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Full text of "A Biographical record of Clark county, Ohio .."

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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Civ ARK County 

OHIO 



ILLUSTRATED 



The people that take no pride in f/ie noble aehieven/enfs of reinoic amcsiors -wiU never aeJii 
anything "^vorth\ to he remembered zvitk pride bv remote generations. — Macaut.av. 



NEW YORK AND CHICAGO: 
Thk S. T. Clarke Publishing Compa> 



.^^" 



PREFACE, 




I Hi greatest of English historians, Macaulay, ami one of tlie most 
biilliant. writers of tlie present century, has said : ''The history of a 
countrj' is best told in a record of the lives of its people." In con- 
formity with this idea, the Biographical Record has been prepared. 
Inslead of going to musty records, and taking therefrom dry statistical 
matter that can be appreciated by but few, our corps of writers have 
gone to the people, the men and women who have, by their enterprise 
and industry, brought this county to a rank second to none among 
those comprising this great and noble State, and from their lips have the story of their life 
struggles. No more interesting or instructive matter could be presented to an intelligent 
public. In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy tlie imitation 
of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and 
economy, have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing 
an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout 
the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of 
life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in 
every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usu- 
ally crowned their efforts. It tells also of those, who, not seeking the applause of the 
-world, have pursued the " even tenor of their way," content to have it said of them, as Christ 
said of the woman performing a deed of mercy — "They have done what they could." It 
tells how many, in the pride and strength of young manhood, left the plow and the anvil, the 
lawyer's office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country's 
call went forth valiantly " to do or die," and how through their efTorts the Union was 
restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every 
woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. 

Coming generations will appreciate this volume and preserve it as a sacred treasure, from 
the fact that it contains so much that would never find its -way into public records, and which 
would otherwise be inaccessible. Great care has been taken in the compilation of the work 
and every opportunity possible given to those represented to insure correctness in what has 
been written ; and the publishers flatter themselves that they give to their readers a work with 
few errors of consequence. In addition to biographical sketches, portraits of a number of 
representative citizens are given. 

The faces of some, and biographical sketches of many, will be missed in this volume. 
For this the publishers are not to blame. Not having a proper conception of the work, some 
refused to give the information necessary to compile a sketch, while others were indifferent. 
Occasionally some mernber of the family would oppose the enterprise, and on account of such 
opposition the support of the interested one would be withheld. In a few instances men 
never could be found, though repeated calls were made at their residence or place of business. 



December, 1902. 



The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co, 



INDBX, 



I'A(iE 

Ackermann. J. C 761 

Ackerson, T. C 196 

Adams. J. E 146 

Agnew, P. J 377 

Aldrich, A. R 656 

Andei*son, David 432 

Anderson, James 641 

Arthur. Samuel 769 

Athy, T. R 666 

Athy. j. W 36s 

Atkinson. Levi . . . 459 

Baird. W. J 759 

Baker. Adam 734 

Baldwin, Frank 52 

Baldwin, Jonah 823 

Baldwin, Henry 23 

Baldwin, Rachel W 691 

Baldwin, William SS 

Ballentine, David 449 

Ballentine, J. V 73 

Bancroft. P. E 346 

Banta, W. E 623 

Barrett. E. L 663 

Battin, S. R 334 

Bauer, C. A 181 

Bauer, Michael 311 

Beach, T. D 767 

Beck. R.J 333 

Becker, J. A 413 

Beckley, A. J 37 

Berger. W. H 246 

Berry, G. \V 3D0 

Bigler, C. H : 325 

Bird, F. J.... 373 

Bird, Silas Van 695 

Blose, J. H 732 

Best, C. E 421 

Botley. R. H :.. 613 

BowUis. C. J 316 

Boun. Alfred 260 

Bradhury. H. P 561 

Bradbury. W. H 563 



PAGE 

Brain Family, The 619 

Brening, C. E 770 

Bretney, C. V 450 

Briggs, Charles 304 

Brooks, A. N 473 

Bryant, W. H 742 

Buch waiter, E. L 73s 

Burk, J. W 103 

Burnett, W. R 176 

Bushnell. A. S 18 

Bymaster, G. W 800 

Calvert, R. G 45 

Calvert, T. L 389 

Carr, S. H 153 

Chapman, John 75 

City Pumping Station, The.. . ,S99 

Clark, C. M 667 

Clippinger. J. C 224 

Coberly, D. U 635 

Colvin. Chase 434 

Conard. Enos 250 

Conklin, William 221 

Copenhaver, W. E 368 

Cosier, H. A 174 

Cotes. A. E 302 

Crabill, James 788 

Crabill, W. H 387 

Craig, J. B 172 

Grain, C. R 274 

Grain. J. B 717 

Creager. T. J 775 

Cftgar, E. F 16 

Curtis, J. C 710 

Dalie. J. G 574 

Dalie. J. H 466 

DeardorfT, J. M 443 

Dick. John 262 

Dicus. J. A 789 

Diehl, William 718 

Dillahunt, P. A 595 

Dillahunt. W. S. G 780 



PAGE 

Dinwiddle, E. C 399 

Dye. E. A 216 

Ebersole, Daniel 755 

Eichelbarger, J. T 462 

Elder, Robert 47 

Elifritz, B. 353 

Elliott, J. S 36 

Engle, J. H 782 

Erter, Frank , 54 

Erter, Henry 382 

Evans, J. M 572 

Farr. T. G lOl 

Ferree, D. A 655 

Fink, Andrew 610 

Finney, James 145 

Foley, James 104 

Follrath, George 526 

Follrath, Henry 528 

Foos, G. S 236 

Foos. R. H 129 

Foster, J. S 502 

Fox, M. M 781 

Frankensteins. The 818 

Frey. G. H., Sr 93 

Frey. I. W 631 

Card. E. J 289 

Gard, J. S 320 

Garlough Family, The 336 

Garrard, Joseph 487 

Gasser. C. A 241 

Geiger, H. R r. 84 

German. Peter 560 

Gladfelter, W. S 485 

Goodfellow, Manley 798 

Gordon, D. T 680 

Gotwald. L. A 60s 

Graham, W. H 624 

Gram, W. J 580 

Grant, A. W 724 

(".•-im. E. E 124 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Grisso, J. N 230 

Hagan, Addison 200 

Hagan. F. M 294 

Hahn. A. K 310 

Hall. J. W 164 

Haninia, .\. W 697 

Hamma. I. G 699 

Harris, F. G 673 

Harris, G. H 545 

Harris, W. M 632 

Harshman. J. S 48 

Harwood. T. E 57 

Hatfield. F. L 235 

Hatfield. James 194 

Hatfield, M. A 244 

Heckcrt. C. G 64 

Heffelfinger, J. E 519 

Hempleman, G. F 404 

Hess. T. M 645 

Higgins, P. J 557 

Hinkle. Joseph 479 

Hockman, S. R 423 

Hollenbcck, D. W 121 

Homan, James 733 

Horr, C. A 99 

Houghton. Samuel 452 

Hughes. W. H 326 

Hunter, Eli 700 

Huntington, G. W 26 

Hypes, O. F 212 

Irwin, W. J.! 136 

Jenkins, J. W 766 

Jenkins. S. S 677 

Johnson, James 646 

Johnson. James. Jr 173 

Johnson. J. E 257 

Johnson, Robert 11 

Juergens, C. A 204 

Kay. C. H 542 

Kay. C. S 126 

Kay. Isaac 538 

Keifer. R. F 186 

Keifep. J. \V 28 

Keller, J. C 210 

Kelley. R. T 233 

Kelly, O. S 76 

Kelly. O. W 122 

Kershner, Hezekiah 200 

Kidder. W. S 752 

Kills. J. M 81 

King. David. Sr 625 

Kitchen, E. J 500 



PAGE 

Kitchen. J. S 155 

Kizcr, Thomas Ill 

Knote. J. M 378 

Kriegbaum, Nicholas 278 

Krotz, A. S 323 

Kuqua. Christian 536 

Kyle. F. J 179 

Lafferty. S. J 39° 

Lantz, R. X 3S0 

Layton, L. M 763 

LeFevre, Daniel 65 

l.eflfel, Henry 555 

Leffel. John 406 

Leffel, Joseph 600 

Leffel, J. M 433 

Leffel. J. M 687 

Leffel, J. P 424 

Lenhart. Adam 715 

Leuty, John 375 

Leiity, J. L 699 

Little, J. D 795 

Littler. J. R 270 

Long. C. M 5S8 

Ludlow, John 821 

Ludlow, J. W 372 

Liise, S. T 480 

Luse. \V. H 511 

lynch. G. C 343 

L>«n. H. C 644 

Lyon. J. C 642 

MacGregor, .Alexander 116 

Marshall, J. M 529 

Martin, Christian 223 

Martin. J. W 280 

Mason. Jonathan 163 

Mnst, P. P 592 

Mattinson, Charles 184 

Mattinson, Thomas, Jr 209 

Mnttinson, Thomas, Sr 206 

Mattinson, T. E 47 

Maxwell, J. L 119 

McClure, J. E 392 

McConkey. .Alexander 661 

McGilvray. C. F 291 

McGregor, Frank 113 

McGrew, T. F 59 

Mclntire, E. K 254 

McKillip, Daniel 364 

McLaughlin, J. T 264 

McMillen, G. 602 

Mellinger, H. S 520 

Mellingcr, J. H 727 



PAGE 

Merritt, C. H 165 

Miller. A. C 711 

Miller, E. D 687 

Miller. Irvine 460 

Miller, J. C 492 

Miller, J. N 495 

Miller, O. H 267 

Miller, S. M 668 

Milligan, M. L 96 

Mills, F. H 24 

Mills. John 708 

Mills. R. R 720 

Mills, T. D 130 

Mills, William. Jr 731 

Minear, N. 226 

Minnich. C. W 76S 

Moore, William 362 

Moores, W. B 232 

Moorman, J. H 470 

Mower. J. K 66 

Miulholland, J. H 476 

Myers, D. A 554 

Myers, Eliab 783 

Myers, W. D I54 

Nave, J. C 290 

Nave, J. G 475 

Nave. J. P 568 

Nave, J. T; 59i 

Nave, T. F 760 

Nawman. Henry 517 

Neff, Turman 386 

Necr, David 745 

Nichelson. John 57^ 

Nichols. CM 65 

Normand. J. M 392 

North, J. B 464 

North. J. P 501 

North, O. R 472 

CVBrien. J. C 568 

O'Brien. R. E 152 

Olds, D. H ,366 

Otstot. George 786 

Otstot, W. T 96 

Over. L. F 524 

Over. Madison 351 

Overholser. .Abraham 74° 

Owen. W. H 271 

Paden. WO II5 

Parker. A. B 463 

Patric, C. E 614 

Patric. Lewis 603 

Patton, A. C 213 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Patton, W. S 215 

Payne, W. F 331 

Pearson, Joseph 587 

Peet. T. B 821 

Perrin Family, The John 189 

Perrin. John 191 

Perrin. J. 1 192 

Pierson, John 579 

Poole, WilHani 512 

Potter, A. M 72 

Powell, W. C 396 

Prince, B. F 793 

Printz, S. W 679 

Rabbitts, Charles ISO 

Rabbitts, J. H 149 

Ramsey, C. S 215 

Ramsey, Josiah 282 

Rankin, H. M 416 

Rankin, John 628 

Rankin, J. F 631 

Rankin, S. B 630 

Rankin, W. H.. Jr 442 

Rankin, W. H., Sr T 436 

Ranch, John 622 

Rawlings, D. W 820 

Rayner, T. S 514 

Rebert, Andrew 689 

Reddish, John 456 

Reynolds, J. H 785 

Ridgely, C. T 772 

Ridgely, J. T 410 

Rind, R. C 640 

Rocke!, O. J 60 

Ross, E. W 584 

Roush, Charles 530 

Rontzahn, L. F 273 

Royet D. S 567 

Rnssell. Hugh, Jr 676 

Rnssell. M. C 534 

Riithrauff, J. M 822 

Sadlier, J. G 314 

Schaefer, H. L 445 

Schindler, Charles 599 

Schindler, P. A 597 

Schindler, P. A 819 

Schumacher, Christian 6og 

Schuster, C. A 43 

Scott, W. A 743 

Seever, I. N 447 

Seggerson, John 627 

Seitz, Jacob 141 

Sellers. H. H 255 



PAGE 

Seys, H. H 142 

Sharp, Thomas 820 

Shaw Family, The 401 

Shawd. William 483 

Shipman, J. A .' 753 

Shorey, W. L 674 

Sidley, W. H 298 

Sieverling, W. H 636 

Sintz, George 525 

Skillings, Lewis 797 

Slack, A. J 552 

Smith, Amos 690 

Smith, A. H 683 

Smith, A. H., Jr 686 

Smith, S. W 777 

Smith, W. R 820 

Sparrow, J. B ^^Z 

Spence, D. W 3IS 

Spence. G. A 746 

Spence, John 13 

Sprague, D. A 161 

St. Charles Borromeo Church. 608 

Staley, P. A 498 

Steele, Marshfield 202 

Stelzer, August 461 

Stewart, David 38 

Stewart, Eliza D 86 

Stewart Family, The 648 

Stewart, H. P 544 

Stewart, O. N 414 

Stewart. P. M 242 

Stewart, R. N 655 

Stewart. W. C 523 

Stroud, Charles 430 

Swanger, Thomas 660 

Syman, L. L 15 

Taft. .\. F 219 

Tavenner, B. F 577 

Tavenner. W. E 579 

Taylor, Zachary 543 

Thatcher. David 819 

Thomas, C. E 712 

Thomas, J. H 106 

Thomas. T.J 384 

Thomas. W. S 156 

Tliiimpson. R. S 288 

Thomson, J. B 411 

Tliorpe. R. H 547 

Tindall. Robert 694 

Todd, C. E 551 

Todd, W. B 549 

Torrance, F. P 482 

Toulmin. H. K 426 



PAGE 

Trinnner. Michael 356 

Turner. G. D 509 

Tuttle. Isaac 132 

Tuttle. J. 133 

Tyner. H. H 548 

Ultes, Carl 183 

Unglaub. C. W 140 

Vananda, C. H 62 

Van Horn. J. G 27 

Voges. Herman, Sr 533 

Wade. Hamilton 383 

Walker, J. C 728 

Walker. R. P 134 

Wallace. George 8ig 

Warner. W. W 302 

Watkins. D. S 611 

Weast. G. A 696 

Weaver. J. S 284 

Weaver, W. L 822 

West. Eli 791 

Whitaker. H. 125 

Whiteley. William 252 

Wickham. Henry 488 

Wildasin. C. 166 

Wildman. William 312 

Williams. E. W 75i 

Williss F. W 170 

Wilson. Michael 344 

Wilson. T. W 531 

Wingate. T. R T 565 

Winger, Amaziah 40 

Wise. William 659 

Wood. C. A.. 581 

Wood. R. 1 739 

Wood. William 7n 

Woodward, R. C 820 

Woosley, Benjamin 638 

Woosley, Thomas 757 

Woosley. W. S 639 

Wright. L. M 134 

Wyant. J. F 24s 

Xanders. William 70 

Yarnell, D. L 283 

Yeazel. Jacob 725 

Yeazel, W. E 665 

Yeazell. C. 516 

Yeazell, J. A 671 

Yeazell, J. W 714 

Yeazell, W. D 675 

Yeazell. W. M 681 

Young. L. L 419 



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e^'^r^^- 






BIOGRAPHICAL. 



ROBERT JOHN SOX. 

Robert Johnson was born in Springfield 
township, Clark county, Ohio, January 20, 
1832, a son of James and Helen (Johnston) 
Johnson. The father was born near Pet- 
tigo. County Donegal, Ireland, of Scotch 
ancestry, and at that time the surname was 
spelled Johnston. He grew to maturity and 
was married in his native land. In 1824 he 
crossed the Atlantic to the United States, 
coming direct to Clark county, Ohio, where 
he purchased a farm of one hundred acres 
south of the city of Springfield. This he 
improved and made his home throughout 
his remaining days, his death occurring in 
1872. while his wife passed away in 1869. 
The}" were members of the ^lethodist Epis- 
copal church. 

Robert Johnson, the fiftli in order of 
birth of their eight children, was educated 
in the district schools near his home, and on 
the 2 1 St of April, 18.19. removed to Spring- 
field, where he became an apprentice to the 
carpenter's and joiner's trade, receiving 
forty dollars and beard for his first year's 
service and sixty-two dollars for the second 
year's work. Before he attained his ma- 
jority he laid off and built unaided a double 
flight of continued rail stairs, a thing which 



had not been previously done in Springfield. 
He, at tliat time, in partnership with his 
brother, James Johnson, took a contract for 
the erection of a house at a cost of fifty-five 
hundred dollars. He followed contracting 
and building until 1865, when he went to 
the Pennsylvania oil fields, where tire recent 
discovery of oil and the development of wells 
had given rise to a new influstry which was 
proving a profitable one and was destined to 
play an important part in commerce. 

For two years Mr. Johnson successfully 
continued in business there, operating under 
the firm name of Law, Johnson & Company, 
and then disposing of his oil interests in 
1867, he returned to Springfield, where in 
September of that year he joined .Amos 
\\'hiteley, \\'. W. \\'ilsnn, J. W. Taylor. 
Walter Craig, William H. Oglevee and 
oth.ers in the organization of the Champion 
Machine Company, which was formed for 
extending the business of the manufacture 
of Champion reapers and mowers that were 
then being made by the firm of Whitely. 
Fassler &• Kelly. The first board of direc- 
tors of the new compau}- was composed of 
Ano'S \\'hiteley, W. W. Wilson, Robert 
Johnson, Walter Craig, Thomas McKee, O. 
S. Kelly and William H. Oglevee. Mr. 
Johnson was elected secretary and superin- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tendent and acted in those capacities tor tit- 
teen year<. In 1873 the Champiim Malle- 
able Iron Company was f(jrnied fcr the 
manufacture of malleahle iron for the three 
concerns — the Champion IMachinc Coni- 
panv, Whiteley, Fassler & Kelly and Ward- 
ner, Mitchell & Company, and of the new- 
company Mr. Johnson l>ecame a director 
and the secretary. Its shops were built east 
of Linden avenue and the liusiness insti- 
tuted on a successful basis. In 1874 the 
three concerns named aliove organized the 
Ear & Knife Company ior the purpose of 
manufacturing cutter bars, knives and sec- 
tions and continued to do a very extensive 
business until 1884, Mr. Johnson also act- 
ing as the secretary and as a director of that 
company, which built the factory now owned 
and operated by the Foos Gas Engine Com- 
pany. In 1 88 1 he disposed of his interests 
ill the Champion Machine Company, the 
Cliamiiiiin Malleable 'Iron Company and the 
Champion Bar & Knife Company and in 
1882 he became connected with the upluiild- 
ing of the city in another direction, for in 
that year he erected a block on ]\Iain street 
q>l»site the First Presbyterian church, still 
known as the Johnson block. In 1883 he 
acquired an interest in the manufacturing 
concern of Mast, Foos & Ct-mpany. of which 
he was cho.sen vice-president, acting in that 
capacity for fourteen years. 

On the 1st of November. 1883. Mr. 
Johnson was instrumental in inaugurating a 
business which has proven of the greatest 
benefit to the city as well as the individual 
stockholder, contributing greatly to the in- 
dustrial activity and in consequence to the 
commercial prosperity of Springfield. .As- 
sociated with E. L. Buchwalter, C. E. Pat- 
ric. Richard IT. Rodgers, Charles S. Kay 
and others, he bought out Thomas, Ludlow 



&■ Rodgers and organized the Superior Drill 
Company for the purpose of extending the 
manufacture of Superior grain drills, which 
had already won favor and patronage on the 
market. The company was incorporated 
with a capital stock of two hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars, and ■Mr. Johnson be- 
came the first vice president and has served 
continuously in this position. The first 
directors of the company were E. L. Buch- 
walter, Robert Johnson, C. E. Patric, 
Tliomas'F. McGrew and Charles S. Kay. 
The business was extended until it outgrew 
the original quarters on Limestone street 
and in 1898 the original factory in which 
Mr. Johnson had beai interested as a mem- 
ber of the Champion Machine Company, at 
the corner of Gallagher and Monroe streets, 
was purchased, and with the increased facil- 
ities the business was extended until it now 
cnrplovs five times the original capital and 
gi\-es employment to about five hundred 
men, it being now the second in extent and 
importance of any manufactory of the city. 
In i8q2 Mr. Johnson acquired an interest in 
the Hoppes Manufacturing Company, a con- 
cern enjoying an excellent reputation for the 
character of its goods all over the country, 
and of this company Mr. Johnson is the vice 
president and director. He is also a stock- 
holder and director in the Springfield Ctvil 
iK: Ice Company, which was the first com- 
pany to manufacture artificial ice in this 
city. He is financially interested in the 
Foos Gas Engine Company, now occupying 
the old works of the Champion Bar & Knife 
Company, engaged in the manufacture f)f 
gas and ga.soline engines, many of which 
have lieen shipped to various Euroi)ean 
countries as well as to all sections of the 
United States. Of this company Mr. John- 
son was formerly the vice i)residcnt and is 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



now a director. For some years he was a 
director of the Springfield National Bank, 
and in 1902 he erected a fine brick and steel 
department store on High street between 
Limestone street and Fountain avenue, five 
stories in height, one hundred feet front and 
one hundred and forty-five feet deep, this 
iTeing the first steel skeletou structure of the 
city. 

Mr. Johnson has always beai a Republi- 
can in politics, but never an aspirant for 
office, altliowgh he served as a mentber of the 
city council for the third ward from 1882 
until 1886 and was president of council one 
temi. 

In Clark county Mr. Johnson was mar- 
ried to Adelaide T. Humphreys, a daughter 
of William Humphreys, and they ha\e six 
living children : Effie. now the wife oif K. 
]M. Burton; Nellie, the wife of Randolph 
Co'leman; Frank C, who is assistant mana- 
ger of the sales department of the Superior 
Drill Company; Clara, the wife of A. M. 
McKnight, of New York city; Jessie, the 
wife of Luther L. Buch waiter, of Spring- 
field; and Ben P., who is with the Superior 
Drill Company. The parents are members 
of the High Street Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which Mr. Johnson has been a 
trustee for some years. For fifteen years he 
has been a trustee of Ferncliff cemetery; is 
also an active member of the Associated 
Charities, and in i8g8 was one of the in- 
corporators of the Methodist Home for the 
Aged, located at Yellow Springs. Tlie in- 
terests which have made claim upon his time 
and co-operation have been varied for any- 
thing which tends to the betterment of con- 
ditions for mankind or the improvement oif 
the city receives his endorsement and as- 
sistance. His efforts in industrial fields 
have been particularly beneficial to Spring- 



field. At the time he became interested in 
manufacturing very little business of that 
character was carried on here and he has 
witnessed the entire and the splendid growth 
of manufacture here, while in the city's prog- 
ress in this direction he has been a most 
potent factor, — the dominant spirit in many 
enterprises whose value to the commercial 
activity of Springfield cannot be overesti- 
mated. His keen foresight, utilization of 
oi^portunity and executive force have en- 
abled him to formulate and execute many 
plans wdiereby the avenues of trade have 
been broadened, while Springfiekl has 
gained prestige as a priiducti\e center that 
places it far ahead of many cities of greater 
size in the L'nion. 



JOHN SPENCE. 

Widi the farming and stock-raising in- 
terests of Pike township John Spence is 
connected. He was born in this township 
March 21, 1824, and is therefore one of the 
oldest native sons of Clark county still liv- 
ing within its borders. His paternal grand- 
father, Oliver Spence, died in England. He 
was of both Scotch and English ancestry 
and engaged in herding sheep on the wide 
prairies of England. The parents of our 
subject were William and Elizabeth 
( Wo-nes) Spence, 'both of whom were na- 
tives of Yorkshire, England, and there 
spent their childhood days. After their mar- 
riage ajid the birth of their eldest soai, 
James, they sailed for America, believing 
that they might have better opportunities 
for securing a home of their own and gain- 
ing a comfortable competence in this land. 
The vear 1817 witnessed their en-igration 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and fi r a lime they lived in Cincinnati. Mr. 
Spence had only ten dollars when he arrived 
in that city, but he at once sought eii.ploy- 
nient and worked there as a common latorer 
for two years. In 1820 he came to Clark 
coimty. taking up his alxxle here on Christ- 
mas clay of that year, upon the farm which 
is now occupied by his girandson. George 
Spence. He became well-to-do and as time 
passed made extensive and judicious invest- 
ments in real estate until he was the owner 
of ir.ore than two hundred and forty acres 
of land in Clark county : three hundred acres 
in Kentucky : and four hundred and twenty- 
eight acres in Indiana, near to Muncie and 
Decatur. He also had an eighty-acre tract 
in Michigan and the inccjnie from these vari- 
ous farms supplied him with all the comforts 
and many luxuries of life. 

In his family were thirteen children, 
twelve of whoni reached years of maturity: 
Jame.-', who was dr(jwned in the (Jhio ri\er; 
Matthew, who died at the age of twenty- 
four years ; Mark, who died leaving one son, 
George ; Simon, who died at the age of 
thirty years, leaving four children: John, 
whose name intr&xluces this review ; Wlilliam, 
who died when more th;m forty years of 
age, leaving one child who is now Mrs. Jolin 
Hollis, of Addison, Ohio; George, who was 
an attorney of Springfield and at his death 
left a son, George, who is now in-California; 
Timothy, who resides in Iowa and has sev- 
eral children ; Mary Ann, who died in child- 
hood : Maria, who became the wife of 
Henry .Schell and is now deceased: Jane, 
who n.arried Samuel Pierce, of Ivnoxville, 
Iowa, bv whom she has three children: 
Ellen, who became Mrs. Scott and at her 
death left only one child: Elizabeth, who is 
married and" lives in Jolict, Illinois, and has 
two children. 



John Spence, who was the fifth in order 
of birth, spent his boyhood days upon the 
home farm, being reared amid the wild 
scenes of frontier life, for during his boy- 
hoo<l Clark county was still a frontier dis- 
trict. .\1! around stretched the green for- 
ests, the woodman's ax having not yet felled 
the great trees and prqjared the land for 
cultivation. There were few roads yet con- 
structed and those that had been cut through 
the forests were not in very good condition. 
Ir was long distances to mill and market and 
the farn ers largely depended upon the prod- 
ucts from their places for ever}-thing needed 
for the family use. The pUoIic school sys- 
tem of the county had not then been insti- 
tuted and John Spence therefore attauled 
a subscription school for about thirty days 
each year w hen the weather was so bad that 
it [Hxnented him from doing farm work. 
In the log scbf.Kil building with slab seats 
and a writing desk formed by- a slab placed 
upon wooden pins driven into the wall. Mr. 
Si)ence pursued his studies. In one end of 
the r™:)m was a large fireplace. The meth- 
ods of instruction were ahr.ost as primitive 
as the furnishings of the room. Mr. Spence 
aided his father in carrying on the work oi 
tlic lion e farn: until twenty-one years of age. 
alter which be beg-an working by the month 
as a farm band. He also learned the ccKiper's 
trade in a shop on the home farm and fol- 
lowed that for several years. He became 
an expert workman and n.ake as many as 
sixteen barrels in a single day, when he had 
to prqjare the luml>er from the rough. 

On the 3d of July. 1853. ^^^- Sjicnce was 
married tO' Miss Louisa Bade)', and they be- 
came the parents of four children, but one 
died in early childhood and another at the 
age of thirteen years. Two sons, Marcellus 
and Warren, are still livine- and both are 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



iT.arried. The irother also passed away and 
2kli. Spence afterward married Mrs. Hen- 
rietta Crawtis, ncc Daffenbach. Three chil- 
dren were 'born of tliis union, of whom two 
are still living: Arminta, and Arwilda. 
The latter married J. P. Wall and is 
li\ing in Muncie, Indiana. Mr. Spence and 
his second wife lived together for about 
th.irteen years and then she, too, was called 
to the home beyond. 

In his political views Mr. Spence has 
been a stanch Republican from the organiza- 
tion of the party. He cast his first vote 
for Taylor in 1848 and in 1856 depotsited 
his -ballot for John C. Fremont. At the time 
of the Morgan raid into Ohio he was elected 
cnptain of what was known as the Flatfoot 
Company and v, ith his C(;mmand went to 
Xenia. Througho'Ut his entire life his atten- 
tion has been largely given to his farm work, 
which he has carried on continuously and 
e\en yet he superintends the cultivation of 
his land although he has passed the seventy- 
eighth milestone on life's journey. He is 
' ne of tlie ho-nored and venerable residents 
1' his township, his upright life having 
_;:!inL'd f'T bin: the respect of those with 
\v hum he has come in contact. 



LOUIS L. S'YMAX. M. D. 

.•\n:ong- the successful n^edical practi- 
tioners of .Springtield who have left the 
ranks of the many to stand among the suc- 
cessful few is Dr. Syman. who was born in 
Cleveland. OBiio. June 5. 1871, and is a son 
<=f F. K. and Rebecca E. (Goldsmith) 
Syman. The f.'ither engaged, in business in 
Cle\-cland for a raimber of years and can:e to- 
Spi i-'gfield in 18;"^. where he est;ildished a 



music and jewelry store. He is now num- 
bered aiv.ong the old and respected citizens 
of the city and occupies a leading position 
in commercial circles. He votes with the 
Republican party but has hatl no tim.e or de- 
sire to seek office. In his family vvcre nine 
sons, but one of the number died in early 
childhood. The others are: Charles, who 
is engaged in the jewelry business in Den- 
ver, Colorado': David, who is associated in 
business with his father; Louis L., O'f this 
review; Fred, wbo is with his brother in 
Denver ; Albert and Edwin, who are travel- 
ing salesmen for The Champion Chemical 
Con-pany; Arthur, who is in a railway clear- 
ing house at Buffalo, New York ; and Ben- 
jamin, who is a student ,at Starling Med- 
ical College. 

Dr. Syman, having completed the gran:- 
niar school course, matriculated at Witten- 
berg College, where he pursued a regular 
course to the, junior year, when he entered 
Brown University, at Providence, R'lode Is- 
land. Oi the coirpletion of his collegiate 
work lie returned to Springfield and became 
connected with journalistic intere.-ts, being 
at different times associated with the Ga- 
zette, the Democrat and the Republic- 
Times. When the Sun was organized he 
at once became a member of the staff of that 
paper, serving as city editor. He remained 
for a time in his position and then went 
to Marion, Indiana, acting as city editor of 
the Leader. He also assisted in starting the 
Marion News. He then returned to this city 
and took up his position with the Sun. but 
determining to devote his energy to the 
practice cif medicine, in 1895 he became a 
student at Starling Medical College, of 
Columbus. Ohio, where he was graduatetl 
in the spring of i8c;8. In that year Dr. 
Synan rctrrned to Spiingfiekl and became 



i6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



associated in the practice with liis preceptor, 
Dr. L. E. Xiles, with wliuni he remained for 
three years, when Dr. Niles retired. Since 
that time he has been alone, devoting his 
entire attention to his professional duties, 
which have constantly increased and have 
L-eciire of a more and more important na- 
ture. He has now a very lucrative practice, 
drawing his business from, a good clasS of 
citizens. In iiSgg he was made township 
physician and health ofhcer but afterward 
resigned. He is now chief surgeon of the 
Detroit Southern Railway and local surgeon 
for the luie Railroad, and is a membei" of 
tlie Ohio State Medical Society, the Ameri- 
can Medical Association, the Clark County 
Medical Society iuid the International As- 
.sociation of Railway Surgeons. He is also 
a regular contributor to medical journals, a 
fad which indicates that he ranks high in 
his profession, making his influence of value 
to the medical world. He is also the house 
l)hvsician of the .Arcade Hotel, and is dis- 
trict surgeon for the Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Engineers and Firemen and is 
medical examiner for various fraternal 
lodges. 

Dr. Synian was narricd in l)ela\'an, llli- 
ni-is. in 1898. to ^liss ISertha Reinheimer. 
who was l;urn in Delavan and was a daugh- 
ter of the n:ayor of that place. The Doctor 
belongs to Clark Lodge. 1-. & A. M.; 
Spring-field Chapter. R. A. M. ; and Spring- 
field Council. R. & S. :\[. He also holds 
membership with Springfield Lodge, \o. 
51. B. P. O. E.. and with the Chi Phi fra- 
ternity. In manner Dr. Syman is entirely 
free fr<;m I'Stentation or display, InU he de- 
serves connrendation for his success and at- 
tainn"ents in a professional way. There is 
no man who h.as a greater regard for the 
ethics of his profession and is very courte- 



ous to his professional brethren. He is a 
representali\-e of high ideals in his line and 
he is honored and respected in every das- 
of societv. 



EDWIX F. CREGAR. 

Edwin F. Cregar, a prominent represc;;- 
tative of the building interests of Spring- 
field, doing business as an architect, stands 
among the leaders in his line. He has tlie 
noble example of his father to inspire and 
encourage him, for Nathaniel Cregar was 
one of the most capable and successful archi- 
tects of this part of the state. He was born 
September 29, 1823, in Hagerstown. Mary- 
land, and died June 15. 1885. Tlie paternal 
grandfather was a carpenter and Nathaniel 
Cregar seemed to have inherited his mechar.- 
ical genius and as tlie years passed became 
a well known architect and builder. In the 
year 1846 he left the place of his nativity, 
going to Cincinnati, where he completed the 
carpenter's trade and also his study of archi- 
tecture, although in later years he was con- 
tinually broadening his knowledge by read- 
ing and research. In the fall of 1847 '^^ 
came to Springfield and entered upon his 
building career here, continuing in this line 
of industrial activity until his death. He 
made the plans and superintended the con- 
struction of many of the finest buildings in 
this part of the state. He superintended the 
building of the original water works and 
was suijerintendent of the construction of 
the countv courthouse and of the first high 
school building of Springfield. Many struc- 
tures w hich he erected are still standing and 
are monuments to his enterprise and skill. 
He carried on general contracting and build- 
ing, as well as architectural wo-k. and his 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



splendid success arose from thorough under- 
standing of mechanical principles, his faith- 
fulness to the terms of a contract, close ap- 
plication and his unquestioned honesty. He 
was one of the organizers of the Indepen- 
dent Rover Fire Company of Springfield, 
was captain of a hose company and for ten 
years was its secretary. This fire company 
won great renown and made a most credit- 
ahle record. 

In 1830 Nathaniel Cregar was married 
in Springfield toi Miss Catherine Smith, who 
was horn in Warren county, Ohio. August 
15. 1827. a daughter of \\'illard Smith, who 
was engaged in tJie manufacture of paper 
an.d is still living in Springfield. By her 
marriage she became the mother of five chil- 
dren, of whomi Mary B., the first horn, died 
at the age of three years. Charles A., born 
April 8, 1S58, was an architect associated 
with his father in business until 1885. at 
which time he became his father's successor 
and continued his counectir-n with his de- 
partment of business acti\-ity until his own 
death, on the 8th of July. 1896. He pur- 
sued his literary education in the public 
schools and aftenvard attended a technical 
school at Indianapolis, Indiana. Lulu mar- 
ried I.. V. Lynch and died July 9. 1898. 
Edwin F. is the subject of this review. 
Frank M.. !>orn November 30. i860, in 
Springfield, is a carriage painter. The fa- 
ther was never an aspirant for office but was 
a leader in local Democratic circles and he 
had strong faith in the principles of his 
party and exercised marked influence in its 
ranks. He was always a supporter of church 
and charitable \\ork and as a citizen was 
deeply interested in everything pertaining to 
the general good. His attention, however. 
was chiefly given to his profession, in which 
he won distinction and creditable success. 



his superior ability placing him in the front 
ranks among the architects of Ohio. 

Edwin F. Cregar, whose name intro- 
duces this record, was born in Springfield 
January 9, 1855, and pursued his education 
in the public schools. After putting aside 
his text books he worked with his father for 
about two years and in 1874 went to Cin- 
cinnati, where he entered the Mechanics' In- 
stitute, pursuing a full course in architecture. 
This he completed in 1876 and then returned 
to Springfield, beginning work with his fa- 
ther, and in 187S he went to Topeka. Kan- 
sas, where he followed his trade, remaining 
there until the death of his father in 1885. 
He then returned to Springfield and became 
associated with his In'other Charles, the 
business being carried on under the firm 
style of Cregar Brothers until i8gfi. whei/ 
the elder brother died. Our subject thus 
assumed the management of the business of 
the firm and has since been very successful 
in his work. He has furnished plans and 
specifications for all kinds of work and 
draws much of his patronage from a radius 
of one hundred miles. His business has 
been built up tlirough his own efforts and 
ability, and he enjoys the confidence of a 
wide circle of friends. He has always fully 
sustained the dignity of his profession and 
has lieen very successful. While associated 
with his lirother they furnished the plans for 
the city building, St. Raphael's church, for 
the Henry block,- for the Third Presby- 
terian church, the St. John's Evangelical 
Lutheran church, the United Presbyterian 
church, the first Zimmerman building and 
many other buildings, including business 
Ijjocks and residences throughout the city 
and surrounding country. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. Cregar was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Amanda \\'ilhelm. of Spring- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



field, who was born in Harshmansville, Ohio, 
in February, 1863, and unto them lias been 
born one son. W'ilHam R., whose birth oc- 
curred October 29, 1881. He is a gradu- 
ate of tlie public schools and is now associ- 
ated with the R. G. Dunn & Company 
Agency at Denver. Colorado. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Cregar is 
a r^emocrat and has been a delegate to coun- 
ty conventions, but the honors and emolu- 
ments of office have had no attraction for 
him. A man of strong individuality and in- 
domitable purpose, one who has attained to 
a due measure of success in the aft'airs of 
life and whose influence has ever been ex- 
erted in the direction of progress and the 
right, this native son of Springfield well de- 
serves mention in the history of Clark 
countv. 



ASA SMITH BUSHXELL. 

Like the Roman matron of old the states 
of the Union present their illustrious sons 
as their jewels. In no land are individual 
merit and accomplishment so widely recog- 
nized as worthy of public honor, and the 
record which the American nation holds in 
greatest regard is that of the man whose 
prominence, success and position are 
achieved through individual effort and high 
character. Distinguished as one of the emi- 
nent and influential men of Ohio, Hon. A. 
S. Ij?ushnell is well known because of his 
connection with an important business en- 
terprise and because of his political promi- 
nence. His course has ever been such as to 
sustain the dignity of political lab. r and 
service and his public career has been an 
honor to the state which has honoreil him 
with the oitice <if chief executixc. He has 



also displayed ability to handle commercial 
and industrial transactions of magnitude 
and is to-day connected with an enterprise 
which is known throughout the country, 
especially in agricultural circles and tf) those 
engaged in kindred lines of business. Ani- 
mated by a spirit of enterprise and progress 
in bu'iness, of loyalty and patriotism in 
public life, Asa Smith Bushnell has won and 
retained the respect, confidence and good 
will of people throughout the nation in all 
walks of life. 

]\Ir. Bushnell was born in Rome, Oneida 
comity, Xew York, on the i6th ()f Septem- 
ber, 1834, and comes of Xew England an- 
cestry that had to do with the shaping of the 
colonial policy and the early history of the 
country. Jason Bushnell. his grandfather, 
was a soldier of the Revolutionary war, 
serxing first in the company of Captain 
Charles Miel, General Waterbury's brigade, 
and subsequently with Washington's Army 
at Tarrytown. - Connecticut was the ances- 
tral home of the family through many gen- 
erations and it was at Lisbon, that state, on 
the jtii of I'ebruary, 1800. that Daniel Bush- 
nell, the father of our subject, was born. 
His residence in Xew York covered a num- 
ber of years and Ohio became his place of 
abode in 1845. J" the meantime he had 
married Miss Harriet Smith, the wedding 
being celebrated ]\L-irch 9, 1825. For many 
years the father was a resident of Cincinnati 
and from there removed to Oberlin, Ohio, 
which was his home at the time of his tleatli. 

At the age of sixteeix years Asa S. Bush- 
nell became a resident of the city in which 
he was destined to bear an imjiortant part 
in the work of promoting commercial act- 
ixity and prosperity as well as in shaping 
its political record. The advantages of his 
youth were not unlike those enjoyed by 




ASA S. BUSHNELL. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



other young men of the period. He had oIj- 
tained a common-school education and de- 
termined to advance in the business world 
he eng-erly a\-ailed himself of e\-ery oppor- 
tunity that would lead to honorable pro- 
motion and success. For three years he was 
employed as a salesman in a dry-goods store 
and then became bookkeeper for the firm of 
Leffel, Cook & Blakeney, there remaining 
until the spring of 1857, when he accepted a 
jiosition with Warder, Brokaw & Child, 
manufacturers of mowers and reapers. In 
the succeeding fall, however, he gave up that 
jiosition to enter upon an independent busi- 
ness career as a partner of Dr. John Lud- 
low in the conduct of a drug store. For 
ten years he was connected with that line of 
trade and then became identified again with 
the work of manufacturing mowers and 
reapers with the firm with whicli he had 
formerl}- been associated. This time, how- 
ever, he became a partner in the enterprise 
under the firm style of Warder, Mitchell & 
Company, and has since been a controlling- 
factor in the business, the splendid success 
of whicli is largely attributable to his enter- 
prise, his close attention and his sound l)usi- 
ness judgment, which readily grasps a sit- 
uation, recognizes opportunity and utilizes 
the means at hand in extending the scope of 
the business. Changes have occurred in the 
partnership but the present firm of Warder, 
Bushnell & Giessner Company is known by 
re]nitatinn throughout the length and 
breadth of the land and its exports have also 
made the name of the hmise familiar to a 
consideralile extent in trade circles in for- 
eign lands : in fact the products of the house 
are sent to e\-ery country where improveil 
methods of agriculture are known. Mr. 
Bushnell has been president of the company 
since 1886 and the growth of the business. 



which has reached mammoth proportions, 
is largely attributable to his capacity for 
controlling commercial affairs of beadth 
and magnitude. Other business enterprises 
of Spi-nfigeld ha\-e profited by his labor, his 
counsel and liis control. He is the president 
of the First National Bank and the Spring- 
field Gas Company and has been actively or 
financially interested in many other busi- 
ness enter]3rises of importance to the city. 
In early manhood '\\x. Bushnell was 
married. In September, 1857, he wedded 
Aliiss Fllen Ludlow, a daughter of Dr. John 
Ludlow, of Springfield, and they became the 
parents of two daughters and a son : Mrs. 
J. F. McGrew, Mrs. H. C. Diamond and 
John L. Bushnell, In the first years of his 
married life Governor Bushnell left his lit- 
tle family to respond to the nation's call for 
aid, prompted by a spirit of patriotic de\-o- 
tion to the Union cause. With firm belief 
in the supremacy of the national government 
he began raising troops fcjr the field, the 
command being organized as Company E. 
of the One Hundred and Fifty-second Regi- 
ment of Ohio Infantry. He was made its 
captain and with the command oi General 
David Hunter served in the Shenandoah 
valley in 1864. His interest in his fellow 
comrades of the blue has since been a salient 
characteristic of liis career and he is an 
active and valued member of Mitchell Post. 
No. 45, G. .-V. R.. of Springfield. His re- 
ligious belief is indicated by his member- 
ship in the Protestant Episcopal clnu-ch and 
further evidence of the springs of conduct 
in his life is his relationship with the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. Avhich is based upon the 
brotherhood of man and inculcates princi- 
ples of mutual helpfulness, charity and kind- 
liness. He is a Knight Templar, is also a 
member of the consistorv and has attained 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tlie tliirty-thinl degree of the Scottish 
rite. 

It is seldnni found that a man of the 
mental ken. tlie extended interests and the 
luimanitarian spirit of Asa S. Buslmell is 
not deeply interested in the political situa- 
'.ion of his countr_\-. Politics Ijecomes mure 
than a question of the riglit of franchise 
and the success (jr defeat of indi\-idual can- 
didates ; to men accustomed to control im- 
portant interests and to look upon life from 
a broad standpoint, political questions as- 
sume their national relation to other affairs 
of life as affecting the w'elfare of the country 
not only for the present but also through 
direct influence upon the future. It was but 
natural that Mr. lUishnell should become a 
factor in the piilitical field of Ohio. Strong 
in support of his convictions, fearless in his 
advocacy of any measure which he believes 
to be right no one has had reason to question 
his position concerning any vital issue. His 
capacity for business also indicated to party 
leaders what might be his power as an act- 
ive factor in promoting Republican suc- 
cesses in Ohio. While he has never hedged 
himself about with undue reserve, his de- 
meanor is always dignified and such a man 
could nut but 1)0 an honur as well as a power 
in his ]x'irt_\-. ami the ]5(ilitical career of 
(jovernur I'ushnell is such as has reflected 
credit ujKin iiis state. He became a local 
leader and his ser\ices were then sought in 
the broader field of state politics. In 1885 
he became chairn^'an of the Republican state 
executive committee and his ability to mar- 
shal and direct forces was one of the potent 
elements in securing the Rcimblican \ictory 
of that year. In i88fi he was ajipoinled 
cjuartermaster general of the state, serving 
for a term of four years. In 1887, whon the 
state convention convened, he was nomi- 



nated by acclamation as the candidate for 
lieutenant governor, but declined tlie prof- 
fered honor and in 1889 he refused to 
accede to his party's earnest request that he 
accc])t tlie nomination ff)r governor. Has 
amhiliun was nut in the line uf political 
hunurs ;uid he has e\-er been cuntent to pcr- 
furm his duties towartl city, state and na- 
tion in the honorable capacity of a private 
c.itizcn. Again in i8()i he was spoken of in 
connection with the nomination for gover- 
nor, which, however, went to Major \N'ill- 
iam McKinlex', uf whum Mr. Bushnell was 
a must ardent ailherent. In 189J he was 
sent as a delegate to the Republican national 
convention and has been a member of each 
body of this character which has met in 
recent years. Several times he refused the 
nomination for congress and his nomination 
for the governorship, in IMay. 1893. came 
without solicitation, hut the party and tlie 
public recognized his fitness for the office 
and no higher token of confidence, appre- 
ciation, trust and good will could have been 
given him by the people of the state than 
was shown in his election when, 1?\- a vote 
of ninety-two thousand six hundred and 
twenty-two, he was given a larger majority 
than was ever won 1)_\- another candidate 
fur governor in the state with the excep- 
tion of that given to John Brough, the war- 
governor of Ohio. His administration was 
like his campaign, dignified, free from petty 
])atrisanshi]) and characterized by practical 
dex'otion to the weal of the commonwealth. 
He was inaugurated on the 13th of January, 
1896, as the fortieth governor of Ohio, and 
liis course as chief executive gave general 
satisfaction not only to liis own party but 
to the state at large. He- was re-elected in 
the fall of 1897 by a good majority and en- 
tered upon his second term the following 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



23 



January, serving in all four years. The 
many times that he has refused pohtical 
lienors proves conclusively that self-aggran- 
dizement has ne\'er been the motive power 
in his political work, l)ut that a devotion to 
his country and the principles in which he 
believes has been the mainspring < if his po- 
litical activity. It would be difhcult to des- 
ignate one characteristic as the leading one 
in the life recortl of Asa S. Bushnell for 
lliere are none of the great departments of 
action bearing upon the country's progress 
and advancenient which have not received 
his endorsement, his sympathy and his sup- 
port. The city of Springfield has been es- 
pecially benefited by his labors in its behalf. 
The churches, the schools, the business in- 
terests, the social conditions, the aesthetic 
and the moral culture have all received im- 
petus from his helpfulness. No sense of 
self-laudation has promoted this but a de- 
\otion to the general good and a broad- 
minded interest in improvement in keeping 
with the world's advancement. In his so- 
cial life he is known for his kindly, genial 
nature, quick to recognize true worth and to 
give friendship and regard in appreciation 
I if character. 



HEXRY C.-VLDWTX, M. D. 

Dr. Henry Baldwin, a well kno-wn physi- 
cian O'f Springfield, represents gne of the 
pioneer fan: dies of this city, where he was 
born on the 17th uf July, i860. His pater- 
nal grandfather, Jonah Baldwin, was a. na- 
tive of Virginia and in the opening years of 
the nineteenth century took up his abode in 
Ohio, establishing his home in Springfield 
in i8o2. After a short time he returned to 
the Old Dominion and brought his family 



to Springfield in 1804, settling oai what is 
noiw the east side of Main street, east of 
Limestone street. During the pioneer de- 
velopment O'f the city he pro'\-ed a potent 
factor in establishing its policy and in its 
growth. A leader of public thought and 
action, his influaice was felt in pohtical cir- 
cles and along lines directing the intellectual 
and moral proigress of the community. AfT 
ter locating here he served a,s justice of the 
peace foT a number of years, his decisions 
being strictly fair and impartial. He mar- 
ried Miner\-a Xeedham, a daughter of Dr. 
William A. Needham, who came to Spring- 
fiield in 1814, practicing in this city and in 
Clark county. The conditions which met 
a physician at that time were very different 
to tliose of the present day. Hardships and 
trials knoiwn oarly to the people of the fron- 
tier were to' be met and continually faced 
by him who devoted his attention to the al- 
le\-iation of human suffering. Streams had 
to be forded and there were no roads biut 
bridle paths or verj' often only the old Indian 
trails. Most of the settlers were widely 
scattered, and braving the storms of winter 
and die heat of summer, the pioneer physi- 
cian made his way toi each home in which 
his services were needed, his calls often de- 
manding great personal sacrifice. For soane 
time Dr. Needham was a resident of what 
is now known as Lagoaida, but the place 
was then called Pillville because of tlie Doc- 
tor's residence there. He established the 
first drug store in Springfield and for .many 
years conducted it, but e\'entually it was sold 
to the LudlO'W family who carried on the 
business until 1896 and it was not until 
1898 that the old store building was torn 
down. It was situated (ai [Main street on 
the southwest corner (if the first alle\- east 
of Limestone street. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Henry Baldwin, Sr., the father of tlie 
Df>ctiir. is a native of Clark county, liis 
birth having occurred upon a fami in Reas- 
ant township in 1830. His boyhood days 
were spent in the usual manner of fanner 
lads of that period. On coming to 
Spring-field he entered the employ of his 
brother Joseph, who was conducting a dry 
goods store, and remained with him in the 
capacity of salesman until the death of the 
brother, after which, he continued the busi- 
ness <;n his own account until 1880, when 
lie disposed of his interests to other parties 
and has since been living in retirement. He 
married Maria Dawson, of Uniontown, 
Pennsylvania, in which place she was l)orn 
and reared. She was the daughter of John 
DaA\son and granddaughter of Nicholas 
Dawson, one of the pioneer settlers of Ken- 
tucky, who went to that state at a tim.e 
when most of the population lived in forts 
r>n account of the hostilities of the Indians. 
Nicholas Dawson married Violet Little- 
ton, of Fairfax, \^irginia. She was a niece 
of Lord Fairfax and a daughter of iLartha 
^^'ashin.gton. with wiiom she often corre- 
siKiaided, many of the letters of the wife of 
the illustrious father of his country being 
now in the possession of the Dawson family. 
Nicholas Dawson and his wife spent their 
last days in Springfield and were Imried in 
the old Columbia street cemetery. 

Dr. Henry Baldwin, both as boy and 
n-an. has been a resident of the city which 
is still his home and in the public schools 
he l;egan his education which was continued 
until his graduation on the completion of 
the high school course. He prepared for his 
profession as a student in the office of Dr. 
?-. M. Buckingham, of this city, and in the 
Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, 



where he was graduated with the class of 
1883. 

The Doctor was married in 1897 ^o Miss 
Lucretia Mathers, of Sydney, Shelby coun- 
ty, Ohio, a daughter of John ^Mathers, a 
prominent lawyer of that place, and a 
granddaughter of Judge Hugh Thompson, 
of Sydney, who was one of the distinguish- 
ed jurists of Ohio at an early day. Dr. 
Baldwin and his wife have a little daughter. 
Elizabeth Mathers. 

Fraternally the Dix'tor is a Mason, his 
membership being with Clark Lodge, No. 
101, F. & A. ^r.. of which he is past mas- 
ter; and Spring-field Chapter, No. 48, R. A. 
M. He is al«o a member of the young men's 
Literary Club of Springfield. For one term 
he was a n-ember of the school board of the 
city, has also served as city physician and 
is now a memljer of the Mitchell Thomas 
Hos])ital staff. He belongs to the Clark 
Countv Medical Society, the Ohio State 
Medical Society and the .\merican Medi- 
cal .Association, while in the first nan'ed he- 
has served as president. 



FR.XNK II. MILLS. 



Frank II. Mills, a well known factor in 
commercial and political circles of Spring- 
field, was lx>rn in Green township, Clark 
county. June 20, 1861. and is a son of Jacob 
N. and Harriet (Rupert^ Mills, both of 
whom are residents of Springfield. The fa- 
ther was a farmer by occupation for many 
years, but in 1873 came to this city and es- 
tablished a grocery store, which he con- 
ducted for a number of vears, but is now 
living retired. Mo.se< Mills, the grandfather 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



25 



of our subject, was a native of Xew Jersey 
and becan:e the founder of the fan-.ily in 
Clark county, locating upon a farm in Green 
town'ship at an early period in the develo'p- 
nient of this portion of the state. He pur- 
chased land from the g< ivernment and there- 
upon made his home until his death. His 
son Jacoib was die }-oungest of eight children 
and is the only one now living. He was 
born in 1824, and his wife was born in 1827. 
Both were educated in the early schools of 
the comity and have witnessed marked 
changes in methods since that day. In the 
early '80s Jacob ]\lills served for two years 
as a member of tlie city council of Spring- 
field but has ne\-er been a politician in the 
sense of office seeking, preferring to per- 
form his duties as a private citizen. Both 
he and his wife are consistent and faithful 
men-Jl>ers oi the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Unto them ha\-e been born three sons aiid 
four daughters, but two daughters and a 
son died of cholera in 1851. when they were 
small children. The others are : America, 
wife of Henry \\'o>lford. of Cedarville, 
Ohio; Charles, who is agent for the Oslxjrn 
Machine Company of Louisville, Kentucky ; 
Florence, the widow of' Robert C. Rensberg, 
of Springfield ; and Frank H. 

The last named pursued his education in 
the district schools until the family removed 
toi Springfield, when he became a student in 
the pujlic schools here. After putting aside 
his text bookf he secured a position in the 
carriage shops of David \\'est and followed 
that business for a time. He was afterward 
employed by Mr. Bancroft, entering his es- 
tal)lishment in May. 1882. That he is one of 
the most trusted representatives of the 
hoiuse as well as one of the most capalaie 
workmen is indicated by the fact that he has 
since been connected with the hrn\ 



In 1895 in this city 2\lr. Alills was united 
in marriage -to Cora B. Miller, daughter of 
Charles T. Miller, now deceased. Her fa- 
ther engaged in merchandising here and was 
a ;\'ery successful business man. Of Oer- 
m.an descent. ]\Irs. Alills was born in Spring- 
field and was one of five children : Amelia, 
the deceased wife of Albert Hohl, of New 
York city; Anna, the wife of Charles T. 
Wallace, of Springfield, Ohio; Clara, the 
wife of George Clark, of Cleveland, Ohio; 
George, who is a machinist of Springfield ; 
and Cora, the wife of our subject. All are 
high school graduates of Springfield. 

In his political affiliations Mr. ^tlills is 
a Republican and is recognized as a leader 
in the ranks of his party, taking an active 
interest in its growth and success. He has 
frequently been a delegate to the city and 
county conventions and has put .forth every 
effort in his power to secure Rq^ublican vic- 
tories. In 1898 he was elected to the 
city council and was re-elected in 1901, 
thus representing the second ward for four 
years. He was an active member of various 
committees and' the chairman of ser\'eral and 
he exercises his official prerogatives in sup- 
port of all progressive measures for the gen- 
eral good. At the county convention of 
}ilarch, 1902, he was nom/inated for the 
office of county recorder and elected the fol- 
lowing November. He is quite prominent 
in social and fraternal circles, belonging to 
Moncrieffe Lodge, K. P.. in which he was 
master of exchequer in 1890, and is a mem- 
ber of Division No. 6, of the uniform rank; 
the Junior Order of American Mechanics ; 
Logan Castle of the Knights of the 
(i6lden Eagle; and Ccimmercial Camp, 
M. ^^'. A. His wife holds n.embership with 
the First Presbyterian church and ]\Ir. Mills 
contributes liberallv to church and charitable 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



work. He is a self-made man for when he 
left school he started out upon his business 
career empty-handed and his advancement 
has been acquired entirely through his own 
capal)ility, his fidelity and close application. 
He has purchased some valuable property, 
and this is a monument to his enterprise and 
diiip-ence. 



GEORGE W. HUXTIXGTOX. 

George W. Huntington, a resident far- 
mer of Mad River township, was bom No^ 
xenvber 13. 1839. in Springfield, upon a 
farm owned by his father. His maternal 
grandfather was Hugh Kirkpatrick. one of 
the earliest residents of the city of Spring- 
field. He tof>k up his abode there when the 
present metropolitan city was but a village, 
and it became his home in 181 1. his house 
standing in the southwestern portion of the 
city. William Huntington, the father of 
our subject, was bom in Franklin county, 
Pennsylvania, June 15, 1800, a son of Na- 
thaniel Huntington, whose birth occurred 
either in Vermont or Connecticut. After 
arri\ing at years of maturity he married 
Martha Kirkpatrick, who was born Deceni- 
l)er9, 1808. in Flemingsburg, Kentucky, and 
was a daughter of Hugh and Rachel ( Kel- 
ley) Kirkpatrick. In June, 1835, William 
Huntington came to Ohio with his mother 
and her family. I'rom that time until his 
death he remained a resident of Clark coun- 
t>-. He passed away near Springfield on 
the 1 8th of December, 1886, having long 
survived his wife, who died on the i/th of 
May, 1862. In their family were five chil- 
dren, namely, George W., of this review; 
Ann. the wife of Arthur Forljes, by whom 
she has four children : Hugh, who married 



Hannah Pierce and has six children; Sam- 
uel, who was the twin brother of Hugh and 
died at the age of twaity months; and 
Rachel, the wife of Edwin McClintock. 

The father left his farm in Springfield 
when our subject was alx)ut fifteen years of 
age and Ix>ught another farm farther from 
the town. The family lived upon that place 
until our subject was alx)Ut twenty-five years 
of age, when the father purchased the farm 
uiwn which George W. Huntington is now 
li\ing. It reir.ained the home of William 
Huntington for three years, after which he 
removed to Springfield, where he died. 

George \\'. Huntington was reared under 
the parental roof in the usual manner of 
farmer lads of the period. His educational 
pri\-ileges were thase afforded by the coun- 
try public schools, and in the fields he worked 
from the time of early .spring planting until 
after the crojjs were harvested in the 
autumn. In 1870 he was united in marriage 
to Mrs. Anna Hill, a widow, and a daugh- 
ter of Charles and Catherine (Snyder) 
Swaney. in whose family were the following 
children : Anna, Charles, Emma, Ella and 
Rachel. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Huntington 
were Ixmi three sons : Willie, born June 
1 5. J871, died five days later. Clifford, born 
January 12, 1873, has engaged in scho;)l 
teaching and is now a student in the State 
University. For five years he was eir.ployed 
as a teacher in the high school at Fairfield. 
He was graduated in Anti<x:h College witii 
the class of 1896. at which time the degree 
of Bachelor of Science was conferred u]X)n 
him. In 1902 he was graduate<l in the 
State University with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Philosophy and he took a fellow- 
ship in econon.ics. Elmer, lx)rn February 
3, 1876, died Xoveniljer 6, 1889. 

Mr. Huntington was reared in the politi- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



cal faith of the Republican party, casting his 
first presidential vote for Lincoln in 1864, 
and no'W g-i\-es his support to the Prohibi- 
tion party. He has never been an office 
seeker, but was a candidate on the Prohibi- 
tion ticket for county slieriff. He represents 
one of the old families O'f the county and is 
well knoAvn as a worthy and representative 
citizen of this portion of Ohio. 



JOSEPH GILBERT VAX HORX. 

Joseph Gilbert \'an Horn is connected 
with industrial and agricultural interests in 
Clark county and is a representative' busi- 
ness man, wide-awake and progressive. He 
is now engaged in the manufacture and sale 
of hardwood lumber and also follows farm- 
ing, owning and operating a tract of land of 
fifty acres, one mile east of South Charles- 
ton. He was born near Harrisville, Harri- 
son county, Ohio, about twelve miles "from 
\\'heeling, August 31, 1850. and is a son of 
Edward and Eliza (Gilbert) Van Horn. 
His father was a native of Bucks county, 
Pennsylvania, was reared upon a farm and 
was about fifteen years of age when he 
came to Ohio in company with the grand- 
father of our subject, Christian Van Horn, 
who settled in Harrison county. There Ed- 
ward \'an Horn was married, and when his 
son Joseph was about four years old the 
grandfatlier and the father both removed to 
Cedarville, Ohio. After two years the latter 
remo\-ed to McDonough county. Illinois, 
where he remained until the fall O'f i860, at 
which time he ])ecame a resident of Cedar- 
ville. Ohin, and in 1862 he offered his ser- 
vices to the government, enlisting in the 
Tenth Independent Battery, Light Artillery. 
With that command he continued until hon- 



orably discharged in 1865. He participat- 
ed in the siege of Vicksburg, went with Sher- 
man to Chattanooga, thence to X'ashville 
under command of General Thomas, and af- 
ter the battle at that place was sent to Sweet 
Vater Valley, where the regiment was sta- 
tioned until after the close of hostilities. Mr. 
\^an Horn spent his remaining days in Ce- 
darville, passing away in 1895, at which 
time he was laid to rest in the Cedarville 
cemetery by the side of his wife, who passed 
away in 1892. 

Joseph G. \'an Horn of this re\-iew re- 
cei\'ed a common school education. His 
father was in limited financial circumstances, 
and he had to begin to make his own way in 
the world when but a boy. In his youth he 
worked at farm labor for ten or twel\-e dol- 
lars per month and his earnings went to the 
support of the family until after he had at- 
tained his majority. He farmed and worked 
in the timber regions, making his home in 
Cedarville. When abont twenty-five years 
of age he began to buy timber, which was 
cut for ties, and gradually he overcame the 
difficulties and obstacles in his path to suc- 
cess. Soon after his marriage he entered 
the employ of Zwick & Greenwall. and for 
four years purchased timber for them. Dur- 
ing that time he saved some money, and on 
the expiration of that period he entered into 
partnership with D. S. Er\-in. of Cedar\-ille, 
in the manufacture and sale of hardwood 
lumber. Tliis relation was maintained until 
1899, ^vhen Mr. Van Horn purchased the 
mill which he now owns. This mill has 
been located at different places, wherever 
timber could be purchased. For eight years 
it has stood about one mile east of South 
Charleston, in Madison township. 

On the 22nd of September. 1881. Mr. 
Van Horn was united in marriage to Miss 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Sarah C. Milbuni. a daugiiter of Aaron and 
Celinda ( Bozarth ) Milburn. They have a 
fine residence which was erected by Mr. Van 
Horn in 1894. and the farm comprises fifty 
acres of well developed land. In 1897 Mr. 
Van Horn entered into partnership with 
George Thorpe in handling thorough-bred 
Norman draft stallions and also fast trotting 
and pacing horses. He has seven stallions, 
all kept at South Charleston. He started 
in this business with one horse. This was 
a charitable act in order to give a poor man 
a business opportunity, but he has kept in 
the business and has foimd it a profitable 
source of income. 

In his political affiliations Mr. \'an Horn 
is a Republican and has supported the party 
since casting his first presidential vote for 
Grant in 1872. He has never been an office 
seeker, but as a citizen is pitblic-spirited and 
progressive. He attends anil supports the 
Methodist Episcopal church of South 
Charleston, of which Mrs. Van Horn is a 
member. .\t one time he held membership 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
at Xenia. but afterward transferred his mem- 
bersliip to the lodge in Cedarville. and later 
to South Cliarleston. He is a self-made 
man who started out in life a poor boy with 
no capital, but he realized that success may 
l',e gained through industry, economy and 
honesty, and these ciualities have proved the 
foundation u])nn which he has reared the 
superstructure i>f his prosperity. 



J. W.VRRKX KEIFER. 

The name of J. Warren Keifer has long 
figured in the annals of this country. It is 
found in connection with the history of juris- 
])rudence in Ohio and in connection with the 



military records of the land. It is found 
upon the records of congress, and he is the 
only resident of Ohio that has been honored 
with the speakership in the national house 
of representatives. .\n enumeration there- 
fore of the distingui.shed men of Ohio would 
be incomplete were there failure to make 
prominent reference to the subject of this 
review, whose course has reflected credit 
and honor upon the state which has honored 
him. -At the bar his comprehensive under- 
standing of the principles of jurisprudence 
and his masterly presentation of a cause 
have gained him fame as a lawyer of marked 
al)ility: on the field of battle he showed 
thorough knowledge of military tactics and 
strategy and a loyalty and ilevution to duty 
that gained him promotion, and he was 
Inevetted brigadier-general, also major-gen- 
eral by the President for gallantry on the 
field; but still other honors awaited him in 
this land where the road to public distinc- 
tion is that of public usefulness and merit. 
In the affairs of state, as taken aside from 
the extraordinary conditions of warfare, 
there are demanded men whose mental ken 
is as wide and whose generalship is as ef- 
fective as those which insure successful 
manouvering of armed forces by the skilled 
commander on the field of battle. The na- 
tion's welfare and prosperity may be said to 
hinge as heavily upon individual discrimi- 
nation and executive ability in the one case 
as in the (Jther. It re(|uires a master mind 
to luartial and organize the forces for po- 
litical pur])oses and produce the best results 
by concerted effort, and such a leader is 
fijund in General J. Warren Keifer, whose 
statesmanship and love of country, guided 
by wise judgment in securing results, made 
him a leader during his service in the halls 
of congress. 




GEN. J. WARREN KEIFER. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Well may Clark county be proud to call 
this man her son. He has never known 
another home. He was born on Mad river, 
in this county, January 30, 1836, and while 
!iis interests, public and pri\-ate, have some- 
times called him elsewhere he has always 
maintained his deep affection for this local- 
ity and its people and the tie has been 
strengthened \\\X\\ the passing years. His 
parents were Joseph and Mary (Smith) 
Keifer. The father was born at Sharps- 
l)urg-. ^Maryland. December j8, 1784, and 
the year 181 2 witnessed his arrival in Clark 
ciiunty, Ohio. He was a farmer and civil 
engineer and in this pioneer district he fol- 
lowed his dual occupation, taking an active 
part in reclaiming the wild land for the uses 
of the white man. He bore an active and 
h.elpful part in. the work of early improve- 
ment and progress here and continued a 
resident of the county until his death, which 
occurred April 13, 1850. His wife was 
born in what is now Cincinnati (Columbia), 
Ohio, January 31, T7Q9, and died at Yellow 
Springs, this state, March 23, 1879. She 
was of English lineage and about 1790 her 
ancestors removed from New Jersey to what 
was tlien the Northwest Territory-. 

The boyhood of Joseph Warren Keifer 
was not unlike that of most boys of the 
period. .\t the usual age he entered the 
public schools and later continued his stud- 
ies in .\ntioch College. In the meantime 
he had acquainted hi«iself to a considerable 
extent with American history and especially 
that of his own locality for he lived amid 
historic localities. Here were many famous 
Indian battle-fields; on a neighboring farm 
( in a Piqua Indian village) was born the 
Indian chieftain, Tecumseh. Mr. Keifer, 
as a boy, found great delight in wandering 
among these places and picking up informa- 



tion concerning their early struggles, which 
established the su]3remac_\- of the white race 
as masters of the rich district. jVs 
he advanced in years he continually broad- 
ened his knowledge by reading and investi- 
gation, and from an early age kept in view 
his purpose of one day becoming a member 
of the bar. In 1853 he taught a term of 
country school which was his first regular 
employment, aside from duties of the home 
farm. While assisting in the labors of field 
and meadow he dex'oted his leisure hours 
through three years to reading law, and in 
185^) took an advanced step in the line of 
his ambition to become a member of the bar 
h\- entering the oflice of the law firm of An- 
thony &- Goode, of Springfield, there re- 
maining as a student until his admission to 
the bar. January 12, 1858. 

For- forty-faur years General Keifer has 
been a member of the Springfield bar. His 
was the usual experience of the young law- 
yer who begins practice at a bar where are 
many older and more experienced men, 
whose reputations have already been estab- 
lished and wdiose cleintage is assured, but 
be i)iissessed persistency of purpose, laud- 
al)le ambition and strong mentality, and 
gradually he worked his way upward, prov- 
ing his power to successfully cope with the 
intricate problems of jurisprudence. Early 
in his professional career his labors were 
interrupted by military service for the coun- 
try became involved in Civil war. ' He had 
kept informed concerning the growth of 
sentiment and the progress of events in the 
south, and his love of liberty and his de- 
votion to his country increased as oppres- 
sion and rebellion were more strongly mani- 
fest below the Mason and Dixon line. The 
echo from Simiter's guns went sounding 
and resounding throughout the land and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



General Keifer was among the first to offer 
his services to the government, enlisting on 
the 19th of April, 1861. A contemporary 
hiographer lias written of his military his- 
tory as follows : "He was commissioned 
major of the Third Ohio Infantry, April 27, 
1861, for three months, and June 12, 1861, 
for three years. He took part in the battle 
of Rich Mountain J"ly 1 L 1861. the first of 
the war; the same year he participated in 
engagements in Cheat Mountain and Elk 
AX'ater, West Virginia; in Xovember his 
regiment was attached to General Buell's 
army; February 12, i8r.2, he was commis- 
sioned lieutenant-colonel of his regiment 
and was present at the capture of Bowling 
f'ireen. Kentucky;' Nashville, Tennessee; 
and Huntsville and Bridgeport, Alabama. 
Ai)ril 30, 1862, he led the first expedition 
into Georgia and performed an important 
service in the destruction of the salt-peter 
works at Xickajack cave. He returned to 
Louisville with General Buell's command; 
was made colonel of the One Hundred and 
Tenth Ohio Infantry, September 30, 1862; 
was assigned to General !Milroy"s division 
in West Virginia, and placed in command 
o! a brigade and the post at Moorefield ; was 
in the battle of Winchester, Virginia. June 
1863, where he was twice wounded; July 
9, 1863. lie was assigned to the army of the 
Potomac in the Third Army Corps in pur- 
suit of General Lee's army, and took part in 
engagements at Wapping Heights July 23, 
1863 ; in. August, 1863, he was sent with his 
command to aid in the suppression of the 
draft riots and in enforcing the draft in 
New York city and Brooklyn ; rejoined the 
army in the field in September and bore a 
pmiuinent part in the battle of Mine Run, 
Nii\ ember 2J. ^^(^^2)^ 'ind in other minor en- 



gagements; March 24, 1864, he was trans- 
ferred to the Sixth Army Corps and at the 
battle of the Wilderness, May 5, 1864, was 
wounded by a musket ball which shattered 
both bones of his left forearm, disabling him 
until August 26, when he resumed command 
of his brigade, at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
l>enig the Second Brigade, Third Division, 
Sixth Army Corps, and with his arm still 
in a sling commanded his troops in the hard- 
fought battles of Oi^equon, Fisher's Hill 
and Cedar Creek in the Shenandoah Valley ; 
at Opequon he was wounded b>- a shell, his 
horse being shot under him; at Fisher's 
Hill he, with out orders, led his brigade in 
the assault on the fortified left flank of the 
enemy and captured many prisoners and 
guns : at Cedar Creek he commanded the 
Third Division, .Sixth Army Corps, and 
for his distinguished gallantry and the en- 
ergy and discretion there evinced was 
brevetted by President Lincoln a brigadier- 
genera! and by him assigned to duty with 
that rank. In December. 1864. with ..his 
corps he rejoined the army of the Potomac 
in front of Petersburg and was actively en- 
gaged on the left of the fortified line ; March 
25, 1865, he led a successful assault upon 
the enemy's outer line of works and was 
complimented in general orders; April 2, he 
charged v.ith his division in the final assault 
which carried the main works and resulted 
in the capture of Petersburg and Richmond ; 
April 5, his command aided in, cutting off 
the retreat of Lee's army and forced it to 
give battle on the 6th at Sailor's Creek ; the 
wnigs of the army (General Keifer com- 
manding the left) being forced forward 
( notwithstanding the fact that the eneiuy 
had broken the center line), surrounded and 
effected the capture oi above six thousand 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of the enemy, including Generals Ewell. 
Kershaw, Custis Lee, Barton, Corse, Hnnton 
and other officers of high rank. 

One of the incidents of the war, thrill- 
ing and full of adventure and showing the 
true spirit of military heroism and presence 
of mind, is worthy of representation here. 
Immediately succeeding the surrender of 
the six thousand Confederates, and while as- 
sisting in the re-formation of the troops, in- 
formation reached General Keifer that a 
hody of the enemy was concealed in a wood 
on his right. He rode in person into the 
woods to reconnoiter and came suddenly 
n.pon the Confederate troops lying on the 
ground, evidently ignorant of the surrender 
which had just taken place. The density of 
the wood, approaching night and the smoke 
of the battle saved the General from instant 
identification as a I'nion officer. To attempt 
to withdraw was instant death, and sur- 
render never entered his mind. Seeing that 
the troops were awaiting and expecting a 
command he rode forward and wheeling his 
horse shouted, "Forward!" and led the 
enemy as his own troops, waving his sword 
toward the recent scene of battle. The 
command was instantly obeyed and the 
faster he rode the faster the enen:y foJloiwed 
after, until the edge of the wood and the 
better light led to the discovery of his iden- 
tit}-, when he was the mark for many mus- 
kets, and would have been shot but for the 
command of the Confederate officers, who 
pre\"ented their men from delivering their 
fire. General Keifer escaped to his own 
troops and leading them in a charge upon 
the enemy secured the surrender of the en- 
tire brigade of Confederates, which was 
composed of marines little used to land ser- 
vice, commanded by Commodore J. R. 
Tucker and Captain John D. Semmes. 



Tucker and Semmes both claimed to have 
saved General Keifer's life by preventing 
their troops from firing upon him and as an 
act of gratitude he used his influence to ob- 
tain the parole from Johnson's Island of 
these ofillcers, who, having deserted from the 
United States Navy, were not entitled, un- 
der then existing orders, to that clemency. 

"General Keifer joined in the pursuit 
and capture of General Lee's army, and was 
brevetted major-general 'for gallant and 
distinguished serxice during the campaign 
ending in the surrender of the insurgent 
commander. General R. E. Lee." His corps 
was sent south to aid in the capture of Gen- 
eral Joe Johnston's army in North Carolina, 
and learning at Danville of the contemplated 
surrender, he, with a piirtion of his stafif, 
pushed across the country fifty miles to wit- 
ness it. He was thus present at the capitula- 
tion of both General Lee's and Johnston's 
armies. 

"A career beginning in April. 1861, and 
closing June ly, 1865, when he retired from 
the army to resume the practice of law at 
Springfield, briefly outlined, has l.nit few 
parallels ; without military education or ex- 
])erience, without influence or wealth, merit 
and distinguishd ability earned the highest 
rank in the service. For over four years he 
was, except when disabled from wounds, in 
active service in the field and at the front. 
His purpose in entering the army — the 
preser\-ation of the L'nion — was accom- 
plished, his life works in arts of peace was 
before him and upon it he entered with the 
same energ\' and enthusiasm that hatl made 
his military career so glorious. His return 
to civil life was followed by success at the 
bar, where he soon acquired an extensive 
practice. In 1866, he was tendered a com- 
mission as lieutenant-colonel of the Twentv- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



sixlln I'nited States Infantry upon the un- 
solicited recommendations of Generals 
Grant and Meade, but declined it." 

.\ftcr the cl<ise of the war General 
Keifer resumed the practice of law and the 
duties of civil life. Before the outbreak of 
hostilities he had established a home of his 
'■wn and on the 22i\ of March, i860, had 
married Miss Eliza Stout, of Springfield. 
They became the parents of three sons: 
J. Warren, Jr.. who is engaged in farming 
in Nebraska; William W. and Horace C., 
who are associated with their father in the 
practice of law in Springfield; also one 
daughter, Margaret E., now deceased. 

The practice of his profession has been 
the real life work of Mr. Keifer, who from 
the time of his return from the army has 
steadily maintained a foremost jxjsition in 
the ranks of the legal fraternity in this part 
of Ohio. His fidelity to his client's inter- 
ests is proverbial, yet he never forgets that 
he owes a higher allegiance to the majesty 
of the law. His diligence and energy in the 
preparation of his cases, as well as the earn- 
estness, tenacity and courage with which he 
defends the right as he understands it, chal- 
lenges the admiration of his associates, yet 
he has never sought forensic triumph when 
it had to be gained by lowering his standard 
of manhood or degrading the dignity of his 
profession. He has a ready command of 
English and is an orator, whose ability has 
maile him sought outside the strict path of 
his profession. He has addressed many 
public gatherings on momentous questions 
and notable (jccasions and his eloquence is 
not the least of his many gifts. On the oc- 
casion of a state reunion of the sailors and 
soldiers of Ohio, held at Xewark, July 22. 
1878, the anniversary of the death of Gen- 
eral Mcfhersdu, General W. S. Sherman. 



President Hayes and cabinet. General Gar- 
field and other distinguished men being pres- 
ent, he deli\ered an address entitled "Ohio's 
Contribution, Sacrifice and Service in the 
War." He has ever been actively interested 
in the cause of the soldiers since his partici- 
pation in the war and has served as a mem- 
ber of the Department of Ohio of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. A\'hile filling that 
ofiice in 1868 he organized the board of con- 
trol for the establishment of the Soldiers and 
Sailors' Orphans' Home, at Xenia, of which 
the state assumed control in 1870, making 
General Keifer one of its trustees, in which 
capacity he served from April 15, 1870, un- 
til March 5, 1878. From 1873 he has been 
a trustee of Antioch College and in the same 
year he was made the president of the La- 
gonda National Bank of Springfield, in 
which capacity he has served almost contin- 
uously since. 

Perhaps, however, the work which has 
drawn the attention of the country to Gen- 
eral Keifer more than anything else which 
he has ever done is that which he performed 
while a member of congress. Not long after 
the close of the Civil war he became an im- 
portant factor in Ohio politics and from 
1868 until 1870 was a member of the state 
senate, where he served on several import- 
ant committees, including the judiciary and 
municipal corporation committees. He was 
an active working member of the senate and 
was the author of a number of laws, some of 
which found their way upon the statutes of 
other states. He introduced an amendment 
to the replevin law providing special safe- 
guards for heirlooms and other property not 
possessing general marketable value. In 
1 876 he was made a delegate to the Repub- 
lican national convention, and the same year 
was elected to consrress. where he served 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



3 5 



continuously from March 4, 1877. ""'i' 
March 4. 1885. On the 5th of December, 
1881. he was chosen speaker of the house, 
(Forty-seventh Congress) and fihed that 
position until the 4th of March. 1883. It 
\\as an honor well deserved and his course 
sliowed that he well merited the confidence 
reposed in him by the party leaders, many 
I if whom were among the most distinguished 
men of the nation. He is not only the first 
and only Ohio man ever chosen to the 
speakership but he also enjoys the distinc- 
tion of being the first speaker to enforce the 
rule of closure, his ruling having been 
adopted in the house giving to the speaker 
the right to cut off obstructive or dilatory 
motions. He displayed marked knowledge 
of parliamentary proceeding and his rulings 
were always, just and impartial, winning 
liim the commendation of even the opposi- 
tion. Xo parliamentary decision of his was 
overruled by the house. He was the first 
to ad\'ance in the direction of doing away 
with an old order of things wh.ich allowed 
the minority to prevent the action of the 
house on pending measures by dilatory mo- 
tions or by refusing to vote to prevent a 
(juorum. He ruled such motions out of 
order, and favored the counting of a quor- 
um ( the late Speaker Reed then not agree- 
ing with him) when a sttfficient number 
were present for this purpose. He labored 
untiringly for the welfare of the nation 
without a thought as to policy where the 
right or the country's good was involved. 
He is a statesman who has studied long and 
deeply the c[uestions concerning national 
]:)rogress and improvement and who places 
the coup.try's weal before personal aggran- 
dizement or party power. He is, however, 
an earnest supporter of Republican principles 



and since his retirement from nftice has 
labored earnestly and effectively to promote 
the cause of Republicanism, delivering many 
addresses on the leading political cjuestions 
throughout Ohio and other states of the 
Union. Hiis life of public activity and use- 
fulness has extended over a long period, be- 
ginning with, his service on the battle-fields 
of the south, and no man of national fame 
has been more fearless in conduct, faultless 
in honor or stainless in reputation than Jo- 
seph Warren Keifer. 

When the war with Spain was declared 
in April, 1898. General Keifer. then sixty- 
two years of age and actively engaged in 
ihe practice of law in Springfield. Ohio, was 
appointed by President [McKinley and un- 
animously confirmed by the senate, a majijr- 
general of volunteers, this being the highest 
rank then known in the United States Army. 
He was the only man from civil life in the 
northern states appointed to that rank, in 
that war, though he had not had a military 
education ; his military record in the Civil 
war earned him this distinguished recogni- 
tion. He served in command of troops 
(Seventh Army Corps) principally from 
Texas, Alabama, Louisiana and South Caro- 
lina, at Miami and Jacksonville, Florida : 
also at Savannah, Georgia, from which place 
he embarked about sijcteen thousand men 
for Culja, principally to the vicinity of Hav- 
ana. iMan}' who served under him and were 
on his staff \vere sons of ex-Confederates, 
and not a few of the officers had served in 
the Confederate Arm}-. General John B. 
Gordon's son, Hugh H., and General J. E. 
B. Stuart's son, J. E. B. Stuart, served on 
his staff. He established his own "head- 
quarters at Buena Vista, just r.utside of 
Havana. He commanded the United States 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



military forces which entered and took pos- 
session of that ancient capital cit\', January 
I. 1899. 

The war beino; over and the occupancy 
of Cuba by the United States Volunteers 
ended, he was mustered out of military ser- 
vice in May, 1899. when he again returned 
to the practice of law in Springfield, which 
he has since continued, taking much inter- 
est in political campaigns, state and national. 
He has also given much attention to litera- 
ture and writing. Tlis political history of 
".Slnver\- and Four Years of War," though 
principally written in 1895-6, was com- 
pleted, by adding some account of the Span- 
ish War, and published by the Putnam's 
(Xew ^^^ork). in 1900. He was the first 
commander-in-chief of the Spanish War 
Veterans, now a large and fli.urishing or- 
ganization. 



JOHN S. ELLIOTT. 

Insurance interests of Springfield have 
ad\anced to enormous proportions in the past 
fifteen years, and at the present time consti- 
tute one of the leading departments of busi- 
ness activity. Special enterprise and ability 
always tell in business, and this is particu- 
larly so in tlie line of fire insurance. Com- 
petition is particularly keen and the wide- 
awake and alert underwriter is the one who 
obtains the largest share of public patronage. 
Prominent among the insurance men of 
Spring-field and of Clark county, and a nota- 
ble representative of this line of business, is 
John S. Elliott, who since 1877 has insured 
a large number of buildings against loss 
through fire. He also is an agent for all 
lines of insurance and has met with credita- 
ble success in his chosen field of labor. 



Mr. Elliott was born near the village of 
Sudlersville, in Queen Anne county, Mary- 
land, December 9, 1854, a son of John 
S. and Martha A. (Sudler) Elliott, both 
of whom were torn in Maryland of old fam- 
ilies and were educated in the early schools 
there. The father followed the occupation 
of farming and died in his native county. 
Unto him and his wife were born seven chil- 
dren, of whom one daughter died at the age 
of twenty-one years, while tlie others are al! 
li\ing. Two sons are engaged in the 
insurance Inisiness in rhiladel]jhia, while the 
other members of the family are representa- 
tives of farming interests in the east. 

John S. Elliott of this review pursued a 
comm.on school education in his native coun- 
ty, and when a young man accepted a clerk- 
ship in a dry goods store there. In the year 
187,1 he came to Ohio, 1< eating in G^eene 
county, where he was employed as a farm 
hand for a year by ^f. V. Morris. In 1874 
he entered the A. D. Wilt Miami Business 
College at Dayton, Ohio, where he pursued 
a complete c^nmercial course. He then 
came to Springfield and for .one year was 
engaged in clerking for J. \\'. Murphy, after 
which he became an insurance solicitor for 
D. R. Hosterman. In 1876 he removed to 
Xenia, where he opened a local office, and 
in 1877 he returned to Springfield and fol- 
lowed the insurance business for a time. l-i 
1885 he purchased an agency and has since 
met with very creditable success in his un- 
dertakings. He is the president and general 
manager of the general fire insurance agency 
of the J. S. Elliott Con'.pany, which is incor- 
porated under the laws of Ohio for twenty- 
five thousand dollars, and is district agent for 
the Mutual Life Insui-ance Company of Xew 
York. He represents all large fire insurance 
companies and does a strictlv union business. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



3? 



representin.t;' fire, life and accident insurance 
companies. He has devoted liis entire time 
and energy tO' the building up of his present 
extensive business and has the best individ- 
ual agency in the state of Ohio. Since 1884 
he has been located in the Mitchell building. 

On the 6th of September, 1877, in Day- 
ton. Ohio, Mr. Elliott wedded Mary W. 
Boyer, who was born in that state and was 
a daughter of O. P. Boyer, of Dayton. She 
died December 20, 1884, leaving two chil- 
dren : Lida B., the wife of Charles C. Lim- 
backer, of this city ; and John Oliver, who 
\\as born in August, 1882, and is now in 
his father's office. Both are graduates of 
the public schools of Springfield. In Janu- 
ary, 1886, Mr. Elliott was again married, 
his second union being with Nora E. Wood, 
a native of Springfield, and a daughter of 
Samuel R. and Margaret Wood. Her fa- 
ther was a farmer in early life and afterward 
became a n:achinist. He is now deceased, 
but his widow is yet living. Three children 
have been born oif the second marriage of 
our subject : Margaret, born in December, 
1887; Benjamin P., in March, 1891 : and 
Allen G., on the 4th of December, 1897. 

Mr. Elliott was president of the board of 
public affairs of Springfield for three years, 
and by reappointment he served for another 
term of four years, being the Democratic ad- 
visory member. He has been a delegate to 
the city, county and state conventions of the 
Democratic party, and although he has 
ne\-er sought office some have been conferred 
upon him. He belongs to Anthony Lodge, 
Xo. 455. P. & A. M. ; Springfield Chapter, 
R. A. M. : Springfield Co-uncil, No. 17, R. 
it S. M. ; Palestine Commandery, No. 33, 
K. T. : Rose Croix Lodge, No. 18, of the 
Scottish rite o.f Dayton ; and the Consistory 
of Cincinnati. He is also a memlier of Anti- 



O'ch Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He holds 
membership relations with Red Star Lodge, 
K. P. ; the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks: Springfield Lodge, No. 2,2,- I- O. O. 
F. ; and Mad River Encampinent, No. 16, 
Knights of Khorassan ; and the United Com- 
mercial Travelers' Association. He is also 
a charter member of the Lagonda Club, and 
was one of the original directors. He is a 
charter member of the Commercial Club, and 
also of the board of trade. He belongs to 
the State Underwriters' Association of Ohio, 
and his wife is a member o^f the Second Pres- 
byterian church. Mr. Elliott is deeply in- 
terested in every act that tends to develop 
the city and to promote its progress. He 
was appointed iDy Mayor Goodwin as one of 
the original trustees of the MitchellThomas 
hospital, and remained upon the board until 
it came under the control of the board of 
public affairs, by act of the legislature. In 
connection with O'. S. Kelly he raised the 
money to pay ofif the indebtedness of the 
hospital. Patriotic and public-spirited, he 
has labored along safe lines for the substan- 
tial upbuilding of Springfield, and is known 
here for his genuine worth in public affairs 
as well as for his enterprise and honesty in 
business. 



ADDISON J. BECKLEY. 

.\(ldison J. Beckley is a wholesale and 
retail dealer in coal and ice in Springfield. 
He now occupies a -prominent and honor- 
able position in commercial circles here and 
to this he has advanced through earnest, 
persistent effort. He was born in Danville, 
Indiana, July 7, 1857, his parents being 
James S. and Elizabeth f Christie) Beckley. 
The father was a nati\e of Virginia and the 



38 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



mother of Kentucky. On leaving the soutli 
they located in the vicinity of Danville, In- 
diana, where they spent the greater part of 
their remaining days, and both died in In- 
dianapjlis. 

Addison J. Bcckley. whose name forms 
the caption of this article, spent his boyhood 
days in the state of his nativity and pursued 
a literary education in Danville, Indiana, 
completing a high school course, afrer which 
he entered upon a commercial course in In- 
dianapolis. Thus well fitted to enter busi- 
ness life he took up the study of telegraphy 
in his native state and whai he had ac- 
f[uircd a knowledge of the art he accepted 
a position as operator in the Union Station 
of Indianapolis. Soon afterward he ac- 
cepted a position with the Indiana, Bloom- 
ington & Western Railroad at the general 
oftices, continuing there until Octolier, 
1882, when he came to Springfield and ac- 
cepted the position of storekeeper and 
timekeeper for the Ohio Southern Rail- 
way, acting in that capacity until 1887, with 
lieadquarters in this city. He next became 
freight agent for the Indiana, Bloomington 
& \Vestern Railroad and for the Ohio South- 
ern Railroad, as joint agent, and was re- 
tained in that position until 1895, when he 
resigned to engage in an independent busi- 
ness venture. He began dealing in coal and 
ice, entering into partnership with Warren 
D. Myers, under the firm name of Beckley & 
M\-ers. Their business prospered from the 
beginning, and soon they became, extensive 
dealers in these commodities. They now 
have a very large trade, emplo\-ing from 
twenty-five to thirty men. and about an 
equal number of wagons are used in the con- 
duct of their business. Their trade is both 
wholesale and retail, with ofiice on Lime- 
stone street and large yards on the corner 



of Mechanic and Washington streets, hav- 
ing connection at each place with the Big 
Four Railroad. 

In'1887 Mr. Beckley was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Clara Huben, a native of 
Springfield, and a daughter of Henry and 
Louise (Rohrer) Huben, who were old cit- 
izens of this place and highly respected by 
all. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Beckley has been 
born one son, Henry A. 

In his political affiliations the subject of 
this review is a Democrat and in 1901 was 
appointed by Mayor ^lilligan a member of 
the advisory board of public afifairs to fill 
the vacancy caused by the resignation of 
J. S. Elliott' and on the expiration of the 
term was re-appointed for a term of two 
years, and during that time took a very ac- 
tive interest in the improvement of the city. 
]Mr. Beckley is also a director of the Mer- 
chants & Mechanics Building & Loan As- 
sociation, with which he has been thus iden- 
tified since its organization in 1892. Prom- 
inent in the ranks of the Masonic fraternity, 
he holds membership in Anthony Lodge. 
Xo. 455, F. & A. M.; Springfield Chapter. 
Xo. 48. R. A.':\I.: Springfield Council. Xo. 
17, R. & S. M.; and Palestine Conmanderv. 
Xo y^, K. T. 



DA\TD STEWART. 

More than two-thirds of a century ag", 
on the farm where he now lives. David Stew- 
art first opened his eyes to the light of day. 
his birth occurring August 20, 1833, in 
Green township. He is a son of James and 
Jane ( Elder) Stewart. His father was born 
and reared in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, 
and was there married, after which he came 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



39 



with his wife to Ohio, hving for a time in 
Hamilton county, whence he removed to the 
farm upon wiiich our subject now Hves, in 
1814. Here he became the owner of seven 
hundred acres of land. He was a very in- 
dustrious man. and through his untiring la- 
bor and careful cnntrol of his business af- 
fairs he accumulated a comfortable com- 
petence, which supplied him with all the com- 
forts of life during his later years. He lived 
to the advanced age of seventy-six years, 
passing away in April, 1857. In the family 
were ten children, all of whom reached ma- 
ture }-ears, with one exception, while six are 
still living. Elijah died in this county. Ann 
Ingram became the wife of James Cowan, 
l>y whom she had one son. James, who is 
now living in Green township. Her second 
husband was David Torrence. by whom she 
had two children who are yet living. Her 
third husband was Samuel Barnett. with 
whom she is now living in Xenia. James 
F. is a resident of Yellow Springs. ]\Iary 
P. is the wife of David ]\Iillen. of Xenia. 
Eliza became the wife of Harvey Jobe and 
is now deceased. John E. is a resident of 
• Xebraska. Susannah died in early woman- 
hood. David is the next of the family. 
Sarah Adeline became the wife of .Willian 
Bancroft, by whom she had one child, Stew- 
art Bancroft. She afterward married \M11- 
iam C. Ci'others, and there were no children 
b\- the second union. Her third husband is 
J. \\'. jNIarshall. and the\- are miw li\-ing in 
Xenia. 

David Stewart, whose name introduces 
this record, grew to manhood upon the old 
home farm. He attended school when it 
was not necessary to assist in farm work, 
but his educational privileges were some- 
wliat limited, as his services were so often in 
demand in field and meadow. After his 



father's death he continued to live with his 
mother and care for her. The former passed 
away in 1857. and the latter in 1863. In 
the meantime I\Ir. Stewart was married, on 
the iith of January, 1859. in Green town- 
ship, to Aliss Laura ^^IcKeehan. who was 
born near Fredericktown. [Maryland. Five 
children have been born of this union : Car- 
rie E., who is acting as her father's house- 
keeper ; Estella, who became the wife of John 
Brough Rife and lives in Greene county with 
their two children, ]\lerrill and Cecil : Anna 
]May is the widow of Carg-ill ^lorton, and 
they have one child, Grace. James ]\Ic- 
Keehan is a resident of Xenia. David Ed- 
win, the youngest, is engaged in dealing in 
horses. 

Mr. Stewart of this review inherited one 
hundred and thirty acres of land, to which 
he has added until his possessions now aggre- 
gate two hundred and ten acres. He has 
remodeled and improved the buildings upon 
his place, and his farm is now .attractive in 
apjiearance and well equipped with modern 
accessories. In i86_|. he proved liis loyalty 
to the I'nion by enlisting in the Xational 
Guard, with which he was^ealled out for one 
hundred days' service. He was in \\"est 
Virginia, doing guard duty during that peri- 
od. In politics he is a Republican, and for 
seven consecutive terms he served as town- 
ship trustee, }et he has never been a poli- 
tician in the sense of office seeking. Reared 
in the faith of the United Brethren church, 
he afterward became a member of the Pres- 
byterian churcli of Clifton, with which he 
now holds membership, and in which he has 
long lieen a trustee. In 1873 he was called 
upon to mourn the loss of his \\ife. a most 
estimable lady, who died in that year. Since 
that time his daughter has acted as his house- 
keeper. Mr. Stewart is well known in the 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



county of his nativity, havings a wide ac- 
quaintance, among whom he numhers many 
•stanch and earnest friends. 



AMAZIAIJ WINGER. 

Faithfulness to duty and strict adher- 
ence to a fixed ]nn"pose in life will do more 
to advance a man's interests tlian wealth or 
advantageous circumstances. The success- 
ful men of the day are they who have 
planned their own advancement and have ac- 
complished it in spite of many obstacles and 
with a certainty that could have been at- 
tained only through their own efforts. This 
class of men has a worthy representative in 
Amaziah Winger, who began life amid un- 
favorable circumstances and has steadily 
worked his way ujiward until he occupies an 
enviable position in industrial circles, being 
superintendent and one of the stockholders . 
of the Superior Drill Company. 

Mr. AN'inger was born in Lancaster 
cotnity, Pennsylvania. September 13, 1835, 
upon a farm, and is a rejjresentative of one 
of the old families of the Keystone state, 
coming of Holland Dutch and Swiss an- 
cestry. I'he representatives of the name 
are \-ei"y numerous in Pennsyhania. The 
parents, Jacob and Catherine (Trout) Win- 
ger, were both natives of Pennsylvania, the 
former born in 1810 and the latter in 1809. 
They rema'ncd in the state of their nativity 
until 1837, when they came to Springfield, 
Ohio, and here the father engaged in car- 
pentering and building for many years, be- 
ing well known in building circles. He pos- 
sessed natural mechanical ability and was 
an expert workman, llis death riccurred in 



1886. and his wife pased away in 1890. 
They were the parents of ten children. 
six of whom are yet living, while three of 
the number died in early childhood. Heze- 
kiah was a soldier in the Civil war for four 
years, going to the front with Mason's 
Zouaves, of the Second Ohio Regiment, 
but died in Springfield in 1865. The others 
are — Amaziah; Mrs. Catherhie Ramsay, of 
Cheboygan. Michigan ; Mrs. John A. Sites, 
who is a widow living in Denver, Colorado; 
George W.. who is bookkeeper of the First 
Xational Bank of Springfield; John M., 
who is connected with the Sui>erior Drill 
Company; and Mary, the wife of Theodore 
Troupe, a druggist. George was also a 
soldier of the Civil war. having gone to the 
front with' the One Hundred and I'ifty- 
second Ohio Regiment. With the exception 
of our subject all were brirn in Sjjringfield 
and the educational privileges which they 
enjoyed were those afforded by the public 
schools here. 

.Amaziah \\'inger. like the others, at- 
tended the public school of this city, and 
entering uiion his business career he became 
an em))lo}-e in a lumber yard. In 1858 he 
embarked in the same line nf business for 
himself, as a member of the firm of Simp- 
s' m. Yarnell & Company, lumber manufac- 
turers and jobbers, located at the corner of 
A\'ashington and Limestone streets. In 
i8''ij Mr. Winger sold his business interests 
and enlisted in the Lhiion army as a member 
of Comi)any A, Ninety-fourth Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry. He saw service at the battles 
(if Perryville, Stone Ri\er, Chickamauga, 
the Atlanta campaign, and participated in 
the siege of the city, was with Sherman on 
the march to the sea, then took part in the 
Carolina campaign and was afterwaril in the 




^^./c«-j(^£ y^^fkf-^ 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



43 



grand review at Washington. He was 
ne\-er wounded or incapacitated for duty in 
an_\- way, and was always found at his post 
of duty as a faithful defender of the stars 
and stripes. He received an honorable dis- 
charge on the 5th of June, 1865, and with a 
most creditable military record returned to 
his home. 

Mr. \A'inger then purchased an interest 
in a lumber business, becoming a member of 
the firm of Hayward & Winger. In Jan- 
uary. 1885, he became interested in the Su- 
perior Drill Company, accepting a position 
as superintendent and has since devoted his 
entire attention to fostering the growth of 
his business, which' has assumed good pro- 
portions and now yields a desirable profit to 
its stockholders. ^Ir. Winger is a man of 
resourceful business ability, and has been 
an active factor in the successful control of 
other enterprises. He was a director of the 
Lagonda Bank._ was one of the organizers 
and one of the first directors of the Mer- 
chants & Mechanics Loan Association, and 
is a director of the Springfield Savings 
Bank. He is also a member of the board of 
trade and has served on a number of import- 
ant committees. 

In this city, in 1867, ^Ir. Winger was 
united in 'marriage to INIiss Mary Crothers, 
wh<i died in 1872. leaving two daughters, 
Frances and Laura, the former a graduate 
of a college in Yonkers, Pennsylvania, and 
the latter of a college in Hollidaysburg, 
Pennsylvania. Li 1S76 Air. Winger was 
again married, his second union being with 
I\Irs. I\Iar_\^B. Tcrbert. the widow of James 
Torbert. She was born in Lebanon, Ohio, 
and is a daughter of James Barr, of that 
place, who removed from Lelianon to 
Springfield and was afterward connected 
with manufacturing interests in Cincinnati, 



insurance business for a time. 

Mr. Winger served as a member of the 
city council for one year and in politics has 
always been a Republican. He belongs to 
Mitchell Post, No. 45, G. A. R., and is also 
a member of the commandery of the Loyal 
Legion, of Ohio. He holds membership in 
Clark Lodge, No. loi, F. & A. M. : Spring- 
field Chapter. R. A. M. ; Springfield Coun- 
cil, R. & S. M'. ; and Palestine Commandery, 
K. T. Both he and his wife belong to the 
Presbyterian church, taking a very active 
part in its work and upbuilding. For a 
number of years he was one of the church 
trustees and is now serving as deacon. He 
is a liberal contributor to charitable work 
and to the Young Mien's Christian AsscKia- 
tion, being particularly interested in the 
latter organization. He has also been a 
generous friend to the Clark Memorial 
Home and his wife is serving- as a member 
of its board of managers and also of the 
board of managers of the Children's Home. 
While he has led a very busy and useful life 
he has realized that the character of a man 
is shown by the use which he makes of his 
financial success and he has freely given of 
his means to various worthy objects, because 
of his deep interest therein. His record as 
a soldier and as a citizen, as a gentleman 
and a man of honor is one worthy of high 
commendation and of emulation. 



CHRISTIAN A. SCHUSTER. 

Since 1874 Christian A. Schuster has 
been closely and actively identified with in- 
dustrial circles in Springfield and his influ- 
ence in public affairs has also been potent. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



At the present time he is serving as a mem- 
ber of the city council, while his business 
relation is that of a member of the firm of 
Peet & Schuster, jjartners in a galvanized 
iron and roofing business of this city. 

Our subject was born in Erie county. 
New York, near Buffalo, on the 8th of 
February, 1848. opening his eyes there to 
the light of day upon his father's farm. He 
is a son of Christian and Elizabeth (Hauck) 
Schuster, both of whom were natives of 
Alsace, Loraine. Germany. The former was 
eighteen years of age when he crossed the 
Atlantic to the new world, while his wife, 
wlio still survives him, is now living near 
Bufi'aln. at llie age of eighty-seven years. 
They were married in this country, located 
upon a farm and amid the surroundings of 
rural life reared their family of seven chil- 
dren, of whom two are now deceased. De- 
wald was killed in the army during the 
Ci\ il war when going with Sherman from 
Atlanta to the sea, and Jacob died in Flori- 
da at the age of twenty-six years. The sur- 
viving members of the family are Magda- 
lena. the wife of Jacob, Janes, who resides 
near Buft'alo; Elizalieth, the wife of George 
B. Walter, who is living in Florida; George 
H., a resident of Goshen, Indiana; Chris- 
tian A. ; and Caroline, the wife of Josiah 
Young, who makes his home in Green 
Springs, Ohio. In the common sch(X)ls of 
Erie county. Xew York, the children were 
educated and were reared upon the home 
farm. The father had firm faith in Repuli- 
lican principles and gave his support to the 
men and measures of the party and ser\ed 
in a few local miner offies. He located in 
Erie county, Xew York, when he could ob- 
tain government land there, which fact is 
an indication that he was one of the first 
settlers. 



Tike the others of the family. Christian 
A. Schuster was educated in the conmion 
schools and remained upon the home farm 
until he was sixteen years of age, when he 
was apprenticed to learn the trade of tin 
and sheet metal worker, in Buffalo. In 
1 866 he came to Ohio, locating first at Fre- 
mont and afterward in Toledo. Subse- 
quently he removed to Goshen, Indiana, fix- 
ing also in Elkhart, and in 1869-70 was in 
Chicago, leaving the latter city in the spring 
of 187 J. He then came to Springfield and 
made a permanent location here, embarking 
in business on his own account in 1874. as 
a partner of T. B. Peet, under the firm name 
of T. B. Peet & Co. That association was 
maintained until the death of the senior 
partner and then the present company was 
incorporated under the firm name of the 
Peet & Schuster Company, of which Mr. 
Schuster has been president and general 
manager since its organization. They d< < 
ail kinds of sheet metal work and roofing, 
and manufacture all classes of products 
needed in their business, including sheei 
metal, tin, slate, tile, iron and composition 
roofings. Their contract work extends over 
a territory embracing both Ohio and Indi- 
ana and they ship their products to variou'^ 
parts of the country. They began business 
on a small scale but the trade has gradually 
grown larger until it has assumed large and 
profitable proportions. Mr. Schitster has 
gi\en his entire attention to the development 
of the business, which, since 1873, has been 
carried on at Xo. jS'i South Fountain ave- 
nue. 

In 1876 Mr. Scluister was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary Kershner, who was 
born in Springfield in 1856 and died in 
1887. " Of the other children, one died in 
infancv and the <nhers are: Rosamond G.. 



i 



'^HE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Bertlia E. and Robert C. The first two are 
graduates of tlie high school. In 1890, in 
this city, l\Ir. Schuster was again married, 
his second union being with JuHa Miller, 
who was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, 
in 1864, and died in 1901. They had two 
children: Mary B. and Ruth I\I. 

.\ believer in Republican principles Mr. 
Schuster always supports the men and 
measures of the party by his ballot and upon 
its ticket he was elected to the city coun- 
cil in 1897, aixl has twice been re-elected, 
so that he has ciintinuously served in that 
office. He has been a member of various 
important positions and has put forth earn- 
est and effective efforts for the welfare and 
progress of the community. In 190 1 he 
^er\■ed as president of the city council and 
in the same year was a member of the li- 
brary board of the city. He is a member of 
the Commercial Club ; belongs to Anthony 
Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Springfield Chapter, R. 
A. M. ; Springfield Council, R. & S. M.; 
Palestine Commandery, K. T. : the Scot- 
ish Rite bodies of Dayton, and the Con- 
sistory of Cincinnati. He was one of the 
organizers and charter members of the 
Champion City Guards, of Springfield, and 
is a consistent meml^er of the High street 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



REESE GARRETT CALVERT. 

Reese Garrett Calvert well deserves rep- 
resentation in this volume, because he is one 
of the persistent, most energetic and wide- 
awake merchants of Selma, where he is also 
filling the position of postmaster. He is now 
engaged in dealing in grain, coal, lumber and 



seeds and in this line has built up a business 
whose groiwth has resulted from his earnest 
purpose and honorable dealing. A native 
of Pennsylvania, Mr. Calvert was born in 
Delaware county January .21, 1857, and is a 
.son of Thomas L. and Elizabeth (Paist) 
Cah-ert. He is also a descendant of Cecil 
Calvert — Lord Baltimore — who was the 
founder of the colony of Mainland. 

Hie spent his early boyhood days upon 
a farm and when he was about ten years 
of age he acconpanied his parents on their 
removal to Philadelphia, where he contin- 
ued until he came to Ohio, as a youth of 
eleven years. He made his home with his 
uncle, Joshua Harrison, until 1876. He 
had attended both the public and select 
schools in Pennsylvania, and thus acquired 
a good practical English education. At the 
age of nineteen he began clerking in a gen- 
eral store, owned by the firm of HoUings- 
worth & Company, of Selma, and remained 
in their employ for four years, a fact which 
indicates that he gave excellent satisfaction 
by capable service. He afterward removed 
to West Liberty, Io\\'a, where he engagd in 
clerking until 1883. In that year he returned 
to Clark county and, entering into partner- 
sliip, bought out a store of his former em- 
ployer, the new firm being organized under 
the name of Ca]\-ert, Brother & Company. 
Our, subject and his brother remained in this 
business until 1892, when Reese G. Calvert 
jiurchased his brother's interest. In 1892 
they established a private bank, which was 
conducted until 1894. In the latter year 
the firm divided its interest, ^Ir. \\'ildman 
continuing as proprietor of the mercantile 
department, while our subject took as his 
interest of the business, a grain, coal, lum- 
ber and seed department, and in this line 
of commercial activitv he has since conduct- 



46 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ed a growing trade, yielding to him a good 
income. In tlie year 1883 he was ap- 
pointed postmaster and served in that capac- 
ity until 1892, when he retired from the 
office as he had entered it — with the confi- 
dence and good will of all concerned. In 
1898 he was reappointed to that office and 
has since been the incumbent. In the same 
year he had become ticket and freight agent 
in Selnia for the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Compajiy. 

Mr. Calvert was married at Riclunond. 
Indiana, on the 28th of July, 1885, to iliss 
Ethel Kirk, of that city. She was born in 
the village of Eagletown, Hamilton county, 
Indiana, November 4, i860, and is a daugh- 
ter of Charles W. and Rachel (Hollings- 
worth) Kirk, who on leaving her native 
place removed to Darlington, Indiana, where 
the father entered upon the active practice 
of medicine, continuing there until Mrs. Cal- 
vert was about fourteen years of age. His 
health then ga\e way under his strenuous 
professional duties and he removed to Ko- 
komo, Indiana, where he and his brother en- 
gaged in the practice of dentistry. In 1878 
Dr. Kirk was appointed superintendent of 
an Indian boarding school on the Wyandot, 
Seneca and Shawnee reservation and Mts. 
Calvert began teaching there when she w^as 
eighteen years of age. After two years, 
however, she returned to Indiana and en- 
tered Earlham College at Richmond, being 
there graduated in the class of 1885. In 
1884 her father gave up the superintend- 
ency of the Indian school and returned to 
Richmond for a year's rest. Mrs. Calvert 
frequently visited at her uncle's home in 
Ohio and here had become acquainted with 
the subject of this review as early as 1876. 
About a month after her graduation she 



gave him her hand in marriage. The same 
year her parents returned to the Indian Ter- 
ritory in the interest of the Society of 
Friends and Dr. Kirk retained his former 
position until his death, passing away while 
engaged in active missionary work there. 
He died September 9. 1893, in Shaw- 
neetown, Oklahoma, and was laid to rest 
in the midst of the field where he had 
lalx>red so earnestly and accqjtably. His 
wife still carries on the missionary work 
among the Kickapoo Indians. Dr. Kirk 
was lx)rn in Richmond. Indiana, April 
7, 1836, and was a son of Israel and 
Sarah (Test) Kirk, the former a native of 
Pennsylvania, and the latter of Xew Jer- 
sey. The grandfather of Mrs. Calvert died 
when her father was about fi\e years of age. 
He had been a miller and his mill was de- 
stroyed by fire a short time before his death, 
so that the family was left in somewhat 
straitened financial circumstances, but 
Dr. Kirk managed to obtain a good educa- 
tion through his own efforts and was thus 
qualified for the teacher's profession, which 
lie followed in different schools in early life. 
After his marriage he continued "teaching 
for about two years, when he took up the 
study of medicine and was graduated in the 
Miami Medical College with the class of 
1867. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Calvert have been 
born three children: Cecil Kirk, who was 
born in Selma, Ohio, August 3, 1886; Ed- 
ward Harrison, born January 21, 1889: and 
Rachel Grace, born Xovember 2, 1890. The 
Calvert family is one of prominence in the 
community, widely known, and amid a large 
acquaintance our subject and his wife num- 
ber many warm friends, who hoKl them in 
high rcijard. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



47 



ROBERT ELDER. 

The business interests of Selma find in 
Roliert Elder a worthy representative. He 
is engaged in deahng in general merchan- 
dise and agricuhural implements, carr^-ing 
a. well selected stock, whereby he secures 
from the pubHc a liberal patronage, which 
he justly merits because his business meth- 
ods are honorable and he earnestly desires 
to please his patrons. He was born upon a 
farm in Green township, Clark county, Jan- 
uary 1 6, 1872, and is a son of Robert N. 
and Julia A. (Stewart) Elder. The home 
farm remained his playground in youth and 
was also the training school for his busi- 
ness career, as he learned there habits of 
industry, enterprise and perseverance. His 
literary education was acquired in the coun- 
try schools of the neighborhood and at the 
age of twenty-three years he entered upon 
his mercantile career as a salesman in a 
store. After two years he purchased a half 
interest in the store and in 1899 became sole 
proprietor and is now conducting an exten- 
sive business, which is constantly increas- 
ing owing to his well conducted business af- 
fairs, his keen foresight and executive abil- 
ity. 

On the 14th of September, 1898, ;\Ir. 
Elder was united in marriage in Selma to 
jMiss Rachel Wildman, a daughter of Will- 
iam and Eliza (Harrison) \\'ildman, who 
are residents of Aladison township. They 
ha\-e two children, Robert Xewell, born Sep- 
tember 8, 1899; and Lois, born December 
14, 1900. Mr. Elder is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, but his wife 
was reared in the faith of the Society of 
Friends. He votes with the Republican par- 
ty, takes an active interest in its w^ork and 
has been a delegate to various conventions. 



He is now a memlaer of the central com- 
mittee for the Selma precinct of Madison 
township. As a citizen he is interested and 
active in the welfare of town and county, has 
serA-ed on school board, as election officer 
and cashier of Ohio State Fair, and his 
worth is widely acknowledged because of 
what he has done in behalf of the gen- 
eral good. 



THOMAS E. MATTIXSON. 

Thomas E. Mattinson, who is engaged 
in general farming and stock raising in 
Madison township, was born in this town- 
ship on the 23d of October, 1849, ^"d h's 
continuous residence here is an indication 
that Clark county offers good business op- 
portunities to its native sons. His parents 
were Matthew and Margaret (Evans) Mat- 
tinson, who removed to the farm upon which 
our subject now resides when he was about 
eight years of age. Here he was reared to 
manhood. He has turned the furrows upon 
man}^ a held and the svm has shone down 
and ripened the grain which he planted un- 
til the golden sheaves were harvested and 
the grain became a marketable commodity. 
The common schools afiforded Mr. Mattin- 
son his education. He was the third in a 
family of six children and bore his part in 
the work of the farm, and also enjoyed 
his share of the advantages provided in the 
home circle. He continued under the paren- 
tal roof until 1881. 

It was on the ist of December, of that 
^•ear, that Mr. ^Mattinson was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Emma Clemans, of Madison 
township. Clark count}', where she was born, 
her parents being William and Catherine 
(Schickendantz) Clemans. There is one 



48 



^HE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



cliild oi this marriage. Edwin, who was 
born April 25, 1887. The wife and mother 
(Hed A])ril 19. 190c. and was laid to rest in 
Green Lawn cemetery in South Charleston. 
Mr. Mattinson belongs to the Presby- 
terian church of South Charleston and in his 
political views is a Republican, having con- 
tinually supported the party since he cast 
his first presidential vote for Grant m 1872. 
He ha.s never been an office seeker, prefer- 
ring to give his whole time and attention to 
his business affairs. He inherited two hun- 
dred acres from his father, and his farm is 
now a valuable tract with substantial build- 
ings and modern improvements and in its 
neat and thrifty appearance it indicates the 
careful supervision of a wide-awake and 
enterprising owner. 



T. S. HARSHMAX. 



During his residence in Clark county the 
subject of this biography has gained distinc- 
tive recognition as one of the leading finan- 
ciers and business men not only of Spring- 
field, but of this ixjrtion of the state, having 
shown a marked capacity for the conduct 
of affairs of great breadth. One of his sa- 
lient characteristics is his ability to recog- 
nize favorable opportunities and to utilize 
these for ends of business advancement. He 
is prominently known in connection with, 
electric railway construction and in this way 
has iiDt only added to his own wealth, but 
has i)roven a benefactor to the community, 
for business advancement depends perhaps 
more largely uptm rapid tranportation than 
any other agency f)Utside of the direct line of 
trade. He is today the president of the 
Pavtoi. Spviii-ricl:! \- I'rl.ana F.lectric Rail- 



way Company and has been connected with 
the prosperous conduct of a number of oth- 
er electric lines. Honored and respected 
l.y all. there is 'no man who occupies a 
n^ore honorable position in financial, com- 
n-jercial and industrial circles than does J. 
S. Harshman, not alone on account of the 
great success he has achieved, but also on 
account of his honorable, straightforward 
business policy which he has ever followed. 

Mr. Harshman is one of Ohio's native 
sons, his birth having occurred in the vil- 
lage which tears the family name, in Mont- 
gomery county, January 26, 1863. He is 
a son of George \\'. and Anna V. (Rohor) 
Harshman, both of whom were natives of 
Ohio, the father representing an old Man- 
land faniily that was established in the new 
world by ancestors who came from Germany 
and took up their alxxle in Maryland. Later 
representati\-es of the name sought a home 
in Ohio and became pioneer residents of 
Montgomery county. In early life the fa- 
ther of oair subject was engaged in manu- 
facturing and later turned his attention to 
merchandising. He was largely interested 
in real estate, owning a number of good 
farms in Montgomery and other counties. 
As the years passed he acquired wealth and 
in addition to his landed possessions he won 
an honorable name because of his just and 
straightforward dealings. He died in the 
village of Harshman in i8<)8, respected and 
honored by all who knew him. His career 
excited the adniration of those with whom 
he was associated and at the same time 
gaine<^l for him the confide:ice and good will 
of all. 

I. S. Harshman. will ise name introduce- 
this record, pursued !iis preliminary edu- 
cation in the sch<X)ls of his native village and 
subsa|uently became a student in a select 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



sch(X)I. On putting aside liis text books he se- 
cured employlnait under R. D. Hughes, of 
the American Express Conpany at Dayton. 
Ohio, but at the end cf one year resigmed 
Iiis poisition, 'being called home to take 
charge of his father's extensive (business, 
which included the supervisioin of large 
tracts of farming lands as well as the control 
of the linseed oil mill and other milling 
business and of grain supplies. Mr. Harsh- 
man assumed the duty of looking after the 
g-rinding, buying and selling of mill pro- 
ducts and at the same time he was extensive- 
ly engaged in buying and shipping grain. 
He continued in active charge of the busi- 
ness until 1886, when he entered intoi part- 
nership with his brother, Samuel R., under 
the firm name of S. R. Harshman & 
Brother. This relation was maintained for 
four years, at the end of \vhich time the 
sul>ject of this review sold his interest to his 
brciihers and ren:o'ved to Clark county, lo- 
cating in Enon. 

Since that time Mr. Harshman has been 
a factor in trade relations and in the busi- 
ness development o^f his portion of Ohio. 
He became a grain n:erchant of Enon, build- 
ing there an elevator which was afterward 
destroyed liy fire and wdiich he rebuilt in 
1900. In 1893 his attention was attracted 
to the work O'f constructing electric rail- 
way s. He belieA-ed that there was a bright 
ftitrre for that enterprise and was instru- 
mental in securing the right of way for 
the Dayton. Springfield & Urbana Electric 
Railroad. He became the vice president of 
the company and later president and is still 
serving in that capacity. He is also' inter- 
ested in the Columbus, London & Spring- 
field Electric Railway, is president oif the 
company ar.d from its organizatioar has been 
at its head. He is also interested in the 



Springfield & Western Electric Railway 
Company, of which he is the president; is 
president of the Urbana, Bellefontaine & 
Northern Railway Company, and the 
Columbus, Delaware & Marion Electric 
Railway Company. It will thus be seen that 
Mr. Harshman has been a most active factor 
in the establishment and control of electric 
railway lines. This interurban transporta- 
tion has been a marked step in advancement 
along transportation lines and is indicative 
of the progressive spirit which so character- 
izes America. The efforts of Mr. Harsh- 
man have indeed been fruitful and have like- 
wise proven of great benefit to the com- 
munities intOi which his electric railways 
have been extended. The business interest 
that recei\-es his co-operation gained its 
fortune because of his wise council, keen 
discernment and sound judgment. He is 
now the vice president of the Citizens Na- 
tional Bank of Springfield; is the president 
of the Victor Rubber Tire iComipany; is 
interested in the Kyle Art Glass Company 
of Springfield, and was one of its organizers. 
He was also vice president oif the Harshman 
Shoe Manufacturing Company, of Harsh- 
man, Ohio, until the sale oif the factory to a 
Wisconsin concern. What Mr. Harshman 
has accomplished in the world of commerce 
cannot adequately be told in words. It is cer- 
tainly not asserting too much to say oi one 
who can direct and control a business of 
such magnitude, that he must iiossess, aside 
from mercantile foresight and sagacity, the 
happy faculty of reading and judging men, 
unusual powers O'f organization and execu- 
tive ability, in a word, that his must be a 
master mind. And yet, if o-ne shall seek 
in Mr. Harshman's career the causes that 
ha\e led to his success, they will be found 
along the lines of well tried and old time 



52 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



maxims. Honesty and fair dealing, prompt- 
ness, truthfulness, fidelity — all these are 
strictly adhered to. Faithfulness on the 
part of employes is promoted h}- the knowl- 
edge that good service means advancement 
as opportunity opens and that neglect of 
duty will not he tolerated, and is further 
■enhanced bj^ the interest taken by the em- 
ployer in the personal welfare of the deserv- 
ing. 

In 1887 Mr. Harshman was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary Snyder, of Snyder- 
ville, Ohio, a daughter of the late Henry 
Snyder, of Springfield. . Her uncle was one 
of the most highly honored and respected 
citizens of this place and proved a public 
benefactor to the city, making a donation of 
two hundred and sixty acres of land for 
park ])urposes, which is now known as 
Snyder's Park. He married Anna Hertz- 
ler. a daughter of Daniel Hertzler. 
wlio some years ago was n-urdered at his 
home. The marriage of our subject and his 
wife has been blessed with three children : 
Anna S., ("leorge W. and V'irginia V. Mr. 
Harshman votes with the Republican party 
but has never sought or desired office. He 
is not only recognized as a most enterpris- 
ing citizen hut is broad and liberal in his 
views and well versed on all n:atters of 
general interest. His beautiful home stands 
just outside the corporation limits of Spring- 
field and is adorned with all the accessories 
which wealth can secure and refined tastes 
suggest. 



FI^ANK BALDWIN. 

Frank Baldwin, who is filling the posi- 
tion of justice of the peace for Moorefield 
township, is a public officer in whom his fel- 



low townsmen have every reason to place 
their trust and confidence for his loyalty and 
fidelity to duty and his promptness in the 
execution of public obligations have been 
n any times demonstrated. He is a native 
of the township in which he still lives, his 
birtli having occurred September 3. 1841 
just across the Big Four Railroad from hi.- 
present farm on the old family homestead 
which is now occupied by his brother. Will- 
iam Baldwin. His parents were Samuel 
Vance and Catherine (Van Meter) Baldwin. 
The father was a native of Gerrardstown, 
Berkeley county, \\'est Virginia, and was 
about nineteai years of age when he came t' > 
Ohio with his father, Joseph Baldwin, who 
settled in ibxjrefield township. Clark coun- 
ty, then a part of Champaign county. Here 
the grandfather spent his remaining days 
and became the owner of a large tract of 
land. He had owned a tannery in \'irginia 
but traded it for property in this state, and 
in addition to three hundred acres which he 
purchased, he inherited considerable Ian.', 
which came to him from his eldest son. Will- 
iam Baldwin, who had secured a fortune in 
Xew York which he had invested in the 
Ohio real estate and as he died umnarried, 
;it the age of forty-eight years, his proi)erty 
therefore reverted to the family. Samuel 
\'. Baldwin, the father of our subject, spent 
his Ixnhixxl days on the old family home- 
stead, assisting in the arduous task of de- 
\ eloping a new farm. His early education 
acquired in the common schools was sup- 
plemented by study in Oxford. Ohio, and 
when his literary course was con^pleted he 
tcx>k up the study of the law and was ad- 
mitted to the 'l)ar. He had also studied to 
some extent in Indianapolis, but c<impleted 
his course in Urbana. Ohio. Throughout 
his remaining days he was engaged in the 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



53 



practice of law except during the period 
when he served as prohate judge. He was 
called to that office at the time it was cre- 
ated and acted in that capacity until his 
death, co*vering a period of twelve or luur- 
teen years. This fact indicates in an un- 
mistakable manner his fidelity to the duties 
of the profession and his fairness in ren- 
dering decisions. In Union township, Cham- 
paign county, he wedded Catherine Van Me- 
ter and they became the parents of seven 
childrai : William, who is now residing in 
Moorefield township, married Emily Reed, 
and has four children. He, too-, prepared 
lOir the bar and engaged in the practice of 
law for a number of years, but is now liv- 
ing retired on the old home place. Josq>h 
H., who married Lyda Skillman, by whom 
he has one child, is living retired in Spring- 
field. Caroline is the wife of ']. W. An- 
der.son, a druggist of Urbana. John Iv., 
whoi joined th6 service in the Civil war as 
a private of Company G, Sixty-sixth Ohio 
\'()lunteer Infantry, was promoted to the 
rank of sergeant and died of pneumonia in 
a hospital at Washington. He had wedded 
Mary M. McCo'rkle and left one son. Frank 
is the next of the family. Jennie died in 
1863, at the age of seventeen years; and 
Mary, who- con-.pletes the family, has also 
passed away. 

Frank Baldwin spent his boyhood days 
in Urbana, his people having removed to 
that cit_\' when he was only about a year 
old. At the usual age he entered the pub- 
lic schools there and was graduated in the 
high school. The question of slavery and 
the attitude of the south regarding it was 
one largely discussed in the family and the 
s])irit of patriotism was dominant. On the 
twentieth anniversan- of his birth Frank 
Baldwin offered his services to the go\er.i- 



ment, joining the boys in blue of Company 
G, Sixty-sixth Ohio Infantry, was promoted 
to the rank of first lieutenant of Company 
1, of the same regiment, and was acting 
quartermaster of the regiment at the close 
of the war. In the meantime he had veter- 
anized and remained with his command un- 
til the cessation of hostilities. He had par- 
ticipated in the engagement of Port Repub- 
lic, in the battles of the Shenandoah valley, 
(ti Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and 
went with .Sherman when the Union troops 
marched with that gallant leader from' At- 
lanta to the sea coast. He never missed an 
engagement in which his regiment partici- 
pated and was in many of the hardest fought 
battles O'f the war, including the last one, at 
Bentonville, North Carolina. He afterward 
took part in the grand re\-iew in Washing- 
ton, a military pageant yhich has been un- 
equaled in the western hemisphere. On 
several occasions he was struck by spent 
balls, and he sustained a slight wound at 
Peach Tree Creek, but was never disabled 
nor left his command. Man\- times he nar- 
rowly escaped death, his clothing being 
pierced by rebel bullets. Twice he was in 
the hospital at Washington, the first time 
about a week, after which he came home for 
a short \isit. He could not obtain a fur- 
lough, but his colonel took him down town 
and told him to g"o home and stay until he 
had recovered his health, and that he would 
lake care of his record. 

In 1S67 Mr. Baldwin went to Macoupin 
county, Illinois, where he remained for sev- 
eral years engaged in herding cattle. Re- 
turning to Springfield, he was married in 
that city in 1872,10 Miss J. S. Nagley, a na- 
tive daughter of this county, her parents be- 
ing Henry B. and Mary J. (Wright) Nag- 
ley. After their marriage the young cou- 



54 



THE BIUGRAPHICAL RUCUKD. 



pie .S]>ent two years in Indiana, and in 1872 
returned to Clark comity, wliere they have 
since made their hon e. Tlieir marriage 
has 'l)een blessed witli six children : Laura 
C, the wife of J. \V. Anderson, of Spring- 
field, hy whom she has two sons; Helen, 
at home: Mary Janette, who is teaching 
school ; Ruth, who is a graduate of the Ur- 
bana iiigh schofjl ; Frances L., a student in 
Urbana; and Pauline. 

In 1864 ^Mr. Baldwin cast his first presi- 
dential vote for Abraham Lincoln and has 
ever beai an earnest Republican. In 1876 
he was elected justice of the peace and has 
served in that office altogether for about 
eighteen years. During this time he has 
tried many cases and his rulings have never 
been reversed. He has also comproir.ised 
many cases, for he always advises such a 
course rathei' than bring the differences 
into court. W'iiliout tear or favor he has 
discharged the duties of his office and that 
he has the entire counfidence of the public 
is indicated by his long continuance in that 
position. Tliroughout his business career 
he has carried on farming and stock raising 
and is today the owner of a valuable prop- 
erty in M(X)refield township. 



FR \.\K FRTFl 



Frank Erter. who carries on general 
farming in Moorefield township, was torn 
within its borders October 3. 1856, his par- 
ents l)eing John and Xancy (Grube) Erter. 
The father was probably a native of Mary- 
land, and in early life cajre to Ohio with his 
parents who located on Urbana pike, in 
Clark county, where the grandfather rented 
land for a time. I^ter he removed to Logan 
county, where he purchased a farm and there 



resided until his life's labors were ended in 
death. John Erter was probablv married 
before his jxrople remoxed to Logan county. 
He, too, made farming his life work and 1>e- 
came the owner of alxiut three hundred and 
eighty acres of rich land, in the cultivation 
of which he manifested marked industry and 
enterprise so that he won a ver\- gratifying 
competence. In his political views he was 
a Republican and served as a trustee of 
iMoorefield township. His death occurred 
in 1876, while his wife, who was lx)rn in 
1818, still survives him and now resides 
with her daughter, Mrs. John Hare, on the 
Urbana pike, in Champain county. 

Frank Erter, who was the sixth of their 
fair.ily of seven children, spent his lx)yhood 
days upon the home farm and attained a 
common-school education. He assisted his 
father not only in the work of the fields, out 
also in paying otf the indebtedness upon the 
place, and when he had attained his majority 
he took charge of the home farm which he 
operated for a number of years. On the 
J St of May, 1890. in the hone of the bride 
at Xo. 981 Lagonda avenue, in Springfield, 
he married Miss Laura J. Cowan, who was 
born near Pitchin, in Springfield township. 
Clark county. Xovember 7. 1858, a daughter 
of Hugh and Marjorie (Elder) Cowan. 
Her father passed away in February,' 1898, 
I,ut her mother survives and is still living 
<in Lagonda avenue. The home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Erter has been blessed with two sons, 
Harry J., who was born on Lagonda avenue 
in Springfield, April 10, 1892, and Stanley, 
w hose birth occurred on the home farm. July 
20, 1897. 

Mr. Erter innxhascd his present farm 
in 1892 with money which he had 
himself earned, and now has one hun- 
dred and four acres of rich land. Tlie- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



55 



house is one of the old landmarks of this 
portion of the county, but is in a good state 
of preservation. His fields are well tilled 
and he annually harvests good crops which 
result from the care and labor he bestows 
upon his place. Keeping well informed on 
the political issues of the day. as every true 
An.erican citizen should do, he votes with 
the Republican party which he has supported 
since casting his first presidential vote for 
Garfield in i88o. He has never been an 
office seeker, hoiwever, preferring to give his 
entire time and attention to his business af- 
fairs in which he is meeting with creditable 
and gratifying success. 

It will be interesting in this connection to 
note something of the family history of Mrs. 
Erter. Her father, Hugh Cowan, was born 
on the Selma pike, three and one-half miles 
south of the county seat in Springfield town- 
"ship, March 27, 1824, his parents being 
Da\id and Jane ( Steele) Coiwan. David 
Cowan was a native of Pennsylvania and 
during his boyhood removed with his par- 
ents to Kentucky, where he was reared and 
married, coining thence to Oliio. He took 
up his abode on the farm where his son Hugh 
was born in Green township, eight miles 
as the David Cowan farm. There Hugh 
Cowan was reared and in the district schools 
of the neighborhood attained a fair educa- 
tion. He married Miss Marjorie Elder, who 
was born in Green township, eight miles 
south of Springfield, April 17, 1834, a 
daughter of Robert and Nancy (Elder) 
Elder. Her father was bom in Dauphin 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1803, and was a son 
of R(»bert and Ann Elder. Mrs. Erter's 
maternal grandmother was Nancy Elder and 
her family name in maidenhood was the 
same, she being a distant relative of her hus- 
band. She was also born in Pennsvlvania. 



but it is not definitely known whether in 
Dauphin or in Indiana county. After the 
marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Cowan they made 
their home on the old home farm, living 
there up to the time of the death of Mr. 
Co'wan with the exception of one year which 
they spent in Cass county, Missouri. Not 
liking that locality, however, they returned 
to Ohio and Mr. Cowan passed away on the 
26th of January, 1898. In the family of 
this worthy couple were seven children of 
whom Mrs. Erter is the eldest; David S., 
a farmer of Springfield township, who was 
born June 7, 1861, and married Minnie 
Haley; Agnes, who died at the age of nine- 
teen years; Mary, wife of Bert Sellers, a 
resident of Dayton; Elder, who married 
Katie Prindle, of Ashtabula, Ohio, where 
they are living with their one child, Jane ; 
Harriet B., born January 27, 1872; and 
Grace A., who died at the age of twentv-two 
years. 

Mr. Cowan was a Republican, believing 
firmly in the principles of the party. At the 
time nf the Ci\'il w'ar he became a member 
of tlie state militia, joining the "Squirrel 
Hunters." and went out on the raid against 
General Morgan. He held membership in 
the United Pre.sbyterian church and his was 
an upright, honoirable life in which his fidel- 
ity to the duties of citizenship and to home 
relations and family ties gained him the 
warm regard and respect of those with 
whom he was associated. 



WILLIAM BALDWIN. 

William Baldwin, a retired attorney and 
an honored veteran of the Civil war, now liv- 
ing on the old family homestead in Moore- 



56 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



field township, was born in Urbana, Janu- 
ary II, 1834, his father, Samuel Vance Bald- 
win, owning both the home farm and the 
adjoining property. The family is one of 
long connection with Clark county, for the 
grandfather located here about 1809. He 
took an active part in the work of pioneer 
development, sharing- in tlie arduous task 
of transforming the wild lantl intO' good 
farms, and the work he began has been 
carried <in bv his descendants, the family 
ever 1>eing kmown as a valued and repre- 
sentative one of this portion of the state. 
Samuel Vance Baldwin was an attorney and 
practiced successfully for many years. Be- 
side his home in Urbana he owned the 
farm upon which William Baldwin now re- 
sides. He had here live hundred and twenty 
acres of land and in connection with its 
cultivation he like\vise operated a mill here. 
He also had one thousand acres in Cham- 
paign county, so that his landed possessions 
aggregated almost sixteen hundred acres. 
The mill had been erected before the prop- 
erty came into his possession. Samuel V. 
Baldwin became prominent in public afifairs 
antl was a progressive citizen, co-operating 
heartily in every movement and measure 
whii'h he believed would contribute to the 
general good. He married Catherine Van 
Meter and in their family were eight chil- 
dren, of whom the subject of this review is 
the eldest. 

Upon the home farm and in the city 
home in Ur'bana ^\'illiam Baldwin spent the 
days (if his boyhood and youth. He ac- 
(piired his education in the Urbana schools 
and afterward took up the study of law 
under the direction of Judge Ichabod Cor- 
win, of that city. Later he pursued a course 
of lectures in the Cincinnati Law School, 
was graduated in 1H58 and then liegan prac- 



tice at Urljana, remaining a member of the 
bar at that place imtil 1861, when in re- 
sponse to President Lincoln's first call for 
Union soldiei"s to serve for three months he 
offered his aid to the government and be- 
came the captain of the first company or- 
ganized in Urbana. With his command he 
left that city the day following the one upon 
which Fort Sumter was fired upon. His 
con:mand became Company K, of the Sec- 
ond Ohio Infantry, and was in the first bat- 
tle of Bull Run, but as Captain Baldwin Ind 
been detailed for special service he did not 
]>articipate in that engagement. In August, 
his term of service having expired, he re- 
turned home, but almost immediately he re- 
cnlisted and was comnnssioned second lieu- 
tenant of Company D, Twenty-sixth Ohio 
Infantry. Later he was promoted to first 
lieutenant and afterward became captain of 
Company G, retaining that rank until bre- 
veted major. He was in the service al- 
together for alx)Ut six years, doing garrison 
duty after the close of the war. His last 
service was in command of old Fort SuMi- 
v;m, at the month of die St. Croix. At Mis- 
sionary Ridge he was wounded in the side 
of the head and temporarily disabled while 
making a charge, but later he led his men 
over the breastworks. At the f(x)t of Kene- 
saw Mountain he was shot in the lower left 
thigh, on the 25th of June. 1864, the day 
after General Polk was killed. Major Bald- 
win was then sent to the general hospital 
at Cincinnati, his injury disabling him for 
eight nionths, but as soon as ix>ssible he 
rejoined his regiment at Huntsville, Ala- 
l>ama, this being near the close of the war. 
A short time before the cessation of hos- 
tilities he claimed his discharge, which was 
granted him, but later he was appointed first 
lieutenant of Company C, c)f the Third Regi- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



nient \'eteran Reserve Corps, witli which 
he remained until tlie close of his military 
ser\ices. He had indeed been a loyal de- 
fender of the Union cause and through al- 
most six 3ears he woire the blue uniform 
of the nation, faithfully upholding its banner 
where\-er duty called him. 

Soon after his return home Major Bald- 
w in was married to IMiss Emily Reed, a 
daughter of Joel and Leah (W'eldin) Reed. 
Unto them have been born four children : 
William, who- is now cashier for the Ameri- 
can Express Company, in Columbus, mar- 
ried Susan Cline, of Osborne, Ohio^, and 
has a little son, William Robert. Blanche 
is the wife of James W. Roberts, of Aloore- 
held township, and they have a daughter, 
Blanclie. Leah is the wife oi A. G. Dey, 
manager for the Rogers Iron Company, at 
Spring-field, Oliio. Reed, nineteen years of 
age, is at home. 

At the time of his marriage Major Bald- 
win owned a farm in Champaign county, 
which he afterward sold, removing to Wich- 
ita, Kansas. He built the first house in 
the town, although he was not the first set- 
tler there. Fromi the government he pur- 
chased land and made his home in Wichita 
for seven years. The city grew rapidly and 
he becan:e a prominent and influential fac- 
tor in public affairs. While there he was 
elected citv attorney fi\-e times and he pre- 
pared the charter under which the city was 
organized. He was also elected and served 
as probate judge of Sedgwick county, and 
was elected to represent his district in the 
state legislature and would have been re- 
elected had he not moved to Washington. 
He was alsoi commissioned colonel of the 
Kansas National Militia on Governor Os- 
born's staff. While residing at Wichita he 
received an appointment to a goxernn ent po- 



sition at Washington and resided in • the 
capital city for five years, after which he 
returned to Clark county, where he has since 
lived. He is now retired from the practice 
of the law, his attention being given to the 
supen-ision of his farnning interests in 
Moorefield township. In politics he has al- 
ways been a stalwart Republican where 
n:aiters O'f national imjiortance are involved, 
but at local elections he votes independently. 
His first ballot was cast for General John 
C. Fremont. He became a member of B. 
B. French Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., in 
Washington, and by special dispensation re- 
ceived the IMaster Mason degree within 
three days. 



THOMAS EDWARD HARWOOD. 

Thomas E. Harwood is the president and 
business manager of the T. E. Harwood 
Printing & Publishing Company of Spring- 
field. It is nO' uncomn'.on thing in this coun- 
try to meet men who have worked their 
way upward from humble beginnings to po^ 
sitions O'f affluence. Mr. Harwood, from 
tlie humble capacity of journeyman printer, 
has advanced until he stands at the head of 
the Han\-ood Printing & Publishing Com- 
pany and in this position is controlling an 
extensive and important business, including 
the publication of the Gazette, which is the 
oldest existing journal Oif Clark county, es- 
tablished in 1872. There is also a well 
equipped job printing- and binding establish- 
ment and each department of the business 
has become a paying one. 

Thomas E. Harwood was born in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, May 26, 1846, and is a son of 
Francis Lee and Mary (Coffman) Har- 
wood. The father, a native of Warwick 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



county, Virginia, was a cousin of General 
Robert E. Lee, and during his youth re- 
moved to Newark, Ohio, while subsequent- 
ly he became a resident of Cincinnati, where 
he was engaged in contracting and building. 
-Later in life, howe\'er, he retumed to New- 
ark, where he died in 1862, his wife surviv- 
ing him, aged ninety years. Both were de- 
voted members of the Baptist church, and in 
his political views Mr. Harwood, Sr., was a 
Democrat. 

At the age of twelve years Thomas 
Edward Harwood was apprenticed to learn 
the printer's trade in the office of the 
Advocate, at Newark, then owned by 
Hun. W. 1). ^Morgan, at one time sec- 
retary of state of Ohio. He completed 
his full term of service and subse- 
quently worked as a journeyman in New- 
ark, Columbus, Cincinnati, Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, and then came to Springfield in 1865. 
Here he secured a similar situation and was 
emjilojed in wnrious offices in that capacity 
until he w as made city editor of the Weekly 
Gazelle, and in 1S73 he purchased the pa- 
per, which was conducted solely as a weekly 
journal for three j-ears, when he also began 
the publication of the Daily Gazette. He 
continued alone in business until he admit- 
ted his son, Frank C, in partnership under 
the firm, name of T. E. Harwood & Son, 
and in 1898 the business was incorporated 
as the T. E. HarwiMxl Printing & Publish- 
ing Company, of which our subject is the 
president. Both, the daily and- weekly Ga- 
zette ra,nk an.ong the leading papers of 
southwestern Ohio, and from 1872 the Ga- 
zette has l>een continuously published, mak- 
ing it the oldest existing paper of the county. 
It is a Reiniblican sheet devoted to the wel- 
fare and interests of the party, and is like- 
wise fouiul as the advocate of everv treasure 



and m.ovement calculated to prove of prac- 
tical benefit to the city along lines of pro- 
gress, reforni and improvement. Not only 
are the meml>ers of the coiupany actively en- 
gaged in the publication of this journal but 
are also devoting their time with success to 
the control of a job printing business and a 
bindery establishment, in both of which they 
have secured a liberal patronage, and these 
interests, combined with the publication of 
the Gazette, returns to the firm an excellent 
income from their investment. 

Mr. Harwood was united in marriage to 
Miss Anna M. Hartstone, a daughter of 
Frederick Hartstone, of Springfield, and the 
marriage, which was celebrated on the 19th 
of October, 1868, has been blessed with ten 
children, eight of whom are still living. 
Frank C, the eldest, is managing editor of 
the Gazette and vice-president of the T. E. 
Harwood Printing & Publishing Company. 
Fred H., who is one of die directors of the 
company, was quartermaster sergeant of the 
Tenth Ohio Regiment during the Spanish- 
American war, and also sergeant-major of 
the Thirty-first Regiment, doing two years' 
senice in the Philippines, and is now* chief 
clerk in the department of works in Manila. 
Lee Edward is sen-ing as city editor of the 
Gazette; Charles A., who until recently 
was a clerk in the office of the Warder, 
Bushnell & Glessner Company, is now in tlie 
office of the International Har\-ester Com- 
pany at Evansville, Indiana. Ralph C. and 
Kenneth S. are students in business colleges. 
Jessie Manton is now the wife of Jolui L. 
Bushnell, of Springfield. Nannie L. ctnn- 
pletes the family. Mr. and Mrs. Harwcxxl 
and their children are memljers of the High 
street Methodist Episcojial church and with 
Ibis denomination he has been identified for 
a number of vears. He has erected for his 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



59 



family a comfortaible home on South Foun- 
tain a\-enue, where, with his wife and young- 
er childi'en, he is now living. In his politi- 
cal views he is now a stalwart Rqiublican, 
but early in life was idaitified with the 
Democratic party. He is looked upon as 
a \'alued and helpful supporter oif his party 
and frequently is called as a delegate to the 
state and other conventions. His time since 
entering the Gazette office has been devoted 
to the upbuilding of the paper and in this 
regard his labors have met with some suc- 
cess, for the Gazette is not only the oldest 
existing journal of Clark county, but is rec- 
ognized as one of the leading newspaper 
publications of Spring-field and southwestern 
Ohio. 



THOMAS FLETCHER McGREW. 

Among' the pioneer families of the co^m- 
ty whose early history runs into other coun- 
ties of the state, is the McGrew family. The 
head of this family in Clark coimty is Thom- 
as Fletcher McGrew, who was born in Steu- 
ben ville, Jefferson county, Ohio, April 15, 
1 81 7. Mr. McGrew is the youngest of a 
family of ten children, his father, John Mc- 
Grew, having moved from Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, toi Ohio early in the 
last century. The family driginally came 
from Adams county, Pennsylvania, where 
Robert McGrew, the first member of the 
family to comie to America, settled in 1727. 
In early life Mr. McGrew studied law and 
practiced his profession for a number of 
years, at the same time taking- an acti\e 
part in the politics of his county and state. 

On April 8, 1841, he was married ti> 
Martha Dilworth Judkins, in Smithfield. 
Ohio, the home of the bride, and where some 



of the menlbers of the family still reside. 
Mrs. McGrew was born August 12, 1819, 
and was the daughter of Dr. Anderson Jud- 
kins, a prominent physician of his day, and 
her mother was Catherine Carr Judkins, 
whose father, James Carr, laid out Smith- 
field in 1803' and built the first house in the 
town. The Carrs originally came froni 
Msrylnnd and were prominent people 
among the early settlers of that state. One 
of Mrs. McGrew's sisters married General 
John S. Mason, who for a number of years 
resided in Springfield, Ohio. Mrs. McGrew 
died ou December 10, 1900, and is buried 
in Ferncliff cemetery. 

To Thomas and Alartha McGrew were 
born six children, William A., Samuel F., 
Thomas F., John F., Baldwin and Elizabeth, 
the last named dying in early childhood. All 
the other children are living and all were 
born in Steubenville, Ohio, except Baldwin, 
who was lx)rn in S]3ringfield. Mr. McGrew 
removed to Spring-field in 1856 to accept a 
position vvith the Mad River Valley Branch 
Bank of the state of Ohio, now the Mad 
River National Bank, O'f which institution 
Mr. McGrew is now the president. The eld- 
est son, William A. McGrew, was a 
captain in the war of the Rebellion and 
shortly after his marriage, in 1861, 
to Miss Elizabeth Richardson, he n.O'ved 
to the west and is now a resident of 
Denver, Colorado. Samuel F. McGrew, the 
second son, graduated from Wittenberg 
College at the age O'f sixteai years and after 
a short time became connected with the Mad 
River National Bank, of Springfield, Ohio, 
and is at the present time the cashier of that 
institution. Mr. McGl^ew, while never taking 
a very active part in politics, has held 
a number of important offices in his home 
city and has always manifested a deep in- 



6o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



terest in her affairs. He was married to 
Miss Elizabeth E. Baldwin, in 1869, and 
his family consists of two sons, John B. 
McGrew and Samuel J. McGrew. John B. 
McGrew, the eldest son, is an attorney by 
profession, and is at the present time the 
prosecuting attorney of Clark county. Sam- 
uel J. McGrew, the second son, was an officer 
in Company M, Tenth Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry, in the Spanish-American war and is 
at the ])rescnt time connected with the Mad 
River National Bank. 

Thomas F. McGrew married ]\liss Clara 
J, Baldwin, and he with liis wife and two 
children, Thomas W. and Clara J. McGrew, 
are li\ing in New York city. John 
Franklin McGrew married Miss Fannie 
Buslmell, and with their two daughters, El- 
len McGrew and Fannie McGrew, are liv- 
ing in Springfield. Mr. McGrew is an at- 
tornev at law and practices his profession 
m his h(Miie city. He at one time repre- 
s-eiited Clark county in the state legislature 
and is at present one of the tnistees of the 
Ohio State Library. Baldwin McGrew, the 
yoimgest son, married Miss ^Mary Elizabeth 
Yi3ung, of Troy, Ohio, and resides in the 
citv of Springfield with his family, which 
consists of one daughter, Miss Ann Kliza- 
l>eth IMcGrew. Mr. McGrew is engaged in 
active business in Springfield and is inter- 
ested in a number of the city"s commercial 
in,-titutions. 



OSCAR J. ROCKEL. 

Oscar J. Riickel. who follows farming 
in German township was ijorn within its 
borders December 26, i860. His parents, 
Henry and I\Iary :\\m ( Richards) Rockel, 
are both still Hving. The father was bom in 



German township, ^larch 14, 1835. and is 
a son of Adam and Mary (Baker) Rockel. 
The grandfather was born in Northampton 
county, Pennsylvania, November 12, 1793. 
and died May 13, 1884, while his wife, who 
was born in Shenandoah county, Virginia, 
passed away April 14, 1886. The great- 
grandparents were Peter and Ann Maria 
(Brown) Rockel, who in 1822 started with 
their family to Ohio. They made the journey 
by wagon, bringing with them their house- 
hold effects. They were the parents of nine 
children, of whom three remained in I'enn- 
sylvania. One of the daughters who came 
with them was the wife of Peter Kern, who 
also accompanied the party. On reaching 
their destination Peter Rockel purchased 
land, which is still known as the Rockel 
farm, just south of Tremont. Tlieie assf>- 
ciated with his sons, Adam and Peter, he be- 
came the owner of one hundred and ninety- 
two acres of land, and of this ninety-six 
acres is now in possession of Henry Rockel. 
the father of our subject, while the remain- 
der is owned by other descendants. Peter 
Rockel, Sr., had followed milling in Penn- 
sylvania, but after locating in Ohio he 
abandoned that pursuit. He was not long 
permitted to enjoy his new home, his death 
occurring about two years after his arrival, 
when he was si.xty-three years of age. His 
wife, surviving him for some time, passed 
away about 1841. 

Adam Rockel, the grandfather of our 
subject, spent his boyhood days on the home 
farm and also worked in his father's mill un- 
til the war of 181 2, when he was drafted 
for service. He went to the front under 
General Henry Sherring. but was never in 
any battle, .\fter the war he was again at 
home in Pennsylvania until 1822, when with 
the familv he came to Ohio. He was mar- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



6i 



ried in Clark county to Miss Baker. A 
shoemaker by trade, for a time he visited the 
people's houses, making- shoes for the dif- 
erent mem1>ers oi the family and he also c;ir- 
ried on farming. He was well educated in 
l30tli German and English and was a con- 
sistent Christian, holding membership in the 
Lutheran chiu'ch and ser\-ing for many }-ears 
as one of its officers. In his political views 
he as a Jacksonian Democrat and though 
he never sought or desired oftice, his fellow 
townsmen insisted on his services and for 
n.any years he occupied the positions of 
townshij:? trustee and township treasurer. In 
his family were five children. Peter, the eld- 
est, married Margaret Shick, by whom he 
had one son, William ]\I. Rockel, an attor- 
ney of Springfield, who was formerly pro- 
bate judge. For his second wife he chose 
Sarah Ilgess. Harriet, the eldest daughter cf 
Adam Rockel, became the wife of Michael 
Shawver and died at her home in German 
township, leaving five children. Henry is 
the third of the family. Mary is the wife of 
Joseph Collins by whom she has five chil- 
dren and their home is in German township. 
William, of McLean county, Illinois, mar- 
ried Hester Heller and they have three chil- 
dren. 

.\dam Rockel pro\-ided his children with 
good educational advantages, thus enabling 
them to get a start in life, ^\'hen fifteen 
years of age Henry Rockel began cutting 
cord wood and by the time he attained his 
majority he had laid up a snug little sum of 
money. He resided with his father until 
his marriage, which took place January 19, 
i860, in German township, Miss Mary Ann 
Richards becoming his wife. She is a 
daughter of John Henry and Susanna 
(I-andis) Richards. Five children have 
been born of this union. Oscar James, of 



this review, being the eldest. Laura died at 
the age of thirteen years and was buried in 
Tremont. Emma is the wife of Abram 
Thomas and lives on the d\(\ Rxockel farm. 
Thejf had three children — Elsie, Grover, and 
Lewis Henry, who' died in infancy. Clara 
is the wife of Charles Shafer, of Springfield. 
Warren A., the }'oungest, married Pearl 
Lorton, by whom he had two- children, both 
now deceased. For his second wife he chose 
Ida Pierson. 

In his politics Henry Rcjckel has always 
been a Democrat since casting his first vote 
for Buchanan in 1856. His fellow towns- 
men recog-nizing his worth and ability, 
elected him to the office of trustee against 
his will, l)ut he would never consent to serve 
after that. He and his family are members 
of the Lutheran church and he is a well 
known and respected farmer of German 
township. 

Oscar James Rockel spent his boyhood 
days on the home farm, acquiring a fair 
common-school education in the neighbor- 
hood. To his father he gave the benefit of 
his services during his boyhood and re- 
mained under the parental roof until he ]jre- 
prred for a home of his own by his n^arri^ge 
in Northampton, Ohio, October 5, 1882, to 
Miss Laura A. Hause, who^, was born in 
Lawren.ce\-ille, German township, January 
30, 1S62, and is a daughter of Emanuel and 
Elizabeth ( Rust) Hause. Their union has 
been blessed with six children ; Letta 
Leonora, Bernis Ga^-nell, C. Carlisle. Eman- 
uel Henry, Mary Elizabeth, and Esther Cor- 
rinne. 

For a few years after his marriage Mr. 
Rockel engaged in operating land belonging 
to his father, but in 1891 removed to the 
city of Springfield. He owned stock in a 
lumber company there and remained in this- 



•62 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



place for three years, but on the expiration 
of that period he returned to the farm and 
has since devoted his energies to agricultural 
pursuits, linding that this is to him a more 
profitable business. In 1894 he began oper- 
ating a steam thresher and each year has 
been an active factor in the harvest fields of 
this locality. In his political views he has 
been a Democrat since voting for Cleveland 
in 1884 and he is a member of the board of 
education. He belongs to the German Re- 
formed church at Tremont and is also iden- 
tified with the Knights of Pythias frater- 
nity- at that place in which he has filled all 
of the chairs. 



CHARLES H. VAXAXDA. 

Charles H. Vananda was born in Spring- 
field, January 20, 1856, and has silent his 
entire life in Clark county. His father, John 
Wesley Vananda, was born in Marjland, 
August 19, 1828, his hcane being near Mid- 
dletown, Frederick county. He was a 
wagonmajker by trade and would go to the 
timber districts, where he would get out the 
material for constructing wagons. Tliese he 
made of a mammoth size, such as were used 
for freighting over the mountains. In his 
native state he was married, Feliruary 6, 
1830. to Ann E]izal>eth Sigler, who was 
born in Maryland, June 26, 1824. While 
they were still living in that state they l>e- 
came the parents of one son, John Henn,-. 
born March 6. 18^3. and soon afterward 
the}' came to Ohio, traveling by rail and 
wagon. Here Mr. Vananda built the 
first four-wheeled dray used in the city. 
and also the first si.x-horse wagon. 
The latter was owned bv John and 



Daxid Snyder, early millers of Springfield. 
For three years INlr. \''ananda followed wag- 
onmaking, after which he learned the butch- 
ers' trade and entered into partnership with 
John Swanger in the conduct of the busi- 
ness, which they carried on for a number of 
years. ]\Ir. Vanajida afterward turned his 
attention to the huckster business, traveling 
with a four-horse wagon over a radius of 
fifty miles into Madison, Fayette, Logan and 
Champaign counties. His business was ex- 
tensive and profitable and he carried on the 
gaieral huckstering business and gained a 
wide circle of friends among his patrons. 
He was known throughout Clark and sur- 
rounding counties and on his trips he would 
drive turkeys into the city for sale in the 
markets here, and he also shipped poultry 
to varioais points. After giving up the huck- 
stering Ijusiness he turned his attention to 
farming and later was employed by D. S. 
Morrow & Son in the grocer\- and ice busi- 
ness. Subsequently he assisted his son in 
conducting a retail fruit store. He made his 
home in this city until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1888, while his wife passed away 
Xovenber 30, 1872. both being buried in 
Ferncliff cemetery. They were memters 
of the First Lutlieran churcli and reared 
their children in that faith. In ix>litics ]\Ir. 
\'ananda was a Democrat, and was a mem- 
lier of one of the early military companies 
of Springfield. Of domestic tastes he was 
fond of his family and did all he could to 
promote their welfare and happiness. L'nto 
the parents of our subject were lx>m six 
children. John H. was killed in Houston, 
Texas, in December, 1898; Charles Ham- 
ilton is the second in order of birth; Will- 
iam Carlton, born Deceinber i, 1859, is 
married and is employed in the store of his 
brother, Charles: Cordelia Titus, born April 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



63. 



22. 1862, is the wife of Thomas E. Wren, 
of Springiiek!, and has five hving children, 
Floy Birdie, Artluir, Ruth and Earl, and 
has lost two, Maude and Evan; Theodm-e 
Keller, 'born September 18, 1866, is mar- 
ried and lives in ]\Iuncie, Indiana, where he 
is employed as a meat cutter; and Margaret 
Helwick, born November, 17, 1869, is 
the wife of George Jackson, oif Spring- 
field, and they have two children, Mon- 
roe and George. After the death of 
his first wife John \\\ Vananda was mar- 
ried, in February. 1874. to^ Hester AI. Po- 
land, the widow o'f James P'oland. a native 
of OhioL They have one child, Ann Eliza- 
beth, who was born April 13, 1875. and is 
the wife of Martin Dobbs, oif Dayton. 

Tames C. Vananda, an elder brother of 
John W. and an uncle of our subject, was a 
painter by trade and entered the service of 
the United States as a captain in an Ohio 
regiment of infantry during the Civil war. 
Fie was afterward promoted for meritorious 
conduct to the rank of major, and being 
captured was incarcerated in Libby prison. 
He was born in 1823, and died in 1882, 
leaving a daughter, Mrs. George Stevel^s, 
who resides on Yellow Springs street. Will- 
iam, another brother, who was also a paint- 
er by trade, joined the Union army as a 
drunurer in his brother's company and died 
in the Soldiers" Home at Dayton, in 1892. 

Charles H. Va.nanda attended the public 
schools of Spring-field until fourteen years 
of age, when he began driving an express 
wagon on his own account, continuing that 
business for four years. He then began 
hauling- water for nasons, as the city had 
no water works. When two years had 
passed his father lemoveJ tO' a farm in 
Springfield townshi]) and our subject a^si-t- 
ed in its cultivation for seven vears. He 



then returned to the city and again began 
teaming, hauling many loads of brick for the 
East street shops, and also stone for Kel- 
ley's arcade. He continued to do heavy 
teaming- for about two years, but gave up 
that work in 1883 and accepted a po'sitiou 
as a driver of a grocery delivery wagon lor 
the firm of McCracken & Morrow-. In 1885 
lie left that employ and accepted a clerkship 
for W. S. Straley, a grocer, in the room in 
w liidh Mr. Vananda now carries on business 
for himself. For a number of years he- 
\\(_»rked as a grocery clerk for various men 
and in 1888 he began business on his own 
account, retailing fruit, gan.e and vegeta- 
bles in the store now occupied by Lobenherz. 
Then he sold out to E. M. Baker in 1891 
and began working for him, remaining w-ith 
]\Ir. Baker until the business w-as sold, w hen 
he entered the employ of Baldw'in McGtew 
and on the nth of April, 1899, purchased 
his stock. The business was started on a 
small scale, but he now conducts one of the 
largest retail trades in groceries and gener- 
al provisions in the city. He carries a full 
line of hig'h grade goods and employs six 
men as salesmen and to deliver the pur- 
chases. In his business he has made a splen- 
did success, giving to it his personal at- 
tention. 

In Springfield, on November 2y, 1883, 
Mr. Vananda was married to Miss Ida 
Belle Sparrow, who was born in this city, 
November 30, 1862, and is a daughter of 
Elisha and Julia (Hoak) Sparrow. Her 
father died here at the age of forty-seven 
and the miother is now- li\'ing in a hoare ad- 
joining that of her daughter at the age of 
sixty-six years. Mr. Vananda is the eldest 
of five children. Cliarles Oscar, who was 
born in 1867. was married and died at the 
age of twentv-se\-en \-ears. Cora Ann. boni 



64 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in 1868, is the wife of John \\". Adams, of 
Springfield, and their children are John W., 
William, Chester and Julia. William F., 
born in Springfield in 1872, is married and 
is clerking in the store of Mr. Vananda. 
They have one daughter. Gladys. Mary E., 
born in 1875, is the wife of C. S. dinger, 
an attorney, and they have two children, 
Francis and Robert S. The father of this 
family was a carpenter by trade and did fine 
cabinet work and finishing for three years. 
He served as a soldier in the Seventeentli 
Ohio Battery. The Sparrows were of 
Scotch-Irish descent on tJie paternal side 
and German lineage on the maternal side. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Vananda have been born 
two children, Daisy Belle, born May 3. 
i8(S5. and Julia Blanche, born September 3. 
1887. 

In national affairs Mr. \'ananda is a 
Den.ocrat, but at local political elections he 
votes indq^endently. His wife is a member 
of the Center street Methodist Episcopal 
church, and he was reared in the Lutheran 
faith. He belongs to the National Union, 
an insurance order, holds n-.embership in the 
Commercial Club, and is treasurer of the 
Grocers' AsstKiation of Springfield. In early 
life he showed that he possessed good busi- 
ness ability and from the age of fourteen 
years he has made his own way in the world, 
achieving the success which comes from 
earnest, persistent lalx>r when guided by 
sound judgment and supplemented by un- 
faltering honesty in all trade relatii>ns. 



CHARLES (\. H1-:CKERT, A. M., D. D. 

Charles G. Heckert, A. M.. D. D.. who 
is occupying the chair of English and logic 
in Wittenberg College, has attained dis- 



tinction as an educator and since his gradu- 
ation from this institution has devoted his 
entire attention to educational work. The 
Professor is a native of Pennsylvania, his 
birth having occurred in Northumberland 
County, on the 22nd of March, 1863. His 
parents were Benjan.in antl Sarah (Durst) 
Heckert, who were also natives of the Key- 
stone state, and the father carried on mer- 
chandising there for many years. 

Professor Heckert acquired his prelin,- 
irary education in Sunbury, Pennsylvania, 
gaining a good knowledge of the common 
branches of English learning. He displayed 
special aptitude in his studies and, desirous 
of gaining more advanced knowledge, he 
came to Springfield in 1880 and entered 
\\'itten'l>erg College, as a member of the 
freshman class. Here he pursued his studies 
for two years, after which he engaged in 
teaching for a similar period. His ex- 
chequer thus being replenished he once more 
entered Wittenberg College and was gradu- 
ated in that institution with the class of 
1886. Desiring to devote his attention o 
the work of the ministry he entered upon a 
course in theology and in 1889 was g^radu- 
ated in the Tlieological Seminary. Soon 
afterward he began teaching, and for two 
years occupied the position of principal of 
the academy, after which he was offered and 
accepted his present position as professor 
of English and logic. 

On the 24th of July. 1889. Professor 
Heckert was united in marriage to Miss Ada 
Rover, of Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, a 
daughter of Daniel Royer. who is now liv- 
ing a retired life at No. 29 East Ward 
street in Springfield, where he has made his 
home since 1891, 

Professor Heckert is managing editor 
of the Lutheran World, having extended his 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



65 



labors to the journalistic as well as the edu- 
cational field. This is one of the lea '.Ing 
church papers of his denomination in the 
country and has been a potent factor in ad- 
\ancing the cause of the church. Professor 
Heckert has also been president of the Mi- 
ami synod of this state and his social rela- 
tions connected him with Clark Lodge, No. 
101, F. & A. ^I., and Ingomar Lodge, No. 
610. K. P. He has been a deep, thorough 
and earnest student from his boyhood days 
and his reading has been wide aiid compre- 
hensive, coA'ering not only a range of phi- 
losophy and trade literature, but embracing 
all the standard classics of ancient and mod- 
ern times. There is nothing narrow or con- 
tracted in his views of life. He has studied 
the political, social and m.oral conditions of 
the country and his labors have e\-er been 
directed in channels resulting to the benefit 
of his felloAv men. 



CLIFTON M. NICHOLS. 

Clifton Melvin Nichols was born in 
A\'estfield, Chautauqua county. New York. 
He was a son of Wiseman C. and Fivilla 
( Cass ) Nichols, the former born in \'er- 
n^ont and the latter in New Hampshire. He 
is a grandson of Jonathan Nichols, who was 
one of General Stark's men in the Revolu- 
tionary war and was wounded at the battle 
of Bennington. He was born in Bolton, 
Massachusetts, and married Triphena Sack- 
ett, whose birth occurred in Kent, Litch- 
field cnunty, Connecticut. 

C. M. Nichols cane to Ohio in 184S ai'.d 
removed from Cincinnati to Springfield in 
1854. He married Francis Henrietta Keith, 
of Elyria, Ohio, October i, 1855. In April, 
1854, he engaged in the newspaper business. 



being connected with the Daily Nonpareil. 
He edited the Daily Nonpareil and after- 
ward various other journals, successors of 
that paper, finally closing his newspaper ca- 
reer on the Republic, thus ending thirty-fiv'» 
years' service in journalism. He next be- 
cair.e secretary and superintendent of the 
board oi trade. He was a Repu'blican from 
the birth of the party and for a few months 
served as a private in the Union army dur- 
ing the Ci\'il war. 



DANIEL LeFEVRE. 

Daniel LeFevre has for a number of 
years filled the office of trustee of Spring- 
field township, and is a worthy incumbent 
with a full realization of the obligations and 
duties devolving wpow him. These he faith- 
full}- meets and has therefore won the com- 
mendation of all concerned. 

Mr. LeFevre is a native of Maryland, his 
birth having occurred on the 12th of Au- 
gust. 1842, his parents being Henry and 
Catherine (Sterling) LeFevre, who were 
also nati\es of the sam.e state. There they 
were reared and married and spent their re- 
n:aining days. The paternal grandfather, 
George LeFevre, was a prosperous farmer, 
who belonged to one of the old families of 
jMaryland that was established in the countiy 
at an early day. 

Daniel LeFevre of this review passed 
iiis boyhood da}-s upon the home farm, work- 
ing in field and meadow through the sum- 
mer months. He also' attended the public 
schools until his eighteenth year, and subse- 
quently began clerking in a general store 
for Charles Downs, of Downsville. Mary- 
land. Six months later he went to Martins- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



burg, West Virginia, where he was em- 
ployed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 
for twelve months. The year 1875 wit- 
nessed the arrival of ^Ir. LeFevre in Spring- 
field, Ohio, and soon afterward he secured 
a situation in the employ of the P. P. Mast 
& Company in the wood and set-up depart- 
ment, acting in this capacity for a period of 
eighteen years. During the last year of his 
connection with the liouse Mr. LeFevre, in 
1893, \\"^s elected township trustee, and by 
re-elections has held this oftice continuously 
since, being elected each time by an in- 
creased majority, a fact that shows tliat he 
enjovs in an unusual degree the confidence 
and support of the public. It also indicates 
that his service has been efficient, because 
jjopular suffrage is only bestowed in case of 
nierit after the test has been made of a per- 
stw in official life for one term. He affili- 
ates witii the Republican part>-, taking an ac- 
tive interest in the success of his party and 
of his friends and is recognized as a leader 
in the Rq^ublican ranks. 

in 1866 occurred the marriage of Mr. 
LeFevre and Miss Ann E. Snyder, a daugh- 
ter of William and Margaret ( Cunningliam ) 
Snyder, who was born in Maryland, and in 
1875, with her husband, came to Ohio, 
where her remaining days were i>asse<l. She 
died in 1885. leaving six children: Fannie 
M.. the wife of William Hick; Alice I.. \\v. 
wile of William Bell, of Springfield; George 
W.. a machinist, who is employed by the P. 
v. Mast & Company; Daniel W., of Spring- 
field ; Albert L., who is a railway postal 
clerk ; and James E., at home. For his sec- 
ond w ife Mr. LeFevre chose Annie LaForce. 
of Xenia. Ohio, the wedding being celebrat- 
ed in 1889. TJie lady is a native of Ken- 
tucky, but spent the greater part of her 
girlhood in Ohio, and liy her marriage she 



lias become the mother of one daughter, 
Abbie F. Mr. LeFevre is one whose patriot- 
ism and fidelity to the duties of citizen- 
ship are an important part of his nature and 
his loyalty to all that is best in proir.oting the 
general good lias oftentimes been manifest- 
ed in the discharge of his duties. 



HOX. JACOB K. MOWER. 

In this enlightened age when men of in- 
dustry, energy and merit are rapidly push- 
ing their way to the front, those who, by 
their own individual mei'its and diligent 
efforts ha\e won favor and success, may 
properly claim recognition. In no calling to 
which man gives his attention does success 
depend more largely upon individual eft'ort 
than the law, and tliat Mr. Mower has 
achieved distinction in the field of jurispru- 
daice at once attests his superior ability and 
close application. A man of sound judg- 
ment, he manages his cases with masterly 
skill and tact, is a logical reasoner and has 
a ready command of English. His powers 
as an advocate have been demonstrated by 
his success on many occasions and he is an 
able lawyer of large and varied experience 
in all the courts. Thoroughness character- 
izes all his efforts and he conducts ail his 
business with a strict regard to a high stand- 
ard of professional ethics. He is quick to 
master all the intricacies in a case and 
grasp ail details, at the same time losing 
sight of none of the essential points upon 
which the decision of every^ case finally 
turu'^. lie has a ready flow of language 
and'Ss a speaker is fluent, forcible, earnest, 
logical and convincing. His knowledge of 
the law. it nust be conceded, i-^ Ivin" -r- 




J. K. MOWER. 



^ 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



69 



ond to that of any member of tlie bar of 
Clark county. 

Jacob Kreicler ]\Io\ver was born in 
Franklin count}-, Pennsylvania, on the 4th 
of April, 1833, '^"^^ fo'^ more than forty 
years has been a n-.en.ber of the Springfield 
bar. His paternal grandparents were 
George and Eva (Leitig) Mower, \\\v> 
spent their last days in Pennsylvania. The 
father of our subject also bore the name of 
George Mower and was l^orn in the Key- 
stone sta,te, becoming a farmer by occupa- 
tion. His political support was given to the 
Whig party until he joined the Free Soil 
party and later he became identified with the 
new Republican party which was formed to 
preven_t the further extension of slavery. 
Going- to Ohio he «-as for a nun-iber of years 
identified with agricultural interests of 
Richland county and departed this life at the 
cild homestead there, in 1855. His wife 
Ijore the maiden name of Mary Kreider and 
was a daughter of John and Barbara 
(Schmidt) Kreider and a granddaughter 
of the Rev. [Martin Kreider of the United 
Brethren church. In the family of George 
and Mary ( Kreider) Mower were eight 
cliildren, oi whom the subject of this review 
was tlie youngest. 

In the spring- of 1834, when only 
about a year old, Jacob K. Mower was 
brought to Oihio by his parents, wlio 
took up their abode uiion a farm near the 
villag'e of Ontario' in Richland comity. 
\\'lien a small boy he received his first edu- 
cational discipline in the schcxjlhouse known 
as the Quail Trap, near his home, and after- 
ward was a student in the high school 
in ]\Iassillon and in the Ohio Wesleyan 
University at Delaware. His course there 
was supplen:entecl by stud\- in the Ohio 
University at Athens, where he was grad- 



uated in 1856, w inning- the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts. His first important work in 
business life was as a representati\-e oi the 
teacher's profession. He became superin- 
tei-ident of the public schools of Athens and 
while thus emplo_\-ed and even previous to 
iliis tin-.e, he devoted his leisure hoiu's to 
the reading of law-, which he continued 
until the autumn of 1858, having- in the 
meantime becon-ie a student in the office 
oi Leonid;iS Jewett. .\t the date mentioned 
he was admitted to the bar and from that 
time has been an active practitioner in the 
courts of Ohio. 

In December of the same year Mr. 
M<)wer became a resident of Springfield, 
where he has since continuoitsly practiced, 
and for fi\-e years he w as senior member of 
the law firm of ■Mower & Rawlins. He has 
to son-.e extent figured prominently in public 
affairs, and especially as a representative of 
the Republican party. He served as city 
solicitor in 1868 and 1869 and w-as a mem- 
. ber of the board of education of Springfield 
from 1873 until 1878. Fie was elected to 
represent Clark county in the Ohioi legisla- 
ture, being a member of the house during 
the sessions of 1870 and 1871. Heiias never 
wavered in his allegiance tO' the Republican, 
party since he cast his first presidential ballot 
for John C. Fremont in the year 1856. In 
his youth he had become bitterly opposed to 
slavery and had aided many an escajied 
slave who was making his way from the 
bondage of the south tO' liberty in Canada. 
^Ir. Mower assisted these fugitives in going- 
from his honie in Richland count}- to. Ober- 
lin. He is a firm believer in the equal rights 
of all, without regard to race, color ot sex, 
and belie\es the greatest evil of this coun- 
try is the disfranchisement of a majority of 
its citizens — and those of the best class. It 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



is therefore not suq;rising that when a n:em- 
ber of the legislature, he was appointed 
chairnian of the committee on woman suf- 
frage. Further, he claims that the tariff 
should not be a party question but that each 
representative in congress should be free 
to act so as to protect the industries and in- 
terests of the citizens of his own locality. 

Through all these years Judge Mower 
has continued in an active and professional 
way to practice in the courts of Ohio, and his 
able efiforts in the line of his chosen calling 
have been manifest in the jurisprudence en- 
acted in his county and state. On the jth of 
October. 1900, he was appointed by Gov- 
ernor Xash to rhe position of judge of the 
court of common pleas to fill out the unex- 
pired term of Judge J. C. Miller, deceased, 
and at the Xo\eml>er election of that year 
was chosen by pojmlar suffrage to the office 
which he is now filling. Uix>n the bench 
]iis ciiurse lias been free from judicial bias 
ant! his decisions have shown a comprehen- 
sive knowledge of the law and a clear un- 
derstanding of the facts, arguments and 
principles presented in the trial of every 
case. 

It was on the 2d of December. 1858, in 
llillslx>ro, Ohio, that the marriage of Judge 
Jacob K. Mower and Miss Eunice M. Rice 
was celebrated. Tlie lady was born March 2. 
1833. at a farm house in Ames township. 
.\thens county, Ohio, and is a daughter of 
Sabinus and Pamela ( Hiblxird ) Rice. The 
Judge and his wife have two daughters and 
a son : Maljel, the eldest, is a graduate of 
the Ohio W'esleyan University of Delaware, 
where she won the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 1882; Alice Mary was graduated 
in Wittenljerg College of Springfield in the 
year 1884 with the same degree and is now 
a teacher of Latin and German in tlie same 



college; Carl Kreider, the son, was grad- 
uated in Wittenberg College in 18S6, 
studied law in his father's office and was 
admitted to the bar in February, 1889, be- 
coming the junior member of the firm of 
Mower & Mower, attorneys. He eniistetl 
for service in the Spanish-American war. 
was commissioned a captian and served in 
Porto Rico for one year, after w hich he en- 
listed and was commissioned captain, serv- 
ing in the Philippines for two years. At 
the expiration of that period he joined the 
regular army and was commissioned first 
lieutenant of heavy artillery and assigned to 
the One Hundred and First Heavy .\rtillery 
located at Fort Totten. Long Island, where 
he is stationed at the present time. He mar- 
ried Miss Fannie Foley, of Springfield. 
Ohio, a daughter of the Hon. James Foley. 
Such in brief is the life histon,- of the 
Hon. Jacob Kreider Mower, who since 1858 
has l)een a prominent resident of Spring- 
field. A well known mem1:)er of the bar, of 
strong mentality, keen analytical mind and 
of marked talaits, he possesses the cpialih- 
cations essential tO' success. His fidelity to 
his clients" interests has l>een proverbial, yet 
iie never forgets that he owes the highest 
allegiance lt> the majesty of the law. 



WILLI. \M X.WDERS. 

Among the men who were prdiiiinem in 
n-any of the important walks of busines- 
life, and who have now passed away, their 
lalx>rs being ended in death, none are more 
deserving of mention than William Xanders. 
who was one Clark county's native son-;, 
his birtli having occurred in German town- 
ship on the 7th of May, 1824, his parent^ 



-^HE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



being John and Magdalena (Baker) Xan- 
ders. His boyhood days were spent in the 
usual manner of farmer lads of that 
period. The country had been settled but 
recently and pioneer times existed, so 
that there were many hardships and trials 
to be borne during those early times 
in which the settlers were reclaiming 
the region for purposes of civilization. 
The schools were of a primitive character, 
but farm work was not limited, and j\lr. 
Xanders bore his full share in the wo-rk of 
developing and improiving his father's land. 
However, he gained practical experience 
which enabled him to' carry on farm work 
successfully when he started out in life on 
his own account. 

On the 9th of x\ugust, 1849, ^'^ German 
township, William Xanders was united in 
marriage to Miss Susanna Balder, who was 
born in that township June 18. 1828. a 
daugihter o-f John and Susanna (Nawman) 
Baker. She was reared upon a farm and 
attended the public schools of the neighbor- 
hood, acquiring a good knowledge of the 
branches of English learning usually tauglit 
in such institutions. Fot a few years after 
his marriage Mr. Xanders engaged in o\}- 
erating a rented farm, and then, with the 
capital which had been acquired through the 
the labors Oif himself and wife, he pur- 
chased one hundred and thirty acres of land, 
upon which he made his home as long as he 
lived. He l»ught and sold other pro[)erty, 
but he never left the home place. He also 
becan'.e the owner of three hundred and 
twenty acres in Carter county, Miss(j'Uri, 
which still belongs to his estate. The mar- 
riage of Mr. and Mrs. Xanders was lilessed 
with nine children, of whom three died in 
infancy. Sarah, the eldest living n:eml)er 
of the familv, is the wife of Tavlor Seifert. 



of Springfield, and has one child. Isabella 
C. is the wife oif Edward M. Pattison, of 
Springfield. Mary E. is the wife of Daniel 
F. Shafer. and they ha\'e four children. 
Enos William is the next yoimger. Emma 
A. married John H. Forman, of Springfield, 
and they have two children. Susanna J. 
is the wife of O. \\'. Plick, of German town- 
ship. 

In his political views William Xanders 
was a stanch Democrat, believing firmly in 
the principles of the party, but was never 
active in political work nor sought office. 
Fie was reared in the Lutheran faith and 
his widow, who still survives him, is a mem- 
ber of that church. His death occurred Janu- 
ary- 4, 1878, and the communit)' mourned 
the loss of a valued and representative citi- 
zen. His life had been quietly passed in 
the pursuits of the farm, but all who knew 
him recognized in him the sterling qualities 
of manhood which gained fi>r him the warm 
regard oif all with w hom he came in contact. 
He provided well for his family and all that 
he possessed canre to him as the result of 
his oiwn untiring labor. 

Enos William Xanders, the eldest son of 
the family, was born August 8, 1S61, on the 
old homestead and at the usual age entered 
the common schools. ^Yhen eighteen years 
of 5ge he began teaching and followed that 
profession for three years. Like most 
young men starting out in life, he sought 
a companion and helpmate for the journey, 
and mi the 21st of September, 1882, in Ger- 
n an tO'wnship, he was united in marriage to 
Miss Anna C. Ballentine, a daughter of 
James V. and Rosanna ( Domer) Ballen- 
tune. Unto them ha\-e been born five chil- 
dren : Blanche, born August 19, 1883, is 
the wife of Jerome Michael, and they have 
one child, Mabel, 'born in March, 1900. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL KECUKD. 



Clyde, born March 21, 1885. is a graduate 
of the high schm>l of German township, 2nd 
is now a soiiiomore in Wittejiberg College. 
Claude, born June 1. 1887, is a student in 
the township higli sch<jol. Ruth, born April 
20. 1893, and Cle<*n, born March 7, 1889. 
are at home with their parents. 

When Enos Xanders started out in busi- 
ness life for himself he began operating the 
home farm, which he is now conducting. In 

1887 he turned his attention to merchandis- 
ing in Lawrenceville and there conducted a 
store for about ten 3ears, meeting with a 
fair degree of success in that euterjirise. 
While thus engaged he alsoi began selling 
fertilizers, and because of ill health he con- 
cluded that the confinement of the store was 
not beneficial and he went upon the road to 
sell fertilizers, tliis business clainung his at- 
tention for fi\e years. He also devotes his 
energies to the cultixation and improven.ent 
of the home farm, which, under his carefui 
sui)ervision, has been kept in touch with tr.e 
progressive spirit of tlie times. He follows 
modem methods in his farm work and uses 
the latest in:provcd mnchinery in cultivating 
the fields and harvesting the crops. He has 
been quite prominent in public affairs and 
while engaged in merchandising in Law- 
rence\ille he was appointetl postmaster of 
the town under President Cleveland, filling 
the o.'^'ficc until it was discontinued on account 
of the estal)lishment of the rural delivery 
system. He has always been an earnest 
Democrat and for eight years has served as 
a member of the board of education. In 

1888 he was elected to represent German 
township in the Clark County Agricultural 
Society, and each year has l:een again chos- 
en for that oJifice. For two years he was 
president r.'f the society and has been an ac- 
tive l':ict..r in nrM:i , ,iiii..- :i.^i iri-liur.-il inter- 



ests in this portion of the state, doing every- 
thing in his power to advance the welfare of 
the farmer. Socially he is connected with 
Springfield Lodge, Xo. 33, I. O. O. F., and 
with Donnell's Creek Council. Xo. ui. J. 
O. U. A. M In this community, in which 
he has always made his home, he is widely 
known as a representative business man, as 
a public spirited citizen and as a friend 
wlnjse lovallv is tried and true. 



ALFRl-D .M. rOTTFR. M. 1 ). 

.-Xmong- the honored representatives ni 
the medical fraternity who are worthy nf 
mention as leading citizens of Springfield 
ijecauseof capability in the lines of their pro- 
fession and by reason of the per.sonal ster- 
ling worth which they possess is Dr. Al- 
fred ]^I. Potter. He was born in Miami 
county, Ohio, in the city of Troy, Se]neni- 
her 17, 1850, and comes of an old Xew 
England family that was early establislied ii 
America. His paternal grandfather was Al- 
fred Pottei". a native of Xew York, for. in 
the meantime representatives of the nan i 
had removed from Xew England to the E:i - 
pi re state. 

Dr. Alfred Potter, Sr., the father of our 
subject, was born at a place called Corner 
Bridge, in Xew York, and on his removn! 
to the west took up bis abode in Troy, Ohii'. 
where he was actively engaged in praclicin- 
for a short time. Believing that Springfield, 
however, would prove a better field of la 
ijer. he removed to this city, openetl his of- 
fice and remained one of tlie leading repre- 
sentatives (if the medical fraternity here n., 
to the tine of his death. He was a gradu- 
aif .1 ilic Xfidi.al Institute i^f Xew York. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



73 



and also f)f the Bellevue Hospital of New- 
York city. His capability in diagnosing 
diseases, of foretelling- the complications and 
issues that might arise, and his skill in ad- 
ministering remedial agencies that diecked 
the ravages of disease made him an eminent 
mem'ber of the profession in Springfield and 
secured for him a large practice. He was 
united in marriage to Miss Lavina Murphy, 
a daughter of K. C. Murphy. She was born 
in Coa-mecticut and was a n.ost estimable 
lady, her death occurring December 12, 
1874, a short time prior to her husband's 
demise. 

'Although born in Troy, Dr. Alfred M. 
Potter was very young when his parents re- 
moived to Springfield, so^ that his early edu- 
cation was: obtained in the public schools 
here, \\nien he had largely m.astered the 
branches of English learning taught in the 
Springfield schools he entered the Lebanon 
Normal School, A\-here he prosecuted his 
studies for some time and gained a broad 
general kno'wdedge which served as a foun- 
dation upon which to rear the superstructure 
of his professional learning. An inherited 
tendency and natural inclination all proba- 
bly combined in determining his choice of 
a life work. He became a student of medi- 
cine under the direction of his father and 
later matriculated in the Eclectic Medical 
Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was 
graduated with the class of 1872. He then 
returned to Springfield and opened his 
office here in counection with his fa- 
tlier, and the relation between them 
was maintained until the death of the 
senior partner in 1875. '^ '^^ Doctor 
has since been alone. He has a commodious 
and pleasant suite of rooms in the Bucking- 
ham block, well fitted up for the successful 
conduct of an office practice, and at the same 



time he \-isits many cases throughout the 
city, his patronage coming from a large 
numl)er of the 'best homes in Springfield. 

The social relations of Dr. Potter con- 
nect him with Ephraim Lodge, L O. O. F., 
the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolait 
Protective Order of Elks. Li 1877 he was 
happily married to Miss Lillian Odenschain, 
of Mouticello', Indiana, \\4io w-as born in 
Bellefoiitaine, Ohio. The Doctor and his 
wife have five children: Helen B., iVlfred 
M., z\rmom- Lucile, Cornelia and Lawrence 
K. In the practice of his profession Dr. 
Potter manifests close application to his 
work, and this, supplementing his broad and 
accurate iknowledge. have made his efforts 
of muclh baiefit in coping \vith disease. He 
is cmitinually reading and studying that 
his labors may be more efi^ective. Already 
his knoavledge and skill have classed him 
among the niost sulistantial medical prac- 
tioners of Springfield. 



JAMES VINTON BALLENTINE. 

James \^inton Ballentine, who has retired 
froni acti\-e farm wo^rk and is noA\' dealing 
in stock in Lawrenceville, is an energetic 
business man wdio recognizes that toil is the 
foundation of all prosperitjf and thus he has 
labored earnestly to accpiire a competence 
that will enable him to provide a good hnnie 
for- his family. He was born in Cumberland 
county, Pennsylvania, October 15. 1823. 
and in the year 183 1 his parents, William 
and Nancy (Neal) Ballentine, came from 
the Keystone state to Ohio, locating- first 
in Montgon-ien' county, where tlie)' remained 
for a \ear. His parents were na- 
tives of courity .\rmagh, Ireland, and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



it was in the year 1798 that they left 
their liome in tlic mirth of the En:er- 
alcl Isle anil cn.ssefl the Atlantic to 
America. Jmhn liallcntine, an luicle of our 
subject, had lieen drafted by England to 
serve as a soldier, but whai he reached this 
cmintry he severed his allegiance to the Brit- 
ish crown and becan:e an American soldier. 
William Ballentine never succeeded in find- 
ing him, liut afterward learned that he died 
in Greenbush, Xew York, lie and his wife 
lived in Pennsylvania for a number of years, 
then, as stated a1x>ve, came to Ohio. In 
1832 they came to Clark county, through 
which they had ])assed when they sought a 
home in Montgomery county, and here the 
father purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, to which he afterward added 
a tract of forty-four acres in Gemiaii town- 
ship, his place being pleasantly located a 
mile and a half from Lawraiceville. Our 
subject lias since made his home in this 
county and in the common schools he ac- 
quired his early education, which was after- 
ward sui^plemented by a \ear's study in the 
high school of Springfield. For nine years 
he engaged in teaching, entering upon that 
]>rofession in 1846. although he later at- 
tended school to son-.e extent. He was a 
successful educator, earnest and thorough in 
his work, and thus he gave general satisfac- 
tion wherever lie was employed. In early 
life he was also a clerk in his brother-in-law's 
store in Traiiont, and likewise acted as a 
ckrk in the postofiice at that place. 

On the 21 St of .\ugust, 1853, Mr. Bal- 
lentine was united in marriage to Miss Ro- 
sanna Doner, who was born in Clark ccxun- 
ty. and was a daughter of John and Sarah 
(Myers) Domer. who came from Maryland 
to Ohi<i. Five children have been born unto 
our subject a.nd his w ife, but one of the nmn- 



ber died at the age of six months. The 
others are: Charles F., who is a teacher of 
this county and lives in Lawrenceville; Eliza 
J., the wife of Dr. Reynolds; Nancy A., the 
wife of Enos Xanders, who is living in 
Lawrenceville; and Marion Seymour, who 
is a grocery merciiant of Darnell, Chajn- 
paign county, Ohio, and is married and has 
one child. 

Through a nun-.l>er of years Mr. Ballen- 
tine carried on general fanning, applying 
himself closely to: his work and following 
progressive methods. He obtained thereby 
a gwxl living. At length he put aside the 
more arduous duties of the farm and began 
dealing in st(X-k in I^wrence\ille, the busi- 
ness which he yet follows. In politics he 
is a DemtTcrat and has lieen quite promi- 
nent in public affairs. He was elected jus- 
tice of the peace and served in that office in 
a most cretlitable manner for twelve years. 
At the end of that time he was again ciiosen 
for the position, but refused to serve longer. 
Of all the many cases he tried only one was 
ever appealed, and in that his decision was 
sustained. He has also married about sixtv- 
nine couples and has performed other duties 
in connection with his office. He acted as 
assistant to an assessor in his township for 
six years and afterward was elected to the 
position of assess<^>r and continued in that 
capacity for ten years. He has beai a dele- 
gate to various state conventions of the 
Democracy and was elected a delegate to 
the national convention, but did not atteiul. 
During the administration of President 
Johnson he served as revenue collector for 
three townships in Clark county. Mr. Bal- 
lentine has long been deeply and actively 
interested in e\'erything jiertaining to the 
public good and his efforts have l>een ef- 
fective in i)romoting the general progress. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



75 



He was one of the prime iT.o\-ers in estali- 
lisiiing- tlie township high school — in fact 
tliis school owes its existence tO' Mr. Ballen- 
tine and Scjuire Eli Kizer. It is now a source 
of pride to the conmiunity and has done 
n:uch. toward promoting educational ad- 
\-ancenient here. Mr. Ballentine was like- 
wise amoaig the first to adx'ocate free pikes, 
and was superintendent of the construction 
of one pike that is twelve miles in length 
and is called the Ballentine pike. He was 
also instrumental in building Flick pike and 
largely assisted in getting the toll gates re- 
n:o\-ed so that the pikes became free high- 
way's of travel. Tluis in all matters of pub- 
lic progress and imprcjvement Air. Ballen- 
tine has home an acti\'e part in the communi- 
ty \\here he resides and where he is re- 
garded by his friends and acquaintances as 
one of the substantial and representative 
citizens. 



JOHN CHAPMAN. 

John Chapman is a partner in an enter- 
jirise of magnitude in Springfield, being a 
memlier of the firm of W'ickham, Chapman 
(S: Company, manufacturers of piano plates. 
He has been a representative of business in- 
terests of the city since 1S77 and since 1889 
has been associated with ]Mr. ^Vickham in 
the conduct of their present industry, which 
has grown in \-olume until its importance 
in the manufacturing circles of the city is 
widely acknowledged. 

Mr. Chapman was born in Ontario, Can- 
ada, Alarch I, 1854, and comes of a family 
noted for longevity. His father. George B. 
Chapman, reached the adxanced age of 
eight}'-se\-en vears, while his mt.tlier, Mrs. 
Belinda Cha]jman, dicfl at the age of seven- 



ty-seven years and was buried in Ferncliff 
cemetery. Their last days were spent in 
Springfield. In their family were five chil- 
dren, of whom three are living : Robert \\'., 
a resident of NeAvark, New Jersey; Eliza- 
beth, the wife of Theodore Colx, of Spring- 
field ; and John. The family comes of Irish 
ancestry. 

In )his early lK)yho<id John Chapman ac- 
companied his parents on their remo\'al from 
Canada to New Jersey, the fam.ily settling 
in Newark, where he pursued his education 
in the public schools. At the age of thirteen 
lie began to learn the trade of a decorator 
in decorative japanning and when he had 
n-tstered the l>usiness he was employed as 
joiu'neyman and afterward as a foreman, 
wliile later he carried on business oai his 
own account as a coutractor. In 1877 '"'^ 
removed to Springfield and became associ- 
ated with the St. John Sewing Machine 
Company as a contractor in the line of ja- 
patming, doing their work in that line until 
1889, when he entered into; partnership with 
Mr. ^^'ickham in the establishment of the 
business which they have since continued. 
They manufacture piano places oif a high 
grade and also piano hardware and the 
products of their factory are shipped tO' all 
portions of this countr\- and Canada. Their 
factory is now- the largest of its kind in the 
world and constantly increasing and the in- 
dustry is of \'alue to the city, as en'.ployment 
is furnished to four hundred workmen. 

In 1896, in Springfield, Mr. Chapman 
was united in marriage to Miss Kittie Gale. 
who was Ijorn in Springfield, a daughter of 
Otho B. Gale, and the_\- now have one daugli- 
ter, Kathryn B. Their home is at No. 133 
North Plum street, and they attend the ser\'- 
ices of the Congregational church, Mv. 
Chairman contributing freely to its support. 



76 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



In ])olitics he is a Repuljlican, but has never 
had any desire for political honors, as he 
is pre-eminently a business man. devoting 
his whole time and energies to the develop- 
ment and control of the enterprise which he 
established in connection with Mr. Wickham 
■thirteai years ago. He has watched with 
interest the growth of the city since 1877 
and has seen its population increased two 
and one-half times what it was when he 
took up his residence here. While there 
has l)cen in his career no exciting chapters, 
there is in bis life history that which com- 
mands the respect and attention of business 
men. who realize that force of character, 
diligence and keen discrimination are the 
elem.ents which count in coinmeicial and in- 
dustrial circles. 



()M\"ER S. KELL^'. 

Success comes not to the man who idly 
waits, but to the faithful toiler whose work 
is characterized by intelligence and force 
and who has the foresight and keenness of 
menial vision to know when and where and 
how to exert his energies. Thus it happens 
that but a small proportion of those who en- 
ter the "world's broad field of battle" come 
off victorious in the struggle for wealth and 
position. Some lack perseverance, others 
business sagacity and still others are dila- 
tory or negligent, but Mr. Kelly possesses 
the activity, spirit and enterprise in business 
which have developed and are developing 
the marvelous resources and wealth of the 
western states. At an early age he learned 
one of the great lessons of life — that there is 
no "royal road'" to wealth — and as he was 
not aliove work be toiled industriously un- 



til he has won not only fortune but also the 
esteem and confidence of the people with 
whom he has lieen associated for many years. 
Work, the true friend of mankind, has de- 
veloped his latent resources and brought out 
the strong, self-reliant force of his charac- 
ter. His has been the controlling influence 
of some of the most extensive industrial 
concerns of Springfield and his labors along 
other lines have also contributed in large 
measure to the improvement and upbuilding 
of the city, of which he has long been an 
honored resident. 

Mr. Kelly is one of Clark county's native 
sons. The ancestral line is traced l)ack to 
colonial days and the grandfather, James 
Kelly, was one of the heroes of the Revolu- 
tionary war, who entered the army from the 
colony of Virginia and fought ff)r the in- 
dependence of the nation. ITe reared a 
large family of eight sons and four daugh- 
ters, most of whom have descendants now 
residing in Clark county. Ohio. John Kelly, 
the father of our subject, was born in Vir- 
ginia and with his father's family came to 
this state in the year 1808. a settlement be- 
ing made in Green township, then in Greene 
but now in Clark county. When the country 
again became engaged in war with Eng- 
land, John Kelly entered the army as an 
American soldier in the war of 181 2. He 
was united in marriage to Margaret Mc- 
Beth. a daughter of Alexander McBeth, 
also an early resident of Clark county. 
They were the fifteenth couple married in 
Clark county, whicli was organised in Jan- 
uary , 1818. their marriage being celebrated 
April TO. 1818. They resided upon a farm 
adjoining the old Kelly homestead, and there 
the father died September 25. 1825. at the 
age of thirty-six years, when the .subject 
of this review was but nine niimths old. The 




O. S. KELLY. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



79 



mother remained upon tlie farm and after 
four years of widowhood was again mar- 
ried. 

It was upon his father's farm that OUver 
S. Kelly was born December 23, 1S24, and 
spent the first four years of his Ufe. At the 
age of fourteen he started out to make his 
own way in the world and fate was kind tn 
him in that he found a home with William 
T. Mclntire, who throughout the communi- 
ty was lovingly called "Uncle Billy." ^h\ 
Kelly assisted that gentleman in farm work 
until the spring of 1842, when he entered 
ujion an apprenticeship at the carpenter's 
trade under Joseph and John Mclntire, 
brothers of his benefactor. He served for 
a term of three years, during which time he 
was paid one himdred and sixty-eight dollars 
in addition to his board and the instruction 
which he received at his trade. One year 
was then spent as a journeyman, after which 
he entered into partnership with J. A. An- 
derson, under the firm name of Anderson 
cSi: Kelly, and the new firm prospered, re- 
ceiving a large share of the public patron- 
age and erecting many of the leading struc- 
tures of the county in an early day. This 
business relationship was maintained until 
1 85 2, when the partnership was dissolved 
and Mr. Keily went to California, hoping 
to more rapidly gain a fortune among the 
mines of the Golden state. He left his wife 
and one child in Ohio, and after four years 
he returned to Springfield in 1856 with a 
capital sufficient to enable him to become an 
active and useful factor in the business life 
of this city. 

^Ir. Kelly's first x'enture following his 
return \\as in the wholesale grocery line, 
but after a short tiine he disposed of his in- 
terests in that house and in X'ovember. 
1857, became a n:ember of the firm of 



W'hiteley, Fassler & Kelly. He was a val- 
ued addition to the firm, both because he 
possessed practical knowledge as a mechanic 
and also because he had several thousand 
dollars in ready money to invest, and the 
firm was in need of cash capital in the early 
days of its existence. The new house pros- 
pered as the years passed, their sales bring- 
ing to them an excellent return, until the 
firm became recognized as a leader in the 
manufacture of agricultural hnplements 
throughout the country. Before Mr. Kel- 
ly's connection therewith was terminated 
tire Champion works became one of the 
most important and extensive industries of 
Springfield, employing a large force of 
workmen, utilizing the most improved ma- 
chinery in the conduct of the business and 
ha^•ing• a plant of magnitude, the products 
of which produced sales that annually 
amounted to thousands of dollars. The firm 
built a very extensive plant on East street in 
order to accommodate the increased busi- 
ness. In 1 88 1. howe\-er, Mr. Kelly sold out 
his one-tliird interest to William N. White- 
ley, and in 1882 purchased the Rinehart & 
Ballard Threshing ilachine Works and or- 
ganized a company under the name of the 
Springfield Engine and Thresher Company. 
This was incorporated with O. S. Kelly as 
president and O. W. Kelly, superintendent. 
Later the business name was changed to the 
O. S. Kelly Company and the cajiital stock 
increased from two hundred and fifty thou- 
sand dollars to three hundred and fiftv thou- 
sand dollars. This company manufactured 
threshing machines and engines, which for 
many )-ears were largely sold all over the 
country. To-day this branch of the business 
is largely carried on at Iowa City. Iowa, 
where about three years ago an extensive 
plant was established. There are manufac- 



8o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tured the separators and feed mills while the 
engines are constructed at the home plant in 
Springfield. For the past five years the 
cftnipany has extensively manufactured pi- 
ano plates, now carrying on one of the larg- 
est husiness enterprises of its kind in the 
United States. The minimum numijer of 
employes at one time in the facton- during 
the year is four hundred and twenty-five 
and the numher often reaches the maximum 
of five hundred and twenty-fi\e. The vol- 
ume of business has constantly grown until 
the products of the house are now knoiwn 
throughout the country, the plates l:)eing 
sold on a large scale to piano mamtfactur- 
ers. They also manufacture all kinds of 
rollers in various sizes and their export 
business in rollers has reached mammoth 
proportions. 

After the Whiteley, Fassler & Kelly 
Company had erected its big East street 
works, Mr. Kelly, on selling out his interest 
in the business, purchased the old factory 
of the firm, tore down the building and on 
its site erected the .Arcade buildings, cover- 
ing one hundred and fifty by three hundred 
and forty feet. This place is utilized by the 
Arcade Hotel, t\\ent\--!five business rooms 
and many offices, and by Nelson's Commer- 
cial College and is one of the finest buildings 
of Springfield. .At one time Mr. Kelly was 
also connected with the banking interests of 
the city, having been a director and vice 
president of the Secfmd Xatioiial Bank dur- 
ing its existence. 

On the 23d of Deceml^er. 1847. Mr. 
Kelly was united in marriage to Ruth .\nn 
Peck, whose father, B. W. Peck, was a 
resident of Bridgeton. Xew Jersey, in early 
life and migrated westward to Ohio at an 
early day, journeying in the primitive man- 
ner of the times. lie made his wav from 



Baltim.ore to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in a 
waigon and then came on a flat-lx)at down 
the Ohio river to Cincinnati, where he left 
his family while he traveled the distance on 
foot to Springfield. Being please<l with the 
prospects of the embTvo city he then secured 
a team and brought his family to his new 
home. It was after the removal of the 
parents to this city that Mrs. Kelly Avas 
born, her natal day Ijeing December 24, 
1 82 J. By her marriage she l^ecame the 
n:other of four sons and one daughter, of 
whom only two sons are now living: O. 
\V. and E. S. Kelly. The family home was 
a pleasant residence at the .southwest cor- 
ner of Market and Mulljerry streets and it 
wa,^ noted for its gracious and generous 
ho,spitality, but in 1901 Mrs. Kelly was 
called to her final rest. [Kissing away nn the 
9th of May, "1 901, in her sevaity-ninth 
year, after a happy married life of more than 
fifty-three years. Ideal relations existed in 
the home, the mutual love and confidence 
increasing as time passed by. Mrs. Kelly 
was a devoted wife and mother, .sharing with 
the husljand and sons in their an.bitions and 
desires, her council often proving of value in 
business affairs as well as concerning other 
interests of life. Of a domestic nature, Mr. 
Kelly found his greatest enjoyment l>y his 
own fireside in the society of his family an<l 
friends. 

Throughout his residence in Springfield, 
Mr. Kelly has always taken a dee|) and 
helpful interest in the city, its development 
and improxemait, and has not only exerted 
his official prerogatives for the gaieral grxxl 
but in the capacity of a private citizen has 
lalx)refl earnestly and effectively to jjromote 
the public welfare along lines of material 
develq:)mait and intellectual and moral cul- 
ture. In 1 8^3 he was elected a member of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



8i 



the city council during the exciting times 
of the Civil war and was continuously re- 
elected to that position until his services had 
co\ered a period of six years. When the 
water \vorks were established in Springfield 
he was appointed one of the tnistees 
to inaugurate and put in operation the water 
s\'stem, his colleagues being John H. Thom- 
as and George H. Fre)-. The work was 
satisfactorily completed at an expense of 
four hundred thousand dollars. In 1887 
the highest honor within the gift of the citi- 
zens of Springfield was conferred upon Mr. 
Kelly by his election to the mayoralty. He 
was chosen on the Rq^ublican ticket and 
ser\"etl for two years, during wdiich time tlie 
citv hall was built at a cost of two hundred 
and twenty-five thousand dollars. At the 
same time the city built the esplanade, w bile 
^Ir. Kelly donated the fountain which is 
erected in the same district. At the time 
he entered upon the duties of chief execu- 
ti\e of Springfield, in 1887, the city was en- 
gaged in building a hospital, and by reason 
of his office he was ex-officio chairman oif 
the hospital board. The institution was com- 
pleted and opened during his adniinistratioai 
and from 1898 to 1902 he served as a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees. He was also 
cx-ofificio member of the tax commission and 
after the expiration of his term of serA'ice 
he was appointed by the jndge of the court 
as a member of the tax commission board 
and ser\-ed for two terms or six years. 
During the past twenty-two years he has 
been one of the trustees of Fernclifif ceme- 
tery, and for the past four years has been 
president of the board, during which time 
great changes and many improvements ha\'e 
been wrought in the Ijeautiful city of the 
dead. He has ever been watchful of oppor- 
tunities to promote the public good, and 



although he is alwa}-s quiet and miostenta- 
tious in his work for the imprcA'ement of 
Springfield, the city acknowledges its in- 
debtedness to him for effective and beneficial 
services rendered. Mr. Kelly is always 
courteous, kind and affable, and those who 
know him personally ha\'e for him a w'arm 
regard. A man of great natural ability, his 
success in business from the beginning ot 
his residence in Springfield was uniform and 
rapid. As has beai truly remarked, after 
all that ma\' be done for a man in the way 
of gi\-ing him early opporttmities for ob- 
taining the requirements which are sought 
in schools and in books, he m.ust essentially 
formulate, determine and give shape to his 
own character; and this is what Mr. Kelly 
has done. He has persevered in the pursuit 
of a persistent purpose and gained a most 
satisfactory reward. His life is exemplary 
in all respects and he has ever supported 
those interests which are calculated to uplift 
and baiefit humanity, while his oavn high 
moral worth is deserving of the highest com- 
mendation. 



JOHN M. KILLS. 



The fam.ily name oi our subject has 
been closely connected with the history of 
Clark comity through several generations 
and e\-er in an honorable way that hais re- 
flected credit upon the county. Tlie subject 
of this review is one whose life work adds 
new luster to the creditable family record, 
for he is known as a reliable and enterpris- 
ing business man who has won and retained 
the confidence of his fellow townsmen. He 
was born in Springfield, Xovemlier 10, 
1840. and is a .son of William .\. Kills, 
whose birth occurred in Berks countv, Penn- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



sylvaiiia, in 1809. The paternal grandfa- 
ther, Jacob \V. Kills, was engaged in the 
mannfacture of papei" in Beiks county, and 
in 1820 left the Keystone state, emigrating 
to Ohio. He took up his alx)de in Clark 
county and erected a paj^er mill near where 
the building of the Springfield Metallic 
Casket Compan)- now stands. This was the 
first manufacturing dcme in the city. The 
business was carried on consecutively un- 
til after the Civil war, when Mr. Kills sold 
out to Charles Bacon. Afterward the busi- 
ness was absorbed by the trust and the fac- 
tory at this place closed up. Jacob \\'. Kills 
was a leading and influential residait of 
Springfield in the days of its villagehood 
and he served as a member of the county 
iufinr.an- Ixwrd until his death, which oc- 
cmred in 1865, when he was ninety-seven 
years of age. He was among the honored 
pioneers of the city and county and left 
the impress of his individuality upon the 
public progress and business advancement. 
His wife was also a native of the Kejstone 
state and both were laid to rest in Green- 
mount cemeteiy. In their family were five 
children, namely : Susan, Rebecca, Mary 
William A. and Jacob \\"., Jr. All came to 
this county and all died here with the excep- 
tion of Rebecca, who departed this life in In- 
diana. The n:embers of the family readied 
ad\anced ages and the sons grew up in 
the business that \\as followed by their 
fatiier. 

William A. Kills was only about eleven 
years of age when the family came to 
Springfield. His educational privileges 
were limited because no very good schools 
had been established in this section of 
the country at that time. l>ut he became 
a well read man and a g(X>d scribe, 
gaining bis knowledge through read- 



ing, experience and observation. He gave 
his p<jlitical support in early days to the 
\\'hig party, and afterward became a stanch 
Republican. He served as a meir.ber of 
the city council for a numl>er of years and 
was a public spirited man, devoted to the 
welfare of his community. Some of the 
family were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and others of the Baptist 
church and the father of our subject was 
a charter men.her of Clark Lodge, F. & A. 
M., in which he passed all of the chairs, 
and in the conunandery he attained the de- 
gree of Knight Templar. He was also a 
charter member of Springfield Lodge. I. O. 
O. F., and of the Encam.pment, and filled 
all of the oftices of the former. He was an 
earnest worker in these fraternal circles and 
in his life exemplified the benevolent spirit 
upon which they are based. Having learned 
the business of manufacturing paper in his 
youth he carried it on for a numter of years, 
winning success through his enterprising 
and well directed efforts. He did not self- 
ishly hoard his earnings, but was liberal 
in his patronage of all aiterprises that b.e 
believed would benefit tlie city. He married 
Charlotte Hawkins, a native of England, 
who came to this country with her ])arents 
in a sailing vessel, the family .settling in 
Clark cpunty, Ohio. Her father purchased 
government land and engaged in fam-.ing. 
His children were John, James, William, 
Charlotte, Hannah, Xancy and Sarah, all 
of whom are now deceased, although all 
reached advanced ages and passed away in 
this county. The father of our subject died 
at his home on Columbia street in Spring- 
field August 14. 1894. and the mother in 
1898. They had three daughters and four 
sons, of whom Charlotte died in early child- 
hood. The others now deceased are: Ja- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



S3 



cob \\'., who was a musician in the Thirty- 
first Ohio Infantry during the Civil war 
and was killed in the service when sixteen 
years O'f age; and William \., whoi died at 
the age of fifty-three years. Those living- 
are: Sarah A., the widow of John Shelle- 
barger, a resident of Bethel township : Jolui 
^[. ; and James J\I., who resides with his 
hr(.)ther John. He served for three years 
in the regular army and was a \'olunteer in 
an Ohio regim.ent during the Ci\-il war, 
joining that conanand at the age of nine- 
teen years. The children all attended the 
subsciption scliools of the county, for pub- 
lic schools w'ere a new thing in their youth. 
John AI. Kills was thus educated and 
during the periods of vacation he worked 
in his father's mill. At the age of twenty 
he joined the arm}_, for his patriotic spirit 
was aroused by the attempt of the south -to 
q\erthrow the Union, and hardly had the 
smc>ke of Fort Sumter's guns cleared away 
when, in April, 1861, he enlisted in Com- 
pany F. Second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
for three months' ser\-ice. On the expira- 
tion of that term he re-enlisted and became 
first lieutenant of Company K, Thirty-first 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and took part in 
the battles of Mills Springs, on the banks 
of the Cumberland, and those of the Ala- 
ban a and Mississippi campaign, including 
the battles of Perryville, Stone River and 
Pittslmrg Landing-, and was also in the 
siege of Corinth and the battle of Franklin, 
and later went with Sherman on his cele- 
brated march toi the sea. During the term 
of his first enlistment he had taken part in 
the first battle of Bull Run. He served al- 
together in twenty-five battles of the war, 
but never was wounded or injured, although 
the con-pany saw \-ery acti\-e ser\-ice and he 
was often in the thickest of the fight. At 
length, when the war was over, he partici- 



pated in the grand review in Washington 
and was discharged in Columbus, Ohio, re- 
turning to his home with a most creditable 
and honorable military record. 

Mr, Kills then began: to Avork in the 
machine shop of Warder, Bushnell & Gless- 
ner, being thus eir.ployed for several v-ears. 
He was also with John Foos and later 
ser^;ed as foreiran of the machine shop of 
the Thomas Manufacturing Company for fif- 
teen years. In 1S90 he entered the draying 
ijusincss, beginning on a small scale, and 
as his patronage increased he enlarged his 
facilities and now has five teams, employed 
in this way. Among his patrons are many 
of the leading residents of the city and he 
does a general draying and trucking busi- 
ness, ha\-ing made a success of his enterprise 
by giving it his perso'nal attention. 

Mr. Kills was married in Spring-field 
on the 19th o<f December, 1878, to Miss 
Ellnora Harding, who was born in this city 
in 1850, a daughter of William H. Harding, 
who \\-as a brick contractor. He was born 
in 180S and died in 1867. His wife, Mr~. 
Mahala C. Harding, was, like her husband, 
a native of Maryland, and she died in Feb- 
ruary, 1 888, at the age of seventy-eight 
xears. In their family w-ere the following 
chiklren: Williarii F., now deceased; John 
M., who has also passed away; Samuel P.. 
now deceased, who was a soldier in the Civil 
war; Mary E., Cliailes X., Emily C. and 
William C, all deceased ; George, a resident 
I A Springfield; Edward, of Dayton, Ohio; 
and Ellnora, now Mrs. Kills. The Harding- 
family had come to this country at an early 
da}', about the sa.me time that the parents of 
our subject arri\-ed. They were of Eng- 
lish ancestry and were actixe factors in the 
de\-elopn:ent of this portiijai of Ohio. ]\Irs. 
Kills w-as educated in the public schools. 

Our subject antl his wife liave one son. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Charles E., who was born June 13. 1871, 
Slid assists Mr. Kills in his business. He is 
married and has one daughter, Helen 
Beatrice, who was lx>rn in 1891 and is at- 
tending school, maiking her home with our 
suihject. 

_Mr. Kills purchased a lot and erected 
thereon his present residence in 1886. which 
is located at 390 Di'bcrt street. He and his 
wife are m.embers of the First Lutheran 
church, take aai active interest in its work 
and withhold their support from no mo\e- 
ment for the general good. In national af- 
fairs he is a Dan<xrat. but in local elections. 
where there is no issue involved, he supports 
the men best cjualified in his oijinion to per- 
form the business of the town and county. 
He belongs toi the Union Veteran Union, in 
which he has served as quartermaster. Hi.- 
success has been by no means the result of 
fortunate circun. stances. l>ut has come to 
him through energy, lal)or and perseverance, 
directed by an evenly balanced mind and 
by honorable business principles. He coni- 
jiiands the respect of all with whom he has 
come in contact and deserves the high re- 
gard of his fellow men, as his life has ever 
been honorable and straightforward. 



lli'ZEKI.MI \i. CA'AGVM, I'li.D., D. D. 

A man of irorc than local fame. Profes- 
sor Hezekiah Kiieuhush (ieiger left a life 
record which is inseparably interwoven with 
the history of Si)ringfield and its moral, so- 
cial and iiucllectual dexelopn.ent and lii?- in- 
tluence for good in the world cannot ne 
measured, for his was an individuality which 
left its im])rcss upon the lives of all with 
whom he came in contact. Had he accom- 
plished nothing save the founding of Wit- 
tenberg College. Springfield wmild liave 
reason to hold hin^ in grateful remembnmce. 



but his efforts along many lines contribuled 
in large measure to public progress here and 
the sum total of the world's knowledge was 
augn:enle(l by his rcse.'\rch and inxestiga- 
tion. It is said of an eminent man of old 
that "he has done things worthy to be writ- 
ten ; that he has written things worthy to 
be read; and by his life has contributed to 
the welfare of the republic and the hap- 
piness of mankind." He on whom this 
trariscendant eulogy can be ;,ronounced with 
e\ en partial truth is entitled Xo the gratitude 
of his race, and nowhere within the liniils 
of this section of Ohio lias there died a man 
over whom this n:ight more justly be -aid 
than over Y)\\ Geiger. 

His life history began in Greencastle, 
.Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, his na- 
talclay Ijeing January 10, i8jo. and from 
German and Scotch ancestr_\- he was de 
scended. His paternal grandfather, Charles 
Geiger. born in Germany, crossed the At- 
lantic to America and settled in Montgom- 
ery county about 177^. He was living near 
Philadelphia at the time of the Rev(;lution- 
ary war antl he lx)re an honorable part in 
the struggle for freedom between the colo- 
nists and the mother country. By trade he 
was a n'illcr and he spent his entire life aft- 
er his emigration to this country in Penn- 
sylvania. 

iicnry (ieiger. the father of the Doctor, 
was born in Montgom.ery county. Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1789. was reared in his native state 
and was a man of gocxl mental calibre, 
strong convictions, and was a good citizen. 
He was intensely loyal to his coiuitry and 
at the time of the war of 181 2 he joined 
General Scott's division and ])artici])ated in 
the battles of Chippewa Plains and Lundy's 
Lane. He was also with Comnwxiore Perry 
in bis naval victory on Lake Erie and was 
with the shiiis that anchored ;it Put-in-Bav 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



85 



and assisted in bnrying the dead who are 
interred there. At the close of the war he 
received an honorable discharge from the 
army and settletl in Franklin coamty, Penn- 
sylvania. Henry Geiger was married in 
1815 to Julia Rheubush, who was of Scotch 
parentage and was lx)rn and reared in Ha- 
gerstown, Maryland. In the year 1833 
Henry Geiger removed with his family to 
Columbiana county, Ohio, and after a year 
there passed went to Holmes count}-, this 
state, where he li\ed until his remo\al to Ur- 
bana, in 1S51. Here his wife died August 31, 
1854. He lived retired during the last years 
of his life, spending most of his time with 
his children. His death occurred at the 
home of his son, Dr. Geiger, of Dayton, 
Ohio, in 1861. In the family were eleven 
sons and a daughter, and o>f this numljer 
se\-en hecame prominent professiomal men, 
there being, beside Dr. Geiger of this re- 
view, two ministers of the gospel, one physi- 
cian and three lawyers ; two of whom at- 
tained judgeships, while one was a gen- 
eral in the Union army. The father, with 
intense patriotism, offered his services to 
the go\-ernment in the Cixil \var, Ijut was 
not accepted because of his age. The i:>nly 
sur\-ivin;g n.embers of his famil_\- are Rev. 
Dr. Andrew Geiger, of Kansas City, Alis- 
souri : and Mrs. J. B. Hileman, of Altoona, 
Pennsylvania. The parents were members 
of the Lutheran church and in that faith 
reared their family. 

Dr. Geiger of this review spent the ear- 
ly }ears of his life in the state of his nativi- 
ty and accon.panied his parents on their re- 
mo\-al to Ohio. He was provided with good 
educational privileges and in 1846 was grad- 
uated with high rank in Pennsylvania Col- 
lege. When lie had completed liis cillegi- 
ate course he came tc* Spriiigheld, and join- 
ing Rev. Ezra Keller, D. D. and Micliael 



Diehl, became one of the founders of Wit- 
tenberg College, which will e\'er stand as 
a monument to the pul>Lic spirit and Chris- 
tian philanthropy oif these gentlemen. Dr. 
Geiger accepted a professorship in the new 
mstitution, becoming instructor in Latin, 
natural sciences and mathematics, antl Ije- 
came widely recognized as one of the most 
capable educators of Ohio, his broad learn- 
ing and the readiness with which he impart- 
ed it tot others doing much to estaljlish a 
high standard foT the school. As the college 
grew his duties became nioTe arduous and 
resigning the chair of Latin and mathemat- 
ics, he devoted his entire attention to that 
of natural science. This occurred in 1873. 
In this counection extensive travel for in- 
vestigation residted, and in 1874 he visited 
the Pacific coast and the Sandwich Islands 
in compan_\- with the Hon. John W. Book- 
waiter and wife, on which trip Mr. Book- 
waiter first e.xtended his travels beyond the 
borders o^f this land. While on this jour- 
ney Dr. Geiger made original sur\-eys of 
the craters of the islands and gathered much 
data oi great scientific interest. The inci- 
dents of the trip were embodied in a, most 
interesting volume published by Mr, Book- 
waiter. 

Early in his professional career Dr. Gei- 
ger was ordained to the ministry by the 
Wittenberg synod, and from that time un- 
til his death continued an a.cti\'e worker in 
the cause of Christianity. He not only 
possessed broad and comprehensixe knowl- 
edge of natural science and of mathematics, 
but made a close study of the great princi- 
ciples of religion, the object and plan of life 
as manifest in the Scriptures, and was a 
theologian of clear conception, fine analytical 
pi>wers and positive con.'\-ictions. His chem- 
ical and mechanical ability were of such high 
order that he was for a consideralile period 



86 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



oi liiT.e retained as an expert by different 
manufactuiing- concerns of tlie city and was 
associated with James Leffel in the perfec- 
tion of his water wheel. Besides his edu- 
cational work in Wittenberg College he w as 
a maitber of both tlie city and county Ixjards 
of school examiners. In 1882 he resigned 
his position as a member of the faculty of 
Wittenberg College and accepted a position 
on the United States geological survey in 
charge of the Blue Ridge division, for which 
iiis well trained mind and previous study 
and investigation well qualified him. He 
acted in that capacity until 1890, when he 
resigned. His inxestigations had extended 
through Maryland. West Virginia and \'ir- 
ginia, and while engaged in that work he 
ad\-anced, and ijroved in opposition to all 
pre\-ious theories, the true theory of the 
geological construction of the aitire Blue 
Ridge system as now accei>ted and recog- 
nized l)y scientists and government author- 
ities. Editorial and literary work claimed 
his attention in his later years. He edited 
the Lutheran Evangelist, and was on the 
staff of a leading agricultural joiu-nal and 
his work in this direction bore the impress 
of a n.ind of strong convictions and fear- 
less purpose. 

On the i-|th of December, 1834. Dr. 
Geiger was united in marriage to Miss Xan- 
cv Melvina Hartfortl, who was b-orn in 
\\'est Virginia, but was educated in Steu- 
ben ville, Ohio, and became a teacher in the 
Presbyterian Seminary in Spring-field, 
wh.ere she met and married Dr. Oiger. 
They became the parents of seven children: 
Alice M.. who was graduated in Wittenberg 
College in 18711. the first wcnran to com- 
plete the course there; Charles A., manager 
of the Troy \\'agon works, of Tro\-, Ohio: 
Lizzie G.. the wife of A. D. Hosterman, of 
Springfield: Anna L.. the wife of J. X. 



Carver, of Springfield, n:anager of the 
Farm Xews; Harry AL, of Indianapolis; 
Ella L. ; and Frank W. With the excep- 
tion of Harry, all are graduates of Witten- 
berg College, and Frank, Alice and Ella 
occupy the old family home, which was built 
by Dr. Geiger at Xo. 3 Ferncliff avenue, in 
1853, ''"^^ '-^ O"^ '*^' ^'^^ oldest residences of 
the city. 

Dr. Geiger passed away July 18, 1889, 
and his wife Septeml>er 30, 1900. Thus de- 
parted this life one who had played an im- 
port part in molding the history of 
Springfield. His work was not of a charac- 
ter that cijuld l>e measured by dollars and 
cents, nor had it erected a monum.ent in any 
building or commercial enterprise of the 
city, but its power was that of influencing 
intellectual and moral develoijn-.ait, of con- 
trolling actiim through the development of 
high character and lofty puipose. 
•'His life was nolMe and the elements 

So mixed in him that Xature might 
stand up 

And say to all the world, "this was a 
nan." "' 

MRS. EL1Z.\ D. STEW.VRT. 

As long as history chronicles the prog- 
ress of the world in all the paths of life that 
lead to the uplifting- of humanity and the 
betterment of the world, so long will the 
name of "Mother Stewart" figure on its 
pages. Among the great movements wliich 
have led to a clearer insight into the plans 
and purposes of the Creator for the hunian 
race, ])erhai)s none has had more direct in- 
fluence or l)eci >me a stronger cause for good 
than the temperance work instituted by her 
in the Ohio town of which she was then a 
resident. Without force or compulsion, but 
through loving sympathy for her fellow 



i 







MOTHER STEWART. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



89 



men, she has enrolled an army of workers 
for the right who are continually winning 
new victories for "God and Home and Na- 
tive Land." And yet not alone as an advo- 
cate of temperance reform is Mrs. Stewart 
known to the world. Her efforts have been 
felt along almost every line that has led to 
the alleviation of human misery caused by 
wrong; her influence has been a potent fac- 
tor in the cause of Christ and her patriotism 
was an inspiration in the darkest hour of 
her countrj^'s peril. 

A native of Ohio, in which state she is 
yet living. Mrs. Stewart was born in Pike- 
ton April 25, 1816, and has therefore passed 
the eighty-sixth milestone on life's journey. 
She is descended from two prominent Amer- 
ican families, the Baldwin and the Guthery, 
and her grandfather, Colonel John Guthery, 
was one of the heroes of the Revolutionary 
war. She looked upon the serious side of 
life at a \-ery early age, for she was only 
twelve when left an orphan by her father's 
death, her mother ha\ing died when she 
was but three years of age. When only nine 
years of age she operated a spinning wheel 
and when her father died and her brother 
went into business for himself, it became 
necessary for her to take charge of the stock 
upon the home farm, in addition to perform- 
ing the work of the household and caring for 
an invalid stepmother. She afterward went 
to li\-e with relatives and there she learned 
to spin wool, cotton and flax and when four- 
teen years of age her day's work equalled 
diat of a grown woman. Though her early 
years were thus largely a period of physical 
:oil she used her few leisure moments in the 
improvement of her mind and as she found 
opportunity attended the schools and semin- 
iries in this part of Ohio and when eighteen 
rears of age she engaged in teaching school. 



Another duty came to her about 1833, 
when, becoming housekeeper for her broth- 
er, who was then postmaster of his town, 
she was sworn in as his assistant under the 
administration of General Jackson, being, it 
is believed, the first woman who ever acted 
in that capacity. In 1848 Eliza Daniels be- 
came the wife of Hiram Stewart, and five 
children were born of this marriage, but 
all died in infancy. With a true mother's 
devotion, however, she cared for her two 
stepsons, whom she trained and educated to 
be an honor to their parents and their coun- 
try. The elder son secured a teacher's cer- 
tificate when only fourteen years of age and 
about that time he entered upon the regular 
course in the Ohio State University, being 
the youngest student ever admitted to the in- 
stitution, and he graduated with the hon- 
ors of his class. H]e always gave to Mrs. 
Stewart great credit for what he accom- 
plished, because of the splendid assistance 
which she rendered him in his early training. 
Later, when the country became involved in 
Civil war the two stepsons went to the front 
in defense of the Union. In those years. 
Mrs. Stewart largely devoted her time and 
energies to the duties of home, church and: 
society, and throughout her entire life she 
has had the deepest love of home. Yet there 
was to come a time when she would leave the 
quiet of her own fireside to take her place 
among the great workers of the wurld, la- 
boring for humanity and Christianity. 

Mrs. Stewart became a member of the 
Methodist church when fifteen years of age 
and in recent years she has joined the Chris- 
tian Catholic church, of Zion City, founded 
by Dr. Dowie, who ordained her one of the 
elders, but her nature has always been too 
broad to be hampered by dogmas or creeds. 
Hers is the religion of Christianity, which 



90 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



embraces the entire race in an effort for the 
universal uplifting of man. She became ac- 
tively interested in temperance work in 1858, 
when she joined the Good Templars socie- 
ty, of which she has since been an honored 
member. When the Ci.\-il war came on and 
her husband went to the south in the commis- 
sary department, and her stepsons as soldiers 
•of the Union, she began her work for the 
'"boys in blue" and thus won from them the 
loving name of "mother." She was one of 
the organizers of the Soldiers Aid Society, 
of Athens county, of which she was made 
the secretary, giving her time and energies 
to the work of collecting money, food and 
clothing, and in fact everything needed by 
the soldiers in the field and their families 
at home. She organized a large class of lit- 
tle girls, instructing them in the work of 
making quilts, bandages, lint and other use- 
ful articles for the soldiers. Her work won 
recognition not only from the humble pri- 
vate, 1)Ut from some of the highest officials 
of the army and of the country, and she now 
lias in her possession a framed certificate, offi- 
cially signed, testifying to the work of her 
county in the Cincinnati Sanitary Fair, 
which work was largely due to the efforts of 
JVIrs. Stewart. When Morgan made his 
raid through Ohio, she stood on picket duty 
at .\thens one entire night, while the old 
men and boys left weiU out to fell trees and 
l)uil(l fiirtifications to ol)Struct the route of 
the Confederate commandjer. She also has 
in her possession a framed copy in the hand- 
Avriling of the author, of Sherman's March 
to the Sea, a song which proved an inspira- 
tion to the soldiers ofttimes traveling a 
weary road. These are but a few of the 
many testimonials of appreciation which 
she received from her wmk and nmre than 
that, her name is deeply engra\ed in rever- 



ence and love upon the hearts of hundreds 
of soldiers who benfited by her labors. Af- 
ter the war ended there was still great suf- 
fering remaining as one of the after effects 
and she" traveled and lectureil in behalf of 
those who needed assistance until much re- 
lief was furnished by those who heard her 
earnest, eloquent words. 

Again her abilit)' was called into action 
as a member of the state board of charities, 
in which capacity it became her duty to 
look after and report upon various charit- 
able institutions of Ohio. Because of her 
pleasing and interesting style as a writer 
her services were secured to travel through 
the south and report to northern papers, 
and tliis she did in 1871 and 1872, thus 
helping to enlighten the ])ublic mind and 
encourage the just settlement of national 
difficulties. 

In' the meantime Mrs. Stewart had be- 
come an active factor in woman's suffrage 
work, and a society, organized in her own 
parlor, chose her for its president. She has 
since become a national leader in this move- 
ment and has attended various national con- 
ventions in behalf of the furtherance of this 
cause. Tbroughout all the years she had 
continued to .speak and labor in behalf of 
temperance as opiwrtunity had offered. Her 
first public address on temperance was de- 
livered under the auspices of the Good 
Templars in Pomeroy, Ohio, in 1858. Hei 
labors continued through the following 
years until January, 1872, when she in- 
augurated a new movement in behalf of 
temperance, which has spread until it now 
encompasses almost the entire civilized 
world. At that date she spoke on temper- 
ance in Springfield. Ohio, the first lecture 
e\cr delivered there by a woman on that sub- 
ject, and under the .\dair law she plead and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



gained cases tor drunkards' \\i\es in the 
courts of lier city. 'I'hen came an aijpeal 
from the Women's Benevolent Society for 
temperance work, and the temperance sen- 
timent tlius aroused led to the organization 
of the now world-famous Women's Chris- 
tian Temperance Union, Mrs. Stewart be- 
ing chosen president of the first local union 
in Springfield. She organized the first 
union at Osborn, Ohio, December i, 
1873. followed by the organization of 
temperance women in Springfield, and 
from that point Mrs. Stewart continued 
her work through the different counties 
of the state. For years she traveled almost 
continuously, taking scarcely time to eat or 
sleep, ever organizing, stimulating and ap- 
pealing to the people to arouse and destroy 
the liquor traffic. When the Prohibition 
party was formed she became one of its en- 
dorsers and has been a member of both the 
state and national Prohibition committees. 
In 1876 Mrs. Stewart became the mis- 
sionary of temperance into foreign lands 
and carried the "white ribbon" to the women 
of Great Britain, who welcomed her heartily 
and co-operated in her great work for the 
reclamation of the race from the bonds of 
intemperance. The British Women's Tem- 
perance Association is the result of her 
work. Almost twenty years later she again 
visited Great Britain, as the guest of Lady 
Henry Somerset, now the head of the move- 
ment there, attending the world's convention 
of the W. C. T. U. In her native land she 
took up the work of introducing the new 
movement among the women of the south, 
white and black, in 1878, and again in 1880, 
sJie sold her dearly prized souvenirs and 
heirlooms in order to secure funds for carry- 
ing on the work there. Abrn'e and beyimd 
all and through all, has Ijeen her abiding 



faith in Christianity, and certainly she has 
followed close!}" in the footsteps of Him who 
came not to Ije ministered unto but to 
minister. 

Mrs. Stewart is the author of two works 
uj^on the subject of temperance. When, 
cuing to her strenuous life and indefatiga- 
ble efforts her health failed her so that she 
was obliged to leave the lecture platform 
and remain quietly at home, she wrote the 
^Memories of the Crusade, and later she 
produced The Crusader in Great Britain, 
books which are more wonderful than fic- 
tion, more thrilling than romance, treating 
of the world's great tragedies and "the 
bloodless wounds of the soul, o\-er which 
the angels weep." 

There certainly was never a more unbi- 
ased anaiyzation of character given than 
that contained in the psychological chart of 
3. Irs. Stewart, made by the great lahrenol- 
ogist. Professor Headley, in 1882, at which 
time he had no intimation as to who his sub- 
ject was. Hb said : "You have an organi- 
zation of remarkable power, physically and 
mentally. You are of the finest quality, and 
hence are sympathetic, sensitive as a flow- 
er, possess very strong affections, and are 
cast in a charitable mold. And yet, withal, 
you have great endurance, wonderful exec- 
utiveness and amount of force, will and fin/z- 
ness, especially in what is right and noble, 
that is worthy of a Wendell Phillips. Your 
brain is very large ; you take broad, com- 
prehensive views of things, are capable of 
managing extensive enterprises and would 
be known anywhere as a leader and not a 
follower. The great organs in your charac- 
ter are Conscientiousness, Benevolence, 
Firmness, Perseverance and Human Na- 
ture. Such a combinatir)n as this was pos- 
sessed bv the John Howards, Florence 



92 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Nightingales and Elizabeth Fre\-s of his- 
tory. You are a natural reformer and agi- 
tator : vou have the head of a missonary. You 
take any risk, make any sacrifice and bear 
exposure or even abuse and the misconcep- 
tion of men for the sake of helping the down- 
trodden, reforming the wayward and err- 
ing and doing work for God, but, alx)ve all, 
for humanity. You are not so orthodox 
but that character, rather than creed and 
human needs rather than dogmas, win and 
hold you most. You are a natural speaker, 
and can make vigorous, earnest, sympathetic 
speeches. Vou should lecture on the great 
questions of the day, 'Woman's Moral Cul- 
ture,' 'Reform.' etc. You have not much ac- 
(iuisiti\eness. and the money y(iu might get 
out (if a thing WDuld be ynur last considera- 
tion. \'nu are nut selfish enough for your 
own personal proht, nor are your afraid of 
public opinion: whether what you said or 
did was pojnilar or not, would never trouble' 
you as long as your conscience said it was 
right. \ on can write, would be a go<jd edi- 
tor or contributor to magazines, etc. Xow, 
combined with your force and moral inde- 
pendence, 1 lind a large conjugal nature. 
You would be a good wife; would be as true 
as steel, even to an inferior or non-appre- 
ciative husband. You are very motherly 
and love pets — the young and beautiful ev- 
erywhere. You ixissess a degree of friend- 
ship thai is large; while you are not attract- 
ed to tlie masses, except to do them good, 
yet with congenial souls you would be kind- 
lier ami would give your confidence almost 
beyond the bounds of need. You are math- 
ematical, exact, honest, executive, long-suf- 
fering and yet are balanced by wonderful 
hope, great cheerfulness, and, at times, are 
joyous and humorous as a child. Herein 
lies the safesruard asainst the strain of vour 



intensely grave and earnest character. God 
cripples your usefulness a little in that he 
had not given you another sex. You should 
ha\e been a man. The world neetls such 
men every day." 

Mrs. Stewart now resides at her beauti- 
ful and attractive home on Appletree Place 
in Springfield. When she reached the 
eightieth anniversary of her birth some of 
her friends prepared and printed an account 
of her life, closing it with the words: 
"Dearly beloved Mother Stewart, yours is 
one of the true lives that 'can nevei" die.' 
Y(jur 'promotion' may come, but your influ- 
ence upon the soldiers of prohibition, patri- 
otism, temperance and righteousness will 
never pass from under your commantl. 
Vou have placed the insignia of your Sa- 
\ior's love in every loyal heart, given the 
ensign of His cross into the hand of every 
true disciple, while the badges of fidelity are 
on every breast. \'our friends, anxious to 
'give honor to whom honor is due," have 
gathered as best they could some of the 
more important and memorable incidents 
of ycjur life-work as a lo\ing memorial of 
your eightieth birtlulay. We feel it to be 
a small and insignificant tribute, compared 
w ith the magnificent life you have li\ed, but 
we know that loving hearts and willing 
hands may write and rewrite regarding your 
remarkable career, yet we are sure that the 
hand of Infinity only can do you justice, 
^birtals can not compute the miles trav- 
eled, the weary steps taken, the heartfelt 
anxieties, the tears shed, prayers offered, 
appeals made, pledges taken, badges given. 
the treasure expended, the faith exercisetl, 
the trusts kejjt and blessings bestowed. Xo, 
we can not know, and you have kept no ac- 
coujit: it was His wdrk, and 'God holds the 
ledger." Blessed thought! that while our 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



93 



loving mission fails in enumeration, the an- 
gels know; and if ciur earnest appreciation 
fails to compass \-our work, God's crown 
will cover it all." 



GEORGE H. FREY, Sr. 

George H. Frey, Sr., prominent among 
the older residents of Springfield, \\-as born 
at Philadelphia, Jefferson county. New 
York, Decem'ber 19, 1825, and is a son of 
Samuel C. and Susan (Calhoun) Fre3-. 
The father was bnrn at St. Johnsville, in 
what is noiw Fulton county, New York, and 
was of the fifth generation in tlie line of 
descent from Heni^y Frev\ who settled at 
Paletine Bridge, New York, in 1684, having 
come from Zurich, Switzerland. The bur- 
gomaster of that city certified him to be a, 
good house-builder. There were no white 
settlers as far up the "\'alley of the Mohawk 
river as the lucality in which Henrv Frey 
took up his al>ode. He was at the headquar- 
ters of the most warlike tribe of the Mohawk 
Indians and these were said to be the most 
ferocious of the American red men. He and 
his descendants, ho'\\-e\'er, lived among these 
Indians for about one hundred years and 
ne\er had any trouble with them. During 
all of the period of the early colonial his- 
torv when the French possessed lower 
Canada and their Indian allies made fre- 
quent forays on the New England and New 
York colonies the Mohawk Indians were 
efficient protectors oif the family. The next 
in the line of direct descent was Henry 
Frey, the second, and he was the father of 
Henry Frey, the third, who was attached 
to the staff of Sir William Johnson and was 
present at the capture of Fort Niagara, 



when it was taken from the Frencli during 
the colonial wairs. He also filled various 
commissions, by appointmait from the 
crown, including the position of colonel of 
militia and magistrate. He was likewise a 
member of the colonial legislature. A man 
of broad learning, he had been admitted to 
the bar and was a prominent and influential 
resident of his community. In 1774 he was 
appointed one of the judges of common pleas 
for the new county of Tryoit, which em- 
braced all the territory of the colony of New 
York, west of Schenectady. His frequent 
appointments, together with the fact that 
just before the Revolution he qualified as a 
judge, and also owing to the fact that he and 
associate judges declined to serve as mem- 
bers of the comittee of public safety, led to 
his suffering much persecution, although his 
k-olher and his brother-in-law were both 
members of the committee of public safety 
and he was a warm personal friend of Gen- 
eral Philip Schuyler, one of the leading 
patriots of the colony. His brother-in-law 
was General Nicholas Herkimer, but the in- 
fluence of none of these men availed and 
neither did the fact that Judge Frey. him- 
self, had contributed seven thousand dollars 
to the support of the anny, for the grudges 
and jealousies of men, who seemed to con- 
trol affairs, were manifest in the continued 
annoyances. He was also seized and sait to 
Hartford, Connecticut, and his son, Philip 
R. Frey, was also put under arrest, lieing 
taken from school at Schenectady and con- 
fined in the stockade at Johnstown, New 
York. Tire son, Philip R. Frey, l>ecame ill 
in his unhealthy place of confinement and 
his mother and sister procured for him per- 
mission to visit home, his arrest l>eing- an 
arbitrary proceeding, for he was then only 
sixteen years of age when taken from school 



94 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and put in confinen.ent. As lie was an only 
son his mother determined to put him be- 
yond the reach of any further persecution 
and placed, him in charge of some Indians 
of the Six Nations. He was then taken to 
Canada, where he remained until after the 
close of the Revolutionary war. 

In the meantime Philip prey was married 
in Detroit. Michigan, to Miss Marie Louise 
St. Martin, who. it is claimed, was a niece 
of General Montcalm, ,who fell at the head 
of the French troops in the battle of Quebec. 
On his return to the Mohawk valle)- Philip 
Frey, who was the grandfather of our sub- 
ject, completed the study of law but was en- 
gaged in practice for only a few years, when 
he died. His first wife had previously parsed 
away and he had afterward married Mrs. 
Elizabeth Howe. The first child bom of 
this union was Samuel C. Frey, the father of 
our subject. 

Samuel C. Frey learned the trade of a 
watchmaker and silversmith at Canajoharie, 
New York, and also followed these pursuits 
in Syracuse, New York. He was married 
in the former place to Miss Calhoun, a na- 
tive of Boston, Massachusetts, and a daugh- 
ter of Andrew Calhoim, a native of the 
north of Ireland and also remotely related 
to the prominent Calhoun family of the 
s::utli. In 1830, whai the subject of this 
re\ lew was but five years of age, the father 
reircned to Canada and there George H. 
I*"rey saw the first steamer that ever sailed 
on the waters of lake Ontario. It was the 
old Niagara, which made a rate of speed of 
alx>ut five miles an hour. The father located 
at Brock'^■ille, Ontario, and took an active in- 
terest in public affairs. In 1837, when the re- 
belliim arose, he and his immediate friends, 
among them Stephen Richards, the father of 
the late Chief lustice Richards, of the Do- 



minion of Canada, were threateneil with 
arrest for suspected sympathy with the re- 
bellion. Mr. Frey escaped without arrest 
and came to the states in Deceirtber, 1S37, 
settling at Morristown, New York, where he 
remained until 1838, when on account of 
supposed hostility to British interests and 
violation of the neutrality laws he was again 
threatened with arrest. He then went to 
Canton, Ohio, with his family, where he re- 
mained for nearh' twenty years and from 
1857 until 1870 he was a resident of Spring- 
field. In the latter year he went south to 
Decatur, Alabama, where he died in Feb- 
ruary, 1877, his wife passing away in March, 
1883. 

George H. Frey received his preliminary 
education at Brockville, Ontario, and later 
studied under the instruction of private 
tutors, receiving excellent educational ad- 
vantages for those days. With the intention 
of becoming a manber of the legal profes- 
sion, he then altered the office oi Hiram 
Griswold, of Canton, Ohio, and read law 
until admitted to the bar in Xaiia. in June, 
1847. -^t that time he came to Springfield, 
which was thai a town of about thirty-six 
hundred. He opened an office, entering into 
partnership with a man who was also the 
editor of the Republic, the leading Whig 
paper of the county. In 1849 ^^^- Fre\- took 
charge of the office of the Cincinnati & 
Sandusky Tel^raph Company, in this city, 
as oijerator for one year. In 1850 he was 
elected superintaidait of the comixiny and 
in 1852 he was elected presidait, so con- 
tinuing "until about 1839, when the company 
was absorbed by the Postal and \\'estern 
Union Telegraph Companies, each purchas- 
ing a portion. During this time Mr. Frey 
had become one of the owners of the Repul>- 
lic printing offite. having purchased an in- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



terest in 1854. about the time of the begin- 
ning nd" the agitation of slavery. He con- 
tinued one of the editors and chief owners 
of the Springfield Republic until 1861, when, 
on account of ill health, he withdrew from 
the business and turned his attention to the 
quarry business, in the manufacture of lime 
on an extensive scale, having large quarries 
north of Buck creek in the city limits. This 
enterprise claimed his attention until about 
1889, and the business was increased to a 
considerable extent, giving emplopnent to 
many men. In 1889, ho'wever, Mr. Fb-ey 
withdrew and has since lived in retirement. 
For a numljer of years he has been one oi 
the directors of the Second National Bank 
and has other excellent investn.ents in stock 
and property. 

In 185 1 was celebrated the marriage of 
Mr. Frey and Miss Jane Quigley Ward, of 
Springfield, a daughter of Isaac and Mary 
Ward. Untoi Mr. and Mrs. Frey were born 
twelve children, oi whom five are still living : 
Isaac Ward, George H., Albert C, Robert 
R. and Susan H. Roibert is connected with 
the John Deere Plow Works, of Moline, Illi- 
nois. The wife and mother died in April, 
i88i,in the faith of the Presbyterian church, 
of which she had long been a member. Mr. 
Frey has held membership with the First, 
tlie Second and the Third Presbyterian 
churches, joining these successively, as the 
churches have been divided and new ones 
formed in order to meet the demands of the 
growing population. He served as an elder 
in the Second church. In politics he has 
long been a stalwart Republican and the his- 
tory of the Republican Party of Ohio said 
of him: "There is nO' one in the state of 
Ohio^ who has done more for the city of 
Springfield and the cimnty of Clark than has 
the gentlen.an whose name appears at the 



head of this sketch and no one is better 
posted than he in the early politics of Ohio. 
As a journalist his pen has supix>rted the 
principles of the grand old party, and his 
intelligent advocacy of its principles has been 
an important and effective factor in molding 
public sentiment. His finn convictions on 
matters of public policy have led him to 
stand loyally b}- the party through the period 
of its darkest gloom as well as its brightest 
da}'S and to carr\^ forward its work until 
many of its principles have been impressed 
upon the statute books of the nation. To- 
day he stands as one of the pioneers 
of Republicanisni in the state, a patriotic, 
devoted citizen, who earnestly cherishes the 
welfare of the country, and believes that the 
greatest good will come to the nation 
through the adoption of Republican policy. 
In 1856 he was appointed one of the dele- 
gates to the con\'ention held at Pittsburg, 
February 22d, for the purpose of organizing- 
the national Republican party and to provide 
for the selection of delegates to^ the first 
Republican national convention ( for nom- 
inating presidential candidates) which was 
held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, June 19, 
1856, to which Mr. Frey was also a delegate. 
He was widely known in political circles and 
was on intimate terms with n.any of the 
early leaders. He was a personal friend of 
Horace Greeley, and when that eminent 
journalist was a candidate for president of 
the United States, Air. Frey ga\e him a 
complimentary \-ote, as did all the voting 
members of the family." He has m.ade an 
untarnished record and unspotted reputation 
as a business man. In all places and under 
all circumstances he is loyal to truth, honor 
and right, justly valuing his own self-respect 
as infinitely more preferable than wealth, 
fame and position. In those finer traits of 



96 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



character which combine to form that which 
we tenn friendship, which aidear and attach 
mian to man in bonds which nothing but the 
stain of dishonor can se^•er, whicli triumph 
and shine brightest in tlie hour of adversity, 
— in those quahties he is royally endowed. 



\\1LLL\M T. OTSTOT. 

William T. Otstot, well known as an en- 
terprising agriculturist of Clark county, was 
born in December, 1837, on the old home- 
stead farm which his father purchased in 
that year, and it is still his home. Hfe is a 
son of Daniel and Hiannah (Dushane) Ot- 
stot. The former was born and reared in 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and l)y his 
marriage l>ecame the father of ten children, 
•of whom the subject of this review is the 
youngest. 

In early life William T. Otslol became 
familiar with farm work through the as- 
sistance which he rendered to his father in 
cultivating the fields of the home farm. He 
was thus engaged until after the outbreak 
of the Civil war, when aroused by a spirit 
of patriotism he offered his services to the 
government, enlisting in September, 1861, 
as a member of the Forty-fourth Ohio In- 
fantry, with which he served continuously 
until January, 1864. He then re-enlisted as 
a member of the Eighth Cavalry, w ith which 
he continued until July, 1865. The war 
having closed, he was then mustered out at 
Camp Dennison. He had first enlisted in 
the S])rinfield fair grounds and he re-enlist- 
ed at Strawberry Plains, in east Tennessee. 
His duty largely took him to the outixists, 
but he participated in the siege of Knoxville 
and was always true to the old flag, faith- 



fully responding to every call made ui)on. 
him and to e\ery military task which was as- 
signed him. After his return home he re- 
sumed farming upon the old home place 
which his father had purchased in 1837. 
paying eighteen dollars per acre for it. In 
1 881 Mr. Otstot purchased this farm from 
the other heirs, paying one hundred dollars 
per acre for the tract of one hundred acres. 
This rise of value indicates the impro\ed 
condition of the farm as well as the ad- 
vanced progress caused by the growth in 
population in the county. He keeps his 
farm under a good state of cultivation and it 
is equipped with modern machinery and all 
accessories found upon a model farm of the 
twentieth century. 

In 1868 Mr. Otstot was united in mar- 
riage to Miss ]\Iary A. AVillis, a daughter 
of Thomas and Elizabeth Willis, of Colum- 
bus, Ohio, both of whom are now deceased. 
Unto our subject and his wife have been 
born three children, but Walter, the second, 
died in infancy. The daughter, Nellie, is 
at home, and Harry, who is now twentv- 
four years of age, assists his father in the 
work of the farm. Mr. Otstot is connect- 
ed with Mitchell Post, No. 45, G. A. R., 
and is to-day a loyal citizen, very deeply in- 
terested in the welfare of his county, state 
and nation, and their sulistantial progress. 



HON. MELVTX L. MILLIGAN. 

Melvin L. Milligan is one (.-f Ohio's na- 
tive sons, his birth having occurred on a 
farm in Perry county July 28, i860. His 
parents were Alfred P. and Rachel (Iliff) 
Milligan. His paternal grandfather, George 
Milligan, was a n;itive of Pennsvlvania, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



99 



bocn in 1801, and became oiie of the pioneer 
settlers of the Buckeye state. He married 
Priscilla Thrap, and among their children 
was Alfred P. Milligan, whose birth oc- 
curred in Perry county, Ohio, September i. 
1 83 1. After arri\-inig- at years of naturity 
he wedded Rachel Iliff, who was born in the 
same county February 16, 1840. Both are 
still living, their home being in Deavertown, 
Ohio. 

Mr. Milligan oif this review was reared 
as a fanner boy. attending the district 
schools in Perry and 'Morgan counties, 
where he prepared for college. He then ma- 
triculated in Zanesville Business College and 
later became a student in the Ohio' Wes- 
leyan University, at Delaware, Ohio, being 
graduated in the latter institution in the 
class of 1884 with the degree of B. A.. 
while the degree of A. M. was conferred 
upon him three years later. He then became 
a student of law and was adn^tted to. the bar 
before the supreme coiirt at Columbus 
Subsequently he went toi Kansas City. Mis- 
souri, where he opened an office and entered 
upon the practice of his profession, but later 
became connected with the Associated Press 
of Kansas City. In the fall of 1891 he re- 
turned to Ohio, locating in Springfield, and 
since that time has 'been a representative of 
the industrial interests of the city. He be- 
cane financially interested in the Spring-field 
Foundry Company, the Miller Gas Engine 
■Company, and the Indianapolis Switch & 
Frog Company, which is aigaged lin the 
manufacture of switches and frogs for rail- 
roads and alsoi railroad specialties. It was 
incorporated Julv 27, 1892, with a capital 
■stock of three hundred thousand dollars and 
Mr. Milligan served as its president for four 
years. In 1902 when the Springfield Fonn- 
■drv Company was merged with and re-or- 

Lof<i 



ganized as the Fairbanks Machine Tool 
Company, he became its president and gen- ' 
eral manager and is now serving in that ca- 
pacity. 

On the 30th of August, 1887, Mr. Milli- 
gan was united in marriage to Miss Jeimie 
Fairbanks, of Columbus, Ohio, a daughter 
of Loriston and Mary Adelaide Fairbanks. 
Four children have been born unto them : 
Loiriston F.. Harry S., Mary Adelaide and 
Rob-ert L. 

In politics Mr. Milligan is a Republican 
and takes an active interest in the success 
of the party and in the election of !iis 
friends. He is a close stutlent of political 
issues and questions, which has led to his 
firm faith in the Republican party and its 
principles. In April, 1901, he was elected 
n ay or of Springfield for a temi of two years 
and his administration is one which has 
giva: universal satisfaction. He has lalx>red 
untiring-ly along practical business lines for 
the welfare and upbuilding of the city. 



CALVIN A. HORR. 

Cah'in Auburn Horr was for many years 
a prominent factor in business circles of 
Springfield and at his death he left to his 
family not only the splendid financial result 
of his labors but also an untarnished name. 
Everywhere in our land are found men who 
have worked their own way from humlile be- 
ginnings to leadership in the commerce, the 
great productive industries, the rranagement 
of financial affairs, and in controlling the 
\eins and arteries of the traffic and ex- 
changes of the country. It is one of the 
glories of our nation that it is so. It should 
be the strongest inceiiti\e and encourage- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ment to the youth of the country tliat it is 
so. Prominent among the self-made men of 
Ohio was the subject of this sketch, a man 
honored, respected and esteemed wherever 
known and most of all where he was best 
known. 

Mr. Horr was lx>rn in Denmark, New 
York, August 9, 1818. and was a son of 
Jacob Hbrr, of Scotch descent. The sch(X)l- 
house which he attended was three miles 
from his home. He had limited opportunity 
for acquiring an education for his services 
were needed upon the home fann. He was 
the youngest in a family of nine children 
and with one e.xception all were sons. .\t 
the age of fourteen years he went to Mc- 
chanicsburg, Ohio, living with his brother. 
Dr. Obed Horr, until he went to Jefferson- 
ville, where he aigaged in the drygoods busi- 
ness for a time and then returned to Me- 
chanicsburg. \\liere he again 1)ecame a dry- 
gootls n.erchant in partnership with hi^ 
brother. Dr. Horr. He came to Springfield 
to purchase the right of way for the Spring- 
field, Mount Vernon & Pittsburg Railroad 
ComiKiny, of which he was the secretary and 
treasurer. His association with that com- 
pany continued for a number of years and 
in its behalf he went to Europe, where he 
spent five months, purchasing "I'ailroad iron 
for the construction of the road. On the 
expiration of that period he returned to iiis 
native land in the month of Alarch, 1861, 
but sold his interest in the road in the same 
year. Tlie folloAving year Mr. Horr became 
a men.ljer of the firm of W^right, Horr & 
Bacon, wholesale grocers, and continued in 
that business up to the time of his death, 
which occurred January 21, 1873. He was 
a very successful business man and con- 
ducted a number of enterprises. For years 
he devoted his entire time and concentrated 



all his energies toward the supervision of the 
active details of his business and his was 
the heart to resolve, the understanding to 
direct, and the hand to execute all its vari >us 
transactions. He also became the owner 
of considerable city real estate. 

Mr. Hon- was twice married. He first 
wedded Mazey Ann Owens and they l^ecan e 
the parents of three children : Luvenia ; 
Lle\vellyn, who is living in Oklahoma; and 
Elijah, who died in childhoo<l. On the i ith 
of December, 1845, ^^''- Horr was again 
married, his second union being with Miss 
Elizabeth Morgan, a most estimable lady, 
who was to bin: a faithful companion and 
lielpniale on life's journey and who still sur- 
\ives him. She was a native of the city of 
London and in- 1832, when twelve years of 
age, was a passenger on a westward bound 
sailing vessel, which dropped anchor in the 
barter of New York, after a voyage of seven 
weeks. She caiv.e witli lier parents. Tliomas 
and Mary Morgan. Unto the second mar- 
riage fi\e children w ere born : Louise, who- 
is now the wife of L. C. Smith, of Saginaw, 
Michigan; Laura, who because the wife of 
Jonathan Harshman and now lives with her 
mother, her husband having died in 1874; 
Lucien, who is married and has five chil- 
dren, and lives in Ogden City, Utah; Mary 
L., who was at home; and Lillian, the 
widow of Edward "C. Leffel. She also re- 
sides with her mother and has lost her only 
only son, James, who died at the age of 
eighteen years. 

Mr. Horr possessed many admirable 
qualities. His record was that of a man 
who by his own unaided efforts worked his 
way upward to a position of aflfluence. His 
life was one of industn,- and perseverance 
and the honorable and systav.atic business 
meth<xls which he followed won him the es- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



teem and confidence of many. \Vithoiit the 
aid of influence or wealth he rose to a lead- 
ing position in C'ark county and his native 
genius and unremitting diligence formed the 
stepping-stone on which he mounted. 



THOMAS G. FARR, M. D. 

Close study, careful preparation and an 
earnest desire to be of use to the world in 
alleviations of human suffering have made 
Dr. Thomas Giljson Farr one of the most 
capable and successful physicians of this 
portion of Ohio. He is practicing in South 
Charleston and has a \'ery liberal patronage. 
The Doctor is a native of Crawfordsville. 
Indiana, born on the 24th of February, 1838, 
his parents being James Gibson and Asenath 
(Bennett) Farr. The father was a trader 
on the river and in 1840, when on his way 
to New Orleans with his cargo, a tornado 
overtook than at Natchez, Mississippi, de- 
stroyed both his boats and everything was 
lost. He was injured but returned as far as 
Evansville, Indiana, where he died of lock- 
jaw, caused from the injuries which he had 
sustained. He had been buried two weeks 
before his widow learned of his death. She 
was left in \-ery straitened financial circum- 
stances and returned to Selma. Ohio'. in 
which place she had teen reared from the 
age of serven years. Mrs. Farr made her 
home in that town and the Doctor became a 
member of the household of his uncle in 
\Vayne county, Illinois, until his mother 
married again, becoming the wife of Mor- 
decai Taylor. The Doctor then returned to 
his mother, whn was living upon a farm in 
A\'arren county, Ohio, and in that locality 
he was reared tO' n:anhood. accniiring his 



education in the common schools and in 
Springboro Academy. At the age of nine- 
teen he began teaching in the country schools- 
of Warren county and during his leisure 
honrs devoted his attention to the study of 
medicine For three years he was a 
studait in the office of Dr. Smith, of Spring- 
boTO', after which he pursued a winter's 
course of lectures in the Cincinnati College 
of Medicine and Surgery during the scholas- 
tic year of 1861-2. 

Dr. Farr began practice at Bellbrook.. 
Greene county, and entered upon a success- 
ful professional career. He remained there 
for a }-ear and then remo\'ed to Selma, 
where he was a practitioner for nineteen) 
years, meeting with creditable and enviable 
success, Ixit his health at length failed him 
and in 1882 he came to South Charleston. 
In the meantime he had further perfected 
himself in his chosen calling as a student m 
the Starling Medical College at Columbus, 
in which he was graduated in the class oi 
1878. He has always read extensi\ely in 
the line of his chosen work, thus contin- 
ually broadening his knowledge and enlarg- 
ing the field of his usefulness. 

The Doctor was married in Lebanon,. 
Ohio, March 10, 1859, to Miss Helen 
Sweeny, a daughter of Colonel James and 
Clarissa (Coffeen) Sweeny, who were early 
settlers of Warren county. Her n:other 
came oif Revolutionary stock. Her mater- 
nal great-great-grandfather was Captain 
John Coffeen, who was a privateer during 
the war for independence. His father, John 
Coffeen, Sr., was a student in a college of 
Dublin>, Ireland, and he and some young 
men w ent on board a vessel to- view the ship 
and were fastened down in the hatch and 
taken to America, where they were sold to^ 
pay the passage. A pamphlet called the- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Traditions oi the Coffin or Coffeen family 
says : "John Coffeen was stolen or kid- 
naped, which at that period \\;as a frequent 
■occurrence. This was many years previous 
to the Revolutionary war and with thirteen 
other young men, who were students at a 
literary institution, he was brought to 
America and was soJd or purchased for a 
sum which was equivalent to the passage 
•charges. John Coffeen was indentured to a 
Boston merchant for a term of two- years. 
Another version of the affairs is that lie was 
inpressed by a British man of war and 
when the \essel was at Ne\v Bedford he es- 
cai)ed and went tO' Boston, where he bound 
himself out tO' a merchant as an apprentice. 
At any rate he proved valuable to liis master, 
rose in favor, married his master's daughter 
and became a partner in the business of his 
father-in-law. When John Coffeen w as kid- 
naped he had in his possession the geneal- 
og>' of the family." This Ji:>hn Cuffeen had 
three sons. Eleazer, Michael and John, the 
last nan ed being the father of .\m\ Cof- 
feen. will I married Isaac Baldwin in Caven- 
dish, Vermont, in i/Qi. They had eleven 
-childrai. one of whom was Emu'a or Amy 
BaJdwin, who< was married July lo, 1804, 
to Jose]>h Parker, and their family consisted 
•of se\-en children, Josq>h, Lucy, Lydia, 
Harvey, Florella, Lavina and Sarah. 
Eleazer t<n>k the family record and set out 
for his father's birthplace in order to re- 
co\er the proi^erty which woiild fall to him 
there, but was never heard from afterward. 
Michael became an owner of large n-ill pro])- 
erty at or near the present site of Lowell. 
Massachusetts. It is said to be the first ini- 
provemait of that great water power. He 
married a German lady by the name of 
Lake. ^lichael was lust in a great freshet 



in one of his mill streams. John was a man 
of great energy of character and possessed 
large means for the times. Through the de- 
pression in value of the continental money 
he lost more than sixty thousand dollars. 
He purchased a large portion of the town (if 
Cavendish from a corporation of a Xew 
Hampshire grant, the first name on record 
in 1770. From the children of Jesse Rjead 
he also bought the land afterward sold to 
Tliomas Baldwin, second from John Church 
O'f Charleston, under a New York title. This 
was just previous to the Re\-0'lutionary war. 
A dispute about the title of the Connecticut 
ri\er anil Lake Champlain lamls, which were 
claimed under a New Hampshire grant to 
Mason and afterward to the Duke of York 
and then the attempt to dispossess the sol- 
diers of lands itnder the New Hampshire 
title by claiming them under the New York 
title, had nearly occasioned oi^en hostilities 
l>et\\een the two parties, InU the breaking cuit 
of the Revolutionary war o\eTwhelmed all 
minor considerations. John was a comnis- 
sioner of the Revolutionary amiy. He mar- 
ried Susan Goldsmith, a Boston lady of 
good family. Her mother's maiden name 
was Gideon. John and Susannah Coffeai 
had fourteen children. John was the first 
settler in Cavendish, Venr.ont. where he 
took up his alxide in \y('(). 'Hie first deed 
reported there was from Jesse Read, of 
Lurenburg, Massachusetts, to John Coffeen, 
March 21, 1781. He was a member of the 
convention which signed the revised declara- 
tion of independence of V'erm.ont and whidi 
formed the constitution of that state. He 
was appointed a captain of militia in 1775 
and was the rq)resentati\e of the town in 
I78i-I785-I78(>. His wife, Susannah 
Goldsmith Coffeen. lived to be o\er ninetv- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



103, 



four years O'f age, at wliich time she was very 
active, being able to \Aalk n ore than a half 
mile over the hills. She was very helpful 
to the soldiers during the war O'f the Re\-olu- 
tion and was the original of the leading 
character in the Rangers Daughter, a his- 
toiical no\el. Her mother's mother had 
died at sea when on the way to America. 

It is from this ancestry that Mrs. Dr. 
Farr is descended. By her marriage she 
has becoane the mother of four children, but 
the first, a daughter, died at birth. Mor- 
decai J. is now an undertaker of Franklin 
Warren county, Ohio. He married Clara 
Xull and has one son, Raymond Gibson. 
Otto H., who wedded Margaret Ferard, of 
South Charleston., is engaged in the jewelry 
business in Wabash, Indiana. Zella H 
died in Selma in 18^80, at the age of fifteen 
years. 

It is said that with boyish enthusiasm 
Dr. Farr sang the song cif Tippacanoe and 
Tyler, too. and shouted for the Whig' can- 
didate and principles. Since attaining his 
majority he has been a stanch Republican, 
casting his first presidential vote for Abra- 
ham Lincoln. He volunteered' for service 
in the Civil war, but was rejected on account 
O'f physical disability. The Farr family 
came of Quaker stock and although the fa- 
ther was a member of the church Dr. Farr 
becair.e identified with the Hickites branch 
o^f the Quakers and holds membership in 
the Green Plain Meeting. His life has heen 
an honorable and upright one, comiranding 
the confidence and respect of all. He is the 
loA-ed famil)- physician in many a household 
in' this county, having for many years prac- 
ticed his profession here, his labors proving 
of great benefit as he has carried on the 
work of alleviating human suffering. Since 
1882 he has resided in South Charleston and 



here and where\-er known his influence has 
been given f^r the general good, while his 
personal characteristics form an example 
well worthv of emulation. 



JOHN W. BURK. 

The name of John W. Burk is well 
known in business circles of Springfield as 
he is president and general manager of The 
Ansted & Burk Company, owners and opera- 
tors of the Springfield Flouring Mill. He is 
a progressive, typical American business 
man, energetic and resolute, and with due 
regard to his obligations in the business 
world. 

Mr. Burk is a native of Canada, where 
he attended school prior to coming to the 
United States, though he was quite young 
when he took up his residence in Michigan. 
During his boyhood and youth he acquired 
a good academical education, and after com- 
pleting his literary course he began learning 
the miller's trade, since which time he has 
been connected with that line of industrial 
activity. In 1897 he became a member of 
The Ansted & Burk Company, owners of the 
Springfield Flouring Mill, which is among 
the oldest manufacturing institutions in the 
city, having been established in 1841 by 
Samuel J. Barnett. Later the mill was 
owned and operated by the firm of Warder 
iK- Barnett until 1897, when it was purchased 
l>y The Ansted & Burk Compan)-. Since 
that time the mill has been greatly impro\^ed, 
remo<leled and equipped with the best roller- 
system, includhig all modern improA-ements. 
The mill has a capacity of five hundred bar- 
rels in a day of twenty-four hours and en- 
joys a large local trade and also has an ex- 



i04 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tensive patronage from New England, the 
southern states and Europe, as well as from 
the towns and cities adjacent to Springfield. 
Lender the capaljle management of Mr. Burk 
Ihe husiness is constantly increasing and the 
■company are now the second largest ship- 
pers in Sp'-ingfield. They are also largely 
interested in manufacturing enterprises in 
Indiana and extensive lumbering operations 
in Washington and Idaho. 

During the years of 1900 and 1901 ^Ir. 
Burk was president of the board of trade of 
Springfield. He is well known in industrial 
and commercial circles for his- enterprise, 
his reliability and his unfaltering persever- 
ance. Fraternally he has been a member of 
the Masonic order for many years; has filled 
all the chairs in the blue lodge, chapter and 
commandery, and has also been an officer in 
the grand chapter of ]\Iichigan. He is mar- 
ried and has two daughters. His elder 
daughter, Miss Helen M., is a graduate of 
the Michigan State Normal College and also 
of the University of Michigan at Ann Ar- 
bor. His younger daughter, Miss Mabel, 
is a student at Wittenberg College. 



TA^IES FOLEY 



Prominent in the ranks of the Republi- 
can party, Mr. Fole\' has manifested his 
loyalt\- to the general good by capable ser- 
vice in office. He at one time served as 
sheriff of Clark county and stood as a stal- 
wart defender of law and order. He is now 
engaged in auctioneering and is a real estate 
agent of Springfield. His birth occurred in 
Moorefield township, Clark county, August 
30, 1838, his father teing John' Foley. Tlie 
familv is of Scotch-Irish descent, and \\'ill- 



iam Foley, the great-grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was a land surveyor of Virginia. He 
served his country as a soldier in the war of 
the Revolution and he reared a family of 
eighteen children, ele\en of whom \)ecame 
residaUs of Ohio. 

James Fole^', the grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was born in \'irginia in 1779 and was 
also a land surveyor. The year 1803 wit- 
nessed his arrival in Clark county, at which 
time he settled in what is now Moorefield 
township, which was a part of Champaign 
county. He made the journey westward on 
horseback and became the owner of govern- 
ment land which he enteretl at Cincinnati. 
In 1808, in Darby Plains, he wedded ^lary 
Marsh, wh<i was born in Virginia in 1784. 
He was one nf the first county commission- 
ers of Clark county, being elected to that 
office after the county was forn:ed, in 1818. 
While he was serving on the board the first 
courthouse of the coimty was erected. He 
was also a captain in the war of 1812, and 
the sword w hich he carried in that struggle 
is in the possession of our subject. He 
was \-ei-y prominent in political affairs 
and for two terms represented his dis- 
trict in the state legislature. In his 
business affairs he prospered, becoming 
the owner of twenty-eight hundred acres 
of land in Clark county and one hundred and 
sixty acres in Franklin county. Fraternally 
he was connected with the Masonic order. 
His death occurred in October, 1863, and his 
wife passed away in 1853, their remains be- 
ing interred in Fernclift' cemetery of Spring- 
field. They had four children, John, Cather- 
ine, James and Susan, all of whom were 
born and educated in Clark county and here 
died. Tliey, too, now sleep in Ferncliff 
cemetery. 

John Foley, the father of mw subject. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



105 



was born in Moorefield township in 1815, 
and died in 1841 at the early age of twenty- 
six years. He wedded Mary Dimlap, who 
was Ijorn in Champaign county in 181 5 
and died in this county in 1899. Their chil- 
dren \\ere Janes and An-.anda. The latter 
became the wife of Garrett Loomis and at 
her death was interred in Ferncliff cemetery. 
After the deadi of her first husband Mrs. 
John Foley became the wife of Theodore 
Stout and had one son, William, who was 
married and at his death left two sons, Harry 
and Charles, 1x)th of whom are living in 
Springfield. In religious faith the Foleys 
w ere Presbyterians. 

James Foley of this review was only 
three years of age when his father died. 
In Moorefield township he was educated and 
went with his mother to Morgan county, 
Illinois, where her father was then living. 
After five years there passed he returned to 
Clark coimty to make his home with his 
grandfather and w-orked upon thefarm here. 
He also attended school for- a time in Spring- 
field and for a short period engaged in 
clerking in a store here. He lived with his 
grandafther until 1862, at which time he 
was married. Just previously he had con- 
ducted a dry-goods store in Springfield, 
which he sold in 1861. He then returned 
to the farm in Moorefield township and car- 
ried on agricultural pursuits until 1873, 
wheni he came to the city and was identified 
with business affairs here until 1876, when 
he was appointed deputy sheriff under 
E. G. Coffin. In 1880 'he was elected 
sheriff of tlie county and served for 
two terms of two years each, enter- 
ing upon the duties of the office on the 
1st of January, 1881. Since his retirement 
from offilce he has been engaged in auc- 
tioneering and in the real estate Ijusiness, 



handling property on commission. In these 
enterprises he has met w'ith gratifying suc- 
cess and is well known in the business world. 

Mr. Foley has always been a stalwart 
Republican, has attended the national con- 
ventions of his party and has been a delegate 
toi county and state conventions. He does 
all in his power to promote the growth and 
insure the success of the party and his 
efforts have been effective in its behalf. For 
six years he served as justice of the peace 
of Moorefield township, was also township 
tnistee and was largely instrumental in the 
building of the schoolhouse while acting on 
the board of education. For fifteen }ears 
he served on the board of equalization in 
Springffield and at all times has been loyal 
and true tO' public duties. 

The lady who bears the name of Mrs. 
Foley was in her maidenhood Miss Mary J. 
Marsh, who was born in Moorefield town- 
ship, a daughter of John and Maria (Dye) 
Marsh. Her father was a farmer of Moore- 
field township biit devoted most of his time 
to stock dealing, driving his stock toi eastern 
markets for sale. He owns seven hundred 
acres of valuable land. Both he and his 
wife were natives of Virginia and came to 
Clark county on horseback. They were the 
parents of three children : Nathan, who is 
living in Champaign county ; Mary, the wife 
of our subject, and John, deceased. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Foley have been 
born five children: Mabel died in Spring- 
field at the age of eighteen years. Frances 
W. is the wife of Carl K. Mower, a first 
lieutenant in the United States regular army, 
being connected with the heavy artillery at 
Fort Totten, New York. He served for one 
year at Porto Rico and for two years in 
the Philippines. Alice is the wife of Ed- 
ward M. Hurd, man;iger of the Albany 



io6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Rul>l)er Tire Company, of Albany, New 
York, and they ha\e three sons — James 
Foley, Francis Casper and Dvvight Harris. 
Marie is living with her parents. John 
]\Iarsh Foley, the yoimgiest cliild of our 
subject, is a clerk in the Lagonda National 
Bank. The children were all educated in 
Springfield, being students in the high school 
and seminary here. 

Mr. Foley is connected with the Knights 
of Honor and is a progressive and public- 
spirited citizen. Any matter or movement 
which tends to promote the general welfare 
receives his attention and if his judgment 
sanctions it he gives to it his hearty endorse- 
ment and active co-operation. His official 
career has been most enviable and over his 
public record there falls no .shadow of 
wrong. 

HON. JOHN H. THOMAS. 

There are no rules fr)r building cliarac- 
ters ; there is no rule for achieving success. 
The man who can rise to a position of emi- 
nence is he who can see and utilize the op- 
portunities that surround his path. The es- 
sential conditions of human -life are ever the 
same, the surroundings of individuals dif- 
fer but slightly, and when one man jjasses 
another on the highway to reach the goal 
of prosperity before others, who. perhaps, 
started out before him, it is because Ik has 
the power to use advantages which probably 
encompass the whole race. Among the citi- 
zens of this county who haAe won distinc- 
tinction, have been an honor and a help to 
the ach-ancenient and improvement of their 
community and left an honorable name to 
the city wiiich mourns their loss, is the Hon. 
John H. Thr.nias. By the death of this hon- 
orable and upright citizen Springfield and 



Clark county lost one of their most promi- 
nent and highly respected citizens. As the 
day, w'th its morning of hope and promises, 
its noontide (jf activity, its evening of com- 
pleted anrl successful efforts, ending with 
the grateful rest and quiet of the night, so 
was the life of this honored man. His ca- 
reer was a long, busy and useful one, and al- 
though he was earnest and active in business, 
he never allowed the pursuit of wealth to 
warp his kindly nature, being to the end of 
his life a kindly, genial friend, one whom it 
was a pleasure to know and meet, under any 
circumstances. By his friends and associ- 
ates his loss is deemed irreparable and the 
communit}' is deprived of the presence of 
one whom it had come to look upon as a 
guardian, benefactor and friend. Death of- 
ten removes from our midst those whom we 
can ill afford to spare, whose lives have been 
all that is exemplary of the true, and there- 
by really great citizen. Such a citizen was 
]Mr. Thomas, whose whole career, both bus- 
iness and social, served as a model to the 
young and an inspiration to the aged. He 
slied brightness around everything with 
which he came in contact. By his usefulness 
and g-eneral ijenevolence he created a mem- 
ory whose perpetuation does not depend 
upon brick and stone but upon the spontane- 
ous and free-will offering of a grateful and 
enlightened people. No citizen did more for 
Springfield than Mr. Thomas in the proud 
lX)sition it to-day occupies. 

It would therefore be incompatible with 
the purpose of a histor\- in which are men- 
tioned the leading men who have mokled the 
destiny of this section of the state to omit 
t!ie record of the Hon. John H'. Tliomas. He 
was born in Middletown, Frederick county. 
Maryland, on the 4th of October, 1826. 
coming of an old southern familv of Pres- 




JOHN H. THOMAS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



109 



byterian failh. His parents were Jacolj and 
Sophia ( Bowius) Thomas. His surviving 
brothers and sisters are : Cliarles E., who is 
the vice president of tlie Thomas Manufac- 
turing Company; Joseph ^\^, of San Diego, 
California: Mrs. Alfred RafYen.sperger and 
Josephine, who are residents of Springfield. 
Amid the retining influences of a good 
Christian home, John Henry Thomas was 
reared and early formed habits of life that 
made his career conspicuous for his deter- 
mination and self-reliance, his perseverance 
and his honesty. His parents realized the 
value of an education and gave to him good 
opportunities in that direction. His pre- 
liminary mental training was supplemented 
by stu(l\- in Marshall College, of Mercers- 
burg, Pennsylvania, where he was gradu- 
ated with the class of 1849. He chose the 
law for his profession and became a student 
in the otfice of the Hon. S. W. Andrews, 
of Columbus, Ohio. In 1851 he came to 
Springfield and entered the office of the bril- 
liant attorney, William White, then one of 
the strongest and best known lawyers in the 
state. Mr. Tliomas possessed keen foresight 
and sound judgment and he saw that an ex- 
cellent business field was opening before the 
residents of Ohio in the manufacture of fuel. 
Many prominent business men were becom- 
ing connected with this line of commercial 
activity and Mr. Thomas, quick to note the 
possibilities for achieving success that lay 
before him, entered into the manufacturing 
world. He continued his law practice, how- 
ever, for two years and was then chosen re- 
corder of the county. This was a direct rec- 
ognition of his ability and personal popu- 
larity, for he had come to Springfield a com- 
parative stranger. .At the close of his term 
he became an active factor in the manufac- 
turing life of this city, entering into partner- 



ship with P. P. Mast in the business of man- 
ufacturing agricultural implements. The 
liouse began operations in the year 1857, 
when the entire country was involved in a 
financial panic that forced many of the 
strong, capable and apparently successful 
business men to suspend operations. The 
capital of the new firm was limited and the 
depression and other obstacles seemed to 
bar the path to success, but both Mr. Thom- 
as and ]\Ir. Alast possessed great energy, 
strong purpose and splendid executive force, 
managing not only to pass through the crisis 
of the times, but to continue and enlarge 
their business until within a few years the 
sales of the firm reached one million dollars 
annually. The business was carried on by 
the original partners until 1872, when Mr. 
Thomas, having already accumulated a large 
fortune, decided to retire and dispose of his 
interests. For two years he enjoyed a well 
merited rest, but comparative idleness was 
utterly foreign to his nature and he deter- 
mined to again become an active factor in 
manufacturing interests of his adopted city. 
-Associating with him his two sons, William 
S. and Findlay B. Thomas, he again en- 
gaged in the manufacture of agricultural 
implements, establishing the large plant 
which now stands on South Limestone street 
and is still conducted under the name of the 
Thomas Manufacturing Company. The 
firm, having gained a world-wide reputa- 
tion, was incorporated in 1887 and entered 
upon an area of prosperity which brought 
10 the stockholders a splendid income and 
at the same time made the industry one of 
great value to the city by furnishing em- 
ployment to hundreds of workmen. A large 
number of traveling men were also placed 
upon the road in order to introduce the prod- 
uct of the house to the market. Year by 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



year the business grew and the plant was en^ 
larged to meet the growing demands of the 
trade, until to-day the Thomas Manufactur- 
ing Company is one of the largest manu- 
factories of hay machinery, harrows and 
grain drills in the entire country. During 
the latter years of his life John H. Thom- 
as, the father, was largely relieved of the 
business cares by the efforts of his son. 
W. S. Thomas, yet he still continued to take 
some ])art in the active management of the 
splendid house which he had established and 
even u]) to the day of his death was seen in 
the office superintending business affairs. 
As he prospered in his undertakings he 
macbe judicious . and e.xtensive investments 
in land. He owned many of the finest farms 
in Clark county and had thousands of acres 
in the west, including extensive tracts in 
Kansas. He possessed rare business judg- 
ment which was seldom at fault, and thus 
liis capital was so placed as to yield a good 
return. Prior to his death he divided his 
pro]>erty. leaving his wife and children in 
^excellent financial circumstances. 

Mr. Thomas was united in marriage in 
tlie year 1854 to Mary Bonser. the young- 
est daughter of the Hon. Jacob Bonser. of 
Oiillicothe, Ohio, and entered ujxw a happy 
married life. Although his business and 
public interests were extensive, he was yet 
a man of domestic tastes and accounted no 
personal effort or sacrifice too great that 
would enhance the welfare or happiness of 
wife and children. Two sons and two 
<laughters were born of this union: W. S. 
r.nd Findiay B., who became associated with 
their father in the manufacturing business: 
Mrs. Sunnners. the wife of Judge A. X. 
Summers: and Mabel. Mrs. L. P. Mat- 
thews. 

Mr. Thomas was a member of the Pres- 



byterian church. .There was no ( stentation 
or display in his religion, but he li\ed a life 
of quiet Christianity and the teach'ngs of 
the lowly Xazarene were exemplified in his 
daily career as he went to and fro among 
his fellow men. In connection with Ross 
Mitchell, he gave to the city a home for the 
sick, popularly known as the Mkchell- 
Thomas Hospital. This was but one 
of his many bene\olent acts, yet more 
numerous were his kindly deeds that 
were unknown to the public than those 
which found jnihlic recognition. The poor 
and needy indeed shared his friendship and 
his aid. and many a home was macle bright- 
er iiecause of his sympathy and his material 
rssistance. 

Mr. Thomas figured prominently in 
jiuhlic affairs and was long a recognized 
leader in public thought and action. Xot 
only was he influential in the municipal life 
of Springfield, but his opinions bore weight 
in the councils of state and national poli- 
tics. For many years he served as a mem- 
lier of the city council, where his ability as 
a financier was recognized and his labors 
pro\e(l of direct benefit to the city. He was 
a member of many of the municipal boards, 
including the board of public affairs, the 
board of equalization and the Snyder Park 
board, serving as a member of the latter at 
the time of his death. In 1868 lie was nom- 
inated on the Democratic ticket for con- 
gress and won an excellent record, at the 
time he made the race for United States 
senator against Calvin S. Brice. Several 
times he was elected by large majorities as 
a trustee of the water works, his ability. 
honesty and capability for the control of 
large affairs bringing him a commantling po- 
sition, not only in Springfield, l)ut through- 
out Ohio and the countrv. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



It is probable that tlie end came to ]\Ir. 
Thomas as he would have wished, for his 
acti\'ity in the world continued almost to the 
last moment of his life. On the morning of 
the day on which his death occurred, Jan- 
uary 23, 1 90 1, he went to the office of the 
Thomas Manufacturing Company apparent- 
ly in good health and spirits, meeting 
friends pleasantly and superintending some 
business affairs. At the dinner hour he was 
dri\-en to his home in East High street, ac- 
companied by his son, Hon. \\\ S. Thomas. 
The wives of the two gentlemen were dining 
out that day and the son, with his children, 
had decided to take their noon meal with 
the father and grandfather. It was a pleas- 
ant family circle and at the close of the din- 
ner Mr. Thomas, accompanied by his son 
and grandchildren, went to the upper apart- 
ments of the house, where he sat down in 
his big arm chair to rest. Soon the chil- 
dren started to school, the son returned to 
his office and he was left alone. About half 
past one a .servant of the family, passing 
through an adjoining room saw him appar- 
ently dozing in his chair. He probably saw 
her and attempted to- reach her and speak 
to her, but instantly paralysis terminated his 
life and Springfield was called npon to 
miiurn the loss of one whom it had ever 
known to honor and respect. He attained 
the age of seventy-four years, retaining to 
the last those qualities of the mind and heart 
which had endeared him to everyone 
throughout bis life. 



^y . THOMAS KIZER. 

The life record of Thomas Kizerd'' cov- 
ered three-fourths of a century. He was 
a nati\-e son of Clark countv and thus at an 



early period in the development of the coun- 
ty he became a resident of this portion of the 
state and his work here was of a very im- 
portant and valuable character. He was a 
surveyor of marked ability and skill in the 
line of his chosen profession and the work 
which he accomplished in this way proved 
of benefit to the community. He stood in 
the front ranks of the column which ad- 
vanced the civilization of Clark county 
and led the way to its substantial devel- 
opment, progress and upbuilding. He lived 
here when little of the land had been re- 
claimed for purposes o'f cultivation but re- 
mained in the primitive condition in which 
it had come from the hand of nature. 

Mr. Kizer was born on the i8th of De- 
cember, 1812, in German township, a short 
distance northwest of the city of Springfield. 
His Ijiith tooik place in a little log cabin 
built in an old fashioned pioneer style. His 
parents were David and Eva (Nawman) Ki- 
zer, who came from Virginia to this state 
after their marriage. The father, however, 
was a nati\e of Pennsylvania. He arrived in 
Clark county aboiut 1809. settling in German 
township, and was a leading and active fac- 
tor in the substantial improvement and devel- 
opment oi this iX)rtion of the county. He left 
!he impress of his individuality upon the 
public life and was prominent in political, 
church and business circles. A minister of 
the United Brethren church, he many times 
preached the Gospel to the early settlers and 
his influence in behalf of the moral progress 
was widely felt. He also preached many of 
the early funeral sermons, speaking either 
in German or English as circumstances de- 
manded. He was also the first recorder of 
Clark county, Ohio. H'e accumulated about 
four hundred acres of land and also had 
other capital. He was a true pioneer set- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tier, cine of those men. wlio, claiming none, 
yet deserved the honor of having assisted 
in laying the foundation of the great west. 
He was appointed to the position of county 
recorder in 1818 ani4 acted in that capacity 
for seven years. On his retirement from 
office he returned to the farm, where he re- 
mained until his death, there rearing a fam- 
ily of hearty and intelligent sons to culti- 
vate the tields and carry on the work which 
he had begun. He passed away December 
31, 1847, at the age of si.xty-eight years and 
was Inn ied in Greenmount cemetery, on East 
High street, in Springfield. Many years 
ha\-e passed since then and few of the .set- 
tlers of Clark county can remember him, 
but his work yet remains and the part which 
he ]K'rformed in aiding in the development 
of this county will endure to all time and 
will ]jro\e of benefit to coming generations. 

Thomas Kizer was the fouT'th in his fa- 
ther's family. He received but limited edu- 
cational privileges. For a time he studied 
at home, studying by the fireside and later 
he pursued a course in an acatlem\- of which 
Professor Isaac H. Lancy was tlie profes- 
sor. His training at farm work, however. 
was not meager and he early became famil- 
iar with the arduous task tif clearing the 
land and deveUjping the fields as well as 
continuing the work of cultivation. 

Mr. Kizer learned the trade of a mill- 
wright and while thus engaged decided to 
turn his attention to surveying. He began 
his work in the latter direction in 1S36 and 
was afterward associated with the surveys 
of the L'nited States public lands in vari- 
ous districts. In 184 I he was chosen county 
surveyor, to which oltice he was re-elected 
again and again until his incuml>ency had 
covered twenty-six vears. He then retired 



from the ofiice. as he had entered it. with 
the confidence and good will oi all con- 
cerned. He had early become familiar with 
the profession. He constantly increased his 
proficiency and in the exercise of his busi- 
ness duties he had acc(uired a comprehensive 
knowledge of all the obscure corners of this 
section of the state, "original errors," and 
other peculiarities which occurred in con- 
nection with the first survey. He was spoken 
of as a "mine of facts" pretaining to the 
later subdivisions of the lots of Clark coun- 
ty. He aided in making the surveys for the 
first railroad through Clark county and had 
more to do with the survey of the pike than 
all other surveyors together. 

Mr. Kizer was also a leader in military 
circles in the old days of the state militia. 
He held different offices, was promoted from 
time to time and finally rose to the rank of 
lieutenant colonel. Old training days oc- 
curred and became impcjrtant e\ents in the 
communities where muster was called. Col- 
onel Kizer's soldierly bearing was long no- 
ticeable and he took great pride in maintain- 
ing the discipline and high standard of his 
men. He was also very active in organiz- 
ing the Rover Fire Company, one of the first 
in .Springfield, and was a memlier of the 
sauK'. 

!n 1814 was celebrated the marriage of 
.Mr. Kistr and Miss Mary A. Tattison. 
who was born in German township, this 
count}-, Se])teml)er 5, 1820, and is a daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Ellen I Wones) Pattison, 
l)(jth natives of \ orkshire. luigland, where 
they were reared, though they came to this 
country prior to their marriage. Mr. Pat- 
tison was a farmer of (jerman township. 
Unto our subject and his wife were born 
eight children, but only two of that number 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



are now living : Mary E., who resides with 
her mother, and Emma, who is the wife of 
H. H. Prugh, a resident of Springfield. 

Tliomas Riser was a Whig in the early 
da}-s and upon the dissolution of that party 
he joined the ranks of the new Republican 
party and continued to march under its ban- 
ners until his death. He was a close and 
earnest student of the political issues of the 
day and was well informed on all matters 
pertaining to. politics. After his retire- 
ment from the office of county sur\-eyor he 
still maintained an independent office of his 
own and engaged in surveying until within 
a few years prior to his death. As he tra\-- 
eled over the country and saw opportunity to 
make judicious investments in property he 
would purchase land and thus became the 
■owner of considerable land, consisting of 
farm property and city real estate, having, 
however, a greater majority of the latter. 
He prospered in his business undertakings, 
owing to his judicious expenditure of his 
capital, and thus he left his family in very 
comfortable financial circumstances. He 
passed awa}' December 20, 1887, and was 
laid to rest in Ferncliff cemetery. Hte had 
been a resident of Clark county for seventy- 
fi\e years and had great love for this section 
of the state. It was endeared to him from 
his boyhood associations, as well as the as- 
sociations of manhood. He had watched 
with interest its development from pioneer 
conditions as it merged to take its place 
among the leading counties of the common- 
wealth. He delighted in noting the growth 
of its business interests, its social, moral and 
intellectual development and he was known 
to co-operate heartily in many movements 
for the general good. In manner he was 
courteous and pleasant, winning friends by 
his disposition and honorable character. 



which comananded the respect of all. Public- 
spirited in an eminent degree, throughout 
the period of his manhood he gave his sup- 
port to whatever was calculated to advance 
the general progress. In all the relations of 
life, whether as a soldier, a public official or 
a private citizen he was ever faithful and 
true and in his life work no shadow of 
wrong or suspicion of e\-il darkens his hon- 
ored pathway. 



FRANK McGregor. 

Prominent among the self-made men of 
Ohio is the subject of this sketch — a man 
honored, respected and esteemed wherever 
known, and most of all w'here he is best 
known. Mr. McGregor is now extensively 
and successfully engaged in business as a 
florist and seedsman of Springfield, where 
he has made his home since 1876. 

He was born in Nottinghamshire, Eng- 
land, of Scotch parentage, June 19, 1838. 
His father was Peter McGregor and his 
grandfather Donald McGregor. The fam- 
ily is noted for longevity and the grandfa- 
ther reached the age of one hundred and 
two years. Tlie father was a graduate of 
the engineering department of Edinburgh 
University and became a ci\'il engineer in 
the employ of the British government. He 
was sent wherever his ser\-ices were needed 
and he worked on the first tubular bridge in 
Wales and also the first oue in this country. 
He came with his family to America in 
1850, settling first in Cincinnati, and in 
later life he spent about six years in Spring- 
field. He was always a hale and hearty man 
and died at the age of eighty-six. For 
sometime he followed civil engineering and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



railroad construction in this country and 
then turned his attention to agricultural 
pursuits, to which he devoted his energies 
until his retirement from business life. In 
early manhood he married Christine Ross, 
who passed away at the age of seventy-six 
years, both she and her husband dying in 
the place now occupied by their son David. 
She was Ijorn and reared in Rosshire, Scot- 
land, and there gave her hand in marriage 
to Peter McGregor. Unto them were born 
ten children of whom eight are yet living. 
One son and one daughter died in early 
childhood and one daughter in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, 'iliose still living are: Thomas R., 
who was a soldier of the Civil war and is 
now a resident of Cincinnati : Frank, of this 
review; David, who is associated with his 
Ijrother in business; Isabelle, who is living 
in Spring-field ; Margaret, also of Cincinnati ; 
and Christine and Jessie, who are residents 
of the same place. 

Frank McGregor was educated in the 
north of Scotland, going there to make his 
home with his grandparents with whom he 
lived from his infancy until he had attained 
Ihe age of thirteen years, when he came with 
his parents to this country, attending school 
in Cincinnati, Ohio. When the country be- 
came involved in Civil war, he offered his 
services to the government in 1862, becom- 
ing a member of Company E, Eighty-third 
Ohio Regiment. This was afterward consoli- 
date<l witli the Forty-eighth Regiment and 
Mr. McGregor Ijecame a member of Com- 
pany H, of the latter command. Me took 
part in eleven important battles and in num- 
erous skirmishes, Init was never wounded, 
although lie carrietl a n usket in defense of 
his country for three years. He was a non- 
commissioned officer, being mustered out 
v.ith the rank of sergeant. His brother 



Thomas R. was in the Sixtieth Indiana In- 
fantry and was twice promoted for bravery. 
They were in the same brigade in the south- 
ern campaign and our subject received an 
honorable discharge at Galveston, Texas, in 
1865. 

Mr. McGregor then returned to his 
home and embarked in business. He was 
employed as shipping clerk for a firm wlien 
a mere boy and after his return from the 
war he became connected with the business 
of supplying seeds and plants to the retail 
trade, becoming connected with a nursery- 
man who had lost his sons in the service. 
These sons were personal friends of Mr. 
McGregor, who then joined their father in 
business under the firm name of S. S. Jack- 
son & Company, a partnership that was 
maintained for ten years. He was offered a 
position in the pension department by Judge 
Spooner but did not accept it. W'iien a de- 
cade iiad passed he severed his connection 
with Mr. Jackson and came t(j SpringhelcU 
where in partnership with his brother Da\id, 
under the firm name of McGregor Brothers, 
they established greenhouses which have 
since been enlarged from time to time until 
they now have one hundred and twenty-five 
thousand square feet under glass. They do 
a general florist shipping business, both 
wholesale and retail, and give their pcrsnnal 
attention to the enterprise, which has con- 
stantly grown in volume and importance un- 
til it has assumed extensive proportions. 
He has kept abreast of the times in his line 
and the plant is a modern one, equipped 
with all accessories for promoting efficiency 
in the work. Mr. McGregor is also con- 
nected with Brain & McGregor Real Estate 
Company and in this department of his busi- 
ness activity is also meeting v.ith creditable 
prosperity. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



U5 



Mr. McGregor was united in marriage 
in Cincinnati, June, 1866, to M!iss Susan 
Brown, who was born in 1843. They have 
seven children, namely: Olive, Grace, 
Bertha, Robert, Allan, Helen and Harold, 
the last two being twins. All are graduates 
of the public schools of this city. Robert is 
now married and has two sons. Mr. Mc- 
Gregor is a man of domestic tastes and finds 
his greatest happiness in the midst of his 
family and he counts no personal sacrifice 
on his part too great if it will enhance the 
happiness of his wife and children. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican and a member of the 
board of park commissioners of Springfield. 
.-V self-made and self-educated man he cer- 
tainly deserves great credit for what he has 
accomplished. Mr. McGregor's actions 
have been such as to distinctively entitle him 
to a place in this publication, and although 
his career has not been filled with thrilling- 
incidents, probably no biography published 
in this book can serve as a better illustration 
to young men of the power of honesty and 
integritv in insurins: success. 



W. O. PADEN. 

W. O. Paden, who is now identified with 
farming interest of Clark county, was born 
on the _'9th of November, i8-|8, in German 
township, five miles northwest of Spring- 
field. His father, James Paden, was a na- 
tive of Peniisylvania, and, removing to the 
west, located in Ohio, where he became the 
])roprietor of the American Hotel in Spring- 
field. His mother li\-ed to become almost 
a centenarian and was a pensioner of tlie war 
of 1S12. James Paden, howe\er, reached 
onl}- luiddle life, ])assing away during the 
boyhood of our subject. His wife bore the 



maiden name of Catherine Whitmer, and is 
still living at the age of seventy-seven years. 
Her father, Jacob Whitmer, was torn in 
Gennan township, a mile and a half south- 
west of Tranont. After the death of her 
first husband Mrs. Paden marrie'd again. 
V>\ the first uifion she had five children, 
namely; P)avid W". : Jane and S(|uire, who 
died in childlvod: W. O., of this review-; 
and Susan, who became the wife of James 
Barnes, and died on Christmas Day of 1901,. 
leaving one son, Claude. 

W. O. Paden of this review started out 
in life for himself at the early age of thirteen 
}-ears. Leaving honie he worked by the 
month until seventeen years of age, after 
which he attended the Holbrook Normal 
School for three years, making his own way 
through that institution. He thus gave 
evidence of the elemental strength of his 
character, for his determination to secure 
an education at the cost of his own labor in- 
dicated that he would accomplish whatever 
he undertook in life and was proof of his 
self-reliant, enterprising and progressive 
spirit. At the age of eighteen Mr. Paden 
began teaching and followed that pursuit 
for twelve years with much success, his 
services being highly satisfactory in the va- 
rious localities \\-here he was employed. He 
had the ability to impart with accuracy and 
clearness the knowledge which he had ob- 
tained and thus left an impress U]:)(jn the 
minds of his pupils. 

On the 7th of January, 1873, \V. O. 
Paden was united in marriage to Miss Laura 
J. Garlough, the wedding being celebrated 
by the Rev. Richard Morris, five miles S(juth- 
west of Springfield, at the old 0\erpeck 
hon-iestead. The lady is a daughter of W. 
H. and Phcebe C. ( Dalr}-mple) Garlough. 
In tile vear 1880 Mr. Paden removed to the 



Ii6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



mountains of Kentucky for the benefit of 
his wife's healtli and remained in the south 
for twenty years engaged in tlie lumber 
business. In 1899, however, he returned to 
Clark county and located upon the farm 
which is now his liome and which claims his 
time and energies. Unto him and his wife 
have been born two children but the son 
died in Kentucky, at the age of thirteen 
months. The daughter, Gertie, born in 
iS/i], is now the wife of Irvin G. Hamma, 
by whom she has two children, Clarence and 
fhelma. 

Throughout his entire life Mr. Paden 
has given his ])()litical sujiport to the Dano- 
cracy and while residing in the south he 
frecjuently served as a delegate to county 
conventions and as a member of the central 
committee. He has never been a politician 
in the sense oi office seeking nor has he de- 
sired the rewards of nffice in recognition of 
his party fealty. He is a member of the 
Presbyterian church and S(x:ially is con- 
nected with the Odd I-ellows Society of 
South Charleston and with Fielding Lodge, 
No. 192, F. & A. M.. also of that place. H« 
has truly won the title of a self-made n:an, 
for from the age of thirteen years he has 
been dependent upon his own resources, not 
only for his li\ing but for his education and 
for his advancement in all walks of life. 
Faithfulness to duty and strict adherence to 
a fixed purpose, Jiowever, will do more to 
advance a man than wealth or advantageous 
circumstances. Mr. Paden has battled earn- 
estly and energetically and by indomitable 
courage and integrity has achieved both 
character and success. By sheer force of 
will and untiring effort he has worked his 
way upward and is now numbered among 
the leading agriculturist of his native 
county. 



.\LEX.\XDER .M.vcGREGOR. M. D. 

In the practice of medicine Alexander 
MacGregor has demonstrated his al)ility to 
successfully cope with the intricate ques- 
tions which continually confront his posi- 
tion. He has been a close and earnest stu- 
dent of the science of medicine and his skill 
and ability are recognied in a liberal patron- 
age. He came to Springfield in 1885 and 
from the beginning his business has con- 
stantly increased both in character and vol- 
ume and to-day he is accounted one of the 
leading representatives of the profession in 
the county. 

Dr. MacGregor was born in CovingtDn, 
Kentucky, in 1852, and is a son of .\le\- 
ander and Rachel (\\'illoughb\ ) Mac- 
Gregor. the former a native of Ivlinbur- 
ough, Scotland, and the latter of England. 
The father's birth occurred May 29. 1821, 
and he is still living, being an inspector in 
one of the large factories in Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He has always been an active man, 
of a sturdy and industrious nature. He was 
educated in Scotland and was married in 
England, coming to the United States be- 
tween the ages of twenty and thirty years 
accompanied by his mother and his wife. 
For a time he resided in Philadelphia. Penn- 
sylvania, and then went to Kentucky, while 
at the present time he is living in Cincinnati. 
Ohio, although for a few years he was a 
resident of Springfield. Hfe is a well edu- 
cated man keeping abreast of the times read- 
ing and observation and in his business af- 
fairs he has prospered owing to his own en- 
terprise and careful managaiient. In the 
family were five sons and two daughters. 
The first died in infancy and Thomas was 
murdered in Louisiana, when about forty- 
four years of age. Those still living are 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Rolaiid, a resident of Cincinnati, Ohio; 
Alexander; Oliver, of Louisiana; and Mrs. 
Adeline Salmon, of Dayton, Ohio. 

The children were all educated in the 
public schools of Kentucky and the Doctor 
is the only one who chose a professional ca- 
reer. After graduating in the high school of 
his nati\-e state he worked at wood-carving 
for a time and was also employed in a brass 
foundry. During this period he spent his 
evenings in study and at the same time did 
excellent work in the line of his employ- 
ment. He carved the models for the Cor- 
inthian capital on the courthouse at St. 
Joseph, Missouri, about 1871, being a resi- 
dent of that city at the time. He also 
worked in Dayton, Ohio, and Chicago, Illi- 
nois, and executed work for the exhibition 
of Joseph Liambert of Dayton. He pos- 
sessed natural ability in this direction, and 
in order to supplement this he pursued a 
course in the MacMicken School of Design- 
ing at Cincinnati. He made rapid advance- 
ment in the work and later he became con- 
nected with the brass wurks in Dayton, 
Ohio, having charge of a fouudry there, 
while later he became superintendent of a 
large foundry in Cincinnati, tilling that re- 
ponsible position for five years. The Doctor 
then removed to Springfield and established 
business here and after two years he sold 
out and took up the study of medicine. He 
had refused very tempting offers from a 
number of brass founderies, having been 
oft'ered the superintendency of the works 
but he had determined to devote his atten- 
tion to the alleviation of human suffering 
and to this end he entered the Columbus 
Medical school and was graduated in 1892. 
He also attended the Ohio Medical College. 
Dr. MacGregor then returned to Spring- 
field and open.ed an oflice in this city, where 
he has steadily advanced in a profession de- 



manding keen intellectuality, strong dis- 
cernment and comprehensive knowledge of 
the principles of science. He engages in 
general practice and surgery and is' a close 
and discriminating student, who reads in- 
telligently and is quick to adopt any new 
idea which he believes will prove of prac- 
tical value in his professional work. W'hat- 
e\er he undertakes he masters as fully as 
lies within the human power. He has broad 
sympathy and patience and his labors in the 
sick room have gained for him many friends. 
The poor and needy find in him a friend anrl 
he has often tendered his services without 
thought or desire of remuneration. 

The Doctor was married in Dayton, 
Ohio, to Miss Alice Smith, who was born in 
Maryland and was a resident of Dayton at 
the time of her marriage. They have two 
children. Howard E. and Ethel, who an; 
graduates of the high school of Springfield. 
In his political views he is a Republican. 
Fraternalh- he is a member of Anthonv 
Lodge. F. & A. M., and also of the Knights 
of Pythias fraternity. He is examiner for 
several of the old line insurance companies, 
is a member of the American Insurance 
Union and of the Foresters, and is medical 
examiner for both of these. The Doctor 
acquired liis education through his own ef- 
forts anrl in the practice of medicine he has 
shown that his choice of a life work was a 
wise one. He is a member of the Spring- 
field Medical Society and has advanced be- 
yond mediocrity to a creditable position in 
professional circles. 



JA^IES L. MAXWELL. 

In an analyzation of the character and 
life work of James L. ]\Iax\vell. we note 
many of the characteristics which have 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



marked the Sc(jtch nation for many centur- 
ies ; the perse\erance, rehabihty, energy and 
unconquerable determination to pursue a 
course that has been marked out. It is these 
sterling qualities which have gained for Mr. 
Maxwell success in life and made him one 
of the substantial and valued citizens of 
Springfield. Mr. Ma.xwell is now a well 
known and prosi)en)us florist of this city 
where he has carried on business on his own 
account since 1895, ^I's residence in Spring- 
field, however, dating from 1882. 

He was born in Kirkcudbright, Scot- 
land, May I, 1854, and is a son of John 
Ma.xwell, who was also born in the .-^ame 
place. The father is a stone-mason Ijy trade 
and long followed that occupation, but is 
now living retired. He pursued his education 
in the common schools of his native country, 
was an apt pupil and has always been a wide 
reader of gCMjd literature. He married Ag- 
nes Lindsay, also a native of Kirkcudbright. 
He is now a hale and hearty man of eighty- 
two years, while his wife has reached the 
age of seventy-si.x years. His mother at- 
tained the advanced age of eighty-nine 
years, while her sister reached the extreme 
old age of ninety-nine years. Unto John 
and Agnes Maxwell were born six children, 
of whom a son died in early childhood. The 
others are: Margaret, the wife of P. H. 
-Muriihy. (if Springfield; Isabelle, who is the 
widow of Robert Aitken and a resident of 
Port Augusta, Australia; James L., of this 
review ; John, who is engaged as chief man- 
ager of an insurance company of Liverpool, 
England ; and Alexander, who is living in 
Springfield. The children all attended the 
public schools of Scotland and the last two 
had college educations. 

James L. ^Laxwcll pursued his studies 
in the ])ublic schools until thirteen vears of 



age when he began working in a private 
greenhouse belonging to General Ervin. 
There he learned the business with which he 
has since been coimected, working for Gen- 
eral Ervin until eighteen years of age. He 
was afterward associated with his father as 
a stone cutter for two years. In 1874 he 
left the land of hills and heather and came to 
America, remaining in Springfield for two 
years. On the expiration of that period he 
returned home to his native land and when 
two years had elapsed he once more crossed 
the .\tlantic to the United States and took 
up his permanent abode in this city. He 
managed the florist business for his brother- 
in-law until he embarked in business on his 
account in 1895. He rented his first place 
for five years and in 1900 purchased four 
acres of land and erected thereon a modern 
residence with all up-tt>date improvements. 
He also equipped a florist plant, has well ar- 
ranged and large greenhouses and conducts 
a good business, selling to the local trade. 
He began operations on a small scale, but 
has constantly enlarged his facilities to meet 
the growing demands of his trade which he 
continues upon that basis, always keeping 
well stocked in order to supply his patrons. 
XW t'nat he possesses has been acquired 
through his own efiforts and to-day he is a 
prominent and successful re])resentati\-e of 
business interests in Springfield. 

In the year 1895 Mr. Maxwell was 
united in marriage to Miss Rachel Kolb, 
who was Ixjrn in Springfield in 1862, a 
daughter of Frederick Kolb, now decea.sed, 
who owned a shoe store at Xo. 9 West 
Main street, Springfield. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Maxwell have been born two sons: 
George L. and Frederick K. 

In his political views Mr. Maxwell is a 
Republican where c|uestions of state and na- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tional importance are involved, but at local 
elections where tliere are no issues before 
the people he casts his ballot regardless of 
party ties, considering only the capability of 
the candidate. He is a member of the Pres- 
byterian church, and also of Ingonxar Lo<lge, 
K. P. \\hile working with Genera! Ervin 
in early youth he learned salmon tishing and 
became an adept at that art. He also at- 
tained superior proficiency as a marksman 
and hunter and in the handling of all kinds 
of fire arms. For three years he served in 
the Scotch army as a volunteer. In all 
manly sports he takes an active interest, and 
in church and charitable work he is found 
as a liberal contributor. Thirteen times he 
has crossed the Atlantic, making trips to 
and from his home in his native country. 
He has found in the business ad\'antages of 
the new world the opportunities which he 
sought, for here labor meets with its just 
reward and consecutive efforts and keen dis" 
cernment in business have won for him a 
creditable place in the financial workl. 



DWTGHT W. HOLLEXBECK. 

In a history of the representative men 
who have been connected with the business 
dc\-elopment and substantial progress of 
Clark county, Dwight Wheeler Hollenbeck 
must he mentioned. He occupied a leading 
and honorable position in business circles 
here fur a number of years and he left be- 
hind him an untarnished name. Moreover, 
his social qualities and genuine worth had 
gained for him the esteem, good will and 
confidence of many friends, who will gladly 
receive the record of his career. 

Mr. Hiillenbeck was born at Great Bar- 



rington, Massachusetts, amid the Berkshire 
hills, on the 12th of April, 1844, and is a 
son of John Van Dusen Hollenbeck. He 
pursued his education at Great Barrington 
and Brooklyn, New York, continuing his 
studies until eighteen years of age. when he 
ran away in order to enlist for service in the 
Civil war with a regiment that had been 
formed in his nati\e town, but because of 
his youth his father ilid not wish him to en- 
ter the army and went after him, causing 
hnn to return home. His military experi- 
ence was therefore nipped in the bud but he 
e\er manifested the same loyalty and pa- 
triotic spirit throughout his entire career, 
doing everything he could to promote the 
best interests of his city, his state and his 
nation. When his education was completed 
he entered into the wholesale flour and feed 
business owned by his father at Great Bar- 
rington, receiving his business training in 
that way. For two years he was associated 
w ith his father and then determined to seek 
a home in a western district, believing that 
he might have better business opportunities 
elsewhere. Coming to Ohio he located in 
Circleville, wdiere he established a whole- 
sale and retail clothing house, entering this 
business in connection with George Melvin, 
his father-in-law. He was thus engaged un- 
til 1886, meeting with creditable success in 
his undertaking there. 

In the year mentioned Mr. Hollenbeck 
came to Springfield, Ohio, where he made 
his home throughout his remaining days. 
Here he entered the insurance field, first rep- 
resenting the Union Central Insurance Com- 
pany of Cincinnati. In this enterprise he 
was associated witli Mr. Heffelfinger and 
subsequently he became connected with the 
John Hancock Insurance Company, of which 
he was made general manager for this dis- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



trict. occupying the position continuously 
up to within a short time pridr to his death. 
He possessed excellent business ability, 
strong executive force, keen insight and 
sound judgment and these qualifications 
made liini a \ery valuable man in the office 
whicli he filled. He was, moreover, strictly 
honorable and straightforward in all his 
business transactions and he enjoyed the un- 
qualified confidence of the company and of 
those with whom he became connected in 
business dealings. 

On the 1st of January. 1867, ]\Ir. Hol- 
lenbeck was united in marriage to Miss Ada 
A. Melvin, a native of Circleville, Ohio, 
and a daughter of George Melvin, with 
w horn Mr. H'ollenbeck had been engaged in 
business. Their union was blessed with a 
family of seven children, of whom five are 
yet living, namely : Anna Marfield. Xelle 
Barrere. Clarence Melvin. Ralph Wheeler 
and Mina Grisv.dld. 

In his political views Mr. Hollenbeck 
was a Republican and by reading and study 
of the questions of the day he was able to 
give his intelligent support to the party, yet 
he never sought or desired office for himself. 
He belonged to the Masonic fraternity and 
in his life he exanplified a teieficent spirit 
of tiie craft, which is leased upon the prin- 
cii)Ies of mutual helpfulness and brotherly 
kindness. His death occurred November 7. 
1896, and he was laid to rest in Fernclifif 
■cemetery. His life record covered nearly 
forty-two years, yet in that time he accom- 
plished much. He was a successful business 
man. a progressive and public-spirited citi- 
zens, a faithful friend and a devoted hus- 
band and father. Through liis business as- 
sociations he gained a wide acquaintance 
and wherever known he commanded the re- 
spect antl good will of his fellow men. while 



to those within the circle of his friendship 
he was endeared by all the ties of a close and 
lasting relation. 



OLIVER \\'ARREX KELLY. 

The pioneers of a country, the founders 
f)f a business, the originators of any under- ■ 
taking that will promote welfare or advance 
tlie educational, social and moral interests 
of a community deserve the gratitude of 
the community. The name of Kelly is one 
tliat figures prominently on the pages of the 
industrial and commercial history of Spring- 
field, and the family finds a worthy and 
honored representative in Oliver Warren 
Kelly, who is the vice-president of the O. 
S. Kelly Company, manufacturers of piano 
plates and road rollers. He is active in con- 
trolling a business of great magnitude and 
one which by furnishing employment to 
hundreds of men, is of great value to the 
city as well as to the individual stock- 
holders. 

Mr. Kelly was lx)rn in Springfield De- 
cember II, 1851, and is the elder of the twc 
sons of Oliver S. and Ruth .Ann ( Peck) 
Kelly. At the usual age he entered the pub- 
lic schools of his native cit\' and after com- 
pleting a course here determined to master 
the German language. With a desire of 
acquiring a practical and thorough knowl- 
edge of this he went abroad, sailing from 
Xew York on the 2d of September. 1869, 
when eighteen years of age. He kcated 
first at Weinheim, Baden, where he contin- 
ued his studies of tlie German language un- 
til he could speak and write sufficiently to 
enter upon the pursuit of a college course. 
.\fter completing his studies there he went 
to Zurich. Switzerland, during the Easter 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



123, 



holidays of 1871, and continud in tliat city 
in the land of the Alps until the summer of 

1872. He next went .to Aix la Chapelle. 
\\liere he remained until the autumn of 

1873. At each of these places he pursued 
special studies and during his residence 
abroad he mastered mechanical engineering. 
He visited London, Paris and other of the 
leading cities on the continent, spending the 
luonths of vacation in viewing the scenes 
of historic and modern interest and in ac- 
quainting himself with the manners and 
customs of the people of foreign lands. He 
was in Germany at the beginning of the 
Franco-Prussian war, in 1872-3, and on the 
4th of September, of the latter year, he 
sailed for his native land, returning after 
an absence of four years. 

Mr. Kelly now became connected with 
the firm of Whiteley, Fassler & Kelly, the 
third partner being his father. This com- 
pany was engaged in the manufacture of 
the Champion reapers and mowers. Our 
subject continued with the house until 1881, 
and the following year he purchased the 
business of Rhinehart & Ballard, manufac- 
turers of threshing machines, forming the 
Springfield Engine and Thresher Company. 
In 1890 the name was changed to the O. 
S. Kelly Company, and the capital stock 
increased from two hundred and fifty thou- 
sand to three hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars, -with O. S. Kelly as president, J. 
B. Cartmell as secretary and treasurer, and 
Oliver W. Kelly as superintendent. In 
189 1 the}- began the manufacture of piano 
plates and their business entered upon an 
era of growth antl prosperity which has 
made their industry one of the most import- 
ant in the country. Their plates are sold 
extensi\ely throughout this country to pi- 
ano manufacturers. The\' also manufac- 



ture all kinds of rollers in various sizes, 
weighing from eighteen hundred to thirty- 
five thousand pounds, and the export busi- 
ness which they do in this line is also mam- 
moth. These rollers are propelled by steam 
and are being used largely in preparing the 
roadbeds for macadam and asphalt pave- 
ments. So extensive has the business be- 
come that employment is now furnished to 
between five hundred and five hundred and 
fifty men, and the various buildings consti- 
tuting the plant cover a large area. The 
machinery used is of the latest and most 
improved pattern and skilled workmen are 
eiuployed in the various departments. From 
the beginning Mr. Kelly, of this review, has 
been active in the management and control 
cif this extensive enterprise, the success of 
which is attributable in no small degree to 
his efforts. 

In 1877 ]\Ir. Kelly was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Katherine Fassler, of Spring- 
field, a daughter of Jerome Fassler. They 
noiw occupy one of the most lieautiful resi- 
dences on South Fountain a\-enue, this 
being one of the fine boulevards of 
the city. They have three children : Ar-< 
min Lee, Louisa and Katherine. The son 
is a graduate of Wittenberg College of the 
class of 1898, and is now secretary of the 
O. S. Kelly Company. 

I\Ir. Kelly is a pronuneut Mason, now 
holding membership in Chrk Lodge. No. 
1 01, F. & A. M. ; Springfield Chapter. R. 
A. M. ; Palestine Commandery, No. 33, 
K. T. ; the Consistory of Cincinnati, ajid 
Syrian Temple of the Mystic Shrine. Mr. 
Kelly has made good use of his opportuni- 
ties. He has prospered from year to year 
and has conducted all business matters care- 
fully and successfully, and in all his acts 
displa}-s an aptitude for successful manage- 



«24 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



merit. He has not permitted tlie accumula- 
tion of a vast fortiuie to affect in any way 
his actions toward those less successful than 
lie, and has always a cheerful word and 
pleasant smile for all with whom he comes 
in contact. 



ELMORE E. GRIM. 



Dr. Elmore E. Grim occu])ies a promi- 
nent position among professional men of 
Springfield, heing one of the leading opti- 
cians of that city. While yet a young man 
he has already given evidence of the posses- 
sion of ahility of a superior order that places 
him above the ranks of mediocrit}'. He was 
born in the city which is still his home, liis 
natal day being September 23, 1866. 

His father, W. S. Grim, was born in 
Pennsylvania on the 2d of February, 1830, 
and now has charge of the accounts of the 
Superior Drill Company. He was educat- 
ed in college, became an expert accountant 
and is one of the best mathematicians in 
this section of Ohio. His has been an active 
and useful career, and he is a well read man, 
devoted to his home and family and to the 
best interests of citizenship. He came to 
Clark county in the latter part of the '50s, 
aiul since that time has been prominently 
identified with the interests of the city, sup- 
l)()rting all measures for the general good. 
That he is jiatriotic and loyal is indicated 
by the fact that at the time of the Civil 
war he offered his services to the govern- 
ment and became colonel of the One Hun- 
dred and Tenth Regiment of Ohio Volun- 
teers. He served for a time as commander 
of the regiment, and then on account of dis- 
al)ility, received an honorable discharge. He 
-devotes nnich of his leisure time to stndv 



and is a man of broad general infurmation 
which renders him an interesting and agree- 
able companion. Of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church he is an active and earnest 
member and his influence has ever been on 
the side of the right, the true and the beau- 
tiful. He was married in Pennsylvania to 
Henrietta Jacobs, who was born in that 
state and educated in the public schools. 
They now ha\-e three children : Horace, 
who was born in Pennsylvania in 185G; 
Ehrore E., of this review; and William J., 
who was born in March, 1869, at Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, where his parents were 
then visiting. 

Dr. Grim, whose name introduces this 
record, pursued a public school etlucation 
and afterward sjient three years as a student 
in Wittenberg College, but left that insti- 
tution in his sophomore year in order to 
take up the study of medicine under the di- 
rection of Dr. Jay W. Morrison, of the firm 
of Morrison & Kennan. who were i^hysi- 
cians to the county infirm;iry. Later he at- 
tended the Jeft'ereson Medical C"ollege at 
Philadelphia, during the winter of 1884-5. 
and then returned to Springfield, where he 
entered the office of Dr. L. E. Russell, who at 
that time was chief surgeon for the Indiana. 
Bloomington & Western Railroad, the Cin- 
cinnati. Sandusky & Cleveland Railroad and 
the Little Miami division of the Pittsburg,, 
Cincinnati, Chicago & St. L'>uis Railroad. 
He was also surgeon to the police depart- 
ment and the Springfield Hospital. While 
connected with Dr. Russell, Dr. Grim be- 
came skilled as a surgeon and assisted in 
many complicated cases. In 1887 he went 
to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he entered the 
Eclectric Medical College and was graduated 
in 1890. He served for one year in the col- 
lege as ]5rofessor of the diseases of women 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



125 



and cliildren. and while performing a sur- 
gical operation he received a bad case of 
blood poisoning and for several months 
it was thought that he could not live. He 
v.as for a long time at various health resorts 
in the west and south and after suffering se- 
verely for fourteen long months he event- 
ually recovered and once more resumed 
his studies. \Vhile in college he won over 
all competitors the Norris, Higgins, Har- 
court and American testimonials. In 1892 
he began making a special study of the di- 
seases of the eye, spent two years in that 
way and the following two years in gain- 
ing desired optical training in order to be- 
come a practical and competent optician. 
The last two }'ears were spent in a whole- 
sale house, where he learned the technical 
points of manufacturing lenses. 

Dr. Grim then returned to Cincinnati, 
Ohio, where he remained for one year 
when, on account of the failing health of 
)iis parents, he came to Springfield in order 
to be near them, and opened his office at his 
present location in June, 1901. He is the 
only person in the city who manufactures 
or grinds lenses from scientific measure- 
ments. His knowledge of medicine and 
surgery, together with his proficiency and 
skill in his specialty have gained for him a 
prominent position among the professional 
men of this city. He has a large patronage, 
not only in Springfield, but many come to 
him from adjoining cities and his business 
is constantly increasing. His work room 
is fitted up with the most modern equip- 
ments known in lens work and he is thor- 
oughly competent to fit any eye perfectly. 
Mis specialty is technical lens work. 

In this city, in 1902, Dr. Grim was 
united in marriage to Miss Lulu Cimning- 
liam. a native of Oberlin. Ohio. She was 



an only child and her parents died during 
her infancy, after which she resided in 
Springfield with an aunt, pursuing her ed- 
ucation in the public schools here. The 
Doctor and his wife occupy a very enviable 
position in social circles, the hospitality of 
the best homes being extended to them. He 
\-otes ^\•ith the Democracy and is a suppor- 
ter of the M'ethodist Episcopal church. As 
a citizen he is public-spirited and is ever 
willing to put forth his best efforts to pro- 
mote any enterprise that tends to the wel- 
fare and best interests of the people and of 
the community. He is a member of the 
Greek college fraternity. Phi Gamma Delta, 
of this city, and at present is sachem of 
Miami Tribe. No. 207, Improved Order of 
Red Men. Early in life he learned to lie 
self-reliant and realized that there is no ex- 
cellence without labor and that there is no 
royal road to learning. He therefore did 
everything in his power to secure his own 
advancement along honorable lines. He 
has displayed thoroughness in the work he 
has undertaken and is yet an earnest stu- 
dent, realizing that he can by continued 
reading broaden his knowledge and aug- 
ment his efficiency as an optician. His abil- 
ity being widely recognized his position in 
the professional world is a most creditable 
and honorable one. 



H. OSBORN WHITAKER. M. D. 

H. Osborn Whitaker, who is engaged in 
the practice of medicine and surgery in 
South Charleston, was bom in' Mechanics- 
burg, Champaign county, Ohio, September 
4, 1875, and, although a young man, in 
professional ranks he has gained a reputa- 



126 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tion wliich many an older practitioner might 
well envy. His parents were Xewton and 
Mary Elizabeth (Osborn) Whitaker. The 
father was born in Clark county, Ohio, near 
Vienna, and has always carried on agricul- 
tural pursuits. He spent the first seventeen 
years of his life in his native county and 
then went to Clay county, Illinois, where 
he remained for about two years. His 
health failed him and he then returned to 
Ohio and has since resided in Champaign 
county. 

Our suljject was reared upon the home 
farm and pursued his education in the coun- 
try schools and in the Mechanicsburg high 
school, being gradnated with a class of fif- 
teen in 1^92. He afterward returned to 
his father's farm and assisted in the work 
of field and meadow until the fall of 1897, 
when he took up the study of medicine in 
the Cleveland Homeopathic Medical Col- 
lege. There he was graduated in the class 
of 1 90 1, completing the course on the loth 
of April, and on the 1st of May, of that year, 
he located in South Qiarleston, where he 
has already secured a good patronage that 
is indicative of the confidence reposed in his 
professional skill and ability. 

The Doctor was married in Mechanics- 
burg July 6, 1901, to Miss Nellie Rutan. 
who was a native of that city and a daugh- 
ter of D. W. and Lucy (Kimball) Rutan. 
the former a farmer of Champaign county, 
Ohio. The Doctor is independent in politi- 
cal views, holding himself free to support 
men and measures without regard to party 
affiliations. He was reared in the faith of 
the Methodist Protestant church and held 
niembershi]) therein until his removal to 
South Charleston, when, as there was no 
church of that denomination here, he joined 
the Methodist Episcopal church. The Doc- 



tor is also a member of Clark Lodge. Xo. 
166, L O. O. F., of South Charleston. While 
in college he became a member of the Ustian 
fraternity of Cleveland, and for the past 
two years has been its grand chaplain. He 
is a young man possessed of laudable ambi- 
tion, strong determination and he has a 
bright outlook for the future because of the 
possession of qualities which always insure 
success in any avenue of honorable busi- 
ness. 



CH.VKLES S. KAV. 

The tlistinctixe office of biography is 
not to give voice to a man's modest opinion 
of himself and his accomplishments, but 
rather to lea\e a proper record of his char- 
acter derived from a concensus opinion on 
the part of his fellow men. That Mr. Kay 
occupies an enviable position in business cir- 
cles of Springfield is a well known fact, and 
b.is career is one which e.xcites the commen- 
dation and respect of his associates. He is 
to-day the treasurer of the Superior Drill 
Company and also the president of the board 
of trade of Springfield. His efforts ha\e 
l)een of permanent benefit to the city, for he 
belongs to that class of representative Amer- 
ican citizens who, while promoting individ- 
ual success, also contribute in a large meas- 
ure to the general welfare and prosperity. 
Charles S. Kay was born in Miamis- 
burg, Montgomery county, Ohio, Xovem- 
ber 4. 1853, and is a son of Dr. Isaac and 
Clara M. (Deckert) Kay. His mother was 
a resident of Miamisburg and a daughter of 
Samuel Deckert, a prominent citizen of long 
residence there. Dr. Isaac Kay is one of the 
oldest physicians of Springfield and an hon- 
ored member of his profession. 




CHARLES S. KAY. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



[29 



The son, Charles S. Kay, came to this 
city witli his parents in infancy and ac- 
quired his preliminary education in the puh- 
lic schools. On putting aside his text books 
he entered upun his business career and for 
over ten years was connected editorially 
with newspapers in Cincinnati and Spring- 
tield. In 1883 he entered the Superior Drill 
Company, and has been for over fifteen years 
treasurer of that company. The plant owned 
by the company is an extensive one. 
eifuipped with the latest and most highly 
improved machinery connected with this 
line. Over four hundred men are employed 
in the different departments and the indus- 
try is one of the most important fnisiness 
concerns of Springfield. The Superior Drill 
Company was inxorporated 'in November, 
1883, and has a capital stock of two hun- 
dred and fifty thousand dollars, an imest- 
ment n(_iW ba\ing a value of o\-er a million 
dollars. Various kinds of grain drills and 
agricultural implements are manufactured. 
The Superior Drill has attained a world- 
wide reputation and finds sale not only 
throughout the United States but is ex- 
ported to England, Germany, Russia and 
South American countries. Mr. Kay has 
contributed in no small degree to the up- 
building and grow^th of the business. The 
financial workings of this great plant have 
been capably directed by him. He is also a 
stockholder in the Citizens National Bank. 

In 1893 ^^''- -^■^''y '^^'^s married to Miss 
Pjelle G. Gunn, of Lexington, Kentucky, a 
daughter of Captain John T. Gunn. She 
was liorn in the city of Lexington, where 
she spent her girlhood days. She was the 
first lady graduate of the State College of 
Kentucky, and is a lady jMssessed of many 
excellent qualities that well fit her for 
leadership in social circles, as well as to 
7 



preside over her hospitable home. Four 
children have been born of this union, three 
of whom survive, namely: Clarence M'., 
Edith \V. and Claribel. The parents are 
members of the First Baptist church. 

For nine years Mr. Kay was director of 
the public library in Springfield and he is a 
prominent Mason, belonging to Clark 
Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Springfield Chapter, 
R. A. M. ; and Palestine Commandery, K. 
T. While he possesses social qualities that 
render him a favorite, his attention has been 
chiefly given to his business afifairs. Mr. 
Kay can be depended upon to further by his. 
efforts and means, every movement looking 
ti>ward municipal progress and philan- 
thropic enterprise. He devotes consider- 
able of his leisure time to literary pursuits, 
and has broadened his horizon by foreign 
travel. He possesses- untiring energy, is 
quick of perception, forms his plans readi- 
ly and is determined in their execution. His 
close application to business and bis excel- 
lent management have brought to him the 
high degree of ])rosperity which to-day 
is his. 



ROBERT H. FOOS. 

A student of the history of Clark coun- 
ty can not carry his investigations far into 
its business records without noticing that 
the name of Foos figures conspicuously 
upon its pages. Robert H. Foos is the pres- 
ident of the Foos Manufacturing Company 
and is thus actively and closely associated 
with manufacturing interests, his operations 
being extensive and of an important char- 
acter. He is one of Clark county's native 
sons, his birth ha\ing here occurred in 
1850. His parents were Gustavus S. and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Elizabeth (Houston) Foos. His father was 
the founder of one of the leading industries 
of this city; a man of splendid business and 
executive force, and upon another page of 
this work his life hist(ir_\- is given in detail. 

Robert H. Foos acquired a primary ed- 
ucation in the schools of Springfield, where 
lie prepared for college, and then entered the 
Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, be- 
ing a graduate of that institution in 1872. 
After his graduation he spent two years 
abroad, visiting the city of London and the 
countries of France and Germany. He stud- 
ied both the German and French languages 
and viewed with interest the places of mod- 
ern and historical importance, at the same 
time acf|uainting himself with the manners 
;nid customs of the peoiile of those lands 
;ind their methods of conducting Inisiness. 

L'piiii his return -to his nati\c cnuntrx- 
.Mr. Fi'iis accepted the pusitiou of teller in 
tiie Second \ational UanU of Springfield, 
and served in that capacity for five years, 
after which he became identified with his fa- 
ther's manufacturing interests as a mem- 
ber lit the I'oos Maiuifacturing Compan\-, 
which was incor])orated on the 1st of Jan- 
uary, 1S84, with a capital stock of one 
hundred and fifteen thousand dollars. This 
company has since been engaged in the 
manufacture of special grinding machinery, 
scientific grinding mills, portable forges, 
farmers" tools, corn harvesters, corn shell- 
crs and other implements of a similar na- 
ture. His father was president of the com- 
pany at the tiiue of his death, on the nth 
"' J"'y^ 1900. The son was immediately 
elected to the presidency on the death of his 
honored fatlier, and his brother, W. F. 
I'oos, is vice-president and treasurer. The 
c iinpany employs two hundred men and the 
plint is ec|uii)ped with machinery of the la- 



test design, made especially for this pur- 
])ose. The business, having assumed mam- 
moth i^roportions, has become a \ery \alu- 
able enterprise in Springfield and the exten- 
sive output and large trade result in bring- 
mg an excellent financial return to the stock- 
holders. 

Mr, FcK« gives his political support to 
the Republican party, but the honors and 
emoluments of otifice have no attraction for 
him. He is one of the enterprising and pro- 
gressi\e business men of this city. His ef- 
forts have been discerningly directed along 
well defined lines of labor and he seems to 
ha\e realized at any jx^int of progress the 
full measure of his possibilities for accoiu- 
plishment at that point. A man of distinct 
and forceful individuality, of broad mental- 
ity and mature judgment, he has left and is 
leaving his impress upon the industrial 



THOM.AS D. AHLLS. 

Thomas D. Mills is a farmer and stock 
raiser of Green township, whose entire life 
has been passed in that portion of the coun- 
ty. Fie is therefore widely knOAvn to many 
of its citizens, and is held in the highest 
esteem. His birth occurred June 2, 1843, 
on the farm which is yet his home. It was 
then the property of his parents, James and 
Delilah (Moore) Mills. His father was 
born in Kentucky, and with his grandfather. 
Thomas Mills, came to Ohio when but three 
years of age. The grandfather settled uixm 
the farm which is now occupied by John 
Mills, and in this county the father of our 
subject was reared to manhood and mar- 
ried. He inherited from his father's es- 
tate one hundred and thirtv acres of land 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



131 



and always gave his attention to agricultural 
pursuits. He was twice married, and l)v 
his first union had two children. The 
daughter, Nancy E., hecame the wife of 
\\'alter Cultice, but both are now deceased. 
They left nine children, eight of whom are 
still living. There were no children born 
to the father by his second marriage. 
Thomas D. Mills is therefore an only son. 
He and his sister inherited the farm, each 
securing sixty-five acres. In church work 
James Mills was prominent. Hte held mem- 
bership \\ith the Methodist Episcopal de- 
nomination and served as a class leader in 
the church, while in other ways he assisted 
in promoting the growth and extending the 
influence of the organization. His politi- 
cal support was given the Republican party. 
Upon the home farm Thomas D. Mills 
was reared, and in the common schools of 
the neighborhood he acquired a fair educa- 
tion. He entered upon an independent bus- 
iness career when about twenty-two years 
of age, and in August. 1862, he was found 
among the defenders of the Union. Don- 
ning the blue uniform he went to the front 
as a private of Company A, Ninety-fourth 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, being first sent to 
camp at Piqua, and thence ortlered to' Ken- 
tucky. He was first under fire at Tates 
Ford, in that state, a skirmish occurring dur- 
ing the night. Tlie first regular battle in 
which he participated was at Perryville, and 
he was afterward at Stone River, Chatta- 
nooga, Chickamauga and other important 
engagements of the war. After the battle 
of Chickamauga he was transferred to the 
Veteran Reserve Corps of the United States 
Regulars, and was sent to Camp Do'uglas, 
in Chicago, Illinois, and did guard duty 
there. He had been ill in the hospital and 
was not able to again enter active field ser- 



vice. Later he was sent to Cairo, Illinois, 
where he was honorably discharged. Al- 
though often in the thickest of the fight, 
where his comrades fell to each side of him, 
he was never wounded, and he was also 
fortunate in escaping capture. 

Not long after his return home, on the 
19th of December, 1865, Mr. Mills was 
united in marriage to Miss Marinda Qark, 
of Pitchin. She was born in Warren coun- 
ty, a daughter of Benajah and Nancy (Mor- 
gan) Clark. They located in this county 
at the tin:e of their marriage and here lived 
until 1875, when they removed to Cham- 
paign county, where Mr. Mills purchased 
forty acres of land, making his home there- 
on until 1879. In that year he sold that 
property and took up his abode in Green 
township, and in 1880 he came to his present 
home in the same township. Here he is 
carrying on general farming and stock 
raising, feeding a high grade of cattle in 
his pastures. His fields, too, are well culti- 
vated and his rich harvests return to him a 
good income annually. 

Four children have been born unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Mills, but Herbert E., the eldest, 
died at the age of nineteen years. David 
Forrest, born on his father's farm May 11, 
1870, was married August 31, 1898, to 
Myrtle Craig, of Pitchin. She was prob- 
ably born near South Salem, Ohio, and 
when fi\-e weeks old was adopted by Jasper 
Craig, who provided her with a good com- 
mon school education, and also a musi- 
cal education, and she has success- 
fully taught music. She has one child, 
Nellie E.. born on the farm where our sub- 
ject is now living June 23, 1899. Forrest 
is a member of the Junior Order of the 
American Mechanics. Lydia Fannie, the 
next member of the Mills familv, is the wife 



132 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of Clifford Hess, of Greene county. Emery, 
born in Champaign county. July 20, 1877, 
is yet at home with his parents. Mr. Mills 
and his estimable wife are consistent mem- 
})ers of the Methodist Protestant church at 
Pitchin. and he is a member of Mitchell 
I'ost. (;. .\. R., of Springfield. While in 
the army he cast his first presidential vote 
for Lincoln in 1864 and has since been a 
stalwart Republican. 



ISAAC TUTTLF. 



Isaac Tuttle was born in Springfield 
township. Clark county. January 15, 1840, 
and is now accounted (uic of the enterprising- 
farmers of (jreen township. His parents 
were John and Margaret (Prickett) Tuttle. 
The father was born in Virginia, and when 
a boy came to Ohio with his parents. The 
grandfather. Sylvanus Tuttle, became one 
of the first residents of Clark cnunty. and 
was identified with its pioneer improvement 
and upbuilding. John Tuttle was born 
February 18. 1794. and was reared amid 
pioneer conditions and surroundings in this 
county. On the 23d of February. 1815, he 
was united in marriage to Margaret Prick- 
ett, whose birth occurred January 19. 1798. 
He passed away June 7, 1849. 'i"<^l '"' '^^''^" 
ow, long surviving him. was called to her 
final rest in 1S79. 'i'liey were the parents 
of fifteen children, fourteen of whom 
reached manhood or womanhood, Isaac be- 
ing the fourteenth in order of birth. All 
who grew up reared families of their own, 
but the only ones now living are the subject 
of this review and his younger Imnher. 
Harvey. 

Isaac Tuttle spent his boyhood days 



upon the home farm, acquiring a fair com- 
mon school education. When sixteen years 
of age he began to work for his brother at 
the carpenter's trade, but followed that pur- 
suit for only a year, and in the second year 
resumed farming. He afterward began to 
operate his sister's land, and when a few 
years had passed he went to northern Indi- 
ana, where he lived for about a year. There 
he suffered from ague, and on that account 
returned to Ohio. 

Here, on the 6th of February, 1862, in 
Green township, Mr. Tuttle -was united in 
marriage to Miss Fannie E. Eichelbarger, 
who was born in this township Octolier 13, 
1842, and is a daughter of Michael and 
Margaret (TckUI) Eichelbarger. Her fath- 
er was born in Washington county, .Mary- 
land, September 3. 181 5, while the mother's 
birth occurred in (ireen township, ("lark 
county, Ohio. November 2, 1819. She is 
still living, but Mr. Eichelbarger i)assed 
away January 7. 1867. After his marriage 
f)ur subject and his wife lived in Indiana 
for about a year, and then he purchased his 
present farm, but in May. 1864. he put aside 
business cares and personal preferences in 
order to aid his country, joining the army 
as a member of Company D of the One 
Hundred and Forty-si.xth Ohio Infantry, in 
defense of the Union. He did guard duty, 
remaining in tiie service for alxnit four 
months, after which he returned to his home 
in Green towlnship, where he has resided 
continuously since. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Tuttle have been 
born four children : Ermina Belle, Ijorn 
Decemljer 29, 1862, married Herbert P. 
Stewart, of Green township, and they have 
four children — Ira Elton, Roy La Vaughn, 
Walter Xesbit and Elmer .Arthur. Effie 
Augusta, born November 28, 1867, is tin 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



133 



wife (if Oliver E. Allen, a teacher in the 
pnhlic schools of Springfield, and they have 
three children — Otho Preston, Ollin Win- 
frecl and Harold Everett. Harry Edwin, 
horn May 6, 1869, wedded Mary Belle Mc- 
Ciillough, and they have three children — 
Howard, Guy and Hlomer. Elton J., born 
Septeniber 6, 1872, married Anna Elizabeth 
\\'alters, and they have one child — Mabel 
Adella. 

^Ir. Tuttle cast his first presidentiaUvote 
for Lincoln in 1864, and is now independent 
in politics, voting regardless of party ties. 
Throughout his entire business career hebas 
carried on agricultural pursuits, and his 
work in this direction has brought to: him a 
good living. Neither negligent nor dila- 
tory in his labors, his business career has 
been characterized b}- diligence and enter- 
prise, and all that he has acquired has come 
to him as the result of these qualities. 



J. O. TUTTLE. 

In Harmony township resides J. O. Tut- 
tle, who is devoting his energies to farming 
and stock-raising with creditaible success. 
He was born in Green township, Octdber 
26, 1S47, o" ths i2:rm where his maternal 
uncle, J. P. Garlough. is now living. He i? 
a son of Sylvanus and Jane B. (Garlough) 
Tuttle. His father was born in Clark cotm- 
ty and lived to be about fifty-nine years of 
age, passing away in Springfield township. 
John Tuttle, the paternal grandfather, died 
before our subject's recollection. For a few 
years after his marriage, Sylvanus Tuttle 
lived on tlie Garlough liomestead, but when 
his son J. O. was a little lad of three summers 
he purchased one hundred and sixtv acres of 



land in Pleasant township, Clark county, 
and as his financial resources increased he 
added to his property until he became the 
owner of between three and four hundred 
acres of land, of which Mr. Tuttle of this 
review now has one hundred acres. The 
father was a Republican but never soiight 
or desired office. In his family were six 
children, of whom four are living, namely: 
Margaret, who became the wife of Charles 
Holland and died at their home in Hardin 
county, lea\-ing four children ; John, who 
died in infancy ; J. O., of this review ; 
Marion, at home; Tabitha, the wife of John 
Blee, of Harmony township; and George 
H., who is living in Kansas. 

Tiie boyhood days of J. O. Tuttle were 
spent on the home farm and he acquired his 
education in the common schools. The oc- 
cupation to which he was reared he has 
made his life work. He assisted his father 
in caring for the fields and meadows of the 
home place until he had attained his major- 
it)-, when he began operating a portion of 
his father's land on shares. As a companion 
and helpmate for life's journey be chose 
Miss Kate Todd, their marriage being cele- 
brated in (j-reen township November 6, 
1870. She was born in Madison connty and 
is a daughter of Samuel and Saloma ( Gar- 
lough) Todd. During her early girlhood 
her parents remo\ed to Clark county, where 
she was reared and in the common schools 
she was educated. By her marriage she has 
become the mother of one child, Maliel J., 
who is the wife i>f W'illiam Na\e, and they 
reside with her father. 

In 1872 Mr. Tuttle came to the farm 
ui)on which he noiw lives. At his father's 
death he inherited one-fifth oi the estate 
and he purchased one hundred acres upon 
which he is now living. His place is well 



34 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



iirpnned. having a good set of farm build- 
ings and machinery, a high grade of stock 
ajid all modern equipments. From the time 
when lie cast his first presidential \ote for 
Grant, in 1868, Mr. Tuttle has been an 
earnest Republican, giving an unfaltering 
support to the principles of the party. In 
his work he is diligent, carefully performing 
the many tasks connected with agriculture, 
and he yearly finds his rew ard in the profit- 
able sales of his crops. 



L.E\\-1S AI. AARIGHT. 

It is not only the pioneers who have 
been ])rominent in the upbuilding of Spring- 
field. The city is constantly attracting to 
it men of enterprise, imbued with the spirit 
which has led to the rapid growth and de- 
velopment of the west. Among the more 
recent arrivals here is Lewis M. Wright, 
wlio has become a factor in the electrical 
world of trade as proprietor of a leading 
shoe house. He was born February 2, 1S59, 
in the state of Virginia, and is a son of 
John P. and Sarah E. (Divine) \\'right, 
bntli of whom were natives of the Old Do- 
minir>n, born in Loudoun county. The 
Wright family is of Scotch and English 
descent and the father of our subject is 
still living, his home being in Maryland. 

Lewis M. Wright belongs to a family 
of four children. In the public schools of 
Maryland he acquired his educatioii and. 
ambitious to become a factor in business 
life and attain success for himself, in No- 
vember, 1879. he embarked in merchandis- 
ing in Maryland, where he resided until 
1897. In Januar}-, of that year, he arrived 
in S])ringfield and purchased a half interest 
in the shoe firm of Routzahn iS: Company. 



which name was changed to Routzahn & 
Wright. This partnershi]) still exists and 
the new firm, with L. M. Wright as its 
senior member, took on a new impetus. 
They are now carrying an extensive line 
of men's, women's and children's footwear, 
have gained favor with the public and are 
now looked upon as one of the leading shoe 
houses of the city, which accords to them 
a liberal and growing ])atronage, so that 
the business has become a paying one. 

In 1886 Mr. Wright was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary E. Williard, a native 
of Maryland, and their union has been 
blessed with two children. Hazel and Will- 
ard. They have a pleasant home in Spring- 
field and the hospitality of many of the best 
residences of the city has been extended to 
them. During the six years in which they 
have lived in Ohio, Mr. Wright and his 
estimable wife have gained many warm 
friends. He is a valued member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity and also holds membership 
relations in the Knights of Pythias frater- 
nity, the Modern Woodmen of America and 
several other secret organizations. He is 
an ardent believer in religion and holds ■ 
membershii) in St. Paul Methodist Episco- 
pal church, where his active service is ap- 
preciated. His conservative business judg- 
ment has won him a seat on tlie official 
board, and his assistant superintendency of 
the Sunday-school is not lacking in appre- 
ciativencss on the part of its members. 



ROBERT P. W.XLKKR. 

The stor}- of the sufferings and bravery 
of those who wore the blue and fought no- 
bly for t'le preservation of the Union, now 
so great anrl glorious, as a direct result of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



their lieroism and devotion to principle and 
country, can not be told too often. It is 
especially well that those of the younger 
generations slumld have impressed upon 
their minds that the liberty and happiness 
which they enjoy freely was purchased for 
them at an awful price and though naught 
liut actual civil war can give the picture in its 
entirety, a faint idea may be gained in the 
perusal of the history of those who experi- 
enced the horrors of war in many of its 
worst phases. Mr. Walker was one of the 
loyal sons of the Union who donned the 
blue uiiifoirm and went to the front in de- 
fense. of his country. He sacrificed health 
upon the altar of freedom, but as long as 
possible he remained at the front, fighting 
the battles of the Union and performing 
all duty that was assigned to him. 

Mr. Walker was born in Ross township, 
Greene county, Ohio, May 8, 1845, a son 
of William H. and Mary P. ( McFarland) 
Walker. His paternal great-grandfather 
was a native of Ireland and became the 
founder of the family in the new world. 
He settled in Greene county, Ohio, in the 
early part of the nineteenth century. Zach- 
ariah Walker, the grandfather of our sub- 
ject, owned a farm in Ross townshi]!, 
Greene county, and upon that farm both our 
subject and his father, William H. Walker, 
were born. The grandfather died in early 
manhood. William H. Walker was mar- 
ried at the age of nineteen years and our 
subject was born the following year, being 
the eldest of four sons. When he was about 
four years of age his parents removed to 
Cedarville township, Greene county. Will- 
iam H. Walker was a life long Democrat 
and through a long period he filled the office 
of justice of the peace, discharging his 
duties with promptness and fidelity. He be- 



longed to the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, to the Improved Order of Red 
Men, to the Order of American Mechanics 
and to the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
died in Cedarville December 10, 1901, at 
the age of seventy-six years and one day. 
His sons are all Democrats with the excep- 
tion of our subject. Deluna W. resides in 
\\'ashington, Indiana, and has three chil- 
dren. John W. is a farmer and school 
teacher of Madison township, Clark county, 
Ohio, and has four sons. Wilson is a me- 
chanic and lives in Dayton. He, too, is 
married and has one daughter. 

In Cedarville our subject remained un- 
til after the inauguration of the Civil war, 
when, feeling that his duty was to his coun- 
try, he enlisted on the 8th of August, 1862, 
being then a little more than seventeen years 
of age. He became a member of Company 
H, Ninety-fourth Regiment of Ohio Volun- 
teers, under Captain James Kyle, and went 
into camp at Piqua. After two weeks he 
was ordered to the front, proceeding to 
Newport Barracks, where the regiment was 
provided with uniforms, after which they 
Iiroceeded to Lexington, Kentucky, and 
were then sent to re-enforce the troops at 
Malvern Hill, but before they reached their 
destination the Union forces had been de- 
feated and the Ninety-fourth Ohio returned 
to Lexington, which had fallen into the 
bands of the Rebels and the regiment there- 
fore had to surrender. They were marched 
into the toavn with guns reversed. They had 
permission to go to the hotel for food, but 
scouts reported an opening left for Illinois 
and Indiana regiments to come into the trap 
and through that the Ninety-fourth Ohio 
marched out, met the advancing regiments 
and thus saved them from being captured. 
They proceeded toward Louisville, and at 



•36 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Tales Fern- a skirmish occurred, Mr. Walk- 
er sustaining -a flesh wound in the lower left 
leg. He hound up his wound, however, 
and marched on with his counrand for one 
hundred and fifty miles. .\t Louisville he 
did duty luitil taken ill. after which he went 
to Perryville and thence returned with the 
Avounded and sick, being sent to the hospital. 
\\'hile there his father went to kwik for him 
and on account of his injuries Mr. Walker 
was discharged. I-"or twelve years after 
his return home he was an invalid, being 
confined to the bed and after he was able to 
leave his bed he could not get around with- 
out crutches, which he still uses. He has 
iiever fully regained his health, which was 
laid down as a sacritice upon the altar of 
his country. 

On the 3th of March, 1874. in Ross 
township. (Jreene county, Mr. Walker was 
united in marriage to Miss Margaret A. 
Heath, who was born in Clark county and 
was a daughter of John and Sarah (Will- 
ing) Heath. They now have two daughters, 
Lillie Ma\-, who was born in Xenia, is the 
wife of Edwin H. Pierce, the foreman of 
the plating de])artment for the National 
Cash Register Company, at Dayton. Ohio. 
Anna Myrtle, the younger daughter, was 
borne in Ross township. Greene coanity. 

In his political views IMr. Walker has 
always l)een a Rqiublican and for six years 
he served as justice of the peace in Ross 
township. While thus serving he gave his 
aid and intlucnce to securing compromises 
rather than to continue litigation in the 
courts and of the cases which finally came 
to trial his decisions were so fair and im- 
partial that none were ever reversed. For 
eight years he served as pike sui)erintend- 
ent in Ross township and for five years he 
was a member of the township lK>ard of 



education there. While living in Cedarville 
he was also a member of the board of edu- 
cation for three years and served in a sim- 
ilar ])osition in South Charleston for three 
>ears. He and his wife and daughters are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and for four years he served as Sunday- 
school superintendent in Shiloh church, in 
Ross township, Greene county. He liecame 
a charter member of Curry Post, G. A. R., 
of Cedarville, served as its chaplain for a 
number of years and is now a member of 
McMillan Post, No. 122. G. A. R.. in which 
he has long filled the position of adjutant. 
In matters of citizenship he is as true to- 
day to his country and her welfare as when 
he followed the nation's starry lianner upon 
t!ie battlefields of the south. 



WILLIA.M J. IkWlX. 

William J. Irwin, now deceased, be- 
Imiged t<i that class (^f men whom the world 
terms self-made and well did he deserve all 
of the praise and honor which the term im- 
])lics. He was born in Randallstown. coun- 
ty Antrim, Ireland, in the year 1833 and 
w ith his ])arents he made the voyage across 
the l)riny deq) to Canada when he was only 
about a year old. He reniained in the Brit- 
ish province in this land until eighteen years 
of age. at which time he became a resident 
of the United States, locating in Spring- 
field. His educational privileges in youth 
were limited, but he was fond of study and 
always read extensively, so that he became 
well informed on the issues of the day and 
on all topics of general interest. While still 
in Canada he earned his own living, learn- 
ing and following the molder's trade. For 




WILLIAM J. IRWIN. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'39 



a time after his ai"ri\al in Springfield he 
was in the emjilny of the lirm of Mason, 
Ciiok & Bial<ene_\'. and subsequently he 
was employed in the Lagonda shops for a 
time. He was afterward foreman in the 
molding department of the plant of W'hite- 
le}-, Fassler & Kelly for twenty-two years. 
No higher proof of his capability, of his 
earnest application tO' business and of his 
fidelity to dut>' could be gi\-en than this 
statement. He had die entire confidence of 
those whom he served, the respect of those 
w ho worked under him and he commanded 
the good will of all with whom business re- 
lations brought him in contact. After, sev- 
ering his connection with that company he 
remained with William Whiteley until 1887, 
when he i"esigned his position because of 
ill health and for two years was retired from 
acti\e business life. In 1889 he formed a 
partnership under the firm najiie of Wick- 
ham, Chapman & Company, he being the 
junior member, while an equal partner. He 
took charge of the molding department of 
the firm and acted in that capacity until 
his life's labors were ended in death. 

At the time of the Civil war }»Ir. Irwin 
had manifested his loyalty to his adopted 
country by enlisting at the first call for 
troops to serve for three months. He be- 
came a member of Company F, Second 
Ohio Infantry, and after the expiration of 
that' 'term he re-enlisted for six months" 
ser\-ice, as a memlier of the One Hundred 
and Twent}-ninth Infantry, becoming sec- 
ond lieutenant of Company C. His valor 
and meritorious conduct on the field of bat- 
tle afterward won him promotion to the rank 
of first lieutenant, and he largely engaged 
in performing the duties of captain of the 
company because of the illness of his su- 
perior oflicer. Mr. Irwin was never wound- 



ed while in the ser\ice, but contracted 
rheumatism, froiu which he suffered 
throughout his remaining life and which 
ultimately caused his death. He always 
maintained pleasant relations with his old 
army comrades through his membership in 
the Grand Amiy Post, of Springfield. 

In December, 1870, William Irwin was 
united in marriage tO' Miss Hulda E. White, 
a native of this city, and a daughter of 
James M. and Eliza (Jolly) White. Her 
parents were natives of Highland and Ross 
counties, Ohio, respectively, and the father 
was a successful farmer, carrying on agri- 
cultural pursuits in a prosperous manner 
for many years. 

Mr. Irwin gave his political support to 
the Republican party, but he possessed a re- 
tiring disposition and would never accept 
office, not demanding ofificial position as a 
reward for party fealty. In Masonry he 
became prominent, attaining to the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite. There 
was in the life record of Mr. Irwin much that 
commanded the highest respect and admira- 
tion. He was a strict!}- temperance man in 
the best sense of the tenu. When a mere 
boy he was left an orphan and all that he 
possessed he accumulated by his own bard 
work. Not only was he an active factor in 
industrial circles of Springfield, but also be- 
came the owner of real estate here. His life 
history should serve to encourage others who 
have to start out empty handed as he did. 
His career proves that success is not a mat- 
ter of genius or the result of fortunate en- 
vironment or the aid of influential friends. 
He attained it by persistent purpose, by hon- 
orable dealing and by good judgment in 
business matters. His word was as good 
as any bond that was ever solemnized by 
signature or seal and his name was a svn- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



nnym fur integrity. He passed away De- 
cember 9, 1895, and was laid to rest with 
Masonic honors in Ferncliff cemetery. 



CHARLES W. UNGLAUB. 

Charle- W. ITnolanb is a successful 
young business man of Springfield and a 
well known florist. He established business 
here in tS88, and from the beginning his 
success has been uniform and rapid. He is 
one of the native sons oi the city, born on 
the Tith of October, 1872, his parents being 
Casper and Sophia ( Xoelp) Unglaub, who 
now reside on Shaffer street. The father 
was born in Germany in 1850, ajid when a 
small child of three years was brought to 
America by his parents, the family locating 
in Baltimore. His mother died Avhen^ he 
was but a young lad and he was bound out 
to learn a trade in the city of Baltimore. 
On leaving that place in the year 1870, he 
came to Springfield, Ohio, and here he was 
first employed as foreman in the grinding 
room of a knife and fork factory — the 
Whiteley Mill. There he remained for five 
years and was afterward shipping clerk for 
the firm of Robbins & Myers for ten years. 
C)\\ the expiration of that period he accepted 
a position as watchman and is now serving 
in that capacity. In the year 1870, in this 
city. Casper Unglaub was united in mar- 
riage to Sophia Noelp. and unto them have 
been born seven children, of whom one died 
in infancy. The others are: Charles, of 
tin's review; Laura, who is a tailoress: An- 
drew, a mcxlder: Kmil, a press feeder: and 
Flora and Helen, who are yet in school. 
Tile children have all been educated in the 
German schools of this citv. 

Charles W". Unglaub, like the others, at- 



tendefl sclmul imtil about fourteen years of 
age, when he emljarked in his present busi- 
ness on his own account. He began opera- 
tions on a small scale, having a capital of 
only six dollars. He commenced growing 
plants in a hot" bed, and with strong purpose 
he worked against adversity, determined to 
achieve success. He always treated his cus- 
tomers with the utmost courtesy and fair- 
ness, and he soon won many friends who 
gave him their patronage and thus enabled 
him to build up a large business. He did 
all of his own building and plumbing, tiiere- 
b>' saving expense in that way, and as the 
profits 011 his sales increased he kept adding 
to his greenhouses and buildings until he 
now has a large and well equi]>ped ])lant. 
He erected and stocked his own houses, and 
he now has nine thousand square feet un- 
der glass. His trade has continually in- 
creased and he caters to the city patronage. 
In addition to his greenhixises he has a 
flower stand in the market place, where he 
serves all customers. He handles cut flow- 
ers and bedded plants, and has a thorough 
and practical knowledge of the business, 
which enajjles him to keejj hrs plants in an 
excellent conditimi, and they find a ready 
sale upon the market. 

In iSc),K yir. rn^laub was united in mar- 
riage, in (ireenficld, Ohio, to Miss Minnie 
Humes, wiio was born in Washington Court 
House, in this state, in 1872. Tliey now 
have one son, Howard Clinton, who was 
born in October. 1900. Mrs. Unglaub pur- 
sued her education in the public schools and 
in Lebanon College. Our subject is large- 
ly a self-made and self-educated man. but 
is now an intelligent and well read citizen. 
He has gained a comiirehensive knowledge 
concerning the cultivation of flowers, for 
which he has always h;id ;i liking. He has 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



kept in touch with the most approved meth- 
ods of cuhivating plants at this time, and al- 
thougii not a member of any floral societies 
he is conversant with what is being done b} 
leading florists throughout the country. 
His endorsement of political principles is 
seen in his ballot, which he casts in favor o>f 
the men and measures oi the Republicai, 
party. He has never been an aspirant for 
office, however, preferring to devote his time 
and attention to his business affairs. He 
belongs to the Gennan Lutheran church, and 
is deeply interested in every measure and 
movement for the general good. Starting 
out in life on his Oiwn account at an early 
age, Mr. Unglaub has steadily worked his 
way upward, placing his dependence upon 
the substantial qualities of self-reliance, per- 
severance and diligence, and to-day' he is 
enj(jying a well merited prosperity . 



JACOB SEITZ. 

A deep feeling of sadness spread 
throughout Springfield when it was an- 
nounced that Jacob Seitz had passed from 
this life, but while those who knew him re- 
main his memory will be cherished not so 
much on accoimt O'f the splendid success he 
achieved in business, not because he con- 
tributed to the improvement of the city and 
promoted its commercial activity, althouph 
either would make him worthy to be lung 
remembered, but because of his life nf help- 
fulness, of good cheer, of broad sympathy 
and his deep interest in and labors for the 
benefit of his fellow men. His nature was 
so kindly and gentle that he won not merely 
regard but that deeper feeling which, call 
it friendship or love, binds man in close re- 



lation to his fellow man in ties which naught 
can sever. Thus it was that Springfield 
has seldom so widely and sincerely mourned 
one of her residents. But for thirty-se\'en 
years he was closely associated with her his- 
tory, and many of his friends, in thought 
have breathed the sentiment. 

"He was a man, take him for all in all, 
I shall not look upon his like again." 

Jacob Seitz was born in Lancaster coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, December i8, 1818, a son 
of Henry and Mary Seitz, who came to 
Clark county in 183 1, settling near what is 
now Fernclift" cemetery, Springfield's beauti- 
ful city of the dead. Springfield was then 
but a mere hamlet, and the early settlers were 
at that time instituting the work oi progress 
and improvement which was soon to make 
a vast change in the county antl place it with 
the leading counties of this great common- 
wealth. Henry Seitz purchased a farm 
abo'ut a mile and a half from' this village, 
and there he carried on agricultural pur- 
suits until his death, which occurred a few 
years after his arrival here. He also con- 
ducted a still upon the river which ran liy 
his farm. His children were: Antlrew. 
Isaac, Elizabeth, Henry, Jacob and Cather- 
ine, all of whom were born in Pennsylvania 
and came to this county with their parents. 

Jacob Seitz was one of the self-made 
men of Clark county, for he began his busi- 
ness career working by the month as a farm 
hand, and these earnings proved the founda- 
tion upon which he built his later success. 
He attended school in Pennsylvania, but left 
his native state when twelve years of age 
and came with his parents to Clark county. 
He was always fond of books, however, and 
in his youth studied at home by the side of 
the fire whenever he had the opportunitv. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Tliroiighout his entire life lie read extensive- 
ly and thus became a well read man, con- 
versant with all topics of general interest. In 
1840 he turned his attention to the milling 
and distilling business, carrying on opera- 
tions along these lines for a few years. He 
afterward went to Champaign county, Ohio, 
\.liere. in connection with George Stine- 
berger, he conducted a large flouring mill 
for ten years, meeting with success in this 
undertaking. \\'hen that decade had passed 
he sold his interest in the mill there and re- 
turned to Springfield, in 1855, making his 
home here continuously up to the time he 
was called to his final rest. For a number 
of years he was engaged in the wholesale 
tobacco business in this citv. vet he did not 
confine his efforts to any one line, and his 
wise council and sound judgment proved im- 
portant factors in the successful conduct of 
a number of other business concerns. He 
was a director and stock holder in the Mad 
Ri\er Hank, of Springfield, was also a stock- 
holder in the Lagonda Bank of that city 
and a stockholder in the bank at Urbana^ 
He became quite an extensive land-owner, 
and had both farm and city property. In 
1865 he purchased what is now the Miller 
House, and it is still in possession of the 
family. He erected a fine large residence 
oi brick at No. yy North Limestone street, 
and that he made his home until his death, 
and it is still the home of Mrs. Seitz. 

In the year 1846 our subject was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary A. Stinebcrgcr, 
a daughter of David Stinel>erger. She was 
born in Cham])aign county, Ohio, and by her 
marriage became the mother of three chil- 
dren, but Theodore H., the eldest, died in 
1869 at the age of twenty-one years. Olive 
E. is the wife of Charles Anthony, a mem- 
ber uf the firm .>f I'.lack & .XntlKniv. of this 



city, and they have five children: Frank, 
who is married and has two sons, Theodore 
and Rol)ert, while the other members of the 
Anthony family are Theodore, Louise, 
Rachel and Howard ,B. Laura, the younger 
daughter of Mrs. Seitz, is the wife of M. 
Hedges, a resident' of Chattanooga. Ten- 
nessee, and they have two sons, James and 
Lawrence. 

It was in October, 1892, that Jacob Seitz 
was called to his final rest, his remains be- 
ing interred in Ferncliff cemetery. He was 
a worthy representative of one of the hon- 
ored pioneer families of the county. He 
came here at an early date, and for more 
than sixty' years was a witness of the prog- 
ress and development of this portion of the 
state and took an active part in the work 
of improvement and upbuilding. He was 
deeply interested in all that pertains to the 
general good and co-ojierated in many 
measures calculated to benefit the comnnm- 
ity along material, social, intellectual and 
moral lines. The poor and needy found in 
him a friend and no one ever went to him 
with a tale of distress that did not receive 
his sympathy and his more substantial assist- 
ance. He had • a large circle of warm 
friends, and his friendship .was most |)rized 
b\- those who knew him best. His loss to 
the commimity was a severe one, but he left 
a name which is honored and res]:)ected. 
His wife and older daughter still reside in 
Springfield, where they lune the high re- 
gard of nianv friends. 



lllvXm- II. SEVS. M. D. 

One of the most competent and success- 
ful medical practitioners of Springfield is 
Dr. H. II. Scys. who was born in Ogdens- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



143 



burg, St. Lawrence county, New York, 
October 13, 1830. He is a son of tbe Rev. 
John Seys and is descended from Welsh an- 
cestry, that was estabished in the Nether- 
lands in the fourteenth century, wliile rep- 
resentatives of tlie name afterward emi- 
grated to tlie West Indies. The paternal 
grandparents of the Doctor were Jacobus 
and Catherine (Runnels) Seys, and the 
Rev. John Seys, the father of our subject, 
was born in St. Cruix, West Indies, March 
30, 1799. He was a well educated man of 
scholarly attainments and broad general cul- 
ture. He became a minister and missionary 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
married Ann Osborn, a daughter nf John 
and Mary Beaks (Laverock) Osborn. She 
was born July i, 1804, in St. Bartholomew, 
of the West Indies, and they were married off 
Old Roads St. Christophers, September 28, 
1821, and again at St. Eustatius, on the utii 
of October, tbe double ceremony beinp- 
necessary to conform to the law concerning 
the civil and religious marriage rite of that 
country. They lived at various places. 
Rev. Dr. Seys doing missionary work for 
some time among the Oneida Indians. He 
then went to Africa in 1834 and served as 
minister plenipotentiary ou that continent, 
althoiugb the greater part of his time was de- 
voted to missionary work. They traveled 
through many places on the face of the 
globe. Rev. Dr. Seys serving as United 
States agent at West Africa for recaptured 
slaves. He spent eighteen years on that 
continent, engaged in church and mission- 
ary work and as a United States official — 
consul, minister plenipotentiary — and had 
charge of recaptured Africans. Both he 
and his wife died in Springfield, Ohio, the 
former passing away February 9, 1872, 
while the latter died January 8, 1881. They 



were the parents of twelve children : Jacob- 
us Osborn. born at St. Eustatius, West In- 
dies, July 22, 1822, was droAvned at Bassa- 
bar, W'est Africa. December 5, 1840. and was 
buried at Monrovia, Liberia. Mary Cather- 
ine Runnels, born November 17, 1824. at 
Point a Pierre, on the Island of Trinidad, 
died in Middletown, Conecticut, April 24, 
1839. George Dewint, born October 11, 
1826, at St. George, Island of Granada, died 
on ship board October 4, 1828. and was bur- 
ied in the ocean. John Charles, born on the 
Island of St. Martins on Friars' Bay, No- 
\ember 4, 1828, died at Monrovia, Liberia, 
(October 3, 1835. Henry Hill, born October 
13, 1830, in Ogdensburg. New York, is the 
subject of this review. Cornelius Dewint 
was born in September, 1832, at Canton, 
New York. Ann Osborn, born at Mission 
House in Vernon township, Oneida county, 
New York, .\pril 30, 1834. died on 27th of 
October, the year following, at Fishkill 
Landing, New York. Maria Tellar, born 
January 22,, 1836, at Monrovia, Africa, died 
in Baltimore, Maryland, January 15, 1854. 
John, born in Middletown, Connecticut, Au- 
gust 25. 1838, died October 27, 1839, at 
Monrovia, Africa. \\'ilmot Oisborn, born in 
Monrovia, July 19, 1S40, died there on the 
27th of .\pril, 1 84 1. Ann Goheen was 
born March 18, 1843. at Wilkesbarre. Penn- 
sylvania. Clement Tracy, born July 2^. 
1844, at Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, died in 
Springfield, Ohio, November 8, 1886. Two 
brothers of our subject were soldiers of the 
Civil war, and one died from the effects 
of army life. 

Henry Hill Seys was educated in the 
private schools of Pennsylvania and New 
York, and during bis boyhocxl days he 
spent three years in Monrovia, Africa. In 
1850 he entered the University of Balti- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



more. Maryland, and was graduated in 
1853, with the degree of M. D. In May, 
of the same year, he came to Springfield and 
began practice here, but when the first call 
for troops came he put aside his business 
and personal considerations in order to aid 
his country in the struggle to preserve the 
Union. He went to the front as assistant 
surgeon of the Third Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry, enlisting on the 2nd of May. This 
was one of the first regiments in the field, 
and on the ist of August, 1863. the Doctor 
was promoted to the rank of surgeon of the 
Fifteenth Ohio Regiment. He was made 
medical director in December, 1862. of the 
Third Division of the Fourteenth Army 
Corps, thus serving until March, 1863, 
when he became medical inspector of the 
army of the Cumberland on the staff of 
General Rosecrans and General Thomas, 
acting in that capacity until December, 
1863. Dr. Seys was then detailed for sur- 
gical work at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and 
acting medical director of the post, contin- 
uing to fill that position from December, 
1863. until August, 1864, when he resigned 
and was honorably discharged after more 
than three years of service. His promo- 
tiiins came rapidly, in recognition of hi- 
ability in his profession and his patriotic 
loyalty to his country. He took part in 
many desperate engagements O'f the war and 
his service was of the greatest value to the 
Union. Owing to circumstances over which 
he had no control he resigned, but the coun- 
try had already received at his hands valu- 
able aid for more than three years. 

Dr. Seys then returned to Springfield, 
and in the >ame year removed to Oil City, 
Pennsylvania, where he continued in active 
practice until the fall of 1873. when he 
again came to SiM-ingfield. where he has since 



remained. He is the oldest practitioner be- 
longing to the Clark County Medical So- 
ciety. By hard work, close application and 
comprehensive knowledge he has met with 
success. He is careful and accurate in the 
diagnosis of a case and is ready to adojit 
any new idea which will aid him in reaching 
the l>est results. 

The Doctor was married in the fall of 
1853 to Harriet Foote, in W'illiamstown, 
Massachusetts, and they have had one son 
and one daughter, but the son died while 
the Doctor was in Murfreesboro. Tennes- 
see, at the age of seven years. The daugh- 
ter, Mary, is the wife of Edwin Buss, of 
Bakersfield. California, and they have two 
daughters, Harriet Foote and Mal)el Buell. 
Mrs. Seys died in 1876. and in 1877 the 
Doctor was married to Elizabeth Wickham, 
of Racine, Wisconsin. Tliey have many 
friends here and the hospitality of the best 
homes is extended to them. 

The Doctor votes with the Republican 
party, of which he has been a stanch sup- 
ix>rter since John C. Fremont became its 
first candidate. Prior to that time he was 
a Whig. He was appointed by the lx)ard of 
health to the position of health officer in 
1888. and has continuously served in that 
capacity since. He belongs to Mitchell Post, 
G. A. R.. is a member of theTx>ard of trade 
of the city and has served on various com- 
mittees. Upon his return to Springfield 
he purchased his present home at No. 234 
South Fountain avenue. This place was 
formerly the home of his parents, but he 
purchased it in 1872. prior to his mother's 
death. Mrs. Seys is a member of the E]iis- 
copal church and the Doctor contributes 
liberally ti> church and charitable work. In 
the line of his profession he is connected 
with the Clark Countv Medical Societv. and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



145 



with the Ohio State Medical Society, and 
at various times has served as president (jf 
the 'former. He is to-day one of the distin- 
guished and capable physicians of this sec- 
tion (>i Ohio, his knowledge being broad, 
comprehensive and accurate, and in his prac- 
tice he has met with excellent success both 
from a professional and financial standpoint. 
The qualities of an upright manhocxl are his 
and have commended him to the confidence 
and regard of his fellow- townsmen for many 
_\ears. His wcirth is widely acknowledged, 
and he well deserves representation in this 
volume. 



JAMES FIXXEY. 

James Finney is to-day one of the ex- 
tensi\-e farmers and stock-raisers of Clark 
county, owning and operating six hundred 
acres of valuable land in Green township. 
He was born near Cincinnati, Hamilton 
county, Ohio, on a farm which is now plat- 
ted into town lots, his birth occurring De- 
cember 19, 1820, and he is a son of Elijah 
and N'ancy (Stewart) Finney. The grand- 
father. James Finney, for whom Mr. Fin- 
ney of this review is named, located at Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, and subsequently came 
to Ohio, floating down the Ohio river on a 
flat-boat, about 1810 or 181 1, before the 
steamboat had been practically used. There 
were at that time twelve children in the fam- 
ily, and (iue was added after their arrival. 
Elijah Finney, the father of our subject, 
was born in Pennsylvania, while the mother 
was born in one of the eastern states. Both 
removed to^ Ohio, the mother to Butler 
county and the father to Hamilton county. 
After their marriage they resided in Ham- 
ilton county, spending the remainder of their 
lives there. 



On the farm in Hamilton county James 
Finney was reared to manhood, his boyhood 
and youth being there passed. He received 
but limited educational privileges, as his ser- 
\ices were required in the work of field and 
meadow during the sunnner months, and he 
was able to attend the district school but 
thirty to forty days out of the year. He 
early became accustomed to the work of the 
fnrm and turned the furrows of the soil 
when he could barely reach the plow handles. 

On the 22nd of December, 1847. ^'^^ ^^^^ 
united in marriage to Miss Eleanor S. An- 
derson, and six children have been born of 
this union : Elijah Stewart Finney mar- 
ried Lizzie Bonner, and is a resident of 
Pawnee county, N^ebraska, and is a mechan- 
ic at that place. He has eight children. 
Isabelle F. married Alexander P. Clark, and 
the latter died on October 16, 1900. Agnes 
S. married Charles E. Oldham and died in 
Springfield in Deceml>er, 1900, leaving three 
children. Anderson T. is a farmer of 
Green township. Charles T. married Mary 
J. Ramsey and resides in Greene county. 
They have five daughters. James P. is at 
home with his parents. 

For some years after his marriage Mr. 
Finney resided in Great township, but in 
March, 1848, he removed to Clark county 
on a farm of one hundred acres, which had 
come to him through his mother, who in 
turn had inherited it from her father, Joseph 
Stew art, who purchased the land O'f the gov- 
ernment, and it has never been out of the 
family possession since, Air. Finney being 
the third owner. He has added to his farm 
from time to time until it has assumed its 
present large proportions, and is one of the 
best equipped as well as one of the most 
highly developed farms of Clark county. 
The rich fields, being well cultivated, return 



r46 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



a rich harvest each season, rewarding gen- 
erously the care and labor Ijestciwed upon 
them. 

-Mr. l-"inney may well be classed among 
the highly respected and leading citizens of 
Clark county, having been one of its pioneer 
settlers. Although he has long passed the 
Psalmist's span of three score years and ten, 
he is yet an active and healthy man, being 
able to take his share of the responsibilities 
of conducting a large and well improved 
farm. In early life he was a Whig, and 
voted for Hjenry Clay in 1844. C>n the dis- 
solution I't that party he joined the ranks of 
the new I-iepublican party and \iited for its 
first presiilential candidate. John C. Fre- 
mont, in 1856. since which time he has re- 
mained firm in his adv(xacy of the prinicples 
of the party, although he has never desired 
office, preferring to devote his attention to 
the management of his farming interests. 
He and his children are faithful members 
of the Cnited Presbyterian church, of which 
he is a deacon. Mr. Finney has long been 
a resident of Clark county, and has wit- 
nessed much of its growth and progress, his 
memory going back to the time when this 
portion of the country was but sparsely set- 
tled. As a pioneer settler and a progressive 
and influential business man of his com- 
munity he is highly respected and honored. 



JOHX E. ATXVMS. 

A ctnmtry has but one chief ruler, be 
he king, emperor or president. Compara- 
tively few men can attain to the highest 
offices in civil and military life, but com- 
merce ofYers a broad and almost limitless 
field in which one may exercise his powers 



unrestrained and gain a leadership as the 
head of a chosen calling. Drawing the les- 
sons which we do from the life of Mr. .\d- 
ams, we learn that the (lualifications neces- 
sary for success are a high ambition and a 
resolute, honorable purjxise to reach the ex- 
alted standard that has been set up. From 
an early age he has been dependent upon his 
own resources and has won the proud Amer- 
ican title of a self-made man. Since March, 
1880, he has made his home in Si)ringfield. 
Mr. Adams is a native of Hamilton 
county. Ohio, his birth having occurred near 
the village of Sheartown on the 20th of 
Octoljer. 1853. his i)arents being W'illiani 
and Jnirbara (Hartman) Adams, lx>th of 
whom were residents of Cincinnati from 
infancy and were educated in the pub- 
lic schools there. The father was a mill-- 
wright l)y trade and in the early '50s re- 
moved to Hamilton county, where he fol- 
lowed farming throughout his remain- 
ing days. He died in \Sj2. at the age of 
sixty-four years, his birth having occurred 
in 1818. His wife, who was born in 1828. 
died in 1882, at the home of her son, John 
E.. in Springfield. Unto this worthy cou- 
ple were born ten children, of whom one 
died in infancy, while Samuel died at the 
age of twenty-four years, and Josephine 
passed away in Cincinnati. The surviving 
members of the family are : Margaret, who 
is the wife of George Metzger and resides 
near the old homestead : William, w ho 
makes his home in the same locality, his 
postoffice being Taylor Creek; Eiiza, the 
wife of John Schafer, of the same neighbor- 
liood ; Caroline, the wife of Andrew Schmidt 
01 Cincinnati: Louisa, the wife of ^lartin 
lxra])p, of Springfield ; John E., of this re- 
\ iew ; and George, of Springfield. The two 
youngest were born up<m the home farm in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



149 



Hamilton county and the others in Cincin- 
nati and all were educated in the country and 
city schools and were reared upon the old 
iiome place. In politics the father was a 
Republican, but never had any aspirations 
for office. Both he and his wife held mem- 
bership in the Lutheran church and were 
esteemed for their sterling w'orth. 

John E. Adams was educated in the dis- 
trict schools and remained upon the home 
farm until he attained his majority, becom- 
ing familiar with all the duties that fall to 
the l(jt of the agriculturist. He was mar- 
ried in 1S75 in Hamilton county. Ohio, to 
Amelia Schafer, who was born in that coun- 
ty March 4, 1854, and is a daughter of Leon- 
ard and Phcebe (Diehl) Schafer, both of 
whom are now deceased. In the family were 
nine children, but only three are yet living, 
namely : Mrs. Adams ; and Charles and 
Louis, w ho are residents of Cincinnati. The 
educational privileges afforded them were 
those of the common schools and they re- 
mained at home until their marriage. Air. 
and .Mrs. Adams have reared one son, 
Harry. 

At the time of his marriage Air. Adams 
located upon a farm and carried on agricul- 
tural pursuits until after his father died, 
when he came to Spring-field, where his 
brother George had located some time be- 
fiire. They engaged in business together 
as grocers and market men, conducting their 
stbre for a few years, w hen John E. Adams 
sr>ld out the grocery business and embarked 
in tlie butcher business on South Yellow- 
Sjirings street. On the ist of January, 1898, 
lie Iiecame connected with another important 
industry of the city, organizing the Progress 
I-'urnace & Stove Company, for the manu- 
facture of stoves and furnaces. This enter- 
prise was successfully conducted until T^'eb- 



rnary, 1902, wdien the plant w'as destroyed 
by fire, after which he again engaged in the 
meat business at his old stand. 

.Mr. Adams is a Republican in his politi- 
cal \-ie\vs and has labored 'effectively and 
earnestl}- for the success of the party, but 
has ne\-er sought office as a reward for party 
fealty. He has served as a delegate to the 
city and county conventions and is now 
serving as ward committeeman. The only 
office he has ever filled was that of council- 
man of Springfield, to which he was first 
elected in 1897, and re-elected in 1899, con- 
tinning in the office until 1901. He belongs 
to Springfield Lodge, No. 33, I. O. O. F., 
and to Mad River Encampment; is a mem- 
ber of the Society of Ben Hjur, an insurance 
organization ; and both he and his wife hold 
membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Few men are more widely known in 
the enterprising city of Springfield than Mr. ■ 
Adams. He has been an important factor 
in business circles and his success and pop- 
ularity are well deserved, as in him are em- 
liraced the characteristics of an unbending' 
integrity, unabating energy and industry that 
never flags. He is public-spirited and thor- 
oughly interested in whatever tends to pro- 
mote the moral, intellectual and material 
welfare cf his communitv. 



JAMES H. RABBITTS. 

James H. Rabbitts, the oldest son of the 
late Charles Rabbitts and the present post- 
master of Springfield, is a native of that 
city, his birth having occurred there on the 
I St of April, 1853. and to its public school 
•system he is indebted for his early educa- 
tion. This was supplemented l)y studv in 



ISO 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tlie University of Wooster, at W'ooster, 
Oliio, where he completed the course by 
graduation in 1874. He pursued the study 
of law in the office and under the direction 
of General J. ^Varren Keifer and Hon. 
Charles R. White. After his admission to 
the ])ar by the supreine court, in 1876, he 
formed a partnership with his preceptors, 
which continued until 1881, when Mr. Rab- 
bitls was elected on the Republican ticket as 
clerk of the courts of Clark county. He 
served as chairman of the Republican cen- 
tral committee of Clark county for the years 
1883 and 1884. and again in 1889. He 
was re-elected as clerk of the courts in 1884 
and again in 1887, holding that position for 
eight years, or until his resignation on the 
1st of January. 1890. whei; he assumed the 
duties of managing editor of the Daily Re- 
public Times of Springfield, the leading 
RejHiblican paper of the cnnity. He con- 
tinued in that capacity until April i, 1898, 
when he resigned .to enter upon the duties 
of jKistmastcr the ist of the following 
month, having been ajJixjinted to the office 
by President McKinley. In 1902 he was 
reappointed by President Roosevelt, and is 
the present incuniL^ent. When he became 
connected with the office the annual gross 
receipts were about one hundred thousand 
dollars, but they ha\ e increased rapidly and 
now amount to one hundred and forty-two 
tlKiusand dollars. Under the administra- 
tion of I\Ir. Rabbitts large additinns ha\e 
been made to the force of employes and 
many additions to the facilities of the office. 
Avhich now ranks sixteenth in the United 
States in respect to second class matter. 

Mr. Rabbitts was married, on the 7th 
of December, 1882. in Indianapolis. Indi- 
ana, to Miss Cornelia Burt, a daughter of 
Rev. Nathaniel C. Burt, D. D., former pas- 



tor of the First Presbyterian church of 
Springfield. The}' have two living chil- 
dren : Burt and Frances. 

Like his father, Mr. Rabbitts is a public- 
spirited and progressive citizen, giving his 
active support to all commaidable public 
enterprises. He is a member of the board 
of directors of the Merchants and Mechan- 
ics Building and L<ian Association, and for 
four years he has served as a member of 
the board of directors of the Associated 
Charities of Springfield. Fraternally he is 
a member o'f Anthony Lodge, No. 455, F. 
& .\. M., of Springfield: Springfield Chap- 
ter. R. A. M. : and Palestine Commandery, 
No. 33. K. r. He also holds membership 
relations with Red Star Lodge, K. P.. and 
is a member of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity 
and The Literarv Club. 



CHARLES RABBITTS. 

Charles Rabbitts. now deceased, was for 
many years one of Springeld's most pro- 
gressive and public-spirited citizens, taking a 
prominent and active part in business af- 
fairs and also in the develojiment of the city. 
He was a native of England, born near the 
village of Bath, in Wiltshire, September 7. 
1820, and was twelve years of age on the 
emigration of his family to America. His 
father liicated on a farm near Cleveland, 
where Mr. Rabbitts continued to make his 
home until 1S43. when he removed to New- 
ark. Ohio, and engaged in the business of 
\\(ii :len manufacturing. 

In 1846 Mr. Rabbitts came to Spring- 
field to seek a location.and the following year 
leased a water right on Bamett's hydraulic. 
In partnership with his brother-in-law. L. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



H. Olds, lie built the wonlen mill in Warder 
street, where he carried on business until 
1875 and then retired. Tlie machinery was 
lirought here by wagons, Mr. Rabbitts driv- 
ing one of the teams. During his active 
business life he was an e.\tensive dealer in 
wiiol. and in that \-ocation was at various 
times associated with the late G. S. Foos, 
the late Marshfield Steele and Jolui Foos, 
His woolen mills were extensively enlarged 
from time to time and the various brands 
of "Rabbitts jeans and yarns" were widely 
celebrated throughout the middle west. 

.\fter retiring from the woolen manu- 
facturing Ixisiness Mr. Rabbitts. in connec- 
tion with William S. Thompson and Ama- 
7iah Winger, purchased the old Rodgers 
home on South Limestone street and erected 
the Commercial building, and in i86g he 
built the handsome residence at the corner 
of Limestone and North streets, now the 
property of Mrs. William Black. These 
were not the only monuments of his activity 
in the ownership and dcA-elopment of real 
estate, for he purchased the old Shaffer 
quarry in Sleepy Hollow, filled it to the level 
cif Limestone street and platted the tract in 
his first addition to the city. He also plat- 
ted as another addiion a tract of four and 
<. 'lie-half acres on Limestone street and 
Cooper avenue. He was one of the pro- 
jectors of the Ferncliff Cemetery Associa- 
tion, and aided in selecting the site of the 
beautiful grounds now known throughout 
the country. At the time c<f his death he 
was one of the few surviving incorporators 
nf the enterprise, ami always took a justi- 
fiable pride in developing and beautifying 
the grounds. 

On the 3d of May. 1848. Mr. Rabbitts 
was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
Ivobinson. of \\'avne county, Ohio, and for 



o\-er fifty years they traveled life's journey 
together, their giilden wedding anniversary- 
being happily celebrated in 1898 at their 
pleasant home in Sleepy Hollow, where they 
resided almost continuously after coming to 
Springfield. Mrs. Rabbitts still survives 
her husband, being now in her seventy-sixth 
year. LTnto them were born six children, 
four sons and two daughters, but the eldest, 
Horatio, died in infancy. The others are 
James H.. the ]>resent postmaster of Spring- 
field ; W. S., cashier of the Springfield Na- 
tional Bank; Charles, a traveling salesman; 
Mary, now deputy clerk of the county; and 
Anna, at home. 

In his political \-iews Mr. Rabbitts was 
first a Whig and later a Republican, and 
was unswerving in his allegiance to his 
party, though he never cared for official 
honors. His interest in educational affairs, 
however, led him to serve as a member of 
the school board for several terms, and he 
was trustee of the Mitchell-Tliomas hospital 
by appointment of ex-^Iayor O. S. Kelly. 
He was one of the first board of directors 
of the Second Nati(/nal Bank of Springfield, 
and was a Jeader in the movement for the 
erection of the Lagonda House. He was 
a member of the colony that left the First 
Pre.sbyterian church to^ build the Second 
church, and was one of the most active of 
those in the establishment and erection of 
that edifice. After a useful and well spent 
life he passed away on the i6th of Decem- 
ber, igoo, and in his death' Springfield real- 
ized that she had lost one of her most valued 
and honored citizens. From, one of the 
local pa]iers we quote the following fitting 
trilnite to his memor_\- : 

"It was with sincere regret that the 
news of the death of the \'eiieral)le Charles 
Raljbitts was recei\'ed in this communitv. 



152 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



His important part in the foundation of the 
industrial and commercial Springfield and 
his long and useful career of themselves en- 
titled him to the high and universal esteem 
in -which he was held ; but more than these 
was his genial, lovable disposition, which 
made lasting friends of all with whom he 
came in contact. There was the light of 
human sympathy in his eyes, its ring in his 
voice, and its warmth in his handclasp. In 
truth mav it Ije written of him 



■His life was gentle. 
And the elements so mixed in him 
That nature might stand up and say 
To all the world: 'This was a man.' " 



RICH.VRD E. O'BRIEN. 

Richard E. O'Brien is now serving as 
chief of police of Springfield, having been 
called to this responsible position by reason 
of his ability and his known loyalty to the 
interests of the city. He was born here 
Jantiary 7. i860, and is a son of John 
O'Brien, who was a teamster and came to 
Springfield in the "505. His birth occurred 
in Ireland, where he pursued his education, 
and when a young man he bade adieu to 
friends in the native land, sailing for the 
new world. He took up his abode in Cin- 
cinnati, where he attended school for a time, 
and was there tmited in marriage to Miss 
Dora Mc.Vvny. who survives him and is 
now living in Springfield at the age of 
si.xty years. Mr. O'Brien passed away in 
1886. He was a Democrat in his political 
views and an acti\e worker in the ranks 
of his party. He lielonged to a family mim- 
l)ering eight children — seven sons and a 
daughter. The surviving members of the 
faniilv are James, nf Union countv, Ohio; 



and Mrs. Eliza Hackett. One brother, Rich- 
ard, now deceased, was a soldier of the Civil 
war. The marriage of. John and Dora 
( Mc.\voy) O'Brien was blessed with seven 
children — four daughters and three sons : 
Mary is the wife of Adam Peifer, of Spring- 
field, by whom she has three children ; Eliza 
is the wife of William Moore, and has one 
son : Richanl E. is the next of the family : 
Annie is the wife of P. Lawler, and they 
have one daughter; Patrick is married and 
has a son and a daughter and is connected 
with the A. C. Evans Manufacturing Com- 
pany; Jennie is the wife of B. Sheveland 
and they have one daughter; William re- 
sides at home with his mother and is em- 
ployed as stationary engineer by the Evans 
Manufacturing Company. 'Hie children 
were all born in this city and pursued their 
education in the public schools. 

Like the other members of the family 
Richard E. O'Brien entered the public 
schools when about six years of age. When 
a young man he learned the painter's trade 
and did job work as well as contracting, 
following that pursuit for eight years. In 
1881 he entered into the saloon business, 
which occupation he followed until Decem- 
ber, 1889. In May, 1890, he was made pa- 
trol driver of the police force. He acted in 
that capacity for two years and was then 
promoted to patrolman and afterward to 
special officer and detective, serving tlius 
for two years. In 1899 he was made chief 
of [xiHce and has since continued in this re- 
sponsible position, being appointed by the 
police commission of Springfield. 

On the i6th of May. 1886. Mr. O'Brien 
was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
Burns, who was born, reared and educated 
in this city and is a daughter of Edwin 
Binns. now deceased. Four daughters and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



two sons liave Ijeen born unto ^Nl'r. and Mrs. 
Burns, and the living are Mary, tlie widow 
ot Charles Creager, who was an architect 
of Springfield ; a'nd Edwin, of this city. The 
children born unto Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien — 
two sons and two daughters — are as fol- 
lows : Gretta, \\'illiam E., Walter and 
Dora, who are stutlents in the pulilic schools 
here. 

In his political views our subject has al- 
ways been a Democrat and has been a dele- 
gate to city and county conventions. He 
is a member of the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks. His advancement in 
life came to him in recognition of his fidel- 
ity- to duty. He has been most efficient as 
a public officer and his success as a detective 
v.as notable. These qualities therefore have 
led to his advancement to the position which 
he now occupies, which he is filling in a 
must creditable and capable manner. 



SAMUEL H. CARR. 

Samuel H. Carr, who is proprietor of a 
livery stable in South Charleston, was born 
near Jeft'ersonville. in Fayette county, Ohio, 
December 23. 1S42, and is a son of Michael 
and Mary (Lohr) Carr. The father was 
also a native of Fayette count)- and there 
spent his entire life, passing away in 1870, 
when fifty-eight years of age. Samuel H. 
Carr spent his boyhood days on the home 
farm and acquired a fair common school ed- 
ucation, working through the summer 
vnonths in the fields and meadows and thus 
olitaining a practical knowledge of agricul- 
tural pursuits. He was a young man of 
eighteen years when his patriotic spirit was 
aroused by the attempt of the south to over- 
thrdw the Union and he enlisted in Com- 



pany C of the Nintieth Ohio Infantry, as a 
pri\-ate. jrle participated in several battles, 
including the engagements at Perryville, 
Kentucky, Wild Cat Mountain, Xashville, 
Stone River, Chickamaug'a, ^Missionary 
Ridge and Kenesaw Mountain. At the last 
named he was wounded in the left arm by 
a minie-ball and was then sent trj the field 
hospital. Later he was in the hospital at 
Big Shanty, at Chattanooga, at Xashville 
and at Louisville, and at the last nametl 
place the arm was amputated because gan- 
grene had set in. The injury had been re- 
ceived on the 20th of June and it was on 
the 13th of July that the meniber was ampu- 
tated. Mr. Carr then returned home on a 
furlough and again reported for duty at 
Columbus where he was honorably dis- 
charged in December, 1864. after two years 
of service, having enlisted in 1862. 

In 1868 Mr. Carr entered the liverv 
Imsiness in Jeffersonville, Fa\-ette county. 
.\lthough his beginning was a small one, 
for he had but one horse and buggy, he soon 
enlarged his stock, howe\-er, carrying on 
a business there until 1872, at which he was 
the owner of five horses and buggies. Re- 
mo\-ing to South Charleston he here estab- 
lished a livery stable and after three years 
removed to his present location. At that 
time he also purchased a third interest in 
the Aliami House and has since become sole 
owner. He had fi:)rmerl\- been proprietor 
of the Ackly House and livery stable for 
three years. He conducted the hotel busi- 
ness in the Miami House for tweh-e years, 
but has since given his whole time to the 
livery business, but still retains the owner- 
ship of both properties. Mr. Carr has been 
continuously in the livery business since 
1868 and so far as is known the longest in 
that business of anv man in Ohio. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mr. Carr was married in Jeffersonville, 
Ohio.' in 1 868. to Miss Ardil'a A. Mcln- 
tyre and unto them were born three chil- 
dren : Charles Lester, who died in Dayton. 
Ohio, at the age of twenty-four years ; ^lary 
AI., who is the wife of John Brown and has 
two children ; and Addie B., at home. The 
wife and mother died in April, 1886, and 
Mr. Carr has since been again married, his 
second union being with Miss Grace !Ma- 
hoy, of Fayette count}-, h\ whom he has 
one son, Leon Harold. 

Mr. Carr votes with the Rcpuljlican par- 
ty but is not an active politician, though he 
has served as a member of the school board 
and township trustee. He has never missed 
a vote since his return from the war. 
At the age of fifteen years he became a mem- 
ber of the Christian church and, upon his 
removal to South Charleston, as there was 
no church of that denomination here, he 
joined the [Methodist Episcopal church, in 
which he is a class leader, trustee and stew- 
ard. He belongs to McMillan Post, G. A. 
R. Mr. Carr is well known among his fel- 
low townsmen through the possession of 
many qualities of genuine worth. He is 
energetic and reliable in business and his 
influence is ever on the side of measures 
and movements for the pu1)lic good. 



W. D. MYERS. 



Concentration of purpose and persist- 
ently applied energy- rarely fail of success 
ir the accomplishment of any task. Again 
and again it has been proven that these are 
the most sure foundations upon which to 
rear the superstructure of labor in the com- 
mercial world. It is therefore that Mr. My- 
ers has made these the salient elements in 



his business career, which have carried him 
forward to the plane of affluence. 

He was born in Osborn, Ohio, Septem- 
ber u, 1862, and is a son of-Christian K. 
and Serepta (\\'ood) Myers. His father 
was a native of Maryland and the mother's 
birth occurred in Ludlowville, New York. 
Both are now living in Springfield and 
through the years of his active business ca- 
reer the father engaged in contracting, but 
at the preseiit time he is living retired in 
the enjoyment of a well earned rest. 

In the public schools of his native cit_\' 
the subject of this review pursued his early 
education and Ijecame familiar with the 
branches of English learning which fit one 
for the practical duties of business life. In 
1882 he became associated with E. S. Kel- 
ly in the coal and ice trade and was after- 
ward with the Champion Coal & Ice Com- 
])any, which was' re-incorporated under the 
name of the S)3ringfield Coal & Ice Com- 
pany. On the 1st of January. 1895. ^^r. 
Myers began business on his own account 
as a partner of Addison Beckley, under the 
firm name of Beckley & ]\lyers. dealers in 
coal and ice. Their firm has since main- 
tained a continuous existence and is doing 
business at Xo. 120 South Limestone street, 
'iliey have increased their yards and have 
lately extended the scope of their commer- 
cial transactions by dealing in Ohio pressed 
brick, which is manufactured in Zanesville. 
and hydraulic pressed brick, manufactured 
in Cleveland. Ohio. Their sales have now 
reached a large figure and their patronage 
in each comnumity in which they deal has 
stadily increased, and they may well be 
classed among the wide-awake and enter- 
prising merchants of the city. 

In 1886 ;Mr. Myers was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Matilda Ilnlmcs. of Hills- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



boro, Ohio, and they now have one child, 
Maude M. "Sir. Myers" social relations con- 
nect him with the Knights of Pythias and 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. Public-spirited he responds to all 
reasonable demands upon his time, means 
and sympathy when his fellow men are to 
be benefited therebv. 



JOXATHAX S. KITCH'EX. 

Jimatlian S. Kitchen is the owner of six 
hundi-ed and twenty-fi\-e acres of the rich 
and \aluable farming land in Clark and 
Logan counties, having in previous years 
been activel}' identified with agricultural 
pursuits in this section of the state. He has 
also been prominent in political office and 
has been honored with various positions of 
trust and responsibility. He is now living 
retired at No. 300 South Limestone street 
in Springfield. 

His birth occurred in Green township, 
Clark county. Xovember 7. 183 1, his par- 
ents being Abraham and Martha Matilda 
(Jones) Kitchen. His paternal great-grand- 
father was a native of England and in 
1779 came to America, settling in Pennsyl- 
N-ania, where he married a Miss Vorhees, 
who was born in Sweden. Li the Keystone 
state Stephen Kitchen, the grandfather of 
our subject, was born and in the year 1808 
he came to Ohio, settling in Warren coun- 
ty, where Abraham Kitchen was soon after- 
ward born. Li the year 1818 the family 
was established in Clark county. 

After the death of his mother Abraham 
Kitchen was placed in a family by the name 
of Hawkins, and was there reared until 
eighteen years of age. He was married in 
Greene county X'ovember 19, 1829, and fifty 



years later this worthy couple celebrated 
their golden wedding anni\-ersary, on which 
occasion there were present five of their chil- 
dren, three sons-in-law, three daughters-in- 
law, twenty-eight grandchildren, four great- 
grandchildren, twelve other relatives and 
many friends, numbering altogether more 
than one hundred people. Abraham Kitchen 
was a very prosperous man in his business 
affairs ar.d at one time owned about twelve 
hundred acres of land. Pie was likewise 
prominent and influential in his community 
and was fearless in defense of his honest 
convictions. He was one of the three orig- 
inal abolitionists who started the movement 
in favor of freeing the slaves in Green town- 
ship and prior to the Civil war his home 
was one of the stations on the famous un- 
derground railroad, whereby many a poor 
negro was assisted northward on his way- to 
freedom. When the Republican party was 
formed to prevent the further extension of 
slavery he became one of its stalwart advo- 
cates. He was also a member of the Free- 
will Baptist church and the first church of 
that denomination in this locality wasbuilt 
upon his farm at Pleasant Grove. He died 
June 28, 1888, having survived his wife for 
two months only, her death ha\ing occurred 
on the 28th of April. 

Jonathan S. Kitchen was reared to 
manhood on the home farm and acquired a 
fair common-school education, although his 
privileges were somewhat limited. He attend- 
ed altogether for about twenty-eight 
months, including one term at Wittenberg 
College. He had never been insiile a school- 
room as a student until twelve years of age 
and after that he attended only through the 
winter months anrl had to go two and one- 
half miles t'j the nearest schoolhouse. Ex- 
perience and obser\-ation, trigether with 



156 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



reading in later years, have made him a 
well informed man. He was twenty-two 
years of age when he left the home farm 
and began earning his own living. 

About that time Mr. Kitchen was mar- 
ried, on the loth of November, 1853. in 
Warren county, Ohio, to Miss Amelia 
Ridge, w iio was born in Waynesville. War- 
ren county, a daughter of Simpson and Je- 
mina (Hisey) Ridge. Two children have 
I)een born unto them: Alsa J., who was 
educated in Hillsdale. Michigan; and J. 
Forrest, who married ]\Iinnie Xeal and has 
one child, Louise. After leaving the public 
school he entered Wittenberg College, re- 
maining three years and then went to Cin- 
cinnati, where he pursued a course of legal 
study and is now a practicing attorney of 
Springlield. 

After his marriage Mr. Kitchen of this 
review began to operate his father's land 
in Green township and there he lived until 
his removal to Springtield in 1879. About 
seven years after his marriage he found 
that he had saved enough to purchase two 
hundred and forty acres of land. Thus in- 
vesting his money, he made good improve- 
ments upon his farm, where he continued to 
reside until he took up his abode in the cit}-. 
He has since purchased and sold several 
farms and has realized good profits from 
these transactions. He is now the owmer of 
about six hundred and twenty-five acres, 
and he also owns some property in Spring- 
field. He is a stockholder in the Citizens 
Bank of South Charleston and in the Cit- 
zens National Bank of Springfield, and is 
to-day accounted one of the sulistantial res- 
idents of this portion of the state. 

Mr. Kitchen lacked only one day of be- 
ing old enough to vote in the year 1852. 
but this dav denied him the right of fran- 



chise and it was therefore that he cast his 
first presidential ballot for Fremont in 1856, 
since which time he has been a stalwart Re- 
publican. For about eight years he served 
as justice of the peace in Green townshij), 
during which time he tried many cases, and 
of those appealed only one was ever re- 
versed. He also served as township trus- 
tee, and in 1881 he was chosen county com- 
missioner and was again elected, so that he 
filled the office for two consecutive terms. 
Durijig his incumbency some of the largest 
buildings of the county were erected. The 
courthouse, which had been started, was 
completed and other public improvements 
made. Mr. Kitchen was reared in the faith 
of the Freewill Baptist church and yet ad- 
heres to it. He has served as church clerk 
for several years and is a member of Clark 
Lodge. No. loi, F. & A. M. His life his- 
torv is familiar to many residents of the 
county, for within its borders he has always 
resided and there has been nothing in his 
history that he has desired to conceal, for 
his has been an upright, honorable charac- 
ter and he has ever been found loyal to 
truth, dulv and the right. 



WILLIAM S. THOM.\S. 

Honored and respected by all. there is 
no man in Springfield who occupies a more 
enviable position than William S. Thomas 
in industrial and financial circles, not alone 
on account of the brilliant success he has 
achieved, but also on account of the honor- 
able, straightforward business policy he has 
ever followed. He possesses energy, is 
quick of perception, forms his plans readily 
and is determined in their execution ; and 
his close application to business and his ex- 




WILLIAM S. THOMAS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



[59 



ccllent manag-ement ha\-e lirougiit to him the 
liigh degree of prosperity which is to-day 
his. It is true that he became interested in 
a Jjusiness already estabhshed, but in con- 
troIHng and enlarging such an enterprise 
many a man of even considerable resolute 
jjurpose, courage and industry would ha\e 
failed : and he has demonstrated the truth 
of the saying that success is not the result 
of genius, but the outcome of a clear judg- 
ment and experience. He has also won dis-. 
tinguished honors in political circles and is 
recognized as one of the leaders of the Dem- 
ocratic party in Ohio. 

William S. Thomas was born in Spring- 
field April 22, 1857, at the old family home- 
stead at that time located on the present site 
of the St. Raphael school. He is a son of the 
Hon. John H. Thomas, who is represented 
on another page of this work. In the public 
schools he began his education and after- 
ward continued his studies in a private 
school conducted by Chandler Roberts, Sr. 
Thus he prepared for college and later he 
received some military instruction and train- 
ing. At the age of fourteen years, in the 
fall of 1 87 1, he matriculated in W'ooster 
University and four years later was gradu- 
ated with honors in that institution, lieing 
at that time and for many years thereafter 
the youngest graduate of that school. 

\Mien his literary education was com- 
pleted, ^\'illiam S. Thomas became an ac- 
ti\-e factor in the business world, joining his 
father in the industry of manufacturing ag- 
riculturj.l implements. The father, associ- 
ated with his two sons, organized the Thom- 
as Manufacturing Companj^, and for many 
years the suliject of this review has been 
its secretary and treasurer. From the be- 
ginning- the business grew in volume and 
importance until it had assumed mammoth 



]3roportions, its trade covering large sections 
of this country and of foreign lands as well. 
A large export business is carried on and the 
hay-rakes, tedders and loaders, also the disc 
and spring tooth harrows and grain drills 
manufactured by this company are sent to 
all parts of the civilized world. To-dav the 
Thomas Manufacturing Company ranks 
among the most important business firms of 
Ohio and lias been an integral factor in pro- 
moting the commercial activity and conse- 
quent prosperity of the city of Springfield. 
The plant is an extensive one, ec[uipped with 
e\'erything needed for the prosecution of the 
work, being supplied \\ith the latest im- 
proved machinery, while a large number of 
workmen are constantly busy in the manu- 
facture of the various implements which are 
sent out annually from this house. Mr. 
Thomas, of this review, has recentl}- been 
elected president of the National Association 
of Agricultural Implements and Vehicle 
Manufacturers. In addition to his extensive 
industrial holdings he has farming inter- 
ests, owning se\eral hundred acres of rich 
farm lands in Clark county, having thus 
made judicious investments in realty. 

On the 8th of December, 1887, was cel- 
ebrated the marriage of \\'illiam S. Thom- 
as and Miss Fanny Senteny, of Louisville. 
Kentuck}', the ceremon-}' being performed 
by Dr. Ort, the president of ^^'ittenberg 
College. Three children, two sons and a 
daughter, l)Iessed this union, namely : John 
Henry. Wallace and Lucretia. 

\\'hile Air. Thomas has led a very Imsv. 
useful and active life, his extensive indus- 
trial interests making heavy demands upon 
his time and attention, he has yet found am- 
ple opportunity to co-operate in many meas- 
ures for the general good, and is a well- 
known factor in church, social and political 



i6o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



circles. He is a member of the board of di- 
rectors of tlie Mad River National Bank, a 
member of the board of trade, of the Com- 
mercial Club and the Economic League. He 
is thus associated with organizations which 
have for their object the promotion of busi- 
ness affairs along lines of broad usefulness. 
He holds meml^ership in the First Presby- 
terian church and is the president of its 
board of trustees. For a number of years 
he served as a member of the board of di- 
rectors of the "S'oung Men's Christian As- 
sociation and was largely instrumental in 
securing the funds for the Association build- 
ing and contri])nte(l quite liberally to this 
cause. It is said that not a church has been 
erected in this communit\- during the past 
twenty years tliat has nut recei\'ed substan- 
tial a.ssistance fmni Mr. Thomas. He is a 
gentleman of bmad humanitarian principles 
without narrow bias, and every moxement 
whicli lias for its object the betterment of 
mankind receives his hearty endorsement 
and co-operation. Hie has been a member of 
the board of trustees of the Wooster Uni- 
versity for a numljer of years and the cause 
of education indeed finds in him a friend. 

Air. Thomas looks from a practical and 
patriotic standpoint at the political situa- 
tion of the country and his close and earnest 
study of the questions of the day has led 
him to believe that Democracy embodies the 
best elements of good government. He has 
therefore allied his interests with the party 
and has been unswerving in his advocacy of 
its principles, although he is not bitterly par- 
tisan, nor has he lieen connected with any 
of the factions which cause such disturb- 
ances in the great political questions. In 
the city he has been called to public office 
and served for one term as a member of the 
school board, one term in the citv council 



board. While one of Springfield's aldermen 
and for two terms on the police and tire 
he acted as president of the council and so 
directed his influence and aid as to mate- 
rially benefit the municipality. He has been 
a delegate \.o nearly all of the Democratic 
state conventions in recent years and has 
continuously been a member of the state cen- 
tral committee since 1895. He was twice 
elected chairman of that committee and w as 
a delegate at large from Ohio to the nation- 
al Democratic convention at Kansas City. 
From the time he attained his majority he 
took a deep and earnest interest in political 
questions and even before he had attained 
the right of franchise his Democratic friends 
in the Sixth w;ird had determined to make 
him the nominee for the city council in the 
spring following his twenty-first birthday. 
He is an imtiring worker, yet he has never 
been allied with any of the factions which 
so often undermine the strength of a party 
and which arise merely from personal pre- 
ferment for a known candidate or from op- 
position to any particular section of the plat- 
form. It is a well known fact that in sev- 
eral state conventions he has worked in op- 
position to probably the strongest Demo- 
cratic faction in the state, and yet to-day in 
this very faction he numbers many of his 
warmest personal friends. Hfe is a conserva- 
ti\e Democrat, yet he has always been found 
in line with his jiarty in state and national 
issues, including the memorable campaign of 
1896. At local elections, where no particular 
issue is involved, lie does not consider him- 
self bound by party ties, regarding more 
than party affiliations the capability of the 
candidate tc discharge the business affairs 
of town or county. He was the president 
and a "most active worker in the celebrated 
Ictlerson Club that from the vear 18S0 un- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



til 1890 was a potent element in Demo- 
cratic forces in the cit\'. county and district. 
It gave annual banquets which were attend- 
ed by many of the leading Democrats of the 
state and nation. He is a man of such 
known patriotism and such unswerving loy- 
alt}' to the principles in which he believes, 
that he has commanded the respect and con- 
fidence of nrjt only the men of his own party, 
but of the opposition as well. His course 
has e\-er been above suspicion, for the good 
of the nation he places above partisanship 
and the welfare of his constituents before 
personal aggrandizement. He commands 
the respect of the leaders of his party 
throughout Oliio, but at home — in the city 
of his adoption — where he is best known, he 
inspires personal friendships of unusual 
strength and all who know him have the 
highest admiration for his good C]ualities of 
heart and mind. 



DARIUS A. SPRAGUE. 

Darius A. Sprague is the proprietor of 
IMaple Leaf fami of South Charleston and 
is one of the most noted horse raisers and 
dealers in this portion of the state. He has 
done much to improve the grade of horses 
raised in this section of Ohio, and his efforts 
ha\-e been of benefit to his fellow men, for 
bv improving the grade of stock prices are 
advanced and all of the agricultural com- 
munity are thereby benefited. ]\Ir. Sprague 
is a native of Harmony township, Clark 
county, born January 31, 1849, '^'''d 'S a 
son of Darius and Sarah (Rice) Sprague. 
His boyhood days were spent upon his fa- 
ther's farm in his native township, and he 
acc|uired a good common school education, 
continuing at home until twentv-twn vears 



of age. After attaining his majority he 
worked for his father by the month for a 
year. 

On his twenty^econd birthday Mr. 
Sprague was united in marriage to Miss 
Phebe E. Thorpe, a daughtei" of Robert and 
Mary (Homer) Thorpe. Mr. Sprague's fa- 
ther was a well-to-do farmer and of him 
our subject rented a tract of land. He had 
one horse and his wife's uncle gave them 
another, so that he had a team with which 
to break his land. He also traded his sad= 
die and bridle to his father for a new plow 
and with characteristic energy he began the 
cultivation of his fields. For three years 
he rented his father's land, giving him half 
of all lliat was raised for several }-ears. Af- 
terward he rented at a cash rental and in 
this way he gained a start, acquiring suffi- 
cient capital to enable him to purchase 
eighty acres of land from his father. When 
that tract was about paid for he bought 
another eighty-acre tract, making his home 
thereon for thirteen years. On the expira- 
tion of that period he rented his property 
and bought where he now lives, near South 
Charleston, at first becoming the owner of 
thirty-one acres. As his financial resources 
increased he extended the boundaries of his 
farm' until it comprised one hundred and 
twenty acres, but he has since sold forty 
acres, now retaining possession of eighty 
acres. \\'hen he disposed of his other proper- 
ty in this county he accepted residence prop- 
erty in Springfield, worth ten thousand dol- 
lars, as part payment, and this he still owns. 

The home of jNIr. and Mrs. Sprague has 
been blessed with four children : Eva 
Blanche, after graduating from the South 
Charleston high school, attended college at 
Fairfax Hall, West "Virginia, and for sev- 
eral vears was a successful teacher in the 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



public schools. On the 12th of June, 1901, 
she married Roy Warner, and they now live 
in Kansas City. Missouri. Xellie Pearle, 
now at home, was also graduated from the 
South Charleston high school and later was 
a. student at Oxford College, Oxford. Ohio. 
Zella Xaomi also completed the high school 
course and attended Oxford College, and 
IS now a successful teacher in the schools of 
South Charleston. Flossie Hazel, the young- 
est i>f the family, has just entered high 
school. 

In his lx3yhood j\lr. Sprague was always 
very fond of horses and began to trade in 
them to some extent, although his first ven- 
ture in fine stock was in pure bred Berkshire 
swine. For many years he bred and raised 
fine li'igs and was a prominent exhibitor at 
the fairs of Clark and adjoining counties 
with his herd of Berkshires. He then went 
back to his first love — the horse — and about 
1S94 he invested in trotting stock. In that 
year he purchased Bessie Bonehill, a two- 
year old. for which he ])aid two hundred 
and twenty-five dollars. This was the first 
horse he ever trained. He bred her, rais- 
ing a colt in 1895. In 1896 she made a rec- 
ord of 2 :iO;y4 at Chillicothe. She next won 
a race at Columbus in three straight heats, 
and the following year he put her in the 
hands of John Dickerson, of Terre Haute, 
Indiana. She won several races, and in Ter- 
re Haute made the world's record for pac- 
ing marcs in 1897 — 2:05-;4. Mr. Sprague 
sold this horse in Chicago for fifteen hun- 
dred dollars. She was afterward sold to 
1-red Deitz, of New York. Mr. Sprague 
next bought Alatus, a stallion by Alcyone, 
with a record of 2 ■.2-/, sired by George 
Wilkes. Alatus had a record of 2:2554, 
which was tlie next year reduced to 2:2414- 
and the following year to 2:17'/^. This 



horse is still owned by Mr. Sprague and has 
proved a wonderful successful sire, al- 
ready having six performers, one with a 
record of 2:09)4. In 1895 he became the 
owner of Banner Belle, which he bought at 
Lexington. Kentucky, with a lot of brood 
mares, including a two-year-old. which 
made a record of 2 .^o and was sold in 
iqoo. One of his mares, which cost him 
one hundred and fifty dollars, developed un- 
til she had a record of 2 :28. She was sold 
in Chicago in 1897 for six hundred dollars. 
He next bought Axius, 28396. by Axtell. 
the world's champion, with a three-year-old 
record of 2:12, and is the leading sire of 
the world of his age. Axius is one of the 
finest bred horses ever brought to Ohio. His 
dam, with ;>. record of 2 :28. was sired by a 
full brother of :^[aud S.. 2:o8;M- His sec- 
ond dam has a record of 2:2604. 'was sired 
by a son of Hambletonian 10. and his third 
dam was the great Green Mountain Maid, 
the dam of nine performers, and also the 
d.am of Flectioneer. Individually Axius is 
a perfect type of the American trotter, 
standing sixteen hands and weighing twelve 
hundred jjounds. While not used for track 
purposes he has shown 2 :o8 speed. Mr. 
Sprague bred and now has Colonel Coit. 
3 ^41 1 , by Alatus. out of the great .\rab Girl, 
dam of Bessie Bonehill. He is now a four- 
year-old. with a pacing record of 2:241-4. 
Arab Girl now has twin fillies, foaled April 
18. 19C2, by .\xius. Mr. Sprague also owns 
a three-year-old stallion, Tanforan. 32814. 
a trotter, by Expedition. 2:i5-j4. out of 
Tanta Buona. 2:2o;4. His draft stallion. 
Pai)illion 10180 (T8296). weighing seven- 
teen hundred ]>ounds. is coal black and has 
mane four and one-half feet long. Mr. 
Sprague built his track, training and breed- 
ing barn in tSc/i. and in that year called his 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



163 



place tlie Maple Leaf farm, under which 
name it has gained a wide reputation and is 
ahxady credited with ten performers and 
many promising prospects. He is one of 
tiie leading stock breeders of this portion of 
Ohio. 

In his political affiliations INIr. Sprague 
is a Prohibitionist. He was reared in the 
Democratic party, but has never affiliated 
with that organization. In 1900 he cast 
his ballot for Major McKinley, the Repub- 
lican candidate. He is a man of most tem- 
perate habits and never uses intoxicants or 
tobacco in any way. He belongs to the Bap- 
tist church and his life is in harmony with 
Christian principles. In business dealings 
he is always honorable and straightforward 
and in all life's relations is true to- duty, 
so that he has won the contidence of his fel- 
low men. While not an aspirant for pub- 
lic office he has been deeply interested in ed- 
ucational and local afifairs. He served as 
a member of the board of education of South 
Charleston for a number of years, holding 
the office of treasurer and president of the 
board. He was also a member of the town 
council for several ^-ears. 



JOXATHAX ^lASON. 

Jonathan Mason is a farmer and stock 
raiser of Green township. He was born in 
this township December 10, 1826, and is a 
.-■;m of James and Electa (Town) Mason. 
The mother was a native of Vermont and 
when a child came to Ohio with her par- 
ents, but it is not known when the father 
arrived in this county. He died when his 
son Jonathan was very young, and at the 
earlv age of twelve years the subject of 



this review began earning his own liveli- 
h(3od, working as a farm hand at that time. 
He has depended entirely upon his own re- 
sources for a living and he has come oi¥ 
concpieror in the world of business. His 
educational privileges were necessarily lim- 
ited, but reading and experience in later 
years have continually broadened his knowl- 
edge. For a few years he worked for the 
meager sum of five dollars per month and 
he had but little saved when he attained his 
majority. He continued to be employed 
by the month until a1x)Ut twenty-five years 
of age, when he was married, the lady of his 
choice being Miss Malinda Craig. They be- 
came the parents of three children : Eiu- 
maranda, now the wife of James Evans, a 
resident of Morton count}-, Kansas, by 
whom she has eight children ; Oscar, who 
married Elizabeth Galloway, of Noble coun- 
ty, Indiana, and has two children, Marjorie 
and Walter Scott; and George, who mar- 
ried Edith Dugan and is the youngest of 
the family. 

At the time of his marriage ^Ir. Mason 
located upon rented land and after renting 
farms for a number of years he finally pur- 
chased thirty acres of land, upon which Fred 
Wilson is now living. He never took up his 
abode upon that property, but selling it at 
an advance he purchased fifty-six acres 
where he now lives in Green township. To 
this he has since added until he has a good 
farm, here of seventy-three acres, and he also 
owns forty acres where his son Oscar is 
now living. Throughout his entire life he 
has carried on agricultural pursuits and his 
home farm is under a high state of cultiva- 
tion and equipped with all accessories to a 
model country property. 

In 1863 Mr. Mason was called upon to 
mourn the loss of his first wife, who died on 



1 64 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the 22(1 of March. Later he wedded Mrs. 
Hannah McKinney, ncc SkilHngs, and she 
died on the 17th of August, 1901. Mr. 
Mason was reared in the faith of the Whig 
party and voted for Taylor in 1848. When 
the new Republican party sprang into ex- 
istence he cast his ballot for its first presi- 
dential candidate, John C. Fremont, and 
has since been a stanch Republican, but 
never an office seeker. He is a member of 
the Free Will Baptist church, belonging to 
the congregation of the Ridge. \\'ith this 
he has been identified since a young man, 
his entire life being in harmony- with his 
(Thristian belief and principles. 



J.VMES W. HALL. 

The Emerald Isle has sent many repre- 
sentatives to this country who have become 
prominent in public and business life. They 
have an adaptability and prescience of busi- 
ness opportunities and unfaltering enter- 
])rise which in a large majority of cases win 
success. Such was the history of James W. 
Hall, who for eighteen years followed con- 
tracting and building and in the line of his 
chosen pursuit gained a good income. He 
was, moreover, a man whose personal char- 
acteristics made him popular with all with 
whom he came in contact and at his death 
he left behind him a large circle of warm 
friends, as well as his immediate family, to 
mourn his loss. 

Mr. Hall was born in County ]\lona- 
ghan, Ireland, on the 22d of May, 1835, and 
was fifteen years of age when he came to the 
new world, making the voyage with rela- 
tives who had formerly lived in America 
and had returned to Ireland on a visit. For 



a short time he remained in New York city 
and then came to Ohio, locating in Xenia. 
which was his place of residence for twelve 
years. lie had attended school in his native 
land and also continued his studies after 
emigrating to America. He there acquired 
a good practical English education, and 
reading, experience and observation also add- 
ed to his knowledge as the years passed by. 

Under the direction of Tobias Dreese, of 
Xenia. Mr. Hall learned the carpenter's 
trade, becoming a good workman, and for 
three years after his marriage he carried on 
business in Xenia as a contractor and build- 
er, but on the 8th of X"nvember, 1864, he 
removed to Springfield, where he continued 
in the same line with good success until 
1880, when he began dealing in builders' 
supplies on Main street and was engaged in 
that business up to the time of his death. 
Many important contracts were awarded 
him and a number of fine buildings of the 
city stand as monuments to his thrift and 
enterpri.se. He met with success in his un- 
dertakings and made judicious investments 
in real estate, becoming the owner of con- 
siderable property here. He was also one of 
the original stockholders of the Lagonda 
Bank. All that he possessed was acquired 
through his own efforts, for from the time 
he was fifteen years of age he was depend- 
ent upon his own resources for a livelihood, 
and his energies and labors brought to him 
richly merited success. 

Xovember 15, i860, in Springfield, Mr. 
Hall was niarried by Rev. Chandler Robbins 
to Miss Jane A. Johnson, who was born in 
County Tyrone, Ireland, February 10. 1839. 
a daughter of George and Sarah (Taggart) 
Johnson. HIer parents were also natixes (jf 
tiie Emerald Isle, the father born in Cnun- 
tv Tvrone. and the mother in Countx- Mmu- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



aghan. Tl:e year 1849 witnessed their em- 
igration to America, and after a voyage of 
eiglit \\eeks and two days, in which they en- 
countered some severe storms, they landed 
at Quebec, Canada, wliere they remained 
for a short time. There were also two broth- 
ers of Mrs. Hlall in the party : William, who 
now resides in Springfield; and Robert T., 
who makes his home in Dayton, Ohio. ]^.[;". 
Johnson, on leaving the Dominion of Can- 
;'(la. made his way to Berea, Ohio, twelve 
miles west of Cleveland, and there remained 
until 1850, when he came to Springfield. 
Here he spent his remaining days, passing 
away nn the 25th of April, 1900, at the 
very advanced age of eighty-nine years and 
nine months. His wife had previously 
jiassed away, ha\-ing been called to the home 
beyoml in May, 1891, when eighty-five 
years of age. Both were Episcopalians in 
religions faith and were earnest Christian 
])eople. They were laid to rest in Ferncliff 
cemetery. The father was a contractor for 
work on streets and railroads of the city 
and county and aided in building several of 
the principal streets of Springfield. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hall were born four 
children : Sarah A., born September 19, 
1 86 1, was married on the 15th of Novem- 
])cr, 1883, to John Tyler Ricks, and Ihey 
have one daughter, Sarah Elizabeth. U'ill- 
iam George, born December 24. 1864, mar- 
ried Charlotte Ohmer, of Dayton, Ohio, and 
now resides in Camden, this state. Oliver 
James, born January 17, 1868, is at 
home. Jane Florence, born March 29, 1876, 
is also at home. For thirty-six years the 
family residence has been at Xo. 1 5 1 South 
I^imestone street. 

jVIr. Hall was a Free Mason and attained 
the Knights Templar degree in that order. 
At an earlv da\- he was identified with the 



Odd Fellows society and afterward became 
a member of the Knights of Pythias frater- 
nity. His political support was given to the 
Democracy and he had firm faith in its 
principles. For some years he served as a 
member of the city council, representing 
the old third ward with credit to himself 
and satisfaction to his constituents. Both 
he and his wife were reared in the Episco- 
palian faith and were members of that 
church in earl)- life, but they joined the 
Presbyterian church in Xenia and contin- 
ued thereafter followers of that denomina- 
tion. Mr. H'all was for a long period a 
trustee of the Second Presbyterian church,' 
of Springfield. He died July 7. 1882, and 
was laid to rest in Fernclift" cemetery, the 
fu.neral services being conducted b}- Rev. 
\\'illiam H. Webb and the Knights Tem- 
plars. He was a charitable man, who aid- 
ed man)- worth)^ and benevolent insti- 
tutions, both of a public and private char- 
acter, and in manner he was pleasant, ge- 
nial and ever approachable. Steadily pur- 
sru'ng his va)-, undeterred by the obstacles 
and difiiculties which one always encoun- 
ters in a business career, he has achieved 
prosperity. His life was manly, his actions 
sincere, his manner unaffected and his ex- 
ample well worthy of emulation. 



CHARLES H. MERRITT. 

Clark count)- is happy to number among 
its representative farmers and stock-raisers 
Charles H. 'Merritt, a resident of Madison 
township, having his postoffice address at 
Springfield, Ohio. ;\Ir. Merritt was born in 
Springfield township October 11. 1848, and 
is a son of Edwanl and Mary (Mullen) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Merritt. The father, who is still living, is 
nuw about eighty years of age, while the 
mother who was horn in 1815. passed away 
in 1885. 

Our subject spent the days of his boy- 
hood upon the farm where he was born, at- 
tending the scliools of the district and re- 
ceiving a good common-school education. 
He remained upon the old homestead with 
his parents until twenty years of age, when 
he accompanied them on their removal to a 
farm near Sc«utli Charleston in 1867. His 
common-school education was supplemented 
by one year at Taylor's Scientific and Classi- 
cal Academy, at Wilmington, Delaware. 
He had taught une year previous to enter- 
ing the acadcniN . and after completing the 
course there he taught for two years more. 

In Madison township. January 20, 1886, 
was celebrated the marriage of Mr. ]\Ierritt 
and Miss Alice Buffenbarger, who was born 
and reared in Madison township, on the 
banks of the Little Miami river, and a 
daughter of Peter and Elizabeth (Kizer) 
Buffenbarger. After his marriage he re- 
moved to his present farm. Here he pro- 
ceeded to put the land under a desirable state 
of cultivation, and has three hundred acres 
of land, which is a very valuable and highly 
productive tract. He has been quite exten- 
sively engaged in stock-raising and his well 
tilled fields have yielded to him a gratifying 
si'urce of income imtil he is to^-day one of 
the well-to-do farmers of this part of the 
country. In 1S90 he built a fine brick resi- 
dence, of modern architecture, a comfortable 
and attractive home, well arranged for con- 
venience and equipped with all the accessor- 
ies which are necessary to the comfort and 
convenience of an A.merican family of the 
twentieth century. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Merritt have been 



born five children : Beulah E., born in No- 
vember, 1886; Thomas Edward in 1888; 
Esther Alice, born in i88g; Mary Elizabeth, 
born in 1891 ; and Charles H., born in 1893. 
In politics Mr. ^lerritt is independent, vot- 
ing fi>r the men and measures that he thinks 
will conserve the public welfare. He has a 
birthright membership in the Society of 
Friends, of x'ihich his wife is now also a 
member. 

Mr. Merritt has witnessed much of the 
growth and development of his native coun- 
ty and has been no unimportant factor in the 
work of improvement and advancement 
which has liere taken place in the last half 
century. The c(mnty owes its prosperity to 
the energetic eft'orts, the diligence and per- 
severance through difficulties of representa- 
tive citizens of the calibre of Charles H. 
}*Ierritt. 



CHARLES O. WTLDASIX. M. D. 

Dr. W'ilclasin has not only attained dis- 
tinction as a skilled representative of the 
medical profession, but is also one of the 
most prominent representatives of frater- 
nal life in Ohio, having been the promoter 
of many organizations which have for their 
object the inculcation of the spirit of broth- 
erly helpfulness, charity and kindness. He 
was born in Mad River township. Clark 
count}-, Ohio, Octolier 8. 1850. and comes of 
German and Scotch ancestry on tiie ]>aternal 
side, while on the maternal side he is of 
Holland lineage. In the grandfather's fam- 
ily were six children : Henry. Charles. 
I'olk. Elizabeth, John and Lee. all of whom 
are yet living. Of this number Polk and 
John were soldiers of the Civil war in the 
L'nion army and Henry attcmpte(l to enlist 




DR. CHARLES O. WILDASIN. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



169 



hut was rejected on account of liis healtli. 
Henry F. Wildasin, the father of our sul> 
ject, is also a physician, now engaged in 
])ractice in Plattsburg, but was the only 
member of the family who entered a pro- 
fessional life, the others following mercan- 
tile nr agricultural pursuits. Dr. H. F. 
Wildasin was born near Bow'lusville. Ohio, 
and was graduated in the Eclectic Medical 
Institute of Cincinnati in 1872. He also 
studied under Dr. Potter, and at the end of 
liis graduation he was one of only three 
eclectic physicians in Clark county. In 
earl}- life he followed farming, carpentering 
and wagon making, possessing much natural 
mechanical ability, but he determined to be- 
came a member of the medical profession 
and has had excellent success in treating di- 
seases. He is now sixty-five years old and 
is a man of wonderful vitality. His politi- 
cal support is given the Democracy and he 
Ijelongs to the Christian church, .\fter ar- 
ri\-ing at years of maturity he wedded 
Mary Kaler, who was born in December, 
18:7, being only about two months her hus- 
1 land's junior, for the Doctor's birth oc- 
curred in October of that year. They be- 
came the parents of ten children, of whom 
four are }et living: Charles O., whose 
name introduces this record ; George, a resi- 
dent of Plattsburg; E. Homer, of Bellefon- 
taine, Ohio; and Pearl, who is a graduate 
of the high school of Springfield, and is 
ni;>w a public school teaclier. 

Dr. Charles O. Wildasin pursued his 
education in the public schools of Clark 
county, after which he took a selected course 
in Antioch College and then entered the Ec- 
lectic Medical College at Cincinnati, where 
he was graduated in 1884. He had previ- 
(.nsly become connected with commercial 
uitcrests but abandoned that line in order 



to follow in his father's professional foot- 
steps. He practiced in Dayton, Ohio, for 
a time and afterward in Plattsburg, largely 
succeeding his father, but in January, 1888, 
he sought a broader field of labor, coming to 
Springfield, where he has since built up a 
large and growing practice. In all of his 
atTairs he has been very successful. He is 
deeply interested in any subject which tends 
to bring to mankind the key of that intricate 
problem which we call life, and he has car- 
ried his research and investigation far and 
wide in order to make his efforts of the 
greatest practical value in the healing art. 

The Doctor was married in Plattsburg 
in March, 1881, to Miss Sallie E. Loukes, 
a daughter of William Eoukes, an old 
butcher of Springfield, nowf deceased. Her 
mother, jMrs. Harriet Loukes, is a resident 
of Plattsburg. Unto the Doctor and his 
wife have been born two children: Myrtle, 
\\-ho was born in 1883, and is a graduate of 
the public school of Springfield, and now a 
member of the sophomore class in ^\'itten- 
berg College; and Fred, who was born in 
1886. 

The Doctor is a member of the State 
Eclectic ^Medical Association, and aside 
from his profession he has some business in- 
terests, being a stockholder in the Oaxaca 
Association, of Chicago, owning rubber 
and cofi^ee plantations in Mexico. He has 
been very prominent in fraternal circles, 
taking an active part in lodge work. He 
belongs to Ingomar Lodge, No. 610, K. 
P., has served as a representative to the 
grand lodge of the state and is a candidate 
for grand outer guard. He lielongs to Corn- 
many Six of the Uniformed Rank of the 
Knights of Pythias, is past assistant sur- 
gc'in of the Fourth Regiment (jf the Uni- 
formed Rank and has the rank of captain. 



I/O 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



He likewise belongs to Al Yenibo Temple, 
No. 112, D. O. K. K. He is medical exam- 
iner and a member of the Independent Or- 
der of Foresters and of the Protected Home 
Circle. He became identified with the 
Knights of P3'thias society in Miami lodge 
during his residence in the t(j\\n of Dayton 
in 1882, and held the office of district dep- 
uty grand chancellor for two terms. Hie has 
also given his attention to the promotion of 
the interests of the order and has organ- 
ized three lodges — Vienna Crossroads, 
Clifton lodge and Ingomar lodge, being a 
member of the last named. He is a rqjre- 
sentative of the State Lodge, a captain of 
the degree staff and is physician and sur- 
geon to the Pythian Home of the city, serv- 
ing without remuneration. He is also a 
member of the Springfield Commercial Club. 
In politics he is a Democrat, and he and his 
family are members of the Presbyterian 
church. In his life Dr. Wildasin exempli- 
fies the benevolent and helpful .spirit of the 
fraternities with which he is connected, and 
his genuine worth ami his social qualities, 
as well as his professional skill, have made 
him a popular and respected, as well as 
highly honored citizen of Springfield. 



PROFESSOR FRFD W. Wil.LISS. 

Business conditions of the past half a 
century have become so complicated and so 
extensive that there has been a demand for 
superior skill in the control of all business 
affairs. In order to meet this demand schools 
of business training have sprung up 
throughout the country and one of the most 
creditable of these institutions is the W'il- 
liss Business Universitv. of which our sub- 



ject was the founder and is now the princi- 
pal. In educational circles he has per- 
formed an important work, training young 
men and young women for the practical and 
responsible duties of life, and the university 
is upon a par with the best schools of the 
kintl throughout the entire land. 

Professor Williss was born in Madison 
township, Clark county, Oiiio, June 18, 
1858. Fle pursued his early education in 
the district schools and was reared to man- 
hood upon his grandfather's farm. At the 
age of sixteen he became a student in South 
Charleston, Ohio, and was graduated there. 
He afterward began reading medicine with 
a local physician and proceeded as far as 
therapeutics, but did not complete his prep- 
aration for the medical profession. Com- 
ing to Springfield he then entered the law 
office of Keifer & \\'hite, and after a thor- 
ough and comprehensive course of reading 
he was admitted to the bar in 1880. At 
that time he entered the office of S. .A. Bow- 
man as an assistant, but in 1882 returned 
to the ofiice of his former preceptors, with 
whom he continued until 1890. During this 
time Professor Williss organized the school 
of which he is now the head, beginning on 
a small scale and employing teachers to con- 
duct the institution, which was established 
in 18S1 as a school of shorthand and type- 
writing. When he came to this city he was 
the only one who earned a living through 
stcnograjiliy in Springfield. Hie had coni- 
jilcted its study under the direction of Benn 
(laincs. a nephew of Mr. Keifer. Many 
wanted to learn the art and prevailed upon 
Professor \^'illiss to open a school, which 
he did. He served as private secretary to 
General Keifer and also to the latter's 
brother-in-law. Judge WillLam White, and 
through these associations he became known 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



171 



throughout the east. For twelve years he 
sen-ed as court stenographer in the com- 
mon pleas court. He opened a school on a 
very small scale and .it was advertised by 
his pupils and thus gradually grew. It wzs 
his pupils who ga\'e the name of Williss 
Business Uni\-ersity to the institution. So 
rapidly did the school gain in numerical 
strength that in 1890 Professor Williss was 
obliged to abandon his law work in order to 
give his entire time to the institution. A 
complete university course has been added, 
the branches of learning being under the 
charge of special teachers. There is also a 
complete business course and since 1900 
there has been an advisory board connect- 
ed with the school, composed of J. H. Ralj- 
liitts, General Keifer and J. L. Zimmerman 
From the beginning the school has met 
with desirable success and substantial 
growth. It is the oldest institution of the 
kind in Springfield and teachers are em- 
ployed for all branches, with Professor 
\A'illiss as superintendent of instruction. 
The school has been a financial success and 
its high rank is everywhere acknowledged. 
Since the erection of the Zimmerman build- 
ing the Williss Business University has 
been located therein and our subject super- 
intended the arrangement of the floor for 
his own use. On the walls of the school- 
room is a freehand pen drawing of the na- 
tional capitol at Washington, D. C. This is 
eight by ten feet, being the largest picture 
of the kind in the country. The artist was 
.Albert Reddy, who has pursued a course 
in the pen art in the Williss Business Uni- 
versity. The Hammond Typewriter Com- 
pany gives as prizes in this school, ex'cry 
six months, a one hundred dollar machine 
to the best operator whoi has studied here. 
Such a gift is not made to anv other insti- 



tution. The school has the hearty support 
of the intelligent citizens of Springfield and 
also of its numerous pupils. 

In 1881, in South Charleston, Clark 
county, was celebrated the marriage of 
Professor F. W. \\'illiss to Aliss Mattie 
H. Sands, who was born in Illinois, but 
was reared in Clark county, Ohio, from her 
infancy, her father being Israel Sands, now 
a resident of Winfield, Kansas. Mrs. Wil- 
liss is a graduate of the public schools of 
South Charleston, and by her marriage she 
has become the mother of six children, but 
Fred W., the fifth in order of birth, died in 
early childhood. The others are: Carl L., 
born in 1883; Frank S., born in 1885; War- 
ren K., born in 1887; Grace, born in 1889; 
and Leroy M., born in 1900. The four 
eldest compose the Williss quartette and are 
all graduates from the school of music, 
^vhile Carl has had further advantages along 
musical lines in Cincinnati, Dayton and 
Cleveland, Ohio. They figure prominently 
in musical circles in the city, Carl being a 
violinist, while Frank plays the 'cello, War- 
ren the cornet, and Grace the piano. The 
sons are now in the school with their father, 
and Grace is a student in the public schools. 

Professor Williss and his wife belong 
to St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal church 
and he is a member of the Ohio Commer- 
cial Teachers' Association, State Stenogra- 
phers' Association and the International 
Stenographers' Association. In both he has 
certificates of the highest grade. He has 
been a representative to the conventions of 
these associations, is now a delegate to the 
national convention and is authority oil 
many subjects. Professor Williss owes his 
advancement entirely to his own efforts and 
has worked his wa}' through school, pur- 
sued a legal course, as the result of his de- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORl 



termiiiati(jn and business ability and has 
eventually established an institution of 
learninqf. which is of the greatest benefit to 
the conmuuiity as well as a source of re- 
munerative income to himself. His reading 
has" been of a broad and comprehensive 
character and he is widely known as a man 
of strong intelligence, of keen discernment 
and of broad human sympathy. His life 
work Ik'.s had an important bearing upon the 
intellectual development of this section of 
Ohio, and no history of Clark coun- 
ty would be complete v>ithout mention of 
Professor W'illiss. whose efforts have aided 
in establishing the business career of so 
many of the young people of Springfield 
and surrounding districts. 



T.\SPER B. CRAIG. 



So great has been the improvement, so 
rapid the changes, so complete the transfor- 
mation wrought in Clark county, that it is 
almost difficult to believe that during the 
boyhor^d days of Jasper B. Craig pioneer 
conditions yet existed to a considerable ex- 
tent, but the efforts of a progressive and en- 
lightened people have been such as to make 
Clark county a leading agricultural and in- 
dustrial section of Ohio. Mr. Craig was 
for many years identified with farm work, 
but is now living retired. 

He was Ijnrn in Springfield township 
near bis home on the 15th of October, 1833. 
His parents. Robert and Fannie (Barnett) 
Craig, were Imth natives of Brattleboro, 
W-rniont. and with their respective parents 
came to Ohio in childhood, their marriage 
being iirobably celebrated in Clark county. 
The father was an agriculturist and owned 



the farm upon which our subject was born. 
ha\ing there two hundred and forty acres, 
which he cultivated successfully until his 
death, whidh occurred in 1850, when he was 
about fifty years of age. His widow sur- 
vived him alx)ut twenty years, and then she. 
too, departed this life. They were the par- 
ents of nine children, of whom Jasjjer B, 
was the fourth in order of birth. Only 
three of the number are now living. John, 
the eldest, is a resident of northern Indiana, 
w bile ]\Iar.garet is the widow of John Coul- 
ters, and lives in Indianapolis, Indiana. The 
father strongly endorsed the Whig party, 
but was never a politician in the sense of 
office seeking. 

On the home farm Jasper B. Craig spent 
the days of his childhood and youth, enjoy- 
ing the pleasures in which boys of the pe- 
riod usually indulged, mastering the lessons 
assigned in the district schools and work- 
ing in the fields during the summer months. 
He remained with his father until the lat- 
ter's death, and with his mother, until 1856. 
when be made an overland trip to Califor- 
nia. l)eing attracted by the discovery of gold 
on the Pacific slope. He traveled with a 
party and was five and a half months upon 
the way. After reaching the Golden state 
he engaged in teaming in the northern part 
of California, making his home at Sacra- 
mento for a few years, after which he went 
to Carson City, Nevada, spending altogether 
fourteen years in the far west, during which 
time he was engaged in various enterprises. 
In 1870 he returned to Ohio and with the 
capital ac(iuired tluring his western sojourn, 
he purchased land in Green township, which 
he owned for about twelve years. 

Mr. Crai.g was married in Harmony 
township on Christmas day of 1872 to Miss 
Racliel Hawkins, who was born in that 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tMwnship and is a daughter of John and 
Jane ( Pinneo ) Hawkins. Tlieir (inly child 
(Hed in infancy. In the year 1885 Mr. Craig 
]nn"chased liis present farm in Harmony 
tiiwnship, on which he has since lived. He 
has a quarter section of land, on which are 
excellent improvements, including an at- 
tractive residence, substantial outbuildings 
and modern accessories, which indicate his 
careful supervision. He is now practically 
living retired, leaving the care of his land 
to i:)thers, while he is enjoying a richly mer- 
ited rest. In politics he is a Republican. 
He attained his majority in 1856, but could 
not vote that year because of his removal to 
California, and therefore he cast his first 
ballot in i860 for Abraham Lincoln. In 
early life he became a member of Spring- 
field Lodge, No. 1 01. F. & A. M., but has 
not been actively identified witli the order 
since his residence in Carson City. His life 
has been cjuietly passed, in a measure, yet 
there is much in his history that is worthy 
of emulation because he has always been 
fiiund true to his duties of citizenship and 
straightforward in his relations with his 
fellow men. 



JAMES JOHXSOX. Jr. 

The name of this gentleman figures 
l)rominently in the legal profession and in 
political circles of Springfield. Fortune 
does not bestow its favors promiscuously, 
but gives its benefits as a reward of earn- 
est and persistent labor. In a profession 
where advancement depends entirely upon 
individual merit. James Johnson has at- 
tained distinction, being to-day classed as 
line of the leading attorneys of the city of 
'.lis ])irth — Springfield, Ohio. His natal 



day was December 3, 1856, and his father, 
James Johnson, Sr.. was a native of Ire- 
land, whence he came to the L'nited States 
when a mere boy with his parents, who set- 
tled on a farm in Clark county. 

In this city the subject of this review 
acquired his primary education and after 
attending public and private schools here, 
he entered Wittenberg College, in which 
institution he was graduated with the class 
of 1877. The legal profession attracted him 
and he resolved that his energies should be 
directed along the line of maintaining jus- 
tice at the bar. He read law with the firm 
of Bowman, Pringle & Scott, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in April. 1880, before the 
supreme court at Columbus. Ohii). Im- 
mediately afterward he entered upon the 
prosecution of his chosen profession in 
Springfield and became a partner of his 
former preceptor, Thomas J. Pringle, un- 
der the firm name of Pringle & Johnson. 
This became one of the strongest law firms 
in this city, maintaining a consecutive ex- 
istence of seventeen years, at the end of 
which time it was dissoh'ed by mutual con- 
sent. I\Ir. J(jhnson has since been alone in 
practice. He has had a distinctively repre- 
sentative clientage, connecting him with 
much of the most important litigation tried 
in t!ie courts of this locality. He is a strong 
in argument, logical in his deductions, and 
in the presentation of a case displays a thor- 
ough mastery of the subject and of the law 
bearing upon it. 

In 1888 Mr. Johnson was married to 
Miss Blanche Obenshane. of White county, 
Indiana, a daughter of M. L. arid Margaret 
(Armour) Obenshane. Three children 
graced this union ; Martha, James Line 
and Porter B. James Line dietl when three 
vears old. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mr. Jnlmsnn lias long been rccng-nized 
.-IS a le;i(ler in Democratic circles in Spring- 
liclil. and his dcNotion to party arises from 
a firm belief in its principles and from a 
patriotic Iciyalty to his country and its wel- 
fare. ?Ie has not been a politician in the 
sence of office seeking, although he has been 
iionored with political preferments. In 
i885 he recei\'ed his party's nomination for 
circuit judge in the second circuit of Ohio, 
and succeeded" in reducing the majority \o 
six hundred \otes in a district which has 
sdways given a Republican majority of over 
four thosand. He carried his own county 
l)y nine hundred and fifty. At the biennial 
election for mayor, in 1893, o^"' subject 
was chosen the chief executive of tlie city 
for a term of two years, and during his ad- 
ministration many of the substantial im- 
provements cif the cit\- were made. One 
especially worth}- of ncjte was the gift of a 
tract of land of two hundred and sixty acres, 
which was donated by the late John D. L. 
Snyder as a park, and the securing of two 
hundred thousand dollars as an endowment 
I'' T the maintenance of the park. The citizens 
■ f .SpM-ingfield have every reason to be proud 
this beautiful park. The Snyders were rel- 
atives of Mr. Johnson — iiis mother's cous- 
ins. In 1897 lie was elected president of the 
board of trade, and his efforts lia\e l)een 
of signal usefulness to Springfield. oMr. 
Johnson was appointed by the common 
p'eas court as advisory trustee of the en- 
dowment fund of two hundred thousand 
dollars fcir Snyder I'ark. and he is honored 
in the fact thai in 1901 he was elected pres- 
ident of the Clark County Bar Association 
and re-elected in 1902. and as its chief offi- 
cer he has won honor and respect. Fra- 
ternally he is connectetl with Anthony 
L.Hlge. Xo. 4-,:;. F. & A. M. His is a well 



rounded character, in which he gives due at- 
tention to the social side of life, to his ob- 
ligations of citizenship, to his home duties 
and to his business. 'J'hc zeal with which 
he has devoted his attention to his profes- 
sion, the careful regard evinced for the in- 
terests of his clients, and an assiduous and 
unrelaxing attention to all the details of 
his cases, have brought him a large busi- 
ness and made him very successful in 
its conduct. His arguments have elicited 
warm commendation, not only from his as- 
sociates at the bar, biU also from the bench. 
Jde is a very able writer; his briefs always 
show wide research, careful thought, and 
the best and strongest reasons which can be 
urged for his contention, presented in logi- 
cal and cogent form, and illustrated by a 
stvle unusuallv lucid and clear. 



H. A. COSLER, M. D. 

Dr. H. .\. Cosier, a practicing physician 
and surgeon of the regular school of medi- 
cine, located at .\orth Hampton, was born 
near Yellow Springs, Greene county, Ohio, 
May 4, 1873. He is a son of Abram B. 
and Susan \'. (Stutsman) Cosier. The 
father was born on a farm near Alpha. 
Ohio, and there spent the days of his youth. 
In 1863 he responded to his coinitry's call 
for aid in ])reserving the I'nion, enlisting as 
one of the boys in blue of Company D. One 
Hundred and Fifty-fourth Ohio Infantry, 
for one hundred days' service. He went to 
the front with the rank of sergeant, and 
while in \'irginia he was captured, being 
held as a prisoner of war for si.x months in 
Salisbury. On the expiration of that jieriod 
he was released and returned home, but he 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



175 



never regained his health, his constitution 
liax'ing- been undermined Ijy the hardships 
of prisou life. On the 26th of Novemlser, 
1868, he was united in marriage, near Yel- 
low Springs, to ]\Iiss Susan V. Stutsman, 
and they became the parents of two chil- 
dren. Sanniel S., who wedded Mary Mc- 
Knight, of Spring Valley, Ohio, was for one 
}ear an assistant in Nelson's Business Col- 
lege, of which he was a graduate. Later he 
removed to Xenia, where he was employed 
as an accountant in the Xenia National 
Bank for a time and subseciuently was ap- 
pointed dqjuty treasurer of Greene county, 
in which capacity he was serving at the time 
of his death, which occurred on the 19th of 
August, 1897. The father died ^larch 8, 
1873, a few weeks before the birth of our 
subject. 

When the Doctor was three years old 
the mother removed with her two sons to 
^'ellow Springs, and there he was educated, 
being graduated from the high school with 
the class of 1889, when only sixteen years 
of ag'e. He afterward spent one year in 
Antioch College, and then engaged in clerk- 
ing in a store for one year. Subsequently 
he secured a position as a school teacher in 
Byron, Ohio, where he remained for a year, 
when he removed to Delaware, this state, 
and entered the Ohio Wesleyan University. 
While pursuing his studies there he also 
acted as tutor in mathematics in the college, 
thus helping to pay his way thrnugh the 
institution. He was graduated there in the 
class of 1897. 

At the outbreak of the Spanish-Ameri- 
can war, in the spring of the following year, 
he enlisted for service as a member of Com- 
pany K, Fourth Ohio \"olunteer Infantry, 
and was made a sergeant. He was sent to 
camp' at Columbus, and thence to Cliicka- 



mauga. and sailed from Newport News to 
Porto Rico, where he remained from the 
1st of August until the 6th of Nor^-ember, 
1898, during which time he participated in 
three engagements, those of Guyama, Cayey 
Heights and a skirmish at Aibonito Pass. 
He has several valuable souvenirs of the 
campaign. While upon the march he 
sprained his knee and has never recovered 
horn the accident. 

.Vfter his return tu his nati\-e country 
Dr. Cosier received an honorable discharge 
and then entered the Ohio Medical Univers- 
ity, of Columbus, Ohio, fromi which he was 
graduated with the class of 1902. He at 
once went toWVest Carrollton, and in June 
of the s-ame year he came to North Hamp- 
ton. \\here he opened an office. Although 
he has been here but a brief period he is well 
established in his profession, and is recog- 
nized by the public and by the members of 
the medical fraternity as a young man Oif 
good ability in the line of his chosen work. 
When he was graduated at Oihio W^esleyan 
University the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence was conferred upon him, and in 1902 
his Alma Mater conferred upon him the de- 
gree of Master of Arts. AVhile studying 
medicine in Columbus he was appointed to 
the office of secretary of the Children's 
Home Society. He has made his oaxu way 
through college, thus proving the strength 
of his character, his self-reliance and his 
genuine worth. \\'hile in the military ser- 
\'ice he actevl as clerical sergeant for two 
m^inths under Brigadier General Compton. 

The Doctor is a member of the Meth(3- 
dist Episcopal church. Fraternally he is 
connected with Humboldt Lodge. No. 476, 
F. & A. M., of Columbus, the Knights of the 
Golden Eagle and the Junior Order of Amer- 
ican [Mechanics, of North Hampton, and he 



[76 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



also Ijelongs to the Sigma-Chi fraternity, 
whicli he joined at Delaware, Ohio. He is a 
young man of strong mentality, iml>ued 
with the spirit of advancement so character- 
istic of the times, and his laudable ambition 
and unfaltering enterprise will doubtless win 
for him a very creditable position in the 
ranks nf the medical fraternitv. 



HON. WILLIAM! R. BURNETT. 

A list of the leading citizens of Clark 
county contains the name of William Riley 
Burnett, one of the representative and hon- 
ored residents of Springfield. He is ime to 
whom has been entrusted important public 
service and over whose record there falls 
no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil. 
His unbending integrity of character, his 
fearlessness in the discharge of his duties, 
and his appreciation of the resixrnsibilities 
that have rested upon him, have been such 
as to make him a most acceptable incumbent 
in ofTice, and his worth is and has been 
vxddely acknowledged. He is now serving 
as a member of the board of public affairs 
in Springfield and is a recognized leader in 
Democratic circles. 

Mr. Burnett is a native of Clark county, 
having Ijeen born on a farm west of Spring- 
field, .\uc?nst 17, 1846. His father. John 
Burnett, was liorn also near Springfield in 
i\^2J^ and was a son of Richard Burnett. 
one of the honored pioneer settlers of Clark 
county. The grandfather married a iliss 
Nolan, who was a native of Kentucky, and 
among their children was John Burnett. The 
latter became a millwright by trade and fol- 
lowed that business for a number of years. 
When he liad arrived at vears of maturitv 



he wedded Mary Jones, who was born in 
Randolph county, Virginia, in 1826. a 
daughter of Wesley Jones, who was a na- 
tive of Virginia and a ship carpenter 1)\ 
trade. The father of our sul)ject is now 
deceased, but the nmther is living in Spring- 
field. 

William R. Burnett entered the public 
schools at the usual age and therein pur- 
Sued his studies until his fourteenth year, 
when he started out to make his own way 
in the world by obtaining a position in the 
shop of Whiteley. Fassler & Kelly, where 
he learned the machinist's trade, and contin- 
ued in their employ as a machinist fur twen- 
tw-Que years, with the exception of the time 
spent in the army. In 18^)3. when a ynuth 
of seventeen, he responded to his country's 
call for aid to crush out the rebellion, and 
enlisted in Company A. Fourth Battalion 
Independent Ohio Cavalry. After being 
mustered in he was ordered to Kentucky, 
where for a time he was in the dangerous 
service of scouting and hunting bushwhack- 
ers. He served faithfully until the close of 
tiie war. receiving an honorable discharge 
in 1865. 

^Nlr. Burnett then returned to Clark coun- 
ty and after visiting his parents for a time 
he resumed work in the sh(jp of Whiteley. 
Fassler & Kelly. On leaving their employ 
he embarked in the grocery business on 
East Main street, Springfield, and there 
conducted a store for ten years with signal 
success. In October, 1865. was celebratetl 
the marriage of Mr. Burnett and Miss Mary 
C. ^lonahan, of Springfield, a daughter of 
John ^lonahan, and two children have been 
born to them : Theodore .\.. a veterinary 
surgeon, graduate of the .\merican X'eter- 
inary College, Xew \'ork : and Levi Hcrr. 
The latter is now a rising attorney of Pitts- 




W. R. BURNETT. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



179 



burg, Pennsylvania, and assistant attorney 
for tlie United States Steel Trust. 

For foiu' years Mr. Burnett was a mem- 
l)er of tlie school board and for two years 
was a niemljer of the city council, represent- 
ing the first ward. Since that time he has 
fieen almost continuously in pulilic office. In 
1889 he was elected mayor of the city and 
his administration was so practical, progres- 
sive and business-like that he was re- 
elected in 1 89 1, continuing as the chief ex- 
ecutive officer of the city for four years. 
During that time many improvements were 
made in the streets and the city building 
was erected in 1890, a structure of which 
his fellow townsmen ha\'e every reason to 
be proutl. He was the first mayor to occupy 
the new building and on the expiration of 
his term of service in that office was ap- 
pointed a member of the police and fire 
board by Maj-or John M. Good, and was 
afterward appointed by Mayor Bowlus, a 
member of the board of public affairs. His 
next appointment came from Mayor M. L. 
Milligan and was a tribute to his personal 
ability and official worth because Mr. Milli- 
gan. a strong Republican, recognized the 
fitness of Mr. Burnett, a Democrat, for the 
I iffice. As a member of the board Mr. Bur- 
nett has been most faithful, prompt and en- 
ergetic in the discharge of his duties, and 
his official career is indeed commendalile. 

Socially he is a member of Clark Lodge, 
No. loi, F. & A. M., and also belongs to 
Red Star Lodge, No. 205, K. P., and to 
Ciimpany No. 44, of the Uniformed Rank of 
Knights of Pythias ; and Springfield Lodge, 
No. 33, I. O. O. F. He is a vahted repre- 
sentati\-e of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks anfl he maintains pleasant re- 
lations with his old army comrades through 
his mcmbershii) in Mitchell Post, G. A. R.. 



and also the Union \^eterans Union. He is 
justly accorded a place among the promi- 
nent and representative citizens of Spring- 
field, for he belongs to that class of men 
whose enterprising spirit is used not alone 
for their own benefit. He is one whose cour- 
tesy is unfailing and whose integrity is 
above question, and few men are more 
widely and favorably known in Springfield 
tlian ^\■illianl R. Burnett. 



FOSTER I. KYLE. 



Foster J. Kyle is a representative of an 
honored and prominent family of this sec- 
tion of Ohio, and is now engaged in the prac- 
tice of veterinary surgery at Springfield. 
He was born in Yellow Springs February 6, 
1864, and is a son of Roland Kyle, whose 
birth occurred in Cedarville, Ohio, in 1837, 
and who is still a resident of that place. 
He has followe;! farming throughout his 
entire life. His grandfather. Judge Samuel 
Kyle, was upon the bench of Greene comity 
for more than thirtv years. He was one 
of the first settlers of that locality, remov- 
ing from Kentucky {o Ohio, and he was of 
Scotch ancestry. He not only left the im- 
press of his indi\-iduality upon the judicial 
district of that county but took an active 
part in public progress and improvement 
along many lines. He died at the ripe old 
age of eighty _\ears, respected and honored 
by all who knew him. In his family were 
fifteen sons and six daughters, and Roland 
Kyle was the shortest of the sons — and he 
measured six feet and twi> inches. All 
were educated in Greene ciimty. Thomas 
is the father of the late Senator Kyle, of 
South Dakota, and is now living in Lh"- 
bana. Illinois. He is a ci\il engineer by 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



profession, which lie fullowed in Greene 
county for many years, liul is now living re- 
tired. The average length of life of the 
nienihers of the family is eighty years. 

Roland Kyle carries on fanning and 
stock raising and is a representative agri- 
culturist of his community. He votes with 
the Republican party and has held some 
minor offices, but has never Ijeen a poli- 
tician in the sense of office seeking. He 
married .\nna Dunlap, who was born in 
1842 in Cincinnati and died in 1894. They 
were the parents of nine children, of whom 
one died in early childhood. The others 
are: Agnes, who is engaged in the millin- 
ery business in Cincinnati : Foster J. : Grace, 
the wife of Ross Tanehill, of Clifton; T. 
Dales, who has been connected with the 
Citizens Rank of Xenia since 1890: Or- 
mond, (if Kno.wille, Tennessee; Irvin, a 
farmer of Cedarville. Ohio; Carl, of Day- 
ton, this state; and Rolanna, at home, 

Foster J. Kyle of this review acquired 
his education in the public schools, which 
he attended until about the time he attained 
his majority. He also assisted in the work 
of the home farm! in field and meadow 
throughout the summer months. He was 
engaged in f;u-ming near Dayton, Ohio, for 
one year and then entered the commercial 
college at Ada, this state, where he com- 
pleted a regular course. Subseciuently he 
went to Canada and entered the Toronto 
(Ontario) \'eterinary College, in 1889. be- 
ing graduated in that institution in 1891. 
after c'-m])leting a full course. His 
strong love for horses induced him to 
enter the profession in which he has 
l)een extremely successful. After bis 
graduation be located in .\enia and there 
built up a large practice in Greene county, 
where he made his home until 1899, 



when, believing that there were broader 
Inisiness c;'pportunities in Springfield and the 
surrounding country districts, he came to 
this city. He has built up a large practice 
in Clark county, where his ability has been 
again and again demonstrated, and by rea- 
son of his skill this large patronage has 
\yttn gained. He has an accurate and com- 
prehensi\e knowledge of the profession, 
conducts his business on business methods 
and treats all with fairness and courtesy. 

In Iberia, Ohio, in 1893, Mr. Kyle was 
united in marriage to Miss Anna G. ilc- 
Clarren, who was torn in that place in 1865. 
She pursued a college course there and 
afterward engaged in teaching school for 
several years. Her parents were Robert 
and Jeanette (Richardson) McClarren, the 
former now deceased, while the latter is a 
resident of Iberia. Mrs. Kyle was the sixth 
in order of birth in a family of seven chil- 
dren, and by her marriage she has become 
the mother of five children, but Helen died 
at the age of three years. The others are : 
Anna Janet, Florence Louise, Roland M. 
and Mildred. 

Dr. Kyle exercises bis right of franchise 
in supjjort of the men and measures of the 
Republican jiarty. He was appointed a 
member of the Iward of Humane So- 
ciety of Springfield in 1902, and few are 
better tiualified for such a position, for bis 
Ime for animals makes all cruelty abhorrent 
to him and he is therefore desirous of put- 
ting forth every effort to prevent this. He 
belongs to the United Presbyterian church 
and is a member of the State \'eterinary As- 
sociation of Ohio. He is a lover of fine 
horses and today is the owner of two of 
the finest bred stallions in southern Gbio, 
i>ne Ijeing the fast pacer Tem]>eras. and the 
other Edwin Simmons, bv Simmons, bv 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Georg'e \\'ilkes, his dam lieing the dam of 
J. AI. K.. whose recunl is 2:1614. and Bes- 
sick, whose record is 2-a-\\. Edwin Sim- 
mons is considered' hy experts to 'be tlie 
finest horse in this section of the state. The 
Doctor has his office in the C. E. Todd liv- 
ery stable at 22 Xorth Limestone street. He 
is devoted to his profession, in which he has 
met with creditable success, and thus in 
business affairs he has prospered. 



CHARLES A. BAUER. 

Charles A. Bauer attained a distin- 
g'uished position in the industrial circles of 
Ohio, while his re]nitatiou as an expert and 
authority in mechanical affairs was na- 
tional. Thrown at an early age upon his 
own resources, his life is a striking example 
of what may be accomplished by genius, en- 
ergy and ability. 

He was born in W'urtemberg, Germany, 
.\ugust 16, 1846, and was a son of Fred- 
erick Bauer, a pniminent bridge builder and 
draughtsman of that cijuntry. In 1852 
Frederick Bauer came to America with his 
family, but three months after his arrival 
was stricken with yellow fever and died in 
Xew Orleans. The mother then determined 
to seek a home farther north and in the 
same year took up her residence in Cincin- 
nati, where she remained until her death, 
which occurred on the 2d of February. 
1900. 

The subject of this review was only six 
years of age at the time of the emigration of 
the family. His educational privileges were 
limited and from an early age he was de- 
pendent upon his own resources. .\\ the age 
of twelve he obtained employment in the 



Pyrotechnical Manufactory owned by H. P. 
Diehl, of Cincinnati, and in 1861 he became 
an apprentice to the gunsmith's trade. Three 
years later he entered the shops of Miles, 
Greenwood & Company as a practical ma- 
chinist, devoting his leisure hours to the 
study o'f mechanics and applied mechanics. 
So rapidly did he. progress in this line that 
in 1878 he was called to the Ohio Mechan- 
ics Lnstitute as a teacher of mechanical 
drawing and applied mechanics. During his 
connection with the institute the progress of 
these departments was very ranarkable. Li 
187 1 he accepted the position of superin- 
tendent of the great Niles Tool Works at 
Hamilton, O'hio, and continued in that ca- 
pacity until his resignation in 1873, when 
he assumed the duties of consulting engi- 
neer for the firm of Lane & Bodley, of Cin- 
cinnati. Ohio. During all this time he re- 
tained his position as instructor of mechan- 
ics and applied mechanics in the Ohio Me- 
chanics Institute. In 1875 he was tendered 
the position of assistant superintendent of 
the works of the Champion Bar & Knife 
Company at Spring-field, Ohio, and iii 1878 
was made superintendent of the same con- 
cern. In 1883 he became general manager 
of the mower and reaper works owned by 
the firm of Warder, Bushnell & Glessner at 
Springfield, and in 1886, when the business 
was incorporated, he became one of the part- 
ners and stockhoWers, retaining his position 
as general manager of the extensive enter- 
prise. His career was remarkably success- 
ful, chiefly by reason of his natural ability 
and his thorough insight intO' the business 
in which as a young man he embarked. He 
had a most comprehensi\-e and thorough 
knowledge of the great mechanical prin- 
cijjles underlying his chosen pursuit, and 
reading and in\-estigation along such lines 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



continually broadened his knowledge and 
added to the eflicacy of his work. Again 
and again promotion came to him in recog- 
nition of his superior ability in this line. 
His strict integrity, business conservatism 
and judgment were uniformly recognized 
and he enjoyed jniblic confidence to an envi- 
able degree. This naturally brought to him 
success. 

Although preferring home life to active 
connection with public affairs, Mr. Bauer yet 
gave mucii of his valuable time to works of 
public importance. For nine years he ser\-ed 
as a member of the board of water works 
trustees of Springfield and was instrumental 
in having installed a fine water works sys- 
tem, which is to-day the jiridc cif the city. 
At liis death he was chairman of tlie Ohio 
State House Commission, having been ap- 
pointed tO' that position by Governor Asa S. 
Bushnell. This commission was to have 
charge '■! the remodeling of the state house 
at Columbus and the appointment was a 
splendid acknowledgement of Mr. Bauer's 
marked ability. He was one of the vice- 
presidents rf the National Founders Asso- 
ciation and refused to accept the presidency 
of that organization at the last meeting 
which was held just l^efore his death. He 
was also a member of the fifth district com- 
mittee of the XationaJ Founders' Associ- 
ation, was one of the vice-presidents of the 
y\merican Foundrymen's Association and 
took a great interest in the American So- 
ciety of IVfechanical Fngineers, of which he 
was one of the charter menil)ers, his avo- 
cation liearing date May 14, 1880. He was 
elected one of the managers of this society 
in 1891 and served for four successive years. 
Because of his broad and comprehensive 
knowledge of everything in the line of me- 
chanics and mechanical constructiiin, lie- 



cause of his familiarity with great mechani- 
cal principles and also because of a charm 
of manner which made him popular, Mr. 
Bauer was thus honored again and again 
but he never sought notoriety along such 
lines. In manner he was entirely free from 
ostentation and display. He possessed, 
however, broad sympathy and a genial, 
kindly nature, and these qualities won for 
him the esteem of all with whom he came in 
contact, and the regard in which he was held 
was in the great majority of instances deep- 
ened into strong friendship. He always re- 
ceived the respect of the men whose efiforts 
he superintended in business and the rela- 
tions between employer and employe were 
largely of an i<Ical character. The men rec- 
ognized in him (me wlmse ability was su- 
perior to their own, and. moreover, his just- 
ness gained for him their unciualified re- 
gard. An estimate of his ability could only 
be gained by visiting the factories of which 
he had charge and closely inspecting the 
methods and original ideas which he had 
inaugurated. 

Mr. Bauer was married in 1868 to Miss 
Louise Haeseler, who came to America with 
her parents from St. Goar. Prussia, in 1831. 
Three children were born to them : Charles 
L., \\\\o is now the general superintendent of 
the Warder, Bushnell & Glessner Company : 
William A., who is employed in the office 
of the same ctim])any; an<l Lmis V... whn is 
in the chemical dciiartment there. The 
home of the Bauer family is located on East 
High street. 

Mr. Bauer pas.sed away in June, 1899. 
and was laid to rest in Ferncliff cemetery. 
In }iIasonic circles he was pri>minent. be- 
longing to Anthony Lodge. Xo. 455. F. & 
A. ^r.. while in the Scottish Rite he had 
attained the thirty-second degree. He was 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



183 



also connected with the Knights of Pythias. 
Air. Bauer was a self-made man in the best 
sense of that oft misused term. From early 
life he depended upon his own resources. 
He realized fully that advancement is largely 
due ta enterprise and keen discernment, sup- 
plementing untiring diligence, and it was 
along those lines that he won success and 
gained promotion to a \-ery prominent posi- 
tion in the ranks of the representatives of 
mechanical interests of the country. That 
his death was universally regretted is proven 
by the large number of letters and telegrams 
which came to his family from all parts of 
this country and Europe, breathing words of 
condolence and consolation ; but. while his 
success was marked and his capability was 
of a high order, it was the man who won 
the friends. Throughout his entire career 
he was always the same genial, courteous 
gentleman, whose ways were those of re- 
finement and whose word no man could 
question. 



CARLULTES. M. D. 

There is no element which has entered 
into our composite national fabric that has 
been of more practical strength, value and 
utilit}' than that furnished by the sturdy, 
persevering- and \vm\ irable sijns of Germany, 
and in the progress of our Union this ele- 
n''ent has played an important part. In- 
tensely practical and ever having a clear 
ciimprehension of the ethics of life, the Ger- 
n\-m contingent has wielded a powerful in- 
tluence, and this service can not be held in 
light estimation by those who appreciate true 
civilization and true advancement. 

The subject of this review comes from 
stanch German sti.>ck and was born in Rhen- 



ish Bavaria, Germany, Julv i, 1848. His 
father, Jacob Ultes, was a native (jf the same 
locality and the Doctor had one brother and 
one sister, who are still living in Germany, 
these being Friederich, who is proprietor of 
a large printing establishment at Stuttgart; 
and Helen, who is living in Westphalia. 

Dr. Ultes of this review pursued his 
education in the primary schools of Heidel- 
berg, in Baden, later attending the medical 
department of the university at the same 
place. In the year of 1869 he bade adieu 
to the father land and sailed for the new 
world, having just reached his majority. In 
1873 he entered the medical department of 
the University of Michigan and was grad- 
uated in that institution in 1875 with, the 
degree oi Al. D. For six months thereafter 
he acted as assistant tO' Professor Frother- 
ingham, of Ann Arbor, who' held the chair 
of opthalmoloigy and otology, and on leaving 
that city he settled in Manchester, Michi- 
gan, where he continued in general prac- 
tice for three years. In 1877 he entered the 
Bellevue Medical Hospital Cbllege at New 
York city, in which he was graduated in 
March, 1878, again winning the degree of 
M. D. After his graduation he took a 
spring course in ophthalmology and otology 
under the direction of Professor Herman 
Knapp, of New York. He studied operative 
surgery with Professor Alexander Mott 
and physical diagnosis with Professor Ed- 
ward Janeway. In 187S he left that city 
and returned to Manchester. Michigan, but 
in September. of the same year again went 
to New York and continued his studies con- 
cerning the diseases of the eye and the ear 
under Professor Hennan Knapp. 

Subsequently Dr. Ultes again took up 
his residence in Michigan, this tin:e settling 
at Chelsea, where he remained until 1884 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in the successful practice of his profession 
and then went to Lansing, where lie re- 
mained an acti\e practitioner until xSqo. 
Tliat year witnessed his arrival in Spring- 
lield, Oiiio, and here he Ijegan practice, en- 
tering on what has proven a very successful 
career as a member of the medical fraternity 
i>f Clark county. He has a large general 
l)ractice but is also giving much attention to 
the specialties for which he prepared. He 
iias n.et with merited and creditable success 
in treating contagious diseases, especially 
diphtheria and spinal meningitis. He makes 
a s])ecialtv of the diseases of the heart, 
^ic-niacb. kidney ami intestines and has ef- 
fected some remarkable cures. His knowl- 
edge is broad and comprehensive and he is 
seldom at fault, not even in the slightest 
degree in diagiiosing a case. He is particu- 
larly ai)t in recognizing the remedial agency 
which will prove of the most value and his 
work has been of a most important and val- 
uable character to mankind. 

The Doctor was married in 1878 in 
Manchester, Michigan, to Miss Bertha Wer- 
licini. who was torn in Wisconsin and died 
in lyoi, at the age of forty-three years. 
She was a sister of Rev. Werheim of this 
city. By that marriage two sons were born. 
William P.. born in 1879, is a graduate of 
Wittenberg College and is now studying 
medicine in the University of Michigan. 
Carl, bom in 1881, is also a studait in \\'it- 
tenberg College and will graduate in 1903. 
He was graduated with honor in the public 
schools of this city and William is a gradu- 
ate of the Springfield School of Music. The 
1 )octor has s<xial qualities which endear him 
ti> many friends outside of the profession. 
He is known throughout this section of the 
st;ite as one of the most prominent ivembers 
of the profession hero and his opinions are 



brgely recognized as autliority on many 
subjects. In a profession where advance- 
ment depends uixju individual merit and 
ability he has steadily progressed and his 
prominence has come as the result of su- 
perior skill and .knowledge. 



CHARLES MATTLXSOX. 

Charles INlattinson, whose home is in 
Madison township. Clark count}-, three 
miles west of South Charleston, where he 
has two hundred acres of land, has resided 
here about nine years. He is one of Ohio's 
native sons, his birth having occurred near 
his i^resent home on the 25th of Xoveml)er. 
1844. His parents were Matthew and Mar- 
garet (Evans) Mattinson. The father was 
born in Westmoreland county, England, and 
was a son of Thomas Mattinson. whose wife 
died in England and who afterward came 
to America, bringing with liim his family, 
consisting of four sons and three daughters. 
He had some means, which he invested in 
Clark county land, purchasing four hun- 
dred acres, to which he added as his finan- 
cial resources increased until, at the time of 
his death, he was one of the extensive land 
owners of the county. He lived to be a very 
old man, reaching the ripe old age of ninety 
\ears. He always ren-ained true to the 
niemory of his wife. ne\er marrying a 
.second time. 

Matthew Mattinson had attained his ma- 
jority when he came with his father to the 
new world, but it was after his emigration 
that he was married. His wife was born in 
Wales and came to America with her niotli- 
er. her father having died in the old coun- 
tr\-. When ihev crossed the l)rin\- deep thev 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



185 



made their way to Ohio, settling in Clark 
county. Mr. Mattisoai inherited about two 
hundred acres of land from his father's es- 
tate, but he did not content himself with this 
]jroperty and through his well directed ef- 
forts and energy he coutinually added to 
his possessions until he had about one thou- 
sand acres of land. He engaged in general 
farming and cattle dealing, becoming- a rec- 
ognized leader of this branch of business 
activity in his section of Ohio. Unto him 
and his wife were born six children, all of 
whom are yet living, namely : Charles, of 
this review ; Ruth, who makes her home at 
South Charlest(_in ; Thomas, who resides 
near the old homestead; Alary, the wife of 
Darwin Pierce, who is living in Madison 
township; Evan, who married Minnie Wil- 
son and is living in Ford county, Illinois ; 
and iMinnie. also a resident of South 
Charleston. The father voted with the Re- 
publican party but the honors and emolu- 
lents of office had no attraction for him. He 
was reared in the Episcopalian church, but 
there was no organization of that denomina- 
tion near his home in Ohio and he was 
therefore not connected with any church 
after his removal here. 

Charles Mattinson spent his boyhood 
days on' the old home farm and in the win- 
ter months attended school, while in the 
snmmer season he workeil in fiekl and mead- 
ow early gaining practical experience that 
has proved of value to him in his later years. 
At the age of twenty years he responded to 
his country's call for men, enlisting in 
Company I, One Hundred and Forty-sixth 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private, for 
one hundred days' service. He was on duty 
in West Virginia, but the regiment was 
never under tire. In 1S66 he went toi Ford 
coimty, Illinois, and there purchased land 



• and carried on farming. He afterward 
went to Champaign county and condncted 
a farm for his father. 

While in the west Mr. Mattinson was 
married on the 24th of Xo\ember, 187S. to 
Miss Ida Drossel, who was born in She- 
lx)ygau county. Wisconsin, a, daughter of 
Martin and Christina ( Hyzer) Drossel, 
bcjth of whom are natives of Germany, the 
father 'boa-n in Hano'\-er and the mother in 
Leipsic, Saxouy. Both had about reached 
adult age when the}- came to America with 
their respective parents. \Miile cm the 
voyage they became acquainted. Tliey 
started from Gern^any in May and arrived 
in Xew- York on the 4th of July, following. 
The Drossel family settled in Fairfield 
county. Ohio-, and the mother's people in 
Sheboygan county, AX'isconsin. The two 
young people, who^ had formed an acquaint- 
ance on 'board the \'essel, kept up a corre- 
spondence and in due course of time were 
iKarried. The}- lived for a tin:e in Co'lum- 
bus. Ohio, where Mr. Drossel was employed 
as bookkeeper, and subsequently they re- 
mcned to Wisconsin, where he engaged in 
business on his own account. He died in 
that state when Airs. Alattinson was quite 
}-oung. Her mother afterwards n:arried 
again, becoming the wife of August Zim- 
ball, and they are now li\-ing in Sheboygan, 
Wisconsin. Mrs. Alattinson was born Au- 
gust 8, 1857, ^"<^1 t)y '1^'' marriage she has 
become the m.other of three children, Minnie 
and Esther, who were born in Champaign 
county, Illinois ; and Lee. who was born on 
the farm in Ohio, \a here oiu" subject now re- 
sides. 

Mr. Mattinson continued to make his 
home in Illinois until 1893. \vhen he returned 
to Ohio and began farming on the place 
where he yet lives. He has a good tract of 



[86 



JHE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



land here ami in the cultivation of tlie fields 
is meeting with good success, annually gar- 
nering rich harvests, which retur^i to him a 
good income. In politics he is a Republican 
and he belongs to ^^IcMillan Post, G. A. R. 
While residing in Illinois he was a memljer 
of tlie Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
Lodge at Fisher and of the Knights of Pyth- 
ias Lodge there, but has not continued his 
connection with these organizations. In his 
farm work he is progressive and practical 
and the neat and thrifty appearance of his 
place indicates his careful supervision. 



BEX'JAMIX F. KEIFER. 

Benjamin Franklin Keifer is one of the 
early settlers of Clark county, Ohio. His 
parents were Joseph and Mary (Smitli) 
Keifer. The father came to this county in 
the year 1812 and settled in Bethel town- 
ship, near Tecumseh Park, where he en- 
gaged in farming. In 181 5 he was united 
in marriage to ]Mary Smith and they be- 
came the parents of fourteen children, three 
of whom are now living, namel}- : Sarah, 
of I,ogan county, Ohio, who married Lewis 
James, and after his death married Richard 
Youngman. who has also passed away; 
Benjamin F.. of this review: and Joseph 
Warren, a distinguished citizen of Spring- 
fielfl, whose sketch appears on another page 
of this volume. 

Benjamin Franklin Keifer. of this re- 
view, was born upon his father's farm in 
i8ji and was reared amid the wild scenes 
of pioneer life. All an mud stretched the 
green forests, the trees having been uncut 
and the land uncleared for purposes of civ- 
ilization. Everything was wild and unim- 



proved and the work of progress was large- 
ly \et to be performed by the pioneer set- 
tlers. 'Sir. Keifer, of this review, pursued 
his education in a log schoolhouse such as 
was common at that time. There was little 
instruction given beyond that of writing, 
reading and arithmetic. His training at 
farm labor, however, was not limited, for, 
from the time of early spring planting until 
late in the fall, he worked in the fields, do- 
ing his part in the farm work. He was thus 
engaged imtil he purchased a farm of his 
own. On the 12th day of September, 1854, 
he bought the land upon which he now re- 
sides, becoming the owner of one hundred 
acres six miles from Springfield on the Fair- 
field road. To this he has since added, 
liowever. until he is now the (jwner of a 
very valuable tract of two hundred and 
ninety acres of land. Here he is now en- 
gaged in general farming and he keeps on 
hand about forty head of stock. 

'\\v. Keifer was married in 1846 to Eme- 
line F. Henkle, a daughter of Silas H'en- 
kle. one of the old settlers of Springfield, 
coming to Clark county from Virginia. Six 
children have been born of this union : Cy- 
rus H.. at home; Joseph, deceased; Mary 
and Frank Irwin, at home: ^Montgomery, 
wjio has passed away; and Benjamin \\'., 
who married Ethel Christ, a daughter of 
-Martin Christ, of Mad River township. 
They h.ave one child, A\'ilbur. 

Mr. Keifer is a member of the Methodist 
church and has lived an upright, honorable 
life in consistent harmony with his profes- 
sions. 'He has now passed the eightieth 
milestone on life's journey, but is yet a hale 
and hearty old man and gives his personal 
supervision to the management of his farm. 
He is, indeed, a worthy representative of an 
honored pioneer family, the name of Keifer 




^m 



BENJAMIN F. KEIFER. 



} 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



89^ 



having- long been associated witli the work 
of progress, development and improvement 
here. 



THE JOHN PERRIN FAMILY. 

No history of Clark county would be 
complete without mention of the John Per- 
rin. family, one of the oldest of this por- 
tion of the state, its representatives having 
been identified with the growth and upbuild- 
ing and with the agricultural, intellectual 
and moral welfare of the city and county 
from 1806 down to the present time. The 
(lays of chivalry and knighthood in Europe 
can not furnish more interesting tales than 
our own pioneer history. Into the wild re- 
gions of the unexplored west went brave 
men whose courage was ofteu called forth 
ni>t only to meet the conditions of the land 
as yet unculti\-ated and of the forests un- 
cut, but also to meet the hostile savages. The 
land was rich in all natural resources and 
sim]ily awaited the demands of the white 
race to yield up its treasures ; but the moun- 
tains separated Ohio from the older east; 
its forests were difificult to penetrate, so 
densely grew the magnificent trees. The 
establishment of homes in this beautiful re- 
gion therefore meant sacrifices and liard- 
ships, but there were some men lirave 
enough to undertake the task of reclaiming 
tlie district for purposes of civilization and 
tn make this one of the productive sections 
of the country. Taking an active part in 
this work the representatives of the Perrin 
family therefore interwo\'e their name in- 
separabU- with the history of this region. 

The Perrin family is doubtless of French 
origin, although the immediate ancestors of 
John Perrin, the first of the name in Ohio, 



came from England. It is supposed that 
those who lived in France were driven out 
of that country at the time of the Catholic 
persecution ; that they came to America and 
eventually returned to the old world, but 
did not again go tO' their native land, locat- 
in.,g, instead, in England, whence at an early 
day representati\-es of the name sailed for 
the new world and the family was then es- 
tablished in ]\Iar}'land, where they purchased 
land in 1740. 

John Perrin, the first to locate in Clark 
county, Ohio, was born in Washington 
county, ]Maryland, November 12, 1778, and 
there married Amelia Ingram, who was 
born in the same county September 26, 
1778. He was a son of Joseph and Rachel 
Perrin, who lie side by side in an old bury- 
ing ground in Hagerstown, Washington 
county, Maryland. 

In 1804 he made a trip to the west, go- 
ing as far as Fort Wayne, Indiana, and at 
that time he returned to jNIaryland, and it 
was not until 1806 that he took up his 
permanent abode in Clark county, bringing 
his family to this new and wild region.. 
They journeyed to what is now the beautiful 
site of Springfield, Ohio, and settled on: 
section 3, in Springfield township, Mr. Per- 
rin purchasing the entire section. For miles 
around them stretched the dense forests ; the 
uncultivated tracts of valley land. The work 
of progress and improvement seemed scarce- 
ly begun, and it remained to such brave meiii 
and women, as those of the Perrin family, 
to establish homes here upon the frontier 
and utilize the natural recources, thus re- 
claiming the land and making it one of the 
most attractive sections of this great com- 
monwealth. 

The family of John and Amelia In- 
gram Perrin consisted of six children : 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Edward, Joseph. Jolin. William. Minerva 
and Emery. The first child. Edward, was 
horn in Maryland, and the others were add- 
ed to the family after the removal of tlie 
parents to Ohio. 

When John Perrin purcliased his sec- 
tion of land in Springfield township, there 
had been only a small clearing made, but 
by incessant effort and unremitting industry 
he cleared a large portion of this tract and 
placed it under cultivation, so that the fields 
returned to him good crops. He also added 
to his real estate holdings until at his death 
he owned more than twelve hundred acres 
of land. He continued the work of culti- 
vating his land until his death, which oc- 
curred December i6, 1848. He survived 
his wife only a short period, for she had died 
on- the 8th of June, 1847. Here upon the 
land which he had purchased was established 
a burial ground, called the Perrin cemetery, 
where John Perrin and his family were l)ur- 
ied and but few others outside of the family 
bave been laid to rest in this city of the 
dead. 

William Perrin, a son of John and 
Amelia (Ingram) Perrin. was born in the 
little log cabin, which was the family home 
in Springfield township, die date of his 
birth being January 22, 1815. He was reared 
upon a farm amid the wild .scenes of pioneer 
life, but while the early settlers were de- 
prived of some of the advantages of the 
older east, they also enjoved privileges and 
pleasures which were unknt>wn to the more 
thickly settled districts. He had little oi>- 
p:^rtunity to attend school, but he gained 
nuich knowledge in the school of experience. 
Throughout his entire life he followed the 
ix-cupation of farming and his work was 
c :uinued in such a manner that he won 
.splendid sucess. He always followed pro- 



gressive methods of farming and every- 
thing about his place was neat and attrac- 
tive in appearance and indicated his care- 
ful supervision. He was married ^larcli 
25, i8.}.9, to ^liss Dorothy Sturgeon, a 
daughter of Jeremiah and Phoelje ( .\n- 
drews) Sturgeon, both of whom were na- 
tives of the north of Ireland, and were of 
Scotch descent. Mrs. Perrin was also l)orn 
on the Emerald Isle and came to America 
w hen she was about twenty years of age. By 
her marriage she became the mother of but 
one child, John E. Perrin. She was a \ery 
devoted Christian woman, who held mem- 
bership in the United Presbyterian church, 
and her religious faith permeated her en- 
tire life. In harmony with her "belief she 
was kind and helpful to friends and neigh- 
l)ors. loving and devoted to her family and 
at all times strictly adhered to the rule cf 
upright conduct. 

]\Ir. and .Mrs. Perrin lived in the little 
cabin in which he was born until 1849. when 
they removed into the home where he died. 
ha\ing erected a good brick residence, which 
was one of the fine homes of the county, 
and one of the largest brick structures 
erected here. William Perrin was the own- 
er of five hundred acres of land at the time 
of his death and his farming interests were 
capably contlucted. bringing to him a satis- 
factory financial return. As a citizen he 
was public spirited and progressive, and gave 
a generous co-operation to all movements 
and nieasures which he believed would prove 
of good to the majority of the people in his 
district. He became a supporter of the Re- 
publican party upon its organization and 
when the country became involved in Civil 
war. he stood as one of the stanch advocates 
of the Union cause. He was one of the 
well knnwn citizens of the countv, honest 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and upright in all his dealings with his fel- 
low men, an obliging neighbor and a man 
of domestic tastes, who found his greatest 
happiness in providing for his family. All 
who knew him. respected him for his gen- 
uine worth, and when called to the home 
beyond, both he and his wife were deeply 
mourned by many who had known them. 
jNlrs. Perrin died on the 27th of October, 
1878, and Mr. Perrin departed this life 
March 30, 1890, being laid to rest in Fern- 
cliff cemetery. 

John E. Perrin, their only son, and a 
grandson of John Perrin who foimded the 
family in Clark county, was born in Spring- 
field October 4, 1850. He always lived upon 
the old home farm in a brick bowse, which 
was one of the first of the kind built in 
Spi-ingfiekl township. Although erected 
many years ago, it has been remodeled and 
is a fine, large, modern home. John E. Per- 
rin obtained his early education in the dis- 
trict schools and later supplemented his 
knowledge gained in boyhood, by a course 
of study in a commercial college in Spring- 
held, Ohio, whereby he was well eirpipped 
for the practical and responsible duties of 
life. His natural taste and his early train- 
. ing led him to adopt the life of an agricul- 
turist, and his occupation was ever that of 
a farmer. He ranked, however, among the 
best. He was quick to utilize any new idea 
of machiaery that would facilitate his work 
or make it of greater value; he used the 
latest improved machinery and he always 
kept e\-erything about his place in good re- 
pair. He planted the grains best adapted 
to the soil and climate, and his fields annu- 
ally returned to him golden harvests. His 
business methods were above su.spicion or 
reproach; he was honorable and reliable in 
all his dealings: and no man ha<l au;dit to 



say against him. He was without ostenta- 
ticm or displa}-, yet liis genuine worth of 
character commanded for him the high re- 
gard of all with whom he came in contact. 
Through his business interests he accumu- 
lated a handsome fortune, which was in- 
dicative of his life of industry and useful- 
ness. His death occurred July 2, 1902, and 
he was laid to rest in Fernclifif cemetery. 
He was a life-long Mason, very prominent 
in the fraternity, and in his life he exempli- 
fied its beneficent teachings. He enjoyed 
the highest esteem of his brethren of the 
order and when he was called to rest, on the 
2d of July, 1902, his remains were interred 
with Masonic honors. 

This, in brief, is the hist(jry of a fam- 
ily which has through almost a century been 
a prominent one in Clark county. Its mem- 
bers have ever commanded the warm re- 
gard of a large number of friends and at 
the same time their efforts have been of ma- 
terial benefit in promoting the progress and 
improvement of this portion of the state. 



TOHX PERRIX. 



The members of the Perrin family have 
ever been w^orthy of respect and regard, and 
John Perrin possessed a character that com- 
manded the esteem and good will of all 
with whom he came in contact and for many 
years was classed among the valued and rep- 
resentative citizens of his community. He 
was born in Springfield township. Clark 
county, April 15, 1812, on the farm now oc- 
cupied by his fainily, and was a son of John 
Perrin, whose sketch Ls given above. He 
\\-as reared upon the home farm, pursuing 
his education in a log schoolhouse, and he 
remained with his parents until their death, 



JHE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



when he inherited the old homestead. He 
continued to reside upon tliat place unti' 
liis deatii. which occurred June 27, 1888. 
In the meantime he had erected a tine l)rick 
residence, had built good outbuildings and 
liad greatly improved his farm, making it 
one of the valued and attractive country, 
seats of the locality. His birth occurred in 
a log house which stood upon the site of the 
present home of the family. Tiie latter was 
erected in 1870 and is the fourth house 
which had occupied the same site on the 
Perrin farm. The Pcrrin homestead com- 
prised twelve hundred acres of land, owned 
by his father, John Perrin. The first house 
built here v,as of rough logs and after a 
time it was replaced by a more substantial 
and comfortable residence, built of hewed 
logs. The third house was built of brick. 
In 1870 John Pcrrin, of this review, remod- 
eled the building and improved it as we see 
it to-day. At the time of his death he owned 
over si.\ hundred acres of land. He wTis a 
representative and energetic farmer, and 
everything about the place was kept in good 
condition. He used the latest improved 
machinery in operating his land and was 
untiring in his work, so that he was enabled 
to provide his family with a good living. 

On the 9th of March, 1853, ^I''- Perrin 
w^TS united in marriage to ^liss Mary Dunn 
Roush, who was born in Berkeley county. 
West Virginia, on the 2(1 of February, 1825, 
her parents being Martin and Margaret 
(Patton) Roush. Her paternal grandpar- 
ents were natives of Germany and on lea\- 
ing that country crossed the Atlantic to 
America. The grandfather was quite well- 
to-do and became the owner of a goocf plan- 
tation and n number of slaves in \'irginia. 
It is thought that Martin Roush was bom 
at the old familv home in that state. He. 



to:j, was a ])lanter and slave-holder, and he 
continued to conduct his plantation until 
1847, when he sold out and came to Ohio, 
residing in Madison county for alwut twelve 
months. On the expiration of that period 
he removed to Springfield, purchasing a 
fami near the town, now known as the 
Slaughter farm. Upon that property he 
spent his remaining days, passing away in 
1877, when eighty-six years of age. His 
wife, who bore the maiden name of Mar- 
garet Patton, was born in Greencastle, 
Franklin county, Pennsylvania. She, too, 
passed away and was laid to rest by the side 
of her husband in F'erncliff cemetery. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. John Perrin were 
Iiorn seven children : ^largaret Amelia ; 
Ellen Nora, the wife of Dr. James E. Stu- 
debaker, a resident' of Springfield: John 
Martin; Mary Belle: Ida Lavina, who died 
Xovember 28, 1897, and was buried in 
Ferncliff cemetery; ilinerva Cooper: and 
Catherine McKee, who died December 23. 
1864, at the age of seven years and five 
months. Mr. Perrin, the father, was in- 
rerretl "in the old family cemetery, \\ ithin 
two hundred yards of where he was born, 
but on the lith of October, 1898, his re- 
mains were removed to Ferncliff cemetery. 
While he led a quiet life, his attention be- 
ing given to his farm, he was a man who 
p(jssessed many sterling traits of character. 
He was prompt and honest in all of his bus- 
iness dealings, was energetic in carying on 
his work, was true to his duties of citizen- 
ship and devoted to his family. 



JOSEPH INGRAM PERRIN. 
The Perrin family has been so clo.^^ely 
and prominently connected with the history 
of Clark county and its dexelopment that its. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



193 



members well deserve specific mention in 
tills \-(jlume and we are glad to- present to 
our readers tlie life record of Joseph Ingram 
Perrin, wliose circle of friends was almost 
co-extensive with the circle of his accinaint- 
ances. He was born on the old Perrin 
homestead in 1813, a son of John and 
Anielia Perrin. A complete history of the 
family is given on another page of this 
work. During his boyhood days Joseph 
I. Perrin remained at home and assisted his 
father in the work of the farm. He early 
learned what it was to care for the stock and 
culti\ate the fields and his early experience 
enabled him to successfully carry on farm 
work for himself in later years. He contin- 
ued under the parental roof until his mar- 
riage. He wedded INIiss Elizabeth Abigail 
Bailey, a nati\'e of New Hampshire, and 
thev became the parents of two children, of 
whom one died in infancy, the other being- 
Emily Amanda, who is the wife of John E. 
Driscoll, a native of Springfield, and a son 
of Elias Driscoll, a member of an old pioneer 
family. After the death of his first wife 
Mr. Perrin married Eliza Jane Hamilton, 
who is yet living, an'd they had one child, 
Jo.seph Ingram, Jr., who now resides in 
Springfield township. 

After his first marriage Mr. Perrin re- 
moved to a farm not far from the old home- 
stead and there spent his remaining days. 
He was a sitccessful agriculturist in every 
sense of the term. He knew how best to 
manage his property so that it would yield 
to him good returns and from his fields be 
ap.nually gathered rich harvests. H'is stock 
dealing was also a profitable source of in- 
come to him and whatever he undertook he 
carried forward to successful completion. 
He owned about three hundred and fifty 
acres of land, but part of this has since been 



subdi\'i(led into city lots and forms what 
is kno\\n as the Melrose addition to Spring- 
field. In Iiis political views he was a Re- 
publican, and voted conscientiously because 
he believed in the principles of the party. 
Howe\^er, he never sought office, but was 
content to give his time and attention to his 
business affairs in order that he might pro- 
vide well for his family. His death oc- 
curred December 30, 1865, and he was bur- 
ied in the Perrin cemetery, but after a pe- 
riod of thirty-seven years his remains were 
rcmo\-ed to Fernclifif cemetery, September 
18, 1902. 

His surviving daughter, Emily ^Amanda, 
became, as above stated, the wife of John 
E. Driscoll. Mr. Driscoll was educated in 
Springfield and learned the trade of a car- 
riage trimmer, but after bis marriage he 
suffered greatly from ill health, which pre- 
vented him from continuing work along his 
chosen line. Accordingly he removed to the 
farm belonging to his affianced wife's father 
and throughout his remaining days he car- 
ried on agricultural pursuits, finding in the 
outdoor life of field and meadow much that 
pro\-ed to him beneficial in restoring his 
health. He was a successful agriculturist, 
car}-ing on his work with skill, energy and 
determination. 

I'nto Mr. and Mrs. Driscoll were born 
■en children, of whom two died in infancy, 
while eight are yet living, namely: Julia, 
the wife of Albert Rebert. Edward E., 
who married Grace Swonger, and lives with 
his mother upon the home farm, which he 
operates. By his marriage he has four chil- 
dren — Harry, Nora, Clara and Helen. Nan- 
cy is the wife of Joseph McDonnell, and 
they have one child, Mary. John married 
Miss Izora Hedrick and with their daugh- 
ter, Nellie, thev reside in De Graff, Ohio. 



194 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Elisha married Miss Carrie Long and tliey 
liave two children, Lamar and an infant 
not named. Emma, Catherine and Rachel 
are all at home. With the exception of 
John, all the children reside in Clark coun- 
ty. The father of this family died July 15, 
1895, and was buried in Ferncliff cemetery, 
and since his death his widow, by the aid 
of her children, has carried on the home 
farm. Mr. Driscoll was a man who made 
friends wherever he went, because he was 
honest, true and faithful. Those qualities 
characterized his citizenship as well as his 
business relations and his private life, and 
when he was called to his final rest many 
friends, as well as his immediate family, 
mourned his loss. Mrs. Driscoll and her 
children have a wide acquaintance in the 
community and are highly esteemed for 
their arenuine worth. 



JAMES HATFIELD. 

.\ record of those agriculturists who 
have promoted the improvement and devel- 
opment of Clark county, causing the fields 
to yield abundantly for their well directed 
efforts, must necessarily include the name 
of James Hatfield, who is successfully en- 
gaged in farming and stock raising and the 
breeding of Poland-China hogs, in Green 
township. Mr. Hatfield was born in Spring- 
field township April 12, 1844, '"i^' '^ 'i ^'^'i 
of James and Margaret (Kitchen) Hatfield. 
The father was born in 1803 and came to 
(lark county with his parents, Nathaniel 
and Xancy (Judy) Hatfield, in 1808. when 
he was alxiut fwt years of age. The grand- 
parents were among the first settlers of 
Clark county, having taken uj) iheir abode 



about one and one-half miles northeast of 
Pitchin. in Springfield township, where Na- 
thaniel Hatfield became the owner of three 
or four hundred acres of land. He was not 
an old man at the t,ime of his death, his de- 
mise being caused by milk sickness. James 
Hatfield, the father of the subject of 
this review, was also called to his final rest 
at a comparatively early age, dying when 
his son James was but eleven years of age. 
The mother was a native of Pennsylvania 
and had come to Clark county, Ohio, with 
her parents when a girl. By her marriage 
she became the mother of fourteen children, 
of whom the subject of this record is the 
. tenth in order of birth. Of these, eleven 
grew to maturity, but only four are yet 
living. 

At the time of the death of his fatlier, 
Mr. Hatfield, whose name introduces this 
review, was bound out to a brother-in-law, 
to remain with him until eighteen years of 
age. He performed such labor in repayment 
for his board and clothing as he was able, 
attending school during four months in win- 
ter, but at the age of fifteen he began to 
work by the month for himself. For one 
year he continued in this way and, at the age 
of sixteen, went to Hillsdale. Michigan, 
where he attended Hillsdale College for 
two. years. About this time the Civil war 
was inaugurated and. roused by a spirit of 
patriotism and the desire to serve his coun- 
try in her time of need, he returned home 
and enlisted, in the spring of 1862. as a pri- 
vate, under Howard D. Johns, in Company 
B, Eighty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
He was stationed at Camp Chase, thence go- 
ing to Clarksljurg, West Virginia, remain- 
ing there for about four months. His en- 
listment had been for three months, and his 
term having therefore expired, he re-en- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



195 



listed as a member of Company D. Eighth 
Ohio Volunteer Cavah-y. With his regi- 
ment he -went to the Shenandoah valley and 
was with the gallant "Little Phil"' Sheridan 
m several engagements. At Beverly, Vir- 
ginia, he was captured, but regained his 
freedom in about- fifteen minutes. Having 
served his country faithfully and well, and 
his efiforts, combined with those of the other 
hra\-e boys in blue, had resulted in quelling 
the Rebellion, at the close of the war in 
1865, he was honorably discharged, and re- 
turned to his old home in Clark county. 

Before his enlistment he had taught 
school for a short time in Liberty township, 
Clark county. After remaining a short time 
in Clark county, in 1865, upon his return 
from service in the army, he went to Logan 
county, Illinois, and there engaged in teach- 
ing. There he also purchased one hundred 
and fifty acres of land, which at the present 
time is worth one hundred dollars per acre. 
He remained in Logan county for about 
< ine year, when he returned to Clark county. 
Ohio, and there, on the 12th of April, 1866, 
was united in marriage to Miss Harriet J. 
Stewart, a daughter of Captain Perry and 
Rlioda A. (Wheeler) Stewart. With his 
liride he returned to Logan county, Illinciis, 
but in 1867 sold his farm in that county and 
returned to Clark county, Ohio, and for a 
few years ' rented and then purchased one 
hundred and twenty-five acres of land, which 
forms part of his present farm. This pur- 
chase was made in 1872. He has placed his 
land under a high state of cultivation, hav- 
ing made all the improvements thereon, 
which are of the latest and most modern 
kind. The well tilled fields and neat and 
attractive appearance of the farm indicate 
the practical lousiness methods of the owner, 
who, in his varied experiences in life has 



witnessed many vicissitudes, but through 
them all his brave and indomitable spirit 
has conquered, and in his private life, as 
on the field of battle, he has turned many a 
threatened defeat into a glorious victory. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Hatfield 
has been blessed with three children, as fol- 
lows : Charles Stewart, born in Logan 
county, Illinois, May 27. 1867, resides at 
home with his parents. Jessie R., born in 
Clark county, Ohio, also lived at home un- 
til she became the wife of Alonzo Strecher, 
a resident of Green township. They have 
two children — Edwin and Robert. Julia 
M. married Clarence Anderson, and also 
resides in Green, township. 

In his political aftiliations Mr. Hatfield 
is a Republican, having first cast his ballot 
for Abraham Lincoln in 1864 while in the 
army. His fellow citizens, recognizing his 
integrity, have called him to positions of 
public trust and he served at treasurer of 
Green township. In 1902 he canvassed the 
county for cotinty commissioner, and his 
popularity is shown by the fact that of six 
candidates he was the second highest. He 
and his wife are earnest and consistent 
members (if the High street Christian 
church, and in their quiet way perform many 
acts of kindliness and charity, thus doing 
what they can for the benefit of their fellow 
men. Mr. Hatfield is a charter member of 
James A. Elder Post, G. A. R., and has filled 
all the chairs connected therewith. He has 
attended most of the natiiinal reunions and 
attended the World's Fair in Chicago in 
1893. .Faithful in one thing — faithful in 
all : such is the record. As a bra^-e soldier 
and a public-spirited citizen, Mr. Hatfield 
has performed his duties well and faithfully, 
aiding his country in times of war, and in 
times of peace contributing- to the substan- 



196 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tial gniwtli of his community and state. His 
measure of prosperity has been meted to 
liiin witli -liberal hand, because he has never 
been sparing of his efforts for the welfare 
of his country. 



THOMAS C. ACKERSOX. 

J Tonored and respected by all, Thomas 
(\ .\ckerson occupied an enviable position 
in business circles not only on account of the 
success he achieved, but also because of his 
honorable, straightforward business policy 
which he ever followed. His success in his 
undertakings was so marked that his meth- 
ods were of interest to the commercial 
world, lie based his business principles 
and actions on strict adherence to the rules 
which govern industry, economy and strict, 
iins\\erving integrity, and although he had 
few achantages in early life, he steadily 
prcjgressed and commanded tlie respect and 
confidence of all with whom he was associ- 
ated. He served his country in the Civil 
war and was ever a loyal and patriotic citi- 
zen. He was also a faithful friend and one 
in whose career were many elements that are 
worthy of emulation. In his death the com- 
munity in which he lived lost one of its val- 
ued citizens. He l)elonged to that pul^lic- 
spirited class who, while advancing indi- 
vidual prosperity, also labor earnesth- for 
the general good. 

Air, .\ckerson was born June 5, 1829, in 
Alnnniouth county, Xew Jersey, his parents 
being John and Eliza ( Hay ward) Acker- 
son, wiio were also natives of that state. 
'The Ackerson family is of German lineage 
Mil the grandfather, 'i'lKmias Ackerson, 



came to America in colonial days and when 
the country resolved to throw off the yoke 
of oppression he joined the American arm\- 
and fought for the independence of the na- 
tion. The Hayward family is of English 
origin and was founded in this country by 
Abraham Hayward, the maternal grandfa- 
ther of our subject. John Ackerson was a 
stone mason, brick layer and builder, hav- 
ing mastered all of those trades during his 
residence in New Jersey. About 1S47 'i*^ 
removed to and became identified with the 
agricultural interests of Clark county, as a 
farmer of Springfield township. There he 
made his home until his death, which oc- 
, curred in 1853. His wife survived him for 
a number of years and was then called to her 
final rest. This worthy couple were the 
parents of eight children, five sons and three 
daughters. 

Thomas C. Ackerson, the fourth in or- 
der of ])irth, remained with his parents un- 
til he was eleven years of age and then went 
to live with his uncle. Dr. J. S. English, of 
Monmouth county. New Jersey. While 
there he attended school and assisted the 
Doctor until he was seventeen years of age, 
w hen he was apprenticed tf) learn the black- 
smith's trade. At the close of his term of 
service, during which time he accpiired a 
good knowledge of the business, he came to 
Ohio, locating in Harmony township, Clark 
county, where he established a shop and 
there coiulucted successfully a growing 
business for a period of seven years. He 
tlien came to Springfield and here en- 
tered into partnership with James Neily in 
the conduct of a smithy. Again his e.xcel- 
lent workmanship and honorable business 
methods won him a large patronage anil he 
continued business tmtil after the breaking 
out of the Civil war when, feeling that his 




THOS. C. ACKERSON. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



199 



first duty was to his country, he put aside 
all business and personal considerations, 
joining an independent company of light ar- 
tillfery, which was assigned to the Sixteenth 
Ohio Regiment, and with that command he 
went to St. Louis, Missouri, wdiere he 
joined the troops under General Fremont. 
Three months later he was made wagon- 
master of the train and later was appointed 
fjuartermaster of the battery, acting contin- 
uously in that capacity until he was mustered 
out at Columbus, Ohio, on the expiration of 
his three years' term of service, in 1864. 

At the close of his army life, Thomas C. 
Ackerson returned to Springfield, Ohio, and 
then went to his native state of New Jersey, 
where he remained for three }'ears. devoting 
his energies to farming. On the expiration 
of that period he again came to Springfield, 
where he entered into business with his 
brother, David Ackerson, with whom he 
was associated for a time, when David sold 
out to their younger brother, E. H. Acker- 
son, and the business was continued under 
the' firm name of T. C. and E. HO. Ackerson. 
Almost from the beginning this firm en- 
joyed a very liberal patronage, doing an ex- 
tensive business in slate roofing materials. 
Their trade constantly grew in volume and 
importance and their sales became exten- 
si\e, shipments being made to various places. 
They furnished employment to a large num- 
ber of workmen and in business relations 
they sustained an unassailable reputation. 
Mr. Ackerson, was watchful of all the de- 
tails of his business and of all indications 
pointing toward prosperity, and from the 
beginning had an abiding faitli in the ulti- 
mate success of his enterprise. He possessed 
untiring energy, formed his plans readily 
and executed them with precision and deter- 



mination. His close application to business 
and his excellent management brought to 
him a high degree of prosperity which he 
enjoyed. 

In 1872 Mr. Ackerson was united in 
marriage tc? Miss M. Jennie Hluffman, a 
daughter of Lewis C. and Eliza Huffman. 
They became the parents of two children — 
Lydia H., the wife of Charles R. Ried. of 
Springfield, by whom she has one child. 
Thomas; and Bessie H., who resides with 
her mother. Fond of his home and his 
family, Mr. Ackerson took great delight in 
ministering to the happiness of his wife and 
children and he counted no personal sacri- 
fice on his part too great if it would enhance 
the welfare of those dear to him. 

He was a member of the High Street 
Methodist Episcopal church. Li his politi- 
cal \iews Mr. Ackerson was a stanch Re- 
publican, but the honors and en:oluments of 
office had no attraction for him, as he pre- 
ferred to give his attention to his business 
pursuits. He was a member of Mitchell 
Post, No. 45, G. A. R.. and enjoyed the es- 
teem of his old army comrades. He died 
May 23, 1896, and was laid to rest in Fern- 
cliff cemetery. Starting out in life for 
himself at an eaidy age, dependent entirely 
upon his own resources, he steadil}' worked 
his way upward. In thought and action he 
was always independent, carrying out his 
honest views without fear orTavor. In pi'i- 
vate life he gained that warm personal re- 
gard which arises from true nobility of 
character, deference to the opinions of oth- 
ers, kindliness and geniality. Thus, hon- 
est and honored in business, faithful in 
friendship and loyal to home ties, Thomas 
C. Ackerson commanded the respect of all 
with whom he was associated. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ADDISOX HAGAN. 

Addison Hagan is a well known resident 
of Mad River township, Clark county. His 
father, James Hagan, was born in Lancas- 
ter, Pennsylvania, and at an early day came 
to Clark county, Ohio. He wedded Cath- 
erine Kimball, also a native of the Keystone 
state, and they became the parents of the 
following children: John, who married 
Caroline Benjamin, was a well known ed- 
ucator of Springfield for many years, but 
at the time of his death was an attorney 
of Cincinnati, Ohio, where he passed away 
July f). 1873; Louisa is living on the home 
farm with our subject; Julia is deceased; 
]\iargaret married James Robinson and died 
August 20, 1862, leaving one child; Susan 
died March 18, 1892; Sally is the wife of 
l-'r.-iiik l'"ryant. who resides upon a farm 
near the old homestead; and Kate and Ad- 
dison, of this review, are yet living on tire 
old home place. The father of this family 
was (|uite active in politics and was a lead- 
ing and. inllnential citizen of his community. 
He sewed as township clerk for many years 
and was also a candidate on the Democratic 
ticket for the legislature. For twenty-five 
years he was engaged in teaching school 
and his devotion to the general good was 
cordially acknowledged. He died February 
4, 1874. and his wife departed this life April 
2, 1856. 

Air. Hagan. of this review, has always 
resided upon the old home farm, where he 
was born on the 24th of July, 1847. In his 
youth he attended the district schools of his 
neighborhood and also assi.sted in the task 
of improving and cultivating the fields. This 
work he has since continued and since his 
father's death he has assumed the manage- 
ment of the farm, which c<insists of eightv- 



four acres, and on which he is living with 
his sisters, Louisa and Kate. In connection 
with the raising of grain best adapted to 
the .soil and climate lie is also engaged in 
the raising of stock to some extent. Every- 
thing about the place is neat, thrifty and at- 
tractive in appearance. In his political views 
Mr. Hagan is a Democrat, having always 
supported this party, but has never been an 
oftice seeker, i)referring to give his time and 
attention to his farm work. 



HEZEKIAH KERSHXER. 

Hezekiah Kershner has been a resident 
of Clark county since 1828 and since 1848 
has !i\ed on the street where he yet makes 
his home, although when he took up his 
abode here his house was practically situated 
in the midst of a cornfield. The growth 
of the city, howevef, has included that 
place within its limits, and with the public 
progress and imjirovement Mr. Kershner 
has been identified. .\ native of Ilagers- 
town, Maryland, he was born October 24, 
1826, and is a son of Jacob Kershner, also 
a native of Maryland, who served in the 
war of 1812. By trade he was a blacksmith 
and in the year 1828 he brought his family 
to Clark county. In 1806, however, he 
had \isited this county and had purchased 
government land three miles south of the 
present site of Springfield. He became the 
owner of six hundred and forty acres, which 
was purchased at the usual government 
price, but when he removed to the county he 
sold one-half of this to his brother, Alartin. 
As the year passed he carried on agricu- 
cultural pursuits. He saw many changes in 
the growth and develoi)ment of the coun- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ty as it emerged from the wilderness to a 
po]nilons residence district, replete with all 
the advantages of the east, with all of its 
improvements and its comforts. He was al- 
way an industrious man, energetic and dili- 
gent, and thus in his business affairs he 
prospered. He was also a well educated 
man of his da}-, was a fine penman and read 
extensively. He voted with the Democracy, 
but in anti-bellum days was an Abolitionist, 
his home being near the famed underground 
railroad, and by this road many a slave was 
aidetl northward on his way to freedom. 
In religious faith Mr. Kershner was a Pres- 
byterian. He was twice married and by 
his first uniou he had three sons : Isaac, 
^^'illiam and Jacob, who carried on the 
farm work, while the father followed his 
trade, but all are now deceased. A daugh- 
ter, Mary, died when about twenty-two years 
of age. For his second wife Mr. Kershner 
chose Catherine Kline, and like her husband, 
she was of German lineage. She was a wid- 
ow, having been pre\-Ious!y married, and by 
her first union there were ])orn three chil- 
dren : Henry Albert, who is married and 
lives with his children in Illinois; Mary Al- 
bert, who became the wife of Mr. Lehman, 
and died in Illinois; and Catherine Albert, 
the widow of Henry Starrett, who was a 
shoemaker by trade and was an early settler 
of Springfield, his birth having occurred in 
Champaign county, Ohio. Mrs. Starrett 
noiw resides in Springfield at the age of 
eighty-two years. By the second marriage 
of the parents of our subject five children 
were born, but two died in early childhood. 
The others are : Hezekiah, Philip and Le- 
onidas. The last named is a carpenter and 
is li\-ing in Penns_\lvania. Philip was also 
a car])enter and l^uilder and died in Detroit 
^Michigan." He raised a company for serv- 



ice in th.e Civil war, became its captain and 
wcut to the front with the Second Ohio 
Regiment. He afterward veteranized and 
remained \\\\h the army until the close of the 
war, taking part in numerous engagements 
until wounded and incapacitated for further 
duty. .\t the time of his re-enlistment he 
became colonel of his regiment and in this 
capacity served until, through his valor and 
meritorious service, he was promoted to the 
rank of director general. He was born and 
reared in Clark county and reached the age 
of sixty-five years. The father of our sub- 
ject died upon the home farm at the age 
of seventj^-six years, while his wife passed 
away at the age of seventy-three. ^Ir. 
Kershner, of this review, received a district 
school education in what is now the Possum 
schoolhouse. At that time the "temple of 
learning" was a log- building, seated with 
slab benches and the same kind of desks. 
After leaving school he worked upon the 
home farm for a time and in 1842 he went 
to Dayton, Ohio, where he apprenticed him- 
self to a brick contractor, there remaining 
for three vears, during which time he mas- 
tered the trade. He then came to Spring- 
field and worked for Mr. Trimmer, stone 
and brick contractor, with whom he re- 
mained for four months. In 1846 he began 
contracting on his own account on a small 
scale. He did his work well, was honorable 
in all business transactions and thus gradu- 
ally his patronage increased. He has erected 
many of the leading bltx:ks of the city, in- 
cluding the Ross shop, the Foos manufac- 
tory, the old Zimmerman block and many of 
the residences of Springfield. He is widely 
known as a mason contractor, having- gained 
a prominent position in building circles here, 
although at the present time he is living re- 
tired. ha\ing in 1898 put aside Iwsiness 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



cares. His home is at No. 167 West Pleas- 
ant street, where he has lived since i8j.8, 
having built a home at the corner of Cen- 
ter and Pleasant streets when this locality 
was surrounded by a cornfield. 

In 1849 ^fT- Kershner wedded Miss 
Eliza Johnson, who was l)orn in Ireland, 
in May, 1827, and is a daughter of James 
Johnson, who came to Springfield about 
]849. and a sister of James, Robert and 
Isaac Johnson. Four children have been 
born unto our subject and his wife, of whom 
one died in infancy and another, Jacob H., 
died at the age of nine years. Edwin Al- 
len, a carpenter, now in the employ of the 
Superior Drill Company, is married and has 
three children — Harry, Frederick and Rob- 
ert. Nanc\'. the daughter, is the wife of 
Robert Singer, a resident of Columbus. 

At the time of the Civil war Mr. Kersh- 
ner raised Company A, of the Ninety-fourth 
Ohio \'olunteer Infantry and enlisted in 
i^()2. He served for six months and then 
(jn account of ill health was obliged to re- 
sign. At that time he was first lieutenant 
of this company and he t(X)k part in the bat- 
tles of Perryville and a number of skirmish- 
es, being in an engagement three days after 
leaving Camp Pickaway. Mr. and Mrs. 
Kershner have for about fifty years been 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
On the organization of St. Paul's church 
they transferred their membership to .that 
body. In politics he is a Democrat, save at 
local elections, when he supports the men 
best cpialified for office. He gives to his 
business his personal supervision and has 
always lived a quiet home life, caring not 
for political i)referment. .\s the years have 
passed his close attention to business, his en- 
terprise and his honorable methods, have 
been the means of bringing to him consider- 



able success, and with the handsome com- 
petence acquired from his own labors he is 
now living retired in the enjoyment of the 
fruits of his former toil. 



MARSH FIELD STEELE. 

In a history of those who have con- 
tributed to the upbuilding, improvement and 
commercial prosperity of Springfield men- 
tion should be made of Marshfield Steele, 
who, through an active business career 
proved a valued addition to commercial 
circles here, so that his death was deeply 
deplored by many who had come to enter- 
tain for him high regard by reason of his 
sterling worth, his prominence in trade cir- 
cles and his possession of those traits of 
character which draw man to man in ties of 
warm friendship. 

Mr. Steele was born in Caklwcll. New 
Jersey, August 27, 1822, a son of Marsh- 
field Smith and Mary (Carlock) Steele. By 
intermarriage of the Steele and Bradford 
families shortly after their settlement in 
America, he was a direct descendant of 
Governor William Bradford, who came 
over in the Mayflower, and therefore be- 
longed to one of the most prominent old 
Puritan families of New England. On the 
paternal side he traced his ancestry back to 
John Steele, who was born in Essex coun- 
ty, England, and became a resident of New 
England about 1631 or 1632, .settling at 
New Town, now Cambridge. Massachusetts, 
He afterward removed to Hartford, Con- 
necticut, becoming one of the first settlers 
of that place. His son, John Steele, Jr., 
wedded Mary Warner, and on the 15th of 
.March, \i)},2. there was liorn to them a son. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



203 



Samuel Steele, who married Mercy, daugh- 
ter of Major William Bradford. Their son, 
Eliphalet Steele, was born June it,, 1700, 
and married Catherine Marshfield. The 
next in direct descent was Josiah Steele, 
who was born in West Hartford, Connecti- 
cut, Februaiy 2^, 1724, and on the 2nd uf 
Decen:ber, 1753, married Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Rev. Benjamin Cnlton. Their son, 
Josiah Steele, Jr., was the grandfather of 
our subject and a cousin of Noah Webster. 
He was born in Hartford, Connecticut, Aug- 
ust 24, 1760, and was a student in Yale 
College at the time when the Revolutionary 
war was inaugurated, but ran away from 
school in order to enter the ami}- and fight 
for the cause of liberty. He enlisted in the 
First Connecticut Regiment and was soon 
commissioned sergeant. This commission, 
dated at West Point, August 4, 1780, is a 
valued possession of the family. He was 
married August 15, 1790, to Phoebe Smith, 
and died October 22, 1836. Marshfield S. 
Steele, the father of our subject, was born 
;\lay I, 1797. and on the 20th of March, 
1820, was united in marriage to Mary Car- 
lock. In 1848 he came to Ohio and after 
spending a short time in Dayton, located in 
Springfield, wliere he made his pemianent 
hom.e, becoming one of the prominent busi- 
ness men of the city. Here he died in 
1868, his remains l;eing- interred in Ferncliff 
cemetery. 

]\Jr. Steele, of this review, was educated 
in the schools of New Jersey and New York 
and lived in those states until 1846, when 
he made his way westward to Urbana, 
Ohio, where he engaged in teaching for one 
year. He then returned to his native state, 
but again came Xo' Ohio in 1848, accompan- 
ied by his father and mother. They all lo- 
cated in Dayton, but in 1848 or 1849 '^'-"' 



subject became a factor in the business life 
of Springfield, and until the time of his 
death his efforts returned to him not only 
creditable success, but also contributed to 
liie general prosperity of the city. He was 
engaged in the wholesale tobacco business 
for a number of years and was also^ identified 
with the conduct of a foundry. He was en- 
gaged in the manufacture of radiators un- 
der the firm name of M> Steele & Company, 
which was later incorporated as the M. 
Steele Company, Mr. Steele being its pres- 
ident. He constructed the first cable for 
the New York city cable cars. He also 
owned a large sugar plantation in Louisi- 
ana, and was a stockholder in the Baton 
I-iouge Sugar Refinery Company, of Baton 
Rouge, up- to the time of his death. His 
lousiness interests were of a varied nature, 
but all where successfully controlled, the 
business judgment of Mr. Steele being sound 
and practical. He carefully reviewed the 
possibilities of a business situation and his 
conclusions regarding such were usually ex- 
ceptionally correct, the wisdom of his opin- 
ions and his advice being demonstrated Iw 
the splendid success which attended his ef- 
forts. 

In 1853 occurred the marriage of Mr. 
Steele and Aliss Martha Lehman, a daughter 
of Jonathan and Mary C. (Cannon) Leh- 
man. Her father was a native of Frederick- 
town, Alaryland, and c:i..ie to Ohio when 
only four years of age with his father, Da- 
vid Lehman, who emigrated westward in 
1805 and settled near Dayton, where the 
family always lived. Jonathan Lehman 
learned the trade of wagon-making and 
when a young man came to Springfield, af- 
ter which he was identified with the indus- 
trial interests of this city. His wife came 
frrim Marvland to \isit her sister, \\'ho re- 



204 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



sided in Springfield, and here she formed 
the acquaintance of Jonathan Lehman, who 
souglit and won her hand in marriage. Af- 
ter following tlie business of wagon-making 
for a few years, Mr. Lehman turned his at- 
tention to the Inmlier trade and later became 
an extensive manufacturer of linseed oil. 
He made judicious investments in property 
and thus accumulated considerable real es- 
tate. For fifty years he was an elder in the 
Presbyterian church, and although his busi- 
ness interests were extensive and important, 
he yet found time to devote to church and 
kindred work, and his influence was strong- 
Is- felt in the moral development of the com- 
nnmity. Both he and his wife have now 
passed away, i)ut their memory is still en- 
shrined in the hearts of many who knew 
them. 

L'nto Air. and Mrs. Steele were Ixnn 
seven chiklren : Charles L. ; Mary, the wife 
of E. D. Plaisted; Elizabeth, the wife of 
Frank Webb; George M. ; Anna B., the wife 
of H. H. Cowherd; Martha, who married 
W. \\". Keifer: and Helen A., wife of A. 
.\. Ridder. The family is oneof pron:inence 
in the comnuuiity. Here the children were 
reared and have lived to take a leading part 
in the social and business life of the city. 

In politics Mr. Steele was a stanch Re- 
puljlican and his influence and aid were giv- 
en to the party which he believed would best 
conserve the nation's welfare, although he 
never sought or desired public office. In 
early life he became a member of the Afa- 
sonic- fraternity and he was a devoted mem- 
lier of the Second Presbyterian church, of 
Springliekl. Through the years of a success- 
ful business career he providently provided 
for his family, jjlacing considerable money 
in that safest of all investments — real es- 
tate--:md thus his wife and children have a 



good income from his estate. He passed 
away June 13, 1898, and was laid to rest in 
Ijeautiful I'-ernclifif cemetery. His life rec- 
ord e.xceetled the Psalmist's span of three 
score years and ten, for he reached the age 
of se\enty-six. He had long been a resi- 
dent of Springfield — -a citizen of worth, in- 
terested in public progress and adxancaiient 
and contributing of his time and means for 
the general good. He was a man of domes- 
tic taste, whose greatest happiness centered 
in his family, to whom he was a devoted 
husband and father, carefully rearing his 
children in accordance with ])rinciples that 
develop good character, and winning their 
confidence, respect and love l)y devoted 
kindness, while the companionship of hus- 
liand and wife deepened and broadened as 
the years went by. Such a record influaices 
individuals and. leaving its impress upon 
])nblic progress, well deserves perpetuation 
in this \olume. 



CHARLES A. JUERGEXS, M. D. 

The world instinctively pays deference to 
the man whose success has been worthily 
achieved, who has attained wealth by hon- 
orable business methods, acquired the highest 
reputation in his chosen calling by merit, and 
whose social prominence is not the less the 
result of an irrqiroachable life than of rec- 
ognized natural gifts. \\'e pay the highest 
tribute to the heroes who t.m bloody battle 
fields win victories and display a valor that 
is the admiration. of the world. Why should 
the tribute be withheld from those who wage 
the blomlless battles of civil life, who are 
conquerors in the world of business? Great- 
er than in almost anv other line of work is 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



205 



the responsibility which rests upon the phy- 
sician. The issues of Hfe and death are in 
his hand. A false prescription, an unskilled 
operation, may take from man that which 
he prizes above all else — life. The physi- 
cian's power must be his own. Xot by pur- 
chase, by gift or by influence can he g-ain it. 
He must commence at the very beginning, 
learn the rudiments of medicine and surgery, 
continually add to his knowledge by close 
study and application, and gain reputation 
b}- merit. If he would gain the highest 
prominence it must come as the result of 
superior skill, knowledge and ability, and 
these qualifications are possessed in an emi- 
nent degree by Dr. Juergens, of Springfield. 

Dr. Juergens is a native of Germany, his 
birth having occurred in Oldenburg, xApril 
2, 184 1, his parents being Henry and Ann 
(Wohlers) Juergens. who were born and 
reared in Germany, where the father carried 
on merchandising. At the usual age the 
Doctor began his education in the pulilic 
schools, sliowing- special aptitude in his stud- 
ies, and when a youth of twelve }cars he 
entered a gymnasium, where he pursued a 
rigid course of study in the leading sciences, 
languages and kindred subjects, devoting his 
attention to the mastery of the branches 
therein taught, for si.x; years. He is a man 
of scholarly attainments, able to read and 
translate thirteen different languages, a num- 
ber of which he speaks fluently. After pass- 
ing his gy^mnasium examination he entered 
the University of Goettingen, and studied 
theology, but while there changed his mind 
about his life work and entered upon a medi- 
cal course, attending lectures at Goettingen, 
Alarbourg, Berlin and Greifswald. 

When he had completed his studies the 
Doctor resoh-ed tO' seek a home in America, 
for he believed that in the new world he 



might find better professional oiDportunities 
than in his fatherland. Accordingly, he 
made his way across the Atlantic and for a 
time engaged in teaching languages and 
music in various cities of this country. He 
also to some e.xtent eng'aged in the practice 
of medicine until his skill and ability in the 
latter direction became so widel}' recognized 
that his practice grew to extensive propor- 
tions and he was obliged to give up teaching. 
He resided for a time in Chicago, Illinois, 
and subsecjuently removed to Cincinnati, 
where almost immediately he entered on a 
large and successful business. In addition to 
his medical duties his thorough knoivyledge 
of the German language and his ability in 
translation placed him on the editorial staff 
of the Courier, a daily newspaper now pub- 
lished under the name of Anzeiger. 

The year 1868 witnessed the arrival of 
Dr. Juergens in Springfield. Already he 
was known by reputation to many of the resi- 
dents here, and within a short time he had 
gained a liberal clientage from among the 
best class of Springfield's citizens. In 1873 
he was appointed by the Springfield school 
board to conduct special examination of high 
school classes and also of applicants for posi- 
tions in German. For several years the 
Doctor served in that capacity. He also be- 
came an active factor in mnsical circles of 
the city and a director in the Mannerchor 
Singing Society. He organized the Har- 
monia Music Society, and' his efforts and en- 
thusiasm were potent factors in developing 
the musical taste of this city. In 1879 ^^^ 
returned to Cincinnati, and again his prac- 
tice there grew to extensive proportions. He 
li\ed in a beautiful \-illa in Elmwood, which 
was erected under his direction, and gained 
prominaice socially as well as professionally. 
In 1892 he again came to Springfield, which 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



will probably be liis permanent place of resi- 
dence. \\t has held leading positions in 
fraternal circles; he was medical director of 
the Knights of the American Brotherhood, 
president of the Phoenix Mutnal Aid Asso- 
ciation and medical director of the Universal 
i5rotherhood. He is also examiner of the 
Prudential Life Insurance Company, of New 
jersey, and the Catholic Mutual Benefit As- 
sociation, of Ohio. He has also been hon- 
(jred with the apointment to a position on 
the medical staff of St. Luke's Hospital, in 
Xiles, Michigan, and he belongs to the 
Springfield board ol trade. In \-aried lines 
of activity he has thus proved his usefulness 
and capability, and his worth is widely ac- 
knowledged wherever he is known. 

The Doctor has by his first wife two chil- 
dren living: Arthur and Amma. The lat- 
ter is the wife of John Distler, of Buffalo, 
Xew ^'ork, and the fomier, Prof. Arthur 
Juergens, has for the past seven years been 
superintendent of music in the public schools 
of Springfield, is a composer of note, an 
artist (in the violin and a thoroughly well 
educated man. For his second wife the Doc- 
tor chose Miss Bernhardine Mueller, and 
they have two children: Otto and Oscar. 
The Doctor's reading has never been con- 
fined afone to his profession, but has em- 
braced subjects of wide range, making him 
a man of broad general information and 
scholarly attainments. He has the German's 
lo\e of music^and ixjssesses marked ability in 
the art. He has a large circle of warm 
friends and his friendship is best prized by 
those who know him best. In bis pro- 
fessional capacity he is widely kncwn. his' 
reputation extending beyond the limits of 
his state, and he is an honor tn the pro- 
lession in which he has won creditable dis- 
tinction. 



THOMAS MATTIXSOX, Sr. 

Tliomas Mattinson, Sr., is toilay one 
of the esteemed and venerable citizens of 
Clark county, where throughout a success- 
ful business career he has ever maintained 
a re]nitatiou for incorruptible integrity and 
fair dealing-. A native of England, Mr. 
iMattinson was born in Westmoreland coun- 
ty on the 24th of .Vpril, 1820, and when a 
youth of fourteen years he came to America 
with his father, Tliomas Mattinson. His 
mother, who Ixjre the maiden name of 
Jane Beedham, had died in England 
l)ri()r to this time, and with his chil- 
dren the father sought a home in the new 
world, settling- uptin the farm which is now 
occupied by his grandson, Thomas Mattin- 
son, Jr. Here the father of our subject 
spent his renuuning days and prospered in 
his undertakings, becoming the owner of 
several hundred acres of land. He assisted 
in the arduous task of developing the wild 
region and opening up this section of tlie 
country to civilization, and his labors not 
only resulted in bringing him a comfortable 
competence, but were also of marked value 
to the community. In his family were sev- 
en children, of whom Tbonias Mattinson 
of this review was the fifth in order of birth 
antl is the only one now living. 

As above stated, Tboiras Mattinson, Sr., 
spent the lirst fourteen years of his life in 
his native country and there acquired his 
early education. After coining to America 
his life was not exempt from the hard toil 
incident to pioneei- settlement upon the fron- 
tier, for he assisted his father in develop- 
ing the old home place. After arriving at 
\-ears of maturity he was united in marriage 
to Elizabeth A. Wilkinson, who was lx)rn 
in Ashtalnila counlv, Ohio, October 15, 




), 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1834, a daughter O'f Henry and Elizabeth 
lIMitchell) Wilkinson, both of whom were 
natiN-es oi England, her father having been 
bom in \\'estnioreland county. He was 
acquainted with the parents of Mr. Mattin- 
son before the emigration of the family to 
America and he came to the new world sev- 
eral years prior tO' the arrival of the 2^Iat- 
tinsons. The daughter, Elizabeth A. Wil- 
kinson, was reared to womanhood in her 
native county, and her marriage to Mr. ]\Iat- 
tinsoai was celebrated at Springfield, this 
state, since which time they have lived iipon 
the farm that was settled by hi^ fatlier. 
Four children have been Ijorn tO' thau, but 
all died in youth with the exception of one 
son, who is his father's namesake and is a 
prouiinent and influential farmer and stock 
dealer of Clark comity. 

From his fatlier Thomas Alattinson, Sr.. 
inherited two hundred acres of land, and it 
was upon that farm that he settled with his 
bride, giving his attention to agricultural 
pursuits. He worked earnestly and long 
in his efiforts to make his farm productive 
and valuable, and as he prospered he added 
to his place from year to year, purchasing 
adjoining tracts of land until his possessions 
aggregated sixteen hundred acres, all in one 
body. Not only did he. engage in the culti- 
vation of the cereals best adapted to the soil 
and climate, but throughout his acti\-e busi- 
ness career he also successfully carried on 
stock feeding. He no.w owns in addition to 
his Clark count)' property five hundred and 
twenty-fi\-e acres of land in Madison county 
and his real estate is the visible e\-idence 
of ills life of thrift, industry and enterprise. 
He was one of the incorporators of the 
Farmers National Bank of South Charles- 
ton, and served as one of its directors for 
many years, but when the bank gave up its 



charter he withdrew from lianking interests 
and his stock was turned over to his son, 
Thomas ]\Iattinson, Jr., whO' is now a direc- 
tor in the Citizens Bank of South Charles- 
tun, the successor of the Farmers National 
Bank. ]\Ir. Mattinson of this review is now 
living a retired life, having turned all his 
business and property interests oiver toi his 
son, Thomas Mattinson, Jr. He has reached 
the age of eig-hty-two years and well dbes 
he deser\-e the rest from further labor which 
is vouchsafed tO' him. In his political views 
he has always beai independent, having no 
desire for office and preferring to give his 
time and attention to his business affairs, 
in w hich he has indeed n-.et with signal pros- 
perity. Both he and his wife are Episcopal- 
ians in rehgious faith and are numbered 
among the esteemed citizens oif the county 
where from pioneer days to the present they 
have continuoiusly resided, watching witli 
interest its substantial growth and upbuild- 
ing. In all business relations Mr. Mattin- 
son has been found reliable and trustworthy 
and sustains an unassailable reputation for 
integrity that makes his example well worthy 
of emulation. 



THO-MAS :MATTIXS0N, Jr. 

Thomas ^Mattinson. Jr., is the most ex- 
tensi\'e breeder of Aberdeen Angus cattle in 
Ohio, and is a progressive, wide-awake busi- 
ness man, whose efforts ha\-e resulted not 
alone toi his individual good,- but have been 
of marked benefit to agricultural classes. 
The m.an who is instrumental in improving a 
grade oif stock whereby higher market prices 
are received is just as worthy to be termed 
a benefactor of his fellow men as is he who 
gives directly from his ca])ital the means for 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the founding- of institutions or for tlie up- 
building of communities. 

Mjr. 'Mattinson makes liis home near 
South Charleston upon the old family home- 
stead which was at one time in. the 
possession of his grandfather. He was 
born upon this farm December i8, 
1864, his parents 1>eing Thomas and 
Elizabeth (\\ilkinson) Mattinson. The 
sketch of his father is given alxwe. Un- 
der the parental roof he was reared. 
Having obtained a coir.mon school edu- 
cation, he entered a business college in 
Columbus and subsequently became a stu- 
dent in the State University of the capital 
city, remaining there for two years. He 
afterward matriculated in Jiliami University 
at 0.\ford, where he also continued his 
studies for two years, and since that time 
he has gi\-en his attention to the work of 
the farm, which he has carried on in an 
energetic and profitable manner. His fa- 
ther, after obtaining his share of the grand- 
fatlier's estate — two hundred acres — added 
to his iK>ssessious until he l>ecame the own- 
er of about two thousand acres of land, of 
which six hundred acres is coanprised with- 
in the home farm and the rcn.ainder is in 
Madison coimty, Ohio. 

In 1896 the subject of this review be- 
came the owner of the old homestead near 
South Charleston, and at that time he began 
raising Aberdeen Angus cattle, beginning 
Avitli alxiut fifty head of thoroughbreds. He 
has greatly increased the numljer until now 
he owns over two hundred pure bred regis- 
tered cattle, together with aliout five hun- 
dred and fifty high grade cattle, this being 
the largest herd in the state of Ohio of that 
l)reed. He has had his cattle at the com- 
bination sales in Indianapolis, Giicago and 
Oni.aha. \\hcre only ])ure bred cattle are 



sold, and has disposed of many animals at 
fancy prices, receiving an average price at 
those sales of n:ore than two hundred dol- 
lars per head. He is a member of the Amer- 
ican Aberdeen Angus Breeders' Assojcia- 
tion. covering the United States and Canada. 
;Mr. Mattinson is also a director in the Citi- 
zens Bank of South Charleston, in which 
he owns considerable stock. 

On the 2ist of October, 1896. ^Ir. Mat- 
tinson was united in marriage to Miss B\rd 
Damarus Pugsley, of Clark county, a daugh- 
ter of James F. and Damarus Byrd (Ltmg) 
P'ugsley. . Her father was bom Octoter 3, 
1824. in the town of Claverack, Columbia 
county. Xew York, and the mother's birth 
c;ccurred at Sinking Springs in Highland 
county, Oliio. She died July 3, 1895. Eight 
children were bom unto this worthy couple, 
of whom six are yet living, and Mrs. Mat- 
tinson is the fourth in order of birth. Her 
nr.iternal grandfather was Judge Charles 
Willing Byrd, governor of the Northwest 
Territory. Unto our subject and his wife 
have been lx>rn three children: Margaret, 
born August 7, 1897: Thomas Janes, born 
I'ebruary 7, 1899; and Byrd, born March 
-•3, 1901. Mr. and Mrs. Mattinson are 
widely and favorably known in this county 
and he is one of the most progressive and 
successful farmers and stock dealers here. 
He thoroughly understands his business, 
gives it close attention and his laudable am- 
bition, his close application and his earnest 
purjwse have resulted in the acquirement of 
a handsome competence. 



JACOB C. KELLER. 
A man's reputation is the property of 
the world. The laws of nature have for- 
])iclden isolation. Everv human being sub- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



mils to the controlling influence of others, 
or as a master spirit wields a power either 
for good or evil on the masses of mankind. 
There can be no impropriety in justly scan- 
ning the acts of any man as they effect his 
public and business relations. If he ig hon- 
est and eminent in his chosen field oif labor, 
in\-estigation will brighten his fame and 
point the path that others may follow with 
like success. From among the ranks of 
quiet, persevering yet prominent citizens — 
prominent on account of what he has done 
in commercial circles — there is no one more 
deser\-ing of mention in a volume Oif this 
character than Jacob C. Keller, who is now 
living in Springfield, where he has made 
his home since 1867, and has been the gen- 
eral superintendent of the P. P. Mast & 
Company since 1898. 

Mr. Keller was born in Reading, Penn- 
sylvania, September 8, 1848, and is a son of 
John Keller, who was a school teacher, and 
was educated in Philadelphia. He married 
Esther Clouscer, who was likewise a native 
of Pennsylvania, born in 1810. He died in 
185 1, but his widow now resides in Read- 
ing. They were the parents of fourteen chil- 
dren, eight of whom grew to maturity : Will- 
iam, who died in August, 1902, near Read- 
ing: Daniel, who is living near Springfield, 
llHnois; D. C, who served as colonel of a 
J'ennsylvania regiment throughout the Civil 
war, died in Reading in May, 1902; Sam- 
uel, a farmer; Jeremiah, who was a lieuten- 
ant of a company of Union soldiers in the 
Civil war; Sally, who is the wife of William 
Yauch and resides on a farm in Reading; 
Caroline, the widow of Alfred Brumbach, 
living at home with her mother; and Ja- 
cob C. 

The last named was the thirteenth in or- 
der (if l:>irth in the family. He pursued a 



public school education and remained at 
home until eleven years of age, when he 
started out upon his business career, going 
to Philadelphia, where he was employed for 
a lime in a hotel. He then returned to the 
farm, where he remained until fifteen years 
of age, after which he began learning the 
molder's trade, and when he had served a 
three years' apprenticeship he remained with 
his employer as a journeyman for one year. 
On tlie expiration of that period he went 
to Decatur, Illinois, in 1866, remaining there 
for a year, and in 1867 he came to Spring- 
field, Ohio, where he has since made his 
home. Here he found emplo}'ment in the 
old Champion Foundry, and for many years 
has been identified with the industrial pur- 
suits of Clark county. 

In the year following his arrival — 1868 
— in Springfield, Jacob C. Keller was mar- 
ried to Fmma De Vault, who was born in 
this city, a daughter of Henry De Vault, 
who was a cooper by trade and a pioneer 
settler here. Mr. Keller began work for the 
New Champion Binder Works on the 7th 
of December and was married on the 8th 
of that month. He worked as a molder 
until 1870, when he entered the employ of 
P. P. Mast & Company, and in 1873 took 
charge of their foundry as foreman, filling 
that position continuously until 1898, wdien 
he was promoted to the superintendency of 
the plant. He now has under his superin- 
tendency about three hundred and fifty men, 
employing competent foremen to^ assist him. 
Not a little of the development and success 
of tlie business is justly attributable to his 
efl'orts. He has the entire confidence of the 
members of the compan}' and justly merits 
their good will and respect. He has worked 
his way up gradually from the time when he 
became connected with the trade at the age 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of titteen years. By experience and nl)ser- 
vation he has become well versed in me- 
chanics and is thoroughly competent to su- 
perintend any branch of the business. In 
his labors he has thus met with success and 
is to-day a well known and prominent fac- 
tor in industrial circles of Springfield. 

In 1 88; ilr. Keller erected his present 
home at Xo. 217 South Factory street and 
remodeled it in 1900. Unto him and his 
vile ha\e been born five children, but two 
of the number died in early childhood. The 
others are: Harry H., who is employed 
in the ofiice of P. P. Mast & Company, and 
is a graduate of the public schools of this 
city: Hcltie B., the wife of George Lennert, 
inspector nf the water works of Spring- 
field : and Gertrude A., the wife of August 
Du\e. a lithographer of Dayton, Ohio. 

Mr. Keller is a Republican and an active 
worker in the city and county conventions, 
but the honors and emoluments have had 
no attractions for him personally. Pie has, 
however. lieen elected as a member of the 
board of trustees of the Springfield water 
wi;rks and is serving his second term as 
])n\si(lcnt i>f the board. Pie has always been 
an njiright and honorable man and would 
never stoop to anything dishonest, either in 
private life or public affairs. He has never 
missed a meeting of the water works board 
and in his official service has labored earn- 
estly for the best interests of the people. 
He belongs to Anthony Lodge, F. & A. M. ; 
to Springfield Chapter, R. A. AI. ; to Red 
Star I.odge, K. of P. : and to the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. H'e has 
also been a meml)er of the board of trustees 
of the Springfield Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation since 1885. His success has been by 
no means the result of fortunate circum- 
stances, but has come to him through en- 



ergy, labor and perseverance, directed b\ 
an evenly l)alanced mind and by honorable 
Inisincss principles. From early life he 
made it his plan to spend less than his in- 
come. In manner he is quiet and straight- 
forward, saying exactly what he means 
without the addition of useless compliments. 
Although rather retired he has a host of 
warm friends throughout the city and is a 
man whom to know is to esteem and honor. 



HON. ORAX F. HYPES. 

Among the leading and influential citi- 
zens of Springfield is numbered Hon. Oran 
F. Hypes, whose successful mercantile in- 
terests have made him a prominent factor in 
trade circles, while activity and loyalty in 
public affairs have classed him ahiong the 
valued residents of his district, in which he 
has been honored with the office of legis- 
lator, having served as a member of the sev- 
enty-fifth general assembly of Ohio. 

Mr. Hypes was born in Xenia, Ohio. De- 
cember 18, 1862, his parents being Samuel 
H. and Hannah (Van Brocklin) Plypes. 
His father, also a native of Obio, was born 
in Greene county in 1826 and is now living 
in Xenia. where he is engaged in the in- 
surance business. His wife is a native of 
Springfield. The paternal grandfather. 
Henry Plypes, was born in Virginia, but his 
father came from Germany, near Bingen on 
the Rhine, and on crossing the Atlantic to 
the new world he took up his abode in ^'ir- 
ginia, establishing his home in the vicinity 
of the Xatural Bridge. From that place, 
early in the nineteenth century, he removed 
to Xenia, Ohio, and down to the present time 
the family has been pnjmincnt in the affairs 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



which ha\-e led to tlie sul3stantial progress 
and improvement of the state. 

Oran F. Hypes spent liis boyliood days 
in his nati\-e city, being reared under the 
parental roof. He was a student in the com- 
mon schools, after which he entered the high 
school and was graduated with the* class of 
1879. He then Ijecame connected with mer- 
cantile interests in Xenia, helping build up 
the Inisiness with which he was identified 
until 1882, when he came to Springfield and 
at first opened a store on Main street, but 
later removed to No. 43 South Limestone 
street, where he deals in hats and nien's fur- 
nishing goods, his being one of the leading 
establishments of the kind in the city. He 
was not long in demonstrating to the public 
that he was worthy of their patronage, and 
almost from the beginning of his residence 
here lie has enjoyed a large and prosperous 
trade. His business methods are such as 
will bear the closest investigation and scrut- 
iny, and his earnest desire to please, com- 
bined with reasonable price, has secured to 
him a liberal and well deserved patronage. 

In 1889 occurred the marriage of Mr. 
Hypes and ]\Iiss Jessie B. Johnson, a daugh- 
ter of Richard and Dorothy Johnson, the 
family being a prominent old one of Spring- 
field. They have two children. Dorothy and 
Douglas. Fraternally Mr. Hypes has long 
l:)een connected with the Masonic order, and 
is a past n- aster oi Anthony Lodge, No. 455, 
F. & A. 'y.l., and past commander of Pales- 
tine Commandery, No. 33, Knights Ten-.plar. 
Li his life he exemplifies the beneficent spirit 
of the craft. He has served as director of 
the Board of Trade, and is a charter mem- 
ber of the Commercial Clul>. Mr. Hypes 
is a Methodist and is one of the directors of 
the Young Men's Christian Association, and 
takes a deep and lasting interest in all that 



pertains to the material upbuilding of social 
welfare, the intellectual and moral advance- 
ment of his adopted city. 

With a firm faith in the principles of the 
Republican party, Mr. Hypes has been loyal 
and active in support of that great political 
organization since early manhood, even be- 
fore beconTing a voter, and has put forth 
every effort in his power to promote the 
growth and insure the success of the party. 
In 1 90 1 he was elected a member of the gen- 
eral assembly of Ohio and served in the regii- 
lar and extraordinary sessions of 1902; was 
appointed upon se\'eral important commit- 
tees ; was secretary of the committee on tax- 
ation; chaimian of the committee on public 
buildings and lands ; and a memlier of the 
committee on insurance. In the extraor- 
dinary session called to create a new cixle 
of laws for municipal government ]\Ir. Hypes 
was named by the speaker to serve on the 
special committee to report a bill to the 
house. Such, in brief, is his life history. 
In whatever relation of life we find him — 
in business, in society, in government circles 
or in political service — he is always the same 
honorable and honored gentlen-an \\liose 
worth well merits the high regard which is 
uniformlv given him. 



ALEXAXDER C. PATTOX. 

Alexander C. Patton, now deceased, was 
a mon whose upright Christian character had 
marked influence on the development of the 
comnnmity. Not by precept but b}- example 
did he demonstrate the better way of life, 
and thus to- his family he left the priceless 
heritage of an untarnished name. He was 
liorn January 14, 1838. in Belmont county. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Oliio. and was a son of \\'illiam and Ann 
(Clark) Fatten. Our subject grew to maii- 
Iicud in Belmont county, was reared upon 
a, farm and received a gcwxl common-school 
education. He was married October lO, 
1861. in that county, to Miss Agnes J. 
Sharp, who was born and reared there and 
was a (laughter of William and Caroline 
I llarrah ) Sliarp. She received a goo<l edu- 
, nil n. her early educational privileges af- 
1 -rded l)v the common school being supple- 
mented by two years' attendance in the sem- 
inary in \^■ashington, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Patton's father had given him a 
farm in Belmont county, and there the young 
ciaiple began their domestic life, his atten- 
tion being then given to the culti\ation of 
his fields until he joined the army. In 1863. 
feeling that his first duty was to his country, 
. he organized a company of soldiers and was 
elected captain. They went to the front as 
Company I, of the One Hundred and Sev- 
enth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for one hun- 
dred days, and were sent to Harper's Ferry. 
Two companies were there consolidated, 
and on that occasion Mr. Patton was made 
first lieutenant. After about four months' 
service he recei\ed an honorable discharge, 
having in the meantime participated in sev- 
eral skirmishes around Harper's Ferry. Be- 
coming ill, he was sent to the hospital at 
Annapolis. Maryland, from which place he 
was granted a furlough which allowed him 
to return home, where he remained until the 
expiration of his temn of service, when he 
was lionorably discharged at Columbu;^. 

Captain Patton continued a resident of 
P>elmont county until 1869. when he sold his 
farm there and purchased a tract of land in 
Clark ctunty. comprising two hundred and 
fortv-six acres, which is yet the homestead 
of the familv. He was an industrious, en- 



terprising man, who labored earnestly, be- 
ing never negligent in his work. His efforts 
brought good results, and he became one of 
the prosperous and well-to-do agriculturists 
of this community, providing his family with 
a good home and comfortable living and 
leaving to his widow an estate ample for her 
needs. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Patton were born two 
children: William S., who married Flor- 
ence Creagar, by whom he has four children 
— Helen M., Grace J., Raymond and Paul- 
ine, their home being in Harmony township : 
and Anna I., who is yet with her mother. 
Both children were provided with good edu- 
cational privileges, and the son was for one 
year a student in \\'ittenl3erg College and for 
one year studied in \\'ooster College. Miss 
Anna entered O.xford College, where she was 
graduated on the comjiletion of a musical 
course, and later spent one year in the Bos- 
ton Conservatory of Music. 

In his political views Mr. Patton wa.s a 
Republican. He kept well informed on the 
issues of the day, and for several years he 
served as township trustee. He took an ac- 
tive part in everything pertaining to the 
growth and success of his party and fre- 
quently served as a delegate to its conven- 
tions. He was a member of the United 
Presbyterian church and for several yertrs 
served as clerk of sessions. He had an un- 
usually retentive memory, and could repeat 
whole chapters in the Bible and the entire 
l)Ook of Psalms. If any (-ne would begin 
a Biblical quotation lie would take it up, com- 
plete the chapter and even tell what verse 
was used in the beginning. He had, too. 
a great love of music and poetry, and many 
poems which he loved he could recite with- 
out once referring to the book. Blank verse 
was his especial favorite, and the kindly na- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



2 1.5 



ture whicli usually accompanies a Io\-e of 
music, poetry and the Bible was his in an un- 
usual degree. He died July lo, 1899, se- 
cure in his Christian faith. He had sO' lived 
as to be honored by his fellow men and his 
memory is as a blessed benediction to those 
who knew him. 



\MLLIAM SHARP PATTOX. 

\Mlliani Sharp Patton, who is carrying 
on general farming and stock raising in Har- 
mony township, is a native son of Belmont 
county, Oliio, his birth having occurred there 
July 28, :862, his jMrents being Captain 
Alexander Clark and Agnes J. (Sharp) Pat- 
ton. The first years of his life were spent 
in the county nf his nativity, and he then 
accompanied his parents toi Clark county, 
where he was reared to manhood on the 
home farm. At the usual age he entered the 
public schools, and when he had coinpleted 
the course of instruction there he spent a 
year as a student in Wittenberg College and 
also one year in study at W'coster. The 
occupation to which he was reared he has al- 
ways made his life work, and in his farming 
methods he has kept abreast with the im- 
provements of the times. On the 24th of 
October, 1889, in Harmony township, he 
wedded Miss Florence Creagar, who was 
born in Frederick county. ^laryland, and 
came to Ohio in i86g with her parents, Jo- 
seph and Mary A. (Smith) Creagar, who 
located in Springfield township, where her 
father carried on farming. Both were born 
in Frederick county, Maryland, and became 
highly respected residents of this locality. 
Her father died in 1888, at the age of sixty- 
one vears, Init her mother is still living, and 



makes her home in Springfield township. 
Airs. Patton received a good common-school 
education, and is an estimable lady, who pre- 
sides with gracious hospitality over her 
home. By her marriage she has became the 
mother of four children: Helen M., born 
in Knox county, Indiana, October 19, 1890; 
Grace Jeanette, born on the home farm in 
Harmony township, December 5, 1896; Ray- 
mond Alexander, born December 24, 1897; 
and Myrtle Pauline, born November 17, 
1899. 

At the time of their marriage Mr. and 
Airs. Patton removed to Knox county, In- 
diana, where he owned one hundred and fifty 
acres of land and for five years they resided 
upon that farm. On the expiration of thst 
period, however, they returned to Clark 
county and Mr. Patton purchased his present 
farm of two hundred and ten acres in Har- 
mony township. Upon this he built a very 
fine residence in 1901. He has his farm well 
tiled, and has cleared forty-five acres of his 
land. He is wide-awake, enterprising ag- 
riculturist, and his life shows the force of 
industrv and perseverance in the acquirement 
of success. He votes with the Republican 
party and is a member of the Presb)-terian 
church at South Charleston. 



CLARENCE S. RAAISEY, M. D. 

It is a noticeable fact that in this land, 
as in no other, young men are found at the 
front in professions and in business life. 
Dr. Ramsey is a notable example of this 
fact. Although he has attained the age of 
only twenty-eight years, he has advanced in 
the medical fraternity to a position of dis- 
tinction, and his work in the line of his pro- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



fession has been of such a nature as to gam 
for him the recognition of his professional 
bretliern as well as of the public. 

Tlie Doctor was born in Steubenville, 
Oliio, January 6, 1875, and comes of Scotch 
lineage. Throughout almost his entire life 
he lias resided in Springfield. He obtained 
his common school education in the public 
schools, his collegiate work being prosecuted 
in Wittenberg College, in which institution 
he was graduated with the class of 1895. 
He then entered the business world, accept- 
ing a position as bookkeeper with the firm 
of William Ramsey & Company, commis- 
sion merchants. He acted in that capacity 
for some time, but believing that he would 
find professional life more congenial, he be- 
came a student of medicine in the office and 
under the direction of Dr. Buckingham, of 
Springfield, and continued his studies in the 
Jefferson Medical College, of Philadelphia, 
in which he was graduated with the class of 
1900. Again taking up his abode in this 
city, Dr. Ramsey opened his office in the 
King Building. He was appointed house 
]>hysician to the Charity Lying-in Hospital. 
Phihdelphia, his duties being largely in the 
line of oljstetrical work. In 1901 he re- 
ceived appointment as resident physician in 
the Jefferson Medical College, which he saw 
fit to decline. He is physician to the county 
infirmary, also examiner in the United 
States recruiting service. 

His military record consists of connec- 
tion with the National Guard from 1892 un- 
til 1899. He first servefl in the Hospital 
Corps, of which he afterward became hos- 
pital steward. He was then promoted to 
regimental commissary. Third Regiment. 
Ohio National Guard, and during the Span- 
ish-.\merican war was made regimental 
quartermaster of the Third Ohio \'nlunteer 



Infantry. He is a close student ;Of text 
books bearing upon the science of medicine 
and its principles, as also its practical work- 
ings, and further extends his knowledge and 
usefulness through association with the 
members of the Springfield Acadany of 
Medicine and the Clark County Medical So- 
ciety. 

In the year 1902 Dr. Ramsey was united 
in marriage to Miss Delia Wilson, of this 
city. The Doctor is a member of Clark 
Lodge. No. lOT, F. & A. M. His choice of 
a profession seems to have been wisely made, 
for he finds it congenial and has a deep in- 
terest in his work, both from a scientific 
standpoint and from the position of one who 
possesses broad humanitarian \iews. He 
was endowed by nature with a good mind 
and strong purpose, and these, supplemented 
by a laudable ambition and unfaltering de- 
votion to. his chosen calling, have gained him 
already a creditable place in the ranks of 
the medical fraternity. 



ELZA ANDERSON DYE. M. D. 

E. A. Dye, M. D., one of the most skilled 
and prominent physicians and surgeons of 
Clark county, now practicing in \^ienna. 
v.as born near Woodview, Morrow count}'. 
Ohio. July 13. 1871. His parents were the 
Rev. Iliomas \\'. and Alice (Krout) Dye. 
The father, also a native of >Iorrow county, 
was reared upon a fami there, and was in- 
debted to the common school system for the 
educational privileges he enjoyed in his 
■vTOuth. He was always a student, reading 
and thinking deeply, and he became a suc- 
cessful teacher, being emi)loyed for nineteen 
\cars in the same school. .\t the time of 




DR. E. A. DYE. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tlie Civil war he joined the Union, army and 
served lor three years as a private in de- 
fense of the old flag and the cause it repre- 
sented. Soon after his return, froair the war 
he was married and began preaiching in 
Butler, Ohio, as a minister of the Free Will 
Baptist church. Throughout his remaining 
da}-s he de\ i.ited his attention largely to 
the work of the ministry and his influence 
Wis widely and strongly felt in 'behalf of the 
church.. 

Dr. Dye of this review was only about 
eiglit or nine years of age when his father 
died, and for five years thereafter he was em- 
ployed on a farm ty one man. At the age 
of sixteen he entered the Jobnsville high 
school and was graduated at the age of 
twenty with the class of 1890. He was 
am.bitious to gain an education and jjrepare 
for some useful walk in life and resolved to 
make the practice of medicine his chosen 
work. He began studying in Wittenberg 
College as a preparation for some advanced 
professional line. In 1894 he entered the 
Ohio Aledical College at Cincinnati and was 
graduated in that institution with the class 
of 1897. He also recei\ed the diploma of 
graduation from the eye and ear department, 
having made a specialty of that branch of 
medical science. 

Dr. Dye entered upon the practice of 
medicine in Indiana, where he remained for 
two and one-half years. He then went to 
Chicago and was afterward in the south, 
being associated with an uncle. Dr. J. B. 
Krout. whom he assisted in performing an 
operation for umbilical hernia, which opera- 
tion proved a success, although it was a 
m.ost difficult one. In Decembei-, 1899, the 
Doctor came to Clark county, locating in 
Harmony township. In 1901 he was called in 
in a case of appendicitis, on which he oper- 



ated, and his patient was- the only one of 
eight operated upon in this neighborhood 
that lived through an attack of that disease 
and the only case of which the Doctor had 
charge. He has been most successful in 
his practice and is continually augmenting 
his skill by reading, in\'estigation and re- 
search along the line of medical science. 

On the loth of April. 1902, in H^armony 
township. Dr. Dye was united in marriage 
to ^liss Xina Smith, who' was born in Har- 
mony township and is a daughter O'f Amos 
and Catherine (Wirt) Smith. She is a 
most estimable lady and one well read. She 
completed a public school conrse in 1898 
and spent the year of 1900-1901 as a student 
in ^^'ittenberg■ College. The Doctor is a 
Republican in his political \-iews, having 
always voted for the presidential candidates 
v.ith the exception of the year 1892, whtn 
he cast his ballot with the Prohibition party. 
He belongs to the Knights of Pythias fra- 
ternity at Vienna, to the Junior Order of 
.Vmerican Mechanics, and also to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. In the 
line of his profession he is connected with 
the Clark County Medical Association and 
with the State Medical Society and through 
the interchange of thought, experience and 
knowledge in these meetings he is continual- 
ly broadening his o-\vn knowledge and thus 
adding to his usefulness as a member of 
one of the most valued professions of the 
world. 



ALOXZO F. TAFT. 



.Vlonzo F. Taft. who is connected with 
farming interests in [Madison township, was 
born in Franklin count}-, [Massachusetts, May 
^*^- ^^?>o- '''i* i-iarents being Chapin and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Harriet (Bardwell) Taft. The boyhood 
(lays of our subject were spent upon his 
father's farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
and in addition to the common school privi- 
leg-es which he enjoyed, he attended the 
Shelburn Falls Academy for two years at his 
own expense, having previously earned the 
money to meet his tuition. He entered that 
institution wherv a youth of fifteen. He per- 
formed all of the chores upon the home farm 
in the morning and evening and then had to 
walk^a distance of four miles to the high 
school at Montague, which was the nearest 
town to his home. Before he entered the 
academy he had been employed by the month 
as a farm hand at eight and twelve dollars 
per month and thus earned the money with 
which he met the expenses of his academic 
course. His father had died when the son 
was only four years of age, leaving the moth- 
er with nine children, so that the advantages ' 
which the family received were very lim- 
ited, save those which they acquired for 
themselves. 

After leaving the academy Mr. Taft en- 
gaged in teaching for some time during the 
winter months, and thus had acquired capital 
sufficient to enable him to continue his own 
education in the State Xormal School at 
Westfield. The tuition there was free, but 
he had to meet his Iward bills and other 
necessary expenditures. He entered into 
a contract to deliver books that had been sold 
on the subscription plan and was then sent 
to Jonesville and Hillsdale. Michigan, in the 
interest of Mr. Bills, of Xorwich, Connecti- 
cut. When he reached his destination he 
received word that the lx)oks had been 
shipped to Bufifalo and from there would be 
transmitted over the lake route, but this could 
not be done, for the lake was then frozen 
over and navigation for the season was 



closed. ^Ir. Taft then secured a situation 
as a teacher in a school, which he conducted 
for four months. This provided him with 
some ready inoney, and the next spring he 
began the delivery of the books, which had 
ultimately arrived. During three winters 
he continued his school work and in the sum- 
mer months engaged in delivering books. 
He was then taken ill and went to the water 
cure in Cleveland, Ohio, where he was ad- 
vised to go south. Following this advice, 
he secured a position as a teacher in a school 
in Clermont county, Ohio, where he re- 
mained for three years as a teacher in a small 
village. 

During the last year there Mr. Taft was 
united in marriage on the 17th of March, 
1858, to Miss Mary J. Bragg, and three chil- 
dren were born to them: William II. . who 
is now a resident of Springfield, Ohio; .Mon- 
zo F., who married Amanda White and lives 
in Dayton, Ohio ; and Charles R., of Spring- 
field, Ohio. 

After his marriage Mr. Taft turned his 
attention to merchandising in Clermont 
county, but after a year he removed his store 
to Martinsville, Clinton county, and for sev- 
en 3'ears was there successfully engaged in 
merchandising. He then determined to 
change the field of his labor, and selling out 
at that place came to South Chtirleston, 
where he was in business for fourteen years. 
Severing his connection with mercantile af- 
fairs, he became a representative of the agri- 
cultural interests of Clark county and ])ur- 
chased a place of one hundred and sixty 
acres in Madison township, formerly known 
as the Joshua Harrison farm, whereon he 
made his home until March 5, 1902, when 
his residence was destroyed by fire and he 
returned to the town, where he is now living. 

In 1877 Mr. Taft was called upon to 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



mourn the loss nf his wife, who died in South 
Charleston, in the month of Ofctober of that 
year. In December, 1S78, he was again 
married, his second union being with Miss 
JMary Sweet, who was born in Soiith Charles- 
ton and is a daughter of Griffith F. and Mar- 
tha (Jones) Sweet. She is a lady of su- 
perior education and culture, and for sixteen 
}-ears was engaged in teaching school in 
South Charleston. 

In his political views Mr. Taft has been 
an earnest and stalwart Republican, since 
casting his ballot in support of Jobn C. Fre- 
mont, the first candidate of the party. He 
has never been an office seeker, yet he was 
elected and served for three years as justice 
of the peace in Clinton county and for eight 
or ten years in ]\Iadison township, Clark 
county. Of all the cases he has ever tried, 
his opinion has been reversed by a higher 
court in only one instance. He has per- 
formed many marriage ceremonies and 
otherwise faithfully and acceptably dis- 
charged the duties of his office. He was 
reared in the Congregational church, but af- 
terward became a member of the Baptist 
church, and both he and his wife are now 
members of the ^lethodist Episcopal church, 
in wliich he is an earnest and faithful work- 
er. He has also been superintendent of the 
Sunday • school and Mrs. Taft a teacher 
therein, and their influence and labors in be- 
half of Christianity have been effective and 
far reaching. ]\Ir. Taft became a member of 
the Masonic order in Xew Vienna. Clinton 
county, and was connected with that lodge 
for about two' years. He afterward aided 
in organizing and became a charter member 
of Martinsville Lodge, F. & A. M., serving 
as its master until his removal from that 
place, when he demitted to l>ecome a member 
of Fielding Lodge. F. & .A. M., of South 



Charleston, of which he has served as mas- 
ter for thirteen years. He has also attended 
the meetings of the grand lodge and is a 
worthy representative of the craft and in his 
life shows forth its teachings concerning 
brotherly kindness and mutual helpfulness. 



\MLLI.-\AI COXKLIN. 

For forty-two years William^ Conklin has 
been a resident of Spring-field, and his worth 
as a citizen in public affairs and as a repre- 
sentative of business interests is widely ac- 
knowledged. At the present time he is liv- 
ing a retired life, in the enjoyment of a rest 
which he has truly earned and richly de- 
serves. He was born in Sonijerset county, 
Xew Jersey, August 18, 1827, and was edu- 
cated in the subscription schools, wdiile ! ^ 
was reared upon the home farm of his par- 
ents, \\'illiam and Cornelia (Goltry) Conk- 
lin, both of whom were natives of New Jer- 
sey and were of English ancestry. The 
father was a well known farmer, and died at 
the home of his son in Spring-field at the age 
of seA'enty-nine years. He was 'a man 
of strong constitution, and in his busi- 
ness affairs was energetic and deter- 
mined, acquiring all that he possessed. 
\Mien the country liecame involved in the 
second .war with England, in 1812, he joined 
th.e amiy as a private. His political support 
was given the Democracy. In his family 
were six children, but only two are now liv- 
ing: William, who was the eldest, and 
Mrs. Elizabeth Trowell, of Franklin, Indi- 
ana. ■ Those who have passed away are : 
John, who was a well known grocer of 
Springfield and for four years served as a 
soldier in the Civil war: Stephen: James, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



who made his home in Springfield for a time ; 
and Augusta, who was the wife of Granville 
Winger. 

William Conklin was educated in the 
subscription schools and remained upon the 
home farm until sixteen years of age, when 
he went to Brooklyn, New York, where he 
learned the mason's and plasterer's trade, 
serving a four years' apprenticeship. He 
afterward worked in that city as a journey- 
man, and in 1859 he located in Yellow 
Springs, Greene county, Ohio, where he be- 
gan doing contract work. In 1863 he came 
to Springfield and has since continuously re- 
sided in this city. He located at his present 
home in 1865. it being a country residence 
at that time. He purchased property and 
built tor himself thirty-three dwellings in 
this city. He was also one of the pioneer 
mason contractors and employed many men, 
for a large share of the business in his line 
was awarded him. He was generally en- 
gaged as a plasterer, and during the busy 
seasons had a force of ninety workmen. His 
extensive operations and capable manage- 
ment made him well-to-do, and at length he 
retired with a handsome competence. His 
own home, which he erected, was one of the 
first built in the neighborhood. The last 
contract which he took was on the Savings 
Bank in 1899. and since that time he has 
lived retired from business cares. He was 
one of the prime movers in the purchase of 
the plant now operated by the Trump Manu- 
facturing Company, and since the incorpora- 
tion of this company he has been its vice- 
president. He is also one of the directors 
of the Lagonda National Bank and of the 
Champion Coal & Ice Ccvmpany. 

Mr. Conklin has been twice married. On 
Long Island, on the 3d of January. 1854. he 
wedded Mary Sellcck. who died in Sjiring- 



field. ;March 20, 1863. She had four chil- 
dren, of whom three died in infancy, while 
Anna is the widow of Charles Atkinson and 
has two children, Charles Dewitt and Cieorge 
Harry. In Marcli. 1865. ilr. Conklin was 
again married, his second union being with 
Emily E. Cole, who -was a school teacher in 
Springfield. She was born in Pulaski. Ot- 
sego county, New York, in October, 1833, 
pursued a public school course and in 1855 
came to this city, where for eight years she 
was closely and actively associated with edu- 
cational work, being one of the most capable 
instructors in the schools here at an early 
day. She has always had considerable in- 
fluence along such lines and has been a popu- 
lar member of social circles where true worth 
and intelligence are received as the passports 
into good society. When she was a little 
maiden of twelve year.s she went with an 
uncle in 1836 to Racine county, Wisconsin. 
This was during the territorial days of the 
state and her uncle, Alliert G. Cole, engaged 
in the practice of law there and was one of 
the delegates who framed the constitution 
when the state was admitted to the IJnimi. 
His efforts, too, were effective in securing its 
admission, and he was a prominent and in- 
fluential citizen. ]\Irs. Conklin remained in 
\\'isconsin for nine years. By her marriage 
she became the mother of two child.ren : 
Alexander C. and Emily C Init botli died in 
early childhood. 

^Ir. Conklin has been a member of the 
city council, and for eleven years was a mem- 
ber of the 1x)ard of education. He has never 
sought official honors, being of a modest and 
rather retiring disix-)sition, but these were 
conferred upon him by his fellow towns- 
men, who recognized his worth and ability. 
Tic belongs to Springfield Lodge. No. 33. I. 
O. O. P.. has passed all of the chairs and is 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



a member of tlie encampment. His identi- 
fication with the order dates from 1865. 
Eotli he and his wife hold membership with 
the First Congregational church, take an 
active part in its growth and in the extension 
of its influence and for several years he has 
served as church treasurer. He has always 
been active in promoting any enterprise tend- 
ed to advance the interests of the city and its 
people, and his unswerving purpose, his un- 
questioned fidelity, his unfaltering honesty, 
and his unchanging will have commanded the 
highest respect of all. A leader in the cause 
oif lil:)erty, of freedom and of progress, his 
hearty co-operation lias ever been gi\-en to 
that which tends to ele\-ate mankind. 



CHRISTIAN ^lARTIN. 

Christian [Martin is numbered among the 
progressive and influential farmers of Green 
township, where he has also' been extensively 
engaged in stock raising and the breeding" of 
shorthorn cattle. He is well posted on the 
latest and best methods of practical farm- 
ing, his valuable farm- being kept in- good 
condition. On it he raises cattle of good 
grade, and is authority in his community on 
the subject of shortiiorn cattle, having had 
wide experience in the raising of these, in 
which occupation he has met with excellent 
success. "Mr. Alartin was born in Washing- 
ton county, Maryland, October 20, 1836, and 
is a son of Emanuel and Anna (Doyle) Mar- 
tin. The parents both died in Maryland, 
the father at the age of eighty-one years and 
the mother at the age of sixty-six. 

On the home farm in \\'ashington coun- 
ty, [Maryland, Christian [Martin was reared, 
recei\ing the privileges of a fair common 



school education. He worked on the farm 
for his father until he was about twenty- 
seven years of age, or until the time of his 
marriage, and from the time of reaching, his 
majority he received from him a remunera- 
tion for his services. On the ist of Janu- 
ary, 1863, he was united in marriage to 
Miss Sarah E. Bowers, a former school- 
mate, who was also a native of Washington 
county, Maryland. She was born Decem- 
ber 10, 1843, and was a daughter of Jacol:) 
and Mary Ann (Bergesser) Bowers. Her 
father died in Maryland at the age of fifty 
years, while her mother is still living at the 
age of ninety years, making her home" in 
Springfield. 

At tlie time of his marriage Mr. Martin 
received from his father the earnings that 
had accumulated during the years he had 
worked on the home farm — about five hun- 
dred dollars. With this start he began his 
doauestic life and rented a farm for five years. 
On the expiration of this period he had ac- 
quired about five thousand dollars. In 
1869 he removed to Ohio, settling in Green 
township, Clark county, where he purchased 
eighty acres of land and lived thereon for 
about sixteen years. In the meantime he 
had purchased eighty acres upon which his 
home now stands, and on his removal to the 
latter place he rebuilt the house and also 
erected a substantial barn. The neat and 
thrifty appearance of the farm indicates the 
careful supervision of the owner, who is 
ever awake to the improved methods of the 
day in regard to farming and stock raising. 
Everything is in good sanitary condition, 
the farm is rich and productive, and the suc- 
cess of ilr. Martin has been assured from 
almost his first business ^■enture, showing 
that he has sound Imsiness judgnnent and ex- 
ecutive force to carrv to a successful com- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



pletion plans which seem to him to be best. 
His landed possessions are considerable. 
Besides the property above named, he owns 
a lot. in Spring^field and one hundred and 
sixty acres of land between the Springfield 
pikes. 

Eight children have graced the union of 
Mr. ]\Iartin and his wife, but one died in 
infancy. Harvey Grant, born March 27, 
1864, in Washington county, Maryland, is 
a graduate of \\'ittenberg College, in Qark 
county, of the class of 18S9, and has engaged 
for .some time in teaching; Silas Clinton, 
born in Washington county, Maryland, De- 
cember 4, 1865, also received a good educa- 
tion; Emanuel Jacob, born Septemljer 12, 
1867, in Washington county, IMaryland, 
married Anna German, and resides in 
Springfield township, with his wife and five 
children — Ernest P., Lola, Walter, Jennie 
and Charles Lewis : John Henry, born Janu- 
ary 15, 1869. in Washington county, ilary- 
land, married Edith Davis, and has two chil- 
dren, Edna May and Alice Lenora; Charles 
Lewis, born February 21, 1872, died in 
March, 1872, in Springfield; IMary Cather- 
ine was born June 23, 1873; Albert Lewis, 
born October 17, 1876, married Ethel Grin- 
die and has two children — Cecil and Harry 
Leo; Jessie Lulu, born August 30, 1882. was 
a graduate of Clifton College, in the class 
of 1899, receiving high honors. 

Mr. Martin has strong faith in the princi- 
ples of the Republican party, and has always 
advocated its cause, although he is retiring 
and does not desire office, preferring rather 
to devote his time and attention to his busi- 
ness pursuits. Both he and his wife were 
reared in the faith of the Lutheran church, 
but are now identified with the Presbyterian 
church, as are two -of the children. The 
family is highly resjiected for their genuine 



worth of character, and in the enjoyments 
of the comforts of life and many of its pleas- 
ures, which are the result of their years of 
industry, they live in peace with their fel- 
low men, respected and honored by all. 



JOHX C. CLIPPLXGER. 

John C. Clippinger is connected with the 
industrial interests of Springfield as foreman 
of the P. P. Mast Manufacturing Company. 
He was born in Cumberland, Allegany coun- 
ty, Maryland, October 3, 1856, and is a son 
of Valentine B. and Catherine (Startzman) 
Clippinger. The father was born in 
\\'aynesboro, Pennsylvania, in 1823, while 
the mother's birth occurred near Hagers- 
town, Maryland, in 1826. Valentine B. 
Clippinger followed the trade of a copper- 
smith and tinsmith in the employ of the Bal- 
timore & Ohio Railroad and remained in the 
service of the company a long time, living in 
Cumberland, Maryland. In 1863 he re- 
moved to New Carlisle, Ohio, where he was 
in business for alx>ut two years, and on sell- 
ing out at the end of that time came to 
Springfield, where he followed the tinsmith's 
trade as a journeyman until 1898, since 
which time he has lived retired at No. 255 
West North street. He has always been an 
active man in business and public affairs, and 
by reading has kept well infomied on the i?- 
sues of the day. He belongs to the Royal 
Arcanum, and both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the First Lutheran church. In poli- 
tics he was in early life a Whig, and upon 
the dissolution of that party he joined the 
ranks of the new Republican party and has 
since fought under its banner. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. \'alentine B. Clip- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



225 



pinger have been born twelve children, seven 
of whom reached years of maturity : Will- 
iam H., who is a bookkeeper and salesman 
in Indianapolis, Indiana; Charles Edward, 
who formerly resided in Springfield, but is 
now a confectioner of Bellefontaine, Ohio; 
Emma, the wife of Abram Myers, who is a 
foreman pattern maker for the Springfield 
JNIalleable Iron Company ; John C. ; Joseph 
A., who is an employe of the P. P. Mast 
Company of Springfield; Effie, the wife of 
A. M, Dissinger, who has charge of the 
opera house of this city ; and Clara Belle, 
the wife of Hayes Stockstill, a salesman of 
Dayton, Ohio. 

During his boyhood John C. Clippinger 
came to Springfield with his parents and 
here attended the public schools. He was 
also a student in a select school for a year, 
and then began tO' earn his own livelihood 
as an employe in a furniture factory of Eons, 
Mulligan & Kyle, learning the trade of a fin- 
isher. He served a four years' apprentice- 
ship, during which time he became an expert 
workman in the line. He afterward entered 
the employ of Baker & Christie, a new firm, 
with which he remained for eighteen months, 
after which he entered the Lagonda shops of 
\\'arder, Bushnell & Glessner, He was in 
the paint department, remiaining there from 
1874 until 1876, when he obtained a posi- 
tion with the Xew Champion Company, be- 
ing thus engaged until 1885. In that year 
he entered the service of the P. P. INIast 
Company, and has gradually advanced to a 
prominent position. In 1889 he was ap- 
pointed foreman of the paint department, 
and now has under his supervision fifteen 
men. He is thoroughly competent to take 
charge of any branch of the business in this 
line, to control the department and e.xpand 
its usefulness, and he has the unreserved 



confidence of the house, his employers recog- 
nizing his ability and fidelity to duty. 

In 1880 jNIr. Clippinger was joined in 
wedlock tO' Miss Mary Ellen Kohler, who 
was born in Greencastle, Pennsylvania, in 
1863, and is a daughter of Daniel and Eliz- 
abeth (Croft) Kohler. The former is de- 
ceased, while the latter is living with her 
daughter in this cit}-. She was born in 
1 83 1. They had eight children, of whom 
four are yet living: Catherine, wife of 
Clarence Chrissinger, of Hagerstown, Mary- 
land; Martha J., the wife of Clarence M. 
Miller, of Springfield : Mrs. Clippinger ; and 
Da\-id S., who is chief engineer in the Edi- 
son light plant of Columbus. The parents 
came to this city in 1877, and in 1883 re- 
turned to Maryland, but Mrs. Clippinger was 
here educated. By her marriage she became 
the mother of four children : Lester died in 
infancy. The others are: Delmer K., who 
was born in August, 1882; John Sherman, 
born in June, 1885 ; and Catherine Eliza- 
beth, born in December, 1891. The eldest 
son is now a student in Nelson's Business 
College, and the others are in the public 
schools. 

^Ir. Clippinger has always taken an ac- 
tive part in politics since becoming a voter. 
He cast his first presidential ballot for the 
candidate of the Republican party and has 
since been ever loyal to its principles. He 
has served as a delegate to cit}' and county 
conventions, but has never been an aspirant 
for office, although he was elected as a mem- 
ber of the city council in April, 1902, for a 
two years' term, r.nd is now chairman of the 
committee on police and fire. He has also 
served on various other committees. He has 
taken an active interest in municipal affairs, 
putting forth every effort possible to promote 
the general welfare and advance public prog- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ress. His wife is an active member of the 
First Lutheran church, and he belongs to the 
Independent Order of Foresters, in which he 
has held the office of court deputy for sev- 
eral years. He also belongs to the Protec- 
tive Home Circle. He is a man of domestic 
tastes and habits and finds his greatest hap- 
piness at his own fireside, having built a nice 
modern house at Xo. 69 South Race street, 
in 1894, where he has since resided. 



XATHAX O. .MIXEAK. D. O. 

There has been n'.arked ad\ancen'.ent — 
in fact, almost a revolution in the methods 
of treating disease in the past quarter or 
half O'f a century. Inyestigation, study and 
research have brought to light many valua- 
ble truths in connection with the work of 
healing and restoration of the vital forces 
of the l»dy, and the practice of osteopathy 
has won recognition as one of the most 
important elements in the great work which 
falls to the lot of the physician. Dr. !Minear 
is a representative of this department of 
practice and during his four years' residence" 
in Springfield he has gained a very liberal 
patronage, as he has demonstrated his skill 
and ability to successfully cope with disease. 

The Doctor is a native oif Elkhart coun- 
ty. Indiana, his birth having occurred near 
the city of Elkhart on the 13th of February. 
1861. He is a son of Qiarles W. and Cath- 
erine (Miller) Minear, who are now resi- 
dents of Kirksville, Missouri. Tlie father 
lormerly followed agricultural pursuits, but 
since 1880 has lived retired in Kirksville. 
Both he and his wife are about sixty-five 
years of age. On leaving Indiana the fa- 
ther removed with his familv to Iowa. 



where he carried on farming until 1867, 
when he took up his abode in Kirksville, 
Missouri, there continuing to engage in the 
tilling of the soil until his retireiv.ent from 
active business life. Both he and his wile 
are earnest workers and loyal men^bers of 
the ]\Iethodist Episcopal church, and Mrs. 
Minear is of German lineage. By their 
marriage they Jjecame the parents of three 
children, the eldest being Dr. Minear of this 
review. James F., the second son, is a 
graduate of the College of Osteopathy in 
Kirksville, Missouri, and is now practicing 
in Fort Scott, Kansas. The youngest son 
died in infancy. 

In the district schools Xallian O. Minear 
pursued his early education and at the age 
of fcmrteen became a student in the public 
school of Kirksville, where he was gradu- 
ated. Subsecjuently he entered the State 
Xormal there and was graduated in the lat- 
ter institution with the class of 188 1. He 
possessed special aptitude in his studies, hav- 
ing a great fondness for books, and for 
four years enga.ged in teaching in Missouri, 
after which he turned his attention to n:er- 
chandising, becoming connected with a gen- 
eral store near Kirksville. There he re- 
mained until 1895, when his inclination for 
professional life led him -into another depart- 
ment of labor. Uixni leaving school he had 
studied medicine for a short time but had 
been dissauded from continuing his prepara" 
tion for medical practice and had taken \\\) 
teaching instead. In 1895, however, he sold 
his business interests and entered the Ameri- 
can School of Osteoijathy. ccniducted by 
Professor A. T. Still, and was graduated in 
1898. having gained a broad and compre- 
hensive knowledge of the science whose 
\ alu.e to the world has l)een recognized at 
a comparatively late date, but its worth has 




N. O. MINEAR, D. O. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



been so manifest that it has receiveil ahnust 
universal recognitioii and support. 

Dr. Minear tirst located in Xenia, Greene 
count}', Ohio, but believing that there was a 
better field oif labor in Spring-field, he came 
to this city in 1898 and opened his present 
office, since which time he has enjoyed a 
large and constantly growing practice. He 
gradually influenced the public to iiiivesti- 
gate his methods and his honorable dealings, 
combined 'with his skill in his profession, 
has won for him steady success. He was 
one of the Jirst to introduce the treatment 
according to osteopathy in Springfield. The 
word comes from two Greek words, "os- 
teon," meaning bone, and "pathos," suffer- 
ing. Therefore osteopathy is the science oif 
treating diseases manually, by the adjust- 
m.ent of all the parts and organs to^ their 
natural relations, thus removing the irrita- 
tions resulting from abnormal relations and 
removing obstacles to vital forces and fluids 
of the body, also by stimulating mechanical- 
1\- all organs to their prosper functions or 
inhibiting abnormally active processes or 
movements of portions of the bodily or- 
ganisni. It therefore must have for its 
ioimdation a thorough and comprehensive 
knowledge of human anatomy and physiol- 
ogy and of the normal and abnormal action 
and metabolism of all parts oi the bodily 
mechanism. Osteopathy reorganizes man 
as a human machine capal>le of self rqiair 
when adjusted in all its parts as nature in- 
tended it. Health is our natural right and 
disease is the result of some abnormal de- 
rangement of the human mechanism. An 
osteopath is simply an engineer who recti- 
fies and repairs any such derangements act- 
ing upon ihe human "body the same as a jew- 
eler examining and keeping in repair a 
watch. The forces that tend tO' derange 



the human mechanism are over e.xertion, 
extreme heat and cold, external violence, 
use of poisons, entering of germs intO' the 
system. The vital forces in a state of health 
have facilities at hand to thoroughly protect 
the organism against the attack o^f gemis. 
The duty of the physician is to so carefully 
read and to so interpret the expressions of 
life as to determine to what degree it is wise 
to equalize the distribution of functional ac- 
tivities of the body. To a certain degree 
this lack of balance may be corrected and 
a more ecjual distribution of functional ac- 
tivities of vital forces realized by the sci- 
entific manipulation of the human mechan- 
ism. Osteopathy can accomplish this by 
keeping the structural adjustment perfect, 
by maintaining functional adaptation and 
co-operation among the organs directing en- 
ergy so as to secure equal distribution of 
force, lessening and removing muscular rig- 
idity; all this through sensations which act 
upon the senso^rium and through it upon the 
entire motor mechanism of the body. In his 
continued practice Dr. Minear has been ex- 
tremely successful and his business is con- 
stantly increasing as the practicability of 
his methods are recognized by the public. 

In Calloway county, Missouri, near the 
town of Fulton, Dr. Minear was united in 
marriage to: Miss Georgia Darnes, in 1883. 
She was educated in the public schools of 
that locality, her father being a farmer 
there. They have six children: Xollie O., 
who is a bookkeq>er; Lloyd V. and James 
F., students in the high school ; Norman 
W. ; and Mabel and Myrtle (twins). The 
children ha;ve all been educated in the 
sciiools of Springfield. The parents are 
members of the Presbyterian church. The 
Doctor is a R-epublican in his political \-ie\vs. 
The family has a pleasant home at No. 356 



2 30 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



South Center street and tlie members of the 
household have already gained an enviable 
position in the social circles of the city. 



J. XEWTOX GRISSO. 

J. Newton Grisso, the manager of the 
Spot Cash grocery, located at Xo. 385 South 
Fountain avenue in Springfield, has always 
lived in Clark county, his birth having oc- 
curred at Grisso Mills, in Springfield town- 
ship, January 22, i860. He is a son of 
John Grisso and a representative of one of 
the oldest pioneer families in this portion of 
the state. The founder of the family here 
Avas his great-grandfather, George Grisso, 
who was a farmer by occupation. He was 
bom in Coffintree township. Lancaster coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania. July 6. 1783. and died in 
-March. 1884, when nearly one hundred and 
nne years of age, being the oldest man in 
Clark county at that time. When a child 
he removed with his parents to Virginia, and 
at a very early day came to Ohio, settling 
on a tract of land west of Springfield when 
that city was a collection of but fifteen or 
twenty log houses. This was in 1812, and 
the rival "city" at that time was Boston, near 
the present home of Leander Baker, on the 
^'alley pike, which was jierhaps half as large. 
Mr. Grisso well remembered the contest be- 
tween these places for the court house and 
how rejoiced the citizens of Springfield were 
over their victory, although they came out 
but a few votes ahead. In politics he was 
always a Democrat, as most of his family 
have been, but he paid little attention to pub- 
lic affairs and very seldom voted. Re- 
lii^musly he was a quiet, though consistent, 
nicnihcr of the Crerman Baptist, or what is 



more commonly called the "Dunkard" 
church, and he said "I was baptized in 1812 
in Peter's creek, Salem, Virginia." During 
the war of 1812 he was drafted, but as his 
church was opposed to warfare and taught 
that disputes should be settled by peaceful 
methods, he left his home and with his little 
family came to the west to try his fortune. 
He was married in Virginia in 1809 to Cath- 
arine Frantz, who was the mother of all his 
children, eight in numl>er, and died in 1841 
at the age of fifty-five years. Two years 
later he married her cousin, Xaijcy Frantz, 
who died in 1870. Of his children one died 
in infancy, while the remaining seven lived 
to rear families of their own, and five of his 
sons were still living when he celebrated his 
"centennial," July 6, 1883, at which time he 
was in comparatively good health. Besides 
his sons there were present thirty-nine grand- 
children. sixty-si.K great-grandchildren and 
two great-great-grandchildren. His chil- 
dren in order of birth were as follows: 
Christian, the grandfather of our subject, 
was born in Virginia in 1810, and had ten 
children. \\'hen his father celebrated his 
one hundredth birthday he had five children 
living, twenty-three grandchildren and two 
great-grandchildren. He died in this county 
when about eighty years of age. George, 
Jr.. the well known miller at Ricky Point, 
had two children, one of whom is still liv- 
ing. Catherine became IMrs. Brubaker, of 
Preble county, Ohio, and died at the age of 
si.Nty, leaving five sons, who have twelve 
children altogether. John was the father of 
thirteen children and died in Indiana at the 
age of fifty-two years. Benjamin died at 
the age of si.\ty-two. leaving nine children. 
Emanuel died in Laketon. Indiana, leaving 
si.x children living, while si.x had previously 
passed away. Joseph, the \oungcst son and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



231 



last siir\i\-ino- meirljer of tlie family, died at 
the old "Patriarchal Homestead." west of 
Springfield, on the National pike, in the 
spring of 1902. He was the father of six 
children. George Grisso, Sr., lived a quiet, 
]3eaceful life, and on his one hundredth birth- 
day said that he had lived long enough and 
was ready to be taken home. He had no 
disease, and at the time of his death was 
seemingly a healthy man. He was temper- 
ate in labor, eating and drinking ; ne\-er used 
tobacco or tea and but very little coffee ; and 
he never used liquor as a beverage, but, as 
was the old custom, he kept his pure "bitters" 
on the shelf. 

John Grisso, the father of our subject, 
was born in this county in 1836 and in early 
life followed milling. He afterward turned 
his attention to farming, which he carried on 
in Clark county for a number of years, and 
in 1868 he went to Shelby county, Illinois, 
w here he purchased a farm. On account of 
ill health, however, he was advised to return 
to Ohio, but he died in Bethel township soon 
after reaching the county of his nativity. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Elizabeth Weaver, and was born in this 
county in 1840, is still living. Her father. 
John Weaver, now deceased, was a veteri- 
nary surgeon and farmer and made his home 
in Pike and German townships. Mrs. 
Grisso is a resident of Springfield. By her 
marriage she became the mother of six chil- 
dren : Mary, the wife of D. S. Gordon, of 
Springfield; J. Newton, of this review; Ida, 
the wife of John Eversole, of Bethel town- 
ship ; Oros, who was a m:ember of Battery E 
and was killed by the explosion of a cannon 
at the unveiling of the monument at Gettys- 
burg. Pennsylvania, in 1887; Oron, a twin 
brother of Ores and now a farmer of Spring- 
field township; and Hester E., the wife of 



Dr. Frank Riegel. of Thackery, Ohio-. The 
children all attended the district schools of 
Clark county and Hester E. and J. N. were 
students in the Olive Branch high school of 
Bethel township, while the subject of this 
review also pursued a business course in 
Valparaiso, Indiana. After the death of the 
father the widow remained with her family 
in this county until 1884 and since that time 
has lived in Springfield. , 

J. Newton Grisso, of this review, was 
provided with good educational privileges, 
as previously indicated. During his youth 
he w^orked for a short time as a farm hand 
and was afterward employed at quarrying 
until he had attained his miajority. when he 
accepted a position as clerk in a grocery 
store in Tower Hill. Illinois, remaining in 
that state until 1883, when he became a clerk 
in the store of Stein & Tremont, of Spring- 
field. Subsequently he entered into part- 
nership with William Gordon and they con- 
ducted business for about a year. Later Mr. 
Grisso opened a store alone, and in 1887 he 
became a partner of John Troutman, this 
relation being maintainetl until 1891, when 
our subject sold his interest in the business 
and became a partner of D. S. Gordon. He 
has remained with the company through 
various changes, and since 1892 has been 
manager of the Spot Cash grocery, its suc- 
cess being largely due to his capable control 
and enterprise. 

On the 7th of April, 1891. in Fort 
Wa}'ne, Indiana, Mr. Grisso was married to 
Miss Alice Vordermark, wdio was born there 
in 1 87 1 and pursued a college course after 
completing her common school education. 
She also engaged in teaching in the neigh- 
borhood of Fort Wayne. By her marriage 
she has become the mother of two sons : 
John Palmer, born December 9. 1892; and 



232 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Jay Xewton, born February 2, 1894. Mr. 
Grisso votes independently at local elections, 
but supports the state and national candi- 
dates lit the Democracy. He and his wife 
are charter members of the First Church of 
Christian Scientists and he belongs to An- 
thony Lodge, F. & A. M., having been 
made a Mason in Illinois when twenty-one 
years of age. He is also a member of the 
Commercial Club and nf the Springfield 
Grocers' .Association. He represents a 
worthy and honored pioneer family, and, 
like his ancestors, he is interested in the 
work of improvement and development and 
has carried on the task which they begun by 
contributing to the general progress here. 



WILLIAM P.. MOORES. 

William B. Moores is tlie resilient super- 
intendent of The ^loores Lirae Com]xmy and 
in this capacity is conducting an excellent 
business at Springfield. He was born in 
Springfield township. Hamilton county, 
Ohio. October 5, 1869. His father, John 
P>. C. Moores. also a native of that county, 
was born in 1844 and was a son of William 
B. Moores, Sr.. who was the original con- 
ductor and owner of the business now car- 
ried on by our subject, having established it 
in the early '60s. He was a resident of Cin- 
cinnati. Ohio, and was a prominent and in- 
fluential man. He died in 1870, at which 
time John B. C. ?^Ioores assumed control of 
the enterprise in behalf of his mother. Later 
he and his brother. H. H. Moores. conducted 
the business until the latter purchased the 
interests of his brother in 1890. Iit that 
year a new company, known fts Tbe Moores 
Lime Company, was organized, and in 1895 



the business was incorporated. During the 
past twelve years our subject has been the 
resident manager at Springfield, while F. 
Lawson Moores. who resides in Cincinnati, 
is the president of the company. 

The father of our subject was united in 
marriage to Caroline A. Lawson, who was 
reared in Cincinnati, is a graduate of the 
Glendale Female Seminary and now makes 
her home in her native city. She is a daugh- 
ter of Fenton Lawson. who was the first 
man to introduce gas into Cincinnati, that 
being in the early '40s. He established a 
metal business there about 1823 and the en- 
terprise has gradually grown until it is now 
one of the largest of the kind in the city. 
It is still in possession of the family, being 
controlled by F. H. Lawson. an uncle of our 
subject. Fenton Lawson was one of -fifty 
men who left Cincinnati and established the 
city of Glendale, and both he and \\'illiam 
B. Moores. Sr., the paternal grandfather of 
our subject, became residents of that place. 
His death occurred in the early '50s. The 
Lawsons are a very distinguished people in 
Cincinnati, prominent in both business and 
focial circles. They have contriljuted in no 
small degree to the commercial prosperity 
and upbuilding of that city and other por- 
tions of the state and have also advanced the 
social and intellectual status. The parents 
of our subject also became residents of 
Glendale and there the father died in 1894. 
since which time the mother has returned to 
Cincinnati. They were the parents of three 
children : F. Lawson. who is married and 
resides in Ciincinnati : Florence, the wife of 
George S. Keck, of that city, by whom she 
has three children; and William B.. of this 
icxiew. 

In the ])ublic schools of Hamilton county 
William B. Moores pursued his education. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and at the age of eighteen years lie entered 
into tlie hme business with his uncle and 
father, with wliom he was associated for 
two years. In 1890 he joined liis father and 
brother in the organization of The 'Moores 
Lime Company, which five years later was 
incorporated. Since that time Mr. Moores 
lias been a resident of Springfield, personally 
su]3erintending the conduct of the business 
from that point. In 1895 he began doing a 
retail Inisiness in all kinds of building ma- 
terial, with offices located at the corner of 
Linden a\enue and Washington street. The 
quarries of the company are at Durbin sta- 
tion and a wholesale business is carried on 
nil a very extensive plan, large shipments 
being made throughout Kentnck\, huhana 
and Ohio, while an extensive retail trade is 
conducted in both Cincinnati and Spring- 
field. One hundred and twenty-five men are 
employed at the quarries in getting out stone 
and the product is such as finds a ready sale 
on the market. All kinds of building ma- 
terials of a high grade are also handled and 
the business has increased annually until the 
output now brings a very gratif}'ing and 
satisfactory financial return. 

In the county of his nativity, in 1894,- 
Mr. Moores wedded Miss Leila Huston, who 
was born in Butler county, Ohio, a daughter 
of David and Emih^ Huston, prominent 
people of that locality. Mrs. Moores is a 
graduate of Glendale College and is a most 
highly esteemed lady. They now have three 
children, William Huston, John S. L. and 
Emily Caroline. Their home is at Xo. 48 
Park Llace. ^Irs. Moores is a member of 
tlie Presbyterian church, to the support of 
whicli her husband contributes liberally. 
He belongs to the Commercial Club and 
\'otes with the Republican party when ques- 
ti(.nis of state- and national importance are 



involved, and at local elections casts his bal- 
lot regardless of party affiliations. Through- 
out his entire business career he has been 
connected with one line of business activity. 
This concentration of his energies has en- 
abled him to gain a thorough and accurate 
knowledge of the business in every detail 
and department and his comprehensive un- 
derstanding and unremitting diligence have 
been the means of building up an enterprise 
of importance. All trade transactions have 
been conducted with strict regard to com- 
mercial ethics and therefore the house bears 
a reputation which is commendable and 
worthy of emulation. 



RICHARD THOMAS KELLEY. 

Richard Thomas Kelley is engaged in 
Ijlacksmithing in Green township and his life 
of earnest toil, characterized by fairness in 
his dealings, has made him a respected cit- 
izen of his community. He was born in 
Springfield township, near Beatty, Novem- 
ber 24, 1843, 'i"tl is a son of William C. and 
Miranda C. ( Dudley) Kelley. The father 
was also born in this county and represents 
one of its pioneer families. The first of the 
name tO; come to America was James Kel- 
ley, who was born in Scotland and crossed 
the broad Atlantic to the new world in 
1773, accompanied by a younger brother, 
John Kelley. He settled in Monongalia 
count}', Virginia, where he was married and 
followed farming. At the time when the 
colonists attempted to throw ofi the voke 
of British oppression he joined the Ameri- 
can army and served under Washington at 
\'alley Eorge. ' The sufl'ering enrUned by 
the American heroes at that iilace has be- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



come a matter of history. Mr. Kelley's 
face, ears and head were frozen there, but 
w itli cmn-ageons spirit he and his fellow sol- 
diers endured their sufferings for the cause 
of liberty. When American independence 
was achie\ed he was united in marriage to 
Catherine Stuart, of Virginia. She was of 
Scotch-Irish ancestry. The young couple 
remo\-ed to Fleming county, Kentucky, and 
in the year 1808 came to Clark county, Ohio. 
They were the great-grandparents of our 
subject. Joseph Kelley, the grandfather, 
was- born in [Monongalia county. West Vir- 
ginia, and in Kentucky was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary Detrow. In 1813 they 
became /[prominent residents of Clark coun- 
ty, although Mrs. Kelley had visited the 
county the previous year, while her husband 
was serving as a soldier in the war of 181 2. 
William C. Kelley. thefather of om- sub- 
ject, was here Imrn nn the 28th of January, 
1820. and in his youth he learned the black- 
smith's trade, which he followed for a num- 
ber of years in Green and Springtield town- 
ships. Later in life he purchased of his fa- 
ther fifty-seven acres of land and began 
farming, carrying on that pursuit through- 
out the remainder of his business career. Al- 
though reared in the Democratic faith he 
endorsed tlie Whig party on attaining his 
mainritv. and when the Republican party 
sprang into existence he joined the latter or- 
ganization and continued thereafter to fol- 
low its banners. A devoted anil faithful 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
be took an active part in its work and served 
as class leader, Sunday-school superintend- 
ent and church trustee and steward. He 
died October 11. 1901, at the very advanced 
age of eighty-one years, and thus passed 
awav one of the honored ]Moneer settlers of 
Clark countv. who for manv vears had been 



a witness of the changes which had occurred, 
the transformation which had been wrought, 
and the progress which had led to the sub- 
stantia! development and prosperity ijf this 
section of the state. In the family of Will- 
iam C. and Miranda C. ( Dudley) Kelley 
were ten children, of whom our subject is 
the eldest, and foiu" sons and two daughters 
are yet living : Lavina is the wife of James 
B. Toland and resides in Jewell county, 
Kansas ; Frances Asbery is married and is 
living in Lyon county, Kansas; George is 
a resident farmer of Urbana, Ohio; Martha 
Ann is the wife of William Baldwin, of 
Madison township, Clark county ; and James 
Edwin is living in Green toumship. 

If one could draw back the curtains of 
the years that cover the boyhood of our 
siil)ject he would find a little lad standing 
before his fatl er's forge blowing the bellows 
in the blacksmith •^bop. He was soi snail 
that he bad to stand on a block in order to 
reach the pole and his stature was also 
heightened in the same way when he began 
swinging the hammer. It will thus be seen 
that his early youth was one of toil. When 
lie was fourteen years of age his father aban- 
doned blacksmithing and turned bis atten- 
tion to farming, so that Mr. Kelly of tliis 
review had a change of work. He tixik his 
place in the fields and was employed on the 
hom.e farm until twenty-one years of age. 
when he began working at the blacksmith's 
trade on his own account and has since fol- 
lowed that pu'-suit, being for thirty-five years 
situated at his present location. Many of 
his present patrons have been with him 
througout this perio<l. It is a noticeable 
fact in his career that when he once secures 
the patronage of a person be has no difficulty 
in retaining it. This is due to his excellent 
workmanship, his jiromiitness and his earn- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



235 



est desire to please, and tliroug-h tlie exer- 
cise of his business ability and his unremit- 
ting diligence he has gained a comfortable 
competence which is well merited. 

On the 24th of October, 1867, Mr. Kelly 
was married to Miss Mary Jane Smith, 
of Springfield township, in which locality 
she was born. Their union has been blessed 
with eight children : Ida Elnora, the wife 
of S. O. Rush, of Springfield, by whom she 
h.as one child, Kenneth : Leo Rush ; Forrest 
Ehner; Charles O. ; Elsie R., the wife of 
John Anderson, of Springfield, by whom she 
has one child, Roland R. ; William Earl ; 
Garwin Chester; and Zoe Goldie. 

Mr. Kelley cast his first presidential vote 
for Grant in 186S, and has since endorsed 
Republican principles and voted for the men 
and measures of the party. He was elected 
and serxed for nine consecutive years as 
justice of the peace and after an interval of 
six years was again elected tO' that position. 
He has tried many cases and, of the seven 
cases wdiich have been appealed, his decision 
has been reversed in only one instance and 
that because of new evidence which was in- 
troduced. He has performed a number of 
marriage ceremonies and was a candidate 
for the nomination for county infirmary di- 
rector in 1902. He belongs to the Method- 
ist Episcopal church, is a class leader, Sun- 
day-school superintendent and licensed ex- 
horter. He has assisted in holding many 
revival meetings and is most earnest and 
-•zealous in his chtuxh work. He belongs to 
Springfield Lodge, Xo. 33, I. O. O. P., and 
for twenty-five years he has been the corre- 
spondent for the Press-Republic, his arti- 
cles, o\-er the initials R. T.. becoming quite 
noted. He gathered the data for the his- 
tory of the Kelley family, which was pub- 
lished in 1900 by Oliver S. Kelley, of 



Springfield. During leisure hours he has 
also written some poetry and various poems 
liave appeared in the Press-Rq^ublic. He is 
a gentleman of strong mentality, of wide 
reading and is a deep thinker, and his in- 
fluence in the intellectual and moral develop- 
ment of his section of Clark county has been 
an important one. 



FRANK L. HATFIELD. 

Frank L. Hatfield, who recently founded 
a tailoring establishment and has already 
won fa\-or with the public, commanding" for 
himself a place as a representative business 
man of Springfield, was born in Wyoming 
count}-, Pennsylvania, May 12, 1867. His 
father. William Hatfield, was born in New 
Jersey and is noAV living retired in this city 
at the age of sixty-seven years, making his 
home with his son Frank. The mother, 
Mrs. Mary E. Hatfield, died in Pennsyl- 
vania in 1897, at the age of fifty-five years. 
The\- had but two children, and the daugh- 
ter, Olivia, died in Boston, Massachusetts. 
The birthplace of our subject was on a farm 
which had been cleared and improved by his 
maternal grandfather, but when Mr. Hat- 
field was only about two years of age his 
parents removed from Wyoming county to 
Pittston, Pennsylvania, where he was reared. 
At the age of sixteen he began earning his 
own living by learning the trade of a coat- 
maker and tailor in this city. When he had 
completed his apprenticeship he was em- 
ployed as a journeyman for a time, working 
as an experienced cutter in various places, 
his term of service extending from a few 
months to four years. He finally came to 
Ohio and followed his trade, locating in 



236 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Springfield in 1898. He accepted the po- 
sition of cutter with Bruce & Pursell. and 
after eighteen months, upon the death of 
Mr. Bruce, he succeeded to a partnership 
in the business, the firm of Pursell & Hat- 
field being formed. After a year he sold 
his interest, however, but continued in the 
house as a cutter for six months. He then 
withdrew and began business for himself 
in March, 1901, locating in the Johnson 
building on East High street. In the spring 
of 1902 he removed to his present location. 
His store is fitted up in a model manner and 
he employs only experienced workmen, so 
that the garments sent out from his estab- 
lishment give uniform satisfaction. He is 
always courteous and obliging, reliable and 
honest and has therefore won a large pa- 
tronage, although he has been in business 
alone lor only about a year and a half. He 
is fast gaining a reputation for conducting 
an up-to-date establishment and his trade is 
increasing rapidly. He has given his per- 
sonal attention to every detail of the busi- 
ness and he buys direct from the wholesale 
houses, making semi-annual trips to the 
east in order to purchase goods and get new 
styles. He has a thorough practical ac- 
quaintance with all branches of the busi- 
ness and is thus capable of directing the la- 
bors of those whom he employs. His store 
is adorned with pictures of his own design- 
ing and he carries a high grade of goods 
ond has a select patronage. 

In Trumanburg. Xew York, in Septem- 
ber. 1890, Mr. Hatfield was married to 
Miss Elizabeth M. Harneston, who was ed- 
ucated in an academy of the Empire state. 
Thev have three children: Elma Hermi- 
■nc. I-'thel Winifred and Vernon LeRoy. 

In church and charitable matters ]Vlr. 
Hatfield is found as a liberal supporter, al- 



though not connected in membership with 
any religious organization. He is quite 
prominent and popular in fraternal circles, 
being a member of Friendship Lodge. No. 
153,- F. & A. M.. of Owego, Xew York; 
Xew Jerusalem Chapter. Xo. 47, R. A. M., 
of Owego: Palestine Commandery. K. T., 
of Springfield : and Antioch Temple (if the 
Mystic Shrine in Dayton. He was made a 
Mason when twenty-one years of age. He 
also belongs to the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, to the Commercial Club, 
to the }klatinee Gentlemen's Driving Club, 
to the Springfield Gun Club, and to the Co- 
lumbian Republican Qub. The last named 
is indicative of his political views. He and 
his estimable wife, who is a lady of culture 
and refinement, have a pleasant home at 
Xo. 344 W'oodlawn avenue, which is noted 
•for its hospitality and good cheer. The 
strong qualities of Mr. Hiitfield's nature 
h.ave made him popular with many friends, 
while in his business career he has gained 
success by indomitable energy, his skill and 
integrity in the line of his chosen pursuit. 
When he embarked in business here he had 
strong competition to work against, but his 
capability, determination and evident fair- 
ness in all trade transactions have won for 
him the favorable opinion of the public and 
a fair share of public patronage. 



GUSTA\'US S. FOOS. 

There are no rules for building charac- 
ters; there is no rule for achieving success. 
Tlie man who can rise from the ranks to 
a position of eminence is he who can see 
and utilize the opportunities that surround 
his path. The essential conditions <>f human 




GUSTAVUS S. FOOS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



life are ever the same, the surroundings of 
in(U\iduais ditil'er but sHghtly ; and when one 
man passes another on the liig-hway to reach 
the goal of prosperity before others who 
perhaps start out before him it is because 
he has the power to use advantages which 
probabl)' compass the whole human race. 
For m<_}ire than a half century among the 
most prominent business men of Obio stood 
Gustavtis S. Foos, and his name at once 
brings to mind accomplishments of great 
value. The history of such a man can not 
fail tO' be oif widespread interest, for he 
ranked high in commercial and industrial 
circles, and furtliermore, he proved that ac- 
coimplishnient depends upon the man, and 
not npoai inheritance, or upon influential 
en\iro'nmcnts. Starting out in early boy- 
hood upon his own account, he worked his 
way steadily upward and in the face of dif- 
ficulties anld obstacles he progressed and 
gained foir himself not oaily wealth but an 
honorable name. 

GustaA'US S. Foos was born in Colum- 
bus, Obio, July 8, 1818, representing one of 
the pioneer families of this state. His father. 
General Joseph Foos, was born in Ken- 
tucky, while the mother was a native of 
Virginia and remoived tO' Ohio at a very 
early da,te. When the country became en- 
gaged in the second war with England Gen- 
eral Foos entered the army, serving with 
distinctin-n as a defender of his country. 
He gained prominence in civil affairs in his 
adopted state and for twenty-one years was 
a member of the Ohio legislature, and his 
labors and influence were very effective in 
promoting some of the most inipoirtant leg- 
islation that has established the policv of 
this great commonwealth. 

Mr. Foos of this review was reared in 
the usual manner of farmer lads, earlv ac- 



quiring habits of industry, economy and 
hiinesty, which pro\'ed the foundation upon 
which he reared the superstructure oif his 
prosperity in later years. His preliminary 
education, acquired in the public schools, 
was supplemented by one year's study in 
the high school of Springfield, entering that 
institution at the age o.i sixteen years. Tbe 
west attracted him and he then left hoiiie, 
g"oing to Illinois, where he was engaged in 
farming and in trade pursuits, but after 
three years he returned to his native state, 
settling in Logan county, Ohio, where he 
secured anployment in the store of his 
brother, William Foos, who was a resident 
of Springfield, but is now deceased. After 
three years experience as a salesman, he, in 
partnership with his brother, Lewis, pur- 
chased the store and for several years suc- 
cessfully conducted the 'business. He then 
disposed of his interest to his brother, Lewis 
Foos. 

The year 1848 witnessed the arri\-al of 
Gustavus S. Foos in Spring-field. Here he 
joined his brother William in the ownership 
and conduct of the store and from the for- 
mation of the partnership the business stead- 
ily increased until it reached mammoth pro- 
portions, being second to none in the city. 
A man of resonrceful business ability, Air. 
Foos did not confine his efforts to one line. 
He was cjuick to note, appreciate and in> 
proA-e opportunities. He saw that Spring- 
field had a bright future and had faith in its 
rapid and permanent growth, so that in 1848 
he and his brother purchased fifty acres 
of land, which they laid out in town lots, 
niiw forming the best residence district of 
the city. In 1858 they sold their mercantile 
l:usiness and the subject of this re\'iew 
turned his attention to the stock business, 
purchasing a tract nf lanrl in Illinois which 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



lie greatly iir.proved. Another field of busi- 
ness activity claimed his attention in 1858 
;i;i(l he and his brother opened a broker's 
• ,ilice in Springfield. In the meantime he 
had disposed of his land in Illinois at a 
much advanced price, and also disposed of 
his slock l>usiness. Another enterprise of 
\alue to the city owed its origin to 
William and Gustavus Foos, who in i860 
established a private bank in Springfield 
that later became the Second National Bank, 
with William Foos as its president and Gus- 
tavus S. Foos as cashier. The confinemait 
of the bank, however, was not to his liking, 
and in 1862 he resigned his position as 
cashier, although he still remained a stock- 
holder in the institution. The next um- 
portant industry claiming his attention was 
liie purchase and sale of wool, and with his 
usual determination and ability he soon rose 
to the front in this line and became the larg- 
est wool buyer in this section of Ohio. His 
1 usiness interests in various lines prospered 
;is the }-ears passed by until the country be- 
came involved in financial panic in 1873, 
when, with many others of the test business 
men throughout the land, he lost his entire 
fcjrtune. Such a misfortune wowld have ut- 
terly discouraged many a man of a less reso- 
lute spirit. 

Mr. Foos was then fifty-seven years of 
age, with a family about him. He bravely 
faced the situation, however, looked over 
the business fielil and summoned all his en- 
ergv and strength tn meet conditions. As- 
sociated with his two sons, he began the 
manufacture of wringers in a small way, 
and the business capability of the firm, their 
resolution, their honorable dealing and the 
excellent rpjality of the commodity which 
thty placed upon the market soon wrought 
a change in the prospects of the new house 



and their sales continually increased, and 
as their financial resources were thus aug- 
mented they extended the field of their op- 
erations until they became well known as 
nan.ufacturers of agricultural in:plements, 
and this industry reached successful and ex- 
tersive proportions. It was in 1884 that 
Gustavus Foos disposed of his interests in 
agricultural implement manufacturing and 
with his two sons organized the Foos 
Alanufacturing Company, of which he l>e- 
came the president, while Roibert H. Foos 
was vice-presidait, and \\'illiam F. Foos 
treasurer. They began the manufacture of 
grinding mills and portable forges and from 
the beginning met with gratifying success 
in the new undertaking, which in the course 
of a few years becajne one of the largest and 
most important industries in the city, llie 
father was a man O'f excellent abilit_\-, keen 
foresight and sound judgment. He pos- 
sessed, moreover, unfaltering courage and 
determination and throtighout his long ca- 
rter he maintained a reputation that has 
ever made his an honored name in trade cir- 
cles. 

On the .i8th of June, 1849, was cele- 
brated the marriage of Gustavus S. Foos 
and ]\Iiss Elizabeth Flouston, a daughter of 
Dr. Robert Houston, of South Charleston, 
Clark county. Ohio'. Two soais were born 
unto them, Robert H. and William F., who 
became associated with their father in busi- 
ness, and since the death of their father 
they ha\e conducted the large enterprise 
anil n et the demands of their constantly 
growing trade. 

Mr. Foos was a man of don:estic tastes, 
his interest centering in his family, yet he 
found time to faithfully perform his duties 
of citizenship and was always ready to co- 
operate in any movement for the general 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



good. Diirin.o- llie dark daxs of the Rebel- 
lion tlie administration at \\'ashington liad 
no more stalwart friend or supporter than 
Gustavus S. Fuos. He was elected a mem- 
ber O'f the county executive committee and 
gave liberally of his time and means for 
the presei-vatioii o.f the Union. In early life 
he had been a Whig, but when the Republi- 
can party .was fo-rmefl tO' prevent the further 
extension of slavery he joined its ranks and 
was ever afterward one oi its stanch adher- 
ents. The Fo-rty-foiu'th Ohio Regiment was 
largely organized as the result of his efforts 
and his financial aid. It camfe intoi existence 
at a time when public confidence was some- 
what shaken, owing to- the prolonged war 
and the great loss of life on both sides, so 
that few had strong faith in the ultimate 
success of the Union arms, but Mr. Foos, 
in connection with J(bn Alinnick, a worthy 
and wealthy citizen, gave his personal guar- 
antee that all claims against the regiment 
for provisions wo'uld be paid by them, if 
not accepted by the government, and they 
also agreed to see that the families oif those 
enlisting should be cared for. Tliis agree- 
ment was carried O'Ut, both in the letter and 
in the spirit, and many a soldier's home was 
made brighter by the substantial assistance 
^^hich he rendered to the family. 

On tlie nth of July, 1900, death came 
to ;\Ir. Foos. He had attained the ripe old 
age of eighty-two }'ears. In his character 
there was something he. obtained in the 
prin.itive schools where he was educated and 
in Ids early farming experiences, something 
that might be termed solidity Oif purpose, 
and which is a characteristic worthy o-f emu- 
lation. His school privileges were meager, 
yet in the school of experience he had 
learned lessons that made him a well in- 



formed man, broad-minded and liberal in 
his \-iews and witji a charity that reached out 
to all humanity. 



CHARLES A. GASSER. 

A fact of which due recognition is not 
usually accorded in coimection with the 
commercial history of Springfield, is that to 
no foreign element is its development due 
in so large a measure as to those who have 
had their nativity in or trace their lineage 
to the great empire of Germany. Among 
those who left the fatherland to identify 
themselves with American life and institu- 
tions, who have pushed themselves to the 
front and are a credit alike to the land of 
their birth and that of their adoption, is 
Charles A. Gasser, now a successful grocer 
of Springfield, located at No. 238 Clifton 
street. He has made his home in the city 
since 1889 and when his labor had brought 
him capital large enough to enable him to 
begin business on his OAvn account, he estab- 
lished a small store, which has since grown 
until it is now one of the leading grocery 
houses of this city. 

Mr. Gasser was born in Baden, Ger- 
many, January 18, 1867, and is one of two 
sons. His brother John, older than he, 
came to America about 1889, locating in 
Buiifalo, New York, and is now in the em- 
ploy of the Erie Railroad shops at that place. 
Both parents died in Germany. In the 
schools of the fatherland our subject pursued 
his education and when fourteen years of 
age he began earning his own living. He 
spent one year in Italy and was also in 
Switzerland and Austria, being employed in 
the difterent hotels as an experienced waiter. 



242 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



He has traveled all over Europe and has a 
broad knowledge of the old world, its peo- 
ples and their manners and customs. At the 
age of twenty he determined to come to 
America, and in 1887 first visited Spring- 
field, but did not make a permanent loca- 
tion at that time. Going to Cincinnati he 
was there employed in hotels for twenty 
months, after which he returned to this city 
and pursued a course in Nelson's Business 
College, feeling the need of further educa- 
tional training as a preparation for the re- 
sponsible duties of business life. He then 
purchased a small grocery business of Lu- 
ther Smith, located at the corner of Clifton 
and Taylor streets, where he remained four 
and a half years. He secured a new stock of 
goods and afterward removed to No. 2 1 1 
Clifton street, where he spent the succeeding 
six years. He then purchased a lot at No. 
238 Clifton street and erected there a build- 
ing suitable for his business. He now car- 
ries a large line of staple and fancy grocer- 
ies and provisions. When he began business 
for himself he had a cash capital of only 
four hundred dollars. His trade, however, 
has increased many fold and he has substan- 
tially enlarged his stock to meet the grow- 
ing demands of the business until he now has 
a splendidly appointed grocery store and is 
enjoying a profitable trade. 

Mr. Gasser was married in S]iringfield. 
Ohio, in 1895 to Carrie Pfeififer. who was 
born in this city in 1868, a daughter of 
Charles Pfeift'er, who for about twenty-five 
years was foreman for Mast. Foos & Com- 
pany. Mrs. Gasser pursued her education 
in the public schools of this city and by her 
marriage has become the mother of two 
daughters, LilHan and Eliza. The parents 
hold membership in Zion's Lutheran church 
and Mr. Gasser votes with the Repulilican 



party on questions of state and national im- 
portance, but at local elections casts his bal- 
lot independently. He belongs to the 
Springfield Mannerchor and to the Spring- 
field Grocers' Association. He is a self- 
made man whose success has been gained 
through good management and business 
judgment, and from the age of fourteen he 
has depended upon his own resources for a 
Ifving. He realizes that there is no royal 
road to wealth and that the surest way to 
gain prosperity is through indefatigable in- 
dustry. Therefore he has given close at- 
tention to his business, considering no de- 
tail too unimportant to claim his attention, 
and his energy has brought to him a very 
desirable competence. 



PERRY M. STEWART. 

On the roster of county officials in Clark 
county is the name of Perry M. Stewart. 
ni(jre familiarly known as Pearl .M. Stew- 
art, and public commendation is given 
him for capability as the count\- treas- 
urer, for in the exercise of his duties in the 
office of trust which he so ably fills, his 
l)rompt, systematic and thoroughly reliable 
methods have won recognition. As the fam- 
ily name indicates he comes of Scotch an- 
cestry. He was born in Green township. 
Clark county, July 6. 1866, and his father. 
Perry Stewart, was born in the same town- 
ship. June 6, 1 818. The grandfather. John 
T. Stewart, was born in Dauphin county. 
I'ennsylvania. and in 1806 came to Clark 
county. -being one of the first settlers in 
Green townshi]i. where he ")]iened up a farm 
and took an active part in the pioneer de- 
velopment of this piirtiiin of the state. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



243 



Tliroiighniit the first half of tlie last century 
he witnessed the growth and improvement 
of Clark county and passed away in the 
year 1850. In his family were ten children, 
of whom one daughter died in early child- 
hood. Samuel passed away in 1892, antl 
Mrs. David Anderson died in 1901. The 
living members of the family are: Perry, 
the father i:if our subject; Elder R., a miller 
by trade, who makes his home with his 
daughter, JMrs. L. B. Corry ; Charles, who 
is living retired in Springfield; James M., 
who served as probate judge for six years 
and is living in Xenia. Ohio: Thomas E., 
of Clifton, Ohio; Oscar X., who resides in 
Plattsburg; and William C, who is now 
living retired in Springfield. All of the 
members of the family were reared upon the 
home farm and only two of them ever turned 
from agricultural pursuits to enter other 
branches of life. 

Perry Stewart, the father of our sub- 
ject, pursued his studies in the district 
schools of his native township and on enter- 
ing a business career followed the occupa- 
tion to which he had been reared. He car- 
ried on farm work successfully until 1893, 
when he removed to Springfield, where he 
is now living retired. He is a well preserved 
man of eighty-four years and a venerable 
gentleman, honored and respected by all 
who know him. Prominent in public af- 
fairs his fellow townsmen called him to rep- 
resent Clark county in the state legislature, 
where he served during the sessions of 
1868 and 1869. For six years he was also 
county commissioner and was an active party 
worker, doing everything in his power to 
promote the growth and insure the success 
'if Republican principles. He married Rhoda 
\\'heeler. who was born in Clark county 
December 30, 1824. and is still traveling 



life's journey with her husband. Their 
marriage was blessed with ten children, oi 
whom one died at the age of four years, but 
the other nine are still living, as follows ; 
Harriet, the wife of James Hatfield, who 
resides near Clifton, Ohio; Julia, the wife 
of R. XT. Elder, living near Selma, Clark 
county; Da\-id \V., who was a soldier of the 
Civil war and is also living in Qark county; 
John T., an electrician of Greencastle, In- 
diana ; ]\Iary E., who is the w-idow of Sam- 
uel Kerr and makes her home in Washing- 
ton, D. C. ; Charles F.. who- resides near 
Pitchin, Clark county; Jane E., the wife of 
George Nicholson of Springfield ; Perry M., 
of this review' ; and E. W' heeler, wdio is living 
on the home farm. The children were pro- 
\ided with good educational advantages, at- 
tending the district schools of Green town- 
ship and afterw-ard continuing their educa- 
tion in the schools of Antioch and Lebanon. 
At the time of the Civil war the father mani- 
fested his loyalty to the government by en- 
tering the Union army. He and his wife 
are faithful members of the Christian 
church. 

Under the parental roof Perry j\I. Ste- 
wart of this review spent the days of his 
childhood and after acquiring his prelimin- 
ary education in the district schools pursued 
an elective course in Antioch Colege. Sub- 
sequently he took charge of the home farm, 
which he managed for a few years, and then 
for a few years he was employed in a gen- 
eral store in Selma. He was afterward ap- 
pointed as deputy county auditor, serving 
from 1893 to 1895 and in 1897 he was ap- 
pointed deputy county treasurer, acting in 
that capacity until elected to the office of 
treasurer in 1901. He has since filled the 
position and was recenti}- nominated for the 
second term, a fact which indicates that his 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



has been a capable service and that he has 
won the confidence and endorsement of the 
public. 

On the i6th of October, 1901, Mr. 
Stewart was united in marriage to Irene B. 
Black, a daughter of Charles R. Black, a 
prominent farmer and stock-raiser of Ross 
county, Ohio. She is a graduate of South 
Salem Seminary. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Stewart are memljers of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church and he belongs to Clark Lodge, 
No. loi, F. & A. M.; Springfield Chapter, 
No. 48, R. A. M. ; Springfield Council, No. 
17, R. & S. M. ; and is a member of the 
Commercial Club of this city. He has made 
his home in Springfield since appointed to 
the position of deputy auditor. In political 
circles he is prominent, and his convictions 
carry weight in the local councils of the Re- 
publican party. He has frequently served 
as a delegate to county and congressional 
conventions and believes most firmly in the 
party as best calculated to promote the na- 
tion's welfare. The Stewart famil\- is an 
old and prominent one in Clark county, hav- 
ing been established here through almost an 
entire century. The record is creditable, 
for representatives of the name have ever 
l-)een honorable and worthy citizens, and the 
history of Perry M. Stewart, the efficient 
county treasurer, adds new luster to the 
honored familv name. 



MARCUS A. HATFIELD. 

It is always a pleasure to see true merit 
suitably rewarded, to behold the prosperity 
of those who eminently deserve it, as does 
the subject of this review. At an early age 
he learned one of the great lessons of life — 



that there is no royal road to wealth, — and 
as he was not above work he toiled indus- 
triously until he has won not only a snug lit- 
tle fortune but also the esteem and confi- 
dence of the people with whom he has been 
associated for many years. Work, the true 
friend of mankind, has developed his latent 
resources and brought out the strong self- 
reliant force of his character. He is widely 
known as a merchant of Pitchin and is con- 
trolling there a constantly growing busi- 
ness. 

ilr. Hatfield was born in Green town- 
ship, Clark county, April i, 1839, his par- 
ents being John and Eva (Garlough) Hat- 
field. The father was born in Henry coun- 
ty, Virginia, and the mother in ^Maryland. 
The former came to Ohio with his father, 
Nathaniel Hatfield, in 1806. The family 
home was established in Spring^eld town- 
ship. The mother of our subject also came 
to Clark county with her father, John Gar- 
lough, who located in Green townshij). and 
when they had reached adult age the }nung 
couple were married in this county. They 
became the parents of twelve children, five 
of whom are still living. 

During his boyhood days Marcus .\. 
Hatfield received a fair common school edu- 
cation and was alxDut twenty years of age 
when he began to earn his own living by the 
operation of rented land. In August, 1861, 
he enlisted in Company G of Burgess' ^\'est- 
ern Sharp Shooters and saw duty in west 
Missouri. In 1862 this regiment became the 
Fourteenth ^Missouri Infantry, and after the 
battle of Shiloh. in which Mr. Hatfield tOL>k 
part, it became the Sixty-sixth Regiment of 
Illinois Volunteers. He was at Fort Don- 
nelson, Fort Henry, Corinth and Atlanta 
and also went with Sherman on the famous 
march to the sea. which proved that the 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



245 



strength of the Confederacy had heen drawn 
■from from the interior to defend the borders. 
H'e afterward went from Carolina to Wash- 
ington, where lie marclied in grand review 
throngh the streets of the capital city — one 
of the great \-ictorions host that had pre- 
served the Union. In the .\tlanta cam- 
paign he was hit by a spent ball on the left 
knee. After the battle of Shiloh he was 
taken ill and was ordered tO' go to the hos- 
pital, but would not go, reinaining with his 
company on the field of duty. He was in 
the service for almost four years, through- 
out which period he was found as a faith- 
ful defender of the Union cause, always at 
his post of duty. 

\\'hai the war was over Mr. Hatfield re- 
turned to Clark county and engaged in farm^ 
ing until his father died in 1883, when 
eighty-five years of age, his birth having oc- 
curred in 1799. The mother had died in 
1 88 1, at the age of eighty-one years. For 
some years Mr. Hatfield was in poor health, 
but he continued his farm work with reso- 
lute spirit. In 1888 he purchased a store in 
Pitchin and has since been located here, 
doing a good business as an enterprising 
merchant. 

A Republican in politics, Mr. Hatfield 
cast his first presidential ballot for Abraham 
Lincoln in i860. He has twice assessed the 
township and for many years has served as 
treasurer of the township, being the incum- 
bent of the office at the present time. He 
was appointed postmaster of Pitchin under 
President Harrison and continued in the po- 
sition during a period of President Cleve- 
land's administration. He then retired and 
was afterward appointed by President Mc- 
Kinley. He has supported his party as a 
delegate to various conventions, including 
the state convention, and has been a mem- 



ber of the central committee for several 
years. He belongs to Mitchell Post, No. 45, 
G. A. R., and in 1893 he visited the World's 
Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Mr. 
Hatfield takes an active interest in political 
affairs and in all matters pertaining to gen- 
eral progress and improvement and is a 
worthy type of an enterprising merchant of 
Ohio. 



JOHX F. WYAXT. 

Nature seemed to have designed that the 
strenuous duties of business life should be 
borne by man, \\-hile wooian should attend 
to the lighter tasks of the household. The 
history of business activity is therefore 
largely the record of the men who are im- 
portant factors in industrial, commercial 
and professional circles. One who was well 
known in this connection in Springfield was 
John Franklin Wyant, whO' became a well 
known contractor in the building of roads 
and pikes. Indefatigable and energetic, he 
successfully conducted his business inter- 
ests until his life's labors were ended in 
death. 

Mr. Wyant was born on the old family 
homestead in Moorefield township, Clark 
county, October 21.. 1855, and was there- 
fore forty-six years of age when called to 
his final rest on the 31st of December, 1901. 
He was a son of Jonas and Susan Wyant 
and in the district schools near his home he 
acquired his early education which Avas sup- 
plemented by two years' study in the Ur- 
1 ana high school. He cnntinued to^ li\e 
\vith his parents for two or three years there- 
after, w^orking upon the home farm, and 
then turned his attention to contract work 
in the building of roads and pikes in New 



246 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mooretield and adjoining townships. In 
Alarch. 1885. he removed to Springfield and 
with tliat city as his headquarters he contin- 
ued his work as a contractor, doing much 
work on Springfield's streets. He also did 
similar work in Dayton for a time and ex- 
ecuted some contracts awarded him by the 
Big Four Railroad Company. He was quite 
prosperous in his chosen field of labor, so 
irianaging his business affairs that his ser- 
\ices were of value to the pubnc anci at the 
same time profitable to himself. 

On the 2 1 St of June, 1884, Mr. Wyant 
was married to Miss Minnie Bumcrat, a na- 
tive of Moorefield township and a daughter 
of William and Xancy E. Bumcrat, the 
fi)rnicr now tleceased. while the motlier is 
yet li\ing. P'our children were born unto 
.Mr. and .Mrs. Wyant: Grace, Floyd, Inez 
and Jiihn. Fur nearly thirty years our sub- 
ject was a member of the Knights of Pyth- 
ias fraternity, connected with both the lodge 
and the uniformed rank. His political sup- 
port was given the Democracy, but his busi- 
ness left him little time to seek public olifice 
even had he so desired. In religious belief 
he was a Methodist and died in that faith, 
his remains lieing interred in the cemetery 
at New Moorefield. His record ended, the 
world's judgment upon it was a favorable 
one. He had not only won success in busi- 
ness by well directed effort and close appli- 
cation, Init had also gained a reputation for 
straightforward dealing that made his an 
hnnarablc and liDUored name. 



WILLI.VM HFXRY BERGER. 

William Henry Berger is one of the best 
iwn citizens of Spring-field township. 
Illy intelligent, and a u.-^eful member of 



the community. He was torn in Heidel- 
burg tOAVitship. Berks county, Pennsylvania, 
January 21, 1830, and is a son of Daniel 
and Esther (Body) Berger, who were na- 
tives of the same county. Henrj^ Berger, the 
father of the last named, was a native of 
Germany and became the founder of the 
family in .\nierica, establishing his home in 
Pennsylvania, where he spent his remain- 
ing days. The grandfather of our subject 
resided in the Keystone state throughout his 
entire life, while Daniel Berger was there 
torn and reared, and in his native county 
was married. In his youth he learned 
the trades of a brick and stone mason and 
of a plasterer, and followed these pursuits 
for many }-ears. In the spring of 1838. ac- 
companied by his wife and five children, he 
left Berks county, Pennsylvania, and trav- 
eled o\erland with team and wagon to Qark 
county, being four weeks in making the trip. 
He located in Springfield township when the 
city of Springfield was but a hamlet. He 
first occiipied a vacant house in Lagonda, 
and after renting it and establishing his 
family therein he liegan a search for work, 
and also sought a farm which he tlesired to 
purchase, .\fter a month he Ixnight one 
hundred and thirty-three acres of land, for 
which he paid sixteen and two-third dol- 
lars per acre, and the log building which 
then stood upon the place was tKCupied by 
him for two years. It was covered with 
clapboards, rived by hand and held in place 
by heavy poles. In this primitive pioneer 
cabin the family lived for two years and then 
the father erected a substantial brick resi- 
dence. In course of time lie al.<o built good 
barns and other buildings which are found 
uix)n amcxlern farm, and placed his land 
under a high state of cultivation. 11 is edu- 
cational privileges in youth had been limited 




WILLIAM H. BERGER. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



249 



to six months' attendance in the pdjlic 
schools, but he was always fond of reading 
aiid through this means he became a well 
informed man and kept in touch with the 
advanced thought and progress of the times. 
He and his wife were members oif the Ger- 
man Reformed church while in Pennsyl- 
vania, but after coming to Ohioi placed their 
membership in the United Brethren church. 
Mrs. Berger was, like her husband, a native 
of Berks county, Pennsylvania, and her fa- 
ther, Henry Body, was bom in that state, 
where he spent his entire life as a farmer. 
They were married April 12, 1818. 

iMr. Berger, the father of our subject, 
died May 19, 1878, at the advanced age 
of eighty-four years, and his wife passed 
away August 31, 1881, when she had 
reached the age oif about eighty-four, her re- 
mains then being interred by the side of her 
husl>and in the Newcoaiier cemetery. Tliey 
had lived tog^ether in the holy bonds of mat- 
rimony for sixty years, their miutual love 
and confidence increasing as time passed by. 
Untoi them were born the following chil- 
dren : Eliza, born August 11, 1819, died in 
December, 1825; Mary, born December 22, 
1821, died March 30, 1825; Catherine, who 
was born Ncn^emiber 27, 1824, becan:e the 
wife of E. Suver, and died in Illinois, May 
24, 1889; Sairah, born October 9, 1827, mar- 
ried W. J. Shuey, the manager of the United 
Brethren Piiblishing House, and died June 
27, 1901 ; William H. is the fifth oi the 
family ; Daniel, who^ was born October 14, 
1832, and now resides in Dayton, is a min- 
ister of the United Brethren church and for 
a number of years edited the church and 
Sunday-school papers for that denomina- 
tion; and Ellen, born Decem.ber 13, 1834, 
died July 10, 1843. 

^^"illiam H. Berger of this review was 



only eight }ears ,oif age when he came to 
Clark county with his paraits. As he 
gained strength and stature he assisted more 
and more largely in the work oif the home 
farm, being thus employed through the sum- 
mer months, while for three n:onths during 
the winter he pursued his education in the 
district schools. Fond of books, he devoted 
all his leisure time to reading and study, 
and afterw'ard," to his great delight, he was 
allowed to attaid the high school of Spring- 
field for one term. Before he was twenty- 
one years oif age he began teaching in 
Moorefield township in the Hunter district 
and for twenty-six years he followed that 
profession, being for eighteen years a teach- 
er in the Lagonda. school. Diu'ing most oif 
this time he taught only during the winter 
months, while in the summer he carried on 
farm work. In 1866 he bought the old home 
farm, on which two years before he had 
made good and substantial impro\-ements, 
but these were destroyed by fire in March, 
1899. Since then he has relxiilt and now 
has a beautiful home, lying partly within 
the city limits. He has laid out two addi- 
tions toi' the city, known as Berger' s first 
and second additions. 

On the 18th oif March, 1852, occurred 
the marriage of Mr. Berger and Miss Maiy 
J. Jackson, who was born January 1 1, 1830, 
in Loudoun county, Virginia, a daughter of 
John and Mary Jackson, whoi were also- na- 
tives of "Virginia, where they died. Mrs. 
Berger afterward w-as brought to Clark 
county by her uncle, William Moore, wb.en 
seven years of age. Unto our subject and 
his wife have been born five children: Dan- 
iel Franklin, born March 24, 1853, ^''^'^ ^^O'" 
vanber i, 1855; John Mortimer, born, Oc- 
tober 5, 1856, is living in Springfield; Eliza- 
beth Ann. born Octoljer 8, 18^8, is the wife 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of Albert H. Tavenner, of Springfield; Will- 
iam Henry, born in October, 1865, died No- 
vember 9, 1866; and Mary Esther, born 
Noveir.ber 24, 1869, is now Mrs. William 
E. Sneed and resides with her father. She 
has one child, Shirley Pauline, bom De- 
cember 24. 1895. Mrs. Berger was called to 
her final rest July 11, 1.893 and was buried 
in Newcomer cemeten-, her death being 
deeply regi-etted by her m^ny frinds, and 
also in the United Brethren church, of 
which she was a consistent member. 

Mr. Berger belongs to the same church 
and he has been identified with the Prohibi- 
tion party from its organization, teing a 
warm friend of teirperance. He sen-ed for 
three years as township trustee, being elected 
on the Prohibition ticket, and endorsed by 
the workingmen's ticket. In the church he 
has served as a class leader, steward and 
trustee through many years, acting in the 
latter capacity for more than twenty-five 
years, and since 1870 he has Ijeen a Sunday- 
school superintendent without intermission 
and had served several times prior to that 
tim.e. The cause of education' has e\-er found 
in him an interested advocate and for eight- 
een years he was a member of the school 
board. Mr. Berger was one of tlie organ- 
izers of the Newcomer cen-.etery and is still 
a trustee of the same. He has often been 
appointed as a guardian of children, some 
of whom, now in business, yet come to 
him for advice. He has likcAvise settled 
manv estates as administrator and is 
a man of unquestioned probity and integri- 
ty. No trust reposed in him has ever been 
betrayed in the slightest degree and he meets 
evei-y dbligation of citizenship or friendship 
and of hoir.e life. Daily he exemplifies in 
his career his lielief in the advantages of 
education, of temperance anti niDrality and 



over the record of his public career as well 
as his private history there falls no shadow 
of wrong- or suspicion of evil. 



ENOS CONARD. 

In this age of colossal enterprise and 
marked intellectual energy the prominent 
and successful men are those whose abili- 
ties, persistence and courage lead them into 
large undertakings and assume the responsi- 
bilities and labors of leaders in their re- 
spective vocations Success is methodical 
and ci.nsecutive. and however much we 
may indulge in fantastic theorizing as to its 
elements and causation in any isolated in- 
stance, yet in the light of sober investigation 
we will find it to be but a result of the de- 
termined application of one"s abilities and 
powers along the rigidly defined line of la- 
bor. America owes much of her progress 
and advancement to a position foremost 
among the nations of the world to her news- 
papers, and in no line has the lincidental 
broadening out of the sphere of usefulness 
been more marked than in this same line of 
journalism. Springfield has enlisted in its 
newspaper field some of the strongest intel- 
lects of this section of the state, men of 
broad mental grasp, cosmopolitan ideas and 
notable business sagacity. 

Prominent among the men who have 
given the city prestige in this direction must 
be found Enos Conard. the president of the 
Sun Publishing Company. He was born in 
Lancaster. Pennsylvania, September 9, 1854, 
and is a son of Enos Conard. Sr. Tlie fam- 
ily is of German lineage, and in 1753 the 
name was changed from Cunnard to its pres- 
ent form of spelling. In colonial days the 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



251 



family was established in America by repre- 
sentatives who settled in the Keystone state. 
The father of our subject was born in Lan- 
caster county, Pennsylvania, February 8, 
18 10, and followed farming as a life work. 
He resided in that state until 185S, when he 
purchased a farm in Highland county, Ohio, 
and removed from there to Hillsboro, this 
state, buying- a farm adjoining the city, upon 
which he lived until his death, which oc- 
curred in August, 1889, when he was sev- 
enty-nine years of age. His wife, who boi'e 
the maiden name of Grace Stacy, was born 
in the north of Ireland in 1818 and died in 
1877. Unto them' were bom six daughters 
and two sons, of whom one died in infancy. 
Sarah J. now resides in Hillslioro, Oliio. 
Anna Salome makes her home in Alarysville, 
Ohio. Catherine is the widow of Edward 
Beeson, of Springfield. Rachel is the wife 
of L. Piper, of Marysville. Enos is the 
next of the family. William S. is engaged 
in the wholesale grocery business in Hills- 
boro. . Elizabeth is the deceased wife of 
George X". Hartman, a successful farmer of 
^^'ilmington, Ohio. She died in 1901. By 
a former marriage the father had seven chil- 
dren, three of whom died in early childhood. 
The others are : Davis, now deceased ; 
John, who is living in Hillsboro; Isaac, a 
resident of Elwood, Illinois, where he is en- 
gaged in the hardware business ; and Emma, 
who became the wife of Cyrus Brewer, of 
Chicago, and died in 1902, while her hus- 
band passed away in this state. Davis, John 
and Isaac were all soldiers of the Civil war, 
who served from President Lincoln's first 
call for troops until the close of hostilities, 
being with the Twelfth and Forty-eighth 
Ohio Regiments. The father of this family 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. A man of domestic tastes, he found 



his greatest enjoyment when in the midst of 
his family and he put forth every effort in 
his power to promote their welfare and hap- 
piness. His children were provided with 
good educational privileges and after attend- 
ing the public schools were students in col- 
leges of Pennsylvania and in the Hillsboro 
Seminary. 

Enos Ccnard, whose name introduces 
this review, pursued his education in . the 
public schools of Hillsboro and was reared 
to manhood upon the home farm until nine- 
teen years of age, when he left the parental 
roof in order to learn a trade and entered 
the carriage shops of the firm of Black & 
Elster, of Hillsboro. There he remained for 
three }'ears, when he went to Rainsboro, 
Ohio, where he carried on business along the 
same line for three years as an employe. He 
then began business on his own account at 
New Vienna, Ohio, at manufacturing and 
repairing carriages in 1878. In 1880, how- 
ever, he sold his business interests there and 
came to Springfield, where he entered the 
paint department of the old Champion works 
of W'hiteley, Fassler & Kelly, ^^■ith that 
firm he remained until 1889, when he became 
connected with the Thomas Manufacturing 
Company as striper in the paint department. 
There he remained for five years, leaving that 
house in August, 1894. On the nth of Sep- 
tember, following, the Morning Sun was 
established, with Mr. Conard as vice presi- 
dent of the Sun Publishing Company and 
circulating manager of the western division. 
In September, 1895, he was elected presi- 
dent and business manager of the company 
and has since held that position. Cnder his 
guidance the business has grown with won- 
derful rapidity and the company has the con- 
fidence of the city and its people and the 
paper enjoys a large circulation. He is also 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



one ct the stockhrJders of the Citizens Na- 
tional Bank. 

In March. 1882, in Springfield, Mr. Con- 
ard was united in marriage to Miss Dora 
I\Iay Mendenhall. who was born in Clark 
county. Ohio, in 1861, and is a daughter 
of Samuel and ^lary (Whittingtou) ^Men- 
denhall, both of whom are now deceased, 
her father having died in 1900. He w^as one 
of the well known millers of the county and 
a reliable, enterprising business man. In his 
family were nine children, eight of whom are 
yet living: Mary, the wife of Aaron Ellis, 
of Clifton. Ohio: Jane, the wife of Henry 
Hopping, of this city ; Amanda, the wife of 
Smith Chambliss, of Xenia. Ohio, where he 
is serving as superintendent of the Kelly 
Tool \\'orks: Sarah, the deceased wife of 
Thomas Wharton, of Xenia; Laura V., the 
widmv of Jacob Fry. of Springfield: Dora, 
the wife of our subject; James, who is an 
engineer in this city ; and Bemis A., who is 
a blacksmith in the employ of the Superior 
Drill Company, of Springfield. Of this fam- 
ily James served as a soldier in the Union 
army during the Civil war. The home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Conard has been blessed with 
two daughters. Helen G.. born September 
12. 1S91 ; and Stacy M.. born December 3. 
1894. Mrs. Conard is a meml>er of the Clif- 
ton A\enue Methodist Episcopal church, 
which the children also attend. 

In his political views Mr. Conard is a 
Republican where questions of national and 
state importance are involved, but at local 
elections, where only municipal afYairs are 
concerned, he votes for the men best quali- 
fied for office. He is a member of Clark 
Lodge. Xo. loi. F. & A. M. ; Moncriefife 
Lodge. Xo. 33. K. P. : and Springfield 
Lodge. Xo. ^-. B. P. O. E. In the Knights 
of Pythias fraternity he has passed all of 



the chairs of the lodge and has been dis- 
trict deputy and special dqxity to the grand 
chancellor for two years, while for two terms 
he served as rqjresentative to the grand 
lodge. He also belongs to the Commercial 
Club and to the board of trade. His life 
history proves the value of a strong char- 
acter, of determined purpose and unremit- 
ting diligence in the active afifairs of life. 
He started upon his business career with no 
pecuniary assistance or si>ecial family ad- 
vantages to aid him, but has progressed by 
reason of his earnest purpose, close applica- 
tion and exercise of natural abilit\- and to- 
day he stands among the successful n.en of 
Springfield and is also classed among those 
that the city values because of his hearty co- 
operation in all movements and measures 
for the general good.. 



WILLIAM WHITELEY. 

For eighty-one years William Whiteley 
was a resident of Clark county and his life 
record should find a prominent place on the 
pages of its history because he was not only 
a representative of a leading pioneer family 
but also because of what he accomplished in 
the business world. He was an inventor of 
note and the founder of one of the leading 
industrial concerns of Springfield — the 
Champion Iron Works, and aside from 
business his life was of value to the com- 
munity because of the active and helpful in- 
terest which he took in many movements 
contributing to general progress and to the 
public good. 

Mr. Whiteley was b( rn in the eastern 
part of Springfield township. Clark county. 
January 18. 1815. a son of Tohn and Chris- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tiana ( HalH ^^'hiteley. The family comes 
of English ancestry and was established in 
Virginia in colonial days when this country 
still belonged to Great Britain. When the 
colonies became aroused with the attitude of 
oppression manifested by the mother coun- 
try Josq>h Whiteley, the grandfather of our 
subject, and his brother John joined the 
American army and fought for the cause of 
liberty, the latter laying doAvn his life on the 
altar of freedom. Joseph Whiteley, how- 
ever, survived his army experience and lived 
to enjoy the liberty for which he fought. 
He reared a large family, including John 
^^"hiteley, the father of our subject. 

John WHiitele}' was born in North Caro- 
lina while his parents were visiting in that 
state, but he always claimed \'irginia as the 
place of his nativity. In 1804 he journeyed 
to Ohio from Kentucky, where he had re- 
sided for several years previous. He came 
simply on a prospecting tour, and in 1810 
he made a similar trip. In the spring of 
181 1 he married Miss Christiana Hall, in 
what is now Clark county, Ohio. She was 
born in Virginia and was of English, Ger- 
man and Scotch descent. Her parents came 
to this state at a very early date in its de- 
velopment. After his marriage John \\'hite- 
ley and his wife returned to Kentucky, where 
he engaged in teaching school until 1814. 
He was a man of good education and proved 
a successful educator of his day. In 1814 
he remo^-ed to this county and became one 
of the first teachers within its borders, teach- 
ing in the neighborhood known as Fletcher 
Chapel. Both he and his wife did their duty 
Avell in the upbuilding of the moral and ma- 
terial interests of the neighborhood and they 
enjoyed the love and respect of the entire 
community. Mr. W'hiteley was for some 
years county ccmmissioner and justice of 



the peace and was known throughout the 
county as Squire \\'hitele}-. Unto him and 
his wife were born seven children : An- 
drew, Freelove, William, Abner. Joseph, 
Nancy and Sarah. 

Upon the home farm C)n which he was 
born the subject of this review was reared. 
The marked characteristic of the family was 
an inventive turn of mind, and naturally 
William Whiteley early took up work along 
this line and from his fertile brain evolved 
many ideas which took shape in devices of 
practical utility. \\'hen on the farm he be- 
gan business in a small way in the manu- 
facture of plows, which have become known 
far and wide as the product of the Champion 
Company. He was a successful in\-entor 
and business man, having not only the abil- 
ity to make improvements in the line of his 
manufactured products but ;also had the 
power to successfully control the manufac- 
ture and sale of these, so that his labors were 
attended with gratifying financial success. 
He was entirely a self-made man, for when 
he entered upon his business career he had 
no capital save the skill arid diligence which 
he put intO' his work. The years, however, 
rewarded him with the just recompense of 
labor and he became the possessor of a very 
gratifying competence. 

In 1848 Mr. Whiteley was married to 
Miss Mary Ann Stickney, a daughter of John 
and Sarah Stickne}', natives of England, 
while Mrs. Whiteley was born in this coun- 
ty. They had but one child. ]\Iary E.. who 
is now li\'ing at No. 408 South Limestone 
street, which was the home of her ]3arents in 
the later years of their life. \Mien ]\Ir. 
Whiteley removed to Springfield he located 
on Mound street, and later removed to- East 
High street, where he remained for twenty- 
five vears. going then to the residence which 



254 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



is now tlie lioiiic of his daughter. In early 
life he joined the Fletcher Methodist Epis- 
copal church, situated near his old home, 
six miles east of Springfield, and was one 
of its trustees. A\"hen he removed to the 
city in 1850 he joined the High Street 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which he 
was a faitliful member until his death. He 
was an open-lianded and large-hearted man, 
who gave freely of his time and means to 
any individual or movement that needed as- 
sistance. His benevolences were many ajid 
few men have done more for Springfield ac- 
cording to their means than did William 
\\'hiteley. It migbt be said of him. as it 
was of Goldsmith's village preacher, that 
"e'en his failings leaned to virtue's side," 
for if he erred in any direction it was on 
the side of too great generosity. His goo<l 
deeds, however, caused him to be enshrined 
in the hearts of many whom he aided and 
befriended and to-(la\- bis memor\- is revered 
by many who knew him. He passed away 
ill January, 181/'- and in January, iqoi. his 
wife was laid by his side in Ferncliff ceme- 
tery. The family name is closely associated 
with the history of tlie county from pioneer 
times down to the present and no member of 
tlie family more deserved the confidence, 
love and respect of liis fellow men than did 
William \Miitelcv. 



EDW I.V K. McIXTTRK. 

Hdwi'i K. McTntirc is the superintend- 
ent ol Snyder park and his capability and 
fitness for tlie position are widely recog- 
nized. He is an enterprising and progres- 
sive young business man and a worthy rep- 
resentative of one of the pioneer families 



of this section of the state. He was born in 
Cloufl county. Kansas, February 4. 1872. 
but since 1875 ^'^'^^ been a resident of this city. 
The ilclntire family is of Scotch lineage 
and was founded in .America at an early day. 
'I'he family was represented in the war of 
18 1 2 and in pioneer times representatives of 
the name came to Clark county, since whicli 
time their descendants have been active fac- 
tors in the work of improvement, develop- 
ment and progress here. William Mcln- 
tire. the grandfather of our subject, was one 
of the first supervisors of Springfield and 
held the office for a quarter of a century. 
His brother John was a government con- 
tractor and became quite wealthy but went 
to Chicago and invested heavily in property 
there, v.hich was destroyed in the great fire 
of October. 1871. Joseph, another brother, 
was sheriff of Clark county for sometime. 
The family was established in Springfield 
townshi]) and also purchased considerable 
land in Cernrin township. They were fam- 
ing people and William Mclntire, the grand- 
father of our subject, becane a \-ery promi- 
nent and infiuential citizen, leaving the im- 
press of his individuality upon public 
thought, feeling and action. 

.Albert Mclntire, the father of our subject. 
was 1)1 rn in Mad River township, Claik 
C( unity, in 1833, and is now living a retired 
life in Springfield. During his business career 
he followed general contracting and construc- 
tion work. He was educated in this county 
.111(1 here made his home until 1865, when he 
removed to Kansas and secured a. homestead 
claim but in 1875 he returned to his native 
county and resumed contracting here. He 
b.ad the contracts for both the old and new 
pumping stations and for the moving of se\- 
eral buildings. He took contracts for heavy 
nia.snn work and in the line of his chosen 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



255 



vocation lie recei\-ed a liberal patronage, do- 
ing a large and lucrative business up to the 
time of his retirement. He is now enjoying 
a well earned rest. By reading and observa- 
tion he" has kept abreast with the times and 
deserves great credit for what he has accom- 
plished, being both a self-educated and a 
self-made man. He was united in marriage 
to Miss Anna Peck, who died in 1888 in 
this city. They became the parents of eleven 
children. Samuel died at the age of six- 
teen years and Ada at the age of twenty 
years. The others are: \\"illiam, who is 
an insurance agent of Springfield ; Benja- 
min, who is a professor in the \V;ishington 
School ; L. May, the wife of James Dick, 
who is assistant superintendent of Fern- 
cliff cemetery; Albert H.. a medical student 
in the Columbus ^Medical College; Edwin 
K., of this review ; Jennie, the wife of Albert 
\\'right, of Springfield; Samael, deceased; 
Sarah, who is a telegraph operator and as- 
sistant manager of the Postal Telegraph 
Company at this place ; John, who is electri- 
cian at the power house for the Dayton, 
Springfield & Urbana Electric road ; and 
Pearl, who is a student in school. It was on 
account of wishing to provide his children 
with better educational privileges that the 
father returned with his family to Ohio and 
here the children were educated in the pub- 
lic schools and in Wittenberg College and 
also in a business college, of this city. 

Edwin K. McTntire was here educated 
and about 1890 he began work as a landscape 
gardener, receiving instruction in this de- 
partment of activity from ^Ir. Dick of the 
Ferncliff cemetery. After the first years" ser- 
vice he had charge of a part of the work. He 
remained in the cemetery for seven years 
and was then appointed by the Snyder Park 
board ti' the position of superintendent ijf 



this park, which he has remodeled, beautify- 
ing it in many \\ays. He now has under his 
supervision forty men, who are engaged in 
keeping up the park and continually improv- 
ing it. This tract of land consists of two 
hundred and se\-enteen acres, well laid out, 
so that it is pleasing to the eye, being one 
of the most beautiful spots in all Spring- 
field. 'Mr. Mclntire has made great ad- 
vancement in his knowledge of landscape 
gardening. He does his own engineering 
and plans his improvements himself and his 
work in all respects has been most creditable 
and satisfactory to the city. 

Mr. Mclntire belongs to the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks and also to In- 
gomar Lodge, No. No. 610, K. of P., and 
to the .Logan Castle of the Knights of the 
Goklen Eagle, in which he has served as 
chief and has also been a representative to 
the grand lodge. He is a young man, of 
good business ability and with excellent skill 
in the line of his chosen pursuit. He pos- 
sesses laudable ambition and enterprise and 
while he has already achieved success he 
will no doubt gain a greater advancement in 
the future. 



HARRY HARVEY SELLERS. 

Harry Harvey Sellers, the cashier in the 
post-ofiice of Springfield, was born in ^\'ar- 
ren county. Ohio, near Lebanon, July 13, 
1868, and is a son of Ferdinand and Re- 
becca (Hormell) Sellers. On the paternal 
side he comes of German lineage and on the 
maternal side is of English descent. Three 
brothers of the name of Sellers came from 
the fatherland to America about 1690 and 
settled in Pennsylvania near Philadelphia. 
Two of them afterward removed to Ham- 



256 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



iltoii comity, Ohio. They tra\-ele(l across 
the country until they reached the Ohio 
river, where they built rafts and then floated 
down the stream to Cincinnati. This was 
in the early part of the eighteenth century 
and from the government they purchased 
land, dividing their attention between farm- 
ing and stock-raising. William Runkel 
Sellers, the father of Ferdinand, was also 
a farmer, but had two brothers who were 
members of the medical profession. He 
settled in Warren county. Ohio, where he 
owned a farm of two hundred acres and also 
conducted what was known as the Four 
Mile House. Tlie Sellers w^rt a sturdy, in- 
telligent, respected and long lived people 
and gained success in their various business 
ventures. The grandfather lived to be about 
eighty years of age and unto him and his 
wife were born eight children, of whom 
three daughters and a son are yet living: 
Mrs. Mary McDonald, who is a widow and 
rsides in Springfield ; Mrs. Melvina Burnett, 
a widow living in AX'arren county. Ohio; 
Mrs. Amanda Russell, a widow of Frank- 
fort, Indiana; and Ferdinand, the father of 
our subject. 

Ferdinand Sellers was born in this state 
in 182S and in his early life was reared on 
a farm and assisted in the work of cultivat- 
ing the fields. In later years he conducted a 
sawmill and followed general merchandis- 
ing in Clinton county, Ohio, where he also 
filled the position of postmaster. His life 
has been one of marked industry. At the 
time of the Civil war be joined the army for 
one hundred days' service. Subsequently 
he removed to Warren county, Ohio, ami 
cared for his father until the latter's death. 
Ferdinand Sellers then embarked in the lum- 
ber business and in the operation of a saw- 
mill in Greene countv. where he was suc- 



ceeded by his son-in-law. E. E. Lackey, of 
Xew Burlington, who still conducts the 
business. ^Ir. Sellers carried on operations 
there until 1895. when he retired to private 
life and is now living in Springfield. The 
family has always been identified with the 
Methodist church and the home of \\'illiam 
R. Sellers, the grandfather, was the abiding 
place of all itinerant preachers and circuit 
riders who visited this section of Ohio in 
an early day. The early political faith of the 
family was that of the Whig party until its 
flissolution. since which time they have been 
Republicans. In 1887 Ferdinand Sellers 
was called upon to mourn the loss of his 
wife, who died at Xew Burlington. Greene 
county, at the age of fifty-nine years, her 
birth having occurred in 1828. Tliey were 
the parents of nine children, of whom two 
died in infancy. The others are: Laura. 
tlie wife of Ellsworth Lackey, of Greene 
county; (^wen M.. a Methodist Episcopal 
preacher of Champaign county; Wilbur S., 
of this city ; Ettie. the wife of Frederick 
Lucas, of" Xenia ; Charles E., a grocer of 
Springfield; .\ddie. a trained nurse of 
Springfield ; and Harry H., of this review. 
The elder children were educated in the pub- 
lic schools of \\'arren county and the young- 
er members of the family in Xew Burling- 
ton. Greene county. 

At the age of fourteen Harry H. Sellers 
put aside his text books in order to earn his 
own living, accepting a clerkship in a gen- 
eral store in X'ew Burlington. He also as- 
sisted his father in the operation of the saw- 
mill. At the age of fifteen he came to 
Springfield and secured a position as wrap- 
]iing clerk in the dry-goods store of Murphy 
Brothers. He left that service in 1885 and 
was afterward taken ill. which necessitated 
his remaining at home for severrd months. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



257 



Again coming to Springfield he secured a 
position with a grocer, wlio was a short- 
hand writer and who in return, for Mr. 
Sellers' services instructed him in the art of 
stenography. When he hecame competent 
to accept a position he left his teacher's ser- 
vices and on the nth of February, 1886, 
entered the employ of Qiarles R. Grain 
with the P. P. Mast Manufacturing Com- 
pany. He filled that position for about 
twenty months, when a vacancy occurred in 
the shipping department and to this he was 
transferred, acting as assistant to the ship- 
ping clerk. He was put in charge of the de- 
partment July 15. 1892, and filled that place 
until the ist of October, 1902, when he ac- 
cepted a position as cashier in the Spring- 
field post-office. He is a man who stands 
high in business circles, because he has al- 
wa}-s been found to be trustworthy, accu- 
rate systematic and prompt. He has made 
his own way in the world from the age of 
fourteen years and his- education has been 
received through practical application and 
business experience. 

Mr. Sellers was married in Springfield 
September 26, 1888, to Miss JMillie Darrow, 
who was born in Dayton, Ohio, in Novem- 
ber, 1869, a daughter of William J. and Isa- 
belle ( Segrove) Darrow. The father is 
now deceased, but the mother makes her 
home with her only child, Mrs. Sellers. The 
latter was educated in the Springfield pub- 
lic schools and the Springfield Seminary and 
like her husband is a member of the [Meth- 
odist church. They have two sons : Dar- 
row Hormell. born June 26, 1889: and Jo- 
seph William, born March 2^, 1893. Mr. 
Sellers is a member of Anthony Lodge. Xo. 
455, F. &• A. M., and was the youngest mas- 
ter to fill that position at the time of his 
service in the office in 1900-1. He was re- 



elected, being the first one to be chosen as 
his own successor in many years. He is also 
a member and treasurer of the Commercial 
Club. Since attaining his majority he has 
lieen a stalwart Republican and is ser\-ing as 
a member of the executi\-e committee of 
Clark county. He has never aspired to any 
official honors, but has been a strong party 
worker, taking an active interest in ward 
politics and frequently serving as a delegate 
to the citv, countv and state conventions. 



JOHX ESTLE JOHXSOX. 

John Estle Johnson is engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising in Green 
township, and is well known in his com- 
niunity as a breeder of polled Jersey cattle, 
having originally introduced this fine breed 
of cattle into Green township. He was born 
in the village of Clifton, Greene county. 
Ohio, April i, 18-15, '^'^^^ is a son of Joseph 
R. and Lydia E. (Estle) Johnson. Joseph 
R. Johnson was a native of Mason county, 
Kentucky, having been born near Mays- 
ville, March 8, 1819. He was a son of James 
and Clemency (Donovan) Johnson, both of 
whom \\ere natives of ^^irginia and had re- 
moved to Iventucky after their marriage, 
and in the Blue Grass state their son Joseph 
R. was born. When he was seven years old, 
his parents removed to Greene county, Ohio, 
in 1826, settling on the farm now owned by 
Charles Birch. Later they remnved to the 
farm now owned by Sebastian (jerhard, 
where the}' spent their remainng days. 
James Johnson died December i. 1830. 
while his wife. Clemency (Donovan) John- 
,son, died December 3. 1837. 

Joseph R. Johnson was the oldest of the 



JHE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



cliiklren at home at tlie time of the tleath of 
the father. He was then about thirteen 
years old, but at this early age he became 
manager of the farm and assisted his mother 
until she too passed away, seven years later. 
He then began to work in the mills of Clif- 
ton, learning the business and remaining 
there for twenty-three years. A\'hile thus 
engaged h^ was married, January 6, 1842, 
to Lydia E. Estle. who was born in Green 
township, Clark county, January 30, 1822, 
and was a daugliter (jf William and Abigail 
( Little) Estle. Byihis marriage there were 
the following children : Clemency married 
Michael iladden and resides in Kenton, 
Hardin county, with her husband and two 
children, Elizabeth and Lulu. The subject 
of this review is the next in order of birth. 
Abigail died at the age of eighteen years. 
Asahel married Lavinia Garlough, resides 
at Pennington Gap, Virginia, and has six 
children — Myrtle; Pearl, who married Dr. 
Graham: Lydia C. ; Catherine; Ulalie and 
Earl. Hannah M.. the next meml>er of 
the family, married Cicero Jacobs and lives 
at Yellow Springs, Ohio. She is the mother 
of six children — James, Elmer. Maude, 
Pearl. Charles and Homer. Ann Maria 
married Harvey Scranton, and li\es in Co- 
lumbus, Georgia. They have one child, 
Ethel. Margaret J. married William Forl^es 
and resides in Miami township, Greene 
county. Three children were born of this 
union — Xora, .\rthur and Curtis. 

Joseph R. Johnson, the father of the sub- 
ject of this review, in iS6o purchased the 
farm called the Clark County farm, compris- 
ing three hundred and thirty-three acres. 
Upon this farm he remi:)ved in 1861 and later 
added one hundred acres to his purchase, 
huilding thereon a substantial l)rick resi- 
dence. There he made his home until he 



sold the property to John H. Thomas. He 
then removed to Springfield. Ohio, wnich 
was his place of residence until the time of 
his death, November 6, 1892. His ballot 
was cast for the Republican party, but he 
never sought or desired office. He was an 
earnest Christian man, a member of the 
First Presbyterian church of Springfield, 
and was serving as one of its deacons at the 
time of his death. His wife had passed away 
twelve years before, her death occurring 
February 29, 1880. He had been a self-re- 
liant man, who through honesty, industry 
and economy had made his way in the 
world. He was faithful in all relations of 
I'fe and attentive to business. In three 
years' time while working in the mills in 
Clifton, lie was absent from his place of 
business but a day and a half, and then only 
upon being called away to Springfield on 
business. He was truly a self-made man, as 
he had neither influence or money when he 
started out upon life's journey, but it scxm 
became e\-ident that he was one whom ob- 
stacles mereh' served as a whetstone upon 
which his ambition was kept brightened, 
and difficulties in his path were brushed 
aside with ease. 

John Estle Johnson of this review was 
rather delicate in his yo^ith. He worked in 
the mill somewhat, assisting his father, and 
had a liking for the miller's trade, but his 
family dissuaded him from pursuing it, as 
it was thought the dust of the mills would be 
very detrimental to his health. His schooling 
also was limited to some extent, owing to his 
health, and when not attending school he 
was sent to 'the home of his grandfather 
Estle. where it was thought he would gain 
sirength. He did not attend school much 
after the age of fifteen. On the 15th of Feb- 
ruary. 1864, he responded to his country's 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



259 



call fnr aid. and at the age of nineteen en- 
listed in Company F. Eighth Ohio Volun- 
teer Cavalry and was sent for service in 
Virginia. He was under fire many times. 
On his first experience in the skirmish line 
a shell hin-st very close to him, in front. 
He was on the skirmish line in the Lynch- 
hnrg raid, was captured at Beverly, \\'est 
Virginia, but was soon recaptured. He was 
later captured again at Beverly, in January, 
[865. and was sent to Libby prison, march- 
ing over the mountains from Beverly. He 
was incarcerated in prison until the latter 
part of February oi that year, when he was 
paroled and sent to Columbus and thence he 
we!it home. Later he returned and served 
witli his regiment until he was honorably 
discharged, July 30, 1865. At the close of 
the war he returned to his home, where he 
remained, working on the farm." 

On the 26th of Xovember, 1867, he 
brought his Ijrirk to the houie farm in 
Green township, where he now resides. The 
lady of his choice was ^Sliss Sarah J. Weller, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Wyant) 
Weller. Since his marriage ]\Ir. Johnson 
has carried on agricultural pursuits, culti- 
vating his fields and raising a fine grade of 
stock. His collection of polled Jersey cat- 
tle is among the finest in the state. In 1885 
lie bought a heifer from a thoroughbred 
Jersey male and a native "muley" cow, or 
hornless cow, and from this crossing of 
breeds produced the polled Jersey stock. 
There has been an association formed for 
the breeding of this class of polled Jersey 
cattle, for they are considered very valuable. 
One Jersey cow from ^Nlr. Johnson's breed- 
ing took the premium at the Pan-American 
Exposition for richness of butter. She is 
owned b}' a brother-in-law of ]Mr. Johnson, 
while Mr. Johnsnn jnas in his posession her 



mother and sister. The breeding of fine 
stock has ever been an interesting subject 
to Mr. Johnson and he is well versed in mat- 
ters pertaining to the same. The cattle from 
this breeding are in great demand and IMr. 
Johnsou derives a good income from the 
sale of the same. 

The liome of Mr. and Mrs. Johnson has 
been blessed with five children: Samuel 
\^^, born on the home farm August 29, 
1868, for his first wife chose Alice Budd, by 
whom he had four children. His second 
marriage was with Aranunta Sproull, and 
they now reside in Mansfield, Illinois. Ger- 
trude E., born July 8, 1870, married John 
Budd, resides at New Albany, Indiana, and 
has one child. John O., born June 6, 1873, 
is now cashier for the Northern Pacific Rail- 
road at Whitehall, Montana. He was mar- 
ried November 5, 1902, to Tillie J. Need- 
ham, of that place. Joseph R., born May 
30, 1875, and Jennie A., born April 17, 
1883, '"'^ both at home with their parents. 

Mr. Johnsou has always been a stanch 
Republican. Hte cast his first vote for Abra- 
ham Lincoln in 1864, when nineteen years 
old. In 1887 he removed with his family to 
Van W^ert county, residing in Elgin. There 
he remained for five years. While living 
there he was postiuaster for one and one- 
half }ears, but resigned his position. In 
1900 he took the census in Green township, 
Clark county. He has always worked for 
his party and its interests, and has served 
as a delegate to a number of conventions. A 
member of the Presbyterian church at Clif- 
tiin. he earnestly upholds its teachings and 
principles. Fraternally he is a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
Springfield Lodge, No. t,t,. F. & A. M., at 
Yellow .Springs ; and also became a member 
oi [Mitchell Post at Springfield. He was a 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



charter member of James A. Elder Post, G. 
A. R., and has tilled all the chairs of that 
order and attended the national re-unions, 
thus keeping up pleasant relationship with 
his old army comrades who wore the blue 
and so faithfully served their country upon 
the battle-fields of the south, who were ever 
faithful in war, and now in peace, like the 
father of their country, are honored in the 
hearts of their countrymen. Mr. Johnson 
was a charter member of the Knights of 
Pythias Lodge at Clifton, has represented 
the order in grand lodge, and has filled all 
the chairs. The life record of Mr. Johnson 
stands out in bold relief, speaking for itself 
in strongest terms of a life well and nobly 
spent. He enjoys the respect, confidence 
and esteem of his fellow citizens and is a 
valued member of the comnumity in which 
he resides. 



ALFf^ED BOWX. 



Alfred Bown is a farmer and stock 
raiser of Madison township, Clark county, 
and is one of Ohio's native sons, his birth 
having occurred in the capital city on the ist 
of June, 1840. . His parents were Thomas 
and Rachel Ellen ( Phillips) Bown. The fa- 
ther was born in Upham, Hampshire. Eng- 
land. September 2, 1809, and his mother's 
liirlh (ccurred in Annapolis, Maryland, De- 
cen her 4. 1815, tlieir marriage being cele- 
brated in Columluis. Ohio, January 28. 
1836. In his native country the father 
ser\e(l a seven years' apprenticeship at the 
trade of painting, decorating and graining. 
\\'hen a young man he sought the business 
opportunities of the new world, crossing the 
Atlantic and taking up his aliode in Colun- 
bus. where he reirained until 1844. His 



wife si>ent lier girlhood days in Washington. 
D. C, and aljout 1S34 accmv.panied her par- 
rents on their removal to Ohio's capital. She 
was a daughter of Stqihen and Rachel Phil- 
lips and had been provided with fair educa- 
tional privileges. In lier new home she 
formed the acquaintance of Mr. Bown and 
to him gave her hand in marriage soon af- 
terward. The parents of our subject re- 
moved to Chillicothe. Ohio, and in 1847 be- 
came residents of Cincinnati, where they 
lived until October, i860. Mr. Bown was 
there engaged in merchandising and manu- 
facturing and prospered in his undertakings 
but afterward lost much that he had ac- 
quired through going security for friends. 
In October, i860, he came to Qark county 
and purchased a farm east of Springfield, 
turning his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits. He was the father of ten children, 
nine of whom reached years of maturity. In 
1 86 1, when President Lincoln issued his 
first call for troops to serve for three months, 
the three oldest sons, William H. H., Thom- 
as Walter and Alfred, enlisted in the L'nion 
army. The first named was engaged in 
business in Cincinnati and was connected 
with the militant- company there. He be- 
came a recruiting officer at Cincinnati and 
remained in Ohio for a number of months, 
but later joined the army as a major of the 
Sixty-first Regiment of Ohio Volunteers. 
He was born October 19, 1836, and on the 
23d of April, 1862. he enlisted and was mus- 
tered in by the governor of Ohio. He was 
also mustered in by Captain Dodd at Camp 
Chase and on the 23d of September, follow- 
ing, was promoted to the rank of lieutenant 
colonel. He died September 6, 1864, at 
Chattanooga, Tennessee, of wounds received 
in the battle ( f Peach Tree Creek, July 20, 
1864. His service was with the Amiv of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tlie Potomac until his corps was transferred 
to tlie west. He liad participated in many 
important engagements. The rebel lead 
struck him in the limb, which had to be am- 
putated the second time, and the injury 
proved fatal. Thomas \\'alter, born July 9, 
1838, was living in Springfield when the - 
country called for aid. He went to Cin- 
cinnati and enlisted in Company C, Fifth 
Ohio Infantry, as a private. On the 5th of 
i\Ia}', 1S61, he was promoted to orderly ser- 
geant by Captain Gordon Granger, who af- 
terward became a general, ^^"hen his three 
months' term of service had expired he again 
went to Cincinnati and re-enlisted in Com- 
pany A, Fifty-second Regiment of O'hioi In- 
fantry, for three years. On the i ith of Sep- 
tember, 1 86 1, this regiment was consolidated 
with the Seventy-first Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry, and he was made captain of Coanpany 
K, but because of disability he was honor- 
ably discharged in 1862. Later he re-en- 
tered the service, becoming major of the 
One Hundred and Forty-sixth Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry, and was honorably discharged 
in September, 1864. He now resides in 
Marion, Kansas. 

Alfred Bown, of this review, offered his 
services to the government at the same time 
his brothers enlisted and became a private 
of Company C, Fifth O'hio Infantry. He 
was made a sergeant and with that rank 
served during his three months' term. He 
re-enlisted as a member of Company K, Sev- 
enty-first Ohio Infantry, and was mustered 
in for three years' service by \\'. H. H. 
Bown. He took part in the battle of Shi- 
loh and in a number of skirmishes and then 
he, too, was discharged because of physical 
disability on the 31st of December, 1862, 
but his patriotic spirit did not allow him to 
remain at hr>me long and after he had some- 



what recuperated his health he again en- 
listed and was enrolled as captain of Com- 
pany I, One Hundred and Forty-sixth Ohio 
\'olunteer Infantry, for one hundred days' 
service. This regiment was sent to West 
Virginia to do garrison duty and remained 
at the fort for about four months from the 
2d of May, 1864. Mr. Bown was a brave 
and loyaK soldier and was always found at' 
his post of duty until incapacitated by ill 
health. 

During his boyhood our subject assisted 
his father in the work of the farm and re- 
ceived a good common school education. 
After the war he was undecided for a time 
as to what pursuit he would follow. It 
had been his intention to prepare for the 
bar, but in the meantime his father had pur- 
chased the farm and he decided to make 
agriculture his life work. On the 22d of 
March, 1865, he married Miss Caroline 
Peirce, of Madison township, a daughter oi 
William D. and Cosmelia (Howell) Peirce, 
Mr. Bown then turned his attention to farm- 
ing upon the land which is yet his place of 
residence. His wife inherited about three 
hundred and thirty-eight acres of land, but 
the improvements upon the farm have all 
been placed here through the energy and 
business ability of Mr. Bown. Three 
children were bom of his marriage : Will- 
iam P., who was born April 17, 1867, 
and is living in Madison township; Alfred, 
born July 12, 1872 ; and Jessie D. The wife 
and mother died !\Iay 19, 1899. 

]\Ir. Bown votes with the Republican 
party. He holds membership in the Presby- 
terian church, in which he is serving as an 
elder, and he belongs to ]\IcMilIan Post, 
G. A. ^. He is quite active and prominent 
in political affairs, and in matters of public 
interest pertaining to the general welfare he 



262 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



is found as one who endorses all measures 
for the public good. He possesses consider- 
able artistic ability and his home is adorned 
with a numlier of fine paintings from his 
brush. 



JOHN DICK. 

John Dick has occupied the position of 
superintendent of the Ferncliff cemetery 
since November, 1863, and has wrought a 
transformation here of which the people of 
the city could hardh- have dreamed at the 
beginning of his work. Beauty, quiet, rest- 
fulness — all are desirable features of this 
city of the dead, and nature has seemed to 
supplement every effort put forth by Mr. 
Dick and his helpers in their .work to trans- 
form this into one of the most lovely spots 
in all this section of the country. 

Mr. Dick was born in Ayrshire, Scot- 
land. January 14, 1834, his parents being 
David and Jessie (Charles) Dick, the lat- 
ter a descendant of the Stewarts. Both were 
educated in the private schools of their na- 
tive country and the former became a land- 
scape gardener. The paternal grandfather, 
John Dick, for whom our subject was named, 
was also a professional landscape gardener. 
David Dick reinoved with his family to 
Kirkcudbright in 1838 and there followed 
his profession until 1867, when he came to 
America, his son having previously crossed 
the Atlantic. He was employed in Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, in the line of his chosen voca- 
tion for a time and then came with his wife 
to Springfield, where he lived retired until 
called to their final rest, the father passing 
away at the age of eighty }-ears and the 
mother at the age of seventy-two. The 
grandparents had died in the country of 



their birth. Unto David Dick and his wife 
were born six children, two of whom died 
in early childhood and are buried in Scot- 
land. The others are: John, of this re- 
view; Agnes, of Springfiedt the widow of 
James Hay, who died in Cincinnati, Ohio; 
David, a landscape artist, who died in Mem- 
phis, Tennessee, and was buried in Ferncliff; 
James, who followed the same pursuit in 
Dayton, Kentucky, and at his death was laid 
to rest-in Ferncliff' beside his father, mother 
and brother. The children -were educated in 
excellent schools of Scotland and had* every 
advantage that would assist them in the 
preparation for the practical and responsible 
duties of life. 

After acquiring a good literary educa- 
tion John Dick studied in the Royal Botanic 
Gardens of Edinburgh, the best in the 
country. During the periods of vacation he 
worked with his father and learned the rudi- 
ments of his profession for which he was 
preparing. After his school days were over 
he served an apprenticeship under the direc- 
tion of his father, and at the age of eighteen 
went to Edinburgh, where for two years 
he was under Curator James McXabb and 
Professor Balfour, who was professor of 
botany in the college. In 1854 he started 
for this country and was first employed in 
the United States on Long Island in laying 
out parks for some Xew York people. He 
remained in that section of the country, how- 
ever, for only a short time, making his way 
westward to Cincinnati, Ohio, and in the fall 
of 1863 he came to Springfield on the rec- 
ommendation of Adolph Strauch, who was 
superintendent of the Spring Grove ceme- 
tery in Cincinnati. Mr. Strauch was one of 
the most experienced and thorough land- 
scape artists in the country. He was of 
German birth and had traveled extensively 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



263 



both in Europe and the United States. His 
death occurred in Spring Grove several 
years ago. From him Mr. Dick received 
some valuable infomiation, which he has 
since utilized in his work. When he located 
in this city our subject and his brother 
David, who was then assistant superinten- 
dent under Mr. Strauch, came to inspect the 
location of Ferncliff, and both agreed that it 
was an ideal spot for the purpose selected. 
In the fall of 1S63 our subject and his wife 
came to this city, which has since been their 
home. He was selected by the trustees of 
the cemetery association to improve the wil- 
derness and convert it into what was then 
beyond the expectations of any one, but the 
labors of Mr. Dick have made it a most 
beautiful spot in the state of Ohio. .The 
fruits of his labors can be seen in the ar- 
rangements of the avenues, drainage and 
work as a designer by visiting the cemetery. 
From time to time he has and is adding new 
improvements. He does his own leveling 
and surveying and knows every foot of 
ground in the cemetery. His experience as 
a landscape artist is such that in filling in 
and cutting out various places he has 
brought the natural and artificial in such 
harmonic contact that the latter is not de- 
tected. In all his work he has retained the 
natural element as much as possible. His 
entire time and energy have been devoted to 
improving and beautifying the cemetery. 
Tlie entrance has been preserved in almost 
its entirety except in the roadway, and the 
plans are now under way for a beautiful 
stone conservatory and chapel on the south 
side with a broad entrance from Plum street. 
The home for the use of the superintendent 
was built on an eminence overlooking the 
valley and was the spot chosen by i\Ir. Dick 
manv vears ago. It is a modern stone 



structure and the style of architecture was 
the first of the kind used in Spring-field. The 
dri\-eway is lined with natural flowers, trees 
and shrubs and as it winds about the large 
overhanging rocks a sight most beautiful is 
presented. Winding up the avenue one 
comes in view of the plats laid out on the 
rising ground. The beautiful little lake at 
the foot is the donation of O. S. Kelly, an 
old settler and highly esteemed gentleman of 
the city, who has donated his time, money 
and influence toward carrying out the plans 
as laid out by Superintendent Dick. To 
Gustavus Foos is also due great praise, for 
he is one who gave his personal attention to 
beautifying the eastern slope. Tlie whole 
has been carefully laid out by Mr. Dick and 
carried to completion under the supervision 
of the board of trustees. There can be no 
better monument to the memory of Mr. Dick 
than this beautiful cemetery, which is the 
outcome of his skill, ability and labor. Visi- 
tors who have taveled all over the old coun- 
try and the United States and having visited 
Ferncliff are unanimous in saying that it is 
the most beautiful spot that they have ever 
seen. 

Mr. Dick was married in 1863 to Cath- 
erine Fitsimmons, of Cincinnati, Ohios and 
unto them were born four children. Charles 
is deceased. James F.. who for several 
years has been assistant superintendent of 
Fernclifif, is a graduate of the public schools 
of this city and was a student at Wittenberg 
College for a time. He has followed in his 
father's footsteps, making four generations 
to be connected with landscape gardening. 
He has assisted his father in carrying out 
his designs, taking great interest in build- 
ing up and beautifying the cemetery. He 
has a host of friends and is a very active 
young man in S(xial circles. He married a 



264 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Miss Mclntire and they have one daughter, 
Catherine. Jessie, the third member of the 
family, is the wife of Stacy Buffenbarger, of 
Springfield, and has four children. Mary is 
deceased. The wife and mother died in 
Springfield in 1879, and in 1881 Mr. Dick 
was again married, his second union being 
with Margaret Simons, who was born in 
Pennsylvania. All the children were edu- 
cated and married in this city. 

Mr. Dick is a supporter of all church and 
charitable work and holds membership with 
the Presbyterian denomination, while his 
wife l>elongs to the Lutheran church. He 
is also connected with Springfield Lodge, L 
O. O. P"., and Mad River Encampment. To 
all enterprises that have tended to advance 
the interests of the people and develop the 
city he has been an advocate and supporter. 
He has made landscape gardening his life 
work and it has been his ambition and desire 
to complete the various improvements and 
plans before he, too, should be laid to rest in 
the place he has prepared. He has refused 
lucrative offers in other lines in order to see 
his cherished plans carried to completion. 
He has met discouragements and difficulties, 
being criticised by many, but he has perse- 
vered in his work and there is to-day ho citi- 
zen of Springfield who is not proud of Fern- 
cliff. A self-made man, he owes his success 
antl advancement entirely to his own efforts. 
He has made the Golden Rule the motto of 
his life and his career is therefore one that 
commands the respect and admiration of all 
with whom he has come in contact. 

J. T. McLAUGHLLX, M. D. 
The state of Ohio, with its pulsing in- 
dustrial activities and rapid development, 
has attracted within its cnnfines n.en of 



narked abilitv and high character in the 
\arious professional lines, and in this way 
progress has been conser\ed and social sta- 
i)ility fostered. He whose name initiates 
this review has gained recognition as one 
of the able and successful physicians of the 
state, and by his labors, his high professional 
attainments and his sterling characteristics 
has justified the respect and confidence in 
which he is held l)y the medical fraternity 
and the local public. 

Dr. AIcLaughlin was lx>rn in Bellefon- 
taine, Logan county, Ohio. March 29, 1844, 
and comes of Scotch lineage. His paternal 
grandfather, William McLaughlin, was lx>rn 
in the land of hills and heather near the city 
of Edinburgh and became the founder of the 
family in America. He was a farmer by 
occupation and died at Old Tcnvn, MaiT- 
land, at the age of eighty years. His son, 
George F. McLaughlin, the Doctor's father, 
was torn in Maryland, became a well edu- 
cated' man and in early life remo\ed to Ohio, 
becoming a teacher in the schools of Belle- 
fontaine. He was mairied near Urbana, in 
Champaign county, to Miss Rosanna F. 
Monroe, who was torn in Virginia. She, 
too, was of Scotch lineage and a daughter of 
James Monroe, a nqjhew of President^ Mon- 
roe of the United States. George F. Mc- 
Laughlin built the first public school house 
in Bellefontaine and conducted a school for 
eight years, in which won"k he was assisted 
by his wife, but his useful career was ter- 
n.inated by the hand of death in 1844, at 
the age of forty- four years. Our subject 
was their only child. After the death of 
her first husband the mother was again mar- 
ried, becoming the wife of Dr. Alexander 
Holmes Baldridge, and they had three chil- 
dren. Dr. Baldridge was one of the faculty 
of the Eclectic Medical College, of Cincin- 




J. T. McLaughlin, m. d. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



267 



nati, Ohio, for sixteen years. Both he and 
his wife, the mother of our sul^ject. died in 
Urbana. Tlieir cJiildren were: Landora 
Anerva, Laura Lueha and James Mmnroe, 
all residents of Springiield. 

Dr. McLaughlin of this re\-iew pursued 
his earljr education in the public schools and 
was graduated in the Urbana Oollegiate Li- 
stitute of the class of 1864. He afterward 
read medicine under the direction of his 
step- father, Dr. A. H. Baldridge. and then 
entered the Eclectic Medical Institute of 
Cincinnati, in which he was graduated with 
the highest honors of his class in the spring 
of 1867. He then returned toi Urbana, 
where he practiced for about a year, after 
which he remo\-ed to Xenia, Greene county, 
remaining in that city until he came to 
Springfield in the spring of 1S74. Here 
he became associated \\ith Dr. L. E. Rus- 
sell and the partnership was maintained un- 
til 1886, since which time out subject has 
been alone. He has built up a large and 
extensive practice in the city and ranks high 
as a physician and surgeon. While connect- 
ed with Dr. Russell he built an office next 
U) the one which he now occupies and since 
the dissolution of the partnership he has 
been located at his present place, enjoying 
a constantly increasing business. 

In Springboro', Warren county, Ohio, 
in 1892, Dr. McLaughlin was united in 
marriage to Aliss Mary Emma ^^'ilson, a 
native of that place and a daughter of 
Aaron and Sarah Jane (Brown) Wilson, 
who were farming people of that count}-. 
The mother was born in 1820 and is now re- 
siding with the Doctor and his wife. In 
the family were five children, but JNIrs. Mc- 
Laughlin is the only sur\-iving member. Sbe 
is a graduate of the Springboro Institute 
and is a ladv O'f culture and refinement, and 



of domestic tastes, presiding graciously over 
her pleasant home. The Doctor exercises 
his rig-ht of franchise in support of the men 
and measures oi the Prohibitionist partv. 
He is a member of the Masonic fraternity 
and is a prominent member of the Ohio 
State Eclectic Medical Association, oi which 
he served as secretary for fifteen years, at- 
tending all of its conventions. For a num- 
ber of years he was jail physician, and at 
tlie same time he had charge of a large pri- 
\-ate practice, his patronage indicating the 
confidence and trust reposed in him Ijy the 
public. 



OLIVER H. MILLER. 

01i\er H. Miller is engaged in the prac- 
tice of law in Springfield. He was born in 
Clark county, Ohio, October 10, 1862, and 
is a representative of two of the old families 
of this portion of the state. He traces his 
ancestry back to Moses Miller, who was 
born in England on the ist of August, 1759, 
and on leaving his native land emigrated to 
New Jersey, where he was married in 1780. 
He came to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1791, and 
spent his last days in Clark county, where 
he passed away in 1814, having removed 
from Cincinnati to this locality in 1806. He 
took up his abode in Mad River township, 
following farming there. At the usual gov- 
ernment price he purchased nearly one thou- 
sand acres of land, which his descendants 
still have in their possession. He married 
Phrtbe Baker, who was born in New Jersey 
December 31, 1761. She had two brothers, 
Jonathan and Melyn, wdio came to Clark 
county about 1806 and settled on adjdining 
land in Mad River township. 

Moses Miller and his wife became the 



268 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



parents of eight children, of whom ilelyn 
IMiller, the grandfather of our subject, was 
tlie eighth in order of l)irth. He was born 
in Cincinnati in 1801 and died in Clark 
county January 15, 1854. Like the other' 
members di the family he pursued his edu- 
cation in the early schools of this county, 
was reared amid the wild scenes of frontier 
life and followed farming and cabinet mak- 
ing in order to provide for his wife and chil- 
dren. The Millers are not a long-lived race, 
nor ha\e they married early in life and of 
this particular branch of the family there are 
but few descendants. The land originally 
owned by the grandfather has always re- 
mained in the family. Melyn Baker Miller, 
the grandfather, was married to Christena 
Powell, of LIrbana, Ohio, who was born 
April 15, 1803, and died October 16, 1884. 
Their marriage was celebrated March 12, 
1823. Melyn B. ^Miller acquired consider- 
able of the land belonging to the original 
purchase and upon his farm he reared his 
family, numbering ten children, of whom 
but one is now living, Melyn H. Miller, who 
resides upon the old family homestead. He 
was born August 28, 1836. Of this family 
all the children were born and educated in 
Clark county. Seven of the number, five 
sons and two daughters, reached mature 
years. Sylvester had one son who is still 
living- -Edgar .S., a dentist, of Indianapolis, 
— while Abram Powell had three children 
and the others died leaving no descendants. 
Abram Powell Miller, the father of our 
subject, was the ninth child of his parents' 
family and was born in 1839. On the ma- 
ternal side he is a representative of the 
Powell family which originally emigrated 
from Virginia to Kentucky, but on- account 
of a poor land title in the latter state they 
came to Ohio, settling in Urbana. Abram 



Powell Miller became a prosperous farmer 
of Clark county. He inherited some of the 
land of the Closes' Miller purchase, added 
to that and possessed at the time of his 
death a very valuable farm of three hundred 
and twenty-five acres. Abram Powell Mil- 
ler was married October 20, 1861, to Mary 
Cox, a daughter of George W. Cox, a farm- 
er of this count}". Her mother bore the 
maiden name of Lois H. Baker, belonging to 
an early pioneer family that removed from 
New Jersey to Clark county. Three sons 
were born of this marriage : Oliver H. ; 
Albertus Cox, who is married and resides 
upon a farm in Mad River township and has 
two children — Mary J., and Eldon G. ; and 
Lioval O., who is a mechanic, is married 
and resides in Springfield. Abram P. Mil- 
ler, the father of these children, died in the 
year 1897, at the age of fifty-eight years, 
his birth having occurred on the 10th of 
July, 1839. His wife passed away April 20, 
1 88 1, and they were laid to rest in the ceme- 
tery at Enon. Ohio. 

]t will be interesting in this connection 
to know something of the maternal ancestry 
of our subject, who in that line is descended 
from Melyn Baker, who was born I\Iay 18, 
1793, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and was a son of 
Melyn Baker, Sr., who was born Jan- 
uary 10, 1760, and became a resident of 
Clark county in 1806. He served his coun- 
try as a soldier in the Revolutionary war, 
belonging to the Xew Jersey Artillery and 
was wounded in the army but never asked 
for a pension. His wife, Pha'be Baker, was 
bom December 31, 1761. His death oc- 
curred January 20. 1826. while she died 
in Clark countv, November 4, 1813. Tlie 
Bakers owned two sections of land in Mad 
River township and the Millers a section 
and a half. Both .families carried on farm- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



269 



ing on an extensive scale. Their land was 
all covered with heavy timber which they 
cleared away and improved the fields, trans- 
forming the tract into richly cultivated land. 
To-day of the eight hundred and sixty acres 
owned by the Millers, only forty acres is 
still covered with the native timber. The 
Millers and Bakers Avere about the fifth and ■ 
.^ixth families to establish homes in j\Iad 
River tow^nship and since that time repre- 
sentatives of both families have carried on 
general farming here. Our subject now has 
in his possession a land patent which was 
signed by Thomas Jefferson, the president 
of the United States, in 1806. Of the tract 
of eight hundred and sixty acres of land 
above mentioned, nearly all is yet in the pos- 
session of the Miller family and the subject 
ijf this re\-iew is the owner of one hundred 
and thirty-five acres of that tract and twen- 
ty-five acres of the Baker tract. 

r^Ielyn Baker, Jr., was united in mar- 
riage to ]\Iary I.ayton, who was born in 
Clark county December 13, 1797. She was 
a very bright and intelligent woman, retain- 
ing her mental faculties up to the time of 
her death, which occurred January 8, 1879. 
Her husband had long since passed away, 
liaving died in Clark county June 4, 1844. 
They were the parents of nine children, of 
whom seven reached years of maturity. 
Oliver H. Miller, of this review, has now in 
preparation a genealogy of the Miller family 
and is well posted upon the family history. 

In the district schools our subject pur- 
sued his early education and later became a 
student in Wittenberg College at Spring- 
field, Ohio, where he completed the work of 
the junior year. In 1886 he began the study 
of law under General J. Warren Keifer, and 
in 1887 he became a student in the Cincin- 
nati Law School, where he was graduatetl 



in May. 1888. Immediately afterward he 
returned to Springfield where he opened an 
otBce and during his fourteen years' con- 
nection with the bar here, he has built up a 
practice which has constantly grown in vol- 
ume and importance. 

On the 15th of February, 1900, Mr. Mil- 
ler was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Adra R. 
Hutchinson, a daughter of John and ]Mar- 
tha (Kelly) Hutchinson. She was born in 
Clark county, Ohio. Her father was a stair- 
builder and cabinet-maker, and died in 1898, 
\\ hen about sixty-nine years of age, his birth 
having occurred in 1829. His widow now 
makes her home with Mrs. ]\Iiller, who was 
an only daughter. 

In his political views ]\Ir. Miller is a Re- 
publican and has been an active worker in 
his party, for he believes firmly in its prin- 
ciples. He served as secretary of the i^e- 
publican central committee from 1892 until 
1897. and was its chairman in 1899. In 
1802 he was elected secretary of the school 
board and has served in that capacity con- 
tinuously since, the cause of education find- 
ing in him a warm and earnest friend. He 
was the first librarian of the Clark County 
Law Library and is a member of the Clark 
County Bar Association. H(e belongs to 
Ingomar Lodge, No. 610, K. of P., in which 
he has served as master of finances since 
1892. Mr. Miller is a worthy representative 
of pioneer families of Clark county. His an- 
cestors began the work of development and 
improvement liere. This task was carried 
on by representatives of later generations 
and at the present time the subject of this 
review is performing his full share in the 
advancement and upbuilding of the county. 
The family name figures prominently upon 
the pages of Clark county's history and 
Oliver H. ]Mil!er is now recognized as an 



270 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



active factur in iirofessinnal circles. ha\ing 
■-'ttained creditable success as a member of 
the bar. 



jAMI'S R. LITTLER. 
In the history of the business enterprises 
of Pitchin James R. Littler deserves men- 
tion as a representative of industrial life of 
the town. He also may well be numbered 
among the veterans of the Civil war to 
whom the country owes a de1)t of gratitude 
for his efforts in preserving the LTnion. He 
is one of Ohio's native sons, his birth hav- 
ing occurred in Clifton, Greene county, Sep- 
tember 9, 1837. His parents, Nathan and 
Belinda (Sellers) Littler, were early set- 
tlers of Ohio. They were born in Virginia 
between \\'inchester and Martinsburg on 
Back creek, along Applepie ridge. Both 
came lo Ohio with their respective parents. 
Nathan Littler, the paternal grandfather of 
our subject, settled in Greene county, near 
Clifton, while the materiTal grandfather, 
Paulser Sellers, took up his abode near Sel- 
ma in Greene county. The young ijeople 
were married in this state. Tlie father was 
a miller by trade, working all over the coun- 
tv. l)ut made his home in Clifton. Live chil- 
dren were born of this union : John, who 
married and left several children, was a sol- 
dier in the Sixtieth Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry and was captured at Harper's Ferry 
but soon afterward was paroled. He lived 
tt:> the advanced age of si.xt^-two years. 
James R. is the second of the family. Sam- 
uel died in childhood. Sarah J. became the 
wife of Owen Garlough and after his death 
married B. F. Garlough. Henry Clay, who 
was also a soldier, belonging to the Seven- 
teenth I'nitcd States Regulars, now resides 
in Xenia. 



James R. Littler was a youth of tifteen 
years when his father died. He afterward 
made his home with his maternal grand- 
parents until 1855. when he went to Cedar- 
\ille, Ohii>, to serve as an apprentice to a 
Ijlacksmith. He received thirty-seven dol- 
lars for his serices the first year, sixty dol- 
lars for the second year and seventy-five 
dollars for the third year. \\'hen he had 
completed his apprenticeship he worked in 
Cedarville as a joiu'neyn.an and also in New 
Burlington. 

I\lr. Littler was married in the latter 
place .April 17, 1861, to :Miss ;Margaret J. 
Hurle}-, a daughter of Henry and Sarah 
(Moffatt) Hurley. He afterward returned 
to Cedarxille and became a partner of his 
former employer, J. R. Cooper, but soon he 
put aside all business relations and in Au- 
gust, i8()j. enlisted for service in the Union 
army, becoming a member of Company F, 
lH)rty-fourth Ohio \'olunteer Infantry, as 
a private. He was lirst sent to West \'ir- 
ginia and was under fire at Brtwkville, Ken- 
tucky. Later he participated in a numl>er 
of hard fought battles and in many skir- 
nn'shes and in February, 1864, he veteran- 
ied, becoming a member of the Eighth Ohio 
Cavalry, the first veteran cavalry regiment 
of Ohio. He saw much hard fighting and 
was found in the thickest of the engage- 
ment. They participated in the battle of 
L}nchburg. The regiment was then di- 
vided and Mr. Littler was with that portion 
that oi)erated in the Shenandnah X'alley un- 
der General Sheridan. With his command 
he was captured at Beverly, West \'irginia. 
being held a prisoner from the nth of Janu- 
ary until the latter part of February in 
Liliby. Then with others he was exchanged. 
Throughout his entire army life he was 
always found -at his post of duty, whether 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



it took liim to the lonel}- picket line or led 
him into the midst cif the field (if carnage. 

After his return home Mr. Littler es- 
tablished a l)lacksmith shup at Gurneyville, 
Clinton count}-, Ohio, where he remained 
for about seventeen months and then took 
up his abode in Sharon, where he remained 
for eleven }'ears. On the expiration of that 
period he came to Pitchin in 1877 and has 
since conducted a blacksmith shop at this 
place, having a good patronage. 

L'nto Air. and ]\Irs. Littler ha\-e been 
born twelve children. Those living are: 
Clayton B., Frank R., Joella, Jennie M., 
\\'iliam, Clyde, Goldie, Loreii and Glenn. 
Their third child, Sarah, died at the age of 
twenty-six years, and James H. and Mary 
E. died in childhood. In i860 Mr. Littler 
cast his first presidential vote, supporting 
Lincoln in that }'ear and again in 1864. He 
voted while in the saddle, the rebel balls try- 
ing all around him. He is a member of 
Xenia Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Mitchell Post, 
G. A. R., of Springfield; and also became a 
member of the subordinate lodge and en- 
campment of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He has attended fourteen national 
re-unions of the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic and has been active in political work, 
serving many times as a delegate to conven- 
tions of his party. 



^^TLLIAM H. OWEX. 

The glory of our republic is in the per- 
petuation of individuality and in the accord- 
ing of the utmost scope for individual ac- 
complishment. Of America is the self-made 
man a product, and the record of his ac- 
complishments is the record which the true 
and loyal American holds in deepest regard 



and highest honor. In tracing tlie career of 
the subject of this review we are enabled to 
gain a recognition of this sort of a record. 
There is particular interest attaching to the 
points which mark his progress in life as 
he has steadily advanced, through capabil- 
ity, determination and perseverance, to a 
prominent position in the industrial world, 
being now extensively and successfully en- 
gaged in the manufacture of milling ma- 
chines and machine tools in Springfield, 
Ohio. 

^\'illiam H. Owen was born in Glenham, 
Dutchess county, X'ew York, October 26, 
1850, his parents being Morgan and Har- 
riett (Rodgers) Oavch. The family is of 
Welsh lineage on the paternal side and in 
the maternal line comes of English extrac- 
tion. David Owen, the grandfather of our. 
subject, was a soldier of the war of 1812. 
The parents were both born and reared in 
Dutchess county, Xew York, where they 
spent their entire lives. The father was a 
contractor for heavy work and also- carried 
on agricultural pursuits. His birth occurred 
in Matteawan, X'ew York, in 18 16, and in 
March, 1896, he was called to his final rest, 
having attained the ripe old age of eighty 
years. He had but limited school privileges, 
but he made the most of his opportunities 
and his life work and accomplishments were 
most creditable. His political support was 
given the Democracy in the early years of 
his manhood, but he afterward became iden- 
tified with the Republican party and held 
some local oftices. Reading, experience and 
observation made him a well informed man 
and he exercised not a little influence in Ijusi- 
ness and political life. Both he and his wife 
were active and consistent members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and their fidel- 
ity to Christian teachings made them people 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of the highest respectability, honored wher- 
ever they were known. ^Mrs. Owen, who 
was born in 1817, died in April, 1901, hav- 
ing spent her entire life in Dutchess coiuity. 
This worthy couple were the parents of ten 
children, of whom four are yet living. 
James, the eldest, became a member of the_ 
Uninn army at the first call of President Lin- ' 
coin for troops, served in the navy for a 
time. later enlisted in the United States cav- 
alrv service and* afterward Ijecame a member 
of the heavy artillery. He served for five 
years or until the close of the war and he 
now resides in Salem, Illinois, where he fol- 
lows farming. Sarah J. is the wife of C. B. 
Cunley, of Poughkeepsie, New York. Will- 
iam H. is the next of the family. Amelia, 
the yiAingest living child, is the wife of 
George Cooper, of Amsterdam, Xew York. 
Four children passed away in early youth, 
and Emily, who became the wife of John 
Gracey, died at the age of forty-six years, 
while Annie died at the age of nineteen. 

\\'illiam H. Owen pursued a common 
school education and also s^ni one year as 
a student in a select school in Glenham. The 
days of his boyhood and youth were passed 
in his parents' home, and, entering upon his 
business career he secured a clerkship in a 
general store in Glenham. where he remained 
for eighteen months. Desiring to learn a 
trade he then entered upon an apprentice-, 
ship as a machinist in the shop of John B. 
Schenk & Sons, of ilatteawan, Xew York. 
At the age of eighteen he began working for 
journeyman's wages and secured employ- 
ment at Fishkill Landing in the engine 
works, where he remained for six months. 
On the expiration of that period be entered 
the Eehring Works at Glenham and subse- 
quently he returned to the shop in which he 
bad learned bis trade. On again leaving his 



old employer be secured a situation in the 
West Point Foimdn.-, but his ability and 
fidelity were such- that after a few months 
the firm of J. B. Schenk & Sons again sought 
his services, offering him the position of 
foreman in the planing department. There 
he remained for a year. Subsequently he 
became connected with the Kipp Steam En- 
gine Company, at Sing Sing, New York, 
building engines by contract and employing 
eight men. He continued this work for 
three years and then built a contract ma- 
chine in the Sing Sing prison for the finn 
of Xuttman. Tucker & Havemeyer. This 
was a special machine for the manufacture 
of asphaltum paving brick and it required 
four months to complete it. On the expira- 
tion of that period Mr. Owen returned to 
the Kipj) Steam Engine Company as fore- 
man and later be became tool-maker for 
W. X. Whiteley, at Yonkers. Xew York. 

When six months bad there passed Will- 
iam H. Owen, leaving the EnT])ire state, 
came to Springfield, Ohio, to accept the po- 
sition of tool-maker for the firm of \\'hite- 
ley, Fassler & Kelly, in September, 1887. 
Here his services were so satisfactory that 
he was retained in the employ of that com- 
pany for ten years and was advanced from 
the position of journeyman to that of fore- 
man, his wages lieing projxDrtionately in- 
creased. On the expiration of the decade he 
removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, and for five 
months was with the firm of Lodge & Davis, 
after which he returned to Springfield and 
organized the Springfield Machine Tool 
Company, in which he was associated with 
P. E. ^lontanus and Frank Kempsmith. 
This newly formed company continued its 
existence for four years and was then in- 
corporated under -the name of the Spring- 
field Machine T(X>1 Company, business being 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



273 



thus carried on for l\vi;> years. On the ex- 
piration of that period "Sir. Owen established 
the Owen Machine Tool Company and, in 
1893 he began business on a small scale, 
gradually increasing his trade as it became 
known that his products were of a superior 
grade and character. He now employs 
thirty-five skilled workmen. The machines 
manufactured are of original designs and 
there is a system of fourteen sizes of plain 
and imiversal milling machines, all O'f which 
are manufactured from designs made by Mr. 
Owen and are constructed under his per- 
sonal supervision, which are to-day found 
in all parts of the civilized world and agen- 
cies have been established in various points 
of this country and abroad. The business 
has been built up entirely through the ex- 
ertions of Mr. Owen, his success resulting 
fromi his capability and the excellencies of 
the machines manufactured. 

In Plattsburg. New York, in 1870, ]\Ir. 
0^ven was united in marriage to ]\Iary Cud- 
worth, who was born in the vicinity of Platts- 
burg in 185 1, a daughter of Joel Cudworth, 
a farmer of that locality. Both he and his 
wife lived to an advanced age and died in 
that county. In their family were two 
daughters, Sarah, wlio is married and lives 
in Plattsburg, and Airs. Owen. Mr. and 
Mrs. Owen have six daughters : Grace, the 
wife of Ernest Bell, of Bloomfield, New Jer- 
sey : Maud: Ada: Josephine; Cora; and 
Willitta. All have received good educa- 
tional advantages in the public schools of 
Springfield and three are graduates of the 
high school, while Grace is a graduate of 
the Nelson Business College. 

Mr. Owen is a Republican in politics but 
has never sought political honors or emolu- 
ments. He has long been a member of the 
ilasonic fraternity, lielonging to Westches- 



ter Lodge, F. & A. M., of Sing Sing, New- 
York. Church and charitable work receixes 
his endorsement and liberal support. He is 
a self-made man, whose advancement in life 
has come to him through earnest purpose and 
unremitting diligence. He purchased the 
land and erected his present home at No. 
509 South Limestone street, supplying it 
with all modern improvements. He largely 
owes his success in life to the fact that he 
has persevered in the pursuit of the business 
in which, as a young tradesman, he em- 
barked, ne\-er turning aside into other chan- 
nels or dissipating his energies over a broad 
field of labor. His success' has been the re- 
sult of honest, persistent effort in the line of 
honorable, manly dealing. His aims have 
always been to attain the best, and he has 
carried forward to successful completion 
whatever he has undertaken. His life has 
marked a steady growth, and now he is in 
possession of a handsome competence, and 
more than all, has that contentment that 
comes from a consciousness of ha\-ing lived 
for a noble purpose. 



L. FLOYD ROUTZAHN. 

L. Floyd Routzahn is filling tlie posi- 
tion of county sheriff of Clark county, and 
on the roster of officials here there is no 
name wdiich is more truly a synonym for 
faithful, fearless and meritorious service 
than that of Air. Routzahn. Fully realizing 
the obligation which rests upon him as an 
ofiicer of the law, he stands as a defender 
of all that is right, the protector of the weak 
and as the opponent of every element of 
lawlessness. 

?\lr. Routzahn is a native of Springfield, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



his birth having here occurred on the i-'th 
of January, 1866, his parents l>eing Lutlier 
M. ?.nd Ehnira ( l-iomtzahn) Routzahn. 
Tlie fatlier was horn in Frederick county, 
Maryland, in 1830, and in the year 1863 
hecame a resident of Springfield, where, 
soon afterward, he secured employment with 
the \\'arder, Bushnell & Glessner Company, 
in whose service he was long retained, leav- 
ing that employ only a short time prior to 
his death, which occurred in this city on 
the 14th of July, 1887. His wife, who was 
horn in Hagerstown. Maryland, in 1824. 
still survives him. 

In the personal history of L. Floyd 
Routzahn we present to our readers the life 
record (if one who is widely and favorably 
known in Springfield and throughout this 
section of the state. When a boy of si.x 
years he entered the public schools, therein 
continuing his studies until he had mas- 
tered the I)ranches of the high school course. 
On putting aside his text b<x>ks he entered 
upon his business career as a dealer in boots 
and shoes, forming a partnership with Mrs. 
Rose Routzahn in 1892. under the firm 
name of Routzahn & Company. They built 
up a good trade and continued in business 
together until 1897, when the partnership 
was dissolved and L. M. Wright became a 
memlier of the firm, the name being changed 
to Routzahn & Wright. Tlieir place of 
business is at Xo. 1 1 South F(Hintain aven- 
ue, and they carry a large and well selected 
stock of goods. The reliable business 
methods of the house, combined with their 
reasonable prices, has led tn the acc|uire- 
nient of a good trade, which has reached 
profitable proportions. 

On the 26th of April. 1888. ^\r. Rout- 
zahn was united in marriage tn Miss Carrie 
Rupert, of Springfield, a daughter of Henry 



and Emily Rupert. Bi)th having spent 
their entire lives here, they are well known 
to a large number of Springfield citizens, 
and the hospitality of many of the test 
homes is extended tr. them. In his political 
views ilr. Routzahn is an earnest Repub- 
lican, taking an active interest in IcKal, 
county and state politics, and doing all in 
his power to promote the growth and insure 
the .success of the party. Upon his ticket 
he was elected in November, 1900, to the 
position of sherifif tif Clark county for a 
term of two years, and entered u])i>n the du- 
ties of his office in the following January. 
In Xovember, 1902, he was re-elected to 
the same office, so that he will retain the 
incuml>ency until January, 1905. Fearless 
and faithful in the discharge of his duties, 
his course has won him high commendation, 
and as an officer he deserves the regard and 
confidence of his fellow men. Mr. Routzahn 
was made a Mason in Anthony Lodge, Xo. 
453, F. & .\. M., and is also a member of 
Springfield Chapter, X'o. 48, R. A. M., and 
Springfield Council, Xo. 17. R. & S. M. He 
is also a member of Red Star Lodge, Xo. 
205, K. P. !\Ir. Routzahn is popular with 
a large circle of acquaintances, for he is of 
genial manner and kindly temperament, and 
the sterling traits of his character have 
gained for him many friends. 



CH.VRLKS R. CRAIX. 

For more than a third of a century 
Charles R. Crain has been numbered among 
the most prominent and progressive citi- 
zens of Springfield. He has earned for him- 
self an enviable reputation as a careful man 
of business, and in his dealings is known for 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



his prompt and hrmora'ble methods, which 
have won liini tlie deserved regard and un- 
bounded confidence of his feUow men. He 
is today the president and treasurer of tlie 
business conducted under the name of P. P. 
Mast & Company, manufacturers of Buck- 
eye agricuhural implements. 

Mr. Grain comes of one of the honored 
pioneer famihes of Clark county. His pa- 
ternal grandfather was John Crain, who 
was descended of sturdy Scotch-Irish stock 
and who, at an early period in the develop- 
n-ent of this portion of Ohio took up his 
abode in Clark county. He married a Miss 
Reeder. whose father, emigrating westw'ard, 
took up his abode in the midst of the green 
wo<3ds on the waters of Mad river. Among 
the childrai boni of this marriage was John 
A. Crain, the father of cair subject, whose 
birth occurred in Clark county in iSii. He 
was reared as a farm boy and followed agri- 
cultural pursuits throughout the greater 
part of his life. He married Anner M. Ba- 
con, also a native oi this county "and a 
daughter oi John Bacon, one of the pioneer 
settlers who cam.e tO' Ohio from Xew Eng- 
land, and took up his abode in Springfield 
when the city was a m.ere hamlet, gi\'ing lit- 
tle indication of future growth and develop- 
n-.ent. As the city began to extend its bor- 
ders, however, John Bacon became an active 
factor in mercantile interests there and later 
became extensively engaged in the 'banking 
business, being for a number of years the 
president of the idd Mad River Xational 
Bank, holding that position at the tim.e of 
his death. His wife bore the maiden name 
of Mary Cavalier, and they reared a family 
of six children, including the mother of our 
subject. 

Charles R. Crain spent his boyhood in 
the citv which is still his home and is in- 



debted to the public school system for his 
preliminary education, which was supple- 
mented by study at the ^^'ittenberg■ College, 
w lie re he ren;ained as a student until his 
eighteenth year. He then became a factor 
in the business life of Spring-field and has 
since been closely and actively associated 
with business affairs. In 1867 he embarked 
in the dry-goods business with Brelsford 
& Dinwiddie, acting in the capacity of clerk 
until 1869, when he resigned his jwsition to 
enter the emplo}' of Thon'.as & Alast, manu- 
facturers of agricultural implements. He 
continued with them until 1871, at which 
time the firm was dissolved and the P. P. 
Mast & Company was incorporated with a 
capital stock of five hundred thousand dol- 
lars, P. P. Mast being elected president and 
treasurer and J. S. Eberhard as secretary. 
I\Ir. Crain remained with the new con:pany 
and at various times was promoted tO' re- 
sponsible positions of greater and greater 
importance until he had a broad and com- 
prehensi\-e knowdedge o-f the business in 
principle and detail and was a m.ember of 
the first board of directors when the com- 
pany was incorporated in 1871, and at the 
present time is tJie only m.ember of the orig- 
inal board still connected with the company. 
In 1 881 he was elected secretary of the 
company, wdiich position he, held until the 
death of Mr. :\Iast, in October, 1898, at 
which tim.e ]\Ir. Crain succeeded him as 
president. He also became one of the large 
stockholders of the compau}-. The corpora- 
tion name has remained jLinchanged. but the 
business has been enlarged and the company 
now employs four hundred men. The 
various buildings are substantial brick struc- 
tures, ef|uipped with highly impro\-ed ma- 
chinery, and the plant, which is located on 
Warder street, covers an area of eight acres. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



The present ofi'icers are: C. R. Grain, pres- 
ident and treasurer ; C. C. Kirkpatrick, vice- 
president ; and J. \\'. Spahr, secretary. Tlie 
Buckeye ag^ricultural implements, consisting 
of grain drills, cultivators and cereal mills, 
are manufactured on an extensive scale. 
The implements manufactured by this firm 
are e.xtensively sold throughout the United 
States and there is also a large foreign 
trade, which covers all of the grain growing 
countries of the world. 

Mr. Grain has not confined his efforts 
to one line, but has extended his operations 
into other fields in the world of activity. 
He is now a director and vice-president of 
the Springfield National Bank. He has also 
made extensive and important investments 
in real estate and is the owner of the old 
homestead in the Mad River valley, south- 
west of Springfield, consisting of three hun- 
dred and forty acres. This he has placed 
under a high state of cultivation and has 
made it beautiful by many improvanents 
which he has placed thereon. He also has 
one of the finest herds of pure bred red 
polled cattle, registered, to be found in 
southem Ohio. On this farm, on the Day- 
ton, Springfield & Urbana interurban road, 
]\rr. Grain and his family make tlicir home, 
and the household is known for its gracious 
and cordial hospitality. 

In 1870 occurred the n^arria§■e of 
Gharles R. Grain and Miss Susan Stoler, 
of Springfield, a daughter of Jacob Stoler, 
and they now have two children, Gharles 
Edward, who is in the employ of P. P. 
Mast & Gompany; and Nellie R., the wife 
of Louis E. Bauer, of this city. Mr. Grain 
is a memter of St. Paul's Methodist Epis- 
copal church, of Springfield, and for some 
years has served as a memlier of its lx)ard of 
trustees. He is a citizen whose public spirit 



and deep interest in the welfare of Spring- 
field have been manifest in suljstantial as- 
sistance to many enterprises and movements 
for the general good. Politically Mr. Grain 
is a Republican. He takes an active inter- 
est in the growth and success of his party. 
Ijut has never desired or sought public office. 
S(x:ially he is connected with the Masonic 
fraternity, his membership being in An- 
thony Ixxlge, Xo. 455, F. & A. M.. Spring- 
field Ghapter, Xo. 48, R. A. :M.. Springfield 
Goimcil. Xo. 17, R. & S. ^I.. and Palestine 
Gommander}-, No. 33, K. T. 

Mr. Grain is one of Spring-field's solid 
n:en who has done a great deal for his natix'e 
citv. He possesses a genial manner, and is 
a fine illustration of a self-made man, his 
career well serving as a lesson to the young. 
He began his career under adverse circum- 
stances, laeing compelled to make his own 
way, and his success in life illustrates most 
forcibly the power of patient and persistent 
effort and self-reliance. He has so conduct- 
ed all affairs, whether of private interests 
or public trusts, as to merit the esteem of 
all classes of citizens, and no word of re- 
proach is ever uttered against bin:. .\s a 
man and citizen he aijoys the prosperity 
which has come to those genial spirits who 
liave a hearty shake of the hand for. all those 
with whom they come in contact from day 
to day, and who seem to throw around them 
in consequence .so much of the sunshine of 
life. 



XIGHOLAS KRIEGBAUM. 

For more than a half century Xicholas 
Kriegbaum has resided in Springfield and 
he has passed the seventieth milestone on 
life's journev. He was born in Germany, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



279 



December 3, 183^. and spent the first eigli- 
teen years of his lite in his native country, 
acquiring his education according to the 
laws of that land and there learning the cab- 
inet-maker's trade. He was a yoimg man 
of eighteen when he determined to try his 
fortune in America, for he had heard favor- 
able reports of the business opportunities 
of this country and hoped to more readily 
advance toward the goal of success than he 
could do if he remained in Germany. Ac- 
cordingly in 185 1 he sailed for America, 
and settled in Springfield, Ohio, where he 
began working at the cabinet-maker's trade, 
following that successfully for ten years. 
During that time he acquired capital' suiifi- 
cient to enable him to engage in the grocery 
business in 1857, and for seven years he 
conducted his enterprise in that line. At 
length, however, he sold out on account of 
ill health. He then went abroad, visiting 
Germany, France and England, spending 
four months in his travels in European 
countries. 

On the expiration of that period he again 
took up his abode in this city, and in 1866 
established a bakery. He was not long in 
gaining a good trade, which constantly grew 
until his business had assmned profitable 
and extensive proportions. He conducted it 
with growing success from year to year until 
1 89 1, when Charles Nicholas KriegbaunT, 
his son, became his successor in the enter- 
prise and our subject retired from active 
business life. For over a third of a century 
he has resided at his present location at the 
corner of Plum and Columbia streets, hav- 
ing first built a small house on the site of his 
present fine brick residence. 

Nicholas Kriegbaum was married to 
Minnie Banner, who was Ijorn in Auglaize 
countv, Ohio, and during her infancy was 



left an orphan. Six children have been 
born unto our subject and his wife. Mary 
Jane, the eldest, is the wife of George 
Tritsch, who was born in Indiana and is 
now engaged in the real estate business in 
Indianapolis. They have reared two chil- 
dren, Arthur and Walter. William George, 
the second of the family, wedded Barbara 
Myers and is now the owner of an orange 
grove at Riverside, California, where they 
are living with their one child, Lawrence. 
Emma Minnie is at home with her parents. 
Charles N. married Alice Brandt, of Day- 
ton, Ohio, by whom he has one child, Clar- 
ence, and is now engaged in the bakery busi- 
ness in Springfield, as his father's successor. 
George P. is associated in luisiness with his 
brother Charles. Edward J. is working as 
a florist in this city. 

For almost a half century Mr. Krieg- 
baum has been a member of the Odd Fel- 
lows society and enjoys the high regard of 
his brethren of that fraternity, while in his 
life he has ever been true to the teachings 
and principles of the order. He is also con- 
nected through membership relations with 
the Knights of Pythias, the Red Men and 
the German Benevolent Society. He is a 
stalwart Democrat in political affiliations 
and has been honored with public otiices, 
having served from 1880 until 1885 as a 
member of the common council, during 
which time he exercised his official preroga- 
tives in support of every measure which he 
believed would prove of benefit to the city. 
He belongs to St. John's Lutheran church, 
of which he was the secretary and treasurer 
for about a quarter of a century. This in- 
dicates how upright has been his life. He is 
a man of strong character, of marked in- 
telligence and is ever found to be fearless in 
defense of his honest convictions, and his 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



political service, like his business life, is 
above reproach, while his church connec- 
tions have been manifested in his just and 
honorable treatment of his fellow men. 



JOHN \V. MARTIX. 

John W. IMartin, who is now engaged 
in the business of renovating feathers on the 
Dayton pike, near Pleasant street, Spring- 
field, was born near the Rocky Point school, 
southwest of the city, on a farm now owned 
by the Howell heirs. The date of his birth 
was February 28, 1840, and his parents 
were David and Rachel (Sands) Martin. 
His father was born in Berks county, Penn- 
svlvania, in 1797, and was a son of Richard 
:\Iarlin. who was also a native of the Key- 
stone state and died on what is now the Ben 
Mellinger farm in Clark county, Ohio. He 
was a farmer and cooper. He served in the 
war of 1812, and the father of our subject 
witnessed the burning of the capitol during 
that war, being then in Washington. The 
latter was fourteen years of age at the time. 

In 1828 David Martin came to Clark 
county. Ohio, and located south of Spring- 
field on the present Stratton farm. After a 
short tin-e, however, he removed to the farm 
on which our subject was 1x)rn. there living 
until 1840. when he went to Beatty and con- 
ducted a cooper shop there for a number of 
years. Later he took up his abode at Yel- 
low Springs, where he engaged in the coop- 
erage business in connection with agricul- 
tural pursuits for about seven years. He 
next located at New Carlisle, where he 
farmed for about two years, after which he 
settled two miles south of Troy, carrying on 
agricultural pursuits at that point for seven 



years. His next home was at Gettysburg. 
Darke count \-. Ohio, but two years later he 
removed to the Adolph Smith farm and 
from there to the Miller farm, southwest of 
Enon. His next removal took him to Piqua, 
Ohio, and later he returned to Enon. where 
his death occurred September 21. 1874. His 
wife, who died June 24. 1884. bore the 
maiden name of Rachel Sands and was of 
English descent. There was a fortune left 
in England to the family but it was never 
claimed. Thomas Sands, her father, resided 
in Maryland, and in that state she was born 
in 1804 and there gave her hand in marriage 
to David Martin. 

This worthy couple became the parents 
of eight sons and one daughter, namely: 
Samuel wedded Katherine Deaver. now de- 
ceased, liy whom he had two children, one 
of whom is dead, while the other resides in 
Kansas. Richard married Elizabeth Mar- 
tin, who died in 1898. Thomas wedded 
Caroline Xewhouse and died in October. 
1899, while two of his five children are also 
deceased. Da\id wedded Mary Speelman 
and died January 7. 1899. He had four 
children, two of whom are now deceased. 
Elizabeth, the only daughter, died at the 
age of three years. John \\'. of this review 
is the next younger. Joseph married Sallie 
Gibbs and they had three children, one of 
whom is deceased. William married Fran- 
ces Beadle and of their five children one is 
deceased. James married Minnie Graves 
and they have two children. The four eld- 
est sons of the family were coopers and our 
subject became a farmer, while the younger 
sons were carpenters. 

Under the parental roof John \\'. Mar- 
tin was reared to manhood anil when he 
arived at years of maturity he became a 
soldier, enlisting on the 15th of August. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1 86 1, as a member of Company I, First 
Ohio Cavalry, being mustered in at Piqua. 
He was then sent to Camp Chase, near Co- 
himbus, Ohio, where the regiment remained 
until the ist of November, when it took the 
field in Kentucky. Air. Martin was in the 
sei'vice for four years and fifteen days, and 
he had three lirotliers who were also sol- 
diers. Samuel, the eldest, contracted ill- 
ness at Vicksburg which caused his death 
after his return to his home in Aliami coun- 
ty, Ohio. John W. Alartin participated in 
the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga, 
Shiloh, the siege of Atlanta, and the engage- 
ments at Lovejoy Station and Champion 
Hills, after which he returned to Louisville. 
He had previously been in three raids, in- 
cluding the Kilpatrick raid around Atlanta 
and through Tennessee after General 
Wheeler. He was untler fire at Atlanta for 
four days and nights. The third raid was 
that of General Wilson from Mississippi 
through Alabama and back to Georgia. Dur- 
ing this raid he participated in a heavy bat- 
tle at Columbus, Georgia, and was also in 
a hard fight at Selma. Before the Wilson 
raid the regiment had gone back to Louis- 
ville to get arms and horses, having given 
up their own to General Kilpatrick's men. 
jMr. ;\Iartin \\as at Atlanta for two months, 
thence went to South Carolina, where he re- 
mained until the ist of September, 1865, 
when he went l)y vessel from Hilton Head 
to Xew York city and thence returned to 
Columbus, Ohie, where he was mustered out 
in September, 1865. He had enlisted for 
three years and on the expiration of that 
period be rejoined the army as a veteran. 
He was a dashing, gallant soldier and on 
one occasion was one of two volunteers to 
ride into what is supposed to have been an 
ambush to reconnoiter. Fearless and loval 



in defense of dut}- he made for himself a 
most creditable militar}- record. 

In January, 1867, Mr. Martin was mar- 
ried to Miss Susan E. Aldrich, a daughter of 
Aaron and Sarah (Bell) Aldrich, who were 
farming people. The Aldrich family came 
to Ohio from Maine and the father was born 
in Clark county, \A-bile the mother's birth 
occurred in Champaign county, this state. 
Mrs. ]\lartin was born in 1848, and by her 
marriage to our subject became the mother 
of two daughters : Effie, born February 
13, 18(18, is the wife of John Burroughs, of 
Springfield, and they have three children, 
Mabel, George W^esley and James. Cora, 
born August 15, 1870, is the wife of Ed 
Baker, who is li\ ing on the corner of Lud- 
low avenue and Harrison street, Springfield, 
and they liave two children, Irvin and 
\\'ayne. Mrs. Martin died August 27, 1877, 
and on the 28th of October, 1880, Mr. Mar- 
tin was again married, his second union be- 
ing with Miss Mary Manzella Reed, who was 
born at Plattsburg, Ohio, and is a daughter 
of Josiah Wesley and Charlotte (Taylor) 
Reed, from Maryland. She is heir to some 
land in that state but knows little of her 
early ancestry. Hei" father, who was a 
farmer by occupation, entered the L^nion 
service in 1861, and at the end of sixteen 
months was discharged for disability, but 
he finally re-enlisted on the 2d of May, 1864, 
in the One Hundred and Fifty-third Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry. Being taken prisoner,, 
he was first incarcerated at Andersonville 
and later in the military prison at Millen, 
Georgia, where he died July 3, 1864. By 
his second marriage !Mr. Martin has one 
child, Laura May, who was born May 16, 
7883, and is yet living with her parents. 
She was educated in Springfield and is now 
a successful music teacher. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



]\lr. Martin is a member of the Odd 
Fellows society and has held all of the offices 
in Ephraim Lodge, No. 146, with which he 
is identified. After his return from the war 
he was ill for a year and then began busi- 
ness. He is now engaged in feather reno- 
vating and receives a liberal patronage in 
this line. In matters of citizenship he is as 
loyal and faithful to-day as when he wore 
the blue uniform of the nation and fought 
for the defense of the stars and stripes on 
southern battle-fields. 



JOSIAH RAMSEY, D. D. S. 

Through forty-nine years Dr. Josiah 
Ramsey engaged in the practice .of dentistry 
and became an eminent member of the pro- 
fession in this state, his ability classing him 
with the best representatives of the calling 
in Ohio. The qualities of his manhood, too, 
were such as to command for him the high- 
est regard and confidence of his fellow mai, 
and the circle of his friends was constantly 
enlarged as his acquaintance grew. It was, 
therefore, a matter of widespread regret 
when he was called from this life, and his 
memory is yet dear to many who knew him, 
not only in Springfield but throughout the 
state as well. 

Dr. Ramsey was born near Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, May 12, 1816, and in 1836 
became a resident of Ohio. For one year he 
was a student under the instruction of Mr. 
Mc^^"illiams, a well known educator of that 
day, and then his brother John wished his 
assistance in the fulling and carding mill, 
which was near Dayton, Ohio. There our 
subject remained for six months, after 
which he went to Oldtown, where he was 



employed in a large spinning factory, which 
was operated b}- water power, the machine 
being about twenty-eight feet long. While 
thus engaged he received eighteen and 
twenty dollars per month for his sei'vices. 
From that place he returned to the neigh- 
borhood in which lived his brother John and 
taught school at what was called Cuppy's 
school for three months. He was afterward 
employed as teacher of a school near Fair- 
field, Ohio, for three months and later 
taught the Fulks school, near Xenia, for a 
year and three months. His next school, 
located between Fairfield and Dayton, was 
called the Cost school, "and of this he had 
charge six months, after which he spent a 
half year as teacher in the Fullcuff school 
near Dayton. In the fall of 1843 he went 
to Indiana, thence made his way to the Ohio 
river, down which he proceeded on a raft to 
Natchez, Mississippi, but he found no favor- 
able opening there for a school and he con- 
tinued on horseback up the banks of the Mis- 
sissippi river to Rodney, about thirty miles 
north of Natchez, where after a short time 
he secured a position as teacher, at a salary 
of thirty-five dollars per month, being em- 
ployed there for six months. He later was 
teacher of another school in the same lo- 
cality for a year, after which he returned to 
Springfield in 1847, having been absent for 
four years. During his first two years' resi- 
dence in the south he had suffered much 
from fever. 

About 1847 oi" 1848 t)r- Ramsey went 
to Cincinnati, Ohio, and entered the office 
of Drs. Edward and James Taylor, dentists, 
with whom he studied for a time and then 
pursued a full course in the Ohio Dental 
College, from which he was graduated, en- 
tering upon the active practice of the pro- 
fession in Springfield in August, 1850. By 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



283 



his skill, judgment and ability he soon 
earned for himself well merited eminence in 
professional ranks and a liberal patronage 
was accorded him. He was known as one 
of the best dentists in the state. He prac- 
ticed for forty-nine years, having his office 
in the Fisher block for twenty-six years, 
after which, in 1893, on account of his 
health, he established his office in his home, 
where he remained until his death. 
Throughout the long period of his connec- 
tion with the dental profession he kept 
abreast with the times and with all new in- 
ventions which tended to promote the effi- 
ci«icy and value of dental work. He was a 
close, earnest and discriminating student and 
continually augmented his ability by re- 
search and investigation, so that his skill 
was second to that of no practitioner of den- 
tistry in this part of the state and his ability 
made him the superior of the large majority 
of members of the profession. He was a 
respected and honored member of the State 
Dental Association. 

Dr. Ramsey was united in marriage to 
Mrs. Emma M. Steele, at Pine Grove Fur- 
nace, near Hanging Rock, Ohio, September 
23, 1857, and they had twO' daughters, M. 
Jennie B. and Mary E. C. The latter is the 
wife of James M. Rumsey, of Rawlings, 
Wyoming, and their children were Jean 
Harriet and Elizabeth Margaretta. The 
home relations in the Ramsey household 
were ideal. The Doctor was devoted to his 
wife and children and his greatest pleasure 
was found at his own fireside. He provided 
liberally for his family to the best of his 
ability and he was also' found as a faithful 
and devoted friend. 

Dr. Ramse}^ passed away Septemher 27, 
1899, at the age of eighty-three years, and 
was laid to rest in Fernclifif cemeterv. In 



politics he had been a strong Republican, 
g"iving an earnest support to the principles 
of the party which he believed would pro- 
mote the best interests of the nation. He. 
was a charter member of the Second Pres- 
byterian church of Springfield and a useful 
and valued member, who ga\'e freely of his 
means to the support of the church and earn- 
estly strove to promote its growth and ex- 
tend its influence. "His life was like the 
quiet shining of a star," whose light is un- 
obtrusive but steadfast. He was conscien- 
*tious and upright in all that he did and his 
example is worthy of emulation, while his 
influence and memory are yet a potent ele- 
ment for good in the lives of many who 
knew him and who honored him for his un- 
faltering devotion to principle. 



DAVID L. YARN ELL. 

David L. Yarnell is filling the position 
of sergeant at arms in the house of repre- 
sentatives at Columbus, and his promptness 
and capability, accompanied with a genial 
and courteous manner, have made him a 
popular officer. His home is at Selma and 
he is one of the native sons of Clark county, 
his birth having occurred in Green township 
on the 30th of May, 1842. He is a son of 
Jesse and Rachel (!\Iiller) Yarnell. He 
was reared upon a farm and received a fair 
common schoo'l education. In 1858 he went 
to Richmond, Indiana, where he began learn- 
ing the carpenter's trade, following that pur- 
suit until the country became involved in 
ci\'il war, when business was largely sus- 
pended and he returned to Selma. He 
watched with interest the progress of events 
in the south and when it was evident that it 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



was to be no mere lioliday affair. Init would 
be a long, hard struggle, he offered his 
services to the government in October. 1861, 
enlisting in Company D. Forty-fourth Ohio 
\'olunteer Infantry, for three years. When 
two and one-half years had passed he vet- 
eranized and became a member of Company 
D. Eighth Ohio Cavalry, with which he re- 
mained until the cessation of hostilities, pro- 
claiming that the preservation of the Union 
was an assured fact. He was mustered out 
in August. 1865. and returned home with a 
most creditable and honorable military rec- 
ord. He was largely engaged in scouting 
duty and thus took part in very few pitched 
battles, although his services were often of 
a very difficult and arduous nature. He, 
howexer. was in the siege of Knoxville, and 
afterward, when in the cavalry service, he 
took part in Hunter's raid. He was cap- 
tured at Beverley, Virginia, where the Union 
troops were surprised in camp on the nth 
of January. 1864. Mr. Yarnell was sent to 
1-ibby prison and was kept there until Feb- 
ruar)-, 1865, when he was among the first 
to be e.xchanged. 

After the war Mr. Yarnell returned to 
Selma and began working with his Ijrother- 
in-law at blacksmithing, entering into a com- 
pact to work for two years for four hundred 
dollars, ^\■hen that period had elapsed he 
received two dollars per day for his services, 
continuing with his brother-in-law for three 
years. In 1S69 he established a shop of his 
own and prospered in the new undertaking. 
He has carried on his trade continuously 
since in Selma and he still owns the shop, 
although he is now largely giving his atten- 
tion to his official duties. 

On the 25th of March. 1869, David L. 
YaTuell was united in marriage in Madison 
t( \.nship to Miss Mary Wise, a daughter of 



Jesse and Mariel (Honn) Wise. Two chil- 
dren were Ijorn unto them : Emma, the wife 
of Dr. A. E. Cotes; and Herbert, who died 
at the age of five years. Mr. Yarnell is a 
Republican, having given his support to the 
party since he cast his first vote for Lincoln 
in 1864. He has served as a member of 
the township board of education, but has 
not been an active politician. He is now 
serving as second assistant sergeant at arms 
in the house of representatives, filling the 
office in the seventy-fourth and seventy-fifth 
assemblies. He was also postmaster ifor 
the hcnise. In 1866 he was initiated into 
the Masonic fraternity, l>ecoming a maiiber 
of Fielding Lodge, Xo. 192, F. & A. M., of 
South Charleston, in which he has filled the 
position of senior deacon. This, in brief, 
is his life histor}-, and it is the record of 
one who has been thrifty in business and 
loyal in citizenship, proving his patriotism 
in military service as well as in civic office. 



PROFESSOR JOHN S. WEAVER. 

In educational circles the name of Pro- 
fessor John S. Weaver is widely known and 
he has attained distinction among those who 
are devoting their energies to the dissemina- 
tion of knowledge. He is now superintend- 
ent of the schools of Springfield and under 
his guidance rapid and satisfactory advance" 
nient is being made along educational lines. 
A native of Warren county. Ohio, he was 
born near Carlisle Station Septeir.ber 28, 
1846. and comes o* a family of Gennan an- 
cestry. His father. John S. Weaver, was 
born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1802, 
and v.as a Presbyterian minister, who, in 
his bovhood davs, caire to Ohio. He was a 




JOHN S. WEAVER. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



2S7 



nieir.'ber of the first class that graduated 
from Miami University at Ouxford. On the 
completion otf his course he entered tlie min- 
istry and devoted the greater part of his Hfe 
tQi proclaiming the Gospel among his fellow 
mai. For twoi years he also served as a 
teacher in the University. In 1865 he came 
to Spring-field and thereafter lived retired 
until called to the home beyond in 1871. 
His wife, who' bore the maiden name of 
Amanda Hurin, was bom in Lebanoai, Ohios 
in 18 10, and pursued a public school educa- 
tion. She survived her husband a number 
of years, passing away in this city in 1885. 
In their family were seven children : Susan, 
whoi died in Springfield ; Catherine, the wife 
of Captain J. H. Robison, and a resident of 
this city; Dr. James M.. o-f Dayton; Mar- 
garet, who is the wife of Andrew Robison, 
and is living in Cincinnati ; Georgiana, the 
wife of R. E. Nay lor, of Osage cotinty, Kan- 
sas; Walter L., who^ was formerly an at- 
torney of Springfield and a member of con- 
gress and is now a judge of the United 
States coiurt, oif Indian Territory, to which 
positii>n he was appointed by President 
Roosevelt in 1902; and John S., whose name 
introduces this review. 

Professor John S. Wea\-er spent his boy- 
hood days under the parental roof, being 
eighteen years of age when his parents came 
to Springfield. Prior to this time he pur- 
sued a. preparatory course in ]\Ionroe, Ohii>, 
after which he became a sophomore in Wit- 
tenberg College in the fall of 1864. He 
was graduated with the class of 1867 and 
at once entered upon the profession which 
he has made his life work. He taught in 
various schools in Clark. Greene and Wayne 
connties, and for one year was a teacher 
in the academy at Canaan, Ohio. In the 
year 1874 be went to Sioux City. Iowa. 

15 



where he remained until 1880 as principal 
of the schools tliere. In the latter year he 
returned to> Springfield and accepted the po'- 
sitioo oif principal of the old northern school 
here, while from 1892 until 1900 he was 
principal of the high school. He was then 
a(l\-anced to the position of superintendent 
of schools and was reappointed in 1902. 
He has entire charge of the educational 
features of the public schools of this city. 
Professor Weaver is a most capable instruc- 
tor, having the ability tO' impart with readi- 
ness and clearness tO' others the knowledge 
of the branches of learning which he has 
niastered. His own zeal and enthusiasm in 
the work inspire both teachers and pupils 
to renewed and better efforts. He is con- 
tinually alert for improved practical niethods 
which will advance the work of the schools 
and raise the standard of education here, and 
under his guidance the public schools of 
Spring-field have made marked and gratify- 
ing- advancement. 

In 1876, in Le Mars, Iowa, was cele- 
brated the marriage oif Proifessor \\'ea\-er 
and Miss May Burlingame, who was born 
and reared in Illinoiis. They now have two 
daughters : Helen, the wife of Van C. \\"\\- 
son. of Springfield, Ohioi; by whom she has 
one child; and Katherine, of this cit\'. The 
parents are members of the Third Presby- 
terian church and Professor Weaver is en- 
titled tO' membership in the Grand Army of 
the Republic, because in 1864 he responded 
to his country's call foir troops, and served 
for four months as a member of Company 
B, One Hundred and B'orty-sixth Regiment 
of Ohio Volunteers, being at the time only 
seventeen years of age. He noAV belongs to 
jMitchell Post. He is a member of Phi 
Kappa Psi, a college fraternity, and also 
holds membership in the National Teach- 



288 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ers" Association and the Count}- Teachers' 
Association. A man of scholar!)- attain- 
ments and broad intellectuality, there is in 
Professor \Vea\er a \\eight of character, a 
native sagacit}-, a far-seeing judgment and 
a fidelit}- of piu-pose tliat command the re- 
spect of all. 



RALPH S. THOMPSON. 

Ralph S. Thompson is the president and 
manager of the New Era Company, gen- 
eral printers, blank book manufacturers and 
book binders, as well as publishers of the 
New Era. In the control of this enterprise, 
which has become an extensive one in 
Springfield, Mr. Thompson displays marked 
executive ability and business force, and has 
gained that success which indicates the char- 
acter of the man — success which comes 
through diligence, unremitting labor and 
capable business management. 

'Sir. Thompson is a native of Illinois, his 
birth having iKCurred in Edwards county, 
on the 19th of December, 1847. His par- 
ents were Samuel and Katherine (Ronalds) 
Thompson. The father was a native of 
England and spent his boyhood days in Lon- 
don, where his birth occurred, and where 
he acquired his education. At length he 
came to the United States, traveled to some 
extent over the country and finally took up 
his alx)de in Edwards county, Illinois, where 
he engaged in agricultural pursuits, and 
there studied medicine, becoming prominent 
in his profession, though continuing to work 
his farm. He died in 1872, having long 
survived his wife, who passed away in 1850. 

Ralph S. Thompson worked in his youth 
on the farm. Owing to some peculiar ideas 
of his father he was not allowed to attend 



school, but got what education he could at 
home, which was added to by a free use of 
his father's extensive library. His favorite 
studies were chemistry and mechanics. He 
had a workshop in his father's barn and a 
chemical laboratory in his father's library 
until the frequent explosions caused the ban- 
ishment of the laboratory to a separate 
building. He entered upon his business 
career in his native county in the year 1865, 
as a druggist and chemist, arrd conducted it 
with considerable success until 1872, when 
he sold out. In the meantime, in 1869, he 
had become a member of a printing company 
of Edwards coimty, owning and editing the 
Albion Pioneer. In 1873 he sold his inter- 
est in the ]iaper and moved to Cincinnati, 
where he engaged in printing and editorial 
work, and through the failure of others lost 
all he had accumulated. In 1876 he ar- 
rived in Springfield, accepting a position as 
manager of the Grange Visitor, which was 
afterwards changed to the Farmers' Ad- 
vance, which he controlled until 1886. At 
this time Mr. Thompson joined others in 
the organization of the New Era Company, 
which was incorporated January 21, 1886, 
with a capital stock of twenty-five thousand 
dollars, and at the first election Mr. Tbomp- 
son was made president and manager, in 
which capacity he has since been retained, 
his associate officers l^eing Rei Rathbun, 
secretary, and S. P. Behrends, treasurer. 
The company does a genei-al job printing 
and book business, and at the same time 
publishes the New Era. Theirs is one of 
the best equipped modern printing offices in 
this portion of the state. The plant is sup- 
plied with the latest improved machinery for 
turning out a higli grade of work, and the 
office has acquired a very favorable reputa- 
tion not onlv for neat, but also for artistic 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



289 



work. From fifty to one hundred men and 
girls are employed in the establishment. 
Recently the printing establishment has been 
removed to the large stone front building 
24 and 26 North Fountain avenue. Mr. 
Thompson is alsO' associated with other busi- 
ness affairs here, being at the head of the 
Springfield Furnace Company, of 28 and 
30 North Fountain avenue, manufacturing 
the Thompson Tubular Hot Air Furnace, of 
which he is the inventor, and also of a burn- 
er for the use of oil as fuel. There is a 
promising future before this furnace, which 
is rapidly finding favor with the public and 
already meeting \\ith a good sale, and the 
oil burner has attracted attention not only 
in this country but in Europe. Mr. 
Thompson is also assistant secretary of the 
Springfield Board of Trade. 

In 1872 was celebrated the marriage of 
Mr. Thompson and Miss Margaret A\'eed, 
• ■-f Albion, Illinois, a daughter of Hampton 
Weed, who was a relative of Wade Hamp- 
ton, the Revolutionary patriot. In politi- 
cal thought and action Mr. Thompson has 
always been independait, adhering to his 
convictions without fear or favor. In busi- 
ness he has achieved success through hon- 
orable effort, untiring industry and capable 
management, and in private life he has 
gained that warm personal regard which 
arises from true ncibility of character, def- 
erence for the opinions of others, kindliness 
and geniality. 



E. J. CARD. 



If every j-oung man thoroughly under- 
stood and believed what wise mai and phil- 
osophers are always pointing ont — that suc- 
cess almost never comes to anvone without 



great and persevering eft'ort — the multitude 
of failures in life would be averted. In 
countless thousands of instances, especially 
in the United States, where men are rated 
at their true personal worth, poor boys have 
risen to places of prominence and influence 
because they were not afraid of work and 
because they were actuated by the com- 
mendable ambition to. do something and be 
something worthy of the respect of all man- 
kind. In reviewing the historjr of E. J. 
Gard, now engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness in Tremont, we note that the salient 
features in his career have been earnest, per- 
sistent labor and honorable dealing. 

He was born in German township, Clark 
county, January 23, 1834, and is a repre- 
sentative of an old family of Virginia. His 
grandfather, Job Gard, came from the Old 
Dominion to Ohio in 1803, and was the first 
settler in Miami county, upon the site of the 
present city of Piqua. He followed wagon- 
making- and repairing and lived to the ad- 
vanced age of about seventy-six years. In 
the meantime he removed to Kentucky, 
where the father of out subject was born, 
but afterward he returned to Ohio and spent 
his last days in Clark county, his remains 
being interred in Rector cemetery. 

Gursham Gard. the' father of our sub- 
ject, was born in Kentucky and at the age 
of nineteen years accompanied his father on 
his return to^ Ohio. In early life he en- 
gaged in the operation of rented land, but 
ultimately he became well-to-do. He de- 
served great credit for what he had accom- 
plished, as all that he had was acquired 
through his own diligence and enterprise. 
He was also widely kno^^vn as a man of 
honor and genuine worth. He wedded 
Mary Peacock, and among their children 
was the subject of this review. 



290 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



¥.. J. Card was reared upon the home 
farm, and at tlie usual age entered the com- 
mon school, where he acquired a good edu- 
cation. On the 17th of March, 1853, in 
the village of Tremont. he was married to 
]Miss Martha Friermood, who was also born 
in German township, her parents being 
Reuben and Sarah (Kiser) Friermood. 
The young couple began their domestic life 
upon a farm and fcr thirty-two years Mr. 
(iard was extensively and successfully en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. From the 
time of early spring planting until crops 
were .garnered in the late autumn he earnest- 
ly carried on his work, and as the result of 
his unremitting labor he acquired a hand- 
some competence. At length, however, he 
sold his farm and removed to Fletcher, Mi- 
an- i county, where he purchased property and 
made his home for four years. On the ex- 
piration of that period he returned to Clark 
county and, settling in Tremont, has since 
engaged in the real estate business, in which 
he has secured a good clientage. He is 
thoroughly conversant with values in this 
section of the state, and has negotiated many 
in-.portant real estate transfers. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Gard were 1>orn 
the following children : Albert, who attended 
school in Lebanon and became a teacher, 
died of consumption at the age of 
twenty-one years. Jennie, who was al.so 
provided with good educational privi- 
leges, l^ecanie an expert lx)okkeeper and was 
employed by the governor of Kansas in gen- 
eral office work and as an accoimtant. She 
married Rufus Buck and died in IVIiami 
county, Ohio, but was laid to rest in the 
cemetery of Tremont. Eliza1>eth is the 
wife of Elbert Skillman and resides in 
Piqua, Miami county. Grant died at the 
age of thirteen years, fronn the result of 



accidaital shooting. Martha died when 
alxiut seven years of age. Lillie May. the 
youngest of the family, died in infancy. 

Mr. Gard was formerly a Rqiublican in 
his political views, and voted for John C. 
Fremont on the organization of the Repub- 
lican party, but of recent years he has been 
a Prohibitionist. He belongs to the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, in which he has 
served as steward and trustee, taking an 
acti\e part in the work of the church and 
giving his co-operation to many measures 
for the general good. He is a fearless 
champion of what he believes to be right, 
and at all times his course has been such as 
to commend him to public contidence and 
esteem. 



JOHX CHARLES XAVE. 

John Charles Xave. who follows farm- 
ing in Green township on the place where he 
was born, October 6. 1870. is a son of John 
Garlough and ^largaret Elizabeth (Gram) 
Xave, whose sketch appears on another page 
of this volume. The home farm became his 
play ground in boyhood and his training 
school for the practical duties of a farmer's 
life. His literary education was acquired in 
the common schools and he remained under 
the parental roof until his marriage, which 
was celebrated on the 7th of April, 1892. 
at the Methodist Episcopal parsonage in 
Springfield, Miss Jennie Matilda Littler, of 
Pitchin, becoming his wife. She is a daugh- 
ter of James R. and Margaret (Hurley) 
Littler, who are also mentioned elsewhere in 
this work. In tlieir family were twelve 
children, of whom Mrs. Xave is the sixth 
in order of birth, while Mr. Xave was the 
youngest in a family of five children. Their 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Imme lias been blessed with six children: 
01i\e Esther, born in Springfield Augnst 
17. 1892; Margaret Elizabeth, born in 
Green township June 17. 1894: Goldie 
Fern, born November 18, 1895: Harold 
Jennings, born February 27, 1897; Paul De 
Motte, born September 12, 1898; and Frank 
Russell, born February 23, 1900. 

For one year after his marriage IMr. 
Nave resided in Springfield, working in the 
Ross shops and also in the Lagonda shops. 
He then came to his present place of resi- 
dence in Green township, and has had 
charge of this farm ever since. He oper- 
ates one hundred and fifty-three acres of 
land, which he has fenced and the fields have 
been placed under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. He also has a dairy of sixteen cows. 
His farm work fully occupies his time, and 
indolence and idleness are utterly foreign 
to his nature. He is independent in poli- 
tics and takes an active part in political 
work. In April, 1900, he was elected to 
the office of road supervisor in district No. 
I, which office he still holds. He became a 
charter member of the Junior Order of the 
United .\merican Mechanics, and during 
the first year served as one of its trustees. 



CHARLES F. ^IcGILVRAY. 

Frijm the farm come many of the 
strijngest and best men found in business 
and professional circles. In the free life 
of the country they seem to imbibe self-re- 
liance, independence and strong purpose, 
and, entering into the competition which 
forms so great a part of business life, they 
so direct their energies as toi win success. 
Such a one is Charles F. McGilvra}-. He 
was born in Peterbnro, New Hampshire, 



January 22, 1849, ^"'^' '* ^ -"-"'' '-'*' Thurston 
IMcGilvray, whose birth occurred in Anv 
hnrst, New Hampshire, as did that of the 
grandfather otf our subject, while the great- 
grandfather was a native of Scotland. He 
became the founder of the family in Amer- 
ica, leaving- the land of hills and heather in 
1792, and taking up his abode in New Eng- 
land. Thurston McGilvray went to Cali- 
fornia in 185 1, attracted by the discovery of 
g-old in that state, and there died when about 
thirty-seven years of age. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Mary A. Bullard, 
is still living in Peterboro, at the age of 
eighty-nine years. She came of English 
ancestry noted for longevity. The family 
was first established at Dublin, New Hamp- 
shire, and the maternal grandfather of our 
subject was a soldier in the war of 1812. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. ]\IcGilvray were born 
three children, but our subject is the only 
one living, Albert and Marsena having both 
passed away. After the death of her first 
husband Mrs. McGilvray became the wife 
of David Smiley. Mrs. Addie Greenwood, 
a sister of Thurston McGilvray, is now li\-- 
ing in Everett, Massachuetts. 

Charles F. McGilvray pursued his early 
education in the public schools of Peterboro 
and when ele\-en years of age he began earn- 
ing his own livelihood b}- working on a 
farm. He followed various occupations 
for a few years, and at the age ot eighteen 
he entered a foundry and learned the trade. 
When he had completed his apprenticeship 
he began working as a journeyman at the 
age of twenty-one, and continually ad- 
vanced in his chosen pursuit. He remained 
in the east until 1870. when he came to 
Cleveland, Ohio, which was his place of resi- 
dence for a time. He afterward took up 
his abode in Elmira, New York, where he 



292 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



had charge of the foundry at the Xew York 
State Reformaton,-, continuing in that posi- 
tion for one year. On the expiration of 
tliat ])eriod he returned to Cleveland, where 
he remained about three months, and in 
February. 1884, he came to Springfield and 
here took charge of the shops of the Rob- 
bins & Meyers Company foundry. He has 
remained in that capacity until the present 
time, and under his capable supervision the 
business has rapidly increased and he has 
been advanced to the important position of 
superintendent of the entire plant, having 
three hundred men under his supervision. 
In 1888 the company was incorporated as 
the Rol>bins & ^Nleyer Company, and in 1900 
J. A. Meyers and Mr. IMcGilvray purchased 
the interest^ of Mr. R()bl)ins. and H. E. 
Meyers also became a member of the com- 
panv. Mr. ]^IcGilvray gives his entire time 
and attention to the management of the bus- 
iness. The plant is now used for the manu- 
facture of electric ceiling fans, desk fans, 
dynamos and motors, and a general foundry 
business is carried on. The sales of the 
house are extensive and the annual output 
is constantly increasing, bringing the stock- 
holders an ailarged annual income. 

In 1873 ^^i"- McGilvray returned to Xew 
Hampshire and was there married to Miss 
Addie F. Gray, who was horn in the old 
Granite state and pursued her education in 
the high schools there. Her father, David 
Gray, was a contractor and builder. After 
lii< marriage Mr. McGilvray remained in 
the state oi bis nativity until 1877. when he 
returned to Cleveland, Ohio. One child 
was born of this marriage, but died in 1876 
at tlie age of two years. I\Ir. and Mrs. Mc- 
Gilvray reside at No. 717 East High street, 
where they have a pleasant and hospitable 
home. 



In politics he is a Republican where na- 
tional affairs are concerned, but at local elec- 
tions, where no issue is involved, he votes 
for the men whom he regards as best quali- 
fied for the office, aside from political affili- 
ations. He is a member of Anthony Lodge. 
F. & A. M., and also belongs to the Benevo- 
lent ami Protective Order of Elks, t... 
the Royal ,\rcanum. and to the Mys- 
tic Circle. He devotes his entire time 
to the management of the business, 
Ixit in social life is found as a genial, 
courteous and kindly gentleman. He is a 
man of wide experience and broad-minded 
— a man whose strong individuality is the 
strength of integrity, virtue and deep hu- 
man sympathy. 



JAMES E. ^IcCLURE. 

James E. McClure, a retired farmer 
now engaged in the grocery business in 
Springfield, has spent his entire life in Clark 
county, his birth having occurred in Mad 
River township on the 5th of December. 
1868. He is a son of George and Harriet 
.\. (Dory) McClure. The father was born 
in Mad River township in 1833. and the 
mother in Springfield, in 1839. The pater- 
nal grandfather. Jefferson McClure, was of 
Scotch-Irish parentage, and cajne from 
Maryland to Ohio in his early boyhood 
days, being reared to manhood in Clark 
county. He worked as a farm hand and 
teamster in early life, and during pioneer 
times in this locality he purchased land in 
Mad River township and there carried on 
fanning until his death. He and his wife 
were buried in tlie cemetery at Ebenezer. 
In their family were four children who are 
vet li\ing: William, a resident of Spring- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



293 



field ; George, the father of our subject ; 
Samuel J., a dair\-man residing west of 
Springfield; and Addie, the wife of Cyrus 
Kissell, of Mad River township. These 
children were all educated in the public 
schools of the locality and reared upon the 
home farm. 

'George McClure spent his boyhood days 
in the usual manner of farmer lads of the 
period, and when he attained to man's es- 
tate he continued to follow the occupation 
to which he had been reared, making it his 
life work. At length he retired from acti\-e 
business cares, and is now living retired in 
Springfield, having purchased a home in the 
city. He was a good business man, ener- 
getic and resoJute, and his success is at- 
tributable to his own efforts. In politics 
he is a Democrat, and both he and his wife 
are highly esteemed people of the cnmnnm- 
ity in which they make their home. This 
worthy couple became the parents of tweh'e 
children, all of whom' reached adult age, al- 
though three are now deceased. The oth- 
ers are: D. Dory, who is a gardener of 
Springfield township; Rosa, the wife of 
Samuel Arthur; Charles J., w'\.o is living in 
Pueblo, Colorado; Harriet A.; William; J. 
E., of this review; Seth, also of Pueblo; 
Mary, the wife of Elmer Cale; and Thomas. 
All were educated in the district schools, 
and Harriet was a student in Nelson's Busi- 
ness College. 

James E. ]\IcClure of this review at- 
tended the country schools through the win- 
ter months, and in the periods of vacation 
worked upon the home fann, continuing to 
assist in its cultivation until he had attained 
the age of twenty-two years. During the 
last two years of that time he had charge of 

the farmi Kvork. successfully carrying on 
general farming and stijck-raising. He 



cultivated one hundred and seventy acres of 
land, improving it and bringing it to a high 
state of production. His farming opera- 
tions were contiiuied until December, 1901, 
when he sold his property and came to 
Springfield to make his home. On the 17th 
of January, 1902, he established a grocery 
at his present location, purchasing a new 
and complete line of groceries, provisions, 
and feed. He has since been increasing his 
stock as the trade dananded, and is now 
well fixed to meet the demands of his grow- 
ing trade. He delivers to any part of the 
city, and has gained the confidence, good 
will and therefore the patronage of a large 
number of the residents in his part of the 
town. 

On the 15th of March, 1888, Mr. Mc- 
Clure was united in marriage toi Miss Fan- 
nie Johnson, a daughter of Eli Johnson, who 
was a farmer of Mad River township. Mrs. 
McClure was educated in the common 
schools and by her marriage became the mo- 
ther of one son, Arthur J., who was bom 
December 30, 1892. On the 6th of Janu- 
ary following, Mrs. McClure died. In 1895 
our subject was again married, his seco'ud 
union being with Elizabeth Geron, a daugh- 
ter of Jacob Geron, who was bo'rn in Ger- 
many. The lady was educated in Spring- 
field township and has two daughters' — 
Gertrude, who' was born December 15, 
i8g6; and ^Margaret, born September 3, 
1902. 

In his political views ^Ir. McClure is 
known to be independent, casting his ballot 
for the men and measures that he deems best 
calculated and qualified to promote the gen- 
eral welfare. To church and charitable 
work he gives hearty endorsement. He is 
a member of Lincoln Castle, No. 49, K. T. 
E., and while at Enon served as keeper of 



294 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the excliequer. While tliere is nothing in 
the life history of Mr. McClure to attract 
the reader who delights in a sensational 
chapter, there is nevertheless in his career 
much that is commendable and worthy of 
emulation, for he has always been found in- 
dustrious, honest and straightforward, and 
these qualities should ever be cultivated by 
men who wish to attain success and at the 
same time enjuy the respect of tlieir fellow 
mai. 



TRAXCIS MARION HAGAX. 

Whatever else may be said of the legal 
fraternity, it cannot be denied that mem- 
bers of the bar have been more prominent 
actors in public afifairs than any other class 
of the community. This is l>ut the natural 
result of causes which are manifest and re- 
quires no explaiiQtion. The ability anil 
training which (pialify one to practice law 
also qualify him in many respects for duties 
which lie outside the strict path of his pro- 
fession, and which touch general interests of 
society. Holding marked precedence 
among tlie meml>ers of the bar of Springfield 
stands Mr. Hagan, who has also been hon- 
ored with various official positions of trusi. 
and the confidence thus reiK)sed in him has 
nc\er been lietrayed in even the slightest 
degree. 

Judge Hagan has spent his aitire life in 
Clark county, his birth having occiirred near 
Enon, in Mad River township, on the loth 
of June. iS.(_|. He comes of Scotch-Irish 
lineage. His ])alernal grandfather was a 
native of county Monaghan, Ireland, and in 
the year 1798 he left the Emerald Isle f<ir 
the new world, taking up his aljode in Penn- 
sylvania. Subsequently he continued his 



westward journe_\- until he reached Clark 
county, Ohio, being a resident of this place 
from 181 5 until 1825, when he was called 
to the home beyond. Among his children 
were Hugh Hagan. the father of our subject. 
His birth occurred in Xorthumljerland coun- 
ty, PennsAlvania, June 3, 1803. and he was 
therefore about twel\-e years of age when 
the family cast in their lot with the pioneer 
families of this locality. He was reared 
amid the wild scenes of frontier life and 
through many years witnessed the develoji- 
ment and upbuilding of this section of the 
state, bearing his part in the work of public 
improvement. Having arrived at years of 
maturity, he married Ann Furay, who was 
born in Ross County, Ohio, Octolier 3, 
1 81 6, and was of French and Irish extrac- 
tion and a daughter of Peter Furay. Her 
death occurred September 22, 1892. 

The youth of Judg-e Hagan. like that of 
other b<>\s. was largely given to the work 
of acquiring an education. He attended the 
public and select schools and later becair.e a 
student in Antinch College, at Yellow 
Springs, but ill health prevented his gradua- 
tion. From early life he was imbued with 
a desire to become a meml^er of the legal pro- 
fession, and so directed his reading and ef- 
forts that he might ultimately realize his 
ambition. It was not possible for him at 
once to prepare for the bar, and for a num- 
ber of years he engaged in teaching in com- 
mon and select schools, but he never lost 
sight of what was his real aim. and pur- 
suing his reading as he found oi)portunity, 
he was admitted to the bar in 1873. The 
following year he opened an office and be- 
gan the i)ractice of law in Springfield, where 
he has since remained. His prqjaration of 
cases is most thorough and exhaustive; he 
seems almost intuitively to gras]3 the strong 




F. M. HAGAN. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



297 



points of law and fact, wliile in his 'briefs 
and arg-unients the authorities are cited so 
extensi\'ely and the facts and reasoning 
thereon are presented so cogently and un- 
answerably as to leave noi doubt as to^ the 
correctness of his views or oif his conclus- 
ions. No detail seems to escape him ; e\-ery 
point is given its due proaninence and the 
case is argued with such skill, ability and 
power th.at he rarely fails to gain the ver- 
dict desired. 

Many positions of honor and trust have 
been conferred upon him and the official 
career of Judge Hagan is one worthy oi the 
highest commendation', because it has ever 
been characterized! not only by capable but 
by most earnest devotion tO' duty and by- 
loyalty to the trust rq:)osed in him. In 1879 
he received the endorsement of many of the 
leading members of both the Democratic and 
Republican parties for the office of city so- 
licitor oi Springfield and was triumphantly 
elected. A conten:porary biographer, in 
speaking oi this perio'd ot" his career, has 
said : 

"Mr. Hagan's first term as city solicitor 
was so full of achievement that he was again 
elected in 1883. ^^r. Hagan was pre-eminent 
in his services in this connection. His ef- 
forts for the city's weal in important litiga- 
tion, the successful defense of the municipal 
rights, his thoughtful and broad command 
of the law in relation to cities marked his 
years of public perfonnance with conspicu- 
ous force. It is a significant fact that he 
is yet summoned intoi consultation by the 
city in all important cases, no matter who 
is city solicitor, nor how able. The mature 
and ripened judgment of Mr. Hagan and his 
close familiarity with the city's past ren- 
der him highly essential as an adviser." 

Other offices, both in the direct line of 



his profession and in other departments of 
activity, have claimed the services of Judge 
Hagan. From President Cleveland came 
his first appointment to the position of post- 
master of the city of Springfield, in which 
capacity he served from 1887 until 1890, 
discharging his duties in a manner that pro- 
moted the business affairs of the office and 
won for him the high commendation of tlie 
general public. In 1890 he was the efficient 
president of the board of trade, and his co- 
operation with leading business mai con- 
nected with that organization led to^ sub- 
stantial improivement in Springfield. He 
has ever had firm faith and enthusiasm in 
Springfield and its future and his capacity to 
direct large movements was ably demon- 
started during his incumbency as president. 
From 1885 until 1890 the Judge served as 
a trustee of the Mitchell-Thom.as Hospital, 
of this city, and in the latter year he be- 
came judge of the common pleas court of 
Clark county, Ohio, by the appointment of 
Governor Campbell, thus becoming the suc- 
cessor of the Hon. Charles R. Wliite. Judge 
Hagan was president of the Clark County 
Bar Association in 1892 and 1893. He has 
been one o^f the trustees oi the Associated 
Charities for the last four years. Judge 
Hagan is a member of the Second Presby- 
terian church and is strongly identified with 
the church element. In his politics he is a 
lirm but liberal Democrat, and stands high 
in the councils of his party. 

Judge Hagan was married May 21, 
1 88 1, to Justina Bevitt, of Springfield, Ohio, 
daughter of Dr. Bevitt, of St. Charles, Mis- 
souri. His life partner is a lady of many 
intellectual graces. Three children have 
blessed the union — Francis Marion, Hugh 
and IMargaret. Judge Hagan's domestic 
life is an ideal one. and the quiet, scholarly 



298 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



man, finds pleasure and satisfaction in 
the society of his interesting family. His 
spotless career, his force of character, his 
varied accomplishments as barrister, jurist 
and pleader, his broad personality as an in- 
di\-idual, make him indeed a man among 
men. In his home life harmonious tastes 
produce congeniality, the scholarly attain- 
ments of Judge Hagan l>eing well pointed 
out by the intellectual graces of his wife, 
while the influence of lx)th is ever found on 
the side of right, the true and the beautiful. 
The practice of law has been the real life 
work of Judge Hagan and at the bar and on 
the bench he has won; marked distinction. 
A man of unimpeachable character, of un- 
usual intellectual endowments, with a thor- 
laigh understanding oif the law, patience, 
urbanity and industry. Judge Hagan took 
to the bench the \ery highest c|ualifications 
for this responsible office .of the state gov- 
ernmait. and his record as a judge has been 
in harn-.ony with his record as a man and a 
lawyer, distinguished by unserving integ- 
rity and a masterful grasp of e^•ery problem 
which has presented itself for solution. He 
is a man of cultivated literarj- taste and of 
wide reading. He has prepared a large 
number of papers for the Literary Club, of 
Springfield, all of which were well received. 
He, together with Judge A. N. Summers, 
was the author of the special code for 
Springfield, under which the city has been 
governed since 1891. He is a man of be- 
nevolent purpose and broad humanitarian 
principles, and his chairitable nature is indi- 
cated by his acts of kindness and interest in 
the welfare of those less favored than him- 
self. Faultless in lionor, fearless in conduct, 
stainless in reputation — such has been his 
life record. His scholarly attainments, his 
statesman.ship. his reliable judginent and his 



charming powers of conversation would 
enable him to ably fill and grace any position 
however exalted, and he has been no less 
honored in public than loved in private life. 



WILLIAM HENRY SIDLEY. 

William Henry Sidley is the distin- 
guished representative of the Catholic 
church here, now ser\-ing as pastor of St. 
Raphael's church in Springfield. He was 
born at Thompson, Geauga county, Ohio, 
November 17, 1844, and is a son of Henry 
and Man- (Turner) Sidley. When a young 
man his father, who was a native of Limer- 
ick. Ireland, came from the Emerald Isle 
to the new world, and after his marriage lo- 
cated in Geauga county. The family had 
many representatives in the Catholic min- 
istry, including Rev. Robert Sidley. an uncle 
of our subject, aud two brothers. Rev. John 
and Rev. Alexander .\. Sidley. The latter 
is now pastor of a church in Ravenna, Ohio, 
and the former died in 1893. One sister 
of the family entered the order of L^rsulines 
in Cleveland. The father and mother both 
came of families noted for longevity. The 
former was a farmer, and at an early day 
secured a claim of government land in the 
western reserve of Ohio. He had to clear 
his farm and blaze a trail for miles in order 
to reach his property. In the family were 
twelve children, of whoni W'illiam H. Sid- 
ley was the second in order of birth. There 
are now four living sisters and one is de- 
ceased. Lizzie is an L'rsuline nun at Pitts- 
burg. Pennsyhania. Mrs. P. H. Butler is 
a widow, and with her two children, Alex- 
ander and Marguerite, reside with Father 
Sidlev. Sarah makes her home with her 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



299 



brother, John, in Ra-\-enna, Ohio. Mrs. M. 
B. Moroney is living in Cincinnati, Ohio. 
The mother still survives, and is residing 
upon the old homestead with her son, 
George M. Sidley, at the age of eighty 
years, while another brother, Charles A. 
Sidley, is a resident of Cleveland. 

Rev. William Henry Sidley of this re- 
view was reared on a farm and attended the 
district schools, thus acquiring his prelim- 
inary education, which was supplemented by 
study in the Xotre Dame University, which 
he entered at the age of sixteen years. Two 
years afterward he became a student in the 
Roman Catholic Theological Seminary at 
Cle\-eland, completing his theological studies 
in the Provincial Saninary, in Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He was ordained to the priesthood 
June II, 1870, by Bishop Toeble, of Cov- 
ington, Kentucky. His first pastorate was 
at Sidney, Ohio, and he labored there for 
three years, removing thence to Springfield, 
Ohio, in 1873, to assume charge of St. 
Raphael's parish. He is a man of ripe 
scholarship, pleasing manners and a perse- 
vering and efficient pastor. He has the love 
of his congregation and the esteem of the 
entire community. During his pastorate a 
magnificent stone church has been erected, 
besides a large parochial school and pastoral 
residence. There are six hundred children 
attending the school, and a congregation 
numbering six hundred families is in a pros- 
perous condition. In 1887 Father Sidley 
was made dean of the Springfield confer- 
ence and permanent pastor of St. Raphael's 
church. 

The history of Catholicity in Spring-field 
is almost identical with its history in every 
city in Ohio — a few scattered families, a 
missionary's visit once r;r twice a year and 
gradual and steady increase of population 



until finally from a small nucleus has grown 
a strong, young, thriving parish with a resi- 
dent priest. There was not a Catholic fam- 
ily in Clark county in 1830, but from 1835 
and the following ten years several Catholic 
families located in or near Springfield. The 
first priest who visited this city, as far as 
known, was the Rev. Henry D. Juncker, of 
Dayton, Ohio. This was between 1844 and 
1849. Two others, J. J. O'Mealy and his 
brother, Patrick, are known to have at- 
tended Springfield about that time. From 
1849 St. Raphael's parish may date its his- 
tory as a distinct congregation attended by- 
its own pastor, the Rev. James Kearne\', by 
whom was begum the first parish register in 
August, 1849. The first church was erect- 
ed through the g«-ierosity of M. P. Cassilly 
and completed later by Rev. Kearney. This 
was started in 1848. The old church was 
remodeled in 1865 and 1866, and was dedi- 
cated in 1867 by Bishop Rosecrai-is. Until 
1865 the pastoral residence was in the rear 
of the church, but Father Thisse purchased 
a separate residence, which was sold as a 
part of his estate in 1873. -^^ that time 
Rev. William H. Sidley was appointed pas- 
tor, and arrived in June of that year. The 
present residence was then begun and com- 
pleted on the 1st of June, 1874. In 1884 
a residence was purchased for the sisters at 
a cost of seventy-five hundred dollars and 
a chapel was added to the rear of the church, 
which cost eighteen hundred and fifty dol- 
lars. 

In the spring of 1889 a meeting was held 
in the school hall to prepare plans for the 
erection of a new church to meet the de- 
mands of the increasing congregation. The 
property was purchased at a cost of seven- 
teen thousand dollars, the amount to be met 
in special payments, the last of which was 



300 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



made on the 2nd of February, 1892. Mr. 
Cregar was aigaged as architect and pre- 
pared the plans. Father Sidley visited 
many prominent cities of Ohio and submit- 
ted the designs as seen to-day — a modern 
structure with one tower one hundred and 
eighty-four feet high and another one hun- 
dred and thirty-five feet high. The corner 
stone was laid by the Most Rev. William H. 
Elder. D. D., on the 25th of Septem1)er. 
1892. while on the 17th of July. 1898. the 
church was dedicated. This house of woe- 
ship is one of the objects of public interest 
in Springfield, and non-Catholics, as well as 
members of the denomination, point with 
pride to the high tower, and from its lofty 
height a splendid view can be had of the 
citv. The other tower contains the bell. 
Tlie style of architecture is modified Gothic, 
with a ceiling fifty feet high, three graceful 
arches meeting in a beautiful drop, giving a 
clear space in the auditorium sixty by one 
hundred and seventy-five feet. It is all fin- 
ished in quarter sawed oak. and the material 
used for the outer walls is Berea sandstone. 
The complete cost of the church was more 
than seventy-five thousand dollars. It has 
taken years of hard lal»r to accomplish all 
this. The first Catholic school was held 
in the basement of the church, instruction 
being given by Father Howard. In 1864 
Father Thisse purchased a small frame 
house standing on the site of the present 
school building. In 1876 the old frame 
structure was sold, and the following year 
the present place was ready for occupancy, 
having Ijeen erected at a cost of nineteen 
thousand dollars. The course of instruc- 
tion is the same as that given in the public 
schools, and tlie scholarship is of as high 
a grade as that found in the select institu- 
tions. The ])u])ils who have left this school 



are found in all branches of business, in pro- 
fessional life, in educational work and in 
government positions. The first diiiloma 
was issued in 18S2 to Miss Ella Maher, 
who died soon afterward. This school is 
conducted by the Sisters of Charity, and is 
the delight of Father Sidley. Always zeal- 
ous and self-sacrificing, the Sisters ha\e 
gi\en to the school their most fervent care 
and. cheerful and happy, they have con- 
tributed their happiness to others. 

Father Sidley devotes his entire atten- 
tion to the church work and its various de- 
partments, and to the building and complet- 
ing of the beautiful house of worship, and 
he has had the hearty support of his entire 
congregation, who In Id him in the highest 
esteem and give him their entire confidence. 
Tlie design for the church was laid out by 
him, including the beautiful entrance, which 
is one of the most attractive and modern in 
the west. Father Sidley is a public-spirited 
man, and in all enterprises that have for 
their object the general good and improve- 
ment of the city he is found as a co-operator, 
giving liberally to their support. He takes 
an active interest in public gatherings, and 
his council is widely sought. He has beai 
the organizer and promoter of many worthy 
objects and his gifts of charity are without 
number. He is a thorough American in 
love with the institutions of the country, 
and his work has been carried along on pro- 
gressive American lines. 



GEORGE \\". BERRY. 

Xo one is more deserving of success 
than is the man who begins the battle of life 
cmi)ty handed and b.y honest toil continued 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



301 



through a long period accumulates a com- 
petence. Such has been the life record of 
Mr. Berry, who is now well known as a 
substantial liurticulturist and farmer of 
German township, his home being pleasantly 
situated a quarter of a mile west of Tre- 
mont. 

He was born in Alad River township, 
Cliampaign county, Ohio, April 22, 1857, 
his parents lieing- Achory and Angeline 
( Kite ) Berry. His father was born in 
Champaign county and throughout his en- 
tire life carried on agricultural pursuits. 
He located in Johnson township, of his na- 
tive county, and purchased eighty acres of 
land, on which he carried on general fann- 
ing until about 1874.. He then bought a 
farm at \\'est\-ille and continued his agri- 
cultural pursuits until his life's labors were 
ended in death, in ?^Iarch, 1901, when he 
was sixty-eight years of age. As the years 
passed he had accumulated a comfortable 
competence, and thus left his family in good 
financial circumstances. He was the father 
of five children, of whom the subject of this 
review is the eldest. The others are : 
Monroe E., a farmer residing in Champaign 
county, who is married and has three chil- 
dren : Albert, who is also of Champaign 
county, and Jias two children : Minnie, the 
wife of Charles Straub, of Clark county, by 
whom she has three children ; Nina, who- be- 
came the wife of Frank \\'yant and died in 
German township, leaving one child. The 
father was a Democrat in his political affil- 
iations, and was a member o-f the Myrtle 
Free Baptist church, in which he served as 
deacon for a number of years, filling that 
office up to the time of his death. 

George A\'. Berry of this review was a 
little lad when his parents removed to John- 
son township. Champaign county, where he 



remained until seventeen years of age, when 
the family went to a farm near Westville. 
There he continued until he had attained 
his majority, giving his father the benefit of 
his services until he was twenty-one years 
of age, when he began to work by the month 
as a farm hand. He was thus employed for 
two years, after which he operated land on 
shares. 

On the 2nd of November, 1881, in IMad 
River township, Champaign county, he wed- 
ded Miss Laura B. Ward, a native of that 
township and a daughter of Joseph and 
Sarah J. (Wyant) Ward. Tfiey began 
their domestic life upon a raited farm, and 
after renting for about nine years Mr. Berry 
purchased property. He had come to Clark 
county a year after his marriage, and had 
lived on the Thackery place, thus getting 
his start in life. He found a warm friend 
in Mr. Thackery, who helped him to buy 
the sixty-eight acres of land upon which he 
is now living. Later Mr. Berry has pur- 
chased an additional tract, and now has 
ninety-two acres, which are well improved. 
He has remodeled the honse and has added 
other ecjuipments such as are found upon a 
model farm of the twentieth century. He 
had to incur an indebtedness of over fonr 
thonsand dollars when he purchased the 
property, but Mr. Thackery told him that 
he would stand by him, and as the years 
have advanced the enterprising efforts of 
oiu- subject ha.\-e resulted in clearing away 
all incumbrances from the place. He plant- 
ed fruit trees and also began raising garden 
vegetables, and by the sales of his products 
he was not only enabled to meet his financial 
obligations, but also to add to his farm, and 
in his work attained success. 

The home of Mr. and ]\Irs. Berry has 
l)een blessed with two daughters : Lula, 



302 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



born in German township December 20, 
i88j. is the wife of WilHam Aylshire and 
resides in German township; Ruth, born 
September 26, 1891, is at home. Mr. Ber- 
ry holds membership with the Knights of 
the Maccabees at Tremont, and since his 
first presidential ballot was cast for Han- 
cock he has been an advocate of the Democ- 
racy. Truly he has earned the title of a 
self-made man. He has overcome obstacles 
and difficulties in his path aiid by persistent 
and honest industry he has gained a compet- 
ency and a position where he is highly re- 
spected by his acquaintances. 



DR. .\LBERT E. COTES. 

Dr. Albert E. Cotes, who is success- 
fully practicing medicine and surgery in 
Selma, was born in Bates county, Missouri, 
July 2, 1874, and is a son of Eliphalet and 
Julia (Hallenbeck) Cotes, the former a na- 
tive of Jefiferson county, New York, while 
the mother's birth also occurred in the Em- 
pire state. Upon a farm the father was 
reared, and when about twenty years of age 
made his way westward to Ohio, where he 
was first employed as a clerk in a store. 
He afterward began teaching school, and 
followed that profession for alwut twenty 
years, being well known in educational cir- 
cles. Remo\ing to the west, he there en- 
gaged in teaching and in following farming, 
but after a time he returned to Ohio and foi" 
fourteen years was principal of a ward 
school in Springfield. He is now connected 
with journalistic interests as a member of 
the staff of the Morning Sun, of Spring- 
field. 

The Doctor was oiilv a vear old wlien 



his people returned to the Buckeye state, 
and in the schools of Springfield he obtained 
his early education, while later he entered 
Antioch College at Yellow Springs. After 
three years spent in that institution he be- 
came a student in the State University at 
Columbus and was graduated in the class 
of 1S97 with the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence. He had determined to engage in the 
practice of medicine as a life work, and then 
took up the study of medicine in the Ohio 
Medical University, where he was gradu- 
ated in 1900. For a short time he practiced 
in Springfield, and in December, 1900, he 
came to Selma, where he has already secured 
a good patronage of a lucrative character. 
On the 30th of September, 1901, in this 
town, the Doctor wedded Miss Emma Yar- 
nell, who was born here and is a daughter 
of David and Mary (Wise) Yarnell. She 
is a graduate of the high school of Selma 
of the class of 1893, and is one of the es- 
teemed ladies of the place. Tlie Doctor 
votes with the Republican party, and the 
character of his life is indicated by the fact 
of his membership in the Methodist Episco- 
pal church and in Clark Lodge, No. 166, I. 
O. O. F., at South Charleston. In his pro- 
fession he is advancing, and his laudable 
ambition and earnest purpose gives promise 
of a bright future. He belongs to the Clark 
Countv Medical Societv. 



WILLIAM W. WARNER. 

William \\'. Warner is assistant chief 
of police of Springfield, and in this city has 
made his home since 187S. Capability and 
worthiness led to his selection for his pres- 
ent office, for during the years of previous 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



303 



connection with the police service he had 
ever shown himself to be a stalwart de- 
fender of law and order. He was born in 
North Lewisburg, Champaign cornity, Ohio, 
February 2, 1862. The family is of English 
lineage and was established in America at 
an early day when the William Penn colony 
was planted in Pennsylvania. His forefa- 
thers were members of the Society of 
Quakers or Friends. William ^^^arner, the 
grandfather of tmr subject, remoa-ed to 
Clark county, Ohio, at a very early period 
in the development of this portion of the 
state. H'e had two children ; Levi D. and 
Angeline Garwood, the latter a resident of 
North Lewisburg, Ohio. Tlie former, the 
father of our subject, was born in Selma, 
this county, and became a blacksmith, learn- 
ing the trade in early life. He was always 
an active, industrious man, very temperate 
and exemplary in his habits. In 1878 he 
removed with his family to Springfield, and 
here followed ,his trade for a Jiumber of 
years. He came of a family noted for 
longevity, but an accident terminated his ca- 
reer, he being killed by a train at South 
Charleston. He had served his country in 
the Civil war, was a member of Alitchell 
Post, G. A. R., and also belonged to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, while 
both he and his wife held membership in 
the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. 
Warner bore the maiden name of Lue Hurd, 
and they were married in Union county, 
Ohio. She was born in Clark county. Her 
great-grandfather and great-grandmother 
are buried in Harmony township, where her 
stq>sister, Mrs. Marian Darrow, whose 
maiden name was Brooks, was 1>orn in 181 8, 
while Charles Brooks, a half-brother, is a 
resident of North Lewisburg, Ohio. Mrs. 
^^'amer was one of three children born unto 



her parents, the others being James, of Ken- 
ton, and Thomas, who is living in Kansas. 
The Hurds were farming people, and were 
\-ery early settlers of Union county, Ohio. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. \\'arner were born five 
children, but two of the number died in 
early childhood. The others are: A. 
Woodrow, of this city ; Rilla. at home ; and 
William W., of this review. 

The last named pursued his education in 
the common schools of North Lewisburg 
and spent the days of his boyhood and youth 
under the parental roof. He served his ap- 
prenticeship with his father and for a few- 
years followed the blacksmith's trade, be- 
ing employed as a journe}-man from the 
time he was tw^enty years of age. He al- 
ways sought employment in this city, and 
as he was a good workman he had little 
difiiculty in obtaining situations in the vari- 
ous factories here. By the city council he 
was appointed a member of the police force, 
as guard of the chain gang, in 1885, while 
in 1887 he was promoted to a position on the 
regular force and has gradually worked his 
way upward throiigh all the dififerent offices, 
having served at various times on the dififer- 
ent beats of the cit}-. For five years he has 
been assistant chief of the police force, which 
he believes in keeping up to a higii standard 
of discipline, and all such men stand as an 
able bulwark in times of excitement and 
danger or when the public safety is in any 
way menaced. Mr. Warner is known as a 
worthy representative of the official life of 
Springfield. 

In 1886, in this cit}', was celebrated the 
marriage of our subject and Miss Sadie C. 
Shoemaker, who- was born in Pike township, 
Clark county, Ohio, a daughter of Samuel 
Shoemaker, a farmer of that township. 
Her mother is' now deceased. Mrs. Warner 



304 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



is one of five children, the others being Ida, 
the wife cf \\'aher Calhoun, of Springfield; 
Carrie, the wife of Emory Zerkle, of Law- 
renceville, Ohio, who follows fanning; 
Mary, deceased ; and Elwood, who died in 
1902. I'nto Mr. and Mrs. Warner was 
lx>rn one son, Edward A\'., whose birth oc- 
curred in 1887, and who is now a student 
in the high school. The wife and mother 
died in December, 1887, and Mr. Warner 
then returned home with his son and they 
have since resided with his mother. 

Mr. Warner holds membership in Eph- 
raim Lodge. Xo. 146. I. O. O. F.. and also 
belongs to Mad River Encampment. For 
five years he was a member of the old Sev- 
enth Regiment of the Ohio National Guard, 
and during that time attended six encamp- 
ments. Publc-spirited and progressive, 
he withholds his support from no enterprise 
or measure calculated vto benefit the city. He 
has a wide acquaintance in Springfield, en- 
joys the confidence of a large circle of 
friends and has always proved an efficient 
officer, devoting bis entire time to his duty. 



CH.\RLES BRIGGS. 

Charles Briggs is a well known farmer 
and stock-raiser of Madison township, Clark 
county, and was born on the farm where 
he now lives. He has here four hundred 
acres of valuable land and his realty posses- 
sions altogether aggregate eleven hundred 
acres lying in Clark. Madison and Greene 
counties and ten hundred and fifty acres in 
Jackson county. Ohio. As Mr. Briggs has 
a wide accpiaintance in this portion of the 
state, his friends will receive his life record 
with interest and it is therefore with pleasure 
that w c iiresent his historv to our readers. 



He was bon'n Septeirbcr 2^. 1832, and is 
a son of Samuel and ElizabetJi (Hemple- 
nian) Briggs. The father came to Ohio 
from Virginia when but a lx>y. in company 
with his parents John and Catherine ( Peter- 
son) Briggs. The grandfather at that time 
settled near where the subject of this review 
now li\es and became the owner of a large 
tract of land. He nade his hcvire in the 
county at a time when Indians were en- 
camped near by and when primitive condi- 
tion existed, all Ijeing wild and unimproved 
in this section of the state. He lived to be 
over ninety years of age. Samuel Briggs. 
then a boy, would frecpiaitly play and wres- 
tle with the Indian boys. He was reared 
amid the wild scenes of frontiea- life, sharing 
witli the family in the hardships and trials 
incident to frontier existence, and eventually 
he liegan farming on his own account, car- 
rying on that pursuit throughout his active 
business career. The mother ai our subject 
came to Ohio from Pennsylvania with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Hempleiran. 
Her mother died when she was quite ymmg 
and the father afterward married Miss 
Fletcher, and George Heir.pleman. now of 
Clark county, is her half-brother. The nnr- 
riage of Mr. and Mrs. Briggs was celebrated 
in Clark County, May 10, 1821. The grand- 
father had given to each of his children a 
farm and Samuel Briggs became the owner 
of the tract upon which our subject now 
lives. His home was a hewed log cabin and 
therein he reared his family. Unto him and 
his wife were born se\-en childrai, six of 
whom reached years of maturity. Lucinda 
became the wife of John Selsor and died 
in Illinois. Mary became the wife of Mar- 
tin Luther Carr and is now a widow living in 
White county, Indiana. She has four chil- 
dren. Matilda is the wife of Clement 




CHARLES BRIGGS. 




MRS. CHARLES BRIGGS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



309 



Shockley and is residing in Fayette county, 
Ohio'. Amos died in Clark county. Charles 
is the next in the family. Elizabeth married 
Daniel AlcKillip and is living- in Clark 
countv. In his political affiliations the la- 
ther of the subject of this rexdew was a 
Democrat but was never an office seeker. 
In early life he belonged to the Baiptist 
church but later changed his religious views 
and joined the Christian church. His life 
was ever upright and honorable and coan- 
n.ended him to the confidence and good will 
of those with whom he came in contact. He 
passed away September 8, 1850, at the age 
of fifty-three years, his birth having oc- 
curred. January 115. 1797. His wife, who 
was Ixxn October 8, 1803, long sundved 
him. passing away on the 13th of January, 
1889. 

Charles Briggs spent his boyhood days 
on the old home fann and pursued his edu- 
cation in a log schoolho'use, continuing his 
studies until alx>ut sixteen years of age. At 
that tin-.e his father died and the following 
year Charles Briggs began earning his own 
li^■elihood. He inherited about three hun- 
dred and fifteen acres of land from the es- 
tate, but had to meet some indebtedness left 
bv his father. He engaged in raising sheep 
and found that a profitable industry, owing 
tO' his successfully conducted work aud un- 
tiring aiterprise. As his financial resources 
increased he Jcept adding toi his land from 
time tO' time until he is now accounted one 
of the most extensive land owners of this 
portion of the state, having altogether two 
thousand, one hundred and seventy acres 
of land. Much of this is very rich and high- 
ly cultivated and returns to hini a splendid 
income. For the past six years ^Ir. Briggs 
has been interested in coal mining and now 
"wns about one hundred and fiftv acre* of 



coal land in Jackson county, this state. Af- 
ter oi:)ening up the mines, he has leased them, 
and they are now in shape toi pttt out one 
hundred tons per day. They are conven- 
iently located on the Baltimore & Ohio 
Southwestern railroad and give promise of 
being very profitable. 

On the 9th of December, 1867, Mr. 
Briggs was united in marriage to Miss Sa- 
rah Woosley, of Clark comity, where she 
was born and reared, her parents being 
Benjamin and Keturah (Hunt) Woosley. 
Her father was also' born in this county,, 
while her paternal grandfather, James 
Woosley, was a native of Virginia and of 
English ancestry, being a descendant oi 
Lord Woosley. Fot a time he lived in Cir- 
cleville, Ohio, and then located oa: a fann 
near South Charleston. The mother of 
>ilrs. Briggs was born in Xew Jersey and 
when about three or foiu' _\ears of age came 
to Ohio with her parents, Isaiah and Re- 
becca ( Sleeper) Hunt, who lived to an ad- 
vanced age here. Her father died at the 
age of sevent}--two, her mother when sixty- 
three years of age. In their family were six. 
children, of whom Mrs. Briggs is the eldest. 
The others are: Lavina, the wife of Jesse 
Strottp; Isaiah, who died in infancy; Jair.es, 
who died at the age of si.xteen years; Emma, 
the wdfe of Edward H. Florence: and Will- 
iam, whoi is living in Clark county. Four 
children graced the union of our subject aud 
his wife, of whom the eldest died in infancy. 
Francis M. married Florence Hopkins and 
died at the age of thirty years, leaving three 
children — Charles F., Xellie. and Amos P. 
Mary became the wife of E. Barton Shep- 
herd and died in Greene county, Ohio, leav- 
ing one child, Merrill Briggs She])hcrd. 
Laura, the youngest nf the family, dietl in 
infancv. 



3IO 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mr. Brig-gs is a standi Daiiocrat and 
never fails to cast his ballot for the nien 
and measures of that party, but the honors 
and emolun.ents of office have had no at- 
traction for him. His wife belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal church and both are 
well known and highly respected people of 
the community. Although Mr. Briggs in- 
herited some land, he did not sit down idl\- 
content with what he possessed, but with 
great energ\- and determination he entered 
upon his business career and has steadily 
advanced to a positio:i of wealth and afflu- 
ence, acquiring lands and property as the 
result of his industry and capable manage- 
ment. His life history shows what can be 
accomplished if one has the will to dare and 
to do, and his example should serve as a 
source of encouragement and inspiration to 
others. 



ALBERIT K. HAHX. 

On the list of officers of Clark county 
appears the name of .Albert K. Hahn, who 
is now serving as county auditor and makes 
his home in Springfield — his native city — 
wliere his birth occurred on Christmas day 
of 1855. His parents were Casper and Caro- 
line ( Kastner) Hahn, lx)th of whom were 
natives of Germany, the father having been 
born in Frankfort-on-the-Main, February 
5, 1826, while the mother's birth ocairred in 
Strasburg on the ist of January, 1827. She 
came to America in her fifth year, but the 
father was twenty-one years of age when 
he crosscfl the Atlantic. For a long period 
he was a resident of Springfield. Ohio, and 
here he died in 1884, his remains being in- 
terred in the beautiful FernclifF cemetery. 
His wife passed away in 1876. and she, too. 



was laid to rest there. Tlie name of Cas- 
per Hahn figured prominently in connection 
with the mercantile interests of the city. At 
one time he conducted a merchant tailoring 
establishment and was aftenxard proprietor 
of a dry-goods store, which did an e.Ktensive 
and profitable business. 

.\jbert K. Hahn, whose name forms the 
cajilion of this review, was educated in the 
public schools of his native city, and after 
thus preparing for college he liecame a stu- 
dent in Wittenberg College, where he re- 
mained a student for five years, pursuing a 
scientific course that has greatly broadened 
his mental ken and well fitted him for busi- 
ness life. He entered upon his business 
career in the capacity of a clerk in the em- 
ploy of T. J. Casper and W. T. Sn.ith. with 
whom he remained for twelve years. A'o 
higher testimonial of the intelligent and 
faithful ser\ice of this gentleman could be 
given than the fact that he was so long re- 
tained in one employ. On the e.vpiration. 
of tliat peried, in 1894, he was appointed 
deputy county auditor under L. F. Young, 
and in Xovemlljer, 1899, he was elected au- 
ditor of Clark county, assuming the duties 
of the office on the 15th of Xovember, 1900, 
for a term of three years. He is methodical 
and systematic in conducting the work of 
the office and faithfully performs every du- 
ty devolving upon him in this position of 
public trust. In March, 1902, he was re- 
nominated, and was again elected to that 
office. He is a director, vice president and 
treasurer of the Fair\ievv Floral Company, 
of which he was one of the incoqxjrators. 
Tliis coinpany has an e.xtensive trade, which 
extends from Maine to California, and from 
the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico, 

In September, 1886, occurred the mar- 
riage of Mr. Hahn and Miss Emma Circle, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of Clark county, a daughter of Samuel and 
Hannah (Overholser) Circle. Two children 
grace this union, Esther and Justus A. The 
family attend and support 'St. Paul's Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, of which Mrs. Hahn 
is a member. 

For many years Mr. Hahn has been an 
active worker in tlie ranks of the Republi- 
can party and for five years was a member 
of the county central committee and of the 
executive committee for ten years. He is 
a member o^f the Commercial Club, which he 
joined on its organization. He is also con- 
nected through membership relations with 
Red Star Lodge, No. 205, K. P.; Clark 
Lodge, No. loi, F. & A. M. ; Springfield 
Chapter, No. 48, R. A. M. ; Spring-field 
Coiuncil, No. 17, R. & S. M.; and Palestine 
Commandery, Noi. 33, K. T., while in the 
Scottish Rite he has attained the thirty- 
second degree, and is therefore a Consistory 
Mason. Mr. Hahn is a representative of 
our best t}-pe of American manhood ; in his 
business he has been diligent, enterprising 
and honorable, and in public afifairs loyal and 
patriotic, so that he has justly attained to 
a position as a director of public thought and 
action in political circles. 



MICHAEL BAUER. 



Michael Bauer, who was formerly en- 
gaged in blacksmithing and now follows 
farming in Harmony township, is one of the 
worthy citizens that Germany has furnished 
to Clark county. A native of Hesse Dam- 
stadt, he was born July 11, 1843. his parents 
being Michael and Barbara (Winkler) 
Bauer. In the town where his Ijirth oc- 
curred he was reared to manlinod and at- 



tended school there until fourteen years of 
age, when he began learning the black- 
smith's trade, serving an apprenticeship of 
two years. Instead of receiving any pe- 
cuniary compensation for his services, Ihe 
had to pay his employer one hundred dollars 
for the privilege of learning the business. 
When his term of apprenticeship was ended 
he received about twelve cents a week for 
his services for a year. He was afterward 
paid one dollar a week, and later commanded 
two dollars a week for his labor. This was 
considered good wages in the fatherland. 
Hearing favorable reports of the business 
opportunities of the new world, Mr. Bauer 
believed that he migjit better his financial 
condition in America, and after attaining his 
majority he crossed the Atlantic. In the 
meantime, however, when he had reached, 
the age of twenty-one years, he was called 
to serve in the army according to the laws 
of his native land, and was on military duty 
for three years. Pie was then granted a 
furlough. At the end of another j-ear the 
war between Prussia and Austria broke out 
and he was again called to service, partici- 
pating in the battle of Aschaffeuburg, in Ba- 
varia, in which his knapsack was pierced 
with bullets, but he was uninjured. He 
was also in the battle at Schaffliauser. 

The year 1868 witnessed the anigration 
of Mr. Bauer to the United States. He 
came in company with his parents, who lo- 
cated in Hancock county, Ohio, where they 
are still living, both having reached an ad- 
vanced age, the father ha\ing been bcrn in 
1819, the mother in 1816. Mr. Bauer of 
this review secured work at West jMiltou 
in Miami county, Ohio, and there remained 
for about two years, after which he went 
to the vicinity of Xenia, where he conducted 
a shop of his own. After his marriage he 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



resided near Cedarville for a few years and 
then went to Clifton and there conducted a 
smitliv. Tiiere he also bouglit twenty acres 
of land, and in connection with work at his 
trade he engaged in the cultivation of his 
fields. Removing to Harmony township, 
he purchased ninety acres of his present 
farm and has erected good buildings upon 
this ])lace. developing an excellent prc<]>erty 
highly improved with modern equipments. 
On the 23d of March, 1871, Mr. Bauer 
was joined in wedlock, in Stormtown. 
Greene county, Ohio, to Miss Lizzie Ger- 
man, who was horn in Springfield township, 
Clark county. July i-|, 1850. Her parents, 
Bals and P>arbani (Hartmann) Gemian, 
were both natives of the fatherland, and the 
former was about twenty-three years of age 
and the latter eighteen years of age when 
they came to .\merica with their res])ective 
parents. They were married in Springfield 
September 15. 1849, and for seme time 
thereafter Mr. German worked at his trade 
of shoemaking in order to provide for his 
family. E\-entually, however, he abandoned 
that inu-?uit and purchased land in Green 
township. Clark county, where he died. Oc- 
tober 8. 1900. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Bauer 
have been born three children : Anna, lx>m 
in Greene county. January 17. 1872. is the 
wife of George Conrad, of Great Falls. Mon- 
tana, and they have three children — Daisy, 
Clarence and Frances ; John, born in Greene 
county, July 7. 1874, was married in Great 
Falls. Montana, to Xellie Tyler, and now 
lives in the state of Washington : and Will- 
iam, born in Clifton. Greene county. Xc- 
vember 12. 1879. is also living in Great 
Falls. }ili:ntana. Mr. Bauer votes with the 
Democracy. Both he aufl his wife were 
reared in the faith of the German Lutheran 
church and were confirmed therein at the 



age of fourteen years. All that he has ac- 
quired he owes to his own industry and 
perseverance. He has been a faithful toiler 
in the field of business activity, and his good 
farm is the visible evidence of his cnter])ris- 
ing life. 



WILLIAM WILDMAX. 

More than a century ago George Wash- 
ington said that "agriculture is the most 
useful and honorable occupation of man." 
and the truth of this statement stands today 
as it did then. Among the representatives 
of farming interests in Madison townshij). 
Clark county, is William Wildman, who was 
Ixjrn near Selma, in what is now Cedarville 
township, Greene county. Ohio, his natal 
day being June 19, 1833. Mis parents were 
Edward and Hannah (Thorn) Wildman. 
The father was born in Virginia in 1806 and 
was aljout seven years of ag-e when his 
parents, John and Elizabeth (Bond) Wild- 
man, came from Grayson, Virginia^ to Ohio, 
legating upon the farm which is now the 
hom.e of our sul>ject. Here the grajidfatber 
]Mrchased land, comprising about one hun- 
dred acres, which had been improved to a 
slight extent. Upon' the farm was a small 
l<-g cabin, which is still standing as one oi 
the landmarks of pioneer days. Tlie grand- 
father was a native of Loudoun county. Vir- 
ginia, and after coming to Ohio he spent his 
remaining days upon the old homestead farm 
here, it being his place of residence from 
1814 until 1840. He soon added to his orig- 
inal purchase until he had three hundred 
and eighty acres. He also enlarged and 
in- proved the log house and occupied it as 
long as he lived. 

Edward \\'ildn'.an. the father of our sub- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



313 



ject, was reared to manhood amid the wild 
scenes oif frontier life and was married in 
Greene county in 183 1. There he resided 
until 1843, when he remo'ved toi the farm 
upon which William Wildman now resides, 
purchasing the interest of the other heirs 
in the old hooie property. Here he con- 
tinued toi carry on agricultural pursuits 
throughout his remaining days. Four chil- 
dren were born unto him and his wife, all 
of whom reached maturity, although only 
two are now living, William and Rachel T., 
the wife of Israel H. Hollingsworth. wb.i> 
lives near Richmond, Indiana. John, the 
second .':on. made his home in Greene coun- 
ty, where he died in 1878; and Marion, who 
was the third o.f the family, died in Rich- 
mond. Indiana, in January, 190 1, leaving a 
widr>w and children. 

In his boyhood days William Wildman 
acquired a good common-school education 
and was trained to habits of industry, econo- 
ni}- and honesty upon the home farm, gain- 
ing, too-, that practical experience of farm 
work that enabled him to successfully carr\' 
on agricultural pursuits on his own account 
after he had attained his majority. On the 
19th of October, 1859, he married Miss 
Eliza Harri.son, of Clark county, a daug-h- 
ter of John F. and Elizabeth (Paist) Harri- 
son. }vlr. and Mrs. Wildman began their 
domestic life upon a farm in Madison town- 
sliip, on which they lived for several years. 
When the father died in 1870 he left an 
estate of about one thousand acres, which 
was divided among his heirs. In the home 
farm Air. Wildman has frmr hundred and 
eiglity acres, and his landed possessions also 
comprise a farm of three hundred and twen- 
ty acres in Elk county. Kansas, and also 
three hundred and twent_\' acres in \\'right 
C()lnlt^•, Alissouri. In 1878 Mr. Wildman 



becam.e a partner in a mercantile enterprise 
in. Selma, Ohio, with which he was connected 
until 1898. In 1894 the firm- established the 
Exchange Bank, of which Mr. Wildman was 
president, doing a general banking business 
in Selma until 1898, when he removed to 
Cedarville and opened what is known as the 
Exchange Bank of Cedarville. He serves as 
president of the same, and his son, Walter 
J., as cashier. Tliis bank has elegant quar- 
ters in the township building, although they 
own business property in Cedarville. Mr. 
W'iklman's business interests have been of 
an extensi\'e and important character and he 
deserves to be ranked among the captains of 
industry in this portion of Clark county. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Wildman have been 
six children. Bertha is now the widow O'f 
John Fremont Hickman and a resident of 
W'ooster, Wayne county, Obio. She has 
two children, Hilda L. and Roger A. Wal- 
ter J., who married Cora D. Atkins, by whom 
he has two children, Ernest A. and Gladys, 
is now cashier in the Exchange Bank of 
Cedarville. Ahin Edward, who manages 
the home farm, married Anna White, and 
they have five children, Edith E., Edna E., 
William \^"endell .Walter E. and Winnifred. 
Louis H. married Myrtle ]\Iandeville and 
died in Cedarville February 23, 1899, leav- 
ing one son, Louis M. He was the cashier 
of the bank at the time of his death. Ra- 
chel T. is the wife of Robert Elder, of Selma, 
and has two children, Robert Newell and 
Lois. William Ernest died in 1889 at the 
age of twelve years. 

At the tin-.e of the organization of the 
Republican party, when John C. Fremont 
becnme its first presidential candidate, Will- 
iam Wildn-an advocated its iprinciples and 
for many years gave to it his support, but 
in recent vears he has been identified with 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the Prohibition party. He served for several 
years as a meml>er of the board of education. 
He is a birthright member of tlie Green 
Plain Society of Friends and his wife became 
a member before her marriage. They have 
many friends in the community and are wide- 
ly known here. Mr. Wildman has been en- 
ergetic and resolute in Inisiaess affairs and 
owes his success to his ability to recognize 
a business opportunity and improve it. 



JOHX G. S.\DLIER. 

John G. Sadlier, deceased, was born in 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania, June 14. 1856, 
a son of John and Ann (Graham) Sadlier, 
the latfer a native of tlie Keystone state, 
while the former was born in Ireland and 
was a farmer by occupation. The subject 
of this review attended the common schools 
until thirteen years of age, and then began 
learning tlie mnldcr"s trade in the Cambria 
Iron Works, where he was employed for 
eight years, thoroughly mastering every 
branch of the business with which he was 
connected. He then went to Alliance, Ohio, 
entering the service of the Morgan Engin- 
eering Company in the capacity of assist- 
ant foreman, serving three years. At Shar- 
on, Pennsylvania, he was for three years em- 
ployed by D. J. Egan, in his iron and steel 
works, being for one year the foreman of 
the plant. He had been very much inter- 
ested in steel work from his boyhood and he 
made the first steel casting ever manufac- 
ured in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Re- 
mnving to Cleveland, Ohio, Mr. Sadlier en- 
tered the works of the \^^^lker Manufac- 
turing Company, now the Westinghouse 
Company, and after a sliort time was made 



assistant foreman of the foundry depart- 
ment, his duties being important and 
onerous. When six years had passed in 
that way he gave up the position and came 
to the Springfield Company, at Springfield, 
Ohio, taking charge of the foundry, which 
was then a very small concern, but under his 
able guidance the business increased until 
an extensive plant was demanded in the con- 
duct of the enterprise, and the works were 
enlarged until they became one of the lead- 
ing industrial concerns of tl>e city. Mr. 
Sadlier was after a short time made vice- 
])resident and manager, and to his practical 
knowledge of the foundry business, his un- 
llagging industry and enter]>rise the splendid 
growth of the Iiusiness was largely attributa- 
l)le. At the time of his death he was plan- 
ning to ])lace upon the market a dust-proof 
ratler for cleaning. The model had beai 
completed, but tlie machine had not l>een 
constructed when his life's labors were end- 
ed in death. He designed the drill made 
by the Fairbanks Machine Tool Company, 
secured the patent upon it and a vast num^ 
ber are now in use. In addition to acting 
as tlie vice president of the Springfield 
Foundry Company, he was the manager of 
the Fairbanks Tool Company and the Indi- 
anapolis Switch & Frog Com]>any. and his 
connection with extensive and important 
mechanical interests made him known in 
trade circles of this kind throughout the 
country. De\ices wliich are his invaitions 
have proved of practical utility in the busi- 
ness world, and his life work was therefore 
of material benefit to his fellow men. 

In 1876 Mr. Sadlier was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary Luther, a native of 
Johnstovm, Pennsylvania, and unto them 
were born thirteai children, ten of whom 
are now living: h'hn \\'., Marv G., Dan- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



315 



iel I., Thomas, Frances, Charles, Margaret, 
Rose, Laurence and Ruth. They also adopt- 
ed a son, William;, a nephew oi Mrs. Sad- 
lier. To his family Mr. Sadlier was de- 
noted, putting foi'th every effort in his pow- 
er toi promote the happiness and welfare of 
his wife and children. 

Although Mr. Sadlier started out in the 
business world with little education to aid 
him, he broadened his knowledge by attend- 
ing night school, also by reading, experi- 
ence aind observation, and became a well 
read man. He often wrote articles for pub- 
lication upon subjects relating to foundry 
work. He was an honorary member of the 
Iron Moulders' Union, and in June, 1901, 
he was elected the president of the Ameri- 
can Foundry Association, at Buffalo, and 
was filling that position at the time of his 
death. In politics be was a, Democrat who 
took an acti\'e interest in the growth of the 
party, and when in Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, he delivered many campaign ad- 
dresses in behalf of Hancock and was a del- 
egate to the convention- which nominated 
Patterson. In 1901 he was a, candidate on 
the Democratic ticket for mayor of Spring- 
field. He held membership in St. Joseph's 
church anrl in that faith died, passing away 
January 6, 190J, his remains being interred 
in St. John's cen etery. at Johnstown, Penn- 
sylvania. He was an earnest Christian 
man, and perhaps no better estimate of his 
character can l)e given than the words of his 
pastor, who delivered the funei-al sermon, 
and who said : "Early in life he learned to 
follow the Savior's instruction — 'Seek first 
the Kingdom of God and his justice and all 
things will be added unto you.' He has left 
a legacy more precious than jewels and 
gems — a legacy of faith, hope and charity. 
He has shown that a man could live, mingle 



and labor in the world and practice his faith 
every day." The transcendant goodness and 
purity of his life commanded uniform re- 
spect and the life record of John G. Sadlier 
IS v.orthy to be cherished in the minds and 
hearts uf his man friends as long as n'.em- 
ory endures. 



D. \\'ALTER SPEXCE. M. D. 

Since 1898 Dr. D. Walter Spence has 
engaged in the practice of medicine and 
surgery in Springfield. Professional ad- 
x'aaicement is proiverbially slow, for the physi- 
cian has toi demonstrate his ability and skill, 
and time, which tests the merits of all things, 
then places its approval or disapproval upon 
his work, and theretby public patronage is 
gained or lo«t. Dr. Spence, however, has 
continuall}- advanced in public regard since 
he became a factor in the medical fraternity 
in Springfield. He was born in Moncton, 
New Brunswick, March 22, 1864, and is a 
son of David Spence, whose birth occurred 
in New Brunswick, in March, 1843, '^''"^1 \\\'^a 
in early life was employed as a foundry- 
man. He is now living at Dover, New 
Hampshire, and is the general manager 01 
the Kidder Press Company. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Margaret Mac- 
Claren, was born at Charlottetown, on Prince 
Edward's Island, in 1844, and l»th were 
educated in the academic schools of Canada. 
They were married in New Brunswick, and 
afterward the father removed with his fami- 
ly to Nova Scotia, where he engaged in the 
foundry business at Annapolis. There he 
continued until 1878, when he went to Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, remaining for four years 
in that city, acting as sUperintaident of 
the Sturtevant Blower ^\V)rks. Later he 



3i6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



was located at Williamsport, Peiinsyhania, 
as superintendent of the Deniorest sewing 
machine and bicycle facton-, capably filling 
that position until 1894. From there he 
went to Dover, New Hampshire. He is a 
scientific niclter and foundryman, fully ac- 
quainted with great mechanical principles 
and has always led an active, busy and use- 
ful life. In the family were two children, 
the Doctor and Floraice E. The daughter 
died at Valaitia, Columbia county, New 
York, at the age of twenty-one years. 

Dr. Spaice of this review pursued an 
academical education and was fourteen years 
of age when he went to Boston, Massachu- 
setts, with his parents. There he entered 
a drug store in the capacity of clerk and aft- 
er some connection with mercantile life he 
determined to devote his time and energies 
to the important work of alleviating hu- 
man suffering, and accordingly, in 1884, 
he entered the JefTerson Medical College of 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was gradu- 
ated in that institution in the class of 1888, 
with the degree of M. D. He afterward 
took a post-graduate course in the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College of New York, 
and was graduated in 1889. After his 
graduation the Doctor located in Williams- 
port, Pennsylvania, wliere he continued in 
practice until 1898, when he came to Spring- 
field. He has here made a specialty of sur- 
gery and of the diseases of women, and in 
these lines has jjrog-ressed rapidly, for his 
skill and close attention to his professional 
work have made his lalx)rs of much value 
in the line of his chosen calling. He has 
built up a lucrative practice and is numbered 
among the representative surgeons of the 
citv. lie was vice president of the Spring- 
field .Vcademv oi Medicine before it was 



merged into another organization, and in 
Williamsport he was a member of the Ly- 
coming County Medical Society. He now 
belongs to the Clark County Medical Soci- 
ety, of which he is the treasurer. He is 
one who puts into practice modern methods 
of utility and value, and at the present time 
he is surgeon for the Detroit Southern rail- 
road, is examiner for the Pacific Life In- 
surance Company of California, the Inter- 
state Company of Cincinnati, and the Cen- 
tral Life Insurance Company of Pittsburg, 
in addition to performing the duties devoh- 
ing upon him as a practitioner. 

The Doctor was married in Willianis- 
poit. Pennsylvania, in 1899 to Miss Blanche 
V^. Fegley, who was born in Williamsport, 
Pennsylvania, in 1876. Her father, Alvin 
D. Fegley, was engaged in merchandising. 
She was one of two children, the other 
having died in infancy. The Doctor and 
his wife have one son, Walter Alvin, who 
was Ixim in July, 1901. 

The Doctor belongs to the Independent 
Ordei- of Odd Fellows, of Williamsixirt, 
Pennsylvania. He' is a Republican and is a 
citizen of worth, his efforts in behalf of the 
general good having Ijeen effective and far- 
reaching. His clo.se and earnest study of the 
science of medicine has given him a com- 
prehensive knowledge of the best methods 
of treating disease and Dr. Spence's rqni- 
tation is by no means far behind that of 
many surgeons of twice his years. 



HOX. CH.XRLKS J. BOWLCS. 

One of Springfield"s i)rominent and in- 
fluential citizens is Ibm. Charles J. Bowhis. 
ex-mavor of that citv. who is now cxten- 




C. J. BOWLUS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



3<9 



sively engaged in 'business as a wholesale 
dealer in fruit and produce and is a general 
commission merchant doing business under 
the name of the Bowlus Fruit Company, at 
No. 23 West High street and No. 20 North 
Market Place. 

It is in the county of his natix'ity that 
Mr. Bowlus has attained distinction, for he 
was born in Clark county upon a farm, De- 
cember 17, 1866, bis parents being George 
C. and Barbara (Crabill) Bowlus. Tbe 
father was born in Maryland in 1841 and 
in his boyhorxl da3-s came to- this county 
\\\t\\ his father, Captain Samuel H. Bo-wlus, 
and settled on the old Urbana pike. The 
g^rand father was a farmer by occupation and 
improved one of the finest farms in Clark 
county. A man of forceful individuality, 
unwavering in support of bis honest convic- 
tions and ever loyal tO' wha't he believed 
to be right, he commanded the respect and 
confidence of all who knew him. When, ac- 
cording to his political convictions, he had 
reason to change his position he became a 
Democrat, having previously been a stal- 
wart Whig. However, with equal fervency 
he became devoted to the principles of the 
Democracy, affiliating with the latter party 
up to the time of his death, which occurred 
November 26, 1896, at Bowlusville, which 
is on the county line. He took a very ac- 
tive part in the Vallandingham can.paign 
and ga\'e a barbecue, which he conducted 
with great success, attracting thousands of 
people. His wife lx>re the maiden nan:e of 
Lucinda Michael. She was a native of 
Maryland, and possessed many excellent 
qualities of heart and mind. She, too, passed 
away at Bowlusville in the year 1896. 

Georg'e C. Bowlus, the father of our 
subject, was reared to manhoorl on the old 



family homestead in this county, and the 
public schools afforded him his educational 
privileges. Throughout the period of his 
youth he also asssisted his father in the worjc 
of the home farm, and after he put aside his 
text books he carried on agricultural pur- 
suits on his own account for a number of 
years. He afterward removed to Spring- 
field, where he has now made his honie for 
some time and at present is serving as su- 
perintendent of the city prison. His wife 
is a native of Pennsylvania and a daughter 
of Joseph Crabill, who was also Ixirn in the 
Keystone state. 

Charles J. Bowlus of this review spent 
his early boyhood days in the usual manner 
of farmer lads of the period, performing 
t'le duties of the school room, enjoying the 
pleasures of the playground and assisting 
in the work of the field and meadoav during 
the periods of \-acation. On leaving the 
farm he took up his abode in 'Springfield 
and has since been identified with its m.er- 
cantile interests. He first secured a clerk- 
ship in a grocery store conducted by C. C. 
Funk, now deceased, with whom he re- 
mained for several years, and afterward be 
engaged in clerlcing for other parties. PI is 
enterprise and industr)- at length brought 
to him sufficient capital to enable him to 
begin biusiness on his own account in 1888, 
and he established a wholesale fruit and pro- 
duce store on High street, there carrying on 
a large and successful trade. In! 1897 he 
entered into- partner.ship with William R. 
Hackett under the name of the Bowlus Fruil: 
Company, doing a general commission busi- 
ness, dealing in wholesale specialties. They 
handle potatoes, cabbages, bananas, ai>ples, 
strawberries and melons and their trade cov- 
ers a radius of one hundred niles. Tbe\- 



320 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORl 



receive their goods in car-load lots from all 
parts of the United States, from Maine to 
California, and from Canada to the Gulf. 

On the 31st of March, 1887, Mr. Bow- 
lus was married to Miss Fanny Lee Duvall. 
of Springfield, a daughter of William H. 
and Sarah (Bingham) Duvall. By this 
union were born three sons: Roger C, 
now a student in Kenyon Militar)' /Vcade- 
my ; William D. ; and Charles J. They also 
lost an infant daughter named Thelma. 

In religious belief both Mr. and Mrs. 
Bowlus are Episcopalians, being members 
of the church of the Heavenly Rest, of 
which he is junior warden, and he is also a 
director of the Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation, taking an active interest in that 
line of work. Fratemally he is connected 
w^ith Red Star Lodge, K. P., and with 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
He is also a meml>er of the Commercial 
Club and is a director of the Board of Trade 
and of the Episcopal hospital in Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He has interested himself in mat- 
ters pertaining to the history of Clark coun- 
ty and was a manber of the committee on 
city government and its departments at the 
centennial anniversary held in Spring-field 
in 1901. In his political affiliations he has 
always lieen a Den.ocrat and for two years 
foJlowing the election of A])ril, 1899, he 
was mayor of Springfield, his adniinislra- 
lion being commendable liecause it was busi- 
ness-like, practical and progressive, many 
important mo\'ements and measures being 
executed during that time. His life has been 
one of exceptional activity and usefulness 
and has been characterized by the most un- 
swerving integrity and honor. He began 
life as a poor boy and has made a success 
not only as a business man. but also as a 
respected resident of Spring-field. 



JOHN S. CARD, M. D. 

By the death of this honorable and up- 
right citizen Clark county sustained a great 
loss, for he was prominent in his profession- 
al life and in public circles and was widely 
regarded as a most highly respected citi- 
zen. .\s the day with its morning of hope 
and i)ron:ise, its noontide o)f activity, its 
evening of completed and successful effort 
ending with the grateful rest and quiet of 
the night, so was the life of this honored 
mian. Through ma:iy years he devoted his 
efforts and energies to the practice of medi- 
cine, his lalx>rs pro-^ing of great benefit to 
his fellow men. He remained to the end 
of his life a kindly, genial friend, one whom 
it was a pleasure to know and to> meet under 
any circumstances and his influence was ever 
exerted in behalf of the true and the right. 

Dr. Gard was Ix^rn in German township, 
Clark county, October 12, 1829,, and died 
November 19. 1886, his remains being in- 
terred in Rector cemetery. Tlie ancestral 
history of the family can be traced hack to 
Xew Jersey, in which state Job Gard, the 
grandfather of the Doctor was born. He 
became one of the early settlers of Kentucky 
and subsequaitly removed to Ohio, settling 
first at Cincinnati and aftenvard at Dayton, 
whence he removed to ^Nliami county, and 
finally, in 1805, he t(H>k up his ahotlc in 
German township, Clark county, where he 
spent the greater part of his remaining days. 
He was one of the honored .pioneer set- 
tlers here and assisted materially in the 
early development and improvement of this 
section of the state. 

His son. Gershon Gard. the father of 
the Doctor, was about thirteen years of age 
when the family was established in Clark 
coimty. and here he wa.s reared in the pio- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



321 



neer hon:e. All around grew the great for- 
ests, standing in their primeval strength, 
and Indians still roamed through the woods. 
The work of improivement antl upbuilding 
had scarcely beai begun, but the Gards reso*- 
lutely bore their part in- the labor which 
resulted in reclaiming this section of the 
state for the uses oif the white man, Ger- 
shon Gard was reared upon a farm and after 
attaining his majority carried on both agri- 
cutura'I pursuits and milling, bnilding and 
operating several mills on Mad river. He 
alsOi served his couiDtry in the war of 181 2 
and led a very active 'and useful life. He 
^\•as twice married and by the first union had 
thirteen children, wdiile by the secoaid mar- 
riage two children were born. He first wed- 
ded Mary Peacock, who died in 1849. The 
same \'ear he married Maria Smith. His 
death occurred on the ist of Xo\'ember, 
1S65. 

Dr. Gard of this review was trained to 
manual labor in his yo'Uth and until eighteai 
years of age he spent the winter months as 
a student in the district schools. Better edu- 
cational privileges were then afforded him 
and he became a student in the OhiO' Con- 
ference high school of Springfield, where 
he remained for two years.- He was also a 
student for twoi years in the Wesleyan 
University of Delaware, after which he 
entered the R, S. Bacon commercial 
coillege oi Cincinnati. All this mental 
training served Ixit as a foundation upon 
which to .rear the superstructure of 
professional kno'wledge. Detennining to 
devote his life to the practice of medicine 
in order to lessen the sum of human suf- 
fering in the world, he entered the Starling 
Medical College O'f Columbus, from which 
he was graduated in the class Oif 1864. 

Dr. Gard had been previously married 



on the nth of November, 1851, to Miss 
Emma E. Hurd, who was bofn near Bridge- 
port, Connecticut, August 10, 1831, a 
daughter of Edwards and Elizabeth ( De 
Forest) Hurd. Her father was born in 
Connecticut and ^^'as a, son of Fi'ederick and 
Susanna (Edwards) Hurd, his mother's 
maiden nam.e being used as his Christian 
name. Mrs. Gard's mother was also born 
nea,r Bridgeport, Connecticut, in the to'wn 
of Stepney, and her parents were Pliilo and 
Nancy (Beach) De Forest. The De Forests 
were oif French lineage. When Mrs. Gard 
was two months old her parents remoAxd to 
Otsego county, New York, and lived there 
until she was sevai years of age, when they 
went to Chenango county, that state, there 
spending six years. In DeceniDjer, 1S46, 
they came to- Ohio, locating in Cincinnati, 
where her father worked at the carpenter's 
trade and she attended the Methodist Fe- 
male College Institute. She afterward en- 
gaged in teaching school for a year and 
was then married. Her aunt, Miss Mai-y 
De Forest, who after\\'ard became the wife 
of Rev. Dexter Witter, of Burton, Ohio^ 
engaged in teaching school for about twenty 
years. While she was in school Miss Lucy 
Webb, after Mrs. Rutherford B. Ha}-es, was- 
a student there, and she, and Mrs. Gard were 
warm friends. Tlie latter no'w has her pic- 
ture, which was given to- Miss De Forest and 
afterward willed to 'Mrs. Gard. 

When Dr. Gard had completed his medi- 
cal studies he entered the army as assistant 
surgeon and was located at Madison, Indi- 
ana, where he remained until he \vas ap- 
pointed den:onstrator of anatomy in his alma 
mater, the Starling Medical College. He 
filled that position for three years and in 
1867 he purchased the old homestead near 
Treniont,, Ohio. Taking up his abode there 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



he devoted his attention to the practice of 
his profession and secured a large and grow- 
ing patronage. He had three fanns, all of 
which he rented. In 1879, wishing to retire 
from professional life, he removed to one of 
his fanns, inpon which his widow is now 
living, and there he spent the last years of 
his life in quiet retirenaent from the more 
arduous duties of the practice of his pro- 
fession. 

Unto the Doctor and Mrs. Gard were 
born five children. Edward De Forest, who 
Avas lx>rn K'ovemher 10, 1852, acquired a 
fair common-.school education, but died at 
the early age of twenty-one years. He was 
a n-(Mlel young man, his life being actuated 
by ndble and honoral>le principles. He died 
December 3, 1873, in full faith of the Chris- 
tian hope and was laid to rest in the Rector 
burxing ground. Horace Arthur, liorn May 
15, 1854, is a resident of Painsylvania. He 
married Elizabeth Fleming, whose home was 
in Leeksville, Virginia, and they have two 
children. He deals in fruit trees, carrying 
on an extensive business. Warren Emerson, 
born October 11, 1857, married Ida Wallace 
and they have two children. Carrie lona and 
Nellie Eulalia, Mary 'Belle, born October 
14, 185Q, became the wife of Fred Cor.vley 
and died in California, leaving twin sons. 
Earl Crard and Glenn Bressee. I^ura Al- 
beita. burn January 10, 1862, was married 
November 17, 1883, to George McMahon. 
and they became the parents of four chil- 
dren, but ihcir first lx>rn (twins) died in 
infancy. The others are Glenn .\rthur and 
Fre<l Carroll. 

Since llie Dwtor's death Mrs. Gard and 
lier son have administered the estate an.d she 
has ne\cr sold or mortgaged any of the 
property, but has 1wen very successful in 
her control of her business interests. She 



is a most estimable lad}' and a devoted 
Christian woman, and her strong character 
and sterling worth, combined with her many 
acts of kindness and charity, have endeared 
her to all with whom she has con-.e in con- 
tact. Perhaps no better estimate of the 
character and life work of Dr. Gard can 
be given than in quoting from the "In Mem- 
oriimi" which was written after his death: 
"John S. Gard, M. D., was bom October 
12, 1829; died Novenvter 19, 1886. aged 
fift3-seven }ears. one month and seven da}S. 
lia\ ing been born and reared within a shorv 
distance of this place and with the exception 
of three years resided in this community all 
his life. His face was a familiar one to 
old and young and his sterling qualities as 
a true Christian and his integrity of prin- 
ciple is a fact that none can question. He 
was raised in the lap of jMethodism by his 
now sainted mother. He was soundly con- 
verted in the winter of 1870 or 1871, under 
the ministration of Rev. John Black and 
joined this church, where he has been an 
acceptable member since. He sincerely loved 
the church of his choice, was always de- 
sirous to see its prosperity, ready and will- 
ing to give of his means to the supix>rt of 
the gospel and the advancemait of the cause 
of Christianity. With a free and willing 
heart he clieerfully gave to aid in the con- 
struction and completion of this beautiful 
structure, this temple of Gcxl. For a quar- 
ter of a century Dr. Gard successfully prac- 
ticed medicine here and brought comfort to 
man)- a household, as many can testify to 
his power to restore the sick, but as \ears 
and infinrity can'e upon him he retired and 
engaged in less arduous avocations. His 
last illness of five months' duration, was 
borne with the most i>erfect Christian forti- 
tude and resignation, althiiugh iiis sufferings 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



at times were almost more tlian hiimanit}- 
could bear, _\et he counted all the trials as 
nothing compared with the bliss he would en- 
joy when the toils and cares and sufferings 
O'f this short life were ended, knowing tliey 
would work out for him a far more ex- 
ceeding and eternal w eight of glory. Many 
times when talking with his family of the 
joys of Heaven and the bliss that awaited 
the faithful he became enraptured and shout- 
ed aloud praises to God. and his so'ul would 
be so 0'\'erwheIn'.ed with the magnitude of 
God's great love and mercy that he longed 
to depart to mingle his praises with that 
blessed throng who. had washed their robes 
and m.ade them white in the blood of the 
Lamb. He was confined to his bed but three 
weeks and such was the nature of the disease 
that he was unable to partake of any nour- 
ishment or even a glass of water, until with- 
in fifteen hours O'f his departure, Ixit like a 
patient lamb he quietly bore all these priva- 
tions without a murmur or complaint, hav- 
ing constant communion with liis blessed 
blaster, ever rejoicing in the wondrous lo\e 
of God that was giving him such con-.plete 
N-ictorjr over his last foe. A devoted, loving 
husband, kind, affectionate father, and true 
friend has been called to his reward. A sor- 
rowing wife and fo'ur children survive him 
and a host of lo\-ing friends tu muurn their 
loss, but there will be a happy reunion in 
the sweet bye and bye, beyond tlie swelling 
tide of Jordan where all tears shall be 
wiped away. Xo- more separations shall 
be known or farewells spoken, there to bask 
in the sunshine of God's love." 



ALVARO S. KROTZ. 
.\l\-arc:) S. Krotz. whose inventive genius 
and mechanical skill has gained for him 
prominence in the business world, is an elec- 



trical and niechanical engineer of marked 
ability and since 1890 he has resided in 
Springfield. He was born in Defiance coun- 
ty, Ohio', Novenjber 3, 1864. His father, 
Charles W. Krotz, was born in Germany 
and when a bo}- devoted all his time to farm 
work. He becan'.e a resident of Ohioi dur- 
ing his boyhood days, and from that time 
forward until his 'retirement from active 
life his energies were given to the work of 
field and meadow. His birth occurred in 
1 82 1, and he is' still living, a hale and hearty 
man. He is numbered among the honored 
pipneers of Defiance county who aided in 
clearing the land and preparing it lor the 
purposes of civilization. He hunteil all 
over that district when wild game was to be 
had in abundance. His first home was a 
log cabin, which he built upon his land, and 
later he erected a colonial mansion., for as 
the years passed he prospered in his under- 
takings. He has accumulated considerable 
land and today has a large farm, well 
stocked. In early m.anhood he wedded Eliza- 
beth Brubaker, who was born in 1828 and 
died in 187 1. She was a native of Penn- 
sylvania and their miarriage was celebrated 
in this state. Air. Krotz has been twice mar- 
ried and has had fifteen children, all of 
whom reached years of maturity, while 
twelve are yet li\-ing. His smis were: Fill- 
more; Charles W. ; Daniel F. ; Alvaro S. ; 
Linford E., w1k> is an att' raey ; \\'alter. who 
was born of the second marriage; and three 
sons who are deceased. The six daughters 
were Sarah, Lovina, Elizabeth. Clara, Alary 
and Josephine. The last twoi were alsoi chil- 
dren of the second marriage, the second wife 
of Air. Krotz having borne the maiden nan:e 
of Caroline Corwin. The sons are all en- 
terprising business men and three of the 
daughters have married farmers. The fa- 
ther ed.ucated his children in the liest schools 



324 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of the county, thus preparing them to meet 
llie (hities and responsiliihties of Hfe. Tliey 
were reared upon the home farm until they 
reached the age of se\"enteen years, when he 
gave to each the sum of two hundred dollars 
in cash and told them they could then choose 
the mode of life which the}' preferred. 
The sons all went to the city of Defiance and 
became identified with business circles there. 
In politics the father has ever been a Dano- 
crat, but has never aspired to political offices. 
He is a liberal m.inded man. who believes in 
supporting all measures for the general good 
and has been a. liberal contributor to church 
work and charitable institutions. A promi- 
nent man of the community, he enjoys in 
the highest degree the respect and good will 
of those with whom he has beeii associated 
' and he well deserves mention among the 
honored pioneer settlers whose efforts have 
been of avail in improving the conditions of 
Defiance county from early days. 

Mr. Krotz, whose name introduces this 
record, spent his early childhood upon the 
old home farm and when seventeen years 
of age was given his portion and told to 
choose a business which' he desired to follow. 
For a year longer, however, he remained 
upon the home fann in his father's anploy 
and then, believing that he would be better 
fitted for the business world by further edu- 
cational training, he entered the Valparaiso 
Normal School of Valparaiso, Indiana, 
where he pursued special studies, spending 
two years in the college. On the expiration 
of that period he entered tlie employ of the 
Defiance Electric Light Company as an op- 
erative. When but fourteen years of age 
he built a small engine and put it on wheels. 
It was similar to the automobiles in 
use at the present time. He early 
gave evidence of mechanical ability and 
inventive genius, and, following o\it the 



natural trend of his life, he has won 
success and gained distinction. He remained 
with the electric light company for fi\e 
years and in the meantime it was reorganized 
vmder the name of the Power, Light & 
Railway Compam-. Ilie marked ability of 
Mr. Krotz gained him advancement until 
he was promoted to the very resiXMisible po- 
sition of general superintendent, and in that 
position he installed the electric railway sys- 
tem of Defiance, Ohio. He remained as 
superintendent for two years and in 1890 
he ranoved to this cit\-, for the company in 
which he worked had "purchased the railroad 
system of Springfield. On ranoving here 
here he served as engineer and super- 
intendent of construction, and he de- 
sigiied and installed the street car sys- 
tem which is now in use and which has 
been such an important factor in facilitating 
the business of the city by affording quick 
and sure transportation, thus shortening the 
tiiue needed to bring the business men into 
the tomn-.ercial sections of the place. Mr. 
Krotz continued in the employ of the com- 
pany until 1895. after which lie devoted his 
time and attention almost exclusively for 
two years to developing experiments of his 
own and in perfecting various inventions on 
which he had previously begun work. In 
1897 he entered into business relations with 
the Kelly Rubljer Tire Company, having 
charge of the mechanical work in their fac- 
tory-. In 1900 he was elected sui^erintendent 
of the Grant Axle & \\'heel Company, with 
which he remained until the fire. He was 
one of the stockholders and directors of this 
company. He still holds his position with 
the Kelly Ruibber Tire Company and has 
made two trips to Europe in l>ehalf of that 
con-.pany, but in the meantim.e the company 
has changed its name to the Consolidated 
Riibl>er Tire Company. He has traveled 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



325 



all over America in its interests, also^ in Ger- 
many, France and England. From 1895 
to the present time he has labored on his own 
inventions and has developed many of value, 
which he has disposed of to good purpose 
to companies desiring to^ place his in\-entions 
upon the market. 

Under the firm name of the Krotz ISfanu- 
facturirig Company, Mr. Krotz is now en- 
gaged in the manufacture oi automobiles 
and quite a number of electric automobiles 
have been built under his direction. In 
these he has carried out experiments which 
have pro'ven of value in this new method of 
transportation and has various patents on 
appliances for automobiles. The company 
is meeting with success and has orders in 
advance oi the finished vehicles. They are 
now building special machinery for European 
parties. Mr. Krotz's knowledge of the great 
mechanical principles, his skill of a superior 
order and his work have called tO' him the 
attention of the business world and gained 
him distinction by reason of the advanced 
steps he has taken in the line of mechanical 
and electrical constiiiction. He is one of 
the organizers and constructors of the 
Springfield Railway Company, installed the 
sixth electric railroad systeni in the state, 
and has do|ne iconsiderabile desigining for 
outside railway companies. He is a con- 
tributor to' varions technical journals 
througho.ut the country and his opinions 
are considered authority on various subjects 
connected with mechanical and electrical 
work. !With a nature that could not con- 
tent itself with mediocrity, with a mind 
keenly analytical and of an investigating 
turn, with pure mechanical skill and handi- 
craft, he has gained distinction along lines 
of usefulness to the world. 

In Defiance, Ohio, in 1889 Mr. Krotz 



was united in marriage to Miss Grace P. 
Shirley, who was. 'boirn in Indiana, but was 
educated! in Defiance. Unto- our subject and 
his wife have been born four children, nan.e- 
ly : Faye E, ; Emma L. : Al\-a S. ; and Ro\', 
all of whom are students of the pulilic schools 
of Springfield. 

Upon coming to Springfield Mr. Krotz 
purchased property and located in his pres- 
ent home at Noi. 272 Clifton avenue. He 
and his wife are menil>ers of the Baptist 
church and he is an officer in the Sunday- 
school. He devotes consideraible time to 
missionary Sunday-school work, is super- 
intendent of the same and his efforts in 
behalf of Christianity have been effective 
and far-reaching. He belongs to Commer- 
cial Camp M. W, A., also to the Tribe of 
Ben Hur. In politics he is a Republican, 
but has never sought or desired office. He is 
a member of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, takes a deep interest in the 
work, serving on several committees. J^Ir. 
Krotz is a man of broad capabilities, as his 
varied and extensive business interests indi- 
cate. He is at all times approachable and 
patiently listens to whate\'er a caller may 
have to say, always courteous and at all 
times a gentleman in the titiest and best 
sense of the term. He cares not for no- 
toriety, nor is there about him the least shad- 
ow of mock modesty. He is a gentleman 
of fine address and thorough culture, occu- 
pying a first place in society as well as in 
the business circles of Springfield. 



CHARLES HERMAN BIGLER. 

Prominent among the business men of 
Springfield whose enterprise and labors re- 
sult in promoting the commercial prosperity 



326 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of the city and at the same time enhance 
individual prosperity is numliered Charles 
H. Bigler, who is the president of the 
Springfield Hardware Company. He was 
born in the city of Cincinnati April 23, 1868, 
his parents being Dr. George W. and Laura 
F. (Collins) Bigler. His father was a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania and was there reared 
to manhood. He studied medicine in that 
state, was graduated and soon afterward re- 
moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where for a 
number of years he conducted a successful 
practice, being recognized as a distinguished 
physician of that place. There he died in 
the year 1870. His wife, who was a native 
of Cincinnati, still survives and is now a 
resident of Springfield. 

In the public schools nf his native city 
Charles H. Bigler acquired his preliminary 
education, which was supplemented by study 
in Antioch College, remaining there as a 
student for se\eral years On putting aside 
his text books in 1887 he went abroad and 
there added to bis knowledge through travel 
and investigation. Many points of historic 
and modern interest were visited by hini in 
Switzerland, Belgium, Gemiany and Eng- 
land, after which he returned to his native 
land. 

In the year 1893 he became identified 
with the electrical world of business of Chi- 
cago, where he was connected with the Co- 
lumbian Exposition. After the close of the 
fair he removed to Indianapolis, Indiana, 
and there he entered the employ of the 
Kingen Company, pork packers, with whom 
he remained for six months. He then re- 
moved to Zanesville, Ohio, where for a short 
time he occupied the position of clerk in the 
St. Charles Hotel, and on the expiration of 
that period he came to Springfield, in 1896, 
and ]iurchased an interest in the Sprin.gfield 



Hardware Company. He became assistant 
and soon afterward became the partner of 
H. C. W'isner, who was then at the head of 
the enterprise. Not long after this the busi- 
ness was incorporated and Mr. Bigler was 
chosen the president and Mr. Wisner secre- 
tary and treasurer. Tlieir house is centrally 
located, being at No. 36-38 East Main street. 
The store building is fifty by one hundred 
and ten feet and the first floor and basement 
are occupied by their large stock of hard- 
ware. They carry a general line of both 
shelf gootls and heavy hardware and a con- 
stantly increasing trade is indicative of their 
reliable Inisiness methods, their enterprise 
and the high reputation for business integ- 
rit_\- sustained by the house. In connection 
with their retail trade in Springfield they sell 
t(j a considerable extent in smaller places. 
In the year 1896 Mr. Bigler was happily 
married to Miss Stella Pursell of Spring- 
field, a daughter of L. H. Pursell, formerly 
of Pennsylvania. Mr. Bigler is a member 
of Clark Lodge, F. & A. M. As a citizen he 
is progressive, wide-awake, withholding his 
co-operation from no enterprise for the gen- 
eral good. In poHtics he has always sup- 
ported the men and measures of the Repub- 
lican party. He ranks high in commercial 
circles in S])ringfield and deserves the credit 
which is accorded to those who owe their 
business prosperity and prominence to their 
own enterprise and diligence. 



WILLIAM II. HUGHES. 

\\'illiam H. Hughes is the efficient su- 
l)erinten.dent of Clark County Infirmary, his 
incumbency in the position covering ten 
years, during which time his lalx>rs have 
resulted to the benefit of the institution by 




W. H HUGHES. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



329 



tlie adoption of movements which have ad- 
vanced sanitary crmditions and thereby pro- 
moted the lielpfuhiess of tlie place. He has 
likewise gradually improved the appearance 
of the infinnary by keeping everything in 
first class condition and improving the 
gToimds in a way toi add to- their attractive- 
ness. 

;Mr. Hughes is a native of Wilmington, 
Clinton county, O'hio. born August 31, i8-j !, 
and is of English descent. The family was 
founded in this slate at a very early day. 
Jesse Hughes, the grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was one of the early settlers of Clin- 
ton county and a distinguished jurist of 
Ohio in pioneer times. He served for twen- 
ty-eight years as judge oi the common pleas 
court and left the impress of his individuality 
upon the judicial histoTy of this common- 
wealth. He was a man of broad learning in 
his pi'O'fessioo and his decisions were strict- 
ly fair and impartial, his rulings being sel- 
dom reversed. He had come from Virginia 
to Ohio and w-as a well educated man. In- 
dians were numerous in this state at the 
tin:e he took up his abode here, and the work 
of impro'vement and development largely lay 
in the future. An acti\'e and prominent 
member of the Baptist church, he did much 
to promote the cause of religion here. His 
son, Jesse Hughes, Jr., succeeded his fa- 
ther upon the bench of common pleas. Judge 
Hughes lived to the ad\-anced age of eighty- 
eight years and the county profited by his 
labors, by his mentality and 'by his efforts 
in advancing the general good. From the 
establishment of the family in Ohio- repre- 
sentatives of the name have been leaders in 
pulolic affairs. They have become well-tot- 
do citizens, actively associated with the busi- 
ness interests as owners of a packing house, 
woolen mills, and as merchants. 



Charles D. Hughes, the youngest son of 
Judge Jesse Hughes, was a farmer and mer- 
chant, who was born in Clinton county and 
made that locality his home throughout his 
entire life. During the greater part of his 
m.anhood he carried on general mercantile 
pursuits, meeting with good success in his 
undertakings. He was an excellent ac- 
coun.tant and penman, and in his store was 
found to' be an obliging salesman, putting" 
fin'lh every effort tO' please his customers. 
Tlie cause of temperance and religion found 
in him a w^ann friend and he w'as an earnest 
Christian gentleman, doing everything in 
his power to uplift his fellow men and add 
to their usefulness in the world. As an ac- 
tive member of the Christian church, he 
ser\-ed for niany years as O'ue of its officers 
and contributed liberally of his means to its 
support. In politics he was a Republican, 
but he never held or desired office. He niar- 
ried Mahala Jones, who was born in Hills- 
boro, Highland county, Ohio, and was of 
Welsh and German ancestry. Her father 
was a colonel in the war oif 1812 and was 
also a distinguished citizen in civil life. He 
served as a state senator from Highland 
county, was treasurer of his count}- and 
was very prominent and influential in poli- 
tical circles. The father of our subject died 
in Clinton county at the age of seventy-one 
years, and his wife passed away near W'il- 
min.gton at the age of fifty-one years. Tliey 
were the parents of eleven children, of w hom 
seven are living, as follows: John J., 
O'f Kansas City, Missouri, wdio is engaged in 
contracting and building; Charles, a retired 
lumber merchant of Wilmington, Ohio : En:- 
mia, the widow of Colonel Elias W'right, of 
Buffalo, Xew York; W'illiam H., of this re- 
view ; Belle, the wife of Albert Stowell. the 
custodian of the Garfield Memorial, of 



330 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Cleveland, Ohio; and David, who is en- 
gaged in tlie insurance business in Alle- 
gheny City ; also Jasper S.. who is a Chris- 
tian preacher and lecturer of note, living in 
Chicago. Charles was a soldier of the Civil 
war, serving for about six months as leader 
of the band in the Fifty-ninth Ohio Infantry. 
The second child of the family died in in- 
fancy and the others who have passed away 
are Mrs. Elizabeth Neville, who resided at 
Great Falls, Moaitana ; and Jennie, who died 
at the home of her brother in Dayton, Ohio. 
The memliers of the family were all born 
and reared in Clinton county, and the chil- 
<lren received good public school advan- 
tages. 

William H. Hughes, whose name intro- 
duces this record, was a student in the com- 
xxon schools of Clinton county until seven- 
teen years of age and ren:ained at home with 
his father until 1863, when he enlisted in 
the Seventh Ohio Cavalry', as a bod}-guard 
and escort to President Lincoln, remaining 
in that service until the close of the war. 
He was on detached duty as usher in the 
AMiite House fcfc- President Johnson for 
several months and was a non-commissioned 
officer. The company to which he belonged 
was made up by Governor Tod. of Ohio, and 
the majority of its members were all very 
large men. ^Ir. Hughes has many times as- 
sisted Presidertt Lincoln in mounting his 
horse when the chief executive wished to 
ride, as he always rode with him as an es- 
cort. At the time of the muster out of 
the vaiious companies he returned to the 
Seventh Cavalry and was discharged in 
September, 1865. 

Mr. Hughes at once returneil to Clinton 
county, Ohio, and began carpentering in 
connection with his brother Charles, who 
was a contractor and lumi',er merchant. He 



learned his trade and followed it as a jour- 
neyman for a number of }ears. He was 
married in 1867 and then went with his W'ife 
to \\"eit Kansas City, Wyandotte county, 
Kansas, where he secured employment in 
the car shops of the Union Pacific Railroad 
at carpenter and repair work. In 1S69, 
however, he returned to Yellow Springs, 
Ohio, and followed his chosen pursuit there, 
working on the Xeff House and Antioch 
College. When two and one-half years had 
passed in that way he removed to Dayton 
and in the spring of 1873 '^^ can:'e to Spring- 
field, where he was employed as a joiu"ney- 
man, and also spait a few years in the 
\\'hiteley and Mast shops. In the spring of 
1880 he was ai^pointed to the position of 
patrolman on the police force of the city and 
after four years spent in that capacity he 
was elected as city marshal for a temi of 
two years, when on the expiration of this 
pericxl, in 1886, the oi'lke was alx>lished by 
law. Air. Hughes theui returned to the police 
force, acting as patroliran for a year, after 
which he secured a situation as watchman 
with the P. P. Mast Company, being thus 
en-]3loyed until January, 1892, when he was 
appointed superintendent of the county in- 
firmary, having since had charge of the in- 
stitution. There have been a good n.any 
changes made during the last decade, a new 
laundry having been added, with mo<leni 
iiiaoliinery. Tiiere are si.xty-nine acres of 
land in connection with the home and twelve 
employes in addition to Air. and Mrs. 
Hughes and upon the farm the work has 
been 'kept up to a high standard and Mr. 
Hughes superintended many changes in the 
interior as well as on the exterior of the 
farm and buildings. He has seciired bet- 
ter sanitary conditions and has added many 
motlern efpiipments. There are now one 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



hundred and twenty-six inmates ol the in- 
firmary and at times the number has reached 
as higli as one hundred and seventy-three. 
He gives his personal attention to all the de- 
tails oi the institution, to the purchase of 
supplies and to the general supervision of 
the inmates and has received higth com- 
mendation 'by reason of his efficient service. 
In 1867 was celebrated the marriage of 
]\Ir. Hughes and Miss Cornelia King', of 
Yellow Springs, a daughter of William 
King, a nursennian. He was very promi- 
nently identified with Antioch College, act- 
ed as one of its first trustees, and came 
from New York to Obio to look after the 
erection o>f the college buildings. His sons 
and daughters were all educated in that in- 
stitution. Sarah passed away in April, 1902 ; 
Moses King is now in the dq^artment of 
seeds at Washington, D. C, and form'erly 
was a newspaper man. Celia resides at Yel- 
low Springs, Obio. Mrs. Huglies is the 
next of the family. Nathaniel was a sol- 
dier of the Civil war and died in a hospital, 
and Moses was also a soldier. Mrs. Hughes 
\vas a student in Antioch College under 
President Horace Mann, a noted educator, 
and is a lady of culture and refinement. By 
lier marriage she has become the mother of 
three children: Lavinia Belle, the wife of 
Irving Lawrence,, oi Lagonda, by whom she 
lias three children, HaToild, Edwin and 
Helen ; William K., born in 1876, is the 
steward and baker in the infirmary ; Albert 
X. lis a 'bookkeeper and stenog-rapher in 
the state hospital at Toledo. The children 
attended the public schools and both sons 
liave been students in a business college. 

■ As the years bave passed Mr. Hughes 
has made investments in real estate and has 
erected four houses. He still retains th.e 
ownership of his home place, which is now 



kno'vu as the Golf Club Hoiuse. He is con- 
nected with Mitchell Post, G. A. R.; 
Ephraim Lodge, I. O. O. F., and since 1880 
lias been a member of the Encampment. 
Since 1885 he has also been a member of 
Red Star Lodge, K. P., and he belongs to 
the Commercial Club. His wife is a mem- 
her of the Giristian church, and he contri- 
butes generously to its support. In his 
1 olitica! views he is a Republican and served 
at one time as sanitary marshal of Spring- 
field. His course in office has ever been com- 
mendable, being characterized by unfalter- 
ing performance of duty, and his loyal citi- 
zenship stands as an unquestioned fact in 
his career. 



WILLIAM F. PAYNE. 

There is no man in Qark county who 
more deserves the confidence, respect and 
good will of his fellow men and citizens o' 
his community than does William F. Payne, 
of Springfield. His efforts toward advanc- 
ing the material interests o fthe city are so 
widely recognized that tliey can be consid- 
ered as being no secondary part of his ca- 
reer of signal usefulness. His public spirit, 
progressiveness and liberality have been of 
substantial aid to Springfield and at the pres- 
ent tin:e he is serving as president of the 
board of education, the schools findinig in 
him a warm friend who believes in introduc- 
ing all advanced methods that Avill prepare 
the young for the practical duties of business 
life. 

Mr. Payne was born in Harmony town- 
ship, Clark connty, April 19, 1864, and is 
a son of Asa Payne, who was a farmer, 
'born in Marietta, Obio, in 1835. William 
Payne, the paternal grandfather of our sub- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ject, was one of tlie early settlers of Marietta, 
living in a block house when such buildings 
were necessary as a protection from Indian 
attacks. His early life had been passed in 
Connecticut, and lie came of an old Ne\v 
England family. He served his country in 
the Re\olutionary war prior to coming to 
Ohio. As a pioneer he took up his abode 
in Marietta and afterward removed to a 
place in that vicinity known as Duck Creek. 
Like other early settlers, he secured land 
from the go\ernn-.ent and engaged in farm- 
ing. During the "fiifties he came to Clark 
county and located in Harmony township, 
where he continued to engage in agricultural 
pursuits through.out his active business life. 
In his family were twelve children, eleven 
of whom reached years of maturity, and nine 
of the number are still living. 

Asa Pavne, the father of our subject, was 
reared upon the old family homestead and 
after arriving at years of maturity wedded 
Catherine Farrynian, who died in Clark 
countv in 187J. They had three children: 
Wliliam P.. (if this review; Samuel, of Ca- 
tawba, Clark county ; and Arthur, of Marion, 
Ohio.' Shortly after the death of his wife 
^Ir. Pavne removed to Marion, Ohio, where 
he followed farming. He was again mar- 
ried and by the second union had three chil- 
dren, who are yet living, being residents of 
Brighton, Ohio. Asa Payne is now in the 
employ of the United States government as 
a mail carrier. He has always been a Re- 
publican, but has never taken an active part 
in political work. He belongs to the Chris- 
tian church and his life has ever been in con- 
sistent harmony with its principles. He 
comes of a family noted for longevity. One 
of his aunts. r^Irs. Hannali Messenger, died 
in ^Marion. Ohio, at the age of ninety-sevai 



years, while his father died at the age of 
seventy-six years. 

William F. Payne, whose name forms the 
caption of this review, was educated in the 
common schools of Marion, Ohio. At the 
early age of eleven years he started out 
in life to earn his own living, and though 
difficulties and obstacles have barred his 
path to success, he has worked on with 
continued perse\erance and has e\-entually 
gained a position of affluence. He first was 
anployed at farm labor, working by the 
month as a farm hand until nineteai }ears 
of age. In 1883 he came to Springfield and 
entered the employ of an uncle, working at 
the painter's trade for four years. For some 
years he also engaged in teaming, and grad- 
ually his work developed into heavy con- 
tracting. He began business on his own 
account on a small scale, but kept increas- 
ing his facilities and is now one of the 
heaviest contractors of the city. He makes 
a s^iecialty of excavations and street paving, 
laying out of new additions, aud has laid out 
the Brains, Frey's, Clark's and Rogers' ad- 
ditions. He uses all modem machinery, is 
well equipped- for handling heavy contracts 
and his patronage has l>een such as to bring 
to him a \er\- comfortable competence. He 
has enjoyed a good business since he started 
out on his own account in i^Cfi. He now 
employs from fifty to one hundred and twen- 
ty-five men and a large numl>er of teams in 
the prosecution of his work. He pa\-ed 
Union street in Springfield, and does all of 
the work of the Big Four Railroad Company 
here. Although he began with no cai^ital, 
he has gradually worked his way upward 
and has gained an enviable position as a con- 
tractor of Gark county. Perhaps one of 
the secrets of his success is his abilitv to 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



333 



control iT.en, as well as his fidelity to the 
terms of a contract. 

Mr. Payne was married in Springfield in 
1885 to Hattie B. Rhoderick, a daughter of 
Henry B. Rhoderick, who was a cabinet- 
maker and carpenter by trade. She was edu- 
cated! in the p'U'blic schools o^f this city. Tliey 
now have two children, Alabel and H. Rho- 
derick, the former a student of the high 
school. 

Mr. Payne and his wife are n:einbers of 
the Third Presbyterian church, oif which he 
is sen-ing as trustee, and is also secretary of 
the Sunday-school. He exercises his right 
of franchise in support of the men and meas- 
ures oif the Democracy. He was appointed 
a member of the board of education in 1898, 
has been twice elected to that office, and in 
190J was chosen president of the board, in 
which capacity he is serA'ing in a manner that 
lias awakened comn:endation from Spring- 
field's best citizens. He belongs to Red Star 
Lodge, K. p., and the Commercial Camp of 
the Modern Woodmen of America. He pur- 
chased the interest O'f the heirs in the old 
Rhoderick home and there erected his pres- 
ent residence. He is also- building a niod- 
ern and attracti\-e residence on Xorth Lime- 
stone street. Mr. Payne deserves great cred- 
it foT what he has accomplished. From^ early 
boyhood he never knew a mother's care or 
really had a home of his own until he was 
n:arried. During his long and successful 
industrial career, characterized by enterprise, 
he has ever maintained an enviable reputa- 
tion for the h'ghest honor and principle 
and noi unworth}" deed or woird has e\-er 
linked itself with his name. He has been 
particularly pron-pt in keeping his business 
engagements and expects the sair.e considej-- 
ation from others, ilanj' of his associates 
testifv in strong terms tO' his kindness of 



heart, finding in him not only a safe adxiser. 
bfut alsoi one whose counsel \\as not that 
of words alone. He has been the architect 
of his own fortunes and has liuilded wisely 
and well. 



ROBERT J. BECK. 

Roibert J. Beck was born in the shire of 
Wigton, Scotland, October 9, 1832, and is 
a son of James and Elizabeth Beck, \\\\o in 
the year 1835 left the land oi hills and 
heather toi become residents of the new 
w-orld. Taking passage on a westward bound 
sailing vessel, such as was used in ocean 
travel at that time, they eventual!)- reached 
the harbor of New York, and prriceeded 
thence to Buffalo^ New York, by way of 
the Erie canal, and from there to Silver 
Creek, Chautauqua county, New York, 
where the parents spent their remaining dzxs. 
In their family were nine children, of whom 
se\'ai were (born in Scotland and two' in the 
United States. These were Mrs. Jane Dver. 
a resident of Red Wing, Minnesota : Hugh, 
deceased; Mrs. Margaret Gardner, of Alliert 
Lea, Minnesota ; James, who \\as a sailor on 
Lake Erie and in a storm near BuiYalo, Ncav 
York, in 1844, the crew lost control of their 
vessel and were blown in the Niagara xiwer 
aiid o\&r the falls, not a person being sa\-ed ; 
Mrs. Elizabeth Morrison, deceased; Robert 
J. ; John, who passed away ; Mrs. Lydia 
Wilder, who resides, on the old family home- 
stead at Sih-er Creek, Chautauqua county, 
New York; and Isabella, the wife o'f J. ]. 
MicCrum, the mayor of Titus\-i!le. Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Robert J. Beck attaided school at Siher 
Creek, New York, but his educational privi- 
leges were quite limited and in the school of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



experience he has largely broadaied his 
kiimvledge. At the age of foiirteai he was 
bound out to learn die trade of carriage 
trimming and ser\-ed a six years' apprentice- 
ship. He afterward worked as a journey- 
man for two years at Cleveland, Ohio, and 
one \ear at Fort Wayne, Indiana, after which 
he located at Ravenna, Ohio, where he was 
employ^ed as a foreir.an for four years. In 
1859 he came to Springfield and entered the 
employ of E. & J. Driscoll as foreman, fill- 
ing that responsible position. in a most satis- 
factory manner for eleven years, while for 
fourteen years he was the foreman in the 
shoi^s of David West. He has also worked 
for a number o\ other finns in this city and 
is still fo'llowing his trade. His thorough 
understanding of the business, his reliability 
and his enterprise has made him a valued fac- 
tor in the trade circles of this city. 

Mr. Beck was married in 1857 to Miss 
Elizabeth Allison, a native of Pennsylvania, 
and the\' now have two children : Cora B.. 
who has been employed in the office of 
.the Farm and Fireside for the past fourteen 
years; and Agnes May, the wife of C. C. 
Hayner, of Troy, Ohio. 

Mr. Beck has Ijeen honored with a num- 
ber of ix)sitions of public trust and responsi- 
bility. He was one of the trustees of the 
Clark County Children's Home for fo^ir- 
teen years ; was a n.eir.ber of the school board 
for four years, and has been infirmaiy direc- 
tor for six years and was recently nominated 
for another term of three years. He was 
also an active member of the Rover fire de- 
partment, an indqiendent company, and long 
served as its treasurer. In politics he has 
always supported the n:en and measures of 
the Republican party and for many years 
was a member of the Republican central com- 
mittee. He and his familv are valued mem- 



l>ers of the First Presbyterian church of 
this city. Mr. Beck purchased a home at 
Xo. 228 South Center street, which he has 
remodeled into a fine properly, and it has 
teen his place of residence for the past thir- 
ty-six years. His success in life is not the 
result of any outside aid or influence, but 
has arisen from his earnest effort, unfalter- 
ing diligence and devotion to his business 
career. He merits tlie good will of his fel- 
low men, and throughout the forty-three 
years of his residence in Springfield he has 
niade n.anv friends here. 



S.VMUEL REEDER BATTIX. 

Among the prominent farmers and stock 
raisers of this section of the country is Sani- 
uel Reeder Battin, who since 1874, has been 
a resident of Clark county and has borne an 
important part in the de\elopment and pro- 
gress of agricultural interests here. He traces 
his ancestry back to an early epoch in the 
history of this county, being descendeil 
from Quaker forefathers. The traditions of 
the fan.ily state that the Battins were orig- 
inally of Welsh extraction, and that the name 
was originally spelled Batten. The founder 
of the family in America crossed the Atlan- 
tic s<X)n after the landing of William Pain. 
Our subject's great-grandparents, Richard 
and Elizal>eth (James) Battin, settletl in the 
upper part of Philadelphia county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and there followed agricultural pur- 
suits, in peace with mankind, living in faith- 
ful accord with their religious views, as 
they were men-.bers of the Society of Friends. 

Tlieir son, John Battin, was the grand- 
father of our subject. He was born near 
Wiln ington, Delaware, <n the 13th nf 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



June, 1767, aiul in early life learned 
the cooper's trade. On reaching manhood's 
estate he ranox'ed to Westmoreland coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, and throughout life fol- 
loiwed his trade in connection with farming, 
linding- coopering quite profitable at that 
time. From the Keystone state he removed 
to: Stark county, Ohio, and later toi Colum- 
biana! coimty,' being- one oif its early set- 
tlers. Tliere he died in 1847. He married 
Ann Raley" and to them were born ten chil- 
dren. At the time of their death the com- 
bined ages O'f these children were seven hun- 
dred and se\-enty-seven years, making an a\-- 
erage oi seventy-seven years. The\' were 
thus noted for their longevity and well fitted 
to become the progenitors of such sturd}- 
n:en and women as were required to take 
the work of the progress of this great coun- 
try. And it is due to such a type of civiliza- 
tion that America stands today as she does — - 
foremost among the nations of the world. 
It was the possession oif such strong traits 
of character, courage tO' overcome and endiU'L' 
the hardships and trials of frontier life while 
this country was yet in its undeveloped state, 
that has: led to the establishment of the grand 
industrial institutions of which the United 
States may well be proud. The brave spirits 
who braved the dangers of the ocean vo}"- 
age, which was then not the easy and com- 
fortable one oif to-day, broiught this countr_\- 
the 'best elemaits of manhood and woman- 
hood and well n:ay we be grateful to- them 
for the privileges and opportunities of this 
land oif the free which we to-day enjoy as 
the result of their toil. 

David Battin, the father of our suljject. 
was Ixjrn in Westmoreland count}', Penns^l- 
vania, June 8, 1803, and as a child accom- 
panied his parents on their rennival to Ohio. 
On reaching' vears of matnritx' he bought a 



tract of heavily timbered land in the midst 
of the forest, which he cleared and trans- 
fornied into a good farm. As his two sons 
grew older thej' added to the farm, more 
than doubling the original number of acres. 
Throughout his active business life the fa- 
ther follo'wed farming and stock-raising, and 
became quite a prominent breeder of fine 
sheep. In early manhood he married Sara 
Ann Reeder, a da,ughter oi Samuel and 
Ann (Malone) Reeder, who were among the 
pioneers of this state, haA'ing come here in 
1806 from near Westtown Boarding Schooil, 
Chester county, Piennsylvania. Tliev' were 
also members of the Society oif Friends. 
David Battin died in Columbiana county, 
O'hio'. September 6, 1877, at the age of sev- 
enty-four years, and his wife, who^ sun-ived 
him about six years, was eighty at the time 
of her death. 

Samuel R. Battin oi this review was born 
in Columbiana county, March 3, 1829, and 
was there reared upon a farm, where in 
the summer seasons he became accustomed to 
the work of the field and meadow, while 
through the winter he acquired a good prac- 
tical education in the common schoiols. When 
twenty years oi age he 'began working on 
a farm at ten dollars per month, 'but later 
turned his attention to the sawmill business, 
purchasing a half interest in a mill, for which 
he paid what he could and gave a note 
for the balance to his uncle, who had faith 
in his hoaiesty. Subsequentl}' he was ai- 
gaged in farming in Columljiiana county 
until 1874. when he took up his abode in 
Clark county, purchasing one hundred acres 
of land, to which he has since added, so that 
he now has one hundred and eighty-three 
acres. He has made most of the improive- 
n:ents upon the place, which is a rich and 
araljle tract under a high, state of cultivation. 



336 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



A part of his fami is devoted to pasturage, 
for he is engaged in stock-raising, having 
for many years paid especial atte:ition to the 
raising and breeding of fine wool sheep. He 
has also beai interested in shorthorn cattle, 
and is quite widely known as a progressi\e 
agriculturist and breeder of fine stock. 

Mr. Battin was one of the charter mem- 
bers of the Clark County Farmers' Mutual 
Protection & Aid Association, of which he 
was adjuster for many years, and now holds 
the offite of president. Tliis company does 
an extensi\e business in insuring farm prop- 
erty in Clark and adjoining coimties, and 
now carries nearly one and a half million dol- 
lars of risks, its membership being over 
eight hundred. 

In 1853 Mr. Battin was united in mar- 
riage to ]^liss Lydda Ann Winder, also a 
native of Columbiana county, and a daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Efphama (Yates) \\'inder, 
of Carroll county, Ohio. By this marriage 
were bom four children: Efphama Ann 
married John Cole, of Fairfield county, and 
died, leaving one child. Harry Battin Cole. 
Dr. David Wilmot Battin, a residait of 
Clarksville, Iowa, maiTied Jura Cubbison 
and they have one child, Edna Cubbison Bat- 
tin. Charles Sumner Battin, a florist and 
pluml>er of South Charleston, Ohio, wedded 
Mary Ann Mather and they have two chil- 
dren, Leonard Winslow and Jessie. Aman- 
da died at the age of three years. The wife 
and n-.other died December 24, 1864, and 
Mr. Battin was again married, June 7, 1S66, 
his second union Ijeing with Miss Emily 
Tomlinson, of Jefferson comity, Ohio, a 
daughter of Samuel S. and Rachel (Street) 
Tomlinson. Four children blessed this mar- 
riage: Orlando T., who assists his fatlier 
in farn.ing and stock-raising, married Esther 
jMatthews and they have one daughter, Edith 



W. Kerse\' Raley is now engaged in the 
building of electric railways. Martha Alma 
is at home. Mary Alice is the wife of Wal- 
ter Sanders Boone, whose home is near 
Richniond, Indiana. 

Both yiv. and Mrs. Battin remain stead- 
fast n.embers of the Society of Flriends. 
On coming to this county he was in debt 
four thousand dollars, but by perseverance 
and industry has steadily advanced to a high 
degree (^f prosperilx', and is recognized by 
those who know him as a man of integrity 
and honesty, these qualities alone being 
worth a fortune to an}- man. In early life 
Mr. Battin was a Free-soiler, but in 1856 
he cast his presidential vote for John C. 
Fremont and has since been a stanch sup- 
porter of the Republican party, although 
he has never been an office seeker. He has 
sen-ed on the board of education and the 
cause of education has ever foinid in him a 
warm friaid. He is one of the highly re- 
spected citizens of Dark county and well 
does he deserve mention in this volume. He 
has been quite an extensive traveler, having 
visited many places of national and historic 
interest in this country, including the home- 
stead:; i-f lii-; earlv ancestors. 



THE GARLOUGH FAMILY. 

Among the old and prom.inent families 
of Clark county, Ohio, none stand iiigher 
in public esteem than the Garlough family, 
who have been actively identified with the 
growth and de^■elol)ment of this section of 
the state for almost a caitury. Its mem- 
bers ha\-e been noted for patriotism and 
lo\-aJty to country and have participated 
in the wars in which the L'nited States has 




J. p. GARLOUGH. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



339 



been engaged. Jolin H. Garltxigh, the pro- 
genitor of the family in America, aided tlie 
colonies in their struggle for independence 
as a sicklier of the Revolutionary war, and 
soii.e of his sons took part in the war of 
18 IJ. He was a native of Germany and 
for some years made his home near liagers- 
towii, in Frederick coimty, Maryland, but 
his last days were passed in Clark cotuity, 
(ihio. He was about eighty years of age 
when he came with liis family to this state, 
and was the first man Imried in the Garlotigh 
cenieten-. He was a shoemaker by trade, 
bi.t had retired from that occupation before 
coming west. 

John Garlough, son of Jcibn H., was 
[■ractically the founder of the family in this 
state, whither he removed from his old home 
near Hagerslown, Maryland, in 1807. After 
spending one winter on Beaver creek, near 
Oldujwn, Greene county, he came to Clark 
county in Fdiriiary. 1808, and kxated on 
a farm in Green township, which is still in 
possession of the family. Here lie pur- 
chased one and a quarter sections of land, 
which was inherited by his children, and 
upon that tract he made his home through- 
out the remainder of his life. His remains 
vere also interred in the Garlough burying 
ground. By occupation he was a fanner. 
His wife, who 'lx>re the maiden nam.e of 
Margaret A. Eichelbarger, died in Clark 
co'jnty and was buried in the Garlough 
cemetery. 

John Garlough, Jr., was lx)m near Ha- 
gerstown. Maryland, and was nineteen years 
of age when he took up his residence in 
Clark county. He engaged in business, l)otii 
as ? farmer and millwright, and built mills 
all along iMad river, including Schmidt's, 
Snyder's and many others, some of which 
are still standing. He was the owner of 



one hundred and forty-four acres of land, 
r lie hundred acres nf which he liad inherited 
frnni his father In politics he was first a 
Whig and later a Republican, and for sev- 
eral years he filled the office of justice of 
the peace, also serving as township trustee 
and assessor. He narried Miss Ann Pat- 
ton, and to them were born two children: 
Jane D.. the elder, married Sylvanus Tutlle, 
and they m.'ide their 'liome in Harmony 
township, Clark county, where three of their 
children are still living, while another lives 
in Kansas. 

John Patton Garlraigh. son of John, Jr., 
was born on ihe farm in Green township, 
where he now resides, March i, 1825, his 
birth occurring in a part of his present resi- 
dence. In the conmion schools of the 
neighborhmxl he acf[uired a fair education, 
and on the old homestead grew to n:an- 
h(Mjd. After his marriage he operated rent- 
ed land until the death of his father, in 1858. 
when he and his sister inherited the farm, 
and he purchased her share in the property, 
being now the owner of the entire tract of 
one hundred and forty-four acres. The 
front part of his house was erected by his 
father, and he built the remainder. On the 
4th of December, 1845, '^^ '^^'i* united iv. 
marriage to iMiss Tabitha Jane Tuttle, and 
to them were born seven children, five of 
whom are still living : George'Edward, now 
deceased, married Annie E, ]\IcCaurtney, 
and they had four children. Tlieir home 
was in the village of Pitchin, this county. 
Jam.es Har\ey, formerly a wagon maker, but 
now a 1x)okkeq)er in a bank in Jeflfersonville. 
Fayette county, Ohio, married Emma Boyer 
and has four children. Oliver, whose home 
is near Clifton, Greene county, wedded 
iNfary B, Corry and has four children. He 
IS a farmer and carpenter b\- cKcupation. 



340 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Anna tlied unmarried. John H. was mar- 
ried at Sandwich. IHinois, August .18, 1892, 
to ]\iiss Anna ^I. Torrence, who was born 
in Xenia, Greene county, Ohio, and was left 
an orphan when quite young. Slie received 
a good higli-school education and for two 
}ears taught in the schools of Enon, Clark 
county, and nine years in Qifton. By her 
marri;ige she became the mother of three 
children: Jcihn Patton, born May 3, 1894; 
William Torrence, December 6, 1897; ^"•^^ 
Willis Findle\', iSeptemljer 4, 1901. All 
weie born in the house where their grand- 
father still lives, as was also their father. 
Enm:a Jane, daughter of John P. Garlough, 
is the wife of George W. Rife, of Greene 
county, and has three children. Rhoda 
May is the wife of James R. Corry, of 
(jreene county, and also has three children. 
The n.other of these children died in 1862 
ar.d was buried in the Garlough cemetery. 
Frir his second wife Mr. Garlough married 
Miss Ann Elder, who died Aug^lst 5, 1891. 
He took an active part in the Harrison cam- 
paign of 1840. but was not old enough to 
\ote until 1848. when he supported Zachary 
fay lor for the presidency. He supported 
Jolin C. Fremont in 1856 and has since 
bee;: a stalwart Republican. Prominent in 
public afifairs, he ser\-ed as township trustee 
lor fifteen years and as school director many" 
years. For alx)ut thirty years he also filled 
the office of justice of the peace m a most 
commendable and satisfactory manner, 
tliough in the meantim.e he was out of office 
a little over one term. He < nlv had two 
cases appealed to higher courts, and in thc^e 
his decisions were not reversed. He mar- 
ried a number of couples and in one instance 
the wife afterward came Ixick and wanted 
him to untie the matrimonial knot. Relig- 
ion '-Iv be i< a irenilier of the Prcsbvterian 



church at Clifton, and is a man highly re- 
sjiected and esteemed by all who know him. 

Jacob Garlough, another son of John, 
tiie founder of the fam.ily in Qark count}, 
was I'orn near Hagerstown, Maryland, Oc- 
tober 28, 1796, and in 1808 came with the 
fauiily to this county. Amid pioneer scenes 
iie grew to manhood, early becoming fa- 
miliar with the arduoLis task of clearing 
and ii; proving a new farm. Throughout 
lite he followed agricultural pursuits and to 
the property he inhei"ited from his father he 
added se\eral hundred acres, becoming a 
large land owner and quite well-to-do. On 
the igth of January, 1826. he was united in 
marriage with Miss Xancy L. Luse, who 
i>.:;.'- born in Xew Jerse}', February 5, 1803, 
and was quite young when brought by her 
parents to this county, her father being Jus- 
tus Luse. ]j\ his ballot Jacob Garlough sup- 
]ii.rtcd the men and measures of the Repub- 
lican party, but he never cared for the hon- 
ors and emoluments of public office. He 
died when alx)ut eighty-three years of age 
and his wife dq>arted this life seven years 
previous. Thus passed away one of Clark 
county's honored pioneer couples. They 
were the parents of seven sons. 

\\'illiam H. Garlough, the eldest of these, 
was born in Clark county October 16, 1826, 
and died on the 13th of Septeml>er, 1898. 
He was married in Springfield, March 2, 
1848, to j\Iiss Phebe Dalrymple, who was 
bom near South Charleston, Ohio, August 
29, 1823. and still survives her hu.siband. 
They began their domestic life upon the 
farm where she yet makes her home. Mr. 
Garlough having inherited a jiart of the 
place and purchased the remainilcr. It com- 
prised one hundred and eighty-three acres. 
He supijorted the Republican party and was 
n ineiiibcr of rlie agricultural board of Clark 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



couiirv, Ijul was opposed to secret societies. 
An earnest and consistent Christian, he was 
a faithful member of the Presbyteriaai 
church, and being a good singer, he was a 
member ot its choir for many years. He 
alsoi taugiit vocal music toi some jextent, 
and was successful in that as well as in his 
farming operations. In his family were si.x 
childrai, namely : Nancy L. is now the wife 
(jf Asahel Johnsou, a resident of Virginia, 
and they have six children : Mary E. died at 
the age of sixteen montlis ; Laura Jane is the 
wife of William Paden, of Greene county, 
Ohio, and they have one child : Edwin Aus- 
:iri, a resident of Colorado, married Ellen 
Alehan and has three children; Isalina D. 
is the \\idoi\v of Sterling Sprague, and with 
her one child resides in New York state; 
Alinnie E. is the wife of Frank A. W'hitaker, 
mentioned below. 

Frank A. \\'hitaker, a well known farm- 
er and dairvman of Green township, Clark 
county, was born on -the 6th of May, 185 1, 
in I\lagofhn county, Kentucky, and is a son 
of Thonias P. and Evaline (Marshall) 
Wdiitaker. His paternal great-grandfather 
was a native of England and a pioneer O'f 
Virginiai, where his death occurred. The 
family records unfortunately have been lost, 
but could the family history be traced they 
would show that Frank A. W-hitaker is one 
of the heirs tO' millions in tlie Whitaker es- 
tate in England. His grandfather, Fran- 
cis A. \Miitaker, was born near Abingdon, 
Virginia, and from that state removed to 
Kentucky, where his last days were spent. 
Ihfiirias P. Whitaker, the father of Frank 
A., died at Kingfisher, Oklahoma, in 1893, 
and his wife died at Arapahoe, Oklahoma, in 
1899. When fourteen years of age Frank 
A. ^\ hitaker remm-ed with his parents to 
Douglas C(,'unt\-. Kansas, and twi> vears 



later went to Barber comity, that state. 
While residing there he began herding cat- 
tle, ^\•hich occupatioai he followed for fifteen 
years, traveling all over the west. In 1874 
he joined the Kansas state militia and en- 
gaged in Indian warfare, taking part in sev- 
eral battles, including twoi engageir.ents at 
Salt Fork river and near Medicine Lodge. 
Later he became interested in shipping 
horses to- the east. On the ist of August, 
18S2. he married Miss Minnie E. Garlo'Ugh, 
who was born on the farm in Green town- 
ship, Clark county, Ohio^, where they now re- 
side. They have three children : Claude 
C, who was born in Sun City, Kansas, 
April 24, 1884; Goldie ^Nla)-, born in the 
same place August 14, 1885 ; and Gladys 
Fern, born there August 25, 1890. 

John L. Garlougth, the secoaid son of 
Jacob, wedded Mairy Tuttle. Thomas F., 
the third son, was twice married, his first 
wife being Lottie Hawkins, and the second 
Margaret Ann Nave. During the Civil war 
he enlisted in Company F, Forty-fourth 
Ohio Infantry, was made lieutenant and aft- 
erward promoted tO' captain of his company. 
Jan.es T., the next of the family, is mai- 
tioned Wow. Edward R. married Eliza A. 
Williams and lives in Hillsdale, Michigan. 
He has nine children. Benjamin F. mar- 
ried Mrs. Sarah J. Garlough, nee Littler, 
and has six children. He was also one of 
the boys in blue during the war of the Re- 
bellion, enlisting September 2, 1861, in Com- 
pany F, Forty-fourth Ohio X^olunteer lu'- 
fantry, and in the spring of 1864 re-enlisted, 
this time becoming a member of Company 
F, Eighth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. 

James Todd Garlough, the fifth son of 
Jacob, was born on the old homestead in 
Green township, June 3, 1834, and remained 
under the parental roof until he attained his 



342 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



majority, receiving a fair comir.on-school 
education and becoming familiar with all the 
duties which fall to the lot of the agricultur- 
ist. He was assisted h\ his father in pur- 
chasing the farm which he now occupies, 
and today has a well improved and valuable 
tract of one hundred and forty-se\'ai and 
one-half acres. He was n^arried March 6, 
1856, to Miss Sarah Jane Hause, a native 
of West Virginia and a daughter of Will- 
iam and Sarah f Murphy) Hause, who 
brought their family to Ohio when Mrs. 
Garlough was three years old and settled 
in Green tcnvnship, Clafk county, but later 
remo\-ed to Madison township, where she 
w'as reared and educated. To James T. 
Garlough and wife have been torn ten chil- 
dren, namely : Florence, who died at the 
age of six years; Clara, wife of Charles F. 
Stewart, of Greeii township; Mary H., who 
died at the age of twenty-three years ; Alva, 
who married Emma iCralbill and lives in 
Springfield township; Sheridan G.. men- 
tioned 'below; Alice, who married Charles 
Otstot and died, leaving four children; Jesse 
Elmer, mentioned below; Forest W., at 
home; Marguerite, who died at the age of 
eleven n:onths ; and Robert C, who was 
born in 1876 in Green township, and is 
still at home. In his political affiliatioiis 
James T. Garlough is a pronounced Repub- 
lican, having sup])orted that party since 
casting his first presidential vote for John 
C. Freiront in 1856. During the Civil war 
he became a member of what was known 
as the Squirrel Hunters and assisted in the 
protection of Cincinnati. As one of the 
prominent and influential men of his com- 
munity he has been called upon to serve as 
trustee of his township for several years, 
and is still filling that office in a most ac- 
ceptable manner. He has also served as 



township treasurer six years and always 
faithfully discharges any duty evolving upon 
him, whether public or private. He was 
a meml:)er o>f the county agricultural Ixxird 
for nine years, when he resigned. 

Sheridan G. Garlough, the fifth child of 
James T., is now a traveling salesman for 
the ]VIast Manufacturing Coir.pany, and 
nmkes his home with his father. He was 
l>orn October 13, 1864, and was married 
Septem!l>er 4, 1889, to Miss Stella Hanes, by 
whom he has two children living — Ruth E., 
lx)rn September 7, 1891 ; and Harry Hanes, 
Ixjrn March 30, 1893. Blanche, the first 
lx)rn, died at the age of two months and two 
da\s. 

Jesse Elmer Garlough, the seventh child 
of James T., was born in this county, a 
little south of the village of Pitchin, Feb- 
ruary- 25, 1869, and grew to manhood on 
the home farm. At the age of twenty-one 
he began life for himself by working as a 
farm hand by the month, and was thus em- 
ployed for five years, during which time he 
iTLanaged to save sufficient to start in life 
for himself. On the 20th of February. 1895. 
he married Miss Cora May Hess, a daugh- 
ter of Thomas M. and Calista ( Stratton 1 
Hess, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this 
volume. He continued to live on his fa- 
ther's place until the spring of 1901, when 
he removed to his present farm of seventy- 
five acres in Green township, which he had 
purchased the previous fall. He has made 
many improvenients upon the place, includ- 
ing the erection of a pleasant residence in 
1 90 1. Like the other members of the fami- 
ly, he .supports the Republican party ami its 
principles, casting his first presidential bal- 
lot for Benjamin Harrison in 1892. He takes 
an active interest in educational affairs and 
has efficientlv served as a member of the 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



school board. Both he and his wife are 
members of the ^ilethodist Protestant 
chivrch, in which lie has served as steward 
and superintendent of the Sunday-sdiool, 
and the)' are held in high regard by all 
who know them. Their children are Nellie 
l\Iarie, boirn January 13. 1896; Robert Hess, 
born January 26, 1898; and Fern C, 'born 
June 28, 1902. 

William Forest Garlough, the eighth 
child O'f James T., was born July 2'/, 1871, 
and was married November 15, 1894, to 
Miss Maude May Jones, who was born in 
]Madison township, this county, a daughter 
of Willard and Eliza (Oates) Jones. Her 
father was also a native of Clark county, and 
is now deceased, but her mother, who was 
born here December 25, 1855, is still living. 
Her maternal grandfather, Richard Oates, 
was a native of England and came to Ameri- 
ca when about eighteen years of age. Will- 
iant F. Garlough and wife have twO' chil- 
dren : Russell Pearl, born in Green town- 
ship July 8, 1895; and Mary E., born Jtme 
14, 1897. The father of these children is 
a charter member of the Junior Order of 
United American ]ilechanics. O'f Pitchin, 
Ohio, and, like the other members of the 
Garlough family, commands the respect and 
confidence of all who know him. 



GEORGE C. LYNCH. 

George C. Lynch, the suliject of this re- 
\\t\y. is a self-made man, who, without any 
extra ordinai-y -family or pecuniary advan- 
tages at the commencement oif life, has bat- 
tled earnestly and energetically and-bv in- 
domitable courage and integrity has achieved 
b( )th character and position. By sheer force 



of will and untiring effort he has worked 
his way upward and is numbered among the 
leading business men O'f Spring-field. 

Mr. Lynch was born in Virginia and 
comes of an old and well established family 
oif that state. He pursued his education in 
the primary schools there, but was ear'ly 
thro'wn upon his own resources, beginoing 
to make his own way in the world at the age 
of twelve years, at which time he entered 
a general store. Subsequently he was em- 
ployed in a wholesale groceiy house in Wes- 
ton, Virginia, and in 1890 entered the em- 
ploy of the Herb' Medicinie Company as a 
bookkeeper, and in 1892, when the business 
was removed toi Springfield, he also came 
to this city in the same capacity. In 1898 
he \\-as promoted to the office of general man- 
ager of the Herb Medicine Company, of this 
city. This business was established in 1888 
by Jolin Morrow, who conducted the enter- 
prise for several years and then sold out to 
the present company, retiring in June, 1898. 
The capital stock of this company is large- 
ly O'wned by parties residing in Virginia, 
^^'h0l have been connected with the business 
from the beginning. In fact, the business 
had its origini in the Old Dominiion and 
thence was removed tO' Spring-field. JNIli-. 
Lynch being connected therewith froan the 
first. Under his control tlie cr»ncern has 
been put upon a substantial footing and is 
one which adds to the material prosperity of 
SpringfieW as well as to- the individual suc- 
cess of the stockholders. The company now 
employs a large force of operatives' in the 
factory and the plant is well equipped with 
the latest improived machinery. One among 
the leading proprietary medicines manufac- 
tured by the company is that called Light- 
ning Hot Drops. These and (fther medicines 
are sold throughout the United States and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the patronage of the house is continually in- 
creasing because of the excellence of its 
product. 

In June, 1892, Mr. Lynch was united 
in marriage to Miss Cecilia Kitson, of West 
Virginia, a daughter of \\'illi'vm J. and Sa- 
raJi Kitson. Mr. and Mrs. Lynch now have 
three cliildren — Ruth and Rhea, both in 
school, and George C, at home. Our subject 
is well known in Masonic circles, belonging 
to Clark Lodge, No. loi, F. & A. M., also 
to Springfield Chapter, No. 48, R. A. M., 
and Palestine Commander}-, No. 33, K. T. 
Among the leading representative business 
men of Springfield Mr. Lynch is justly num- 
bered, where in an unostentatious ^\ay he 
is fulfilling his duties of citizenship as well 
as promoting the industi-)- which adds to the 
development and financial prosperity of the 
communitv. 



MICHAEL WILSON. 

;\Ir. A\'ilson's residence in Springfield cov- 
ers almost a third of a century, for he lo- 
cated here in 1870. He was bora on a 
farm near Brighton, Ohio, March 11, 1837, 
and is a son of Washington Wilson, who 
at an early day came to Ohio from Ken- 
tucky- with his parents, the family settling 
in this state when the country was infested 
with Indians. The land was purchased from 
the govemment and fann work was con- 
tinued for many years. The father of our 
subject died in Springfield when he had at- 
tained to an advanced age, and the older 
generation has all passed away, ^^'ashiug- 
ton Wilson was probably of Scotch-Irish an- 
cestry and his wife of German origin. He 
was a well educated man for those days, w as 
aai ai)t pupil and readily retained what he 



read or heard. In early life he learned the 
blacksmith's trade and to some extent fol- 
lowed that pursuit, Ixit afterward devoted 
his attention to farming and stock-raising. 
He was a large stock dealer, prospered in 
his undertakings, and though he had but lit- 
tle capital with which to start in life, by 
his good management and enterprise he pros- 
pered and thus accumulated over two thou- 
sand acres of land. He also invested in 
property in Springfield, and thus his realty 
holdings were the visible evidence of his life 
of industry and earnest toil. His honesty, 
too, was proverbial, for he was just in all 
his dealings with his fellow m.en. On leav- 
ing the farm he took up his abode in Spring- 
field, where he lived for about thirty years, 
passing away at the age of scA-enty-five. 
He was president of the Harmony town- 
ship board of education and was interested 
in all that pertained to educational, moral,, 
as well as material advancement, of his com- 
niunity. Many of the landmarks of Har- 
mony township stand today connected with 
his name and work, including the Wilson 
school, chapel and cemeter>\ He was a 
member of the Christian church of Platts- 
burg and aided largely in the m.oral advance- 
mait and de\'elopment of the communit}-. 
He prospered, too, in his undertakings, adtl- 
ing from time to time to his land and exten- 
sively engaging in stock dealing. He woukl 
purchase stock in adjoining counties and 
feed and fattai for the market. He was one 
of the largest stock handlers in Gark county 
ami this branch of his business added n:ater- 
ially to his income. 

Washington Wilson was united in mar- 
riage to Mar}- A. Foreman, who was born 
and married in Clark county. Her fadiei-, 
William Foreman, was for many years en- 
gaged in conducting a tannery. Mrs,. Wil- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



son died at the age of sixty-five years. By 
her niarriag-e she became the mother of ten 
cliildren, one of whom died in infancy, w'hile 
the others reached years of maturity. Mary 
became the wife of Dr. Strain of London, 
but is noAV deceased. Hattie married Fred 
Gillette, and died at the home of her sister, 
JMrs. Kay. Those stiU hving are: Michaeh 
wlio is the eldest of the family; WilUam J., 
a banker, stockman and manufacturer, and 
a leading resident of Gibson City, lUinois : 
Geoirge \\., \\\\o was a soldier in the Civil 
war and is an attorney at law, practicing 
in London, while at the same time he repre- 
sents his district in congress ; Harrison, who 
was also a veteran of the Union anny and 
is a retired fanner, now living in London, 
Ohioi; John, who likewise aided in the pres- 
er\'ation of the Union, is now living in Gib- 
soai City, Illinois; Addison, w^ho is engaged 
in the real-estate business in Springfield : 
Nancy, who is the widow of John Goodfel- 
low, once county treasurer, and makes her 
home at the old family property at the cor- 
ner oif Factory and Washington streets.; and 
Flora, the wife of Dr. Clarence Kay, of this 
city. The members of this family were all 
reared upon the old fanni in Harmony town- 
ship, and attended the township schoiols. 
Creorge afterward pursued a college course 
in Antioch Co'llege, and Mrs. Kay was a 
student in a private seminary. 

Michael Wilson, whose name introduces 
this record, was educated in the schools of 
his home district and rn his youth assisted 
in f«rmi work. He dro\-e oxen to the plow 
and aided in breaking the land and cultivat- 
ing the fields. When he had attained his 
majority his father gave him a tract of 
land upon which he followed farming on his 
own accoimt and began building up a stock 
business. He continued fann work until he 



came to Springfield, in 1870, this removal 
being occasioned by his ill health. After 
coming to the city Mr. Wilson turned his 
attention to the grocery business under the 
firm name of Wilson & Son Company, at 
High and Market streets. After the death 
of the senior member, our subject remoi\-ed 
to East High street and purchased an in- 
terest in the store of Mr. Goudy. This part- 
nership was maintained for a few years, 
when Mr. \\'ilson became sole proprietor 
of the store and conducted a general gro- 
cery business. In his mercantile efforts he 
prospered as the years passed by, and, hav- 
ing acquired a handsome competence, he 
sold out his store in 1885 and retired to pri- 
vate life, putting aside the more arduous 
business cares. He still owns one hundred 
and fifty acres of land which was a part of 
the O'ld Wilson farm. He has also' pur- 
chased a small farm near Plattsburg, and has 
n'lade investments in real estate in the city, 
so that his property interests noiw return 
him a good income. 

In the year 1850 Mr. Wilson was united 
in marriage to Miss Margaret Ann Prugh. 
She was born in Madison county and died 
in Springfield about 1883. There were three 
children born of the marriage: Luella, who 
died at the age O'f twenty years; Carrie B., 
who passed away when about the same age ; 
and Georg"e iC, who resides upon a farm 
near Plattsburg. Mr. Wilson was again mar- 
ried in 1886, his second union being with 
Mrs. Lovina Marsh, the widow of John 
Marsh. Tliey no-w reside at Xo. 200 West 
High street, where they ha\-e a \-ery pleasant 
home, which was purchased by ]\Ir. \\"ilson 
about 1895. 

Mr. Wilson has served as trustee of the 
Childrens' Home, and for one term he was 
also a member of the school board of Spring- 



346 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



field. He has always been a warm friend 
of the cause of education and has \xen ac- 
ti\e in promoting good schools here. In 
early life his political support was given 
to the Whig party and upon its dissolution, 
he joined the ranks of the Republican party, 
which he has since continued to endorse. 
He is a men.lier uf the Plum street Episcopal 
church and his inrluence and efforts have 
ever been given upon the side of advance- 
ment and cf the right. His success in life 
is attributable entirely to his own efforts 
and his labors have been rewarded with the 
success which comes from earnest purpose, 
unfaltering industry and capable manage- 
n:cnt. Pie is one of the honored and es- 
teemed citizens of Springfield and Clark 
county, where his entire life has l>een passed, 
his fidelity to the principles of honorable 
manhocKl having gained him the good will 
and esteem of all with whom he has been 
associated. 



THRAORTES E. BANXROFT. 

This gentleman has passed the eightieth 
milestone on life's journey. His entire life 
has beeii passed in SpringfieUl and he is 
justly numbered among the honored pio- 
neers and leading rq^resentatives who have 
ijeen prominently identified with her busi- 
ness interests in connection with manufac- 
turing affairs. His is an honorable record 
of a conscientious man. who by his upright 
life has won the confidence of all with whom 
he has come in contact. He has rounded the 
psalmist's span of three-score years and ten, 
and although the snows of several winters 
have whitened his hair, he has the vigor of 
a nuich younger man and in spirit and in- 
terests seems yet in his prin:e. Old 



age is not necessarily a synonym of weak- 
ness or inactivity. It need not suggest as 
a matter of course want of occupation or 
helplessness. There is an old age that is 
a benediction to all that comes in contact 
with it, that gives out of its rich stores of 
learning and experience and grows stronger 
intellectually and spiritually as the years 
pass. Such is the life of Mr. Bancroft, an 
encouragen.ent to his associates and an ex- 
ample well worthy of emulation by the 
yooing. 

Phraortes E. Bancroft was born in 
Springfield on the aSth of January, 1S22, 
and is of English lineage. Three brodiers 
of the name originally came from England 
to America in the year 1632, and founded 
the various branches of the family now re- 
siding in the United States. John Bancroft, 
the paternal grandfather of our subject, 
was a native of Massachusetts, born in 
Reading, antl at the time of the Revcilu- 
tionary war he ji lined the Coli>nial arn:y 
and served for seven complete years, 
holding the rank ai first lieutenant. He 
was married Septemljer 17. 1777, to Ann 
Waters, and remoxing to the west spent his 
last days in Springfield, Ohio, where he 
died in 1834. His wife survived him until 
1842 and departed this life in her eighty- 
ninth year. He could trace the ancestral 
line back through Moses, Thomas, Thomas, 
Thomas and Thomas Bancroft. 

Louis Bancroft, the father of Phraortes 
E. Bancroft, was born near beautiful Lake 
Champlain, in the state of Vermont, in 
1796, and during his early manhood was 
connected with educational work, teaching 
school during the winter months, while in 
the summer seasons he worked U'ix>n the 
farm. He came to Springfield in 1812, aft- 
er having taught for a year in Chautauqua. 




(^ ^ r3-an.-^^<^p~ 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



349 



Xew "^^'ork. He took a Ijoat to Upper San- 
dusky and proceeded thence on horseback to 
Spring-field, camping two nights on the way. 
He largely followed trails to this locality 
and he found here a hamlet containing a 
population of two or three hundred. He 
soon enlisted for ser\ice in the war of 1812, 
but was rejected on account of his health, 
urning- his aittentio-n to general merchan- 
dising, he conducted a coimtry store, follow- 
ing that business for many years witli suc- 
cess. He also filled the position of deputy 
sheriff and later was appointed government 
inspector, there being- man}- distilleries in 
this vicinity. He afterward engaged in the 
wholesale grocery and liquor business and 
was an extensive dealer and trader in real 
estate, his name appearing on many ab- 
stracts of die city. Thus his business inter- 
ests were of a varied and important charac- 
ter and he was recognized as one of the 
leading residents of Springfield. He wed- 
ded Mary Christie, who was born October 
1 1. 1792, and was reared upon a farm. Her 
lather, Robert Christie, was one of the pio^ 
neers of Clark county, having come to the 
Buckeye state from Massachusetts at an 
early day. He was a contractor and build- 
er and many o>f the leading business houses, 
homes and churches of the early day stood 
as monuments to^ his skill and enterprise. 
Xot only did he attain success in business 
affairs, but he was also witlely and favora- 
bly kno'wn for his many sterling traits of 
character. Mr. and Airs. Louis Bancroft 
resided together as man and wife for sixty- 
five years, and then he laid her remains in 
Ferncliff cemetery, within a few- rods of 
the home where they were married, the old 
farm being now used fnr cemetery pur- 
])oses. She passed away at the age of eighty- 
four years, and [Mr. Bancroft died in Spring- 



field at the ad\anced age of ninety-two years. 
Their children were: Leonidas; Phraortes 
E. ; LaFayette, who resides in Springfield ; 
Oscar, who is living in California; Amanda 
M., the w-ife of Benjamin Churchill, both 
deceased; and FJavilla G., the wife of 
W'illiami Kleiman, of Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The subject of this review pursued his 
ed-acation in the private schools and in a 
little schoolhouse which stood on Market 
street. It is still one of the landmarks of 
the city and today may be seen on Fountain 
a\-enue. Later Mr. Bancroft attended the 
Springfield academy, which was then under 
the control of Milo G. ^Villian.s, a noted 
educator O'f his da}-. On putting aside his 
te.xt books Mr. Bancroft assisted his father 
in the store, and so continued until his 
eighteenth year, when he was apprenticed to 
learn the hatter's trade under the direction 
of the firm of Coates & Lathrop. When he 
liad completed his apprenticeship he was a 
journeyman for a time and in March, 1851, 
began business on his own accotnit at No. 
4 East Main street, as a hatter and furrier. 
He made all the hats which he handled by 
the hand process and began business on a 
small scale. His store was located in a 
frame structure, which he rented for a num- 
ber of years, after Avhich he bought the site 
upon \\hich his present fine business block 
now stands. In 1882 he erected here a 
splendid four-story brick structure in con- 
nection with the Lagonda; National Bank 
building, which was erected at the same time, 
the two' constituting a very fine business 
block. Mr. Bancroft succeeded in building- 
up a very extensive business and for many 
}-ears was considered not only the leading- 
hatter of Spring-field, but also did an exten- 
sive trade in the line of fine furs, occupying 
the four floors of his building- with goods 



350 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of this character. Recently he has turned 
over the business to his son, who is now con- 
ducting tiie enterprise along the same lines 
by which it was established by the father. 
For many years i\Ir. Bancroft has been a 
director of the Lagonda National Bank, 
with which he thus became connected in 
the early period of its existence. Today in 
point of service he is senior member of the 
board of directors. In 1851 he aided in 
laying the corner stone of the Union Hall 
building and has been one of the directors 
of the company since that time, acting as 
manager. 

In 1845 ^J^i"- Bancroft was united in mar- 
riage to Aliss Catherine Aloody, of Spring- 
field, who died in 1854, leaving no children. 
On the 1 2th of July. 1859. occurred the 
marriage of 'Sir. Bancroft and Miss Louisa 
]\I. Mayhugh, of Warren county, Ohio. She 
was born in Butler county, this state. April 
27, 1834, her parents being ^\'illiam and 
Mary (Foot) Mayhugh. Her maternal 
grandfather. Jobn Foot, died in 1883. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Bancroft has been 'born but 
one son who survives. Robert C, who is 
his father's successor in business and carries 
a large and varied stock of goods at the old 
location, and who is conceded to be one of 
the ablest business men of Springfield. He 
married Miss Esthei- Simpson, and they 
have two children' — Dorothy Louise and 
Robert Christie. 

Mr. Bancroft gave his jxilitical support 
to the Whig party at an early day. and on 
the organization of the nt\\ Rqjublican par- 
ty he joined its ranks and has since followed 
its banners, voting for each of the presiden- 
tial candidates. He is a prominent Mason 
and in his life exemplifies the noble spirit 
(vf the fraternity. His membership is in 
Clark Lodge, Xo. lOT. F. & .A. M. : Spring- 



field Chapter, R. A. 'SI. ; and Palestine Com- 
mandery, K. T. For fifty-five years he has 
been a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, has filled nearly aU of the 
offices of the lodge, and has been treasurer 
of the grand encampment. He has also 
been a trustee of Iheir property for many 
years. A genial gentleman, he receives the 
veneration and respect which should ever 
be accorded to one of advanced years, and 
furthermore, he deserves all the esteem 
which is tendered him. Through eight 
decades he ha^ been a witness of Spring- 
fields development and growth and has tak- 
en an active interest in its progress and ad- 
vancement. His mind bears the historic im- 
press of the years and his memory forms a 
connecting link between the primitive past 
and the progressive present. 



ROBERT X. LAXTZ. 

Robert X. Lantz is filling tiie position of 
city clerk of Springfield in a very capable and 
efficiait manner. He is a native of Hagers- 
town, Maryland, torn July 16, 1868. and is 
a son of John Nelson and Mar}- .\. (Huf- 
man) Lantz, both of whom were born and 
reared in ilaryland and there spent their ai- 
tire lives, each passing away in 1876. For 
a num1)er of years the father was engaged 
m the grocery business and subsequently he 
turned his attention to the manufacture of 
Imggies and carriages in Hagerstown, teing 
well known in the industrial circles of that 
city as one whose enterprise and progressive 
spirit contributed not alone to his individual 
prosperity but was also a means of advance- 
ing the general success. 

In the public schools in his native town 



"HE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



351 



Robert N. Lantz began his education and 
later continued his studies m a Lutherai' 
school in Loysville, Pamsylvania, going 
thence to Selin's GroA'e Institute, at Selin's 
Grove, Pennsylvania, where he pursued his 
studies for several terms. His literary edu- 
cation being completed, he afterward learned 
the printer's trade in the ofhlce of the Peo- 
ple's Advocate and Press, at Xew Bloom- 
held. Pennsylvania. After he had completed 
his apprenticeship he went to Roanoke, Vir- 
ginia, where he \\'as employed as a salesman 
in a men's furnishing goods store. The year 
1889 witnessed his arrival in Spring- 
held, where he entered the office of the 
paper known as the Farm and Fireside in 
the capacity oi compositor. He was con- 
nected with tliat paper for seven years, 011 
the expiration of which time he accepted the 
position of bookkeeper in the house of Ben- 
jamin Harris & Con.pany. Later he occu- 
pied a similar position with the house of 
Charles J. Bowlus Fruit Company, with 
which he remained until 1900, when he was 
appointed by the city council to the position 
(if city clerk for a term of two years. In 
1902 he was reappointed for anc'ther term 
of two years, so that he is the present incum- 
l)ent. His appointment came to him in di- 
rect recognition of his ability and his fideli- 
ty in m.atters of citizenship. In the dis- 
charge of his duties he is prompt and sys- 
tematic and his control o-f the affairs con- 
nected with this office has made his adminis- 
tration one that has commended him to the 
trust and good will of his fellow townsmen. 
On the 7th of December, 1897, occurred 
the marriage of Mr. Lantz and Miss Mary 
A. ^Miller, of Si>ring-field, Ohio, whose fa- 
ther, John Miller, was one of the old resi- 
dents of the city. Two children have been 
born to this union : Luther AL, born Janu- 



ary I, 1900; and Xelson B., born [March 
18, 1902. 

Of the Masonic fraternity Jvlr. Lantz is 
a woirthy, exempla:ry and popular representa- 
tive. He belongs to Clark Lodge, No. loi, 
F. & A. M., in which he served as master 
for two^ years, and rqjresented his lodge at 
the meetings of the grand lodge at Toledo 
and Springfield. He is also a member of 
Springfield Chapter, No. 48, R. A. M., is 
a past high priest, and represented the chap- 
ter at the meeting oif the grand chapter at 
Toledo. He has alsoi taken the degree of 
Cryptic and Chivalric Masonry, belonging 
to Springfield Council, No. 17, R. & S. M., 
and Palestine Coa-nmandery, No. 2)2>^ ^^- T. 
Thirteen years co\-er the period of Mr. 
Lantz's residence in Springfield, and during 
that tin:e he has continually advanced in pub- 
lic favor and regard. The elements of char- 
acter depicted in the best type of American 
manhood are his. He has energ}-, progressive 
ideas and a loyal spirit, which is manifest 
in his devotion tO' the general good along 
lines pertaining to public progress and im- 
provement. 

* » » 

MADISON OVER. 

Madison Over, one of the leading mem- 
bers of the Democratic party in Springfield 
and Clark county, has filled a number oi 
po'sitions of public honor and trust and al- 
though the county is strongly Republican, 
he has always won the commendation of the 
jniHic by reason of fidelity and promptness 
in the discharge of his duties. He was 
formerly 'probate judge of the county, and 
since his retirement from that office he has 
lived a retired life. He was born in Ger- 
man to'wnship, this county, on the 15th of 
Decen:1;er. 184 1. a son of Elias and Sarah 



352 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



(W'elchans) Over. The father, also a na- 
tive of this state, was a son of Jacob Over, 
a Pennsylvania-German, who served his 
country in the war of 1812 and came home 
with five Inillet holes in his hat, but though 
he escaped uninjured from the war he met 
death shortly after his return, being acci- 
dentally drowned. 

Elias Over was a man of considerable 
mechanical ability and business ingenuity. 
He learned the trade of a tanner and also 
that of a blacksmith and was likewise a suc- 
cessful school teacher at an early day. At 
the time of the grading of the national road 
from Zanes\ille, he was engaged in con- 
struction work. The road was not ir.acadam- 
ized beyong Springfield and he settled here, 
taking up his abode in German township. 
His political support was given the De- 
mocracy and his fellow townsmen, recogniz- 
ing his worth, loyalty and ability, frecjuently 
called him to public office. He served as 
township trustee, assessor and clerk. His 
wife, who was born in this county in 1820, 
was a daughter of George W'elchans, who 
was a Pennsylvania-German and on remo^•- 
ing to Clark county settled in German town- 
ship in 1806; there living until called to his 
final rest. Unto the parents of our subject 
were born sixteen children, nine of whom 
reached mature years : Adaline, the wife of 
George Myers, of Indiana; Madison; 
George, who died in Indiana; Mrs. Lucy 
Helvie, who resides in Thackery, Ohio; 
Cynthia, who married and is now de- 
ceased : Mrs. Rachel Proctor, of Indiana; 
Peter D.. who is living in that state; Jacob, 
a resident of Arkansas; and Mrs. Clara 
Strasburg. a widow of Spring-field, Obio. 
The mother died in 1874, the father in 1875, 
and both were buried at Merom, Indiana. 

In the district schools Madison Over l^e- 



gan his education and at the age of eighteen 
he entered Wittenberg College of this city, 
studying there for a year, after which he be- 
gan teaching at North Hampton. He taught 
altogether for thirteen years and was a cap- 
able educator whose ability to maintain dis- 
cipline was ecjualled by his power of in^part- 
ing to other the knowledge he had acquired. 
While at North Hampton he was electeil 
justice of the peace, serving for eight 
years with promptness and fairness, after 
which he resigned to accept the posi- 
tion of special examiner in the paision 
office with headquarters at Bloom. ington. 
Illinois. He served thus until 1889, when a 
change in the national administration caused 
him to be dropped and he returned to North 
Hampton, where his familv were living. 
In 1890 he was elected assessor of Pike 
township and the same year he removed to 
Springfield. In 1886 he was the nominee for 
sherifif on the Democratic ticket and made a 
very hard fight. Ijeing defeated by only nine 
votes. Tliis was a defeat that amounted al- 
most to a victory as the vote indicated his 
personal popularity and the confidence re- 
posed in him, as at previous elections very 
large majorities had been won by the Re- 
publican candidate. In 1890 he was the 
candidate on the Democratic ticket for pro- 
bate judge of the county and was defeated 
by a small numl>er of votes, but in the sam.e 
year there occurred a vacajicy on the probate 
court bench and Governor Campbell appoint- 
ed him to the office, which he acceptably 
filled. From 1893 until 1895 he served uiwn 
the city board of etjualization and resigned 
to accept the position of assistant postmas- 
ter of Springfield, creditably filling that ptisi- 
tion during the four years of President 
Cleveland's second temi. Since that time he 
has lived a retired life. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



In 1865 Mr. Over was joined in wedlock 
tn Miss AIar_\- J. Jenkins. Oif OiaiVipaign 
county, Ohio, and seven children have been 
born unto them, of whom three are now liv- 
ing: Sallie, the wife of J. F. Kneisly.. of 
Springfield, by whom she has two children, 
Blanche and Bessie; Florence L., an elocu- 
tionist now li\-in'g in the Indian Territory ; 
and Edwin J., who resides with his father 
and is now one of the mounted police at 
Sn}(ler s P'ark. He served for three years 
in the Philippines in the Fourth United 
States Cavalry and returned home with the 
rank of coqioral. 

]\Ir. Over is a man of literary tastes, 
has been a broad reader and profound 
thinker and is particularly well informed on 
ancient and modern history, being familiar 
with the world's progress. 



BYROX OLIVER ELIFRITZ. 

\Mien only nine years of age, Byron O. 
Elifritz started oiit upon an independent 
career and since that time has made his own 
way in the world. All that he has ; all that 
he has accomplished ; and all that he has 
achieved are the result of his own enterprise 
and capability. He is now conducting a 
large and practical job printing business and 
is (_:ne of the progTessi\-e citizens of Spring- 
field. 

Mr. Elifritz was borw in Circleville, 
Pickaway county, Ohio, and comes of a fam- 
ily of Gennan ancestiT. The father, George 
Elifritz, was born in Greencastle, Pennsyl- 
vania, and was one of se\-en children. The 
only survivor is Daniel Elifritz, an inmate of 
the Soldiers' Hc;-me at ]\Iarshalltown, Iowa. 
George Elifritcb. rpmo\-ed from his nati\-e 



state to Maryland at an early day. when a 
young man, and was there married. Subse- 
quently he took up his abode in Circleville. 
Oliic, where he remained from 1844 until 
1848, when he came with his familv to 
Sipring^eld. He was a tanner and also a 
butcher by trade and in the latter years of 
his life he worked in the manufacture of 
brick, carrying on an extensive and profita- 
ble business in that way. He manufactured 
the brick used in the construction of Witten- 
berg College, for the seminary on East High 
street and in the old Catholic church. He 
afterward removed to Yellow Springs, 
where he manufactured the brick for Antioch 
College, as well as for many other of the 
old land marks of the place. During the 
summer months he conducted his brickvard 
and in the wmter sessions he followed 
butchering. Fie was a self-m.ade man of 
Hniited educational advantages, but he pos- 
sessed business capability, and strong quali- 
ties of character and steadily he has advanced 
in his business affairs. He died in 1853, at 
the age of thirty-two' years, respected bv all 
who knew him. His wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Elizabeth Boward, was born 
in Maryland and received but limited educa- 
tional privileges. She belonged to^ a farmer's 
family and her services were needed in the 
homie. She was boi-n in 181 1 and died in 
1900. Her mother died at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-two years. ]\Irs. 
Elifritz was laid to rest in Ferncliff 
canetery, while her husband was interred 
in Greenmount cemetery. Unto them 
were born six children. Of these. Upton, 
the eldest, died in Springfield, in 1899, 
at the age Oif fifty-eight years. He was 
a men Ijer of the Se\"enteenth Ohio Bat- 
ter)- during the Ci\-il war. serving through- 
out the period of hostilities. At his death 



354 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



he left a son. William, and three daughters. 
The son now makes his hoire in Toledo, 
Ohio, while the daughters reside in Spring- 
field. Charles H., the second meir.ber of the 
family of George Elifritz. is a farmer now 
living retired, at Vienna Crossroads, in this 
county. He was a member of the Artillery 
service during the Civil war. Byron O. is 
the next younger. Emma is the wife ol 
Robert Smith, of Springfield, and has one 
son and one daughter. Laura is the widow 
of John Miller, of this city, and has a son 
and daughter. Carrie is the wife of Peter 
Critzinger, of this city, who has one daugh- 
ter, the wife nf John Powell. The daughters 
of ]\Ir. Elifritz were educated but the sons 
attended school for only a short time. After 
the death of her first husband Mrs. Elifritz 
was again married, becoming the wife of 
John Webster, and they had twin children, 
one of whom died at the age of thirteen and 
the I ^ther at the age of twenty-one, ami 
Ixnh are interred in Ferncliff cemetery. The 
hon.e of the Elifritz family was on ten acres 
of land on what is now Harrison street in 
Springfield. In religious faith they were 
Lutherans. The father was well known and 
was very successful in his business career for 
many years, hut afterward met with reverses 
which undoubtedly hastened his death. l\\ 
jwlitics he was an ardent Democrat. 

Mr. Elifritz. whose name introduces this 
re\iew, was a lad of only seven years when 
his father died. He spent six months as a 
student in. the first public school of Spring- 
field, near the East High street bridge. In 
the fall of 1855 '""s becan.e connected with 
the printing business, receiving a salary of 
one dollar and twenty-fi\c cents per week, 
but even this was many times nx)t fortlico-.r- 
con iiio-. He worked in the office of tlic 



Evening News, published by Hastings & 
Nichols. The printing of job work was then 
all done by hand presses, which were after- 
ward superseded by the cylinder press. Mr. 
Elifritz fed the first cylinder press that was 
brought into this city. In 1863 he left the 
employ Oif the firm of Hastings & Nichols 
and then went to work for Freye & Fre}-e, 
on the Tri-\\'eekly Republic, continuing with 
that house until 1865. On severing that 
business connection he began the publication 
of the Weekly Transcript, now the Spring- 
field Democrat. This was the second Der.o- 
cratic paper published in the county, and the 
only one that prospered. John McGaffcy 
was his partner in the enterprise, which was 
conducted until 1869 by the first finn, when 
Mr. AIcGaffey- sold his interest to David C. 
Ballentine, who is now in the navy depart- 
ment at Washington, D. C. He reirained 
with the house until 1872 and then sold out 
to Charles E. A\'inters. During the contin- 
uation of this partnership they branched into 
the job work and also established the Moni- 
ing Globe, which is to-day the Press Re- 
I>uiblic. After a time, howc\er. they gave up 
all newspaper work and entered upon litln;- 
graphing, getting out all of the work for 
World's Columbian Exposition, in Chicago, 
with a large amount of other job work. I\Ir. 
Elifritz continued in the business until 1890, 
when he left the company and purchased the 
present business, which was then very small, 
for three thousand dollars. In this under- 
taking he and his brother Upton formed a 
partnership, which continued for a year, 
when Byron purchased his brother's interest 
and has since secured a \ery lucrati\e pat- 
ronage. He now has a large and well 
equippeil jjlant and has added n any ini- 
prcvarents in technical and mechanical 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



355 



wurk. He is thoroughly practical in all 
that he undertakes and has advanced in the 
l)usiness through comprehensive knowledge; 
through fidelity to tiie terms of a contract; 
through the capable execution of all trusts 
gi\-en into his care. Good management has 
always been one of his strong character- 
istics. Although lie was in debt to some 
amount when he embapked in this business, 
the enterprise has proved successful finan- 
cially and he has paid dollar for dollar. He 
enjoys the respect of the best business men 
of the city and their trade is constantly be-, 
sto'wed upon him. Air. Elifritz is a mechani- 
cal genius and can manufacture anything 
necessary toi earn- out his plans and please 
his patrons. He has done considerable 
printing for manufacturing concerns from 
1 85 5 tO' the present time. He left home when 
a Ijoy of only eight years of age and went 
to Illinois, where he remained for a year, 
after which he returned tO' Ohio*. From that 
time forward he has depended entirely upon 
his O'Wn resources for a living and all that 
he has acquired is the merited reward of his 
labo'r. 

In 1867 in Hagerstown, [Maryland, was 
celebrated the marriage of Mr. Elifritz and 
Miss Alice V. Boavard, who was born there 
in 1848' and there pursued her education. 
This union has been blessed with three li\ing 
daughters, while one son, Plarry, died at the 
age of twenty-one years. May L. is the wife 
of Qiarles E. Winckler, who is associated 
with Mr. Elifritz in the office; Ada E. is 
assisting her father in business ; and Pearl 
Dot is at home. The children were all edu- 
cated in the public schools. 

Mr. Elifritz is a member of the Lutheran 
church and his political support is given the 
Democracy. He has never sought or de- 
sired office and has alwaA's declined to serve 



although he has frequently been solicited to 
do so. He has given his entire time and 
attention toi his business and his unremitting 
diligence and honorable efforts have brought 
to him gratifying prosperity. He is a mem- 
ber of Anthony Lodge, F. & A. M., and also 
belongs to F.phraim Lodge, I. O. O. F., and 
is O'ue oi the past grands of the lodge. He is 
also identified with the Order of Rebekah, 
to which his \vife likewise belongs. 'Mr. 
Elifritz was a member o-f Moncrieffe Lodge, 
K. P., and later became a charter member 
of the Red Star Lodge. He is one of the 
old original Company Six, of the Uniformed 
Rank, and left that to become a member 
of the Furt}--fourth Company. He is now 
commissary of the Fourth Ohio Regiment. 
He is likewise identified with Te Ha tribe 
of the ImprO'\-ed Order of Red Men, whicli 
was the first tribe installed in Springfield. 
He 'belonged to the Senior Lodge of Amer- 
ican Mechanics, \yhich was later absorbed 
by the Junior Order of American Mechanics. 
He is likewise a member oi Knights of the 
Ancient Essenic Order, and past senator of 
the same. He is also a n:ember of the Com- 
mercial Club. He belonged to the Silver 
Gray Fire Company and later he became con- 
nected with the old Ro-\-er Compan}', an in- 
dependent fire organization, which was char- 
tered under the state law. He remained with 
that company for fourteen years and through 
a long period was thus connected with the 
imi^ortant work of fighting fires. He has 
been loyal in all matters of citizenship per- 
taining to the general good, and as the years 
ha\-e acjvanced' he has gained a very prom- 
inent position in business circles because he 
has realized that energy and perseverance 
are two^ salient features in his prosperity. 
Amid surroundings and obstacles that would 
ha\-e utte'-lv discouraged manv a man of less 



356 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



resolute spirit, he has worked his way \x\y- 
ward and to-day stands an.id the successful 
rqjresentatives of the printing business in 
Springfield. 



MICHAEL TRIMMER. 

Michael Trimmer, who traveled life's 
journey until after he had passed the ninety- 
third milestone, was a man whose worth 
to the world was widely acknowledged. He 
was so conscientious and faithful in the per- 
formance of duty that he sustained an un- 
assailable reputation in business circles and 
in his private life was equally above re- 
proach. In some of the good buildings of 
the city are yet seen the evidences of his 
handiwork, but he built for himself a monu- 
ment n-.ore lasting than any of brick or stone 
in the regard and friendship oi his fellow 
men, who )^et honor his memory as one who 
was worthy of their highest regard. 

^Ir. Trimn-.er was lx>rn in Adams coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, February 26, 1806, a son 
of ^lathias and Elizabeth (Fisher) Trim- 
mer, who were also natives of the same 
county, and was there reared and married. 
Tile former was of German descent, while 
the mother was of English lineage. Fnur 
of their sons became residents of Springfield, 
but John remained here for only a brief 
period. David and Mathias were associated 
for some time in brick contracting with the 
subject of this review, and David died in 
this city in August. 1849. while Mathias 
passed away in Iowa in the spring of 1873. 
He is buried in Greenmount cemetery, while 
David lies in Femcliff. 

In the county of his nativity Michael 
Trimuner pursued his education and also 
learned tlie stone mason's trade, after which 



he went to Hagerstown, ;Maryland, and 
there secured work in that line. While there 
he formed the acquaintance of Miss Cath- 
erine Barbara Eitel, who was born in that 
city May 11, 1806. a daughter of John Mar- 
tin and Christiana ( Stotler) Eitel. Her father 
was a native of Germany, born near Stutt- 
gart, and when a young man came to .\nieri- 
ca. His wife w as a native of Winchester, Vir- 
ginia, and was an only child. Her father 
died when she was but fifteen months of 
age and her mother passed away in Hagers- 
town, Maryland. Mr. Trimmer sought in 
marriage the hand of iliss Eitel and being 
successful in his wooing they were joined 
in wedlock in 1834. 

The bridal trip of the young couple con- 
sisted of a journey to Springfield. Ohio, 
made by stage, for that was before the ad- 
vent of railroads into this state. Mr. Trim- 
mer here began working at the stone mason's 
trade. He had also learned the trade of 
laying brick and was one of the first brick 
masons. of this city. He came to Ohio a 
young man full of determination, industry 
and perseverance and it was not long before 
he had won a commanding ix>sition in the 
industrial circles of the city. He at once 
began contracting, and a little later was 
joined by his brothers. David and Mathias, 
who entered into partnership with him. Aft- 
er the death of David the surviving brothers 
dissolved partiiership. and our subject was 
afterward a partner of John Kershner, who 
had learned the trade with Mr. Trimmer 
and who joined him under the firm style 
of Trimmer & Kershner, a relation that was 
maintained through consecutive years until 
1873. ilr. Trimmer received and executed 
contracts for the erection of many of the 
most imixirtant buildings of the city in an 
earlv dav. He erected the old Pennsvlvania 




MRS. MICHAEL TRIMMER. 




MICHAEL TRIMMER. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



361 



building- in tlie west end; tlie Barnett mills; 
tlie First Presbyterian cburcli, whicb bas 
• since been remodeled; the Secoaid Presby- 
terian church, which remains as he built it, 
sa\-e that the interior has been improA'ed ; 
the first building of the Wittenberg College; 
the P. P. Mast shop; the Miller Hotel, and 
the Commercial block 011 Limestone street. 
He also erected the Buckingham building, 
opposite the Commercial, many smaller busi- 
ness blocks andi a large number of the fine 
homes oif the city. He easily maintained a 
position as one of the leading contractors 
and builders of Springfield during his active 
business life and received a very liberal 
share of the pitblic patronage, which indi- 
cated the excellence O'f his labor and the 
confidence reposed in his business probity 
by the citizens of Springfield. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Trimmer were born 
five children: Anna R. is the wife of Seth 
H. Arbogast, and has one sou, David Sheri- 
dan, who wedded Mary Donohue, and re- 
sides in Springfield. Mary E. is the de- 
ceased wife of Jesse C. Trimmer. John 
IMartin died in 1S52 at the age of ten years 
and was laid to rest in Ferncliff cemetery. 
Sarah Jane died in infancy and was also 
l)uried in Ferncliff. David S. is his father's 
successor in business. Mrs. Trimmer was a 
n- ember O'f the Central Methodist church. 

In his political \'iews Mr. Trimmer was 
originally an old-line \\"hig and afterward 
became a Republican, but while he was un- 
faltering in advocacy of the party principles 
he would never accept office. He owned the 
property which later belonged to Jacob' Seitz 
and built for him the home which now 
stands on the site. A self-made man in the 
trust and best sense of the term, he car- 
ried on his business in such a wa_\- that his 
correct metliods and honorable principles 



as v;ell as his excellent workmanship recom- 
n:erded him to all who needed the services 
of a mason contractor, and thus he gained 
a most liberal patronage and won a satisfac- 
tory financial reward, clt the same time main- 
taining" a high p'lace in public confidence and 
regard. Ambitious andl resolute in early 
manhood, persevering and diligent in the 
prime of life, he reached a \enerable old 
age, \^hich like a da}- with its accomplished 
labors, passed into the grateful rest and 
quiet of the night. His wife was called to 
her final rest June 14, 1893, and on the i6th 
of September, 1899, at the age of ninety- 
three, he passed away as one who 

" Wraps the drapery of his couch about him 
And lies down to pleasant dreams." 

Da\-is S. Trimmer, wlio became his fa- 
ther's successor in business, was born in 
Springfield, January 10, 1845. accjuired his 
education in the schools of the city, and in 
1865 began learning the bricklayer's trade. 
In 1863, howex'er, he ran awav from home 
anfl enlisted in tlie Union army as a member 
of Company C, One Hundred and Twenty- 
ninth Ohio Infantry, being mustered in at 
Cleveland, Ohio'. In March, 1864, he was 
mustered out in the same city. He learned 
his trade under his father and followed it 
until 1886, when he retired from the busi- 
ness. In 1873, upon the retirement of his 
father, he became the partner of ^Ir. Kersh- 
ner under the firm style of Kershner &: 
T'rimmer, which connection was continued 
until 1880. In that year David S. Trim- 
mer went tO' St. Paul, ^Minnesota, where he 
worked at his trade until 1886, wdien he re- 
turned tO' Springfield because his parents 
were reaching advanced years. He has since 
resided in this city, where he is well kncnvn, 
ha\ing spent the greater part of his life here. 



362 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



WILLIAM MOORE. 

William ]^Ioore lias a wide acquaintance 
in Springfield and the circle of his friends 
is almost as large. He was for many years 
connected with the fire department of this 
city and rose to the rank of chief, his labors 
in this connection winiting him the approval 
and the gratitude of the public. The field of 
battles is fraught with no greater danger or 
demands no greater bravery than does the 
life of the fireman. In the position of chief 
.Mr. Moore filled a most responsible posi- 
tion, his office demanding a cool, calm and 
yet ready judgment in the hour of peril, a 
quick comprehension of the situation and a 
ready utilization of the forces and means at 
hand. He discharged the uljligations de- 
voh-ing upon him in such a capable manner 
that he won high commendation and well 
does he deserve mention as one of the rep- 
resentative citizens of Springfield, where he 
is now living in honorable retirement. 

.\ native of this city, he was Ixirn at the 
corner of Plum and West Main .streets. Au- 
gust 30, 1847. His father, \\'illiam Moore, 
Sr., was a native of County Cork, Ireland, 
born in 1808, and was one of a large family 
of children noted for their tall stature and 
longevity, which was a familiar characteris- 
tic. William ^Nloore. Sr.. was educated in 
his native country and with his parents ani- 
grated to America, the family settling in 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in 181 6. Sub- 
sequently they came to Clark county, Ohio, 
establishing their home in Springfield, where 
the grandfather of our subject died at an 
advanced age. 

After reaching America. William Moore, 
the father of our subject, completed his 
studies in the schools of Philadelphia, and 
there he learned the tinner's trade, which he 



followed until his death. He started out in 
life a poor man, but by good managemait 
and unfaltering industry he accumulated 
considerable property, and at the time of his 
death was in very good financial circum- 
stances. In addition to his other business 
interests he was a stockholder in the old 
Union hall. He possessed excellent e.Kecu- 
tive ability and when he died he had all his 
affairs in good condition. His business rei)- 
utaton was unassailable because of his hon- 
esty in all trade transactions. He was an 
active, sturdy man, six feet and six inches in 
height and of commanding appearance. His 
pulitical sui)pnrt was given the \\'hig party 
in early life and afterward he became a 
stanch Republican. He served as a member 
and president of the first city council of 
Springfield, served as the second mayor of 
the city, was also the county coroner, was 
justice of the peace and held many other 
offices of public honor and trust. His aid 
and influence were ever given in behalf of 
all nreasures for the general good. He was 
a well-read man. keeping informed on all 
general topics of the day, and his knowledge 
of law was also quite extensive. He always 
worked to obtain better conditions for the 
people and was ever the opponent of oppres- 
sion in any form. Charitable and benevo- 
lent, he gave freely to church work aind to 
diaritable interests. He laelongetl to the 
Methodist Episcopal denomination and was 
a charter member of Clark Lodge, F. & A. 
M., being well ix>sted in Masonry. He also 
was a charter member of Springfield Lodge, 
I. O. O. F. At the time of the Civil war 
he was a stanch advocate of the Union cause 
and the soldiers and their families found in 
him a faithful and helpful friend. He mar- 
ried Charlotte Xagel. who was born in Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, in i8og, and was reared 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



363 



in Springfield, acquiring her early education 
in the schools of tliis city. Air. Aloore died 
on the 14th of Feliruary, 1889, at the age 
of eighty-one year.s and five months, and his 
wife passed away in 1872. In their family 
were five children, of whom four are yet liv- 
ing, Mrs. Annie Bradbury having died in 
Springfield at the age of fifty-five years. 
Alarion is foreman in the paint shoi>s of the 
O. S. Kelly plant on Plum street in Spring- 
field. Elizabeth is the wife of Barlow Law- 
rence, of this city. Charlotte is the wife of 
Emanuel Reigel, of Seattle, Washington. 
^^'illiam completes the family. All of these 
childrai were reared and educated in Spring- 
field. After the death of their mother the 
lather remo^-ed tn Richmond, Indiana, and 
later to Centerville, Indiana, where his death 
occurred. He was married a second time 
while in Richmond. After his demise his 
remains were brought back to Springfield 
and laid to rest in Gr'eenmount caneter\-. 
Although he was a resident of Indiana for 
twelve years, from 1877, he yet retained 
business interests in this city. 

William Aloore, whose name introduces 
this record, pursued his education in sub- 
scription and public schools, the latter being 
organized during his boyhood days. On the 
26th of July, 1862, he enlisted in Co'mpany 
A, Ninety-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
with which he served for three years, taking 
part in the battle of Perryville and the Per- 
ryville campaign, the engagements at Stone 
Ri\er, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Lcrok- 
out Mountain, Missionary Ridge and the 
Atlanta campaign and the march tO' the sea 
under General Sherman. He was also at 
the battle of Bentonville. which was the last 
general engagement of the war. General 
Johnston there surrendering his Confederate 
forces. Later Air. Aloore participated in the 



grand review in Washington. D. C, and 
was mustered out in June, 1865, without 
having ever received an injury or wound, 
although during his entire service he was in 
active duty on southern battlefields. When 
he returned home he foiind that his father 
had manifested his patriotic devotion to the 
Union cause by painting a chimne}' of his 
house with the national colors. 

FoT a time after his return Air. Aloore 
attended school in 1866 and then entered 
upon an apprenticeship in the butchering 
business under William Grant. Afterward 
he began working in the finishing room of 
the furniture factory of Foos & Alilligan, 
acting as foreman in that department for 
several years. In his early manhood he be- 
came a member of the Rover Fire Company, 
an independent organization, and served 
with that company until the first of April, 
1869, when he became a member of the paid 
fire department, \vhich had beai organized. 
He first served as hoseman, but gradually 
he worked his way upward until he became 
chief, acting in that capacity for four years. 
From. 1869 until 1900, with the exception of 
eight years, he was continuously a member 
of the fire department and witnessed its de- 
velopment as the work of improvement was 
carried steadily forward. He was the first 
one to use the city water works in a fire. 
He has seen some very large conflagrations 
in this city and has done his full share in 
fighting fires here. He was injured while 
in the service by a falling horse and at length 
he was retired from the service on a pension. 
He is to-day the oldest surviving member of 
the fire department of Spring-field. 

Air. Aloore was married Decern ber 26, 
1869, to Aliss Anna Belle Tiffany, who was 
born in Xenia in 1849, a daughter of Aaron 
Tift'anv, who was a minister of the Alethod- 



364 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ist Episcopal church. Mrs. Moore is a lady 
of good education and has been an able help- 
mate to her husband. Unto than were born 
five children, but four of tlie number died in 
childhood. La Verna. liorn in 1874, is now 
the wife of Foster Huchings and they are 
now in the theatrical profession, residing at 
Springfield. ]VIrs. Huchings has taken a 
musical course and is a graduate of the high 
school of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Moore 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and he lielongs to Moncrieffe Lodge, 
K. P. He was formerly an active mem- 
ber of Ephraim Lodge, L O. O. F., and was 
a member of Company 6 of the Uniformed 
Rank of the Knights of Pythias when the 
company won the world's prize at Detroit. 
He also served as lieutenant in the first bri- 
gade in the fraternity in Ohio. He is also 
a member of the Firemen's Relief Associa- 
tion, and in 1876 he took a fire engine, the 
Queen of the West, to Findlay, Ohio, to 
the firemen's tonrnament, at which time he 
had to give seven thousand dollars bonds 
for the safe return of the engine. Mr. 
Moore and Richard Powell are now the only 
survivors that attended the tournament. He 
is well known to firemen throughout the 
state and is also recognized as a prominent 
and influential citizen of Springfield, having 
mnnv friends here. 



DAXIEL McKILLIP. 

Daniel McKillip is engaged in the till- 
ing of the soil and in raising stock in Moore- 
field township. He is one of the native 
sons of this locality, his birth having oc- 
curred eight miles south of South Charles- 
ton, in Favette ccuntv. .\ugust 24, 1832. 



His father, Thomas ^IcKillip, was born in 
North Carolina and when only three years 
of age was brought by his father, John Mc- 
Killip, to the Buckeye state. He is de- 
scended from Scotch ancestry, who fled 
fr(jm Scutland to the northern part of Ire- 
land, and frtjm the Emerald Isle the great- 
grandfather of cur subject crossed the At- 
lantic to America. Mr. McKillip's grand- 
father was a jioor man when he came to 
Ohio, but as the years passed he accumulated 
a comfortable competence, becoming the 
owner of a large tract of land in Fayette 
county. There Thomas ]\IcKillip was 
reared tc manhood and he. too, prospered in 
his farm work until he was the owner of 
eight hundred acres of land. He followed 
farming and cattle-raising and had his life 
been spared he would have probably become 
a very wealthy man. but he died when but 
forty-eight years of age. He was the father 
of twelve children, four of whom passed 
away in early youth, while the other eight 
reached years of maturity, our subject being 
the second in order of birth. In his political 
views Tliomas McKillip was an old-line 
Whig, but was never a politician in the sense 
of office seeking. 

The educational privileges afforded Dan- 
iel McKillip were somewhat limited, for he 
was never able to attend school after he was 
thirteen years of age until he had attained 
his majority. He then sjjent seven months 
as a student in Antioch College, his father 
having purchased a scholarship in that insti- 
tution. He was forced to give up school in 
early boyhood in order to go to Illinois and 
tiike care of a herd of cattle which l>elonged 
to his father, the man who had been em- 
jiloyed for this purpose having been taken 
ill. There Mr. McKillip engaged in lierdinp 
cattle fi^r seven vears. during which time 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



365 



he made many trips to and from Ohio. In 
the fall he would make his way to Illinois, 
purchase a herd, feed the cattle during the 
winter and until Jul}", wboi he would start 
east with them, driving them to markets in 
this section of the country. He made eight 
trips to the east, crossing the Allegheny 
mountains. When he had attained his ma- 
jority his father gave him one hundred 
acres of timber land, which he at once began 
to clear and also to drain by ditching, thus 
preparing it for the plow. 

Like most young men starting out in life 
for themselves, he desired a companion for 
the journey and was married in Clark coun- 
ty July 13, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth Briggs, 
who was born in ]\Iadison township and is 
a daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Hem- 
pieman) Briggs. After his marriage he 
lived upon his fann in Eayette count}- for 
about five years and thai traded that prop- 
erty for a tract of land in Stokes township, 
]\Iadison county, where he made his home 
until the fall of i86j. He then removed to 
his present place, having traded for one hun- 
dred and eighty acres of land here. To this 
tract, however, he has since added until he 
now has in the home place two hundred and 
eighty acres of rich land and likewise owns 
anothei- farin of one hundred and sixty-two 
acres in ]\Ioorefield township. He has been 
ven,- successful and, although he lost two 
thousand dollars by going security for a 
friend, he is accounted one of the prosperous 
agriculturists of his community. 

]\Ir. and Mrs. ^IcKillip now have two 
living children. La.ura, born April 24, 
1857, was married February 3, 1876, to 
\\'illiam H. Winter, and they have five chil- 
dren: Effie. born April i, 1878: George, 
who was Iji^irn. September 5. 1879, and mar- 
ried Zella B\-ers : Lizzie : Crawford ; and 



Daniel. Emma Frances, the second daugh- 
ter of Mr. and ISIrs. AIcKillip, was born 
June 17, 1859, and on the 23d of March, 
1882. lD€came the wife of John S. Swaidner, 
of Spring-field township. They had two 
children: Jessie Belle, born February 5, 
1895; and Charles, who died in infancy. 

\\'hen age gave to him the right of fran- 
chise Mr. McK'illip proudly cast his first 
presidential ballot for John C. Fremont and 
from that time to the present has never 
wavered in his allegiance to the Republican 
party. He has had neither time nor incli- 
nation for office seeking, preferring to give 
his attention to his business affairs, which 
ha\-e been capably controlled so that his 
earnest toil and business sagacity have re- 
sulted in making him one of the prosperous 
agriculturists of his community. 



JOHN W. ATHY. 

John W. Athy is a prosperous farmer 
whose home is located about five miles from 
Springfield on the Dayton pike, and through 
close attention to- business, unremitting' dili- 
gence and the assistance of his estimable wife 
he has accumulated about one hundred acres 
of land, which, because of the excellent im- 
provements that have been placed upon it, 
is now valued at about one hundred and 
fifty dollars per acre. 

^Ir. Athy was born ]\Iarch 17, 1S48, 
within a half mile of the farm on which he 
now resides, and on the paternal side is of 
English descent. His parents were John 
and Frances (Rue) Athy, the former a na- 
tive of Cumberland. ^Maryland, and the lat- 
ter of ^lad River township, Clark county, 
Ohio, her family being pioneers of this coun- 



366 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ty. Throughout Hfe the father of our sub- 
ject followed farming and died in 1870, at 
the age of fifty-eight years, while his wife, 
who long survived him, passed away in 
1891, at the age of eighty-one years. This 
worthy couple were the parents of nine chil- 
dren, eight of whom are still living, namely : 
Jacob R., whose sketch api>ears on another 
page of this volume; Sarah, deceased; 
Jesse C, a resident of Mad River township; 
Wilmina. wife of Martin Leflfel. of Bethel 
township; Maria, wife of Ephraim Creel, of 
Mad River township; Malinda, wife of Da- 
vid Sheets, of the same township; Margaret 
Elizabeth, who married William Burnett 
and now resides in Combs. Arkansas ; John 
W., of this review : and Elisha P. S., a resi- 
dent of Springfield. 

In the usual manner of farmer boys of 
his period John W. Athy spent the days of 
his boyhood and youth, working in the fields 
through the summer months, while in the 
winter season he attended the district schools 
of the neighborhood, thus acquiring a good 
common English education. In 1872 he 
married Miss Nannie G. Wallace, who was 
born in Enon, this county, and is a daugh- 
ter of John and Martha A. (Bush) Wallace. 
Her mother died in 1878, at the age of fifty- 
eight years, and the father subsequently mar- 
ried Elizabeth Staats, with whom he is now 
living near Oslx>m, Greene ciainty, Ohio, at 
the age of eighty-two years. He is a native 
of England and on coming to this country 
first settled in Pennsylvania. \\' hen a young 
man he learned the tailor's trade and later 
engaged in the nursery business, but is now 
living a retired life. For sixteen years he 
served as postmater of Enon, Ohio, and sub- 
sequaitly lived for a time in Missouri. By 
his first marriage he had five children: 
Mary, the deceased wife of Major McBride; 



Martha Ellen, the wife of George Maple, of 
Holt county, Missouri ; T. D., who is a resi- 
dent of Springfield and at one time served 
as postmaster of that city; Xannie G., wife 
of our subject; and Anna ^1., the wife of 
John Jackson, who is living in Forest City, 
Missouri. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Athy have 
been born two children : L. lone, a musi- 
cian, and John Earl, who is engaged in the 
stock business, both at home with their par- 
ents. 

In his political views ]Mr. Athy is a Re- 
publican, and like all true Americans citi- 
zens should do, he keeps well informed on 
the issues and questions of the day. For 
five years he served as clerk of the school 
board. He is actively interested in every- 
thing pertaining to the material, intellectual 
and moral welfare of his community. He is 
a self-made man, whose life has been one of 
industry and earnest toil, and to his own ef- 
forts and the assistance of his wife,'who has 
indeed been a helpmate to him, he owes his 
prosperity and his advancement in the busi- 
ness world. They have a happy home and 
everything about the place is neat and at- 
tractive in appearance. They deserve great 
credit for what they have accomplished and 
are well knoAvn and highly respected citizens 
of their communitv. 



DWIGHT II. OLDS. 

Dwight II. Olds has for more than a 
quarter of a century been a resident of Clark 
county, having located within its borders in 
1875. He has been engaged in the dairy 
business as a member of the firm of Olds & 
McGregor since 1898, and in March. 1902, 
he became sole proprietor of the business, 
which he is now successfullv conducting. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



367 



Mr. Olds is a native of Massachusetts, his 
birth having- occurred in Middlefield, Hamp- 
shire county, on the lOth of April, 1848. 
He comes of Welsh ancestry on the pater- 
nal line and of English descent on the ma- 
ternal line, but for many generations the 
Olds family has been established in Amer- 
ica. Levi Olds, the father of our subject was 
a 'farmer who lived and died in Berkshire 
county, Massachusetts, passing away at 
the age of sixty-two years. His wife, who 
was born in the same locality, bore the 
maiden name of Emily Meacham and died 
upon the old home farm at the age of eighty- 
four years. This worthy couple were the 
parents of fifteen children, eight of whom 
reached years of maturity, while six of the 
number are still living: Levi F., the eld- 
est, who was a member of the Fifty-second 
Massachusetts Lifantry during the Civil 
war and is now living in Springfield ; 
Dwight H., of this review; William C, of 
Bridgeport, Connecticut; Helen S., the 
widow of John Hamilton, a resident of Ran- 
to'ul, Champaign county, Illinois; Mrs. El- 
nra Rammage, of Decatur, Alabama ; and 
Edwin W., of Chicago^. 

In the public schools in his boyhood days 
Dwight H. Olds pursued his education. 
Upon the father's death he was left with the 
care of the family upon his shoulders and 
he assumed the management of the farm, 
carrying on the work there until twenty- 
five years of age. The first five hundred 
dollars which he ever earned he spent in the 
acquiranent of an educatioii, studying be- 
tween the ages of twenty-one and twenty- 
five years. He then embarked with his 
brother Levi in the fancy-goods business in 
Concord, New Hampshire, and after re- 
maining for one year in that city he came to 
Spring-field, where he continued in the same 



line of business in Black's Opera House 
l)uilding. For fourteen years the new en- 
terprise here was attended with success, con- 
tinuously conducted by the brothers, and 
then our subject sold out his interest and 
turned his attention to the insurance busi- 
ness in connection with G. W. Bellow, this 
relation being maintained for six years, on 
the expiration of which period Mr. Olds dis- 
posed of his interests and turned his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits. He purchased 
an improved farm in German township and 
there began dairying. He has also been en- 
gaged in the raising of full-blooded regis- 
tered Jersey cattle and now has one hundred 
and fifty head upon his place. He handles 
nothing but blooded stock and he ships to 
all parts of the country. In 1898 he came tO' 
the city and entered the dairying business 
with the firm of McGregor Brothers. This 
relation was maintained until 1902, when 
Mr. Olds purchased his partners" interest. 
He cultivates three hundred and fifty acres 
of land and has a large number of cows for 
dairying purposes upon that tract. i\Ir. Olds 
became sole proprietor of the dairy and 
farm, which adjoins the city of Springfield, 
in 1902, and has since carried on the busi- 
ness with good success. The dairy is 
ecjuipped with all modern appliances, and, as 
he keqDs a high grade of cattle, the milk is of 
excellent Cjuality and receives a ready sale 
upon the market. The other fami is located 
in German township and is improved with 
all modern equipments and accessories for 
the purpose of his business. Mr. Olds is a 
member of the American Jersey Cattle Club 
of New "^^ork and a member of the Ohio 
Jersey Cattle Club, organized to promote the 
interests of the raisers of Jersey stock. 
Throughout his entire life he has been con- 
nected with the stock business and is laro-elv 



368 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



considered an authority in such matters, 
especially regarding Jersey cattle. He ran 
three wagons, delivering one hundred and 
fifty gallons of milk per day for four years 
hut now dis.poses of his product through the 
Pure Milk Company. All is aeriated and 
lx)ttled in the building upon his farm and to 
this business he largely gives his personal 
supervision. 

In 1878 Mr. Olds was united in mar- 
riage in Madison county. Ohio, to Sallie 
Corns, the widow of Otis Smith, of London, 
Ohio. Socially our subject is connected 
with Clark Lodge, F. & A. M.. and in his 
political affiliations is a Republcan, but has 
never been an aspirant for office. He is a 
member of the Fourth Lutheran church and 
at one time was a deacon in the First Lu- 
theran church. He contributes liljerally to 
church and charitable work and to many 
public enterprises for the good of the com- 
munity. In Sunday-school work he is par- 
ticularly active, having devoted his time and 
energies to this branch of Christian activity 
for a quarter of a century. For a number 
of years he filled the ofiice of assistant super- 
intendent of the Sunday-school of the First 
Lutheran church. A man who in all his 
business dealings is honest, upright and con- 
scientious and who in all life's relations fol- 
lows the golden rule, doing unto others as 
he would be df.ne by, he has gained a most 
enviable reputation and has made a success 
of his labors. In manner he is modest and 
unassuming, but his genuine worth makes 
him well liked bv his manv friends. 



\\ILI.IAM E. COPEXHAVER. 
\\'illiam E. Copenha\er occupies the re- 
sponsible position of superintendent of the 
Foos Manufacturing Company, his thorough 



understanding of the great mechanical work 
well qualifying him for this position. He 
came to Springfield in 1S86 and represents 
one of the oldest families of the south. His 
birth occurred in Baltimore, Maryland, on 
the 9th of April, 1865, and he is of German 
lineage, although the family was established 
in the new world at an early period in the 
colonization of this country. The paternal 
great-grandfather of our subject was lx>rn 
in ilaryland, while his father was a native 
of Pennsylvania. The paternal grandfather, 
Abraham Copenhaver, was likewise a native 
of that state and served as a soldier in the 
war of 1812. The mem'l:€rs of the family 
have been interred in Greenmount cemetery 
in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Augustus Copenhaver. the father of our 
subject, was born in Maryland in 1817 and 
was married in 1847. Fifty years later he 
and his wife celebrated their golden wedding 
and in iqoi he passed away in Baltimore. 
He was then the oldest living manufacturer 
in the city. He built and operated the first 
paper mill in the state cuf Maryland and was 
always an active factor in the development 
of n-.anufacturing interests there. He was 
also connected with the Second National 
Bank of Baltimore and his time, talents and 
capital were largely gi\en to the improve- 
ment of the city through the establishment 
of manufacturing concerns and in many 
other ways. In politics he was never bitter- 
ly partisan, nor did he at any time seek pub- 
lic office. He made his own way in life and 
his business capability and enterprise have 
l)rought to him creditaWe prosperity. Elis 
lalj<irs, too, were of a character that resulted 
largely in the' prosperity and upkiilding of 
the city, for he was active in bringing int" 
Baltimore various manufacturing plants, 
which contributed to the con.mercial acti\i- 



^HE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ty. He was a member of the board of 
trade of Baltimore and also of the board of 
associated charities and he gave freely and 
generously Ixit unostentatiusly, his bene- 
factions many times being known only to* 
himself and the recipient. He was a gentle- 
man of strong, .robust manhood and re- 
mained an active factor in business circles 
until about ten years prior to his death, 
when he retired from active life. He was 
an earnest and helpful member oi the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church and a man of do^ 
n^estic habits. He lived a very useful life, 
gathered around him^ a close circle of friends 
and business associates, who' honored and 
respected him for his genuine worth. His 
wife bore the maiden name of Elizabeth 
Raine and was born in Maryland, of Eng- 
lish parentage, the year of her birth being 
1827. Her parents were natives of Man- 
chester, England. Unto ]\Ir. and Mrs. Co- 
penhaver were born six children: Susan, 
who' became the wife oi John Nicholson, 
and died in Baltimore at the age of forty- 
eight years, leaving one son, Fred; John, a 
farn:er of northern Alaryland, who has a 
family oif three children ; Emma, the wife 
of Tilman Shafer, of Kenned\wille, Mary-* 
land, b}' whom she has two daughters ; Eliza- 
beth, the wife of E. Frank Dodson, an em- 
ploye of the Pennsyhania Railroad Com- 
pany, 'by whom she has two sons and one 
daughter ; Carrie, who is at home with her 
mother; and William E., of this review. 
The children of this family were provided 
with excellent school privileges and Emma 
received the first premium, a gold medal, 
of the Pea'body 'Institute. She jfollowed 
tcacliing for some tin:e, as did Susan, who' is 
now deceased. TSlie mother still resides at 
the old hon-ie place in Baltimore. With 
the exception c^f our subject and one sister. 



the representatives of the family have al- 
ways made Baltimore or the state of Mary- 
land their home. Mrs. Dodson, however, is 
a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

At the usual age William E. Copenhaver 
entered the public schools of Baltimore and 
was graduated in 1882. He afterward pur- 
sued a course in mechanical drawing at the 
Maryland Institute and he began learning 
the machinist's trade with the firm of Poole 
& Hunt, of Baltimore. He then completed 
his course in mechanical training at the 
Maryland Institute, one of the oldest educa- 
tional institutes of the state. While learn- 
ing his trade he lived at home and for four 
years continued in the employ of Poole & 
Hunt. In 1886 he came to Spring-field, 
Ohio, and found employment in the tool 
room of Whiteley. Fassler & Kelly Com- 
pany. He remained with that house until 
they closed their business and then entered 
the experimental department of the P. P. 
]\Iast Compan\-'s foundry, but remained 
there only a short lime, after which he went 
to Qliicagoi and accepted the position of fore- 
man with the A