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Full text of "Biographical and portrait cyclopedia of Cambria County, Pennsylvania, comprising five hundred sketches of the prominent and representative citizens of the county"

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(.'AiMI'.KIA ( ( )l N I \ ( t il l< I 111 >US1';. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT 



CYCLOPEDIA 



OF 



CAMBRIA COUNTY, 



PENNSYLVANIA, 



COMPRISING ABOUT FIVE HUNDRED SKETCHES OF THE PROMINENT 
AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF THE COUNTY. 



ILLUSTRATED. 



e 



The Union Publishing Company, 

philadelphia, pa. 

1896. 



THE NEW YORK 

298393B 

ASTOH, LE.\(j\ ^^.„ 
» 19M i 



PREFACE. 



THE last written, usually, though the first read by most intelligent book 
men, is this page. Hence it is, that authors often use this privilege to 
fence against adverse criticism, or apologize for errors of omission or 
commission, singularly forgetting the fact that nothing of man's creation is 
perfect, and that the dear critics are not only busy pointing out the "Mistakes 
of Moses," but are exploiting upon the faults of creation itself. We welcome 
them all, for doubters and critics we esteem the salt of every civilization, and 
we will rest content that every person competent to know, after even a super- 
ficial examination, will realize that the whole has not been the work of "the 
idle singer of an empty day." 

In the front of the work will be found a complete Table of Contents, which 
will render reference easy to every biographical sketch in the book. 

In these biographies it was not the intention to devote large space to 

men of pre-Revolutionary times, but to make it a live cyclopedia, which, while 

it contains sketches of many who have passed away, includes the men who are 

doing the work and moulding the thought of the present time. This work, 

we believe, will supply an invaluable and useful means for establishing identity, 

relationship, birth, official position, details as to many military records and other 

data necessary to the making-up of family history. In the preparation of many 

of these sketches we were assisted by Samuel T. Wiley, whose reputation as a 

writer on historical and biographical subjects is well known throughout this and 

adjoining states. 

The Publishers. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



A DAMS, Simon 165 

Adair, Alexander .... 463 

Akers, Alvar 1 146 

AUenuis, Dr. C. E 203 

Alexander, Blair 61 

Allport, James Hobart . . . 3S3 

Anderson, Henry 212 

Anna, Anthony 453 

Aruiitage, Dr. T. 1, 133 

D.ARKER, Hon. Abraham A. 434 

Barker, Valentine .... 435 

Barker, Florentine H 435 

Barker, Jndge Angnstine V. . 436 

Barker, Constantine 437 

Barnhart, Isaac B 369 

Barcla}', Robert 176 

Bauer, George A 243 

Bearer, Joseph 320 

Bender, Richard J 330 

Beuford, John II 323 

Eengele, Joseph 433 

Blanch, Col. David D 274 

Blimmel,John C 399 

Bland, Fred 264 

Blair, Celestiue J 452 

Boyd, Hon. James K 43 

Boyer, N. J 377 

Bowman, George W 177 

Brown, John H , Esq 29 

Brown, Morganza A 48 

Brown, Joseph Green .... 45 

Brown, Elmer C 379 

Bradimyer, August loS 

Brallier, Daniel Webster . . . 235 



Brendlinger, David W. . . . 442 , 

Brehm, John F 236 

Bracken, Michael 260 

Buck, A. W 261 

Bnrkhart, D. S 353 

Burns, James P 214 

Burkhard, John 220 

Byrne, Thomas T. 231 

QAMPBELE, Gen. J. M. . . 11 

Campbell, Peter .... 251 

Campbell, John 1 449 

Caldwell, Dr. Wm. ..... 479 

Carter, John Wesley .... 49 

Carpenter, Peter h 225 

Christy, FVank J 361 

Chandler, Isaac E 245 

Claghorn, Clarence R 347 

Clark, Alpheus B 456 

Coulter, David W 143 

Coulter, William P 144 

Conrad, Dr. George E. ... 281 

Conrad, John 191 

Connelly, Patrick 468 

Cooper, James 157 

Cooper, Joshua M., A.M., M.D. 158 

Cooper, Auson B 293 

Costlow, James 340 

Cordell, John R 407 

Craig, F.J 419 

Craver, Lewis A 291 

Cressvvell, Robert E 416 

Crofford, Rev. Daniel .... 76 

Crouse, Charles N 37S 

Croyle, Ulysses S 164 



Custer, Jonathan 394 

Cunningham, John 360 

PjAVISON, Dr. ThomasJ. . 199 

Davis, Thomas 152 

Davis, Col. Samuel W. ... 222 

Davis, Daniel J 112 

Davis, Howard 370 

Davis, Dr. M. H 358 

Davis, William 396 

Davis, Elmer E 417 

Devlin, John J 206 

Diethri"h, Martin 388 

Dietrick, P. J 4S6 

Denny, J. B .100 

Dick. Chalmers L 5^ 

Dick, Thomas W 79 

Dibert, Wm. B 152 

Dimond, Arthur h 461 

Dillon, Patrick E 169 

Dowling, John 274 

Duncan, Joshua C, D.D. S. . 401 

Duncan, Clark J 372 

Dunegan, Lieut. Edward D. . 259 

CARHART, Alexander B. . 46+ 

Eckenrode, Andrew . . . 446 

Edwards, Lewis L 187 

Edwards, Elias 189 

Edwards, John L '89 

Edwards, Thomas L 190 

Eichenlaub, Valentine .... 286 

Emmerling, John 210 

Endsley, Henry Sullivan . . 55 

Evans, Alvin '54 

5 



6 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Evans, David E 4^6 

Evaus, Josiah T 67 

Evans, Nicholas 45' 

CARRELL, Frank E. • • • 105 

Fend, Jacob 53 

Fenlon, John, Esq 57 

Ferguson, Dr. Frank U. . . . 315 

Fichtner, Dr. Albon S. ... 97 

Fitzharris, Michael 43° 

Fisher, Edgar 205 

Fisher, Peter S 218 

Fisher, John 284 

Fisher, Henry 309 

Foley, John S 455 

Fox, Francis J 376 

Frouheiser, Jacob 364 

Eraser, Charles F 437 

Frazer, Charles K 196 

F'ulton, John 37 

r^AGEBY, Maj.Jas. Harrison 185 

Galbraith, Wm. L. ... 227 

Galbraith, Wni. D 107 

Gallitzin, Rev. Demetrius A. . 232 

Gates, Joel A 124 

Gates, John C 312 

Gasteiger, John E 84 

Geer, James H 124 

George, Nicholas S 262 

George, Frederick M 447 

George, Robert h 448 

Gessler, Everhart 325 

Geus, Philip J 480 

Gittings, Richard W 382 

Glasgow, G. L 279 

Glasgow, M. L 281 

Glasgow, John Hudson . . . 281 

Glass, Dr. George R 226 

Gore Family, The 287 

Goodwin, Clarence I., 138 

Good, John J 145 

Gochnonr, Hiram 214 

Griffith, Thomas 241 

Griffith, Dr. Abner 242 

Griffith, Webster 242 



Griffith, Wm. G in 

Graham, Capt. Patrick ... 86 

Gray, Joseph A. 294 

Green, Dr. John B 163 

Green, A. W 271 

Greene, E. Will 3r8 

Gwiu, John 431 



UAMILTON, Alexander . . 

Hamilton, Thomas F. . 

Hamilton, Major David . . . 

Hamm, C. B 

Hartman, Philip 

Harshberger, George M. . . . 
Harshberger, Cornelius . 

Harris, David A 

Harris, John T 

Hartung, Rev. Ferdinand . . 

Hannan, Hon. John 

Haws, Andrew J 

Haws, Henry Y 

Hagey, John E 

Hahn, Wm. Henry 

Hager, George A 

Herzog, Thos. J 

Hill, Stewart A 

HonaUjJohn 

Hoffman, Joseph 

Hosteller, Abram 

Hoover, Thomas 

Horrocks, John H 

Hofmyr, Rev. Michael, O.S.B. 

Horner, Jacob C 

Hoover, James I 

Hunt, Timothy h 

Huntley, Geo/ge 

Hughes, Thomas J 

Hughes, John J 

Hummel, Lieut. Jos. R. . . . 



JTELL, Thomas J. 
Ivory, Francis 



JACOBY, Jacob 

Jones, Dr. Fremont C. . 

Jones, Thomas h 

Jones, Griffith J 



337 
168 

39 
306 
122 
179 
29S 

330 

69 

399 

415 

70 

71 
255 
273 

75 
219 
212 
272 
362 

So 
356 

394 
109 
322 

82 

46 
81 

72 

360 

90 

328 
413 

341 

23S 
237 
324 



Jones, Henry 92 

Jones, Philip H 193 

Johnston, Thos. B 357 

Johnson, Judge Robert L. . . 345 

Johns, Joseph 160 

Jordan, John 308 

I^AYLOR, Raymond J. . . . 267 

Kerr, Ellis Glenalvine . 349 

Keedy, Thomas P 389 

Kensinger, James A 400 

Kinkead, George A 132 

King, Hon. George S 15 

Kirsch, Simon 200 

King, Dorsey 297 

Kline, George K 234 

Koontz, Dr. David M 221 

Kohler, Anthony 365 

Krebs, Frederick 30 

Krebs, Dr. A. Bryan 169 

Kress, Charles T 160 

Krumenacker, Henry J. . . . 331 

Kunkle, Ellsworth 75 

Kuhn, Col. H. H 481 

1 AYTON, Joseph P 221 

Lantzy, John 155 

Lautzy, Andrew 363 

Laffey, Mark 400 

Lewis, Wm. C 131 

Lehman, Josiah M 350 

Leech, James Wilson .... 4S5 

Leckey, Louis 474 

Lewis, Evan G 134 

Litzinger, B. W 278 

Linton, Col. John P 32 

Livingston, Dr. L. S 216 

Livingstou, Dr. Frank J. ... 51 

Levergood Family, The . . 299 

Levergood, Jacob 304 

Long, John T 66 

Lon g well, Robert T 332 

Lowman, Dr. Wel>ster Bodine. 19 

Love, Joseph K 327 

Loutlier, Daniel 292 

Loughry, Thomas Clark . . . 351 

Lloyd Family, The 170 



• i' 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Ivloyd, Abel 172 

Lloyd, John 173 

Lloyd, Festus 175 

Lloyd, GrifiSth 88 

Lloyd, Johu G 174 

Ludden, Rev. John J 233 

Lucas, John Emmelt .... 88 

Luther, Demetrius A 151 

Luke Family, The iSr 

Luke, Dr. John C 183 

Luke, Daniel W 183 

Lynch, Lieut. John 83 

JY^ARTIN, Dr. George ... 96 

Mauniou, John 208 

Marburg, Dr. Esther L. W. . 141 

Masters, Joseph 31 

Masters, Samuel 253 

Matthews, Dr. William Edgar. 41 

Matthews, Charles A., D.D.S. 42 

Maucher, Dr. Johu E 258 

Mardis.B.T., D.D.S 352 

Martin, Frank P 47 

Mellon, James 113 

Miller, Harry W 470 

Mitchell, George S 210 

Miller, Dr. A. J 270 

Miller, Dr. E. L 94 

Miller, John C. 95 

Miller, Maurice 218 

McDonald, George F., M.D. . 334 

McHugh, Edward 412 

McAnulty, Daniel S 96 

McManamy, J. B .' 276 

McCartney, James 406 

McKernan, Thomas 374 

McKernan, Philip 374 

McGough, Daniel A 199 

McNeelis, Hon. Edward T. . . 168 

McKee, William 311 

McMillen, James 21 

McGough, P 326 

Murphy, Jacob C 64 

Murphy, Dr. John 452 

Murphy, Robert S 159 

Murdock, Jacob M 240 



Myers, Herman H 137 

Myers, George J loi 

MEFF, AlonzoG 426 

Nees, Bernard 257 

Nicholson, James L 192 

Noonan, Dr. John B 465 

Notley, James M 473 

Q'CONNOR, Francis Joseph 284 

O'Brien, H. W. S 369 

O'Hagan, Bernard 195 

Oriis, Lewis 390 

Osborn, George W 22S 

Ott, Peter C 393 

Owens, Edward 167 

Owens, Johu 342 

pATTERSON, Hon. Sam'l D. 139 

Parrish, Josue D 126 

Parrish, Francis J 354 

Paul,Wm. H gi 

Petrekin, Albert B 204 

Perr}-, James 252 

Peden, Dr. Samuel A 312 

Pierson, George W 135 

Porch, William W 266 

Pryce, Newton 363 

Pratt, Johu 1 310 

Priugle, Alexander B 73 

DASBACH, Charles 216 

Rainey, Joseph 450 

Rettger, Rev. Marcel 1 us, O. 

S. B 279 

Ream, S. C 60 

Reade, George Marshall . . . 206 

Reed, Samuel Lemon . . . 229 

Reese, Wm. P 295 

Rieg, Vincent 392 

Ream, Gairett 365 

Rice, Dr. Daniel S 136 

Richards, Capt. George B. . . 54 

Richards, T. Mason, D. D. S. . 196 

Rivinius, Carl 217 

Riddell, Wm. J 320 

Riffel, John no 



Robison, Robert Potter .... 121 

Rose Family, The 22 

Rose, Wesley J 23 

Rose, Hon. W. Horace .... 24 

Rose, Hon. John M, 27 

Rose, Harry G 28 

Rose, Horace R 28 

Rowe, Rev. Alfred Lewis ... 68 

Rowland, Rev. Elias 403 

Roberts, John D 39 

Robertson, W. H. H 487 

Rockefeller, Lemuel C. . . . 319 

Ruthrauff, Dr. William S. . . 334 

Roberts, Howard J 445 

gALY, Henry Y 475 

Schellhamer, Vincent . . 378 

Schill, Dr. Francis 119 

Sechler, Johu L 35S 

Seigh, John L 226 

Sechler, William H 443 

Short, Blair 194 

Shryock, William L 74 

Shaflfer,xHenry R 93 

Shepherd, Cyrus 472 

Shaflfer, John J 378 

Sherbine, Aaron 395 

Sherbine, Wallace 335 

Shoemaker, Harry A 247 

Shoemaker, Francis A 462 

Shumaker, James M 249 

Sheridan, Dr. Campbell ... 117 

Sheridan, Dr. John Campbell . 347 

Shipman, Rev. William Alfred 85 

Sharbaugh, Thomas A 180 

Simmers, William 408 

Singer, Jacob 256 

Sipe, D. A. . . . 224 

Slick, Dr. Geo. A. ■ ■ • . . . 476 

Slick, Benj. F 161 

Skelly, A. J 314 

Smith, George W 365 

Smith, Wm. M 476 

Smith, Benjamin Franklin . . 411 

Sommerville, Dr. Harry . . . 355 

Sommerville, John H 410 



8 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Spencer, Edwin F 471 

Strayer, Jacob 478 

Stackhouse, Alexander .... 381 

Stiitzman, Stephen 265 

Stewart, E'lwin R 106 

Stinenian Family, The . . . . 114 

Stineraan, George B 115 

Stinenian, Hon. Jacob C. . . . 116 

Stinenian, William II 178 

Stinenian, Washington Irving 316 

Slrittmatter, Aloysius T. . . 460 

Slrittinatter, Paul A 461 

Strittinatter, Anthony C. . . . 461 

Storey, Henry Wilson • • • . 423 

Stephens, Martin Bingham . . 414 

Stibich.J. L 371 

Stull, B. F 91 

Stuver, Samuel L • 104 

Swank Morrell 402 

Swan, Dr. Samuel M 59 

Swank, Hiram 367 

Sybert, Sebastian P 339 

y.WLOR, J. Swan, M.D. . . 288 

Thompson, James JI. . . 127 

Tliompson, Walter R. ... 129 

Thompson, James P., M.D. .. 42 

Thompson, N. F 438 

Thompson, Francis A 454 

Thomas, Robert R 142 

Thomas, Hon. James I. . . . 149 



Thomas, Jacob 458 

Tomb, Dr. Benj. F 342 

Tomb, Dr. Henson F 120 

Traxler, Rev. Francis X. . . . 402 

Trageser, Rev. Rupert .... 39S 

I JNGER.EliasJ 119 

yAUGHEN, Samuel W. . . 317 

Varner, David 373 

Van Scoyoc, David 409 

Vicroy, Edwin A 405 

Von I,uiien, Louis 359 

U/ALKINSHAW, John C. . 444 

W^lls, W. Frank ... 459 

Warner, Charles 385 

Waltz, Michael J. ...... 468 

Wakefield, Dr. Joseph C. . 386 

Wakefield, Rev. Samuel, D.D. 420 

Wakefield, Dr. A. N 422 

Wagner, Solomon 103 

Wagoner, Dr. George W. . . 244 

Walters, James M 305 

Wallers, John W 296 

West, Johnston G 129 

Wertz, George M 4:8 

Weaver, Herbert H 56 

Weaver, Rev. M. L, 441 

Wesiier, Dr. M. A 405 

Weimer, S. A 84 



Weaklaud, Anselum ... 3S7 

Wentroth, John D 201 

Wharton, James A 2S2 

Wicks, John ,S 63 

Williams, William 248 

Williams, William R 112 

Williams, James 99 

Williams, Frank E 254 

Williams, Morgan L, 469 

Williams, William J 202 

Wilson, Joseph P 268 

Wilson, John E 483 

Wilson, David B 147 

Wirtner, Benjamin 457 

Woodruff, Hon. L. D 77 

Womer, Henry F., M. D. . . . 374 

VAHNER, Paul 33S 

Yeagley, Dr. Benjamin . 368 

Yeagley, Dr. Andrew .... 45 

Yeckley, Jacob 277 

Yearick, Isaiah M 466 

Young, Samuel E 343 

Young, Emanuel 238 

Yothers, Richard J 190 

VAHN, George C. K. ... 52 

Zimmerman Family, The 426 

Zimmerman, Charles .... 42S 

Zimmerman, Jacob 428 

Zimmerman, Edward .... 429 




CAMI'.KIA COIMN' lAII.. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Facing Page 

Barker, Hon. Abraham A 434 

Barker, Judge A. V 436 

Campbell, Gen. Jacob M 11 

Cambria County Court-House Frontispiece. 

Cambria County Jail 9 

Davis, Col. Samuel W 222 

Evans, Alvin 154 

Fend, Jacob 53 

FiCHTNER, Dr. a. S 97 

Gageby, Major James H 185 

Haws, Andrew J 70 

Haws, Henry Y 71 

Jacoby, Jacob 341 

Lewis, William C 131 

Linton, Col. John P 32 

Louther, Daniel 292 

Lloyd, Abel 172 

Rose, VV. Horace 24 

Stineman, Senator Jacob C n^ 

Wagoner, Hon. George W 244 

Walters, James M 3^5 

Wilson, J. P 268 

Woodruff, Hon. L. D 77 

9 











i 


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^^f^m^ 




9 




^^^^^!^mI^^^^^^^ 



GEN. JACOB M. CAMl'UKLL 



CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



/>EN. JACOB MILT.ER CA]>rPBELL„ 

^^ soldier and statesman, is a son of John 
and Mary (Weyand) Campbell, and was born 
November 20, 182 1, in Allegheny township, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and died in 
Johnstown, this county, September 27, 188S. 

His father was a native of Scotland, whence 
he emigrated to the United States in 1817, 
and his mother was a native of Somerset 
county. In 1826 his parents removed to 
Allegheny city, where he attended the com- 
mon schools. In I S3 5, at the age of sixteen 
years, he returned to the town of Somerset, 
and entered the printing house of the Somer- 
set Whig, where he mastered as much of the 
" art preservative of all arts" as could be ob- 
tained in a country printing office. In 1840 
he took a position as a printer in the compos- 
ing rooms of- the " Literary Examiner," a 
monthly magazine published in Pittsburg. In 
the autumn of 1840 he went to New Orleans 
and worked in the newspaper offices of that 
city until the spring of 1 841, when he engaged 
in steamboating on the lower Mississippi 
river and its tributaries, and for several subse- ' 
quent years filled the position successively of 
mate, clerk, and part-owner of a vessel. In 
April, 1847, he married, and in the fall of that 
year abandoned steamboating, and removed 
to Brady's Bend, Pennsylvania, where he en- 
gaged in the iron business at the Great West- 



ern Ironworks. In 1851 he went to Cali- 
fornia, but returned within a year, and re- 
sumed work at the Brady's Bend Iron Works. 
In 1853 he removed to Johnstown, this 
county, and assisted in the construction of 
the mammoth iron works of the Cambria Iron 
company at that place, and remained con- 
nected with these works, holding all the time 
an important and responsible position until 
the breaking out of the Civil War, in 1861. 
Upon the first call of President Lincoln for 
troops for the three months' service to defend 
the National Government, he was enrolled as 
lieutenant in the first company from Cambria 
county, tendering their services to the Gov- 
ernor, and with it arrived in Harrisburg early 
on the morning of the i8th of April, 1 861, 
being the first company to enter Camp Cur- 
tin. LTpon an organization of regiments, 
which was effected during the next few 
days, his company was assigned to the Third 
regiment and designated as company G, and 
Lieutenant Campbell was appointed quarter- 
master of the regiment April 20, i86i,and 
with it served in the Second brigade, Second 
division, under General Patterson in his abor- 
tive campaign on the upper Potomac, in the 
vicinity of the mouth of the Shenandoah Val- 
ley, and returned to Harrisburg, and with the 
troops of that command was mustered out of 
service July 28, 1861. Immediately upon 

11 



12 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



being mustered out he was commissioned a 
colonel by Governor Curtin, and authorized 
to recruit a regiment of volunteers for three 
years' service. In due time the regiment was 
recruited mainly through Colonel Campbell's 
exertions, and it was designated as tlie Fifty- 
Fourth regiment of Pennsylvania volunteers. 
As soon as organized the regiment was 
ordered to Washington, D. C, in which vicin- 
ity it remained until the 29th of March, 1862, 
when Colonel Campbell was ordered to report 
to General Miles, commanding at Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, and in accordance, with in- 
structions from that officer, proceeded to oc- 
cupy the line of the Baltimore and Ohio Rail- 
road from North Mountain Station, Virginia, 
fifty-si.x miles westward to the south branch 
of the Potomac, the regiment occupying the 
most important points along the line. In Sep- 
tember, 1862, the forces under General Miles 
were all, except the Fifty-Fourth Pennsyl- 
vania volunteers, driven into Harper's Ferry 
and captured by the Confederate forces under 
General Jackson. Colonel Campbell retained 
his position on the line of the road and suc- 
ceeded in saving it from destruction, although 
his regiment was the only one left south of 
the Potomac between Cumberland and the 
defences at Washington. After the battle of 
Antictam Colonel Campbell's regiment was 
temporarily attached to Gen. Franklin's corps 
(Si-xth). On March 6, 1863, he was ordered to 
Ronnicy with his regiment, anil was there as- 
signed to the command of the Fourth brigade, 
First division, Eighth army corps. With tiiis 
force he proceeded to occupy the different 
mountain passes in that section, making his 
headquarters at Mechanicsburg Gap. Whilst 
occupying this position they were in almost 
daily conflict with iletachments of the Con- 
federate ami)- and the guerrilla forces, which 



infested that section. On the 14th of June, 
1863, Colonel Campbell, with his brigade, was 
ordered to New Creek to assist in the defence 
of that post, which was threatened by the 
enemy. On the 5th of July his command 
formed part of a column under General Kelly, 
which marched to Fairview, Maryland, to pre- 
vent the forces under General Lee from gain- 
ing possession of the forts at Cherry Run and 
points further west on the Potomac. On July 
1 6th he crossed the Potomac at Cherry Run 
and marched to Hedgeville, driving the enemy's 
forces from that place. On August 2d, 1863, 
Colonel Campbell, with his brigade, was 
ordered to return to his former stations among 
the Hampshire mountains, where he remained 
doing active duty until the 6th of November, 
when he was ordered to Springfield, West 
Virginia, with his command, and all the troops 
along the line of the railroad from Cherry 
Run to New Creek, a distance of ninety miles, 
were assigned to his command in addition to 
his brigade. On the 4th of January, 1864, he 
removed, with his brigade, to Cumberland, 
which place was threatened by the forces of 
Rosser and Fitzhugh Lee. Here he remained 
until General Siegel took command of the 
department of West Virginia. In April, 1864, 
in the reorganization of the troops that took 
place preparatory to the contemplated move- 
ment up the valley of the Shenandoah, Colo- 
nel Campbell, at his own request, was relieved 
from the command of his brigade and returned 
to his old regiment. At the battle of New 
Market, May 15, 1864, he occupied the ex- 
treme left of the line with his regiment, and it 
suffered lieavil)-, two hundred and eighty-four 
of its number being killed or wounded. After 
the battle General Siegel fell back to Adar 
Creek, where he was relieved of his command 
by General Hunter, who again renewed the 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



13 



inarch up the valley, meeting the enemy at 
Piedmont, on the 5th day of June, 1864. In 
this battle Colonel Campbell, with his regi- 
ment, again occupied the left of the line flank- 
ing the enemy's right and attacking them in 
the rear, capturing twice as many of the 
enemy as he had men in his conmiand. For 
gallant conduct and superior skill exhibited 
at this battle Colonel Campbell was breveted 
a brigadier-general, a position doubly earned 
by long and efficient service as a brigade 
commander. Three days after this battle, 
when the forces under Crook joined those of 
Hunter at Staunton, Virginia, General Camp- 
bell was assigned to the command of the 
Third brigade, Second division, and as a 
special favor the Fifty-Fourth regiment was 
transferred to the same brigade, that it might 
be under its old commander. In all the 
engagements under General Hunter, while on 
the celebrated "Lynchburg Raid" General 
Campbell took a prominent part, and on the 
return from that place covered the retreat. 
On July 24, 1864, he took part in the battle 
of Winchester under Crook, and upon the fall 
of General Mulligan, in that battle, assumed 
command of the division, and participated in 
all the subsequent battles of Crook while the 
latter was in command, and after Sheridan 
came to the head of the department he took 
part in all the engagements of the Shenan- 
doah Valley under that renowned chieftain. 
General Campbell was absent from his com- 
mand but three weeks, when, in February, 
1864, he was detailed by the Secretary of 
War to act as a member of a court of inquiry 
at Wheeling, West Virginia. With but one 
single exception he was with his command in 
every fight in which his brigade or regiment 
took part, from the time of its organization 
until he was mustered out of service, Septem- 



ber 3, 1864. After the close of the war, on 
the 17th of August, 1865, General Campbell 
was nominated by the Republican State con- 
vention of Pennsylvania as a candidate for the 
office of Surveyor General (now Secretary of 
Internal Affairs), and was elected for a term of 
three years. In 1868 he was re-elected to the 
same office, and served with great satisfaction 
to the people and with credit to himself At 
the end of his second term in this office he 

I declined a re-election, and devoted his time 
and attention to mechanical and other indus- 
trial pursuits until the fall of 1876, when, 
recognizing his ability, the Republicans of the 
-Seventeenth Congressional district of Pennsyl- 
vania, composed of the counties of Bedford, 
Blair, Cambria and Somerset, nominated and 
elected him to represent them in the House of 
Representatives by a majority of 520 votes 
over the Hon. John Riley, democrat, who 
carried the district two years before by a ma- 
jority of 1 147 votes. In 1878 he was a can- 
didate for re-election, but, owing to the organ- 

! ization of the Greenback party in the district, 
he was defeated by a majority of 305 votes. 
In 1880 he was again a candidate, and was 
elected by a majority of 1436 over his former 
competitor, Hon. A. H. Coffroth, and in 1882 
he again defeated Coffroth. In 18S4 he was 
elected to the Forty-Ninth congress by a ma- 
jority of 3564 votes over Dr. Americus En- 
field. When in Congress he served as a mem- 
ber of the Committees on Education, Labor, 
Railways, Canals, and others of a special char- 
acter. In the Forty-Seventh congress he served 
as chairman on the Committee on Manufac- 
tures. He was an earnest advocate of the re- 
sumption of specie payment, and was opi>osed 
to the free and unlimited coinage of silver for 
the reason that ^12% grains of silver were 
not worth a dollar in the market of the world. 



14 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



He advocated the repeal of the Bankrupt 
Law, believing its repeal essential to the re- 
storation of financial and commercial confi- 
dence and prosperity. He voted for the re- 
striction of Chinese emigration to this country. 
He was always an earnest advocate of the 
principles of protection to all branches of 
American industry. He favored all measures 
looking to the enlargement of our foreign 
commerce, the establishment of proper harbor 
and coast defences, the building of an efficient 
navy and the reform in the civil service and 
kindred measures. In 1856 he was a delegate 
to the first Republican National convention, 
assisted in the organization of the party, and 
ever afterward was an earnest advocate of its 
principles and sui:iporter of its candidates. He 
was chairman of the Republican State con- 
vention in 1887. This was his last public 
appearance, anil though visibly failing in 
health, he proved, as on all former siiiiilar 
occasions, his remarkable ability as a presid- 
ing officer. .So excellent an impression did 
he make b)' his dignified conduct that, coupled 
with his previous unsullied record, and com- 
ing as he did from a section of the State 
whose claims had long been unrecognized, he 
was by many spoken of as a suitable candi- 
date to succeed Governor James A. Beaver, 
and, had his physical vigor remained adequate, 
it is extremely probable that he would have 
received the gubernatorial nominaliim. 

In business circles the general was no less es- 
teemed than in public life. Because of his high 
character, his name was a tower of strength 
in anv entci[)rise. Prominent among the cor- 
porations with which he was connected as a 
director were the First National Bank, The 
Savings Bank and the Gas and Water Com- 
panies antl the Johnstown IClectric Light Com- 
pany. He was a charter member of .\lma 



Lodge and of Wm. F. Packer Encampment, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and for 
thirty years took a lively interest in those 
organizations, in which he rose to the princi- 
pal offices. He was likewise a charter mem- 
ber of Johnstown Lodge, No. 538, Free and 
Accepted Masons. By his former comrades 
in arms, among whom he was affectionately 
known as " Uncle Jake," he was loved and 
honored for his sterling qualities, both as a 
man and as a soldier, and some of his happi- 
est hours were those passed at the camp-fires 
of Emory Fisher Post, No. 30, G. A. R., of 
which he was a prominent and enthusiastic 
member to the day of his death. In 1887, 
upon the reorganization of the Fifty-Fourth 
regiment as a civil body, he was enthusiastic- 
ally chosen president by the survivors. Upon 
retiring from public life General Campbell 
sought the tjuiet and seclusion of his home, 
and devoted himself to looking after his 
private interests, and to taking a well-earned 
rest after his active and useful life. But he 
was not destined to enjoy it long. Up to the 
year 1883 he had been wholly exempt from 
physical ailments, but in that year he sus- 
tained a severe attack of pneumonia, which 
seriously underminetl his health. Twice sub- 
sequently the same disease prostrated him, the 
last time being in May, 1888 ; but owing to his 
strong constitution he recovered, although 
with each attack his strength visibl)' dimin- 
ished. When apparentl)' recovering from the 
last attack of pneumonia he was stricken with 
paralysis, and although his life was despaired 
of then, he exerted his intlomitable will so 
effectively that he routed the disease and 
recovered sufficient strength to leave his bed 
and go about almost as usual. About two 
montlis before his death his final illness began 
with symptoms of heart failure. His death 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



15 



was directly due to acute inflammation of the 
brain. Under a plain and unassuming ex- 
terior, General Campbell concealed high 
ability and a rare degree of manly virtue. 
Unselfishness and a sincere regard for the 
welfare of others were conspicuous among his 
striking characteristics. "As a soldier," said 
one who was familiar with his career in all its 
phases, "he was brave and noble, and his 
heroism was never questioned. As a State 
official he was above suspicion, and although 
he instituted many great reforms which met 
with opposition, no one, even amid the greatest 
political excitement, impeached his integrity. 
As a congressman he was untiring in his work 
and a faithful agent of his constituents, never 
failing to attend to a duty exacted of him and 
never neglecting to answer a letter asking for 
information. * * * His private life, his home, 
were beautiful. The youngest of his children 
was treated by him with the same manly con- 
sideration as the best of his fellows, and the 
strength of his affection for her who so nobly 
shared his trials and sacrifices, and partici- 
pated in the honors and triumphs of his later 
years was one of the loveliest traits of his 
character." " A life's work well done, a name 
historical in the annals of the State, a record 
of duty conscientiously discharged in every 
walk of life." 

In April, 1847, he married Mary R., daugh- 
ter of James and Mary Campbell, and to their 
happy union were born the following chil- 
dren: Mrs Mary W. Kinney, of Braddock, 
Pennsylvania; Curtis G. , a druggist of Johns- 
town, who married Mary M. Robb, of Johns- 
town; Louis D., who married Mrs. Emma 
Elliott, and is a lawyer located in Tacoma, 
Washington ; Ida Blanche, deceased, James 
A., of Braddock, Pennsylvania ; Eva A., the 
wife of Dr. C. L. R utter, of Chicago, Illinois; 



Frank M., who married Annie Madden, is a 
business man of Eureka Springs, Arkansas 
William B., of Los Angeles, California; Ralph 
R., physician, located in Chicago, who mar- 
led Miss Ida Belle MacArthur of that city; 
John B., at home, and Bruce H., an attorney- 
at-law, located in Chicago, Illinois. 
^ 

HON. GEORGE S. KUfG. In the indus- 
trial history of Johnstown and Cam- 
bria county perhaps no one stands higher 
or is more favorably known than the gentle- 
man whose name heads this sketch. He 
stands as a typical representative of that 
sturdy American citizenship whose brain and 
brawn have made western Pennsylvania the 
most noted iron-producing section in the world. 

George S. King was born in Hagerstown, 
Washington county, Maryland, on October 
28, 1809, and is a son of John and Ellen 
(Shryock) King, and is of German stock, about 
seven-eighths German blood coursing through 
his veins. 

When he was about four or five years of 
age his father removed to Mercersburg, 
Franklin county, Pennsylvania. At the age 
of about twelve years he took a position as 
clerk, and from this time on young King 
made his own way, and gained a knowledge 
of those fundamental principles of business 
which no doubt contributed so largely to his 
future success. Remaining in that position 
about three years, he accepted a similar posi- 
tion in Meadville, Pennsylvania, where he re- 
mained until seventeen years of age, when he 
embarked in the same place in mercantile 
pursuits for five years, being uniformly suc- 
cessful. 

In 183 1 he traded a portion of his Mead- 
ville property to Abraham Morrison in part 
pay for sundry Johnstown properties. When 



16 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



leaving Meadville he took a position in the 
wholesale dry-goods establishment of Michael 
and Frank Tiernan of Pittsburg. He remained 
in Pittsburg one year, when he purchased 
from Col. James Patton, a brother-in law of 
Col. Thomas A. Scott, then a small boy, a 
half interest in a store at Loudon, Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania. While at Loudon he 
boarded with the father of Thomas A. Scott, 
and the only brother of the future great rail- 
road manager clerked in his store. He did 
not remain long at Loudon, but retained his 
one-half interest in the store, his brother hav- 
ing become an owner of a half interest. He 
then went back to Mercersburg and pur- 
chased the store of Arthur Chambers, a 
descendant of the founders of Chambersburg. 
Soon after this purchase he formed a partner- 
ship with a man named McGaw, and started a 
store in McConnellsburg, then Bedford coun- 
ty, now the county-seat of Fulton county, 
Pennsylvania. He soon found that McGaw 
in the McConnellsburg store was doing a 
more lucrative business than he in the Mer- 
cersburg store, and this caused him to become 
dissatisfied, and to seek a new location. 
Through the influence of Jeremiah S. Black, 
then a young lawyer of Somerset, afterward 
the renowned lawyer and jurist, he went to 
the latter place with the intention of going 
into the mercantile business at that point. 
Matters not materializing then as he had anti- 
cipated, he was advised to come to Johnstown 
by a merchant of Somerset, who gave him a 
letter of recommendation to Abraham Morri- 
son, Esq., who had practiced law at Somerset, 
but had removed to Johnstown about the time 
of tlie luiiidiiig of the main line. This was in 
the year 1833. 

He came on horseback and l;(jI tlierc in the 
evening. It was his fust visit to the place. 



and, to use his own language, "When I heard 
the boat horns blowing and saw the improve- 
ments that were going on I concluded that 
this was the place to do business." 

He purchased a portion of Mr. Morrison's 
property, and gave in part payment a tract of 
land in Crawford county. The property pur- 
chased of Mr. Morrison consisted of a plot of 
ground on the corner of Main and Franklin 
streets, extending on Franklin street to the 
alley between Carpenter's restaurant and the 
Methodist church property, and an equal dis- 
tance on Main street, including the location 
now occupied by Griffith's drug store; also 
the lot on which Dr. Swan's residence now 
stands, and a number of lots on Market and 
Vine streets. 

The lot upon which Dr. Swan's residence 
now stands was then a cornfield. Here Mr. 
King built a cottage house, in which he lived 
for some years, and afterward sold to Rev. 
Samuel Swan, the father of Dr. Swan. \\'hen 
he first went to Johnstown, boating on the 
western division of the Pennsylvania canal 
had just begun, antl one track of the Portage 
railroad was about completed. He remained 
in Johnstown most of the time from that on, 
having removed his Mercersburg store to that 
place in 1834. 

He had contracted with Mr. Hamilton, the 
father of Major David Hamilton, for the erec- 
tion of his store building, but it was not fin- 
ished at the time specified, and his goods lay 
in boxes awaiting its completion. At last it 
was completed, and he concluded to open his 
store, after which he was to go to Bedford to 
be married, but in conseciucnce of arranging 
the store, he was detained longer than lie ex- 
pected, so that he did not reacli Bedfortl until 
nine o'clock at night of the i.!a}- for wliich tlie 
weddinir was set. The niinistci' luul ahead\- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



17 



gone home, and the assembled guests had 
given hitii up. However, the minister was 
informed of his arrival, and the wedding took 
place a little late, but nevertheless in the eve- 
ning of the day for which it had been ar- 
ranged. 

He continued the mercantile business in 
Johnstown for three or four years, and then 
sold out to John K. and William L. Shryock, 
who had come to the place from Hagerstown. 

It had been his intention to go to Pittsburg 
and engage in the wholesale mercantile busi- 
ness ; but the hard times of 1837 and 183S 
came on, and he remained in Johnstown. 

About 1839 or 1840 Mr. King turned his 
attention to searching for iron ore in the hills 
around Johnstown, and, after a hunt of several 
months, was rewarded by finding a deposit 
near Laurel Run, some three miles west of 
Johnstown, which he thought sufficient to 
justify the erection of a furnace. He associ- 
ated with himself David Stewart, and John K. 
and William L. .Shryock, and Cambria Fur- 
nace was built. It was a charcoal furnace, 
and made its first iron in 1841. 

About the latter part of 1843 Dr. Peter 
Shoenberger, of Pittsburg, purchased the in- 
terest of David Stewart, and in 1844 Dr. 
Shoenberger and Mr. King purchased the in- 
terest of John K. and William L. Shryock, 
and thereby became equal owners of Cambria 
furnace. 

In consequence of the better times brought 
about by the tariff of 1842, Dr. Shoenberger 
and Mr. King built two more furnaces. Mill 
Creek and Ben's Creek, the former about four 
miles and the latter about three miles from 
Johnstown. In these enterprises Mr. John 
Bell was associated with Mr. King and Dr. 
Shoenberger, but they soon after purchased 
his interest. 
2 



Mr. David Stewart, who had been interested 
in the Cambria furnace, built Blacklick fur- 
nace, situated in Indiana county, Pennsyl- 
vania, about eight miles from Johnstown ; but, 
becoming discouraged in consequence of the 
tariff of 1846, sold it to Mr. King and Dr. 
Shoenberger. They then built another fur- 
nace at Sharon, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, 
making five furnaces which they then operated, 
but with little profit to themselves. 

Dr. Shoenberger favored the erection of a 
large foundry, so as to put the iron in the 
shape of castings, such as large sugar kettles, 
for the New Orleans market, which then 
seemed most in demand. Mr. King advo- 
cated the erection of a rolling-mill to manu- 
facture railroad iron. The iron of these fur- 
naces was not suitable for bar-iron, and, in his 
opinion, was not good for castings, being too 
hard, though in a wrought form he was satis- 
fied that it was good for railroad iron, if pro- 
perly worked. The result of a trial demon- 
strated that he was right in his opinion. 

Finally it was agreed that an effort should 
be made to organize a company to erect a 
rolling-mill at Johnstown for the manufacture 
of railroad iron. 

In the early part of 1852 Mr. King went 
east to endeavor to get capitalists interested 
in the proposed enterprise. He went first to 
New York city, but finding little encourage- 
ment there, he went to Boston. 

This visit resulted in an arrangement by 
which certain Boston parties were to get up a 
company within six months, and Mr. King 
was to secure the charter. Mr. King and Dr. 
Shoenberger were to put in their four fur- 
naces and 25,000 acres at $300,000, and they 
were to retain stock to the amount of $100,000, 
the difference to be paid them in cash. The 
capital was to be $1,000,000, and the works 



18 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



were to be located in Johnstown. Mr. King, 
witliout consultation with Dr. Shoenber- 
ger or any one else, named the company. The 
Cambria Iron company and the works The 
Cambria Iron works, and fixed the capital. 

When the six months were up the Boston 
parties wanted more time; they had not suc- 
ceeded in raising the money as they had anti- 
cipated, and further time was granted. 

They then transferred their efforts to New 
York, and were finally successful in having 
the amount subscribed. Mr. King was ap- 
pointed to go to Harrisburg and secure a 
charter incorporating the proposed company. 
Arriving at the latter city, he was not long in 
finding that a statute existed prohibiting the 
incorporation of companies controlling more 
than five hundred acres of land in any one 
county. As the lands included in the Cam- 
bria Iron company's landed interests embraced 
several thousand acres in Cambria county, it 
was necessary to secure special legislation 
adapted to the conditions as they existed in 
this particular case. Mr. King went to Har- 
risburg, the legisiatuic then being in session, 
and secured the enactment of an additional 
article to the general law permitting the in 
corporation of tlie Cambria Iron company, 
with its extensive landed acreage. A meeting 
was held to organi/.e the company, which re- 
sulted in the election of Ur. Shoenbergcr, 
president ; Simon Draper, of New York, trea- 
surer ; George N. Hodges, secrctarj', and 
George S. King, general manager. Some time 
after this it was arranged tliat Mr. King and 
Dr. -Shoenberger should take $200,000 of the 
stock of the roinpan)', instead of $I00,000, as 
originally agreed upon, leaving $ 100,000 to 
lie paid them by the company. 

Mr. King purcliased the land upon which 
the Cambria Iron company's mills and new 



coke furnaces are erected at Johnstown, and, 
as general manager, superintended the erec- 
tion of the original buildings. Work began 
on them in February, 1853, just one year 
after he had gone to New York to interest 
capitalists in the matter. 

In 185s Mr. King was elected to the legisla- 
ture by the Whig party. It was urged at that 
time that no man living in Cambria county 
had done so much to develop her resources 
and advance the prosperity of her citizens; 
that he was the first to discover the iron in 
her hills, that it was his energy that brought 
to light her latent treasures and transformed 
them into iron rails to cement the mighty 
East and the growing West, and it was his 
enterprise that brought hundreds of thousands 
of dollars from the East to be distributed 
among her citizens. During his term in the 
Legislature there was a movement to secure a 
new comity to be called Conemaugh, with 
Johnstown as the county-seat. The bill passed 
the House by a fair majority and the Senate 
by a majority of one vote, but the adverse in- 
fluence was sufficient to secure a reconsidera- 
tion, and the measure was finall}' defeated. 

Mr. King and Miss Eliza McDowell, a 
daughter of Charles McDowell, then editor of 
the Bedford Gazette, were united in marriage 
in 1834. To their marriage union were born 
nine children that are living: Charles, of Mis- 
souri ; Anna, wife of the late Hon. John P. 
Linton, an account ol whose life record ap- 
pears elsewhere in this volume; luiward, of 
riiiladelphia; Walter, of California; Mary, who 
was the wife of Ste[)lien Evans, deceased, of 
Missouri; George, of I'coria, Illinois; Olho, of 
Mason City, Illinois; Newton, of lla\'ana, 
Illinois, and Alice, wife of Kenj-on S. Fisher, 
of ICnnis, Te.xas. 

All. ls.ni>' sold out his interest in the Cam- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



19 



bria Iron company, and in 1866 moved to 
Levvistown, Fulton county, Illinois, two of 
his wife's brothers being practicing physicians 
there at that time. Having been one of the 
founders of the First National bank of Johns- 
town, his mind naturally turned to banking, 
and he organized the Lewistown National 
bank. In connection with his banking inter- 
ests he, with others, carried on a large real- 
estate and loan business in Chicago, and was 
also interested as a stockholder and director 
in a numberof insurance companies in Chicago. 

The great fire of 1 871, that devastated so 
much of the city and ruined so many of the 
prosperous business firms of the city, ma- 
terially affected this firm with which he was 
connected, and they closed up their business. 
In the division of their assets Mr. King took 
as his share ten acres near the then city 
limits, and eighty acres about one mile dis- 
tant ; shortly afterward he sold the ten acres 
for 530,000 and the eighty acres for ,$70,000. 

In 1872 he established a banking business 
in Mason city, Illinois, of which his son, Otho 
S., was made cashier. It is now known as 
the Mason City National bank, and Otho S. 
is still cashier. 

In 1874 he founded what is now known as 
the Havana National bank, his son, Newton 
C, becoming cashier, and has remained such 
to the present time. 

During his residence in Lewistown and 
Chicago, he, in connection with others, under 
the firm name of Howes, King & Co., pur- 
chased and operated a woolen mill in Lewis- 
town. 

Mr. King has always taken a lively interest 
in real estate affairs in and about Johnstown, 
and at one time or another has owned a 
greater part of the realty in the environs of 
the city. 



After the death of his wife, and in the 
absence of all his children, Mr. King returned 
to Johnstown, the scene of his early activities, 
in 1889, and, with the e.vception of one year 
visiting in the West, has resided there ever 
since, making his home with his daughter, 
the widow of the late Col. John P. Linton. 

Hon. George S. King has lived in every 
decade of the closing century; he has been a 
witness to the progress of an age unparalleled 
in the history of the world, and has contri- 
buted to a greater degree than is usually the 
privilege of man to that progress. His is a 
mind in which the power of construction and 
generalization are highly developed, whilst he 
possesses that executive and organizing ability 
that are so essential in the carrying out of 
enterprises vast in conception and far-reaching 
in their influence. Successful and honorable 
has been his career, and as he enters upon the 
closing scenes of a busy life, it is with that 
happy consciousness of having faithfully per- 
formed every duty intrusted to his care, and 
in such a manner as to draw to himself a 
host of appreciative and admiring friends. 



1r\R- WEBSTER BODINE I^OWMAN, 

^^ who ranks as a physician and surgeon 
second to none in the city of Johnstown, Penn- 
sylvania, is a son of Dr. John and Margaret 
Ann (Bodine) Lowman. 

Dr. John Lowman was himself a physician 
of note in his day. He was a son of Andrew 
Lowman, and was born February 13, 18 17, in 
Greencastle, Franklin county, Pennsylvania. 
The family of the paternal side enjoyed the 
distinction of being Hollanders, the great- 
grandfather of Dr. John Lowman having 
emigrated, finst of the family, from that thrifty 
little country to this. 

Dr. John Lowman was educated in the 



20 



BlUGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CVCLOPEUIA 



common schools. His parents removed from 
Franklin county to Indiana county about 1834, 
where his father died. The latter was a tan- 
ner by trade, but followed the milling and 
distillery business in Indiana county. 

Dr. John Lowman was apprenticed to learn 
the carpenter trade, but, becoming dissatisfied 
with it because of a desire for a professional 
career, entered Indiana academy at Indiana, 
Pennsylvania. He read medicine later with 
Dr. Stewart, of Indiana, Pennsylvania, and 
entered Jefferson Medical college in 1844, 
graduating from tliat institution in 1S47. He 
located in Johnstown, where he practiced his 
profession with deserved distinction until his 
death, June 16, 1894. He was a member of 
the American Medical association, the Penn- 
sylvania State Medical association, and the 
Cambria County Medical society, of which 
body he was the first president. 

He was the first surgeon ever appointed by 
the Pennsylvania railroad, and hold the posi- 
tion until his ileath. He made a specialty of 
surgery, being for a number of years the onl)' 
surgeon in the vallc)'. l'"roni 1864 to 1872 
lie was pension examiner of the cit)'. 

He did not confine his labors wholl)- to his 
professional duties, but like a good citizen 
aided in the promotion of private enterprises 
that were beneficial to his neighbors. So we 
find him one of the originators of the Johns- 
town Water compan}', and also of the Johns- 
town Gas compan)-, licing at the time of his 
death president of the latter and a director of 
the former. He was also one of the promo- 
ters and charter members of the Johnstown 
.Savings bank, of which he was vice-president 
at the time of his death. 

Politically he was first a whig, then a repub- 
lican, l)\it never sought nor held office. 

He was ,1 member of the I'lpiscopal Chunli 



of Johnstown, and of the Masonic frater- 
nity. 

He was married to Margaret Ann Bodine, 
of New Jersey, whose ancestors were French 
Huguenots, and they had but one child, Dr. 
Webster B. Lowman, our subject. 

He was born March 25, 1 841, at Indiana, 
Pennsylvania. After preparatory studies at 
Burlington college, New Jersey, he commenced 
the study of medicine in 1865 at Johnstown 
with his father. He attended two courses of 
lectures at the Jefferson Medical college, from 
which school he graduated in 1867. He be- 
gan, after graduating, the practice of medicine 
in Johnstown, where, except the time he was 
engaged in the Civil War, he has practiced 
ever since. In April, 1S61, he enlisted as a 
private in company K, Third regiment 
Pennsylvania volunteers, but was promoted to 
the office of hospital surgeon. In June, 1861, 
he was discharged on account of disability, but 
re-enlisted in 1862 as first sergeant of com- 
pany K, One Hundred and Thirty-sixth 
regiment, Pennsylvania volunteers. Decem- 
ber, 1862, he was promoted to the rank of 
second lieutenant, and afterwards captain of 
this company. At the expiration of the time 
of enlistment he was mustered out of the ser- 
vice, but re-entered September 10, 1864, as 
captain of Battery " D," Fifth Penn.sj-lvania 
artillery, and remainetl to the close of the war. 
He is now a member of the Military Order of 
the Loyal Legion, United States. Dr. Low- 
man, as a medical man of high standing, holds 
various responsible positions and memberships. 
Since 1867 he has been surgeon of the Cam- 
bria Iron company, and of the Pennsylvania 
railroad company ; surgeon in charge of the 
Cambria hospital since 1884. 

lie is surgeon of the Johnson Steel com- 
p.my ; between 1S73 and 1S93 was United 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



21 



States pension examining surgeon, and since 
1891 has been senior surgeon on the staff of 
tlie Conemaugh Valley Memorial hospital. 
lie is a member of the American Medical 
association and of the Medical Society of the 
State of Pennsylvania, being vice-president of 
the latter in 1886, and of the Cambria County 
Medical society, of whicli he was president in 
1893. 

To his military and professional career Dr. 
Lovvman adds a private career full of good 
works, being a director of the Citizens' National 
bank, trustee of the Johnstown Savings bank 
since 1886, director of the Johnstown Water 
company and of the Johnstown Gas company 
since 1893, director of the Johnstown Tele- 1 
phone company, trustee of the Grand View ; 
cemetery, and since 1891 trustee of the Cone- 
maugh Valley Memorial hospital. It will 
thus be seen what a hard worker Dr. Low- 
man has been. His unusual powers, too, have | 
ever been directed to the promotion of the 
useful and good, the alleviation of suffering, 
and the course of freedom and right. 

Dr. Lowman in 1870 married Miss Susan 
Morrell Stackhouse, of Edgemont, Delaware 
county, Pennsylvania, and has one son, Dr. i 
John B. Lowman, who graduated from Jeffer- 
son Medical college in the class of 1895. 
Since graduating he has practiced with his 
father in Johnstown. A high rank among 
physicians may be prophesied for a young 
man who has the inspiration of such highly 
creditable examples as are afforded by the 
father and grandfather of Dr. John Low- 
man, Jr. I 



TAMKS Mf3IILL,EN. It is no mean thing 

in these days of hot competition to attain 

success in any line without the advantages of 

systematic training, and there is good stuff in 



a man who, unaided, makes himself and his 
fortune without marring either. So it follows 
that the condition of life of a self-made man is 
the proof of his inborn capacity or lack of it 
The above has had a literal interpretation in 
the life of the subject of this sketch. 

James McMillen, widely known as an influ- 
ential business man of Johnstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, also occupies a high place among his 
fellow-citizens as a self-made man of ability 
and integrity. He grew into positions of trust 
and profit, not from the force of external cir- 
cumstances, but because of innate strength 
and sound ability. He has educated himself, 
and chiefly through his association with men 
and connection with business interests. Such 
an education makes a man of affairs and dis- 
pels the illusions which make the dreaming 
theorist. The latter is seldom useful to many 
people, the former is always so if he possesses 
executive ability, energy and good judgment. 
These traits have made Mr. McMillen what 
he is to his fellow-men. 

In March, 1850, he came to Johnstown, 
Cambria county, and at the organization of the 
Cambria Iron company, in 1853, he became a 
member. He was appointed to superintend 
the transferring of the property from Shoenberg 
& King, the old company, to the new cor- 
poration, a task of considerable difficulty 
owing to necessary complications. 

From that day to this he has been an active 
and valuable member of the company, being 
one of the few who are connected with it at 
present, and who were connected with it at its 
beginning. He has for a number of years 
been a member of the board of directors, but 
six or eight years ago was elevated to the 
position of resident director, a recognition due 
to his qualifications. 

He is president of the First National bank 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and of the Savings 
bank of the same place. This bank was 
organized in September, 1870, and enjoys the 
distinction of having had two prominent men 
for its president — Daniel J. Morrell and James 
McMillen — Mr. Morrell being the president 
immediately preceding Mr. McMillen. For 
the position of bank president our subject's 
natural abilities, his capacity and inclination 
for business, and his scrupulousness in monej' 
matters combine to make him a very desirable 
person. 

He is also president of the Johnstown Water 
company, and the Johnstown Water and Gas 
company, and of the Grand View Cemetery 
association, being one of the organizers of the 
latter. This, as well as the Savings bank, is a 
mutual arrangement ; fifty members control it. 

From this brief sketch a small idea may be 
obtained of what Mr. McMillen has done for 
the public welfare. His life affords an instruc- 
tive lesson of what may be achieved by a 
capable and ambitious man. 

He was born November 21, 1822, in Indiana 
county, near Rlairsville, where his father, who 
was a native of either Blair or Bedford county, 
emigrated near the beginning of the present 
century. Mr. McMillen married Miss Su- 
sanna Fair, now deceased, and to them were 
born Malissa, wife of Harry Rosensteel, of 
Jtjhnstown, an inlluuntial citizen, and now 
president of the Johnstown Electric Light 
company; another child, Frank, died in 1888, 
and with him a bright enjoyment of the par- 
ent's life went out. 

Mr. McMillen is a consistent member of 
flic I'.nglish Lutheran Church, and although 
not in any sense an active politician, he dis- 
charges tlie duties of a citizen in such a way 
as to win the respect and confidence of his 
fellow-townsmen. 



'T^HE ROSE FAMILY. — No family in Cam- 
bria county has better claims to recog- 
nition in a work of this kind than the Rose 
family of Johnstown. For three generations 
they have been prominent in the affairs of the 
town and county. 

The Rose family is of sturdy English stock, 
and the energy and tenacity of purpose char- 
acteristic of the English race is one of the 
prominent traits of the family. They trace 
their ancestry in America through William 
Rose (seven generations) to one of five brothers 
who emigrated from England to eastern Penn- 
sylvania in the last centur)'. W'illiam Rose 
settled first at Philadelphia. From there he 
went to Lancaster county; from Lancaster 
county he moved to Bob's Creek, near the 
town of Bedford ; from Bob's Creek he moved 
to Jenner X Roads, in Somerset county. Here 
his wanderings ceased, and after a life of 
adventure and hardship — such as fell to the 
lot of the pioneers who wrested this great 
State from a savage wilderness — he lived 
quietly until his death in 1847. His grave is 
in the old Baptist graveyard at Jenner X Roads. 

Allen Rose, son of William Rose, was born 
in Bedford county, March ::o, 1793. He 
seems to have inherited some of his father's 
adventurous spirit, for in 1812 we find him 
located in Somerset county. Shortly after- 
wards he is in Ohio. After a short stay in 
Ohio he is for a brief period a resident of 
McKeesport, Pa. He finally returned to Som- 
erset county and purchased a grist mill at 
lenner X Roads in 1826. He operated the 
mill for two years, and in 182S came to what 
was then called the town of Conemaugh, but 
since 1834 is known as Johnstown. 

At Johnstown Mr. Rose was engaged as a 
contractor and builder. Me was a carpenter by 
trade, and old citizens of the town remember 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



23 



him as a mechanic of more than ordinary skill 
and genius. In addition to his work as car- 
penter and builder, he was a pumpmaker, and 
many of the large pumps that were once numer- 
ous in the town were the product of his shop. 

Allen Rose was a man of earnest piety, and 
was a consistent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, of which his wife was also 
a devout member. His opportunity for edu- 
cation, so far as schools and text-books are 
concerned, was limited to such as the schools 
of Bedford county furnished at the beginning 
of this century, and was meagre. But in the 
knowledge of the Bible he was deeply learned 
and could quote texts with an aptness pos- 
sessed by few. 

In i<S23, Mr. Rose was united in marriage ', 
to Elizabeth Freame, who was born December 
21, 1803. To this union the following child- 
ren were born : Eliza, born February 9, 1824; 
Wesley J., born April 17, 1826; Marshall, 
born July 4, 1828; John S., born June 19, 
1 83 1; Lewis S., born October 5, 1834; W. 
Horace, born November 17, 1838; George 
W., born November 28, 1840; and Agnes F. , 
born April 4, 1844. 



Tll'KSLEY J. UOSE, the well-known con- 
tractor and builder of Johnstown, is the 
son of Allen and Elizabeth (Freame) Rose. 
He was born April 17, 1826, on a farm near 
Jenner X Roads, Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

In 1828 his father moved to what is now the 
city of Johnstown (then called Conemaugh), 
and there our subject has made his home con- 
tinuously to the present time. 

He was educated in the common schools of 
the town, and taught one term in Somerset 
county in the winter of 1848. He learned the 
trade of carpentry with his father. 



In 1854 he went into a partnership under 
the firm name of Pringle, Rose & Edson. 
The firm purchased the foundry and machine 
shops of S. H. Smith, on the site of the present 
Gautier mills. These they operated until 1864. 
when a corporation, known as the Johnstown 
Mechanical Works, was formed to operate 
the works. Mr. Rose became manager for 
the company, and continued in that position 
until 1869, when he resigned his position, and 
went to California, where he remained several 
months sight-seeing and visiting friends. 

He came back to Johnstown, and went into 
business as a contractor and builder; and 
j-rom that time to the present, has been a lead- 
ing contractor in his line of business, which 
includes all kinds of manufactured lumber 
and builders' supplies. 

In 1884 his son, Walter E., was taken into 
partnership under the firm name of W. J. Rose 
& Son. The "Great Flood" washed their 
planing mill away and destroyed their entire 
plant ; but as soon as possible after that great 
disaster, they, with characteristic energy and 
pluck, began to rebuild on a larger scale than 
before. Another son, Mr. R. G. Rose, was 
taken into the firm, and W. J. Rose & Sons 
were soon doing a larger business than ever 
before. 

Mr. Rose was united in marriage to Martha 
Given, March 14, 1850, at New Florence, by 
Rev. J. J. Covert. Mrs. Rose was born Sep- 
tember 16, 1825 ; and died, January 28, 1886. 

The following children were born to this 
couple: Elizabeth F., born May 18,1851, now 
the wife of Sam. E. Young, of Johnstown ; 
Emma J., born August 20, 1852, now the wife 
of James S. Gallagher ; Maggie T., born March 
21, 1854, now the wife of A. P. Ellis; Hon. 
John M., whose sketch appears in another 
place; Walter Edson, born March 19, 1858, 



24 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



now a member of firm of W. J. Rose & Sons; 
Harry G. (deceased), whose sketcli appears 
elsewhere; Howard J., born June 17, 1862, 
died February 22, 1863; Annie M., born 
November 21, 1863, now the wife of R. L. 
Taney; Robert G., born May 25, 1865, mem- 
ber of \V. J. Rose & Sons; and Frank Z., 
born September 20, 1867. 

Personally Mr. Rose is one of the most 
genial and companionable of men, and all his 
acquaintances (and this includes all old citizens 
of the town) esteem him very highly. He 
takes a deep interest in everything pertaining 
to the early history of the town, and has quite 
a collection of interesting relics connected 
with local hiitory, and his gallery of over six 
hundred photographs of prominent citizens of 
the town, past and present, is of great interest 
Mr. Rose takes pleasure in showing his gallery 
to all who know anything of the Johnstown 
of ante bellum days. 



HOX. \\. IIOISACK ROSK, the first mayor 
of Joiuistown. It would be difficult to 
find a better example of a self-made man than 
the subject of this sketch, and it would be still 
more difficult to name one who has been more 
closely iilenlified with the public affairs of his 
native town. 

William Horace Rose, son of Allen and 
Elizabeth (Freame) Rose, was born Novem- 
ber 17, 1838, in a log house which stood at 
the southeast corner of Vine and Market 
streets, in tiie borough of Johnstown. As a 
i)o_\' he attended the schools of the town until 
his thirteenth year, wiien he lost both of his 
parents by tleatli. The)' both expired at the 
.same hour, August 3, 1851, and thereafter, 
with the exception of five months at Flders 
Ridge academy, in Indiana county, he never 
again entered a school-room as a student. 



Being thus doubly orphaned, he showed his 
mettle by beginning at once to earn his own 
way in the world. He first went to work in 
the tannery of Mr. J. P. McConaughy, which 
occupied the site of the present Cambria 
Library building. He was next employed 
cutting screws in the machine shop of S. H. 
Smith, on the present site of the Gautier mills. 
Later he learned the trade of moulding with 
the firm of Pringle, Rose & Edson. He was 
employed for a time as moulder in the foundry 
of the Cambria Iron company, but an attack 
of bronchitis compelled him to abandon this 
trade. We next find him learning carpentry 
witli his brother, Wesley J. He subsequently 
worked at tiiis trade for Joseph Kuntz, Emanuel 
Shaffer and Pringle, Rose & Co. In 1857 he 
went to Davenport, Iowa, and worked at his 
trade for one season. He then returned to 
Johnstown, and on February i, 1858, entered 
the office of John P. Linton as a law student. 
He made rapid progress, and March 6, i86o, 
was admitted to the bar of Cambria count}-. 

Being a carpenter, he built himself an 
office on the lot now occupied by the city 
offices, am.! began the practice of law on his 
own account. With the exception of the 
years spent in the service of his country, on 
the field of battle, he continued the practice 
of law at this office until the " Great Flood " 
of 1889. 

Having taken a great interest in state mili- 
tar)' affairs, he was appointed by the governor 
judge advocate of the Third brigade of State 
Unifoi'nu'd militia, with the rank of major. 
This brigatle was conimandetl i)y another dis- 
tinguished citizen of Johnstown — Hon. James 
Potts. 

In April, 1861, the local militia company to 
which Mr. Rose was attached as lieutenant 
offered its services to the government to aid 




HON. W. HORACE ROSE. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



25 



in suppressing the rebellion. Preparations 
were made to have the command start for 
Camp Curtin, near Ilarrisburg, on Tuesday, 
April 30, 1 861. Just at this point in the 
young soldier's record a bit of romance creeps 
in. On Monday, April 29, the day before the 
company was to leave, he was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Maggie A. Ramsey, at the 
Presbyterian parsonage, by the Rev. B. L. 
Agnew. The next morning orders were re- 
ceived to disband the company, as their ser- 
vices were not needed. A few weeks later 
the government had quite a different idea as 
to the number of men required to put down 
the rebellion. It is probable, however, that 
our gallant lieutenant had no serious fault to 
find with the governor's order at that time. 

Three months later he enlisted as a private 
in company I, Fifty-fourth regiment Penn- 
sylvania volunteers. His promotions were 
rapid; he was soon elected second lieutenant 
of his company, and Januarv' 31, 1862, became 
adjutant of his regiment, and in November, 
1862, he became assistant adjutant general of 
General Campbell's brigade. In January, 
1864, he was appointed post-adjutant at Cum- 
berland, Maryland. Rejoining his regiment 
in May, 1864, he accompanied it in " Hunter's 
raid" in the Shenandoah Valley, and received 
a severe wound at the battle of Piedmont, 
June 5, 1864. Of his conduct in this battle 
General Campbell's official report says : "The 
only commissioned officer wounded was Ad- 
jutant W. H. Rose, who received a painful 
wound in the thigh while gallantly cheering 
on his men in front of the rebel position held 
by Major General Jones." He fell into the 
hands of the rebels, but was soon released and 
sent home to recover from his wound. He 
rejoined his regiment at Harper's Ferry. 
General Campbell's (Third) brigade was at- 



tached to General Cook's division, and went 
with it in another campaign in the Shenandoah 
Valley, under the command of Generals Sheri- 
dan and Cook. Adjutant Rose participated 
in the battle about Halltown and First Cedar 
Creek, during this campaign. After this cam- 
paign his brigade returned to Harper's P'erry, 
and there he was mustered out, the term of 
service for which he had enlisted having ex- 
pired. 

He returned to Johnstown, and resumed the 
active practice of his profession. Being a 
close student and careful practitioner, he soon 
established a large and paying practice, and 
became one of the recognized leaders of the 
bar. 

In 1869 he was elected burgess of the bor- 
ough of Johnstown on the Democratic ticket 
(although the town was strongly republican), 
and filled the office for one year. He was 
induced to become a candidate by the follow- 
j ing petition, bearing date February 16, 1869: 
i " The undersigned would respectfully, but 
earnestly, solicit you to permit us to place you 
before our citizens as an independent candi- 
date for burgess at the ensuing election. 

" The varied and important interests of our 
borough require an honest and efficient man- 
agement of its affairs, and we believe that a 
large majority of our fellow-citizens are con- 
vinced that the time has come when, throwing 
aside party feelings, they should unite in the 
election of a suitable person to the honorable 
and important office of burgess. We trust 
you will comply with our request, and oblige, 
yours, etc." Signed by the leading citizens of 
the town, regardless of party. 

Mr. Ryckman was his opponent in the elec- 
tion which followed. Mr. Rose was elected. 
Of the outcome of this contest the Tribune of 
February 26, 1 869, says : 



26 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



" We believe it to be a fact that Mr. Rose 
received more republican votes than his com- 
petitor, while nearly one-half Mr. R)'ckman's 
support came from democrats. It was not a 
party contest." 

Mr. Rose regards this as one of his special 
triumphs. In 1870 he was elected to the State 
legislature, defeating Captain H. D. Wood- 
ruff. This was the celebrated " Removal " 
campaign. Mr. Rose ran as a democrat on 
national issues. Mr. Woodruff ran as an " In- 
dependent," having for his issue "The removal 
of the county seat from Ebensburg to Johns- 
town." 

While in the legislature he became a recog- 
nized authority on construction, and was fre- 
quently consulted as to the correct wording of 
acts. He gave such close attention to his 
duties that he knew the contents of every 
General Act passed during the session, and 
comprehended its effect upon the law as it 
then stood. 

Mr. Rose was elected district attorney of 
Cambria county in 1873, and at the expiration 
of his term of three years wished to retire from 
the office ; but, at the earnest request of the 
judge and members of the bar, he was induced 
to become a candidate for re-election in 1 876. 
Ilis candidacy was warmly supported by the 
law-abiding citizens on account of his able 
and fearless prosecution of participants in the 
famous " railroad riots " of 1876. Me was re- 
elected by a majority of 1498 votes. 

While liistrict attorney he revolutionized 
the m.uincr of conducting business, his admin- 
istration being characterized 1)\- promptness, 
efficiency and integrity. 

At the close of his secontl term as district 
attorney he ileclined further nomination for 
office, and resumed the general [)ractice of 
law; but, notwithstanding his extensive prac- 



tice, he still found time to aid his party by 
wise counsel and active service on the stump. 

Mr. Rose was severely injured in the Johns- 
town flood of May 31, 1889, and for some time 
his recovery was in doubt. Before his com- 
plete recovery from his injuries he became an 
active supporter of the movement to unite 
Johnstown and the surrounding boroughs into 
the " City of Johnstown." This movement 
having been successful, a new city government 
was to be organized and administrated. It 
was apparent to all that a master mind was 
required to create and direct the government 
of the new cit\-. A man was required who 
possessed executive ability, legal knowledge, 
w-ide experience in public affairs, and known 
integrity ; and, as if by common consent, the 
citizens of the new city turned to Hon. W. 
Horace Rose as the man for the emergency. 
He was elected first mayor of the city of 
Johnstown by a large majority, and on the 
first Monday of April, 1890, entered upon the 
duties of his office. 

He was confronted by a newly-created city, 
without a municipal code for its government; 
a city of wrecked buildings, torn streets and 
ruined bridges. .\nd none but those intimately 
associated with him in the work can appre- 
ciate the magnitude of the task he set himself 
to perform. The mayor, himself, prepared 
and drafted all ordinances of the nninicipal 
cotle. Me was tireless in planning for the 
widening of rivers, rebuilding bridges, grading 
and paving streets, antl restoring public places, 
and was ever active in urging and directing 
the work. 

When Maj'or Rose retired from office at 
the expiration of his term, in April, 1893, he 
left an orderlj- cit)- in good physical and sani- 
tary condition, and all departments nf the city 
government running smoothly. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



27 



Since retiring from office Mr. Rose has con- 
tinued the practice of law. In 1895 he was 
the choice of the Cambria county Democracy 
for Superior Judge, and his claims were 
warmly, but unsuccessfully, urged in the State 
convention at Williamsport. In June, 1893, 
he was appointed by the governor of the Com- 
monwealth a member of the commission to 
select a site and erect buildings for an insti- 
tution for the feeble-minded children of West- 
ern Pennsylvania. 

As showing the active part Mr. Rose takes 
in the business and social affairs of the town, 
we mention his connection with the following 
organizations and institutions : He has served 
as clerk of the town council ; has been em- 
ployed as solicitor by Johnstown, Millville, 
Conemaugh, and others of the neighboring 
boroughs ; has been the solicitor of the Johns- 
town school board, city and borough, for 
twenty years; he is solicitor for The Johnson 
company; a director of the First National 
bank, the Johnstown Savings bank, and the 
Johnstown Water company ; he is a member 
of Johnstown Lodge, No. 538, F. and A. M., 
and of Portage Chapter, No. 195, Oriental 
Commandery, and was First Eminent Com- 
mander of that body. 

Mr. Rose's family consists of: Horace R., 
an attorney of Johnstown, whose sketch ap- 
pears on another page ; May, who died in in- 
fancy ; June, wife of Samuel J. McClune, of 
Lorain, Ohio ; Winter, who is a machinist by 
trade, and now with The Johnson company, 
at Lorain, Ohio ; Forest and Percy, now stu- 
dents at Hamilton college, Clinton, New York. 



HON. JOHN M. KOSE, is a son of W. J. 
and Martha (Given) Rose, and was born 
May 18, 1856, in Johnstown. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of his native town 



and in Washington and Jefferson college. 
From the latter institution he was graduated 
in the class of 1880. Like so many of our 
successful public men, he has been a teacher 
in the public schools, and was for a couple of 
years principal of the Sixth ward schools. 
After graduating from college he taught two 
years, then took up the study of law with his 
uncle, W. Horace Rose. In June, 1884, he 
was admitted to the Cambria county bar, and 
in 1886 was admitted to practice before the 
Supreme Court of the State. Since his ad- 
mission to the bar he has devoted himself dili- 
gently to the practice of law, and his perse- 
verance has been rewarded by a large and 
growing practice. 

He is employed as solicitor for two of the 
most prosperous local building and loan asso- 
ciations, and has been solicitor for several of 
the neighboring boroughs. 

Socially Mr. Rose is a genial companion 
and popular with all his associates. As a boy 
he was the champion whistler of the county, 
and was in great demand at charitable and 
social gatherings on account of that gift. He 
enjoys quite a reputation as a post-prandial 
orator, and no banquet is complete without a 
"speech," or, at least a droll story from the 
local Chauncey Depew. 

John M. Rose is public-spirited and always 
ready to do his full share in promoting every- 
thing that tends to increase the prosperity of 
the city. At present he is president of the 
Johnstown Board of Trade, a body that is 
very active in building up the city by secur- 
ing the location of many new manufacturing 
and business enterprises at Johnstown. 

Politically Mr. Rose is a republican, and in 
1888 was his party's candidate for member of 
the legislature, and although Cambria county 
was democratic, was elected and served for 



28 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



the ensuing two years. In the legislature he 
had more influence than usually falls to the 
lot of new members, and served on several 
important committees. 

October 21, 1.SS4, he was united in marriage 
to Fannie S. Slick, daughter of George R. 
Slick, of Joiinstown, and to this union was 
born one child, aiiriglit little girl, M.iry Ethel, 
tile idol of her parents. 



I sonal loss by hundreds of friends in the city, 
who respected him for his unusual ability and 

I success as a lawyer, but loved him for his 
personal qualities. 



HARKY (i. KOSE (deceased), attorney-at- 
law, was the son of Wesley J. and Martha 
(Given) Rose, was born September 19, i860, 
at Johnstown, and lost his life in the Great 
Mood of May 31, 1889. 

That great disaster cut short what gave 
promise of being an exceptionally brilliant 
career. 

lie attiiiiled the public schools of Johns- 
town and completed the course in the Higli 
School. He is remembered by his school- 
mates for his diligence as a student, his kind- 
ness of heart, and his unfailing good nature. 

He studied law in the office of his uncle, 
W. Horace Rose, ami was admitted to the 
Cambria county bar July 19, 1881. lie im- 
mediately began the practice of his profession, 
and by close application together with great 
natural ability soon attained an enviable posi- 
tion in his [Mofession. In 1883, when only 
twent}-lliree )-ears of age, he was elected dis- 
trict attorney of Cambria county, and gave 
such satisfaction in the conduct of the office, 
that he was re-elected in 1886, and was dis- 
trict attorney at tiie time of his ilcath. 

On February 5, 1S84, he was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Jessie Lane, ilaughter of Rev. 
James A. Lane, who survives iiim. 

Harry G. Rose was a man of lovable char- 
acter, and iiis sudden taking off at the verj* 
outset of a brilliant career was felt as a per- 



HOltACE II. KOSI*:, one of the rising 
young attorneys of the Cambria bar, is 
the son of the Hon. W. Horace Rose, whose 
sketch a[)pears above. He was born in Johns- 
town, September 16, 1862, and attended the 
public schools of Johnstown for a number of 
years, and then for two years was a pu])il in 
the .Select and Preparatory .School of Profes- 
sor Burr. He subsec|uently enteretl Philips 
Exeter Acadeni)', at Elxeter, New Hanii)shire. 
There he prepared for the Freshman class at 
Washington and Jefferson college. After his 
course in college he retiuMietl to Johnstown 
and engaged in teaching. For a time he 
taught night school, and was for one term 
principal of the Coopersdale schools. He 
studied law in his fuher's office, and on April 
5, 1886, was admitted to practice at the bar of 
Cambria count)', and two years later was ad- 
mitted to practice before the Supreme Court 
of Pennsylvania. He now pr.\ctices his pro- 
fession in tiie (ifllce with his fither, and is con- 
cerned in man)' important cases. Mr. Rose 
is a member of Johnstown Lodge, No. 157, 
F. and A. M., and of Johnstown Lodge, 
Knights of P\'lliias. I\Ir. Rose is a man of 
Imk- ph)si(pie and is ijuite an athlete. He is 
a firm believer in the ma.xim, "a sound mind 
in a somul boil)'," and keeps both in tune for 
hard work b)- exercise in the \'. M. C. A. 
g)'nuiasiuni .uul h)- occasion. il outings with 
dog ant! gun, and always keeps a stable of fine 
horses. He speculates in real estate and 
owns a number of gootl tenement houses. 

On November 18, 1885, he was united in 
marriage to Clara Ewing Hell, daughter of 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



29 



John E. Bell, of Washington, Pa. ; to this 
union were born three daughters, viz. : May 
Bell, Gladys Romaine and Julia Winters. 

The experience of Mr. Rose in the Johns- 
town flood was thrilling. Escaping from the 
third floor of his father's brick house while it 
was being demolished by the raging waters, 
he was carried two squares toward the now 
famous " stone bridge," amid the crushing, 
grinding wreckage and debris, and finally 
lodged upon a roof-top in sight of his home, 
where his wife and daughter were out of reach 
of the flood. But the angry waters, and per- 
haps death, were between him and his family. 
How near, and yet how far! He was rescued 
the following day at noon. 



JOHN H. BKOWN, ESQ., attorney-at- 
law, Johnstown, Pa., is a son of Samuel 
and Margaret (Gates) Brown, and was born 
April 15, 1848, at Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 

John Brown, the grandfather of John H. 
Brown, was an early resident of Indiana 
county, but subsequently moved to north- 
western Cambria county, and was a resident 
of that county at the time of his death in 1 860. 

Samuel Brown, father of John H., was born 
in Indiana county in the year 1818, but was 
reared in what is now Blair county, then part 
of Huntingdon county. In 1844 he came to 
Cambria county and remained there until his 
death, which occurred in the city of Johns- 
town, on February 25, 1893. His avocation 
was that of a furnace-man, and for many years 
he was employed as a " keeper " of a blast 
furnace. In 1842 he was united in marriage 
to Margaret Gates, daugliter of John Gates, of 
Blair county. 

To this union were born the following chil- 
dren : Rachel, deceased; Thomas, deceased; 
John H.; Elmira, deceased; Annie E., wife of 



John L. Jones, of Braddock, Pa.; Emma 
Lucretia, deceased; Jeannette, wife of W. W. 
Cope, of Johnstown ; W. Milton, of Johns- 
town; and Cyrus E., of Pittsburg, Pa. Mrs. 
Brown is yet living, she was born in January, 
1824, Huntingdon county, Pa., and comes of 
a long-lived race; her father, John Gates, and 
his wife Hannah, both lived to the advanced 
age of ninety-three (93) years. 

In politics, Samuel Brown was a staunch 
republican ; in religion a consistent Methodist. 

John H. Brown, the subject of this sketch, 
received his early education in the public 
schools of Johnstown and at Mt. Union college 
near Alliance, Ohio. He worked his way to 
a profession by studying at home in the eve- 
nings, while he worked in the mills of the 
Cambria Iron company. He learned the trade 
of a blacksmith, and worked at that trade for 
four or five years, studying law at odd 
moments. He finally entered the office of 
Col. John P. Linton as a law student, and 
under the preceptorship of that able prac- 
titioner, made rapid progress, and in Septem- 
ber, 1S73, was admitted to the bar of Cambria 
county. Subsequently he was adnntted to 
practice before the Supreme Court of the 
State. He served as deputy clerk of the Dis- 
trict Court, which held its .sessions in Johns- 
town in 1874-5, but has since been abolished. 

On August I, 1880, he married Amanda 
(Carroll) Fisher, daughter of George Carroll, 
of Johnstown. To this union was born one 
child, June S., born June 25, 1881. 

In politics Mr. Brown is an active republi- 
can, and is prominent in the councils of his 
party. 

In July, 1 880, Mr. J. G. Lake, the register and 
recorder of Cambria county, died, and Gover- 
nor Hoyt appointed our subject to take charge 
of the office until a register and recorder was 



30 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



elected and sworn in. Mr. Brown took charge 
of the office in Augu.st, and was made the 
nominee of his party for the same office at 
the ensuing fall election. The county was then 
Democratic by nearly a tiiousand majority, 
but such was the confidence in Mr. Brown's 
ability and integrity that he was elected by a 
majority of seven hundred, a strong testimony 
to his popularity. He served a full term of 
three years, and in 1883 was re-elected, serv- 
ing in all six years in that office. 

In 1886, he was again the republican can- 
didate for register and recorder, and in 1892 
he was chairman of the Republican County 
committee. His management of the cam- 
paign in Cambria county, showed him to be a 
most efficient chairman, possessed of execu- 
tive ability of no mean order, for in that year 
of " Democratic landslides " the Republican 
ticket made large gains in Cambria county. 

Ever since his admission to the bar, Mr. 
Brown has practiced his profession in Johns- 
town, except the six years the duties of his 
office required his residence at the county 
seat. He has acquired a fine practice, prin- 
cipally in civil cases, as he never .seeks crimi- 
nal cases. 

As a lawyer, he is shrewd and painstaking, 
and his clients are always well cared for. 

When the crisis of Civil War was upon us, 
true to his patriotic instincts he enlisted in his 
country's cause, as a private in company F, 
Twenty-first Peniis)lvania cavalry. 



FKICmOKK'K KKKB.S, superintendent of 
the Gaulicr department of the Cambria 
Iron company, was born June 9, 1855, in 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 

He is a son of l-'rederick and Sophia (Berg- 
man) Krebs. I'"rederick Krebs, Sr., was born 



in Germany in 1822, and came to America in 
1848, first locating in Blairsville, Indiana 
county, where he remained a short time, then 
came to Johnstown, where he lived until 1855, 
when he removed to La Crosse, Wisconsin. 
In 1865 he again moved to Johnstown, where 
he died August 24, 1886. He was a baker and 
confectioner by avocation. 

His family consisted of two sons and four 
daughters : Albert A., a resident of Johns- 
town, and a roller in the Gautier works ; 
Amelia, wife of George Sheeler, of Johnstown, 
in the employ of the same works ; Emma, wife 
of J. W. Walters, a lumber merchant of the 
city ; Charlotte, unmarried, and Matilda, a 
teacher in the public schools of Johnstown. 

The mother of Frederick Krebs, Jr., died 
March 26, 1876, at the age of forty-two years. 
The character of the parents if not written may 
be judged by that of the children, who are all 
industrious, highly esteemed citizens. Fred- 
erick Krebs, Jr., was married March 8, 1S88, 
to Margaret Walters, an amiable young lady 
and a daughter of Dr. W. W. Walters. They 
have three children : Frederick, born July 19, 
1889; Margaret, born March 30, 1892, and 
Walter, born Januar)- 30, 1894. 

Mr. Krebs, Sr., in common with the people of 
his nation, believed in the worth of a good, solid 
education ; so we find the subject of our sketch 
carefully educated in the public and private 
schools of the City. 

He began life on his own account at the 
age of sixteen as a clerk in the employ of the 
Cambria Iron compan)', and has been with the 
company ever since. His intelligent and faith- 
ful service gained for him a promotion from 
time to time, until in 1S80 he became assist- 
ant superintendent of the Gautier Steel mills 
of the Cambria Iron company. In 1882 he 
was m.ulc suiicrintendcnt of these mills, and 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



31 



in 1890 was made superintendent of the entire 
Gautier department, supervising the manu- 
facturing and commercial affairs of the de- 
partment. That his position is a responsible 
one is evidenced by the fact that twelve hun- 
dred men are employed in it. 

Mr. Krebs is a republican, and is the presi- 
dent of the board of school controllers of the 
city of Johnstown, having been a member of 
this board since 1881. With the natural in- 
.stinct of an intelligent, progressive man, and 
a German, he takes an active interest in the 
educational affairs of the city. 

Mr. Krebs is a member of the German 
Lutheran Church. 



JOSEPH MASTEUS, ex-Associate Judge 
of this county, is a son of George and 
Sarah (Custer) Masters, and was born May 22, 
1834, near Davidsville, Conemaugh township, 
Somerset county. Pa. His grandfather, Wil- 
liam Masters, was a native of England, whence 
he emigrated to America and located in Fay- 
ette county, and later removed to Somerset 
county, where he died. George Masters, son 
of the above and father of the subject of this 
sketch, was born in Somerset county in 18 12. 
He was a weaver of coverlids by trade. In 
politics he was a whig, and held a number of 
important local offices by appointment or elec- 
tion. In 1842 he was appointed a justice of 
the peace, and at the time of his death, in 
1850, held the office of county commis- 
sioner. He was married to Sarah Custer, and 
was the father of seven children — five boys 
and two girls, of whom four are living, viz. : 
Joseph, Kate, Amanda, wife of J. S. Custer, su- 
perintendent of the labor department of the 
Cambria Iron company, Johnstown, and 
Samuel, also of Johnstown, whose sketch 
follows. 



Joseph Masters is self-educated, and he is a 
fine example of what a young man may ac- 
complish even under adverse circumstances. 
His actual schooling consisted of a two 
months' term under the old regime, when 
teachers boarded around among the schools' 
patrons ; but so well has he improved his 
opportunities that few men have a better store 
of general information. 

Mr. Masters came to Johnstown in 1850 at 
the age of sixteen years, and first found em- 
ployment on the canal. He learned the trade 
of a blacksmith, and helped make the first 
clay picks with which ground was broken for 
the Cambria Iron company's works, in the 
winter of 1852-3. Next, he was employed in 
a flouring mill, tiien known as the Red Mill, 
at the mouth of Hinkston's run, at eight dol- 
lars a month and boarding. Eighteen months 
later he was in charge of the mill, a position 
he held for about ten years, when he took 
charge of the lumber department of the Cam- 
bria Iron company, as buyer and seller. To 
this, in 1865, was added the superintend- 
ency of houses. His duties and responsibili- 
ties were further increased in 1878 by the ad- 
dition of the superintendency of lands. His 
present position is that of superintendent of 
houses and lands for the Cambria Iron com- 
pany. 

Politically Mr. Masters is a republican, and 
his popularity is attested by the fact that he has 
been uniformly successful in his political ven- 
; tures, even in the face of strong adverse ma- 
jorities. In the si.xties he served as councilman, 
school director and burgess of MiUville bor- 
ough. In 1882, when the normal Democratic 
majority in Cambria county was about 1,000. 
j Mr. Masters was elected associate judge by the 
flattering majority of 900. In this office he 
served a term of five years, when the associate 



32 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



judgeship was abolished by a change of consti- 
tution. In his home ward — the Ninth — where 
the democrats were a majority of 300, he was 
elected a member of select council by a majority 
of four. When Coopersdale was raised to the 
dignity of a borough, Mr. Masters was a resi- 
dent of the town, and was honored by an elec- 
tion to the responsible offices of burgess and 
justice of the peace. 

Mr. Masters was married to Miss Elizabeth, 
daughter of John Shaffer, on November 27, 
1857. To this union ten children have been 
born, of whom one died in infancy. The sur- 
viving children are Anga, wife of John W. 
Wonders, of Johnstown ; George H., of Coop- 
ersdale ; Albert M., Johnstown ; Kate, wife of 
Ellsworth Kunklc, Coopersdale ; Emma, wife 
of Samuel Greer, Johnstown ; Frank, mar- 
ried and a resident of Coopersdale, and Sarah, 
Lilly and Cora, at home. Mr. Masters is a 
member of the First Methodist Episcopal 
church, also of Johnstown Lodge, No. 538, F. 
and A. M. His venerable mother is still living 
at the advanced age of eighty-four years. 



^OL. JOHN P. LINTON was born in Johns- 
town, January 26, 1833, and died August 
31, 1892. He was of Scotch-Irish extraction. 
His grandfather, John Linton, was born in 
County Down, Ireland. WhileattendingMcGil- 
ligan college he became invulved in the revolu- 
tionary schemes which led up to the outbreak 
of 1798, and was obliged to flee the country. 
In 1796 he embarked for America, and located 
at Greencastle, I'^ranklin county, tiiis .State. 
There he married, and in 1S09 he and his 
family came to Johnstown. They set up the 
town's first hotel, an old-fashioned country 
inn. It was a log-house on the lUlis pro- 
perty, corner of Franklin and Locust streets, 
opposite the property of the late 'Squire 



Brady. Mr. Linton was an engineer and 
conveyancer. He became postmaster of 
Johnstown, and one of the county's first audi- 
tors. He died in 181 8, and his remains were 
interred in the old Union graveyard. They 
were recently interred in Grand View. 

His son, Robert P. Linton, father of the 
subject of this sketch, was sheriff of the coun- 
ty three terms between 1832 and 1856. He 
fell dead on Main street, in front of what is 
now the Merchants' hotel, in 1879. His wife, 
who was Phcebe Levergood, died when John 
P. was only eight years of age, but her son 
did not forget her admonitions and example, 
and his boyhood was spent in close applica- 
tion to study in the schools of Johnstown. He 
also attended Jefferson college, at Cannons- 
'• burg, one term. 

1 When eighteen years of age he entered the 
s office of Cyrus L. Pershing, now judge of the 
i courts of Schuylkill county, as a student at 
law. He was admitted to the Bar on June 6, 
1854, a few months after he had attained his 
majority, and for some years after his admis- 
sion he and Mr. Pershing were in partnership. 
When the brick building, which now stands at 
what is known as "the bank corner," was 
erected — over thirty years ago — young Lin- 
ton opened an office for himself in the rooms 
which he occupied during the remainder of 
iiis life, lie at once attracted attention as a 
safe counselor and accomplished pleader, and 
soon acquired an extensive practice, which he 
retained until he was no longer able to give 
it attention. It is said that during all his long 
years of practice he never missed attendance 
at a regular term of court. 

Many of the most important cases, both 
civil and criminal, tried in the count)' courts 
during the thirty eight j'ears of his practice, 
were conducted b)' him as counsel-in-chief on 




COL. JOHN P. LINTON. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



33 



one side or the other. He also practiced con- 
siderably before the State Supreme Court and 
the courts in our adjoining counties. In 
point of years of service, he was third on the 
list of attorneys, Hon. John Fenlon and Gen. 
Joseph McDonald outranking him. He was 
an active and interested member of the Bar 
association, serving it in various official capa- 
cities, and enjoyed to the fullest extent the 
confidence and respect of the court and his 
fellow-attorneys. He also enjoyed the con- 
fidence of the community, and had attained 
considerable local prominence, taking an ac- 
tive part in politics, serving as secretary of 
the old agricultural society, whose grounds 
were in the sixth ward, and as lieutenant of 
the military company, which had existence 
long before the Rebellion. 

In 1 86 1, when the clouds of Civil War cast 
their gloom over the land. Lawyer Linton 
took earnest part for the Union, and at once 
forsook his practice at the Bar for the profes- 
sion of arms. 

Col. Linton's military record covers the 
entire period of the war. On the 20th of 
April, 1 86 1, he entered the service for three 
months as captain of company F. His 
company and nine volunteer organizations, 
existing prior to the breaking out of the war, 
were formed into the Third regiment, at Camp 
Curtin, Harri,sburg. The other officers of 
the company were: Hugh Bradley, first lieu- 
tenant ; James C. Noon, second lieutenant ; 
W. B. Bonaker, first sergeant; Michael 
Woods, second sergeant ; Charles Kelly, third 
sergeant ; Edward Connery, first corporal ; 
Michael Burns, second corporal ; Lewis 
Baumer, third corporal, and Morgan McDon- 
ald and George W. Crissinger, musicians. 
The company was among the first to arrive at 
Camp Curtain. The regiment was officered 
3 



as follows: Colonel, Francis P. Minier, Holli- 
daysburg ; Lieutenant-Colonel, John M. 
Power, Johnstown ; Major, O. M. Irvine, Pitts- 
burg. James C. Noon, of company " F," was 
appointed adjutant. On the evening of April 
20th the regiment left Camp Curtin for Bal- 
timore. At Cockeysville, Maryland, the ad- 
vance was halted by a destroyed bridge, and 
on April the 22d the regiment returned to 
York and went into camp. On the 27th of 
May the regiment went to Chambersburg 
and encamped there. On the 7th of June the 
command proceeded by rail to Hagerstown, 
and the same day marched to Funkstown. 
Three weeks were spent here. On July 1st 
the regiment proceeded to Williamsport, and 
the next day crossed the Potomac. On the 
1 3d it arrived at Martinsburg and encamped. 
In a few days it was ordered back to Williams- 
port to guard the wagon trains. It remained 
there until July 26, when, the time of enlist- 
ment, having expired, it was ordered back to 
Harrisburg and mustered out of service on 
July 29. 

In August and September following the 
Fifty-Fourth regiment was formed and ren- 
dezvoused at Camp Curtin. The regimental 
officers were: Colonel, Jacob M. Campbell, 
Johnstown ; Lieutenant-Colonel, Barnabas 
McDermitt, Cambria county; Major, John 
P. Linton, Johnstown. On February 27, 
1862, the regiment was ordered to Washing- 
ton and went into camp. On March 29th it 
departed for Harper's Ferry, and, upon arriv- 
ing there, reported to Col. Miles and the 
various companies were assigned to guard 
duty along fifty-six miles of the Baltimore & 
Ohio railroad. The country was full of guer- 
rillas, and almost daily conflicts were had with 
them. On the night of May 25th Col. Camp- 
bell received orders to concentrate his com- 



34 



BIOGRAPIIICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



maiid at South Brancli, owing to the approach 
of Stonewall Jackson, to Martinsburg. This 
was done with considerable difficulty. At this 
point there was a substantial iron bridge, the 
only one left by the rebels during their occu- 
pancy the previous summer. This bridge 
was guarded by two companies under com- 
mand of Major Linton. On July i the com- 
panies returned to their old posts, Jackson 
having been driven from the vallc)', but his 
roving bands continued to wander up and 
down the country, pillaging friend and foe, 
and the Fifty-Fourth was kept constantly on 
the alert. On September 1 2th, Col. Campbell, 
with small detachments from companies I 
and D, proceeded to liack creek. There 
he was reinforced by sixty men under Capt. 
Long, and proceeded to North mountain, 
where he attacked and routed the enemy's 
rear guard. Major Linton was left with a 
small detachment at Back creek, and the col- 
onel and his men returned to headquarters. 
Two days later the enemy advanced again on 
Back creek, and Col. Campbell, with several 
company detachments, returned to the sup- 
port of Maj. Linton. Skirmishing was kept 
lip until tiie 2ist, when Maj. Linton's com- 
mand, attacked by an overwhelming force, 
was obliged to fall back. 

After the battle of Anlictaiu tlic Fifty- 
I'ourth was attached to Gen. Franlcliii's com- 
mand, and later, to that of Gen. Morrell, when 
it was placed in defence of the upper Potomac. 
Upon tlic organization of the I'-ighth corps it 
was assigned to the command of Gen. Kell}'. 
On the 6th of January, 1863, the command 
moved to Romney, where it remained until 
spring. On July 29lh Lieut-Col. McDermitt 
resignetl, and M.ij. Linton succeedcil him, 
(,"apt. F. D. Vutz)-, of company C, being 
promoted to major. The Fifty-Fourtli was 



now attached to the Fourth brigade. First 
division. Department of West Virginia, Col. 
Campbell in command of the brigade, and 
Lieut. -Col. Linton of the regiment. On the 
6th of November another reorganization of 
the command took place, the Fifty-Fourth 
being assigned to the First brigade. Second 
division. Col. Campbell in command. On 
January 4, 1864, Col. Campbell, at his own 
request, was relieved of the command of the 
brigade, and assumed charge of his regiment. 
On May 15th the battle of New Market was 
fought, and Lieut.-Col. Linton was among the 
severely wounded. 

At Staunton the Fifty-Fourth was trans- 
ferred to Crook's command, Third brigade, 
Second division, Col. Campbell taking com- 
mand of the brigade and Maj. Yutzy of the 
regiment, owing to Lieut.-Col. Linton's 
wound, received at New Market. On the 
14th of July the command moved to Martins- 
burg, and Lieut.-Col. Linton resumed com- 
mand of the regiment. On July i8th, at 
Snicker's Gap, in a spirited engagement, 
Lieut.-Col. Linton was again wounded and 
entirely disabled, by having his shoulder-bone 
fractured, and on the 19th of September he 
received a third serious wound in a skirmish 
at Winchester by a grape-shot penetrating his 
arm. This confined him to the hospital until 
February 3, lS65,wlien his term of enlistment 
e.\pired. 

Tiie command, after arduous and almost 
constantl}' active service, moved to Washing- 
ton anil thence to City Point. In May, 1864, 
upon the Third and Fourth reserve regiments 
l)eing mustered out of service, the veterans 
ami rcciuits were organized into an indepen- 
dent battalion, and on February 7, 1865, the 
term of enlistment of the Fifty-l-'ourth having 
expired, the two organizations were consoli- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



35 



dated as the Fifty-Fourth, and new ofificers 
were in command, the old ones having been 
mustered out at the expiration of their terms. 
Thus it will be seen that Col. Linton's record 
of service in the army was highly honorable. 
His bravery was attested in every battle in 
which he participated, and they were many 
and fierce. He was once heard to remark 
that he was struck in every engagement in 
which he took part, but only three of his 
wounds were serious. 

After his recovery from his wound and his 
return from the army. Col. Linton resumed 
the practice of the law, and also resumed his 
interest in politics. He was an effective stump 
speaker, and rendered the Democratic party 
valuable services in many a campaign. In 
local affairs he served for several years as 
secretary of Johnstown borough council, and 
as a member of council. 

In 1866, when Gen. Jacob M. Campbell 
was elected surveyor-general of the State by a 
majority of 21,000, Col. Linton ran against 
him and had a majority in this county of 831. 
In 1867 he was elected a member of the lower 
House of the State Legislature over Samuel 
Singleton, republican, of Ebensburg, by a 
vote of 3,031 to 1,971. In 1868 he ran against 
Hon. Daniel J. Morrell for Congress, but was 
defeated by a majority of 1,094. At the pre- 
ceding Congressional election Mr. Morrell 
had a majority of 1,219 over Hon. R. L. 
Johnston. The district was then composed 
of the counties of Cambria, Blair, Huntingdon 
and Mifflin. 

Col. Linton also served his party in other 
capacities, as delegate to National and State 
conventions, candidate for Presidential elec- 
tor, and in the fall of 1891 as candidate for 
president judge of the courts of Cambria 
county, for which office he was defeated by 



Hon. A. V. Barker, his failing health prevent- 
ing him from entering actively into the cam- 
paign. 

Col. Linton was married in 1857. His 
wife was a daughter of George S. and the late 
Mrs. King. They were united in Johnstown 
by Rev. David Swope, pastor of the Lutheran 
church. Mrs. Linton survives. She bore 
the colonel eleven children. Three daughters 
died in childhood. The living are : Miss 
Phoebe, who is at home; George K., of Lewis- 
town, Illinois; Reuben M., of Somerset; 
R. P., of Dubois; Ivan, at home; Selah L., 
at home, a student at Pennsylvania college, 
Gettysburg; Anna, at home, a student at 
Luthersville, Maryland; and Kate, at home. 

When they were first married Mr. and Mrs. 
Linton went to housekeeping on Singer street, 
Conemaugh borough. Afterward they lived 
on Locust street. In 1882 they moved into a 
handsome brick residence, which they had 
built on Main street at the intersection of 
Union. Here they lived at the time of the 
flood. On that eventful evening the colonel 
and Mrs. Linton and their three daughters 
were at home. The descending deluge drove 
; them to the roof of the house. The building 
was partially wrecked, but the roof did not 
fall, and they afterward, assisted by Orlando 
Potts, made their way to the high-school 
building, where they spent the night. As 
soon as possible the colonel built a house at 
Osborne, now the eighth ward, and there the 
funil)' have ever since resided. 

In his family relations the colonel was very 
affectionate and kind. He was also socially 
inclined among his fellow-men, and was asso- 
ciated with many orders, etc. He was a 
charter member of Oriental Commandery, 
Knights Templar, and was prominently iden- 
tified with Johnstown Lodge of Masons, Cone- 



36 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



maugh Lodge of Odd Fellows, William F. 
Packer Encampment, Knights of the Mystic 
Chain, the Knights of Pythias, the Grand 
Army and the Union Veteran Legion. From 
1882 to 1884 he was Supreme Chancellor of 
the Knights of Pythias of the world, and in 
1885 he was Supreme Commander of the 
Knights of the Mystic Chain. He was vice- 
president of the Citizens' National bank, a 
charter member of the Citizens' Cemetery 
association, and a member of the Board of 
Trustees. 

Showing the high character of Col. Linton 
fraternally, and as a citizen and a man, we 
give the following letters of condolence re- 
ceived by his family: 

Cresson Springs, August 31, 1892. 
(Telegram.) 
Mrs. John P. Linton : 

The sad news of the death of Mr. Linton 
has just reached me. Accept my heartfelt 
sympathy. Robkkt E. Pattison, 

Governor of State of Pennsylvania. 

Cresson Springs, August 31, 1892. 
(Telegram.) 
Mrs. John P. Linton : 

We have received the news of your great 
loss with profound sorrow. You have the 
sympathy of all who knew Col. Linton. I 
will attend liis funeral if possible. 

James M. Swank, 
Secy. Iron & Steel Association of America. 

Kansas Citv, Mo., August 31, 1892. 
Afis. Joint P. Linton : 

In tin- expression of the sympathy of the 
Supreme Lodge, Knights of I'j'thias, lur )'OU 
in your great aflliclion, it is my sad privilege 
to advise you that the following resolutions 
were adopted at the opening of the morning 
session : 

Whereas, This Supreme Lodge lias heard, 
witii great sorrow, of the death of Past Su- 
preme Cliancellor John P. Linton, of Pennsyl- 
vania, at his home in Johnstown, and in order 



that a proper and fitting notice of this sad 
event, occurring, as it has, during a session of 
this Supreme Lodge, be made by this body, 
therefore be it 

Resoh'i-d, That in this dispensation of an 
All-wise Providence, we bow in humble sub- 
mission, believing He doeth all things well. 

Resolved, That in his loss we recognize that 
a bright particular star has fallen from our 
Pythian firmament; an able expounder of the 
principles of our order has ceased his labors; 
a true and devoted brother, a loving and dear 
friend, and a cherished and enjoyable com- 
panion has, for the last time, met us in legis- 
lation, in deliberate and fraternal council, and 
that no more will the warm clasp of his hand 
be felt on our own or his genial words com- 
fort and cherish us in the cause of Pythian 
friendship. 

Resolved, That to his family this Supreme 
Lodge extends profound and heartfelt sym- 
pathy in this hour of their great bereavement. 

A committee will represent this Supreme 
Lodge at the funeral, the day and hour of 
which please telegraph to me. 

George B. Shaw, 

Supreme Chancellor. 

CoRRY, Pa., September i, 1892. 
A', il/. Linton, Johnstoivn, Pa. : 

Telegram received, and with piofound re- 
gret learn of the death of our beloved IVicnd 
and brother, Past Supreme Chancellor, John 
P. Linton: to you and his surviving family I 
tender, in the name of the Uniform Rank, 
Knights of Pythias of Pennsylvania, my deep- 
est and most sincere .sympathy for the irre- 
parable loss which they have sustained in his 
death. Fraternally, 

Charles K. Bentley. 
Commander Penna. Brigade, U. R., K. of P. 

Tlu- fallowing is an editorial from the /<'///«- 
toion Tribune : 

DEATH OF COL. LINTON. 

The death of Col. John Park Linton takes 
away one of our best-known and mo.st highly- 
esteemed citizens. Born and raised in Johns- 
town, and living here all the years of his life, 
except when serving his country on the field 
of battle, he was looked upon by our old citi- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



37 



zens, when a boy, with admiration, when a 
young man with pride, and as a leading mem- 
ber of the bar, a soldier, and in every way a 
worthy citizen in his early and later middle 
life, with love, respect and veneration. His 
life was an honor to Johnstown, and he was 
honored by her people as a man who loved 
his town and his country, and served them 
both with great ability. His place will long 
remain vacant in the hearts of the people of 
the Conemaugh valley. 



TOHN FULTON.— In reviewing the family 
history of John Fulton, a notable en- 
gineer of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, we are 
constrained to admit the truth of the old say- 
ing, " blood tells." The father, Rev. Thomas 
Fulton, was an honest, industrious, intelligent. 
God-fearing man ; the son possesses the finest 
characteristics of the father. 

The Rev. Thomas Fulton was born in Ire- 
land, May, 1797, and died in Campbell county, 
Virginia, June 24, iSgo. At about nineteen 
years of age he professed religion and joined 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and soon 
afterward was licensed to preach. He was 
not loth to begin the work for God and his 
church as a minister, and he continued in it 
faithfully until his death. The first part of 
his labor was in Ireland, but about the year 
1848 he moved with his family to America, 
first settling in Pennsylvania, but in 1867 went 
to Campbell county, Virginia. He never be- 
came a circuit preacher after coming to this 
country, but remained an elder in the local 
ranks, and yet as long as he was able he kept 
up regular appointments ; preaching with 
such zeal and earnestness that the people 
heard him with gladness. He was never a 
dead preacher, and although he made no pre- 
tentions to oratory, he had the eloquence 
which comes from a burning soul. By this 
very force he commanded the attention of his 



hearers, and again and again were they heard 
to say : " I love to hear Brother Fulton 
preach." He was a man of prayer and great 
patience, who never flinched nor complained 
when reverses came upon him. He was a 
firm believer in the old-time religion and its 
forms, prayer meetings, class meetings and all 
the details of the old Methodist service. He 
was also a man of unbounded faith in God, 
and to his death never wavered in his trust in 
Him who is able and willing to save unto the 
utmost. His end was a complete justification 
of his godly life, for he died peacefully and in 
the full assurance of his eternal reward. 

At his funeral a large crowd gathered and 
wept with his bereaved family, and they were 
tears of genuine sorrow for the gentle, loving 
man, the kind father and affectionate husband 
who had passed from them. For his wife and 
children, who are esteemed and honored mem- 
bers of the church there is the sweet joy of 
living so that they may meet him in heaven. 

There were born to the marriage of Rev. 
Fulton and Maria (McKeon) Fulton six sons 
and one daughter. John (subject), Thomas, 
William James, Alfred and Adam, are all 
residents of Concord, Virginia. Sophia, de- 
ceased, was the wife of Samuel Dilworth, of 
Wayne county, Pennsylvania. Edmund, who 
died in Saxon, Bedford county, Pennsylvania, 
was at the time of his death agent and tele- 
graph operator for the Huntingdon and Broad 
Top railroad. 

His ancestors on the paternal side were of 
the Lowlands of Scotland, living at the time 
in the history of Scotland when there was a 
general movement of the Scotch to the north 
of Ireland. His ancestors on the maternal side 
being from the Highlands of Scotland, Mr. 
Fulton is therefore one of the those fortunate 
persons who can claim Scotch-Irish descent. 



33 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



Mr. Fulton was carefully educated in Eras- 
mus Smith's school, a high school, and at 
Ardtrea Classical seminary, Ireland. He 
studied civil engineering in Dublin, and was 
empIo\-ed in the construction of the Midland 
Railroad from Dublin to Galway, this being 
his first professional work. In 184S he came 
to America with his father, and began his pro- 
fessional career by superintending the work in 
the completion of the old North Branch canal, 
Pennsylvania. This lasted from 1848 to 1852. 
From 1852 to 1854 he was assistant in the 
construction of the Junction canal, which con- 
nected the Pennsylvania system of canals with 
the New York system. For the next two 
years he was assistant engineer of the Barclay 
Railroad, in Bradford county, Pennsylvania, 
and from 1856 to 1874 was resident civil and 
mining engineer of the Huntingdon and Broad 
Top Railroad and Coal company, and from 
1870 to 1873 he was chief engineer for the 
Pennsylvania Railroad company, of the Bed- 
ford and Bridgeport Railroad under the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad company. In 1874 he 
came to Johnstown, and until 18S7 was gen- 
eral mining engineer of the Cambria Iron 
company. 

He was general superintendent of the 
Cambria Iron company from 1887 to 1888, 
and general manager of the company from 
1888 to 1892. On account of failing health 
and requiring more out-door exercise he was, 
upon the advice of his ])hysician, relieved from 
the service of the compaii)' in 1893. During 
the second geological survej' of Pennsylvania 
he was assistant geologist, reporting on Cam- 
bria and .Somerset counties under Prof. I. P. 
Leslc)'. 

Now (1896) he pursues tiie occupation 
of mining engineer, and also has a half in- 
terest in a coke manufacturing plant in the 



Connellsville coal and coke region. He is a 
member of the American Institute of Mining 
Engineers and of the American Philosophical 
society of Philadelphia. He is the author of 
a treatise on the manufacture of coke, com- 
prising about three hundred and fifty pages 
and containing many important facts. He is 
also the engineer of the State Board of Health 
and Vital Statistics. 

Mr. Fulton is a member of the Board of 
Trade of Johnstown, before which body he 
delivered an address setting forth the advant- 
ages of the city of Johnstown as a manufac- 
turing centre and a desirable place for all such 
enterprises. He is an ardent republican and 
is president of the park commissioners. 

His church connections are with the Pres- 
byterians, he being a ruling elder of the church 
at Johnstown, a teacher in the Bible-school, 
and an active, earnest participant in all church 
work, in this respect most clearly showing the 
traits of his excellent father. 

He is also president of the Young Men's 
Christian Association organization of Johns- 
town. 

Mr. Fulton was married in 1855 to Ann 
Mackay, a daughter of James Mackay, a man 
of " gude Scotch blood." To this union have 
been born two sons and two daughters : 
Maria, the wife of J. D. Ligon, an employee 
in the printing department of the general gov- 
ernnunt at Washington, D. C; James E., de- 
ceased ; Thomas W., also deceased, and Ann 
West, who lives at home. 

The hist monument to the meniorj' of a 
man is the record of his good deeds ; so are 
the responsible positions that he has held and 
the work he has ilone the best evidence of 
Mr. Fulton's superior attainments in his pro- 
fession and of his character as an honorable 
citizen and Christian gentleman. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



39 



IIITA JOR DAVID HAJ^IILTON. — One 

1 whose name and military record is 

familiar to many people of Cambria county is 
Major David Hamilton, of Johnstown, Penn- 
sylvania. He is a son of Robert and Polly 
(Hoover) Hamilton, and was born August 28, 
1822, in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. The father 
of Major Hamilton was a native of Eastern 
Penns\lvania, who emigrated to Huntingdon 
county; later he moved to Frankstown, now in 
Blair county, where he lived until he removed 
to Tuckahoe, in Blair County. About 1810 
or 181 1 he came to Johnstown and died here 
February 2, i864. 

Major Hamilton received a very limited 
education under the instruction of one of the 
old typical Irish schoolmasters of that time. 
He learned the trade of a carpenter, and fol- 
lowed that occupation, in connection with con- 
tracting, until he entered the Civil War, April 
16, 1861. He enlisted in the Tenth regiment, 
Pennsylvania infantry, company H, as a first 
lieutenant. This was in response to the first 
call of three months. The end of this term 
of enlistment was September 30, 1862. This 
short service did not satisfy the patriotic zeal 
of our subject, for he re-enlisted, entering the 
cavalry service in the Eighteenth regiment 
cavalr)', company K. He served with honor 
in this regiment, which was under the com- 
mand of that dashing cavalry officer, General 
Kilpatrick, until he was wounded at the battle 
of Cold Harbor. He was so severely wounded 
that he could not again rejoin the service. His 
wound, which was in the left hip, resulted in 
the paralysis of his legs, and he was kept in 
the hospital at the Naval school, Maryland. 
He received the unusual honors of a discharge 
by a strict order from Edward M. Stanton, 
-Secretary of War. Tlie war record of Major 
Hamilton shows him to have been a faithful 



soldier and worthy of much honor. Before 
this he had received two wounds, once with 
a bullet and twice with a sabre. About 
a year prior to his discharge he served as 
major, an honorable title, justly bestowed. 
Since the war Major Hamilton has not en- 
gaged in any active work. 

He married Jennie Oiler, who died May 30, 
1889. He is a member of the G. A. R., Post 
No. 30, and Camp 1006, Union Veteran Le- 
gion. 

Major Hamilton has been a republican ever 
since he has been old enough to think for 
himself, and has always been an active poli- 
tician. In 1884 he was elected associate 
judge of Cambria county. 

Major Hamilton was a brave soldier, who 
gave his blood for the freedom of his country. 
What more should be said of him ? Any more 
would be superfluous. 

JOHN D. ROBERTS, cashier of the First 
National Bank of Johnstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, is a man of unusual financial ability ; a 
successful man whose success has been gained 
by industry and thorough mastery of his 
business. 

It is surprising how many of our best men 
have been reared on a farm and educated 
largely in the common schools. Mr. Roberts 
spent the first nineteen years of his life on a 
farm, meanwhile attending for a number of 
those years the common schools, which had a 
three or four months' session each year. 

In April, 1864, he entered Iron City college, 
graduating in June, 1864. After this he came 
to Johnstown, and for eleven months held 
the position of clerk in the mercantile house 
of Wood, Morrell & Co., of which business 
James McMillan was manager. At the end 
of this time he obtained a position in the P'irst 



40 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



National Rank as clerk and bookkeeper, hold- 
ing it for four years. August i, 1869, he 
formed a partnership with John Dibert, and 
organized a private bank under the name of 
John Dibert & Co. This partnei.ship con- 
tinued twenty years, less two months, and was 
dissolved by the death of Mr. Dibert in the 
Johnstown flood. 

The business of this firm was conducted so 
carefully by the advice of Mr. Dibert and 
the experience of Mr. Roberts, that within 
nine months after the flood every dollar was 
paid to the depositors and the business entirely 
settled. 

The cashier of the First National Bank, 
Howard J. Roberts, having lost his life in the 
flood, the directors of the bank tendered the 
position to our subject, and he has continued 
in it ever since. The responsibility of his 
position ma)' be better understood by append- 
ing the following statements concerning the 
First National Hank. 

It started in 1863 with a capital stock of 
$60,000. The first charter was for nineteen 
years and expired in 1882, when it was re- 
organized with a capital stock of S 100,000. 
Daniel J. Morrell, the first president, held the 
office till his death in 1885, when James 
McMillan succeeded him. 

The business of the bank under our subject 
as cashier lias been eminentl)' successful, it 
being the leading bank in the count)- and 
having a surplus fund of 5150,000. 

Because of the eminent worth and the busi- 
ness integrity of its officers and directors it is 
regarded as one of the solid banks of the 
country. In 1895 the Ijuilding was enlarged 
to twice its original capacity. A new steel 
vault and burglar-proof chests were put in, 
making it one of the best c(iuip[)ed banks in 
the State. 



Mr. Roberts is not only esteemed as a bank 
official of superior merit, but as a neighbor 
and citizen of good judgment and character. 
Consequently, we frequently find him serving 
as guardian and in various positions of trust. 
He had also been a member of the town coun- 
cil for eleven years. 

He is a leading member of the Presbyterian 
church, and at present is superintendent of 
the Sunday school. 

His fraternal affiliations are with Cambria 
Lodge, No. 27S, and Portage Chapter, No. 195, 
R. A. M. 

It is interesting to note that the ancestors 
of our subject were substantial people also. 
His father, Evan H. Roberts, was born in 
Cambria county near Ebensburg, in 18 10, and 
resided at the old homestead up to the time 
of his death, which occurred in 1851. 

He was a substantial citizen and a good 
farmer, but was likewise one of those rare 
geniuses who can turn his hand to an)'thing, 
for, along with his other attainments, he added 
those of a competent shoemaker, blacksmith 
and dentist. 

He was a member of the Welsh Congrega- 
tional church. 1 lis father, Hugh Roberts, wasa 
native of Wales, who came to Ebensburg with 
the first settlers. He was a farmer and tailor 
by trade, following the former occupation here. 
The grandfather of our sulijcct died near 
ICbensburg in 1843, aged seventy years. His 
mother was Margaret Hughes, also a native 
of Wales, who came to this country in 1841. 
.Siie now resides with her three daughters and 
one son near Iowa City, Iowa. She is a 
daughter of Hugh Hughes, a native of Wales, 
who died in 1866, aged sevent\--five, near 
Ebensburg, on his farm, adjoining that owned 
by the father of John D. Roberts. The father 
and daughter both professed the faith of the 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



41 



Welsh Congregational church. She is now 
seventy-five years old. 

The subject of this sketch was born near 
Ebensburg, Cambria county, July 13, 1S45, 
and was married October 5, 1869, to Miss 
Mary C., daughter of the late Samuel Kuiter, 
of Johnstown. 

Frank H., employed as a clerk in the First 
National Bank; Ella F., a student at Wells 
College, Aurora, New York, where she will 
soon graduate after a five years' course, and 
Kinter, a student at the Kiskimifietas school, 
Saltsburg, Pennsylvania, are his children. 

These children have the inheritance which 
can be bequeathed only by a father belonging 
to a good race, and possessing good habits 
and intelligence. 



ir\li WILLIAM EDGAR MATTHEWS, 

one of the most prominent physicians 
of Johnstown, Penns)'lvania, was born in East 
Wheatfield township, Indiana county, Penn- 
sylvania, January II, i860. 

He was educated in the country schools, at 
the Armagh academy and at the State Normal 
school, Indiana, Pennsylvania, having gradu- 
ated from the latter school in July, 1884. He 
taught for a number of years in the schools of 
Indiana county. His efficiency and high char- 
acter as a teacher are proven by the fact that at 
the age of nineteen he was chosen to fill the 
position of principal of the Market street 
school of Johnstown. He has also held other 
responsible positions in the schools in the en- 
virons of Johnstown. 

Having resolved to make medicine his pro- 
fession, he studied with Dr. W. B. Lowman, 
and entered Jefferson college, Philadelphia, 
where he graduated April, 1887. After grad- 
uating he entered a competitive examination 
for a hospital position, and was one of the 



successful ones out of a class of one hundred 
and eighty-seven. 

I-'or the first six months he was in St. 
Joseph's hospital, Reading, Pennsylvania, and 
after that for one and one-half years was at 
the Philadelphia hospital. This hospital is 
supported by the city of Philadelphia, and at 
that time embraced about two thousand pa- 
tients. From the importance of this position, 
and his success in securing it, we have an 
early intimation of Dr. Matthews' attainments 
in his chosen profession. 

April II, 1889, after his hospital service, he 
came to Johnstown, where he has remained 
ever since, practicing his profession with uni- 
form success, and winning by his generosity, 
honesty, affable manners and undoubted ca- 
pacity, hosts of appreciative friends. Dr. 
Matthews deserves high credit for having 
made his way unaided from the farm through 
the schools to a position of importance in his 
profession. After the flood he was for one 
year chief medical inspector to the State Board 
of Health, doing excellent service. Prior to 
1 896 the State Board had but sixteen inspectors, 
and Dr. Matthews was one of them. Now 
there is an inspector for each county, and he 
is the one for Cambria county. He is one of 
the staff of the Conemaugh Valley Memorial 
hospital, is a member of the Cambria County 
Medical society, and of the Pennsylvania State 
Medical society. 

He is a member of Johnstown Lodge, No. 
538, F. and A. M., of Portage Chapter, 195, 
R. A. M., of Orient Commandery, No. 6i, 
Knights Templar, and of the A. O. U. W., 
No. 245. He is also first vice-president of 
the Johnstown Board of Trade. 

April 9, 1 89 1, he married Cora Belle 
Greene, a daughter of Wesley Greene, of 
Johnstown, and an amiable and cultivated 



42 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



lady. Of this union two children were born, 
Ehzabeth Rosalie and Ruth Matilda. 

As intimated above, Dr. Matthews is pos- 
sessed of a good ancestry. His grandfather, 
Archie Matthews, who emigrated to East 
Wheatfield township about 1787, and who was 
one of its very early pioneer settlers, was of 
the traditional good Scotch-Irish stock. His 
avocation was that of a farmer, but he also 
owned a distillery, and built and operated a 
woolen factory. That he was an intelligent, 
wide awake farmer and business man is shown 
by the considerable amount of property which 
he accumulated and bequeathed to his de- 
scendants. 

He married l^lizabeth Finley, who was born 
in 1784. On the old homestead February 2, 
1828, Archie Matthews, Jr., father of Dr. 
Matthews, was born. He inherited part of 
the old homestead, and has resided there ever 
since, having followed farming as a life occu 
pation. 

His family consists of four boys and three 
girls. The mother of Dr. Matthews was born 
in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1842, and is a 
daughter of Capt. Hugh Mitchell, a boatman 
on the old Pennsylvania canal. 

Archie Matthews is a democrat, and a 
respected and worthy citizen. Dr. Mat- 
thews is also a democrat, having inherited 
his political tendencies as well as many of 
his other characteristics, from his sturdy 
ancestry. 

He has the welfare of his city sincerely at 
heart, but lias never been an office-seeker nor 
an office-holder. 

From this brief sketch it is correctly in- 
ferred that Dr. Mattiicws has lost no time ; 
" young in years, but old in experience," as 
expressed b\- the wise Bacon. Moreover, he 
has lived well. 



/CHARLES A. MATTHEWS, D. 1). S., a 

rising young dentist of Johnstown, Penn- 
sylvania, is a son of Arcihbald and Matilda 
Jane (Mitchel) Matthews, and was born Janu- 
ary 22, 1871, at Oakhill Farm, Indiana county, 
Penns)'lvania. (For ancestral history, see the 
sketch of his brother, Dr. W. Edgar Matthews, 
which appears above.) He was reared upon 
the paternal acres until sixteen years of age, 
received his early education in the common 
schools of his native county. He still further 
prepared himself for a professional career by 
attending the academies at Armagh and Cra- 
mer, of Indiana county, Penns)4vania, and the 
Morrell institute at Johnstown, graduating 
from the latter institution in 1890. After 
graduating he accepted a position as chemist 
with the Cambria Iron company, which posi- 
tion he filled for two years. 

Having decided upon dentistry' as a life 
profession, he entered the dental department 
of the University of Maryland, at Baltimore, 
from which well-known institution of technical 
learning he graduated in 1894, and the same 
year located in Johnstown, this county, where 
he has since practiced with profit to himself 
and with credit to the profession he repre- 
sents. 

T A>Ii:s I'. TIIODIPSOX, M.l>., the oldest 
[)racticing dentist of Johnstown, Penn- 
sj-lvania, is also a temperance advocate of 
prominence in western Pennsylvania. For- 
merly he was an active democrat, but having 
conscientious convictions concerning the enor- 
mit}' of the drinking evil he left his party and 
joined the ranks of the prohibitionists. Later 
he became the editor and publisher of a vig- 
orous prohibition organ, known as the "Tem- 
perance Vindicator," which he publisheil for 
more tli.m three years, and which was the first 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



43 



temperance weekly in the State to raise the 
prohibition banner, and the first published in 
the State having a year's existence. This 
paper had quite an influence in its day in 
moulding the opinions of its readers according 
to the principles of the Prohibition party. 
Dr. Thompson has been connected with a 
number of temperance organizations, and 
having ever since his conversion to the pro- 
hibition faith been an active prohibitionist, has 
done faithful service, but he is now inclined to 
withdraw from the political arena. 

The professional life of Dr. Thompson also 
furnishes an interesting record. Having been 
educated in the common schools of Hunting- 
don county, he studied both medicine and 
dentistry at Williamsburg, Blair county, with 
Dr. Alexander McKamy. Afterward he en- 
tered the Medical Department of the Pennsyl- 
vania College, graduating at Philadelphia in 
the spring of 1857. He located first at New 
Germantown, Perry county, and then at Wil- 
liamsburg, Blair county, practicing in all about 
sixteen years. At the end of this time, because 
of failing health, he took up the study of den- 
tistry exclusively, having up to this time 
practiced it in connection with medicine. 

He went to Johnstown in 1878, and has 
remained there ever since in constant practice. 
He also gave valuable service to his country 
during the Civil War, serving as acting assist- 
ant surgeon, United States army. He was 
on duty with General Burnside's division at 
Fredericksburg, Virginia, at the time of the 
battle of the Rapidan, but was sent from that 
point to Mount Pleasant hospital. District of 
Columbia, on the day of the second battle of 
Bull Run. 

Dr. Thompson's religious life, too, is worthy 
of notice. Formerly he was a Presbyterian, 
but by a careful, prayerful study of the Bible, 



he became convinced that the second coming 
of Christ is near at hand, and as he could no 
longer subscribe to many of the doctrines 
held and taught by the church of his choice, 
he joined the Seventh Day Adventist church, 
in which he continues a faithful and earnest 
member. 

He was an Odd Fellow from 1850 until re- 
cently. He is of Irish extraction, his grand- 
father having emigrated from Ireland to 
America, located shortl\- afterward in Hunt- 
ingdon county, where he died. His vocation 
was that of farming. David Thompson, father 
of our subject, was born in Maryland, near 
the city of Fredericksburg, and emigrated to 
Huntingdon county, dying there. He was a 
blacksmith. Thus it will be seen that the 
ancestors of Dr. Thompson followed the occu- 
pations of sturdy men. 

Dr. Thompson was born in Huntingdon 
county, October 16, 1823. His mother was 
Martha Porter ; his first wife was Elizabeth 
Ann Ake, of Williamsburg, Blair county ; and 
his .second wife, Margaret McCahan. He has 
no children living. 

This brief sketch of Dr. Thompson war- 
rants us in giving to him the character of an 
energetic professional man, and a man of 
strong convictions and worthy aims. 



HOX. JAMES K. BOYD, ex-Mayor of 
Johnstown, is a notable example of a 
man who has achieved honorable successes by 
the force of a strong character. Although we 
may believe that God makes new Adams every 
day, we cannot but acknowledge the powerful 
influence of heredity and be glad if in our own 
case we can look back upon a line of strong, 
sturdy ancestors. Mr. Boyd has reason to be 
especially proud of his ancestral stock. In 
the first place, he has Scotch blood in his 



44 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CVCLOPEDIA 



veins ; in the second, his ancestors, as the 
records show, were among the hardy, pioneer 
settlers of America where no hiy-livered man 
dared live. 

William Boyd, perhaps the great, great- 
grandfather of James K. Boyd, was one of the 
early settlers of Somerset county, Pennsylva- 
nia. Among his family were two daughters 
and one son. While he was on a business 
trip to New York, the Indians of the Miami- 
Ohio region, made a forage into Pennsylvania, 
capturing the two daughters and the son, and 
tomahawking his wife and an infant son. Wil- 
liam Boyd did not rest in his pursuit of the 
Indians until he had recaptured the two daugh- 
ters. The son David was never recaptured, 
but was afterward heard of in Canada. William 
Boyd afterward married a second time, and 
from this union I'lon. James K. Boyd is de- 
scended. The grandfather, James Boyd, and 
tiie father of our subject, were born and lived 
all their lives in Somerset county, Pennsylva- 
nia. The father, who was born September 23, 
1 8 14, was for a time in his early life, manager 
of a section of the Pittsburg pike, from Stoyes- 
town to Ligonier. Afterwards he went into 
the hotel business at what is known as Sliding 
Rock on top of Laurel Hill. Later he moved 
near Jennertown, Somerset county, where he 
kept hotel until he died September 27, 1854. 
The hitter hotel, owing to the affability and 
good management of the host, was known as 
a very popular resort. 

William l^oyd was a democrat of pronounced 
views. His family consisted of three boj's 
and one girl: our subject; Joshua, deceased; 
William P., who resides in Joiinstown, and 
Missouri J., wife of Daniel Peterson, of Jen- 
nerville, Jenner townsliip, Somerset count)-. 

Hon. James K. Boyd was i)i>rM I.muary 26, 
1845, in Jenner township, Somerset county, at 



the Boyd homestead, situated on the old Pitts- 
burg pike, on the top of the Laurel Hill moun- 
tains. He was educated in the common 
schools. After his father's death, at the age 
of eight years, he went on a farm, where he 
lived for nine years, when he went to learn the 
trade of a carpenter. These facts, simple and 
seemingly small in their importance, are a 
testimony to his worth, even as a young boy. 
After serving his apprenticeship faithfully, he 
worked at his trade in Somerset county until 
1864. Then coming to Johnstown, he was 
employed by the Cambria Coal and Iron com- 
pany and by the Pennsylvania Railroad com- 
pany, and later by W. J. Rose, for whom he 
worked for twent\-three years. So efficient 
and enterprising was he in his work that he 
became Mr. Rose's architectural manager, and 
in this capacit}- erected many of the finest 
buildings in the town. 

Mr. Boyd is a republican and a loyal citizen, 
and, as such, has always taken an active part 
in the affairs of government. His fellow-citi- 
zens have manifested their confidence in his 
character and capabilities by electing him to 
various public offices. He was auditor of the 
borough of Johnstown, prior to its incorpora- 
tion as a cit}'. In 1S91 he was elected city 
treasurer, and 1893, mayor, serving one full 
term. In addition to these positions of public 
trust, he has held or holds important offices 
in fraternal organizations and business corpor- 
ations. He is ex-Deputy State Counsellor of 
the O. U. A. M., Past Supreme Commander 
of the A. O. K. of M. C, and ex-Dcputy 
Supreme Arclum of the Independent Order of 
Heptasophs. He has been president of the 
Johnstown Building and Loan association for 
about t went)' \'ears. He is vice-president of the 
Cambria Building and Loan association, is a 
member of the Board of Trade, and liuring his 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



45 



term as mayor, was by reason of his position, a 
director of the Coneinaugh Valley Memorial 
hospital. On December 28, 1871, Mr. Boyd 
married Miss Lizzie A. Shaffer, and to this 
union have been born five children : Nannie 
May and Joshua, both dead ; William F. ; 
Charles A. and James K., Jr. As will be seen 
by this sketch, our subject has had an invalu- 
able inheritance, the blood of a good race, 
and the traits of courageous ancestry. He 
has had an education which was derived from 
self-directed, independent effort and which is 
the best education. He is a useful man, living 
among people, knowing them and doing them 
good. 



y%R. ANDREW YEAGLEY, deceased, 
^^ was a well-known and popular physi- 
cian of Johnstown, and was born March 24, 
1830, in Union township, Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania, and was a son of Henry and 
Phcebe Yeagley, both of the latter d)'ing in 
Connellsville, the same county, the former at 
the age of eighty-seven and the latter at the 
age of eighty. 

Dr. Andrew Yeagley, was reared on the 
paternal acres, attended the public schools of 
his neighborhood, and afterwards broadened 
his mental training by a thorough academic 
course at Carmichaels, Greene county, Penn- 
sylvania. 

In 1850 he came to Johnstown and took up 
the study of his profession in the office of h>s 
brother Henry. Having diligently pursued 
his studies, he entered the Cincinnati Eclectic 
Medical College, from which he graduated in 
1852. He at once located at Fairfield, West- 
moreland county, where he remained but a 
short time, when he came to Johnstown, and 
was in active and successful practice, in part- 
nership with his brother, until his death, 



which sad event took place October 23, 1889, 
and was occasioned by the Great Flood. 

He was eminently successful in his chosen 
profession, and was widely known throughout 
the county of his adoption. 

Not only in professional circles was he 
highly respected, but in political matters 
recocnized as a leader. He was a democrat 
in political faith, and in 1878 his party hon- 
ored him by electing him to the office of 
county treasurer of Cambria county, and for 
three years he filled the responsible duties of 
that office with signal ability. 

In 1870 he married Mrs. Mary L. (Otter) 
Criley, a daughter of James Otter, of New 
York city, and to this marital relation were 
born two children : Arthur H. and Bella. 
Dr. Andrew Yeagley possessed those ele- 
ments of mind that makes their possessor 
influential and respected. He had a clear 
judgment, and was a good judge of human 
nature, rarely failing in his estimate of indi- 
viduals and possessed a deep sympathy that 
contributed to make him very popular with 
his patients. The grandfather of Mrs. Yeag- 
ley, James Otter, was born at Hampton 
Courts, England. When a young man he 
left the mother country, and came to New 
York city, where he resided many years, 
when he removed to Galveston, Texas, where 
he received a grant of a large tract of govern- 
ment land, and it is supposed the city is now 
built upon a portion of this land. He was a 
sea captain, owning his own vessels, and as 
such sailed over a great portion of the marine 
world. During this time his home and fam- 
ily were in New York city. During the war 
of 18 1 2 he served in the naval forces of the 
United States, for which service he received 
the grant of land above referred to. His son, 
James Otter, father of Mrs. Yeagley, was born 



46 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



in New York city in 1814, and resided in the 
city of his birth until death closed his career 
at the early age of twenty-eight years, Mrs. 
Yeagley being a babe of eight weeks at the 
death of her father. He married Sarah Furey, 
a daughter of Wni. Furey, who was a native of 
Ireland and a man of thorough classical edu- 
cation, and a gentleman of refinement and 
culture. After the death of James Otter his 
widow wedded Philip J. Artiiur, and she now 
lives in Indiana county, this State, at the ad- 
vanced age of seventy-five years. 

Mrs. Yeagley came to Johnstown in 1866, 
and for four years was engaged as a teacher. 
In 1889 she was appointed to the honorable 
and responsible position of librarian of the 
Carnegie Free library of that city. 

'piMOTIIV l>. IIL'NT, an old and highly 
respected citizen of Roxbury, was born 
in Yorkshire, England, November 14, 1827, 
and is a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Clemin- 
son) Hunt, natives of England. His parents 
came to this country in 1830, first locating at 
Pottsville, tiiis State, but soon coming to 
Cambria county, where they settled and Jived 
in East Taylor townsliip, about si.v miles 
from Johnstown. Henry Hunt and iiis wife 
were both members of the Methodist church, 
and passed their lives on their farm, wiiere he 
liied in 1849, at fifty years of age, and she, 
surviving him for nearly half a century, passed 
away in June, 1895, at tiie advanced age of 
eight)'-six years. 

1 inintli)' linnt li\'c(i a life cnnunon to the 
majority of farmers' sons, and attended the 
early common schools until lie was sixteen 
years of age, wlien he came to Jolinstown and 
learned the trade of blacksmith with that old- 
time and well-known firm of Kinley & 
Gageby. After learning his trade Mr. Hunt 



opened a shop, which he has conducted suc- 
cessfully for nearly fifty years, being in a man- 
ner now retired from active business. In 
addition to his blacksmithing business on 
Haynes street, Johnstown, Mr. Hunt has car- 
ried on farming in East Taylor township, 
where he has ow]ied a good farm for many 
years. He also owns some valuable propertj' 
in the borough of Roxburj'. He is a repub- 
lican politically, and served as tax collector, 
besides holding other township offices before 
Ro.\bury was made a borough. A skilled 
workman, a good neighbor, and a reliable 
business man Mr. Hunt is highly respected 
and has a large circle of friends. 

On March 14, 1850, Timothy L. Hunt 
wedded Eleanor M. Kern, of Greensburg, 
Westmoreland county, and they have three 
living children, one son and two daughters— 
Margaretta E., who married Jeremiah Barnett, 
a resident of the borough of Roxburj', and a 
Union soldier of the late Civil War; Kittie A., 
wife of Julius Hoffman, of Johnstown, and Dr. 
George, a practicing dentist. Mrs. Hunt is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
as were also her parents, and her father, 
Joseph Kern, was boin at " Little York," 
this State, and settled at Greensburg, the 
county seat of Westmoreland, where he died 
May 23, 1.S46, aged seventy-four years. 
Joseph Kern was a hatter by trade, and car- 
ried on hatting at Greensburg for many )'ears 
before combined capital, improved machinery 
and specialized piece work drove the indi- 
\iilual ni.iniifacturcr from the market b)- 
cheaper but not better work. Mr. Kern was 
a man of foresight and judgment, and in the 
early years of Johnstown's history, perceiving 
its future importance, invested largely in real 
estate in what is now the Fiftli ward, where 
his son George was the first settler. When 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



47 



buildings were erected and the town com- 
menced to grow on his land it was named 
Kernville, in honor of him, and continued to 
hold that name until it was made a part of 
Johnstown as the Fifth ward. Joseph Kern 
married Margaretta Stinebaugh, who died 
April i6, 1856, aged seventy-six years and 
nine months. 

The Hunt and Kern families are among the 
sturdy, substantial and useful families of West- 
ern Pennsylvania, although not so old or 
numerous as many other families west of the 
Alleghanies. 

<s 

FRANK P. 3IAIITIN, ESQ., the well 
known attorney-at-law, is the son of 
Frank P. and Mary (Menamen) Martin. He 
was born at Tamaqua, Schuylkill county, 
Pennsylvania, March 18, 1856. He is of Irish 
descent. His grandfather, Peter Martin, was 
a native of Tipperary, Ireland, who came to 
America early in the present century, and 
settled in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, 
where he passed the remainder of his life, fol- 
lowing his business of contractor. 

Frank P. Martin, Sr., the father of our sub- 
ject, was born in Tamaqua, about 1830, and 
lived at that place until 1869, when he moved 
to Easton, remaining in Easton until 1888, 
when he moved to Philadelphia. He is a 
master-mechanic in the employ of the Phila- 
delphia and Reading railroad company. 

He married Mary Menamen, and to this 
union four children were born : John T., attor- 
ney-at-law, .Scranton, Pennsylvania; Susan, 
wife of John McCluskey, of Easton, Pennsyl- 
vania ; Frank P., and Mary, the wife of Abra- 
ham L. Garran, of Easton. 

Mr. Martin received his early education in 
the public schools of Schuylkill county, and 
early began to make his own way in the , 



world. As a boy he was first employed at a 
colliery picking slate ; his next employment 
was as a "wiper" of engines, at Easton. Then 
he served an apprenticeship as a machinist, 
and worked one year at boiler-making, and 
finally served as fireman on a locomotive. 
But he was ambitious to rise in the world, 
and, as the first step to that end, he determined 
to secure an education. Accordingly he en- 
tered Thomas Steven's Commercial School, 
at Easton, in 1877, and completed the course. 
Subsequently he read law with Major A. B. 
Howell, at Easton, and in 18S0 entered the 
academic department of the University at 
Georgetown, D. C. After a two years' course 
in that department he entered the law school, 
from which he was graduated in 1883. 

He was admitted to the bar of the District 
of Columbia June 4, 1883, and to the bar of 
Northampton county, Pennsylvania, in Janu- 
ary, 1884. He was admitted to practice before 
the Supreme Court of the United States on 
the 9th of September, 1886, and June i, 1887, 
was admitted to practice before the Supreme 
Court of Pennsylvania. 

In 1886 Mr. Martin was appointed to a 
clerkship in the state department at Harris- 
burg, under Secretary of Commonwealth W. 
S. Stenger. He practiced law for a time in 
New York city, and in September, 1887, came 
to Johnstown, and was admitted to the bar of 
Cambria county September 20, 1887, and has 
practiced there ever since. 

On February 24, 1886, Mr. Martin was 
united in marriage to Miss Emma Rose Mur- 
phy, of New York city. Mrs. Martin is a 
daughter of that brilliant attorney, M. J. Mur- 
phy, formerly deputy attorney-general of New 
York. Mr. Murphy is a popular and influen- 
tial member of Tammany Hall, and is a pro- 
lific writer, as well as a distinguished linguist. 



48 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



Mr. Martin's family at present consists of 
his wife and four children: John J., Mar\' J., 
Emma R. and Gerarldine. 

In politics Mr. Martin is a staunch demo- 
crat, and takes an active interest in the success 
of his party, and in the campaign of 1896 was 
the nominee of his party for State Senator in 
the Cambria-Blair district of Pennsylvania. 
As an attorney Mr. Martin is noted for the 
earnest and enthusiastic interest with which 
he enters into a case for his clients. As a 
speaker he is earnest and forcible. 



/"Y^OHOAXZA A. BROWN, who for forty 
years was the faithful and efficient head 
of the saddlery department of the Cambria 
Iron company, is a son of Andrew and Mary 
(Green) Brown, and was born May 3, 1822, in 
Blairsville, Indiana county, Pennsylvania. 

His father was born in Centre county, this 
State, and belonged to one of those sturdy 
pioneer families of central Pennsylvania. 
When a young man, the tide of emigration 
being westward, he removed to Blairsville, 
Indiana county, which was his home until 
death closed his active and useful and emi- 
nently successful life, -September 19, 1830. 
I le was a resident of that old borough at 
the time of the building of the old Pitts- 
burg pike, antl for him the upper portion 
of the borough was named, and, to this day, 
is known as Brownstown. His trade was 
tliat of a stonemason, and in his craft was 
recognized as a skilled and reliable artisan. 
Just prior to his death he was a contractor for 
the building of a lock on the Pcnn.sylvania 
canal, which, in connection with the old Port- 
age railroad, was the connecting link between 
the eastern and western part of the State. 
While thus engaged he caught cold, from 
which he never recovered, and which caused 



his death. Politically he affiliated with the 
party of Jefferson, and being well known as a 
a man of discriminating judgment, clear con- 
ceptions and of the strictest integrity, he was 
appointed by the Governor of the State an as- 
sociate judge, to sit on the judicial bench of 
Indiana county, a position for which his well- 
known qualities of head and heart rendered 
him eminently qualified to fill, and he discharged 
the duties of his office in a way that reflected 
great credit upon him and secured for him the 
esteem and respect of those who knew him. 
His marriage resulted in the birth of the fol- 
lowing children : Eliza, born January 3, 1800, 
died January 12, 1822; James G., born Feb- 
ruary 19, 1807; Harriet, born January 23, 
1809; William B., born September 17, 181 1 ; 
Susanna, born October 6, 18 13, the wife of 
Elijah Smith, of Farmington, Fulton count}', 
Illinois, and the only one living except the 
subject of this sketch ; Joseph G. was born 
November 30, 1815 ; Mary Ann, born Feb- 
ruary 3, 1818, and died September, 18 19; 
John B., born April 17, 1820, and died Jan- 
uary 16,1843; Morganza, subject, and Emil\-. 
Morganza Brown secured but the elements 
of an education, by attending, for a short time, 
the subscription schools, as they existed be- 
fore the common school system was estab- 
lished. His father died while he was yet 
young, and he was put to the necessity of 
going to work to help support and take care 
of the family. In 1839 he came to Johnstown 
and apprenticed himself to learn the trade of 
a saddler. After learning the trade he fol- 
lowed it for a time, but on account of failing 
health was compelled to give it up, and then 
for a time worked in and about the warehouses 
that were an adjunct to the transportation on 
the canal and Portage road. In October, 
i854, he commenced working for the Cambria 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



49 



Iron company, and in 1855 took charge of the 
saddlery department of that company, and for 
forty years remained the efficient head of it. 
In 1895 he resigned the position he had so 
long and so efficiently filled, and has since 
lived a retired life, and if there is anything in 
the saying that " labor sweetens rest," the rest 
of Mr. Brown must be sweet indeed. Up to 
the days of " Knownothingism," Mr. Brown 
was a staunch democrat, but upon the issues 
of that campaign he left the party of his an- 
cestors and his youth, and has ever since cast 
his fortunes with the party of Lincoln and 
Grant. 

Fraternally Mr. Brown stands deservedly 
high. He is a member of Alma Lodge, No. 
523, I. O. O. F., and has passed through its 
chairs ; Mineral Lodge, No. 89, Knights of 
Pythias, in connection with which he was, for 
a number of years, Master of the Exchequer, 
passed through the chairs and belongs to the 
Uniform Rank, No. 18, and has passed the 
chairs in both lodges. 

Mr. Brown is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and has been since 1839. 
He is a class-leader and an active and devoted 
worker in the church of his choice, and his 
walk and conversation reflect that amiable- 
ness of disposition, humane sympathy and 
kindly consideration for the rights and feel- 
ings of others, that are the ever-present char- 
acteristics and attributes of the true Christian. 

Mr. Brown has been twice married. He 
wedded as his first wife Caroline Tantlinger, 
January 23, 1845, ^""^ this union resulted in 
the birth of six children : Mary Catherine, 
born March 26, 1846, is the widow of John E. 
Hill, in his day a prominent and respected 
citizen of Morrellville. 

William Andrew, born December 23, 1847, 
now deceased ; Joseph Green, whose sketch 
4 



follows; Anna Lena, born May 14, 1852, is 
the wife of John F. Seigh, whose sketch ap- 
pears elsewhere in this volume ; Henry Yeag- 
ley, born April 14, 1856, deceased; Samuel, 
born May 16, i860, deceased. 

The life record of Mr. Brown is a striking 
lesson in constancy of purpose and faithful- 
ness and fidelity to the interests of his em- 
ployers. And, although the latter were re- 
luctant to accept his resignation, yet it was 
done with the kindly assurance that they would 
only be glad to accept his service should he 
feel disposed to again enter their employ. 
© 

JOSEPH GREEN BROWN, deceased, son 
of Morganza Brown, whose sketch ap- 
pears above, was born in Johnstown, Decem- 
ber 17, 1849. He was educated in the public 
schools of his native town and then learned 
the trade of a cabinetmaker, but preferring 
mechanical pursuits as an avocation, he en- 
tered the pattern department of the Cambria 
Iron company, where he soon developed con- 
sideral skill, and where he was continuously 
engaged up to the time of his death, which 
occurred on August 26, 1895, as assistant 
foreman under Mr. Evan Lewis. 



JOHN" WESLEY CARTER, superintend- 

^ ent of the supply department of the 
Cambria Iron company, is a son of John B. 
and Mary Ann (Goodman) Carter, and was 
born in Marietta, Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 
vania, June 8, 1839. His great-grandfather, 
William Carter, was a native of England, 
whence he emigrated to America and located 
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and became a 
factor in the early history and development of 
that city. From Philadelphia he removed to 
Wyoming county, where his wife was a vic- 
tim in that memorable Wyoming massacre. 



50 



He endured all the hardships and perils inci- 
dent to a settlement in a wilderness infested 
with Indians and wild beasts, and while cross- 
ing the Susquehanna river in a small boat in 
company with another man and his wife the 
boat capsized, and he lost his life in a brave 
effort to safe the woman. 

The grandfather of our subject, John Henry 
Carter, was born in Wyoming county, but 
removed to Marietta, Pennsylvania, where he 
died. He was a pump-maker by trade, but it 
was his privilege to have a much better educa- 
tion than was permitted to many in those early 
days, so during the winter months he taught 
school. 

He married Sallie Brabson, and to their 
union were born several children. One of their 
sons, John B. Carter, became the father of our 
subject. He was born in the eastern part of 
Lancaster county, in i8l2. He was reared in 
his native county and educated in the old sub- 
scription schools of that period, and learned 
the trade of cabinet-maker. He removed to 
Mount Minon, Pennsylvania, where he became 
a partner in the Mount Minon furnace. 

In 1872 he removed to Johnstown, this 
county, where he followed his trade as cabi- 
net-maker. In religious belief he was a mem- 
ber of tlie Methodist church ; politically he 
adhered to the principles of the Republican 
|)arty and represented iiis w.ird in council. 

He married Miss Mary Ann Goodman, and 
their marriage was blessed in tiie birth of six 
ciiildrcn, two boys and four girls. 

John Weslc)' Carter, the subject of this 
mcmou-, attended the common schools of 
.Marietta, and at the age of eleven years en- 
tered a store at that place. He was employed 
l\ere for seven years, and then became super- 
intendent of the ore banks of K. Haldeman & 
i-". S. Eagle 6c .Son, of York county, Pennsyl- 



BIOGRAI'HICAL AND PORTRAIT CVCLOPEDIA 

I 



vania. He occupied this position about seven 
years, and in December, 1863, he enlisted in 
the service of his country in the Civil War, 
and was placed in Military R. R. department. 
First Pioneer corps, and was transferred later 
to the post of commissary of the Military R. 
R. department, at City Point, being there at 
the time that Grant was before Petersburg. 
At the close of the war he returned to York 
county and resumed his position as superin- 
tendent of the ore banks. He was engaged 
there until the close of the year 1871. 

February, 1872, he removed to Johnstown 
and entered the mills of the Cambria Iron 
company, where for eleven )-ears he was em- 
ployed as stamper and inspector of steel rails. 
He was then transferred to the Gautier depart- 
ment as weigh-master, and after a )-ear in this 
position was made assistant superintendent of 
the spring shops. He was employed in this 
capacity for two years, when he was again 
transferred, this time to the warehouse of the 
Gautier department as superintendent, which 
position he occupied at the time of the disas- 
trous flood of 1889. Mr. Buchanan, who was 
superintendent of the Cambria Iron company 
warehouse, lost his life in the flood, and the 
two warehouses were put under one manager 
and called the supply department of the Cam- 
bria Iron company. Mr. Carter's long period 
of efficient and faithful service received recog- 
nition, and he was made superintendent of 
this new department, and is still retained in 
that capacity. 

1 Ic endorses the principles of the Republican 
party, and has been elected to the council of 
W'estmont for two terms and has served his 
second term on the school board and has 
acted as secretary of the Board of Health ever 
since that body was establisiied. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



51 



February 9, i860, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Kate Blessing, a daughter of John 
Blessing, of Hellam, York county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and their marriage has resulted in the 
birth of six children : James B., who married 
Miss Emma Stahl, of Lorain, Ohio, and is 
now in the employ of the Johnson company; 
Lucretia, at home ; John, who is a dealer in 
agricultural implements, at Massillon, Ohio; 
Charles, who married Miss Gertrude Cun- | 
ningham, is now living at Morrellville, and 
is employed as steel inspector for the Cam- ; 
bria Iron company ; Frank G., in the Gautier 
office of the Cambria Iron company, and 

Olive, at home. 

© 

♦^K. FRANK J. LIVINGSTON, a rising 
young physician and coroner of Cambria 
county, is a son of Josiah H. and Eliza (Sitman) 
Livingston, and was born July 16, 1867, in 
Adams township, near his present home, Salix, 
this county. 

His grandfather, Samuel R. Livingston, was 
a native of Somerset county, Pennsylvania, 
and now resides in Davidsville, Somerset 
county, having reached the age of eighty- 
eight years. By trade he was a blacksmith, 
but also followed the pursuits of a farmer. 
Politically he was identified with the old 
Whig party, but became a Republican at 
the organization of that party. Since reach- 
ing his majority he has never missed casting 
his vote for the presidential electors, and 
although he took a deep interest in all politi- 
cal issues of the day, he never sought office. 
He was twice married. His first marital union 
was with Catherine Horner, and as his second 
wife, he married Barbara Wissinger. 

Josiah H. Livingston, father, was born in 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, in 1836, where 
he was reared. His early education was limi- 



ted to the common schools of his native 
county, but Mr. Livingston was ambitious. 
His limited knowledge excited a desire for a 
better education, and he has since, by judicious 
reading, supplemented his early attainments 
and is now recognized as one of the most 
intelligent thinkers of his community. 

He taught school in Somerset and Cambria 
counties for seventeen terms, and then turned 
his attention to market gardening. He located 
in 1830, on a farm within a half mile of Salix, 
in Adams township, then Richland township, 
in which vicinity he has since lived. He has 
always been an advocate of the principles of 
the Republican party and always shown an 
intelligent interest in local affairs. Believing 
that " The office should seek the man," he has 
never sought a political office. Yet his party 
has honored him on many occasions, as he 
has held at different times nearly every town- 
ship office. Being deeply interested in the 
cause of education, and having more than 
ordinary qualifications for the office, he has 
been elected and served as school director 
many times. He is a consistent member of 
the United Brethren church, 
i On March 3, 1863, he was wedded to Miss 
Eliza Sitman, a daughter of John R. Sitman, 
a United Brethren pastor, who was at that 
time located in Richland township. To this 
marriage have been born five children : Ulysses 
Sidney, who died in 1869; Frank J., William 
W., who lives at home, Ida May, who was 
born 1880 and lives at home, and Sadie E., 
born in 1888, also living at home. 

Frank J. Livingston received his elementary 
education in the common and select schools 
of his township ; later he took advantage of a 
course of instruction at the Ebensburg Normal 
school and commenced life on his own account 
as a teacher. After teaching two terms he 



52 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



entered the office of Dr. G. E. Conrad, of 
Johnstown, where he began the study of 
medicine. In 1885, he became a student in 
the Fxlectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, from wliich institution he graduated 
June 5, 1888, when he located at Sahx, this 
county, where he has since been successfully 
engaged in the practice of his chosen profes- 
sion. Alwaj's interested in everything that 
tends to promote progress in medical science, 
he is a member of the Eclectic Medical asso- 
ciation of Penns)-lvania, also of the Central 
Medical association, of which he is treasurer 
at the present time. He is affiliated in poli- 
tics with the Republican party and takes an 
active part in local politics. For several terms 
he served as auditor of iiis township, and in 
the autumn of 1895 was elected county coro- 
ner of Cambria county. He is a member of 
Adams Council, No. 274, Jr. O. U. A. M., and 
medical examiner in his township for the 
Royal Benefit Insurance Society of New York; 
and for the Metropolitan Society of the same 
place. 

On September 2, 1888, he married Nannie 
J. Stutzman, a daughter of Tobias Stutzman, 
of Salix, and this marriage has resulted in 
the birth of one child, George R., born June 
28, 1892. 



f>lMltC,K C. K. Z.MI.AI, who has been a 
^■^ prominent citizen of Ebensburg, IV-nn- 
.sylvani.i, for more than half a century, is a 
son of iJaniel and Elizabeth (Uradd) Zahm, 
and was born in Lancaster, Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, October 24, 18 16. 

His i)aternal ancestry was of German origin, 
whilst his maternal was English. Matthew 
/ahm, his grantlfather, was a native of Fred- 
erick, Marjland, whence he migrated to Lan- 
caster, wliere he passed the remainder of his 



life. Daniel Zahm, father, was born in Lan- 
caster in the year 1792, and died in the year 
1854 at Columbia, Lancaster county, where 
his remains now lie buried. He was a soldier 
in the war of 181 2, our second struggle with 
Great Britain, and served during the latter 
part of the conflict under the command of 
Captain George H. Ambright. 

At the early age of sixteen he left the pater- 
nal roof to assume the responsibilities of life 
on his own account. For five j-ears he was 
engaged in butchering in Lancaster; and in 
February, 1838, he went to Portage, then 
known as No. 2, A. P. R. road, on the old 
Portage railroad, and accepted a position with 
William Russell, Esq., who was engaged in 
merchandizing. He remained with him until 
1844, and in January of that year went to 
Ebensburg, Cambria county, this State, as 
deputy sheriff under Captain James Murray. 
Me served a full term of three years, and Cap- 
tain Murray's successor. Sheriff Jesse Patter- 
son, reappointed him to that office in 1847. 
The year following Mr. Zahm and Captain 
Murray engaged in merciiandizing, manufac- 
turing lumber and tanning, which the}- followed 
successfully until October, 1854. The two 
succeeding years were occupied as clerk to 
the commissioners of Cambria count}-, and 
then he was again appointed dejiuty b}- Sheriff 
John Roberts, under whom he serx'cd until 
1859. He also ser\'od in the same capacity 
during the years i860 and 1S61 under Sheriff 
R. P. Linton. Subsequentl}- he filled various 
clerical positions about the court house until 
April, 1864, when he located upon a farm 
near Ebensburg, in Cambria township, which 
he had previously purchased. In 1865 he was 
elected prothonotary of Cambria county for 
three )-ears. At the end of said term, in 1869, 
he and his son, James B. Zahm, formed a part- 




lAC'oi; I'lixi). 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



53 



nership under the firm name of Zahm & Son, 
and embarked in mercantile pursuits in Ebens- 
burg. In 1 87 1 his son withdrew, and Mr. 
Zahm continued successfully until the financial 
crisis of 1873, which prostrated business in 
every form throughout the United States. He 
withstood the pressure of the times until 1875, 
when he, along with many of the substantial 
business men of the country, was obliged to 
close out. Since this time he has done cleri- 
cal work in the various offices of the court 
house. 

On the 23d March, 1843, Mr. Zahm and 
Miss Eliza Wherry were united in marriage, 
and to their union have been born the follow- 
ing children, viz. : Margaret A., who is the 
wife of F. H. Barker, now Treasurer of Cam- 
bria comity. Mary V. is the relict of George 
W. Jones; James B., deceased, was a book- 
keeper in the employ of Carnegie & Co., of 
Pittsburg; was thrown from a train and killed 
in 1895 near said city; Daniel H. is a loco- 
motive engineer on the Cresson and Ebens- 
burg branch of the Pennsylvania railroad ; 
Elizabeth is dead ; Kate F. is the wife of Judge 
A. V. Barker, now president judge of the 
several courts of Cambria county, and resides 
at Ebensburg; Amelia married Ezekiel Wher- 
ry, and resides at Altoona, this State ; Alex- 
ander died in infancy; Alice is the wife of 
Webster Griffith, of Ebensburg, manufacturer 
and dealer in lumber; Hattie wedded A. W. 
Buck, a prominent banker of Ebensburg; 
George died young, and Matthew is at home 
with his parents. 

Mr. Zahm and his wife are both living and 
enjoj'ing reasonably good health, and cele- 
brated their golden wedding anniversary on 
the 23d of March, 1893, when all their chil- 
dren then living were present, together with 
their husbands, wives and their grandchildren. 



.JACOB FEND, a highly respected citizen 
and one of the oldest and most success- 
ful business men of the city of Johnstown, is 
a son of John and Mary (Gerhardt) Fend, and 
was born at Funkstown, a village in the vicinity 
of Hagerstown, Maryland, June 10, 1823. 

His parents were both natives of Germany, 
and, in 1821, settled near Hagerstown, Mary- 
land, but soon removed to Berlin, Somerset 
county, this State, where the father died, 1824, 
and his mother passed away, 1848, when in 
the fifty-second year of her age. They were 
an honest, frugal and industrious couple who 
well deserved the respect which was accorded 
them in the community where they resided. 

Jacob Fend was brought, when but a mere 
child, by his parents to Somerset county, 
where in 1837 he commenced work in the 
Kantner woolen factory, one mile east of 
Stoyestown, at fifty cents per week and board- 
ing himself He worked two years in the 
woolen mill, and a year more on a farm, and 
then learned the trade of millwright with E. 
M. Smitley, who gave him the only oppor- 
tunity he ever enjoyed in youth of attending 
school for three months. Stonycreek town- 
ship, where he formerly resided, had refused 
to adopt the free-school system. With Mr. 
Smitley he also learned the lessons of economy 
and self-reliance. He worked for eleven years 
at his trade, and when not contracting received 
1^2.50 per day. Completing Benshoff's mill 
at Johnstown, in 185 1, his physicians urged 
him to find lighter employment if he wished 
to live. Reluctantly accepting their advice he 
purchased for ^1260, of John Geis, the site of 
his present building on Main street, Johns- 
town, and opened a confectionery establish- 
ment and cracker bakery in 1852. His pay- 
ments were light, only $200 per year without 
interest, and he prospered fairly well in his 



54 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



new line until the war came, when such a 
demand came for his goods that he could 
hardly fill the orders that poured in on him. 
This increase of business remained permanent 
with him after the war, and up to 1882, when 
he retired from business. He then spent his 
winters at New Orleans and in California until 
the great flood came and swept away so much 
of his property that he was compelled to 
again engage in business. He had his wrecked 
residence repaired and opened as a hotel, and 
it was the leading hotel for several years. 
From the scattered remnants of his property 
properly managed and income of the hotel he 
was enabled, on November i, 1893, a second 
time to retire from active business with a suffi- 
cient competency to provide him with the 
comforts of life. ; 

On November 4, 1845, Mr. Fend married 
Hannah Probst, a member of the English 
Lutheran church, and a granddaughter of 
John Probst, the first iron manufacturer west 
of the Allegheny mountains in the Ligonier 
valley. Mrs. Fend was of French descent 
and died August 5, 1878, aged fifty-si.x )-ears, 
leaving four daughters : Matilda, wife of Major 
James H. Gageby, United States army; Mary, 
who died May 9, 1887, at Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia; Emma, who passed away, July 25, 
1888; and Ettie, who is her father's devoted 
companion. 

Jacob Fend is a republican in politics, and 
has served the city council for a number of 
years, but being of a modest and retiring dis- 
position he has never desired a public office, 
although serving in obedience to the will of 
the voters wiienever elected to any municipal 
position. For years he has been among the 
foremost business men of the cit}-, and has 
always identified himself with an_\- movement 
for the atlvancement of Johnstown's material 



interests. As one instancee illustrating his 
devotion to the development of his city may 
be cited the great effort of Mr. Fend, in con- 
nection with G. W. Osborn, to obtain the 
necessary amount of subscription that secured 
the erection of the Johnstown water works. 
In a score of other ways more or less promi- 
nent, he has been a potent factor to secure 
additional advantages for his city or bring to 
it new enterprises. 

Jacob Fend has been an industrious and 
persistent worker, and an excellent manager, 
and by prudence and economy has acquired 
a handsome competency. From a boy with- 
out a dollar and but little schooling he has 
not only achieved success in a business point 
of view, but in the maintenance of a character 
for integrity. His charities, however, have 
not been ostentatious, and few persons outside 
of his own family and intimate friends have 
knowledge of them. A fine example of a self- 
made man, his kindly nature, liis thoughtful- 
ness and consideration have won him friends 
wherever he has "one. 



•> APT.VIN GKORGK li. HItllAHDS, a 

^^ farmer of Reade township, this county, is 
a son of George and Charlotta (Bellman) Rich- 
ards, and was born at Allegheny Ore bank, 
Huntingdon county, now IMair county, Penn- 
.sylvania, March 13, 183S. 

His father, George Richards, was a native 
of England, and emigrated to America about 
1830 or 1 83 1, and located at Carthouse, Clear- 
field count)-, Pennsylvania. While in his own 
countr)- he learned the trade of a stone-mason, 
and acquired considerable knowledge of miner- 
alogy, and followed this pursuit as a means of 
gaining a livelihood in his adopted county. 
I'^rom here he removed to Allegheny Ore 
Hank for a short time, and then located at 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



55 



Coalport, Clearfield county. His residence 
here was not permanent, and he soon returned 
to Allegheny Ore Bank. He finally located 
at Lloydsville, at that time called Richards 
Coal bank, this county, where he died in 
October, 1846. 

He was a member of the old line Whig party, 
and took a normal interest in all political af- 
fairs. In religious faith he was an ardent 
member of the Lutheran Church. 

His marriage with Charlotta Bellman, a 
daughter of Jacob Bellman, of Tioga county, 
Pennsylvania, resulted in the birth of seven 
children, three sons and four daughters : Mary 
Ann, deceased, who was the wife of Jacob 
Burgo ; John, a veterinary surgeon of Blair 
county, Penn.sylvania ; George B. ; Sarah Jane, 
the wife of James Bowman, a blacksmith, of 
Allmansville, Clearfield county ; Hannah, de- 
ceased, who was the wife of Perrie Harkins ; 
Malinda, deceased, who was the wife of Isaac 
Haines, and Emanuel, of Madera, Clearfield 
county. 

George B. Richards was educated in the 
common schools of Cambria and Blair coun- 
ties, and, prior to the Civil War, earned a 
comfortable living as a day laborer. When 
the crisis of civil war threatened the dismem- 
berment of our Union, he was one of the first 
75,000 volunteers to respond to President 
Lincoln's call for troops. April 21, 1 861, he 
enlisted in company " D," Fourteenth regi- 
ment, Pennsylvania Militia infantry, and served 
four months. September 14, 1861, he re- 
enlisted in company " D," Fifty-third regiment, 
Pennsylvania infantry, and was appointed first 
corporal, but was soon raised to the rank of 
sergeant, and again first sergeant. He received 
his discharge in December, 1863, and re- 
enlisted the same month in his former com- 
pany, where he was promoted to the office of 



first lieutenant. His career was one of ad- 
vancement; his services in behalf of his coun- 
try received due recognition, and he was again 
promoted ; this time he was raised to the rank 
of captain. His regiment belonged to the 
Army of the Potomac, and in all the engage- 
ments in which he participated the only injury 
he received was while at Savage Station ; he 
suffered a sunstroke, which impaired his left 
elbow, and rendered him a cripple for life. 

After receiving his discharge from the mili- 
tary service, July 10, 1865, he purchased a 
farm in Reade township, this county, on which 
he located in August, 1865, where he has 
since been actively engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. 

He is a member of David Truxel Post, 421, 
G. A. R., at Glasgow, a member of Washing- 
ton Camp, No. 56, P. O. S. of A., of Glasgow, 
and of the agricultural order of the Grange 
at Mount Pleasant, Clearfield county, Penn- 
s}'lvania. In politics he affiliates with the 
Republican party, and has filled some of the 
local offices. 

His marriage with Susan E. Beers, a daugh- 
ter of John Beers, a carpenter and farmer (who 
served as a volunteer in the war with Mexico), 
of near Fallen Timbers, this county, was cele- 
brated March 30, 1865. 



HENRY SULLIVAN ENI>SLKY, of Johns- 
town, Pa., is a prosperous attorney and 
assistant solicitor for the famous Cambria Iron 
company of that place. 

He is a son of Andrew J. and Catharine 
(Johnson) Endsley, and was born September 
26, 1855, at Brownsville, Fayette county, 
Penn.sylvania. 

His grandfather was Capt. Thomas Ends- 
ley, a captain of the old Pennsylvania State 
militia, and a native of Virginia, who emi- 



56 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



grated to Somerfield, Somerset county, on the 
old National road, and died at Somerfield in 
1852. He was a farmer, and owned a good 
sized fine farm surrounding that village, where 
he died. For a number of years kept the old 
stone tavern at Somerfield. He was an old-line 
whig and took an active part in local politics, 
although he never held nor aspired to office. 

I\Ir. Endsley's maternal grandmother was a 
sister of Judge Jeremiah S. Black's mother, 
being the youngest and eldest daughters, re- 
spectively, of Captain Sullivan. 

Andrew J. Endsley, the father of Henry .S. 
Endsley, was born in Januar)-, 1824, at Tom- 
linson, a town in Mar}'land, on the old Na- 
tional road, where hi.s father lived for a short 
time prior to locating at Somerfield. He now 
lives in the town of Somerset. He was edu- 
cated at .Allegheny college, Pennsylvania, and 
being ordained to the ministry of the Metho- 
tlist Episcopal church followed this profession 
in the Pittsburg and East Ohio conferences 
a number of years, having been stationed in 
Pittsburg, Allegheny, Canton, Ohio, Joiins- 
town and other places. He is a man of un- 
usual ability and of acknowledged force and 
influence in the church and in society. 

He marrietl the mother of our suiiject at 
Somerfield, Somerset county, of which place 
she was a native. Their family consisted of 
eight children, three boys and five girls. 
Ilenr)- .S. Endsley was educated in the com- 
mon schools and the High school of Canton, 
Ohio; studied law with Gen. VV. H. Koontz, 
of Somerset, Pennsylvania ; was admitted to 
the bar of Somerset county, August 7, 1878, 
.ind pr.icticed in Somerset until April, 1S92, 
wiiin In- removed to Johnstown, Pcnn.sylvania, 
at \vhi( li time he became assistant solicitor for 
the Cambria Ir(in comiiany, and also practices 
generally in Cambria and Somerset counties. 



Politically he is a republican, taking an active 
interest in the affairs of his party, and per- 
forming creditably the duties of a loyal 
citizen. 

In April, 1880, he married Ida Margaret 
Hay, a daughter of Frank W. Hay, deceased, 
of Johnstown, and to this union have been 
born three daughters — Eliza, Catharine and 
Margaret. Mr. Endsley performs his duties 
as an attorney with a fidelity and an evidence 
of strong capacit}', which have gained for him 
lii"h esteem. 



HEKl 
ra 



MJEHT H. WE.WER, Assistant Gene- 
ral Manager of the Cambria Iron Com- 
pany, is a son of Samuel E. and Louisa 
(Donini) Weaver, and was born in Dixon, 
Illinois, January i, 1859. 

His ancestors were natives of New Eng- 
land, whence they emigrated to the Genesee 
valley. New York. From there they went to 
Northwestern Pennsylvania. Henry Weaver, 
grandfather of our subject, settled in North- 
western Pennsylvania, where the father 01 
Herbert II. Weaver was born, in the upper 
valley of the Allegheny, probably in Arm- 
strong county, near Kittanning. He went 
west for a time, but in i860 moved to Johns- 
town, dying there in 1893. He was for many 
years assistant superintendent of Wood, Mor- 
rell & Co.'s store, latterl}- merged into the 
Penn Traffic company. 

The mother of Mr. Weaver was born in 
1837, near Berlin, Somerset county. She is 
the daughter of Casper Domni, a native of 
Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, who emigrated 
to America in 1825 and located near Berlin, 
where he lived until 1874, when he located 
permanent!}' in Johnstown, having lived there 
also some prior to that period. He died 
in Johnstown in 1891, aged eighty-six years. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



57 



His avocation was that of a contractor and 
builder. Mr. Weaver has one brother and 
one sister Hving ; Walter S., who is chief 
time-clerk for the Cambria Iron company, 
and Lulu M., wife of M. G. Moore, who is 
employed as a mining engineer by the Cam- 
bria Iron company. Another brother, Frank 
R., died in 1880 at the age of seventeen. 

On September 23, 1884, he married Jennie 
Nitterauer, a daughter of Rev. Cornelius 
Nitterauer, of Ohio, a minister of the Lutheran 
church, and who was located at Blairsville, 
Pennsylvania, at the time of his death. The 
family of Mr. Weaver, as is shown by this 
sketch, is composed of prosperous, intelligent 
people. He has three children: Louisa D., born 
July 4, 1885; Frank R., born November 28 
1887; and Alan M., born September 15, 1891. 

He was educated in the public schools of 
Johnstown, and passed his examination for 
the high school at the age of fourteen, an 
evidence of the possession of industrious 
habits and unusual ability. Being ambitious to 
begin a business career, he took a position with 
the Cambria Iron company in 1873 as an office 
boy. He had in him the elements of success, 
and consequently rose steadily. In 1876 he 
was made a clerk in the general office ; in 1877 
he became assistant cashier; in 1883 assumed 
general duties in connection with the order 
department; in 18S9 he was given the very 
responsible position which he now holds, and 
which includes the supervision of the clerical 
forces of the Company. In the absence of the 
general manager he acts with full authority, 
his position being as stated in the beginning, 
that of assistant general manager. Mr. 
Weaver, although a prominent man, and one 
who could command good support, has never 
been an office-seeker. 

In 1880 he joined company H, Fifth regi- 



ment, National guards of Pennsylvania, and in 
this capacity, too, received deserved promo- 
tions, being first raised from a private to the 
position of first lieutenant of the company, 
later was made adjutant of the regiment, and 
finally became an aid on the staff of Governor 
James A. Beaven being on his staff until 
January, 1885, when he withdrew from the 
service. 



TOHX FEXLON, ESQ., the nestor of the 
Cambria county bar, is a son of James 
and Catherine (MacDonald) Fenlon, and was 
born in Ireland in 18 16. About 1834 he emi- 
grated to this country, and for a short time 
located in Philadelphia, where he was em- 
ployed by Robert Towland, a wholesale mer- 
chant of that place. At a later date he re- 
moved to Ebensburg, this county, and after 
remaining here six months, he removed to 
Indiana, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, where 
he entered the law office of Judge Thomas 
White, a distinguished attorney of that 
place, afterwards judge of the Tenth Judicial 
district of Pennsylvania. On finishing the 
study of law under this able preceptor, he 
was admitted to the Indiana county bar in 

1837- 

Immediately after his admission to the In- 
diana bar, he came to Ebensburg and was ad- 
mitted to the Cambria county bar, where he 
has since practiced his profession. Politically 
he was reared a whig, but became a democrat 
during the campaign that resulted in the elec- 
tion of James Buchanan for President, for 
which candidate he voted. In 1S48 he was 
elected to the Pennsylvania legislature on the 
Whig ticket, but at the end of that time re- 
tired from political life until 1S79, when, be- 
cause of an issue involving an effort to remove 
the county seat to Johnstown, he was per- 



58 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



suaded to again stand as a candidate for elec- 
tion to the legislature. He was elected and 
served until 1882. In addition to this he has 
served his borough in the capacity of council- 
man and later as burgess. 

Mr. Fenlon married Miss Catherine R. 
Myers, of I'ittsburg, Pennsylvania, and this 
union has been blessed in the birth of the 
following children : John M., who is at 
present in the city of New Orleans, Louisi- 
ana ; Harry E., of Bellefonte, Pennsylvania ; 
Paul B., of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Philip 
G. and Catherine, the wife of Celestine 
Rlair, of Ebensburg ; Rose C. and Grace M. 
Philip G. Fenlon, postmaster at Ebensburg, 
this county, was born June 15, 1867, in 
Ebensburg, Cambria county, and received his 
early education in the scliools ot that county. 
He learned the trade of a printer in the 
office of the Cavibria Frcciiian ; after serving 
his apprenticeship he worked at his trade for 
two years, when he accepted a position in the 
register and recorder's office under Celestine 
Blair as deputy register anil recorder. He 
remained in this position four years. In 1893 
he was appointed postmaster of Ebensburg, 
which position he how holils. He has al- 
ways affiliated with the Democratic party. 

Mr. Fenlon is a member of the Improved 
Order of Heptasophs. 

e> 

/^I! \M>IKI{S I.. DICK, deceased, was a 
man remarkable in many ways. By 
profession he was a lawyer, and as a general 
practitioner he was very successful. He was 
born at Mt. Plea.sant, Pcnn.sylvania, June 20, 
1856, and was the only son of Rev. William 
and Virginia (Caldwell) Dick. Rev. Dick 
was a noted minister in the United Brethren 
church, and at tlie close of the war, in which 
lie earned the affectionate title of "Captain 



Billy," he became pastor of the United Breth- 
ren church at Greensburg, Westmoreland 
county, Pcnn.sylvania. In 1868, with his fam- 
ily he removed to Johnstown, where he built 
the well-known stone church of that denom- 
ination and became its pastor. Rev. Dick 
died in 1 87 1. His chiklreii are: Mrs. A. P. 
Shupe, Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania; Mrs. 
Samuel Coombs, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania ; 
Mrs. Amos Graham, of Kearney, Nebraska, 
and Chalmers L. 

Chalmers L. Dick received his early educa- 
tion in the common schools, and after gradu- 
ating from the High school took a course at 
the Otterbein University of Ohio ; being thus 
well equipped, he entered the law office of 
Judge James Potts, of Johnstown, and com- 
pleted his study of law in the office of Horace 
Rose. In 1S78 he passed a brilliant examina- 
tion and was admitted to the Cambria county 
bar. His thorough knowledge of the law 
excited the admiration of all and brought him 
a large clientage. Although young, he was 
one of the leaders of the Cambria county bar, 
and was resident solicitor for the Pennsylvania 
railroad for many \'ears. He was for many 
years one of the most influential Republican 
jioliticians of Cambria count}-, and in 1888 
was elected burgess of Johnstown. He also 
served as a delegate to many state and 
national conventions. As a political speaker 
he gained much prominence, and his personal 
participation in a campaign won much for the 
cause he espoused. Mr. Dick was probably 
the best all-around sportsman in western 
Pennsylvania, antl for ten years was a mem- 
ber of the Western Penns\K-,inia .Sportsmen's 
association ; he was also an original member 
of tlu- llciron llill Ciun club, was prominent 
in Masonic circles, and was a member of the 
Vigilant Fire company of Johnstown. In the 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



59 



darkest hours following the flood of 1889 he 
was one of the first to take steps looking to 
relief, and to his unselfish work and indom- 
itable will is due the beginning of what 
eventually brought order out of chaos. 

In 1888 he married Miss Mary Wagoner, 
daughter of the late Dr. George Wagoner, 
and to this marriage were born three chil- 
dren : Virginia, Florence, and Helen. 

Nature was to a marked degree kind to Mr. 
Dick, endowing him with her choicest gifts of 
mind and body. The possessor of many fine 
qualities of heart and mind, he was to all who 
knew him, the rich and poor alike, a kind 
friend, a wise counsellor, and a helper in time 
of need. In his profession he was eloquent, 
forcible, and strong with juries, and much of 
his success was due to his intimate acquaint- 
ance with the people of all classes. 



1r\R- SAMUEL M. SWAN. Shortly before 
our Revolutionary war, a Scotchman by 
the name Swan, left his bonnie country to come 
to America. This Scotchman was the grand- 
father of Dr. Samuel M. Swan, of Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania, a prominent citizen and physi- 
cian of high worth. In America, the grand- 
father of Dr. Swan lived in New York city for 
a short time. From there he removed to the 
Bermudas, where, on the beautiful little island 
of St. Domiiiico, Samuel Swan, father of Dr. 
Swan, was born. 

In 1799 the family returned to Scotland, 
where they remained for twenty years. At 
the expiration of that time they came back to 
America and settled in Philadelphia. Samuel 
Swan emigrated to the Ligonier valley, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, probably 
about 1824. 

He was a member of the Presbyterian 
church, and a man of influence and scholarly 



habits. He had the unusual advantage of 
obtaining his literary education in Scotland, 
where there are not only "grand scholars," 
but many a man that has the " richt sough." 

Rev. Swan received his theological training 
at the Princeton Theological seminary, and 
after being ordained to the ministry, was 
called to take charge of a number of churches 
in the Ligonier valley. In 1842 he came to 
Johnstown, at which place he was pastor of 
the Presbyterian church for ten years. After- 
wards he had charge of a church at Armagh, 
Indiana county, for four years. Then, going 
to De Kalb county, Illinois, he served as a 
missionary for a number of years, and until 
he became superannuated. 

In 1877 Rev. Samuel Swan died in Blairs- 
ville, Indiana county, where he had been living 
for a short time before his death. 

The mother of Dr. Swan was a descendant 
of one of the oldest and best families of Ligno- 
nier valley. Her father, Samuel Moorhead, 
for a long time justice of the peace in the 
county, was a prominent and reliable man, 
of fine judgment and sturdy attainments. 
Thus it will be seen that Dr. Swan at his birth 
came into an invaluable inheritance, an inherit- 
ance which only an ancestry possessed of 
moral and intellectual worth can bequeath. 
In addition, he was carefully educated. He 
prepared for his college course at the Elders 
Ridge academy, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, 
and graduated from Cannonsburg college, 
Washington county, in 1851. He began the 
study of medicine with Dr. C. .Sheridan of 
Johnstown, and then attended the Jefferson 
Medical college of Philadelphia, from which 
college he was graduated in 1854. After 
graduating, he practiced for one year with Dr. 
Thomas St. Clair, of Indiana county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Then, going next to De Kalb county. 



60 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



Illinois, he continued the practice of his pro- 
fession with eminent success until 1862. At 
this time the Civil War was in progress, and 
being filled with patriotic zeal, he joined the 
Twelfth regiment of the Illinois infantry in the 
capacity of assistant surgeon. For two years 
he discharged the duties of this office with an 
efficiency and earnestness which gained for 
him a promotion to the surgeoncy of the One 
Hundred and Eleventh regiment of Illinois 
infantry. He remained with this regiment 
as surgeon until it was mustered out in 
1865. 

After the war Dr. Swan returned to Johns- 
town and entered into a professional partner- 
ship with his old preceptor, Dr. Sheridan, 
which lasted for ten years. Since that time 
he has practiced by himself and in the per- 
formance of his professional duties has been to 
his patients a benefactor and a kind friend. 

Dr. Swan married Elizabeth A. Collins, 
daughter of Thomas Collins. Collins M., a 
son, born December i, 1874, now a pupil in 
the Johnstown high school, is the only child 
of this union. 

The circumstances of Dr. .Swan's life have 
amply attested to his genuine and fruitful 
ability. His associates in the medical profes- 
sion have accorded him signal honors. He 
has served as president of the Cambria County 
Medical society, is a member of the .State 
Medical society of Pennsylvania, .md has been 
a delegate to its meetings twice, once when it 
was held at Philadelphia and once at Bedford 
Springs. He was also a delegate to the 
American Medical association at one of its 
meetings in Washington and at one in Phila- 
delphia. In addition to these honorable and 
responsible positions which he has held in the 
associations of Iiis profession, Dr. Swan served, 
during the administration of President Arthur, 



as a member of the pension examining board 
of Cambria county. 

He is a member of Cambria lodge of 
Masons, No. 228, and of P'mory Fisher Post 
No. 30, G. A. R., at Johnstown. 

The Scotchman has " gude buid," an uni- 
versal and long-established belief Nothing 
in the life of this descendant of a Scotchman 
will disturb it. 



O' C. KEAM. — The early ancestors bear- 
• ing the name Ream came from Ger- 
many and settled in Cambria county, where 
Samuel Ream, the grandfather of our subject, 
was born. He followed the blacksmith trade, 
in connection with his farming pursuits up 
until the time of his death. 

Elias Ream, father of our subject, was born 
in Conemaugh township, near Johnstown, 
Cambria county, Pennsylvania, in 1 82 1. 

His education was very limited, being 
secured in the district schools of his day. 
The facilities for securing much education 
were denied him. When quite young he 
entered his father's smithshop, where he sub- 
sequently learned the trade and followed it 
continuously up until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1873, he having spent the entire 
fifty-two years of his life in Cambria county. 

The Reams of which he was a descendant 
were among the earliest of Cambria count)''s 
settlers, and helped to make the countv what 
it is to-daj'. 

He was an active man politically, at first a 
whig and then a republican. He served as 
school director several terms, as well as hav- 
ing filled other local offices. 

Religiously he was an active member and 
earnest worker in the German Baptist church. 

i\Ir. Ream was married three times and was 
the father of twent\'-one children, all of whom 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



61 



are dead except nine — five boys and four 
girls. 

S. C. Ream, our subject, was born in Rich- 
land township, now Adams township, Cam- 
bria county, Pennsylvania, January i8, 1853. 

His entire education was received in pub- 
lic schools which he attended during the 
winter months. At an early age he entered 
the blacksmith shop of his father, where 
he learned the trade ; he followed th&t 
trade for ten years, when he abandoned it 
to accept a position as clerk in the store of 
the Swank Hardware company, Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania. He remained in their employ 
about one year, when he formed a co-part- 
nership and engaged in the meal and feed 
business. This he followed but a short time 
under this partnership, when he purchased 
the interest of his partner and ran it about 
three months, when he sold out, and shortly 
afterwards engaged in a general mercantile 
business, starting on a very small scale in a 
building on Bedford street, Johnstown. By 
strict attention to business he soon built up 
a good trade, and as his business increased 
he added to his stock and soon found his 
quarters too small to accommodate his grow- 
ing business; so in 1892 he erected his pres- 
ent large and spacious store at the corner of 
Fronheiser and Cedar streets, his store proper 
being thirty by eighty feet, it being one of the 
largest general stores in the city of Johns- 
town, and his stock comprises everything 
found in general mercantile house. In con- 
nection with the general store he has a 
warehouse where he carries grain, feed and 
hay. 

He has been universally successful and en- 
joys a large trade. While Mr. Ream's time 
is principally occupied in managing his store, 
he is also identified as director in the Morrell- 



ville Water company and interested in the 
Johnstown Telephone company. 

Politically he is identified with the Repub- 
lican party, and always takes an interest in 
the success of the same. In 1895 he was 
elected to represent the Seventh ward in com- 
mon council for a term of two years, which 
office he now holds. Mr. Ream is a member 
of the United Evangelical church, and takes 
great interest in the work of the same. He has 
served at different times in nearly all the of- 
fices pertaining to it, and at present is one of 
the trustees and the superintendent of the 
Sunday-school. 

In 1876 Mr. Ream was united in marriage 
to Mary J. Granling, daughter of George 
Granling, of Richland township, then Adams 
township, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, who 
died March 23, 1896. This union was blessed 
by the birth of twins, Clara Belle and Ida 
May, born June 10, 1877, both of whom are 
at home with their father. 

Mr. Ream's career has been one of con- 
tinued success, notwithstanding the many ob- 
stacles he has had to overcome in early life. 
By his thrift, perseverance and honesty he has 
succeeded in climbing the business ladder 
until he stands high in his particular line in 
the county of Cambria. 

His life's work is another illustration of 
what can be obtained by perseveringly keeping 
alive and up to the times. 



jOLAIR AXEXANDEK, a leading citizen 
^ and business man of Conemaugh, Cam- 
bria county, Pennsylvania, and a son of Wil- 
liam and Clarissa J. (Lee) Alexander, was born 
January i, 1857, at Duncansville, Blair county, 
Pennsylvania. His ancestors were among the 
distinguished people of early colonial times. 
James Alexander, his grandfather, was a 



62 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



descendant of the Alexanders that came to 
America shortly after the second Mayflower 
fleet. They were of Scotch-Irish extraction, 
and were among the early settlers of Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania, having removed thither 
from the north of Ireland to New England, 
thence to Franklin county; thus were they 
peculiarly fortunate both in their race and en- 
vironment ; a Scotch-Irish people in a New 
England atmosphere is a felicitous combina- 
tion. 

James Alexander was born near Fahnetts- 
burg, Franklin county. He married Mar- 
garet Ilolliday, a niece of Adam and Wil- 
liam HoUiday, the founders of Hollidaysburg, 
and a daughter of Samuel Ilolliday. Mr. 
Alexander was a soldier of the War of 1812, 
and served at Lundy's Lane and Niagara. 
His marriage occurred in 18 17, at Dr)' Run, 
in Path Valley, Franklin county, and he im- 
mediately afterward came to I51air count)-, 
locating three miles from Hollidaysburg, and 
followed the occupation of a farmer; he died 
there, on the old Alexander homestead, near 
Duncansville, Blair county. 

The father of our subject was born on the 
Alexander homestead in 1827, and died June 
9, 1869, at Conemaugh, Penn.sylvania. He 
was a clear-headed, thoughtful man, a great 
reader, and mainly self-educated. He came 
to Conemaugh valley in 1 858, and followed 
the avocation of a merciiant, first at Duncans- 
ville, and then at Conemaugh, until within two 
years of the time of his death, i le was a 
whig in politics, later a republican, but never 
sought office, although, because of the im- 
plicit confidence placed in him by the people, 
lie was fretiuently solicited to become a candi- 
date. In religion he was a Presbyterian, being 
a leading member and a deacon in that body. 
He w.is an enterprising man, too, and pos- 



sessed a sagacity in business matters which 
enabled him to acquire an ample competencj' 
for his old age. 

Among his brothers and sisters, eleven in 
number, are the following: Margaret, born at 
Duncansville in 1818; John H., born in 1820, 
and now living in Davenport, Iowa; Ann M., 
born in 1822; James and Mary (twins), born 
in 1829 or 30; Temple, born in 1831, and 
Charlotte. One died in youth. 

The father of Blair Alexander married 
and had a family of four children: Blair; 
Anna L., wife of Mr. Billingham, a master 
mechanic in the employ of the Baltimore and 
Ohio railroad, at Garrett, Indiana; William 
A., a locomotive engineer, who died February, 
1891; Clarissa J, wife of A. B. Hutchinson, 
agent of the Pennsylvania Railroad compaii}' 
at Fairchance, Pennsylvania. 

The grandfather of Mr. Alexander on the 
maternal side was Ezra Lee, a native of Herki- 
mer county. New York, and a son of Walter 
Lee, a native of Connecticut, who was an 
early settler of Herkimer county. Ezra Lee 
was connected in blood with the famous Lee 
family of Virginia, a very high distinction. 
His wife was Ann W. Harvey, a daughter of 
Benjamin Harvey, who died at the age of one 
hundred and thirteen, and who preached until 
he was one hundred and eleven. Ezra Lee 
dictl in Herkimer county. New York, in 1S84. 

His family consisted of the following child- 
ren : Frank Hutchinson, Minnesota; James, 
of Utica, New York ; the mother of our sub- 
ject ; Ezra, who died young ; William, who 
was killed at Mobile, Alabama, during the late 
war ; Albert, who was wounded at the battle 
of the Wilderness, and died in Conemaugh 
from the effects in 1866. At Conemaugh the 
mother of Mr. Alexander was married the 
seconii time, in 1878, to Robert Niz, now 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



63 



superintendent of construction and general 
foreman of the Johnson company, at Lorain, 
Ohio. He was connected with the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad company for twenty-seven 
years in various capacities ; was a burgess of 
the borough of East Conemaugh, and a pro- 
minent and active citizen. 

Our subject was educated in the public 
schools and at the Glade Run academy, Arm- 
strong county, attending the latter school one 
term. He learned telegraphy, and worked at 
intervals for about seven years in the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad office at Conemaugh, and for 
one year in the main office at Pittsburg. He 
taught school two terms, and in 1886 em- 
barked in the grocery and confectionery bus- 
iness at Conemaugh. He is a member of the 
Juinor Order United American Mechanics, at 
Conemaugh ; is treasurer of the Conemaugh 
Building and Loan association; and was one 
of the organizers of the Conemaugh and 
Franklin Water company. He is a presby- 
terian and a republican ; is at present a justice 
of the peace, and has held other local offices. 

Our subject has many causes for self-gratu- 
lation. He has the characteristics of a good 
race ; his ancestry embraces historic names ; 
he has within himself those qualities which 
bring success and give to a man an enviable 
reputation among his fellow-creatures. 



JOHN S. WICKS, one of the public-spirited 
and progressive business men of South 
Fork, is a son of Thomas H. and Maria 
(Soady) Wicks, and was born in Cornwall, in 
the southwestern part of England, December 
27, 1856. 

The Wicks are a very old English family, 
who trace their ancestry back, in the history 
of England, over nine hundred years, to the 
time of the Danes and their struggles to con- 



quer the Saxons. The Wicks family, in all prob- 
ability, located first in Wales and then removed 
south into Cornwall, where they have had 
their ancestral home for untold generations. 
Members of the family were doubtless at the 
battle of Hastings, took part in tlie Crusades 
and fought in the war of the Roses. They 
were under Elizabeth, the Stuarts, Cromwell 
and Orange, and finally, in the opening of the 
eighteenth century, came under the rule of 
the present House of Brunswick. 

John Wicks, the paternal grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch, was a tin miner, a trade 
which had been followed by his ancestors 
back as far as any authentic history can be 
obtained of them. John Wicks married, 
and four of his five sons came to America — 
Alfred, dying in England ; John Wicks, Jr., 
the eldest son, who was a miner, landed in 
this country after a voyage of sixty-four days, 
on the " Good Intent," and went to Michigan, 
where he became a boss in the copper mines, 
and, after discovering the great Chapin copper 
ore mine, settled at Iron mountain, at which 
place he is now serving as justice of the peace. 
William Wicks, upon coming to America, 
first settled at Ontonagon, on Lake Superior, 
in the extreme north of Michigan, but soon 
removed to South Carolina, where he married 
and reared a family, and was killed in a mine 
when he was fifty years of age. Joseph Wicks, 
the third son, made two trips to this country 
before settling, which he did first in New 
Jersey, and then at Johnstown, which he left 
in 1 88 1, to come to South Fork, where he 
owns property, and is superintendent of A. J. 
Hawes' fire-clay mines. Thomas H. Wicks, 
the youngest son, never came to America. 
He was born in Hayler, county of Cornwall, 
England, and died in that country August 24, 
1889, aged sixty-five years. He was a tin 



G4 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CVCLOPEDIA 



miner in early life, and afterwards was in the 
employ of the Great Western Railroad com- 
pany of England. He was a member of the 
VVeslej'an Methodist church, and married 
Maria Soady, daughter of John Soady, of his 
native country. Their children were : Edwin, 
who has been in this country for eighteen 
years, and in 1883 was the only one of ten 
miners who were precipitated one hundred 
and twenty-five feet by a Michigan mine cave- 
in, that was taken out alive; John S., subject; 
Thomas, a resident of South Fork since 1882, 
where he has been engaged in mining ever 
since; Rev. Alfred, pastor of the Chadwick 
Methodist church, of Illinois; William H., 
and Rutland, who are printers by trade and 
have been in Pennsylvania since 1889 ; Bertha, 
Annie and Herbert, who still reside in Corn- 
wall, P^ngland, witli tlu-ir mother. 

John S. Wicks attended the public schools 
of Cornwall, and at an early age entered the 
mines with his father, working there until he 
was seventeen years of age. He then served 
for seven years as a fireman on the Great 
Western railroad of England, his last run 
being between Exeter and London. Leaving 
England at twenty-four years of age, became 
to New York city and soon went to Iron 
mountain, Michigan, where he served as de- 
partment engineer at the mines until 1883, 
when he came to .South I'ork anil entered the 
employ of the Argyle Coal company, with 
whom he remained up till 1887. In that 
year Mr. Wicks engaged in the music busi- 
ness, wiiich he has follnwcd profitably ever 
since. His establishment is on the corner of 
Argyle and Grant streets, and he carries a 
large and well-assorted stock of pianos, or- 
gans, bicycles and sewing machines. Within 
the last two years he has opened a clothing 
and gentlemen's furnishing department on the 



second floor, and his usual success has ac- 
companied him in that line, where he has al- 
ready established a good business. He is a 
[jleasant, agreeable and well-informed man of 
excellent business qualifications. 

On November 11, 1886, Mr. Wicks married 
Sadie E. Pringle, daughter of Philip W. Prin- 
gle, of Pringle Hill, this county. Their union 
has been blessed with six children : Annie, 
Victor John, Juniata Hope, Carrie, Leon, 
and William Lowell. 

Intelligent, active and energetic, John S. 
Wicks has already made his mark at South 
Fork, where he is useful along several lines. 
He is a member and treasurer of Cone- 
maugh Valley Conclave, No. 388, Improved 
Order of Heptasophs, and a member, trustee 
and organist, for twelve years, of South Fork 
Methodist Episcopal church, of whose Sun- 
day-school he has been superintendent for the 
last three terms. 

In the sphere of political life, he is a staunch 
republican, and enjoys public confidence as 
well as commanding party support. He was 
elected as justice of the peace in i89i,and two 
years later received a further mark of political 
and civil preferment at the hands of his fellow- 
citizens by being elected burgess of South 

Fork. 

& 

T.VCOn C. 3ll'UPHY, an active and pro- 
^ gressive business man of South Fork, is 
one of that class of men who are remarkable 
for energy, enterprise, and fine organizing 
ability. He is a son of Daniel and Caroline 
(Reighard) Murphy, and was born on the 
Frankstown road, in Adams township, Cam- 
bria county, Pennsylvania, May 6, 1854. Five 
generations back his paternal great-grand- 
father, Conrad Murphy, a native of Ireland, 
married in that country a Scotch woman by 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



65 



whom he had a son named John Murphy, ' 
who was one of the pioneer settlers and early 
farmers of Richland township, this county. 
This John Murphy was a man of marked 
individuality, being widely noted for gen- 
erosity, hospitality, and benevolence, and of 
whom it was said that the indigent never ap- 
plied to him in vain. He was also a man of 
courage and enterprise, and made two trips to 
California during the early gold excitement in 
that state, where dangers at that time threat- 
ened the adventurer on every side. 

He was a member of the Lutheran Church, 
and a whig and republican in politics, and had 
served as constable of his township. He died 
in 1858, aged sixty years. John Murphy 
married Mary Bouser, of German descent, and 
by whom he had twelve children, four sons 
and eight daughters. The third in order of 
age of their children was Daniel Murphy, the 
father of the subject of this sketch. Daniel 
Murphy was born on his father's Richland 
township farm in 1828. He followed farming 
for many years in that township, but lately 
removed to South Fork, which he is now 
making the place of his residence. He is a 
veteran soldier of the late Civil War, enlisting 
at Johnstown, in 1862, in company I, Fifty- 
fourth Pennsylvania infantry, and serving 
until 1865, when he was honorably dis- 
charged at the close of the war. He was in 
several engagements and numerous skirm- 
ishes, and received a wound at the battle of 
New Market. Mr. Murphy is a republican in 
politics, and has been a member for several 
years of Daniel Stineman Post, No. 560, Grand 
Army of the Republic, of South Fork. 

In 185 1 Mr. Murphy married Caroline 

Reighard, who is a daughter of Jacob Reig- 

hard, of Adams township. To their union 

were born six children, four sons and two 

5 



daughters: Edward^ now deceased; Hiram, 
deceased; Susan, married George Wilt, and 
is now dead ; Noah, engaged in the general 
mercantile business at South Fork, and Em- 
ma, wife of T. J. Wilt, a shoe merchant of 
South Fork. 

Jacob C. Murphy spent his boyhood days 
on the farm, where numerous duties and 
varied labors were the lot of the farmers' sons 
of that day when our present and labor- 
saving machinery was not in existence. He 
attended the common schools until he was 
seventeen years of age, and then left the 
school and farm to become a brakeman on 
the Pennsylvania railroad. After four years 
of the life of a brakeman he turned his atten- 
tion to carpentering, and for several years 
divided his time between working at his trade 
in summer and working in the coal mines 
in winter. Leaving the work-bench and the 
mine in 1882, he went into contracting and 
building at South Fork, where two years later 
he formed a partnership with George B. Stine- 
man in that line of work, and built a large 
planing-mill, which the great flood of 1889 
swept away. After the flood-wreckage had 
been somewhat cleaned up business life re- 
vived in the valley, and among the first to 
recover from the terrible shock, with his 
accustomed energy, he prepared to resume 
business. He bought out Mr. Stineman's 
interest, erected a new mill, and in a short 
time was doing a good business, which has 
gradually increased up to the present time. 

On April 22, 1877, Mr. Murphy was united 
in marriage with Rebecca Finley, who is a 
daughter of James Finley, of Indiana county. 
In politics Mr. Murphy has always been 
identified with the Republican party. In 
recognition of his business and mechanical 
ability in 1885 he was made superintendent 



(iO 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



of the South Fork water-works, in whose 
construction he took an active part. In his 
own line of work he docs a good business, 
iiaving about all the contracting and building 
at South I^'ork, besides having many orders 
and contracts from a distance to fill. His 
planing-niill is a first-class building of its 
kind, being 32 by 60 feet in dimensions, and 
two stories high. His plant is located in the 
western part of South Fork, and gives steady 
employment to about fifteen men. At the 
present time he furnishes from his mill and 
yards lime, brick, lumber, and all other house- 
building supplies. 

Mr. Murphy is in the very matured prime 
of life, and has before him a long and promis- 
ing business career, if past energy and enter- 
prise are to be accepted as manifestations of 
future success. 



TOHN T. TvONG, an enterprising contractor 
and builder and manufacturer of build- 
ing supplies, of Summerhill, this county, is a 
son of Joseph and Barbara (Schwab) Long, and 
was born in Cambria township, this county, 
in 1848. 

Joseph Long, grandfather, was a native of 
.Switzerland, where he learned the trade of a 
tailor. In 1812, seeking a wider field for his 
labors, he, with his wife and four sons, emigra- 
ted to the United .States, locating for a short 
time in the cit)' of Philadelphia, where he fol- 
lowed liis trade. The tide of emigration at 
this time being westward and as there were no 
railroads, lie purchased a horse and cart and 
packing his limited belongings, made an over- 
land trip from that city to Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania. While making the trip, he was 
put til the necessity of working wlierever work 
could be found, to secure tiie necessary means 
with which to defray the expenses of the tiip. 



He located in the town of Somerset, where he 
resided about two years, and then came to 
Johnstown, where, with his small accumula- 
tions, he purchased property and remained 
about six months. He then purchased a tract 
of land on the border line of Cambria and 
Summerhill townships, in 1818, moved upon it 
and lived there the remainder of his life, dying 
February 22, 1852, at the age of seventy-five 
years. He became naturalized in 1820, and 
at once identified himself with the old-time 
Whig party. 

He was justly entitled to rank as one of the 
very first pioneer settlers of the county, set- 
tling where he died at a time when it was a 
dense wilderness he served on the first jury 
that ever tried a criminal case in Cambria 
county. He was a man of considerable genius, 
possessed more than ordinary musical talent ; 
was a composer of music and sang in the 
Loretto church choir. He had married before 
coming to this countrj', and was the father of 
four sons: John, deceased; Joseph, father; 
Anthony, deceased, and Peter, deceased. 

Joseph Long, father, was born in Switzer- 
land, December 14, 1808, and died on his farm 
in Cambria township, November 3, 18S3. At 
the time of his death he resided on the old 
Long homestead, where he had lived since 
1 81 8. As a farmer, he was industrious and 
successful anil accunnilatei,! a very handsome 
competency before his death. 

He married Miss Barbara Schwab, a native 
of Baden, Germany, and to this marital rela- 
tion were born three sons and four daughters, 
as follows: Peter, a farmer on the old home- 
stead; Joseph, a farmer of Croyle township; 
Maria, wife of Peter .Stritmatter, of Carroll 
township ; H.irb.uM, wile of Paul Vahner, a 
firmer antl justice of the peace of Klder town- 
ship ; Christina, deceased, was the wife of 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



67 



Charles Anna, of Carrolltown ; Helena, de- 
ceased, was the wife of Jacob Yahner, of 
Elder township, and John T., the subject of 
this sketch. 

John T. Long was reared on his father's 
farm, received his education in the common 
schools and remained on the paternal acres ', 
until nineteen years of age, when he appren- 
ticed himself to learn the trade of a carpenter. 
After learning his trade he followed journey- 
work throughout the west in the states of 
Ohio and Illinois, and at the time of the 
Chicago fire, in 1871, was in that city, and 
remained there until the following March, 
when he returned to Cambria county. He 
soon afterwards located at Summerhill and 
engaged in contracting and building. In 1877 
he built a planing mill, which was then oper- 
ated by means of water-power and on a small 
scale. 

His business prospering, in 1886, he en- 
larged the mill and changed it to a steam- 
power plant and began the manufacture of all 
kinds of building material. His business con- 
tinued to grow and e.xpand, and it was neces- 
sary for him to increase his facilities from time 
to time until he now has a plant worth at least 
;g 10,000, and does a business of from $30,000 
to $50,000 per year. 

Politically, Mr. Long is a democrat who 
believes in a Jacksonian enforcement of Jeffer- 
sonian principles. Recognizing his reputation 
for good judgment and strict integrity and 
probity of character, the people of his borough 
have elected him justice of the peace for a 
period of four successive terms, and as the 
first burgess of the borough. 

November 12, 1872, he married Miss Mary 
Stritmatter, daughter of Andrew Stritmatter, 
of Carroll township, and two children have 
blessed this union: Amelia and Bennett. 



TOSIAH T. EVA^S, mine inspector for the 
Sixth Bituminous Coal district of the 
State of Pennsylvania, is a son of Henry D. 
and Ann Lovett Evans, and was born in Pitts- 
burg, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, July 
24, 1848. 

His paternal grandfather, Josiah Evans, was 
a native of Carmarthenshire, Wales, but moved 
to Merthyr Tydvil, Glanmorganshire. His 
father, Henry D. Evans, was a native of that 
place, born April, 1812, but at the age of 
twenty-eight, in 1840, emigrated to America. 
He obtained a good elementary education in 
the schools of his native country, which he 
further improved and broadened by an exten- 
sive course of general reading. Naturally of 
a literary bent of mind, he contributed many 
articles to the press in the "Welsh language, 
which were ably written and widely read. 

Soon after landing in this country he located 
at Brownsville, on the beautiful and historic 
Monongahela river. Then he found employ- 
ment with his uncle, Edward Evans, who had 
preceded him, and who was engaged in opera- 
tin? a rollinp--mill. He remained there, how- 
ever, but a short time, about one year, when 
he removed to Pittsburgh, where he spent 
about ten years, thence to Dravosburg, near 
McKeesport, being engaged in mining, his 
avocation, the remainder of his life. In 1854 
he located at Johnstown, and died there June 
12, 1883. 

He was an old-line whig in politics in early 
life, but, upon the dismemberment of that party 
in 1856, he associated himself with the Repub- 
lican party, then in process of formation. 
Religiously, he was a baptist, and was one of 
the charter members of the Welsh Baptist 
church of Johnstown. He was kept in official 
position in the church organization all his life. 
A man of positive character, deep sympathy. 



as 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



and a true Christian, he did much for the 
cause of Christ, and the ultimate amelioration 
of mankind. He married Ann Lovett, who 
was also a native of Wales, born in the year 
1818, and passed away in the year 1883. A 
devout Christian, a loving and devoted mother, 
she was universally loved and lamented. The 
progeny of their union were seven children, 
five of whom died in infancy. Of the remain- 
ing two, Josiah T. is our subject, and Israel 
died in 1876. 

Mr. Evans attended the public schools of his 
day; but the essentials of his education — and 
he possessed a good business education — were 
acquired through self-study and experience 
in business. At the tender age of nine years 
he was employed in the mines, and continued 
a miner until thirty-four years of age. In 
1 88 1 he was employed by the Cambria Iron 
compan)' to make explorations in the Adiron- 
dack mountains for iron ore. Returning from 
the Adirondacks, he was made superintendent 
of the Woodvale mines, which supplied the 
Johnstown Manufacturing company. 

In 18S5 having, for the third time, success- 
full)' passed the required examination, he was 
appointed mine inspector for the Sixth Bitu- 
minous Coal district of Pennsylvania, which 
includes Cambria and parts of .Somerset and 
Indiana counties, and has since ably filled the 
position. Politically, he is a republican, and 
has always t.ikcn an active inteiest in the 
success of his party, lie was a canditlate for 
county treasurer in 1.S96; went into the con- 
vention with more delegates instructed for liim 
than ail)- other caiulidate, but he failed to se- 
cure a plurality. He is a member of the Bap- 
tist church, and has served that organization 
as trustee for about fifteen years. Fraternally, 
he is a MK-niber of Alma Lodge, No. 528, I. 
O. O. I"., and William I'. Packer Encamp- 



ment, No. 127; Cambria Lodge, No. 278, F. 
and A. M. ; Portage Chapter, No. 27, R. A. 
M. ; Orient Commandery, No. 61, K. T. 

Mr. Evans has been twice married. His 
first marriage was with Mary Ann Morgan, 
who bore him eight children : Annie May, 
Maggie M., Harry, William, Walter, Lake, 
Josiah and Ira. 

Mrs. Evans and four children, Maggie, Wal- 
ter, Lake and Ira, were lost in the Johnstown 
flood, which occurred on May 31, 1889, and 
which wrought such wonderful havoc and ter- 
rible destruction to life in the cit\- of Johns- 
town and the valley of the Coneniaugh. Jo- 
siah and Anna May had died prior to the 
flood ; hence but two of those children survive : 
William and Harry. 

Mr. Evans married for his second wife Miss 
Maggie Lewis, a daughter of David and Ann 
Lewis, of Johnstown. Two children bless this 
union : Lewis and Margaret. 

Mr. Evans is a pleasant and companionable 
gentleman, attends closely to the duties of his 
office, and is popular and well liked as an 
official. 

nEV. ALFRED LEAVIS KOWF,. the 
scholarly, eloquent and popular pastor 
of North and South Welsh Congregational 
churches of lihensburg, Pennsylvania, is a son 
of Thomas and Margaret (Lewis) Rowe, and 
was born in the parish of Margam, Glan- 
morganshire, South Wales, June 28, 1859. 

His father was a contractor in the coal mines 
of South Wales, but died when our subject 
was in childhood. Young Rowe was em- 
ployed in the mines until he was sixteen years 
of age. Quitting the mines in 1S75, he en- 
tered the Cardiff Grammar school under the 
supervision of the Welsh Congregational 
church (Ebenezer-Jon-y-pandy, South Wales), 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



69 



from which he was graduated in 1880. He 
had been preaching for three years prior to his 
entrance to Cardiff in 1875. Immediately 
after his graduation he received a unanimous 
call to the Welsh Congregational church at 
Fleurdelis, Monmouthshire, South Wales. 
He filled that pastorate for a period of two 
years, when he received a call from the Welsh 
• Congregational church, of Sherman, Ohio. 
Leaving his kindred and native land, he ar- 
rived in the United States May 13, 1882, and 
immediately proceeded to his new charge, 
where he labored earnestly and faithfully for 
two years and seven months. In January, 
1885, he wascalled to Siloam, Gallia county, 
Ohio, where he preached one year, when he 
was then called to Ixonia, Wisconsin, Decem- 
ber, 1885, where he remained one year. In 
February, 1887, he went to Cambria, same 
state, where he remained until July, 1890, 
when he went to Barneveld, Wisconsin, and 
remained there for three years, until October, 
1894. In that year he was called to the 
North and South Congregational churches of 
Ebensburg, Pennsylvania, where he has since 
labored effectively in the " vineyard of the 
divine Master." 

Rev. Rowe has been very successful in 
the ministry, and during his comparative 
brief ministerial labors has had more than 
five hundred accessions to his church. He is 
an active temperance worker, and in 1892 was 
elected district lecturer of the Sons of Tem- 
perance for Iowa county, Wisconsin, and filled 
that office with ability and satisfaction to all 
concerned. In 1891 he was madea life mem- 
ber of the New York Bible society, and also 
a member of the American Political and 
Social Science society. 

On December 18, 1884, Rev. Rowe and 
Miss Jane Davis, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 



i John P. Davis, of Sherman, Ohio, were uni- 
ted in the holy bonds of matrimony, and to 
their union have been born five children : 
Jenkin L., Milton S., Charlotte B., Talmage B. 
and Margaret R. 

A true Christian and an eloquent pulpit 
orator. Rev. Rowe has done much for the ad- 
vancement and up-building of the church of 

i God. 



JOHN T. HARRIS, an ex-alderman and 
ex-chief of police of Johnstown, and the 
present county detective of Cambria county, 
is a son of John J. and Jane (Thomas) Harris, 
and was born in Ystradgynlais, South Wales, 
March 29, 1843. He is one of a family of 

! twelve boys and one girl. Two besides him, 
Morgan and Louis, emigrated to this country 
in 1 86 1, and after saving sufficient money sent 
for his parents and the balance of the family. 
John T. Harris was a miner by occupation, 
and came of reputable ancestors in Wales, 
where the Harris family has reputation and 
existence stretching back for centuries into 
the past. Mr. John J. Harris came in 1863 to 
Johnstown, where he died August 3, 1880, 
aged sixty- four years and five months. His 
widow passed away January 17, 1889, at sixty- 
seven years of age. They were both mem- 
bers of the Methodist Calvinistic church, and 
two of their sons served in the Union service, 
Morgan in the navy, Louis in the heavy 
artillery. Both were in the service when 
their parents arrived in the country. 

John T. Harris was reared in Wales until 
his eighteenth year, and then, in 186 1, took 
passage on a sailing vessel, the " Resolute," 
Captain Freeman, which was forty-two days 

I in reaching the United States. After a short 
stay at New York city, he came to Johns- 
town, which has been his place of residence 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



ever since. lie received his education chiefly 
in the night schools of Wales and Johns- 
town, attending one three months' term of day 
school by means of money saved between his 
tenth and fifteenth years. He went to regular 
work at ten years of age, and after coming to 
Johnstown followed coal and ore mining for 
the Cambria Iron company for seven years. 
He was then, in 1868, placed on the police 
force of the city, and one year later, under 
Burgess Hon. W. H. Rose, was made chief of 
police, which position he held up to May 10, 
1890, when he was elected alderman in the 
First Ward for a term of five years At the 
expiration of his term as alderman, in 1895, 
he was commissioned as county detective, 
which position he is still holding. In his 
long experience of nearly thirty years with 
the law-breaking element of human society, 
but (cw criminals have eluded his grasp, and 
the city and county are indebted to him for 
the suppression and prevention of crime in a 
large degree within their boundaries. Mr. 
Harris for several years has been engaged in 
different business enterprises in connection 
with his official duties. He operates a collec- 
tion agency and real estate business, is a 
member of the Johnstown Electric Light 
company, Johnstown Telephone company, 
Johnstown Tri-County Agricultural and Driv- 
ing Park association, Johnstown Driving Park 
association, and holds honorary membership 
in the I'irst Assistance Fire company. He is 
a member of the Johnstown Lodge, No. 137, 
Knights of Honor, and has held membership 
for twenty-seven years in Alma Lodge, No. 
523, and Wm. F. Packer lincampmcnt, No. 
127, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
Mr, I I. n lis is ,ui cxaiuple of wli.il industry, 
energy, tact and shrewdness can accomplish 
in one or more lines of business. The great 



flood swept away over twenty-one thousand 
dollars' worth of property for him, and left 
him to commence life anew with a few shat- 
tered remnants of a fair competence. Mr. 
Harris is a stalwart republican, and his official 
life has brought him in contact with many 
people. He is acquainted with many promi- 
nent men of national reputation. 

On August 6, 1863, John T. Harris married 
Margaret Davis, of Onllwyn, South Wales, who 
perished in the wild waters of the Great Flood, 
whose engulfing wave almost swept the city 
from off the face of the earth. Of her seven 
children, the five that were drowned with her 
were: Willie, aged twenty-three; Winnie, 
twenty two; Maggie, nineteen ; Sarah, seven- 
teen ; and Frank, who was in his twelfth year. 
The two children escaping were: Louis, the 
eldest child, whose family went through the 
Flood (they lost their only child, a boy, Johnny, 
aged three); and David, the youngest. 

When the flood struck the city, Mr. Harris' 
house was washed away, and as he was work- 
ing his way through the water and drift to- 
ward dry land, he heard a child scream and 
went to its rescue, when he found his young- 
est child, l).i\id, floating on a mattress that 
was almost submerged in the scattered, rush- 
ing waters that were still dealing death to 
hundreds that had escaped with life from the 
shock of their great combined volume. 



riNOUKW J. HAW.S, one of the oldest 
business men of Johnstown, and the 
manufacturer of the celebrated Haws fire brick 
used so extensively in the United States, is a 
son of Isaac and Barbara (Burtner) Haws, and 
was born near Freeport, Butler county, Penn- 
s_\-lv.inia, in 1S25. Isaac Haws, a man of 
energy and will, was a native of Lancaster 
county, and resided successively near Free- 



,,*»-S^» -r'%s 




ANDREW J. HAWS. 





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illNRN \ . HAWS. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



71 



port, and in Allegheny county, on the Alle- 
gheny river, twenty miles above Pittsburg. 
At the latter place he was engaged in farming 
from 1840 up to the time of his death in 1847- 
at seventy years of age. Remarried Barbara 
Burtner, who was a native of Butler county^ 
and died about 1862, aged eighty-two years. 

Andrew J. Haws was reared in Butler and 
Allegheny counties, received a common-school 
education, and at seventeen years of age went 
to work in a fire-brick yard at Brady's Bend- 
Two years later he was transferred to a meta' 
refinery, and a year later was put in a rolling 
mill, under Alexander Campbell, where he 
helped roll the first " T " rails made west of 
the Allegheny mountains. The Brady's Bend 
Iron company, which operated all of the above- 
named works, ceased work in 184S, and he 
acted, during the ensuing four years, as busi- 
ness manager for Dr. Gleason,a physician and 
traveling lecturer on anatomy and physiolog}'. 
At the end of that time, in 1S52, he came to 
Johnstown, and helped to roll the first rail 
that was made for the Cambria Iron works ; 
and, after having charge of the iron teams for 
eighteen months, resolved upon commencing 
the manufacture of fire-brick. He then formed 
a partnership with Ephraini Stitt, and they 
leased for five years the fire-brick yard and 
cement mill of H. S. Smith, of Johnstown. 
At the end of the first year he bought out Mr. 
Stitt, and when the lease was up purchased 
the works, which he enlarged and improved. 
In so doing he contracted a debt of thirty 
thousand dollars, which he was enabled to 
pay off at the rate of five hundred dollars per 
month, with interest at 6 per cent, through 
the assistance of D. J. Morrell, the manager 
of the Cambria Iron company. After paying 
his indebtedness in full, he succeeded in manu- 
facturing tuyers, at thirty-five cents each, for 



the Bessemer Steel mill, that were being im- 
ported at seventy cents. His tuyers were far 
superior to the foreign article ; and his second 
j successful step was in producing a superior 
! silica brick for furnaces and open hearths, at 
one-half the cost of the imported article in that 
line. He gets his best fire-clays at South 
Fork, and his quartz at McKee's Rocks, in 
Blair county. 

He employs four hundred men and boys in 
his mines and works, and his plant has a 
' capacity of fifteen million bricks per year. 
His shipments are as far west as Colorado and 
east as Maine, while each year increases his 
orders from the leading cities of the United 
States. He was his own general manager until 
1880, when he gave his son, H. Y. Haws, that 
position, and who, since 1882, has had a quar- 
ter interest in the business. 

Besides his brick plant, Andrew J. Haws 
owns a farm of two hundred and twenty acres, 
which is heavily underlaid with coal. This 
farm is fourteen miles from Johnstown, and on 
it is Mr. Haws's stable of thoroughbred trot- 
ting horses, of which one has a record of 
2.12^, a second of 2.14, and a third of 2.10}^. 
Mr. Haws is a man whose business capacity 
is of the first order, and to think with him is 
to act. His success is but the record of his 
victories over great obstacles in his career. 
o 

HENRY Y. HAWS, manager of the well- 
known and extensive Haws brick works, 
of Johnstown, this county, is a son of A. J. 
Haws, whose sketch appears above. He was 
born in Johnstown in 1859. 

His early education was obtained in the 
public schools of Johnstown, to which was 
added later a course of instruction in the In- 
diana State Normal school. His education 
has been directed with the idea of pursuing a 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CVCLOPEDIA 



business career; so upon leaving school he 
turned his attention to the study of details of 
brick manufacture as pursued in his father's 
establishment. He was an apt student, and 
in time mastered the many details that enter 
into the successful management of such an 
enterprise, and in 1880 was made its general 
manager, and in 18S2 became a partner in the 
business. The property of this firm and the 
growth cf their business is the best evidence 
of the business ability of its manager. WHien 
the works were established in 1859 they were 
run on a small scale, but now cover about 
thirty acres of ground and give employment 
to about four huniired liands and turn out 
annually 1 8,000,000 bricks. 

One of their products which has obtained a 
national reputation is the Haws silica brick. 
This make has supplanted the use of the silica 
brick which has heretofore been imported 
from England and Wales. In addition to this 
they are leaders in the manufacture of special- 
ties for use in Bessemer mills. 

Mr. Haws is a republican in his political 
belief and has served as a member of the select 
council from the First Ward of the city, and 
while he interests himself in the cause of good 
government, municipal, state or nation, has 
never felt inclined to leave the sphere of busi- 
ness to enter the arena of politics. 

In Masonic circles he stands deservedly 
high. He is a member of Cambria Lodge, 
No. 78, Free and Accepted Masons ; Port- 
age Chapter, No. 27, Royal Arch Masons ; 
Orient Commander)', No. 61, Knights Templar, 
and is a tliirt)--t\vo degree Scottish Right 
Mason. 

He is president of the Johnstown l)ri\ing 
r.uk association and takes a livel)- interest in 
ail wiiolesomc and elevating sports. 

In June, 1885, he married Mary S., daugh- 



ter of Jacob Trefts, of Johnstown, and to 
their union have been born three children — 
Luc)', Henry, Jr., who died at the age of two 
years, and Ralph. 

Accurate in judgment, thorough-going and 
progressive in spirit, and possessing a rare 
executive ability, Mr. Haws ranks among the 
leading business men of Cambria county. 



'T'HOMAS J. HUGHES, superintendent of 
the Cambria county almshouse, and a 
business man of recognized ability, is a son of 
John T. and Anna (Williams) Hughes, and 
was born in North Wales, December 27, 1 844. 
His father was also a native of North Wales, 
born in 1820, and came to America in 1848, 
his family, which then consisted of his wife and 
one son, accompanying him. He located in 
Cambria township, Cambria count}-, where he 
purchased two hundred and fifty acres of wood- 
land, which he proceeded to clear up and con- 
vert into a tillable farm. He cleared up about 
two hundred acres of this land, put it in a 
good state of cultivation, and further improved 
it by the erection of a substantial and com- 
modious building. I le was a careful and neat 
farmer, and raised good stock, making a 
specialty of breeding fine horses. He was a 
true Christian and for many years was deacon 
of the Congregational church. He was a 
member of Rheyoma Lodge, No. 537, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, at Wiimore, 
this county. His marriage with Anna Wil- 
liams, of North Wales, resulted in the birth of 
five sons and four daughters: Thomas J., sub- 
ject; Margaret, the wife of William Howell, of 
Cambria township ; Lemuel J., a farmer, resid- 
ing on the old homestead; Mary Ann, the 
wife of Tiiomas D. Jones, a farmer of Munster 
township, this county ; Jane, the wife of Reese 
Roberts, of Summerhill townsliip, this county; 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



Elias J., a farmer, of Johnson county, Iowa ; 
Isaac J., a farmer in SummerhiU township, 
Cambria county ; Rebecca, the wife of David 
T. Edwards, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and 
Ezekiel J., who died March 6, 1887, at the age 
of twenty-two years. 

Tiiomas J. Hughes was brought up on a 
farm, educated in the public schools of his 
neighborhood and in the Ebensburg public 
school. He remained with his father upon 
the farm until 1864, when he entered the Civil 
War. He enlisted August 13th of that year 
in company D, Fifth Pennsylvania heavy artil- 
lery, at Pittsburg, and was honorably dis- 
charged from the Federal service at Vienna, 
Virginia, June 30, 1865, after the close of that 
terrible conflict. He participated in a number 
of skirmishes in the Shenandoah valley, against 
Colonel Mosby, the noted guerrilla warrior, 
and on November 5, 1864, was captured by 
his men and incarcerated in Libby prison, 
where he was confined until Februarys, 1865, 
suffering such privations and miseries as were 
only known to southern army prisoners. 
Returning from the war, he engaged in farm- 
ing and lumbering, near Wilmore, this county, 
for a period of four years, and then engaged 
in the saw-milling business, in which he con- 
tinued until 1876. Returning to his farm that 
year, he continued the tranquil but remunera- 
tive pursuits of husbandry until 1895, when 
he was elected superintendent of the Cambria 
county almshouse, which position he is now 
acceptably filling. Mr. Hughes was made 
first lieutenant in command of company H, 
Fifth regiment Pennsylvania State militia, and 
rendered valuable service in the suppression of 
the great railroad strike of 1877, which com- 
pletely tied up, as it were, the railroads and 
paralyzed business throughout the country. 
He was stationed at Pittsburg during the riots 



in that city, and was subsequently transferred 
to Altoona to prevent the destructive invasions 
of the rioters. Lieutenant Hughes is a mem- 
ber of Summit Lodge, No. 312, F. and A. M., 
and John M. Jones Post, No. 556, G. A. R. 
In politics he is a republican and in religion a 
Congregationalist. 

He has been thrice married. August, 1873, 
he married Eliza Ellis, of Wilmore, by whom 
he had six children: John T., May, Edna, 
Leah, Martha and Mary. His first wife died 
September 9, 1882, and he wedded as his 
second wife Miriam Roberts, of Pittsburg. 
They were married December 28, 1884, and 
became the parents of one child, Miriam, 
deceased. Mrs. Hughes died May 2, 1889, 
and Mr. Hughes took for his third and last 
wife Wilhelmina Young, of Clearfield county, 
Pennsylvania. The nuptials which made them 
husband and wife were celebrated on Decem- 
ber 18, 1890. 

n LEXANDER B. PRINGLE, a represen- 
■^^ tative of one of the old families of this 
county, is a son of William and Elizabeth 
(Bolwine) Pringle, and was born in Croyle 
township, this county, September 17, 1829. 

His paternal grandfather, Philip Pringle, was 
born in the eastern part of this State, but at 
an early day, with his brother George, settled 
in the wilderness near what is now known as 
" Pringle Hill," and from these two brothers 
have sprung the numerous family of that 
name in this county. The Pringles are of 
Scotch extraction, whilst the Bolwines are of 
German origin. The mother of the subject of 
this sketch was born in Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1798. Her father was Henry 
Bolwine, a native of Germany, but one of the 
early settlers of Somerset county. 

William Pringle, father, was born in Croyle 



74 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



township, was reared and lived there all his 
life, dying March 20, 1895, at the advanced 
age of ninety-seven years. His was truly a 
pioneer's experience, living in that section at 
a time when the woods were filled with deer 
and bears, in the hunting of which he was an 
expert. His avocation was necessarily that of 
a farmer and lumberman. 

Alexander B. Pringle was reared on this old 
pioneer homestead, where he received the ad- 
vantages of but a common-school education. 
He remained upon the farm until 1861, when 
he took a position with the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road company as a freight conductor between 
Altoona and Pittsburg, remaining in this posi- 
tion until 1864, when he enlisted in the service 
of his country in the late Civil War. He 
joined company D, F"ifth regiment, of Penn- 
sylvania Heavy Artillery, in which he .served 
until the close of the war. After the war was 
over he again entered the employ of the Penn- 
.sylvania Railroad company as a freight con- 
ductor, and continued in this relation until 
1873, when he purchased a farm in Summit 
Hill township, this county, and followed the 
pursuits of agriculture until 1884. Upon the 
latter date he removed to Conemaugh, where 
he has lived comparatively a retired life ever 
since. He is the owner of a large apiary, in 
the care and cultivation of which, as a pas- 
time, he devotes much of his attention. I Ic 
is the owner of considerable realty in the bor- 
ough of his adoption. 

In 1855, he wedded Sarah, a daughter 
of William Barnctt, of this county, and 
to this marital union have been born five 
sons: William N., a practicing phy.sician, of 
Johnstown ; Allison A., a physician of South 
i'^ork, this county; Harry B., a resident of 
Conemaugh and an engineer of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad company, and Charles W. and 



Edgar E., engineers of the same company, 
also living at Conemaugh. 

Mr. Pringle has for fifty years been a con- 
sistent member of the United Brethren church, 
and belongs to Emory Fisher Post, No. 30, 
Grand Army of the Republic, Johnstown. 



TTiWAAXM L. SHKYOCK is a son of 

^^"^ George and P^lizabeth (Lewis) Shry- 
ock, and was born September i, 1819, at 
Hagerstown, Maryland. His father, George 
Shryock, was born near Greensburg, Westmore- 
land count}-, Pennsylvania, and removed to 
Hagerstown, Maryland, where he died in 1873. 
William L. Shryock was reared and edu- 
cated in Hagerstown. Removing to Cambria 
county in 1839, he located at Johnstown, 
where he accepted a clerkship with Buck & 
Co., general merchants, and in 1842, in con- 
nection with George S. King and David 
Stuart, built the Cambria furnace on Laurel 
run — a charcoal furnace. He was prominently 
connected with the above-named gentlemen 
in the furnace business luitil 1846, when he 
purchased Shade furnace, in Somerset county, 
which he operated until 1850, when he be- 
came superintendent of the Mill Creek furnace, 
at that time operated b\- George S. King and 
Dr. Shoenberger. He managed this furnace 
for them until it was absorbed by the Cambria 
Iron company. This company, recognizing 
his unusn.il ahilit)- in this business, retained 
him as superintendent until 1858, when the 
coLuUy furnaces belonging to the Cambiia 
Iron company were all closed, he left their 
employ to become manager of the Indiana 
furnace, in Indiana county. He remained 
there until 1869, when he acceptted he posi 
tion of clerk in the Johnstown Water and Gas 
com[)an\-, which position he has filled accepta- 
bly to the present time. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



75 



Mr. Shryock is a member of the First Lu- 
theran church of Johnstown. He was married 
on the 25th of January, 1844, to Miss Nancy 
M. Royer, and eight children have been born 
to this union : Frank R., of Denver, Colo- 
rado; James W., of Pueblo, Colorado ; Emma, 
wife of J. P. Pringle, of Denver, Colorado; 
Ada L. ; Samuel R., a mine owner in Colo- 
rado ; Mary P., died in 1861, and R. B., died 
in 1884. 



^EORGE A. HAGER, assistant treasurer 
^^ in the Johnstown Savings bank, is a son 
of Casper and Mary (Klinefelter) Hager, and 
was born in Johnstown, this county, on Octo- 
ber 20, 1853. His father, who was a native of 
Germany, came to America in 1848 and 
located at Johnstown, where he engaged in 
the occupation of shoemaker, at the same time 
speculating in real estate to some extent. He 
died in Johnstown in 1878. His wife, who 
survived him, was a native of York count}-, 
Pennsylvania, and with her husband was a 
member of the German Lutheran church. She 
was one of the many victims of the great flood 
of 1889. 

Henry Klinefelter, grandfather on the ma- 
ternal side, was a native of York county, and 
removed from that place to Johnstown, where 
he died in i860. 

George A, Hager received his elementary 
education in the common schools of Johns- 
town, and later pursued a business course in 
the Iron City college, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
After graduating from this institution he ac- 
cepted the position of assistant treasurer of 
the Johnstown Savings bank, which position 
he still fills. 

Mr. Hager is an active and consistent mem- 
ber of the Christian church, in which he oc- 
cupies the office of elder. He is a mem- 



ber of Cambria Lodge, No. 278, F. and A. M., 
Past High Priest in the Portage Chapter, No. 
195 ; also Past High Priest in the Oriental 
Commandery. 

June 10, 1880, Mr. Hager married Miss 
Emma, a daughter of the late Charles Von 
Lunen, of Johnstown. To this union were 
born two sons, Frank C. and Harry Von 
Lunen. His wife was drowned in the memor- 
able flood of 1889. 

In 1893 Mr. Hager married Miss Carrie, a 
daughter of Samuel Clark, of Hollidaysburg, 
Pennsylvania, and this marriage has resulted 
in the birth of one son, Ralph E. 



■pLLSWORTH KUNKLE, senior member 
of the general mercantile firm of Kunkle 
Bros., of Coopersdale, is one of that class of 
business men who are successful in what- 
ever line they are engaged. He is a son of 
Solomon and Mary Ann Kunkle, and was 
born in Centre township, Indiana county, 
Penns\'lvania, February 5, 1863. He was 
reared principally on his grandfather's (Joseph 
Gilbert) farm, where the many useful but un- 
eventful labors of an agricultural life engaged 
his boyhood years. He attended the com- 
mon schools but a short time, and after 
working as a farm hand until January 8, 
1S79, he went to Johnstown, where he was in 
the employ of the Cambria Iron company 
up to January 28, 1884. He then went to 
Coopersdale and formed a mercantile partner- 
ship with D. P. M. Loughrey, as Loughrey & 
Kunkle. A year later George H. Sheridan 
purchased Mr. Loughrey's interest, and the 
firm name changed to that of Kunkle & Sheri- 
dan, which remained until 1889, when Syl- 
vester V. Kunkle was admitted to partnership 
under the firm name of Kunkle Bros. & Sheri- 
dan, and the business was carried on until 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



1894, when Mr. Sheridan's interest was pur- 
chased and the firm name since then has been 
Kunkle Bros. Their present large and well- 
arranged general mercantile establishment at 
200, 202 and 204 Main street was erected by 
Mr. Kunkle in 1886, and has remained in his 
ownership ever since. 

The building fronts 20 feet on Main street, 
with a depth of 112 feet, and was specially 
arranged for the large and varied stock of 
general merchandise carried by the present 
firm. They do an extensive and prosperous 
business in a substantial and well-to-do sec- 
tion of surrounding country as well as in the 
town and along the line of the railway. 

On May 5, 1885, I'lUsworth Kunkle mar- 
ried Mary Kate Masters, a daughter of Joseph 
Masters, now a superintendent of the Cambria 
Iron company. To their union have been 
born two children, a son and a daughter: 
Joseph Masters and Edna Marguerite. 

In his political views Mr. Kunkle is a repub- 
lican, and while not an aspirant for office nor 
active as a politician, yet has served for several 
terms as an auditor of borough accounts. He 
is a trustee and a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church of Coopersdale. He is a 
member of Morrellville Lotlgc, No. 50, I. O. 
O, E., and Lodge No. 376, Order of Ilepta- 
.sophs, and a charter member of Good Intent 
Castle, No. 133, Knights of the Golden Eagle. 
Commencing life win illy without means Mr 
Kunkle possessed credit sufficient to give him 
a start in a line of business where he has 
achieved almost phenomenal success. To 
organize a business, jjuild it up to large i)ro- 
portions, and so contiuct it as to win and hokl 
honorable standing, has been the labor that 
lie has successfully accomplished under ad- 
verse anil often discouraging circumstances. 
lie confines his labors to the legitimate rou- 



tine of merchandizing and does not branch out 
into uncertain ventures, however promising of 
results. He also takes an active interest in 
the material prosperity of the general public, 
and has served for several years as a director 
in the Morrellville Building and Loan associa- 
tion, besides in other ways aiding in measures 
calculated for the public good. 

The early ancestors of the Kunkle family 
in this country were from one of the states of 
Germany, and some of their descendants set- 
tled in western Pennsylvania, where Henry 
Kunkle settled and lived in Centre township, 
Indiana county. He was a farmer all his life 
and a staunch republican. He died in February, 
1894, aged eighty-nine years. His son, Solo- 
mon, the father of the subject of this sketch, 
was born February iS, 1837, and died Octo- 
ber 10, 1863. Solomon Kunkle attended the 
early common schools, and then turned his 
attention to farming, in which he was engaged 
until his death. He lived a useful life, was a 
republican and a Lutheran, and married a 
daughter of Joseph Gilbert, a farmer, black- 
smith, and merchant during his sixty-five years 
of life. Joseph Gilbert's ancestors came over 
on the Mayflower, which huulcd on ri\ mouth 
Rock. Mrs. KvMiklc tlicd May 1, iS7i,and 
left two sons, Sylvester Vernon and Ellsworth, 
whose name heads this sketch. 



ni:\. l>\Mi:i, f'TJOFFORO, formerly a 
uunisler in the Brethren church, but 
now a prominent insurance man of Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania, is a son of David and Eliza 
(Berkey) Croffoni, and was born February 24, 
1S46, near Davidsville, Somerset county, 
Pennsj-lvania. 

Rev. Croflbrd's father, David Crofford, was 
horn in Westniorel.md count}', this State, 




Il().\. 1 . 1). \\( K)l»Rl Fl--. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



77 



June 6, 1818, but was reared and educated in 
Somerset county. He pursued the combined 
avocations of farming and merchandizing all 
his life, and died at Duncansville on April 30, 
1889, having resided there eighteen years 
prior to his demise. 

He wedded Eliza Berkey, a daughter of 
Daniel Berkey, who was designated as " Eng- 
lish Daniel Berkey," in order to distinguish 
him and his family from the numerous Ger- 
man families of Somerset county, which bore 
the same name. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Crofford was born a famil}' 
of thirteen children, eight of whom are still 
living, three sons and five daughters. 

On December 29, 1869, Rev. Crofford and 
Miss Delilah Blough were happily married. 
She is a daughter of Rev. Samuel Blough, 
deceased, a prominent divine of Cambria 
county, this State, and a bishop in the Men- I 
nonite church. Rev. and Mrs. Crofford are 
the parents of four children: Charles Wesley, 
James Calvin, Minnie May and Harry Bashor 
Crofford. 

The Rev. Crofford received his education in 
the public schools of Indiana county, Penn- 
sylvania, and in the Elderton academy of 
Armstrong count)'. Having acquired a good 
academic training, he assumed the responsi- 
bilities of life on his own account as a mer- 
chant in Johnstown in 1872. He continued 
merchandizing about seven years, when he 
engaged with the Cambria Iron company, in 
whose employ he continued in various capa- 
cities until 1893. During that year he em- 
barked in the insurance business. He does 
a general insurance business and represents 
many of the reliable old line companies. 

Among some of the more important com- 
panies are : The National and Orient, of Hart- 
ford, Connecticut; AUemannia and German, of 



Pittsburg, Penna. ; Philadelphia Underwriters, 
of Philadelphia; New York Underwriters' 
Agency, of New York city ; Prussian National, 
of Germany ; London and Lancashire, of Liver- 
pool, England. In addition to his extensive 
insurance business, he is secretary both of the 
Johnstown and Cambria Building and Loan 
Associations, the latter of which he assisted 
in organizing. 

Practically, he is a strict republican, but not 
an aspirant to political preferment. Reli- 
giously, he is a devout and earnest worker in 
the Brethren church. 

He is a regularly-ordained minister of this 
church, and for many years filled regular ap- 
pointments, but owing to the arduous duties 
of a large and gradually increasing business, 
he has been obliged to relinquish his minis- 
terial labor. 

HON. L. D. WOODRUFF, a prominent 
democrat of Central Pennsylvania, and 
the present postmaster of the city of Johns- 
town," was born January 8, 1845, at Landis- 
burg, Perry county, Pennsylvania, and is a son 
of Captain Henry D. and Elizabeth Harper 
Woodruff. He received his education at 
New Bloomfield academy ; taught one term of 
school and then learned the trade of printer 
in the office of the Pmy County Democrat. 

In 1865 he came to Johnstown and became 
associate editor and proprietor o'iV\\& Johnstown 
Democrat, and after the retirement of his father, 
in 1876, he was sole editor and proprietor of 
the sheet until February i, 1893, when he 
disposed of the paper and printing plant, and 
a year later a.ssumed charge of the Johnstown 
post-office, of which he had been commis- 
sioned as postmaster by President Cleveland. 
The Johnstown office is one of the presidential 
offices, and to its management and advance- 



78 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



ment Mr. Woodruff has devoted himself assid- 
uously with very satisfactory results. Politi- 
cally, he is a strong democrat of pronounced 
views, and served from 1879 to 1882, as a 
member of the House of Representatives of 
Pennsylvania, in which he was ever watchful 
of the interests of his constituents. He served 
on several important committees, and was 
nominated by his party, in 1892, as their can- 
didate for Congress in the Twentieth district 
composed of Cambria, Somerset, Bedford and 
Blair counties. Mr. Woodruff made an active 
campaign, but was defeated, as the district was 
strongly republican. He has frequently served 
as chairman of the Democratic County com- 
mittee; also represented Cambria county in 
different state conventions of his party, and in 
1884 was a delegate to the Democratic Na- 
tional convention at Chicago, which nominated 
Grover Cleveland for president. 

After Johnstown was organized as a city 
Mr. Woodruff was elected for two consecutive 
terms as a member of the school board, where 
his services were valuable and duly ai^preciated- 

On December 26, 1866, Mr. Woodruff wed- 
ded Maggie W. Lynch, who died January 24, 
1 888, aged forty years, and six years later, 
in October, 1894, he was united in marriage 
with Marie A. Dick, a daughter of George 
Dick, of Baltimore. By his first marriage he 
had five children: Jessie, wife of Anderson II. 
Walters, assistant superintendent of Johns- 
town gas works; Harry D., engaged in the 
printing business; I.ucian D., now in the em- 
plo)' of the Cambria Iron company; and two 
who died at an early age. 

Tlie Woodruff family was one of the old 
Knglish families of Connecticut that came of 
Puritan ancestors who came over to the Boston 
Bay colony in the early days of its history. 

A. Philip Wooilruff settled at Waterbury, 



Connecticut, and his grandson, Philip Wood- 
ruff, was the father of Captain Henry D. Wood- 
ruff, the father of Hon. Lucian D. Woodruff 

Captain Woodruff was born September 24, 
1825, at Waterbury, Connecticut, and spent 
his boyhood days at Windsor, New York, 
where he received a good education. At 
eighteen years of age he removed to Perry 
county, this State, where he followed teaching 
up to 1861. In April of that year, under 
Lincoln's first call for troops, he raised com- 
pany D, Second regiment, Pennsylvania three 
months' troops. The company was recruited 
at Bloomfield, Perry county, and when mus- 
tered into the Federal service on April 20, 
1 86 1, Mr. Woodruff became captain. The 
company was assigned to the Second regi- 
ment, and served under General Robert Pat- 
terson in his fruitless attempt to hold General 
Johnson at Winchester. At the expiration of 
his term of service Captain Woodruff raised 
company D, of the Forty-seventh regiment of 
Pennsylvania volunteers, which was mustered 
in September 20, 1861. 

This regiment served in the defenses around 
Washington city, at Key West, Florida, was 
in the battles of Pocotaligo, West \'irginia; 
Pleasant Hill and Sabine Cross Roads under 
Banks, and Opequan and Cedar Creek under 
.Sheridan. The Fortj'-seventh was the only 
I'ennsj'h'aiiia regiment in the Red River ex- 
pedition. It saw service in seven southern 
states; marclied over twelve hundred miles, 
and made twelve sea voyages. Company D, 
under Captain W'oodruff, performed well its 
part in siege, battle, march and sea voyage, 
and returned home with a well-earned reputa- 
tion for efficiency and bravery. After the war 
Captain Woodruff came to Johnstown, where 
he was engaged with his son in conducting 
the Dt-moa-at from 1865 to 1876. Ill-health 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



79 



then compelled his retirement from business, 
and he afterwards removed to Blairsville, in 
Indiana county, at which place he died. He 
was a Jeffersonian democrat, and wielded a 
great influence in the county councils of 
his party. Captain Woodruff married Eliza- 
beth Harper, who was a daughter of Edward 
Harper, of Landisburg, Pennsylvania. She 
was born in Juniata count}', Pennsylvania, and 
died in Johnstown. Captain and Mrs. Wood- 
ruff had seven children : Edward C, Hon. 
Lucian D., Mrs. Ada Little, and four others 
who died young. 

& 

'T^HOMAS W. DICK, an attorney and well- 
known business man of Ebensburg, 
Cambria county, Pennsylvania, is a son of 
James and Mary (Stewart) Dick, and was born 
October 7, 1S39, in Indiana county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Ireland was the ancestral home of the 
family, from which country James Dick, the 
father, emigrated when but seven years old. 
He located in that part of Indiana county, 
now known as Wheatfield township, where he 
spent his life, gaining a livelihood in the pur- 
suits of a farmer and a tanner. He was first 
married to Miss Graham, and this marriage 
resulted in the birth of two children: Robert 
G. and Annie. His second marital union was 
with Mary Stewart, and resulted in the birth 
of the following children : John S., now de- 
ceased ; Thomas W., Mary E., Wallace B., 
who is in the real-estate business in Topeka, 
Kansas ; Lucy A., and Samuel S., a farmer, of 
Indiana county, Pennsylvania. 

Thomas W. Dick received his early educa- 
tion in the common schools of Indiana county, 
Pennsylvania, principally in the village of 
Armagh. After gaining a good elementary 
education, he followed the profession of teach- 
ing for two years. At this time the rebellion 



threatened to disrupt the Union, and in order 
to better serve his country, Mr. Dick enlisted 
as a private, in 1861, in company H, Twelfth 
regiment, Pennsylvania reserve volunteers. 
He served three years, the greater part of the 
time in the capacity of second sergeant. Mr. 
Dick fought with the army of the Potomac, 
and although slightly wounded in an engage- 
ment, he was never out of service on account 
of his injuries. During seven months of his 
army life, he was in the recruiting service in 
the eastern part of Pennsylvania, spending a 
large part of this time in York, Columbia and 
Harrisburg. Mr. Dick took an active part in 
the battles of Drainesville, Mechanicsville, 
Seven Days' fights. Second battle of Bull Run, 
South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericks- 
burg, Culpepper Court House, Battle of the 
Wilderness and Cold Harbor. After return- 
ing from the war, Mr. Dick entered Elder's 
Ridge academy, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, 
at that time a prominent institution of learning. 
He remained there until the spring of 1865, 
when he began the stud}' of law with Wil- 
liam Banks, Esq., of Indiana. Completing a 
thorough course of law, he was admitted to 
the bar in Greensburg, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, in November, 1867. In the 
autumn of 1868, Mr. Dick began the practice 
of his profession, and in 1S71, in connection 
with his law business, he devoted part of his 
time to the insurance business, representing 
some of the old-line fire insurance companies, 
among which are the following: yEtna Insur- 
ance company, of Hartford, since 1873, The 
Hartford company, of Hartford, and the Phce- 
ni.x company. He is secretary and treasurer 
of the Protection Mutual Eire Insurance com- 
pany, of Cambria county, Pennsylvania, organ- 
ized in 1857. 

Politically, Mr. Dick is a staunch republi- 



80 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



can, and has served as burgess of the borough 
of Ebensburg. Having been a teacher, Mr. 
Dick still takes a warm personal interest in 
the public schools and is at present an active 
member of the Ebensburg school board. 

He is a member of the John M. Jones Post, 
No. 556, G. A. R., of Ebensburg. He is a 
consistent member of the Presbyterian church, 
holding the honored jiosition of elder. 

In 1867 Mr. Dick married Lucy E. Kern, 
a daughter of George \V. Kern, of Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania. This marital relation resulted 
in the birth of the following children: John 
B., a liveryman in Vintondale, Cambria county; 
George K., who married Celia McCue, of 
Montana, and is in the emjjloy of Butte, Ana- 
conda and P.icific railroad, in Anaconda, Mon- 
tana, where he now lives; Margaret M., the 
wife of John I. Bowman, of Grapeville, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania ; James .S., an 
assistant in his father's office, and also pur- 
suing the study of law; Carl \V., who is 
attending school, and Bessie G. 



QliKAM HOSTETLKK, a well qualified 
business man and a very successful 
farmer and fruit-grcnvcr of Richland township, 
is a son of Henry and Mary (Weaver) Hos- 
tetler, and was born in Richland township, 
Cambria county, Pennsylvania, October 17, 
1866. The American ancestry of the Ilostet- 
lers is traced from early settlers in one section 
of Chester count)-, to pioneers in one part of 
Somerset, and then in the first quarter of the 
present centurj' to Richland to\\nshi[). Peter 
Hosteller, whose parents came from Chester 
county, was born and reared in Somerset 
county, and came in 1830 to Richland town- 
shii), where he purchased a farm and passed 
the remainder of his life, dj-ing April I, 1863, 
aged fifty-two years. He was the father of 



Henry Hostetler, whose son Abram is the sub- 
ject of this sketch. Henry Hostetler was 
born December i, 1841, and after receiving a 
common education, turned his attention to 
agricultural pursuits, in which he has been 
engaged ever since. Energetic as a business 
man and successful as a farmer, Mr. Hostetler 
has come to be one of the representative citi- 
zens of his township. His business and farm 
interests have not, however, rendered him 
indilTerent to affairs connected with his town- 
ship or having a bearing on the county. For 
many years he has served as supervisor and 
manager of the Johnstown and Scalp Level 
turnpike. He is a republican in political 
opinion, and has been for many years a con- 
sistent member of the German Baptist church. 
Mr. Hostetler married Mary Weaver, who 
was born in Paint township, Somerset county, 
March 19, 1846, and is a daughter of Abraham 
Weaver, who was a native of Davidsville, that 
count}', and died in the spring of 1895, aged 
seventy-seven years. The Weavers, like the 
Hostellers, were of German descent and be- 
lievers in the faith of the German Baptist 
church, also Amish and Mennonite. Abram 
Hostetler received a practical English educa- 
tion in a common school some distance from 
his home, and then attended a good normal 
school, after which he taught two terms in 
the public schools. In \-outh he became 
familiar with the labor of the farm, and assisted 
in its culti\'ation until his majority was at- 
tained, when he engaged for himself in farming, 
which he has followed ever since, except the 
two )'ears parti)- spent in teaching. Mr. 
Hostetler owns a well-improved farm of eighty 
acres of good land, situated along the Johns- 
town and Scalp Level turnpike, and only two 
miles from the Scalp Level post office. 
' Abram Hostetler, on October 30, 1887, 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



81 



married Lizzie Statler, a daughter of Peter 
Statler, a well-known citizen of Richland town- 
ship. Their union has been blessed with 
three children, two sons and a daughter: 
Clyde H., Emma J., and Newton K. 

Engaged in the employments of an agricul- 
turist, Mr. Hostetler, while not neglecting gen- 
eral farming, yet made fruit culture a study, and 
at present has the largest peach, plum and 
pear orchards in his section of the count)'. In 
politics he has always been a republican of 
pronounced views, and an active worker in the 
interests of his party. He has served as 
assessor and auditor, and held other township 
offices. He was the first assessor elected for 
three years in Richland township under the 
State law providing for that length of term. 
Abram Hostetler is deservedly popular on 
account of business ability, good character 
and efficient service as a public official. Eco- 
nomic, prudent and yet progressive, he is a 
safe and reliable business man, and in any 
township or county office could be depended 
upon to look carefully after the true interests 
of the people. 



/^EORGE HUNTLEY.— The people of 
^^ every race have some characteristics of 
which they are deservedly proud. The French- 
man has taste ; the German, thrift ; the English- 
man, tenacity; the Irishman, keen wit; the 
Scotchman, sturdy habits. The native of New 
England, however, no matter what his race, 
has cause for greater pride than any of these. 
In his land the foremost men of America were 
born and bred. On his soil, and in his at- 
mosphere, great men have grown, lived and 
died. Strength and hope must germinate in 
the heart of every one who feels himself so 
nearly akin to greatness, which is a heritage 
for self-gratulation. This heritage belongs 
6 



to the subject of our sketch, George Huntley, 
a thriving hardware merchant of Ebensburg, 
Pennsylvania, who was born in green Ver- 
mont, February 4, 1 83 1 , in Chelsea, the county 
seat of Orange county. He is a son of Selden 
and Dorothea (Spiller) Huntley. His grand- 
father was a native of England, who emigrated 
to America, and settled in Massachusetts. 
His father, who was a blacksmith by trade, 
was born in the state of New Hampshire, and 
lived there, and in the state of Vermont, all 
his life, dying in May, 1862, aged sixty-three 
years. The mother of Mr. Huntley was also 
a native of Vermont, and of their family of 
eight children five of those living reside in the 
same state. They are: Marinda, wife of John 
Conant, of Barre, Vermont ; John, of Brook- 
field, Vermont ; Erastus, a resident of North- 
field, Vermont; Newcomb, of the same place; 
and Harriet, wife of Asa Harrington, also of 
Barre, Vermont. Two children, Sarah and 
Alma, are dead. 

The subject of this sketch married Miss 
Mary A., daughter of William Roberts. To 
this union have been born the following chil- 
dren : Alma, wife of W. R. Smith, of Aspin- 
wall, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania; Carrie, 
wife of W. S. Humphreys, of Conemaugh, 
Cambria county, Pennsylvania;- W. Selden, 
who lives in the state of Indiana; George W., 
deceased ; Marinda and Leonard, who is his 
father's assistant in the store. 

Mr. Huntley was educated in the common 
schools of Vermont, and was reared upon the 
farm, following that occupation until he came 
to Ebensburg in the autumn of 1S50. He at 
once entered into an apprenticeship to learn 
the trade of a tinner, and has followed it for a 
number of years exclusively, and since 1855 
has continued it in connection with the hard- 
ware business. His storeroom is well filled 



82 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



with everything found in a first-class store of 
its kind. His business apartments include 
two stories of a building one hundred and fifty- 
feet deep and twenty-four feet wide, with four 
or five warerooms, thus affording unusual 
facilities for a large trade. 

Mr. Huntley is a prosperous, wide-awake 
business man. In addition, he owns a well- 
cultivated farm of fifty acres adjoining the 
borough of Ebensburg. 

He is a staunch republican, and the confi- 
dence of his fellow-townsmen in his good 
judgment and stability has been manifested 
by electing him to the offices of school di- 
rector, councilman and burgess. Apropos of 
this it may be said that confidence in a New 
Englander is seldom misplaced. 

Mr. Huntley is a member of Summit Lodge, 
No. 312, F. and A. M., of Portage Chapter 
at Johnstown, and of the Orient Conmiandery 
at the same place. 



TAMKS l>. IIOOVKK, who was called from 
earth in the dawn of matured manhood 
when a promising career of success was open- 
ing before him, ranked as one of Johnstown's 
leading merchants. lie was a son of Jacob 
and Cornelia (Goudy) Hoover, and was born 
at Coopersdale, Cambria county, Pennsyl- 
vania, October 10, i860. The Hoovers are of 
German descent, and Jacol) 1 loos'cr was born 
in 1832 in Bedford county, which he left in 
early life to accept the position of manager of 
the general store of the Cambria Furnace 
company. W'licn tin's company went out of 
existence he worked for a number of j-ears as 
a heater at the Cambria Iron works, and then 
removed to New Castle, Lawrence county, 
wliere he has resided ever since, and held ac- 
tive membership there in the Metiiodist Epis- 
copal church, of winch he has been a member 



for many years. From 1887 to 1889 he was 
engaged in the mercantile business with his 
son at Johnstown, but after the flood he with- 
drew from the partnership. 

James L. Hoover was reared at Coopers- 
dale, received his education in the public 
schools and then turned his attention to active 
business pursuits. He served for several 
years as a clerk in the stores of Wood, Mor- 
rell & Co. (now the Penn Traffic compan)', 
limited), and then in February, 1887, seeing a 
favorable opportunity for another mercantile 
venture at Johnstown he formed a partnership 
with his father, under the firm name of Jacob 
Hoover & Son. The new store was opened 
at Coopersdale and prospered under efficient 
management until the water of the flood swept 
it out. This shock and disaster that dis- 
heartened so many business men did not cause 
Mr. Hoover to lose heart and opportunity, for 
the waters had hardly receded before he 
ordered a new stock of goods and commenced 
the many repairs needed to his buildings. In 
a few days he had reopened and under his 
own name, and conducted a substantial and 
remunerative business up to his death in 1894. 

On October 2, 1884, Mr. Hoover married 
Margaret Smith, of Huntingdon county, and 
to their union were born two children, a son 
anil a tlaughter, James R. and Mildicd. Mrs. 
Hoover is a daughter of John C. Smith, and 
her mother's maiden name was Ella Cogan. 
The Smiths were of .Scotch Irish extraction, 
antl John C. Smith, who tlied March 4th, 
1 892, aged forty-five years, was a son of Pro- 
fessor Lyman Smith, a teacher of music in a 
college, in Vermont. John C. Smith was an 
ornamental stair builder. He was a member 
of the Baptist church and enlisted in Com- 
[uuiy G of the P'ifth Penn.sjlvania reserves, 
serving until he was wounded. His wife 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



83 



was a native of Huntingdon, and passed away 
in Huntingdon at thirty-two years of age. 
Mrs. Hoover is a woman of intelligence and 
energy, and a member of Coopersdale Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. Since her husband's 
death she has continued the mercantile busi- 
ness at Coopersdale under the name of Mrs. 
J. L. Hoover, and has a large and well-ap- 
pointed establishment filled with suitable and 
first-class goods in every line of the general \ 
mercantile business. Ability, industry and 
tact have made her successful in holding 
former and gaining new patrons until a large 
and remunerative trade has been established. 
James L. Hoover began life under peculiar 
auspices that promised the development of 
vigorous energies and a determined spirit of 
self-reliance. The promise was fully verified 
when opportunity came for opportune develop- 
ment, and he took a prominent position as a 
merchant and business man. He was a mem- 
ber of Coopersdale Methodist Episcopal 
church ; Johnstown, Lodge No. 157, Knights 
of Pythias; Independent Castle, No. 133, 
Knights of the Golden Eagle, and of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

He was a republican in politics. He was 
willing to aid every good work in the proper 
and right way, but with a proper business 
spirit was opposed to lavishness and undue 
expenditure in any line or for any object. 
His views were for adequate means appropri- 
ately expended and wise management under 
experienced superintendence. 

James L. Hoover was stricken down by the 
grim reaper when in the midst of an honor- 
able, active and successful business career. 
His final summons came on May 6, 1894, and 
his remains are interred in a pleasant spot in 
Grandview cemetery. 

His death was a great loss in a community 



of whose progress he had been a potential 
factor for quite a number of years. 



T . lEUT. JOHN LYNCH, who was a brave 
soldier, and is now serving his fifth 
term as justice of the peace at Cresson, this 
county, is a son of Owen and Rose (McCul- 
lough) Lynch, and was born at Fredericks- 
burg, Virginia, May 7, 1839. His father, 
Owen Lynch, was born in county Cavan, Ire- 
land. In 18 1 2 he left the land of the sham- 
rock, with its crowded economic conditions, 
and crossed the Atlantic, seeking the greater 
freedom of the United States. He first located 
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where, for several 
years, he worked in a sugar refinery. He then 
accepted employment as a boss miner, and in 
this capacity worked in the Black Rock and 
Potomac tunnels. In 1844 he removed to 
Blair county, Pennsylvania, where he located 
on a farm, and for four years engaged in agri- 
culture. At the close of this period, in 1848, 
he removed to Washington township, this 
county, where he resided until the time of his 
death, in 1859. 

Rose (McCullough) Lynch, mother, was a 
native of county Derry, Ireland. She was a 
devout Catholic, and died at Cresson in 1889, 
at the advanced age of seventy-two years. 

John Lynch's education was limited to the 
common schools of Washington township, 
and on leaving school he was employed 
as a lumberman until the beginning of 
the memorable conflict of 1861-65, when, 
true to his patriotic instincts, he enlisted, 
April 15, 1 861, in company G, Tenth Penn- 
sylvania volunteers, for three months, and re- 
enHsted August i, 1861, as second sergeant in 
company A, Fifty-fifth regiment, Pennsylva- 
nia volunteers, for three years, or during the 
war. November, 1861, he was promoted to 



84 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND POkTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



quartermaster sergeant, and on August 28, 
1862, was made second lieutenant in the above 
company. He was wounded in the battle of 
Drury's Bluff, Virginia, May 16, 1864, and in 
acknowledgment of his gallantry on the field, 
was promoted to the office of first lieutenant, 
February 24, 1865. He served until the close 
of the war. October 20, 1865, he received his 
discharge in Maysville, Buckingham county, 
Virginia. On leaving the army he returned 
to Cresson, where, in 1867, he engaged in lum- 
bering, which business he conducted until 
1873, and followed draying in Cresson until 
1877, at which time he was compelled to re- 
tire from active business on account of the 
wound received while valiantly fighting the 
battles of his country and gallantly defending 
the honor of the flag. 

In religious belief he adheres to the doc- 
trines of the Roman Catholic church. Politi- 
cally he is a democrat, and has always taken 
an intelligent interest in politics. As a friend 
of the cause of education, and a supporter of 
our public school sj'stem, he has served as 
school director for fifteen years, was supervi- 
sor of his township two years, a member 
of borough council of .Summitville for three 
years, and is serving his fifth commission of 
five years each as justice of the peace. His 
long term of office testifies to his integrity 
and excellent judgment, and his standing with 
the people who know him best. 

In 1867 he wedded Miss Margaret, daugh- 
ter of Jacob and I'.lizabeth Hincs, of Cresson, 
and to this marital relation eight children have 
been born : James A., Joseph Francis, Mary 
E., Cclestine, llacket, Agnes, Katie and Harry. 



TOIIN K. GASTKUilOK was born in Paint 

township, Somerset county, Pemisyl- 

vania, September 18, 1862. He was educated 



in the common schools and at the Indiana 
State Normal school, and taught nine terms in 
the conniion schools of Somerset and Cambria 
counties. On September 23, 1886, he passed 
the preliminary law examination and became 
a law student in the office of Coffroth & Rup- 
pel, at Somerset, Pennsylvania. After pur- 
suing the necessary course of study under 
their direction he was admitted to practice in 
the courts of Somerset county on September 
28, 1S89, and on November 18, 1889, was ad- 
mitted to practice in the courts of Cambria 
county. Wishing to make himself yet more 
proficient in his chosen profession, he pursued 
and completed the course in the law depart- 
ment of the University of Michigan at Ann 
Arbor. He graduated from that university, 
and received the degree of LL.B. Since which 
time he has been located in Johnstown, this 
county. 

On October 9, 1S93, he was admitted to 
practice before the Supreme Court of Penn- 
.sylvania. 

His political affiliations are with the Demo- 
cratic party, but he has never sought nor held 

political office. 

© 

Q" .\. WKIMICH, alderman of the eighth 
'*"^' wanl, Johnstown, a son of David and 
Cath.iriiie (llartnian) Weimer, was born 
March 14, 1846, in Milford townshij), Somer- 
set county. 

His grandfather, Samuel A. Weimer, was a 
farmer of Milford township, Somerset county, 
in all probability of German descent. He 
furthermore enjoyed the distinction of having 
served in the Revolutionary War. 

The father of our subject was born in 
Somerset county, December, 1814, and died 
in 1S75 in Ligonicr, Westmoreland county, 
lie was a farmer of consequence in his neigh- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



85 



borhood, a Lutheran and an old-time whig 
and republican. To his union with the mother 
of our subject seven children were born ; 
Franklin, a farmer of Ligonier ; Daniel H., 
who died in 1867 at Ligonier; Susanna, wife 
of Franklin Walters, of West Mills, Somerset 
county; Eliza, of Hills View, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania ; Lydia, wife of G. W. 
Beck, of Hills View, Westmoreland county ; 
Lavina, widow of John T. Beam, of Water- 
ford, Westmoreland county, Penn.sylvania, 
and the subject of this sketch. 

S. A. Weimer married Elvira Beck, a 
daughter of David B. Beck, and had four 
children: Daniel, a justice of the peace of 
upper Yoder township, married Millie Hersh- 
berger; David P., a student preparing for the 
profession of law ; Ora, who is at home, and 
Catharine, who died in infancy. 

Mr. Weimer's second wife was Mrs. Alinira 
Vickroy {/iff Osborn), who has been to him 
a helpmeet indeed. 

He was educated at Centerville, Somerset 
county, and in local normal schools, and 
taught acceptably ten successive terms, three 
in Somerset county and seven in Westmore- 
land county. 

He was well equipped for making his way 
in life, having learned the carpenter trade, as 
well as the teachers' profession. He followed 
contracting from 1867 to the present time, 
formerly doing an extensive business in that 
line. In addition he owns a farm of sixty 
acres in Upper Yoder township. 

He has always been a staunch republican, 
and an influential member of the Presbyterian 
church. The esteem in which his fellow- 
citizens hold him has been manifested by 
electing him to various offices within their 
gift. He served as first burgess of Grubtown, 
as school director, and for nine years as jus- 



tice of the peace of his borough, and when 
that borough became the eighth ward he was 
elected alderman, serving ever since. Like 
every good citizen, he takes an active interest 
in local politics. 



nEV. WILLIA3I AliFBED SHIPBIAN, 
the eloquent and popular pastor of the 
First P.vangelical Lutheran church of the 
city of Johnstown, was born at Springtown, 
Warren county, New Jersey, September 9, 
1852, and is a son of Dr. William and Annie 
E. (Young) Shipman. His paternal grand- 
father, Matthias Shipman, Sr., was of English 
descent, and passed his life in New Jersey, the 
state of his nativity. He married and reared 
a family of children, of whom one was Isaac 
Shipman, who, like his father, was a native 
and life-long resident of New Jersey. Isaac 
Shipman married, and his son, Dr. William 
Shipman, was born May, 18 18. 

Dr. Shipman received a good education, 
read medicine under Dr. Clyde Kennedy, of 
Easton, this State, and Dr. George McClellan, 
father of General George B. McClellan, and 
then entered JefTerson Medical college, from 
which he was graduated in 1840. After 
graduation he opened an office at Finesville, 
New Jersey, and two years later removed to 
Springtown, that state, where he was in con- 
tinuous practice for fifty-two years. His long 
and useful life closed in 1893, when he passed 
from earth on February 5th of that year. 

Dr. Shipman married Annie E. Young, 
whose grandfather, Captain John Young, 
owned a large tract of land near Springtown, 
and had served under Washington, being at 
Trenton, and receiving a severe wound at 
at Monmouth. Mrs. Shipman died May 5, 
1884, aged sixty-one years. Dr. and Mrs. 
Shipman had two sons, Rev. William Alfred, 



86 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



and Samuel Yohe, a farmer of Wright county, 
Missouri, who served as a Union soldier in 
the late Civil War. 

Dr. Shipman was among the early abolition- 
ists of New Jersey, and fearlessly denounced 
the crime of slavery, regardless of conse- 
quences. He was a warm admirer of William 
Lloyd Garrison, and lived to see the ultimate 
triumph of the anti-slavery principles which 
he advocated and the dawn and early growth 
of a new national day in the life of the great 
republic. 

Rev. William Alfred Shipman was reared 
at his native village, received his elementary 
and academic education in the public schools 
of New Jersey and Stevens Hall, Gettysburg, 
this State, and then entered Pennsylvania col- 
lege, at Gettysburg, from which well-known 
institution of learning he was graduated in 
the class of 1876. After graduation he en- 
tered the Lutheran Theological seminary 
ot the General Synod, at Gettysburg, and 
graduated from that celebrated institution on 
June 25, 1879. He then returned home, and 
on April I, 1880, was elected as pastor of St. 
Paul's Lutheran church of Grafton, West Vir- 
ginia, where he labored acceptably for three 
years and six months. At the end of that 
time he accepted a call from St. Paul's church, 
h'rostburg, Maryland, and remained there for 
three years and three months, resigning then 
to take charge of Zion Lutheran church at 
Hollidaysburg, Blair county, to whom he 
broke the bread of life for three years anil 
three montiis. He closed his labors at llnlli- 
daysburg in June, i8go, to accept a call to 
the pastorate of the First English Lutheran 
church of Johnstown, as successor of Dr. R. 
A. Fink, wiio had l)een [lastor continuously 
for a (piarter of a century. Entering upon 
his new field of labor he has wrought effec- 



tively ever since for the salvation of souls and 
the cause of pure and undefiled religion. 

On May 20, 1880, Rev. Shipman was united 
in marriage with Anna L. Beidenbaugh, a 
daughter of Rev. Edward Beidenbaugh, of 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Their union has 
been blessed with one child, named Minot 
Martinneau. 

In politics Rev. Shipman is a staunch re- 
[Hiblican, but takes no active part in political 
affairs. He is a member and Master Mason 
of Mountain City lodge. No. 99, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Frostburg, Maryland. 
William Alfred Shipman is a genial, affable 
gentleman, who never loses his proper dignity 
on any occasion, and always commands the 
respect of those with whom he mingles, which 
includes the common people as well as the 
professional and business classes. .Sound in 
doctrine, able as a logician and in touch with 
the idea of the age, he is remarkably eloquent 
when the theme or occasion demands. He 
uses his rare gift of language to clothe appro- 
priately living ideas and forcible truths, and 
not to gain the applause of the large audience 
which his preaching draws from all classes of 
societ)-. 



/^Al'TAIN PATRICK <iK.\lI.VM.— No 

^^ memories are so lo\ingly enshrined in 
the Inyal hearts of the North as those of the 
men who fought and suffered in the War of 
the Great Rebellion. Towards these men our 
most generous impulses go forth; to them our 
kindest acts are extended. Although those 
gallant veterans may win fame in other fields, 
we remember them chief!)' for the unselfisli 
service rendered our country in a time of 
direst need. 

Capt. Patrick Graham, an alderman of 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania, is one of those men 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



87 



who are distinguished among their fellows as 
gallant soldiers. He mustered a company in 
Johnstown in 1861, and, being appointed its 
captain, started for the war. From that time 
until May 15, 1864, he was in active service, 
but in the battle of New Market, Virginia, he 
received a wound which nearly proved fatal. 
At that time he was left on the field for dead, 
but was picked up by the rebels, and after 
much suffering recovered. They, however, 
held him for nine months and a half as a 
prisoner at Harrisonburg, Virginia, and he 
was afterwards taken to Macon, Georgia, 
Charlestown, South Carolina. Columbus, 
South Carolina, and Goldsborough, North 
Carolina, when he was released. He then 
came home to Johnstown, where he has re- 
mained ever since, and filled for one term the 
office of justice of the peace, and at present 
is serving his second term as alderman. It is 
meet to say that in his civil service Captain 
Graham shows the same faithfulness and effi- 
ciency which characterized his military life. 

He is a son of Daniel and Liddie (Idding) 
Graham, and was born November 15, 18 17. 
His great-grandfather Graham was a native of 
Scotland, and married a lady from County 
Tyrone, Ireland, where Patrick Graham, grand- 
father, was born. The grandfather ran away 
from home in boyhood and came to America, 
where he followed the occupation of farming 
during the remainder of his life. He took no 
active part in politics, but was a staunch 
democrat. He married Elizabeth McKee, a 
descendant in direct line from the McKee 
family which settled in Jamestown under Capt. 
John Smith. Mr. Graham's maternal grand- 
parents were of German extraction. 

Daniel Graham, father of our subject, was 
born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
and was a farmer the greater part of his life. 



About four years of his early life were spent 
in the manufacture of salt near Freeport, 
Penn.sylvania. He was a republican, and for 
fifteen years was justice of the peace in But- 
ler county, Pennsylvania. He had thirteen 
children, five of whom served in the Civil 
War. 

Captain Patrick Graham is principally a 
self-educated man, having built a small room 
in which he spent his evenings in the study 
of the common branches. Previous to his 
enlistment as a soldier, he had various occu- 
pations and a busy life. He was timekeeper 
during the building of the Pennsylvania canal, 
and followed this occupation until about 1832. 
He then learned the tailor trade, which con- 
stituted his employment until 1844, and at 
intervals until 1853. After that he was em- 
ployed by the Brady's Bend Iron company, of 
Brady's Bend, Pennsylvania, for about three 
years, in the capacity of heater. At the ex- 
piration of this time he was elected justice of 
the peace of that place and served four years. 
He resigned this office and came to Johns- 
town, entering the service of Wood, Morrell 
& Co., as heater, in which occupation he con- 
tinued for six years. At this point his war 
history begins. 

Captain Graham has been twice married. 
March 24, 1837, he married Miss Magdalene 
C. Hamble, who died December 15, 186S. 
She was the mother of seven children, four 
sons and three daughters. Given in the or- 
der of their birth they are as follows: Jane, 
married to Stephen B. Gregory, at present 
living in Johnstown ; Martha W., wife of Rob- 
ert Bennett, a resident of Braddock, Pennsyl- 
vania ; May E., married to John llutzcn, 
residing in Braddock, Pennsylvania; John 
T., married to Eliza Moore, died in Johns- 
town ; Robert Smiley, who married Jennie 



88 



lUOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



Her, and lives in Braddock, Pennsylvania; 
Holmes S., a resident of Braddock also, mar- 
ried Emilia Behm, now dead; Thomas II., 
who lives in Lorain, Ohio, and whose wife was 
Dolly Walters. 

The second wife of Captain Graham was 
Miss Ethelinda Benshoff, of Johnstown, Penn- 
sylvania. 

/^KIKIITII J. LLOYD, a progressive 
^■^ farmer of Cambria township, is a son of 
John and Jane (Vaughn) Lloyd, and was born 
near Bculah, in Cambria township, Cambria 
county, Pennsylvania, 7\ugust 14, 1824. 

His paternal grandfather, Griffith Lio_\ d, 
was born in North Wales, but emigrated to 
America in 181 8. He brought his wife and 
fimily with him, and first located in Philadel- 
phia; here they remained one year. Li 1820 
they moved westward, and settled at Beulah, 
where Mr. Llo}-d passed the remainder of his 
life, engaged in farming. He was a member 
of the Congregational Chuich, and, while in 
his native country, followed the trade of a 
weaver. 

Joiin Lloyd, filher, was born in North 
Wales June 6, \/ij$, and at the age of twenty- 
three came to this country in company with 
his father and family. They finally settled near 
his father in Caml^ria townshij), upon a piece 
of v.ic.mt land containing one lumdietl and 
forty acres, and afterwards purchased one 
lunulrcd and si.\ty acres more from John 
ICvans. 1 le had learned the trades of a weaver 
and stone-mason in liis native country, but, 
after coming to this, followed agricultural 
pursuits exclusively. In early life he was a 
member of the Congregationalist Church, 
but (iii.iU)' became identified witli the Cinistian 
Church, in wiiich he was active. 

On May 6, 18 16, he wedded Jane Vaughn 



in Wales. She was born in North Wales, 
May 8, 1790, and became the mother of eight 
children, three sons and five daughters ; Jane 
died during the voyage to this country ; Nancy 
died in girlhood ; John J. resides in Marshall 
county, Iowa; Griffith J. is the subject of this 
sketch; P^lnora, deceased, was the wife of 
David Jones ; Anna, deceased, was the con- 
sort of George Wilson ; Thomas, deceased, 
was a lumber merchant of Ebensburg, the 
county seat of Cambria county; and Phcebe, 
the relict of Stephen Lloyd, of Nebraska. 

Griffith J. Lloyd was reared upon a farm, 
and has been engaged in the pursuits of hus- 
bandry most of his life. In 1854 he purchased 
the old homestead, which contains one hun- 
dred and forty-six acres. He also owns an 
interest in a valuable tract of timber land situ- 
ated in Blacklick township, this county. He 
is a member of the Christian Church, and in 
politics is a republican. He has filled va- 
rious local offices, among which are: assessor, 
auditor ami school director. 

His marriage on December 7, 1852, with 
Mary, a daughter of David Powell, resulted 
in the birth of five children : Jane A. is de- 
ceased ; John G. is a fu'mcr, and resides near 
Iowa cit)', Iowa ; Jerry, who resides at home 
with his parents, is a successful teacher of 
Cambria county, and is taking the normal 
course in tlie Indiana State Normal school ; 
llattie resides with her brother, John G., and 
Lilly is at home with her parents. 



TOIIN E3IMET LUCAS, a skilled and ex- 

perienced workman, and the senioi- mem- 
ber of the planing mill and contracting firm 
of Lucas & Saly, of Johnstown, is a son 01 
Jolin T. am! S.u'ah ( ik-rry) Lucas, and was 
born in Johnstown, Cambria county, Pennsyl- 
v.mia, June 22, 1851. His paternal great- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



89 



grandfather, Sergeant George Lucas, was a 
native of Ireland, who came to this country 
and served through the Revolutionary war in 
the American army, being promoted to 
orderly sergeant just before the siege of 
Yorktown. He died in Johnstown when 
nearly a hundred years of age. His son, 
David Lucas, was a native of Bedford county, 
and in the '30s came to Johnstown, where he 
abandoned his trade of butcher to serve for 
many years as constable and as a section boss 
on the c.uial. He was a Methodist, and died 
the day before the presidential election of 
1876, when in the eighty-ninth year of his age. 
His son, John T. Lucas, was of Bedford 
county nativity, who came in early life to 
Johnstown, which he left in the spring of 
1852, and went, on account of ill-health, to 
Sacramento, California, where he died in the 
fall of 1852, at the early age of thirty-four 
years. He ran a boat and was a contractor 
on the old canal. He was a member of the 
Methodist church, and married Sarah Berry, 
a member of the same church, and who is 
now, 1896, in the seventieth year of her age, 
and a resident of Johnstown. Her father, 
John Berry, was of Pennsylvania German de- 
scent, and a native of Centre county, and after 
serving as a fifer boy in the War of 18 12, 
went to Duncansville, Blair county, where he 
carried on a wagonmaking-shop until his 
death, in 1866, at eighty years of age. 

John Emmet Lucas was reared principally 
in Johnstown, and at Hollidaysburg, in Blair 
county, and is a natural mathematician, but 
only received a limited education on account 
of having to go to work at nine years of age. 
He worked at first in the oil house, then in the 
brickyard of the Cambria Iron works, at 
twenty-five cents per day, then drove in coal 
mines, etc., and at fifteen years of age became 



a driver in their carpenter shop, where, two 
years later, he was made foreman of the car- 
penters putting up building material, which 
position he held for two years. After this he 
was successfiilly engaged in putting up der- 
ricks in the Pennsylvania oil regions, worked 
on the Canton, Ohio, court house, served as 
foreman of one of the Cambria Iron com- 
pany's gangs of house-building carpenters and 
worked at carpentering and stair-building in 
Indianapolis, Indiana, and Peoria, Illinois. He 
then returned to Johnstown, worked in the 
Cambria Iron company's car department, 
traveled through the South and West doing 
carpenter and stair work, and in 1879 formed 
a partnership with W. H. Smith, in Johns- 
town, in general contracting and stair-building. 
This partnership was of four years' duration, 
when he sold out his interest to Mr. Smith and 
spent a year in Colorado. He then started a 
stair shop in Johnstown, did draughting for J. 
J. Straycr for three years, and then was fore- 
man for S. J. Little, in Pittsburg, who was a 
manufacturer of office and bank fi.xtures until 
the Great Flood of 1889. In that year he 
returned to Johnstown as general superintend- 
ent of estimating work for J. J. Strayer, which 
position he resigned in June, 1894, to form his 
present partnership with Henry Saly in the 
planing mill and general contracting business. 

On May 1 8, 1 872, Mr. Lucas married Minerva 
Cover, who was a daughter of Daniel Cover, 
of Johnstown, and who died March, 1882, 
aged twenty-eight years, leaving four children : 
Emma K., Edith B., Nellie J. and Emmet W. 
Three years later, in 1885, Mr. Lucas wedded 
for his second wife, Mary Dcane, daughter of 
Amos Deane, of Sandy Lake Park, Mercer 
county. By his second marriage he has no 
children. 

In politics Mr. Lucas is an independent 



90 



BIOGRAPHICAL A^T) PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



voter. His life has been one of ^'aried busi- 
ness acti\nt\% and his sennces are always in 
demand where skilled labor and intelligent 
management in his line of work are needed. 



T . lEUT. JOSEPH R. HU3DIEL, a Union 
•^ oi5 cer of the late Ci\-il War, and who 
has served continuously as burgess of Dale 
borough ever since its incorporation, is a son 
of Ttavid and 'Slary Hummel, and was bom in 
Shade township, Somerset count}-, Pennsjl- 
\-ania, Januar\- 17, 1840. Da\'id Hummel 
was a son of Heniy Hummel, a native of 
Franklin count}-, whose father, Henrj^ Hum- 
mel, came from German}-, in all probabilit}-, 
as early as the middle of the last centur\-. 
David Hummel was bom in Somerset count}' 
in 1810, and learned the trade of blacksmith, 
which he followed for a life- vocation. He 
was a democrat, and at one time was one of 
only ten men who voted the Democratic 
ticket in Shade township, Somerset count}'. 
He was a member of the Evangelical church 
of North .America, and married Mar}- Rhoades, 
who was a daughter of Joshua Rhoades, and 
died in 1879, aged sixt}'-nine years. Their 
family consisted of ten children, eight sons 
and two daughters. 

Joseph R- Hummel was reared in his native 
township, received but a limited education in 
the common schools, and was a farm laborer 
until he attained his majority, in 1861. A 
few months later, in October, 1861, he en- 
listed in company " E," Fifty-Fourth Pennsyl- 
vania infantr}', and served until Lee surren- 
dered, being honorably discharged at Anna- 
polis, Maryland, on May 31, 1865. He par- 
tidpated in the following battles : New Mar- 
ket, May 15, 1864; Piedmont, June 5 ; James 
river, June 14; Lynchburg, June 17 and 18; 
Liberty and Salem, June 19-22; Snicker's 



Ford, July 18; Winchester, July 23 and 24; 
Cedar Creek, August 1 2 ; Second Winches- 
ter, September 19; Fisher's Hill, September 
22; Cedar Creek, October 19; Fort Griggs, 
and High Bridge, besides numerous skir- 
mishes. He served as a private until Novem- 
ber I, 1S62, when he was promoted to cor- 
poral, and on October 20, 1864, was made 
sergeant. Afterwards, on April 2, 1865, he 
was commissioned as second lieutenant. Re- 
turning from the army, he drove team for a 
fe« years and engaged in the saw-mill business, 
which he followed for several years, being 
manager of Ashtola mills from 1870 to 1874. 
In the last-named year he came to Johnstown, 
ran a farm and burned lime seven years, and 
then spent nine years in Somerset count}'. 
He returned to Johnstown in 1890. and was 
elected burgess of Dale borough, which was 
organized that year, and has been re-elected 
ever}' year since. 

He is a republican in politics, cast his first 
vote for Abraham Lincoln, and has served for 
ten years as a member of school boards in 
Somerset and Cambria counties. He is a 
member of Emory Fisher Post, No. 30, Grand 
Army of the Republic, and the United Evan- 
gelical church, in which he has always been an 
active worker. In every field in which he has 
labored, Lieut. Joseph Hummel has been 
active, zealous, and useful. As a business man 
he is prompt and reliable, as a public official 
he is firm and just, as a school ofificer discreet, 
prudent and progressive, and as a man, a 
citizen, and a neighbor, he is respected. 

On September lo, 1868, Mr. Hummel was 
united in marriage with Frances Pickworth, a 
daughter of John Pickworth, of Johnstown, 
who was engaged for several years in boating 
on the old canal. Lieut, and Mrs. Hummel 
have seven sons and three daughters: John 



OF CA.MBRIA COUNTY. 



91 



H., Milton A., F. K., Mamie, Samuel P., Ada, 
Nora, Robert, Forest, and Henry. 



Ty^ILLIAKI H. PAUL, a prosperous and 
successful farmer of Conemaugh town- 
ship, was Vjorn in Adams township, this county, 
September 9, 1855, and is a son of Jacob ]?. 
and Barbara (Kring) Paul. 

Jacob B. Paul, grandfather, was a native 
of the German empire, whence he emigrated 
to America, and shortly afterward located 
in Adams township, this county, being among 
the earlier settlers of that township. In 
that township, then mainly a wilderness, he 
cleared up a farm and lived the remain- 
der of his life. 

Jacob B. Paul, father, was born in that town- 
ship in November, 1822. He followed in the 
footsteps of his father, as regards an avocation, 
and has lived all his life in the township of 
his birth. The Republican party is the one 
with which he has always affiliated, and he is 
a conscientious member of the United Evan- 
gelical church. His marriage resulted in the 
birth of six children: two died in infancy; 
Jeremiah, a farmer and lumberman of Adams 
township ; William H., subject ; Jacob, died 
young; and Mary A., the wife of A. B. Custer, 
a merchant of Conemaugh, this county. 

William H. Paul received a limited educa- 
tional training in the common schools of 
Adams township. For twelve years he fol- 
lowed lumbering, and then, in 1890, purchased 
a farm consisting of ninety-nine acres, situated 
on the Frankstown road, about two miles east 
of Johnstown, and has since followed the pur- 
suits of agriculture. He believes in the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party, which party 
has elected him to the office of tax collector 
and constable of Conemaugh township. On 
October 31, 1883, were celebrated the nuptials 



that made Mr. Paul and Mary Hoffman, hus- 
band and wife. To this wedded relation have 
been born four children : Irvin Ellsworth, 
Cora May, Sidney Elmira and Mimiie Mabel. 



^O F. STULL., a self-made business man 
• and successful merchant of Dale bor- 
ough, is a son of Rev. William H. and Mar- 
garet (Varner) Stull, and was born forty- 
six years ago, on a farm, in Richland town- 
ship, Cambria county, Pennsylvania. He 
is of German and Scotch descent, and his 
paternal grandfather, Jacob Stull, was a na- 
tive of Berks county and settled in Cambria 
county, where he purchased a farm and reared 
a family of respectable sons and daughters. 
He was a democrat and a member of the 
Evangelical church, and married Elizabeth 
Paul, by whom he had eleven children — Bar- 
bara, wife of John Paul ; Mary married Rev. 
Louis Dunmire, and now is dead ; Elizabeth 
Oster, now deceased ; Catharine, wife of 
Henry Dunmire ; John F., living at Salix ; 
Jacob R., now deceased, who served for 
thirty-two years as justice of the peace in 
Richland township, and also one term as 
county commissioner ; Susan ; Rev. William 
H., father; Daniel, now dead ; Lydia, wife of 
John S. Wissingcr; and Leah, who wedded 
Lewis Shank. Rev. William H. Stull was 
born August, 1825, and his life labor closed 
in 1875, passing to rest on October 5 of 
that year. He was a man of ordinary educa- 
tion and self-made in the true sense of that 
term. He entered the ministry of the Evan- 
gelical church in 1856, and was on Bedford 
circuit two years ; Jefferson, two years ; Indi- 
ana, two years; Preston, West Virginia, two 
years; Fairview, one year; and Somerset, 
two years. He was a whig and afterwards a 
republican in politics, gave an ardent support 



92 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



to the Union during the Civil War, and always 
took a lively interest in the public schools. 
Reverend Stull married Margaret Varner, 
who is a daughter of George Varner, and has 
reached the seventy-first milestone along the 
pathway of life. Their union was blessed 
with si,\ children — Sarah Jane, who died in 
1863 ; B. F., the subject of this sketch ; Chris- 
tiann married Alexander Story and is now de- 
ceased ; Martha Elizabeth, wife of William 
G. McKce ; Lorenzo Dow, of Adams town- 
ship, and Amanda J., who wedded Herbert 
Benner, of Atlantic city. 

B. F. Stull was reared on the farm, attended 
the common schools and Dayton Union 
academy, and taught for eleven terms in the 
public schools while employing the summer 
seasons in farming and carpentering ; resided 
at Conemaugh six years and then moved to 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania, where he lived four 
years and then went to Bethel, .Somerset 
county, where he entered the mercantile busi- 
ness and remained there until 1887, when he 
was washed out by a flood, lie then came 
to Dale and resumed the general mercantile 
business on a small scale. 

Each year since then he has aiUled to this 
stock of goods and increasetl his patron- 
age until he has a fine establishment and a 
large and desirable trade. lie makes special- 
ties of groceries, dry goods, boots and shoes, 
besides keeping in stock all other kinds of 
general merchandise. 

On September 8, 1874, Mr. Stull married 
Mary J. Maurer, a daughter of George J. 
Maurer, of .Stoyestown, Somerset county. 
They have five children : I loward W., George 
B., Annie May, Ivella I'earl and y\rthur 
Maurer. 

In politics Mr. .Stull has alwa)'s been a re- 
pui)lican. lie was one of the first council- 



men of Dale borough, served two years as 
auditor of the borough and one term as clerk 
of council, and is a member of the present 
school board. He is a member of the Pro- 
tected Home Circle, No. 138, and Moxham 
Lodge, No. 1044, Independent Order of Odd 
I'^ellows, and a member and the secretary of 
the Dale Building and Loan Association, of 
Dale, Pennsylvania. He is a member and 
trustee of the United Evangelical church. B. 
F. .Stull is one of that class of substantial 
business men who give stabilit)- and reputa- 
tion to any place or community in which 
they live. With but little means, and those 
the scant savings from meagre resources, he 
embarked in a business career which is now 
but fairly begun in a field where abundant 
success has already crowned his unaided 
efforts. He is energetic, persevering and hon- 
est in all matters and a thorough-going busi- 
ness man. 



HKNIJY .lONKS, a successful and substan- 
tial farmer of Cambria township, Cam- 
bria county, Pennsylvania, is of Welsh birth 
and parentage, born in Llanelly, Carmarthen- 
.shire, March 12, 1841. 

His father, James Jones, who was a skilled 
artisan, died in Jul)', 1842, when Henry was 
but fourteen months old; and his mother 
(Miss Margaret Roberts Jones) afterwards 
wi'iKkd John Philip, who rearetl young Jones 
to manhooil, and gave him such mental train- 
ing as the common schools afforded. He 
learned the trade of a copper-smelter, in which 
he became a skilled and proficient workman, 
anil which he continued until 1871, in his 
native country antl in Baltimore, Maryland. 
He located in Baltimore in 1865, and in 1871 
removetl to his piesent farm of one hundred 
and sixt)'-nine (169) acres, situated three miles 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



93 



north of Ebensburg, this county. He is a care- 
ful and methodical farmer, and has been suc- 
cessful from the very beginning. He is a 
member of the State Grange, and takes an 
intelligent interest in all matters pertaining to 
the ait of husbandry. He subscribes to the 
tenets of the Calvinistic Methodist church, in 
which he is an active worker, having been 
deacon of the church since 1 891. 

In 1869, he married Mary Evans, a daugh- 
ter of E. J. Evans, oC Cambria township, and 
to them have been born three sons : Arthur, 
at home ; Ambrose, a laborer on a farm of 
Johnson county, Iowa ; and William H., at 
home. 

Mr. Jones is regarded as a good citizen, and 
is held in high esteem by his many friends 
and associates. 



HENRY R, SHAFFER, an old and highly 
respected citizen of Conemaugh town- 
ship, who has served as a justice of the peace 
for a quarter of a century, is a son of John P. 
and Maria (Lehman) Shaffer, and was born in 
Richland township, Cambria county, Pennsyl- 
vania, December 11, 1828. His paternal 
great-grandfather, George Shaffer, was a native 
of Germany, who came to this country prior 
to the Revolutionary war, in which he served 
as a soldier in the American army. He settled 
in the Kishacoquillas valley, in the eastern 
part of the State, where he lived until his 
death. His son, Henry Shaffer, emigrated 
from the valley to Richland township, where 
he followed farming as an occupation. He 
served as a soldier in the War of 1812, and 
his son, John P., who lived for some time in 
Richland township, was born on the old valley 
homestead in eastern Pennsylvania, July 19, 
1804, and in 1848 removed to Conemaugh 
township, where he died November 30, 1875. 



John P. Shaffer did not enjoy very good edu- 
cational privileges, as his father died when he 
was but fourteen years of age, and he was 
then busied with many cares. He was a 
farmer and a democrat, and held membership 
in the Reformed church for many years. He 
married Maria Lehman, whose father. Chris- 
tian Lehman, was a resident of Richland 
township. Mrs. Shaffer died February, 1861, 
aged fifty-six years. Their family consisted 
of five sons and four daughters. 

Henry R. Shaffer spent his boyhood days 
on the farm, received a good English educa- 
tion in the schools of his day, and commenced 
life for himself as a repair hand on the old 
Portage railroad. He afterwards taught four 
terms of school, and then learned the trade of 
carpenter, which he followed for ten years. 
At the end of that time, in 1861, physical 

: disability caused him to abandon his trade, 
and also prevented him from entering the 
Union army. Not desiring to be idle, he took 
timber contracts for the Cambria Iron com- 
pany and the Pennsylvania Railroad company, 
and was thus engaged until 1866, when he 
removed to his present farm in Conemaugh 
township, which he tilled up to 1S94. Since 

i that year, Mr. Shaffer has been engaged in 
introducing improved and modern farming 
implements into the county. His farm, which 
is five miles from Johnstown, contains one 
hundred and forty-three acres of good land, 
one-half of which is cleared and improved. 
In matters of national import and issue, Mr. 
Shaffer has always supported the Democratic 
party, but in local affairs is independent, sup- 
porting men instead of parties. He has been 
honored with all of his township offices, 
served as county auditor in 1867, 1868 and 
1869, and has been justice of the peace for 
twenty-five years, serving continuously from 



94 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



1869 to l8g6, except two years. 'Squire 
Shaffer is a member and trustee of Mt. Carmel 
United Brethren church, and ranks as one of 
the oldest and most representative citizens of 
his section of the county. 

On May 7, 1857, 'Squire Shaffer married 
Ehzabeth Strayer, a daughter of Jacob P. 
Strayer, of Yoder townsliip. To 'Squire and 
Mrs. Shaffer have been born eight children: 
Anna Matilda, wife of William Giffin,a farmer 
of Adams township ; Charles, who died 
young; George W., who died April 11, 1894 
aged thirty-two years ; William B. F. ; Mary 
E., wife of Edward H. Boytes, of near Somer- 
set, Somerset county ; Ellen, who married A. 
C. Rively, of Richland township; Effie Etta, 
wife of Harry Gilnian, a farmer ; and Robert 
H., who is at home with his parents. One 
died in infancy. The Shaffer family is one 
among the old families of the western part of 
the State, while its members have always 
been known as respectable and reliable people. 

o 

I^K. K. 1.1. MITXKIJ, one of Johnstown's 
leading young phjsicians, is a son of 
Rev. J. K. and Charlotte Henrietta (Ziegler) 
Miller, and was born Jul)- 15, 1859, '" Erie- 
dens, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. 

Me was educated at Centre Hall, Centre 
county, Pennsylvania. For aljout four and 
one-half years he was with his fither and 
brother John in the drug business at Centre 
Hall. He clerked for a time in A. A. Ker- 
lin's general merchandi.se .store at Stone Mills, 
Centre county, then went into the lumber 
business for about a year and a half Later 
he studied medicine under Dr. W. A. Jacobs, 
of Centre Hill, and, entering the University of 
Maryland, graduated in 1884. He first prac- 
ticed in Philipsburg, Centre county, for three 
months, then for three and a half years at 



Unionville, Centre county, and in December, 
1887, came to Johnstown, where he has re- 
mained ever since, a general practitioner of 
merit. 

He is a member of the Centre County 
Medical society, of the Pennsylvania State 
Medical society, and of the Cambria County 
Medical society, of which body he has served 
both as vice president and as secretary. His 
fraternal affiliations are with the Knights of 
the Golden Eagle. He is a republican. 

October 30, 1884, Dr. Miller married Joanna 
E. Atherton, a daughter of Nelson Atherton, 
and has two children. The oldest, Elvira May, 
was born February i, 1886; the second, 
Clarence A., was born July 18, 1888. The 
authentic family history of Dr. Miller, on the 
paternal side, begins with his grandfather, 
Charles Miller, a native of Maryland, who 
emigrated, living successively in York, Cam- 
bria, Centre and Bedford counties. In the 
latter county he established himself at Bed- 
ford as a cigar maker, following this trade 
until the last twenty years of his life, when he 
became a paralytic. 

A sketch of the life of the father of our sub- 
ject forms a very interesting portion of the 
family history. Born in Manchester, Mary- 
land, 1823, he learned the trade of a cigar 
maker, but, being dissatisfied with his attain- 
ments, determined to make his way through 
Pennsylvania College at Gettj-sburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. This he did, overcoming difficulties 
which would have disheartened a less brave 
spirit, and grailuated in 1850. Tn this college, 
a Lutheran institution, he took the full classi- 
cal and theological course, requiring seven 
long years of hard study. He was then or- 
tlained to the Lutheran ministry, and served in 
that relation the remainder of his life, dying 
at Loganton, Clinton county, where he had 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



95 



been living, September, 1887. He was a 
thoughtful, suggestive preacher and a scholarly 
man, who always took an active, earnest part 
in church and educational work. He was for 
a number of years a trustee of Pennsylvania 
college, and was also the second county super- 
intendent of the schools of Somerset county. 
Having had dyspeptic tendencies, he was in- 
duced to take the latter position on account of 
his health. He was a constant reader, and 
sought in all his preaching to pour light upon 
all great public questions, meanwhile uttering 
truths which lay at the heart of all ages. 

He was a man of keen sympathies and 
human instincts, who has been held in the 
kindest remembrance by many who knew 
him. He was a pioneer preacher of great 
religious influence, who yearned to carry to 
others the charities of a Christian faith. Being 
likewise an eloquent, forcible, convincing 
speaker, he was an acknowledged leader in 
the conventions of his church. 

In addition to these high qualifications, he 
was a business man of no mean ability, as is 
evidenced by important real-estate deals in 
Illinois and in Adams county, Pennsylvania, 
which lie put through with honorable success. 
Politically he was a whig, but became a demo- 
crat. His first wife, and mother of our sub- 
ject, was born in 1832. Their family consisted 
often children : Charles A., who died at Cen- 
tre Hall, at the age of twenty-two years, a 
young man of fine education and high Chris- 
tian character ; John C, a traveling merchant 
for the drug firm of J. A. Williamson, Fred- 
erick, Maryland ; Eugene, of Lorain, Ohio, in 
the employ of the Johnson company ; Dr. Mil- 
ler, our subject ; Jacob K., of Johnstown, an 
employee of the Cambria Iron company ; with 
his brother John C. ; Mary Grace, wife of 
Frank Singer, of Johnsonburg, Elk county, 



Pennsylvania, manager of a paper mill ; Annie 
Gertrude, of Johnstown ; Maggie, who died 
at Chambersburg, a child of two and a half 
years; Charlotte H., wife of C. H. Morris, 
druggist, of Millheim, Centre county; and 
William, who died in infancy. 

The father of our subject was married the 
second time to Barbara Ellen Lonebarger, of 
Centre county, and to this union was born one 
child, Nellie M., book-keeper for the hard- 
ware firm of Goodfellow, Melvin Co., of Al- 
toona, Pennsylvania. Few families, it may be 
said, have been more fortunate than that of 
the Rev. J. K. Miller's in having the example 
of a noble father. 



JOHN" C. MILLER, a brother of Dr. E. L. 
Miller, and a traveling salesman residing 
in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, was born Febru- 
ary 18, 1854, at Friedens, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania. He received a high-school edu- 
cation, and learned the trade of a printer, serv- 
ing a full apprenticeship. He went west later, 
and, after traveling over a number of western 
States,, came back to Centre Hall, and between 
1873 and 1879 was engaged in the drug busi- 
ness with his father. For eight years there- 
after he was in the lumber business. This 
was followed by a year as a clerk, and then 
he embarked in the grocery business in 
Johnstown, continuing in it for about three 
years. Since that time he has been a travel- 
ing salesman in the drug business, first for the 
Physicians' Pharmaceutical company, of Jen- 
kintown, Pennsylvania, until 1895, when 
they went out of business; now for a Fred- 
erick, Maryland, firm, as before stated. 

Mr. Miller was married March 3, 1892, to 
Grace V. Achenbach, a daughter of George 
A. Achenbach of Loganton, Clinton county, 
Pennsylvania, who was a member of the Con- 



96 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



stitutional convention, called to amend the 
Constitution in 1878. He is a member of 
Sugar Valley Lodge, No. 822, I. O. O. F. 

Mr. Miller is a genial, successful business 
man, observing in his life the sound principles 
inculcated b}' his home training. 



-^H. GKOIUJK 3IARTIN.— The subject 
^"^ of this sketch, Dr. George Martin, is a 
leading physician of Conemaugh, Cambria 
county, Pennsylvania. He is the son of 
David and Nancy (Hadden) Martin, and was 
born October 11, 1858, in Indiana county, 
]V-nns\lvania. November 21, 1888, he mar- 
ried Miss Mary Clark, a daughter of L. M. 
Clark, of Indiana coUnty. December 25, 
1889, Blanche, the first of his two children, 
was born; January 16, 1S94, Almira, the sec- 
ond, was born. 

Dr. Martin was educated in the common 
schools and at Pine Flat Academy, Indiana 
State Normal school anil a college at Cham- 
paign, Illinois. For six terms he taught 
school successfully in Pennsylvania and Illi- 
nois, and also clerked for a time in the store 
of his brother, at Martintown, Indi.m.i count)', 
a town named for the family. 

Hut Dr. Martin's ambitions led him into 
professional work, and in 1882 he commenced 
the stud)' of medicine uiulcr Dr. Thomas 
MacMuUen, of Greenville, Indiana county. 
Later he entered Jefferson Medical college, 
and graduated in 1885. For four years after 
graduating he practiced his profession at 
Cherrytree, Indiana county, and then moved 
to Conemaugh, where he now has a profitable 
and congenial practice. 

He was a member of the Indiana County 
Medical society and of the Cambria County 
Medical society. He served for three years 
as coroner of Cambria county, this being 



the only ofifice for which he was ever a 
candidate. At the same time he is a staunch 
democrat, and stands high in the esteem of 
his fellow-citizens. He is a member of the 
Presbyterian church. In his profession Dr. 
Martin is zealous and indefatigable, and in his 
character is manifested the best characteristics 
of the Scotch-Irish race. 

Dr. Martin is a great-grandson of David 
Martin, a native of Scotland, who emigrated to 
Donegal county, in the north of Ireland, noted 
as the cradle of the Scotch-Irish people. His 
grandfather, John Martin, was born in Ireland 
and came to America in iSoi, at the age of 
twenty-one. He landed at New Castle, Dela- 
ware, but shortly afterward came to Indiana 
county, and located in what was then Cherry 
Hill township. Here he died at the age of 
ninety-six years. He was a farmer and a 
democrat up to the late Civil War, held town- 
ship offices and took an active part in local 
politics. 

The father of our subject was born in West- 
moreland county, January 4, 1S14, and was 
three months old when the family moved to 
Indiana count}', lie lived nearly all his life 
in Green townshij), dying there in 1890. He 
also was a farmer and active in local politics, 
lie married the mother of Dr. Martin, who 
was born near Indiana, in Indiana count)', and 
to this union were born three boys and fi\e 
girls. 

o 

♦^ANIKI. S. I>I«-ANUI..TY, a retired bus- 
^^ iness man and respected citizen of Barnes- 
boro, Cambria county, Penns\lvania, is a son 
of Michael and Mrs. Mary Dcane nee Simpson 
McAnult}-, and was born in Indiana county, 
Pennsylvania, June I, 1819. His ancestors on 
the paternal side of the famil)' were of the 
sturdy Scotch race, renowned for its frugality, 




DR. A. S. IK II IM:1 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



97 



integrity, and sterling qualities of heart and 
mind. 

His grandfather, John McAnulty, was born 
in Scotland, and came to this country the latter 
part of the eighteenth century, and located near 
Chambersburg, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, 
where he married an Irish lady, and then 
removed to Indiana county. He engaged in 
the hotel business, which he followed the re- 
mainder of his life. He was a consistent 
member of the Presbyterian church. His 
family consisted of three sons and two daugh- 
ters : Patrick, who served in the War of i8i2, 
at the close of which he settled near Niagara 
Falls; Michael, father of the subject of this 
memoir; and John, who died in Jefferson 
county. 

Michael McAnulty was born in Franklin 
county, and removed to Indiana county with 
his parents, where he received a liberal edu- 
cation, considering the limited educational 
facilities of those days, and as a means of 
gaining a livelihood adopted the pursuits of a 
farmer, while during the winter he taught in 
the subscription schools of those early days. 
He married Mrs. Mary Deane {uce Simpson), 
and their union was blessed in the birth of 
seven children. In religious faith he was a 
member of the United Presbyterian Church. 
He died at the age of seventy-three years. 

Daniel S. McAnulty was reared a fermer 
boy, and received his early education in the 
old subscription schools. Since he reached 
the age of maturity he has been engaged in 
farming and lumbering, which pursuits he has 
followed with a marked degree of success. 
In 1856 he located on a tract of land which 
he owned, containing four hundred and twenty 
acres, upon which the town of Barnesboro, 
this county, is now located. 

In religious belief he is a member of the 



Church of God. He has always taken an 
active interest in the progress of the church, 
and has served as deacon for twenty-five years. 
He is a member of the Junior Order of 
American Mechanics, and in political faith 
adheres to the principles of the Republican 
party. 

July 4, 1843, li^ wedded Mrs. Eliza Jane 
McDowell, and to this union have been born 
seven children : Michael, a sawyer, located at 
Barnesboro; Nancy, the wife of Samuel Hart- 
zel, of Clearfield county, Pennsylvania ; John, 
deceased ; Mary, the wife of A. A. Grumbling, 
of Barnesboro ; Henry McAnulty, sawyer, of 
Barnesboro; George, a farmer, in Indiana 
county ; Sarah, the wife of Thomas Jones, of 
Barnesboro, and Frank, a merchant of Barnes- 
boro. 



y^R. AL,BON S. FICHTNEK. The man 

^^ who inherits the spirit and tastes of his 
immediate ancestors is a fortunate man, for the 
hindrances which stand between him and the 
attainment of his ambitions are more easily 
overcome when he has the helpful sympathy 
of those who have had similar experiences. 

The subject of this sketch. Dr. A. S. Ficht- 
ner, a flourishing young physician of Johns- 
town, should therefore be congratulated upon 
being the son of a physician, who was him- 
self the son of a physician. 

Dr. Fichtner, son of Dr. B. A. and Louisa 
J. (Darby) Fichtner, was born August 9, 1868, 
in Preston county, West Virginia. 

His grandfather, Daniel Fichtner, was a 
native of Germany, whence he emigrated to 
this country and settled in Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania. The grandfather of Dr. Ficht- 
ner, who was born in Somerset county, was a 
physician in that county for at least fifty years, 
an unusual record. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



He was a prominent member of the Evan- 
gelical cluirch, and being a man of superior 
education for the time, was often called upon 
for exhortations. He was a licensed minister 
in the Evangelical Association from about 
1839 until his death, in 1884, thus combining 
in his life the work of a physician and spiritual 
leader. His wife survived him nearly six 
years. Their family consisted of Benjamin 
A., Susan Catherine (Browning) and Martin 
Luther, all of whom are still living. 

The eldest Dr. Benjamin Abbott Fichtner, 
father of our subject, was born near Somerset 
count)', Pennsylvania, January 31, 1836. His 
grandfather, Martin Fichtner, and his father, 
Martin Fichtner, were also natives of this 
count)'. Ilis mother's name was Rebecca 
I'"erner, who was the daughter of John Ferner, 
and a sister of Randolph Ferner. 

Dr. Benjamin A. Fichtner began the study 
of medicine in early life, was admitted to 
practice in 1857, and has followed the profes- 
sion exclusively and very successfully for 
more than thirty-si.x years. 

" What the child admired, the youth en- 
deavored, and the man acquireil. " 

While in the office of his father as assistant 
he married Louisa Jane Darby, a member of 
one of the most prominent and respected 
families of the State. 

In i860 he moved to I'ayette county and 
built tiie second iiouse in what is now the 
borough of l\Iarklc)'.sburg. In 1864 he went 
to .SiuuMierlicKl, Camhiia lount)', antl soon 
afterward joined the Eighty-eightii regiment, 
Pennsylvania volunteers, serving until the 
close of the war. In 1S76 he located perma- 
nently at Conlluence, Cambria county. 

Dr. Fichtner, Sr., has given his undivided 
attention to the study and practice of his pro- 
fession, and being always ready to avail him- 



j self of new discoveries in medical science, is 
very successful, and has an extensive and 
lucrative practice. 

He has a very fine and complete medical 
library, is a subscriber to all the standard 
medical and surgical journals, and his offices 
are fully and completely equipped. He is a 
close student, still an active, energetic, lex-el- 
headed man, and notwithstanding ad\'ancing 
)'ears, has apparentl)' many years of useful- 
ness before him. He is well up in the news 
of the da)' and in general literature. As a 
public speaker he is able, forcible and logical, 
and is a debater of ability. He united with 
the Evangelical association when a young 
man and is a leading member of that denomi- 
nation. In the great controversy he is op- 
posed to Esher, Esherism and Esherists. 

He is connected with a number of different 
societies and organizations, is the president of 
a board of medical pension examiners, and is 
general business manager of the Confluence 
Cornet band. He is a public-spirited man, 
and is entirely fearless, personally. It was 
through him and by his skill and pluck more 
than anything else that the notorious McClel- 
lantown gang of robbers was hounded down, 
surrounded and captured a few years ago. He 
was the first man at the house, and it was to 
him, .iml on his tieniami, thai tlic gang sul- 
lenly surrendered. 

In politics he was reared a democrat, but 
was never in accord with the southern wing 
ol tint part)', ami ah\a)'s opposed the here- 
sies of State rights and secession. At the elec- 
tion closing the memorable campaign of i860 
he voted for Stephen A. Douglas, but the fir.st 
shot fired b)- the iei)els at "Old Glory" made 
him at once what he is ami has been ever 
since, a true republican. 

He does not, howe\er, wear a collar around 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



99 



his neck with any man's name on it, and does 
not believe that loyalty to party demands ser- 
vile obedience to the orders of any clique 
whose object is revenue only. He believes in 
statesmen, not mere politicians ; teachers, not 
bosses, and when he strikes at " rings " of 
.State, county or borough, it is always straight 
out from the shoulder. He is a true party 
man and is not related in any way to the 
chronic kicker, but when he does kick, he 
kicks with both feet ; he kicks hard and kicks 
to hurt. 

He is not an ofifice-seeker, but when his 
services are required in an official capacity, he 
thinks it his duty as a citizen to accept, and he 
always fills the position with marked ability. 

He is the father of nine children, three of 
whom — Walter Lee, Ulysses Grant and Cla- 
rence Ellsworth — are dead. Of the living all 
are married except Fannie Felicia, the young- 
est of the family. The other five are : Benja- 
min Beeson, Confluence ; Louisa Jane (Mc- 
Farland), Uniontown ; John Daniel, Union- 
town ; Sarah Rebecca (Morrison), Uniontown ; 
and Albon Sylvester, our subject. 

The mother of Dr. Albon S. Fichtner died 
in the spring of 1894. 

He received a solid education in the com- 
mon schools of the town, and at the age of 
nineteen became a teacher. His character 
and success as a teacher are demonstrated in 
the fact that although so young, he held prin- 
cipalships at Addison, Deer Park, Maryland, 
and Confluence, this State, and taught a normal 
school at Addison or Petersburg, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania. 

He studied medicine with his father, and, as 
the records of the father's life show, the 
son had the advantages of a good library and 
unusually fine instruction. | 

He then entered the College of Physicians , 



and Surgeons of Baltimore, from which school 
he graduated in 1882. He located first at 
Cranesville, Preston county, W. Va., practi- 
cing there until 1888, when he came to Johns- 
town, where he has been, ever since, a general 
practitioner, progressive and diligent in his 
work. While at college he took four special 
courses, viz. : operative ophthalmic surgery, 
general surgery, diseases of chest and throat, 
gynaecology. 

He is a member of the Cambria County 
Medical society, is physician for a number of 
insurance companies, and has served on the 
staff of the Conemaugh Valley Memorial hos- 
pital, being the first surgeon appointed. He 
is also a member of Morrellville Lodge, No. 
50, I. O. O. F., one of the charter members of 
Jr. O. U. A. M., a member of the Mystic Chain 
and Foresters, and a number of the patriotic 
orders represented in the city. 

In 1 89 1 he organized the Morrellville 
Building and Loan association, and has been 
its president ever since. It has done much 
towards helping to secure homes for the poor 
of Morrellville, and has been very successful. 
He is the president of the Morrellville Board 
of Health. 

He is an earnest republican and a valued 
member of the Lutheran church. 

In 1881 he married Latilla M. Mayer, and 

has four living children : Ellsworth, Annie E., 

Sarah Rebecca and Rachael R. One child 

died in infancy. 

o 

TA3IES WILLIAMS, the oldest Odd Fel- 
low in Cambria county, Pennsylvania, 
was born in county Norfolk, England, on June 
13, 1818. 

At a very early age he took to the sea, and 
followed the perilous fortunes of seamen until 
twenty-six years of age, circumnavigating the 



100 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



globe twice, and crossing and re-crossing the 
Atlantic several times. In 1845 he was en- 
gaged upon a liner which ran between New 
York city and Charleston. 

Knowing that his parents had come to this 
country in about 1830, he began to make a 
search for them, and was successful in locating 
them in Catasauqua, Lehigh county, this State. 
His father was a blacksmith in the employ of 
the Crane Iron works, and Mr. Williams be- 
came a helper in the shops until 1854. Upon 
the latter date he went to Johnstown, and has 
remained in that city ever since. 

Coming to that borough he entered the 
employ of the Cambria Iron company until 
1866. In 1866, having demonstrated consid- 
erable constructive skill, he was employed to 
build the water works for the Johnstown 
Water company. After their completion he 
was made su[)erintendent, a position he has 
held to the present time, and all enlargements 
and improvements to the same have been 
under his supervision. He has also been 
superintendent of the gas works of the same 
company. 

Fraternally no less than as a citizen and a 
man, Mr. Williams is deservedly popular. He 
is a member of Johnstown Lodge, No. 538, [ 
F. and A. M.; Portage Chapter, No. 195, R. 
A. M.; Alma Lodge, I. O. O. F., the 
oldest in the county, being an Odd Fellow 
since 1846. He has been district deputy and 
also a delegate a number of years ; is a mem- 
ber of Knights of Pythias at Johnstown ; I)e- 
longs to the Encampnuiit connected with the 
Odd Fellows; is a member of the Episcopal 
("hurch. 

Mr. Williams has been twice niarried. His 
first union was with Jane G. Emmerson, and 
resulted in the birth of the following children: 
Leonora, dead; Robert E. was a locomotive 



engineer in the employ of the Pennsylvania 
railroad, and was killed in the service; and 
George H., a resident of Morrellville. 

His second marriage was with Jane Hamil- 
ton, of Johnstown, a sister of Catherine Hamil- 
ton, who was born in Johnstown in 18 17, and 
who is perhaps the oldest native of that city 
now living in it. To the latter marriage were 
born the following children : Harrv, a physi- 
cian at the time of his death in Pittsburg; 
John F., of Johnstown; Homer D., of Indian- 
apolis, Ind ; Frank, of Johnstown, a manufac- 
turer of brick, and Webster, who died young. 



T B. DENNY, of Ebensburg, this county, 

^ • is a son of Matthias Dennj' and Mary 
(Latterner) Denny, and was born in Elder 
township, Cambria count)', on November 9, 
i86i. His grandfather, Peter Denny, was a 
native of Alsace-Lorraine, P'rance, and emi- 
grated to America about 1820, locating in 
Hollidaysburg Blair county, after which he 
moved to Elder township, this county, where 
lie followed the avocation of a stonemason 
and farmer for many years. Matthias Denny, 
his only son, and the father of J. H. Denny, 
was born in 1831, in Elder township, Cambria 
county, where he lived until 1865. He was 
a carpenter by trade, and from 1S65 to 
187s was one of the leading contractors of 
Altoona, Pa. 

During the late Civil War, Matthias Denny 
was draftctl for service three times, and was in 
the field when the war closed. 1 le has always 
supported the Democratic part)- and repre- 
sented his party in conventions, and in 18S6 
served as burgess of Gallitzin borougli.and in 
1887 as school director. lie is a devout 
member of the Roman Catholic church. 

In 1858 Matthias Denny married Mar>' 
Latterner, who was a daughter of Michael 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



101 



and Catharine (Sharbaugh) Latterner, Michael 
Latterner being a native of France, and hav- 
ing emigrated to Loretto, this county, where 
he followed the business of tailoring. Their 
marriage has been blessed in the birth of the 
following children : J. B.Denny; Michael R., 
who died in Altoona in 1894 at the age of 
thirty-two years ; Wm. C, a carpenter, now 
in the employ of the Penn.sylvania Railroad 
company at Altoona ; Rev. Joseph G., who was 
ordained to the priesthood at Price Hill The- 
ological Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, in June, 
1895, and who is now stationed in Cincinnati, 
Ohio; Mollie ; Annie R., who died in 1895; 
Edward R., painter, who is in the employ of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad company at Al- 
toona; Tillie M.; Frank, who died in 1890; 
Stella and Loretto. 

J. B. Denny received his education in the 
public schools, and when fourteen years of 
age he embarked in the produce business at 
Chest Springs, after which he engaged in the 
merchandizing business at that and other 
places. On October 19, 1884, J. B. Denny 
was married in St. Patrick's church, Chicago, 
Illinois, to Miss Caroline V. Christy, of Lor- 
etto, a daughter of Dr. A. J. Christy and 
Mary (Gwin) Christy, of that place, and a 
niece of Rev. R. C. Christy, who was a noted 
chaplin of the late Civil War. Mr. Denny's 
marriage has been blessed in the birth of the 
following children : Mary Olean, Matthias 
Andrew, who died in 1887, Emily Grace, 
Hilda Rose, and John. 

After his marriage Mr. Denny embarked in 
the hotel business at Loretto, after which he 
came to Ebensburg and took charge of the 
Mountain House, one of the leading hotels 
of Ebensburg, which hotel he has owned 
since 188S. In addition to this hotel, Mr. 
Denny, in 1890, purchased the West End 



hotel, in Altoona, Pennsylvania, one of the 
principal railroad hotels in that city. He has 
been successful in the hotel and real estate 
business. 

Politically he is a democrat, and has repre- 
sented his party as a delegate to both county 
and state conventions. In 1894 he was the 
nominee of his party for the legislature. 



/>EOKGE J. MYERS, who has carved out 
for himself a useful and successful career, 
is a son of John B. and Catherine (Myers) 
Myers, and was born in Williamsport, Penn- 
sylvania, March 4, 1820. His father, who was 
born November 8, 1791, was a native of Rus- 
sia, and his mother was born in Germany, 
November i, 1793. They were married before 
coming to this country. In 18 17 they emi- 
grated to America and located near Williams- 
port, where they rented a farm, which they 
continued to cultivate until 1822, when they 
removed by means of wagons to this county, 
locating in the woods in Allegheny township, 
where they had all the difficulties of a new 
settlement to overcome. Here by untiring 
energy and industry Mr. Myers succeeded in 
clearing a farm on which he resided until 
1837. He then removed to Pennsylvania Fur- 
nace, on Spruce creek, on the line of Centre 
and Huntingdon counties, Pennsylvania. He 
resided here for six years and again returned 
to Cambria county, where he purchased a 
farm near Loretto. 

He died in 1S75, his wife having died June 
19, 1854. They were both devout members 
of the Roman Catholic church. They had 
seven children: Peter, an inmate of the sol- 
diers' home, in Kansas; A. J., who lives near 
Sioux city, Iowa ; John B., of Pender, Ne- 
braska; Mary, the wife of Martin Fleck; 
Catherine, the wife of R. E. Smith, of Keokuk, 



102 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



Iowa; George J., and Matilda, the wife of F. 
D. Saupp, of Altoona, Pennsylvania. 

George J. Myers, whose boyhood days were 
spent near Wiliiamsport, never had the ad- 
vantages of common school education. He 
remained with his parents until he was twelve 
years old, and during these years his father 
taught him to read and write in the German lan- 
guage. 1 le had a retentive memory, and being 
a constant reader and a close observer of 
human events, he has through his own efforts 
obtained a good practical education. When 
but twelve years old he worked on the old 
Portage railroad as errand boy, serving in 
this capacity six months, and in the following 
spring went to Johnstown, this county, where 
he worked on the old Pennsylvania canal from 
March, 1833, until June, 1S37. In the latter 
year he went to Philadelphia and secured an 
appointment on the police force of that city, 
and although young and small, proved himself 
a courageous and efficient officer. 

In November of iS37he retired from the 
police force and went to -Spruce creek to work 
as furnace-man for John Lemon, the blower 
at Pennsylvania furnace. He remained here 
for si.\ years and then took charge of Mitchell's 
furnace in upper Dauphin county, Pennsylva- 
nia, and in two years was able to clear $10,- 
000, which he lost during the next two years 
on account of the Walker Tariff law of I S46. 
He was now penniless and from a financial 
standpoint had to begin life anew. I le walked 
to his home in Blair county and soon secured 
work at the Elizabeth furnace; here he com- 
menced to write l^lnglish under Martin Heli.wiio 
was superintendent, and remained there fifteen 
months. For the next three years he was foun- 
dryman of the .Ashville furnace of this county, 
owned by Hugh McNeal, of Ilollidaysburg, 
Pennsylvania. About this time he built and 



operated three coke ovens the first in this 
county, using the coke produced in the fur- 
nace he was operating. 

In March, 185 i, he located on his present 
firm in Gallitzin township, which at that time 
was a dense forest. By the 25th of the follow- 
ing September he had cleared a small tract of 
land and had built and moved into a small 
shanty. By dint of hard work and indefatig- 
able energy, he has cleared and improved one 
hundred and fifty acres, and now owns one of 
the most desirable farms in the county. 

In religious faith he and his entire family 
are devout and consistent members of the 
Roman Catholic church. In politics Mr. 
Myers was an old-line whig, but on the dis- 
ruption of that party and the organization of 
the Republican party, he became a republican, 
and in 1856 attended the first Republican 
County convention held in Cambria county. 
His voice was heard from the hustings in the 
memorable campaign of 1 840, when the log 
cabin and the political slogan of " Tippecanoe 
and Tyler too," enthused the masses, and made 
it one of the most noted campaigns in the his- 
tory of political parties. He has always taken 
a very prominent i)art in the politics of his 
township as the following record will show: 
I'or three years he was count)- poor director; 
for twenty-five years, served as justice of 
the peace in Gallitzin townshijj; was assessor 
of his township for seventeen years, road su- 
pervisor for si.x years, collected the school 
tax for ills township for seven )'ears; served 
nil school board twelve years; as township 
auditor for twenty-nine consecutive years, and 
has acted as school treasurer of his township 
fmm I S76 to the present time. This evidences 
in a marked degree the confidence reposed in 
him by the people who know him best. At 
one period he filled five offices in his township. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



103 



In 1847 he married Miss Mary, a daughter 
of Joseph Urban and EHzabeth (Koons) Urban, 
of this county. Their marriage has been blessed 
in the birth of eight children, three daughters 
and five sons : Mary E , the wife of T. Thomas 
Stephens, of Gallitzin, Pennsylvania; John A , 
a conductor on a work train on the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad; D. Gallitzin, a hotel man at 
Ashville, this county; James F., now located 
in Altoona; Joseph P., who operates the coal 
bank on the farm; Thomas H., who lives 
at home, acts as justice of the peace and aud- 
itor; Catharine, now deceased, was the wife 
of George L. Allwauger, and died August 9, 
1895, leaving four children; and Clara A., 
born in 1852, and died in infancy. 

Mr, Myers knows well the lesson of indus- 
try and economy, and by unyielding perseve- 
rance has become one of the most prosperous 
farmers of the county. lie is affable and con- 
genial and has deservedl)' won the confidence 
and esteem of his fellow-citizens. 



^OLOMON AVAGNER, farmer, lumber 
^^ manufacturer, coal merchant and gen- 
eral dealer of Glen Glade, who, with no capi- 
tal except the willingness and ability to toil, 
has won recognition as a thrifty and reliable 
business man of Cambria county, is a son of 
George and Mrs. Mary Smith (;/t\' Cane) Wag- 
ner, and was born at Glen Glade, in Jackson 
township, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, June 
II, 1849. 

Mr. Wagner is descended from a sturdy 
and highly reputable German ancestry, and 
his immigrant ancestors first settled in what 
was known locally as Black Log Valley, in 
Huntingdon county, this State. They settled 
there some time subsequent to the Revolu- 
tion, and were tillers of the soil, assisting in 



opening up that valley and claiming it to 
civilization. 

Henry and Daniel Wagner, two brothers, 
with their families, left that valley in about 
1S30, to settle in Jackson township, which has 
since been the home of their posterity. Henry 
Wagner, who was the grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was a shoemaker by trade, and, after 
locating in Jackson township, pursued that 
trade in conjunction with farming. He was 
an honest, hard-working man, and acquired 
an ample fortune for his da}'. He was a 
member of the German Baptist church, and 
was a regular attendant of church and Sab- 
bath school. 

His marital union with Elizabeth Roush 
resulted in an issue of nine children : Jacob, 
Samuel, George, Martin, Mrs. Elizabeth Row- 
lins, Mrs. Catherine Pergrim, Mrs. Mary 
Brown, Hannah and Mrs. Sarah Rager. 

George Wagner's father was born upon the 
old homestead, and died in his native town- 
ship December 14, 1857, aged forty years, 
having passed his entire life near the scenes 
of his birth. He was engaged in laboring 
upon a farm all his life, and was a member of 
the German Baptist church. He married Mrs. 
Mary Smith, nee Cane, a daughter of William 
Cane, of Baltimore, Maryland, who became 
the mother of eleven sons and one daughter : 
Jacob, died young ; Andrew was a soldier of 
the late war, enlisted in 1862, in company 
" D," One Hundred and Fifteenth regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteer infantry; was wounded 
at the battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863, from 
the effects of which he died on the 14th of 
the same month in the hospital at Baltimore ; 
John and George were twins ; the former is 
night watchman, in the employ of the Penn- 
sylvania railroad company, at Altoona, Penn- 
sylvania, and the latter was a farmer, late. 



104 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



of Jackson township; Hannah ni.iiried Joel 
Simmons, a farmer of Jackson townsliip. 

Solomon Wagner started in life as a day 
laborer, but, by his own efforts, untiring indus- 
try and honorable business methods, has ac- 
quired a fair amount of this world's goods, 
and to- da)' finds him in a position of compara- 
tive ease and affluence. In 1877 he engaged 
in the blacksmith business at Fairview, but 
one year later he abandoned that business to 
engage in the pursuits of husbandry, and owns 
a farm of one hundred and twenty-one acres, 
adjoining Glen Glade. In 1886 he engaged 
in manufecturing lumbei', and now owns a saw 
and [jjaniiig mill, the annual [)roduct of which 
amounts to about $3000. Aside from his fann- 
ing, lumbering and milling interests, he owns a 
valuable tract of coal land, situated near Glen 
Glade, and containing one hundred and seventy- 
seven acres. lie mines and ships each year 
about one liundred car-loads of this coal to 
Ebensburg, whilst about twenty thousand 
bushels per annum are consumed b)- the local 
trade. D. AV. Dunwiddie, of Philipsburg, Cen- 
tre county, Penns)-Ivania, has leased a part of 
the coal land, and is now putting in a siding 
which connects with the Pennsylvania rail- 
road, and the ensuing year will see the output 
of liis mine greatly increased. Mr. Wagner also 
owns another tract of land of fifty-six acres in 
Jackson township, and sixhouses in Glen Glade, 
lie is a republican, and has served as a 
member of the scliool board. 

On February 19, 1871, Mr. Wagner and 
Miss Rachel Sluiman were joined in wedlock 
;iiid they are the happy parents of six ciiildren : 
Caroline, tlic wife of Herman Krousc, of Glen 
Giadc; Mary C, the wife of William Krouse, 
also of Glen Glade; ll.uin.di, the consort of 
John Wilkinson, of Jackson townsliip; llai- 
riet, William E. and Daniel W., are at home. 



C'AJVIUEL li. STUVER, an energetic busi- 
ness man and the senior member of the 
meat and grocery firm of Stuver Brothers, of 
Coopersdale, is a son of William and Mary 
(Brallier) Stuver, and was born in Blacklick 
township, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, 
June 6, 1S59. He is of German descent, his 
father, William Stuver, being a son of John 
Stuver, who was born and reared in Germany 
and became a settler of Northampton county. 

William Stuver was born May 26, 1829, re- 
ceived a limited education, such as his neigli- 
borhood afforded, and learned the trade of 
carpenter, which he followed in connection 
with farming until his death, which occurred 
at Rosedale, this county, October 15, 1895. 
He was a good citizen and an industrious 
man, and was a member and deacon of the 
Dunkard or German Baptist church. He was 
a democrat politically, and though not am- 
bitious or desirous of public office yet served 
one term as school director in Indiana county, 
having been elected to that office there. A 
man of rather retiring disposition, but who 
never shirked a duty or hesitated to act in 
case of emergency. 

Mr. .Stuver married Mar\- Brallier, whose 
father was Emanuel Brallier, of Cambria 
county. Mrs. Stuver was born November 20, 
1836. Mr. and Mrs. Stuver were the parents 
of eleven children, si.x sons and five daughters 
— Emanuel, in Rawlins, Wjoming ; Sylves- 
ter, now a resident of P'ort Collins, Colorado; 
Samuel L., the subject of this sketch ; Chris- 
tine, wife of James Kellj', of this county; 
Charlotte A. E., wife of John E. Rodgers, of 
Braddock, Pennsylvania ; Lucy, wife of Lewis 
F. Link, of this county ; Jacob, who died at 
fifteen years of age ; Mollie married Thomas 
1). Rager, of Cambria county ; William, living 
at Minersvillc, this county; Susie, wife of 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



105 



William Keiffer, of Cambria county, and Ben- 
jamin, who died in infancy. 

Samuel L. Stuver attended the common 
schools of his native township until he re- 
ceived a good business education, and then 
learned the trade of carpenter, which he fol- 
lowed for five years. At the end of that time 
he sought for a line of business in which there 
was a wider field for the exercise of energy 
and push, and more general contact with the 
public. He selected the butchering and dairy 
business, the wisdom of which choice has 
been fully demonstrated in the exceptional 
success attending his operations. 

He opened his meat market in Coopersdale 
and laid out his milk routes with such good 
judgment that success and profit were the re- 
sults. On May 20, 1S96, his firm, consisting 
of himself, his brother William and Fyock, 
opened their present large grocery depart- 
ment, in which a heavy stock of the best and 
most marketable goods are carried. The up- 
building of the extensive business of the firm 
in its different lines is largely due to Mr. 
Stuver, whose excellent judgment and push 
gave an impetus to their enterprise that made 
it popular and profitable. 

On December 24, 1878, Samuel L. Stuver 
married Mary A. Benshoff, a daughter of Ben- 
jamin Benshoff of Rosedale. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Stuver have been born five sons and four 
daughters : Irwin E., John Eli, died in in- 
fancy ; Anna May, Benjamin W., Harry L., 
Ira Logan, Mary K., Essie Priscilla and 
E. Rosamond, 

Mr. Stuver's reading and study of religious 
matters has led him to connect himself with 
the Progressive Brethren church, in which he 
is alike active and useful. He is a republican 
in politics, has held township offices, but gives 
his time chiefly to his varied business affairs. 



Mr. Stuver in these days of keen competi- 
tion has won because he possesses that 
rare power of concentration so necessarj' to 
achievement, and that inspiration of energy 
so potent for power. Desirous of success he 
has never lost his energy or enthusiasm, and 
by wise decision has always made the best of 
his opportunities. 



FRANK E. PARKELL, Morrellville, Penn- 
sylvania, an enterprising business man, 
and a member of the firm of Farrell & Kredel, 
who own and conduct drug stores at Johns- 
town and Morrellville, is a son of John and 
Hannah (Grigsby) Farrell, and was born in 
the city of Philadelphia, April 26, 1S65. In 
the latter part of the eighteenth century we 
have record of Edward Farrell, of French 
lineage, as a resident of County Longford, 
Ireland, where his son, John Farrell, was 
born. John Farrell left his native island at an 
early age, settling in Baltimore, where he 
learned blacksmithing and the trade of ma- 
chinist. After working for a short time as a 
machinist he joined the tide of westward emi- 
gration, and became a resident of the State of 
Ohio, where he soon came into prominence as 
an extensive contractor and road builder. He 
constructed the present main streets of Zanes- 
ville and Cambridge, Ohio, and built in that 
state over twenty miles of the " National 
road," or " old pike," besides completing 
many other contracts of important pieces of 
work. He married Mary Grace, and died in 
1852, leaving a family of eight children, four 
sons and four daughters, all of whom are now 
deceased, except one daughter and a son, 
John H. Farrell, the father of the subject of 
this sketch. 

John H. Farrell was born at Somerset, 
Ohio, November 15, 1840, received his educa- 



106 



BIOGRAPHICAL AN'D PORTRAir CYCLOPEDIA 



tion in the public schools and the Catholic 
parochial schools of Zanesville, that state. 
He learned millin<: and iniihvrighting', in 
which lines he was actively engaged in the 
east and south until May 31, 1889. In 1895 
he opened his present grocery store at Mor- 
rellville. Me made a specialt}' of changing 
flouring-mills from the old burr to the new 
roller process, and had charge in New York 
of the first full roller process that was bnilr 
in this country until the miller engaged was 
able to operate it. He managed and con- 
structed roller process mills in Philadelphia, 
New York, Richmond, Atlanta, Brooklsn, 
and other cities. In 1889 he came from 
.Selins Grove, this State, to Johnstown, and 
acted as manager of the Cambria Flouring 
mills, which were destro\'ed by the great 
flood of that year. He is frccjucntly con- 
sulted and asked for advice by those who 
are constructing flouring-mills in this and 
other states. Mr. Farrell is a republican in 
politics, and evinced his patriotism thiring the 
Civil War, serving for two months in the 
.Seventy-eighth regiment of Ohio volunteers, 
where he acted as drill-master. A part of 
the time during the war he was stationed at 
Philadelphia as inspector of flour. 

In 1S64 Mr. Farrell married Hannah 
Grigsby, a daughter of James M. Grigsbj', a 
resident of Zanesville, Ohio, and to their union 
was born one child, P'rank E. P'arrell, who re- 
ceived his education in the public and private 
schools of Zanesville, Ohio; Hrookh-n, New 
York, and Philadelphia, this .State. 1 le spent 
several months in the then great dry-gooils 
house of Hood, Bonbright & Co., in Philadel- 
phia, and then entered the drug store of 1). R. 
11, lird, of Johnstown, which he ami his present 
partner, Krcdel, purchased in March, 1889. 
They also established a branch drug store at 



Morrellville, and two months later the great 
flood swept their Johnstown propert}- away. 
In a short time they reopened their Johnstown 
drug business in their present establishment, 
at No. 1 14 Clinton street. ]Mr. Farrell now 
personally supervises the Morrellville branch 
anil Mr. Kredel attends to the Johnstown 
branch of their extensive business. They 
carry a large stock of pure and fresh drugs 
and give special attention to the filling of 
recipes and the compounding of physicians' 
prescriptions. 

On April 28, 1896, Mr. Farrell was united 
in marriage with Bessie Somerville, a 
daughter of Edwin Somerville, a resident and 
well-known citizen of West Taylor township, 
Cambria county. 

In politics Mr. Farrell has always been a 
republican, though neither partisan nor poli- 
tician. He received his pharmaceutical edu- 
cation in the Chicago College of Pharmacy. 
He is persistent and pushing, and has 
achieved signal success in the large business 
that he has built up in such a short time. 



PI>AVIN K. STKWART, the courteous and 
very efficient station agent of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad comjiany, at Conemaugh, is 
a son of Judge Robert and Elizabeth A. (Pat- 
ton) .Stewart, .uid was jjorn on the .'~^tcw.lrt 
homestead farm in Blair county, PennsyKania, 
February 18, 1862. He attended the public 
schools of Williamsburg, in his native county, 
until he was fourteen \-ears of age, and then 
went to Philadelphia, where he was employed 
in the office of the St. Cloud hotel for three 
years. At the end of that time he became a 
clerk ill the office of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road company at .Mtoona, and in 1879 was 
transferred to Conemaugh and placed in 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



107 



charge of the station and shop work there, 
which position he has held ever since. On 
July 12, 1884, Mr. Stewart wedded Annie 
Clark, a daughter of William Clark, of Balti- 
more, Maryland, but formerly a resident of 
Columbia, this State. Their union has been 
blessed with three children, two sons and a 
daughter: William Denning, Edwin P., and 
Kathryn E. 

In religious faith and church membership, 
Edwin R. Stewart is a Presbyterian. He is 
a member of the Conemaugh Presbyterian 
church, in which he is an active and zealous 
worker. He is also a member of the Young 
Mens' Christian association, of Conemaugh, 
where he is never lacking in words of cheer 
and acts of usefulness, and secretary of the 
Conemaugh Building and Loan association, 
which has done much to improve the borough. 
A republican in politics, his active labors in 
political affairs are confined to local matters. 
Thus early in life Mr. Stewart has achieved 
the success that many men have labored long 
years to win. That he is methodical, correct, 
and honest, may be judged from his being so 
long in the employ of one of the greatest and 
most exacting business companies of the world, 
while his promotion at their hands tells more 
forcibly than words could of his special ability 
and fitness for the important position which 
he holds. 

The Stewarts are descended from an ancient 
and honorable Scotch family of Pennsj'lvania. 
John Stewart, a member of this family, was 
among the early settlers of Canoe Valle}-, Blair 
county. He was a farmer and iron-master and 
died at the age of about seventy jears. He had 
an only child by his marriage with Eliza Fer- 
guson. This child was Judge Robert Stewart, 
and he was born and reared in Canoe valley, 
in Catherine township, of Blair county, which 



was also the home of the Moreheads, Lowerys 
and Deans, a member of which latter family 
is Judge John Dean, of the Supreme Court of 
Pennsylvania. Judge Stewart received a good 
English education, spent his early years at 
home and on the farm of his father, and then 
lived a life of honor and usefulness of which 
his descendants may be proud. 

Judge Stewart, who died June 29, 1893, 
aged sixty years, was an old-line whig, a Pres- 
byterian, and a Free Mason, and was very 
active alike in politics, church and lodge. He 
was one of the last associate judges of Blair 
count}', serving from 1 88 1 to 1887, when the 
office was abolished. He married Elizabeth 
A. Patton, who is a daughter of John .S. Patton, 
of Huntingdon, and was born in 1837. Their 
children were: Kathryn E., wife of G. E. 
Schmucker; John Dean; Edwin R. ; Wm. Pat- 
ton, of Altoona ; and Frederick, a resident of 
South Fork. 



TA*ir>LIAM D. GALBRAITH, burgess of 
Morrellville borough, Cambria county, 
and a prominent and prosperous merchant of 
that town, is a son of William L. Galbraith. 
In common with many of our best citizens, he 
claims descendance from Scotch-Irish stock, 
his paternal grandfather having been an emi- 
grant from the north of Ireland to Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania. 

William L. Galbraith, father of our subject, 
was born at west Fairfield, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, August 10, 1S26. He 
received a rudimentary education in the public 
schools, which gave him the knowledge re- 
quired for future contact with men and the 
affairs of a busy life. After leaving school he 
worked on a farm until sixteen years of age, 
then acted as clerk in the Cambria Furnace 
campany, in the Company's store, and then 



108 



BIOGRAl'IlICAL AND I'ORTRAIT CVCLOl'EDIA 



worked in the office of the Cambria company's 
furnace at Coopersdale, where he remained 
until tlie furnace went out of blast in 1S50. 
Upon this event he farmed the Cambria furnace 
farm, where he still is. He is also engaged in 
the lumber business. 

The fiither of our subject is a loyal republi- 
can and takes an active part in local politics, 
having held various township offices. fie 
is a prominent and energetic member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in which he has 
served as a class leader and trustee, liesides 
having held other church offices. 

William D. Galbraith was born January 15, 
1863, on the old homestead at Cambria fur- 
nace, near Coopersdale, Pennsylvania. Like 
his father, he received his early education in 
the common schools, but in accordance with 
the demands of the times, he has been more 
liberally prepared for the responsibilities of an 
active life. Later, he spent one year at the 
Indiana Normal school, a similar length of time 
at Duff's Business college, Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, and one year at Mt. Union college, 
Ohio. xVfter leaving college, he taught school 
two years in West Taylor township and Coop- 
ersdale, Cambria count)-, lie then entered 
the First National Bank of Johnstown as a 
clerk, where he remained about one and one- 
half years. Afterwards he engaged for two 
years as a clei'k in a general store. His last 
business venture, and that in which he is now 
engaged, is the conduct of a general store at 
Morrellville, in partnership with Mr. Loughry. 

Mr. Galbraith, true to his ancestral traditions, 
is a republican in politics. At present he is 
burgess, having been appointed August 12, 
1895, to fill the unexpired term of L. B. Ilorn- 
berger, deceased. Like a worthy citizen, he 
takes a prominent part in all affairs pertaining 
to the good government of the town. 



He is a member of Morrellville Lodge, No. 
50, I. O. O. F., and of the Morrellville Con- 
clave, No. T,yG, Independent Order of Hepta- 
sophs. Again true to the faith of his ancestors, 
we find his church affiliations with the Presby- 
terians, a people who hold a faith dear to the 
heart of a Scotchman. 

On March 19, 1890, Mr. Galbraith married 
Jennie C, an estimable young lady, the 
daughter of J. Clark Loughry. They have 
three interesting children: Clark Bryan, Lau- 
ra Belle and Alice Cannon. 

In his career as student, teacher, clerk and 
business man, Mr. Galbraith has proven him- 
self persevering and reliable, and he undoubt- 
edly has before him a future of creditable 
success. 



TTKilST HIJADIMYEU, the efficient 
superintendent of Grand View cemetery 
of the city of Johnstown, is a son of William 
and Charlotte (Bravier) Bradimyer, was born 
at Lewisville, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, 
December iS, 1850. His parents were natives 
of near Hanover, Germany, and shortly after 
marriage came to this country, landing August 
10, 1850, the father dying in Johnstown, De- 
cember I, 1884, age si.xty-eight years; and 
his widow survived him four j'cars, passing 
aw.iy January 4, 1888, at seventy-nine years 
of age. William Brailimyer and his wife, of 
whose nativity and death we have so briefly 
spoken, were an honest and industrious cou- 
ple, being consistent members of the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran church and their remains 
sleep in Grand View cemeter)'. William 
Bradimyer received his education in Germany, 
learned the trade of a blacksmith, and served 
four years as a soldier in a German cavalry 
regiment. 

He was the son of Henry Bradimyer, and 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



109 



landing in this country soon settled at Lewis- 
ville, in Indiana county, where he ran a black- 
smith shop up to August i8, 1853, excepting 
the year 1852, during which he worked in a 
Pittsburg shop. Leaving Lewisville, he ran a 
shop in that part of Johnstown known as 
Parkstown, from 1S53 to 1863, then bought a 
small farm at La Cune, Wisconsin, which he 
sold in October, 1863, to remove to Zanes- 
ville, Ohio, which he left in January, 1864, to 
settle at Hillside, Westmoreland county. At 
the latter place he ran a shop until the autumn 
of 1865, then bought a Richland township 
farm, on which he built and ran a shop until 
the winter of 1866. From there he returned 
to Johnstown and ran a Parkstown shop for 
eleven years, when, in 1877, he removed to 
Porter street, Johnstown, and worked in the 
Cambria Iron company's blacksmith shops 
until his death, in 1884. After coming to 
America, Mr. Bradimyer was identified with 
the Democratic party, and supported its mea- 
sures and nominees at the polls. Mrs. Bradi- 
myer, whose maiden name was Bravier, was a 
daughter of Henry Bravier, of Hanover, Ger- 
many. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bradimyer were the parents 
of two children: a son, Augustus, whose 
name appears at the head of this sketch, and 
a daughter, Lena. 

August Bradimj'er received his education in 
the public schools, and after learning the trade 
of a blacksmith with his father, worked at 
blacksmithing at different places until 1S71. 
In that year he went west spending five 
years in the states of Iowa, Wisconsin and 
Minnesota. Returning from the West in 
in 1876, he followed his trade for one year at 
Parkstown, and then went to Edensburg, in 
the " oil country " above Pittsburg, but not 
finding there the advantages that had been 



held out as inducements he returned to John- 
town a second time and worked for the Cam- 
bria Iron company, from the fall of 1877 until 
August, 1888, when he received his present 
appointment as superintendent of Grand View 
cemetery. 

On December 24, 1878, Mr. Bradimyer 
married Mary Amelia Davis, a daughter of 
Benjamin Davis, of Johnstown. 

W^hile taking an intelligent interest in polit- 
ical affairs, Mr. Bradimyer is no politician. He 
votes the Republican ticket. 

He is a member of the United Brethren 
church, Johnstown Lodge, No. 157, Knights 
of Pythias, Johnstown Council, No. 85, Junior 
Order of the United American Mechanics, and 
Conemaugh Lodge, No. 191, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is a Past 
Grand. 

He resides at 725 Napoleon street, and now 
devotes nearly all of his time to superintend- 
ing and beautifying Grand View cemetery, the 
beautiful city of the dead, that has won so 
many words of praise from visitors. When 
Mr. Bradimyer assumed charge, but 240 graves 
were within its boundaries, and on July 2, 1896, 
3801 graves were registered. Under his hand 
the cemetery has grown in beauty and attrac- 
tiveness. Tasteful walks, beautiful flowers, 
graceful vines and ornamental trees greet the 
eye and charm the sense. He is well-fitted 
for his present position and has placed Grand 
View cemetery among the fine cemeteries of 
Pennsylvania. 

nEV. MICHAEL HOFMAYR, O. S. B., 
a courteous and scholarly gentleman, and 
prior of St. Benedict's, at Carrolltown, was born 
in Toelz, Bavaria, January 2, 1838, and is a son 
of Joseph and Mary Frances (Petz) Hofmayr. 
He was reared in his native country, and after 



110 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



taking the full classical course of Ludwig's 
gymnasium of Munich, Bavaria, came, April 
29, 1861, to Pennsylvania, where he pursued 
advanced studies at St. Vincent's college, an 
abbey in Westmoreland county, which noble 
institution of learning had been founded in 
1846, by Rt. Rev. Boniface Wimmer, who 
thus revived in America the grand institutions 
of the Benedictine abbeys of the middle ages 
for the wider spreading of the glad tidings of 
Christianity. After five years of close and 
successful study he completed the work, and 
on May 30, 1866, was ordained priest, at Cov- 
ington, Kentucky, by Rt. Rev. A. Carell. 

After his ordination he was made assistant 
to the church at Covington, where he re- 
mained acceptably until September, 1868, 
when he was transferred by his ecclesiastical 
superiors to St. Boniface's and St. Lawrence 
churches, near Carrolltown, where he re- 
mained in charge one year. At the end of 
that time he became the first resident priest at 
Lincoln, Nebraska, and in the winter of 1871 
returned to Carrolltown, where his pastoral 
labors continued from February, 187 1, to Feb- 
ruar)', 1877. 

During the spring of the last-named year 
he was at St. Vincent's abbey and college, and 
then went to St. Mary's German Catholic 
church of Allegheny city, where he remained 
as assistant pastor up to October, 1882. In 
that month he was called as prior to St. Vin- 
cent's, where he served for five and a-half 
years. 1 \c then served as prior at Covington, 
Kentucky, from April, 1888, to October, 1889 ; 
as assistant pastor of St. Mary's, Allegheny 
city, from 1889, to September, 1892, and as 
professor of moral theology at St. Vincent's 
college from September, 1892, to August, 
1894. In the last-named month he returned to 
Carrolltown, where he has since served as prior. 



Father Hofmayr has always proved to be an 

efficient, careful, and successful pastor, ac- 
complishing much in the mental and spiritual 
interests of his people in the different cities 
and towns where he had churches, and win- 
ning worth)' commendation in his other fields 
of important labor as teacher and as prior. 



JOHN RIFFEL, one of the soldiers who 
stormed the castles of Cherubusco and 
Chapultejjec during the Mexican War, is a 
son of John and Jane (Mariner) Riffel, and 
was born at Milton, Northumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, May 7, 1827. The Riffels are 
of German extraction, while the Mariners, or 
maternal branch of the family, is of Irish 
descent. The maternal grandfather of subject 
was born in Northumberland county, from 
which county he enlisted in the patriot army 
and fought in the cause of liberty during the 
Revolutionary War. John Riffel, father, was 
born near Milton in 1783, and removed to 
Cambria county in 1832, locating at Loretto, 
where he followed the trade of a hatter. In 
politics he was a member of the Democratic 
part}', and during his life held several of the 
borough offices. He died at Loretto in 1852. 
Jane (Mariner) Riffel, mother, was also born 
near Milton, and with her husband, was a 
tlevout member of the Catholic cIuulIi. .She 
died in 1862, at the age of sevent)' years. 

John Riffel, the subject of this sketch, re- 
ceived his education in the common schools 
of Loretto. At the age of nineteen years, 
with the "American Highlanders," he joined 
the Second Pennsylvania regiment at Pitts- 
burg and served in the Mexican War. Dur- 
ing this conflict he engaged in seven of the 
princii)al battles and served until the close of 
the war. After receiving his discharge he 
returned home, and went to work on the old 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



Ill 



Portage railroad as captain of a train, which 
position is similar to a raihoad conductor of 
the present. He continued in the service of 
this road until it was abandoned. He then 
went to Kansas, where he remained three 
years. Here he took up a farm claim, but 
in 1858 became enthused with the dazzling 
prospects of gold-mining, and went as far 
west as the Rocky mountains, where he re- 
mained one summer and then returned to 
Kansas. The next summer he went back to 
the Rockies, but the same year returned to 
the East and went to work on the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad, first in the capacity of brake- 
man and later as fireman. He remained in 
the employ of the road for five years. At the 
expiration of this period he returned to the 
Summit, where, for about fifteen years, he ran 
a hack and wagon, conveying passengers and 
freight in this vicinity. He discontinued this 
business and adopted the avocation of a far- 
mer, and, in connection with his agricultural 
pursuits, engaged in the closely-related busi- 
ness of dairying, which he continued for thir- 
teen years. At the present time he is engaged 
in farming exclusively. 

Politically he is a silver democrat, and at 
the time the Summit was a borough served as 
a councilman. 

In 1876 he married Mrs. Margaret Allen 
Boland, who died in 1889. 



TTJILLIAM G. GRIFFITH, an enter- 
^^** prising, successful farmer and a scion 
of an old and highly respectable family of 
Somerset and Cambria counties, is a son of 
Nehemiah R. and Rebecca (Jacoby) Griffith, 
and was born in Upper Yoder township, 
Cambria county, on June i, 1865. His grand- 
father, Abner Griffith, was a native of Somer- 
set county, but now lives in Stony Creek 



township. He has always followed the pur- 
suits of a farmer, and has always espoused 
the principles of the Republican party, but 
previous to the organization of that party he 
was a whig. He married Miss Mary Reich- 
ard, now deceased. Nehemiah R., father, was 
born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, but is 
now a merchant in Walnut Grove, this county. 
He, like his father, Abner Griffith, has been a 
life-long republican, and has held several local 
offices. In September 18, i860, he married 
Miss Rebecca Jacobj', and to this union ten 
children have been born : Mary, the wife of 
J. VV. Rager, who resides in Conemaugh 
township; William G. ; Simon L., of Walnut 
Grove ; Franklin A., of Walnut Grove ; Clara, 
the wife of Carl Griffith, a resident of W'alnut 
Grove; Minerva Ella, wife of John Lohr, also 
of Walnut Grove ; Lucinda E., and Ida Lu- 
cretia. 

William G. Griffith received his education 
in the common schools of his native township, 
and at the age of maturity began life on his 
own account as a farmer, which pursuit he 
has always followed. Although he has been 
very successful as a farmer, the mercantile 
business has always held attractions for him, 
and he thinks seriously of soon entering that 
field. 

He, too, is a republican, and has held the 
offices of assessor and school director for his 
township for several years. He is a mem- 
ber of Corona Lodge, No. 999, I. O. O. F., 
of Conemaugh, Junior Order U. A. M., Cone- 
maugh Council, No. 137. He, with his entire 
family, belongs to the United Brethren church, 
of which organization they are active and 
consistent members. 

On April 19, 1888, he married Delia, a 
daughter of David Shaffer, of Wilmore, this 
county, and this marriage has resulted in the 



112 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



birth of the following children : Louis Waldo ; 
Melvin Marrison ; Austin Ilarrold, and Ralph 
Foster. 



TA>ILLTAM K. WILLIAMS, a farmer and 
timber dealer of near Ebensburg, Cam- 
bria county, is a son of Robert and Mary 
(Rowland) Williams, and was born on the old 
Williams homestead, three miles west of 
Ebensburg, in Cambria township, August ii, 

1835- 

William Williams, grandfather, was born in 
Wales, but in the year 1800 he left the land of 
his nativity to seek a home in the New World. 
He landed in New York city, and thence pro- 
ceeded to Cambria county, Penns)-h'ania, and 
located upon a tract of land situated within 
three miles of Ebensburg, the county seat of 
that county. He at once proceeded to clear 
up a farm and establish a home, in which he 
was successful. He remained upon the farm 
until his death which occurred in 1843. 

Robert Williams, father, was born in the 
principality of Wales, on September 28, 1796, 
and died in Cambria township, April 24, 1869, 
having passed the greater part of his life there 
engaged in farming. He was a prosperous and 
well-to-do farmer, and in addition to the old 
homesteatl i)urchascd a tract of timber land of 
two hundred and sixty acres, u]5on whicli ho 
operated a saw-mill for some years. He en- 
listed in the War of 181 2, and was on his way 
to the front when peace was dcclatcd, having 
gone as far as Cumberland, Maryland. He 
was a member of the Disciple church, and in 
earl)' life a whig, but upon the organization 
ol the Republican party, in 1856, became 
identified with its interests. He filled many 
local offices, and was regarded as a reliable 
and trustworthy citizen. In 1825 he married 
Mary Rowl.md, a daughter of i'',Ilis Rowland, 



who was a native of Wales, and who emigrated 
to America in 1800, settling in Blacklick town- 
ship, six miles west of Ebensburg, where he 
passed the remainder of his life upon a farm. 

Mr. and Mrs. Williams became the parents 
of five children : John, a farmer of Wadena 
county, Minnesota; Anna, died in girlhood; 
Harriet, the wife of Griffith J. Jones (see his 
sketch); William R., subject ; and Julia A. 

William R.Williams and Mary J. McClure, 
a daughter of James McClure, of Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, were united in marriage 
on October 19, 1869, and their union has been 
blessed in the birth of two children : Emma 
and Hattie, both of whom are married, the 
former to B. J. Evans and the latter to M. J. 
I lughes. 

Mr. Williams was reared upon a farm, and 
has followed the combined avocations of farm- 
ing and saw-milling all his life. He owns a 
large farm, under a good .state of cultivation, 
and three hundred acres of valuable timber 
land. Politicalh' he is a Rei)ublican, and re- 
ligiously a member of the Disciple church, of 
which he has been a deacon for twelve years 
in succession. 



I^.VMICL J. DAVIS, one of the enterpris- 
ing and substantial farmers of Cambria 
township, Cambria county, is a son of John 
v.. and Magdaleine (Jones) Davis, and was born 
in Blacklick township, Cambria county, Pcnn- 
sylvani.i, June 12, 1844. 

John E. Davis was a native of the princi- 
pality of Wales, born at Cardigan, in 1812, 
and grew to manhood and married there. 
After his marriage in 183S he and his wife 
emigrated to America. They first located in 
Pittsburg, but soon removed to Portsmouth, 
Ohio, thence, in about 1843, to Blacklick 
township, where Mr. Davis purchased a farm 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



113 



of 1 80 acres, and embarked in agricultural 
pursuits. In 1869 he disposed of this farm 
and bought another, containing the same 
number of acres, situated in Cambria town- 
ship, two miles east of Ebensburg. He re- 
sided upon and tilled this farm until death 
ended his labors on January 16, 18S2, his 
wife surviving him. 

He was a careful and well-to-do farmer, and 
passed the latter years of his life in compara- 
tive comfort and ease. Politically he was a 
republican, and filled many local offices. His 
marriage with Magdalene Jones resulted in 
the following issue : Mary, the widow of 
David Davis ; Evan, a soldier in the late war, 
died in service at a camp in Texas ; Daniel 
J., the subject of this sketch ; John and Eliza- 
beth are twins (the former is a farmer and 
merchant of Blacklick township, and the latter 
is the wife of David Lewis, of Cambria town- 
ship), Joseph J, a liveryman of Ebensburg; C. 
Jane, wife of Joseph Thomas, of Cambria town- 
ship : and David M., of Cambria township. 

Daniel J. Davis was reared and remained 
upon the farm until 1864, at which time he 
sought and found emplo)'ment in a rolling- 
mill in Pittsburg for five years. In i868 
he returned to Cambria township, and three 
years later purchased a farm of 145 acres 
of arable and well-improved land. The land 
is fertile, well adapted to grazing and stock 
raising, and the buildings are nearly new, 
and commodiously arranged. Aside from 
this property, he owns three fine brick houses 
in Ebensburg which yield him a handsome 
annual rental. He is a member of the Welsh 
Presbyterian church, and takes a leading 
interest in church work. 

December 31, 1868, Mr. Davis and Miss 
Jane Davis, a daughter of Richard B. Davis, 
a farmer and butcher, of near Ebensburg, 



were joined in wedlock. The product of their 
union is two children : Anna and one son, who 
died in infancy, unnamed. 

Richard B. Davis, the father-in-law of Mr. 
Davis, was born in Montgomeryshire, Wales, 
in 1788, and died in Cambria township Octo- 
ber 20, 1872. He married in Wales, and 
became the father of three children. Their 
mother and two of the children died in Wales. 
The other child, a son (Edward), accompanied 
his father to this country in 1836, and died in 
Cincinnati, O., of cholera, in 1849. In 1837 
Mr. Davis married, as his second wife, Anna 
Bennett, a daughter of Richard Bennett, a 
Welshman by birth, but then a pro.sperous 
and successful farmer, and one of the oldest 
and most reputable citizens of Cambria town- 
ship ; and they became the parents of seven 
children, three sons and four daughters : 
Mary became the wife of William Davis, of 
Ebensburg; Richard, a soldier of the late 
war, was killed in the battle of Fredericks- 
burg; Mrs. Daniel J. Davis; Anna, the wife 
of William Griffiths, of Pittsburg; John, a 
farmer of Cambria township ; Sarah and Ed- 
ward, deceased in childhood. 



TAMES MELLON, justice of the peace of 
Patton, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, 
is a son of Redmond and Bridget (Bradley) 
Mellon, and was born in County Derry, Ire- 
land, in 1844. 

The ancestors of the Mellon family were 
originally from the Isle of Man. Redmond 
Mellon, father, was a native of Ireland, from 
which country he emigrated to America in 
1847, locating first in Phoenixville, Pennsyl- 
vania, and then finally, in 1 850, he located on 
a farm near St. Augustine, this county, where 
for the remainder of his life he engaged in the 
pursuits of a farmer. In religious faith he 



114 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



was a Roman Catholic ; in politics a demo- 
crat, and served one term as tax collector of 
his district. 

He married Miss Bridget Bradley, and this 
marriage has resulted in the birth of ten chil- 
dren, six daughters and four sons : John, a 
farmer, located near Manassas Junction, Vir- 
ginia ; Henry, deceased ; James ; Philip, who 
now resides at Moxham, Pennsylvania ; Catha- 
rine, the wife of Francis Burgoon, of Hastings, 
Pennsylvania ; Alice, deceased, who was the 
wife of Dr. Peter Malone, a dentist of Altoona, 
Pennsylvania ; Mary, wife of Dr. J. B. Noonan ; 
Annie, of Chest Springs; and Sarah, wife of 
Austin .Stall, of y\ltoona. James Mellon, the 
subject of this sketch, received his education 
in the common schools of Ireland and Cam- 
bria counties. On leaving school he worked 
on the farm for his father for several years. 
When he began life on his own account he 
engaged in the lumber business in Clearfield 
and Cambria counties. 

In 1867 he opened a coal mine on land 
which he owned in Carroll township, this 
being the first discovery of coal in this sec- 
tion ; this mine is now operated by the firm 
of Magec & Lingle. He at the present time 
owns a colliery in the vicinity of Patton, 
and is engaged in the mining of coal for 
the supply of the custom trade of that 
i)orough. 

Politically he is a democrat, and in 1S93 
was elected to the office of justice of the peace 
in his borough, and also for two years served 
as collector of taxes. 

I-'cbruary 5, 1871, he wedded Miss Matilda 
Cunningham, daughter of John Cuimingham, 
of Susquehanna township, this county. Ten 
children have blessed this marital relation. 
Those living are : Thomas F., Cecelia, Ada, 
Rudolph, Annie, Bertha and Lucy. 



'X^HE STINEMAN FA3IILY.— One of the 

most prominent families of Cambria 
county is the one whose name heads this 
record. Its old world home is in the little 
prosperous kingdom of Holland, whence came 
Christian Stineman, the great-grandfather of 
the older members (Jacob C. and George B.) 
of the family now living in Cambria county. 
He was a tailor by trade and came to America 
at the age of eighteen years. This founder of 
the family in the United States first located in 
Schuylkill county, this State, later removed to 
Bedford county, whence his son, Jacob Stine- 
man, grandfather, removed in iSo3,to what is 
now Cambria county, and located in what was 
then Conemaugh township, later Richland 
township and now Adams township, on the 
waters of the South Fork. His location in 
that section, almost a centurj' ago and ante- 
dating the formation of the county itself, was 
fraught with all the hardships that characterize 
the genuine pioneer life. The first thing 
necessary was to build a cabin to shelter the 
family, then the clearing away of the woods 
and the planting, and soon the wilderness, 
whose stillness had never been broken by 
man, began to assume an appearance fit for 
habitations. Here Jacob Stineman spent the 
remainder of his life, engaged in the necessary 
jjursuits of farming and milling, and died Sep- 
tember 28, 1853. He married Elizabeth Ling, 
a Bedford county lady in 1805, and among his 
children was Jacob Stineman, the father of 
Jacob C. and George B. Stineman, whose 
sketches follow : 

Jacob Stineman was born on the old pio- 
neer homestead of the Stinemans, in Adams 
township, and lived and tlicd in that section. 
Although a man of but limited education, 
yet ho possessed man)' strong attributes of 
nnnd. He was a man of observing habits 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



115 



and the volume from which he obtained most 
of his information was the great book of nature. 
From this source, being a man of practical 
instincts and talents, he obtained much infor- 
mation of great value to him in the every-day 
affairs of life. He was a man of the strictest 
integrity of character and one in whom was 
reposed the confidence and respect of his 
neighbors by whom he was frequently elected 
to offices of trust. In religious matters, he 
adhered to the dogmas of the Lutheran 
church. He married Mary Croyle, a daugh- 
ter of Thomas Croyle, a native of Germany, 
and who, in 1798, emigrated into what is now 
Cambria county, locating on the present site 
of Summerhill, on the Pennsylvania railroad. 
He was of German ancestry and one of the 
first settlers in that section of the county. 
Croyle township is named for the family. He 
was a man of more than ordinary mechanical 
skill and could turn his hand to various occu- 
pations, and was at once a tanner, a cooper, a 
farmer and a niill-wright. 

The children born to the marriage of Jacob 
Stineman and Mary Croyle were as follows : 
Elizabeth, deceased, was the wife of Jacob 
Seigh ; Joseph P., a resident of Philadelphia, 
Penn.sylvania, not actively engaged in busi- 
ness ; George B., whose sketch follows ; Daniel 
T., who entered the Civil War, in company F, 
One Hundred and Ninety-eighth regiment, 
Pennsj'lvania volunteers, and lost his life at 
the battle of Hatcher's Run, February 9, 1865. 
Daniel T. Stineman Post, No. 560, of South 
Fork, was named in honor of his memory ; 
Jacob C, whose sketch follows, and Mary Ann, 
wife of Joseph S. Stull, of this county. 

© 

^EORGE B. STINEMAN, a retired mer- 
^■^ chant of South Fork and a soldier of 
the late war, is a son of Jacob and Mary 



(Croyle) Stineman, and was born in Adams 
township, this county. May 17, 1837 

A record of his father's life history and 
ancestors appears above under the heading of 
the Stineman family. 

His education was acquired in the common 
schools and academies of the county. Obtain- 
ing a liberal education, he followed the pro- 
fession of teaching for three terms, prior to 
the Civil War. 

When the clouds of war hovered over the 
land and patriotic men had grave fears for 
the safety and perpetuity of the Union, he laid 
aside the profession of teaching for the pro- 
fession of arms. He enlisted September 14, 
1 86 1, in Company I, Fifty-fourth regiment 
Pennsylvania Volunteer infantry, in which he 
served until February of 1864, when his com- 
pany was consolidated with company C, of 
the Veteran Volunteer infantry. Mr. Stine- 
man entered the service as a private, but was 
promoted from time to time until he became a 
first lieutenant, and when the war closed had 
a recommendation for a captaincy. His is the 
record of no common soldier, as the story of 
thirty-seven well-fought battles and numerous 
skirmishes fully attest. At the battle of High 
Bridge he was captured just three days prior 
to the surrender of Lee. 

Coming out of the service, he again took up 
the pursuits of civil life as a lumberman. He 
built the first house erected in South Fork. 
This house remained standing until carried 
away by the remarkable flood of 1889. He 
continued in the lumbering business about 
three years, and then after five years in agri- 
cultural pursuits, returned to South Fork and 
took up mercantile pursuits, which he conti- 
nued until 1892, a period of nineteen jears. 
Since the latter date he has lived a retired life. 

He is a firm believer in the principles of the 



116 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



party of Lincoln, Blaine and Garfield, and has 
held the following offices in his town and 
county: auditor of the county, from 1878 to 
1881 ; was the first burgess of South Fork, 
school director for fifteen years, first postmaster 
of South Fork and held the office thirteen 
years. 

He married on September 13, 1866, Martha 
Paul, and to this union have been born the 
following children: John William, Sarah Jane, 
Minnie L. and Milton E, deceased; Ida L.; 
Reta, deceased; Viola, George L., Chester A., 
Pearl, Jacob H., Essie and Eugene N. 

As a citizen Mr. Stineman commands the 
respect of all who know him, as a business 
man his career has been honorable and suc- 
cessful, and as a soldier he fought the battles 
of his country bravely. 



HON. JACOB C. STINEMAN, a member 
of the legislature of Pennsylvania, and 
a man who has been prominently identified 
with the industrial development of Cambria 
county, is a son of Jacob and Mary (Croyle) 
Stineman, and was born in Adams township, 
then Richland township, this county, April 9, 
1842. 

His ancestral history, which appears above, 
shows that he is a member of one of the oldest 
families of Cambria county. The early years 
of Mr. Stincman's life were passed on his 
father's farm, and his education was obtained 
in the common and select schools, attending 
school two and three months in the year; but 
he was studious and ambitious, and made good 
use of his time, so that at the age of sixteen 
years he was qu;dified for the profession of 
teaching and followed th;it avocation foui- 
years in Cambria county. When the crisis 
of Civil War was upon us and the countrj' 
was threatened with dismemberment and dis- 



solution, he left the school-room for the camp, 
enlisting in company F, One Hundred and 
Ninety-eighth regiment, Pennsylvania Volun- 
teer infantry, served to the close of the war, 
and witnessed the termination of that bloody 
conflict in the surrender of Lee at Appomattox, 
April 9, 1865, having taken part in a num- 
ber of hotly contested engagements and done 
valiant service in defense of the flag. At the 
close of the conflict he returned to his father's 
farm, and for a few years was engaged in farm- 
ing, lumbering and mercantile pursuits. In 
1868 he began working in a coal mine; this 
proved to be the first step in that line of busi- 
ness which has been mainly his life's work. 
He was soon advanced to mine foreman and 
subsequently to superintendent of the mines 
in which he first commenced working. In 
1873 he began operating for himself, and is 
now the owner of much valuable coal property, 
and ranks as one of the largest individual pro- 
ducers of bituminous coal in the State. 

Mr. Stineman has aUvavs been a firm be- 
liever in public improvements, the principles 
of a protective tariff, and the gold standard in 
monetary affairs ; hence he has always given 
his su])[:ort to the Republicnn party and its 
measures. He is a man who enters zealously 
into anything he advocates or undertakes; 
hence in politics no less than in l>usiness he 
has taken an active part. He is a great friend 
of the common schools, and has served fifteen 
years as a school director in the borough of 
.South Fork. 

In 18S5 he was the candidate of his party 
for the office of sheriff of Cambria county, 
and although defeated with the rest of the 
p:ut)' candidates, yet his vote was so far in 
excess of that of his colleagues on the ticket, 
that he was nominated three \-ears later and 
elected by a handsome majority. 




SENATOR JACOI! C. STINEMAN. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



U7 



In 1889 he was a delgate to tlie Republican 
State convention, and two years subsequently 
was chairman of the Cambria county Repub- 
lican committee, and in 1892 was elected a 
member of the legislature of Pennsylvania, 
leading all the candidates, and in 1894 was 
re-elected by the handsome plurality of 1691 
votes. In the legislature Mr. Stiueman was 
recognized as one of its most able members. 
During the sessions of 1893 he served on the 
following committees: Mines and Mining; 
Judiciary (Local), Iron and Coal, Bureau of 
Statistics, Printing, and Fish and Game ; and 
during the session of 1895 he served on the 
following committees : Appropriations, Mines 
and Mining, Bureau of Statistics, Iron and 
Coal, and Printing. Recognizing his valuable 
service to the county as a legislator he was 
nominated in 1896 for the office of State 
senator to represent the Thirty-fifth district, 
composed of Cambria and Blair counties. 

Mr. Stineman is an active Grand Army 
man, being one of the founders and the first 
commander of Daniel T. Stineman Post, No. 
560, of South Fork. 

On December 20, 1866, Mr. Stineman mar- 
ried FUen Varner, and their union has been 
blessed in the birth of the following children : 
Albert Meade; Washington Irving; Harvey 
Camerson; Nettie May; Oliver Morton; Nora 
Lucretia, who died young; Jacob Wilbur, and 
one that died in infancy. 

Mr. Stineman is a director in the Citizens' 
National bank of Johnstown, and a stock- 
holder in a number of other business enter- 
prises of Cambria county, and stands among 
the most prominent of Cambria county's bus- ' 
iness men. Energetic, prompt and painstaking 
he leaves nothing to chance or good fortune, 
and believes that good luck is but the result of 
good management. As a citizen he is highly 



esteemed by all who have business or social 
relations with him, while his integrity and 
honor are unquestioned. 



♦^H. CAJIPBELL SHERIDAX, who, for 
almost half a centur\', has been an ac- 
tive practitioner of medicine in Johnstown, is 
a son of John and Mary (Campbell) Sheridan, 
and was born on June 30, 18 19, in Butler, 
Butler county, Pennsylvania. 

Patrick Sheridan, the grandfather of Dr. 
Sheridan, was a native of Ireland, whence, de- 
siring to escape the crowded economic condi- 
tions of his native country, he, after his mar- 
riage to Mary Spence, emigrated to the 
United States and settled in Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, where he died. John 
Sheridan, father, was born in Westmoreland 
county, learned the trade of a blacksmith, and 
afterward went to Butler county, where he 
remained until about 1830, when he removed 
to Freeport, in Armstrong county. He was a 
man of considerable mechanical skill and 
genius, and attained quite a degree of effi- 
ciency in his trade. When the Pennsylvania 
canal, connecting the eastern with the western 
part of the State, was being built, he took a 
contract for the building of a section, between 
the Allegheny aqueduct and Leechburg, Arm- 
strong county. After his services in this con- 
nection he took up his residence in Centre- 
ville, Indiana county, and for a time was em- 
ployed by the State in building lock-houses 
on the canal. Later — in about 1837 — he 
went to Johnstown and took a position in the 
repair shops of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
company, but after a short service in this 
capacity opened a shop on his own account 
and furnished supplies to the same company. 

In 1842 he transferred his residence to near 
Brookville, Jefferson county, Pennsylvania, 



118 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



where he hved for a short time upon a farm 
he had purchased, and then removed to Arm- 
strong count)'. In 1854 he emigrated to IIH- 
nois, where he Hved but a short time and 
came back to Johnstown, where he died in 
1855. 

Dr. Sheridan received a rudimentary educa- 
tion in the common schools, and also attended 
Indiana academy, at Indiana, Pennsylvania. 
In 1839 he came to Johnstown and took a 
position for six years in the office of the canal 
collector, and, at the end of that time, in the 
forwarding house of Henry Kratzer, for three 
years. While holding a position in the col- 
lector's office, the canal being closed during 
the winter, he improved himself by attending, 
during the winter months, Jefferson college, 
of Washington county, this State. He, how- 
ever, did not graduate, as he was compelled 
to make his own way and could not afford it. 
Having resolved to pursue the profession of 
medicine as a life vocation, he entered upon 
the study of the profession in the office of Dr. 
John Lowman.a prominent physician of Johns- 
town. After a faithful preparatory study he 
entered Jefferson Medical college, of Pliiladel- 
phi.i, from which renowned institution he 
graduated in 1H49. He at once located in 
Johnstown, and, with the exception of four 
years, has practiced continually and success- 
fully at that place. Duiing the four }-cars re- 
ferred to he pursued a drug and farming l)usi- 
ness at Earlville, Illinois. 

Dr. Sheridan has practiced the profession of 
medicine timing a period that lias been marked 
by great strides in its progress. Of this pro- 
gress he has been a part. He has been a close 
student of human nature, and has ever lent 
his influence to every move inU-ndcd to elc- 
v.ite the standard of his profession and pro- 
mote a bond of fellowship among its members. 



He was one of the founders of the Cambria 
County Medical society, and has served it a 
number of times as president. Of the original 
members of the society, Dr. Sheridan is one of 
the few members now living. Politically he 
was a Democrat, prior to the organization 
of the Republican party, when he became 
an adherent of that party, and continued 
to affiliate with it until 1892, when he es- 
poused the cause of the Prohibition party. 
Although always manifesting a normal interest 
in politics and lending his influence to the 
cause of good government, yet he has never 
had the time nor the inclination to enter the 
role of the politician as an office-seeker. 

He is an honorable and respected member 
and elder of the First Presbyterian church of 
Johnstown, and for several years was superin- 
tendent of its Sabbath-school. 

On the 2ist of June, 1851, Dr. Sheridan 
and Emily Speer, daughter of William Speer, 
of Massachusetts, were united in marriage. 
To this union have been born the following 
children: Mary E., wife of B. F. Speedy, a 
member of the banking firm of Speedy, Brown 
& Barry, of Johnstown; Sallie C, wife of 
lacolj La}-toii, formerly a carpenter, contractor 
and builder of Johnstown, now in the employ 
of a Pittsburg refrigerator company ; Dr. John 
C, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this 
volnnie ; 1 lariy, for several years a time-clerk 
in the office of the C. I. Co. ; George, a black- 
smith in the employ of the Johnson company; 
William S., a clerk in the same company; 
P.Iaillia, w ifc of George F,risman,a nKR-hinist in 
the emploj' of the C. I. Co. ; Emil)' and Jessie, 
both at home. After the death of his first wife 
he married as his second wife Mrs. Lizzie H. 
I,, I, i lit on, widow of Peter Linton and daughter 
of lawyer Hutchinson, a prominent attorney 
of Ebensburg, this count)-. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



119 



Although past his seventy-seventh mile- 
stone on the path of life, yet Dr. Sheridan is 
still active in his profession, and as he draws 
near the end of a long and successful pro- 
fessional career, his greatest encomium is to 
be found in the grateful hearts of hundreds 
of those whose sufferings he has alleviated 
and who have come to consider him more 
than a personal friend. 



■|^K. FRANCIS SCHILL, successful as a 
physician, popular and well liked as a 
citizen is the gentleman whose name heads 
this sketch. He was born in 1S31, in the 
Grand Dukedom of Baden, Germany. 

He received his early education in the 
schools of his native village and at the age of 
fifteen years entered the gymnasium of Frei- 
burg, Baden; after completing the course of 
instruction required there, he became a student 
in the medical department of the University 
of the same place and began the study of 
medicine. During his career as a medical 
student he twice visited the University of 
Heidelberg, Germany, but did not matriculate 
there. After passing the State medical ex- 
aminations in his native country he came to 
America in February, 1864, being induced to 
take this step by a friend who was assistant 
surgeon in the United States army. Dr. Schill, 
by presenting the necessary papers and pass- 
ing a satisfactory examination at Columbus, 
Ohio, received an appointment as assistant sur- 
geon of the One Hundred and Seventh regi- 
ment, Ohio Volunteer infantry, and embarked 
for Jacksonville, Florida, in May, 1864. In the 
fall of this year he was transferred as post-sur- 
geon to Fernandina, Florida. Here he remained 
almostayear, where besides the care of his own 
soldiers he had charge of the hospital at that 
place, and also gave his attention to the gar- 



rison of Fort Clinch and the white inhabitants 
of the town. July 3, 1865, he left for Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, at which place his regi- 
ment was stationed then, after joining General 
Sherman's army. They remained here several 
weeks, when they were sent home to Cleve- 
land, Ohio, and after two weeks were mustered 
out of service. 

Induced by a friend, Dr. Schill came to 
Johnstown August, 1865, where he opened an 
office and since that time has been continu- 
ously engaged in the practice of medicine. 

He is one of the examining surgeons of the 
United States Pension board of Johnstown. 
For five years he was a member of the Board 
of Health of that city. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Cambria County Medical Society 
since its organization, and for many years 
has served as treasurer for that society; he is 
also a prominent member of the Medical 
Society of the State of Pennsylvania, and a 
meuiber.of the American Medical Association. 
He was one of the incorporators of the Cone- 
maugh Valley Memorial hospital, is a mem- 
ber of the board of managers of the same 
and on the medical staff. 

In 1875 he married Miss Anna Lorentz, of 
Johnstown. To this union has been born one 
son, Frank G. R., who is a medical student at 
Jefferson Medical college, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 



T^LIAS J. UNGEK, deceased, whose record 
■^^ was that of a successful business man, is 
a son of David and Catherine (Eisenhower) 
Unger, and was born March 16, 1830, in Lower 
Paxton township, Dauphin county, Penna. 

The family of which Mr. Unger was a worthy 
scion is of German origin, but was trans- 
planted from Germany to this country prior 
to the Revolutionary war, by David Unger, 



120 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



the grandfather of the subject of this record. 
He settled in Dauphin county, this State and 
became a farmer. 

David linger, father, was born in Dauphin 
county, December 31, 1798, and died in the 
same vicinity in 1848. lie was a bUicksmith 
and farmer by avocation ; a man of sterhng 
quahties of head and heart. He entered the 
war of 181 2, and for meritorious conduct was 
promoted to a captaincy. His niarri.ige with 
Catherine Eisenhower, a daughter of John 
Eisenhower, a farmer of Dauphin county, 
resulted in the birth of three sons and two 
daughters, of which Ehas J. was tlie youngest. 

Ehas J. Unger was reared upon the farm of 
his father and secured his education in the 
puljlic schools. At the age of twenty years 
he was employed by the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road company three years as route agent, then 
one year as brakeman, then a conductor on the 
eastern division of the road, from Ilarrisburg 
to Philadelphia for thirteen years. He was 
then made superintendent of the Company's 
hotels in the territory extending from Pitts- 
burg to Jersey City, for a period of ten years, 
at the end of which long and faithful [jcriod of 
service, he voluntarily retired from the em- 
ployment of that company. Subsequently he 
became proprietor of that well-known and 
popular hotel, the Seventh .Vvenuc, of Pitts- 
burg, where he remained ten years. Mr. 
Unger was president of the South Fork Fish- 
ing club, and in 1888, upon retiring from the 
hotel business, purchased the land u|)i)n which 
he lived until his death in 1896. This farm con- 
sisted of 250 acres, and situated upon the banks 
of what was formerly the lake of the South 
Fork Fishing club. Upon that fum he li\cd the 
remainder of his life, indulging his tastes for 
the arts of husbanilrj- and enjoying the fruits 
of an active and successful business career. 



Mr. Unger was eminent in Masonic circles, 
being a thirty-second degree Scottish Right 
Mason, and was also a member of Dauphin 
Lodge, No. 160, I. O. O. F., of Harrisburg, 
of which lodge he was a Past Grand. 

December 19, 1854, he married Annie C. 
Steele, and to this marital union has been one 
child, Mary, wife of George C. Wilson of 
Pittsburg. 



-|^K. HKNSOX F. TOMB, of Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania, is a son of Washington 
and Mary (Ling) Tomb, and was born Decem- 
ber 16, 1 86 1, in Armagh, Indiana county. This 
neighborhood has been the birthplace of many 
of the successful professional men of the neigh- 
boring city of Johnstown. The pure air of 
the country gives the cool brain and robust 
health so necessary to success in the crowded 
walks and keen competition of professional 
life. 

Washington Tomb, the father of our subject, 
was an elder brother of Dr. B. V. Tomb, whose 
sketch appears elsewhere. He was a son of 
Hugh and Nancy (Devlin) Tomb, and was born 
near .Armagh, March 30, 1827. He learned the 
trade of moulder in the foundry of the Cam- 
bria Iron company at Johnstown, and worked 
.it that trade for several \-ears. He abandoned 
his trade and began fanning near .Armagh, 
lie continued farming until recentl)' when he 
left the farm to younger hands and removed 
to Armagh, where he now resides. 

On February 28, 1856, Washington Tomb 
was married to Mary Ling, daughter of Wil- 
liam Ling, of Indiana county. To this union 
were born five chihiren : Agnes, who died in 
iiifanc)-; Alice, wife of James Filler, a farmer 
of Indiana county; Henson F.; Emma, wife of 
I'rank Conrad, a farmer of Indiana county, 
and Harry, who lives on the old homestead, 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



121 



and is a farmer and stock-dealer. Mrs. Mary 1 
Ling Tomb died December i6, 1866, and 
Washington Tomb married as his second wife 
Lizzie Braci<en, daughter of Wm. Bracken, of 
Indiana county August S, 1867. To this union 
no children were born. 

The subject of this sketch attended the dis- 
trict schools near his home during tlie winters 
and a select school at Armagh in the summer. 
He also attended two terms at Dayton, Arm- 
strong county, preparing for college. In the 
fall of 1882 he entered Allegheny college at 
Meadville, Pennsylvania, being a member of the 
class of 1886, but quit school in his junior year. 
He taught several winter terms of school before 
enterinfT college, and one term at Morrellville 
afterwards. After leaving school he began 
the study of medicine with his uncle, Dr. R. 
J. Tomb, at Armagh, and subsequently' entered 
Jefferson Medical college at Philadelphia, from 
which he graduated in 1887 and located in Mor- 
rellville. He practiced at that place for about a 
year and then moved to Johnstown, where he is 
at present located and has a growing practice 

Dr. Tomb is a member of Cambria County 
Medical society and of the Pennsylvania State 
Medical association, and is one of the board 
of three pension examiners of Cambria county. 
He is also examiner for a number of life insur- 
ance companies, and a member of the medical 
staff of the Conemaugh Valley Memorial hos- 
pital. Of the latter institution he is one of the 
incorporators. 

Politically Dr. Tomb is a Democrat. In 
religion he is a Methodist, and is a member 
of the board of trustees of that church. Dur- 
ine the Great Flood he served on the field hos- 
pital and did his duty at that trying time, both 
as a physician and a Christian. He is a mem- 
ber of Council No. 401, Royal Arcanum, and 
of Johnstown Lodge, No. 538, F. and A. M. 



On December 28, 1887, our subject was 
married to Miss Emma Matthews, a sister of 
Dr. W. E. Matthews. To this union two chil- 
dren were born: Jessie, born February 18, 
1890, and Ralph, born January 24, 1895. 

Most of the ancestral history appears under 
the heading of his uncle, Dr. B. F. Tomb. 



Robert potter ROBISON was born 
T near Jenner X Roads, Somerset county, 
this State, on June 19, 1824, and died in Johns- 
town, this county, on March 3, 1892. He was 
a son of John and Rachel (Potter) Robison. 
He was of sturdy Scotch ancestry, and his 
father was born on the ocean during the voy- 
age to the United States. The family settled 
in the vicinity of Jenner X Roads. The elder 
Mr. Robison died when the subject of this 
sketch was yet a mere child, and he was de- 
nied the privileges of securing more than a 
knowledge of the mere rudiments of an edu- 
cation. He left school when but twelve \ears 
of age. He was one of a family of three boys : 
John M., who sought his fortunes in Califor- 
nia during the gold excitement of 1S49, ^"^^ 
from which adventure he never returned ; Wil- 
liam James, a farmer, now living in the state 
of Iowa. 

When a young man, Robert Potter Robison, 
emigrated west, and located at Cadiz, Ohio, 
where he learned the trade of a cabinetmaker, 
and after following that trade some time in 
the west, returned to Somerset town, and for 
a time worked at his trade for William B. Cof- 
froth, of that place. In 1850 he came to 
Johnstown and plied his trade under the em- 
ploy of B. F. Orr, and then after a short ex- 
perience as a clerk in Somerset of about 
two years, he married and again returned to 
Johnstown, and engaged with the Cambria 
Iron company as a house contractor and 



122 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



builder, building some of the first houses built 
by that company. He held that position with 
the company for some time, when, because of 
the mechanical skill he had displayed, he was 
promoted to the pattern department of the 
same compan\', where he remained up to the 
breaking out of the Civil War, when he entered 
the service of his country in that memorable 
conflict. He enlisted for the three months' 
service in 1861, in company G, of the Third 
regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer infantry, as 
an orderly-sergeanti but before the end of this 
term of enlistment was promoted to second 
lieutenant. At the end of the three months' 
service he re-cnlisted for three years in the 
famous Ffty-fourth regiment, and participated 
in the many hotly-contested engagements of 
that regiment, and was mustered out a first 
lieutenant. His military recoril is that of a 
soldier, who was brave and courageous, and 
who discharged every duty with fidelity, and 
in such a way as to command the confidence 
of his superiors, and win the respect of his in- 
feriors in arms. Laying down the pursuits of 
the soldier, and returning to those of the civil- 
ian, he became one of the founders of the 
Johnstown Mechanical works, with which he 
remained, perhaps, seven or eight years. Then, 
after three or four years as a sewing-machine 
agent, he was appointed by the governor of 
the .State an auctioneer for the borough of 
Johnstown. At the end of that period he 
again entered the pattern-making department 
of the Canihiia Iron company, where he spent 
the remainder of his days. 

Politically he was a democrat prior to the 
war, but being a strong anti-slavery man, be- 
came a republican upon the issues of that con- 
flict. Religiously he was a member of the 
Lutheran church, and fraternally a charter 
member of Corona Lodge, No. 999, 1. O. O. F., 



and a respected member of the Union Veteran 
Legion, No. 60. He married in August, 1853, 
Mary J. Shaffer, a daughter of Michael Shaffer, 
of Somerset county, and to this union were 
born nine children: John P., who died when 
but seven years of age ; William Fry, who died 
August 19, 1896, at Mt. Clements, Michigan. 
He was a brick contractor by avocation; 
Bertha J., wife of Willis A. Moses, a mer- 
chant tailor, of Johnstown ; Campbell, chief 
clerk of the Gautier Department of the Cam- 
bria Iron Company's works ; Edgar N. , who 
married Jennie Boler, and is engaged in the 
bricklaying business as a contractor; Harrj', 
who married Annie Zinges, and is a bricklayer 
by trade ; Minnie and Marion, twins, the 
former tfie wife of Harry McDowell, a ma- 
chinist in the employ of the Cambria com- 
pany, and Katie M., the wife of Frank J. Mc- 
Mullen, of Model City, New York. 



j^lIILIP lIAHT3rAX, a self-made man and 
the general superintendent of the large 
coal-mining plant at Ehrenfeld, is a son of 
Lawrence and Catherine (Cramer) Hartman, 
and was born in the kingdom of Prussia, now a 
state of the German Empire, on October 2, 1839. 
Lawrence Hartman was born January 9, 
1S06, in Prussia, where he was a coal-miner 
l"or some )'e:us. lie came to Pennsylvania in 
.Ajjiil, iS_|o, locating at No. 6, on the old 
Portage railroad, where he followed mining to 
a small extent, but worked chiefly on the rail- 
road. He was soon promoted to a foreman, 
which position he held until the Pennsylvania 
railroad was built, and the old Portage road 
was abandoned. He retired from active life in 
1869. His latter )-ears were spent at Houtz- 
(lale, Clearfield count)', where he died March 
25, 1887. He was a Catholic, and served for 
six years as a soldier in his nati\-e country. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



123 



Mr. Plartinan married Catherine Cramer, 
who was also of Prussian parentage, and their 
family consisted of the following children: 
Philip; Valentine, now dead ; Jacob, an assist- 
ant mine foreman at Ehrenfeld ; Henry, now 
car inspector for the Pan Handle Railroad 
company, in Pittsburg; Catherine, wife of 
Michael Gibbons, of Houtzdale, this State; 
Wilhelmina, widow of Lawrence Simendinger, 
and Rachel, wife of Isadore Simendinger, of 
Ehrenfeld. 

Philip Hartman was brought by his parents 
at six months of age to this country, and re- 
ceived his education in the common schools of 
his district, when a school term consisted of 
but three months. He left school at seventeen 
years of age, to commence working in Lillies' 
coal mine as a driver. In a short time he was 
given a room, and worked steadily as a miner 
until 1859, in which year he went to Broad 
Top, Huntingdon county, at which place he 
followed mining for six years. He then, in 
1865, removed to Osceola, Clearfield county, 
where he secured and held for four years the 
position of weighmaster at a coal mine there. 
From Osceola he went to Houtzdale, in the 
same county, in 1870, and was employed for 
the first two years as a track-layer in an exten- 
sive coal mine, and for two years longer in 
carpentering work. At the end of that time, 
on November 4, 1874, he was selected on 
account of fitness and experience as superin- 
tendent of the Houtzdale mines of the Webster 
Coal company, which position he held there 
continuously until May, 1883, when he came 
to Ehrenfeld, this county, to open mines and 
superintend the construction of a coal plant for 
John C. Scott & Sons, members of the Web- 
ster Coal company. The mines are now 
known as Webster mines, No. 3 and No. 5. 
The company owns two thousand acres of 



coal land, operates two drifts, with haulage 
system at each, and has an output of two 
thousand tons of coal per day, when necessary. 
The company also laid out on their own 
grounds the town of Ehrenfeld, which now 
contains one hundred and tvvent_\'-four houses, 
which are for rent to their employees. In the 
opening and development of the mines, the 
construction of the coal plant and the building 
of the town, Mr. Hartman had a very import- 
ant and responsible work, which he discharged 
satisfactorily to all who were interested. He 
has placed the latest of practical machinery in 
the mines, has secured all needed appliances 
for the coal yards, and placed electric lights 
in the town of Ehrenfeld, whose rapid growth 
is an index of the enterprise and energy of 
the company, and the skill and efficiency of 
the superintendent. 

On June 8, 1869, Philip Hartman married 
Bridget Leech, a daughter of Lawrence Leech, 
and a native of Queens county, Ireland. They 
have six children living: Margaret, wife of A. 
L. Dimond, a hotel-keeper of Ehrenfeld; 
Mary Elizabeth, Catherine Louisa, Sarah Jane, 
Josephine, and Nellie May. 

Mr. Hartman is a democrat in politics, and a 
member of the Catholic church. Within the last 
five years he has been active in different build- 
ing and loan associations, being a director of 
the State and Pennsylvania building and loan 
associations, the former of Hollidaysburg, and 
the latter of Altoona, and both in Blair 
county. He is an affable and pleasant gentle- 
man, of intelligence and energy, whose for- 
tune in life has been the result of his own 
labors. He is no politician, but has served 
for the last three years as postmaster, and has 
rendered satisfaction there as well as in all 
other positions that he has held. He was one 
of the first settlers of Houtzdale, and was 



124 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



elected a member of the first town council, in 
which position he served six years. He has 
been a member of the school board in Croyle 
township for the past four years, and still oc- 
cupies a place in that body. Mr. Martman is 
a man of good organizing power and execu- 
tive ability. 

^ 

TA>IKS II. fJI'^ICIt, assistant chief engineer 
of the Cambria Iron company, is a son 
of James and Phoebe Jane (Patch) Geer, and 
was born August 2, 1843, in Blairsville, Indi- 
ana county, Pennsylvania. James Geer, his 
grandfather, was one of the earlier settlers in 
the vicinity of Hlairsville, whence he removed to 
Erie, this .State, where he died. I lis father was 
born in Blairsville, Indiana county, and died on 
the old homestead in the same county. 

The life of J.unes II. (ieer has been one of 
practical activity. He attended the common 
and select schools of Johnstown, and when 
about fourteen years of age connected himself 
with the Cambria Iron company, that wonder- 
ful practical university from the work-shops of 
which so many men have gained that mental 
discipline and mechanical skill that can but 
command success. He entereil the pattern- 
making department, taking his fust lessons in 
that course which has led up to his present 
responsible ])osition. He remained in that 
department until 1S62, when, yielding to his 
patriotic impulses, he enlisted in defence of 
the Flag. He entered the seivice in com- 
pany A, of the One Hundred and Thirty- 
Tiiird regiment, Pennsylvania volunteers, and 
served for a term of ten months. At the 
end of this military service he spent about 
seven years throughout the West, following, 
for a time, his trade, and, for a time, general 
mechanic. il pursuits. In 1S70 he rcliuncd to 
Johnstown and entered the pattern-making 



department of the Cambria Iron company, 
where he was kept one year, and was then 
placed in the drawing-room. In 1 88 1 he was 
made master mechanic, a position he held 
until 1884, when his capabilities were rewarded 
by being promoted to the position he now 
holds. 

He married Anna, a daughter of Peter 
Fought, formerly of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, 
and later of the State of Illinois. To this 
union have been born the following children : 
Albert M., Harry R., Erastus L. (in the em- 
ploy of the Cambria Iron companj-), Frank D., 
and James, at school. 

James H. Geer is talented as a mechanic, 
thorough-going and progressive in whatever 
he undertakes, and possesses that genius of 
generalization so indispensable in the direction 
of a vast enterprise. He has been a member 
of the American Society of Mechanical Kn- 
gineers since 1884. 



TOKL A. G.VTKS, superintendent and book- 
keeper for J. M. Troxell, a lumber dealer 
in Cambria and Clearfield counties, is a son 
of Isaac and Mary (Troxell) Gates, and was 
bom in White township, this county, Septem- 
l)er 30, 1848. His grandfather, J. Caleb Gates, 
was born in Wittenburg, Germany, whence he 
emigrated to America, and located in Berks 
county, Penns)'lvania, and engaged in farm- 
ing. Later he removed with his fomily to 
Cambria count}-, and located in Wiiite town- 
ship, where he purchased a tract of wood- 
land, whicii is now owneil by Joseph Vance, 
and became a pioneer farmer in White town- 
ship, where he died. 

His marriage rcsultcii in the birth of seven 
ciiiidren: Margaret, who married Ma)-or John 
Zentmyer, of Huntingdon county, Pennsylva- 
nia, who was the fither of P. R. Zentmver, 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



125 



superintendent of the Novelty Works at Clear- 
field, Pennsylvania; Nathan, deceased; Levi, 
deceased ; Isaac, deceased ; Matilda, the wife 
of Daniel Louffer; Joel, late of White town- 
ship ; William, located at Lyson, Blair county, 
Pennsylvania. 

Isaac Gates, father, was born in Berks 
county on September 7, 181 8, and died on 
his farm in White township, September 26, 
1876. He had led a very active life, begin en- 
gaged in farming and lumbering many years. 
He was quite an extensive farmer, and owned 
a tract of land containing nineteen hundred 
acres of farm and timber territory, lying in 
White and Chest townships. He was exten- 
sively engaged in the lumber business, own- 
ing and operating a saw-mill, besides sending 
large quantities of lumber by raft and floats 
to Williamsport, Pennsylvania. He was a 
careful and successful business man, and had 
accumulated quite a competency. 

In political faith he was a republican, and 
in religious belief a member of the United 
Brethren church, of which he was a liberal 
supporter; however, he did not confine his 
liberality to this church, but was deeply inter- 
ested and very active in everything that was for 
the benefit of the community in which he lived. 

His union with Miss Mary, a daughter of 
John Troxell, a farmer of Reade township, 
this county, resulted in the birth of eight 
children, five sons and three daughters : Eliza- 
beth, the wife of Rev. Daniel Strayer, of the 
United Brethren church of White township; 
John C, whose sketch appears elsewhere in 
this book; Lafayette M., a farmer, of Musca- 
tine county, Iowa, who is also a local minister 
in the United Brethren church ; Joel A.; Isaac 
W., a farmer, residing in Coalport, Clearfield 
county, Pennsylvania ; Perry C, also a farmer, 
residing in Coalport; Mary M., the wife of J. 



S. McKee, a farmer of White township, and 
Hannah, who died in childhood. 

Joel A. Gates was reared on a farm, and 
received his early education in the local 
schools of Reade township and Normal schools 
of Blair and Centre counties, and prepared 
himself for a business career by a course in 
the Iron City Business College, Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, graduating in 1869. After leav- 
ing school he, in company with his father and 
brother, J. C. Gates, under the firm name of 
Gates, Son & Co., opened a general store in 
Glendale, this county, and for a number of 
years conducted an extensive and remuner- 
ative business. He was also assistant post- 
master of Glendale, aggregating seventeen 
years. On the death of his father the partner- 
ship was dissolved, and Mr. Gates was con- 
nected with G. L. Glasgow, of Glasgow, this 
county, under the firm name of G. L. Glasgow 
& Co. ; he was also a member of the firm 
known as Gates, Glasgow & Co., merchants, 
of Fallen Timber. During the last fifteen 
years he has been engaged in the lumber 
business, and has handled immense quantities 
of lumber. For five \ears he has been super- 
intendent and bookkeeper for J. M. Troxell, 
a lumber dealer in Cambria and Clearfield 
counties. 

In political circles he is prominently iden- 
tified with the Republican party, and is at 
present serving his third term as justice of the 
peace, )'et holding bis fourth commission — 
one being for but one year by appointment, 
and in 1880 was appointed census enumerator 
for the sub-district composed of Dean, Reade 
and White townships. Fraternall)- he is a 
member of Coalport Lodge, No. 574, F. and 
A. M., of Coalport, and of Flinton Grange, 
No. 1 129. He is a consistent member of the 
Lutheran church of Glasgow. 



126 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



March lo, 1870, he celebrated his marriage 
with Miss Catharine B., a daughter of John 
Glasgow, whose sketch appears elsewhere. 
This marriage has resulted in the birth of 
three children : Eva S., a music teacher of 
much ability; John I., of Glendale; and Frank 
J., at home. 



TO.SUK D. PARRI.SH. A worthy citizen 
of Cambria county is Josue D. Parrish, a 
builder and contractor of Ebensburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. Besides being a man whose business 
and social life commands the utmost respect, 
he has the honor of being one of the famous 
" Cambria Guards," a company which served 
with great distinction in the Mexican War. 
This company was raised mostly in Ebens- 
burg, and left Ebensburg January 2, 1847, 
going to Pittsburg in wagons. January 5, 
1847, the " Cambria Guards " were mustered 
into service, to serve during the war, with the 
following officers: Colonel, Wm. B. Roberts; 
Lieutenant-Colonel, John W. Geary, who was 
afterwards Governor of the State ; Major, 

Brindle. James Murray was captain of 

company D, the company in which our sub- 
ject served. Charles Hire was first lieutenant, 
and John Given was second lieutenant, and 
Chas. McDermott, third lieutenant of the same 
company. They were sent to aitl Scott's 
army, were detained at Lobos Island with nine 
cases of small-pox about one month, and 
landed at Vera Cruz three daj's after the bat- 
tle; l)Lil their entliusiasm was not dampened, 
and they pushed on after Scott, coming up 
just one day after the battle of Cerro Gordo ; 
the fight, however, was not over, and we find 
the brave " Guards " from this time to tlie 
taking of Mexico in the thickest of the fight, 
everywhere performing valorous service. Their 
first engagement was at Lahoya ; this was fol- [ 



lowed by those famous battles in the valley of 
Mexico, at Contreras, Cherubusco, Tucabya, 
Chapultepec, and lastly at the taking of the 
city of Mexico. 

General Quitman, who commanded the divi- 
sion in which Mr. Parrish served, was the first 
to raise the flag over the " halls of the Monte- 
zumas " and to accomplish by strategy the 
capture of the citadel of the city of Mexico; 
for this brilliant feat the division was highly 
complimented by General Scott. 

The inferiority in numbers of the American 
arm)' to the Mexicans contributes much to the 
glory of this victory, the Americans number- 
ing but 9,500, and the Mexicans, according to 
Mexican statement, 19,000. 

August, 1848, after having won glory for 
themselves, Mr. Parrish's company returned 
to Ebensburg. Our subject took up his resi- 
dence in Ebensburg, where he has lived ever 
since, following carpentering and contracting 
and building as his life work. In this capacity 
he has erected many of the best buildings in 
the town, the Opera House, etc. Politically, 
he is a Democrat, and is a justice of the peace 
of the borough, having been appointed in 
September, 1890, b)' Governor Pattison, and 
elected in the following February for a term 
of five years. He also served as county com- 
missioner, and has filled local offices. Mr. 
Parrish is a son of George and Catharine 
(Storm) Parrish, and was born June 3, 1825, 
in what is now known as O'Hara's Mills, Mun- 
ster township. 

His grandfather, Joshua Parrish, was a 
native of England, who emigrated at a very 
early day, and married Barbara Thimble, a 
Germ.m woman whose father served in the 
German army. Joshua Parrish, was a mill- 
wright, who learned his trade in Western 
Maryland. He came to this country upon the 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



127 



solicitation of Prince Gallitzin, and settled in 
Cambria county, dying in Cambria township, 
a mile from where our subject was born. He 
built in Cambria township the mill now called 
0'Hara's,and which was among the first mills 
of the county. 

George, the father of Josue D. Parrish, was 
born July 28, 1795, and died on August 25, 
1837, from injuries received by a fall. His 
death was followed by that of the mother of 
our subject on November 20th. He helped to 
build the O'Hara mill, where he learned the 
trade of a miller, following it mainly as a 
means of securing a livelihood. 

He was a Whig in politics, and in religion 
a devout and worthy member of the Catho- 
lic church. Josue D. Parrish, Jr., was edu- 
cated in the subscription schools prior to 
the adoption of the common-school system. 
The first free schools were held in his father's 
house, and this house is still standing. He 
attended one term of the free schools for 
about three months. After the death of his 
father he went to live with his grandfather, 
where he worked upon the farm. He then 
learned the trade of a carpenter, and worked 
in Loretto two years. In the spring of 1844 
he came to Ebensburg, and has lived there 
ever since, except during the before-men- 
tioned service in the Mexican War. His 
wife was Mary Magdalene Meyers, a daughter 
of John Meyers. Of his children, Evaristus 
C. was born September 5, 1853, and is now 
engaged in the grocery business. He has 
served three terms as school director of the 
borough, although a democrat, and is also 
borough weighmaster and secretary of the 
Catholic Beneficial society. 

Callistus M. graduated from the Philadel- 
phia College of Pharmacy, and is now in the 
drug business in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, 



being a well qualified and successful drug- 
gist. 

Flora P. is at home ; John S. is a real estate 
and collecting agent and notary public in 

Pittsburg. 

© 

TAMES M. THOMPSON, a merchant and 
ex-soldier of Ebensburg, this county, 
was born in Blairsville, Indiana county, Penn- 
sylvania, January i, 1840. His great-grand- 
father, Robert Thompson, which is as far back 
as this family can trace their lineage, was 
born in Londonderry, Ireland, in 1737, where 
he married Mary Cannon, whose home was 
also there. Their children, eight in number, 
were all born in Ireland, two of them dying 
there' when quite young. 

On the 29th of May, 1789, this Robert 
Thompson and wife, with their children (Hugh, 
Martha, James, John, Margaretta and Eliza- 
beth) emigrated to America, where, soon after 
their arrival, they settled and remained for 
some time in what is now Derry township, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. Being 
staunch Presbyterians they became members 
of the " Old Salem " church. 

In this congregation resided James Thom- 
son, also from Ireland, but of direct Scotch 
descent, a gentleman of more than ordinary 
education, and in mental ability much above 
the average. He had been a Presb}'terian 
elder in Ireland, and was one of the founders 
of the "Old Salem" congregation and clerk 
of the session at the time that Robert Thomp- 
son and family came into the bounds of this 
congregation. 

This James Thomson was the father of nine 
children, the fifth of whom was a daughter 
Martha. She was born in Ireland in 1 770, 
came to America in 1771, with her parents, 
and on the 8th of September, 1791, became 



128 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



the wife of Hugh Thompson, the first son 
of Robert Thompson, above mentioned. This 
Hugh Thompson and his wife Martha (ncf 
Thomson) were the parents of nine chil- 
dren : Mary, Jane, Joseph, James, Robert, 
Jolm, Wilham, Hugh and Samuel. 

In 1793 Hugh Thompson and wife, Martha, 
with their first-born babe, Mary, attempted to 
settle on land on Thompson's run, about one 
mile above what is now Kellysburg, Indiana 
county, and eleven miles north of the present 
town of Indiana, in what is now Rayne town- 
ship. This start in life in the howling wilder- 
ness was interrupted by the unfriendly Indian, 
and they soon returned to Derry township, 
where they remained until after the defeat of 
the Indian forces by Gen. Wayne in the Ohio 
campaign in the month of August, 1794. 
Peace followed, and in the spring of 1795 the 
family, now increased by another daughter 
(Jane), came out once more and safely settled 
on the same land that the hostilities of the 
Indian had driven them from before. This 
time Robert Thompson, the father of Hugh, 
with his wife and five otlier children, came 
along and settled on a portion of the same 
tract of land. Martha, Robert Thompson's 
.second child, and Hugh's sister, was now the 
wife of one Hugh Cannon. The family was 
now permanently settled, and to this da)' the 
fine farms which they caived out of the forest 
are known as the " (JldTiiompson I lomcstead." 

Of these old original Thompsons, Robert, 
the father of tluni all, died on the old place 
on October 13, 1809, and his wife, Mary, on 
January 15, 1815. Hugh, their son, died on 
June 13, 1829, and Martha, his wife, on Sep- 
tember 10, 1848. All are buried in the Gil- 
gal Presbyterian graveyard, four miles north 
of the "Old Homestead." All were members , 
of the Gilgal church. | 



Hugh Thompson and Martha, his wife [jiee 
Thomson), were the grandparents of James M. 
Thompson, of Ebensburg, the subject of this 
sketch, and their sixth child, John, was his 
father. 

Major John Thompson, as he later in life 
came to be known, was born on the " Old 
Homestead" June i, 1804, and died in Ebens- 
burg on December 5, 1879. He was reared 
and received his education in the old subscrip- 
tion schools of his boyhood days. On leaving 
school he began life on his own account in 
the mercantile business, and was later, for a 
number of years, landlord of the " Cambria 
House" and the "Mountain House," at 
Ebensburg, and was postmaster at the same 
place for fifteen years. On March 24, 1S30, 
he married Miss Ellen Patton, and their union 
resulted in the birth of the following children : 
Joseph, Benjamin, Mary, Ellen, Amelia, James, 
John, Robert and Rose. 

James M. Thompson received his education 
in the common schools of Ebensburg, and on 
leaving school accepted a position as traveling 
salesman for a clothing house in Philadelphia. 
He remained in their employ from 1857 to 
1859, when he resigned his position and ac- 
cepted another with the wholesale Philadel- 
phia tobacco house of VVardell & Stephenson, 
rt-niaining with them until iS6j, when he 
enlisted as a soldier in the Union army, 
in company E, One Hundred, and Thirty- 
Third regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers in- 
fantry, and served for ten months. He parti- 
cipated in the battles of Antietam, Eredericks- 
burg, before Mayes Heights, in front of tlie 
historical "Stone Wall," and Chancellorsville, 
in which fourteen of his company were killed, 
fifteen were wounded and two made prisoners. 
Among the killed were his captain and first 
lieutenant. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



129 



On retiring from the service of his country 
lie again entered the employ of Wardell & 
Stephenson, and remained with the firm until 
December, 1863. On severing his connection 
with the above firm he located in Ebensburg 
and embarked in the mercantile business on 
his own account, opening a general store, 
which he has conducted to the present time. 
He has been eminently successful, and has 
built up an e.xtensive and lucrative business. 

In political faith he is a republican, and has 
served for two terms as a member of the 
Ebensburg borough council. In religion he is 
an attendant of the Presbyterian church. He 
is a member of John M. Jones Post, No. 556, 
G. A. R., of Ebensburg. 

On June 26, 1866, he married Miss Frances 
M. Rogers, daughter of Evan Rogers, of 
Churchtovvn, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, 
whose mother's maiden name was Catherine 
Jenkins. Miss Rogers was a cousin of our 
martyred President, Abraham Lincoln. Their 
marriage resulted in the birth of the following 
children : Walter R. ; John E., who is engaged 
with his father in the mercantile business ; 
Frances and Ellen, who died in infancy, and 
Mary R., who is at home with her parents. 



rrl ALTER K. THOMPSON, editor, pro- 
^^■^ prietor and founder of the Ebensburg 
Mountaineer, is a son of James M. and Frances 
(Rogers) Thompson, whose history appears 
above, and was born in Ebensburg, October 
20, 1867. He received his education in the 
common schools of Ebensburg, and at an early 
age learned the trade of a printer. For some 
time he was employed as a draughtsman in 
the Johnson Company's works, at Johnstown. 
In 1891, in partnership with John L. Sechler, 
he founded the Ebensburg Motintaineer, and on 
June 18, of the same year, issued the first 



copy. The partnership continued four months, 
when Mr. Thompson purchased the entire 
paper, which he has published ever since. 

The Ebensburg Mountaineer is a six-column 
quarto eight-page paper, republican in politics, 
devoted to home matters and local news and 
ever alive to the interest of Ebensburg and 
Cambria county, having an extensive local 
and rural circulation. The office of the Ebens- 
burg Alountaineer is in the Opera House 
block, Ebensburg, where, besides editing this 
newsy paper, Mr. Thompson does an extensive 
job-printing business. 

Fraternally he is a member of Summit 
Lodge, No. 312, F. & A. M., of Ebensburg, 
and belongs to the Sons of Veterans, Lieut. 
Hugh Jones Camp, No. 227. 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church, 
and on February 14, 1 891, celebrated his mar- 
riage to Miss Anna Frederick, of Homer City, 
Indiana county. They have two children : 
Frances M.,born June 12, 1892, and Anna H., 
born September 24, 1895. 



JOHNSTON G. WEST, a wounded Union 
veteran of the late Civil War, and a 
prominent and leading citizen, as well as an 
efficient public official of Ferndale, is a son of 
Matthew Hay and Mary (Glass) West, and 
was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
November 5, 1843. The American branch of 
the West family was founded in Maryland, 
where Joseph West, whose father came from 
England, was born and reared. Joseph West 
married and removed to an old stone house 
on the site of Homestead, Allegheny county, 
having previously resided for a short time 
in eastern Pennsylvania. His son, Matthew 
Hay West, was born in the old homestead 
stone house on Februaiy 22, 1800. He re- 
ceived his early education in the old district 



no 



IIIOCKAPHICAL AXIJ PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



schools. He learned the miUing business, 
but soon abandoned that line of work and 
went to Pittsburg, where he engaged in the 
mercantile business, opening the first large 
dry-goods establishment of that city, which 
he conducted until 1840. In that year he 
removed to Six Mile Ferry, in the same 
county, where he owned a farm and spent the 
remainder of his life in its management and 
cultivation. He died February 14, 1872, 
when in the seventy-third year of his age. 
Mr. West was, in his political views, an old- 
line Whig, and naturally espoused the princi- 
ples of the Republican party on its organiza- 
tion. He cared but little for the distinction 
of office, yet held all of his township's offices, 
yet never soliciting any position nor refusing 
to serve when elected to any office that would 
not take him from home. He was a Presby- 
terian in religion, and was a deacon in the 
church of that denomination at Six Mile 
Feriy. He married Mary Glass, a daughter 
of Johnston Glass, who was born March 7, 
18 1 3, and died July 1 1, 1870. Of the thirteen 
children born to their union, those living are: 
Eliza, wife of James H. Irvin, of Pittsburg; 
Agnes T., married Hiram Need, of Allegheny 
county ; Elizabeth, widow of John Noble, ot 
the place last mentioned; Dr. M. II., Sarah 
R. ami luhvartl I'",., who are also residents of 
Homestead; 'Squire Johnston G., and Elva, 
wife of Charles C. Dudgeon, of PLlyria, Ohio. 
Robcr G. is deceased. 

Johnston G. West was reared on his father's 
farm, and at seventeen years of age left the 
sciiool room to enter the Union army. He 
enlisted on July 7, 1861, in company II, Sixty- 
second regiment Pcnnsj'lvania Volunteer in- 
fantry, ami servetl in liie Army of the Potomac 
from the I'eninsula to the battle of Gettysburg. 
He was wounded and captured at the battle 



of Gaines' Mill, and spent fourteen weeks 
in Libby prison and on Belle Island. After 
being e.xchanged he participated in the bat- 
tles of P^redericksburg and Chancellorsville, 
and lost his leg at Gettysburg. He was dis- 
charged December 20, 1863, came home for a 
short time and then served for eighteen months 
in the quarter-master general's department at 
Washington. Leaving Washington he went 
to Pittsburg and served as deputy clerk of the 
Criminal Court up to 1870, in which year he 
was elected as coroner of Allegheny county 
for a term of three years. At the expiration 
of his term of office he removed to Home- 
stead, and three years later took charge of 
the old farm at Six Mile Ferry, on which he 
remained three years. He then, in 1881, 
came to Ferndale, where he has resided ever 
since. 

On October 9, 1869, Mr. West married 
Maiy Vickroy, whose father, Edwin A. Vick- 
roy, is a son of Thomas, and a grandson of 
Hugh Vickroy, who came from England and 
settled near Cumberland, Maryland. To Mr. 
and Mrs. West have been born si.x children, 
two sons and four daughters : Edith McClure, 
who died at three years of age ; Vickroy, 
Ethel, Mary, Helen, who died in infancy; 
Kenneth Johnston and Agnes. 

In religious belief Mr. West is a Presby- 
terian, being a member of that church and a 
elder of the church of that denomination at 
Johnstown. In his political predilections he is 
a republican of the 1 lamilton tj'pe, and ever 
eager for the advancement of the principles of 
his party. He has served as school director, 
antl held nearly all the other local offices of 
Upper Yoder township. He was elected as 
justice of the peace in 18S6, and re-elected in 
1S90 and 1896. He has filled the latter office 
with abililj-and discretion, and in all business 




W 11,1 1 \M ('. l.l.W IS. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



131 



transactions has manifested a soundness of 
judgment which has made his opinions re- 
spected. 'Squire West is a member of Post 
No. 3, G. A. R., of Pittsburg, and as a citizen 
and man possesses many traits of character 
which are the exponents of success in Ufe. 



TA>IL,LIA3I C. LEWIS, treasurer of the 
Johnstown Savings bank, is a son of 
WiUiam and Mary Ann Lewis, and was born 
August 23, 1820, in Mitcheldean, Gloucester- 
shire, England. 

His father, WilHam Lewis, having been 
born and raised in the same town, engaged in 
the mercantile business, in the drug and gro- 
cery line. He married about 1817 Mary Ann 
Lake, whose native place was Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, United States, having gone to Eng- 
land in her youth. In May, 1834, he emi- 
grated with his family to the United States, 
landing in Philadelphia July 4, of that year. 
Later he located in HoUidaysburg, then in 
Huntingdon county, now the county seat of 
Blair county, where he died in 1854, survived 
by his wife, who died in Altoona in 1876, and 
the following children : Mary Ann, deceased ; 
William C, Thomas B., of HoUidaysburg, now 
deceased ; Sarah Jane, of Altoona, widow of 
Christian Kuhn, now deceased ; Alfred J , of 
Altoona, this State; George H., of Philadel- 
phia, deceased ; Eliza B., now of Pittsburg, 
widow of Thomas Clark ; Emma Penelope 
and Amelia L., of Altoona. 

Mr. Lewis had very poor advantages for 
scholastic training, as his school privileges 
were broken off when he emigrated to this 
country. The common-school system had not 
yet been established, and he was put to the ne- 
cessity very early of leaving school to enter 
upon duties in a store, combining the business 
of a grocery and bakery. To say, however, 



that he is uneducated would be misleading. 
His education has been by association with 
men in the business relations of life — of that 
practical character so essential to every man's 
success in life. He learned the trade of a 
baker in HoUidaysburg, and on August 20, 
1839, came to Johnstown, where he has lived 
ever since. He worked as a journeyman, at 
his trade for D. B. Wakefield until April, 1847, 
when he embarked in a grocery, confectionery 
and bakery business. He successfully pursued 
the mercantile business along these lines until 
1864. Among the incidents of his first years 
of business was the introduction of the first 
stock of toys, and the first invoice of bananas 
and strawberries shipped to Johnstown. In 
1 864 he withdrew from mercantile pursuits and 
took up insurance in its various departments of 
fire, life and accident. 

In about 1857 he was elected borough treas- 
urer, and with the exception of one year served 
continuously by re-election for a period of fif- 
teen years. While acting in these capacities 
he was at the same time holding other posi- 
tions of honor and trust ; among them were 
the following : For several years the position 
of Secretary of the Johnstown Building and 
Loan association, and treasurer of the Johns- 
town Water and Gas company a number of 
years, and treasurer of the Johnstown Flood 
Finance committee; also treasurer of the Union 
Benevolent association of the Conemaugh 
valley, and treasurer of the trustees of the 
Young Men's Christian association. On Sep- 
tember 12, 1870, the Johnstown Savings bank 
was chartered, and in March, 1878, Mr. Lewis 
was chosen treasurer of this bank by the 
board of trustees to succeed Frank Dibert, 
resigned, and has remained continually in that 
position to the present time. 

The other present officers of the bank are : 



132 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND TORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



James McMillen, president; George T. Swank, 
first vice-president ; Herman Baumer, second 
vice-president, and James Quinn, third vice- 
president. The board of trustees are: Herman 
Baumer, James G. ElUs, John Hannan, Charles 
F. Kress, W. B. Lowman, James McMillen, 
James Quinn, John D. Roberts, Dwight 
Roberts, W. Horace Rose, H. W. Storey, 
George T. Swank, John Thomas, George W. 
Moses, John H. Waters and Erhard Zang. 

Mr. Lewis is an upright and consistent 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He has been a member of this church for fifty- 
nine years, and is an ardent and devoted church 
worker. For twenty-five }'ears consecutively 
he has been superintendent of the Sabbath- 
school, has been a member of the board of stew- 
ards for the period of forty-five years, and for j 
twenty-five years was leaderofthe church choir. 

On .September 23, 1847, Mr. Lewis mar- 
ried Catherine Swegler, a daughter of John 
Swegler, and sister of Captain John .S. .Sweg- 
ler, and their union has been blessed in 
the birth of one son, William J., a teller in 
the' Keystone National bank of Pittsburg. 
His experience in the flood of May 31, 1889, 
was similar to that of hundreds of others re- 
sulting in the entire destruction of his home and 
contents, but with his family he escaped death 
in the flood to commence life anew in vigorous 
efforts to rebuild and replace losses, and thus 
assist in building a new city. 

William C. Lewis is a gentleman well-known 
for his strict integrity, probity and uprightness 
of cliaracter, one in whom is reposed the high- 
est confidence of all who have business or 
social relations with liim. 



r>i:OHi.i: \. KIMvi:.\l>, a general insur- 
ance agent of Kbeiisburg, Pennsylvania, 
and a son of I larrison and Pamelia (Stewart) 



Kinkead, was born August i, 1837, in Ebens- 
burg. 

His grandfather, George Kinkead, was a 
lock-keeper on the old Pennsylvania canal, 
who lived originally in Centre county, but 
died near Blairsville, Indiana count}-. 

The father of our subject was born in Miles- 
burg, Centre county, Pennsylvania, October 
30, 1814, and died in October, 1892. He re- 
ceived a limited education in that county, and 
learned the trade of a saddler and harness 
maker, following it in Ebensburg from the 
time he came there in 1835 to within twenty 
years of his death. He was a strong Demo- 
crat, and had served as a justice of the peace 
at least forty years prior to his death — a sure 
proof of the confidence of the people in his 
integrity, probity and good judgment. He 
was also a ruling elder in the Presbyterian 
church, in the affairs of which he was very 
active, having been one of the organizers of 
the Presbyterian church in Ebensburg. 

His fanu'l)' consisted of five boys and six 
girls: George A.; James N. (deceased); Maria 
L. ; Pamelia Jane, wife of A. Y. Jones, of Re- 
nova, Pennsylvania ; .Susan H. ; David H., 
who lives in lohnstown, and has charge of 
the PhcLiiix Brewing conipau)' ; Anna Olivia, 
wife of I'ergus C. Lloyd, a merchant of Ebens- 
burg. The remainder died in infancy. The 
mother of our subject died March 11, 1S54. 
She was a daughter of Alexander Stewart, a 
native of Scotland, and an early settler of 
Indiana county. 

March 11, 1862, George A. Kinkead mar- 
ried Deborah Evans, a daughter of David 
tlvans, of Cambria county, and has three 
sons : .S. Stewart, who occupied the position 
of clerk of the Gautier Steel company, of 
Johnstown, twelve j'ears, and is now deputy 
register and recorder of Cambria county ; 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



133 



George D., who has been a clerk in the Gau- 
tier department of the C. I. Co. for five years ; 
Oscar A., who is his father's assistant in busi- 
ness. 

The subject of our sketch was educated in 
the common schools of Ebensburg, and took 
his first position in the store of A. A. Barker 
& Sons, where he remained for seventeen 
years. In 1877 he embarked in the insurance 
business, representing the following insurance 
companies : The Insurance company of North 
America, the Fire Association of Philadelphia, 
the Orient of Hartford, the North British, the 
Mercantile, the Travelers' Life and Accident 
company of Hartford, besides seven other fire 
insurance companies. 

Mr. Kinkead is a conspicuous republican. 
He has served as county auditor, and has 
held local offices in his borough, being at pres- 
ent president of the council. He is a member 
of Summit Lodge, No. 312, F. and A. M., 
having been its secretary for twenty-five years. 

During the Civil War he served in the 
Emergency department. Like his father, he 
is a ruling elder and valued member of the 
Presbyterian church. Like his father's, too, 
Mr. Kinkead's personal character has in it 
nothing that is unbecoming a good citizen 
and worthy man. In the discharge of his 
public duties he is zealous and indefatigable. 
In his private life he is sincere and unosten- 
tatious. 



ir\R- T. L. AR3IITAGE, a graduate of the 
"^■^ Royal university of Ireland, and a suc- 
cessful practitioner of medicine, at Lilly, this 
county, is a son of Thomas and Agnes (Shaw) 
Armitage, and was born in North Ireland, 
November 22, i860. Thomas Armitage, 
grandfather of the subject of this memoir, 
was a native of Yorkshire, England. 



Thomas Armitage, father, was born in Man- 
chester, England, March 25, 1834, where he 
received his early education. When but a 
young man, he went to Ireland with his uncle, 
Thos. Firth, who was the first locomotive en- 
gineer of Ireland, and under whose direction 
Thomas Armitage followed railroading. He 
arose from one position of trust to another 
until he became superintendent of motive 
power ot the Waterford and Limerick railway, 
and occupied this position until 1880, when 
he resigned. In 1883 he emigrated to America, 
locating in London, Canada, where he became 
foreman of a roimd house. He died October 
31, 1891. His marriage with Agnes Shaw, 
who still survives him, resulted in the birth of 
twelve children, all of whom are living but 
one son, who died in infancy. 

T. L. Armitage's early life was spent in 
Ireland; his elementary education was ob- 
tained in the Dundalk Grammar school and 
from private tutors. In 1876, when but six- 
teen years old, he entered Dublin university, 
of Ireland, from which renowned institution 
he graduated after a three years' course 01 
study. On leaving the university he joined 
the medical staff of the British army and re- 
mained on the staff seven years, during which 
period he served in the memorable Egyptian 
campaign, and for active service rendered was 
awarded the Egyptian medal, and the Khedive 
of Egypt's Bronze Star, which is an emblem 
of faithful, effective service. 

In 1 89 1 he retired from the service and 
emigrated to America, where he first located 
in Michigan and practiced his profession two 
years. He then removed to Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, and took a special course in 
the Medico-Chirurgical college, of that city, 
where in six months he received a degree, and 
took twefth place in a competitive examina- 



134 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



tion in a class of two hundred and fifty-two 
candidates for an apj)ointment in Blockley 
hospital. In May Dr. Armitage removed to 
Lilly, this county, where he has since prac- 
ticed his profession. He always keeps up to 
the high-water mark of his profession, and, 
while he has filled his mind with the best 
thoughts of the college and leading physicians 
of the age as a preparation, yet has preserved 
and developed his own individuality, and has 
thought and worked and grown into a careful, 
safe and progressive physician. His practice 
already extends along the Pennsylvania rail- 
road from Altoona to Pittsburg, and he enjoys 
the confidence and respect of a large and in- 
creasing patronage. 

In politics he supports the principles of the 
Democratic party, and takes an active interest 
in all local issues. Dr. Armitage is interested 
in whatever pertains to the advancement of 
his profession, and is a member of the Cam- 
bria County Medical society, and of the Penn- 
sylvania State Medical association, both of 
which organizations are in the interest of 
progress in medical science. 

While in England, Dr. Armitage was united 
in marriage with Miss Caroline Annie Hole, on 
March 22, 1888. She is a daughter of Jonas 
Hole, is a true Englishwoman and was born 
within the sound of the Bow Bells of West- 
minster, Londim. Their liapp)- marriage has 
been blessed in the birth of the following 
children: Anna, Hazel and Thomas Leger 
Firth. 

CV.VN «. LKWIS, superintendent of the 
pattern ilepartment of the Cambria Iron 
company of Johnstown, is a son of David and 
Mary Lewis, and was born Augu.st 24, 1821, 
in Llanidloes, Montgomeryshire, North Wales. 
Mr. Lewis was at an early age thrown 



upon his own responsibilities, his mother 
dying when he was one year old, and his 
father when he was but ten years of age. Mr. 
Lewis was employed as an errand boy around 
several business establishments, among them 
being a bookbindery, a printing house, and 
later as helper to a physician and surgeon, 
being in the employ of the latter a number of 
}-ears. At about this time his brother began 
the manufacture of carding machines used in 
the manufacture of wool, and Mr. Lewis took 
a position with him for three or four years. 
His brother closed out this business and came 
to the United States, and Mr. Lewis being 
again thrown upon his own responsibilities, 
again took up mechanical pursuits, working in 
the cities of Merthyr Tydvill, Tredeger and 
other places. In 1840, in company with a 
friend, he came to the United States, his desti- 
nation being Portsmouth, Ohio, but owing to 
his lack of knowledge of the geography of the 
country, landed at Portsmouth, New Hamp- 
shire. He soon went west, and engaged in 
various capacities as a laborer, finally securing 
work in the carpenter shop of the Scioto fur- 
nace. That his ability as a workman was 
appreciated, is shown by the fact that in a 
short time his wages were increased from sixty- 
two and a half cents a day to one dollar and 
twenty-five cents per day. In 1844 he came 
to Brail}''s Heud, in Armstrong count}-, this 
State, and worked at any good work that came 
to hand, until he was placed in the pattern- 
making department of the furnace at that 
place. This was his first work in the line of 
pattern making. Here he made rapid pro- 
gress, but began to feel the lack of an educa- 
tion, and realizing that it was a great barrier 
t<i his progress, he resolved to procure a better 
one. Through the generosity of a friend, he 
was given a scholarship in Allegheny College, 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



135 



at Meadville. He met the principal, who, 
upon a very brief examination, found that the 
prospective pupil did not even know the mul- 
tiplication table, but being attracted by the 
young man's courage, encouraged him, saying 
they would do all they could for him. Mr. 
Lewis remained two terms and made rapid 
progress, going so far in mathematics as to 
master the elements of algebra. He after- 
wards further pursued his studies in Lewisburg 
academy until 185 i, when, in company with 
others, he went to California to try his fortune 
as a gold miner. He remained there thirteen 
months, clearing three thousand dollars, and 
then returned to Pennsylvania, and thence 
again to his native heath across the Atlantic. 

After his return to America, in 1853, he took 
a position in the pattern department of the Cam- 
bria Iron company, and has been at the head of 
that department ever since. To those who know 
of the magnitude of these works, no explana- 
tions are necessary to show the responsible 
nature of his position, and his long continuance 
in it is the strongest testimony of his efficiency. 

Politically, Mr. Lewis is a republican, and 
held the office of councilman in Millville 
borough ten years, and the office of school 
director and treasurer continuously for a period 
of twenty-seven years. He has always been a 
staunch friend of the common schools, and 
has, indeed, contributed much towards bring- 
ing about the excellent schools of the present 
city of Johnstown. 

He was married to Mrs. Phoebe J. Geer in 
the year 1857, and to this union has been born 
one child, Will. F., a draughtsman in the 
employ of the Cambria company. 



^EORGE W. PIERSON, justice of the 

^* peace and general merchant, of Dysart, 
Dean township, this county, is a son of Charles 



A. and Mary (Hench) Pierson, and was born 
near Iowa city, Iowa, November 18, 1866. 
His father, Charles A. Pierson, was born in 
Saxony, Germany, and when about fourteen 
years old emigrated to America. He learned 
the trade of a tailor, and followed his trade a 
k\v years. About 1S67 he located in Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa, and embarked in the mercantile 
business. In 1873 he removed to McGregor, 
Iowa, and from there removed to Mazomanie, 
Wisconsin. After a residence of nine years 
in the above place, he returned to the east, and 
established himself in the mercantile business 
in Altoona, Pennsylvania. About 18S3 he re- 
moved to St. Augustine, this county, and from 
there located in Dysart in 1886, and opened a 
general store. He remained there until his 
death, which occurred March 10, 1895. He 
was a member of the German Lutheran church, 
and in politics belonged to the Democratic 
party. In connection with his store he was 
a])pointed postmaster, and held the position 
eight years. 

He married Miss Mary Hench, a daughter 
of Augustine Hench, who emigrated from 
Germany in 1841, and located in Altoona, 
Pennsylvania. To their marriage nine chil- 
dren were born, six sons and three daughters, 
of whom four sons and one daughter grew to 
maturity : Frank, employed in the railroad 
service and located at Fort Worth, Texas ; 
George W. ; William, located at Dysart; 
Michael, a Pennsylvania railroad employee at 
Dysart, and Rosa at home. 

George W. Pierson was educated in the 
common-schools at Mazomanie, and finished 
at the State normal at Madison, Wisconsin, and 
on leaving school learned the trade of a barber, 
which he followed several years at Chicago 
and St. Paul, but has made the mercantile 
business his principal vocation in life. He lo- 



136 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



cated in Dysart in 1890, and in 1895, in con- 
nection with his other business, he embarked 
in the mercantile business and opened a store, 
where he handles everything usually found in 
a first-class mercantile establishment. 

He is a member of the Baptist church, and 
in politics is identified with the Re])ublican 
[jarty ; lie takes an active part in local affairs, 
and in 1894 was elected justice of the peace 
at Dysart. He is a member of Logan Lodge, 
No. 1059, I. O. O. F., of Altoona, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

March 30, 1891, he celebrated his [uarriage 
with Miss Mary Elizabeth Kear, who is a na- 
tive of England. 

e> 

I^AMKL S. IJICE, M. D., a physician and 

^^ surgeon of character and distinction, 
whose professional life has been mostly spent 
at Hastings, is a son of Samuel and Eliza 
(]5eck) Rice, and was born near Deckinspoint, 
Indiana county, Pennsylvania, September 17, 
1859. Dr. Rice represents the fifth genera- 
tion from the pioneer, Conrad Rice, who was 
a native of Lancaster county, and a blacksmith 
by trade. Conrad Rice purchased, in 1794, « 
from a clergymiUi b\' the name of .Smith, the 
right for a tract of one hundred and si.\ty 
acres of land represented to be within nine 
miles of Greensburg, this State, but which 
Hon. William I'iiiley, after a careful search of 
legal records, found to be near the waters of 
Two Lick creek, in Indiana county. Mr. Rice, 
wlio had came as far as the site of Youngs- 
town, Westmoreland county, after finding iiis 
l.uKJ to be in Intliana county, proceeded there 
and found his tract, which afterwards became 
tiie James P. Carter farm, adjoining the bor- 
ough line of tlic town of Indiana. Returning 
to the site of Youngstown, where he had left 
his family and team, lie received information 



from Capt. Anderson Sharp that it would not 

be safe to settle there then on account of 
Indians, and went to Centerville, in the Ligo- 
nier valley, where he remained until the spring 
of 1795. He then removed to his land, of 
which about eight acres had been cleared by 
a previous occupant, who had his cabin burned 
and who had been driven away by the Indians. 
He erected a temporary shelter, built a cabin, 
and cleared some land ; but before he had 
sown any grain his horses, four in number' 
died. He replaced his two teams with a yoke 
of oxen, and built a blacksmith shop, to which 
the settlers repaired for miles around. He 
was never molested by Indians, although 
making sugar each spring in the Cross Creek 
valley, a favorite Indian hunting-ground. His 
land, purchased for ten shillings per acre, in 
time became very valuable, and, between his 
farm and shop, he acquired a competency for 
that day. His son, Conrad Rice, Jr., was born 
in Lancaster county in 1783, and married 
Phili[xiia Dickey, by whom he had eight 
children: Philip, Margaret, l^lizabcth, Cather- 
ine (I\Irs. James Middletoun), Philipena (Mrs. 
John Lynch), Susannah (Mrs. Robert Adams), 
Harbani (Mrs. John McDonald), and Conrad, 
who married Mary Farr. Philip, the eldest 
child by this marriage, was a blacksmith by 
trade, and a farmer by occupation. He wed- 
ded Margaret McAnult)-, an aunt to Daniel .S. 
McAnult}-, wiiose sketch appears elsewhere in 
this volume. To this union were born five 
children, three sons and two daughters : Con- 
rad, .Samuel, John, Isabella and Margaret, 
who married John Fisher. Samuel Rice, the 
second si)n, antl the father of Dr. Rice, was 
born on tlie old Rice liomestead, near the 
town of Indiana, in 1879. He was a black- 
smith by trade, and owned a f.uin which 
he cultivated. He was a strong Jacksonian 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



137 



democrat, served many years as a justice of 
the peace, and held membership in the United 
Presbyterian church. His wife, Eliza Rice, 
whose maiden name was Beck, was a daughter 
of William and Margaret (Row) Beck, early 
residents of near the town of Indiana. Tlie 
mother probably died in the same section. 
Squire and Mrs. Rice reared a family of eight 
children : Philip, a carpenter and contractor 
of near Dixonville, Indiana county ; Mary, 
wife of Nelson O'Neil, of Jacksonville, in her 
native county ; John and William B., both 
farmers in their native township ; Dr. Daniel 
S.; Porter E., engaged in farming near Decker's 
Point, in Indiana county ; and Frank A., of 
Hastings. 

Dr. Daniel S. Rice was reared on the farm, 
received his education in the public schools, 
Purchase Line academy, and the select schools 
of Professor Wolf, of Marion Center, and 
taught during the winters of 1879-80 and 
1880-81. He then commenced the study of 
medicine with Dr. J. B. Green, then of Di.xon- 
ville, Indiana county, and now of Summerhill, 
and in 1882 entered the Cincinnati College of 
Medicine and Surgery, from which he was 
graduated in the class of 1884. Returning 
home, he commenced the practice of his pro- 
fession at St. Boniface, this county, which he 
left five years later to locate at Hastings, 
where he has practiced ever since. 

On January 6, 1891, Dr. Rice was united in 
marriage with Nettie Corbin, of Houtzdale, 
this State. To their union have been born 
two children, a son and a daughter: Mary 
Hayes and Daniel Sweeny, now deceased. 

Dr. Rice is a republican politically, and has 
been a Methodist for several years, being a 
member of the Hastings Methodist Episcopal 
church. He is a member of Somerset Lodge, 
No. 312, Free and Accepted Masons, of Ebens- 



burg, the county seat, and Patton Lodge, No. 
1089, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Patton. Dr. Rice is devoted to his profession, 
and, in addition to his collegiate courses of 
lectures, has taken special courses. In 1886 
he took a special course at the Philadelphia 
Pol)xlinic, and three years later another spe- 
cial course at the New York Post-graduate 
Medical school. A pleasant and congenial 
gentleman, he is accessible to all, meeting 
every one with kindness and affability. Dr. 
Rice is a gentleman both at home and abroad. 
But it is in his profession — to which he has 
devoted his life— that he stands at his full 
height. All his reading and study are pursued 
with but one view, and that the better to 
qualify him for the discharge of his duty. 
He has a very large practice, and ranks as one 
of the most able, experienced and successful 
physicians of the county. Dr. Rice has never 
suffered himself to become antiquated in his 
profession, but has always kept fully abreast 
of all the advances made in medicine, and has 
been sometimes able to anticipate them in 
this "reat age of wonderful discoveries. 



HEKMAJV H. MYERS, a rising young 
lawyer, of Ebensburg, this county, is a 
son of James and Mary J. (Murray) Myers, 
and was born in Ebensburg, Cambria county, 
Pennsylvania. His great-grandfather, John 
Myers, was born in Maryland, and at an early 
age removed to Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he lived for a short time, and 
then removing farther west, settled near Ash- 
ville, Cambria county, where he died. He was 
a cabinet-maker by trade, but on locating in 
this county, adopted the avocation of a farmer. 
The grandfather of the subject of this sketch 
was born along the waters of the Conemago, 
in Maryland, and removed with his parents to 



138 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



tliis county, where he hVed the remainder of 
his life. He was also a carpenter and cabinet- 
maker, and followed his trade near Ashville. 
In politics he was a democrat, and took an in- 
telligent interest in all local affairs. His mar- 
riage with Ann Glass resulted in the birth of 
twelve children, six boys and six girls: James, 
Susan, Tillie, Mary, George, John, Henry, Mar- 
garet, Catherine, William, Jane, and Joseph. 

The maternal great-grandfather, George 
Glass, was also a native of Maryland, and was 
induced to settle in Cambria county through 
the influence of Father Gallitzin. He located 
near the village of Muster, and engaged in 
farming. 

James Myers (father) was the son of John 
and Ann (Glass) Myers, and was born near 
Ashville, this county, February 20, i8i8; he 
was educated in the common and subscription 
schools of Muster, this county, and learned 
the trade of a carpenter with his father, and 
for twenty-five years was engaged as con- 
tractor and builder in h^bensburg, Cambria 
county. 

Politically he affiliated with the Democratic 
party, and took a very prominent part in local 
political affairs, serving as burgess, council- 
man, school-director, etc. In 1864 he was 
elected sheriff of Cambria county for a term 
of three years; on the ex[)iration of his term 
of office he cmbarketl in the nicicantile busi- 
ness with John Lloyd, under the fu in name of 
Myers & Lloyd. This business alliance con- 
tinued for about six years, when Mr. Myers 
sold out his interest to Mr. Lloyd, and from 
tliat time until his death, on Jul)' 10, 1896, he 
devoted his time and attention to his farm aud 
real-estate interests. He was a prominent and 
devout member of the Roman Catholic church. 

September 9, 1845, he celebrated his mar- 
riage with Miss Mary J., a daughter of Daniel 



Murray, a native of County Antrim, Ireland, 
who emigrated to America, and settled in 
Ebensburg. To their union were born four 
children: Ramlolph, Cornelia, Gallitzin, and 
I Icrnian H. 

1 [erman H. Myers was educated in the com- 
mon and private schools of Ebensburg. On 
leaving school lie taught three months in a 
country school, finishing a term commenced 
by another. After his short exiierience in 
the school-room, he entered the office of 
Wm. H. Sechler, an able lawyer of the county, 
and engaged in the study of law. After 
completing his required course of reading, 
he was examined and admitted to the bar 
of Cambria county on January 8, 1SS4. Upon 
the very threshold of the practice of his pro- 
fession lie was called into politics, and in 
March, 1884, was appointed deputy prothono- 
tary, and occupied that position continually 
until January, 1896, when he retired, leaving 
an enviable record as an able and efficient pub- 
lic official. Since the above date he has de- 
voted his attention to the practice of his profes- 
sion, in which he is rapidly forging his way to 
the front ranks. 

He has always been identified with the 
Democratic party, and has served on several 
occasions as a delegate to the State Demo- 
cratic conventions. 



/>L.\RENCK L. t;OOl)\VIN, one of the 

^^ )-oung democrats of Cambria county, is 
a man of classical education and with some 
experience as a public speaker. He is a son 
of John M. and Delia (La Rue) Goodwin, and 
was born in Warren county, Kentucky, De- 
cember 23, 1859. His father was a physician 
and a native of the State of Indiana. His 
grandfather was a soklier under Gen. W. H. 
H. Harrison in the battle of Tippecanoe. Mr. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



139 



Goodwin received his education in the State 
university of Indiana, at Bloomington, tliat 
State, and was graduated from that institution 
of learning in the class of 1883. Leaving the 
university, he taught school in Clark county, 
Indiana, read law for six months, and then 
became a reporter on the Indianapolis Times, 
which he left later to assume a similar position 
on the Indianapolis Journal, where his labors 
were terminated in a short time by ill-health. 
He then went to Los Angeles, in southwestern 
California, where he remained about four years 
for his health, and during that time was edito- 
rial writer and associate editor on the Los 
Angeles Evening Express. After his health 
had improved to considerable extent he came 
east in December, i8go, and took a position 
on the WasJmigton [D. C.) Post, which he held 
up to April, 1 891, where confinement in an 
eastern climate had so affected his health that 
an out-door occupation was ordered by medi- 
cal advice. An opportunity being offered him 
at that time to engage in the lumber business 
in Cambria county, he accepted the offer and 
became a member of the present firm of Kuhns 
& Goodwin, who now own over four thousand 
acres of timber. In their busiest season they 
employ from eighty to ninety hands, and have 
a yearly out-put from their mills of five million 
feet of lumber. On their timber tract they 
have three miles of logging railroad on which 
they run a locomotive, and their mills have a 
capacity of thirty-five thousand feet of lumber 
per day. Doing a large and successful busi- 
ness, the firm is widely and favorably known. 
On November 17, 1885, Mr. Goodwin wed- 
ded Harriet A. Kuhns, a daughter of the late 
Philip S. Kuhns, a resident of Greensburg, 
Westmoreland county, and a member of that 
old and respectable Kuhns family, so well- 
known in that section. Mr, and Mrs. Good- 



win have two children : Helen L., born De- 
cember 10, 1893, and John K., born July, 25, 
1895. 

In politics Clarence L. Goodwin is a Jeffer- 
son Democrat, opposed to the centralization of 
power in the general government, though 
holding that government is always empowered 
to protect itself in the exercise of all its func- 
tions. He now resides at Dunlo. He was a 
delegate to the Democratic State convention 
of 1895, at Williamsport, where on the floor 
of the convention hall he presented the name 
of Hon. W. Horace Rose, of Johnstown as a 
candidate for nomination for Superior Court 
judge. Mr. Goodwin has been a participant 
in the active scenes of several important politi- 
cal campaigns. He first took part in the presi- 
dential canvass of 1888 in California, when he 
spoke at various places in the interest of the 
Democratic nominees. In the gubernatorial 
campaign of 1894, in Pennsylvania, he made 
several speeches in favor of the Democratic 
nominee. Prior to his graduation he repre- 
sented his university in the State College Ora- 
torical contest and won. He then represented 
his State in the Inter-State Collegiate Oratori- 
cal contest of Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Wiscon- 
sin, Iowa and Minnesota, and won third place, 
and delivered the annual address before the 
alumni of his university for the year 1894. 

o 

HOX. SAMUEL D. PATTERSON, a mem- 
ber of the House of Representatives of 
Pennsylvania, from Cambria county, is a son 
of Thomas and Magdalene (Dunkle) Patter- 
son, and was born in Green township, Indiana 
county, Pennsylvania, February 16, 1845. As 
the name would indicate, the Pattersons are 
of Scotch-Irish origin. The progenitors of 
the American branch of the family, after land- 
ing at Philadelphia, with the characteristic 



140 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



energy of their wonderful race pushed west- 
ward to find ample room and untranimeled 
freedom. They came about the commence- 
ment of the present century and were pioneer 
settlers in one section of Juniata county. From 
this Patterson settlement Samuel Patterson 
(grandfather) removed to the Manor settlement 
of Indiana county, when the latter was largely 
a wilderness. He was a Presbyterian, like most 
of his race, and cleared a large farm, on which 
he died about 1830, at fifty years of age. He 
supplied his table with meat by killing bear 
and deer, which then were plenty in that sec- 
tion. He married Elizabeth Evans, and they 
sleep side by side in the Presbyterian ceme- 
tery at Pcnn Run or Greenville, in Indiana 
county. They were the parents of four sons 
and three daughters : John, William, Thomas, 
Robert, Mrs. Elizabeth Eigness, Mrs. Mar- 
garet McLaughlin, and Mrs. Nancy Lockhart. 
Thomas Patterson, father, was born in the 
Manor settlement, July 7, 1814, and lived to 
be seventy-four years of age, dying May 11, 
1888. He was a shoemaker by trade, spent 
several years as a clerk in a store at Cascy- 
ville, Kentucky, taught school in Indiana 
county for fourteen consecutive terms, and 
passed the latter part of his life in agricultural 
pursuits on a Green township farm. He was a 
whig and republican in politics and a member 
and class-leader of the Methodist Protestant 
church, in which he was a pillar of strength 
in times of darkness or periods of depression. 
He served fifteen years as a justice of the 
peace, was noted as a man of stainless char- 
acter and excellent judgment, and enjoyed the 
respect and confidence of all who knew him. 
Thomas Patterson married Magdalene Uunkle, 
who is a daughter of John Dunkle, a member 
of tin; Dunkle funily of York count)-. Mrs. 
Patterson, who is still living, was born in 



Brush Valley township, Indiana county, 1821. 
Mr. and Mrs. Patterson had nine children : 
Hon. Samuel D., John W., residing on the 
old homestead; Kezia N., wife of R. F. 
Templeton, a farmer; William E., Martin L., 
and Robert N., all farmers in their native 
township ; Caroline M. married John L. 
Evans, a farmer of Cambria township, this 
county ; Mary Pollen, wife of Evan Davis, 01 
Buffiington township, Indiana county, where 
he owns a farm ; and Emma Catherine, who 
married William Douglass, a farmer of her 
native township. 

Hon. Samuel D. Patterson was reared on 
the farm and learned the trade of shoemaker 
with his father. He went through the com- 
mon schools and then entered Pine Flat acad- 
emy, which he left in a few weeks to enter the 
Union army, at the early age of seventeen 
years. He enlisted on August 20, 1862, in 
company I, Si.Kty-seventh Pennsj-lvania in- 
fantry, and served until June 19, 1S65, when 
he was honorably discharged at Harrisburg. 
He was taken prisoner at Milroy's defeat at 
Winchester, June 15, 1S63, and spent three 
months in Libby prison. Castle Thunder and 
on Bell Island, being paroled in September. 
He was then sent to the parole camp at An- 
napolis, where he remained until exchanged 
in March, 1864, and sent back to his regiment, 
with which he served until June 20, 1864, 
when at the battle of White House Landing, 
he was captureil a second time and sent to 
Georgia to spend ten months in Andersonville, 
Millen, Savannah, Thoma.sville and Blackshire 
prisons of that State. He was released April 
J.S, 1865, at Andersonville, and sent to Harris- 
burg by the way of Jacksonville, Florida. 
Returning home, he went to school that win- 
ter, attended the Pine Flat academy one ses- 
sion and then taught one term in a neighbor- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



141 



ing school district. His next employment 
was as engineer on a steam saw-mill, which 
he left, in 1870, to purchase one hundred acres 
of woodland in Barr township, that he has 
cleared out and changed into a fine and pro- 
ductive farm. 

On September 29, 1870, Mr. Patterson mar- 
ried Kate Evans, a daughter of Richard J. 
Evans, of Cambria township. To their union 
have been born four children : Harry E , Nor- 
man Arthur (dead), Annie M., and Roy B. 

In early life Mr. Patterson united with the 
Methodist Protestant church, but coming to 
Barr township and finding no church of his 
profession, he became a member of the Con- 
gregational church, of whose Sabbath-school 
he has served as superintendent for ten years. 
He is a member of the Ex-Prisoners of War 
Association of Pennsylvania and vice-com- 
mander of Captain John M. Jones Post, No. 
556, Grand Army of the Republic, of Ebens- 
burg, and but few Union soldiers have had 
such a prison experience as Mr. Patterson for 
length of time and number of horrible pens. 

His political career commenced in 1876, 
when he was appointed as a school director, 
in a district strongly Democratic, and then 
elected for one term. He served as school 
director for four years, and as assessor for 
thirteen years, and in 1890 was appointed by 
John H. Jones of Philadelphia, as census 
enumerator of Barr and Blacklick townships. 
Four years later, he was nominated for the 
legislature by the Republican party, and at 
the ensuing election was elected. He served 
with efficiency and credit during the session 
of 1894-95, was a member of the committees 
on congressional apportionment, constitutional 
reform, labor and industry and militaiy affairs, 
and is now the candidate of his party for re- 
election. A staunch republican, and a firm 



supporter of his party and its measures for 
the last quarter of a century, Samuel D. Pat- 
terson has been an influential factor in Repub- 
lican success during repeated county cam- 
paigns. He has shown good judgment in 
dealing with questions of public policy, has 
always been deeply interested in educational 
and religious matters, and enjoys the repu- 
tation of being a safe and conservative business 
man. Mr. Patterson is a pleasant and con- 
genial gentleman, popular with all who know 
him, and yet never lacking in proper dignity 
when occupying any office of trust or respon- 
sibility. 



♦^B. ESTHER L. W. MARBOURG, a 

narne identified with the medical profes- 
sion at Johnstown, this county, was born in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She is a daugh- 
ter of William Wright, of Philadelphia, and 
Rachel (Lukens) Wright. Her father was a 
civil engineer and professor of languages, of 
Philadelphia, and a man of prominence. His 
cousin, Abednego Wright, was the founder of 
the Girls' Normal school of that city. 

Dr. Marbourg was educated in the public 
schools of her native city. Her inclinations 
from youth, however, led her to the study of 
medicine, and at an age when young women 
usually attend to frivolous pursuits, we find 
her earnestly engaged in the study of medical 
lore under the preceptorship of Dr. Benjamin 
B. Wilson, of Philadelphia. 

In 1869 she entered the Woman's Medical 
college of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, and 
in March, three years later, completed the 
course. Although this was not many years 
ago, so few women had graduated as physi- 
cians that Dr. Marbourg may be called a 
pioneer woman physician, and the pioneers in 
every great work should be held in remem- 



142 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CVCLOPEDIA 



brance, especially when they are of import- 
ance by right of character or unusual attain- 
ments. 

Very soon after graduating she came to 
Johnstown, where she has practiced her profes- 
sion with encouraging success ever since. In 
addition, Dr. Marbourg is an honored mem- 
ber of the Cambria County Medical society, 
the Pennsylvania State Medical society and 
the American Medical association, she being 
a delegate to the meeting of the latter associa- 
tion when it convened in Chicago in 1887. 
She was one of the incorporators of the Cone- 
maugh Valley Memorial hospital, being the 
only lady among the incorporators, and has 
served a period on the staff of that institution. 

Dr. Marbourg was twice married. Her 
first husband, J. Charles Nippes, was killed at 
the battle of Gettysburg. It was shortly after 
his death that she took up the study of medi- 
cine. By this first marriage she had one 
child, Chester W. C. Nippes, a farmer of In- 
diana county. 

She was married the second time in March, 
1872, after her graduation, to Dr. H. W. Mar- 
bourg, who was born in Centreville, Indiana 
county, Pennsylvania. He was educated in 
the public schools and at Pennsylvania col- 
lege, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. He studied 
medicine with Dr. John Lownian, of Johns- 
town, and entered Jefferson Medical college, 
graduating in 1857. After graduating he 
located in Johnstown, where, with the excep- 
tion of a period during the Civil War, he prac- 
ticed continually until his death, which oc- 
curred during the disastrous flood of 18S9. 

He entered the Civil War in the latter part 
of 1863, and served one year as a contract 
surgeon. Dr. H. W. Marbourg, like his 
estimable widow, was married twice. To his 
first union were born two children : Eva L., 



wife of McClellan Leggett, of Johnstown, and 
Edgar M., a physician of Pueblo, Col. His 
first wife was also a physician, who graduated 
in 1869 from the Woman's Medical college, 
of Philadelphia, and practiced for one year in 
Johnstown. 

Dr. Marbourg, the husband of our subject, 
was a physician and citizen of worth and 
character. He was a member of St. Paul's 
Lodge, F. & A. M., of Philadelphia, and of 
the Cambria County Medical society, of which 
association he enjoyed the distinction of being 
secretary for a number of years. 

Dr. Esther Marbourg and her husband 
were both members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, in which body they shed the good 
influences of their lives, united in aims and 
work. 



no BERT R. THOMAS, now actively and 
extensively engaged in the lumber and 
granite business in Johnstown, is a son of 
Richard J. and Mary (Owens) Thomas, and 
was born near Ebensburg, in Cambria town- 
ship, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, October 
16, 1851. 

Richard J. Thomas was a son of Robert 
Thomas, a native and life-long resident of 
Wales, where his family had honorable stand- 
ing, and honorable mention for centuries in 
local Welsh annals. 

Richard J. Thomas was born June 6, 1827, 
received a good common English education, 
and in 1849 came to Cambria count)', where 
he settled in Cambria township, and has fol- 
loweil farming ever since. After coming to this 
country, Mr. Thomas made a study of [lolitical 
questions, and on the organization of the Re- 
publican party joined its ranks, and through 
disaster and victory alike, has suj^ported its 
measures in every campaign. Although ac- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



143 



tive and interested in politics, yet he has taken 
a deeper interest and a more active part in the 
cause of popular education, serving his town- 
ship frequently as a school-director, and in 
various ways promoting the improvement and 
well-being of the public schools. He is a 
close and observant reader, and, besides ac- 
quiring quite liberal self-education, has made 
himself well-informed upon all questions of 
public importance or general interest. Not 
only philanthropic, but practically patriotic, 
Mr. Thomas, in 1864, enlisted in company G, 
I92d regiment Pennsylvania infantry, and 
served until the curtain fell upon the last act 
of the great drama of civil war at Appomat- 
tox. 

He married Margaret Owens, a daughter of 
Joseph Owens, who lived and died in his na- 
tive land of Wales. To their union were born 
a family of six children, three of whom died 
in infancy. Those who grew to maturity and 
are living are : Robert R., Joseph O., a resi- 
dent and farmer of Cambria township ; and 
Jane, wife of John E. Jones, who is engaged 
in farming in Cambria township. 

Robert R. Thomas received his elementary 
education in the common-schools of his native 
township, and then entered the Millersville 
State Normal school, from which well-known 
institution he was graduated in the class of 
1 877. At eighteen years of age, he commenced 
teaching, which he followed consecutively and 
successfully for eleven years, excepting two 
years spent at the normal. At the end of that 
time, in 1883, a good business opportunity pre- 
senting itself, Mr. Thomas retired from teach- 
ing and formed a partnership with John W. 
Walters, of Johnstown. They engaged in the 
timber business, and continued in partnership 
until January i, 1896, when he sold his in- 
terest to Mr. Walters, and branched out for 



himself His new office and lumber-yards are 
on Center street, adjoining the Baltimore & 

j Ohio Railroad depot, and his large stock is 
constantly recruited from the leading lumber 

t markets of the country from Florida to Wash- 
ington. In addition to overseeing his exten- 
sive lumbering business, he is a member and 
the general manager of the Bronlas Quarry 
company, whose quarries of Ligonier granite 
are situated in West Taylor township, about 
four miles down the Little Conemaugh from 
Johnstown. 

Mr. Thomas is a member of the First Con- 
gregationalist church of Johnstown. In poli- 
tics he has always supported the Republican 
party, and served from the First ward for four 
years as a member of the Select Council of 
Johnstown. 

On February 22, 1882, Mr. Thomas married 
Elizabeth Jane Davis, a daughter of Evan and 
Rachel Davis, of Cambria township, who died 
April 27, 1886. They had two children: El- 
dora May and Mabel Ann, both dead, Mabel 
Ann being lost in the Great Flood, in which 
Mr. Thomas was barely able, and then by a 
mere accident, to save his wife from a watery 
grave, in doing which he nearly lost his own 
life. 

On February 24, 1887, Mr. Thomas wedded 
Mrs. Mary Roberts, a daughter of Humphrey 
and Elizabeth Jones, of Wales, and their union 
has been blessed with one child, a daughter, 
named Elizabeth. 



■J^AVID W. COULTER, the present popu- 
^^ lar and efficient sheriff of Cambria 
county, Pennsylvania, is a son of William and 
Mary (Walters) Coulter, and was born in 
Johnstown this county. May 10, 1 84 1. 

Sheriff Coulter's grandfather Coulter was a 
native and life-long resident of Centre county, 



144 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CVCLOPEDIA 



this State, whilst his father, WiUiam Coulter, 1 
was also a native of the same county, born in 
1821, and died in Blair county, this State, in 
1895. He married Mary Walters, and they 
were the parents of four children : David W., 
the subject of this biography ; William, who 
served in the Federal army in Battery B, 
First Pennsylvania artillery, and was killed 
in front of Petersburg, in June, 1863 ; Henry, 
who also served a long term in the Civil War, 
and is now a jeweler in New Orleans, Louisi- 
ana; and Mary M., who wedded James Sim- 
mons, who resides at South Fork, this county. 

Sheriff Coulter and Miss Eliza J. Pringle, a 
daughter of Daniel Pringle of this county, 
were married December 3, 1857, and to them 
have been born six children ; William P., who 
is engaged in general merchandizing at Cone- 
maugh, married Blanche Fisher; David P., 
who married Leonora Thomas, is also a resi- 
dent of Conemaugh, where he conducts a meat 
market; Annie married George Parks, who 
resides at Rockwood, Somerset county, this 
State; Mary E., the relict of Henry Fite, 
resides at Conemr.ugh, and Izora married 
James S. Gettemy, of Conemaugh. 

.Sheriff Coulter was brought u[) on a farm, 
and obtained his education in the public 
schools of his native county. Reared upon a 
farm, he natural!)' look up that avocation, 
and followed it until the breaking out of the 
Civil War. In August, 1862, he enlisted in 
company G, One Hundred and Forty-ninth 
Pennsylvania Volunteer infantr)', popularly 
known as the Pennsylvania " Bucktails," and 
served until the latter part of June, 1865. The 
famous " Bucktails " originally belonged to the 
First corps of the Army of the Potomac, but 
they became so cut up and demoralized, that 
they were finally, in 1863, consolidated with 
the Fifth corps of the army. Sheriff Coulter 



was a brave soldier and bore himself well, 
participating in all the engagements of his 
regiment, from Gettysburg until the surrender 
of Lee at Appomattox, which marked the 
downfall of the Southern Confederacy. He 
saw much hard fighting, and was seriously 
wounded in the knee at Hatche's run. 

Returning from the Federal service, he em- 
barked in mercantile pursuits at Conemaugh, 
and continued successful!)- in the same until 
November, 1894, when he was elected sheriff 
of Cambria county. He is a prominent and 
active Republican in politics, and filled various 
local offices prior to his election to the shriev- 
alty. 

He is prominently identified with many 
secret and fraternal organizations. A member 
of Cambria Lodge, No. 278, F. and A. M. ; 
Portage Chapter, No. 95, R. A. M.; Oriental 
Commandery No. 61, K. T., of Johnstown ; 
O'Cyrus Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. of Pitts- 
burg. He is also a member of Corona Lodge, 
No. 999, L O. O. F. ; Castle No. 140, K. of G. 
E. ; Conemaugh Lodge, No. 402, K. of P. ; 
and Council No. 137, Jr. O. U. A. M., all of 
Conemaugh. He takes a live!)' interest in the 
G. A. R., and is a member of Post No. 30, at 
Johnstown. He is a member of the United 
IVethren church of Johnstown, to which he is 
a liberal contributor. 

Sheriff Coulter is affable and congenial as a 
companion, and popular and efficient as an 
official. Public-spirited anil energetic, he 
takes a commendable and active interest in all 
public improvements, which have for their ob- 
ject the good of the people. 



TTillAAXM P. COULTER is the son of 

^'^ Sheriff David W. and Lizzie (Pringle) 
Coulter, whose sketch appears above, and was 
born in Conemaugh, Pennsylvania, on August 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



145 



15, 1870. He received his early education in 
the common scliools and graduated from the 
Conemaugli High school in 1889. ■ 

In 1892, in connection with his father, he 
engaged in the mercantile business at Cone- 
maugli, under the firm-name of D. W. Coul- 
ter & Son. On January i, 1895, when Sheriff 
Coulter entered upon the duties of the office to 
which he had been elected, W. P. Coulter 
purchased his father's interest in the business, 
and has since conducted it alone. 

His establishment contains every thing usu- 
ally found in a first-class general store. By 
close attention to the details of his business 
and the enforcement of strict principles he has 
built up and fostered an enviable trade. His 
surplus earnings he has invested in real estate, 
and he now counts to his credit considerable 
valuable realty in the borough. 

Mr. Coulter is not only prominent in the 
commercial affairs of his borough, but takes a 
commendable interest in its religious and 
social features as well. He is a consistent 
member of the United Brethren church of his 
borough, and prominently identified with 
Lodge No. 372, F. & A. M., of Johnstown, 
this county. In politics he affiliates with 
the Republican party, and takes a prominent 
part in local affairs. 

On August 28, 1892, Mr. Coulter wedded 
Miss Blanch, a daughter of John Fisher, of 
Johnstown, this county. This marriage rela- 
tion has resulted in the birth of one child, 
Waldo McClay. 



TOHN J. GOOD, a retired train dispatcher 
and one of the large and leading farmers 
of East Taj'lor township, is a son of Jacob and 
Elizabeth (Gochnour) Good, and was born on 
the farm adjoining the one on which he is now 
residing, in Cambria county, Pennsylvania, 

10 



March 20, 1831. He is a grandson of 
Christian Good, who owned the farm on 
which he now resides, and whose father, 
was a native of Germany, Christian Good 
was a large land-owner, and a native of Penn- 
sylvania, and died on his farm in East Taylor 
township in 1852, aged eighty years. He was 
a great hunter and fisherman, and found en- 
joyment with his rod and gun as well as food 
for his table. He was a member and a deacon 
of the German Baptist church, and married 
and reared a family. His son, Jacob Good, 
was born in Conemaugli township, in the last 
year of the last century, and died in 1873, 
when in the seventy-fourth year of his age. 
He was an excellent farmer, and a strict 
German Baptist, being a deacon in his church, 
where he was highly respected for his piety 
and many virtues. He married Elizabeth 
Gochnour, who survived him until 1884, when 
she passed away in the eighty-fourth year of 
her age. She was a member of the German 
Baptist church, as was her father. Christian 
Gochnour, who died on his East Taylor town- 
ship farm in 1852, at eighty-five years of age. 
He was of German descent, and in early life 
entertained the ministers of his church when 
they were often compelled to preach in barns, 
whose owners generally provided dinner for 
the whole congregation. 

John J. Good was reared on the farm, and 
after enjo}'ing such meagre advantages as was 
afforded by the common schools of his neigh- 
borhood, assisted in the cultivation of the farm 
until he attained his majority. He then en- 
gaged in the saw-mill business, and two years 
later became a day-laborer for the Pennsylva- 
nia Railroad company, which, in two days 
after his employment, gave him the position 
of night watchman. He discharged every 
I duty assigned him so well that he was made 



14C 



BIOGRArillCAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



switcliman at Concmaugh, and promoted from 
position to position until he was made con- 
ductor of a local freight train running from 
Pittsburg to Conemaugh. One morning in 
January, 1865, when pulling out with his train 
the engine boiler blew up, and injured him 
seriously, but not fatally, and when he recov- 
ered he was at first given the superintendence 
of some track laying, and then made train dis- 
patcher at Conemaugh, which position he 
resigned in 1S67, to remove to his present 
home-farm. Besides this farm, which is con- 
sidered one of the best farms in the township, 
he also owns another valuable farm and some 
desirable property at Conemaugh. . 

In November, 1852, Mr. Good was united 
in marriage with Louisa Cobaugh,a daughter 
of Daniel Cobaugh, of East Taylor township 
To their union have been born eleven chil- 
dren, three of whom died in infancy. The 
four sons and four daughters living are: Eliza- 
beth, wife of R. II. Kelley, of Allegheny 
count)'; Isabella, married \\'illiam S. Head- 
rick, of East Taylor township; Asbury R., 
now a railroad engineer, and residing at 
Conemaugli ; IVIary Jane, wife of V. T. Kisel, 
of Westmoreland county ; E. Edgar, who re- 
sides in Conemaugh township ; John R., a 
resident of Franklin borough ; Alice Ann, wife 
of J. C. Sciisebaugh, of Allegheny count)-; 
and I loward J, R., still at home. 

In politics Mr. Good has always been a 
staunch republican, and has always taken an 
active part in all political campaigns, lie has 
served as auditor, supervisor and inspector, 
besides filling other township offices, and has 
been annual!)' re-elected as judge of election 
at his voting jirecinct for the remarkable num- 
lui ol t\veiU\'-one times — a recortl thai has 
seldom been cijualed, and scarcely ever sur- 
passed, in the State of l'enns)lv;iiiia. He is 



among the active and substantial citizens of 
his township, and always interests himself in 
all other matters as well as farming, in which 
he has been very successful. 

© 

n[LyAR I. AKEKS, deceased, a former 
citizen and reliable business man of 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and a son of Wilson 
Lee and Jane (Atkinson) Akers, was born May 
24, 1837, in Carrolltown, Carroll county, Ohio. 

His ancestors were of English origin, the 
family being transplanted from England to 
America, prior to the Revolution, by four of 
its descendants: Israel; Ralph, who settled in 
Maine; one who went to Virginia, and another, 
who settled in Ohio. 

Ralph Akers, the great-grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch, was a farmer and set- 
tled in Bedford count)', where he died. He 
was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. 

Robert Akers, grandfather of our subject, 
was born and reared in Bedford count)', where 
he lived all his life and followed agricultural 
pursuits. He married Nancy Hanks, and his 
fimih' consisted of five children: Israel, Wes- 
Ic)', Timothy, Nancy and Wilson Lee, the 
fathei' of the subject of this record. 

Wilson Lee Akers (1814-1895) was born 
in Bedford county, Penns)'lvania, and lived 
there until about 1834, when he removed to 
Caridlhown, where he short!)' afterward mar- 
ried Jane Atkinson, a daughter of a prosper- 
ous newspaper man and woolen manufacturer, 
lie was first in partnership with his father-in- 
law in the new.spaper business, and later with 
Mr. George Rhe\' in the agricultural business, 
Mr. Rhey being a furnace man who ran the 
firms. .After leaving Carrolltown Mr. Akers 
came to Johnstown ant! took charge of the 
gardens and grounds surrounding the resi- 
dence of the late Daniel J. Morrcll. He was 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



147 



an artistic gardener, and the first city florist 
who planted the pubh'c gardens of the city. 
Later he went to Altoona and engaged in the 
grocery business; but in 1886 he returned to 
Johnstown, dying tliere in tlie autumn of 1895. 
He gave a good common-school education to 
his son, Alvar I. Akers, who left home at the 
age of fourteen and became a clerk in a com- 
pany store in Johnstown, where he remained 
for five years, when he was given charge of 
the company store of Baker's at Couemaugh 
Furnace, and was made postmaster at that 
place, although under age. In this is set forth 
the honesty and efficiency of Mr. Akers as a 
youth. He remained there until about i860, 
and then formed a partnership with Mr. Fred- 
erick Leoch, under the firm name of Leoch 
& Akers, and carried on a grocery and meat 
store until the breaking out of the Civil War. 
Being filled with patriotic ardor and hav- 
ing the spirit of a brave man, lie enlisted in 
company B, One Hundred and Thirty-third 
regiment, Pennsylvania volunteers, upon the 
first call, serving the full term of enlistment 
in the commissary department. For stealing 
away and bringing the body of his brother 
John home he was court-martialed. After 
having done faithfal service for his country he 
returned home and formed a partnership with 
Louis and Herman Baumer in 1864, and as 
the firm of Akers it Baumer the partner- 
ship continued until the flood of 1889, in a 
general mercantile business. He was an in- 
dustrious, thrifty man and built the house where 
his widow now lives on Akers street. Eighth 
Ward, then a woods in Upper Yoder township. 
His wife was Catherine Gahr, a native of 
Bavaria, who came to America about 1857 to 
take care of an invalid brother studying for the 
priesthood. She was the mother of fourteen 
children. 



Mr. Akers possessed many of the traits of 
his estimable father, Wilson Lee Akers, the 
the latter having been a self-educated man of 
more than ordinary intelligence, who was a 
constant reader, well informed on all current 
events, and also a man of considerable literary 
ability, contributing to various periodicals. 
Both were converts to Roman Catholicism; 
both were men of forceful character; both 
were good citizens. 



-j^AVID B. WILSOX. On the lowlands 
of Scotland, in Roxburyshire, near the 
town of Kelso, on October 19, 1837, was born 
the gentleman whose name heads this sketch. 
His grandfather was James Wilson, also a 
native of the Scotch lowlands. James Wil- 
son (father) was born near Kelso, and received 
his education in his native town, where he 
also learned the trade of a tanner, but for 
several years prior to his coming to America, 
had been employed as overseer on a farm 
in Roxburyshire. In July, 1854, he emigrated 
to this country and located in Jackson town- 
ship, Cambria county, Peinisylvania, but at 
the beginning of the Civil War he removed to 
Johnstown, where he followed his trade as a 
tanner. After the death of his wife he removed 
to Conemaugh and retired from active life. 

He was a member of the Presbyterian 
church. In politics he was a republican, and 
served as burgess of Conemaugh. While in 
his native country he married Mary Bratton, a 
a daughter of Edward Bratton, of Kelso, and 
to them were born ten children, three of whom 
died in Scotland when quite young. The 
others are: James, who died in 1876 ; Charles, 
now living in Conemaugh ; William, who 
died in I889 ; David B. ; Margaret, the wife of 
William H. Hunt, a farmer in Jackson town- 
ship; Jessie, the widow of George B. Gray, 



148 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



deceased, of Conemaugh, and John, who died 
at the age of sixteen, death resulting from 
being kicked by a horse. Mr. Wilson died in 
Jackson township. 

Mr. D. B. Wilson received a common school 
education. On leaving school he began life 
on his own account in Jackson township, 
where, for a number of years, he engaged in 
the saw-mill business. He then learned the 
copper's trade, and followed this occupation 
until 1862, when, in response to President 
Lincoln's call for troops to defend the Union 
against dismemberment by secession, he en- 
listed October 20, 1862, in company G, Elev- 
enth regiment, Pennsylvania cavalry, and 
served until the close of the war. Among the 
most important battles and skirmishes in 
which he participated were the following : On 
November 33, 1862, Joyner's Ford and Frank- 
lin, Virginia; December 1st at Beaver Dam 
church, where they captured Rocket battery; 
December 10, 1862, near Zuni, Virginia; Jan- 
uary 3, 1863, Deserted House, Virginia; 
March 17, 1863, Franklin, Virginia ; April 24, 
1863, Clinton Roads, near .Suffolk; June 7, 
1863, South Ann Bridge, Virginia, and July 
28, 1863, Jackson, North Carolina, Ream's 
Station, .Siege of Richmoml and was at the 
surrender at Appomattox. He was mustered 
out of service August 13, 1865, antl for about 
one year was in the employ of the Cambria 
Iron company, working at the carpenter's 
trade. On leaving their cmplo)- he removed 
to Conemaugh township, Somerset county, 
where he purchased property on which he 
built a saw-mill. He o[)crate(_l this mill and a 
portion of the land for si.x ye.irs, and then sold 
the saw-mill ami a i)art of the land, retain- 
ing for himself one hundicd and thirtj' acres. 
1 le now purchased a portable steam saw-mill, 
and for two years operated it in the nu)untains 



of Cambria county. Selling this mill at an 
advantage to himself, he next engaged in the 
coal business in Bedford county, wliich for 
two years he conducted with profit. As a 
result of the depression in business which fol- 
lowed the panic of 1873, the gentlemen to 
whom Mr. Wilson had sold his saw-mill pro- 
perty was unable to pay his indebtedness, and 
Mr. Wilson, in order to recoup himself, was 
compelled to take back the property. He 
again operated this mill, manufacturing reels 
for the Cambria Iron company for about four 
years. In 1888 he rented his farm and mill, 
and removed to Mineral Point, this county, 
where he has since resided. During the first 
year of his residence in Mineral Point he 
operated a furniture factory, and continued to 
make reels for the Cambria Iron company. 
In connection with this enterprise he was in- 
terested in the mercantile business. The mem- 
orable flood of 1889 destroyed both branches 
of his business, and on recovering from the 
effect of this terrible disaster he devoted his 
attention to the mercantile business exclusively 
for about two years, at the end of which time 
he sold out to his nephew, William Wilson, 
who still conducts the store. 

He is now engaged in mining and shipping 
fire clay. Ever since his residence in i\Iineral 
Point he has been postmaster, and is also 
freight agent for the IVnnsylvania railroail at 
that place. 

Politically he has always been a republican, 
and in addition to the above office he has 
served as school director in Taylor township, 
and was elected justice of the peace in that 
townshij), which office he resigned in 1890, 
after serving one jear. 

lie is a member of the (i. A. R., lunory 
Fisher Post, No. 30, and of Camp 60, Union 
Legion, at Johnstown. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



149 



On January 4, 1886, he married Miss Cath- 
erine, a daughter of Joseph J. and Harriet 
(Hoffman) Mishler, of Jenner Cross Roads, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, who was born 
January 4, 1847. She is one of a family of 
two children. Her sister, Sarah Mishler, is 
the wife of George VV. Nicodemus, a resident 
of Jenner township, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania. 



HON. JAMKS J. THOMAS, an ex-member 
of the House of Representatives of Penn- 
sylvania, and who is in the foremost rank 
among those leaders of that branch of industry 
which enables Pennsylvania to take a promi- 
nent place among the agricultural States of the 
Union, is a son of John and Mary A. (Camp- 
bell) Thomas, and was born at Kaylor station, 
Cambria county, Pennsylvania, September 27, 
1838. 

The Thomas family is one of the many hon- 
est, honorable and substantial families of the 
United States that trace their transatlantic an- 
cestry to Wales. — Thomas, a paternal ancestor 
of the subject of this sketch, was a soldier in 
the English army. He was stationed in Ire- 
land, where he afterwards married and resided \ 
until his death. Michael Thomas, one of the 
decendants of the Welsh soldier, was born and 
reared on the " Emerald " Island, and held an 
office under the English government until 
1820, in which year he came to Cambria county 
and settled at Munster, where he died in 1835, 
aged eighty-five years. He married a Miss 
Mulhern, who was a member of an old Irish 
family, and by whom he had eight children — 
finir sons and four daughters. The second 
child born to them was John Thomas (father), 
whose birth place was in County Donegal, in 
1792, and who came with his parents in 1820 
to Cambria county, where he died on his farm 



at Kaylor Station, in September, 1887, when 
lacking but five years of being a centena- 
rian. 

He was a man of good education and fol- 
lowed teaching in Ireland, and teaching and 
farnnng in Cambria and Indiana counties after 
coming to this State. He quit teaching in 
1864, and many prominent and successful men 
of the older citizens in this and Indiana coun- 
ties ascribe their success to the instruction 
which they received when pupils in his schools. 

He voted for every presidential nominee of 
the Democratic party, from Andrew Jackson 
down to 1894, and, although a man of stand- 
ing and influence, he never sought for office, 
and never held but one office which was the 
postmastership at Munster, under Van Buren's 
administration. He was a member of the 
Catholic church, and in 1836 was married by 
the illustrious Father Gallitzin, to Mary A. 
Campbell, who died September, 1870, aged 
fifty-seven years. Her father, Patrick Camp- 
bell, was a native of the North of Ireland, and 
came out in 1800 to what is now Cambria 
county, where he purchased a farm and reared 
a large family. 

To Michael and Mary Thomas were born a 
family of three sons and eight daughters : Ann ; 
Hon. Jas. J.; Mary J., wife of Frank Quinlan, a 
professor and county office-holder in Michi- 
gan; Margaret, Bridget and Susan, residing on 
the home farm ; Cecelia, now known as Sister 
Mary Gonzaga, of the Sisters of Charity of the 
Greensburg convent; Philip, now dead; Sarah, 
wife of L. W. Weakland, of Cumberland, 
Maryland, and EUie, who died in a convent 
in Altoona; she was known as Sister Mary 
Joseph. 

James J. Thomas attended the public schools 
long enough to learn to spell, and then re- 
ceived his education at the hands of his father 



150 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



in private instruction. He was reared on tlie 
farm, and in 1858 became a teacher in the 
common schools, where he taught, with few 
intermissions, until 1892. While teaching he 
also gave close attention to the management 
of his farm and made a special study of agri- 
culture. He owns and resides upon a farm of 
one hundred and thirty-eight acres of good 
land in the eastern part of Carroll township, 
where he has been successful for the last 
twenty years as a general farmer. 

On April 22, 1867, Mr. Thomas married 
Tillie A. Glasser, a daughter of Frank Glasser, 
of St. Boniface, this county. Hon. James J. and 
Mrs. Thomas have six children: John F. ; 
Mary T. ; Annie; Samuel; Emma, and Otto. 
Of these children Annie and Samuel are 
teachers. 

James J. Thomas is a Catholic in religion, 
being a member of the Catholic church, and in 
politics has always been a strong democrat. 
Me has held the most important of his town- 
ships offices, was elected and served during 
1877-78 as a member of the legislature from 
Cambria count}-, and during Cleveland's first 
administration was storekeeper in the United 
States revenue department of the Twenty-third 
district, comprising a larger part of western 
Pcnns)'lvania. In 1S92 he was re-elected to 
the legislature of Pennsylvania, and in the ses- 
sion of 1893 was appointed by Speaker Thomp- 
son, as a member of the Congressional and 
judicial apportinnment conunittees, and the 
committees on vice and immorality, and con- 
stitutional reform. He also served as vice- 
president of what was Icnown as the Agricul- 
tural Caucus, of which the venerable John 
Cessna, of Bedford, was president, and Sena- 
tor Critchfield, of Somerset, was secretary, 
and was a member of a subcommittee on con- 
gressional app<irti<)nnicnl with roj)rescntative 



Lawrence as chairman, and Messrs. Richmond, 
Cotton and Ritter as fellow-members. He 
served during Lee's first invasion of Pennsyl- 
vania in the Fourth Pennsylvania regiment of 
emergency men until the regiment was dis- 
charged after the battle of Antietam. 

He was appointed on a committee of five 
to draft a road bill. He was also selected by 
the friends of the Miles ta.x-bill — a reform 
measure — as one of a committee to take charge 
of the bill on the floor of the House. 

While prominent and active as a legislator 
in securing needed agricultural legislation, yet 
he has labored effectively for the farming in- 
terests, not only of his county, but for the 
whole State, in the Pennsylvania State Grange 
and the Penns)'lvania State Board of Agricul- 
ture, of which organizations he is a member 
and an officer. He is a member and the mas- 
ter of Concord Grange, No. 11 25, Patrons of 
Husbandr)', and a member of the executive 
committee of the State grange, and when the 
Cambria County Mutual Fire Insurance com- 
pany was organized, August i, 1895, in the 
true interests of grange members, he was 
made a director and elected as its president. 
In the autumn of 1895, in recognition of his 
many valuable services in behalf of farming, 
Mr. Thomas was elected chairman of the com- 
mittee appointed by the State Board of Agri- 
culture to formulate a basis for the re-organi- 
zation of the State Board of Agriculture ren- 
dered nccessar}' by the creation of the State 
Department of Agricidture, which had pre- 
viously placed him on its list of lecturers for 
farmers' county institutes. 

James J. Thomas, whose life-career has 
been in the interests of agriculture, education 
and politics, is a man who has won public 
confidence ami whose character is above the 
breath of suspicion. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



151 



j^EMETKIUS A. IATTHER, SK., ex- 
sheriff of Cambria county, and a suc- 
cessful, enterprising and benevolent gentleman, 
of near Carrolltown. this county, is a son of 
John Luther, Sr., and Mary Ann Piatt, and 
was born in Carroll township, Cambria county, 
Pennsylvania, October 31, 1827. 

His grandfather, Conrad Luther, was a na- 
tive of Hesse, Germany, and was among that 
body of Hessian soldiers who were brought 
to America by the government of Great Britain 
during the Revolutionary War, but tiring of 
this service he deserted the English arm)' 
in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. In his 
flight he met Elizabeth Smith, who was en- 
gaged in the bleaching of linen; she carefully 
concealed him until his pursuers went by, and 
thus enabled him to make his escape. He 
afterwards married the young lady, and re- 
mained in that section some time working for 
the farmers, but about 1796, shortly after the 
issues of the war had been decided, he removed 
to what is now Carroll township, this county, 
where he became one of the pioneer farmers, 
and spent the remainder of his days. He was 
the father of six chililren, five sons and one 
daughter. 

John Luther, father, was born in that town- 
ship in 1800, and lived all his life in the town- 
ship of his birth, dying April 22, 1862. He 
took up the avocation of an agriculturist, and 
became one of the most successful farmers ' 
and business men of that section of the county, 
owning four hundred acres of land on the 
Carrolltown and Ebensburg road, one mile 
from Carrolltown, and at the time of death 
was estimated to be worth ;g20,000. 

He married Mary Ann Piatt, a daughter of 
John Piatt, then a resident of Susquehanna 
township, but a native of Germany, and to 
them were born four sons and six daughters : 



Henry, of Gallitzin, Penn.sylvania; Demetrius 
A., subject; Sarah A., wife of Henry Bender, 
a farmer of this township ; Elizabeth, deceased, 
was the wife of James Weakland ; Lucinda, 
i wife of Michael Snyder, of Houtzdale, Clear- 
field county, this State ; Matilda, wife of An- 
selum Weakland, whose sketch appears in an- 
other part of this work ; Mary Ellen, wife of 
John Latternes, a farmer and butcher of Mun- 
ster township, this county ; Victoria, who mar- 
ried Joseph Lied, of Barr township ; John W., 
deceased; and Chrysostom, a farmer, of Car- 
rolltown. 

Demetrius A. Luther was reared upon his 
father's flirm, receiving the- advantages of such 
educational training as were afforded by the 
subscription schools as they existed in this 
county prior to the adoption of the common- 
j school system. At the age of twenty-one he 
j apprenticed himself to learn the trade of a 
carpenter, and after mastering that trade, fol- 
lowed it for twenty years as a contractor and 
builder throughout Cambria and adjoining 
counties. In 1872 he purchased a farm of 
one hundred and seventy acres near Carroll- 
town, and has since lived upon it and devoted 
himself to the arts of husbandry. This farm 
is well improved, underlaid with coal, and is 
considered one of the best in the county. 

Politically, Mr. Luther is a strong believer 
of the party of Jefferson, and has frequently 
represented his party in political conventions, 
and been honored by it in being elected to 
positions of honor and trust. In 1875 he was 
elected mercantile appraiser, in 1866 county 
auditor, and in 1882 to the responsible posi- 
tion of sheriff of this county. 

Religiously, Mr. Luther is a devout member 
of the Roman Catholic church, and is active 
in all matters pertaining to the work of the 
same, and for the promotion of the cause of 



152 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



Christianity. In connection with tlie church 
lie is a member of tiie lloly League. 

March i, 1859, Miss Mary M., daughter of 
Thomas Bendon, of Gallitzin township, this 
county, became his wife. To their marriage 
union have Ijeen Ijorn fourteen children : 
Harry A., who is in the hotel business at 
Nicktown, this county; Utha C. and W. A., 
of Carrolltown ; Mary Ellen, wife of C. O. 
Stultz, a butcher of Carrolltown ; R. Augusta, 
deceased; Andrew R., deceased; Mary A., 
deceased ; Rudolph, deceased ; James W., 
painter, of Elyria, Ohio ; Beno M., a farmer 
of this county ; Rose A., wife of Francis 
Bearer, of Spangler, this county; A. L., 
Urban, and John, at home. 

Demetrius A. Luther is descended from an 
honorable ancestry, ant! is highly respected 
and honored in the community in which he 
hves, and as sheriff of the county, no less 
than in the private affairs of life, he discharged 
every duty in a wa}' that lias reflected credit 
upon himself and with entire satisfaction to 
those he represented. 



Tl^ir^M.VHI 15. DIItlCKT, an enterprising 
hardware merchant of Johnstown, be- 
longs to a family that has for several genera- 
tions taken a [iioniincnt [)art in the history 
and development of Johnstown. The family 
is of Holland-Dutch origin, and was trans- 
planted from tlie Old to the New Workl b)- 
the great-grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch. Numbers of the family settled at a 
very early day in Bedford county, whence 
John Dibert, grandfather, removed to Somer- 
set county, and settled at what was afterwartls 
called Diberlville, in iionor of its oldest and 
most prominent settler. He remained in 
Somerset county, engaged in the pursuits of 



an agriculturist and a tanner and distiller until 

ai;out 1S16, when he removed to what is now 
Johnstown, and resided there the remainder 
of his life, dying at the age of forty-five years. 

Coming to Johnstown, he engaged in the 
hotel and mercantile business, invested largely 
in real estate, and became one of the most 
wealthy and prominent citizens of the place. 
His son, John Dibert, father of William B., 
received a fair education for business in the 
mercantile establishment of his father, and de- 
voted himself to mercantile and banking pur- 
suits all his life. In about 1850 he founded 
the hardware house now owned and operated 
by the subject of this sketch. On August i, 
1869, he formed a partnership with John D- 
Roberts, and founded- the banking firm of John 
Dibert & Co., which was successfully con- 
ducted until Mr. Dibert's life was lost, and the 
business house demolished, in the great flood 
of May 31,1 889. 

William B. Dibert is the son of Joliii and 
Martha (McClain) Dibert, and was born in 
Johnstown, January 5, 1857. At the age of 
sixteen he began a mercantile career, when he 
took a clerkship in the store of his fiither. 
He remained with him until the latter's death, 
when he succeeded to the business, and has 
successfully conducted it ever since. In 1878 
Mr. Dibcit and Lizzie, a daughter of Rev. 
James A. Lane, of Johnstown, were married, 
and their marriage has been blessed in the 
birth of three daughters : Florence L., Laura 
L., and Mary E. 



'T'llo^lAS DAVIS, a real-estate agent of 
Ebensburg, Pennsylvania, is of Welsh 
ilescent, his ancestors on both sides of the 
t'.imily having eiiiigratetl from Wales. He is 
,1 son of Richard and Elizabeth (Roberts) 
Davis. His grandfather, William Roberts, 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



153 



came to America about 1S05, and landed in 
New York, where he married a Welsh lady. 
Shortly after his marriage he came to Cam- 
bria county, and settled in a wilderness about 
two miles southeast of Ebensburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. He lived there for a number of years, 
and then moved about two miles farther out to 
the Pittsburg and Philadelphia pike, where he 
built a house and carried on a mercantile busi- 
ness for the remainder of his life, dying about 
1833. He was a baptist, and very probably 
an old-line Whig. 

The father of Thomas Davis was born in 
North Wales in 1791, and died in June, 1863. 
He came to America about 18 12, and located 
in Ebensburg, where he remained for a num- 
ber of years, then he moved to Cambria town 
sliip, and established what is now the old 
Davis homestead. In 1833 he moved near to 
Ebensburg, where he remained eight years, 
when he moved into Jackson township, where 
he cleared another farm, built a home and died. 
He followed farming all his life. He was an old- 
line whig, and one of the foremost citizens 
of the county. He held various township 
offices, and was an exemplary member of the 
Congregational church. His family consisted 
of ten children, four boys and si.x girls: Eliza- 
beth, wife of David W. Jones, now deceased; 
William and Hannah, who both died young; 
Catherine, also dead, was the wife of Edward 
Davis ; Timothy R., formerly a prosperous 
lumberman, now living a retired and comforta- 
ble life in East Conemaugh township; Thomas 
Davis, our subject ; Jane, wife of Milton Jones, 
of Ebensburg; Martha, wife of Jackson Ross, 
of Reynoldsville, Jefferson county, Pennsyl- 
vania; Mary, widow of Luther Stiles, and 
lives in Ebenburg; David, a resident of Johns- 
town, formerly engaged in the mercantile and 
insurance business. 



Thomas Davis was born in Cambria town- 
ship, about two miles southeast of Ebens- 
burg, October 7, 1831. On December 20, 
1864, he married Susan Burkhart, a daugh- 
ter of Joseph Burkhart, and to this union 
were born four children : Frederick W., who 
died November 29, 1893; Schuyler C, whose 
wife was Minnie Stough, and who is a resident 
of Ebensburg; Izora, wife of Lester Larmer, 
also residents of Ebensburg ; Thomas S., who 
is private secretary of Congressman J. D. 
Hicks, and has his residence in Ebensburg. 

The subject of this sketch was educated in 
the common schools of his township. He 
commenced life as a farmer, but while a young 
man engaged in the lumbering business in 
Cambria county, and followed it from 1854 
until the breaking out of the Civil War. Then, 
in common with other brave men, he was in- 
spired to do something for the cause of free- 
dom. The work for the Union he began by 
recruiting one hundred and twenty men for 
the Nineteenth regiment. United States regu- 
lars, which had its headquarters at Indianapo- 
lis. Afterwards he was made first sergeant 
of company C, filling this position until after 
the battle of Chickamauga, when he was 
commissioned second lieutenant of the regi- 
ment. In about four months he was promoted 
to the first lieutenancy, and remained in the 
service in this capacity until the close of the 
war, serving in all three years, seven months 
and seventeen days, and taking part in thirty- 
two engagements. He was at Pittsburg Land- 
ing, Stone River, Resaca, Chickamauga and 
Lookout Mountain. But although in so many 
great battles he was never taken prisoner. 
He was with Sherman, too, at Atlanta, and 
saw the city burned. He resigned from the 
service on account of ill health. About one 
year after he came from the v/ar he farmed ; a 



154 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



little later he engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness with his brotlier, under the firm name of 
Davis Brothers. In 1 887 he went out of busi- 
ness and lived in South Dakota for three years, 
in the hope of curing a bad asthma. At the 
end of this time he returned to Ebensburg 
and engaged in tlie real-estate business, which 
he has since followed. Politically he is a re- 
publican, and has served as jury commissioner 
of Cambria county. In 1876 he accepted the 
nomination for the office of sheriff, and came 
within two hundred and eleven votes of being 
elected, the Democratic majority being twelve 
hundred and sixty-eight. His candidacy, as 
shown by this, was a very creditable one. 
Mr. Davis is also a member of the borough 
council. 

It was said at the beginning, that Mr. Davis 
is of Welsh descent. It m<iy be said in con- 
clusion, that in his unusual war record and in 
his public and private life, he has uniformly 
shown the reliance, energy and ad.iptation 
peculiar to his race. 



n I.VIN KV.VNS, a talented, well-known 

■^^ and leading attorney-at-law of Ebens- 
burg, is a son of David J. and Jane Ann 
(Jones) Evans, and was born in Ebensburg, 
the county seat of Cambria county, Pennsyl- 
vania, October 4, 1845. His grandfather was 
John ICvans, wIim was a native of the Princi- 
cipalily of Wales, but who, in about 1833, left 
the parental roof to seek a new home and new 
associations in America. His first location 
was in Cambria townshi[), tiiis county, but he 
afterwards removed to Ebensburg, his home 
at the time of his death, in 1847. He was a 
carpenter .uid wood-worker by trade. A 
skilled and proficient artisan, he followeil that 
craft successfully all his life, combining with 
it, during his more mature years, the manu- 



facturing of lumber, by what was known as 
the old whip-saw process. 

He married and reared a large famil)-, one 
of whom, David J. Evans, was the father of 
the subject of this biography. He was born 
in Wales in 1813, and came to the United 
States in about 1836. He was a tailor by 
trade, and plied his craft at Munster, Pitts- 
burg, and other places, and finally located in 
Ebensburg, and embarked in the merchant 
tailoring and clothing business, which he con- 
tinued the remainder of his life. Originally 
he was an old-line whig, but upon the disrup- 
tion of that party, and the organization of the 
present Republican party in 1S56, he became 
a republican, and filled many local ofiRces. 
Religiously he was a member of the Congre- 
gational church. 

He married Jane Ann Jones, who was a 
daughter of David Jones, a native of Wales, 
but who, in 1836, came to America. Mr. 
Jones was married prior to his emigration, 
brought his wife and fmiil)- with him, and 
settled in Cambria township. Here he and 
Mr. Evans' paternal grandfather, John Evans, 
figured prominently in the pioneer life of that 
section, toiling together in sympathetic har- 
mony, and contributing their share to the con- 
version of the virgin forest into farms and 
homes, fit for the habitation of civilized man. 
They were warm friends and close companions 
through the various trials and vicissitudes in- 
cident to pioneer life, and their last remains 
were laid to rest in the Ebensburg cemetery, 
where tiieir unurned ashes now tranquilly and 
peacefullj' repose. 

Alvin Evans acquired his early mental 
training in the public schools, and in the Iron 
City business college, at Pittsburg. He en- 
tered the battle of life on his own account at 
the early age of sixteen years, his mother 




ALVIN EVANS. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



155 



having died when he was but a mere child. 
He worked at tlie lumber business in his na- 
tive county until he arrived at the age of 
twenty-three years. In 1870 he entered the 
office of the late George M. Reade, of Ebens- 
burg, as a student of the law, and was admitted 
to the bar of Cambria county in 1873, since 
which time he has been in the continuous and 
active practice of his chosen profession. He 
enjoys a large remunerative and appreciative 
clientage in Cambria county, and practices in 
the Supreme Court of the State and in the 
United States Circuit Courts as well. He is 
also solicitor for the Pennsylvania Railroad 
company in Cambria county. 

Politically, Mr. Evans is a republican, loyal 
and firm in his convictions, and has always 
taken a deep interest in the success of his 
party, and, at the convention of his party held 
at Ebensburg in the spring of 1896, he re- 
ceived the unanimous endorsement of the Re- 
publican party in the county of Cambria for 
Congress in the Twentieth Congressional dis- 
trict, being the only aspirant in the four coun- 
ties comprising the district who received a 
unanimous endorsement. Each county had 
its candidate. Religiously he is a member of 
the Congregational church, to whose support 
he is a liberal contributor. Fraternally he is 
a member of Summit Lodge, No. 312, Free 
and Accepted Masons, and the Improved 
Order of Heptasophs, both of Ebensburg. 

On November 17, 1875, the nuptials were 
celebrated which made Mr. Evans and Miss 
Kate E. Shroyock, a daughter of John K. and 
Susan M. Shroyock, husband and wife; and 
their union has been blessed in the birth of 
four bright and interesting children: John E., 
Charles S., Flora M., and Alvin W. 

In professional and private life Mr. Evans 
has borne himself above reproach, and, by his 



superior ability and manly traits of character, 
has won an enviable respect and popularity. 
As a lawyer he takes rank with the leading 
attorneys of the State of Pennsylvania. He 
is a careful student of law literature, possesses 
a keen and discriminating mind, and is always 
alert in the detection of technical points and 
legal manceuvering. He is an earnest and 
fluent speaker, and a gentleman of pleasant 
address, polished manners, and a deep, sym- 
pathetic nature — qualities of head and heart 
which have made for him a host of warm and 
admiring friends. 



ItlTR. JOHX LANTZY, now living a retired 
\ life near Hastings, has been identified 

with many important enterprises, and for a 
period of fifty years wielded an extended in- 
fluence in the business interests of the com- 
munities in which he resided. He is a son of 
Joseph and Mary Ursula (Betters) Lantzy, and 
was born in Barr, then Susquehanna, township, 
Cambria count)-, Pennsylvania, March 24, 
1827. 
Joseph Lantzy was a native of Canton, Organ, 
Switzerland. He was born in 1775, received 
a fair education, and followed farming until 
1 8 10, when he came to Philadelphia, which 
he soon left to settle in Lancaster county. 
Sixteen years later he removed from his 
Lancaster county home to Susquehanna town- 
ship, this county, where he purchased one 
hundred acres of woodland off the Fisher 
tract. He was one of the pioneer farmers of 
his section, and after clearing up his land, he 
bought an additional one hundred acres, own- 
ing at the time of his death a two hundred 
acre farm of fertile and productive land. Mr. 
Lantzy prospered as a farmer, and was highly 
respected as a man, a neighbor and a citizen. 
He was a consistent member and a constant 



156 



BIOGRAl'IIICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



attendant of the Catholic church, in whose 
faith he had been nurtured and taught. His 
toils of life ceased on FcJjruary 20, 1889, when 
his spirit left its earth clay casket, and passed 
to the invisible world. Mis remains were in- 
terred in the Carroll cemetery. 

Joseph Lant/.y, while on shipboard, coming 
over to America, formed the acquaintance of 
Mary Ursula Betters, a girl, whom he 
married shortly after arriving at Philadelphia. 
Their union was blessed 'with nine children, 
four sons and five daughters : Elizabeth, widow 
of Henry Gray; Susan married Philip Gray, 
and now deceased ; Joseph, residing on the 
home farm ; John, whose name heads this 
sketch ; Mary Ann, wife of Daniel Eckenrodc, 
a well-situated farmer of Allegheny township ; 
Ambrose, a farmer of Susquehanna township; 
Matilda wedded Augustus I<"ckenrode, and is 
now deceased; and Philip, wlio enlisted in 
the Union army, and was killed at the battle 
of Antietam, in 1863. 

John T.antzy passed his boyhood days on 
his father's farm, and at tiie early age of six- 
teen years commenced life for himself as a 
farmer, which vocation he followed for ten 
years. From farming he went to millwright- 
ing, in which he was engaged for a period of 
twelve years, and then embarked in timber 
contracting, which he followed for fifteen years. 
During the time he was in the timber business, 
lie invested his earnings judiciously in timber 
and coal lands in Carroll and IClder townships, 
wiiicii he cleared up, cutting, rafting, antl 
otherwise di.sposing of all the timber. As fast 
as he cleared his land, he sold or exchanged 
it to good advantage, and being an energetic, 
enterprising and practical business man, he 
has in iiis various and numerous transactions, 
extending over a [jcriod of half a century, 
accumulated an ample competency, that is the 



just reward of honorable and honest enterprise. 
He retired from active business life in 1888, 
and si.x years later removed to his present 
farm in Susquehanna township, from his farm 
in Elder township, where he had resided con- 
tinuously for thirty-five years. While practi- 
cally retired from active business, yet charac- 
teristic of his energetic nature, he takes quite 
an interest in keeping u[) and improving iiis 
various fu-ms, that rank high in value and 
productiveness. 

On June 10, 1847, Mr. Lantzy was married, 
by Father Gallagher, at Loretta, to Mary 
Whitehead, who is a daughter of tidward 
Taylor Whitehead, formerly of Huntingdon 
county, but then a resident of Susquehanna 
township. The children born to their union 
were: Joseph, a funier on the PLlder town- 
ship home firm; John, now farming in Linn 
county, Oregon; Mary Jane, wife of Simeon 
Kline, a farmer of Carroll township ; William 
Edward, engaged in fuming in Susquehanna 
township ; James ; Henry and Francis Anthon)', 
who are both deceased ; Margaret Matilda, 
wife of Michael Kline, a resident of Susque- 
hanna township ; Andrew, a wholesale liquor 
dealer and [)rominent business man of Hast- 
ings ; Philip, a farmer of Linn county, Oregon ; 
David Albert, now farming in Susquehanna 
l(5wnship; George Iredon, now deceased ; Ra- 
chel Elizabeth, wife of Samuel Giggey, a 
fumer of Aroostook count)', ALaine ; Barbara 
I'llmira, wedded William Conn, of Philadelphia; 
Sarali Matilda, now deceased ; Lucinda Agnes, 
wife of Burt Neason, of Altoona, this State; 
and I'jnma Ann, wife of George Bearers, of 
Bennett, this State. 

In his political belief Mr. Lantzy is a de- 
clared democrat, being active in the promotion 
of the interests of his party and its success. 
He has served three terms as justice of the 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



157 



peace, and is now serving on his fourth term, 
being elected the last time in the spring of 
1896. 'Squire Lantzy was reared in the faith 
of the Catholic church, of which he is an ac- 
tive, influential and useful member. He is a 
pleasant and affable gentlemen, justly popular 
with all with whom he comes in contact, and 
has achieved a marked success in lines of 
business where many others only met disaster 
or ruin. 



TAMES COOPER, in honor of whom Coop- 
ersdale is named, so lived that his life 
presents one of the marked examples of suc- 
cess as the reward of ability, integrity and in- 
dustry. He was a son of Joshua and Jane 
(Boyd) Cooper, and was born in Jenner town- 
ship, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, Febru- 
ary 27, 1 82 1. His family is one of the re- 
spectable and well-connected farmer families 
of North Ireland, whence his father, Joshua 
Cooper, emigrated, when a boy of eight years 
of age, about 17S6 to Somerset county, where 
he was reared, followed farming and served 
for many years as a justice of the peace. He 
married Jane Boyd, and died in 1838 at the 
age of sixty years. 

James Cooper was the eldest child of the 
family, and at his father's death, although but 
seventeen years of age, took upon himself the 
care of his mother and sisters. He acquired 
the limited education of his section, and taught 
several winter terms of school. He married 
in 1 84 1, and six years later removed to Ben's 
Creek furnace, which he was to furnish with 
ore from the Mill Creek mines. Two years 
later he was employed by J. Bell & Bro. to 
manage Washington furnace, in Westmore- 
land county, which position he resigned in 
1 85 1 to become manager of Cambria furnace, 
where he remained until it yent out of blast, 



in i860. The Cambria Iron company appre- 
ciating his services, was desirous of retaining 
him and made him superintendent of farms 
and stables, which position he held until his 
death, in 1887. 

On November 25, 1841, Mr. Cooper mar- 
ried Elizabeth Ann Boyd, a daughter of James 
Boyd, of Jenner, and who died on September 
8, 1894. To their union were born eleven 
children; those surviving are : Dr. Joshua M., 
of Johnstown ; Maggie J., now Mrs. D. A. 
Harris; Kizzie E., now Mrs. N. B. Griffith; 
Emma L., now Mrs. C. H. Lougherj', and 
Anson B., now holding his father's position 
with the Cambria Iron company. 

James Cooper was an old-line whig and 
republican in politics, and served several 
terms as a school director, besides acting as 
an aide-de-camp to Governor Pollock during 
his term of office. He served one term of 
three years as commissioner of Cambria 
county, and was the nominee of his party for 
the legislature, but was defeated, although 
running ahead of his ticket in the county, 
which was then strongl)' Democratic. He 
was a man of integrity in business, and in 
1858 purchased the tract of land on which 
Coopersdale is built. The place was named 
in honor of him, and received many substan- 
tial favors at his hands. He was a man of 
remarkable capacity, and transmitted these 
qualities in a marked degree to his children. 
He was a trustee of the Savings bank of 
Johnstown and, president of Ridgeview Park 
association at the time of his death. 

Mr. Cooper was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church of Coopersdale, to which he 
donated a lot and contributed liberally towards 
the erection of the present church edifice 
which stands as a monument to his liberality 
and loyalty to his church. James Cooper 



158 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



attained a position of independence and influ- 
ence entirely by his own force of character 
and industry, and when he passed from time 
to eternity, on June 8, 1887, his loss was felt 
by the entire community. His remains rest 
in a pleasant spot in Grandview cemetery, but 
the memory of a life well spent remains as a 
monument to him more enduring than those 
of iron or stone. 



JOSHUA »I. COOPEK, A.M., M.D., a 

surgeon and physician of large experi- 
ence and extensive practice, now resident of 
Johnstown, is a son of James and Elizabeth 
A. (Boyd) Cooper, and was born in Jenner 
township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, 
April 29, 1844. His father, James Cooper, 
was a son of Joshua Cooper, who was born in 
County Tyrone, North Ireland, in which coun- 
try their family was well connected and re- 
spectable. Joshua Cooper, Sr. , came from 
Ireland to Somerset county, Pennsylvania, at 
the age of eight years. He married Jane 
Boyd, and died when their son, James, was 
but seventeen years of age. James Cooper 
took care of his fatlier's famil)', and after 
teaching school for a time, went to Ben's 
Creek furnace, contracting for the delivery 
of the ore. He afterwards managed Wash- 
ington furnace, and then served as manager of 
Cambria furnace until it went out of blast in 
i860. In that year the Cambria Iron com- 
pany made him their farm and stable superin- 
tendent, which position he held until his i 
death, June 8, 1887. He owned the site of I 
Coopersdale, which was named after him, and 
was a ver)- energetic and active business man. 
He was a republican and a methodist, aiul 
took an active part in the interests of his party 
and his church. His life was such as to com- 
mand respect and win friendship. Just, hon- 



est and fearless, he was a born leader and 
exercised a controlling influence in his com- 
munity. At his death he left a priceless heri- 
tage to his children, that of a spotless reputa- 
tion. He married Elizabeth A. Boyd, who 
died September 8, 1894, and their surviving 
children are : Dr. Joshua M.; Maggie J., wife 
of D. A. Harris; Kizzie E., married to N. B. 
Griffith; Emma L., wife of C. H. Lougherj'; 
and Anson B., now holding his father's posi- 
tion as superintendent of farms and stables for 
the Cambria Iron company. 

Dr. Joshua M. Cooper received his early 
education in the common schools of the county 
and the public schools of Johnstown, attended 
Latrobe academy, of Westmoreland county, 
and took the full course of Duff's Commer- 
cial college of Pittsburgh. He then taught a 
term of school at what is now Coopersdale, 
and in the ensuing summer entered Allegheny 
college, of Meadville, this State, from which 
he received the degree of A M. Leaving col- 
lege he read medicine with Dr. John Lowman, 
of Johnstown, and in the fall of 1866 entered 
Jefferson Medical college, of Philadelphia, 
from which time-honored institution he was 
graduated in the class of 1868. Immediately 
after graduation he opened an office at Canton, 
Ohio, which he left two years later to locate 
at ICrie, where he remained six years and was 
surgeon at that place, and during that time, of 
the Erie and Pittsburg Railroad company. 
Leaving Erie, in 1876, on account of the 
rigorous climate, Dr. Cooper resideil for two 
years at Braddock, Allegheny countj', as ph)'- 
sician and surgeon of the Edgar Thompson 
Steel company, and then removed to Mead- 
\ille, this State, where he practiced eighteen 
months. At the end of that time, in 1879, 
lie came to Johnstown, where he built up a 
fnie practice and secured quite a valuable 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



159 



property, which was nearly all swept away in 
the great flood. After the flood he returned 
to Meadville and practiced there up to Janu- 
ary, 1895, when he located in Pittsburg, re- 
maining in that city till June, i8g6. He 
then returned to Johnstown, where he is now 
engaged in active practice. 

On December 15, 1869, Dr. Cooper married 
Salome McFarland, a daughter of John McFar- 
land, a prominent merchant of Meadville, 
Crawford county. To their union were born 
three children : Lizzie McFarland, who passed 
away at eleven years of age; John Bertram, 
who died at eight years of age ; and James, 
deceased in infancy. 

Dr. Cooper is a republican in politics, and 
a member of Council, No. 401, Royal Arca- 
num. He has made a specialty for some 
years of throat and lung diseases, having com- 
pleted a course in the Philadelphia Polyclinic, 
and is a surgeon of high standing for coolness 
and skill. Dr. Cooper has devoted his active 
life strictly to the duties of his profession. He 
is a member of the Cambria County Medical 
society, the Pennsylvania State Medical society, 
and the American Medical association. 



nOBERT S. MURPHY, third son ot 
Francis Murphy, whose fame in the 
field of temperance is world-wide, and Eliza- 
beth Jane Ginn, is the present district-attorney 
for Cambria county. He was born on Octo- 
ber 1 8, 1 86 1, in Louisville, St. Lawrence 
county. New York, and first attended school 
in Portland, Maine, where, at an early period 
of life, his mother died. Subsequently, he 
removed to Fryeburg, in the same state, for 
the purpose of enjoying an academic course 
at Potts academy, a well-known educational 
institution ; after which he successively at- 
tended schools at Freeport, Sterling, and 



i Abingdon, Illinois, at the latter place being a 
student at Hedding college ; his education 
was completed at Pennington, New Jersey. 
In March, of 1 880, accompanied by his brother, 
T. Edwin, whose fame as a speaker in his 
chosen sphere, is hardly second to that of his 
father, he came to Johnstown, and together 
they entered the office of Hon. W. Horace 
Rose as students at law, the subject of this 
sketch remaining the prescribed period of 
three years; the brother, T. Edwin, being 
compelled to relinquish his studies and as- 
sume the place of secretary and assistant to 
his father, who was then just embarking on 
an evangelistic tour, which eventually covered 
all of Great Britain proper. One of the very 
keenest regrets of Mr. Murphy's is that his 
brother never completed his legal education 
and became a member of the profession in the 
technical sense. It was the failure of a plan 
conceived by the father and most warmly 
adopted by the sons, that they should not only 
read law together, but should, at the proper 

' time, be joined in its practice. 

Having completed his studies in the office 
of Mr. Rose, Mr. Murphy was admitted to 
practice in the several courts of Cambria 
county on the 7th day of June, 1883, and in 
October of 1885 the Supreme Court of Penn- 
sylvania admitted him to membership. 

In politics Mr. Murphy has always been a 
republican of the active, zealous type, and in 
1892 he was unanimousl)' selected by his party 
in convention as a candidate for the ofiice of 
district-attorney for Cambria county. The 
contest that followed is a memorable one in 
the history of local politics, for despite an ad- 
verse majority and a candidate of marked 
popularity, the Republican party was success- 
ful, and Mr. Murphy was elected. In the dis- 
charge of the duties of the office, Mr. Murphy 



IGO 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CVCLOPEDIA 



proved acceptable to the people and to his 
party, and in 1 895 he was, without dissent, re- 
nominated, and his election followed by a de- 
cisive majority, largely in excess of that re- 
ceived in the previous campaign. In addition 
to his position as district-attorney, Mr. Mur- 
phy's talents have won for him an excellent 
civil practice, he being the legal representative 
of numerous important interests in his city 
and county. 

These evidences clearly indicate Mr. Mur- 
phy's high standing as a lawyer and his influ- 
ence with court and jury. The future for him 
seems fraught with promise, and distinction 
apparently awaits him in the ranks of the pro- 
fession so much admired and respected by 
himself 



TOSKPII JOHNS, the first permanent set- 
tier in the vicinity of Johnstown, was 
born in Switzerland in 1750. He emigrated 
to America and located in Lancaster, Penn- 
sylvania, where he was employed for a short 
time. Thence he went to Berlin, Somerset 
count)-, Pennsylvania, removing to what is 
now Cambria count)-, in 1 791, when he located 
on what is known as the Campbell tract of 
land. He built a log dwelling on the flats, 
near Stony creek, a short distance from where 
the house of Doctor Caldwell now stands. 
There he resided with his wife and four 
children about sixteen years, when he re- 
moved to a farm he had purchased in 1804, 
from John Stover, eight miles up the Stoyes- 
town turnpike, and one mile east of Davids- 
ville. He died in iSiO, and was buried on the 
farm. A board fence encloses a plat thirty 
feet square, on the sunnnit of a hill command- 
ing a superb view, in one corner of which 
slumbers the pioneer, his faithful wife l)y his 
side. 



/CHARLES F. KRESS, a typical represen- 
^^ tative of that intelligent and progressive 
class of citizens of German birth or lineage to 
which the progress and development of Cam- 
bria county owes so much, is a son of Rev. 
Charles F. and Henrietta (Freymuth) Kress, 
and was born in October, 1837, in llesse 
Darmstadt, Germany. 

Rev. Charles F. Kress, father, obtained his 
education under that excellent system of 
schools for which Germany has for centuries 
been noted, completing his education in that 
famed institution, the University of Geissen. 
He was ordained to the ministr\- of the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran church in his native country, 
and preached there about eighteen or twenty 
years, up to the time of his coming to America. 
In 1848 he came to the United States. He re- 
ceived his first appointment in this country in 
the divine vineyard at Newark, New Jerse)-, 
and after laboring at other points throughout 
the country came to Johnstown in 1856, and 
took charge of the church of his denomination 
at that place, and remained in that charge until 
his death, in 1859. His marriage resulted in 
the birth of seven chiklren. 

Charles F. Kress obtained a liberal educa- 
tion, partly in the public schools of his native 
country and parti)- under the instruction of 
private tutors. At the age of about fourteen 
years he began life on his own account, when 
he accepted a position as a clerk in a dry- 
goods store at Zanesville, Ohio; then, after 
several years of clerical experience in Newark 
and Dresden, he came in 1857 to Johnstown. 
Jacob Fronheiser was then, as well as many 
years afterwards, one of the most prominent 
business men of the place. Mr. Kress secured 
a position with him as bookkeeper, and re- 
mained with him a number of years, and then 
went into the confectionery business for a short 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



161 



time. Later he founded a brewery, and until 
1895 .successfully conducted that line of busi- 
ness. Upon the latter date he relinquished that 
line, and having previously invested largely in 
real-estate in the city has since devoted him- 
self to looking after these interests. 

Mr. Kress has been actively interested in 
every measure intended to promote the mate- 
rial interests of Johnstown, and holds a num- 
ber of positions of trust in connection with its 
enterprises. He is vice-president of the Citi- 
zens' National bank, member of the board of 
directors of the Johnstown Electric Light 
company, of Johnstown Passenger Railway 
company, the Johnstown Chemical company, 
trustee of the Grandvlew Cemetery associa- 
tion, of the Johnstown Savings bank, and a 
member of the Board of Park commissioners. 

March 20, 1866, Mr. Kress married Justina 
Fronheiser, a daughter of the late Jacob Fron- 
heiser, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this 
volume. Five children have blessed this union : 
Jacob F., who married Myrtle Zimmerman, 
and now lives with his father, by whom he is 
employed as book-keeper ; Carl F., who took 
a course in mechanical engineering at Cornell 
universit)'. New York, and is now in the em- 
ploy of the Johnson company; and Edward H., 
a medical student in Jefferson Medical college, 
Philadelphia. 



■toENJAJVIIN F. SLICK, justice of the 
peace in Conemaugh township, this 
county, and a man of intelligence, honesty 
and probity of character, was born August 12, 
1 82 1, in Geistown, then Slickville, this county. 
He is a son of William and Rebecca (Hemp- 
hill) Slick. 

His grandfather, John Slick, was a native of 
Frederick City, Maryland, of Swiss-German 
lineage. At an early day in the history of 
11 



the county he removed to St. Clair township, 
Bedford county, Pennsylvania. He was a 
farmer by avocation, and a man of fine phy- 
sique. 

William Slick, father of the subject of this 
biographical sketch, was born in Frederick 
City about the time of the Declaration of In- 
dependence in America, and died in Johns- 
town in 1 866, at the advanced age of ninety- 
three years. He came into what is now 
Cambria county in 1806, and purchased a 
considerable tract of land, upon which is now 
located that portion of the city of Johnstown, 
extending from Market square to what is 
known as the "point," or the confluence of 
Stony creek and the Conemaugh river. He 
was a tanner by trade, and built and operated 
for six years a tannery which was located 
upon the present site of the Carnegie Free 
library. He sold out in 1812, and removed 
to the present site of Geistown, three miles 
southeast of Johnstown. This section was 
then a wilderness. He purchased a large 
tract of land, and with characteristic pioneer 
industry and determination, began the clearing 
of a farm and the establishment of a home. 
Upon this farm he lived until 1866, when he 
disposed of his land, which at that time con- 
> sisted of three large farms, and remo\'ed to 
[ Johnstown, where he spent the remainder of 
' his days. He was an old-line whig, politi- 
cally, but became a republican upon the or- 
ganization of the Republican party, in 1856. 
He was a man of many strong traits of char- 
acter, a great reader, and, possessing a pecu- 
liarly retentive memory, he became the pos- 
sessor of a great store of information of an 
historical nature. Of strictly temperate and 
moral habits, his services and councils were 
frequently sought in matters requiring calm 
judgment, and for at least twenty years served 



162 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



as justice of the peace of Richland township. 
He was a beUever in the reUgious tenets of 
the sect of John Wesley, and the first class of 
Methodism ever established in Cambria coun- 
ty, was in his home, on December 25, 1827. 

He was twice married ; his first marital 
union was with Rebecca Hemphill, who died 
in 1846, and in 1847 he married Rachel Ben- 
son, widow of William Benson. His children 
were of the first union, and were as follows : 
Annie, deceased ; Eliza, was the wife of William 
Makin ; Robert, died at the age of twenty- 
six years, of small-pox; Nancy, wife of John 
Amsbough ; Julia Ann, wife of Robert E. 
Rodgers ; John; Benjamin Franklin, subject ; 
William, a surveyor of Johnstown ; Rebecca, 
died young; Joseph, a resident of Johns- 
town; George, father of Dr. George A. Slick, 
of Johnstown, was lost in the great flood of 
1889. 

Mr. Slick had very poor advantages for 
securing an education. His father was a man 
of progressive spirit, and fully realized the ad- 
vantages to be gained through education, and 
made a strong effort to secure enough pupils 
in Richland township to run a subscription 
school, but failed in this very worthy effort. 
He then secured a private teacher for his own 
family in the person of Rev. John Spencer. 
Young Slick profiti-d under the instruction of 
this tutor two winter sessions of three months 
each. It is misleading, however, to say that 
lie is without education. lie has always been 
a close reader, and has learned much from 
experience and by mingling with the business 
world. 

lie learned the tratle of a tanner with his 
father, ;uid, until twenty seven )-ears of age, 
followed journey work, lie then purchased 
a property at Summerhill, this county, built 
a tannery upon it, and successfully operated it 



from 1 848 to 1 86 1 . The crisis of the Rebellion 
was then upon us, and his services were 
sought in another and perhaps more useful 
field. He was engaged for a time as enrolling 
ofificer, and as a provost guard. In 1864 he 
enlisted in company K, Two Hundred and 
Sixth regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer in- 
fantry, in which he served as quartermaster- 
sergeant from the autumn of that year until 
December 10, when he was transferred to the 
office of Capt. William C. Crandall, of St. 
Louis, where he remained until March 30, 
1865, when he returned to his regiment, which 
had the honor of being the first organized 
regiment to enter the city of Richmond on 
April 3, 1865, and he was the first man as- 
signed to duty after entering. Shortly after 
this, being a good penman and a man of good 
clerical ability, he was selected by Gen. Devin 
as a clerk, and later held a similar position at 
the headquarters of Gen. F. T. Dent, where his 
services were very satisfactory and highly 
appreciated. 

Having served his country faithfully and 
well upon the field of battle, he returned to the 
peaceful pursuits of the civilian, and for twenty- 
two years was weighmaster for the Cambria 
Iron company, since which time he has fol- 
lowed farming in Conemaugh township. In 
his [lolitical texture Mr. Slick was an adherent 
of that school of political economists, of which 
Clay was an illustrious exponent, but upon 
the organization of the Republican party as a 
substitute to Whigism he became an ardent 
exponent of the new party, and has stead- 
fastly pinned his faith to the party of protec- 
tion and sound finance. 

He has been acti\e in the councils and work 
of his party, holding many local offices. He 
served as postmaster at Summerhill seven 
years, as enrolling officer about four years, 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



163 



and lias served in the honorable roll of justice 
of the peace for the long term of thirty-two 
years, and always with credit to himself and 
with entire satisfaction to his constituents. 

Religiously, Mr. Slick is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and fraternally a 
member of Emory Fisher Post, No. 30, Grand 
Army of the Republic, at Johnstown. 

Mr. Slick has been twice married ; his first 
union was on March 30, 1848, with Ann Eliza- 
beth Gordon daughter of Peter Gordon, a sol- 
dier in the Revolutionary war, who participated 
in the first battle of Bunker Hill April 19, 
1775. This union resulted in the birth of eleven 
children, as follows: Henry T., Helen M., Wil- 
liam A., Alexander, Elmer, Clemena Jane, 
Franklin, Meade and Dorsey. The rest died 
young. He married as his second wife Frances 
Cashun, March 9, 1887, and is now living and 
owns what is called the old Cashun farm, one 
mile east of Johnstown, and is at present an 
acting justice of the peace. 



JOHN B. GREEN, 3I.D., a graduate of 
the Cincinnati college of Medicine and 
Surgery, and the Rush Medical College of 
Chicago, and who has been employed in the 
successful practice of his profession for 
nearly a quarter of a century, is a son of Jess 
and Rebecca (Byers) Green, and was born 
near Penn's Run, Indiana county, Pennsyl- 
vania, January 9, 1849. The Greens are of 
honest and honorable German ancestry, and 
Jess Green was a son of Samuel Green, an In- 
diana county farmer in good circumstances, 
who lived near the county seat, and reared a 
family of four sons and three daughters. 

Jess Green was born in 1827 in Indiana 
county, where he died December 1st, 1884, 
while on a visit. He was a farmer and huck- 
ster, and early in life removed to Morrison's 



Cove, in Blair county, which he afterwards left 
to settle at Altoona, where he was residing at 
the time of his death. He was twice married. 
His first wife was Rebecca Byers, whose father, 
John Byers, was an Indiana county farmer, 
who removed late in life to Ohio, where he 
lived to the remarkably old age of one hun- 
dred and four years. After the death of his 
first wife, in 1870, at forty-three years of age, 
Mr. Green wedded Elizabeth Howard, of 
Washington city, who survived him. All of 
his children, six in number, were by his first 
marriage, and were : Dr. John B. ; Nancy, de- 
ceased ; Emanuel, of Johnstown ; Lincoln, in 
Pittsburg, and Mary, of St. Louis, Missouri. 
John B. Green received his education in the 
early common schools of Pennsylvania, and 
when he attained his majority left his father's 
farm to learn the trade of a carpenter with 
John Geesey, of Altoona. He served his ap- 
prenticeship of three years, and then worked 
one year as a journeyman. At the end of that 
time, in the autumn of iS73,he came to Chest 
Springs, this county, where he did some con- 
tracting in his mechanical line of work, and 
commenced reading medicine with Dr. W. H. 
Sloan of that place. A year later he took a 
first course of lectures at the Cincinnati Col- 
lege of Medicine and Surgerj', and returned to 
Chest Springs, where he practiced under his 
preceptor until July i, 1875, when he went to 
Indiana county, and worked for a few weeks 
at his trade. He then returned to his medical 
college, and was graduated in the class of 1876. 
After graduation he formed a partnership with 
his preceptor, which lasted until August i, 
1876, when he located at Dixonville, Indiana 
county, and practiced there up to February, 
1883, in which month he removed to Carroll- 
town, where he was a resident for two years 
and nine months. At the end of that time he 



164 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



disposed of his practice to Dr. G. H. Sloan, a 
son of his preceptor, and in December, 1885, 
came to Summer Hill, where he has been in 
active practice up to the present time. 

On the 5th of October, 1874, Dr. John B. 
Green married Matilda Goss, a daughter of 
George Goss, of Hillsdale, Indiana county. 
To this union have been born four children, 
one son and three daughters : Fannie A., who 
died March 29, 1887, aged thirteen years; 
Stella A., died June 2, 1 890, aged twelve years, 
three months; Charles B., and Golda Adalina. 

Dr. Green's professional labors and business 
duties preclude any active interest on his part 
in politics. He is a democrat politically. He 
is a member of Cambria Lodge, No. 278, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Johnstown, and has 
always contributed liberally to the Lutheran 
church. Dr. Green has always taken a deep 
interest in the struggle of the working classes 
to .secure homes, and to provide all classes 
with a safe investment, and is now vice-presi- 
dent of the Penn.sylvania Building and Loan 
Association of Altoona, Blair county, which 
was chartered February 26, 1892, and now 
has a subscribed capital of nearly $800,000, 
and mortgage loans approximating $200,000. 
He is an active member of the board of direc- 
tors, which, by a conservative and careful 
course, liave thrown additional safeguards 
around the management and funds of this 
popular business institution. Dr. Green antl 
F. Lindcrman manufacture the famous Lin- 
derman piano polish, now coming into general 
demand. While ever active in business, yet 
Dr. Green iloes not neglect his patients, or his 
profession. He took the post-graduate course 
of the Rush Medical college, of Chicago, 
graduating April 19, 1884, and has kept 
abreast of every advancement in medicine 
during this progressive age. His practice, 



which is general rather than special, is both 
extended and successful. 



TJLYSSES S. CROYLE, of near South 
Fork, is a worthy descendant of the old 
and well-known Crojle family of Cambria 
county. He is a son of Joseph and Barbara 
(Moyer) Croyle, and was born on the old 
homestead in the western part of Croyle town- 
ship, Cambria county, Penns\lvania, Decem- 
ber 3, 1865. Of sturd)- and honorable 
ancestry, the Croyle family of the United 
States has well sustained in every section of 
the Union where its members are settled, its 
old world reputation for industry, strength 
and integrit}-. The founder of the family in 
this country settled near Hagcrstown, Mary- 
land, and from there nine of his descendants, 
and all brothers, served as soldiers in the Con- 
tinental armies during the Revolutionary War. 
They were all men of great strength and fine 
physique, and Thomas, the youngest and 
smallest, )-et over six feet in height, removed 
to Bedford count)-, which he afterwards left 
to settle in Summerhill township, this countj', 
where he built a grist mill in 1824, and had 
his nearest neighbor at Ebensburg. He owned 
the tract of land on which the village of Sum- 
merhill is located, anil the township of Croyle 
was named in honor of him. He was a con- 
sistent member of the Evangelical church, and 
to his marriage was born four children: Sam- 
uel, I'rederick, Mrs. ]\Liry S. .Stineman, and 
Mrs. IClizabeth Patterson. Frederick Croyle, 
the ne.\t to the eldest child, was a native of 
•Suiiunii hill, anil a life-long farmer of Croyle 
township, where he owned and cultivated a 
large tract of land. 

He was an extensive and leading farmer for 
his da}', and, like his father before him, held 
membcrNliip in the Lvitheraii church, while in 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



165 



politics he supported the Whig party. He 
was twice married. His first wife, whose 
maiden name was Knepper, bore him four 
children : Joseph ; Samuel, a farmer of Kansas, 
and now dead; May, wife of Henry Ketner, 
of Kansas; and Susan, now deceased, who 
was the wife of Peter Varner, and resided in 
Ohio. For his second wife he married Re- 
becca Stineman, by whom he had one child, 
Philip S., a resident of South Fork. Joseph 
Croyle, the eldest son by the first marriage, 
was born at Summerhill, August 3, 1824. 
He owned a fine and well-improved farm of 
two hundred and forty acres in the western 
part of Croyle township, was an active and 
prominent business man, and for many years 
had been a stockholder and director of the 
South Fork Coal and Iron company. He was 
a member and deacon of the Lutheran church, 
a whig and republican in politics, and had 
served for several years as a member of his 
township school board. His life was one of 
activity and usefulness, and its earthly labors 
closed on March 30, 1894, when he died on 
his farm. 

Joseph Croyle married Barbara Moyer, who 
was a daughter of Philip Moyer, and is living 
on the farm. To Joseph and Barbara Croyle 
were born four sons and five daughters : Wen- 
dall and Frederick, of South Fork; Elizabeth, 
wife of Edward Hull, of Summerhill ; Annie, 
at home ; Henry, a blacksmith at Summerhill ; 
Amanda, now deceased ; Ellen, who married 
William Reighard, a farmer of Croyle town- 
ship ; Ulysses S. ; and Alice, at home. 

Ulysses S. Croyle was reared on his father's 
farm, received his education in the South 
Fork public schools, and since has been en- 
gaged successfully in the congenial and health- 
ful pursuits of an agriculturist. He owns a 
good farm, and is also manager of his father's 



farm, which he has kept up to the high stand- 
ard of its old-time fertility and productive- 
ness. 

He takes a keen interest in whatever per- 
tains to the farm and its improvement, while 
its every labor is both a duty and a pleasure 
to him. He has made farming the business 
of his life, and moreover has made it a profi- 
table and pleasant vocation. Although his 
career has not been noticeable for any new 
departures in farming, he has kept pace with 
the latest inventions and improvements that 
are made available in aiding the farmer. Mr. 
Croyle in political matters affiliates with the 
Republicans, and while not found prominent 
among party leaders or workers upon every 
trivial occasion, yet is not indifferent to office 
when his township's interests are concerned. 
He has served for several years as a member 
of the township school board, and takes an 
intelligent interest in education. Born and 
reared in the faith of the Evangelical Lutheran 
church, in which his ancestors have li\'ed and 
died for nearly two centuries, he has been a 
member of Summerhill Lutheran church for 
twelve years. In addition to his church he 
takes a deep interest in beneficial associations, 
and since 1887 has held membership in South 
Fork Castle, No. lOi, Knights of Pythias, of 
which he is a past chancellor. 

On April 11, 1889, Mr. Croyle was united 
in marriage with Marinda Miller, whose father, 
Alexander Miller, is a resident of Johnstown. 
Mr. and Mrs. Croyle have four children : 
Miller H., Frank A., Arthur S., and Harry F. 



Q'IMON ADAMS, an enterprising farmer 
and lumber merchant, of Black Lick town- 
ship, this county, whose success has been due 
to his own unaided efforts, and the exercise of 
prudence, energy, and perseverance, is a son 



166 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



of John 0. and Ann (Frazier) Adams, and was 
born near Everett, Bedford county, Pennsyl- 
vania, February 15, 1846. His grandfather, 
Josiah Adams, was born on tlie eastern shore 
of Maryland, but early in life removed to Bed- 
ford county, where he resided at the time of 
liis death. 

John Q. Adams, father, was born in Mont- 
gomery county, Maryland, January 12, 18 13. 
He received his education in the old subscrip- 
tion schools of half a century ago, and as a 
means of gaining a livelihood learned the 
trade of a miller, which pursuit he followed all 
his active life, first in his native county, then he 
removed to Cambria county about 1850, and 
engaged in his chosen avocation until i87i,at 
which time he removed to Coshocton county, 
Ohio, where he remained until his death, which 
occurred February 4, 1877. 

In political opinion he was a republican, 
and during his residence in Black Lick town- 
ship, this county, served as justice of the peace 
for several years. 

He married Miss Ann Frazier, a daughter 
of John Frazier, of Bedford county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and their imion was blessed in the birth 
of eight children : Susan M., the wife of George 
W. Reed, of Morrellville, this county ; William 
H. H., of Penn Run, Indiana countv, Penn- 
sylvania; Emma, deceased; Simon, Thomas 
O., of Coshocton, Ohio; Nancy, the wife of 
J. II. Carter, of Nebraska; George B., of 
Newark, Ohio, and John H., of Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Simon .Adams received his etiucation in the 
common schools of Black Lick township, this 
county, and during his boyhood worked in 
the mill for his father, who was located at tliat 
time in the above township. On reaching ma- 
turity he began life on his own account as a 
firmer. He owns one luiiidrcd and fift}' acres 



of farm and woodland in Black Lick township, 
which ranks as a very desirable piece of prop- 
erty. In addition to his agricultural interests 
he does a large and prosperous lumber busi- 
ness. 

He is a man of energy and enterprise, and 
possesses those qualities necessary to a suc- 
cessful business career. 

He served in the late war, enlisting June 1 3, 
1863, in company E., Battalion of Emergency 
men, and received his discharge August 8, 
1863. September 19, 1864, he re-enlisted for 
three years or during the war, and was imme- 
diately attached to the Army of the Potomac, 
which was at that time in front of Petersburg. 
Some of the important engagements in which 
he participated are : the battle of Hatcher's 
Run, Weldon railroad, where they had sev- 
eral days' fighting ; the following spring the 
second battle of Hatcher's Run ; Gravel Run, 
Five Forks, High Bridge, and Appomattox 
Court House, and was present at the surrender 
of General Lee. May 31, 1865, he was mus- 
tered out of service. 

In political opinion he is a republican, and 
has occupied man)- oftices of trust and honor 
in his township, and now, for the first time in 
twenty-one years, is free from the responsi- 
bilities of an office-holder. 

He is a member of John M. Jones Post, No. 
560, G. A. R., of I'2bensburg, this county, and 
of Highland Lodge, No. 428, I. O. O. F., of 
Ebensburg. 

In religious faith he is a member of the 
Methodist Ei^iscopal church, and in which he 
has been a steward for a number of years. 

March 13, 186S, he wedded Miss Maggie 
Nip[)s, a daughter of John Nipps, of Black 
Lick- township. To this union were born three 
children: Orr, who died September 5, 1893; 
Beit, and William, at home. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



167 



'CDW.VKD OWEXS, a thrift}' and well-to- 
do farmer of Cambria township, and a 
soldier of the late war, is a son of John and 
Ann (Williams) Owens, and was born in Ma- 
chynlleth, Montgomeryshire, North Wales, 
June 22, 1828. 

His father, John Owens, was also a native 
ofWalesandat an early age enlisted in the 
British army, in which he served continuously 
for a period of twenty-three years. During 
his military service he participated in the war 
of 18 1 2, and subsequently served under Wel- 
lington in the world-renowned battle of Water- 
loo, which resulted in the utter defeat of 
Napoleon's army and the restoration of the 
Bourbon dynasty. Among other battles in 
which he participated, are the following: Tou- 
louse, Ortris, Pyrenees, Villoria, and Corunna. \ 
His son, John Owens, whose sketch appears 
elsewhere, has in his possession a badge given 
him (John Owens) by the British government 
for his meritorious conduct during his term of 
service. It is a massive silver medal, bearing 
the date of 1848, with the ensign of the Queen 
of Great Britain on one side, and a representa- 
tion of the bestowing of a crown upon the 
worthy on the other side. Soon after the battle 
of Waterloo he was sent, with his command, to 
the West Indies, and there, at tlie age of forty- 
three, was discharged from the service, after 
which he returned to the place of his nativity 
and engaged in weaving, which he followed 
until his death, aged seventy-eight }-ears. 

As a solder he was always at his post of 
duty, and in recognition of his bravery and 
long and useful service, the British government 
presented him with a medal of honor. 

He married Ann Williams, by whom he 
had twelve children, two sons and ten daugh- 
ters. One of these daughters, Mrs. Ann 
Evans, together with her seven children, were 



lost in that terrible and disastrous inundation 
of the Conemaugh valley, known as the Johns- 
town Flood, and no one knows their final 
resting-place. 

Edward Owens learned the trade of weaving 
and manufacturing woolen goods in Wales. 
Seeking a broader field for the employment 
of his skill, and more remunerative wages, he, 
in June, 1849, set sail for America. He lo- 
cated in Ebensburg, Cambria county, and 
followed his trade for years. Carefully hus- 
banding his earnings during this time, he pur- 
chased a farm near the village, upon which he 
has since resided, engaged in the pursuits of 
husbandry. He has become a prosperous and 
thrifty farmer, owning two farms, one of two 
hundred acres, and another of one hundred 
and twenty acres. 

Mr. Owens was a staunch Union man, and 
served for a short time in company A, Inde- 
pendent battalion, and at the expiration of 
this enlistment, re-enlisted in 1864, at Ebens- 
burg, in company C, Two Hundred and Ninth 
regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer infantry, 
and served until the close of the war, having 
been honorably discharged at Alexandria, 
Virginia, in June, 1865. He participated in 
the battle of Petersburg, and during this en- 
gagement was wounded in the left clavicle by 
the explosion of a shell. He is a member of 
John M. Jones Post, No. 560, G. A. R., High- 
land Lodge, No. 428, I. O. O. F., and of the 
Baptist church, of which he was a deacon for 
thirty-four years. 

In 1848 he married Miss Ann Owens, a 
native of Wales, and soon after their marriage 
emigrated to the United States. Mr. and Mrs. 
Owens are the parents of ten children: John 
is a merchant of Ebensburg ; Mary A., de- 
ceased, was the wife of William Lewis; Mar- 
garet, William, and Eliza J., are at home; 



168 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



Susan is the wife of A. J. Waldam, of Ebens- 
burg; Kate married John C. F. Jones, of 
Braddock, Pennsylvania, and J. C. resides at 
home. 



HON. EDWARD T. McNEELIS, the well- 
known and popular attorney-at-law, of 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania, is a son of Edward 
and i\nnie (McCole) McNeelis, and was born 
April 23, 1863, in Johnstown. 

The father of our subject was a native of 
Ireland, was born January 28, 1826, and emi- 
giated to .America in 1851. He at first loca- 
ted at Tyrone, Pennsylvania, but in 1855 he 
came to Johnstown, and entered the employ 
of the Cambria Iron company, and remained 
in tlieiremploy until his death, which occurred 
October 4, 1 892. 

Our subject received his early education in 
the schools of Millville borough, then a suburb 
of Johnstown ; but at an early age went to 
work in the mills, where he was employed as 
a laborer until 1881, when he entered the 
machine shop as an apprentice and learned the 
trade of machinist. He was ambitious and 
eager to accept all chances for self-improve- 
ments, and while out of other em])loyment for 
a short time in 1887, he improved the time by 
attending a term of school, at the Indiana 
State Normal school. 

He was employed as a machinist by the 
Cambria and the Johnson comjjany mills until 
February, 1887, when he went to the Normal 
school, as above noted, after whicii lie began 
the stutly of law with the late District Attor- 
ney II. G. Rose. He was admitted to the bar 
of Cambria county, September 5, 1889, and 
opened an office in Johnstown, wlierc he has 
practiced his profession ever since. 

In October, 1893, he was admitted to prac- 
tice before the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. 



In politics Mr. McNeelis has been a staunch 
democrat, and frequently advocates the doc- 
trines of his party from the rostrum. In 1890 
he was elected a member of the State legis- 
lature, and proved an active and influential 
legislator. He was renominated for the suc- 
ceeding term, but subsequently declined the 
nomination. Since then he has devoted him- 
self exclusively to the practice of his profes- 
sion, and now has a large and growing practice. 



'T^IIOMAS F. HAMILTON, superintendent 
of the mills of the Gautier department 01 
the Cambria Iron company, is a son of Alex- 
ander and Mary (Jaquette) Hamilton, and was 
born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The an- 
cestral history of Mr. Hamilton appears under 
the heading of Alexander Hamilton, his father. 

The career of Thomas Hamilton has, since 
the age of fifteen, been closely identified with 
the Cambria Iron company, that wonderful in- 
dustrial and mechanical school to which so 
many of the successful business men of western 
Pennsylvania owe their training. In 1865 he 
entered the draughting-rooms of that company, 
where he was employed two years when he 
was transferred to the mechanical department, 
and remained in it six years, and then after a 
service of ten years as a boss roller, was 
promotetl to the position of assistant superin- 
tendent of the Gautier mills. In every posi- 
tion in which he had been placed, Mr. Ham- 
ilton has proved himself competent and trust- 
worth}', and in 1890 was promoted to his 
present position, a verj- responsible one, 
which includes the overseeing of a department 
that gives employment to from twelve hundred 
to fifteen hundretl men. 

AltluHigh Mr. Hamilton never sought nor 
held office, yet he takes an active interest in 
the success of the Republican party and its 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



169 



measures, believing that it stands for the best 
interests of the country. 

October 31, 1876, he married Angehne 
Beacom, a daughter of Rev. H. C. Beacom, 
then located at Washington, Pennsylvania, 
and to their marriage have been born two chil- 
dren : Francis B. and Donald A. 



♦^K. A. BRYAN KREBS, physician and 
surgeon of Lilly, who is well known for 
his skill, ability and success, was born at Di.\- 
onville, Indiana county, in 1863. 

He received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools of Greene township and Marion 
Normal school, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, 
and then attended the Ebensburg High school, 
from which he graduated in 1880. Leaving 
the High school, he taught three consecutive 
years in Cambria county, during which time 
he was also reading medicine. In 1883 he 
read medicine in the office and under the 
preceptorship of Dr. Rice, of Hastings, this 
county. He remained there until 1884, and 
then matriculated as a student in Cincinnati 
College of Medicine and Surgery, where he 
graduated in the spring of 1886, after a two 
years' course in the above well-known insti- 
tution. 

Believing in thorough preparation as a ne- 
cessary qualification to successful practice, in 
the spring of 1886 he took advantage of a 
special course on diseases of the throat and 
lungs. Thus well equipped to battle with 
diseases on the very threshold of his profes- 
sion, he opened an office in Dixonville, Indiana 
county, where he remained nearly a year, and 
then removed to Hillsdale, Indiana county; 
after practicing there two years he located, in 
1889, at Lilly, this county, where, by reason 
of his thorough preparation and natural ability, 
and devotion to his chosen profession, he has 



built up a large and successful practice. He 
also conducts a drug store, being a registered 
pharmacist. 

Politically he is prominently identified with 
the Democratic party, and takes an active part 
in local politics. For several years he served 
as a councilman in Lilly, and in 1894 was 
elected burgess of the borough, which office 
he fills at the present time. 

In the spring of 1888 he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Minnie M. Munshower, a 
daughter of John Munshower, of Indiana, 
Pennsylvania, and their union has been blessed 
in the birth of three children: Blossom, who 
died in infancy ; Charles Bryan, and Inez 
Meredith. 

Dr. Krebs has won his way by his own un- 
aided efforts. He is blessed with the capacity 
for hard, diligent, professional work, and it is 
but natural that success should be his meed. 



■j^ATRICK E. DILLON, a prosperous far- 
mer, of Northern Cambria county, 
is a son of Samuel and Susan (Noel) Dillon, 
and was born at Cresson .Springs, Cambria 
county, Pennsylvania, November 9, 1847. He 
traces his ancestry to Ireland, from which 
country his paternal great-grandfather emi- 
grated to America, locating with an Irish 
colony at Baltimore, and here Charles Dillon, 
grandfather of the subject of this record, was 
born. On attaining his majority he removed to 
Adams county, Pennsylvania, where he engaged 
in farming, and followed this pursuit all his life. 
He was a member of the Roman Catholic 
church, and married Miss Mary Strausbaugh, 
a German. To their union were born four sons: 
John, deceased ; Peter, deceased ; Samuel, the 
father of our subject, and Charles, deceased. 

Samuel Dillon was born in Adams county, 
Pennsylvania, April 6, 1802, and removed to 



170 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



Cambria county in 1828. He had been reared 
on a farm, and, following in the footsteps of his 
father, became a farmer. He first located on 
a farm on Laurel Hill, Jackson township, this 
county, but only remained there a few years, 
and then bought sixty acres of woodland, now 
Cresson Springs. Here he cleared his farm, 
and made the first improvements at Cresson 
-Springs. Previous to locating on a farm he 
and his brother were wagoners on the old 
Pike, between Pittsburg and Philadelphia and 
intermediate points. In the days of the old 
Portage railroad he was employed as fireman, 
and later as engineer on that once famous road. 
He lived in Cresson at the time the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad was built, and some of the im- 
provements he made at that time are still 
standing. 

In 1854 he sold his Cresson Springs prop- 
erty and removed to Altoona, Pennsylvania, 
where he remained two years, and then re- 
turned to Cambria county, locating at Carroll- 
town, where he engaged in the hotel business; 
after four years' experience in this line he re- 
turned to his farm hfe, and located on a farm 
in Susquehanna township, where Hastings 
now stands. 

He was a democrat in political faith, and 
about 1847 held the office of county commis- 
sioner; at various times he filled a number of 
local offices in his township. 1 le was a devout 
member of the Catholic church. In 1824 he 
married Miss Susan, a daughter of Nicholas 
Noel, a native of Germany, who located in 
Adams county, and engaged in farming. To 
this marriage were born eight sons and seven 
daughters: Margaretta, deceased, who was the 
wife of Edward McClosky ; Charles, deceased ; 
Mary Ann, the wife of \Vm. \'oung, of Adams 
count)'. William, now locatetl in Arkansas; 
during the late Civil War he served in the Con- 



federate arn)y under Gen. Lee, and was present 
at Lee's surrender. He was wounded at 
Pittsburg Lantling; Catharine, the wife of 
James Kirkpatrick, a farmer of Carroll town- 
ship, this county. 

Thomas, a soldier in the late war (Union 
arni)') died in the Alexander hospital in 1863; 
Roselia, deceased ; John, a farmer of Susque- 
hanna township, near Hastings ; Patrick E. ; 
Samuel, deceased; Jennie, deceased, who was 
the wife of Augustine Kirkpatrick, and Eliza- 
beth, deceased, who was the wife of Samuel 
Irwin, of Adams county. 

Patrick E. Dillon was reared on the farm, 
and received his education in the common 
schools. Inheriting the taste for a farmer's 
life, he has always followed farming. 

In 1868 he bought his first farm ; it was lo- 
cated in Chest (now Elder) township, and con- 
tained seventy acres ; he has since bought 
twenty-three acres of adjoining land, all under- 
laid with coal. 

He has been very successful in his agricul- 
tural pursuits, and is a first-class general 

farmer. 

-o 

'T'HIO LLOYO FAMILY.— The Welsh peo- 
pie began to settle at Ebcnsburg, Cam- 
bria county, about 1796, and among the first 
settlers was Rev. Rees Lloj'd, the founder of 

the Lloyd fuiiily in this county, of whom the 
following is a short biograph)', Iranslated from 
the first volume of the "Cyfaill," in 1838 and 
written by Rev. George Roberts, of Ebens- 
burg: On the 2ist of May, 1838, Rev. Rees 
Llo\-d died at Paddy's Run, Butler county, 
Ohio, in the eightieth (80th) year of his age. 
He was born May i, 1759, in the parish of 
Llanboid}', Carmarthenshire, Wales. In his 
youth he unitetl with the Non-conformist 
church, at Glandwr, Penbrokeshire, which was 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



171 



then under the pastoral charge of Rev. John 
Griffiths. When twenty-one years of age he 
was invited by that church to enter the minis- 
try, and for several years was with Rev. Grif- 
fiths in ministerial work. Afterwards he was 
called to preach for the Non-conformist church 
at Ebenezer, near Pont-y-Pool, Monmouth- 
shire. This church was under the pastoral 
charge of Rev. Edmond Jones, who was then 
very aged and unable to serve the church with- 
out an assistant. After being there for some 
years he was fully ordained to the work of the 
ministry at Ebenezer church, April 29, 1795, by 
prayer and by the laying on of hands by Revs. 
Manuel Davies, Miles Edwards, Howel Powel, 
David Thomas and John Evans. 

In August of the same year (1795) he left, 
with his family, for this country, and arrived 
in Philadelphia about the last of the following 
October. 

After a residence of over a year near Phila- 
delphia, he removed, with his family, to the 
wilderness where Ebensburg now stands, ar- 
riving there in November, 1796, and became 
the founder of that town, owning the land 
upon which it now stands, and donated the 
grounds for the public buildings, court-house, 
jail and academy; and also donated ground 
for the Congregational church and for Lloyd's 
cemetery, it being stipulated that all members 
of the Lloyd family were to be interred free of 
charge. In this connection he donated five 
acres of land to the Congregational church, to 
be used ever after for the benefit of the 
minister of the church. This land was after- 
ward sold by an order of court. After con- 
tending with the difficulties and obstacles 
connected with the formation of a new settle- 
ment in the wilderness, April, 1797, he organ- 
ized a Congregational church of Welsh peo- 
ple, which contained twenty-four members, of 



whom twelve had been members of the Cal- 
vinistic Methodist church, eleven had been 
members of the Congregational church, and 
one was a new member. 

This church gave him a call to be their 
pastor, and he labored earnestly and faithfully 
among them, with a large degree of success, 
until October, 1817, Rev. William Tibbot and 
George Roberts being fellow-ministers with 
him part of the time. On the above date 
he received a call from the Congregational 
church at Paddy's run, which was com- 
posed principally of Welsh people. He 
accepted the call, and removed his family 
to that place. When he left the Ebensburg 
church the most friendly relations existed 
between pastor and people. I had very little 
knowledge of him after his departure from 
Ebensburg, but I understand that difficulties 
arose in the church in the course of some 
years, and that Rev. Lloyd resigned his charge 
chiefly on account of advancing years, but he 
continued to be highly respected among his 
people, and preached occasionally when the 
condition of his health permitted. I have 
heard also that he was in a happy state of 
mind in the last conflict with the " King of 
terrors." 

He published an English book under the 
title, " The Richmond Alarm," comprising one 
hundred and forty four pages, i2mo., which 
contained an account of the burning of a thea- 
tre at Richmond, December 26, 181 1, together 
with practical lessons drawn from the events. 
This book had a large sale and a second edition 
was called for. 

Having come with Mr. Lloyd across the 
sea, and having been a fellow-member with 
him in the Welsh-American church at Ebens- 
burg for more than twenty-two years, and for 
more than ten years of that period a fellow- 



172 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



minister of the gospel, I enjoyed many oppor- 
tunities to know him familiarly, and my con- 
viction is that he was a man eminent for his 
godliness. I have seldom met any one whose 
views and knowledge of Scripture were more 
tiiorough and consistent, nor any one who, 
according to his ability, was more earnest or 
more active in God's work. 

He. observed carefully the dispensations 
of Providence, and was calm and confident 
amidst the outward appearances of a frowning 
Providence. He was very diligent in his 
temporal labors, and while careful not to 
waste the providential mercies which his 
heavenly Father gave him, yet he was very 
liberal in his contributions to any good cause- 

Ebensburg was no doubt so called because 
of the place in Wales, where he was ordained, 
and probably has some reference to that pas- 
sage of Scripture, " Here I raise my Eben- 
ezer," etc. 



TT f'T^Ti IjTX)YI>, an influential citizen of 

"^^ Ebensburg, Pennsylvania, and a grand- 
son of the Rev. Rees Lloyd whose history 
appears above, is a son of John and Jane 
(Tibbott) Lloyd. 

The fatiier of Abel Lloyd was born in Wales 
in all probability and was brought to Ebens- 
burg, where he was left by his father who went 
west and died in Ohio. The son, who con- 
tinued to live in Ebensburg, was a wheel- 
wright of considerable mechanical skill, and 
employed himself in making old-fishioned 
spinning wheels and reels. He also showeil 
a superior knowledge of electricity for his 
day. 

In religion he was first a Congregationalist, 
and afterwards a member of the Christian 
church. lie was a democrat and prominent 
in the political life of his section, having served 



as county commissioner and as the first post- 
master at Ebensburg. 

His family consisted of the following chil- 
dren : John, died young ; Rachael, died while 
a child; Jane, who married Richard Evans; 
Rees J., who lived and died in Ebensburg ; 
Abel, the subject of this sketch; and John, 
a merchant, whose sketch appears elsewhere. 

Abel Lloyd was educated in the common 
schools and at the Ebensburg academy. When 
a young man he learned the trade of a cabinet- 
maker, but he never followed it. For one 
year he taught school in Cambria township, 
the next year he engaged in the mercantile 
business in P^bensburg, and the next he was 
employed as a salesman and manager at what 
was then known as No. 4, on the old Portage 
road, in this county. 

Later he took a position with a large com- 
mercial house in Pittsburg, where he remained 
about seven years, when the company with 
which he was connected took the Conemaugh 
and Johnstown furnaces, in which they had a 
large interest, in order to protect themselves 
against lo.ss. Mr. Lloyd was sent to these 
furnaces as a general superintendent, and there 
he introtluced several new ideas which were 
successful and which contributed to a large 
degree toward the advancement of the enter- 
prise. 

Afterward he removed to Ebensburg where 
he has lived ever since. In 1861, when the 
Ebensburg and Cresson r.iihoad was being con- 
structed, he was chosen secretary and director, 
and managetl the grading, etc. The Pcnn.syl- 
vania company leased the road for nine hun- 
dred and ninty-nine years, agreeing to operate 
it whether it [laid or not. 

Mr. Lloyd was chosen by the Pennsylvania 
company as their agent, and has remained in 
that capacity to the present time. In addition 




ABEL LLOVD. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



173 



to this he has been largely engaged in real- 
estate and other speculations. One of the 
most important of these ventures was the 
building of the large summer hotel in Ebens- 
burg near the station. 

Prior to the Civil War, Mr. Lloyd was a 
democrat and took an active part in the Doug- 
las, Breckenridge campaign, but the issues of 
the war caused him to transfer his influence to 
the Republican party. 

Now, however, he is independent in politics. 
It was during the aforesaid campaign that he 
was elected county commissioner, serving the 
full term with credit to himself and entire 
satisfaction to the public. Aside from this he 
has never sought nor held office. 

He is a member of Summit Lodge, No. 312, 
at Ebensburg, of Oriental Commandery, No. 60, 
and the Knights Templar, at Johnstown, being 
a charter member of the latter, and honored 
and respected in all his fraternal relations. 
The wife of Mr. Lloyd was Ann Gardner, a 
lady of English extraction, who resided in 
Pittsburg at the time of her marriage. 

To their union have been born the follow- 
ing children : Mary J., wife of Carl Rivinius, 
a jeweler of Ebensburg ; J. Gardner, a man of 
large political following, who is at present 
serving his third term as county commissioner 
of Cambria count}'; Maggie A., married to F. 
A. Speller, agent of the Pennsylvania railroad, 
at Shadyside, Pennsylvania; Ann, married to 
Mathiot Reade, an attorney of Ebensburg; 
Isabella and Martha, who live at home ; Abel, 
Jr., an employee of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
company and William, deceased. 

The facts of a man's life are the best evi- 
dence of his character. The facts in the life 
of our subject show him to be a self-made 
man of upright character, universal ability, 
and of great influence in his community. 



TOHN LIiOYD, a prominent citizen and 
business man of Ebensburg, was born 
November 11, 1827, in Ebensburg, Cambria 
county. His parents dying when he was 
young, our subject did not have any advan- 
tages for securing an education outside of 
those afforded by the common schools. He 
first learned the trade of a printer, and fol- 
lowed it for about three years. Then he 
taught school one term, and afterwards took 
a position as clerk in Ebensburg, in which 
capacity he was engaged for about three years. 
In 185 I he was one year at Plane No. 2 on 
what was then known as the old Portage rail- 
road. From that time until 1859 he was in 
the mercantile business in Ebensburg with a 
Mr. Davis, the firm name being Davis & Llojd. 
From 1859 to 1871 he speculated in various 
enterprises, and followed no regular business. 
At the latter date he bought one-half interest 
in the mercantile business of H. A. Shoemaker 
& Co., continuing it until 1878 under the 
name of Meyers & Lloyd. He was sole owner 
from 1878 to 1882, when he took his two sons 
into partnership, and, in the name of John 
Lloj'd & Sons, the business has been carried 
on successfully ever since. Thus we have 
found Mr. Lloyd in the capacity of a printer, a 
teacher, a clerk and a merchant, discharging his 
duties in every instance with intelligence and 
efficiency. His versatility, however, was mani- 
fested in other directions. In 1858 or '59 an 
opposition newspaper to James Buchanan was 
started in Ebensburg, and Tlie Mountaineer 
was the organ of Buchanan's opposers. In 
August, 1S60, Mr. Lloyd was induced to take 
charge of it. This he did with ability and en- 
terprise for one j'ear. 

In 1861 Thomas Callan was elected treasurer 
of Cambria county for a term of two years. 
He took his office January i, 1862, and served 



174 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



until August of the same year, when, having | 
met with an accident which made it impossi- 
ble for him to discharge the duties of his 
office, his bondsmen solicited Mr. Lloyd to 
take charge of the office, which he did, serving 
out the remainder of the term. In the autumn 
of 1863 Isaac Wike was chosen treasurer, and 
Mr. Lloyd was his deputy in full authority, 
holding this position during the term of two 
years. When he took charge of the office 
under Mr. Callan he noticed tiiat the orders 
on the county were selling at a discount of 
from twenty to twenty-five per cent., and the 
commissioners were paying from twelve to 
fourteen per cent, for the money. Mr. Lloyd, 
in looking over the books, found that there 
was much uncollected money, and he called 
the attention of the commissioners to this fact. 
They immediately agreed to collect, and Mr. 
Lloyd sent out notices, and succeeded in col- 
lecting the greater part of it, and thus put the 
finances of the county in such good shape that 
the orders were paid promptly and at par. 
This furnishes another instance of the sagacity 
and unerring foresight of Mr. Lloyd. { 

Since 1 871 our subject has also been Adams 
E.xpress agent, and, during the temporary 
absence of his brotiicr, Abel, in 1866, he 
served in his place as station agent at Ebens- 
burg. Mr. Lloyd is esscntiall}' a business 
man, and from a business standpoint the same 
tribute may be accorded him that Johnson 
paid to Goldsmith, " He touched nothing that 
he did not adorn." It should he added that 

Mr. Lloyd is a staunch democrat, hut he 

•' I 

never aspired to office. 

He has been twice married. Sarah Cannon, ^ 
of Indiana, was his first wife, whom he mar- 
ried January 21, 1857, and to them were born 
three sons: Fergus and Harry; both are resi- 
dents of Ebensburg, and are in partnership 



with their father in the mercantile business, 
under the name of John Lloyd & Sons; Ira 
died in 1882, about the time of reaching his 
majority. In 1874 Mr. Lloyd was married 
the second time to Margaret Evans, of Cam- 
bria county. 



TOHN G. LLOYD, a county commissioner 
of Cambria county, and a son of Abel 
Lloyd, was born February 17, 1856, in Johns- 
town, Pennsylvania. He was educated in the 
common schools of Ebensburg, Pennsylvania. 
At the age of twelve years he commenced to 
carry the mail for the railroad company, and 
has been in the service of the railroad com- 
pany ever since, having learned the business 
in the office of his father. In 1881 he engaged 
in the coal business on his own account in 
Ebensburg. He continued in this business 
until 1887, when he was nominated and elected 
commissioner as minority candidate. In 1890 
he was again elected as minority commissioner, 
and in 1893 as majority commissioner, the 
position he now holds. 

In 1892 he entered into a partnership with 
a Mr. Tibbott, in the grain and feed business, 
under the firm-name of Tibbott & Co. Mr. 
Tibbott sold out to Mr. Ferguson, and the 
business was continued in the n.ime of Fergu- 
son & Co. Mr. Lloj'd is now out of business, 
except as assistant agent of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad company at Ebensburg, and as county 
commissioner. The father of Mr. Llo\d owns 
a one-third interest in the Moore syndicate 
which controls about twelve thousand acres 
of land. IMr. Lloyd himself is interested in 
the Springfield .syndicate, which controls about 
one thousand acres of the finest coal land in 
the count)'. Tiie lumber on this tract has been 
sold. In addition he is largely interested in 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



175 



other real-estate enterprises in the county and 
State. 

Mr. Lloyd is an ardent republican. He 
has served as a congressional conferee, and in 
many ways has been prominent in the coun- 
cils of his party. It was largely through his ^ 
influence that the county officers are Repub- j 
lican, and the political power was thus wrested 
from the Democratic part}-. All his work for 
his party has been strong and distinct, all his 
business enterprises have been ably and suc- 
cessfully conducted. 

Mr. Lloyd married Miss Mary Griffith, a 

daughter of Evan Griffith, and to this union 

have been born four children : Mazie, Elsie 

and Charles Gardner are living ; Joseph died 

young. 

© 

FESTUS LLOYD, of Ebensburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, the enterprising editor of the 
Cambria Herald, and a son of Rees S. and 
Ann (Tibbott) Lloyd, was born April 17, 
1849, in Cambria township, near Ebensburg, 
Cambria county, Pennsylvania. 

His ancestors were of the race characterized 
by Paxton Hood, in his " Life of Cromwell,*' 
as royal. " All Welshmen are royal," says 
that writer. Sure it is, that as a race they are 
a steady, reliable people, of indomitable energy 
and unflinching integrity. This characteriza- 
tion applies, as will be seen, to the immediate 
ancestors of Festus Lloyd. 

His grandfather was Stephen Lloyd, a native 
of the principality of Wales, who emigrated 
to America and settled in Ebensburg, where 
he died. He was a pioneer settler in this 
section, and was a justice of the peace, a sur- 
veyor and superintendent of the Philadelphia 
and Pittsburg pike, each for a number of 
years. 

The father of Festus Lloyd was born in 



Cambria township in 18 16. When a young 
man, he received the appointment of post- 
master at Ebensburg, and held the office for a 
number of years. In 1875 he was nominated 
by the Republicans of the county for the office 
of county commissioner, and was elected by a 
large majority. He filled this office for a term 
of three years in an altogether satisfactory 
manner, his highest ambition being to admin- 
ister the affairs of the county honestly and 
justly and to the interest of the taxpayer. 
Although residing in the township, he served 
as school director for a number of years in his 
early life, in the borough of Ebensburg, and 
was always an untiring worker for the public 
schools. 

From early boyhood he had been identified 
with the Christian church, and he confirmed 
the honesty of his professions to the world, 
by the uprightness of his life. He was always 
a staunch, exemplary member of the Christian 
church, an uncompromising advocate of the 
right, and an enemy of the wrong; a temper- 
ance man, too, in the fullest sense of the word, 
whose character is written in letters so legible 
that " all who run may read." When he died, 
the church, the connnunity, and his family 
missed him as a Christian man and a good 
citizen is missed, but he left the latter a legacy 
more precious than a heritage of lands and 
money — the legacy of a good name. His 
death occurred August 15, 1892. 

He married Ann Tibbott, the mother of our 
subject, and they had the following children : 
Maggie, deceased, who was the wife of W. H. 
Sechler; Nane, the wife of Edmund James, a 
druggist of Ebensburg; and Festus. 

The grandfather of our subject on the mater- 
nal side was Festus Tibbott, also a native of 
Wales, who settled about one mile south of 
Ebensburg, and built a grist mill, known as 



176 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



"Tibbott's Mill," this being the first grist mill 
in the county. Later, he built a saw-mill, and 
followed this business all his life, dying there. 
He, too, was distinguished in church work, 
being an elder, and frequently preaching 
in what is known as the Disciple church. 
He was the founder of this church in Ebens- 
burg. 

Festus Lloyd, on September 4, 1879, mar- 
ried Anna K. Shryock, a daughter of J. K. 
Shryock, who removed from Hagerstown, 
Maryland, to Johnstown, where he was en- 
gaged in mercantile pursuits until he was 
burned out, when he returned to Wilmore, 
this county, where he died, January, 1895. 
Nellie, born September 15, 1S80; Fannie, 
Ada, Lynn S., Rees S., and Fred., comprise 
his family. 

He was educated in the common schools 
of Ebensburg, and learned the trade of a 
printer, with J. Todd Hutchinson, of Tlie 
Alleghenian. In 1871, he, in connection witli 
Edmund James, purchased this paper, and 
changed its name to the Cambria Herald, 
issuing their first edition, August 3, 1871. In 
1879 Mr. Lloyd purchased Mr. James' inter- 
est, and has continued unto the present time 
its editor and publisher. The Cambria Herald 
is an eight-column folio, ably edited, spicy and 
newsy, progressive, and true to the spirit of 
the times. In connection with the paper, 
Mr. Lloyd does a general job-printing busi- 
ness. 

He has always been a republican, and has 
served four years as burgess of Ebensburg 
borough, one term of one year and one term 
of three years. 

Mr. Lloyd is a member of Highland Lodge, 
No. 428, I. O. O. F., Jr. O. U. A. M., and a 
consistent member and valued trustee of the 
Disciple church. 



nOBERT BARCL.VY, burgess of Rox- 
bury, this county, was born in Somerset 
county, June 27, 1834, and is a son of Thomas 
and Eliza (Daugherty) Barclay. 

His paternal grandfather was a native of 
Scotland, while his maternal grandfather was of 
Irish origin, and served as a soldier in the 
patriot army in their struggle for liberty in 
the war of the Revolution, and was the first 
man buried at Stoyestown, Somerset county, 
with military honors. 

Thomas Barclay, father, was born in 1S05, 
in Westmoreland county, educated in the dis- 
trict schools, spent his early life in Westmore- 
land county, and when a young man, went to 
Somerset county. In 1846 he came to Cam- 
bria county, and was in the employ of the 
Cambria Iron company most of the remainder 
of his life. 

In political faith he adhered to the school of 
Clay and Harrison, was an old-line whig, and 
a republican from the organization of the 
Republican party until his death, and although 
he took a lively and intelligent interest in the 
subject of politics, yet never sought office. 
He was a consistent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mr. Barclay's early life 
was spent in various pursuits. He is one of 
the few now left who operated on the Penn- 
s)'lvania canal and old Portage railroad, a 
thoroughfare then of great importance, but 
which now lives only on the page of history 
and in the minds of those who witnessed its 
rise anil f.di. In 1855, after his marriage, he 
went to work for the Cambria Iron company 
and remained continuously in the cmplo)' of 
that compaii)' until 1878. We ne.xt find him 
serving on the police force of the borough of 
Johnstown, and, later, as weighmaster two 
years. I le then teamed for a number of years 
and served for a time as watchman at the 



f)F CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



177 



Gautier works of the Cambria Iron company 
until 1889. In 1888 he removed to Roxbury 
and has resided there ever since. 

Tiie Barclay family certainly did its patri- 
otic duty in that crisis extending from 1 860 to 
1865, in which the life of the nation was 
threatened; for, in addition to serving ten 
months as quartermaster in the Army of the 
Potomac, he has five brothers who saw duty 
in that memorable conflict. 

Mr. Barclay was a strong anti-slavery man 
and abolitionist, hence upon the organization 
of the Republican party he became one of its 
original supporters, and has continued to vote 
with his first love to the present time, believ- 
ing that upon the whole, it stands for those 
principles and has advocated those measures 
best adapted to the needs of the country, and 
in 1894, upon the organization of the munici- 
pal government of the borough of Ro.xbur}-, 
was chosen its first burgess, and is a director 
and member of the executive committee of the 
Roxbury Park association. On January 5, 
1855, he married Mary, a daughter of Michael 
Barnhart, and to this union have been born 
eleven children, seven boys and four girls, of 
whom four boys and three girls are yet living. 



/^EOKGE W. BOWMAN, an industrious 
^■^ farmer of Reade township, this county, 
is a son of Benjamin and Barbara (Gaff) Bow- 
man, and was born in Mifflin county, Penn- 
sylvania, September 4, 1831. 

The Bowman family is of German descent. 
Benjamin (father) was born in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, coming to Mifflin county when 
a young man, where he met and married Miss 
Barbara Gaff, daughter of James and Mary 
(Ford) Gaff. He moved to Cambria county in 
1848, locating in White township, now Reade 
township, when he purchased one hundred 
12 



acres of farm land, partially improved, where 
he resided until 1850, when he was killed by 
a runaway horse, at the age of fifty-two years. 
By trade he was a plasterer. P"or several 
years previous to moving to Cambria county 
he followed boating, having charge of a sec- 
tion-boat running from Philadelphia to Pitts- 
burg. He was a consistent member of the 
Presbyterian church, and in politics a demo- 
crat. Their marriage resulted in the birth of 
nine children : James J., a blacksmith in Alle- 
mansville, Clearfield county ; Sarah Ann, who 
died in childhood ; John M., a printer of 
Everett, Pennsylvania, editor of the Everett 
Republican ; Nancy J., deceased, who was the 
wife of Rev. Thomas Van Scoyoc, of Moun- 
taindale, this county ; George W. ; Susan Cath- 
arine, the wife of John Van Scoyoc, of Reade 
township ; Samuel M., a farmer at Mountain- 
dale ; Jacob G., also a farmer of Mountaindale; 
and Mary E., wife of Benjamin F. Byers, of 
Coalport, Clearfield county. 

George W. Bowman was educated in the 
common schools of Mifflin county. After his 
father's death he purchased the one-half inter- 
est in the farm from his brother James, and 
took charge of it, and has since remained on 
this farm. It contains about one hmidred 
acres, and is underlaid with coal. In March, 
1864, he gave up the life of a farmer for the 
trials of a soldier, and enlisted in company D, 
One Hundred and Eighty-fourth regiment, 
i Pennsylvania Volunteer infantry, and served 
until the close of the war. He took part in 
the following battles: Prospect Hill, Cold 
Harbor, where he was wounded in the left hip 
by a mortar shell ; two engagements at Deep- 
bottom, on the James River, and at Reams' 
Station, on the Weldon railroad, where he was 
detailed, and drove a medical supply team 
until the close of the war. On receiving his 



17S 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND rORTRATT CYCLOPEDIA 



discharge from the service he returned to his 
home, and has since followed pursuits of agri- 
culture. He is a member of David Troxell 
Post, No. 421, of Glasgow, this county ; also 
a member of Alleniansville Lodge, No. 900, 
I. O. O. F. In religious belief he is a con- 
sistent member of the Baptist church, and in 
political faith is identified with the Republican 
party, and has always taken a prominent part 
in local politics. He has served as school 
director for over thirty-five years, and was the 
second president of the directors' association 
of the county ; was po.stmaster of Roseland, 
this county, for seven years previous to the 
war; has served as assessor in his township 
seven terms, and in 1890 was census enume- 
rator for Reade township. • | 

On June 23, 1859, he married Miss Mary 
Byers, a daughter of Benjamin Byers, a farmer, 
of Rcade township, and second postmaster of 
Roseland, and the first post office in the 
northern end of Cambria county. This mari- 
tal union has resulted in the birth of nine 
children: Sarali B., wife of Lemuel Troxell, a 
progressive and w<ll-to-di) farmer of Reade 
township; Benjamin F., weighmaster of coal 
at Mountaindalc; VJVd N., the wife of Benja- 
min N. McCuUey, carpenter, of Altoona ; Re- 
becca AI., at home; Catharine S., wife of Gil- 
bert Miller, boss-sawyer in company mills at 
Belsano, Clearfield county, Pennsylvania; 
John M. C. was killed while acting as brake- 
in. m on a br.mch of the l'cnn'^}'l\'ani,i railroad 
near Mah.iffcy, Pennsylvania, leaving his wife 
Allie.and little daughter, Marion; Warren G, 
at home ; Laura A., a successful school teacher 
in Cambria county; and Carrie I\L, at home. 



T r j I l-M.\M II. STINKHIAN, an enterpris- 
^■^"^ ing merchant of South I'ork, is a 
son of Joscpli 1' II. and Mar)- (Hi ikcbilc) 



Stineman, and was born in Adams township 
on what is known as the "old Fulmer farm," 
Augu.st 30, 1859. 

The father of William H. Stineman is a 
brother of George B. and Jacob C. Stineman, 
whose ancestral history appears on another 
page of this work under the heading of "The 
Stineman Family." His father was born on 
the Stineman homestead in Adams township, 
learned the art of photography and followed 
it a number of years, went to Bethlehem, this 
State, and for eighteen years was the agent 
for the Philadelphia & Reading Transfer com- 
pany. He now resides in Philadelphia. His 
marriage with Mary Berkebile resulted in the 
birth of three children : Ann, wife of Daniel 
Rorabaugh, of Croyle township, this county; 
James Monroe, deceased, and William H. 

William H. Stineman, at an early age, 
learned the lesson of self-reliance. He was 
reared until thirteen years of age by his uncle, 
Jacob C. Stineman, being engaged as an errand 
boy in the iron mills of the latter, at Holli- 
daysburg. Later he went to Johnstown and 
was cmjilo^-cd !))• the Camliria Iron company, 
first as a helper in the roof shop, and later as 
a helper on the stamping-machine of the 
Blooming mill. He was soon advanced to 
the position of slate-boy, his duties being to 
keep account of ail the work sent out by this 
department. After remaining in Johnstown 
several years he went to Pittsburg, and was 
engaged ui ihc e.stahlishmcnt of Wilson & 
Walker for a short time, and then, after one 
year's experience as a railroad brakeman in 
tliecm[)loj' of the Penn.sylvania Railroad coni- 
p.in\-, he located at South I'ork and took a 
position as weighmaster at tlie mines of his 
uncle, Jacob C. 

In iSS7he eml).irkcd in the general mer- 
cantile business in .South Fork, and has thus 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



179 



been engaged ever since. He carries a full 
line of general merchandise, and has a large 
and growing trade. In addition to merchan- 
dizing he conducts the only restaurant in the | 
town, and manufactures ice-cream for the 
wholesale and retail trade. Fraternally he is 
a member of South Fork Council, No. 74, 
Jr. O. U. A. M., and religiously of the Lutheran 
church, of which he is a member of the coun- 
cil. He adheres to the Republican party as a 
matter of politics, and has served as auditor 
and councilman of South Fork. December 
25, 1884, he married Miss Elizabeth M. 
Walter, a daughter of Justice Henry Walter, 
of Cambria township, this county, and to their 
union have been born three children : Mary 
Odessa, died in infancy ; Earl Walter and 
Charles Clare. 



^EORGE MARION HARSHBERUER, 

^■^ a successful business man, and an active 
Republican worker of Johnstown, is a son of 
John M. and Catherine (Wertz) Harshberger, 
and was born on the old homestead farm in 
Adams township, Cambria county, Pennsylva- 
nia, September 28, 1861. He was reared on 
the farm, received his education in the public 
schools and several county normal schools, 
and before he had attained his majority had 
taught three winter terms of school, one term 
in Adams and two terms in Richland township. 
At twenty-one years of age he left the farm, 
where he had worked during several summer 
seasons, and in March, 1883, came to Johns- 
town, where he has resided ever since. His 
first employment in the city was as clerk in the 
store of N. B. Hartzell, where he remained 
three j^ears. He then engaged in the grocery 
and meat business, but sold his establishment 
in 1888 to McClelland & Miller, and became 
a traveling salesman with J. Swank, Son & 



Co., hardware dealers of Johnstown, and built 
the Pompeii restaurant, which he conducted 
some time after the flood. About September 
I, 1889, he commenced the erection of the 
Pompeii hotel, which, after its completion, he 
conducted until April, 1894, when he sold it 
to D. B. Cook, its present owner. After dis- 
posing of his hotel property he traveled for 
one year for the Northwestern Fertilizing 
company, of Chicago, and in October, 1895, 
embarked with his father and brother Corne- 
lius in their present business of handling flour, 
feed, fertilizers, grain and coal. Their estab- 
lishment is on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad 
and Bedford street, and he aims to keep every- 
thing in their line that is needed by their many 
patrons. He is building up a very good busi- 
ness, with every indication and assurance that 
it will be permanent and remunerative. Mr. 
Harshberger is in his political belief a staunch 
republican, and further is an active and effective 
worker for the principles and nominees of his 
party. He was elected in 1892 as a member 
of the common council from the Fourth ward, 
but he resigned in 1893 to accept the position 
of city assessor, to which he had been elected 
for a term of three years that expired in April, 
1896. He is a contributor to the United 
Evangelical church of Johnstown, of which 
his family are members; and has been a mem- 
ber for several years of Daniel Webster council, 
No. 700; Junior Order of United American 
Mechanics, and Johnstown Lodge, No. 245, 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. Mr. 
Harshberger has always been active in any 
measure or movement for either the protection 
or improvement of his city; being an active 
member of the Board of Trade. He was one 
of the organizers and is the present president 
of the Seventh ward fire company. He is also 
vice-president of the Firemen's Union of the 



180 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



city of Johnstown. Active and persevering, he 
throws his whole energy into wliatever enter- 
prise he engages, and has always come out 
well in his different ventures. 

On June 21, 1S83, Mr. Harshberger married 
Lovinia J. Shank, a daughter of Jacob Shank, 
a resident of Adams township To their union 
have been born four children : Ivy Pearl, who 
died at six years of age ; Royal Longfellow ; 
Mabel Gladys, and Elsie V. 

The Harshberger family is of German lin- 
eage, and Joseph Harshberger, in 18 16, moved 
with his family from .Somerset county, near 
the Castleman's valley, near the Maryland 
line, to a farm of four hundred acres, upon 
which Mo.xham or the Seventeenth ward of 
Johnstown now stands. He reared to maturit}' 
a family of sixteen children, of whom Moses 
was among the youngest. He was born in 
December, 1804, and was twelve years of age 
when his father moved to the farm at Moxham. 
Being a farmer he purchased the old Wissinger 
farm, now known as the Abner Griffith farm, 
near Walnut Grove, Cambria county, which 
he sold to buy the farm in Adams township, 
on which he died in 1885. He was a man of 
standing and character, and married a Miss 
Shryock, of .Shanksville, Somerset county, by 
whom he had two children, a son and a daugh- 
ter : John M., and Mary, wife of Christian 
Shetler. John M. Harshberger was born on 
the Wissinger farm, August 13, 1835, and after 
receiving a good English education taught 
school for two terms. He then retired from 
teaching, and since then has devoted his time 
and attention to the improvement and cultiva- 
tion of the home farm on which he still resides. 
In politics he has supported the Republican 
party since 1861, but is not an active politician. 
He is a member and minister of the German 
Baptist church, and has been an active and in- 



fluential worker in religious affairs for many 
years. Though in no sense a public man, yet 
Mr. Harshberger is endowed with strong force 
of character, and this quality, associated with 
good judgment and a high sense of honor, has 
enabled him to exercise unsought a controlling 
influence in the community where he resides. 
On Christmas, 1858, Mr. Harshberger married 
Catherine Wertz, a daughter of Jacob Wertz, 
of Conemaugh township. To their union have 
been born eleven children: Cornelius, a mem- 
ber of the firm of J. M. Harshberger & Sons ; 
George M.; Mary Catherine, who died at six 
years of age; Malinda Jane, wife of Jacob G. 
Custer; Milton, died in infancy; Minnie E. 
wife of .Samuel W. Pearse, of Johnstown; Ira 
L., a farmer; Lizzie; Jacob W., a teacher; 
Edith May, and David, who died in infancy. 

© 

'piIOMAS A. SIl AKBAUGH, one of the 
j^oung and progressive business men of 
Carrdlltown, and the efficient cashier of the 
bank at that place, is a son of John and Mary 
(Doughert)) Sharbaugh, and was born at Sum- 
mit, Cambria count)', Pennsylvania, August 5, 
I S60. The .SharbauL;h f.imilv is of German 
descent, and locate their trans- Atlantic home 
in one of the present states of the great Ger- 
man Empire, whose educational progress and 
militar)- growth have been so wonderful since 
its establishment in 1 871. From this great 
land, which was not over-powerful fifty years 
ago, came Jacob Sharbaugh and his family, 
who landetl in the I'nited States in 1832. He 
soon removed to Carroll township, where he 
resided until his death. He was a blacksmith 
by trade, and in religious faith and church 
membership a Catholic, lie married in Ger- 
many and had a fimily of five children, tliree 
.sons and two daughters : Jacob, who married 
Mary Noel, and died December 24, 1875, aged 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



181 



sixty-one years ; Catherine wedded Michael 
Latterner, and is now deceased ; Peter, now 
engaged in farming in Carroll township; Eliza- 
beth, who married John Flick, and is now 
deceased, and Squire John, the father of 
Thomas A. John Sharbaugh was born in the 
Grand Duchy of Baden, Germany, December 
1 6, 1827, and at an early age was brought by 
his parents to Carrolltown, where he received 
his education in the common shools. Upon 
attaining his majorit)' he went to Ebcnsburg, 
and learned the trade of cabinet-maker, wliicli 
he followed for many years at Summit, where 
of late years he has reduced his business of 
furniture-dealer and undertaker to suit his de- 
clining years. While in active business he 
had a large and remunerative trade. He is a 
man of good judgment and business ability, 
and has been so highly esteemed for integrity 
and legal knowledge that he has been elected 
for ten successive terms as justice of the 
peace, and is now serving his fortieth year 
in that office. Squire Sharbaugh is a demo- 
crat in politics, and a zealous member of the 
Catholic church. He married Mary Dough- 
erty, whose father, James Dougherty, was a 
native of Ireland, and successively resided in 
Brooklyn and at Summit, where he ran a sta- 
tionary engine for the old Portage Railroad 
company. Squire and Mrs. Sharbaugh have 
seven children, four sons and three daughters: 
Dr. William, of Altoona, this State; A. J., an 
undertaker, of Clearfield county ; J. B., a book- 
keeper, of Peoria, Illinois; Thomas A.; Jen- 
nie, wife of Dr. Buck, of Altoona, this State, 
Annie and Aline, who are at home with their 
parents. 

Thomas A. Sharbaugh was reared at Sum- 
mit. The usual life of a business man's son 
was his, and such education as the public 
schools of the town and Houtzdale afforded 



he acquired. Having a natural aptitude, and 
a strong liking for financial pursuits, he ac- 
cepted in 1880 the position of assistant cashier 
of the Johnson, Shoemaker & Buck Banking 
company, of Ebensburg, now the Johnson, 
Buck & Company. Eight years later, when 
the company decided to open a branch bank 
at Carrolltown, he was selected as cashier on 
account of his valuable services at Ebensburg. 
This last position he has held ever since, and 
rendered satisfaction alike to the company and 
the public. 

In politics Mr. Sharbaugh is a strong demo- 
crat, who believes in the simplicity, strength 
and purity of Democracy as taught by Jeffer- 
son, and enforced by Jackson. He is a mem- 
ber of the Catholic church, and unmarried. 
While not aggressively active in politics, nor 
desirous of offices of emolument or honor, 
yet he takes an intelligent interest in educa- 
tional matters, and is now serving as president 
of the school board of Carrolltown. Mr. 
Sharbaugh is recognized as a good financier. 
He is an efficient cashier, whose good judg- 
ment and correct business methods have won 
for him an enviable reputation. 



^HE LUKE F.V]\IILY, of which Daniel 

-"■ W. and Dr. John C, of South Fork, 
are worthy scions, is of sturdy Scotch-Irish 
ancestry and origin. The grandfather of these 
representatives of the family was James Luke, 
who was born in County Antrim, Ireland. 
Here he wooed and wedded Miss Mary Mc- 
Clain, a Scotch lady, and near the close of the 
eighteenth "century, or shortly after the war 
for Independence, they sought a home in the 
newly-born republic across the Atlantic. 
They settled in the vicinity of the present 
town of Armagh, Indiana county, then a dense 
forest, broken at but rare intervals with the 



182 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



clearings of a sturdy pioneer. With charac- 
teristic industry and energy he set about tlie 
task of clearing out a farm and the founding 
of a home, upon which homestead he spent 
the remainder of his days. Coming to this 
country during the formativeperiod of our gov- 
ernment, the various theories of government 
and party principles were hotly discussed, and 
Thomas Jefferson was the political idol of a 
large following of worshipers, he became a 
staunch democrat, and adhered steadfastly to 
that party all his life. He was a devout Pres- 
byterian, and stood high in Masonic circles. 

His marriage with Mary McClain resulted 
in the birth of seven children, all of whom are 
deceased. They were James, who did honor- 
able service for his country in the War of 
1812, and afterward settled in Black Lick town- 
ship, this county, where he held honorable 
place among his neighbors, and served as a 
justice of the peace ; William, who emigrated 
to the state of Iowa and followed farming; 
Elizabeth, who married Jacob S. Ambough, 
who was also a soldier in the War of 1812; 
John, the father of the older members of the 
family; Daniel W. and Dr. John C, of South 
Fork; George, died young; David, died 
young; Catherine, and Alexander, who was a 
farmer near the old homestead of the family 
at Armagh, and with whom Catherine lived. 

John Luke (fatiier) was born in Indiana 
county, and attended tlie suijscription schools 
of the vicinity of Armagh which were noted 
as being in advance of those of other sec- 
tions of the country at this period. He was 
diligent and industrious in his studies, and 
secured an eijuivalcnt of a good common- 
school educati<in, and for a number of years 
followed teaching. 

After iiis marriage, or about 1.828, he, with 
his wife, with no other possessions than a 



strong arm, a stout heart and unyielding 
courage, removed into the virgin forests of 
Black Lick township, this county, and there 
founded a home and cleared to cultivation one 
of the finest farms in the township. Prior to 
i860 he was a democrat, but, upon the issues 
of that campaign, became a republican. His 
wife died in 1858, fourteen years prior to his 
death in 1872, and he made his home with his 
children at Riter's Furnace, Indiana county, 
Pennsylvania. In 187 1 he was afflicted with a 
stroke of paralysis, but through kind nursing 
and good medical attention, was supposed to 
have entirely regained his health in 1S72, when 
in August of that year he started afoot for 
Summerhill, to visit his son, Daniel W., who 
then lived at that place. On account of sick- 
ness, or some unknown cause, he lost his way 
and never reached his destination. As soon 
as it became known that he was missing, the 
alarm was given, and hundreds of people 
scoured the woods diligently searching for 
him; he was not found until twelve days had 
elapsed, when he was found quietly sleeping 
the sleep that knows no waking on a rude bed 
of leaves and moss he had hastily constructed 
by a log, only a short distance from his old 
home. 

His marriage with Charlotte George re- 
sulted in tile birtli of the following children: 
N. G., who, after attending Meadville Col- 
lege, joined Erie conference as a Methodist 
preacher; Mar_\', widow of the late Philip W. 
Pringle, of .Summerhill, this count)'; James, 
deceased; Elizabeth, deceased, was the wife of 
William C. P^llis, of Iowa ; Dr. John C, whose 
sketch follows; Charlotte, wife of Patrick 
Bremen, of McKean count)-, this State ; Daniel 
W., whose sketch follows; Catherine, wife of 
Hugh Robeits, Jacob, William, and David, 
deceased. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



183 



y^K. JOHN C. LUKE, a prominent and sus- 
cessful physician of South Fork, this 
county, is a son of John and Charlotte (George) 
Luke, and was born in Blackiick township, 
this county. 

For the family history refer to sketch under 
tlie head of " The Luke Family " above. 

Dr. Luke was brought up on the farm and 
received his preparatory education in the pub- 
lic schools and attending school during the 
summer at the Western Reserve seminary of 
Farming in Ohio and Leroy academy at Leroy, 
Ohio. By teaching during the winter months 
and attending school during the summer lie 
obtained a good preparatory education. lie 
entered the office of Dr. G. W. .Smith, of f lolli- 
daysburg, as a student of medicine, entered 
the medical department of the University of 
Michigan at Ann Harbor, in 1865, and spent 
one term ; then after teaching two years, en- 
tered the medical department of the Western 
Reserve university, at Cleveland, Ohio, from 
which school he graduated in 1871, taking a 
special course in operative surgery and holds 
a diploma for the same. After completing his 
professional preparations he located in Sum- 
merhill, this county, where he practiced nine 
years and then removed to South Fork, his 
residence ever since. 

Dr. Luke is progressive, keeps well abreast 
of the medical science of the age, and belongs 
to the Cambria County Medical society, of 
which organization he has been vice-president 
and was one of the committee appointed to 
revise the fee bill. 

In the Masonic Order, Dr. Luke stands 
high, being a 32° Scottish Rite Mason. 

Dr. Luke has not confined himself to his 
profession, but has taken an active part in the 
industrial development of his neigliborhood. 
He was one of the organizers of the Euclid 



Coal company in 1883, and was secretary, 
treasurer and superintendent of these mines 
until 1891, and is a one-third owner of a large 
tract of coal land in Adams township. 

Politically Dr. Luke is a republican, and 
was postmaster of South Fork under the ad- 
ministration of Benjamin Harrison from 1889 
to 1893; school director for twelve years; 
councilman of the borough of South Fork, 
and has served as chairman of the Republican 
County committee of Cambria county. 

November 8, i860, he married Annie, a 
daughter of Watson Thomson, of Indiana 
count\^ this .State, and to this union have been 
born five children as follows : Arab, who died 
in chiklhood; Charles E., in the employ of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad company; Annie 
and John T., deceased, and Roscoe M., at home. 



j^.-VXIEL W. LUKE, a coal operator, of 
.South Fork, this county, is a son of 
John and Charlotte (George) Luke, and was 
born, March 23, 1841, in Blackiick township, 
this county. 

He was educated in the common and select 
schools, and at the age of eighteen began 
teaching and followed it two years. When 
the clouds of war arose he left the school 
room and took up arms in defence of the flag 
and the honor of the country. He enlisted as 
a private, but was promoted to a first ser- 
geantcy. Among the most important battles 
and skirmishes in which he took part are the 
following: Great Falls, Jul)- 7, 1861 ; Falmouth, 
April 18, 1862; Mechanicsville,June 26; Chick- 
ahominy, June 27 ; Cold Harbor, on the same 
day; Culpej)per, July 12; Glendale, June 30; 
Nelson farm, Frazier farm and Turkey Bend, 
on the same date ; Gumtown or Gainesville, 
August 28-29, 1862; Bull Run, August 30; 
White Oak Swamp, June 30, 1862; Malvern 



184 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



Hill, July i; Williamsburg, July li, 1862; I 
Gettysburg, July i, 1863; Manassas and 
Chester Gaps, July 21-23, 1863; Rappahan- 
nock Station, Brandy Station and Kitty Ford, 
August I to 3, 1863; Bristoe Station, October 
14, 1863 ; Bcveily Ford and Bradley's Station, 
January 9, 1863; Warrenton Junction, May 3, 
1863 ; Rappahannock Station, September 4-19 
and October 10, 1S63; Mine Run, November 
26 and 28, 1863, and the Wilderness, May 5, 
1864. 

He was captured at the battle of the Wil- 
derness on May 5th, and taken to Anderson- 
ville prison, where he was lield four months 
and was then taken to Florence, South Caro- 
lina, where he was held three months longer 
before being exchanged. While in prison at 
the latter place, he with nine others under a 
guard of ten men were sent out to gather 
wood ; watching his opportunity, Mr. Luke 
made a break for freedom, the guard fired at 
him, bLit missed, and he made his way into a 
swamp. Here he carefully concealed himself 
until night when he tried to make good his 
escape. He had not proceeded far until he 
heard the tongueing of blood hounds; but 
upon their coming up to him he discovered 
they were not of the ferocious kind, and he 
easily quieted tliem, ami following their guide 
some distance came upon a corn field. The 
owner, not knowing of their presence, fired a 
gun, and the dogs fled. He then proccedeil 
and coming to a swollen stream, the Great 
Pedee river, improvised a raft of rails witli 
which lie tried to cross it, but in miil stream 
it parted, and he was forced to swim for the 
shore. Soon afterward, near Cheraw, Noith 
Carolina, about sixt)- miles from the prison, he 
was surprised and captured by four Confeder- 
ates, wlio returned him to prison. 

After retiring from the service lie again 



taught school a few years, and, in 1871, came 
to South Fork, where he began his career as a 
coal producer. 

He is at the present time superintendent of 
the Aurora Coal company, of which he was 
one of the organizers, a member of Mountain 
Coal company, a member and the manager ot 
the South Fork Supply company, an owner of a 
third interest in another tract of coal land con- 
sisting of seven hundred acres in Adams town- 
ship, president of the Roaring Springs Land 
and Mining company, of Joplin, Missouri. 
This company with a capital stock of $100,000 
was organized for the purpose of developing 
the lead and zinc mines of that section of 
Missouri. He is also a director of the South 
Fork Water company. Politically Mr. Luke 
is a democrat, and as he iias always been 
known to be a staunch friend of the cause of 
education he has been kept, with the excep- 
tion of one term, continuously on the board 
of school ilirectors of his district since the 
organization in 1871, and is at the present 
time (1896) secretary of the board. 

He has been postmaster at South Fork 
under both of Cleveland's administrations. 
In Masonic circles Mr. Luke stands deserv- 
edly high, being a member of Summit Lodge, 
No. 312, F. and A. M., Portage Chapter, 
R. A. M., Oriental Commandery, No. 61, 
Knights Templar. 

Air. Luke has been twice married; his first 
marital alliance was with Francis P., a daugh- 
ter of William Davis, of Clarion County, this 
State, and resulted in the birth of eiglit chil- 
dren : John Howard, a merchant of South 
l'"ork ; William Tell ; Maggie Oliva and Katie 
Lenora, deceased; Daniel Wallace, Mar}- Flor- 
ence, Josephine and Ralph Waldo, at home. 

June 26, 1894, he married as his second 
wife Catharine, a daughter of Joseph W. Wil- 




MAJ. JAMLS 11. tiACiEliV. 



OK CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



185 



son, of Blair county, and one child, Laban Lee, 
has blessed this nuion. 

Daniel \V. Luke was born to the inheritance 
of a noble character and a good name, which 
he has preserved through every trial and vicis- 
situde of life. He is one of the representa- 
tive business men of the State who have not 
only deserved success, but won it. 

As a soldier he shirked no duty, but fought 
well and gallantly the battles of his country, 
and well won a reputation for bravery and 
courage that will shine with increasing lustre 
until the final roll call. 

Mr. Luke, since the age of eighteen, has 
been a consistent and earnest member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and a worker 
in the cause of Christianity, and it is with 
happy satisfaction he realizes the fact that his 
family are following in his footsteps. This to 
him is more to be desired than honor or great 
gain. 

o 

IIITAJOK JAMES HARRISON GAGKBY, 

A deceased, was born within the corporate 

limits of the city of Johnstown, September 5, 
1835, and died in the same city, July 13, 
1896. Me was a son of Robert B. and Re- 
becca (.Scott) Gageby. 

Major Gageby was of Scotch-Irish stock, 
and his military genius came to him through 
a long line of honorable ancestry, easily trace- 
able to the Conqueror, William of Normandy. 
His grandfather, James Gageby, emigrated 
from the North of Ireland to the United States 
in 1774, and located in the city of Philadel- 
phia, and was present in Independence Hall 
when the Declaration of Independence was 
read. No doubt this document had the effect 
to convince him of the righteousness of the 
American cause, for he entered the patriot 
army and fought with them in the cause of 



liberty throughout the entire struggle. After 
the war was over and independence had been 
acknowledged, he removed to Westmoreland 
county, where he died in 1836, at the advanced 
age of eighty-six years. 

Robert Gageby (father) was born in West- 
moreland county and was reared in that 
county, and in 1834, during the building of 
the Pennsylvania canal and Portage railroad, 
he came to Johnstown and assisted in its con- 
struction. He lived the remainder of his days 
in Johnstown, dying in 1880, at the age of 
seventy-four years. Robert Gageby was a 
staunch republican, and alwa)-s took an active 
and intelligent part in all affairs pertaining to 
the party. He was a man possessing in an 
eminent degree many sterling qualities of 
head and heart. Major Gageby's mother was 
a native of Somerset county, of Scotch extrac- 
tion, and a descendant of the Scott and Stew- 
art families, so famed in the history of Scot- 
land. 

In his early days, Major Gageby worked 
with his father in the blacksmith shop of 
Gageby & Kinley. His elementary education 
was obtained in the common schools of Johns- 
town, to which, when about eighteen years of 
age, was added an academical course in Elder's 
Ridge academy, under the direction of Dr. 
Donaldson. In 1857, following a spirit of 
adventure, he went to Iowa, and there for three 
years engaged in various occupations. He 
returned home, and entered the military ser- 
vice, April 19, 1861, as a sergeant in company 
K, Third Pennsylvania volunteers, for the 
three months' service. The company was 
known as the " Joiinstown Zouaves," and as 
such was thoroughly drilled in infantry tactics. 
In this regiment he served in General Patter- 
son's column in Maryland and Virginia, and 
was engaged in the battle of Falling Water, 



18B 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CVCLOrEDIA 



Virginia, July 2, 1861, and was discharged ' 
July 30, 1861. He assisted to recruit a com- 
pany for the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania vol- 
unteers, with a view of becoming a commis- 1 
sioned ofificer in that regiment, but prior to 
the organization of it, enlisted October 25, 
1861, ill the Nineteenth regiment of United 
States infantry, and was appointed first sergeant, 
to date from enlistment. He was on duty in 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania, several weeks drill- 
ing a detachment of this regiment, ami at the 
headquarters of the regiment in Indianapolis, 
Indiana, was engaged as drill-sergeant, until 
the organization of companies G and H, of 
the first batter)' of this regiment, when he 
went into the field in the Army of the Poto- 
mac, as first sergeant of company G, and 
served with it at Harrison's lantling. His 
regiment acted as guard for Gcncr.il McClellan 
from there, and was in the campaign through 
Maryland, took part in the battles of Antietam, 
Soutii Mountain, and subsecpiently at the bat- 
tle of Fredericksburg, at which time it was 
attached to the Seventeenth infantry, aiul was 
actively engaged during all that battle. In 
March, 1863, company G was transferred to 
the army of the Cumberhuul, and joined to the 
first battalion, Nineteenth infantry. At Mur- 
freesboro, Tennessee. June I, 1 863, he was 
appointed a second lieutenant, and assigned to 
company A, Nineteenth iiifmtry; served with 
it until the battle of Hoover's Ga[), Tennessee, 
when he was placed in command of company 
G of the same regiment, led it in the charge 
of the regular brigade against a ilivision of the 
Confederate forces, and was brevetted first lieu- 
tenant for "gallant and meritorious service" in 
action upon this occasion. He was returned 
to compan)' A, I'irst battalion. Nineteenth in- 
fantry, just prior to the battle of Chickamauga, 
in which battle he was wounded on September 



20, 1863, and made a prisoner of war, and was 
taken to Libby prison, Richmond, Virginia. 
While there, the famous tunnel was being con- 
structed to provide for the escape of prisoners, 
and Captain E. L. Smith, Lieutenant M. C. 
Causten and Major Gageby were told by Colo- 
nel Rose, chief of the tunnel party, to consider 
themselves as belonging to his party, and 
while they were not permitted to work in the 
tunnel, on account of the prejudice of some of 
the volunteer officers, they were charged with 
preventing the discovery of tiic tLmnel while it 
was being constructed. 

M.ijor Gageby escaped through this tunnel 
P'ebruary 9, 1 864, but was re-captured Fcb- 
ru.uy 1 1 near Charles City X Roads, Virginia, 
and returned to the prison, and placed in the 
middle dungeon during eight days, when 
he was removed to Danville, Virginia, thence 
to Charlotte, North Carolina, Macon, Georgia, 
Charleston, South Carolina, where he was for 
several days under the fire of the Federal 
artillery; Columbia, South Carolina; thence 
again back to Charlotte, North Carolina, and 
later to Raleigh, Goldsboro, and Wilmington, 
where he was released on parole, March i , 
1865, after an imprisonment of seventeen 
months and ten days. He then returned to 
duty as first lieutenant of the Nineteenth in- 
fantry, on Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, in 
May, 1865. He was on dut)- with his regi- 
ment in Arkans.is and the Cherokee Nation in 
1865 and 1866. He was brevetted captain 
.Se|)tember 20, 1863. He was ordered on re- 
cruiting service in September, 1866, until 
Marcii, 1868; was appointed a captain in the 
Thirty-seventh infantry, and passed liis exam- 
ination for that office in Louisville, Kentucky, 
then joined the Thirty-sexcnth infantr)- .it Fort 
Stanton, New Mexico, in March, 1868, and was 
engaged in several unimportant scouts and e.K- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



187 



peditions against the Mescalero Apaches, and 
in October, i868, was ordered with his com- 
pany to join the Canadian River expedition 
under Col. A. W. Evans at Fort Bascom. 
This expedition was against the " Comanches," 
and they were out four months, a greater part 
of the time witliout tents, until they found the 
Comanche village on the Salt Fork of the Red 
river, Te.xas, December 25, 1868. Merc they 
were actively engaged with Indians from 10 
o'clock, A. M., until sundown of that day. 

In April and May, of 1869, he was with 
General J. R. Brooke, on his expedition against 
the Mescalero and the Sierra Diablo Apache 
Indians. His company had a brief engagement 
with them near the big Caiion of the Guada- 
loupe mountains. New Mexico. On August 
1 1, 1869, he was assigned to the Third infantry, 
and with his company (D) served on duty 
in 1870, guarding the Kansas Pacific railway 
in Colorado, where he had several slight skir- 
mishes with Arapahoe and Cheyenne Indians ; 
was removed to Fort Lyon, Colorado, and 
Camp Supply, Indian Territory, and in 1874 
was ordered on reconstruction duty in the 
South, and remained there until August, 1877. 
when he was ordered north during the railroad 
riots in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana. In 
September, 1877, he was ordered to Fort Mis- 
soula, Montana, where he served until again 
ordered on recruiting duty in 1878. He re- 
joined the Third infantry from recruiting ser- 
vice in May, 188 1; served with it until April. 
1883. In February, 1889, he came to Johns- 
town on leave of absence, and was there at the 
time of the great flood, in which he lost sev- 
eral members of his family and all his home 
property. He was placed on duty there by 
order of the Honorable Secretary of War, and 
performed duty with the Pennsylvania National 
Guard until September, 1889, when he was de- 



tailed on special recruiting duty for one year, 
and subsequently selected by Colonel Mason, 
of the Third infantry, for the regular detail, 
and was on that duty until promoted to major 
of the Twelfth infantry, July 4, 1892. He 
was then put in command of Fort Sully, South 
Dakota, where he remained two years, when 
he was transferred to Fort Niobrara, Nebraska, 
and at the time of his death stood within two 
files of a lieutenant-colonelcy, which it was his 
ambition to reach. 

In 1873 Major Gageby was happily married 
to Matilda, a daughter of Jacob Fend, of Johns- 
town, and to their union was born one child, 
Emma Fend, who was born at Fort Missoula. 
Montana, and is now being educated at Ogontz' 
near Philadelphia. 

The above military record, sketched some- 
what in detail, is one of which any man might 
justly feel proud. Courageous in action, firm in 
the discharge of duty, he was yet one of the 
most generous, affable, and companionable of 
men, and his friends in the army were, perhaps, 
more numerous than those of any other man 
of his rank. He had the faculty of remem- 
bering names and faces to a great degree, and 
was scarcely ever at fault in recognizing and 
calling by name any person he had ever met. 
Constantly forming new acquaintances, he 
never forgot his old friends, and grasped them 
to himself as " with hoops of steel," and 
although by reason of his occupation, sepa- 
rated for the greater portion of his life from the 
scenes of his childhood, it is doubtful whether 
there was at the time of his death a man in the 
community more universally known and more 
sincerely liked than Major Gageby. 



T ^EWIS I.,. EDWARDS, late of Cambria 
■^^ township, and the founderof the Edwards 
family in Cambria county, Pennsylvania, is of 



188 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CVCLOPEUIA 



Welsh birth and parentage, born in county 
Mereventh, North Wales, in March, 1816. 

lie learned sheep-lierding, and pursued that 
craft in his native country until 1842, when 
he emigrated to the United States. His bro- 
ther, Robert Edwards, having preceded him 
to this country, settled upon a farm in Cambria 
township, nine miles north of Ebensburg, 
where he became a prosperous and successful 
farmer. Mr. Edwards was employed as a day- 
hand by his brother Robert and others in the 
neighborhood until after his marriage in 1843, 
when he engaged in farming and lumbering 
in Cambria township. Carefully hu.sbanding 
the profits of his business, he purchased, in 
1850, a farm of one hundretl acres inBlack Lick 
township, upon which he resided the remainder 
of his life. .Subsequently he purchased one 
hundred mure acres, and soon afterwards pur- 
chased six hundred acres of timber land, own- 
ing, at the time of his demise, eight hundred 
acres of valuable land. 

Mr. Edwards' only stock- in trade when he 
landed in America was the ability and willing- 
ness to work ; but by careful and economical 
habits, good sound judgment and industry, he 
acquired an ample competence, ami the latter 
years of his life were spent in practical retire- 
ment, enjoying the comforts and case of a 
prosperous and successful business career. 
He passed aw.iy November 9, 1 8S8, univer- 
sally loved and lamented. 

He was a prominent ineniher of the Cdvin- 
istic Methodist church, and served that or- 
ganization as deacon for man)- )-ears. He 
was also a life member of the American Bible 
society. Politically, he was formerly a whig ; 
but upon the organization of the Republican 
party in 1856, he espoused its cause and piin- 
ciples, which he advocated the remainder i^il 
his life. He believed in the education of the 



masses, and served as a member of the school 
board of his township many years. 

He married Mrs. Ann Davis, nee James, in 
1843, and became the father of six children: 
Elias and John L., whose sketches will follow; 
Ebenezer ; Edward ; Thomas L., whose sketch 
will also follow ; and [Robert. Mrs. Lewis L. 
Edwards was born in Llanbeder, South Wales. 
She came to America in 1836, locating in 
Pittsburg. Her family was Quaker stock. 
.She was preceded to this country b\- two bro- 
thers, early in 1800; one settled at Chippewa 
Falls, in Canada, and Ebenezer located in 
Philadelphia, where he became a prosperous 
merchant and newspaper man. He was editor 
and proprietor of the Pliiladelpliia Tribune, a 
strong anti-slavery organ. 

This branch of the Edwards family did their 
patriotic dut)- in the late Civil War, four of 
the sons serving in that conflict. They were 
David H.,who served through the entire con- 
flict, was a sharpshooter in the Sixty-first 
regiment, Pennsj-lvania volunteers, antl was 
the best shot of his regiment ; William, of the 
I'^levcnth regiment, volunteers, lost his life 
in the service; Joshua served during the lat- 
ter i)art of the service ; and Elias, who entered 
the latter part of the service. 

Lewis L. Edwards, before coming to A mcrica, 
had charge of two thousand sheep on one of 
the highest mount, liiis df W.dcs, the .Vvan 
I''\\\tldn, and was noted for his fleetness of 
foot. i\n incident of his early experience in 
this country is given to show the pioneer con- 
dition of Cambria count)' even as late as 1853. 
He went into the woods to get a piece of tim- 
ber for a sled runner, and, while seeking for a 
suitable stick, lost his bearings and became 
lost ; he w.uulcred on antl on several miles 
before coming to a house, and did not get 
back to his home that night. The family be- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



189 



coming alarmed, aroused the neighborhood 
the next da}', and tliey started out in search 
of him, and found him with his friends of the 
previous night on his way home. So delighted 
were tlic}- to find him tliat they bore him on 
their shoulders to his own home and family. 



"PLIAS EDWARDS, a prosperous and 
well-to-do farmer of Black Lick township, 
Cambria county, this State, is a son of Lewis 
L. and Mrs. Anna Davis {nee James) Edwards, 
and was born in Cambria townsiiip, this 
county, October ii, 1844. 

He was reared upon a farm, and has fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits, together with 
lumbering, all his life. In 1870 he bought a 
farm, covering one hundred and fifty acres, 
and he has added to it by purchase, until he 
now owns five hundred acres, situated in 
Black Lick township, one hundred of which 
is cleared and under a good state of cultiva- 
tion ; the remainder is covered with first-class 
timber. 

Near the close of the late Civil War, on 
February 25, 1865, Mr. Edwards enlisted in 
the Federal army at Harrisburg, Pennsylva- 
nia, in company H, One Hundred and Ninety- 
second regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer in- 
fantry, and served until August 25, 1865, 
when he was honorably discharged at Har- 
per's Ferry, Virginia. 

He is a member of John RL Jones Post, 
No. 556, G. A. R., at Ebensburg, and is a re- 
publican in politics. His marriage with Eliza 
J. Davis, a daughter of the late Thomas Davis, 
of Black Lick township, was celebrated October 
19, 1870. To this marriage seven children 
have been born : Elizabeth and Rowland are 
both deceased ; Clark, Ebenezer, Thomas, 
Stanley and May are at home with their 
parents. 



TOHX L. EDWARDS, ex-postmaster of 
Belsano, Cambria county, and a leading 
business man of near that place, is a son of 
Lewis L. and Mrs. Anna Davis (//^t' James) Ed- 
wards, and was born in Cambria township, 
this county, September 18, 1846. 

He was reared upon a farm and educated in 
the public schools. In 1868, he located upon 
a farm near Nicktovvn, this county, and culti- 
vated that farm three and one-half years. 
Subsequent to this he followed blacksmith- 
ing eight years at Belsano, and then located 
upon a farm near Belsano in Black Lick town- 
ship, and has resided there since, engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, lumbering, etc. He is 
an extensive land-owner, owning in all four 
hundred acres of improved land and six hun- 
dred acres of timber land, all underlaid with 
coal and minerals. He also owns seven acres 
in the village of Belsano, which is well im- 
proved, having a good house and other build- 
ings upon it. He is a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, of which he has been 
steward and trustee eighteen years. Politi- 
cally he is a republican, and served as post- 
master of Belsano, from 1871 to 1879. He 
has also been assessor and auditor of his town- 
ship. 

Fraternally, he is a member of Summit 
Lodge, No. 512, F. and A. M.; Belsano 
Council, No. 1 82, Jr. O. U. A. M., which 
latter lodge he served as treasurer in 1894- 
'95-'96. 

March 26, 1866, he married Eliza J., a 
daughter of Edward Thomas, by whom he 
has seven children : Walter, on the old home- 
stead ; William, in California ; Minnie B., the 
wife of Frank Amond, of Vintondale; Mor- 
ton, a teacher in the public schools of Black 
Lick township; Vinton, Oscar and Bertha at 
home. 



190 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



rpnOMAS L,. EDWARDS, farmer, stock- 
raiser and dealer, of Blacklick township, 
this county, is a son of Lewis L. and Mrs. 
Ann Davis {jice James) Edwards, and was born 
in the northeastern part of Blacklick township. 
May 7, 1852. 

Mr. Edwards was brought up on a farm, 
and has always followed farming and lumber- 
ing. In 1887 he purchased the old home 
farm of two hundred acres of fertile and well- 
improved land, upon whicli he resides. This 
farm is well adapted to grazing, and he makes a 
specialty of stock-raising. He also deals ex- 
tensively in stock, shipping sheep to Philadel- 
phia and other eastern markets. He is a 
republican in politics, and has served as a 
member of the school board six years. Re- 
ligiously, he is a member of the Calvinistic 
Methodist church, and has served as deacon, 
trustee and treasurer of the church. 

On January 25, 1877, Mr. Edwards and 
Miss Jane E. Williams, a daughter of Row- 
land E. Williams, of Pine township, Indiana 
county, Ponns}'lvania, were married, and to 
thcni have been born si.x children : Milton, 
died January 1 1, 1 88 1, aged three years; Row- 
land, Benton, Lawrence, .Samuel and Martha 
Pearl. 



-j^ICIT.MJD J. VOTIIIOUS, a descendant 
T of one of those sturdy German families 
to which the early history of Cambria county 
owes so much, was born in Karthous township, 
Clearfield county, Penn.sylvania, August 12, 
1858, and is a son of Henry and Maria (Col- 
burn) Yothers. 

The founder of tlic famii\- in this country 
was Daniel Yothers, who emigrated to America 
over one hundred years ago, and located in 
Eastern Pennsylvania, perhaps in Bucks or 
Berks county. This licing an agricultural 



communit)- it is likely that he followed farm- 
ing as an avocation. He was the father of 
seven sons, five of whom died young. Joseph 
was the grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch. John, the remaining son, removed to 
near Milesburg, where he died. 

Joseph Yothers removed to Karthaus town- 
ship, Clearfield county, at about the time that 
Peter Carthous, for whom the township was 
named, settled there. He was a miller by trade, 
and ran a mill for Mr. Carthous for a number 
of years, but finally purchased a farm and lived 
upon it the remainder of his life. He married 
Elizabeth Reiter, a lady also of German de- 
scent. To their marriage were born ten chil- 
dren: Maria, deceased, was the wife of James 
Curl}-; John, of Clearfield county; Sophia, 
who married George Heckendorn ; Daniel, 
deceased ; Henry, father ; Adaline, deceased, 
was the wife of Joseph Gilliland, of Potterdale, 
tin's State ; Reuben, who lives some place in 
the west ; Joseph, of Clearfield county ; Chris- 
tian, deceased, and Mary, deceased, was the 
wife of William Heichel. 

Henry Yothers, father, was born in Kar- 
thous township, Clearfield county. May 5, 
1830. He was reared upon the paternal acres, 
and in iSGgleft the farm to engage in the lum- 
ber business as a contractor until 1S71. Upon 
the latter date he located at Central Point, in 
Covington township, same county, and for two 
years was engaged in merchandizing. I le then 
sohl out his mercantile interests, and for three 

I years more followed the fortunes of a lumber- 
man. At the end of that time he returned to 
his farm, and has since devoted his attention 
to his farming and lumbering interests. 

j He is a firm believer in the religious tenets 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and takes 
an active part in all affairs connected with the 
church organization at his place. Politically 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



191 



he upholds the standard of the party of Lin- 
coln and Grant, and has filled all the offices of 
his township. 

He married Miss H. Maria Colburn, a daugh- 
ter of Richard Colburn, a native of Wales, but 
a resident, since 1816, of Karthous township, 
Clearfield county. To this marriage relation 
have been born three sons and two daughters: 
Daniel W., who died in early boyhood ; Rich- 
ard J.; Elizabeth J., who married William 
Zimmerman, of Milesburg, Pennsylvania; 
Walter S., who is secretary and a member of 
the firm of the Crescent Wagon company, of 
Driftwood, this State, and W. May, who is at 
home. 

Richard J. Yothers received a good training 
for a business career in the public schools of 
his county, and at the Millersville State Normal 
school. He remained upon the farm with his 
father until 1882, when he became clerk, book- 
keeper, and store-manager for the Raker Min- 
ing company, operating in Logan township, 
Blair county, Pennsylvania. He remained there 
in that position until April, 1888, when he re- 
moved to Coalport, Clearfield county, where 
he founded a mining-tool manufactory, and 
operated it for a short time when he came to 
Hastings and engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness. In 1889 he became the agent for the 
Adams Express company at that place. 

Mr. Yothers has been prominently identified 
with the political, commercial, and industrial 
history of Hastings since its organization as a 
borough in 1889. He was elected its first 
burgess, was a member of the school board, 
borough treasurer in 1895, and in 1894 was a 
candidate before the Republican convention 
for the office of assembly, and secured a very 
creditable following, and made a good impres- 
sion upon those with whom he came in con- 
tact. He takes an active interest in everything 



tending to promote the growth and prosperity 
of the borough witii which he has been so 
closely identified. In this connection he has 
been treasurer of the building and loan asso- 
ciation for five years, an organization that has 
done much to assist many of the poor of his 
borough to secure homes. 

In the fraternal world he stands deservedly 
high, and is a highly-respected member of 
Coalport Lodge, No. 574, F. and A. M.; Ve- 
randa Lodge, No. 532, 1. O. O. P., of Altoona; 
Hope and Charity Castle, No. 400, K. of G. E., 
of Hastings, of which castle he is Past Chief; 
Washington Camp, No. 401, P. O. S. of A., of 
Hastings, of which he has been Past President, 
Past District President, and is now treasurer 
and trustee. 

In addition to the above positions of honor 
and trust, civil and religious, he is secretary of 
the Hastings Opera House company, agent 
for the International Navigation company, 
and the Denlinger Bros. Oil coinpanj'. 

June 21, 1883, he married Carrie E., daugh- 
ter of Jacob Kertlein, a soldier, who lost his 
life through service in the late Civil War, and 
to this marriage have been born four children : 
Eva Pearl, and three others that died in in- 
fancy. 

Richard J. Yothers belongs to one of that 
class of men to be found in every community 
whose advice and counsel are sought in every 
move where the general welfare of the people 
is at stake. Intelligent, active, and enter- 
prising, he is a useful citizen in the town of 

his adoption. 

^> 

JOHN CONRAD, a merchant of Lilly, this 

^ county, is a son of James and Susan 

(Coons) Conrad, and was born in Allegheny 

township, Cambria county, July 16, 1836. 

His early ancestors came from Germany 



192 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



and located in Adams county, Pennsylvania, 
about the latter part of the eighteenth cen- 
tury. Here James Conrad, father of our sub- 
ject, was born March ii, 1811. His educa- 
tion was limited to the subscription schools of 
his youth, but he profited by the broader and 
deeper education gained in the schools of ex- 
perience. When but a boy he was employed 
in a grist mill, where he learned thoroughly 
the milling business which he afterward fol- 
lowed all his life. About 1830 he removed to 
Cambria county, locating near Loretto, where 
he resided until 1S49, when he removed to 
what was fornierly called Hemlock, now known 
as Lilly. He located on a farm containing 
sixty acres, which he cultivated in addition to 
which he conducted a saw-mill and a grist 
mill, and the success he attained is evidence 
of his activity and business enterprise. 

In religious faith he was a devout member 
of the Roman Catholic church. Politically 
he endorsed the principles of the Republican 
party and took an intelligent interest in local 
affairs and at various times filled the township 
offices. 

In 1834 he married Miss Susan Coons, and 
to them were born eleven children ; six are now 
living, five boys and one girl. 

He led a very industrious and useful life, 
and was actively engaged in business at the 
time of his death, which occurred May 8, 
1879. His wife who survived him died Janu- 
ary 22, 1895. 

John Conrad's early education was very 
limited, being obtained in the formation days 
of our present public-school system when the 
facilities were extremely limited. lUit he has 
been a close observer and a careful reader, 
and by contact with business men and busi- 
ness methods has acquired a practical business 
education. At an early age he assisted his 



father on the farm and in the mill ; he remained 
with him until he attained to his majority. In 
1859 h^ went to Chest Springs, this county, 
where he was employed in a saw-mill until 
the death of his father in 1879. He then 
removed to Lilly, where he opened a general 
store, which he conducts at the present time. 

He is a prominent member of the Roman 
Catholic church, and takes an active interest 
in all matters pertaining to it. Politically he 
is identified with the Republican party, and 
has served as burgess of Chest Springs, besides 
having held several minor offices. Since re- 
moving to Lilly he has served several terms 
as councilman and in other offices, and takes 
active part in all local affairs. 

In 1S62 he married Miss Annie McDermott, 
of Chest Spring.s, this county, and their mar- 
riage has resulted in the birth of the following 
children : Charles, who is in the employ of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad company at Altoona ; 
Mary and Carrie, at home. 



TAMKS L,. NICHOLSON, superintendent 
of the Sterling coal mines at Hastings, 
and a man of valuable mining experience in 
both the old and the new world, is a son of 
James and Jane (Stevins) Nicholson, and was 
born in Westphalia, Prussia, now a part of the 
German Emjiire, January 31, 1863. Of Eng- 
lish parentage and Prussian German birth, he 
received his education in English schools, and 
at the age of only eleven years was employed 
as a trapper boy in one of the great coal mines 
of England ; two )-ears later he came with his 
parents to the United States, and, after work- 
ing in various coal mines, he learned the trade 
of brickla\-er, which he abandoned in 18S9 to 
become foreman of Sanford & Duncan's coal 
mines at Phillipsburg, this State, which posi- 
tion he helil until 1S9J, when the companj', in 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



193 



recognition of his efficient services, sent him 
to Houtzdale, Clearfield county, as superin- 
intendent of their mines at that place. In his 
new field he showed himself complete master 
of his work, and at the end of two years' ser- 
vice, in February, 1S94, the company selected 
him as superintendent of their collieries, No. 
8 and No. 9, of the Sterling mines at Hastings. 
Accepting his new position he came to Has- 
tings, and has been in charge ever since of , 
these two coUieries, in which four hundred 
men are now employed. Thoroughly conver- 
sant with his line of work, and confining his 
labors to the general routine of the mines, he 
has engaged in no new departures in the science 
of mining, yet he has kept up with all late in- 
ventions and mechanical devices for lightening 
mine labor, protecting the life of the miner, 
and securing a large output at the least possi- 
ble cost. Mr. Nicholson is rather neutral in 
politics, and is a Mason, being a member of 
Summit Lodge, No. 312, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Ebensburg. 

On March 13, 18S6, Mr. Nicholson wedded 
Nancy Ashcroft, a half-sister to John Ashcroft, 
of Patton, and a daughter of Thomas Ashcroft, 
of Phillipsburg, Centre county. They have 
four children : Thomas Ashcroft, James Her- 
bert, Leslie Raymond and William Frederick. 
The Nicholson family is of honorable Eng- 
lish ancestry, and for a century or more has 
had its old-world home in Northumberland 
county, in the historic north of England, where 
James Nicholson, Sr., the grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch was born and reared. 
James Niciiolson, Sr., was an expert in coal 
mining, and made a specialty of sinking shafts. 
His services in sinking shafts were employed 
by William Coulson, Durham, England, who 
sent him, in i860, to Prussia, where he sank 
four shafts for them. He did most of his work 
13 



on contract, and was a mine official during the 
greater part of his life, and died in 1893, aged 
eighty years. 

He was twice married, and by his first wife 
had three children : James, father of James L. 
Nicholson ; Edward, postmaster at Gerhards- 
ville, Clearfield county ; and Bessie, wife of 
Henry Selway, of England. James Nicholson 
was born January 2, 1836, and served for seve- 
ral years as deputy foreman of the Monwear- 
mouth shaft, one of the deepest coal shafts in 
England. He assisted his father in sinking 
shafts in Prussia, and in 1876 came to Morris 
Run, Tioga county, where he was engaged in 
mining up to 1879. ^^ then went to Phillips- 
burg, Centre county, where, after seven years 
spent in mining, he retired. He is a democrat 
and an Episcopalian, and has served as school 
director and as overseer of the poor. A man 
of good judgment and general information, his 
counsel and advice is often sought by his 
neighbors. 

He married Jane Stevins, of his native 
county, and of their nine sons and four daugh- 
ters, seven sons and one daughter grew to 
years of maturity: Mary Ann, widow of Absa- 
lom Butcher; James L.; Edward, assistant 
mine foreman at Hastings; William, Jonathan, 
John George, Absalom and Frank. 



■i^HILIP H. JONES, a prosperous and in- 
fluential farmer and lumber dealer of 
Blacklick township, this count}', is a son of 
Edward and Sarah (Price) Jones, and was 
born in Blacklick township, July 28, 1841. 
His father, Edward Jones, was born near New- 
town, Montgomeryshire, Wales, where he was 
reared and educated. He emigrated to Ame- 
rica about 1829, locating first in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. About 183 1 he removed to 
Cambria county and purchased land. in Black- 



194 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



lick township, where he cleared a farm and 
followed the avocation of a farmer the remain- 
der of his life. Before leaving Wales, he 
married Miss Sarah Price, and their union was 
blessed in the birth of nine children, of whom 
Philip H., the subject of this memoir, is the 
youngest. Mr. Jones, Sr., died on his farm 
in 1S77. Philip H. Jones was reared on the 
farm, and received his education in the com- 
mon schools of his township. Being reared 
on a farm, he naturally took to farming as a 
means of securing a livelihood. He is a pro- 
gressive and extensive farmer, owning a farm 
of three hundred acres in Blacklick township, 
of which one hundred acres are cleared, the 
remainder in timber, and a farm of one hun- 
dred and forty-three acres in Jackson town- 
ship. He has for a number of }-ears been 
extensively engaged in the lumber business, 
in connection with which he has a water-mill 
on his farm, and owns one-half interest in a 
steam sawand shingle mill in Blacklick town- 
ship. In this line of business he has shown 
rare good judgment and business tact, and has 
pursued it with more than an ordinary degree 
of success. 

June 12, 1861, he gave up the life of a farmer 
for that of a soldier, and enlisted in the defense 
of the imperilled liberties of his country. He 
entered company A, l'",lcvcntli regiment, i'enii- 
sylvania Reserve infantry, and served three 
years. The following is a list of battles in 
which he participated: battle of Cold Harbor; 
then he was taken prisoner at Gaines' Mills, 
and sent to Richmond and Belle Isle, where 
he remained from June 28, 1862, until August 
8, 1 862. His next engagement was the second 
battle of Bull Run ; then followed Gettysburg, 
White Hall Church, Mine Run, battle of the 
Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, Foun- 
tain Faun and Bethesda Church. Although 



wounded slightly several times, he was never 
off duty on account of his injuries. He re- 
ceived his discharge at Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, June 12, 1864. He is a member of the 
Emory Fisher Post, No. 30, at Johnstown, 
this county, and of Council No. 182, Jr. 
O. U. A. M., and is an influential member of the 
Farmers' Grange of this county. In political 
opinion he is a republican, and has served for 
six terms as school director in his township. 
He served seven years in company A, Fifth 
regiment, National Guards of Pennsylvania. 

July 3, 1 87 1, he married Miss Diana Shoe- 
man, a daughter of John Shoeman, of Jackson 
township, and to this union six children have 
been born: Jennie and Harry, who were 
burned to death at the time of the burning of 
their home, February 23, 1875; Minnie M., 
the wife of Samuel Marks; Rachel, Lucy, and 
Clara May, all at home. 



jo LAI K SHOUT, the proprietor of the 
Washington hotel at Lill)', this coimty, 
is a son of John and Mary (Murphy) Short, 
and was born on the old homestead near 
Lilly, January 14, 1861. The .Short family is 
of (jennan origin, the paternal great-great- 
grandfather having been born in Germany. 
The great-grandfather, Peter Short, was born 
in I\Iar)'land, antl was a soldier under Wash- 
ington in the Revolutionary War. 

Samuel Short, grandfather, a native of Mary- 
land, was a carpenter by trade, and followed 
that avocation all his life. He died in 1873, 
at the age of seventy-si.x years. John W. 
.Sjiorl, father of the gentleman whose name 
heads this memoir, was born in Cambria 
county, Pennsylvania, neai' his inesent home 
at Lill)-, in 1828. He was educated in the 
district schools, and early in life learned the 
trade of a carpenter. However, for a number 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



195 



of years he worked on the old Portage road, 
and afterward, from 1864 to 1877, became 
identified witii railroading; during a part of 
that period he was an engineer on the Penn- 
sylvania railroad. From the latter year until 
1894 he followed his trade as a carpenter, 
when, on account of failing health, he was 
compelled to retire from active duties, and has 
since lived in comparative quiet at his home 
in Lilly. 

During the War of the Rebellion he served 
his country as second lieutenant in company 
G, Tenth regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer 
infantry. 

In politics he is a loyal democrat, and takes 
a very active interest in all local affairs, and in 
religious belief he is a devout member of the 
Roman Catholic church. 

His marriage with Miss Mary Murphy has 
resulted in the birth of eleven children, of 
whom all are living but two. 

Blair Short was born January 14, i86i,near 
the old homestead at Lilly, and received his 
education in the public schools of his district. 
Beginning life on his own account, he worked 
on the Pennsylvania railroad for a year, and 
then accepted a position as clerk in a general 
store at Lilly, where he remained for four 
years. During the next three years he was 
employed in the mines of W. H. Piper & Com- 
pany. In 1890 he opened his present hotel at 
Lilly — the Washington House, which is the 
oldest licensed house in the town. 

He takes an active part in political affairs, 
and is prominently identified with the Demo- 
cratic party. Served as a delegate to the State 
convention in 1894 and 1895 ; was one of the 
auditors who settled the differences between 
the borough of Lilly and Washington town- 
ship, when the borough was first incorporated ; 
has served as borough assessor, and also as 



school director of Lilly. He is a member of 
the Roman Catholic church. 

In 1886 he celebrated his marriage with 
Miss Elizabeth Robine, a daughter of Chris- 
topher Robine, of Lilly. Their union has 
been blessed in the birth of five children : 
Pearl, Millard, Gertrude, Myra (who died 
when a year old), and Ira. 



jOERNARD O' HAG AX, secretary and 
"^^ bookkeeper of the Cresson and Clear- 
field Coal and Coke company, is a son of 
Charles and Su.san (Murray) O'Hagan, and 
was born at Plain No. 5, on the old Portage 
railroad near the summit, Cambria county, 
August 30, 1848. Charles O'Hagan, father, 
was born in County Derry, Ireland, in May, 
1808. He was reared on the home farm and 
emigrated to America in 1841. He located 
first in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, but re- 
mained there but a short time. He then re- 
moved to Cambria county and located at Plain 
No. 5, near the summit, and was employed for 
a number of years on the old Portage railroad. 
In 1856 he removed to Gallitzin,and died Sep- 
tember 15, 1892, at Frugality, Pennsylvania. 
Shortly after coming to America he married 
Susan Murray, of Philadelphia, formerly of 
county Derry, Ireland, and this marital union 
resulted in the birth of five children, four 
daughters and one son : Margaret, the widow 
of John Waters, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania ; 
.Susan Alice, a sister in the Benedictine Order, 
now of Allegheny city, Pennsylvania; Bernard; 
Catharine Ann, a sister in Mercy convent, 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and Sarah Jane, ot 
Allegheny city. 

Bernard O'Hagan spent his boyhood days 
in Gallitzin, Pennsylvania, attending the public 
schools in the winter and working during the 
summer with his father in the mines. He was 



196 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



ambitious, energetic and willing, and soon 
worked his way up to the more responsible 
position of weighmaster of the mines, then 
clerk in the office. He embraced every oppor- 
tunity which was presented for self-improve- 
ment, and in 1875 accepted a position as book- 
keeper for the Sandylick Gas, Coal and Coke 
company at Du Bois, Pennsylvania. He re- 
signed this position to become the superin- 
tendent of the same mines at Uu Bois, where 
he remained until 1882, when he removed to 
Gallitzin and accepted the position of book- 
keeper with Taylor & McCoy. He remained 
with them for eight years. In 1890 he came 
to Frugality as secretary and bookkeeper of 
the Cresson and Clearfield Coal and Coke 
company, which responsible position he holds 
at the present time. He is a member of the 
Roman Catholic church, and in politics is 
identified with the Democratic party. 

June 27, 1876, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Rebecca Braniff, a daughter of Pat- 
rick Braniff, of Altoona, Pennsylvania, and 
their marriage has resulted in the birth of 
eleven children : Charles Faber, John lidgar, 
Mary Clare, Walter Lawrence, Mary Lorine, 
Mary Hortense, Thomas Ralph, deceased ; 
Mary Agnes, deceased; Marie Autlra, licrnard 
ICngcne, and La Mar, deceased. 



/^II.VUI.KS K. FKAZKK, the efficient Ciiicf 
^^ of Police of the city of Johnstown, is a 
son of William and liridget (Kelly) Frazer,and 
was born in Johnstown, November 2, 1865. 
His father died when he was young and he 
was reared under the care of an uncle, Chas. 
Kelly, who gave him a fair educational train- 
ing through an attendance in the St. John's 
Parochial High school, of Johnstown, nearly 
completing the course of that institution. 
Leaving school, lie entered a drug store as a 



clerk, intending to learn the profession of a 
pharmacist, but was compelled to give up that 
idea on account of failing health. He then 
entered the spring department of the Gautier 
works of the Cambria Iron company, where 
he remained six years. He spent about six 
years more in the rolling mills and hammer 
shop of this company, and then, in 1893, took 
a position as a laborer in the works of the 
Johnson company, where his fidelity to every 
trust reposed in him was rewarded from time 
to time by promotions until he was given a 
responsible post in the order office of that 
company, where he remained until 1896. In 
April of the latter year he was elected by 
city councils to the office he now holds. 

The organization of the city by bringing into 
it a number of boroughs, formerly adjacent, has 
contributed to make the duties devolving upon 
the chief and his assistants very onerous by 
reason of the great amount of territory lying 
within the district and the necessity of keep- 
ing the force at the minimum in numbers. 

Mr. P^razer, with his able assistants, which 
consist of a lieutenant, a warden and eighteen 
patrolmen, has by the exercise of great vigil- 
ance succeeded in giving the city a very effi- 
cient police service and shown himself in every 
way to be the right man in the right position. 

He married Miss Lucy McCo)-, a daughter 
of Augustine McCo)-, who was a foreman in 
the service of the Penns)'lvania Railroad 
Dompany. To this marriage have been born 
the following children: Inez De Leilis, born 
April 27, 1890; Grace Columbia, born Octo- 
ber 21, 1891 ; Charles Anthony, boin October 
IS, 1895. 



^ !>IA.SON IMCIIAKDS, 1), 1). S., one of 

• the leading dent.d doctors of Cambria 
county, located at Kbensburg, the county's 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



197 



capital, and a young man who, from the 
energy and ability already displayed, is des- 
tined to figure prominently among the leaders 
of his profession in the State, is a son of 
Thomas E. and Sarah (Hughes) Richards, 
and was born in Watertown, Ohio, February 
1 6, i860. 

Dr. Richards' grandfather, William Rich- 
ards, was a native of Wales, and emigrated to 
America a few years subsequent to the Revo- 
tionary War, locating first at Reading, Penn- 
sylvania. He afterwards migrated to Pitts- 
burg, this State; thence to Steubcnville, Ohio, 
where he died in 1892, at the remarkably old 
age of one hundred and one years. He was 
an iron worker, skilled and proficient in his 
craft. The last forty years of his life, how- 
ever, were spent in practical retirement, having 
acquired, by careful and economic business 
methods, an ample competency. He married 
Miss Evans, by whom he had seven children, 
four sons and three daughters. 

Thomas E. Richards, the fither of Dr. 
Richards, was also a native of Wales, born in 
the year 1831, and died at Zanesville, Ohio, 
in the year 1895. He obtained a good Eng- 
lish education in the common schools of his 
day, and further prepared himself for a busi- 
ness life by taking a course in Duff's Business 
College of Pittsburg. 

Finishing his education, he embarked in 
general merchandizing at Watertown, Ohio, 
in 1853. In 1863 he removed to Beverly, the 
same state, and in partnership with his brother, 
D. J. Richards, ex-postmaster of Zanesville, 
under the firm style of Richards Bros., en- 1 
gaged in the pork-packing business, and in 
speculating in wool ; this occupied his time 
and attention until 1873, when he sold out 
and removed to Zanesville, Ohio, and en- 
gaged in the wholesale mercantile business. 



under the firm name of T. E. Richards & Son. 
In 1890 he disposed of his business, and re- 
tired from the tumult and turmoil of a long 
and active business career, universally admired 
and respected. 

He was regarded as a safe and conservative 
business man, and, at the time of his demise, 
was secretary and treasurer of the Zanesville 
Barley company; president of the Trust, Safe 
and Deposit company of Zanesville ; president 
of the Gohien Manufacturing company — a 
company engaged extensively in the manu- 
facture of mixed paints. He was a republican 
in politics, loyal and active, and in 1890-91 
served as mayor of Zanesville. 

He married Sarah, a daughter of Richard 
Hughes, and they were the parents of four 
children : Addison W., a wholesale paper- 
dealer, etc., of Zanesville ; Mary, deceased, 
was the wife of Professor L. A. Austin, pro- 
fessor of Greek and Latin in Rollins College, 
in Florida; Ella R., the wife of Colonel D. S. 
Hurlbut, a traveling salesman of Zanesville, 
formerly of Mississippi ; and Dr. T. Mason, 
the subject of this sketch. 

Dr. Richards and Miss Anna, a daughter 
of the late Thomas Lloyd, of Ebensburg, were 
happily married, and to them have been born 
two children : Margaret and Rowena. 

Mrs. Richards is a grand-daughter of Eze- 
kiel Hughes, who was one of the pioneers of 
near Ebensburg, and who was a leading and 
prominent citizen of that vicinity. Her father, 
Thomas Lloyd, deceased, was a pioneer lum- 
ber merchant and extensive land-owner of 
Ebensburg. 

Dr. Richards was educated in the public 
schools of Zanesville, and afterwards studied 
dentistry under the preceptorship of C. H. 
Scott, D. D. S., of Zanesville. Subsequently 
he entered the Pennsylvania Dental College, 



198 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



of Philadelphia, from which he was graduated 
in 1883. Tlie succeeding two years he prac- 
ticed his profession in Pittsburg, and in 1885 
located at Ebensburg — his present place of 
residence and field of practice. Politically he 
is a republican, and has served as burgess of 
the borough of Ebensburg. He is a member 
of St. John's Lodge, No. 219, F. and A. M., 
at Pittsburg, of which Lodge he is a past 
master. 



-^ANIEI^ A. MoGOUGH, ex-register and 
recorder, and a descendant of two very 
old and highly respectable families of the 
county, is a son of Thomas and Isabella 
(Plummer) McGough, and was born in Croyle 
township, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, May 
13, 1856. Mis paternal great-grandfather, 
James McGough, was a native of Ireland, and 
came to this country with his brother, Patrick, 
who fought under Washington, and fell at the 
battle of Princeton. James McGough first ' 
settled near Baltimore, in Harford count)', 
Maryland, where he married Esther James, of 
Welsh descent, and in 1806 came to what is 1 
now Croyle township, in which he died six 
years later. He was a farmer, school-teacher 
and a civil engineer, and ranked as one of the 
pioneer settlers of Croyle township, in which 
he owned a large tract of valuable land. 

Of his sons, Thomas, Sr., was born in Har- 
ford county, Maryland, and died in 1870, at 
eighty-five years of age. He was a man of 
better education than was usually enjoyed by 
the men wiio lived in that time, and belonged ! 
to that old school of school-masters character- j 
istic of the day, and to whom the early edu- 
cational progress of this country owes so much. 
Thomas McGough, Sr., like his father, was a 
farmer and teacher. He was a Catholic, served 
for twcnt)--five )-ears as a justice of the peace. 



and wedded Mary Skelly, by whom he had 
ten children, six sons and four daughters. 
Next to the youngest of these children was 
Thomas McGough, the father of the subject 
of this sketch. 

Thomas McGough was born October 27, 
1827, and resided on a farm in his native 
township until his death, which occurred May 
14, 1870. He was a farmer and cooper by 
occupation and trade, a democrat in politics 
and a Catholic in religion. He married Isa- 
bella Plummer, of Summerhill township, in 
1855, and to their union were born three sons : 
Daniel A., Charles and George, who are both 
in the employ of the Penns_\lvania Railroad 
company, at Conemaugh. 

Mrs. McGough, who is still living, is a 
daughter of John and Mary (Fye) Plummer, 
belongs to the Plummer family of western 
Pennsylvania, so well known for its many 
good qualities. 

Daniel A. McGough grew to manhood on 
the paternal acres, received his education in 
the common schools, and then was engaged 
in farming and teaching school until 1885, in 
which )'ear he was appointed as clerk to the 
board of count)- commissioners. In that po- 
sition Mr. McGough served continuously for 
seven years, and his services had so recom- 
mended him that he was nominated and 
elected, by the Democratic party, as register 
and recorder of Cambria county, for a term of 
three years. His services in his elective 
offices were as valuable and as acceptable as 
had been his labors in his appointed position, 
and at the expiration of his term in 1S95 he 
retired with credit to himself. A democrat 
in political associations, he has never accepted 
office but once at the hands of his party, 
although sufficiently popular to have been so 
honored frequently. The burdens and re- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



199 



sponsibility of public care have no special 
charms for him, yet he is not averse to the 
labors and duties of public life. E.xact, care- 
ful and accurate, he is well fitted for private 
and public business. 

On June 14, 1888, Daniel A. WcGough was 
united in marriage with Harriet Eberly, a 
daughter of Francis Eberly, of Munster town- 
ship. Their union has been blessed with four 
children, two sons and two daughters : Mary, 
Esther, Thomas Francis and James. 

& 

j^R. THOMAS J. DAVISON, a prominent 
and successful physician and surgeon 
of Ebensburg, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, 
and a veteran of the Civil War, is a son of 
Robert and Eliza A. (Scott) Davison, and was 
born in Ligonier township, Westmoreland 
county, this State, April 30, 1838. 

Dr. Davison's paternal grandfather was John 
Davison, who was a native of the " Emerald 
Isle," and was born in County Down. He 
emigrated to America in the year 1785, 
and soon made his way into the beautiful 
Ligonier valley, where he passed the remainder 
of his life, dying in about 1820. He was a 
weaver by trade, and followed that avocation 
all his life. One of his sons, Robert Davison, 
who was the father of Dr. Davison, was born 
in Ligonier valley, Westmoreland county, and 
died there December 27, 1895, universally 
loved and lamented. Possessed of strong 
mind and studious habits, he acquired a good 
education for his day, and taught school 
during the winter months until 1850. At that 
time he abandoned teaching, purchased a farm, 
and devoted the remainder of his active life to 
agricultural pursuits. 

In early life he espoused the principles of 
the Democratic party, but upon the issues of 
the Civil War, he, believing that human bond- 



age was a curse to any civilized country, joined 
hands with the Republican party, and was 
ever afterwards found among its loyal sup- 
porters. Religiously, he was reared a Uni- 
ted Presbyterian, but in later life connected 
himself with the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He married Eliza A. Scott, who died in 
August, 1895, aged eighty years, and who 
l^orc him ten children, eight of whom grew to 
maturity : Dr. Thomas J., subject ; Elizabeth, 
deceased, the wife of John Campbell ; Annie, 
the wife of Andrew Henderson ; Malissa, the 
wife of John McDowell, of Cooke township, 
Westmoreland county ; James B., a carpenter 
of Unity township, same county; John A., a 
lumberman, of Wisconsin ; Maria, the wife of 
Alfred -Slirum, of Tarr's Station, Westmore- 
land county; and George A., of Ligonier 
township, of the same county. 

Dr. Davison obtained his scholastic training 
in the common schools of his native county, 
and in the old and renowned Ligonier academy. 
Leaving the academy, he taught school and 
read medicine alternately, until the Civil War 
burst upon us in 1861. Imbued with patriotic 
sentiments, he enlisted in the Federal service, 
under Captain McCurdy, company E., Eleventh 
regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer infantry, 
and served until the close of the war. He 
was connected with the Army of the Potomac, 
and participated in twenty-seven regular en- 
gagements and a number of skirmishes. Among 
the more important engagements may be men- 
tioned : Second Battle of Bull Run, South 
Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chan- 
cellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, and Five 
Forks. In all his service he was never seri- 
ously wounded or captured, but made many 
very narrow escapes. He was present at the 
surrender of Lee at Appomattox, and through- 
out his entire service bore himself with gal- 



200 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



lantry and courage. To such soldiers we are 
indebted for the preservation of the union of 
States. 

After the close of the war, he returned 
home and resumed the study of medicine under I 
the preceptorship of Dr. L. T. Beam, of Lig- 
onicr. He afterwards taught school for a 
time, and in 1867 went to Indiana county, and 
there read under Dr. C. M. Ewing. Subse- 
quently he comj)leted his education in Pliila- 
delpliia medical colleges, and in 1869 returned 
to Indiana county, and formed a partnership 
with his preceptor. Dr. Ewing, with whom he 
maintained pleasant relations for one )'ear, 
when Dr. Ewing removed from that place, 
leaving his practice to Dr. Davison, who 
remained there until 1886, when he removed 
to I'.bensburg, where he iias since been engaged 
in active and successful practice. In connec- 
tion with his practice he runs a drug store. 1 
Politically, he is a republican, and is a school ! 
director of his borough, president of the board 
of health, and inider the administration of 
Harrison was a member of the board of 
United States Pension examiners of Cambria 
county. He is a member of John M.Jones 
Post, No. 556, G. A. R., of which he is past com- 
mander; Highland Lodge, No. 428, I. O. O. F., 
of which he is a past grand ; and Beulah 
Castle, No. 248, K. G. E., of which he is a 
past chief. He is steward and trustee of the 
Methodist I'^piscopal church, and takes a lively 
interest in church affairs. 

On March 4, 1870, Dr. Davison and Miss 
Maggie H. Stopiiel, a daughter of Thomas 
and Elizabeth Stojjhel, of Indiana county, were 
married, and to them have been born nine 
children : Olive B., married C>tto Wagner, a 
tanner of Buckhannon, West Virginia ; Robert 
¥.., is taking a medical course in the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania; Emma M., wedded 



Charles White, a miller of Ebensburg; Annie 
W., clerk in her father's drug store at Ebens- 
burg; and Charles S., Thomas Edison and 
Lydia are at home with their parents. 



O'l^IO^" KIKSCH, a prosperous farmer of 
'^ Barr township, this count}-, is a son of 
Joseph and Catherine (Bear) Kirsch, and was 
born in Alsace-Lorraine, France, December 27, 
1820. 

His grandfather, Mathias Kirsch, was a 
native of France, and came to America in 
1777, and under the noble Frenchman La Faj'- 
ette fought in the Revolutionarj' War for 
American independence. 

Joseph Kirsch (father) was born in Alsace- 
Lorraine, and came to America in 1S32, loca- 
ting on a tract of woodland in Barr township, 
this county, where he cleared a good farm. 
Having learned the trade of a weaver, he fol- 
lowed this trade in connection with his agri- 
cultural [lursuits, and during the winter he 
threshed large quantities of grain for neighbor- 
ing farmers. He was a devout member of the 
Roman Catholic church. 

He marrietl Miss Catherine Bear, and to 
them were born the following children : Simon, 
Mar\-, deceased; Michael, a farmer of Barr 
township ; John and Joseph, both deceased. 

Simon Kirsch was but twelve j'cars of age 
when his [larents removed to this country and 
located on a farm in Barr township, where he 
was reared. I le adopted the life of a farmer, 
and in 1847 loc.ited on a tract of woodland 
and cleared about seventy-five acres, reserv- 
ing about twenty-five acres of timber land; 
later he purchased an adjoining farm of one 
Inmtlred acres. His land was all underlaid 
with coal, and he has disposeil of a large part 
of it at a good [jrofit. 

Mr. Kirsch is a member of the Roman 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



201 



Catholic church, and has been twice married. 

May 31, 1849, ''^ married Miss Mary Ann 
Shearran, and to them were born two children : 
Philamina, wife of John Kline, of Barr town- 
ship, and Simon P., a farmer in Barr township. 
His second wife was Miss Anna Bromanspar- 
ger, whom he married October 18, 1854. To 
this marital union seven children have been 
born : Louis, a farmer and carpenter, of Barr 
township; Joseph W., a farmer; John E,a 
farmer, located in Ohio; Philip, a farmer; 
Annie, at home; Magdalena, the wife of Peter 
J. Bell, of Spangler; Stephen, a business man, 
of Altoona, Pennsylvania, and Maud. 



JOHN D. AVENTROTH, one of the most 
successful hotel proprietors of Cambria 
county, and the popular manager of the ele- 
gant and modern Vintondale Inn, is a son of 
George and Elizabeth (Huether) Wentroth, 
and was born in Hesse Cassel, Prussia, May 
27, 1 84 1. George Wentroth was of the farm- 
ing class in Hesse Cassel, where he was born 
November 14, 1809. He came to this coun- 
try in 1 85 I, and settled at Summerhill, where 
he followed agricultural pursuits during the 
remaining years of his active life. He was an 
exemplary member of the Evangelical Lu- 
theran church, a man of industrious habits, 
and his life pilgrimage on earth closed Janu- 
ary 14, 1895. Mr. Wentroth married Eliza- 
beth Huether, of his native place. Mrs. 
Wentroth was born in the year 1799, and 
passed away April 4, 1865, leaving three 
children : George, a farmer and merchant of 
Wilmore ; John D., and Mary, widow of Vic- 
tor Voegley. 

John D. Wentroth received his education in 
the government schools of Hesse Cassel and 
the common schools of Cambria county, and 
then learned the trade of shoemaker, which 



he followed for eight years after leaving the 
farm. Leaving the shoemaker's bench, he 
was in the saw-mill business for some time, 
and then opened a store and a hotel at Sum- 
merhill, conducting the one for twelve years 
and the other for fifteen years ; also filled the 
office of postmaster during the twelve years 
he was engaged in the mercantile business. 

Successful as a merchant, yet his greatest 
popularity was as a landlord, and in 1895 he 
was offered and accepted his present position 
as manager of the Vintondale Inn, a large and 
elegant three-story structure, complete in all 
its appointments with steam heating and elec- 
tric light. Up to every requirement of mod- 
ern travel and well fitted for a fashionable 
summer resort, the hotel has grown rapidly in 
public favor under Mr. Wentroth's adminis- 
tration. 

On February 26, 1864, Mr. Wentroth wed- 
ded Mary Ann Patterson, a daughter of James 
A. Patterson, of Summerhill, and grand- 
daughter of Thomas Croyle, one of the first 
settlers on the Alleghenies. Their children 
are : Lorena E., wife of P. S. Eisher, of Johns- 
town ; George J., engaged in the hotel busi- 
ness ; Clara M , married J. H. Luke, of South 
Fork, and Anna P., Robert P., Donald, Clyde 
and Nellie, who are still at home. 

In politics Mr. Wentroth has always been a 
staunch republican. He is a member of Moun- 
tain Lodge, No. 281, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Altoona, this State. Mr. Went- 
roth is a courteous gentleman and very patri- 
otic citizen. He was one of the first to re- 
spond to President Lincoln's call for troops 
in the dark April days of 1861. He enlisted 
on April 1 5th, of that year in a Company of the 
Third Pennsylvania three months' men, but 
was taken sick in June and sent to the Hagers- 
town hospital, where later he was discharged 



202 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



for disability and sent home. He afterwards 
sought to enhst, but was rejected on the same 
grounds on which he had been discharged — 
that of physical disabihty. He was one of 
the first sixty-five thousand men who went 
forth to sustain the Hfe of the nation and to 
preserve an undivided country. 



TAflLLIAM .T. WILLI A3IS, a coal opera- 
tor of Johnstown, is a son of William 
and Catherine (Fool) Williams, and was born 
September i, 1852, at Camborne, Cornwall, 
England. 

William Williams' father was a native of 
Camborne, and was reared there, and followed 
mining. In 1 880 he came to the United 
States, locating at Lloydsville, this county, 
but later returned to his native land, where 
he died in 1S87. He was married in 1832, in 
Crown Parish, to Catherine Pool, a daughter 
of William Pool. The grandfather of William 
Williams, on the paternal side of the family, 
was Robert Williams, a miner, although most 
of the family were farmers and millers, and 
also the proprietors of a china clay works in 
that country. To the marriage of William 
Williams and Catherine Pool were born but 
two children, of which the subject of this 
sketch is the elder. llis brother's name is 
Walter, who was born in 1863, anil is in the 
employ of his brother as mine boss. 

William J. Williams has a good practical 
education, obtained, not through the medium 
of schools or text-books, but by travel and 
general reading. A youth of spirit, he went 
to work at the age of thirteen, cleaning tin as 
it came from the mines. Then for about eight 
or nine years, with his father, was engaged in 
the copper and tin mining business of his 
country, five of which tiiey were engaged in 
trippcting or prospecting on their own per- 



sonal account, and were very successful. In 
December, 1876, he set sail from Plymouth. 
England, for South Africa, being under the 
employ of his government, which was building 
railroads in that section of the "Dark Conti- 
nent." He had opened the first tunnel (No, 
2), having had a contract. This trip was an 
interesting one, and by Mr. Williams was 
made a great source of education; and he had 
an opportunity to observe many interesting 
things on the Madeira Islands, at St. Helena, 
St. John's and Cape Town, whence they went 
to Beuda West, three days and nights, to the 
scene of their labors at No. 2 tunnel on the 
Beuda West railroad. He remained there 
eight months, when he returned to England, 
and shortly afterwards came to the United 
States, making the trip across the Atlantic in 
seven days, seven hours and twenty minutes, 
the fastest time on record up to that date. 
After a brief period spent in visiting friends, 
he took a position with an iron ore company 
of Orbisonia, Huntingdon county, this State, 
and remained there five months ; thence, after 
a stay of four j-ears at Lloydsville, this county, 
he came in 1880 to Johnstown. He there en- 
tered the iron ore mines of the Cambria Iron 
company, at Minersville, and later was en- 
gaged at various other mines of the same com- 
pany. During this period he was industriously 
engaged in study, preparing himself to pass the 
required examination for a mine forcmanshi[). 
1 le was successful, and passed a very crctlitable 
examination, and took a foremanship with the 
firm of Miller & Co., of Portage, this county. 
I le remained there some time ; then, after a 
short service rendered them, supervising 
their pumps at Burwellsdale, he was offered 
a superintendency by the Cambria Coal and 
Coke company, at Amsbry, this county, 
but, on account of a physical disability, was 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



203 



compelled to give up the position. In April, 
1889, he came to Johnstown, and, like many 
others, lost all his worldly possessions in the 
catastrophe of May 31, 1889. After the wreck 
of that terrible calamity had been cleared 
away, and Mr. Williams began to look about 
him for a medium through which to secure a 
livelihood, mining seemed to be the best 
adapted to his training and capabilities. He 
purchased the coal mine of Daniel Thomas, a 
coal operator of Johnstown, and later that of 
Hiram Swank, and now operates both mines, 
giving employment to twenty hands. 

Religiously Mr. Williams is a presbyterian, 
and takes an active part in all church and reli- 
gious work. He was one of the prime movers 
in the organization of the Miners' Christian 
association, the first organization of its kind 
in the country. The objects of this are to 
advance the spiritual and intellectual interests 
of the miners by providing wholesome read- 
ing for them, and by conducting orthodox 
exercises specially adapted to their needs. 
The first officers of this association were : 
William J. Williams, president; D. J. Jones, 
treasurer; M. L. Weaver, Secretary; and Mr. 
John Fulton, Geo. Robinson, Dr. Overdorff 
and Wm. Morris, directors. It has been in 
existence since October 19, 1894, is largely 
patronized, and has done and is doing a truly 
ennobling work. 

On January 15, 1874, Mr. Williams and 
Mary Ann Ritallick, daughter of Richard Ri- 
tallick, of Lannar, Cornwall, were united in 
marriage at Camborne, in the Wesleyan chapel. 

Richard Ritallick was a native of Lannar, 
but after his marriage removed to Camborne, 
where he died. He married Mary Ann Car- 
penter, and to this union were born fourteen 
children, but three of whom are yet living: 
Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Little, of Cornwall; 



John R., of Johnstown ; and the wife of the 
subject of this record. Mrs. Williams has 
always traveled with her husband, and takes 
an active interest in all his works, especially 
in the work of the Miners' Christian associa- 
tion, being accustomed to such work from 
childhood. Prior to her marriage with Mr. 
Williams she spent most of her life traveling 
with a good, Christian lady. Miss Ellen Budge. 



j^R. C. E. ALTE3IUS is a well-known den- 
tist of Morrellville, Pennsylvania. He 
is of Scotch-English extraction, his original 
ancestors having emigrated from Scotland. 

Nicholas Altemus, his grandfather, spent 
most of his life in Indiana county, Pennsylva- 
nia. In this county he died from the result 
of an accident. He followed the occupation 
of milling. 

James Altemus, father of Dr. Altemus, was 
born in Indiana county, in 1832, and was edu- 
cated in the public schools. After leaving 
school he worked for his father in the grist 
mill. He then began farming, an occupation 
in which he still continues. 

Although not a politician, the father of our 
subject is a loyal republican. He is also a 
consistent member of the Lutheran church. 

He was married to Miss Mary E. Dorney, 
mother of Dr. Altemus, and has nine children: 
Frank, Eddie, Julia B., and C. P., are dead. 
The other five are: James J., Newton Grant, 
B. D., a dentist, of Scottdale; our subject, and 
Laura C. 

Dr. C. E. Altemus was born August 14, 
1863, in Indiana county. He obtained his 
early education in the public schools. In ad- 
dition to this he spent several years in private 
schools. 

In 1889 he entered the office of Dr. Malone, 
of Altoona, where he spent a few months in 



204 



inOr.RAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



study. In September of the same year he 
went to the Baltimore College of Dental sur- 
gery. Here he remained until 1S91, when he 
graduated, after which he located in Morrell- 
ville, where he still practices his profession 
with conscientious zeal and fair prospects of 
material profit. 

June 4, 1895, he married Miss M. Aggie 
Davis, a daughter of William Davis, of Indiana 
county. 

Dr. Aitenuis is a member of the A. P. A., 
is a good republican, and iiis wife is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

In addition to his professional work he has 
an interest in the grocery store of Altemus & 
Company, consequently we find him having 
business, professioucd and social pursuits which 
bring him close to his fellow-citizens, and which 
will give liini much strength in his work. 



n I,|;i:kT IJ. PKTIJIKIN, a merchant and 
business man, of Johnstown, and a well- 
known citizen of the county, is a son of Thomas 
J. and Martha (I'ark) Petrikin, and was born 
at St. Clairsville, Bedford county, Pennsylva- 
nia, August 1 1, I'SjS. He is in the tiiird gen- 
eration from his old-workl ancestor, who was 
a native of Scotland, ami who built the sec- 
ond cabin in Centre county, where lie died at 
Bellefonte. This Scotch-Irish inmiigrant reared 
a famil)' of useful anti distinguished sons in his 
Centre county home. William A. was president 
of tlic Lycoming Insurance company; Dr. 
David was a member of congress during Jack- 
son's administralioi) ; Ilenr)', the fust white 
child born at Bellefonte, Centre county, served 
as Secretary of State under Governor SInink. 
James was an able lawyer, of Central I'enn 
sylvania; Thomas J., the fither of the subject 
of tliis sketch, became pronn'nent as an etlitor 
and educator. 



Thomas J. Petrikin was born July 4, 1801, 
at Bellefonte, Centre county, where he received 
a good education, and became editor of the 
Bellefonte Gaaettc, which he made a power in 
the State for the election of Jackson. He 
battled bravely for Jackson and his policy as 
President, and sii|)ported the Democratic party 
up to 1856, when he turned to the Republican 
party, then just on the political stage. Al- 
though " born and cradled a democrat," the 
issues of the new party set him firmly on the 
" rock of republicanism,'' where he remained 
until his death, at Johnstown, 1 88 1 . He was a 
fine writer, being employed on different pa- 
pers, and his articles were read throughout the 
State. He taught in Bedford county for sev- 
eral years, but after coming to Johnstown, in 
1859, retired from teaching. He was a prac- 
tical printer as well as an efficient editor, and 
e.x-Governor Packer served his apprenticeship 
as a printer under him. Mr. Petrikin married 
Martha Park, who lived to reach her si.xty-fifth 
year, dying in 1881. She was a methodist, 
and lier father, David Park, a native of Scot- 
land, was in his day one of the largest whole- 
sale grocers of Philadelphia. His marriage 
resulted in the birth of the following children : 
William, Henry, and James, now deceased, 
who both served in the Civil War ; Martha and 
Luc}', both deceased ; David, who has been in 
the employ of the Cambria Iron company for 
thirty years, is now a master mechanic, and has 
charge of the rolling machinery, and Albert 
B., the subject of this sketch. 

Albert B. Petrikin was principally reared in 
Bedford county and Johnstown, and received 
but ten months' schooling, often studying his 
lessons at m'glit by the light of a pine knot. At 
an early age he became a clerk in tlie large 
mercantile house of Welin & Walters, witli 
whom he remained until 1861. In that year 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



205 



he was appointed assistant-postmaster of 
Johnstown under J. E. Chandler, and served 
for four years. He then was railroad mail 
agent between Altoona and Pittsburg for five 
months, and at the end of that time became a 
salesman in Wood, Morrell & company's es- 
tablishment, where he remained until 1881. 
That year saw him and Nathan Miller as part- 
ners in a grocery house, which was washed 
out in the flood of 1889. When the city 
straightened up he opened his present grocery 
house, where he has a well-selected stock of 
goods, and a first-class and growing patronage. 

On August 3, 1884, Mr. Petrikin married 
Mrs. Frances S. Long, a daughter of Jonathan 
Horner. He has four children : Edna L., 
Irene, Bruce and Byron, and three step-chil- 
dren, Elfra, Jennie and James Long. 

In politics Albert B. Petriken is a republi- 
can. He has been a member of Alma Lodge, 
No. 523, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
since 1864, and has held active membership 
in Cambria Lodge, No. 278, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, for twenty-four years. Mr. 
Petriken, since early years, has been the archi- 
tect of his own fortune, and that his history is 
the record of a busy and useful life is apparent 
at a glance. His aim in life is clearh- mirrored 
in successful results, and the many obstacles 
that he has overcome but attest his business 
capacity and reveal the persistent genius pecu- 
liar to the Scotch-Irish race, of which he is a 
worthy member. 



"PDGAR O. FISHEK, alderman of the First 
^^ ward of the city of Johnstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, is a son of John and Margaret (Osborn) 
Fisher, and was born in New Florence, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, August 30, 
1863. 
His father, John H. Fisher, was a native of 



Somerset county, this State, born at Stoyes- 
town, March 3, 1834. He was reared there 
until the age of si.xteen, when, in 1850, he 
came to Johnstown, where he resided until 
after his marriage, in 1862, when he removed 
to Westmoreland county. Two years later he 
returned to Johnstown and resided there until 
May 31,1 889, when he, along with his wife, 
six children, and some five thousand unfortu- 
nates, was drowned in the memorable Johns- 
town flood. 

In early life he was employed as a book- 
keeper, but in the sixties he began the study 
of law under the preceptorship of Judge Cyrus 
L. Pershing, an able jurist, who is now presi- 
dent judge of Schuylkill county, Pennsylva- 
nia. He was admitted to the Cambria county 
bar in 1869, and practiced at that bar for some 
years. In 1871 he was elected justice of the 
peace in Johnstown, and held that ofifice until 
death. He also served as treasurer of the 
Johnstown School district about nineteen 
years, and as borough clerk for twenty-two 
years. 

He was a republican, loyal and true, favored 
James G. Blaine's protective tariff, and was a 
strong advocate of the National Banking sys- 
tem of which -Salmon P. Chase was the author. 
He was public-spirited and took an active 
interest in the improvement of his city and 
county. 

He married Margaret Osborn, a daughter 
of George W. Osborn, who was born near 
New Alexandria, Westmoreland county, and 
who, in about 1840, removed to Johnstown, 
where he died in May, 1886. Mr. Osborn was 
engaged in mercantile pursuits most of his 
life, and was a prominent and influential busi- 
ness man, whose history appears elsewhere 
in this work under the heading of George W. 
Osborn. He took a deep interest in politics. 



206 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



belonging to the party of whicli Jefferson was 
the father. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fisher were the parents of 
ten children, two of them now living, Edgar 
O. and Luella ; of tiiose deceased six were 
lost in the flood, and two died prior to that 
event. 

Edgar O. Fisher obtained his education in 
the city schools of Johnstown, and at the age 
of sixteen left school to accept a clerkship in 
the store of his grandfather, Geo. W. Osborn, 
who was a grocer of Johnstown. In Jan- 
uary, 1882, he entered the general office 
of the Cambria Iron company in the capacity 
of a clerk, and remained there four and one- 
half years. lie then spent one year in the 
West, and returning home he took charge of 
the books of a lumber company for six months. 
He then accepted a position as bookkeeper for 
the Johnson company in April, 1888, and was 
soon promoted to the office of paymaster, 
with full charge of that office until September, 
1889, when he resigned to engage in business 
on his own account. He was appointed notary 
public on September i, 1889, and at the same 
time embarked in the real-estate business, 
continuing until May 6, 1895, when he was 
elected alderman, which office he has since 
ably filled. 

In May, 1890, he was elected city assessor 
by the councils of Johnstown, being the first 
republican to secure a position under the city 
administration, whicii was then Democratic. 
He is prominentl)' iticntificd with a number 
of secret and fraternal organizations, among 
which are: Johnstown Lodge, No. 157, K. of 
P.; Conemaugh Lodge, No. 191, I. O. O. F., 
and Johnstown Lodge, No. 175, B. P. O. E., 
of wiiich he was secretary two years; and 
Mountain Castle, No. -JT, A. O. K. M. C, for 
fourteen years. 



JOHN J. DEVLIN, alderman of the Ninth 
ward of the city of Johnstown, is a son 
of John Devlin, and was born in what is now 
the city of Johnstown. His father, John 
Devlin, was born in Ireland in 1803, and emi- 
grated to Canada at an early age, where he 
remained until 1829, when he removed to 
Johnstown, being one of the pioneer settlers 
of that place. He was a stonemason by trade 
and accepted large contracts for masonr}' and 
stone-cutting. He lived here during the man- 
agement of the old Pennsylvania canal, upon 
which he worked, at different times accepting 
and executing contracts for that enterprise. 

Politically he was a staunch democrat and 
took an interest in all political matters. He 
married Anna J. Stuart, a daughter of James 
Stuart, of Cambria county, and to this union 
were born, Daniel J., pastor of St. Stephen's 
church, Pittsburg, Penn.sylvania ; Francis J., a 
furniture dealer, of Johnstown, and John J. 
He died in Johnstown in 1889. 

John J. Devlin received his education in the 
schools of his native count)-. He served an 
apprenticeship and worked for a number of 
years at the printing trade, and with the ex- 
ception of seven years has alwaj's resided in 
Johnstown. In the local affairs of his city 
Mr. Devlin has always taken a normally active 
part, and when the city was organized in 1890, 
he was elected alderman in the ward in which 
he now resides. 



i^i:<>i{<;i: m.vrsh.vll uk.vdk, who 

^^ practiced successfully for half a century 
before the supreme court ot Pennsylvania, was 
one of the ablest and most eloquent lawyers 
that ever resided within the boundaries of 
Cambria county. 

He was a son of Ilczckiah and .Susan 
(Shrum) Reade, and was born in the Ligonier 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



207 



valley, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
on the 29th of May, 18 19. Five generations 
have passed away since the new-world pio- 
neer of the Reade family came from old Eng- 
land to New England, where, in all proba- 
bility, he settled in the pathless woods of 
Maine. Abner Reade entered the Continental 
army, and, after his service in that memorable 
conflict, he came from Maine to Lancaster 
county, this State, where he died. He was 
accompanied by his son, Hezekiah Reade, 
who finally settled in the beautiful and his- 
toric Ligonier valley, in Westmoreland coun- 
ty, where he owned a flouring mill and fol- 
lowed farming for an occupation. Of sturdy 
New England stock, he threw his whole 
energy into whatever he attempted, and made 
his impress on the community in which he 
lived and died. He married Susan Shrum, of 
St. Clair township, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, and to their union were born 
eight children. 

George Marshall Reade, who stood con- 
fessedly in the front rank of his profession 
was reared on his father's farm, where he was 
engaged in the usual pursuits tiiat fall to the 
lot of farmers' sons. He received a good 
common-school and academic education, and, 
having made choice of the law as a profession, 
he commenced and pursued his legal studies 
in the office of James Potts, of Johnstown- 
He was admitted to the bar of Cambria coun- 
ty on the 8th of October, 1851, and at once 
located at Ebensbuig, the county-seat, where 
he practiced with success until death closed 
his professional career on June 22, 1892. His 
remains lie in Lloyd's cemetery. He was a 
republican in politics, and a trustee and at- 
tendant of the Presbyterian church, but ac- 
tively sympathized with all churches, and con- 
tributed to their support. He was a member 



of Summit Lodge, No. 312, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Ebensburg, Pennsylvania, 
and Oriental Commandery, No. 61, Knights 
Templar, of Johnstown. 

On the 25th of April, 1855, George M. 
Reade married Cassandra Mathiot, of Ross 
Furnace, Westmoreland county. To this 
union were born two children, a son and a 
daughter, Helen and Mathiot. 

George Marshall Reade laid broad and deep 
the foundations of his professional success in 
early life by forming habits of close and 
thorough study, and devoting himself solely 
to his profession despite the alluring tempta- 
tions of political place and power. His suc- 
cess was such in the county courts that he was 
soon called to the management of important 
cases in the higher district and circuit courts, 
where he rapidly distinguished himself by 
ability, talent and winning suits in which 
defeat sometimes seemed inevitable to his 
clients. He argued his cases for all there was 
in them, and in a few years ranked as one 
of the leading lawyers of western Pennsyl- 
vania. He practiced extensively before the 
Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, and for 
years before his death was engaged in every 
important or prominent case that came up 
in the county courts. As a lawyer he was 
an acknowledged leader in his profession, 
which then, as now, in western Pennsylvania, 
was distinguished for an array of able legal 
talent. His mind was comprehensive, his 
judgment, at times, almost intuitive, and his 
sagacity remarkable in discriminating the es- 
sential from the non-essential. As a pleader 
he was eloquent and effective, and always 
wielded a great influence over a jury when he 
appeared before it. The movement of his elo- 
quence was forceful and brilliant, inculcating 
logical truths as well as producing pleasure 



208 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



by beauty of language, but could not be ade- 
quately reported. But few of his efforts have 
been preserved, and those only in fragmentary 
form ; hence he is no exception to Dupon- 
ceau's remark, that " lawyers leave nothing 
behind but the echo of a name." But while 
the remains of his legal learning and splendid 
eloquence are few, yet the echo of his name 
will never die in the courts where he prac- 
ticed, while his life is a part of the history of 
his count)' that may be read with profit and 
for inspiration by all who seek to be useful or 
prominent at the bar. At once an honor and 
an ornament to the bar, George Marshall 
Reade was equaled by few as a representative 
of his profession. 

Mathiot Reade, son of George M. and Cas- 
sandra (Mathiot) Reade, was born March 28, 
1858. riis mother was a daughter of Col. 
Jacob D. Mathiot, who served as a member of 
the legislature in 1833-34, and was exten- 
sively engaged in the manufacture of iron at 
Ross furnace. Col. Mathiot was a son of 
George and Ruth (Davies) Mathiot and a 
grandson of Jean and Catherine Margaret 
(Bernard) Mathiot, who came from France in 
1754. Col. Mathiot's father served in the 
Revolutionary war, and his brother, Hon. 
Joshua D., was a ilistinguished lawyer at 
Newark, Ohio, who represented his district in 
Congress in 1841-42, but declined re-election. 
The Mathiots are of I'Vemli tlcsceiit, and trace 
their ancestry back to a French officer, who 
held a high military position, and obeyed the 
voice of conscience rather than the command 
of the king at St. Bartholomew. 

At a meeting of the members of Cam- 
bria county bar, on the 8th day of August, 
1892, the following memorial was adopted 
in respect to the memory of George M. 
Reade : 



" In Memoriam. 

"The Bar of this County is called upon 
again to mourn the loss of one of its able and 
successful members, George M. Reade, Esq., 
having departed this life on June 22, 1892. 

" Mr. Reade was admitted to the Cambria 
County Bar on the 8th of October, 1851. At 
the time of his admission the way of the young 
lawyer was a hard one, for he had to combat 
such able men as Judge Thomas White, John 
G. Miles, Henry D. Foster, William Banks, 
Robert L. Johnston and others, some of whom 
were in the zenith of their power and practice 
as lawyers at this Bar, and others, who, by an 
adherence to the principles of the profession, 
won a place in the legal histor)- of our Courts. 
He entered the field with an indomitable will, 
a fixedness of purpose and a resolution to 
fight the battle. He was a close student all 
the daj's of his professional career, and was 
seldom confronted in the trial of a cause with 
a legal proposition which he was unable to 
answer and support by authorities. His prac- 
tice was a large and varied one, and his in- 
dustry, ability and zeal in behalf of his clients 
secured him a lucrative one. He possessed 
one of the largest and finest law libraries in 
western Pennsylvania, and it was his delight 
to sit among his books and gain pleasure and 
profit from their contents. His great legal 
contests were not confined to the courts of the 
County alone; he was well known in the 
Supreme Court of the State, and in the United 
States Courts. He was for many years the 
Honored President of our Bar Association, 
and, at the time of his death. Chairman of the 
Examining Committee. His death was sud- 
den, though not unexpected, and now we 
mourn the loss of a professional brother and 
friend, the community one of its most wilued 
citizens, and above all the family an affection- 
ate father and brother. 

" Rfsok'Cti, That a cop)' of this memorial be 
presented to the Court of Common Picas of this 
County, with a request that the same be spread 
upon the records, and that a copj' be suitably 
engrossed and transmitted to his family." 

e 

TOIIX I>I.\\XIOX, one of the mo.st success- 

ful farmers and business men of northern 

Cambria county, is a son of Martin and Mary 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



209 



(Neland) Mannion, and was born in the parish 
of BaUinderreen, County Galway, Ireland, 
June lo, 1818. 

His parents were natives of County Galway, 
and life-long residents of Ireland, where they 
reared a large family of sons and daughters, 
all of whom remained in the " Emerald Isle" 
except the subject of this sketch. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mannion lived lives of thrift and economy 
on their farm, and their remains were interred 
with the dust of their ancestors in the old 
family burying grounds. 

John Mannion was reared on the farm, and 
carefully trained to farming, while his parents 
took great pains to instruct him thoroughly 
in the faith of the Catholic church. After 
coming to the age of manhood he was vari- 
ously employed until 1846, when he resolved 
to seek the improvement of his fortunes in 
the United States. Landing at New York 
city, June lo, 1846, he accepted the first em- 
ployment that came to hand, which was work 
on the New York and Erie railroad. In a 
short time he left the railroad and went to the 
Dalaware and Hudson canal, on which he 
worked until 1848. 

In that year he came to western Pennsjl- 
vania, and after working for a short time on 
the Pennsylvania Central railroad he went into 
Indiana county and spent eighteen months 
there as a farm hand. At the end of that 
time he secured profitable work in the lumber 
region of Clearfield county, where he spent 
two years. He then, in 1852, purchased a 
small farm of seventy-three acres in Susque- 
hanna township, paying for the same with 
gold brought from Ireland. Upon this farm 
he settled the next year and engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits on a limited scale. 

With each succeeding year Mr. Mannion's 
adaptability for farming and farm management 
14 



has become more apparent in acquired acres 
and increased cereal and stock production. 
Having embarked in farming he manifested a 
spirit of energy and determination which in- 
sured success and prosperity. By additions 
he increased his seventy-three acre farm to 
one hundred and sixty-five acres, and he now 
owns six other good farms in Susquehanna 
and Clearfield townships, besides some valua- 
ble coal lands. He has also dealt largely and 
successfully in real-estate, and at one time 
held nearly all of the site of the villages of 
Piatt and Plattsville. Mr. Mannion has been 
the moving impulse in many improvements in 
his section of the county, and has manifested 
much foresight and taste in his varied business 
undertakings. With but limited educational 
opportunities in his youth he has gathered 
from reading and observation such supple- 
mentary education as to render him compe- 
tent to personally transact all of his own ex- 
tensive business, and to bear himself with ease 
in intelligent and educated company, while his 
reading and thought have always been along 
the current of public events, and especiall)- in 
all that has reference to the early history of 
Cambria county, with which he is thoroughly 
acquainted. 

He is a stockholder in the Patton bank, and 
a consistent member of the Catholic church. 
In politics he has always been Democratic 
since coming to this country, and held the 
office of school director and helped to elect 
the first county superintendent of Cambria, 
before he received his naturalization papers at 
Ebensburg, August 12, 1855. Continually 
busy with his own affairs yet he has never 
refused to lay the cares of business aside and 
devote himself to his party's need or the public 
interest. He has served in township and 
county conventions, and, in 1883, was a dele- 



210 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



gate to the Democratic State convention that 
met at Harrisburg; not anxious for position 
and caring for no office he has been content 
with his ballot and allowed the party reins to 
be held by other anil more ambitious hands. 
On November 8, 1S53, Mr. Mannion wedded 
Mar}' Ann King, who is a daughter of Reader 
King and Mary McCreery, of Cherrytree, In- 
diana county, and was born June 6, 1822. 
To this union were born four sons and one 
daughter: Martin, now farming in Clearfield 
township; Edward and John, farmers of .Sus- 
quehanna township; Andrew, at home; and 
Jane, wife of Cliristopher Grossman, a farmer 
of Chest Springs, this county. 



JOHN KMMERLING, proprietor of the 

^^ lMii[)irc Brewery, of Johnstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, was born in Philadelphia, this State, 
February 22, 1851 . 

His education was acquired in the pul)Iic 
schools of his native cit}', upon the completion 
of whicli he learned the business of brewing. 
Subsequently, he traveled extensively, visiting 
many of the more important cities of the West, 
and finalU- located in Pittsburg, where he 
married. 

In 1878 lie came to Johnstown, and innne- 
diately embarked in the brewing business on 
liis own account. .Starting in the huiiible 
building now known as the Eintracht Hall, 
the brewery of Joliii ICmmerling prospered so 
well that ill one year it was moved to the 
larger building now occupied by tlie bottling 
liousc of William Thomas. .Six years more 
saw tiie business grow until it became neces- 
.sary to build and remove to the large and 
commodious brick stiuclure which occupies i 
nearly half a sipiare, fronting on Horner street. 
The plant is two hundred by one luindreLl 
ami eighty feet, three stories high, and has an 



annual output of eight thousand barrels, and 

contains all the latest improved machinery 
known to the brewer's art, including engines, 
two ten-ton refrigerators, seven pumps for 
various purposes, and bottling apparatus. 

A visit to the vault in which the beer is 
stored, gives to the uninitiated a genuine sur- 
prise. I'oUowing the guide, one wanders in and 
out among the huge hogsheads, some of which 
contain forty, and others as high as eighty 
barrels of the amber fluid, surrounded on all 
sides b}- pipes covered to the depth of several 
times their own thickness with white frost, 
produced b)' the intense cold of the ammonia 
and brine which they contain, one can but 
express astonishment at the wonderful advance 
made since the time when nature alone sup- 
plied the cooh'ng substance. 

So large is the local demand for the beer 
brewed at this establishment, that very little 
is shipped out of the city. Two wagons are kept 
going constantl)', and two others are used 
when the demand requires. The present force 
consists of fourteen men, to which several 
others are added when increased business 
makes demand. 

On September 26, 1 872, Mr. Emmerling 
married Miss Phil. Houch, a daughter of 
Earnest Houch, a prominent citizen of Pitts- 
burg, and to them have been born ten children. 

Mr. Emmerling was one of the organizers 
of the board of trade, in which he takes an 
active interest. 



/^K()l{<;i': S. .AIITCIIKI.L, Vanl Master of 

llu' 1\ nns\lv.ini, naili-o.ul y. lids, at Cres- 
son, this county, is a son of George S. and Sarah 
( Miller) Mitchell, and was born near Shelocta, 
Indiana county, PeMns)'l\'ania, Jul)' 26, 1850. 
His paternal grandfather, Robert Mitchell, 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



211 



was of Scotch parentage and birth, and when 
a young man settled in Indiana county, being 
one of the pioneer settlers of that county. 
He was a farmer, and a member of the Sece- 
der church. After coming to this country he 
married Miss Margaret Smith, who was also 
a native of Scotland. He died in 1853, at the 
advanced age of eighty years. 

Moses Miller (maternal grandfather) who 
was of German extraction, was one of the 
pioneer settlers of Armstrong county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he owned a large farm, which, 
at his death, in 1869, was divided among his 
children. 

George S. Mitchell, father, was born near 
Shelocta, in 181 1, received his education in 
the subscription schools of those days, and 
for many years devoted his attention to farm- 
ing. In 1866 he located in Blair county, 
where, for several terms, he served as county 
coroner. Many years prior to his death he 
retired from active life, and during these years 
of leisure found ample time to gratify his de- 
sire for good reading. He had always been a 
careful reader, and read with keen apprecia- 
tion the productions of our best authors. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian church, 
and for forty years held the responsible posi- 
tion of elder in that church. He died in Al- 
toona, April 26, 1886. 

George S. Mitchell, the subject of these 
memoirs, was educated in the public schools 
of Armstrong and Indiana counties, where he 
spent his boyhood days. From 1865 until 
1868 he was employed in Beaver and Blair 
counties. In October, of the latter year, he 
enUsted in the volunteer service, under the 
now renowned General Custer. He served 
under his command about one year, fighting 
Indians, and establishing forts throughout 
Kansas, Texas, and Mexico. During this 



time he passed through some very thrilling 
experiences, and made several very narrow 
escapes from the Indians. It was his privilege 
to make the acquaintance of many of the noted 
Indian scouts, among whom were Buffalo Bill, 
Wild Bill, and others of note, who were under 
the instructions of General Custer. 

After leaving the service, Mr. Mitchell trans- 
ported freight from Leavenworth, Kansas, to 
the Cherokee Nation. In this way he was 
thrown in contact with such chiefs as Johnny 
Cake, his brother, Charles Johnny Cake, and 
many full-blooded Cherokee Indian scouts, 
who have rendered valuable service to the gov- 
ernment. 

In 1869 he took the contract for hauling the 
stone to be used in constructing a bridge near 
Ottawa, Kansas, for the Atchison, Topeka and 
Santa Fe railroad. On completing this con- 
tract he engaged in farming in Kansas until 
the fall of 1870, when he came east, and lo- 
cated in Blair county, Pennsylvania. About 
this time he entered the employ of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad company, as brakeman, but 
was shortly made freight conductor, and for 
fourteen years ran a train from Altoona to 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. In 1892 he was ap- 
pointed yard master at Cresson, which posi- 
tion he occupies at the present time. 

He is prominently identified with the Order 
of Railway Conductors, and has served as 
delegate for many of their conventions. He 
is a life-member of that order. 

With his family he is prominently connected 
with the Baptist congregation, and since loca- 
ting in Cresson has been superintendent of the 
Sabbath-school in connection with the Pres- 
byterian church. 

On December 18, 1870, he was united in 
marriage with Miss Mary Stiffler, a daughter 
of John H. Stiffler, of Blair county. To Mr. 



212 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



and Mrs. Mitchell have been born three sons 
and one daughter: Percy S., connected with 
the C. E. department of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad company; John Hays, connected 
with the passenger department of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad compan}-, and located in 
Washington, D. C; Marguerite and Paul at 
home. 



C'TEWAKT A. HILL, a son of John W. 

*^ and Martha (Stuart) Hill, was born near 
Leechburg, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, 
June i8, 1853. His immediate ancestors on 
both sides were of Western Pennsylvania stock. 
His father was born near Greensburg, West- 
moreland county, and died at Armagh, Indiana 
county, September 21, 1 890, aged sixty-eight 
years. 

From boyhood the latter was an active 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
where his talent as a public speaker found fre- 
quent exercise as a local e.xhorter. B)- occu- 
pation he was a farmer. From 1S68 to the 
date of his death he was a resident of Indiana 
county. His grandfather, Aaron Hill, was a 
native of Pennsylvania; hut little of his history 
has been preserved in the family records, be- 
yond the facts that he was engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits in Westmoreland county. 
He was born in 17SJ, in the state of Mary- 
land, and died July i, 1842, near Greensburg, 
Westmoreland county, aged si.xty years. 

I le was of Scotch extraction. Martha .Stuart 
was born at Ligonicr, Wcstiiiorcl.uu! county, 
Pennsylvania. She was a woman of rare vir- 
tue, and was a consistent member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in whose com- 
munion she died Apiil 24, 1894, at liie age of 
sixty-six years. 

Grandfather Barrakiah Stuart was born in 
Westmoreland county, of Scotch ancestry. 



He was a farmer by occupation, and lived and 
died in the county of his birth, his death oc- 
curring in 1849, near West Fairfield, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania; death result- 
ing from accident by falling from a building. 

Our subject, Stewart A. Hill, was himself 
reared in Armstrong and Indiana counties. 
His educational facilities were such as are 
ordinarily provided by the common schools, 
supplemented by a single term at the Indiana 
Normal school, and a short term at a business 
college. Subsequently he followed the pro- 
fession of teaching for eight years in Indiana 
and Camjjria counties, including two years in 
the public schools of Johnstown. He was a 
successful instructor; but preferring a business 
career to the routine of the schoolroom, he, 
on May 24, 1880, accepted a position as clerk 
and salesman for the Penn Traffic company of 
the same city, with which he has been con- 
tinuously identified since 1884 as foreman and 
biner of the shoe department. 

June 15, 1880, Mr. Hill was married to 
Miss Laura J., daughter of Elias Paul, of 
Johnstown. Four children, one son and 
tiiree daughters, have been born to this 
union, viz.: Bessie O., Edith \'., W. Forester, 
and Martha M. 

Mr. Hill is a member of llic Methodist 
Episcopal church. Also of the following so- 
cieties : A. O. K. of M. C, Knights of Pythias, 
and Royal Arcanum, the latter being identified 
especially as an insurance feature. 
o 

HICMfV .VNI>FRSON, a successful busi- 
ness man, and who enjoys the distinction 
of being one of the pioneer merchants of Mor- 
reiiville, is a son of John and Elizabeth (Fergu- 
son) Antlerson, and was born in Londonderry 
township, Bedford county, Pennsylvania, Oc- 
tober 24, 1844. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



213 



The name of Anderson is of common oc- 
currence in Scotland, and most of the families 
there who bore it were more or less closely 
related. Descended from an Anderson that 
came from .Scotland to Pennsylvania, was John 
Anderson, Sr., of Bedford county. 

The younger John Anderson, the father of 
Henry Anderson, was born in Bedford county 
in 1802. After receiving instruction in the 
common English branches of that day, he 
learned the trade of carpenter and builder, at 
which he worked during all the years of his 
active life. He resided near the town of Bed- 
ford, and died .September i, 1853, aged fifty 
years and eleven months. Mr. Anderson mar- 
ried Elizabeth Ferguson, whose father, William 
Ferguson, was a resident of Bedford county. 
Mrs. Anderson was born August 25, 1807. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Anderson were born eight 
children; William, who resides in Illinois; 
John and JcUnes, who are dead ; Henry; Rev. 
Joseph, pastor of a Methodist Episcopal church 
at Williamsport, this State ; Hannah, married 
David Brown, and resides in Nebraska; Susan, 
a resident of Nebraska, and wife of Philip 
Hoover, and Martha, now of Clearfield county. 

Henry Anderson grew to manhood in his 
native county, and was so situated during his 
boyhood years that he received but six mouths' 
schooling, and that in the early common 
schools of Pennsylvania. Being reared to farm 
life, when he came to do for himself, he con- 
tinued to follow farming until 1862. On Feb- 
ruary loth, of that year, he enlisted in com- 
pany H, Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania infantry, and 
served as a private up to August 30, 1865, 
when he was honorably discharged from the 
Federal service at Petersburgh, Virginia. He 
participated in the battles of Hatcher's Run, the 
Wilderness, Cold Harbor and Drury's Bluff, 
Petersburgh, Richmond, Weldon Railroad, 



besides numerous skirmishes; was wounded 
three times ; spent three months in Libby 
prison in 1864; was captured at Drury's Bluff 
May 16, 1864; four hundred captured; at the 
same time thirty-two of Company H, and two 
out of the thirty-two returned to the company ; 
the other member was Samuel Call, of Shells- 
burg; the other thirty died in prison. After 
the war he worked on Bedford county farms 
until 1868, in which year he came to Johns- 
town as an employee of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road company. A year later he went into the 
service of the Cambria Iron company, working 
for one year as a bricklayer, and then acting 
as a night watchman for seven years. Leaving 
the latter position in iSSo, he came to Morrell- 
ville, where he opened his present grocery store 
which is one of the first grocery stores of that 
place. His store is on Chandler street, where 
he carries a large stock of general merchandise. 

On April 14, 1867, Mr. Anderson married 
Ellen R. Hull, whose father, John Hull, is a 
resident of Bedford county. To their union 
have been born five children : Harry, in busi- 
ness with his father; Mary, wife of John Over- 
dorff, of Altoona; John, who died at two years 
of age; Minnie and Maud, at home. 

In political affairs Mr. Anderson has always 
been a staunch supporter of the Republican 
party. He has served at different times as tax 
collector and as school director. He is a mem- 
ber of the Evangelical church, Emory Fisher 
Post No. 30, Grand Army of the Republic, 
and Council No. 941, Royal Arcanum. It is 
a mistake to suppose that men always succeed 
with ease and without effort. Mr. Anderson 
is one who has succeeded by commendable 
labor. When he left home at the age of eight 
years he had only a silver three-cent piece as 
stock in hand. He took for his motto this 
familiar proverb, " Honesty is the best policy," 



214 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



and by close observance of this, and the 
" Golden Rule," he has achieved an enviable 
record as a soldier and a successful career as 
a merchant. He has won everything by per- 
sistent and self-reliant effort. 



HIRA3I GOCHNOUR, a trustworthy loco- 
motive engineer of many years' experi- 
ence, was born in Taylor township, this county, 
on July 27, 1840, and is a son of Daniel and 
Catherine (Amesbaugh) Gochnour. 

The family, of which Hiram Gochnour is a 
worthy scion, is of German origin, and was 
one of those families that settled in Maryland 
at an early day. His grandfather was Daniel 
Gochnour, born in Maryland. He emigrated 
when a young man to Cambria count}-, ranking 
as one of the pioneer settlers of the county. 
He was a wagon-maker by trade, but upon 
coming to this county took up the necessary 
pursuits of farming and lumbering. He pur- 
chased a large tract of woodland, containing six 
hundred acres, in the vicinity of Conemaugh. 
His father and mother came from Germany to 
Maryland. The maternal grandfather of Mr. 
Gochnour was Adam Amesbaugh, also of Ger- 
man stock, and died in Siielby county, Ohio. 

Daniel Gochnour (father) was born on the 
old Gochiuiur homestead, near Conemaugh, 
in 1799, and resided upon it all his life, dj'ing 
in 1 870. Tiie pioneer character and surround- 
ings of the home of his early boyhood were 
such as to develoj) within him a genius for 
many kinds of labor, and he could turn liis 
hand with skill to almost any kind of work 
requiring tlie display of mechanical genius. 

Hiram Gochnour was reared upon his 
father's farm, where he made himself useful 
in attending the flour and saw-mills of his 
father, attending, during the winter months, 
the public schools of the neighborhooii. 



In 1873 he began his career as a railroad 
man, entering the employ of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad company as a fireman, and remained 
in that positian until September, 1881. Upon 
the latter date, his fidelity as an employee 
was rewarded by being promoted to an en- 
gineer, and he has faithfully served his company 
in that capacity ever since. His run extends, 
and has, through most of this long service, 
from Gallitzin to Conemaugh. 

Mr. Gochnour has made Conemaugh his 
home since 1873, and is thoroughly identified 
with its progress and history. He is a pro- 
gressive citizen, and his aid and influence are 
cheerfully given in every move tending to 
promote its progress. He is a stockholder 
and director in the Conemaugh Water com- 
any, the Conemaugh Building and Loan asso- 
ciation, and is president of the Independent 
Fire company of the same place. 

On November 14, 1861, Mr. Gochnour 
married Mary A. McCreery, of Taylor town- 
ship, and to their happy union have been born 
the following children : William, who married 
Mary L. Ressler, of this county; Hiram R., 
Benjamin J., died in infancy ; Ephraim E., who 
died when nine years of age ; Catherine, 
who is deceased, was the wife of Samuel 
Burkhart ; and Martha J., who died at the age 
of twenty-five j'cars. 

Mr. Gochnour and his wife are members of 
the United Brethren church at Conemaugh, in 
which organization he is a deacon. Frater- 
nal 1)-, he is a member of the Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers, and the Junior order 
of United American Mechanics. 



TAJIKS 1». liriJXS, well-known as the 
^ popular proprietor of the Arlington 
hotel, Johnstown, this county, was born at 
what is now South Fork, on November 25, 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



215 



185s, and is a son of James and Mary (Kelly) 
Burns. 

In county Donegal, Ireland, on March 10. 
1832, was born James Burns, the father of 
the subject of this record. James Burns was 
reared upon his native island until eighteen 
years of age, when, desiring to better his con- 
dition and to seek a liberty not attainable in 
that country, he emigrated to America in 
1850. What is now known as South Fork 
was then known as the Halfway House. It 
was to this point that Mr. Burns came. The 
Pennsylvania railroad was then being built, 
and he secured a position in the construction 
of that road as sub-division boss. He was in 
this employ about four years, when he re- 
moved to what is now Cambria city, where 
he purchased a tract of land and became one 
of the earliest settlers and founders of the 
place. For about eighteen years after locating 
in the latter place he was engaged in the ore 
mines of the Cambria Iron company. After 
the e.xpiration of that time he purchased a 
farm in Lower Yoder township, and lived 
upon it a quiet life as a tiller of the soil, until 
death ended his active and industrious life on 
January 27, 1878. 

Politically he was a tlemocrat of the strong- 
est convictions, a man who labored zealously 
for his party ; and although he had but a lim- 
ited education, yet was frequently called to 
political positions of trust and honor. He 
was a man of considerable mathematical talent. 
He served a number of years as tax collector 
in Cambria city borough, and also in Lower 
Yoder township. When the district court 
was held in Johnstown, he served a number 
of years as tipstaff. 

His marriage with Mary Kelly resulted in 
in the birth of nine children : Cornelius, who 
resides on the old homestead, in Lower Yoder 



township; James P., subject ; John A., who is 
a locomotive engineer, of Chicago, Illinois ; 
Charles, alderman of the Fifteenth ward, Johns- 
town ; Daniel, now deceased, was a traveling 
salesman for Corliss Brothers, collar and cuff 
manufacturers ; Jerre, in the hotel business, 
in Elyria, Ohio; Mary, the , wife of Edward 
Waltz, of Morrellville, this county; Patrick 
and Katie both died in infancy. 

James P. Burns had the advantages of but 
a common school education. .Striking out 
into the world on his own account, he cast 
his fortunes among the coal miners of the an- 
thracite coal regions of Pencsylvania, follow- 
ing this line of work about one year, when he 
returned to Johnstown. He took a position 
under the employ of the Cambria Iron com- 
pany, where he learned the trade of a wire 
galvanizer, and worked at that trade for that 
company about sixteen years. He then 
learned the trade of a roller, and for a year 
and a half was engaged in the rolling of clock 
springs, paragon wire and brush wire. This 
was a line of work requiring the greatest skill ; 
and so apt was Mr. Burns in the conception 
and execution of the work, that he was given 
a foremanship in that department a short time 
prior to the flood, which destroyed the enter- 
prise. Although the establishment which 
had given him employment had been carried 
down in the path of destruction, yet Mr. Burns 
was not without a business and an avocation. 
A short time prior to that great calamity he 
had built a hotel in Minersville, now the 
Fourteenth ward of Johnstown, and after the 
flood devoted his energies to the running of 
this popular place, the Arlington hotel, a first- 
class frame building. 

June 29, 1880, Mr. Burns and Kate, a daugh- 
ter of Michael Connelly, were happily mar- 
ried, and their union has resulted in the birth 



216 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



of six children : Daniel, Mary, Susan, Irene, 
Katie and Cokimbus. 

Politically Mr. Burns is a democrat, and 
formerly took an active part in the affairs of 
his party, holding the offices of treasurer one 
term, and councilman two terms, of MiUville 
borough, before.it became a part of the city 
organization. 



/>-II.\I{LES IfASlJAC'H, a prosperous and 
^■^ enterprising farmer, is the son of George 
and Katie (Muench) Rasbach, and was born 
October 20, 1838, in Brotterode, State of 
Schmalkalden, Kurhessen, Germany. He was 
educated in his native land, receivins a cood 
common-school education. At a very early 
age he learned the trade of a machinist, and 
after completing his apprenticeship was em- 
ployed in an establishment engaged in the 
manufacture of stirrup and bridle bits. 

As is the custom in his native country, at 
the age of twenty years he entered the Ger- 
man army, in wliich he served eight years. 
For two years of this period he served as cor- 
poral, then for another period of two years he 
was overseer in the commissary department, 
and later acted as supervisor of the armory 
depart mciit. At the close of this long and 
faithful term of military service he emigrated 
to America and located at Birmingham, Pitts- 
burg, l'enns)'lvania, where he was engaged, 
first ill a lock f ictor)', and later in a machine 
shop. Ill 1S69 he removed to Johnstown, 
this county, and then caine to Concmaugh 
township, where he adopted the pursuit of a 
farmer. He soon purchased a farm of eighty- 
five acres, in the above township, and has 
since been actively engaged in tilling the soil. 
His efforts in this direction have been liberally 
rewarded, ami Mr. Rasbach I'cviews with satis- 
faction the results of iiis industrious life. 



Mr. Rasbach has been three times married. 
His first wife was Miss Philipp';;na Soffel, and 
this marriage was fruitful in the birth of four 
children: August; Charles, deceased; Katie, 
who now resides in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
and William, who is at home. As his second 
wife he married Miss Mary Herald, and to 
this union were born two children: John and 
George, deceased. His third wife was Mrs. 
Harriet Scanlon, ndc Woods, and to this mari- 
tal union was born one daughter, Annie. 

Mr. Rasbach upholds the principles of the 
Democratic part)', and has always taken an 
intelligent interest in politics, both local and 
national, but has never sought nor held office. 

I le is a consistent member of the German 
Lutheran church, to which organization he 
gives his hearty support. 



y\R. L. S. LIVINGSTON, a successful 
young physician, of Johnstown, Penn- 
sylvania, who has won his wa)', unaided by the 
influence of friends or relations, is a son of 
Alfred W. and Mary (Berkebile) Livingston, 
and was horn in Conemaugh township, Som- 
erset count)', l'enns)dvania, l\La)' 22, 1866. 

lie is of Scotch-Irish extraction, and his 
graiulfitlii'i', Samuel Li\'ingstoii, is a native 
and life-long resident of Somerset count)'. I le 
was born in the year 1809, and is, therefore, 
eighty-seven years of age. 

Alfreil W. Livingston, the father of our 
su'iject, was also a native of Somerset count)-, 
born April 6, 1 841, and still resides there. 
He is a carpenter by trade, and has followed 
th.it Iraiic, together with agricultural pursuits, 
all his life, excepting nearl)- three and one-half 
years spent in the Federal ami)'. I le belonged 
to compan)' I, I'ifty-fourth regiment, Penns\l- 
vania Volunteer infuiti)-. 1 Ic participated in a 
number of engagements , and was wounded at 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



217 



New Market. Throughout all the trials and 
hardships of the war, and, indeed, they were 
many, he bore himself bravely and courage- 
ously, and was honorably discharged from the 
United States service on October lo, 1864, at 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia. 

His marriage with Mary, a daughter of 
Peter Berkebile, resulted in the birth of ten 
children ; eight sons and two daughters. 

April 24, 1S90, Dr. Livingston and Miss 
Laviiia Stutzman, a daughter of Stephen Stutz- 
man, were united in marriage, and to their 
union one son, Robert Lloyd, has been born. 

Dr. Livingston was educated in the schools 
of Somerset county, and afterwards taught 
eight consecutive terms in the public schools 
of that county. In 1887 he entered the 
office of Dr. George Conrad, of Johnstown, 
under whose preceptorship he continued tliree 
years. The following year, 1888, he entered 
the Eclectic Medical institute, of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, from which he was graduated June 4, 
1891 ; since which time he has been engaged 
in active and successful practice in Johnstown. 
In the autumn of 1893, in order to more thor- 
oughly qualify himself for the practice of his 
profession, he took a post-graduate course in 
th^ Polyclinic college, of Philadelphia. In 
addition to his general practice, he makes a 
specialty of the nose and throat, in which he 
has met with success. 

Dr. Livingston is a live, progressive young 
physician, and takes an active interest in every 
movement which has for its object the advance- 
ment and promotion of the science of medi- 
cine. He is a member of the Central Medical 
Association of Pennsylvania, and of the Eclec- 
tic Medical Association of the State. 

Dr. Livingston is not in the ordinary ac- 
ceptance of the term a politician, but believ- 
ing in pure citizenship, he takes an intelligent 



interest in local, state and national politics, 
such an interest as every citizen should take, 
and upon such an interest the safety of our 
nation depends. He affiliates with the Repub- 
lican party, but has never aspired to office. 
He is a member of Speer Orr Camp, No. 14, 
Sons of Veterans, of Johnstown. 

© 

^^ARL KIYINIUS, a successful and pros- 
^^ perous merchant and highly respected 
citizen of Ebensburg, this county, is a son of 
Gotleib Ferdinand and Mrs. Catherine (Kus- 
terer, iiee Haish) Rivinius, and was born in 
Wurtemburg, Germany, July 4, 1845. 

Catherine Haish's first husband was a Mr. 
Kusterer, and their marriage union resulted in 
the birth of five children, one of whom, Ernest 
Kusterer, came to America in 1852, and pro- 
bably settled in Pennsylvania, but his where- 
abouts has never been positively ascertained. 

Carl Rivinius was educated in the common 
schools of his native country and by private 
instruction. He served a full apprenticeship 
of four years in the Fatherland at the watch- 
maker's trade. He then worked ten years at 
the trade in that country as a journeyman, and 
in 1874 he crossed the Atlantic, seeking a 
home in the new world ; for two years he fol- 
lowed journey work in this countrj-. 

In 1875 he came to Ebensburg, and estab- 
lished a watch-repairing and jewelry business 
on his own account in the fall of 1876. His 
motto has been " Upward and Onward," and 
he has gone ahead adding to his stock and 
expanding his business until he now has a 
store that would do credit to many of the 
stores of a similar kind in the larger cities. 

In religious faith and practice he is a Luth- 
eran, having joined that church before com- 
ing to this country. Fraternally Mr. Rivinius 
is a member of Highland Lodge, No. 428, 1. 



218 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



O. O. F., at Ebensburg; Ebensburg Con- 
clave, No. 367, I. O. of 1 1., and Beulah Castle, 
No. 248, K. G. E. 

On April 14, 1886, Mr. Rivinius and Mary 
J. Lloyd, a daughter of Abel Lloyd, of Ebens- 
burg, were united in marriage, and their union 
has been blessed in the birth of three children : 
Ferdinand L., born February 2, 1890, and 
died April 12, 1890; Mary, born February 3, 
1891 ; and Otto, born June 9, 1892. 

Mr. Rivinius is a typical representative of 
that sturdy German element of our citizen- 
ship, whose industry, genius and thrift are 
found in ever\- avenue of life. 



i^lCTKH .S. FISHER, a representative busi- 
ness man and enterprising merchant of 
Johnstown, this county, is a son of Daniel and 
Dinah Fisher, and was born in Berlin, Somer- 
set county, this State, June 2, 1S51. 

His father was born in Germany in 1817, 
and was a member of a prominent and well- 
to-do family, many of whom were well edu- 
cated and followed the profession of teaching. 
He learned the trade of a tailor in the Father- 
land, and came to the United States in 1843, 
locating in Somerset county, where he resided 
until 1886, when he came to Johnstown, and 
has resided there ever since in comparative 
retirement. Although he learned the trade of 
a tailor, yet he never followed that craft, but 
pursued the arts of agriculture in Somerset 
county. In religious belief, he, as well as his 
wife, has always been a Lutheran. 1'. -S. 
Fisher had the advantages of a good common- 
school training in the schools of Somerset 
county and the iiigh schools at Berlin and 
Jenner Cross Roads, of the same county. I le 
was then engaged for a time as a teacher. 

In 1872, just after attaining to his majority 
and seeking a more active fiekl for his indi- 



vidual efforts, he came to Johnstown and 
secured employment from April until Sep- 
tember of that year, in the bakery and confec- 
tionery business of Jacob Fend. In October 
of the same year he took a position with Vo- 
ronickel & Co., in the wholesale liquor busi- 
ness, and two and a half years later succeeded 
them, and has conducted that line of business 
to the present time. He has been eminently 
successful as a business man, and ranks as 
one of the substantial and progressive citizens 
of Johnstown. Mr. Fisher does not confine 
his efforts exclusively to the mercantile busi- 
ness, but lends his influence to every move 
which has for its object the promotion of the 
good of the city. He is a director in the 
Johnstown Board of Trade, an organization 
through whose efforts much substantial good 
has come to the city ; and is also a director of 
the Johnstown Telephone company and of the 
Johnstown Wall Paper company. 

Mr. Fisher has been twice married. His 
first union was in 1875, with Emma, daughter 
of Elijah Butler, of this county, and this union 
resulted in the birth of three children, two 
sons and one daughter : Carl, Grace and 
Curtis. His first wife died in 1S84, and he 
married, as his second wife, in 1889, Laurena 
Wcntroth, a daughter of J. D. Wcntroth, of 
X'intontlalc, this county. 

/■VN AriMCK .^IILLEK, the leading mer- 
c li.uit tailor of Johnstown, Cambria 
county, is the son of Samuel and Eliza (Leo- 
pold) Miller, and was born in Pottstown, Mont- 
gomery county, Pennsj-lvania, on December 
22, 1869. llis father is a n.ative of Germany, 
but before emigrating to this country he 
resided in England for a period of ten years. 
He came to the United States in 1859, and 
located for a short time in Philadelphia, Penn- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



219 



sylvania, and in 1865 he removed to Potts- 
town, where he still resides. He is engaged 
in the merchant tailoring business, and con- 
ducts a large store at that place. 

In 1864 he married Eliza Leopold, a native 
of Germany, who came to this country with 
her parents and located in the State of Indiana. 

Mr. Miller was reared in his native town 
and received his education in the private and 
public schools of the same place. He went 
to Philadelphia, where he learned the trade of 
a cutter, and at the early age of eighteen 
years, such was the confidence placed in him 
by liis father, that he was put in charge of a 
large merchant tailoring establishment by the 
latter, which he successfully managed a num- 
ber of years. In 1891 he came to Johnstown, 
and opened a merchant tailoring establish- 
ment. He carries the finest piece-goods in 
the city, and attends personally to the cutting 
of fine garments, thus insuring perfection in 
style. Mr. Miller is not only successful as a 
business man, but prominent in social circles 
as well, and is a member of several social 
clubs, among which are the following: Presi- 
dent of the Progress Club, a member of the 
Amicus Club and the M. S. Club. 



'pHOMAS J. HERZOG, an experienced 
and skilled brick manufacturer, and the 
present foreman of the Cambria Iron com- 
pany's extensive brick }'ards at Johnstown, is 
a son of Lambert and Rosanna (Hinkle) Her- 
zog, and was born in Blair county, Pennsyl- 
vania, December 6, 1834. He received his 
early education in the common schools, and 
went to work when quite young in a brick- 
yard, where he thoroughly learned the brick- 
making business, which he has followed ever 
since. After becoming proficient in this line 



of work, he went to Hollidaysburg, in his na- 
tive county, and operated a brickyard of his 
own for some time; and then, on July 13, 
1867, entered the employ of the Cambria Iron 
company, at their Johnstown brickyards, where 
he rapidly filled every position, and on July 
13, 1869, was given his present position as 
foreman. During the long period of twenty- 
nine years that he has been in these yards, 
he has always had his employer's interest in 
view, yet wronged no one, and made a record 
for efficiency and honest work. Business 
duties have left Mr. Herzog but little time at 
his command to devote to political or religious 
affairs, yet he is a consistent and useful mem- 
ber of St. John's Catholic church of Johns- 
town, and has always given an active and 
whole-hearted support to the Democratic 
party, in whose principles he believes. He 
has improved his early and limited education 
by reading and observation, and has decided 
opinions on all issues of public interest. 

Thomas J. Herzog, on April 28, 1864, was 
united in marriage with Lydia M. Hileman, 
daughter of Philip Hileman, of Blair county. 
To their union have been born eight children, 
all sons : John Howard; Edgar, died at seven- 
teen years of age ; William, deceased ; James ; 
Thomas V. ; Frank ; Leo and Joseph. 

The Herzog family has been natives for 
many generations of Switzerland, the moun- 
tain-walled Republic of Europe, and Lam- 
bert Herzog (father) was one of Napoleon's 
veterans. He was born in Switzerland in 
1787, and served seven years in the Third 
Swiss regiment, under Napoleon Bonaparte. 
He enlisted January 14, 1807, and was dis- 
charged in 1 8 14. 

After leaving the French army Mr. Herzog 
came to Huntingdon county, and followed 
working at furnaces until his death, which 



220 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



occurred on Christmas day, 1835. He was an 
only child, and married Rosanna Hinkle, who 
had neither brother nor sister. To their union 
were born six children, five sons and one 
daughter. Mrs. Herzog passed away in March, 
1874, when in the seventy-sixth year of her 
age. Lambert Herzog and his wife were an 
industrious couple, and he left behind him a 
brilliant military record, of which his descend- 
ants may be justly proud. 



JOHN BUKKHAKD, the popular and en- 
tcrprising proprietor of the City Hotel, 
Johnstown Pennsylvania, is a son of Peter 
and lilizabetii Rurkhard, and was born in 
West Taylor township, this county, April 11, 
1855. 

Leonard Burkliard, grandfather, was a na- 
tive of Szcilengstadt, Frankfort-on-tlie-Main, 
and died in the land of his nativit}'. Peter 
Burkard was born in the same place in 1813, 
was reared and educated in his native countrj', 
where he followed the avocation of a turf- 
digger, owning and operating some territory 
until he came to America, in 1854. Coming 
to this country he located at what was then 
known as Cambria furnace, a suburb of Johns- 
town, this county, where lie woikcd in the 
coke-yard; but preferring agricultural pur- 
suits rather than working about public works, 
he rented a farm in what is now West Taylor 
townshij), this county, and for about twenty- 
cigiit years conducted a successful dairy busi- 
ness. Retiring from active life he removed 
into Cambria city, where he spent the re- 
mainder of his days, dying March 27, 1885. 
Politically lie was a democrat, but never 
sougiU nor held any [lulitical office. 

The grandfather of John lUirkliard, on the 
maternal side of the family, was Michael 



Burkhart, who was also a native of Frank- 
fort-on-the-Main. He came to America with 
his son-in-law in 1854, and for a time located 
at Cambria furnace, but later at Coopersdale, 
where he lived at the time of his death, which 
took place in his eighty-fourth year, being ac- 
cidentally killed while actively engaged as a 
mail-carrier. 

John Burkhard is one of a family of the 
following children: Elizabeth, wife of Charles 
Fritchie, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Peter 
' H., a resident of Bethlehem, this State ; 
Michael, a resident of the same place ; Cathe- 
rine, wife of Joseph Kern, of Johnstown ; 
Leonard, also of Johnstown ; subject ; David 
and Annie, both deceased. 

Mr. Burkhard received a fair German and 
English education in the schools of Cambria 
city. When he took up the battle of life on 
his own account it was in the employ of the 
Cambria Iron company, where he was engaged 
for sixteen years, six in the puddling-mill and 
ten as a rougher on the rolls. He then 
tried the fortunes of the dairy business one 
j'ear, at the end of which time, in 1 886, he 
embarkeil in the hotel business, which he has 
pursued to the present time. 

Mr. l^uikhanl is a democrat in political 
fiitli, tak'cs an active and intelligent interest in 
affairs pertaining to his ward, and served as 
councilman of the borough of Cambria city 
before it became a part of the city of Johns- 
town. 

June 28, 1876, he married Catharine lleck- 
nian, and to this union have been born the 
following children : Minnie, born Januar)- 21, 
1877; Charles, born July 17, 1S78; Catharine, 
January 10, 1880; John, December 4, 1S82, 
and is now deceased ; Clara, born November 
30, 1885; Gertrude, born l'\'bruary 13, 1887; 
William, born May 13, 1889; Albert, born 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



221 



February 4, 1 891, and is now deceased ; Ag- 
nes, born November 16, 1893; and Emma, 
born August 13, 1895. 



y^R. DAVID M. KOONTZ, a practicing 
^^ physician of Johnstown, was born April 
6, 1864, in Cessna, Bedford county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

He received his literary education at Pleas- 
antviiie, Ikdford county, Pennsylvania; stud- 
ied medicine with Dr. S. G. Statler, of Pleas- 
antville, and entered the Jefferson Medical 
college, of Philadelphia, from which college 
he graduated April 3, 1889. July I, 1889, he 
located in Johnstown, whence he removed to 
Pittsburg for six months, going thence to 
Charlesville, Bedford county, where he re- 
mained three years. He then returned to 
Johnstown, and has lived there ever since. 
He is a general practitioner, but makes a 
specialty of catarrh and gynaecology, having 
taken a special course in gynsecolgy and ob- 
stetrics, at the Lying-in Charity hospital of 
Philadelphia. He has also taken a special 
course in dermatology, at the Philadelphia 
hospital. He fills at present the important 
positions of medical examiner for the New 
England Mutual Life Insurance company, of 
New York city, for the Progressive Endow- 
ment Guild of America, of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, for the Protective Home Circle, of 
Sharon, Pennsylvania, and for the Royal Bene- 
fit society, of New York city. He is a mem- 
ber of Rainsburg Lodge, No. 730, I. O. O. P., 
of Protective Home Circle, No. 138, of P. E. 
G. of America, of the Jr. O. U. A. M., and of 
the Bedford County Medical Society of Bed- 
ford, Pennsylvania. Dr. Koontz's political 
affiliations are with the Republican party. He 
married Minnie E. Anderson, daughter of 



W. W. Anderson, of Cessna, Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania. He is a son of William and 
Susanna (Miller) Koontz. The family are of 
German extraction and settled at an early day 
in the state of Virginia, from which state his 
great-grandfather Koontz, emigrated to Bed- 
ford county, being one of the earliest settlers 
of that county. The long and tedious jour- 
ney from Virginia to Bedford county was 
made in a covered wagon, in which the family 
lived for one year until a house could be built. 

The grandfather, Henry Koontz, was born 
in Bedford county, and lived all his life on 
the farm on which he was born. The father 
of Dr. Koontz was born on the old homestead 
February i, 1838, and is still living. He has 
been following the joint occupations of dairy- 
man, truckman and farmer, at Cessna, about 
four miles north of Bedford. During the 
Civil War he was exempt from service. 

He was married to a daughter of Michael 
Miller, who lives near Fishertown, Bedford 
county. He was born at Henrietta, Pennsyl- 
vania. They have had three children : Henry 
M., deceased ; David M., and George W., 
who lives with his father and follows the 
same vocation. 



JOSEPH P. LAYTON, who for forty years 
^ faithfully discharged the duties of fore- 
man in the blacksmithing department of the 
Cambria Iron company, is a son of Henry 
and Helena (Pretzman) Layton, and was born 
in Greencastle, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, 
January 30, 1821. 

His grandfather, Theodore Layton, was 
born in Elberfeldt, on the Rhine, and emi- 
grated to this country in 1796. He landed at 
Baltimore, and from there removed to Green- 
castle, which he made his permanent home. 
Henry Layton ( father) was but six months 



222 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



old when his parents came to the United 
States. He received his earlj' training and 
education in Greencastle. In the War of 1812, 
our second struggle for independence, Henry 
Layton, then a boy of about seventeen years, 
entered the army and served under that re- 
nowned soldier, General Winfield Scott. He 
served until the close of the war, having taken 
part in the battle of Lundy's Lane and Chip- 
pewa. He was a weaver by trade, and located 
in Johnstown, this county, in 1833. He was 
a republican in politics, and served as justice 
of the peace for a number of years. He died 
in Johnstown in 1871. 

Joseph P. Layton received his education in 
the common schools of Johnstown, and in his 
youth learned the trade of blacksmith, which 
occupation he has always followed. 

In 1853, when the Cambria Iron company's 
works were built in this city, he was made 
general foreman of the blacksmith shops of that 
company. He filled this position very accept- 
ably for forty years, and at the close of this long 
period of faithful .service, he was made clerk 
of that department, in which capacity he acts 
as timekeeper. He is a member of the Pres- 
byterian church, and is identified with a num- 
ber of lodges. He belongs to Corona Lodge, 
No. 999, I. O. O. F., at Conemaugh; to the 
Cambria Lodge, No. 278, F. and A. M. ; and 
Mineral City Lodge, No. 100, Knights of the 
Mystic Chain. He is very prominently iden- 
tified witii the order of Good Templars, and 
with the -Sons of Temperance. Hcing a strong 
advocate of the cause of temperance he is a 
member of the Prohibition party, and has been 
before the public as a candidate for the state 
legislature and for various count)- offices. 

He has been twice married. His first mar- 
riage was with Miss Elizabeth Huber, to which 
union three children were born: John II., of 



McKeesport, Pennsylvania ; Anna L., who is 
the wife of John G. Ball, of Kansas City, Mis- 
souri; and one child, who died in infancy. 
His second marriage was with Miss Anna Jane 
Purse. This marriage has resulted in the birth 
of seven children; Ella Grace, wife of Reuben 
Joder, of Morrellville, this county; Mary L., 
Bertha B., and Joseph W., residents of Johns- 
town ; and Mabel, Jennie, and Benjamin, de- 
ceased. 

© 

/^OL. SAMUEL W. DAVIS, the present 
^^ affable and efficient prothonotary, of 
Cambria county, and a substantial and pro- 
gressive citizen, of Ebensburg, the county seat 
of that county, is a son of William and Eliza- 
beth (Davis) Davis, and was born near Ebens- 
burg, in Cambria township, Cambria county, 
Pennsylvania, February 13, 1841. 

His father, William Davis, was a native of the 
principality of Wales, born in the j-car 1802, 
and in the year 18 18 he left the land of his 
birth to seek a home in the New World. He 
landed at the port of Baltimore, and then pro- 
ceeded, via Philadelphia, to central Pennsyl- 
vania. His first location was at Ebensburg. 
There, however, he remained but a short time, 
until he removed to Cambria township, where 
our subject was born. Subsecjuentl)- he re- 
turned to Ebensburg, where he passed the 
remainder of his life, his death occurring in 
1878. He was engaged in general merchan- 
dizing, lumbering and stock-dealing, in which 
triangular enterprises he was uniformly suc- 
cessful, attesting in a marked degree his gen- 
eral business qualifications. 

Formerly he was an old-line whig, but upon 
the organization of the present Republican 
party, in 1856, became identified with its 
interests and remained a republican, staunch 
and firm in his convictions, until his death. 




COL. SAML Kl. \V. DAVIS. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



223 



He was a member of the Congregational 
church, and was a consistent and devout 
Christian. 

He married EUzabeth Davis, a daughter of 
John Davis, who was a native of Wales, and 
who emigrated to the United States in an early- 
day. He first settled in Huntingdon county, 
but at the time of his death was a resident 
of Cambria township, where he had followed 
agricultural pursuits. Of the children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Davis, four died in infancy, and the 
following grew to maturity: Mary, deceased ; 
Catharine, the widow of Evan Griffith, of Al- 
toona, Pennsylvania ; Lydia, the relict of John 
O. Evans, of Ebensburg ; Samuel W., subject; 
and Lemuel, justice of the peace and real-estate 
agent, of Kane, McKean county, this State. 

Samuel W. Davis wedded Sarah J. Evans, a 
daughter of David O. Evans, now of Ebens- 
burg, but formerly of Wales, and to them have 
been born ten children : Emery Hubert, under 
his father, deputy-prothonotary ; Mary E., 
Elmer C, Lillian June, Ralph H., Willis, 
Nannie Margaret, Park Meade, and Reginald 
S., all of whom reside at home with their 
parents, and one is deceased. 

Lieutenant Davis acquired his mental train- 
ing in the public schools of his native county, 
and under the direction of private tutors. 
Finishing his education, he was employed as 
clerk in his father's mercantile establishment, 
and afterwards became associated with him in 
the mercantile and lumber business, in which 
he continued until 1S62. In August of that 
year he enlisted in the Federal service in com- 
pany F, One Hundred and Thirty-third regi- 
ment, nine months' men. At the expiration 
of this term of enlistment, he enlisted as a 
private in company C.Two Hundred and Ninth 
regiment, and upon the organization of the 
company was made first lieutenant, and served 



efficiently in that capacity until hostilities 
ceased between the North and the South. In 
1874 he organized in Ebensburg company A 
of the Fifth regiment, National Guard of Penn- 
sylvania, and for seven years held the com- 
mission of captain, and was promoted to major, 
and later to colonel. Returning home from 
the service, he again took up lumbering until 
1869. Upon that date he engaged in the 
livery business at Ebensburg, and continued 
until 1885. 

Politically Lieutenant Davis is a staunch 
and uncompromising republican, who has ever 
been alive to the interest and success of his 
party. In 1878 he was elected to the office of 
county commissioner, and in 1881 was re- 
elected to that office. At the expiration of 
this term of office he became clerk to the 
county treasurer, Alex. Stackhouse. In 1889 
he was appointed deputy-sheriff by Sheriff J. 
C. Stineman ; was continued another term un- 
der the regime of J. M. Shumaker, and one 
year under the present incumbent, Sheriff D. 
W. Coulter. In the autumn of 1895 he was 
elected to the office of prothonotary, of Cam- 
bria county, for a term of three years, and is 
now ably and acceptably filling that office. 
He is a member of Summit Lodge, No. 312, 
Free and Accepted Masons, and John M. Jones 
Post, No. 556, Grand Army of the Republic, at 
Ebensburg. 

Both as a public official and a man Lieuten- 
ant Davis' career has been one of integrity and 
blamelessness. He is a man of strong person- 
ality, broad-minded, public-spirited, conser- 
vative, and yet enterprising. He was a 
member of the board of commissioners when 
the present court-house — a structure of archi- 
tectural beauty and elegance — was erected in 
1881 ; was a member of the school board 
which built, in 1893, the present public-school 



224 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



building of Ebensburg, at a cost of twenty 
thousand dollars, and which is a model of 
neatness and architectural good taste, and was 
also one of the leading spirits in the move 
which resulted in the erection of an opera 
house, which affords a place for pleasant and 
instructive entertainments for the inhabitants 
of that town. All of these buildings reflect 
great credit upon the town of Ebensburg, and 
speak much for the enterprise of Colonel Da- 
vis, who was the leading spirit in their con- 
struction. He is a man of pleasant address, 
affable and congenial, and possesses a host of 
admiring friends. 

♦^AXIEL A. SIPE, a substantial citizen and 
the proprietor of the " Eclipse Roller 
Mill," at Sumnierhill, is the only son of Peter 
and Maria (Pottsgrove) Sipe, and was born at 
Allegheny furnace, Blair county, Pennsylva- 
nia, June 28, 1839. 

Peter Sipe was of German descent, and re- 
moved in 1835, from his native county of 
Cumberland to Allegheny furnace, Blair 
county, where he followed his trade of tailor 
for several years. At the end of that time he 
went to Collinsville, which he soon left to re- 
move to Frankstown, and a few years later 
{)urchased near the Horse Shoe Bend, a farm 
on which he died at an advanced age. Me 
was a whig in politics, and a member of the 
Catholic church, and wedded Maria Potts- 
grove, whose fallu 1, George Pottsgrove, was 
a miller, resident then in that part of Hunting- 
don which is now Blair county. Their family 
consisted of three children, one son and two 
daughters : Daniel A.; Sarah, who died at ten 
years of age, and Marg.iretta, wife of James 
Knox, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

Daniel A. Sipe was reared in his native 
county, received his education in the common 



schools, and at the age of ten years entered a 
flouring-mill, in which he learned the trade of 
a miller. At the close of his apprenticeship 
he commenced life himself as a miller, and 
took every means within his grasp to perfect 
himself in this line of work. He worked in 
various mills until 1870, when he had acquired 
sufficient means to purchase a mill for himself. 
The milling industry at Sumnierhill presented 
sufficient advantages for a successful business, 
and he purchased the old Sumnierhill mill, 
which he repaired and ran successfully until 
1892, when it was destroyed by fire. This 
great loss did not discourage Mr. Sipe, and he 
immediately made all the necessarj' prepara- 
tions for rebuilding in a manner to keep 
abreast of the times, and with sufficient ca- 
pacity to accommodate the needs of his rapidly 
increasing custom. His present splendid mill 
fills all of these conditions and i^equirements. 
It is 30x40 feet in dimensions, three stories 
high with a basement, and well fitted up in 
every department. This mill is fully equipped 
with all the late and modern milling facilities, 
incliuling rollers, bolting-chests, reels, puri- 
fiers, elevators and a variety of other improved 
and necessary machinery, and has a capacity 
of thirty-five barrels of flour per day. It is a 
modern structuie, and Mr. Sipe employs the 
full roller graduating plan in the manufacture 
of his different grades and brands of flour. He 
also manufactures feed and deals in salt and 
grain of all kinds. He has attained an envia- 
ble reputation for high-grade flour and mill- 
feed, which have a strong hold upon public 
favor throughout this and adjoining counties. 
His choicest brantls are White Rose and Min- 
nesota Patent, which are manufactured under 
his personal supervision and never fail to give 
satisfaction. 

On November 25, 1863, Daniel .X.Sijie mar- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



225 



ried Elizabeth Laferty, a daughter of George 
Laferty, a resident of Blair county. They 
have six children, two sons and four daugh- 
ters : Peter P., in the railroad service, married 
Lizzie Berghane ; Annie, wife of Wm. Davis, 
of Ebensburg, whose sketch appears else- 
where ; Ella, married James Karr, of May- 
beury. West Virginia ; Sadie, wife of J. E. 
Barlow, also of Maybeury; Mamie and G. I. 
Unpretentious and unassuming, Mr. Sipe 
has lived the life of a good and useful citizen, 
and as a business man is in the front rank of 
the milling industry of Cambria county. His 
politics have always been in harmony with the 
Republican party, and in religion he is identi- 
fied with the Evangelical Lutheran church, in 
which he has been a member and deacon for 
several years. 



-i^ETER L. CARPENTER, the genial pro- 
prietor of the Capital Hotel at Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania, is a conspicuous example of the 
right man in the right place. He is a son of 
Joshua F. and Catherine (Levy) Carpenter, 
and was born in Johnstown, Sept. lo, 1855. 
His father is of English descent, and was 
born in Bedford Co., Feb. 19, 1825. He located 
in Johnstown at the time the Pennsj'lvania rail- 
road was opened for travel, about 1852, and was 
the first drayman to haul goods from the 
depot into the town. In 1858 he moved to 
Jennertown, Somerset county, where he kept 
hotel for three years. He then came back to 
Johnstown, and engaged in the manufacture 
of the famous " Carpenter's Liniment," which 
is sold all over the country. In addition to 
the reputation he acquired as the proprietor 
of the liniment, he became known as an auc- 
tioneer. He is possessed of ready wit, and a 
no less ready command of the Pennsjdvania 
Dutch dialect, and an auction conducted by 
15 



Mr. Carpenter in both English and Dutch, 
interspersed with ready-made jokes and songs, 
was worth going miles to hear. His constant 
traveling as salesman and auctioneer gave him 
a personal acquaintance with nearly every 
man, woman and child in Cambria and the 
surrounding counties. 

Our subject's maternal grandfather, Peter 
Levy, was for more than fifty years a resident 
of Davidsville, Somerset county. He was a 
merchant, and held the offices of county sur- 
veyor and justice of the peace. Squire Levy 
was well known for his sound judgment and un- 
impeachable honesty. He was a man of great 
vitality, and lived to be about ninety-two years 
of age. 

Our subject was brought up in Johnstown, 
and attended the public schools. He enjoys 
the memory of his " first trip to school," which 
was made on the stalwart shoulders of ex- 
Mayor Boyd, to the school-house at Jenner- 
town. After leaving school he secured a 
position in the steel works department of the 
Cambria Iron company. He held this posi- 
tion for ten years, then resigned, and, with 
the late Henry Danges, drove overland to 
Michigan. After traveling through the West 
for a time, he secured employment at the Bass 
Machine works at Fort Wayne, Indiana. Two 
years afterwards he returned to Johnstown, 
and opened a restaurant under the famous 
Hulbert House, which was destroyed in the 
great flood. He conducted this for three 
years, then moved to the site of the present 
restaurant on Franklin street, which is still 
owned by him, but is managed for him by his 
brother George. He was very successful in 
the restaurant business, and on December 2, 
1893, took possession of the Cambria Club 
house, owned by the Cambria Iron company. 
He changed the name to the Capital Hotel, 



226 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



and soon made it one of the best managed 
and most popular hotels in Western Penn- 
sylvania. It is one of the few hotels run suc- 
cessfull)' without a bar. He has entertained 
guests of state and national distinction, among 
whom were Governor Pattison, Governor 
Beaver, Governor Hastings, Judge A. V. Bar- 
ker, Judge Harry White, Judge Longenaker, 
and others. 

Mr. Carpenter's business qualities are shown 
by the fact that, while he began life with no 
capital but his hands and brain, he has accu- 
mulated sufficient capital to build twent)' 
thousand dollars' worth of buildings since the 
flood. Part of this was earned by his acting 
as agent for various mercantile companies 
while in the restaurant business. 



/^KOlUiE K. (iLAS.S, M. I)., a rising ph)- 
^■^ sician and surgeon of Portage, this 
county, was born in Ennisvillc, I hintingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, October 15, 1867. At 
an early age he was thrown on his own re- 
sources, and being both ambitious and ener- 
getic, determined to secure for himself a liberal 
education. He received his early instruction 
in the Stone Vallej' academy, and on leaving 
tills school taught for four terms. He then 
entered a business college at Williamsport, 
Pennsylvania, from which he graduated in 
1 887. Having decided upon the profession 
of medicine as a life vocation, and lacking the 
mc.ins with which to pursue .1 professional 
education, he became a salesman of medical 
supplies, and in a year and a half had earned 
enough money to justify his commencing the 
studies preparatory to his profession. After a 
year's pre|)aratory study in the Universit)' of 
Maryland, he matriculated in the College of 
Physicians and .Surgeons at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, from which he graduated in 1891. On 



June I, 1891, he located in Portage, this 
county, and entered upon the practice of the 
profession for which he had been making such 
thorough preparation. 

He is an indefatigable student, and as a 
practitioner is careful, patient, and painstaking, 
as is evidenced by his large and successful 
practice. He is progressive, and is deeply 
interested in all that promotes progress in 
medical science ; is a member of the State 
Medical society, and of the Cambria County 
Medical association. In September, 1892, he 
was appointed railroad surgeon for the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad company, from Gallitzin to 
Johnstown, and still serves in that capacit)-. 

PVaternally, he is identified with the Ebens- 
burg Lodge, No. 312, F. and A. M., in wliich 
he has reached the degree of Past Master. 
He helped to organize the South Fork Lodge, 
No. 838, I. O. O. P., and is a member of the 
Improved Order of Heptasophs. 



TOIIV F. SEIOll, an enterprising merchant 
of Morrellville, Cambria county, Penn- 
s)'lvania, is one of the most jirominent and in- 
fiuential men of that ra[)idl}--growing borough. 
He is the son of John and Nancy (Arthur) 
Seigh, and was born on the old homestead in 
Coopersdale, May 31, 1851. 

The Seighs are of German descent, and 
were among the earliest settlers of the Cone- 
maugh valley. The Arthurs are of Irish de- 
scent. 

John Seigh, the father of our subject, was 
born in York county. He came to the neigh- 
borhood of Johnstown about the year 1829, 
and was em[)li)\ed !))• the -St.ite, working on 
the old State canal. He acquired a farm of 
some two hundred acres near Coopersdale, 
and lived on it llu- remainder of liis life. In 
ciinneclion with his f.inii he kept a (!.ur\- and 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



227 



furnished milk to the people of the neighbor- 
ing boroughs. 

In pohtics Mr. Seigh was an old-Une whig, 
and when that organization was merged into 
the RepubUcan party he became an earnest 
supporter of the Republican party. Wliile he 
took an active interest in politics and worked 
for the success of his party he never became a 
candidate for office himself 

He was a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, and an earnest church-worker. 
He died May i6, 1864, at the age of forty- 
eight, respected by all. His family consisted 
of the following children : Sarah, wife of 
G. W. Stutzman ; Julia, deceased, was the 
wife of James Wills; Elizabeth, deceased, and 
John F., the subject of this sketch. 

John F. Seigh lived with his mother on the 
old homestead and attended the public schools 
until he was sixteen years old, when he was 
employed in the store of his brother-in-law, 
G. W. Stutzman, in Minersville. He remained 
in his employ until 1869, when, having ac- 
quired a knowledge of the business, he bought 
an interest in the store. 

In 1874 he moved to Morrellville and 
opened the first general store in that place. 
He still conducts this store and does a pros- 
perous business. 

Since he became a resident of Morrellville 
Mr. Seigh has been active in promoting the 
growth of the borough, which he has seen 
grow from a small village to be the largest 
borough in the count)^ 

He is a director in and treasurer of the 
Morrellville Building and Loan association, 
and has been treasurer of Morrellville borough 
since its incorporation, in 1890, being re- 
elected annually. 

Like his father, he is a republican, and 
filled some of the township offices before 



Morrellville became a borough. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and was one of the original trustees of the 
Methodist Episcopal church in Morrellville, 
and still holds that office. He is a member 
of the Royal Arcanum. 

In May, 1873. he was married to Miss 
Anna L. Brown, daughter of Morganza Brown 
(whose sketch appears elsewhere). To this 
union were born the following children : 
Albert, who is in the store with his father; 
George, who died when three years old ; 
Nannie, who is at home, and Roy, who died 
at the age of two years. 



rr I ILLIAM L. OALBUAITH, a prosper- 

^-^*-^ ous farmer and lumber merchant of 
West Taylor township, is a son of William 
and Nancy (Houston) Galbraith, and was born 
in Fairfield township, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, August lo, 1826. His father, 
William Galbraith, was born in County Down, 
Ireland, and shortl)' after his marriage with 
Miss Nancy Houston, also a native of Ireland, 
emigrated to America, locating near Armagh, 
Indiana county, Pennsylvania, and was em- 
ployed in the woolen mills of Derry. He was 
a member of the United Presbyterian church, 
and died in 1826. His wife, who was also a 
member of the same church, died in 1872, at 
the age of eighty-nine years. To their mar- 
riage were born eight children : John, who died 
in 1889; Elizabeth, the wife of John Wagoner, 
of New Florence, Westmoreland county ; 
Mary, the wife of James Trimble, of New Flor- 
ence ; Jane, the wife of George Peoples, of 
Fairfield township ; Nancy, who also lives in 
Fairfield township ; Archibald, deceased, and 
William L. 

William L. Galbraith, the subject of this 
sketch, spent his boyhood days on the farm. 



228 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



receiving his education in the public schools 
of his district. At the age of sixteen years 
he was employed as a clerk in the store of the 
old Cambria Furnace company, in West Tay- 
lor township. This position he held for five 
years, and at the end of this period of faithful 
and efficient service, was promoted to the 
position of book-keeper in the office of the 
above firm, and continued in that position 
until i860, when the Cambria Furnace com- 
pany discontinued business. After leaving 
the employ of that company, Mr. Galbraith 
located on a farm in West Taylor township, 
and in connection with his agricultural pur- 
suits, is at the present time engaged in the 
lumber business. 

He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, ami in politics is an adherent of the 
Republican party. He takes an active inter- 
est in local affairs; he has been township 
supervisor, has served as school director, and 
has served in other positions of trust in his 
township. In 1848 he wedded Miss Mary 
Bryan, a daughter of Adam Bryan, of West 
Taylor township, who was formerly manager 
of the Cambria furnace. Their maniage has 
been blessed in the birtii of nine children, six 
of whom are living : Nancy E., the wife of 
William Ailams, of Coopersdale, this count)-; 
Calvin M., I larvey M., Mary, the vvifc of James 
Adams, of Coopersdale ; William IJ., and 
Emma D., the wife of Frank Ulery, of West 
Taylor township. Those deceased are: John, 
Bryan, ami Alice, who was the wife of John 
Hunt, of Jackson township, this count)'. 



/^ICOItGK W. OSltOKN, a citizen of Johns- 
town, renns)lvania, arul a gardener b)- 
occu|)ation, is a son of George W. and Mar- 
garet (Murphy) Osborn. August 6, 1843, in 
a little log house, corner of Main and Market 



streets, Johnstown, he was born, and there, 
too, he was married, his wife being Miss 
Phcebe Myers, a daughter of Abraham Myers. 
Mr. Osborn attended the public schools in his 
earl)' boyhood, but did not acquire very much 
book-knowledge on account of a failure of his 
eye-sight. However, he entered a store, and 
in making his own way gained an education 
that was as valuable to him as the same 
amount of book-lore would have been, per- 
haps more so. He was twent)'-one years in 
this store, and then he entered the employ of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad company as a 
ticket-agent. Later he was transferred to the 
freight department, where he remained until 
he became assistant agent with R. T. Given, 
agent. He now discharged the duties of a 
brakenian ior the Pennsylvania Railroad 
company. He was a faithful workman on the 
Penns)'lvania railroad, but after having served 
this company for a number of years he mar- 
ried and mo\'cd to Bedford count)', returning 
in 188S, after thirteen years' residence there, 
he located in Johnstown and working for the 
Johnson company, and at gardening. 

Mr. Osborn has hatl various occupations, 
and in all has proven himself a laborer emi- 
nentl)- worthy of his hire. In this respect, as 
in others, he shows tlie temper and quality of 
the Irish race to which he belongs. 

11 is grandfatiicr was a native of the "Old 
Country" and came to America, settling first 
in Lancaster count)', later in Westmoreland, 
about one and a half miles fiom Latrobe, in 
Unity township, where he died. The grand- 
fatiicr was a farmer b)' occupation and emi- 
grated to this country on account of being a 
home-ruler. 

The father of our subject was born and 
reared to manhood in Westmoreland county. 
Then he came to Johnstown and ran a boat 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



229 



for a short time on the Pennsylvania canal. 
Afterwards he went into partnership with John 
Dibert, until 1850, and shortly afterward went 
to New Florence, Westmoreland county, and 
engaged in the mercantile business. In 1855 
he had purchased a farm of two hundred and 
forty acres near Johnstown from Abraham 
Stutzman, paying for all this good land but 
;g7i50.00. After his venture at New Florence 
he moved to Johnstown to his farm, going 
into partnership at the same time with his 
son-in-law, J. H. Fisher, in a store. He con- 
tinued for some time in this partnership, and 
then retired and devoted his entire time to the 
care of his real-estate, and to farming and 
gardening. 

He was a prosperous business man, who 
lived in the confidence and esteem of all his 
neighbors and associates. He was a leading 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and was a trustee for a number of years. A 
donation of $2000 to the building at the cor- 
ner of Franklin and Locust streets prove him 
to have been a liberal man. 



C'AMUEL LEMON KEEI), ESQ., a rising 
and progressive young attorney-at-law 
of Ebensburg, who, from the energy and ability 
already displayed, is destined to figure con- 
spicuously among the attorneys of the State 
of Pennsylvania, is a son of Samuel and 
Ella (Simpson) Reed, and was born March 
13, 1864, in Blacklick township, Cambria 
county, Pennsylvania. 

William Reed (grandfather) was a native of 
Connecticut, and, like many of the New 
Englanders, was a sailor in early life, but 
relinquished that occupation, and migrated 
to Cambria county, settling upon a tract of 
land situated on the old Clay Pike, in Cam- 
bria township. At that time that section of 



the country was sparsely populated, and the 
improvements were very slight, consisting 
usually of a patch of cleared land, and there 
with a log hut or a cabin rudely constructed 
upon it as the habitation of the early settlers. 
Mr. Reed was a pioneer, and set about with 
that enterprising spirit which is characteristic 
of the New Englanders, to clear up and con- 
vert the forests into a home, a fit place for the 
dwelling of man. He passed through the 
trials and hardships incident to a pioneer life, 
but, by unyielding and indefatigable efforts, 
succeeded in clearing up a good farm and es- 
tablishing a comfortable home. He died in 
1846, aged fifty-six years, having had the 
pleasure of witnessing a complete metamor- 
phosis of the country. The forest which was 
originally inhabited by wild beasts and wilder 
men — the savage Indians — was transformed 
into productive farms, yielding up bountiful 
harvests ; and the cabins were supplanted by 
beautiful houses, constructed in modern style 
of architecture, with comfortable and commo- 
dious furnishings. 

Mr. Reed served in the war of 1812-15, 
under the command of General William Henry 
Harrison, and was a valiant soldier. He was 
a pioneer of Methodism, and his home was 
headquarters not only for the ministers of his 
own church, but for all other denominations 
as well, and services were frequently held in 
his house, prior to the construction of churches 
in that section. Politically he was an old-line 
whig, and was looked upon as the leader in 
his neighborhood in religion, politics and 
business, his neighbors frequently seeking liis 
advice and opinion on these and various other 
subjects. 

Samuel Reed (father) was born upon the old 
Reed homestead in 1824, the year in which 
Lafayette visited America. He obtained such 



230 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



education as the public schools of his day 
afforded, and then engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, together with stock-raising and drov- 
ing, his life avocations. Through the pur- 
chase of his brother's and sister's interest he 
became the owner of the old homestead, upon 
which he resided all his life, his death occur- 
ring March 14, 1890. He was a successful 
business man, acquiring an ample competency 
for his time. He was a consistent member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he 
was class-leader, and of whose Sabbath-school 
he was superintendent. A loyal and staunch 
republican, he always took an active part in 
the organization and work of his party, usually 
representing his precinct in the county con- 
ventions. He was a strong advocate for the 
free-school system, believed in tlie education 
of the masses, and for many years served as a 
member of the school board. A man in whom 
the people reposed the most implicit confi- 
dence, he filled all the local offices of his town- 
ship, but never sought political preferment. 
He was a soldier in the late war ; enlisted 
in 1864 in company I, Two Hundred and 
Eleventh regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer 
infantry; served to the close of that conflict, 
and was a member of John A. Jones Post, 
G. A. R. 

Mr. Reed married first Christina Orner, and 
they were the parents of tiiree children : Ara- 
bella, wedded George W. Strong, of Tyrone, 
this State ; Tillie J., deceased, was the wife of 
Aaron Rishcl; and one that died in infancy. 
His second and last matrimonial alliance was 
with Ellen Simpson, and resulted in tiie birth 
of nine children: Annie, married George Mar- 
tis.a fuiiier of Blacklick township; Etta E. 
wedded J. C. Risiiel, a merchant, of Punxsut- 
awney, Jefferson county, this State ; Samuel 
L. is the subject of this biography ; Kate B. 



became the wife of James C. Raulston, a farmer 
of Indiana county, this State ; Sofa E. married 
William Gillispie, a merchant of Strongtown, 
Indiana county; Lizzie C. is the wife of Curtis 
McDonald, an engineer running on the Penn- 
■sylvania railroad, and residing at Conemaugh, 
this county ; Aramita died young ; and Tillie 
and Theresa are at home. 

Samuel Lemon Reed wedded, October 18, 
1893, Elizabeth Evans, a daughter of the late 
John O. Evans, of Ebensburg. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools, the Ebensburg 
academy, and an academy at Strongtown, 
Indiana county. Having obtained a good 
academic education, he engaged in teaching 
for a period of seven years. He taught in his 
native township, where, by reason of his su- 
perior talent as an instructor, his salary was 
increased each succeeding year in order to 
retain his valuable services. In 1888 he went 
before the board of examiners, and passed 
successfully the preliminary law examination, 
and immediately entered upon the study of 
law, under the preceptorship of the late George 
M. Reed. Naturally possessed of a legal turn 
of mind and close, studious habits, he made 
rapid progress in his studies, and in July, 1890, 
was admitted to the bar of Cambria county. 
The two succeeding years he practiced alone ; 
but, upon the death of his preceptor, in 1892, 
formed a partnership with Mathiot Reade, 
which partnership has continued up to the 
present time, 1896. 

Politically he is a republican ; religiously a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and fraternally a member of Lieutenant Hugh 
Jones Post, No. 227, Sons of Veterans, at 
Ebensburg. 

Mr. Reed, in connection with Wm. L. Reed, 
of Johnstown, has secured a patent upon a 
Railway Gate below described. " This im- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



231 



provement relates to certain improvements in 
railway gates, such as are employed at cross- 
ings, etc., to close the road on the approach 
and passing of a train ; and the object of the 
invention is to provide a device, simple in char- 
acter and inexpensive in construction, which 
shall be adapted to be operated automatically 
by the train as it approaches the crossing in 
such a way as to close the gates, the device 
being so arranged that the gates are also 
automatically opened when the train has passed 
the crossing." 



T^HOMAS T. BYRNE, a prominent and 
successful farmer of Clearfield township, 
this county, is a son of Augustine and Ann 
(Driskle) Byrne, and was born in Allegheny 
township, this county, March 15, 1832. 

The Byrne family came originally from Ire- 
land, and were among the early pioneer settlers 
of Cambria county. 

John Byrne, the great-grandfather, was born 
in Ireland, and was the founder of the family 
in this country. He emigrated to America in 
1795, bringing with him his three sons and 
five daughters, his wife having died in Ireland. 
He located near Loretto, on what is now 
known as the Flick farm, and engaged in 
farming. He was one of the very early set- 
tlers of this county, locating here previous to 
Father Gallitzin, who was a pioneer in Cambria 
county. His children were : Henry, John, 
Thomas, Mrs. McGuire, Mrs. Levi, and Mrs. 
Piatt. 

Thomas Byrne (grandfather) was born in 
Ireland, and, when a boy, came with his father 
to America. He assisted his father on the 
farm until he reached mature years, when he 
located on a farm in Carroll township, where 
he followed the pursuits of a farmer all his 
life. He died in 1832. He married Miss 



Burgon, and this marriage resulted in the birth 
of thirteen children : Bernard, Michael, Augus- 
tine, Catherine, Little, Henry, James, Nancy 
Buck, Elizabeth, John, Thomas, Frances and 
Mary Ann. 

They were a family of farmers, and are now 
all deceased but Frances, who resides at Car- 
roUtovvn, this county. 

Augustine Byrne (father) was born in Car- 
roll township, April 18, 1807, and died near 
Chest Springs, Allegheny township, May 8, 
1864. He lived in Allegheny township all his 
life except during a short period spent in 
Washington township. He was a farmer and 
a member of the Roman Catholic church. 

He married Miss Ann, a daughter of Charles 
Driskle, of Allegheny township, and to them 
were born eight children : Michael, of Alle- 
gheny township; Alice, deceased, who was 
the wife of James Adams, now deceased ; 
Thomas J. ; Mary, deceased, was the wife ot 
L. Leonard Litzinger; Margaretta, deceased; 
Sarah, the wife of Benjamin Grove, of Chest 
.Springs; Matilda, the wife of John McKensie, 
of Chest Springs ; Cecelia, deceased, who was 
the wife of Andrew Noel ; and George, of 
Johnstown. 

Thomas T. Byrne was reared a farmer boy, 
and educated in the common and subscription 
schools of his township. When he began life 
on his own account, he was employed on the 
old Portage railroad and remained there two 
years, and then for the next ten years engaged 
in the shuck business. In 1865 he purchased 
the farm on which he now resides, located in 
the eastern part of Clearfield township, this 
county, containing one hundred and eight 
acres, underlaid with coal. At the time of 
the purchase the farm was only partially im- 
proved, and he has since cleared and improved 
the entire farm, and it is now in a good state 



232 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



of cultivation and is one of the most desira- 
ble farms in Cambria county. 

In religion he belongs to the church of his 
forefathers, the Roman Catholic church, of 
which he is a devout member. Politically he 
is a democrat, and takes a normal interest in 
local affairs. 

His marriage with Miss Mary Yeatly was 
celebrated January 9, 1853, and their union 
has been blessed in the birth of ten children : 
John Cosmon, located in Altoona, Pennsylva- 
nia ; Emmet, deceased, was a farmer of Chest 
Springs; Mary, wife of James Kclley ; Charles, 
located in Altoona; Ann, a resident of Altoona; 
William, employed in Altoona; Alice, de- 
ceased ; Fannie, the wife of Frank Adams, of 
Clearfield township; and Thomas, a farmer, 
of Clearfield township. 



ni;\ . i>E>iirrKTUS augustine gal- 
I.ITZIN died at Lorctto on the 6th of 
May, 1840. I'^or forty-two }-ears he e.xercised 
pastoral functions in Cambria county. The 
venerable deceased was born in 1770, at Mun- 
ster, in Ccrmau)'. His father, Prince de Gal- 
litzin, ranked among the highest nobility in 
Russia. His mother was the daughter of 
Field Marshal General de Schmeltan, a cele- 
brated officer under Frederick the Great. Her 
brother fell at the battle of Jena. The deceased 
held a liigh commission in the Russian army 
from his infancy. Europe, in the earl\- [>,irt 
of his life, was desolatcii by war — the I'rench 
revolution burst like a volcano upon that con- 
vulsed continent: it offered no facilities or 
attractions for travel, and it was determined 
tli.it the \-r)uiig Prince de Gallitzin should visit 
America. He landed in Paltimore in August, 
1792, in company with Rev. Mr. Brosius. By 
a train of circumstances in which the hand of 
Providence was strikingly visible, his mind 



was directed to the ecclesiastical state, and he 
renounced forever his brilliant prospects. Al- 
ready endowed with a splendid education, he 
was the more prepared to pursue his ecclesi- 
astical studies under the venerable Bishop 
Carroll, at Baltimore, with facility and success. 
Having completed his theological course, he 
spent some time on the mission in Maryland. 

In the year 1799 he directed his course to 
the Allegheny mountain, and found that por- 
tion of it which now constitutes Cambria 
county a perfect wilderness, almost without 
inhabitants or habitations. After incredible 
labor and privations, and expending a princely 
fortune, he succeeded in making "the wilder- 
ness blossom as a rose." His untiring zeal " 
has collected about Loretto.his late residence, 
a catholic population of three or four thousand. 
He not only extended the church by his mis- 
sionar3' toils, but also illustrated and defended 
the truth by several highly useful publications. 
His " Defence of Catholic Principles" has 
gained merited celebrity both here and in 
Europe. 

In this extraordinary man we have not onlj' 
to admire his renunciation of the brightest 
hopes and prospects; his indefatigable zeal — 
but something greater and rarer — his wonder- 
ful humility. No one could ever learn from 
him or his mode of life, what he had been, or 
what he had exchanged for privation and pov- 
erty. 

To intimate to him that you were aware of 
his condition, would be sure to pain and dis- 
please liim. He who might have reveled in 
the princely halls of his ancestors, was con- 
tent to spend tliirt)' years in :. rude log cabin, 
almost denying himself the common comforts 
of life, that he might be able to clothe the 
naked members of Jesus Christ, the poor and 
distressed. Few have left behind thcin such 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



233 



examples of charity and benevolence. On the 
head of no one have been invoked so many 
blessings from the mouths of widows and or- 
phans. It maybe literally said of him, "If his 
heart had been made of gold he would have 
disposed of it all in charity to the poor." 
{AToHiitaiiiccr, May 14, 1840.) 

To this sketch may be properly appended 
the following : 

Princess Amalia Gallitzin, a lady distin- 
guished for talent and a strong propensity to 
mysticism. She was the daughter of Count 
Schmeltan, and lived, during a part of her 
youth, at the court of the wife of Prince Fer- 
dinand, brother of Frederick the Great. She 
was married to the Russian prince, Gallitzin ; 
and, as much of his time was passed in travel- 
ing, she chose Munster, in the center of Ger- 
many, for her permanent residence. Here she 
assembled around her some of the most dis- 
tinguished men of the age, Hemsterhuis, Ha- 
mann, Jacobi, GcEthe, Furstenberg, and others. 
The two first were her most intimate friends. 
She was an ardent Catholic, and strongly given 
to making proselytes. With the exception 
of her excessive religious zeal, she was an ex- 
cellent lady in every respect. In the educa- 
tion of her children, she followed Rousseau's 
system. The princess is the Diotima to whom 
Hemsterhuis, under the name of Dioklas, ad- 
dressed his work on Atheism. She died, in 
1806, near Munster. Her only son was a 
missionary in America. (Encycl. Amcr.) 



nEV. JOHN J. LUDDEN, the scholarly 
and affable pastor of St. Augustine 
church, at St. Augustine, this county, is a son 
of Michael and Sarali (Corcoran) Ludden, and 
was born at Castlebar, Mayo county, Ireland, 
May 12, 1 861. 

His grandfather was James Ludden, a native 



of the " Emerald Isle," where he was engaged 
as a farmer in county Mayo, until shortly after 
the War, when he came to America, having 
been preceded to this country by a number 
of his sons. He located at Florence, New 
York, where he spent the remainder of his 
life in happy retirement, dying August 27, 
1886, at the ripe old age of ninety-one years. 
His marriage to Nora Ludden resulted in the 
birth often children, six sons and four daugh- 
ters : Rev. John, now deceased, was pastor of 
St. Mary's church, of Florence, New York ; 
Martin, deceased, was a merchant of Camden, 
New York; Ann became the wife of Peter 
Acton, of Ireland ; Margaret died young ; Mi- 
chael (father) ; Mary, wife of John Carson, of 
Ireland ; Ellen, wife of James Sullivan, of 
Florence; James, pastor of St. John's church, 
at Albany, New York ; Anthony, pastor of 
St. Mary's church, at Little Falls, New York ; 
and William, an attorney-at-law and a judge, 
at Troy, New York. 

Michael Ludden, his father, was born at 
Castlebar, in the county of Mayo, Ireland, in 
1838. He has always resided on the old 
Ludden homestead in his native country, 
where he has successfully followed the pur- 
suits of agriculture, owning one hundred and 
fifty acres of land. 

He married Sarah Corcoran, a sister of the 
late Father Thomas Corcoran, of St. Agnes' 
church, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. To this 
[ marriage were born five sons and five daugh- 
ters, as follows: Rev. John J., subject ; Ellen, 
deceased ; James, a physician of Cleveland, 
Ohio ; Nora, who resides with Rev. John J. ; 
Mary, wife of Owen McKenna, of Pittsburg ; 
Martin, who died at St. Vincent's college, 
Latrobe, Pennsylvania, November 17, 1894, at 
the age of twenty-one years. He was pre- 
paring for the priesthood, and was within six 



234 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



months of his ordination, when struck down 
by the liand of death ; Anthony resides on 
the old homestead with his father; Joseph 
Patrick, now attending the medical department 
of the Western University of Pennsylvania, at 
Pittsburg ; and Helena, who died in childhood. 

The boyhood days of Father Ludden were 
spent upon the Ludden homestead in Ireland, 
and he attended the national and classical 
schools at Castlebar. On November 28, 
1879, he came to America, and at once entered 
Mt. St. Mary's College, at Emmettsburg, 
Maryland, where he finished a classical and 
scientific course, graduating in 18S5. He 
then entered St. Mary's seminary, of Balti- 
more, and after completing the required theo- 
logical course, was ordained to the priesthood 
on December 17, 1888. He was immediately 
appointed assistant pastor to his cousin. Rev. 
O. P. Gallagher, of St. John's church, South 
Fourteenth street, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

On April 30, 1892, he was transferred to 
his present charge. Since he located at St- 
Augustine, he has shown himself an active 
and an energetic worker in the cause of the 
church. He has built the magnificent brick 
church which now adorns the town. It is a 
brick structure, of the Gothic style of archi- 
tecture, imposing in appearance, and built at a 
cost of thirty thousand tloUars. 

Rev. John J. Ludden is a young man pos- 
sessed of a deep religious zeal, and of that 
executive ability and broad comprehension of 
jjuhlic affairs and events, that can but contri- 
bute to the good of Christianity, and the 
promotion of the common brotherhood of 
humanity. 



/>K01UJr> K. Kl.fNE, one of the leading 
^"^ and most enterprising merchants of 
Johnstown, is a son of Wellington 13. and 



Annie M. (Custer) Kline, and was born in In- 
diana, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, October 
13, 1S63. The ancestors of George K. Kline are 
of German and French origin, but were among 
the old and early-settled families of Eastern 
Pennsylvania. His grandfather, George K. 
Kline, was born in Berks county, March 12, 
1807, and died in Indiana county on February 
5, 1876, at the age of sixty eight years. His 
avocation was that of a merchant and hotel- 
keeper. 

Wellington B. Kline (father) was also born 
in Berks county in 1 840. Having been schooled 
to mercantile pursuits, he, in 1863, went to In- 
diana and became one of the founders of the 
house of Marshall & Kline, one of the oldest 
dry-goods houses in that section of the State; 
this partnership continued uninterruptedh- until 
1894, when it was terminated by the death of 
Mr. Marshall. Upon that date he came to 
Johnstown and entered into a partnership with 
his son, the subject of this sketch, under the 
firm-name of W. B. Kline & Son. 

George K. Kline received his educational 
preparation for a business career in the public 
high schools of Indiana, from which he gradu- 
ated in iS75,and in the Indiana State Normal 
school. In 1878 he took a position as clerk 
in the house of Marshall & Kline, thus taking 
the initial step in the practical ilrill which has 
led up to his present commercial success. 
With that firm he remained until 1891, when 
he came to Johnstown and embarked in the 
ilrj'-goods business on his own account; later, 
in 1894, as stated above, he was joined by his 
father, and the firm-name became W. B. Kline 
& Son. 

The firm of W. H. Kline & Son is one of the 
largest and most substantial dry-goods houses 
in the county; they carry a full line of up-to- 
date dry goods and cloaks; occupy three floors, 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



235 



and give employment to a corps of twelve 
clerks. 

Mr. Kline is a consistent member of the 
Presbyterian church, and fraternally belongs 
to Indiana Lodge, No. 313, ¥. and A. M.; 
Zembabel Chapter, No. 162, R. A. M., of Pitts- 
burg; Commandery No. i. Knights Templar, 
and Syria Temple, Ancient Arabic Order No- 
bles of the Mystic Shrine, of Pittsburg. He 
is also member of Wm. Penn Council, Royal 
Arcanum, of Indiana. 

On August 5, 1 89 1, Mr. Kline married 
Sarah, a daughter of the late James Morley, 
of Johnstown, and to this marriage has been 
born one child, a son, James Morley, born 
May 3, 1892. 

George K. Kline is a young man of good 
business qualifications; is active and enterpris- 
ing, and takes a lively interest in every move 
which has for its object the advancement of 
the material prosperity of the city of his adop- 
tion. He is an active member of the Board 
of Trade. 



j^ANIEL WEBSTER BRALLIER, now 

a resident of Jackson township, and well 
known for energy, thoroughgoingness and 
success, is a son of Rev. Samuel and Susan- 
nah (Good) Brallier, and was born at Belsano, 
Blacklick township, Cambria county, Penn- 
sylvania, April 26, 1851. The Bralliers are of 
French-German descent, and many of them 
in the new world have inherited the good 
qualities of both races. In this State the 
Bralliers were first resident in the eastern part, 
where Emanuel Brallier, the grandfather of 
the subject of this sketch, was born and reared. 
He was a shoemaker by trade and a farmer 
by occupation, and came to Belsano, this 
county, where he died in December, 1882, 
aged eighty-eight years. He was a member 



of the German Baptist church, and his son. 
Rev. Samuel Brallier, was a native of Morri- 
son's Cove, Bedford county. He came when a 
young man to Blacklick township, but after- 
wards removed to Jackson township, where 
he passed the last twenty-five years of his life. 
He was born September 2, 1824, followed 
farming and lumbering for a livelihood, and 
died October i, 1894, just past the seventieth 
year of his age. He became a member of the 
German Baptist church at an early age, and 
served acceptably and with profit in its minis- 
try for many years. He was a man of enter- 
prise, and highly respected by all who knew 
him. His wife, Susannah (Good) Brallier, was 
born in East Taylor township, March, 29, 1833, 
and died November 19, 1887. She was a 
member of the German Baptist church, and 
her father, Jacob Good, was a son of Christian 
Good, a large land-owner and substantial 
citizen of East Taylor township. The Goods 
were of German descent, and Jacob Good 
married Elizabeth Gochuer, whose father. 
Christian Gochuer, was a German Baptist and 
an excellent citizen. 

Daniel Webster Brallier was reared in his 
native township until he was seventeen years 
of age, and then removed into Jackson town- 
ship, which has been his residence ever since. 
He received his education in the public 
schools, and learned the trade of carpenter, at 
which he worked steadily at various places 
until 1873. In that year he commenced his 
present prosperous business of contracting 
and building. He is an excellent and skilled 
workman, and a man of energy and push, and 
has built a large number of houses, including 
the erection of some fine and tasteful resi- 
dences. In connection with his numerous 
contracting and building operations, he takes 
time to manage the fine, productive farm which 



236 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



he owns in Jackson township. Skilled as a 
workman, successful as a farmer and energetic 
as a business man, Mr. Brallier is recognized 
as an intelligent and useful factor in the pro- 
gress of the community in which he resides. 
A strong Baptist in his religious faith, he is a 
member of the First Baptist church of Johns- 
town. He is a democrat in political opinion, 
and, while interested, yet is not active to 
leadership in the field of politics. He has 
filled most of the township ofifices, and has 
been elected consecutively for nine years as 
auditor of Jackson township. On October 
28, 1873, Mr. Brallier was united in marriage 
with Mollie A. Long, a daughter of John 
Long, a resident of Chambersville, Indiana 
county. 

-s 

JOHN F. BKEHM, a successful farmer of 
West Taylor township, who is largely 
engaged in market gardening, is a son of Fred- 
erick and Caroline (Kinebolt) Brehm, and was 
born at Cambria city, now Johnstown, Cam- 
bria county, Pennsylvania, July 8, 1855. 

Frederick Brehm was born and reared in 
Germany, which he left at twenty-seven years 
of age to come to Cambria city, now Johns- 
town, where he followed his trade as carpenter 
for nine years. He then removed to a farm in 
West Taylor township, and was engaged in 
market and truck farming up to the time of his 
death, which occurred March 8, 1893, when 
he was in the sixty-ninth year of his age. He 
was a hard-working and well -respected man, 
who had a large circle of friends. He was a 
patriotic citizen, and served three months as a 
soldier in the Union army. 

Mr. Brehm married Caroline Rincbolt, of 
Ben's Creek, now in the si.\ty-sixth )-ear of 
her age, and a resident of Johnstown, where 
she is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 



church. Her father, George Rinebolt, was a 
native of Germany, and a resident of this 
county for many years before his death, in 
1 886, at eighty-two years of age. He was a 
German Lutheran; served as an engineer for 
the Cambria Iron company for many j-ears, 
and married Catherine Shainhair, who is well 
known all over the city of Johnstown, where 
she still resides, a very active and well-pre- 
served woman for the weight of her eighty- 
five \ears. 

John F. Brehm grew to manhood in West 
Taylor township, on the farm, where he was 
carefully trained in all farming employments. 
He received his education in the common 
schools, and then turned his attention to form- 
ing and market gardening, in which lines of 
labor he has met with success. He owns 
a good farm of thirty-six acres, on which he 
has resided continuously since 1877. Mr. 
Brehm is in his political views a republican, 
and while a strong advocate of the principles 
of his party, is never an aspirant for party 
favors, his time and energies being given 
rather to his daily routine of farming and 
market gardening. 

On December 21, 1876, Mr. Brehm wedded 
Mahala Rogers. To this union were born 
seven children, three sons and four daughters: 
i\nnie M.; Charles J.; Earnest; Gertrude E. ; 
Wilder; Florence Helen, and Margaret F. 

Mrs. Brehm is a daughter of David Rogers, 
and a granddaughter of David Rogers, Sr., 
who was a native of Scotland, and a Seven-Day 
Baptist, and settled in Somerset county, where 
he reared a large family, and died at Shade 
Furnace, aged ninety-eight years. 

David Rogers came from Somerset to Cam- 
bria county when a )-oung man, and is now a 
resident of West Taylor township. His wife 
was formerly Mary Berkebile, who is now in 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



237 



the fifty-fourth year of her age, and is a daugh- 
ter of Jesse Berkebile, who was of German 
descent, and died in his native county of Som- 
erset in 1867, when in the sixty-eighth year 
of his age. 



■T^HOMAS L. JONES, of near Ebensburg, 
a self-made man and successful farmer, 
was born in Montgomeryshire, Wales, in 
1833. When but a mere child he had the 
misfortune to lose his parents, and hence has 
but little knowledge of his family beyond the 
fact that they were industrious and hard- 
working people, whose home had been for 
many centuries in Wales, where the name of 
Jones has always had iionorable mention. At 
the death of his parents he was adopted by 
Lewis Williams, and in 1840 brought to near 
Carrolltown, this county, where Mr. Williams 
died in the succeeding year. This second 
loss by death of a protector resulted in his 
being bound out, or apprenticed to Evan H. 
Roberts, of near ribensburg, with whom he 
remained until he was eighteen years of age. 
He then commenced the battle of life for him- 
self with nothing but strong hands and a 
determination to succeed. He accepted any 
kind of work that came to his hands until he 
had enough of hard-earned savings to invest 
in a team. He then, in 1857, married and 
rented a farm, which he tilled up to August 
31, 1864, when he enlisted in company C, 
Two Hundred and Ninth Pennsylvania infan- 
try. He saw service off the coast of the Ber- 
muda Islands, and then was transferred to the 
Ninth corps of the Army of the Potomac, 
where he was a teamster until Lee's surrender. 
Some time after this he was sent north, and 
received an honorable discharge at Harris- 
burg, in June, 1865. Returning from the army 
he drove a team for Hon. A. A. Barker for 



nearly twenty years, and, in 1887, rented a 
farm from Mr. Barker, which one year later 
he and his son, William G., purchased, and 
upon which he has resided ever since. This 
farm, a little distance southwest of Ebensburg, 
is well improved, and contained, at the time of 
purchase, ninety acres, from which fourteen 
acres have since been sold. Mr. Jones is a 
general farmer, and has been successful in 
every line of his business, from grazing to 
raising cereals. 

On December 31, 1857, Mr. Jones married 
Martha Williams, daughter of William G. 
Williams, one of the early Welsh settlers of this 
communit}', of near Ebensburg. To their union 
have been born nine children : Chalmers C., 
now book-keeper for the firm of J. T. & W. 
Griffith, of McKean county; Lizzie, wife of 
Hershel James, of McKean county ; Dr. F. C, 
of Ebensburg; William G., a farmer; Annie 
M., now engaged in teaching; Prof Herman 
T., superintendent of Ebensburg public 
schools ; Leonard S., a student at the Millers- 
ville (Pennsylvania) State Normal school, and 
Frederick and Ruth (twins), of which the 
latter is dead. 

Thomas L. Jones is but another instance of 
what can be achieved by self-effort on the 
part of those having ability, and that greater 
blessing, a strong will-power. Surrounded 
by adverse circumstances, and apparentl}- on 
the lowest round of the ladder, by patience, 
perseverance, hard work and improving every 
opportunity, he has won honorable position 
and a competency for himself He has been 
a member of the First Congregational church 
of Ebensburg since 1847, and for the last 
eighteen years has served as a deacon. He 
is a Past Grand of Highland Lodge, No. ^28, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Ebens- 
burg, and enjoys the proud distinction of 



238 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



being the oldest initiate member of the lodge, 
having joined in 1854, soon after its institu- 
tion. He is a member of Dr. John M. Jones 
Post, Grand Army of the Republic, of Ebens- 
burg. Mr. Jones is a staunch republican 
in his political principles, served for nine 
years, prior to removing to his present farm, as 
a member of the borough council of Ebens- 
burg, and in 1895 was elected to his present 
position as a director of the poor for Cambria 
county. Active in his party, useful in his 
church and prominent in his lodge and post, 
Mr. Jones is efficient as a public official and 
respected as a man and a neighbor. 



"#^R. FKKMONT C. JONES, one of the 

^^ most successful and prominent physi- 
cians and surgeons of Cambria county, Penn- 
sj'lvania, is a son of Thomas L. and Martha 
(Williams) Jones, and was born in Cambria 
township, Cambria county, October 26, 1861. 

Dr. Jones received his elementary education 
in the public schools of Ebensburg, and under 
the private tutelage of Rev. T. R. Jones. Sub- 
sequently, he entered upon the study of medi- 
cine under the preceptorship of Dr. Abner 
Griffith, of Ebensburg. Having completed 
the required course of reading, he entered the 
medical department of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, Philadelphia, from which renowned 
institution he was graduated with honor in the 
class of '85. Immediately after graduation he 
located at Ebensburg where, by close applica- 
tion to professional duties and careful ;ukI skill- 
ful treatment of diseases, he has established a 
large and remunerative patronage. 

Progressive and energetic, he is alive to 
every movement which has for its object the 
advancement and improvement of tiie medical 
profession. He is a member of the Cambria 
County Medical society, and of the State 



Medical society of Pennsylvania, and is an 
active worker in both organizations. He is a 
physician to the Pennsylvania Railroad com- 
pany, at Ebensburg, and the Cambria county 
almshouse and jail. He affiliates with the Re- 
publican party, but has never sought nor filled 
offices. Religiously he is a member of the 
Congregationalist church. Fraternally he is 
a member of Sunset Lodge, No. 312, F. and 
A. M.; Highland Lodge, No. 428, L O. O. F. 
and Jones Camp, No. 227, Sons of Veterans. 

On October 14, 1886, Dr. Jones and Miss 
Mary E. Davis were united in marriage, and 
to their union have been born two daughters: 
Marian, aged eight, and Martha, aged si.x. 

Dr. Jones is a man whose standing, pro- 
fessionally and socially, is above reproach. 
Well read in the higher arts of his profession, 
and further fortified by a large and varied ex- 
perience, he accurately diagnoses and skill- 
fully treats diseases. He is public-spirited, 
interested in the education of the masses, and 
always in sympathetic harmony with all move- 
ments for the moral and economic well-being 
and advancement of those around him. 



"P MANUEL YOUNG, deceased, was a prom- 
■^^ inent business man, and one of the most 
highl)' respected citizens of Johnstown, and 
was born at Marietta, Lancaster count}-, this 
State, on July 19, 1826. His paternal grand- 
father was a soldier under Napoleon. After 
coming to this country he bought a farm near 
Reading, where he resided for man}' j-cars. 
His father, John Young, who was a butcher, 
was married twice. To the first wife seven 
children were born, viz. : John, Henry, Benja- 
min, Jacob, Daniel, Catherine and Susan, all 
of whom are dead but Henry, who is in Illi- 
nois. To the second wife five children were 
born, whose names are as follows: .\bram ; 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



239 



David; Emanuel; Harriet, wife of Capt. E. D. 
Roath, of Marietta, Pa., and Simon, of the 
Sixth ward, the last-named being the only 
surviving member of the family. 

Emanuel's father died at Marietta, when he 
was twelve years old. In 1839, when but 
twelve years old, he drove a wagon for a 
butcher, named Henry Musser, of Marietta. 
In 1 84 1 he butchered at Columbia, Pennsylva- 
nia, for Mr. Wike. He started for the West 
by stage in 1847, and when near Stoyestown, 
Somerset county, the stage stuck in a snow 
drift. The passengers shoveled their way out 
and got to Stoyestown for supper, but they 
were tired out and let the stage go on. The 
landlord advised Mr. Young to go to Johns- 
town, and from there go to Pittsburg by boat. 
This he decided to do, and the landlord brought 
him to Johnstown in a sled, but after arriving 
they found the canal frozen, and the boats 
could not run for two. or three weeks ; so he 
went to work for Thomas Sharp, whose 
slaughtery was then near the corner of Bed- 
ford street, now in the Fourth ward, Johnstown. 

After leaving Mr. Sharp, Mr. Young started 
in business for himself The first pudding 
and sausage he made he gave away to intro- 
duce it, as there had not been any made in 
Johnstown until that time. 

From 1848 to 1850 he was in business with 
Frederick Tesh, their slaughtery being on the 
" Island." July 4, 1 850, he and George Spang- 
ler formed a partnership, and conducted their 
business under the firm-name of Young & 
Spangler. From 1853 to 1855 he and James 
McMillen were in partnership, their market 
being located on the old lot. In 1855 he went 
into business for himself on Lincoln street, 
and subsequently built a slaughter-house on 
the rear of the lot on which the Young home 
is now situated. 



It was built in 1856, and under it he estab- 
lished the first daily meat market in this city 
in 1 86 1. On August 26, 1863, he was em- 
ployed as foreman of Wood, Morrell & Co.'s 
meat market, and remained in their employ 
until January i, 1892. He was an expert in 
selecting stock, and was well-known by many 
stock-dealers as such. 

Mr. Young was married in Johnstown on 
August 26, 1849, by Samuel Douglass, to 
Sarah A. Layton, a sister of Joseph P. Layton, 
Mrs. Mary A. Kinter, and Mrs. John Harker, 
all of the Fifth ward, and of the late William 
Layton, who perished in the great flood. To 
this union twelve children were born, four of 
whom are dead, viz.: Lorenzo, Catherine, Mol- 
lie and George. The surviving are: John H., 
of the Penn Traffic company; Hattie L., wife 
of W. A. Stewart; Milton B., of Young & 
Young; Anna, wife of Jacob M. Murdock; 
Lizzie, wife of Gomer Walters ; Mary F., wife 
of Herbert Darling; Edith L., wife of James 
Piper, and Miss Grace. 

In 1866, the time of the falling of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad platform, Mr. Young went 
down with the crash and injured his back. At 
the time of the flood he was in Lancaster 
county attending his brother's funeral. 

He organized the Vigilant Fire company, 
and was its treasurer for several years. In 
1890 he joined the Franklin street M. E. 
church, under Rev. H. L. Chapman, D. D., 
and in his last hours enjoyed the consolations 
of his religion. 

Personally, Mr. Young was of pleasant 
countenance and striking figure, bearing a 
marked resemblance to the late Adam Fore- 
paugh, for whom he was often mistaken. He 
was open-hearted and open-handed, a friend 
to everj'body, and everybody his friend. No 
man in Johnstown was better known, having 



240 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



for nearly thirty years presided over a section 
of our business mart. He died February 5, 
1892. Ilis wife, who survived him a short 
time, died December 2, 1893. 



JACOB M. MURDOCK, an enterprising 
and successful young business man ot 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania, is a son of John 
and Mary (Slater) Murdock. He was born 
at Ligonier, Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, September 25, 1863. 

His father is a native of eastern Pennsylva- 
nia, and was brought to Ligonier by his 
parents on their removal to that place in his 
early childhood. When he grew to manhood 
he engaged in business, and conducted a large 
general store at Ligonier for many years. In 
1883 he came to Johnstown, and engaged in 
the lumber business, and has resided there 
ever since. In religion he is an earnest 
methodist, and is a member of the official 
board of the First Methodist Episcopal ciiurch. 
He is j)rcsident of the .Somerset Stone com- 
pany and of the Bare Rock Railroad company. 

Our subject's grandfather, Daniel Murdock, 
was a miller by trade, and operated a grist 
mill at Latrobe, Pennsylvania, for many years. 
His maternal grandfather, Samuel Slater, was 
born on the old homestead, and resitled there 
uiilil his death, at the age of eighty-six years, 
in the year 1S82. Ilis memory extended back 
to the time when the Indi.ms made their raids 
into Ligonier valley, ami i liascd the settlers 
intd the fort at Ligonier. The old barn on 
the .Slater homestead still siiows the marks 
made by tiie Indians' bullets. The red man 
of the forest has long since disappeared from 
western Pennsylvania, and under the direc- 
tion of the grandsons of .Samuel Slater many 
tliousands of acres of liic forest itself have dis- 
appeared. 



Our subject spent his boyhood with his 
parents at Ligonier, and was educated in the 
public schools of that place. In 1881 he laid 
the foundation of his successful business 
career by taking a business course in the Iron 
City college, at Pittsburg. He then found 
employment in a saw-mill in Ligonier valley, 
and acquired a practical knowledge of his 
future business. In 1S83 he came to Johns- 
town, and became secretary of the Johnstown 
Lumber company. He retained this position 
until 1889. In Februar\- of that year he went 
into the lumber business himself After con- 
ducting the business by himself for a short 
time he took his brother, Wilbert F. Murdock, 
into partnership under the firm name of J. M. 
Muriiock & Brother. They manufacture and 
sell lumber at wholesale to other firms. Their 
business has grown from a very small scale 
the first year, until at present they are one of 
the largest manufacturers of their particular 
line in this part of the State, and now control 
and market the product of a large number of 
portable saw-mills. They are both interested 
in tlic Somerset Stone company and the Bare 
Rock railroad, which was built by them. Jacob 
M. is treasurer, and Wilbert F. secrctar\', of 
both the alj)0\e companies. 

On Jainiar)- 25, 1 887, Jeicob M. .Murdoch 
was united in marriage to Miss Anna D. Young, 
daugliter of the late Emanuel Young, who was 
for many j'ears superintendent of Wood, Mor- 
rell & Co.'s extensive slaughteries and meat 
market. To their union were born three 
daughters : Sara E., a bright child, who died 
in 1893; Florence Lillian and Alice. 

In politics Mr. Murdock is a republican, 
but in no sense a politician. In religion he is 
a methodist, and has held various official po- 
sitions in the church. He is also a very active 
and loyal member of the Young Men's Chris- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



241 



tian association, and has done much to build 
up that institution in Johnstown by his con- 
tributions of both time and money. He was 
a member of the building committee that 
erected the fine Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation building on Main street, and for five 
years has been a member of the board of di- 
rectors. He is a member of Mineral Lodge, 
K. of P., of Johnstown. 



T^HOMAS GRIFFITH was of Welsh de- 
scent, whose father, Griffith Griffith, 
came to this country from Wales with his 
parents, William and Jane G., about the year 
1805 or '06, when twelve or tiiirteen years of 
age. 

They located on the little Conemaugh, 
about three miles south of Ebensburg, and 
followed the trade of carding and fulling, 
while Griffith grew to manhood. 

In 1 8 16 he married Hannah Reese, a 
daughter of one of the early Welsh settlers. 
As a result of this union eight children were 
born, Thomas, the subject of this sketch, 
being born October 20, i8i8. When about 
two years old his parents purchased land and 
erected a carding and fulling-mill on the little 
Conemaugh, one-half mile south of Ebens- 
burg ; here he continued to live for over fifty 
years, moving into Ebensburg in 1876, where 
he lived for fourteen years, dying January 5, 
1890. 

During his early years he worked hard, 
assisting his father at his trade. His educa- 
tional advantages were very meagre, he never 
having attended over three months at school. 
By far tlie best part of his mental training was 
obtained by self-study and business experi- 
ence. 

Arriving at maturity, he and a brother pur- 
chased the farm, including the carding-mil! 
16 



and a water-power saw-mill, from their father, 
and continued to carry on the business, but 
upon the death of his brother; two or three 
years later, he turned his attention almost 
entirely to the saw-mill as the most profitable. 

Commencing the business over half a cen- 
tury ago on a small scale, and when the facili- 
ties for the manufacture of lumber were of a 
very primitive nature, he was a practical wit- 
ness to the many improvements for the cut- 
ting of timber and the handling of lumber 
that characterized the last decade. He kept 
pace with the progress of the age in which he 
lived, and was not slow to adopt new and im- 
proved methods. 

His motto was "upward and onward," and 
at the time of his death he ranked among the 
large lumbermen of the State, having saw- 
mills in Cambria, McKean and Elk counties, 
and was, perhaps, the most extensive cherry 
lumber dealer in the State. For a period of 
about twenty years he operated a retail lum- 
ber-yard in Philadelphia. During the latter 
part of his life he was somewhat interested in 
the oil-producing industry of the State, and 
also at his death owned a large tract of coal- 
land in the Blacklick coal regions, embrac- 
ing about four thousand acres. 

Politically he was a staunch republican, and 
always took a commendable interest in the 
success of his party and for the promotion of 
its principles. 

In 1873 he was the nominee of his party for 
the office of county treasurer, and although 
the county was Democratic by about twelve 
hundred voters, he came within twenty-eight 
votes of being elected. In 1879 he was the 
successful nominee of his party for the office 
of sheriff, overcoming a very large majority, 
and had the distinction of being the first 
Republican sheriff elected in Cambria county. 



242 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



He was an active, enterprising citizen, deeply 
interested in every move which had for its ob- 
ject the good of the borough in which he 
lived and the promotion of the welfare of the 
community at large. In him the cause of 
education found one of its warmest and most 
ardent friends, and he served a number of 
terms as school director. 

His marriage with Mary Davis, daughter 
of William Davis, in 1844, resulted in the birth 
of four boys and one girl that grew to ma- 
turity. 

William W. was born August 15, 1845, and 
received a good common-school education, 
after which he devoted his time to assisting 
his father in his lumber business, part of this 
time at the retail yard in Philadelphia, but at 
the time of his death, which occurred in June, 
1877, was managing the lumber interests at 
Kane, Pennsylvania. He leaves to survive 
him a wife and one child. May. 

John T. was born June 19, 1853, and died 
June 30, 1892, leaving a wife and three chil- 
dren to survive him : William, Mary and 
Annie. 

Upon the death of William W., John T. 
assumed charge of the lumber interests in 
McKean and I<llk counties, and also several 
years before his death, engaged in lumbering 
and oil interests on his own account. He was 
active in McKean count)' politics, and for two 
terms representctl that count)- in tlie State 
legislature. 

Abner Griffith was born August 5, 1855, 
received a good common-school education, 
and spent one year at Cannonsburg academy, 
in Washington county, Pennsylvania. He 
graduated in medicine at the Universit)- of 
Pennsylvania in 1879, "i"*^' ^^ once began 
practice at ICanc, I'cnn.sylvania, but Ironi 
night exposures contracted lung troul)Ic, 



which compelled him to give up his practice 
during the first year and spend the winter in 
P'lorida. 

Upon his return, in 1880, he began practice 
in Ebensburg. which he continued during the 
six or seven warmer months for eight years, 
returning to his farm and orange-grove, near 
Ocala, I'lorida, during the winter ; but, on ac- 
count of continued poor health, abandoned 
hi.s profession entirely in 1SS8. He now 
spends his summers in Ebensburg and winters 
in Florida. He is a member of Summit 
Lodge, No. 312, Free and Accepted Masons. 
In 1879 he married Elizabeth Evans, daughter 
of John J. Evans, of Ebensburg, and this 
union has been blessed in the birth of three 
children: Clarence, dying in infancy; Mar- 
garet, born November 14, 1890, and Eliza- 
beth, born March 13, 1895. 

Annie E., born December 3, 1858, now 
living at Kane, Pennsylvania, with her three 
children ; Ruth, Thomas and Dorothy. In 
1 884 she was married to F. A. Ly te, of Lan- 
caster, Pennsylvania, who at the time of his 
death, occurring on June 24, 1S96, was cashier 
of the P'irst National bank of Kane. 

Webster Griffith, born June 5. i860, and is 
now actively engaged in the lumber business 
at Ebensburg. 

He received his education in the common 
schools of tlbensburg. llis father having 
Ikcu elected to the office of sheriff, Webster 
was compelled to leave school at an earl)- age 
and assist in the management of his father's 
business interests, remaining with him until 
he arrived at his majorit)-. Connnencing the 
battle of life on his own account, he formed a 
business alliance with his brother under the 
firm-name of J. T. & W. Griffith. This firm 
was engaged in the lumbering and oil busi- 
ness in McKean cmnit)- until 1S92. the date 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



243 



of his brother's death. Upon the death of 
his father, Mr. Griffith was made executor of 
his estate, the affairs of which he adjusted to 
the satisfaction of all concerned. 

Since 1895 Mr. Griffith has continued lum- 
bering on his own account, and also has oil- 
producing interests in the McKean county 
fields. Politically he is a republican, and at 
present is serving as a member of the board of 
school directors of the borough of Ebensburg, 
and is a member of Kane Lodge, No. 566, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of Kane, Penn.syl- 
vania. On November 28, 1894, Mr. Griffith 
wedded Alice Zahm, a daughter of George K. 
Zahm, of Ebensburg, and to their union have 
been born one child, George W., born De- 
cember 12, 1895. 



/^EORGE A. BAUEK, editor of the Johns- 
^"^ town F/rte Prcsse, one of the leading 
German Democratic papers of Pennsylvania, is 
a son of Gottlob and Dorothea (Traut) Bauer, 
and was born June 30, 1863, at Eisfeld, in the 
dukedom of Saxe-Meiningen, now one of the 
twenty-six states of the German empire. His 
parents are natives, and have been life-long 
residents of Saxony, where they have witnessed 
many stirring events in the unification of Ger- 
many, and the growth of the present great 
German empire. Gottlob Bauer was born in 
1816, and is a tailor by trade. His wife was 
born in 1832, and they are both consistent 
members of the Evangelical Lutheran church, 
in whose faith and teachings they were reared 
and have lived. 

George A. Bauer passed his boyhood days 
at his native place, where he received his early 
education in the citizens' schools then preva- 
lent in Saxony, and all the other states of 
Germany. At fourteen years of age he left 



his native land and came to the United States, 
finding a situation in a printing office in Steu- 
benville, Ohio, where he learned the " art 
preservative of all arts." After the close of 
his apprenticeship he worked in printing offices 
at various places until April, 1880, when he 
came to Johnstown and remained six months. 
He then went to Philadelphia, and after work- 
ing in some of the principal printing offices of 
that city, made a trip through northern New 
Jersey, working in Trenton and Newark, and 
reached New York city, where he remained 
until 1886. In that year he returned to Phila- 
delphia, and four years later, in November, 
1890, came to Johnstown to assume charge of 
the Firie Pressc, of which he has been editor 
and manager ever since. Mr. Bauer is unmar- 
ried. He is a member of Johnstown Lodge, 
No. 175, Order of Elks, and Barbarossa Castle, 
No. 85, Ancient Order Knights of the Mystic 
Chain. He is a pleasant gentleman and a 
practical printer, and keeps up with the times 
in everything that regards newspaper work, 
from the sanctum to the composing room. 

The Johnstown Freie Presse is a German 
Democratic paper. It is a folio, twenty-seven 
by forty inches, and issued on Wednesday of 
each week. Under Mr. Bauer's management, 
the paper has attained a wide circulation. The 
Freie Presse is always bright and reliable. 
Every number is an epitome of all the interest- 
ing and important news of Johnstown and 
Cambria county, while foreign affairs and cur- 
rent events receive due mention, and the farm, 
garden and shop are not neglected. Mr. 
Bauer has made the paper unwaveringly Dem- 
ocratic in politics. He gives a candid and 
cordial support to the true principles of the 
Democratic party, as taught by Jefferson and 
enforced by Jackson. Prominently associated 
as he is with public affairs, Mr. Bauer is un- 



244 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



obtrusive in demeanor, and has always aimed 
to be useful to the full extent of his oppor- 
tunities. 



♦^K. GEORGE WASHINGTON WAG- 
^^ ONER, a prominent physician and sur- 
geon, and the present ma}'or of the city of 
Johnstown, is a son of George and Mary L. 
(Henrie) Wagoner, and was born February 22, 
1856, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

The paternal great-grandfather of Dr. Wag- 
oner was George Wagoner, formerly written 
Von Wagner, a native of the province of Wur- 
temburg, Germany. He was a man of fine 
education, and a preacher of independent 
thought and action. J5ecoming dissatisfied 
with the dogmas and doctrines of the estab- 
lished church lie dissented therefrom, and be- 
cause of his strictures upon the same, was 
thrown into prison, which incarceration re- 
sulted in his death. 

His son, George Wagoner, grandfather, de- 
siring to escape the persecutions and secure 
the blessings of the greater religious liberty 
of the United States, secured passage to this 
country by selling his time to the transporta- 
tion company that convened him to these 
shores. He was placed with a I'liiladclpliia 
Quaker, with whom he remained until his 
pledged obligations were discharged. While 
in this employ he had good advantages for 
securing an education, and improved iiis op- 
portunities, so tliat wlien he emigrated to the 
western part of the State his mental qualifica- 
tions were superior to those of most of the 
young men with whom he was thrown in con- 
tact, lie located in Madison, Westmoreland 
county, wliere he was soon employed as a 
teacl)cr during the winter mouths, and worked 
at the pottery trade wlien not thus engaged. 
Having inherited a deep religious zeal, he soon 



began to figure prominently in the religious 
affairs of the community. He was ordained 
as a minister in the United Brethren church, 
and for many years labored earnestly and zeal- 
ously for the cause of Christianity. He was 
a man of strong individuality, and possessed 
considerable literar)' ability; and as one of the 
pioneer anti-slaverj- men, did much by his 
eloquence and his trenchant pen to mould 
public opinion on that subject in his commu- 
nity. He was a thinker as well as a writer, 
and as early as 1835 wrote a book entitled 
"A Plan for Abolishing War," which embodies 
many of the principles and plans suggested 
by the " Peace Commission " in its sessions at 
Washington, over half a centur)' afterwards. In 
about 1850 he resolved to make the State of 
Iowa his future home, and died while en route 
to that State. 

Rev. George Wagoner, father of Dr. G. W. 
Wagoner, was one of the oldest and most es- 
teemed citizen of Johnstown. Born in West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1S26, he 
received a country-school education and care- 
ful instruction from his father. At twenty 
years of age George was licensed to preach in 
the United Brethren church. I le gave the best 
years of manhood to the church, serving it in 
everj' capacity to the close of his life. 1 le was 
the oiliest niinisti-r in the length of service in 
the .Mlegheiiy conference. In 1850 he located 
.it Joimstown ; his occupation required fre- 
quent movings, hut he always returned to the 
home of his choice, living there continuously 
since 1869. Intense a[)i)lication to ministerial 
work impaired his he.dth, and he was forced 
to desist from i)rcaching in i860. Studying 
dentisMy, he practiced his profession, in addi- 
tion to performing much clerical work, and 
looking after a mission church in Kernvillc. 
Concerning the pl.ui upon which the United 




HON. GEORGE W. WAGONER. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



245 



Brethren Mutual Aid Society, of Pennsylvania, 
conducts its business of life insurance, he estab- 
lished its system and managed its affairs. He 
held the first policy the company issued, and 
was a director from its organization, in 1869, 
until his death. 

Rev. Wagoner was distinguished for coura- 
geous maintenance of the right, and his readi- 
ness to uphold the weak and deserving. Af- 
fectionate, congenial, and lovable, his was a 
model household. 

Dr. Wagoner's preparatory education was 
obtained in the Public High school, of Johns- 
town. Leaving school he worked at the 
printer's trade for two years in the office of 
the Johnstown Tribune. At the age of seven- 
teen he published for one year (1S73) The 
Literary Hera/ii, an amateur weekly newspa- 
per, thirteen by twenty-six inches. In con- 
nection with this he did a general job printing 
business. Having decided on a professional 
career, he, in 1875, began the study of medi- 
cine in the office of Dr. A. N. Wakefield, of 
Johnstown. He then entered the medical de- 
partment of the Western Reserve University, 
of Cleveland, Ohio, from which he graduated 
in the class of 1878, and at once located at 
Johnstown, where he has ever since practiced 
his profession. He is a member of the Cam- 
bria County Medical society, of which he was 
secretary from 1887 to 1889, and president 
from 1 890 to 1 89 1 of the Medical Society of the 
State of Pennsylvania and the American Medi- 
cal association. In addition to the above or- 
ganizations of a scientific and fraternal nature, 
he has been honored with positions of honor 
and trust, an attestation of the high regard in 
which he is held professionally and as a citizen 
of the city. He was secretary of the United 
States pension examining board from 1884 to 
1889; deputy medical inspector for the Penn- 



sylvania State Board of Health after the Johns- 
town flood, having charge of the sanitary 
operations in one section of the flooded dis- 
trict covered with debris, and containing about 
three thousand five hundred people; was hos- 
pital director of the Conemaugh Valley Me- 
morial Hospital, of Johnstown, from 1892 to 
1 896, when, having been elected mayor of the 
city, he resigned, but still retains a directorship 
in the board of management, and from 1889 
to the time of his resignation was secretary of 
the board. He is a director in each of the fol- 
lowing organizations : Cambria Library asso- 
ciation, Grandview Cemetery association, and 
the Johnstown Board of Trade. Fraternally, 
he is a member of Cambria Lodge, No. 278, F. 
and A.M.; Portage Chapter, No. 195, R. A.M.; 
Oriental Commandery, No. 61, K. T. ; Syria 
Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S.; Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, and Knights of Pythias. 
Dr. Wagoner is a democrat, who believes in 
a Jacksonian enforcement of Jeffersonian prin- 
ciples, and has always taken an active part in 
the councils of the party of his choice, fre- 
quentl)' representing it in its conventions and 
other bodies of deliberation. He served as 
ward committee-man a number of years ; was 
delegate to the State conventions of 1884 and 
1889; member of the State central commit- 
tee; alternate delegate to the National Con- 
vention, at Chicago in 1 884, and in 1896 was 
elected to the office of mayor of Johnstown. 
As maj'or, his administration of municipal 
affairs has been characterized by a progressive 
spirit that has done much for the material in- 
terests of the city, and he has shown himself 
a competent executive officer. 



TSAAC EATON CHANDLER, deceased, 

one of the most prominent and respected 

citizens of Johnstown, was born at Rising Sun, 



246 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



Cecil county, Maryland, July 26th, 1824. 
While still an infant his parents removed to 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, and located on 
a farm in London Grove township. 

At an early age Mr. Chandler was appren- 
ticed to learn the trade of blacksmith. After 
serving his time he opened a shop in Union- 
ville, Chester county, where he remained until 
1849. In that year he removed to Catasauqua, 
Pennsylvania, and with his brother-in-law, 
Frank Stroud, started a blacksmith and wheel- 
wright shop. They built and shipped many 
carriages through the Lehigh Valley, from 
Mauch Chunk to Easton. About 1851 they, 
with John and George Fritz, built the Union 
Foundry and Machine works, and continued 
in business until 1854, when they sold out. 
John Fritz liaving assumed the management 
of the Cambria Iron works at Johnstown, 
Mr. Chandler, in company with John and 
George Fritz, Frank Stroud, Dr. W. W. 
Walters, James Williams, John E. Fry, Thomas 
Magee and Jacob Kuhn, removed to Johns- 
town, just as the Cambria works were enter- 
ing a period of prosperity. During the early 
years of the operation of tiie works, he was 
connected with them in different clerical 
capacities. 

In 1861 he was appointed postmaster of 
Johnstown by President Abraiiam Lincoln. 
After leaving the post office, in 1865, he re- 
entered the service of the Cambria Iron com- 
pany as receiving clerk, wliich position he 
held until 1892, wlien lie retired. 

Mr. Chandler was best known among the 
older citizens of Johnstown and Morreliville, 
in the development of the latter thriving 
borough. In 1870 he and his famil)- moved 
from the corner of Locust street and Court 
Place to the residence now owned by Mr. 
Alex. Stackhouse, on Fairfield avenue. Mor- 



reliville, he having purchased about one hun- 
dred acres upon which Morreliville now 
stands, and having layed it off in building lots, 
sold them on easy terms, and to a large num- 
ber of buyers he furnished the money to erect 
their houses. The records at Ebensburg will 
probably show that Mr. Chandler helped 
more people to homes in and about Johnstown 
than any other one who ever lived there, and 
it has been said there never was a difficulty 
between him and the purchaser, which illus- 
trates his probity of character. Mr. Chand- 
ler built the brick residence at 3 17 Main street, 
Johnstown, and removed to it in 18S2. 

Mr. Chandler was a stalwart republican 
from the organization of the party. In 1864 
he was sent from Cambria county as a dele- 
gate to the National Republican convention 
at Baltimore, in which President Lincoln was 
nominated for a second term. He represented 
his ward in the borough council. He was a 
member of the Young Men's Republican club. 
He was a director of the Citizens' National 
bank, and a director of the Cambria and Johns- 
town Building and Loan associations. 

]\Ir. Chandler was a descendant of very old 
families in Pennsylvania. In the year 1687, 
George Chandler and Jane, his wife, started 
from Westshire, luigland, to America, with 
their seven cliildien. The father dieii at sea. 
I lis family continuetl their journey, landing at 
Piiiladelphia in December, 1687. For a time 
they lived in a cave on the Delaware front, 
hut later built a house in Apple Tree alley, 
between Fifth and Sixth, and Arch and Ciierry 
streets. This liouse was recently standing, 
was built of brick and covered with tile, and 
was considered one of the oldest houses in 
the city, there being probably one older, the 
Letitia house, formerly the residence of Wil- 
liam Penn. William Chandler, the youngest 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



247 



son, married at Christ church, July lo, 1712, 
Ann Bowater, daughter of John and Frances 
Bowater, of Middletovvn township, Chester Co. 
He was a shoemaker by trade, and owned one 
hundred acres of land in London Grove town- 
ship, Chester county, to which he removed in 
1722. He died in 1746, leaving several chil- 
dren. His son William was born March i, 
1717, and was a farmer by occupation. He 
married at London Grove Friends' Meeting 
house, in 1756, Rebecca Allen, daughter of 
John and Amy Allen, of London Grove. 
■William died February 28, 1795, leaving chil- 
dren. His son Allen was born in London 
Grove, October 31, 1759; he too was a farmer 
and a militiaman in the war of the Revolu- 
tion. He married May 13, 1789, at London 
Grove Friends' Meeting house, Sarah Pyle, 
daughter of Joseph and Alice Pyle, and died 
December 24, 1837, leaving children: Joseph, 
William, Allen, Jr., James and Hanna. Allen, 
Jr., born in London Grove, July 12, 179S, was 
the father of the subject of this sketch. He 
married May 25, 1820, Mary, daughter of Dr. 
David and Mary Potts Eaton. 

The Eaton family came from Dolan, Rad- 
norshire, Wales, and settled on the Pennypack 
creek, in Lower Dublin township, Philadel- 
phia county, in 1686. John Eaton and Joan, 
his wife, with children: Joseph, John and 
George, helped to organize the Pennypack 
church, the first and oldest Baptist church in 
Pennsylvania. 

John and Joan both died in Newcastle 
county, Del, in 1717. Their son Joseph, born 
in Wales, August 25, 1679, married March 
17, 1724, in Montgomery township, Mont- 
gomery county, Pennsylvania, Urie Humphry. 
He was ordained to preach at Montgomery in 
1721, and organized the New Britain Baptist 
church, in Bucks county, in 1740. He died 



at Montgomery, April i, 1749. He left a 
large family. His son Isaac was born in 1726, 
and was educated at Southampton, Bucks 
county, Pennsylvania, and was there licensed to 
preach. He married Rebecca Stout, daugh- 
ter of David and Ann Stout, of Burlington 
county. New Jersey, and moved to Hopewell, 
same State, where in 1756 he opened the 
first Baptist academy in America, for the edu- 
cation of youth for the ministry. From it 
sprung up Brown University at Providence, 
Rhode Island. He died July 4, 1772. His 
son, Dr. David Eaton, born October 21, 1762, 
married October 21, 1784, Mary Potts, daugh- 
ter of William and Amy Borden Potts, of 
Bordentown, New Jersey. He died August 
13. 1813. 

His daughter, Mary Eaton, married Allen 
Chandler, Jr., as mentioned above. Their son, 
Isaac Eaton Chandler, the subject of this 
sketch, was born July 26, 1824. He married 
April II, 1857, Katherine Fritz (sister of the 
late George Fritz), of Highland township, 
Chester county, Pennsylvania. Their children 
were: George Allen Chandler, of Bethlehem, 
born September 8, 1858, married December 
27, 1 88 1, Florence M. White, of Chambers- 
burg, Pennsylvania. Their children were — 
Gertrude, born March 29, 1883; Allen, born 
June 18, 1885 ; George F.,born May 30, 1888; 
David E., born November 20, 1890, died 
September 6, 1891, and Daniel T., born July 
13, 1892. The second of this family was Mary 
Gertrude Chandler, born July 17, i860, married 
December, 1885, Axel Sahlin, of Sparrow's 
Point, Md. Their children were — Robert, born 
June 2, 1889, and Ellen F., born Feb. 21, 1895. 
& 

HARRY A. SHOEMAKER, ex Prothono- 
tary of Cambria county, is a son of 
Edward and Mary (Hanson) Shoemaker, and 



248 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



was born September 23, 1845, in the borough 
of Ebensburg, tliis county. 

He received his education in St. Francis 
college, at Loretto, this county, from which 
old and reliable institution he graduated in 
1862. His father was a merchant at Eljcns- 
burg, and Harry took a position in his father's 
store, where he remained until about 1866, 
when, having shown his aptitude for business, 
he was taken into a partnership with his fitlier, 
remaining with him until the hitter's death, 
which occurred in 1867. He then conducted 
business for liimself and the estate until 1871. 
Upon the latter date he disposed of his mer- 
cantile interests, and emigrated to the .State of 
Iowa, and remained there engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits until September, 1872, when he 
returned to the town of his nativit)' and formed 
a partnership with i)is brother, J:imes A., antl 
went into the foundry business. This part- 
nership continued until September, 1891, when 
Harry A. became sole owner by purchase of 
his brother's interest, and has since conducted 
it alone. Mr. .Shoemaker lias always been a 
staunch democrat, and on September 23, 1877, 
was appointed dcputy-slieriff under .Sheriff 
John R\'an, and served in this capacit)- until 
1880. On the completion of Mr. Rj'an's term 
Harry, showing his capacity for public busi- 
ness, was elected in the autumn of I 8S3 to the 
office of prothonotary of Cambria county, and 
served a full term of three years in a mannci 
that reflected credit upon himself, and accept- 
ably to all concerned, as is evidenced b}- the 
fact that he was renominated and re-elected 
for a second term. Since his term of office 
has expired he has been engaged in the stove 
and agricultural implement business in Ebens- 
burg. 

In May, 1869, he married Lydie Myers, a 
daughter of John V. Myers, of Pittsburg, and 



their union has resulted in the birth of six 
children, as follows : William, Maude, Philip, 
Bessie, Edward and Mildred. 



TAflLMAM WILLIAMS, a young attorney 
of Joluistown, this county, was born 
January 3, 1863, in Pittsburg, and is a son of 
Thomas and Margaret (Morgan) Williams. 
Tiic trans-Atlantic origin of the family of 
which Mr. W'illiams is a member is in the 
little principality of Wales. His paternal 
grandfather, John Williams, was a native of 
North Wales, and lived and died in the land 
of his nativity. 

Thomas Williams, father, was born in North 
Wales on December 25, 1813, and died in In- 
diana county, this State, April 28, 1878. He 
was reared in his native country, and, like so 
many i>f his countrymen, was an iron-worker 
b)- tratle, and followed that trade there until 
1850, when he sought a new home in America, 
with its more liberal economic conditions. 
As Pittsburg was the centre of the great iron 
industry of this country at that time, he located 
in that city, and plied his trade there until 
1863, when he removed to a farm lie had pur- 
chased in the vicinity of Pine Flats, in Indiana 
count)', in 1853. He had purchased a large 
tract of land in that section, and after locating 
thereon was engaged in the imi)roving of it, 
and clearing it to cultivation. Tliis lednatur- 
rall)' to lumbering, and, in addition to farming 
and stock-raising, he was for a number of years 
engageil in that intlustry. Politically he was 
a whig, but, upon the disruption of that party, 
became a republican, with which party he 
affiliateil the rest of his life. He was a reader 
and a thinker, and kept well posted on the 
political issues of the day, but was in no sense 
a politician. 

He was a devout Christian, and a zealous 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



249 



member of the Welsh Calvinistic Methodist 
church, and in that organization lield the 
office of elder, both in Pittsburg and in his 
country home. He was three times married. 
He wedded, as his first wife, Elizabeth Jones, 
and to their imion were born seven chil- 
dren, four of whom died in infancy. Those 
who lived to maturity were as follows: 
John, who is now located in Scottdale, West- 
moreland county, this State, where he is en- 
gaged as foreman in a large iron-working 
establishment. He entered the Civil War 
near the beginning of the conflict, in the 
Eighteenth regiment, Pennsylvania cavalry. 
He served three years, and saw much of the 
stern realities of war, and at the battle of 
Winchester, Virginia, was wounded and taken 
prisoner; Elizabeth, wife of Robert Morris, of 
Indiana county; and Thomas, of Pittsburg. 

His second marital union, in April, 1855, 
was with Margaret Morgan, of Wales. She 
came to this country with her brother, David 
Morgan, and her death occurred May 10, 
1867. To the latter union were born the fol- 
lowing children : David, who graduated from 
the Indiana State Normal school in the class 
of 18S2, and is at present a superintendent of 
schools in the city of Quincy, Illinois; Sarah 
Ann, deceased, was the wife of Samuel Grif- 
fith ; Catherine J., wife of Morris D. Jones, a 
merchant of Johnstown; William, the subject 
of this sketch ; Mary Irene, who graduated 
from the Indiana State Normal school in 
the class of 1887, and has since followed 
the profession of teaching, and is at pres- 
ent holding a position in Spellman Semi- 
nary, at Atlanta, Georgia ; and Evan, who 
died in infancy. 

In February of 1869 Mr. Williams married 
as his third wife Ann Elizabeth Coy, and 
three children, Lewis C , Robert R. and Mag- 



gie Belle, blessed this marriage. They all 
reside at Grisemore, Indiana county. 

William Williams attended the common 
schools, and at the age of eighteen took up 
the profession of teaching. In 18S2 he en- 
tered the Indiana State Normal school, and 
pursued his studies during two years, and 
graduated in the class of 1884. After com- 
pleting the course in that institution, he 
taught two terms in the borough schools of 
Johnstown, and one term as principal of the 
schools of Wilcox, Elk county, Pennsylvania. 
In 1887 he returned to Johnstown and taught 
a portion of another term, when, having 
decided to study law, he entered the ofiice 
of W. Horace Rose, Esq., and, after pur- 
suing the necessary course, and passing the 
required examination, was admitted to prac- 
tice at the Cambria county bar January 12, 
1 89 1, and has practiced in that county ever 
since. 

His marriage with Agnes C, a daughter of 
John W. and Matilda Gardner, of Jenner town- 
ship, Somerset county, this State, has been 
blessed in the birth of three children : Bruce 
Cardiff, Ora May, and Raymond Eugene. 



TAMES M. SHUMAKEK, ex sheriff of 
Cambria county, was born July 8, 185 1, 
in Fairfield county, Ohio, and is a son of Simon 
and Mary (Bower) Shumaker. He is of Ger- 
man origin, but his family was among the 
early settled ones of Berks county. The 
founder of the family in this country was John 
Shumaker, the great-grandfather of the subject 
of this sketch. He came from Germany to 
the United States in 1742, and settled in Phila- 
delphia for a time, and then removed to Berks 
county. A wooden spoon and fork, brought 
by him to this country, are much-prized heir- 
looms in the possession of John Shumaker, 



250 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



the uncle of the subject of this record. John 
Shumaker (grandfather) was born in Berks 
county. He was reared in that county, mar- 
ried there, and became the father of seventeen 
children, and spent his life in the county of 
his nativity. In that ccninty was born Simon 
Shumaker, on March lo, 1810. He was 
reared in that county, and worked in the 
woolen mills of that section at different times, 
and was also engaged upon the Erie Canal, 
from Williamsport to Havre-de-Grace, Mary- 
land. Later, he became a manufacturer of 
woolen goods. In 1846 he removed to Fair- 
field county, Ohio, and returned to Penn.syl- 
vania in 1854, where he spent the remainder 
of his life, dying May 30, 1 880. He was twice 
married. His first union was with Mary Wal- 
ton ; and his second was with Elizabeth Bowers, 
a daughter of Peter Bowers, of Lycoming Co. 
She was born in tiiat county in 1824, and is 
yet living. To this marriage were born six 
children, three boys and three girls. They 
are as follows : Annie, deceased, was the wife 
of John Ramsey, of Clinton county, Pennsyl- 
vania; Thomas J., of Williamsport, this State. 
He entered the Civil War at the age of sixteen 
years, served three years and si.x months, 
took part in twenty-seven engagements, and 
is at present a foreman in a woolen mill at 
Williamsport; liniily, wife of John Shoemaker, 
of Clarkstown, Pennsylvania; Rebecca, wife 
of Peter Marshall, of Heberon, Lycoming 
county; James M., subject; John S., who is 
unmarried, and lives with his mother at Mun- 
cy, Lycoming county. Pennsylvania. 

James M. Siuunaker had but few advan- 
tages for securing an education. He attendetl 
the common schools during the winter months, 
and worked during the summer months to help 
support the family, until he was si.xtecn years of 
age. At that age he left home, and began the 



battle of life single-handed and alone. Al- 
though he had but limited education with 
which to wage this battle, yet he had that 
which is perhaps better than a knowledge of 
Latin, Greek, and the " ologies." He had a 
good trade. He had learned the trade of a 
woolen worker, so when he came to Johnstown 
in 1874, he soon secured employment in the 
woolen mills of Wood, Morrell & Co., as fore- 
man of the spinning rooms. He remained with 
that company eight years. Carefully husband- 
ing his earnings, he had saved enough, in 1 882, 
to engage in mercantile pursuits. He purchased 
a store situated on the corner of Washington 
and Clinton streets, Johnstown. Here he was 
successfully engaged until that fatal 3 ist day of 
May, 1 889, when everything he had was carried 
away by the " Great Flood." After that calam- 
ity, he was for some time actively engaged in 
the work which was made necessarj' by it. 
From the report of the secretary of the Johns- 
town Flood Relief Conmiission, we take the 
following as giving a clearer idea of Mr. Shu- 
maker's connection with the burial of the un- 
known dead : " From a conversation with 
Herman Baumcr, of Johnstown, as to the best 
means of identifying as many as possible of 
the large number of unknown bodies, origin- 
ated the idea of removing from their scattered 
resting-places all the bodies, and interring 
them at one place. Having carefully consid- 
ered all the details, the matter was referred to 
the Commission, and their secretary was given 
authority to carr\- on the work to completion. 
From the cemetery company of Grand View, 
was secured a beautiful plot of ground of about 
twent)'-two thousand square feet, high up 
above the ruineii city, for which was paid 
only enough to warrant the perpetual care of 
the ground, the deed being held by the mayor 
of Johnstown, as trustee. A committee was 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



251 



formed, known as the Committee on the Re- 
interment of the Unknown Dead, of which 
committee Mr. Shumaker was made secretary. 
He afterwards took full charge of the work, 
seeing in this a possibility of finding his lost 
wife. He gave the work his undivided atten- 
tion, and although thirty-six bodies were iden- 
tified during the progress of the work, yet it 
is to be regretted that his hopes were not 
realized, and that he is yet ignorant of her 
last resting place." He was also on the com- 
mittee that purchased the tombstones, marking 
the graves of the unknown. 

Mr. Shumaker is a staunch republican, and 
in the autumn of 1891 was elected sheriff of 
Cambria county, by a majority of five hun- 
dred and seventy-one votes, although the 
county was Democratic by some eight hundred 
votes. 

On June 28, 1877, he married Lena Streum, 
and to this union were born : John S. ; James 
G., who died in 1885; Edith May, Irene G., 
and Walter S., all of whom were lost in the 
flood, except James G. 

He married, as his second wife, November 
12, 1 891, Antonia Lambert, and four children, 
Mabel, Warren, Donald E., and Esther, bless 
this union. 



"I^ETER CAMPBELL is a son of John and 
Susan (Myers) Campbell, and was born 
in what is now Carrolltown, March 25, 1837. 
Patrick Campbell, grandfather, was a native of 
Ireland, whence he emigrated to America and 
probably settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
where John Campbell, the father of our sub- 
ject, was born. His parents died when he was 
but four years old, and he found a home in the 
family of Emericus Bender, who came from 
Philadelphia to Cambria county. John Camp- 
bell was reared in the Bender home, and re- 



mained with his worthy benefactor until about 
seventeen years old, when he apprenticed him- 
self to John Myers, who afterward became his 
father-in-law, and learned the trade of a car- 
penter. 

After his marriage with Susan Myers he 
bought a tract of one hundred acres of wood- 
land adjoining the present site of Carrolltown, 
which he cleared, and on which he established 
his home. He followed farming in connection 
with his trade as a carpenter the remainder of 
his life. Previous to purchasing the above 
farm he had resided for a short time on a farm 
belonging to Mr. McDonald, who sold the 
place to Rev. Father Lemke. F"ather Lemke 
afterward gave the farm to the Benedictine 
society with which he was connected. 

Mr. Campbell was a man of considerable 
business ability, was a member of the Roman 
Catholic church, and died May 4, 1865, aged 
sixty-four years. His wife, who survived him 
many years, was born in 1800, and died August 
31, 1890, at the advanced age of ninety )'ears. 
Their union was blessed in the birth of nine 
children: Henry, a carpenter of Altoona, 
Pennsylvania; Mrs. Catharine Farrell ; John, 
Joseph and Robert, all deceased ; Peter ; Au- 
gusta, deceased ; Mrs. Mary A. Kirkpatrick, 
deceased, and Susan, who died in childhood. 

Peter Campbell was reared on the homestead 
farm and learned the carpenter trade with his 
father, which he followed for a number of years. 

On the death of his mother, in 1890, Mr. 
Campbell purchased the homestead, which 
contains one hundred and twenty-five acres of 
well-improved farm-land, lying just outside the 
borough of Carrolltown, with the exception of 
the buildings and their surroundings. It is one 
of the most desirable farms in that locality. 

In political affairs Mr. Campbell is a staunch 
advocate of the principles of the Republican 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



party, and exerts a wide influence in the local 
councils of the same. He cast his first vote 
for Lincoln, and has ever since voted with the 
party of Lincoln and Grant. 

He was appointed sealer of weights and 
measures for Cambria county under Governor 
Hoyt, and was postmaster of Carrolltown 
under President Harrison. In i8Si he was 
elected constable by a majority of thirty-five, 
at a time when the borough gave a Democratic 
majority of about one hundred and fifteen. 
August 23, 1895, he was a delegate to the 
State convention, and for thirty-seven years 
has served as a delegate to the county conven- 
tion. During the Delamater, Hastings and 
Montooth campaign for the nomination for 
Governor in 1890, a great effort was made to 
have the delegates to the county convention 
instructed for Delamater, and thus secure his 
nomination by acclamation. Against this pro- 
ceeding Mr. Campbell took a firm stand and 
entered the county convention as an unin- 
structed delegate, being the only one in the 
convention; for this reason there was great in- 
fluence brought to bear upon him, but having 
the courage of his convictions he nominated 
General Hastings and forced a ballot. 

Mr. Campbell has been twice married. April 
21, 1857, he married Miss Mary Kirkpatrick, 
who died June 27, 1 866; this marriage resulted 
in the birth of five chiklren : .Susan, the wife 
of Matthew Weaklind, who is the only one 
now living; Josephine E., Jennie, James and 
Peter, all deceased. 

His second marriage, which occurred in 
May, 1867, was with Miss Jane Hendon, a 
daughter of Thomas Bendon, a stone-mason 
of Gallitzin township, this county; this mar- 
riage resulted in the birth of ten children : 
.Stephen, weighmaster at Reed's mines; Fran- 
ces, tile wife of Albert Feighner, Spangler, this 



county; Jessie, at home; Samuel, deceased; 
Jennie, at home; Matilda, at home; Mary, the 
wife of C. A. Repsher, of Patton, this county; 
Charlotte, Amanda and Delia ; besides an 
adopted child, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sides, of 
Barr township, this county. He was taken by 
Mrs. Campbell at the age of two months, and 
named Francis Benjamin Harrison Campbell. 
He is now seven years of age, bright and 
intelligent. 



T.VMES PERRY, a retired and highly re- 

spected business man of Chest Springs, 

is a son of James R. and Flmira (Nutter) 

rVrr)', and was born in Porter, Maine, March 

7, 1827. 

The name Perry is one of the nld and time- 
honored names of Maine. The family is of 
English origin, and is descended in a direct 
line from Lord Bechani, of England, who was 
the great-great-grandfather of our subject. 
His son, John Perry (great-grandfather) be- 
came involved -in some family troubles, and 
for this reason was disowned by his family. 
He emigrated to the United States and lo- 
cated in Osipa, Maine, where he married 
and engaged in agriculture, and, b)- indus- 
try and perseverance, accumulated consid- 
erable wealth. His son, Stephen Perry, 
who became the grandfather of this subject, 
was born in Osipa, Maine, and following in 
the footsteps of his esteemed father, became 
a farmer. He married, and this marital rela- 
tion resulted in the birth of six children, three 
sons .md three daughters, of whom James R. 
was the oldest. He was born in Porter, 
Maine, about 1 801, and died in 1863, aged 
sixty-two years. He too was a tiller of the 
soil, and spent the greater part of his life on a 
farm. For a number of years before his death 
lie was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



253 



church. His union with Miss Ehnira Nutter, 
the mother of our subject, resulted in the birth 
of the following children : Sarah, deceased, 
who was the wife of Harrison Clement ; 
James; Charles, deceased; Eben, ex-sheriff 
of Portland, Maine; Henry, a printer in New 
York city, New York ; Olive, the wife of 
Elijah Buggle, a farmer of Iowa ; Arminda, 
deceased; Fannie, the wife of William Hayes, 
a clothier of Massachusetts ; Ella, deceased, 
who was the wife of a New England rail- 
road conductor. 

James Perry was reared a farmer boy on 
the old homestead, in Porter, Maine. At the 
early age of fifteen years he went to Saco, 
Maine, where for three years he was employed 
in a dye-house. He then accepted a similar 
position in a dyeing establishment in Man- 
chester, New Hampshire, where he remained 
fifteen years. 

Early in May, 1863, he removed to Chest 
Springs, this county, on a farm. For a num- 
ber of years he was quite extensively en- 
gaged in fcirming and lumbering, and, in con- 
nection with the latter enterprise, handled large 
quantities of shuck. Later he engaj^ed in 
the mercantile business in Chest Springs. 
But within the last three years, on account of 
impaired hearing, he has retired from the 
business world, and is at present enjoying the 
fruits of a profitable and well-spent life. 

Mr. Perry is a prominent and consistent 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
in which organization he has been class-leader 
for a number of years. 

In politics lie supports the principles of 
the Republican party, but has never sought 
nor held office. He married Miss Eliza- 



beth C. Batchelder, of Saco, Maine, who 
died June 20, 1896. She was a loving wife, 
a devoted mother, and for many years had 
been a devout member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. Their happy marriage has 
been blessed in the birth of the following 
children : Charles, who has recently suc- 
ceeded his father in the mercantile busi- 
ness ; Mary, the wife of Perry McDonald, of 
Chest Springs; Georgia, the wife of J. B. 
Wilbur, a clothier of Ebensburg, this county; 
William and Frank, engaged in the meat 
market business in Coalport, this county, and 
Lillie and Ehnira, who both died in childhood. 



C'AMUEL MASTERS, assistant superin- 
tendent of houses and lands in connec- 
tion with the Cambria Iron company, is a son 
of George and .Sarah (Custer) Masters, and 
was born at Davidsville, Somerset county, 
February 20, 1842. 

His grandfather, William M.isters, was a 
native of England, whence he emigr.ited to 
America and located in Fayette county, and 
later removed to Somerset county, where he 
died. George Masters, son of the above and 
father of the subject of this sketch, was born 
in Somerset county in 181 2. He was a wea- 
ver of coverlets by trade. In politics he was 
a wiiig, and held a number of important local 
offices by appointment or election. In 1842 
he was appointed justice of the peace, and at 
the time of his death, in 1850, held the office 
of county commissioner. He was married to 
Sarah Custer, and was the father of seven chil- 
dren, five boys and two girls, of whom four 
are living, viz.: Joseph, Kate, Amanda, wife of 
J. S. Custer, superintendent of the labor 



254 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



department of the Cambria Iron company, 
Johnstown, and Samuel. 

Subject of this sketch, Samuel Masters, was 
reared in Somerset county and received his 
education in Davidsville. He worked at 
farming until he entered the Civil War. He 
enlisted in the I'ifty-fourth I'ennsj'lvania regi- 
ment, company II, and w.is honorably dis- 
charged at Gallipolis, Ohio, on the 20th day 
of December, 1864. He participated in some 
of the most hotly-contested battles of the war, 
among which were the following : Hedges- 
ville, North Mountain, New Market, New 
Hope Church, Lexington, Buchanan, Salem, 
Lynchburg, all in Virginia. In the latter 
contest he was wounded in the wrist by being 
struck with a canister shot. This necessitated 
the ain]nitation of his left arm. After his ser- 
vices in this connection he engaged with the 
Cambria Iron company on the 1st day of Sep- 
tember, 1865, and has been in their em- 
ploy to the present time. Politically he is a 
republican, and has always taken an active 
interest in the success of his i)arty. Relig- 
iously Mr. Masters is a member of the Meth- 
odist church of Johnstown. Mr. Masters 
married Miss Lucretia Metz on August 23, 
1875, and to their union have been born 
Edward, Nellie J., living, and Ral|)h and Ray, 
deceased. Mr. Masters is a gentleman with 
good ideas of business; he fought well the bat- 
tles in defence of liis country's lionor and 
deserves and possesses the entire resi)ect of was elected president and manager. Alter the 



and general manager of the Basic Brick com- 
pany, of Johnstown, and the general manager 
of the Faj^ette Manufacturing company, of 
Southwestern Pennsylvania. 

He is a son of James and Jane (Hamilton) 
Williams, and was born in Johnstown, Cam- 
bria Count)', Pennsylvania, May 19, 1865. He 
received his elementary education in the pub- 
lic schools of Johnstown, and spent two years 
in the laboratory of the Cambria Iron com- 
ixan\-. He then entered the Lehigh University, 
where he took the course in mining metal- 
lurgy, and was graduated in the class of 1887 
with the degree of B. S. Immediately he took 
a post-graduate course and received the de- 
gree of E. M. After graduation he spent a 
year at the Edgar Thomson Steel works of 
the Carnegie Steel company, after which lie 
built the Michigan Steel works at Detroit, 
which he left as soon as it was in good run- 
ning order to study in Europe the basic method 
of making steel, which was largely employed 
there. Returning from Europe he remodeled 
the plant of the Ciiicago Horse-shoe company, 
in Chicago, and had charge of the Elast Chi- 
cago Foundry company. His health fiiiling, 
he was compelled to leave Chicago. After 
two years' travel he so far regained his heaUh 
as to take charge of the Fayette Manufactur- 
ing company. Tliis company has its plant at 
Layton, P'ayclte county, Pennsylvania. After 
tlie incorporation of the Fayette company he 



all who know him. 



FIJAXK WILI.I.VMS, whose life has been 
one of activity and event in the field 
of American manufactures, is the organizer 



organization of the 15asic Brick company lie 
resigned as president of the Fayette company, 
but remains a director and general manager of 
both companies. The general office of these 
companies is in Pittsburg. The Faj'ette com- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



255 



pany manufactures silica, sand and magnesia 
bricks, and basic refractories, and is the sole 
agent for Carl Spaeter, of Coblentz, Germany. 
In connection with the Basic Brick company 
these companies are the largest silica brick 
manufacturers in the world, besides being the 
only successful magnesia brick makers in the 
United States. The Basic Brick company 
manufactures magnesia bricks, tuyeres, and 
crucibles, and silica brick for glass-works and 
steel furnaces. The products of their yards 
go to all the large steel plants and smelting 
and refining works of America, and to some 
parts of Europe. 

Mr. Williams has never taken an active part 
in politics, although identified with the Repub- 
lican party. He is a member of the Protestant 
Episcopal church. He has been a member of 
the American Institute of Mining Engineers 
since 1888. At college he was elected a 
member of the Honorary Scientific Societ}- 
of Tau Beta Pi, and the college fraternity 
of Theta Delta Chi. He is a member of the 
Duquesne and the University clubs of Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. He is unmarried, and re- 
sides with his parents at No. 511 Main street. 

Frank Williams is justly acknowledged as 
one of the leading and most scientific brick 
manufacturers of the United States, a posi- 
tion won by ability, technical education, and 
energy. In a few years he has done much to 
increase the output of basic steel in the United 
States, and thus utilized ores, in many locali- 
ties, which were considered worthless for steel, 
at the same time producing a purer and better 
grade of steel. In the smelting and refining 
of copper, lead, zinc, and the precious metals, 
much progress has been made due to the basic 
materials introduced. Formerly all this mate- 
rial was used only by the largest steel firms, 
and none was manufactured in this country. 



From the Fayette and basic companies the 
various basic and neutral materials can be ob- 
tained in all shapes and proportions necessary 
to the smelter and refiner of metals. 

Early in life Frank Williams has gained 
distinction and high standing in his chosen 
pursuit, and to his native city has given an 
additional industry and valuable increase to its 
yearly output of manufactures. 



JOHN E. HAGEY, a man of high stand- 
ing, and the general manager of Penn 
Trafific company of the city of Johnstown, is 
a son of David and Margaret (Kissinger) 
Hagey, and was born at Martinsburg, Blair 
county, Pennsylvania, March 8, 1853. The 
Hagey family is of German origin, and settled 
in pioneer days in Huntingdon county, where 
Jacob Hagey, the paternal grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch, was born, in Woodcock 
valley. From this valley he went to Marietta, 
Ohio, where he died in 1855, aged seventy- 
three years. David Hagey (father) was born 
in Huntingdon county, December 13, 1825, 
and is still a resident of Martinsburg, Blair 
county, to which place he removed in 1850. 
David Hagey learned the trade of stone-mason, 
which he followed until some fifteen years 
ago, and was engaged for many years in 
building and contracting. He is a member 
of the German Reformed church, and wedded 
Margaret Kissinger, who was a native of Mar- 
tinsburg, and died there July 27, 1884, aged 
fifty-one years. David Kissinger was of Ger- 
man origin, and after learning the trade 01 
tailor at Reading, removed to Martinsburg, 
where he died at seventy years of age. 

John E. Hagey passed the early years of 
his life at his native place and at Fredericks- 
burg, in the same county, receiving his edu- 
cation in the common schools, where he de- 



256 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



voted his attention chiefly to those branches 
essential to success in business. At sixteen 
jears of age he left the school-room to en- 
ter the great school of business life as a 
clerk in a general mercantile establishment, 
where he so thoroughly fitted himself for his 
selected line of life-work that, in October, 
1882, he received the position of purchasing 
agent for the Penn Iron and Mining company, 
whose plant was located at Vulcan, Michigan. 
Four years afterwards Mr. Hage)- was made 
general manager of their mines, in which ca- 
pacity he served until July, 1891, when he 
resigned to accept his present position as 
general manager of the Penn Traffic company, 
Limited, of Johnstown. Tlie stores of this 
company are extensive, and Mr. Hagey has a 
regular force of one hundred employees under 
his personal control in the different depart- 
ments, which owe a large part of their pros- 
perous upbuilding and present prosperity to 
his efficient management and careful super- 
vision. 

He is a republican in politics, and a 
regular attendant of the Presbyterian church. 
While not a politician in the generally accepted 
sense of that term, \et, when only twenty-one 
years of age, he was elected as auditor of 
Blair county, and held that office successfully 
for a term of three years. His early inclina- 
tion toward business pursuits, instead of pro- 
fessional or political life, was not only char- 
acteristic of his special qualifications for in- 
dustrial or commercial enterprises, but was 
indicative of the [jcrseverance that is always 
the forerunner of success. 

On September 17, 1871, Mr. Hagey wedded 
Mary N. ]5rumbaugh, a daughter of Rev. 
G. W. Brumbaugh, of Fredericksburg, Blair 
count)'. Mr. and Mrs. Hagey h.ive one child 
living, a daughter n.uned Carrie. 



TACOB SIXGER, one of the substantial 
farmers of Conemaugh township, Cam- 
bria county, Pennsylvania, is a well-known 
figure on the streets of Johnstown. Although 
he has passed the allotted three-score and ten 
he is still bright and active. Being born 
March 1 1, 1S26, his memory extends back to 
pioneer times. In fact his maternal grand- 
father, Jacob Good, was one of the earliest 
settlers in this vicinit)-, having settled on the 
farm which our subject now occupies in the 
year 1796. This was four years before Joseph 
Johns laid out the " Town of Conemaugh " in 
the valley below the Good homestead. 

Our subject's father (David Singer) was 
born in York county, Pennsjlvania, in 1790. 
When but two years of age his father died, 
and the family were thrown on their own 
resources. At the age of fifteen years he 
found his way to Cambria count)-, which 
was formed the same year by act of legisla- 
ture, although the first court was not held 
until two years later, when the organization of 
the new county was completed. 

This lad of fifteen had to make his own 
way among entire strangers in a new countr)', 
but was successful. When he grew to man- 
hodil hi- married Mary Good, daughter of 
Jacob Good, and purchased the old Gmid 
homestead, whcic he resided until his death, 
in 1850. lie h.id learned tlie trade of a 
weaver, l)iil followcil faiining all his iile. His 
wife, the mother of our subject, survived 
until 1858. They were the parents of thirteen 
children: Ciiristiana, wife of John B. Horner; 
John, who died at the age of sixty-three ; 
Mary; Susan, wife of e.x-Sheriff John Roberts; 
Flizabeth, wife of Morganza Brown; Barbara, 
Jacob, David, Samuel, Aaron, Sarah, wife of 
John Carrol ; Catherine and Cluisti.ni. 

Of these Mrs. Horner, Carrol, Aaron and 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



257 



Jacob are all that survive. David Singer and 
his wife were honest, Godfearing and indus- 
trious; in religion they were adherents to the 
sect known as Dunkards or German Baptists. 

Jacob Singer grew up on his father's farm 
and attended the district school, but his edu- 
cational advantages were very meagre. He 
finally became the owner of this valuable farm 
of one hundred and eighty-eight acres, all 
underlaid with coal. He is possessed of 
abundant means, but cannot be induced to 
leave the old farm, where his life has been 
spent, to enjoy the comforts and luxuries of 
city life. 

While he is an earnest republican and takes 
a deep interest in his party's success he has 
never sought for office. During the Civil War 
he was appointed enrolling officer for Cone- 
maugh, Taylor and Yoder townships, and held 
that office until Lee surrendered. He still 
takes an active interest in local politics. 



JOKKNARD NEES, a genial gentleman and 
the popular proprietor of the commodious 
hotel, at Geistown, is a son of John and Mary 
Ann (Fleckenstein) Nees, and was born in the 
kingdom of Bavaria, now one of the states of 
the great German empire August, i6, 1842. 
His parents were both natives and life-long 
residents of Bavaria, where the mother died in 
1840, at thirty-four years of age, and the father 
survived until 1878, when he passed from 
earth, aged seventy-two years. They were 
industrious people, who held to the faith of 
the German Catholic church, and reared a 
respectable family of sons and daughters. 

Bernard Nees grew to manhood in a farm- 
ing district in one of the valleys of the blue 
Danube, received his education in the old 
Bavarian schools, noted for thoroughness and 
excellence, and then followed agricultural 
17 



pursuits until he attained his twenty-third 
year, when he left the Fatherland to seek his 
fortunes in America. He came to Johnstown 
on April 23, 1866, and secured a position as 
clerk in the general mercantile store of Geis 
& Foster, of that place. He remained in their 
employ for four years, and then erected at 
Geistown his present hotel building, in part of 
which he conducted a general mercantile store 
from 1870 to 1876. 

Opening his hotel in 1870, he has con- 
ducted it ever since, excepting the years 1885, 
18S6 and 1887, when he rented it. This hotel 
has always been licensed, except the year 
1893. Mr. Nees has always made it an ob- 
ject to render his guests comfortable, and this 
has helped to secure him the large and re- 
munerative patronage which he enjoys. He 
is a highly-respected citizen, a democrat in 
politics and a member of the German Catholic 
church of Johnstown, of which his family are 
communicants. Mr. Nees owns a good farm 
in connection with his hotel property, and 
employs his time largely in the management 
of the one and the operation of the other. He 
is pleasant and genial, and on July 4, 1893, in 
company with E. Zang, sailed from New York 
city to Europe, where they visited many old 
cities, historic places and beautiful spots, and 
enjoyed themselves exceedingly well. Mr. 
Nees is wont to refer to this tour as one of the 
most enjoyable times of his life. 

On February 22, 1870, Bernard Nees mar- 
ried Helena Geis, of Geistown. Air. and Mrs. 
Nees have eight children living, three sons 
and five daughters: Agnes, wife of Jacob 
Grosh ; Katie, Annie, Josephine, Rose, Lud- 
wig B., Joseph M. and George A. Mrs. Nees 

, was born in Geistown February 11, 1850. 

I Her paternal grandfather, Conrad Geis, was a 
man of fine memory and good education, who 



258 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



served twenty-four years as magistrate in his 
native countiy of Bavaria before coming, in 
1842, to Richland township, where he boiiglit 
the old Squire Horner farm, on which he died 
in April, 1876, when in the eighty-third year of 
his age. His son, Joseph Geis, and the father 
of Mrs. Nees, was born in a Bavarian district 
in 1 82 1, and came with his father, in 1842, to 
Richland township, where Geistovvn was soon 
laid out and named in honor of the latter. 
Joseph Geis was successfully engaged in 
farming for a number of years, but is now 
living a retired life on his farm. He is a 
member of St. Joseph (German) Catholic 
church, and married May A. Fleckenstein, 
who was a daughter of Adam and Eva Fleck- 
enstein, and died January 16, 1893, at the age 
of seventy-two years. 

Frugal and industrious, the Nees and Geis 
families arc among the useful families of the 
county, and have brought from their old-world 
Bavarian home many worthy characteristic 
traits that arc worthy of emulation. 



j^lC. JOHN E. M.AUCIIIOU, one of the 

best posted physicians of northern Cam- 
bria county, and now a successful practitioner 
at Carrol Itown, is a son of Francis S. and 
Anna Mary (Smith) Maucher, and was bom 
in Bavaria, Germany, December 15, 1825. 

That Dr. Maucher has been eminently suc- 
cessful as a practitioner of medicine is but 
natural, for in addition to possessing a mind 
pcciiliarl)' adapted to the profession, he comes 
from an ancestry which has furnished many 
physicians of note, among them being his 
father and his grandfather. 

Dr. Manclier received his literary education 
in Neiibuig college, from which world-re- 
nowned institution he graduated in 1844, and 
liis professional training was obtained in tiic 



medical department of the University of Mu- 
nich, which he entered in 1846, and where he 
studied four years. After making thorough 
preparation in his profession, he practiced for 
about eleven months with his father. In 1852, 
believing that the new world offered better 
opportunities for the young professional man 
than the old world, he emigrated to America. 

He first located in Pittsburg, but remained 
there only a short time, when in February 
of 1853 he came to CarroUtown, where he has 
remained ever since. He was the first regular 
physician to locate in that place. In his pro- 
fession he has been eminently successful, and 
whilst he has been a general practitioner, he 
has pushed his studies and his practice a little 
further along some lines than along others. 
In obstetrical cases he has been unusually 
successful, and in his treatment of between 
eleven hundred and twelve hundred cases, has 
had but four fatalities. He has also been suc- 
cessful in the treatment of pulmonar\- diseases, 
having effected some remarkable cures of this, 
the most dreaded of diseases. 

The secret of Dr. Maucher's remarkable 
success lies, perhaps, more in the fact that he 
has always been a diligent student, than in 
an)-thing else. This, coupled with the fact 
that he has been a close observer, and has 
caicl'iilly noted his observations, has enabled 
him to diagnose a case very closely — the first 
and most necessarj' requisite in the successful 
treatment of diseases. 

Prior to 1SS6, Dr. Maucher was very active 
as a practitioner, but for the last ten j'ears has 
preferred to relinquish an out-door practice, 
and has confined himself to the office. 

Religious!)-, Dr. Maucher is an ardent and 
ileviHit member of the Roman Catholic church, 
and has been secretary of the church in his 
community for thirty-six years. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



259 



Politically, the doctor is a republican, keeps 
well posted on the political events of the day, 
but has never been an aspirant for office, except 
in his own borough, where he held the office 
of school director for twenty-three years ; for 
sixteen years he was a member of the town 
council, postmaster for eleven years, and bur- 
gess one year. 

April 19, 1853, Dr. Maucher and Mary A., 
daughter of Michael Steigerwald, of Carroll- 
town, were united in marriage, and eight chil- 
dren have blessed this union : Amelia, wife of 
John L. Walters, of Carrolltown ; Rudolph, 
assistant inspector in the custom-house at 
Newport News, Va. ; Adelaide, deceased ; 
Albert, deceased ; who, having graduated from 
the Baltimore College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, successfully practiced his profession 
ten years — three of them in Nicktown, this 
county, and seven of them in Carrolltown — 
and was a young man having very flattering 
prospects for a successful professional career ; 
William, a member of the Benedictine order, 
known as Rev. P. Alcuin, located at St. Vin- 
cent's college ; he is an artist of considerable 
skill and taste, and an electrician of ability. 
He was ordained at St. Vincent's Abbey, near 
Latrobe, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1886; Joseph V., who graduated from the 
Baltimore College of Physicians and Surgeons 
in 1885, and is now engaged in the drug busi- 
ness at Carrolltown ; Victor, who graduated 
from St. Vincent's college, and is now a music 
teacher in Johnstown ; and Rosa, at home with 
her father. 



T ^lEUTENANT EDWARD R. DUNE- 
GAN, a merchant of St. Augustine, this 
county, and a justice of the peace of Clearfield 
township for over a quarter of a century, was 
born in Croyle township, this county, Janu- 



ary 19, 1835, and is a son of Michael and 
Catherine (Rudden) Dunegan. His father 
was born in County Fermanagh, Ireland, in 
1792. In his native country he followed the 
avocation of a farmer. In 1829, shortly after 
his marriage, he emigrated to the United 
States. He landed at the city of Quebec, 
thence he went to Montreal, whence he drifted 
into the State of New York, and later into 
Eastern Pennsylvania, and in 1833 located in 
Croyle township, on the old and famous Port- 
age railroad at the time it was being built, 
and became a subcontractor in the construc- 
. tion of it. After the road had been completed 
he held the position of foreman at the foot of 
plane No. 5. He remained on the Portage 
road until 1845, the date upon which he re- 
moved to St. Augustine. In that vicinity he 
purchased several large tracts of woodland, 
and cleared considerable portions of it for 
cultivation. To agricultural pursuits and lum- 
bering he devoted the remainder of his active 
life, dying May 19, 1888, at the advanced age 
of ninety-six years. He was a man of great 
energy and enterprise, and was quite success- 
ful in all his undertakings. He was a life- 
long democrat of the Jefferson school, and 
held various township offices, and voted for 
every Democratic candidate for president from 
Jackson to Cleveland. In his religious belief 
and practice he was a devoted Catholic. 

A few months before he left Ireland he had 
married Catherine Rudden, of County Cavan, 
and to their union were born three sons : 
Patrick, deceased, was a farmer and teacher, 
and died March 16, 1879, at the age of forty- 
nine years, leaving a family of three sons and 
two daughters ; Edward R., subject; Michael 
J., deceased, who died May 16, 1889, at the 
age of fifty-two years, leaving a family of five 
sons and three daughters. 



260 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



The school-boy days of Edward R. Dunegan 
were spent upon the farm, and he was given 
such educational advantages as were offered 
by the common schools. lie was of a stu- 
dious turn of mind and improved well his 
time, and was soon found well qualified for 
the profession of teaching, which he followed 
in connection with farming a number of years 
in Clearfield township. When the clouds of 
war arose, and the country was threatened 
with dismemberment, he left the school-room 
and the farm to take up the life of a soldier. 
He enlisted, on July 24, 1862, in company K, 
One Hundred and Twenty-fifth regiment, 
Pennsj'lvania Volunteer infantry, and, upon 
the organization of the company, he was 
elected first lieutenant, and served until May 
20, 1863, when he was mustered out at Har- 
risburg, this State. Among the more import- 
ant battles in which he participated were the 
following: Chantilly, August 31, 1862; South 
Mountain, September 13, 1862; Antictam, 
September 17, 1S62, where one-third of the 
regiment was killed or wounded ; h'redericks- 
burg, December 14, 1862, and Chancollors- 
ville, May 1-3, 1863. It was during the latter 
conflict, on .Sunday, May 3, when the Union 
troops were making their retreat from the dis- 
astrous battlefield, under Gear)''s division of 
the Twelfth Army coips in the neighborhood 
of the Plank road, that the bravery of IJeuten- 
ant Dunegan was so marked as to attract the 
attention of General Geary, who complimented 
him in ])crson for his gallant conduit, antl 
afterwards urged his i)roniolion to the position 
of captain in a very complimentary letter of 
recommendation, addressed to Andrew G. Cur- 
tin, then governor of Penn.sylvania. 

Mr. Dunegan has always been a staunch 
democrat, and, prior to his enlistment in the 
service of his country, had been elected county 



auditor. In 1864 he was elected a county 
commissioner, and served with credit a full 
term of three years. At the close of his ser- 
vice as commissioner, he engaged in the mer- 
cantile business at St. Augustine, and has con- 
tinued that line to the present time. During 
1879-80-81 he served as clerk to the board 
of county commissioners. In 1868 he was 
elected a justice of the peace in Clearfield 
township, and has served continuousl)' in that 
office to the present time. His long-continued 
service in this office is the highest testimony 
of the esteem in which he is held by his neigh- 
bors, and those who know him best. 

Lieutenant Dunegan is still actively engaged 
in the mercantile business in St. Augustine, 
Pennsylvania, and there is nothing affords him 
more pleasure than to meet an old comrade 
and recount the exciting scenes they partici- 
pated in during the battle-storms of the great 

rebellion. 

o 

/nr\ICH.\KL BUACKEN, a highly re- 
spected citizen and successful lumber 
nuMchant and contractor, of Gallitzin, this 
county, is a son of Michael and Mary (Cough- 
lin) Bracken, and was born in Johnstown, this 
count)', March 26, 1832. His father, Michael 
Bracken, was born in Kings count)-, Ireland, 
and for a number of years was a tenant of 
Lord Ross, the scientist. He emigrated to 
America in 1827, and located for a short 
time in Pittsburg, Peinisylvania, ami in 182S 
removed to Johnstown, where he resided for 
si.x or seven )'ears. From Johnstown he 
removed to the Viaduct, near Mineral Point, 
this county, where he remained until his death 
in 1863, aged seventy-four years. He engaged 
in farming to some extent, but devoted a large 
part of his time to contracting. His wife was 
also a nati\-eof Irel.uui, and with her husband 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



261 



was a devout member of the Roman Catholic 
church. She died in 1847. 

Michael Bracken was reared a farmer boy 
on the old homestead farm near Mineral Point, 
and received his early education in the com- 
mon schools. He remained on the farm until 
1852, when he engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness near Mineral Point. In 1854 and 1855, 
Mr. Bracken and his brother, Patrick Bracken, 
secured the contract for laying several miles 
of the track for the new Portage railroad. 
Having fulfilled the terms of the above con- 
tract, in 1856, Mr. Bracken returned to the 
lumber business, which he has since conducted 
with much success. In 1864 he removed to 
Gallitzin, this county, where his large planing 
mill is located. He leases large tracts of 
timber land, and by means of his portable 
saw-mill manufactures all the lumber he 
handles. His saw-mill is at present located 
near Bennington, Blair county, where he has 
control of a large tract of timber. From 1885 
until 1895, Mr. Bracken also conducted a gen- 
eral store in Gallitzin, and in connection with 
his lumber interests has been engaged as a 
contractor and builder. He has furnished the 
lumber for, and built nearly one-half of the 
houses of his borough, besides having built 
the fire-brick school house and the Opera 
house. 

He owns a tract of coal land near Mineral 
Point, which for the last fifteen years has been 
leased to other parties, who have been opera- 
ting mines in that section. Mr. Bracken has 
always been an enterprising citizen, and has 
been largely instrumental in the material de- 
velopment and growth of the town in which he 
lives. In 1889 he was the prime mover in the 
organization of the Gallitzin Water company, 
in which he is also the largest stockholder. 
Prior to the incorporation of the company, 



many deaths occurred in the borough which 
were traced directly to the use of impure 
water. Now the town is well supplied with 
pure water pumped from wells three hundred 
feet deep. In political sympathy he is a dem- 
ocrat, and has faithfully served his town in 
different offices. But aside from the natural 
interest displayed by every patriotic citizen, 
he has never taken an active part in local 
politics. In religious opinion he is a devout 
member of the Roman Catholic church, which 
receives his most liberal support. 

In 1 866 he was united in marriage with 
Miss Louisa, a daughter of Martin Christy, of 
Blair county, Pennsylvania, and their union 
has been blessed in the birth of the following; 
children: Frank B., a lawyer, of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania; James H., William C.,John P., 
Paul v., Michael J., Louis C, who died in 
1893, aged twelve years, and Joseph, who died 
in 1876. 

e 

n W. BUCK, a member of the banking 
* firm of Johnston, Buck & Co., of Ebens- 
burg, and a man of financial and business abil- 
ity, is a son of Hon. John and Regina (Sherry) 
Buck, and was born in Carroll township, Cam- 
bria county, Pennsylvania, March 15, 1858. 
He attended the common schools until he was 
sixteen years of age, and since then has sup- 
plemented his early education by observation 
of men and the world more than by reading. 
With a natural aptitude, and a strong inclina- 
tion for a business pursuit, he left school to 
become a clerk in the banking house of Col- 
lins, Johnston & Co., of Ebensburg. He served 
in that capacity for three years, during which 
time he showed much aptness for the business, 
and was so diligent and thorough in his work, 
that he was made cashier when only nineteen 
years of age. As cashier his services soon 



2H2 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



became invaluable, and two years later he was 
admitted to partnership, under the firm-name 
of Johnston, Buck & Co. While a member 
of the firm he still serves as cashier. 

He is well versed on financial matters, and 
is thoroughly familiar with all the details of 
banking, and his close and careful supervision 
is such as to prevent errors and avoid losses. 

Politically a democrat, but no office-seeker, 
Mr. Buck while carefully studying the political 
issues of the day, yet is neither partisan nor 
politician. Standing unquestioned for what 
he is, a man of business ability and strict in- 
tegrit}-, his career furnishes an additional 
instance of what capability can accomplish 
without friends or influence. 

On May lO, 1880, Mr. Buck wedded Hattie 
L. Zahm, a daughter of Geo. C. K. Zahm, of 
Ebensburg. Mr. and Mrs. Buck have one 
child, a daughter named Blanche. 

Carl Buck, the founder of the Buck family 
in Cambria county, was of German origin and 
nativity, and built Buck's mills, where his son, 
Hon. John Buck, was born .September 11, 
1823. Hon. John Buck was engaged for many 
years in the general mercantile business, but 
is now living a retired life. He is an ardent 
democrat, yet served as postmaster at Carroll- 
town under Grant's administration. He served 
from 1862 to 1865 as sheriff of Cambria county, 
which he represented in the house of rei)rc- 
sentatives of Pennsylvania, during the session 
of 1875 to 1876. He always took an active 
part in all matters pertaining to the success of 
his party, or the local government of his town- 
ship and county. He is a member of the 
Catholic church, and on June 5, 1849, married 
Regin.i Siierr)-, a daughter of Pclcr .Slicrr)', of 
Allegheny township. To their union were 
born twelve children : Celcstine A., a large 
furniture dealer, who resides at Carrolltown, 



and has branch stores at Hastings and Spang- 
ler; Dr. M. J., of Altoona, who was graduated 
at Jefferson Medical college, took special 
courses in New York city and Vienna, Aus- 
tria, and ranks as a leading surgeon of the 
United States; S. H., a contractor and builder 
of Lorain, Ohio ; Peter, who died in the year 
1 881; Dr. James P., a graduate of Jefferson 
Medical college, and after serving in the Aus- 
trian army, operating against .Servia, returned 
home and is now practicing in Chicago; A. 
W., subject of this sketch; Mary, wife of James 
V. Scanlan, a traveling salesman of Johnstown ; 
Ambrose C, who has hardware stores at Brad- 
dock, Turtle Creek and Gallitzin, Pennsylva- 
nia; Annie, at home; Vincent J., engaged in 
the hardware business with Ambrose C, and 
Lambert, who is at home. 

The Buck family, of Cambria county, is of 
honorable German origin, and if related to the 
old and well-known Buck family of iMontgom- 
ery count}-, of which the historian, William J. 
Buck, is a member, it will trace its ancestry 
back " to the time of the Crusades," its coat- 
ofarms being a white or silver springing 
buck on a vermilion field. Such surnames 
which indicate courage or agility have been 
borrowed from the shields and banners of war. 
The most common Christian names in the 
f.imily for generations have been Nicholas, 
Jacob and John. 



i^lOV. MCIIOL.VS S. GEORGE, a man of 

T \aricd and successful business experi- 
ence, and a Union soldier in the late Civil War, 
is the eldest son of Rev. Nicholas and Cathe- 
rine (Yutzler) George, and was born near 
Mechanicsburg, Indiana count}-, Pennsylvania, 
September 7, 1834. His paternal ancestors 
were of German origin, and the Georges, of 
Cambria county, are descendants of Nicholas 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



263 



George, whose father was a Revolutionary sol- 
dier and resident of near Camden, New Jersey, 
where the George family was among the earli- 
est settlers in that locality. Nicholas George 
removed to Chambersburg, Franklin county, 
and in 1810 went to Buffalo, New York, from 
which he was driven back in i8i4by Indian 
and British raids to Franklin county, in which 
he remained until 1820. In that year he be- 
came the first settler in the vicinity of Belsano, 
this county. He bought a tract of land, and 
cleared out a farm, on which he died in Octo- 
ber, 1846, aged over sixty years. He was a Lu- 
theran; served as a soldier in the War of 1812, 
and married Elizabeth Helman, by whom he 
had nine children, five sons and four daughters : 
Mrs. Charlotte Luke, Jeremiah, Rev. Nicho- 
las, Adam, Mrs. Elizabeth Cameron, Jacob, 
Mrs. Mary Mardis, Mrs. Catherine Pringle, 
and Cyrus. 

Rev. Nicholas George was born near Buffalo, 
New York, March i, iSii.and died at Bel- 
sano, March 2, 1883. He was a shoemaker 
by trade, spent the early part of his life on a 
farm, and served for over twenty years as a 
local minister of the Evangelical association. 
While in the pulpit at Belsano, and in the 
midst of his sermon, he had a paralytic stroke, 
from which he died in a few hours. His life, 
though quiet and unostentatious, was well 
rounded and consistent to the close. He 
married Catherine Yutzler, who was born in 
Westmoreland county, November 15, 18 10. 
Her father, Jacob Yutzler, was a native of near 
Greensburg, Westmoreland county, who en- 
listed as a soldier in the War of 18 12, and was 
killed at the battle of Lundy's Lane. 

To Rev. and Mrs. George were born ten 
children : Rev. Nicholas S., Lieut. Adam, a 
school-teacher, who enlisted in the One Hun- 
dred and Forty-ninth regiment Pennsylvania 



infantry; was taken prisoner at South Anna, 
and died at Andersonville after six months' 
confinement, July 7, 1864, number of grave 
2992 ; Jonathan Mendall and William D., who 
died respectively at two and thirteen years of 
age ; Jacob D., served in company I, Fifty- 
fourth Pennsylvania infantry; was wounded 
five times, and after the war became a carpen- 
ter, contractor, and builder in Cumberland, 
Maryland ; Annie M., wife of Rev. B. F. Feitte, 
of Warren county ; Elizabeth died at two years 
of age; Benjamin F., of South Fork, and Ma- 
linda and Fannie, twins, who died in infancy. 

Rev. Nicholas S. George was reared on the 
farm ; received a common-school education, 
and at fifteen years of age went to an iron fur- 
nace, where he worked for three years. He 
then engaged in farming in Clarion county, 
which he left in May, 1857, to learn the trade 
of cooper, which he followed at Summerhill 
and Ben's Creek for three years, excepting the 
winters. From 185710 1862 he taught five terms 
of school. During this time, in i86i,he had 
offered to enlist as a soldier, but was rejected 
on the ground of physical disability ; but when 
Lee invaded Maryland, he served as a sergeant 
in an emergency company at Antietam, and 
again in the same capacity at the time of Lee's 
invasion. A year later, on September i, 1864, 
he offered to enlist, and was accepted as a mem- 
ber of company D, Two Hundred and Fourth 
Pennsylvania regiment or Fifth Heavy artil- 
lery, in which he served at the battles of Salem 
and Rectortown, Virginia. After the close of 
the war he returned to Summerhill, and entered 
the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad com- 
pany as a laborer, but was soon promoted to 
foreman. Four years later, in November, 1869, 
he became manager of P. M. and J. Brown's 
large general mercantile establishment at Sum- 
merhill, which position he resigned nine years 



264 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



later, in 1878, to assume the management of 
his farm, which he left in October, 1884, to 
open a general mercantile establishment at 
South Fork. At the end of nearly a year, in 
September, 1885, he formed a partnership with 
P. M. Brown, of Wilmore, and J. C. Stineman 
and Dr. J. C. Luke, of South Fork, under the 
firm name of ]?rown, George & Co. They 
did a large general mercantile business up to 
April I, 1890, when they sold to Stineman 
Brothers, and Mr. George and his son, Harry 
J., started their present and first regular hard- 
ware establishment at South Fork. Their 
establishment is on Main street, a two-story 
building, twenty-two by fifty feet in dimensions, 
and has been thoroughly fitted up for business. 
They carry constantly a stock of nearly four 
tliousand dollars, and do a business of ten 
thousand dollars per year. 

In politics Mr. George is a republican, and 
has served as school-director, member of the 
borough council, burgess, and justice of the 
peace. He is past commander of D. T. Stine- 
man Post, No. 560, Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic; commander of South Fork Castle, No. 61, 
Ancient Order Knights of the Mystic Chain; 
treasurer of South Fork Council, No. 74, Junior 
Order of United American Mechanics ; treas- 
urer of Lone .Star Court, Ancient Order of 
P'oresters of America, and a past officer of 
South Fork Castle, No. 161, Kniglits of the 
Golden Eagle, and a member of Washington 
Camp, No. 621, Patriotic Order Sons of Amer- 
ica. Mr. George has led an active, honorable, 
and industrious life, and although unassisted 
pecuniarily when starting out to do for himself, 
yet has by good judgment and judicious man- 
agement secured a fair competency and con- 
trols a prosperous business. Pleasant, enter- 
prising, and public-spirited, his highest ambi- 
tion is to be useful to his fellow-citizens, and 



to advance ihe true interests of his borough. 
He is a member of the United Evangelical 
church, in which he has served for over twenty 
years as a local minister. In every relation of 
life he has been faithful to duty and honor, 
and caring but little for distinction, has alwaj's 
acted for the right, independent of interest or 
[popularity. 

On July 18, 1858, Rev. George married Mary 
Paul, a daughter of Lewis Paul, of Croyle town- 
ship. Rev. and Mrs. George have had nine 
children : Epanimonidas, in the railway service 
at .South Fork ; Mary C, wife of William Rohr- 
baugh, of Wilmore, this State; William E., a 
freight conductor on the Pennsylvania rail- 
road; Sylvester S., now deceased; Harry J., 
a partner in the hardware business with his 
father; Charles E., a freight conductor on the 
Pennsylvania railroad; Annie C. , a clerk in 
Stineman & Brothers' general mercantile estab- 
lishment at South Fork; John L., and Homer 
C, at home with their parents. 



FRKI>. BLAND, a general merchant and 
mine operator of Blandburg, this county, 
is a son of B. Bland and Mary (Yeckley) Bland, 
and was born in Wiirtemburg, Germany, 
December 17, 1847. He was reared and edu- 
cated in his native countr\-, antl, like his father, 
was employed for a number of years as a shep- 
herd. In 1867 he emigrated to America, and 
located in Gallitzin. He learned the trade of 
a cooper, which occupation he followed suc- 
cessfully until 1877. During this time he 
acted as foreman for Nutter, Cunningham & 
Co., coopers, of Johnstown, Pa., for several 
N'cars, anil from 1873 until 1877 was emplo\-ed 
by the above firm as a contractor. In the 
latter year he engaged in the lumber enter- 
prise on his own account, and for five years 
carried on quite an extensive and remunera- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



265 



tive business. During the following five or 
six years he was engaged in the butchering 
business at Blandburg. In 1889 he opened 
the Bland mine, near the above place. This 
mine has an average annual output of 30,000 
tons of bituminous coal of a good quality, and 
is still in operation. In the same year Mr. 
Bland opened a large general store in Bland- 
burg, where he carries a complete and well- 
selected line of general merchandise, and in 
1895 he purchased the old McCammant farm 
near Tifton Station, Blair county, containing 
two hundred and twenty-six acres of well- 
improved farm-land. 

Fraternally he is a member of Allemansville 
Lodge, No. 900, I. O. O. F., of which he is 
past grand master. In political opinions he 
supports the principles of the Republican party, 
and, while not a politician, he takes an active 
interest in both local and national issues. For 
twelve years he has served as school director 
in his district. 

September 5, 1 871, he celebrated his mar- 
riage with Miss Annie Newhouse, a daughter 
of Ludwig Newhouse, of Cambria county. 
To this marriage ten children have been born: 
George, who is a clerk in his father's store ; 
Amanda, the wife of William Clawson, of 
Bellwood, Pa. ; Ludwig, at home ; Fred., Jr., a 
farmer ; James and Mary, both deceased ; Wel- 
lington, at home ; John, Bessie and Adam. In 
1873 Mr. Bland built the first house where the 
village of Blandburg is now located. 



OTEPHEX STUTZMAN.— About the mid- 
^^ die of the eighteenth century a German, 
filled with the spirit of enterprise, left the 
environs of his native land and settled in what 
is now the little mountain republic of Switzer- 
land. The German referred to was Abram 
Stutzman, in all probability, the great-grand- 



father of the subject of this sketch. In that 
land of the mountains Abram Stutzman, grand- 
father, was born. Abram Stutzman continued 
the journey to the west begun by his father, 
and emigrated to the United States, settling at 
the very old German settlement in Franklin 
county, this State, on the waters of Conoco- 
cheague creek, where he lived the remainder 
of his life, following the pursuits of a shoe- 
maker and farmer. 

Jacob Stutzman, father, was born in Frank- 
lin county in 1 777, and died in Taylor town- 
ship, this county, in 1859. He was reared in 
Franklin county, and learned the trade of a 
shoemaker with his father, and when a young 
man came to Cambria county, seeking work 
along the line of his craft. In those early 
pioneer days it was the custom of the trade to 
travel from house to house seeking employ- 
ment, and it was while thus engaged that he 
became acquainted with a family by the name 
of Ulery, one of the daughters of which 
family he afterwards took as his wife. 

Jacob Stutzman was an industrious worker, 
and carefully husbanded his earnings and pur- 
chased a farm of two hundred and thirty-one 
acres, now known as Osborn, or the Seventh 
ward of the city of Johnstown. He lived upon 
this homestead until 1853, when he sold it to 
his son Stephen, and removed to Taylor town- 
ship and spent the remainder of his days with 
his son, Samuel Stutzman. He married, when a 
young man, Susanna Ulery, and their marriage 
was fruitful in the birth often children : Daniel, 
Abraham, Jacob, John and David, all deceased ; 
Elizabeth, deceased, was the wife of Abraham 
Weaver, now also deceased ; Hannah, wife of 
George Knable ; Susanna, wife of John Knable, 
deceased ; Mary, who married the first time 
Samuel Berkey, and afterwards Christian Good, 
who is deceased ; Samuel, a resident of Taylor 



2t>U 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



township, and Stephen, the subject of this 
sketch. 

Stephen Stutzman was born on the old 
homestead, now known as Osborn, Decem- 
ber 20, 1825. His advantages for securing an 
education were not to be compared with the 
advantages held out to the youth of that 
vicinity at the present day, with its brick 
building, carefully graded course of study and 
skilled teachers. On the otiier h.iiid, the 
young Stutzman of three-quarters of a century 
ago secured his limited mental training in old 
log school-houses, and was taught usually by 
an incompetent set of teachers, who " boarded 
around." Being reared upon the farm, he natu- 
rally took to agricultural pursuits as a means 
of securing a livelihood. 

He farmed for his father a number of years. 
The latter, after considerable importuning on 
the part of Dr. Henry Yeagley, consented to 
sell the farm to the latter for $6000, where- 
upon young Stephen, seeing the old homestead 
about to pass from the family, made the propo- 
sition to buy it himself. 

The old gentleman was very much sur- 
prised at this manifestation of so great an 
amount of pluck on the part of his son, 
remarking that he did not see how he, the son, 
could pay for it; but .Stephen persisted, and 
his father consented. This amount of money, 
in those days, was comparatively a much 
larger amount than it would be considered at 
the present day, and the undertaking fore- 
sJiadowcd that enterprising and thorough- 
going spirit in the young man which contri- 
buted so largely, in after years, to his success. 
He soon, however, sold the farm to George 
VV. Osborn for $7000. With the surplus 
giooo he made a down pa)'ment on a farm of 
one hundred and seventy-five acres in Upper 
Yoder township, for which he paid ^3600. 



Upon that farm he lived, successfully pursuing 
the arts of husbandry until 18S8, when he 
removed to Westmont, where he has since 
lived, enjoying the fruits of an industrious and 
honorable career. 

Mr. Stutzman is a republican, and served 
three years as tax collector of his township. 
He has always manifested a deep interest in 
the cause of popular education, and for eighteen 
years served as a member of the school board 
of his township. 

Religiously he is a devout and consistent 
member of the German Baptist Church. 

Mr. Stutzman has been twice married. His 
first marriage was in March, 1849, with Rachel 
Berkey, a daughter of Peter Berkey, of Som- 
erset count}', and resulted in the birth of the 
following children : Peter, an agriculturist of 
Taylor township; Sarah, wife of Aaron Strayer, 
of Morrellville ; Franklin, a farmer of Upper 
Yoder township ; Jacob S., also a farmer of 
the same township ; Mary Jane, wife of Slater 
Allen, of Johnstown ; Lovina and Lizzie, 
twins (Lovina is the wife of Dr. L. S. Living- 
ston, of Johnstown; Lizzie, wife of Joseph D. 
h'inley, of Glenford, Ohio); and William, a 
farmer of Upper Yoder township. 

Mr. Stutzman married as his second wife 
Mary Fyock, widow of the late Samuel Fyock, 
of Paint township, Somerset county, Penns)-1- 
vania. 



lA^II.LI A>l \V. I'OUCII. the leading nui- 
sical instrument dealer of Johnstown, 
ami an active and successful business man of 
that [)lace, was born, January 22, 185S, in 
I-'ayette county, Pcnnsjdvania, and is a son of 
Jacob and .Susanna ( 1 1. union) Porch. He is 
of German-English ancestrj'. His great-great- 
grandfather, on the paternal side of the family, 
was G. F. Porch, who emigrated at an early 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



267 



day from England, and settled in Westmore- 
land county, where John Porch, great-grand- 
father, was born. In that county, also, was 
born George Porch, grandfather, in 1801, and 
he died in the same county in 1 874. The great- 
great-grandfather of Mr. Porch on the mater- 
nal side of the family emigrated from Ger- 
many and was killed by the Indians. His son, 
the great-grandfather of our subject, was taken 
prisoner by the Indians, but afterward returned 
to his Westmoreland county home. Andrew 
Harmon was the grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch. He was born in 1805, and died 
in 1869. His father first saw the light in 
Westmoreland county March 4, 1831. His 
mother was also born in Westmoreland county 
February 4, 1837, a daughter of Andrew Har- 
mon, who was born in 1805, and died in 1869. 
W. W. Porch was reared upon the paternal 
acres in Westmoreland county, and like many 
of the successful business men of the day 
began life on his own account as a teacher. 
He taught four terms in the common schools 
of Westmoreland county, and then took a 
commercial course in the Iron City Business 
college of Pittsburg, graduating from that well- 
known institute in 1882. Having directed his 
education with the view of pursuing a busi- 
ness career, he took a position as a clerk in a 
gents' furnishing store of the " Smoky City," 
where he remained over a year. At the end 
of that period, or in 1881, he began selling 
musical instruments under the employ of the 
firm of Wilcox & White, of Pittsburg, remain- 
ing with that firm until 1888, when he em- 
barked in the business on his own account in 
Johnstown, and has continued the same at that 
place to the present time. In addition to the 
handling of musical instruments he is vice- 
president of the Mendelssohn Piano Manu- 
facturing company. 



On January 26, 1893, Mr. Porch and Lydia 
Cline, a daughter of William D. McClelland, 
of Johnstown, were united in marriage, and to 
this union was born one child, Ralph, on 
December 29, 1895. 



nAYMOND J. KAYLOR, proprietor and 
editor of the Hastings Tribune, is a son 
of James and Cecelia (Burke) Kaylor, and was 
born in the Cambria county alms-house, April 
16, 1867, during his father's stewardship. 

His sreat-grandfather was a native of Ger- 
many, whence he emigrated to America about 
the time of the Revolutionary war. He 
enlisted as a soldier in that famous struggle 
for American independence. After the war he 
located on a farm in Adams county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he died. Two of his sons, Peter 
and Jacob Kaylor (the latter was the grand- 
father of the gentleman whose name heads 
this sketch) came to this (Cambria) county 
about the time Father Gallitzin arrived, and 
located with the colony at Loretto. There 
Jacob Kaylor met and married Katie McCon- 
nell, who was a member of the Loretto col- 
ony. This marriage resulted in the birth of 
several children, one of whom, James J. Kay- 
lor, became the father of our subject. He was 
one of the younger children in the family, and 
was born on the old homestead, near Loretto, 
Pennsylvania, and died June 14, 1894, at the 
age of sixty-nine years. He received a liberal 
education, for those early days, and for a 
number of years followed the profession of 
teaching. For ten years— from 1858 to 1868 
— he was .steward of the County Home, and it 
was during this term of office that Raymond J. 
Kaylor was born. On retiring from the above 
position, Mr. Kaylor returned to the home- 
stead near Loretto, where he followed the pur- 
suits of a farmer, remaining on the farm the 



268 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



rest of his life. He was a faithful adherent of 
the principles of Democracy, and served the 
public of his community in all of its local 
offices. He was a member of the Roman 
Catholic church. 

His marriage with Cecelia l^urke, a daugh- 
ter of John Burke, of Croyle township, Cam- 
bria county, resulted in the birth of nine chil- 
dren, four daughters and five sons : Mark 
Burke, deceased ; Cyrillis, deceased ; Mary, 
deceased ; Rose, a professional nurse in the 
Pennsylvania ho.spital at Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania ; Ida, a member of the order of 
Sisters of Mercy, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania ; 
Raymond J. and Harold G., twin brothers; 
Harold is a merchant of Johnstown, and con- 
trols all the news routes in and between 
Johnstown and Altoona ; Irene, at home, and 
Lewis V.., a fanner, owning the old home- 
stead. 

Raymond J. Kaylor was reared a farmer 
boy, and received his education at the St. 
Francis college, Loretto, and .St. Vincent col- 
lege, Latrobe, Pennsylvania, gratluating from 
the latter well-known institution in 1887. 
Previous to entering St. Vincent college he 
had commenced to learn the trade of a printer 
in the office of the Altoona J/irror, and, after 
graduating, went to Philadelphia, where he 
finished his trade. Until 1890 he worked as a 
journeym.ui ; in the latter year he removed to 
Hastings, and succeeded R. M. Huston as 
proprietor and editor of the Hastings Herald, 
now called the Hastings Tribune, an eight- 
page, five-column paper, published weekly in 
the interests of the Democratic party, and 
making a specialty of local and county news, 
which is given in an acceptable form to the 
general public of all [larties. The Tribune 
has a large circulation, and is one of the best 
papers in the northern part of the county, 



being one of the three county papers officially 
filed in the count)' archives. 

Mr. Kaylor was appointed postmaster of 
Hastings by President Cleveland in 1893, 
which office he still holds. In religious be- 
lief he is a member of the Roman Catholic 
church. 

October 24, 1892, Mr. Kaylor celebrated 
his marriage with Miss Nellie F". Adams, 
a daughter of Thomas Adams, of St. Augus- 
tine, this county. They have two children : 
M. Gordon and Madeleine Frances. 



JOSEPH P. WIL.SON, one of the repre- 
sentative business men of Cambria 
county, and general superintendent of the ex- 
tensive Argyle and Conemaugh coal mines, is 
a son of James and Jane (Brown) Wilson, and 
was born near Apollo, Armstrong county, 
Pennsylvania, January 26, 1 833. The Wilsons 
trace their ancestry back to the house of .Stu- 
art, in Scotland, when a MacCanimet, with 
others of royal blood, was banished by Queen 
Anne. MacCammet settled in the neighbor- 
hood of Valley P'orge, in eastern Penns)-lvania, 
and either his daughter or granddaughter 
became the wife of John Wilson, the grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch. John 
Wilson was born near where Washington's 
army passed through the hardships of Valley 
Forge, ami where his brother, the Rev. James 
Wil.son, served as an army chaplain. A year 
later, 1778, John Wilson came to the Horse- 
shoe Bend, on the Kiskiminetas river, then in 
Westmorelant! county, and became a pioneer 
farmer, near the site of the present village ot 
Vandergrift. He was a man of good circum- 
stances for that ilay, and after some years 
removed to the vicinity of Spring Church, 
Arm,strong county, where he died in 1837 or 
1838, at a ripe old age. He was a Scotch- 




J. p. WILSON. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



269 



Irish Presbyterian, and his widow survived 
him four years, dying at eighty years of age. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson reared a family of six 
sons and two daughters : Joseph, a farmer, 
now deceased ; Thomas and John, both Arm- 
strong county farmers, now deceased ; Samuel, 
a blacksmith of Tipton, Blair county, who 
died a few years ago ; Polly, who married 
Archibald Smith, a farmer of Arm.strong 
county— both died at an old age ; James ; and 
Jackson, a farmer of northwestern Missouri. 
James Wilson (father) was born on the old 
Westmoreland county farm in 1810, and died 
at Apollo, Armstrong county, in 1852, aged 
forty-two years. He was reared on the farm, 
and lived a farmer's life until 1844, when he 
removed to Apollo, Armstrong county, where 
he served for eight years as a justice of the 
peace. He was a man of business ability, had 
always been a democrat in politics, and was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
His wife was Jane Brown, a daughter of An- 
drew Brown, who served as a soldier under 
General Harrison in the War of 1812, and 
laid his land warrant on a valuable piece of 
land in Armstrong county. James and Jane 
(Brown) Wilson were the parents of six sons 
and one daughter. The daughter was the 
eldest, and died in infancy, and the sons in 
order of age were: Andrew, a machinist of 
Apollo; John, who died at thirty-three years 
of age, December 8, 1864, while serving as a 
soldier in the Union army, and his remains 
were buried in the National cemetery at Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn. ; Joseph P. ; James P., a mill- 
wright, who died at Danbury, Illinois, in 1881, 
aged fifty years ; George W., who served as a 
Union soldier, and contracted disease while in 
the service that caused his death, December 23, 
1869, at the early age of twenty-one years; 
and William, who died in childhood. 



Joseph P. Wilson was reared on his mater- 
nal grandfather Brown's farm, received his 
education in the common schools, and in 1846 
went on the canal, where he remained up to 
1854, in which year he engaged in coal-mining 
at McKeesport, this State, but did not continue 
there for any length of time. Soon thereafter 
the Westmoreland Coal company was organ- 
ized and opened mines at Irwin Station, where 
he was engaged in mine service for them from 
1856 to 1863. In the latter year he became 
mine foreman for the Penn Gas Coal company, 
at Penn's station, which position he held up 
to i88l,when he accepted his present position 
as superintendent of the Argyle Coal mines 
of South Fork. Ten years later, Mr. Wilson 
opened the Conemaugh mines at Conemaugh, 
and also has the superintendence of them. 
He was also one of the organizers and is a 
member of the Roaring Spring Land and 
Mining company, operating zinc and lead 
mines, in Jasper county, Missouri, where they 
own five hundred acres of land. 

On August 5, 1850, Mr. Wilson married 
Catherine Suman, whose father, Philip Suman, 
was a resident of near Murraysville, West- 
moreland county. To Mr. and Mrs. Wilson 
have been born five children : Anna L., widow 
of D. L. Masters, of Westmoreland county ; 
John W., assistant superintendent and mine 
foreman of the Argyle coal mines; Marj^ 
Jane, who died at seven years of age ; Alice 
v., widow of George B. Heffner, of Franklin 
county ; Marj^ wife of G. W. Schrock, of 
South Fork. 

Joseph P. Wilson is a republican in politics, 
and served four terms as justice of the peace 
at Penn station, in Westmoreland county, one 
term by appointment and three succeeding 
terms by election. He is a member of West- 
moreland Lodge, No. 518, Free and Accepted 



270 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



Masons, Greensburg; William Penn Lodge, 
No. 50, United Order of American Work- 
men, of Penn station ; Council No. 79, 
Junior Order of American Mechanics, of 
South Fork, and Corona Lodge, No. 999, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Cone- 
maugh, of which he is a charter member and 
Past Grand. 

During the late Civil War Mr. Wilson 
enlisted in September, 1862, in Colonel 
Jack's regiment, of Westmoreland county, and, 
after serving two months, was discharged on 
account of defective sight in the right eye 
Active in church and party, and prominent in 
lodge, as well as patriotic in the Civil War, 
Joseph P. Wilson has never neglected any 
duty in his line of work, and has made invest- 
ments in coal lands and coal enterprises that 
have become valuable, lie is a member of 
the Mountain Coal company, owning nine 
thousand acres of good coal land in Adams 
township, which is now operated by indi- 
vidual coal companies on a royalty. He 
also owns a one-third interest in a seven hun- 
dred-acre tract of coal land in Adams town- 
ship. He is superintendent of the Dunlo 
Coal company, of Dunlo, and president of the 
South Fork Supply and Water companies. 
When Mr. Wilson entered the coal field it 
was by severe struggles that men earned a 
competency, but the cramped conditions of 
the past have yielded to the wonderful de- 
mands of the present, and possibilities have 
become realities. He is a genial and com- 
panionable man, kind but firm, and generous 
but just. Mr. Wilson has permanently linked 
his name with the most successful business 
men of Cambria county, being a man of exe- 
cutive ability and great capacity for looking 
after the various details of an immense and 
complicated enterprise. 



i^H. A. J. MILLEK, a successful medical 
^^ practitioner of Cambria county, located 
at Portage, is a son of Andrew and Alary (Sej- 
more) Miller,and was born in Carroll township, 
Cambria county, April 8, 1858. He is of Ger- 
man ancestry, his grandfather, John Miller, 
having emigrated from Germany when a young 
man. He located in Bedford count)', Pennsyl- 
vania, and followed the trade of a blacksmith. 
Later in life he removed to Cambria county, 
where he died when about forty years old. 

Andrew Miller, the father of the gentleman 
whose name heads this sketch, was born near 
Bedford, Bedford county, in 1821. He was 
educated in the old subscription schools of 
those early days, when the scholastic advan- 
tages were extremely limited. Earl}- in life 
he began to work on a farm, and having de- 
cided likings for agricultural pursuits he 
became a tiller of the soil and followed farm- 
ing all his life. When the Civil War threat- 
ened the destruction of the Union he gave his 
services to the country, and enlisted in com- 
pany B, Sixteenth regiment, Pennsylvania 
volunteers, and served about one year, receiv- 
ing his discharge in 1865. He is now located 
on a farm near Carrolltown, this county, and 
lives a comparatively retired life. The Car- 
rolltown Water works arc located on a portion 
of his property. In politics, Mr. Miller, Sr., 
is a democrat, and while taking a personal 
interest in all local affairs, he has never sought 
nor held office. He is a consistent member 
of the Roman Catholic church, to which he 
gives liberal support. 

His marriage with Mary Seymore, a daugh- 
ter of Nicholas Seymore, of Cambria county, 
has resulted in the birth of thirteen children, 
ten of whom are now living. 

A. J. Miller received his elementary educa- 
tion in the public schools of his district, and 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



271 



on leaving the common schools was employed 
for several years in various pursuits, and then 
began preparation for a medical career. In 
1889 he began reading medicine under the 
preceptorship of Drs. G. H. Sloan and Hun- 
ter, and in 1890 entered the Columbus Medi- 
cal college, of Columbus, Ohio, where he 
spent one term, and then matriculated as a 
student in the Ohio Medical university, of 
Columbus, from which he graduated in 1892, 
after having completed a thorough course in 
that well-known institution. Having passed 
the Pennsylvania State medical examination, 
he located in his present office at Portage, and 
is enjoying a large and lucrative practice. 
Doctor Miller is a truly self-educated man. 
By persistent application and through his own 
efforts he is amply prepared for the successful 
practice of his chosen profession. 

Dr. Miller supports the principles of the 
Republican party ; while not a politician he 
takes an active interest in local politics and 
has filled several local offices. He is a mem- 
ber of the Roman Catholic church. He is iden- 
tified with the Cambria County Medical society, 
and is also a member of the Pennsylvania 
Medical association. In June, 1884, he cele- 
brated his marriage with Miss Susie Fees, a 
daughter of John Fees, of Ebensburg, this 
county, and their happy union has been 
blessed in the birth of the following children: 
Bertha Mary, Warren Andrew, Edwin Emer- 
son, Raymond Alfred, and two girls who died 
in infancy. 



r\ W. GREEN, a merchant of Chest 
• Springs, this county, is a son of Wil- 
liam and Eliza (Beckett) Green, and was born 
near Freeport, in Butler county, Pennsylvania, 
October 22, 1821. 

Nathaniel Green, grandfather, was a native 



of County Antrim, Ireland, where he followed 
farming all his life in the parish of Ballendery. 
In the latter parish was born William Green, 
the father of the subject of this record. He 
was born early in the present century, and in 
July, 1 82 1, with his young wife, came to 
America. He located for a short time in Butler 
county, and later at the salt works near Free- 
port, where he remained about three years, 
and then removed to Pittsburg, and there 
learned the trade of plasterer, which trade he 
followed in that city until 1850. Upon the 
latter date, he purchased a farm near Strongs- 
town, Indiana county, and lived upon it until 
the death of his wife, in 1856, when he returned 
to Pittsburg, and made that city his home until 
his death, which occurred in 1857, at the age 
of about fifty-five years. In religious matters, 
he was in his earlier years an Episcopalian, 
but later cast his church affiliations with the 
Methodist Episcopal church. In matters of 
politics, he was originally a democrat, and 
later a staunch whig. He married Miss Eliza 
Beckett, an Irish lady of his native parish, and 
they became the parents of eleven children : 
A. W., subject ; Helena, widow of D. C. Kurtz, 
now of Washington, D. C. ; Mary Ann, de- 
ceased, was the wife of William Hines ; James, 
died in infancy ; Thomas Nelson, who, when 
last heard from, was in the army of the South- 
ern Confederacy ; Eliza, died in early girlhood; 
Sarah died in infancy; William H., deceased; 
James and Matthew, merchants of Pittsburg. 

A. W. Green received his educational train- 
ing in the common schools of Pittsburg. He 
then served a five years' apprenticeship at the 
carpenter trade, pursuing that trade from 1837 
until 1850, in Pittsburg. After finishing his 
trade in 1842, he took to contracting and 
building in that city, until 1847, being a mem- 
ber of the firm of Lyons & Green, a firm that 



272 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



did an extensive and prosperous business. In 
1847 he formed a partnership with John Gettys, 
under the firm name of Green & Gettys, and 
went to the city of St. Louis, where they oper- 
ated one year. The next year they came 
back to Pittsburg, and remained until 1850. 
The latter year he purchased a farm near 
Strongstown, Indiana county, consisting of one 
hundred and fifty-five acres, and lived upon it, 
jointly following farming and carpentering 
until 1857, when he removed to Chest Springs, 
this county, and followed his trade a short 
time, when, in connection with his brother 
William, he founded the first planing-mill of 
Chest Springs, and also operated a steam saw- 
mill in connection with it, shipping the pro- 
duct to the Pittsburg and Philadelphia markets. 
This partnership continued two years, when 
the subject of this sketch became sole owner, 
and operated it alone for a time, and then sold 
out, together with all his possessions in Chest 
Springs, which included considerable real 
estate, and in 1867 removed to Iowa county, 
Iowa. There he purchased a farm of one 
hundred and thirty acres, and for a time fol- 
lowed farming and carpentering. He remained 
in Iowa county twenty-three years, and built, 
during that time, thirteen churches. In 1889 
his wife died, and shortly afterward he returned 
to Chest Springs, where he embarked in the 
confectionery business, which was later en- 
larged to a green grocery and notion store. 
Politically lie is a republican, and served a 
number of terms in Iowa as a member of the 
school board. Fraternally, he is a member 
of the Masonic order, and is a past grand 
representative of tiie Grand Lodge of Iowa 
I. O. O. F. He is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

He has been twice niarricil. His first mar- 
riage was on April 2, 1844, "'I'l Miss Eliza- 



beth Luker, of Allegheny city, and this mar- 
riage resulted in the birth of nine children : 
James L., a carpenter who lives at Deep River, 
Iowa; Rachel Matilda, wife of D. C. Little, a 
carpenter of Summit, Pennsylvania; John R. 
a carpenter of Grinnell, Iowa ; Wesley L., 
deceased ; Elizabeth Annabelle, wife of Charles 
Wessels, superintendent of the Grinnell Agri- 
cultural works, at Grinnell, Iowa; Angeline 
Frances, wife of Finley Glendennin, also of 
Grinnell ; Mary Catherine, wife of John Brown, 
of Graham county, Kansas ; and Henry W., 
deceased. On January 14, 1890, Mr. Green 
married as his second wife Miss Jane Douglas, 
of Chest Springs. 



TOHN HONAN, respected as a citizen and 
successful as a business man, was born 
in Ireland, and is a son of William and Sarah 
(Maher) Honan. Desiring to escape the 
crowded conditions of his native countrj' and 
to seek a wider field for his individual efforts, 
he came to America in i860, locating in 
Minersville, now the Fourteenth ward of the 
city of Johnstown, where he has ever since 
resided. Having learned the trade of a shoe- 
maker in his native country, he followed it 
two years in this countrj-. Laborers at this 
time were much in dcm.uul by the Cimhii.i 
Iron compau)', and he left the bench to be- 
come an employee of that company, working 
for a time in the mines, and later in the blast 
furnace and the steel mill. I Ic then embarked 
in the hotel business in Minersville, which 
line he successfully pursued for ten years, 
since which time he has been engaged in the 
mercantile business. 

Politically he is a democrat who believes in 
a Jacksonian enforcement of Jeffersonian prin- 
ciples, and served his ward one term as coun- 
cilman. In 1855 Mr. Honan manied Bridget 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



273 



White, and seven children blessed this mar- 
riage. Five are deceased. Those living are 
John, and Bridget, wife of Attis Adams, of 

Minersville. 

© 

TA^ILLIAM HENRY HAHN, a self-made 
man of excellent business character, is 
entitled to the credit of starting the pioneer 
meat market of Morrellville, which he still 
successfull}' operates. He is the fourth son 
and fifth child of John and Margaret (Heil) 
Hahn.and was born near Utford, Hesse- Darm- 
stadt, Germany, January 26, 1853. John 
Hahn was a son of Christian Hahn, and on 
September 5, 1821, first saw the light of day 
at Utford, where he learned and followed, for 
several years, the trade of shoemaker in con- 
nection with discharging the duties of a shep- 
herd. In 1854 he came to the United States 
to find a better home for his family than his 
opportunities would allow him to provide in 
the fatherland. He first settled in the State 
of New York, but soon came to Johnstown 
furnace, where he worked in the ore mines on 
Ben's creek up to 1880, in which year he was 
employed as watchman by the Cambria Iron 
company, a position that he held until 188S, 
when he retired from active work. He came 
by himself to this country in 1854, and the 
next year sent for his wife and children, who 
came over on the next vessel sailing for New 
York. 

John Hahn was industrious and reliable, 
and died August 15, 1893. He was a devout 
member of the German Lutheran church, and 
married Margaret Heil, a native of Germany, 
and who died in 1873, when in the fifty-second 
year of her age. They were the parents of 
six children: Christian, who died in Germany; 
Conrad, a resident of Johnstown ; Henry, who 
died in Germany; Catherine, wife of Charles 
18 



Owens, of Johnstown ; William Henrj' and 
Mary, who died when young. 

William Henry Hahn was brought in 1855, 
with brother and sister, by his mother to this 
country to rejoin his father. He received his 
education in the common schools, and learned 
the trade of butcher with his brother Conrad, 
for whom he worked for two yeans. Having 
mastered the butchering business in all of its 
details, he worked for six months in Pitts- 
burg, and for three months in Steubenville, 
Ohio, and then opened a shop for himself at 
East Conemaugh, which he left a year later to 
form a partnership with his brother in Johns- 
town. They ran their large meat market until 
1884, when he withdrew to open his present bu- 
siness, the pioneer meat market of Morrellville. 
His market is on Fairfield avenue, where every- 
thing has always been kept in the best man- 
ner to accommodate his patrons, who are not 
confined to Morrellville, as first-class goods 
and courteous attention generallj- bring cus- 
tom from a distance. 

On April 14, 1879, Mr. Hahn married Sarah 
Brixner, who was a daughter of Christina 
Bri.xner, of Johnstown, and died March 17, 
1890, leaving one child, Charles. For his 
second wife, Mr. Hahn wedded, on September 
5, 1 89 1, Emma Sides, daughter of Anna Sides, 
of Indiana county. To this second union has 
been born one child, a son named John. 

In the great schools of life the only prizes 
offered Mr. Hahn were those that could be 
won by self-effort, and he has succeeded well 
in the contest, having gained honorable posi- 
tion and a comfortable competency. Besides 
his own prosperous business, he is interested 
in the Morrellville Building and Loan asso- 
ciation, which he is now serving as vice- 
president. He is a member of Morrellville 
Council, No. 941, Royal Arcanum, in which 



274 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



he lias served as treasurer for eleven years ; 
and a charter member of the Morrellville Fire 
compan}-, all of whose offices he has filled, 
and is now serving it as treasurer. He is 
also a member of the Turner's Association, of 
Johnstown, and has held membership for many 
years in the German Lutheran church. Mr. 
Hahn, in politics, has always been identified 
with the Democratic party. He served for 
six years as a school director, being for 
one year president, and for three years treas- 
urer of the board. He has also held other 
elective and appointive offices, and in every 
public capacity in which he has served has 
made an honest and honorable record. 



JOHN DOWLING is one of the entcrpris- 
ing merchants of Johnstown, Pennsyl- 
vania. He is a son of Walter and Mary 
(Hanna) Dowling, and was born at Mount 
Savage, Maryland, in 1855. His father was 
born in Ireland in 1814, and came to America 
at the age of twenty-five. He first settled at 
l^altimore; about a year later he moved to 
Mount .Savage, and was employed as an iron- 
worker until 1861, when he came to Johns- 
town and found employment at the Cambria 
Iron companj-'s coke yard. He remained in 
their employ for more than twenty years, and 
was strong and active until near his death, 
which occurred in 1884. He took an active 
interest in public affairs and served for a time 
in tlie town council. In politics he was a 
democrat; in religion a devout Catholic, a 
member of the St. John's church. He left a 
family of six sons and Ihree daughters; one 
of the sons has since died. 

John Dowling, after receivingasmall amount 
of schooling, went to work in the mills of the 
Cambria Iron company and worked in nearlv 
all the dtnailmL-nts of tlie works. He finalK- 



became a roller. In 1885 he left the mills 
and began business as a merchant on Broad 
street, Cambria borough, now in the Sixteenth 
ward of the city of Johnstown. Mr. Dowling 
is still doing business on Broad street, and by 
many years of square dealing and up-to-date 
business methods has built up a fine trade in 
dry-goods, notions, and general merchandise. 

Mr. Dowling is a public-spirited citizen, and 
is always ready to aid any enterprise that will 
benefit the community in which he lives. 
He is a member of .St. Columba's Catholic 
church. He is one of the stockholders of the 
Cambria City Water company, and served as 
president of the company for one year, then 
resigned the office. 

In politics Mr. Dowling is an ardent demo- 
crat, and an active party worker, and has had 
a share of the honors and rewards of active 
party service. He was treasurer of Cambria 
borough for six j-ears — from 1884 to 189O. 
When that borough was merged into the 
city of Johnstown, in 1890, Mr. Dowling was 
made the democratic nominee for city con- 
troller and was triiim|iliaiitl\' elected, and has 
ihe honor of being the first controller of the 
city of Johnstown. He entered upon the 
duties of his office in April, 1890, and served 
until the e.\[)iratii)n of his term in April, 1893. 

In January, 1891, he was married to Miss 
Mar)- T. Fromald. 



^<>K. I) V\ 11) 1). I$r.\UCH, aman of varied 
^^ and successful business experience, and 
a leading real-estate dealer of Johnstown, is a 
son of David and Barbara (Fyock) Blauch, 
,ind was horn in I'.iint township, .Somerset 
count)-, rcnns)'lvania, June 1 i, 1849. Tiie 
HIauch and Fyock families respectively are of 
Swiss and German origin, and were among 
tlu; earl)- settlers of Somerset count)-. Jacob 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



275 



Blauch was a native of tlie celebrated city of 
Berne, Switzerland, and settled at an early day 
in Somerset county, where he followed farm- 
ing until his death at an advanced age. Of 
his sons who remained in the count)', one was 
David Rlauch, who was born in 1789, and 
died in 1872. He was a shoemaker by trade, 
but followed farming during his long and use- 
ful life. He was a member of the Mennonite 
church, and passed his years with remarkable 
exception from pain and sickness, never being 
ill a day until his summons came to rest from 
the toils of life. 

Mr. Blauch married Barbara Fyock, a native 
of Somerset county, and a member of the 
Seven-Day Baptist church. She was born in 
1808, and passed away in 1884, at seventy-six 
years of age. Her father, John Fyock, an old 
and well-known resident of Somerset county, 
lived to a ripe old age. 

Col. David D. Blauch did not grow to man- 
hood in his native township, but after receiv- 
ing his education in the common schools came 
to Johnstown when in his sixteenth year. He 
served as a clerk for some time in a general 
mercantile establishment ; next learned the 
trade of carpenter, and then took charge of a 
stationary engine for the Cambria Iron com- 
pany. Later he was transferred to the roofing 
department of the works, and after working in 
all of its different divisions was promoted to 
chief roofing clerk, which position he held 
until the time of the great flood of 1889. After 
the city had passed from the immediate effect 
of the flood Mr. Blauch turned his attention 
to contracting and building, which was then 
so badly needed, and during two years con- 
tributed his part towards rebuilding Johns- 
town. Retiring from contracting and building 
in 1892, he embarked in his present real-estate 
business. 



On November 10, 1874, Colonel Blauch 
married Emma Campbell, a daughter of Chris- 
topher Campbell, of Indiana county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Their union has been blessed with two 
children — daughters : Jessie May, died at the 
age of two and a half years, and Barbara, a 
member of the junior class of Johnstown high 
school, aged fourteen. 

As a business man Colonel Blauch is capa- 
ble and well qualified, and conducts with skill 
and sound judgment whatever enterprise he 
may be engaged in. He is a member of the 
First Methodist Episcopal church of Johns- 
town, in which he is useful and efficient for 
the promotion and advancement of every good 
enterprise. While active in business and use- 
ful in the church, yet Col. David D. Blauch 
has found time to be serviceable to his city in 
various other ways. He is prominent and in- 
fluential in various beneficial and secret socie- 
ties. He is a member of Washington Camp, 
No. 583, Patriotic Order Sons of America, and 
Johnstown Lodge, No. 538, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and Portage Chapter, No. 195, Royal 
Arch Masons. He is also a member and 
past chancellor of Johnstown Lodge, No. 57, 
Knights of Pythias, and a member and past 
representative of Independent Castle, No. 51, 
Ancient Order of the Knights of the Mystic 
Chain, and the organizer of the castle. In 1880 
he was awarded a gold medal by the Select 
Castle of Pennsylvania for having organized 
the largest number of castles in the State. 
Colonel Blauch is a member of Pride of Cam- 
bria Castle, No. 52, of Johnstown, and Monarch 
Temple, No. 7, of Washington City, of the 
Knights of the Golden Eagle. He is colonel 
of the Sixth regiment of the Uniformed Rank 
of the Eagles. For si.x years he was colonel 
of the Seventh regiment, and for three years 
was on the staff of the lieutenant-general, and 



276 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



past grand chief of the Jurisdiction of Penn- 
sylvania, and a member of the Supreme Castle 
of the United States. As an organizer in this 
branch of the order he has few equals, having 
introduced the order in four counties, besides 
organizing some thirty-four castles. Colonel 
Blauch is a representative member of the 
Order of the Knights of the Golden Eagle, 
" whose teachings, if they could find expression 
in the daily acts of all men, would put a new 
color into life and a new light on the face of 
humanity." 

e> 

TAMES B. McMANAMY is a son of Wil- 
liam and Sarah (Gray) McManamy, and 
was born in Wliite township, this count)', on 
November 15, 1856. 

His grandfather was James McMananij', 
who was a native of the north of Ireland, and 
a worthy representative of that wonderful 
Scotch-Irish race wliich lias given so many dis- 
tinguished names to American history. .Seek- 
ing to better his condition, and secure better 
privileges than were obtainable in his native 
country, he emigrated to America when a 
young man. He first Idcatcd in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, where he remained until 
i83i,then removed to Ohio, where he lost his 
wife and helpmate, and iiis home was broken 
up. His later years were spent with Iiis .son, 
the father of the subject of this record, and he 
died in January, 1S68, at the age of sixt}- 
seven years. I lis religious affiliations were 
always with tJu- I'resbytcri.m ihnrrli. I lis 
marriage resulted in the birth of three sons — 
John, William, and James. 

William McManamy, father, was born in 
Ohio in October, 183 1, and came to Cambria 
county on March 17, 1856, and purchased a 
small farm in White townshii), and has lived 
there ever since, engaged in farming and lum- 



bering. Prior to locating in White township, 
he had followed canal boating, chiefly on the 
Juniata canal. He commenced his career on 
the canal when but a boy, and by his fidelity 
to every trust reposed in him was promoted 
from time to time until he was made captain 
of a boat. The line of boats of which he had 
charge ran from Hollidaysburg to Philadel- 
phia, by way of Havre de Grace, Maryland. 

He married Sarah Gray, a daughter of Wil- 
liam Gray, of White township, and to this 
marriage were born four sons and five daugh- 
ters, as follows: James B., subject; Alice, wife 
of James Dunn, of Fallen Timber, this count)-; 
Cordelia, wife of George Brown, of Dysart, 
this county; Sarah, widow of Cyrus Holland; 
Howard, a sawyer and lumberman, of the State 
of Michigan; John, a railroad engineer, who 
is located at Grand Rapids, Michigan; Minnie, 
the wife of George Van Scoyoc, a farmer of 
near Glasgow, this ccuinty ; Frank, also an 
engineer, living at Giand Rapids. 

James B. McIManamy was reared on the 
farm of his father, attending the common 
schools until sixteen years of age, wiicn lie 
engaged in lumbering in this county for four 
)'ears. In 1878 he went to Michigan, and fol- 
lowed the same line of business for a period ot 
nine )'ears, a part of the time as foreman. In 
1SS7 lie returiu'd to tiie county of his birth, 
and as he hail previously learned the trade of 
a carpenter, and shown his ability as a skilled 
workman, he soon secured the position of boss 
carpenter for the Clearfield & Cresson Coal 
company, at Frugality, a position he has held 
to the present time. In addition to the above 
Ir' lias been engaged in the grocery business, 
and in 1894 was apjioiiited post-master at Van 
(driller. 

I-'ratcrnall)- he is a member of Champion 
Castle, No. 415, Knights of the Golden Eagle, 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



277 



at Van Ormer, and of Van Ormer Grange, 
No. 1 1 27, Patrons of Husbandry. 

December 31, 1878, Mr. McMananiy and 
Maggie, daughter of Jolin H. Kantner, of Al- 
toona, were united in marriage, and to this 
union three children, Clyde C, Rex K., and 
Paul L., deceased, have been born. 

Michael Kantner, the grandfather of Mrs. 
McManamy, was a native of Germany, wlience 
he emigrated at an early day to within two 
miles of Altoona, whence he cleared up a farm, 
upon which he lived the remainder of his life. 
He was a member of the Lutheran church, 
and a good, substantial, and highly-respected 
citizen of that community. He married Su- 
sanna Hartzel, of Blair county, and their union 
resulted in the birth of four sons; Michael, 
John H., Jacob, and Henry, who lost his life 
in the Civil War. John H. Kantner, her father, 
was born in 1822 on the Blair county home- 
stead, and died in Altoona in March of 1873. 
He was a carpenter by trade, and followed it 
as an avocation all his life. He enlisted in the 
Civil War in company A, Two Hundred and 
Fifth regiment, Pennsylvania volunteer infantry, 
during the last year of the war, and took part 
in a number of hotly-contested engagements. 
He was twice married. His first marriage 
was with Susan Nelson, and resulted in the 
birth of but one child, a son, David T., who is 
now proprietor of a cigar store in Altoona. 

His second marriage was with Miss Emily 
Jane Caldwell, and was blessed in the birth of 
three sons and four daughters: William G., a 
carpenter of Altoona ; Maggie, wife of subject ; 
Anna D., wife of John N. Miles, of West 
Middlesex, Mercer county ; Robert C, de- 
ceased ; Martha, Henry B, a druggist of Al- 
toona, and Sarah H., wife of John A. McGon- 
agle, of fronton, Ohio. 

Mrs. McManamy secured a good, liberal 



education in the public schools of Altoona, 
and for seven years, two of them in Blair 
county, and five of them in Cambria county, 
was successfully engaged in the profession of 
teachin". 



JACOB YECKLEY, the leading merchant 

clothier of Gallitzin, this county, is a son 

of George and Mary (Aberle) Yeckley, and 

was born in Cresson township, this county, 

October 20, 1852. 

George Yeckley was a native of Baden, Ger- 
many. He there grew to manhood, and 
lived there, until his marriage with Mary 
Aberle, a native of the same place. In 1850 
he left the land of his nativity and crossed 
the ocean to this country, whose advantages he 
desired to share. He first located at Plane 
No. 6, on the Old Portage road, and has 
resided in this and Blair county ever since. 
Since 1S61 he has been a resident of Gallitzin, 
where he now resides. He is now sixty-eight 
years old, has been a miner all his life, and is 
a consistent member of the Lutheran church. 
His wife came to this country in 1851; she 
is now sixty-six years old, and is also a mem- 
ber of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Yeckley come of old German 
ancestry, and were the first of their respec- 
tive families to find a new world home. 

Jacob Yeckley spent his boyhood days 'm 
Gallitzin, where he received his education in 
public schools. After leaving school he was 
employed in the coal mines near Gallitzin for 
about eighteen years. In March, 1882, he 
engaged in the mercantile business and opened 
a clothing store in Gallitzin. He is an enter- 
prising and successful business man, and for 
the success he has attained he is indebted to 
neither friends nor relatives, but to singleness 
of purpose coupled with fair business tact and 



278 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



acumen. He first began business in a small 
way, but by close application to business and 
unyielding perseverance he has become one 
of the most prosperous business men of that 
locality. 

He is a republican in politics, and while not 
a politician he has always taken an active 
interest in all party issues. He has served 
three terms as a member of the Gallitzin 
council, and in 1896 was candidate on the 
republican ticket for the nomination for county 
treasurer. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., 
having held membership in that organization 
since 1874; also a charter member of the Jr. 
O. U. A. M. 

In October, 1878, Mr. Yeckley celebrated 
his marriage with Mary Fosler, a daughter of 
Jacob Fosler, of Gallitzin. This union has 
resulted in the birth of eight children, of whom 
one son and three daughters are living; those 
living are: Elsie L. , ICdna N., Eugene E. and 
Luella P. Clarence W. died at the age of 
nine years; Charles E. died when but seven 
months old; Lorena M. lived to be seven 
years old, and the other child died when but 
three days old. 

Mr. and Mrs. Yeckley are consistent mem- 
bers of the German Reformed church. 



iOlCKN.VIM) W. IJT/>IN(;i:U, a merchant 
of Lorettu, this count)', is a son of Wil- 
liam and Monica (Maguire) Litzinger, and was 
born in Lorelto on August 20, 1 85 I. 

His grandfither, on the paternal side of the 
family, w.is Anthony Litzinger, a wheelwright 
and cabinet-maker by trade, who followed his 
trade a number of years in I luntingilon, Hun- 
tingdon county, tills State. In 1835 he re- 
moved to Lorctto, where he followed his trade 
until 1837, when he and his son Thomas 
founded the mercantile house of which Hcmard 



\V., the subject, is now the head. They 
remained in partnership until the death of 
Thomas, when William, the father of the sub- 
ject, was taken in as partner. This business 
alliance continued until 1853, when the latter 
succeeded to it, and operated it until 1S87, the 
date of his death. 

Anthony Litzinger (grandfather) married 
and became the parent of four sons and four 
daughters : David, Lydia, Mary, Elizabeth, 
Catherine, Sarah J., Charles, Thomas, William, 
and Benjamin, all deceased. 

William Litzinger, father of Bernard W. 
Litzinger, was born in Huntingdon, November 
5, 1819, and died in Loretto, July 17, 1887. 
He was a cabinet-maker by trade, but came 
into the mercantile business as described 
above, and was also extensively engaged in 
the lumbering business, and being a man of 
good business capacity, accumulated consider- 
able wealth, and was regarded as one of the 
most substantial and successful business men 
of the county. Politicall}', he was a democrat, 
and being a man of good judgment and of 
strict integrity of character, was elected justice 
of the peace, in which capacity he served for a 
time. 

He married Miss Monica, a daughter of 
Luke Maguire, a descendant of one of the 
pioneer families of Cambria county. To this 
marital union were born the following chil- 
tlren : luigenc, a retired farmer of Loretto ; 
Bernard W'., merchant ; Sirenus, who tlied in 
bojhood ; and Henry C, a merchant at Chi- 
cora, Butler county, this State. 

Bernard W. Litzinger obtained his education 
in the public schools, and at Villa Nova col- 
lege, Delaware county, Pennsylvania. He 
worked for his father until the lattcr's death 
in 1887, when he succeeded to his father's 
business. In addition to carrying on an e.x- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



279 



tensive general mercantile business, he is 
largely interested in agricultural pursuits, and 
owns considerable farm land. 

Politically he is a democrat, and has served 
as justice of the peace since 18S5. 

April 17, 1877, he married Annie Pfoff, a 
daughter of Frederick Pfoff, a farmer of Alle- 
gheny township, this county. To their happy 
union has been born one child, a son, Walter 
Frederick. 



nEV. MAKCELLUS RETTGER, O. S. B., 
the young and popular pastor of St. 
Mary's Catholic church, at Patton, and St. Pat- 
rick's and Seven Dolors' IMission churches ot 
Indiana county, is the youngest son of George 
and Eva (Wilhelm) Rettger, and was born at 
St. Mary's, Elk county, Pennsylvania, March 
10, 1868. George Rettger was born, reared 
and educated in Nassau, Germany, and in 
1844 came to St. Mary's, then a wilderness, 
and sixty miles from the nearest town or set- 
tlement. He was a carpenter, and worked at 
his trade during the years of his active life. 
He died September 25, 1886, aged sixty-eight 
years. 

He married Eva Wilhelm, of St. Mary's, 
whose father was a native of Herchenfeld, 
Germany, and an early settler in Elk county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rettger reared a family of 
eight children, six sons and two daughters. 

Rev. Marcellus Rettger was reared at St. 
Mary's, where he attended the public schools 
and received his elementary education. He 
then entered St. Vincent's college, of West- 
moreland county, in 1881, from which excel- 
lent and well known institution of learning he 
was graduated in the classical, philosophical 
and theological courses in the year 1892. 
Immediately after graduation he was ordained 
to the priesthood by Rt. Rev. R. Phelan, 



Bishop of Pittsburg, and served for a short 
time as pastor of St. Boniface Catholic church, 
of Allegheny county, during the absence of 
its regular pastor. In the autumn of 1892 he 
came to Carrolltown as assistant pastor of St. 
Benedict's Catholic church, which position he 
held acceptably for two years, and at the end 
of that time, in 1 894, he was appointed as 
pastor of St. Mary's Catholic church, of Pat- 
ton, this county, which has enjoyed his minis- 
terial labors ever since. This church was or- 
ganized in 1893, and under the efficient and 
active administration of Father Rettger has 
grown to a congregation of one hundred and 
sixteen families. To this field of labor was 
added St. Patrick's church, of Cammeron's 
l^ottom and Seven Dolors' Mission church, of 
Indiana county. Energetic and practical, he 
has neglected no interest of his people, and is 
now making preparations for a commodious 
and tasteful parochial school building near St. 
Mary's church. Besides this school, Father 
Rettger has many other beneficial measures 
in contemplation for his different congrega- 
tions when the proper time for their introduc- 
tion arrives. 

A classical scholar, a pleasant gentleman 
and an energetic worker, his pastoral labors 
have been crowned with gratifying success, 
while his administration has been character- 
ized by prudence and justice. 



f>- L. GLASGOW, postmaster and mer- 
^^* chant of Glasgow, this county, is a 
son of John and Sarah (Leamer) Glasgow, 
and was born on the old homestead, Reade 
township, this county, October 8, 1844. His 
great-grandfather, John Glasgow, the first of 
this family to locate in America, was a mem- 
ber of a prominent numerous family from 
Glasgow, Scotland, whence he emigrated, and 



230 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



located near what is now known as Bellwood, 
Blair county, Pennsylvania, then Huntingdon 
county. He was a pioneer settler in that lo- 
cah'ty, and married Miss Hunter, and to this 
union ten sons were born, one of whom, John 
Glasgow, became the grandfather of the gen- 
tleman whose name heads this sketch. He 
was born in Blair county, formerly Hunting- 
don county, and resided near the present lo- 
cation of Altoona. About i8i8 he purchased 
a tract of woodland containing two hundred 
acres, near where the present village of Glas- 
gow now stands, and became one of the ear- 
Hest settlers of Reade township, formerly 
White township, Cambria county, where he 
resided until his death in 1845. 

When he removed to the above locality his 
nearest neighbor was three miles distant. The 
settlement of which he was the pioneer was 
named for him, as is also the present village 
and post-office of Glasgow. 

His marriage with Miss Bell, of Blair county, 
resulted in the birtii of two sons and four 
daughters: Mrs. liliza Noble, deceased; Mrs. 
Jane Smiley, deceased; Mr.s. Hannah Shoff, 
of Osceola, Clearfield county ; Mrs. Mary Ann 
Calderwood, deceased ; John, the father of our 
subject, now deceased; and James, deceased. 

John Glasgow, father, was born lu-.u where 
Altoona now stands, January 12, 1S17, and 
died Janu.iry 12, 1881. Being reared a farmer 
boy, he ado[)ted the avocations of his father, 
and followed firming all his life. He o\\ ui'd 
a farm of nearly two hundred acres, and, be- 
sides his farming pursuits, engaged in lumber- 
ing quite extensively. He was a very suc- 
cessful business man, and by his energy and 
industry accumulated considerable wealth. 
He was a member of the Lutheran church, 
and a liberal supfiorter of the same. 

He married Miss Sarah, a daughter of 



George Learner, of Reade township, and to 
them were born eight children, three sons 
and five daughters : Mary Jane, wife of James 
McKee, of Marion, Clearfield county, Penn- 
sylvania ; G. L.; Anna, the wife of Ciiristo- 
phcr .Shoff, of Marion, Clearfield county; 
Catherine Bell, the wife of Joel A. Gates, oi 
White township, this county; Sarah, the wife 
of John M. Tro.xell, a lumber merchant of 
Mobile, Alabama; Laura A., the wife of James 
McCartney, of Mountaindale, this county; M. 
L., a farmer on the old homestead ; and John 
Hidson, a business man of Fallen Timber. 

George L. Glasgow was reared on the pater- 
nal acres, educated in the common schools of 
the township, and remained on the farm until 
he was about twent)'-three )-ears old ; about 
that time he went to AUemansville, Clearfield 
county, Pennsylvania, and accepted a position 
as clerk in the general store of H. AUeman. 
He remained there as clerk for one j-ear, and 
then purchased an interest in the store; at the 
end of the next year he disposed of his interest 
to Mr. AUeman, and took a trip west, looking 
for a place to locate ; unable to find a suitable 
opening, he returned home, and followed 
farming for the next two years. In the spring 
of 1873 he went to Dubois, Penns)-lvania, and 
foiiued a partnership with J. M. Troxeli. They 
opened a general store under the firm name 
of Glasgow & Tro.xell, and Mr. Glasgow was 
ap[)ointed postmaster of the place, which office 
he held two years. In 1876 Mr. J. B. Ellis 
purchased the entire store, and Mr. Glasgow 
returned to the old homestead, where he re- 
mained while buikling his present home in 
Glasgow. He opened a general store at the 
above place, and has since built the store-room 
now occupied by C. E. Troxell & Co., of which 
firm he is a partner. In 1892 he built his 
present connnodious birsiness house, which is 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



281 



a two-story building, 24 x 60 feet. Here he 
keeps a well-selected stock of general merchan- 
dise. He is a man of much business ability, 
and, by discreet and judicious methods, has 
established a large and increasing patronage. 
In 1876 a post-office was granted to Glasgow ; 
Mr. G. L. Glasgow became the postmaster, 
and has held the office continuously to the 
present time. In political faith he is identified 
with the Republican part)', and has always 
taken an active interest in political affairs, and 
has served as school director three terms. 
Fraternally he is a charter member of Coal- 
port Lodge, No. 574, F. and A. M., of Coal- 
port, Pennsylvania, and a member of Alle- 
mansville Lodge, No. 900, I. O. O. F., of 
which he is treasurer. He is a prominent and 
consistent member of the Lutheran church, in 
which organization he has been an officer for 
twenty years. 

October 8, 1874, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Julia L., daughter of John Ellis, a 
native of Wales, who emigrated to America, 
and located near Ebensburg, Pennsylvania. 
To this marriage four children have been 
born : John, deceased ; Bertha O. ; Luther E. ; 
and Sarah M. 



llir L. GLASGOW, a brother of G. L. and 
"^ • J. H. Glasgow, whose sketches ap- 
pear above, was born on the old Glasgow 
homestead, June 6, 1858. Being reared a 
farmer boy, he adopted the pursuits of his 
father and grandfather, and has followed farm- 
ing all his life. He owns one hundred and 
eighteen acres of farm land, underlaid with 
coal, which is a part of the original tract of 
land that belonged to his grandfather, John 
Glasgow. His farm lies in a fertile belt, is 
well improved and is one of the most desira- 
ble farms in the township. He is a member 



of the Lutheran church, and in politics affili- 
ates with the Republican party. 

June 4, 1881, he celebrated his marriage 
with Miss Sue Fulkerson, a daughter of Dan. 
Fulkerson, a farmer and millwright, of Smith's 
Mills, Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, and 
their marriage has resulted in the birth of three 
children: Dan. F., John Guy, and Eleanor. 



TOHX HUDSON GLASGOW, a merchant 
of Fallen Timber, this county, is a son 
of John and Sarah (Learner) Glasgow, Reade 
township, this county, and was born March 
17, 1 86 1. The ancestral history appears else- 
where, under the sketch of his brother, G. L. 
Glasgow. 

He was reared a farmer boy and received a 
common-school education. He remained on 
the old homestead until he attained to his ma- 
jority, and in 1884 embarked in his present 
mercantile business at Fallen Timber, this 
county. He is active, energetic, and progres- 
sive, and has already attained a fair degree of 
success. He is a member of Coalport Lodge, 
No. 574, F. and A. M., of Coalport, and of 
Mountain Chapter, No. 1S9, of Altoona. He 
is a charter member of Coalport Lodge, No. 
781, I. O. O. F., and in politics advocates 
the principles of the Republican party. 

September 18, 1890, he married Miss Eunice 
Ewing, of Mansfield, Ohio. They have three 
children : Genevieve Grace, John Edward, and 
Helen Elizabeth. 



I^K. GEORGE E. CONRAD, of Johns- 
^^ town, Pennsylvania, is one of that city's 
most successful practitioners and most public- 
spirited citizens. He is a son of George and 
Jane (Gahegan) Conrad, and was born January 
3, 1854, at Scalp Level, a hamlet some seven 
miles southeast of Johnstown, celebrated for 



282 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



the naturiil beauty of the surrounding country, 
which makes it a favorite resort for artists. 

Dr. Conrad is of German and Irish extrac- 
tion, and unites the energy of the Celt with 
the thrift of the German. His paternal grand- 
father, Henry Conrad, was a native of Hesse- 
Darmstadt, German)', who, with his two 
brothers, emigrateii to Pennsylvania about 
1826. He settled first in Indiana county, and 
there our subject's father, who was about eight 
years old when brought to America, grew to 
manhood. In 1847 he moved to Somerset 
county, and soon after to his present home, in 
Scalp Level, where he has been in business as 
a merchant for nearly half a century. 

In politics he has always been a staunch 
democrat ; in religion he is a devoted follower 
of the doctrines of Martin Luther. 

Thomas Gahegan, the maternal grandfather 
of our subject, was a native of Ireland. He 
possessed a good education, and was a man of 
some means. He first settled at Carlisle, but 
subsequently moved to .Somerset county, and 
purchased a furnace and began the manufac- 
ture of "charcoal" iron. He operated this 
furnace vmtil the great [)anic of 1837 ruined 
the iron industry. His education then ena- 
bled him to successfully take the profession of 
surveyor, and his name ai)pears on many 
drafts of land in Somerset county. He was a 
prominent member of the Masonic fraternity. 

Dr. Conrad began his education in the pub- 
lic sghools in tlie vicinity of his birth-place, 
but at an early age was sent to St. Vincent's 
college, Westmoreland county, Pennsvlvania. 
From there lie went to the Millersvilie Normal 
school. He then taught school for eight 
terms, after which lie began tlie stud)- of law 
in the office of John Conrad, l^si;., at Hrook- 
ville, Pa. Becoming dissatisfied with tlie 
legal profession, he began the study of medi- 



cine with the Drs. Ycagly, of Johnstown. In 
1873 he began attending lectures at the Eclec- 
tic Medical college, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
graduated from that institution in the class of 
1877. 

He began the practice of his profession at 
New Baltimore, Pennsylvania, and 1883 he 
removed to Johnstown, where he has prac- 
ticed with great success ever since. He has 
recently built, and now occupies, with his 
family, one of the finest houses in the cit\'. 
It is located on Franklin street, in the Fifth 
ward, and for substantial beauty and conveni- 
ence it has few rivals. 

As might be expected from his energy and 
warm social nature. Dr. Conrad is a prominent 
member of several fraternal societies; among 
others he is a member of Portage Chapter, 
Oriental Commandcry, and of Syria Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mj'stic 
-Shrine. 

In ptjlitics the doctor is an enthusiastic 
democrat, and is prominent in the councils of 
his party. Si.\ years ago he was the choice 
of the Cambria Democracy for State senator 
from the district composed of Cambria and 
Blair counties, but for party reasons he con- 
ceded the nomination to the Blair county 
candidate. 



T.VMI'^S .v. WH.VKTON, a farmer and e.K- 

soidiL-r o( Clcaifieid township, is a son of 

loscpii .iiul C'.itlicrinc (Bender) Wharton, and 

was born in Clearfield townsliip, this count}', 

January 16, 1845. 

The Wharton family traces its ancestry 
to England, wiiere Mr. Wharton, the great- 
grandfather of the subject was born. Stanton 
Wharton, grandfather, was for many years a 
resident of the District of Columbia, whence 
he removcil at an eail}' day to Clearfield town- 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



283 



ship, where he purchased a large tract of 
woodland. 

He was a pioneer of the township, and 
cleared and cultivated a large farm. He 
remained on the farm until iS6i, when he 
removed to St. Augustine, this county ; here 
he opened a grocery store, and for several 
years was postmaster. He was a member of 
the Catholic church, and was a soldier in the 
War of 1 812, and died in 1872. He married 
Miss Mary McConnell, and to their union 
were born four sons and five daughters : 
Saraii, the wife of Michael Driscoll ; Joseph, 
deceased ; Jane, the widow of the late John 
McMullen; John, deceased ; William, located 
in Clearfield township; Ellen, deceased, who 
was the wife of Enos McMullen; Arthur, a 
farmer of Clearfield township; and Alice, post- 
master at St. Augustine. 

James A. Wharton's father was born in 
Ebensburg, this county, where his father re- 
sided for a short time previous to settling in 
Clearfield township. He was reared on a 
farm, and followed farming all his life. On 
attaining his majority he located on the farm 
now owned by his son, James A., and resided 
there all his life. He died January 6, 1834. 
Death resulted from injuries received by being 
kicked by a horse. He was a member of the 
State militia, and held the rank of major. In 
religious opinions, he was a devout member 
of the Roman Catholic church, and in politics 
affiliated with the Whig party. 

His marriage with Miss Catharine Bender, 
a daughter of Emericka Bender, of Carroll 
township, resulted in the birth of five children : 
James A.; Charles, who was killed by light- 
ning, July 29, 1892, was a merchant of Dysart, 
this county; Mary, the wife of Silas Mc- 
Gough, of Altoona; Alice, the wife of James 
McGough, of Clearfield township; and Ellen, 



the wife of Albert Ivory, of Greensburg, Penn- 
sylvania. 

James A. Wharton was reared on his father's 
farm, and received his education in the com- 
mon schools of his native township. He fol- 
lowed in the footsteps of his ancestors, and 
has followed the life and pursuits of a farmer 
all his life. He purchased the old homestead, 
and now owns eighty-five acres of land, all 
underlaid with coal. When the Civil War was 
upon us, Mr. Wharton left his farm and entered 
the service of his country. He enlisted Sep- 
tember 15, 1 86 1, in company A, Fifty-fifth 
regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteer infantry, 
and served during the war, receiving his 
discharge, August 27, 1865. He took part in 
the following battles : Pocotaligo, South Caro- 
lina; Drury's Bluff, Virginia, where he was 
taken captive and was prisoner in Anderson- 
ville prison for six months and seven days, and 
was then exchanged. Other battles were : 
Fort Darling, Virginia; Hatcher's Run, and 
Appomattox Court House. On receiving his 
discharge from the army, he returned to his 
farm, where he has since been actively engaged 
in agriculture. He is a member of the Roman 
Catholic church, and in political belief is iden- 
tified with the Democratic party. 

He has been twice married. October 22, 
1867, he celebrated his marriage with Miss 
Marguerite McDermitt, and to their union 
eight children were born : Charles, of Buffalo, 
New York; Gertrude, a dressmaker in Altoona, 
Pennsylvania ; Herman, deceased ; Catherine, 
at home; Helena, in Altoona; Marcellus, at 
home; Mary and William, deceased. Novem- 
ber 20, 1887, he married his second wife, Miss 
Mary Dodson, of Clearfield township, and the 
marriage has resulted in the birth of five chil- 
dren : Marguerite, Geneva, Charles, Cyrus and 
Edna. 



284 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



- TOIIX FISHEK is a representative of that 
sturdy class of Germans who have con- 
triljiited so tmich to the development of Cam- 
bria county. He is a son of John and Mary 
Fisher, and was born October 15, 1827, in 
Reckenhovcn, Gerni.uiy. 

He was reared and educated in the Father- 
land, where he lived until twenty-seven years 
of age. At that age he broke away from the 
associations of his youth and emigrated to 
America, locating at Johnstown. He secured 
employment in the mines operated around 
Johnstown in connection with the Cambria 
Iron compan}', being in this employ about 
fourteen years. Having learned the trade of 
a butcher in his native country, he, at the end 
of his experience as a miner, went into the 
butchering and retail meat business. He has 
established a slaughter-shop on Water street, 
where he averages the slaughter of ten beeves, 
foity to fifty hogs, and tuenty-fivc siiccj) per 
week, besides all the calves obtainable in this 
market. For the disposition of this product 
he has established two retail maikets, one on 
Clinton street and one on Broad street in Cam- 
bria City. Mr. Fisher has been three times 
married. His first wife was Miss Frances 
Kabler, and after her demise, he married a 
widow, whose maiden name was Margareth 
Morgenroth, and whose name after her first 
marriage was Margareth Kichenselir. Mr. 
Fisher's present wife's maiden name was 
Teresa Hegele, who was born May 3, 1843, 
in Germany, and is a daughter of Waldiser 
Hegele, of the empire. To the married union 
of Mr. Fislier and Teresa Hegele have been 
born the following chiUlren: George, Mar)-, 
wife of Josei)li Schonhart, of Johnstown ; Ce- 
cilia, wife of George Lumbacher, of Johns- 
town, and Lena, Kate, Frances, Henry, Annie, 
and l'"rank, at liome. 



FU.VNCI.S JOSEPH O'CONNOR, one of 
the most prominent and popular mem- 
bers of the Cambria county bar, is a son of James 
and Flizabcth (Croyle) O'Connor. He was born 
at what was then called Forwardstown, Somer- 
set count)-, Pennsylvania, August 11, i860. 

The grandfather of Mr. O'Connor was Fran- 
cis O'Connor, a native of Ireland, who came 
to America about the year 1812. Soon after 
his arrival he married Margaret Josephine 
McNulty, and settled in Jenner township, 
.Somerset count)-. He was a man of force 
and energ)-, and when the contracts for build- 
ing the Harrisburg and Pittsburg pike were 
let, he contracted to construct a large section 
of that impoitant thoroughfare. He w-as suc- 
cessful in his unilcrtaking, and .liter the com- 
pletion of the work he accepted a further con- 
tract to keep a portion of the pike in repair. 
Francis O'Connor remained a citizen of Jen- 
ner township until his death, and there, on 
November 5, 1820, James O'Connor, the father 
of the subject of our sketch, was born. He 
was educated in the common schools of his 
native county. 

In 1850 he had an attack of the "gold 
fever," and made what was then a long and 
perilous trip to California. He remained there 
a short lime, then returned to Somerset and 
began the study of law with the Hon. Edward 
.Scull, of the town of Somerset. In 1854 he 
was .idniitted to the bar, and practiced at 
.Somerset for a numi)er of years. Subse- 
quently he moveil to Jenner township, and 
formetl a partnershi|) with Samuel Garther, 
Esq. Later this was dissolved, and he entered 
into a partnershi[> with General Coffroth for 
the practice of law. While engaged in prac- 
tising law he operated his farm in Jenner 
township, and also dealt somewhat in real- 
estate and live stock. 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



285 



He was united in marriage a. d. 1851, to 
Elizabeth Croyle, and to this union were born 
the following children: John A., a merchant, 
who resides on a part of the old homestead, 
and is postmaster at Connor; Margaret, 
deceased; James B., attorney -at-law, of Johns- 
town, Pennsylvania ; Francis J. ; Peter J., at 
present preparing for admission to the bar ; 
Philip, now in the employ of the Hartford 
Paving and Construction company, and Bertha 
M., teacher in the Johnstown schools. Having 
trained their children to habits of industry, 
and educated them to fill places of influence 
and usefulness, James O'Connor and his ex- 
cellent wife continued to live quietly on the 
old homestead in Somerset county, until Octo- 
ber 5, 1896, when Mr. O'Connor died, sur- 
rounded by wife and family, whom he loved 
so well, and at his own request his body was 
laid at rest in the little country grave-yard 
near his former home. 

P'rancis Joseph O'Connor was educated in 
the common schools of Somerset county, and 
at special schools known as normal schools. 
These " normals " were subscription schools, 
for the preparation of teachers and usually 
taught by those whose education and experi- 
ence fitted them for a professorship in state 
normal schools. 

While a mere boy in years, Mr. O'Connor 
began teaching, and taught seven terms in the 
common school and five terms of normal 
school, in his native county. 

But the life of a successful teacher in a 
countr)' school was far from being the goal of 
Frank O'Connor's ambition, and he soon 
sought a wider field for the exercise of his 
talents. Accordingly, he entered the law de- 
partment of the University of Michigan as a 
student, and made such good use of his time 
there, that he graduated from that institution 



in the spring of 1884, with the degree of LL.B., 
and was admitted to practice before both 
the supreme court and the circuit courts of 
the State of Michigan. After graduating he 
returned to Somerset county and taught school 
for a year. Then, having passed the examina- 
tion for admission to the bar of his native 
county, May 8, 1884, he began the practice of 
law at Somerset, May 4, 1885. 

Having been admitted to the bar of Cam- 
bria county, November 9, 1886, he came to 
Johnstown and opened an office on Franklin 
street, opposite the old post-office building. 
Here he was joined a year later by his brother, 
James B. O'Connor. The firm of O'Connor 
Bros, soon built up a paying practice, and 
continued until 1889, when he was elected 
district attorney of Cambria county, the firm 
was dissolved, and he has since occupied the 
commodious and convenient offices in the 
Woolf Block. 

In 1894 he was elected city solicitor by the 
councils of the city of Johnstown, and per- 
formed the duties of that office for the term 
of two years, for which he was elected, his 
term expiring in May, 1896. 

On the 28th of October, 1891, Mr. O'Con- 
nor was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
Bailey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Bailey, 
of his adopted city. 

Mr. O'Connor has the happy faculty of 
winning both the friendship and the respect 
of those with whom he associates. He is at 
home anywhere, and can adapt himself to any 
company. He is a born orator, and when he 
has occasion to address an audience or a jury, 
his earnest words, with his fine presence and 
splendid physique, make a strong impression. 

In politics Mr. O'Connor is a democrat, and 
in 1889 was elected district attorney on that 
ticket. He performed the duties of that office 



286 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



for a term of three years. He was nominated 

by his party for a second term, but dissensions 
in the party led to the defeat of the entire 
county ticket, and he failed of election. 

He is one of the acknowledged leaders of 
his party in the county, and as he is young, 
able and ambitious, there is little doubt that 
he will yet be called upon to fill high office in 
the county or state. 

During the heated campaign of 1894 he be- 
came involved in a controversy with Gen. 
Hastings, then a candidate for governor of the 
State. The controversy grew out of Gen. 
Hastings' administration of affairs at Johns- 
town immediately after the great flood of May 
31, 1889, and was taken up, commented upon, 
and discussed generally pro and con by the 
press in and without the State. The matter 
culminated in a suit at law, which was dis- 
posed of by agreement in the court of common 
pleas at Ebensburg, June 20, A. D. 1895, in 
such a way that it gave great satisfaction to 
Mr. O'Connor and his friends. 

Since the preparation of this work was 
begun Mr. O'Connor received the unanimous 
indorsement of the Democratic county conven- 
tion for congress, and was afterwards tendered 
the nomination for tiiis high office by the con- 
gressional conference of the district, which lie 
declined in fix'or of R. C. McNamara, of Bed- 
ford count\'. 



\ >ALI:NTINK EICIIICNLAUB, general su- 
perintendent of the Glen Helen Colliery 
and Coke works at Amboy, Gallitzin town- 
siiip, tiiis county, and operated by Taylor 
Hrothcrs, 21 South Gay street, Baltimore, 
Maryland, and the Glen White mines of l?lair 
county, this State, is a son of Joseph and 
Margaret (Sherry) Eichenlaub, and was born 
in Cincinnati, Ohio, February 9, 1846. His 



father and mother were both born in Germany, 

and after their marriage emigrated to this 
country, the former in 1832, his wife following 
in 1836. After a short residence in each of 
the cities of Pittsburg and Cincinnati, he came 
to Cambria county, locating at Ashland Fur- 
nace and St. Augustine, where he resided until 
1859, when he removed to Blair county, this 
State, locating near Altoona, which was his 
residence until 1S88, when he removed to 
Elstie, this county, at which place he still re- 
sides. Mr. Eichenlaub is a devoted member 
of the Roman Catholic church, as was also 
his wife up to the time of her death, which 
occurred in 1872. 

Valentine Eichenlaub had very poor ad- 
vantages for securing an education so far as 
schools and text-books go. His mental train- 
ing is of a more practical character, and is such 
as he has been able to gain through general 
reading and attrition with the business world. 
Prior to the Civil War he was a day laborer. 
When the crisis of war was upon us, true to 
his patriotic instincts he entered the service of 
his country and enlisted in company A, Sec- 
ond regiment of Pennsylvania cavalrj-, and 
was engaged in some of the most desperate 
battles of the war, in all fought in twenty-seven 
separate battles ; he served until the close of 
the war, receiving his discharge at Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, on July 13, 1865. He 
then went to Altoona, where he served an ap- 
prenticeship at the carpenter's bench. In 1869 
he began working in the mines, where, after 
working for a period of five years, he was 
made foreman, which position he filled until 
November 30, 1895, when he was made gen- 
eral superintendent of the Coal and Coke 
Works of the Glen Helen colliery, of Gallitzin 
township, and of the Glen White mines of 
Blair county, Pennsylvania. From his former 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



287 



experience and his thorough knowledge of 
this line of business he has gained more than 
the ordinary quaUfications for the position he 
now fills. 

Mr. Eichenlaub has been twice married. 
In 1 868 he married Miss Catherine E. Conrad, 
of Indiana county, Pennsylvania, who died in 
1876. To this marriage were born four chil- 
dren : Annie ; Ellie ; Joseph, deceased, and 
Maggie, who died in 1879. 

As his second wife he married, in Septem- 
ber, 1877, Miss Margaret Kelly, of Blair 
count)', and to this marital union the follow- 
ing children have been born : Mary, Willie, 
Gertrude, Delia, Thomas, Bertha, James, 
Walter and Charles, deceased, and Francis 
Howard. During his life Mr. Eichenlaub 
has experienced two serious accidents. When 
fourteen years old he fell into the ice-cold 
water of Clearfield creek and was carried 
sonie distance down stream, when he made 
his escape more dead than alive, and was once 
buried under a fall of rock in the Glen White 
mines. While in the line of battle in front of 
Richmond, Virginia, he had his horse killed 
from under him by the rebels shelling from 
the rear, the shell struck the horse behind the 
saddle and plowed through his breast; in a 
desperate charge at Dinwiddle Court House, 
Virginia, his horse fell, pinning its rider down 
while the rest of the column passed over as 
best they could. 



/^ORE FAMILY. — Mrs. Ella P. (Gore) 
^■^ Taylor, the wife of Dr. J. Swan Taylor, 
is the youngest daughter of Thomas Gore, 
Esq., one of Johnstown's most esteemed citi- 
zens. 

Mr. Thomas Gore was born at Mann's 
Choice, Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and is 
a son of John and Catherine (Mowery) Gore. 



Catherine Gore was born in 1792, and died 
October 18, 1880; she was the daughter of 
John Mowery, who had married Miss Hilli- 
gas, of Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, 
and located near Mann's Choice. The Hilli- 
gas famil}' was a noted one. Mrs. Mowery's 
sister married Mr. Schell, for whom Schells- 
burg was named, and the Schells of Somerset 
are of the same family. Mr. Thomas Gore 
has been an active man. He was an assistant 
in the building of the Old Portage road, and 
was afterward fireman on the same road. He 
built the section boat " General Scott," of 
which he was owner and captain for many 
years, running between Pittsburg and Phila- 
delphia along the old Pennsylvania canal. 

He married Miss Amanda Jane Mitchell, 
daughter of James H. and Saphronia (Thatch- 
er) Mitchell. 

James H. Mitchell was born at Jersey 
Shore, Pennsylvania, and died November 12, 
1869. His father was a minister. His rela- 
tives were the Mitchells, famous physicans 
and surgeons of Philadelphia. He married 
Saphronia, who died October 2J , 1847. Of 
this union one of the children was Amanda 
Jane Mitchell, who became the wife of Thomas 
Gore. She died March 20, 1891. Mrs. Gore 
was the eldest daughter of James H. Mitchell, 
who is remembered by the business men of 
half a century ago. She was born in Ligonier 
Valley, where most of her life was spent until 
she removed with her father to Johnstown. 
Here she was married, in 1848, to Thomas 
Gore, who survives her. She was the mother 
of eight children, of whom seven are still 
living. As one who knew her well has ex- 
pressed it : " Mrs. Gore was a humble and 
consistent member of the church from her 
fourteenth year. Of a retiring and unselfish 
disposition, she was always more thoughtful 



288 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



of the comfort and welfare of others than her- 
self. She was constantly doing good by those 
little acts of kindness and love to her friends 
and neighbors which won a place for her in 
the hearts of all who knew her. In the famil}' 
circle her life was one of love and unselfish 
devotion. She knew in whom she trusted, 
and leaves a ' blessed memory.' " 



T SWAJS" TAYI.OK, 31. D., is the third 

^ • in descent from James Taylor, who 
came with his wife l^lizabeth, soon after their 
marriage, to America, in 1780, from County 
Armagh, Ireland. They landed at Baltimore^ 
and settled at Greensburg, Pennsylvania, but 
soon after moved upon a farm near 1 Iarve)''s 
Five Points, in Westmoreland county. James 
Taylor was born in 1760; died in 1842, and is 
buried in Ebenezer church-yard. Elizabeth 
Taylor died in 1823, and is buried in Con- 
gruity church-yard. They had three children, 
two sons and a daughter ; the daughter died 
young, and is buried by the side of her mother. 
They were Presbyterians of the most strict 
type. James Taylor hatl two brothers in the 
Revolutionary war. I lis father came to 
.America to visit him before 1790, but re- 
turned to Ireland. 

James Taylor, the elder son of James Tay- 
loy, Sr., was in the War of 1 81 2, and afterwards 
died at Pittsburg, while in active service as a 
soldier in the United States regular army. 

John Taylor, the youngest son, was born 
in 1788; was a .soldier in the War of 18 12, and 
died in 1853. He married P^leanor Miller, a 
daughter of Samuel Miller. She was horn in 
Ireland, November 10, 1794, and died January 
26, 1879. When she was but six weeks old 
her parents came to America, landing at Balti- 
more after a voyage of thirteen weeks upon 



the ocean. The Millers settled near Alters, 
north of New Alexandria, Westmoreland 
county, on what was afterwards known as the 
Rev. Milligan farm, but they soon removed to 
Indiana. 

John and Eleanor Miller Taylor removed 
to Indiana county in 1838; the deed for their 
land bearing the date of December 22, 1838. 
They had six children who lived to maturity, 
viz.: John M. Taylor, who died May 5, 1886; 
Samuel Taylor, who died February 23, 1895 ; 
Dr. James Taylor, fitther of subject ; David 
Taylor, still living. David Taylor and wife 
celebrated their golden wedding on January 
II, 1894; Hugh M. Taylor, who died March 
25, 1881, and William B. Taylor, still living. 
William B. Taj-lor and wife celcbratetl their 
golden wedding on February 26, 1896. 

Dr. James Taylor, father, was educated in 
the common subscription schools, Blairsvillc 
academy, P'^ranklin Medical college and Jef- 
ferson Medical college. Previous to entering 
the medical school he had read medicine with 
Dr. Edward Emerson, of Blairsville. True 
to the Irish and .Scotch idea that every boy 
must have a trade. Dr. Taylor became a weaver, 
and there are still to be seen articles woven 
by him when a young man. 

He rci)resentctl the district composed of 
Westmoreland and Armstrong counties in the 
legislature of Pennsylvania during the sessions 
of i860 and 1 86 1, and served on three of the 
important committees of th.it l)otl\-. 

The history of Westmoreland count)- ( 1 882) 
says, "One who served creditably in the leg- 
\ islature of Penn.sylvania at a time when the 
commonwealth was luenaccd by many dangers, 
and the Union was threatened with destruc- 
tion, was Dr. James Taylor, who is the most 
prominent physician in Ligonicr valley." He 
is .it this time (September, 1896) the oldest 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



289 



physician in the continuous practice of medi- 
cine in Pennsylvania, west of Huntingdon. 

Dr. James Taylor was twice married, first 
to Mary Matthews, daughter of Archibald 
and Elizabeth Matthews, by whom there were 
two sons ; the elder died in infancy, and tlie 
younger, John Taylor, served through the 
late rebellion in company E, Eleventh regi- 
ment, Pennsylvania Volunteer cavalry, and 
was discharged from the hospital in Alexan- 
dria. His second marriage was with .Susan 
Mary Ogden, daughter of Colonel Amos 
Ogden, and occurred January lO, 1849, ^""^ 
by this marriage there were five sons, viz. : a 
son who died in infancy; Dr. Amos O.Taylor, 
of Altoona, Pennsylvania ; Jeffery W. Taylor, 
Esq., attorney-at-law, Greensburg, Pennsjlva- 
nia; Dr. J. Swan Taylor, of Johnstown, Penn- 
sylvania, and Dr. Joseph M. Taylor, of West 
Fairfield, Pennsylvania. 

Dr. J. Swan Taylor, by his mother, is fifth 
in lineal descent from Dr. Joseph Ogden, who 
had been a surgeon on a British man-of-war, 
and is of that celebrated Scotch-Irish Ogden 
family of New Jersey. David Ogden, the 
eminent jurist, was born in 1707, and gradu- 
ated from Yale college in 1728. He was judge 
of the Supreme Court of New Jersey, and died 
in 1 800. Judge Ogden's son, Hon. Abraham 
Ogden, was the founder of Ogdensburg, New 
York, and ranked as one of the great lawyers 
of his day. He was the father of Thomas 
Ludlow Ogden, who was the law partner of 
Alexander Hamilton, and the legal adviser of 
the great " Holland Land company." 

Major-General Aaron Ogden, LL.D., served 
with Washington in the Revolutionary war, 
was governor of New Jersey, and president- 
general of the " Society of the Cincinnati," 
from 1829 to 1839, up to the time of his death, 
April 19, 1839, aged eighty-three years. 
19 



John Ogden married Judith Budd. He died 
in 1683, leaving to survive him four children, 
viz. : David, Joseph, Richard, and John. David 
Ogden died in New Jersey in 1767, and his 
will is probated at Morristown, Morris county, 
New Jersey. He had eleven children : Gil- 
bert, Elizabeth, Nancy, Mary, Gabriel, David, 
John, Abigail, Dr. Joseph, Amos, and Nathan. 
Of David's children, Captain Amos Ogden was 
in command of the Pennamites in the Wyom- 
ing valley. Nathan, David and Gilbert were 
there also with their brother. Captain Ogden. 
Nathan was killed. Fort Ogden, at Wilkes- 
barre, was named in honor of Captain Amos 
Ogden. The name of Joseph Ogden, as one 
of the slain in battle, is inscribed on one of 
the slabs of the monument erected at Wyom- 
ing to commemorate the terrible Wyoming 
massacre. 

Dr. Joseph Ogden was born in 17 16, and 
died in 1768. He married a Miss Garrabrant, 
who died December 26, 1815, and Joseph 
(great-grandfather), who was born in New 
Jersey, and died in Ligonier valley, April 12, 
1815. 

Joseph Ogden and Susannah, his wife, who 
died April 6, 1829, were among the first set- 
tlers west of the Allegheny mountains, locat- 
ing in Ligonier valley, Fairfield township, 
Westmoreland county, then Bedford county. 
Joseph Ogden obtained his title papers from 
George Wood. Wood street, Pittsburg, was 
called for George Wood, who laid out Pitts- 
burg for the Penns. Wood was surveyor for 
Juniata and Bedford counties; was captive in 
Fort Duquesne, and bought his own ransom. 

Joseph Ogden built the first stone house 
which is still standing in Ligonier valley. He 
was one of the first ruling elders in old Fair- 
field Presbyterian church, and his name fre- 
quently appears in the published " minutes of 



290 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



Redstone Presbj-tery," and in the " History 
of Blairsvillc Presbytery." The history of 
Westmoreland county says of Joseph Ogden 
inter alia, " Joseph Ogden was one who would 
not suffer persons to pass his house on Sun- 
daj- on secular business without having them 
brought before a justice of the peace for viola- 
tion of the law." 

Joseph and Susannah Ogden had ten chil- 
dren, viz.; Joseph, Jr., John, James, George, 
Armstrong, Col. Amos, William, Elizabeth, 
Mary, and Susannah. They are all dead. 
Elizabeth married Jamison Hendricks, uncle 
of the late Vice-President Hendricks, and 
died in 1857, and was buried at Madison, 
Indiana. 

The doctor is, on his mother's maternal 
side, a direct descendant of John Rarnett, who 
came with his faniil)- from Londonderry, Ire- 
land, to Hanover township, then Lancaster, 
now Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, prior to 
1730. Elizabeth Barnctt, the third in direct 
line from John Harnett, married William 
Moorhead, and had twelve children, of whom 
the second was Samuel Moorhead, who was 
born March 28, 1769, and died March i, 1853. 
He married Nancy Craig, who was the seventh 
child of Capt. Samuel Craig, .Sr , a commis- 
sary in tlu' Revolutionary War, having come 
from New Jersej' to Westmoreland county 
about 1770. Nancy Craig Moorhcad's bro- 
thers were General Alexander Craig, Capt. 
John Craig, and Sanuirl Craig, Jr., all sokliers 
in the Revolutionary War and in the War of 
1S12. Samuel Craig, Jr., was one of the few 
who returned from Col. Archibald Lochr)''s 
ill-fated expedition in 1781. Capt. Samuel 
Craig, Sr., was killed by tlie Indians on Satur- 
day, November I, 1777, while in pursuit of 
his official duties at a point on the Chestnut 
Ridge in I'"airfiel(! township, about li.ilf way 



between Fort Ligonier and Pack Saddle sta- 
tion on the Pennsylvania railroad. 

Samuel and Nancy Craig Moorhead had 
nine children, of whom Elizabeth, born July 
18, 1 80 1, married Col. Amos Ogden, and died 
March 26, 1884. Col. Amos Ogden was born 
April 17, 1797, and died March 22, 1867. He 
was married December 24, 1818, and had 
eleven children, one of whom, Susan Mary, 
married Dr. James Taylor. 

Col. Ogden lived and died upon the same 
farm, and in the same house where he was 
born. He was a remarkable man, an ideal of 
the old-school gentleman ; as a husband and 
father, kind and indulgent; as a citizen, es- 
teemed, re.spected and honored b)' all ; and 
while no seeker after office, yet he was the 
recipient of responsible civic appointments ; 
the first common school inspector in West- 
moreland county appointed by the Court No- 
vember 3, 1834, under the Act of Assembly 
of April I, 1834, and the Republican candi- 
date for associate judge of the several Courts 
cjf Westmoreland county, at the general elec- 
tion held October 14, 1 856; and as a military 
officer he was firm and decided, kind and for- 
bearing, appreciating the responsibility of his 
position; yet he never shrank from the dis- 
charge of his duty. 

l^r. Ta\'lor, the subject of our sketch, was 
born at West k'airfiekl, W'estmoreland county, 
l'cnns}-K'ani,i, and was educated at l-'airficld 
academy. Elder's Ridge academj-. Western 
Reserve college, Ohio, Jefferson Medical col- 
lege, and the Eclectic Medical institute of 
Cincinn.iti, Ohio. He is a member of West- 
monland Lodge, No. 518, F. and A. M., Ura- 
nia Ch.ipter, No. 192, Royal Arch Masons, 
Kedron Commandery, No. 18, Knights Tem- 
plar, and Pennsylvania Grand Consistory, 
lliirt) -second Regular Ancient ami Accepted 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



291 



Scottish Rite Mason. He was chairman of 
the Repubhcan County committee of Cambria 
county. He located in Johnstown immedi- 
ately after the flood of May 31, 1889, having 
previously practiced medicine at West Fair- 
field and Larimer station. 

On June 27, 1889, he celebrated his inar- 
riage to Miss Ella P. Gore, a daughter of Tho- 
mas Gore. To this union one child has 
been born, Amanda Mary Taylor. 

Dr. Taylor has been eminently successful 
as a physician by reason of his experience 
under peculiarly favorable circumstances, aid- 
ed by his natural ability and skill and kindly 
disposition. 



T ^EWIS A. CBAVER, the popular and 
obliging proprietor of the Blair House, 
of Ebensburg, the county seat of Cambria 
county, is a son of Lewis and Margaret (Wolf) 
Graver, and was born in Carroll township, 
Cambria county, Pennsylvania, December 14, 
1846. 

His grandfather, Stephen Graver, was born 
and passed his entire life in the confederation 
of Germany. One of his sons, Lewis Graver, 
who was the father of the subject of this 
sketch, was born in the year 1807 at Oeldorf, 
in the State of Baden, Germany, and in the 
year 1832 emigrated to the United States. 
His first location after coming to this country 
was in Carroll township, where he died in 
March, 1873. A greater part of his life, how- 
ever, was spent in Susquehanna township, this 
county. He was a weaver by trade, but after 
coming to this country followed agricultural 
pursuits exclusively. 

He was twice married. His first marriage 
was with Mrs. Hegue {nee Rutler), who bore 
him three children : Catherine, who joined the 
benedictine order, has been at St. Mary's, Elk 



county, this State, for forty-two years ; Au- 
gustine resides in Susquehanna township, and 
Margaret died in early girlhood. His second 
and last marriage was with Margaret Wolf, 
who became the mother of nine children : Mag- 
dalena and Julia Ann both died in infancy, 
Mary became the wife of Nicholas Seymore, 
of Clearfield township ; Theresa died young; 
Lewis A. is the subject of this biography ; 
Joseph resides in Hendricks, West Virginia ; 
Cecelia, died at the age of three years, Flora, 
deceased, was the wife of William Shank ; 
Thomas is a resident of Chest township, this 
county. 

Lewis A. Craver and Theresa Hott were 
united in marriage June 16, 1868. She is the 
daughter of Augustine Hott, who was born 
in Baden, Germany, March 24, 18 12, and emi- 
grated to America in 1828, when but sixteen 
years of age. He was employed by Prince 
Demetrius Gallitzin for a period of six years, 
and then located upon a farm in Carroll town- 
ship, where he has since resided, engaged in 
the tranquil and peaceful pursuits of hus- 
bandry. His marital union with Barbara 
Moke resulted in the birth of eleven children: 
Mary Ann, the wife of John Cole, of Altoona; 
Ellen, deceased at the age of thirty-two ; 
Philomena, the consort of George Seymore, 
of Allegheny township, this county, died 
February 17, 1896; Augustine, a resident of 
Carroll township ; Mrs. Henry Hertzog, died 
June 12, 1895 ; Ann, the wife of F. J. Vaught, 
of Altoona ; Jane, the wife of Nicholas Wy- 
land, of Spangler, this county ; James, at home ; 
Lucinda, consort of Anselum Buck, of Cone- 
maugh, this county, and Thomas, a grocer of 
Altoona. 

Mr. and Mrs. Craver are the parents of eight 
children : Jennie, . a graduate of Western 
Michigan Commercial college at Grand Rapids, 



292 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



Michigan, is a stenographer and typewriter; 
Ida is at home with her parents; Minnie is a 
teacher in the public schools of tliis county; 
Demetrius Augustine died at Chicago, Oct. 
9, 1893, while attending the World's Fair; Ed- 
win H., graduated from Ebensburg High 
school, April 16, 1896; Emma and William 
are attending school ; the younger died in 
infancy. 

Lewis A. Craver was reared upon a farm 
and followed farming until about twentj'-five 
years of age, and then invested ^4000 in tim- 
ber lands in Forest county, this State. Losing 
all his money in this investment he then car- 
ried the United States mail for a short time 
between Carrolltown and Chcrrytree. Subse- 
quently he ran a hack line between Indiana 
and Cherry tree, but in 1881 he became pro- 
prietor of Henderson Hotel, at Cherrytree, 
Indiana county. He continued this business 
until 1S81 when he engaged in the lumber 
business at Fallen Timber, this county, for 
two years. He also kept a hotel at the same 
place. It) 1888 he became proprietor of 
Fountain Hotel, at Johnstown, but when the 
city was destroyed by the famous floe id of 
1889 lie went to Ebensburg, his present abode 
and place of business. In 1890 he became the 
owner and proprietor of the Blair House, a 
licensed hotel, situated on High street. Con- 
veniently and pleasantly located, comfortably 
and commodiously furnished with modern 
conveniences, the Blair House has a large and 
remunerative patronage, which is composed 
of an eminently respectable class of people 
both local and commercial. 



"I^.VNIICIi LOrTIII'MJ. — Anteilating the 

founding of our government and all 

along its line of history, frem the formation of 

its first cabinet to the present time, the won- 



derful Scotch-Irish race has played a potent 
part in the affairs of our nation. In every 
phase of life and in every sphere of human 
activity — in business, literature, and religion, 
no less than in civil affairs — has its moulding 
and directing influence been felt. The gentle- 
man whose name heads this sketch sprang 
from that race and possesses, in a marked 
degree, those sterling qualities of character 
and strong attributes of mind that have ever 
been characteristic of the race. 

He was born, Feljruary 27, 1822, in West- 
moreland county, this State, and is a son of 
Jonathan and Margaret (Falloon) Louther. 
His grandfather was David Louther, a native 
of near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. David 
Louther was a son of James Louther, a native 
of Scotland, who came to America prior to 
the war for American Independence, in which 
he served. After this memorable conflict he 
settled in Westmoreland county, where he 
dietl and where he ranked as one of the pioneer 
settlers of the county. 

Jonathan Louther (father) was born in West- 
morel, uid county, where he followed the twin- 
pursuits of farming and milling. He served 
in the War of 1812, our second war for inde- 
pendence. 

The education of I\Ir. Louther, so fir as his 
youth was concerned, was such as he was able 
to get by attending the subscription schools 
three months, and one month's attendance 
uniler the free-school curriculum at a total 
cost of three dollars. His father being poor, 
he was compelled to lend his help to the sup- 
port of the family until he was twenty-four 
)ears of age. 

On .April I, 1S46, he began the labor of life 
on Jiis own account, taking a position as a 
laborer at fiftj- cents per day, earning and sav- 
ing the first nine months ^sioo, which he put 




DANIEL LOU rHP:R 



OF CAMBRIA COUNTY. 



293 



at compound interest, and has compounded it 
every year to the present time. He then 
worked two years at learning the trade of a 
millwright, receiving for his services in this 
relation five dollars a month. Having thor- 
oughly mastered his trade, and feeling himself 
a competent millwright, he soon secured work 
along the line of his craft. He solicited his 
first work, making at the same time the reso- 
lution that he would never again solicit em- 
ployment. This resolution was easily kept, 
for the completion of his first workmanship 
was the strongest testimonial of his skill, and 
thenceforward the work sought him, and for 
forty-seven years he was kept so constantly 
employed that he lost but seventy-two days 
during this long and faithful period of service. 

He followed his trade over the adjoining 
counties of Indiana, Cambria, Somerset, and 
Westmoreland, and earned the familiar sobri- 
quet of " The Millwright Louther." From 
April, 1852 to 1855, he filled the responsible 
position of steward of the Westmoreland 
county almshouse. In 1868 he was called 
upon to superintend the building of mills for 
the Westmoreland Lumber company, and, 
after satisfactorily performing this work, again 
returned to his trade, which he pursued until 
1892, since which time he has lived a compar- 
atively retired life. He has lived in Johns- 
town since 1867. 

Mr. Louther has always been a firm believer 
in the principles of the party of Lincoln, 
Blaine, and Garfield; keeps well posted on the 
current events — political and otherwise — of 
county, state, and nation, and, although never 
in any sense an office-seeker or an office- 
holder, believes it the duty of every good 
citizen to interest himself in the cause of good 
government, and, although he had but meagre 
advantages himself for securing an education. 



has always interested himself in the cause of 
popular education, and is counted as among 
the staunchest supporters of the common 
schools. He served twenty years as a director 
of the schools in Westmoreland and Cambria 
counties. He believes the church wields a 
most potent influence for good, and subscribes 
most ardently to the dogmas of the church of 
John Wesley. 



rjXSOX B. COOPER, superintendent of 
farms for the Cambria Iron company, 
and a resident of Coopersdale, is a son of 
James and Elizabeth A. (Boyd) Cooper, and 
was born on the old homestead, at Coopers- 
dale, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, August 

13, 1 860. He was reared at his native place, 
and after receiving his elementary education 
in the public schools, pursued his academic 
studies in private schools, and entered Mount 
Union college, Ohio, from which well and 
favorably-known institution he was graduated 
in the class of 1S83. Immediately after his 
graduation he entered the service of the Cam- 
bria Iron company, and had received several 
promotions before his father's death, which 
occurred in 1887. He then succeeded his 
father as superintendent of farms, stables and 
teams, an important and responsible position 
under this company, whose lands are so exten- 
sive, and whose teams, used about their fur- 
naces, mills and mines, far exceed in number 
those of any other company in western Penn- 
sylvania. Under his immediate orders is a 
large force of hands, comprising laborers, 
farmers, stablemen and teamsters. He is a 
practical man of business, as well as a man of 
education and general information. In his 
political views Mr. Cooper is a republican. He 
has served as a councilman, was justice of the 
peace for several years, and has been active in 



294 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT CYCLOPEDIA 



various ways for the material advancement of 
his borough. He is a member of Coopers- 
dale Methodist Episcopal church, which he 
has served as trustee for several years. 

On September 20, 1883, Mr. Cooper mar- 
ried Nannie Stutzman, a daughter of George 
W. Stutzman, a retired merchant of Coopers- 
dale. Mr. and Mrs. Cooper have five chil- 
dren : James Blaine, Sarah Elizabeth, Mj'rtle 
Stutzman, George Stutzman, and Anson Boyd. 

James Cooper, the father of the subject of 
this sketch, was a son of Joshua and Jane 
(Boyd) Cooper, and was born in Somerset 
county, February 27, 182 1. His early life was 
passed in farming and teaching, and in 1847 
he removed to Ben's Creek furnace, where 
he entered upon a remarkable career as a fur- 
nace manager. He ran Ben's Creek and 
Washington furnaces, and in 185 1 became 
manager