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Full text of "Biographical Record. Nos. 2-5"

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o FIFTH 



Biographical Record 



OF THK 



CLASS OF FIFTY-EIGHT, 



YALE UNIVERSITY. 



1858— 1908. 



BY WIIvUAM PIvUMB BACON, class secretary. 



NKW BRITAIN, CONM. 

THE RECORD PRESS, 
1908. 



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"A health to our future — a sigh for our past 
We love, we remember, we hope to the last; 
And for all the base lies that the almanacs hold. 
While we've youth in our hearts we can never grow old.*' 

— Holmes. 



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RECORDS OF '58. 



First, 


Pages 
130 


Copies 
400 


Printed 
1865 


Second, 


110 


250 


1869 


Third, 


102 


300 


1883 


Fourth, 


265 


300 


1897 


Fifth, 




250 


1908 



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PREFACE. 

The Secretary was officially floating idly upon a sea of contentment, 
believing that '58 was gorged and would call for no more class records, 
when he awoke and found it all a dream. 

In 1865, in the 'first class record, he included the non-graduat«s. 
He then concluded that the duties of a Secretary, especially because 
the numbers graduating were larger and increasing, could not be 
properly done if non-graduates were included. He therefore omitted them 
in the next three records. 

In July, 1908, he yielded to a second earnest appeal from the Secre- 
tary of the University to secure for him the addresses of the living non- 
graduates and secured them all. 

When the class in June, 1908, asked the Secretary to issue a record 
supplementary to that of 1897, he concluded to supplement also the non- 
graduate part of the record of 1865. The result is before you. In brief, 
the whole non-graduate record is in the 1865 and the 1908 records, and 
the whole graduate record is in the 1897 and the 1908 records. 

Thus practically closes a class secretarial career of fifty years, which 
bas probably been unequalled in duration. 

W. P. BACON, Class Secretary. 
Nkw Britain, Conn., December 31, 1908. 



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CLASS MEETINGS. 



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CLASS MEETINGS. 



1898. 

Pursuant to the resolution of 1893, the Class met in June, 
1898. There was no business to be transacted. Brinton spoke 
acceptably for the Class at the alumni meeting, and presided 
at our six o'clock dinner on Church and Chapel streets, after the 
usual lunch at noon and the pilgrimage to the Athletic Field. 

There were present of 57 survivors: Adams, Bacon, Boyn- 
TON, Brinton, Chalmers, Cqi^gat^, Frankun, Callaway, 
GiBBS, Gr^^nwood, Harris, Hewitt, How^, Hubbell, Kim- 
ball, Lee, Magill, Mathewson, Mills, Neidi^, Perkins, 
E. A. Pratt, Scott, Sleight, Stevens, Street, Van Name, 
Williams, Woodrui^f. (29.) 



1901. 

At the bi-centennial celebration of Yale, although no effort 
had been made by the Class Secretary to assemble the Class, 
the following were present of 52 survivors : 

Bacon, Chalmers, Gibbs, Harris, Howe, Kimball, Lee, 
Mathewson, Noble, Perkins, Street, Tomlinson, Van 
Name, Wilbur, Williams, Woodrui^i^. (16.) 



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12 CLASS MEETINGS. 

1903. 

Pursuant to the resolution of 1898, the Class met June 23, 
1903, in Professor Thacher's old home at 255 Crown street, 
where, also, the Class of '53 met. Besides resolving to meet in 
1908, no business was transacted. A parlor was open all day as 
a rendezvous, a lunch was provided at noon, and at six o'clock 
dinner was served in the next room. 

There were two pleasant incidents. 

The Class of '58, that the Class of '53 might keep its spirits up 
by pouring its spirits down, presented to it, through a committee 
of Armstrong and Bacon, a maximum, or four-quart bottle of 
champagne, for which the Bishop of Michigan returned thanks 
in a few happily chosen words. 

Presently a committee from '53, Stedman and Thomas, came 
in and officially presented '58 a box of cigars, and unofficially 
said that '53 had procured for us a bottle of wine, but their gift 
had been forestalled. 

Richard Waite, once Captain of the Shawmut Club, arid in 
1853 the first Commodore of the Yale Navy, had, it seems, with- 
out the knowledge of Bacon of '58, the sixth commodore, sought 
in vain the back-board of the Shawmut. Bacon, who had 
owned this for forty-five years, sprung a delightful surprise upon 
Waite, his boat-club and his Class, by lending the board to '53 
for the evening and placing it upon the mantle-piece, whence it 
evoked many old and pleasant memories. 

The next day, with the approval of Waite, Bacon deposited 
it, with a suitable inscription, together with the back-board of 
the Augusta of '49 and '52, in the Trophy Room of the Yale 
Gymnasium. 

Since then. Bacon, eflfectively aided by William Gilbert Ander- 
son, Director of the Gymnasium, has placed in the Trophy 
Room, the graduation pictures of the fifty-six Commodores 
and Presidents of the Yale Navy from 1853 to 1908. They have 
been framed and hung. 

There were present of 47 survivors: Adams, Armstrong, 
Bacon, Chalmers, KimbalIv, Lee, Mathewson, Neide, Per- 
kins, E. A. Pratt, Sleight, Stevens, Williams, Woodruff. 

(14.) 



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CLASS MEETINGS. I3 

1908. 

Pursuant to the resolution of 1903, the Class met June 23, 
1908, in the southeast first story comer room of Dwight Hall, on 
the College Campus, next south of Alumni Hall, where a room 
was reserved for us by the University for the day. 

The Class was seated on the platform in Alumni Hall at 10 
o'clock, where, among a few other speeches, the following, by 
Rev. William Stone Hubbell of '58, evoked more than usual 
hearty applause: 

It has been said that the easiest way to become celebrated is to 
outlive all of one's contemporaries. The Class of '58 is on its way to 
this goal, but has not yet fully arrived. Of the one hundred members 
with which our class graduated, forty still survive, and twenty-four of 
these are present here to-day in reasonably good health. We acknowl- 
edge our years, but have not reached the celebrity of the late Hannibal 
Hamlin of Maine who was wont in old age to pose as the last survivor 
of the Cabinet of Abraham Lincoln and as having been an office-holder 
for fifty years in his native State. It was said of him that "he was so 
old that he could remember when Mount Katahdin was a hole in the 
ground." 

Suffer me to recall a few events of interest in the life of a Yale 
student of fifty years ago. 

Not long after our college life began, something happened, which 
seemed trivial at the time, but proved of great and lasting importance to 
Yale. One morning, in accordance with the trying custom which then 
prevailed of recitations by gas-light before breakfast, our division was 
to meet that formidable instructor in Greek, Prof. James Hadley, at 7 
a. m. We found the class-room locked and we scattered at once with 
joy at our escape from his penetrating inquiries. Later it appeared that 
the Professor was observing the Feast of the Nativity at his own home. 
The occupant of that cradle was named Arthur Twining and the date was 
on or about April 23, 1856. On that morning we congratulated our- 
selves; to-day we congratulate the University on that advent. 

But other great events were occurring in those days. On the 17th 
of June, 1856, the anniversary of the Battle of Bunker Hill, the first 
National Republican Convention met at Philadelphia and nominated 
John C. Fremont for President, and forthwith the stirring campaign 
burst upon us. Abraham Lincoln came to New Haven to make his 
first speech in New England. He was not yet famous here, but the 
Democrats were taking no chances. They hired every commodious hall 
in the city and locked it up for that evening. Mr. Lincoln spoke in a 
small dance-hall over a livery-stable on Union street The room was 



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14 CI^SS MEETINGS. 

packed to suffocation. When the speaker arose — or began to get up — an 
Irishman near me cried out — "Look at him! there's two hundred men 
in this town better looking nor that." Mr. Lincoln joined in the 
uproarious laugh that followed and said — "That reminds me of a story." 
He gained at once the rapt attention and applause of the crowd without 
respect to party lines, and spoke for two hours, using every variety of 
political address and making the most wonderful speech of its kind ever 
given in this city before or since. It was well worth a four years* 
stay at Yale to have included this one marvelous feat of oratory as a 
part of our education. 

Later on, Senator Thomas H. Benton of Missouri came to deliver 
his lecture on the History of the U. S. Senate, and, his address being 
non-political, he spoke in the Centre Church. He had just published a 
colossal work entitled, "Benton's Thirty Years in the U. S. Senate,*' 
which publication by a typographical error was first printed under the 
significant title— "Benton's Thirty Bears in the U. S. Senate." This 
plausible mistake promised a volume of "nature studies" which would 
have delighted the heart of President Roosevelt, and was not altogether 
wide of the truth. After the lecture he went to his room at the New 
Haven House, and a crowd of Yale boys went over from "The Fence", 
(Alas, that now it has disappeared!) and by their cheering for the 
Senator called him out, a willing victim, on the balcony for a speech. 

Something boisterous in the audience led him to ask — "Young 
gentlemen, perhaps you desire my views on the use of alcoholic stimu- 
lants? Let me tell you then, what seems to me the best rule: total 
abstinence till forty : temperance afterward." 

Many of his audience slid away dejected, longing to grow old in a 
single night, so as to reach the time-limit of indulgence specified. But 
the passing years have remedied that difficulty for us here to-day. 

A little earlier than this the New Haven colony, under Deacon 
Lines, had gone out to help in making Kansas a Free- State. They 
were presented with Sharpe's rifles in an address by Dr. Leonard Bacon 
given from a platform built against the outside wall of the Centre Church 
and near the Regicide's grave. These colonists thus conspicuously armed 
were never molested by the raiding parties from Missouri, then known 
as Border Ruffians. Herein we find an argument which our President, 
or his successor (who may or may not belong to the Class of '78) might 
use in his plea for a competent army and navy in the interests of peace. 

Taught by these stirring lessons during life at Yale, when the Great 
Rebellion began, the Class of '58 took active part in the struggle. Sev- 
eral of them were prominent in the Sanitary and Christian Commissions ; 
eight of them, including our Salutatorian and De Forest Medal man, 
entered the Confederate Army; thirty-three enlisted in the Union Army 
and Navy. Forty-five per cent, of the entire class thus served in the 
bitter war and many of the noblest of these laid down their lives on 



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CI^SS ME^INGS. 15 

the battlefield. The 21st Conn, was sometimes called the Yale Regiment, 
because of the large proportion of Yale men among its officers. Two 
Colonels, a Lieutenant Colonel, two Adjutants and four Captains came 
from this College. Its first Colonel, Arthur H. Dutton, went from the 
Sheffield School to West Point, was placed after his first examination 
there, at the head of his class, was graduated No. 2, and at the age of 
twenty-three was mortally wounded at Bermuda Hundred at the head 
of his Brigade a Captain of Engineers in the Regular Army, a Colonel 
of Volunteers and already nominated as Brigadier General. 

When the regiment returned it was our good fortune to be mustered 
out at New Haven during Commencement week in July, 1865. The 
officers who were Yale men received a special invitation from the Faculty 
to attend the Commencement exercises, and were met at the old fence 
corner by Prof. Noah Porter, who decorated each with a special badge 
of blue worth more to us than the prizes we had missed during our col- 
lege career. We also had high seats in the synagogue at the Commence- 
ment dinner. 

But we have, as a class, other names more honored still in the 
ranks of peace. Perhaps no alumnus of Yale has ever add-ed more lustre 
to her fame in Europe than the late Josiah Willard Gibbs. It is said of 
him that he took up the work of Sir Isaac Newton where the latter left it 
and carried it on to regions of discovery in Mathematical Physics of 
which Newton never dreamed. In the realm of Ethnology, Daniel 
Garrison Brinton has added a multitude of volumes to the literary treas- 
ures most highly prized by scholars in that department of knowledge. 

Arthur Mathewson has been a conspicuous Ophthalmologist and 
Otologist. 

Bishops like the gentle Elisha Smith Thomas, great preachers like 
Frederick Alphonso Noble, great educators like the United' States Com- 
missioner of Education William Torrey Harris, Presidents Walter Scott 
Alexander and Samuel Henry Lee, and Superintendent John Edwin Kim- 
ball, great librarians like our modest valedictorian Addison Van Name, all 
these are ours, and there are others; for it is a case where not only 
comparisons but selections are ungracious if not odious. 

For fifty years we have tried to carry out the Yale spirit, under 
our class motto, "Fortiter, Fideliter, Feliciter." We love our Mother 
and gladly could sing to-day as we did fifty years ago in the old 
parody — 

"God bless our Mother Yale, 
Her star shall never pale. 
In storm or night." 



Every honor, deserved or ui^Icserved, which time has brought us, 
we modestly lay here to-day at our Mother's feet. 



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1 6 CI^SS M^^TINGS. 

When we graduated, our beloved Prof. Denison Olmsted gave to 
each of us, in addition to his autograph, this parting sentiment, "Doing 
good is a work of inherent dignity." 

To this noble task we hope to devote the residue of our lives. 

At noon lunch was furnished in the Dwight Hall room, where 
at a business meeting the Secretary was requested to print a 
fifth Class Record, supplementary to the preceding ones. 

The Class then posed on the steps of the old library where an 
excellent photograph of the twenty-four present was taken. 

Seats in the covered grandstand having been secured, the most 
of the fellows took the trolley out two miles to the Athletic 
Field to s6e the Yale-Harvard ball game, and incidentally the 
unusual concomitant of '78's parade with their Classmate Taft. 

At six o'clock, Adams and Gallaway having been obliged to 
return to New York, the other twenty-two sat down to dinner 
at a round table in the President's Reception Room, in the north- 
east corner of the second floor of the Woolsey Hall, on the 
southwest corner of College and Grove streets. 

Sleight presided, and exhibited the Wooden Spoon * given 
to him by the Class, June 15, 185,7, which, with the assent 
of the Class, he the next day deposited in the Trophy Room. 

A very unusual and touching feature of the dinner was the 
presentation by the Class, through Bacon, of a beautiful solid 
gold Tiflfany spoon to Stevens, with the following remarks. 

The following letter came to the Secretary of '58: 

New York, June 3, 1907. 
I have to announce to you the birth of a daughter to the class of 
'58, Frederica Stevens, born June 1st, a fine, healthy specimen, weighing 
854 pounds. Mother and child doing well. I am 68 years old. This 
should stand as a record, and should merit even Teddy's approbation. 

The old Adam again at his old trick of shifting responsibility ! 
However, the proud father is a lawyer, and the Class of '58 
remembers ''qui facit per alium facit per se/' and accepts the 
responsibility. 

[* The Wooden Spoon was introduced by Henry T. Blake of '48 as 
a burlesque on the Junior Exhibition, and the last one was given by '71.] 



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CLASS MEETINGS. IJ 

Among the many surprises to which Time has treated us, per- 
haps the most conspicuous is this of proclaiming to us at our 
50th anniversary the arrival of the Stork at our door. We wel- 
come the bird and we compliment him upon his exceedingly good 
judgment in the selection of a father for the child. 

And now my dear Istie, selected by the Class to mark the 
recognition and appreciation of this delightful honor which you 
have brought to us, and qualified for the task only by the deep 
affection I have for you, I beg you to accept from us this gold 
spoon on which is inscribed the name of your daughter Frederica. 

Being as you were in 1858 among the first in scholarship and 
among the first in athletics, you were an early and much needed 
proof at Yale that a sound mind and a sound bddy were not 
incompatible. And had the witty Frenchman who wrote 

''Si la jeunesse savait et si la veillesse pouvaitT 
known you in your earlier and your later years, he had not 
written it. You will take with this simple gift the hearty good 
wishes of us all for the future of yourself, your wife and your 
daughter. 

Stevens was greatly surprised and deeply affected. He made 
a few fitting remarks, and testified, by his emotion even better 
than by his words, his gratification and his appreciation . of the 
esteem and affection that had prompted the gift. He has laid 
away the spoon "for Frederica to hold fifty years from now, as 
her most precious memorial of her father and his dear friends 
of :58." 

It afforded all of us much unexpected pleasure to have with us 
Jones of Massachusetts, and Kellogg of Louisiana for the first 
time in fifty years. 

Altogether, the meeting was universally agreed to have been 
the best one we ever had. 

Of forty survivors the following were present: Adams, 
Bacon, Gallaway, Greenwood, Harris, Hewitt, Hubbell, 
Jones, KelIvOGG, Kimball, Lee, Mathewson,Neide, Perkins, 
Pratt, Scott, Sleight, Steele, Stevens, Tomlinson, Van 
Name, Wilbur, Williams, Woodrui?!?. (24.) 



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1868 " 94 


« 


35 


1873 " 90 


it 


24 


1878 " 84 


tt 


35 


1883 " 80 


ti 


24 





Anniversary 




43 


31 


72 


38 


18 


* 50 


43 


18 


42 


39 


24 ' 


61 


43 


33 


77 


.40 


24 


60 



1 8 CLASS MEETINGS. 

There were present in 

1865 of 96 living 46 1888 of 74 living 22 

1893 " 72 " 15 

1898 " 57 " 29 

1903 " 47 " 14 

1908 " 40 " 24 

Class Living Attended 50th Per cent. 

'53 

'54 

'55 

'56. 

'57 

'58 

Total average per cent. 60. 

The following letters explain themselves: 

Dear Bacon : 

It is the pleasant duty of the committee appointed for this purpose 
at our late reunion, to send you this testimonial of your classmates' 
affection. 

To find words to say what was of necessity left unsaid in the inscrip- 
tion, is far from easy. For half a century you have been the central 
organ of the Class life, giving to its current warmth and impulse. Your 
admirable Class Records have kept us in touch and sympathy with one 
another. Even those who for one cause or another had left the Class 
before graduation, you have been unwilling to let go from your watch 
and ward. That this work, to which you have given such generous and 
uncommon devotion, has been to you a labor of love, only adds to the 
weight of our obligation. "Owe no man anything, save to love one 
another," wrote the Apostle Paul to the Romans. What we owe you 
we can never pay; the saving clause alone fits our case. Therefore 
we tender you this loving cup, which bears from each one of us an over- 
flowing measure of the substance of which it is itself the symbol. 

Faithfully yours. 

ADDISON VAN NAME, 
- CHAS. H. WOODRUFF, 

THATCHER M. ADAMS, 
New York, November 24, 1908. Committee. 



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CI.ASS MEETINGS. I9 

Addison Van Namk, Charles H. Woodru^^, Thatcher M. Adams, 
Committee of the Class of '58, and Classmates. 



Dear Friends All: 

Shakespeare has said, "Silence is the perfectest herald of joy; I were 
but little happy, if I could say how much." 

I would be silent. I may not. The superb Loving-cup which reached 
me this day before Thanksgiving Day, compels me to attempt fit words 
of ■ acknowledgment. 

How can I speak? The room seems filled with the thirty-eight, and 
the air crowded with the shadows of the sixty-six, and I seem to hear 
all the spoken and written words of approval and affection that have been 
stored up in my memory for fifty years burst forth at once as one grand 
paean of praise. 

It is a marvelous experience to read such words from so many 
widely separated friends after a probation of fifty years, and to hear 
them still sing with Burns, 



"We'll take a cup o' kindness yet 
For auld lang syne." 



I can only say with Tiny Tim 

"God bless us every one." 

Sincerely yours, 

WILLIAM PLUMB BACON, 

Secretary of '58. 
New Britain, Conn., November 25, 1908. 



The cup is eight inches in diameter and eight inches in height, 
and when mounted on its ebony pedestal is twelve and a half 
inches high. It weighs fifty ounces and holds a gallon. It is 
hand-wrought sterling, of Roman pattern, of three-handle design, 
each handle studded with three blisttr pearls. 

It is inscribed : 



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20 CI^SS M^^TINGS. 

Portiter, Fideliter, Feliciter 

1858 1908 

WILLIAM PLUMB BACON 

SECRETARY FOR FIFTY YEARS OF THE 

CLASS OF 1858 IN YALE COLLEGE. 

IN TOKEN OF LOVE AND GRATITUDE 

FROM HIS CLASSMATES. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 
OF GRADUATES. 

* MONTELIUS ABBOTT. 
1838 — 1877. See Record of 1897. 



THATCHER MAGOUN ADAMS. 

He is a descendant, in the seventh generation, of Henry 
Adams, who came in 1634 to Braintree, Mass. 

He has been a member of the firm of Adams & Comstock, 
Attorneys at Law, since May i, i88i7, and since January i, 1902, 
has been a special partner in the firm of Day, Adams & Co., 
Stock Brokers, 45 Wall street. 

His clubs are the Union, Metropolitan, Knickerbocker, City 
Midday, Down Town^, Whist and Yale. 



* WALTER SCOTT ALEXANDER. 

He resigned his pastorate in Philadelphia in 1898, and returned 
to Cambridge, Mass. 

His wife died in Cambridge, Mass., September 14, 1898. 

He died there May 15, 1900, at the age of 64, after being ill 
five months with cancer. 

"Alexander was a gifted scholar, a faithful minister and a 
delightful friend. Not only in religion and theology was he a 
progressive and fearless teacher of truth, but in historical and 
literary researches he proved himself a master. His articles and 
historical addresses reveal a graceful style and commanding 
Icnowledge. 



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24 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

"For forty-five years he had been collecting thousands of 
autograph letters from the poets, statesmen and distinguished 
men and women of the world, a collection among the most valu- 
able and extensive, in certain lines, in this country. 

"He bore his suffering with a courage and cheerfulness mar- 
velous and inspiring to his friends, keeping to the end his sunny, 
loving outlook on the world, his unwavering faith in God, to 
whom he looked with confidence and absolute faith, as a son 
to his father. Living in closest sympathy with his fellows, yet 
preserving a soul unspotted from the world, he laid down his 
life with no struggle, making death forever beautiful to those 
who loved him." 

"He' said to his daughter, almost as his last conscious word: 
'Two things are eternal: the Saviour's love and my love for 
you.' " 

Constance G. taught in the Cambridge Latin School from 
1893 to 1907. In 1907-8 she was *Secretary of Mr. Bernard 
Berenson in Italy. She has published poems in the Atlantic, 
Century and other magazines. In September, 1908, she was 
teaching in the Dana Hall School, Wellesley, Mass. 



* VOLNEY STAMPS ANDERSON. 

Mrs. Anderson is living with her son, Volney S., in Salt Lake 
City. Both sons are yet unmarried. 

Volney S. has lived in Salt Lake City for the last eight years, 
and is Secretary of the firm of Windsor & Co., General Insur- 
ance Agents. 

George P. is engaged in mining in Goldfield, Nev. 



* GEORGE PIERCE ANDREWS. 

In 1898 he was re-elected Judge of the Supreme Court of the 
State of New York. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 25 

. He died of apoplexy in New York May 24, 1902, aged 66. 
His remains were cremated and the ashes placed in the Garrison 
mausoleum in Greenwood Cemetery. 

Andrews was a descendant in the eighth generation from 
Captain Robert Andrews, who came to Ipswich, Mass., in 1635, 
as owner and master of the ship "Angel Gabriel." 

When Andrews, as Assistant U. S. District Attorney, by his 
zeal and industry, effected the execution on the 21st of February, 
1862, of Captain Gordon, the only slave-trader ever executed, 
he ended in this country a trade that had continued for more 
than 300 years, and had been illegal over forty-two years. 

As Corporation Counsel he recovered for the city several mil- 
lions of dollars. He was recognized as a high authority on 
municipal and corporation law and in cases in equity. He was 
quick to perceive, deliberate in action, modest, of untiring indus- 
try, wise, learned and just. 

A bronze portrait bust of him by George T. Brewster of N. 
Y. City, given by Mrs. Andrews, was unveiled June 17, 1904, 
in the County Court House. A Replica was placed in the 
library of the Bar Association. 

Mrs. Catherine Mahala (Garrison) Van Auken, daughter of 
Cornelius Kingsland Garrison, former wife of Barret H. Van 
Auken, and widow of Andrews, died at her summer home at 
Lake George, N. Y., August 13, 1905, aged 66. 



* WILLIAM NEVINS ARMSTRONG. 

After 1903 he lived in Washington, D. C. 

In 1904 he issued a book "Around the World with a King/' 
pp. 290, F. A. Stokes Co., N. Y. City. 

He died after having been ill all the summer, from catarrh of 
the liver, in the Garfield Hospital in Washington, October 16, 
1905, at the age of 70. 

His body was cremated and the ashes were placed near his 
father's on Oahu Island in the Old Mission burial ground 
adjoining the Kawasahas Church. 



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26 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

Mrs. Armstrong died at Hampton, Va., February 7, 1903, 
and was buried in Saybrook, Conn. 

Matthew C, is in the Oyster and Real Estate business in 
Hampton, Va. 

He married in Boston, Mass., November i, 1905, Grace, 
daughter of Charles Henry Taylor and Georgianna Olivia Davie. 

CHILD. 

Elizabeth, b. Boston, Mass., Nov. 10, 1906. 

Richard is in business with Matthew C. 

He married in Hampton, Va., April 21, 1906, Rosa Fairfax, 
daughter of Wills Lee and Florence Beverly Whiting. 

Morgan K. (Yale Sheff. 1901) is a manufacturer of roofing 
paper in Kansas City, Mo., and is unmarried. 

Dorothy, unmarried, is at Hampton. 



WILLIAM PLUMB BACON. 

He. still resides in New Britain, Conn. 

In 1902 he became a member of the Conn. Historical Society 
and of the N. Y. Commandery of the Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion ; in 1907 Cor. Member of the N. Y. Genealogical 
and Biographical Society; and in 1908 member of the Conn. 
Society of the Order of the Cincinnati. In October, 1907, he 
retired from business. 

In December, 1907, he issued a genealogy of his wife's ances- 
tors, "Whittemore-Clark, pp. 125, Adkins Printing Co., New 
Britain, Conn." 

He has also ready for the press a similar volume of Bacon- 
Plumb, his own ancestors, pp. circa 250. 

Corinne (Packer 1890) was from December i, 1894, Assistant 
Librarian of the New Britain Institute until 1901, when she went 
to the New York State Library School in Albany, N. Y., where 



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WILLIAM PLUMB BACON. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 01^ GRADUATES. 27 

she was graduated with the degree of B. L. S. Since 1903 she 
has been Instrux:tor in the Library School, and has had full 
charge of the Summer School. 

Adele (Mrs. Clinton Peters) is a painter of miniatures, and 
lives at 360 W. 23d street, N. Y. City. 

CHILDREN. 

John Clinton, b. Paris, France, Jan. 24, 1891. 

Margaret Elizabeth, " " " Aug. 25, 1892. 

Emily Ruth, " " " June 6, 1894. 

William S. lives in New Britain, Conn. He has remained 
with the American Paper Goods Co. in Kensington, and is now 
the Assistant Secretary and Treasurer. 

He married in Rockville, Conn., June 15, 1904, Margaret, 
daughter of Dennis Bradley, 

CHILD. 

Robert Bradley, b. New Britain. Conn., July 14, 1905. 

Arthur W. was graduated from Yale Sheff. in 1903, receiving 
honorable mention in all engineering subjects and being elected 
to the honorary high stand Society of the Sigma Xi. 

In July, 1903, he was Assistant Instructor in topographic and 
hydrographic surveying to the Senior Class in the Sheffield 
Scientific School. 

From September i, 1903, to February i, 1904, he was transit- 
man and assistant engineer in the office of Fred. L. Ford, City 
Engineer of Hartford, Conn. Engaged during this time on 
general city work, with special attention to sewer construction. 

From February i, 1904, to July i, 1905, he was in the office 
of Lindon W. Bates, Consulting Engineer, of 74 Broadway, New 
York City, and also acted as Secretary of the United States 
Engineering Company, engaged in raising the grade of the city 
of Galveston, Tex. 

From July i, 1905, to December i, 1905, he was resident 
engineer in charge of preliminary work on contract No. i of 
the New York State Barge Canal Improvement for the Empire 
Engineering Corporation of New York City. 



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28 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

From December i, 1905, to January 20, 1906, in the office of 
the executive engineer of the above corporation in Albany, and 
from January 3, 1906, to October i, 1908, engineer and 
assistant superintendent on contract No. 4 Erie canal, also 
for the Empire Engineering Corporation. 



JOHN TAYLOR BAIRD. 

"July II, 1905, having preached for forty-four years and 
having served the same church in Plattsmouth, Neb., thirty 
years to a day, I was, at my own request, honorably retired from 
the pastorate by the order of my Presbytery." 

William N. (Bellevue Coll. 1900) has since 1901, been book- 
keeper in the Commercial National Bank of Omaha, the U. S. 
National Bank of Omaha, the U. S. Bank of Denver, Col., and 
since 1906 in the First National Bank of Salida, Col. 

Mary A. H. lives in Plattsmouth. 

She married in Plattsmouth, Neb., January 19, 1904, George 
Lord Farley, owner and editor of the Evening News. 

CHILDREN. 

Helen Louise, b. Plattsmouth, Neb., May 13, 1905. 

Edith Maria, " " " May 13, 1905. 

Caroline I. and Edith B., both B. S. Bellevue College, 1905, 
live at home. 

Florence B. expects to graduate from Bellevue College in 
1910. 



* EDWARD PAYSON BATCHELOR. 
1835 — 1876- See Record of 1897. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 29 

* ROBERT MARSHALL BEALE. 
1839 — 1866. See Record of 1897. 



* DAVID MARKS BEAN. 

Mrs. David M. Bean is living at 20 N. 9th avenue, Mt. 
Vernon, N. Y. 

Annie H. (Mrs. Willard Bean Howe) lives in Burlington, 
Vt., and has 

CHILDREN. 

David Willard, b. Burlington, Vt., June 22, 1892 

Ruby Frances, " " " Mch. 2, 1894. 

Katherine Emily, " " " Feb. 14, 1896, 

Elizabeth Anne, " " " July 11, 1898 

George Frederick, " Cedar Beach, " July i, 1901 

Edward Oilman, " Burlington, " Jan. 19, 1903 

Laurence Prescott, " " " Nov. 25, 1905 

Susan H., (Mrs. Laurence T. Gray) lives in Colorado Springs, 
Col., and has 

CHILDREN. 

Natalie, b. Chicago, 111., May 21, 1894. 

Laurence Tenney, " Colorado Springs, Cal., May 9, 1902. 
Seymour Bevier, " " " July 18, 1903. 

Elizabeth H., (Mrs. Harry P. Wilcox) lives in Mt. Vernon, 
N. Y., and has a 

CHILD. 

Faith, . b. Stamford, Conn., July 14, 1894. 

Grace S. married in Stamford, Conn., July 6, 1897, R^v. 
Warren Morse (Williams, 1896), now pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church in Brewer, Me. 



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30 BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

CHII.DREN. 

Lucy Marston, b. Bennington, Vt., .July 23, 1901. 

Frances Margaret, " Brewer, Me., Mch. 8, 1906. 



* WILLIAM COMSTOCK BENNETT. 
1836— 1886. See Record of 1897. 



* EDWARD FOSTER BLAKE. 
1837 — 1862. See Record of 1897. 



* GEORGE MILLS BOYNTON. 

He continued as Secretary of the Congregational Sunday 
School and Publishing Society until he was no longer able to 
speak in public meetings. 

In 1905, Rev. Frank S. Sanders, D. D., (Ph. D. Yale, 1889,) 
was elected Secretary of the Society, and in the work of reor- 
ganization and extension the new office of Missionary Secretary 
was created, and Dr. Boynton was elected to the position. 

In July, 1907, he resigned and the Directors adopted the 
following resolution : 

"Inasmuch as Rev. George M. Boynton. D. D., has, on account of 
impaired heahh, resigned the office of Missionary Secretary of The 
Congregational Sunday School and Publishing Society, the Directors 
wish to record their high estimation of him as a man and their grateful 
acknowledgement of the wise and efficient way in which he has discharged 
the onerous duties of his high office. For more than nineteen years he 
has served this Society with tireless and tactful assiduity — seventeen as 
Corresponding and two as Missionary Secretary, doing much in each depart- 
ment to make this the most fruitful period in the history of the organiza- 
tion. With true business instinct he has carried on the routine work 
in a prompt and orderly way. With fine literary taste his voluminous 
correspondence has been clear and comprehensive, his varied printed 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 3I 

pages informing and attractive. Scanning the needs of our country with 
a statesman's eye, he has sought to answer the many calls for aid both 
east and west in a judicial way, giving a portion to each in due season. 

"An entertaining and forceful speaker, he has found ready access to 
the larger as well as to the smaller pulpits of the denomination, and 
received numerous calls to present the cause at conferences and Sunday 
school conventions all over the land. 

"As a result one million, ninety-five thousand, six hundred and twenty 
dollars have been received for the Missionary Department during this 
administration — forty-five thousand the first year and seventy-five thou- 
sand the last — ^making a gain of over sixty-six per cent. In this time 
nearly nine thousand Sunday schools have been established in about all 
the states and territories, out of which have grown something like five 
thousand churches, not a few of which have become not only self-sup- 
porting, but also generously contributing bodies to the missionary enter- 
prises of the denomination. 

"Under Dr. Boynton's careful supervision an exceptionally strong 
and efficient corps of laborers has been kept constantly at work on the 
most promising fields, without running the Society into debt at the close of 
any single year, and without exciting friction between employer and 
employed. Instead, the missionaries at the front have regarded the 
Secretary at home, not as an executive officer merely, but as a personal 
friend as well, whose tender sympathy and sane advice were always 
available to help them on in their hard tasks. 

"We congratulate our brother on the high favor and grand success 
which have attended his administration, and we dare express the hope 
that even greater harvests will be gathered from seed he has already 
sown." 

His three books, The Model Sunday School, The Pilgrim 
Pastor's Manual, and The Congregational Way, are examples 
of a great amount of wise teaching and counsel he has given 
which has contributed largely to the growth and prosperity of 
Congregational churches. 

For nearly a year his health steadily failed, and he died of 
paralysis at his home in Boston, May 1,7, 1908, aged 71. He 
was buried in Newton Centre. 

Mrs. Boynton lives at 64 Sewall avenue, Brookline, Mass. 

Louis H. is an architect at 11 70 Broadway, New York City. 

He married in Rome, Italy, March 25, 1897, Miss Maude 
Franklin, daughter of James Seymour Reynolds and Margaret 
Mason. 



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32 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 01^ GRADUATES. 

CHILDREN. 

Louise, b. Scranton, Pa., Sept. ii, 1898. 

Lucia Margaret, " White Plains, N. Y., Sept. 27, 1899. 
George Mills, 2d, " College Point, " Sept. 11, 1906. 

Henry W. lives in Bristol, R. L 

He married first in Portland, Me., December 21, 1893, Miss 
Lucia Griswold, daughter of Rev. James Griswold and Louisa 
W. (Boutwell) Merrill. 

Mrs. Boynton died in Andover, Mass., September 19, 1899. 

He married second in Providence, R. L, March 26, 1908, Miss 
May Whittemore, daughter of Solon Vergil Whittemore and 
Maria Elizabeth Gleason. 



CHILDREN. 

Merrill Holmes, b. Andover, Mass., Nov. 15, 1895. 

Oliver Griswold, " " " Dec. 8, 1898. 

Percy H., (Amherst, 1897) A. M. Harvard, 1898, was 
Instructor in English in Smith Academy, St. Louis, 1898-1902; 
.at the University of Chicago as Reader in English, 1902-3 ; Asso- 
ciate in English, 1903-5; Instructor, 1905-8; Assistant Professor, 
1908, and has been University Extension Lecturer since 1906, 
and Secretary of Instruction, Chautauqua Institution since 1903. 

He married in St. Louis, Mo., October 11, 1902, Lois, daughter 
of Charles P. Damon and Rosa Ewald. 



CHILDREN. 

Holmes, b. Chicago, 111., Aug. 15, 1906. 

Damon, " " " Sept. 27, 1908. 

George H. spent three years at Amherst College, and then 
became a bookkeeper in the New England Trust Co. of Boston, 
and lives with his mother at 64 Sewall avenue, Brookline, Mass. 



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DAN[KL GARRISON BRIXTON. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 33 

, * DANIEL GARRISON BRINTON. 

He died after a brief illness at Atlantic City, N. J., July 31, 
1899, aged 62. 

He published twenty or more volumes and contributed about 
one hundred and fifty papers to scientific periodicals, including 
valuable reports on mounds, shell-heaps, rock inscriptions and 
other American antiquities, besides popular articles on science 
and literature. 

In 1899, he presented his entire collection of two thousand 
books and manuscripts on the aboriginal languages of America 
and nearly two hundred indexed pamphlets on the ethnology of 
the American Indians to the University of Pennsylvania. 

"In his death American science has suffered a grievous loss. 
Notably brilliant and versatile, endowed with exceptional acumen, 
and an indefatigable worker, he investigated much of the broad 
field of anthropology with signal success : a fluent and forceful 
speaker and a clear and cogent writer, he was remarkably suc- 
cessful in putting the results of his work before general auditors 
and readers as well as students ; exceptionally public-spirited 
and appreciative of the normal human demand for better knowl- 
edge, he strove constantly to extend and improve instrumen- 
talities for the diffusion of science. Thus through rich natural 
endowment, coupled with wise and persistent effort, he materially 
advanced the Science of Man and placed himself in the front 
rank of the anthropologists of the world. His activity continued 
undiminished (despite the weight of well-guarded suffering con- 
sequent on military service) until checked by the illness which 
terminated with his life. 

"Largely by reason of his versatility, it is not easy to define 
his original additions to the body of definite knowledge com- 
prehended by the term anthropology; his range was broad and 
his touch vivified many lines of thought. Perhaps his richest 
gift to 'scientific method was that embodied in his unique library 
designed 'to put within reach of scholars authentic materials 
for the study of the languages and culture of the native races 
of America.' 

"Perhaps his richest contribution to the body of science is 
the second chapter of his 'Religions,' entitled 'Origin and Con- 



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34 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

tents of Primitive Religions,' which has well been characterized 
as a work of genius ; while certainjy the influence of his eloquent 
advocacy of the doctrine of mental unity will long remain in 
the minds of the anthropologists of the world. Yet despite 
the difficulty of signalizing special features of well-rounded 
work, the great fact remains that Brinton's investigations and 
expositions have served to set forward the outposts of the 
Science of Man along almost the entire front. 

''During the last two decades workers in various branches of 
science have benefited much by Dr. I>rinton's readiness to pro- 
mote and diffuse knowledge by all means at his command ; he 
conducted a large and varied correspondence in which he freely 
gave of his information to numberless seekers; he contributed 
voluminously to current periodical literature, both special and 
general ; he was given to attending scientific meetings, and was 
particularly free in formal and informal communications and 
discussions ; and he was a frequent and attractive lecturer. He 
was no less generous in editorial work ; his name has added 
strength to the editorial corps and his pen has added interest to 
the pages of other journals of scientific character. 

"Among scientific associates Dr. Brinton was noted for court- 
esy and urbanity even more than for the vigor and insistence 
whereby his convictions were enforced. Clear and trenchant in 
statement, clever and terse in debate, incisive and even sharp 
in criticism he was instinctively fair and tolerant ; and no forceful 
thinker was ever readier to recognize the right of free opinion. 
These and other qualities united to form a strong personality, 
which served the world well in attracting auditors and pupils 
toward useful lines of thought. 

"It was among intimates that Dr. Brinton was seen at his 
best. Of refined social sense and of peculiar delicacy in word 
and manner, an easy and often brilliant conversationalist, and 
a pleasing raconteur, he was a delightful companion, charming 
host, or ideal guest, as occasion demanded. Naturally his asso- 
ciations warmed into friendships, many and deep; and the pass- 
ing of his life has rent unnumbered ties and wrought widespread 
sorrow. 

"Surviving more than three-score years despite an infirmity 
of war concealed with Spartan care, and living a remarkably 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RB:C0RD OF GRADUATE:S. 35 

busy life, it is but natural that Dr. Brinton should become a 
prominent figure of his times. His death creates a void that 
must long be felt ; yet few American scientists have left worthier 
monuments in the form of finished works." 

Mrs. Brinton is living in Media, Pa. 

Robert T. is unoccupied and lives in Rutledge, Pa. 
He married in Chicago, 111., October 6, 1897, Rose, daughter 
of Robert James Arkell and Rose Smith. 

CHILDREN. 

Daniel Garrison, b. Chicago, 111., July 2, 1898. 

d. " " Apr. 30, 1902. 

Sarah Maria, b. Salt Lake City, Utah, Oct. 13, 1900. 

Robert Arkell, " Ridley Township, Pa., Nov. 4, 1907. 

Bniilia G, married in Philadelphia, February 26, 1895, James 
Beaton Thompson. 

CHILDREN. 

Elizabeth Hough, b. Philadelphia Pa., Jan. 13, 1896. 

Daniel Garrison, " '' *' July 9, 1898. 



* ORLANDO BROWN. 

Mrs. Brown is living in Frankfort, Ky, with her daughters, 

Annie and Mary W., both of whom are unmarried. 

Hord is unmarried and lives in Frankfort. 

Mason P, is unmarried and in the drug business in Frank- 
fort. 

Samuel is in the grain business at 68 Pavonia avenue, Jersey 
City, and lives at 315 W. 113th street. New York City. 

He married in Newark, N. J., February 23, 1903, Elizabeth 
Stewart, daughter of Harry B. and Susan (Hudson) Innes. 

He has no children. 



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56 BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

* SAMUEL CALDWELL. 

Mrs. Caldwell is living at 119 Flora avenue, Peoria, 111., with 
her brother, Leslie Robison, of '58. 

Blsie L. lives at 23^0 Green street, San Francisco, Cal. 
She married in Peoria, III., October 25, 1893, Loren E. Barnes. 
They have no children. 



* MATTHEW CHALMERS. 

He continued the practice of medicine at 24 W. i6th street, 
New York City until 1902, when he retired. 

In November, 1905, he suffered a slight stroke of apoplexy. 
In December, 1908, he had another, which was followed by an 
attack of pneumonia, from which he died January 6, 1909, at the 
age of 72. 

He was buried in West Charlton, X. Y., whence the family 
came. 

He is survived l)y a brother, John C. Chalmers of Ann Arbor, 
Mich., by a half-sister, Julia H. Chalmers of New York City, 
and a half-brother. Dr. Thomas C. Chalmers of 29 West 9th 
street, New York City. 



* ADDISON LEWIS CLARKE. 

Elizabeth S., lives at 7 Regent Circle, Brookline, Mass. 

She married in Newton, Mass., June 19, 1890, Dr. George 
Franklin Harding (Harvard, 1885). 

CHILDREN. 

Dorothy, b. Boston, Mass., Feb. 14, 1895. 

Marjorie, " Brookline, " Apr. 7, 1900. 

Mary A. F., lives at Bretton Hall, 86th street and Broadway, 
New York City. 

She married in Brookline, Mass., November 15, 1900, Joseph 
Wodell, a manufacturer. 

He died in Summerville, Ga., February 12, 1903. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 37 

SANFORD HOADLEY COBB. 

From July, 1900, to May, 1901, he was pastor of the Presby- 
terian Church in Greenwich, Conn., but resigned because his 
health failed. 

In 1902, he published The Rise of Religious Liberty in 
America, a History, pp. 541, Macmillan Co., New York. 

From November, 1903, to May, 1904, he supplied the pulpit 
of the First Presbyterian Church of Wilkes-Barre', Pa., and 
from November, 1904, to September, 1905, the pulpit of the 
Reformed Church of Catskill, N. Y. 

In the spring of 1905, he removed from Richfield Springs to 
Cooperstown, N. Y., and in September his health became so 
much impaired as to prevent his preaching; 

He has spent the last three winters in California. 

Farrar C. was graduated from Harvard in 1890, from the 
Harvard Medical School in 1892, the Mass. General Hospital 
in 1893, and began practice in Boston in August, 1893. 

He married October 12, 1893, Miss Frances McMurray, of 
Chicago, 111., and has 

CHILDREN. 

Leslie Frances, b. Boston, Mass., Apr. 24, 1897. 

Farrar McMurray, " " " Mch. 11, 1902. 

Bernard C. married in Detroit, Mich., November 19, 1901, 
Caroline Ellis of Detroit, and has 

CHILDREN. 

Margaret Elizabeth, b. Saginaw, Mich., Jan. i, 1903. 

Mary Katherine, " " " Nov. 30, 1904. 

Alby Eugenia, " " " Feb. 3, 1906. 

Alice Emmet, " New York, N. Y., June 29, 1907. 

Julia N. married December 29, 1892, Rev. George Reynolds, 
Pastor of the Presbyterian Church, Richfield Springs, N. Y., and 
has two 



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38 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

CHILDREN. 

Sanford Cobb, b. Richfield Springs, N.Y., Oct. 2y, 1893. 

Katharina Rainsford, " " " May 16, 1896. 

Caroline B, married in Richfield Springs, June 20, 1899, 
McNaughton Miller, of Albany, and has a 

SON. 

Ernest John, b. Albany, N. Y., July 21, 1906. 



* ABNER WEYMAN COLGATE. 

He died in Pasadena, Cal., of heart disease, March 20, 1904, 
aged 65. He left a widow but no children. 

He was a member of the Century and Yale Clubs, the Ameri- 
can Museum of Natural History, the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art and the American Geographical Society. 

Retiring early from commercial pursuits, he found in private 
life the leisure favorable to systematic methods of charity and 
other well doing, and for the cultivation and enjoyment of his 
artistic predilections and public spirit, as well as for occasional 
contributions to the press in behalf of the current interests of 
the community in various fields. Greatly interested in astronomy, 
he built at the country house where he and Mrs. Colgate gave 
their friends so hospitable a welcome a well arranged observa- 
tory, supplying it with a telescope powerful enough to give him 
full opportunity for close study of constellations, and for noting 
those periodical movements of the firmamental bodies which 
carry conviction to the mind of the scientific observer that 
"order is heaven's first law." 

In those finer arts which find their manifestation in plastic 
and graphic rendering Colgate was no less at home. As 
a water color ist he excelled, and in earlier years his pictures 
were occasionally on public exhibition. His work in the medium 
of water colors, especially when architecture was their subject, 
elicited the admiration alike of professional artists and of ama- 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 39 

teurs, and he introduced in the hall and stairway of his house in 
town a fine example of Pompeiian decoration. Nor was his 
knowledge of architecture confined .simply to the delineation of 
its surface development, as found in executed work. He made 
a design — never shown, except privately to a few friends — for 
the "flatiron" building, which, in execution would have been 
infinitely more pleasant to the eye than the wedge shaped 
and hurricane breeding structure to the production of which its 
architect was doubtless driven by the necessity of yielding to his 
client every possible square inch of floor space to secure adequate 
return in rent, and so make his investment profitable. At 
the time of the fall of the Campanile di San Marco, in 
Venice, the writer hereof was so struck by a diagram prepared 
by Colgate for his inspection, and covering certain features 
of interior construction designed to prevent any possible recur- 
rence, from causes within the proposed new structure itself, of a 
calamity everywhere deplored, that he introduced the designer 
and his project, as set forth in said diagram and its acompany- 
ing descriptive text, to the architect charged with the restoration 
of the famous, tower. 

Such a life as Colgate led tends strongly, not only to the 
betterment of one's self and one's neighbors, but to that of one's 
entire community, affording, as it does, a quiet but steadfast 
example of what, even in the private walks of life, conduces to 
the advancement of civilization in its best aspects. 



* RALPH HASTINGS CUTTER. 

From 1893 until perhaps 1898, he practiced law in Boston, 
and later was for several years in Nashua, N. H. 

He died of paralysis in Taunton, Mass., February 19, 1904, 
aged 68. 

Mrs. Mildred M. Cutter is living at 306 Charlton street, E. 
Savannah, Ga. 

Cutter has two sisters, Mrs. W. B. Whiting, who lives at 3604 
Broadway, New York City, and Mrs. C. M. Gage, at 34 Phillips 
street, Andover, Mass. 



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40 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

Mr. Dixie Hines, New York Times Building, is a son of Mrs. 
Cutter by her first husband. 

John H. is a cotton broker in Charlotte, N. C. 
He married in Charlotte, N. C, February i, 1906, Miss Grace, 
daughter of George H. King, of Charlotte, N. C. 
They have no children. 

Ellen D. married in Savannah, Ga., December 28, 1898, Homer 
Hopkins of Pittsburgh. 

CHILDREN. 

Ruby Cutter, -b. Savannah, Ga., Apr. 2, 1900. 

Miriam Ellen, " " " Oct. 18, 1902. 

Raymonde P. lives at the Shirley Hotel, Denver, Col. 
She married in New York City, January 20, 1908, Charles 
Frederick Smutzer, of Denver, Col. 



ISAAC DELANO. 

He is still living in the house he bought February 12, 1879, 
in East Saginaw, Mich. 

Neither of his two sons has married. 

Edward W. at sixteen, entered the coal business in November, 
1899, and is now head of the office of Morley, Ewen & Co., 
East Saginaw. 

Evans H. at twenty-one entered the machine shop of Mitts 
and Merrill in January, 1906. 



* LOUIS DEMBINSKI. 

He was born in Poland, and was the son of a wealthy vine 
grower and wine manufacturer and merchant. When eighteen 
years of age he was compelled to flee the country on account of 
a debate at college in which he participated, on the question of 
the Russian dismemberment of Poland. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 4I 

Mrs. Dembinski and her daughter Emma, who is unmarried, 
are at 2717 Paloma street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

They went from Cleveland, Tenn., to Chattanooga in the 
autumn of 1889, to St. Louis, Mo., in July, 1893, and to San 
Francisco, Cal., in June, 1905. They suffered much in the 
earthquake of April 18, 1906, and in the same month removed 
to Los Angeles. 

Malvina (Mrs. Edward B. Parry) lives at 31 14 Bell avenue, 
St. Louis, Mo., where he is an accountant. 

CHILDREN. 

Edna, b. Philadelphia, Pa., July 10, 1886. 

Lilli, " Cleveland, Tenn., Sept. 6, 1888. 



* ROBERT ODGEN DWIGHT. 

In 1866, he removed to South Hadley Falls, Mass., for a year 
or more was paymaster of the Glasgow Mills, and then opened a 
law office, which he later moved to Holyoke. 

In South Hadley Falls he was Selectman, on the School Com- 
mittee, a member of the Library Board of Trustees, of which 
he was also for a while President, and for several terms Town 
Attorney. 

In 1904, he received the degree of A. B. from Yale, and was 
enrolled with his old class of '58. 

He was a descendant, in the sixth generation, from John 
Dwight of Dedham, England, who came in 1634 or 1635 to 
Watertown, Mass., and was a great-great-grandson of Jonathan 
Edwards. 

He married October 6, 1869, Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of 
John Simonton Cobum of Rockland, Me., and Sarah Elizabeth 
Levensaler. 

His wife died, without issue, in Holyoke, July 2, 1908, after 
an illness of twentv-one months. 



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42 BIOGRAPHICAL KKCORU OF GRADLATKS. 

And D wight followed her on the ist of November, at the 
age of 70, yielding to an acute attack of B right's disease. 

He was deeply interested in town affairs and was an authority 
on local history. At the 150th anniversary of the settlement of 
the town he delivered the address. 

As a lawyer he was at least the equal of any in western 
Massachusetts. He was a frequent contributor to the press. 



* MARTIN SMYSER EICHELBERGER. 
1836 — 1893. See Record of 1897. 



EDWARD THOMAS ELLIOTT. 

He lived in England from 1899 to July, 1905, and is now 
in Hawarden, Iowa, with his daughter. 

He wrote in December, 1908: "I am doing nothing and suc- 
cessful in that line. I lectured in England on the topic, 'Toward 
Some Great End.' Lectures seemed to interest audiences. 
Since then have occupied myself with telepathy, the molecular 
motions, the power of mind over matter so as to move the latter 
without manual tolich, etc., etc.'* 

William H. left the nail mill in Lock Haven, Pa., in 1894, 
and engaged in life insurance until July, 1903, when he became 
a rural mail carrier in the U. S. Postal Service in Towanda, Pa. 

CHILDREN. 

George Henry, b. Lock Haven, Pa. July 25, 1888. 

Edward Laning, " " " Oct. 17, 1891. 

Robert Thomas. " " " Aug. i, 1893. 

Elmer T., " Towanda, " Jan. 24, 1906. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 43 

Antaie M. (Mrs. Charles T. Fox) lives in Philadelphia. 
He is manager of the Philadelphia branch of the Pillsbury- 
Washburn Flour Mills Co. 

CHILDREN. 

Laning, b. Minneapolis, Minn., Aug. 13, 1889. 

d. Towanda, Pa. Apr. 17, 1890. 

Robert Taylor, b. Minneapolis, Minn., Mch. 3, 1891. 

Mary L. married first in Towanda, Pa., September 12, 1882, 
George Washington Van Brunt, and divorced him in Cleveland, 
O., September 19, 1898. 

She married second in Minneapolis, Minn., December 27, 1904, 
Elmer Ellsworth Maynard and lives in Hawarden, Iowa. He 
travels for the Cudahy Packing Co. 

CHILD. 

Theodore Edgar, b. Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan! 8, 1884. 
d. Minneapolis, Minn., May 21, 1901. 



* LEMUEL RILEY EVANS. 
1838— 1870. See Record of 1897. 



* GEORGE MAYER FRANKLIN. 

After an illness of three weeks from pneumonia, he died sud- 
denly from disease of the heart at his home in Lancaster, Pa., 
May 15, 1899, ^^ ^h^ ^S^ o^ 60. 

There passed one of nature's noblemen. 

In peace and war, in church and state, in business and idle- 
ness, conservative, yet progressive, efficient, faithful, modest, 
gentle. It is no wonder that his death was hardly believed in 
Lancaster. 



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44 BKK^RAPHICAL RECORD OK GRADUATES. 

George S. (Lehigh University, 1888,) is a member of the 
Steinman Hardware Co. in Lancaster. 

William B, (Yale, 1892,) is with the M. S. Pipe, Iron and 
Foundry Co., Land Title Building, Philadelphia. 
^ He married in Lancaster, Pa., June 9, 1896, Ellen Julia Ford- 
ney, daughter of Thomas Potter Fordney and Ida Mary Cox. 

CHILDREN. 

Sarah Steinman, b. Lancaster, Pa., Sept. 26, 1897. 

Sidney Josephine, " '* " July 30, 1899. 

William Buell, " Florence, Ala., Sept. 15, 1902. 

Frederick S. (Yale, 1895,) is freight solicitor of the P. R. R., 
and lives in Hamburg, N. Y. 

He married in Lancaster, Pa., November 17, 1904, Carolyn 
Musselman Herr, daughter of Reuben Daniel Herr and Harriet 
Frances Musselman. 

CHILDREN. 

Frederick Steinman, b. Germantown, Pa., Aug. 25, 1905. 
Barbara Ann, " Hamburg, N. Y., Apr. 20, 1908. 

Thomas E. (Yale, 1900,) died suddenly in Lancaster, October 
20, 1900. 



DE LANCY FREEBORN. 

He retired from business in 1898, and still lives in Knox- 
ville, Pa. 

Gertrude E. (Mrs. George H. Davis) lives yet in Proctor, 
Vt., and has had no children. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 45 

Angelo C. is Supt. of the Building Dept. of the Vermont 
Marble Co.^ in Proctor, Vt. 

He married in Falls Village, Conn., May 15, 1907, Mary 
Emeline, daughter of Erastus Deming Goodwin and Julia 
Emmons. 

CHIU>. 

Emeline, b. Proctor, Vt, Mch. 11, 1908. 

Fair De L. (Cornell, 1895,) is unmarried and in business. 

Faun W, (Cornell, 1897,) was from 1898 to 1900 Supt. 
Glenns Falls Portland Cement Co., Glenns Falls, N. Y.; from 
1901 to 1904 Supt. Cayuga P. Cement Co., Ithaca, N. Y. ; from 
1904 to 1905 Manager of the lola P. Cement Co., Dallas, Tex., 
and in 1908 became President of the Freeborn Engineering and 
Construction Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

He married in Brooklyn, N. Y., October 8, 1902, Louise 
Edgell, (Wellsley, 1899,) daughter of Rev. Stephen Livingston 
Baldwin and Esther Eliza Jerman. 

CHILDREN. 

Faun William, Jr., b. Ithaca, N. Y., Sept. 16, 1903. 

Elizabeth, " Smyrna,, Del., June 17, 1904. 

d. " " July 30, 1904. 

David Davis, b. Bloomfield, N. J., June 5, 1906. 

Jane, " Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 14, 1908. 



WILLIAM RUSSELL FRISBIE. 

He was bom September 25, 1836. 

He is still connected with the Bureau of Pensions in the" 
Department of the Interior in Washington, D. C. 



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46 BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

ROBERT MACY GALLAWAY. 

He is still President of the Merchants National Bank at 42 
Wall street, and lives at 68 E. 55th street, New York City. 

He is a member of the Union, Metropolitan, University, Union 
League, and New York Yacht Clubs. 

He is a Director of the Bowery Savings Bank (Trustee), 
Chicago, Indianapolis & Louisville Railway Co., Iron Mountain 
Railroad Co., Manhattan Life Insurance Co., Manhattan Rail- 
way Co., New York Mutual Gas Light Co. (President and 
Director), New York Mutual Telegraph Co., The Night & Day 
Bank, Rio Grande Western Railway Co., St. Louis, Iron Moun- 
tain & Southern Railway Co., St. Louis Southwestern Railway 
Co., Southern Railway Co., Texas & Pacific Railway Co., 
Wabash Railroad Co., and Western Union Telegraph Co. 

Merrill W. (Yale, 1892) lives at 68 E. 55th street. New York 
City, and is unmarried. 

He has practiced since 1894 in the law offices of the Manhattan 
Railway Co., and Interborough Rapid Transit Co. 

He is a member of the Union, Union League, Yale, and 
Salmagundi Clubs. 

John M. lives at 68 E. 55th street, and is in business. 

He married in New York City, September' 30, 1905, Miss 
Annie Beatrice, daughter of John Bascom Wright and Annie 
Louise Hanchett of San Francisco, Cal. 

CHILD. 

Robert Wright, b. New York, N. Y., Dec. 29, 1906. 

Mary died in New York City April 9, 1905. 



JEPTHA GARRARD. 

Mrs. Garrard died May 19, 1887. 
There is nothing to add to his record. 

He still lives in Cincinnati, where his office is at 405 Johnston 
Building. 



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* JOSIAH WILLARD U;(^L>S. 

• . » ' •• n \n Wvv iiavcJi, v r.-xvcwi. February 11, 

• ' •• !• i 111 tlic same cil\. ri:\ -S. it/j.V iio was 

'■■ 'i ;; nr'th generation, Uo^m '>: J-.'/rt (..M)S. tl]« fourth 

'• ;f> <>1M)> i)f llunini^tci^ \\ .uwickshin*. x'/r.c. i-muk* 

mT U>^8. ( )n(« of RolK'Tt i",:*-;' n's i^ran«i<«.>ns, iitury 

;'..; 'iiarrKNl KailRTine. 'ia.ii:-;- •- •>{ tlx- \\'j\\. j's-aii 

.Marviir.!. h'kjS- Socretaiy ^ ;' u • ; •• rco ot Massa- 

..-. an 1 'l t''c U -ix*Tu'c'iut> cf tiii- •• .• j.i various parts 

. • v*"i.Ji::> «!«• '»'vv.-r ti.cin <ix havr r. .1*.. tia name Josiah 

• .ij'd v*iM>'- 

Tb."' subject .-a' t!ii> memorial was the % ":rtb child and c^'\ 

^ :. oi josiah \\'-r.a-(l (.xil»'><, [Y. C, l^w, . JVnfess^.jr ui .> . »" ' 

^'lUirc in tbc \ /'<' i>ninily Scho.>l . ; - m 1S24 to iSfw. ,^'.. 

' - v»in. M.ir. \fi .... '^uit^btor i.-f i;r. John Van ('.«'.(■ 

*:c'.tnn, «7m;' m* u t'. :: ctual caLni: \\as his by ricl/ '^l 

• 5 iTiMTK-r 'r .♦; M.'^ '■. ' ' Mi'li'rithtr al^! -i-.u-jrrandtather of 

*■- cMrr rr..i\....r • .?!•• V ^\ • : ,r;jtiiiMv> ..' }<:ir>-ir'-, ,i^ -N^Te 

<•'-•«* »^ccretar\ '\\ li! od ;inJ >. .- : i-ticr. iVt^i'lenl Samiul \'vJiard. 

\mon!r )jj^ !ji-.'' • r's nnc<"-t^ ' • •' I'-vr^ t.-,-.- Yale gradiK^'-^. one 

of vviiom. \i'-\ i'>:»a'han l/..--- « • j7<i^)) becan." *fk tirst 

Pre<?i(lont * ''' •!:. ('olu^^-e (••" * ■ ■ 

He wns \ :';..>)'. *'^ for t' ■: .- u " •. :" 'dns Grammar School, 
New M:!W... ^v ' (T.^rt'l '•:. ^ ..t • : .1 4, 1854. 

H.— ^^ i; K-iS^O. rtr.-. '<. rr*-'- .. r for i.atin '.'(-'-•. ^ii- 
t.on — {Sfr". ''ri'v',. (1 S<:h«)iarvi ,» /-^ ir-< I.iiin Exani-:;:-: -m 
2<\ term rur »r. — Berkeley F're.r hmv. i(>r 1 nrj* Composit-- ;« - 
:>^;,8. 1st i >.l'ore^t Matlinr. '\:c:i: l'r:/< -i iarl. Seholar>ij'.;. — 
i a' Ml ( )T'i::. >:. 



>Ki'l.',.| io l:'•I..^• A. :it!f V-. .. . ]•'• i'. ' • - r of 
i.)iicct<>r ot *U ' Si.'inr }*h_*-ji\'l Lai>(>r;i'.nr\ "'■'«' rnivtv ;•> 
pupil of Pru*'--'-">5 (ji.rj. .iiwl joint-editor «.f •!.> "-.iru: 
abriflg(-fl fr'>in tvo pap*-^^. one a >oinc\v}..i! ' x;.- ,..vl ' 
which appeari'ij in the .trtitricin Jouniai if >.: t. c 
•^printed in "Scientific Paper" vol I), the uthe'- 
•t"'r4'/.v of Fcbruarv 6. 1907] 



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BIOGRAPHICAl, RKCORD OF GRADUATES. 47 

* JOSIAH WILLARD GIBBS. 

* He was born in New* Haven, Connecticut, February ii, 
1839, 2Uid died in the same city, April 28, 1903. He was 
descended, in the fifth generation, from Robert Gibbs, the fourth 
son of Sir Henry Gibbs of Honington, Warwickshire, who came 
to Boston about 1658. One of Robert Gibbs's grandsons, Henry 
Gibbs, in 1747 married Katherine, daughter of the Hon. Josiah 
Willard, (Harvard, 1698) Secretary of the Province of Massa- 
chusetts, and of the descendants of this couple, in various parts 
of the country, no fewer than six have borne the name Josiah 
Willard Gibbs. 

The subject of this memorial was the fourth child and only 
son of Josiah Willard Gibbs, (Y. C, 1809), Professor of Sacred 
Literature in the Yale Divinity School from 1824 to 1861, and 
of his wife, Mary Anna, daughter of Dr. John Van Cleve 
(Princeton, 1797). An intellectual calling was his by right of 
inheritance. The father, grandfather and great-grandfather of 
the elder Professor Gibbs, were graduates of Harvard, as were 
also Secretary Willard and his father, President Samuel Willard. 
Among his mother's ancestors also were two Yale graduates, one 
of whom, Rev. Jonathan Dickinson, (Yale, 1706) became the first 
President of the College of New Jersey. 

He was prepared for college at the Hopkins Grammar School, 
New Haven, and entered the Class July 24, 1854. 

B. — ^ B* K- — 1856, Berkeley Premium for Latin Composi- 
tion — 1857, Bristed Scholarship. — 3d Prize Latin Examination, 
2d term Junior. — Berkeley Premium for Latin Composition. — 
1858, 1st DeForest Mathematical Prize. — Clark Scholarship. — 
Latin Oration. 



[ * For the appreciative notice of our classmate, Gibbs, we are 
indebted to Henry A. Bumstead, Ph. D., Professor of Physics and 
Director of the Sloane Physical Laboratory. Yale University, a former 
pupil of Professor Gibbs and joint-editor of his "Scientific Paper". It is 
abridged from two papers, one a somewhat extended review of his work, 
which appeared in the American Journal of Science for September, 1903, 
(reprinted in "Scientific Paper" vol. I), the other in the Yale Alumni 
Weekly of February 6, 1907.] 



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48 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

From 1858 he continued his studies in New Haven, and in 
1863 received the degree of doctor of philosophy and was 
appointed a tutor in the college for a term of three years. Dur- 
ing the first two years of his tutorship he taught Latin and in 
the third year Natural Philosophy, in both of which subjects 
he had gained marked distinction as an undergraduate. At the 
end of his term as tutor he went abroad with his sisters, spend- 
ing the winter of 1866-67 i" Paris, in attendance upon courses, 
mostly in pure mathematics, at the Sorbonne and College de 
France, and the following year in Berlin, where he heard the 
lectures of Magnus and other teachers of physics and of mathe- 
matics. In 1868 he went to Heidelberg, where Kirchoff was 
then stationed, returning to New Haven in June, 1869. Two 
years later he was appointed Professor of Mathematical Physics 
in Yale College, a position which he held until the time of his 
death. 

It was not until 1873, when he was thirty-four years old, 
that he gave to the world, by publication, evidence of his extra- 
ordinary powers as an investigator in mathematical physics. In 
that year two papers appeared in the Transactions of the Con- 
necticut Academy, the first being entitled "Graphical Methods 
in the Thermodynamics of Fluids,'' and the second "A Method 
of Geometrical Representation of the Thermodynamic Properties 
of Substances by Means of Surfaces." These were followed 
in 1876 and 1878 by the two parts of the great paper "On the 
Equilibrium of Heterogeneous Substances," which is generally, 
and probably rightly, considered his most important contribu- 
tion to physical science, and which is unquestionably among the 
greatest and most enduring monuments of the wonderful scien- 
tific activity of the nineteenth century. 

Thermodynamics is the science which treats of heat as a form 
of energy, and of the various conditions which govern the trans- 
formation of heat into other forms of energy, such as, for 
example, ordinary mechanical work. To an unusual extent, 
among the sciences which appeal to experiment, it can be, and 
has been, cast in a deductive form. Sir Isaac Newton said that 
"it is the glory of geometry that from a few principles . . . 
it is able to produce so many things." Thermodynamics shares 



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BIOGRAPHICAi, RECORD OF GRADUATES. 49 

in this kind of glory ; it has only two fundamental principles, 
of which the first is the statement of the conservation of energy 
as applied to heat, and the second states the fact (so deeply 
founded in general experience that it seems almost axiomatic) 
that heat will not of itself flow from a body at a lower tempera- 
ture to one at a higher temperature. From these two simple 
principles, by an almost Euclidean method, a surprising number 
of facts and relations between work and heat, and various prop- 
erties of bodies were deduced about the middle of the last century 
by Kelvin, Clausius, Helmholtz, Rankine and others. These 
results have been constantly tested by comparison with the results 
of experiment and have never been found wanting; no excep- 
tions have been discovered and no changes in the fundamental 
hypotheses have been rendered necessary or even probable either 
by experiments upon the earth or by observations upon the most 
distant stars and nebulae. As to the importance of the results 
thus mathematically deduced (taking first the practical side), 
one may point to the fact that every mechanical engineer must 
be familiar with them, and use them constantly if he has to do 
with heat engines; that the present efficiency and economy of 
steam engines are mainly due to this body of mathematical 
knowledge; and that the improvements in details which are con- 
stantly taking place are more often suggested by theoretical 
considerations than by empirical knowledge. On the broader 
ground of its contribution to human knowledge, one may cite as 
an example that thermodynamics gives an irrefragable demon- 
stration that, unless at some time or some place the laws of 
nature are quite dilTerent from those we know, the universe is 
not a perpetual motion machine going forward in endless cycles 
of development; but that the present "order of nature" must 
have begun at a definite time in the past and must end at a 
definite time in the future, when all the active interchange of 
energy which makes up the life of the physical world will have 
ceased. Thermodynamics may well claim a share in the glory 
of having produced many and great things from a few simple 
principles. 

About 1870 the relations between heat and one other form 
of energy — mechanical work, which manifests itself in the move- 



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50 BIOGRAPHICAL, KKCORD OF GRADUATES. 

ment of visible bodies — had been pretty well worked out. 
Important applications were being made and are still being made 
but the theory was fairly complete and the science was, in some 
ways, stagnant. But there were other forms of energy whose 
relations to heat had hardly been touched. The energy of 
chemical action in particular has obviously a very intimate con- 
nection with thermal processes; the evolution or absorption of 
heat accompanies nearly all chemical reactions, and our principal 
artificial source of heat, combustion, is merely a transformation 
of chemical energy. Some attempts had been made to bring 
chemical action within the scope of the thermodynamical laws 
but they had been successful only in a few isolated special cases; 
a way could not be found to open up the whole subject and 
obtain the broad general relations, as had been done in the case 
of mechanical energy. The way seems easy enough now ; but 
it is also easy to recognize that it is just one of those things 
which needs a stroke of genius to uncover it. 

It was Willard Gibbs who supplied this stroke of f^enius. He 
did more, however, than to open the way : in a single publication 
he carried the study of the relations between heat and the energy 
of chemical combination to a degree of completeness equalling 
that of the older theory which dealt with mechanical work. The 
older theory had to do with a less complicated subject; it was 
the work of a number of men whose mathematical deductions 
were constantly being checked by experiment, and who had the 
stimulus of mutual suggestions from each other's work. Pro- 
fessor Gibbs worked alone in a field in which he had no rivals 
and no helpers: he published practically all that he had to say 
upon the subject in a single paper of great length; and there 
were scarcely any experiments to which he could look for con- 
firmation or suggestion as to his theoretical conclusions. Yet 
his very numerous results were correct, were of the highest 
importance, and were extremely general in their application. 
Many things which had been mysteries, and concerning which 
our ignorance had been confessed by such vague terms as "affin- 
ity" or "catalytic action" were in this paper shown to be simple 
and direct consequences of the two laws of thermodynamics. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 5 1 

Relations between facts, and laws of chemical action were 
stated a priori which have since been verified by laboriou-s and 
exact experiments ; and in fact there is little exaggeration, if any, 
in the statement that this paper contains, so far as general 
principles are concerned, practically the whole of the science 
which is now called physical chemistry and which had scarcely 
been begun when it was written. Considered merely as an 
intellectual tour de force, there are very few chapters in the 
history of science which can be compared with this; as an 
example of scientific prediction it is probably without a rival in 
the number and complexity of the relations discovered, by a 
priori reasoning, in a science essentially experimental. 

This great paper, "On the Equilibrium of Heterogeneous Sub- 
stances'' did not at once attract attention ; for some ten years it 
was almost wholly neglected and in the meanwhile physical 
chemistry had been born. A good many important facts and 
laws had been discovered and much interest was being shown in 
this new and interesting subject, when certain investigators in 
Holland and Germany awoke to the importance of Gibbs's work. 
In 1 89 1 it was translated into German by Professor Ostwald, 
who says in his preface : "The contents of this paper are to-day 
of immediate importance and its interest is by no means purely 
historical. Up to the present time, of the wealth of results 
which it contains or suggests, only a small part has been made 
fruitful. Untouched treasures in the greatest abundance and of 
the greatest importance for the theoretical or experimental inves- 
tigator reveal themselves in its chapters." Eight years later M. 
Le Chatelier, in translating the work into French, writes in a 
similar vein. Even now, more than thirty years after its publi- 
cation, the direct results of this work have not been exhausted; 
and the indirect consequences of the stimulus which it gave to a 
new and important branch of science will be felt for many years 
to come. 

After the death of Professor Gibbs, the following notice 
appeared in the Zeitschrift fur physikalische C hemic, edited by 
Wilhelm Ostwald and J. H. Van't Hoff, at the end of vol. 43, 
for the year 1903 : 



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52 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 



^zr nlii$:emiiixjeu ^kzmie tat :er £»ir «tt JakrJbtttJfcetrt 



. This Zeitschrift is the most important journal of general chem- 
istry in the world, and the above, from the pen of its celebrated 
editors, is the most competent testimony that could be adduced 
to the value and permanence of his work in this subject. 

The extraordinary character of Gibbs's work in thermo- 
dynamics has, to a certain extent, caused it to overshadow his 
contributions to other branches of physics. These were, how- 
ever, marked by the same great qualities, although less in volume 
and in the influence which they exerted. The subject of Vector 
Analysis, and Multiple Algebra in general, possessed a great 
attraction for him, and he contributed much to the progress of 
this branch of mathematics, which is of especial use to the 
physicist. A vector is a quantity which possesses direction in 
space as well as magnitude, such as a velocity or a force; it is 
thus more complicated than the quantities (called scalars) with 
which ordinary algebra is concerned, and in order to deal con- 
veniently with the mathematical relations of vectors, a special 
form of algebra must be devised, with its own special rules and 
operations. The first and, for a long time, the most important 
of these vector algebras was that invented by Sir William Rowan 
Hamilton, and called by. him "Quaternions." It is a very beau- 
tiful and interesting mathematical structure, but unfortunately it 
has not proved to be entirely suited to the practical needs of 
physicists and geometers in their dealings with vectors. Pro- 
fessor Gibbs's system of Vector Analysis was devised to meet 



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BIOGRAPHICAIy RECORD OF GRADUATES. 53 

these objections, and did meet them with great success. While 
the quaternionic analysis has been, from the beginning, practi- 
cally unused by physicists, vector analysis on the lines laid down 
by Gibbs is now used to great advantage by many of the most 
distinguished investigators in mathematical physics. 

Another field in which Gibbs did important work was in 
the development and defense of Maxwell's electrical theory of 
light. When he wrote, the epoch-making work of Hertz had 
not yet been done, and there was thus no direct experimental 
verification of Maxwell's fundamental hypothesis or of his more 
important deductions. The electromagnetic theory of light was 
only one of several theories, any one of which served very well 
for the explanation of the greater and more obvious properties 
of light. When it came to finer details some of them were in 
hopeless difficulties, while others (including Maxwell's) were 
not wholly free from apparent discrepancies with the facts. 
Gibbs's papers showed that the discrepancies of the electrical 
theory were only apparent and were due to the particular form 
in which it^ had been presented ; and it is made clear that "a 
point of view more in accordance with what we know of the 
molecular constitution of bodies will give that part of the ordi- 
nary (electrical) theory which is verified by experiment, without 
including that part which is in opposition to observed facts." 
On the other hand, it was shown that the only serious rival to 
this theory (based on a very ingenious hypothesis due to Lord 
Kelvin) did encounter contradictions which were only to be 
met by artificial and forced interpretations and subsidiary 
hypotheses. 

Of all the arguments (from theoretical grounds alone) for 
excluding all other theories of light except the electrical, these 
papers furnish the simplest, most philosophical, and most con- 
clusive with which the present writer is acquainted ; and it seems 
likely that the considerations advanced in them would have suf- 
ficed to firmly establish this theory even if the experimental dis- 
coveries of Hertz had not supplied a more direct proof of its 
validity. 

In his last work, "Elementary Principles in Statistical 
Mechanics," Professor Gibbs returned to a theme closely con- 
nected with the subjects of his earliest publications. In these 



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54 lUOGKAPHICAL KKCORD OF GRADUATES. 

he had been concerned with the development of the consequences 
of the laws of thermodynamics which are accepted as given by 
experience; in this empirical form of the science, heat and 
mechanical energy are regarded as two distinct entities, mutually 
convertible of course with certain limitations, but essentially dif- 
ferent in many important ways. In accordance with the strong 
tendency toward unification of causes, there have been many 
attempts to bring these two things under the same category; to 
show, in fact, that heat is nothing more than the purely mechani- 
cal energy of the minute particles of which all sensible matter 
is supposed to be made up, and that the extra-dynamical laws 
of heat are consequences of the immense number of independent 
mechanical systems in any body,— a number so great that, to 
human observation, only certain averages and most probable 
effects are perceptible. Yet in spite of dogmatic assertions, in 
many elementary books and popular expositions, that "heat is a 
mode of molecular motion,'* these attempts have not been entirely 
successful, and the failure has been signalized by Lord Kelvin 
as one of the clouds upon the history of science in the nineteenth 
century. Such investigations must deal with the mechanics of 
systems of an immense number of degrees of freedom and (since 
we. are quite unable in our experiments to identify or follow indi- 
vidual particles), in order to compare the results of the dynami- 
cal reasoning with observation, the processes must be statistical 
in character. The difficulties of such processes have been pointed 
out more than once by Maxwell, who, in a passage which Pro- 
fessor Gibbs often quoted, says that serious errors have been 
made in such inquiries by men whose competency in other 
branches of mathematics was unquestioned. 

On account, then, of the difficulties of the subject and of the 
profound importance of results which can be reached by no 
other known method, it is of the utmost consequence that the 
principles and processes of statistical mechanics should be put 
upon a firm and certain foundation. That this has now been 
accomplished there can be no doubt, and there will be little 
excuse in the future for a repetition of the errors of which Max- 
well speaks ; moreover, theorems have been discovered and proc- 
esses devised which will render easier the task of every future 
student of this subject, as the work of Lagrange did in the case 
of ordinary mechanics. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF GRADUATES. 55 

The greater part of the book is taken up with this general 
development of the subject without special reference to the prob- 
lems of rational thermodynamics. At the end of the twelfth 
chapter the author has in his hands a far more perfe.ct weapon 
for attacking such problems than any previous investigator has 
possessed, and its triumphant use in the last three chapters shows 
that such purely mechanical systems as he has been considering 
will exhibit, to human perception, properties in all respects 
analogous to those which we actually meet with in thermody- 
namics. No one can understandingly read the thirteenth chapter 
without the keenest delight, as one after another of the familiar 
formulae of thermodynamics appear almost spontaneously, as it 
seems, from the consideration of purely mechanical systems. 
But it is characteristic of the author that he should be more 
impressed with the limitations and imperfections of his work 
than with its successes; and he is careful to say (p. i66) : "But 
it should be distinctly stated that, if the results obtained wheii 
the numbers of degrees of freedom are enormous coincide 
sensibly with the general laws of thermodynamics, however inter- 
esting and significant this coincidence may be, we are still far 
from having explained the phenomena of nature with respect to 
these laws. For, as compared with the case of nature, the sys- 
tems which we have considered are of an ideal simplicity. 
Although our only assumption is that we are considering con- 
servation systems of a finite number of degrees of freedom, it 
would seem that this is assuming far too much, so far as the 
bodies of nature are concerned. The phenomena of radiant heat, 
which certainly should not be neglected in any complete system 
of thermodynamics, and the electrical phenomena associated with 
the combination of atoms, seem to show that the hypothesis of a 
finite number of degrees of freedom is inadequate for the explan- 
ation of the properties of bodies." While this is undoubtedly 
true, it should also be remembered that, in no department of 
physics, have the phenomena of nature been explained with the 
completeness that is here indicated as desirable. In the theories 
of electricity, of light, even in mechanics itself, only certain 
phenomena are considered which really never occur alone. In 
the present state of knowledge, such partial explanations are the 
best that can be got, and, in addition, the problem of rational 



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56 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

thermodynamics has, historically, always been regarded in this 
way. In a matter of such diflficulty no positive statement should 
be made, but it is the belief of the present writer that the 
problem, as it has always been understood, has been successfully 
solved in this work; and if this belief is correct, one of the 
great deficiencies in the scientific record of the nineteenth cen- 
tury has been supplied in the first year of the twentieth. 

In method and results, this part of the work is more general 
than any preceding treatment of the subject; it is in no sense 
a treatise on the kinetic theory of gases, and the results obtained 
are not the properties of any one form of matter, but the general 
equations of thermodynamics which bielong to all forms alike. 
This corresponds to the generality of the hypotheses in which 
nothing is assumed as to the mechanical nature of the systems 
considered, except that they are mechanical and obey Lagrange's 
or Hamilton's equations. In this respect it may be considered 
to have done for thermodynamics what Maxwell's treatise did 
for electromagnetism, and we may say (as Poincare has said 
of Maxwell) that Gibbs has not sought to give a mechanical 
explanation of heat, but has limited his task to demonstrating 
that such an explanation is possible. And this achievement 
forms a fitting culmination of his life's work. 

The following are some of the societies of which he was a 
member, and the degrees which he received : 

1861 M. A. Yale College. 

1863 Ph. D. Yale College. 

1879 Member of the National Academy of Sciences, Washington. 

1880 Associate Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, Boston. 

1881 Rumford Medallist of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, Boston. 

1886 Foreign Member of the Dutch Society of Sciences, Haarlem. 

1889 Corresponding Member of the Royal Society of Sciences, 
Gottingen. 

1891 Honorary Member of the Royal Institution of Great Britain, 
London. 

1891 Honorary Member of the Cambridge Philosophical Society. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OJ? GRADUATES. 57 

1892 Honorary Member of the London Mathematical Society. 
1892 Honorary Member of the Manchester Literary and Philoso- 
phical Society. 

1892 Foreign Member of the Royal Academy of Sciences, 
Amsterdam. 

1893 Honorary Ph. D. University of Erlangen. 
1893 LL. D. Williams College. 

1896 LL. D. Princeton University. 

1896 Member of the American Philosophical Society. 

1897 Foreign Member of the Royal Society of London. 
1900 Correspondent of the French Institute. 

1900 Corresponding Member of the Royal Prussian Academy of 
Sciences, Berlin. 

1901 Copley Medal of the Royal Society, London. 

1901 Honorary Member of the Physical Society, London. 

1902 Corresponding Member of the Royal Bavarian Academy of 
Sciences, Munich. 

1902 Math. D. University of Christiania. 



The reviewer of his "Scientific Papers" in The Nation of 
January 7, 1907, says, "That Josiah Willard Gibbs advanced 
science the world over more than it has ever been given to any 
other American researcher to do, can hardly be questioned;" a 
judgment with which foreign opinion has been in entire accord. 

Outside of his scientific activities. Professor Gibbs's life was 
uneventful ; he made but one visit to Europe and with the excep- 
tion of those three years, and of summer vacation in the moun- 
tains, his whole life was spent in* New Haven, and all but his 
earlier years in the same house, which his father had built only 
a few rods from the school where he prepared for college and 
from the university in the service of which his life was spent. 
His constitution was never robust — ^the consequence apparently 
of an attack of scarlet fever in early childhood,— but with care- 
ful attention to health and a regular mode of life, his work suf- 
fered from this cause no long or serious interruptions until the 
end, which came suddenly after an illness of only a few days. 
He never married, but made his home with his sister and her 
family. Of a retiring disposition, he went little into general 
society and was known to few outside the university; but by 
those who were honored by his friendship, and by his students, 



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58 blOGRAPlllCAL RICCORD OF GRADUATES. 

he was greatly beloved. His modesty with regard to his work 
was proverbial among all who knew him, and it was entirely 
real and unaffected. There was never any doubt in his mind, 
however, as to the accuracy of anything which he published, nor 
indeed did he underestimate its importance; but he seemed to 
regard it in an entirely impersonal way and never doubted, 
apparently, that what he had accomplished could have been done 
equally well by almost any one who might have happened to 
give his attention to the. same problems. Those nearest him for 
many years are constrained to believe that he never realized that 
he was endowed with most unusual powers of mind; there was 
never any tendency to make the importance of his work an 
excuse for neglecting even the most trivial of his duties as an 
officer of the college, and he was never too busy to devote, at 
once, as much time and .energy as might be necessary to any of 
his students who privately sought his assistance. 

Although long intervals sometimes elapsed between his publi- 
cations, his habits of work were steady and systematic; but he 
worked alone and, apparently, without need of the stimulus of 
personal conversation upon the subject, or of crticism from 
others, which is often helpful even when the critic is intellectu- 
ally an inferior. So far from publishing partial results, he 
seldom, if ever, spoke of what he was doing until it was prac- 
tically in its final and complete form. This was his chief limita- 
tion as a teacher of advanced students ; he did not take them into 
his confidence with regard to his current work, and even when 
he lectured upon a subject in advance of its publication (as was 
the. case for a number of years before the appearance of the 
Statistical Mechanics) the work was really complete except for 
a few finishing touches. Thus his students were deprived of 
the advantage of seeing his great structures in process of build- 
ing, of helping him in the details, and of being in such ways 
encouraged to make for themselves attempts similar in character, 
however small their scale. Rut on the other hand, they owe to 
him a debt of gratitude for an introduction into the profounder 
regions of natural philosophy such as they could have obtained 
from few other living teachers. Always carefully prepared, his 
lectures were marked by the same great qualities as his published 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RKami) (JF ORADLATKS. 59 

papers and were, in addition, enriched by many apt and simple 
illustrations which can never be forgotten by those who heard 
them. No necessary qualification of a statement was ever omit- 
ted and, on the other hand, it seldom failed to receive the most 
general application of which it was capable; his students had 
ample .opportunity to learn what may be regarded as known, 
what is guessed at, what a proof is, and how far it goes. 
Although he disregarded many of the shibboleths of the mathe- 
matical rigorists, his logical processes were really of the most 
severe type ; in power of deduction, of generalization, in insight 
into hidden relations, in critical acumen, utter lack of prejudice, 
and in the philosophical breadth of his view of the object and 
aim of physics, he has probably had no superiors in the history 
of the science; and no student could come in contact with this 
serene and impartial mind without feeling profoundly its influ- 
ence in all his future studies of nature. 

In his personal character the same great qualities were appar- 
ent. Unassuming in manner, genial and kindly in his inter- 
course with his fellow-men, never showing impatience or irrita- 
tion, devoid of personal ambition of the baser sort or of the 
slightest desire to exalt himself, he went far toward realizing the 
ideal of the unselfish. Christian gentleman. In the minds of 
those who knew him, the greatness of his intellectual achieve- 
ments will never overshadow the beauty and dignity of his life. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

1873. Graphical Methods in the Thermodynamics of Fluids. Trans, 
Conn. Acad., vol. 2, pp. 309-342. 

A Method of Geometrical Representation of the Thermod)mamic 
Properties of Substances by Means of Surfaces. Ibid., pp. 382-404. 

1875-1878. On the Equilibrium of Heterogeneous Substances. Ibid., 
vol. 3. pp. 108-248; pp. 343-524. Abstract: Amer. Jour. Set., (3), vol. 16, 
pp. 442-458. 

[A German translation of the three preceding papers by Prof. W. 
Ostwald has been published under the title "Thermo-dynamische Studien," 
Leipsic, 1892.] 



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6o BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

1879. On the Fundamental Pormulae of Dynamics. Amer. Jour, 
Math., vol. 2, pp. 49-64. 

On the Vapor-densities of Peroxide of Nitrogen, Formic Acid, Acetic 
Acid, and Perchloride of Phosphorus. Amer. Jour. Sci., (3) vol. 18, pp. 
277-293; pp. 371-387. 

1881 and 1884. Elements of Vector Analysis arranged for the use of 
students in Physics. New Haven 8^. pp. 1-36 in 1881, and pp. 37-83 
in 1884. 

1882-1883. Notes on the Electromagnetic theory of Light. I. On 
Double Refraction and the Dispersion of Colors in Perfectly Transparent 
Media. Amer. Jour. Set., (3), vol. l23. pp. 262-275. II. On Double 
Refraction in Perfectly Transparent Media which exhibit the phenomena 
of circular polarization. Ibid., pp. 460-476. III. On the General Equa- 
tions of Monochromatic Light in Media of every degree of transparency. 
Ibid., vol. 25, pp. 107-118. 

1886. On Multiple Algebra. (Vice-President's address before thf 
section of Mathematics and Astronomy of the American Association foi 
the Advancement of Science.) Proc. Amer. Ass. Adv. Sci., vol. 33, pp. 
37-66. 

1887 and 1889. Electrochemical Thermodynamics. (Letters to the 
Secretary of the Electrolysis Committee of the British Association.) 
Rept, Brit. Ass. Adv. Sci., for 1886, pp. 388-389, and for 1888, pp. 343-346. 

1888. A Comparison of the Elastic and the Electrical Theories of 
Light with respect to the law of double refraction and the dispersion of 
colors. Amer. Jour. Sci., (3), vol. 35, pp. 467-475. 

1889. A Comparison of the Electrical Theory of Light with Sir 
William Thomson's Theory of a Quasi-labile Ether. Ibid., vol. 37, pp. 
129-144. Reprint, Phii. Mag., (5), vol. 27, pp. 238-253. 

On the Determination of Elliptic Orbits from Three Complete Obser- 
vations. Mem. Nat. Acad. Sci., vol. 4, pp. 79-104. 

Rudolf Julius Emanuel Clausius. Proc, Amer. Acad., new series, 
vol. 16, pp. 458-465. 

1891. On the Role of Quaternions in the Algebra of Vectors. 
Nature, vol. 43, pp. 511-513. 

Quaternions and the Ausdehnungslehre. Ibid., vol. 44, pp. 79-82. 

1893. Quaternions and Vector Analysis. Nature, vol. 48, pp. 364-367. 

1896. . Velocity of propagation of Electrostatic force. Nature, vol. 
53, pp. 509. 

1897. Semi-permeable Films and Osmotic Pressure. Nature, vol. 
55, pp. 461-462. 

Hubert Anson Newton. Amer. Jour. Sci., (4), vol. 3, pp. 359-376. 
1898-1899. Fourier's Series. Nature, vol. 59, pp. 200, 606. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RKCORD OF GRADUATES. 

1901. Vector analysis, a text-book for the use of Students of Mathe- 
matics and Physics, founded upon the lectures of J. Willard Gibbs, by 
E. B. Wilson, pp. xviii-|-207. 

Yale Bicentennial Publications. C. Scribner's Sons. 

1902. Elementary principles of Statistical Mechanics developed with 
reference to the rational foundation of Thermodynamics. 

Yale Bicentennial Publications. C. Scribner's Sons. 

The Scientific Papers of J. Willard Gibbs: 

Vol. I. Thermodynamics, pp. xxviii-f-434. 

Vol. II. Dynamics, Vector Analysis and Multiple Algebra, Elec- 
tromagnetic Theory of Light, etc., pp. 284. Longman's, 
Green and Co., Lond., N. Y., and Bombay, 1906. 

NoT^— In these two volumes edited by Prof. Henry A. Bumstead 
and Ralph G. Van Name, with a biographical sketch of the 
author by the former, are collected all the papers contributed 
to periodicals. With the two bicentennial volumes they 
constitute the whole of his published work. 



* SHELDON GOODWIN. 
1836— 1 888. See Record of 1897. 



EDWARD DROMGOOLE GRANT. 

From the autumn of 1871 he was engaged in Topeka, Kan., in 
partnership with others, in the nursery business, for two years. 

From the spring of 1874 he was for two years in the employ 
of William A. Heermance, 67 Broad street, New York City, in 
the produce commission business. 

From May, 1876, until May, 1893, he was a member of the 
firm of S. B. Goodale & Co., in the real estate business, at 
5 W. 23rd street, New York City, from which he retired and has 
since been in no business. 



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62 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

In the summer of 1893, he removed to Margaretville, N. Y., 
in the Catskill Mountains, and from there removed in May, 1904, 
to Farmington, Conn., which he expects to make his permanent 
home. 



MOSES MERRITT GREENWOOD. 

He is still in business with his son Moses, as Greenwood & 
Co., Real Estate and Investment Brokers, Missouri -Lincoln 
Trust Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. Greenwood died in St. Louis, June 3, 1904. 

Addie (Mrs. Rev. Denver R. Hancher) lives in Staunton, Va. 

CHILD. 

Martha Rankin, b. Knoxville, Tenn. May 13, 1897. 

Moses is in the real estate business in St. Louis. 

CHILDREN. 

Mary Whittlesey, b. St. Louis, Mo., Mar. 31, 1885. 

Annie Louise, ^ " " " Mar. 14, 1888. 

Moses Merritt, " " " Sept. i, 1889. 

d. " " Apr. 30, 1892. 

Charles W. lives in Little Rock, Ark. 

CHILDREN. 

Ruth, b. St. Louis, Mo., June 11, 1893. 

d. " " July 10, 1893. 

Anna Breckenridge, b. Little Rock, Ark., June 19, 1899. 

Charles Whittlesey, " " " Jan. 11,1907. 



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WILLIAM TORRKV HARRIS" 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 63 

WILLIAM TORREY HARRIS. 

In August, 1894, he received from the King of Italy the 
degree of Commander of the Order of Saint Maurice and 
Lazarus. 

In 1895, ^s chairman of a sub-committee of the Committee 
of Fifteen on Elementary Education, he contributed a report on 
the educational values of the several branches of studies in the 
elementary schools. 

In 1896 he brought out a second and enlarged edition of 
The Spiritual Sense of Dante's Divina Commedia, pp. xxi + 193, 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., London and Boston. 

He delivered the University convocation address ("Higher 
Education, its function in preserving and extending our civiliza- 
tion") at the Quarter Centennial of Boston University, May 31, 
1898. In the same year he published ''Psychologic Foundations 
of Education" in the International Educational Series. 

In 1899 he received the degree of Ph. D. from the University 
of Jena. 

In 1900 he represented the Bureau of Education at the Paris 
Exposition. He wrote the Monograph on Elementary Education 
in the United States for the series edited by Dr. N. M. Butler, 
and contributed to the United States Educational Exhibit at the 
Paris Exposition by the State of New York. He sent to the 
Woman's Congress of the Paris Exposition, 1900, an article on 
"The Relation of Women to the Trades and Professions.*' 

He read an address on "Social Culture in the Form of Educa- 
tion and Religion" before the International Congress of Arts and 
Science, Division G — Social Culture, at the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition in St. Louis, September 20, 1904. 

He delivered the convocation address in the Educational Con- 
gress held at the Lewis and Clarke Exposition, Portland, Oregon, 
August 28, 1905. 

In 1908 the Bureau of Education issued a bibliography of 29 
pages of 479 titles of the writings of W. T. Harris, prepared in 
the Library of the Bureau of Education. 

He has been Editor-in-Chief of Webster's International Dic- 
tionary since 1900. 



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64 BIOGRAPHICAIv RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

Harris and his wife celebrated their Golden Wedding Decem- 
ber 2yy 1908. 

He continued to be United States Commissioner of Education 
until June 18, 1906, when he resigned the office which he had 
held since September, 1889. 

The following letters explain themselves: 

THE WHITE HOUSE 

Washington, June 19, 1906. 
My Dear Dr. Harris: 

In accepting your resignation as Commissioner of Education it is due 
to you to express not merely my regret at your feeling obliged to leave 
the service of the government, but my keen realization of the gain that 
has come to the United States from your presence in Washington and 
from your identification with the cause of education. I think it is a 
safe thing to say that all the people of- our country who are most 
alive to the need of the real and thorough system of education have felt 
a peculiar pride and confidence in you. 

With hearty good wishes, believe me, sincerely yours, 

(Signed) THEODORE ROOSEVELT. 

Dr. W. T. Harris, 

Commissioner of Education, Washington, D. C. 

CARNEGIE FOUNDATION 

FOR THE 

ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION. 

May 26, 1906. 
William T. Harris, 

1360 Fairmont St., Washington, D. C. 
Dear Sir: 

1 am sending to your address a copy of the rules adopted by the 
trustees of the Carnegie Foundation for the granting and retiring 
allowances, together with a copy of the act of the incorporation. The 
executive committee of the foundation desires, in its first step, to show 
that such grants as it may make are in recognition of honorable 'Service, 
not as acts of charity. It has seemed to them that they could best 
serve this purpose by tendering to a few men who have rendered a great 
service to education places at the head of what they wish to make a roU 
of honor. There is naturally no other name connected with American 
education which is so identified with its progress for the last thirty 
years as yours. We should like in the best way possible to show our 
appreciation of what you have done for education and philosophy. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF GRADUATES. 65 

If it be agreeable to you, therefore, we should be glaa to confer 
on you, as the first man to whom such recognition for meritorious service 
is given, an annual income of $3000, of which, under the rules, one-hall 
would be paid to Mrs. Harris should she survive you. I beg that you 
will inform me of your wishes in this matter. In communicating to you 
this wish of the executive committee, I am commissioned to express 
at the same time their hope that you may accept this action as indicative 
of the highest appreciation and esteem which they can express. 

I may add that this action is taken in virtue of the following rule 
adopted by the trustees April 9, but not included in the published rules: 

"Meritorious service — Retiring allowances may be conferred for 
meritorious services on teachers who have served not less than twenty 
years as professors, who have rendered unusual or extraordinary service 
to education, or who have in other posts served education in a con- 
spicuous or unusual manner. Each case must be considered on its 
merits." 

Very faithfully yours, 

(Signed) HENRY S. PRITCHETT. 

Dr. Harris replied as follows: 

My Dear Sir: 

Your favor of May 26, present month, is received, inclosing copy 
of the rules adopted by the Carnegie Foundation for the granting of 
retiring allowances and notifying me of the action of the executive 
committee of the foundation offering to confer upon me, "as the first man 
to whom such recognition for meritorious service is given, the highest 
retiring allowance which our rules allow, an annual income of $3000, 
of which, under the rules, one-half would be paid to Mrs. Harris should 
she survive you," and further expressing to me in a delicate manner the 
kindly sentiments of appreciation and esteem of the executive committee 
in taking this their action. 

In reply, permit me to say that I accept the offer of the retiring 
allowance with feelings of profoundest gratitude for the delicate and 
honorable expressions of esteem and, appreciation with which it is 
tendered. Permit me to say that I have never in my life been so com- 
pletely taken by surprise, nor have I ever before received so high an 
honor — an honor that I must feel to be completely beyond my deserts. 
With highest respect and esteem. 

Very truly yours, 

(Signed) W. T. HARRIS. 

To Dr. Henry S. PritchETT, 

President of the Carnegie Foundation 
for the Advancement of Education. 



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66 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

Theodore married first in Taylors Falls, Minn., August 6, 
1879, Miss Florence, daughter of Sidney B. and Mary (Lines) 
Fairchild. 

She died March 15, 1901. They had six 







CHILDREN. 










Ethan Torrey, 


b. 


St. Louis, 


Mo., 


Nov. 


30, 


1881. 




d. 


Concord, 


Mass., 


Dec. 


9, 


1882. 


Florence Albee, 


b. 


it 


(( 


Oct. 


3. 


1883. 




d. 


Dillsboro, 


N. C, 


Apr. 


25. 


1891. 


Arthur Lines, 


b. 


St. Louis, 


Mo., 


Jan. 


II, 


1886. 


Edith, 


a 


Concord, 


Mass., 


June 


6, 


1888. 


Amy, 


a 


San Antonio, 


Texas, 


Apr. 


15- 


1897. 


Marjorie Bruce, 


ti 


<< 


ti 


Mar. 


21, 


1899. 




d. 


{( 


ti 


Mar. 


I, 


1906. 



He married second in San Antonio, Texas, June 16, 1903, 
Julie Benedicite Plesner. 

He served as Texas State Senator, 1900-1902; member San 
Antonio School Board, 1902- 1908; member Executive Board 
Texas State Conference for Education, 1907-1910. 

Edith D. is unmarried, lives with her father and assists in his 
editorial work. 



* ROBERT CHANDLER HASKELL. 

Mrs. Haskell is living at 441 Second avenue, corner nth 
street, Lansingburgh, N. Y. 



* EDGAR LAING HEERMANCE. 

Theodore W. was Tutor in Greek at Yale from 1896 to 1899. 
In 1898 he received the degree of Ph. D. 

In 1899 he was appointed Instructor in Classical Archaeology 
for three years, but the year 1900- 1 he spent, on leave, in research 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 67 

in Germany and Italy. In 1902 he was chosen for a year as 
Secretary of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, 
Greece, and the next year became the Director. He became a 
member of the Archaeological Society of Athens in 1904, of the 
Imperial Archaeological Institute of Berlin and of the Austrian 
Archaeological Institute, both in 1905. 

He died in Athens, September 29, 1905, of typhoid fever, 
contracted in excavating in Corinth, Greece. 

His remains were brought to New Haven, Conn. 

Laura W. is unmarried and lives with her mother at 354 
Edwards street, New Haven. 

Edgar I<. (Yale, 1897) received the degree of A. M. in 1899, 
and spent a year in Europe in travel and study. On his return 
he entered the Yale Divinity School, and received the degree of 
B. D. in 1901. 

In 1 901 -2 he was Director of Religious Work in the Yale 
Divinity School. 

June 28, 1902, he was ordained pastor of the First Congrega- 
tional Church in Mankato, Minn. He has published a book, 
"Democracy in the Church." 

He married in Fairmont, Minn., July 9, 1907, Nora Kate, 
daughter of William Robert Livingston and Britania Jane Smith. 

CHILD. 

Edith, b. Mankato, Minn., Aug. 9, 1908. 



* FREDERICK CHARLES HEWITT. 

He died of apoplexy at his home in Owego, N. Y., August 30, 
1908, aged 68. 

Hewitt inherited from his father and from a brother, Gurdon, 
a large fortune, to which he added more. 

While in his unostentatious way he had given much before he 
died, his will disposed of $500,000 to Yale University, $1,500,000 
and some residuary estate to the Metropolitan Museum of Art 



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68 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

in New York City, and $2,000,000 to the New York Post-Grad- 
uate Medical School and Hospital, besides other bequests. 

In the summer of 1905 he had given Yale $25,000 for the 
general endowment fund. 

Hewitt had spent many winters on his place near Melbourne, 
Fla. 

He was an ardent lover of horses, a keen sportsman, and an 
enthusiastic collector of paintings and objects of art. 



* ARTHUR NELSON HOLLISTER. 
1835 — 1897. See Record of 1897. 



* LEAVITT HOWE. 

He was descended, in the seventh generation, from James 
Howe, of Roxbury and Ipswich, Mass. 

He died at his home in Princeton, N. J., July 19, 1904, 
aged 67. 

No more fitting words may be written than the following by 
Professor W. M. Sloan of Princeton University : 

"In the death of Leavitt Howe this community has lost one 
of its most honored and most esteemed members. He was 
fashioned in a mould distinguished by its combination of strength 
and courtesy. Quiet in spirit and unostentatious in his ways, he 
came and went without hurry or stir. His duties were per- 
formed without display but with punctilious care, his many 
kindnesses and charities were almost unobserved, except by the 
recipients. In his walk and conduct he was the Christian gentle- 
man ; humble^ faithful, and sympathetic. 

"His departure has been so sudden that his absence can only 
be felt as his accustomed places know him no more, as his sound 
advice and excellent counsel can no longer be had by those who 
leaned upon him. To his own family, of course, the loss of a 
spirit so gentle and so strong in every domestic relation leaves 
a heritage of sorrow, which friends can not appreciate, but the 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 69 

bereavement felt by his neighbors is a due acknowledgement of 
his worth as a man. Both just and generous, both grave and 
gay as occasion required, Leavitt Howe will be missed wherever 
his friends and comrades meet, and missed the more as time 
passes and it is seen how irreparable is the loss of so uncommon 
a man. 

"The places he filled were of great importance in our world, 
religious, social and financial. As a Trustee of the First Presby- 
terian Church and of the Princeton Cemetery he bore himself 
with a dignity and reverence which sprang from his sense of 
moral and religious responsibility ; as Vice-President of the 
Princeton Bank he was distinguished by prudence on the one 
hand and enterprise on the other; as President of the Nassau 
Club his tact was only equalled by his wisdom in the delicate 
management of its affairs. Those who knew him in these rela- 
tions honored him always with their confidence and often with 
their deference. To his intimates here and in the neighboring 
cities he was especially endeared by his loyalty. His sociable 
nature seemed to be ever receiving, whether in conversation or in 
debate, so keen was his enjoyment as a listener. But he was, 
though both sensible and sensitive, nevertheless so generous that 
an afterthought would show him probably to have contributed 
far more than he had taken. His gift was so fnstinctive and so 
destitute of self-consciousness that his associates when alive to 
their debt were not jealous but willing debtors. 

"The people of Princeton knew Mr. Howe as a safe adviser and 
a willing friend. Not by word alone, but by his bounty he 
brought cheer to many hearts and homes. Moreover, he was a 
faithful citizen ; the interests of town and borough were close 
to his heart and conscience. On occasion rendering efficient offi- 
cial service, as a private citizen he was ever observant and 
resourceful. He was never silent when things were to be done 
and ways were to be devised. The notable family from which he 
sprang was characterized by public spirit, and the honest pride 
he felt in his origin stimulated him to his best in upholding his 
ancestral traditions. Among the honored dead who lie in Prince- 
ton Cemetery no one was truer to the spirit of the place than he 
was. He will be remembered as a good and faithful servant, 
mindful of his duty to his God and to his neighbor." 



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70 BI(X>RAPHICAI. RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

Fisher left the Princeton Bank in July, 1901, and with Richard 
Stockton entered the Nursery business in Princeton. 

He married in Wilton, Va., November 10, 1908, Mrs. Mary 
Willoughby Williams, daughter of George Fulton Brown and 
Mary Estelle Amest, and former wife of the late John Rogers 
Williams of Princeton, N. J. 

Helen lives with her mother in Princeton. 



WILLIAM STONE HUBBELL. 

He is a descendant, in the seventh generation, of Richard 
Hubbell of Fairfield, Conn., who was born in 1627-8. 

February i, 1898, he became Secretary of The New York Sab- 
bath Committee at 31 Bible House. 

"The object of this Society, which was formed in 1857, is to 
protect and promote Sunday Rest and Observance, and to awaken 
public sentiment so as to secure the prudent enforcement of 
existing laws and new legislation when necessary and to guard 
against unfavorable legislation; to prevent unnecessary work 
and illegal public amusements on Sunday; and in general to 
save the Rest Day from destruction by greed, pleasure and 
irreligion. 

"With this strenuous task I have been busy for the past ten 
years, making a multitude of addresses in New YorV State and 
elsewhere, conducting fifty public hearings before the legislature 
and the mayor, campaiening for the Sunday closing of Exposi- 
tions at Buffalo, (^maha, St. Louis, Jamestown, and Seattle, 
taking part in various Sunday Rest Congresses in this country 
and in Europe, consorting with commissioners and other police 
authorities in New York and acting as complainant in many 
courts, serving as President of the Federation of the eleven 
Sunday Rest Societies in the United States and Canada for fnur 
years, and issuing meanwhile many reports and other documents. 

"Tt has been a difficult and delicate business, from which I 
would gladly withdraw if allowed to do so. During ^his period 
I have visited Europe seven times with most of my familv." 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 7 1 

He edited and prepared The Story of the Twenty-First 
Regiment, Conn. Vol. Infty., pp. 518, Stewart Printing Co., 
Middletown, Conn., 1900. 

He is serving his eighth term as Chaplain of the New York 
Commandery of the Loyal Legion; is Chaplain of the Medal 
of Honor Legion, of George Washington Post, No. 103, G. A. 
R., and of the Military Society Dept. of the Gulf. 

He is a member of the Army and Navy Club and is Vice- 
President of the Quill Club. 

Mary C. and Susan are unmarried. 

William S.j (Yale, 1897) after a year in the Harvard Law 
School, at the outbreak of the war with Spain enlisted in Battery 
A, 1st Regt. Artillery, Conn. Vols., spent the summer at Niantic, 
Conn., and was mustered out in October, 1898. He then spent a 
year in the law office of Hollister and Babcock in New York, and 
a while in mining in South Dakota. About May, 1901, he 
entered the service of the Long Island Railroad as an Assistant 
Civil Engineer, and died June 11, 1901, at St. Mary's Hospital 
in Brooklyn, N. Y., from a compound fracture of the skull 
sustained the same day while on duty. 

DeWitt (Wesleyan, 1898) is Receiving Teller of the Mutual 
Alliance Trust Co., in Hanover Square, New York, and lives in 
Plainfield, N. J. 

He married in Buffalo, N. Y., December 27, 1902, Harriet 
Harrington, daughter of George Henry and Belle (Harrington) 
Sickels. 

They have no children. 



* WILLIAM FLETCHER INGERSON. 

In 1900 Mrs. Ingerson removed from Maple Plain, Minn., to 
Colfax, Wis., where she remained with her two daughters until 
1905, when they all removed to Minneapolis, Minn. 

Margaret married in Minnetrista, Minn., September i, 1896, 
Jasper Allen Jadwin. 
They have no children. 



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72 BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

Martha was appointed Librarian of the New Boston Branch 
of the Minneapolis Public Library in January, 1907. 
She is unmarried. 



* CHARLES NAPOLEON JOHNSON. 
1829 — 1867. See Record of 1897. 



AUGUSTUS TURNER JONES. 

He is living in Brockton, Mass., and since 1896 has been 
Treasurer of the People's Savings Bank. 

For sixteen years he has been a Director of the Trust Com- 
pany, and is a member of the State Civil Service Examiners. 

Bertha B. (Wellesley, 1889) married in Brockton, Mass., June 
13, 1894, Edward D. Blodgett, (Amherst, 1887) Editor of the 
Cortland Standard. 

CHILDREN. 

Eleanor Dickinson, b. Cortland, N. Y., Aug. 18, 1896. 

Edward Eveleth, " '* " June 10, 1903. 

Lizzie L. (Wellesley, 1891) married in Brockton, Mass., June 
9, 1897, John Howard Field of Brockton. 

CHILDREN. 

Helen Eveleth, b. Brockton, Mass., Mar. 19, 1900.. 

John Howard, " " " May 17, 1903. 

Elizabeth, " " " Nov. 12, 1907. 

Everett A. (Amherst, 1900) is unmarried and lives at home. 
He is the head of E. A. Jones & Co., manufacturers of shoe- 
making supplies. 



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BIOGRAPHICAIv RECORD OF GRADUATES. 73 

CHAUNCEY SEYMOUR KELLOGG. 

He is a descendant, in the sixth generation, of Lieut. Joseph 
Kellogg, who was baptized in England in 1626, and died in 
Hadley, Mass. 

From 1901 to 1903 he was Assistant Postmaster in Don- 
ner, La. 

In March, 1903, his health failing in that cypress swamp, 
he removed to New Orleans, La. 

After a course in the Home Correspondence School in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., to qualify himself as a proof-reader, he failed to 
secure work in New Orleans because "the entire publishing 
business is bound, hand and foot, by the Printers' Union, and 
only members can read proof, and only practical printers can 
become members." 

He lives at 347 Millaudon street, New Orleans, La. 



JOHN EDWIN KIMBALL. 

He has been much absorbed by business cares in his capacity 
of Vice-President of the Interstate Petroleum Co., and later as 
President of the New England Consolidated Oil Co., and of its 
successor, the Osage Consolidated Oil and Gas Co. 

He has also been President of the Boston and New Mexico 
Copper Co. 

The planning and erection in Oxford, Mass., where he yet 
resides, of a Memorial Library Building, given by a former resi- 
dent, has occupied much of his time. 

He is a descendant, in the seventh generation, of Richard 
Kimball, who came in the "Elizabeth" to Ipswich, Mass., and 
died in 1675. 



WILLIAM ALLEN LANE. 

He withdrew from the Avenue Grocer Co. in 1898, took a 
vacation, then was in a railroad office for a year ; was census 
taker in 1900, and in October became bookkeeper for the store 
of J. B. Burnside, where he still is. 



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74 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

He has had no children by his second wife. 
His three children are living and not married. 

William A. worked for five years as a machinist in railroad 
shops and then became a traveling salesman. 



SAMUEL HENRY LEE. 

He resigned the Presidency of the American International Col- 
lege in Springfield, Mass., in July, 1908, but by special vote was 
retained in the Corporation, and for one year in the Faculty to 
teach Psychology and Economics. Gn the 29th of September, 
however, he withdrew from both positions and was made Presi- 
dent Emeritus. In July, 1893, when he became President, 
the institution had property valued at $8000, a Faculty of six, 
and thirty-three students. Now it has a campus of five acres, 
with six buildings, of $150,000 value, a Faculty of thirteen, 
and an average attendance, for ten years, of 105, of perhaps 
fifteen races from Southern and Eastern Europe. 

The college is unique, in that it aims to do what no other is 
doing. 

Gerald S. lectures on Literature and Life, and writes for lead- 
ing magazines. He published "The Lost Art of Reading," pp. 
439, New York and London, 1902 ; "The Voice of the Machines," 
Mount Tom Press, pp. 189, translated and published in Ger- 
many, 1906; and "Inspired Millionaires," Mount Tom Press. 
Northampton, pp. 308, 1908. He also publishes a periodical of 
his own, a bimonthly, "Mount Tom. 

Mrs. Gerald S. Lee is Professor of English in Smith College, 
Northampton, Mass. 

She has published: 

1900. "Kate Wetherell," pp. 199, New York. 

1901. "A Pillar of Salt," pp. 255, Boston and New York. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. . 75 

1902. "The Son of a Fiddler," pp. 286, Riverside Press, Cambridge. 
1905. "Uncle William," pp. 298, The Century Company. 
1907. "The Ibsen Secret," "A Key to The^Prose Dramas of 
Ibsen," pp. 207, Putnam & Sons, New York. 

CHILD. 

Geraldine, b. Northampton, Mass., Apr. i, 1897. 

Christabel (Mrs. Philo P. Safford) lives in Lakeville, Conn. 

CHILDREN. 

Goeffrey Lee, b. Brooklyn, N. Y., Apr. 4*1893 

Elizabeth Lee, " New Rochelle, " Nov. 26, 1896, 

Theodore Lee, " '' '' Feb. 22, 1898, 

Philip Lee, " " " Jan. 15, 1902 

Grace taught in the American International' College six months 
and in the autumn of 1897, entered upon service in the Children's 
Aid Society of Boston. In October, 1900, she was elected Secre- 
tary of the Children's Aid Society of Baltimore, but was taken 
ill with typhoid fever and died in Springfield December 28, 1900. 

Theodore S. (Amherst, 1900) was graduated from the Union 
Theological Seminary, N. Y., in 1903. October 20, 1903, he was 
ordained Missionary Pastor of Westchester Church, White Plains, 
N. Y., and under appointment of the American Board sailed for 
India, November 15. The White Plains Church support both 
him and his wife. Their residence is Wai, Satara District, 
Bombay Presidency. He has a large field and besides his mis- 
sionary work, he has been appointed under the civil government 
a member of the City Council and Chairman of the Board of 
Education. 

He married October i, 1903, Hannah Hume (Wellesley, 1900), 
daughter of Dr. Robert Allen Hume (Yale, 1868) and Abbie 
Lyon Burgess. 

CHILD. 

Grace Hume, b. Ahmednagar, India, Oct. 24, 1906. 



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76 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

JOHN LOVEWELL. 

He still lives in Willow Springs, Mo., where for some years 
he has devoted himself to horticulture. 

His account of his origin is this : "Jo^" Lovewell, an Ensign 
in 1653 in Cromwell's army, came to America and settled in what 
is now Nashua, N. H., and died at the age of 120. His oldest 
child, Captain John, was slain in the battle of Piggwacket, near 
Saco Pond, by the Indians. A carved powder-horn captured 
from an Indian chief by him is in my possession. His son 
Nehemiah, settled in Corinth, Vt., and was my great-grand- 
father." 

Clarence H. is in the real estate business in Lincoln, 111. 
He married in Dwight, 111., July 24, 1898, Marie Anna, daugh- 
ter of Nathan Baker and Margaret Anna Zimmers. 

Blntina M. (Mrs. Edward C. Ryan) lives in Kansas City, Mo. 
He is a train despatcher. 

CHILD. 

Neuma Lovewell, b. Sanborn, la., Nov. 11, 1889. 

Harriet J, lives in Willow Springs, Mo. 

She married in Willow Springs, Mo., February 25, 1898, 
Arthur Henry Hoffman, a machinist. 

CHILDREN. 

George, b. Winona, Mo., Oct. 12, 1901. 

Elizabeth Cecelia, " Willow Springs, " Dec. 17, 1904. 
Richard Arthur " " " Sept. 9, 1908. 

Marion H. lives in Denver, Col. 

She married in Minneapolis, Minn., June 26, 1902, Paul 
Bielitz, a dealer in soda fountains. 

John H. is unmarried and lives in Denver, Col. 

Ethel M. is a stenographer in Kansas City, Mo. 

Edith M., lives, in San Antonio, Texas. 

She married in Dallas, Texas, June, 1906, Willard Tailor, a 
dealer in refrigerators. 
They have no children. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF GRADUATCS. ^^ 

* WILLIAM ALLEN MACDOWELL. 

Mrs. MacDowell is living at 26 Mifflin avenue, Uniontown, Pa. 

Annie W, is unmarried and lives at home. 

Robert W, also lives with Mrs. MacDowell. 
He married in Pittsburgh, Pa., October 25, 1900, Margaret 
Anna, daughter of William and Anna McKaig (Kerr) Eakin. 

CHILDREN. 

Allen, b. Uniontown, Pa., Jan. 9, 1902. 

Jean Reid, " " " Aug. 20, 1903. 

Clara Patterson, " " " Dec. 12, 1905. 

(Daughter,) " " " Aug. 13, 1907. 



* GEORGE BOARDMAN MACLELLAN. 

He died in the Confederate Veterans* Home in Jacksonville, 
Fla., where he had been three years and a half, October 30, 1897, 
aged 64. 

He left two children of his first and two of his second 
marriage. 

Maud M. married in New Hampton, N. H., May 22, 1890, 
Charles H. Odell. 
They keep the Odell Farm House at Sanbomton, N. H. 

CHILDREN. 

Harry Williams, b. Sanbornton, N. H., May 5, 1895. 

d. " " May 21, 1895. 

Alice May, b. '' " Oct. i, 1896. 

d. " " Apr. 15, 1897. 

Robert M, is a printer, unmarried, and has just gone to the 
Pacific coast. 

MacLellan's second wife, Ethel (Wyeth) MacLellan, secured 
a divorce from him December 29, 1887, and married James ^ 
Conover of Jacksonville, Fla. Later, the names of MacLellan's 



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78 BIOGRAPHICAL RKCOKl) OF GRADUATES. 

two surviving children by his second wife, Ethel Sanborn Mac- 
Lellan and George Brinton MacLellan, were legally changed to 
Ethel Wyeth Conover and George Wyeth Conover. MacLellan's 
second wife was a descendant of George Wythe of Virginia, a 
signer of the Declaration of Independence. 

Ethel Wyeth Conover married in Jacksonville, Fla., October 
4, 1905, Horace Rainsford Drew, M. D. 

They live at 319 Laura street, Jacksonville, Fla. 

George Wyeth Conover is unmarried, an Attorney at Law and 
lives in Jacksonville, Fla. 



* WILLIAM ALEXANDER MAGILL. 

He died suddenly of angina pectoris, at his home in Amherst, 
Mass., November 22^ 1899, at the age of 63. 

Mrs. Magill died suddenly of heart disease at her home in 
Amherst, December 23, 1908. 

Maud H., unmarried, is living in Amherst. 

William 5. (Amherst, 1887) lives al 684 St. Nicholas avenue, 
New York City. 

He wrote in December, 1908 "I am actively engaged in my 
profession with surgery and pathology my special scientific occu- 
pations for many years. My real and profitable sources of 
revenue are however my industrial interests in *Dry Milk' and 
similar dry products which are of processes of my invention and 
which I control. These industries are widely established through- 
out Europe and America, but their predominance of activity is 
in Europe and this necessitates my almost permanent residence 
there with frequent trips from one country to another. I main- 
tain headquarters in Paris, and Berlin, with a legal residence in 
the latter city (address 5 Sommer Strasse, N. W. 7, Germany). 
Letters may be addressed to my brother in New Haven, Conn. 

"I have recently been nominated as Lieutenant in the Medical 
Reserve Corps of the United States Army." 



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BIOGRAPHICAL MJCORD O^ GRADUATES. 79 

POSITIONS. 

1887-1889. Superintendent and Chemist, Boston Color & Acid Works. 

1889-1897. University of Paris— Student and Post-Graduate student 
of Science and Medicine. 

1897-1900. Amherst College and New York — Research, Pathology and 
Toxicology. 

1900-1901. University of West Virginia — Professor of Physiology and 
Pathology, and Dean of the College of Medicine. 

1901-1903. Carnegie Laboratory— Research Department; Pathology, 
Bacteriology, Chemistry of enzymes, toxins, sera, etc. 

1903-1907. Special investigations in Europe. Berlin, 1903-1906; 
Vienna, (Munich, Basel) 1906-1907. 



DEGREES AND TITI.ES. 

1887. B. A., Amherst College. 

1889. B. L., University of Paris. 

1889. B. S., University of Paris. 

1892. M. A. Amherst College. 

1894. M. D., University of Paris. 

Member of the American Academy of Medicine. 

1897. Member of the Franco-American University Committee. 

Member of the N. Y. Medico-Legal Society. 

1900. Member of the American Medical Association. 

Member of the Am. Ass. for the Advance of Sciences. 

Mernber of the American Chemical Society. 

Surgeon, N. Y., Nose, Throat and Lung Hospital. 

1900. Pathologist of the N. Y. Medico-Legal Society. 

1901. Member of the American Congress of Tuberculosis. 
1903-1905. Member International Congresses of the Milk Industry. 
1905-1908. Member of the International Congresses of Tuberculosis. 
Interpreter and Translator of English, French, and German, for the 

last International Congress on Tuberculosis, Washington, D. C. 



BIBUOGRAPHY. 

1886-1887. "Man — A Response to Environment." Amherst Philoso- 
phy Papers. 

1892. "The Requirements of a Medical Degree in France." Medical 
Record. 

1893. "A New and Rapid Method of Anaesthesia." Medical Record. 

1893. "Compte Rendue du Congres de la Nouvelle Hollandc." With 
Prof. Terrier in Revue de Chirurgle, Paris. 

1894. "A New and Rapid Method of Anc-esthcsia." International 
Medical Magazine. 



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8o BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

1894. "A Review of the Results Obtained by the Use of Absorbable 
Plates in Surgery Effecting Visceral Approximation." Annals of Surgery. 

1894. "Approximation Viscerale par Plaques Absorbables." Thesis, 
Paris. 

1897. "A Study of Choledectomy." With Dr. Jourdan in Interna- 
tional Medical Magazine. 

1897. "Resection of the Ileo-caecal Coil of the Intestine." Annals of 
Surgery. 

1898. "A Study of the Bacteriology of Salpingitis, etc." With Dr. 
Reymond in Annals of Surgery. 

1899. Addresses: "The Progress of Medicine — at the Dawn of the 
Twentieth Century," to the General Federation of Women's Clubs of 
America, Boston. 

1900. "Anaesthesia and Analgesia — A Study of Drug Action." Medi- 
cal News, Trans, of the Medical Society of West Virginia, 1900, 

1901. "Poisoning by Aconite — The Condon Case." Medical News. 
1903. "Etiology of Small-Pox." Trans, of the Medical Society of 

West Virginia, and "Demonstration of its Microbe." Medical News, 1903. 
1903. "Chemical Theory of Small-Pox." Trans, of N. Y. Path. Soc. 

He married first in New York City, December 25, 1890. Fran- 
ces, daughter of David Laird and Frances Anne Keeler. 

His wife died in Amherst, Mass., June 26, 1902. 

He married second in New York City, August 15, 1903, Rose, 
daughter of Albert Marx and Tillie Rothschild. 

CHIIvD. 

William Herman, b. Berlin, Germany, May 29, 1904. 
d. Amherst, Mass., Oct. 16, 1904. 

Claude A. (Mass. Agricultural College, 1891) lives in New 
Haven, Conn. 

He was from June, 1891, to May, 1892, in the engineering 
department of the Boston & Maine R. R., thence for fifteen 
months in the City Engineer's office in Maiden, Mass. He was 
then in the engineering department of the Boston & Abany 
R. R. until May, 1894, when he became a partner in the firm of 
Thayer & Magill, Civil Engineers and Surveyors, in Westfield, 
Mass. He sold his interest December i, 1899, and entered the 
engineering department of the Pennsylvania division of the New 
York Central R. R. 

November i, 1900, he became Assistant City Engineer of 
Sharon, Pa.; October i, 1901, City Engineer of Greenville, Pa.; 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 8 1 

February 15, 1902, Street Commissioner of L)nin, Mass., and 
April 5, 1905, Superintendent of Streets in Woonsocket, R. I. 

May I, 1906, he became Manager of the Hassam Paving Co. 
of Worcester, Mass. 

May I, 1907, he became General Manager of the Connecticut 
Hassam Paving Co. in New Haven, Conn., and is still there. 

He married in Maiden, Mass., October 23, 1894, Miss Fannie 
Louise, daughter of Albert Fearing and Rebecca Francis 
(Wilder) Shelton. 

CHILDREN. 

Claude Shelton, b. Westfield, Mass., Apr. 22, 1897. 

Ruth, " Sharon, Pa., Jan. 12, 1901. 

Arthur £. (Amherst, 1896) was a student on the Pope Fellow- 
ship in Paris, France, from March, 1897, to 1899. 

His health was bad until in 1902 he became an Examiner in 
the U. S. Patent Office in Washington, D. C. He received the 
degree of LL. B. from the George Washington University in 

1905. 

June 26, 1905, he was found dead in his bed. He was buried 
in Amherst, by the side of his father. 

He married in New York City September 3, 1902, Miss Nina, 
daughteer of Adelbert Bebee and Eunice Waters. 

CHILDREN. 

Helen Matilda, b. Washington, D. C, June 24, 1903. 

Eunice Mina, " " " Dec. 12, 1904. 

The children lived with their grandmother in Amherst. 



* EDWARD AUGUSTUS MANICE. 
Mrs. Manice lives at 138 Temple street. New Haven, Conn. 

Heaton is an attorney and lives at 39 Schloss Strasse, Stuttgart, 
Germany. 

He is also of Manice and Perry, Counsellors at Law, 55 Wil- 
liam street. New York. 



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82 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 



He married in Vienna, Austria, February 2, 1884, Marie 
Eugenie, daughter of Johann and Marie Anna (Syrovi) von 
Gruber. 

CHILDREN. 

Vienna, . Austria, 
Fiume, " 

Frankfort, Germany, 
Nauheim, " 



Phebe Marie, 

Heaton, 

Walter Augustus, 

Frances Isabella, 

DeForest, 

Oliver, 

Katherine M., 



Nov. 12, 1884, 
Mar. 18, 1886. 
Apr. 7, 1887 
Aug. 25, 1888. 
Aug. 9, 1890 
Feb. 20, 1893, 
Stuttgart, " Aug. 28, 1895 

None of his children are married. His son Heaton is of the 
firm of Manice and Lcitch in Goldfield, Nevada. 

His son Walter A., is U. S. Vice-Consul at Amsterdam, Hol- 
land. 

His son DeForest, is in Yale, Sheff. 

Catherine M, lives at Belwood, Mt. Morris, N. Y. 
She married in New Haven, Conn., September 12, 1899, Wil- 
liam Littauer. 

CHILD. 

Catherine Louise, b. Mt. Morris, N. Y., Aug. 19, 1901. 

Edward A. (Yale, 1891) has been, since 1903, a member of the 
New York Stock Exchange, and is associated with his brother 
Arthur, as E. A. Manice & Co., i Broad street. 

Arthur R. (Yale, 1897) lives at 58 W. nth street. 

He lived in Paris, France, for two years, and traveled in Asia 
and Africa. 

He returned in 1900, lived for some years in Colorado, and 
then moved to New York. 

He married first in Denver, Col., December 19, 1900, Miss 
Catherine, daughter of Henry Ellsworth Wood and Belle 
McKinniss. 

Mrs. Manice died in Denver, September 14, 1903. 

He married second in New York, November 10, 1904, Mrs. 
Louise (Bell) Whitney, daughter of Louis Bell and Anna Wood. 

CHILD. 

Katherine, b. Denver, Col., Apr. 11, 1903. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 83 

GEORGE ROBERT MARBLE. 

He is living in Oshkosh, Wis., and says that since 1894 he has 
done nothing but vegetate. 



ARTHUR MATHEWSON. 

From 1900 to 1903 he was Vice-President, and from July, 1903, 
was President of the American Ophthalmological Society. 

He has twice been President of the New York Ophthalmolog- 
ical Society, resigning in 1904 and becoming one of the few 
distinguished Honorary Members. 

In February, 1904, he relinquished his work in Brooklyn, N. 
Y., where he had been engaged for thirty-seven years in Oph- 
thalmic and Aural practice and surgery. 

Since then he has spent the winters in the South imtil January, 
1906, when he took up his residence with his three unmarried 
children, on the family estate of a hundred acres, called Argyle, 
on i6th street extended, Washington, D. C, where, although he 
allows himself some latitude, he has no longitude, as he is on 
the Washington Meridian. 

His summers he passes in his forest in South Woodstock, 
Conn. 

His time for the past three years has been devoted to the 
development of the Blagden Estate, and to the study of arbori- 
culture, especially in its relations to street and roadside planting. 

Mrs. Mathewson died in Hartford, Conn., January 19, 1908. 

William W, spent from 1897 to 1902 at the University of 
"Virginia, the last two years in the study of law. He then studied 
law until 1904 at the George Washington University in Wash- 
ington, D. C, and was in Wakefield, Neb., until 1908, at first in 
banking, and later in law. 



* DANIEL AUGUSTUS MILES. 
Mrs. Miles lives at 5 Goulding street, Worcester, Mass. 



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84 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATE. 



* EDWARD MILO MILLS. . 

He died of apoplexy at his home in Northampton, Mass., Octo- 
ber 6, 1900. 

He had been in poor health for two years and for the last 
year had been confined to the house. 

He had lived in Northampton seventeen years. He became 
thoroughly interested in all that was for the best welfare of the 
city, and everything that made for what was good, both materially 
and morally, found an earnest advocate and hearty supporter in 
him, and his death is a great loss to the community. 

Mills was of a scholarly turn of mind, took a deep interest in 
the events t)f the day and always had an opinion to express. He 
was a man of great cordiality and genial disposition. He had 
the faculty of quickly making those whom he met as a stranger 
feel that he was their friend, and his kindly, affable manners 
won for him a host of friends, to whom his death will bring 
sorrow. 

Mrs. Mills died in Northampton, Mass., June 28, 1904. 

Albert H. is at 119 N. Willow street, Waterbury, Conn. 
He married in Waterbury, Conn., June 29, 1887, Cornelia 
Roscoe, daughter of James H. Roe and Elizabeth Edgerton. 

CHILDREN. 



Florence Johnson, 


b. 


Waltham, 


Mass., 


July 


5, 1889. 


Albert Edward, 


« 


Waterbury, 


Conn., 


June 


8, 1892. 




d. 


« 




Jan. 


30, 1896. 


Richard Hill, 


b. 


{< 


(( 


Sept. 


5. 1896. 




d. 


ft 




Feb. 


I, 1898. 


Katherine, 


b. 


i( 




Dec. 


23, 1896. 




d. 


ti 




June 


II, 1901. 



Sarah M. lives in Torrington, Conn. 

She married in Northampton, Mass., April 19, 1892, Willis 
Lyman Pond. He was shot and killed accidentally while hunting 
in Maine, October 8, 1900. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD O^ GRADUATES. 85 

CHII.DREN. 

Ruth Esther, b. Torrington, Conn., Feb. 5, 1893. 

Willis Lyman, Jr., " " " Apr. i, 1897. 

Edward, " " " May 15, 1899. 

Clara A, lives in Northampton. 

She married in Northampton, Mass., February 9, 1889, Charles 
H. Sawyer. 

CHILD. 

Corinne Constance, b. Northampton, Mass., Sept. 4, 1895. 

Harriet C married in Northampton, Mass., January 28, 1897, 
Robert C. Cooley, a lawyer, of Springfield, Mass. 

CHILDREN. 

Charles B. b. Springfield, Mass., May 24, 1901. 

Rebecca M., " " " Oct. 10, 1903. 

Edith A. lives in Springfield, Mass., 344 St. James avenue. 



* ELAWSON CARRY MORE. 

He died July 24, 1902, in Peoria, 111., at the home of his step- 
son. Dr. Logan H. Taylor. For the last five years his health had 
been poor. During the last six months he failed rapidly until 
diesase of kidney and liver terminated in dropsy. 

He rests in the Columbia, Mo., cemetery. 

"In the death of Col. E. C. More, there passed away one of 
the gentlest spirited and most cultured men who have resided 
in this community. He possessed an individuality wholly unlike 
any man we have ever known, and one which has left a lasting 
impress upon all who knew him well. Of splendid physical 
development, the soul of chivalrous courtesy and honor, he had 
a personality of a distinctive and noble type. His tenderness of 
nature was remarkable. 

"His voice, his smile, the grasp of his hand and the tmfailing 
kindness of greeting which he exhibited to all whom he met, 
made him a favorite of all classes and conditions of people. 



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86 BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

"He was thoroughly educated, having graduated at Shurtleff 
College in Illinois, at Yale, and at colleges in Spain, France and 
Germany. He spoke the languages of the last three countries as 
well as he did his own. He was a fine classical scholar and had 
a rare knowledge of general literature. Such was his familiarity 
with the poets and the best writers of prose that he could quote 
pages from their productions, and besides he was a devotee of 
the finer arts. It could be truthfully said of him that he was in 
the highest sense accomplished. 

"While a native of Arkansas he spent most of his life in 
Missouri, and about thirty years in Columbia, where his friends 
were legion. The beautiful estate, which he improved near 
Columbia, will ever remain an ornament to this city and a 
reflection of his taste and generosity." 

Mrs. More is living at 105 Barker avenue, Peoria, 111. 

Julia L,, who died in 1899, left a son, Osborne Augustus. He 
died in Cambridge, Mass., February 25, 1907, aged 19. 

Elijah L, is President of the Horse Shoe Lumber Co., River 
Falls, Ala. 

He is unmarried. 



* WILLIAM DARE MORGAN. 

Mrs. Morgan and her unmarried daughter Ruth live at 26 
Washington Square, New York. 

Margaret L, married in New York June 15, 1897, Adam 
Gordon Norrie (Columbia, 1891, and LL. B., 1895). 
They live with Mrs. Morgan. 

CHILD. 

Lewis Gordon, b. New York, N. Y., Dec. 25, 1901. 

Geraldine L. lives at Red Bank, N. J. She married in Staats- 
burgh, N. Y., June 16, 1896, Lewis Thompson. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF GRADUATES. 87 

CHIU)REN. 

William Payne, b. Tuxedo Park, N. Y., Apr. i6, 1897. 

Elizabeth Steenrod, " New York, " Sept. 27, 1900. 

Geraldine Livingston, " " " Oct. 8, 1902. 

Lewis Steenrod, Jr., " " " Mar. J5, 1904. 

William G. D, (Yale, 1901) was a while with Maitland, Coppell 
& Co., bankers, in New York, and was later Secretary to the U. 
S. Military Attache' in Japan. 

He is unmarried and lives with his mother. 



* ROBERT MORRIS. 

Since January, 1897, he had not written the Class Secretary. 

He died in San Francisco at a lodging house, 702^^ Van Ness 
avenue, where he had lived for more than three years November 
15, 1901, of carcinoma of the liver, after being confined to his 
bed little more than a day. The body was cremated at the Odd 
Fellows Crematory. 

He never engaged in any business nor practiced any pro- 
fession in California, but during the twenty years he lived there 
led the life of a recluse, joining no clubs nor other social asso- 
ciations. 



HORACE NEIDE. 

The sketch of him in the Class Record printed in 1897 should 
read on page 172, eighth line, "1861"; nineteenth line, "mustered 
out of volunteer service"; page 173, fourteenth line, "on leave 
in Europe". 

He is an Original Companion of the First Class of the Military 
Order of the Loyal Legion in the Pennsylvania Commandery; 
a member of the following in Philadelphia, the Penn Club, the 
Philobiblon Club, the Yale Alumni Association and the Union 
League. 



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88 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 0}f GRADUATES. 

Since 1898 he has been living at 3821 Chestnut street, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

CHILD. 

Blanche Elizabeth, b. Boston, Mass., Jan. 5, 1864. 

She resides with her father. 



FREDERICK ALPHONSO NOBLE. 

He resigned the pastorate of the Union Park Congregational 
Church in Chicago, July i, 1901. He was the recipient of a 
check for $5000, "In recognition of the eminent usefulness to 
the church and community of the twenty-two years' service." 

In 1908 he published "The Pilgrims," pp. 500. The Pilgrim 
Press, Chicago, 111. 

He resides in Evanston, 111., 1414 Forest avenue. 

Frederick P. (Amherst, 1885) was from 1886 to 1889 in the 
Chicago Theological Seminary, has been on the Editorial Staff 
of the Advance and the Union Park Review, and was for a while 
Assistant Librarian of the Newberry Library, Chicago. 

He received the degree of Ph. D. from the Chicago Theo- 
logical Seminary in 1899. He has contributed to the Bibliotheca 
Sacra, New England Magazine, Independent and other maga- 
zines and papers. 

He is unmarried. 

Philip S. is of Hildenbrandt & Noble, Real Estate and Loans, 
615 Chestnut street, St. Louis, Mo., and lives in Kirkwood, Mo. 

He married in Chicago, 111., March 10, 1907, Frances, daughter 
of William and Pauline (Bassford) Teale. 

CHILD. 

Mary Frances, b. St. Louis, Mo., Mar. 25, 1908. 



* DEWEES OGDEN. 
1839 — 1863. See Record of 1897. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 89 

LUTHER HILLS PEIRCE. 

From April to September, 1908, he and his wife were again 
in Europe. 

He is still in the Real Estate business at 99 Clark street, 
Chicago, 111. 



* BENJAMIN FRANKLIN PENNY. 

Mrs. Penny died in Greenville, Miss., July 22, 1907. 
She left no children. 



* THOMAS ALBERT PERKINS. 

His connection with the firm of Dennis Perkins & Co. ceased 
June I, 1 89 1, when he became a member of the Classification 
Committee of the New York Cotton Exchange, continuing until 
July I, 1908. 

He had been for forty years a member, and for thirty years an 
elder, of the First Presbyterian Church in Brooklyn, N. Y. 
For ten years he had on New Year's Day spoken a few words 
at the annual service in the church lecture room. January i, 
1909, he did so, resumed his seat by his daughter, and almost 
instantly died of apoplexy. A veritable euthanasia ! 

It seems now significant that his five minutes' talk should have 
concluded with these lines from Cowper, 

My boast is not that I deduce my birth 
From loins enthroned and rulers of the earth, 
But higher far my proud pretensions rise — 
The son of parents passed into the skies. 

To have known such a man for fifty-four years is an educa- 
tion, and to have had his friendship, a blessing. 

He lived at 39 Garden Place, Brooklyn, N. Y., with four of 
his children, none of whom have married. 



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90 BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

Thomas S., Chemist and Manufacturer of Paints, is with the 
F. O. Pierce Co., Tiffany Place, Brooklyn. 

Albert D, lives on a farm in Franklin Park, Mass. 

Walter C, is in fire and marine insurance with The Johnson 
& Higgins Co., Atlantic Building, Wall street, New York. 



* JOSEPH WORTHY PICKETT. 
Mrs. Pickett died in Grand Jimction, Col., August 5, 1902. 

John R, (Colorado College, 1884) was mining near Silverton, 
Col., until October, 1886, farming near Grand Junction until 
June, 1900, mining until July, 190^, and since then has been pro- 
prietor of the Greenleaf Hotel in Whittier, Cal. 

He married in Whittier, Cal., September 5, 1905, Mrs. Anna 
(Dungan) Smiley, daughter of William Holland Dungan and 
Margaret Coe, and formerly wife of Harry Smiley. 

CHILD. 

Mary Dungan, b. Whittier, Cal., Oct. 17, 1908. 

George B,, from 1884 to 1886 was mining; from 1886 to 1897 
in the cattle business on a range, and since 1897 has been mining. 
He is now part owner and manager of a mine in Ophir, Colorado. 

He married first in Grand Junction, Col., March 17, 1903, 
Georgia Walker. 

Mrs. Pickett died without issue in Denver, Col., February 
22, 1905. 

He married second in Tclluride, Col., November 14, 1906, 
Matie A., daughter of James William Washburn and Mary 
Willaetta Morrison. 

CHIU>. 

Hazel Washburn, b. Montrose, Col., June 2, 1908. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 9 1 

* WALTER STANLEY PITKIN. 

He died of apoplexy at the Hamilton in Washington, D. C, 
April i8, 1903, aged 65. 

His widow survived him. 

He was a descendant, in the sixth generation, of William 
Pitkin of Hartford, Conn., who was bom in England in 1635. 

By his will be left to Yale University ten thousand dollars to 
found a scholarship in memory of his uncle, Anthony Dumond 
Stanley, M. A., (Yale, 1830) who was Professor of Mathematics 
in Yale College from 1836 until his death in 1853. 



* EDWARD CLARKE PORTER. 
Mrs. Porter is living in Hubbard Woods, 111. 

James F. lives in Hubbard Woods, and has an office at 135 
Adams street, Chicago, 111. 

He married in Chicago, June 16, 1898, Ruth Wads worth, 
(Bryn Mawr, 1896) daughter of William Eliot Furness and 
Lucy Fairfield Wads worth. 

CHII.DREN. 

Nancy Foster, b. Chicago, 111., June 5, 1900. 

Eliot Furness, " Hubbard Woods, " Dec. 6, 1901. 

Edward Clark, " " " Feb. 10, 1904. 

Fairfield, " " " June 10, 1907. 



* DANIEL TERTIUS POTTER. 
1829 — 1895. See Record of 1897. 



ELECTUS ABIJAH PRATT. 

He still remains in the War Department in Washington. 
He has often been a member of the board of officers of the 
Yale Alumni Association. 



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92 BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD 01? GRADUATES. 

He wrote September 19, 1908 : "We celebrated the 42d anni- 
versary of our marriage yesterday; our life on the whole has 
been happy." 

Edward lives at Ocean Grove, N. J. 



* HENRY ANDREWS PRATT. 

Mrs. Pratt is living at 10 High street, Gloversville, N. Y. 

Kate L. married in Gloversville, N. Y., June 2, 1887, Glenn 
Alonzo Tisdale, of Cortland, N. Y. 

CHILDREN. 

Glenn Wayland, b. Gloversville, N. Y., Aug. 2, 1890. 

Doris Harriet, " Cortland, " Sept. 30, 1896. 

Katherine Maude, " Providence, R. I., May 4, 1899. 

Hulda Rose, " " " June 5, 1902 

Lillian H, married in Gloversville, N. Y., October 30, 1889, 
Henry Hamilton Steele of that place. 

CH11.DRKN. 

MadeHne, b. Gloversville, N. Y., Sept. 12, 1890. 

Helen Morgan, " " " Sept. 3, 1895. 



* CHARLES FREDERICK PUMPELLY. 

He died of pneumonia at his home in Owego, N. Y., May 
10, 1907, aged 72, He rests in the Pumpelly-Parker vault in 
Evergreen Cemetery. 

He is survived by his wife, one sister, Mrs. A. Wadsworth 
Thompson, of New York; and three brothers, James Pumpelly, 
of Chicago, Joseph C, of New York, and George B., of Candor. 



* CHANNING RICHARDS. 

Mrs. Richards is living in Cincinnati, address, 10 Ortiz 
Building. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 93 

Channing W. married in Covington, Ky., April 15, 1899, Miss 
Rose, daughter of John and Kate (McKim) Leathers. 

CHILD. 

Virginia, b. Cincinnati, O., June 23, 1902. 

Paschal L., Brayton G., James S., and Virginia D. are all 
unmarried and live in Cincinnati. 



* ISAAC RILEY. 

Mrs. Riley and her two daughters, Emma V. and Kate P., are 
living in Montrose, Pa. 

Neither of the three children is married. 

« 
Isaac W. (Yale, 1892) was in 

1892-93. Teaching, Columbia Grammar School, New York 
City. 

1893-97. Studying, Union Theological Seminary, Yale Divin- 
ity and Graduate Schools. 

1897-98. Instructor in English and Lecturer in Biblical Liter- 
ature, New York University. 

1899-1901. Teaching, St. 'Paul's School, Concord, N. H. 

1901-02. Completed studies for Ph. D. Yale Graduate School. 

1902-04. Professor of Philosophy, University of New Bruns- 
wick, Canada. 

1904. Lecturer in American Philosophy, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, Baltimore. 

November, 1907, became Associate Editor of the International 
Year Book. 

1908. Taylor Professor of Philosophy in Vassar College. 

Associate Editor of the Psychological Bulletin. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

1896. "B. D. thesis on "The Apocryphal Gospel of Peter." 

1897. Gazetteer articles in The International Encyclopedia. 

1898. New York Evangelist, "The Writings of De Quincey." 
1898. M. A. thesis (Yale) on "The Metaphysics of Mormonism." 
1901. Bibliotheca Sacra, "The Letters of Junius," pp. 24. 



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94 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

1902, "The Founder of Mormonism, a Psychological Study of Joseph 
Smith, Junior; with an Introductory Preface by Prof. George Trum- 
bull Ladd," 8vo., pp. xix-j-446, Dodd, Mead & Comapny, New York. 

1903, November, "The Personal Sources of Christian Science," 
Psychological Review. 

1904, November, "The Sacred Books of the Mormons," The Book^ 
man; "The New Thought and Its Literature," Ibid, 

1905, June, "Recent Theories of Genius," Journal of Philosophy, 
1905, "The Rise of Weiser in Yale College," American Journal of 

Theology. 

Also twenty other reviews in above journals on French and Italian 
psychology, and American philosophy. 

1907, American Philosophy: the Early Schools," Dodd, Mead.& Com- 
pany, New York. 



LESLIE ROBISON. 

Mrs. Robison died May 31, 1904. 

Robison, with his sister, Mrs. Mary J. Caldwell, widow of 
Samuel Caldwell, of '58, is living at 119 Flora avenue, Peoria, 
III. He says : 

"I enjoy good health and have been in active business of late 
years. I regret that I could not be present at the fiftieth class 
meeting, but will now promise to be present at the sixtieth, and 
may be 'the last leaf upon the tree' at some subsequent meeting." 



* HENRY ROYER. 

Mrs. Royer died in Philadelphia, Pa., February 15, 1898. 

Royer died suddenly of heart failure in Denver, Col., February 
13, 1903, at the age of 65. He was buried in the Baber Ceme- 
tery in Pottsville. His military funeral was very impressive, as 
he had been so long identified with all the best interests of the 
town and was mourned by a circle of unusual extent and variety. 

Joseph W. is District Manager of the Barber Asphalt Paving 
Co., Chicago, 111. He lives in Oak Park, 111. 

He married in Pottsville, Pa., September i, 1889, Katherine, 
daughter of James Murray and Dorothy Hollister. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD O^ GRADUATES. 



95 







CHILDREN. 








Henry, Jr., 


b. 


Pottsville, Pa., 


July 


i6, 


1890. 


Katherine Whitfield, 


(( 


({ « 


Nov. 


22, 


1894. 




d. 


« « 


Apr. 


2, 


1895- 


James Murray, 


b. 


it ii 


Mar 


13. 


1906. 



Allou W. (Smith, 1895) lives in Akron, Col. 
She married in Denver, Col, November I, 1899, William 
Lionel Thompson. 

CHILDREN. 



Henry Royer, 
William Lionel, 



b. Denver, Col., 



Sept. 26, 1904. 
Sept. 30, 1906. 



Lucy D. lives in The Chatsworth, 726 street and Riverside 
drive. New York City. 

She married in Pottsville, Pa., April 5, 1893, John Cordis 
Baker of Philadelphia. 







CHILDREN. 








John Cordis, 


b. 


Philadelphia, 


Pa., 


Nov. 


12, 1894. 




d. 


« 


« 


Mar. 


19, 1895. 


Eleanor, 


b. 


it 


C( 


Oct. 


17, 1896. 


Katherine Cordis, 


t( 


Wyncote, 


n 


Sept. 


24, 1900. 


John Cordis, 


« 


it 


it 


Apr. 


18, 1902. 




d. 


it 


it 


Apr. 


19, 1903. 


Louise Sewall, 


b. 


(( 


ti 


Jan. 


4, 1907- 



EBEN GREENOUGH SCOTT. 

He was also a member of K. S. E. 

He is a member of the American Historical Association and 
of the Pennsylvania Historical Society, and has written for the 
Atlantic Monthly. 

He has resided continuously in Wilkes-Barre', Pa., visiting 
larger cities during the opera season, and passing the summers 
at his cottage on Lake St. Joseph, west of Quebec, and upon 
the Montmorenci, trying to draw out leviathan with a hook. 



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96 BIOGRAPHICAI, RJ^CORD OF GRADUATES. 

* EDWARD SEYMOUR. 
Mrs. Seymour is living with her daughter in New York City. 

James S. left the New York Evening Post and the Nation 
May I, 1897, and from July i was publisher of the Commercial 
Advertiser, and President of the Commercial Advertiser Asso- 
ciation. He went to Chicago in 1904 and became General Man- 
ager of the Record-Herald. He lives at Highland Park, 111. 

He married in Newark, N. J., June 22, 1887, Martha Steever. 







CHILDREN. 








Edward, 


b. 


New York, N. Y., 


June 


18, 


1888. 


Martha, 


« 


<( t( 


May 


6, 


1890. 




d. 


Highmount, " 


July 


9. 


1890. 


Theodore Palmer, 


b. 


New York, N. Y., 


Dec. 


18, 


1891. 


Laura Sherwood, 


(t 


a a 


Feb. 


16, 


1893. 


Jane Sherwood, 


it 


It « 


Mar. 




1898. 



Mary (Mrs. George Rice Carpenter) lives at 207 W. 56th 
street. New York City. 

CHILD. 

Margaret, b. Boston, Mass., Apr. 3, 1893. 



BRINLEY DERING SLEIGHT. 

He is still holding down Sag Harbor, N. Y., and writes that 
his only business activity is as Secretary of the Board of Educa- 
tion, which he has been for thirty-six years. 

Cornelius R,, unmarried, is Clerk of the village, and Deputy 
Collector of the port. 

William J. R. married in Sag Harbor, January 31, 1894, Miss 
Fannie, daughter of George McFarland and Catherine Dalton. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF GRADUATES. 97 
CHIU>REN. 

Evangeline Deering, b. Sag Harbor, N. Y., Nov. 6, 1894. 

Brinley Deering, ^ " " " Oct. 13, 1897. 

Mary Frances, * '' " " Dec. 3, 1899. 

Mildred Philomela, " " " May 12, 1902. 

Harry D,, unmarried, is running The Corrector. 



* GEORGE FAIRLAMB SMITH. 
Mrs. Smith is living in Wellesley, Mass. 

Mary F, (WeTlesley, 1896) is Secretary to the Dean of Welles- 
ley College. 

Persifor F. is Master Mechanic of the shops of the Pitts- 
burgh, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis R. R. at Columbus, O. 

He married in Fort Wayne, Ind., June 22, 1898, Haidee Win- 
nette, daughter of Frederick Grannis Tyler and Lucy Anna 
Orff, both of Fort Wayne. 

CHIU>REN. 

Johanna, ** b. Mansfield, O., Dec. 8, 1899. 

Thomazine Fairlamb, " Logansport, Ind., Nov. 12, 1902. 



* NORMAND SMITH. 

Mrs. Smith married second in Brunnen, Switzerland, August 
26, 1899, Bemhard Dey, Captain in the German Army. They 
lived four years in Berlin, and four years in Aurich, and for a 
year have lived in Osnabriick, Germany. 

Mary H. lives in Fox Lane, Flushing, N. Y. 
She married in New York City June i, 1899, James Purviance 
Atkinson, Chemist of the New York Board of Health. 



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gS BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OP GRADUATES. 

CHILDREN. 

Maria Elena, b. New York, N. Y., Jan. 5, 1901. 

Elisa Purviance, ** Flushing, " Aug. 23, 1902. 

James Purviance, " ** " Feb. 23, 1907. 

d. " " Oct. 4, 1907. 

Gertrude E. I. is a composer of songs, is unmarried and lives 
at 318 W. 57th street, New York City. 

Thomas M. (Yale, 1898), (LL. B. Columbia, 1901) is unmar- 
ried and lives there also. 

He is a musical critic for the New York Press. 

Angelina is living at 800 Oxford avenue, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
She married in New York City May 3, 1904, ^amuel Pierson 
Lockwood, Professor of Music at the University of Michigan. 

CHILD. 

Normand, b. New York, N. Y., Mar. 19, 1906. 

Normand F. is unmarried and visiting his mother. 

Fedor, having spent three years in practical agricultural work 
in Germany, is now studying agriculture at the University of 
Berlin. 



WILLIAM HENRY STEELE. 

Although he still owns a home in Oswego and claims a resi- 
dence there, he has been in Altmar, N. Y., since July, 1897, where 
he has a store and farm. 

After the one hundred and forty-one sessions of the New York 
State Constitutional Convention were closed, he was employed 
for fifteen months in making an index of the 4915 pages of the 
record. 

From April i. 1896, to July, 1897, ^^ assisted Col. Henry 
H. Lyman, the first Commissioner of Excise in organizing the 
new State Department under the Raines Law. 

For two years, from 1897 to 1899, a revision of the record of 
the Constitutional Convention being decided on, he was occupied 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 99 

in that work and in re-indexing the same, which, by change of 
type and of size of pages, became 5 volumes of 6000 pages, 
including Steele's admirable quadruple index of 333 pages. 
Steele gave a copy of this to the Yale Library in 1903. 

Bmerette P, married in Oswego, N. Y., October 28, 1896, 
William Foster Ballou of Syracuse, where they reside, having 
lived in Buffalo seven years. 

CHILD. 

William Steele, b. Buffalo, N. Y., Aug. 6, 1904. 



FREDERICK WILLIAM STEVENS. 

He lives at 33 West 35th street. New York City. 

He gave up his down-town office May i, 1908. He retains all 
his old positions. 

Since 1902 he has also been the First Vice-President of the 
Bank for Savings. He was Trustee of the New York Free 
Circulating Library and member of the Circulating Committee 
of the New York Public Library from 1880 to 1908. 

His clubs are the Century, University, Down Town and Yale. 

He writes : "It seems to me a noteworthy fact that while the 
father and mother of my second wife were both descendants 
of the Loyalist Refugees who founded St. John in 1783, my 
children by my first wife are third in descent from Ezra Samp- 
son, (Yale, 1773), and a Chaplain in the Revolutionary Army, 
while Frederica is fifth in descent from Oliver Arnold, (Yale, 
1776), and Rector of the first Anglican Church of St. John. 
After 130 years their descendants are united in blood and have 
a common country. I wonder if the two old Yalensians ever 
knew each other and, if so, whether they ever discussed politics 
with the usual theological heat?" 

Stevens and his first wife were legally separated in Newport, 
R. I., March 16, 1886. 



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lOO 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 



He married second in New York City December 8, 1904, Alice 
Caroline, daughter of Daniel J. and Catherine Louise (Vail) 
Seely of St. John, New Brunswick. 



Frederica, 



CHILD. 

b. New York, N. Y., 



June I, 1907. 



Adele L. (Mrs. Frederick H. Allen) lives at Pelham Manor, 
N. Y. 



Frederic Stevens, 
Mary Dorothy, 
Barbara Frances, 
Joan Livingston, 
Julian Broome, 
Priscilla Alden, 



CHILDREN. 

b. Paris, France, June 15, 1894, 

Pelham Manor, N. Y., Aug. 30, 1895 

Paris, France, Feb. 16, 1897 

Pelham Manor. N. Y., Mar. 2,7, 1898, 

" Apr. 8, 1900, 

Nov. 4, 1904 



Joseph S. joined Roosevelt's Rough Riders and went through 
the Cuban campaign of 1898, unscathed by bullet, but was 
brought near to death's door by yellow fever. 

He married in Upper Alton, 111., August i, 1899, Mrs. Clara 
(Sherwood) Rollins, daughter of William and Harriet (Wilson) 
Sherwood of Ohio. 

He has no children. 



Frances G. (Countess Charles de Gallifet) lives in France. 
Count Charles de Gallifet died at Deauville, France, Septem- 
ber 8, 1905. 



CHILDREN. 



Jacques, 



b. Paris, France, Dec. 18, 1891 



d. Trouville. 
b. Paris, 



Marguerite, 
Diane, 

d. Trouville, 
Charles Gaston Frederic, b. Paris. 
Jacqueline, '' Pau, 



Aug. 12, 1896. 

June 8, 1893 

Nov. 26, 1895 

Sept. 14, 1896. 

Nov. 24, 1898, 

Feb. 27, 1903 



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BIOGRAPHICAI« RECORD OF GRADUATES. lOI 

Mabel L. (Countess Micislas Orlowski) lives in France. 

CHILDREN. 

Alexandre, b. Paris, France, Oct. i6, 1892 

Elizabeth Dorothee, " Trouville, " Sept. 2, 1894 

Rose Clementine, '' Dunajowce, Russia, May 28, 1900. 

Eveline, *' Paris, France, Dec. 9, 1901 

Stanislas, '* Deauville, " Aug. 26, 1905 



* GEORGE EDWARD STREET. 

After twenty-eight years in the pastorate of the Second (now 
Phillips) Congregational Church in Exeter, N. H., December 
31, 1899, he was made pastor emeritus and granted the free use 
of the parsonage for life. He left a permanent impress upon 
the lives of many of the students of Phillips Academy, and 
was deeply interested in the higher life of the community. He 
did much to secure the improvement of Gilman Park, of which 
he was trustee, and at the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary 
of the town, in 1888, secured the erection of a monument mark- 
ing the spot where Whitefield preached his last sermon. Through 
ecclesiastical gatherings and in other ways he exerted a wide 
influence in the State, and was the first President of the Pis- 
cataqua Congregational Club. In 1897 he was elected a corpor- 
ate member of the American Board of Commissioners for For- 
eign Missions. He received the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Divinity from Dartmouth College in 1900. 

He frequently described his travels in letters in the local 
press, to which he also contributed articles on topics of special 
interest. He published a number of biographical sermons, 
among them, memorial addresses on Rev. Erasmus D. Eldridge, 
Amos Tuck and John Phillips, D.D., also a "Commemorative 
Discourse on the Fifty-seventh Anniversary of the Reorganiza- 
tion of the Second Church, Exeter," 1889, and had completed 
for early publication. "Mount Desert, in History, Literature 



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I02 BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

and Modern Life," having had for many years a smiimer home 
at Southwest Harbor on that island. This was edited by Samuel 
A. Elliot and issued in 1906. 

Street and his wife lived lately with their son-in-law, Rev. 
William W. Ranney, in Hartford, Conn. 

He died there of heart disease December 26, 1903, aged 68. 

Mrs. Mary Evarts Street, youngest daughter of Rev. Rufus 
Anderson, D.D., LL. D. (Bowdoin, 1818), and for nearly thirty- 
five years Foreign Secretary of the American Board, died at 
Southwest Harbor, Me. September 19, 1905. 

"After the death of her husband, Mrs. Street was in poor 
health, but was able to go to the summer home of the family 
on Mt. Desert as usual From her parentage and early sur- 
roundings she was familiar with the wide missionary work 
of our New England churches, and was the special and 
sympathetic helper of her parents in their great and always 
welcome world work. She made a trip to the Sandwich Islands 
in 1863 with her father and mother in the interests of missions, 
and wrote an interesting account of their journeys and labors 
entitled, "Scenes in the Hawaiian Islands." 

"With her scholarly and devoted husband Mrs. Street was 
always in full sympathy in his work as a minister. She had a 
great many contributary side lines to aid him. She made con- 
nection with people outside the regular channels of formal parish 
visiting and brought them into the friendly Christian circle. 
She was by instinct and cultivation a social leader, and her home 
was always the clearing house for a great variety of friendly 
personalities and groups of travelers. Her family ties spread 
widely, and this range was vastly increased by her fellowships 
with Christian workers, saints and personal friends throughout 
the world. Her house was never full till it overflowed, and this 
to the very last. She would formally invite tired workers who 
needed a bit of cheer and rest, and multitudes of others scented 
the hospitable atmosphere and found the door open and were 
constrained to drop in, for a bit of sky line and the twinkle of 
stars in the dark day. Seldom did twenty-four hours pass with- 
out the experience of some guests. She kept the social manor 
, house for many groups of cottagers. Young people were at a 
premium and old ones were kept young at the manse. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF GRADUATES. IO3 



"Mrs. Street herself had no inconsiderable literary talent, 
while she also aided in her husband's closing labors. She had 
completed a genealogy of the Street family, involving large cor- 
respondence. She also assisted in the rich volume, Mt. Desert, 
which her husband left unfinished. 

"In her last hours there were no marked symptoms of pain. 
The services and burial were at Exeter, September 21, among 
the familiar scenes and beloved people of their nearly mirty 
years* ministry." 

In January, 1906, a memorial tablet was placed in Phillips 
Church by friends of Doctor Street. 

George H. (Yale, 1897) lives at 50 Moreland street, Roxbury, 
Mass. 

He reported for two months in New Haven, was nine months 
in a flour mill in Detroit, two months in a machine shop in Hart- 
ford, was a while in New Haven, reporting, insuring, and adver- 
tising; he then attended the Harvard Law School. 

Later he was in the real estate business in Roxbury. 

He was in 1906 in brokerage in Boston at 50 Congress street. 

He married in Providence, R. I., April 9, 1898, Gertrude, 
daughter of William Henry Towne of Boston and Mary Johnson 
Bird. 

CHII4). 

Wolcott Davenport, b. Boston, Mass., Sept. 4, 1906. 

Helen L. lives in Hartford, Conn. 

She married in Hartford, Conn., October 7, 1903, Rev. Wil- 
liam W. Ranney, pastor of the Park Congregational Church. 
They have no children. 



* PRESTON IRVING SWEET. 
1834— 1858. See Record of 1897. 



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I04 BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

^ * HENRY EDWARD SWEETSER. 
1837 — 1870. See Record of 1897. 



* EDMUND MORSE TAFT. 
1834— 1858. See Record of 1897. 



* ELISHA SMITH THOMAS. 

November i, 1908, on the bank of the Mississippi at Minne- 
apolis, Minn., there was dedicated a Hospital constructed only 
for tuberculosis patients of the advanced type. At the entrance 
is engraved upon a marble tablet "This building is dedicated 
to the memory of Elisha Smith Thomas, Bishop of Kansas, 
Philosopher, Philanthropist, Friend, 1907." 

Mrs. Thomas has for more than ten years been living at 332 
S. 2 1 St street, Philadelphia, with her son, Nathaniel S, 

Nathaniel S. was Rector of St. Matthew's Church, Wheeling, 
W. Va., from November i, 1897, to December i, 1899. From 
December i, 1899, to the present time. Rector of the Church of 
the Holy Apostles, Philadelphia; Examining Chaplain of the 
Diocese of Pennsylvania; from 1902 to 1905, lecturer on Pastoral 
Care at the Philadelphia Divinity School; in 1902 was elected 
to the Bishopric of Salina, but declined. " In 1908 he was dele- 
gate from the Diocese of Pennsylvania, to the Pan-Anglican 
Congress in London. 

He married in Quincy, 111., June 4, 1896, Edith, daughter of 
Edward and Virginia (Arthur) Prince. 

They have no children. 

George O. (LL. B. University Law School, New York, 1897) 
was admitted to the New York Bar in 1900, and practiced in 
New York until 1905, when he removed to Philadelphia. 

He is not married. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. IO5 

CHARLES TOMLINSON. 
There is no change. 



* HENRY HOLMES TURNER. 
1831 — 1893. See Record of 1897. 



* THEODORE WOOLSEY TWINING. 
1835 — 1864. See Record of 1897. 



* THOMAS GILBERT VALPY. 
1832 — 1890. See Record of 1897. 



ADDISON VAN NAME. 

After forty years in the Yale Library, he resigned, becoming 
Librarian Emeritus. 

The Corporation at its meeting November 21, 1904, authorized 
the recording of the following minute : 

"Mr. Addison Van Name, having resigned his office as Libra- 
rian of the University since 1865, ^md being no longer able to 
endure the labor incident to the full duties of the position, the 
Corporation accept his resignation, yet hope he will still retain 
some duties in the Library which no one else on the ground 
can so well fulfill as himself. 



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I06 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

"In relieving Mr. Van Name from his official position, the 
Corporation desire to express to him their gratitude for the 
unwearied fidelity and eminent ability with which he has served 
the University in this office for so many years. 

"The Corporation, in taking this action, would also express 
their warm recognition of the several points of excellence that 
stand out in Mr. Van Name as a Librarian. 

"The unusual range of his interests, — comprehending many 
branches of science and literature, with the result that the 
Library under his care has moved forward systematically and in 
as true proportions as was possible under existing conditions. 

"His remarkable memory, which rarely fails him in recalling 
the important purchases or gifts of books added to the Library — 
thus making it more available for use to students. 

"His rare judgment in purchasing, so that the slender income 
of past years yielded results far beyond reasonable expectations. 

"His uncommon linguistic attainments, which have gone so far 
to provide the means and promote the efficiency of the Library 
as the chief condition of learning. 

"His unfailing courtesy and patience towards both the patrons 
and the staff of the Library, which have been constant and potent 
factors for successful administration of the department. 

"The Corporation offer to Mr. Van Name their congratulations 
on the long service thus administered, and their cordial wishes 
for his continued health in the years to come." 

He spent the summers of 1903 and 1907 with his family in 
Europe, chiefly in Italy. In January, 190^ he went to Egypt. 

Willard G. (B. A. Yale, 1894; Ph. D. Yale, 1898) was Assist- 
ant in Biology in 1897-9, and the year following he spent at the 
University of Berlin. 

In 1902-3 he was Assistant in Histology at Yale. 

Since 1903 he has been with the G. & C. Merriam Co. in 
Springfield, Mass. 

Ralph G: (B. A. Yale, 1899; Ph. D. Yale, 1902) was Assistant 
in Chemistry from 1900 to 1902. 

The next two years he spent at the Universities of Leipzig 
and Goettingen, studying especially Physical Chemistry. 

Since 1904 he has been Instructor in Chemistry at Yale. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI* RECORD O^ GRADUATES. 107 

* GIDEON WELLS. 

From 1889 to 1892 he was a member of the law firm of 
Wells, McClench & Barnes. 

He was President of the Anthracite Coal Co. of Pottsville, Pa., 
a Director of the Glasgow Mfg. Co. of South Hadley Falls, 
Mass., of the Western Massachusetts Fire Insurance Co., and of 
the Old Women's Home, and a member of the Governing Board 
of the Springfield Hospital. 

He died at his home, 52 Avon Place, March 26, 1898, of 
Bright's disease. He had been failing for two years, but had 
been able to attend to his business until January 17th, from which 
for two weeks his condition was critical. He however rallied, 
and drove out occasionally. March loth he went with his wife 
to Virginia for relief, stopped in New York, Washington and 
Richmond, and enjoyed the first few days at Old Point Comfort. 
A sudden change occurred, and he came home with his physician, 
arriving on the 24th in a state of extreme weakness, and nearly 
unconscious. From this condition he did not rally. 

As a lawyer, Wells had for forty years maintained the best 
traditions of the Massachusetts Bar ; as a business adviser he had 
no superior. To sound common sense, a retentive memory and 
an intuitive knowledge of men and affairs he added a large expe- 
rience, which made him a formidable antagonist and a safe coun- 
selor. If he was brusque in his manner at times, it was only a 
manifestation of his impatience with non-essentials. If he was 
cynical, it was to conceal a wider belief and a warmer heart than 
many possess. 

He grew with his responsibilities, and was everywhere respected 
for his strength and force of character. His farm and his garden 
were his hobbies. In society and in his home he was ever the 
same delightful, entertaining, jolly, always ready and kind heart 
that we knew at Yale. 

Mrs. Wells is living at 52 Avon Place, Springfield. 
Gilbert is unmarried and lives with Mrs, Wells. 



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I08 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

* HENRY ALBERT WELLS. 
1838— 1871. See Record of 1897. 



* CHARLES BOARDMAX WHITTLESEY. 
1834 — 1864. See Record of 1897. 



ALBERT BYRON WILBUR. 

He is still living in Middletown, N. Y., He wrote November 
19, 1908: 

'*I have continued in the real estate and insurance business to 
the present time, and have in addition some pecuniary interest 
in orange and mango plantations in Porto Rico. 

"In 1896 I was active in organizing The Orange County Tele- 
phone Company in opposition to the Bell Telephone Co. and 
have held therein official position most of the time since, either 
as President, Vice-President, Treasurer, or General Manager, 
and am still in the Directorate. 

"In 1900 I was elected a member of the Board of Education 
of this city, and was its President for three years. 

"In 1903 I went to San Francisco as a delegate from this 
state to the National Encampment of The Grand Army of the 
Republic, made a tour along the continent's western edge from 
Los Angeles to Seattle, and visited the Yellowstone National 
Park on the way home. 

"In 1904 I went in a similar capacity to Denver, and visited 
many of the mining camps and places of note in Colorado. 

"I have been for many years a member of the Dutch Reformed 
Church, of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, of the Masonic Fraternity, and of the Knights of 
Pythias. 

"I am a descendant in the eighth generation from Samuel Wil- 
bur (Wildborej who migrated from Yorkshire, England, became 
a member of the First Church of Boston in 1633, was admitted 
as a Freeman in 1634, and banished from the colony in 1637 on 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. IO9 

account of his religious views; fled, by advice of Roger Wil- 
liams, with seventeen others, to Providence, where they founded 
a new colony, and he with five associates purchased from the 
Chief Sachems of the Narragansett Indians the island of Rhode 
Island." 



CHARLES HENRY WILLIAMS. 

He lives at The Standish, Worcester, Mass. 

He is a descendant, in the seventh generation, of Robert Wil- 
liams, who was in Roxbury, Mass., in 1637. 

His father was of Yale, 1816, grandfather Yale, 1772, great- 
grandfather Yale, 1735, great-great-grandfather Harvard, 1711, 
and great-great-great-grandfather Harvard, 1683. 

Williams lived in Hartford until August, 1902, then iq New 
London until January, 1908, when he removed to Worcester, 
Mass. 

The chief fields of his work have been Litchfield, New London, 
New Haven and Fairfield Counties in Connecticut, the Central 
Church in Worcester and the First Church in Springfield, Mass. 

In 1901 an attack of vertigo caused him to fall in his room 
in New Haven and break his right arm. 

In August, 1907, in New London, he was run over by a tour- 
ing car, resulting in various bruises and contusions, a broken 
rib, and a compound fracture of the left leg. 

A few historical and biographical papers have employed his 
pen ' from time to time. 



CHARLES HORNBLOWER WOODRUFF. 

He traces his descent through numerous lines to the earliest 
settlement of this country, numbering among his ancestors a 
governor of the Colonies, officers in the Indian Wars, members of 
the Continental Congress, and officers in the Revolution. 

His great-grandfather, James Woodruflf, served as a private 
soldier in the Revolutionary War. His grandfather, Morris 



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no BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. 

Woodruff, was a Judge of County Court in Connecticut, and his 
father, Lewis Bartholomew, was Judge of the highest Court of. 
New York State, and of the U. S. Circuit Court. His maternal 
grandfather, Joseph Courten Hornblower, LL. D.,.was Chief Jus-, 
tice of New Jersey. Woodruff became a hereditary member of 
the "Society of the Cincinnati" in New Jersey, February 22, 1895. 

In 1899 he spent several months in Spain, Algeria, Egypt, 
Palestine, Turkey, Greece and Italy, and in 1 901 he made the 
tour of the British Isles, taking in Paris. 

He has retired from active practice, although he retains an 
office at 165 Broadway. He still lives in the winter at 14 E. 68th 
street. New York, and in the summer in Litchfield, Confi. 

Lewis B. (Yale, 1890) spent a year at Columbia University 
and another at the New York University, whence he rec^eived the 
degree of LL. B. in 1892. 

He was admitted to the New York Bai; in October, 1893. 

Since 1891 he has been in the law office of Hornblower, Byrne, 
Miller and Potter. 

In 1897 and 1899 he was -much of the time in Europe. 

He married in Birmingham, Ala.» June 18, 1904, Helen, daugh- 
ter of Oscar E. and Emma (West) Smith of Birmingham, Ala. 

They have no children. 

Frederick S.j (Yale, 1892) after some months in Europe and 
study in the New York Law School, two years as clerk for Root 
& Clarke, and a while in his father's office, he became in May, " 
1897, on the retirement of his father, a member of Gulipk, Wood- 
ruff & Marsh. May i, 1902, the firm dissolved and he opened 
an office at 170 Broadway, with his father as counsel. 

He is a member of the University, Strollers, D. K. E. Ass'n, 
Sons of the Revolution, and Society of Colonial Wars. 

He is unmarried. 

Charles H. was in business in New York, and unmarried. 
He died there February 17, 1909. 

Edward S. (Yale, 1899) was born December 23, 1876. 
He spent a year, as a post-graduate, studying Biology at the 
Johns Hopkins University and, after a short service with a firm 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF GRADUATES. Ill 

dealing in investment securities in New York, entered the Forest 
School at Yale, and graduated with honor in 1907. He then 
became State Forester of New York. 

While forestry was his chosen profession, he had from early 
youth manifested a keen interest in original research in several 
branches of natural history, especially in botany, entomology and 
ornithology. He continued these studies in connection with his 
life work and was widely known to the scientific world for his 
contributions to the literature pertaining to these subjects. 

He was a member of several clubs and associations, scientific 
and fraternal, including the National Geographical Society, Grad- 
uates, New Haven, The American Forestry Association, The 
American Ornithologists' Union, Sigma Xi, Robin Hood, Delta 
Phi and University and Country Clubs of Albany, N. Y. 

He died at his father's home in New York, January 15, 1909, 
after being sick three weeks with typhoid fever. He was buried 
in Litchfield, Conn. 

He never married. 



* WILLIAM HERRICK WOODWARD. 
1838— 1893. See Record of 1897. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 

OF 

NON-GRADUATES. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 

OF 

NON-GRADUATES. 

* JOSEPH HYDE ANDREWS. 

He continued in the real estate business in Chicago with his 
brother, Ebenezer (Yale, 1861), until 1876, when his brother 
retired. 

He was for many years afterwards identified with building 
and commercial enterprises. 

He resided for many years at the Calumet Club, of which he 
was for a time Vice-President. 

He died, unmarried, at the Club in Chicago, December 11, 
1906, aged 71. 



* EDWARD JOHNSON COALE ATTERBURY. 
1838—1855. See Record of 1865. 



* GEORGE BADGER. 

During the last twelve years of his life he practiced medicine 
in Aspinwall, S. A. 
He never married. 
He died there, June 16, 1877, aged 42. 



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Il6 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 

* WILLIAM BADGER. 

From October, 1864, to 1868, he practiced medicine in West- 
port, Conn; from 1868 to 1871, in Hastings, N. Y., and from 
1871, in Flushing, N. Y. 

FaiHng health compelled his retirement in 1892, soon after 
which he moved to 135 Madison avenue, Flushing, where, after 
an illness of over two years, he died of paralysis, February 13, 
1908, aged 74. 

He married, first, in New York, January 21, 1864^ Mary 
Emily, daughter of Rev. Alexander Hamilton Crosby and Julia 
Ann Barker. 

Mrs. Badger died October i, 1879. 

He married, second, in Flushing, N. Y., June 7, 1893, Mrs. 
Emma Estelle Donly, daughter of Rev. John Battersby, of 
Greene County, N. Y., and Mary North Haynes, and former 
wife of Stephen Lester Donly. 

CHILDREN. 

Clara Crosby, b. Hastings, N. Y., July 16, 1868. 

George Crosby, " " " Mar. 22, 1870. 

Clara C. married in Croton, Falls, N. Y., May 9, 1894, LoUis 
Anson Du Bois, now of East Orange, N. J. 

CHILDREN. 

Anna, b. Croton Falls, N. Y. July 25, 1895. 

Emily Crosby, " East Orange, N. J., July 24,1900. 

George C, who is a Superintendent of Iron Works, married 
in Port Chester, N. Y., April 17, 1894, Miss Nellie, daughter of 
George H. Ellis and Mary A. Hunter. 

CHILD. 

Helen Marie, b. Port Chester, N. Y., Mar. i, 1895. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF NON-GRADUATKS. II7 

* ROBERT GRAY BANCROFT. 

His health failed soon after leaving Harvard and he was never 
able to enter an active life. 

He died, unmarried, in New London, N. H., December 23, 
1906, and was buried in Mt. Auburn, Cambridge, Mass. 



JOHN EDWARD BEALE. 
Never located. 



SAMUEL COLLINS BEANE. 

He lives at 43 E. Haverhill street, Lawrence, Mass. 

He was Minister of East Church in Salem, Mass., from Jan- 
uary I, 1865, to January i, 1878, and of the Second Congrega- 
tional Church in Concord, N. H., from January 8, 1878, to May 
10, 1885. 

He was Field Agent of the American Unitarian Association 
for Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, from May 10, 1885, 
to May 15, 1888. 

He was Minister of the First Religious Society in Newbury- 
port, Mass., from May 15, 1888, to May 15, 1965, and since then 
has been of the First Unitarian Church of Lawrence, Mass. 

He received the degree of D.D. from Dartmouth College in 
1894. 

He married, first, in Stowe, Mass., .May 22, 1862, Carrie 
Brooks, daughter of Nathan Sprague and Elmira (Whitney) 
Turner. 

She died in Salem, Mass., January 25, 1867. 

He married, second, in Salem, Mass., January 7, 1869, Miss 
Harriet Cook, daughter of Ephraim and Susan (Prentiss) Gray. 

She died in Hanover, N. H., August 19, 1904. 



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Jl8 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD O^ NON-GRADUATES. 



William Hilliard, 


b. 


Chicopee, 


Mass., 


May 23, 1863. 




d. 


it 


« 


(young) 


Prentiss Collins, 


b. 


Salem, 


« 


Nov. 26, 1869. 




d. 


« 


(( 


Mar. 9^ 1873. 


Caroline Turner, 


b. 


« 


« 


Dec. 9, 1872. 




d. 


« 


€t 


Sept. 12, 1873. 


Samuel Collins, 


b. 


« 


(( 


Dec. 9, 1872. 


Elizabeth Silsbee. 


« 


t( 


it 


Nov. 27, 1875. 



Samuel C. was graduated in 1899 from the Meadville Theo- 
logical School, Pa., and is Minister of the Old North Church at 
North Andover, Mass. 

He married in Waterbury, Vt., August 27, 1901, Miss Mary 
Ellen, daughter of John Downer and Mary Jane (Camp) Smith. 

Elizabeth S, was graduated from Smith College in 1899. 



* HENRY MARTYN BOIES. 

In th fall of 1865 he settled in Scranton, Pa., and entered the 
firm of Laflin, Boies & Turck, which, in 1869, was consolidated 
with the Moosic Powder Company, and of this he was President 
for over 30 years. In order to prevent the many fatal accidents 
due to careless handling of cartridges by lamplight, he invented 
a cartridge package which was extensively used. In 1882 he 
became President of the Dickson Manufacturing Company, which 
he reorganized, enlarging and improving its property, and four 
years later built the Boies Steel Car Wheel Works for the 
manufacture of an improved steel-tired car wheel of his own 
invention. He was also President of the Enterprise Powder 
Manufacturing Company, and a director of other leading manu- 
facturing companies, one of the incorporators and for ten years 
director of the Third National Bank, and in 1887 was elected 
President of the Board of Trade of Scranton. He was a mem- 
ber of the executive committee of the Municipal League, a Trus- 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON -GRADUATES. II9 

tee of the Scranton Public Library, and at one time a member 
of the City Board of Public Instruction. In 1884 he was a dele- 
gate to the Republican National Convention in Chicago. 

During the labor troubles in 1S77 he organized the City Guard, 
of which he was chosen Commander, and when this body was 
mustered into the National Guard he became Major. In 1878 
the independent companies were consolidated with the battalion 
to form the Thirteenth Regiment, and of this he was appointed 
Colonel. He brought the regiment to a high degree of efficiency, 
but, at the end of five years, business duties compelled him to 
decline a reelection. 

Colonel Boies was appointed a member of the Board of Public 
Charities of Pennsylvania in 1886, serving on the executive com- 
mittee and committee on lunacy. He was a member of the 
National Prison Association, and various other philanthropic 
societies. As a result of thorough study of crime and pauperism 
he published, in 1893, "Prisoners and Paupers," and in 1901, 
'*The Science of Penology." He wrote for Harper's Magazine 
in 1880 on the National Guard, and occasionally contributed to 
trade periodicals. 

He traveled widely and gathered many curiosities and a choice 
collection of orchids. With the religious interests of the city and 
state he was actively identified, having been President of the 
Trustees of the Second Presbyterian Church since 1884, Secre- 
tary and Trustee of the Lackawanna County Bible Society, Trus- 
tee of the Young Women's Christian Association, Trustee of the 
Young Men's Christian Association and President of the same 
from 1870 to 1874, and from 1888 to 1890; member for many 
years of the State Executive Committee of the Young Men's 
Christian Association. While on his way home from a mission 
to Washington in behalf of the State Convention of that associa- 
tion which was to be held in Scranton, he was taken ill on the 
train and died of angina pectoris in Wilkes-Barre, December 
12, 1903, at the age of 66. 

He married, first, in Philadelphia, Pa., December 26, 1861, 
Emma G., daughter of Rev. Thomas Chalmers and Mary (Whit- 
ing) Brainerd. 



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I20 



BIOGRAPHICAL MCX)RD OF NON-GRADUATlSS. 



Mrs. Boies died in Scranton, Pa., November ii, 1868. 

He married, second, in Scranton, Pa., February 17, 1870, Eliz- 
abeth, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Marvine) Dickson of 
Scranton. 







CHILDREN. 








May, 


b. 


Scranton, 


Pa., 


Jan. 


22, 1863. 




d. 


n 


n 


Aug. 


13, 1866. 


Carrington, 


b. 


** 


i( 


May 


13, 1865. 




d. 


(( 


« 


Aug. 


10, 1866. 


Henry Whiting, 


b. 


n 


t( 


Feb. 


5, 186^. 




d. 


Philadelphia, 


ii 


June 


27, 1906. 


Mary Dickson, 


b. 


Scranton, 


Pa., 


Jan. 


25, 1872. 




d. 


ti 


« 


July 


8, 1876. 


Joseph Milton, 


b. 


u 


it 


Aug. 


8, 1873. 




d. 


(( 


t< 


Apr. 


27, 1898. 


(Son), 


b. 


(t 


« 


Mar. 


IS, 1877. 




d. 


it 


it 


Mar. 


18, 1877. 


Ethel Marvine, 


b. 


ii 


tt 


Oct. 


2, 1878. 


David, 


« 


ti 


ti 


Sept. 


29, 1881. 


Helen Elizabeth, 


(( 


New York, 


N. Y. 


, Jan. 


6, 1886. 



Henry W. (Yale, 1888), was, after graduation, for some years 
in the coal business in Chicago, then became Vice-iPresident of 
the Boies Steel Wheel Company in Scranton, Pa., and later 
was with the Du Pont Powder Company until his death. 

He never married. 

Joseph M, was graduated in 1895 from Yale Sheff. 

David (Yale, 1904), worked for a year in the Engineering 
Department of the Scranton Coal Company, and then became 
President and General Manager of the Spencer Heater Com- 
pany in Scranton. 

He married in Wayne, Pa., Feburary 2, 1907, Ethel May, 
daughter of Pearson Serrill and May (Stretch) Conrad. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 121 

LANE WILLIAM BRANDON. 

He was a son of William Lindsay Brandon (l>rig. Gen'l., C. 
S. A.) and Ann Eliza Ratliffe, and was born in Wilkinson 
County, Miss., August 15, 1837, at 12:30 P. M., just as Mars 
was rising. 

It was predicted, at the time, that he would witness a great 
war. 

His grandfather, Gerard Chittic Brandon, was born in County 
Donegal, Ireland, was a Colonel, commanding a regiment 
at the battle of King's Mountain, and was commended in the 
official report. 

His wife's grandfather was a Captain in the regular army 
of the U. S. A., arid was in Col. Cushing's Cavalry Regiment at 
Fort Adams, Miss. 

Brandon has been a cotton planter ever since the war, except- 
ing that from 1884 to 1896, he served three four-year terms as 
Clerk of the District Court and ex-oMcio Clerk of the Appellate 
Court. His sight failing, he withdrew from candidacy. 

He has had cataracts removed from both eyes, and has been 
for some years on a restricted diet for a diabetic affection. 

He married at Wyoming Plantation in Wilkinson County, 
Miss., October 20, 1865, Miss Ann Eliza, daughter of Col. Robert 
and Francina Rosaltha (Wade) Sample. 

CHILDREN. 

Francina Alice, b. Wilkinson Co., Miss., July 6, 1867. 

Sarah, " " " Dec. 14, 1869. 

Belle Liddell " " " Jan. 5, 1874. 

Mary Ryland, " " " Feb. 27, 1879. 

Sarah married at Como Plantation, West Feliciana County, 
La., June 22, 1892, Daniel Robert Buchanan, a native of South 
Rye Gate, Vt., and then Professor in Tulane University, New 
Orleans, La. 

CHILDREN. 

Lydia, b. New Orleans, La., May 17, 1893, 

Lane Brandon, " " " Sept. 14, 1895. 

Anna Brandon, " W. Feliciana Co., " Oct. 27, 1897. 

Mary Ryland, " " " Dec. 26, 1898. 

Belle Brandon, " " " Dec. i, 1901. 



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122 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON -GRADUATES. 



Mary R. married at Como Plantation, May 22, 1899, James 
Davenport Wood, a merchant and a native of Port Gibson, 
Miss. 

CHILDREN. 

James Davenport, b. St. Francisville, La., Mar. 25, 1901. 

Frank Brandon, " W. Feliciana Co., " Aug. 20, 1902. 

Mary Lacy, '* " " Nov. i, 1904. 

Earl Van Dorn, " " " Sept. 25, 1906. 



JOHN HENRY BRIGHT. 
Never located. 



* FREDERICK LEMUEL BUCKELEW. 

He left the service in December, 1864, with the rank of Major, 
and continued to manage the estate of his father, in Jamesburg, 
N. J., until his death. 

From January, 1876, he was Vice-President of the First 
National Bank until December, 1884, and thereafter President 
until 1901. 

He died in Jamesburg, N. J., March 8, 1901, at the age of 65. 

Mrs. Buckelew died there January 19, 1905. 

He married in Bridgeville, Del., October 27, 1869, Ellie 
Sophia, daughter of William and Margaret (Laws) Cannon. 

CHILDREN. 

Bessie, b. Bridgeville, Del., June 18, 1871. 

d. " " July 18, 1872. 

Frederick Lemuel, b. Jamesburg, N. J., Nov. 4, 1872. 

William Cannon, " " " Dec. 10, 1875. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON -GRADUATES. 1 23 

Frederick L. lives in Jamesburg, N. J. 

He is engaged in the lumber business, and is President of the 
First National Bank. 

He married in Washington, D. C, April 28, 1906, Mary 
Hunter, daughter of Thomas Munroe and. Marion Virginia 
(Gait) Elliott. 

William C. is unmarried. 

He is a manufacturer of aluminum castings in Bridgeport, 
Conn. 



CHARLES BUCKINGHAM. 

From 1865 to 1870 he was an United States Appraiser at 
the port of New York. 

He then took up literature. His work has consisted of mono- 
graphs on civil and naval architecture and on archaeology, which 
have appeared in various newspapers and periodicals. 

He married in New York City, April 7, 1865, Maria, daugh- 
ter of Stephen West and Catherine Drake. 

Mrs. Buckingham died, s. p., at Highlands, N. J., October 
IS. 1870. 

His address in October, 1908, was 122 Chandler street, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 



* FREDERICK FOSTER BURLOCK. 

He remained in Birmingham, Conn., until 1866, and then 
moved to Chicago, where he became a member of the law lirm 
of Rae, Mitchell & Burlock. 

In 1867 he opened a branch office in New York City, but 
after some, months' sickness, he gave up law and went with 
his wife to Europe and engaged in business, where, except one 
visit to the United States in 1873-4, they were until 1877, when 



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124 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD O^ NON-GRADUATES. 

Mrs. Burlock came home to care for her parents, who died in 
1888 and 1889. Burlock came home now and then, but wrote 
in 1 89 1 that he had failed and expected to come home in two 
weeks. As nothing to 1908 has been heard of him since, it 
is infered that he is dead. 

He married in Davenport, la., May 18, 1861, Julia, daughter of 
Col. Daniel H. and Lydia (Martin) Wheeler. 

He had no children. 

Mrs. Burlock is in the Scott County Hospital in Davenport, 
Iowa. 



* GEORGE BIBB BURNLEY. 
1838— 1863. See Record of 1865. 



CARLOS CLEMENT CARPENTER. 

In 1867, because of poor health, he was dismissed from his 
church in Brookline, Mass. 

After three .years in business he was, from 1870 to 1880, 
Pastor of the Mt. Pleasant Unitarian Church in Boston. 

Following ten years of business life, he was, from 1890 to 
1902, Pastor of the Harvard Church in Charlestown, Mass. 

Since 1902, he has been in Owasso, Mich., he says, 

"Watching as from some ruined tower, 
How grows the day of human power." 

He married, first, in Montague, Mass., August 7, i860, Miss 
Nellie L., daughter of Apollos and Lucy (Kinsley) Gunn. 

Mrs. Carpenter died in Boston, Mass., October 31, 1888. 

He married, second, in Detroit, Mich., September 11, 1902, 
Mrs. Maria Elizabeth Thomas of Owasso, Mich., daughter of 
Henry Knill and Louisa Richards, and former wife of George 
Thomas. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF NON -GRADUATES. 1 25 

CHIU>. 

Helen De Forest, b. Derby, Conn., June ii, 1865. 

Helen De F, married in Boston, Mass., November 26, 1889, 
Charles Frederick Stodder, of Boston. 

CHILD. 

Clement Kimball, b. Boston, Mass., May 26, 1895. 



* ORLANDO ERASTUS CHAMBERLIN. 

From Jime i, 1859, he cultivated his father's farm in Great 
Bend, Pa., after 1865 establishing on the estate, from which he 
cut, a lumber business. 

In 1876 he sold out and bought a lumber yard in Dunellen, 
N. J., where he remained until 1879, when he removed to Plain- 
field, and engaged in real estate and lumber business. 

About 1901, having lost his wife and three sons, he went to 
Chicago, where he passed his last six years with his daughter, 
and was most happy in the enjoyment of golf, his books and 
his friends. 

He died July 29, 1907, at the age of 78. 

Mrs. Chamberlain died in Plainfield, N. J., October 2, 1901. 

He married in Luray, Va., January 4, 1857, Mary Hickman, 
daughter of Samuel and Mary (Hickman) Cram. 

CHILDREN. 

Ernest Orlando, b. Great Bend, Pa., Oct. 9, 1859. 

d. Edge water, N. J., Apr. 29, 1897. 

Georgia Louisa, b. Great Bend, Pa., May 9, 1862 

Wilbur Johnson, " " " Mar. 12, 1865 

d. Carlsbad, Germany, Aug. 15, 1901 

Walter Nelson, b. Great Bend, Pa., Oct. 2, 1870. 

d. Plainfield, N. J., July 29, 1900 

Ernest O. became, in 1878, Editor and Proprietor of the Plain- 
field (N. J.) Daily Bulletin; was in 1882 and 1883 Secretary 
in the New Jersey Senate and House of Representatives ; was on 



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126 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF XON-GRADUATES. 

the Staff of the Philadelphia Press; was Special Correspondent 
and City Editor of the New York Sun for some years, and was 
Manager Editor of the New York Evening World. 

He married in Philadelphia, Pa., in 1883, Clara L. Dore. 

They lived at Edgewater on the Palisades, N. J., where he died 
April 29, 1897. 

They had no children. 

Georgia L., unmarried, was Reader, Chautauqua Literary and 
Scientific Circle, 1882- 1890; Secretary, Chautauqua Summer 
Schools, 1 883- 1 898; Secretary, American Institute of Sacred 
Literature, 1891-1908; private classes in Biblical Literature, 
1898-1906; conducted courses in Biblical Literature and Peda- 
gogy, University College, University of Chicago, 1904; is now 
Secretary in the American Institute of Sacred Literature, the 
University Extension Division of the University of Chicago, 111. 

Wilbur J. entered business in 1882; was on the staff of the 
New York Sun, 1886 to 1901, being, during our war with Spain 
and the Boxer outbreak in China, a special war correspondent. 
While recuperating at Carlsbad, Germany, on his return, he died, 
August 15, 1901. His letters from China and other places were 
published in book form about 1904, entitled "Ordered to China," 
Frederick Stokes & Co., New York. 

He married in Plainfield, N. J., September 27, 1884, Laura, 
daughter of Amos and Phebe (Wilcox) Moffatt. 

Mrs. Wilbur J. Chamberlain lives at 236 New York avenue, 
Brooklyn, N..Y. 

CHIU>REN. 

Grace Laura, b. Jersey City, N. J., Dec. 16, 1886. 

Georgie Helen, " " " Dec. 28, 1888. 

Wilbur Johnson, " " " July 21, 1893. 

Chester Lord, " " " Jan. 15, 1897. 

Walter N. was, from 1889 to 1900, Special New York Corre- 
spondent of newspapers in Chicago, Cincinnati, Pittsburg, Provi- 
dence and Troy. 

During our war with Spain he was Assistant Cable Editor of 
the New York Sun. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF XON-GRADL'ATES. 1 27 

WILLIAM BRADFORD DARRACH. 

He was Stated Supply of the Presbyterian Church at Winne- 
conne, Wis., 1 863-1 865 ; Missionary at Barnegat, N. J., 1865- 
1866; Stated Supply at Upper Mt. Bethel, Pa., 1868-1871 ; Pas- 
tor at Shickshinny, Pa., 1871-1876; Stated Supply at Orwell, 
Pa., 1876-1877; Stated Supply at Behman and Northumberland, 
Pa., 1878-1879; Stated Supply at Scott, Pa., 1880-1881 ; without 
charge at Walden, N. Y., 1882-1885; Pastor Reformed Dutch 
Church at Kerhonkson, N. Y., 1886: without charge at Walden, 
N. Y., 1887-1889; without charge at Fishkill, N. Y., 1890-1893; 
Stated Supply of the Presbyterian Church at Mt. Pleasant, Pa., 
1894; without charge at Newark, N. J., 1895; ^^ Newburgh, N. 
Y., 1896-1899; at Ambler, Pa., 1900-1904. 

Since 1904, he has done no preaching, and has lived in New- 
burgh, N. Y. 

He is "amusing" himself by selling new and old books at yy 
Broadway, in Newburgh. 

He is a member of the Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of 
the Revolution, and of the Newburgh Historical Society. 

He has never married. 



* JOHN DAVENPORT. 

After graduation he accompanied Gen. R. B. Valkenburg 
(then resident minister to that country) to Japan, and traveled 
thence home around the world, being absent a period of about 
two and one-half years. On his return he engaged in real estate 
business in Bath, N. Y. In this he was very successful, and the 
wealth which he accumulated he bestowed liberally on various 
benevolent objects. He aided many young men and women in 
their efforts to obtain an education and was an unostentatious 
but generous contributor to the wants of a large number of poor 
people. 

From 1868 to the end of his life he was President of the 
Trustees of the Davenport Orphan Home, in the town where he 
resided. For more than twentv vears he was Chairman of the 



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128 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 

Trustees of the Presbyterian Church and was the donor of one- 
half of the amount required for its costly house of worship. 

He died of paralysis, in Bath, N. Y., May 5, 1895, aged 59. 

He married June 11, 1879, Sarah, daughter of James Lyon, 
of Bath, N. Y., who survives him. 

They had no children. 



JOHN MILTON DAVIS. 
Never located. 



MOULTON DE FOREST. 

In December, 1865, he entered the employ of Henry Folsom 
& Co., importers, in St. Louis, Mo., and remained until July, 
1880, when he gave up because of ill health. 

Since then he has lived in Wetmore, Kan., where he has long 
been conspicuous with pen, voice and work in the cause of tem- 
perance. 

He was in the ''law, land, loan and collection" business of the 
firm of Burlingame & De Forest, which was dissolved in Decem- 
ber, 1892. Since then he has conducted the business alone. 

He has been for several years Secretary of the School Board. 

He married in Wetmore, Kan., June 12, 1889, Mary A., daugh- 
ter of John Thomas and Mary Matthews. 







CHIU>REN. 




Thomas Moulton, 


b. 


Wetmore, Kan., 


May 22, 1890. 


Paul, 


u 


it it 


Dec. 31, 1892. 




d. 


it it 


Aug. 8, 1893. 


Mary Augusta, 


b. 


it it 


Dec- 31, 1892. 


Gwendolyn, 


€i 


it it 


Nov. 26, 1895. 



Thomas M. is at the Ottawa University, Kansas. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATCS. 1 29 

* ALFRED OTIS DELANO. 

He was son of Benjamin Franklin Delano and Jane Foster. 

After leaving his farm in Squankum, N. J., he lived for many 
years in Brooklyn, N. Y., with his father, who was Naval Con- 
structor in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. 

His father having died, he went, in 1884, ^o South Scituate, 
now Norwell, Mass., to his mother's old homestead. 

For a long time his health had been poor, and in 1888 a cold 
brought on consumption and he died at Norwell, Mass., April 
21, 1891, at the age of 52. 

He never married. 



* ARTHUR DISBROW. 
1839— 1857. See Record of 1865. 



* GEORGE ELLIOTT DUNHAM. 



1838— 1858. See Record of 1865. 



* THOMAS BRADFORD DWIGHT. 

In 1864 he became Assistant District Attorney of the county, 
and was employed in the prosecution of criminal cases for many 
years. He then resumed civil practice and so successfully that 
upon the establishment of the Orphans' Court for the County 
of Philadelphia, in 1874, he was elected one of the judges. 

Ill health compelled his resignation near the close of 1877. 

He spent the rest of his life in great weakness, at the home of 
his sister in Andover, Mass., where he died, August 31, 1878, 
aged 41. 

He married June 6, 1872, Julia K., daughter of Robert R. 
Porter, of Wilmington, Del. 

They had no children. 



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130 BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF NO N -GRADUATES. 

* CHARLES MERWIN FENN. 

(Lacon, 111.,) son of William and Anna Maria (Merwin) Fenn, 
was born in Hamilton, O., June 18, 1835. ^^ was prepared 
for college by Rev. J. A. Nash, Amherst, Mass. He entered the 
Class September 12, 1855, ^^ ^^^ beginning of the first Sopho- 
more term, and left in March, 1857, during the second Junior 
term. 

*. B. K. 

After a year as his father's accountant in Lacon, 111., a 
trip west to Fort Kearney, and a winter in New Orleans, in 
March he went to California over the Isthmus. In San Fran- 
cisco he was for four year a doctor's assistant and medical stu- 
dent, graduating in 1865, from the Toland Medical College, at 
the head of his class. 

He received the degree of M. A. in 1881, from Illinois Col- 
lege. He served before 1886, for four terms as County Physi- 
cian, and was a frequent contributor to the transactions of the 
State Medical Society as well as to medical journals of the 
Atlantic and Pacific coasts. 

With the exception of a year, from 1872 to 1873, spent in Los 
Angeles, he lived in San Diego, from 1868 until his death. 

He served as Assistant Army Surgeon, U. S. A., at the Post 
in San Diego; as County Coroner two terms; Public Adminis- 
trator; Health Officer, and City Physician, and member of the 
Board of Education. 

He died March 7, 1907, at the age of 71. 

He married in Los Angeles, Cal., January 21, 1872, Catherine 
Devilla, daughter of Joseph and Catherine (Torique) Archam- 
beau. 

CHILDREN. 

Lois Merwin, b. Los Angeles, Cal., Jan. 7, 1873. 

(Son), " San Diego, " Oct. 30, 1877. 

d. " " Nov. 2, 1877. 

Lois M. married in San Diego, Cal., July 11, 1894, Charles 
Dryden Kimball. 

She lives in Hollywood, Cal., and has 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF NO N -GRADUATES. 131 
CHILDREN. 

Ralph Merwin, b. San Diego, Cal., May ii, 1895. 

Lois Archambeau, " " " Aug. 14, 1896. 

Charles Fenn, " " " Mar. 26, 1900. 



* NATHAN CYPRIAN FOLGER. 

(New Orleans, La.,) son of Nathan Cyprian and Madeline 
(Godfrey) Folger, was born in New Orleans, La., January 28, 
1838. He entered the Class in September, 1854, and left during 
the third term of the Freshman year. 

He had nine brothers and sisters, of whom survive only Mrs. 
Flower, of Camden, S. C, and Mrs. Corinne Folger Oehme, of 
629 Lower Line street. New Orleans. 

Folger never married. 

He was a member of Company "A", Crescent Rifles, which 
left the city of New Orleans April 15, 1861, for service in the 
Confederate Army at Pensacola, Pla. About the latter part of 
May, 1 861, the Crescent Rifles became one of the companies of 
a battalion of infantry named "Dreux Battalion," serving 
on the Peninsula between . the York and James rivers 
until April, 1862, when they were disbanded by General J. Bank- 
head Magruder, their term of service having expired. 

After his discharge from the Dreux Battalion, he, with many 
other members of that command, joined Fenner*s Louisiana Bat- 
tery, commanded by Charles E. Fenner, served throughout the 
war as a good and faithful soldier, and was honorably dis- 
charged at the end of the war. 

At the close of the war he engaged in business. 

He died in New Orleans March 30, 1872, at the age of 34. 



EDWIN BANCROFT FOOTE. 

He received the degree of LL. B. from Columbia University 
in 1 87 1, but has not practiced law. 

He has lived much in New York and New Haven, leading a 
very retired life. 



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132 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 

He has crossed the Atlantic forty-six times. 

In 1899 he became interested in work for boys, and as a result 
the Edwin Bancroft Foote Boys' Club at 964 Chapel street, New 
Haven, Conn., was established in 1903, by his generous gift of 
twenty-five thousand dollars, and in 1904 he gave the Edwin 
Bancroft Foote addition to the Y. M. C. A. Building, costing 
twenty-five thousand dollars, the income to be used for the sup- 
port of the Club. 

As a result of his interest in this work, he was brought into 
touch with Mr. Hinckley, of the Good Will Farm at Hinckley, 
Me., and later erected there and generously endowed the Ban- 
croft Foote Memorial, a dormitory accommodating about twelve, 
who must be honor boys in the school. 

He removed not long ago to Fairfield, 'Me., to have the oppor- 
tunity of meeting the boys personally, and thus becoming inter- 
ested in their welfare as individuals. 

He has never married. 



ARCHIBALD ALEXANDER FORBES. 
Never located. 



* JOHN DENNET FROST. 

He was for some time a clerk in the Paymaster's Depart- 
ment in the Portsmouth Navy Yard, "until about 1880^ when lie 
returned to his farm in Eliot, Me., doing some surveying, dealing 
in farm implements and settling estates. 

He was for many years President of the Eliot and Kittery 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and Superintendent of Schools 
in Eliot, which he helped to raise to a high level of efficiency. 
He was widely known and universally regarded as a man of 
sterling character and superior intellect. 

He died in Eliot, Me., December 17, 1894, at the age of 63. 

His wife is living at the old home in Eliot. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 



133 



He married in Kennebunkport, Me., November 14, 1859, Lucy 
Jane, daughter of James and Isabella Shapleigh (Tobey) 
Knowlton. 







CHILDREN. 








Evangeline, 


b. 


Eliot, 


Me., 


Dec. 


14, 


1862. 




d. 


(( 




Nov. 


2, 


1885. 


Walter Lincoln, 


b. 


(t 




Dec. 


22, 


1865. 


Clarence Dennet, 


(I 


(( 




Sept. 


15, 


1869. 




d. 


(( 




Jan. 


8, 


1908. 


John Edwin, 


b. 


a 




Apr. 


II, 


1874. 



Walter L. is a train despatcher in Rollinsford, N. H. 
He married in Rollinsford, N. H., May 24, 1894, Emma 
Bertha, daughter of Thomas B. Gould and Sarah Willard. 



Dorothy Knowlton, 
Ruth Willard, 
Thomas Gould, 
Lucy Mildred, 
Pearl Eliot, 
Beatrice Lillian, 



CHILDREN. 

b. Rollinsford, Me., 



Aug. 18, 1897. 

Mar. 27, 1899 

Apr. 27, 1 90 1 

Apr. 8, 1903 

May 9, 1905 

Nov. 9, 1907 



Clarence D. succeeded to the farm in Eliot. 
He married in South Berwick, Me., December 13, 1890, Flor- 
ence, daughter of Enoch Emery and Maria Eastman. 



CHILDREN. . 

Eliot, Me., 



Nov. 25, 1891. 
Mar. 29, 1897. 
Sept. 21, 1898. 
July ,7, 1902. 



Evangeline, 

Dennet, " " * " 

George Eliot, 

Isabel Knowlton, 

He died in Eliot, Me., January 8, 1908. 
His wife died in Eliot, Me., April 18, 1903. 

John E. (Bowdoin, 1896), taught for some years, and is 
now Agency Inspector of the John Hancock Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company, and lives at 305 K street S. Boston, Mass. 



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134 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON -GRADUATES. 

He married in East Boston, Mass., October 3, 1903, Mrs. 
Lillian Mary Swift, of New Sharon, Me., daughter of Solomon 
Berry and Celia Ann Purington. 

They have no children. 



* CLAUDE GIBSON. 
1837— 1863. See Record of 1865. 



* HARRY ALLEN GRANT. 

He resumed the practice of law in New York in October, 1881. 

He continued to live in Tarry town, N. Y., from 1869, spend- 
ing some of his summers in his cottage at Bar Harbor, on Mt. 
Desert Island, Me. 

He died in Tarrytown August 19, 1898, at the age of 61. 

Mrs. Grant still lives there. 

He married in New York November 28, 1865, Miss Julia 
Clementine, daughter of Henry Schoonmaker and Julia Elizabeth 
Thompson. 

CHILDREN. 

Margaret Prall, b. Tarrytown, N. Y., Sept. 7, 1871. 

Harry Allen, " " " July 13, 1880. 

Margaret P. married in Tarrytown, N. Y., October 28, 1899, 
Marshall Lockhart Bacon, who died in New York City, January 
28, 1906. 

He was an Auditor of the New York Central & Hudson 
River Railroad. 

CHIIvDREN. 

Julia Grant, b. Tarrytown, N. Y. Mar. 23, 1902. 

Prall Grant, " " " Oct. 2. 1905. 

Harry A. was graduated from Columbia University in 1904, as 
a Mechanical Engineer. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF NO N -GRADUATES. 135 

* LORENZO MOSES HANCOCK. 

In 1865 he bought an interest in a lumber business, of which he 
became Bookkeeper and Manager, in Lincolnville, Pa., where 
he was attacked by pneumonia and died, unmarried, October 30, 
1866, aged 32. 



* DIODATE CUSHMAN HANNAHS. 
1839 — 1862. See Record. of 1865. 



* HERRICK HAYNER. 
1837— 1862. See Record of 1865. 



* GEORGE HENDRICKSON. 
1838— 1 861. See Record of 1865. 



THOMAS SHERWOOD HODSON. 

He was graduated from Princeton University in 1857. He 
was then a Private Tutor until March, 1862, and thence until 
March, 1865, a Methodist Preacher. From November, 1864, 
to 1869, he edited a weekly Republican newspaper, the Somerset 
Herald, at Princess Anne, Md. In April, 1872, he was admitted 
to the bar. 

In January, 1868, he removed to Crisfield, Md., where he pub- 
lished the Crisfield Leader from 1872 to 1876, and was Deputy 
Collector of Customs until 1875, when he became Collector and 
served two terms. 

In 1884 and 1886, he was State Senator from Somerset 
County. In 1884 and in 1892, he was a Maryland delegate-at- 
large to the National Republican Convention. 



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136 lilOGRAPHICAIy RECORD OF NON-GRADUATlCS. 

In July, 1893, he received the degree of LL. D. from Dickinson 
College, Carlisle, Pa., of which he was a Trustee for many 
years from 1882. 

In 1890, he removed to Baltimore and practiced law for ten 
years. In 1896, he was elected President of the United States 
Trust Company there. ' 

In July, 1903, he removed to Philadelphia, where he was 
Editor of the Banker and Investor Magazine, Drexel Building. 

In 1908, he resumed his residence in Crisfield, Md. 

He married, first, in Laurel, Del., February 7, 1866, Alice, 
daughter of Dr. Aaron Mauck and Eliza Longnecker. 

His wife died in Crisfield, Md., June 8, 1877. 

Pie married, second, in Crisfield, Md., February 10, 1880, 
Clara, daughter of Samuel Griffith Miles, of Somerset County, 
Md., and Sarah Anne Lankford. 

CHILDREN. 

Clarence, b. Laurel, Del., Feb. 22, 1868. 

Thomas Sherwood, " Crisfield, Md., June 5, 1872. 

Mary King, " " " July 17, 1873. 

Clarence lives in East Orange, N. J. 

He married, first, in Snow Hill, Md., September 13, 1893, 
Sara M., daughter of George Sanders Payne and Lelia Mathews. 

Mrs. Hodson died in Baltimore, Md., November 8, 1898. 

He married, second, in Winston, N. C, July 10, 1901, Lillian 
M., daughter of Rufus Donaldson Brown and Sarah Gibbs, of 
Winston, N. C. 

CHILDREN. 

Clarence, Jr., b. Crisfield, Md., Sept. 21, 1894. 

George Irving, " " " Apr. 19, 1896. 

Lelia Payne, " Baltimore, " Oct. 12, 1898. 

Thomas S. is unmarried, and lives in Albuquerque, N. M. 

Mary K. lives in Long Beach, Cal. 

She married in Baltimore, Md., July 1,7, 1894, Rufus Donald- 
son Brown, of Winston, N. C. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF NON -GRADUATES. 1 37 
CHILDREN. 

Alice Hodson,, b. Wilmington, Del, Apr. 25, 1895. 

Lillian Gibbs, " Baltimore, Md., Mar. 8, 1897. 

Doris, " Los Angeles, Cal., Dec. 3, 1907. 



JOHN HONEYMAN. 

He received the degree of M. D. from the University of Penn- 
sylvania in 1872, but never practiced. 

He has devoted himself almost entirely to teaching and to 
research in American history, and has acquired some interesting 
literature on Americana. 

He lived at Mouth of Seneca and Onego, West Virginia, from 
July, 1905, to January, 1909, engaged in teaching. 

He never married. 



FRANCIS HENRY HOUSTON. 

In February, 1866, he* became First Assistant, and in April, 
1868, Chief Librarian of the New York Mercantile Library. 

In October, 1869, he resigned, and for a year or more was 
Correspondent of George W. Child's Literary Gazette. 

He next essayed fruit culture in Maryland, but in the autumn 
of 1873, removed to Paterson, N. J., and engaged in the real 
estate business. In August, 1876, he became Commercial Statis- 
tician in the wholesale dry goods house of A. T. Stewart & 
Co., remaining until its dissolution in 1882, soon after which he 
became Statistical Editor of the New York Commercial Bulletin. 

Later, he was on the American Journal of Fabrics, and on the 
staff of the New York Journal of Commerce for about six and 
one-half years, until, in 1892, it was bought by the Commercial 
Bulletin. He then re-entered the real estate business and the 
promotion of new companies, but soon returned to journalism. 

In March, 1899, he had a paralytic stroke, but was able some 
months later to join his wife and daughters in Belgium. 



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138 BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 

In October, 1901, they removed to Berlin. 

He and his daughters hope to return to the United States 
early in 1909. 

He married, first, in Baltimore, Md., December 16, 1871, Miss 
Matilda Hodson, daughter of John Thompson and Mary Payne. 

Mrs. Houston died in East Newmarket, Md., May 17, 1877. 

He married, second, in New York, October 25, 1884, Miss 
Elizabeth Lusby, daughter of Rev. James Liston Houston and 
Adeline Price of Wilmington, Del. 

Mrs. Houston died in Berlin, Germany, May 31, 1908. 

CHILDREN. 

Henry Eugene, b. Vienna, Md., Nov. 29, 1872 

Elsie Ely, " Paterson, N. J., Aug. 8, 1875, 

d. " " Apr. 3, 1878 

Tryphena Maria, b. " " Feb. 1877 

d. E. Newmarket, Md., Jul> * 1877, 

Adeline Tryphena Frances,b. New York, N.Y., Feb. 17, 1886. 

Lelia Rose Cecilia, " " " July, 3, 1888 

Henry E. was graduated from Columbia University in 1895, 
and is engaged in teaching. 

His two daughters have, since 1899, 'studied niusic in Brussels, 
Liege "^nd Berlin, the elder as a pianist, the younger as a violinist. 



HENRY JANIN. 

(New Orleans,. La.,) son of Louis and Juliet (Covington) Janin, 
was born 'in New Orleans, La., December 21, 1838. He was 
prepared for college by Timothy Dwight, (Y. C, 1849,) ^"^ 
entered the Class August 9, .1854, but left during the first Fresh- 
man term. He sailed for Europe in July, 1856, and until Octo- 
ber, 1857, lived in Dresden, studied languages and his own 
amusement. He then joined the Mining Academy at Freiberg, 
and remained until October, i860, when he started on a tour 
through Austria, Hungary, Transylvania, and many other places, 
visiting mines. In December, i860, he went to Paris and joined 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF NON -GRADUATES. 1 39 

the Ecole des Mines. In February, 1861, he sailed for America, 
arrived in March, and in April went to California. In June, 
he became Assistant Superintendent of the Enriqueta Quicksilver 
Mine. In November, he became Superintendent of the mine, 
and remained there until June 1862, when he left and became 
Superintendent of the Cosala Silver Mines, at Sinaloa, Mexico. 
He remained there until March, 1864, when he returned to Cali- 
fornia with I»ouis. 

As a Mining Engineer his career was brilliant and pecuniarily 
successful. 

For many years he was Consulting Engineer. 

He retired from active business some time ago, and has been 
living in England for many years. His address is care of 
Exploration Company Limited, u Comhill, London, E. C. 

He married in 1888, Miss Mabel Smith. 

CHILDREN. 



(Child), 


b. 


(Child), 


d. 




b. 




d. 


Louise, 


b. 


Hamilton, 


it 




LOUIS JANIN 



(New Orleans, La.,) son of Louis and Juliet (Covington Janin, 
was bom in New Orleans, La., November 7, 1837. He was 
prepared for college by Timothy Dwight, (Y. C, 1849,) ^^w 
Haven, Conn., and entered the Class July 22^ 1854, but left 
during the first Sophomore term. He and Henry sailed for 
Europe in July, 1865, and until October, 1857, lived in Dresden, 
studying languages and amusing themselves. They then joined 
the Mining Academy at Freiberg, where they remained until 
October, i860, when they started on a tour through Austria, 
Hungary, Transylvania, and many other places, visiting mines. 
In December, i860, they went to Paris, and joined the Ecole des 



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I40 BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF NON -GRADUATES. 

Mines. In February, 1861, they returned to America, and in 
April went to California. In June he took charge of the 
Enriqueta Quicksilver Mine, with Henry as an assistant. In 
November he left and was engaged in mining engineering, in 
various places, until May, 1862, when he became Metallurgist of 
the Mexican Mill, in Nevada, where he served until October, 
1863. Tiring of this, he left for San Francisco, and made a four 
months tour through Sonora, (Mexico,) and Arizona, with the 
Butterworth party, (see Ross Browne's description in Harper's 
Magazine of October, 1864). Returning in March, he engaged 
in general work until October, 1864, when he took charge of 
the Gould & Curry Mill, at Virginia City, Nevada. In July, 
1865, he became General Superintendent of the Gould & Curry 
Mine and Mill. He wrote, in January, 1866, "In the course of 
time, I hope to get rich, have three children, live happily, and 
go to Heaven when I die. My business will always be con- 
nected with the mining interests on the Pacific coast." And he 
adds, "Henry's ideas are similar to my own." 

He once spent a year in Japan before 1876, and he has been 
variously occupied as a Mining and Metallurgical Expert from 
British Columbia to Mexico, as well as in other foreign countries. 

He is now living on his Rancho Marselino, near Gaviota, Cal. 

He married in Virginia City, Nev., December 2^, 1865, Miss 
\JvLTA^, daughter of Charles and Henrietta (Cole) Marshall. 

CHILDREN. 

Louis Marshall, b. Virginia City, Nev., Nov. 2, 1866. 

Eugene Latham, " Oakland, Cal„ May 25,* 1871 

d. Minas Prietas, 

Sonora, Mex., Aug. 20, 1894 
Charles Henry, b. Oakland, Cal., Nov. 16, 1873 

Louis M: is living in Gaviota, Cal. He studied at Exeter, N 
H., and matriculated at the University of California in 1875 
He left college early to accept a responsible position in Utah 
He gained distinction as a cyanide man, and was one of the 
first to experiment with cyanide, filing a caveat in 1887. His 
account of his work appeared in Mineral Industry in 1893. 
He had considerable experience as an Engineer and Metallurgist 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD O^ NON-GRADUATES. I4I 

in this country, Mexico, South America and as a Manager of 
mines in Australia. He was for a while Assistant Editor of 
the Engineering and Mining Journal of New York, and Editor 
of the Pacific Coast Miner. 

He was obliged some time ago to relinquish work because of 
illness. 

He is living in Gaviota, Cal., and is not married. 

Eugene L., after studying at a private college in San Francisco, 
and subsequently with his father and uncle, accepted a position 
in Sonora, Mexico, and died August 20, 1894, six weeks after 
his arrival, of typhoid fever. 

He never married. 

Charles H., after managing his father's ranch for some years, 
studied mining. He is now a member of Janin & Smith, 
Consulting Mining Engineers, at 619 Kohl Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., and lives on Claremont avenue, in Berkeley, Cal. 

He has traveled extensively in mining interests from Alaska to 
Mexico, having visited Mexico six times. 

He married October 7, 1908, Miss Erwina Dunbar, daughter 
of J. Howard and Elizabeth (Dunbar) Smith. 



* ANSON JONES. 

He continued in Brockville, Canada, for many years, eventually 
entering the Quebec Bank and serving on its staff in different 
cities ill Canada. 

On retiring from the bank about 1881, he took up his residence 
in Toronto. 

He was of a retiring disposition, of scholarly tastes, and was 
much interested in astronomy. 

In 1905, he became partially paralyzed, but was able to move 
about. He died in Toronto, September 25, 1906, at the age of 
74, and was buried in Brockville. 



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142 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NO N -GRADUATES. 

Mrs. Jones and her son live at 603 Sherborne street, Toronto. 
He married in Toronto, Can., June 25, 1884, Miss Mary, 
daughter of John and Annie (Campbell) Cook. 

CHILD. 

Anson Allen, b. Toronto, Can., June 30, 1885. 



EDWIN LEANDER KIRTLAND. 

In 1869, he represented Westbrook in the State Legislature, 
and was clerk of the Fisheries Committee. 

In 1871, he removed to Holyoke, Mass., where he was in 
1908. He edited the Holyoke Transcript for five years; was 
representative in 1875, and clerk of the Committee on Mercantile 
affairs in 1876. 

From 1878, to 1886, he was Superintendent of public schools. 

He published a Choral Book and perfected a new system 
of musical instruction. 

In 1905, he became Deputy Collector of the Third District of 
Massachusetts of the U. S. Internal Revenue. 

He lives with his daughter, Mrs. Bellows. 

He married, first, in Westbrook, Conn., December 7, 1864, 
Miss Edwina, daughter of Captain Joseph N. and Maria (Spen- 
cer) Magna. 

Mrs. Kirtland died in Holyoke, November 4, 1884. 

He married, second, in Holyoke, July 6, 1892, Laura Maria 
Whiting, daughter of Moses and Maria B. (Arms) Newton. 

Mrs. JCirtland died in Holyoke, April 9, 1898. 

CHILDREN. 

Edwina Magna, b. Westbrook, Conn., Nov. 14, 1865. 

Maria Lucy, " " " Mar. 13, 1869. 

Edwina M. lives at 231 Cabot street, Holyoke. 

She married in Holyoke, May 23, 1888, Lewis Edward Bel- 
lows. He is an Insurance Broker. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON -GRADUATES. 143 

CHILD. 

Edwina Magna, b. Holyoke, Mass., Oct. 2, 1890. 

Maria L. lives at 67 Pearl street, Holyoke. 
She married in Holyoke, October 18, 1893, Isaac Erskine Saw- 
yer. He is Assistant Treasurer of the Mechanics Savings Bank. 

CHILD. 

Lucy Erskine, b. Holyoke, Mass., July. 15, 1897. 



* MARTIN VAN BUREN LEE. 

(Clinton, La.,) son of Samuel and (Cleveland) Lee, was 

bom in the Parish of East Feliciana, La., in 1838. He was pre- 
pared for College by William H. Russell, (Y. C, 1833) New 
Haven, Conn., and at an Academy in Northampton, Mass. He 
entered the Class, September 13, 1854, and left February 27 y 
1856, during the second Sophomore term. 

After leaving college he assisted his father at home on the 
plantation until the 9th of September, 1858, when he died, at 
the age of 20. 



* WILLIAM POTTS LLOYD. 
1836— 1863. See Record of 1865. 



* ROBERT LEVEN LUCKETT. 

(Alexandria, La.,) son of Leven Luckett of Loudoun County, 
Va., and Adaline Crain of Rapides Parish, La., wa? born Decem- 
ber 12, 1837. 

He entered the Class October 3. 1854, and left during the 
first Freshman term. He studied at the University of Virginia 
from 1855 to 1858. 



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144 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 



In i860 he received the degree of M. D. from the New Orleans 
Medical College. 

In 1862, he enlisted in the Alexandria Rifles of the Crescent 
Regiment. Later he was Assistant Surgeon on the staff of 
General Polk, commanding the Army of Western Tennessee, 
and later still performed the same service for General Bragg. 

In 1863, h^ became Post Surgeon of Alexandria, remaining 
through the war. 

In 1874, he represented the Parish in the State Legislature. 

In 1879, he was a member of the Constitutional Convention, 
and from 1880 to 1884, was a State Senator. 

At the time of his death he was United States Marshall. 

He died in Boyce, La., April 24, 1894, at the age of 55. 

He left eight children, and a widow now living in Alexandria. 

He married in Marks ville, La., November 27, 1861, Angelica, 
daughter of Auguste Marye, of Baltimore, Md., and Octavia 
De Generes, of Virginia. 

CHII.DREN. 



Robert Edward, 


b. 


New Orleans, 


La., 


Oct. 


I, 


1862. 




d. 


Bladen Springs 


,Ala 


, June 


17, 


1863. 


Robert Leven, 


b. 


Alexandria, 


La., 


Nov. 


II, 


1864. 




d. 


(( 


tt 


Aug. 


29, 


1901. 


Constance Adaline, 


b. 


t( 




July 


16, 


1866. 




d. 


Plaquemine, 




Dec. 


22, 


1907. 


Henry Marye, 


b. 


Alexandria, 




Mar. 


17, 


1868. 




d. 


Boyce, 




Sept. 


28, 


1883. 


Cora Mary, 


b. 


Alexandria, 




Mar. 


17, 


1870. 


Ellen Flower, 


(( 


t( 




Sept. 


3. 


1871. 


Edward Flower, 


(( 


t( 




May 


18, 


1873- 


Lizzie, 


« 


a 




May 


20, 


1875- 




d. 


Boyce, 




June 


17. 


1881. 


Samuel Flower, 


b. 


Alexandria, 




Mar. 


10, 


1877. 


Francis Berkley, 


a 


ti 




Dec. 


19. 


1879. 


Marselina Eugenia, 


t( 


it 




May 


17. 


1881 


Mary Elizabeth, 


tt 


Boyce, 




Auo^. 


28. 


1882. 


Harry Flower, 


(( 


a 




July 


II, 


1884. 




d. 


(C 




Oct. 


19, 


1893. 


George Victor, 


i( 


ti 




Julv 


12, 


1886. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 



145 



Dr, Robert L. lived in Alexandria, La. 

He married in New Orleans, La., November 11, 1893, Mrs. 
Anna (Dowty) Alexander, daughter of John Cross Dowty and 
Anna Darke. 

CHILDREN. 

b. Boyce, La., Sept. 27, 1894. 

" Alexandria, " Jan. 5, 1896. 

Jan. 2, 1900. 



Constance Eulalie, 
Anna Lee, 
Robert Leven, 



Constance A. lives in Plaquemine, La. 

She married in Boyce, La., January 6, 1886, James Monroe 
Rhorer, Deputy Clerk, Court. 







CHILDREN. 




Mary Ellen, 




b. Colfax, La., 


Nov. 15, 1887. 


Phillip Goode, 




« {( (( 


July I, 1889. 


Robert Luckett, 




(( t( (( 


Apr. 21, 1891. 


Lilian Angelique, 




(( (t it 


Dec. 15, 1892. 


Constance, 




" Plaquemine, " 


Dec. 27, 1894. 


Mary Ethel, 




a it (( 


July 16,1897. 


James Monroe, 




ti (( t( 


May 21, 1899. 


Cecelia Virginia, 




li it it 


Sept. 8, 1900. 


Elizabeth Luckett, 




(( it . (( 


Apr. 19, 1903. 


Cora M. lives in 


Alexandria, La. 




She married in Boy( 


:e, La., December 31, 1891 


, James Wallace 


Alexander. He is 


in 


the insurance business. 

CHILDREN. 




Angelique Marye, 




b. Alexandria, La., 


Aug. 4, 1894. 


William Ledyard, 




it K U 


Apr. 22, 1896. 



Bllen F. lives in Alexandria, La. 

She married in Boyce, La., June 12, 1889, Mark Leigh Alex- 
ander. He is in the insurance business. 



Robert, 
Ethel Lucille, 
Constance Marye, 
Mark Leigh, 



CHILDREN. 

b. Boyce, La., Mar. 28, 1895. 

" Alexandria, " July 9, 1896. 

" Jackson, Miss., Feb. 24, 1898. 

" Alexandria, La., Feb. i, 1904. 



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146 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 

Dr, Edward F. is unmarried, and lives in Loyd, La. 

Samuel F. is a planter in Boyce, La., and unmarried. 

Francis B. is a doctor in Alexandria, La., and single. 

Marselina B. lives, unmarried, in Alexandria. 

Mary Elisabeth lives in Alexandria, La. 

She married in Boyce, La., December 12, 1902, Thomas Pierce 
Wheadon. He is in the banking business. 

CHILDREN. 

Elizabeth Luckett, b. Alexandria, L?i., Aug. 31, 1904. 

Thomas Carey, " " " Apr. 13, 1906. 

George V. lives, unmarried, in Alexandria. 



* CHARLES NORTHROP LYMAN. 

In June, 1865, he resumed his Pastorate in Canton Center, 
Conn., and remained until September, 1868, when he removed to 
Iowa, and engaged in pioneer missionary work. 

From 1869, to January, 1871, he was Pastor in Dunlap, then 
for nineteen years at Onawa and eleven years at Alden, until he 
retired in 1902. Under his care these churches, became self-sus- 
taining and prosperous. 

He was also an earnest supporter of the educational interests 
of the region, being for nine years a Director, and for six years 
President of the Alden Public School Board and, at Onawa, 
County Superintendent of Schools for three terms. 

He died at Alden, Iowa, after an illness of two weeks, July 
4, 1905, at the age of 70. 

"His life was forceful, vigorous and fruitful. He taught by 
both word and deed, and his promise was always more than 
fulfilled. He bore affliction with fortitude, success with modesty 
and all with buoyant and hopeful courage." , 

He married in New Haven, Conn., October 13, 1863, Eveline, 
daughter of Russell and Adeline (Tuttle) Upson. 

Mrs. Lyman died February 8, 1903, aged 6y. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. I47 







CHILDREN. 








• 


Charles Russell, 


b. 


Canton Center, Ct., 


Jan. 


19. 


1867. 




d. 


Onawa, 


la., 


Nov. 


23. 


1881. 


Theron Upson, 


b. 


Dunlap, 


(( 


Sept. 


7. 


1869. 


Winthrop Brewster, 


(( 


Onawa, 


tt 


July 


14, 


1872. 


George Henry, 


« 


(( 


u 


Mar. 


9' 


1876. 



Theron U. (Iowa College, 1891), practiced law a while in 
Madison, Wis., and is now a Manager of the Travelers' Insur- 
ance Company in Hartford, Conn. 

He is unmarried. 

Winthrop B. is in business in Alden, la. 
He married in Sioux City, la., October 12, 1898, Jennie Ellen, 
daughter of Frederick Elmour and Sarah Ann (Dodge) Fitch. 

CHILDREN. 

Carson Fitch, b. La Crosse, Wis., July 23, 1899. 

Auta Eveline, " " " Jan. 23, 1901. 

Charles Winthrop, " Alden, la., July 28, 1904. 

Sara Elizabeth, " " " May 27, 1907. 

George H. is a Locomotive Engineer in St. Joseph, Mo. 
He is unmarried. 



* ALEXANDER MCDONALD. 
1831—1857. See Record of 1865. 



* ROBERT BOOTH MACLIN. 

(Fort Leavenworth, K. T.,) son of Sackfield, Major and after- 
wards Colonel and Paymaster in the United States Army, and 
Arabella Jane (Booth) Maclin, was born in Memphis, Tenn., 
August II, 1838. He was prepared for college by Joseph Cor- 



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148 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 

byn in Palmyra, Mo. He entered the Class, September 23, 1854, 
from the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and left during 
the first Freshman term. He then entered Trinity College at 
Hartford, Conn., in the Class of '58, from Memphis, Tenn., in 
May, 1855, and left in May, 1856. He next went to Detroit, 
where he was in the following July, and whence he wrote in 
September that he was an accountant there, and expected to 
remain two years, and then go to the Harvard Law School. He 
subsequently entered the rebel army, and in 1863 ^^^^ of con- 
sumption in Texas. 

In October, 1857, he was again a member of the Junior 
Class of the University of Michigan, and 'remained until March, 
1859, when he left without graduating. He then commenced 
the study of law, but soon abandoned it and went to Texas as 
a Paymaster's Clerk in the Army. In i860 he attended the 
Pennsylvania Medical Institute in Philadelphia, Pa. 

In 1 86 1, he returned to Texas and raised a company of light 
artillery for the rebel service. He was stationed at Brownsville, 
Texas, for some time, and finally died of consumption in San 
Antonio, April 16, 1862. His death is believed to have been 
hastened by exposure in camp. 



* ROBERT SENEY MOORE. 

(Hudson, N. Y.,) son of Ezekiel James and Esther Ann (Ray- 
mond) Moore, was bom in New York, August 14, 1837, and 
was prepared for college by William H. Russell, (Y. C, 1833) 
New Haven, Conn. He entered the Class, July 24, 1854, and 
left during the first Junior term, and went to St. Louis, Mo., 
where he remained until June, 1858, when he entered the Class 
of 'S9, and graduated. After he graduated he lived in New 
York for two or three years, engaged in phonographic writing 
and reporting. 

In 1864, or thereabout, he went to Sacramento, Cal., where he 
taught phonography and was engaged in reporting. In 1865, he 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 149 

was engaged in reporting in San Francisco, where he continued 
until the summer of 1866, when his health failed very rapidly, 
and he came east, reaching New York in August. 

From there he went to Trenton, N. J., quite ill, and on the 
morning of October 17, 1866, he died without apparent pain, at 
the age of 29. 

His remains were deposited in the family vault in St. Marks, 
New York City. 



* NATHAN CAMPBELL NAPIER. 

At the beginning of the Civil War, he volunteered, raised a 
company, and, although he lost an eye in Kentucky, he returned 
to the front as soon as he recovered, and until the end was 
a bold sabreur under the Stars and Bars, in the valleys made 
famous by Wheeler, Cleburne and Bragg. He left his children 
the priceless heritage of a valiant and stainless solider: 

Coming back from the war maimed and impoverished, he took 
up the thread of his life again, and began farming on his planta- 
tion at Woodside, in Walker County, Ga. 

In 1 88 1 he removed to LaFayette, having purchased the county 
paper, "The Messenger," in 1880. Gifted and versatile, wielding 
a trenchant pen, he advocated always the side of right, and 
strove untiringly for the good of his county and state, and to 
uplift the people of his section. 

He died in LaFayette, Ga., January 21, 1902, at the age of 57. 

Mrs. Napier died there November 9, 1906. 

He was a man without reproach, of unquestioned integrity and 
spotless honor; a citize;n upright and patriotic; a gentleman of 
the old school ; a devoted husband, and a loving father ; a Chris- 
tian without guile. 

On April 2, i860, he was married in Walker County, Ga., to 
Julia L., daughter of Thomas A. and Harriet (Young) Sharpe, 
a perfect woman, who made for him an ideal wife, and for his 
children a noble mother. 



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150 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 

CHILDREN. 

Caroline Matilda, b. Walker Co., Ga., June 23, 1861. 

George Moultrie, " '' " Mar. 28, 1863. 

Alice Osborne, " " " Feb. 17, 1867. 

Leroy, " " " July 30, 1868. 

Augustus Young, '' " " Mar. 2, 1S72. 

Julia Sharpe, " LaFayette, " June 19, 1874. 

Emma Sharpe, " Walker Co., " Aug. 4, 1876. 

Nathan Campbell, " ". " Aug. 10, 1878. 

Caroline M. (Shorter College, 1880, Rome, Ga.,) is unmar- 
ried, and lives in LaFayette, Ga. 

George M. (University of Georgia, 1898, Athens, Ga.,) now 
of Napier, Wright & Cox., lawyers, Atlanta, Ga., is a successful 
and able lawyer, prominent as a Layman in the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South, and as a Mason, for nine years a Colonel 
and Judge Advocate General of the National Guard, and since 
August, 1908, President of the Commercial Law League of 
America. 

He married, first, in Chattanooga, Tenn., April 17, 1888, Miss 
Moss, daughter of William Franklin and Martha (Rainey) 
Harris. 

Mrs. Napier died in Monroe, Ga., June 2, 1892. 

He married, second, in Monroe, Ga., December 16, 1905, Miss 
Frances, daughter of William Hartwell and Eula Bell (Gober) 
Nunnally. 

CHILDREN. 

Florence, b. Monroe, Ga., Jan. 9, 1890. 

d. " . " Apr. 5, 1894. 

Julia Osborne, b. . " " Sept. 2, 1907. 

Alice O. a graduate of the Peabody Normal College, Nash- 
ville, Tenn., has been teaching for fourteen years in the Georgia 
Normal and Industrial College for Girls, Milledgeville, Ga., 
where she now holds the Chair of Mathematics. 

Leroy is a successful physician at Lumber City, Ga. He 
studied at Mercer University, Macon, Ga., and in 1898 received 



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BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 



151 



his medical diploma from the Atlanta College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. Later he took post graduate work at Tulane Uni- 
versity, New Orleans. 

He married in Macon, Ga., February 2, 1899, ^^ss Mary, 
daughter of Thomas Jefferson and Temperance Jordan (McKin- 
non) Lightfoot. 

CHILDREN. 

Alice, b. Mcintosh, Fla., Mar. 9, 1900. 

Jean Parry, " Lumber City, Ga., May 25, 1902. 

Leroy, " " " Aug. 31, 1904. 

Rene, '* " " Oct. i, 1906. 

d. " Sept. 19, 1907. 

Augustus Y. (Mercer University, 1896, Macon, Ga.), and Th. 
D., 1901, from the Southern Baptist Seminary, Louisville, Ky. 
After several years of successful work as Pastor of two import- 
ant Baptist Churches in Alabama, he went, in January, 1905, to. 
China as a Missionary, where he labors to-day, in Yang Chow. 

He married in Nagasaki, Japan, April 7, 1906, Miss Lois, 
daughter of Bunyan and Harriet Holman (Jones) Davie. 

They have no children. 

Julia S. (Wesleyan College, 1894, Macon, Ga.,) married in 
LaFayette, Ga., March 29, 1904, Early Wilbur Adams. 
They live at 1209 Susquehanna avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
They have no children. 

Emma S. is a graduate of the Georgia Normal and Industrial 
College, Milledgeville, Ga., and of the Louisville Kindergarten 
Training School. 

She married in LaFayette, Ga., April 11, 1906, Rev. Samuel 
Byrd Ledbetter, and lives in Atlanta, Ga. 

CHILD. 

Cornelia Byrd, b. Rome, Ga., June 5, 1907. 

Nathan C. (Emory College, 1901, Oxford, Ga.,) is now editing 
the Walker County Messenger, in LaFayette, Ga. He is a man 
of ability and influence, and is an accomplished musician. 

He is unmarried. 



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152 . BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 

AUGUSTUS WHITE NICOLL. 

He continued the practice of law in New York until 1890. 

He, with his wife and sons, Henry G., and William W., now 
lives at 95 Brooklyn avenue. New York. 

He is Second . Deputy Clerk in the Naturalization Bureau of 
the Superior Court, Room 20, County Court House, Brooklyn. 

He married in New York City, October 3, 1866, Mary Curran, 
daughter of Samuel Bostwick and Julia Maria (Mitchell) Garvin. 

CHILDREN. 

John, b. Yonkers, N. Y., July 30, 1867 

Henry Garvin, " New York, " Nov. 14, 1869 

Augustus White, " Yonkers, " Sept. 20, 1877 

Albert Deniston, " " " Sept. 20, 1877 

William Walter, " " " Oct. 5, 1883 

John lives in Canaan^ Conn. 

He married in Coxsackie, N. Y., October 8, 1891, Ada, daugh- 
ter of Warren Mclntyre. 

CHIU). 

Marjorie Garvin, b. Canaan, Conn., Nov. 3, 1893. 

Augustus W. is a merchant in Great Barrington, Mass. 
He married in Holyoke, Mass., October 8, 1904, Isabel, daugh- 
ter of Archibald Lade. 

CHILD. 

Mary Barbara, b. Great Barrington, Mass., Feb. 8, 1906. 

Albert D. is an Electrical Engineer in Williamstown, Mass. 
He married in Williamstown, Mass., Octobery 7, 1907, Edith 
Mabel Roberts. 

They have no children. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 1 53 

* ALLISON HENRY NORCUTT. 

He enlisted in Company B, 12th Illinois Infantry, September 
2Ty 1864, and was discharged May 31, 1865, ^^^ resumed farm- 
ing. He lived in Woodville, 111. until 1866, three years in Grin- 
nell, Iowa, twelve years in Nodaway, Iowa, two years in Cass 
County, Iowa, and nine years in Urbanna, Mo., returning to Nod- 
away, Iowa, in 1892. 

He was admitted to the National Home for disabled Volunteer 
Soldiers in Leavenworth, Kan., December 17, 1890, discharged 
at his request March 24, 1892, re-admitted April 3, 1894, dis- 
charged July 2y, 1897, re-admitted November 9, 1901, and died 
there July 30, 1905, at the age of 74. 

He married, first, in Annawan, 111., February 4, 1856, Miss 
Artha L., daughter of Samuel Clarke. 

Mrs. Norcutt died February 13, 1858. 

He married, second, April 5, i860, Mrs. Lucy Ann (Boyles) 
Carlisle, daughter of Archibald and Phoebe Jane (Tuttle) 
Boyles. 

Mrs. Norcutt died in Nodaway, Iowa, June 15, 1904. 







CHILDREN. 








Frances Henrietta, 


b. 






Dec. 


17, 1856. 




d. 


. 




Feb. 


2„ 1858. 


Henry Herschel, 


b. 


Basco, 


111., 


Feb. 


15, 1861. 


Marshall Fairfax, 


a 


tt 


^ tt 


Mar. 


20, 1862. 


Raymond Carlisle, 


<t 


(( 


it 


Dec. 


14, 1863. 


Lucy Henrietta, 


a 


(( 


tt 


Mar. 


8, 1865. 


William Haven, 


n ■ 


Grinnell, 


la., 


Oct. 


2, 1866. 


Spencer Boyles, 


n 


" 


tt 


Nov. 


25, 1867. 


Linda Maria, 


it 


a 


tt 


Nov. 


25, 1869. 


Gilbert McEuen, 


n 


Nodaway, 


tt 


June 


9. 1872. 


Quincy Sumner, 


It 


t( 


tt 


Sept. 


3, 1874. 




d. 


It 


tt 


Sept. 


5. 1875. 


Nancy May, 


b. 


tt 


it 


Mar. 


24, 1879. 



Henry H, lives in Nodaway, Iowa. 

He married in Keokuk, Iowa, April 2, 1888, Ida May, daugh- 
ter of James Isaac and Matilda (Paden) Davis. 



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154 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NO N -GRADUATES. 



Henry Spencer, 
Lula Mae, 
Cora Lee, 
Pearl Edna, 
Bertha Ellen, 

Clarence Bryan, 
Beulah Grace, 
Archie Raymond, 
Minnie Viola, 
Russell Christopher, 



Clark Co., 



CHILDREN. 

b. Hancock Co., * 111., Jan. 26, 1889 

" Nov. 4, 1891 

" June II, 1892, 

" Aug. 19, 1894 

Mo., Feb. 22. 1896 

d. " " Apr. 3, 1896. 

b. PottawattomieCo., la., Apr. 18, 1897 

Adams Co., " Feb. 3, 1899 

" Apr. 15, 1903 

" " " June 2, 1905 

" Mar. 16, 1908. 



Marshall F. lives in Nodaway, Iowa. 

He married in Coming, la., October 24, 1888, Ida May, dau'^^h- 
ter of James Andrew and Mary Ida (Elwell) Mason. 



(Son), 


b. Nodaway, la., Nov. 


II, 


1889. 




d. " " Nov. 


12, 


1889. 


Bessie May, 


b. " " Mar. 


23, 


1891. 


Mary Edna, 


" Pacific Junction, " Jan. 


15, 


1894. 


Raymond Earl, 


" • Nodaway, " Mar. 


23, 


1902. 



Raymond C. lives in Van, Mo. 

He married in Nodaway, la., March 16, 1892, Cora Belle, 
daughter of Cyrus Kingsley and Margaret (Widner) Wescoat. 
They have no children. 

Lucy H. lives in Villisca, la. 

She married in Carthage, 111., November 10, 1887, William 
Henry Wright, a farmer. 



Ray Allison, 
Emily Hazel, 
Henry Roy, 
Edward Carl, 



CHILDREN. 

b. Carthage, 111., 

" Memphis, Mo., 

" Nodaway, la., 



July 20, 1889. 

Feb. 20, 1893. 

Feb. 18, 1896. 

Apr. 20, 1899. 



William H. is County Attorney in Sidney. la. 
He married near Sidney, la., June 9, 1901, Alta Mae, daughter 
of William and Martha Elizabeth (King) Barrett. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 



155 



Veca Haven, 
Arleen Alta, 
Zelma Hazel, 
Cleon Vivian, 



CHILDREN. 

b. Sidney, la., 



July 31, 1902. 

June 19, 1904. 

Sept. 26, 1905. 

Dec. 20, 1907. 



Spencer B. is a. farmer in Denton, Montana. 
He married in Corning, la., December 14, 1892, Viola, daugh- 
ter of James Marion and Almira Briar (Newcomb) Gladson. 



Gladys Almira, 
Etta Viola, 
Lewis Bethuel, 



CHILDREN. 

b. Griswold, la., 

H H i( 

ii {( a 

d. 



Feb. 24, 1894. 

Dec. 30, 1896. 

Oct. 7, 1900. 

Jan. 24, 1901. 



Linda M. lives on a farm at Rocky ford. Col. 
She married in Corning, la., April 10, 1899, William Alfred 
Strain. 

CHILDREN. 



Stella Ethel, 
Minta Onie, 
Verne Lester, 
Leslie Milton, 



b. Nodaway, la.. 



Jan. 


9, 1890. 


Dec. 


9, 1891. 


Nov. 


9, 1892. 


Feb. 


12, 1897. 



Rev. Gilbert M. lives in Exeter, Mo. 

He married in Sleepyeye, Minn., September 2, 1894, Addie, 
daughter of Peter and Rachel (Wylie) Kelly. 







CHILDREN. 










Lucy Olive, 


b 


Sleepyeye, 


Minn 


June 


iS» 


1895. 


Ora, 


i( 


it 


It 


Dec. 


10, 


1896. 


Ella, 


n 


Pleasanthope, 


Mo., 


Jan. 


25, 


1899. 




d. 






June 


22, 


1900. 


Lottie, 


it 






Dec. 


10, 


1900. 


Noble Elias, 


ti 






Oct. 


3, 


1902. 


Forest Silas, 


t( 






Nov. 


25, 


1904. 


Rachel Lillie, 


11 






Sept. 


22, 


igo6. 


(Daughter), 


a 


Exeter, 




Sept. 


25, 


1908. 



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156 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 

Nancy M. lives in Kansas City, Mo. 

She married in Kansas City, Mo., December 14, 1904, Chris- 
topher Housh Rucker, a lawyer, Kansas City. 
They have no children. 



EDWARD FOWLER PALEN. 

In 1878, he left Canadensis, Pa., where, since 1856, he had 
been engaged in tanning, mercantile and lumber business, and 
went to Tunkhannock, Pa. 

From 1878 to 1884, he made shoe pegs in Grover, Pa. 

In 1880, he removed to Philadelphia, Pa., where he has been 
engaged, until now, as Business Manager of Drs. Starkey and 
Palen, 11 12 Girard street. 

He lives at loi West Washington Lane, Germantown, Phila- 
delphia. 

He married in Canadensis, Pa., November 10, 1864, Miss 
Elizabeth, daughter of George William Northrop and Caroline 
Palen. 

CHILDREN. 

Frances, b. Canadensis, Pa., Aug. 18, 1865. 

d. Lake Placid, N. Y., Aug. 17, 1899. 

William DeWitt, b. Canadensis, Pa., Feb. 7, 1867. 

Ruth, " " " Oct. 14, 1871. 

Frances (Wellesley, 1890,) was a teacher in St. Gabriel's 
School in Peekskill, N. Y., and taught Latin in Girls' High 
School in Philadelphia. 

William D. lives in Philadelphia. 

He received the degree of Mechanical Engineer at the Stevens 
Institute in 1889, and has been in New York City with the Edison 
Electric Company and with Croker & Wheeler, and in Phila- 
delphia with the Link Belt Comapny, and has been for some 
years with the Philadelphia Textile Machinery Company. 

He married in Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa., February 8, 
1898, Ida M., daughter of John Wesley Van Horn and Rosanna 
Murphy. 

They have no children. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 1 57 

Ruth graduated from the Drexel Institute Library School in 
1895, and is now an Assistant in the Library of the University 
of Pennsylvania. 



* THOMAS GORDON POLLOCK. 
1838— 1863. See Record of 1865. 



* GEORGE OLIVER ROBINSON. 

He continued farming near Riverhead, L. I. 

He was Commissioner of Highways for four years, and was 
for about three years part owner of a coal yard in Riverhead. 

After an illness of about a week from pneumonia, he died in 
Riverhead, N. Y., January 5, 1904, aged 71. 

His widow and her daughter Alice live at 51 Sound avenue, 
Riverhead. 

He married in Riverhead, N. Y., December 6, 1855, Miss 
Nancy L., daughter of Noah and Nancy (Terry) Hallock. 

CHILDREN. 

Alice Rosabel, b. Riverhead, N. Y., Oct. 28, 1856 



Frank Herbert, 
Ada Maria, 
Elmer Ellsworth, 
Wallace George, 
Nannie Lucretia, 



Roanoke, " Dec. 15, 1857 

Nov. 2, 1859 
June 6, 1861 
Nov. 15, 1868 
Feb. 21, 1871 



Frank H. married in Brooklyn, N. Y., December 25, 1882, 
Addie Claracy Salmon, daughter of Joshua C. and Jerusha 
(King) Salmon, of Roanoke, N. Y. 

She died in Roanoke, N. Y., August 24, 1908, aged 47. 

CHILD. 

Harold Crosby, b. Roanoke, N. Y., Sept. 27, 1889. 



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158 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON -GRADUATES. 



Ada M. married at Riverhead, N. Y., October i6, 1898, Elisha 
Wheeler Wells, of Aquebogue, N. Y. 



Halsey Benjamin, 



CHILD. 

b. Riverhead, N. Y., 



Jan. 16, 1901. 



Blnier B. married in Aquebogue, N. Y., November 27, 1884, 
Jennie Cora Corwin, of Aquebogue, daughter of John Henry 
Corwni and Phebe Ann Corwin. 





CHILDREN. 




Ellis C, 


b. Roanoke, N. Y., 


Jan. 21, 1893. 


Leroy, 


tt H (( 


June 9, 1897. 


George Russell, 


{( a « 


May II, 1898. 


Ruth, 


a a t( 


May 14, 1902. 


Ralph, 


a u (( 


May 14, 1902. 


Jeannetta, 


i^ a it 


June 28, 1905. 


Elmer, 


it a tt 


July 8, 1907. 


And six who died 


in infancy, Roanoke, N. Y. 




Wallace G. married at Roanoke, N. Y., June 


I, 1892, Mildred 


Juletta, of Roanoke, 


daughter of John C. and Lena (Benjamin) 


Young. 


CHILDREN. 




George Ray, 


b. Roanoke, N. Y., 


July 31, 1894. 




d. 


Sept. 29, 1895. 


Archie Wallace, 


b. 


Mar. 7, 1896. 


Ralph Corwin, 


<( a n 


Oct. 7, 1897. 




d. 


Apr. 29, 1898. 



Nannie L. married in Roanoke, N. Y., September 11, 1890, 
DeForest Wells, of Aquebogue. 



Ralph Otis, 
Clara Bell, 
Myra Myanda, 
Amy Rachel, 
Lulu Anetha, 
Alice Fayette, 



CHILDREN. 

Orient, N. Y., 
Riverhead, " 



Aug. 9, 1 89 1 

July 30, 1893 

Sept. 20, 1894, 

Mar. 27, 1895 

Mar. 9, 1896, 

Feb. 13, 1899 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 1 59 

* CHARLES HENRY RUSSELL. 

He continued in business in Bridgeport until he died there 
February 26, 1895, at the age of 67. 

He was buried with his two wives in Hagerstown, Md. 

He had no children. 

He married, first, in Hagerstown, Md., December 2, 1863, 
Miss Anna E., daughter of Samuel and Mary (McLaughlin) 
Zeller. 

She died in Hagerstown, February 2, 1864. 

He married, second, in Brooklyn, N. Y., October 23, 1865, 
Mrs. Anna A. (Shelleberger) Zeller, daughter of David and 
Christana (Newcomber) Shelleberger. 

She died in Bridgeport, Conn., October 24, 1888. 



* DANIEL WEBSTER SEARLE. 

He was elected District Attorney of Montrose, Pa., in 1865 
and in 1868. In 1883, he became a partner of the law firm of 
McCollum, Searle and Smith. 

In 1888, he was elected President Judge of the Courts of Sus- 
quehanna County, and was re-elected in November, 1898, which 
was regarded as a fitting testimonial of the high estimate of his 
judicial character, and of the esteem in which hewas held. 

He died in Montrose, Pa., November 2y, 1907, at the age of 71. 

His wife is living in Montrose. 

He married in Towanda, Pa., February i, 1883, Mary Irene, 
daughter of Gordon Fowler Mason and Mary Ann Mason. 

They had no children. 



* CHARLES SEW ALL. 

He continued the practice of law in Salem, Mass., for thirty- 
five years. 

He was a member of the School Committee for six years, 
and was Treasurer of the Essex Bar Association for twenty-one 
years. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 



He died in Salem, Mass., April 4, 1894, at the age of 58, leav- 
ing a widow, who still lives there. 

He was of untiring industry and sterling integrity, a close 
student and had phenomenal success in inspiring confidence in 
his clients. 

He married in Salem, Mass., October 8, 1863, Margaret 
Perkins, daughter of Stephen Bradshaw and Mary (Perkins) 
Ives. 

CHILDREN. 



Alice Ives, 


b. 


Salem, Mass., 


Sept. 


12, 


1866. 




d. 


a (( 


Jan. 




1867. 


Grace Robards, 


b. 


a t( 


Sept. 


12, 


1866. 




d. 


H 11 


Oct. 


12, 


1892. 


Edward Lang, 


b. 


H if 


July 


29, 


1867. 




d. 


Conway, N. H., 


July 


5. 


1875- 


Lizzie Ives, 


b. 


Salem, Mass., 


Sept. 


5, 


1868. 




d. 


iC n 


Dec. 


4. 


1876. 


Stephen Bradshaw, 


b. 


u n 


Nov. 


II, 


1871. 




d. 


a it 


Jan. 


29, 


1876. 


Charles Henry, 


b. 


it a 


July 


29. 


1874- 




d. 


a a 


July 


5. 


1878. 



* ROBERT GILL SIMS. 

He was son of John Hampton and Minerva (Brown) Sims. 

After the war he was a planter on Deer Creek, Washington 
County, Miss. 

In 1875, he was a County Assessor, and in 1878 President of 
the Board of Supervisors of the County. 

He was appointed General Agent and Custodian of Fort 
Thornberg, on the Utah Reservation, a year before his death, 
which occurred there on a Saturday, after an illness of perhaps 
two weeks, in 1893 or 1896. 

About 1867, he married Miss Wingfield, who died in 1878. 

They had no children. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. l6l 

* BENJAMIN HALE SMITH. 

He continued the practice of law in Gloucester, Mass. 

He was a member of the School Committee in 1867, Surveyor 
of the District of Gloucester from 1867 to 1875, for many years 
before 1872 was Chairman of the Republican Town Committee, 
in 1876 City Solicitor, and for several years a Director of the 
Gloucester Lyceum and Library Association and a Trustee of 
the Public Library Fund. 

He was also Publisher of The Telegraph in Gloucester, of the 
Cape Ann Advertiser and of the Cape Ann Bulletin. 

He was an able lawyer, a ripe scholar and a graceful speaker. 

Mrs. Smith died in Gloucester, January 8, 1874. 

He died in Gloucester, Mass., November 23, 1880, at the age 
of 47- 

He married in Gloucester, Mass., May 8, i860, Harriet Gilbert, 
daughter of Daniel and Anna Maria (Gilbert) Say ward. 

CHILDREN. 

Hattie Gilbert, b. Gloucester, Mass., Sept. 6, 1862. 

d. " " Apr. 10, 1863. 

Anna Sayward, b. " " Oct. 16, 1864. 

Hester Sayward, " " " Sept. 22, 1868. 

Anna S. lives in West Somerville, Mass. 

She married in Gloucester, Mass., June i, 1887, Albert Center. 

CHILDREN. 

Charles Hale, b. Gloucester, Mass., Apr. 19, 1888. 

Gilbert Sayward, " " " Tnly 20, 1891. 



HAYDEN KELLOGG SMITH. 

Smith, with his daughter, lives in Oak Park, 111., at 405: 
Maple avenue. 

He was Editor-in-Chief of the Milwaukee Sentinel from Jan- 
uary I, 1866, to April, 1871, and was with the Chicago Times 
as editorial writer, making a specialty of economic subjects, 
from June, 1871, to December, 1888. Thence to 1890, and at 
other times, he wrote for various publications. 



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1 62 BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF NON-GRADUATJ$S. 

He was next an editorial writer for the Chicago Herald, from 
February, 1890, to March, 1895. 

From its establishment in May, 1895, until May 31, 1907, when 
it ceased publication, he was editorial writer for the Chicago 
Chronicle. 

Last year he wrote a book on Socialism. 

He was Regent of the University of Wisconsin from February, 
1870, to June, 1 87 1. 

He was Lecturer on Economics and the only Instructor on 
that subject in the University of Chicago for three years, ending 
in June, 1881. 

He received an Honorary A. M. from the University of Wis- 
consin in 1867, ^^^ LL. D. from the University of Chicago in 
1879. 

He married in Waukesha, Wis., August 30, i860. Miss Fannie 
A., daughter of Isaac and Fanny (Amsden) Proctor. 

His wife died at Oak Park, 111., January 2, 1903. 

CHILD. 

Ida Amsden, b. Madison, Wis., Sept. 26, 1861. 

Ida A, took a special course of a year to June, 1881, in the 
University of Chicago, and has since taught in and near Chicago. 



JEWETT GUERNSEY SMITH. 

He continued in business in New Haven until 1875, when he 
dropped the name of Smith, became Guernsey Jewett, took up 
land in Waco, Texas, and became a farmer. Later he removed 
to Washington Territory, whence he wrote once or twice to his 
onlv brother, Frederick James Smith, who died and was buried 
in Granby, Conn., May, 1908. 

He had no sisters. He is believed to be dead. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI, RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. l6j 

* JACOB HENRY SMYSER. 

(Pittsburgh, Pa.) He was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., August 5^ 
1838, entered the Class September 13, 1854, and left during the 
first Freshman term. June 3, 1856, he entered the Military 
Academy at West Point. He graduated May 6, 1861, No. 28 
in a class of forty-five members, and was promoted to Second 
Lieutenant, Third Artillery, and May 14, 1861, to First Lieu- 
tenant, Fifth Artillery. He drilled volunteers in Washington in 
May and June ; from June to August, was on the upper Potomac 
and in the Shenandoah Valley; on Recruiting service August 

17, to October 7; with Battery in Kentucky October, 1862, to 
February, 1863; in the Tennessee and Mississippi campaign 
(Army of the Ohio) February, to June, 1862, being engaged in 
the march to Bowling Green, Nashville and Pittsburg Landing 
February, to April, 1862; Battle of Shiloh, April ,7, 1862, and 
advance upon and siege of Corinth, April 10, to May 30, 1862;, 
on leave of absence June 11., to August 13, 1862; with Battery 
(Army of the Ohio) in the movemept through North Alabama 
and Tennessee to Louisville, Ky., August 13, to September 2J, 
1862; Acting Assistant Ordnance Officer at Louisville, October 

18, 1862, to April 2y, 1863, when he was transfered to the 
Ordnance Corps; in command of Louisville Ordnance Depot, 
April 27, 1863, to January 24, 1864; Assistant Ordnance Officer 
at Watervliet Arsenal, N. Y., January 26, 1864, to November 
6, 1865 ; Brevet Captain March 13 1865, for faithful and meri- 
torious services in the Ordnance Department; in command of 
Detroit Arsenal, Mich., November 7, 1865, to March 7, 1867, 
when he became Captain, Ordnance; on duty in Detroit to 
June 6, 1867; thence Assistant Ordnance Officer at Allegheny 
Arsenal, Pa., to February 10, 1869, when he resigned. 

He was for several years engaged in the iron business of 
his father-in-law, in the firm of Dil worth, Porter and Company, 
of Pittsburgh, Pa. During this time his health steadily failed, 
developing into consumption. Thinking that a change of cli;nate 
would arrest the disease, he went to Minnesota, March 10, 1878, 
having acquired a tract of land in Clay County, along the line 
of the Northern Pacific Railroad, in what afterwards became 
the township of Riverton. Here he engaged in farming. He 



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164 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 

died in Riverton, May 6, 1885 — ^the twenty-fourth anniversary 
of his graduation from West Point — at the age of 46, and was 
buried in Allegheny Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

He married in Washington, D. C, May 16, 1861, Caroline 
Frances, daughter of the late James Hutchinson Swett of Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

His wife is now living in Harwich, Mass. 

CHILDREN. 

Henry Bohemund, b. Troy, N. Y., Apr. 13, 1864 

d. Riverton, Minn., Dec. 3, 1888, 

Charles James, b. Troy, N. Y., July 22, 1865 

Helen Peyton, " Pittsburgh, Pa., Aug. 29, 1867. 

Frederic William, " " " July 30, 1869 

James Swett, " " " Sept. 17, 1871 

Albert Ernest, " " " Aug. 11, 1873 

Henry B, died unmarried. 

Charles J. is unmarried. He graduated from the Har- 
vard Medical School, Cambridge, Mass., in 1897, with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine, and is now practicing medicine in Water- 
town, Mass. 

Helen P. (Ogontz, 1886,) lives in Washingtion, D. C. 

She married in Riverton, Minn., June 2y, 1889, Dr. John 
Kurtz, son of the late Col. John D. Kurtz, Corps of Engineers, 
U. S. A. 

They have no children. 

Frederic W. graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, Boston, Mass., in 1896, with the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Mechanical Engineering. 

He IS now with the General Electric Company, Schenectady, 
N. Y. 

He married in Lincoln, Neb., June 27, 1895, Frances Shelden 
Hawley, daughter of the late Ezra S. Hawley of that city. 

CHILD. 

Frederic Hawley, b. Brookline, Mass., Dec. 17, 1896. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF NON -GRADUATES. 165 

James S. graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, Boston, Mass., in 1896, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Mechanical Engineering. He returned for two years 
of post graduate study in Electrical Engineering in the same 
institution, and in 1898, entered the employ of the General 
Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 

He is now living in Harwich, Mass., and is unmarried. 

Albert £. graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, Boston, Mass., in 1896, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Mechanical Engineering. He returned for two years 
of post graduate study in the same institution, and in 1898, 
received the degree of Master of Science in Mining Engineering. 

He is now Assistant General Manager of the La Belle Iron 
Works, Steubenville, Ohio. 

He married in Pittsburgh, Pa., September 17, 1901, Leila Hall 
Palmer, daughter of William Palmer of that city. 







CHILDREN. 










Helen Frances, 


b. 


Steubenville, 


Ohio, 


Dec. 


5, 


I905. 


Eugene Palmer, 


« 


Pittsburgh, 


Pa., 


Apr. 


10, 


1907. 



* EUGENE ROLAZ STEVENS. 

On leaving the army he returned to his home at Dwight, 111., 
where he continued to farm, and also had an interest in the grain 
business, both at Dwight and in Chicago. 

In 1875, he moved to Gunnison County, Col., and worked at 
mining for several years, when he returned to Illinois with 
impaired health and fortune. He lived at Dwight until 1888, 
when he came east to his family to pass the remainder of his 
life, the last ten years with his brother Frederic (Yale, 1858) 
in New York. 

He died February 16, 1905, at the age of 67. 

He was never married. 



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l66 BIOGRAPHICAI^ RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 

* PETER MORSE TAFT. 

In September, 1881, he removed from Whitinsville, Mass., to 
Boston, where he engaged in the real estate business. 

He died in Providence, R. L, March 25, 1905, at the age of 
y2, and was buried in Whitinsville. 

Mrs. Taft died in Boston, Mass., November 30, 1905. 

He married in Rochester, Minn.,- June 21, 1859, Lucia A., 
daughter of Moses and Martha (Prentiss) Cobb. 

CHIU). 
Charles Cobb, b. Northbridge, Mass., Apr. ,7, 1862. 

Charles C. is a manufacturer of shoes. His address is 20 
Bicknell street, Dorchester Center, Mass. 

He marrried in Southbridge, Mass., June 18, 1884, Helen 
Atkinson, daughter of William Booth and Abbie Jane Cook. 

CHILDREN. 

Lucia Helen, b. Boston, Mass., Feb. 7, 1889. 

Charles Booth, " " " May 1,1893. 



* JOSEPH LORD TAINTOR. 

In the spring of 1864, he returned to Avon, N. Y., and bought 
out his partners in the publishing business. 

In 1866, he took up his residence in South Orange, N. J. 

In the spring of 1867, he opened a publishing office at 229 
Broadway, New York City, under the title of Taintor Bros., and 
began to publish school and other books, removing, in 1868, to 
678 Broadway. 

In 1879, h^ was attacked by pneumonia, which compelled him 
to retire from business in August, 1880. 

He died in Bloomingdale, N. Y., September i, 1881, aged 46. 

Mrs. Taintor and the children, Orville C, Ralph N. and 
Isabella, now live in South Orange, N. J. 

He married in Avon, N. Y., September 4, 1862, Isabella, 
daughter of Orville and Jane (Garlinghouse) Comstock. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 



167 







CHILDREN. 






Mary Lord, 


b. 


Avon, 


N. Y., 


Sept. 24, 1863. 


Ellen Garlinghouse, 


(C 


« 


H 


June 15, 1865. 




d. 


Ellenville, 


t< 


Sept. 24, 1889. 


Orville Comstock, 


b. 


S. Orange, 


N.J., 


May 22, 1867. 


Ralph Newhall, 


it 


a 


« 


May 10, 1869. 


Charles Comstock, 


li 


it 


ti 


Oct. 23, 1870. 




d. 


n 


U 


Dec. 23, 1870. 


Isabella, 


b. 


" 


ti 


Aug. 12, 1874. 



Mary L. married, first, in South Orange, N. J., April 28, 1886, 
Edward Palmer Mason. 

She married, second, in New York City, October 8, 1904, 
Daniel Gregory Mason. 



Gregory, 
Lowell, 
Ellen Taintor, 
William Buckminster, 



CHII^DREN. 

New York, N. Y., July 3, 1889. 

Swampscott, Mass., Aug. 26, 1890. 

Boston, " Dec. 17, 1893. 

Milton, " Sept. 4, 1896. 



Ralph AT. married in Mount Vernon, N. Y., January 27, 1902, 
Mildred, daughter of Hiram Coleman and Mary Martha (Wil- 
son ) Conger. 

Thev have no children. 



* HERBERT BRADWELL TITUS. 

He was made Brevet Brigader General from March 13, 1865, 
for gallant service. After the war he resided much of the time 
for many years in Washington and New York City, traveling 
extensively in this country and in Europe as a Special Agent of 
the U. S. Government. 

As a member of the firm of Hovey and Titus, Attorneys and 
Counsellors at Law, he practiced in Washington and New York. 
His partner died about 1895, and Titus, who had suffered for 



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l68 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NON -GRADUATES. 

many years from Brights' disease, retired in 1898, to Brattleboro, 
Vt., where he Hved for the last three or four years with his 
niece, Mrs. Emma A. Wilder. 

He died there June i, 1905, at the age of y2. 

He never married. 



* GEORGE WILLIAM TROW. 

On the 1st of May, 1871, he sailed for Europe, intending to be 
absent a year or two. While in Paris he became ill, and, in 
search of health, went to Champigny, France, where he died of 
typhoid fever October 10, 1872, at the age of 35. 

Though he was with us at Yale only two years, he won more 
hearts than many do in a life time. Frankness, cordiality and 
sincerity were marked characteristics of his. He was deeply 
religious by nature, and his keenness of susceptibility was almost 
feminine. He was very fond of music, was a fine singer, and 
many of us will long remember his manly voice. He had spent 
much time in reading, writing and traveling, and was "a full 
man, an exact man,'' and a man of much refinement and culture. 



JOHN HOWARD VAN AMRINGE. 

(Montgomery, N. Y.) He was son of William Frederick and 
Susan (Sterling) Van Amringe, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., 
April 3, 1835, prepared for college at the Montgomery Acad- 
emy, Orange County, N. Y., J. M. Wilkin, Principal, and 
entered the Class September 13, 1854, but left April 8, 1856, 



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BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. 1 69 

during the second Sophomore term. From that time until the 
autumn of 1858, he was private tutor in Croton Falls, N. Y. 
He then entered the Class of i860 in Columbia College, N. Y., 
and graduated. 

During a part of the year before graduating, he supplied the 
place of the ad interim Professor of Latin. From October, i860, 
to the autumn of 1863, ^^ was Tutor of Mathematics, and then 
for two months Assistant Professor, after which he was Adjunct 
Professor of Mathematics until June,' 1865. 

He became Professor of Mathematics at Columbia in 1865. 

He has been Vice-President of the American Metrological 
Society from 1890, and Dean of the School of Arts of Columbia 
since 1894. He was President of the New York Mathematical 
Society from 1888 to 1890. 

He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science ; member of the American Mathematical Society 
and of the New York Historical Society. He is a Trustee of 
the New York Protestant Episcopal Publishing School Society 
for promoting religion and learning in the State of New York; 
and of the New York Bible and Common Prayer Book Society ; 
and is a member of the Standing Committee of the General 
Theological Seminary, Protestant Episcopal Church. 

He received the degree of M. A. from Columbia College in 
1863; of Ph. D. University State of New York, 1877; L.H.D. 
Columbia, 1890; LL. D. Union College, in 1895. 

Clubs : President of Columbia University ; Metropolitan, 
Church, and Century. 

Editor Davies' series mathematical works, writer of pamphlets 
and articles on life insurance, vital statistics, etc., and of History 
of Columbia College . and University, and many articles and 
addresses relating thereto and to the alumni of Columbia. 

He lives at 48 East 26th street. New York City. 

He married in New York, June 20, 1865, Miss Cornelia, 
daughter of William Goelet and Emily Ann (Biilow Bucknor. 



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I70 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF NO N -GRADUATES. 



Guy, 


b. 


New York, N.Y.,Jan. 


20, 


1868. 


Bucknor, 


i( 


" Jan.. 


7, 


1869. 




d. 


Washingtonville, " Sept. 


i9> 


1887. 


Howard, 


b. 


New York, " Jan. 


31, 


1870. 




d. 


" July 


4, 


1870. 


Emily Billow, 


b. 


" May 


28, 


1876. 



Guy (Columbia, A. B., 1888; LL. B., 1891,) is of Oakes, Van 
Amringe, Schurtz & Davis, Counsellors at Law, 49 Wall street, 
New York City. 

He is a member of the Metropolitan, University, Bar Associ- 
ation, Salmagundi, Columbia University and Baltusrol Clubs ; is 
Deputy Secretary General of the Society of Colonial Wars; on 
the Board of Managers of the St. Nicholas Society, and a 
Director of the New York Juvenile Asylum. 

He is unmarried. 

Emily B, is unmarried, and lives with her father. 



JOEL BROWN VOSBURGH. 

In 1865, he sold his store in Shelbyville, 111., and opened one in 
Greencastle, Ind. 

In 1870, he engaged in farming for two years in Los Angeles 
County, Cal. 

In 1873, having been appointed Indian Agent, he took charge 
of the Tule River Agency in Tulare County. In 1875, he 
resigned, and February i, 1876, established the first hardware 
store in Alameda, Cal, which he has managed until now, with 
increasing success. It is now the J. B. Vosburgh Co., and his 
sons, Lew W. and Jerome D., are also stockholders. 

He married in Greencastle, Ind., October i, 1856, Miss Caro- 
line Amelia, daughter of Tucker Woodsen and Caroline (Depew) 
Williamson. 



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BIOGRAPHICAI. RECORD OF NON-GRADUATES. I7I 







CHIUOREN. 






Ida Maria, 


b. 


Shelbyville, 


lU., 


Apr. 8, 1858. 


Edwin Clarence, 


b. 


« 


« 


June 21, i860. 




d. 


« 


« 


Jan. 26, 1893. 


Lew Williamson, 


b. 


€t 


« 


May 7, 1863. 


Jerome Depew, 


it 


it 


« 


May 24, 1868. 



/rfa M. married in Alameda, Cal., June 20, 1900, Sylvanus 
Dexter Waterman, Superintendent of the Berkeley Public 
Schools. 

They have no children. 

Edwin C. was long the bookkeeper of the Chicago Lumber 
Company, but, his health failing, he went back to California in 
1891. 

He did not marry. 

Lew W. married in Alameda, Cal., June 9, 1908, Jeane Francis, 
daughter of Samuel Winant and Jennie Francis Neal. 
He is Treasurer of J. B. Vosburgh Co. 

Jerome D. is unmarried, and is Secretary of the Corporation. 



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STATISTICS. 



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STATISTICS. 



ROOMS OCCUPIED. 



Abbott 61 College st. 

Adams 

Alexander 59 College st. 

Anderson 19 College st. 
G. P. Andrews 27 LaFayettest 
J. H. Andrews 93 York st. 

Armstrong 16 College st. 

Atterbury 

Bacon 26 College st. 

G. Badger 74 College st. 

W. Badger 74 College st. 

Baird 

Bancroft 6 College st. 

Batchelor 93 York st. 

J. E. Beale 

R. M. Beale 91 George st. 

D. M. Bean 31 Wall st. 

S; C. Beane 83 York st. 

Bennett 85 York st. 

Blake 41 Elm st. 

Boies 6 Atwaterst. 

Boynton 29 Wall st. 

Brandon 41 S. M. 

Bright 38 College st. 

Brinton 32 College st. 

Brown 

Buckelew 11 York st. 

Buckingham 42 High st. 

Burlock 93 York st. 

Burnley 

Caldwell 

Carpenter . 151 Ath. 

Chalmers 44 High st. 

Chamberlin 137 York st. 

Clarke 77 York st. 

Cobb 109 N. 

Colgate 24 High st. 

Cutter lOW.Chapelst 



61 College st. 


61 College st. 


27 8. 


28 Elm St. 


79N.M. 


A. 


15 Elm St. 


182 D. 




179 D. 


170 D. 


22 8. 


96 George St. 


96 George st. 


96 George st. 


13 Chapel st. 


28 High St. 


88 Church st. 


48 College st. 






26 College st. 


26 College st. 


26 College st. 


91 George st. 


91 George st. 


139 Coll. Chapel 


61 S. M. 


93 N. M. 


69N.M. 


115 N. 


71 N. M. 


119 N. 


31 Wall St. 


31 Wall St. 


143 Coll. Chapel 


47 S. M. 


is! * 


1^. 


41 Elm St. 


41 Elm St. 


41 Elm St. 


37 High St. 


150 Ath. 


HON. 


6 Grove st. 






40S.M. 


40 8. M. 


32 8. 




74 College st. 


25 8. 


10 College St. 


74 College st. 






19 College st. 


106 York St. 


9 Crown st. 


91 N. M. 




9 Chapel st. 


76N.M. 


107 N. 


80 Wall St. 


146 George st. 




39 Chapel st. 


28 High St. 


88 Church st. 


11 Elm St. 


11 Elm St. 


11 Elm St. 


24 High St. 


15 8. 


6 8. 



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176 




STATISTICS. 






Darrach 










Davenport 


12 Grove st. 








Davis 


37 High St 


59 S. M. 






DeForest 


77 York St. 








A. 0. Delano 


54 Crown st. 








I. Delano 


82N.M. 


91 George st. 


91 George st 


91 George st. 


Dembinski 




82N.M. 


41 S. M. 


30 S. 


Disbrow 


7^ Broadway 


7y2 Broadway 






Dunham 


6 Atwater st. 


6 Atwater st. 






R. O.Dwight 


61 College st. 


47 S. M. 


56 High St. 




T. B. Dwight 


29 Wall St. 








Eichelberger 


29 Wall St. 


37 High st 


94N.M. 


104 N. 


Elliott 




24 Grove st 


23 Grove st. 


llElmst 


Evans 


22 College st. 


22 College st. 


28 College st. 


120 N. 


Fenn 




52 Chapel st. 


83 York st 




Folger 


16 College st. 








Foote 


22 George st. 








Forbes 


92 York St. 






•/ 


Franklin 


93 York st 


6 Atwater st. 


88N.M. 


105 N. 


Freeborn 




64S.M. 


96N.M. 


86N.M. 


Frisbie 


130 York st 


63S.M. 


87 N. M. 


29 Wall st 


Frost 


65 N. M. 








Gallaway 


16 College st 


6 Grove st 


71 N. M. 


119 N. 


Garrard 


' 77 York st 


115 N. 


87N.M. 


125 N. 


Gibbs 


71 High st 


71 High St. 


71 High St. 


71 High St. 


Gibson 


22 High st 


108 Crown st. 






Goodwin 


4 Atwater st. 


4 Atwater st. 


42 S. M. 


112 N. 


E. D. Grant 




59 College st. 


81 York St. 


81 York St. 


H. A. Grant 


6 Atwater st. 


42 High st 






Greenwood 


78 College st. 


10 College St. 


94N.M. 


104 N. 


Hancock 


14 Grove st. 








Hannahs 


24 High st 








Harris 


65 N. M. 


Gymnasium 


44^ High st 




Haskell 


79 High st 


36W.Chapelstl72D. 


103 N. 


Hayner 


64 College st. 








Heermance 








24 S. 


Hendrickson 






19 Chapel st. 




Hewitt 


6 Atwater st 


6 Atwater st 


6 Atwater st. 


6 Atwater st 


Hodson 


9 Chapel st 








Hollister 


4 Atwater st. 


4 Atwater st. 


4 Atwater st 


4 Atwater st 


Honejrman 


14W.Chapelst 






Houston 


9 Chapel st. 








Howe 


4 Atwater st. 


4 Atwater st. 


42 S. M. 


112 N. 


Hubbell 


11 Park st 


76 York st 


52 Chapel st. 


6 Atwater st. 


Ingerson 




148 Ath. 


153-Ath. 


lis. 


H. Janin 


91 George st. 


.*.•.'• , 







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STATISTICS. 




177 


L. Janin 


91 George st. 


35 Chapel st. 






Johnson 


99 N. 


38 S. M. 


153 Ath. 


16 S. 


A. Jones 


lOW.Chapelst 






A. T. Jones 






91 N. M. 


9S. 


Kellogg 


11 Park St. 


54 High St. 


69N.M. 


122 N. 


Kimball 


139 Chapel St. 


140 Chapel St. 


77 N.M. 


31 S. 


Kirtland 


147 Ath. 








Lane 


6S. 


81 N. M. 


74N.M. 


126 N. 


M. V. BXec 


98 York St. 


98 York St. 






S. H.Lee 


59 College st. 


106 York st 


113 N. 


118 N. 


Lloyd 


108 Crown St. 








Lovewell 




..... ... 




13 S. 


Luckett 


98 York St. 








Lyman 


151 Ath. 


116 N. 


116 N. 




MacDonald 


85 York St. 


145 Ath. 


62S.M. 




MacDowell 






57 College st. 


8S. 


MacLellan 


8 College st. 


54 High St. 


90 N.M. 


IIIN. 


Maclin 


16 College St. 








Magill 




161 D. 


161 D. 


161 D. 


Manice 




123 Crown st. 


46 Chapel St. 


46 Chapel st. 


Marble 


57 College st. 








Mathewson 


Hillhouse ai 


r. Hillhouse a's 


r. Hillhouse av.lO Hillhouse av. 


Miles 


171 D. 


171 D. 


185 D. 


8S. 


Mills 


152 Ath. 


39S.M. 


7S. 


137H Lye. 


Moore ^ 


7 Elm St. 


6 Atwater st. 


WA High St. 




More 








23 S. 


Morgan 


72 College St. 


25 High St. 


25 High St. 


123 N. 


Morris 


92N.M. 


42 High St. 


90 N.M. 


IIIN. 


Napier 




25 College st. 






Neide 


1 St. John PI, 




28 High St. 


lOW.Chapelst. 


Nicoll 


14 Grove st. 








Noble 


79 High St. 


8 Grove st. 


46 Chapel st. 


46H Chapel st. 


Norcutt 


23 Dixwell St. 








Ogden 


6 Grove st. 


100 N. 


78 N.M. 


108 N. 


Palen 


6 Atwater st. 








Peirce 


69N.M. 


25 High St. 


25 High St. 


123 N. 


Penny 


98 York St. 


81 N. M. 


74 N.M. 


126 N. 


Perkins 


28 Elm St. 


6 Atwater st. 


88 N.M. 


105 N. 


Pickett 








8 Grove st. 


Pitkin 


8 College st. 


55 S. M. 


69 N.M. 


122 N. 


Pollock 










Porter 


61 College st. 


24 High St. 


54 High St. 


109 N. 


Potter 


15 Grove st. 


15 Grove st. 


38S.M. 


29 S. 


E. A. Pratt 




14 Grove St. 


8 Grove St. 


79 York St. 


H. A. Pratt 


16 Broadway 


66^ George st. 


58S.M. 


12 s.' 


Pumpelly 




81 York St. 


75 N. M. 


127 N. 



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178 




STATISTICS. 






Richards 


57 College st 


55 S. M. 




120 N. 


Riley 


42 High St. 


114 N. 


114 N. 


73 N. M. 


Robison 








106 York St. 


Robinson 


76 York St 








Royer 


Leffingwell st 


. 89 N. M. 


92N. M. 


26 S. 


Russell 


Gymnasium 








Scott 





44S.M. 


75 N. M. 


106 N. 


Searle 


14 W.Chapel st 








Sewall 


iy2 Broadway 








Seymour 


64 College st. 


48 S. M. 


39 Broadway 


142 Coll. Chapel 


Sims 




87 N. M. 


73N.M. 


128 N. 


Sleight ■ 




6 Atwater st. 


n N.M. 


128 N. 


B. H. Smith 


lYi Broadway 


•••••••• 






G. F. Smith 




114 N. 


95 N. M. 


23 S*. 


H. K. Smith 




21 High St. 


80 N.M. 




J. G. Smith 


137 Chapel st. 








N. Smith 


4 Atwater st. 


4 Atwater st. 


4 Atwater st. 


4 Atwater st. 


Smyser 


151 State St. 








Steele 


4 Atwater st. 


6 Atwater st. 


104 York St. 


104 York St. 


E. R. Stevens 


108Crown st. 









F. W. Stevens 


lOSCrown st. 


6 Atwater st. 


85 N. M. 


124 N. 


Street 


147 Ath. 


17 High St. 


15 S. 


10 S. 


Sweet 


144 State st. 


106 York St. 


4 Atwater st. 


124 N. 


Sweetser 


22 High St. 


19 Chapel st. 


57 S. M. 


26 S. 


E. M, Taft 


15 Grove st. 


64S. M. 


96 N.M. 


85 N. M. 


P. M. Taft 


9 Crown st. 








Taintor 


14 Grove st. 








Thomas 


17 High St. 


IS Grove st. 


39 S. M. 


28 S. 


Titus 


31Wall St. 








Tomlinson 


49 Temple st. 


49 Temple st. 


49 Temple st. 


49 Temple st. 


Trow 


22 High st 


29 Wall St. 






Turner 




39 S. M. 


12 N. M. 


13 S. 


Twining 


10 Elm St. 


10 Elm St. 


10 Elm St. 


141 Coll. Chapel 


Valpy 


9 Crown st. 


99 N. 


91 N. M. 


9S. 


Van Amringe 


88 Church st. 


14 Grove st. 






Van Name 


28 Elm St. 


28 Elm St. 


28 Elm St. 


28 Elm St. 


Vosburgh 










G. Wells 


78 College st. 


78 College st. 


28 College st. 


88 Church st. 


H. A. Wells 




29 Wall St. 


17 High St. 


17 High St. 


Whittlesey 






8 Grove st. 


14 S. 


Wilbur 


,. 






106 York St. 


Williams 


19 Chapel st. 


19 Chapel st. 


52 Chapel st. 


43 College st. 


Woodruff 


8 College St. 


8 College st. 


54 S. M. 


54S.M. 


Woodward 


108 Crown st. 


11 Elm St. 


54 High St. 


109 N. 


Totals 


137 


Ill 


105 


100 



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STATISTICS OF GRADUATES. 



179 



STATISTICS OF GRADUATES. 



Abbott 


0. 


Mathewson 


0. 


Andrews 


Col. 


Miles 


0. 


Baird 


H.O. 


Mills 


1st Dis. 


Batchelor 


0. 


Morgan 


2d Dis. 


Bean 


1st Dis. 


Noble 


Col. 


Blake 


Coi. 


Penny 


3d Dis. 


Boynton 


2d Dis. 


Perkins 


Col. 


Brinton 


2d Dis. 


Pitkin 


1st Dis. 


Caldwell • 


0. 


E. A. Pratt 


Col. 


Cobb 


3d Dis. 


H. A. Pratt 


H.O. 


Delano 


0. 


Riley 


3d Dis. 


Dembinski 


0. 


Scott 


Dissertation 


Eichelberger 


3 Dis. 


Sejmiour 


Phil. 0. 


Elliott 


0. 


Steele 


3d Dis. 


Evans 


Col. 


Stevens 


H.O. 


Freeborn 


Dissertation 


Street 


1st Dis. 


Gibbs 


Latin 0. 


Sweet 


1st Dis. 


Haskell 


Phil. 0. 


Sweetser 


0. 


Heermance 


H.O. 


Taft 


2d Dis. 


Ingerson 


2d Dis. 


Thomas 


Dissertation 


Johnson 


1st Dis. 


Tomlinson 


Col. 


Jones 


0. 


Turner 


0. 


Kellogg 


3d Dis. 


Valpy 


Dissertation 


Lane 


Dissertation 


Van Name 


Val. 0. 


Lee 


2d Dis. 


G. Wells 


2d Dis. 


MacDowell 


Dissertation 


Whittlesey 


1st Dis. 


MacLellan 


Phil. 0. 


Williams 


1st Dis. 


Manice 


1st Dis. 


Wood»ward 


3d Dis. 




R^mvKD NO APPOINTMENTS. 




Adams 


R. 0. Dwight 


Hubbell 


Potter 


Alexander 


Franklin 


Kimball 


Pumpelly 


Anderson 


Frisbie 


Lovewell 


Richards 


Armstrong 


Callaway 


Magill 


Robison 


Bacon 


Garrard 


Marble 


Royer 


Beale 


Goodwin 


More 


Sleight 


Bennett 


Grant 


Morris 


G. F. Smith 


Brown 


Greenwood 


Neide 


N. Smith 


Chalmers 


Harris 


Ogden 


Twining 


Clarke 


Hewitt 


Peirce 


H. A. Wells 


Colgate 


Hollister 


Pickett 


Wilbur 


Cutter 


Howe 


Porter 


Woodruff 

Total, 48: 



Note: Adams, Alexander, Dwight, Harris and Marble received the 
degree of A. B. after the class graduated. 



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i8o 



STATISTICS OF GRADUATES. 

CATALOGUE OF 1855. 

SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDED AUGUST, 1846. 

Addison Van Name. 



BERKELEY PREMIUMS FOR LATIN CX)MP0SITI0N. 

R. O. Dwight, Gibbs, Hollister, MacLellan, Miles, Pitkin, Van Name. 

CLARK PREMIUM FOR THE SECOND IN RANK AT THE FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIP 

EXAMINATION. 

George B. MacLellan. 

COLLEGE PREMIUMS FOR SOLUTION OF MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 

First Prise Gibbs, Van Name. 

Second Prise R. M. Beale, Sweetser. 

Third Prise Davis, Freeborn, Harris, Hubbell, Lloyd, MacLellan, 

H. A. Pratt. 



First Prise 
Second Prise 

Third Prise 



CATALOGUE OF 1856. 

COLLEGE PREMIUMS FOR ENGLISH COMPOSITION. 

Second Term. 
First Division Second Division Third Division 
Lee MacLellan 



First Prise 
Second Prise 
Third Prise 



Van Name 

T.. , ^ (Kimball 

Brmton Richards •< -njA ' 



Thomas Seymour 

Third Term, 



( Pitkin 
1 H. K. Smi 



Smith 



First Division 

j Brinton 
(Lee 

Eichelberger 
Garrard 



Second Division Third Division 

MacLellan Van Name 

IseXr H.K.Sn,UH 

j Blake 

\ Ogden Kimball 



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STATISTICS OI? GRADUATES. 



I8l 



FOR POETICAL COMPOSITION. 

Porter, Riley 

FOR DECLAMATION. 

First Division Second Division Third Division 



j Bean 
I Garrard 
\ Porter 
'/ Royer 

^. . . « . ( Abbott 

Third Prtse | Xhomas 



first Prize 
Second Prise 



iSe)miour 
Sweet 
jFenn 
1 Kellogg 
j Freeborn 
1 MacLellan 



( Kimball 
I Noble 
f Pitkin 
I Van Name 
j Anderson 
I 



FOR SOLUTION OF MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 

First Prise Baird, Gibbs, MacLellan. 

Second Prise Dcmbinski, Freeborn. 
Third Prise I. Delano, Royer. 



CATALOGUE OF 1857. 

Appointments for Junior Exhibition. 

Class of 1858. 

ORATIONS. 

Josiah W. Gibbs, . Latin Oration, New Haven. 

Robert C. Haskell, Greek Oration, Weathersfield, Vt. 

George B. MacLellan, Philosophical Oration, Oktibbeha Co., Miss. 

Addison Van Name, Philosophical Oration, Binghamton, N. Y. 



Arthur N. Hollister, Hartford. 
Edward Seymour, Bloomfield. N. J. 
Montelius Abbott, Philadelphia, Pa. 
John T. Baird, Cincinnati, O. 
Louis Dembinski, Tarnow, Galicia. 
Arthur Mathewson, Woodstock. 



Henry A. Pratt, Litchfield. 
Daniel A. Miles, Worcester, Mass. 
Fred'k W. Stevens, New York City 
Henry E. Sweetser, New York City. 
Henry H. Turner, Denmark, Iowa. 



DISSERTATIONS. 



Edward P. Batchelor, WhitinsvilleMs. 
Edward T. Elliott, Towanda, Pa. 
Charles M. Fenn, Lacon, III. 
Thomas G. Valpy, Lawrence, Mass. 



Chauncey S. Kellogg, Bridgewater, 

N. Y. 
Edward A. Manice, New York City. 
Elisha S. Thomas, Wickford, R. I. 



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l82 



STATISTICS OF GRADUATES. 



DISPUTES. 



David M. Bean, Sandwich, N. H. 
Isaac Delano, Fairhaven, Mass. 
De Lancy Freeborn, Knoxville, Pa. 
Charles N. Johnson, Seymour. 
William A. Lane, Clinton, La. 
Samuel H. Lee, Lisbon. 



Edward M. Mills, Canton Center, 
Eben G. Scott, Wilkeharre, Pa. 
Preston I. Sweet, Fishkill, N. Y. 
Charles H. Williams, Salem, Mass, 
Charles B. Whittlesey, Berlin. 



George M. Boynton, Orange, N. J. 
Daniel G. Brinton, West-Chester, Pa. 
Robert Morris, New York City. 
Hayden K. Smith, Madison, Wis. 



George E. Street, Cheshire. 
Gideon Wells, Wethers/ield. 
William H. Woodward, Woodstock,. 
Vt. 



Walter S. Alexander, Killin^ly. 
Martin S. Eichelberger, York, Pa. 
William T. Harris, North Killingly. 
Alexander McDonald, Panbury. 
Benjamin F. V^rmy, Baton Rouge, La. 



Isaac Riley, Montrose, Pa. 
George F. Smith, West Chester, Pa, 
Edmund M. Taft, Whitinsville, Mass, 
Charles Tomlinson, New Haven. 



COLLOQUIES. 



Sanford H. Cobb Tarrytown, N. Y. 
Slieldon Goodwin, Hartford. 

Volney S. Anderson, St. Louis, Mo. 
Edward F. Blake, New Haven. 
Matthew Chalmers, New York City. 
Robert S. Moore, Hudson, N. Y. 



William A Magill, Waterbury, 
William D. Morgan, New York City, 

Edward D. Grant, Norfolk, Va. 
Leavitt Howe, Brooklyn, L. L 
John E. Kimball, Oxford, Mass. 



BRISTED SCHOLARSHIP. 

Josiah Willard Gibbs. 



First Prise 



^ , ^ XX 1 ,, ( George B. MacLellan, 
Robert C. Haskell, j ^^^j^^^ y^^ ^^^^^ 



FOR EXCELLENCE IN LAtlN. 

Class of 1858. 
Second Prise Third Prise 

\ Josiah W. Gibbs. 



/ Charles H. Williams. 



BERKELEY PREMIUMS FOR LATIN COMPOSITION. 



Robert O. Dwight. 
Josiah W. Gibbs. 
Robert C. Haskell. 
Arthur N. Hollister. 



George B. MacLellan; 
Daniel A. Miles. 
Henry E. Sweetser. 
Addison Van Name. 



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STATISTICS OF GRADUATES. 
CATALOGUE OF 1858. 



183 



Appointments for Commencement. 

Class of 1858. 

orations. 

Addison Van Name, Valedictory Oration, Binghamton, N. Y. 

George Boardman MacLellan, Philosophical Oration, Oktibbeha Co., Miss. 

Josiah Willard Gibbs, Latin Oration, New Haven. 

Robert Chandler Haskell, Philosophical Oration, Weathers-field, Vt. 

Edward Seymour, Philosophical Oration, Bloomfield, N. J\ 



Henry Andrews Pratt, LitchAeld. 
Edgar Laing Heermance, Kinder- 
hook, N. Y. 



John Taylor Baird, Cincinnati, O. 
Frederick William Stevens, New 
York City. 



Augustus Turner Jones, N. Bridge- 
water, Mass. 
Louis Dembinski, Tarnow, Galicia. 
Arthur Mathewson, Woodstock. 

Daniel Augustus Miles, Worces- 
ter, Mass. 
Henry Edwards Sweetser,iV.K07y 



Montelius Abbott, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Henry Holmes Turner, Denmark, la. 
Samuel Caldwell, Farmington, III. 
Edward Thomas 'El\iott,Towanda,Pa. 
Edward Payson Batchelor, Whitins- 

ville, Mass. 
Isaac Delano, Fair haven, Mass. 



DISSERTATIONS. 



Elisha Smith Thomas, Wickford, R.I. 
Thomas Gilbert Yalpy, Lavurence, Ms. 
William Allen McDowell, Union- 
town, Pa. 



^ DeLancy Freeborn, Knoxville, Pa. 
J William Allen Lane, Clinton, La. 
I Eben Greenough Scott, Wyoming 
[ Valley, Pa. 



DISPUTES. 



Charles Napoleon Johnson, Seymour. 
Edward Augustus Manice, New 

York City. 
Edward Milo Mills, Canton Center. 
Charles Henry Williams, Salem, 

Mass. 

< Samuel Henry Lee, Lisbon. 

\ Gideon Wells, Wethcrsfield. 

[" William Dare Morgan, N. Y. City. 

J William Fletcher Ingerson, Bvans 

\ Mills, N. Y. 

[George Mills Boynton.Orang^,A/^./. 



< 



David Marks Be3Ln,Sandzmch,N .H. 

Preston I. Sweet, Fishkill, N. Y. 

f Walter Stanley Pitkin, Hartford. 

! George Edward Street, Cheshire. 



Charles Boardman Whittlesey, 
Berlin. 



I 



r Daniel Garrison Brinton, West 
I Chester, Pa. 

j Edmund Morse Taft, Whitins- 
I ville, Mass. 



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l84 STATISTICS OF GRADUATES. 



' Martin Smyser Eichelberger, York^ 
Pa. 
Isaac Riley, Montrose, Pa. 



Chauncey Seymour Kellogg, Bridge- 
water, N. Y. 
William Henry Steele, PFmrfAain,iV. F. 

( Sanford Hoadley Cobb, Tarry- | William Her rick Woodward,. 
J town, N. Y. [^ Woodstock, Vt. 

I Benjamin Franklin Penny, Ba- 

[^ ton Rouge, La. 

COLLOQUIES. 

Lemuel Riley 'Ey^xiSySanAntonio,Tex. j Electus Abijah Vv2Xi,0akHillJS[.Y. 

C George Pierce Andrews,N ewHaven | Charles Tomlinson, New Haven. 

} Thomas Albert Perkins, New Edward Foster Blake, New Haven, 

(^ York City. Frederick Alphonso Noble, 0;r^orrf,Af^ 

BERKELEY SCHOLARSHIP. 

Daniel A. Miles, Robert C. Haskell. 

CLARK SCHOLARSHIP. 

Josiah W. Gibbs. 

DE ^REST GOLD MEDAL. 

Chauncey S. Kellogg. 

SENIOR MATHEMATICAL PRIZES. 

Class of 1858. 
First Prise Second Prize 

Josiah W. Gibbs. John Lovewell. 

TOWNSEND PREMIUMS FOR ENGLISH COMPOSITION. 

(Including two given for this year by an anonymous donor.) 

Class of 1858. 

Daniel G. Brinton, Samuel Caldwell, Martin 8. Eichelberger, Edgar 
L. Heerraance, Samuel H. Lee, Walter S. Pitkin, Channing Richards. 

CLARK PREMIUMS. 
FOR SOLUTION OF PROBLEMS IN PRACTICAL ASTRONOMY. 

Class of 1858. 

First Prize Second Prize 

DeLancy Freeborn. George B. MacLellan. 

John Lovewell. ' William A. MacDowell. 



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STATISTICS OF GRADUATE. 

BOAT CLUBS' 

(The Navy In 1858 had fourteen boats and 185 men.) 

ARI^. 



185 



Capt. Pitkin 


1st Lt MacDowell 2d Lt. Kimball 


Purser Turner 


Abbott 


Lee 


Potter 


G. F. Smith 


Freeborn 


More 


Riley 

ATALANTA. 


E. M. Taft —12 


Capts. Adams, 


Chalmers 


1st Lts. Chalmers, Greenwood 


2d Lts. Eichelberger, Goodwin 


Pursers Bo3mton, 


N. Smith 


Armstrong 


Elliott 


(H. A. Grant) 


(Pollock) 


Clark 


(Folger) 


Haskell 


Porter 


Cobb 


E. D. Grant 


Hewitt 


Van Name —18 


Capt. Bacon 




1st Lts. (Dunham), Morgan 


2d Lts. Morgan, 


, F. W. Stevens 


Pursers Peirce, Howe 


Blake 


(L. Janin) 


( Moore) 


(E. R. Stevens) 


Brinton 


Kellogg 


Morris 


Twining 


Cutter 


MacLellan 


(Nicoll) 


(Trow) 


Franklin 


Magill 


Perkins 


G. Wells 


Hollister 


Manicc 


Royer 

ROW^NA. 


Woodruff —26 


Capt. Magill 


1st Lt. Twining 2d Lt. Anderson 


Purser Richards 


(Brandon) 


( Buckingham 


^ Garrard 


(Hodson) 






(Napier) 


9 






WA-WA. 





Capts. Garrard, Gallaway 1st Lts. Gallaway, Beale 

Pursers Sleight, Pumoelly 
Brown Caldwell (Hendrickson) (Sims) 

(Burnley) (Fenn) Richards —14 

Frisbie Rover 



Blake 



EDITORS, YALE LITERARY MAGAZINE. 
Elected February 18, 1857. 
Brinton Kimball Lee (H. K Smith) 

Smith was succeeded, July 21, by Kellogg. — ^5 



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i86 



Peirce 

G. F. Smith 



STATISTICS OF GRADUATES. 

CHESS CLUB. 

President, Magill 
N. Smith Thomas 

Sweetser H. A. Wells 



Wliittlesey 
Woodruff 



BEETHOVEN. 




President, Lee 


Vice-President 


, Boynton 


Cutter Freeborn (Nicoll) 


E. M. Taft (Trow) Twining 




• 


—8 


CHOU-CHOU. 




Kali-oka-ai, Greenwood, MacLellan 




Adams (Fenn) 


Lane 


(Sims) 


Armstrong Franklin 


Morgan 


Sleight 


Boynton Gallaway 


Morris 


(H.K. Smith) 


Chalmers (Gibson) 


Peirce 


Stevens 


Clark E. D. Grant 


Penny 


Sweet 


Cobb (H. A. Grant) 


Perkins 


(Trow) 


(Dunham) Hewitt 


Pitkin 


Woodward 


Eichelberger Howe 


Pumpelly 


—33 



SOCIETY MEMBERS. 



BROTHERS IN UNITY. 



Abbott 


Frisbie 


Manice 


Steele 


Adams 


Gibbs 


Marble 


Stevens 


Alexander 


Goodwin 


Mathewson 


Street 


Andrews 


Greenwood 


Miles 


Sweetser 


Armstrong 


Harris 


Noble 


Taft 


Batchelor 


Haskell 


Peirce 


Thomas 


Bean 


Hollister 


Penny 


Turner 


Blake 


Howe 


Perkins 


Twining 


Boynton 


Hubbell 


Porter 


Valpy 


Caldwell 


Tngerson 


Potter 


Whittlesey 


Chalmers 


Jones 


E. A. Pratt 


Wilbur 


Clarke 


Lane 


Robison 


Williams 


Cobb 


Lee 


Scott 


Woodward 


Delano 


Magill 


N. Smith 





—55 



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STATISTICS OF CRAOUATSS. 



187 







UNONIA. 




Anderson 


Evans 


MacDowell 


Riley 


Bacon 


Franklin 


MacLellan 


Royer 


Baird 


Freeborn 


Mills 


Seymour 


Beale 


Gallaway 


More 


Sleight 


Bennett 


Garrard 


Morgan 


G. F. Smith 


Brinton 


Grant 


Morris 


Street 


Brown 


Heermance 


Neide' 


Tomlinson 


Colgate 


Hewitt 


Ogden 


Van Name 


Cutter 


Johnson 


Pitkin 


G. Wells 


Dembinski 


Kellogg 


H. A. Pratt 


H. A. Wells 


Eichelberger 


Kimball 


Pumpelly 


Woodruff 


Elliott 


Lovewell 


Richards 






FRESHMAN SOCIETIES. 






DELTA KAPPA. 




Anderson 


Gallaway 


Neide' 


Sweet 


Beale 


Garrard 


Penny 


Sweetser 


Boynton 


Hubbell 


Perkins 


Twining 


Cobb 


Johnson 


Pitkin 




Cutter 


Lane 


Richards 




Frisbie 


Morris 


N. Smith 






KAPPA 


SIGMA EPSILON. 




Adams 


Goodwin 


Peirce 


Tomlinson 


Alexander 


Grant 


Potter 


Turner 


Bacon 


Greenwood 


Riley 


Van Name 


Batchelor 


Heermance 


Royer 


G. Wells 


Blake 


Hollister 


Scott 


Williams 


Chalmers 


Kimball 


Seymour 


WoodruflF 


Clarke 


Manice 


G. F. Smith 


Woodward 


Dembinski 


Mathewson 


Stevens 




Freeborn 


Morgan 


Thomas 






SIGMA DELTA. 




Abbott 


Eichelberger 


MacLellan 


H. A. Pratt 


Andrews 


Evans 


Marble 


Steele 


Armstrong 


Haskell 


Mills 


Street 


Bean 


Hewitt 


Noble 


Taft 


Bennett 


Kellogg 


Ogden 


Valpy 


Brinton 


Lee 


Porter 


Wilbur 



-47 




—21 



—34 



—24 




oogle 



i88 



STATISTICS OF GRADUATES. 



SOPHOMORE SOCIETIES. 

ALPHA SIGMA PHI. 



Beale 


Garrard 


Morris 


Steele 




Chalmers 


Hubbell 


Penny 


Sweet 




Frisbie 


Lane 


Perkins 


Sweetser 




Gallaway 


MacLellan 


Pitkin 


Woodruff 


-^16 




KAPPA SIGMA THETA. 






Abbott 


Boynton 


Greenwood 


Royer 




Anderson 


Clarke 


Howe 


N. Smith 




Andrews 


Eichelberger 


Kellogg 


Stevens 




Armstrong 


Evans 


Manice 


Thomas 




Bacon 


Franklin 


Morgan 


G. Wells 




Bennett 


Goodwin 


Peirce 


Woodward - 


-24 




JUNIOR SOCIETIES. 








ALPHA 


DELTA PHI.. 






Anderson 


Gallaway 


Noble 


Richards 




Beale 


Hewitt 


Odgen 


Scott 




Brown 


Jones 


Penny 


Steele 




Frisbie 


More 


E. A. Pratt 


Woodruff 






Neide' 


H. A. Pratt 




-18 




DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. 






Abbott 


Elliott 


Heermance 


Potter 




Armstrong 


Evans 


Howe 


Pumpelly 




Batchelor 


Franklin 


Lee 


Royer 




Brinton 


Freeborn 


Manice 


Sleight 




Caldwell 


Garrard 


Morris 


N. Smith 




Chalmers 


Grant 


Perkins 


Taft 




Cobb 


Harris 

PSI 


Porter 

UPSILON. 


Woodward 


-28 


Adams 


Eichelberger 


MacLellan 


Sweet 




Alexander 


Goodwin 


Mathewson 


Thomas 




Bacon 


Greenwood 


Morgan 


Twining 




Blake 


Haskell 


Pitkin 


Van Name 




Boynton 


Hollister 


Riley 


G. Wells 




Clarke 


Kellogg 


Seymour 








Kimball 


Stevens 




-25 



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STATISTICS OF GRADUATE. 
SENIOR SOCIETIES. 

SCROLL AND KKY. 



189 



Adams 


Clarke 


Morgan 


Sweet 


Andrews 


Elliott 


Morris 


Thomas 


Brinton 


Howe 


Richards 


G. Wells 


Chalmers 


Kellogg 


Sleight 






SKULL AND BONES. 




Blake 


Heermance 


MacLellan 


Stevens 


Eichelberger 


HoUister 


Perkins 


Van Name 


Grant 


Kimball 


Porter 


Woodward 


Haskell 


Lee 


Scott 






PHI BKTA KAPPA. 




Abbott 


Gibbs 


MacDowell 


Stevens 


Baird 


Haskell 


MacLellan 


Street 


Batchelor 


Heermance 


Manice 


Sweetser 


Caldwell 


Hollister 


Mathewson 


Thomas 


Delano 


Jones 


Miles 


Turner 


Dembinski 


Kellogg 


H. A. Pratt 


Valpy 


Elliott 


Lane 


Scott 


Van Name 


Freeborn 


Lee 


Seymour 






ORDER OF THE CINCINNATI. 




^ 


■ Bacon 


Society of Connecticut 




Woodruff 


Society of New Jersey 


MILITARY ORDER OF THE LOYAL LEGION. 


Bacon 


Franklin 


Neide 


Scott 


Brinton 


Garrard 


E. A. Pratt 


G. F. Smith 


Chalmers 


Hubbell 


Richards 


G. Wells 




Mathewson 


Royer 





—15 



—15 



—31 



—14 



MEDAL OF HONOR LEGION. 
Hubbell 



— 1 



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190 



STATISTICS OF GRADUATES. 



SONS OF '58 AT YALE. 



Armstrong, Richard, 


'95S. 


Manice, Arthur R., 


'97 


Morgan K, . 


'01 


Morgan, Wm. G. D., 


'01 


Bacon, Arthur W., . 


'03S. 


Riley, Isaac W., 


'92 


Franklin, Wm. B., . 


'92 


Smith, Thos. M., 


'98 


Fred. S., . 


'95 


Street, Geo. H., 


'91 


Thos. E, . 


*00 


Van Name, Willard G., 


'94 


Gallaway, Merrill W., 


'92 


Ralph G., 


'99 


Heermance, Theo. W., 


'93 


Woodruff, Lewis B., 


'90 


Edgar L., 


W 


Fred. S., 


'92 


Hubbell, Wm. S., . 


'97. 


Edward S., 


'99 


Manice, Edward A., 


'91 




—21 



CLASS MEETINGS. 





Dead 


D 








Present 


P 








I86S 


1868 


1873 


1878 


1888 


1888 


1893 


1898 


1908 


1908 


ToUl. 


Abbott 




, , 




D 












. , 


None 


Adams 


P 


, , 












P 


P 


P 


4 


Alexander 


P 






P 










D 




2 


Anderson 








, , 








D 




, , 


None 


Andrews 


P 


P 




P 




P 






D 


, , 


4 


Armstrong 




P 


P 






P 






p 


D 


4 


Bacon 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


p 


P 


10 


Baird 


. . 






, , 








. . 






None 


Batchelor 




, , 




D 














None 


Beale 


P 


D 




, , 














1 


Bean 


P 


P 








D 










2 


Bennett 


P 


. . 






D 












1 


Blake 


D 


, . 


















None 


Boynton 


P 


P 


P 


P 








P 




D 


5 


Brinton 




P 




P 








P 


D 




3 


Brown 














D 








None 


Caldwell 






D 
















None 


Chalmers 




P 




P 


p 


p 




P 


P 




6 


Clarke 






P 






D 










1 


Cobb 








P 














1 


Colgate 


P 


P 












P 




D 


3 


Cutter 








, , 




, . 








D 


None 


Delano 






















None 


Dembinski 












D 










None 


Dwight 


.. 




















None 



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STATISTICS OF GRADUATES. 



191 



Eichelberger 
Elliott 
Evans 
Franklin 
Freeborn 
Frisbie 
Gallaway 
Garrard 
Gibbs 
Goodwin 
Grant 
Greenwood 
Harris 
Haskell 
Heermancc 
Hewitt 
HoUister 
Howe 
Hubbell 
Ingerson 
Johnson 
Jones 
Kellogg 
Kimball 
Lane 
Lee 

Lovewell 
McDowell 
MacLellan 
Magill 
Manice 
Marble 
Mathewson 
Miles 
Mills 
More 
Morgan 
Morris 
Neide' 
Noble 
Ogden 
Peirce 
Penny- 
Perkins 
Pickett 



1865 1868 1873 1878 1883 1888 1898 1898 1908 1908 
P P .. D .. .. 



P 
P. 



P 
P 



P 
P 
P 
P 



P 
P 
P 
P 
P 
P 



D 
P 



P 
P 
P 



P 
P 
P 



p. P 
P 



P 
P 
P 
P 



P P P P P P D 



P 
P 



P 
P 



P 
P 



P 
P 



P 
D 
P 



P 
P 



P P 
P P 
.. D 



P P P 



P 
P 
P 



D 

P 
P 



P 
P 



P 
D 
P 
P 
D 



P P P 
PP.. 



P 
D 
P 
P 



D 
D 
P 



P 
P 



D 



D 



D 



P P 
P P 



D 



P P 

D .. 

P D 

D 



D 
P P 



P 

P 



D 
P 



P 
P 
P 



P P P P P 
D 



ToUi. 

2 

None 
None 

6 
None 
None 
• 2 
None 

7 

4 

1 

5 

7 

3 

1 

4 

5 

8 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

8 
None 

6 
None 

2 
None 

7 

2 

5 
10 

1 

5 
None 

1 
None 

3 

2 
None 

1 
None 

9 
None 



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Google 



192 



STATISTICS OF GRADUATE. 



Pitkin 
Porter 
Potter 
E. A. Pratt 
H. A. Pratt 
Pumpelly 
Richards 
Riley 
Robison 
Royer 
Scott 
Seymour 
Sleight 
G. F. Smith 
N. Smith 
Steele 
Stevens 
Street 
Sweet 
Sweetser 
Taft 
Thomas 
Tomlinson 
Turner 
Twining 
Valpy 
Van Name 
G. Wells 
H. A. Wells 
Whittlesey 
Wilbur 
Williams 
Woodruff 
Woodward 
Totals, 104 



1M6 IMS 1878 1878 1883 1888 18M 1808 1909 1908 
P P .. P P P D 

P .. .. D 

D .. .. 

P .. P P P .. .. P P P 

P D .. .. 

P P D 

P .. P P .. .. D ..- .. 

P P P P D 



P 
P 



P 
P 
P 
P 
D 
P 
P 



D 
P 
P 
P 
P 
D 



P 
P 



D 



D 

P 
D 
P 
P 



D* 



P 
P 
P 
D 



P 
P 



D 



D 



P P 

P P 

D 



P 
P 
P 



.. . P 
P P 



D 
P 
P 



P 
D 



P P P P P P 

P P P P P P 

P P 

48 36 24 35 24 22 



P 
P 



P 
P 
D 



P P 

P P 
D 

22 is 29 



P 
P 
P 

24 



Total. 

5 

1 
None 

7 

1 

2 

3 

4 
None 
None 

2 

1 

5 

2 

2 

3 

6 

4 

4 

2 
None 

1 

3 
None 
None 

2 

8 

7 

1 
None 

1 

10 
10 

2 



Attendance at class meetings : 

22 are dead who never attended 
9 are living who never attended 

46 are dead who have attended 
27 are living who have attended 



Attended all the ten 



31_30% 

73—70% 

104 

4—4% 



Digitized by 



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STATISTICS OP GRADUATE. 
DEATHS. 



193 



Walter S. Alexander 
George P. Andrews 
William N. Armstrong 
George M. Bo3mton 
Daniel G. Brinton 
Matthew Chalmers 
Abner W. Colgate 
Ralph H. Cutter 
Robert O. Dwight 
George M. Franklin 
Josiah W. Gibbs 
Frederick C. Hewitt 
Leavitt Howe 
George B. MacLellan 
William A. Magill 
Edward M. Mills 
Elawson C. More 
Robert Morris 
Thomas A. Perkins 
Walter S. Pitkin 
Charles F. Pumpelly 
Henry Royer 
George E. Street 
Gideon Wells 



Mrs. W. S. Alexander 

" G. P. Andrews 

" W. N. Armstrong 

" R. O. Dwight 

" J. Garrard 

" M. M. Greenwood 

" W. A. .Magill 

" A. Mathewson 

" E. M. Mills 

" B. F. Penny 

" J. W. Pickett 

" L. Robison 

" H. Royer 

" G. E. Street 



CLASSMATES. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
New York, N. Y. 
Washington, D. C. 
Boston, Mass. 
Media, Pa 
New York, N. Y. 
Pasadena, Cal. 
Taunton, Mass. 
S. Hadley Falls, Mass. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Owego, N. Y. 
Princeton, N. J. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Northampton, Mass. 
Peoria, 111. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Washington, D. C. 
Owego, N. Y. 
Denver, Col. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Springfield, Mass. 

WIVES. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Lake George, N. Y. 
Hampton, Va. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Cincinnati, O. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Northampton, Mass. 
Greenville, Miss. 
Grand Junction, Col. 
Peoria, 111. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Southwest Harbor, Me., 



May 15, 1900 
May 24, 1902 
Oct. 15, 1905 
May 17, 1908 
July 31,1899 
Jan. 6,1908 
Mar. 20, 1904 
Feb. 19, 1904 
Nov. 1,1908 
May 15, 1899 
Apr. 28, 1903 
Aug. 30, 1908 
July 19, 1904 
Oct. 30, 1897 
Nov. 22, 1899 
Oct. 6,1900 
July 24, 1902 
Nov. 15, 1901 
Jan. 1,1908 
Apr. 28, 1903 
May 10, 1907 
Feb. 12, 1903 
Dec. 26, 1903 
Mar. 26, 1898 
Total, 24 



Sept. 14, 1898 
Aug. 13, 1905 
Feb. 7,1903 
July 2,1908 
May 19, 1887 
June 3,1904 
Dec. 23, 1908 
Jan. 19,1908 
June 28, 1904 
July 22,1907 
Aug. 5,1902 
May 31, 1904 
Feb. 15, 1898 
Sept. 19, 1905 
Total, 14 



Digitized by 



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194 



STATISTICS O^ GRADUATES. 



CHILDREN. 



Mary 


Gallaway 


New York, N. Y. 


. Apr. 9,1905 


Theodore Woolsey 


Heermance 


Athens, Greence 


Sept. 29, 1905 


William Stone 


Hubbell 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


June 11, 1901 


Grace 


Lee 


Springfield, Mass. 


Dec. 28, 1900 


Arthur Edward 


Magill 


Washington, D. C. 


June 26, 1905 


Charles Hornblower 


Woodruff 


New York, N. Y. 


Feb. 17, 1909 


Edward Seymour 


Woodruff 


New York, N. Y. 


Jan. 15,1909 
Total, 7 



Digitized by 



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STATISTICS OF NON-GRADUATE. 



195 



STATISTICS OF NON-GRADUATES. 



UNMARRIED. 



♦Andrews 
♦Atterbury 
*G, Badger 
♦Bancroft 
♦Beale 
♦Bright 
♦Burnley 
Darrach 



♦Davis 
♦Delano 
♦Disbrow 
♦Dunham 
♦Folgcr 
Foote 
♦Forbes 
♦Gibson 



♦Hancock 
♦Hannahs 
♦Hayner 
♦Hendrickson 
Honeyman 
♦Lee 
♦Lloyd 
♦MacDonald 



♦Maclin 

♦Moore 

♦Pollock 

♦J. G. Smith 

♦Stevens 

♦Titus 

♦Trow 

Total, 31 



MARRIED. 



♦W. Badger 

S. C. Beane 

♦H. M. Boies 

L. W. Brandon 
F. L. Buckelew 
C. Buckingham 
♦F. F. Burlock 
C. C. Carpenter 

♦O. E. Chamberlin 
♦J. Davenport 
M. De Forest 
♦T. B. Dwight 
♦C. M. Fenn 
♦J. D. Frost 
♦H. A. Grant 
T. S. Hodson 

F. H. Houston 

H. Janin 
L. Janin 
♦A. Jones 
E. L. Kirtland 

*R. L. Luckett 
♦C. N. Lyman 



New York, N. Y. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
Stowe, Mass. 
Salem, Mass. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Scranton, Pa. 
Wilkinson Co., Miss. 
Bridgeville, Del. 
New York, N. Y. 
Davenport, la. 
Montague, Mass. 



♦Mary E. Crosby 

Mrs. Emma E. B. Donly 

♦Carrie B. Turner 

♦Harriet C. Gray 

♦Emma G. Brainerd 

Elizabeth Dickson 

Ann Eliza Sample 

♦Ellie Sophia Cannon 

♦Maria West 

Julia Wheeler 

♦Nellie L. Gunn 

Mrs. Maria E. R.Thomas Detroit, Mich. 

♦Mary Hickman Cram Luray, Va. 

Sarah Lyon Bath, N. Y. 

Mary A. Thomas Wetmore, Kan. 

Julia K. Porter Wilmington, Del. 

Catherine D.ArchambeauLos Angeles, Cal. 

Lucy Jane Knowlton Kennebunkport, Me. 

Julia C. S'choonmaker New York, N. Y. 

♦Alice Longnecker Laurel, Del 

Clara Miles Crisfield, Md. 

♦Matilda H. Thompson Baltimore, Md. 

♦Elizabeth L. Houston New York, N. 

Mabel Smith 

Lizzie Marshall 

Mary Cook 

♦Edwina Magna 

♦Laura M. W. Newton 

Angelica Marye 

♦Eveline Upson 



Y. 



Virginia City, Nev. 
Toronto, Can. 
Westbrook, Conn. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Marksville, La. 
New Haven, Conn. 



Jan. 
June 
May 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Feb. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Apr. 
May 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
June 
June 
June 
Jan. 
.Nov. 
Nov. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Dec. 
Oct. 

Dec. 

June 

Dec. 

July 

Nov. 

Oct. 



21,1864 
7,1893 

22,1862 
7,1869 

26,1861 

17. 1870 
20,1865 
27, 1869 

7,1865 
18, 1861 

7,1860 
11, 1902 

4, 1857 

11. 1879 
12, 1889 

6, 1872 
21, 1872 
14, 1859 
28,1865 

7,1866 

10. 1880 

16. 1871 
25,1884 

1888? 
27, 1865 
25,1884 
7,1864 
6,1892 
27,1861 
13, 1863 



Digitized by 



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196 



STATISTICS OF NON-GRADUATES. 



♦N. C. Napier 
A. W. Nicoll 
♦A. H. Horcutt 



♦Julia L. Sharpe Walker Co., Ga. 

Mary Curran Garvin New York, N. Y. 
♦Artha L. Clarke Annawan, 111. 

♦Mrs. Lucy A. B. Carlisle 



Canadensis, Pa. 
Riverhead, N. Y. 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Towanda, Pa. 
Salem, Mass. 



E. F. Palen Elizabeth Northrop 

♦G. O. Robinson Nancy L. Hallock 
♦C. H. Russell ♦Anna E. Zellcr 

♦Mrs. Anna A. S. Zeller 
♦D. W. Searle Mary Irene Mason 
♦C. Sewall Margaret Perkins Ives 

♦R. G. Sims Miss Wingfield 

♦B. H. Smith ♦Harriet Gilbert Sayward Gloucester, Mass. 
H. K Smith *Fannie A. Proctor Waukesha, Wis. 

♦J. H. Smyser Caroline Frances Swett Washington, D. C 
♦P. M. Taft ♦Luda A. Cobb Rochester, Minn. 

♦J. U Taintor Isabella Comstock Avon, N. Y. 

J. H. Van Amringe Cornelia Bucknor New York, N. Y. 

J. B. Vosburgh Caroline A. Williamson Greencastle, Ind. 



Apr. 
Oct. 
Feb. 
Apr. 



2,1860 
3,1866 
4,1856 
5,1860 
Nov. 10, 1864 
Dec. 6,1855 
2,1863 
23,1865 
1,1883 
8,1863 
1867? 
8,1860 
Aug. 30, 1860 
May 16, 1861 
June 21, 1859 
Sept. 4,1862 
June 20, 1865 
Oct. 1,1856 
Total, 39 



Dec. 
Oct. 
Feb. 
Oct. 

May 



BIRTHS. 



Clara Crosby 

George Crosby 

♦William Hilliard 

♦Prentiss Collins 

♦Caroline Turner 

Samuel Collins' 

Elizabeth Silsbee 

♦May 

♦Carrington 

♦Henry Whiting 

♦Mary Dickson 

♦Joseph Milton 

♦Child 

Ethel Marvine 

David 

Helen Elizabeth 

Francina Alice 

Sarah 

Belle Liddell 

Mary Ryland 

♦Bessie 

Frederick Lemuel 

William Cannon 

Helen De Forest 



Badger 
« 

Beane 



Boies 



Brandon 



Buckelew 



Carpenter 



Hastings, N. Y. 

M If 

Chicopee, Mass. 
Salem, 



Scranton, Pa. 



New York, N. Y. 
Wilkinson Co., Miss. 



Bridgeville, Del. 
Jamesburg, N. J. 

M « 

Derby, Conn. 



July 16,1868 
Mar. 22, 1870 
May 23, 1863 
Nov. 26, 1869 
Dec. 9,1872 
Dec. 9,1872 
Nov. 27, 1875 
Jan. 22,1863 
May 13, 1865 
Feb. 5,1867 
Jan. 25,1872 
Aug. 8,1873 
Mar. 15, 1877 
Oct. 2,1878 
Sept. 29, 1881 
Jan. 6, 1886 
6,1867 

14,1869 
5, 1874 

27, 1879 
June 18, 1871 
Nov. 4,1872 
Dec. 10, 1875 
June 11, 1865 



July 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Feb. 



Digitized by 



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STATISTICS OF NON-GRADUATBS. 



197 



♦Ernest Orlando 


Chamberlin 


Great Bend, Pa. 


Oct 9,1859 


Georgia Louisa 


« 


« it 


May 9,1862 


♦Wilbur Johnson 


(1 


It tt 


Mar. 12, 1865 


♦Walter Nelson 


i< 


tt tt 


Oct. 2,1870 


Thomas Moulton 


De Forest 


Wetmore, Kan. 


May 22, 1890 


♦Paul 


u 


II II 


Dec. 31, 1892 


Mary Augusta 


tt 


II tt 


Dec 31, 1892 


Gwendolyn 


it 


tt tt 


Nov. 26, 1895 


Lois Merwin 


Fenn 


Los Angeles. Cal. Jan. 7, 1873 


(Son) 


u 


San Diego, " 


Oct. 30, 1877 


♦Evangeline 


Frost 


Eliot, Me. 


Dec. 14, 1862 


Walter Lincoln 


« 


tt it 


Dec. 22,1865 


♦Clarence Dennet 


<( 


ft tt 


Sept. 15, 1869 


John ^win 


II 


tt ft 


Apr. 11, 1874 


Margaret Prall 


Grant 


Tarrytown, N. Y 


Sept 7,1871 


Harry Allen 


« 


tt tt 


July 13,1880 


Clarence 


Hodson 


Laurel, Del. 


Feb. 22, 1868 


Thomas Sherwood 


u 


Crisfield, Md. 


June 5,1872 


Mary King 


u 


i< tt 


July 17,1873 


Henry Eugene 


Houston 


Vienna, " 


Nov. 29, 1872 


♦Elsie Ely 


« 


Paterson, N. J. 


Aug. 8,1875 


*Tryphcna Maria 


« 


« It 


Feb. 1877 


AdelineTryphenaFrances 


tt 


New York, N. Y 


Feb. 17,1886 


Lelia Rose Cecilia 


it 


U It 


July 3,1888 


♦(Child) 


(H.) Janin 






♦(Child) 


fi 






Louise 


(I 






Hamilton 


« 






Louis Marshall 


(L.) Janin 


Virginia City, Nev. Nov. 2, 1866 


♦Eugene Latham 


M 


Oakland, Cal. 


May 25, 1871 


Charles Henry 


(I 


i< tt 


Nov. 16, 1873 


Anson Allen 


Jones 


Toronto, Can. 


June 30, 1885 


Edwina Magna 


Kirtland 


Westbrook, Conn. Nov. 14, 1865 


Maria Lucy 


« 


II II 


Mar. 13, 1869 


♦Robert Edward 


Luckett 


New Orleans, La. Oct. 1,1862 


♦Robert Leven 


it 


Alexandria, 


* Nov. 11, 1864 


♦Constance Adaline 


it 


M 


' July 16,1866 


♦Henry Marye 


u 


II 


' Mar. 17, 1868 


Cora Mary 


n 


tt 


' Mar. 17, 1870 


Ellen Flower 


tt 


tt 


Sept. 3,1871 


Edward Flower 


(t 


II 


* May 18, 1873 


♦Lizzie 


tt 


M 


' May 20, 1875 


Samuel Flower 


M 


« 


Mar. 10, 1877 


Francis Berkley 


(I 


II 


' Dec. 19, 1879 


Marselina Eugenia 


II 


II * 


May 17, 1881 



Digitized by 



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198 



STATISTICS OF NON-GRADUAT^. 



Nicoll 



Norcutt 



Mary Elizabeth Luckett 

Harry Flower " 

George Victor " 

♦Charles Russell Lyman 

Theron Upson " 

Winthrop Brewster " 

George Henry " 

Caroline Matilda Napier 

George Moultrie " 

Alice Osborne " 

Leroy 

Augustus Young " 

Julia Sharpe " 

Emma Sharpe " 

Nathan Campbell 

John 

Henry Garvin 

Augustus White 

Albert Denniston 

William Walter 

♦Frances Henrietta 

Henry Herschel 

Marshall Fairfax 

Raymond Carlisle 

Lucy Henrietta 

William Haven 

Spencer Boyles 

Linda Maria 

Gilbert McEuen 

♦Quincy Sumner 

Nancy May 

♦Frances 

William DeWitt 

Ruth 

Alice Rosabel 

Frank Herbert 

Ada Maria " 

Elmer Ellsworth " 

Wallace George " 

Nannie Lucretia " 

♦Alice Ives Sewall 

♦Grace Robards " 

♦Edward Lang " 

♦Lizzie Ives " 

♦Stephen Bradshaw " 

♦Charles Henry 



Boyce, 



La. 



Palen 



Robinson 



Canton Center, Conn. 
Dunlap, la. 
Onawa, " 

Walker Co., Ga. 



La Fayette, " 
Walker Co., " 

Yonkers, N. 
New York, " 
Yonkers, 



Basco, 111. 
« (( 

ft u 

tf tt 

Grinnell, la. 
tf It 

Nodaway, " 
tt tt 

tf ft 

tf tt 

Canadensis, Pa. 



Riverhead, N. Y. 
Roanoke, " 



Salem, Mass. 



Aug. 28, 1882 
July 11,1884 
July 12,1886 
Jan. 19,1867 
Sept. 7,1869 
July 14,1872 
Mar. 9,1876 
June 23, 1861 
Mar. 28, 1863 
Feb. 17, 1867 
July 30,1868 
Mar. 2,1872 
June 19, 1874 
Aug. 4,1876 
Aug. 10, 1878 
July 30,1867 
Nov. 14, 1869 
Sept. 20, 1877 
Sept. 20, 1877 
Oct. 5,1883 
Dec. 17, 1856 
Feb. 15, 1861 
Mar. 20, 1862 
Dec. 14, 1863 
Mar. 8,1865 
Oct. 2,1866 
Nov. 25, 1867 
Nov. 25, 1869 
June 9,1872 
Sept. 3,1874 
Mar. 24, 1879 
Aug. 18, 1865 
Feb. 7,1867 
Oct. 14, 1871 
Oct. 28, 1856 
Dec. 15, 1857 
Nov. 2,1859 
June 6,1861 
Nov. 15, 1868 
Feb. 21, 1871 
Sept. 12, 1866 
Sept. 12, 1866 
July 29,1867 
Sept. 5.1868 
Nov. 11, 1871 
July 29,1874 



Digitized by 



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STATISTICS OF NON-GRADUATES. 



199 



♦Hattie Gilbert 
Anna Sayward 
Hester Sayward 
Ida Amsden 
♦Henry Bohemond 
Charles James 
Helen Peyton 
Frederick William 
James Swett 
Albert Ernest 
Charles Cobb 
Mary Lord 
♦Ellen Garlinghouse 
Orville Comstock • 
Ralph Newhall 
♦Charles Comstock 
Isabella 
Guy 

♦Bucknor 
♦Howard 
Emily Bulow 
Ida Maria 
♦Edwin Clarence 
Lew Williamson 
Jerome Depew 



(B. H.) Smith Gloucester, Mass. 



(H.K.) Smith Madison, Wis. 
Smyser Troy, N. Y. 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Taft Northbridge Mass. 

Taintor Avon, N. Y. 

S. Orange N. J. 



Van Amringe New York, N. Y. 

" Washingtonville, " 

" New York, " 

(I n << 

Vosburgh Shelbyville, 111. 



Greencastle, Ind. 



Sept. 6,1862 
Oct. 16, 1864 
Sept. 22, 1868 
Sept. 26/1861 
Apr. 13, 1864 
July 22,1865 
Aug. 29, 1867 
July 30,1869 
Sept. 17, 1871 
Aug. 11, 1873 
Apr. 7,1862 
Sept. 24, 1863 
Jun€ 15, 1865 
May 22, 1867 
May 10, 1869 
Oct. 23, 1870 
Aug. 12, 1874 
Jan. 20,1868 
Jan. 7, 1869 
Jan. 31,1870 
Mar. 28, 1876 
Apr. 8, 1858 
June 21, 1860 
May 7,1863 
May 24, 1868 , 
Total, 140 



Joseph H. Andrews 
Edward J. C. Atterbury 
George Badger 
William Badger 
Robert G. Bancroft 
John E. Beale 
Henry M. Boies 
John H. Bright 
Frederick L. Buckelew 
Frederick F. Burlock 
George B. Burnley 
Orlando E. Chamberlin 
John Davenport 
John M. Davis 
Alfred O. Delano 
Arthur Disbrow 
George E. Dunham 
Thomas B. Dwight 



DEATHS. 

Chicago, 111. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Aspinwall, Colon 
Flushing, N. Y. 
New London, N. H. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Jamesburg, N. J. 

Murfreesborough. Tenn. 
Chicago, 111. 

Bath. N. Y. 

Norwell, Mass. 
Westport, Conn. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Andover, Mass. 



Dec. 11, 1906 
Nov. 22, 1855 
June 16, 1877 
Feb. 13, 1908 
Dec. 23, 1906 

Dec. 12, 1903 

Mar. 8,1901 

Jan. 4, 1863 
July 29,1907 
May 5,1895 

Apr. 21, 1891 
Apr. 14, 1857 
July 17,1858 
Aug. 31. 1878 



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200 



STATISTICS OF NON -GRADUATES. 



Charles M. Fenn 
Nathan C. Folger 
Archibald A. Forbes 
John D. Frost 
Harry A. Grant 
Claude Gibson 
Lorenzo M. Hancock 
Diodate C. Hannahs 
Herrick Hayner 
George Hendrickson 
Anson Jones 
Martin V. B. Lee 
William P. Lloyd 
Robert L. Luckett 
Charles N. Lyman 
Robert B. Maclin 
Alexander McDonald 
Robert S. Moore 
Nathan C. Napier 
Allison H. Norcutt 
Thomas G. Pollock 
George O. Robinson 
Charles H. Russell 
Daniel W. Searle 
Charles Sewall 
Robert G. Sims 
Benjamin H. Smith 
Jewett G. Smith 
Jacob H. Smyser 
Eugene R. Stevens 
Peter M. Taft 
Joseph L. Taintor 
Herbert B. Titus 
George W. Trow 



San Diego, Cal. 
New Orleans, La. 

Eliot, Me. 
Tarrytown, N. Y. 
New Orleans, La. 
Lincolnville, Pa. 
Williamsburgh, Va. 

New York, N. Y. 
Toronto, C. W. 

Trenton, N. J. 
Boyce, La. 
Alden, Iowa 
Texas 
Danbury, Conn. 
Trenton, N. J. 
La Fayette, Ga. 
Leavenworth, Kan. 
Gettysburg, Pa. 
Riverhead, N. Y. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Montrose, Pa. 
Salem, Mass. 
Fort Thomberg, Utah 
Gloucester, Mass. 
Washington Territory ? 
Glyndon, Minn. 
New York, N. Y. 
Providence, R. I. 
Bloomingdale, N. Y. 
Brattleboro, Vt. 
Champigny, France 



Mar. 7,1907 
Mar. 30, 1872 

Dec. 17, 1894 

Aug. 19, 1898 

Mar. 22, 1863 

Oct. 30, 1866 

Sept. 10, 1862 

May 4,1862 

Dec. 9,1861 

Sept. 25,1906 

Sept 3,1860 

Mar. 26, 1863 

Apr. 24, 1894 

4,1905 

1863 

4, 1857 

17,1866 

22,1902 

30, 1905 

3,1863 

5,1904 

Feb. 26, 1895 

Nov. 27, 1907 

Apr. 4,1894 

1896? 

Nov. 23, 1880 

1880? 

May 6,1885 

Feb. 16,1905 

Mar. 25, 1905 

Sept. 1,1881 

June 1,1905 

Oct. 10, 1872 

Total, 52 



July 

June 
Oct. 
Jan. 
July 
July 
Jan. 





Died 


Aged 


Atterburg 


1855 


17 


Disbrow 


1857 


18 


McDonald 


1857 


26 


Dunham 
Lee 


1858 
1860 


20 


Hendrickson 


1861 


23 


Hannahs 


1862 


23 


Hayner 


1852 


25 



SEQUENCE OF DEATHS. 



Burnley 

Gibson 

Lloyd 

Maclin 

Pollock 

Hancock 

Moore 

Folger 



Died 
1863 
1863 
1863 
1863 
1863 
1866 
1866 
1872 



Aged 
25 
25 
27 

25 
32 
29 
34 



Digitized by 



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STATISTICS OF NON-GRADUATE. 



20 1 





Died 


Aged 




Died 


Aged 


Trow 


1872 


35 


Napier 


1902 


64 


G. Badger 


1877 


43 


Boies 


1903 


66 


T. B. Dwight 


1878 


41 


Robinson 


1904 


72 


B. H. Smith 


1880 


47 


Lyman 


1905 


70 


Taintor 


1881 


46 


Norcutt 


1905 


75 


Smyser 


1885 


47 


E. R. Stevens 


1905 


68 


Delano 


1891 


52 


Taft 


1905 


72 


Frost 


1894 


63 


Titus 


1905 


73 


Luckett 


1894 


56 


Andrews 


1906 


71 


Sewall 


1894 


59 


Bancroft 


1906 


70 


Davenport 


1895 


60 


Jones 


1906 


74 


Russell 


1895 


68 


Chamberlin 


1907 


78 


Sims 


1896? 


58 


Fenn 


1907 


70 


Grant 


1898 


62 


Searle 


1907 


71 


Buckelew 


1901 


65 


W. Badger 


1908 


74 



And probably Beale, Bright, Burlock, Davis, Forbes and J. G. Smith. 

Total, 52 



Mrs. W. Badger 

" S. C. Beane 

" H. M. Boies 

" F. L. Buckelew 

" C. Buckingham 

" C. C. Carpenter 

" O. E. Chamberlin 

" T. S. Hodson 

" F. H. Houston 

" E. L. Kirtland 

'' C. N. Lyman 

'* N. C. Napier 

" A. H. Norcutt 

4i U 

" C. H. Russell 

" R. G. Sims 

"' B. H. Smith 

" H. K Smith 

'' P. M. Taft 



VilVtS. 

Flushing, N. Y. 

Salem, Mass. 

Hanover, N. H. 

Scranton, Pa. 

Jamesburg, N. J. 

Highlands, 

Boston, Mass. 

Plainfield, N. J. 

Crisfield, Md. 

E. Newmarket, " 

Berlin, Germany 

Holyoke, Mass. 
« *f 

Alden, la. 

La Fayette, Ga. 

Nodaway, la. 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Gloucester, Mass. 
Oak Park, 111. 
Boston, Mass. 



Oct. 1,1879 
Jan. 25,1867 
Aug. 19, 1904 
Nov. 11, 1868 
Jan. 19,1905 
Oct. 15, 1870 
Oct. 31, 1888 
Oct. 2,1901 
June 8,1877 
May 17, 1877 
May 31, 1908 
Nov. 4,1884 
Apr. 9,1898 
Feb. 8,1903 
Nov. 9,1906 
Feb. 13, 1858 
June 15, 1904 
Feb. 2,1864 
Oct. 24, 1888 
1878 
Jan. 8, 1874 
Jan. 2, 1903 
Nov. 30, 1905 
Total. 23 



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202 



STATISTICS O^ NON-GRADUATES. 



William Hilliard 
Prentiss Collins 
Caroline Turner 
May 

Carrington 
Henry Whiting 
Mary Dickson 
Joseph Milton 
(Child) 
Bessie 

Ernest Orlando 
Wilbur Johhson 
Walter Nelson 
Paul 
(Son) 
Evangeline 
Clarence Dennet 
Elsie Ely 
Tryphena Maria 
(Child) 
(Child) 

Eugene Latham 
Robert Edward 
Robert Lev en 
Constance Adaline 
Henry Marye 
Lizzie 

Harry Flower 
Charles Russell 
Frances Henrietta 
Quincy Sumner 
Frances 
Alice Ives . 
Grace Robards 
Edward Lang 
Lizzie Ives 
Stephen Bradshaw 
Charles Henry 
Hattie Gilbert 
Henry Bohemond 
Ellen Garlinghouse 
Charles Comstock 
Bucknor 
Howard 
Edwin Clarence 



CHILDREN. 

Beane Chicopee, Mass. 

Salem, 



Boies 



Buckelew 
Chamberlin 



De Forest 

Fenn 

Frost 

Houston 

(H.) Janin 

(L.) Janin 
Luckett 



Lyman 

Norcutt 
it 

Palen 

Sewall 



Scran ton, Pa. 



Scranton, 



Bridgeville, Del. 
Edgewater, N. J. 
Carlsbad, Germany 
Plainfield, N. J. 
Wetmore, Kan. 
San Diego, Cal. 
Eliot, Me. 

Paterson. N. J. 
E. Newmarket, Md. 



Minas Prietas, Mex. 
Bladen Springs, Ala. 
Alexandria. La. 
Plaquemine, " 
Boyce, 



Onawa, la. 

Nodaway, la. 
Lake Placid, N. Y. 
Salem, Mass. 

it u 

Conway, N. H. 
Salem, Mass. 



(B. H.) Smith Gloucester, Mass. 
Smyser Riverton, Minn. 

Taintor Ellenville, N. Y. 

S.Orange, N.J. 
VanAmringe New York, N. Y. 



Vosburgh 



Shelbyville, 111. 



d. y. 
Mar. 9,1873 
Sept. 12, 1873 
Aug. 13, 1866 
Aug. 10, 1866 
June 27, 1906 
July 8, 1876 
Apr. 27, 1898 
Mar. 18, 1877 
July 18,1872 
Apr. 29, 1897 
Aug. 15, 1901 
July 29,1900 
Aug. 8,1893 
Nov. 2,1877 
Nov. 2, 1885 
Jan. 8, 1908 
Apr. 3,1878 
July 1877 



Au.g20, 1894 
June 17, 1863 
Aug. 29, 1901 
Dec. 22, 1907 
Sept. 28, 1883 
June 17, 1881 
Oct. 19, 1893 
Nov. 23, 1881 
Feb. 2,1858 
Sept. 5,1875 
Aug. 17, 1899 
Jan. 1867 
Oct. 12, 1892 

5. 1875 

4. 1876 
29, 1876 

5, 1878 
10. 1863 
3,1888 
Sept. 24, 1889 
Dec. 23, 1870 
Sept. 19, 1887 
July 4, 1870 
Jan. 26,1893 
Total, 45 



July 
Dec. 
Jan. 
July 
Apr. 
Dec. 



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ADDR^SES. 



203 



ADDRESSES OF GRADUATES. 



♦Abott, Montelius 
Adams, Thatcher M. 

36 Wall St. or 15 W. 17th St., 
New York 
♦Alexander, Walter S". 
♦Anderson, Volney S. 
♦Andrews, George P. 
♦Armstrong. William N. 
Bacon, William P. 

New Britain, Conn. 
Baird, John T. 

Plattsmouth, Neb. 
♦Batchelor, Edward P. 
♦Beale, Robert M. 
♦Bean, David M. 
♦Bennett, William C. 
♦Blake, Edward F. 
♦Boynton, George M. 
♦Brinton, Daniel G. 
♦Brown, Orlando 
♦Caldwell, Samuel 
♦Chalmers, Matthew 
♦Clarke, Addison L. 
Cobb, Sanford H. 

Richfield Springs, N. Y. 
♦Colgate, Abner W. 
♦Cutter, Ralph H. 
Delano, Isaac 

E. Saginaw, Mich. 
♦Dembinski, Louis 
♦Dwight, Robert O. 
♦Eichelberger, Martin S. 
Elliott, Edward T. 

Hawarden, la. 
♦Evans, Lemuel R. 
♦Franklin, George M. 
Freeborn, De Lancy 

Knoxville, Pa. 



Frisbie, William R. 

Bureau of Pensions, 

Washington, D. C. 
Gallaway, Robert M. 

42 Wall St., New York 
Garrard, Jeptha Cincinnati, O. 

♦Gibbs, Josiah W. 
♦Goodwin, Sheldon 
Grant, Edward D. 

Farmington, Conn. 
Greenwood, Moses M. 

Missouri Trust Bldg., 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Harris, William T 

1360 Fairmont St., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 
♦Haskell, Robert C. 
♦Heermance, Edgar L. 
♦Hewitt, Frederick C. 
♦Hollister, Arthur N. 
♦Howe, Leavitt 
Hubbell, William S. 

31 Bible House, New York 
♦Tngerson, William F. 
♦Johnson, Charles N. 
Jones. Augustus T. 
182 N. Main St., 

Brockton, Mass. 
Kellogg, Chauncey S. 
347 Millaudon St., 

New Orleans, La. 
Kimball, John E. 

47 Main St., Oxford, Mass. 
Lane, William A. 
904 Burnet St., 

Fort Worth, Tex. 
Lee, Samuel H. 

106 Wilbraham Road, 

Springfield, Mass. 



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204 



ADDUSS^. 



Lovewdl, John 

Willow Springs, Mo. 
♦MacDowell, William A. 
♦MacLellan, George B. 
♦MagiU, William A. 
♦Manice, Edward A. 
Marble, George R. 

Oskosh, Wis. 
Mathewson, Arthur 

Argyle, 16th St Extended, 

Washington, D. C 
♦Miles, Daniel A. 
♦Mills, Edward M. 
♦More, Elawson C 
♦Morgan, William D. 
♦Morris, Robert 
Neide' Horace 

Union League Club, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Noble, Frederick A. 

1414 Forest Av., Evanston, 111. 
♦Ogden, Dewees 
Peirce, Luther H. 

1904 Surf St., Chicago, 111. 
♦Penny, Benjamin P. 
♦Perkins, Thomas A. 
♦Pickett, Joseph W. 
♦Pitkin, Walter S. 
♦Porter, Edward C. 
♦Potter, Daniel T. 
Pratt, Electus A. 

War Dept., Washington, D. C. 
♦Pratt, Henry A. 
♦Pumpelly, Charles F. 
♦Richards, Channing 
*Riley, Isaac 
Robison, Leslie ' 



^Royer, Henry 



Peoria, 111. 



Scott, Eben G. 

324 S. Franklin St., 

Wilkes-Barrc, Pa. 
♦Seymour, Edward 
Sleight, Brinley D. 

Sag Harbor, N. Y. 
♦Smith, George F. 
♦Smith, Normand 
Steele, William H. 

Altmar, N. Y. 
Stevens, Frederic W. 

33 W. 35th St., New York 
♦Street, George E. 
♦Sweet, Preston I. 
♦Sweetser, Henry E. 
♦Taft, Edmund M. 
♦Thomas, Elisha S. 
Tomlinson, Charles 

30 Washington St., 

Hartford, Conn. 
♦Turner, Henry H. 
♦Twining, Theodore W. 
♦Valpy, Thomas G. 
Van Name, Addison 
121 High St., 

New Haven, Conn. 
♦Wells, Gideon 
♦Wells, Henry A. 
♦Whittlesey, Charies B. 
Wilbur, Albert B. 

Middletown, N. Y. 
Williams, Charles H. 

The Standish, Worcester, Mass. 
Woodruff, Charles H. 

170 Broadway or 14 E. 68th St., 
New York 
♦Woodward, Williams H. 

Total, (104) 36 



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ADDRKSS^. 



205 



ADDRESSES OF NON-GRADUATES. 



Honeyman, John Onego, W. Va. 
Houston, Francis H. 

31 Nassau St., New York. 
Janin, Henry 

care Exploration Co. Lim'd, 
11 Cornhill, London, E. C. 
Janin, Louis Gaviota, Cal. 

♦Jones, Anson 
Kirtland, Edwin L. 

Holyoke, Mass.. 
♦Lee, Martin V. B. 
♦Lloyd, William P. 
♦Luckett, Robert L. 
♦Lyman, Charles N. 
♦Maclin, Robert B. 
♦MacDonald, Alexander 
♦Moore, Robert S. 
♦Napier, Nathan C. 
NicoU, Augustus W. 
95 Brooklyn Av., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
♦Norcutt, Allison H. 
Palen, Edward F. 

101 W. Washington Lane, 
Germantown, Phila., Pa. 
♦Pollock, Thomas G. 
♦Robinson, George O; 
♦Russell, Charles H. 
♦Searle, Daniel W. 
♦Sewall, Charles 
♦Sims, Robert G. 
♦Smith, Benjamin H. 

Smith, Hayden K. Oak Park, IlL 
♦Smith, Jewett G. 
♦S'myser, Jacob H. 
♦Stevens, Eugene R. 
♦Taft. Peter M. 
♦Taintor, Joseph L. 
♦Titus, Herbert K 
♦Trow, George W. 
Van Amringe, John H. 

48 E. 26th St., New York. 
Vosburgh, Joel B. Alameda, Cal. 
Total, (70) 18 

Note: Adams, R. O. Dwight, Harris and Marble received degrees, 
and were transfered to the graduates. 



♦Andrews, Joseph H. 
♦Atterbury, Edward J. C. 
♦Badger, George 
♦Badger, William 
♦Bancroft, Robert G. 
♦Beale, John E. 

Beane, Samuel C. 

43 E. Haverhill, St., 

M Lawrence, Mass. 

♦Boies, Henry M. 

Brandon, Lane W. Brandon, La. 
♦Bright, John H. 

Buckingham, Charles 
122 Chandler St., 

Boston, Mass. 
♦Buckelew, Frederick L. 
♦Burlock, Frederick F. 
♦Burnley, George B. 

Carpenter, Carlos C. 

Owasso, Mich. 
♦Chamberlin, Orlando E. 

Darrach, William B. 

Newburgh, N. Y. 
♦Davenport, John 
♦Davis, John M. 

De Forest, Moulton 

Wetmore, Kan. 
♦Delano, Alfred O. 
♦Disbrow, Arthur 
♦Dunham, George E. 
♦Dwight, Thomas B. 
♦Fenn, Charles M. 
♦Folger, Nathan C. 

Foote, Edwin B. Fairfield, Me. 
♦Forbes, Archibald A. 
♦Frost, John D. 
♦Gibson, Claude 
♦Grant, Harry A. 
♦Hancock, Lorenzo M. 
♦Hannahs, Diodate C. 
♦Hayner, Herrick 
♦Hendrickson, George 

Hodson, Thomas S., Crisfieli Md. 



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