent from August, 188-1, 
until May, 1886, being engaged in the drug 
business in Texas. He was born in Berkshire 
County, Massachusetts, in 1851. In 1S5G 
his father, E. J. Aldrich, removed with his 
family to Lee County, Iowa, but is now a 
resident of Pottawatomie County. In 1S71 
Mi-. Aldrich took a course of instruction at 
the School of Pharmacy in Chicago, and was 
subsequently engaged live years as a druggist 
clerk in that city and Geneva, Illinois. He 
then went toWest Liberty, Muscatine County, 
Iowa, and engaged in business under the firm 
name of Aldrich A' Gibbs, coming from West 



Liberty to Creston. Mr. Aldrich posses^cs a 
thorough knowledge of his business, and has 
had many years' experience as a practical 
druggist. Mrs. Aldrich was formerly Emma 
C. Keith, daughter of A. F. Keith. They 
have two sons — Clifford K. and Harry C. 

fX^ J. MYERS, M. D., is the Homeopathic 
f/Vv physician and surgeon of Creston. He 
T^;i?5 settled here June 15, 1S79, and is the 
second resident physician of his school in 
the city, the first being Dr. T. L. Andrews. 
Dr. Myers was born in Lancaster County, 
Pennsylvania, January 12, 1854. When he 
was ten years of age his father removed with 
his family to McDonough County, Illinois. 
He began the study of his profession at 
Macomb, in 1875, with Dr. B. R. Westfall, 
and graduated at the Hahnemann Medical 
College, Chicago, in February, 187S. After 
graduating he engaged in practice in Wash- 
ington, Illinois. The school of medicine to 
which Dr. Myers belongs is rapidly growing 
into favor as its many virtues become known 
to the people. He has a large, lucrative 
practice, which is increasing year by year. 
He was married, at Creston, to Miss Mar- 
garet Silverthorne, daughter of O. J. Silver- 
thorne, formerly of Creston. 



m S. PERRY is a native of New York 
C) State, born December 5, 1846, a son 



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Q of John F. and Christiana (McCum- 
ber) Perry, who were natives of New York. 
Our subject left his native State in 1854, when 
be accompanied his parents to Illinois, and 
in that State he grew to manhood, receiv- 
ing in the district schools a very limited edu- 
cation. He was united in marriage February 
IS, 1874, to Miss Sarah Stickland, a daughter 
of George and Olive (Sheldon) Stickland, her 
father being a native of England, and her 



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mother of Canada. Mr. and Mrs. Perry arc 
tlio parents of three children — Harry S., born 
December 22, 1874; Harvey 0.. born Jul}" 
15, 1878, and Joseph L, born May 30, 18S1. 
Mr. Perry remained in Illinois until 1S76, 
when be came to Union Count}", Iowa, and 
has since resided on his present farm on sec- 
tion 3, Grant Township, where he has eighty 
acres of land under a fine state of cultivation. 
He has a tine residence and good buildings on 
his farm, and north of hi.s residence he has a 
good orchard, which covers about four acres of 
land. All the improvements on the place 
have been done by Mr. Perry, he settling on 
the land when it was in a state of nature, en- 
tirely unimproved. In politics Mr. Perry 
affiliates with no particular party, voting for 
the man whom he considers best fitted for 
office. Mrs. Perry is a member of the Method- 
ist Episcopal church. 

OHN E. BRAGG, farmer and stork-raiser, 
~T,i\ residing on section 12, Dodge Township, 
was born in Coles, now Douglas County, 
Illinois, September 18, 1839, a son of Abra- 
ham Bragg, who was a native of Greenbrier 
County, Virginia. The family removed to 
Illinois in 1817, where our subject, John E. 
Bragg, lived till 1SG5, with the exception of 
eighteen months spent in Texas in 1S."'9 and 
1SG0, and while in the war of the Rebellion. 
He enlisted in Company G, One Hundred 
and Sixteenth Illinois Infantry, in the three- 
years service, and participated in the battles 
of Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, Vicks- 
burg, Missionary Bidge. Resaca, Dallas, 
Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta, Jonesboro, 
Bentonville and others if minor importance. 
In the fall of 16C5 he came to Union County, 
Iowa, and settled on section 14, Dodge Town- 
ship. He is now engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits on section 12 of the same township, 
where he has a valuable farm of 320 acres. Mr. 
Bragg was united in marriage April 7, 1S75, 



to .Miss Martha J. Morrow, a daughter of 
"William Morrow, who resides at Afton, Union 
County. Mrs. Bragg is a native of Guernsey 
County, Ohio. In politics Mr. Bragg affiliates 
with the Greenback party. He is a member 
of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

fTOSEPJI M. DILLOYT, section S, Lincoln 
I Township, was born in McDonough 
;•-<■( County, Illinois, August 7, 1S51, a sou 
of Frederick and Sarah J. (Baxter) Dillow, 
the father being a native of Virginia. He 
settled in McDonough County, Illinois, in 
the year 18 1 0, and in 1S61 came with 
his family to Lincoln Township, Union 
County. The surrounding country was then 
in a wild state, and the family experienced 
many of the hardships and trials of pioneer 
life, going a distance of forty miles to mill, 
etc. Their first farm machinery was brought 
from Des Moines. Wolves, deer and other wild 
animals were numerous, and our subject and 
his father bunted and trapped wolves and 
minks. Our subject caught forty minks, 
which he sold in Chicago, Illinois, at $3.25 
each, and in this way made his first money. 
At that time there were but a half dozen 
shanties where Afton now stands, and Creston 
bad not even been thought of. The parents 
subsequently went to Clay County, Nebraska, 
where they died — the mother September 19, 
18S2, and the father August 25, 1883. Joseph 
M. Dillow, whose name heads this sketch, 
was a mere boy when he was brought by his 
parents to this connty,and here he grew to 
manhood and was educated in the common 
schools. He bought his present farm April 
7, 1875. which was then raw prairie, but by 
persevering industry he has brought it under 
a high state of cultivation, and has made all 
the improvements on the place. His fine 
frame residence was erected in 1S76, and in 
18S5 he built bis present commodious barn, 



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vrliicli is 32x00 foot in size, with 18-foot posts 
and good basement. ].lc was married, in 
March, 1S7S, to Miss Maude Maxwell, a 
daughter of Robert Maxwell, of this county. 
The}' have had two children — Edith E., who 
died at the age of four years, and Zella 
Florence. Mr. Billow has met with success 
in his agricultural pursuits, and has now a 
fine farm of 100 acres where he resides. He 
is devoting considerable attention to stock- 
raising, and is making a specialty of short- 
horn cattle. Thirteen of his cattle have 
pedigrees, nine of them being registered, and 
he has also seven thoroughbred spring calves. 
Mr. Dillow has never sought office, wishing 
to devote his entire time to his farm duties. 
He is a member of the Evangelical church. 
Two of his brothers, Samuel and William, are 
ministers in the Evangelical church, the 
former in Nuckolls County and the latter in 
Seward County, Nebraska. 

fEORGE W. AURACHER, dealer in fur- 
niture at Nos. 205 and 207 North Pine 
^i street, Creston, carries about §4,000 
worth of well-selected furniture, his sales 
amounting to about $20,000 a year. He was 
born in Monroe County. Pennsylvania, in 
1800, and is a son of Gottlieb and Elizabeth 
Auracher, both parents of German descent: 
father died in 1884, and mother lives in 
Lisbon, Iowa. Mr. Auracher lived in the lat- 
ter place until he was sixteen years of age, 
his parents having moved there when he was 
six years old. He received a fair education. 
First entered the furniture business in Cres- 
ton, and since 1876 has commanded a profit- 
able trade, and now owns a half interest in 
the building and in the brick structure at 203 
Pine street, one house and two lots. In his 
political principles he is a Republican; belongs 
to the Knights of Labor, is a member of the 
School Board and of the Fire Department. Is 
highly respected by all who know him. 1! 



lieves in no religion but that of humanity, 
and that we cannot add anything to the hap- 
piness of an infinite God. lie was married in 
1S31 in Lisbon, to Mary Runkle, who was 
born in that village in 1S63. They have one 
child, Harry. 



sWRA SEELEY, section 33, Dodge Town- 
j>| ship, was born in the mountains of Tioga 
i^r County, Pennsylvania, October S, 1S29, a 
son of Gideon and Eunice (Townsend) Sceley, 
who were natives of New York and Connect- 
icut, respectively, both now deceased. Ira 
Seelej- was reared to agricultural pursuits, re- 
ceiving a common-school education, the first 
school he attended being in a rude log-cabin 
with puncheon floor, slab seats, etc. He came 
to Union County in 1S55, his parents coining 
at the same time, they locating in Piatt Town- 
ship, with our subject. He was married July 
29, 185S, to Martha A. Anderson, a daughter 
of John Anderson. They have had six chil- 
dren — Helen, Angie, Ralph W., Frank E., 
Carl E., and one who is deceased. Mr. Seeley 
was a soldier in the late war, enlisting in the 
three-years service in Company H, Twenty- 
ninth Iowa Infantry, and participated in the 
battles of Helena, Little Rock. Fort Spanish 
and others of less importance. He was home 
recruiting from November, 1SC3, till Ma}', 
1861. He enlisted in the service as a private, 
was promoted to First Sergeant, and commis- 
sioned Second Lieutenant November 10,1864. 
At one time Mr. Sceley was engaged in teach- 
ing school, and tanght some eight or ten terms. 
In 1876 he purchased the Afton Tribune, 
which he published for one year. He is now 
devoting his attention to farming and stock- 
raising on section 33, Dodge Township, where 
he has a fine farm of 320 acres. Mrs. S(.-elej r 
owns a tract of eighty acres. Mr. Seeley held 
the office of sheriff from 1S5G until 1858, and 
from January, 1800, until January, 1870, he 
was county treasurer. He is county commis- 



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HISTOID' OF IWIOX COUNTY. 






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eioner elect, at this writing, a position he has 
held two terms, has also served as township 
assessor a few years and school treasurer in any 
years, and has also held other offices of trust, 
serving in all to the best interests of his town- 
ship and county. lie is a member of the Odd 
Fellows order, and of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. 

§11. COPENHUFFER attorney at law, 
joined the bar of Union County in 1S7S, 
and has been alone in his practice ex- 
cept about three years, during which period 
lie was associated with S. S. Dunning. He 
was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 
in 1853, where he lived until about twenty 
years of age. His education was obtained at 
one of the normal schools of his native 
State. He began to study law when about 
seventeen years of age. Later lie came to 
Oskaloosa, where he continued his studies 
two years, and was admitted to the bar in 
1876. The greater part of his professional 
life thus far has been spent in Union County. 
His parents were John B. and Susan Copen- 
hufier. The former is deceased, and the latter 
resides with her son at Creston. 



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gt^AMUEL G. LEAK came to Afton in 
fiMS'jj August, 1859, and bought unimproved 



land on sections 21, 22 and 31, in Union 
Township. The following year he broke a 
part of the laud and built a house. Finding 
it necessary to return to Montgomery County, 
Indiana, whence he had come, to look after 
his parents, improvements were discontinued. 
In 1809 he came back and purchased a farm 
in Dodge Township, upon which he settled 
with his family. This farm, containing 280 
acres, he still owns. Since 1881 lie has re- 
sided in Afton, and is engaged in the grocery 
and provision trade. In 1881 he retired from 



that business, owing to failing health. Mr. 
Leak was born in Montgomery County, Indi- 
ana, March 15, 1S32. His father, Hiram 
Leak, was a native of Virginia, and was 
reared in Kentucky. He died in Indiana in 
18G5. His mother, Henrietta Harris, was 
born in the State of Maryland, and died in 
1875. Hiram Leak was twice married, and 
had eight children who grew to maturity. 
Samuel G. was the oldest of the three children 
by the second marriage; the others were — 
Mrs. Lucretia Ann Handlcy, of Dodge Town- 
ship, and Charles M., of Guthrie County, 
Iowa. Mr. Leak married Miss Catherine A. 
Compton, who died in this county in 1SS0; 
his present wife was formerly Hattie M. 
Lawrence. By his first marriage were five 
children — Francis E., Emily A., John H., 
Russell A. and Samuel A. He has one child 
by his second marriage — Bennett C. 



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ILLIAM V.McQUAID, proprietor of 



i one of the leading mercantile houses 



Ml 

Iz^rJ of Creston, engaged in business here 
in September, 1SS0. His stores occupy a part 
of the Summit House Block, Nos. 307, 309, 
311. In 1880 Mr. McQuaid and his father, 
J. R. McQuaid, engaged in the grocery trade 
at Creston, and in August of 1SS2 they added 
the china hall department. In 1884 Mr. Mc- 
Quaid succeeded McQuaid & Son, and in 
April, 1SS5, he added the dry-goods depart- 
ment. The rooms devoted to the several 
branches of business are adjacent, and open 
into each other. The grocery department, 
which is very complete, includes a meat 
market, the latter being an important branch 
of his trade. The second or middle room 
constitutes the china hall, while the third 
room is a first-class dry-goods store. The 
rooms are commodious, the first two being 
22 x 60 feet, and the last 22 x 70 feet. In 1885 
his sales amounted to £90,000, and the first 
six months of 1880 reached $50,000, and will 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



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doubtless aggregate $100,000 during this year. 
Mr. MeQuaid was bom in Canton, Illinois, 
where he grew to manhood. He was reared 
to mercantile pursuits, and tor three years 
prior to ccmiDg to Creston he was a com- 
mercial traveler. His father still lives at 
Canton. He was married, in Illinois, to 
Miss Nettie Reffer, daughter of David Ref- 
fer, of Canton. They have four children — 
Hairy, Edith, Charles and Bessie. 



^OAH M. JACKSON, retired farmer and 
j',7 stock-raiser, resides on section 2, Pleas- 
% ant Township, where he owns 140 acres. 
Postoffice, Thayer. He was bora in Marion 
County, Indiana, in 1S31, but was brought up 
in Cass County. His parents, John M. and 
Mary (Watts) Jackson, were from North 
Carolina, and both died in Indiana, he in 
Cass County and she in Marion County. 
Noah M. 3 our subject, came "West during the 
j-ear 1SG3, settling in Pleasant Township, 
Union County, without any property; but he 
has earned his present estate, which com- 
prises a well-improved farm. His early edu- 
cation was very limited, as there were no 
schools but those supported by private sub- 
scription, and they were few and poor; but 
what Mr. Jackson lacked in school- training 
he has made up in common sense, by which 
he has attained a high standing in his com- 
munity. He has held the offices of school 
director, township trustee, justice of the 
peace twelve years, etc. He is a man of 
firm principle and consistent conduct, and is 
a member of Hopeville (Clarke County) Lodge. 
No. 306, I. O. O. F., also of the Christian 
church, and is a Republican. Mr. Jackson 
was married in Fulton County, Indiana, in 
1851, to Pheebe Gripp, who was born in Wayne 
County, Indiana, in 1S33, the daughter of 
Frederick and Anna (Emmel) Gripp. The 
marriage has been blessed with the birth of 



nine children, namely — Sarah F., who is now 
the wife of Peter Walters and has four chil- 
dren — Marion, Agnes, Harvey and Ona; Mary 
A., who married Elias Day, of Jones Town- 
ship, and has eight children — Minnie, Josie, 
Maud, Myrtle, Clyde, Emma, Clarence and 
— — — ; John A. married Mary dinger and . 
lias three children — Ethel, Eessie and Jennie; 
Elizabeth L. is the wife of Wesley Walters, 
and has four children — Carrie, James, Jessie 
and Nellie; Harvey F., Jay M., Nora M., Em- 
ma F. and Laura C. are the five others. Mrs. 
Jackson died during the year 1SS3, and Mr. 
Jackson during the following year married 
Miss Helen, daughter of Henry and Catharine 
(Hamilton) Baker, of Welsh and Irish ances- 
try. Her parents died when she was quite 
young. Mr. Jackson's postoffice address is 
Thayer, Union County, Iowa. 

SglDWARD STALKER JR., farmer and 
Vrfj. stock-raiser on section 21 of Douglas 
OfH Township, was bora in Rochester, New 
York, his parents being Edward and Jane 
(Kneale) Stalker, whose history appears else- 
where in this volume. He lived with his 
parents in Rochester until he attained the 
age of twelve years, when they moved to Knox 
County Jllinois. After living there nine} curs, 
working on his father's farm, he came, in 
1S75, to Union County, locating at his present 
place. Here he has worked hard, and made 
all his property by his own exei lions, now 
owning 240 acres of good land, all except 
sixty acres of which is under cultivation. He 
makes a specialty of feeding stock. His farm 
and buildings are so arranged that he can 
feed all his stock at home. He was married 
in Douglas Township, in ]S77, to Miss Susie 
E., daughter of C. E. and Phoebe (Morris) 
Widger. the former a native of Ohio and the 
latter of Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Stalker 
have three children — Charles E., Jennie M. 
and James H. Mr. Stalker received a good 



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H/STonr of ux/ox countt. 



education in the common schools, and him- 
self and wife arc genial, kind hearted, and by 
their deeds of benevolence have endeared 
themselves to all who know them. They are 
prominent members of the Free-Will Baptist 
church, and in political views he is an out- 
spoken Republican. Postoffice, Cromwell. 

APTAIN B. T. XIX, Clerk of Court, 
^ Union County, was born in Ohio County, 



Kentucky, in 1840. His father, Rev. 
James E. Nix, was a Methodist minister, 
and as such was necessitated to change resi- 
dence often. When the civil war broke out 
the people of Kentucky were divided in their 
sympathies toward the North and South, and 
the partisan feeling became extremely bitter. 
There was no neutral ground to be taken. A 
man was either for or against the Government, 
emphatically and absolutely. When the time 
for deciding this question came, there was 
no hesitancy in the mind of Captain Nix, 
nor in thatof any other member of the family, 
as to which cause he. should espouse. They 
were arrayed at once on the side of the Gov- 
ernment. In August, 1802, our subject en- 
listed in Company B, Thirty-second Kentucky 
Infantry, for one year. Upon the organiza- 
tion of the company he was made its Captain, 
and he commanded the company throughout 
his time of service. The regiment operated 
in Kentucky, participating in the battle of 
Mill Springs, where the Confederate General 
Zollicoffer was killed. At the expiration of 
his term of service he immediately engaged in 
recruiting a company, which consisted of many 
members of his former company, and, as be- 
fore, was made its Captain. Ho re-entered the 
army and the Company became Company D, 
Fifty-third Kentucky Infantry. He continued 
in the service until after the war closed, being 
mustered out in the fall of 1865. lie served 



in guerrilla lighting, the most dangerous and 
hazardous kind of warfare. Captain Nix was 
a gallant and an efficient officer, ready for 
duty at all times, and discharging that duty 
wisely and faithfully. His record as a soldier 
is an honorable one. In 1868 he decided to 
come West. He first went to Kansas with a 
view of locating in that State; but not being 
altogether pleased with the country he retraced 
his steps as far as Iowa, and, in 1870, settled 
upon a farm in Clarke County, where he re- 
mained five years. In 1875 he came to Union 
County and purchased a farm in Platte Town- 
ship, which he still owns. He was married in 
Kentucky, to Virginia E. Rhodes, a daughter 
of S. C. Rhodes, formerly of Platte Township, 
but now deceased. She was bom in Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. They have one daughter, Libbie 
P., born in Des Moines County, Iowa. 
Their first child, Alberta M., died at the age 
of five years. The father of Captain Xix died 
in Kentucky, in November, 1885. He had ten 
children, most of the surviving members still 
living in Kentucky. He had been twice mar- 
ried. A sister, Mrs. E. C. Lucas, resides in 
Creston. Politically, Captain Xix is a Re- 
publican. He has served as clerk of the 
court six years, having been first elected in 
1880. He is recognized as a worthy and em- p$. 
cient officer, having been nominated three HH 
times by acclamation by the Republican party :<»: 

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.SEEN LIXIXGE R, one of the prosper- 
,| j ous agriculturists of Platte Township, is 
•-.',„• a native of Pennsylvania, born in Mer- 
cer County, November 11, 1833. His parents, 
Daniel and Catherine (Klingensmith) Lin- 
inger, were natives of the same State, but 
subsequently came to Iowa, and in 1853 
settled in Ringgold County. The father was 
)ora in 1802. Our subject was reared to 



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with ins regiment in Virginia, Tennessee and j manhood on a farm, and received his ednca- 
Jientucfcy. Much of the time he was engaged | tion in the district schools. March 19, 1803 






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BIOGRAPHICAL SKE TCHES. 



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be was united in marriage to Miss Rachel A. 
Woods, a daughter of Michael and Polly 
(McVcy) Woods — her father a native of Ten- 
nessee and her mother of Ohio. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Lininger have been born three children, 
of whom two sons are living, named Archi- 
bald and William. Their only daughter, 
Catherine, is deceased. Mr. Lininger was 
among the early settlers of Union County, 
settling on his present farm, on section 32, 
Platte Township, in the year 1SG5. His land 
at that time was without improvement, being 
in its natural state. He has now 4S0 acres 
of land, which he has brought under cultiva- 
tion, and has on his farm a commodious 
residence and good farm buildings, and is 
classed among Union County's hest farmers. 
In connection with his general farming he is 
devoting considerable attentiou to stock-rais- 
ing, making a specialty of Norman horses. 
Mr. Lininger in his political views is a Green- 
backer. He is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, belonging to Lenox Lodge. 






§H. BLAKELY, a successful farmer and 
stock-raiser, living on section 2, Grant 
.,- s Township, was born in Logan County, 
Ohio, June 12, 1841, a son of Richard and 
Elizabeth Blakely, who were of Scotch and 
Irish ancestry. His father being a farmer by 
occupation, he was reared to the same pursuit, 
which he has made his life work. He remained 
in his native county till 165o, when his mother 
removed to Cec'ar County, Iowa, remaining 
there some time, whin they came to Union 
County. J. II. Blakely served three years in 
the defense of his country during the late war, 
being a member of Company D, Eleventh 
Iowa Infantry, lie participated in the battles of 
Shiloh, Corinth and A r itksburg, beside others 
of minor importance, and at the expiration of 
his term of service received an honorable dis- 
charge, when he returned to his home, lie 



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was married May 10, 1866, to Miss Martha 
Miller, a daughter of Israel and Catherine 
(Walton) Miller, who were of Dutch descent. 
Of eight children born to this union six are 
still living— Kate E., Alary E., Adda E., 
George F., Maggie M. and Joseph M. Since 
coming to Union County Mr. Blakely has 
always lived on his present farm in Grant 
Township, where he now has 240 acres of land 
under cultivation. Mr. and Mrs. Blakely are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
In politics he has always been a Republican. 

rr-r^lLLIAM GROUNDS, farmer and 
• ;r \l\i'] stock-raiser, resides on section 22, 
1%%^ Douglas Township, where ho owns 
210 acres of highly cultivated land. He was 
born in Edwards County, Illinois, in 1834, 
the son of John and Elizabeth Grounds; father 
died in 1872. aged about seventy-three years; 
the mother was born in 1811, and is still liv- 
ing in the same county, in Illinois. In 1861 
Mr. Grounds enlisted in Company K, Fifty- 
fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served 
three years and ten months, engaging in more 
than thirty battles, as Shiloh, Russell House, 
siege of Corinth, Chickasaw Bayou, Arkan- 
sas Post, Snyder's Bluff, Champion Hills, 
assault on and siege of Vicksburg, siege of 
Jackson, Mississippi, Tuscumbia, Alabama, 
Missionary Ridge, Kenesaw Mountain, At- 
lanta, Jonesboro, South Edisto River, Colum- 
bia, South Carolina; Bentonville, North 
Carolina, etc., etc., besides skirmishes in- 
numerable, traveling altogether 11,507 miles, 
of which he marched on foot 3.340 miles, 
traveled by rail 2.S75 miles, and sailed 
5,850 miles total, 11,567. Was under fire 
128 days, and received a flesh wound at 
the battle of Jonesboro. Mr. Grounds was 
brought up on the farm, and has all his life 
been a farmer. Beginning in life without 
means, working by the month, for seven years, 
for 8U to $25 a month, his present prospcr- 

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ity shows him to have been an industrious 
and economical man. He lias been a school 
director in his district, and is now school treas- 
urer for his township, lie was married in 
Warren County, Illinois, in 1S66, to Miss 
Lavina, daughter of John and Eliza Butler, 
natives of Kentucky. Her grandfather was 
the first sheriff of Warren County. Mr. and 
Mrs. Grounds have had eight children — Mary 
M., Ira B.,Lena E., John II., Gracie L., Will- 
iam S., Stella M. and Floy O., and an infant 
deceased. Postoffice, Creston. 



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m OHN BROWN, JR.. a farmer on section 
"S 33, Spanlding Township, where he owns 
sfc 120 acres, was born in Scotland, in 
1814. His parents, Robert and Martha 
Brown, emigrated to America when he was 
eleven years of age. His father died in 1879. 
Mr. Brown, the subject of this sketch, was 
married in Ohio to Margaret A. Yeats, a 
native of England, being born in that country 
in the year ISIS. To Mr. and Mrs. Brown 
have been born six children, namely: Robert, 
Richard, Walter, Thomas, Mary E. andElta. 
Mr. Brown is a believer in the principles of 
the National Greenback party, is an esteemed 
member of his community, and an industri- 
ous husbandman. On his present place he 
has made all the improvements. Postoffice, 
Cromwell. 



ISg J - THOMPSON, engaged in farming 

% *~Y and stock-raising cm section 20 of 

3 A. 

H^\° Spanlding Township, where he owns 

eighty acres of well-improved land, was born 
in Adams County, Ohio, December 23. 1817. 
His father, Daniel Thompson, who was a mill- 
wright for fifty years, was a native of Penn- 
sylvania; and his mother, whose maiden name 
was Mary Baldridge, was born in Ohio; both 
were of Scotch-Irish extraction. The subject 



of this biographical notice grew to years of 
maturity on the farm in Ohio. In 1SG3 he 
enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and 
Ninety-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, aud 
served four months. His present farm had 
no improvements when he settled upon it, 
but he has greatly enhanced its value by his 
industry. Ho is serving his third term as 
justice of the peace, and has held other local 
ofhees. In politics he is a Republican, and 
in religion a member of the United Brethren 
church at Creston. He was married in 1871, 
in Adams County, Ohio, to Mary Kenady, a 
native of that State, aud they had one child — 
Wilbert R. by name. Mrs. Thompson died 
in 1S72, and Mr. Thompson was again mar- 
ried in Warren County, Iowa, in 1S74, to 
Caroline Lattie, who was born in Adams 
County, Ohio, in 181-5. By this marriage 
there are two children — Dora B. and Ethel M. 



;£jj&3n&ILTO» BOURNE, farmer, section 7, 
') \ \'/ M Union Township, has been a resident 
^71^ of Union County since 1SG5. He 
first settled on section S, upon the farm now 
owned by J. II. Nicholson, and located upon 
his present farm in 1S78. There were then no 
improvements on the place; all have been 
made by Mr. Bourne. He was born in the 
town of Savoy, Berkshire County, Massachu- 
setts, in March, 1S25, son of Joseph Bourne, 
also a native of Massachusetts, who died in 
lS3i. When he was about thirteen years of 
age, the family removed to Licking County, 
Ohio. There were then the mother and live 
children — three sons and two daughters. Mr. 
Bourne remained in Ohio until he reached 
his majority. He married Angcline Monser, 
daughter of Abram and Martha (Hancock) 
Monser, who were natives of Virginia, and 
removed to Ohio where his lather died. Her 
mother came to Iowa and lived with her 
daughter until her decease. Mr. and Mrs. 
Monser were the parents of eight children — 



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I>/0< GRAPHIC. \T. SKBTi HES. 



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six of whom grew to maturity, and five arc 
still living. Mrs. Bourne and D. C. Monsei 
are all that live in this county. Emma R. 
lives in Missouri, unci George and Samuel live 
in Ohio. Mr. Bourne emigrated to Iowa in 
October, 1857, and settled upon a farm in 
Marion County, which he improved and upon 
which he lived until iS'35, when lie came to 
Union County. lie is the only member of 
his father's family who lias settled in this 
count}', except a sister, Mrs. Rosclla Peck. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bourne lave two children — 
William Sylvester and Mary L. Martha O, 
who married Eugene Roberts, is deceased. 
Politically Mr. Bourne has been a Republican 
since the organization of that party. Himself 
and wife are members of the Baptist church. 



among the well-to-do citizens of Grant Town- 
ship, and during his residence here has tilled 
acceptably most of the township offices. In 
politics Mr. Richards casts his suffrage with 
the Republican party, lie and his wife are 
worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church; Sarah and Mary Ella being member; 
of the same denomination. 



rrSAAC XEWTOX CHEERY is a native of 
| Virginia, born in 181 7. In 1S21 his par- 
--? ents moved to Muskingum County, Ohio, 
and there he was reared. His lather, Jacob 
Cherry, was a native of Richmond, Virginia, 
of English descent, aud died in Muskingum 
Count} T , in IS66, his wife's death preceding 
his several years. Their family consisted of 
four children — Isaac jN t ., James (deceased), 
% AUL RICHARDS, a prominent agricult- ' Mary Ann, wife of Joseph R. Morrison, of 
j urist of Grant Township, engaged in j Licking County, Ohio, and William, of Mus- 
''■■-;'■ farming and stock-raising on section 2G, I kingum County, Ohio. Isaac Newton Cherry 
is a son of Silas and Ellen Richards, who j was married in Ohio to Alcinda TV Morrison, 
were natives of Virginia and Ohio, respec- j also a native of Virginia, and six months 
tively, both now deceased. Saul Richards j after his marriage moved to Perry County 
was born January 1, 1S23, ar.d reared to '■ and thence to Morgan County. In 1S02 he 
Agricultural pursuits, which he has followed | came to Iowa and located in Jones Township, 



through life. He was married at the age of 
twenty-four years to MissElma Jane Harris, 
who was born July 20, 1323, a daughter of 
William and Julia Harris, her father being a 



Union County, buying a partially improved 
f ;nn, which he improved and lived on until 
the spring of 1876, when he went to Alton. 
In his youth Mr. Cherry received good edu- 



native of Pennsylvania, and her mother born j cational advantages and thinking he would 

in Virginia, both of whom are deceased. Mr. j like the life of a physician, read medicine 

and Mrs. Richards have five children living — j under the direction of Dr. J. W. Watkins, of 

Sarah S., born March 23, 1848; Tracy W., j Muskingum County. Concluding, however, 

born November 10, !S49;MaryE., born May that the profession would not suit him he 



9, 1853; Silas P., born April 7, 1855; and 
Homer S., born July 9, 1S61. Mr. Richards 
lias devoted his attention to general farming 
and stock raising, and by his industry and 
good management he lias become the owner 



abandoned the study and turned his attention 
to agriculture, a calling which he has made 
successful. In politics Mr. Cherry was in 
early life a Whig, but since its organization 
has affiliated with the Republican party. He 



of his present farm which contains eighty i has served one term as judge of Union 
acres of good land. He commenced life en- j County. To him and his wife have been 
tirely without means and is now classed j born seven children, six of whom are living — 



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HISTORY OF UNION COUNTT. 



Mary E., wife of Dr. L. S. Groves; Jacob E., 
John W., Charlotte, wife of ,1. F. Dishop, 
Alcinda, wife of J. W. Johnson, of Red Oak, 
Iowa, and Cyrena, wife of J. N. Gadd, all, 
save Alcinda, living in Afton. Their son, 
S. B., died in August, 1S82, aged forty-three 
years. He was a graduate of the Columbus 
Medical College, Ohio, and was a successful 
physician. 

sgiSTANCIL MOFFITT resides on section 
'vaI 1) Union Township, where he settled in 
\jp the spring of 1S5G. He was born in 
Randolph County, North Carolina, in March, 
1S24. Ilis parents were Charles and Mary 
Moffitt, also natives of North Carolina. The 
father died in that State and the mother sub- 
sequently removed to Tennessee, where she 
passed the remainder of her days. They 
were the parents of twelve children — seven 
sous and five daughters. Two of the sons 
died in childhood. Stancil and his brother, 
Solomon C, of Union Township, are the only 
members of the family known to be living. 
Our subject was reared in his native State 
and married Deborah L. Barker, born in 
October, 1824. Her parents were Robert 
and Naomi Barker, who lived in North Caro- 
lina until their decease. They had four 
children that grew to maturity — one son and 
three daughter?; one daughter died in infancy. 
Three of the children are supposed to be still 
living. September IS, 1854, Mr. Moffitt 
started north with his family with wagon 
and horse team. His family then consisted 
of wife and four children. Mrs. Moffitt had 
an uncle living in Union County, and through 
his influence they settled here. They were 
two months making the journey, passing 
nearly every night in their wagon. Only 
two or three nights, when the weather was 
severely cold, did they sleep in a house. 
They arrived here November 18. Mr. 
Moffitt had but slO left, and had the mis- 



fortune to lose one of his horses the third 
day after his arrival. That fall he engaged 
to build a log-cabin for Mr. William Groes- 
beckj and in this cabin both families passed 
the winter. In the spring of 1S55 Mr. 
Moffitt pre-empted eighty acres in Dodgo 
Township upon which he built a cabin, im- 
proved a few acres, then sold out. In March, 
1856, he entered eighty acres of his present 
farm and settled upon it with his family. 
The same year he built a small frame house, 
which constitutes a part of his present resi- 
dence, and here he has lived thirty years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Moffitt have endured all the 
privations and hardships incident to pioneer 
life. They are among the oldest settlers in 
Union County. They have a family of six 
children — five sons and one daughter. A son 
died in North Carolina, and two daughters 
have died in Union County, the eldest, 
WinsieAnn, in her twentieth year, and Mary 
E. died at the age of about two years. Charles 
T. lives in Tremont County, Iowa, and 
Nazariah lives in Union Township. Five 
children were born in Union County, four of 
whom are living — Henry W. resides in Jones 
Township; Marion F., at home, Edwin S. 
and Frances L. Mr. Moffitt and sons have 
about 520 acres of land. In early life Mr. 
Moffitt was a Whig and cast his first Presi- 
dential vote for General Taylor, in 1848. 
He affiliated with the Republican party till 
the salary grab trial and since then he has 
voted with the Greenback party. 



" A. NYE. general grocer, 125 Maple 
") I \/ V street, Creston, began business on 
^.T>?c- g Adams street, this city, April 9, 
1S77, as successor to James Butler. Fifteen 
months afterward he opened business on Pine 
street, where he continued until the fall of 
1SS3; located where he now is in October, 
1884. During this period he has been out of 
business about one year. He has also opened a 



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niOGKAFHICAL SHE TC1U-S. 



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farin in Nebraska,spendingoue summer there; 
and he now owns a tine farm near Kearney, ami 
one near Creston; also one in Barton Comity 
and one in Ness County, Kansas. Air. Nye 
was born in Muscatine County, Iowa, in March, 
1S46, and was reared in that county in the 
occupation of farming. His father, Alfred 
Nye, settled in that county in 183(3, as a pio- 
neer, and died at Iowa City, January 8, 1SSG, 
continuing, however, to the time of his death, 
to own the old homestead. He was a native 
of Montpelier, Vermont. His wife is still 
living at Iowa City. Their six sons and one 
daughter are all living, the subject of this 
sketch being the only one residing in Union 
County. The latter was married in 1S69, in 
Muscatine County, to Miss Iona N. Pace, who 
was bom and reared in the same county, of Yir 
ginian parents, who were among the earliest 
pioneers of that county. Mr. and Mrs. Nye 
are the parents of three children — Carrie 
ii., Bertha A. and Mabel, besides two de- 
ceased — Glenn Perkins and Mamie. In his 
views of national affairs Mr. Nye is Demo- 
cratic, but he votes for the best men at local 
elections. He is a member of the Creston 
City Council. On the 1st of April, 18S3, he 
started a general store at Nevinville, Adams 
County, and at the close of the first year he 
admitted Mr. A. T. Joy as a partner, which 
relation still continues. Mr. Nye is one of 
the enterprising business men of Creston, 
with whose interests he has been identified 
nearly ten years. 



•T-; D. McDONALD, one of the enterpris- 
. j.-.? ing farmers, stock-raisers and dealers 
tM» of Union County. located on section 25, 
Douglas Township, was born in Madison 
County, Ohio, March 16, 1855, and is a son 
of James and Lncilla (Davidson) McDonald, 
natives of the same county, where they still 
reside. The subject of this sketch was reared 
on a farm in his native county, and has ever 



since followed the vocation of his youth, in 
which he evinces unusual talent and marked 
success. He is the proprietor of a quarter- 
section of land in this county, and a fifth 
interest in the Union County Draft-Horse 
Association at Creston, a full description of 
which is given elsewhere in this work. He 
was married in this county, March 30, 1S82, 
to Lizzie Jamison, who was born in Ohio, 
July i, 1861. They have one child, named 
Dow. Byers, born June 28, 1884. Although 
a young man, Mr. McDonald has shown good 
business qualifications, a fine social nature, 
for which he is highly esteemed by all 
who know him. Postoffice, Creston. 



.RICHARD H. DELMAGE, of Afton, was 
V born in Ireland, November 20, 1639, and 



%^\ removed with his parents to Kendall 
County, Illinois, in the year I8i3, where he 
was reared, receiving his education at the 
academy at Bristol. He served an apprentice- 
ship at the joiner's trade at Peoria, and has 
been engaged in contracting and building ever 
since. He was a soldier in the war of the 
Rebellion, enlisting January 1, 1S62, in Com- 
pany H, Ninth Illinois Cavalry, and served in 
General Steele's brigade, in the army under 
General Curtis. He first went to iSt. Louis, 
thence to Pilot Knob, thence to Batesville, 
Arkansas; thence to Jacksonport, Arkansas, 
and thence to Helena. The last was one of the 
severest marches on record that occurred dur- 
ing the war; they were following the Confed- 
erates commanded by Major-Generals Hinch- 
man and Rusk. The enemy, destroying every- 
thing in their retreat, rendered the sufferings 
of the Union army following them almost un- 
endurable. The Ninth Illinois Cavalry was 
the first regiment to enter Helena. Later the 
regiment operated in Mississippi, and then re- 
turned to Helena. In August, 1802, when 
returning to Helena, Mr. Delmage was sud- 
denly prostrated by sunstroke, and was not 



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again able to do a soldier's duty. ILe was 
sent to a hospital al St. Louis where he re- 
mained until his discharge, which occurred 
December 9, 1S63. His health was very seri- 
ously impaired for several years, nor has he 
ever fully recovered from the effects of that 



Mrs. Lillie E. Taylor, of Bradfield, Missouri, 
and George J., of Fremont, Nebraska. Mr. 
Oelmage was married October IS, 1876, to 
Miss Jennie E. Hunt, of Henry, Marshall 
County, Illinois. Her parents were Richard 
and Ruth (Harratn) Hunt; the former is de- 



misfortune. From the time he entered the | ceased, and the hitler resides in Henry, Illinois 
army until he was disabled he was always | Mr. and Mrs. Delmage have three children- 
ready for duty, and performed it faithfully 
and well. Soon after his return his two 
younger brothers, Raymond C. and Charles G., 
enlisted in the same company, serving till the 
close of the war. Mr. Delraage came to Un- 
ion County in 1864, his brother, R. C.,beintr 
then at Afton. In 1S60! he erected the large 
frame school building at Afton. In 1804 he 
and his brother purchased 100 acres of land 
in New Hope Township, which they still own 
and have increased to about S00 acres. Tliey 
are extensively engaged in stock-raising, hav- 
ing as fine a stock farm as can be found iu 
Union County. In 18titi Mr. Homage's par- 
ents, Christopher and Rebecca (Holmes) 
Delmage, came West, and settled in Union 
Township. They now reside at Creston. In 
connection with his farming interests Mr. 
Delmage has been extensively engaged in 
contracting and building. He has erected 
many of the fine residences, business blocks 
and public buildings in Afton and Creston. j 
He employed from twenty-five to thirty hands ! 
for many years. His parents had four sons 
and three daughters. The four sons and two j 
daughters are still living. The youngest 
daughter, Louie R., wife of Henry Murphy, | 
of Cromwell, died June 27. 1SS6. She was a j 
lady of refinement, education and culture and 
possessed of more than ordinary intelligence. 
She was a teacher in Union County fifteen , 
years, and was deputy county superintendent j 
of schools of this county, her brother, George 
J. Delmage, being superintendent. The other j 
children are- -Mary, wife of Charles Bond, 
of Murray, Iowa; Richard II., our subject; 
Raymond (.'., who is associated with R. II. 
in business, Charles G., of Denver, Colorado; 



Vera Z., Verne and Maud. Mr. Delmage is 
a member of the Henry Keating Post, G. A.R., 
at Afton, and is also a member of the Masonic 
and Odd Fellows lodges at Afton. Mr. and 
Mrs. Delmage have a pleasant home in Afton 
where comfort, contentment and hospitality 
abound. 

m H. PATT was born in the State of Rhode 
1 "j Island, in 1810, son of James M. and 
^® Abigail (Haven) Patt, who are also 
natives ot Rhode Island, but now reside in 
Bureau County, Illinois. His father was a 
mechanic in humble circumstances, bnt a nun 
who was endowed with more than ordinary 
shrewdness and common sense. The boy- 
passed his childhood until the age of ten at 
the family home, and before that age obtained 
all the education he was destined to receive 
from the few books about his lather's humble 
home. Education at the schools in those 
days was a much more costly luxury than 
now, and only the children of rich parents 
were able to attend the few schools of the 
time. "When he reached the age mentioned 
the imperative necessity of gaining his own 
livelihood threw young Patt out into the 
world, and at that tender age lie began the 
struggle in the hard tasks of life. The ex- 
perience of necessity thus gained ever stood 
him in good stead in his career, and was un- 
doubtedly the foundation of his character. In 
his weary toil on farms he learned that it was 
earnest work that achieved the most, and be- 
came early imbued with the characteristics 
that marked his after life, and contributed so 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SAT TCHES. 



largely to his success. In a few years, at- ! "big with prophecy." Here, he saw, would 
traded by the boundless possibilities of the ' grow up a city of which lie should he proud to 
West, Mr. Patt emigrated to the State of j claim citizenship. After arriving here the 
Illinois. He settled in Bureau County, a \ first act of Mr. Patt was to begin the erection 
county that was largely made up in popnla- I of the well-known Putt's Block, the large 
tion of people from the Pastern States — a ! three-story brick building at the corner of 
people noted for thrift, energy and intellect!!- j Adams and Elm streets. In 1S75 there were 
alitv. Amid such surroundings Mr. Patt ! no business houses on Adams street west of 
found a congenial sphere and resolved to re- ! that corner, and but one or two old shells be- 
tnain permanently, lie did not shrink from ! tween the corners of Maple and Adams, and 
an}' class of work that came to hand. An old- j Adams and Elm streets. lie also erected 
time resident, of that county once remarked | several dwelling-houses and invested largely 



that "Mr. Patt, rather than be idle, carried a 
hod two years, and he carried it with signal 
ability, and with satisfaction to his employer/' 
A boy who was not afraid to work, even at 
such a humble calling, must surely have had 
sterling material in his composition. Those 
were the days when he was battling with the 



in real estate, showing li is confidence in the 
future of the city. Since then he has carried 
on an extensive hardware and implement 
business in one of the store-rooms of his tine 
block. Air. Patt has been prominently con- 
nected with almost every successful public 
enterprise of note inaugurated since his arriv- 



opposing elements of life, and builded wiser i al in Creston, and has also held numerous 



for the future, perhaps, than be knew. By 
frugality and industry the young man con- 
trived to accumulate a small capital, and 
opened a restaurant on a small scale. Aban- 
doning this soon after, he opened a grocery 
store, and in 1S5S went into the hardware line, 
with which he has since been identified, and 
in which he has been more than ordinarily 
successful. In June. 1863, Mr. Patt was 



responsible positions of trust and bono''. In 
1S77 he was elected mayor of the city, and his 
administration was marked by his fidelity and 
good judgment in his discharge of the duties 
incumbent upon the office. Every public 
charity has found in him a liberal subscriber, 
and in more than one instance his large- 
heartedncss has prompted him to help the 
needy and give substantial encouragement to 



married, at Tiskilwa, to Leah M. Kitterman, j young men struggling for a foothold in bu-i- 
daughter of one of Bureau County's oldest 
and best-known citizens. From this happy 
union were born their son and daughter — 
Frank and Florence. In 1873 Mr. Patt be- 
came inclined to try a residence in the charm- 
ing climate of the Pacific States, and selling 
out the extensive business he had built up in 
Illinois, went, with his family, to California. 
They remained in that State two years. 



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ness. As a business man Mr. Patt enjoys 
the confidence of all who know him, and his 
name is known to almost every one who 
knows of Creston, so closely have both grown 
united. lie has been the leader in several 
corporation enterprises that have been of- 
much general benefit to the town. At present 
he. is president of the Agricultural Society. 
and has given his best efforts toward making 



hot finding it suitable for a permanent home, - this important enterprise a permanent one It 

returned East, dust at that time the city of ''■ was principally through his efforts and zeal 

I Creston was beginning the era of prosperity I that the Creston Opera House Company, of 

and progress that has thus far indelibly | which he is president and the largest stock- 

: marked its growth. With quick foresight and : holder, erected the fine opera house building. 

natural business judgment he saw at a glance I which is an ornament and a great credit to 

that this young city of the rolling prairie was ! the city. Mr. Patt has a large interest, both 

37 

•-■-.-- 



. . . .- . 






jf /stout or ex /ox countt. 



financial ami friendly, in fcho advancement of j classed among the most successful slock deal- 

the town, and hence, lias many times put j era of Union County. He still owns 400 

aside private interests to help with his inde- \ acres, having sold -200 acres in 1SS5. In the 

fatigablo energy any public enterprise that de- | spring of 1SS2 he leased his land and removed 

manded aid. in 1883 Mr. and .Mrs. Patt, j to Alton, where he is engaged in buying and 

with a large throng of their warm friends l shipping stock, lie is also one of the principal 

celebrated the twentieth anniversary of their auctioneers of the county, and his services in 



marriage at their spacious mansion in th 
city. 



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jENJAMIN HUBBELL, a member of the 
; Board of Supervisors of Union County, 
has been arcsident of U nion County since 
1S71. He was appointed to his present posi- 
tion January 1, 1886, to fill the vacancy made 
by the resignation of C. Gr. Shnll, who re- 
moved from the district, and in the fall of 
1SS6 was elected for another term. Mr. Hub- 
bell is a native of Goshen, Elkhart County, 
Indiana, born in 1811. lie was reared in his 
native town to the occupation of a farmer. 
His parents, Elisha and Amelia Ann (Cor- 
nell) Hubbell, were natives of Ohio. They 
settled in Elkhart County about 1833, where 
the father died in 1877. The mother is still 
living. In 1S77 our subject sold out in Indi- 
ana and came "West to look for a location. He 
decided to settle in Union County, and pur- 
chased 120 acres of land in Grant Township, 
upon which he immediately settled. This land 
was wholly unimproved. He made his pur- 
chase in March, and by the 4th of July 



this direction are in general demand. Mr. 
Hubbell's parents had eight children who 
grew to maturity, live sons and three daugh- 
ters. Two sons and one daughter are deceased. 
Elisha At. served in the Twenty-first Indiana 
Battery, in the war of the Rebellion, and was 
wounded in the breast at Chiekamauga, where 
he fought under General Thomas. He lived 
several years afterward, hut died from the 
effect of that wound. Benjamin is the only 
son of his father's family who has settled in 
Iowa. He has been twice married. His first 
wife was Jennie Gufiin, who died in Indiana 
in June, 1S75. His present wife was Sally 
Palmer. liy the first marriage was one daughter 
— Beatrice. By the second marriage are two 
children — Maud and Chester. Mr. Hubbell 
is a Republican, as were all of his father's 
family. 



||EORGE D. BENTON, one of the self- 

7- made men of Union County, and an 
'^jn enterprising farmer and stock-raiser of 
Lincoln Township, where he lives on section 
20, was born in Ohio, July 22, 1830, a son of 
following had the land all broken. His first j Edward II. and Rebecca (Sealy) Benton, who 
crop was a splendid crop of rye. The next ] were natives of Vermont, the former dying 
year he planted sixty acres to corn, and the i at the age of forty-seven years, the latter liv- 
average production was sixty bushels to the j ing at the age of ninety years. George D. 
acre; and eight acre.-, which he measured, j Benton was reared to agricultural pursuits, 
gave seventy-five bushels to the acre. These ; remaining on the home farm with his parents 
figures are given to show what can be done in [ till eighteen years of age. He went to Cali- 
Union County by a thorough fanner. Mr. ; fornia in 1S49, remaining there three years. 
Hubbell's land is on section 14. He added to ; when he located in Indiana, and after a resi- 
his original purchase until he at one time ■ dence of four years in that State he removed 
owned COO acres of excellent land. He is , to Illinois, where he improved a farm, on 
largely engaged in the stock business, and is | which he lived for seven years. February 25, 



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i?/0< GRAPHICAL SUE i CUES 



lS57,he was married to Miss Nancy Jane Han- 
cock, who was born February 7, 1S41, a daugh- 
ter of John and Leona (Mayfield) Hancock, 
who were natives of Spencer County, Indiana. 
About the year 1863 Mr. Benton settled in 
Marshall County, Illinois, remaining there 
eleven years, since which he has been a resi- 
dent of Lincoln Township. Union County. 
lie bought raw prairie land on coming to 
Union County, which is now one of the finest 
farms in Lincoln Township, and is still 
owned and occupied by the subject of this 
sketch, the farm containing 160 acres of well 
cultivated land. He has a very fine orchard, 
which covers twenty acres, and three acres 
of vineyard. Mr. Benton began life a poor 
man, but has succeeded in accumulating a 
good property by his industrious habits and 
persevering energy. Mrs. Benton died March 

3, 18S5, leaving a family of five children — 
Martha J., who was born March 11, 1S59, mar- 
ried E. I). Salisbury, J line 10, 1S75; Margaret 
A., born March 21, 1SG2; Edward D.,born June 

4, 1604; Emma E., born April 7, 1S66, and 
George A., born August 4, 1S72. Mr. Ben- 
ton and two of his daughters are members of 
the Christian church. His wife was also a 
member of the same church. 



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fC. ARMITAGE. engaged in agriculture 
and the raising of live stock, resides on 
,- 3 section 27, Pleasant Township, where 
he owns a fine farm of 120 acres. He was 
born in Trumbull County, Ohio, in the year 
1S24, his parents, Abraham and Mary (Cald- 
well) Annitage, being natives of Pennsyl- 
vania and of English and German descent. He 
grew to the years of manhood as a laborer on 
the paternal farm in Allen County, Ohio, and 
has since followed the calling in which lie 
was trained. He first came to this State in 
1S52, settling in "Wapello County, the year 
afterward he accompanied his brother-in-law 
to tliis county, being the first settlers in 



Pleasant Township). His father died in Ohio 
in 1875. Mr. Annitage, our subject, was 
married in this county, in 1853, to America 
Lamb. This was the second marriage in the 
county. She was born in 1835, in Floyd 
County,Indiana. They have had ninechildreu, 
six of whom are living — Albert, Perry, Min- 
nie (wife of Lewis McCntcheon). Wesley, Ira 
and Daniel. Airs. McCntcheon has one child, 
named Roy R. Mr. Annitage has been school 
director several terms; is a member of the 
New-Light church, and an honored citizen. 
Poslofhce, Hopewell, Clarke County. 

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fOHN HENKLE, residing on section 16, 
Sand Creek Township, is one of the 
; active and enterprising farmers of Union 
County. He was reared to agricultural pur- 
suits on the home farm in Lee County, Iowa, 
his father's family being the second that set- 
tled in Van Bnren Township, that county. 
He was a soldier in the late war, enlisting in 
Company A, First Iowa Cavalry, and after 
being in the service three years was honorably 
discharged, at Austin, Texas. After lie left 
the army he returned to Lee County, remain- 
ing there a short time, when he removed to his 
present home. He was married in 1S67 to 
Mary M. Simons, and they are the parents 
of four daughters — Laura A., born December 
22, 1868; Martha L., born October 24, 1S72; 
Opha P., born September 22, 1878, and Eva 
J., born September 8, 1SS0. Mr. Henkle is 
one of the leading agriculturists of Union 
County, and has one of the finest farms in 
Sand Creek Township, containing 240 acres 
of well-improved land. Mr Henkle takes an 
active interest in the cause of education, and 
has various school offices in this county. In 
politics lie is a Republican. Mrs. Henkle is 
a member of the Baptist church. Her par- 
ents were both born in Pennsylvania, and 
are yet living, their home being in Afton, 
Union County. The parents of our subject, 






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wsronr of union countt. 



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Amos and Martha (McGreer) ELcnkle, were 
natives of Virginia ami Indiana respectively. 
The father was born Juno 15, 181 7, and in 
.1829 went with his father to Illinois. In 
1S3G they removed to Lee County, Iowa, the 
father settling with his family in Lee County 
as before stated. 

jEJOBERT J". BIGGS has been a resident 

'■_. |m; of Union County since May, 1S66. lie 
•--;.\ was born in Clark Comity, Indiana, in 
1825. His father, Abner Biggs, was a native 
of Kentucky, and settled in Indiana at an 
early day. He lived for many years in Clark 
County, where he died in the fall of 1S72. 
Mr. Biggs was reared to the occupation of a 
farmer. August 11, 1S62, he enlisted in 
Company D, Forty-ninth Regiment, Indiana 
Infantry, and Eer^cd till the close of the war 
He was honorably discharged July 15, i860. 
He was engaged with his regiment in the 
following battles: Chickasaw Bayou, Arkan- 
sas Post, Port Gibson, Champion Hills, 
Black River Bridge, Siege of Vicksburg, and 
Bayou Rapids. After the last named battle 
he was transferred to the Army of the Gulf. 
During the last six months of the war he was 
located at Lexington, Kentucky, engaged in 
guarding the railroad. Mr. Biggs was a true 
and faithful soldier. His constitution was 
badly shattered by exposure and other hard- 
ships endured in the army. Especially in 
warm weather he suffers from the effects of a 
sunstroke received in 1863. At the close of 
the war he returned to Indiana and the fol- 
lowing April removed with his family to 
Union County. In 1868 he purchased a farm 
of eighty acres in Jones and Pleasant Town- 
ships, lie also has twenty acres of timber in 
Sand Creek Township. In November, 1S81 
he removed to Alton, leasing his farm. Mr. 
Biggs was married in 1860 to Nancy E. 
Enlow, born in Washington County, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1831, and removed to Indiana with 



her parents, Henry and Susan Enlow, when 
three years of age. Her lather was born in 
1799 and died in 1S80. Her mother was 
bom in 1S00 and died February 25, 1874. 
They had eight children, four of whom are 
living— Richard M., Mrs. Elizabeth Clark, 
and Mrs. Martha Jones, a twin sister of Mrs. 
Biggs. Mr. Biggs' mother, Emily Biggs, was 
born in 1802, and is still living in Indiana. 
Bis parents had fifteen children, eleven of 
whom are living, five sons and six daugh- 
ters. There were two pairs of twins in the 
family. Mr. and Mrs. Biggs have four 
children— Elmer Ellsworth, Ernest L., Enola 
and Robert Irving. Mrs. Big S s is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. 
Biggs is now and has always been a Repub- 
lican. 

11 . <JjxlL}i l o,s>Q\t..pl the leading agricult- 
urists of Grant Township, residing 
3 on section 11, was born December 6, 

18-13, in the State of Vermont, his parents, 
Andrew and Phoebe Oakes, being natives of 
the same State. Mr. Oakes was reared on a 
farm in his native State, remaining there till 
1865, when he accompanied his parents to Illi- 
nois. October 21, 1867, he was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Agnes Johnson, who was born 
August S, 1841, a daughter of Andrew and 
Julia Johnson. Of the three children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Oakes only one, Willis G., is liv- 
ing. A son, Leon A., and a daughter, Mary R., 
are deceased. Mr. (Jakes lived in the State 
of Illinois six years, when he came to Union 
County, Iowa, being one of the pioneers of 
Grant Township. He then bought the farm 
where he still resides, which he has converted 
from a state of nature into a well-improved 
and highly-cultivated farm. His farm eon- 
tains 160 acres, with comfortable residence 
and good farm buildings. He began life a 
poor man, but has always been an industrious 
and hard-working citizen, and by his perse- 
vering energy and good management has ac- 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



quired his present fine property. .Mr. Oakes 
lias lately turned his intention to stock-raising, 
and also manufactures cheese. In polities 
he ca=ts his suffrage with the Republican 
party. 



: :^7T,ARTIN MILLER, conn 
') I ;\{ V Union County, is serving t 



ity auditor, 
the first year 

3?^ of his second term in that .capacity, his 
first, election occurring in the fall of 1SS3, 
succeeding 0. II. Fuller, who had served two 
years. He was born in Mercer County, 
Illinois, in 1S42, and was reared a farmer, 
lie married Senora Seiver, born in Indiana, 
and removed to Rock Island, Illinois, with 
her parents, when a child. Mr. Miller came 
to Union County in 1869, settling upon a 
farm in Lincoln Township. He purchased 
160 acres of new land, which he improved and 
cultivated. He now owns 320 acres, and is 
engaged in stock-raising. Politically he has 
usually affiliated with the Democratic party. 
He was elected to his present position on the 
Greenback ticket. Mr. and Mrs. Miller have 
two children — a son, born in 1S63, has 
charge of the farm; a daughter, Nettie, was 
born in 1867. 

Jp^DWARD S. HUNTINGTON, one of 
', p.. the successful agriculturists of Lincoln 
isp. Township, Union County, is a native of 
Onondaga ('unity, New York, born June 15, 
1841, a son of Daniel II. Huntington, de- 
ceased, who was a native of Litchfield, Con- 
necticut. Edward S., the subject of this 
sketch received a good education in his youth. 
at the common schools and the Onondaga 
Academy. His father being a t inner he was 
reared to that avocation, which lie lias made his 
life work. He came to Union County, Iowa, 
in the spring of I860, v. hen he settled in 
Highland Township, remaining there until 



lie settled on his present farm, on section 33, 
Lincoln Township, in the year 1S76. He has 
by diligence and good management met with 
success as a farmer, and is now the owner of 
a fine property of 24 J acres. In connection 
with his general farming he is engaged in 
stock-raising, and is devoting considerable 
attention to the raising of short-horn cattle. 
Mr. Huntington was married November 1, 
1S6S, to Miss Belle Perow, a daughter of 
Joseph Perow who is now deceased. Of the. 
nine children bom to this union, eight are 
still liviug, their names being as follows— 
Walter P., Robert S.. Elinor E., Fred. D., 
Arthur L., Hurt L., Ruth M. and Harry F. 
In his religious views Mr. Huntington is a 
member of the Evangelical church. 

-i o-ps^J^r'tfSsE-* 1- 

rr\Al)LFY B. LARRABEE, superintend 
.' f , \ ent of the Creston city schools, was born 
i ~./ in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, 
August IS, 18-19. Beginning at the age of 
seventeen years he taught in the country 
schools of his native county, and of the. ad- 
joining county of Broome, New York, together 
with one year in the graded school at Great 
Lend, Pennsylvania, until 1871, when he en- 
tered Hillsdale College, Michigan. During 
his college career he taught classes in mathe- 
matics several terms. Graduating June 17, 
1S75, he soon afterward returned to Pennsyl- 
vania, and was chosen principal of Pleasant 
Mount Academy. His administration of the 
affairs of this institution, which covered a 
period of throe years, was attended with 
marked success, as was indicated by its widely- 
extended influence and rapidly increasing at- 
tendance. At the close of theacademic year. 
in 1S78, he resigned, to accept the office of 
superintendent of the schools of Wayne 
County to which he had been elected May 7. 
cf that year. While occupying the latter po i 
tion ho saw that it presented opportunities 
for usefulness that are seldom properly appre- 



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520 HISTOPr OF I'XJOX COUNTT. gS 



ciated — that tlie duties of a county superin- | place in the ranks of educational leaders of 
teudent should be far more extensive than Iowa. Professor Larrabee was married in 
simply the performance of office work and Lenox, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, 



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to Miss Ella Rood, June 30, 1S75. They have 
two children living — "Wayne and Bennie. A 
daughter, Nettie May, died in infancy. 



repeated examinations of teachers. Accord- 
ingly, with characteristic energy and execu- 
tive ability, he thoroughly organized the 
educational forces of the county, inspired the 
teachers to greater zeal and effort, and caused 
his influence to be felt in every one of the 220 
schools under his care. His success in this 
oflice was so signal that he was accorded a 
unanimous re-election in 1S81, and a second 
re-election in ISS-i was assured when he do- \ 31, is a son of Alfred P. and Mary Francis, 
elined to be a candidate, on account of his ' his parents being natives of the State of New 
having determined to engage in educational I York, lie was born in the same State, the 
work in the "West. Enjoying the personal , date of his birth being May 12, 1833, and 

there grew to manhood, his youth being 
spent in assisting bis lather on the farm. He 
was married in the vearlS60,toMissGeorgeina 



C. FRANCIS, a prominent agricultur- 
ist, of Platte Township, engaged in 
* farming and stock-raising on section 



friendship, and receiving the hearty indorse- 
ment of Hon. J. P. W'ickersham, LL. D., for 
many years superintendent of public instruc- 
tion in Pennsylvania, together with that of j I.Davidson, who was horn September 7, 1839, 



other eminent educators of the SLaie, por- 
tions were not wanting from which to choose 
He was elected superintendent of schools at. 
three different points in the "West at about 
the same time, viz.: Helena, Montana, Hum- 
boldt, Nebraska, and Creston, Iowa. Accept- 
ing the latter position, he entered upon his 
duties in September, 1S84; he is therefore 
now in the third year of his administration 
of the school affairs of Creston, enjoying the 
full support of the people of this thriving city, 
whose greatest pride is her public schools. In 
these are employed thirty teachers, and 1,3G0 
pupils are enrolled. To his successful experi- 
ence as a teacher and superintendent Professor 
Larrabee has added a no less successful career 
as a conductor and instructor of teachers' in 
stitut . The reputation achieved in this 
line of work in Pennsylvania, confirmed and 
emphasized by his later experience in the 
"West, has secured abundant calls for like work 
in the future. Energetic, enthusiastic, cap- 
able, with marked executive ability, and 
thoroughly conversant with the work of pub- 
lic instruction, a continuance is assured of the 
success he has already attained, as also a large 



and Rachel (Brownlee) 

Davidson, who were both born in the State of 

Pennsylvania. To Mi-, and Mrs. Francis 

have been born ten children — Mary C, born 

May 17, 1SG1; Franie M., born November 7, 

1862; Laura P., born December S, 1S6'4; 

Charles J., born December 31, 1SCG; Elizabeth 

13., born December 22, 1SGS; Anna E., 

May 19, 1871; James S., born September 

27, 1874; Alfred R. and George C. (twins), 

born May 20, 1S76, and Frank A., born 

November 13, 1S7S. Mr. Francis came to 

Iowa in 1851, and entered laud in Marshall 

County, on which he located in 1800, rcmain- 

; ing there five years. He then removed to 

' Boone County, where he spent six years, and 

j from there came to Union County, where he 

j has since made his home. He has been sue 

' cessfulin his agricultural pursuits, and is now 

; the owner of his present fine farm, which con- 

: tains 200 acres of well-improved land, a com- 

' modions house, large barn, and other good 

1 farm buildings, and is identified with the best 

'< farmers of Union County, and since coming 

| here he has by his honorable and upright 

! dealings gained the confidence and respect of 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



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all who know him. lie has held various 
local offices of trust in the township, serving 
as township trustee and Echool director. In 
politics he casts his suffrage with the Re- 
publican party. 

^VOMER K. BURKET, senior member of 
f\ the firm of Burket Brothers, funeral 
-7-./ directors and einbalmers, and dealers in 
■window shades, picture frames, moldings, 
etc., purchased the business of his cousin, and 
conducted it alone until September 1, 1886, 
when he was joined by his brother, T. X. 
Burket. He had also handled sewing 
machines, while his brother, in 1884, em- 
barked in the window furnishings, picture 
frames, etc. The brothers consolidated their 
different branches of business, and are pre- 
pared to furnish to the public anything in 
their line ot goods. They are located on the 
corner of Maple and Montgomery streets. 
The business was established by II. K. 
Burket, a cousin of the present proprietors. 
Our subject has been a resident of that city 
since 1879. He was bora in Dixon, Illinois, 
in 1S5S. In 1S73 he removed with his lather's 
family to Tipton, Iowa, where he lived until 
he came to Creston. He was married in this 
city, to Miss Ella Gibson, a daughter of the 
Rev. Josiah Gibson. T. N. Burket was born 
at Dixon, Illinois, in 1863. 

f^-V-TILLIAM G. BLACK, section 20, Lin- 
: '\/\r com Township, is a native of Illinois 
\?T~prl bom in LaSalle County, July 11, 
185S, a son of Alonzo S. Black, a prominent 
old settler of that county, removing there from 
his native State, Pennsylvania, in an. early 
day. Our subject was given good educational 
advantages, attending school at Aurora, Illi- 
nois, and Valparaiso, Indiana. He came to 
Iowa in the fall of 18S3, and located on the 
farm where lie now lives, which contains 2G0 



acres of choice laud, all well improved. In 

the fall of 1S84 he went to Creston and dealt 
in stock until the following July, when he 
returned to his farm, which ho has since con- 
ducted, and at the same time deals quite 
extensively in stock. He is one of the enter- 
prising voting men of the county, and is fast 
gaining many friends among the business men 
as well as in social circles. He was married 
January 13, 1881, to Ida M. Banker, daughter 
of Scley Banker, of Sand Creek Township. 
They have had two children — Clarinda Pearl, 
who died August 31, 18S5, in her second year, 
and Minnie Juanita, born September 5, 18SG. 
Mr. Black is a member of the Odd Fellows 
order. 

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ILLIAM M. LEECH, farmer and 
ptock-raiser, section 36, Highland 

7] Township, was born in Rockbridge 
County, Virginia, December 17, 1833 ; a son 
of James and Nancy A. Leech, now of Lucas 
County, Iowa, natives of Virginia, the father 
born in Rockbridge, and the mother in Bote- 
tourt County. His father was a son of John 
Leech, who was also a native of Virginia, and 
his mother was a daughter of William Mc- 
Knight, who was of Scotch-Irish parentage, 
and a soldier in the war of 1812. His parents 
were among the early settlers of Lucis County, 
Iowa, locating on wild land. Their first house 
was a small log cabin, in which the family 
lived until better accommodations could be 
prepared, and the land made ready for culti- 
vation. Oar subject was reared a farmer, 
and lias made that vocation the work of his 
life. He has been successful, and new owns 
a good farm of 240 acres. He went from 
Lucas County to Allen County, Kansas, in the 
fall of 1807, and in 1^74 came to Union 
! County, and located on the farm on which he 
1 now lives, which at that time was a tract of. 
; barren prairie laud. He pays especial atten- 
! tion to the raising of horses and cattle, and 






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history or uxion countt. ;♦:;♦; 



lias uindu a decided success of that industry. ; business. He resides in Kansas where the 

Mr. Leech was married February 20, 1S6G. to j brothers have large farming ami stock in- 

Rachel A. Courtney, daughter of George and terests. W. W. 1ms charge of the busnicss 

Elcey J. Courtney, who came from Virginia ; iutereste of the linn in Union County. He 

to Iowa, in 1851, and settled in Lucas County. | was born in Guernsey County, Ohio, in 1849, 

To Mr. and Mrs. Leech have been born six ' and married Miss Mary E. Roberts, daughter 



children — Freston M., died aged six years ; 
Arthur A., Julia A., George C, Elmer E. 
and Roy, died in infancy. Mr. Leech has 
been trustee of his township eight years, and 
at present is serving as school director. lie 
and his wife are members of the Congrega- 
tional church. 

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of C. G. Roberts, of Union Township. 

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rrSAAC K. WHITE, one of the early set- 
\ tiers of Union County, was born in Cale- 
^? donia County, Vermont, August 10, 1825. 
His father, John White, was a native of 
Massachusetts, ami his paternal grandfather 
was born in New Hampshire, and of Scotch- 
Irish ancestry. His maternal ancestry was of 
Dutch origin. "William White, the grand- 
father, was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. 
John White married Sarah Kendall, and im- 
mediately immigrated to Vermont They first 
settled in Washington County, and later went 
to Caledonia County. When Isaac K. was two 
years old his parents returned to Washington 
County, where they passed the remainder of 
their days. John White was twice married, 
Isnac being a child of the second marriage. 
to Guernsey County, Ohio, with his family, His first wife was Lucy Blanchard. There 



W. MORROW, of the firm of Mor- 
row Brothers, stock-dealers of Union 
i r<Jsfl ° Township, is a son of William Mor- 
row who came to Union County with his 
family in 1864, purchasing 2S0 acres of the 
farm now occupied by tiie brothers. There 
were then about sixty acres improved. In 
1871 the parents removed to Alton. "William 
Morrow was born in Washington County, 
Pennsylvania, October 31, 1S07, and grew to 
manhood in his native county. He removed 



thence to Illinois, coming from Lawrence 
County, that State, to Union County. The 
children of William Morrow and wile are — 
Robert F., -of San Francisco, California, a 
member of tiie 13 >ard of Trade of that city and 
a director of the Bank of California, was for- 
merly interested in the mines, and his wealth is 
estimated at several millions; Mrs. Martha 
J. Bragg, of Union County; Mrs. Mary E. 
Lorimer, of Gie .t Bend, Kansas; Mrs, Dorcas 
W. llawkin;, of Richland County, Illinois; 
Mrs. Esther Langhlin. who removed to Kansas 
after marriage, and has since died; William 
B., who was a soldier in tin: war of tie Re- 
bellion, as a member of the One Hundred and 
Twenty-second Ohio Infantry, and was lost 
at the battle of the Wilderness, and James C, 
who h associated with his brother W. W.,in 



were fifteen children b}- both marriages, tour- 
teen of whom grew to maturity. The family 
consisted of eight sons and seven daughters. 
Four sons and four daughters are living. Only 
two of the family settled in Iowa; Stephen, 
who was tiie youngest child of the first mar- 
riage and our subject. Stephen came in 1855 
and purchased a farm in Jones Township, 
where he lived until his death. Isaac K. was 
married in Manchester, New Hampshire, to 
Miss Elizabeth Grrgg, who was born in 
Windham December IS. 1827. Her parents 
were Samuel and Janette (Dickey) Gregg, 
natives of New Hampshire, and oi Scotch- 
Irish descent. Her lather died when she was 
sixteen months old, and her mother afterward 
married David Dickey (n t a relative). Mrs. 
White was reared in Manchester, where her 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 533 



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mother died in 1SS0, aged eighty years. She 
had cloven children by her first marriage; live 
of whom grew to maturity and three arc now 
living. In the spring of 1S5G Mr. White re- 
moved with his family to Iowa, having been 
here and made his location the previous 
autumn. He settled on section 5 in Jones 
Township, although his farm was on sections 
5, S, 9 and 6. lie first bought 320 acres, 
which he afterward increased to 900 acres. 
He still owns his original farm. But few 
families had settled in that township, when 
Mr. White made his home there, be, and his 
brother, Stephen, being among the earliest. 
lie occupied the place until the spring of 1885, 
when he removed to Afton, where he has a 
pleasant home. Mr. and Mrs. White have had 
nine children — seven sons and two daughters. 
All are living except the oldest, William 
Edgar, who died at the age of seven months. 
The others are — John F., Kendall D., Lewis 
C, Edward E., Jennie G., Cora B., Charles 
S. and Arthur L. 



JpKENKY WICK, one of the pioneer settlers 
of Union Countv. engaged in farming on 



When the Wick family lirst came to Union 
County Indians were numerous, and our sub- 
ject's early companions were the Indian chil- 
dren, with whom he used to run races and go 
fishing and hunting, lie began life on his 
own account on Eection 19 of Sand Creek 
Township, where he has since made his homo, 
and in his agricultural pursuits has met with 
success. Mr. Wick was married July 30, 
1865, to Martha J. Brown, born November 4, 
1844. They have eleven children— John P., 
George II., Rosa J., Charles A., William S., 
Alma, David E., Frank W., James G., Bertha 
M., Herbert F. In his political views Mr. 
Wick is independent. He is a member of 
Henry Keating Post, of Afton. 



u 



j. section 12,'Sand Creek Township, where 
he has 142 acres of well-improved land, is a 
son of J. C. and Mary (Holly) Wick, his 
father a native of Germany and his mother 
of Tennessee. lie was born in Gallatin 
County, Illinois, May 30. 1S43, and when 
very young was taken by his ] arents to 
Schuyler County, Missouri, and from there 
they went to Burlington, Iowa, when it was 
but a small town. At the age of twelve 
years he accompanied his parents to Union 
County, Iowa, they settling on section 2, 
Sand Creek Township. At the age of eighteen 
years he volunteered in defense of his c mntry, 
enlisting in Company II, Twenty ninth Iowa 
Infantry, and after serving three years was 
honorably discharged at Davenport, Iowa- 



■~^wsr"~ 

WRUMAN II. WHEELER, confectioner 
/-.. and proprietor of general restaurant, 
' 77^ settled in Afton in 1872, and established 
his present business in 187S. He was born 
in Chautauqua County, New York, July 22, 
1S34. lie was reared in his native county, 
to the occupation of a farmer. When twenty- 
one years, of age he went to Toledo, Ohio, and 
engaged in the coopering business at East 
Toledo. April 16, 1861, immediately after 
the bombardment of Foit Sumter, he enlisted 
in Company E. Fourteenth Ohio Infantry, 
and served three months. At the expiration 
of that time he re-enlisted in the First Michi- 
gan Cavalry, a regiment that made a noble 
record, second to none. Mr. Wheeler followed 
the fortunes of this regiment until the battle 
of Cold Harbor, May 17, 18C4, where he lost 
his right leg by a gun-shot in the terrible 
charge on the enemy's works. He was in the 
hospital until the following November, and 
was then discharged. He participated in all 
the cavalry rights in which the regiment took 
part. In 1865 he came to Iowa, first settling 
in Mt. Pleasant, where he was for a time 
engaged in clerking. He was married to 
Amanda Johnson, atOsceola, Clarke County, 



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HISTOHr OF UNION 



COUNTT. 



Iowa, December 31, 1873. Thev 
!»;^ daughters— Nettie, Grace, Edith and Mabc 
MM ranging in age from five to twelve year?. Mr. 
;*■>; 'Wheeler is a member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic, at Af'ton, and politically affili- 
ates with the Republican party. 



^JEREMIAH F. HURLEY has been a 
"Ml resident of Creston since 1881, and of 
V< Union County since 1875. lie was born 
in Oneida County, New York, in 1S55, and 



g>! was reared in his native county. His lather, 
£>: Jeremiah Hurley, Sr., removed with his 
£& family to Illinois in 1S67, and to Union 
^ County in 1S75. He settled on a farm in 
jSj Spaulding Township, which he sold in 1881, 
!*«* and then removed to Creston. Our subject 
'0 was employed for some time as bookkeeper for 
j;^ Joseph Norton, grain dealer. In 1877 he was 
candidate for county superintendent of 
schools. There were three candidates in the 
field at that time, and the successful one was 
Miss J. E. Lester. In 1SS0 he was the 
Greenback candidate for county recorder, 
enough to elect 



ave four j October, 1S74, he came to Union County, 
Iowa, where he lived till his death, which 
occurred March 17, 1877. His widow is still 
living, and makes her home with her sou, 
James T. They were the parents of six chil- 
dren, of whom five are yet living, our subject 
being the eldest. Their names are— James 
T, Eugene, Mary J., Rachel E. and Josephine 
R. ,1 ames T. McCann was reared and educated 
in Hancock County, Illinois, remaining there 
till he ained his majority, when he came to 
Union County, Iowa, in 1874. lie was reared 
a farmer, and has always followed that avoca- 
tion. He was united in marriage June 22, 
18S2, to Miss Anna Mullen, a daughter of the 
late Edward Mullen, and to them have been 
born two children — Margaret O. and Rose M. 
Since coming to Union County Mr. McCann 
has served as township clerk for five years. 
He has also been president of the School 
I Board, on which he is at present holding the 
position of secretary. He is a member of the 
Roman Catholic church, his wife also belong- 
ing to the same church. 



new. but his party was not stron: 

:<;*: nim. lie served as justice of the peace in 

:«>; Spaulding Township 

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gd the Eagle Block. lie is a veteran of the fire 

Sp*; department, having been a member of that 

r | organization fr 

■S3 Greenbacker. 



and is now serving his 
second term in Creston, his office being in 



years. Politically he is a 



w 



fAMES T. McCANN, residing on section 
30,Liucoln Township, was born in Morris- 
f town, New Jersey, October 1, 1863. a eon 
of John and Margaret E. (Burke) McCann, 
£*| who were natives of Ireland, the lather born in 
'0 County West Meath. He immigrated to the 
United States in 1846, when he settled in New 
*£ Jersey, remaining in that Slate till 1854, when 
£*J he removed to Hancock County, Illinois. In 



T. McKEE. section S, Douglas Town- 
ship, is a farmer, horticulturist, apiar- 

-=r\<* ist and teacher. He was born in Adams 
County, Ohio, February 22, 1847. His par- 
ents. John and Nancy (Deniint) McNce, are 
natives of Ohio, of French and Irish descent, 
and reside in Highland Township, Union 
County. Mr. Mclvee was brought up on a 
farm and in the occupation of milling. He 
was sixteen years of age when he immigrated 
to Illinois, living in Henry and Livingston 
counties three years; then was in Ohio again 
until 1872, when he came to Afton, Union 
County, resided there five years teaching; and 
he finally settled on his present farm of fifty- 
five acres in March, 1875, where he is culti- 
vating nearly all kinds of fruits, and has an 
apiary of thirty-five stands of hybrid bees. 
In his social relations lie is a member of the 



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DJOGEAPJUCAL SKETCHES. 



order of OJd Fellows, in which, he has passed business, and 1ms been engaged in general 



all the chairs, taking all the degrees. In his 
political views he sympathizes with the Re- 
publicans. He was first married in Afton. 
Union County, to Gertie Painter, who was 
born in Illinois in 1852, and died in 1880, 
leaving one child, James P. McKec. For his 
second wife Mr. McKee married, July 28, 
1S81, Millie Yowell, widow of the late John 
Yowcil. Iicr maiden name was Beekelhymer, 
and her parents reside in Douglas Township. 



merchandising since 187-i- Mr. Brockman was 
born in Westphalia, Germany, in 1833. When 
nineteen years of age he became apprenticed 
to the shoemaker's trade for a period of three 
years. While still serving his apprenticeship, 
in 1S53, his lather, Franz Joseph Brockman, 
immigrated with his family to America. 
Franz W. remained to finish his apprentice- 
ship. The family settled in Iowa City, where 
the father died, in December, 1SS-1. He was 



By the latter marriage one child was born, J a farmer by occupation. Having served his 
named Blaine, who is now dead. Postoffice, : time at his trade, Franz W. sailed from the 
Cromwell. I port of Bremen in May, 1855, and was seven 

| weeks making the voyage to New York City. 
isSisr* ~ ; Here he, with others of his party who came 

i with him, was induced to purchase tickets to 
j-jfffRANZ W. BROCKMAN" has been a ! Rock Island from a brother countryman who 
>;pi resident of Afton since 1S5S. At that ! promised to provide dinner for them free, and 
'<—J= time he was in the employ of William j to see that they were started all right on their 
Williams, with whom he c&iiie to Afton 'from \ westward journey. He did not fulfill his 
Winterset, as a shoemaker. In the spring of j promise, and charged the emigrants an exor- 
1S59 Mr. Williams removed to Bethany, \ bitant price for their dinner. Their troubles 
Missouri, and afterward died in the insane | did not end here. The baggageman, to whom 
asylum. Mr. Brockman contemplated leav- \ their tickets and baggage were entrusted, dis- 
ing with Mr. Williams, but was prevailed I appeared with the tickets, and they were com- 
upon by the citizens to remain and open a ■ pelled to purchase others before resuming 
shoe shop himself, as there was a vacancy ! their journey. Fortunately arrangements are 
made by the removal of Williams. Afton | now made to prevent such frauds being prac- 
ticed on the emigrants. From Xcw York 
they went to Albany by steamer, thence to 
Buffalo by railroad, thence to Detroit by 
steamer, thence - to Chicago and Rock Isl- 
and by railroad, by river to Muscatine, 
and then on foot to Iowa City. His parents 
brought with them to this country six chil- 
dren, and o'.ie son was born in this country. 



had no railroads then, and goods were hauled 
in wagons from Keokuk. Mr. J. S. Elliott, 
then a merchant of Afton, sent his teamster 
to Keokuk for a load of goods. The wagon 
was drawn by several oxen. Mr. Brockman 
improved this opportunity to send for his 
first stock of leather. His wealth consisted 
of about §150, all of which was required to 
purchase the lasts and leather necessary to , Three of the sons, all of whom had grown to 



open up business. This was his beginning. 
He soon established a large patronage and his 
business increased rapidly. After a time he 
began keeping a ready-made stock. He was 
engaged in the boot-and-shoe business, includ- 



manliood, died in the early winter of 1877 of 
typhoid fever. One daughter died in Ger- 
many. Five children are still living. Mrs. 
Brockman was formerly Christiana Bernhart, 
a native of Pennsylvania. They have ten chil- 



ing the year he worked for Williams, sixteen dren — seven sons and three daughters. They 
years. He gradually went into the mer- i have lost three children by death. Mr.Brock- 
cantile trade in connection with his other , man lias been quite successful in bus', es . 



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526 HISTORY OF UNION COUNTY. ■ »!!« 



His little fortune of §150 that he expended in | attention to niiuiiig. In IS 77 lie came to Iowa, 
1S59 for lasts and leather has increased to a j and located in Creston, where he became asso- 

fine property. lie owns a good store, well | elated with John A. Patterson, Esq., in the 
stocked, and has an excellent farm oh section ' practice of law. This partnership was con- 
25, in Sand Creek Township. In 1SS6 he 
visited his native land, and spent several 
weeks amid the scenes of his early life. 




H^UKTIS G. ROBERTS, section 3, Union 
\l . Township, came to Union County, 
«jpn Iowa, March 1, 1850, and settled on 
section 9, Lincoln Township, where he bought 
an unimproved farm. He fenced 100 acres, 
built a frame residence, and improved 
eighty acres, making it his home about six 
years, when he moved to section 30, Dodge 
Township. He subsequently lived two years 
in Afton, and in 18G9 bought a farm on 
section 10, Union Township. In 1871 he 
went to Page County, returning to Union 
County, in 187S. lie was born in Meigs 
County, Ohio, in 1825. His father, Solomon 
Roberts, was a native id' "Washington County, 
Pennsylvania, and his grandfather, Nathan 
Roberts, was born in Wales. Solomon 
Roberts married Polly Coleman, in Pennsyl- 
vania, and afterward moved to Ohio, where 
he passed the rest of his life. Curtis G. was 
the fifth of their nine children. He was 
married in Ohio to Catharine A. Pec-be, sister 
of Dr. J. T. Beebe, of Alton. They have had 
a family of twelve children, nine of whom are 
living. 



tinued four years, and in 1SS1 Mr. Gibson 
withdrew in order to devote his entire, atten- 
tion to his manufacturing interests. In 1SS3 
lie was elected president of the Iron Mountain 
Company of New York, that company own- 
ing the celebrated Iron Mountain at Durango, 
Mexico, the largest in the world. During the 
presidency of Mr. Gibson over $100,000 have 
been invested in establishing a plant at this 
mountain. Mr. Gibson's residence on Syca- 
more street, Creston, is one of the most beauti- 
ful in the city, and was erected in 1S70. He 
is absent from home much of the time in the 
discharge of his official duties, and has practi- 
cally abandoned his profession, although he 
is still numbered among the attorneys of the 
county. 



-0-<^&g>-C- 



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-«^i2»«->s2V.i v.'.' -;-< <^<r- 



OIIN GIBSON, attorney at law, Creston, 

Iowa, became identified with 

Union County in May, 1S77. He is a 
native of Columbiana County, Ohio. lie was 
reared and educated in Illinois, lie chose as 
his life work the profession of law, and after 
being admitted to the bar, in 1872. went to 
PueMo, Colorado, where he engaged in prac- 



7 |^HRISTIAN N. MAYER, engaged in 
'>l,-'j agriculture and stock-raising, has 2S0 
'V^i acres of well-improved land, where be 
resides, on section 35, Douglas Township. He 
was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 
his parent? being Jacob M. and Fanny (Barr) 
Mayer, natives of the same State. At the 
age of sixteen years he came to Muscatine 
County, Iowa, continuing in the vocation 
of agriculture, in which he was trained from 
his youth. In 1SC2 he enlisted in Company 
G, Thirty-fifth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and 
was in the service (if his country a little more 
than three years, participating in the battles 
the bar of j of Vicksburg, Jackson, Ked River, Nashville, 
Mobile, etc. He was ordered from Mobile to 
Davenport, this State, where he was honor- 
ably discharged, in 18G5. He was married in 
Muscatine County, in UoT, to Miss Elizabeth, 
daughter of George and Juda Ilartman, who 
was born in Montour County, Pennsyl- 



tice. and 



he same time devcted some i vaiiia, in lP4c 



Mi 



id Mrs. Maver have 



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BIOGRAPHIC :AL SKE TCI U.S. 



53 7 



seven children — Hattie E., Mary E., John 
II., Anna E., Elmer 0., Roy B. and Ray II. 

(twins). Mr. Mayer built his residence in 

1575, at a cost of about 8700, and his barn in 

1576, costing §3,500. On his place is a very 
fino maple and cottonwood grove. The fine 
specimen of a cottonwood growing near the 
house is a spontaneous tree. Mr. Mayer 
stands high in the.estcemof his fellow-citizens, 
having held the various township offices, be- 
sides the city treasurership of Wilton Junc- 
tion, .Muscatine County; has also been 
supervisor and school director. He is a 
member of the Odd Fellows lodge at Oreston. 
His start in the world was 8500, left him by 
his mother. 



«4C£Cr®-i3* 






:T-r^ILLIAM M. SPARR, hardware and 

^AflfMnmbo" mp'-«hant Ornrmvfi] \v,is 
ty\MM ■ u —^* m^v-nant, ^oiujiui, Wa 

i^jpr] born in Blair County, Pennsylvania, 
November 5, 1843. His parents, John and 
Sarah (Hall) Sparr, were natives of that State 
also, and of German ancestry. After remain- 
ing on the home farm until he was twenty- 
five years of age, and attaining a good 
education, he came West, stopped one year 
(1868) in Mercer County, Illinois, and finally 
came to Cromwell, where he first began work 
in a lumber yard. He soon purchased an 
interest in the hardware store, and shortly 
afterward bought the remaining interest, so 
that he now carries on the sale of his ■well- 
selected stock alone. In both departments — 
hardware and lumber — he keeps on hand a full 
assortment, the total stock being about §10,- 
000, and the annual aggregate of sales to 
about 830,000. Besides, he owns 160 acres 
of well-cultivated land in Ringgold County, 
and a pleasant home in Cromwell, all Ihe 
proceeds of his own honest efforts, as lie had 
nothing when he started out in life for 
himself. By his reasonable prices and fair 
dealing he is commanding a largo trade. lie 
is a member of Cromwell Lodge, No. 324, A. 



F. & A. M., has been a member of the School 
Board and Township Board for several years, 
and' in politics is a Republican. In 1807, in 
Pennsylvania, Mr. Sparr married Rebecca 
Snively, a native of that State, and they are 
now the parents of four children — Frank V"., 
Fred G., Fanny Bell and Fairy Dell. 



' "*~^ "£i ^i" ;}*"G >_<> ~ 

yff L. HAYERICK, real-estate dealer and 
"Ml insurance agent at Creston, has been 
zg * engaged in his present business in this 
city since 18S1. He was first associated with 
S. G. Lee, and later with A. J. Bivens. He 
has been alone since July 1, 1885. nis loca- 
tion is No. 1, Eagle Block. Mr. Haverick 
came to Creston in 1872. He was born in 
Coshocton County, Ohio, in October, 1S49, 
where he was reared and educated. His 
father, Vincent Haverick, is still a resident 
of that county. When our subject first came 
to Creston he was employed by the Chicago, 
Burlington & Qnincy Railroad Company, 
and afterward clerked for several dry-goods 
firms for several years. He had but a few 
dollars when he came, and has worked his 
own way to his present position. He has a 
younger brother in Creston, employed by the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 
Company. Mrs. Haverick was formerly Miss 
Lina Cournelis, daughter of Roland Oonrnelis 
of Dallas, Texas. They have one son — Willie 
Vincent. 



•*a> 



j 7T7RUMAN SWAINE, one of the prinei- 

: '( \ '■_ pal merchants of Afton, has been cori- 

?pj nected with the mercantile business at 

! this place since September 12, 1S74-. At thai 

! time he engaged as clerk for W. K. Syp & Co. 

In the fall of 1878 he became a partner, and 

the firm name was Syp & Swaine. Severs 1 

changes have been made in this firm. The 

I first change was made by the withdrawal of 



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7USTOAT OF CX/OX COUNT!'. 



Mr. Syp,and the firm became Swaine Brothers, 
and later, Swaine Brothers A: Syp. In Janu- 
ary. 1S86, Mr. Swaine became sole proprietor. 
He was born in Eric County, New York, in 
JS57. He resided in Buffalo until he came to 
Afton. An elder brother, George Swaine, 
came here several years previous, and is now 
at Tingley, Ringgold County. Mr. Swaine's 
father, James Swaine, is still a resident of 
Buffalo, New York. Mr. Swaine married Miss 
Augusta B. Ralph, a native of Buffalo. They 
have three children — Olive, Edna and Alvin 
Ralph. Mr. Swaine is a successful merchant, 
and his store is well stocked. The main room 
is 20x120 feet; second floor S0x20 feel, and 
cellar of the same dimensions as the main 
room. His stock includes dry-goods, boots 
and shoes, clothing, groceries, etc. He is 
genial, courteous and accommodating, and 
deserves the large patronage, he gets. 

H""\ S. CLARKE, President of the First 
|jf|\ National Bank, of Creston, is a gentle- 
%9(f ° man of long experience in his special 
calling, beginning, in 1S55, as bookkeeper for 
the banking house of TV. P. Brazleton & 
Co., at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. November 1, 
1857, lie became the senior partner of the 
banking firm of Clarke & Whiting, in that 
city, he being then but nineteen years of a^c.. 
In the fall of 1S5S the firm started in that 
place a branch of the State Bank of Iowa; 
and in 1S62 Mr. Clarke withdrew from the 
State bank, and, with others, established the 
banking firm of Saunders, Kibbon & Co. 
This institution was succeeded in 1SG4 by 
the First National Bank of Mt. Pleasant, of 
which Mr. Clarke was cashier. In UCS he 
was appointed cashier of the First National 
Bank of Washington, Iowa. Continuing in 
this position until 1873, he returned to the 
First National Bank of'Mt. Pleasant, where 
he was cashier for ten years; then came 
to Creston. Mr. Clarke is a native of the 



Key; 1 ., me State, having been born in Beaver 
County. Pennsylvania, in 1838. His wife, 
nee Docela Weaver, is also a native of that 
State. They have six children, two sons and 
four daughters. 



ic-oooe^s,--*- 



J", AVID M. MOLER, of Afton, was horn 
| ) in Franklin County, Ohio, March 30> 
1841. His father, John Molcr, was a 
native of Virginia. When a young man he 
removed, to Ohio, and settled upon the land 
where the city of Columbus was located, and 
later he settled thirteen miles west of that 
place, where he passed the remainder of his 
days. He died about 1S50. The mother has 
been dead many years. David M. was reared 
on his father's farm. He enlisted June 22, 
1S61, in Company K, Twenty-sixth Ohio In- 
i fan try. His first service was in West Vir- 
ginia. From there he went to Kentucky, and 
on to Nashville, and with Buell took part in 
the second day's battle of Shiloh. He was at 
the siege of Corinth in 1862, and soon after 
returned to Louisville, Kentucky, in pursuit 
of General Bragg. He participated in the 
battle of Stone River, thence to Chattanooga 
J under General Crittenden. He was engaged 
'• in the battle of Chickamauga, where he was 
I taken prisoner and confined first at Belle 
, Island, then at other prisons at] and near 
Richmond. He suffered all the horrors that 
characterized rebel prisons. After eight 
| months of this suffering he was paroled and 
sent to the Union lines, and was mustered out 
: at Huntsville, Alabama, January 16, 1865. 
Only those who have had experience in rebel 
prisons can realize the terrible suffering and 
! torment he underwent during his eight 
months of prison life. He has never fully 
i recovered from that bitter experience. He 
was a gallant soldier, and his record is with- 
out a stain. He returned to Georgcville, 
Ohio, where his'relatives were living, where he 
remained until 1866, then came to Union 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 



County, and setMod one mile east of Alton. In 
1867 lit' returned to Ohio, and was married 
to Cynthia A. Killgore, born and roared in 
Fayette County, Ohio, and removed with her 
parents to Madison County, where she was 
married. Mr. Moler returned to Union 
County in 1868. He still owns his original 
eighty acres and also other land, 400 acres 
altogether. He removed to Afton August 6 
18S3, where he has a pleasant home. Mr. 
iid Mrs. Moler have two children — Hutson 
E. and Minnie Evangeline. 



with success. In polities Mr. Scherer casts 
his suffrage with the Republican party. Since 
coming to Union County he has served as 
school treasurer, pathmaster and school direct- 
or. Both Mr. and Mrs. Scherer are members 
of the Evangelical association. 



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.^"W;ILLIAM SCHERER, one of the pio- 
Wfvii neCI settIers of Union Comity, and a 

l-zip^A prosperous and well-known citizen 
of Sand Creek Township, is a native of Ger- 
many, where lie grew to manhood, and being 
a poor boy his educational advantages were 
very limited, he being obliged early in life to 
help in the maintenance of his father's family. 
At the age of twenty-five years be sailed for 
America, landing at New York, May 1, 1S54. 
He at once proceeded to Burlington, Iowa, 
which at that time was but a small place. He 
was married in February, 1856, to Miss 
Fredcrica Abel, and to this union have been 
born five children— Sophia, Charles, William 
and Frank are living, and Willie is deceased. 
Mr. Scherer is at present engaged in farming, 
on section 15, Sand Creek Township, where 
he has 480 acres under a fine state of cultiva- 
tion. He began life in very limited circum- 
stances, and for some time worked as a day 
laborer on railroads. By hard work, strict 
economy combined with good management, 
he has prospered beyond his expectations, and 
on his farm he has a comfortable residence, 
and a commodious barn, and other farm 
buildings, which are among the best in his 
neighborhood. He is devoting considerable 
attention to stock-raising in connection with 
his farming pursuits, in which he is meetin 



:T7 S. TAN PATTEX, dealer in grain and 
|P live-stock at Afton, is located on the 
'j^° northeast corner of the square. He has 
been engaged in his present business at this 
point since 1878, although he came here two 
years previous to that time. He is a native 
of the Empire State, born in Jefferson County, 
in 1837. His father, Simon Van Patten, immi- 
grated to Rock County, Wisconsin, in 184P, 
where be. still resides, at the advanced age of 
nearly eighty years. Mr. Van Patten was 
1 a farmer, an occupation he followed 
many years. He was engaged in buying and 
skipping stock five years previous to coming 
to Afton. He understands his business thor- 
oughly, and has the confidence of the public, 
being recognized as an upright, conscientious 
business man. Mrs. A'an Patten was formerly 
Miss Kate Guthridge, a daughter of D. J. 
I Guthridge. deceased. She was born in Union 
I County. They have one child, born in Afton, 
! in 1882. 

i ' . ' " 

: • PjLMER J. EMMOXS, of the hardware 
' p. firm of Syp & Emmons, has been a rcsi- 
'r- . dent of Union County since 1867, and 
of Afton since 1873. He was burn in Cort- 
land County, New York, in 1842, and when a 
child removed to Onondaga County with his 
parents. His father, W. A. Emmons, was 
al^o a native of New York, where he lived 
until his death, which occurred in 1882. His 
mother is still living, and reside; with a 
daughter, at Syracuse. lh\ Emmons' grand 



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iiisronr of vxio.y countt. 



State of New York. Our subject was reared 
to the occupation of a firmer. Ilia school- 
days ended at Onondaga Academy, which he 
left to enlist in August, 1862, as a member of 
Company E, Forty-fourth New York Infant- 
ry, and served about one year, when lie was 
discharged for disability. In 1SG5 he, with 
his friend J. J). Spaulding, went to the oil 
regions of West Virginia, where he remained 
about one year, then returned to Syracuse, 
Naw York, and was for a time engaged in 
bookkeeping for I. A. Thurber & Co., in that 
city. He came West in 1S67, accompanied 
by J. D. Spaulding. They made settlements 
in the northwest part of the county, and were 
the first settlers in what is now Spaulding 
Township, which received its name from Mr. 
Spaulding. Mr. Emmons still owns the farm 
upon which they first settled. He now owns 
520 acres of land in the county. In the fall 
of 187:? he was elected clerk of the court, and 
in*January, 1S73, lie removed to Afton. lie 
held the office eight years and made a '.-cry 
competent and popular clerk. He married 
Miss Lillie Hays, a daughter of Dr. Thomas 
Hays, and they have two children — Denaand 
Blanche. 



rr^HILIP L. HARSH, section ?,5, Highland 
HK*? Township, is one of the enterprising 
*■§*' farmers of Union County. He was born 
in Washington County, Pennsylvania, Febru- 
ary 10, 183G. His father, Daniel Harsh, was 
a native of the same county, and in 1837 re- 
moved with his family to Clinton County, 
Ohio, and thence, in 1819, to Bureau County, 
Illinois. Our subject was reared a farmer, 
receiving a common-school education. lie 
remained at home until manhood, and in 
April, 1S61, came to Iowa, and lived in Davis 
County until the following September, when 
he came to Union County, and located where 
he now lives, in Highland Township. His 
land was entirely unimproved, but lie went 
to work, and now has his 220 acres under 



line cultivation, with good buildings, groves, 
fences, etc., and well stocked. For seven years 
lie bought and shipped stock to Chicago, in 
connection with attending to his farm, lie 
was married in October, 1S71, to Belle Oliver, 
daughter of Simon Oliver, of Carl, Adams 
County, Iowa. To them were born three 
children — Francis D., Mary B. and Julius H. 
.Mrs. Harsh died June 29, 1S79, and June 16, 
3 SSI, Mr. Harsh married Mary D. Campbell, 
daughter of Griffith Campbell. Mr. Harsh 
twice offered his services to his country 
during the war of the Rebellion, but was re- 
jected on account of physical disability. He 
has served his township eight years as justice 
of the peace, and two and a half years as clerk. 
He is a member of the Congregational, and 
his wife of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

3fe EVI T. DEAYER, retired farmer, resid- 
-,? ing on section 16, postofiice Thayer, is 
i—r- an old and eminently-esteemed pioneer 
citizen of Union County. He was born July 
18. 1817, in Morgan County, Ohio. II is par- 
ents, Levi and Nancy (llause) Deaver, were 
natives of Maryland, who lived and died in 
Morgan County. Mr. Deaver, whose, name 
heads this notice, passed his boyhood and 
youth upon his father's farm, following the 
independent vocation of agriculture. In 
1S64 he came to Union Count}-, where he 
has been successful in the pursuits of life. 
He commenced in life without any means, 
and but a limited education, but, being a man 
of sterling worth and irreproachable char- 
acter, he has succeeded well, besides form ng 
a large circle of appreciative acquaintances; 
is prominently identified with the Christian 
church, as is also his wife, and takes a. deep 
interest in all religious and educational enter- 
prises. Politically, he is a Democrat. For 
forty years he has been practicing as a veter- 
inary physician and surgeon. In 1810, in 
Ohio, Mr. Deaver married Miss Catharine, 



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BIOGRAPUICAL SKETCHES. 



daughter of William and Sallic Foraker, the 
latter a relative of Governor Foraker, of Ohio. 
Three children have been born by tins 
marriage — Levi J., who married Martha 
Leach, and lias three children — Charles, Ai- 
mer and Dora; William J., who married 
Laura Andrews, and has two children — Ida 
and Pearly; and Clara M., now the wife of 
Walter JBabbs, and lias one child — S. Clark. 

m UDGE JAMES W. McDILL, one of the 

J S well-known pioneers of Union County, 
Sjg came to Aftou, April 16, 1857, having 
been identified with the county about thirty 
years. He was born in Butler County, Ohio, 
March 4, 1834. When he was quite young 
his father, Lev. John McDill, removed with 
his family to Hanover, Jefferson County, In- 
<lir.ua, where he became the settled, pastor of 
a church, and died in 1840. He commenced 
his preparatory studies at Hanover College, 
and. in 1845 returned to Ohio and continued 
his studies at Salem Academy, South Salem, 
Loss County. In 1S51 he entered the junior 
clas3 of Miami University and graduated in 
1S53. After this event he taught school one 
year in Kossuth, Iowa, then returned to Ohio 
and began the study of law at Columbus with 
Messrs. Galloway & Mathews. He was ad- 
mitted to the -bar at Akron, September 30, 
3856. In October following he came to Iowa, 
spending the winter at Burlington, coming to 
Afton the following Fpring. In August, 1857, j 
he was married to Mi .- Narcissa Fullenwider, ,' 
daughter of Samuel Fullenwider, who emi- ! 
grated from Kentucky to Iowa in 1837. He | 
was one of the well-known pioneers of Iowa, ' 
and a member of the first State Senate. He j 
now live? with his son-in-law, Judge McDill, I 
at the advanced age of eighty-two years. Upon ', 
locating at Afton be at once formed a partner- j 
ship with Reuben Puggs, Esq., in the firm i 
name of Riggs & McDill. In 1S59 Mr. Riggs j 
vent to Pike's Peak, and several years later 



was frozen to death in Kansas. In the fall of 
1858 Mr. McDill was elected county judge 
of Union County, and in 1S59 he was elected 
county superintendent of schools, the first 
one elected to that position in Union County. 
In November, 1SG1, Governor dimes, who 
had then became United States Senator, ap- 
pointed Judge McDill clerk of the Senate 
committee on the District of Columbia, of 
which committee Governor Grimes was chair- 
man. This position he lillcd until February, 
1802, when he was appointed by Governor 
Chase, then Secretary of the^Treasnry, to a 
clerkship in the Third Auditor's office at 
Washington, serving a part of the time as 
chief of the division of war claims. In May, 
1865, he opened an office in Washington and 
entered into a partnership in the prosecution 
of war claims. In October, 1SGG, he returned 
to Afton and formed a law partnership with 
X. W. Rowell. In the fall of 1868 he was 
elected judge of the Circuit Court, assuming 
the duties of that office January 1, 1S69, 
being the first circuit judge of his district. 
Two years later he was appointed district 
judge to fill the office made vacant by the ele- 
vation of Judge Day to the Supreme Bench, 
and was afterward elected by the people. In 
August, 1872, Judge McDill was the Re- 
publican nominee for Congress for the Eighth 
District. He accordingly resigned the oilice 
of judge, and was elected and re-elected in 
1874, serving in the Forty-third and Forty- 
fourth Congress. In the former he was a 
member of the committee on the Pacific Rail- 
road, and in the latter on public lands; and 
when the difficulty attending the Presidential 
election of IS76 occurred he was a member of 
the committee appointed to inquire into the 
privileges of the House as to the electoral 
coui t. He declined a third term in Congress, 
and resumed, the practice of his profession. In 
1881 President Garfield, hiving appointed 
Samuel Kirkwood, then United States Sena- 
tor, to the office of Secretary of the Interior, 
Governor Gear appointed Judge McDill 



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United States Senator to fill the vacancy made 
by the promotion of Kirkwood. He took his 
seat March 8,1881. Upon the convening of the 
Iowa State legislature the following winter lie 
was elected to serve the unexpired term, which 
extended to March 4, 1883. At the close of 
his service as United States Senator he again 
resumed the practice of law. April J, 1SS4, 
he became a railroad commissioner by the ap- 
pointment of Governor Sherman, a position 
he still holds. Ko higher compliment to 
Judge McDill can be given than to say that 
the numerous high positions to which he has 
been called have been entirely unsolicited by 
him. The ability and integrity that have at- 
tended the discharge of the duties and respon- 
sibilities that have devolved upon him is 
evidenced by his many calls to positions of 
public trust. It ma}- be truly said that his 
professional and official career is without a 
blemish. It is unnecosoar) to su_) that, he is 
a Republican, and ever a warm advocate of 
the principles of the great party with which 
he is identified. In 1S85 he removed with his 
family to Creston, and is now of the law firm 
of McDi'l & Sullivan. Judge McDill and 
wife have live children, four daughters and 
one son — Edith L., wife of Samuel Light, of 
Barber County, Kansas; Kate H., Blanche, 
Madge and Wilson F. 



: " 110 MAS G. SKAIR, sheriff of Union 



m 



: County, residing at Creston, is a native 



on the Toledo, Peoria & Western Railroad. 
In 1876 he engaged with the Chicago, Burling- 
ton it Quincy Railroad Company as freight 
conductor, and was promoted to conductor of 
the fast-mail train, running that train the three 
years prior to his election to the office of 
sheriff. He has lived in Creston since 1S7G. 
His general popularity and fitness for his 
position were the motives that secured his 
nomination and election by the large majority 
mentioned. Mr. Snail' was married, in Car- 
thage, Illinois, to Miss Emma Hoppe, a 
native of Germany. They have one 6on — 
Joseph II. A. 



fHfl R WOODS, one of Union County's 
'- "■/,}/ V." pioneers, and a successful farmer 
~ i<f living on section 32, Platte Town- 
ship, is a native cf Iowa, born September 29, 
1849, a son of Michael and Polly (McVey) 
Woods, his father being a native of Tennessee 
and his mother of Ohio. At an early age he 
left his native county, Jefferson, in company 
with his parents, who settled in Ringgold 
County, where they remained but a short 
time, removing in 1857 to Union County 
where our subject has since lived. He expe- 
rienced many of the privations as well as the 
pleasures of pioneer life in his youth, coining 
to Union County when wild animals were 
numerous, and before the Indians had left the 
surrounding country. His educational advan 
tages were limited, his only opportunities for 



r~J of Hancock County, Illinois, born No- { obtaining an education being the rude log 
vembcr 12. 1851. He was elected to his j cabin schools of pioneer days. At the age of 



present office on the Democratic ticket in 
1885, his opponent being R. J. McKee, of 
Alton. His popularity is attested by the fact 
that, although Union County is largely Re- 



twenty-one years he began life on his own ac- 
count, engaging in farming pursuits. March 
3, 1870, he was married to Mies Elizabeth 
Page, born in Ohio, 31 arch 28, 1851, a dangh 



publican, he was elected by a majority of i ter of Edward and Rachel (Caldwell) Page 



485; succeeding Mark Blanchard, of Creston. 
Previous to his election as sheriff he had been 
engaged in railroading since the age of seven- 
teen years, beginning his career as brakeraan 



who were also natives of Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. 
Woods have had three children — Edward M., 
born January 28, 1871; Alice M., born July 
21, 1872, died August 7, 1872, and Osben, 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 533 



born November 9,1878. Mr. "Woods lias been 
prosperous in his agricultural pursuits, .".nd 
now owns 160 acres of valuable land where be 
resides, and by his honorable and upright 
dealings has won the respect of the entire 
community. In politics Mr. "Woods casts hi6 
suffrage with the Republican party. 



IfsARRY R. STALKER, fanner and stock- 
| £p\ raiser, resides on section 3, Douglas 
'^l Township, where he is the proprietor of 
a quarter-section of well-improved land. He 
was born on the Isle of Man, in 1850, the 
son of Edward and Jane (Ivneale) Stalker, 
natives also of that island. During the year 
of his birth he was brought to this country by 
his parents, who located at Rochester, New 
York. In that city Mi - . Stalker grew to man- 
hood, learning the blacksmith's trade, as 
well as farming. After working at the trade 
four years, he returned to fanning. He came 
to Union County in 1S76, settling on the farm 
which he bad purchased in 1S71, perfectly 
wild, but which he has brought up to a high 
state of improvement, and now occupies. He 
commenced in life with no means but an 
intelligent design and willing hands; now lie 
is well-to-do in the world, in this respect 
following the example of his father, who, 
when he landed in America had but six 
shillings, but is now wealthy and influential. 
Postoflice, Creston. 

§" A. LEEXS, head clerk of the locomotive 
department of the Chicago, Burlington 
& Qnincy Railroad, at Creston, has 
long been in the employ of this company. 
His services began in 1871, as telegraph mes- 
senger boy, and in the the meantime he 
learned telegraphy. In the", fall of 1873 ho 
c-ng-nrrcd with the Northwestern Railroad 



Company, being at Maishalltown, Iowa, Chi- 
cago and De Kalb, Illinois. He returned to 
Creston, and renewed his connection with the 
Chicago, Burlington & Qnincy Railroad in 
1874, as telegraph operator, and later, left 
that position to take charge of the time books, 
occupying the position of time-keeper. In 
July, 1S83, lie assumed the duties of his 
present position. Mr. Leens was born in 
Kane County, Illinois, in 1S5G. His father, 
Andrew Leens, removed with his family to 
rjurlington, Iowa, in 1S70. Mr. Leens is a 
man of much public enterprise, and is very 
highly esteemed as a citizen. He is at pres- 
ent a member of the city council; has served 
two terms as city clerk, and was one of the 
founders of the newspaper, Every Sunday 
Momhig, still owning a half-interest in the 
paper. Politically he affiliates with the Re- 
publican party. 

m , J- GUTHRIDGE, one of the early 

jn|iT business men of Alton, was born in 

t-> ° ! Urbana, Champaign County, Ohio, in 

1811. He was reared to mercantile pursuits, 

I and served an apprenticeship to the business 

! in Xenia, Ohio. He was a merchant nearly 

' all of his business life. He was married in 

| his native State, to Mary Heston, born in 

Adams County, Pennsylvania, in 1821. In 

j 1851 Mr. Guthridge removed with his family 

; to Oskaloosa, Iowa, where he lived three 

I years, and came to Alton in 1855, entering at 

once into business here, shipping his stock of 

' goods from Oskaloosa. At one time he bad 

j a store in Murray, and one at Qnincy, Adams 

! County, his residence being at Afton, where 

! he carried on his main business. He died at 

| Afton of paralysis, April 30, 1880. Mrs 

I Guthridge resides at Afton. They were the 

i parents of seven children, two sons and five 

I daughters, six are now living — Mrs. Eliza- 

> both Sullivan. Mrs. Margueretta Davis, Adol- 

i phus, an attorney, residing on a farm near 



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niSTOicr of i\\;ox county. 



Creston; Mrs. Belle Himmelrich, Mrs. Kate 
Van Patten and Darius. 1. A daughter, Emma 
Alice, died at the age of seven years. Mr. 
Gnthridge was a man very highly respected 
in his community, and contributed a great 
deal to the advancement of the town. 



§AVID ARNOLD, one of the prosperous 
agriculturists of Dodge Township, re- 
• siding on section 26, is a native of 
Muskingum County, Ohio, born near Zanes- 
ville, August 6, 1826, a sun of David Arnold 
who was a native of Little Falls, Herkimer 
Couuty, New York. The father was a sol- 
dier in the war of 1812. He settled in Mus- 
kingum County, Ohio, in IS] 5, when Indians 
and wild animals we:e the principal inhabi- 
tants. He was a millwright by trade, and 
built litany mills m Ohio. Our suojeut 
learned the same trade when a bo}", working 
at it from the time he was large enough to 
handle tools, till within the last four or live 
years, and often operated mills which he had 
built, He worked on the first, mill in Gales- 
burg,Illiuois,in 1850 and '51, and helped build 
mills in various places in Illinois and Iowa, 
in California and Arizona and some of the 
Territories. He has been in twenty-one States 
and nine Territories in the Union, and has 
visited all the leading cities. He was mar- 
ried December 20. 1853, in Chandlersville, 
Ohio, to Hettie M. Pierce, a daughter of the 
late Jonathan Pierce, who was an early 
settler of Zanesville, Ohio. To this union 
were born five children - -Edward 0., .Minerva, 
Floretta, David 1'. and Laura B. Mr. 
Arnold came to Iowa, January 20, 1850, and 
worked em mills two years; then returned 
to Ohio and spent two years building mil!.-'. 
October 20. 1S54-, moved to Iowa, and to 
Union County, March 5, 1855, and in the 
spring of 1856 settled one half mile west of 
his present farm, where he has since made his 
home, flc was in the employ of the United 



i States Government during the late war as 
detective, being Captain of a company of de- 
j tectives. His wife died August 14-, 1867, 
I and November 14, of the same year, he was 
| married to Miss Margaret M. Veith, a daugh- 
I ter of Frederick Veith, and of the six children 
born to them four are living — Mary A., Will- 
j iam F., Nora M. and Grace M. Two sons, 
j Frank and Charles, are deceased. Mr. Arnold 
: has been prosperous in his farming pursuits, 
| and has acquired a fine property, being the 
owner of 842 acres of choice land. He takes 
I a deep interest in the Masonic fraternity, of 
: which he has been a member for thirty-seven 
i years. 






1 [. OURS, farmer and stock-raiser, on 
section 30, Douglas Township, is the 
-,<, o>.o^i of a quarter-section or well- 
improved land. He was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1S39, the son of Joseph and 
Catherine (Newhart) Ours, natives also of 
the Keystone State, and of Pennsylvania 
ancestry. There Mr. Ours, whose name 
heads this sketch, was brought up at farming, 
which calling he has since pursued excepting 
the time he was in the army. In 1862 he en- 
listed in Company G, Thirty-fifth Iowa In- 
fantry, and was in the service three years; 
was in charge of the Vicksburg, Jackson, 
Mississippi, Red River, Guntown, Rich- 
mond, Tennessee, with Hood; was detailed on 
the ambulance corps; went to New Orleans, 
then to Mobile, and was finally mustered out 
at Davenport, Iowa. In Muscatine, Iowa, in 
1S66, he was married to Miss Anna R., 
daughter of George and Jnda Hartman, 
natives of Pennsylvania. She also was born 
in that State, in 1842. Mr. and Mrs. Ours 
have had four children — Luella, Charles E., 
George W. and Edith V. Mr. Ours began 
in life with a fair education, but with no 
capital, and he has placed his land, which 
was perfectly wild when he purchased it, in a 






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lilOGRAPIUCAL SKETCHES. 



535 



fine state of cultivation, lie lias served his 
townslii]) as school director. In his political 
views lie is a Republican. Mr. and Mrs. 
Onrs and Luella, Charles E. and George W. 
are members of the Presbyterian church. 
Postoffice, Gresion. 



^f&& 



V 



>VRNARD SHERIDAN, farmer and 

11, 



! I ■')) s t° c k-raiser, resides on section 
'*—. * Spaulding Township, where he is the 
owner of 2-10 acres of land, in a high state of 
cultivation. lie was born in "Will Count)', 
Illinois, October 11, 1851, and is a son of 
Barnard and Anna (Lynch) Sheridan, both na- 
tives of Ireland, and at present residing at Cres- 
ton. Mr. Sheridan, the subject of our sketch, 
grew to manhood in his native count)', trained 
to agricultural pursuits, which he has ever 
since successfully followed; has had a fair 
education, and taught school several terms; 
has held the office of commissioner of high- 
ways, and assessor of his township, and is at 
present the clerk of his township. Com- 
mencing in life with no means but his 
inherited abilities, he has succeeded in 
establishing a comfortable home. Of his 
wages as teacher he saved §1,200, which he in- 
vested in land that has risen in value. He 
was married in 1879. in Council Bluffs, Iowa, 
to Miss Anna, daughter of Patrick and Anna 
(Martin) McMenomy, natives of Ireland, who 
immigrated to America in 1S52. Mr. and 
Mrs. Sheridan have one child — Michael by 
name. They are both members of the Cath- 
olic church. Postoffice, Creston. 

-i -&*&>$%%&*&<£- H 

3R&OBERT BISSET, foreman of locomotive 
• i i repairs for the Chicago, Burlington & 

;_Tr -\ Quincy Railroad Company, Creston, is 
one of the veteran employes of this company, 
having occupied hi? present position since 
1S71. Mr. Bisset was born in Dunfermline, 



Fifeshire, Scotland, in 1834. His parents 
were Lawrence and Elizabeth Bisset. His 

mother died when he was but eleven years oi 
age, and his father two years later. They 
left six children. Robert came to America 
with an elder sister and two brothers when he 
was fourteen years of age. He learned the 
trade of machinist in the Niles Locomotive 
Works, at Cincinnati, Ohio, then went to 
North Carolina, and worked at his trade until. 
the breaking out of the. war of the Rebellion, 
when he returned to Ohio, living at Sandusky 
four years prior to coming to Crest >n. lie 
has been a member of the School Board of 
Creston since 1S71, and is now serving his 
second year as president of that body. He 
has twice been a member of thu common 
council. Politically he is a Democrat. Mr. 
Bisset was married in Cincinnati, to Miss 
Margaret Smith, who died in Creston, in 
October, 1S79. His present wife was Eliza- 
beth Johnson. By his first marriage he has 
seven children— four sons and three daugh- 
ters - by his second marriage he has two sons 
and a daughter. 



«»{£:> 



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, AN V. G ROES BECK", farmer and stock- 

,) raiser of Dodge Township, living on 
section 21, is a native of Iowa, born in 
Lee County, November 19, 1842. His father, 
Garrett L. Groesbeck. was a native of the 
Stale of New York, and in early life learned 
the millwright's trade, which he followed the 
greater part of his life. He attended the 
first land sale in Iowa, in 1836, bat did not 
make his home in this State till two years 
later. He came to Union County, Iowa, in 
the spring of 1851, settling in New Hope 
Township, where he lived till his death, which 
occurred in 1870. Dan V., our subject, re- 
ceived his education principally in the select 
school at Ottumwa, "Wapello County. He was 
reared a farmer, and has always followed 
that avocation, and in connection with hh 






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536 ///STOAT Or UNION COUNTT. 



farming pursuits lie is devoting some 
time to raising stock. lie was married in 
the spring of 1868, to Miss Sarah Fenuer, a 
daughter of Joseph Fenuer, who is deceased. 
To Air. and Mis. Groesbeck have been born 
four children — Louise J., Herman F., Ben- 
jamin S., and Arthur II. In their religions 
faith they believe in the doctrines of the 
Baptist church. Mrs. Groesbeck is the owner 
of a good farm containing 230 acres of land. 



^TRANK II. BRUNING, Union County's 
'■■ rl oldest settler, and a successful farmer of 
: ~.r Platte Township, living on section 31, is 
a native of Germany, born January 25, 1S22, 
a son of "William and Catherine Braning, 
who were natives of the same country, lie 
grew to manhood in his native land, being 
reared to the avocation of a f::rrsVr. At the 
a^e of twenty years he sailed from Bremen, 
Germany, landing at New Orleans, in Octo- 
ber, 1812. A few days after his arrival he 
proceeded to St. Louis, Missouri, remaining 
there two years, when he went to St. Joseph, 
Missouri. He lived at St. Joseph until 
1S4G, when he removed to Gentry County, 
Missouri, where he made his home till 1852. 
lie was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Veser, a native of Tennessee, born in Octo- 
ber, 1S29. To this union have been born 
eleven children — W. II.. Caroline, Kittie, 
Louisa (deceased), J. L , J. D. (deceased), 
Nancy E., Thomas P., I. E. , P. J. and Albert 
P. Early in the year 1852, in company with 
his friend, Mr. Binning went up Grand 
River on a hunting and trai ping expedition, 
and being much pleased with that part of the 
country determined to settle there with his 
family. While en route for that place they 
were obliged to turn from the regular road on 
account of high water, and alter traveling 
several days and not finding the place wl ere 
he intended to locate, Mr. Pruning left his 
family in camp, and with Mr. Ames pro- 



ceeded to look for a home. He finally reached 
his present farm, and returning for his family 
brought them to this spot, settling here May 
25, 1852, entering his land two years later. 
Here they experienced all the phases of pio- 
neer life, bravely enduring the many priva- 
tions, and by industry and good management 
have become well-to-do citizens, Mr. Bruning 
owning 210 acres of good land. Ho followed 
farming till within the past few years, since 
which he has been engaged most of his time 
in the nursery business. Twelve acres of his 
farm are devoted to orchard, and he has two 
acres of grape vines. He also devotes some 
time to bee culture, and has at present fifty 
stands of bees. In his political views Mr. 
Pruning is a Democrat. lie is a member of 
the German Lutheran church. In the early 
history of Union County, a man was found 
dead on Grand River, and as he was thought 
f ? have been killed by Indians, strong threats 
were made against them. The Indians, being 
innocent of the deed, came to Mr. Bruning to 
consult with him what was best to do. He 
told them he would go to the settlement for 
them and explain the facts of the case, which 
he accordingly did, and for this he gained the 
good will of the Indians, they agreeing not to 
hunt within two miles of his dwelling, so that 
he might have wild game as well as they. 
They were ever his friends, and were always 
ready to do him a favor if it was in their 
power. 



- ," , B. GIBSON, farmer, resides on section 
\ j i 1-1, Jones Township, where lie owns 

--.T^' 3, 100 acres of land, was born January 
1G, 1S-10, in Bureau County, Illinois. His 
parents were Sanderson and Catherine (Cus- 
ter) Gibson, the latter being a cousin to Gen- 
eral George A. Custer, of the United States 
Army- They immigrated to Boone County, 
Iowa, where, in 1870, Mr. Gibson died, and 
his widow followed him to the unseen world 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



in 1S8-JL The subject of this biographical 
notice was brought up on a farm in Bureau 
County, Illinois, moved to Boone County, 
Iowa, in 1S70, and to Thayer, Iowa, in 1869, 
and has most of the time sitice followed his 
original calling. He served as postmaster at 
Thayer five years, under President Grant's 
administration. Shortly after that place was 
laid out, Mr. Gibson, in company with S. B. 
and A. Downing and L. A. Willard, purchased 
it, and he alone planted nearly all the trees 
now growing in and around Thayer, raising 
them from the seed. He was married in 
Boonesboro, Boone County, Iowa, in 1870, to 
Miss Marietta, daughter of G. W. and Eliza 
Carlile) Hoover, natives of Pennsylvania, 
She was born in Tan Buren County, Iowa, in 
1846, removed to Des Moines in 1853, and to 
Boonesboro in 1S5S, where she taught school 
seven years. They are the parents of four 
children, sons, three of whom are living — 
Win, Lewis and George It. Before closing it 
should be noticed that two brothers of Mr. 
Gibson were starved to death in Anderson- 
ville prison during the war, and that his 
father, who was a slaveholder in Virginia, 
liberated all his slaves on account of conscien- 
tious scruples. 

W. KENDALL, of Creston, settled in 
\ ... Douglas Township in 1869. He uur- 
rt"i a chased the west half of section I, upon 
which no improvements had been made. 
Upon this farm he located with his family, 
made many improvements and occupied it 
until 1ST';, when he rented it and moved to 
Creston. In the fall of 1879 he disposed of 



school was taught in the summer of 1870. In 
1S81 Mr. Kendall erected his fine residence 
on the comer of South Pine and Fremont 
streets. In 1S72 he engaged with the Potter 
Plow Company of Monmouth, Illinois, with 
which ho has since been connected. In 1S7G 
he invented a very important device as an 
attachment to the New Departure Cultiva- 
tor, manufactured by the company that he 
represents, and which he had then been en- 
gaged in selling four years. This is known 
as the tongueless cultivator. The improve- 
ment made by Mr. Kendall was a device for 
transporting and supporting the tongueless 
cultivator by rear supporting bars and sus- 
pending arms. This invention is regarded as 
one of great importance, and has been a source 
of much profit to the inventor. Mr. Kendall 
was born in the town of Athens, Somerset 
County, Maine, April 19,1828. When four- 
teen years of age his parents removed to 
.Middlesex County, Massachusetts. His fa- 
ther, T. P. Kendall, was a merchant by occu- 
pation, and died at his home in Middlesex 
County, in 1S57, aged fifty-eight years. His 
mother, Ludia A. (Abbott) Kendall, died at 
the home of her son, John T. , at Skowhegan, 
Maine, in 1SS3, aged eighty-three years. 
Both parents were natives of Andover, Massa- 
chusetts. In his early life Mr. Kendall was 
employed in his father's store, and later en- 
gaged in farming. In September, 1851, he 
went to California by the Nicarangua route, 
and returned in May, 1S55. He was married 
in the autumn of that year, in Buda, Bureau 
County, Illinois, to Miss }.lary E. Webb, also 
a native of Somerset County, Maine. In 
1857 Mr. Kendal] removed to Olmstead 
County, Minnesota, where he engaged in 
his land to O. J. SilverLhornc. When he first | farming, and in 1SG4 removed to Bureau 
settled in Douglas Township what, is now I County, Illinois, where he lived live years i;: 
Spauldiug Township was a part of it. He wis j charge of a stock farm of 1,200 acres, known 
amember of the School Board of that townshi] 



fatr years. Mr. Kendall engaged the first 
teacher that taught in the town plat of Cres- 
ton. The teacher was a Miss White, and the 



as the Maple Grove Stock Farm. At the 
expiration of this time he removed to Union 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Kendall have two 
gons ai.d one daughter — Frank, born in 



:• 



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HISTORY OF U.XIOX COUNTT. 



Bureau County, September 1, L856, is a loco- 
motive engineer on the Chicago, Burlington 
& Quincy Railroad, with his home at Creston; 
John C, born May 2, 1861, at Rochester, 
Minnesota, is also a locomotive engineer; 
Laura E., was born July 7, 1873, in Douglas 
Township. Mrs. Kendall was born in what 
is now Skowhegan, Maine, May 18, 1S31. 
Her parents, Joseph B. and Martha (Weston) 
"Webb, were natives of the same county. The 
family removed to Bureau County, Illinois, 
in 1851, where the parents lived until their 
decease. 

.•';;; EORGE 0. 1CKIS, farmer and stock- 
)[' r* raiser, section 33, Highland Township, 
*pH was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, 
May 10, 1841. His father. John Ickis, was a 
native of Fredericksburg. Maryland, horn in 
1801. In 1S52 the family came to Iowa, and 
for three years lived in Keokuk. In the fall 
of 1851- the father came to Union County, and 
located in Union Township, the family mov- 
ing to the county the following spring. At 
that time wild animals, such as deer, wclves, 
turkeys and wildcats were numerous, and 
Indians were the principal possessors of the 
soil. The noted chief, John Green, was almost 
a daily visitor at their house, and is well re- 
membered by our subject. They were obliged 
to go to Indianola to mill, and to Keokuk for 
provisions. George 0. remained at home 
until the breaking out of the war of the 
Rebellion, when he enlisted in the defense of 
the Union, and was assigned to Company H, 
Twenty-ninth Iowa Infantry, and served over 
three years. He participated in the battles at 
Helena, Little Rock, Terre Noire, Little Mis- 
souri, Prairie De Ann, Poison Springs, Jen- 
kins' Ferry, Spanish Fort, Fort Blakely, the 
capture of Mobile and many others of less 
importance. Since his return home he en- 
gaged in farming, and in the spring of 1871 
located on the farm where he now lives, which 



contains 200 acres of choice land, all well im- 
proved with a pleasant residence and good 
farm buildings. Mr. Ickis has served his 
township as trustee and his county as deputy 
sheriff. He is a member of the Knights of 
Labor and the Grand Army of the Republic. 
He was married December 21, 1S70, to 
Electa L. Turner, a native of Mercer County, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of George Turner, a 
resident of Highland Township. 

JtffiM ILLIAM II. CHRISTIE, M. D., lo- 
• l/V/'i cated at Creston, April 28, 1874. He 
',;-;--; ■ r] is the oldest resident physician of the 
place except Dr. Wilson. He was born in 
Bergen County, New Jersey, in 1811. When 
he was quite young his father, Daniel Christie, 
removed to New York City, and when he was 
eleven years old the family removed to Lee 
County, Illinois. In August, 1SG2, he en- 
listed in Company K, Seventy-fifth Illinois 
Infantry. At the battle of Perryville, Ken- 
tucky, October S, 1S62, he was ' severely 
wounded, receiving three gunshot wounds 
within the space of a few minutes. He received 
a severe wound in the right shoulder and 
right hand and a flesh wound in the left arm. 
He lay in the hospital at Perryville until able 
to travel, and was then taken home; thence 
to the Marine Hospital until bis discharge, 
which occurred in May, 1SC3. He. had con- 
templated studying for the medical profes- 
sion, but his wounds were so ?exi'.re that it 
was two years before he was able to enter 
upon his course of study. In April, 1865, he 
entered the office of Dr. Chester Hart, of 
Ottawa, Illinois, as a student, where he re- 
mained two years, and in the meantime took 
his first course of lectures at Rush Medical 
College, Chicago. At the expiration of the 
two 3 e.us he went to Tiskilwa, Bureau County, 
Illinois, where he remained six years, Dur- 
ing the first year he completed his course at 
Rush Medical College, receiving from that 



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BTOGRA rh'/CAL SKETCHES. 



Gil 



institution the degree of M. D. Dr. Christie 
stands high i» the medical pi-ofeesion of 
Southern Iowa, and is a popular and success- 
ful practitioner, lie is a member of the State 
and American medical societies, and was a 
member of the Board of Pension Examiners 
from 1876 until July, 1SS5. lie was married 
October 30, 1868, to Miss Sarah M. Whit- 
ford, a native of Illinois, and daughter of C. 
T. Wbitford, formerly from Vermont. They 
have had three children — Charles, Ralph and 
Mabel. Charles was killed by the cars at 
Creston, in March, 1SS3; at the age of nine 
years. Politically, Dr. Christie is an active, 
earnest Republican. He cast his first Presi- 
dential vote for General Grant, in 1SCS. lie 
was only eighteen years old when he entered 
the army, and at nineteen years of age was 
president of a union league. In 1884 he was 
a member of the National Republican Con- 
vention- Rt'Ohic^o fre*n thc'Eighth District, 
lie enjoys the excitement of political contro- 
versy, and has much influence in the councils 
of his party, lie is enterprising and public 
spirited; is a prominent member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. 



novelty works of Stillman, Allen & Co., in 
New York City, then went to Rochester, same 

State, where he remained nine years. During 
the latter part of his stay in Rochester he 
was in the employ of the New York Central 
Railroad Company, From tbatfeity he went 
to Detroit, Michigan, and from there to Cres- 
ton. Mr. "Webster was married in his native 
country, to Miss Jennet Cumnock, born also 
in Renfrewshire. Scotland. They have six 
children — one son and five daughters. The 
son, George Webster, is prominently connected 
with the railroad company, being traveling- 
engineer for the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy. 






-43- 



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^EORGE C. WEBSTER, of Creston, is 
\l|j? one °* tne oldest employes of the Chi- 
%&. caffo, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 
Company. lie is connected with the locomo- 
tive department, and has been in the employ 
of this company since coming to Creston, in 
ISO;", at which time the railroad reached the 
city, and has been connected with the locomo- 
tive department during all this time — a part 
of the time as locomotive engineer on the 
road, and a part of the time in charge of this 
department at the round house. Mr. Webster 
is a native of Scotland, and was born at Ren- 
frewshire, near Glasgow, February 2S, 1820. 
He served an apprenticeship to the machinist's 
trade, and came to America in 1840. When 
he first came he was engaged for a time in the 



M. COLLINS, clerk of J the city of 

\ i,'l Creston and clerk of the Superior 

•-— Q: fj , lv t-. a l S o engaged in insurance, has 

been a resident of Union County since 1877. 

He came to Creston and engaged in his present. 

business in 1883. His office is in the Superior 

Court-room. Mr. Collins was bom in St. 

Louis, Missouri, in 1857, and was reared in 

the State of Connecticut. His father, Morris 

Collins, was a native of Massachusetts, and 

removed to Connecticut in early life. When 

a young man he went to St. Louis, and en- 

sraeed in the mercantile business. Later, he 

sold out, and for many years was engaged in 

the manufacture of lead pipe and sheet lead, 

I doing an exteissive'business. The later years 

; of his life were spent in Jacksonville, Illinois, 

j but he conducted his business in St. Louis 

i until his decease, which occurred at Jackson 

I villc, March IP, 1873. The Collins family 

! came from old New England stock. There 

| were three brothers of Morris Collin?, 

all of whom were prominent business men. 

Two of them were (both dead now) residents 

of Hartford, Connecticut, and the third lives in 

New York City. The mother of our subject 

Martha (Blatchford) Collins, died in 1862. 

His father man ied :. second time, and his wife 



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/{JSTORr OF UNTON COVA'T2\ 



resides in Jacksonville. The wife of A. M. 
Collins was formerly Miss Charlotte Young, 
daughterofJ.lt. Young, of Lincoln Town- 
ship. Air. Collins' parents had four children 
— two sons and two daughters. Mr. Collins is 
the only member of the family living in Iowa. 

=_. s ^S?5a&* 



ap^LMOST. HOLLAND was born in Mo- 
1 i ' nongalia County, "West Virginia, August 
'■'^i 11, 1S4S, a son "of Eli Holland, of Henry 
County, Illinois. His lather was a native of 
the Slate of West Virginia, who immigrated 
to Henry County in 1861, when he located on 
the farm where he has since made his home. 
Our subject was reared on a farm, his father 
being a farmer by occupation, and has made 
agricultural pursuits his life work. He re- 
ceived a good education by attending the 
common schools of his n'nti've eovrnry, and at 
Prairie Home Academy at Orion, Illinois. 
He was married March 8, 1ST7, to Miss 
Louisa Shively, a daughter of John P. Shive- 
ly, who died in Grant Township, Union 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Holland have fan- 
children — Mabel N., Bertha E., Jessie L. and 
Pearl L. Mr. Holland came with his family 
to Union County, Iowa, in the spring of 1SS2, 
and settled on section 29, Grant Township, 
where he has a fine farm containing 240 acres- 
He is meeting with success in his farming and 
stock-raising, and is paying special attention 
to raising graded cattle and hogs. 

.--"*. QUIRE R. DAVIS, postmaster and 
"VAN editor of the Creston Commonwealth^ 
"tV- lias resided in Creston since 1S76. He 
was appointed postmaster by President 
Cleveland July 21, 1885, and took possession 
of the oilice August 10, following, lie was 
confirmed by the Senate May 5, 1SSC. Mr. 
Davis was born near Carthage, Hancock 
County, Illinois, June 17, 1654. He was 



educated in the public schools of Carthage, 
and at the age of fourteen began an appren- 
ticeship at the printer's trade, serving four 
years. He was engaged in the printing and 
publishing business many years. When 
first coming to Creston lie published the 
Creston Democrat. In a year and a half ho 
sold out, but repurchased it and conducted it 
for some time longer. He studied law in 
Illinois, was admitted to the bar at Keokuk, 
Iowa, in 1879, and practiced that profession 
iu connection with his other business for four 
years, after coming to Creston. He was the 
Democratic-Greenback candidate for Congress 
for the Eighth District, in 18S4, his opponent 
being Hon. W. P. Hepburn. He has served 
as justice of the peace several years. Mrs. 
Davis, was formerly Fannie Alice Scdberry, 
born in Maury County, Tennessee. They 
have two children — Rupert F. and Marjorie C. 



/fAMES HAY LEMON was born in Union 
'A : j County, Ohio, in 1S23, where his father 
^7^' had gone to take up land granted to sol- 
diers of the Indian wars. The following spring 
his parents went to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
and in 1S2S to Philadelphia. In his boyhood 
our subject worked at the shoemaker's trade, 
and later was apprenticed to the trade of a 
carpenter and joiner. In 1810 he enlisted in 
the regular army, and served five years, par- 
ticipating in the war in Florida, a number of 
Zachary Taylor's Sixtli United States Infant- 
ry. He was discharged as Sergeant-Major 
of his regiment. In 1849 he went to Califor- 
nia via Cape Horn, and in 1852 returned to 
Philadelphia, and the same year was married 
to Adelaide M. Katcr. In 1851, with his 
wife and two infant sons, he immigrated to 
Wi consin, where he opened up three new 
farms, and while working at his trade built 
several dwellings and store blocks. In 1870 
ho moved to Union County, Iowa, and is now 
engaged in stock-raising on section 21, Platte 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 543 



Township. His family consists of ten chil- 
dren, seven of whom have been school-teach- 
ers; three are graduates of Drako University, 
Pes Moines. 

v^TEPHEN L. EMERSON, one of the 
\."$X!'old and honored pioneers of Union 
\j^» Township, now living on section 29, 
Lincoln Township, was born in Licking 
County, Ohio. February 20. 1830, a son of 
Jasper P. and Eliza (HcCamey) Emerson, who 
were natives of AYier, New Hampshire, and 
Virginia respectively, and are now making 
their home in Union County, Iowa. Our sub- 
ject was reared to agricultural pursuit?, which 
he has made the principal vocation of his life. 
He received a good education, attending the 
academy and college at Granville, Ohio, and 
also spent some time at Oherlin College, and 
after completing his education he taught a 
few terms in his native State. In March, 
18o3, he came to Union County, Iowa, anil 
settled on section 12, Highland Township. 
wiiere he entered 160 acres, lie returned to 
Ohio the same year, lie was united in mar- 
riage October 17, 1852, to Miss Mary L. Feck, 
a daughter of Solomon Peek, who had a fam- 
ily of eighteen children. Mis. Emerson was 
was left an orphan when but a child. In 1856 
Mr. Emerson returned to Highland Township, 
this county, with his wile and two children, 
having spent the previous winter in Monroe 
County, Iowa. They resided in Highland 
Township until I860, when they can.'; to farm, 
where they still reside. After coming to this 
county Mr. Emerson taught school for six 
terms, mostly during winter months. He was 
also a preacher in the Christian church, in the 
early days of the county, but was obliged to 
return to farming in order to make a living 
for his family. His nearest mills in those 
days were on Middle River in Madison 
Comity , and on South Coon River, which took 
four d.iyc' time. He was first obliged to go 



to Missouri to get his corn to grind. Doer 
and other wild animals were in abundance, 
and often has our subject caught wild turkey 
in a steel trap. The Indians at that time were 
the principal inhabitants of the new country, 
and Mr. Emerson kept one Indian all one win- 
ter, and sent him to school. His Christian 
name was John, and Mr. Emerson gave him 
the surname of "White. John would try to 
wash the dark color off his hands, and then 
slap them and say "Ugh, Injin yet." He is 
now chief of the Pottawattamie tribe. Mr. 
Emerson planted the first sugar cane in the 
county, and ground the sap out of it with a 
rolling-pin. The first Hungarian seeds and 
the first locust trees in the county wtre also 
planted by him. He was one of the organizers 
of Lincoln Township, and gave it the name 
it still bears in honor of Abraham Lincoln. 
In politics he was formerly a Republican, but 
now affiliates with the Greenback party. He 
has served his township as justice of the peace 
and assessor, and during the war was commis- 
sioned Deputy Provost-Marshal for Union 
County, and also came within one vote of be- 
ing elected to the office of county clerk. He 
was president of the School Board a few years, 
and for the past thirteen years bas served as 
school treasurer. Mr. and Mrs. Emerson are 
the parents of seven children — Ralph AY., 
Willis G., Jennie L., Mary C, Lincoln -L. 
Lydia P. and Stephen S. Ralph has devoted 
considerable time to literary pursuits, having 
written for several journals and newspapers. 
He was married to Lillian McXaut, and has 
three children — Daisy, Nelly and Jessie. 
"Willie G. is a graduate of the Gem City Busi- 
ness College of Quincy, Illinois, in which 
institution he afterward taught. lie also 
taught penmanship and bookkeeping in Cres- 
ton, Iowa, for two years. He is also a man 
of literary me; it, and is the author of a book 
entitled "Winning Winds" which is a very 
interesting and popular work. Willis G. mar- 
ried Clyde Parker, who is a music-teacher 
and landscape-painter, and they are the par- 






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HISTORT OF VXIOX COfXTV. 



cuts of two children — "Willie Z. and Fred. 
Jennie married Theodore Ecke.rt, of Creston, 
Iowa, and has two children — Harry E. and 
Mary S. Mary 0. married George E. Smith, 
of Cromwell, Union County, and now resides 
with his family in Colorado, having accepted 
the position of second teller of the bank at 
Loveland. They have two children — Winnie 
and Mamie. Lincoln lives in Washington 
Territory; Lydia is a successful teacher. She 
and Stephen S. are living with their parents. 
Jennie and Mary were prominent teachers 
before they were married; Mary teaching six 
terms in one school. 



• f^[ F. SULLIVAN", attorney at law, Afton, 

'< rr] Iowa, was born in Nova Scotia, of 
cipi® Irish parentage. When he was two 
years old his parents moved to the Stpte of 
New York, and when ho was fifteen, in 1S52, 
to Johnson County, Iowa. He began the 
etudy of law in 1858, at Iowa City. with. 
Templin ifc Fairall and was admitted to the 
bar in 1S60. In 1SG3 he located in Afton, 
and since 1872 has been associated in practice 
with J. W. McDill. Mr. Sullivan married 
Miss Elizabeth Gutheridge, daughter of D. 
J. Gnlhcridgc an early settler of Union 
County. They have five children — James, 
John, Frank, Eugene and Annie. In politics 
Mr. Sullivan affiliates with the Democratic 
party. 



5?if\ M. SCOTT, grain-dealer at Creston, is 
|{ ) now the oldest grain-merchant, by 
". 'I - v many years, of the city, having settled 
here in the spring of 1871. George P. Kock- 
wel! was the first to bir grain here, com- 
mencing in the fall of 1869, and he was 
succeeded byjjMr. Scott, in the spring of 1871- 
He has been constantly in the business since 
that time. Mr. Rockwell built the first eleva- 



tor ; J. T. Evans built the second one in 1S71 . 
Mr. Scott, purchased the elevator of Mr. 
Rockwell, which lie enlarged and furnished 
with new machinery. Mr. Scott was an early 
pioneer of Creston. He was reared in Oneida 
County, New York. His parents, John and 
Cyrena Scott, were natives of Massachusetts. 
In 1850 he removed to Mercer County, Illi- 
nois, with his father, but the latter soon after 
removed to Henry County, where he re- 
mained until his decease. His mother died 
in the State of New York. Mr. Scott has 
been identified with the growth of our modern 
city from its infancy. In 1SS0 lie was elected 
mayor, and served with credit. He has done 
a large grain business, at one time employing 
forty men to buy grain. He lias grain houses 
in Creston, Cromwell, Brooks, Nodaway and 
Spaulding. He has been engaged in the grain 
business the greater part of his life. He was 
married in Illinois to Caroline Cossum, a 
native of England. They have one. daughter 
— Cyrena. Mr. Scott's sympathies, politic- 
ally, are with the Democratic party, but be 
intends to vote for measures rather than men. 

-i ^iS^^S^*— — H 

fe^STJAM PETRIE, a prominent stock-raiser 
,\\- and farmer of Douglas Township, and 
fel-b? occupying section 31, is a son of John 
and Elizabeth Petrie, of Tennessee, and was 
born in 1828, in East Tennessee, where he 
grew to the age of manhood. During the 
spring of 1808 he came to Union County, set- 
tling on section 11, eighty acres of which he 
improved. lie then bought 160 /teres on 
section 31, where he now resides. He began 
in life without capital, and by his own untir- 
ing efforts lie has accumulated a fair compe- 
tency for his declining years. "When he 
retires from the active duties of life he can 
enjoy that rest which he ha.- so well earned by 
a life of foil and industry. He was married 
in Keokuk County, Iowa, in 1S56, to Catha- 
rine Golliher, who was born in Tennessee, in 



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BIOGRAPHICA L SKE 1'CIIES. 



545 



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LS36. By tliis marriage there have been 
seven children — Loduskey, William C, 
Jolin II., Blufunl, ."Nannie. Hen and Clara. 
In his political views Mr. Petrie is Independ- 
ent. Postofricc, Kent. 



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^ANIEL J. SPENCER, manufacturer of 

:j j brick and tile at Afton, has been cn- 
I / .... . . 

vv Raged in his present business twenty 

consecutive years. He was horn in Lee Comity, 
Iowa, January 14, 1S42, five years before the 
Territory became a State. His father, Andrew 
Spencer, was one of the pioneers of that 
county, entering land from the Government. 
He came to Iowa from the Western Reserve 
of Ohio; was born in Connecticut, and taken 
by his parents to Ohio when three years old. 
lie is now a resident of Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. 
Daniel J. lived in Denmark, Lee County, un- 
til he grew to manhood. In August, 1862, 
he eulisted in the Twenty-fifth Iowa Infantry, 
and served till the close of the war. He was 
in Sherman'o expedition against Vicksburg, 
also with Grant when that stronghold was 
captured. He was engaged in the battles of 
Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, and 
the Atlanta campaign, his regiment being at- 
tached to the Fifteenth Corps. He was 
wounded at the battle of Jonesboro, in con- 
sequence of which he came home on a fur- 
lough. After he was sufficiently recovered he 
rejoined his regiment at Goldsboro, North 
Carolina, marched to Washington and took ' 
part in the grand review, and at the close of \ 
the war returned to Lee County. In the : 
spring of 1SGG he was married to Julia A. 
Loomis, and soon after removed lo Mt. ! 
Pleasant, where his father's family also re- ] 
moved. He was reared on a farm until fifteen j 
years of age, then learned the trade of brick- j 
laying which he has followed all his life. He 
erectc i the first brick residence in Alton, , 
which was his own dwelling, lie also erected ; 
ail the brick buildings in Alton except the \ 



court-house. lie built the first brick house at 
Creston, also built Several business houses in 
that city. He is still engaged in contracting 
and building in connection with brick and 
tile-making. He began the manufacture of 
tile in 1SS5, which has proved a great success. 
Mr. Spencer is one of the nv>st active busi- 
ness men of Afton. Politically lie was reared 
an Abolitionist, but has been identified with 
the Republican party since he became a voter. 
He cast his first presidential vote for Abra- 
ham Lincoln, in 1864. Mr. and Mrs. Spencer 
have eight children — seven sons and one 
daughter. 

■ flDWIN S. KETCHDM, real-estate dealer 
'■■ f"l at Afton. has been a resident of Union 
V^'. County since 1809. He was born in St. 
Joseph County, Michigan, in 1840, and lived 
in that county until he was fifteen years old. 
At this time his father went to Wisconsin 
and purchased a farm, intending to remove 
there with his family. He returned to Michi- 
gan, and while making arrangements for the 
removal he was kicked by a horse and killed. 
He left a wife and seven children, Edwiu S., 
being the oldest child. After the father's 
death the family removed to Wisconsin, and 
settled upon the farm purchased by the father. 
The mother survived until 1SSG, and died at 
Madison, Wisconsin. In August, 1862, Mr. 
Ketchnm enlisted in Company K, Thirty- 
third Wisconsin Infantry, and served until 
September 1, 1S65, in active service during 
the entire period. He was in the engagement 
at Coldwater, Mississippi, siege of Vicks- 
burg, capture of Jackson, Mississippi, with 
Banks in his Red Liver expedition, and in the 
expedition that scattered the army of Generals 
Price and Marmaduke, in Missouri ; was at the 
battle of Nashville, and at the capture of 
Mobile in the spring of 1805. At the close 
of the war he returned to Wisconsin, coming 
to Union County in 18G9, as previously stated.. 



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Jf/STO/U' OF UNION COUNTY. 



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lie was engaged in fanning for, several years, 
and established his present business in 1SS1. 
He has been twice married. His first mar- 
riage was in Wisconsin, with Miss Mary E. 
Randall, a native of the State of New York, 
who died in Afton, August 11,1882. His 
present wife was formerly Mrs. Mary E. 
Guthrie, widow of Doctor J. B. Guthrie. 
I3y bis first marriage were four children — 
Chailcs E., George A., Anna Laura and Hu- 
bert W. Of the seven children in tbe family 
of Mr. Ketchum's father five are still living, 
four sons and one daughter. The second son, 
George P., enlisted in the Forty-sixth Wis- 
consin Infantry, and died February 22, 1665, 
at Madison, "Wisconsin. Tbe youngest son 
was murdered by cowboys in Nebraska, in 
December, 1S7S. 



•OK" 



HgOBERT COLBERT, farmer and stock- 
in; raiser, section 5, Douglas Township, has 
%|\ 240 acres of highly-cultivated land. lie 
was born in Ireland, in 1842, son of John and 
Mary Colbert, also natives of that country; 
mother is deceased, but father is still living, 
at the age of seventy-five years. Mr. Colbert 
was reared on a farm; came to Canada in 
1861, and to the United States in 1864. For the 
first two years in this country he followed the 
manufacture of lead, in Philadelphia; next 
was engaged in the nursery business, in Henry 
Countj', Illinois, three years, and in Grinnell, 
Iowa, three years, and finally, in 1S71, he 
came to Union County, settling upon his 
present farm, which was then raw prairie. 
He started out in life with no capital but bis 
personal qualifications, working by tbe month, 
at $10 a month, from sixteen to eighteen 
hours a day. lie has put his present place 
under fine improvements, and established a 
substantial and comfortable home. He has 
held the office of school director, township 
assessor, two terms, and is a member of the 
Congregational church. He was married in 



Henry County, Illinois, December 31, 1863, 
to Miss Ellen, daughter of Thomas and Mary 
(Olrieii) Moore, natives of Ireland. She was 
born in Canada, in 1845. Mr. and Mrs. Col- 
bert are tbe parents of four children — Will- 
iam J., Emma W., Mary E., and Frank R. 
Postoflice, Cromwell. 

;'-.-> E. FRENCH, principal of Creston 
\\ I high school, was born in Jackson, 
•'^V 5 Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, 
June 23, 1S46. He began his career as a 
teacher in December, 1SG3, and with the ex- 
ception of two years has been actively em- 
ployed in public school work every year from 
that time until the present. He has taught 
in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, 
Nebraska and Iowa. From 1S78 to 1SS1 he 
served as county superintendent of his native 
county, and successfully supervised 300 
schools taught by 350 teachers. He is now 
teaching on bis third year in[Creston, and his 
efficiency rnd popularity are evinced by the 
enviable reputation accorded to Creston high 
school, and by an increase of salary at each 
annual election. Mr. French is a fine disci- 
plinarian, a thorough scholar, a respected and 
honored citizen. 



R XO 



F^ L. BAYLES, of Afton, is a son of James, 
Pay let, who was born in 179S. He was 
i eared and married in Ohio, to Miss 
Jane Wright. They resided in Ohio until 
about 1S50, when they removed to Henry 
County, Illinois, and lived there until the 
spring of] c o'7, then removed to Union County, 
and settled on a farm on section 14, Union 
Township. The mother lived but two or three 
years alter coming to Iowa. They had 
four children — Mary Jane, wife of W. C. 
Demint, of Kansas; Cynthia Ann, wife of 
Levi Plummer, resiling in Adams County, 
Ohio; J. L. and S. J., living in Cromwell, 



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B/OGRA PtIJC. I L SKE TCHES. 



Union County. J. L. Bayles was born in 
Ohio, in 1S47, and came to Iowa with his 
parents. He lives in Aflon and owns a part 
of the old home farm. He married Miss 
Annie Ingham, of Afton, and they have two 
children— Charles T. and Arthur L. Their 
second child, Ada, died in infancy. 

HARVEY FARLEY, of the firm of Farley, 

f Luster & Harden brook, dealers in West- 
ern lands, lias been engaged in the real- 
estate business in Union County since 1870, 
and at Creston since July, 1872. At that 
time the only real-estate dealers in the city 
were J. L\ Harsh and W. 0. Carpenter, of 
the firm name of Harsh & Carpenter. Mr. 
Farley was born in Monroe County, Virginia, 
in 1S32. "When a child lie removed with his 
parents to Indiana, thence to "Warren County, 
Iowa, in 1849, where the father died the fol- 
lowing winter. Warren County has been the 
home of the family since they first came to 
the State. In April, 1809, Mr. Farley came 
to the eastern part of Adams County, where 
he. owned land, and soon after removed to 
Cromwell. He was married in Indiana to 
Ellen Weaver, of Rnbh County, who died in 
1S74. Mr. Farley has two children — a son 
and a daughter. 

-5 *-&*&•$% fg?"**^ f- 

£TOSEPH F. SYP came to Union County 
"_ I in the fall of 1855, and Afton has been 
.^' his home since that time. He was bom 
in Miami County. Ohio, June 6, 1832. He 
was reared at homo on his father's farm. In 
October, 1850, the family came to Iowa, first 
settling in Henry County. In the fall of 
1855 Joseph F. came to Afton accompanied 
by his brother, W. K. Syp. He made a loca- 
tion, then returned to Henry County, and 
came back the following spring and engaged 
in the furniture business. That same season 



he erected a dwelling, the first permanent resi- 
dence of Alton, though several temporary 
houses were put up about the tame time. 
This house is still in good condition, and is 
owned and occupied by John Bargee. He 
continued in the furniture business two years, 
hauling all his stock from Mt. Pleasant by 
team. He was the pioneer furniture-dealer of 
Union County. In January, 1S5S, Mr. Syp 
closed out his furniture business and engaged 
in contracting and building, in company with, 
his brother, W. K. Syp. This ho. followed 
until the spring of 1SG2, when he enlisted in 
Company II, Twenty-ninth Iowa Infantry. 
The regiment rendezvoused at Council Bluffs, 
Iowa, where they were sworn into the United 
States service. In the fall they went South, to 
St. Louis, thence to Columbus, Kentucky, 
in pursuit of Beauregard, thence to Helena, 
Arkansas, where he remained with his regi- 
ment, at headquarters, until the spring of 
18t>d. During thai time he was in the White 
River expedition. The Union forces captured 
Duval's Bluffs, and routed General Price's 
army. The regiment suffered very much from 
exposure to the cold and wet. At the close 
of this expedition they returned to Helena. 
They took part in the Yazoo Pass expedition, 
and the siege of Fort Pemberton, then re- 
turned to Helena, and took a very important 
part in the battle of that place, Jnly 4, 1863. 
On the 11th of August following, the regiment 
left Helena, and took an active part in the ex- 
pedition against Little Rock, commanded by 
General Steele, which took place September 
JO. In December Mr. Syp was detailed with 
thirty-one others to raise a colored regiment 
in Arkansas. About three months later the 
regiment was organized, and Mr. Syp was 
commissioned Second Lieutenant of Company 
C, One Hundred and Thirteenth United 
States Colored Infantry. In ^May, 1864, he 
was promoted to First Lieutenant, where he 
served until the close of the war. lie was 
mustered out for disability April 8, 18C5. 
Mr. Syp was a brave and efficient soldier, and 



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OF UX/O.X COUNTT, 



did good service in the cause of bis country, i couple in the township, having for a period of 
During the first pari, of his service with the : sixty-three years traveled together the journey 
Tweuty-ninth he was Commissary of the Cora- I of life. They have had a family of ten chil- 
pany; afterward he was appoint) d Color Bearer, i dren, six of whom, live sons and one daughter, 
and carried the colors for several months; ' are living— Jonathan F. is the treasurer of 
then served as regimental drill-master for the ! Union County; Thomas H. lives in Jefferson 
recruits that joined the regiment. lie hss i County, Ohio; Alcnzo F. and George O. are 
been physically unable to do any work since j farmers of Highland Township; Orlando M. 
he left the army. For several years he had | is at home, and their daughter, Mrs. Catherine 
spells of being totally blind, and is now en- 
tirely blind in his left eye, and sees but feebly 
with the other. He has a pleasant home in 
Afton, and is thankful for the blessings he 
still enjoys. He was married October 10, 
1856, to Margaret J. Gray, a native of Alle- 
gheny County, Pennsylvania. They have 
seven children — Alice I., Charles X., Horace 
G., Florence E., Ernest L., William Ward 
and Fear). 



Motherspaugh, lives in Defiance, Ohio. Two 
sons, Alonzo F. and George 0., were soldiers 
in the war of the Rebellion - , serving gal- 
lantly to defend their country in her hour of 



pen 



MJ-ft- 



H^\ P. SAWYER, conductor on the Chi- 
ll } cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, 
%U" )' as held his present position since 
1S72. lie at present has charge of trains 71 
and 72, on North Branch, to Cumberland, 
iiis residence is at Creston. He beg.n rail- 
roading with the Chicago, Milwaukee &, St. 
Paul Company in 1865, as brakeman, on the 
Prairie du Chien division. Mr. Sawyer is a 
native of the Green Mountain State, having 



MOHN ICKIS, of Afton, is one of the 

"M pioneers of Union County. He was born 
p t r J 

2g in Taneytown, Carroll County, Maryland, 
in October, 1801, his native town being that 
of Chief Justice Taney. In May, 1802, his ! been bom in Orange County, in June, ISil 
parents removed to Columbiana Count}', Ohio, j In early manhood he removed with his par- 
where he lived till fifty years of age. August | ents, D. M. and Sally C. Sawyer, to Wiscon- 
28, 1823, he was married to Rachel Hamilton, j sin. The family consisted of father, mother, 
a native of Beaver County, Pennsylvania, j two daughters and II. P. All became resi- 
born December 5,1802. In 1S52 Mr. Ickis j dents of Creston, and the parents lived in that 
removed with his family to Lee County, Iowa, ; city until their decease. Mr. Sawyer was 



married January 2. 1867, in Wyoming, Wis- 
consin, to Miss Sarah E. Joiner, daughter of 
Hon. L. W. Joiner, s prominent early settler 
of Iowa County, that State, and one year was 
id one a member of the Legislature of Wisconsin, and 
was a J of the State Senate, six years. Mrs. Sawyer 



and in the fall of 1854 to Union County, and 
settled on section 31, Union Township. IJe 
entered 160 acres of land, and the same year 
bought eighty acres on section 7. His family 
consisted of six children — live sons 
daughter; and one son, Jonathan 

widower with three children. lie was by : was born in Indian:', and is a lady of rare cult- 
trad.' a blacksmith, and for twenty-live years j ure and education, haung attended the State 
after coming to the county worked at his | University at Madison for some time. She 
trade, bis sons having charge of the farm. In , has been a successful teacher for many years; 
1880 hejleft the farm and its many cares, and ; was principal of the high school at MazoManie, 
moved to Afton, where he has a, pleasant j Wisconsin, when but twenty years of age, and 
home. Mr. and Mrs. Ickis are the oldest j was for eight years principal of the high 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



school at Oreston, during which time the 
school attained high reputati m for it- excel- 
lence. The labors of her position finally be- ! 

came too great for her strength, and, by her 
request, she was made assistant principal, a 
position she now holds. Mr. and Mrs. Saw- ' 
yer have two sons— Frank M., an apprentice I 
to the carriage-making business, at Hastings, ! 
Nebraska, and Eugene L. Wilbur J. died at 
the a£co of six years. 



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~b4&* 



STJJTHOMPSON A. HARDENBROOKwas 

\:\ : 'z born in Mercer County, Illinois, in 1S47, 
§p where he grew to manhood. In. Sep- 
tember, ISr.l, he enlisted in the Seventh Kan- 
sas Cavalry, and served three years with the 
Western army. After the war he returned 
to Illinois, and soon after came to Iowa. In 
ISTu no went hj ii-'ansas, svnere he lived nutu 
18S2, then went to Winterset, Madison Coun- 
ty, thence to Oreston. lie was married 
at Winterset, to Annie Shepherd, a native of 
Pennsylvania. She removed to Illinois with 
her parents, and died al Winterset, February 
27. 18S2. Mr. Hardenbrook has three chil- 
dren — two sons and a daughter. The firm of 
Farley, Luster ik, Hardenbrook deal very 
largely in Western lands. They are men of 
experience, and are thoroughly responsible. 



£fOHN J. BAXTER was horn in Can 

bridge, Ohio, in 1 16. and came to Iowa | 
"-/ in the winter of 1871- He and his | 
brothei-, Isaac, both practical printers, pur- ! 
chased the Afton News, a paper which had 
been issued about four months by Moorehead 
Brothers. Isaac sold his interest to George | 
1'. Wilson, who, with John J., the;: ran the 
paper for a time. Wilson then sold to J. F. ' 
Bishop. The firm of Bishop <fc Baxter ex- 
isted until 1875, when Mr. Bi hop desired to I 
support Tilden for the presidency, and Mr. j 

30 ' 



Baxter not concurring, disposed of his inter- 
est to Bishop. He went to Oreston, worked 
a short time, and then returned and assisted 
Ira Seeley in running the Tribune, a Repub- 
lican paper. Tin's was sold to W. 11. Robb, 
who converted it into a Greenback paper.and 
removed it to Creston. Mr. Baxter was for 
a time with the Tribune- News, tinder Mr. 
Bishop, and then worked on Mr. Robb's In- 
dependent, until 1SS0, when the Enterprise 
was started at Afton. Of this paper he has 
since been the senior proprietor. For the 
past six years he has been the recorder of 
Afton. In 1S75 he was united in marriage 
with Miss Mary Clanssen. Mr. and Mrs. 
Baxter are members of the Presbyterian 
church. 

lf& KLINGENSMITH, engaged in agri- 
i\4)i i:uiUii;il pursuits in Piatte Township, is 
¥J? a one of the active and enterprising 
citizens of Union County, always taking an 
interest in every enterprise which he deems 
for the benefit of the county or township 
where he makes his home. His parents, 
William and .Mary Klingensmith, were na- 
tives of Pennsylvania, in which State he was 
born, the date of his birth being March 10, 
1S30. He was reared to the occupation of a 
farmer, which he has followed through life. 
He has always been used to hard work, having 
been bound out at the early age of six year.-. 
remaining with the same party till he arrived 
at maturity. He has been twice married, 
taking for his first wife Miss Hannah Allen, 
who was born in Pennsylvania, Mav 2, 1830, 
her parents, Lorenzo and Agnes Allen, being 
natives of the same State. To this union 
were horn i mr children — M. R., born March 
20, 1851; S. AY., born April 17, 1S54; N. 
W., born February IS. 1856, and F. A., born 
July 21, 1S63. Mrs. Klingensmith died De- 
cember 5. 1805, and Mr. Klingensmith was 
again married, to Miss Nancy J. Agler, by 
whom he has had two children — Keziah E., 
• . ■ • 






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ii/sronr of rx/ox couxrr. 



born July 22, 1S67, died March 7, 1S68; and 
Flora J., born August 4, .1870. Mr. Klingen- 
sruith began life a penniless boy, and at the 
time of his marriage had but $2. He is now 
classed among Union County's prosperous 
agriculturists, he having by his persevering 
industry and excellent business management, 
become the owner of 574 acres ol choice land, 
lie has a lino, substantial residence on section 
34, Platte Township, surrounded with beauti- 
ful sbade trees, a line orchard, and his farm 
buildings are among the best in Platte Town- 
ship, his large barn being 30 x 40 feet in size, 
with good basement. He is now devoting his 
entire attention to farming and stock-raising, 
making a specialty of Clydesdale horses. lie 
keeps an imported horse for his own use. 

W*v J? WATTM'W " rivrtcnuwo f- r 

f ... I'^ui ^.., .. jjiy^uu^ Ui,i ' ul 

Kyf and stock-raiser, living on section 2, 
^r ° Platte Township, where he has a fine 
farm of 120 acres, is a native of Pennsylvania, 
born June 25, 1S36, a son of Michael and 
Julia Anna (Wilson) Waltman, who were 
natives of the same State. B. F. grew to 
manhood on the home farm, and began as- 
sisting his father with the farm work when 
but a boy, thus early in life learning habits 
of industry and perseverance which have 
been of lasting benefit to him. lie served 
three years in the late war, enlisting in Com- 
pany D, Seventeenth Illinois Infantry — his 
home being in Illinois . t that time, lie par- 
ticipated in the battles of Port Don-Is in, 
Shiloh and Corinth, and several other engage- 
ments of minor importance, and at the expira- 
tion of his term of service was honorably 
discharged, at Chattanooga, Tennessee. The 
maiden name of his wife was Martha Snively, 
she being a daughter of Samuel and Eliza 
Snively, who were natives of Pennsylvania. 
Mrs. Waltman was born in the State of Ohio, 
September 23, 1S49. Mr. and Mrs. Waltman 
are. the parents of seven children — Maud, 



born September 2, 1S67; Cora, born October 
20, 1S68; Victor L., born May IS, IS70; Guy 
II., born January 17, 1S72; Mabel, born 
January 31, 1S76; Lloyd G., born May '.». 
18S0, and Wayne E., March 26, 1SS5. Mr. 
Waltman began working as a farm laborer, 
and after he had saved sufficient money to 
buy a span of horses he rented a small piece 
of land and commenced farming for himself. 
He continued to farm on rente 1 land till he 
came to Union County, Iowa, when he bought 
his present, place, in Platte Township, where 
he has since carried on farming with good 
success, and has brought his land under a 
fine state of cultivation, and is now classed 
among the well-to-do farmers of Piatte Town- 
ship, as well as a much-respected citizen. 
Poth Mr. and Mrs. Waltman, in their relig- 
ious faith, are Presbyterians. In politics he 
is a Republican. He is a comrade of John 
A. Rawlins Pest, Xo. 61, G. A. P., of 
Creston. 

_j ^3$>£2 i^S5*^» 8- 

•^HAKLES II. FULLER, insurance 
Wm a S ont an d keeper of abstract of titles, at 

"fe-n Creston, has resided in Union County 
since 1S6S. He first located on a farm in 
I\*ew Hope Township, section 1.2, and con- 
tinued farming until he was elected county 
auditor, in 1SS1. He served two years suc- 
ceeding F. M. Emerson, now deceased. At 
the expiration of his term of office he re- 
moved to Creston, and has since been engaged 
in his present business. Mi-. Puller is a 
member of the Union County Abstract In- 
corporation, of which he is the general man- 
ager; He was born in Delaware County, 
Ohio, in 1S47. His father, II. C. Fuller, also 
a native of Delaware County, was a member 
of Company I, Thirty-second Ohio Infantry, 
and was mortally wounded at Harper's 
Ferry in September, 1S02. He died of lock- 
jaw the following October, at his home. 
Charles II. Fuller was the oldest of five cbil 
dren. In 1868 the mother and children came 



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IUOCHA J ' 111 Cj ! /. 5 KE TClfES. 



to Iowa, settling in Union County, upon a 
farm of 240 acres, which the husband and 
father had previously entered from the Gov- 
ernment. Mr. Fuller and his oldest brother 
improved this farm, and Mr. Fuller still owns 
eighty acres of it and forty acres adjoining. 
In 1880 his brother sold out, and removed to 
Kansas. The mother, Zclia Fuller, resides 
with her daughter, Mrs. Addie White, in San 
Joaquin County, California. The names of 
the children who came in 18<>8 are — Charles 
IF, William II., Mrs. Addie White and 
Hiram C. The latter died soon after their 
arrival in Union County. Charles II. 
married Miss Lou Reasoner, a native of 
Illinois. They have four children — Chester 
A., Myette A., C. W. Harcourt and Maud. 

rpDGAPt HUNT, section 31, Spanlding 
'•■ ML Township, postoffice, Cromwell, is en- 
"irM gaged in agriculture and the raising of 
live, stock. His parents were Jesper and 
Lavilla (Sherman) Hunt, natives of Chautau- 
qua County, New York, in which county he 
was born, in 1817, and grew to manhood on 
Lis father's farm, enjoying the benefit of a fair 
education. In 1870 he came West, with no 
means hut his capital of energy and wit, 
trained by economical skill, which he has 
practiced through life, resulting in making 
him a well-to-do &nd worthy citizen. For 
live years he worked by the month, at the 
rate of $30 a month: during one year of that 
time he was overseer of the county farm. His 
present farm comprises 240 acres of good 
laud, weil improved, and his live stock in- 
cludes fine cattle, hogs and horses, among the 
latter lieing several line brood mares and one 
stallion. In Pennsylvania, in 1869, Mr. Hunt 
was married to Miss Harriet, daughter of 
David and AnnaMariah (Reed) Wright. She 
Mas born in that State, in 1846. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hunt luce had three children, two of whom 



are living — Lilla and Jesper. Mr. Hunt has 
been elected to theoffict s of township trustee, 
school director and other local offices. He and 
his estimable wife were among the pioneers 
of Spaulding Township, and it is needless to 
say that his life has been a successful one, for 
the broad acres which lie owns attest the in- 
dustry and vise management of their proprie-- 
tor; and his faithful wife lias shared with him 
the vicissitudes of life, intermingled with 
sunshine and storms. 



-cff> 



JOSEPH IFAGER, merchant, Alton, 

p" I Iowa, was born in Clarke County, Ohio, 

2f£ in 183S. In 1846 his parents moved to 

Iowa, and settled in Henry County, where the 

father bought a new farm, and there our sub- 

I ject was reared and educated. In August, 

! 1861j he enlisted in the defense of the Union, 

| and was assigned to Company G. Eleventh 

Iowa Infantry, and served three years. He 

| participated in the battle of Shiloh, siege of 

| Corinth, battle at Iuka, second battle at Cor- 

I ii.th, siege of Vicksburg, and after the sur- 

I render of Vicksburg was stationed there nine 

| months on garrison duty. He was in the 

j siege of Atlanta, and the battles preceding it, 

i and on July 22, 1SC1, was wounded in the 

j left shoulder by a fragment of shell. After 

; the war he returned home, and for two and a 

i half years was employed in the capacity of 

clerk, iti Mt. Pleasant. In 1SGS he located in 

; Alton, where he has since lived. He married 

| Louisa Rose, a daughter of J. Rose, of Salem, 

•. Iowa. They have three children — Orville. 

j Jacob B. ana Rilla. 



: - ;TEFIIEX U. SHAW was born in Sara- 

■ ^S toga County, New York, October 23, 

■=^p 1826, and died at his home, in Lincoln 

Township, Union County, October 26,1882. 

i He grew to manhood in Ins native Stati 

! there received the benefit of a common-school 






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iffsroRr of c.xrox COVNTr. 



education. He wont to Kansas in the year 
1857, and subsequently removed to Adams 
County, lows, and while in that county was 
Captain of the Home Guard?, during the war 
of the Rebellion, lie was married. February 
9, 1805, to Miss Lamira Moore, a daughter 
of Samuel Moore. Her father came to Iowa 
from Morgan County, Illinois, about 1852, 
"when he located in Montgomery Count)'. lie 
is now a resident of Fremont County, Iowa. 
Mr. and Mrs. Shaw have had eight children 
born to them, seven of whom still survive — 
Verna, Truman, Marion, Stella and Sterling 
(twins), Effer and Gertrian. Mr. Shaw re- 
mained in Adams County until the spring of 
1876, when he located in Harrison Count}", 
Missouri, and in the fall of 1877 came to 
Union County, when he settled on the farm 
on section 16, which is still occupied by his 
family, and there he was engaged in farming 
till his de^th K? had cight^-threc v.zvzz 
of choice land. He was a quiet, industrious 
citizen, and was highly respected by all who 
knew him. 

fOriN S. VAN DOREN, one of the enter- 
prising business men of Cromwell, was 
t born in Warren County, New Jersey, 
June 2, ISio, a son of Aaron J. Van Doren, 
of Fredon, Sussex County, New Jersey, who 
was born in Somerset County, of the same 
State. John S. Van Doren, our subject, was 
reared to manhood on a farm, and was edu- 
cated in th.- common schools of New York 
City. He came West in 1S0-1-, and located in 
Muscatine County. Iowa, where he was em- 
ployed on the farm of W. II. Roy, for one 
year, then followed farming on his own ac- 
count in that county for several years. lie 
was united in marriage, December 11, 1866, 
to Miss Phcebe M. Kanoff, a daughter of 
William Kanoff, who is now deceased. They 
are the parents of three children, two daugh- 
ters and one son — Anna M., Alice A. and 



Aaron J. Mr. Van Doren came to Union 
County with his family in May, 1875, when 
he settled in Spaulding Township, remaining 
there till 1SS-1. In October of that year lie 
came to Cromwell, where he still makes his 
home, and since coming here he has been 
successfully engaged in buying grain. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Van Doren are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Van Doren 
is a member of the Odd Fellows order. 

^4 



"'- ANIEL SHANNON, section i, Platte 

"\\ift Township, was born in the State of 
~'- New Jersey, January 19, 1844, a son 
of A. and Mary (Barber) Shannon, natives of 
New Jersey. Our subject was brought np to 
the avocation of a farmer, which he has al- 
ways followed, with the exception of one year 
while i.i the service of his country. He en- 
listed in Company G, Thirty-first New Jersey 
Infantry, being mustered in at Flemington, 
New Jersey, September 3, 1862, and took 
part in the battles of Chancellorsville and 
Fredericksburg. May 31, 1SG3, he was mar- 
ried to Miss Sarah E. Raupe, who was born 
in Warren County, New Jersey, March 9, 
i lo-18, a daughter of George and Melinda 
(Hay) Raupe, who were also natives of New 
! Jersey. To Mr. and Mrs. Shannon have been 
born four children — George A., born Novem- 
| ber 30, I860; Olive B., born February 20. 
j 1876; Clifton Ik, September 3, 1S77, and 
j Zettie D.. born January 2k. 1880. Besides 
1 their own family they have taken two children 
I to bring up— Hugh M. Craig, born May 17, 
j 1SS3, and Mattie A. Craig, born October 17. 
1SS4. Mr. Shannon has met with success in 
i Ids farming pursuits since coming to Platte 
\ Township) and has now his 120-acro farm on 
I section 4, and eighty acres on section 2 under 
good improvement. He is one of the public- 
i spirited citizens, and during his residence in 
' the township has held the ofKce of school 
; director, and has also served as road sup 'rvi- 












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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



sor and assessor. Both Mr. and Mrs. Shannon 
are members of the Presbyterian church, and 
respected members of society. In politics 
Mr. Shannon votes the Republican ticket. 



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rfg* W. FOGG, railroad ticket agent at 
Wfif Oreston, was born in Maine, in 1S55, 
"s^ 0, and is a son of S. L. and Mary W. 
(Dow) Fogg, natives of the same State, lie 
was fourteen years of age when he, in com- 
pany with his parents, immigrated to the West, 
in 1869, settling in Douglas Township, Union 
County. His mother is dead, and his father 
is living in Kansas City. Mr. Fogg was 
braketuan on the railroad two years and a 
half, when by an accident on the train he lost 
an arm.. lie was appointed ticket, agent in 
1871, and has since served in that relation 
with perfect satisfaction to his employers and 
the many passengers whom he has an oppor- 
tunity to accommodate. Socially he is a 
gentleman, and well qualified to fill the posi- 
tion he has so long and so honorably main- 
tained, lie was married in 1878, in Creston, 
to Mary J. Allen, who was born in La Porte, 
Indiana, in 1S55, and they have one child — 
Allen S. Mr. Fogg owns four dwellings and 
lots, nd one store-house and lot on Pine. 
Street, Creston. In his political sentiments 
he sympathizes with Republicanism. 



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fit. PATCH, postomce, Kent, engaged 
,] in farming and stock-raising in Platte 
*20r a Township, is a native of New Hamp- 
shire, born September 17, 1S33, a son of 
Dennis and Susan (Drew) Patch, who were 
horn in the State of Maine. They subse- 
quently removed to the State of Illinois, 
where they 'lived till their death. Our sub- 
ject was reared to the avocation of a farmer, 
which he has followed through life. He was 
united in marriage to Miss Jane Rodenbaugh, 



a daughter of George and Elizabeth Roden- 
baugh, who were natives of New Jersey. Mr. 
and Mrs. Patch are the parents of six chil- 
dren — Nettie, born November 12, 18(31; Lorni 
0., born October 8, 1S6G ; Emma C, born 
July 1, 1S70; Cora, bam March 22, 1S72; 
Alice, born November 2, 1S75, and Mattie, 
born February 27, 1878. Mr. Patch is iden- 
tified with the successful agriculturists of 
Platte Township, where he owns a good farm, 
eighty acres being located on section 2S), and 
eight acres on section 28. lie has a sub- 
stantial and comfortable farm house, good 
barn and other farm buildings in good con- 
dition, and his farm shows the care and thrift 
of the owner. 



*m B. DEVOE has resided in Creston 
.-, ji% since 1878. lie bought property in 
^^" that vicinity in 1869. He purchased 
a half-section in Douglas Township and a 
half-section in Spaulding Township. In 187-1 
he laid out the first addition to Creston, and 
two years later laid out the second addition. 
At this time he was a resident of Madison, 
Wisconsin. He built a large number of 
houses on these additions, and now resides 
on the second one. He still has several lots 
for sale. Upon his land in Douglas Town- 
ship the reservoir of the Chicago, Burlington 
& Quincy Railroad is located. Mr. Devoe bav- 
in" given the company a quitclaim dc d for 
that purpose. This is on section li Mr. 
Devoe has done a great deal toward building 
up the city of Creston. He has erected about 
twenty dwellings, and in 18S1 he built a line 
brick block on the corner of Montgomery and 
Maple streets, the number of the block being 
296. The dimensions are forty-two feet on 
Maple street, and 120 on Montgomery street. 
Mr. Devoe was born in Attica., Genesee Coun- 
ty, New York, in 1S10. He was reared in 
Western New York, and married for his first 
wife Miss Lncretia E, Doty. Soon after his 






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.•■.■■ • . 

551 HISTORY OF UNION COUXTV. 



marriage lie removed to Jefferson County, | 
Wisconsin, then to what was then the town of j 
Rome, now Pleasant Spring, Dane County. 
He was one of the pioneers of Wisconsin. ' 
Previous to coming to Iowa his life was 
passed on a farm. His wife died in Jefferson 
County, in lS-iS. His second wife was Mary 
Kirby, a native of Connecticut. By his first 
marriage he has one daughter and four sons, 
and a daughter by the second marriage. Two 
sons and two daughters now reside in Dane 
County, Wisconsin, and two sons in Union 
County, Iowa. The eldest, son, William, is 
a farmer in Douglas Township, and the 
youngest, George W., is in the insurance 
business at Creston, and represents most of 
the leading companies of this country; also a 
London, England, company, and a Toronto 
company. 



. WILLIAM F. CRAIG resides on the 
'■■■ \j \L" north half of the northeast quarter of 

rr,:~i section 24, Union Township, where he 
settled in the fall of 1873. He has eighty acres 
here and forty acres on section 25, township72, 
range 29. He has been a resident of Union 

County since October. 1866. He fir.-t settled 
on the north half of the southeast quarter of 
section 24, where he resided about five years. 
Disposing of this land he purchased his pres- 
enthomestead of Josephine Linscott, of Wash- 
ington, Iowa. He has nu.de ali the improve- 
ments that are on his place, it being wild land 
when he bought it. Mr. Craig was born in 
Muskingum County, Ohio, November 11, 
1S35, and grew to manhood in his native 
State. He received superior educational advan 
tages, having passed to the senior year in 
Muskingum College, lie did not graduate, 
owing to the breaking out of the civil war, 
and the enlistment of the senior class of the 
college, whose patriotism exceeded their de- 
sire for college honors. Mr. Craig's attend- 
ance at college was not continuous, as he had 



to pay his own way, which he did by teaching 
and engaging in other occupations. In 1S60, 
when Abraham Lincoln was first a candidate 
for the presidency, Mr. Craig was in Illinois 
teaching school. At this time he had an op- 
portunity to engage in a newspaper enter- 
prise with Ira A. Batterton,who was publishing 
the Lexington Globe, and warmly supporting 
the Republican nominee for the presidency. 
Early in 1SG1 he returned to Ohio for the pur- 
pose of resuming his studies at college, 
leaving the paper in charge of his partner. 
But the excitement attending the beginning 
of the war, and the first call for volunteers, 
precluded the idea of re-entering school, and 
in July, 1861, he enlisted; but the State's quota 
being full he was not accepted. It being gen- 
erally thought that the war would soon end, 
and having failed to enter the service, he, 
with his brother, John Craig, went to Indiana 
and engaged in farming. It soon became ap- 
parent that the war was not to end without a 
desperate struggle, and further calli for men 
being made, he and his brother decided to 
enter the service. The brother enlisted in the 
Seventy-fifth Regiment, Indiana Infantry, and 
our subject, after settling up the business of 
the firm, enlisted in the Ninth Indiana In- 
fantry, and was soon placed on detached duty, 
where he remained during the entire term of 
his enlistment, serving as clerk at the head- 
quarters of General II. P. Carrington, at 
Indianapolis, Indiana, and later with General 
Alvin P. Ilovey. He was well fitted for his 
position by his superior educational advan- 
tages, and he discharged the duties assigned 
him with satisfaction. Mrs. Craigwas formerly 
Alary E. Passmore, a native of Muskingum 
County, Ohio, to whom he was married 
October 31, 1801. She died in 1S75, leaving 
live children — John CM.; Maggie,a teacher, 
wife of E. S. Moffitt; Emma C, wife of J. 
W. Moffitt; George W. and Willie F. May 
10, 1S-1. Mr. Craig was married to Mrs. Eilie 
Clongh, eldest daughter of Robert J. Biggs, 
of Alton. They have one son — Guy C. Since 



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BIOGRAPHICA L SKE TCUES. 



555 



coining to Iowa, in 18G6, Mr. Craig has bceu 
engaged but.li in farming and teaching, lie 
has twice been a candidate for the county 
superintendence of schools, and the second 
time, in ISSo, was defeated by only eighteen 
votes. He has been secretary of the School 
Board ten years, and township clerk fur three 
years. He is a member of Henry Keating 
Post, No. 211, G. A. R., of Afton, and was 
identified with the Iowa National Guard for 
seven years. His first vote was cast for Abra- 
ham Lincoln, with whom he was personally 
acquainted; followed his fortunes through the 
vicissitude of the civil war, and finally looked 
upon his remains~after he had been stricken 
down by (he hand of his assassin. At the 
meridian of life .Mr. Craig finds himself com- 
fortably situated amid the works his own 
hand has builded; his patriotism as warm as 
it was way back, in the sixties; an ardent 
admirer of his adopted State, believing that 
the. near future will see her develop into one 
of the most honored of the sisterhood, and is 
willing to accept the situation and try to grow 
old gracefully. 

; IXON WATERMAN, editor and active 
•] I 1 1 partner in the pr iprietorship of the paper 
~~r aj known as Every Sunday Morning^ pub- 
lished at Creston, is a son of I/yman and 
Elizabeth (Wakefield) Waterman, natives of 
New York and Pennsylvania respectively. 
They were married in the Keystone State. 
Mr. Waterman has been a farmer in Penn- 
sylvania, Illinois and Iowa, to which latter 
Stale, Union County, be came in ISO!*. He 
is now retired from active employment, and 
resides in Creston. Of eleven children eight 
grew to maturity, and five aie now living. 
Nixon, the youngest of these, was born No- 
vember 12, 1859, in Kendall County, Illinois, 
and remained within the family circle until 
1881, receiving his education in the public 
schools of Creston, and studying also for one 
year in the college at Valparaiso, Indiana. 



Returning to Creston he was employed by S. 
A. Brewster, from September, 1881, to June, 
1SS5, when he became interested in Every 
Sunday Morning. He is making a success 
of this paper, and has only friends in Creston. 
He was married March It, 1SS3, to Miss 
Nellie Haskin, of the "Twin Cities," Wis- 
consin. 

.'p|EORGE R. JOHNSON, farmer, stock- 
MjjjTf raiser and dealer, and dairyman, resides 
",':> on West Adams street, Creston. He 
is a son of S. B. and Lneinda (White) John- 
son, natives of New York. They were the 
parents of nine, children, of whom George R. 
is the seventh child and sixth son. He was 
born in Chenango County, New York, in 
18-17. In 1862 he enlisted in Company C, 
One Hundred and Fourteenth New York 
Volnnleer Tnffffitrv, and s-erved two years 
and ten months, participating in all the 
battles with Banks and Sheridan; was 
taken prisoner by Mosby while on a 
foraging expedition near Winchester, Vir- 
ginia, was in the battles of Cedar Creek, 
Winchester, Red River, Port Hudson, Pleas- 
ant Hill, etc., and was mustered out at 
El'mira, New York, at the clo.-e of the war. 
Then, after a three-years' residence as :■ con- 
j fectioner at Norwich, New York, he came to 
i Lucas County, Iowa, and settled on eighty 
! acres of wild land, where, be was a resident 
eleven years, lias resided in Union County 
| sincelSSO. lie entered the arena of life with no 
resources but; his own, and has, through dili- 
i gence and judicious use and improvement of 
| opportunities, achieved an honorable and 
i merited success. He has always displayed a 
prominent interest in all worthy public enter- 
pris ■ . He owns a fine farm of 1G0 acres on 
; section 3, Douglas Township, where lie has a 
large, handsome house, with all the necessary 
out-buildings to correspond. He also owns 
eighty acres of good land on section 10, same 
township, on which there is a good dwelling 



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550 lIISTOlir of ux;ox COUNTT. 



house, and one of the finest groves in the 
connty;also several fine dwellings in Crcston, 
and his residence there is a splendid, large 
structure, elegantly furnished. He also 1ms 
seventy fine dairy cows. Mr. Johnson was 
married in 1868, to Augusta Clark, of New 
York, who was horn in 1S47, in that State, 
and they have two children — Carrie A. aud 
Nellie A. As a family, they are noted for 
their industry, perseverance and uprightness, 
and are worthy of the respect in which they 
are held by the community. Mrs. Johnson 
is a lady of more than ordinary intellectual 
ability; is hospitable, kind and considerate, 
and for visitors makes her home pleasant and 
attractive. Mr. Johnson is a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic. 






SOMAS' GRANTHAM, physician and 
y}\'-f ^ r "og' st ! 1S3 North tine street, Ores- 
rp ton, is of English descent, inheriting 
the true English blood, his father, John 
Grantham, being an English gentleman of 
note, and of the royal family of England, as 
was also his mother, Anna (Mercer) Hunt, 
who was the daughter of a prominent Eng- 
lish gentleman. His great-grandfather, 
Thomas Bell Hunt, was a prominent physi- 
cian, and famed for being the discoverer of a 
specific for diseased eyes. His father estab- 
lished the first veterinary college in America, 
and was for a number of years principal of the 
same, assisted by Rem bier Paul. His grand- 
father wa Mayor of York. England, which 
office is next the highest, that of the Lord 
Mayor of London being the highest. Dr. 
' Grantham, the subject of this sketch, was 
born in 1836, in Upper Canada, where he ob- 
tained a good education. After completing 
his studies he entered ;i drug-store as clerk, 
in which capacity lie acted until he was 
twenty years of age, in the meantime making j 
a trip to the West, to see the country. He : 
■:'• o a sis ; ;.i Ins father n h:s dcU?-ctore ?.t 



Brantford, Canada. At the age of twenty 
he went to Buffalo, where ho engaged in the 
drug trade three years, aud in the same busi- 
ness also for a short time at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. But, having once seen the grand 
and beautiful West, and found Iowa to be his 
choice, he. became anxious to change his resi- 
dence to this new and rising Stale. Accord- 
ingly he soon located in Crcston and established 
himself in his chosen calling, in which he has 
been successful. His was the first drag and 
apothecary store established in this place. In 
his profession as a physician lie also com- 
mands an extensive and lucrative practice,- 
employing a clerk in his store, where he has 
over $5,000 worth of stock, his sales amount- 
ing annually to $10,000. In 1861, in Boston, 
Massachusetts, Dr. Grantham was united in 
marriage with Miss Ella Conny, daughter of 
William and Mary (Wilson) Conny, natives of 
Massachusetts; she was born in 1816. The 
doctor nas three children — Florence, Myrtle 
and Bertie. Although a poor man when ho 
came to Creston, the doctor now owns two 
line dwelling houses and lots, besides his 
stock of drugs and sundries, all of which he 
has earned by his own industry. He is an 
enterprising citizen, and always stands leady 
to advance, any project that he thinks will 
benefit the community; is a gentleman of line 
social character and good principles, sterling 
integrity, and highly merits the esteem in 
which he is held. lie has no taste for political 
life, and hence has never given any time to 
the strategy of politics. He has, however, 
labored faithfully to assist in the development 
of his adopted State and to enlarge the city 
in which he lives; is firm in whatever he 
deems to be right, diligent in the callings and 
labors of life, and has no skill in hoarding 
money, as he looks upon that article as valu- 
able only as it contributes to the comforts of 
the body and improvement of the mind. It 
is due to Dr. Grantham to state that, while he 
does not claim to be a graduate of any medi- 
cal college, he did attend Knox Medical Col- 






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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



lege two years, and has ever been a close 
student of the hum an system, and is certainly 
well posted on all medical subjects. Having 
also attended medical lectures of different 
schools, he is liberal enough to ''seize upon 
tenth where'er 'tis found." He is thus well 
qualified for the prominent and responsible 
position he now holds. His widely-extended 
and highly-respected patronage supersedes 
the. necessity of entering further into particu- 
lars upon this head, except to note one remark- 
able feature of his practice, so far as we can 
learn, and that is, lie has never been known 
to make a mistake in compounding and ad- 
ministering medicines. %, Ue sure you are 
right before, you go ahead,'' is known to be 
pre-eminently the Englishman's motto. As 
one of Union County's prominent and suc- 
cessful physicians, the publishers of this work 
enjoy the pleasure of presenting, in connec- 
tion with the above biographical sketch, the 
portrait of Dr. Grantham, winch wijl-Lo iv_,_- 
ognized and appreciated by his many friends. 



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EDWARD DERR, of the firm Derr & 
ttpL Smith, clothiers.- Creston, Iowa, is a 
ujp, native of Pennsylvania, born in 1S48, a 
son of Philip and Catherine Derr. He lived 
in his native State until sixteen years of age. 
In 1864: he came to Iowa, and lived in Cedar 
County, until 1S73, when became to Union 
County, and located in Creston, where he has 
since lived. "When eighteen years of age lie 
began clerking in a mercantile house, and has 
since given his attention to that branch of 
business. He lias been industrious and 
economical, and by good management and 
honorable dealing lias acquired considerable 
property. The firm of Derr & Smith keep a 
full line of clothing and furnishing goods, and 
have by their accommodating and genial 
manner and' reasonable prices built up a 
good trade. In addition to his mercantile 
business Mr. Derr is associated with W. A. 



Page, in the manufacture of soap, their fac- 
tory being on the corner of New York Avenue 
and Union Street. lie is an enterprising man, 
and is one of the prominent and influential 
citizens of Creston. He was married in Cedar 
County, Iowa, in 1868, to Sadie Spohn, a 
native of Ohio, born in 184(3. They have one 
child — Edna. Mr. Derr is a member of the 
Odd Fellows order. In politics he is a Demo- 
crat. 



••"T AMBROSE C. 11 ACER, superintendent 
-k \ -■ of the county poor farm, section 13, 
~~;;r? Highland Township, was born in Steu- 
ben County, New York, March 31, 1832. His 
father, Peter V.' Of. Ilager, was a native of 
Tompkins County, Xew York. His great- 
grandfather Ilager was one of four brothers, 
who came from Germany before the Revolu- 
tion, ami tbuuueu Llagerstown, Maryland, 
where the grandfather of our subject, John 
Ilager, was born. He went to Tompkins 
Count}', New York, when twenty-one years 
old, making that county his home the rest of 
his life. In the fall of 1833 the parents of our 
subject moved to Richland County, Ohio, 
where the father died, in 1840. When he was 
eleven years old he began to work for his own 
maintenance, and when seventeen years of age 
began to work at the carpenter's trade, at. 
which lie served an apprenticeship of three 
years. He afterward worked at his trade six 
rears, when on account of failing health lie 
was obliged to seek other pursuits, and accord- 
ingly, took charge of the home farm and cared 
for his mother and stepfather until the death 
of the former. four years later, in 1S59. After 
the breaking out of the war of the Rebellion 
he offered his services in the defense of the 
Union twice, but was rejected on account of 
physical disability, and afterward gave §150 
to assist liis township to send out its quota o 
soldiers. He was a staunch Union man, and 
although unable to go to the front, was always 









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11ISTOR1' OF UNION COUNT F. 



on the side of his country when necessary to 
make his sentiments known. lie cast his iirst 
presidential vote for Fremont, in 1S50, and lias 
since been a strong Republican. In March, 
1S75, Mr. Hager went to Chautauqua County, 
Kansas, and the following September came to 
Iowa, and located in Union County, where he 
has since lived, lie lived in Lincoln Town- 
ship until March, 18SG, when he was appointed 
to his present position. He owns a good farm 
of eighty acres on section 15, Lincoln Town- 
ship, which is well improved. He was mar- 
ried in November, 1S59, to Lucelia E. Magner, 
of Crawford County, Ohio, daughter of 
Edward Magner. 

JW ATTAIN J. N. GADD, of Afton, is the 
; I ,;". manager at this place of the lumber in- 
''M terests of E. D. Hand & Co., of Bur- 
lington. This yard was established by Mr. 
George W. Beymer, in 1868, and Mr.Beymer 
was succeeded by the present firm. Captain 
Gadd was born in Perry County, Ohio, in 
1S42. When he was four years of age his 
father, David Gadd, died, nis parents had 
twelve children, of whom lie is the youngest 
except one. His father was married twice; 
four of his children, three daughters and one 
son, being the children of his second wife. 
Soon after his father's death the family re- 
moved to Morrow County, and in the fall of 
1S53 came to Scott County, Iowa : thence, in 
1854, to Wapello County. An elder son, E. 
Gadd, settled in Davenport, in 1850. When 
sixteen years of age, our subject engaged in 
a furniture factory at Davenport, to learn the 
turning business, where, he remained until 
18(51; then went to Bloomfield, Davis Coun- 
ty, where a brother. Rev. William Gadd, was 
residing. In July of that year he enlisted in 
an independent body of cavalry, which after- 
ward became a part of the Third Iowa Caval- 
ry. II. II. Trimble was Lieutenant-Colonel 
of this regiment. Mr. Gadd served in Mis- 



I souri about one year. He then returned, and 
• engaged as traveling salesman for a cigar and 
i tobacco firm, o( Ottumwa, and was connected 
j with this firm when he came to Afton, in 
1807. For a time he discontinued traveling, 
and went into the osago business, but finall}- 
returned to the road, traveling altogether 
sixteen years. He has had charge of the 
j lumberyard since 1SS3. In October, 1869, he 
was married, at Afton, to Cyrena L. Cherry, 
! a native of Perry Count}-, Ohio, daughter of 
j Judge I. N. Cherry, of Afton. Judge Cherry 
settled in Union Count}- when a young man. 
His family consisted of seven children, four 
daughters and three sons, Cyrena being the 
youngest. All are living: except one, Dr. 
Cherry, who died in Winterset several years 
ago. Mr. and Mrs. Gadd have had three 
children, 011I3- one of whom, Charles T., is 
living. He was born October 12, 1S70. Their 
only daughter, Mary Cherry, died August 
29, 1885, aged seven years. Harry E. died 
in 1878. Captain Gadd's paternal ancestors 
were Scotch. His mother, Elizabeth Gadd, 
was of English descent. She died at Daven- 
port, in 1S05. David Gadd and wife had a 
large family. Six sons and five daughters are 
now living. Several of the sons are well 
known professionally. Samuel lives in Hyde 
County, Dakota; Dr. Joseph Gadd resides in 
Buffalo, Scott County, a prominent physician 
of that place ; Rev. William Gadd is a min- 
ister of the Christian church, now in Attica, 
Kansas ; Enoch S. resides at Omaha, Nebras- 
ka ; Dr. Benjamin T. Gadd is a member of 
the medical faculty at Des Moines. Upon 
the first organization of the militia of this 
State, Captain Gadd raised a company at 
Afton, of which he had command eight years, 
and when Governor Sherman was elected 
Governor of Iowa. Captain Gadd was made a 
member of his staff, and served in the capac- 
ity of Lieutenant-Colonel of Staff for four 
years. He is one of the wide-awake, public- 
spirited citizens, and always foremost in 
whatever tends to promote the best interests 



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B/OGRA PillCAL SKE TC -I1ES. 



of the public. He has a beautiful home at 
Afton, and owns a farm on section 13, in 
Union Township. Captain Gadd lias always 
been an "Iowa man"; in politics a Republican, 
and a lively one at that. His faith in the 
future of lovva, year- ago, was publicly 
known, for lie believed the State was soon to 
become the leading State in the "West. 

,"7/1 II AFLES T. WELLS, American Express 
viw. agent at Creston, was born in Canton. 

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•;^Hi Ohio, in the year 1856. His father was 
Thomas Wells, a native of Pennsylvania, of 
Scotch parentage, and a contractor by occu- 
pation; and his mother, whose maiden name 
was Mary M. Gregg,. was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, of German ancestry. Mr. Wells was 
appointed express agent at Fairfield, Iowa, 
when but eighteen years of age, and served 
five ye--:, ji»'rl th™ for four ard p half ve?." 
he was express messenger on the railroad, 
running from Burlington to Omaha, Ne- 
braska. He came to Creston in 1883, where 
he has faithfully served in his calling, and 
earned a good reputation, bidding fair to he- 
come a prominent citizen. He is a member 
of the orders of Free -Masons, Odd Fellows, 
and Legion of Honor. He was married in 
1SS2, in Chicago, Illinois, to Miss Minnie 
Mathews, daughter of Amelia Mathews. She 
was born in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1S62, and 
brought up there. 

'," ' F. SMITH, deah.r in harness, saddles, 
i\ etc., on Pine street, Creston, was 



"~ 3 born in Butler Count}-, Ohio, in 
1834, the son of Charles and Matilda Smith, 
natives of Pennsylvania. When he was fit- 
teen years of age he went to Franklin County, 
Indiana, and was a resident there until 1866, 
when he came to O'.tumwa, Wapello County, 
Iowa, where he was engaged for ten years in 
the harness business, which he had learned in 



Indiana; he also followed farming to some 
extent, which vocation he had learned prior 
to the age of fifteen, in Ohio. At present he 
carries about §2,500 worth of stock, while his 
sale6 amount annually to about $7,000; he 
keeps two hands in his employ. He also 
owns a house and lot. In 1864 he enlisted 
in (he One Hundred and Thirty-fourth In- 
diana Infantry, and served four months, 
being mustered out, in Indianapolis. He was 
first married in Bookville, Indiana, in 1851, 
to Frances Carmichaol, who was born in that 
State, in 1S36, and died in 1869. They had 
four children, only one of whom is now living, 
Lenore, the wife of E. Austin. The deceased 
were Eddy, Harry A., and one unnamed in- 
fant. In 1879, in Wapello, Iowa, Mr. Smith 
married Maria Blackburn, widow of the late 
A. Pierce. By this marriage there are three 
children — Everett, Ernest and Warren. 

^TOHN L. WILSOX, a promineut citizen 
''.,', I ami a prosporous farmer of Lincoln 
\t£ Township, residing on section -1, was 
born in Guernsey County, Ohio, Septem- 
ber 12, 1841, a son of Thomas V. Wil- 
son, who was a native of Westmoreland 
County, Pennsylvania. In 1849, the par- 
ents removed with their family to Spring- 
field, Illinois, where the father built the first 
steam flour-mill in the place, he being a 
miller by trade. The father was Captain of 
Company' L, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, during 
the late war, and was killed by bushwhackers 
while in Missouri. John L. Wilson, the ub- 
ject of this sketch, learned the miller's trade 
from his father, and followed it for several 
years. He was also a soldier in the war of the 
Rebellion, enlisting in Company A, Twelfth 
Illinois Infantry, and with his regiment took 
part in the battles of Belmont, Port Donel- 
son, Yicksburg, Pittsburgli Landing, Corinth, 
Inka, and Black Fiver Fridge. After his 
discharge he re-enliated in Company C, Sec- 



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msTonr of ujvjrojv couxrr. 



ond Colored Cavalry, when he \ Va ■ engaged 
most of the time on the frontier, fiyhtiug'lhe 
Indians. While in the service he" was 
wounded five times, one ball passing through 
his body. lie now draws a pension. July 
1(5, 1S68, he was married to Margaret A. 
Cartwright, who is a distant relative of the 
renowned Peter Cartwright. Of the twelve 
children born to this union, ten si ill survive 
—Mary I']., Laura IST., Thomas V., Sarah F., 
Harriet J., Martha B., Alice Catharine' 
Zenida L., Grover C, and Edith M. Mr. 
Wilson came to Union County, Iowa, with 
his family in 1876, and has since followed 
farming and stock-raising on (he farm where 
he now lives. He has met with success in 
his agricultural pursuits, his heme farm con- 
taining 200 acres of choice land, well im- 
proved. He held the office of justice of the 
peace in Champaign County, Illinois, for six 
years and a half, and has held the same office 
Jii.cc eoiiiiiig to Union County, and now 
serving as township trustee. He has been 
president of the School Board for several 
years, and is also at this time president of J 
the Union County Farmers' Alliance. 



j came to Iowa, and located in Creston, and 
! embarked in his present business, and has 
i built up a good trade. Mr. Barr was married 
j i» Allen County, Ohio, in 1869, to Eliza A. 
j Shultz, a native of Greene County, Ohio, 
; born in 1842. To them have been born four 
j children— Gordie, Charles D., Eddie and Ada 
, B. in politics Mr. Barr is a Republican. 
' He and his wife are members of the Christian 
church. 



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§'■ V. BARR, dealer in groceries, pro- 
visions, Hour, feed, etc., No. 309 Mont- 
■..- » gomery Street. Creston, Iowa, is' a 
native of Greene County, Ohio, born in 1S39 
a son of John A\ r . and Phcebe (Snodgrass) 
Barr, the father a native of Ohio, and the 
mother of Virginia. ( ) ur subject was reared 
on a farm in Allen County, Ohio, where his 
parents moved in his childhood. He re- 
mained at home until manhood, assi-ting his 
father on the farm until after the break. ng out 
of the war of the Rebellion. In 1864 he en- 
listed, and was assigned as a recruit to Com- 
pany G, One Hundred and Fifty-sixth Ohio 
Infantry, and served four months. After his 
return home he again engaged in fanning, and 
followed that vocation until J881, when he 



y /RAXK HUDSON, farmer and slock- 
jH raiser, section 16, Sand Creek Township, 
— ■> is a native of Ohio, born July 5, 1S12, 
I his parents, Daniel and Mary (Mayhew) 
! Hudson,^ being natives of the ' same State. 
j Our subject was reared and educated in the 
| common schools of his native State and Til i- 
I nois, his parents having moved to Stark 
I County, Illinois, in 1853. In ISG2 ho enlisted. 
| in Company A, One Hundred and Twenty- 
j fourth Illinois Infantry, and wrote himself 
I private for country and liberty's sake, and 
j went out from home to suffer and die, if need 
| be, in camp or field, that the nation might 
i live. His regiment was assigned to the First 
j Brigade, Third Division, Seventeenth Corps 
j Army of the Tennessee, and the history of 
that organization, of which the One Hundred 
; and Twenty-fourth, bore an honorable part, 
j under such commanders as Grant, Sherman, 
! McPherson and Logan, needs no further 
; comment. After the. close of the war he re- 
I turned to his father's home in Illinois, where. 
i he remained until 1S68, when he came to 
rows, and located in Union County, where he 
: was married to Miss Irene Oliver, daughter of 
: W. S. and Minerva Oliver, natives of Ohio. 
: To Mr. and .Mrs. Hudson have been born five 
children— Mary M., born September 17, 1870; 
Homer E., born January 12, 1873, died May 
27, 1S75; Maggie B., born November 20, 
1875; Clark 0., bom January 2, 1877, and 
Herbert G., born December 25, 1879, die' 



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DIOaRAPIUCAL SKETCHES. 



563 



December 8, 1SS5. Since coming t i Union 
County Mr. Hudson has been successful in 
his farming operations, and is numbered 
among the best farmers in his township, 
whore lie has 440 acres of valuable land. lie 
lias been a member of the Board of County 
Supervisors for three years, and has held 
other offices of honor in his township, and is 
one. of the active and public-spirited citizens. 
He is a member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. In politics he is a Greenbacker. 
He is a member of no church, but his wife is 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



F. HEINLY, of the firm of Holcomb, 
Heinly & Brother, wholesale grocers, 

'~? e at Crestouj was born in Northampton 
County, Pennsylvania, in 1S51. In 1S55 his 
filth nr. Joseph Heinlv. removed with hisfam- 
ily to Muscatine County, Iowa, where B. F. 
was reared, principally, on a farm. He was 
engaged in a store two years previous to com- 
ing to Crcston. He has been in this city 
since 1874. His first business venture was 
in the retail grocery trade in the firm name 
of Mackemer & Heinly. This partnership 
continued about six years. In the meantime 
a younger brother, T. A. Heinly, had became 
a member of the linn, and is still connected 
with it in the firm of Holcomb, Heinly & 
Brother, and also of the firm of Heinly Broth- 
ers, who have a fine retail grocery store. The 
grocery house of Holcomb, Heinly & Brother 
was established in lbSl by Wallace, Heinly 
& Brother. This was the first wholesale 
house in Creston, and the expectation of its 
founders has been fully realized. It is in 
competition with Burlington, St. Joseph. 
Ottumwa and Chicago. They employ two 
salesmen, one oi whoi i is on the road and the 
other attends to the city trade. To Mr. B. 
F. Heinly is due in a great measure the suc- 
cess to which the house has attained. He pos- 

seesi s excellent business qualifications and 



has been connected with the enterprise from 
the beginning. His wife was formerly Miss 
Isabel Sweet, a native of Muscatine County, 
Iowa. They have two children — Earl Casper 
and Webster G., both of whom were born in 
Creston. 

/ TOllN McCAFFERY, one of the promi- 
\ \ nent citizens of Creston, was a native of 
County C'avan, Ireland, and came to 
America with his parents while yet an infant. 
The family settled in Albany, New York. 
When he was eight years old they removed to 
Chicago, where a greater part of his life has 
been passed, lie learned the printer's trade in 
the office of The Young America, a tri-weekly 
newspaper that was afterward merged iuto 
the Chicago Tarns. He continued on the 
Times as foreman in the press department for 
n period of fourteen years This included the 
hi lory of that noted paper to the time that 
Wilbur F. Storey became its proprietor, and 
also the first nine months of that eminent 
\ journalist's connection with the paper. A 
! strike on the part of the typographical force 
I then occurred which resulted in Mr. Me- 
Oaffery's severing his connection with the 
Times. He then engaged with the Inter- 
j Ocean as foreman of the press department, 
i and filled that position two years. He next 
! embarked in the grocery trade in Chicago, and 
was burned out in the great fire of 1871. He, 
with thousands of others, sustained a severe 
loss in that conflagration. His property was 
insured tor $25,000, but he realized nothing 
from his insurance policies, lie immediately 
■ rebuilt and resumed business until 1S77, 
; when failing health compelled him to change 
j locality. Having large land interests in Union 
County, he resolved to make Creston his 
home and devote his attention to the improve- 
ment of his land, and in obtaining the rest 
which his long and close application to busi- 
ness demanded. Politically Mr. McCafl'ery is 
a Democrat. He was prominently connected 



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with Chicago politics for many years. lie 
Berved us alderman four years during his 
business career, and after his retirement from 
business he served another year. In 1S74 he 
was elected member of the county board of 
commissioners, serving three years. From 
the time became to Creston until 1SS5 lie was 
chief of the fire department in this city, and 
to bis management is due much of the reputa- 
tion that this department has attained. Mr. 
McOaffery was married in Chicago to Miss 
Alice Dixon, who died in Creston in 1SS3. 
His present wife was Maria Brownrig. lie 
had five children, two sons and three daugh- 
ters, by his first marriage. He owns 550 acres 
of land in Spatilding Township. lie has a 
beautiful home in Creston, indicative of taste 
and comfort. His library of standard books 
shows his taste for reading, and his desire that 
his family shall not lack the opportunity for 
r.V,f- n ;,,;..n- knowledge Po^-tec +i.~ ,--.' -...._ 

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mentioned he owns other lands and city 
property. 

■",\HARLES II. GRINNELL, one of the 
\\''T. pioneers of Union County, engaged as 

"0^7' sexton, Graceland Cemetery, section 
IS, Highland Township, was born in 
Providence, Rhode Island, November 14, 
1837, a son of William and Frances (Sals- 
bury) Grinnell, who were natives of the same 
place, the father being now deceased. The 
mother still makes hei home in Providence. 
Our subject, was taken Ivy his parents to New 
York State, whore he lived on a farm with 
them till fourteen years of age, and during 
this time learned the tailor's trade. He came 
to Iowa City, Iowa, in IS51, where be clerked 
in a feed store for live years. In 1S56 lie be- 
gan driving a stage for the Great Western 
Stage Company, between Iowa City and the 
Missouri Fiver, and also drove stages on 
other routes for the same company, being in 
their employ till I860. He returned to 



Oneida County, New York, in the fall of 
1S60, and the following year enlisted at Clin- 
ton, that county, in Company E. One Hun- 
dred and First New York infantry, in which 
he served eighteen months, when he was dis- 
charged on account of chronic dysentery. He 
re-enlisted in December, 1863, in Company 
M, Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery, 
and was again discharged, May lf», 1865, 
having received six gun-shot wounds. He 
participated in a number of engagements, 
including the battles of Chickahominy Swamp, 
Seven Pines, was on the seven days' retreat 
from Fair Oaks to Harrison's Landing, second 
battle of Bull Run, battle of the Wilderness, 
Spottsylvariia Court-House and Cold Harbor. 
Three times he with others was left on picket 
duty while the main army moved to the rear 
of the enemy, and each time they were sur- 
rounded by the enemy, through whose ranks 
they ha^ to cut fcaeii way. At the battle of 
the Wilderness Mr. Grinnell received a 
wound in each arm, also slightly wounded in 
the right temple. lie was shot in the left 
side at the battle of Cold Harbor, and still 
carries the ball in his body. In front of 
Petersburg his left shoulder was badly torn 
by an explosive ball, making three holes, and 
at the same place he was shot through the 
right hand, the ball passing between the first 
and second knuckles, permanently disabling 
his hand. After the war he went to Lewis- 
burg, Pennsylvania, where he attended the 
high school for two years. September 7, 
1S67, he was married to Miss Emma J. 
Miller, a daughter of William Miller, de- 
ceased. Of the eight children born to them, 
six are living — Gennetta, Charles A., Mary, 
Theoda, Jennie May and Lillie Bell. The 
two oldest are dead. Nora sleeps in Lewis- 
burg Cemetery; William Henry sleeps in 
Audubon County, Iowa, awaiting the coming 
of Christ to gather us all together; Nora died 
when three days old, and William died at the 
age of four and a half years. Mr. Grinnell 
returned to Iowa, and located in Audubon 



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County. In 1ST t lie removed to Taylor 
County, and in 1S77 came to Union County, 
where lie lias since made his Lome. Mr. 
Grinnell has been sexton of the Creston 
cemetery most of the time since coining to 
this county. Both he and his wife, in their 
religious faith, are Baptists. 



.TOYMAN WATERMAN, Sr., of Creston, 
j\i//? came to Union County, August 6. 1869, 
t"3 and on the ninth day of the same month 
bought a farm of 200 acres on section 26, of 
Douglas Township, 100 acres of which was 
broken and a house built thereon, and other 
slight improvements made. There were but 
few houses in the vicinity at the time when 
he moved his family to the county, the nearest 
one east being four miles distant. Cromwell 
\<»fia thr> toinnm-flvv terminYis of the Burlington 
& Missouri River Railroad, which was rapidly 
building to the Missouri River. The name 
of Creston had not been heard of at that time. 
Some years later Mr. Waterman purchased 
200 acres adjoining, in the same section, 
which he afterward occupied as a home, upon 
selling the former homestead at $10 per acre. 
He moved to Creston several years ago, where 
he has since resided, surrounded by his 
family, consisting of wife and three married 
sons and two married daughters, all of whom 
have comfortable homes. Mr. Waterman 
was born April 20, 1317, in Eaton Township, 
Madison County, New York, in which State 
he resided until nineteen years of age, when 
he removed with his parents to Westmore- 
land County, Pennsylvania, lleie on May 
2, 1839, he married Mary Elizabeth Wake- 
field, and three years later started by way of 
canal to Pittsburg, and by steamboats on the 
Ohio, Mississippi and Illinois livers for Peru, 
Illinois, where he landed among strangers 
with a wife, two children, and 75 cents in 
cash September 20, 1512. After eleven years 
the day and by the job, Mr. 



Waterman found himself possessed of a small 
farm, which he added to until he owned one 
of the best locations in the vicinity. The 
farm lay yn both sides of the line, dividing 
LaSalle and Kendall counties. In 1SG5 he 
sold his interest and removed toBuda, Bureau 
County, Illinois, where he resided four years, 
when he came to Iowa. While residing in 
Pennsylvania Mr. Waterman was employed 
on the Portage Railroad, across the Allegheny 
Mountains, the first road in Pennsylvania. 
While in Illinois he served thirteen years as 
township and Government assessor and col- 
lector in the same locality, where he formerly 
worked at a salary of $10 per month. He 
laised a large family of children, nine of 
whom reached maturity, and five are still 
living, all well-to-do residents of Creston. 
Mr. Waterman has been a member of the 
Methodist church all his life, and has ever 
been an advocate for law and order. In poli- 
tics he has always voted the Republican 
ticket since the party was organized. A his- 
tory of Mr. Waterman's life is a record of ad- 
verse circumstances overcome by persistent 
energy and hard work, and, viewed as a whole, 
is a success most gratifying to himself and 
the fai.thful helpmeet, who has shared his 
joys and sorrows. 



£f AMES ARMSTRONG, an active and 
":'.' ! enterprising farmer and .stock-raiser of 
,- - Grant Township, living cm section 11, is 
a native of Indiana, born in Union County 
October 11, 1S35, a son of Robert and Ellen 
(Logan) Armstrong, who were natives of Vir- 
ginia, both now deceased. James Armstrong 
received but limited educational advantages 
in his youth. His parents moved to Warren 
County, Illinois, when he was quite small, 
and when he was but sewn years old his 
father died. His mother being in poor circum- 
stances he was early in life inured to hard 
work, and started out on his own account en 






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'■'■. p. 566 Hisronr of r.v/o.v coua'ti'. 

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. tirely without means. He. began working for 



;• * farmers in Warren County by the month, 

• : whicli lie followed for nilie years. He then, 

'0 at the age of twenty-five years, enlisted in the 

,_ war of the Rebellion, in Company 13, Eighty- 

pg third Illinois Infantry, and after serving his 

tenn of enlistment, in 1S65 received an 
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three years afterward he went to Chicago, 
Illinois, then to G-alesburg, same State, three 
years, then to Rock Island, same State, where, 
in 1873, he was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Koch, who was born in Erie County. Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1S54. They are the parents of two 
children— Katie E., who was horn in 1876, 
,. honorable discharge, at Nashville, Tennessee, and one deceased. Mr. Beerkle came to 

|| when he returned to Warren County, Illinois. | Creston in 1S74, since which time, he has suc- 

££ In 1867 be was married to Mary X. Hopper, 

• a daughter of John and Eliza Hopper, natives 

of Ohio. Of the six children bom to this 

Pj union five are living— Ida E., born Septem- 

• her 6, 186S; Ora E., horn April 10, 1S70; 

!♦;*! James E., born Jnly 12, 1872; Lon'a B., born 



:*>; September 18, 1874, and John L., horn No- 



ccssfully followed his chosen .calling. He 
commenced in life a poor man, but by habits 
of economy and perseverance, joined with 
honest dealing and the assistance of a good 
wile, he has prospered, as he now is the owner 
of the meat-market, slaughter-house, two 
houses and lots, and two acres of ground and 



;-:■' vember 24,. 1S76. Their youngest child died three lots in the western portion of Creston. 

P March 15, 1SS0, aged about nine months. 
Since corning to Union County Mr. Arm- 
in his farming 



| strong has been success! 

WM oTinrotiin" "nfl '— - -v - 1 ' ; • 

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jjj! good home. He has 160 acres of well-culti- 

'p£ valed land, eighty on section 14, Grant Town- 

.- ship, where he resides, and eighty acres on 

>•';;■ section 15, of the same township, which he hat 



gained by persevering industry and good 
J; management, and is now classed among the 
well-to-do fanners of his township. In poli- 
tics Mr. Armstrong has always affiliated with 
the Republican party. lie is a comrade of 
| Henry Keating Post, No. 211, G. A. R., of 
&;*; Afton. 



He is a clear-headed business man, and one 
of the enterprising and influential citizens of 
the place. Politically he is a Democrat, and 
rdigiouslj ho is a member ot the Catholic 
church, while his wife belongs to the German 
Lutheran church. 



'ILLIAM M. ELLIOTT, deceased, was 
^ \j \7] horn March 2, 1S23, a son of John 
l~J^i S. and Mary (Aufal) Elliott, who 
were natives of Kentucky. He was reared to 
agricultural pursuits, and followed farming 
till his death. Lie went to Indiana in an 
early day, and was married in that State to 
Miss Sara A. Jordon, who was born October 
5, 1822, a daughter of Naucy (Beaman) Jor- 
don, the marriage taking place February S. 
X. BEERKLE, proprietor .of City Meat J 1846. To this union were born thirteen 
i Market, 110 Montgomery Street, Cres- i children— Mary A., born November 25, 1846, 



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is the wife of John S. Mason; Nancy J., born 

:, assortment of pork, mutton, beef, etc., and is j September 7, 1848, wife of James Dixon; 

always ready and willing to do ail he can to ! William J., born May 28. 1850; John N., 

accommodate his customers. He was born in ' born August 1, 1852; Elizabeth A., born 

■ Baden, Germany, Decerabei 3, 1S4S, and is a j March 14, 1854; Henry M., born August 26, 

.-; son of John and Katherine Beerkle, natives j 1856; James S. and George II. (twins), born 

;»; also of Germany. He came to America in j November 28, 1858; R. J., born November 

. 1S66, settling in Erie County, Pennsylvania; | :, I860; Florence P., born April 11, 1.30:3; 

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. Of,; 



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W:il! or S., born February S, 1805; Alice J., 
born December 12, 1866; Sarah O, bom 
March 3, I860. Mr. Elliott remained in In- 
diana about ten years, when lie removed with 
his family to Jasper Comity, Iowa. Prom 
there he came to Union Oonnty, being among 
the pioneer settlers. He subsequently went 
to Missouri, where be lived till his death, 
which occurred March 7. 1 S 7 . After his 
death his widow returned to the old home- 
stead with her family, which she still owns 
and occupies. The home farm is located on 
section 28, Sand Creek Township, and con- 
tains 320 acres of choice land. Wherever he 
resided Mr. Elliott was universally respected, 
and while living in Union County he held 
several local offices of trust, including justice of 
the peace and township trustee, serving in all 
with honor to himself and to his constituents. 
He was a worthy Christian gentleman; a 
member of the Baptist church. In his polit- 
ical views he was luuepeiKlent, voting for i 
man, not party. 

.""I BILDERBACK, a prosperous farmer ' 
\ \ " %. and stock-raiser, living on section 30, j 
'^7i 2 Grant Township, is a native of Ohio, i 
born April 5, 1S30. His parents, Charles 
and Mary (Cooper) Bilderback, were natives l 
of the State of Pennsylvania. They subse- j 
quer.tly came to Iowa, and lived in Dallas 
County. Both are now deceased. Our subject ! 
was reared to the occupation of a farmer, : 
which he has always followed. He grew to j 
mat. hood in Ohio, then statted West, and after I 
spending a short time in Colorado he came to 
Union County, Iowa, settling on his present j 
farm in 1869. He was married June 9, 1866, i 
to Miss Elizabeth Iluneson, a daughter of j 
Levis and Martha Iluneson, who were natives i 
of Ohio. Two sons have been born to this | 
union— Perry Ellsworth, bom April 21, 1867, 
and Walter G., bom September IS, 1869, 
died March 13, 18S3. Mr. Bilderback has 



met with excellent success in his agricultural 
pursuits, and now has 300 acres of well- 
improved lan<! where he resides. His land is 
under cultivation, his house is comfortable 
and convenient, and his barns and other farm 
buildings are in good condition, and every 
thing about the place betokens care and 
thrift. Mr. Bilderback has served as township 
trustee- and school director, beside filling 
other positions of trust in his township. He 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He is also a member of the Masonic 
fraternity. 



m ALFRED GRIM, farmer and stock-raiser. 
.- x\\ section -1, Douglas Township, was born 
^0 in Greene County, Pennsylvania, in 1821, 
his father being Thomas and his grandfather 
Christopher Grim, and his mother's maiden 
name Rachel McCullongb; they were natives 
of Pennsylvania and of German ancestry. 
His maternal grandfather was Martin Grim, 
and his maternal grandmother, Mary Morgan, 
was a relative of the Morgan who was massa- 
cred by the Indians in Pennsylvania in early 
day. Mr. Grim, the subject of this sketch, 
was reared to the years of manhood in agri- 
cultural pursuits, which he has since gener- 
ally followed; has also been a carpenter and 
brick-maker. He came to Union County in 
1SS3, and is now a prosperous citizen. He 
had but little to start in life with. He taught 
school five years: is a member of the Chris- 
tian church. Mr. Grim was married in 1849, 
in Pennsylvania, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter 
( f Zebulon and Catharine (Shrontz)Ferrel, of 
English and German parentage. They have 
had ten children, nine of whom are living, as 
follows — Lyman P. S., who married Ellen 
Shonman, of D (Uglas Township, and has five 
children- — Frank, Arthur Perry, John F., 
Edna and Thomas; Caroline, dec:. 1 ed; 
Catherine, wife of Joseph Coffman, and has 
three children — Ch: rles, George and Gracie; 



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60S 



HISTORT OF UNION COUNTT. 






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James F., who married "Mary Pickrcll; Belle, 
wife of John Tharp, and has three children- 
Katie, Annis and Mary, living in Pennsylva- 
nia; Rachel, wife of David Delves, of Chi- 
cago; Mary M., wife of William McIIary, 
and has one child — Mercella, and Emma J. 
and Ida M. John F. has been trustee of 
Eureka College, Illinois. PostoHice, Creston, 
box 577. 



retired farmer, 
Douglas Town- 
eighty acres of 



.•'.;i EOEGE HARTMAN, 
|j! '■- resides on section 35, 
*gzk ship? where he owns 
land. He was married in Pennsylvania, in 
1832, to Juda Crites, a native of that State, 
and they have had thirteen children, six 
of whom arc living — John O, Caroline 
A., Eliza A., Leah, Reuben, Rebecca, Eliza- 
beth, Saraband Jcr-r.ett*. Geo-? an 4 three 
infants are deceased. In 1873 Reuben mar- 
ried Frances Hill, who was born in Clermont 
County, Ohio, and they have had lour chil- 
dren—Francis S., Judith, Barzilla P. and 
Ella M. He manages the farm of his father. 
The subject of the above short sketch came 
to this county in 1869; is a gentleman well re- 
spected by his neighbors. Postoffice, Creston. 



f ""'',ETER BOLLIG, deceased, was a native 
; . y J : of Prussia, Germany, where he was 
*nP' reared, coming to the United States 
when a young man. He located in La Fay- 
ette, Indiana, where he learned the black- 
smith's trade, at which he worked many 
years, lie became proficient in the English 
language, attending a night school, and 
studying hard to master the language of his 
adopted country. In 18Ci he came to Iowa, 
and opened a shop in Des Moines, and in 
18G8 moved to Madison County, where he 
lived mx years on a farm, moving to Creston 
in 1874. In 1 S TS he located on the iarm on 



section IS, Highland Township, whore he 
built a brewery, which stopped business 
when tlio prohibition law was enforced, which 
was a great disadvantage to his family, who 
still reside on the same place. He was a 
hard-working, energetic man, and by econo- 
my and good management accumulated a 
good property. Mr. Bollig was married 
November 25, 1S59, to Barbara Lehnert, 
daughter of Nicholas Lehnert. To them were 
born six children, but four of whom arc liv- 
ing — Josephine, Maggie, Ida and Albert. 
One daughter, Mary, died aged sixteen years. 
Mr. Bollig died January 10. 1SS0, leaving 
his family and a large circle of friends to 
mourn the loss of a kind husband and father 
and an enterprising citizen. 

: , ,~HIARLE3R. COOPER, farmer and stock. 
fr# raiser, resides on section 26, Jones Town- 
~'&rl ship, where he owns eighty acres of land, 
in good condition. He was bom in Hardin 
County, Ohio, in 1837, and is a son of Andrew 
and Lydia (Robison) Cooper, natives respect- 
ively of Pennsylvania and Connecticut. He 
was but eight years old when his mother 
died, and in 1853 he came West with his 
father and step-mother, settling in Plea-ant 
Township. In 1857 he went to Oregon, and 
at a place called "Devil's Gap" he came into 
company with General Custer, with whom he 
remained four months, fighting the Indians. 
Thence he went to Missouri and thence to 
Santa Fe, Nov.* Mexico, and finally crossed 
the Isthmus of Tehnantepec into Central 
America. Returning by way of New Or- 
leans and St. Louis, he stopped in Ray 
County, Missouri, where, by the ruthless hand 
of rebels, he lost about §2,000 worth of 
property. In 1862 he enlisted in Company 
If, Twenty-ninth Iowa Infantry, and served 
three years, engaging in the battle at Helena, 
Arkansas, and Vicksbnrg and Little Ri ck 
and Camden, in the same State, and also in 



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tlio. Red River Expedition. After wintering 
at Little Rock he went to Atgeres, and par- 
ticipated in the siege of Mobile and many 
other battles of less note. Mr. Cooper was 
married at Afton, Iowa, November 2, 1SG6, to 
Miss Ida F., daughter of William Sewers. 
She was bora in Prussia, in 1813, Mr. 
Cooper was for eight months in the employ 
of Mr. Hull, a Government surveyor on the 
fifth and sixth parallel. He lias traveled a 
great deal, and is a well-informed gentleman. 



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1?& II. .BROOKS, farmer, stock-raiser 
I ; dea 



md 



aler, resides on section 3, Douglas 
- Township, where he has 150 acres of 
good land, highly cultivated. He was born in 
Windham County, Vermont, in 1835, his 
parents being George and Salina (Houghton) 
Brooks, natives aiso of the (jreeu Mountain 
State, of English ancestry. They immigrated 
to Peoria, Illinois, where the subject of our 
notice lived until 1857; then, until 1875, he 
was a resident of Henry County, same State, 
and finally he settled in Union County, 
where he still resides. The place was then 
partially improved, and, although he had 
nothing to commence for himself with, he has 
succeeded in establishing the foundation 
of a permanent and comfortable home. His 
house he erected in 1880, at a cost of §1,000, 
and his barns and outbuildings cost 81,000: 
an acre and a half he has in orchard. He sells 
about fifty head of cattle and hogs annually. 
lie rears the English carriage horse, or the 
Cleveland Bay. He is classed among the 
solid and influential citizens of Union County. 
In politics he is a Republican, and both him- 
self and wife are members of the Congrega- 
tional church. He has been supervisor for 
several years, and school director. He was 
married in Henry County, Illinois, in 1859, to 
-Miss Marion V., daughter of Abraham and 
Betsy (Scudder) Bush, the. former a native of 
Holland and the latter of New York. Mrs. 



Brooks was born in Cattaraugus County, New 
York, in 1839. The five children by this 
matrimonial union are— Charles E., Willis 
M., Lewis E., Estella and John H. Postoffice, 
Creston. 

i . , *^"v ? i. . 

1IOMAS II. LEECH, farmer and stock- 
\. | ..': raiser, section 35, Highland Township, 
' Tpj residing on section 35, was born in 
Rockbridge County, Virginia, May 1, 1847, a 
son of James and Nancy (McKnight) Leech, 
natives of the same county. They came with 
their family to Iowa in 1S55, and settled in 
Lucas County. They made the entire journey 
by wagon, being a month on the road, and 
made their home in Union Township, that 
county, where they still live, the father aged 
seventy-three and the mother seventy-two 
years. Thomas II. Leech, our subject, 
was about eight years old when he accompanied 
his parents to Iowa. He was reared on the 
home farm, and educated in the common 
schools of Lucas County, remaining in that 
county till 1S7G. He was married August 18, 
1S70, to Mrs. Mary J. Leech, who was bom 
in Washington County, Pennsylvania, Janu- 
ary 15, 1840, a daughter of David Cooper. 
The parents of Mrs. Leech were both natives 
of Washington County, Pennsylvania, and 
also her grandparents, Sylvan us and Mary 
(Bryant) Cooper, who were uf Holland descent. 
Mrs. Leech is the eldest in a family of ten 
children, five sons and five daughters, all of 
whom are living. Her parents are also living . 
in Scotland County, Missouri. By her first 
husband Mrs. Leech had two children — Ida 
M. and Eugene E. Ida married George Vin- 
cent., of Grant Township, and has two chil- 
dren—Earl A. and an infant daughter. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Leech have been born six chil- 
dren, of whom five are living — John F., Don 
C, Jessie 1"., Loy C. and Bcrttie C. Mr. 
Leech came with his family to Union County 
in February, 1876, locating on his present 



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HISTORY. OF UNION COUNT)' 



farm, which at that time was raw prairie laud ' entered the grocery business, renting his 



entirely unimproved. He new owns 210 acres 
of well-cultivated land with good buildings, 

line groves, and an abundance of fruit trees, 
all of which lias been done within the last ten 
years. Both Mr. and Airs. Leech are members 
of the Congregational church. 



OSEPH FRIEND, dealer in clothing. 

§ gents' furnishing goods, hats, caps, valises, 
trunks, etc., at 129 Pine Street, Creston, 
carries about $25,000 worth of stock, and his 
sales annually amount to about 810,000. He 



„„. ^, j - - . \J\J1. 11 111 A^KLl, U llij *-^) AN^^w. 

was born in Poland, in 1835, and is the son ; ^ 1SS5, leaving one child, Samuel R., '^ 
of Isaac and Blanche Friend, also natives of j was born in 1867. In June, ISSiJ. he gi 



that country. Tie was eighteen years of ag 
when he immigrated to America. Besides re- 
ceiving a good education, he had in his youth 
considerable experience in various mercantile 
clerkships. All his present wealth he has ac- 
cumulated by his own honest industry. He 
came to Creston in 1878, engaging in his 
present business. Besides his prosperous 
business, he owns a fine, dwelling house and 
lot. He is a Royal Arch Mason, and 
politically he is in sympathy with Republi- 
canism. He was married in 1SG7 in the city 
of New York, to Harriet Hernstcin, who was 
born in 1818. They have live children— Al- 
fred I., Frederica, Benny, Blanche and 
Charlotte. 



farm. He owns the property where he lives, 
his business ) roperty, and GOO acres of land 
in Southeast Missouri, near Cairo, Illinois. 
He once owned fifteen slaves, who were freed 
by the war. He has held the office of alder- 
man in the city of Creston two terms. He 
was married in Charleston, Missouri, March 
5, 1S45, to Martha T. Keesee, who was born » 
in that. State, and died in 1862. For his see- $ 
ond wife Mr. Allen married, in Missouri, 
January 28, 1S61, Frances II. Lamb, who was ;|;| 
born where a portion of the suburbs of Bur- |;«j 
lington now is, being the second white child ! M 
born in Iowa, July 29, 1S35. She died July 

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uated at the Creston High School; is now 
studying law with McDill and Sullivans. 
He is a young man of much promise. 



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1LL1 AM I. STEPHEN, farmer, stoek- 
,\/\l: raiser andshipper, resides on section 
{— ■:— ] 2G, Douglas Township, where he is 
the owner of 160 acres of good land, well 
cultivated; he also has 1G0 acres on section 28. 
lie was born in Kendall County, Illinois, |g 
February 5, 1841, a son of William and Mar- 
garet (Waterman) Stephen, the former of j&j 
Scotch, and the latter of German ancestry; \ ; ;- 
they are at present living in Grundy County, : 
Illinois. Wiiliam 1. Stephen grew to the '0 
years of manhood on a farm in his native gg 
county, and has followed agriculture most of (: 
the time through life; was engaged on. jj | 
' : <? Street, Creston, was born in Meade year in a meat-maiket in Creston, in com 



K. ALLEN, dealer in groceries, candies, 
cigars and tobacco, 104 East Unio 



County. Kentucky, in 1820; his father, Will- I puny with II. F. Hamilton. II 



it the 



Allen, was also a native of that State, | start only a team of horses, he commenced as £| 



and his mother, whose maiden name was 
Lydia Richardson, was from the State of New 
York; both were of English ancestry. Having 
been brought up in agricultural pursuits, 
he continued in the same until 1872, 
iu which he succeeded well. In 1872 he 



a renter; rented one farm for thirteen year 
then purchased 720 acres in Adams County, ;*;;*; 
of which he still owns 480 acres. He also • 
manages the old Waterman farm. He feeds 



about 100 cattle. Mr. Stephen was 



name 



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his native county iu 1 SOS, to Miss IlattieA., 

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BIOGRAPHICA L SKE TCIIES. 



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daughter of Lot and Hannah (Kirkland) 

Sehofield,who were among the earliest settlers 
of that county, and are still living. Mr. 
Stephen's father, who came to Chicago as 
early a? 1S37, was also an early settler there. 
Mrs. Stephen was born in 1851. They have 
had eight children, six of whom are living, 
namely — Addie C, Eddie, Harry, Charles, 
Mabel and Willis R. Mr. Stephen was town- 
ship supervisor in Illinois four years, and he 
has held the office of school director, and is at 
present township trustee. Politically he is a 
Republican. Postoffice, Creston. He has 
again formed a partnership with Mr. Hamil- 
ton in the wholesale meat business in Creston 
and Omaha, and contemplates moving to the 
latter city early in 1SS7. 



■v42£0i^SS* 



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• /?] C. LUCAS, dealer in flour, feed, coal 
"• r.l. and agricultural implements, at 212 
''Sf--^' East, Montgomery Street. Creston, 
keeps a well-selected stock of goods and sells 
as low as an}- one in Western Iowa. The 
JJ stand he occupies was located by Lucas & 
:««; Ferguson. The stock comprises about §5,000 
:♦>; worth of goods, the sales amount annually to 
|J>j about §40,000. and freight, §7,000; has sold 
K* §16,000 worth of self-binders alone; keeps 
!♦;;♦; three hands employed constantly, and five a 
!»;;♦: portion of the time. Mr. Lucas was born in 
!♦::♦: Grant County, Kentucky, in 1S-I3, bis par- 
enls being Richard and Elizal cth (Reed) Lucas, 

• •■ natives also of Kentucky and of English de- 
■J*l scent. He grew up to the age of manhood on 
.$*: a Kentucky farm, near Wiliiamstown, and in 
ijj; March, 1862, enlisted in Company E. Eighth 

* *: Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, and in 1S64 re- 

enlisted in the same regiment; but was 

< v afterward transferred to the Fourth Kentucky 

Mounted Infantry, and served till the close of 

". the war. He participated in the battles of 

''' Stone River. Chiekainauga, Laurel Hill and 

-" Lookout Mountain. He was married in Ken- 



tucky in 1S67, to Louesa E. Nix, who wa6 
bom in 1 S 17, in Grant County, Kentucky. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lucas have eight children — 
James R., Ira B, Elfie, Anna E., Charles 
II., Jessie L., Nellie and Everett. -Mr. Lucas 
has been a member of Bunker Hill Lodge, 
No. 302, A. F. & A. M., at Creston, since 186S, 
also of Post No. CI, G.'A. R. He has held 
the offices of school director and township 
trustee. 

r "Y*\ G. WYCOFF, veterinary physician 
. r \ aud surgeon, and surveyor, Creston, 
^jj$j Q has his office at Whitman's feed-yard, 
or on Montgomery Street, his residence being 
at the corner of Birch and Harsh streets. He 
was born in Mercer County, Kentucky, Sep- 
tember 9. 1S33. His parents, Daniel A. and 
Ann ("Wilson) Wycoff, were also natives of 
the " Corncracker " State, and of German an- 
cestry. He was three years of age when his 
father moved to Decatur County. Indiana, 
where they resided until 1S55, our subject 
being brought up to the occupation of farm- 
j ing. From 1S55 to 1S59 he was a resident 
j of Clark County, Illinois; then, until 1861, in 
: Crawford County, same State. At that time 
I he enlisted in the army for the service of his 
■ country, joining Company G, Sixty-third Illi- 
! nois Infantry, and served to the close of the 
i war, four rears, lie was in the battles of 
\ Yicksburg, Missionary Ridge, Allatoona Pass, 
Bentonville, North Carolina, and many others 
of less note — twenty engagements altogether, 
j coming through all without a scratch! The 
same year of the close of the war, namely. 
1S65, Mr. Wycoff was married at Harrods- 
j burg, Kentucky, to Lucy 13. Thompson, who 
! was born near Danville, Boyle C mnty, Ken- 
tucky. They have live children — Thomas. 
David, William, "Minnie, and Maud. Mr. 
I Wvcoff owns eighty acres of land in Lincoln 
Township, section 10. sixty acres of which is 
in a high state of cultivation. He first came 



572 JffSTORr OF UNION COUNTY. 



to Union County in 1865, settling in New 
Hope Township. Has boon practicing the 
veterinary art for about twenty years, includ- 
ing the castration of horses, and has been a 
close student and diligent reader. In politics 
he is a Greenbacker. 



;T WLLIAMMcOAFEERTY, one of the 



1 



J successful agriculturists of Platte 
c^rj Township, residing on section 9, is a 



native of Ohio, born September 7, 1846. his 
parents, Mathias and Mary (Bennett) Mc- 
Cafferty, being natives of the same State and 
of Dutch and Irish ancestry. Our subject 
was reared to agricultural pursuits in the 
State of Iowa, coming to Henry County, Iowa, 
with his parents in 1S49. He was married 
in Henry County, in 1868, to Vashti E. Joy, 
a daughter of James and .Mary Joy, natives 
of Illinois. To them have been born three 
children— Clara, born in 1868, and Harry, 
bom in 18S1, both died in December, 1880; 
and Guy C, born in November, 18S3. Mr. 
McOaflerty came to Union County from 
Henry County in 1S70, and since coming 
here has followed farming and stock-raisin <r 
on his present farm, and has brought his 120 
acres under a good state of cultivation. In 
politics he was formerly a Democrat, but now 
alliliates with the Greenback party. 



0-AMESM.McDOXALD,aprorainentfarm- 
' 6 j er a: 'd stock-raiser of Spaulding Town- 
^ ship, occupies section 10, where he is the 
proprietor of 220 finely cultivated acres. Be- 
sides these he owns 320 acres elsewhere in 
Union County. He is an enterprising and influ- 
ential man, a social gentleman and a reliable 
neighbor and fri nd. He is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, of the Grand Aimv o!' 
the Republic, .-.nd of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. I;, obedience to his c .untrv's call he 



: enlisted in the late war. mustering in Com- 
pany A, One Hundred and Thirteenth Ohio 
Infantry Volunteers, and served two months. 
i He was born in Madison County, Ohio, in 
j 1842, his parents being John and Sallie Mc- 
i Donald, the former a native of Tennessee and 
• the latter of Virginia; the date of the father's 
J birth was December 29, 1S23, and that of the 
j mother October 11, 1805. Mr. McDonald 
j attained the years of manhood in the vocation 
| of agriculture, upon bis father's farm in his 
; native county, and this calling he has ever 
j since successfully followed. It was in the 
: same county in the year 1863, that he entered 
| the state of matrimony, his bride being Miss 
j Lucy With row, daughter of Washington and 
| Catherine (Truman) Withrow, natives re- 
| spoctively of Ohioand New York State; the 
j latter at present reside in Madison County. 
Mrs. McDonald was born in the same county 
in 1846. There are six children of Mr. and 
Mrs. McDonald — E?tella, a teacher; John, 
Edith, Perry, Imogene and Mertelle. 

■"",-■', EAE W. HOWELL, of Afton, is one of 
■ |.,y the most prominent lawyers of Southern 
%X Iowa, and dates his settlement here from 
July 1-i, 1S5S, which was antecedent to that 
of any other lawyer oi' Union County. He 
was born in Athens County, Ohio, June 19, 
183(3. In 1S47 his father, William Howell, 
lemoved with his family to Wapello County, 
this State, purchasing a claim, which he after- 
ward entered and improved. Later he re- 
moved to Decatur City, Decatur County, 
where he died in January, 1859. His wife 
died at Afton, at the home of her son. in 
March, 1870. In 1S53 Mr. Howell returned 
to Athens, and entered the Ohio University, 
where he graduated in 185;'.. He began the 
study of the | g a i profession at Centerville, 
Iowa, in 1857, with Judge Amos Harris, and 
was admitted to the bar in April, 1^.-,^ an j 
came to Afton immediately afterward. His 






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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



573 



entire professional life lias been passed as a 
member of the bar of Union County. Ho lias 
been associated at different times with most 
of the principal lawyers at Afton. llis first 
partnership was with Judge James G. Day, 
now of Des Moines. This relation existed two 
years, when Judge Day removed. In 1866 
he became associated with Judge James W. 
McDill. January 1, 1869, his partner became 
circuit judge, and the partnership terminated. 
He was then associated with D. D. Gregory 
until the latter was elected to the bench in 
JS70. He then remained alone until 1876, 
when J. jVI. Milligan, Esq., became his part- 
ner, which relation continued until 1SS4-, and 
since that time he has been alone. Few men 
are better known throughout Southern Iowa 
than is Judge liowell. His official career has 
extended over a great many years. He was 
elected judge of Union County in 1860, serv- 
ing two years, lie was a member of the 
Twelfth and Thirteenth general assemblies; 
has twice served as mayor of Afton, and was 
member of the School Board fifteen consecu- 
tive years. The professional and official 
career of Judge Rowell is one that the young 
man who is entering upon a business for life, 
professional or otherwise, would be wise to 
imitate. To a thorough knowledge of his pro- 
fession, and an excellent judgment of human 
nature, he adds a genial and kindly disposi- 
tion, with a firmness of purpose that guides 
him in the course he believes to be right. The 
universal esteem in which he is held by -his 
fellow-citizen? attest his influence for the best 
interests of the community. Politically he is 
a decided Republican. Reaching his majority 
about the time the Republican party was 
organized he at once became enrolled in its 
ranks, where he has over since been found. He 
has never missed a regular election, and was 
ever ready in exciting times of the past to de- 
fend the principles of the party of his choice. 
He has from his youth preferred and practiced 
temperance, and has engrafted into his politi- 
cal creed the doctrine of prohibition. Judge 



Rowell was married to Miss Anna E.Ownby, 
daughter of James II. and Allie (Ray) Ownby. 
The former is deceased and the latter lives 
with Judge Rowell. Mrs. Rowell was born in 
Franklin County, Virginia, and about 1848 
removed with her parents to Marion County, 
Iowa, and to Decatur County in 1855. Mr. 
and Mrs. Rowell have four children — 
James TV., Helen, Bessie and Neal C. Their 
ages range from four to twenty-two years. 

■'/vl D. LAPORT, who is associated with 
' I S Ins brother. J. C. Laport, in his farm- 
•-" .°' in^ operations on section J, of Grant 
Township, where they own 160 acres of well- 
cultivated land, is a native of Ohio, born 
November S, 1S42, a son of Charles and Sarah 
(Wallace) Laport, who were both natives of 
the State of Ohio. The father being a farmer, 
our bubject was reared to the same occupa- 
tion, which he lias always followed. He came 
to Iowa in 1S56, an early day, being among 
the pioneers of Union County, where he lo- 
cated in 1875, in which year he settled on the 
farm where he has since resided. He was 
married in 1803, to Miss Nancy Weddle, 
who was born December 11, 1813, a daughter 
of Daniel and Maria (Brown) Weddle, who 
were natives of Pennsylvania. To this union 
were born two daughters named — Margaret 
B. and Sarah M. The Laport brothers, on 
coming to Union County, located on their 
1 present farm which they bought second- 
hand, but which was entirely unimproved. 
■ By hard work and good management they 
! have brought their laud under cultivation, 
j and made a comfortable home, and are uow 
classed among the enterprising and well- 
1 to-do farmers of Grant Township. Both 
I brothers wore soldiers in the war of the 
Rebellion, C. D. enlisting in Company D, 
Eleventh Iowa Infantry. He is now a mem 
berof Henry Keating Post, No. 211, G. A. 
I R., of Afton. J. C. is also a member of the 









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JlISTOitr OF UNION COUA'Tr. 



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same post, lie served hi Company C, Twen- 
ty-third Ohio Infantry. C. D. was wounded 
at the. battle of Shiloh from which lie was dis- 
charged, and came homo. R. WV, another 
brother, served in the Twenty-fourth Iowa 
Infantry, and is now living in St. Joseph, 
Missouri. 




Mary (Magill) Forsyth, father a native of 
New York, of Scotch descent, and mother of 
Pennsylvania, of German ancestry. His 
father immigrated to California in 1S52, and 
died there in 1854, and his mother moved 
with him to Ringgold County, Iowa, where 
he, at the age of nine years, was bound out, 
and immediately placed at work at the car- 
penter's trade, at which he continued until he 
arrived at the age of eighteen years. Then, 
until 1885, belabored in that capacity for the 
Burlington & Missouri Railroad, and was finally 
appointed to his present position, which he 
fills with perfect satisfaction. Indeed, he 
takes uniform pleasure in giving all necessary 
information to strangers, and in accommo- 
dating the patrons of his road in every way 
he can. He is a member of the Odd Fellows 
order, is a Democrat in bis politics, and a 
liberalist in religion. He has a brother in 
Fulton, Illinois, and a sister in Ringgold 
County, Iowa. 

,,;.\IIL PEARSON", of the firm of Carl 
; \ ~ Pearson & Co., cigar and tobacco mer- 
"k-, chants, 111 Adam, street, Creston, was 
born in Sweden, in 1843, and immigrated to 
America in 1869, landing at New York. 
After making atrip through the South, in- 
cluding Texas and Mexico, looking for a loca- 
tion, he settled in Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, and 
remained their eleven years, during which 



time he married Ida Anderson, who was born 
in Sweden, in 3 850. They have three chil- 
dren — Oscar W., Ruth E. and Pearlie L. 
Mr. Pearson is a popular man, clear-beaded 
and well calculated for business, lie owns 
the property where he is doing business, a 
house and lot in Creston. besides 1,280 acres 
of land in Nebraska. He has a remarkable 
relic in his possession, being a pipe of won- 
derful construction, said to have belonged to 
Charles XII. of Sweden. He has refused 
$1,500 fur it. The firm of Pearson & Co. 
keep a good stock of merchandise in their 
line, have ten to fifteen hands constantly em- 
ployed in the manufacture of cigars. They 
are polite and always ready to accommodate 
their customers. 



i 



.. BEYMER, membei of the implement 
firm of R. S. Beymer & Son, is one 
■ \/ of the well-known pioneers of Union 
County having settled in Afton in 185S. He 
was born in Seneca County, Ohio, in 1S35, 
where he grew to manhood. His father, Arthur 
St. Clair Beymer, was a native of Guernsey 
County, Ohio, born in 1S02, and was married 
to Miss Ruth Skinner at New Haven, Ohio, 
in 1S2S. Miss Skinner was born at Mt. 
Vernon, Ohio, in 1S10. They removed to 
Seneca County in 1834, and' in 1S70 came to 
Afton, where Mr. Beymer died two years later. 
His wife is still living at Afton. They had 
ten children, all of whom grew to maturity, 
and all came to Afton except the two eldest 
daughters, who still live in Ohio. R. S. Bey- 
mer was reared to the occupation of a farmer, 
lie was married in 1857 to Lucy Jane Drown, 
daughter of Solomon and Fannie Drown. She 
was born i i Erie County, Pennsylvania, and 
when a child moved with her parents to Ohio. 
Mr. Drown was born in 1789, and in 1820 was 
married to Miss Fannie Dennis, who was his 
second wife. Mr. Drown had seven children by 
his first wife ami ten children by his second 



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quarter-section. But few persons are living 
in Union County that were here when Mr. 
Reish came. Mr. and Mrs. Reish have five 
sons — Benjamin Franklin. Charles, William, 
John and Jacob. They lost a daughter, Nancy 
Margaret, who died at the age of ten years, 
.In politics Mr. 



none of whom bee:unc residents of Union 
County except Mrs. Beymer. Mr. Drown died 
in Seneca County, Ohio, in the sixty-ninth 
year of his age. Mrs. .Drown died in 1SS0, at 
Clyde, Ohio, at the age of seventy-seven years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Beymer have four children — 

Ella, Lotta, Arthur S. and Albert R. The j and a son died in infancy 
eldest daughter was married in 1S7S to A. P. ; Reish is a Democrat 
Cramer, editor and publisher of the Walnut 
News. They had one child — Reuben F. Mrs. 
Cramer became a widow in 18S6. Lotta was 
married to W. J. Phillips, D.D.S., in 1SS5. 
They live at Afton. Politically Mr. Beymer 
is a Republican, and has been identified with 
that party ever since he attained his majority. 
He has served several terms as city council- 
man, and as a member of the School Board. 
He lias been engaged in his present business 
in Afton for the past seventeen years, and 
in the fall of 18S6 took his eldest son as a 



<*; good trade, and for }'cars has been the princi- 

'■ j pal dealer in the town. 

'* ♦; 

>:;♦: :f^" T *T i iAETIN REISH resides on section 7, 

:**: yji)/:\: Union Township, where he setted in 

j»>: ^s^^ke* 1864. He has been a residentof Union j succeeded to the business, which he still cou- 

;^*: County since 1So7. Mr. Reish was born in ! tinues. The parents bad nine children— six 

;*>: Buffalo Valley, Union County, Pennsylvania, ! sons and three daughters, all but two srrew to 



;/ | MANUEL W. LUSTER, of the firm of 
' p Luster,Farley t&Hardenbrook, real estate 
',:-•. dealers, Creston, was born al St. Thomas 
Lower Canada, in 1S24. His father, Samuel 
Luster, was a native of Rutland, Vermont, and 
his mother, Susan (Winters) Luster, was a na- 
tiveof Pennsylvania, His father was left an 
orphan at an early age, and when he had grown 
to maturity he went to Pennsylvania, and 
there met the lady who afterward became his 
wife. Soon after marriage they removed to 
Canada. When Emanuel W. was a year and 
a half old the family removed to Cleveland, 
Ohio, where the parents passed the remainder 
of their days. The father was a tanner and 
currier by trade, and followed that business 
many years. At his death his son Samuel. 



October 12, 1823. When he was ten years 
old his father, Samuel Reish, removed with 
his family to Miami County. Ohio, where he 
grew to manhood, and where his parents re- 
sided until theii decease. In 1853 he wen! to 
Fayette County, Indiana, where he married 
Sarah Billingsley, daughter of Charles Bil- 
lingsley 3 a native of Pennsylvania, lie was 
killed by the kick of a horse when his daugh- 
ter Sarah was a child. She was bom in Mi- 
ami County, Ohio, in 1829. When Mr. Reish 
first came to this county he lived in Jones 
Township, until he settled upon his present 
fai 



maturity, and are still living. The names of 
the children are — Samuel, Emanuel W. , John, 
who died at the age of ten years; Catherine, 
widow of A. Adams, of Cleveland; Welling- 
ton, died at two years of age; George is a 
resident of East Cleveland, and a harness- 
maker by trade; he was a soldier in an Ohio 
regiment in the war of the Rebellion ; Eliza- 
beth, wife of a Mr. Watson; Sanford, a resi- 
dent of Cleveland, who has been for many 
years engaged in the drug business in that 
city, and Harriet, wife of O Crosby, of Cleve- 
land. All are residents of Cleveland, except 
He owns ICO acres of la-id in the ; the subject of this notice, and his early life 
center of section i, forty acres being on each was spent in that city. He served an ap 



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II/STORr OF UNION COUNTT. 



preuticeship with his father in learning the 

tanner's and currier's trade, aud worked at the 
business with his brother-in-law, Thomas T. 
White, for a time. lie then engaged in the 

same business at Painesville, Ohio, where lie 
remained two years, then sold out and went 
to Sandwich, Canada West, near Detroit, 
where he took charge of a tannery owned by 
James Woodbridge. lie remained at this 
place two years, then removed to Kiugsvillc, 
Canada, and kept a hotel two years, lie 
then purchased a hotel at Unionville, Essex 
Comity, Canada, which lie fitted up and con- 
ducted "three years and exchanged it for a 
farm. A year later he sold his farm and 
rented a large hotel at Windsor, and in an- 
other returned to 01) io. He purchased a 
farm in Cuyahoga County, near Cleveland, 
where he lived for a time, then sold out and 
lived in North Amherst two years. In 1804" 
Mr. Luster immigrated with his family to 
Cedar County, Iowa, vrlici-o ho ggrc'uased a 
farm and was also engaged in buying and 
shipping stock. He lived there until he came 
to Creston in 1875. lie was married in Ohio 
to Ellen C. White, a native of Erie County, 
New York, born July 17. 1824. Her father, 
Thomas White, died before his daughter was 
born. Mr. and Mrs. Luster have two chil- 
dren — Emanuel T. and Ellen C. Mr. Luster 
is the street commissioner of Creston, and is 
now serving his sixth term in that capacity. 
Politically he is a Republican. Mr. Luster's 
mother never married after the death of her 
husband, and lived in Ohio until her death. 
She had seven children and all but one are 
living. 

-* •-st3*5^*'<«*«?-' 1- 

: m K. BOUSLOUGH, proprietor of a liv- 
'",. ; N ery, feed and transfer stable, south 
■t'—-.q gj.ie f Adams street, Creston, keeps 
a full stock of horses and buggies, and waits 
upon his customers with a great deal of pleas- 
ure. He was bora in Blair County, Penn- 



sylvania, in 1S52, and the family moved, with 
him, when he was young, to La Salle County, 
Illinois, where, he remained until 1S81, when 
he came to Creston. He opened his present 
business in 18S3. 

§C. WALLACE, a prominent farmer and 
stock -raiser, resides on section 26, 
55J, Q Douglas Township, where he owns 160 
well-cultivated acres, a fine residence, a barn, 
etc. lie was born in Philadelphia on Aug- 
ust. 3, 1S3G. His parents, William B. and 
Charlotte (Wunder) Wallace, were also na- 
tives of that city. The former died in 1S04, 
at the age of sixty-live years, and the latter is 
still living at Sandwich, Illinois. In his boy- 
hood and youth Mr. Wallace worked with 
his father in Philadelphia, at the stone- 
potter's trade. His father was in e?.rij r life 
a farmer, and afterward a potter. He was 
the first steel-crucible maker in America. 
Going to England he started a plumbago- 
crucible, which met with great success, it 
being the first of the kind in Europe. Al- 
though inducements were offered him to 
remain there, he. having filled his contract, 
returned to Jersey City two years, then to 
Philadelphia, where he became a partner with 
Hussey & Co., the largest steel firm in the 
United States. Our subject subsequently 
took his father's place, followed the business 
for six years, then, after being out of business 
1 a year, he came West, in 1S77, locating upon 
I his present farm, which at that time had but 
I little improvement upon it. The same year 
I he built a house, at a cost of $3,000, besides 
I a barn. Costing $300, and other structures. 
! Mr.Wallace was married in 1859,in Illinois, to 
Amanda C. Waterman. who was born in LaSalle 
i County, that State, in 1841. By that marriage 
there were three children — Frederick G., 
James L. and Lovina A. Mrs. Wallace died 
| October 3, 1865, and Mr. Wallace was again 
married in Pittsburg, in 18C6, to Miss Isa- 



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mOuRAPUICAl. Sh ETCHES. 



.* «! 



holla W., a daughter of Samuel and Jane 
Baird; she was born in that city in 1S41. The 
children by this marriage arc two in number 
— Samuel E. and Lottie L. Mr. Wallace 
has been township trustee, and in politics 
he is a Republican. His father had eight 
children, six of whom are living. His grand- 
father Wallace was a soldier in the war of 
1812. Postofflce, Creston. 

/^T A. JOHNSON, fanner and stock-raiser, 
"% resides on the northwest quarter of sec- 
V;^ ° tion 1, Spaulding Township, where, ho 
owns 160 acres of land in good cultivation. 
He was born in Sweden, in 1S43, son of Alex- 
ander and Sarah Johnson, natives also of 
that country, and still living with the subject 
of this sketch. They immigrated to this country 
in 1S49, settling in Andovtr, Heury County, 
Illinois; from there, in 1852, the} - removed 
to Burlington, Iowa. In 1855, J. A. Johnson, 
the subject of this notice, went to Minnesota, 
entered and improved a piece of land, remain- 
ing upon il eight years. In 1SG2 he enlisted 
in Company H, Ninth Minnesota Infantry, 
and served three years, participating in 
battles in defense of his own State against 
the Indians one year. Then he went clown 
the river to Memphis, and was engaged in 
the battles of Guntown and Tupelo, and from 
there to New Orleans. Mobile, Blakely, 
Spanish Fort, Montgomery, etc., an 1 "bush- 
whacking" and foraging through Missouri, 
and finally to St. Anthony, Minnesota, where 
he was mustered out. At that time his father 
was living in Galesburg, Illinois. Mr. John- 
son was married in 186S, in Jefferson County, 
Iowa, to Louisa Munson, who was born in 
Sweden, in 1843. They have had five chil- 
dren, three of whom are living — Minnie S., 
Charles A. and Sarah E. Mr. Johnson has 
b •■ ii school director, supervisor, school trus- 
tee, etc. Politically, a Republican, and 
religiously, a member oi the Methodist Epis- 



| copal church, being on o of the trustees, and 
also cne of the principal men to establish the 
society herein Spaulding Township; is active 
in religious and benevolent enterprises. 



•**>- 



-o^J*- 



j "■■ ILLI AM FLO [IRA, fanner and stock- 
: , \j yl raiser, resides on section 14, Pleasant 
r^ir-I Township, where he owns 400 acres 
of land, constituting a valuable farm, lie is 
well and comfortably settled in life, and 
considered one of the mo.^t enterprising agri- 
culturists of the township, possessing the con- 
fidence of the people. In his political views he 
is a Democrat. He is the son of Frank and 
Mary Flohra, was born in Germany, in 1828, 
immigrated to California in 1S55, lived there 
ten years, then was a resident nine and a half 
years in the State of New York, when he 
came to Union County and purchased land 
where he now resides. He was married in 
1SCS, to Lotiisa Dvehrt, also a native of Ger- 
many, who died the next year, leaving one 
i child — Samuel. In 1S71 Mr. Flohra married 
j Sarah Walters, a native of Pennsylvania, and 
| by this marriage there are seven children — 
| Anna, Louisa, William, Cora, Albert, Edward 
• and Laura. Mr. Flohra remained at home 
with his parents till of age, learning the prin- 
I ciples of fanning, which has been the occn- 
i pation of his life. 






' , J ALMA DAVENPORT, a prominent 
;! member of the Union County bar, has 
— been a resident of Afton since 1S75. 
He. was born in DeWitt County, Illinois, 
July 23, 1S53. His father, Levi Davenport, 
was born in Albany, New York, in 1812. 
He was a minister of the Gospel, and for sev- 
eral years traveled in the South in that capac- 
ity. About J $45 he located in DeWitt 
County. His mother, Mary F. (Ilutchins) 
Davenport, was born in Butler County, Ohio, 



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5S0 



HISTOID' OF UX/OX COUNT)'. 



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in ISIS. Ho was educated at the Wcsleyan 
University at Bloomington, Iowa, and was 
engaged in teaching for sonic time, beginning 

at the age of sixteen years. He studied law 
and was admitted to the bar at Ottawa, Illi- 
nois, February 25, 1S75. coming to Afton 
soon after, and entering the office of McDill 
and Sullivan. He attended to the collections 
of this firm, an experience which has proved 
of great value to him. He has been in inde- 
pendent practice since 1SS0, and has a good, 
lucrative practice. His ofliee is in the bank 
building at Afton. He has a complete set of 
abstract books, and is president of the Union 
County Abstract Incorporation. In politics 
he a Democrat, and he has held the office of 
justice of the peace six years. Mr. Davenport 
was married in 1879, to Miss Belle Howard, 
a native of Illinois, and they have three chil- 
dren — Carl, Kenneth and Ora. 









JJSfRANKLIN ARMSTRONG, one of the 

| |"i practical farmers of Dodge Township, 



a half later, and in 1S65 came to Union County. 
He went to Texas in the fall of 1875, return- 
ing to Union County in the spring of 1S7S, 
where he has since been engaged in farming 
and stock-raising. He was reared a farmer 
and has always followed that avocation, in 
which he has met with good success, and is 
now the owner of 240 acres of choice land 
where he resides. He. is one of the public- 
spirited citizens of Dodge Township, and 
served his township efficiently as trustee and 
school treasurer. He is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity. 

^ffsENRY W. LEWIS, business manager of 
:Gf\ the Creston daily and weekly Gazette, is 
^§y? a native of Muscatine County, Iowa. He 
is the son of Clark and Rachel (Wright) 
T,ewis, who were Ohioans by birth, and came 
in an early clay to Muscitine County, where 
their parents were pioneers. They were mar- 
ried, and still live in that county near West 
Liberty. Mr. Lewis has at different times 
farmed and kept hotel, and is now retired. 



"-^- living on section 23, is a native of Their family includes four children — Belle, 
Augusta County, born July 4, 1830, a son of now Mrs. J. W. McElravy, of West Liberty; 






William Armstrong who is now living in 
Kansas. Our subject accompanied his par- 
ents to Morgan County, Indiana, in 1842, and 
there he attended school in the rude log- 
cabin school-house of his neighborhood with 



Nellie, now Mrs. F. W. Halderman, of Avoca; 
• Henry W., subject of this sketch, and Fannie, 
now Mrs. Charles Keith, of Des Moines. 
Henry W. was born on the farm near West 
Liberty, March 7, 1S57, and resided with his 



its slab sea's, stick and mud chimney and , parents until nineteen years old, attending 

puncheon floor, and in this building he re- i school the greater part of the time. He 

ceived the rudiments of an education. He I studied for some years in the city schools of 

was married in 1851, to Miss Mary A. j West Liberty. In 1S76 he entered the Jinter - 

Bowles, a daughter of John Bowles, deceased, prise office in that city, where he served an 

and of the ten children born to them six are | apprenticeship of three years at the printer's 

still living — William, Fran!:, Harvey, Au- ! trade. He remained in that office altogether 



gusta, Iluldah and Flora. They have a grand- 
child named Maggie living with them, whom 
they have adopted. In the spring of 1 S55 Mr. 
Armstrong removed from Indiana with his 
family to Madison County, Iowa. Iii l v .> he 
wenl in Arkansas, returning to Iowa ayeai and 



six years, the latter portion of the time as 
manager of the office. In 1833 he went to 
Iowa City, and was employed as telegraph 
editor and foreman of the Iowa City Repub- 
lican. In March, 18S5, he came to Creston, 
where he has sine- filled the position of busi- 



■'.<■'..-■ ... .V.....V..-.-..-'.'.-; 









BIOGRAPHICAL SKE TCI IBS. 



ness manager of the Gazette. He was 
married October 27, 18S0, near Atalissa, 
Muscatine County, to Miss Ida L. Rowe, 
daughter of Dr. D. L. Rowe. They have two 
children — Leigh K. and Alta B. Mr. Lewis 
is politically a Republican. He is active and 
careful in business matters, and has a genial 
manner and sunny disposition that ensure 
him a host of friends. 



t»ARK BLANC HARD, formerly a 
"'-. \\j v- sheriff of Union County, is one of the 
'•*- ~"tt- early settlers of Creston, coming to 
this place early in March, 1875. lie was 
born in Peacham, Caledonia County, Ver- 
mont, in 1821. His parents, Hazen and Sarah 
Blanchard, were also natives of the Green 
Mountain Stale, and lived in Caledonia 
Ocmntv until their decease. They had seven 
children — two sons and five daughters, all of 
whom are still living except Eliza. Mercy 
and Harriet reside in Peacham, Vermont; 
Sarah, in Rome. New York; Chandler E., in 
Lincoln, Nebraska; Isabelle, in Malcoin, 
Iowa. The subject of this sketch was the 
elder son and third child of his parents. He 
remained at home until twenty-two years of 
age, when he engaged in railroading on the 
Vermont Central & Passumpsic Railroad, 
where he continued four years. In 1850 he 
went to California, via Yanderbilt line, where 
he was engaged in mining. In 1854 he re- 
turned to Vermont, and toon afterward came 
West, settling at Osceola, Stark County, Illi- 
nois, where he was engaged in farming. In 
1875 he came to Creston and purchased 210 
acres of land in Spaulding Township, and the 
same amount in Douglas Township, all of 
which he improved. He also obtained 160 
acre.-; in Guthrie. He still owns the land 
above mentioned, but his residence lias been 
in Creston ever since he came to this county. 
His fine residence on Sycamore street he built 
in 1875, being the third house erected in 



Devoe's first addition. In the autumn oi 
1SS1 Mr. Blanchard was elected sheriff of 
Union County, and served in that capacity 
two terms, four years. He was the first 
Democrat ever elected to a county office in 
this county. lie was married in Vermont to 
Harriet Partridge, a native also of Peacham. 
His f, unity consists of five children, four of 
whom are living. The eldest son, MellenF., 
married Jennie Davis, of Bradford, Illinois. 
His family consists of three children — two 
sons and a daughter. lie resides in St. Paul, 
Nebraska; is engaged in stock-raising. J. 
Burton, the second son, married .Mary Booth 
(now deceased), in Stuart, Iowa. His family 
consists of three daughters. He is a resident 
of Omaha, Nebraska, engaged in stock com- 
mission business. Allie K. was married in 
Osceola, Illinois, to A. B. Hall, now a stock- 
shipper of Creston, Iowa. The}' have three 
daughters. Eugene H., died in Stuart, Iowa, 
August 18, 1883, twenty-five years of age, un- 
married. Onie B. was married to Craig Arm- 
strong, a machinist, and resides in Creston, 
Iowa. They have had one son, deceased. 



/-TAMES H. WALLACE resides on the 
".'.' I '•South Hill" addition to Creston, where 
"rf he located in July, 1SS2. At that time 
he built his residence and commenced plant- 
ing a nursery. He now has sixty-three acres 
included in his nursery grounds, the whole of 
which he intends to keep occupied with a 
general nursery stock. Forty acres are now- 
occupied and the remainder is being pre- 
pared for that purpi se. A full description of 
the grounds and stock would be impossible; 
but a brief mention is here given: He has 
one block of 65.000 oi' the various kinds of 
apple tiecs two years old, which were planted 
in the spring of 1885; also another block i t' 
1,000 apple trees of three years' growth, this 
block having been planted in 1883. This 
block als ■ (' ntains a. large number of box 



, ■ - 



5S& HISTORr OF UNION COUNT 1". 



older, white ;isb, evergreens, etc, lie has 
another block of 65,000 yearling?, and a block 
of, six acres of grouud that contains 115,000 
trees planted in 1SS5. His nursery' contains 
a great variety of small fruits of the most ap- 
proved kinds. His stock is in a remarkably 
fine condition, and his grounds everywhere 
indicate taste andj industry in their culture. 
Mr. Wallace was born in Canada, in Septem- 
ber, 1839. At the age of twenty years he 
went to the State of Illinois, and five years 
later returned to Canada and engaged as a 
traveling salesman for Thomas McCormick, 
of London, Canada, in the sale of sugar and 
confectionery. lie then returned to Illinois, 
and three years later came to Union Count}', 
where he purchased a farm in Douglas Town- 
ship, which he still owns. lie was a suc- 
cessful fanner, and is well adapted to the 
enterprise in which he is engaged. He was 
married in Illinois to Miss Mary- A Compter), 
a native of Kendall County, and they have 
one daughter— Ada May. 

li^ENRY VINCENT, section 35, High- 



To them have been hoi n two children — George 
II. and Ella M. George married Ida Leech, 
and lives in Grant Township, lie has two 
children— Earl and Glee. Mr. Vincent is a 
public-spirited, influential citizen of the 
county, and is always among the first to give 
assistance to any enterprise of benefit to either 
the social or material welfare of his township. 
Mrs. Vincent is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



| \ M. NOETON, M. D. 5 proprietor of the 

- ; .'|7i) drug store at Kent, and also engaged 
rri.'.k ° in dealing in grain, is one of the active 
and enterprising men of Union County, with 
whose interests he has been identified since 
1873. He is a native of Ohio, born Decem- 
ber 12, 1833, a son of Edwin and Louisa 
(Yv'elis) Norton, who were born in Connecti- 
cut, both being now deceased. He was reared 
at his birth [dace till seventeen years of age, 
and the two years following he was employed 
on a sailing vessel. He then began learning 
engineering, which be followed for three 
years, by which time, 1S55, he had saved 
U land Township, is a native of England, | enough monej' to enable him to attend med- 
ical lectures. In 1862 he located in Illinois, 



*&M born in Lincolnshire. August 19, 1S19, ! 
a son of John Vincent, a native of Norfolk- i 
shire. He was reared in his native country, 
and came to the United States in ISiS. He j 
lived in Franklin County, Ohio, until 1S50, ! 
when he moved to St. Joseph County, Indiana, | 
and in 1859 came to Iowa, and located in Un- 
ion County, on the land which is now his farm. ! 
It was then wholly unimproved, but he has 
planted groves, erected fine buildings, and in 
other way; improved it until he now has one 
of the pleasantest homes in the county, lie 
has been a hard-workinsr man. and has 



remaining there two years, when he came to 
Iowa, and a year later returned to Illinois. 
He remained in that State till 1S73, when he 
again came to Iowa, locating at Creston, 
Union County, where he was engaged in 
practicing medicine. After Kent became in- 
corporated as a town he came to this place, 
where he established the pioneer drug store, 
and at the same time engaged in the grain 
business, lie still practices medicine, and 
during his residence here has built up a large 
and lucrative practice, being well skilled in 



••■«■■ ' acquired his property by economy and good his chosen profession. Dr. Norton has been 

twice married, taking for his first wife Miss 
Sela Benton, by whom lie had two children — 
Luella and Charles. He was married a second 
time to Miss Belle Paaers, a native of Ken- 



management. His farm contains 220 acres 
of choice land, and in addition to this he has 
given his son 120 acres. Mr. Vincent was 
married in Indiana., in I85i, to Anna Wray. 

.... . . . . 



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tucky, and to this union lias been born one 
child. The doctor has filled the office of 
county supervisor, in which lie lias served 

with credit to himself and to the satisfaction 
of his constituents. 

^(QUIRE OLINGER, a prominent farmer 
'IfljaJ :u) d stock-raiser, residing on section 3 of 
'v>- Pleasant Township, where lie owns 525 
acres of well-cultivated land, was born in 
Henry County, Indiana, in 1842. His par- 
ents, Phillip and Mariah (Felteubarger) 
Olinger, were from Pennsylvania, lie was 
brought up to manhood on a farm in his 
native county, and lias ever since followed his 
inherited calling. His farm Is one of the best 
in the county. He stands high in his commu- 
nity, having been elected to the office of county 
supervisor three years, justice of the peace, 
township assessor, township clerk, etc., and is 
a member of Concordia Lodge, No. 215, A. F. 
& A. M. and Ilopeviile Lodge, No. 306, I. 0. 
O. F. Postoffiee, Thayer. He was married in 
Indiana to Susan Reasoner, a native of that 
State, and they became the parents of four 
children — Charles, John, William and Pen- 
ton. Mrs. Olinger died in 1879, and Mr. 
Olinger, for a second wife, married Caroline 
McKimpson. They are the parents of one 
child — Clarence. Squire Olinger has resided 
in Union County for fifteen years. 

•"aEXEY C. NEIS, farmer and stock-raiser, 
., j | Dodge Township, residing on section 
% t 19, is a native of Hesse- Darmstadt, Ger- 
many, born March 13, 1844. His father. 
Simon Neis, who was also a native of the 
same place, brought his family to America 
in 1851, and first located in Bureau County, 
Illinois. In 1854 he removed to La Salle 
County, Illinois, remaining there till 1856. He 
then went to Lee County, Illinois, and in 
1866 removed to] Livingston County, .Mis- 



souri, where he lived till his death, in 1879. 
Henry C. Neis grew to manhood in Lee 
County, remaining there till March, 1S84. 
He was married in June, 1S65, to Miss Eliza- 
beth Weber, a daughter of Adam Weber, who 
is deceased. Eleven children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Xcis, of whom eight still 
survive — Philip, Henry, Katie, John, Lena, 
George, Theresa and Dora. In March, 1S84, 
Mr. Neis came to Union County, Iowa, and 
soon alter settled on his present farm, where 
he has 320 acres of choice land. He has an 
imported thoroughbred Norman horse weigh- 
ing 1,800 lbs., whose sire took the first medal 
at the Paris Centennial Exposition in 1S7S, 
and also the first prize at St. Louis in 1SS0. 
In his religious faith Mr. J\ T eis is a Roman 
Catholic. 

3$ffiM K. BALL, architect, was born in 
% l'A-V/1 Chautauqua County, New York, 
h~vvp May 10, 1830, of parents who were 
natives of New Hampshire. His life up to 
the age. of seventeen years was passed on the 
home farm and at school, after which he 
learned the trade of house carpenter, and for 
several years followed this occupation. He 
moved to Rockford, Illinois, in 1855, where, 
by an unfortunate fall from a building, he was 
seriously injured and crippled, and after a 
partial recovery he entered the architectural 
office of Stroup & House, where he developed 
a taste for drawing and planning, and for 
many years was occupied in contracting and 
building at various towns in Northern Illi- 
nois. In 1S69, having planned a prominent 
building for Selma, Alabama, he went there 
to superintend its construction, and finding a 
demand for architectural work remained 
South until 1S75, and was occupied in re- 
building Si lma and other adjoining towns 
which were destroyed during the war; the 
I. t building upon which he was engaged 
there being the court-house and jail, at Bir- 



, 



■ : 

• ■ ■ . - 



■ 



584 



IIISTOUr Oh UNION COUNTY. 



mingham, Alabama. The panic of 1S73 having 
paralyzed the iron interest, and building im- 
provements not being in demand, ho came to 
Iowa, and located in Crcston, in 1875. where 

he has planned and superintended the build- 
ing of most of the prominent buildings in 
Creston and adjoining towns in this section 
of Iowa. lie was married in March, 1S60, 
to Miss Emily C. Lane, of Bristol, Illinois. 
They have two children — Frank D., who is 
cashier of the First National Bank of Creston, 
and Fred E., who is an employe of the same 
institution. 



HJ[EORGE W. HART, farmer and stock- 
W$tf raiser, section S, Dodge Township, was 
"^jri born in Cumberland County, Illinois, 
December 31. 1844, a sou of William Hart, 
who was a native of Pennsylvania. The par- 
ents uimu wilii thuur Tauiii) to Iowa j:i ioji, 
and settled in] 'Wapello County, where the 
father died in the fall of 1855. The mother 
came to Union County in 1SG0, making her 
home in New Hope Township. George W. 
Hart was a mere boy when he was brought by 
his parents to Iowa, and in this State he was 
reared on a farm, receiving his education in 
the common and graded schools of Ottumwa, 
"Wapello County. He enlisted in the late war 
of the Rebellion in Company I, Fourth Iowa 
Cavalry, and participated in a number of en- 
gagements, including battles of Vicksburg, 
Selma, Ebenezer Church and Columbus, re- 
maining in the service three years and nine 
months. lie was married December 31, 
1863, to Miss Rebecca E. Tresler, a daughter 
of James Tresler, who is deceased. Six of the 
nine children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hart are 
living, their names being — John M.. Charles 
E.. Alice A., Ella J., George W., and Ruth. 
Mr. Hart came to Dodge Township in the 
spring of 1S70, where he Las since made his 
home, bavin.; now a tine farm containing 375 
acres of well-cultivated land. Since coming 



to Dodge Township Mr. Hart has served ac- 
ceptably as trustee, beside holding other local 
offices. He. is a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. 



^i2*-3<?J<:— »ffS<5-»- 



3fcLEWELLYN RAGUET wa 

■jMt Urbana, Champaign County, 



; born in 
Ohio, Julv 
20, 1829. His father, James Raguet, 
was a native of New Jersey, and a sou of 
Francis Raguet, who was born in France, and 
came to America during the Revolutionary 
war, serving as a Surgeon in the American 
army, and settled in New Jersey. James 
Raguet settled in Ohio early in life, remain- 
ing there until his decease. The mother of 
our subject was born in Virginia, He was 
the fourth of a family of live children. He 
was reared in his native village, and received 
as good an education as the select schools of 
the town afforded, the public school system 
up I Laying been established. Early in life he 
conceived the idea of obtaining a military 
education, and at the age of sixteen years an 
application was made through Senator Vance, 
of Ohio, for his admission to the military 
school at West Point as a cadet; but before 
the time necessary to accomplish this result 
had expired, the war with Mexico broke out, 
and, through the influence of Senator Vance, 
he was appointed by President Polk to a 
Lieutenancy in a regiment of Mounted Rifles. 
He was probably the youngest commissioned 
officer in the United States Array. He pro- 
ceeded to Mexico with his regiment, and par- 
ticipated in the. bombardment of Vera Cruz 
and in the battle of Cerro Gordo. About 
this time, for reasons sufficient to justify his 
cause, he tendered his resignation, which was 
accepted, and he returned home. Put his 
aspirations had not yet been fully realized. 
March 17, 184S,Le again entered the army as 
Orderly-Sergeant of the Fifth United States 
Infantry, and proceeded with his regiment to 
Vera Cruz; but there he learned of the capt- 
ure of the City of Mexico by the army under 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



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General kjcott. The close of the war imme- 
diately followed that event, and Mr. Raguet 
again returned to his home in Ohio. He now 

turned 'his attention to the printing and pub- 
lishing business, and assisted in establishing 
The National, a weekly publication, at Mt. 
Vernon, Ohio. lie continued to reside in 
Ohio until 1S5S, when he came to Iowa and 
established a paper, known as the Corning 
Sentinel, at Corning, Adams County. The 
history of the Afton Reveille, established 03- 
Mr. Raguet, which was devoted to the up- 
building of the material interests of Union 

. County, will be found elsewhere in this work, 
lie established the Boone County Democrat, 
which he published three years, then returned 

, to Afton and engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness in which he still continues. Of him it 
may be said, that, as a newspaper man, he was 
a forcible, able and independent writer, and 
his paper, the Reveille, did much toward 
promoting the interests of his county. As a 
citizen, he is wide-awake and public-spirited, 
and prompt to endorse any enterprise he be- 
lieves is for the best interests of the people. 
In politics he is aDemocrafof the Jacksonian 
type; religiously his church would include all 
who strive to do their duty as they see it, in- 
dependent of creeds and doctrines. In natural 
ability he is much beyond the average. Mrs. 
Raguet was formerly Miss Carrie lladley, a 
native of Ohio. They have three children — 
Ella, Mrs. Carrie Ticks and Sadie May 
Class. Two sons died in infancy. 






-«- 



reared to manhood in Ins native Sfate, and 
was there married, in April, 1S57j to Miss 
Sarah Westler, a daughter of d seph Westler, 
who is now-living in Cass County, Indiana. 
Eight children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Haynes, six still living, named Alice 
M., Ida E., .Mary V., Walter E., Nellie E. 
and Daisy M. Mr. Haynes settled in Preble 
County, Ohio, in 1861, remaining there till 
1S6S, when he removed to Peoria County, 
Illinois. Lie came to Union County, Iowa, 
in lS7d, and has since made his home in 
Lincoln Township, where he owns a flue farm, 
which contains 10O acres of land under cul- 
tivation. Mr. Haynes is one of the active and 
public-spirited citizens of his township, and 
takes an interest in every enterprise which he 
deems of public benefit. He has served as 
justice of the peace one term, to the satisfac- 
tion of his constituents. 



% 1 

Sic 



; | &OSES E. HAYNES, an enterprising 
\j l' farmer and stock-raiser of Lincoh 
^~-^ Town-hip. living on section ?,, was j he possesses by 
born in Frederick County, Maryland, May 9, member of the Free-Will Paptist church for 

tidily years, and for a portion of the time a 



\ E. WIDGER, a farmer and stock-raiser 
of Douglas Township, resides on sec- 
tion 17, where he owns 120 acres of 
land, all under cultivation. He was born in 
Ohio, in 1S33, the son of Charles P. and Sarah 
(Jennings) Widger. of Scotch and English 
ancestry. He was eight years of age when 
his parents immigrated with him to this 
country, first residing in Fulton County, Illi- 
nois, for live years, and then removed to Van 
Buren County, Iowa. Mr, Widger, who was 
brought up to the vocation of agriculture, 
lived in Illinois twenty years, and then, in 
1875, came to Union County, settling upon 
his present place, which was known as the 
"Old Lytic Farm. 1 ' Here he has mode all 
<>wn efforts. He was a 



'^■'■•■1, his father being a native of Washing- 
ton Count}*, Maryland. The father of our 
subject was a mechanic, and he learned the 
cooper's trade when a young man, which ho 
followed till thirty years of age. He was 



"local minister " of the same; but he is now a 
minister in the Congregational church, to 
which denomination Mrs. Widger also be- 
lougs. Mr. Widger is considered a consistent 



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HISTORY OF UNION COUNT1'. 



man, practicing what lie preaches. As to 
local ofliccs, he has served as school director. 
He was married in Fulton County, Illinois, 
in 1S57, to Phebe Morris, who was born in 
Pennsylvania, in 1830, the daughter of' 
Mordecai and Susanna Morris, natives of x\ew 
Jersey and Maryland respectively. They 
have seven children — William 11.; Susan, 
wife of Edward Stalker, has three chil- 
dren — Charles E., Jennie M. and James 1L; 
Clara, now the wife of William Kinkade, 
has three children — Amanda A., Elmer 
E. and Harvey W.; the other children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Widger are— Charles M., Alice, 
Eva and Asa C. Postoffice, Cromwell. 

i^.AVID WOOLEY is one of the pioneers 
'/, V'-jJ of Creston, having settled here January 
%fjf 15,1870. He purchased lots and erected 
be\oiiu buildings, which he siiil owns anu 
rents. He has not been engaged in any gen- 
eral business, preferring to lend his money 
rather than engage in more active business. 
Mr. Wooley was born in Ripley County, In- 
diana, in 1S24. His father, James Wooley, 
moved to Jefferson County when David was 
eight years old. In I860 he came to Mt. 
Pleasant, Iowa, thence to Creston. William 
Wooley, an elder brother, came to Iowa in 
1843, and settled in Washington County, 
where he died July 3, 1885. Our subject is 
now the only representative of his father's 
family residing in Iowa. He is unmarried. 

- P. JOSEPH T. BEEPE, of Aftou, was 

fborn in Knox County, Ohio, June 27, 
1821, son of John and Elizabeth (Tal- 
mage) Eeebe. His early life was passed in 
working upon his father's farm during the 
summer and in attending school during the 
winter. "When seventeen years of age he be- 
came a student of De Witt Academy, where 



he remained about seven months, and from 
that time lie turned his attention to farming 
dining the summer and teaching in winter, 
beginning, also, a preparatory course in the 
study of medicine. He subsequently read 
medicine in the office with Dr. Page, of Del- 
aware County, Iowa, with whom he remained 
until 1843, when he went to Cincinnati as a 
student at the Ohio Medical College of that 
city. Upon completing his course at the col- 
lege, he removed to Columbia City, Indiana, 
where he entered upon the practice of his 
profession. When he left Cincinnati he owed 
S50 tuition fee. He traveled to St. Mary's 
by stage, from which place, with less than S3 
in his pocket, he began his walk to Columbia 
City. When he reached his destination, a 
distance of sixty miles, his finances had be- 
come reduced to 31 cents, and ho was a total 
stranger to all. He stopped at a hotel, and 
the next day he made the acquaintance, of 
one or two brother Methodists, to whom he 
expressed the desire to settle in the place and 
practice his profession, but said nothing of 
his financial embarrassment. Receiving en- 
couragement from them he returned to the 
hotel and then started for the home of a 
cousin by marriage, living about twenty-five 
miles distant. He spent 25 cents of his capi- 
tal for food, and begged his last meal at a 
farm house. He finally reached the home of 
his cousin, to whom he related bis story. The 
cousin kindly furnished him with a horse and 
$10 in money, and after resting a da) or two, 
he rode back to the hotel. He continued to 
board at the hotel, and at once commenced a 
lucrative practice. This was in March, 1S15. 
The following November he returned to Knox 
County, Ohio, where he remained four weeks, 
and in the meantime married Miss Philena 
Ilelt, of Sparta. Her father removed then to 
Columbia City, and the young couple imme- 
diately began housekeeping. They remained 
here until 1S47, when Mrs. Beebe's health 
failed and they decided to remove to Mt. 
Gilead, where the doctor bought property and 



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liJOGJi. l/\'/J CA L SKIS- TCIIES. 



■587 



commenced practice. He remained at this 
place seventeen years, during which time they 
had born to t'uem two sons and a daughter. 
Though enjoying a good practice at Alt. 
Gilead, the doctor decided to situate himself 
so as to advance the interests of his children, 
and with this end in view, lie, with seven 
other families, determined to go to Iowa. 
They were thirty-two days on the road, camp- 
ing out at night. Afton was then 100 miles 
from any railroad. The doctor purchased 200 
acres of land near xVfton, which he commenced 
at once to improve. In January, 1865, he 
bought a half interest in the drug store of Dr. 
Roberts at Afton, and later he purchased the 
remaining interest of Dr. Roberts. In the 
spring of I860 he had built and occupied his 
new home on the farm, intending to retire 
from medical practice, having sold the drug 
store the preceding winter. In the following 
October he had an opportunity to sell his 
farm advantageously. lie improved the 
opportunity and removed to Brookficld, a divi- 
sion station on the Hannibal & St. Joe Kail- 
road. Then he engaged in the drug business 
again with his former partner, Dr. Roberts, 
and also resumed his practice. In 1S63 he 
returned to Afton, bought out a drug store, 
built a residence, and erected a business 
block. At the breaking out of the civil war 
Dr. Beebe was among the first to enlist as a 
private; but he -was soon detached from the 
ranks and placed on the medical staff. In 
Ma} T , 1875, it was largely through his efforts 
that the First National Bank of Afton was 
organized, and in January, 1876, he was made 
its president, and was re-elected the following 
year. He has several times been elected to 
the city council, and has always taken a deep 
interest in the cause of popular education. 
He is an active member of the Methodist, 
church. Himself and wife have been mem- 
bers forty years. Dr. Beebe is the present 
mayor of Afton, and has held that position 
several years. Dv. and Mrs. Beebe have 
three children — Lyman C. is a traveling 



salesmen for the II. P. Clark Drug Company, 
of Omaha. J". Wilbur owns the city bakery 
at North Platte, Nebraska. The eldest. Li- 
vonia, is the wife of I. N. Rice, a dealer in 
music.il instruments at Des Moines. Dr. 
Beebe's father, John Beebe, was born in New 
London, Connecticut, and removed from Ohio 
to the State of New York in 1S17. He lived 
in Ohio until his death, which occurred in 
1S57. His wife died at Afton in ISO". 
There were five children in the family, three 
sons and two daughters, of whom the doctor 
was the eldest. John Helt, the father of 
Mrs. Beebe, was one of the first settlers of 
Bloomfield Township, Knox County, Ohio. 
After the death of his first wife he re-married, 
and the lady whom he married became the 
mother of Mrs. Beebe. He lived in Knox 
County at the time of his death, although he 
had passed one year at Afton and vicinity 
with his children; but he. returned to his old 
home in Ohio to die. 

~ *«M~— 

ff||ERRY W. MILLER, section 35, Grant 
■ !■'» Township, was bom in Muscatine, Iowa, 
%£ December 23, 1854, a son of John H. 
Miller. His father was born in Pennsylvania 
in 1S00, and in 1836 immigrated to Muscatine. 
Iowa, being one of the pioneers of the State. 
His daughter Mary (now Mrs. Cross) was the 
first white child born in Muscatine. Perry 
W. was reared and educated in his native 
town, and after leaving school taught eight 
years, four years being in Harrison County, 
Missouri, and four years in Union County. 
Iowa. He came to Union County in 1 76, 
and settled on section 27, Grant Township, 
where he improved a farm of 160 acres. In 
1SS1 he located on the farm where he now 
lives, which at that time was wild land. He 
has improved his land, and now has a fine 
farm of 100 acres, and his farm buildings are 
among the best in the township. For the past 
six years he. has run a thro hing machii and 



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riiS7'OJ:r of ux/o.x couxti: 



has assisted many of the neighboring fanners. 
He was married in April, 1877. t r > Adella 
Simpson, daughter of Henry Simpson, of 
Muscatine, Iowa. They have four children — 
Nellie, Frank, Arthur'and Roy. Mr. Miller 
and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

, ,.".\tuj., , 

§H. LICHTY, dealer in groceries and 
provisions, located on the corner of 
■^ Q ' Montgomery and Walnut streets, Ores- 
ton, Iowa, is a native of Somerset County, 
Pennsylvania, born November 29, 182P,ason 
of Jacob and Catherine (Hunter) Lichty, the 
former a native of Pennsylvania, of German 
descent, and the latter of Maryland, of Scotch 
descent. The mother died in 1S5S, aged fifty- 
seven years, and the lather in 1SG3, aged 
sixty-live years. They had a family of eight 
children — Edward is a physician, a graduate 
of the Philadelphia Medical College; Lewis 
is an attorney, and ex-mayor of "Waterloo, 
Iowa; J. II. is our subject; Ezra is a machin- 
ist and is employed at the round-house in 
Oreston; Silas is an agriculturist of Somerset 
County, Pennsylvania; Joseph lives in Lin- 
coln, Nebraska; Mary, the eldest daughter, 
is the wife of F. B. Countryman, of Somer- 
set County, Pennsylvania, and Louisa is the 
wife of S- A. Benford, of Page County, Jowa. 
J. II. Lichty was reared a farmer, a vocation 
lie followed" in his native State until 1868, 
when he came to Iowa, and first located in 
Waterloo. lie also worked at the carpenter's 
trade several years, and by economy saved 
§1,500, which he put in the bank. The bank 
suspended payment, and he got only 28 cents 
on the dollar of his money. In 1S7G he 
moved to Cre.-ton and embarked in business. 
Although his capita] was limited he went 
bravely to work, and by good management 
and honorable dealing he has been successful. 
In all his ups and downs he has been assisted 



by hi? most estimable wife, who has been a 
true helpmeet in every hour of trial, taking 
her hill share of the business. Together they 
have acquired a competency and a good home 
for their declining years. Mr. Lichty was 
married in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, 
to Mary A. Felick, a native of that county, 
born in 1S32. She died in 1SG7, leaving four 
children — George E. F., of Waterloo, married 
Anna Derrick; Benjamin, married Jos'eBurr; 
Anna, wife of Johnson Vivian, of Michigan; 
Lottie, who makes her home with George. 
One child, Lizzie, is deceased. In 1S70 Mr. 
Lichty married Clara E. Countryman, also a 
native of Somerset County, Pennsylvania, 
born in 18i2. To them have been born four 
children — Franklin P., Elvira, Edward and 
Howard. Mr. and Mrs. Lichty are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican. 



«i&> 



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J ^f OHN 11. BROWN, farmer and stock- 
I "T j raiser, has a whole section (No. 9, Doug- 
i \^£ las Township) of good and well-improved 
; land, where he resides. He was born iu Scot- 
: land, in 1834, his parents being Robert and 
! Jennett (Hamilton) Brown, both natives of the 
| '-Land'o Cakes." He was about eighteen 
' years of age when he came with his parents 
! to America. They settled in Stark Comity, 
I Ohio, and followed farming there several 
ysars, removing to Henry County, Illinois, 
and thence to Rock Island County. He came 
I to Iowa and settled on his present place in 
Douglas Township, in 1869. Here he had 
i lii st bought a quarter-section of wild land, and 
proceeded to improve it. His fine dweliing- 
. house he erected in 1883 at an expense of 
$3,000, and his barn, built in 1872, cost $2,- 
i 000. On the place, too, he has a fine grove 
of trees and an orchard of three acres, and 2G0 
i acres in pasture or grass. Mr. Brown has 
; held the offices of supervisor and school di- 
rector. The habits of honest industry, which 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



have brought him up to Id's present high posi- ' Hon to farming and stock-raising, yet at times 

tion in the community, were formed in his tills the pulpit as a local preacher. He is one 

youth, when he mined coal and iron ore, which j of the old pioneers of Southern Iowa, and at 

he did until lie was twenty-six years of age. one time mowed grass where Knoxville now 

Neither himself nor his wife inherited any stands, lie was engaged in selling goods in 

property with whicb to launch out in the sea j Marion Count}' for four years, and intended 

of life. Pie is a member of Cromwell Lodge, ' to follow the same business at Afton, Union 

No. 351, A. F. & A. Af. Both himself and County, but through the perfidy of his 

wife are members of the Congregational ' partner he became bankrupt; but through his 

church. He was married in Stark County, j persevering industry and strict economy be 

Ohio, in 1856, to Mary A. Murphy, who was - has mastered his difficulties, and is to-day in 

born in Ireland, in 1S37. The following of; comfortable circumstances. Besides his heme 

their children are living— James, Maria, j farm he owned other property, but has given 

Minnie, Thomas, Jennett, Jeremiah, Alary j to his children 160 acres. lie has been an 

A., Richard, Henry. Olga and Howard. The \ active worker in church affairs for many 

deceased were Robert and Anna. Post-office, : years, and built the church of his denomina- 






■ 



Cromwell. 



-~MH**#-&- 



I3K.EV. WILLIAM C. WILLIAMS i, 
- 1' L native oi Ohio, born where liie city of j 
^Kf§ Urbana now stands, in Champaign j 
County, November 24, 1S2±, a son of William 
Williams, who was one of the early settlers of 
Ohio, and was a soldier in the war of 1S12. j 
William C. Williams grew to manhood in his j 
native State, being reared on a farm and edu- \ 
cated in the common schools. He came to 



tion at Afton. He has held several local 
offices of trust in the township, including 
justice of the peace, trustee, supervisor, and, 
while living in Alton, was a member of the 



iooi Jboara. 



T f^.lRAM HALL, of Creston, keeps a full 

'~-"\ stock of paints, wall-paper, window-glass 

nj.t and painters' supplies; also makes a 

specialty of decorating churches and other 



Iowa in 1815, locating in Marion County, \ public buildings. He is located at 210 North 



where he lived several years. He was mar- 
ried in the fall of 1S47, to Jemima Camplin, 
a daughter of John Camplin, deceased. To 
this union were born eight children — Sarah, 
John, Henry, Benjamin F., Simon. Cora, 
Newton and Anna. Mr. Williams came to 
Union County in June, 1S55, where he has 
since made his home, and is now the owner of 



Maple Street. Mr. Hall is the oldest resident 
painter in Union County, settling in Afton as 
early as 1858. He was born in Genesee 
County, New York, in July, 1836. In 1842 
his parents removed to Genesee County. Michi- 
gan, where lie lived until eighteen years of 
age. He learned the painter's trade at East 
Saginaw, Michigan, and has been engaged in 



120 acres located on section 7, New Hope '. that business thirty-four yen.-:. In 1853 his 
Township, where he settled in 18G4. He was : father, Biram Hall, removed with his family 
licensed as a local preacher in the Methodist to Scott County, Iowa, and later to Louisa 
Episcopal church in 1853, and the following County, where he died in February, 1861. 
four years traveled as an itinerant through 
Marion, Ringgol 1 and Union counties. He 
was ordained a regular minister in 1857, and 
two years later again began traveling through 
the country. He is new devoting i-' : atten- 



The mother is .-til! living in Louisa County. 
'; ; ere were twelve children iri the family who 
grew to maturity, eight sons and four dan 
ters. Hiram went to Davenport in 185-J-j 
where he worked at bis trade for a time, then 



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II/STORr OF UNION COUNT): 



went to Washington, Iowa, and worked three 
years, coming to Afton in 1S5S. In August, 

1S02, lie enlisted at Afton in the Twenty- 
ninth Iowa Infantry, and served three year?, 
his regiment being attached to the Western 



At Lexington lie received a flesh wound, and 
nt Chickamauga he was severely wounded in 
the hip. At Buzzard's Roost he was one of 
a company to cross the gap and open an 
attack on the enemy's batterv. From Ken- 



;*>; Army. In 1S72 he went to Decatur, Indiana, i esaw Mountain he was sent to the rear, and 



and remained there and at Fort Wayne for 
five years, then located at Alt. Ayr one year, 
coining to Creston in 1S7S, and at present 
he is living on his farm, four miles west of 
Creston, running a milk daily. lie mar- 
ried Harriet Harper, a native of Indiana, 
and they have six children — Fred S., Hiram 
A. and Mary A. (twins), Charles R. , James 



was detailed receiving clerk in the orduance 
department of Gen. Thomas's headquarters. 
In the spring of 1865 he returned to his 
regiment, but was subsequently detailed clerk 
in the Assistant. Adjutant-General's office, 
where he remained until the close of the war. 
After his discharge he returned to Illinois, 
and in 1S79 came to Iowa, and located on 



A. and Addie. Hiram and Mary were i section 10, Grant Township, Union County, 
born in May, 1S63, while Mr. Hall lay sick ; where he lived until the spring of 1SS5, 
in the hospital in Helena, Arkansas, and he | when he moved to the farm where he now 



did not see them until they were two years 
and a half old. 



§OHX K. EWIXG, farmer and stock- 
raiser, section 14, Grant Township, is a 
- native of Pennsylvania, born in Perry 
County, October 30, 1543, a son of Clark G. 
Ewing. In 1846 his parents moved to La 
Salle County, Illinois, where the mother died 
in 1S47, and the father in 1S50. Thus, when 
but seven years of age, he. was left an orphan 
with three sisters and one brother, and was 
obliged to work for his own maintenai ce. 
After the breaking out of the war of the 
Rebellion, in the spring of 1861, he enlisted 
in Company A, 1 irsl Illinois Cavalry, and 
served until the following fall, when his regi- 
ment was re-org mized, but disbanded in July. 
1862. lie was then at home a month, when 
he again enlisted and was assigned to Com- 
pany F, One Hundred and Fourth Illinois 
Infantry, and served until June, 1SC5. He par- 
ticipated in the battles at Lexington, Tomp- 
kinsville, Ilartsville, Gallatin, Brentwood, 
Elk River, Tullahoma, Chickamauga. Chatta- 
nooga, Ringgold. Tunnel Hill, Buzz ird'sRoi st 
Gap, Resacaand others of minor importance. 



lives, which contains 160 acres of valuable 
land, well stocked with a line grade of short- 
horn cattle and Poland-China bogs. Mr. 
Ewing was married February 17, 1S6P, to 
Amelia E., daughter of Hugh Alexander. 
They have six children — -Mabel, Herbert, 
Milo, Rose, Arthur and an infant daughter. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ewing are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal erhiich. 



•"'RUE W. GILMAN, an industrious 
\- J : farmer, and a respected citizen of High- 
?p- land Township, living on section IS, is 
a native of the State of New York, born in 
Oneida County. April 20, 1828, a son of 
Charles and Eunice (Markham) Gilman, both 
of whom died before our subject was eight 
years old. He was a native of New Hamp- 
shire. Our subject grew to manhood in his 
native county, being reared on a farm and 
educated in the common schools, lie was 
married to Miss Rosetta C. Tennant, August 
17. 1854, she being a daughter of Hiram and 
Emily (Main) 'Pennant, both of whom are de- 
er, 1 - • !. Three children have been horn to 
Mr. and Mrs. Gilman, two still living, whose 
names are Charles and Dora, the former In ing 



. 









B/OGRA PHICAL SKE TC1IES. 



in Colorado, and the latter engaged in teach- 
ing school in Union County, where she is fast 
becoming a popular teacher. .Mr. Oilman 
left his native county in 1S5G, going with his 
family to Knox County, Illinois, lie went to 
California, where he remained til! 1SG9, then 
he located in Warren County, Illinois, where 
he lived till 1872. In that year he came to 
Union County, Iowa, and has since, resided 
on his present farm, which contains 108 acres 
of choice land, and is engaged in fanning and 
stock-raisintr. 



/TiOLO^EL S. D. SWAN", proprietor of 
Svfvt * UG Summit House at Creston, is one of 
'\k?. the earliest settlers of the town. Janu- 
ary 15, 1ST0, he opened the Creston House, 
the first hotel of the city, and he was ticket 
agent ol the Chicago, Burlington >.^ Quincy 
Railroad four or live years. Later he was en- 
gaged in the building of the Santa Fe Rail- 
road in Mexico. Upon completion of the 
Summit House in 1SS0, Colonel Swan and 
his son-in-law, John Becker, became the pro- 
prietors, and they still conduct this deserv- 
edly popular hotel. Colonel Swan was born 
in Virginia in 1S32, and was reared in Union- 
town, Fayette County, Pennsylvania. He 
has been a resident of Iowa man} 7 years. On 
the breaking out of the war of the Rebellion 
he was a resident of Mt. Pleasant. In May, 
1861, he raised a company for service in the 
army. Of this company, which became a 
part of the First Iowa Cavalry, he was made 
Captain, bat before the regiment was ready to 
take the field Colonel A. B. Potter, who had 
participated in the battle of Wilson's Creek, 
where the gallant Lynn fell, had received or- 
ders to raise a regiment, and he induced 
Colonel Swan to assist him, who at once en- 
gaged in raising men for a new organization. 
He met with such success that in ten days 
he had raised a full company. The regiment 
was organized as the Fourth Iowa Cavalry, 



and Colonel Swan was elected Major. June 
■I, 1S62, he was made Lieutenant-Colonel. In 
the summer of 1863 he tendered his resigna- 
tion on account of ill-health, and about 
the same time he was commissioned Colonel 
of the regiment. Put his resignation went 
into effect and he did not serve under his 
commission as Colonel. He participated with 
his regiment in most of the important events 
of the West and South that attended the war 
for the Union, in those sections. After the 
war he was engaged in farming, railroading 
and hotel-keeping, the latter being his pres- 
ent occupation. Colonel Swan was married 
in Pennsylvania, in 1851, to Dorcas Ayers. 
.They have four children — William, Ella May, 
wife of John Becker; Dora Belle and Flor- 
ence. Colonel Swan was left an orphan at 
an early age, his mother dying when he was 
a small child, and when he was thirteen years 
old his father died. He was thus compelled 
to make his own way in life at an age when 
he most needed the parental care and advice. 
He was a gallant soldier, and his health was 
much impaired by his service in the army. 
"Whatever duties in life he has been called 
upon to perform have been done faithfully 
and well. 



^p- ANIEL EVANS, deceased, was a native 
"\[ J of Wale?, born April IS, 1815, a son of 
l r~' Thomas Evans, who was also a native of 
the same country. When he was seventeen 
years old his father brought his family to 
America, and settled in Licking County, 
Ohio. In 1S40 our subject, Daniel Evans, 
locatfd in Knox County, Illinois, where he. 
remained over ten years. He was married 
March 23, 1847, to Miss Sarah J. Richardson, 
a daughter of Larkiri Richardson, who died 
when she was very young. Mrs. Evans was 
born in Hart County, Kentucky, and wl en but 
four years old was brought by her widowed 
in ither to Knox County, Illinois, where .-he 



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n/STonr or vxiox cov.\rr. 



was reared. Mr. and Mrs. Evan? have had i selected stock— and his sales per year amount 



seven children born to them, ot whom only 
thrce are now living — .Nancy L.,Permelia Ann 
and Albert R. Nancy married Edgar Hayden, 

and has two children— Clara B. and Nellie M. 
They live on the old homestead with Mrs. 
Evans. Ann Amelia, as the second daughter 
is called, is the wife of George S. Hayden, 
of Adair County, Iowa, and has one son — 
Harry E. Mr. Evans left Knox County for 
Henry County, Illinois, about 1851, where he 
remained till 1875. hi the spring of that year 
he went to Adair County. Iowa, and in the 
following fall came to Union County, where 
he engaged in farming. He was reared a 
farmer, and always followed that avocation, 
and died on his farm on section 2, Lincoln 
Township, April S. 1885. He was a consistent 
Christians member of the Evangelical Asso- 
ciation, and gave liberally of his means to the 
support of the Gospel and to benevolent insti- 
tutions. He was a kind husband and an affec- 
tionate father. Strictly honorable in all bis 
dealings, he gained the confidence of all who 
knew him, and his death caused universal re- 
gret, throughout the township where he had 
made his home since coming to Union County. 



'- < V 



R. COTTON, of the firm of Scurr & 
Cotton, proprietors of theFirst Nation- 
^ ,<7 al Grocery, 12S Fine Street, Creston, 
was born in Circleville, Ohio, June 2, 1850, 
being the - m of E. M. and F; : ;o t l eth (Risserj 
Cotton, natives of Pennsylvania and Germany 
respectively. lie was three months old when 
his parents moved to Kentucky, and after 
seven years' resilience there they removed to 
Dallas County, Iowa, and in 1SS3 to Union 
County. Mr. Cotton, who has generally been 
a clerk, either in a store or a bank, entered 
the grocery here in ISS-i, having come to 
Creston in ISS2. Hi- stock, valued at about 
$8,000 to §9,000, comprises fancy and staple 
groceries, qneensware, glassware, etc. — a well 



to $60,000 or $70,000. He keeps five em- 
ployes, running two delivery wagons, and a 
branch store at Spanieling, managed by F. D. 
"Williams. He also owns a quarter-section of 
'and in Kansas. Mr. Cotton had but little 
means with .which to commence in business, 
and his success therefore is a signal testimo- 
nial to his financial capacities. He is classed 
as a solid and influential citizen of Creston, 
and is socially a gentleman. He is a member 
of the Ancient Order of United "Working 
Mechanics. 



| W r . HIGBEE, attorney, located in 
\\A Creston, August 19, 1876. He formed 
v-y ff a partnership with J". B. Harsh,Esq., 
which continued until the fall of 1883, when 
Mr. Harsh retired from the law business. Mr. 
Higbee practiced alone about two years and 
then the present firm of Higbee & Hanna 
was formed. Mr. Higbee was born in Alle- 
gheny County, Pennsylvania, in 1845. In 
1S53, his father, Obediah Higbee, emigrated 
with his family to Johnson County, Iowa, and 
located on a farm near Iowa City, where he 
still lives. His place bears the name of 
Hickory Grove. In 1860 Mr. Higbee en- 
tered the State University, the same year the 
university was opened, and he was a member 
of the first class that was organized. He re- 
mained three years as a student, and in the 
fall of 1864 he began the study of law in the 
law department of the Michigan State Uni- 
versity, at Ann Arbor. lie remained six 
months, then entered the h,w ofiice of Push 
Clark, at Iowa City, where he remained as a 
student u.-.til the spring of 1867, then engaged 
in business at Chicago. He was in active 
business in that city until 1875. He sustained 
a severe loss in the fire of 1871. JDearb rn 
Theater, that was burned at that time, was 
built by Mr. Higbee. Since coming to Cr< 
ton he has been one of the leading men of 



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nWGRAri.-rCAL SKETCHES. 



the city, aiid lias done much toward advancing 
its interests. The Chicago fire had taken 
from him the accumulation of former jears, 
and here, in this new town of Creston he be- 
gan anew, and his success has been commen- 
surate with his energy and perseverance. He 
has dealt considerably in real estate, and his 
investments in that direction have been proSf- 
able. There are two additions to Creston 
known as Higbee and Baker's addition, ami 
Higbee and Baker's second addition. Mr. 
Higbee lias erected sixteen houses in the city 
and sold them. lie was married in Johnson 
County in 1875, to Miss Emma A. Evans, 
daughter of W. C. Evans, formerly of John- 
son County and now a resident of Creston. 
Mr. and Mrs. Higbee have no children, but 
have an adopted daughter — Leila. Politic- 
ally Mr. Higbee is a Derno&iat. 






fS. LAFARRE, farmer and stock-raiser, 
resides on section 10, of Jones Town- 
ship, where he owns 600 acres of land, 
in an advanced state of cultivation. He was 
born .in Washington County, Indiana, in 
1S20, the son of Jacob B. and Lydia (Snyder) 
Lafarre, natives of Kentucky, and of French 
descent. Mr. Lafarre passed his boyhood 
and youth upon a farm in Morgan County, 
Indiana, being reared to the agriculturist's 
occupation. He came to Union County in 
1855, entered land, and settled here the fol- 
lowing year. During this latter year, in War- 
ren, Union County, he mai \ ied Sarah Ledema, 
who was born in Indiana in 1836, the daugh- 
ter of William and Achsa Ledema, and now 
Mr. and Mrs. Lafarre are the parents of six 
children, four of whom arc living — Lydia, 
Catharine, Jacob B. and Line. Jacob B. mar- 
ried Leone Lower, and they have one child- 
George by name. Jane married Thomas 
Clark, and their throe children are, Emma, 
George and Addie. Mr. Lafarre was post- 
master at Thayer eight years, a part of the 



time under President Grant's administration. 

He made his start in the world with nothing 
but one horse as his total amount of property, 

and worked by the month at $25. Socially 
he is a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
and politically he affiliates with the National 
Greenback party. He is highly respected in 
his community. Postofiice, Thayer. 

•;"~R)WIN J. BUSH, vice-president of the 
VfjL First National Bank of Creston, is one 
3|pi of the early settlers of the town, making 
his advent here in 1S72. For several years he 
was engaged buying grain, first for George 
A. Blackwell, one of the early grain mer- 
chants of Creston. In 1873 Mr. Blackwell sold 
out to Messrs. Belden & Scott, with whom 
Mr. Bush continued until 1S79, when he en- 
gaged as assistant cashier of the Creston 
Bank. In September, 1884, the above was 
incorporated as a Stale bank, and Mr. Bush 
was made its cashier. h\ July, 1SS6, this 
hank consolidated with the First National 
Bank, and Mr. Bush was made vice-president. 
He was born in Connecticut in 1852, son of 
William Bnsh. In 1872 he went to Chicago, 
and came to Creston in August of that year. 
He was married December 12, 1SS3, to Miss 
Kate Dowd. 

BRAM W. ENOCH, attorney and coun- 
selor at law, Alton, also the present 
attorney, has been in practice at 
I this place since March. l c 7>, and has been 
j alone with the exception of otic year when he 
! was associated with S. W. McElderry. He 
! was born in the town of Rising Sun, Ohio 
| County, Indiana, in March. 1S55. When 
: thirteen years of age \.<. removed with his 
| father, Benjamin Enoch, to Hancock County, 
j Illinois, his mother having died previous to 
i that time. The father is now a residi n\ of 
i Fairmont, Missouri. Mr. Enoch was edu- 



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insi'onr of union county, 



eated principally in the public schools; later 
he was a student at Keokuk two years. In 
1873 he commenced to study law, and began 
practice in IS77 at Springfield, Illinois. Sub- 
sequent to his admission to the bar he was 
engaged in teaching for a time before enter- 
ing into the practice of his profession, lie is 
a lawyer of more than average attainments, 
of fine ability, and, though a young man, Las 
a good practice, even thomgh older and 
excellent lawyers have long occupied the field. 
He was married December 29, 1880, to Miss 
Emma M. Bagg, daughter of Ralph. Bagg, of 
Afton. They have one child — Albert Blaine. 



vania. To them have been born twelve chil- 
dren — Thomas J., Albert M., Robert L., 
George W., William 1!., Jasper M., Minor 
M., David 11., Joseph C, Annie J.,Selina P. 
and Ida. Mr. McGinnis is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity. 



§EORGE W. McGLNNTS, section 3, 
. Highland Township, was born in Fay- 
V/i ette County, Pennsylvania, January 

c loon „-,„/■ T> i .- . i "». ' -<~* • • , n • ; | 

of the same conut_ 

McGinnis, a native of Ireland. He was 
reared and educated in his native county, 
spending his youth on his father's farm. In 
April, 1854, he came to Iowa, and located in 
Lee County, and in the spring of 1S55 walked 
to Union County, a distance of over 200 
miles, to pay his taxes, and walked back again 
the same spring. In April, 1858, he moved 
to Union County, and located on the land 
which is now his fine farm. At that time it 
was a tract of wild land with but one house 
in sight. The country was infested with In- 
dians and wild animals, who were frequent 
visitors, and partakers of his bounty. Mr. 
McGinnis was an industrious, energetic man, 
and soon got his land under cultivation, and 
gradually improved it until he now has one 
of the pleasantest homes in the county. He 
has added to his possessions until he now 
owns, in addition to the homestead of 120 
acres, 480 acres in Nebraska and 320 acres in 
Colorado. He was married in the spring of 
1S54, to Margaret V. Trimble, daughtei of 
David Trimble, of Fayette County, Pennsyl- 



II. II ANNA, of the law firm ofHigbee 
& Hanna, came from Louisa County 7 
to Creston in 1SS2. He was born in 
Guernsey County, Ohio, June 3, 1810, and 
was reared in Harrison County. In 1861 he 
enlisted at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in the 
Eighth Pennsylvania Reserves. He was in 
the army about a year, during which time he 
participated in the battle of Dranesville, Vir- 
ginia. He was discharged, by special, order 
of Secretary Stanton, whom he met in Wash- 
ington, for disability. His health was poor 
d grandson of Daniel ' *' or several years after his discharge from the 
service. For a time he attended the law de- 
partment of the Michigan State University, 
but his failing health would not admit of a 
full course. In 1SGS he came to Louisa 
County, and was engaged in the practice of 
law at Columbus Junction until he came to 
Creston. Mr. Hanna was first married in 
Ohio, to Miss Sarah Craraflatt, after whose 
death he married Miss II. M. Segafoos, who 
died February 17, 1S79. Politically Mr. 
Hanna is a Republican. 



— o-S33» 



II. BATTAN, agriculturist and stock- 
^\ raiser, is a resident of section 9, Doug- 

V '/ 

-.-. -° las Township. Postoffiee, Creston. 
He was burn in Fulton County, Pennsylvania, 
in 1833. His parents, Thomas and Catherine 
(Ham) Battan, were also natives of that State. 
In lS56,when be was twenty-three years of age, 
he immigrated to Tazewell County, Illinois, 
where he resided until 1S70. In 1864 he en- 
listed in the One Hundred and Forty-second 



■ 



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BIOGRAPHIC A L SKE TCI IKS. 



501 



Illinois Volunteer Infantry and served till the 
close of the war. He started out to brave the 
sea of life single-handed and alone, but by 
his well-directed industry he has established 
for himself and family a comfortable home. 
His well-improved farm comprises 160 acres. 
lie has been township supervisor and school 
director, is a member of the Masonic order, 
and is considered a substantial citizen of 
Union County, lie and his family belong 
to the Congregational church. Tie was mar- 
ried in I860, in Tazewell County, Illinois, to 
Miss Teusy Tobee, daughter of Joseph and 
Sarah Tohee, who was born in Canada, April 
11, 1841. Of their ten children, six are liv- 
ing — Richard II., Maurice, Catherine, Boyle, 
Allen J., overseer of round-house at Kansas 
City, and Samuel W. 



EILLIAM K. SYP, a prominent mer- 
~.\i\h chant of Afton, has been a resident 
\— -J:.r] of that city since the fall of 1857. 
He was born in Miami County. Ohio, March 
30, 1833, son of John and Mary Ann Logan. 
On his father's side he is of German origin. 
His great-grandfather Syp came to America 
in an early day, probably about 1690, and 
settled in Pennsylvania. His grandfather, 
Joseph Syp, emigrated from Pennsylvania to 
Hamilton County, Ohio, not far from 100 
years ago. It is stated as a fact that his first 
wife was once offered fifty acn s of the pres- 
ent site of Cincinnati f< r the paltry sum of 
§50. Joseph Syp was twice married and had 
fifteen children. He removed to Miami 
County about the yiv.r 1820, and died at the 
advanced age of 110 years. He was an active 
farmer until he was eighty-Jive years of aire. 
John Syp, the father of oui subject, was horn 
iii Warren County, Ohio, in 1807. He was 
reared a farmer and followed that occupation 
until he was sixty-five years of age. He then 
engaged in merchandising, and died at Afton 



April !?5, 1SS4, in his seventy-eighth year, 
lie immigrated with his family to Henry 
County. Iowa, in 1852, and to Union County 
in 1SG1. He had twelve children, seven sons 
and five daughters. Four of the children 
died in childhood; five arc now living — 
James L., a farmer of Union County; Joseph 
R, a resident of Afton; William K., our sub- 
ject : David N., a hardware merchant at Af- 
ton, and Mrs. Martha Johnson, residing in 
Kansas. William K. is the youngest, and 
remained at home upon his father's farm un- 
til about twenty years of age. His educa- 
tional advantages were very limited; his 
entire attendance at school would not exceed 
three months. When seventeen years of age 
he requested his father to grant him the 
means for acquiring a collegiate education, 
but the request was not complied with. The 
reason given for the refusal was that he could 
not he spared from the farm. At the age of 
nineteen years his father offered him means 
to educate himself with, but William refused 
it, giving as a reason that he was too old. 
He has ever since deeply regretted that he 
did not embrace that opportunity; in fact, he 
regards it as the greatest mistake of his life. 
His aspiration, in early life, was to be an at- 
torney, and especially did he desire to become, 
an orator. He possesses many of the quali- 
ties requisite for a successful public speaker, 
but his ambition could not be realized, and 
at the age of twenty years decided to turn his 
attention to mechanical pursuits. He appren- 
ticed himself to a blacksmith at Mt. Pleasant, 
Iowa, for a term of three years. His 
compensation was to be 8 cents per (i.<y, 
board and washing, lie remained with the 
blacksmith six months, when, finding the 
work too hard, and his health likely to be- 
come seriously impaired in consequence, he 
decided to bring his apprenticeship to a close. 
His employer, John Campbell, accepted his 
resignation very reluctantly, allowing him the 
munificent sum of 5 cents a day for the 
time he had worked, amounting to &7.S0. 



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598 



iiisronr of uxion couxrr. 



i The generosity of Mr. Campbell bcc 'incs evi- j William K. Sjp purchased Mr. Swain's inter- 
! dent when it is considered that Mr. Syp did ; est in the business, and Truman Swain ioined 
more than half the labor performed in the I the firm. In another year Mr. Svp purchased 
shop during his stay. Mr. Syp then decided his brother's interest, owing to the poor 
5 to learn the carpenter's trade, and engaged health of the latter, and the tinu name which 
£'J; with a man named Strong for 50 cents a day, j had been W. K. Syp & Company, now bo- 
board and washing. No definite time tor the , came Syp & Swain, the former having a two- 
(££; apprenticeship was mentioned in the engage- : thirds interest in the business. One year 
ment. At the end of six months Mr. Syp i later this firm purchased a stock of goods in 
demanded an increase oi* wages to $1.00 per : Farragut, Iowa, of which Swain took charge. 



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day. IJis employer at first refused, but finally 
decided to give him the increase asked for. 
At the expiration of three months more his 
wages were raised to SI. 50 per day. Thai 
for another three months he received $--00 
per day. Mr. Syp and his brother. J. F. Syp, 



After six months the stock was removed to 
Bedford, Iowa, and in another year the firm 
closed out the branch store. Two years after- 
ward W. K. Syp sold out to Swain Brothers, 
as his health began to fail, and took a trip to 
California, where he remained about three 



then decided to come to Af ton, but stopped j months. In January, 1883, he re-engaged in 

at Osceola and worked at the carpenter and j business with Swain Brothers under the firm 

( joiner's trade. In the fall of 1855 they came \ name of Swain Brothers & Syp. Three years 

14:"! to Afton to attend the second public sale of 

k£ W*. Mr. Syp purchased the hot ju:t west cf 

££< the Presbyterian church. He returned to Mt. 

'£'■% Pleasant, then in 1S : >7 came back and set- 



'00 tied permanently. For twelve years 
£$ engaged as contractor and builder, 



he was 
nd for 

j*;*; several years he. erected and completed from 
£;*; forty to forty-five buildings annually, his field 

; ■■: 



later this partnership was dissolved, and in a 
'.'■ .. months Mr. o_\p i canned business in his 
own name. In 1S77 Mr. Syp began to turn 
his attention to stock-raising. He owns 700 
acres of laud in Union Township, and 1G0 
acres in Sand Creek Township. He is exten- 
sively engaged in the stock business. He. has 
-150 head of cattle, a number of specimens of 



of labor comprising a territory within a radius | fine Holstein and short-horn cattle. He has 



of twenty miles of Afton. He was very suc- 
cessful in his career as a builder. Six months 
previous to the expiration of the twelve years 
he decided that when a favorable opportunity 
offered he would change his bnsincss. In 
1SG9 he engaged in the mercantile business 
at Afton under the firm name of Hemerage, 
Wheeler & Company. Mr. Syp was the com- 
pany and the capitalist of the firm. Altera 
period of fourteen months Mr. Syp purchased 



seventy brood mares. He was married in Af- 
ton in April, 1S5S, to Miss Louisa Painter, 
who was born in Northumberland County, 
Pennsylvania, in May, 182S. Her parents 
were John and Anna (Martin) Painter, who 
spent all of their married lire in Northumber- 
land County. Her mother died in 1S-19, and 
her father died four years later. They had 
eleven children, nine of whom grew to ma- 
turity. Two sisters are still living in Peun- 



the interest of his partners, aid one week J sylrauia. the three being the only surviving 
later took Robert Truman as a partner, who is j members of the family. Mrs. Syp came to 



now the- oi' Afton. Six months later this 

partnership was dissolved by Mr. Truman's 
retiring from the business, and George Swain 
became a partner, buying a one-third interest. 
About one year later D. N. Syp became a 



Alton in October, 1857. with her brother, 
William Painter. The latter lived in Afton 
several years, and died ;.t Fed Oak, Iowa, 
January 1, 1880. Mrs. Syp is a woman of 
more than ordinary intelligence and to what- 



m 



member of the firm, and two years afterward | ever degree of success Mr. Syp has attained 



. ■ 






BIOC.Ii.\riUCAL SKB TC1IES. 



509 



♦ V 






Stf'ii 



i 






in life, no small share of credit is due to the 
good advice and excellent management of bis 
wife. Mr. and Mrs. Syp have three children 
— Coral Belle, wife of James Traxton, an at- 
torney at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. Their two 
sons are — Newton and Harry. They lost- 
three daughters in childhood. .Mr. Syp di- 
vides his time between his mercantile busi- 
ness and his stock farm, which lies adjacent 
to the town. 

.'f^EOilGE 13. DREW, engaged in agricnlt- 
';i\tp lire and stock-raising, is a resident on 
"Jjvi section '20, Douglas Townsip, at which 
place he is the proprietor of a quarter-section 
of improved land. He was born in Hamilton 
County, Cliio, in 1852, the son of Harrison 
and Eliza (Lacy) Drew, natives of Ohio and 
Germany, respectively, who now reside in 
Ames County Iowa. The sr. Ki 'cct of this 
sketch was but two years of age when he was 
brought by his parents to Mercer County, 
Illinois, where he remained until 1SG9, and in 
1S75 lie settled in Union County. He was 
married in the latter year, in Poweshiek 
County, Iowa, to Miss Eliza, daughter of John 
. and Margaret (Manatt) Ives, natives of Jowa. 
They have no children. Mr. Drew for a time 
worked on a railroad, and when he began in 
life he had only a team of horses. He was 
next a contractor, and now a farmer and stock- 
raiser. His stock is of fine grade, and he 
i'tedb ail the grain he raises. In his political 
views he is a Democrat. Posb nice, Creston. 



^- '""ILLIAM H. KEMPLIN, one of the 
enterprising and prosperous agricult- 
1tv~^j urists of Union Township, engaged 
in farming and stock-raising on section II, of 
Dodge Township, was born in Franklin 
County, Virginia, July 14, 1822, a son of 
William Kemplin, who was a native of the 
same Slate. Our subject was re. nod a farmer 



his father following that avocation till his 
death. His education was such as could bo 
obtained in the rude log-cabin schools of that 
early day, which he attended when not en- 
gaged with the duties of the farm, lie lived 
in his native State till about eleven years of 
age when he went wi'h his parents to Berrien 
Count)', Michigan, where he grew to man- 
hood. He came to Union County, Iowa, in 
ISo-i, being among the pioneer settlers of 
Dodge Township, where he has made his 
home since coming to Union County, and by 
his industry and good management has accu- 
mulated a good property, being now the 
owner of a line, farm containing 240 acres. 
Mr. Kemplin was united in marriage to ALiss 
j Eunice Comer, and to this union have been 
| born seven children, of whom only four are 
I living — Wilson P., Mrs. Maria Franklin, 
i John and Evaline. Mr. Kemplin is a mem- 
I ber of the Methodist Episcopal church, and a 
I respected citizen of Dodge Township. 

I 

— o-s33>-«> 

1 ^fffOHN S. BLACK, cashier of the Iowa 
State Savings Bank, Creston, is a native 
of Vermont, born in Washington County, 
May 23, 1S49, a son of Ephraim and Alzina 
j (Belknap) Black, natives respectively of Maine 
| and Vermont, of Scotch descent. His father 
! died in 1S56, aged thirty-six years, and his 
I mother is now living in Adair County, Iowa, 
and is sixty-four j ears of age. Left fatherless 
■ at the early age of seven years, he was, when 
I quite young, obliged to rely on his own exer- 
| tions. He was reared in Fontanelle, Iowa, 
; living on a farm until fourteen years of age, 
and there was employed as deputy in the 
I county auditor's office. He subsequently en- 
gaged in the general mercantile business in 
Fontanelle. In IST'j he located in Creston, 
I and resumed the duties of his present posi- 
tion. His prosperity is due to his industrious 
habits and good bu iness ability, having no 
assi t: nee when he started his business career, 



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HISTORY OF UNION COUNT!'. 



but lie lias steadily worked his way up until he 
is now one of the substantial business men of 
Union County. He owns a pleasant home in 
CrestoD, and a fine farm of 200 acres in Adair 
County, Iowa. He is a member of the 
Masonic and Odd Fellows orders, and in his 
religious views is liberal. He is a public- 
spirited, enterprising man, and one of the 
foremost to assist in building up the material 
and social welfare of his town. He was married 
in Afton in 1S73, to Frances V. Burker, a 
native of Mendota, Illinois, born in 1854, a 
daughter of Stephen and Elizabeth (Williams) 



Republican partv. During his residence in 

j Grant Township he has filled acceptably 

1 several township offices, serving as assessor 

, four years— which position he is holding at 

i the present time — township clerk far three 

i years, and has also served as school director. 
I 



fe 



1[DWIN K. CLARK, dealer in paints, 
varnishes, wall paper, brushes, etc., at 
No. 23b' Pine Street, Creston, was born 
SI5. His parents were Justin S. and 



irkcr. They have tour children— Clarence | Alary J. (Miller) Clark, the former a native 

of New York, and the latter of Ohio, of Scotch 
and Irish ancestry; father is still living, the 



A., Charles S., Irene E. and Dena A. 



$■:■ ■ 



W& S. PATTERSON, engaged in farming 
i|j^| and stock raising on section 26, Platte 
•^.- _a Township, was born in Knox County, 
Ohio, July 12, iboo, a son oi Isaac and Alien 
(Jones) Patterson, who were both born in the 

State of Pennsylvania. He was reared on a j Seventy-fourth Ohio Infantry and served two 
.farm and educated in the district schools of j years, being in the battle of Stone River and 
his native State, remaining there until 1849, i with Sherman, almost constantly under fire; 
when he came to Iowa in company with his ; also in the battle at Atlanta. He re-enlisted 



mother is deceased. Of theireight children, the 
subject of this sketch is next to the youngest. 
He was four years old when the family moved 
to Kentucky, and after a residence there of 
about seven years they removed to Athens, 
Ohio, where Edwin K., our subject, remained 
until 1862. He then enlisted in Company 0, 



brother. Two years later he returned to Ohio, 
and in 1S52 went to California, remaining 
there till 1857. He returned to Iowa in 
that year, and after residing a short time in 
Muscatine County, came to Union County, 
when he settled on the farm where he still 
makes his home, his farm containing 120 acres 
of well-cultivated land. Mr. Patterson has 
been twice married, hi 
dying about eleven months after l'.er 
For his second wife he married Lucy Ann 
Henneler, a native of Pennsylvania, and a 
daughter of J. E. and Jane Henneler. To 
this union have been born six children — 
Edward B., born November 10, 1865; Will- 
iam IL, August 10, 1868; Nettie .1 ., Febru- 
ary 12, 1S71; Venona, July 13, 1875; Mary, 
July 13, 1877, and Anna, March 21, 1880. 
In politics Mr. Patterson affiliates with the 



in Company K, Sixty-ninth Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, and served two years longer. In 
August, in front of Atlanta, he was taken 
prisoner, and confined in Andersonville 
Prison and Miller five months. When lie 
was liberated he was within twenty miles of 
Jacksonville; was mustered out at the close 
of the war at Columbus, Ohio, at Camp Chase, 
rst wife, Sarah Cole, j lie was married in 1S72, in Omaha. Ne- 
braska, to Mary E. , daughter of Benjamin 
and Keziah E. (Potts) Trumbull. She was a 
niece of Hon. Lyman Trumbull, of Chicago. 
Her father, a native of Connecticut, was of 
English descent, and her mother was born in 
Pennsylvania, of German ancestry. She was 
born in Springfield, Illinois, in 1854. Mr. 
and Mrs. Clark have had six children, five of 
whom are living. Their names are— Lula M., 
Eddie M., Benjamin. Daisy and Freddie, liv- 



■ ■ ■ • ■• 






BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



001 



*>; 



ing. and the deceased whs Sadie. Mi. Clark 
is a member of Lodge No. 207, I. O. O. F, 
at Creston, of Post No. 61, Gr. A. R., and of 

the V. A. S. Ho had five brothers, all in the 
late war, two of whom were killed, one in 
Kentucky and the other at Chickamauga. 
Mr. Clark has a house and lot at 511 Pine 
Street. lie came to this county in the fall 
of 1S73, locating then in his present business. 
He and his wife arc members of the Congre- 
gational church. 

» s .jw «.v., , 

■ •■•rriq-r."*'' 

§" ROBERTS, one of the pioneers of 
Union County, and a successful agri- 
^ Q culturist of Platte Township, was born 
in "West Virginia, November 16, 182-1, a son 
of John and Nicy Roberts, who were natives 
of Maryland. Our subject was reared to the 
avocation of a farmer which he has followed 
through life with the exception ot three years 
while in the service of his country. He en- 
listed in Company H, Twenty-ninth Iowa In- 
fantry, and participated in a number of hard- 
fought battles. He was honorably discharged 
at Davenport. Iowa, May 19, 1S65, when he 
returned to his home. For his wife ho mar- 
ried Miss Adelia Baker, who was born in 
Virginia, August 1, 1829, a daughter of Jacob 
and Mary Baker. To this union have been 
born ten children — Nina Bella, deceased; 
Amanda M., wife of J. W. Jones; B. A., 
wife of J. Hartman; Mary E., wife of J. 
Elliott; Hannah V., wife of D. A. Big-.:: ,1. 
S. married Mead Wiley; Flora M. , wife of L. 
Burnur; William, at home; diaries H. and 
Nellie. Mr. Roberts can attribute his success 
in life mainly to his own exertions, he having 
come West with but very limited means. He 
experienced many of the hardships and pri- 
vations incident to pioneer life, coming here 
when the country was in a wild state, and 
when Indians and wild animals were numer- 
ous. His first house in Union County was a 
rude log-cabin with puncheon floor, and his 



nearest milling place was Indianola, Iowa. 
He is at present engaged in farming and rais- 
ing stock, in which he is meeting with success, 
lie now owns 265 acres of well-improved 
land in Grant. Township, where he has a com- 
fortable and commodious residence and good 
farm buildings, and is surrounded with all 
the necessary comforts of life. He is one of 
the respected citizens of Grant Township, and 
is held in high esteem by all who know him. 
In his political views lie affiliates with the 
Republican party. During his residence here 
he has held various township offices, includ- 
ing trustee and treasurer, and has served as 
school director for several years. He is a 
comrade of John A. Rolen Post, No. 61, G. 
A. R., of Creston. Both he and his wife are 
earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

JOSEPH M. THOMPSON, an enterpris- 
"Ijfl ing farmer of Lincoln Township, residing 

2^ on section 26, was born in Washington 

County, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1S30, his 

father, Benjamin Thompson, being a native of 
j the same county. When he was a child his 
I father took his family to Hancock County, 
I Illinois, and when about ten or twelve years 
; of age he came with his parents to Van Buren 

County, Iowa, and in that county he received 
i the rudiments of an education by attending 
j the log-cabin schools of that early day. In 
: his teens he went to Wapello County. Iowa, 
| and a few years later went to Monroe County, 

Iowa/where he worked fouryears in the mill of 
;"E. P. Connover, and for two years worked in a 
| steam flou ring-mi 11 at Albia, that county. In 
| August, 1855, he came to Union County, 
| Iowa, and settled where he now lives when 

there were no settlements within twelve miles 
, north and twenty-live miles west. But three 
i houses bad been built in Alton, and where 
i the thriving city of Creston now stands, 

was a wilderness roamed over by wild ani- 



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HISTORT OF UNION COUNTT 



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Dials : nd Indians, 
days had to e;o froi 
to mill, and his t radii 
set and Osceola. He is now the owiu 
fine form of 200 acres of well-cultivated land 
on section 26, where he is surrounded with all 
the necessary com forts of life. Mr. Thompson 
was first married January 19, 1S53, in Mon- 
roe County, to Miss Margaret Jones, daugh- 
ter of Stephen Jones. Of the three children 
bom to this union only one is living — Edo-ar 
A. Mrs. Thompson died in August, 1S59, 
and October 30, 1860, Mr. Thompson was 
married to Miss Mary E. L)cmcree,-a daugh- 
ter of Samuel Demerec, of Nebraska. Ten of 
the fifteen children born to this union still sur- 
vive—Ezra O, Earl, Ella, Phoebe, Kate, Mary 
'0 L., Guy, Ida,Lina B. and Emma E. Mr.Thomp- 
Bon is one of the active men of Union Countv, 
and has served efficiently in several officia 



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Our subject in those carl; ; State, and finally, in 1876, he came to Union 

i ^ twenty-five to fifty miles I County. His father was murdered in ]S3T 

.a done at Winter- j in Philadelphia, in the terrible riot which 

I took place there between the Catholics and 

Protestants. His mother died about 1875, 

j with yellow fever, in a lazaretto in Phila- 

delphia. Mr. Hurlburt laid three brothers, 

I all of whom were in the late war, one of whom 

died while in the service. He has brought 

up four children— John P., Sarah E,F.V. 

and E. M. Foster, brothers and sisters, all of 

whom esteem Mr. Hurlburt as if he wore 

their natural father. 



•g$ trusts, such as county supervisor, township 



1.^ r-,.1 



llll HURLBURT, proprietor of the second- 

Wj hand store at Na 115 rir!0 Street, 
~^ a Crcston, was born March 18, 1S33, in 
the city of Philadelphia. His parents were 
Wesley and Fanny (Gibson) Hurlburt, natives 
respectively of New York and Ireland. She 
was only six weeks old when she was brought 
to America by her parents. Mr. Hurlburt's 
boyhood and youth were passed at the coop- 
er's trade and boating on the. Eric Canal, but 
when only fifteen years of age he crossed the 
plains to California, was there five months 
and returned to New York by water. Next, 
spending two years in Brown County, Ohio, 
learning the cooper's trade, he heated in 
Schuyler County, Illinois, and lived there 
twenty-five years; then worked in the 



jgj&LBEBT HARTMAN, farmer and stock- 
tff§k raiser, section 3, Spanlding Township, 
~:7^ is a native of Johnson County, Iowa, 
born in 1844, a son of Can- and Elizabeth 
(Kepler) Hartman, natives of Pennsylvania 
and Ohio, of German descent. Their parents 
came to Iowa and settled in Johnson County 
in 1842, and there the mother died when our 
subject was a child, and the father in 1883,' 
aged sixty-nine years. They had two chil- 
dren—Harriet, wife of Henry Close, of Iowa 
City, and Albert. Our subject was reared on 
a farm in bis native county, and in his youth 
learned practical lessons that have been of 
benefit to him in all the transactions of his 
life. He moved to Union County in 1874, 
and settled on the farm where he now lives 
which at that time was a tract of uncultivated 
land. He has improved his land, and now 
has one of the most pleasant farms in the 
township. In 1851 Mr. Hartman enlisted in 
the defense of his country, and was assigned 
to Company E, Tenth Iowa Infantry, and 
served four years. He participated in the 
battles of Champion Hills, Corinth, Chat- 
tanooga and many others of less note. A 



n gum two years ; returned to Illinois ; went | the battle of Champion Hills he was wounded 

to Pike's Peak in 1858, remaining only two | and was unable to perform active duty six 

_ montns; then stopped in Madison County, j months, and now receives a small pension 

Illinois, a while, then Adams County, same ! He was married in Johnson Countv in 

■ • 

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I}/OGl!AP/f/C. 1 L SKE TCIIES. 



1867, to Sophia E., daughter of Joel and 
Elizabeth Oberholster, natives of Ohio, of 
German descent. To them have been born 
three children — Archie E., Susan E. and 
Etlie M. Mr. Ilartman lias served his town- 
ship as assessor, clerk, school director and 
supervisor, and in all the trusts imposed on 
him has proved himself a reliable and efficient 
olliecr. He and his wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



•T, COLONEL JOHN O'KEEFFE.ofthe firm 
\ 1 ;c". of John O'Keeffe & Company, dealers in 
J ^Ti clothing and gents' furnishing goods, 
engaged in business at Creston in 1S70, with 
H. Newman, in the clothing and merchant 
tailor business. This partnership continued 
about three months, when the present firm 
was established. The husincec house of John 
O'Keeffe & Company is located on Adams 
street, and is by far the most complete estab- 
lishment of the kind to be found in Union 
County. Colonel O'Keeffe is a native of the 
Emerald Isle, having been born in the city of 
Kilkenny, Ireland, March S, 1S50. His par- 
ents, James and Ellen O'Keeffe, are still living 
in Ireland, and are the parents of five chil- 
dren, our subject being the only one residing 
in America. He is not, however, the first one 
that came. His father came when he was a 
young man, and married Ellen Doran, an 
American lady of Irish ancestry. They were 
married at Steubenville, Ohio, and their two 
eldest sons were born in that State. About 
five years subsequent to their marriage the 
father returned to his native country with his 
family. The maternal grandmother of Mr. 
O'Keeffe was born in Ireland. Her maiden 
name was O'Connell. She was well educated, 
and a teacher in her native land, when the 
penal laws of Ireland punished with death 
those who were detected in teaching the people 
the simplest rudiments of the language. She 
afterward came to America where, as previ- 



ously stated, the mother of Colonel O'Keeffe 

was born. The parents of our subject were 
well-educated, refined people, and gave their 
children opportunities for a liberal education. 
The two sons thai were born in America are 
lawyers by profession, one of whom is located 
at Dublin and the other at Carlo w. "When the 
war of the Rebellion in America was at its 
height, Colonel O'Keeffe was a student at St. 
Patrick's College, Carlo w. He was then only 
a youth, but had become possessed of a strong 
desire to come to this country, and resolved 
to make an effort to accomplish his wishes. 
He accordingly left the college, unknown to 
his parents or the faculty, and, going to Liver- 
pool, with the money furnished for his college 
expenses, purchased a ticket for New York, 
where lie landed in November. In that city 
he found friends of his father, who rendered 
him what assistance he needed. In the spring 
of ISCi lie engaged as correspondent for the 
Irish-American. He joined the famous Sixty- 
ninth Regiment, and continued with them for 
a time, when he was taken sick, and sent to 
the hospital at Hagerstown, Maryland. lie 
remained there two months, and in the mean- 
time Lee had surrendered and the war had 
closed. He returned to New York City, and 
soon after engaged to learn the merchant 
tailoring business with Messrs. Calvert & 
Robinson on Broadway. In 1S6S he enlisted 
for service in the United States Army, under- 
went a competitive examination, and, was 
made Second Lieutenant in the Second United 
States Cavalry. He remained in the army 
until 1872, and then resigned. His held of 
operations was in Montana, "Wyoming and 
Dakota. He was engaged in several battles 
with the Indians, and at the battle with the 
Sioux at Powder River in 1869, received three 
wounds. He also received a gunshot wound 
at the battle of the Sweet Water in 1870. At 
the close of his military service he went to 
Omaha, Nebraska, and engaged in the mer- 
chant tailoring business, and remained there 
until he removed to Creston. Colonel O'Keeffe 












cot 



///STOIC)' OF IWIO.X COUNTY. 



served on the staff of Governor Gear, with the 
rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, four years, or 
during the entire administration of that Gov- 
ernor. May 26, 18S6, he was appointed special 
aid-de-camp on thestaffof Governor Larrabec. 
He lias served rive years on the city School 
Board, and two years of that time was its 
president. Tie was married in Omaha to Miss 
Ellen Murphy, a native of that city. They 
have two children— Clara and Frank R. 

jjjlis* P. HUGH, dealer in drugs and roedi- 

)'S'\{ cines, Creston, is located at 120 Maple 
r'MV 

t;p? ' street. In 1S7S lie purchased an inter- 
est in a drug store with O. E. Silverthrone. 
At that time lie was in the employ' of the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Com- 
pany, and the business was managed by his 
partner. In the winter of 18S2-'3 he sold 
his interest to u. b. Morse, and soon after 
Mr. Morse purchased the interest of Mr. 
Silverthorne. In 1885 the old firm of Rugh 
<fc Silverthorne represented the business, and 
January 1, 18S6, Mr. Rugh became sole pro- 
prietor, lie was born in Lebanon County, 
Pennsylvania, in 1S36. When about four- 
teen years of age his parents removed to 
Columbiana County, Ohio, and in 1851 the 
family removed to Illinois and located near 
Monmouth. Several years later they moved 
to Bushnell, McDonough County. The father, 
John Rugh, now lives in Qnincy, Illinois; the 
mother is deceased. Mr. Rugh left home 
when about eighteen years of age. Septem- 
ber 1, 1859, he began working for the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Com- 
pany, and continued in their employ until 
October 10, 1S82 — a period of over twenty- 
three years. He was employed in the loco- 
motive department all this time. On the 
morning of April 1. ISTo, the passenger train, 
of whose locomotive he was in charge, col- 
lided with another train near Tyrone, Iowa, 
known as the Tyrone collision. The con- 



ductor of his train, John Miller, and the ex- 
press messenger were instantly killed, and the 

. fireman of the other train, Charles Pickle, 
; was also killed. Mr. Rugh saved his life by 
jumping from the engine at the moment of 
! collision; but he was seriously injured as the 
I train was in rapid motion at the time, and 
was unable to do duty for some time. He 
i made several attempts during the following 
j year, but was obliged to give it up. In May, 
j 1S76, he was appointed foreman of the loco- 
motive department at Council Bluffs, and in 
November, 1S80, was appointed traveling en- 
| gineer for the company. In the spring of 
1SS0 he was made foreman of the locomotive 
department at Chariton, where he continued 
until 18S2. During the interval that he was 
out of the drug business at Creston, he was 
in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & 
St. Paul Company as engineer between Marion 
and Ottumwa. Mr. Rugh was married in 
Missouri, May 10, 1S57, to Miss Fannie An- 
drews, and they have one son — Fred. They 
lost five children, and all died in infancy ex- 
cept one daughter, Alice, who died at the 
age of sixteen years. 



'»*$=- 



#S>-o- 



KPOWARD E. IDE, superintendent of the 
' (TA Union Draft Horse Association, Creston, 
^Ji Iowa, was born in Seekonk, Massachu- 
setts, September 8, 1857, a son of William T. 
and S. A. (Stone) Uc, natives of Massachu- 
setts, of English descent. Mr. Ide came to 
Iowa in 1872. He was married in 1881 to 
S. P. Andrews, born in 1860, at Marietta, 
Ohio. They have one son — William T. , born 
in 1883. The Union Draft Horse Association, 
of which Mr. Ide is a member, was organized 
in 1883. For sometime he was secretary, but 
at present is its superintendent. The associa- 
tion owns several fine horses, the following 
being some of the most notable— Hoang Ho 
and Privateer, Norman stallions; the Judge 
and Mauxraan, Clydesdale stallions; Marsh- 



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:• ■ :. 



-.■■■■' ■ . . - . - ■ 



**j BIOGRAPUICAL SKETCHES. 6 Q 



man, English Shire stallion; McMahon, 2,400, 
Percheron stallion; Lord Zetland, imported 
Cleveland Bay stallion; Sandy Racket, thor- 
oughbred stallion; Madam Dien, 1,758, Pride, 
1,810, Faustine 1,6S2, Norman mares. Their 
horses are recorded in the proper records of 
each breed, and their responsibility is vouched 
for by all with whom they have had deal. 
Mr. Ide owns a fine farm of 240 acres in 
Grant Township on sections 17 and 20. He 
is a thorough-going business man, strictly 
honorable and upright, and is one of the 
prominent and esteemed young men of 
Ores to i). 

£7T\\ H. SPURR, photographer, located on 
) S.V the corner of Maple and Montgomery 
4^p£<2 streets, at Creston, in November, 1SS2. 
lie has had many years' experience in pho- 

ii>grap.jy, ...... -o---.i **} i>iuno& Llo 

business, and avails himself of all improve- 
ments pertaining to this branch of industry. 
His rooms are pleasant and well adapted to 
his use, and he has built up a good trade. 
His workmanship is unexcelled. Mr. Spurr 
was born in Chautauqua County, New York, 
in 1869. He removed with his father, J. S. 
Spurr, to Vinton, Iowa, where the latter still 
resides. Previous to locating in business for 
himself, Mr. Spurr was in the employ of a 
former photographer at Creston, Yiola Cutt- 
ler. 



VANHORN, an active and enterprising 
agriculturist of Platte Township, engaged 



27, 1SS0. To Mr. and Mrs. Vanhorn were 

born nine children — Jane, born March 7, 
1S33; Martin, bom January 20, 1838; Nancy, 
born February 25, 1S39; Sidney, February 
14, 1S42; William, born July 28, 1844; Par- 
barn, born May 4, 1S46; Mary, born May 10, 
184S; James, born February 25, 1850; John, 
born May 11, 1851. Mr. Vanhorn com- 
menced life a poor boy, being possessed of 
no capital but a pair of willing hands and a 
determination to succeed. lie made his first 
start in life in hauling rails and splitting cord 
wood, and by persevering industry and strict 
economy he has gained a competency for his 
declining years, being possessed of a good 
farm of sixty acres under fair cultivation, and 
a comfortable home. Quiet, unassuming, in- 
dustrious and strictly honorable in all his 
dealings, he has gained the confidence and 
respect of all who know him. Iu politics he 
affiliates with the Democratic party. 



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3 in farming and stock-raising on section 
12, is a native of the State of Ohio, the ch.te 

of his birth beinc January 7, 1814, a son of county seat of Fayette County. In the spring 

of 1880 he was admitted to the bar at Con- 



0O1IN M. HAYS, attorney and counselor 
~M\ at law, and notary public, located at 
i,i Creston in December, 18S0. lie was 
bom in Fayette County, Indiana, July 1, 
1S53. In March, 1S65, his father, John Hays, 
removed to Preble County, Ohio. He gradu- 
ated at Geneva College, Pennsylvania, in 
the class of '78. This class was composed of 
fen members, and Mr. Hays is the only one 
that chose the law as a profession. Re taught 
school at intervals during his college course, 
and taught considerably afterward. He was 
engaged in teaching in Fayette County, 
Indiana, at the same time reading law with 
Messrs. Little & Little at Connersville, the 



■ 



William and Sidney Vanhorn, wno were na- 
tives of New Jersey. Mr. Vanhorn was 
united in marriage to Miss Sara Neal, a 
daughter of Martin and Nancy Neal, his 
Wife being born January G, 1 SJ 3. She is 
now deceased, her death taking place March 



nersville, and June 23, that same year, he 
came to Iowa, and to Creston in October. 
His parents still reside in Preble County, 
Ohio. They have four sons and tiiree daugh- 
ters. They are well known as a family of 



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/f/STO/cr OF UNION counti: 



influence and culture; have had good educa- mid his wife are prominent members of the 



tional advantages. An older brother, "William 
A., came to Iowa in 1S79, locating on a farm 
in Louisa County. In 1SS3 he disposed of his 
farm and returned to Ohio. A younger 
brother, James IL, graduated at Monmouth 
College, Illinois, in 1871, and follows the 
teacher's profession. lie was superintendent 
of the high school at Connersville for some 
time. In IS^o he was called to the principal- 
ship of the Afton high school. After a suc- 
cessful year at that place he accepted the 
superintendency of schools at Winlield, Kan- 
sas. The other members of the family are 
residents of Ohio. 



,=£*- 



— *^mk 

/JOSEPH HATHAWAY, farmer and 
" '. | stock-raiser, section 19. Douglas Town- 
7%t kIu'ii. nostoffice, Cromwell, is a son of 
William Jkf. and Elmira J. (Sellers) Hathaway, 
and was born in Cass County, Indiana, in 1S3S. 
His father is still living, but his mother died 
in ISIS. He was brought up to the years of 
manhood upon his father's farm. July 3, 
1861, at the age of twenty-three years, he en- 
listed in Company A, Twenty-sixth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, and was in the service of 
his country four years, six months and twenty- 
four days. In the battle of Pine Grove, 
December S, 1802, he was wounded in the 
left side, i'rom which the ball was never ex- 
tracted, lie also engaged in the battles of 
Yicksburg, Syerling Plantation, Louisiana, 
Fort Spanish and other smaller contests. 
Commencing in life without means other than 



Christian church. They were married March 
24, 1861, in Cass Couniy, Indiana. She was 
Miss Ellen, daughter of Peter andTena (Fies- 
haur) Michael, and was born July 25,18-11, in 
Cass County, Indiana. They have had live 
children — Bradford, Minnie, Charlie, Lewis 
and Harry, the last mentioned being the 
only one living. 



■*»:> 



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■ ',""> i- H. BOLD was one of the earl}' pio- 
neers of Union Count v, coming here 



l^&i^H Q in the spring of 1S5G, when seven 
years of age, with his fathers family, who 
settled two miles southwest of Afton on a 
farm. His father died in 186-i, and William, 
being the oldest boy, took charge of the farm, 
which he and his brothers managed success- 
fully for several years. In 1868 he started 
out in life for himself, leaving the old home- 
stead in charge of his brothers. "With $25 in 
his pocket he started West, determined to 
cross the plains, which were then only trav- 
ersed by wagon trains, under escort of Govern- 
ment troops. He walked to Plattsmouth, 
Nebraska, and from there to Nebraska City. 
"While, waiting for a train to start overland, he 
was offered work on a farm near that place, 
and concluded to stay there that summer. 
The next fall he traversed the country west 
of Nebraska City, then only inhabited by set- 
tlers in dug-outs along the streams, in com- 
pany with a set of threshers. The threshing 
season closed only when the snow became too 
dee]) to move the heavy machinery, which was 



his physical and mental capacities, all he now ; left in the valley of the Little Blue, some 

possesses he owes only to himself. In his I twenty miles west of Lincoln. From here he 

youth he obtained a good common-school edu- | walked back to Nebraska City, near which 

cation, lie now has a good farm, well equipped I place lie taught school that winter. The next 

r .vith buildings and other improvements, j spring he was offered a situation as teacher of 

He came to this county in 1871. lla is now \ one of the departments of Nebraska College, 

servinc as assessor of his township the third , and while here he pursued his studies, keeping 

rear. Before the war he was a Democrat, but j his place with the higher classes, and, at the 

since he ha been a zealous Republican. He ! same time, instructing his classes in the 



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intermediate graces. From Nebraska City 
lie went to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, to engage 

in the study of law. After a year's study lie 

was compelled on account of his health to 
come back to Iowa and go on the farm p.gain. 
In 1S73 ho married Miss Kate A. White, then 
a teacher in the public schools of Creston. 
Their marriage was the first one ever cele- 
brated in Creston. In 1S77 he purchased the 
Afton Tribune, then a Republican paper, 
changed the name of the paper to Independ- 
ent American, and the politics to National 
Greenback. The paper has gradually grown 
in circulation and influence, until it is now 
one of the leading papers in Iowa. Politically, 
Mr. RoVb was a born Abolitionist, his father 
being a radical anti-slavery man. His first 
votes were cast for the Republican ticket, but 
in 1S73 he joined in what was known as the 
Granger movement, and took a strong stand 
on the anti-monopoly question. His just 
public speeches were made, this year. In 1876 



people. Chief among the measures introduced 
by him was the bill to prohibit non-resident 
aliens acqniring title to real estate in Iowa. 
This was one of the first bills of this charac- 
ter ever discussed in a Western Legislature, 
and it received prominent mention and discus 
sion in the editorial columns of the metropol- 
itan papers of New York, Chicago and Kansas 
City. It passed the lower branch of the 
Assembly by an overwhelming majority, but 
was defeated in the Senate. Mr. Robb is still 
the editor and proprietor of Independent 
American. 

-rTAMES RYAN, machinist, residing on 
"?; section 0, Highland Township, is a na- 
L tive of Scotland, born in Edinburgh, 
September 17, 1843. His father, James Ryan, 
was a native of London, England, and in the 
childhood of our subject returned to his na- 
tive country. James, Jr., was reared in Lon- 



he became a very active supporter of Peter | don, and was well educated, attending the 
Cooper, then a candidate for President on the 
National Greenback ticket, and stumped the 
county for his favorite candidate. The result 
of the vote surprised the old politicians, who 
did not expect over 100 votes would be given 
to Cooper, but the poll showed over -±00 
Cooper votes, and Sand Creek Township had 
been carried by a sweeping majority. From 
this time on "Billy" Robb became an im- 
portant factor in Union County politics. In 
1880 he moved his paper from Afton to 
Creston. In 1884, after a tierce contest, he 



National School of St. Mary's, Sonthwark 
District. After leaving school he learned 
the trade of a machinist, and in 1SG1 went to 
Bulgaria and worked at his trade in Rustchuk 
three years under the railway contractor, De 
Brasse. lie then went to Constantinople, 
and worked in the Government gun factory 
two years. In 1SG9 he went to Smyrna, in 
Asia Minor, where he was employed in the 
railway shops six months, and then returned 
to London, and in the fall of 1.870 came to 
America, and worked for the Grand Trunk 



was elected alderman from the Second Ward, \ & Great Western Railway, in Canada, from 
and in the fall of 1SS5 he was elected as '• 1871 until 1S75. In 1876 he was sent to the 
member of the Twenty-first General Assembly | Centennial Exposition, at Philadelphia, by 
of Iowa, after a political contest that will long ; the Canadian Government, to superintend tin- 
be remembered 'as one of the most bitter and j agricultural hall of the Canadian department. 
virulent that had ever taken place in Union ' In 1S77 he moved to Detroit, Michigan, and 
County. As a member of the Legislature the ! in 1878 to Iowa, and located at Creston, and 
records show that he took a prominent part in j since then has been in the employ of the 
all discussions on bills of importance., and he j Chicago. Burlington & Quincy Railroad, run- 
was the author of several measures which \ ning the brass lathe in the machine shop,. 
received marked attention from the press and | Mr. Ryan has been twice married. His first 






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wife was Emma J. Mortimer, to whom lie 
was married in London, October 11, LSG7. 
She died in 1ST3, leaving one son, James, 
who is in London. In 1874 Mr. Ryan mar- 
ried Mrs. Elizabeth Green, a widow with 
three children— John 0., Herbert and Ar- 
thur. Mr. Ryan is a member of the Odd 
Fellows order. In religious faith lie. is a 
Unitarian, his wife being a member of the 
Episcopal church. 

fAMES F. McOORMAOK, attorney and 
notary public at Creston, has been a res- 
i ident of this city since 1872, and was the 
first practicing attorney of Creston. He was 
born at Tullamona, Kings County, Ireland, 
in October. 1829. lie was educated at Rahan 

College, Kings County, and at St. Andrew's 

ri.ii r - o .i .. i. • . * i. , . . i i t^. . /-, .i 

lege, England. He studied law at the Temple 
in London, and was at one time a member of 
Parliament from the borough of Stockport. ' 
Mr. McCormack was an Irish patriot of 1S4S, 
and was tried, with Thomas Francis Mahan, j 
"William Smith O'Brien, and others, for high 
treason, and sentenced to be hanged, quar- ! 
tered and beheaded; but the sentence was | 
commuted to transportation for life to Van | 
Dicman's Land. After about a year he, with 
two others, MeMahan and Thompson, made 
their escape to America on a French vessel. 
McMahau afterward became a General in the 
Union army in the war of the Rebellion. He 
was drowned in the Missouri River near Fort 
Benton. Thompson died several years be- 
fore the war. After coming to America Mr. 
McCormack was engaged in various occupa- 
tions for several years. In 1863 he began | 
the study of law at Ogdensburg, New York. | 
His previous education greatly facilitated his 
studies, and lie was admitted to the bar in 
1864 in Syracuse, the same State. He has 
been in constant practice ever since that time. 
He came to Iowa in 1872, locating at Creston, | 



as before, stated, and was admitted at Afton, 
May 4, of that year, Judge James W. McDill, 
presiding. The following year he went to 
Kansas fov the benefit of his health. He lo- 
cated at Topeka and was admitted by the 
Hon. John T. Morton, and was at the same 
time admitted to practice in the United 
States courts. After an absence of a year he 
returned to Creston and was admitted to the 
United States Court 'at Des Moines, March 
9, 1SS2. He was married in Scotland to Miss 
Ann Quinn, a native of Kings County, Ire- 
land. They have no surviving children. Mr. 
McCormack was a Democrat for several years, 
but. is now a Republican, and did good work 
for Blaine in 1SS4. In religion lie is a Roman 
Catholic. 



,'rX.AZARD DUNN, a successful agricultur- 
al i ist of Lincoln Township, living on sec- 
^il tion 34, was born in St. Joseph, Michi- 
gan, July 29, 1834, a son of Nehemiah and 
Sidney (Hopkins) Dunn, the father a native 
of Kentucky, and of Scotch descent, the 
mother being of German ancestry. The par- 
ents now make their home in Linn County' 
Missouri. Our subject remained on the home 
farm till fourteen years of age, and received 
such education as the rude log-cabin subscrip- 
tion schools of that, early day afforded. After 
leaving the farm he began learning the 
machinist's trade, which he followed until the 
year 1861. He was married in 1860 to Miss 
Rhoda Townsend, a native of Pennsylvania, 
and of the seven children born to this union 
only three are now living — Nettie, a student 
at Drake University; Carrie and Charlie. Mr. 
Dunn was a soldier in the war of the Rebell- 
ion, serving his country about two years, and 
during his term of service participated in the 
battles of Hollow Springs, .Jackson, Vicks- 
burg, Milliken's Bend. Champion Hill and 
others of minor importance. He came to 
Iowa in 1865, locating then in Story County, 
where he lived until 1872. He tiien came to 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKET{ HES. 



Union County, and settled on the farm, where 
he has since followed agricultural pursuits. 
His farm in Union Township had but one 
acre broken when he first settled on it, and 
to-day the farm contains 100 acres of fine land, 
all under cultivation. Mr. Dunn began life 
entirely without means, but industrious habits, 
combined with strict economy and good man- 
agement have enabled him to prosper, and by 
his own efforts he has become the owner of his 
present fine property, and lias been able to 
assist his parents in their declining years. 
Mr. Dunn has served two term- as township 
trustee, beside holding other local offices. 
He is a member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. 



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/ffOSEPH M. MILL1GAN, attorney and 
•'• ■■ i counselor at law, Afton The bar o f 
5<f Union County possesses many excellent 
lawyers and men of more than average abil- 
ity, a number of whom have attained an ex- 
cellent reputation and a high standing in the 
profession solely by their own efforts. Prom- 
inent among this class is the subject of this 
notice, Joseph M. Milligan, of Afton, who 
has been a resident of this county since 1S6S. 
He is a native of "Washington County, Penn- 
sylvania, born May 22, 1S33. His father, 
Robert Milligan, was a native of the north 
of Ireland. His paternal grandfather, John 
Milligan, was a native of Scotland, and immi- 
grated to America about 1790, when his son 
Robert was live years of age, settling in 
Washington County, Pennsylvania. Robert 
Milligan served five years in the Indian wars, 
and in the war of 1812. The maternal grand- 
father of Mr. Milligan, William Adams, was 
a soldier in the war of the Revolution, and at 
one time was a member of the body-guard of 
General Washington. Our subject was reared 
in his native State, and attended the common 
schools. When twenty-two years of age he 
entered Waynesburg College, in Greene 



County, where he look a scientific course, 
graduating in 1861. In the meantime he had 
engaged in teaching to some extent, to enable 
him to continue his college course. He 
entered upon the study of the law soon after 
graduating, still leaching at intervals, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1S66. He did not, 
however, enter at once upon the practice of 
law, but continued to teach. He has had 
a large experience as an educator, extend- 
ing over a period of thirteen years. For two 
years he was principal of the school at Afton. 
In 1S69 he was appointed county superin- 
tendent to succeed Rev. Robbins, serving 
the unexpired term, and in fSTO he was 
elected to that office by the suffrage of the 
people, serving the full term. After an inter- 
val of one term he was again elected. He 
has been connected with the School Board at 
Afton eight years, and his experience as an 
educator has rendered him a valuable member 
of that body. In 1S70 Mr. Milligan began 
the practice of law, and in 1S73 formed a 
partnership with S. W. McElderry, which 
continued about four years. From 1S7G until 
1884 he was associated with Judge N". W. 
Rowell, since which time he has been alone. 
He was mayor of Afton in 1873, and was for 
several years a member of the town council. 
Politically Mr. Milligan is a Republican. He 
cast his first Presidential vote for General 
Fremont, in 1S56. He has always been an 
ardent admirer of the principles of his party, 
and in the exciting campaigns of the past he 
has done good service for his party on the 
platform and elsewhere. Mr. Milligan was 
married in Greene County, Pennsylvania, 
in 1861, to Miss Sarah Throckmorton, and to 
thi-s union have been born five children — 
Albert J., Nancy T., Robert F., William and 
Fannie G. Mr. Milligan has three brothers 
aiid one sister living — John, who resides in 
Washington County, Pennsylvania, was a 
member of the One Hundred and Sixteenth 
Regiment, Mounted Rifles, Pennsylvania, 
during the late war; Robert, a farmer in 



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Clarke County, was also a soldier in the war 
for the Union; James, residing in Washing- 
ton County, served in the One Hundred 
and Sixteenth, and was wounded at the battle 
of Gettysburg. 

fTTv, L. BELL, proprietor of a harness estab- 
fjjw? libhment at Creston, W. R. Bell, man- 
^v? 7 '^ agcr, was born in Burlington, IS'ew 
Jersey, in 1844, son of Thomas and Rachel 
(Graham) Bell. The father was born on the 
ocean, of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and the moth- 
er is of American birth. The subject whose 
name heads this sketch, enlisted in Company 
K, Fourteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and 
served thirty-three months, being mustered 
out in January, 1S6L lie participated in the 
battles of Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, Tupelo, 
Mississippi, and Oldtown Creek, in the latter 
cf which ho .. ub tvouiided in L'ue right thigh; 
was also in many' other engagements. After 
the close of the war he went to Chariton, Iowa, 
where he learned the harness trade, which he 
has since followed. He came to Creston in 
June, 1S72, and now owns a house and lot, 
and a business block. He is a member of 
the Odd Fellows order, in politics a Repub- 
lican, and both himself and wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. He was 
married in 1868, in Adams County, Iowa, to 
Lovina S. Ennis, who was born in Ohio, in 
1850. They have had three children — Ella 
M., Robert F. (deceased) and Daisy. 



r - Y.MAN WATERMAN, Jk., dealer in 
, 1 fa feed and produce at 116 South Union 
^* Street, Creston, was born in La Salle I such headway in the world by his industrious 



from eight to ten years of age, was in Bureau 
County, Illinois, and in 1S69 came and settled 
in Douglas Township; was reared as a farmer 
boy. \\\ 1883 he entered the real-estate busi- 
ness, which he indeed still continues in con 
nection with his other cares. He, in connection 
with G. B. Webster, owns half of section 23, 
in Lincoln Township, which they have under 
a good system of cultivation. Their stock is 
mostly of the graded varieties. They have 
210 acres in grass, a fine orchard, and good 
farm buildings. He has also a house and lot 
in Creston and a large house and three acres 
of ground on South Hill. Mr. Waterman 
started in life with small means, but is mak- 
ing money fast at present. He is an enter- 
prising gentleman ; votes the Republican 
ticket. He was married in Union County, 
in 187S, the day he was twenty-one years old, 
to Maggie Leith, who was born in Cedar 
County. Iowa, in 1858. They have three 
children — Earl L., Maggie M. and Blanche E. 



||AMES K. JOHNSTON, retired farmer, 
it, 1 residing in Cromwell, was born in Pick- 
\^' away County, Ohio, December 21, 1811. 
His father, Samuel Johnston, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, of Irish and German ancestry, 
and his mother, Elizabeth Ken-, was born 
in Kentucky, of Irish descent. Mr. John- 
ston, our subject, lived near Circleville, Ohio, 
until he attained his tenth year, whehhe went 
to Hocking County, that State, and was there 
till 1872; he then came to this county. He 
was brought up in agricultural pursuits, and, 
although his early education was limited, and 
he had but $100 to start with, he has made 



County, Illinois, November 20, 1S57, and is 
a son of Lyman and Elizabeth (Wakefield) 
Waterman, the former a native of Now York 
and the latter of Pennsylvania. They came 
with their family, in 1809, to this county, and 



habits and good judgment that he has been 
able to give each of his children nearly $2,000 
apiece, and he owns eighty acres of land in 
Lincoln. He has been a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and is esteemed 



still reside in Creston. Young Waterman, I an exemplary citizen. In Hocking County, 

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



615 



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Ohio, in 1S41, Mr. Johnston was married to 
Sarah Patterson, who was bom in Ohio in 
ISIS, and of their eight children three only 
arc living — George B., who was born in 
1846 in the State of Ohio, in 1S64 bore a 
portion of the hardships in the late war, in 
front of Petersburg and liichmond. He after- 
ward married Emma Reddick, of Hocking 
County, Ohio, and has one child, Bessie S., 
born June 11, 1SS3. S. M., who married 
Nancy A. Bellow, of Vinton County, Ohio, 
has two children — James W. and Samuel 
W., and Amy C, who became the wife of P. 
A. Swepston, Vinton County, Ohio, has 
four children — Mayo B., Enod A., Edna A. 
and Myrtie E. All are living in the vicinity 
of Cromwell, Iowa. 

-— ;^IIEY E. PRIDGEN, wagon and car. 
IIM] ri age-maker at Afton, located at this 
V/r^ir-] place in September, 186S. He may 
be regarded as the first wagon-maker in the 
place, having established his business here in 
April, 1S69; and manufactured the first 
wagon, on Kansas street, in the second block 
east of the southeast corner of the square. 
He had previously been engaged in bridge- 
building for the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad Company. Mr. Pridgen 
was born in St. Stephens, St. Clair 
County, Alabama, February 28, 1834. His 
father, Larlcin M. Pridgen, was a native of 
France, and came to America when a young 
man. He lived in North Carolina a short 
time, then removed to Alabama, where he 
died, in 1863, at the hale old age of eighty- 
nine years. Mr. Pridgen's grandfather, Hardy 
Pridgen, came to America as a soldier of 
the Revolutionary war, and served under 
General La Fayette. At the close of the war 
he returned to France. The mother of our 
subject was Millie (Meyers) Pridgen, a native 
of Alabama and of French ancestry. She died 



four children — three sons and one daughter. 
The oldest, Allen, was a soldier in the Mex- 
ican war under General Price; he died about 
1S57. Jesse died in Missouri in 1860. Mrs. 
Ann Kelp resides in Alabama. At the break- 
ing out of the Rebellion, "Wiley E. and his 
father espoused the cause of the Union. In 
I860 they came North on account of the ex- 
cited condition of the country. Our subject 
enlisted at Greenfield, Greene County, Illi- 
nois, in 1862, as a member of Company K, 
Ninety-first Illinois, commanded by Colonel 
13. M. Day, and served until the close of the 
war, being mustered out at Mobile, Alabama, 
July 13, 1SG5. He participated in the siege 
of Vicksburg, siege of Port Hudson, and the 
battle of Lookout Mountain. Soon after this 
last event his regiment was transferred to the 
Department of the Gulf, and while Banks was 
engaged in his Red River expedition, he, with 
his regiment, was in Texas, capturing Browns- 
ville. They then went to New Orleans, where 
they remained until the Mobile expedition, in 
which they took- part. After the war Mr. 
Pridgen returned to Springfield, Illinois, 
thence to Iowa, and in August, 1866, en- 
gaged in bridge-building, as before stated. 
He was married in Illinois, in March, 1 SGI, 
to Miss Maria Cox, a native of Virginia. 
They have two children — Walter, a resident 
of Illinois, and Fannie, living in Afton. 
Politically Mr. Pridgen is a Republican. 
His fatbJr was an old-line Whig. 



$f W. SLTJTTS, farmer and stock-raiser, 
section 4, Pleasant Township, is a na- 
tive of Union County. His parents, 
Cyrus and Caroline Slutts, settled here as 
early as 1855, and remained residents of the 
county the rest of their lifetime, the father 
dying in 1864, at the age of thirty-three years, 
and the mother January 5, 1883, aged fifty- 
two. The subject of this notice was of course 



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wis his 215 acres in a 
state of high cultivation, and well equipped 
with barns and cither out-buildings, a line re- 
sidence, etc. He is considered a mode] farmer; 
is a member of the Christian church, and a 
Republican. It was in the year 18TS that Mr. 
Slutts was married to Mary E., daughter cf 
Peter and Polly Bolinger, natives respectively' 
of Pennsylvania and Ohio, the former of 
German and the latter of German Irish de- 
scent. Mrs. Slutts graduated at Beverly 
(Ohio) College, with a credit of 100 on all the 
branches, and she afterward taught school 
for several years. The children in this family 
are Daisy, Floyd and Rose. Postoffice, 
Thayer. 

^- /\VID EADS foreman o* th" v.WK~,„;ti, 
1 [|n shop of the Chicago, Burlington & 
i~< Qnincy Railroad, at Crestou, came to 
this city February 14, 1870. He has occu- 
pied his present position since that time, lie 
was born in Crawford County, Indiana, in 
1S2S, and was reared in his native county, 
learning the blacksmith's trade. lie has been 
continuously in the service of the above 
named company since 1S.5S, being one of their 
oldest employes, lie married Mary Merri- 
man, and they have live children — two sons 
and three daughters. 



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: -:,ALPII MORGAN, one of the old and 



ployed on a farm, in Ohio, he having left his 
native State at that age. lie remained in 

Ohio till reaching the age of twenty-three 
years, when he went to Indiana, remaining in 
that State four years, lie was married in 
Indiana, to Miss Nancy Yoker, who was born . 
in October, 1819. she being a daughter of 
Michael and Elizabeth Yoker, natives of 
Ohio. To this union were born ten children 
—Mary A., William II., Daniel, Henry A., 
Andrew. Mattie E., Frank R„ Nancy J., 
Charles B. and Dora B. After his marriage 
Mr. Morgan removed to the State of Illinois, 
and after residing there lour years he came 
to Union County, Iowa, and settled on the 
farm in Platte Township which is still owned 
and occupied by his family. As an agricult- 
urist he was very successful, having by bis 
own exertions become the owner of 300 acres 
of as good land as Platte Township affords. 
He was an active, public-spirited citizen, and 
was identified with the growth and develop- 
ment of Union County, and during his resi- 
dence here served as school director, besides 
holding other township offices. In politics 
he affiliated with the Democratic party. 

PILLARD S. PlNFERTON.an enter- 
% \t \/| prising farmer and stock-raiser of 
f~ '~-i Grant Township, was born in Mercer 
County, Illinois, March 2(5, 185?, a son of 
William M. and Lliz* (Carnahan) Pinkerton, 
natives of Trumbull County, Ohio, and Mer- 
cer (now Lawrence) County, Pennsylvania, the 
father coming to Mercer County, Illinois, in 



«,. K; honored pioneers of Union County, now i ISIS, and the mother in the year 1S38. Our 



deceased, was born in the State of Ken 
tuckv, March 22, 1S22, and died at his old 
homestead on section 32, Platte Township, 
December IS, 1S85. Ho was early- in life 
inured to hard work, and the lessons of in- 
dustry learned in his youth proved of lasting 
benefit to him. When but eleven years of 
age he began working for himself, being em- 



subject was reared a farmer, and received his 
education in the common schools of his native 
county and at the academy at Aledo, Illinois. 
After completing his education he followed 
teaching for two years. He was united in 
marriage July 2, 1874, to Miss Amanda 
Boyer, a daughter of Jeremiah Dover, a resi- 
dent of Mercer County, Illinois. Of the five 






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1J/OGRA PH/CAL SKE 7'C/fJSS. 



children born to this union, four are living — 
Mary E., "William Jay, Violet A. and Ger- 
trude. Mr. Pinker ton came to Jiinggold 
County, Iowa, in 1S80, and from there went 
to Taylor County, locating in Lenox, in 1SS3. 
In the spring of 1884 he settled on his present 
farm on section IS, Grant Township, Union 
County, where lie has 1(30 acres of good land, 
and in connection with his agricultural pur- 
suits ho is successful}' engaged in running a 
sorghum factory. Mrs. Pinkerton is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



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fUDGE D. 1). GREGORY, of Afton, has 
been connected with the bar and bench 
v- of Union County since June S, 1S67. 
Be was born in Otsego County, New York, 
April 23, 1832. His par :.i: were Uriah and 
Phila (Moffet) Gregory. The former, a native 
of Norfolk, Connecticut, was taken by his 
parents to Otsego when a child. There were 
twelve children in the family of Uriah Greg- 
ory, four sons and eight daughteis, all of 
whom reached maturity. Several of them 
are now - deceased. Judge Gregory was reared 
in his native county. His education was ob- 
tained at Union College, Schenectady, in the 
class of '55. Several members of the class 
that graduated with Judge Gregory afterward 
became prominent citizens of Jowa, namely: 
M. M. Ham, of the Dubuque Herald/ C. K. 
Peck, a prominent merchant of Keokuk, who 
died in 1879; Orrin H. Reynolds, of Sioux 
City, who died in ISob; Charles C. Smetzer, 
a State Senator, who died in 1872 at Fort 
Dodge; William W. Ilungerford, a civil en- 
gineer at McGregor, Iowa; Almon G. Chase, 
a banker at Charles City; Henry D. Rice, at 
Bo ne, and Thomas C. Woodward, of Oi- 
tnmwa. Judge Gregory was educated with a 
view of entering the ministry, and was or- 
dained as a minister of the Baptist church; 
but lie afterward decided to adopt the profes- 



sion of the law for his life work, lie en- 
tered upon the study of his chosen profession 
in the. office of Captain Nathaniel Merrill, of 
De Witt, Jowa, in 1S57. lie remained there 
two years, and was admitted to the bar at the 
District Court, Judge John F. Dillon, pre- 
siding. Soon after this he went to Chicago, 
and formed a partnership in the firm name of 
Brcckett & Gregory. The firm established a 
successful practice in Chicago, but the sever- 
ity of the climate so affected the health of 
Judge Gregory that he resolved to make a 
change, and in 1SG7 came to Afton. Two 
years later he became associated with N. W. 
Rowell, which partnership continued several 
years. January 1, 1S7S, he was appointed 
judge of the Third Judicial District of Iowa, 
a position he occupied seven years. In Jan- 
uary, 1SS0, he formed a partnership with 
JudsonL. Wicks, of Creston. Judge Greg- 
ory <vas married in Illinois to Julia Etta Mer- 
ritt, who was born in Ulster Count}*, New 
York, and removed with her parents, Nehe- 
miah and Belinda (Smith) Merritt, to Illinois. 
Judge Gregory and wife have had no chil- 
dren. They have two adopted daughters — 
Maud and Grace. The judge is a man of 
excellent literary attainments. His superior 
judgment and knowledge of the law have 
been well attested by his eminent success, 
both on the bench and at the bar. Politically 
he is a Republican. His first Presidential 
vote was cast for Abraham Lincoln, in 1SC0. 
He has a beautiful home at Afton, where are 
to be found evidences of culture and refine- 
ment. 



-rVH. M. PETERS, teacher, farmer and stock- 
1 - raiser, resides on section 12, of Spauld- 
', ."" iug Township. He was bom in Adams 
County, Pennsylvania, in 1853. His parents, 
Henry and Eliza Peters, natives of Switzer- 
land, now reside in Mercer County, Illinois, 
in which county he grew to manhood in the 
occupation of fanning and teaching. Such 









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j/rsrony of union county. 



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men always have a broader view of life than 
the average of mankind, know how to li lake 
tilings by their smooth handle," and enjoy 
more of the world than they otherwise would. 
As a teacher, Mr. Peter; has been signally 
successful. As a citizen of this republic ho 
enjoys also a freedom unknown to the parti- 
san, in that lie votes for the " best man," re- 
gardless of party. His word is as good as 
liis bond, and he is peculiarly wary in signing 
his name to any obligation. lie has been a 
resident of Union County since 1SS0. He 
was married in Mercer County, Illinois, June 
23, 1SS0, to Miss Maggie, daughter of Rich- 
ard and Jane Cabeen, both natives of Ohio, 
and of Scotch-Irish ancestry. She was horn 
in that county in 1S62. Mr. and Mrs. Peters 
are the parents of three children — Richard, 
Finis and Cabeen. Both the paternal grand- 
fathers of Mr. and Mrs. Peters were soldiers 
in the war of 1312. Fostofflce, Spaulding. 



§AMES FERMAN, general hardware mer- 
chant, is located on Adams street, Cres- 
t -;^ ton. In 1884 he purchased a half-interest 
in the hardware business of Horace Clark, 
and July 3 of the same year he bought the 
remaining interest, and has since been sole 
proprietor. He carries a full line of goods 
and has established a good trade. Mr. Fer- 
man was born in Lancaster County, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 18-11, and when live years of age 
removed with his parents to Ohio. In 1851 
the family removed to Henry County, Illi- 
nois, where his parents, James and Catherine 
Ferman, passed the remainder of their days. 
August 18, 1SG1, Mr. Ferman enlisted in 
Company C, Forty-second Illinois Infantry, 
serving three years and two months. He 
participated in many of the most important 
battles of the war, including Stone River, 
Chickamanga, Lookout Mountain and Mis sion 
Ridge. At the hitter place he was severely 
wounded, and his service as a soldier was 



ended. lie received a gun-shot wound in the 
left leg below the knee which fractured the 
bone. The wound was a painful and danger- 
ous one, and rendered him permanently lame. 
He was confined in the hospital ten months, 
and seven months of the time was confined to 
his bed. For a long time the surgeons con- 
templated amputating the limb. Over fifty 
pieces of bone worked out of the wound while 
the process of healing was going on; and four 
years later a part of the ball made its appear- 
ance from the wound. The limb is three 
inches shorter than the other one. Prior to 
this misfortune Mr. Ferman received a sun- 
stroke while on a march in Mississippi, from 
which he has never recovered. After the 
war he returned to Illinois, where he had a 
farm, which he conducted for a time. In 
March, 18S3, he went to Wayne County, Ne- 
braska, where he still owns property; but the 
condition of his wounded limb rendered him 
unable to attended to the duties of farming; 
and he also suffered from the effects of the 
sunstroke, especially in warm weather. He 
concluded to change his occupation, and ac- 
cordingly, in 1SS1, came to Crcston, and en- 
gaged in business. Mr. Ferman was married 
in Illinois, after his return from the war, to 
Miss Eliza N. Bradford. They have three 
children — two daughters and one son. 

• pUTSHA S. TVILCOX, deceased, was born 
I ' . in the State of New York, in 1812, im- 
'\^-. migrated to Kewanee, Henry County. 
Illinois, resided there thirty years, and then 
came to Union County. He labored as a col- 
porteur for a number of years, beginning 
in 18-17, and traveled till 1852, and while 
traveling became acquainted with Miss 
Anna E. Mills. He was married in 
Henry County, September 1, 1852, to Miss 
Mills, who was born in Daarborn County. 
Illinois, in 1S2S. They became the parents 
of seven children, five of whom are living. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. G17 



John married Cora Hatch, and has. ot\e child, 
Burton; .Mary is the wife of Tom Wakefield, 
of Spaulding, and the remaining three — 
Minnie M., Harry and ILittie — still reside on 
the home farm. The latter consists of 100 
acres of well-cultivated land on section 25 of 
Spaulding Township, and it is leased, as the 
father die! March 9, 1SS6. The mother died 
March 16, 1 S S i . The parents were members 
of the Baptist church. The family came to 
Union County iu 1S81, and the}- were, and are, 
held in high esteem by all who know them. 
Postoflice, Creston. 

— e-S3>-*> 



*T?)-EXJAM1N WRAY", an enterprising 
a farmer of Highland Township, living on 
^7T section 29, was born in Lincolnshire, 
England, January 30, 1S22, a son of Benja- 
min Wray, who is now deceased. He whs 
brought up on a farm, and received his edu- 
cation in the common schools of his native 
place. He was married in England, January 
30, 1S15, to Miss Caroline Vincent, daughter 
of the late John Vincent, and of the seven 
children born to this union only three are 
now living — Benjamin, Joseph and Sarah, 
who married Elmer Lenard of Creston, and 
has two children, named Annie and Maude. 
A daughter, Annie, died after reaching matur- 
ity. She was the wife of Lan Ickis. Mr. Wray 
left his native country with his family in 
1851, landing at Xew York entirely without 
means. Jle borrowed 820 from a friend and 
started for Ohio. While on Lake Erie one 
of his children died. He spent the first 
winter near Paynesville, Ohio, and worked 
hard by the day to support himself and family, 
and by the strictest economy managed to 
save a little of his hard-earned wages. In 
the spring of 1852 he removed to St. Joseph 
County, Indiana, and in 1857 came to Union 
County, when he settled on the farm where 
he has since reside.]. The country was in a 
state of nature when Mr. Wray first settled 



here, and here he experienced many of the 
hardships of pioneer life. His nearest mill 
was at Winterser, and his trading was done 
at Ottumwa, llis land was uncultivated, but 
twenty acres had been broken, and a fence 
had been built around forty acres. His land 
is now well improved, and his residence and 
farm buildings are comfortable and commo- 
dious. Mr. Wray may well be classed among 
the self-made men of Union County. Land- 
ing in America penniless, he has by industry, 
economy and good management gained a com- 
petency for his declining years, being now 
the owner of 1,000 acres of land. In con- 
nection with his general farming he is en- 
gaged in raising stock, paying some attention 
to graded stock, in which he is meeting with 
success. 



VYMOND C. DELMEGE, a successful 
j \ ry and enterprising farmer and stock-raiser 
^o.\ of Xew Hope Township, was born in the 
1 north of Ireland, June 11, 1843. Soon after 
' the birth of our subject, his parents, Chris- 
j topher and Rebecca (Holmes) Delmege, im- 
< t migrated to America, and first settled in Bris- 
j tol, Illinois. whence they removed toKewanee, 
Illinois. They came to Union County, Iowa, 
in 1869, and are still living in Creston, the 
j father being now seventy-four years of age, 
| and the mother aged seventy-six years. Ray- 
j mond C. Delmege grew to manhood in llli- 
| nois, where he received a common-school 
i education. He enlisted in the war in Com- 
pany U, Ninth Illinois Cavalry, and was in 
J the service almost three years. He was in a 
I number of engagements including the battles 
j of Nashville and Duel: River, and was under 
\ lire around Nashville about sixty days. He 
came to this comity in August, 1805, and spent 
three years in Union Township, and at the 
same time owned a farm in Xew Hope Town- 
ship. In DOS he settled on section 16, New 
Hope Township, where he has since followed 
agricultural pursuits, and is now the owner of 



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3S0 acre* of choice land, lie was married 
September 23, 1863, to Miss Mary M. White, 
and they have a family of lour children — 
Frank, William, Sherman and Alfretta. Mr. 
Delmege makes a specialty of thorougb-bred 
short-horns, and he and his brother, Richard 
H.,own eighteen head of cattle, all registered. 
Mr. Delmege has served as justice of the 
peace for eight years, and was township trus- 
tee one term. lie is at present serving as 
county supervisor with credit to himself and 
to the satisfaction of his constituents, lie is 
a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows 
orders, belonging to the Masonic lodge at 
Murray, and the Odd Fellows lodge at Alton. 
He is also a member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic. In politics he affiliates with 
the Republican party. 






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JdjSEORGE W. EMERSON, real-estate 
S ['■ % dealer at Afton', was born in Licking 
^p County, Ohio. September 8, 1S38. His 
father, Jasper P. Emerson, resides at Afton. 
He was born in the town of Ware, in New 
Hampshire, November 1, 1S09, and moved to 
Ohio with his parents in 1S15, who settled on 
land in Licking County before the land was sur- 
veyed, and remained there until death. lie 
laid out a town on his land called Concord, 
which still bears that name. The village 
cemet< ry was also on his land. Jasper P. 
Emerson removed to Union County from 
Ohio, and settled on 200 acres of the western 
part of section 12, Highland Township, which 
he improved and lived upon for many years. 
This farm now constitutes the principal part 
of the County Poor Farm of Union County. 
Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Emerson had six children. 
Five grew to maturity, and four are still liv- 
ing. The oldest daughter, Sarah L., died in 
Ohio, at the age of fourteen years. The oldest 
son, Stephen L., came West in 1855, and set- 
tled on the eastern part of section 12, High- 
land Township. He now lives on section 29. 

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Mrs. Nancy Barber, wife of W. W. Barber, 
resides on section 12, Highland Township. 
She was formerly the wife of James H. Deuel, 
who was a soldier in the late war, being a 
member of Company II, Twenty-ninth Iowa 
Infantry, and died in hospital at Keokuk in 
1863. Lucretia A. was the wife of W. M. 
Wickham, of section 1, Highland Township. 
She is now deceased. George W., our sub- 
ject, came to Union County with his father in 
1857. In early life ho was engaged in farm- 
ing. He owned a farm in Lincoln Township, 
and sold it in 1S75, and moved to Creston,- 
where he engaged in the real-estate business, 
and from which placa he was elected county 
recorder, in 1S76, and served four years. 
Since that time he has been engaged in his 
present business, and resides at Afton. He 
was married in Afton to Miss Mary F. Gal- 
braith, daughter of Samuel and Phebe Gal- 
braith, then of Union Township, but now of 
Dodge Township. Mr. and Mrs. Emerson 
have live children — Nelson E., Luna E., 
Miriam E., Lena Band and Dora L. Miriam 
E., the third child had the misfortune to be- 
come a deaf mute at the age of three years, 
from the effects of spina! meningitis. Polit- 
ically Mr. Emerson is a Republican, and cast 
his first presidential vote for Abraham Lin- 
coln, in 1800. 

-'"} W. ECKERSON, of Creston, is the 
1. ,~ division master mechanic of the Chi- 
' 'I 3 cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 
at this place. He has charge of the locomo- 
tive and car department of the road iron: 
Chariton to Council Bluffs and branches. He 
has held this position since June, 1S7G, and 
has been in the employ of the company since 
April, 1S70. He was first employed in the 
shops at Burlington, and in February, 1872, 
went to Council Bluffs, where he was fore- 
man of the shops. Mr. Eckerson was born 
in Orleans County, New York, in the year 



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B I OCR A I 'UICA L SKE TONES. 



1843. lie began railroading at a very early 
age, being seven years in the employ of the 
New York Central at Rochester, from which 
place he came to Burlington. Mr. Eckerson's 
father, John Eckerson, was one of the early 
settlers of Orleans County, where he lived 
until his decease. Mr. Eckerson learned the 
trade of a machinist while in the employ of 
the New York Central at Rochester. His 
long continuance in his present responsible 
position is sufficient evidence of the ability 
with which he discharges the duties devolving 
upon him. He was married at Medina, New 
York, to Miss Annie G. Bateman. They 
have two children — Fred and Annie Louisa. 



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■<fNTIS D. MOORHEAD, section 22, Lin- 
yl.;d coin Township, is a native of Clermont 

h&£ County. Ohio, the date of his birth 
being October 29, 1813. His parents, William 
and Margaret (Arthur) Moorhead, were both 
natives of Brown County, Ohio, and are 
now living in Clermont County, where they 
have made their home for many years. The 
paternal grandfather of our subject, Patrick 
Moorhead, was a native of Scotland, but immi- 
grated to America many years ago, when he 
settled in "Westmoreland County, Pennsylva- 
nia. James Arthur, the maternal grandfather 
of our subject is still living ill Brown County, 
Ohio, aged nearly ninety years. lie was a 
soldier in the war of 1S12, and for his services 
in that war draws a pension. The father of 
our subject, was a mechanic, and followed 
wood-turning for many years. Otis U. Moor- 
head was reared to the avocation of a farmer, 
and has made that his life work. He served 
as a soldier in the late war almost three years, 
and was wounded and taken prisoner at Sabine 
Cross-Roads. He was kept a prisoner at 
Mansfield, Louisiana, from April 8 until 
Jul)' 11, 180-1, and later in the same month 
received his discharge. He participated in a 
number of engagements, including the battle 



of Shiloh, siege of Corinth, siege of Vicks- 
burg, Chickasaw Bayou and Bed River cam- 
paign. In the fall of 1S67 he settled in 
Wapello County, Iowa, where he was married 
December 26, 1S70, to Lucy E. Howell, a 
daughter of Lemuel Howell, of "Wapello 
County. They are the parents of three chil- 
dren — Ada, Lila and Alice. In 1875 Mr. 
Moorhead removed from Wapello to Adams 
County, Iowa, and in 1S79 came to Union 
County, and in 1880 settled on his present 
farm. His farm contains eighty acres of land, 
most of which is seeded to grass, and he is 
principally engaged in stock-raising. He has 
served as president of the School Board and 
has held other local offices, and is at present 
acting as township trustee, lie is a member 
of the Farmers' Alliance. In politics he 
affiliates with the Greenback party. 

ggTKINSON HUPP, postoffice, Afton, is 

iuMi 011C °' ? *' 1C enterprising agriculturists of 
■sr.;r? Lincoln Township, engaged in farming 
and stock-raising on section 25, where he has 
a fine farm of 120 acres under good cultiva- 
tion. Mr. Hupp was bom in "Washington 
County, Pennsylvania, the date of his birth 
being September 1, 1844. His parents, Isaac 
and Mary A. (Atkinson) Hupp, were natives 
of Pennsylvania and Virginia respectively, the 
father being of German and the mother of 
Scotch ancestry. Atkinson Hupp was reared 
a farmer, and has followed that vocation the 
greater part of Ids life. He enlisted in the 
war of the Rebellion in Company F, Sixty- 
third West Virginia Cavalry, where he served 
six months, and was then transferred to Com- 
pany 11, First West Virginia Battery. Among 
the battles in which he participated may bo 
mentioned, Petersburg, Mansfield and New 
Creek Station, being captured by the enemy 
at the latter place, and imprisoned most of 
the tune in tie Richmond prison. He came 
West in 18C5, and lived in different parts of 



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Iowa, till he finally settled in Lincoln Town- 
ship, Union County, lie was united in mar- 
riage in 1 S 70 to Miss Mary XI. Cupp, a daugh- 



markable campaign. After serving three 
years and three months he returned to Maine, 
and in 1S65 went to Missouri, and engaged in 



ter of "William and Susan Cupp, who were ; railroading. Mr. Stanchficld's father, John 
natives of Virginia, Mrs. Hupp having been j Stanchlield, is still living. Our subject was 



born in that State in 1S53. They are the par 
ents of eight children — Cyrinda, Edward, 
R-jse Ann, Hester V., Charles, Alice, Robert 
L. and Cyrus AY. Mr. Hupp commenced life 
for himself without capital, lie began by 
working as a farm hand at which he continued 
until he. had accumulated §500. He then 
purchased a team, and followed farming on 
rented land for two years, and by the end of 
the time mentioned he had saved §900, with 
which he bought a farm. Tims by persever- 
ing energy, industry and strict economy he 
lias gained by his own efforts his present fine 
property in Lincoln Township, and has gained 
the respect of all who know him. In politics 
Mr. Hupp affiliates with thn Republican 
party. 



ipYRHS A. STANCH FIELD, of Creston, 
'[.'. is conductor of the fast mail train on 
Jl t5y*i the East Iowa Division of the railroad 
between Burlington and Creston. He has 
been connected with the Chicago, Burlington 
& Quincy Railroad since 1871. He was 
freight conductor one year, and then transfer- 
red to a passenger train. Prior to his engage- 
ment with this company he was for six year son 
the Hannibal & St. Joseph Road. Mr. Stanch- 
field was born at Auburn, Maine, in the year 
mi. October 23, 1851, he enlisted, in Com- 
pany F, Fifteenth Maine Infantry, for three 
years. He was with his regiment in Louisiana 
and Texas during the first two and a half 
years of the war; serving with Butler atNew 
Orleans, and took part in General Banks' Red 
River campaign. Hisregiment was a part of 
the Nineteenth Army Corps, and during the 
summer and fall of 1SG1 was with General 
Sheridan in the Shenandoah campaign, taking 
part in all the memorable battle s ofthat re- 



married in 1S07 to Miss Louisa Reynolds, 
native of Monroe, Michigan. Their children 
are — Lucy, Marion, Lnella and Clara. They 
have a pleasant home at Creston, with sur- 
roundings that indicate taste and refinement. 



-"!-;> R. FULLER, one of the prominent 
*v,U and influential citizens of Creston, 
~'~° Iowa, is a native of the State of New 
York, born in 1S40, a son of Azel J. and 
Mary C. (Ross) Fuller, and has been a resi- 
dent of Iowa since 1S45. He was left an 
orphan when but a child, with no means of 
support except bis own earning;, and being 
early thrown on his own resources learned 
lessons of independence that have been of 
benefit to him in all the varied experiences of 
his life. He made Clayton County his home 
from 1845 till 1S6G, and from that county en- 
listed, September 1, 1S61, in the defense of 
his country in the war of the Rebellion, and 
was assigned to Company L, Sixth Iowa 
Cavalry. He enlisted as a private but was 
promoted for his gallantry, and when mus- 
tered out, in 1SG5, was First Lieutenant of 
his company, having refused the Captaincy 
of three other companies. After his return 
home he engaged in business, a pursuit in 
which he was very successful, as he is a good 
salesman, nature having peculiarly endowed 
him in that direction. In 1876 he embarked 
in business in Creston. H\~, residence in 
Creston is one of the finest in town. It is lo- 
cated in the west end. Mr. Fuller is purely 
a self-made man, his wonderful success, 
financially, being the result of industry, good 
management and economical habits. Ho wis 
married in West Liberty, Muscatine County. 
Iowa u 1807, to Mary E. Sharpueck, daugh- 



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Jl/OGRA I 'UICA L SKB TCI IKS. 



ter of Samuel ami Ura (Hise) Sharpneck, na- 
tives of Pennsylvania. Mr.-?. Fulle r was born 
in Salem, Ohio, in 1S38. She is a cultured, 
refined lady, and Las always been to ber hus- 
band a true helpmeet, assisting him in many 
ways, known only to woman, to attain the 
degree of prosperity be has now reached, and 
making his home a haven where he may find, 
when the busy cares of the day are over, that 
rest and comfort which the weary .mm craves, 
and which, like a spring of water in the 
desert, refreshes and gives new vigor for the 
cares to follow. They have two children — 
Maude and Roy. Mr. Fuller is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity' and the Grand Army 
of the Republic. In religious views both 
himself and wife are Free Thinkers, and 
politically lie is independent. Although 
allied to no creed or sect, he is a man of 
quick, keen perceptions, and his naturally 
strong mind and moral tendencies make l"" 1 
a man of irreproachable character. He is 
public-spirited and liberal and is always ready 
to contribute of his means to assist any 
worthy object or individual in need of help. 
In his home he is an affectionate, considerate 
husband and a kind, indulgent father. 



aim and with Sherman on his march to the 
sea, and returned home without receiving the 
slightest wound, lie came to Iowa in 1S73, 
remaining till the following year in Warren 
County, coming to Union County in 1874, and 
in ISs-i settled on the farm which is still his 
home, where he has eighty- acres of well-im- 
proved land. Mr. Sweet was united in mar- 
riage January 27, 1S59, to Miss Amanda J. 
Moody, a daughter of George Moody, who is 
deceased. They have a family of three chil- 
dren — Orrin M., Clara A. and George C. Mr. 
Sweet is a member of the Evangelical church. 



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SYLVESTER SWEET, engaged in gen- 
Ypsjj eral farming on section 15, of Xew Hope 
^f» Township, is a native of Allegany 
Cointy, New York, born August GO, 1837, a 
sen of the late Sylvester Sweet, who was also 
a native of Xew York, born in Genesee 
County. In 1512 the parents removed with 
their family (0 Henry County, Illinois, and in 
that county our subject grew to manhood, 
being reared on a farm, and educated in the 
common schools, lie was a soldier in the late 
war. enlisting in Company F, One Hundred 
and Twenty-fourth Illinois Infantry, and dur- 
ing his three years' service participated in the 
batt'es around Atlanta, Jackson, Tennessee, 
Champion Hill, Meridian, Kenesaw Mount- 



} S. BAYLESS, druggist, physician and 
surgeon at Cromwell, was born it; 
Belmont County, Ohio, in 1844. His 
I father, Elihu Bayless, is also a native of Ohio, 
1 and :: now living in Richelieu County, Wis- 
! cousin. He has represented his county in 
the Legislature several terms; is also a Mcth- 
i odist preacher of considerable note. Before 
I the war he was an able defender of the abol- 
ition of American slavery, and at one time 
on that account, there was a reward offered 
for his life. He is now sixty-seven years of 
age. His wife, Emily Wadswortb, was a 
native of Pennsylvania, and died in 1S5G, at 
the age of thirty-seven years. Dr. Bayless 
was twelve years old when he moved with 
the family to Wisconsin, wdiere he remained 
until the war. In 1864 be enlisted in Com- 
pany D, Eleventh Wisconsin Veteran Infant- 
ry Volunteers, and served to the close of 
that great struggle. Soon afterward, in 1866, 
he married Miss Rachel, daughter of Arthur 
and Elizabeth Cook, her father a native of 
Pennsylvania and her mother of Maryland. 
In the doctor's family there are now two 
children — Emily F. and Winnie E. Dr. 
Bayless came to Union County in 1S73, set- 
tling on a farm, and in 1^7d he entered the 
drug store in Cromwell, where he carries a 
well-selected stock of drugs, paints, oils and 












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sundries. He owns the property, besides a ! the Mississippi River at Davenport, they came 



half-interest in the Oromwel] Hall building. 
He commenced reading medicine in 1S77, 
attended the State University of Iowa, and 
lias now been practicing his profession four 
years, making a specialty of sore eyes, in 
which he has been signally successful. The 
doctor is a member of the orders of Free 
Alasons, Odd Fellows and Grand Army of 
the Republic. 

§AY D. SPAULDIXO has the honor of 
being the first settler of Spaulding Town- 
ship, and for that reason this division of 
the county received his name. He was born 
near Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York, 
Deccraber27,lS41. His father, Dwell j Spauld- 
-.,- v'ns bori in Connecticut W when a 

Ol 'J 

young man lie removed to Eastern New York, 
where he married Cynthia Wood worth, also a 
native of Connecticut; they died in Onondaga 
County, New York, where they had resided 
for many years. They had right children — 
five sons and three daughters, of whom the 
subject of this notice was the youngest. Four 
sons and one daughter are living. Mr. 
Spaulding was reared in his native county to 
the occupation of farming. For a time after 
becoming of age he was engaged in mercantile 
business at Syracuse, but determined to enter 
agricultural pursuits. Land being high in the 
old States of the East, he resolved to go 
West; and accordingly, in the spring of 1866, 
he started westward for Missouri. Passing 
through tin's county on his journey, he was 
pleased with the appearance of the prairies in 
this part of the county, now* Spaulding Town- 
ship, and decided to locate here. The nearest 
railroad station to this place at that time was 
Des Moines. On his way West, while at 
Michigau City, Indiana, he was joined by Mr. 
Elmer J. Emmons, an acquaintance from boy- 
hood, and they came on together. Crossing 



thence on foot, along an irregular route, as 
their object was to see the country, and de- 
termine the most desirable place to locate, 
reaching this vicinity about the middle of 
dune. No settlement had been made here in 
this part of the county. Struck by the b( auty 
of this section, they resolved to locate here. 
Mr. Spaulding's first purchase of hind was 
the northwest quarter of section 11, and also 
a wood lot, which comprised the northeast 
quarter of section 5, in Lincoln Township. 
Here he made the first improvements in 
Spaulding Township. At various times after- 
ward he bought other lands in the township. 
Several years later he sold the prairie he first 
purchased to Mr. E. J. Emmons, who still 
owns it. He now resides on the southwest 
quarter of section 1, while his farm comprises 
the south half of section 1, the north half of 
sec tion 19 and the southeast of section 11. 
He also owns in other parts of the township 
400 acres, besides 240 acres in Lincoln Town- 
ship, having altogether 1,420 acres, the most 
of which cost him but $.5 per acre, and none 
more than $10 an acre. His first experience 
was in grain-raising, and he gradually passed 
into stock-raising, having for a number of 
years past made a specialty of hogs, lie 
deals also extensively in grain and hay. In 
all the above enterprises he has been emi- 
nently successful. Mr. Spaulding was mar- 
ried to Mattie Palmer, a native of Onondaga 
County, New York, and they have one son, 
named Elmer, who was born in June, 18S0. 



1 HOMAS L. MAXWELL, of the firm of 
. j ;. Maxwell & Leonard, attorneys at law, 
:—" settled in Creston in September, 1SS3, 
and commenced the practice of his profession 
in that city. He was tor a time a member of 
the law firm of Ettien, Spurrier cc Maxwell. 
Later the firm became Spurrier & Maxwell. 
His next partnership was the present one— 



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MOCK A PillC. 1 1. SKETCHES. 



Maxwell iv' Leonard — which was established 
in 1875. The office is on Adams street in 

the Million- Block. Mr. -Maxwell was born 
in Harrison County, Ohio, in the year 1S5!, 
and when lie became a lad his father, Thomas 
Maxwell, removed to McDonongh County, 
Illinois. Here Mr. Maxwell attained mature 
manhood, lie began the study of law in the 
year 1870, at Rushville,' that State, in a county 
adjoining McDonough. With his legal studies 
lie alternated the teaching of school until 
1S74, when he was admitted to the bar at 
Afton, in Union County; but lie began prac- 
tice at Corning, Adams County, Iowa, where 
he continued until he came to Creston. 
While a resident of Corning he represented 
Adams County in the Nineteenth General 
Assembly of Iowa, having been elected by the 
Greenback party. He is now (October, 1SSG.) 
the. candidate of his part;)- for district judge. 
Intellectually he possesses move than ordinary 
ability; as a lawyer he has attained a high 
reputation; as a speaker he is fluent and forci- 
ble, and as exponent of the principles of his 
party he is able and gives satisfaction to all 
his friends. After becoming a citizen of 
Union County Mr. Maxwell married Miss 
Lucy Fish, of Beardstown, Illinois. His 
present law partner, Mr. Leonard, is a young 
man of much promise; was born in Johnson 
County, Iowa, in I860; has bad the advanta- 
ges of a lib.'ial education, graduating at the 
Iowa State University in the class of 'SI, and 
iu the law department of that same institution 
in 18S3. 

% D. BLOSSEE, blacksmith and wagon 
and carriage maker at Cromwell, is 
• commanding a large trade on account 
of his superior workmanship and honest deal- 
ing. He was born in Hocking County, Ohio, 
in 1S59. His father, David Blosser, was a 
native of Virginia, and his mother, Elizabeth 
McBroom, of Ohio. They are now liv- 
ing in Kansas. He grew up to years of ma- 



turity ^".) the farm in his native county. In 
1S76 he came West and located upon a farm 
in this county, where for three years he pur- 
sued the vocation in which he was trained; 
then, in 1879, he hired to work at the black- 
smith's trade in Cromwell, for William L. 
Morford, and in 188o bought out Mr. Mor- 
ford's interest. Besides the shop, 24 x 70 feet, 
he owns a house and four lots. He is cs- 
te( mod by the community as a first-class citi- 
zen. He was married in 1SS3, in this county, 
to Ella Peak, daughter of Mordecai Peak. 
She was born in Illinois, in October, 18(30. 
By this marriage there are two children — 
Pay and Harry. Mr. Blosser had seven 
brothers and sisters; two of the former were 
killed in the late war. His grandfather on 
his mother's side was a soldier in the war 
of 1812. 



•T^ILLIAM OHIPMAN, a prominent 
: ■ \J \Ti and influential citizen of Grant Town- 
LT^i^-J ship, engaged in farming and stock- 
raising, on section 28, was born in Kentucky, 
November 9, 1S49. his parents, William and 
E. Chipman, being natives of the same State. 
He was reared to the avocation of a farmer, 
remaining on the home farm in his native 
State till the year 1871, since which he has 
made his home in Union County, Iowa. He 
was married in 1871, to Miss Minnie Lucas, a 
daughter of P. and Aiinie E. Lucas, who 
were natives of Kentucky. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Chipman have been born eight children — 
Eddie, Walter, William, Annie, Myrtle, Mary, 
Biehard and one who died in early infancy. 
Mr. Chipman bought his present farm when 
he came to Union County, which at that time 
was entirely unimproved. It now contains 
100 acres of well-improved land under good 
cultivation, with comfortable residence and 
farm buildings, noticeably good. Mr. Chip- 
man is one of the public-spirited men of 
Grant Township, and during his residence 
hen lias filled ace ptably various township 



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HISTOR1" Or UNION COUNTT. 



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and soho il offices. In politics he is identified 
vritli the Democratic party. Both lie and his 
wife have been connected with the Methodist 
Episcopul church since sixteen years of age, 
and are among its worthy and active membei : . 



Hm ALLEN, of the firm of Allen & Bush, 
|k| dealers in books, stationery, etc., came 
*^ 3 to Crestou in 1879. He is a native of 
Vermont, and resided there until twenty years 
of age, when lie came to Iowa. His father, 
J. Haskell Allen, still resides in Vermont. 
Mr. Allen married Miss Florence Tollers, 
daughter of Colonel Knock Toiler.-. The busi- 
ness house of Allen &Bush was established in 
1879, by Fahnestock & Fuller, of Galesburg, 
Illinois, who were succeeded by the present 
firm, September 1, 18S0. Their store is located 
on the comer of Maple and Montgomery 
streets. Their store-room is 64x30 feet, and 
complete in all its appointments. Mr. Alien 
has entire charge of the business, his partner, 
Mr. E. J. Bush, being vice-president of the 
First National Bank, and devoting his atten- 
tion to his duties there. They keep a com- 
plete stock of books, stationery, wall paper, 
fancy goods, etc., everything usually kept in 
a first-classs store. 

"•■ H. I1AEU1SON, farmer and stock 
■'.\!\i raiser, resides on section 20, Doug 
1-4,—;= las Township, where he owns 1G0 
acres of well-improved land. He was bom 
in Peoria County, Illir.ois, in 1S38. His 
parents, Isaac and Sarah (Nicholson) Harri- 
son, natives respectively of England and 
Virginia, came from the latter State to Illinois 
in a very early day. The father is still living 
in Fulton County, that State, and the mother 
is deceased. Mr. Harrison of this sketch lived 
in Peoria until the year 1856; from that time 
to* 1875 he was a resident of Galva, Henry 



County, same. State; then he settled in Union 
County. It was in Galva that he was married, 
in 1SG0, to Miss Orpha A., daughter of 
| .Daniel and Keturah (Burd) Carroll, who was 
i born in 1S14, in New Jersey. The children 
j in Mr. Harrison's family are Willie II. (de- 
ceased), Elmer E., Isabel, Walter S., "Mary E., 
1 Harry G, Pearlie, Chattie, Frances E. and 
' Evalyn — ten in all. When Mr. Harrison caino 
I with his family to the place that is now his 
home it was only prairie sod, with no im- 
I 'proveincnt whatever, not so much as a hitch- 
ing-post. There was not a tree or shrub on 
! the place; but by perseverance and hard 
J labor he has, with the help of his family, 
! turned it into a well-cultivated and productive 
; farm and pleasant home. 



-S-o- 



•7 : OSEPH JAMES, farmer and stock-raiser, 
"?. I section 2, Highland Township, is a native 
¥■ of Ohio, horn in Athens County, Decem- 
ber 30, 1S35. His father, John James, was a 
native of Maine, and moved to Ohio when a 
young man. In 18-1-7 he located in Morgan 
County, where he died, in 1873. Joseph 
James was reared a farmer, receiving a good 
education in the common schools. In 1855 
he came to the State of Iowa, and lived two 
years in Jones County, and in 1857 removed 
to Appanoose County, where he was living 
on the breaking out of the war of the Ke- 
: hellion. lie enlisted in the defense of his 
country, and was assigned to Company I, 
' Third Iowa Cavalry, and served over three 
' years. He participated in the battles at West 
j Plains, Grand Glaze, Bayou Couch, Warm 
Fork of 'Spring River, Tupelo, Mississippi, 
, the siege of Vicksburg and others of minor 
' importance. He received a sunstroke near 
] Jackson, Mississippi, which disabled him for 
active service for nearly a year. After his 
discharge from the army he returned to Ap- 
panoose County, where he lived until L879, 
I when, in January, he moved to Union County, 



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BIOGRAPHIC. 1 L SICE TCIIES. 



and settled in PleasantTuwnship. He moved : at Houston. Missouri, lie then wont to IV 
to the farm where lie now lives in 1SS5. It ; tosi, Missouri, where he was on guard duty 
contains eighty acres of valuable land, and j some time, and while there he helped to drive 
his building improvements are commodious j Marmadnke from that State. He was detailed 
and comfortable. In addition to attending j as hospital steward at a small town about 
to his farm he is engaged in blacksmithing, j twenty-five miles east of Little Rock, and 
which is a great convenience to the neighbor- j finally was left there as Surgeon, by the re- 
in* farmers. Mr. James was married July j moval of the Surgeon over him. While there 
27^1857, to Martha R., daughter of Augustus j they had some trouble with bushwhackers, 
C. Boyer. To them have been born twelve i although none of the Union men were killed 



children, but eight of whom are living— Ida 
E., Eddie N., Ethel L., Oviett B., Renna O., 
Olive E, Martha C. and Oleinma B. Mr. 
James is a member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic. He and his wife are members 
of the Christian church. 






by them. Dr. Johnston subsequently went 
to Little Rock, thence to Benton, Arkansas, 
where he joined Ins regiment, and was soon 
after detailed Hospital Steward of the Thirty- 
second Iowa Infantry, and served in that 
capacity on the Red River expedition, after 
which he was ordered back to Memphis, and 
was discharged at Keokuk, Iowa, in October, 
1S61, when he returned to his home, broken 
down in health. He was married June 7, 
1865, to Miss Frances Burns, daughter of 
"William Burns, of Garden Grove, Iowa. They 
have five children — Edward, Thomas W., 
Eliza G., Marjerie and Charles R. Dr. John- 
ston came to Union County in 1870, and set- 



J7 RICHARD IT. JOHNSTON, physician 
tk and surgeon; and the present efficient 
^sM postmaster of Cromwell, was born in 
Huron County, Ohio, .May 20, 1836, a son of 
the late Dr. Thomas Johnston, who was a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania. The father settled in 

Huron County, Ohio, in 1S35. and for many ' tied at Cromwell, where he has since built up 
years practiced medicine in New Haven, that i a lucrative practice, and has gained the re- 
count)'. Our subject attended lectures in the j spect and confidence of all who know him. 
medical college at Albany, New York, and at . Dr. Johnston was appointed postmaster July 
the Western Reserve College, at Cleveland, i 1. 18S5, on the resignation of Dr. Henderson. 
Ohio. He came to Iowa in 1857, and settled I He is a member of both the Masonic and Odd 
at Garden Grove, Decatur County, where he | Fellows orders, and also belongs to the Grand 
began the practice of medicine, in August, \ Army of the Republic. 
1858, following it at that place until Angi st, j 

1SG1. He then helped to raise Company L, — °~i3>-*> — "SgyS t,> - < iSH> 

Third Iowa Cavalry, and enlisted as a private | 
in the same company. He was appointed | 



Surgeon at Rolla, Missouri, and was stationed 
at Salem, Missouri, about ten months. He 
then joined his regiment on their raid through 
Arkansas. He joined his company at Leba- 
non, Missouri, in the fall of 1S62, and was 
engaged in doing guard and scout duty about 
a year. He then joined General Totten'i 
command at Springfield, Missouri, but soon 
after returned to General Warren's command, , 1 



"~ , AMUEL F. HARVEY, section 17. Lin- 
coln Township, was born in Fayette 
'^p County, Pennsylvania, June 26, 1S35, 
a son of Alexander and Ann (Foreman) Har- 
vey, his father a native o'i Pennsylvania, and 
his mother of West Virginia. In 1847 his 
arents moved to West Virginia, and in that 
io lived until 18G7, when lie came to 
and located in Mahaska County. In 
e moved to Union County, and se' 1 '. i! 



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HIS TO in- OF UNION CO V NTT. 



in Lincoln Township, where lie has since lived. 
He owns 240 acre- of choice land, all well 

cultivate. 1, and his residence and farm build- 
ings are commodious and comfortable. His 
educational advantages were limited in his 
youth, lmt by making the best of Ins oppor- 
tunities he obtained a practical education and 
tilted himself for the activities of business 
life. He was married January 26, 1860, to 
Miss Jane Gibson, a native of Baltimore, 
Maryland, daughter of William Harvey. To 
them were born ten children — Margaret A., 
Eda E., Franklin W., David G., William G., 
Alton A., decease 1. Harry 0., Thomas S., 
Ehoda B. and Bertha M. Mr. Harvey has 
been a prominent citizen of his township, al- 
ways taking an active interest in its public 
affairs, and has held different positions of 
trust, among others being road supervisor 
and school director. He and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He has been a member of the Masonic frater- 
nity a number of years. 



4 \ !\ 



Sioux City & Pacific Railroad Company, and 
in the autumn of that year engaged with the 
present company and came to Creston. Dur- 
ing his long experience his train has not met 
with an accident of any kind, which, consider- 
ing the length of time he. has been on the road, 
speaks well for his caution and efficiency, lie 
was married at Flint, Michigan, in 1S73, to 
Miss Hattie M. Wing, who died in 1S84, leav- 
ing three children — Charles P., Guy and G. 
Janie. In 1SS5 he married Miss Ella Glass, 
of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and they have one 
child — Iowa Yesta. 






J. JAMESON, conductor on the 
: i' lA/.T Chicago, Burlington &QuincyEail- 
r^cjjs?} road, has been a resident of Creston 
since the fall of 1870, when it was an initial 
point, at which time he became connected 
with the railroad company. He began his 
services as yard-master, and occupied that 
position until the fail of 1877, when he be- 
came conductor on a freight train between 
Creston and Council Bluffs. In 1SS3 he 
assumed the duties of conductor on a passen- 
ger train between the same points. Mr. Jame- 
son was born in New Brunswick, near the 
boundary line between that Province and the 
State of Maine, in 1847. His father, C. S. 
Jameson, is of Scotch origin, and still lives in 
New Brunswick, his grandfather also living 
in the same country. He began railroading 
in 1807, on the New Brunswick & Canada 
Railroad. In May, IS70, he engaged witli the 



SAAC MANN, postoffice Kent, is one of 
the public-spirited citizens of Piatte Town- 
pr ship, and an active and enterprising agri- 
culturist, living on section 1G. He is a son 
of David iuiu Sarah (Sickles) Maun, who 
were natives of the State of Pennsylvania, 
and subsequently came to Union County, 
where the father lived till his death, in 1S86. 
The mother is still living, being now eighty- 
six years of age. The father being a farmer, 
our subject was reared to the same occupa- 
tion, and lias made farming his life work, 
lie was united in marriage to Miss Susan 
Deaver, who was born in 1S35. a native of 
Ohio, her parents, John S. and Mary Deaver, 
being natives of Pennsylvania. To this 
union were bom the following children — 
John D., born February 4, 1856; Sarah, 
born April 2, 1S57 : Caroline, born Jan- 
uary 29, 1S59: a twin of Caroline died 
June 31, 1859; Lavina J., born July 
20, 1S61; Mary, bom August 13, 1S05; 
Susannah Edith, bom October 27, 1863; 
Isaac, Jr., born December 16, 1870; Cora P., 
bom September 5, 1S72; Laura, born Jan- 
uary 1, 1S75; Rollin, bom September 13, 
1876, and Bertha E., born August 10, 18S0. 
Mr. Mann served his country three years 
dining the late war. being a membei of ( ' m- 
pany D., Seventy-fifth Ohio Infantry. He 



. • • . . . 






mo(.;ii.\rnicAL ske tches. 



took part in a number of hard-fought battles ! acres of land and built a house, which was 
including Fort Donelson, Franklin, Gross j the first house they owned. In September, 
Key.-. Sulphur Springs, and second battle of j 1S65, they sold their property in Blackllawk 
Bull Kim. He was mustered out at Colmn- ! County and moved to Union County, locating 
bus, Ohio, receiving an honorable discharge j where they now live. Mr.,Feery commenced 



December 1-1, IS64-, when he returned to his 
home. In 1870 lie came to Union County, Iowa, 
when he settled on the farm in Platte Town- 
ship which has been bis borne. His farm 
contains eighty acres of choice land, a good, 
substantial house, and farm buildings, a fine 
orchard, and about 125 grape vines. In poli- 
tics Mr. Mann is identified with the Republi- 
can party. Tie is a comrade of Post Xo. 31G, 
G. A. R., of Lenox, Iowa. Both he and his 
wife are members of the United Brethren 
church. 

' - r.Y. JOSEPH PEERY, a farmer and 
Vk\K stock-reiser, of Grant Township, resides 
^i<l\ on section 2, where be owns a good farm 
of eighty acres. He is a native of Illinois, 
born in Clark County. September 28, 1S22, a 
son of John and Nancy (Long) Peery, who 
were natives of Tennessee. His father died 
June 19, 1S77, and his mother is still living 
in Ringgold County, Iowa, in the eighty- 
fifth year of her age. His parents moved 
from Tennessee to Illinois and lived there 
until 1836, when they moved to Indiana, 
His grandfather Peery had seven workhorses 
stolen in one night by the rangers during the 
war of 1812. April 24, 181 Lour subject was 
married to Miss Adaline Brown. He lived 
in Indiana six years after his marriage, and 
in 1850 moved to Muscatine County, Iowa, 
where they lived until April, 1853, when they 
started for Black Hawk County, bill on ac- 
count of a severe snow storm they were 
obliged to stop in Cedar County, and rented 
a farm, on which they lived until the follow- 
ing February. They then went to Black 
Hawk County, and settled on Poyner Creek, 
in a little pole house. He took a claim which 
he afterward sold for §50, and entered forty 



life a poor man, working at 25 cents a day, 
but by economy and good management he 
has been successful, ami now has a good and 
comfortable home. In 1S07 he was licensed 
a local preacher in the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He is superintendent of the Sunday- 
school, a position he has held twelve year3. 
In his polities he is independent, voting for 
men not part}'. To Mr. and Atrs. Peery 
were born the following children — John W., 
Louisa, Samuel Milton, Sarah E., George D., 
Jennie and James. John W. enlisted in the 
war of the Rebellion, in 1S62, and was as- 
signed to Company D, Thirty-first Iowa In- 



fantry, 
1863.' 



id died at Vicksburg, January 



,|pkD WARD HENDERSON, physician and 
'■ p surgeon at Cromwell, was bom in Jef- 
^f^i ferson County, Iowa, in 1650. His 
father, H. M. Henderson, was a native of 
North Carolina, of Scotch descent, and his 
mother, Laodicea Baird, was born in Ohio, 
of German and Irish descent; the}- are still 
residents of that county, where they were 
pioneers, highly-respected citizens. ]n their 
family of seven children, Dr. Henderson, our 
subject, is the second in order of birth. He 
grew up to the years of manhood on the faint 
in his native county. At the age of eighteen 
years he went to Wisconsin, and engaged in 
clerking in a general store. After attending 
school two years he began the study of medi- 
cine under Dr. NewsomCj of Batavia, Iowa, 
and after remaining with him a year he at- 
tended the medical college at Keokuk, Iowa, 
two years, graduating in 1^73; commenced 
the practice of his chosen calling at Batavia, 
within four miles of where he was brought 
up, and during the five years of his practice 






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there he won a large patronage, although in 
competition with three old physicians. In 
1ST!." he removed to his present place of resi- 
dence, where he has an extensive practice, 
and bids fair to rise much higher in his pro- 
fession. In Cromwell, besides his house and 
lot, the doctor owns two blocks except one 
lot; was postmaster from 1SS2 to 1SS5; is a 
member of the School Board, and in politics 
a Republican. lie was married June '20, 
1871, to Miss Alice, daughter of Archibald 
and Eliza Caldwell, natives of Vermont, 
where she was born in 1856. They have one 
child— Bertha E. 



fffTtiRS. MARILLA M. DOTY is a 



i,]\i> j» tive of Evans, New York, a daughter 
^. i^ of Harmon and Luis Barber, natives 
of England, and descendants of the royal 
family." Her paternal grandmother was a 
Gould, and her maternal grandmother was a 
member of the royal family. Her father was 
a sea captain. He was born in 1812, and 
was just two weeks old when the war of 
lS12-'lo broke out, his parents at that time 
living in Canada. He was the first wool 
grower in Wyoming County, New York, and 
was also an extensive manufacturer of cheese. 
He made two of the largest cheeses ever ex- 
hibited, one weighing 1,500 and the other 
1,000 pounds. After taking a number of 
premiums: 1 ! fairs the largestone was shipped 
to Liverpool, and was soid at §1 per pound. 
Our subject was married Octobers, 1S4S, to 
Philander Doty, a native of New York, bora 
in 1S2-1. To them have been born four chil- 
dren— Franklin IT., Ella P., William E., and 
Lois. Franklin manied Ella M. Miller and 
has one child, Eddie P. Lois is the wife of 
Ellis Shaw, a son of Judge Henry Shaw of 
Eaton County, Michigan, and a graduate 
from the medical department of the Ann Ar- I 
bur University. For a number of years he 
was a conductor on the Michigan Central 



Railroad, and at present, in partnership with 
Mrs. Doty, is running the Metropolitan res- 
taurant. Mrs. Doty came to Iowa and lo- 
cated in Creston, in 1S77, and in 1S79 built 
the first good hotel in the place, on the south 
side of Pine Street, at a cost of 67.000, which 
she still owns, and also owns a dry-goods and 
grocery store which is in charge of her son. 
Mrs. Doty is an educated, refined lady, a 
graduate of a college in her native State. She 
is a kind, indulgent mother, and a thought- 
ful, loving wife, a good neighbor and friend, 
generous, giving freely of her time and means 
to promote the best interests of the commu- 
nity. She is an untiring worker, and her 
efforts have been crowned with success. In 
her business transactions she is strictly hon- 
orable, and has many friends. Mr. Doty has 
been a fireman on the railroad twenty-nine 
years. In politics he and his sons are Re- 
publicans. 

- * : J OQfrc -; ■ « » 

M. BOTLEMAN, a pioneer of Union 
County, and among the thorough, prac- 
M?4 tical farmers of Grant Township, where 
he resides, on section 30, was born February 
■i, 1S34, a son of Christian and Dorcas (Alex- 
ander) Botleman, the father a native of Penn- 
sylvania, and the mother born in the State of 
Virginia, both now deceased. Our subject 
was reared to agricultural pursuits, and in his 
youth received a fair education, and after 
leaving school taught for several terms. He 
remained in his native State till attaining his 
majority, when he immigrated to Union 
County. Iowa, and settled on the farm where 
he has since made his home, improving it 
from a wild state, lie was married Decem- 
ber 10, 1857, to Miss Minerva Swearngen, 
who was born November 5, 183i, a daughter 
of J. and M. Swearngen who were both born 
in the State of Pennsylvania. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Botleman hare been born five children — 
Matilda -J., horn November 13, 1858, married 
F ut Banning, and has one child, Bertie, 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



631 



who was born May 6, IS79; Lizzie E., born 
August 28, 1SG0, is the wife of Herman Tall- 
man; E. S., born April 2S, 1S62; John W., 
horn March 21, 1S67, died August 30, 1S69, 
and Arthur N., born March 13, 1S69. Mr. 



the spring of 1852, where he remained till 
1S57. In the fall of that year he came to Un- 
ion County, Iowa, and settled in Highland 
Township, which has since been his home. 
John B. Wray, whose name heads this sketch 



reli 13, i.Niy. Mr. donn u. n ray, wnose uhiub ubhub iu» omiw 

Botleman has now one of the best farms in ■ was but nine years of age when he accom- 

Gratit Township, containing 160 acres of well- : panied his parents to this county, and here he 

improved land, under a high state of eultiva- : grew to manhood, being reared on the home 

' land ; farm, and receiving his education in the com 



of 



tion. ile has about three acres . 
devoted to his orchard, and a line maple grove, 
the seed of which was planted by himself. . 
His residence is comfortable and commodious, 
and his farm buildings are noticeably good. 

¥~\^\(, MARTENS, dealer in groceries, 
'; | \/ V queensware, flour, feed, cigars and 
l -~--o tobacco, 21G Union street, Creston, 
opened there in 1876, where ho carries about 
$1,500 worth of slock, and sells annually about 
$15,000 worth, employing one clerk ana two 
boys. He was born in Holland, in 1830, the 
son of Martin and Gertie Martens, natives 
also o! that country. He immigrated to 
America in 1849, first settling in "Wisconsin, 
where he remained eight years. He has 
generally followed house-painting, employing 
clerks to run his grocery previous to entering 
it himself. He owns the business block and 
four houses and lots. He was married in 
Green Bay, Wisconsin, in 1S62, to Johanna 
Van Beak, who also was born in Holland, 
and they have five children living — Theodore, 
Frank, Kittie, Henry and John. Mr. Mar- 
tens is a mem'' 



'her of the Catholic church. 






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OHN BENJA M I N WRAY. residing on 
section 31 of Lincoln Township, is an 
,,U Englishman by birth, being born in Lin- 
c ilnshire, August 1, 1S4S. In 1851 his father, 
Benjamin Wray, who is also a native of J 



mon schools of the county, and while living 
in Highland Township served two terms as 
assessor with credit to himself and satisfaction 
to his constituents. He is now engaged in 
farming and stock-raising on his line farm in 
Lincoln Township, -where he has 320 acres. 
He is also meeting with good success in deal- 
ing in stuck, which lie ships to Chicago. 
Illinois, and Ottuinwa, Iowa. He is one of 
the public-spirited citizens of his township, 
and is always interested in the advancement 
of :mv enternrise for the good of the com- 
munity. 

^WTLLIAM D. McDONALD, of Ores- 
'■■ .\/\j', ton, has been a resident of Union 
t^pJI County since the spring of 1S69, first 
locating at Afton. He was bom in Madison 
County, Ohio, in 1837, where he grew to 
manhood. His father, John McDonald, was 
a native of Tennessee. When he was four 
years old his parents removed to Madison 
County, where he spent the rest of his life, 
dying December 25, 1SS3. In 1S54 lie came 
to Union County, and entered about 2,500 
acres of land, which remained unimproved 
until the laying out of Creston, in 1SG9. This 
land include 1 the east part of the cit) plat. 
The greater part of the land is ; :iil in posses- 
sion of the family- W. D. McDonald was 
the first to come to the county after the land 
was cnter.'J by his father. He came to Af- 
ton in 1 -•'•'*. and has since that time been 



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Benjamin Wray. who is also a native ot JLin- ton in low, »uu im= »u.- >- ».. »».~ ~~~ _ 

colnshire England, came to America with his .aged in the real-estate business, and dca ug 

fumily, and first settled in the State of Ohio, in stock. He bought and shipped stoc, at 

removing to St. Joseph County, Indiana, in Afton for about ten year-, lie came to Cres- 



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J/ISTO.'fl' OF UNION COVNTT, 



ton in 1SS1. lie still owns over a 1,000 acres 
of land in Union County, most of which is 
improved, and he has about 200 head of cat- 
tle. His general business is that of a land 
and stock-broker. The next member of the 
family th it came to Union County was Albert 
S., who came in 1874. lie Incited at Creston, 
and laid out McDonald's addition to the city. 
He died at Creston in 1SS2, leaving a wife 
and daughter who still reside here. James 
McDonald came to Union County in 1SS1, 
and lives in Spaulding Township. A sister, 
Mrs. Sarah A. Bickers, came soon after Will- 
iam came. She is the wife of Nathan C. 
Bickers of Creston. William D. McDonald 
was married in Ohio to Lura Iluckill, a na- 
tive also of Madison County. They have no 
children, but' have reared several from child- 
hood. Mr. McDonald is of Scotch ancestry, 
his paternal grandfather having come from 
Scotland when a child. The family settled 
in Tennessee. John McDonald and wife had 
eleven children — six sons and rive daughters. 
Three sons and four daughters are living. 
Politically Mr. McDonald is a Republican. 



-*— 43^sS= 



c34*> 



P||LFRED KENT, farmer and stock-raiser 
.- ,( : V- on section 23, Pleasant Township, was 
^~? born in Lagrange County, Indiana, in 
1S13, son of Kencel and Sarah Ann (Chase) 
Kent, natives respectively of Connecticut and 
Indiana, who settled in this county in 1S51-; 
the former died in 1S79, aged seventy-five. 
Mr. Kent, the subject of this sketch, enlisted 
in the late war in 1862, Company II, Twenty- 
ninth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and served 
until August, 1805, when he was mustered 
out at Davenport. lie was married in this 
county, in 1SG5, to Miss Mima Jane, daughter 
of George and Rachel Yandjne. Her moth- 
er's maiden name was Reasoner. The chil- 
dren in this family are — Oscar E., Merrill O, 
Addie I., Maria L. and Mary Emma. Mr. 
Kent has held some of the minor school and 



township olliccs where he resides; is a mem- 
ber of Hopeville Lodge. No. 306, I. O. O. F., 
and Republican in his political views, and 
highly esteemed as a gentleman and citizen 
in his community. When he commenced in 
life for himself he had only a team of horses 
and but. limited means to commence house- 
keeping; with savings from an army life and 
by hard work and help from bis father's estate 
of 200 acres, he has accumulated GOO acres of 
land, and well stocked. Postoflice, Hope- 
ville, Clarke County, Iowa. 

~w\,vt/viG2£ *>; : . ^;€^gryi<vvi'vvv* 

$m P. BUTTS, of the firm of Butts & Fos- 
j J ,- ter, druggists, corner of Union and 
'^i. ' Maple streets. Creston, was born in 
1S1-1-, in Dutchess County, New York, his 
parents being Willard and Elizabeth (Potter) 
Butts, the former a native of the same State 
and the latter of Connecticut. When nine 
years of age, however, our subject was brought 
to Bureau County, Illinois, where he lived 
until 1870, when he came to Creston, operat- 
ing in the grocery business seven months; 
next he was for a time a traveling agent 
tor the McCormick Reaper Company; then 
worked for a railroad company two years, 
restaurant and bakery four years, the hard- 
ware business several years, and finally, in 
April 1886, he entered his present position. 
He also owns several houses and lots in Cres- 
ton, and a quarter-section of well-improved 
land in Ringgold County, Iowa. In 1S72 he 
was assessor of his town and township, in 1S73 
city assessor, in 18S5 city treasurer. He is a 
Republican in bis political sentiment. As a 
citizen be is loyal and upright, and has the 
fullest esteem and confidence of his fellow 
citizens; is social, genial and not above 
noticing merit in its most unpretending forms. 
In 186± he enlisted in Company F, One 
Hundred and Fifty-first Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, and served eleven months and 
twenty days, being mustered out at Camp 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



fi33 



Butler, niinois. lie was married in. 1868, in 
Bureau County, Illinois to ELie Waterman, 
who was burn in Kendall, in 1849. Their 
seven children are Lena. William, Ida, Ben- 
jamin, Harry, and Frank and Jessie (twins). 

, ..s-.^iJAx , 



"Y.' 



AMES GALT, a partner of William Scott, 
of Oreston, in the grain and live-stock 



y^ business at Cromwell, was born in Ire- 
land in 1S56. His parents, Uriah and Jane 
Gait, were also natives of the "Green Isle." 
The father is still living, in -Burlington, Iowa; 
and the mother died, in 1S65. Mr. Gait immi- 
grated to America with his father, settled in 
Adams County in 1S7S, and in 18S0 came to 
Union County engaging, in his present bufi- 
ness, in which he handles about sixty car-loads 
annually, sometimes 100 car-lo?/]? n>. ,,<*- n = 
160 acres of land in Adams County. Besides 
a fair, common-school education, he had no 
means with which to start in life, and is 
therefore, financially, a self-made man. In 
his political views he is a Republican. He 
was married in 1884, in Cromwell, to Miss 
Madge Long, daughter of D. P. and Lovina 
Long. 

- — ~*#*1N~ 

V^ILLIAM ]l. HAMMANS, aprosper- 
' \i'' ous and enterprising agriculturist of 
~~y~-\ New Hope Township, living on sec- 
tion 0, is a native of Iowa, born in Jefferson 
County, near Glasgow, January 2, lS51,a son 
of James Ilammans, a native of Virginia, who 
has been a resident of Jefferson County Cor 
many years. Our subject was reared on the 
home farm in his native county, receiving good 
educational advantages, completing his educa- 
tion at Whittier College of Salem, Iowa, lie 
came to Union County, Iowa, in the spring of ' 
1S75, where he has since made his home, and ! 
during his residence here he has gained the 
confidence and respect of all who know him. j 



Mr. Hammans was united in marriage Sep- 
tember 7, 1SS0, to Miss Myrta M. Groesbeck, 
a daughter of William Groesbeck, a promi- 
nent citizen of New Hope Township. They 
are the parents of three children — Boy F., 
Clauson and Ralph. Mr. Ilammans has 
always followed agricultural pursuits, and by 
his industry and good business qualities he 
has prospered beyond his expectations, and 
has now a fine property, his home farm in 
New Hope Township containing 320 acres of 
choice land, beside which he owns a farm of 
2-10 acres in Pottawatomie County. Mr. 
Ilammans in his religious views is a Baptist. 

— »<33*-*> 



-T : WILLIAM II. H. DEVOL, farmer and 
'V|/V/> stock-raiser, resides on section 28, 
H^NS Spaulding Township, where he owns 
too acres of well-improved land. lie was 
born in Washington County, Ohio, in 1S1-0, 
and is a son of Alpha and Avis Dovol, both 
parents of French descent; ancestors immi- 
grated to America about four generations 
'rack. His immediate parents died in Ohio, 
their native State. They had four children, 
William II. II., being the eldest. He has all 
his life been a successful farmer, although his 
opportunities for an early school education 
were limited by the meagerness of the sub- 
scription schools of pioneer times. He came 
West in 1862, first settling in Bock Island 
County, Illinois, where he remained eight 
years. During his life he has been honored 
by his fellow citizens with the oiiice of town- 
ship trustee, member of the School Board, 
school treasurer, etc. Mr. Dcvol started in 
life poor, dropping corn at 10 cents a day, 
then working for 25 cents a day, then s?S a 
month, $11 a month, and so on. In the fall 
of 1867 he immigrated to Missouri, reaching 
Chariton County on the 6th of November, 
but not being suited with the country moved 
to McDonough, Illinois, the following spring 
and remained in Illinois until the 12lh of 






' 



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fcS 634 HISTORY OF VX.'OX COUNTT. 



August, 1S70, when he started for Union 
County, Iowa, where he lias since remained. 
lie broke prairie the first season for W. Iv. 
Syp, of Aftou. The next three seasons he 
rented land, buying and breaking his own 
land in 1874, on which he moved in the year 
oflS75. Assisted by his faithful companion 
in life, he has accumulated all he owns; is a 
man of fair dealing and high esteem. lie 
»;;♦: was married in Rock Island, Rock Island 
i»>: County, Illinois, January 20, 1863, to Miss 
g£ Florence A., daughter of Joseph and Edner 
Wg (Penny) Loughery, both natives of Ohio. Mr. 
and Mrs. Devol are the parents of seven chil- 
dren— Elmer E. , Frank II., Clara E., Joseph E. 
and three deceased— Eila, Charles and an un- 
named infant. Postoflice, Creston. 

0% II. PRUNING, son of William and 
*■*■ cf \a ^ iltner ' ne Pruning, is a native, of Gir- 
ls *^i many, barn November 10, 1832. lie 
' was reared to the vocation of a farmer, his 
•t>; father being a tanner by occupation, lie re- 
£& mained in his native country till he was 
:♦>; twenty-two years of age, and in March, 1855, 
;<;■;;•••: sailed from Liverpool, England, for America, 
:♦;;*; landing at New Orleans. He first located in 
:»>; St. Joseph, Missouri, but remained there 
ss only a short time, when he came to Union 
|H County. Iowa, and has since made his pres- 
;<■>; ent farm his home. For his wife he married 
as Miss Manns A. Richardson, February 2G, 
g* 1S62, a Kentuckian by birth, born September 
|| 26, 1833, a daughter of Aaron and Elizabeth 
^ Eichardson, her father born in Kentucky, 
££ and her mother a native of Virginia. They 

have two children by adoption — Jennie E. 



; residence here has won the respect of all who 
] know him by his industrious habits and quiet, 
i unassuming manners, lie has met with sne- 
j cess in his agricultural pursuits, being classed 
1 among the best farmers of Platte Township. 
j where he has a fine farm of ISO acres on sec- 
tion 3d. and is still actively engaged in farm- 
| ing and stock-raising. Politically he casts his 
j suffrage with the Democratic party. 



■*&> 



cW- 



■ "XI S. MILLARD is the manager and a 
I member of the lumber firm of George 

"\~~ l Palmer & Co. The present company 
assumed control of this yard in November. 
18SJ-, succeeding the National Lumber Com- 
pany, located on the corner of Division and 
Montgomery streets. Mr. Millard is the. only 
member of the firm who resides in Creston. 
lie came from Shenandoah, Iowa, when he 
had been dealing in lumber two years. lie 
was born in Lawrence, Henry County, Illi- 
nois, in 1S57. His parents removed to St. 
Joseph County, where he lived until 1873, 
when he went to Nashua, Chickasaw County, 
Iowa; thence to Milwaukee, and kept books 
for a wholesale lumber firm, and remained 
until 18S2. He was married to Laura Lull, 
born in Jones County, daughter of C. II. 
Lull, of Anamosa, a merchant of that place. 
They have one son — John L.,born in 1S85. 



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N. TORREY. M.D 
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Ames, oorn 
J. Ames, 1; 

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ttled in Creston 
September, 1S75. He was born in 
State of New York, July 2, 1S4G. 
mall bov. his parents removed to 



September 0, 186S, and Thomas Pike County, Illinois. He obtained his early 



September 17, 1871. Mi 
came to Union County in its pioneer 
days, and has bi en one of its most active and 
public-spirited citizens, taking an interest in 
every enterprise calculated to prove of benefit 
to his township or county, and durin» his 



education in the public schools of Pittsfield, 
Illinois, and also attended college in Lincoln 
County, Missouri. }Li be^an the study of 
medicine under Dr. John Hodgen, one of 
the most eminent physicians in the city of 
St. Louis, and graduated at the St. Louis 



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r-IOGRM'llICA L SICE TCHES. 



637 



Medical College in 1873. lie was assistant 
physician in the St. Louis City Hospital for 



Supervisors ten years, justice of the peace 
eight year.-, and held all the other offices of 

two years, coming to Creston from tliatinsti- his township. Politically, he is a Democrat. 

tution. He has now been in practice ahout j He kept hotel at Ly tie's Grove from 1S55 on- 

twelve years, and lias built up a successful 



and lucrative practice, and has established an 
enviable reputation as a careful an i reliable 
physician and surgeon. Dr. Torroy is one of 
the surgeons of the Chicago, Burlington it 
Quincy Kailroad. He is a member of the 
State Medical Association; also of the Society 
of Physicians and Surgeons of Southern Iowa. 



ward for many years. 



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^fTAMES WALTERS, farmer, section 11, 
""•; Pleasant Township, postoffice Thayer, is 
^' a son of David and Mary (Dougherty) 
Walters, of Van Wert County, Ohio, where 



In 1S77 he married Miss Flora E. Reed, a they both died, and where the father was a 
native of Illinois. They have two sons— Harry | prominent fanner. James was born in Ross 
N., born October 7, 1880, and Burt E., born j County, that State, August 4, 1817, and grew 



May 14, 1SS4-. 



f^.A NfES S. LYTLE, section 17, Douglas 
'I Township, owns forty acres of land, 
2^" where he is occupied in agriculture. He 
was born in York County, Pennsylvania, in 
180G, his parents being George and Elizabeth 
Lvtle, natives also of the Keystone State. He 
resided in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 
until 1S50, when he immigrated to Ohio, and 
in 1S55 he came to Union County, at what is 
known as " Lytle's Grove." He was married 
in Lancaster County. Pennsylvania, in 1S±0, 
to Catharine Flesh, who was born in Frank- | 
lin County, Pennsylvania, in 1816. They | 
have had twelve children, five are living, ' 
— Annie E. is the wife of John Davis, ; 
and has eisrht children — Edward C, Ada L., j 



to manhood en his father's farm, receiving 
but a limited education. He came to Union 
County in 1S65, locating upon the farm where 
he now resides. He started in life with no 
means except a capital of energy and deter- 
mination and skill, and with this he has ac- 
cumulattel a handsome amount of property, 
owning now 152 acres of land, good, and well 
furnished with buildings, improvements, etc. 
In whatever he has undertaken he has been 
earnest, and labored with unceasing energy, 
and in all public enterprises he has been 
ready to assist. He is a Republican in his 
political views, and both himself and wife are 
members of the Christian church. His first 
marriage occurred in 1S42, in Van Wert 
Countv, Ohio, to Amanda Harter, who was 
born in Miami County, that State, and died 
in 1843. By that marriage there was one 
child — Mary M.. the wife of James Hunt- 
singer. In ISIS Mr. Walters married Mar- 
garet White, of Ohio, who died in 1S76, 



William R., Bertie D., Frank, Clyde, Ray 
and Maud; Caroline P., who married John i and Mr. Walter.-, for a third wife, married, 
Elliott, of Union Countv, and has three chil- ■ July 9, 1878, Mrs. Celestia R. Ashley, the 
dren— Leonard, Gladys and Harry; Alice, j daughter of Amos Iliines, of Vermont. She 



wife of 13. K. Berry, who has two children. 
Cora, wife of Thomas Hood, has two chil- 
dren — Herbert and George E.; and lfattic, 
adopted. George, John, Ann E., Edith, Fran- 
cis, Mary and William arc deceased. Mr. 
Lytle has been a member of the Board of 



was the widow of Franklin Ashley, by whom 
she had two children — one deceased and Mil- 
ton T., who married Ella Osmond. They 
have three buys — Lyman B., Henry R. and 
Ernest O. Mrs. Walters was born in Peun- 
sylyania } in 1825. Mr. Ashley died in 1S7G. 



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M/STOR}- OF UNION COUNTT. 



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Mr. Walters reared an adopted son, taking 
him when six months old, and Wesley Wal- 
ters is now a prominent farmer of Pleasant 
Township, Union County. lie married Liz- 
zie L. Jackson, and lias four children — Carrie 
G., James W., Jesse L. and Nellie I. 



> 






EILLIAM CADY, who is engaged 



1 \r\j: j farming and stock-raising on section 
Iv^^H 30, of Dodge Township, is a native 
of tiie State of New York, born near Amster- 
dam, May 3, 1S2T. his father, Daniel Cady, 
who is now deceased, having been a native of 
that State. Our subject, when a young man 
worked at saw-milling, but has made fanning 
the principal vocation of his life. lie was 
united in marriage to Miss Caroline Craw- 
ford, who was born in Madison County, New 
York, their marriage taking place July 5, 
1S61. Mr. Cady went to California Is the 
year 1S77, remaining in that State until 
1879, when he came to Union County, Iowa, 
where he has since made his home, locating 
on his present farm, on section 30, Dodge 
Township, in the spring of 1SS3, where he 
has seventy-six acres of well-cultivated land. 
Quiet, unassuming, industrious and honora- 
ble in all his dealing Mr. Cady has gained the 
confidence and respect of all with whom he has 
business or social intercourse. 



SrOCX>5 



~ . NEWMAN, dealer in clothing, hats, 
j j caps, furnishing and merehant-tailor- 
\ ' 3 ing goods, located on the coiner of 
Adams and Maple streets in 1S7-1, where he 
carries a large and well-selected assortment 
of goods in his Line, the stock amounting to 
$2,000, and sales to about §45,000 an- 
nually, lie lias nine employes. Mr. New- 
man was horn in Germany, in 18i3, his 
parents being F. and Rachel Newman, also 
'natives of the "Fatherland." Immigrating to 
this country in 1860, he has resided in Min- 



| nesota and Nebraska, most of the time in 

Plattsmouth, Nebraska, lie came to Onion 

' County in 1871 from Council Bluffs. He 

; started out in life for himself with but little, 

| but he has prospered, and withal has been 

i liberal. He has held the offices of school 

I director, treasurer five years, member of the 

I School Board, and in Plattsmouth was alder- 

I man, in 1871-'2, and member of the School 

I Board. h\ his voting he is an independent 

Democrat ; is a member of the orders of Odd 

! Fellows and Free Masons, being in the latter 

the recorder of Commandery Lodge, No. 

'3-1. He was married in Council Bluffs, 

Iowa, in 187G, to Sadie Danlaum, who was 

born in Amsterdam, New York, in 1S5C. 

They have two boys — Milton B. and Joseph 

L. 

'F? R. WOLFE, one of the pioneer settlers 
'.■ rl of Grant Township, and an active 
'~jp ® farmer and stock-raiser, residing on 
section 25, is a native of Ashland County. 
Ohio, born January 13, 1836, his parents, D. 
and E. Wolfe, being natives of the State, of 
Maryland. He was reared to a farm life, re- 
in lining on the home farm till attaining the 
age of twenty-one years. He then began life 
on his own account, coming to Iowa, and lo- 
cating in Washington County, in 1S57. He 
subsequently returned to Ohio and was mar- 
ried to Miss Rebecca Nickol, a native of Penn- 
sylvania, born August i, 181-3, a daughter of 
John and Jennie (Thompson) Nickol, who 
were natives of the same State. To this union 
have been born seven children— William M.. 
| Jessie M., Charles F., Lillte M., Lavina L.. 
deceased, Bertie A. and John A. Mr. Wolfe 
; came to Union County, Iowa, after his mar- 
riage, and has met with success during his 
; n sidence here. His home farm now contains 
| 280 acres of choice land, all well improved 
\ and under cultivation. Mr. Wolfe is one of 
the active and public-spirited citizens of Grant 
; Township, and is always interested in every 






■ 



fit OGHA I 'ff/CA L .SAY: TCIfES. 



enterprise which tends toward the advance- 
ment of his township or county. In politics 
he is a Democrat. Both he and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Mr. "Wolfe is devoting considerable attention 
to stock-raising, and is making a specialty of 
short-horn cattle and Clyde- dale horses. He 
owns a half interest in a line Clydesdale 
horse, Mr. Bilderback being associated with 
him. 



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M. REIMER. dc 



in dry -goods, 



.jTl cloaks and millinery, 22-i North Pine 
t- p <3 street, Creston, Iowa, keeps a large 
and well-selected stock of goods, his aim 
being at all times to please the public and 
their varied tastes. He carries a stock valued 
at $15,000, his annual sales averaging §30,- 
000. He keeps four employes, who are al- 
ways ready to wait on customers, and his 
genial, accommodating manners and reason- 
able prices make his place a popular one with 
all who are in need of anything in his line. 
Mr. Reimer is a native of New York, a son 
of F. W. and Maria Reimer. His father was 
a prominent New York importer for thirty- 
six years, a member of the firm of Reimer & 
Mecke. He was reared in his native city, 

coming to Iowa in 1SS0, when he located in ! 

■ ■ i 

Creston. He was married in 1SS5 to Ilermia I 

E. Spencer, a native of Ohio, born in 1S61. I 

In politics Mr. Reimer is independent, vot- 

ing for men, not party. 



M J. HORRELL, justice of the peace and | 
|j| editor of the workiugmen's paper, at 
^f<» Creston, has his office in Patt's Block, 
on Adams street, lie has been a resident of ; 
Iowa since 1S70, save one year, which he 
spent in Montana in search of health ; he has I 
resided in Creston since the autumn of 1SS1, ' 
and served as justice of the peace since Janu- ! 



ary, ISS5. He was burn in Westmoreland 
County, Pennsylvania, in 1850; came to 
Chariton, Lucas County. Iowa. inlSTO, where 
he was engaged about three years in clerking, 
etc.; afterward he taught school for about 
fourteen years in Wapello, Clarke, and Lucas 
counties. He is an ardent worker in the in- 
terests of the Knights of Labor, especially as 
editor of the workingmen's paper at Creston, 
and as a member of the State Executive 
Board of that society. The title of "D. S. O." 
was conferred upon him February 5, 1SS6. 
Mr. Horrell was married in 1873, at Russell, 
Lucas County, to Miss Jennie Strong, daugh- 
ter of T. L. Strong, one of the pioneers of 
that county. She was born in the same 
county in 1851. Mr. and Mrs. Horrell have 
two children — Maggie, who was born in 
Jefferson County, Iowa, in IS 70, and Henry, 
who was born in Wapello County, in 18S0. 



fOHN SLONCE, deceased, formerly a 
resident of Pleasant Township, was born 
i in Germany in 1819. His wife, Sophia 
Ort, was born also in Germany in 1826. Mr. 
Slonce was a farmer by occupation. For the 
first three years after coming to America he 
resided in New York; he was next a resident 
of Burlington, Iowa, five years, and finally, 
in 1861, he moved to Union County, where 
he passed the remainder of his days. He 
was a man of good judgment, quick discern- 
ment, and by industry and economy he met 
with good success, and died in possession of 
considerable property. He was a prominent 
member of the Evangelical church. He had 
seven children — Annie, deceased; John, still 
at home; Carrie, Sopheanie, Nancy, Sarah 
and Mary. Annie, the first named, was the 
wife of E. C. Lyons, and left two children — 
Bertha and Nellie. Carrie married A. JI. 
Balinger, and had one child — lona. Sarah 
married Peter Magers, and has three children 
— Perlena, Druzilla and Sophia. .'Mary, the 






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040 



ji/sronv op union countt. 



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youngest child, is the wife of Milton Magers, 
and has one child — Maud. Mrs. Sloncc is 
also a consistent member of the Evangelical 
church. She resides upon the old farm which 
she manages herself, assisted by her son 
John. Mrs. Slonce had at the death of her 
husband eighty- two acres of land with the 
house on it left her. She has now in her own 
name 22G£ acres of land, all in Pleasant 
Township, Union County, Iowa, on sections 
23,10. 11 and 15. She also owns a house 
and lot in the town of Ai'ton. 

g||EORGE W. SMITH, farmer and stock- 
KVjjj* raiser, section 33, Jones Township, was 
"<jv\ born in Licking County, Ohio, January 
29, 1832. His lather, George Stockham 
Smith, was born December 13, 1797, and was 
a son of Jesse Smith, who was born in 1772. 
His mother's maiden name was Susan Fry. 
He was the seventh of nine children, the others 
being as follows — John F., born December 
26, 1S22; Elizabeth, born in 1824; Sarah, 
bom in 1S2G; Katie and Bechie, twins, born 
in 1S27; Marie, born in 1S30; Mary A., born 
in 1834, and William, born June' 13, 1837. 
In 1S37 the lather sold out in Ohio, and 
moved to Illinois, then a new country. There 
were no schools in Illinois at that time, and 
our subject had no educational advantages 
until after the death of bis father, which oc- 
curred in 18-17. When he was sixteen years 
old he went to Vermillion mnty, Indiana, 
where he remained until 1S53, working on a 
farm in the summer, and attending school in 
the winter. He then spent one year with his 
mother in Illinois, and in 1S54 started with 
his uncle, John S. Smith, for Oregon, but for 
some reason he located in Union County. 
Iowa, and here Mr. Smith met and became 
acquainted with Fatima Reed. In 1S55, at 
the first term of court ever held in Union 
County, which convened at Petersville, a little 
town, started on account of a saw and grist 



mill located there, and which was presided over 
by Judge Bradford, ho procured a license, and 

April It* they were married by Rev. Swim, 
of Ottumwa. They started out together to 
lace the hardships of a new country, but their 
hearts were light and free, and they wore, 
prosperous. June 21, 1S5G, their son, John 
William, was horn. In the spring of 1858 
that dreaded disease, typhoid fever, attacked 
the wife and mother, and May 4 she died. In 
the spring of 1859 Mr. Smith left his son with 
his wife's mother, and started for the land of 
gold. A Iter living a miner's life three years he 
returned to Union County that he might be 
with his son. In 1SG4 he married Margaret 
Burkheimer, who is a native of Pennsylvania. 
They have three children — Laura, Clara M. 
Anna. Mr. Smith is a self-made man, and 
has by his own industry and good manage- 
ment become the owner of valuable property. 
His farm contains 220 acres of land in fine 
condition, stocked with Holstein cattle. Be- 
ing one of the first settlers in the county he 
has seen the gradual progress of the trans- 
formation of the wilderness to a state of high 
cultivation. Mr. Smith has held nearly all 
the school and township offices with satisfac- 
tion to the community. He is a member of 
the Odd Fellows order. Politically lie is a 
Greenbacker. His son, John W., is short- 
hand reporter for the Ohio River Pool Com- 
pany at Chicago, Illinois. 



i~ ' T; M. McKEE, farmer and teacher, re- 
:/>7.\- sides on section 23, Spaulding 
*: ". :~ 7 Township, where lie owns eighty 
acres of land under good cultivation, lie. 
was born in Adams County, Ohio, in 1S52. 
His father, John McKee, was born in Brown 
County, Ohio, of Scotch-Irish parents, in 
1807, and his mother, Nancy (Demint) Mc- 
Kee, was born in Adams County, Ohio, of 
French-Irish parents, in 1S20. After attain- 
ing the age of sixteen on his native farm, he 



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LUOGRA PiirCAL SKETCHES. 



i 11 



moved to Livingston County, Illinois, whore j Cosner, daughter 

1)0 followed farming four years, attending 

school during the winters. Altogether he 

lias taught twelve terms, obtaining a good 

reputation as a teacher. Financially Mr. 

McKee is a self-made man, as ho landed in 

Iowa in 1S76 with less than $25, and at the 

time of buying his present home was able to 

make but 46 cents of a cash payment. lie 

was married in Union County, in 1SS0, to Miss 

1211a Mumford, who was also a teacher, having 

taught ten terms. She was born in Anderson 

County, Kansas, August 31, 1S60, being the 

only daughter of James J. and Emmeline 

(Graham) Mumford. Mr. and Mrs. McK.ee 

have one child — Roscoe. 



f Henry Cosner, of Pleas- 
ant Township, Union County. Mr. Mooney 
is a member of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public. He never seeks official positions, pre- 
ferring to devote his entire attention to his 
farm, and by his industrious habits and genial 
disposition he has gained the respect of the 
entire community in which he resides. 



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£?AMES MOONEY, farmer and stock- 
■'? I r piscr Sew Rons Town shin resininq-on 
V^f section 16, is a native of Ireland, born 
in Kings County, February 6, 1S44, a son of 
Thomas Mooney, who is also an Irishman by 
birth. The family came to the United States 
in 1853, and settled in La Salle County, Illi- 
nois. In 1859 they removed to Hillsdale, 
Michigan, and in the fall of 1S70 came to Un- 
ion County, the father being; now a resident 
of Afton. James Mooney was about nine 
years of age when he was brought by his 
parents to La Salle County, Illinois, and there 
he spent his youth on the home farm. He 



AA r JD MIJXCI1, a prosperous farmer 
and stock-raiser, and a prominent citi- 
zen of Platte Township, was born in the 
State of Ohio, February IS, 1SSS, his parents, 
David and Bethnan (Coffman) Munch, being 
natives of the same State. He was reared to 
mercantile pursuits, and at the age of twenty- 
three years he obtained a position in Balti- 
more, Maryland, as clerk in a wholesale 
boof.-and-shoe store February 22, 1863, he 
enlisted in the war of the Rebellion, in 
Company G, Fifty-fourth Ohio Infantry, 
and was detailed as chief clerk in the Quar- 
termaster's department, which position he 
filled until receiving his discharge, August 24, 
1S65. By the explosion of gunpowder March 
5, 1865, his eyesight was ruined, having al- 
most entirely lost the sight of both eyes. He 
has since received a liberal pension from the 
Government. After the war he returned to 
his home in Ohio, remaining there till the 
spring of 1876. He was married to Miss 
Margaret Tailor, a daughter of Peter and 



enlisted in the war of the Rebellion in Coi 

pauv F, One Hundred and Fourth Illinois In- Hannah (Brothers) Tailor, natives of Ohio. 

fantry to serve three years. He took part j Mrs. Munch was born May 10, 1841. They 

with his regiment in the battles of Hartsviile, j are the parents of seven children — Lucy M., 

Tennessee, Stone River, Chickamauga, At- born March 2, 1865; Anna B. and Cora E. 

lanta and others of minor importance. He ; (twins), born August 12, 186S; Lizzie II., 

was wounded in the left hip near Atlanta | born July j], 1ST"; Tailor and Florence 

August 7, 1863, and now draws a pension, j (twins), born February 22, 1872, and Isaac 

Mr. Mooney came to Union County the same B., born March 2-3, 1S7-J. Mr. Munch came 

time as his father, and has since made his , to Union County, Iowa, in 187G, settling on 

home in New Hope Township, where he has | his present farm on section 20, Platte To n- 

a aood farm of 160 acres. Mr. Mooney wa- ' ship, March 9, of that, year, and by industry 

married Decemb 12, 1872, to Miss Clari and perseverance he has accumulated . 



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I/ISTONf OF V.Y/O.X COUNTT, 



property, owning at present 240 acre-,, and by I 
bis honorable and upright dealings lias won j 
tbe respect of all who know him. He has a j 
good residence on hia farm, and commodious | 
farm buildings, and a good orchard, the en- ! 
tire surroundings of the place showing the 
owner to be a thorough, practical farmer. 



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~ ; ~ . EKMAN SCHWANZ, one of the enter 
I 



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'A, I spirite 



young fanners, and a public- 
ted citizen of New Hope Township, 
where he lives on section 26, is a native of 
Union County, Iowa, born in Afton, the date 
of bis birth being March 9, 1859. His parents, 
Lewis and Hannah (Suer) Schwanz, are both 
deceased, the lather having been hilled in 
battle while fighting for the Union during the 
late war. Both parents were natives of Ger- 
man}-. Herman Kchwanz, our subject, was 
brought up by his uncle, Fred Schwanz, of 
Union Township, this county, beiug reared 
to agricultural pursuits, which be has always 
followed, and by his persevering industry and 
strict economy he is meeting with good suc- 
cess, having a good farm of ICO acres, where 
he makes his home. Mr. Schwanz was united 
in marriage April 10, 1881, to Miss Cora B. 
"White, a daughter of Isaac White, a resident 
of Afton, this county. Both Mr. Schwanz and 
his wife are members of the Evangelical 
church, and arc among the most respected 
citizens of New Mope Township. 



-53- 



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-Ex- 



perience, has enabled him to become a busi- 
ness man second to none in Creston and 
vicinity. He is upright in all his dealings, 
judicious and energetic. The present busi- 
ness place he started in 1SS1, in partnership 
with M. Zimmerman, who retired July IS, 
1S>1, and, Mr. C. E. Stewart buying his inter- 
est, the firm name became what it is at pres- 
ent. They have 811,000 worth of stock, their 
sales amounting to 818,000 annually. Mr. 
Eckerson also owds a handsome residence and 
several hits. Politically he is a Democrat, 
and socially a member of the Masonic order; 
is a good citizen, husband, father and friend. 
He was married in New York to Louisa A. 
Eastime, who was born in Rochester, that 
State, in ISIS. They have one child — Myrta, 
who was born in Erie County, New York. 
Mr. Eckerson was a prominent school-teacher 
in bis native county. 



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■jffi ECKERSON, of the firm of Eckerson & 
•,t ; ". Stewart, proprietors of the boot and 
", ;° shoe, store, Bine Street, Creston, was 
bom in 1839 in the State of New York, a son 
of John and Hannah Eckerson, natives of the 
same Si ate, and of German ancestry. He 
received a good common-school education in 
his native State, which, strengthened by his 
growing natural abilities and ripened by cx- 



rrOSIAlI ARMSTRONG, of Creston, 
fi engaged in the livery business on the 
^ corner of Adams street and New York 
avenue in the winter of lS72-'3, and built 
his present barn on Maple street, in company 
with A. N. Bradh'eld, and moved it to its 
present location in 1SS3. Ho is the oldest 
liveryman in the place, having been in the 
business here continuously since 1872, and he 
had been engaged in the same occupation prior 
10 that time, from 1862, in Marion County, 
Iowa. He keeps a complete outfit in all the 
departments of his line. Mr. Armstrong was 
born in Jefferson County, Ohio, in the year 
1824, his father, John Armstrong, haviug 
settled in Ohio in 1800, while it was yet a 
Territory. The latter was born on the ocean, 
while his parents were on the way to this 
country from Ireland. He was married to 
Jane McCamon, and resided in Ohio during 
the remainder of his days. The subject of 
this sketch lived in Ohio until 1S55, when he 
came West, and settled at what is now Monroe, 



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VIOGRAPIUCAL SKE TCIIES. 



in Jasper County, Iowa. There he kept 
a hotel for a number of years, and then went j 
to Bella, where he opened a livery stable, since j 
which time lie has been a liveryman, as 
already mentioned. lie was united in mar- | 
riage with Miss Rebecca J. Scott, a native of j 
Ohio. They are the parents of three Eons 
— Oraig and Scott (twins'), and Horatio 
S. . The first mentioned is a machinist in the 
round house at Creston; Scott is a clerk in the 
master mechanic's office, and the youngest is 
a conductor on the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad. George. B. MeClellan, a 
twin of the youngest, died at the age of seven 
years. 

~H§MIN~ 

ggp DWARD STALKER, residing on section 
ITSL 15, Douglas Township, is an agricultnr- 
""^pl ist and live-stock raiser, having under 
improvements 240 acres of land, forty acres 
on the creek. He was born on the Isle of 
Man, in 1S25, the son of Thomas and Cather- 
ine (Lord) Stalker, of Scotch and French an- 
cestry. (The people of that island are called 
" Manks.") Our subject grew up to years 
of manhood on his native island, where he 
worked as a farm hand. When twenty-five 
years of age he immigrated to America, and 
for fifteen years was a resident of Monroe 
County, New York, where he helped build a 
tannery, working as a common laborer for 75 
cents a day. He then served at the trade live 
years, and then for ten years had charge of the 
yard, and received §50 a month. He then 
moved to Knox County, Illinois, where he 
lived nine years, farming,aiid finally, in 1875, 
he came to Union County, and purchased a 
quarter-section of land in a wild state; after- 
ward lie bought eighty acres more, then forty 
more, and pushed forward the all-engaging 
work of improvement. His house lie built in 
1874, at a cost of $1,100, and his barn at an 
expense of $2,500. He lias forty to fifty he id 
of cattle, besides hogs and horses. All lie 
lias he Las earned by his own efforts. In 



early life lie learned the tanner's trade, but 
he commenced life in America a poor man, 
having but 75 cents when he stopped in Roch- 
ester, New York, in 1S51, and then working 
for 75 cents a day. In this country lie has 
acted in the capacity of school director three 
years; in his politics he is a Republican. 
He was married on the Isle of Man, in 1849, 
to Miss -lane Kneale, daughter of Thomas 
and Catherine (Quale) Kneale, natives also of 
the Isle of Man; she was born February 
26, 1825. Of the twelve children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Stalker, eight are living — Henry R., 
on the Isle of Man; Katlierine, wife of 
Thomas Wolkington; Edward, Ann Jane, 
Elizbeth E., Thomas, Isaac J. and Frances 
Elida. James, John and two infants are de- 
ceased; Thomas and Isaac are with their par- 
ents. 



II. DWTGHT, dental surgeon, came to 
Creston in May, 18S5, and is located in 
Merchants' Block, North Maple Street; 
has been engaged in this business since 1876. 
He was bom near Kockford, Illinois, in 1855. 
He began the study of his profession at the 
age of nineteen years, at Danville, Illinois, 
and commenced his practice at Bushnell. 
Later he practiced five years in Tama City, 
Iowa, and in the spring of 1SS3 went to Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota, and opened an office at 
Lake Hii netonka, a noted summer resort 
near that city. This location brought him in 
contact with people who demanded the high- 
est grade of work known to the profession. 
hi order to attain greater proficiency, he en- 
tered the Minnesota College Hospital, where 
he graduated as Doctor of Dental Surgery, in 
March, 18S5. At the college he learned the 
system of '• Golden Crown and Bridge Work," 
which is a comparatively new system, and is 
the highest point yet attained for inserting 
artificial teeth. Dr. D wight makes it a rule 
to keep well informed of a!! advanced meth- 
ods in his profession, and his office is well 



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64-1 



HISTORY OF UNION COUNTi', 



furnished with all modern instruments per- 
taining to his business, including a Bonwell 
ielectro-magnetic mallet, etc. lie has a fine 
practice, which is constantly increasing. Mrs. 
Dwight was formerly Miss Carrie Bonne;-. 
They have one child — Clyde. 

jvTA R. PETERSON, engaged in stock-rais- 
«AK¥ ing and in farming on section 31, 
^i^ 9 Spaulding Township, was born in 
Crawford County, Pennsylvania, in 1SI3, his 
parents, Amos and Lydia (Ridlc) Peterson, 
being of Scotch-Irish and German descent. 
His mother is still living in Henry County, 
Illinois. Having been brought up on the 
farm, he has all his life been engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits. He came West in 1875, 
locating in this county; he now has 120 acres 
Oi tuOu luiiu, in au eiCfclietit ciaie uj cultiva- 
tion, with residence, barn, etc. Having ob- 
tained a good common-school education, he 
lias been a useful citizen, a good neighbor 
and an excellent officer in his township. He 
lias been elected to the office of township 
treasurer five terms, and that of township 
clerk two terms. His political views coincide 
with those of the Republican party. He was 
married in Fulton County, Illinois, in 1S01, 
to Miss Arabella, daughter of John and 
Rachel (Smith) Hobbs, natives of Pennsyl- 
vania and of Welsh ancestry. She was born 
in Steubenville, Ohio, in 1846. Mr. and 
Mrs. Peterson have two children— Ross \V. 
and A. R. Postoffice, Creston. 



-.■•V* C. FERGUSON, dealer in fruit trees, 
making his headquarters at the office 
%s\ of E. C. Lucas, Creston, has been a 
partner of the latter, and now has a business 
requiring the services of from ten to fifteen 
men. He was born in Springfield, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1853, his parents P. C. and Melissa 



, (Mcrshon) Ferguson, being natives of Penn- 
sylvania, and of Scotch descent. He was 

! reared on a farm, and at the age of thirty 
years left his native State, and came to Cres- 
ton, Iowa. He learned the fruit business 
about seventeen years ago at Rochester, New 
York, and he has sold trees in New York, 
Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illi- 
nois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri, Kansas and 
Nebraska. He had nothing to start with, and 
after working on salary for two years he com- 
menced business for himself, and he has pros- 
pered till his business has the above extent. 
He owns a section of land in Hamilton 
County, Kansas, and property in Springfield, 
Pennsylvania, besides one of the best resi- 
dences in Creston, and the implement house, 
blacksmith shop and feed store occupied by 
E. C. Lucas. He is a member of Evergreen 
Lodge, No. 222, A. F. & A. M., at Conneaut, 
Ohio, is a Republican, and in religion liberal. 
He was married in 1SS1 in Girard, Pennsyl- 
vania, to Miss Grace Greenwood, who was 
born in that city, in 1S55. 

m OSHHA F. BISHOP, of Afton, was born 
'£~\ in Washington Count}', New- York, Octo- 
^ her 15, 1S31. His paternal grandfather, 
a Scotchman, came to America before the 
Revolution and settled in Washington County, 
New York, with many others of his nation- 
ality, lie was a commissioned officer in the 
patriot army, and witnessed the surrender 
ofBurgoyne. The parents of the subject of 
this sketch were Archibald and Sarah (Fisher, 
formerly spelled Visher) Bishop. They fol- 
lowed farming. In ]S35 the)' removed to 
Morrow (then Richland) County, Ohio, where 
they lived twenty years. Here Joshua F. 
received his education. He visited. Iowa in 
1S53, aud in 1S55 the whole family removed 
to Union County. Archibald Bishop died of 
heart disease on a small farm in Jones Town- 
ship in 1861. His wife is now living with a 



- 






BIOGRAPHICAL SKE TC/IES. 



f>17- 



; daughter in Lucas County, at the advanced 
I age of ninety years. They were the parents of 

I seven children, four of whom are living-. Of 
. these Joshua is next to the youngest. Jle 
: entered the land on which Thayer now stands 
; —120 acres— in 1S55, and being a natural 
trader, he at different times increased his 
holding until he found himself the owner of 
: 400 acres of land at the opening of the war. 
: lie enlisted in July, 1861, in Company II. 
! Fourth Iowa, in which he served as Commis- 
sary-Sergeant for one year. lie was then 
made Second Lieutenant, and afterward acted 
as Adjutant of the regiment. In 1864 he was 
made Captain of his company. July 22, 
18G-1, when acting as Adjutant, he was 
wounded at Atlanta, IJe was in hospital at 
Marietta for three weeks and then relumed 
home on sick leave. When he went to the 
field again, lie reached Chattanooga two or 
three days too late to go with Sherman on 
his famous march to the sea. lie was de- 
tailed to Charleston, East Tennessee, where 
he passed the winter, first as Provost-Marshal 
and then as Commissary of supplies. In 
April, 1S65, he was ordered to rejoin his 
regiment, but the latter was moving so rapidly 
he did not overtake it until it reached Peters- 
burg, Virginia, on its way to participate in 
the grand review at Washington, May 2-L 
1865. Captain Bishop was mustered out 
with his regiment at Davenport. Iowa, in 
August, 1865. Without his knowledge or 
consent, bis friend; in Union County secured 
his nomination for county judge and re- 
corder, lie served three years in that 
capacity, and then, the office of auditor hav- 
ing been created, he was ere-officio auditor 
during 1869. Soon after he embarked in 
journalism, to which he has since devoted 
more or less of his time, and is now editor 
and proprietor of the Tribune-News, though 
real estate dealing has been his favorite and 
chief occupation. He is a public-spirited, 
active man, and devoted to the interest, of 
Alton, of which he is now one of the oldest 



and most popular residents. Judge Bishop 
was married November IS, 1S56, in Clarke 
County, to Miss Susan Lindsley, who became 
the mother of seven children, one dying in 
infancy. She died July )i, 1670. He was 
again married September IS, 1S77, to Mrs. 
Lottie (Cherry) Stevenson. By this marriage 
he has one son. All the children are resi- 
dents of Union County- except the eldest, 
who is the pioneer newspaper man of Meade 
County, Kansas. Judge Bishop is a Repub- 
lican, a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and a Free Mason. 



rj EICI1ARDS, physician and surgeon, 
'> I Creston, was born in Preble County. 
V.i 3 Ohio, in April, 1844. Mis parents, 
William and Rachel (Williams) Richards, 
were natives respectively of Kentucky and 
Tennessee, of Scotch-Irish descent, both now 
deceased. Until he was nineteen years of 
age young Richards was employed in agricult- 
ural pursuits; then clerked in a drug store 
two years, and then began the study of medi- 
cine under Dr. W. E. Brown, of Missouri, 
which he continued for two years, and then 
practiced his profession until 1S69, in Marv- 
ville, Missouri. Xext he attended lectures at 
the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, graduating in 1S71; entered again upon 
the practice of medicine in Buchanan County, 
Iowa, one year, then ten years in Fort Wayne. 
In linn: . win . ■ he ■■■' • I a succ :ssfnl busi- 
ness. Tie located in Creston in 1883, where 
he has established a large and lucrative prac- 
tice. He has a well-selected library, and 
practices according to what is known as the 
"Electrical System," which consists in apply- 
ing electricity by large batteries and machines 
made for the express purpose, to all parts 
of the body. He can also apply the wonder- 
ful agent t • an_\ part of the system by means 
of the electric bath, his apparatus costing 
over $1,000. His wife administers the treat- 






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mont to ladies. Tlie doctor was married in 
Whitley County, Indiana, in 1S6±, to Miss 
Margaret, daughter of Edward and Mary 
Beckley, of Irish and German ancestry. She 
was born in Wayne County, Ohio, in ISi'S. 
The two children in the family now are— Ida 
J. and Warren E. The doctor is a member of 
the Odd Fellows and Masonic orders, and in 
politics a Republican. Himself and wife are 
members of the Christian church. As an in- 
teresting relic the doctor has a horse pistol 
which was carried by his grandfather in the 
Revolutionary war. 



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-o§4?- 



rp-^ILLIAM II. CIIILDS, 
: . \; \jf farmer and stock-raiser 



a successful 
of Lincoln 
~v;— J Township, residing'on section IS, was 
burn in Medina County. Ohio, September 13, 
1S-1C, a son of Charles and Sallie Childs, the 
father a native of Vermont, and of Welch 
descent, and the mother born in the State of 
New York, in 1813, of English ancestry. 
They immigrated to Ohio in an early day, 
where the lather lived till his death, which 
occurred in 1872, at the age of seventy years. 
The mother still makes her home in that 
State. They had a family of eight children, 
of whom five are yet living. The father held 
the office of justice of the peace for a pe- 
riod of thirty-three years, and was a much- 
respected man. William II. Childs, the 
snbjector this sketch, grew to manhood in his 
native county, where he was reared to agricult- 
ural pursuits, which he has always followed. 
He came to Iowa in 1867, and after living in 
Polk County for six vers lie came to Union 
County, Iowa, and purchased his present farm 
of ISO acres, where he has followed farming 
and stock-raising. He was married August 
1, 1S77, to Miss Viletta Foster, who was born 
in Dane County, Wisconsin, in 1853, a daugh- 
ter of Matthew and Abigail Foster, who lived 
in Wisconsin till their death. Mr. and Mrs. 
Childs have five children — Frederick, Abigail, 



; William, Myra and Charles M. Mr. Childs 
' began life a poor man, but persevering energy 
j and habits of industry have enabled him to 
succeed, and he is now one of the well-to-do 
farmers of Lincoln Township. Since coming 
to this county ho has held several local offices 
of trust, including road supervisor and school 
director. In his political views he is a lie- 
publican. 

. ; II. LOTSPEICH, one of the most 
i I ■>, prominent and successful agricultur- 
"Cf\ ists of Platte Township, and among the 
self-made men of Union County, is a native of 
Tennessee, born October 3, 1-842, a son of 
William and Rebecca Lotspeich, who were 
born in the same State. In 1851 they re- 
moved with their family to Wapello County, 
Iowa, they being among the pioneers of that 
county. G. II. Lotspeich, our subject, was 
reared a farmer, which avocation he has fol- 
lowed through life. At the age of nine- 
teen years he enlisted in the late war, in 
Company D, Seventeenth Iowa Infantry, be- 
ing mustered in at Keokuk, Iowa.. He par- 
ticipated in many important engagements, 
including the siege of Corinth, battle of Iuka, 
first battle at Jackson, Champion Hill and 
siege of Vicksburg. October 13, 1S61-, his 
regiment surrendered to General Hood, at 
Tilton, Georgia, when they were takeu pris- 
oners and sent to Andersonville prison, where 
they remained till April 28, 1865, their ra- 
ti".:- during then imprisonment being a pint 
of corn meal per day. They were subse- 
quently sent to Jackson, Florida, thence to 
Maryland, and from there by rail to Daven- 
port, Iowa, where the)' received their dis- 
charge. After his discharge Mr. Lotspeich 
returned to his home, in Wapello County, 
and commenced working on a farm, which he 
continued two years. He then went to the 
Pocky Mountains, but nine months later re- 
turned to Wapello County, and worked on a 
farm a year. He then came to Union Count}'. 



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BIOGRAPHIC A L SKE 1 CHICS. 



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where ho lived two years, in the meantime j County in the State Legislature for one term, 
improving his farm, lie then wont to Fro- He was also sheriff four years, and held the 
mont, Nebraska, but subsequently returned j oflice of deputy sheriff the same length of 
to Iowa, and has since lived in Union County, j time. lie has voted the Democratic ticket 
He has by his industry and persevering en- the past iifty years, missing but one election, 
ergy succeeded in accumulating a good prop- j He is classed among the influential citizens of 
erty, and by his upright and honorable 
dealing has gained the confidence and respect 
of the entire community. Before connnenc- 
ing life for himself his father gave him a 
small piece of land, and from this small be- 
ginning he has acquired a competency, lie 
takes an active interest in the ad\ ancement 
of the cause of education, and since becoming 
a resident of Platte Township has filled vari- 
ous offices connected with the schools of the 
township. In politics Air. Lotspeich affili- 
ates with the Greenback party. 



Douglas Township, where he lias made, his 
home so many years. 



SSR\"' -ih-vjvw, iL.Lin.il lunuei, icoiu- 

Svv?j; '"» ln Kent, Union County, was born 
'\^l' in Dodd County, Kentucky, in 1S0G, 



R. REESE, one of the old and honored 
pioneers who has assisted materially 
in developing the interests of Union 
County, is a native of Pennsylvania, born 
December 1, 1S24, a son of Henry and Cr.th- 
erine (Beard) Reese, who were natives of the 
same State. J. P. was reared ia Virginia, 
about fifteen miles from his birthplace. He fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits till 1SI-6, when he 
enlisted in the Mexican war. He was mus- 
tered into the service February 23, 1817, and 
participated in the battle of Buena Vista, and 
several others of Jminor importance. He was 
and is a son of Daniel and Nancy Biggs. In J honorably discharged in 1S4S, when he re- 
1S17 the family settled in Missouri, remain- turned to his home. The following July he 
ing in that State twenty-five years. Samuel | engaged in the milling business, which he 

followed for several years. He subsequently 
went to Ghio, and was there married to Miss 
Poxanna Morman, a daughter of Thomas and 
Rebecca Morman, natives of Virginia, and to 
this union were born two children — Rebecca 
Catherine, born in 1S55, and David 11., born 
in 1575. Mi". Peese settled in Union County 
in 1S57, buying his land second hand, on 
which he erected a rule log house, and many 
were the hardships and privations he en- 
dured in his pioneer home; but by industry 
and perseverance he has become one of the 
successful farmers of Platte Township, being 
the owner of his fine farm on sections 11 and 
1-1, which contains ICO acres of well-culti- 
vated land. He also owns fourteen acres on 
section 1C, making in all 174 acres. Polit- 
ically Mr. Reese is a Democrat. He takes 
an active interest, in the cause of educa- 



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Piggs then lived in Davis County, Iowa, for 
thirteen years, when in 1853 he settled in 
what is known as Piggs' Grove, in Douglas 
Township, where he entered and bought -100 
acres of land, and remained a resident there 
till 1S70. He was the third settler in the 
western half of Union County, and experi- 
enced many of the hardships and privations 
of pioneer life. He was married in Howard 
County, Missouri, in 1825, to Rhoda Belch, 
by whom he had four children — James D., 
Eli H, Nancy and II. P. Airs. Piggs died in 
1S3G, and Mr. Piggs was again married the 
same year, in Kentucky, to Marinda Pipe), 
who was born in Smith County, Tennessee, 
in 1806- To this union were born five chil- 
dren—Mary, S. M., Rebecca, Joseph and 
Daniel. Since his residence in Iowa, Mr. 
Riggs has represented the people of Davis 



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msTonr of union coiwrr. 



tion, and has held various school offices. He 
is the present justice of the peace, filling the 
office to the entire satisfaction of his constitu- 
ents, lie was elected to serve a second term 
in the November election of 1S86. 

;. ~1 EliASTlAX FOIDEL, an active and 

Va^V enterprising farmer and stock-raiser of 

'\j:- Sand Creek Township, and one of the 

self-made men of Union County, is a native 

of Boss County, Ohio, horn January 21, 1S55. 

He received reasonably good educational ad- 
vantage?, receiving his education principally 

at Central University at Pella, Iowa, lie 

was reared a farmer, which he has followed 

through life, with the exception of ten terms, 

when he was engaged in teaching school. 

October 3, 1S52, he was married to Miss I. 

A. Clark, a daughter of L. B. and Harriet 

Clark, who were natives of Virginia, and 

among the pioneers of Union County, Iowa. I fortably well, and all received a fair education. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Foidel have been horn two j The widow and mother still survives and is 

children — Alta L., born June IS, 1884, and { making her home with her children. 

Howard C, bora April II, 1S8G. Mr. Foidel j 

has a hue farm on section 34, Sand Creek , 
3 Township, where he makes his home, which | 
£;;• contains 100 acres of good land, and his sue- ■ 
v£ ce:e hi lif° ^ jas been due to his own industry 
J;J; and persevering energy, which have also 
*jij; gained for him the respect and confidence of j March 14, 1S44. His father, "William Heu- 
!♦>: the entire community. In his political views ! drick, who is now deceased, was a native of 
','['■ Mr. Foidel is a Greenbaeker. His parents ! Kentucky, born near the Mammoth Cave, 
p'':- were natives of Germany, coming to America i and was among the pioneers of Marshall 

in 1854. They wore among the pioneers of i County, Illinois. He was a soldier in the 
). Ringgold County, coming in an early day and ; Black Hawk war. James Hendrick came to 

settling on the farm where the father lived ' Iowa with his parents in the fall of 1S55, 

till his death. The prairie grass surrounding ' they locating in Clarke County, and there he 
£r; his dwelling, which then grew thick and tall, ] grew to manhood, and received his education 
;-»>: was set on fire eight miles to the northwest ' in the common schools. He served over two 
;<-: on one of the most windy days in the fall of : years in the war of the Rebellion, being a 
V, ' 1868. When he saw the fire approaching he j member of Company D, Eighth Iowa Cavalry, 
}♦>! went to burning a strip along the road, which j and participate! in a number of battles in- 

was known as backfiring, but his work was of eluding Nashville, Franklin, Dallas, Marietta, 

no avail; the tire was approaching with the | and was in all the engagements with Sherman 



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speed of a race-horse, and seeing that he could 
not head it off, lie ran to the stable to release 
the horses, but before he could accomplish 
anything the lire broke through the roof, 
which frightened the horses and they became 
uncontrollable. It being unsafe to remain 
longer in the stable he left it, and in doing so 
he ran through about two rods of solid flames 
of lire. Hay and straw stacks were being 
torn to pieces and blown in every direction 
all ablaze and through this he ran. 
His clothes caught fire and burned him 
so that he lived only twenty-two hours 
thereafter. He was a man respected by all 
who knew him, and his death caused uni- 
versal regret throughout the neighborhood 
where lie resided. Thus was Mr. Foidel left 
at the age of thirteen, the eldest of a family of 
four children, and in very destitute circum- 
stances, but with willing hearts and hands 
the family toiled together and with the assist- 
ance of kind neighbors managed to live com- 



AMES HENDRICK, engaged in agri- 
U cultural pursuits on section 23, New 
W' Hope Township, was born in Marshall 
County, Illinois, the date of his birth being 



:•.■ : 
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BIOGUM/IICA L SKE TCI/ES. 



from Chattanooga to Atlanta. lie came to j ness in Morris, Grundy County, and while 
Union County, Iowa, in the fall of 18G5, and i there furnished meat to the penitentiary at 
in 1868 settled on the farm where he has since j Joliet, several years, by contract. Mr. Uam- 



i»>: followed farming and stock-raising. He was 

** married February 2o, 18C9, to Mary M. 

<- »: J ' ' 

:♦*: Smith, a daughter of George S. Smith, who 

Si* came to Union County in 1S54, and is now a 

*£ resident of New Hope Township. Mr. and 

jj ': Mrs. Hendrick have seven children — Burris 

** A., William C. and George C. (twins), Elmer 

g D., Ross 13., Frank R. and Felix W. Mr. 

*■*; Hendrick has been successful as an agricult- 

J£ urist, and by his industry and good manage- 

JJ; meut has acquired a fine property, his home 

J>; farm containing 173 acres. Mr. Hendrick 

>:;*: has served his township as assessor for seven 

;♦;■»• j-ears. He is a member of the Grand Army 

:♦!:♦: of the Republic, ne also belongs to the 

:*!:<■: Anti-Horse-Thief Association. He is a mem- 

:♦::♦: ber of the Christian church. 






and 



p^, F- HAMILTON, stock-dealer 

of meat market at Creston, 



, I | prietor of 
^:l Q Iowa, succe 



acceded Henry Burns in No- 
vember, 1SS2. He was at first a?scciated 
with W. I. Stephen, but in the fall of 1SS3 
purchased his partner's interest in the busi- 
ness and also his town property. He does a 
large business, which is constantly increasing. 
In 1SSG he again formed a partnership with 
TV. I. Stephen and opened a wholesale 
slaughtering and packing house at Omaha, 
Nebraska. This new enterprise promises to 
be successful and cannot fail to be so under 
the direction of Mr. Hamilton, who has 
gained the reputation of being one of the best 
business men of Southern Iowa. Mr. Hamil- 
:<;<•; ton was born in Durham County, Canada, 
■ ■ February 28, 1847, and when nine teen years 
of age came west as far as Chicago, Ulinoi 
where for a, year and a half ho drove a stone 
•*'■*! truck, lie then worked on a farm in Ken- 
£=*. dall County two years and a half and then 
: rented a farm three years and a half. For 
ten years he was engaged in the meat busi- 



ilton commenced life a poor boy, but has been 
universally successful in all his operations, 
and now, in addition to his capital in his busi- 
ness, owns much valuable real-estate, including 

a beautiful home on the corner of Spruce and 
Adams streets, Creston. He was married in 
Morris, Illinois, in 1873, to Anna V. Mason, 
a native of Montreal, Canada. They have 
one daughter— Blanche. 



I g8 



^fOHN HALL, is president of the Creston 
Ice Company, which was organized in 
„ 1SS3. He, with H. M. Spencer and T. 
J. Potter were the pioneers of the ice busi- 
ness in this city, having commenced when the 
reservoir was completed, in 1S74. The organ- 
ization was funned with a capital of §25,000. 
Mr. Hall was elected president; James G. 
Bull, vice-president; and II. M. Spencer, 
treasurer. Mr. Hall is the only president the 
company has ever had. At present 0. E. 
Phelps is vice-president and J. H. Duggan, 
secretary. Mr. Hall was born in Stark 
County, Illinois, in ]S15. He came to Iowa, 
in 1867. and lived in Des Moines two years 
before coming to Union County. In 18G9 he 
bought a farm of 172 acres in Douglas Town- 
ship in company with II. M. Spencer. Mr. 
Hall located on his farm in 1S70. No im- 
provements had been mn.de when they pur- 
chased the property. Mr. Hall remained 
until 1871, and Mr. Spencer continued to re- 
side there until the farm was sold, in 1SS1. 
The father of Mr. Hall, William Hall, settli i 
in Stark County in 1836, and resided there 
until his decease. He was a native of England. 
The mother still lives at the old homestead. 
Mr. Hall was married to Ella Hammers, a 
native of Pennsylvania. She removed with 
her parents to Bcllcvne, Iowa, when a child. 
Mr. and .Mrs. ] lali have three children— J >ai y, 
Lillian ai 1 Clifton C. 



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PHILLIP A. DERR, merchant, Creston, 
iva- born in Schuylkill County, P< nnsyl- 
*■*£ vania,in 1853. Ilis parents, Phillip and 
Christina (Huntsinger) Dorr, wore natives of 
France, and immigrated to America about 
forty years ago, settling in the Keystone 
State; at preseut they reside in Colorado. 
Our subject is the fourth in order of birth of 
their six children, and the third son; the}' 
are all living, his two brothers being both in 
business at Creston. In 1865 their parents 
settled in Cedar County, Iowa, where the sub- 
ject of this notice grew to manhood. At the 
age of eighteen years be entered a dry-goods 
store as clerk for Wyiuan & Muller, in Mar- 
ion, Linn County. Iowa. After two years' 
service for them he came to Creston, in 1873, 
and was clerk in the dry-goods store of George 
"W. Cartlich for seven years; then, buying an 
assortment of stock from Mr. Cartlich, lie 
opened a store, which he is at preseut con- 
ducting, in partUei'ojLlip wiLu wis uiuiueit, 
George and Edward. June 1, 1886, he bought 



out his brothers, and he is now managing the 
business alone with success and satisfaction, 
carrying a well-selected slock of dry-goods 
and notions, and keeping five clerks in con- 
stant employ. Having no means with which 
to make his start in life, his present status is 
a high testimonial to his business abilities. 
Ilis stock is estimated at about $15,000, while 
his sales annually amount, to about $00,000. 
lie also has the agency for the Bonaparte 
Woolen Mills. In his political sentiments 
Mr. Derr sympathizes with the Democratic 
party. He is a member of the orders of Odd 
Fellows and Knights of Pythias. He was 
married in Creston, iu 1S77, to Miss Florence 
E., daughter of H. "W. and Jane (Blair) Car- 
ney, natives of Canada; she was born in 1856, 
in London, that dominion. Her grandfather 
recently died; he had been city collector for 
that municipality for many years. Mr. and 
Mrs. Den- have three children— Edith F., 
Ralph and Eva M. 



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/A'TROD O'CTOR 1'. 










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^ITHIN one brief gener- 
ation a wild waste 
.1-^ of unbroken prairie 
has been transform- 
ed into a cultivated 
region of thrift and 
prosperity, b) LL.cs un- 
tiring zeal and energy of an enter- 
prising people. The trails of 
hunters and trappers Lave given 
place to railroads and thoroughfares 
for vehicles of every description; 
the cabins and garden patches of 
the pioneers have been succeeded 
by comfortable houses and broad 
fields of waving grain, with school-houses, 
churches, mills, postofhees and other institu- 
tions of convenience for each community. 
Add to these the prosperous cities of Creston, 
and several thriving villages, with extensive 
business and manufacturing interests, and 
the result is a work of which all concerned 
may well be proud. 

The record of this marvelous change is his- 
tory, and the most important that can be 
written. For more than thirty years the peo- 
ple of Union County have been making a 
history that for thrilling interest, grand, prac- 
tical results, and lessons that may be perused 
with profit by citizens of other regions, will 
compare favorably with the narrative of the 
history of any county iu the Northwest and, 



.-'■••.- 



considering the extent of territory involved, 
it is as worthy of the pen of a Bancroft as 
even the story of our glorious Republic. 
While our venerable ancestors may have said 
and believed 

" No pent up Utica contracts our powers, 
I"ui lije \,iioie buiinulcas continent is ours," 
they were nevertheless for a long time content 
to occupy and possess a very small corner of 
it; and the great "West was not opened to in- 
dustry and civilization until a variety of 
causes had combined to form, as it were, a 
great heart, whose animating principle was 
improvement, whose impulses annually scut 
westward armies of noble men and women, 
and whose pulse is now felt throughout the 
length and breadth of the best country the 
sun ever shone upon — from the pineries of 
Maine to the vineyards of California, and 
from the sugar-canes of Louisiana to the 
wheat fields of Minnesota. Long may this 
heart beat and push forward its arteriei and 
veins of commerce. 

Not more from choice than from enforced 
necessity did the old pioneers bid farewell to 
the play -ground of their childhood and the 
graves of their fathers. One generation after 
another had worn themselves out in the serv- 
ice of their avaricious landlords. From the 
first fl tsl > .- - i daylight in the morning till the 
i Uinrn i oi the setting sun, they had 

toiled unceasingly on, from father to d, 

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his raw op r.x'ox cocvrr. 



carrying homo each day on their aching 
shoulders the precious proceeds of their daily 
labor. Money and pride and power were 
handed down in the line of succession from 
the rich father to his son, while unceasing 
work and continuous poverty and everlasting 
obscurity were the heritage of the working- 
man and his children. 

Their society was graded and degraded. It 
was not manners, nor industry, nor educa- 
tion, nor qualities of the head and heart that, 
established the grade. It was money and 
jewels, and silk and satin, and broadcloth 
and imperious pride that triumphed over 
honest poverty and trampled the poor man 
and his children under the iron heel. The 
childrcu of the rich and poor were not per- 
mitted to mingle with and to love each other. 
Courtship was more the work of the parents 
than of the sons and daughters. The golden 
calf was the key to matrimony. To perpetu- 
ate a self-constituted aristocracy, without 
power of brain, or the rich blood of royalty, 
purse was united to purse, and cousin with 
cousin, in bonds of matrimony, until the virus 
boiling in their blood was transmitted by the 
law of inheritance from one generation to an- 
other, and until nerves powerless and man- 
hood dwarfed were on exhibition CA-erywhere, 
and everywhere abhorred. For the sons and 
daughters of the poor man to remain there 
was to forever follow as our fathers had fol- 
lowed, and noveri'i lead; to submit, but never 
to rule; to obey, but never to command. 

Without money, or prestige, or influential 
friends, the old pioneers drifted along one by 
one, from State to State, until in Iowa — the 
garden of the Union — they have found invit- 
ing homes for each, and room for all. To 
secure and adorn these homes more than or- 
dinary ambition was required, greater than 
ordinary endurance demanded, ami unflinch- 
ing determination was, by the force of neces- 
sity, written over every brow. It was not 
pomp, or parade, or flittering show that the 
pioneers were after. They sought for homes 



which they could call their own, homes for 
i themselves and homes for their children, 
i How well they have succeeded after a strug- 
| gle of many years against the adverse tides 
: let the records and tax-gatherers testify; let 
: the broad cultivated fields and fruit-bearing 
! orchards, the flocks and the herds, the pala- 
tial residences, the places of business, the 
j spacious halls, the clattering car-wheels and 
ponderous engines all testify. 

There was a time when pioneers waded 
| through deep snows, across bridgeless rivers, 
and through bottomless sloughs, a score of miles 
to mill or market, and when more time was 
required to reach and return from market 
than is now required to cross the continent, 
or traverse the Atlantic. These were the 
times when our palaces were constructed of 
logs and covered with "shakes" riven from 
the forest trees. These were the times when 
our children were stowed away for the night 
in the low, dark attics, among the horns of 
the elk and the deer, and where through the 
clinks in the "shakes" they could count the 
twinkling stars. These were the times when 
our chairs and our bedsteads were hewn from 
the forest trees, and tables and bureaus con- 
structed from the boxes in which their goods 
were brought. These were the times when 
the workingman labored six and sometimes 
seven days in the week, and all the hours 
therewere in a day from sunrise to sunset. 

Whether all succeeded in what they under- 
took is not a question to be asked now. The 
proof that as a body they did succeed is 
all around us. 3Iany individuals were per- 
haps disappointed. Fortunes and misfort- 
unes belong to the human race. Not every 
man can have a school-house on the corner 
of his farm; not every man can have a 
bridge over a stream that flows by T his dwell- 
ing; not every man can have a railroad depot 
on the borders of his plantation, or a city in 
ii snter; and while these things are desir- 
able in some r< =pects, their advantages are 
oftentimes outweighed by the almost perpet- 



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INTRODUCTORY. 



ual presence of the foreign beggar, the dreaded 
tramp, the fear of lire and conflagration, and 
the insecurity from the presence of the mid- 
night burglar, and the bold, bad men and 
women who lurk in ambush and infest the 
village?. The good tilings of this earth are. 
not all to be found in any one place ; but if 
more is to be found in one than another, that 
place is in our rural retreats, our quiet, homes 
outside of the clamor and turmoil of city life. 

In viewing the blessings which surround 
us, then, we should reverence those, who have 
made them possible, and ever fondly cherish 
in memory the sturdy old pioneer and his 
log-cabin. 

Let us turn our eyes and thoughts back to 
the log-cabin days of a quarter of a century 
ago, and contrast those homes with comfort- 
able dwellings of to-day. Before, us stands 
the old log-cabin. Let us enter. Instinctive- 
ly Hie head is uncovered in token oi reverence 
to this relic of ancestral beginnings, carle 
struggles and final triumphs. To the left is 
the deep, wide fire-place, in whose commodi- 
ous space a group of children may sit by the 
fire, and up through the chimney may count 
the stars, while ghostly stories of witches and 
giants, and still more thrilling stories of In- 
dians and wild beasts, are whisperingly told 
and shudderingly heard. On the great crane 
hangs the old tea-kettle and the great iron 
pot. The huge shovel and tongs stand senti- 
nel in either corner, while the great andirons 
patiently wait for the huge, back-log. Over 
the fire-place hangs the trusty rifle. To thy 
right of the fire-place stands the Epinning 
wheel, while in the farther end of the room is 
seen the old-fashioned loom. Strings of dry- 
ing apples and poles of drying pumpkins arc- 
overhead. Opposite the door in which yon 
enter stands a huge deal table ; by its side 
the dresser whose pewter plates and "shining 
dell" catch and reflect the fire-place Haines as 
shields of armies do the sunshine. From the 
corner of its shelves coyly peep out the relics 
of former china. In a curtained corner and 



hid from casual sight we find the mother's 
bed, and un lor it the trundle-bed, while near 
them a ladder indicates the loft where the 
older children sleep. To the left of the fire- 
place and in the corner opposite the spinning 
wheel is the mother's work-stand. Upon it 
lie? the Bible, evidently much used, its family 
record telling of parents and friends a long 
way off, and telling, too, of children 
" Scattered like roses in bloom, 
S.itne at the bridal, some at the tnmb." 

ITer spectacles, as if but just used, are insert- 
ed between the leaves of her Bible, and tell of 
her purpose to return to its comforts when 
cares permit and duty is done. A stool, a 
bench, well notched and whittled and carved, 
and a few chairs, complete the furniture of 
the room, and all stand on a coarse but well- 
scoured floor. 

Let us for a moment watch the city visitors 
Lo Liiis humble cabin. Ihc city bride, inno- 
cent but thoughtless, and ignorant of labor 
and care, asks her city -bred husband, "Pray, 
what savages set this up?" Honestly confess- 
ing his ignorance, he replies, ''I do not 
know." But see the pair upon whom age 
sits "frosty but kindly." First, as they 
enter, they give a rapid glance about the 
cabin home, and then a mutual glance of eye 
to eye. Why do tears start and fill their 
eyes? Why do lips quiver? There are man)* 
who know why; but who that has not learned 
in the school of experience the lull meaning 
of all these symbols of trials and privations, 
| of loneliness and danger, can comprehend the 
! story that they tell to the pioneer ? Within 
this chinked and mud-daubed cabin we read 
j the first pages of our history, and a..- we retire 
| through its low doorway, and note the heavy 
battened door, its wooden hinges and its 
i welcoming latch-string, is it strange that the 
scon s without should seem to be but a 
i dream? But the cabin and the palace, stand- 
j ing side by side in vivid contrast, tell their 
own story of this people's progress. They are 
; a history and a prophecy in one. 



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OEOGIIAI'HY AND TOPOGRAPHY. 

Union County is situated 175 miles west of 
the Mississippi, and eighty miles east of the 
Missouri, on the high table-land lying be- 
tween the two rivers, and in the second tier 
of counties north of the Missouri State 
line. It contains about 275,000 acres, divided 
into twelve Congressional townships, and, at 
the highest point, is 1,280 feet above the 
level of the sea. The. climate is pleasant and 
healthy, and at all seasons of the year breezes 
fan the prairies, with never a day so sultry 
but that a cooling breath brings comfort to 
laborer or traveler. The evenings are delight- 
ful, however heated the day may have been. 
The weary artisan may lie down to rest at 
night and 4 in the morning rise refreshed and 
prepared for his daily toil. 

Old settlers say that consumption was never 
known to attack a victim here, and chronic 
or constitutional diseases are not frequent. 
Malarial diseases, -while more frequently met 
with, are of rare occurrence as compared with 
localities badly drained and supplied with 
poor water, good water being here readily 
obtained by digging wells from fifteen to 
thirty feet deep. 

The larger portion of the county is a gently- 
undulating prairie, resembling the waves of 
the ocean suddenly arrested in their swell and 
changed into soil, there being, however, a suf- 
ficient amount of timber and bottom lands to 
give variety to the face of the country and to j 



wish tolocate here. Grand and Platte Rivers 
drain the greater part of the county, and in the 
immediate vicinity of each is considerable 
brol en land, much of which is or has been 
covered with a fine growth of native timber, 
principally oak, ash, elm, hickory, maple and 
Cottonwood. 

NATIVITY OF THE POPULATION. 

The present inhabitants are chiefly derived 
from the Eastern States — men who, catching 
the spirit of emigration, dissatisfied with the 
circumscribed limits of. the old home and its 
surroundings, chose to struggle for a while 
with poverty to the end that homes of com- 
fort and plenty might cheer their declining 
years. Hundreds of smiling cottages, well 
fenced, and 'cultivated farms, and other evi- 
dences of thrift and happiness, to-day bear 
eloquent testimony to the wisdom of their 
early choice. 

While the great majority of the people arc 
American born, there are many others, frugal, 
honest and prosperous, who have come from 
across the ocean and cast in their lot with the 
others; and the fair-haired sons of the great 
German Fatherland, the warm-hearted, im- 
pulsive Irishman, the men of muscle and 
sinew from the rugged shores of Scandinavia, 
the frank, ingenuous Englishman, the canny 
Scot, the impetuous Frenchman and the 
stolid Russian, all have cast their lot together 
and are working harmoniously for tiic devel- 



gratify the tastes or prejudices of all who may ! opnient of Union County. 



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E. 1 /,'/. r AND CI I '//. HIS TOR ) ', 



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EARLY AND CIVIL HISTORY. 




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... (IK greater part of what 
■ | follows in regard to the 
.'''. Mormons, Indians and 
y Early Settlement is 
taken from the admira- 
ble work of C. J. Colby, 
entitled "Centennial Sketches, 
Map and Directory of Union 
County," published in 1S7G. 
Some additions and correc- 
tions have been made. 

MOUMONS. 



i ;3^n Before the first permanent 
-£ settlement of Union County 



Mm ■ 

Y T ^' : :.-\ -:M- } took place, its territory was 
^if/^ the temporary abiding place, 
of a large body of whites who considered 
themselves (with some truth) persecuted by 
the Christians of civilized Illinois, and were 
on their way to seek an undisturbed home in 
the far West. These were the Mormons. 

In the year 1SA5 the troubles between the 
citizens of Hancock and adjoining counties 
and the Mormons who had settled atNauvoo- 
Illinois, culminated in an aggressive warfare 
made with the avowed object of driving out 
evcrj Saint in the district, and it soon became 
evident that no peace- or per- >nal safety could 
be hoped for by them so long as they remain- 
ed i n Illinois, and it was finally decided to 
seek a home in tlie wilderness of the far West, 
whither a band of Daniteshad been sent some 
months previously on a tour of exploration. 



Accordingly, in September of that year, 
the vanguard crossed the Mississippi and 
commenced their journey toward their far-off 
destination — the wilds of the snow-capped 
Sierras; these were followed, the succeeding 
winter, by a still l