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Full text of "Biographical record of the graduates and former students of the Yale Forest School; with introductory papers on Yale in the forestry movement and the history of the Yale Forest School"

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Biographical Record 

OF THE 

GRADUATES AND 
FORMER STUDENTS 

OF THE 

Yale Forest School 




WITH INTRODUCTORY PAPERS 
ON YALE IN THE FORESTRY 
MOVEMENT AND THE HISTORY 
OF THE YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



Compiled and Published 
BY THE Yale Forest School 

Assisted by the 
Class Secretaries bureau 



NEW HAVEN, 1913 






Gift 
Th« UaivinUy 

MH 8 1914 







HISTORY OF THE YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



YALE IN THE FORESTRY MOVEMENT 

By Henry Solon Graves 

Director of the Yale Forest School, 1900 to 191 1, now Chief of the 
United States Forest Service 

The Yale Forest School was established when the movement 
of forestry in this country was in its infancy — at a time when 
the majority of the people of the country were ignorant of, 
indifferent to, or opposed to the aims and methods of forestry. 
The history of the School has been coincident with a most 
remarkable development of forestry throughout the country. 
The Yale School has a very large share of credit for this develop- 
ment; without Yale and the other forest schools the results of 
the last decade could never have been achieved. No country 
has yet succeeded in establishing forestry on a permanent footing 
except through well trained foresters. Forestry had its real 
beginning in the United States when there were men to initiate 
the work of putting its principles into actual practice. 

In the minds of the founders of the Yale School there was 
not only a recognition of the need of trained men to carry on 
the work of forestry, but there was also a determined purpose 
tO' set a high standard of education that would train its students 
for leadership in the development of the science and practice 
of forestry. No task before the School has been more difficult. 
In the early days the technical demands on the forester were 
small. Oftentimes his first work was purely administrative, for 
which a very elementary knowledge of forestry would suffice. 
The demand for men was at that time so great that a young man 
with but little training could secure a place with the Government 
or elsewhere. There was therefore a tremendous pressure for 
a short-cut education, and to omit many fundamental features 
of technical training that did not seem of immediate practical 
application. But the School consistently maintained its high 
technical requirements, because it was training men to develop 
forestry and not merely to fill certain positions that might be 
available. 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



The keynote of forestry is foresight. In the first work of 
organizing forestry there must be a clear vision of future 
development. Otherwise no real progress is possible. Every 
step undertaken in handling a forest has an effect on its future 
condition, whether it involves the building of trails, the location 
of cuttings, the method of cuttings, or the organization of a 
protective system. The man who has a proper training can 
look ahead and guide his work to meet the requirements of a 
real upbuilding of his forest. The man with no such knowledge 
will invariably work on a basis of immediate expediency, without 
consideration of what is to be the ultimate development of the 
forest. Many do not appreciate the vital influence of single 
localized operations on the development of the forest in the 
future, because mistakes may not be discovered or good work 
appreciated for a long time. 

Already the need for a high standard of forest education 
has been demonstrated. I regard the part Yale has been able 
to play in maintaining this standard as one of its largest achieve- 
ments; it is the real reason for the School's leadership in 
forestry and the confidence it has acquired throughout the 
country. The graduates of the School have been leaders because 
they have had a point of view and knowledge beyond that 
needed for the every-day work which they first find to do. 

In addition to the educational foundations secured at the 
School, the graduates have shown a spirit of public service 
and devotion to their work that has contributed largely to their 
leadership. The forestry movement will have a very vital 
influence on the internal development and lasting prosperity 
of the country. Every forester is working toward an end 
which will benefit the nation, whether he is in public service 
or in the employ of a lumber company. This body of men 
scattered throughout all the states constitutes an educational 
force that is irresistible. 

Through the devoted work of its Faculty and the enthusiastic 
and consistent spirit of loyal service of its graduates, the Yale 
Forest School has already accomplished results which deserve 
high credit. Its work, however, is still in its infancy. In per- 
forming its part in developing public forest policies, both for 
the Nation and the states, in building up the science of forestry, 



YALE IN THE FORESTRY MOVEMENT 9 

and getting its principles in actual practice, Yale has a great 
opportunity and a great responsibility to serve the country. 
When we read the history of the School contained in this volume, 
let it be with the feeling that it tells of the foundation for a 
work which everyone associated with the School aims to do for 
the Nation. It is an account of the past to be of help for the 
future. 



THE YALE FOREST SCHOOL 
AN HISTORICAL SKETCH 

By James William Toumey 

Director of the Yale Forest School, and a professor in the School since 

its foundation 

The first great step in forest conservation in the United 
States was taken in 1891 when, through the action of Congress, 
the President was given authority to set aside forest reserva- 
tions. Previous to this time forestry in the United States 
was chiefly propaganda. There were less than a half dozen 
trained foresters in the entire country. It was soon found 
necessary, however, to appoint supervisors, forest rangers, and 
other forest officers to take charge of the newly created reser- 
vations. The work was organized with men having little or 
no knowledge of technical forestry. Even before the creation 
of the National forests some of the states had begun to develop 
a progressive forest policy and to acquire land for state forests. 
The beginnings were also made in forestry on privately owned 
timber land. At the beginning of the present century not only 
the National government but many of the states and, to some 
extent, private owners of large forest properties were seeking 
trained foresters. 

As early as 1887 a course of lectures on technical forestry was 
given by Bernhard E. Fernow at the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. This was the first instruction in forestry given by a 
trained forester at an educational institution in the United 
States. Prior to this date some of the agricultural colleges 
sustained chairs of botany and forestry combined. In no instance, 
however, were the men who occupied them trained foresters, 
nor did they teach technical forestry. 

In 1898 Dr. Fernow resigned his position as chief of the 
Division of Forestry of the United States Department of Agri- 
culture and organized and became director of the New York 
State College of Forestry at Cornell University. This was the 
first school of technical forestry in the United States. About 




c/2 a. 



AN HISTORICAL SKETCH 



the same time a small private school was established by Carl 
A. Schenck at Biltmore, N. C. The former school was aban- 
doned after three years of successful work through the lack of 
state support; the latter is still in existence. 

The great impetus given to American forestry through the 
creation of the National forests, the activities of the separate 
states in furthering a progressive forest policy, and the rapid 
expanse of the work of the Division of Forestry under the new 
chief, Gififord Pinchot, created a demand almost over night 
for a large number of technically trained men. Mr. Pinchot 
had been trained in the forest schools of Europe and became 
the leading figure in American forestry. He soon realized that 
his vision of forest conservation could not be attained without 
an able corps of men thoroughly trained in technical forestry 
and familiar with American life and institutions. The two 
schools, at Cornell and Biltmore, with uncertain tenure of life, 
could not be depended upon to supply the large numbers of 
men immediately required and the continually increasing number 
that would probably be necessary for some years to come. 

Early in the spring of 1900 it was announced by the President 
of Yale University that a gift of one hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars had been received to endow a graduate school of forestry. 
Two ideas of fundamental importance stand forth in this 
announcement; namely, an endowed institution and a graduate 
school. For the first time in America the new profession of 
forestry was placed upon a high plane requiring the best type 
of scholarship and a thorough scientific foundation. The fact 
of an endowed institution assured permanency and the possibility 
of substantial and gradual development. 

The gift under which the School was founded was from Mr. 
and Mrs. James W. Pinchot and their sons, Gifford Pinchot and 
Amos R. E. Pinchot. It provided for a department in the Uni- 
versity to be known as the Yale Forest School and a summer 
school of forestry at Milford, Pike County, Pa. The object 
of the School, as expressed in the terms of the gift, is both 
instruction and research in forestry. The University in accept- 
ing the gift agreed to provide the necessary buildings to house 
the School until the new institution was in a financial position 
to erect buildings for its special use. 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



Early in the summer of 1900 Henry Solon Graves, of the 
Division of Forestry, was appointed director of the new School, 
and the following Board of Governors organized the instruction 
and administration: 

Arthur T. Hadley, LL.D., president. 
Henry S. Graves, M.A., professor of forestry. 
William H. Brewer, Ph.D., professor of agriculture. 
Gifford Pinchot, B.A., special lecturer on forest policy. 

The School was fortunate in securing Mr. Graves as its first 
director, and its success is largely due to his foresight and 
counsels and to his high ideals of education in this comparatively 
new field. 

Following the announcement of the School a circular was 
issued outlining the plan and the proposed courses of study. In 
June James W. Toumey, of the Division of Forestry, was 
appointed assistant professor of forestry. 

In the organization of the School it was realized that from the 
standpoint of technical training two classes of men were required 
to successfully carry on the work in forestry in the United 
States. First, men trained in the broad field of technical forestry, 
competent to organize and administer forest property and con- 
duct scientific investigations. Second, men especially skilled in 
the conduct of woods work and fitted for rangers, inspectors 
and foremen. In order to prepare men for the former, the 
Forest School was made a graduate department of the Univer- 
sity. A summer school w^as maintained for several years at 
Milford. Entrance examinations were not required and certifi- 
cates of attendance were issued at the expiration of the eight 
weeks' course. Because of the opportunity that it would give 
school teachers to become familiar with the methods of field 
work, particularly in silviculture and dendrology, the course was 
at first opened to women. 

The Faculty included but one professor of forestry and one 
assistant professor. The remainder of the teaching staff was 
from the other departments of the University. Their work was 
supplemented by courses of special lectures by Gifford Pinchot 
and Frederick H. Newell. 

A two-year course of study w^as prescribed, the terms coin- 
ciding with those of the other departments of the University. 



AN HISTORICAL SKETCH 13 

Entrance requirements were much more liberal than at present. 
Graduates of universities, colleges and scientific schools of high 
standing were accepted without examination, provided they could 
show requisite knowledge of botany, geology and chemistry. 
Others were required to pass examinations in mathematics, 
botany, geology, chemistry, physics, German or French, English 
and political economy. Special students were admitted without 
examination when they were able to present other evidence of 
their fitness to pursue the courses given. The tuition charges 
were one hundred dollars per year. 

Looking back from a perspective of thirteen years the curricu- 
lum is simple in the extreme, and may be characterized by the 
emphasis placed upon courses in botany, geology and zoology, 
and the comparatively limited work in technical forestry. The 
forestry subjects in the curriculum were as follows: outline 
of forestry, silviculture, forest management, forest measure- 
ments, forest technology, lumbering, forest protection, forest 
history, forest administration and state and National forestry. 
With the exception of one short course of six lectures given 
by Gifford Pinchot the entire field was covered by the director 
and the assistant professor. 

Provision was made for field work at New Haven, Milford 
and in the Adirondack Mountains. In the first announcement 
of the courses, field work was only briefly mentioned as follows : 
"Frequent excursions will be taken to points of interest near 
New Haven. In the spring of the second year the work will be 
transferred from New Haven to the field, the first few weeks 
being spent in Pennsylvania and the remaining time in the 
.Adirondacks." 

1900-1901 
The first term of the regular course began on Thursday, 
September 27, 1900. Seven students were enrolled and remained 
to complete the two years' course, and in addition thirteen 
Academic and two Sheffield students attended one or more 
courses. The director and four of the regular students lived 
in Marsh Hall, which was provided by the University for the 
use of the School. In November, 1900, the first annual catalogue 
of the School was published, and included practically the same 



14 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

subject matter as the preliminary announcement. There was a 
more detailed account of the field work, and a list of the seven 
students in attendance. 

During- the year the School received in gifts to its equipment 
a splendid collection of axes and a large number of wood-work- 
ing tools from W. D. Simmons of St. Louis, Mo., and a valuable 
collection of saws from H. C. Atkins of Indianapolis, Ind. Mr. 
Tourney gave his herbarium containing two thousand five 
hundred species of indigenous trees and shrubs to the School. 
The library was enlarged through the gift of three hundred 
and twenty-five volumes from Gifford Pinchot. 

1901-1902 

Early in 1901 an illustrated circular announcing the Yale 
Summer School of Forestry was published. The course as 
planned, and later carried out, covered a period of eight weeks 
beginning July 8, 1901. No entrance examinations were 
required, but no one under seventeen years of age was admitted. 
The teaching staff consisted of the director and the assistant 
professor. The following courses were offered: introduction to 
forestry, silviculture, forest botany, forest measurements and 
forest protection. Twenty-seven students were enrolled, seven 
of whom were women. The latter had all the privileges of the 
School with the exception of living and boarding in camp. 

At the opening of the regular course in 1901 the previous 
year's class of seven members was augmented by three men 
from the Division of Forestry. The Junior class had a member- 
ship of twenty-one. The School was now for the first time in 
full operation, and the Faculty was called upon to give instruc- 
tion in all the courses offered in the curriculum. In many 
respects, from the standpoint of instruction, it was the most 
critical period in the history of the School. With more than 
four times as many students as the previous year, and with the 
technical courses of the Senior year given for the first time, 
the burden of instruction was very great. The following courses 
were added: forest entomology% forest administration and law, 
and forest administration abroad. 

During the second year the field work was more fully organ- 
ized. A year before an agreement was made by the School 



AN HISTORICAL SKETCH 15 

and the New Haven Water Company whereby a portion of 
the forest property of the company was placed under the man- 
agement of the School, thus making a large body of woodland 
near New Haven available for purposes of instruction and 
experiment. The field work in silviculture was chiefly confined 
to this tract. Arrangements were made for the Seniors to spend 
the last three weeks of the autumn term in lumber camps in 
northern New England. 

After the Easter recess the work with the Senior class was 
transferred to Central Valley, N. Y., where the entire spring 
term was devoted to field work. A working plan was prepared 
for a forest of 15,000 acres owned by E. H. Harriman of New 
York. 

On the completion of their work, for the college year ending 
June, 1902, the degree Master of Forestry was conferred upon 
eight members of the Senior class, and the first graduates of 
the School were ready to begin their professional careers in a 
field just beginning to develop rapidly in the United States. 
Soon after graduating, two members of the Class, namely, Roy 
L. Marston and Alfred Akerman, were engaged as instructors. 

I 902- I 903 

The second session of the summer school was under Mr. 
Toumey, who was assisted by Walter Mulford, State Forester 
of Connecticut. Nineteen students were in attendance, of whom 
six were women. A large percentage of the male students were 
undergraduates from Eastern universities and colleges, nine 
of whom later entered the School for the regular two-year 
course. 

The curriculum was greatly extended and the courses re- 
arranged during the third year. In September, 1902, Alfred 
Akerman and Roy L. Marston began their work as instructors. 
The position of assistant in botany, occupied the previous year 
by C. E. Preston, was filled by Arthur H. Graves. Howard S. 
Betts was appointed assistant in the wood testing laboratory, 
and Herman von Schrenk lecturer on diseases of trees to take 
the position formerly occupied by William C. Sturgis. 

At the opening of the term twenty-six men enrolled in the 
entering class. Heretofore the students had been largely drawn 



1 6 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

from the Eastern states. In this class, however, all parts of 
the United States were represented, and one student came from 
Japan. The National character of the School for the first time 
became apparent in its student body. The course formerly given 
by Mr. Verrill was given by Mr. Britton, State Entomologist 
of Connecticut. The courses in introduction to forestry and 
history of forestry were taken by Mr. Akerman, who also 
assisted Director Graves in the work in silviculture. The courses 
in lumbering and forest protection were taken by Mr. Marston, 
who also assisted Director Graves in forest management. The 
work in engineering was extended. Field surveying was given 
by Mr. Tracy, and a new course in forest engineering was 
under Mr. Marston. Through the generosity of George H. 
Myers, M.F. '02, three thousand dollars was received to pay 
for the equipment of a laboratory in forest technology, and 
instruction in timber testing was given by Mr. Betts. Through 
cooperation with the Division of Forestry the laboratory was 
opened for investigation on the mechanical properties of wood. 

In the early winter (December, 1902) the members of the 
Senior class were located in lumber camps in Maine, New 
Hampshire, New York, Michigan, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, 
Florida and Texas. Each student prepared a detailed report 
on lumbering in the region studied. The spring field work 
with the Senior class was at West Point Military Reservation, 
where a study was made of a large hardwood tract east of the 
Hudson River. The area was mapped and a working plan made 
under which it has since been managed. 

There was a large increase in attendance, the registration in 
the regular course being forty-four students compared with 
thirty-three the previous year. They represented twenty-three 
collegiate institutions in fifteen states. 

The endowment of the School was increased through the gift 
of fifty thousand dollars by Mrs. J. W. Pinchot and Gifford 
Pinchot. This gift enabled the Governing Board very materially 
to modify the courses of study, add a summer term to the regular 
course, and greatly increase the field work. The principal addi- 
tions to the equipment of the School were through the purchase 
of a portion of the technical library of the late Charles Mohr. 



AN HISTORICAL SKETCH 17 

1903-1904 

The third session of the summer school, which opened on July 
I, 1903, was reduced to seven weeks. Mr. Marston was in 
charge. The curriculum remained unchanged with the exception 
of greater diversity in the work, due to the larger number of 
special lectures. Fifteen students were in attendance, none of 
whom were women. Of those in attendance seven later entered 
the regular course. Mr. Akerman resigned at the close of the 
collegiate year in June and accepted the position of State Forester 
of Massachusetts. 

The registration in the regular course was sixty-six, repre- 
senting thirty-three collegiate institutions in twenty-three states. 
There was one student each from the Philippine Islands and 
Sweden. The large increase in students in the Senior class was 
partly due to the discontinuance of the College of Forestry 
at Cornell University. Special arrangements were made whereby 
students from that institution were admitted to the Yale Forest 
School, and ten men availed themselves of this arrangement. 

Although no additions were made to the list of regular 
instructors, it became necessary to employ a number of tempo- 
rary assistants because of the unexpectedly large number of 
students. Walter Mulford was employed to assist in the courses 
in silviculture and forest mensuration, and Austin Cary in the 
field work of the Senior class at Milford. Harry Tiemann, 
M.F. '03, was appointed engineer in the technological laboratory 
in the place of H. S. Betts, and continued in this position until 
1909, when work in cooperation with the United States Govern- 
ment was discontinued. 

In late December a disastrous fire broke out in Marsh Hall. 
It started in the basement and burned or severely injured the 
testing laboratory, the assembly hall, two recitation rooms and 
the instrument room. The School records, the library and 
herbarium were saved. For two weeks at the beginning of the 
winter term recitations and lectures were held at the Sheffield 
Scientific School. The restored building was in many respects 
better adapted to the requirements of the School than before 
the fire. The equipment at the summer school was greatly 
improved by the construction of three buildings which were the 
gift of Mr. and Mrs. James W. Pinchot. Through the further 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



generosity of George H. Myers the forest library of the late 
Dr. Robert Hartig was purchased and donated to the School. 
This collection contained fifteen hundred books and pamphlets 
representing the accumulation of many years. It is particularly 
rich in German periodicals and early books and pamphlets on 
forestry, many of which are long out of print and difficult to 
obtain. 

For the first time the spring field work of the regular course 
was conducted at Milford, with Mr. Marston and Austin Gary, 
instructors. It later became apparent that it would be necessary 
to rearrange the curriculum and increase the amount of field 
work in order to realize more fully the object of instruction. 
During the winter an announcement was published of proposed 
changes in the curriculum. Experience had shown that the 
courses in forest mensuration and silviculture could not be 
satisfactorily taught without more field work. It became neces- 
sary to add to the Junior year a term wholly devoted to field 
work. Accordingly, the Junior year in 1904 opened at Milford 
at the same time as the summer school. 

Heretofore the tuition for the Junior and Senior years was 
one hundred dollars each. Beginning in July, 1904, it was raised 
to one hundred and fifty dollars for the Junior year, and a year 
later to one hundred and twenty-five dollars for the Senior year. 
To the present no further changes in tuition charges have been 
made. 

Thereafter the Junior class met at the School camp at Milford 
with the summer school students. The field and classroom work 
of the two classes, however, were wholly distinct and usually 
under separate instructors. The session of the summer school 
was seven weeks as in the previous year, but the regular term 
continued three weeks longer. Two distinct bodies of students 
tented in the same encampment and dined together, but the 
character of the instruction was necessarily wholly different. 

1904-1905 
Under this new arrangement the Junior courses in the sum- 
mer of 1904 were given by Director Graves, assisted by E. E. 
Carter, M.F. '04. Mr. Toumey was assisted by A. H. Graves 
in carrying the work of the summer school. The work with 



AN HISTORICAL SKETCH 19 

the Juniors was confined to the following courses: foundation 
of silviculture, treatment of woodlands and forest mensuration. 
Thirty- four men were enrolled in the Junior class and eighteen 
in the summer school. 

The experiment of shifting a large part of the field work 
to an extra summer term proved successful. At the opening 
of the autumn term at New Haven the total attendance was 
sixty-three exclusive of those from other departments. 

The next year surveying was transferred to the summer term. 
On January 2, 1905, both the Junior and Senior classes met in 
Washington, D. C, to attend the Forest Congress. For one 
week the students attended the sessions of the Congress and the 
following week a series of specially arranged addresses and 
lectures to which students from other schools were also invited. 

The Forest Club, composed of Faculty and students, was 
organized and has continued to meet on alternate Wednesday 
evenings except in the summer term. During the early winter 
a group of Seniors with a smaller number of Juniors met and 
organized the Robin Hood Society of Foresters. After an 
existence of six years the organization was discontinued. The 
accumulated funds in the treasury of the society to the extent 
of more than five hundred dollars were contributed to the 
Graduates Fund of the School. 

Shortly after the opening of the winter term Director Graves 
was commissioned by the Forest Service to visit India and the 
Philippine Islands to secure information relative to educational 
instruction in forestry that would best fit students for the prac- 
tice of forestry in tropical regions and particularly in the Philip- 
pine Islands. During the six months of Director Graves' absence 
Mr. Tourney was acting director, and B. E. Fernow, the former 
director of the New York State College of Forestry, conducted 
some of the courses. A. F. Hawes, M.F. '03, State Forester of 
Connecticut, also assisted in instruction. 

As in the previous year, after the Easter recess, the work 
with the Senior class was transferred to the School camp at 
Milford. It became apparent, however, that it was unwise to 
continue the spring field work at this place since the men were 
already thoroughly familiar with the region. It seemed desir- 
able that a wholly new field be selected for the spring work 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



where lumbering operations were in progress and where condi- 
tions were better suited for the preparation of forest maps, 
the projection of logging roads, the estimating of timber and 
the making of working plans. Since the spring of 1905 it has 
been conducted on large tracts of virgin timber in the South. 

The most important addition to the collections of the School 
during the year was a large assortment of forest products from 
the St. Louis Exposition. A former collection of exotic woods 
from the Buffalo Exposition had been severely damaged the 
year before in the fire at the School. The material from St. 
Louis and much besides is stored because of lack of space for 
display. As soon as a School building is erected this material 
can be arranged and made available for exhibition and purposes 
of instruction. 

As in former years the majority of the twenty-nine members 
of the graduating class entered the Forest Service. The rapid 
expansion of the work of the Government under the direction 
of Giftord Pinchot gave opportunity for all who desired to begin 
the practice of their profession on the National Forests, which 
had been only recently transferred from the Department of the 
Interior to the Department of Agriculture and placed directly 
under the management of the Forest Service. 

• 
I 905- I 906 

The year beginning July, 1905, was the most satisfactory 
from the standpoint of the curriculum since the organization 
of the School. The instruction was made more efficient and 
foundations were laid for still further improvements the fol- 
lowing year. The important change in the engineering courses 
became effective at the opening of the summer term. The 
course was conducted by J. C. Tracy, assisted by C. S. Farnham 
and W. L. Ulrich. For the first time a course in field dendrol- 
ogy was included in the summer work. Since 1905 there have 
been no marked changes in the courses as given at Milford. 
Only three courses are offered; namely, surveying, forest 
mensuration and field dendrology. Among the thirty-six men 
enrolled in the regular course were students from Canada, 
Norway, Sandwich Islands and South Africa. Eighteen attended 
the summer school, five of whom later entered the regular course. 



AN HISTORICAL SKETCH 



Herman H. Chapman, M.F. '04, of the Forest Service, was 
employed as assistant during the winter and spring terms. A 
course in State Forest law was given during the winter by Mr. 
Chapman. In April Mr. Marston resigned to enter the lumber 
business in Maine, and the lield work in lumbering as formerly 
conducted by locating the students in lumber camps for a period 
of three weeks after the Thanksgiving recess was abandoned. 
The Senior field work of the spring term was conducted at 
Waterville, N. H., on a tract of 22,000 acres owned by the 
International Paper Company. The topographic work was under 
the direction of Henry Gannett, geographer of the United States 
Geological Survey. The forest work was conducted by Mr. 
Chapman. 

The field work in silviculture was better organized, the autumn 
term being devoted to silvical excursions and investigations in 
the woods about New Haven and the remainder of the year to 
thinnings, improvement cuttings, nursery work, seeding and 
planting. 

The importance of lumbering as a part of the curriculum 
was recognized by the National Lumber Manufacturers' Asso- 
ciation at their annual meeting in 1905, and they voted to 
raise a fund to endow a chair of lumbering. Sixty thousand 
dollars was immediately pledged, and in the autumn turned 
over to the treasurer of the University, and in 1910 an additional 
forty thousand dollars was received. This fund has been of 
great value to the School as it made possible the appointment 
of R. C. Bryant of the Forest Service to take charge of the 
work in lumbering. Mr. Bryant began his work in September, 
1906. 

During the year an Advisory Board was appointed from the 
graduates and proved very important in furthering the interests 
of the School and bringing the alumni into closer touch with 
its activities. The members of the first Advisory Board were 
G. H. Myers, M.F. '02, J. G. Peters, M.F. '03, and W. B. 
Greeley, M.F. '04. 

1906-1907 
The year 1906 marked a long step forward in improving the 
curriculum. This was made possible through the addition to 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



the Faculty of three instructors in forestry, namely Messrs. 
Chapman, Bryant and Hawley, each of whom was given a 
definite line of work which they have been pursuing and 
strengthening up to the present time. This marks a definite 
stage in the development of the curriculum because it is the 
beginning of the separation of the work into specific courses 
continuously handled by the same instructors. It gave an oppor- 
tunity for the courses to develop and expand with succeeding 
years. Hitherto the lack of funds and available instructors of 
experience prevented the development of a Faculty adequate 
for the constantly increasing work of the School. The work 
of instruction as then organized was conducted by three groups 
of men: first, the regular Faculty, consisting of five resident 
members whose time was wholly given to the School and who 
conducted the technical courses in forestry; second, members 
of other departments of the University who gave specially 
arranged courses in auxiliary subjects ; third, non-resident, 
special lecturers. 

An important feature of the year was the development of the 
course in lumbering under Mr. Bryant. The work was organ- 
ized with the advice of a committee from the National Lumber 
Manufacturers' Association. This advisory committee consisted 
of Nelson W. McLeod and Clifford I. Millard of St. Louis and 
Frederick E. Weyerhaeuser of St. Paul. The lectures in this 
subject were given by Mr. Bryant assisted by the members of 
the committee as special lecturers. Through the generosity of 
J. B. White the plant of the Missouri Lumber & Mining Com- 
pany in southern Missouri was placed at the disposal of the 
School for the spring work of the Senior class. The work in 
the woods was conducted by Mr. Chapman, who was assisted 
in the topographic work by Henry Gannett of the United States 
Geological Survey. Mr. Bryant had charge of the work relating 
directly to lumbering. This proved so successful that the field 
work of the Senior class has since followed the same general 
plan. 

I 907- I 908 

The increased demand for foresters by the National govern- 
ment, by states, and by private owners of woodland, resulted 
in the rapid development of facilities for instruction. As early 



AN HISTORICAL SKETCH 23 

as 1907 seventeen institutions in the United States and Canada 
were offering instruction in forestry and five institutions had 
fully organized departments or schools for high-grade training. 
The standard required for the profession of forestry was becom- 
ing higher each year and already many of the graduates of 
minor schools found it difficult to find remunerative positions. 

Six classes had now graduated with a total enrollment of 
127. This does not include 'i^j men who did not take the full 
course. The occupations of the 127 graduates of the first six 
classes, in July, 1907, is shown in the following table : 

In the Forest Service 74 

In state forestry 5 

In educational work 10 

In the Philippine Bureau of Forestry 3 

In private forestry 20 

In the forestry work of foreign countries 6 

Not in forestry 8 

Deceased i 

Hitherto there had been but one program of study prescribed 
for all students. All subjects in the regular course were required 
for the degree. A greater number of students were each year 
applying for admittance with advanced standing, having already 
had courses in technical forestry in other institutions. To supply 
this demand a number of advanced courses in forest technology, 
silviculture, lumbering and forest management were offered for 
the first time. 

The spring work of the Senior class was conducted in Ala- 
bama on a tract of virgin forest owned by the Kaul Lumber 
Company. Hitherto nearly all the field work at New Haven 
was at Maltby Park, a comparatively small portion of the lands 
owned by the New Haven Water Company. During this year 
Mr. Hawley was employed as consulting forester for the com- 
pany. Under this arrangement the School obtained the privilege 
of conducting field work on all the lands owned by the company, 
aggregating eight thousand acres, of which more than one-half 
is covered with forest, under an organized system of manage- 
ment. The open land is gradually being planted. This large 
tract of permanent forest near New Haven and within easy 



24 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

reach of the School is yearly becoming of greater importance 
for purposes of instruction. 

With the decrease in the number of special lectures in the 
regular course, the Forest Club has been the avenue through 
which foresters and other scientific men visiting New Haven 
have been introduced to the School. 

At the close of the work of the Senior class at New Haven 
in February, 1908, formal exercises were held for the first time. 
The principal address was by Giflford Pinchot. Other speakers 
were President Hadley, the Director of the School, W. B. 
Greeley and H. R. MacMillan, the latter representing the grad- 
uating class. These exercises continue to be held each year at 
New Haven before the Senior class leaves for the South. 

1908-1909 

In 1908 R. C. Bryant and R. C. Hawley were promoted to 
the rank of assistant professors. It was becoming more and 
more apparent, in order to meet the needs of technical instruc- 
tion, that it would be necessary to lengthen the course to three 
years or else increase the requirements for admission. The 
latter course was followed. Early in the year a circular was 
issued announcing that candidates for admission for the degree 
Master of Forestry, in addition to completing an undergraduate 
college course, must have pursued certain specified subjects. 
The new requirements did not go into effect for two years in 
order that undergraduates then preparing for the School could 
arrange to cover the required work. Arrangements had been 
made with the Sheffield Scientific School whereby students in 
that institution, by taking certain studies in the Forest School 
during the last year of their undergraduate course, could com- 
plete the work at the Forest School in one year. With the grad- 
ual extension of the curriculum and the increase in the number 
of required subjects, this arrangement became more and more 
difficult. Through action of the Governing Board the old 
arrangement was discontinued, to go into effect at the opening 
of the school year 1910. 

The field work of the Senior class was conducted at Doucette, 
Tyler County, Texas, on the lands of the Thompson Brothers 
Lumber Company. The New Haven Water Company began 



AN HISTORICAL SKETCH 25 

the extensive planting of waste areas. Nurseries were estab- 
lished and plans made to reforest by planting during the next 
decade from 1,500 to 2,000 acres of open land. The work on 
the forested areas was progressing rapidly and already there 
were many instructive illustrations of the results of applied 
forestry. 

1909-1910 

The tenth class to enroll at the School entered in July, 1909. 
There had been a gradual increase in attendance since the 
organization of the School. From seven students in 1900 the 
number had increased in 1909 to thirty-seven in the Senior class 
and forty-five in the Junior, not including five enrolled for the 
summer term only. In addition to the regular students fifteen 
were enrolled in the short course and twelve from other 
departments of the University. 

This year marked the discontinuance of the summer school. 
The rapid development of secondary forest schools and depart- 
ments of forestry in various institutions lessened somewhat the 
demand for this course. Furthermore the large increase in the 
number of students in the regular course made it difficult to 
provide instructors from among the members of the Faculty. 
During the existence of the summer school there were enrolled 
a total of 159 students or a yearly average of 18. 

S. J. Record was appointed instructor in forestry early in the 
year and W. O. Filley field assistant. In January the School 
suffered a distinct loss in the indefinite leave of absence granted 
the director on his appointment by President Taft to the posi- 
tion of Forester of the United States Forest Service. Mr. 
Tourney became acting director. The Senior field work was 
conducted at Clarks, La., on the property of the Central 
Louisiana Lumber Company. 

The large increase in attendance called for more space for 
laboratories and lecture rooms. Marsh Hall was overcrowded, 
making it necessary to duplicate certain courses. As there was 
no prospect of a new building suitable for the needs of the 
School, the timber testing laboratory, only used for a few months 
each year, was dismantled to make space for more imperative 
needs. 



26 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Early in the year Mrs. Morris K. Jesup of New York gave 
an endowment of $100,000 for a professorship of silviculture, 
and Mr. Tourney was appointed the Morris K. Jesup professor 
of silviculture. 

191Q-1911 

At the opening of the summer term in 1910 it became apparent 
that an increasing number of men were being drawn from other 
institutions where, forestry was taught. During the year five 
graduates in forestry from other schools were in attendance. 
Twenty-six states and foreign countries were represented in the 
student body, which was the same as in the previous year. No 
change in the distribution of the student body, due to the rapid 
development of forest schools and departments of forestry else- 
where in the country, was apparent. With the beginning of the 
year the curriculum was rearranged and all the courses became 
technical in character. The following changes were made in the 
teaching staff: Messrs. Chapman and Bryant were made full 
professors, S. J. Record was promoted to be assistant professor 
and W. O. Filley resigned and accepted the position of assistant 
forester of Connecticut. 

The Senior field work was conducted at Trinity, Texas. The 
unusually large class made it necessary to employ two temporary 
field assistants, C. A. Hoar, M.F. '10, and Harold Fay, M.F. '10. 

Nearly three years previous the task of increasing the 
resources of the School by five hundred thousand dollars was 
undertaken. The large increase in the number of students made 
the need of a new building almost imperative. Money was 
needed for salary increases and for experimental work and pub- 
lications. At the close of the year the total receipts toward this 
fund were two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. At the end 
of the year forty-three men completed the course and received 
the degree Master of Forestry. This is the largest number that 
received the degree in a single year since the organization of the 
School. 

1911-1912 

For the past two years the requirements for admission were 
given considerable attention. In the curriculum as first formed 
there were many botanical, zoological and other courses which 




u 



AN HISTORICAL SKETCH 27 

in their scope paralleled the undergraduate work in colleges and 
universities. These subjects were deemed necessary because 
most applicants were poorly prepared in them, and it appeared 
advisable to incorporate them in the requirements for admission. 
The applicant must now hold a degree from a high-grade uni- 
versity, college or technical school and in addition present evi- 
dence that he has taken at least one full year in college or 
university botany, including general morphology, histology and 
physiology of plants ; at least one college course in zoology, 
physics, inorganic chemistry, geology, economics, mechanical 
drawing, the completion of mathematics through trigonometry, 
and has a reading knowledge of French or German. 

The effect of this was apparent in the class that entered under 
the new requirements in 191 1. It resulted in a marked advance 
in scholarship due to a more thorough preparation in the sci- 
ences which are a foundation for forestry. In most respects 
the first year's operation of the new schedule was highly satis- 
factory. The elimination of general science and most of the 
special lecture courses gave the much needed opportunity to 
increase the technical work. The requirements in both silvi- 
culture and management were nearly doubled. There was a 
sharp falling off in attendance, but to what extent it was due 
to this change is not known. It is believed to have been partly 
due to the rapid increase in the number of schools. The 
attendance for the year was sixty, a decrease of forty-two from 
that of the previous year. This made no appreciable difference 
in the wide distribution of the students, as the sixty men enrolled 
were from twenty-five states. 

The revised schedule, calling for additional field work in 
silviculture, made it necessary for the Junior class to spend two 
weeks of the spring term in the Adirondack Mountains. As in 
previous years the Senior field work was conducted in the South. 
The Crossett Lumber Company, Crossett, Ark., granted the use 
of their property for this work. 

The curriculum at this time offered instruction in thirty-six 
courses in forestry subjects, all of a technical nature. They 
varied in length from one to three terms with the exception 
of two short courses on special subjects by outside lecturers. 
It was apparent that the work could not be materially extended. 



28 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

without putting too great a burden on the students, unless some 
of the courses offered were elective. It was believed to be impos- 
sible to omit any of the required courses and still provide an 
all-round training in technical forestry. 

Because of the continued absence of Mr. Graves his resigna- 
tion as director was accepted and Mr. Tourney, who had served 
as acting director for two years, was made director. Mr. Graves 
retained his position as a member of the Governing Board 
and of the Faculty, with leave extended for another year. 
Arrangements were completed whereby Mr. Record, beginning 
with the year 1912-13, would carry the work in technology for- 
merly given by Mr. Dean and the course on the classification and 
structure of wood formerly given by A. H. Graves. 

For the first time since the organization of the School the 
library was placed in charge of a trained librarian, Miss L M. 
Tisdale, formerly on the staff of the University Library. The 
library had grown to such proportions that this was necessary 
in order to properly catalogue and put it in form for ready 
reference and greater usefulness. 

The publication of a series of bulletins, memoirs and mis- 
cellaneous works relating to the School was begun. This was 
of vast importance as it gave the School a wider field of use- 
fulness and brought it in closer touch with the alumni and the 
general public. 

A graduate Advisory Board had been elected in 1905 in order 
to bring the School into closer relations with the alumni. At 
first it had consisted of but three members, but was later enlarged 
to five, and has been of continually increasing usefulness. Dur- 
ing this year the School was brought into closer relations with 
the alumni through the organization of the alumni association 
with officers and class secretaries. This association met at New 
Haven on December 20 and 21, 191 1, and the following officers 
were elected for five years : 

President, W. B. Greeley, M.F. '04. 
Vice-president, T. S. Woolsey, Jr., M.F. '03. 
Secretary and treasurer, H. H. Chapman, M.F. '04. 

This association not only afforded an opportunity for the 
organization of the alumni into an effective body and familiar- 
ized them with the progress of the School, but it served as a 



AN HISTORICAL SKETCH 29 

stimulus to permanently establish a graduates' fund. The sub- 
scriptions to this fund during the first meeting of the associa- 
tion were more than four thousand dollars. A gift of one 
thousand dollars was received from William Wheeler of Buffalo, 
N. Y., the income to be given yearly as a prize for meritorious 
work in silviculture. 

The first number of the series of bulletins and memoirs pub- 
lished by the School was issued in February, 1912. This is "A 
Classification for Forestry Literature" and is the classification 
used in the School library. In February, 19 12, the report of 
the alumni reunion was published and distributed. Two impor- 
tant manuals dealing with forestry subjects were published by 
members of the Faculty during the year, namely: "Forestry in 
New England" by Mr. Hawley, in collaboration with Mr. 
Hawes, State Forester of Vermont, and "Identification of the 
Economic Woods of the United States" by Mr. Record. 

A conference of American Forest Schools was called in 
December, 1909, to consider the aim, scope, grade and length 
of curriculum as the first step in the standardization of forestry- 
education. At this conference a committee was appointed to 
draw up a plan for the standardization of the requirements for 
technical training in forestry. Director Graves was appointed 
chairman; other members of the committee were B. E. Fernow, 
R. T. Fisher, Filibert Roth and Gifford Pinchot. A second 
conference was called in December, 191 1. Nearly all American 
institutions offering instruction in forestry were represented. 
The plan of the committee was discussed in detail and it was 
agreed to publish the report in the Forestry Quarterly. The 
committee was continued, and on the resignation of the chair- 
man his place was taken by Mr. Toumey. The report of the 
committee was published in Volume X, Number 3, of the For- 
estry Quarterly, and widely distributed. The importance of 
this report, its influence on forestry education in America, and 
the part taken in it by the Yale Forest School, calls for its 
recognition in this historical sketch. 

1912-1913 
The total number of students enrolled during the year was 
fifty. It became still more evident that the marked falling off 



30 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

in attendance, first noticeable in the previous year's class and 
still more conspicuous in the enrollment for the year 1912-13, 
was due to two fundamental causes : first, the continued increase 
in the facilities for forestry education in the United States; 
second, the keener competition for profitable employment after 
graduation. To what extent these conditions will afifect future 
attendance at the school it is uncertain. Future classes are likely 
to be smaller and to include a constantly increasing number of 
students from other schools who come to Yale to complete their 
technical training. 

Shortly after the organization of the alumni association in 
December, 191 1, a movement was set on foot to publish a quar- 
terly to be known as the Yale Forest School News. The grad- 
uate Advisory Board undertook the financing and management 
of the proposed publication. The first number of this new 
quarterly appeared in January, 1913, with the following officers 
in charge: 

Editor, W. B. Greeley, M.F. '04. 
Alumni notes, H. H. Chapman, M.F. '04. 
Managing editor, S. J. Record, M.F. '05. 

The Yale Forest School Nezvs was well received from the first. 
It serves a much needed purpose as a medium for communication 
between the alumni and the officers of instruction. 

Bulletin 2, "Prolonging the Cut of Southern Pine," by 
Messrs. Chapman and Bryant, was published in February, 1913. 

The field work of the Senior class was conducted at Warren, 
Ark., and the spring field work of the Junior class in the 
Adirondack Mountains. 

In June, 1913, six hundred and twenty-five acres of land at 
Keene, N. H., were presented to the School by George H. Myers, 
M.F. '02, as the nucleus for a School forest. 

OUTLOOK FOR THE FUTURE 

This historical sketch of the development of the Yale Forest 
School from its organization until the close of the school year 
in June, 1913, would not be complete without a brief statement 
relatinsf to its outlook for the future. As stated in the address 



AN HISTORICAL SKETCH 31 

of the director before the alumni in December, 191 1, the future 
development of the School must be along the following lines : 

a. In adding to the efficiency of the present courses ; 

b. In estabhshing elective courses in the Senior year; 

c. In increasing our facilities for research and advanced v^^ork. 



The need of the first of these is always present because no 
course is so complete that it does not require constant atten- 
tion on the part of the instructor in order to keep it abreast of 
the times and effective from an educational standpoint. 

As regards the second, it is believed that the time is already 
at hand when elective courses should be considered. Because 
of the large amount of required work it is not possible to add 
many optional courses, such as the course on park and street 
trees offered for the first time in 191 1, and four proposed 
optional courses to be given for the first time in 1913-14. Addi- 
tional courses must be largely elective in the Senior year, 
substituted for some of those required at the present time. 

Forestry is a very broad and diversified subject. The training 
required for work in one particular branch may be quite dif- 
ferent from that required in another. Thus a man who devotes 
himself to the reproduction, development and growth of timber 
should specialize in silviculture and management, while one 
whose chief attention is given to utilization should specialize 
in lumbering and technology. 

Regarding the third, it is useless to offer advanced work 
unless there are students prepared to take it. In general, such 
work is only open to those who have already completed the 
regular course or what is deemed equivalent in other institutions. 
Fellowships are needed to stimulate advanced work and to 
induce able men to come to Yale and continue along some 
particular line in forestry. 

With the expanded work of the school it is possible that the 
best interests of the profession can be served by opening certain 
courses to men with woods experience who are not college or 
university graduates, but who desire to enter the School as 
special students in order to secure instruction along some 
particular line. 



32 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

The Treasurer's reports for the past twelve years show the 
yearly income from tuition and from endowment to be as 
follows : 

Income from Income from 

Tuition Endowment 

1900 $ 861.52 

1901 $ 1,240.00 6,666.80 

1902 3,373-^4 7,351.05 

1903 4,585-32 7.224.71 

1904 6,859.51 8,902.42 

1905 5,99750 8,568.95 

1906 6,026.34 7,951.66 

1907 6,469.34 9.507-89 

1908 7,269.41 10,057.62 

1909 8,085.24 10,811.47 

1910 1 1,681.39 12,280.22 

1911 1 1,720.50 17,701.74 

1912 -. 7,765.76 20,706.40 

From this table it appears that the increase in annual income 
is from both tuition and endowment. With our student body 
approximately the same in numbers as now, our present endow- 
ment will carry the work of the School as now conducted and 
provide for minor extensions, particularly in the direction of 
publications. It will not, however, entirely provide for neces- 
sary increases in the salaries of the younger members of the 
Faculty which must be met in the immediate future, or for the 
extension of the curriculum and the advancement of the School 
along the various lines already begun or that have been 
suggested. 

With the smaller classes of the past two years Marsh Hall 
as now arranged provides sufficient space for necessary lecture 
rooms, but laboratory facilities are insufficient, the library is 
overcrowded and there is no space for the display of collections. 

The work accomplished by the School is expressed in the 
biographical records of her alumni which appear in this volume. 
These records clearly show to what extent Yale men are 
identified with and are responsible for the development of 
forestry in America. 



BIOGRAPHIES 



BIOGRAPHIES 



CLASS OF 1902 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

Alfred Akerman 

Athens, Ga.f 

Alfred Akerman was born July 3, 1876, in Cartersville, Ga., the son 
of Amos Tappan Akerman, district attorney and attorney general of the 
United States, and Martha Rebecca (Galloway) Akerman. He is the 
grandson on his father's side of Benjamin Akerman and Olive (Melvin) 
Akerman, and on his mother's side of Samuel Galloway and Elizabeth 
(Scudder) Galloway. He has six brothers: Benjamin Akerman, Walter 
Akerman, Alexander Akerman, Joseph Akerman, B.A. Franklin College, 
University of Georgia '94, and M.D. Johns Hopkins '00, Charles Aker- 
man, B.A. Franklin College, University of Georgia, and B.L. University 
of Georgia, and Clement Akerman, B.A. Franklin College, University 
of Georgia. 

He was prepared at Cartersville High School and received the degree 
of B.A. from Franklin College, University of Georgia, in 1898. Before 
entering the Yale Forest School he studied at Berlin and Tuebingen. 
He was employed at different times as a reporter, a bank clerk and clerk 
for a lumber concern. 

He was married October 15, 1902, in New Haven, Conn., to Miss 
Adeline Sophia Brown of New Haven, Conn., daughter of John Hallock 
Brown and Sophia (Price) Brown. They have three daughters: Cath- 
erine Akerman, born August 6, 1903, in New Haven, Conn. ; Ruth 
Akerman, born January 24, 1905, in Cambridge, Mass. ; Elf reda Aker- 
man, born February i, 1907, in Athens, Ga., and two sons : Robert 
Akerman, born November 25, 1908, in Athens, Ga., and Nigel Akerman, 
born October 29, 1910, in Athens, Ga. 

Akerman is professor of forestry at the University of Georgia. 
After graduating from the Yale Forest School, he held the 
positions successively of instructor at the Yale Forest School, 
forest assistant in the United States Forest Service, state forester 
of Connecticut, and state forester of Massachusetts. He has 
occupied his present position since July i, 1906. 



t The best permanent addresses are indicated by italics. 



36 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He is a Presbyterian. In politics he is affiliated with the 
Democratic party. He served at one time in the state militia 
and is a member of the Society of American Foresters. He 
traveled in Germany in 1902. 

He has published Bulletins i, 2, j and 5, Mass. Forester's 
Office, and several articles in Forest, Fish and Game. 



Charles S. Chapman 

Business address, ^19 Yeon Building, Portland, Ore. 
Residence, Alexandra Court, Portland, Ore. 

Charles Sidney Chapman was born April 2, 1880, in Westbrook, Conn., 
the son of Charles H. Chapman and Helen (Chalker) Chapman. His 
father served as an officer in the navy during the Civil War, and in the 
latter years of his life w^as engaged in farming. He has two sisters : 
Estella and Mary Chapman. 

He was prepared in the public schools in Westbrook, Conn., and in 
1898 was graduated with the degree of B.Agr. from Storrs (now Connect- 
icut) Agricultural College. 

He is unmarried. 

Chapman is secretary and manager of the Oregon Forest Fire 
Association with headquarters at Portland, Ore. He was forest 
assistant in the United States Forest Service from 1902 to 1905 ; 
forester for the E. P. Burton Lumber Company at Charleston, 
S. C, from 1905 to 1907; inspector of timber sales in the Forest 
Service in 1907-08; chief of the office of organization and 
assistant forester, operation, in 1908-09; forester, District 6, 
Washington, Oregon and Alaska in 1909-10. 

In politics Chapman is independent. He served as sergeant 
of the Third Connecticut Volunteer Infantry in the Spanish- 
American War, but was not sent out of the United States. He 
is a member of the Portland Press Club, the Portland Com- 
mercial Club, the Oregon Conservation Association, Society of 
American Foresters and the Masonic Order. 



He has written : Working plan for forest lands in Berkeley County, 
S. C., Bull. U. S. Forest Service ; numerous articles in Portland, Ore., 
papers for Sunday editions and in trade journals. He has delivered 
many addresses on forest subjects. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1902 37 

Alfred K. Chittenden 

Business address. Engineering Experiment Station, Urbana, III. 
Residence, Champaign, 111. 

Alfred Knight Chittenden was born October 28, 1879, in New Haven, 
Conn., the son of Professor Russell Henry Chittenden, Ph.D., Sc.D., 
LL.D., Yale '75 S., director of the Sheffield Scientific School, and Ger- 
trude Louise (Baldwin) Chittenden. He has two sisters, Edith Russell 
Chittenden, B.A. Smith '99, and Lilla Millard (Chittenden) Barbour, 
wife of Henry Gray Barbour, B.A. Trinity '06, M.D. Johns Hopkins 
'10, who was appointed assistant professor of pharmacology in the Yale 
Medical School in 1912. 

He was prepared at the Hopkins Grammar School of New Haven 
and graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School in 1900. In the 
Scientific School he took the Civil Engineer Course, received general 
scholastic honors, and was a member of the scholarship society, Sigma 
Xi. 

He was married February 11, 1908, in Washington, D. C, to Miss 
Lulu W. Brower of Washington. 

Chittenden is director of the engineering' experiment station 
and lecturer on timber and timber resources at the College of 
Engineering of the University of Illinois. After graduation 
from the Forest School he went abroad for seven months to 
study forest conditions in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, 
France and England. On returning to the United States he 
entered the United States Forest Service and has since worked 
in nearly every state in the Union, serving successively as forest 
assistant, chief of the section of cooperation, assistant district 
forester and forest inspector. For a year, in 1907, he was in 
private business in Baltimore, doing consulting forestry work 
under the firm name of Chittenden & Patterson. On September 
20, 191 1, he was appointed forester in the United States Indian 
Service with headquarters in Washington, D. C. This position 
he held until receiving his present appointment. 

He writes : "The Indian Service has a well developed Forest 
Service which is handling all timber matters on the Indian 
Reservations. There are thirty-one saw mills on the reserva- 
tions operated for the benefit of the Indians by the Government. 
These mills vary in size from small portable mills to the large 
mill, with a daily capacity of over 200,000 feet, on the Menominee 
Indian Reservation in Wisconsin. 



38 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

"The total area of Indian timber lands is roughly estimated at 
6,500,000 acres, containing- approximately 38,000,000,000 feet of 
timber, and valued at over $84,000,000. In order to protect and 
properly administer these resources a considerable force of men 
is employed, consisting of forest guards, rangers, scalers, lum- 
bermen and technically trained foresters. The work is in many 
respects similar to that of the Forest Service, except that no 
purely investigative work is carried on and that where it seems 
advisable timber is logged, handled and manufactured by the 
Service, the lumber being sold or disposed of for the benefit of 
the Indians. A considerable amount of permanent improvement 
work is being carried on, roads, trails, telephone lines, cabins, 
corrals and fences being constructed. The Indian timber lands, 
unlike the National Forests, were not set aside for protective 
purposes, but for the use and benefit of the Indians. Much of 
the timber is located on good agricultural soil, some of which 
is allotted. In such cases clear cutting is practised, all the timber 
being cut and removed, and the Indians encouraged to farm 
this land. On the really forest soil, however, forestry methods 
are followed in logging." 

He has published : Forest conditions in Northern New 
Hampshire, Bull. 55, U. S. Forest Service; The red gum, Bull. 
58, U. S. Forest Service. 



George E. Clement 

275 Warren Street, Boston, Mass. 

George Edwards Clement was born April 21, 1877, in Vienna, Austria, 
the son of George W. Clement. 

He received the degree of BA. from Harvard University in 1900. 
He is unmarried. 

Clement is at present engaged in a study of the gypsy moth 
situation in New England, with particular reference to pre- 
venting its spread by silvicultural measures. This study is in 
cooperation between the Forest Service and the Bureau of 
Entomology. Besides his work in the Service he has been 
employed as forester for the Great Northern Paper Company 
and for Fisher & Bryant, consulting foresters. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1902 



C. Temple Emmet 

Stony Brook, Long Island, N. Y. 

Christopher Temple Emmet was born July 8, 1868, in Pelham, N. Y., 
the son of William Jenkins Emmet and Julia Colt (Pierson) Emmet. 
He is the grandson on his father's side of Robert Emmet and Rosina 
(Hubley) Emmet, and on his mother's side of Josiah G. Pierson and 
Julia (Colt) Pierson. He has four brothers: Robert Temple Emmet, 
a graduate of West Point; William LeRoy Emmet, a graduate of Annap- 
olis ; Devereux Emmet, B.A. Columbia '83 and LL.B. '85, and Richard 
Stockton Emmet ; and three sisters : Rosina Emmet, Lydia Field Emmet 
and Jane Erin Emmet. 

He was prepared at Bishops College School, Lennoxville, Quebec, 
Canada, and at the Stevens High School, and in 1891 graduated with the 
degree of M.E. from Stevens Institute of Technology. 

He was married October 27, 1896, in Red Hook, N. Y., to Miss Alida 
Chanler, daughter of John Winthrop Chanler and Margaret (Astor) 
Chanler. They have four daughters : Elizabeth Winthrop Emmet, born 
September 8, 1897, in Newport, R. I. ; Margaret Chanler Emmet, born April 
10, 1899, in New York City; Hester Alida Emmet, born December 5, 
1901, in New Haven, Conn., and Jane Erin Emmet, born May 16, 1908, 
in Freiburg, Baden, Germany; and three sons: Christopher Temple 
Emmet, Jr., born March 18, 1900, in Port Chester, N. Y. ; Winthrop 
Stuyvesant Emmet, born September 4, 1910, in Freiburg, Baden, Germany, 
and William Patten Emmet, born July 26, 191 1, in Freiburg, Baden, 
Germany. Another son, Egerton Chanler Emmet, was born March 9, 
1907, in Stony Brook, N. Y., and died December 18, 1907. 

Emmet is engaged in farming at Stony Brook, Long Island. 

He is an Episcopalian, and a member of the following socie- 
ties : Academy of Sciences ; American Geographical Society ; 
National Geographic Society; New York Zoological Society; 
American Museum of Natural History; American Forestry 
Association; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Audubon Society; 
Knickerbocker Club ; Racquet and Tennis Club and St. Anthony 
Club of New York; Tobique Salmon Club and Ore Hill 
Shooting Club. 

William C. Hodge, Jr. 

Business address. Forest Service, San Francisco, Calif. 
Residence, 3240 Pacific Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 

William Churchill Hodge, Jr., was bom October 24 1877, in Buffalo, 
N. Y., the son of William Churchill Hodge and Helen Maria (Hopkins) 



40 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Hodge. He is the grandson on his father's side of William Hodge of 
Buffalo, N. Y., son of William Hodge of Buffalo, N. Y., son of Benjamin 
Hodge of Connecticut. On his mother's side he is the grandson of Nelson 
K. Hopkins of Buffalo, N. Y. He has two brothers : Harold Hodge 
and Sheldon Hodge. 

He was prepared at the Buffalo High School and at Phillips Andover 
Academy, and received the degree of B.A. at Yale in 1899. He was a 
member of Psi Upsilon. 

He is unmarried. 

After graduation from the Forest School Hodge entered the 
United States Forest Service, remaining until 1908, when he 
became deputy state forester of California. In 1910 he reen- 
tered the Government Service and after some time in the office 
of silviculture, where he made an exhaustive study of methods 
of reconnaissance now in use in District 5, is now inspector of 
fire plans under operation, with headquarters in San Francisco. 

He is Progressive in politics and is a member of the Society 
of American Foresters, the Century Club of Washington, D. C, 
and the University Club of San Francisco. 



Ralph S. Hosmer 

Business address. Box 207, Honolulu, Hawaii 
Residence, 1054 King Street, Honolulu, Hawaii 

Ralph S[heldon] Hosmer was born March 4, 1874, in Deerfield. Mass., 
the son of Rev. George Herbert Hosmer and Julia West (Sheldon) 
Hosmer. His father was minister of the Unitarian parishes of Deer- 
field, Bridgewater, Salem and Dorchester, Mass., president of the Uni- 
tarian Temperance Society and a member and officer in various educa- 
tional and charitable organizations. He is a descendant of James 
Hosmer, one of the first settlers of Concord, Mass.. and the grandson 
on his father's side of Rev. G. Washington Hosmer, D.D., and Hannah 
Poor (Kendall) Hosmer. His mother was the third daughter of William 
Sheldon and Catharine (Williams) Sheldon of Deerfield, Mass. 

He studied at the Boston Latin School for two years and with private 
tutors, and from 1891 to 1895 attended the Bussey Institution and Law- 
rence Scientific School of Harvard University. In 1894 he received 
the degree of B.A.S. from Harvard. 

He is unmarried. 

Froin May, 1896, to November, 1898, Hosmer was assistant 
in the division of soils, United States Department of Agriculture, 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1902 41 

Washington, D. C. He was chief of the section of forest replace- 
ment, Bureau of Forestry in 1903, and since December, 1903, 
has been collaborator of the Bureau of Forestry and Forest 
Service and superintendent of forestry in the territory of Hawaii 
under the Board of Commissioners of Agriculture and Forestry. 
His course in the Forest School at Yale was taken during a 
furlough, and at this time he also gave a course in forest 
mensuration at the Forest School. He was first treasurer of 
the Society of American Foresters from 1901 to 1903, a delegate 
from Hawaii to the Conference of the Governors in May, 1908, 
and a delegate from Hawaii and speaker at the Seventeenth 
National Irrigation Congress at Spokane and at the First Con- 
servation Congress at Seattle in 1909. He has been a member 
of the Chemical Territorial Conservation Commission of Hawaii 
since 1908 and vice president of the Board of Regents, College 
of Hawaii, since 1907. 

Concerning his various experiences, Hosmer writes : "Summer 
of 1902 was spent in Maine, in charge of a party working near 
Moosehead Lake on study of spruce on cut-over land, carried 
on jointly by the Bureau of Forestry and the State of Maine. 
In the summer season of 1903 I went on an inspection trip to 
New England regarding work on white pine, in section of 
forest replacement, and from July to November i, I was in 
Southern California in charge in that part of the state of coop- 
erative forest investigation carried on by the Bureau of Forestry 
and the State of California. Since January, 1904, I have been 
in Hawaii ; organized the division of forestry in the Board of 
Agriculture and Forestry ; established forest reserve system ; 
systematized forest fire service ; conducted campaign of educa- 
tion in forestry and conservation ; and pursued policy of advice 
and assistance to private owners, particularly in tree planting; 
also, as far as limited funds permitted, have carried on experi- 
mental work in the introduction into and trial in Hawaii of trees 
of economic importance new to the islands. Outside of my 
regular work I have been interested in the establishment of the 
College of Hawaii, the local college of agriculture and mechanic 
arts, of which I have been a regent since its inception ; and in 
various phases of city improvement work. My chief avocations 
are in connection with affairs of the Harvard Club of Hawaii 



42 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

and the local University Club. I have been much interested, 
and have helped as I could, in the establishment of the Vol- 
canological Observatory at Kilauea, and in the extension to 
Hawaii of several branches of government scientific work 
carried on by various bureaus and departments. In 1906 I made 
a three months' trip to the Eastern states, during which I read 
a paper, subsequently published in its Proceedings, before the 
Society of American Foresters. In 1908 I was again in the 
East, at the time of the Conference of the Governors, and in 
1909 on the Pacific Coast, for the meetings of Spokane and 
Seattle." 

Hosmer is a member of the Unitarian church. In politics 
he is an "independent Republican, with strong leanings toward 
Progressiveism." He is a member of the following associations: 
Society of American Foresters ; Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, 
Canadian, Minnesota and American Forestry associations; 
National Conservation Association ; Biological Society, Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; Hawaiian Historical Society ; Social Science 
Society of Honolulu ; University Club, Honolulu ; Harvard 
Club of Hawaii (secretary) ; Harvard Club of Washington 
and several Alumni associations, including the Yale Club of 
Hawaii. 

He has published : (With E. S. Bruce) A forest working plan for 
township 40, New York State Forest Preserve, Bull. 30, Div. of For., 1901 ; 
(With E. S. Bruce) A forest working plan for townships 5, 6 and 41, 
Rep. of For., Fish and Game Com. of N. Y., 1903; A study of spruce, 
on cut-over land, 4th Rep. For. Com. of Maine, 1902; Reports of the 
Division of Forestry, Ann. Reps. Bd. Corns, of Agric. and For., Hawaii, 
1904-10; Report as chairman of Conservation Commission of Hawaii, 
Ann. Rep. Div. For., 1908; various articles on forestry and conservation 
in Hawaiian Forester and Agriculturist, Honolulu, 1904-12; illustrated 
article in American Conservation, August, 191 1, addresses before Society 
of American Foresters, 1906, National Irrigation Congress, 1909, Forest 
Conservation Congress, 1900, published in Proceedings of those associ- 
ations. 

Roy L. Marston 

Skowhegan, Maine 

Roy Leon Marston was born September 10, 1877, in Skowhegan, Maine, 
the son of Charles A. Marston, a representative and senator, and 
Sarah (Steward) Marston. On his father's side he is of Scotch, and 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1902 43 

on his mother's of English descent. His father's ancestors have been 
lumbermen for four generations. He has two sisters: Lola (Marston) 
Blunt, a graduate of Mills College, Calif., and Mary (Marston) Stewart, 
a graduate of Mrs. Smallwood's School ; and two brothers : Coburn S. 
Marston, a graduate of Annapolis, and Clair R. Marston, a graduate 
of the Tome School for Boys, Fort Deposit, Md. 

He was prepared at Bloomfield Academy and the Skowhegan High 
School and received the degree of B.A. from Bowdoin College in 1899. 
He was in the lumber business for five years before entering the Yale 
Forest School. 

He was married November 29, 1904 in New Haven, Conn., to Miss 
Julie Parmelee of New Haven, Conn., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
S. Parmelee. They have no children. 

Marston has been treasurer and manager of the Coburn Heirs, 
Inc., since December 26, 1910. He taught at the Yale Forest 
School until April, 1906. He then became forester to the United 
States Military Academy. He was later made a member of the 
academic staff of the United States Military Academy and from 
1905 to 1910 was a consulting forester. He was a member of 
the Tariff Board from 1910 to 1912. 

He writes : "Have worked professionally in New York, New 
Hampshire, Vermont, Florida, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, 
Oregon, Washington, California, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, 
Maine, Canada, Mexico, Korea and China in my private practice. 
Have had charge of all the work on the forest reservation of 
the United States Military Academy since 1902, in addition to 
some teaching, lecturing, landscape work and water supply work 
for the Academy. Made a trip to Hawaii, China, Japan and 
Korea for professional work in 1908. Had charge of the inves- 
tigation of the pulp industry, and the survey of available pulp 
material for the Tariff Board. Made a topographical map and 
working plan for 225,000 acres belonging to the estate of A. 
and P. Coburn in Maine, and thereupon organized Coburn 
Heirs, Inc., of which I am now manager. Have lectured on 
forestry subjects before Bowdoin College, University of Maine 
and various other organizations." 

In politics Marston is a Republican. He was a delegate to 
the Republican State Convention in 1908, 1910 and 1912, and 
Republican candidate for representative to the Legislature in 
1912. He is a Mason, a member of the Loyal Order of Moose, 



44 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

the Society of American Foresters, the American Association 
of Science, the Milburn Club, the Graduates Club of New 
Haven, University Club of Boston, West Point Army Mess, the 
Grange and Patrons of Husbandry. 



George H. Myers 

Business address, 1509, 38 West Thirty-second Street, New York City 

Residence (Summer), Union, via R. D., Stafford Springs, Conn. 

Residence (Winter), 2339 Massachusetts Avenue, Washington, D. C 

George Hewitt Myers was born September 10, 1875, in Cleveland, Ohio, 
the son of John J. Myers, first president of the Vermont Marble Com- 
pany (died in 1883, from injuries received in a runaway at Washington, 
D. 0, and Mary Butterfield Ware (Hewitt) Myers. He has one sister, 
Helen (Myers) Buchanan, wife of James A. Buchanan, and one brother, 
John Ripley Myers, B.A. Hamilton '87. On his father's side he is of 
German, and on his mother's of Colonial descent. 

He was prepared at the Hill School, Pottstown, Pa., and in 1898 was 
graduated from Yale College, where he received a second colloquy Senior 
appointment. 

He was married April 21, 1908, in Fall River, Mass., to Miss Louise 
Stoddard Chase of Fall River, daughter of Simeon Borden Chase, cotton 
manufacturer and banker, and Louise Whitman (Hills) Chase. They 
have one child, Persis Chase Myers, born February 16, 1909, at South 
Lancaster, Mass. 

Myers has given more and more attention to business since 
leaving the Yale Forest School but continues to be slightly in 
touch with forestry through buying land in Connecticut and 
an interest in lumbering in the State of Washington. 

In 1898-99 he studied botany and English at the Harvard 
Graduate School, and then traveled for a year, having his 
headquarters at Washington, D. C. During the three years 
following graduation from the Forest School, he was engaged 
in the United States Forest Service, also traveling extensively 
for the study of forests. 

He was a member of the Graduate Advisory Board of the 
Yale Forest School, where he has given lectures on foreign 
forestry. He has traveled widely, as follows: 1896, western 
Europe; 1900, Porto Rico and Cuba; 1902, western United 
States; 1903, France, Germany, Austria and Switzerland; 1905, 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1902 45 

visited forests of India, Philippines, and Japan, with Professor 
Graves of Yale ; 1908, Alaska ; also, the Pacific coast about 
once a year, mostly on business. 

He is a "Progressive, non-Rooseveltian Republican," and is 
a member of the Metropolitan, Riding and Hunt, and Chevy 
Chase clubs of Washington, D. C. 



46 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



CLASS OF 1903 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

John B. Anderson 

Black Mountain, N. C. 

John Bullions Anderson was born November 19, 1874, in Martin, Mich., the 
son of John Anderson, a minister of the Presbyterian church, and Mary B. 
(Gray) Anderson. On his father's side he is of Scotch-Irish, and on 
his mother's of English-Scotch ancestry. He has two sisters : Mrs. 
F. S. Goodman and Grace E. Anderson, who studied at Smith College, 
and two brothers : Harry G. Anderson, M.D. College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, Columbia University, '89, and Charles G. Anderson. 

He received the degree of Ph.B. at Union College in 1896. 

He was married February 3, 1904, in Albany, N. Y., to Miss Clara N. 
MacRoberts of Albany, N. Y., daughter of Robert MacRoberts and 
Emma (Hill) MacRoberts. They have one son, Robert B. Anderson, 
born May 29, 1910, in Black Mountain, N. C, and one daughter, Grace 
E. Anderson, born March 15, 1912, in Black Mountain, N. C. Another 
daughter, Mary B. Anderson, born October 31, 1904, in Albany, N. Y., 
died October 30, 1907. 

Anderson has been located for the last few years at Black 
Mountain, N. C, as manager of a sawmill and cannery. He 
is a Presbyterian, and in politics a Republican. 



Edward A. Braniff 

Business address, 616-618 R. A. Long Building, Kansas City, Mo. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Edward Andrew Braniff was born May 4, 1876, in Houtzdale, Pa., the 
son of John A. Braniff and Mary Catherine (Baker) Braniff. On his 
father's side he is of English, Irish and German, and on his mother's 
of German ancestry. He has three brothers : Thomas E. Braniff, Paul 
Revere Braniff and Philip Braniff, and two sisters: Madeline Braniff 
and Mrs. H. G. Russell. 

He was prepared at the Central High School, Kansas City, Mo., and 
before entering the Yale Forest School, was a newspaper writer for the 
Kansas City Star. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1903 47 

He was married July 10, 1905, in New Haven, Conn., to Miss Elizabeth 
Conboy of New Haven, Conn., daughter of John Conboy. They have 
one daughter, Lisa Braniff, born July 20, 1906. 

Braniff is manager of the department for Western Missouri, 
Oklahoma and Kansas, for the Fidelity & Deposit Company of 
Maryland, dealers in casualty insurance and surety bonds. He 
was previously engaged as manager of the bond department 
of Merrell & Braniff, a surety bond and liability insurance 
company. 

He is a member of the Roman Catholic church and in politics 
is a Progressive. 

George L. Clothier 

Business address. State College of Washington, Pullman, Wash. 
Home address, Paxico, Kans. 

George Lemon Clothier was born June 30, 1863, in Walkersville, W. 
Va., the son of Henderson Hall Qothier and Jane (Clark) Clothier. 
His grandfather, Samuel Clothier, was English and his grandmother, 
whose maiden name was Crawford, was Scotch. The Clothier family 
were strong advocates of the Union during the Civil War, and several 
served in the Union army. On his mother's side he is of German and 
English descent, his grandfather being George Bogarth Clark and his 
grandmother Matilda (Stone) Clark. The Clarks were also strong sup- 
porters of the Union during the Civil War. He has one sister, Mary 
Elizabeth (Clothier) Martin, M.D. ; and three brothers: Samuel H. 
Clothier, M.D., Robert W. Clothier, M.S., and Nathan S. Clothier, D.D.S. 

He received the degree of B.S. from the Kansas State Agricultural 
College in 1892. For seven winters before this he had taught in the 
country schools and had helped on his father's farm. He was a post- 
graduate student and assistant in botany at the Kansas State Agricultural 
College from 1895 to 1899, when he received the degree of M.S. He 
was a member of the Alpha Beta Literary Society and of the Alma 
Kansas Students' Cooperative Association. 

He was married August 14, 1906, in Westmoreland County, Va., to 
Miss Nellie Antoinette Ames of Westmoreland County, Va., daughter 
of N. T. Ames and Mary F. (Peck) Ames. His wife's mother was 
daughter of Professor Peck of Oberlin College, who was appointed 
minister to the Republic of Haiti by President Lincoln. They have one 
son, George L. Clothier, Jr., born November 16, 1912. 

Clothier was employed in the United States Forest Service 
from July, 1900, to August, 1905. He spent the years 1905 



48 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

to 191 1 working- in the Forest Service and teaching at the 
Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College. Here he was 
assistant in the horticultural department and later became pro- 
fessor of botany and forestry. In September, 191 1, he was 
appointed professor of forestry at the State College of Wash- 
ington, Pullman, Wash., which position he now holds. 

He writes: "The chief business event of my life since leav- 
ing Yale was the purchase of a thousand-acre farm in Kansas 
in 1905. With but $80 cash in my pocket I obligated myself 
to pay $13,000 in seven years' time at six and a half per cent, 
interest. I always have had the greatest possible faith in agri- 
cultural land as a safe investment, particularly in a country with 
such agricultural resources as Kansas. Before my mortgage 
fell due, I was able to pay it off in full, by selling land at an 
advance in price and by saving from my salary. To-day I own 
1,053 acres of Kansas land free from debt, worth at the lowest 
market price $35,000. I would not part with the land for 
$50,000. Faith in Kansas and 'nerve' have enabled me to be 
the owner of one of the finest stock farms in the United States, 
where I propose to spend my declining years practicing 'farm 
forestry,' plant breeding and stock raising. I hope to teach 
a few years longer, then retire to my farm to practice what I 
have taught." 

Clothier is a member of the Presbyterian church. Of his 
political ideas he writes : "Was a Republican till high tariff 
and legislation promoting trusts drove me first to the Democratic 
party, then to the People's party, then again to the Democratic 
party under Bryan, and now to the Progressive party under 
Roosevelt." He was elected to the office of superintendent 
of public instruction in Wabaun, Kans., by the Populists and 
Democrats in 1892. He is a member of the American Breeders' 
Association, the American Forestry Association, the National 
Geographic Society and of the Gesang and Turn Verein. 

He has written many articles for the Kansas hidiistrialist, Kansas 
Farmer, Bulletins of the Kansas Experiment Station, Bulletins and Circu- 
lars of the Forest Service, Proceedings of the Society of American 
Foresters^ American Forestry Magazine, Bulletins of the Mississippi 
Experiment Station, American Breeders' Magazine, etc. 



^ GRADUATES CLASS OF 1903 49 

Albert W. Cooper 

Business address, 605-607 Columbia Building, Spokane, Wash. 

Residence, 1418 South Maple Street, Spokane, Wash. 

4 Akron Street, Boston, Mass. 

Albert Williams Cooper was born March 10, 1879, in Denver, Colo., 
the son of Albert Cooper (deceased), a director and officer in a number 
of business corporations, and Charlotte Eliza (Williams) Cooper. He 
is the grandson on his father's side of Henry Cooper and Sarah (Talpey) 
Cooper, and on his mother's side of Rev. Milton T. Williams and 
Charlotte (Henderson) Williams. He has one brother, Edgar Bailey 
Cooper, B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology '05, and one sister, 
Gertrude May (Cooper) Dean, B.A. Smith College '06. 

He was prepared at the Roxbury Latin School and in 1901 received the 
degree of B.A. at Harvard, where he was a rnember of Theta Delta Chi. 

He was married June 25, 1908, in Boston, Mass., to Miss Gertrude Ellen 
Homans of Boston, Mass., daughter of George Homans and Elizabeth A. 
Homans. 

After graduation from the Yale Forest School, Cooper held 
various positions in the United States Forest Service, being 
engaged on working plans in Minnesota and Texas, and on 
commercial plans in California. He was at one time super- 
intendent of woodlands for the Delaware & Hudson Railroad 
Company, and later chief of silviculture, District i, in the 
Service. Since January i, 1910, he has been secretary of the 
Western Pine Manufacturers Association of Spokane, Wash. 

Cooper is a Unitarian. He is a member of the Inland Club 
and University Club of Spokane and the Century Club of 
Washington, D. C. 

He has published : Sugar and yellow pine in California, Bull. 
U. S. Forest Service; A plan for fire protection at McCloud, 
Calif., Circ. U. S. Forest Service. 

Richard T. Fisher 

Business address, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 
Residence, Petersham, Mass. 

Richard Thornton Fisher was born November 9, 1876, in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., the son of Edward Thornton Fisher, B.A. Harvard '56 and M.A. 
'68, and Ellen Bowditch (Thayer) Fisher. His father, the son of George 
Fisher, a lawyer and president of the North Western Fire and Marine 

4 



50 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Insurance Company of Oswego, N. Y., and Elizabeth Phelps (Huntington) 
Fisher, served in the Civil War from 1861 to 1863 and since then has 
been a teacher. His mother's parents were William Henry Thayer, M.D., 
and Ellen (Handerson) Thayer. He has two sisters: Faith H. Fisher 
and Eleanor Fisher, B.A. Smith College '11. 

He was prepared at the Harvard School, Chicago, 111., and received 
the degree of B.A. at Harvard in 1898. 

He is unmarried. 

Fisher is assistant professor of forestry at Harvard Univer- 
sity. In the summer of 1898, after graduating from Harvard, 
he acted as field agent of the United States Biological Survey, 
and during the year 1898-99 he was assistant in English at 
Harvard College. From 1899 to 1903 he was employed in the 
United States Forest Service, first as student assistant, then as 
agent and finally as field assistant. Upon graduation from the 
Yale Forest School he became instructor in forestry at Harvard, 
which position he held until 1906, when he was made assistant 
professor. Since 1907 he has also been a member of the firm of 
Fisher, Cory & Bryant, now Fisher, Olmsted & Bryant, 
consulting foresters, of Boston, Mass. 

He is a Unitarian. He is a member of the Society of 
American Foresters and of the Farmers' Grange. 

He has published : The redwoods. Bull. U. S. Forest Service ; 
(With H. S. Graves) The woodlot. Bull. U. S. Forest Service. 



*Wesley J. Gardner 

Died 1906 

Wesley Johnson Gardner was born January 30, 1877, in Plainfield, N. J., 
the son of Insley Boice Gardner (died May 30, 1897) and Anna Elizabeth 
(Bellis) Gardner. He was the grandson on his father's side of Alvah 
Gardner, who was of English ancestry, and Sarah (Mott) Boice, and 
on his mother's side of John L. Bellis and Sarah Maria (Dilts) Bellis. 
He had four sisters : Mabel Washington Gardner and Nellie Dunn Gard- 
ner (both deceased), and Mary Craig Gardner and Evelyn Dunn Gardner, 
B.A. Bryn Mawr '08. 

He was prepared at the Helena High School, Helena, Mont., and with 
private tutors, and in 1900 received the degree of B.A. cum laude at 
Harvard and was awarded honorable mention in philosophy. 

He was unmarried. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1903 51 

After graduation from the Forest School, Gardner entered 
the United States Forest Service as forest assistant, which posi- 
tion he held from 1903 to 1906. His work was directed chiefly 
along the line of reforestation in the national forest reserves 
in California, Idaho, Montana, Colorado and Oklahoma. 

He was a member of the First Congregational Church of 
Helena, Mont., and of the Society of American Foresters. 

He died of an abscess at the Episcopal Eye, Ear and Throat 
Hospital in Washington, D. C, June 15, 1906, and was buried 
in that city. 

He had published : Results of a Rocky Mountain forest fire 
studied fifty years after its occurrence (Address before the 
Society of American Foresters, April 28, 1904), Proc. Soc. Am. 
Foresters, I, 102, Nov., 1905. 

Austin F. Hawes 

Experiment Station, Burlington, Vt. 
Residence, 43 South Prospect Street, Burlington, Vt. 

Austin Foster Hawes was born March 17, 1879, in Danvers, Mass., 
the son of Frank M. Hawes, son of Mather Hawes and Laura (Bond) 
Hawes, and Harriet (Foster) Hawes, daughter of Austin F. Foster and 
Sarah H. (Oilman) Foster. He has one brother, Richard Withington 
Hawes, Yale '08, and one sister, Sally G. Hawes. 

He was prepared at the Somerville Latin School and received the degree 
of B.A. at Tufts College in 1901. 

He was married June 27, 1908, in Windsor, Conn., to Miss Alice Clapp 
of Windsor, Conn., daughter of Roswell Clapp and Ida (Pierce) Clapp. 

Hawes was employed in the United States Forest Service 
during the summers of 1900, 1901 and 1902. In 1903-04 he 
held the position of forest assistant, and was state forester of 
Connecticut from 1904 to 1909. On April i, 1909, he was 
appointed state forester of Vermont and professor of forestry 
at the University of Vermont. 

In politics Hawes is a Progressive. He is a member of the 
Society of American Foresters, of the Association of Eastern 
Foresters and of the Ethan Allen Club, Burlington, Vt. 

He has published: (With R. C. Hawley) Forestry in New 
England, N. Y., Wiley & Sons, 1912, 8vo, XV + 479 pp., 14 
figs., 2 maps. 



52 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Wallace I. Hutchinson 

Business address, 519 Majestic Building, Denver, Colo. 

Residence, 1715 East Colfax Avenue, Denver, Colo. 

United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

Wallace Irving Hutchinson was born January 30, i88r, in Wolfville, 
Nova Scotia, Canada, the son of John Robert Hutchinson and Charlotte 
Hutchinson. On his father's side he is of English, and on his mother's 
of Scotch descent. 

He was prepared at Horton Collegiate Academy, Wolfville, and in 
1901 received the degree of B.A. from Acadia University, Wolfville, 
Nova Scotia. 

He was married April 12, 191 1, in Denver, Colo., to Miss Leila Collom 
of Denver, Colo., daughter of Martin H. Collom and Augusta L. Collom. 

Hutchinson entered the United States Forest Service July i, 
1901. Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School in 1903 
he was appointed forest agent, which position he held until 
1905, serving in California, Nebraska, North Carolina, New 
Jersey and Pennsylvania. During that year he was forest 
assistant in the Service, and from then until 1909 he held the 
position of forester in the Philippine Bureau of Forestry in 
charge of the southern administrative district, which embraces 
the island of Mindanao and Jolo Archipelago. During 1909 he 
studied forest management, extension, etc., in the Federated 
Malay States, Burma, India, Ceylon, France, Austria-Hungary 
and Germany. In September, 1909, he received his present 
appointment of forest assistant in the Pike National Forest, 
Colorado. 

He is a member of the Baptist church. He is a Republican 
and a member of the Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo. 

He has published : A Philippine substitute for lignum vitae, 
Bull, p, Bur. For., Manila, P. I., 1908. 



Elers Koch 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Missoula, Mont. 
Residence, 420 Beckwith Avenue, Missoula, Mont. 

Elers Koch was born December 12, 1880, in Bozeman, Mont., the son 
of H^ins Peter Gyllemburg Koch and Laurentze Koch, daughter of 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1903 53 

Christian Koch. His grandfather was Hans Peter Gyllemburg Koch of 
Denmark, a descendant of a long line of ministers of Kirkeburg, Denmark. 
He has one brother, Stanley Koch, a graduate of West Point and 
lieutenant in the United States Army, and two sisters : Martha and 
Lucie Koch. 

He was prepared at the Bozeman High School. During the summer 
of 1899 he served as student assistant in the United States Forest Service 
in the state of Washington and in 1901 received the degree of B.S. from 
the Montana State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 

He was married December 27, 1906, in Bozeman, Mont., to Miss Gerda 
Heiberg-Jiirgensen of Copenhagen, Denmark, daughter of Rasmus Emil 
Heiberg-Jiirgensen and Ingeborg Marie (Biering) Heiberg-Jiirgensen. 

Koch has been employed in the United States Forest Service 
since graduation from the Yale Forest School. In 1903-04 he 
was forest assistant, doing boundary work in California, Mon- 
tana and Wyoming. He was forest inspector in Montana and 
Wyoming in 1905-06, and since January i, 1907, has been 
supervisor of Lolo National Forest, Missoula, Mont. 

He is a member of the Society of American Foresters. 



Francis G. Miller 

Business address, Wenatchee, Wash. 
Home address, Seattle, Wash. 

Francis Garner Miller was born June 2, 1866, in Lanark, 111., the son 
of Isaiah Miller and Isabella Jane (Moffett) Miller. 

He received the degree of Bachelor of Didactics from the Iowa State 
Teachers College in 1893, and from that time until 1899 was superintendent 
of city schools in Iowa. In 1900 he received the degree of Ph.B. from 
the University of Iowa, and in 1901 the degree of B.S. A. from the Iowa 
State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. He entered the United 
States Forest Service in July, 1901. He is a member of Sigma Xi. 

He was married September 16, 1906, in Kansas City, Mo., to Miss 
Evelyn DePew Miller of Kansas City, Mo., daughter of G. W. Miller 
and Catherine DePew (Scruggs) Miller. 

Miller is manager of the Wenatchee Columbia Fruit Company 
of Wenatchee, Wash. He was professor of forestry at the 
University of Nebraska from 1903 to 1907 and dean of the 
School of Forestry, University of Washington, from 1907 to 
1912. He has held his present position since June, 1912. 



54 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

In politics he is a Progressive. He is a member of the Ameri- 
can Forestry Association, the Society of American Foresters, 
the American Association for the Advancement of Science and 
the National Geographic Society, 

He has published : Studies in the germination of leguminosae, Iowa 
State College; Forest planting in eastern Nebraska, Bull. U. S. Forest 
Service; Forest planting in the North Platte and South Platte valleys, 
Bull. U. S. Forest Service; (With Frank B. Kellogg) Forest taxation 
in Washington, Bull. U. S. Forest Service. 



Ellie J. S. Moore 

Route 2, Bozeman, Mont. 

Ellie James Sebastian Moore was born in Bozeman, Mont. 

In 1901 he received the degree of B.S. from Montana State College. 

Moore was in the employ of the United States Forest Service 
in 1903-04 and has since been principally engaged in ranching. 



J. Girvin Peters 

Business address, Forest Service, WasJiington, D. C. 
Home address, 7 East Mt. Royal Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

James Girvin Peters was born November 14, 1876, in Baltimore, Md., 
the son of Winfield Peters, a lieutenant in the Confederate Army from 
1861 to 1865, and Mary Elizabeth (Girvin) Peters. He is the grandson 
on his father's side of George Peters, a colonel in the Confederate Army 
from 1861 to 1865, and Sarah (Cordray) Peters, and on his mother's side 
of James Girvin and Sarah Ann (Smith) Girvin. His ancestry combines 
German and Scotch-Irish. 

He was prepared at Marston's University School, Baltimore, and gradu- 
ated from Johns Hopkins University in 1900, receiving the degree of B.A. 
He was a member of Delta Phi and leader of the Glee, Banjo and Man- 
dolin clubs. He spent the year before entering Yale in Oregon in the 
lumber business with Joseph T. Peters & Company at The Dalles, and 
with the Bridal Veil Lumbering Company at Bridal Veil. On a trip up 
Mt. Hood he met Gifford Pinchot, who told him of the Forest School 
at Yale. 

He was married November 12, 1907, in Garrison, Md., to Miss Harriet 
Dugan White, of Garrison, Md., daughter of Horace W. White and Jane 
M. (Ward) White. They have two sons: Horace White Peters, born 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1903 55 

September 3, 1908, in Ilchester, Md., and James Girvin Peters, Jr., born 
May 18, 191 1, in Baltimore, Md. 

Peters has been employed in the United States Forest Service 
since graduating from the Yale Forest School. In 1903 he was 
made forest assistant, in 1908 forest examiner, in 1909 chief 
of state and private cooperation, and in 191 1 chief of state coop- 
eration. Since 1905 he has been a member of the Graduate 
Advisory Board of the Yale Forest School, his present term 
expiring in 1916. He was a member of the Committee on 
Admissions from 1909 to 191 1, and in 1908 and 1912 of the 
Committee on Meetings, of the Society of American Foresters. 

He writes : "From July to September, 1903, studied forest 
conditions in Northern New Hampshire. From December to 
March, 1904, studied waste in lumbering yellow pine in Louis- 
iana and Texas. In October and November, 1904, gave a six 
weeks' course at Biltmore Forest School, North Carolina, on field 
methods of the Forest Service. This course was repeated in 
October and November of 1905. From May to September, 
1905, made forest working plans in Hudson River valley. New 
York. In June and July, 1906, accompanied Gilbert Rogers of the 
British India Forest Service on a tour of lumbering regions and 
national forests, covering the Southern Appalachians, the long 
leaf pine country, the western yellow pine regions of the Black 
Hills, S. Dak., and the Southwest, and the redwood and sugar 
pine districts in California. In August and November made a 
working plan for the Henry's Lake district of the Targhee 
Forest, Idaho. From May to September, 1907, engaged in a 
cooperative timber sale with the War Department on Fort Win- 
gate Military Reservation, N. Mex. From 1908 to 1912 assisted 
in directing the policy of cooperation between the Forest Service 
and states, including Porto Rico, with a view to the enactment 
by them of remedial forest legislation. In December, 191 1, 
attended the Yale Forest School reunion, which was a corker." 

Peters is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church. In 
politics he is a Democrat. He says : "I am for regulated com- 
petition as against legalized monopoly, publicity as against star 
chamber deals, conservation in all things, woman's suffrage 
(despite her being the 'more deadly' of the species), and any 
progressive measure which is constructive." He is a member 



56 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

of the Society of American Foresters, of the Baltimore Club and 
the Bachelors Cotillon Club, Baltimore, and the Green Spring 
Valley Hunt Club, Garrison, Md. 

He has published : Notes on a northwestern fir, the noble fir, abies 
nobilis, Forestry and Irrigation, Sept., 1902, 362; Notes in logging southern 
yellow pine, Yearbook U. S. Dept. Agric, 1905, 483 ; Work of the Forest 
Service in the South (Address before the Southern Conservation 
Congress in Atlanta), A^i. Lumberman, Oct. 15, 1910, 54; Forest fire 
protection in the United States (Address before the Canadian Forestry 
Association in Quebec, Jan., 191 1), Canadian Forestry Ass'n Ann, Rep., 
1911, 51; Uniform forest legislation (Address before the Southern Com- 
mercial Congress, Forest Section, in Atlanta, March, 191 1), Am. Lumber- 
man, March 18, 191 1, 40; Cooperation with states in fire patrol, Am. 
For., July, 191 1, 383; Cooperative fire protection under the Weeks Law 
and General principles of forestry (Two addresses before the North 
Carolina Forestry Association in Raleigh, Feb. 21, 1912), Economic Paper 
25, 27 and 44; N. C. Geol. and Econ. Sur., Forest fire protection 
under the Weeks Law in cooperation with states, Circ. 205, U. S. Dept. 
Agric, For. Sen, March, 1912; Rural mail patrol, Am. For., Aug., 1912, 
533 ; also two songs : Rah, for Black and Blue, "Songs of all Colleges," 
N. Y., Hinds & Noble, 1900; and We're here to win again, "Johns Hop- 
kins Songs," Baltimore, Willis & Company, 1909; and Black and Blue, 
a banjo solo, Baltimore, Eisenbrandt & Sons, 1897. 



Samuel N. Spring 

Business address. New York State College of Agriculture, 
Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Samuel Newton Spring was born February 5, 1875, in Sioux City, Iowa, 
the son of Winthrop Norton Spring, a business man, and Ellen Elmira 
(Newton) Spring. He is of New England ancestry and a descendant 
of Samuel Hopkins, D.D., who graduated at Yale in 1749, Samuel Spring, 
D.D., Yale 181 1, and Gardiner Spring, D.D., LL.D., Yale 1805, the latter 
being valedictorian of his class. 

He was prepared at the local schools in Le Mars, Iowa, and at Hull 
Academy, Hull, Iowa. In 1898 he graduated from Yale, where he received 
Junior oration and Senior dissertation appointments, was a member of 
the Freshman Glee Club, the Apollo Glee Club and the Banjo and 
Mandolin clubs. 

He was married November 29, 1900, in New Haven, Conn., to Miss 
Adah Elmindorf Bowman of New Haven, daughter of Peter E. Bowman 
and Mary C. Bowman. They have two sons : Ernest Walker Spring, 
born June i, 1903, in New Haven, Conn., and John Bowman Spring, 
born September 7, 1907, in Washington, D. C. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1903 57 

Before entering the Yale Forest School, Spring was with 
J. V. Farwell & Company, wholesale drygoods dealers in Chi- 
cago, 111. (1898-1901). During the summer of 1902 he was 
student assistant and in the summer of 1903 field assistant in 
the Bureau of Forestry, United States Department of Agricul- 
ture. From 1903 to 1905 he was professor of forestry at the 
University of Maine, Orono, Maine. For the next four years 
he was engaged in government work in the United States Forest 
Service. In 1906-07 he was engaged in cooperative work with 
railroads and individual landowners in the Middle West and 
Louisiana, beginning as assistant forest inspector, and subse- 
quently being in charge of the work. In 1907 he became chief of 
the Office of Extension, visiting the Pacific coast and the Rocky 
Mountain states in connection with his duties of inspection and 
administration. On February i, 1909, he began the private prac- 
tice of forestry at Washington, D. C. Later in the same year he 
was appointed state forester of Connecticut and forester of the 
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station at New Haven, 
and while in these positions gave a series of lectures in the Yale 
Forest School. On October i, 1912, he became professor of 
forestry in the New York State College of Agriculture, Cornell 
University. 

He is a Congregationalist. In politics he is "Republican so 
far as general political issues are concerned but does not neces- 
sarily vote that ticket." He was a member of the Special Com- 
mission on Taxation of Woodland for Connecticut in 1911-12. 
He is a member and director of the American Forestry Asso- 
ciation, a member of the Eastern Foresters' Association, the 
Connecticut Forestry Association and the Society of American 
Foresters. He is Secretary of the Class of 1903, Yale Forest 
School. 

He has published : Control and prevention of forest fires, Report of 
the forest commissioner, Maine, 1904; Second growth white pine in Maine. 
Report of the forest commissioner, Maine, 1906; The natural replacement 
of white pine on old fields in New England, Bull. 63, U. S. Forest Service, 
1905; Forest planting on coal lands in western Pennsylvania, Circ. 41, 
U. S. Forest Service, 1906; Report of the State Forester, 1910, Biennial 
Rep., Conn. Agric. Exp. Sta., Pt. XI, 1909-10; Forest fire manual. State 
Forester's Office, 1912. 



58 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

William D. Sterrett 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Residence, Pierce Mill Road, Washington, D. C. 

William Dent Sterrett was born March 2, 1881, in Bedford, Pa., the 
son of Rev. Dr. James Macbride Sterrett, M.A. Harvard '70, S.T.B. 
Cambridge Theological Seminary '72, a clergyman in the Protestant Epis- 
copal church, and Adlumnia (Dent) Sterrett. His father was formerly 
professor of philosophy in George Washington University and is the author 
of several books on philosophy. His father's antecedents were from 
Center County, Pennsylvania, and were Scotch-Irish, French-Huguenot 
and German. His mother's ancestors were from Charles County, Mary- 
land, and were English and Scotch-Irish. He has four brothers : Lieuten- 
ant Robert Sterrett, B.S. Lafayette, Pa. ; Rev. Henry Hatch Dent Sterrett, 
B.A. Columbian (now George Washington) '98, B.A. Harvard '99 and 
M.A. '00, and Cambridge Theological Seminary '03 ; Douglas B. Sterrett, 
George Washington '02; and John A. Sterrett, E.E. Princeton. Two 
other children are deceased. 

He was prepared at Columbian Academy, Washington, and before 
entering Yale received the degree of B.A. from George Washington 
University in 1900 and the same in 1901 from Harvard, where he was a 
member of Theta Delta Chi. 

He was married November 19, 1908, in Frankford, Del., to Miss Ida 
Topping Gum of Frankford, Del., daughter of Dr. F. M. Gum and 
Mary C. Gum. They have two sons : William Dent Sterrett, Jr., bom 
September 9, 1909, in Manila, P. I. ; and J. Macbride Sterrett, 3d, born 
November 26, 1911, in Washington, D. C. 

Sterrett was appointed forest assistant in the Forest Service 
in June, 1903, which position he held until March, 1908. He 
then became consulting forester in private work, and in Decem- 
ber, 1908, received the appointment of forester to the Philippine 
Islands in the Bureau of Forestry. He held this position until 
January, 1910. Since April, 1910, he has been forest assistant 
in the United States Forest Service with headquarters at Wash- 
ington, D. C. He writes: "Studied forestry in Germany, 
Switzerland, Austria and France from April to December, 1904. 
Cruised a 500,000 acre timber tract in Chihuahua, Mexico, April 
to June, 1908, for the Development Company of America, of 
New York City. In connection with forest work in the Philip- 
pine Islands completed a tour around the world." 

Sterrett is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church. In 
politics he is a Progressive. He is a member of the University 
Club of Washington, D. C. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1903 59 

Henry G. Stevens 

Business address, 615 Stevens Building, Detroit, Mich. 
Home address, 1075 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Henry Glover Stevens was born January 18, 1879, in Detroit, Mich., 
the son of William H. Stevens (died in 1901 in Detroit), and Ellen 
(Petherick) Stevens, born in Cornwall, England. He has one brother, 
William Petherick Stevens, Ph.B. Yale '93. 

He was prepared at Thacher School, Nordhofif, Calif., and graduated 
from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale in 1902, where he was treas- 
urer of the Sheff Y. M. C. A., a member of the Junior and Senior 
track teams and of the Senior cross country and debating teams. 

He is unmarried. 

After graduating from the Forest School, Stevens traveled 
for two years in Europe and India studying forestry. In Jan- 
uary, 1905, he entered the employ of H. W. Noble & Company, 
bankers of Detroit, Mich. He became secretary of the Bumpus- 
Stevens Company (investment securities) in October, 1906. At 
present he is in the real estate business with the Stevens Land 
Company, Ltd. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. 



Harry D. Tiemann 

Business address, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wis. 
Residence, 135 Prospect Avenue, Madison, Wis. 

Harry Donald Tiemann was born March 26, 1875, in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
the son of Julius Harry Tiemann, who was lieutenant in the 159th 
Regiment of the Union Army in the Civil War, and Margaret Augusta 
(Megie) Tiemann, daughter of Rev. D. E. Megie of Boonton, N. J. 
He is the grandson of JuHus W. Tiemann, brother of Ex-Mayor Tiemann 
of New York City and son of Anthony Tiemann of New York City. 

He was prepared at Froebel Normal Institute, New York City, and 
Pratt Institute High School. He received the degree of M.E. from 
Stevens Institute of Technology in 1897, and before entering Yale taught 
chemistry at Pratt Institute and mechanical engineering at the University 
of Pennsylvania. He entered the Forest Service in 1900 and was 
employed in field work in management. 

He was married December 8, 1903, in Brooklyn, N. Y., to Miss Eliza- 
beth Minerva Trelease of Newark, N. J., daughter of Charles Carroll 
Trelease and Elizabeth R. (Loder) Trelease. They have one son. 



6o YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Theodore Donald Tiemann, born December 13, 1907, in New Haven, 
Conn. 

Since his graduation from the Yale Forest School Tiemann 
has been in the employ of the United States Forest Service. 
From 1903 to the fall of 1909 he had charge of the Yale Timber 
Testing Laboratory. During the winter of 1909-10 his head- 
quarters in the Service were in Washington, D. C. At the 
present time he is chief of the section of timber physics at the 
Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wis., and is also lectur- 
ing at the University of Wisconsin. He has been engaged in 
this work since the spring of 1910. In 1911-12 he carried on 
experiments in drying eucalyptus in California. He has taken 
out five patents on apparatus and a new method of drying lumber 
in dry kiln. These are dedicated to public use. 

Tiemann is a member of the Congregational church. He is 
a member of the American Society for Testing Materials, the 
Society of American Foresters, the American Forestry Associa- 
tion, the Wisconsin Horticultural Association and the Society 
for Protecting New Hampshire Forests. 

He has published : The mechanical relation of force and mass, Stevens 
Ltd., Oct., 1901, 15 pp., illus. ; (With Thomson and Ophiils) Test of 
a Nash gas engine, Stevens Ind., Oct., 1897, illus. ; A new hypsometer, 
Stevens Ind., Jan., 1904, illus., also For. Quart., 1904; The structure of 
red gum wood, Bull. §8, Forest Service, 1905, illus. with scale drawings 
from the microscope; The effect of moisture and other extrinsic factors 
upon the strength of wood, Proc. Am. Soc. for Test. Mat., VH, pp. 
582-596, illus., 1907; Methods for making discounts for defects in 
scaling logs, and cull rule, For. Quart., HI, pp. 354-357, 1905; The effect 
of speed of testing upon the strength of wood and the standardization 
of tests for speed, Proc. Am. Soc. for Test. Mat., VHI, 16 pp., illus. 
by diagrams, 1908; Some results of dead load bending tests of timber 
by means of a recording deflectometer, Proc. Am. Soc. Test. Mat., IX, 
illus., 1909; The microscopic structure of wood in its relation to 
penetration by preservatives, Bull. 107, Am. Ry. Eng. & Maint. of Way 
Ass'n, 1909, 16 pp., illus. by microphotographs ; The physical structure 
of wood in relation to its penetrability by preservative fluids. Bull. 120, 
Am. Ry. Eng. & Maint. of Way Ass'n, 1910, 16 pp., illus. by 18 photo- 
micros; The theory of impact and its application to the testing of 
materials, Jrl. Franklin Inst., Oct. & Nov., 1909, 52 pp. illus. by diag. ; 
The log scale in theory and practice, summarizing results of an experi- 
mental research carried on at the mills, Proc. Soc. Am. Foresters, 1910; 
The microscopic work of the laboratory of forest products on the struc- 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1903 61 

ture of wood, Am. Forestry, April, 191 1, illus. by photomicros; The effect 
of moisture on the strength and stiffness of wood, Bull. 70, U. S. Forest 
Service, 1906, 144 pp., illus. ; Strength of wood as influenced by moisture, 
Cir. 108, U. S. Forest Service, 33 pp., illus. 

He has in preparation : Principles of drying lumber and humidity dia- 
gram. Bull., U. S. Forest Service; A new dry kiln (invented by the 
author), Bull., U. S. Forest Service; Is California eucalyptus suitable for 
lumber? results of research and kiln drying experiments, Bull., U. S. 
Forest Service. 

Theodore S. Woolsey, Jr. 

Business address. Brown Shipley Company, London, England 

Home address, Albuquerque, N. Mex. ^ 

250 Church Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Theodore Salisbury Woolsey, Jr., was born October 2, 1880, in New 
Haven, Conn., the son of Theodore Salisbury Woolsey, LL.D., Yale '72, 
professor of international law in the Yale Law School, and Anne Gard- 
ner (Salisbury) Woolsey, and is the grandson of Theodore Dwight 
Woolsey, LL.D., D.D., Yale 1820, president of Yale College from 1846 
to 1871, and a descendant of Jonathan Edwards, Yale 1720. A brother, 
Heathcote Muirson Woolsey, graduated from Yale in 1907. 

He was prepared at St. Mark's School at Southboro, Mass., the Pomfret 
School of Pomfret, Conn., and the Fay School, and graduated from 
Yale in 1901. While there he was on the editorial board of the Yale 
Daily News and was a member of Alpha Delta Phi. 

He was married March 15, 1908, in Albuquerque, N. Mex., to Miss Ruby 
Hilsman Pickett of Dawson, Ga., daughter of Thomas Hamilton Pickett, a 
lawyer and soldier. Mrs. Pickett's maiden name was Davenport. They 
have four daughters : Elizabeth Davenport Woolsey, born December 25, 
1908, in Albuquerque, N. Mex. ; Ann Salisbury Woolsey, born June 5, 
1910, in Albuquerque; Edith Woolsey, born April 25, 1912, in Lausanne, 
Switzerland; and Sarah Woolsey, born April 26, 1913, in Paris, France. 

Woolsey is an assistant district forester in District 3 with 
headquarters at Albuquerque, N. Mex. He was appointed to 
this position in October, 1908. Previous to this he had held 
successively the positions of assistant forest expert, forest assist- 
ant and forest inspector, being appointed to the last on May 
15, 1907. During- March and April of 191 1 he was acting chief 
of silviculture. He spent the year 1904-05 studying government 
forestry in Germany, France and India and is at present on leave 
of absence, studying in Austria and France. He is a member of 
the Graduate Advisory Board of the Yale Forest School. 



62 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He writes: "The windy, sun baked hills in the neighborhood 
of Marseille (where not denuded) are covered with pin d'alep 
which during the summer and winter months must exist almost 
entirely without rain. Even at Gresque at an elevation of 350 
meters the rainfall is but 691 millimeters during an average year. 
Add to the summer droughts a temperature of 25° to 37° 
centigrade and the vegetative conditions become intolerable. 
The fellings consequently are light and rarely remove more 
than 25 per cent, of the volume. The selection system is 
employed because in the words of the inspector: 'We are afraid 
of the regular shelterwood fellings because after the parent 
trees are removed the young crop is exposed to the full force 
of the wind and drought. To avoid heavy losses during the 
periodic droughts we employ light selection fellings : if once 
the ground becomes denuded artificial restocking is a difficult 
undertaking.' 

"And no wonder it is difficult! In the Commune of Marseille 
(Serie de reboisement de la Gordiale), the government has pur- 
chased some 800 hectares of denuded calcareous hills as a 
demonstration forest and to temper, if possible, the climate, of 
Marseille by surrounding it with forests. Here a local nursery 
has been established and systematic reforestation is in progress. 
It has taken years of study to determine the best methods. 

"They sow the pin d'alep in seed spots where the conditions 
are not too unfavorable and use ball plants (pot method) where 
seeding results or would result in failures. The sowing and 
planting is in the fall just before or during the rains. Spring 
sowing is equally successful until the summer drought starts 
but during this period the losses are enormous. The seed spots 
are carefully cultivated and cleared of stones and rocks. The 
size varies somewhat but on poor ground the spots are .80 by 
.60 meters and 30 to 35 centimeters deep. They cost from 6 
to 12 cents each, and are irregularly spaced 3 to 4 meters apart 
by a rough quincieux system. When the soil is ready for the 
seed the surface is 2 to 5 inches below the ground level. This 
depression collects the water a little during the rains and pro- 
tects the seedlings against the wind. Perhaps 60 seeds (a small 
handful) are sown in each spot and are raked into the soil 
to a depth of i to ij^ centimeters. As soon as the sowing is 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1903 63 

complete a uniform cover of brush is placed on the seed spot 
and is held down by a good-sized rock. The success of this 
method is phenomenal. Its chief features are : large well- 
worked seed spot; heavy sowing to discount certain loss of at 
least 50 to 90 per cent, of the seedlings which germinate ; the 
brush cover; sowing before or during the rains. 

"The same seed spots are prepared for planting and the pin 
d'alep, after one year in the seed bed and one year in the terra 
cotta pot, is ball planted after the pot is removed. When the 
ground is moist the ball of earth around the roots (often caked 
hard) is loosened to give the roots a better chance. This method 
is so expensive it is only used where absolutely necessary." 

He is an Episcopalian. He is a Mason, a member of the 
Graduates Club of New Haven, the University Club of New 
York City and the Societe de Franche Compte et Belfort of 
BesauQon, France. 

He has published : Management and natural reproduction of chir pine 
near Dehra Dun, India, For. and Irr., April, 1906; Bulletin lOi. He has 
written articles for Forest Quarterly, Indian Forester and has delivered 
lectures before Society of American Foresters. He has in preparation 
a book, "Forest management in France." 



NoN Graduates 
Carl G. Crawford 

Business address, 401 West Main Street, Louisville, Ky. 
Residence, Corner Fourth and Breckinridge Streets, Louisville, Ky. 

Carl G. Crawford was born April 10, 1870, in Newark, Licking County, 
Ohio, the son of James McCann Crawford and Sarah Elizabeth (Beck- 
ham) Crawford. On his father's side he is of Scotch-Irish, and on his 
mother's of English ancestry. He has three sisters : Eva (Crawford) 
McCann, Stella Crawford and Bertha (Crawford) Spencer. 

He received the degree of B.S. from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1898, 
and before entering Yale was a teacher in public schools and at Ashland 
College. 

He was married November 27, 1901, in New Haven, Conn., to Miss 
Mary Gay of Parkersburg, W. Va., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert 
Gay. They have no children. 



64 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Crawford is general manager of the American Creosoting 
Company of Louisville, Ky. After leaving Yale he became forest 
assistant in the United States Forest Service, and afterward 
held the positions of chief of the section of wood preservation 
and chief of the office of wood preserv^ation. He was later 
appointed general superintendent of the American Creosoting 
Company and since January i, 1909, has held his present position. 

He is a Presbyterian. He is a member of the Society of 
American Foresters. 



Samuel B. Detwiler 

Business address, 11 12 Morris Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Bala, Pa. 

Samuel Bertolet Detwiler was born September 18, 1881, in Oaks, Pa., 
the son of Samuel Bertolet Detwiler, a physician, and Frances H. 
(Longacre) Detwiler. On his father's side he is of German and French, 
and on his mother's of German ancestry. He has three sisters : Laura L. 
(Detwiler) Yocum, Elizabeth D. (Detwiler) Hoar and Bertha L. (Det- 
wiler) Storey; and two brothers: John L. Detwiler and Dr. William P. 
Detwiler. 

He attended no college before entering Yale. He grew up on a farm, 
attending the country school and Phoenixville (Pa.) High School, and 
had two years of office and shop experience after leaving school. 

He was married December 24, 1907, in Washington. D. C, to Miss Kate 
Emily Price of Washington. D. C, daughter of Robert A. Price. They 
have two sons : Robert A. Detwiler, born September 20, 1909, and Samuel 
B. Detwiler, born September 21, 1909. 

In 1906 Detwiler received the degree of B.S. in forestry from 
the University of ^Minnesota. He was in the employ of the 
United States Forest Service from 1902 to 1907. In 1907-08 
he held the position of assistant professor of forestry at the 
University of Minnesota. From 1908 to 191 1 he was forester 
and woods superintendent of the Forest Products Company, 
Red Wing, Minn., and in August, 191 1, received his present 
appointment of executive officer and general superintendent of 
the Pennsylvania Chestnut Tree Blight Commission. 

He is a member of the Baptist church and in politics is an 
independent Progressive. He was elected to membership in 
Sigma Xi at the University of Minnesota. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1903 65 

George Griswold 

Lyme, Conn. 

George Griswold attended the Sheffield Scientific School during 
1894-95 and the Yale Forest School in 1901-02. No information 
has been received from him for this record. 



Frank C. Hinckley 

Business address, 26 Central Street, Bangor, Maine 
Residence, 112 Broadway, Bangor, Maine 

Hinckley is a forester and surveyor in Bangor, Maine. 
Felix R. Holt 

Business address, Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va. 
Home address, Florence Court, Washington, D. C. 

Felix Renouf Holt was born June 24, 1879, in Washington, D. C. 
He was prepared at the Friends' School, Washington, D. C, and in 1901 
received the degree of B.A. from West Maryland College. 

Holt is a paymaster in the United States Navy and has been 
stationed at the Navy Yard in Norfolk, Va., since September 26, 
1912, having returned from his last cruise on July 12 of the same 
year. At various times he has been stationed in the Philippines, 
Manchuria and China. He was appointed to his present rank 
on July 30, 1905. 



66 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



CLASS OF 1904 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

John Appleton 

Bangor, Maine 

John Appleton was born in 1879 in Bangor, Maine. 
He was prepared at Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and in 1902 
received the degree of B.A. at Bowdoin College. 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School Appleton 
entered the Bureau of Forestry and was assigned to the division 
of forest products (experimental work). In 1906 he was a con- 
sulting forester in private work in Bangor, Maine. He has fur- 
nished no information for this record. 



Robert W. Ayres 

Business address, Sonora, Calif. 
Forest Service, San Francisco, Calif. 

Robert Williams Ayres was bom October 6, 1880, in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
the son of Stephen Cooper Ayres, Miami '61, oculist and aurist, dean 
of the Cincinnati Medical School, member of the medical staff of the 
Ohio Medical College (Cincinnati University), and surgeon and brevet 
captain in the Civil War, and Louise (McLean) Ayres, daughter of S. B. 
W. McLean, owner of Cincinnati Enquirer in i860. He is of Scotch-Irish 
ancestry on his father's side. He has had two brothers, Wylie McLean 
Ayres, M.D., Yale '97, and Rowan Ayres, Yale '98 S. (died August 13, 
1912) ; and two sisters, Louise and Gertrude Ayres. 

He was prepared at Franklin School, Cincinnati, Ohio, and graduated 
from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale in 1903. Here he was a 
member of Delta Psi (St. Anthony) and chairman of the Statisticians 
Committee. 

He was married August 8, 1906. in Los Angeles, Calif., to Miss Kate 
Dowson O'Neill of New York City, daughter of Henry O'Neill and 
Annie Dowson (Coyle) O'Neill. They have three daughters: Nancy 
McLean Ayres, born May 6, 1907, in Pasadena, Calif.; Katherine 
Louise Ayres, born December 4, 1909, in Sonora, Calif., and Frances 
Rowan Ayres, born March 9, 1912, in Sonora. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 67 

Ayres is forest supervisor in the California district. He 
writes : "I was appointed forest assistant in the Forest Service 
July I, 1904. From July 4, 1904, until July 10, 1905, I was 
stationed in St. Louis, Mo., working in the Division of Forest 
Products of the Forest Service. In July, 1905, I was sent to 
California on experimental work in the same division. I was 
transferred to forest reserve work in January, 1906 (still in the 
Forest Service), where I remained until November of 1907. 
During that time I was engaged in the examination of land for 
national forest purposes and reported on about four million 
acres, which were subsequently included in the National Forests. 
In November, 1907, I was transferred as forest assistant to 
the Stanislaus National Forest, with headquarters at Sonora, 
Calif. I was placed in charge of the forest in June, 1908, and 
in January, 1909, was appointed supervisor." 

In politics he is a Progressive. He is a Presbyterian and a 
member of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion (by inherit- 
ance), the Society of American Foresters, and the Concatenated 
Order of Hoo-Hoo. 



Hugh P. Baker 

New York State College of Forestry, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Hugh Potter Baker was born January 20, 1878, in St. Croix Falls, 
Wis., the son of Joseph Stannard Baker and AHce (Potter) Baker. His 
father was major of the ist Cavalry, District of Columbia, during the 
Civil War and since 1870 has been in the lumber and land business 
in northern Wisconsin. He is of English ancestry on his father's side, 
the first of the family coming to Boston in 1638. His mother's family 
came to New Haven in 1630 and lived for several generations in East 
Haven. His mother is a great, great, great granddaughter of Dr. Ezra 
Stiles, an early president of Yale. He has five brothers : Ray Stannard 
Baker, B.S. Michigan Agricultural College; Charles Fuller Baker, B.S. 
Michigan Agricultural and M.S. Leland Stanford, Jr., University; 
Harry Denio Baker; Clarence Dwight Baker, B.A. Macalester College; 
and James Fred Baker, B.S. Michigan Agricultural College '02 and M.F. 
Yale Forest School '05, and one sister, Winnie Baker, B.A. Carleton 
College. 

He was prepared in the Preparatory Department of Macalester College, 
St. Paul, Minn. He taught in a district school for two years (1895-97), 
and worked in a real estate office and lumber yard three summers. In 
1901 he received the degree of B.S. from the Michigan Agricultural Col- 



68 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

lege and in December, 1910, the degree of Doctor of Economics from 
the University of Munich. 

He was married December 27, 1904, in Saginaw, Mich., to Miss Fleta 
Paddock of Three Oaks, Mich., daughter of Steven Tappan Paddock 
and AureHa (Butler) Paddock. They have one daughter, Carolyn Baker, 
born January i, 1906, in Ames, Iowa, and one son, Clarence Potter Baker, 
born September 16, 1910, in Munich, Germany. Another son, Steven 
Paddock Baker, was born August 26, 1908, in State College, Pa., and 
died January 19, 191 1, in Columbus, Ohio. 

Baker has been dean and professor of silviculture at the New 
York State College of Forestry, Syracuse, N. Y., since April 
I, 1912. From 1901 to 1904 he was employed as assistant forest 
expert and agent in the United States Bureau of Forestry and 
Forest Service. He was forest assistant from 1904 to 191 1. 
During the years 1904-07 he was assistant and associate pro- 
fessor in charge of forestry at Iowa State College, and from 
1907 to 1912, professor of forestry at Pennsylvania State College. 

He writes: "Upon graduation from Michigan Agricultural 
College in 1901, entered the Division of Forestry and spent 
summer in Western Nebraska and Eastern Wyoming under 
R. S. Kellogg, working on report which resulted in Sand Hill 
Reserves. In November, 1901, was sent to Lancaster County, 
Va., to make a study of plantations put out by the Landreth 
Seed Company. In the spring of 1902, took charge of party 
studying sand dunes along Columbia River in cooperation 
between the United States Forest Service and the Oregon Short 
line. Study resulted in report and two small sand dune stations 
afterwards abandoned. Summer of 1903 spent examining public 
lands in Central Idaho, under direction of E. T. Allen. Resulted 
in Sawtooth National Forest. Summer of 1904 spent in making 
planting plans in Michigan, Wisconsin and Iowa and in pre- 
liminary studies of nature and planted timber of Iowa. Summer 
of 1905 had charge of two parties studying forest conditions 
of Iowa, report on which resulted in Circular 154 of Forest 
Service. Summer of 1906 laid out nursery sites at ranger head- 
quarters in New Mexico. Have had ten years of consecutive 
work with Government Forest Service." 

Baker is a Presbyterian. He is a member of the Society of 
American Foresters, the American Forestry Association, the 
American Geographical Society of New York, the Royal Geo- 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 69 

graphical Society of London, the American Breeders' Associa- 
tion, the American Civic Association, the Deutsche Dendrolog- 
ische Gesellschaft, the Masonic Lodge and the Society of 
Colonial Wars. 

He has published : Nature and planted timber of Iowa, Circ. 154, U. S. 
Forest Service ; Holding and reclamation of sand dunes and sand wastes 
by tree planting, Rep. Iowa Acad. Sci.; Die Prdrien in Zentralnordamerika 
und ihr Wert fiir Forstkultur, Dissertation, Univ. Munich. 



William H. von Bayer 

Business address, Indian Office, Washington, D. C. 

Residence, The Earlington Apartments, Sixteenth Street and Colorado 

Road, Washington, D. C. 

William Hector von Bayer was born September 18, 1876, in Wash- 
ington, D. C, the son of Hector Raimund von Bayer and Caroline 
Mathilde (von Cornberg) von Bayer. His father at different times held 
the positions of engineer of the Lighthouse Service and of the Life 
Saving Service, United States Treasury Department and civil engineer 
under the United States Navy Department in 1870. His father is also 
a former president of the German-American Technical Society and a 
member of the Cosmos Club and the Engineers' Club of Washington, 
D. C. He is the grandson on his father's side of August von Bayer 
and Marie (Lamery) von Bayer. The former was director of the Royal 
Museum of Karlsruhe, Baden, and court painter of Emperor William I; 
the latter was the sister of the former Prime Minister of Baden, August 
Lamery. On his mother's side he is the grandson of Freiherr Otto von 
Cornberg, officer on the General Staff of the German Army, and Wil- 
helmina Thvene. He has two brothers : August H. von Bayer, C.E. 
Cornell '00, and Rudolf von Bayer. 

He was prepared at the public and high schools in Washington, D. C, 
and in 1904 received the degree of B.A. from Cornell University. He 
attended the University of Strassburg in the year 1899-00. 

He was married June 13, 1912, in Mount St. Albans, to Miss Margareta 
Alma Lorleberg of Hanover, Germany, daughter of Richard Lorleberg, 
court violoncellist at the Royal Conservatory of Music at Hanover, 
Germany. 

Von Bayer is forest examiner at large in the United States 
Indian Service with headquarters at Washington, D. C. From 
1904 to 1907 he held the position of forest assistant in the 
United States Forest Service, and from 1908 to 1910 was chief 
of Section E of reconnaissance. He was forest assistant in 



70 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

the United States Indian Service from July, 1910, until May, 
191 2, when he received his present appointment. 

In politics he is a Progressive. In 1895-96 he was captain 
of Company A and major of the i86th Battalion of the 
W. H. S. C, and in 1898 captain of Company A, C. U. C. C. 
He is a member of the Society of American Foresters, the 
German-American Technical Society, the University Club of 
Washington, D. C, and of A. A. S. R. 32°, S. J. Freemasonry. 

He has published : Statistics giving area of timber lands, quantity and 
stumpage value of timber on Indian reservations and cost of care and 
protection of timber for fiscal year ended June 30, 191 1 ; Table showing 
sawmills on Indian reservations, quantity and value of timber cut, cost 
of forest protection and average area covered by each employee for 
fiscal year ended June 30, 191 1 (appears as a part of the Annual Report 
of Commission of Indian Affairs, pp. 193-199) ; various forms for the 
simplification of Indian forestry work. 



Fred W. Besley 

Business address, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 
Residence, 113 Beechdale Road, Roland Park, Baltimore, Md. 

Fred Wilson Besley was born February 16, 1872, in Vienna, Va., the 
son of Bartholomew Besley, a farmer, and Sarah (Wilson) Besley. On 
his father's side he is of Huguenot and Quaker, and on his mother's of 
English ancestry. He has four sisters : Grace A. Besley, Elsie M. 
Besley, Florence E. Besley, a graduate of the Nurses' Training School 
of Columbia Hospital, Washington, D. C, and Naomi I. Besley, a 
graduate of the Nurses' Training School of the University of Virginia, 
and one brother, LaMoree G. Besley. 

In 1892 he received the degree of B.x\. from the Maryland Agricul- 
tural College, where he studied military tactics and served in the college 
battalion. After graduating from college he taught in the public schools 
of Virginia and later served as deputy treasurer of Fairfax County, Va. 
In 1901-03 he was employed as forest student in the Forest Service and 
entered the Yale Forest School in January, 1903. 

He was married September 19, 1900, in Washington, D. C, to Miss 
Bertha Adeline Simonds of Washington, D. C, daughter of Elmer A. 
Simonds (deceased), and Susan Adelle Simonds. They have two 
daughters : Florence Eugenia Besley, born August 29, 1901, and Helen 
Besley, born July 31, 1907; and two sons: A. Kirkland Besley, bom 
November 9, 1902, and Lowell Besley, born August 20, 1909. 

Besley is employed by the Maryland State Board of Forestry 
as state forester of Maryland. He has held this position since 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 71 

June 25, 1906. He was at one time superintendent of the forest 
nursery and planting operations in the United States Forest 
Service at Halsey, Neb., and on Pike's Peak Forest Reserve. 
At this time he lectured on forest planting at Farmers' Institutes 
in Colorado. He has been a delegate to a number of forestry 
conventions and state forest representative on several forestry 
committees. 

He is a member of the Roland Park Presbyterian Church of 
Baltimore, Md. In politics he is an independent Democrat. He 
is a member of the Society of American Foresters, the American 
Forestry Association, the National Geographic Society and of 
the Patrons of Husbandry. 

He has published: Growing forest trees on the dry lands, Dry Land 
Agric, about Sept., 1906; Forestry in Maryland, Rep. St. Hort. Soc, 
1906; Some of the problems of forestry, Rep. St. Hort. Soc, 1907; The 
practice of forestry, Rep. St. Hort. Soc., 1908; The forests and their 
products (Md.), Md. Weather Service, III, Baltimore, Md. ; Forest 
mapping and timber estimating, Proc. Soc. Am. Foresters, 1909; Woodlot 
forestry, For. Leaves, Philadelphia, Pa., July, 1908; Mutual forest 
interests of Maryland and Pennsylvania, For. Leaves, Philadelphia, Pa., 
about June, 191 1; State forest problems in Maryland, Am. For., Wash- 
ington, D. C, July, 1912; Report of the State Board of Forestry for 
1906-07, 1908-09, 1910-11; chapter on The timber cut in Report on 
the wood-using industries of Maryland ; The forests of Allegany County, 
Maryland, report; The forests of Kent County, Maryland, report; 
Increasing the durability of fence posts (bulletin). 



John H. Bridges 

Business address. Drawer 1607, Tacoma, Wash. 
Home address, Grandview, Wash. 

John Henry Bridges was born October 13, 1878, in Rose Hill, Ala., 
the son of Tilman Barnard Bridges and Mary Elizabeth (Stewart) 
Bridges. His ancestors on his father's side were English colonists in 
South Carolina and on his mother's side French and English colonists 
in Virginia. He has two brothers : Benjamin T. Bridges, B.S. Univer- 
sity of Florida, and Barnard T. Bridges, M.D. State Medical College of 
Alabama. 

He was prepared at the common schools of Alabama, at Bartow 
High School of Florida, and at Southern Florida Military Institute, and 
in 1902 received the degree of B.S. from the Florida Agricultural College. 

He is unmarried. 



72 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Bridges is forester to the Weyerhaeuser Timber Company of 
Tacoma, Wash. He has held this position since 1908. He was 
at one time assistant forester in the Philippines and later forest 
assistant in the United States Forest Service. 

He is a Democrat. 

Horatio J. Brown 

Business address, 414 Lewis Building, Portland, Ore. 

Horatio Jones Brown was born September 27, 1879, in Schenectady, 
N. Y,, the son of Clinton C. Brown and Anna (Ramsey) Brown. His 
father served four years in the Civil War, is lieutenantrcolonel of the 
134th New York Volunteers and a member of the Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion. On his father's side he is of English, and on his mother's 
of Dutch ancestry. He has three brothers : Albert, Wayne and Theodore 
Brown, and one sister, Gertrude Brown. 

He was prepared at Union Classical Institute, now the Schenectady 
High School, and in 1901 received the degree of B.A. from Union 
College, Schenectady, N. Y. He was a member of Chi Psi. 

He was married October 29, 1912, in Brookline, Mass., to Miss Marion 
Parker of Brookline, daughter of Retire Hathorn Parker and Caroline 
(Delano) Parker. 

From 1904 to 1907 Brown served in the United States Forest 
Service. From 1907 to 1909 he was employed in the timber 
lands firm of James D. Lacey & Company. Since January i, 
1910, he has been secretary and treasurer of the firm of Brown 
& Brown, Inc., dealers in timber lands, reports on timber 
properties and timber bonds. 

Brown is a member of the Presbyterian church and of the 
University Club of Portland, Ore. 

Edward E. Carter 

Petersliam, Mass. 

Edward Edgecombe Carter was born October 7, 1880, in Bath, Maine, 
the son of Christopher O. Carter, a bank director and member of the 
city council, and Margaret E. (Edgecombe) Carter. 

He prepared at the Bath (Maine) High School and before entering 
the Yale Forest School received the degree of B.A. at Bowdoin College 
in 1902. 

He was married October 22, 1907, in Bath, Maine, to Miss Helen L. 
Johnson of Bath, Maine, daughter of George W. Johnson and M. W. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 73 

Johnson. They have a daughter, Margaret Carter, born January 19, 1910, 
and a son, Edward Carter, born December 19, 191 1. 

Carter is assistant professor of forestry in the Harvard Forest 
School. From June to September, 1904, he acted as assistant 
in the Yale Forest School and from that time until June, 1905, 
was instructor in the Harvard Forest School. He was employed 
in the United States Forest Service from June, 1905, until 
September, 1910, when he received his present appointment. 

Herman H. Chapman 

360 Prospect Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Herman Haupt Chapman was born October 8, 1874, in Cambridge, 
Mass., the son of Frederic Lord Chapman and Ella Catherine (Haupt) 
Chapman, daughter of Herman Haupt, a civil engineer and railroad 
builder. He has three sisters : Lucy Lord Chapman, Eleanore Hassell 
Chapman and Marion Norton Chapman. 

He received the degree of B.Sc. from the University of Minnesota in 
1896 and in 1899 the degree of B.Agr. He was a member of Beta Theta 
Pi. Before entering the Yale Forest School he was superintendent of the 
Agricultural Experiment Station at Grand Rapids, Minn. 

He was married December 29, 1903, in Duluth, Minn., to Miss Alberta 
Pineo of Duluth, Minn., daughter of Frank Pineo and Susan (Tupper) 
Pineo. They have two sons : Frederic Pineo Chapman, born March 14, 
1905, and Edmund Haupt Chapman, born August 12, 1906; and one 
daughter, Ruth Chapman, born April 11, 1910. 

Chapman spent the years 1904-06 in the United States Forest 
Service. In 1906 he was appointed instructor in the Yale Forest 
School and the next year became an assistant professor. Since 
1909 he has held the chair of Harriman professor of forest 
management. 

He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church. In 
politics he is a Progressive. 

Horace W. Chittenden 

Business address. Marine Bank Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Residence, 57 North Pearl Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Horace Washburn Chittenden was bom August 28, 1880, in Washington, 
D. C, the son of George Benjamin Chittenden, Yale '71 S., a mining 
engineer, and Ella Spencer (Delano) Chittenden. He is a nephew of 



74 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Samuel Hosmer Chittenden, Yale '67 S. He has two sisters : Mira D. 
(Chittenden) Bowman, wife of Morgan H. Bowman, Jr., Yale '05 S., 
and Marjorie L. Chittenden. 

He was prepared at Columbian Preparatory School, Washington, D. C, 
and in 1903 graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale. While 
at college he was captain of the Freshman Baseball Team, a member 
of the Varsity Baseball Team and vice president of the Baseball Associa- 
tion. He was president of his Class in his Junior year, and a member 
of the Picture Committee, the Graduation Reception Committee and the 
Class Day Committee. He was a member of Delta Psi. 

He was married October 10, 1908, in New Haven, Conn., to Katharine 
Panet Hastings, daughter of Charles Sheldon Hastings, Ph.D., Yale '70S., 
and Elizabeth T. (Smith) Hastings. They have two daughters: Elizabeth 
Panet Chittenden, born July 16, 1909, in Cananea, Mexico, and Marjorie 
Lee Chittenden, born June 23, 1912, in New Haven, Conn. 

Chittenden has been a mechanical engineer in the employ of 
the Lehigh Valley Coal Sales Company since May i, 19 12. He 
began work with the United States Forest Service in 1904, work- 
ing in Tennessee, Georgia and Washington, D. C. Resigning 
from the Service in 1905 he went to Arizona, where he was 
employed by the Saddle Mountain Mining Company. In 1907 
he went to Cananea, Mexico, where he was with the Greene 
Cananea Company until 1909, with the exception of a few 
months when he was in the engineering department of the 
Copper Queen Consolidated Mining Company. On September 
3, 1909, he left Cananea to accept a position in the mining 
engineering department of the Lehigh Valley Coal Company 
on October 5, 1909, and resided in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., until 
April, 1910, when he was transferred to the mechanical engi- 
neering department of the same company, and sent out on 
construction work. He lived at Pottsville, Pa., until March, 
1912, and spent two months on a farm in Connecticut before 
going to his present position in Buffalo. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. He is a 
"Wilson Republican." 

Harold B. Eastman 

Business address, 494 Congress Street, Portland, Maine 
Home address, 343 Woodfords Street, Woodfords, Maine 

Harold Benjamin Eastman was born June 24, 1878, in Portland, 
Maine, the son of Briceno Mendez Eastman and Martha (Clark) East- 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 75 

man. On his father's side he is of English and Welsh parentage, being 
the grandson of Benjamin Franklin Eastman, one of the founders of 
the Republican Party and a colonel of the Maine Regiment, and the great, 
great grandson of Joseph Dyer, one of the members of the Boston 
Tea Party. His mother's family was English and settled in Amesbury, 
Mass., in the seventeenth century. He has one brother, Fred Ermon 
Eastman, and two sisters: Carrie (Eastman) Richardson and Alice Clark 
Eastman. 

He was prepared at the Deming High School and Maine Wesleyan 
Seminary and in 1902 received the degree of B.S. from Bowdoin College. 

He was married October 18, 1905, in Bath, Maine, to Miss Bessie Watson 
Clifford of Bath, Maine, daughter of Charles W. Clifford and Addie 
Strout Clifford. They have one daughter, Martha Clifford Eastman, 
born September 8, 1906, in Tacoma, Wash. 

Eastman served as forest assistant in the United States Forest 
Service from the time of his graduation from the Yale Forest 
School until April, 1908. From then until August, 1909, he was 
employed by the St. John Lumber Company. In September, 
1909, he became vice president and buyer for the firm of Eastman 
Brothers & Bancroft, his present position. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. In politics he is a 
Progressive Republican. He is a Mason and a member of the 
Portland Athletic Club. 



Stuart J. Flintham 

Business address, 610 Loughlin Building, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Residence, 11 1 North N ormandie , Los Angeles, Calif. 

Stuart John Flintham was born December 30, 1879, in Albion, N. Y., 
the son of William S. Flintham. 

He was prepared at the Albion (N. Y.) High School and studied at 
Williams College during the years 1899-1900 and 1900-01, and at the 
Cornell Forest School in 1901-02 and 1902-03. In 1904 he received the 
degree of B.A. from Cornell University. He was editor of the college 
papers and member of the athletic teams at Williams and Cornell. 

He was married November 14, 1907, in Orange, Calif., to Miss Helen 
Billingsley of Orange, Calif., daughter of Ray Billingsley and Eleanor 
Billingsley. They have one son, William B. Flintham, born August 17, 
1908, in Los Angeles, Calif. 

Flintham entered the United States Forest Service in June, 
1904, resigned as forest inspector of California in July or 



76 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

August, 1908, and has since been engaged in business. He was 
forester and vice president of a forest planting concern from 
1908 to 1911, when he entered the real estate business, his 
present occupation. He has also been forester of Los Angeles 
County, California, since 191 1. 

He is a member of the Universalist church. In politics he was 
"previously Republican, at present Progressive." 



Harold D. Foster 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Medford, Ore. 
Residence, 423 South Newtown Street, Medford, Ore. 

Harold Day Foster was born February 12, 1879, in Jersey City, N. J., 
the son of Addison Pinneo Foster (deceased), B.A. Williams '63, M.A. 
and D.D. '86, and Harriette (Day) Foster. His father was a Congre- 
gational clergyman and trustee of Berea College and Tuskegee Institute. 
He is the grandson on his father's side of Eden Burroughs Foster and 
Catherine (Pinneo) Foster, and on his mother's side of Pliny Butts Day 
and Harriette (Sampson) Day. He has two sisters: Mabel Grace Foster 
and Marion (Foster) Gribble, B.A. Mount Holyoke '00; and one 
brother, Winthrop Davenport Foster, B.A. Williams '04 and M.A. '12. 

He was prepared at the Roxbury Latin School and the Newton 
(Mass.) High School and received the degree of B.A. from Williams 
College in 1902. 

He was married December 20, 1904, in Pownal, Vt., to Miss Elisabeth 
Hermon of Pownal, daughter of William Adams Hermon and Mary Ann 
(Rickards) Hermon. They have one son, Harold Day Foster, Jr., born 
June 5, 1907, at Walla Walla, Wash. 

Foster has been employed as forest assistant in the United 
States Forest Service since July, 1904. He writes : "One 
summer's work as student assistant in Maine in 1902 and one 
summer's work in the same capacity in California in 1903 in 
the Forest Service supplemented my technical edvication. In 
Maine I was cruising, in California mapping and gathering 
data on forest resources. My first assignment as forest assistant 
in the Service was in the Southern Appalachians, where I did 
much the same work as in California, but in addition collected 
silvical data and studied logging possibilities as the basis of 
an outline for forest management. After a year's detail in the 
Washington office, I was assigned to the Wenaha, the Whitman 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 77 

and the Crater National forests in Washington and Oregon, 
in turn. My work on the National forests was interrupted by 
special details in the Washington office and the district office 
at Portland, and as examiner of applications under the Act of 
June II, 1906, in District 6. I have been for two seasons in 
charge of field parties engaged in making a map and a recon- 
naissance of the resources of the Crater National Forest in 
Oregon and much of my time has been spent as acting supervisor 
of the Crater Forest." 

He is a member of the Congregational church and of the 
American Forestry Association and the Society of American 
Foresters. 

He has published: The distillation of oil of wintergreen from 
black birch, For. and Irr., reprinted in The Pharmaceutical Era; 
(With W. W. Ashe) Chestnut oak in the Southern Appalachians, 
Circ, U. S. Forest Service. 



William B. Greeley 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Residence, 625 Dahlia Street, Takoma Park, Washington, D. C. 

William Buckhout Greeley was born September 6, 1879, in Oswego, 
N. Y., the son of Frank Norton Greeley, a Congregational clergyman, 
and Anna Cheney (Buckhout) Greeley. He had one brother, Arthur 
White Greeley, B.S. Leland Stanford, Jr., University '98, who died 
March 5, 1904. 

He was prepared at San Jose High School, San Jose, Calif., and 
received the degree of B.L. from the University of California in 1901, 
where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Upsilon and of the 
Order of the Golden Bear. Previous to this he was engaged in mountain 
ranching in California and after graduation from college he taught one 
year in the high school at Alameda, Calif. 

He was married December 30, 1907, in Berkeley, Calif., to Miss Ger- 
trude Maxwell Jewett of Berkeley, daughter of Rev. Henry E. Jewett 
and Alice (Dwinell) Jewett. They have one daughter, Mary Jewett 
Greeley, born April 25, 1909, in Missoula, Mont., and a son, Arthur White 
Greeley, born August i, 1912, in Washington, D. C. 

Greeley has been assistant forester in charge of silviculture 
in the United States Forest Service since June i, 1908. He 
writes: "From July i, 1904, to July i, 1905, I was engaged in 



78 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

commercial tree studies in the Southern Appalachians. July i, 
1905, to November i, 1906, was inspector of timber sales in 
National forests in California. During that period, I directed 
the preparation of silvicultural working plans on portions of 
the Santa Barbara, Sequoia, Sierra and Tahoe National forests 
and supervised the marking and other timber sale activities on 
those forests. From November i, 1906, to May i, 1908, I had 
charge, as supervisor, of the Sequoia National Forest, California, 
area over three million acres. The work was chiefly organization 
of the administrative force and of fire protection in a vast, 
inaccessible, mountainous region." 

He is a member of the Society of American Foresters and of 
the Graduate Advisory Board of the Yale Forest School. 

He has written: (With W. W. Ashe) White oak in the 
Southern Appalachians, Bull. U. S. Forest Service, about Jan. 
I, 1906. 

Walter B. Hadley 

Redlands, Calif. 

Walter Brooke Hadley was born September 7, 1877, in Dayton, Ore., 
the son of William Macy Hadley and Harriet (Fuson) Hadley. His 
father graduated from Earlham College, Richmond, Ind., in both the 
classical and scientific courses, was a professor of languages and sciences 
and held many positions of public trust. On his father's side he is of 
English ancestry, being the grandson of Thomas Hadley and Lucinda 
(Macy) Hadley, both Quakers of early colonial stock. On his mother's 
side he is of English and Welsh descent. He has two brothers : Ellis 
Fuson Hadley and Louis F. Hadley; and one sister, Elizabeth Macy 
(Hadley) Newhouse. 

He was prepared at the public schools of Dayton, Ore., and at the 
Academy, Newberg, Ore. In 1901 he received the degree of B.S. from 
Pacific College, after which he took one year's commercial work at 
McMinnville College, McMinnville, Ore. 

He was married September 30, 1907, in McMinnville, Ore., to Miss 
Amba Irene Daniels of McMinnville, daughter of Charles Franklin 
Daniels and Malissia Minerva (Kuns) Daniels. They have one daugh- 
ter, Mildred May Hadley, born March 19, 1909. A son, Macy Daniels 
Hadley, born October 29, 1910, died November 11, 1910. 

Hadley was employed as forest assista-nt in the United States 
Forest Service from July i, 1904, to September 15, 1908. Since 
leaving the Service he has been in very poor health, which has 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 79 

prevented activities of any kind. He is at present engaged in 
horticulture in Redlands, Calif. 

He is a member of the Friends (Quaker) church and in 
politics is a Progressive Republican. He is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and also holds Rebekah and 
Encampment degrees. 

Ralph C. Hawley 

Business address, 360 Prospect Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Ralph Chipman Hawley was born March 5, 1880, in Atlanta, Ga., the 
son of Chester Warren Hawley and Martha (Jaqueth) Hawley. He has 
one brother, Edwin C. Hawley, B.A. Amherst '01, and D.D. Auburn 
Theological Seminary '04. 

He was prepared with tutors and received the degree of B.A. at 
Amherst College in 1901. 

He was married September 15, 1910, in New Haven, Conn., to Miss 
Mary Minor of New Haven, Conn., daughter of Alfred W. Minor. They 
have one son, Alfred Minor Hawley, born July 19, 191 1, in New Haven, 
Conn. 

Hawley has been a teacher of forestry at the Yale Forest 
School since 1909. Previous to this he held the positions of 
forest assistant in the United States Forest Service and assistant 
state forester in the Massachusetts Forest Service. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. In politics he 
is progressive. He is a member of the Society of American 
Foresters and of the Graduates Club of New Haven. 

He has published: (With A. F. Hawes) Forestry in New 
England, N. Y., Wiley & Sons, 1912, 8vo, XV + 479 PP-, 140 
figs., 2 maps. 

Paul D. Kelleter 

Deadwood, S. Dak. 

Paul Delmar Kelleter was born May i, 1881, in St. Louis, Mo., the 
son of Carl Kelleter and Pauline Josephine (Thomas) Kelleter. His 
father was a native of Aix-la-Chapelle, Germany, and his mother of 
Belleville, 111. 

He was prepared at the St. Louis High School, St. Louis, Mo., and 
in 1902 received the degree of B.A. from Washington University, St. 
Louis. 



8o YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He was married October 21, 1908, in Washington, D. C, to Miss Lucy 
Taber Pool of Washington, D. C, daughter of Dr. Benjamin George 
Pool. They have a daughter, Helen Kelleter, born December 31, 1910, 
in Washington, D. C, and a son, Paul Kelleter, born August 8, 1912, in 
Deadwood, S. Dak. 

Kelleter is forest supervisor in the United States Forest Ser- 
vice with headquarters in Black Hills National Forest, Dead- 
wood, S. Dak., which position he has held since March i, 1909. 
He was forest assistant in the Service from July i, 1904, to 
January i, 1908, when he became chief of the division of 
settlement. On October i, 1908, he was appointed acting chief 
of the office of lands and remained in this position until Decem- 
ber I, 1908. During 1910 and 191 1 he was chairman of a board 
organized to effect the exchange of South Dakota school lands 
and represented the Forest Service on this board. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. He is a member of 
the Society of American Foresters and of the American Forestry 
Association. He is a 32° Mason, a Shriner and a member of 
the Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo. 

He has published: (With A. W. Cooper) Control of forest 
fires at McCloud, Calif., Bull, yp, U. S. Forest Service, 1906. 



Charles A. Lyford 

520-524 Vancouver Block, Vancouver, B. C, Canada 

Charles Albert Lyford was born October 19, 1882, in Waverly, N. Y., 
the son of Frederic Eugene Lyford, president of the First National Bank 
of Waverly, N. Y., and Cora (Lowman) Lyford. He has two brothers: 
Percy Lang Lyford, B.S.A. Cornell '06, and Frederic Eugene Lyford, Jr.; 
and two sisters : Winifred Lyford and Katharine Lyford. 

He was prepared at the Waverly (N. Y.) High School and received 
the degree of F.E. from Cornell University in 1904. 

He is unmarried. 

Lyford is a partner in the forest engineering firm of Clark 
& Lyford, which has headquarters in Vancouver, B. C, Montreal, 
Que., and Philadelphia, Pa., and which was organized in Feb- 
ruary, 1910. He was at one time forest assistant in the United 
States Forest Service, after which he became general manager 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 



of the Eastern Lumber Company, Huttonsville, W. Va., and 
later forester for the Riordan Paper Company, Montreal, 
Canada. 



Wilbur R. Mattoon 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Residence, The Winston, Mt. Pleasant Street, Washington, D. C. 

Wilbur Reed Mattoon was born August 14, 1875, in Harwich, Mass., 
the son of Virgil Wadhams Mattoon, a clergyman of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and Mary Frances (Reed) Mattoon. He is the grand- 
son on his father's side of Plyment Mattoon, a Scotchman, and Tryphena 
(Parker) Mattoon, and on his mother's side of Marvin John Reed and 
Eunice Ann (Heath) Reed. He has one brother, Howard V. Mattoon, 
B.A. Wesleyan University '00, and one sister, Florence A. (Mattoon) 
Bass. 

He was prepared at the Cazenovia (N. Y.) Seminary and received the 
degree of B.A. at Wesleyan University in 1899. He taught science in 
the high school at Kalamazoo, Mich., for three years and studied forestry 
one year at Cornell University before entering the Yale Forest School. 

He was married August 28, 1909, in Tyrone, N. Y., to Miss Kate Van 
Liew of Las Vegas, N. Mex., daughter of Edson Van Liew and Mary 
(Sunderland) Van Liew. They have one son, Richard Wilbur Mattoon, 
born February 8, 1912. 

Since entering the United States Forest Service Mattoon has 
held successively the positions of forest assistant, assistant forest 
inspector, inspector, forest examiner and forest supervisor. In 
1905-07 he established Fort Bayard Nursery. He was inspector 
of District 3 from 1907 to December, 1908, and chief of silvics, 
District 3, in 1908-09. In 1909-10 he was forest supervisor of 
Manzano National Forest and in 1910-12 of Manzano and Zuni 
National forests. Since 1912 he has been employed in the office 
of silviculture, Washington, D. C. 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church. He is a member 
of the Society of American Foresters and of the American 
Forestry Association. 

He has published : Chestnut sprouts, origin and early development. 
For. Quart., 1909; Measurement of the effect of forest cover upon 
the conservation of snow waters. For. Quart., 1909. 
6 



82 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Hamilton G. Alerrill 

■United States Forest Service, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Hamilton Griswold Merrill was born July i8, 1878, in Andover, Mass., 
the son of George Cooke Merrill and Florence (Adams) Merrill. He 
is the grandson on his father's side of James H. Merrill and Lucia W. G. 
Merrill, and on his mother's side of Isaac Adams and Nancy H. Adams. 
He has one sister, Florence (Merrill) Featherston, B.A. Smith '98. 

He was prepared at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and received 
the degrees of B.A. and M.A. at Amherst College in 1900 and 1905, 
respectively. 

He was married January i, 1913, in Santa Barbara, Calif., to Miss Helen 
Inez Eschenburg of Santa Barbara, daughter of Arnold W. Eschenburg 
(deceased), and Mary M. Eschenburg. 

Merrill is deputy forest supervisor in the United States Forest 
Service vi^ith headquarters in Santa Barbara, Calif. He has 
held this position since July i, 1904. He writes: "Have been 
in the Bureau of Forestry and the Forest Service continuously. 
Have traveled some in the South and West." 



Allan B. Patterson 

Business address, Hot Springs, Tulare County, Calif. 
Home address, Concord, N. H. 

Allan Bouton Patterson was born January 22, 1875, in Concord, N. H., 
the son of Joab Nelson Patterson and Sarah, (Bouton) Patterson. 
His father was colonel of the 1st New Hampshire Volunteers in 
the Civil War, captain of the 2d New Hampshire Volunteers in the 
Spanish War and quartermaster of the 3d Division ist A. C. He 
was also United States marshal, 2d auditor of the Treasury, superin- 
tendent of Public Buildings, Cuba, and is at present United States Pen- 
sion Agent. An antecedent on his mother's side, Nathaniel Bouton, 
received the degree of B.A. from Yale in 1821 and the degree of D.D. 
from Dartmouth in 1851. He has one sister, Julia Nelson Patterson, 
and one brother, Louis Marston Patterson. 

He was prepared at Phillips Andover and in 1898 received the degree 
of Ph.B. from Dartmouth College. From April 9 to November 20, 1898, 
he served as a private in the ist New Hampshire Volunteers and in 
the 3d Division, ist A. C. Hospital Corps. He was employed in the 
General Electric Company a year and a half before entering the Yale 
Forest School. 

He is unmarried. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 83 

Patterson is forest supervisor in the United States Forest 
Service with headquarters in Sequoia National Forest, California. 
From July i, 1902, to June 30, 1904, he was employed as 
student assistant in the Service, after which he became forest 
assistant. This appointment he held until December 31, 1906. 
He was appointed special agent of the Bureau of Corporations 
on August 15, 1907, and on May i, 1908, he became chief of 
the office of federal cooperation, which position he held until 
his present appointment, January 24, 191 o. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church and in politics is 
a Progressive Republican. He is a member of the Society of 
American Foresters and of the Sierra Club. 



Allan R. Powers, M.D. 

Business address. Southern Pacific Hospital, San Francisco, Calif. 

Home address, 2009 Buchanan Street, San Francisco, Calif, 

/// Ellis Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Allan Raymond Powers was born May 23, 1881, in San Rafael, Calif., 
the son of George Herman Powers, B.A. Harvard '61, M.D. and M.A. 
'65, and Cornelia Jeanette (Chapman) Powers. His father served in the 
23d Massachusetts in the Civil War as surgeon. He is the grandson on 
his mother's side of Russell Chapman and Maria (Ives) Chapman. He 
has one brother, George H. Powers, Jr., B.L. University of California 
'98 and M.D. '02, and two sisters : Ruth Powers and Katherine Powers. 

He was prepared at Selbourne School, San Rafael, Calif., and received 
the degree of B.S. from the University of California in December, 1901. 
He spent the year 1902-03 at Cornell University at the New York State 
School of Forestry. At college he was a member of Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon, Theta Nu Epsilon and Skull and Keys. 

He is unmarried. 

From 1904 to 1907, and again in the summer of 1908, Powers 
was technical assistant in the United States Forest Service. In 
1909 and 1910 he was cruiser for the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company. He writes: "In August, 1907, gave up forestry to 
study medicine, to go into business with my father. Spent three 
years at the University of California and the last two at Cooper 
Medical College [San Francisco], graduating in May, 1912." 
On May 15, 1912, he was appointed interne in the Southern 
Pacific Hospital, San Francisco, Calif. 



84 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Powers is an Episcopalian. In politics he is a Republican. 
He is a member of the National Geographic Society, the Ameri- 
can Medical Association and the California Fish and Game 
Commission. 



Paul G. Redington 

Northfork, Madera County, Calif. 

Paul Goodwin Redington was born January 25, 1878, in Chicago, 111., 
the son of Edward Dana Redington, Dartmouth '61, and Mary (Cham- 
berlain) Redington. His father was second lieutenant of the 12th Ver- 
mont Regiment in 1862, junior paymaster with rank of major in 1863-64, 
senior vice-commander of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, 
Chicago Commandery and commander of the John A. Logan Post, G. A. 
R., Evanston, 111., and was also a trustee of Dartmouth College from 
1895 to 1905 and author of the "Dartmouth Roll of Honor" in the 
Civil War. He is the grandson on his father's side of E. C. Redington 
and Caroline (Stearns) Redington and is of English ancestry. He has 
one sister, Lizzie Stearns Redington, and two brothers : John Chase 
Redington, B.A. Dartmouth '00, and Theodore Towne Redington, B.A. 
Dartmouth '07. 

He was prepared at the Evanston Township High School and received 
the degree of B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1900. From the fall of 
1900 to the spring of 1902 he worked in the credit department of J. T. 
Ryerson & Son, Chicago, 111. 

He was married September 21, 1910, in Denver, Colo., to Miss Ermina 
Weaver of Denver, daughter of Alonzo Benton Weaver and Ann May 
(Sammis) Weaver. 

Redington has been employed in the United States Forest 
Service since graduating from the Yale Forest School, during 
which time he has held the following positions : forest assistant, 
1904-05; forest inspector, 1906; inspector, 1907-08; assistant 
district forester, 1909; associate district forester, 1910; and 
supervisor, 191 1 to the present time. His headquarters are in 
Northfork, Sierra National Forest, California. 

He is a member of the Congregational church and in politics 
is a Progressive Republican. He is a member of the Society of 
American Foresters, the American and Colorado Forestry asso- 
ciations, the Sierra Club and the Dartmouth Alumni Association 
of California. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 85 

Avery T. Searle 

Business address. Care of Hawkins & Pierce, Brownsville, Texas 
Residence, Brownsinlle, Texas 

Avery Turner Searle was born July 28, 1869, in Brookfield, Mo., the 
son of Luman B. Searle and Susan (Turner) Searle. His father was 
a native of New York and was a teacher in the public schools in Illinois, 
Missouri and Chattanooga, Tenn. His mother was born in Massachusetts 
and was the daughter of Avery Turner. 

He received the degree of B.A. from Pomona College in 1896 and 
afterward attended the University of California. During the year 1897 
he studied law with a private tutor at Oakland, Calif., and was admitted 
to the Bar by the commissioners of the Supreme Court on December 29, 
1897. Before entering the Yale Forest School he taught in high schools 
in California and in a private school in Honolulu, Hawaii. 

He was married September 20, 1903, in Lodi, Calif., to Miss Emily D. 
Colman of Lodi, daughter of Dr. Frederick W. Colman and Emily W. 
Colman. They have twins : Edward T. C. Searle and Eleanor C. Searle, 
born July 8, 1907. A daughter, Margaret Searle, born July 28, 1904, in 
Pasadena, Calif., died June 8, 1912, in Brownsville, Texas; and another, 
Dorothy C. Searle, born September 5, 1905, in Pasadena, died October 
10, 1910, at San Francisco, Calif. 

After graduation from the Yale Forest School Searle was 
appointed assistant to Mr. Lukens in reforestation in the Sierra 
Madre Mountains, Southern California. He left this position, 
however, and became assistant manager of the Oak Knoll Tract, 
Pasadena, Calif. Upon the completion of this work he was 
for a time engaged in law practice in Lodi, Calif., and later 
went to Texas, where he held the position of assistant general 
manager of the Kilgore Plantations at Mercedes and Harlingen. 
Since March 18, 1912, he has been assistant in the law office of 
Hawkins & Pierce in Brownsville, Texas. 

He is a member of the Congregational church and in politics 
is a Progressive Republican. He is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and of the Modern Woodmen of America. 



Clinton G. Smith 

Logan, Utah 

Clinton Gold Smith was born September 16, 1879, in North Cornwall, 
Conn., the son of Walter Dodge Smith and Mary Louise (Coe) Smith 



86 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

(died in 1888). His father was a merchant in Litchfield, Conn., prior to 
1886, and from 1888 to 1908 was business manager of Atlanta University, 
Atlanta, Ga. Several of his paternal ancestors fought in the Revolution. 
He has one sister, Mrs. George Knight Howe. 

He was prepared at the Litchfield High School and received the degree 
of B.Agr. from Storrs (now Connecticut) Agricultural College in 1898, 
where he was second lieutenant in the cadet corps. He entered the 
Division of Forestry in 1900 and was assigned to various field parties in 
Georgia, North Carolina and Tennessee, in Minnesota and California, the 
latter assignment being while he was a student in the Yale Forest School. 

He was married February 17, 1909, in Springfield, 111., to Miss Margaret 
Alice Young of Springfield, 111., daughter of Robert Young and Laura 
Jane (Irwin) Young. 

Smith has been forest supervisor in the United States Forest 
Service since August i, 1908, with headquarters during that 
year in Pocatello National Forest, Pocatello, Idaho, and since 
1909 in Cache National Forest, Logan, Utah. He entered the Ser- 
vice in 1904 as forest assistant and was engaged in the study of 
redwoods in California. In 1905-06 he acted as technical assist- 
ant in Medicine Bow National Forest, Wyoming, and in 1907-08 
held the same position in Weiser and Boise National forests, 
Idaho. Aside from his prescribed duties, he has been interested 
in a variety of projects. While at Logan he has been engaged 
in the establishment of a course of study for forest rangers 
at the Utah Agricultural College and has delivered a course of 
lectures there. He has secured gratifying results through the 
sanitation of Logan River Watershed, bringing the local Board 
of Health into cooperation with the Forest Service. He is inter- 
ested in the application of the principles of scientific management 
to his work, and has prepared two original papers on that 
subject. He is the author of numerous reports on silvical sub- 
jects. In timber reconnaissance he completed a portion of the 
Weiser Forest and initiated similar work on the Pocatello and 
Cache National forests. He is a member of the District 
Investigative Committee of the Forest Service. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. He is a mem- 
ber of the Society of American Foresters, the Commercial 
Boosters Club of Logan, Utah, and is a Mason. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 87 

Thomas J. Taylor 

Thomas Jackson Taylor was born in Montgomery City, Mo., in 1872. 
He attended Missouri University and received the degree of B.A. at 
Chicago University in 1894. 
He was married about 1903. 

Upon graduation from the Forest School Taylor entered the 
Bureau of Forestry, being engaged in the establishment of 
nurseries on the Pike's Peak Reserve. He later entered the real 
estate business. It has not been possible to secure his present 
address. 

Blaine S. Viles 

Augusta, Maine 

Blaine Spooner Viles was born July 22, 1879, in New Portland, Maine, 
the son of Edward Payson Viles and Ada Augusta (Spooner) Viles. 
His father has held the positions of postmaster of North New Portland, 
Maine, sheriff of Somerset County, Maine, chairman of the Somerset 
County Republican Committee, president of the Dead River Log Driving 
Company and of the Dead River North Branch Log Driving Company. On 
his father's side he is of English descent, the grandson of Rufus Viles. 
His mother's parents were Lamont and Caroline Spooner. 

He was prepared at the Skowhegan High School, North New Portland, 
and received the degree of B.A. with the Class of 1903 at Bowdoin 
College, where he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

He was marjried June 30, 1904, in Hallowell, Maine, to Miss Annie Ethel 
Johnson of Hallowell, Maine, daughter of William C. Johnson and Annie 
H. Johnson. They have one daughter, Dorothy Viles, born May 28, 1905, 
in Newport, N. H., and one son, William Payson Viles, born July 16, 1906, 
in Newport, N. H. 

Viles is at present engaged in private forestry work in 
Augusta, Maine, and is also forester and superintendent of the 
Blue Mountain Forest Association (Corbin Game Preserve) of 
New Hampshire. He was employed in the United States Forest 
Service for two summers and in 1908 moved to Augusta to 
engage in forestry work in connection with lumbering opera- 
tions carried on by his father. In July, 1910, he was appointed 
a member of the Fish and Game Commission of the State of 
Maine and in January, 1913, he became state forest commissioner 
and land agent of Maine. The latter position has never before 



88 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

been held by a technical forester. He is also chief fire warden 
of the Maine Forestry District. 

In politics he is a Republican. He is president of the Repub- 
lican Club of Augusta and since 1912 has been a member of 
the Augusta Republican City Committee. He is a member of 
the Society of American Foresters, the American Fisheries 
Society, the American Bison Society ; also B. P. O. E., Masonic 
Orders, including Mystic Shrine, the Abnaki Club and the 
Augusta Yacht Club. 



William G. Weigle 

Business address, Ketchikan, Alaska 
United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

William Grant Weigle was born September 20, 1866, in Bendersville, Pa., 
the son of Henry B. Weigle and Anna Mary (Meals) Weigle. He has 
one brother, Samuel Harvey Weigle. 

His boyhood was spent on a farm and he later attended the Pennsyl- 
vania State Normal School. From 1896 to 1899 he was principal of 
schools in Cornwall, Pa., and from 1899 to 1901 held the same position in 
Steelton, Pa. In 1901-02 he was engaged as a railway mail clerk. 

He is unmarried. 

Weigle is forest supervisor of the Chugach and Tongass 
National forests of Alaska in the United States Forest Service. 
He has held this position since 191 1. In 1904 he acted as field 
assistant in the Service and in 1905 was superintendent of the 
wood department of the Pennsylvania Paper Mills, Bloomsbury, 
Pa. In 1906 he was made assistant forest inspector in the 
Service, in 1907 assistant chief of forest management, in 1908 
assistant chief of state and federal cooperation and in 1909 forest 
supervisor of the Coeur d'Alene National Forest. 

He is a member of the Lutheran church and in politics is a 
Progressive. He is a member of the National Geographic 
Society, the American Forestry Association, the Society of 
American Foresters, the Arctic Brotherhood and the Concat- 
enated Order of Hoo-Hoo. 

He has published: (With E. H. Frothingham) The aspens, 
Bull, pj, U. S. Forest Service. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 89 

Robert B. Wilson 

Medford, Ore. 

Robert Bruce Wilson was born June 2, 1877, in Portland, Ore., the son 
of Robert Bruce Wilson, M.D. University of Virginia '49 (deceased), and 
Caroline Elizabeth (Couch) Wilson. His father was born in Portsmouth, 
Va., and his mother in Newburyport, Mass. He has two brothers : Holt C. 
Wilson, M.D. University of Virginia '76, and George F. Wilson, M.D. 
University of Virginia '79; and four sisters: Mary Caroline Burns, 
Clementine Wilson, Virginia Wilson, and Maria Louise Linthicum. 

He was prepared at Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, N. J., and at 
Portland Academy, Portland, Ore., and graduated from Yale College in 
1901. 

He is unmarried. 

After graduation from the Forest School, Wilson entered the 
United States Forest Service. He resigned from the Service 
in March, 1908, at which time he held the position of supervisor 
of the Cascade National Forest. In 1907 he had purchased an 
apple and pear orchard in Rogue River Valley, Ore., and since 
he left the Service has been a rancher and fruit-grower there. 

In politics he is a Progressive. 



Graduates holding Certificate but not Degree 
William H. Kobbe 

Business address, Shale, Calif. 
Home address, 116 South Grand Avenue, Pasadena, Calif. 

William Hofifman Kobbe was born January 22, 1881, in Fort Hamilton, 
N. Y., the son of William August Kobbe and Isabella (Hoffman) Kobbe. 
His father attended college and mining academies in Germany, served dur- 
ing three years of the Civil War from the position of private to that of 
captain and afterwards in regular service as officer in all grades to and 
including major general. He was also military governor of Mindanao and 
Jolo, Philippine Islands, and retired in 1904. His father's parents were Wil- 
liam August Kobbe and Sarah Lord (Sistare) Kobbe of Nassau, Germany, 
and New York, respectively, and his mother's parents were William Hoff- 
man, brevet major general in the United States Army, and Isabella 
(Simpson) Hoffman. He has three brothers : Ferdinand Walter 



90 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Kobbe, captain of the 22d Infantry, U. S. A., Herman Kobbe, ist 
U. S. A., and Eric Kobbe, and one sister, Sarah Kobbe. 

He was prepared in the pubHc schools of San Francisco, CaHf., and 
attended the Biltmore Forest School before entering the Yale Forest 
School. 

He was married March 6, 1912, in Pasadena, Calif., to Miss Mary 
Ckatherine Mather of Pasadena, daughter of Thomas Wylie Mather and 
Mary Elizabeth Saxe (Maclay) Mather. 

Kobbe served as district forester under the civil government 
of the Philippine Islands from November, 1904, to December, 
1907. He was transferred in 1908 to the United States Forest 
Service as forest assistant and stationed in Arizona for two 
years. In 1910 he became foreman of the Globe Exploration 
Company, oil producers, and in the same year was made surveyor 
of this company. In 191 1 he was appointed superintendent of 
the Rock Oil Company and later in this year received the 
appointment of superintendent of the Globe Exploration Com- 
pany. On September 18, 1912, he accepted the position of 
division superintendent of the General Petroleum Company. 

He writes : "Had charge of the provinces of Batanzas, 
Tayabas, Albay, Sorsogon, Camarines Norte, Camarines Sur 
and the little-known island of Mindoro in the Philippines and 
did considerable exploring and mapping during the three years 
spent there. Saw something of Japan and took the opportunity 
to travel by land from Nagasaki to Kobe. Upon returning to 
the United States spent nearly two years in different parts of 
Arizona, but found government service there distasteful and 
for the most part poorly paid. Have been in the oil business in 
California for nearly three years, starting as a 'roustabout' and 
having held about every position up to superintendent. The 
work is interesting, out-of-doors, mostly mechanical and in very 
congenial surroundings." 

He is a member of the Episcopal church and in politics is a 
Progressive Republican. He is a member of the California 
Academy of Sciences, of the American Ornithologists Union, 
the Cooper Ornithological Club, the Overland Club of Pasadena, 
Calif., and the Yale Alumni Association of Southern California. 

He has written numerous technical articles for the Auk 
(official organ of the Am. Ornith. Union) and the Condor 
(Cooper Ornith. Club of Calif.), 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 91 

Manasseh Smith, Jr. 

Business address, American Eucalyptus Timber Corporation, Chicago, 111. 
Home address, 252 Woodfords Street, Portland, Maine 

Manasseh Smith, Jr., was born January 11, 1880, in Radnor Forges, 
Que., Canada, the son of Manasseh Smith and Georgiana W. (Hall) 
Smith. He has six sisters : Georgiana M. Smith, Gertrude Smith, B.A. 
Vassar '97 and M.A. '03, Katharine B. Smith, Helen G. Smith, Ruth P. 
Smith, B.A. Vassar '05, and Bertha H. Smith; and one brother, Ralph 
E. Smith. 

He was prepared at the Portland (Maine) High School and from 1900 
to 1903 attended Cornell University. 

He is unmarried. 

Smith is forester and field manager for the American 
Eucalyptus Timber Corporation, Chicago, 111. From July, 1904, 
to April, 1907, he was forest assistant in the United States 
Forest Service, and from May, 1907, to July, 1910, was assist- 
ant state forester of California. He has held his present position 
since September i, 1910. 

He is an Episcopalian. In 1898 he was a private in the ist 
Maine Volunteer Infantry. 



NoN Graduates 
Frank P. Hamilton 

Business address, 300 Law Exchange Building, Jacksonville, Fla. 
Residence, 1716 Simmons Street, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Frank Percival Hamilton was born August 20, 1881, in Gloucester, 
Mass., the son of Robert Stevenson Rice Hamilton, who was a member 
of the firm of R. S. Hamilton & Company, general commission merchants, 
of Boston, Mass., and Alice M. (Barton) Hamilton (died in 1883). 
His parents were married in 1879. His father was born in Liverpool, 
Nova Scotia, the son of Samuel Vinton Hamilton and Mary Moore 
(Page) Hamilton of Nova Scotia and grandson of Samuel Vinton 
Hamilton, who was in the British army in the War of 1812 and settled 
afterwards in Nova Scotia. His mother was born in West ■ Windsor, 
Maine, the daughter of Gideon Barton and Harriet (Percival) Barton 
and great-granddaughter of Stephen Barton, a surgeon in the American 
army during the war of the Revolution, and a member of the same 
family as Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross Society. 



92 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He was prepared at Oak Grove Seminary, Vassalboro, Maine, and in 
1902 received the degree of B.A. from Colby College, where he was a 
member of Delta Upsilon. 

He was married May i, 1913, in Jacksonville, Fla., to Miss Elizabeth 
Legere Fleming of Jacksonville, a graduate in 1900 of the Stuart School 
of Washington, D. C, daughter of Francis Philip Fleming (deceased), 
formerly governor of Florida. 

Hamilton studied at the Harvard Law School in 1903-04 and 
spent the year of 1905 ranching in Arizona. In 1908 he received 
the degree of LL.B. from Denver University and since October 
of that year has been clerk in the law firm of Fleming & Fleming 
of Jacksonville, Fla. He writes: "Since leaving Yale and until 
1910 the interval has been entirely devoted to study and to search 
for health. Travels for health's sake have involved trips to and 
residences in Arizona, New Mexico, California, Colorado and 
most of the western states, and in Arkansas at Hot Springs." 

Of his politics he writes that he is a "Democrat, but hardly a 
pure Jeffersonian." He is a member of the Florida Country 
Club and the Seminole Club. 



Wilbur F. Henderson 

Box 145, Manchester, N. H. 
Henderson is engaged in farming. 

Yukichi Hokodachi 

Yukichi Hokodachi entered the Yale Forest School from the 
Middle School of Japan and took all the regular courses at the 
School with the exception of those given in the spring term. Sen- 
ior year. It has not been possible to secure his present address. 

Richard P. Imes 

Business address, Custer, S. Dak. 
Home address. Spear fish, S. Dak. 

Richard Perry Imes was born November 4, 1878, in Springfield, Mo., 
the son of Richard Perry Imes and Eliza Esther (Reynolds) Imes. His 
father, who was of German ancestry, was a farmer and was a scout 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1904 93 

and soldier in the Civil War. He has one brother, Carl Imes, a graduate 
of the South Dakota State Normal School. A sister, Jennie May Imes, 
is now deceased. 

Before entering the School he was graduated from the South Dakota 
State Normal School and was for two years student assistant in the 
Division of Forestry. 

He was married December 31, 1903, in Lincoln, Neb., to Miss Hanna 
Charlotte Christiansen of Spearfish, S. Dak., daughter of H. J. Chris- 
tiansen. They have one son, Richard Perry Imes, born August 24, 1906, 
in Deadwood, S. Dak., and one daughter, Karen Charlotte Imes, bom 
November 5, 1903, in Ogden, Utah. A daughter, born June 16, 1905, 
died the same day. 

Imes has been continuously in the United States Forest Ser- 
vice since leaving the Yale Forest School. He was forest 
assistant from 1903 to 1905 and forest inspector from 1905 to 
1908. In 1909 he was appointed chief of operation, District 4, 
and since 1910 he has been supervisor of the Harney National 
Forest, South Dakota, with headquarters at Custer. 

He attends the Congregational church and in politics is a 
Bull Moose. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge of Custer, 
S. Dak., and of the Ogden Business Men's Club of Ogden, Utah. 



*Louis C. Miller 

Died 1910 

Louis Christian Miller was born in 1873 in Joplin, Mo. 

He received the degree of B.S. in 1901 at the Oklahoma Agricultural 
and Mechanical College and before entering the Forest School was 
registered for one year in the graduate department of the Sheffield 
Scientific School. He took the courses of Junior year in the Forest 
School. 

Miller entered the Bureau of Forestry immediately after leav- 
ing the Forest School, served first as a forest assistant, and later 
became field assistant in the section of which he later became 
chief. In the Forest Service he had devoted himself to work 
directly connected with forest extension and he was recognized 
as an expert in planting. At the time of his death he was chief 
of the section of planting in District 2. 

He died at Denver, Colo., on July 16, 1910, following an opera- 
tion for appendicitis. 



94 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



CLASS OF 1905 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

J. Fred Baker 

Michigan Agricultural College, East Lansing, Mich. 

James Fred Baker was born April 20, 1880, in Saint Croix Falls, Wis., 
the son of Joseph Stannard Baker and Alice (Potter) Baker. For further 
family history see biography of H. P. Baker, M.F. '04. 

He was prepared at McAllister Academy, St. Paul, Minn., and was 
graduated with the degree of B.S. at Michigan Agricultural College in 
1902. 

He was married April 20, 1907, in Wayland, Mich., to Miss Bessie 
Buskirk, daughter of H. F. Buskirk. 

Upon graduation in 1905 Baker entered the United States 
Forest Service as forest assistant but he has given most of his 
time to teaching. His first position was as instructor in the 
Pennsylvania Forest Academy at Mont Alto, Pa. Later he 
became assistant professor of forestry at the Colorado School 
of Forestry, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, and since 1907 
he has been professor of forestry at the Michigan Agricultural 
College, East Lansing, Mich. The latter college conferred upon 
him the degree of M.For. in 191 1. 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church. 



John E. Barton 

Business address, State Forester, Frankfort, Ky. 
Residence, 417 Capitol Avenue, Frankfort, Ky. 

John Earle Barton was born February 12, 1879, in Warren, Mich., the 
son of Arthur Oliver Barton and Julia Alma (Hoxsey) Barton. Both 
parents are of English descent, their ancestors having come to this 
country previous to the Revolutionary War. He has one sister, Helen 
Margaret Barton, and a brother, Louis Arthur Barton, who was 
graduated at the University of Michigan in 1903. 

He was prepared in the public and high schools of Detroit, Mich., and 
was graduated from the University of Michigan in 1902. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 95 

He was married January 19, 1908, in Kuttawa, Ky., to Miss Mabel 
Leech Glenn, daughter of Thomas Glenn, deceased, and Lillian (Huggans) 
Glenn. They have two sons : David Glenn Barton, born November 24, 
1908, in Princeton, Ky., and John Earle Barton, Jr., born October 19, 
1910, in Sandpoint, Idaho. 

Barton was with the Federal Government until September, 
1912, when he became state forester of Kentucky. Previous to 
that time, since 1908, he had been forest supervisor with head- 
quarters at Sandpoint, Idaho. 



Anton T. Boisen 

Business address. Department of Church and Country Life, Presbyterian 

Board of Home Missions, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York City 

Home address, 307 East Second Street, Bloomington, Ind. 

Antes, Iowa 

Anton Theophilus Boisen was born October 29, 1876, in Bloomington, 
Ind., the son of Hermann Balthazar Boisen and Louise (Wylie) Boisen, 
daughter of Theophilus Adam Wylie, professor of physics and vice 
president of Indiana University, 1836-1887. Hermann B. Boisen was a 
professor of modern languages at Indiana University from 1870 to 1880, 
and master of modern languages at Lawrenceville School from 1883 
until his death the following year. He was the son of Amtsrichter 
Johannes Boisen of Sonderberg, Alsace, Schleswig, Germany. A sister, 
Marie Louise (Boisen) Bradley, was graduated at Indiana University 
in 1900. 

He was prepared at the Bloomington High School, Bloomington, Ind., 
and received the degree of B.A. at Indiana University in 1897. He was 
an instructor in romance languages at that institution from 1898 to 1903. 
He was a member of Phi Gamma Delta. 

He is unmarried. 

Boisen served as a forest assistant in the United States Gov- 
ernment Service from 1905 to 1908, resigning to take up 
preparation for the ministry at the Union Theological Seminary 
in New York City. He remained there three years, receiving 
a diploma in 191 1 and during the next year was engaged as a 
field investigator in the department of church and country life 
of the Presbyterian Board of Home Missions. In 1912 he was 
appointed Congregational University pastor at the State College, 
Ames, Iowa. 



96 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He is a National Progressive in politics. 

He has published: The commercial hickories, Bull. U. S. 
Forest Service ; Rural survey in Missouri, Department of Church 
and Country Life, Presbyterian Board of Home Missions. 



Harold R. Bristol 

Box i86, Plattsburgh, N. Y. 

Harold Russell Bristol was born December i8, 1878, in Meriden, Conn., 
the son of Walter Reuben Bristol and Iva Louise (Turner) Bristol, 
who were both descended from early Colonial stock, the Turners being 
early settlers at Guilford, Conn. A brother, Howard Stanley Bristol, 
was graduated at Yale with the Class of '02 S., and received the degree 
of Ph.D. in 1905 at Yale. 

He prepared at Riverview Academy and Portland Academy, Portland, 
Ore., and received the degree of F.E. at Cornell in June, 1904. 

He was married June 15, 1905, in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., to Miss Maud 
Campbell McGlasson, of Pawling, N. Y., daughter of John McGlasson 
and Olivia (Hurd) McGlasson. They have two children: Donald 
McGlasson Bristol, born April 7, 1906, in St. Martins, New Brunswick, 
Canada, and Dorothy Olivia Bristol, born September 12, 1907. 

Bristol served as forester of the Bay Shore Lumber Com- 
pany from June, 1904, until October, 1908. On the latter date 
he became superintendent of w^oodlands for the Delaware & 
Hudson Company and subsidiary companies, his present position. 

He is a Progressive Republican and a member of the American 
Forestry Association, the Eastern States Foresters, the Canadian 
Forestry Association and the American Geological Society. He 
is a Knights Templar and a Shriner. 



Clarence J. Buck 

Business address, 405 Beck Building, Portland, Ore. 
Residefxce, 549 East Thirty-ninth Street, Portland, Ore. 

Clarence John Buck was born October 16, 1881, in Stockbridge, Mass., 
the son of John Milton Buck, son of Jeremiah Buck of Stockbridge, 
and Hattie Elizabeth Buck, daughter of Benjamin Buck of Stockbridge, 
Mass. They had two other children : Jessie M. and Clifford B. Buck. 

He prepared at the Stockbridge (Mass.) High School and received 
the degree of B.A. at Williams College in 1903. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 97 

He was married December 19, 1906, in Pittsfield, Mass., to Miss Edith 

Fenn, daughter of Charles B. Fenn and Carrie (Stevens) Fenn. They 

have three children: John Milton Buck, born November 11, 1907; 

Gilbert Fenn Buck, bom October 30, 1908, and Florence Louise Buck, 
born June 10, 191 1. 

Since graduation Buck has identified himself with the Gov- 
ernment Service, his first position being forest assistant. He 
later served as deputy forest supervisor of the Klamath National 
Forest, then as forest supervisor of the Crater National Forest. 
Since 1908 his appointment has been in District 6, first as assist- 
ant district forester in operation and now assistant district 
forester in charge of lands. 

He is a member of the Society of American Foresters. 



Philip T. Harris 

Business address, Forest Service, Tacoma, Wash. 
Residence, R. F. D. i, Box 53 P., South Tacoma, Wash. 

Philip Talbot Harris v^ras born February 10, 1881, in East Machias, 
Maine, the son of Austin Harris, vi^ho is in the lumber business, and 
Emily Francis (Pope) Harris. Mr. Harris has always been prominent 
in public affairs as county treasurer, member of the state legislature and 
senate, treasurer of Washington Academy and a town selectman. Both 
sides of the family are of English descent. Three daughters and a 
second son are all college graduates : Florence Harris, B.A. Boston 
University '91 ; Mabel A. Harris, B.A. Smith '97 ; Samuel P. Harris, 
B.A. Bowdoin '00 (deceased) ; and Emily Harris, B.S. Northwestern 
'06 and M.A. University of California. 

He was prepared at Washington Academy before entering Bowdoin 
College, where he was graduated with the degree of B.A. in 1903. He 
was a member of Alpha Delta Phi and elected to Phi Beta Kappa. 
Before entering the Yale Forest School he had spent two seasons in 
field work with the Forest Service. 

He was married September 14, 1910, in Alameda, Calif., to Miss 
Dorothea Van Orden, daughter of Leander Van Orden and Kate (Post) 
Van Orden. 

Harris has been continuously in the United States Forest 
Service since graduation in 1905. He served as forest assistant 
until 1907, forest examiner from 1907 to 1909, and since the 
7 



98 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

latter date in the capacity of deputy supervisor of Rainier Forest, 
his headquarters at present being Tacoma, Wash. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. He is a mem- 
ber of Masonic orders, Knights of Pythias and the Concatenated 
Order of Hoo-Hoo. 



Janero Lagdameo 

Bureau of Forestry, Manila, P. I. 

Janero Lagdameo was born in Quinayangan, P. I., in 1880. 
He received the degree of B.A. at Ateneo de Manila in 1896. 

After graduation from the Yale Forest School in 1905 
Lagdameo entered the Forest Service in the Philippine Islands, 
where he has since continued. He has furnished no information 
for this record. 

Jacob J. Levison 

Business address, Department of Parks, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Residence, 526 Cleveland Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Prospect Park, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Jacob Joshua Levison vi^as born January 20, 1881, in Riga, Russia, the 
son of Julius Levison and Esther (Apte) Levison. The family resides 
in Russia and the members are chiefly rabbis, teachers and Yi^ell knovi^n 
philanthropists. 

He came to the United States in 1893, entered the public schools of 
New York and was graduated in 1896 with two medals. He then studied 
art at Cooper Union but later gave this up to allow more time for 
the work at college. He spent eight years in connection with the social 
work at the University Settlement, where he taught out-door athletics. 
He received the degree of B.A. at the College of the City of New York 
in 1902. 

He is unmarried. 

Levison acted as forest assistant for one year and then became 
a forester in the employ of the City of New York, having charge 
of the department of Brooklyn and Queens. Since 1908 he has 
also served as a staff lecturer at the Brooklyn Institute of Arts 
and Sciences and for the New York City Board of Education, 
and since 1909 as forester of the American Association for 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 99 

Planting and Preservation of City Trees. He is a member of 
the executive committee of the Long Island Agricultural Edu- 
cation Association and of the botany department of the 
Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences; has lectured at the 
Yale Forest School on ornamental and shade trees, and has 
been called by many cities to organize tree commissions for 
them, lecture and start them in their work on the care and 
planting of trees. 

He writes: "My chief interest during the past six years has 
centered around the city tree problem of the country. Seven 
years ago I saw the need of championing forestry among the 
city dwellers and to put the tree problems of our parks on a 
scientific footing. It was all in the hands of untrained men. 
Brooklyn and Queens Park departments offered the opportunity 
for demonstrating the possibilities of such work and from that 
very moment I had to fight against all sorts of odds to introduce 
new methods and get scientific tree care recognized. We are 
still spending nearly $4,000,000 annually on parks in New York 
City and only a very small fraction of this goes to tree work. 
But now we are getting more and more interest in the trees 
and the people are fast becoming educated to it. It had to 
be done by systematic and constant effort in writing, lecturing, 
talking from the platform, defying politicians, etc. I traveled 
to other cities and did the same there and now we have many 
cities awake to it. I am now especially interested in seeing 
municipal forests established in cities and to have these displace 
the common, conventional and extremely expensive formal 
park." 

Levison is a member of the Ethical Culture Society of Brook- 
lyn, Mason Lodge, Brooklyn Entomological Society, Brooklyn 
Institute of Arts and Sciences, American Association of Park 
Superintendents, New York Academy of Sciences, American 
Forestry Association and the American Tree Planting Asso- 
ciation of Brooklyn. 

He has written several hundred articles and interviews on city tree 
work and delivered over three hundred lectures in New York and many 
other cities throughout the East. His pamphlets have been published by 
many associations and he has given courses in city tree work in several 
institutions. 



loo YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

James P. McDonough 

Busiuess address, Glen Morgan, W. Va. 
38 Hallock Street, New Haven, Conn. 

James Patrick McDonough was born October 29, 1880, in New Haven, 
Conn., the son of Frank McDonough, a machinist with the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company, and Catherine (Donnelly) 
McDonough. He has five brothers : Joseph McDonough ; Edward Michael 
McDonough, Yale '09 S. ; Vincent McDonough, a graduate of St. Thomas 
Seminary, Hartford, Conn. ; Francis Thomas Aloysius McDonough, Yale 
'13 S. ; and John McDonough, student at St. Thomas Seminary, Hartford, 
and two sisters : Rosemary and Stella McDonough, both graduates of the 
New Haven Normal School. 

He was prepared at the New Haven High School and in 1903 gradu- 
ated from Yale College, where he received a second colloquy appoint- 
ment in his Junior and Senior years. 

He was married April 29, 1910, in Beckley, W. Va., to Miss 
Bess M. Hall of Pulaski, Va., daughter of Leonard and Mabel Hall. 
They have one son, John McDonough, born March i, 191 1, in Glen 
Morgan, W. Va. 

McDonough is employed by the W. M. Ritter Lumber Com- 
pany of Columbus, Ohio. He entered upon his present position 
in 1907. Before that he had been engaged in engineering work 
at Warren, Ark., for the Chicago Lumber & Coal Company of 
St. Louis. 

He is a member of the Roman Catholic church. 



William H. Mast 

Business address, Davenport, Iowa 
Home address, Ottumwa, Iowa 

William Herbert Mast was born August 16, 1879, in Ottumwa, Wapello 
County, Iowa, the son of Jacob Gehman Mast, a pioneer and highly 
respected citizen of Ottumwa (died January 13, 1909), and Frances E. 
(Miller) Mast, the youngest of a family of eight daughters and two 
sons of Thomas and Jane (Hunter) Miller of Keosauqua, Iowa. Jacob 
G. Mast was a son of Isaac Mast and a grandson of Bishop Jacob 
Mast, who emigrated from Switzerland to America in 1750 and settled 
at Northkill, Berks County, Pa. Wiliam H. Mast has three brothers: 
Frank Miller Mast, Charles Fulton Mast and Thomas Walter Mast, 
B.Agr. Iowa State College '97. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 



He was born and reared on a farm near Ottumwa, Iowa, attended the 
country school and in 1893 entered the high school in the small town of 
Agency in the same county. He was graduated in 1897 and entered 
Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa, where he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Agriculture in 1900. 

He was married June 28, 1910, in Ottumwa, Iowa, to Miss Mary 
Ethelda Morrison, Iowa State College '02, of Seattle, Wash., daughter 
of John R. Morrison and Mary Cofifeen Morrison. 

Mast entered the United States Forest Service upon his 
graduation from Iowa State College in 1900. His first position 
as a forest assistant was in charge of Halsey Nursery in con- 
nection with the Nebraska National Forest, and he was super- 
visor of this forest from 1908 to 1910. In 1910 he was in the 
office of planting in Denver; 1910-11, in charge of Monument 
Nursery, Pike National Forest, and in 1911-12, forest assistant 
and acting supervisor of Gunnison National Forest. With 
W. J. Duppert he has recently taken over the operation of the 
Davenport (Iowa) Nursery, formerly owned by Nichols & 
Lorton. 

He writes : 'T have developed the systems for nursery and 
planting work as practiced on the Nebraska and Kansas, and 
to some extent, on the Pike National Forest. This has included 
work with methods of seeding, mulching, shading, watering, 
storing, transplanting, digging, packing and planting. In most 
cases old systems have been modified or, in a number of cases, 
new ones instituted. Have devised the Mast Transplanting 
Tools, which are now being patented, also the Mast Forest 
Trencher. 

"During 1909, 1910 and 191 1, I was a special lecturer of the 
department of forestry, Nebraska University, covering the sub- 
jects of 'nursery' and 'planting' work, and in 1912, a special 
lecturer at the summer school of the Colorado State Normal 
School. 

"Have done extensive work in seed collecting, having gath- 
ered coniferous seed in Minnesota, Nebraska, Colorado, New 
Mexico and Idaho. Have prepared a circular (as yet unpub- 
lished) for the Forest Service on the subject of 'Collecting Seed 
of Rocky Mountain Conifers.' Was the first in the Forest 
Service to make use of a churn or slatted box shaker to remove 
seed from cones." 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



He is a Presbyterian, a member of the Society of American 
Foresters and the Equitable Fraternal Union. 

He has published: Forest tree seed collecting, For. and Irr., July, 1904; 
Nursery and planting tools, Am. For., May, 1912; New tools for trans- 
planting conifers, For. Quart., March, 1912. 



Clayton D. Mell 

Business address, U. S. Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Clayton Dissinger Mell was born November 25, 1875, in Werners- 
ville. Pa., the son of William Dover IMell and Rebecca (Dissinger) Mell. 
Both parents are of German descent. He has one brother, William Adam 
Mell. 

He was graduated at Pennsylvania State School at Millersville, Pa., 
in 1897 with the degree of M.E. He then taught three years and entered 
the Junior year at Franklin and Marshall College in 1900, where he 
received the degree of B.A. in 1902. 

He was married July 3, 1911, in Washington, D. C, to Miss Mary 
Frances Blosser, daughter of Ross and Fannie Blosser. 

Mell has serv^ed as assistant dendrologist in the United States 
Forest Service since graduation from the Yale Forest School. 
He visited England, Germany and Switzerland in 1907 and Cuba 
in 1911. 

He is a member of the German Reformed church and the 
Society of American Foresters. 

He has published: (With G. B. Sudworth) Fustic Wood, Circ. 184, 
U. S. Forest Service; (With G. B. Sudworth) Colombian mahogany, 
Circ. 185, U. S. Forest Service; (With W. D. Brush) Quebracho wood 
and its substitutes, Circ. 202, U. S. Forest Service; (With G. B. Sud- 
worth) Distinguishing characteristics of North American gum woods. 
Bull. 102, U. S. Forest Service; (With G. B. Sudworth) The identifica- 
tion of important North American oak woods. Bull. 102, U. S. Forest 
Service; (With G. B. Sudworth) A chapter on the western yellow 
pine wood. Bull. lOi, U. S. Forest Service; Distribution of tannin in 
tanbark oak, Bull. 75, U. S. Forest Service ; Cabinet woods of the 
future. Am. Lumberman, Oct. 15, 1910; Facts about true and spurious 
mahogany, Hardwood Record, Oct. 26, 1910; Basket willow culture. 
Rep. Printing Co., Lebanon, Pa., 1908 ; Basket willow culture in Germany, 
Proc. Soc. Am. Foresters, 1910 ; A forester whose field is the city. Am. For., 
Sept., 1910; The forests of St. Mary County, Maryland, Md. Geol. Rep., 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 103 



Baltimore, 1907; The histology of resin canals in white fir, Am. For., June, 
1910; The basket willow. By William F. Hubbard . . . with a summary 
by C. D. Mell, Farmer's Bull., 341 ; Notes on the identification of a 
tropical wood, Am. For., Aug., 1910; Pennsylvania-German plant names. 
Pa. Ger., XI, No. 9, Sept., 1910; Pennsylvania-German names of trees. 
Pa. Ger., XI, No. 12, Dec, 1910; Practical results in basket willow cul- 
ture, Circ. 148, U. S. Forest Service; Production and consumption of 
basket willows in the United States for 1906 and 1907, Circ. 155, U. S. 
Forest Service; The use of willow rods by the ancient Germans, Pa. 
Ger., XI, No. 10, Oct., 1910; Classification of woods by structural 
characters, Am. For., April, 1910; Consumption of basket willows in the 
United States for 1908, For. Quart., 191 1; A confusion of technical 
terms in the study of wood structure, For. Quart., Dec, 191 1; History 
of the investigation of vessels in wood, Proc. Soc. Am. Foresters, VI, 
No. I, 191 1 ; Fiber lengths of the woods of trees grown under different 
soil and site conditions, For. Quart., 1910; Identification of North 
American walnut woods. Bull. 120, U. S. Forest Service ; Circassian 
walnut and its substitute, Circ. 210, U. S. Forest Service. 



Walter J. Morrill 

Business address, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 
Residence, 1848 Prospect Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Walter Jean Morrill was born April 17, 1875, in Madison, Maine, the 
son of Cyrus David Morrill, assistant surgeon, U. S. Regulars, during a 
portion of the Civil War, and Clara Maria (Flint) Morrill. Their 
ancestors came to Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630 and 1632 and were 
related to a Mayflower family. They had two other children: Martelle 
Flint Morrill, Maryland Medical College '04, and Ella Maria Morrill. 

He prepared at the high school and Coburn Classical Institute, Water- 
ville, Maine, was graduated at the University of Maine with the degree 
of B.S. in 1899 and before entering the Yale Forest School taught two 
years in New Hampshire and two years in South Carolina. He was a 
member of Kappa Sigma. 

He was married September 18, 1907, in Parkersburg, W. Va., to Miss 
Katharine Cook Stone, daughter of Selden Stone and Victoria (Cook) 
Stone. 

Morrill served as forest assistant on several forests in Colo- 
rado from 1905 to February, 1908; as deputy supervisor of 
the Pike National Forest, Colorado, from February, 1908, to 
July, 1910; as supervisor of the Rio Grande National Forest, 
July, 1910, to November 15, 191 1; and as forest examiner in 



104 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Washington, D. C, until the fall of 1912. He is now professor 
of forestry at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. His 
previous experience in teaching was as professor of forestry in 
the Colorado School of Forestry, Colorado Springs, Colo., 
during 1909-10. 

He writes: "My work in the Forest Service in Colorado has 
made me personally familiar with practically all of the moun- 
tainous portions of that state and with most phases of forest 
service field work there. 

"A scholastic year of teaching forestry in the Colorado 
School of Forestry gave me the opportunity to review the 
courses I had taken in Yale after some years of practical expe- 
rience with the result that I am particularly interested in the 
subject of forest regulation, or management." 

He is a member of the Congregational church. He is a 
Progressive Republican, a Blue Lodge Mason and a member 
of the Society of American Foresters. 

He has published: National forests of southwestern Colorado: 
their resources and conservation, Bull. U. S. Forest Service. 



Harry C. Neal 

Dravosburg, Pa. 

Harry Gamble Neal was born in Dravosburg, Pa., in 1882. 
He was prepared at Pennsylvania State College Preparatory School and 
received the degree of B.S. at Pennsylvania State College in 1903. 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School in 1905 Neal 
was appointed a forest assistant in the United States Forest 
Service. He has furnished no information for this record. 



John M. Nelson, Jr. 

Pottsville, Pa. 

John Marbury Nelson, Jr., was born March g, 1883, in Baltimore, Md., 
the son of John Marbury Nelson, a banker, of Nelson, Cook & Company, 
of Baltimore, Md., son of C. K. Nelson and Mary C. (Marbury) Nelson, 
and Ella Martha (Delaplaine) Nelson, daughter of Edwin and Elizabeth 
(Charlton) Delaplaine. They had four other children: Edwin D. Nelson, 
Alexander C. Nelson, William M. Nelson and Mary C. Nelson. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 105 

He was prepared in the Baltimore public schools and Marston's Uni- 
versity School. He received the degree of B.A. at Johns Hopkins 
University in 1903. He was a member of Alpha Delta Phi. 

He was married April 10, 1912, in Philadelphia, Pa., to Miss Ellen 
Cheston Mcllvaine, daughter of H. C. Mcllvaine and Frances (Randall) 
McIIvaine. 

Nelson was a forest assistant and section chief in the Service 
from July, 1905, to September, 1909. The followin,^ year he 
was superintendent of the timber department of the Philadelphia 
and Reading Coal & Iron Company. From October 15, 1910, 
to September i, 191 1, he held the position of general sales 
agent for the Carolina Pine Lumber Company, and on the latter 
date opened a wholesale lumber business in Pottsville, Pa. 

His political opinions depend upon the men and party prin- 
ciples. He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church and 
of the Society of American Foresters. 



• William B. Piper 

Business address. East Tawas, Mich. 
Home address, Cambridge, Mass. 

William Bridge Piper was born November 21, 1880, in Cambridge, 
Mass., the son of William Taggard Piper, son of Solomon and Mary 
Elizabeth (Taggard) Piper, whose ancestry dates back to early colonial 
times, and Anne Palfrey (Bridge) Piper, daughter of William Frederick 
Bridge and Elizabeth Crosby (Guild) Bridge. They had three other 
children: Elizabeth Bridge Piper, Anne Taggard Piper (married Mat- 
thew Hale), and Ralph Crosby Piper. William T. Piper was prominent 
in the affairs of Cambridge, Mass., serving on the Common Council, 
Board of Aldermen, local board of Civil Service Examiners, president 
of the School Board, on the board of trustees of the Cambridge Public 
Library, a trustee of the Boston Homeopathic Hospital and the Boston 
State Hospital, and a director of the Cambridge Trust Company. 

He was prepared at the Browne-Nichols' Preparatory School in Cam- 
bridge and was graduated with the degree of B.A. at Harvard in 1903. 

He is unmarried. 

In the summer of 1905 Piper was located in the Medicine 
Bow Mountains, Wyo., as forest assistant; the winter, 1905-06, 
in California. The next summer and until February, 1907, 
he was furloughed to work with the Delaware & Hudson Rail- 
road Company in New York State, with headquarters at Lyon 



io6 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Mountain. In the spring of 1907, having been restored to the 
rolls of the Forest Service, he was located in Clearwater Valley, 
Mont., until January, 1908, and in and around Bozeman on the 
Gallatin Forest. In the spring of 1908 he was in charge of 
a field party in Custer County, Mont., and in the summer of the 
same year had a field party in West Gallatin Valley near 
Bozeman. 

He spent the early winter, 1908-09, in Washington, D. C, 
and from February until the middle of April was in charge 
of a field party in Northern Alabama, working in cooperation 
with the Tennessee Coal & Iron Company. The following 
summer he had a field party in the vicinity of Boulder, Town- 
send and Bozeman, Mont., and was in Missoula, Mont., the first 
part of the winter of 1909-10. In February, 1910, he went to 
Bozeman to be on the Gallatin Forest. In August, 1910, he 
was transferred to the Madison Forest with headquarters at 
Sheridan, Mont., and in March, 191 1, went to Au Sable, Mich., 
as acting supervisor of the Michigan and Marquette National 
forests. In the fall of 191 1 the headquarters of these forests 
was changed to East Tawas, Mich., on account of the destruction 
of the towns of Au Sable and Oscoda by fire on July 11, 191 1. 

He is a member of the Unitarian church. 



Merritt B. Pratt 

Nevada City, Calif. 

Merritt Berry Pratt was born October 3, 1878, in Paw Paw, 111., the 
son of Wilbur Alfonso Pratt, a druggist, and Mary Evelyn Pratt. His 
father's people came to Illinois from Deep River, Conn., and his mother's 
father came from New York to Chicago, where he was a carpenter, 
later a farmer and wheat grower. He has one brother and one sister: 
Helen Harriett Pratt, a member of the class of 1915 at Lake Forest Uni- 
versity, and Roger Wilbur Pratt. 

He was graduated from the Paw Paw High School in 1897, Morgan 
Park Academy in 1900 and received the degree of B.S. at the University 
of Chicago in 1903. He w^as a member of Delta Upsilon. 

He was married November 24, 1907, in Nevada City, Calif., to Miss 
Laura May Schroder, daughter of Charles Schroder and Ida Schroder. 
They have a daughter, Mary Louise Pratt, born June 11, 191 1, in Nevada 
City, Calif. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 107 

Pratt served as forest assistant until 1909, when he was 
appointed deputy forest supervisor of Tahoe National Forest, 
with headquarters at Nevada City, Calif. 

He is a member of the Methodist church. 

He has published : California red fir in the Tahoe National Forest, 
For. Quart., Ithaca, N. Y., June, 1907 ; Results of "light burning" near 
Nevada City, Calif., For. Quart., Cambridge, Mass., Sept., 191 1 ; Com- 
parison of large and small sawmills on Tahoe National Forest, For. 
Quart.; Fire working-plan on Tahoe National Forest, Am. For., Wash- 
ington, D. C, June, 1912. 



Jeremiah Rebmann 

1 1 14 Marion Street, Columbia, S. C. 

Jeremiah Rebmann was born in 1869 in Wiirtemberg, Germany. 

He was prepared at public schools in Germany and the University of 
Nebraska preparatory school. He received the degree of B.S. at the 
University of Nebraska in 1898. 

Rebmann was graduated at the Yale Forest School in 1905 and 
then entered the Government Service as an assistant. He has 
furnished no information for this record. 



Samuel J. Record 

Busin^ess address, 360 Prospect Street, New Haven, Conn. 
Residence, 187 Mansfield Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Samuel James Record was born March 10, 1881, in Crawfordsville, 
Ind., the son of James Knox Polk Records (died in 1881) and Mary 
Minerva (Hutton) Records. His father was for several years a school 
teacher, but his principal occupation was farming. On his father's side 
he is the grandson of William Tully Records and Susan Records and 
a descendant of John Records and Ann (Calloway) Records of England, 
who settled in Sussex County, Delaware, sometime before 1750. He is 
the grandson on his mother's side of Samuel M. Hutton (died March 
12, 1905) and Miriam (Harland) Hutton. Samuel Hutton was born 
near Lexington, Rockbridge County, Va., and removed to Indiana in 
1836, where he was engaged in farming and in operating a sawmill. He 
has one brother, William F. Record. 

He prepared at the Crawfordsville (Ind.) High School and received 
the degrees of B.A. and M.A. from Wabash College in 1903 and 1906. 
He was a member of Phi Gamma Delta. 



io8 YALE FOREST SCHOOT. 

He was married April i, 1906, in Cravvfordsville, Ind., to Miss Mary 
Elizabeth Strauss of Topeka, Kans.. daughter of Charles Edward Strauss 
and Sarah (Schooley) Strauss. They have had four children: Harold 
Clayton Record, born January 5. IQ07, and died January 12. 1907: twins, 
Mason Thomas Record and Mary Elizabeth Record, born March 31, 1909, 
and Alice Louise Record, born May 25, 191 1. 

From July i, 1904, to April 30, 1907, Record served as 
assistant in the United States Forest Service. On May i, 1907, 
he was made chief of the Section of Reconnaissance (M) and 
on November 25 of the same year became supervisor. He was 
again appointed forest assistant July 20, 1910, which position he 
held until March 31, 191 1. 

From January i to June 30, 1906, he acted as instructor in 
botany and forestry at Wabash College and from July i, 1910, 
to June 30, 191 1, was instructor in forestry at the Yale Forest 
School. He received his present appointment of assistant 
professor of forest products at Yale on July i, 191 1. 

In politics Record is a Progressive Republican. He was 
elected to the Yale chapter of Sigma Xi in 1912 and has been 
a member of the board of editors of the Forestry Quarterly and 
managing editor of the Yale Forest School Nezcs. He is a 
member of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science and of the American and Connecticut Forestry asso- 
ciations, and is a Mason. He is Secretary of the Class of 1905, 
Yale Forest School. 

He has published : Forest conditions in Montgomery County, Indiana, 
Proc. Ind. Acad. Sci., 1902, pp. 84-93 ; Forestry in Indiana, For. and 
Irr., March, 1905, pp. 107-112; Forestry — A profession for young men, 
Pub., Wabash College, 1906, pp. 8; The hardy catalpa, Pub. 22, Depart- 
ment of Botany, Wabash College, 1906, pp. 15; The Middle West: Notes 
on the attitudes which several states hold toward their timber supplies. 
For. and Irr., April, 1907, pp. 177-180; Forest fire insurance in Germany, 
Proc. Soc. Am. Foresters, II, No. 3, pp. 95-102, July, 1907 ; The forests 
of Arkansas, For. Quart., V. No. 37, pp. 296-301, Sept., 1907; Sugges- 
tions to woodlot owners in the Ohio Valley region, Circ. 138, For. Ser., 
Feb., 1908, pp. 15 ; Missouri's opportunities in forestry, Ann. Rep., Mo. 
State Bd. Hort., 1908, pp. 7; The forest resources of Arkansas, Little 
Rock, Ark., 1910, pp. 35 ; Forest conditions of the Ozark Region of 
Missouri, Bull. 89, Mo. St. Agric. Exp. Sta., Univ. of Mo., Nov., 1910, 
pp. 195-280; Some new ideas in controlling forest fires, Am. For., April, 
191 1, pp. 197-203; Grain and texture in wood. For. Quart., IX, No. I, 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 109 



pp. 22-25, 191 1 ; Pith flecks or medullary spots in wood, For. Quart., 
IX, No. 2, pp. 244-252, 191 1 ; Tier-like arrangement of the elements of 
certain woods. Science, Jan. 12, 1912, pp. 75-77; Identification of the 
economic woods of the United States, N. Y., John Wiley & Sons, 1912, 
8vo, vii+117 pp., 15 fig.; numerous articles in trade journals. 



Arthur C. Ringland 

Business address, U. S. Forest Service, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Home address, 56 Church Street, Montclair, N. J. 

U. S. Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

Arthur Cuming Ringland was born September 29, 1882, in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., the son of Robert B. Ringland, who is of Irish and Scotch 
descent, and Mary (Glenister) Ringland, who is of English descent. He 
has one brother, Robert Finley Ringland, M.D. Columbia '03. 

He was prepared at the Montclair High School, Montclair, N. J., and 
before entering the Forest School took some special courses in Sheflf. 

He is unmarried. 

Ringland acted as forest assistant from 1905 to 1907, then 
one year as assistant forester, and since 1908 has been district 
forester, in charge of District 3, with headquarters at 
Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church. He is 
a National Progressive in politics, and is a member of the Society 
of American Foresters and the Century Club of Washington, 
D. C. 

William F. Sherfesee 

Business address. Bureau of Forestry, Manila, P. I. 
Home address, Charleston, S. C. 

William Forsythe Sherfesee was born May 23, 1882, near Brevard, 
N. C, the son of Louis Sherfesee and Annie (Griffith) Sherfesee. He 
has three brothers and two sisters : Moseley F., Elizabeth, Annie Louise, 
Louis and Robert Augustus Sherfesee, B.A. Davidson College. 

He prepared at the Charleston High School, Charleston, S. C, and 
received the degree of B.A. at the College of Charleston, S. C, in 1903. 

He is unmarried. 

The various positions held by Sherfesee with the Forest Ser- 
vice are forest assistant, assistant chief and chief in the office 
of wood preservation, forester of the Philippine Bureau of 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



Forestry and on July i, 1912, appointed assistant director of the 
Philippine Bureau of Forestry. 

He is a member of the Society of American Foresters, Century 
Club of Washington, D. C, Army and Navy Club of Manila 
and the Baguio Country Club, Baguio, P. L 

He has written various articles for publications of the United 
States Forest Service. 



Ferdinand A. Silcox 

Business address, Forest Service, Missoula, Mont. 
Residence, 529 Cleveland Street, Missoula, Mont. 

Ferdinand Augustus Silcox was born December 25, 1882, in Columbus, 
Ga., the son of Ferdinand Augustus Silcox, president of the Charleston 
Cotton Mills, and Carrie Olivia (Spear) Silcox. His father was of 
English descent and his mother of Dutch and French origin. 

He was prepared at the Charleston High School and received the 
degree of B.S. at the College of Charleston, S. C, in 1903 with honors 
in chemistry and sociology. He was a member of Phi Kappa Sigma. 

He was married March 4, 1908, in Charleston, S. C, to Miss Marie 
Louise Thatcher of Charleston, S. C. 

Silcox is a district forester, in charge of District i, with 
headquarters at Missoula, Mont. He writes : "During summer 
of 1904 I worked in West Virginia making a working plan 
under Ralph Hawley for the U. S. Coal & Coke Company, 
approximately 60,000 acres. Passed civil service exams in 1905 
and was assigned to the Leadville Forest in Colorado. For 
three months I worked as ranger, forest assistant and somewhat 
in the capacity of supervisor. The organization at that time 
had not crystallized and one man had charge of the Pike, Lead- 
ville and Holy Cross forests from Denver. In September, 1905, 
I was placed in charge of the Holy Cross Forest as acting 
supervisor to establish the administration and get things going. 
This forest was the center of bitter opposition to the Service 
and it was here that the famous Fred Light case first came up. 
After getting things under way I was sent to the San Juan 
and Montezuma with headquarters at Durango to get the admin- 
istration under way. These forests included together about 
3,000,000 acres, and when I arrived in early January, 1906, 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 



nothing- had been done. I stayed until April and was then sent 
to Montana with Mr. E. A. Sherman. I stayed two weeks and 
was called to Washington to serve in the capacity of district 
forester for District i. This under the old scheme was in no 
way similar to the present position. It was an assignment to 
handle general omnibus letters for signature of Washington 
office administration officers. Left Washington as assistant 
forest inspector and went to New Mexico to look over the 
Portales with the result of eliminating the entire forest. Came 
back to Montana in the spring of 1907 as forest inspector and 
put the administration on the newly created cabinet. With 
Redington, Class of 1904, worked up the plan of re-districting 
the forests in Montana and Idaho. From 1907 to December i, 
1908, was a general inspection officer. With the creation of the 
district office at Missoula for District i, I was appointed assistant 
district forester, which title was changed later to associate 
district forester upon district forester W. B. Greeley being 
called into Washington as assistant forester. I was made 
district forester July i, 191 1, which position I now hold." 
He is a member of the Society of American Foresters. 

Gordon E. Tower 

Business address, Waldo Hills Orchard Company, Route 5, Salem, Ore. 
Home address, Belding, Mich. 

Gordon Edwin Tower was born July 5, 1877, in Belding, Mich., the 
son of Benjamin Franklin Tower, a Civil War veteran, and Eva L. 
(Peterson) Tower. His grandfather was a Vermont Yankee. He has 
two brothers and a sister: R. Tower, B.S. Michigan Agricultural Col- 
lege, Glen Tower, Belding High School, and Nellie E. Tower. 

He prepared at the Belding (Mich.) High School, was graduated with 
the degree of B.S. at Michigan Agricultural College in 1901 and had 
served in the Forest Service from July, 1901, until entering the Yale 
Forest School. 

He was married December 21, 1905, in Portland, Maine, to Miss Bessie 
Geraldine Leeds, of Sioux City, Iowa, daughter of William B. Leeds 
and Sarah Ann Leeds. They have two children : William Gordon 
Tower, born December 26, 1906, in Orono, Maine, and Ellen Tower, 
born May 22, 1909, in Orono, Maine. 

Tower was an assistant at the Yale Forest School at Mil ford, 
Pa., during the summer of 1905 and then became professor of 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



forestry at the University of Maine, where he remainevi until 
1910. In Inly of the latter year he hecanie a horticulturist tor 
the Waldo Hills Orchard Company, in Salem. Ore. 

He is a Progressive Republican, a member of the Oregon 
Horticultural Society and the Free and Accepted Masons. 

He has published: Estimation of cellulose in wood by the 
chlorination method; Study of reproductive characteristics of 
lodgepole pine, Proc. Soc. Am. Foresters, 1907 to ux^S. 



Lage Wernstedt 

Fortst Stri'ice, Portland, Ore. 

Lage Wernstedt was born May j;, 1S78, in Strengniis. Sweden, the son 
of Judge Lage Wernstedt and Hanna (,RingK>rg') Wernstedt. He has 
seven brothers, most of whom are officers in the Swedish anny and 
navy. 

He was prepared at the Gymnasium. Norrkoping, Sweden, and received 
the degree of M.E. at the Royal Institute of Technology. Stockholm, in 
1902. and before entering the Yale Forest School, spent one year as a 
draftsman. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduation W'enistedt has been eng-aged as a forest expert 
and assistant. He writes: "I have been chiefly engaged in 
boundary work and general reconnaissance in Arizona, Cali- 
fornia. Oregon. Nevada. Washington. Idaho and Alaska. Also 
in national forest routine on the Priest River, Chugach and 
Columbia National forests. I have lately been occupied in 
making topographic maps and surveys." 

He is a member of the Societv of American Foresters. 



Triieman D. ^^\■)odbll^y 

Business address, 1204 First National Bank Building. San Francisco. Calif. 

Residence, 840 Van Ness Avenue. San Francisco. Calif. 

Care Forest Sen^ice, San Francisco, Calif. 

Trueman Doane Woodbur>- was born September 11, 1S7Q. in Bluehill, 
Maine, the son of Samuel Woodbur>-. a Baptist minister, son of Samuel 
and Jane Woodbury, and Adelia (Doane"* Woodbury, daughter of True- 
man and Thankful Doane. Both parents were descended from English 
ancestors, who settled early in this coimtry. in the vicinity of Salem and 
Cape Cod, Mass. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 ijj 

He prepared at Saxtons River Academy, Vermont, and received the 
degree of Ph.B. from Brown University in 1903. He vvas a member of 
Phi Beta Kappa. 

He is unmarried. 

Woodbury entered the Forest Ser\'ice on graduation in 1905 
and was forest assistant two years, inspector for two years and 
has since been an assistant district forester, with headquarters 
at San Francisco, Calif. 

He is a Republican. He is a member of the Commonwealth 
Club of San Francisco and is an Odd Fellow. 



Karl W, Woodward 

Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

Karl Wilson Woodward was born July 24, 1881, in Detroit, Mich., 
the son of Robert Simpson Woodward, C.E. University of Michigan 
'72, Ph.D. '<j2, president of the Carnegie Institute, Washington, and 
Martha Gretton C Bond J Woodward. Both parents are of English- Dutch 
descent, the families having been in this country several generations. 
He has two brothers, Robert Simpson Woodward, Jr., C.E. Columbia 
'01, and William L. Woodward, M.E. Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology '07. 

He prepared at Montclair High School, Montclair, X. J., and received 
the degree of B.A. at Cornell in 1904. 

He was married Septeml>er 11, 1909, in Missoula, Mont., to Miss 
Olive L. Smith, daughter of EUiward and L. Smith. 

Woodward is in charge of examination of lands and the 
acquisition of lands under the Weeks Law. His previous posi- 
tions were forest assistant, assistant forest inspector^ in charge of 
the project of "Northern Pacific Estimates" and as adviser to 
the Dominican government. 

He has written articles for the Forestry Quarterly and the 
Bulletins of the Bureau of American Republics. 



Theodore C. Zschokke 

Business address, 236 Broad Street, San Francisco, Calif. 
Residence, Palo Alto, Calif. 

Theodore Christian Zschokke was born October 9, 1875, in Wapello, 
Iowa, the son of Oscar Zschokke, deceased, son of Theodore and Julia 



114 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

(Koecklin) Zschokke, and grandson of Heinrich Zschokke, a Swiss 
writer, and Anna Margaret (Probst) Zschokke, who was born in Bavaria 
and came to the United States at the age of four. They had two other 
children : Arthur Jacob Zschokke, B.A. Leland Stanford, Jr., '02, and 
Irma Juha Zschokke, B.A. Leland Stanford, Jr., '08. 

He prepared at the Palo Alto High School, Palo Alto, Calif., and was 
graduated from Leland Stanford, Jr., University in 1903 with the degree 
of B.A. He had enlisted in Company K, First California Infantry, U. 
S. v., June 14, 1898, being discharged June 30, 1899. He enlisted in 
Company L, Thirty-sixth Infantry, U. S. V., July i, 1899, being discharged 
January 25, 1901. He took part in engagements and campaigns of these 
regiments in the Philippines. 

He was married September 15, 1904, in Mountain View, Calif., to 
Miss Mabel Grace Lyman, daughter of Edmund Lyman and May 
(Alney) Lyman. They have had two children : Theodore Oscar 
Zschokke, born September 22, 1906, in Manila, P. I., and Charles Edmund 
Zschokke, born July 7, 1912, and died July 8, 1912. 

Zschokke served as forester of the Bureau of Forestry, 
Manila, P. L, from September i, 1905, to September 14, 1910. 
On March 14, 1912, he became a partner in certain of the 
contracts of the Pacific Grading Company of San Francisco, 
and acts as foreman in charge of operations. 

He is a Progressive Republican and a Mason. 



Graduates holding Certificate but not Degree 
Harry M. Hale 

Okanogan, Wash. 

Harry Munro Hale was born March 23. 1881, in Elbridge, N. Y., the 
son of W. S. Hale and Czarina (Munro) Hale. 

He was prepared at the Munro Collegiate Institute, Elbridge, N. Y., 
and studied two years in the Cornell Forestry School before entering 
Yale. 

He was married November 4, 1910, in Aberdeen, Wash., to Miss Helen 
Greenwood, of Syracuse, N. Y. 

Since leaving the Yale Forest School Hale has been in the 
Government Service, as forest expert, assistant, deputy super- 
visor and is at present supervisor of the Okanogan Forest, 
District 6, with headquarters at Okanogan, Wash. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 115 

John S. Holmes 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

John Simcox Holmes was born May 31, 1868, in Coburg, Ontario, 
Canada, the son of George Holmes, who was born at Kings Heath, 
Birmingham, England, and Georgena Beatrice (Simcox) Holmes, who 
was born at Camp Hill, Birmingham, England. He has five brothers 
and sisters : George Hamilton, Lawrence Edward, Alan Launcelot, Mary 
Elise Beatrice (Allston) and Evelyn Holmes. 

He was prepared at the public schools of North Wales and in a private 
school in North Carolina. He attended the University of North Carolina, 
taking a two-year course in agriculture, leaving in 1888. He farmed in 
Henderson County, N. C, from then until November, 1902, when he 
entered the U. S. Forest Service as student assistant. 

He was married November i, 1909, in Georgetown, D. C, to Miss 
Emilie Rose Smedes, of Washington, D. C, daughter of John Esten 
Cooke Smedes and Henrietta Rea (Watts) Smedes. 

During 1905 Holmes was engaged in commercial tree studies 
in the South Appalachians and then was transferred to timber 
sale inspection in District 3 in 1906. He began the study of 
forest conditions of Kentucky in the summer of 1907 and 
received his present appointment as forester for the North Caro- 
lina Geological and Economic Survey in June, 1909. He spent 
the spring of 1912 in a trip through representative forests of 
France, Switzerland, Germany and some watersheds of England. 

He is Independent in politics but holds progressive views. 
He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, the Society 
of American Foresters, American Forestry Association, Cana- 
dian Forestry Association, North Carolina and Georgia 
Forestry associations. 

He has published : Brush disposal, Circ. U. S. Forest Service ; 
Forest conditions in western North Carolina, Bull. 2^, N. C. 
Geol. and Econ. Sur., Economic Papers, ig, 22, 25, etc. 

Stanton G. Smith 

Business address, Forest Service, Seattle, Wash. 
Home address, Berkley, Harford County, Md. 

Stanton Gould Smith was born July 19, 1882, in Berkley, Md., the 
son of Bernard Gilpin Smith and Rebekah Wright (Gould) Smith. A 
sister, Dorothy Cowgill Smith, was graduated at Smith College in 1909. 



ii6 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He prepared at Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa., and 
attended Cornell University for a time before centering Yale. 
He is unmarried. 

Smith entered the Forest Service in 1906 and has served 
in the positions of forest assistant, chief of section of boundaries, 
forest examiner and forest supervisor. He was appointed to 
this last position in October, 1909, and was located in Albu- 
querque, N. Mex., District 3, until January, 1913, when he was 
transferred to District 6, as supervisor of Snoqualmie National 
Forest, being stationed in Seattle, Wash. The district head- 
quarters are in Portland, Ore. 



NoN Graduates 
James M. Fetherolf 

Business address, Forest Serz'ice, Ogden, Utah 
Residence, 2550 Monroe Avenue, Ogden, Utah 

James Milton Fetherolf was born September 27, 1874, in Kempton, Pa., 
the son of James K. Fetherolf and Lydia D. (Kistler) Fetherolf. Both 
parents are of Pennsylvania German or Palatinate descent. They had 
six other children, three sons and three daughters : D. E. Fetherolf, 
Muhlenberg College, Lutheran Theological Seminary ; William Philip 
Fetherolf, Muhlenberg College, M.A. Princeton '04; N. J. Fetherolf, a 
graduate of Keystone State Normal School, forest planting assistant 
at Wasatch Nursery ; Anna L. L. Fetherolf, Keystone State Normal 
School ; Emma K. Fetherolf and Ella M. Fetherolf. 

He attended the common schools, worked on the farm, taught for a 
number of years, prepared for college at Lynnville Academy, and was 
graduated at Muhlenberg College with the degree of B.A. in 1901. 
Before entering the Yale Forest School he had worked for the Bureau 
of Forestry as a student assistant. 

He was married February 27, 1908, in Washington, D. C, to Miss 
Grace Moser, daughter of James Henry and Martha Scoville Moser. 
They have one son : James Moser Fetherolf, born May 13, 1910, in 
Ogden, Utah. 

Fetherolf served as forest assistant from 1904 to 1906, forest 
inspector, 1906 to 1908, and forest examiner, 1908 to 1912. He 
is now in charge of the reforestation work in District 4. 

He writes : "During the summer of 1904, I made an extensive 
study of planted groves in the two Dakotas and Western Minne- 



XON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 117 

sota. In this study extensive g^rowth and volume measurements 
were made in typical groves of various planted species with the 
idea of finding out the relative value of each species for further 
planting. 

"During the summer of 1906 a thorough planting reconnaissance 
was made of the Wasatch Forest in Utah with a view toward 
extensive reforestation of the denuded watersheds from which 
the city of Salt Lake derives its water supply, and in the spring 
of 1907 the Wasatch Nursery was established for the purpose 
of growing the needed planting stock. Since then this and other 
large nurseries in the district have become centers for distri- 
bution to other forests. 

During the summer of 1908 I was a general inspector in 
District 4 with headquarters at Salt Lake. Since then I have 
been in charge of the reforestation work in District 4 with 
headquarters at Ogden, Utah. 

He was brought up in the Lutheran Evangelical church of the 
General Council. He is a member of the Society of American 
Foresters, American Forestry Association, National Geographic 
Society and the Utah Pharmaceutical Association (honorary). 

He has published : Forest planting on the northern prairies, Circ. 145, 
U. S. Forest Service, March 20, 1908; Forest planting in national forests — 
I. Reforestation in the intermountain region, For. Quart., VII, No. 2, 
June, 1909 ; Ferns of Texas ; Forests of Texas ; Forestry investigations 
in the Dakotas; Forest extension in the Dakotas. 

David G. Kinney 

United States Forest Service, San Diego, Calif. 

Home address, Care A. E. Muth, 524 Hale Avenue, Avondale, 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

David Golden Kinney was born March 4, 1879, in Utica, N. Y., the 
son of Thomas Edward Kinney, LL.B. University of Virginia Law 
School, a lawyer (died in November, 1901), and Fanny (Golden) Kinney, 
daughter of David Golden, of Utica, N. Y. He is of Irish ancestry on 
his father's side and of Holland Dutch on his mother's. He has two 
brothers and a sister : Edward Kinney, studied at Harvard from 1904 
to 1907, Thomas Edward Kinney, Williams ex-og, and Rose Kinney, New 
York Art School. 

He was prepared at the Utica Free Academy and at St. Paul's School, 
Concord, N. H., graduating in 1898. The following year he entered 



ii8 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Harvard, leaving in 1901. In July, 1901, he began forestry work with 
the government and passed the civil service examinations in 1904. 

He was married May 11. 1906, in Cincinnati, Ohio, to Miss Lucy Muth, 
daughter of August and Emma (Helleberg) Muth. They have one 
daughter: Virginia Kinney, born November 28. 1909, in Missoula, Mont. 

After leaving: the Yale Forest School Kinney served a year 
in the forest products division of the Forest Service. From July 
I, 1905, to March 14, 1907, he was technical assistant on the 
forests now embraced by the Flathead, Missoula and Glacier 
National Park. From March 15, 1907, to 1912, he was a forest 
supervisor at Kootenai, Cabinet (N) and Missoula National 
forests. In the fall of 191 2 he was on furlough from duty and 
living in Cincinnati, Ohio. He was appointed supervisor of 
Cleveland National Forest, San Diego. Calif., on March i, 1913. 

He is a Progressive Republican. He is a member of the 
Episcopal church, the National Geographic Society and the 
Society of American Foresters. 



Harold D. Langille 

Business address, 1104 Spalding Building, Portland, Ore. 
Residence, 683 IVasco Street, Portland, Ore. 

Harold Douglas Langille was born September 19, 1874, in Tusket, 
Nova Scotia, the son of James Leander Langille and Sarah (Harding) 
Langille. He has two brothers : William A. Langille and Herbert B. 
Langille. 

He moved to Oregon in 1883, where he received his education in a 
country school. He grew up with a special interest for trees and botany 
and in 1900 was engaged by the L^nited States Geological Survey, later 
being transferred to the Bureau of Forestry, then to the interior depart- 
ment as forest inspector on forest reserves. 

He is unmarried. 

Langille studied in the Yale Forest School one year and 
served as forest inspector until August, 1905. He then resigned 
from government service and engaged in the real estate and 
timber business until December, 1906, when he became western 
manager of the Portland office of James D. Lacey & Company, 
timber land factors. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 119 



He has devoted most of his time to the examination of the 
forests of the Pacific Coast and made one trip exploring the 
forests of Chile. He is secretary of the Oregon Conservation 
Association. 

He served three years in the Oregon National Guard and is 
Progressive in politics. He is a member of the Portland 
Commercial Club and the Irvington Club. 

He has published : Forest conditions in the Cascade Forest Reserve, Prof. 
Paper No. 9, U. S. Gov. Ser., 1903; Taxation of timber, Ore. Forester, 
Portland, Ore., March, 1908; Forest chapter in 'The guardians of the 
Columbia" by John H. Williams, Tacoma, Wash., 1912. 



Chester A. Mathewson 

Business address, Training School for Teachers, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Residence, 354 New York Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Chester Arthur Mathewson was born December 11, 1878, in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, the son of Lewis W. Mathewson, a civil engineer, and Mary 
(Cannon) Mathewson. They were of New England ancestry. He has 
two brothers, Walter B. Mathewson and Stanley Mathewson, M.E. Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati. 

He attended the University of Cincinnati before entering Yale and 
taught in secondary schools. 

He was married August 28, 1907, in Bond Hill, Ohio, to Miss Nan 
Jenny, daughter of William M. Jenny and Mary (Manning) Jenny. They 
have one daughter: Marian Estelle Mathewson, born May 9, 1908, in 
New York City. 

Mathewson received the degree of B.S. at Columbia Uni- 
versity in 1905, M.A. in 1906 and Ph.D. in 1912. He has taught 
biology during this period, holding the following positions: 
instructor, Columbia University, 1905-06; Plainfield, N. J., 
1906-07; High School of Commerce, New York City, 1907-10; 
and professor of biology at the Training School for Teachers, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., since 1910. 

He was elected to membership in Sigma Xi in March, 1912, 
and is also a member of the Biochemical Association of Columbia 
University. 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



He has published : Course of pollen tube in Houstonia, Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, N. Y. City, 1906; Practical and scientific biology, Nature 
Study Rev., 1909; Practical biology, Yr. Book, N. E. A., 1910; A study 
of common biochemical tests, 1912. 



Ernest A. Sanders 

Westerville, Ohio 

Ernest Avery Sanders received the degree of M.A. at Ohio 
State University in 1903. He was registered at the Forest School 
during a part of the Junior year. He has furnished no informa- 
tion for this record. 



Herbert O. Stabler 

Business address, Forest Service, 501 Beck Building, Portland, Ore. 

Herbert Osburn Stabler was born December 25, 1878, in Sandy Spring, 
Md., the son of Asa M. Stabler, president of the Sandy Spring Savings 
Institution, and Albina (Osburn) Stabler. Both parents are of English 
descent, his mother's ancestors having first settled in this country in 
Virginia. He has three brothers : Newton, Mortimer and Llewellyn 
Stabler. 

He was prepared at the George School in Pennsylvania and attended 
Cornell Forestry School for the year previous to its discontinuance. 

He was married April 28, 1908, in Albany. N. Y., to Miss Elizabeth 
Elbrey of Sandy Spring, Md., daughter of Major Frederick W. Elbrey, 
a surgeon, U. S. Army, retired, and Katherine Cleggett Elbrey. 

Stabler was engaged as forest assistant on boundary work 
from 1905 to 1907; assistant chief of boundaries, July 29 to 
November 30, 1907; chief of boundaries, December i, 1907, 
to April 30, 1908; assistant chief, office of lands, May i, 1908, to 
October 31, 1908. Since November i, 1908, he has been forest 
supervisor of Columbia National Forest, Washington, with 
headquarters in Portland. 

He writes : "Since 1902 I have seen the Forest Service grow 
from little to big things, which has been fine. The Columbia 
Forest is a well-timbered, undeveloped country — all in all the 
best forest in the States — with the best headquarters." 

He is a member of the Society of Friends. He is a member 
of the Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1905 



Gardiner Watkins 

317 Broadway, New York City 

Gardiner Watkins was graduated with the degree of B.A. at 
Princeton University in 1903. He was registered at the Yale 
Forest School during the Junior year. He has furnished no 
information for this record. 

Arnot W. Whetstone 

Van Buren, Ohio 

Arnot Wilson Whetstone received the degree of M.A. at Ohio 
State University in 1903. He was registered at the Forest School 
during a part of the Junior year. He has furnished no informa- 
tion for this record. 

Edmund J. Zavitz 

Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph, Ontario, Canada 

Edmund John Zavitz was born July 9, 1875, in Ridgeway, Ontario, the 
son of Joseph I. Zavitz, a merchant, and Dorothy (Prout) Zavitz. 
His father was a Canadian born of German Swiss origin, his father com- 
ing to Canada at the time of the American Revolution. His mother was 
born in Cornwall, England, of Celtic origin. 

He attended Woodstock College and received the degree of B.A. from 
McMaster University, Toronto, in 1903. 

He was married December 28, 1905, in Toronto, Canada, to Miss 
Jessie E. Dryden, of Brooklin, Ontario, daughter of John and Mary 
Dryden. They have three children : John Dryden Zavitz, born December 
I, 1906, in Guelph, Ontario; Edmund Ross Zavitz, born March 14, 1909, 
in Guelph, Ontario, and Deane Clarance Zavitz, born May 21, 1912, in 
Guelph, Ontario. 

Since leaving the Forest School Zavitz has been employed 
as a forester at the Ontario Agricultural College and in the 
Department of Agriculture of Ontario. 

He is a Baptist. He is a member of the Canadian Club and 
of the Society of Canadian Forest Engineers. 

He has published : Farm Forestry Bull., 155, Ontario Dept. Agric, 
1907 ; Reforestation of waste lands in southern Ontario, Ontario Dept. 
Agric, 1908; annual reports in Ontario Agric. Coll. Rep., 1905-12. 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



CLASS OF 1906 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

J. Howard Allison 

Business address. Care of College of Forestry, University Farm, St. 

Paul. Minn. 

Residence, 21 16 Carter Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Granby, Conn. 

John Howard Allison was born September 25, 1883, in East Granby, 
Conn., the son of John Alexander Allison, a farmer and holder of various 
town offices, and Mary Elizabeth (Mack) AlHson. On his father's side 
he is Scotch, and on his mother's Irish. He has one brother, Nathan K. 
Allison, who attended Trinity College in Hartford in 191 1. 

He was prepared at the district schools in East Granby and Granby 
and at the Hartford High School in Hartford, Conn., and graduated 
from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale in 1905. 

He was married September 6. 191 1, in New Haven, Conn., to Miss 
^label Ann Shepard of Hamden, Conn., daughter of Henry Shepard 
and Alice M. (Warner) Shepard. They have a son, John Howard 
Allison, Jr.. bom April 19. 1913. 

From July 16, 1906, until January i, 1909, Allison held the 
position of forest assistant, assigned to general administration 
work on the Coconino (old San Francisco Mountains) National 
Forest until April i, 1908, and from July i, 1908, until January 
I, 1909, he was in charge of the Coconino National Forest 
reconnaissance party. From then until August 15, 191 1, he 
was inspecting reconnaissance work or in charge of field parties 
in District 3. He says: "During this time I prepared the 
Coconino Working Plan (area now embraced in the Coconino- 
Tusayan), which I believe I could now greatly improve. I do 
not now believe the Service is following the right 'tack' to 
get a working plan which produces 'plans' of value to super- 
visors. Since February i, 1912, I have been in charge of 
reconnaissance and since June 15, 1912, also in charge of the 
office of 'Geography' in District 3. During this time I have 
gathered the data for an accurate topographic and type map 
of the Sitgreaves, which I believe the Service will publish as a 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1906 i^ 

three color map late this fall. I have other forest maps in 
the process of compilation." He resigned from the Service 
in January, 19 13, to take up teaching at the College of Forestrj' 
at St. Paul, Minn. 

Concerning his travels, Allison writes: "My travels, outside 
of trips in connection with my duties in the Service, have 
been confined to brief pleasure trips to California (1906, 1909 
and 1911), the Yellowstone National Park (1909) and through 
the Canadian Rockies along the Canadian Pacific Railroad 

(1911)" 
He is a Congregationalist, and in politics is a Progressive 

Republican. From July, 1907, to July, 1910, he was a private 

in the Arizona National Guard. 



Fred E. Ames 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Beck Building, Portland, 

Ore. 
Residence, University Qub, Portland, Ore. 

Fred Elijah Ames was born July 21, 1880, in Spencer, Mass., the son 
of James Howe Ames, member of the Massachusetts lei^islature and a 
merchant in Spencer for twenty-five years, and Maria Theresa (Hill; 
Ames. He is of English ancestry. He has one brother, Leroy AUston 
Ames, B.A. Harvard 'g6 and M.A. '01, and two sisters : Alice Louise 
Ames and Florence Ella Ames. 

He was prepared at the David Prouty High School, Spencer, Mass., 
and attended the Lawrence Scientific School, Harvard, in 1899-00. In 
1903 he received the degree of B.A. at Hanard, where he was a member 
of Delta Upsilon. During the year 1903-04 he was emploved in a banking 
house in Boston, Mass. 

He is unmarried. 

Ames is assistant district forester in the United States Forest 
Service, in charge of the office of silviculture. District 6, Port- 
land, Ore. Upon entering the Ser\nce in July, 1906, he became 
forest assistant with headquarters at Washington, D. C. This 
position he held until April, 1907, when he was appointed assist- 
ant inspector with headquarters at Portland, Ore. In July, 
1907, he was made inspector and on December i, 1908, chief of 
silviculture, which position he held until his present appointment, 
January i, 19 10. 



_i24 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He writes: "After being graduated from the Forest School, 
received appointment to the United States Forest Service and 
was assigned to the Santa Catalina National Forest, Arizona, 
to report on the advisability of a large timber sale. From 
August to December, 1908, estimated and mapped timber on 
that forest. Then recalled to Washington for three months for 
office assignment. In April, 1907, was assigned as assistant 
inspector to the northwest district under Inspector E. T. Allen. 
Until August, 1908, was engaged in general inspection of forests 
in Oregon and Washington. In August called to Washington 
for office assignment preparatory to new work when reorganiza- 
tion of Forest Service was put into effect. December, 1908, 
returned to Portland as chief of silviculture in District 6, com- 
prising Oregon, Washington and Alaska, in charge of timber 
sales, planting, silvics and reconnaissance. Have held this posi- 
tion since then with change in title to assistant district forester. 
Work has consisted of office and forest supervision of above 
lines of work on the forests of the district." 

He is a member of the Congregational church and in politics 
is an Independent. He was elected to Sigma Xi while at Yale 
and is also a member of the Society of American Foresters, the 
National Geographic Society, the Multnomah Athletic Club of 
Portland, Ore., and the University Club of Portland. 

Martin L. Erickson 

Business address, Medford, Ore. 
Home address, Flandreau, S. Dak. 

Martin Lewis Erickson was born June 14, 1880, in Saint Olaf, Iowa, 
the son of O. W. Erickson and Gunild (Thompson) Erickson. He is 
of Norwegian ancestry. He has two brothers : Theodore O. Erickson, 
B.A. University of Minnesota '01 and LL.B. '03, and Eric E. Erickson. 

He was prepared at the high school in Flandreau, S. Dak., and in 
1901 attended the South Dakota State Agricultural College. In 1903 
he graduated from the Agricultural Department of the University of 
Minnesota. While in college he worked for lumber companies during 
vacations. 

He is unmarried. 

Erickson is supervisor of the Crater National Forest, with 
headquarters in Medford, Ore. He has held this position since 
December i, 1908. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1906 125 

Dennis C. A. Galarneau 

Business address. Department of Natural Resources, Canadian Pacific 

Railway, Montreal, Que., Canada 

Residence, 10 Bayle Street, Montreal, Que., Canada 

Dennis Camille Amedee Galarneau was born July 26, 1881, in Holyoke, 
Mass., the son of George Amedee Galarneau and Virginia (Robinson) 
Galarneau. On his father's side he is of French Canadian and on his 
mother's of French American ancestry. He has one sister, Aldina Anna 
Louise Galarneau, B.L.S. Simmons College. 

He was prepared at the Holyoke (Mass.) High School and received 
the degree of B.A. from Tufts College in 1904. He was a member of 
Theta Delta Chi. 

He was married June 29, 1910, in Boston, Mass., to Miss Marie Agnes 
May Papineau of Boston, daughter of Alfred Papineau and Josephine 
(Grabherr) Papineau, both deceased. 

Galarneau has been assistant forester for the Canadian Pacific 
Railway of Montreal, Canada, since November, 1912. He 
served in the United States Forest Service from July, 1906, to 
January, 1910, as forest assistant. He then became forester 
for John Fenderson & Company of Sayabec, Quebec, which 
position he held until February, 191 1, when he accepted an offer 
of employment in the Hampden Lumber Company, Springfield, 
Mass. In July, 191 1, he was appointed cruiser for the firm of 
Clark & Lyford, forest engineers of Vancouver, B. C, and 
from October, 191 1, to November, 1912, he held the same 
position in the firm of Lyford, Clark & Lyford of Montreal. 

He is a Roman Catholic. 



John D. Guthrie 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Springerville, Ariz. 

John Dennett Guthrie was born July 15, 1878, in Charlotte Courthouse, 
Va., the son of Eppa Dennett Guthrie, captain of militia in the Civil 
War and later in the Confederate Army, and Nancy Kate (Franklin) 
Guthrie, daughter of John and Martha (Anderson) Franklin. On his 
father's side he is of Scotch-Irish ancestry, the earliest American ancestor 
being Henry P. Guthrie, who settled in what is now King and Queen 
County, Va., on a grant of land received from the King of England, in 
the latter part of the seventeenth century. The Guthrie family originated 
in Scotland and was so named by King David, who knighted a member 



126 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

of the family for a favor done him while he was traveling through the 
north of Scotland. His mother's family was closely related to the 
Earlys, Johnstons, Andersons, Langhornes and Lees of Virginia. He 
had one brother, Charles Calloway Guthrie, now deceased, and four 
sisters : Mrs. William McQuown Thompson of Garanhuns, Brazil, S. A., 
Mrs. Mason Wiley Jones of Shawsville, Va., Mrs. Richard Edmonds 
Moseley of Jeffress, Va., and Mrs. Elmo E. Gibbs of Charlotte Courthouse, 
Va. 

He was prepared at the Charlotte (Va.) High School and in 1902 
received the degree of Ph.B. from Union College, where he was a member 
of Sigma Phi and editor of the college weekly and annual. After grad- 
uation from Union he was employed from 1902 to 1904 in the United 
States Forest Service in Tennessee, Maine, Texas, New Mexico, California 
and Utah. 

He was married March 25, 1912, in Riverside Ranger Station, Greer, 
Ariz., to Susan Ruggles Pratt Church of Brooklyn, N. Y., daughter of 
Judge Calvin E. Pratt, of the New York Supreme Bench (deceased), 
and Susan Pratt. 

Guthrie is supervisor in the United States Forest Service, in 
charge of the Apache National Forest, Arizona. From 1906 
to 1908 he was forest assistant and in 1908 was made deputy 
forest supervisor. He received his present appointment the 
same year. He writes : "Work in the Forest Service of the 
Department of Agriculture since entrance in 1902 has taken me 
into Tennessee, Maine, Texas, New Mexico, California, Idaho, 
Oregon, Utah, Arizona and New Hampshire. Entered the 
Forest Service as a student assistant, then rose to assistant forest 
expert, forest agent, forest assistant, deputy supervisor and 
forest supervisor, with a graduation from $300 per annum to 
$2,200 per annum. Entered and was assigned to collection of 
figures on growth, then later in working plan work in Texas, 
Maine and New Mexico, then in forest extension, later in 
investigations, then boundaries, then administrative work, where 
I am at present." 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church. Concerning 
politics, he writes that he is a "Progressive Democrat. Believer 
in tarifif for revenue only, conservation of national resources, 
and federal control of same so far as possible, regulation of the 
trusts, purity in politics, the recall and referendum (even of the 
judiciary), national aid to good roads, one term (six years) for 
president, popular election of senators, the primary system and 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1906 127 

Woodrow Wilson for president." He is a member of the Ameri- 
can Forestry Association, the Society of American Foresters, 
the American Academy of Political and Social Science, the 
National Geographic Society, the Concatenated Order of Hoo- 
Hoo, the National Conservation Association, the University Club 
of Washington, D. C, and the Sons of the American Revolution. 
He has published articles in the Forestry Quarterly and 
American Forestry — among them, Spitzenber planting tools (in 
Quarterly) and A big tree grove in California. He has lately 
prepared an anthology of forest verse. 



James A. Howarth, Jr. 

Care of Indian Agent, Cloquet, Minn. 

James Ashworth Howarth, Jr., was born July 11, 1875, in New Haven, 
Conn., the son of James Ashworth Howarth, postmaster at New Haven 
since 1898, and Lilian Frances (Stevens) Howarth. He is of English 
descent on both sides of the family. He has two brothers : Harry 
Arthur Stevens Howarth, Ph.B. Yale '99, and Thomas S. Howarth. 

He was prepared at the New Haven High School and attended the 
Sheffield Scientific School at Yale during the year 1893-94. In 1896 he 
received the degree of LL.B. cum laiide from the Yale Law School. 

He was married July 8, 1907, in Flambeau, Wis., to Miss Eva Mary 
Cyr of Flambeau, daughter of Alex Cyr and Severine (Auger) Cyr. 

From July i, 1906, to December, 1909, Howarth was forest 
assistant in the United States Forest Service, being assigned 
to the Indian reservations in Wisconsin and Minnesota. From 
December, 1909, to July 11, 1910, he held the same position 
in the Superior National Forest, Minnesota. He was granted 
a year's leave of absence, during which time he was engaged 
in selling Duluth real estate. He was then transferred to the 
Indian Service and assigned as forest assistant to Fond du Lac 
Reservation, Minnesota. He is now superintendent in the 
Indian Service at Cloquet. 

He writes : "Passed through the Spanish War without seeing 
any fighting as a sergeant in Captain Beach's Volunteer Battery 
C, Heavy Artillery, from New Haven. Was never ordered out 
of the state encampment at Niantic, Conn. Practiced law 
before and after the war in two New Haven offices. Case, Ely 



128 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

& Webb and J. B. Ullman. Tried business a few years in New- 
York and elsewhere. After graduating from the Forest School 
entered the United States Forest Service in 1906 and have since 
been employed in forestry work on Indian reservations in 
Wisconsin and Minnesota." 

He is a member of Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, New 
Haven. 



Frederick W. H. Jacombe 

Business address. Forestry Branch, Department of the Interior, 

Ottawa, Ont., Canada 

Home address, Westboro, Ont., Canada 

Frederick William Hudson Jacombe was born August 25, 1875, in 
Guelph, Ontario. 

He was prepared at the Guelph (Ont.) High School and received the 
degree of B.A. from the University of Toronto in 1896, and in 1898 
the degree of M.A. 

Jacombe is in the Forestry Branch of the Department of the 
Interior, Ottawa, Canada. 

He was secretary and treasurer of the Canadian Society of 
Forest Engineers during the years 1908-12, and at the same 
time assistant secretary of the Canadian Forestry Association. 
He is a Free and Accepted Mason. , 



Sydney L. Moore 

Business address, R. R. Sizer & Company, National Bank Building, 

Savannah, Ga. 

15 JVilliam Street, New York City 

Sydney Luard Moore was born June 18, 1882, in St. Louis, Mo., the 
son of Henry Walter Moore, editor and manager of daily newspapers 
in St. Louis and New York, and Sue (Vandegrift) Moore. His father 
prepared at the Gymnasium in Weimar, Germany, for entrance to the 
University of Jena, where he later studied. On his father's side he is 
of English and on his mother's of Dutch ancestry. 

He was prepared at the public schools in St. Louis, Mo., and in 1904 
received the degree of B.A. from Princeton University, where he was a 
member of Phi Beta Kappa and of the Princeton Campus Club. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1906 129 

He was married January i, iQio, in Denver, Colo., to Miss Frances 
Mary Hart of Denver, daughter of Dr. Charles N. Hart. 

Moore resigned from the Forest Service, March i, 1913, to 
enter the employ of R. R. Sizer & Company, timber brokers, 
of New York City. He writes: "Entered the United States 
Forest Service July, 1906, as forest assistant and was assigned 
to the (then) Sawtooth National Forest, Idaho, and engaged 
in general forest administration, especially timber sales. In 
June, 1907, was assigned to the Lewis and Clarke National 
Forest, Montana, on timber reconnaissance in cooperation with 
the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. In February, 1908, 
was appointed forest inspector with headquarters at Denver, 
Colo. In December, 1908, was appointed assistant chief of 
silviculture, Forest Service, District 2, Denver. In 1909, was 
appointed assistant district forester, in charge of silviculture at 
Denver." 

He is a member of the Episcopal church and in politics is an 
Independent. He was elected to Sigma Xi while at Yale and 
belongs to the Society of American Foresters. During the 
winter term, 1913, he was the lecturer at the Yale Forest School 
on the organization and management of the National forests. 

He has published : Regulating the annual cut of national forests, 
Proc. Soc. Am. Foresters, V, No. i, Washington, 1910; Harvesting the 
annual seed crop. Am. For., XVH, No. 3, Washington, 191 1; The equip- 
ment and operation of a German seed extracting establishment, For. 
Quart., IX, No. i, Cambridge, 191 1. 



Andrew E. Oman 

Weiser, Idaho 

Andrew Edward Oman was born June 27^ 1877, in Leonardville, Kans., 
the son of Andrew P. Oman and Clara (Johnson) Oman. His father 
is a director of the school board and a farmer — active in church work 
and in the improvement of rural conditions. He is of Swedish ancestry. 
He has two sisters: Amanda (Oman) Larsen and Ella A. Oman; and 
four brothers : John W. Oman and Clarence Oman, who took courses 
at Kansas State Agricultural College, and Harry Oman and Victor E. 
Oman, recipients of the degree of B.S., Kansas State Agricultural College. 

He graduated from the Kansas State Agricultural College in 1900 with 
the degree of B.S. He served as a cadet while at college. Following his 

9 



I30 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

graduation he taught three winters in the pubhc schools, working suniniers 
on the farm in partnersiiip with his brother John. 
He is unmarried. 

Oman has been employed in the I'nited States Forest Serviee 
as forest assistant with promotion as to salary, since July i, 
1906. his headquarters since July. 1909. being in the Weiser 
National Forest. Idaho. He writes: "From July i, icxx\ to 
July I, 1909, worked in \\'ashing1on, D. C. in the office of forest 
extension. From Jamiary i to March 12. 1012. taui^ht a ten 
weeks' term — ranger's short course in forestry — at Utah 
Agricultural College, Logan, Utah." 

He is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church. In politics 
he is a "Republican by inheritance and choice" and is pro- 
gressive in his views. He is a member of the Society of Ameri- 
can Foresters, the American Forestry Association and the Weiser 
Commercial Club. 



Arthur D. Read 

Bu.^Hess address. Forest Sen'ice, Washington, D. C. 
Home address, Senorito. Sandoval County, N. Mex. 

Anhur Davis Read was bom October 26. 18S2. near Quincy. III. the son 
of William Everet Read and May R. (Davis') Read. On his father's 
side he is of early Puritan stock and his grandfather lived at Keene, X. H., 
before moving to Illinois. He has three brothers : Kenneth C. Read. 
Howard S. Read and Leslie H. Read. 

He was prepared at the public schools in Emporia, Kans.. and in 1903 
received the degree of B.A. from the College of Emporia. 

He is unmarried. 

Read is an examiner in the L'nited States Forest Service. 
He is now in the Washington office working up results of the 
grazing reconnaissance in which he was engaged in 19 12. His 
district headquarters is Albuquerque, N. Mex. From 1906 to 
1908 he was forest assistant in the Service and supervisor from 
1908 to 1910. In 1910-11 he was deputy supervisor, after which 
he received his present appointment. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. Concerning 
politics he writes that he is an "insurgent Republican. Believe 
in the initiative, referendimi and recall of judges." He is a 
member of the Society of American Foresters. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1906 ^I 

Arthur B. Recknagel 

Business address, Department of Forestry, Q>mell University, 

Ithaca. N. Y. 

Home address, 222, East Nineteenth Street, Flatbush, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Arthur Bernharrl Recknagel was born December 15, 1883, in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., the son of John Hermann Recknagel, a commission merchant and 
president of the American Spice Trade Association, and Marie (Wester- 
mann; Recknagel (died May i, 1890J. He is the grandson on his father's 
side of Carl L. Recknagel and Elise CLohning; Recknagel of Brooklyn, 
N. Y., and on his mother's side of Bernhard Westermann and Johanna 
(Braschj Westermann of New York City. He has three brothers: Carl 
L. Recknagel, Jr., John H. Recknagel, Jr., and Harold S. Recknagel, 
Yale '98 and LL.B. Columbia '01 ; and two sisters : \'iola Recknagel 
and Friede Recknagel. 

He was prepared at Bedford Military Academy, Great Neck, L. I., and 
Adelphi Academy, Brooklyn, N. Y., and in 1904 graduated from Yale 
College, where he was a member of Sigma Xi and of the Orations Base- 
ball team and was the recipient of the Scott Prize in German. 

He was married August 25, 1909, in Albuquerque, N. Mex., to Miss 
Mary Thomas Miller of Harrisonburg, Va., daughter of Lewis Caperton 
Miller and Ada (Pilson; Miller. They have one son, Bernhard Wester- 
mann Recknagel, born June 11, 1912, in Dresden, Germany. 

Recknagel is professor of forestry in the New York State 
College of Agriculture at Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y., 
where he teaches forest management, forest utilization and wood 
technology. He has held this position since February i, 1913. 
He writes: "On entering the Forest Service as forest assistant 
in 1906 my first assignment was to Santa Fe, X. Mex., where 
I was engaged in timber sale examinations on the Jemez, Carson 
and Pecos National forests. Transferred in November to the 
Beaver National Forest, Utah, for similar work, and again to 
the Coconino National Forest, Flagstaff, Ariz., in December, 
where I remained on growth studies (western yellow pine), 
marking and estimates until the end of June, 1907, when I was 
ordered in to Washington for timber sale detail. In September 
and again in December I was in Georgia on congressional tours 
and in Tennessee on a woodlot examination. In January I was 
made acting chief of the reorganized section of reconnaissance, 
office of management. This appointment was confirmed in Feb- 
ruary and in April I started on a four months' trip to organize 



132 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

the new field work. This trip carried me to New Mexico, Colo- 
rado, Utah, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho and Washington. I 
returned to Washington, D. C, over the Canadian Pacific from 
Vancouver to Montreal. During August I was in Alabama 
on congressional tours and also conferred with the governors of 
Alabama and of Georgia as to Service cooperation with these 
states. In December I left Washington to take up my duties 
in District 3 as assistant chief of silviculture, remaining there 
for nearly three years or until October, 191 1, when I sailed for 
Europe on a year's leave of absence to study forest conditions 
abroad. 

"The fall semester I enrolled at the Forst Akademie at Ebers- 
walde, near Berlin, then I traveled through Germany, France, 
Switzerland and Austria. I became especially interested in 
the management: i. e., in the working plan practice of the 
various countries, and, on settling at Dresden for some months, 
specialized on this subject, having the Forst Akademie at 
Tharandt conveniently near. 

"Again and again it has been brought home to me that the 
experiences we are making and the stages through which we 
are passing are nothing new but merely the inexorable repeti- 
tion of history modified by changed economic conditions. But 
great as has been the progress made by European nations in 
the science of forestry, it has not resulted in stagnation. New 
ideas and improvements on old methods are constantly being 
introduced and all this makes for progress towards the ideal 
forestry which is, apparently, as far removed from realization 
in Europe as it is in America. 

"This progress of present day forestry in Europe is best 
exemplified, it seems to me, by the turning away from pure 
stands and artificial regeneration toward mixed stands and natural 
regeneration. Throughout Prussia the beech is being coaxed 
back among the Scotch pine stands. Saxony, where spruce 
was raised in pure stands for successive generations, has realized 
that this repetition of the same crop, however profitable, soon 
exhausts the soil. 

"Another striking example of this progress is Professor 
Wagner's 'Blendersaumschlag' or Border Cuttings, whereby 
he regenerates naturally under shelter working from the northern 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1906 133 

side, where is the maximum of sun and wind protection, towards 
the southern side of the stand. 

"In methods of artificial regeneration what struck me par- 
ticularly is the abandoning of the many complex planting instru- 
ments in favor of that simplest of all tools, the mattock. No 
more jamming of the seedling into the earth with crumpled, 
often injured root system, but a 'natural,' normal planting by 
hand in a mattock-made hole. 

"Finally I must mention the tendency away from large cut- 
ting areas with their attendant increased dangers of fire, drought, 
insects, fungi, wind, etc., towards smaller cutting areas and more 
of them: more points of attack as initial points in a well-planned 
cutting series progressing against the prevailing wind direction." 

Recknagel is an Episcopalian, and in politics is a Republican. 
He was at one time a member of Company C, First Regiment 
of Arizona Militia. He is a member of the Society of American 
Foresters. 

He has published : Practical fire protection, For. Quart., 1906, reprinted 
in Forest Leaves, Pa., 1906; Economics of protection, Forest Leaves, 
1906; The new reconnaissance, Proc. Soc. Am. Foresters, 1908, reprinted 
as pamphlet, Yale Pub. Ass'n, 1909 ; Marking in practice. For. Quart., 
1909; Progress of reconnaissance, For. Quart., 1910; Example of a 
German working plan, a translation. For. Quart., 191 1; Nomenclature of 
divisions of area in working plans, open letter. For. Quart., 1912; 
Prussian seed extracting establishments. For. Quart., 1912 ; The forests 
of northern Russia, a review, For. Quart., 1912; (With T. S. Woolsey, Jr.) 
European study for foresters, For Quart., 1912; Border cuttings, a sug- 
gested departure in American silviculture, Proc. Soc. Am. Foresters, 
1912; Four open letters to the Yale Forest Club, Am. For., 1912; (With 
I. F. Eldredge) Management of longleaf pine with special reference to 
the turpentine industry, Circ, U. S. Forest Service, 1912; The theory 
and practice of working plans, N. Y., John Wiley & Sons, 8vo, x + 230 
pp., illus. 

Alexander H. D. Ross 

Business address. Department of Natural Resources, Canadian Pacific 

Railway, Calgary, Alta., Canada 

Home address, 32 Kendal Avenue, Toronto, Ont., Canada 

University of Toronto, Toronto, Out., Canada 

Alexander Herbert Douglas Ross was born March 18, 1865, in Carlton 
Place, Ontario, the son of Walter Ross, a Presbyterian minister, and 



134 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Elisabeth (Burrowes) Ross. On his father's side he is of Scotch 
Canadian and on his mother's of English and Irish ancestry. 

He was prepared at the Carlton Place High School and Kingston 
Collegiate Institute and received the degree of B.A. from Queen's Uni- 
versity in 1888 and in 1889 the degree of M.A. Following his graduation 
from college he taught for thirteen years in the Ontario high schools 
and the Collegiate Institute. His specialty was mathematics and natural 
science. 

He is unmarried. 

In 1906-07 Ross was technical assistant in the Forestry Branch 
of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, Ontario. In October, 
1907, he was appointed lecturer in forestry at the University of 
Toronto, which position he still holds. He is also consulting 
forester in the Department of Natural Resources of the Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway, Calgary, Alberta. He received this 
appointment in May, 1912. 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church and in politics 
is a liberal Conservative. In 1887 he was color sergeant in the 
Princess of Wales Own Rifles, Kingston, Ontario. He is a 
Mason of the Grand Lodge of Canada and a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Grand Lodge of Ontario. 

He has written numerous articles on forestry for the Canadian 
Magazine, Canadian Courier, Canadian Forestry Journal, etc., 
and for the bulletins of the Dominion Forest Service. 



Robert Y. Stuart 

Business address. United States Forest Serz'ice, Washington, D. C. 

Robert Young Stuart was born February 13, 1883, in Carlisle, Pa., the 
son of William Chalmers Stuart and Janet (Morris) Stuart. He is of 
Scotch-Irish ancestry. He has one brother, Hugh Patterson Stuart, Ph.B. 
Dickinson '03, and one sister, Helen Beecher Stuart, who took a special 
course in music at Wilson in 191 1. 

He was prepared at the Carlisle (Pa.) High School, and received the 
degree of B.A. in 1903 from Dickinson, where he was a member of Phi 
Delta Theta and Raven's Claw. He spent the summer of 1903 in travel 
abroad and from October, 1903, to June, 1904, was traveling sales agent 
for the Aluminum Cooking Utensil Company of New Kensington, Pa. 
In 1906 he received an M.A. degree from Dickinson. 

He was married December 9, 1907, in Harrisburg, Pa., to Miss Janet 
Wilson of Harrisburg, daughter of David Wilson (deceased) and Frances 
Wilson. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1906 i35 

During July, August and September of 1905, before graduat- 
ing from the Yale Forest School, Stuart served as forest student 
in the United States Forest Service. In July, 1906, he was 
appointed forest assistant, which position he held until January 
I, 1908, when he became forest inspector. From December i, 

1908, to January i, 1910, he was assistant chief of operation, 
District i. He then received the appointment of district forester 
of the same district with headquarters in Missoula National 
Forest, Montana. In January, 191 3, he was appointed forest 
inspector in the department of silviculture in the Washington, 
D. C, office. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. He is a member of 
the Society of American Foresters, the Concatenated Order of 
Hoo-Hoo, and is a Mason. 

Horace F. Studley 

Business address, Studley Box & Lumber Company, Rochester, N. H. 
Home address, Rockland, Mass. 

Horace Franklin Studley was born April 10, 1882, in Rockland, Mass., 
the son of Gideon Studley and Hannah Elizabeth (Totman) Studley. 

He prepared at the Rockland (Mass.) High School and received the 
degree of B.A. at Harvard in 1905. 

He is unmarried. 

Studley writes: "After my graduation from the Yale Forest 
School in June, 1906, I was in the Forest Service until May, 
191 1 (with the exception of the year from July i, 1908, to 
July I, 1909). I spent about a year as a forest assistant on the 
Uinta National Forest in Utah. In the winter of 1907-08 I 
was a special agent in the bureau of corporations, doing work 
in Texas, Arkansas and Mississippi. In July, 1909, I was made 
deputy forest supervisor on the Uinta Forest and in November, 

1909, was made acting supervisor of the Nebo Forest in Utah 
and supervisor in January, 1910. I remained as supervisor of 
the Nebo Forest until May i, 191 1, when I resigned to take a 
position as salesman with the Studley Box & Lumber Company 
of Rochester, N. H. 

He has published : Uncle Sam's forest rangers. Tourists' 
Mag., N. Y., May, 191 1. 



136 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

W. Hoyt Weber 

Business address, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York City 
Home address, 131 Courtland Avenue, Stamford, Conn. 

William Hoyt Weber was born April 7, 1881, in New York City, the 
son of George Adam Weber, president of the Weber Rail Joint Company, 
now director of the Rail Joint Company, and Annie (Hoyt) Weber. He 
is the grandson on his father's side of John Harrison Weber and Caroline 
(Hoke) Weber, and on his mother's of William Hoyt and Mary 
(Cahoon) Hoyt. He has three sisters: Caroline Hoke (Weber) Luther, 
Helen H. (Weber) Howe and Muriel (Weber) Foote. 

He was prepared at King's School, Stamford, Conn., and with a tutor, 
and received the degree of B.A. in 1903 from Wesleyan University, where 
he was a member of Psi Upsilon. 

He was married April 21, 1908, in Mount Vernon, N. Y., to Miss 
Helen Elitha Roberts of Mount Vernon, daughter of Hiram Lane Roberts 
and Helen (Lamb) Roberts. They have one daughter, Helen Elethia 
Weber, born February 13, 1909, in Stamford, Conn. 

Weber is vice president of the Munson-Whitaker Company, 
a forestry concern of New York City. He has been with this 
company since February, 1908. In 1907-08 he was consulting 
forester and in 1908 spent some time with the Gunn Richards 
Company, public accountants, studying business methods. 

He was formerly a Methodist, but is at present a member of 
a union chapel in a nearby town. He is a member of the Society 
of American Foresters, the Psi Upsilon Club of New York 
City and the Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo. He is Secretary 
of the Class of 1906, Yale Forest School. 



Georg-e A. Wilmot 

Oflfice of the Jokai Retreat, Union of South Africa 

George Adelbert Wilmot was born in 1877 in Dublin, Ireland. 

He was prepared at St. Aiden's School, Grahamstown, South Africa, 
and at St. Mary's School, Canterbury, England. In 1895 he was 
graduated at the University of the Cape of Good Hope and in 1896 
at Katwijk, Holland. 

After graduation from the Yale Forest School in 1906 Wilmot 
became an instructor in the Forest School at Cape Town, South 
Africa. He is now reported to be in the office of the Jokai 
Retreat, but has furnished no information for this record. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1906 137 



Graduate holding Certificate but not Degree 
Rudo L. Fromme 

Olympia, Wash. 

Rudo Lorenzo Fromme was born July 10, 1882, in Saint Paris, Ohio, 
the son of Frank W. Fromme, advertising manager for some years 
for Gaar Scott & Company (manufacturers of threshing machines) of 
Richmond, Ind., and Stella L. (Riker) Fromme. On his father's side 
he is of German and Spanish and on his mother's of German and Scotch 
ancestry. He has one brother, Fred Denton Fromme, B.S. South Dakota 
State Agricultural College '11, and one sister, Nola Katheryn Fromme, 
B.S. Ohio State University '05. 

He was prepared at the high school in Richmond, Ind., and during 
the year 1901-02 attended Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind. In 1905 
he received the degree of B.S. from Ohio State University, where he 
was a member of Alpha Gamma Rho. He spent three months in the 
summer of 1905 as forest student. 

He was married May 20, 1908, in Priest River, Idaho, to Miss Ruby 
Ellen Gowanlock of Priest River, daughter of John A. Gowanlock and 
Mederise Gowanlock. 

Fromme has been supervisor of the Olympic National Forest 
with headquarters in Olympia, Wash., since September i, 1912. 
On August 16, 1912, he wrote: "Since leaving- Yale I have 
traveled but very little excepting on official business connected 
with the Forest Service. My first assignment after leaving 
Washington, D. C, was to the old Priest River National Forest 
in Northern Idaho as forest assistant, where I spent the summer 
of 1906 on and in the vicinity of Priest Lake, mostly fighting 
fires, carrying tools and supplies by row or sail boat up the lake 
and then packing them back into the mountains on my back. 
During the fall and winter I estimated timber, and later put 
through the first large commercial sales on that, now the 
Kaniksu, forest. In August, 1907, when Supervisor McConnell 
was dismissed, I was placed in charge of the Kaniksu and my 
headquarters changed to Newport, Wash. On May 20, 1908, 
I married my present wife, who was then residing with her 
parents in Priest River, Idaho, and in the latter part of Septem- 
ber, same year, we disposed of most of our newly purchased 
furniture in order that I might accept a new assignment as 
chief of operation in the San Francisco district office, obtaining 



138 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

a temporary detail of six or seven weeks in Washington, D. C, 
while en route. While in San Francisco, seven months, I had 
occasion to visit almost all of the forest headquarters and some 
of the forests proper of California, accepting an assignment as 
supervisor of the Klamath National Forest to supersede acting 
superintendent Harley in July, 1909. After one year in charge 
of the Siskiyou National Forest in Southwestern Oregon, I 
am now to leave in two or three days to take charge of the 
Olympic National Forest of Western Washington, a more 
important forest and a bigger job." 

In politics he is a "Progressive, generally Republican." He 
is a member of the Society of American Foresters, the Geological 
Society, the American Forestry Association and the Concatenated 
Order of Hoo-Hoo. 



NoN Graduates 
Ford D. Bacon 

Harveyville, Pa. 

Ford Dorrance Bacon was graduated from Bucknell Univer- 
sity in 1904. He attended the Yale Forest School in 1904-05. 
He has furnished no information for this record. 



* Jacob F. Bitner 

Died 1912 

Jacob Foster Bitner was born July 5, 1883, in Penn Hall, Center 
County, Pa., the son of Joseph K. Bitner, a retired farmer of Spring 
Mills, Pa., and Elizabeth P. (Fetterolf) Bitner. A sister, Jennie Coburn 
Bitner, survives him. 

He w^as prepared at Spring Mills (Pa.) Academy and in 1904 graduated 
from Franklin and Marshall College. 

He was unmarried. 

After leaving the Yale Forest School Bitner taught one term 
at the Center Hall (Pa.) High School and was agent for the Mor- 
ris Cigar house, later becoming agent for the Capewell Horse Nail 
Company of Hartford, Conn. He was employed for a time on 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1906 139 

the United States Geological Survey and during this period 
worked in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, West 
Virginia, Illinois and Michigan. On September i, 191 1, he 
accepted the position of wholesale agent for the Racine Lumber 
and Manufacturing Company of Racine, Wis., which he held at 
the time of his death. He had been on the road as a salesman 
seven years and during this time had traveled extensively. 

He was a member of the German Reformed church and in 
politics was a Republican. He belonged to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. 

He died February 20, 191 2, in the Borgess Hospital, Kalama- 
zoo, Mich., and was buried in Penn Hall, Center County, Pa. 



Edward G. Cheyney 

Business address, University Farm, St. Paul, Minn. 
Residence, 21 16 Knapp Street, St. Paul, Minn. 

Eldward Gheen Cheyney was born November 24, 1878, in Washington, 
D. C, the son of Rufus T. Cheyney, of the United States Navy Depart- 
ment, and Lucie Marie de Brunin (de Bolmar) Cheyney. On his father's 
side he is of English and on his mother's of French and French-Canadian 
ancestry. His maternal grandfather was an aide of Napoleon at the battle 
of Waterloo. He has one brother, Charles Bolmar Cheyney, B.A. Yale 
'95 and M.A. '04. 

He was prepared at Western High School, Washington, D. C, and 
received the degree of B.A. in 1900 from Cornell University, where he 
was a member of Alpha Zeta. In the year 1900-01 he was employed 
by the Deering Harvester Company of Chicago, 111., and in 1901-02 with 
the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad at Brunswick, Md. In 1902-03 he tutored 
in Apalachicola, Fla., and from July, 1903, to October, 1904, was student 
assistant in the Forest Service. 

He was married September 11, 1907, in Apalachicola, Fla., to Miss 
Harriet Frances Porter of Apalachicola, daughter of R. H. Porter. They 
have two daughters : Virginia Brunin Cheyney, born July 16, 1908, in 
Apalachicola, Fla., and Lucie Marie Cheyney, born September 7, 1909, in 
Apalachicola. 

In 1905-06 Cheyney was assistant and the next year instructor 
in forestry in the University of Minnesota. In 1907 he was 
made assistant professor and in 191 1 was appointed professor 
of forestry and director of the College of Forestry, his present 
position. 



I40 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

In politics he is a Progressive Democrat. He was secretary 
of the Minnesota State Forest Association from 1906 to 1912 
and since 1912 has been a member of the State Forestry Board. 
He is a member of the Society of American Foresters, the 
National Geographic Society, the Minnesota Forestry Club and 
the Campus Club of the University of Minnesota. 

He has written articles for the Forestry Quarterly and for 
Forestry and Irrigation and for three years was editor of the 
Minnesota Forester. 

Galen S. Cleland 

Wells, York County, Maine 

Galen Snow Cleland attended the Yale Forest School in 
1904-05. After leaving the School he was engaged in private 
work in Calais, Maine, and from January to October, 1907, he 
was with the Laurentide Company, Grand Mere, Canada. He 
has furnished no information for this record. 



Walter O. Filley 

Business address, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New 

Haven, Conn. 
Residence, 144 Whalley Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 

Walter Owen Filley was born July 27, 1877, in New Haven, Conn., 
the son of Myron W. Filley (deceased), a photographer, and Cleora 
(Gilbert) Filley. His father's ancestors came to Windsor, Conn., in 
1632, and his mother's settled in New Haven in 1638. He has one 
brother. Homer G. Filley, and three sisters: Mary E. (Filley) Wana- 
maker, Lovella C. Filley and Sara W. (Filley) Chatfield. 

He is a graduate of the Hillhouse High School, New Haven, Conn. 
Before entering the Yale Forest School he spent ten years in the photo- 
graphic business, including eighteen months with the Eastman Kodak 
Company, Rochester, N. Y. 

He is unmarried. 

Filley was at one time acting state forester of Connecticut. 
He afterward became assistant instructor in the Yale Forest 
School and later assistant in forestry at the Connecticut Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. He became assistant state forester 
in October, 191 1, and in September, 1912, state forester. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1906 141 

He is a member of the United (Congregational) Church of 
New Haven, Conn., and in politics is a Progressive. He served 
four years in the Naval Battalion, C. N. G., and three months 
in the Volunteer Navy, U. S. A. He is a member of the Society 
of American Foresters, the United Spanish War Veterans and 
the Patrons of Husbandry. 



*Gay E. Hills 

Died 191 1 

Gay Elijah Hills was born September 5, 1882, in Swanzey, N. H., the 
son of Calvin Elijah Hills and Anna (Gay) Hills. 

He was prepared at Keene (N. H.) High School, and in 1904 received 
the degree of B.A. from Dartmouth College. 

He was married November 17, 191 1, in Swanzey, N. H., to Miss Daisy 
Dawson of New York City, daughter of Walter Augustus Dawson and 
Kate C. Dawson. 

After leaving the Yale Forest School, Gay was employed by 
the Trumbull Electric Company of Plainville, Conn. 

He died November 19, 191 1, at his home in Swanzey, N. H. 



Elmer R. Hodson 

United States Forest Service, Ogden, Utah 

Elmer Reed Hodson was born June 2, 1875, in Salem, Iowa, the son 
of James Lindsay Hodson and Anna Mariah (McGriff) Hodson. He 
is the grandson on his father's side of George Hodson and Rebecca 
(Osbom) Hodson, and on his mother's side of James McGriff and Mary 
(Reed) McGriff. He is of English and Scotch ancestry. He has one 
sister, Lulu Hodson, and one brother, Eugene Hodson. 

He received the degree of B.S. from the Iowa State College in 1898, 
and in 1900 the degree of M.S. 

He is unmarried. 

Upon entering the United States Forest Service in June, 1905, 
Hodson was appointed forest assistant. He is at present forest 
examiner with headquarters in Ogden, Utah. He writes : 
"Have traveled in the South and West mainly, since leaving 
Yale. In 1905 was in the Carolina pine belt, in 1906 in New 
Mexico and Colorado, in 1907 in Montana and Wyoming and 



142 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

in 1908 again in Colorado. In December, 1908, was stationed at 
Ogden, Utah, headquarters of District 4, in charge of silvics." 

In politics he is a Progressive Republican. He is a member 
of the Society of American Foresters and is a Mason. 

He has published a few articles in Bulletin yi, U. S. Forest 
Service. 

J. Osborne Hopwood 

Business address, Central High School, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Home address, Primos, Delaware County, Pa. 

James Osborne Hopwood was born November 6, 1879, in Philadelphia, 
Pa., the son of John H. Hopwood and Rebecca J. (Scott) Hopwood. 
He is of English ancestry on both sides of the family. He has two 
brothers: Arthur M. Hopwood and John H. Hopwood, Jr. 

He was prepared at the Philadelphia schools and attended Cornell 
University one year. In 1904 he received the degree of B.S. from the 
University of Pennsylvania and in 1907 the degree of M.S. from Yale 
University. 

He was married June 20, 1907, in Philadelphia, Pa., to Miss Josephine 
L. Reed of Philadelphia, daughter of Orville Reed and Mark Anna 
(Leeds) Reed. They have two daughters: Josephine Lindsay Hopwood, 
born July 6, 1908, in Marion, Ind., and Margaret Scott Hopwood, born 
December 7, 1910, in Philadelphia, Pa. 

During the year 1906-07 Hopwood was chemist and forest 
adviser to the Publishers Paper Company of Portsmouth, N. H. 
In 1908 he was appointed head of the department of biology 
of the Marion Normal College, Marion, Ind. Since 1909 he 
has been a teacher of natural sciences in the Central High School, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

He is a member of the Teachers Association of Philadelphia. 

He has written an article: Legislation on measurement of 
logs for "Graves forest mensuration," N. Y., John Wiley & Sons, 
1907. 

Thomas P. Ivy 

Conzvay Center, N. H. 

Thomas Parker Ivy was born December 20, 1855, near Warsaw, Ala., 
the son of James Blow Ivy (died in 1872) and Sarah Evans (Reynolds) 
Ivy (died in 1909). His father was bom near Norfolk, Va., in 1818, and 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1906 143 

was a cotton planter and slaveholder with a plantation on the Tombigbee 
River, Alabama. He also assisted in the construction of the fortification 
around Mobile, Ala., for the Confederate Government. His mother was 
born in Williamson County, Tennessee, in 1818, daughter of Sherman 
Reynolds and Sarah (Parker) Reynolds. He has three brothers living: 
B. R. Ivy. William T. Ivy and Jesse C. Ivy, B.A. Harvard '74, LL.B. '^^. 

He received a B.A. at Harvard in 1881 and for many years was engaged 
as a private banker in Atlanta, Ga. Ill health, superinduced by a sun- 
stroke, forced him to give up banking. 

He was married in 1893 in Lowell, Mass., to Miss Julia Dalton Nesmith 
of Lowell, Mass., daughter of the late Hon. John Nesmith, lieutenant 
governor of Massachusetts, and Harriet (Mansur) Nesmith. 

Since leaving the Yale Forest School, Ivy has been engaged 
in forest engineering in Conway Center, N. H. 

He has published a pamphlet, the forestry problem in the 
United States, and various addresses on the subject of forestry. 



John E. Keach 

Business address, Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

John Everett Keach was born July 4, 1874, in Northampton, Mass., 
the son of John Keach and Ellen Maria (Jackson) Keach. His father 
.served in the Civil War, i8th Connecticut, from 1862 to 1864. He is 
the grandson of John H. Keach and Harriett (Young) Keach of Daniel- 
son, Conn. He has two brothers : Merrill Henry Keach, and Walter 
Edmund Keach, who attended the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale from 
1902 to 1906. 

He was prepared at the Northampton High School and at Andover 
and in igoo received the degree of B.A. from Yale. 

He was married December 26, 1907, in Boston, Mass., to Miss Alice 
Belle Ricker, Smith '98, of Falmouth, Maine, daughter of Wentworth 
Pottle Ricker and Dorcas Ann (Merrill) Ricker (now Mrs. Barker). 
They have one son, John Ricker Keach, born June 24, 1909, in Missoula, 
Mont. 

Keach has been an assistant in the United States Forest Ser- 
vice since graduating from the Yale Forest School. He writes : 
"Since leaving Yale Forest School I have served as forest 
assistant on the following national forests : Absaroka in Mon- 
tana, Payette in Idaho, Helena in Montana, Medicine Bow in 
Wyoming, and Arkansas in Arkansas. In 1908 was transferred 
to office work, District i, Missoula, Mont. In 1910 was trans- 



144 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

f erred to Saranac Nursery, Lolo National Forest, Montana; 
in 191 1 to Boulder Nursery, Helena National Forest, Montana, 
and St. Joe National Forest, Idaho; and in 1912 to Boulder 
Nursery, Helena National Forest." In 1913 he took his present 
position as assistant on the Lolo National Forest in Montana. 

He attends the Congregational church and is a member of 
the Society of American Foresters. 



Albert H. Pierson 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

Albert Halsey Pierson was born October 5, 1877, in East Orange, N. J., 
the son of Albert Fleming Pierson and Adelaide (Decker) Pierson. He 
is the grandson on his father's side of Albert Pierson and Jane (Arm- 
strong) Pierson and is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. On his mother's side 
he is the grandson of John Williams Decker, son of Alfred Decker and 
Kezia (Adams) Decker, and Maria Louisa (Haws) Decker. 

He was prepared at Newark Academy, Newark, N. J., and in 1899 
graduated from Princeton University with the degree of B.A. He then 
spent one year in a law office, one year with a business firm in New 
York and about two years at Biltmore Forest School and abroad. From 
October, 1903, to July, 1904, he served as forest student in the Forest 
Service. 

He is unmarried. 

Since September, 1910, Pierson has been statistician in forest 
products in the Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 
He is a member of the Princeton Club of New York. 



W. Kerr Rainsford 

Business address, 40 Central Street, Boston, Mass. 
Home address, Ridgefield, Conn. 

Rainsford is with Allen & Collens, architects, Boston, Mass. 



Jerome H. Ramskill 

Delta, Colo. 

Jerome Hinds Ramskill was born August 11, 1880, in Chicago, 111., the 
son of William F. Ramskill and Addie M. (Hinds) Ramskill. On his 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1906 145 

father's side he is of English, and on his mother's of Scotch-Irish 
ancestry. He has one sister, Emily H. Ramskill. 

He spent his early days in Maryland and Washington, D. C, where 
he attended high school. In 1902 he entered Cornell, continuing to study 
there until the Forest School was discontinued in 1903. 

He was married February 28, 1906, in Parowan, Utah, to Miss Jessie 
Messick of Westerville, Ohio, daughter of Rufus M. Messick and Mary 
Frances Messick. They have two daughters : Margaret H. Ramskill, 
born December 19, 1906, in Parowan, Utah, and Ruth Anna Ramskill, 
born November 23, 1912, in Delta, Colo., and one son, Jerome Hinds 
Ramskill, Jr., born April 23, 191 1, in Delta, Colo. 

Ramskill was appointed forest assistant in the United States 
Forest Service on July i, 1905, and was assigned to Sevier 
Forest Reserve, Utah. He was transferred in August, 1906, 
to Leadville National Forest, Colorado, and in November, 1907, 
to Uncompahgre National Forest, Colorado, which position he 
now holds. 

He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. 



Charles A. Scott 

311 North Eighteenth Street, Manhattan, Kans. 

Charles Anderson Scott was born January 30, 1875, in Westmoreland, 
Kans., the son of Adam Scott, a farmer, and Elizabeth (Anderson) Scott. 
His parents came to the United States from Scotland in 1870. He has 
two brothers : Thomas A. Scott, M.D. Rush Medical College, Portland, 
Ore., and John M. Scott, B.S.A. Kansas State Agricultural College, now 
vice director of the Florida Experiment Station, Gainesville, Fla. 

He lived on a farm and attended the common school at Westmoreland, 
Kans. In 1901 he graduated from the Kansas State Agricultural College 
with the degree of B.S.A. He was a cadet captain while at college and 
a member of Alpha Zeta. He was employed in the United States Forest 
Service from the time of his graduation until he entered the Yale Forest 
School. 

He was married September 30, 1903, in Hall's Summit, Kans., to Miss 
Laura Davidson (deceased), of Hall's Summit, Kans., daughter of Isaac 
Davidson and Mary Davidson. He was married a second time, on Janu- 
ary 30, 1907, to Miss Perley Burnham Jewett of Broken Bow, Neb., daugh- 
ter of Leander Hastings Jewett and Sarah M. Jewett. By this marriage 
he has two daughters : Sybella Adelaide Scott, born January 4, 1908, in 
Broken Bow, Neb., and Sarah Elizabeth Scott, born January 13, 191 1, in 
Manhattan, Kans. 



146 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Scott is state forester and professor of forestry at the Kansas 
State Agricultural College, which positions he has held since 
June I, 1910. He was forest assistant in the United States 
Forest Service in 1905 and forest supervisor from 1906 to 
December 31, 1907, when he became professor of forestry at 
Iowa State College. This position he held until his present 
appointment. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. He is a Pro- 
gressive. He is a member of the Society of American Foresters 
and is a Mason. 

He has written articles for Forestry and Irrigation and for numerous 
farm papers. He has also published articles in Bulletin 120 of the Iowa 
Experiment Station in Ames, Iowa, in 1910, and in Circulars 10, 13 and 
20 of the Kansas Experiment Station, Manhattan, Kansas, in 1911-12. 



Alpheus O. Waha 

United States Forest Service, Albuquerque , N. Mex. 

Alpheus Oliver Waha was born August 27, i88r, in Erie, Pa., the son 
of Charles H. Waha and Emma (Boitz) Waha. He is of German 
ancestry. He has three sisters : Nell, Bessie and Grace Waha, and three 
brothers: Leroy, Raymond and Howard Waha, B.S. Pennsylvania State 
University. 

He was prepared at the Erie High School, after which he worked 
with a manufacturing concern for two years. In 1901 he attended the 
Yale Summer School of Forestry, and in the fall of the same year entered 
the Bureau of Forestry, where he worked as a student assistant in Mary- 
land, Tennessee, New York, Maine, Texas and Alabama until 1904, when 
he entered the Yale Forest School. 

He was married January 12, 1910, in Albuquerque, N. Mex., to Miss 
Mary Simms of Herkimer, N. Y., daughter of George Simms and 
Charlotte (Snell) Simms. They have one daughter, Barbara Waha, 
born June 11, 1912, in Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Waha is assistant district forester in the United States Forest 
Service with headquarters in Albuquerque, N. Mex. From July 
I, 1905, to April 30, 1907, he acted as forest assistant, being 
assigned to Gila National Forest, New Mexico. In May, 1907, 
he was appointed forest inspector of District 3, which position 
he held until December, 1908, when he received his present 
appointment. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1906 147 

He is a member of the Lutheran church and in poHtics is a 
National Progressive. 

John P. Wentling 

Business address, University Farm, St. Paul, Minn. 

Residence, 2160 Carter Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Knox, Pa. 

John Philip Wentling was born February 2, 1878, in Knox, Pa., the son 
of Eli Wentling and Christina (Barlett) Wentling. He has three 
sisters and two brothers : Martha Ella Hugus, Melissa Cathrine Barlett, 
Anna Agnes Sheasley, Edward Henry Wentling and Charles Alvin 
Wentling. 

He was prepared at the Clarion (Pa.) College Institute and was 
graduated at Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa., in 1902. 
Previous to his college course he was a teacher in the public schools. 
After graduation from college he entered government work in forestry 
and worked in various parts of the United States until he entered Yale. 

He was married December 27, 1906, in Washington, D. C, to Miss 
Evelyn Price of Washington, D. C, daughter of Robert H. Price and 
Lucy A. Price. They have one daughter, Margaret Evelyn Wentling, 
born December 4, 1907, in Washington, D. C, and one son, John Philip 
Wentling, Jr., born September 14, 191 1, in Park Rapids, Minn. 

In 1905-06 WentHng was forest assistant in the United States 
Forest Service. In 1906 he was appointed professor of forestry 
at the Pennsylvania State Forest Academy, which position he 
held until 1908, when he became assistant professor of forestry 
at the University of Minnesota. In 1912 he was made associate 
professor, his present rank. From September, , 1912, to April, 
1913, he was in charge of the chestnut wood utilization, for the 
Pennsylvania Chestnut Blight Commission, during which time 
he was on leave from the University of Minnesota. 

He is a member of the Reformed Church in the United States. 
He is a member of the Society of American Foresters, Sigma 
Xi, the Pennsylvania and Minnesota Forestry associations, and 
the Forestry, Campus and Science clubs of the University of 
Minnesota. 

He has written Farm forestry (in collaboration), an article 
in the L. H. Bailey series ; articles for the circulars of the Forest 
Service ; and has delivered addresses which were published in 
various lumber journals in 1905-06. 



148 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Leslie L. White 

Vernal, Utah 

Leslie Leroy White was born in 1881 in Oskaloosa, Iowa. 
He received the degree of B.S. at Pennsylvania College and studied 
at the Cornell Forestry School one year before coming to Yale. 
He is married and has one daughter. 

After leaving- the Yale Forest School in 1905 White entered 
the Bureau of Forestry and was assigned to District 4, where he 
was engaged in silvicultural work. He left the United States 
Forest Service in April, 191 1, and has furnished no information 
for this record. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 149 



CLASS OF 1907 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

William B. Barrows 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Home address, Croton on Hudson, N. Y. 

William Burnett Barrows was born June 13, 1885, in Matthewson, 
Kans., the son of William Kent Hayes, at one time postmaster at Par- 
sons, Kans., and now connected with the Parsons Water Supply & Power 
Company, and Caroline Alabama (Burnett) Hayes. He is of Scotch 
and English ancestry. He is the adopted son of Samuel June Barrows, 
B.D. Harvard Divinity School '75 and D.D. Howard University, Wash- 
ington, '97, of English and Huguenot ancestry, and Isabel Chapin (Hayes) 
Barrows, sister of William Kent Hayes. Samuel Barrows is an ex- 
congressman and clergyman ; he represented the United States on the 
International Prison Commission in 1896 and was corresponding secretary 
of the Prison Association of New York in 1900. He has two sisters : 
Janet (Hayes) Davis, a graduate of Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity, and Anna Gibb Hayes ; and one brother, Edgar Burnett Hayes, a 
graduate of the University of Kansas. He has an adopted sister, Mabel 
Hay (Barrows) Mussey, a graduate of Radclifife College; also a step- 
sister, Helen Margaret Hayes, and two step-brothers : Robin Leslie Hayes 
and Alfred Leslie Hayes. 

He was prepared at the Edward Everett School, Boston, Mass., the 
Boston Latin School, the Mechanic Arts High School, Boston, and the 
Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn. In 1905 he received the degree of 
B.A. from Columbia University. 

He is unmarried. 

Barrows has been forest assistant in the United States Forest 
Service since July i, 1907, and is at present in charge of the 
section of forest measurements in the Washington office. He 
spent the greater part of the summer of 1912 with E. H. Froth- 
ingham, a graduate of the University of Michigan, in a study 
of hemlock and northern hardwoods in the Lake States. He 
writes: 'T spent seven months during the summer of 1909 in 
Montana estimating timber. During 191 2 I spent four months 
studying the results of forest planting in the East and Middle 
West." 



ISO YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Concerning politics, he writes: "Am independent in politics, 
prejudiced against all conservative and reactionary policies." 
He is a member of the Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo. 



Avila Bedard 

Business address, Parliament Buildings, Quebec, Canada 
Residence, 574H St. John Street, Quebec, Canada 

Jaseph Avila Bedard was bom June 6, 1884, in Sainte Anne de la 
Perade, Quebec, the son of Timothee Misael Bedard, a hardware dealer, 
and Mathilde (Jobin) Bedard. His father's ancestors came from the 
parish of Saint Sulpice, Paris, France, in 1666 and settled in Quebec; his 
mother's came from Normandy, France. He has one brother, Lucien 
Bedard, and eight sisters : Bernadette, Marie Louise, Caroline, Emelie, 
Juliette, Lucienne, Cecile and Anna-Marie Bedard. 

He was prepared at the primary and commercial schools of Quebec, 
took the classical course at the Seminary of Quebec, where he remained 
until he was nineteen years of age, and in 1905 graduated from Laval 
University, Quebec, with the degree of B.A. 

He was married July 5, 1908, in Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada, to Miss 
Albertine Saint-Denis of Montreal, Canada, daughter of Felix Saint- 
Denis and Emelie (Jobin) Saint-Denis. They have two daughters: 
Marcelle Bedard, born November 2, 1909, and Marguerite Bedard, born 
December 29, 191 1. 

Since July, 1907, Bedard has been assistant chief forest engi- 
neer in the provincial government of Quebec. He is also pro- 
fessor of silviculture at the Quebec Forest School, Laval 
University, which position he has held since 1910. He writes: 
"All my practical forestry work was done in the province of 
Quebec on crown lands forests and in northern New Brunswick 
on private estates. Went to France and Switzerland during the 
winter of 191 1 to study forestry. Followed the practical works 
carried out in the Vosges forests (France), together with the 
professors and students at Nancy (Ecole des Eaux et Forets)." 

He is a member of the Roman Catholic church. He is a mem- 
ber of the Canadian Forestry Association and of the Societe 
de Geographic de Quebec. 

He has published newspaper articles on forestry and colonization in 
Action Sociale; reports in the Minister of Lands and Forests' annual 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 151 

reports; and articles on forests in the Bulletin de la Societe Geographique 
de Quebec, in Album Souvenir and in the Canadian Forestry Association 
Journal. 



John Bentley, Jr. 

Business address, New York State College of Agriculture, Cornell 
University, Ithaca, N. Y . 

John Bentley, Jr., was born June 8, 1880, in Brooklyn, N. Y., the 
son of John Bentley and Lizzie (Annin) Bentley. On his father's side 
he is of English, and on his mother's of Welsh ancestry. He has two 
brothers: Wray A. Bentley, M.E. Columbia '98, and Ellis W. Bentley; 
and three sisters : Nellie R. Bentley, Meta E. Bentley, B.A. Smith '00, 
and Georgia M. Bentley. 

He was prepared at Adelphi Academy and the Brooklyn High School 
and received the degree of B.S. from Wesleyan University in 1904. He 
was a member of Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa. 

He was married October 5, 1910, in Denver, Colo., to Miss Sue Hay- 
ward of Ottawa, 111., daughter of Hazen Hayward and Martha (McMur- 
ray) Hayward. 

From July to December, 1907, Bentley was employed in the 
Ritter Lumber Company of Mortimer, N. C. He served in the 
United States Forest Service from January, 1908, to December, 
191 1, and on January i, 1912, received his present appointment 
as assistant professor of forestry at the New York State College 
of Agriculture, Cornell University. 

He is a member of the Methodist church. At Yale he received 
an election to Sigma Xi. 

He has published: Pitch pine in Pennsylvania, For. Quart., 
1905 (compiled from statistics gathered by Forest School at 
Milford, Pa., 1904). 



Ovid M. Butler 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Ogden, Utah 
Home address, 124 Downey Avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Ovid McOuat Butler was born July 14, 1880, in Indianapolis, Ind., the 
son of Scot Butler, formerly president of Butler College, Indianapolis, 
and Julia (Dunn) Butler. He is the grandson of Ovid Butler, founder 
of Butler College. He has four sisters : Georgia Elgin Butler, Evelyn 



152 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Mitchell Butler, Elizabeth Ann Butler and Cordelia L. Butler, and one 
brother, John Scot Butler, all graduates of Butler College. 

He was prepared at the Butler Preparatory School and in 1902 received 
the degree of B.A. from Butler College, where he Was a member of Sigma 
Chi. In 1902-03 he worked as student assistant in the Bureau of Forestry 
about eight months and for two years afterward was engaged in news- 
paper work in Indianapolis. 

He was married November 28, 1908, in Indianapolis, Ind., to Miss Adele 
McMaster of Indianapolis, daughter of John L. McMaster and Alpha 
(Steenrod) McMaster. 

Butler is assistant district forester in the department of silvi- 
culture in the United States Forest Service with headquarters at 
Ogden, Utah. Upon entering the Service in July, 1907, he was 
appointed forest assistant. He afterward became deputy forest 
supervisor and later assistant chief of silviculture. 



Philip T. Coolidge 

Business address, New York State Ranger School, Wanakena, N. Y. 
Home address, 77 Garfield Street, Watertown, Mass. 

Philip Tripp Coolidge was born December 5, 1883, in Fall River, Mass., 
the son of Herbert Coolidge and Phila Emma (Tripp) Coolidge. His 
father was active in public affairs, being a member of library, finance 
and town committees. He is the grandson on his father's side of John 
Coolidge of Watertown, Mass., and Martha (Sturtevant) Coolidge of 
Waterville, Maine, and on his mother's side of Azariah S. Tripp and 
Elizabeth R. (Griffin) Tripp, both of Fall River, Mass. He has two 
sisters: Delpha Coolidge, B.A. Vassar '07, and Elizabeth G. Coolidge; 
and one brother, Roger Coolidge. 

He was prepared at the Cambridge Latin School and in 1905 received 
the degree of B.A. from Harvard University. 

He is unmarried. 

Coolidge is professor of forestry, in charge of the New York 
Ranger School, at the New York State College of Forestry, 
Syracuse, N. Y. From 1906 to 1909 he acted as forest assistant 
in the United States Forest Service, chiefly in the national forests 
of Colorado. In 1909-10 he was assistant professor in the Colo- 
rado School of Forestry, Colorado College, and in 19 10 became 
professor and director of this School. This position he held 
until he received his present appointment in 1912. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 153 

He is a member of the Unitarian church and in politics is a 
Progressive. He is a member of the Society of American 
Foresters. 

He has published : Notes on the screech owl, Auk, 1903 ; 
Silvicultural treatment of abandoned pastures in southern New 
England, For. Quart., 191 1. 



Lincoln Crowell 

Business address, Office of Indian Affairs, Neopit, Wis. 
Home address, 8 Monadnock Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

Lincoln Crowell was born October 30, 1883, in Boston, Mass., the son 
of Samuel Crowell and Maria (Lincoln) Crowell. He has two brothers: 
Samuel Crowell, Jr., and David Crowell. 

He was prepared at the Mechanic Arts High School, Boston, Mass., 
and in 1906 graduated from the University of Maine with the degree 
of B.S. 

His engagement has been announced. 

Crowell entered the United States Forest Service in Septem- 
ber, 1907, as forest assistant. In March, 191 1, he became deputy 
forest supervisor, which position he held until April, 1912, when 
he was made forest examiner. In 1913 he was transferred from 
the Forest Service to the Office of Indian Affairs in the Depart- 
ment of the Interior as deputy supervisor of forests. He is at 
present stationed at Neopit, Wis., where he is doing general 
forest assistant's work on the Menominee Indian Reservation. 
During the winter of 1911-12 he attended the Biltmore Forest 
School during its German tour. 

He is a member of the Unitarian church. He is a Free and 
Accepted Mason. 



Stephen M. Crowell 

Business address, Weyerhaeuser Timber Company, Tacoma, Wash. 
Home address, Middletown, Conn. 

Stephen Miller Crowell was born in February, 1884, in Middletown, 
Conn., the son of Lewis M. Crowell and Clara Whitmore (Miller) 
Crowell. He is of English ancestry. He has two sisters : Abbie H. 



154 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Crovvell, D.D.S. University of Pennsylvania, and Irene W. Crowell; and 
one brother, Eldon L. Crowell. 

In 1902 he received the degree of B.Agr. from the Connecticut Agri- 
cultural College and in 1905 the degree of B.S. 

He is unmarried. 

Crowell is in the employ of the Weyerhaeuser Timber Com- 
pany, of Tacoma, Wash., locating logging railroads, mapping and 
timber cruising. From August 15, 1907, to September i, 1908, 
he was with the Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company, Negaunee, 
Mich. ; from September 5, 1908, to December 3, 1909, with 
the Twin Falls Logging Company, Yacolt, Wash., and during 
February, March and April, 1912, with Fisher, Bryant & 
Olmsted of Boston, Mass. 

He is a member of the Methodist church. 



Samuel T. Dana 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Residence, Takoma Park, Washington, D. C. 

Samuel Trask Dana was born April 21, 1883, in Portland, Maine, the 
son of John Winchester Dana, a captain in the Civil War and for many 
years treasurer of the Portland & Ogdensburg Railway, and Martha 
Oliver (Fessenden) Dana. On his father's side he is of French and 
Scotch, and on his mother's of English ancestry. He has two brothers : 
John F. Dana, B.A. Bowdoin College '98 and LL.B. Harvard Law School 
'01, and Harold F. Dana, B.A. Bowdoin '99 and LL.B. Harvard Law 
School '02; and one sister, Helen T. Dana, B.A. Smith '09. 

He was prepared at Portland High School. Portland, Maine, and in 1904 
received the degree of B.A. from Bowdoin College. He is a member of Psi 
Upsilon, Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi. Before entering the Yale 
Forest School he spent a year in further study and private work at home 
in Portland, Maine. 

He was married May 10, 191 1, in Washington, D. C, to INIiss Katherine 
Mahie Fletcher of Middlebury, Vt., daughter of Dolphin Samuel Fletcher 
and Clara Louise (Smith) Fletcher. Mrs. Dana died in August, 1912. 

Dana has been assistant chief of silvics in the United States 
Forest Service with headquarters at Washington, D. C, since 
January i, 1910. From July 15, 1907, to December 31, 1909, 
he was forest assistant in the Service. Since the spring of 
191 1 he has been a member of the editorial advisory board 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 155 

of American Forestry. He has made one field trip to the North- 
east and three field trips to various parts of the West. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. In politics 
he was "previously Republican ; at present Progressive." He 
has been treasurer of the Society of American Foresters since 
February, 1910, and from February, 191 1, to February, 1912, 
was a member of the Committee on Admissions. 

He has published : Extent and importance of the white pine blight, Circ, 
U. S. Forest Service, May 26, 1908; Paper birch, Silvical Leaflet 38, 
Oct. 20, 1908; Paper birch in the Northeast, Circ. 163, U. S. Forest Service, 
July 7, 1909. He has also written book reviews and various news items 
for American Forestry and has done considerable work on manuscripts by 
other authors. 

Raymond Davis 

Business address, Yakima Hotel, North Yakima, Wash. 
Home address, 62 Bowdoin Street, Portland, Maine 

Raymond Davis was born September 5, 1883, in Portland, Maine, the 
son of John Hobart Davis, cashier of the Casco National Bank, Portland, 
Maine, and Jennie E. (Constable) Davis. He is the grandson on his 
father's side of Solomon Davis and Mary Davis of Portland, Maine, 
and his mother's parents were William Constable and Mary Constable 
of St. John, N. B., Canada. He has one brother, Marshall Davis. 

He was prepared at the high school in Portland, Maine, and in 1905 
graduated from Bowdoin College with the degree of B.A. At college 
he was a member of Psi Upsilon. 

He was married August 25, 1909, in Portland, Maine, to Miss Avis 
Miriam Parker of Portland, daughter of Albert Henry Parker. 

After graduating from the Yale Forest School, Davis was 
employed by the Cloquet Lumber Company of Cloquet, Minn., 
nominally as forester, but in reality to learn the lumber business. 
He then became cashier of the Warren Construction Company 
at North Yakima, laying the bitulithic pavement. He is at 
present engaged in fruit ranching in North Yakima, Wash. 

He writes: "Since leaving Yale and the Cloquet Lumber 
Company, where I spent a little over two years, I made a trip 
to Florida with a view of taking over the forestry work of a 
large paper company at Gainesville, but did not do so. I then 
moved to Washington, where I have since been developing my 
orchard, part of the time living on the ranch and during the 



156 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

winters working in town. Was also connected for a short time 
with the Imperial Oil Company of Vancouver, B. C." 

He is a member of the Unitarian church and in politics is 
a Progressive Republican. He is a member of the University 
Club of North Yakima. 



Nils B. Eckbo 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Ogden, Utah 
Home address, Slemdal per Kristiania, Norway 

Nils Bonnevie Eckbo was born February 4, 1885, in Kristiania, Norway, 
the son of Nils Henrik Eckbo and Martha (Jensen) Eckbo. He is a 
descendant of the Vikings. He has four brothers and a sister : Evind 
Eckbo, a graduate of Aars and Voss's College and Kristiania University, 
a supreme court lawyer ; Axel Eckbo, a graduate of Kristiania Business 
College; Leo, a graduate of Hauges Minde College and a military col- 
lege, now a captain in the army; Olaf, a graduate of Aars and Voss's 
College and the University of Berlin, now an electrical engineer; and 
Gunnvor Eckbo. 

He was prepared at Aars and Voss's and attended Ragna Nielsen 
College, Norway, spent one year lumbering and then graduated from the 
Stenkjar Forest Academy, Norway, in 1904. Later he was engaged in 
lumbering in Maine and New Hampshire. 

He is unmarried. 

Eckbo has been in the United States Forest Service since 
July, 1907. He is now forest examiner on Uinta National 
Forest, with headquarters at Provo, Utah. He writes: "From 
July, 1907, to July, 1908, did forestry work in the Northwest 
and California. From July, 1908, to July, 1909, studied forestry 
in Japan, Germany, Austria and Switzerland. From July, 1909, 
to July, 1912, did forestry work in various parts of District 
4 — in Idaho, Utah and Arizona. My experiences since leaving 
Yale have been in forestry lines and in the study of Mormonism, 
the Bible, creative evolution and down to the 'Fearsome 
Creatures of the Timberwoods' by Cox." 

He is a member of the American Forestry Association. 

He introduced the peavy or cant hook into Norway by an 
article in Tidsskrift for Skogbrug (a forestry professional 
paper) in 1904. He has also written short articles for the 
Forestry Quarterly and some of the lumber journals. 



GRADUATE S CLASS OF 1907 157 

John H. Foster 

Durham, N. H. 

John Harold Foster was born April 13, 1880, in Waltham, Mass., the 
son of John Foster and Nellie (Webster) Foster. His father was born 
in Marlow, N. H., and his ancestors came from Massachusetts. His 
mother was born in Royalston, Mass. He has two sisters : Lena F. 
(Foster) Wood and Ethel D. (Foster) Muzzey. 

He was prepared at the Waltham High School and received the degree 
of B.S. from Norwich University in 1903. In 1903-04 he was a student 
at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. At college he was a mem- 
ber of Theta Chi and Alpha Zeta. He spent the year 1904 in a European 
trip and in 1904-05 was an instructor in Lawrence Academy, Groton, Mass. 

He is unmarried. 

Foster is professor of forestry in the New Hampshire State 
College and forester of the State Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, which positions he has held since September i, 191 1. He 
was at one time forest assistant in the United States Forest 
Service and later was assistant chief of state cooperation. He 
writes that his chief experiences in the Service consisted of 
work in the "Rocky Mountain region or in silvical investiga- 
tions, studies of forest conditions in Alabama, Mississippi and 
Louisiana in separate years, woodlot and timber tract examina- 
tions over all the eastern states, examinations of forest con- 
ditions on watersheds of Allegheny and Monongahela rivers for 
Pittsburgh Flood commissions, and in the study of taxations of 
forests in New Hampshire for the State Forestry Commission." 

He is a member of the Unitarian church. In 1902-03 he was 
first lieutenant of the Vermont National Guard. He is a 
member of the Society of American Foresters, the American 
Forestry Association, the Society for the Protection of New 
Hampshire Forests, the Eastern Foresters Association, the 
Souhegan Country Club, and is a Mason. He is Secretary of 
the Class of 1907, Yale Forest School. 

He has published : Cut over lands in Mississippi, Circ, U. S. Forest 
Service ; Engelmann spruce in Rocky Mountains, Circ, U. S. Forest 
Service; Report on taxation in New Hampshire, Rep. State Forestry 
Com., 1907-8; Report on watershed conditions. Rep. Pitts. Flood Com., 
1911; Care of farm woodlots, Circ, N. H. Agric. Exp. Sta. ; Forest con- 
ditions in southwestern Mississippi, Bull., Miss. State Geol. Sur. He has 
also written miscellaneous articles in magazines and lumber journals. 



158 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Bartle T. Harvey 

Business address, United States Bureau of Entomolog}-, 265^ Fifth 

Street, Portland, Ore. 

Home address, 46 Main Street, Orono, Maine 

Bartle Trott Harvey was born November i, 1882, in Fayetteville, Ark., 
the son of Francis Le Roy Harvey, B.S. Iowa State College '72, M.S. 
'86 and Ph.D. '90, and Addie Lillian (Bartle) Harvey, who did three years 
special work at Iowa State College. His father was professor of mathe- 
matics at Humboldt College, Iowa, in 1874, professor of chemistry and 
natural history at the University of Arkansas from 1875 to 1885, and 
professor of biology at the University of Maine from 1887 to 1900; he has 
written many scientific articles, discovered about fifty forms new to science 
in fossil plants, flowering plants, fungi, algae and insects, and there are 
six plant forms and one insect form named after him. He is the grand- 
son of Daniel Harvey and Arminda (Wilkins) Harvey, daughter of 
William Wilkins. His mother's parents were Ransom Bartle, a descend- 
ant of Colonel Peter Bulkeley, founder of Concord, Mass., of Joseph 
Loomis, founder of Windsor, Conn., and the Bacons of Middletown, 
Conn., and Martha (Newkirk) Bartle, a descendant of the Von Nieuen- 
kirchs of Holland and the Stuarts of Scotland. He has two brothers : 
Le Roy Harris Harvey, M.S. University of Maine '01 and Ph.D. Univer- 
sity of Chicago '05, and Willis Lake Harvey, B.S. University of Maine; 
and two sisters : Florence Evelyn Harvey, a special student three years 
at the University of Maine and a graduate of the Boston Children's 
Hospital, and Ruth Josephine Harvey. 

He was prepared at the Orono High School and in 1905 was graduated 
with the degree of B.S. from the University of Maine, where he also 
did special work in diseases of trees. At college he was a member of 
Phi Gamma Delta. Before entering the Yale Forest School he was 
engaged for some time in tree trimming and landscape gardening, worked 
in woods, mills, followed surveying, mapping and estimating of timber, 
and collected and sold insects and plants. 

He is unmarried. 

Harvey was appointed entomological assistant in the United 
States Bureau of Entomology, Portland, Ore., on August 28, 
1912. He was at different times forester of the Great Northern 
Paper Company of Bangor, Maine, forest assistant in the United 
States Forest Service, salesman for the Cree Publishing Com- 
pany, Seattle, Wash., and for the Tunnison Map Company of 
Chicago, 111. He has been deputy forest fire warden, deputy 
forest fish and game warden and licensed guide of the State of 
Maine and special deputy sheriff of Multnomah County, Port- 
land, Ore. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 159 

He writes : "My collections were chiefly of fungi, mosses, 
dragon flies and spring tails. The ranges of certain species 
were extended and new species in fungi and spring tails were 
discovered. Made four expeditions on marine biological collect- 
ing trips along the coast of Maine for the state." He has 
contributed a collection of the woods of Maine, also minerals, 
animals, birds, insects, tree diseases, etc., to the museum of the 
University of Maine. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. In politics 
he has no party choice, but believes in the right man for the 
right place. He also believes in equal suffrage. He is a repre- 
sentative of the United Press Syndicate and a member of the 
Maine Forestry Association, the American Forestry Association, 
the National League for Medical Freedom and the Maine State 
Hunters Association. 

He has written articles on forestry for the Bangor (Maine) 
Daily Commercial and Morning Oregonian, Portland, Ore. In 
1912 he made contributions to the list of dialect expressions in 
the annual publication of the American Dialect Society. 



Charles S. Judd 

Business address, 409 Beck Building, Portland, Ore. 

Residence, 734 East Main Street, Portland, Ore. 

Forest Service, Portland, Ore. 

Charles Sheldon Judd was born July 11, 1881, in Honolulu, Hawaii, 
the son of Albert Francis Judd, LL.D., Yale '62, and Agnes Hall (Boyd) 
Judd. His father graduated from Harvard Law School in 1864, and 
was given the degree of LL.D. by Yale in 1894. He also was secretary 
of the Constitutional Convention of the Hawaiian Kingdom in 1864, 
attorney general in 1873, associate justice of the supreme court of Hawaii 
in 1874, chief justice from 1881 until his death in 1900 and chancellor of 
the Hawaiian Kingdom until it ceased to exist. He is the grandson 
of Dr. G. P. Judd, who went to Hawaii as a medical missionary in 
1827 and afterwards was adviser to Hawaiian kings, and a descendant 
of Thomas Judd, who emigrated from Kent, England, to Cambridge, 
Mass., in 1634. His mother was the daughter of James R. Boyd, a Con- 
gregational minister in Geneva, N. Y., and also chaplain and professor 
at Hamilton College, principal of Maplewood Institute at Pittsfield, 
Mass., and head teacher at Abbott Collegiate Institute, New York City. 
He has two sisters, Agnes E. Judd and Sophie B. Judd, and seven 



i6o YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

brothers : Albert Francis Judd, Yale '97 and '00 L. ; James Robert 
Judd, Yale '97 and M.D. College of Physicians and Surgeons '01 ; Allan 
W. Judd ; Henry Pratt Judd, Yale '01 ; Gerrit P. Judd, D. V.S. University 
of Pennsylvania ; and Lawrence M. Judd. A cousin, George R. Carter, 
graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School in 1888. 

He was prepared at the Punahou School, Hawaiian Islands, and gradu- 
ated from Yale College in 1905, where he was a member of the Sophomore 
Football Team and of the Cap and Gown Committee and received a 
second colloquy appointment in his Junior year. He was also a member 
of Alpha Delta Phi, Elihu Club and Sigma Xi. 

He was married June 11, 1910, in New Haven, Conn., to Miss Louise 
Luquiens of New Haven, daughter of Professor Jules Luquiens, Ph.D. 
Yale 1873, head of the French department at Yale (died August 23, 1899), 
and Emma (Clark) Luquiens. She has two brothers: Huc-Mazelet 
Luquiens, Yale '02, and Frederick Bliss Luquiens, Yale '97. 

During the summer of 1906 Judd returned to Honolulu after 
a five years' absence. He worked for the Board of Commis- 
sioners of Agriculture and Forestry of the Territory of Hawaii 
for seven weeks in Honolulu and on the island of Kauai, taking 
measurements of growth and volume in six hundred acres of 
planted forest trees. He writes : "Immediately upon graduation 
from the School I entered the Forest Service as forest assistant 
in management and started west with my assistant chief, stop- 
ping off at the Medicine Bow Forest, Wyoming. In California 
we visited the Diamond Mountain and Plumas forests, attended 
the Irrigation Congress at Sacramento, and visited the Shasta 
Forest. I was then stationed on the Diamond Mountain from 
September, 1907, to April, 1908, where I was engaged in the 
administration of two large timber sales, marking western yellow 
pine for cutting, and scaling logs. I also surveyed ranger stations 
and claims and, after the snow came, drew maps in the super- 
visor's office. In April, 1908, I was called into the Washington 
office, where during a long hot summer I became thoroughly 
imbued with the timber sale policy and procedure of the Forest 
Service. At the time of the redistricting in December, 1908, I 
was promoted and assigned to the district office at Portland, 
Ore., as assistant chief of silviculture. During the summer of 
1909 I inspected the Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington, 
covering a large area of forested mountains in the Cascades east 
of Seattle. In thirty days I traveled on foot 340 miles, visiting 
all of the operations on the forest and often alone, but more 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 161 

often with a ranger, slept out under a giant hemlock or huge 
Douglas fir overnight and lived for the most part on trout and 
wild blackberries. In October, 1909, I went to Los Angeles 
with my mother and was best man at the wedding of my 
brother Henry. In December of the same year I estimated 
timber on snowshoes on the Whitman Forest in eastern Oregon. 
In the spring of 1910 I inspected timber sales and seed sowing 
operations on the Oregon National Forest near Mt. Hood. 

"In May, 1910, I went east to New Haven, Conn., where I 
was married on June 11. On the honeymoon trip west we 
stopped off at Salem, Ohio, and Cashmere, Wash., visiting 
relatives, before returning to Portland. During August, 1910, 
while the forest fires were at their worst, visited most of the 
National forests in Washington in a seed collecting campaign. 
In the fall of the same year inspected seed sowing operations 
on the Olympic, Columbia, and Oregon forests. In February, 
191 1, lectured on timber sales at the Ranger School of the 
University of Washington at Seattle. While inspecting timber 
sales on the Colville Forest in northeastern Washington in June, 
191 1, received the offer of a position in Honolulu from the Gov- 
ernor of Hawaii. On July 25, 191 1, entered upon the duties of 
commissioner of public lands and president and executive officer 
of the Board of Commissioners of Agriculture and Forestry, 
Territory of Hawaii. 

"During September, 191 1, made the circuit of the Island of 
Hawaii on an official automobile trip with the Governor and 
Attorney General of the Territory and on the way back to 
Honolulu stopped off for some goat hunting on the almost 
uninhabited desert island of Kahoolawe. As president of the 
Board of Agriculture and Forestry, began a campaign for the 
control of a serious infestation of the Mediterranean fruit fly 
and was instrumental in passing a dog quarantine regulation 
to prevent rabies from getting to the Islands. 

"Returned to Portland, Ore., during March, 1912, and 
resumed duties with the Forest Service as assistant district 
forester, District 6." 

He was a messenger in the Citizens' Guard of Hawaii during 
the revolution of 1905 and a trooper in the Mounted Reserves, 
Republic of Hawaii, at the time of annexation to the United 



1 62 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

States in 1908, and served in the same capacity as a quarantine 
guard at Makapuu Pass, Oahu, for two months in 1900 during 
the epidemic of bubonic plague. 

Judd is a member of the Central Union Church (Congrega- 
tional) of Honolulu. He is a Republican, and is a member of 
the Society of American Foresters, the Concatenated Order of 
Hoo-Hoo, the Oregon Conservation Association and the 
University Club of Honolulu. 

He has published : The sandalwood tree in Hawaii, For. and Irr., April, 
1905; Summer session of the Yale Forest School, For. and Irr., March, 
1906 ; Seed distribution in Hawaii, Haw'n Agric. and Forester, Jan., 1907 ; 
A mesquite grove in Hawaii, For. and Irr., April, 1907 ; Efficacy of goats 
in clearing brush lands in the Northwest, Proc. Soc. Am. Foresters, VI, 
No. I, 191 1 ; Western red cedar, The Timberinan, Portland, Ore., Oct., 
1910; Portland needs an arboretum — Open letter to the Oregon Daily 
Journal, Portland, Ore., April 19, 191 1; Two minor wood industries, 
For. Quart., X, No. 2, 1912. 



Francis B. Kellogg 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Beck Building, Portland, 

Ore. 

Home address, 98 El Camino Real, Berkeley, Calif. 

Francis Bentley Kellogg was born August 28, 1879, in Anaheim, Calif., 
the son of George Herbert Kellogg, B.A. Kenyon College '68, and Fay 
(Chase) Kellogg. He is the grandson of Rev. Ezra B. Kellogg, D.D., 
who served in the War of 1812, and Anna (Thompson) Kellogg, and 
the great-grandson of Jason Kellogg. On his mother's side he is the 
grandson of Rev. Dudley Chase, U. S. A., appointed chaplain in the regular 
army by Lincoln, and Sarah Griflfeth (Wells) Chase, and the great-grand- 
son of the Rt. Rev. Philander Chase, Episcopal bishop of Ohio and Illinois 
and founder of Kenyon College, and Hon. Bezaleel Wells, founder of 
Canton, Wellsville and Steubenville, Ohio. He has one sister, Grace 
Wells Kellogg. 

He was prepared at the Lowell High School and Boone's University 
Academy and in 1905 graduated from the University of California with 
the degree of B.S. He was a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Skull 
and Keys. 

He is unmarried. 

Kellogg entered the United States Forest Service July i, 1907, 
as forest assistant on the Sierra South National Forest, Califor- 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 163 

nia, and later was transferred to the Rainier Forest, Washington. 
He then became timber cruiser for the Department of the 
Interior, Oregon. He again was appointed forest assistant in 
timber sales. District 6, and after this deputy forest supervisor 
of Cascade National Forest, Oregon. He is at present forest 
assistant with headquarters in Portland, Ore. 

He is a Progressive. He is a member of the University Club 
of Portland, Ore., and the Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo. 

He has published : The Problem of the dune, Calif. Jrl. Tech., 
1904. 

Kingsley R. MacGuffey 

Parkdale, Ore. 

Kingsley Rich MacGuffey was born January 5, 1880, in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, the son of Alexander Hamilton MacGuffey, LL.D., a lawyer of 
the firm of MacGuffey, Morrell & Strunk, and Caroline Virginia (Rich) 
MacGuffey, a niece of Maria Mitchell, professor of astronomy at Vassar 
College, and a descendant of John Rich, first Earl of Warwick, England. 
His father is a non-graduate of Miami University, having been a stu- 
dent there in 1832 and was dean of the Cincinnati College of Law. On 
his father's side he is of Scotch and on his mother's of American 
descent. He had three brothers : Telford, Winthrop, C.E. Harvard '95, 
and Harold, all deceased; and two sisters: Agnes (deceased) and 
Margaret, who graduated from the Albany State Library School in 1896. 
An uncle, Frederick Packard, graduated from Yale in 1848. 

He was prepared at the Taft School, Watertown, Conn., and graduated 
from Yale in 1905, where he was Dwight Hall organist and a member 
of the Boys' Club Committee. 

He is unmarried. 

MacCjruffey is president of the Red Cross Orchard Company 
of Parkdale, Ore. In addition to managing his ranch there, 
he is also in the employ of the Pacific Telephone & Telegraph 
Company of San Francisco. He entered their traffic department 
in February, 1913. 

Immediately after graduation from the Forest School in 1907, 
he entered the United States Forest Service, spending the months 
of July and August making a study of hickory in Tennessee, 
and from then until November he was stationed in Washington, 
D. C. From there he was sent to Missoula, Mont., as forest 
assistant. He held this position until June, 1908, when he was 



i64 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

given a furlough, and in company with Nils B. Eckbo, M.F. '07, 
took a trip around the world, visiting Japan, China, Siberia and 
the principal European countries. In January, 1909, he returned 
to this country and reentered the Forest Service, remaining 
until June, 1909, when he resigned. He spent the summer in 
England, returning in December of this same year. In com- 
pany with Russell Gordon Pond, of the Class of 1906, Biltmore 
Forest School, he took up the business of fruit-growing, incor- 
porating the Red Cross Apple Company, of which he is president. 
MacGuffey is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Commercial and 
University clubs of Hood River and the Upper Hood River 
Progressive Association. 



Clyde S. Martin 

Business address, Elma Camp, No. i, Saginaw Timber Company, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 

Residence, 304 West Third Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 

Clyde Sayers Martin was born September 19, 1884, in Waynesburg, 
Pa., the son of Charles Alexander Martin, one of the first teachers in 
the Calcutta Boys School, India, and Florence Adelaide (Sayers) Martin. 
He is of Scotch-English ancestry. He has one brother, Edwin Ezra 
Martin. 

He received the degree of B.S. in 1905 from De Pauw University, 
where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi. 

He was married June 30, 1909, in Rushville, 111., to Miss Florence 
Alexander Roach of Rushville, daughter of Herschel B. Roach and 
Helen (Chadsey) Roach. They have one son, Charles Alexander 
Martin, born May 9, 1910, in Aberdeen, Wash. 

From 1907 to 1912 Martin was with the Weyerhaeuser Timber 
Company, where he acted as fire warden, inspector, compass- 
man, timekeeper, logging engineer, trespass man and topog- 
rapher. Since July 10, 1912, he has held the position of logging 
engineer with the Saginaw Timber Company. 

He writes : "My work here has grown entirely apart from 
forestry as a profession in itself. It is rather logging engineer- 
ing in its broader sense; going on the theory that after all is 
said and done logging is a problem of transportation primarily. 
In this country of large timber our operations have developed 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 165 

on such a large scale that the larger companies have found 
pressing need for a systematization of methods and accounting. 
A technically trained man working from a basis of thorough 
understanding of present methods and conditions is preeminently 
the man for this work. It takes years of hard preparatory work 
under actual logging conditions to fit a man for such a position, 
but the future promises great things for the man who will 
persevere until he is a recognized authority on scientific logging. 
And it is the forester working from the inside, with a full 
knowledge of actual conditions who can best say to what extent 
forestry may be practiced by the logger. Briefly, these are the 
lines upon which I am working and by which I hope to show 
that there is a field for the technical man in private work." 

He is a member of the Methodist church and in politics is a 
Progressive Republican. He is a member of the Concatenated 
Order of Hoo-Hoo. 



David T. Mason 

United States Forest Service, Missoula, Mont. 

David Townsend Mason was born March 11, 1883, in Newark, N. J., 
the son of William B. R. Mason, postmaster of Bound Brook, N. J., 
a newspaper publisher, manager of a water company and president of 
the Building Loan Association, and Rachel Manning (Townsend) Mason. 
He is a descendant on his father's side of Captain John Mason, who with 
two brothers settled in Massachusetts in 1634. One of these brothers 
operated the first sawmill in New England, on the Piscataquis River in 
Maine. His mother's ancestors came to New Jersey in colonial times, 
some of them having land of royal grant, part of which is still in the 
family. He has two brothers : Fred R. Mason, B.S. Rutgers '05 and 
M.F. Yale '11, and H. F. R. Mason. 

He was prepared at the Plainfield (N. J.) High School and received 
the degree of B.S. from Rutgers College in 1905 and in 1908 the degree 
of M.S. At college he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Chi Psi. 

He was married October 4, 1911, in Missoula, Mont., to Miss Georgia 
Evelyn Polleys of Missoula, Mont., daughter of Edward H. Polleys and 
Edna (Woodcock) Polleys. 

Since graduating from the Yale Forest School, Mason has 
been employed in the United States Forest Service, where he 
has held the following positions : forest assistant, Montezuma 
National Forest, Colorado, and Washington, D. C, July i, 1907, 



i66 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

to June 30, 1908; assistant chief of timber sales, Washington, 
D. C, July I, 1908, to November 30, 1908; assistant chief of 
silviculture, District i, Missoula, Mont., December i, 1908, to 
July I, 1909; assistant district forester. District i, Missoula, 
Mont, July i, 1909, to July i, 1910; forest supervisor, Deer- 
lodge National Forest, Montana, July i, 1910, to July i, 1912; 
and assistant district forester, District i, Missoula, Mont., July 
I, 1912, to the present time. In January, February and March 
of 191 1 and 1912 he was detailed to give work in connection 
with short courses in forestry at the University of Montana. 
He has in preparation a bulletin on the lodgepole pine in which 
many new and interesting facts are set forth. 

In politics he is a "Progressive — Independent." He is a 
member of the Society of American Foresters and the Concat- 
enated Order of Hoo-Hoo. 



Louis S. Murphy 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Home address, 4 Thurston Street, Winter Hill Station, Boston, Mass. 

Louis Sutliflfe Murphy was born August 10, 1876, in Boston, Mass.. 
the son of Joseph Henry Murphy and Ehzabeth Marion (Atkins) 
Murphy. He is the grandson on his father's side of Michael Thomas 
Murphy, born in Ireland in 1797, and Eleanor Jane (O'Neal) Murphy, 
born in Canterbury, England, in 1806, who were married in Halifax, 
N. S., Canada, in 1831. His mother's foster parents were Sophronia 
Elizabeth Atkins and Caleb Upham Atkins. 

He was prepared at the Forster Grammar School, Somerville, Mass., 
and at the Boston English High School and from July, 1895, to Sep- 
tember, 1897, was a clerk in the insurance office of O'Brion & Russell, 
Boston. In 1901 he received the degree of B.S. from Tufts College, 
where he was a member of Delta Tau Delta. From 1901 to 1905 he was 
employed as chemist in the North Packing & Provision Company of 
Somerville, Mass. 

He is unmarried. 

Murphy has been a forest examiner in the United States 
Forest Service since January, 1910. He was forest assistant 
from July, 1907, to January, 1910. From November, 191 1, to 
May, 1912, he was in Porto Rico studying its forest problems 
and formulating a forest policy for the Island as a whole and 
for Luquillo National Forest. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 167 

He writes : "Porto Rico presents unusual interest for the 
forester just now, for, unless all signs fail, both the Forest 
Service and the Government of Porto Rico will soon need one 
or more trained foresters to direct the forestry operations which 
each seems destined to institute in the near future. Conditions 
in Porto Rico are ripe for the practice of intensive forestry 
from the start. Formerly well timbered, the Island is now only 
sparsely wooded. Not only have its inhabitants, — now number- 
ing 1,116,000 or 325 persons per square mile, — drawn freely 
upon this resource in the past, and even destroyed it to make 
way for agriculture and cattle raising, but considerable timber 
has also been exported. 

"A dense population, geographic isolation, short hauling dis- 
tances, a productive soil, a year round growing season, and an 
abundant native tree flora, not to mention exotics, constitute 
the materials at hand. The forest fire menace is negligible and 
frosts are unknown, although excessive precipitation, the trade- 
winds, and an occasional hurricane will have to be given con- 
sideration. The production of cabinet woods for export will 
have no place in Porto Rican forestry, since local consumption 
will take care of all that the lands available for forestry will 
produce. Wood for fuel is most urgently needed, also for posts 
and house piling, structural materials for native use, and for 
boxes and crates for the shipment abroad of the fruit and other 
products of the Island. 

"Altogether the working out of a successful forest policy to 
meet these various needs, as well as the demands for a protective 
cover to aid in the control of erosion, for shade along roads 
and in cattle pastures, and the like, holds out alluring possibili- 
ties for those who would enter a pioneer field." 

He attends the Unitarian church and in politics is a Repub- 
lican. From December, 1902, to June, 1905, he served as 
private in Troop A (National Lancers), ist Battalion Cavalry, 
Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. At Yale he received an elec- 
tion to Sigma Xi. He is a member of the American Forestry 
Association and the Society of American Foresters, is a Mason 
and belongs to the Somerville Lodge, 917, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, 



i6S YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Gustave C. Piche 

Bus^incss address. Care of the Department of Lands and Forests, Quebec, 

Canada 
Residence, 64 St. Cyriile Street, Quebec, Canada 

Gustave Clodomir Piche was born December 2, 1880, in Montreal, Quebec, 
Canada, the son of Clodomir Piche (died in 1882), and Marie (Heppel) 
Piche. His father was a descendant of the first French settlers that 
arrived in Canada about 1663. His mother was married a second time, 
in 1887, to D. Villeneuve of Berthierville, Quebec. Her ancestor, Pierre 
Heppel, who came to Quebec in 1792, was a surgeon in Lafayette's 
army. He has a step-sister, Eva (Villeneuve) Piette, of Berthierville. 

He graduated from Mount Saint Louis in 1897, after which he was 
employed three years as a clerk on the Canadian Pacific Railway and 
then in the Belgo-Canadian Company, where he was in charge of the 
wood department from 1900 to 1903. From 1903 to 1905 he attended 
the Polytechnical School of Montreal. 

He was married September 24, 1907, in Montreal, Quebec, to Miss 
Cesarine P. Pare of Montreal, daughter of Cyriile Pare and Dorimene 
Le Noblet (Duplessis) Pare. They have four daughters: Claudette Piche, 
bom June 15, 1908, in Berthierville. Quebec; Simone Piche, born August 
21, 1909, in Quebec; Pierrette Piche, born December 12, 1910. in Quebec, 
and Marie-Paule Piche, born May 31, 1912, in Quebec. 

In 1907, Piche entered the Forest Service in Quebec as 
forestry engineer and in 1909 became chief forestry engineer. 
In 1910, he received the appointments of chief of the Forest Ser- 
vice and director of the Ecole Forestiere of Quebec, his present 
positions. He writes: "Visited France, Italy, Germany and 
Sweden in 1909-10, on the account of the Quebec government. 
In 1908, worked at the inventory of the Riding Mountain Forest 
Reserve in Manitoba. Since 1907, I have visited every section 
of the Province to investigate the forest and agricultural con- 
ditions. These reports are filed in the Department of Lands and 
Forests." 

He is a member of the Roman Catholic Church. He is a 
member of the American and Canadian Forestry associations, 
the Canadian Society of Forestry Engineers, the French, Belgian 
and Swiss societies of forestry, the Alliance Nationale (a 
benevolent society) and in 1913 was elected an associate member 
of the Canadian Society of Civil Engineers. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 169 

Colin C. Robertson 

Care of Forest Department, Pretoria, South Africa 

Colin Charles Robertson was born November i, 1884, in Haileybury 
College, Hertfordshire, England, the son of James Robertson (died in 
1903 j, a clergyman in the Church of England, master at Rugby and 
Harrow Schools and headmaster of Haileybury College, and Constance 
Elizabeth (Wilson) Robertson. On his father's side he is of Scotch, 
and on his mother's of English ancestry. He has three brothers: A. J. 
Robertson, M.A. Cambridge University; M. Robertson, M.A. Oxford 
University; and D. H. Robertson, B.A. Cambridge University; and two 
sisters : S. M. Robertson and G. C. Robertson. 

He attended the Rugby School in 1902, and from February, 1903, to 
June, 1905, was a member of the Forestry Department in Orange Free 
State, South Africa. 

He is unmarried. 

From October, 1907, to March, 1912, Robertson was assistant 
conservator of forests in Orange Free State, and since April, 
1912, when the various forest departments in South Africa were 
reorg'anized into one Forest Department, he has held the position 
of research officer at the office of the chief conservator of 
forests, Pretoria, South Africa. 

He is a member of the Church of England. He is a member 
of the South African Association for the Advancement of Sci- 
ence, of which he was a member of the Council in 1911-12, the 
Philosophic Society of Orange Free State, of which he was 
secretary in 1911-12, the Royal Colonial Institute and the Old 
Rugbeian Society. 

He has published : Farm forestry in Orange Free State, Bull. 
Forest Department, South Africa ; Some suggestions as to prin- 
ciples of the introduction of exotic forest trees, Jrl. S. African 
Ass'n for Adv. of Sc. 



David X. Rogers 

Quincy, Calif. 

David N. Rogers was born April 7, 1882, in Patten, Maine, the son 
of Luther B. Rogers and Mary E. (Barker) Rogers. He has three 
brothers: Edwin S. Rogers, Lore Alford Rogers, B.S. University of 
Maine '96, and graduate student at the University of Wisconsin, and 



I70 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Luther B. Rogers, Jr., C.E. University of Maine; and three sisters: 
Mary H. Rogers, Annie L. Rogers and Ruth Rogers. 

He was prepared at Patten Academy, Patten, Maine, and in 1906 
received the degree of B.S. from the University of Maine, vi^here he was 
a member of Kappa Sigma. 

He was married October 30, 1912, in Quincy, Calif., to Miss Edith 
Watson of Quincy, daughter of William and Mary Frances Watson. 

Rogers is forest supervisor in the United States Forest Ser- 
vice with headquarters in the Plumas National Forest, California. 
He was appointed forest assistant in the Service July i, 1907, 
and later became deputy forest supervisor. 

In politics he is a Progressive. 



Robert Rosenbluth 

Business address, Conservation Commission, Albany, N. Y. 
Home address, 522 West isoth Street, New York City 

Robert Rosenbluth was born Februarv 28, 1887, in New York City, 
the son of Selig Rosenbluth, superintendent of a large hospital, and 
Anna (Glantz) Rosenbluth. He is of Russian German ancestry on both 
sides of the family. 

In 1903 he graduated from Philadelphia High, after which he studied 
as a "special in agriculture" at Pennsylvania State College. He after- 
ward attended the Forest Academy at Mount Alto, Pa. 

He is unmarried. 

Rosenbluth was employed as forest assistant in the United 
States Forest Service in 1907 and in the same year became for- 
ester in the Bureau of Forestry with headquarters in the Philip- 
pine Islands. In 1910-11 he was forest assistant in the Service 
and in 1911-12 was state forester for the Conservation Commis- 
sion of New York State. Since July 8, 1912, he has held the 
position of director of forest investigations for the Conservation 
Commission of New York State. 

He writes: "Travel since leaving Yale has embraced prac- 
tically all the states in this country ; Hawaii ; the Philippine 
Islands ; China and Japan. Most interesting was the work in 
the Philippines, not only in exploration of new countries and 
under conditions entirely different from those at home, but in 
the scientific and practical value of the results. There was 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 171 

enough excitement incidental to these explorations to satisfy 
one for the time. In China and Japan I got an insight into 
these great civilizations and the currents of interest. Especially 
interesting was an extended trip in those parts of China where 
the revolution was at its height but a short time later. In 
District 4, I did extensive work along the Grand Canyon of the 
Colorado and also in the desert regions of Nevada. Since then, 
have been on the intensive problems of New York State." 

Concerning politics, Rosenbluth writes: "Am a Democrat — 
progressive, with strong leanings toward Socialism; believe, 
however, that the Democratic party is a more efficient means 
towards that end than is the present Socialist party." He is a 
member of the Y. M. C. A. 

He has written: Forestry for China, Nat. Rev., Shanghai; 
Forestry for farm and county estates. Bull. Conservation Com, 
He is preparing an article on Lumber trade of the Chinese 
Empire, to be printed in the Forestry Quarterly. 



Alfred Senn 

Business address. Care Board of Park Commissioners, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Alfred Senn was born October 23, 1859, in Bennwye, Basel Land 
(canton), Switzerland, the son of J. J. Senn, son of Hans Jacob Senn, 
and Salome (Heinemann) Senn, daughter of Jeremias Heinemann. 

He was graduated at the Swiss French College in 1881 and before 
entering the Yale Forest School was engaged in the lumber business 
in Switzerland. 

He was married a second time May 18, 1905, in Sheboygan, Wis., to 
Miss Lena Hildebrandt of Sheboygan, daughter of Frederic Hildebrandt. 
He has one son, Alfred Senn, born August 8, 1898. 

Senn was at one time planting agent in the United States 
Forest Service and later acted as forester for a private party 
in the northern part of Wisconsin. Since January i, 191 1, he 
has been park forester for the Board of Park Commissioners 
of Milwaukee, Wis. 

He is a Mason and has served in the Swiss army. 

He has delivered lectures before different societies in Mil- 
waukee and before the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society 
at Madison, Wis. 



172 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

William C. Shepard 

R. F. D. 59, Berlin, Conn. 

William Chambers Shepard was born March 2g, 1883, in Ogdensburg, 
N. Y., the son of Leonard Griffin Shepard, chief of the United States 
Revenue Cutter Service, and Isabel (Sharpe) Shepard. He has one 
brother, Leonard Griffin Shepard, M.E. Cornell '03. 

He was prepared at the high schools in Washington, D. C, and in 
1901 entered the Cornell Forestry School, leaving in 1903 when the 
School was discontinued. He was a member of Delta Upsilon Frater- 
nity. Before entering the Yale Forest School, he worked two years with 
a lumber company in West Virginia. He received the degree of F.E. 
at Cornell in 1907. 

He was married October 7, 1909, in Berlin, Conn., to Miss Katrina 
Sloat Bowers of Bridgeport, Conn., daughter of Dr. William C. Bowers, 
Yale '74. They have one son, William Bowers Shepard, born September 
27, 1910, in Berlin, Conn., and one daughter, Katrina Sloat Shepard, born 
October 8, 1912, in Berlin, Conn. 

Shepard was employed as forest assistant by the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company from May 15, 1907, to November i, 1909, 
when he became assistant forester for the same company. He 
has lately resigned from this position and is managing a 
prosperous farm in Berlin, Conn. 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church and belongs to 
the Society of American Foresters. 



Charles P. Wilber 

Business address, Forest Commission, State House, Trenton, N. J. 
Home address, Bishop Place, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Charles Parker Wilber was born October 23, 1882, in New Brunswick, 
N. J., the son of Francis Augustus Wilber, professor at Rutgers Col- 
lege, New Jersey, and Laura Burge (Parker) Wilber. He is of English 
and Scotch ancestry. He has one brother, F. E. Wilber, B.D. New 
Brunswick Theological Seminary, and one sister, L. E. Wilber, B.A. 
Smith College. 

He was prepared at the Rutgers Preparatory School and received the 
degrees of B.A. in 1905 and M.A. in 1908 from Rutgers College, where 
he was a member of Chi Psi. 

He is unmarried. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 173 

Wilber was employed with the WilHam M. Ritter Lumber 
Company of West Virginia from June, 1907, to January, 1908, 
when he became forest assistant in District 4 of the United 
States Forest Service. Since July, 1910, he has held the position 
of New Jersey state fire warden for the New Jersey Forest 
Commission. 

He writes: "Nearly two million acres of forest, largely within 
reach of densely populated centers, traversed by an unusual 
mileage of good roads, criss-crossed by a thousand miles of rail- 
road, and in large part without the telephone, present in New 
Jersey a field of work in forest protection in which a strong 
foundation has been laid, but which still offers a wide scope 
for work on the superstructure. 

"Control of this situation now rests on a state fire warden 
with four helpers, 275 local men under a township warden 
system, and a small corps of fire lookouts and patrolmen. 
Though it has its weaknesses, experience has proved that the 
local system can eventually be relied on. The public understands 
the fight on fire because it sees results and the local effort pro- 
ducing them. The short step from forest protection to forest 
development is taken by yearly increasing numbers. An annual 
retainer of $10 to $20 to the wardens, with reasonable but not 
attractive pay to them and all fighters at a fire, elicits creditable 
activity and ready response whenever need arises. A strict 
requirement of permits for all brush burning throughout the 
year but latitude in handling individual situations by special 
annual permits has engendered universal caution without causing 
excessive inconvenience. Rigid imposition of some penalty for 
every violation of the law, but the possibility of a reasonable 
adjustment of its severity to the specific case, have made 
supporters instead of enemies of most offenders. 

"High efficiency comes slowly, but the fires are growing 
smaller and their aggregate area less. Carelessness is giving 
way to caution. Offenders punished now number hundreds 
yearly. The woodlands, so repeatedly burned heretofore and 
long rated of little value, are showing the effect of fire control, 
for forests are spontaneous throughout the state and their recu- 
perative powers prodigious. New Jersey, therefore, stands 
committed to a policy of establishing forest values, existent and 
potential, by guaranteed protection from fire." 



174 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He is a member of the Dutch Reformed church. He is a 
member of the Society of American Foresters, the Eastern 
States Forestry Association, the National Geographic Society 
and the Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo. 



Hugo Winkenwerder 

Business address. University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 

Residence, 6306 Seventeenth Street, N. E., Seattle, Wash. 

40s North Washington Street, Watertown, Wis. 

Hugo [August] Winkenwerder was born March 16, 1878, in Water- 
town, Wis. 

He prepared at Northwestern University, Watertown, Wis., and 
graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1902 with the degree 
of B.S. and taught botany and physiography in the high school in 
Sheboygan, Wis. 

He was married to Miss Adelene Maddern Clark of Los Angeles, Calif. 

Winkenwerder is dean of the College of Forestry at the Uni- 
versity of Washington, which position he has held since August 
I, 1912. He was at one time forest assistant in the United 
States Forest Service and later became assistant professor of 
forestry at Colorado College. His first appointment at the 
University of Washington was as associate professor of forestry. 

He is a member of Sigma Xi. 

He has published : The migration of birds — monographs. Wis. Nat. 
Hist. Soc, Milwaukee, 1902; Forestry in the public schools, Circ. 130, 
U. S. Forest Service; Progress in conservation, Proc. N. E. A., Chicago, 
1908; Short keys to trees of Oregon and Washington, Forest Lab., 
Univ. of Wash., 1910; Outline for correlation of methods in forest men- 
suration. Forest Lab., Univ. of Wash., 1909; Forests and American 
history, Univ. of Calif. Chronicle, Berkeley, 1912. 



*Edward S. Woodruff 

Died 1909 

Edward Seymour Woodruff was born December 23, 1876, in New York 
City, the son of Charles Hornblower Woodruff, Yale '58, and Catherine 
G. (Sanford) Woodruff. He was a grandson of Hon. Lewis Bartholomew 
Woodruff, LL.D., Yale '30, judge of the United States Circuit Court, and 
a great grandson of Chief Justice Joseph C. Hornblower of New Jersey. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907" 175 

He was a nephew of Col. George B. Sanford, Yale '63. He had three 
brothers : Lewis B. Woodruff, Yale 'go, Frederick S. Woodruff, Yale '92, 
and Charles H. Woodruff, Jr., ex-g6 (died in February, 1909). 

He was prepared at Phillips (Andover) Academy, of whose New 
York Alumni Association his father was the first president, and in 1899 
graduated from Yale College. He then spent a year in biological study 
in the Graduate Department of Johns Hopkins University, followed 
by a short period with an investment firm in New York City. In his 
Senior year at the Yale Forest School he was president of his Class, was 
elected to Sigma Xi and, upon graduating, was appointed a member of 
the Graduate Advisory Board. 

He was unmarried. 

In the summer of 1907 Woodruff became a state forester of 
New York. In this position he gave his attention chiefly to 
reforestation in the Adirondack Mountains. He was deeply 
interested in research work in botany, entomology and ornithol- 
ogy, of which he gained much knowledge in the country about 
Litchfield, Conn. 

He died January 15, 1909, in New York City of typhoid 
fever and was buried in Litchfield, Conn., where he had spent 
a large part of his life. 

His published work was principally upon birds, and included Summer 
birds of Milford, Pike County, Pa., in Cassinia Bird Manual, 1905; 
A preliminary list of the birds of Shannon and Carter Counties, 
Missouri, The Auk, April, 1908; and Scarcity of the ruffed grouse, 
13th Annual Report of the Forest, Fish, and Game Commission of 
New York; also a paper (published in this report) on "Destruction of 
white and Scotch pine seedlings by the white grub." 



Graduate holding Certificate but not Degree 
William Winter 

Business address, 1003 Majestic Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Residence, 1329 North Meridian Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

William Winter was born March 14, 1881, in Indianapolis, Ind., the son 
of Ferdinand Winter and Mary (Keyes) Winter. He has two brothers: 
Clarence Winter, B.A. Yale '97, and Keyes Winter, B.A. Yale '00; and 
three sisters : Sue, Katherine and Mary Winter. 

He was prepared at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., and at the 
Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and in 1899-1900 attended the Massa- 



176 ' YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

chusetts Institute of Technology, where he was a member of Delta Kappa 
Epsilon. 

His engagement has been announced. 

Winter is an attorney-at-law in the firm of Winter & Hen- 
dricks. In 1907 he was foreman for the Gulf Lumber Company, 
Louisiana, and in 1907-08 was employed with the International 
Paper Company of Palmer Falls, N. Y. He entered the United 
States Forest Service in 1908 as land examiner and later became 
forest assistant. In 1910 he was appointed civil engineer in the 
firm of Albright & Mebus, Philadelphia, Pa., which position he 
held until 191 1, when he went into his father's office as attorney. 
He became a partner of the firm in February, 1912. 

NoN Graduates 
J. Franklin Bruins 

Box 249, Pocatello, Idaho 

John Franklin Bruins was born July 24, 1883, in Brandon, Wis., the 
son of Derk Bruins, a successful farmer (now retired), and Cristina 
(Heusinknelt) Bruins. His father was a prominent citizen and church 
worker in the farming community where he lived. His ancestors on his 
father's side were Dutch farmers, his grandfather having come from 
the Netherlands to America as an immigrant in 1847. His mother is the 
descendant of a Dutch family, her parents having come to this country 
from the Netherlands in 1850. He has three brothers : William H. 
Bruins, a graduate of Hope College and McCormick Theological Semi- 
nary, Henry M. Bruins, a graduate of Hope College and B.A. Princeton 
'96, and Dirk Bruins, B.A. Ripon College and M.D. Northwestern Uni- 
versity ; and a sister, Minnie H. Bruins, who attended the University of 
Wisconsin. 

He was brought up on a farm, working there during his vacations. 
He attended Ripon College, where he was a newspaper correspondent 
and manager of the college paper, and in 1905 graduated from Beloit 
College with the degree of B.A. 

He was married July 12, 191 1, in Madison, Wis., to Miss Rose Wagner 
of Menasha, Wis., daughter of Henry Wagner. 

Since October i, 1910, Bruins has been forest supervisor in 
the United States Forest Service with headquarters at Pocatello, 
Idaho. From 1906 to 1908 he was forest assistant in the Service 
and from 1908 to 1910 held the position of deputy forest 
supervisor. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 177 

He writes: "As a forest assistant I was one of the second 
batch to be sent to the National forests. I was first assigned to 
the Old Henry's Lake in Idaho. I was there principally con- 
cerned with timber sale work and secured some figures on the 
workings of the log scale in use in the Service which I am told 
has been of much value. The following summer I spent in the 
Washington office of the Service as district forester. Was 
shortly afterward sent to the Leadville National Forest in Colo- 
rado, where I remained about a year and a half doing principally 
administrative work. In the spring of 1909 I was transferred 
to the Targhee as deputy supervisor, work altogether adminis- 
trative, and that fall was placed in charge of the Pocatello 
Forest, where I have been since. My principal interest from a 
professional standpoint is in forestation problems. Since I have 
been on this forest I have had a chance to engage in that line 
on an extensive scale with some degree of success, but with 
results still mainly undetermined." 

He is affiliated with the Congregational church. He is a 
member of the Society of American Foresters and of the 
Y. M. C. A. 



Harrison DeW. Burrall 

Business and home address, Porvenir, San Miguel County, N. Mex. 
United States Forest Service, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Harrison DeWitt Burrall was born May 21, 1883, in Battle Creek, 
Mich., the son of George Burrall, a wholesale hardware merchant, and 
Fannie Grace (Beecher) Burrall. On his father's side he is of Irish, 
and on his mother's of English ancestry. He has a brother, Frederick 
P. Burrall, M.E. Michigan Mining School, and a sister, Grace F. Burrall, 
B.S. London Ontario College. 

He was prepared at Lawrenceville School and at Biltmore, N. C, 
spending his summers as a compass man, etc., working on timber 
estimates. 

He was married July 3, 1907, in Fort Smith, Ark., to Miss Sarah 
Fairfax Musser of Germantown, Md., daughter of William Henderson 
Musser and Mary Jett (Fairfax) Musser. They have one daughter, 
Mary Beecher Burrall, born in March, 1908, in Douglas, Ariz., and one 
son, Harrison Walker Burrall, born in January, 1909, in Washington, 
D. C. Another son, Frederick Beecher Burrall, born in January, igio, 
in Fort Smith, Ark., died in September, 191 1. 
12 



178 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Burrall is forest examiner in the United States Forest Service, 
in charge of Las Gallinas Nursery, Pecos National Forest, New 
Mexico. Previous to this he was forest assistant in the Service. 

He is a member of the Christian Science Church of Boston, 
Mass. In poHtics he is a Republican, believing in Roosevelt 
principles. He is a member of the National Geographic Society 
and of the Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo. 



Charles H. Flory 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Portland, Ore. 
Residence, 85 East Eighty-seventh Street, North, Portland, Ore. 

Charles Henry Flory was born June 24, 1880, in Arcanum, Ohio, the 
son of Albert M. Flory and Katherine Elizabeth (Burns) Flory. He has 
three sisters : Blanch Flory, Imo Flory and Leola Flory. 

He was prepared at the high school in Arcanum, Ohio, and in 1905 
received the degree of B.S. from Ohio State University. 

He was married July 19, 1906, in Denver, Colo., to Miss Emma Clara 
Bernsdorf of Stralsund, Pomerania, Germany, daughter of Marie Amelia 
Bernsdorf and Karl Bernsdorf. They have a son, Albert Bernsdorf 
Flory, born August 12, 1908, in Bellingham, Wash. 

From July 2, 1906, to February i, 1908, Flory was forest 
assistant in the United States Forest Service. He then became 
forest supervisor, which position he held until December i, 1908, 
when he became assistant district forester in charge of operation 
in District 6, his present appointment. 

He is a Progressive in politics. He is a Mason. 



James L. Grimes 

Business address. Municipal Hall, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Residence, 5510 Kentucky Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Knoxville, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

James Lee Grimes was born August 14, 1881, in Pittsburgh, Pa., the 
son of James Fribley Grimes, president of the St. Clair Water Company 
and the Knoxville Land Company, and Annie Isabel (Fortune) Grimes. 
His father was a pioneer in the development of real estate in Pittsburgh. 
His father's parents were American, coming from Fairfax County, Vir- 
ginia, and his mother's were also American, coming from Zanesville, 
Ohio. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1907 179 

He was prepared at the Pittsburgh Academy and spent the year of 
1901 in study and travel. In 1905 he graduated from Princeton Uni- 
versity with the degree of B.S. 

He is unmarried. 

Grimes left the Yale Forest School in December, 1906. He 
traveled in Europe in 1908 and in 1908-09 was a teacher in Shady 
Side Academy, Pittsburgh, Pa. He was also a member of the 
Tree Commission of Pittsburgh. Since 1910 he has been city 
forester of Pittsburgh. 

He is a member of the Methodist church. In politics he is 
a Progressive. 



Burt P. Kirkland 

Business address. Care University of Washington, University Station, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Home address, Box 52, Portage, Wash. 

Burt Persons Kirkland was born February 6, 1881, in Silver Creek, 
N. Y., the son of Albert Kirkland and Annette (Persons) Kirkland. He 
is the grandson on his father's side of James Kirkland and Sally Kirkland, 
and on his mother's side of Horace Persons and Edith Persons. He is 
of Scotch and English descent. 

He was prepared at the Forestville (N. Y.) High School and in 1905 
received the degree of B.A. from Cornell University. 

He was married November 18, 1905, in New Haven, Conn., to Miss 
Rose Pomeroy Kearns of Ithaca, N. Y., daughter of P. F. Kearns and 
Emmeline Kearns. Mrs. Kirkland died in July, 191 1. They had a son, 
Donald Pomeroy Kirkland, born December 18, 1909, in Ithaca, N. Y. 

He was married a second time, September 12, 1912, in Seattle, Wash., 
to Miss Bessie M. MacMillan. 

Kirkland is associate professor of forestry at the University 
of Washington, Seattle, Wash., which position he has held since 
September, 1912. From July i, 1906, to May 31, 1908, he was 
employed as forest assistant in the United States Forest Service 
and from June i, 1908, to September 30, 1912, acted as forest 
supervisor. 

He is a member of the Society of American Foresters and of 
the Engineers' Club of Seattle, Wash. 

He has published : The need of a vigorous policy of encouraging 
cutting on the national forests. For. Quart.; Working Plans for national 
forests of the Pacific Northwest, Proc. Soc. Am. Foresters. 



i8o YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Robinson M. MacMurray 

Business address, Montana State Land Exchange, Helena, Mont. 
Home address, 2,2> Oak Avenue, Worcester, Mass. 

Robinson Moies MacMurray was born in 1879 in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

He was prepared at Adelphi Academy, Brooklyn, N. Y., and at 
Worcester High School, Worcester, Mass. 

He was married June 14, 1909, in Helena, Mont., to Miss Elsie Edith 
Escher of Harlan, Iowa. 

MacMurray is a forester residing in Helena, Mont. He has 
recently left the position of timber inspector for the Northern 
Pacific Railroad to take charge of the interests of the State of 
Montana in the Montana Land Exchange, a project which 
involves some 700,000 acres of state land with the national forests. 
He is field representative for this department. 



F. Van Thompson 

Business address, State Hospital Commission, Albany, N. Y. 
Home address, Marcellus, N. Y. 

Thompson is a stenographer for the State Hospital Commission 
at Albany, N. Y. 

Charles M. Walker 

Business address, no East Twenty- third Street, New York City 

Charles Morehouse Walker was born in 1879 in South Amherst, Mass. 

He prepared at the Amherst (Mass.) High School and in 1899 received 
the degree of B.S. at the Massachusetts Agricultural College. He 
attended the Yale Forest School during three terms of Junior year. 

He is unmarried. 

Walker is in charge of lantern slides with Charles Beseler & 
Company, dealers in stereopticons, New York City. 



E. Le Verne Wood 

Barceloneta, Porto Rico 
Wood is growing citrus fruit in Porto Rico. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 181 



CLASS OF 1908 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

Raymond W. Allen 

United States Forest Service, Cody, Wyo. 

Raymond Walter Allen was born September 14, 1884, in Medford, 
N. J., the son of Milton H. Allen and Martha B. (Gaskill) Allen. He 
is of English ancestry. He has three brothers : Luther M. Allen, M.D. 
University of Pennsylvania '93, Reginald B. Allen, B.S. Rutgers College 
'93, M.S. '97 and Ph.D. Clark University '05, and Milton D. Allen, P.D. 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy; and one sister, Kate S. Allen, a 
graduate of Trenton Normal School, New Jersey. 

He was prepared at the common schools and by a private tutor and 
in 1906 received the degree of B.S. from Rutgers College, where he was 
a member of Chi Phi and Cap and Skull, manager of the Track Team 
and played football. 

He is unmarried. 

Upon entering the United States Forest Service Allen became 
forest assistant in the office of management, Washington, D. C. 
From December, 1908, to June, 1909, he was chief of the 
section of timber sales. District 2, in Denver, Colo., and from 
that time until December, 1909, he did special work in the Ser- 
vice. He was then appointed deputy forest supervisor, which 
position he held until his present appointment of forest 
supervisor of Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming, June 15, 
1911. 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church and in politics 
is a Progressive Republican. 

Nelson C. Brown 

Business address. New York State College of Forestry, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Residence, Cor. Ostrom and Waverly Avenues, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Nelson Courtlandt Brown was born March i, 1885, in South Orange, 
N. J., the son of Ashbel Greene Brown, a Civil War veteran, and Lucinda 
Ann (Van Duyne) Brown. On his father's side he is of English, and 
on his mother's of Dutch and English ancestry. He has two brothers : 



•i82 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Irving Van Duyne Brown, Yale '02, and David Crane Brown ; and one 
sister, Olive Miriam Brown. 

He was prepared at South Orange High School and graduated from 
Yale College in 1906. 

He was married August 23, 191 1, in Milford, Pa., to Miss Alice Vir- 
ginia Baker of Milford, Pa., daughter of H. T. Baker and Virginia 
(Halliday) Baker. 

Brown is assistant professor of forest utilization in the New 
York State College of Forestry at Syracuse University. He 
has held this position since July i, 1912. 

He writes : "In 1904 spent the summer on general trip through 
the forest regions of California, Colorado and the Southwest. 
Was instructor at Yale Forest Camp at Milford, Pa., between 
Junior and Senior years at the Forest School. In July, 1908, 
I entered the United States Forest Service, going first to Mon- 
tana to classify and value the Northern Pacific Railway holdings. 
The winter of 1909 was spent in Florida, in the interests of the 
government. During the summer of 1909, I had charge of a 
survey party on the Gallatin and Absaroka National forests in 
the neighborhood of Yellowstone Park. While on a furlough, 
in 1910, at home in South Orange, N. J., I sold bonds for the 
banking house of Lee Higginson & Company for awhile." 

Again, in 19 10, he was instructor at the Yale Forest Camp 
at Milford, Pa. During 1910-11 he was deputy supervisor of 
the Kaniksu National Forest in Idaho. He resigned from the 
Service in 191 1, to become assistant professor of forestry in the 
Iowa State College, at Ames, Iowa. In July, 1912, he entered 
upon his present position in the New York State College of 
Forestry. 

Brown is a Presbyterian and is a member of the Yale Club 
of New York City, the Society of American Foresters, the 
American Forestry Association and the Pennsylvania Forestry 
Association. 

He has written : Reproduction of lodgepole pine in relation to its 
management. For. Quart., March, 1912; Possibility of reproducing our 
eastern forests by natural means (read before annual meeting of the 
Pennsylvania Forestry Association, Bushkill, Pa., 1912). In 1909 he wrote 
an article, Forest conditions of Florida, which is to be published as a 
bulletin by the U. S. Forest Service. He has also written miscellaneous 
articles for the Forestry Quarterly. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 183 

Frederick H. Brundage 

Business address. Care Forest Service, Albany, Ore. 
Residence, 1022 West 8th Street, Albany, Ore. 

Frederick Herbert Brundage was born December 8, 1884, in Factory- 
ville. Pa., the son of George L. Brundage, M.D., and Lavina (Gardner) 
Brundage. He has two sisters: Kate (Brundage) Dean and Helen E. 
Stevens. 

He was prepared at Keystone Academy and at Adelphi Academy, and 
graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale in 1907, where 
he was a member of Book and Bond. 

He was married December 29, igog, in Bethel, Maine, to Miss Mary L. 
Carter of Bethel, Maine, daughter of John H. Carter and Carrie (Clough) 
Carter. They have one son, George Herbert Brundage, born December 
24, 1912, in Bellingham, Wash. 

Since the fall of 1912 Brundage has been supervisor of 
Santiam National Forest with headquarters at Albany, Ore. 
Before entering the United States Forest Service as forest assist- 
ant in 1909, he had been employed by the Great Northern Pulp 
& Paper Company of Bangor, Maine. On April i, 191 1, he 
was appointed deputy forest supervisor with headquarters at 
Bellingham, Wash. 

He is a member of the Baptist church. 



Elias T. Clark 

University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 

Elias Treat Clark was born September i, 1886, in Woodbridge, Conn., 
the son of Samuel O. Clark and Carrie P. (Marquette) Clark. His father 
was a descendant of the early settlers of the state and was a member 
of the Connecticut legislature and holder of numerous town offices. 
He has three brothers: Charles Edward Clark, Yale '11 and '14 L., 
S. Orman Clark and Theodore R. Clark. 

He was prepared at the New Haven High School and graduated 
from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale in 1907. 

He is unmarried. 

Concerning his life since graduation, Clark writes: "Have 
led a rather uneventful life since leaving the Forest School in 
June, 1908. Was immediately assigned to the Snoqualmie 
National Forest with headquarters in Seattle, Wash. Here I 



1 84 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

spent three of the most enjoyable years of my Hfe working 
under Supervisor Burt P. Kirkland and helping him to bring 
this great Pacific Coast Forest under forest management. Did 
the work common to most forest assistants and in addition aided 
in preparing the provisional working plan for the forest made 
in 1909 and 1910. A year and a half after assignment to the 
forest was made deputy supervisor, which position was held 
until March, 191 1, when I resigned to take charge of the sur- 
veying and construction of railroad lines for the Standard 
Railway & Timber Company, one of the largest operating 
timber companies in Washington. Here an interesting and 
enjoyable summer was spent until October, 191 1, when a call 
came to take a chair of assistant professor of forestry at the 
Forest School of the University of Washington, to give mensura- 
tion courses and to establish a course in logging engineering. 

"Have never taken trips far outside of the United States, 
but have visited most parts of it." 

Clark is a Progressive Republican. He is a member of the 
Pilgrim Congregational Church of Seattle and the Society of 
American Foresters. 

He made an address before the Pacific Logging Congress on 
logging engineering, which was published in August, 19 12, in 
numbers of lumber trade journals. 



Ernest D. Clark 

Business address, Woodstock, Va. 
Home address, R. F. D. i, Litchfield, Conn. 

Ernest Dwight Clark was born May 14, 1883, in Cornwall, Conn., the 
son of Andrew Miles Clark and Mary Lydia (Brown) Clark. His great- 
grandfather, George Clark, served in the American army in the Revolu- 
tion and another George Clark was one of the original founders of 
Milford. His father was a representative from Cornwall to the General 
Assembly in Hartford in 1895 and has served a number of terms as select- 
man of the town of Cornwall since that time. He is the grandson on his 
mother's side of Seth Brown and Lydia (Clark) Brown and said to be a 
descendant of Peter Brown, one of the Mayflower passengers. He has one 
brother, Loyal Brown Clark, Yale '08, and four sisters : Sarah Beatrice 
Clark, Danbury Normal School '12, Marjorie Hazel Clark, Harriet Lydia 
Clark and Esther Abigail Clark. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 185 

He was prepared at the public schools in Cornwall, Conn., and at the 
Housatonic Valley Institute, which became in turn the Cornwall School 
and the Foster School. In 1902 and 1903 he taught in the public schools 
in Cornwall. In 1907 he graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School 
at Yale. 

He was married June 22, 191 1, in Killingly, Conn., to Miss Bertha 
Marion Branch of Danielson, Conn., daughter of Walter Hamlet Branch, 
deceased, and Ella Maria Branch, now Mrs. F. H. Greener. They have 
one daughter, Helen Melissa Clark, born November 10, 1912, in Litchfield, 
Conn. 

Clark is forest assistant in the United States Forest Service. 
He writes : "July to November, 1908, spent in Kentucky under 
J. S. Holmes studying forest conditions in cooperation with 
the state. Became thoroughly familiar with corn bread, moon- 
shiners and night-riders. January to July, 1909, was in Ala- 
bama, for first three months under W. B. Piper. Then was 
put in charge of making a working plan for the Tennessee 
Coal, Iron & Railroad Company. This working plan is notable 
since it was the last of many perfectly harmless working plans 
made by the Service for concerns whose only concern was for 
an estimate of their timber. September to November, 1909, 
lived among the Indians. Had charge of marking timber for 
the Government mill at Neopit, Wis. July to November, 1910, 
worked in Piedmont, N. C, under State Forester J. S. Holmes 
in cooperation with the state in determining the timber resources 
of North Carolina. December, 1910, to April, 191 1, assisted 
W. W. Ashe in a study of second growth in eastern Tennessee. 
May 15, 191 1, transferred from state and private cooperation 
to Appalachian and sent to New Hampshire to work under 
K. W. Woodward, examining lands for purchase under the 
Weeks Law. The last of June came South to take charge of 
a party examining lands in eastern West Virginia and western 
Virginia. The first of February, 1912, made a preliminary 
examination of the Massanutten Area and recommended its 
purchase by the Government. From May in general charge of 
work in the Potomac, Massanutten and Youghiogheny areas in 
Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia." 

He is a member of the First Congregational Church of 
Cornwall, Conn., and belongs to the Society of American 
Foresters and the Free and Accepted Masons. 



i86 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Robert E. Clark 

Business address, Forest Service, Leadville, Colo. 

Residence, 301 West Seventh Street, Leadville, Colo. 

Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

Robert Eli Clark was born June 9, 1886, in New Haven, Conn., the son 
of Charles Eli Clark, machine contractor with the Winchester Repeating 
Arms Company, and Margaret (Davidson) Clark. On his father's side 
he is of American, and on his mother's of Scotch descent. 

He was prepared at the Boardman Manual Training School, New Haven, 
Conn., and graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale in 1907. 

He is unmarried. 

Clark is acting supervisor in the United States Forest Ser- 
vice, with headquarters at Leadville, Colo. He has held this 
appointment since July 15, 1909. Before that he held the 
position of forest assistant. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. He is a Mason and 
a member of the Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo. 



Arthur M. Cook 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Eraser, Colo. 
Home address, 1^5 Academy Street, Laconia, N. H. 

Arthur Mayhew Cook was born March 25, 1883, in Laconia, N. H., the 
son of Addison Gardner Cook and Harriet Stanwood (Hathaway) Cook. 
He is of English ancestry. He has a brother, William H. Cook, B.A. 
Harvard '04. 

He spent one year in the New England Telephone & Telegraph Com- 
pany and attended Phillips Exeter Academy for two years. In 1906 he 
received the degree of B.A. from Harvard University, where he was a 
member of Theta Delta Chi. 

He is unmarried. 

Cook was appointed supervisor of the Arapaho National 
Forest with headquarters at Eraser, Colo., in July, 1910. Pre- 
vious to this he had held the positions of forest assistant and 
deputy forest supervisor in the United States Forest Service. 

He is a member of the Society of American Foresters. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 187 

John A. Ferguson 

Business address, Pennsylvania State College, State College, Pa. 

John Arden Ferguson was born December 23, 1873, in Canandaigua, 
N. Y., the son of Harrison Boggerly Ferguson, lieutenant in the Civil War 
and county treasurer, and Ella Clara (Woder) Ferguson. On his 
father's side he is of Scotch ancestry. He has two sisters : Clara Louise 
(Ferguson) Henson, a graduate of Albany Normal School, and Julia 
May Ferguson ; and one brother. Dr. Harry N. Ferguson, D.D.S. 
Philadelphia Dental College. 

He was prepared at Canandaigua Academy, N. Y. In 1896 he received 
the degree of B.A. from Hamilton College and in 1903 the degree of 
M.A. At college he was a member of Chi Psi and Delta Theta Sigma. 
Before entering the Yale Forest School he taught at the Brooklyn Poly- 
technic Institute and at Rutgers Preparatory School, New Brunswick, 
N. J. _ 

He was married September 14, 1911, in Allentown, Pa., to Miss Susan 
Kathryn Becker of Allentown, daughter of William Becker. 

After graduation from the Yale Forest School Ferguson 
became forest assistant in the United States Forest Service with 
headquarters in the Boise National Forest. In the same year 
he was appointed instructor in the forestry department of the 
Pennsylvania State College and in 1909 was made assistant 
professor. During 1909-10 he was in charge of the department. 
In the summer of 1910-11 he acted as instructor in the Yale 
Forestry Camp, and in 191 1 he founded the department of for- 
estry at the University of Missouri, himself holding the position 
of professor. Since January, 1913, he has been director of the 
College of Forestry at Pennsylvania State College. 

In politics he is a Republican (independent and progressive). 
He is a member of the American Forestry Association, the 
Conservation Association, the National Geographic Society, the 
Pennsylvania and Canadian Forestry associations, the Society 
of American Foresters, the Society of Eastern Foresters and 
a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He 
is a Mason. In 1911-12 he was a delegate to the Conservation 
Congress and in 1912 delivered an address before the State 
Conservation Congress. 

He has published : How to prolong the life of fence posts, Circ. 51, 
Mo. Agric. Exp. Sta. ; Growing a woodlot from seed, Circ. 52, Mo. Agric. 
Exp. Sta. He made an address on Forest Leaves before the Pennsylvania 
Forestry Association, July, 1909. 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



H. Earl French 

Halsey, Neb. 

Hiram Earl French was born June 24, 1883, in Humboldt, Iowa, the 
son of Hiram A. French and Jane Eliza (McCollough) French. He has 
one brother, Elmer C. French, and two sisters : Nellie E. French and 
Jennie B. French. 

He was prepared at Humboldt (Iowa) High School and received the 
degree of B.S. from the State University of Iowa in 1906. 

He was married November 2, 191 1, in Kenosha, Wis., to Miss Janet 
Esther Hewitt of Livermore, Iowa, daughter of Amos A. Hewitt and 
Eliza Hewitt. 

French entered the United States Forest Service on July i, 
1908. He is now supervisor of the Nebraska National Forest 
with headquarters at Halsey, Neb. 

He is a Free and Accepted Mason. 



Jesse R. Hall 

Business address, Yreka, Siskiyou County, Calif. 
Residence, Bostonia, San Diego County, Calif. 

Jesse Rexford Hall was born September 12, 1882, in Blendon, Mich., 
the son of Jesse Phillips Rexford Hall, a farmer and formerly superin- 
tendent of schools in Blendon County, Mich., and Charlotte (Abbott) 
Hall. He has four brothers : W. D. Hall, engaged in contracting and 
building; Julian D. Hall, a farmer; Samuel C. Hall, a business man 
and attorney at law in Los Angeles, Calif. ; and Arthur Nelson Hall, 
B.S. University of California '07, an electrician. He also has two sisters : 
Marie E. Hall, a normal school teacher, and Helen Hall, a domestic 
science teacher. Another brother, Burdette C. Hall, and two sisters, 
Rosa and Mary Hall, are deceased. 

He was prepared at the El Cajon Union High School, California, and 
in 1905 received the degree of B.S. from the University of California. 

He was married October 23, 191 1, in Bostonia, San Diego County, 
Calif., to Miss Olive Corinne Somers of Santee, Calif., daughter of W. 
H. Somers and Sarah Somers. 

Hall is deputy forest supervisor in the United States Forest 
Service with headquarters in Klamath National Forest, Cali- 
fornia, which position he has held since January i, 1910. Pre- 
vious to this he was forest assistant in Plumas National Forest, 
California. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 189 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church and in poHtics 
was formerly a RepubUcan, but now a Progressive. 



R. Clifford Hall 

United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

R[ufus] Clifford Hall was born October 30, 1885, in Chicago, 111., the 
son of Rufus C[lifforci] Hall and Mary Elizabeth (Piatt) Hall. His 
father's parents were New Hampshire merchants and his mother's 
Michigan merchants. He has two sisters: Fanny Aline Hall, Ph.B. 
Northwestern University '96, and Eliza Piatt Hall, B.S. Northwestern 
University '99 and M.S. '00. 

He was prepared at the Chicago public schools and at the Lake View 
High School, Chicago, and in 1906 received the degree of B.S. from 
Northwestern University, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. 

He is unmarried. 

Hall has been forest assistant in the United States Forest 
Service since July i, 1908, with headquarters at Washington, 
D. C. He writes : "I have traveled on professional work through 
the Middle West and South, mostly in Illinois, Kentucky, Ten- 
nessee, North Carolina and Georgia. Have also been on a 
sight-seeing trip in the West — Yellowstone Park — in the summer 
of 1910." 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church and in politics 
is a "National Progressive." He is a member of the Society of 
American Foresters and at Yale was elected to Sig^ma Xi. 



William C. Latane 

Libby, Mont. 

William Catesby Latane was born September 17, 1883, in Oak Grove, 
Va., the son of William Catesby Latane, an Episcopal minister, and 
Susan (Wilson) Latane. His ancestors on his father's side were French 
Huguenots and early settlers in Virginia. He is the grandson on his 
mother's side of John Wilson of Maryland and Elizabeth (Washington) 
Wilson of Wakefield, Va. 

He was prepared at Wirtland Seminary and in 1905 received the 
degree of B.S. from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

He was married April 27, 1912, in Spokane, Wash., to Miss Mary 
Stuart Lindsay of Baltimore, Md., daughter of George Winston Lindsay 
and Ida (Stuart) Lindsay. 



I90 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Since entering the United States Forest Service in 1908 Latane 
has been forest assistant with headquarters in 1908-09 in Bighorn 
National Forest, in 1909-10 in Kaniksu National Forest, and 
from 1910 to 1913 in Kootenai National Forest, District i. He 
is now deputy supervisor in Kootenai National Forest. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. 

Charles A. Lewis 

Business address, 120 Oak Avenue, Ithaca, N. Y. 
S West Fifty-fourth Street, New York City 

Charles Augustus Lewis was born February 22, 187 1, in New London, 
Conn., the son of James Ivers Lewis, president and treasurer of the 
Uncasville Manufacturing Company of Uncasville, Conn., and a life 
trustee of Trinity College, and Susan (Kidder) Lewis. He is the 
grandson on his father's side of Charles A. Lewis and Adelaide A. 
(Richards) Lewis, and on his mother's side of Edward Kidder and Anne 
(Potter) Kidder. He has a sister, Annette A. Lewis. 

He received the degree of B.A. in 1893 from Trinity College, Hartford, 
Conn., where he was a member of Delta Psi. 

He is unmarried. 

From July, 1908, to January, 1909, Lewis was forest assistant 
in the United States Forest Service and during the year of 
1910-11 was engaged in the hardware business. He is at present 
a student at Cornell University. 

He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church and in 
politics is a Republican. He is a member of the University Club 
of New York City and of the Cape Fear Country Club of 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Forman T. McLean 

Business address, Ephraim, Utah 
Home address, Eatontown, N. J. 

Forman Taylor McLean was born June 28, 1885, in Colt's Neck, N. J., 
the son of John Hull McLean, whose father was Amzi Chapin McLean, 
and Eliza H. (Taylor) McLean, whose father was Tunns Forman Taylor. 
He has one brother, Amzi Chapin McLean, and one sister, Annie Haight 
McLean. 

He was prepared at Red Bank (N. J.) High School and at Shrewsbury 
Academy, and graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale in 
1907. 

He is unmarried. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 191 

McLean is deputy supervisor in the United States Forest Ser- 
vice with headquarters at Ephraim, Utah. He has held this 
appointment since December i, 191 1. He entered the Service 
on July I, 1908, as forest assistant, which position he held until 
he received his present appointment. 

He is a member of the Society of American Foresters. 



Harvey R. MacMillan 

Business address, Forest Branch, Victoria, B. C, Canada 

Harvey Reginald MacMillan was born September 9, 1885, in New- 
market, Ontario, the son of John Alfred MacMillan, holder of local 
municipal offices, and Joanne Caroline (Willson) MacMillan. His grand- 
father came from Scotland and his grandmother was a United Empire 
Loyalist. His mother's family was loyal to the United Empire. They 
settled in the United States about 1690 and went to Canada in 1760 
and 1780. 

He was prepared at the Adelphi Academy and Worcester High School 
and in 1906 graduated from the Ontario Agricultural College, Toronto 
University, with the degree of B.S.A. Since 1903 he has spent his 
summers with the Dominion Forestry Branch. He had charge of the 
first forest survey in Canada. 

He was married August 2, 191 r, in Aurora, Ontario, to Miss Edna 
Mulloy of Aurora, daughter of Charles Wesley Mulloy and Gertrude 
(Clafiin) Mulloy. They have a daughter, Edna Marion MacMillan, born 
June 16, 1912. 

MacMillan is chief of the Forest Branch of British Columbia, 
Canada. From 1908 to 191 1 he was assistant inspector of forest 
reserves and assistant director of forestry from 191 1 to July 
15, 1912, when he received his present appointment. 

He writes : "I have recently left the service of the Dominion 
Forestry Branch, and am at present chief forester of the Pro- 
vincial Forest Branch, recently established to administer the 
public forest lands of the province of British Columbia. 

"British Columbia covers about 350,000 square miles, and is 
very similar in character to Washington, Oregon and Idaho. 
The timber in the southern portion of the Province is similar 
to that north of the 45th parallel of latitude, and west of the 
115th parallel of longitude in the United States, with the dif- 
ference that the valleys in British Columbia are narrower, and 



i9f YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

the mountains are steeper and higher, and there is a smaller 
proportion of very heavy timber. In the northern portion of 
British Columbia the timber consists chiefly of spruce and large 
pine, and does not extend far from the rivers and lakes. 

"The merchantable area of the Province has been estimated 
at from 50 to 60 million acres. 

"The Government has pursued the policy of refusing to part 
with the title of timber land. Only about one million acres 
of timber land have been granted in fee simple to private parties. 
About nine million acres of timber land have been leased to 
private individuals. The remainder of the forest land, consist- 
ing chiefly of timber at present considered inaccessible, and all 
burned-over land covered with reproduction is still in the hands 
of the Crown. 

"The present revenue of the Province from timber leases and 
from the royalty of 50 cents per thousand charged on all timber 
cut amounts to $2,600,000 per year. This revenue will be largely 
increased as the development proceeds. The indications are now 
that there will be a rapid advance in the next few years. 

"The new Forest Branch has been formed under the guidance 
of Mr. Pinchot and Mr. Price, to administer the timber lands 
and to develop the country by a wise forestry policy for the 
Province. The Forest Branch is very young. There are at 
present about twenty foresters, but the indications are that the 
staff will need to be very largely increased during the next two 
or three years. In order that the rangers and foresters may be 
secured it is the intention of the Government to establish a 
forestry school in connection with the new provincial university." 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church. In 1910 he was 
appointed Canadian representative to the Convention of the 
International Association of Forest Experiment Stations at 
Brussels. He is a member of the Canadian Society of Forest 
Engineers, of which he is a member of the executive committee, 
the Ottawa Field Naturalists Society, the Ontario Entomological 
Society and the Canadian Alpine Club, and is a Mason. 

He has published : Forest conditions, Crowsnest Valley, Alta. ; Forest 
products, Canada, 1908; Forest fires, Canada, 1908 and 1910; Lumber, 
lath shingles, Canada, 1909 and 1910; Poles purchased, Canada, 1909, 
1910 and 191 1 ; Pulpwood, Canada, 1909, 1910 and 191 1; Cross ties pur- 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 193 

chased, Canada, 1909 and 1910; Mining timbers, Canada, 1910; Tight 
slack cooperage, Canada, 1909 and 1910; Tanning materials, Canada, 1909; 
Annual Report, Dept. of Interior, Canada, 1909, 191 1 and 1912; numerous 
articles in Canadian periodicals. 



Willis N. Millar 

Business address. Box 1253, Calgary, Alta., Canada 
Residence, 1228 Boulevard, N. W., Calgary, Alta., Canada 

Willis Norman Millar was born October 18, 1883, in Pittsburgh, Pa., 
the son of W. N. Millar and Mary A. (Drum) Millar. He is of Scotch 
ancestry. He has a brother, Bruce D. Millar, B.S. University of Pennsyl- 
vania, and a sister, Sylvia C. Millar. 

He was prepared at the Pittsburgh High School and in 1906 graduated 
from the University of Pennsylvania with the degree of B.S. 

He was married June 29, 1908, in Pittsburgh, Pa., to Miss Lucy May 
Cook of Pittsburgh, daughter of Charles W. Cook and Emma S. Cook. 
They have a daughter, Lucy Elizabeth Millar, born August 5, 191 1, in 
Newport, Wash. 

Millar is inspector of forest reserves in the Forestry Branch 
of the Department of the Interior, Canada, in the Alberta 
District. Previous to this he was employed in the United States 
Forest Service, ifirst as forest assistant and later as forest super- 
visor. He entered upon his present position March 13, 1912. 

He is a member of the United Presbyterian church and in 
politics is a Progressive Republican. He is a member of the 
Society of American Foresters. 



Robert B. Miller 

Business address. Department of Forestry, Fredericton, N. B., Canada 
Home address. Box 256, Thorntown, Ind. 

Robert Barclay Miller was born September 15, 1875, in Lincoln, Neb., 
the son of Jacob S. Miller, a farmer, and Jane (Armstrong) Miller. 
His father's ancestors were natives of Kentucky. His mother's father 
came from Ireland and lived in Conneaut, Pa. 

He was prepared at the Thorntown High School, Thorntown, Ind., and in 
1896 received the degree of B.S. from Wabash College, Crawfordsville, 
Ind., where he was a member of Phi Kappa Psi. In 1906 he received the 
honorary degree of M.A. from Wabash. In 1897-98 he was assistant 
principal of the Thorntown High School and during the two years 

13 



194 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

following was engaged in newspaper work. In 1899 he was appointed 
professor of natural science at the Rochester Normal School, Rochester, 
Ind., which position he held for four years. In the summer of 1899 he 
studied at the University of Chicago. He was professor of natural 
science one year at Dakota Wesleyan, Mitchell, S. Dak., and from 1904 
to 1906 held the same position at Huron College, Huron, S. Dak. 
He is unmarried. 

Miller is at present dean of the Department of Forestry at 
the University of New Brunswick. He entered upon this posi- 
tion in September, 1909. He writes: "Was called to the 
University of New Brunswick when the Department of For- 
estry was founded in provincial university in 1908. Now have 
about twenty-five students and have graduated three classes in 
forestry. Graduates are taking positions with lumber compa- 
nies, paper companies, Dominion Forestry Branch, Canadian 
Pacific Railroad Forestry Branch, and have three men with 
British Columbia Branch, Victoria, B. C. Received gold medal 
for best exhibit of woods at Dominion Exhibition, St. John, 
N. B., in fall of 1910. In the fall of 1912 was appointed for- 
ester by the Senate of the University of New Brunswick, having 
charge of 3,600 acres of college lands. Beginning to make an 
estimate and working plan for same, with the cooperation of 
the Forestry Branch, Ottawa. In fall of 1912 built a camp on 
this land and am trying to give a good, practical, undergraduate 
course in forestry." 

Miller is a member of the Presbyterian church. 

He has published articles in the Canadian Forestry Journal and Canadian 
Lumberman, and is writing an article on Forest resources of the maritime 
provinces for a book entitled "Canada and its provinces," to be published 
by Robert Glasgow, Toronto, Canada. 



Barrington Moore 

United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

Barrington Moore was born September 25, 1883, in Ossining, N. Y., the 
son of Clement Clarke Moore, an architect and a captain in the 22d 
Massachusetts Regiment in the Civil War (deceased), and Laura Martha 
(Williams) Moore. He is the grandson of Benjamin Moore and the 
great-grandson of Clement Clarke Moore, the author of "The Night 
Before Christmas." On his mother's side he is the grandson of William 
S. Williams. He has two brothers: William S. Moore and Benjamin 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 195 

Moore, Harvard '08. A cousin, Benjamin B. Moore, graduated from 
Yale in 1899. 

He was prepared at St. Mark's School, Southboro, Mass., at Craigie's 
School and at the Morristown School, Morristown, N. J. In 1906 he 
graduated from Yale College, where he received a Junior dissertation 
appointment and engaged in football and track athletics. His fraternity 
was Alpha Delta Phi. During the summer after his junior year in college 
he worked as student assistant in the United States Forest Service in 
North Carolina. 

He was married December 20, 1910, in New York City, to Miss Muriel 
Hennen Morris of New York City, daughter of Thurlow Weed Barnes 
and Isabel (Morris) Barnes. They have a son, Clement C. Moore, born 
May 12, 1913, in Washington, D. C. 

Moore is forest examiner in the United States Forest Service, 
being engaged in the construction of working plans at the Wash- 
ington office. He has been engaged in this work since July, 1909. 
Of his life since graduation from the Forest School, he wrote 
in 191 1 : "The year following graduation I spent studying 
forest problems in all the important foreign countries where 
forestry is practiced. The trip was interesting, not to say 
exciting in spots, particularly the four months in India, where 
I tried conclusions with a wild buffalo and a tiger, successfully 
in the case of the latter. On my return to the United States, 
July I, 1909, I entered the United States Forest Service and 
was sent to District 3, the Southwest headquarters, Albu- 
querque, N. Mex. My work has been almost entirely what is 
called reconnaissance — mapping and estimating timber for the 
future management of the forests." 

He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church. He is 
a member of the Yale Club and Chevy Chase Club. 

He has published: (With R. L. Rogers) Notes on balsam fir, For. 
Quart., Spring, 1908; Notes on forests of northern India and Burma, 
Indian Forester, April and May, 1909; Forestry in Japan, Am. For., 
about Aug., 1909; Forestry problems in the Philippines, Am. For., about 
March and April, 1910; Some methods of regulating the cut in the 
coniferous forests of the Himalayas, For. Quart., 1910; Checking the 
floods in the French Alps, Am. For., about April, 1910; (With R. L. 
Rogers) A method of assessing fire damage. For. Quart., Summer, 191 1; 
Nomenclature of divisions (or areas) in forest working plans. For. Quart., 
Fall, 1911; Management of western yellow pine in the Southwest, For. 
Quart., 1st no., 1912; Essentials in forest working plans, Proc. Soc. Am. 
Foresters, VI, No. 2; Methods of regulating the cut for national forests, 
Proc. Soc. Am. Foresters, VII, No. i. 



196 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Thornton T. Hunger 

Business address, Forest Service, Portland, Ore. 
Home address, 202 Prospect Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Thornton Taft Munger was born October 3, 1883, in North Adams, 
Mass., the son of Rev. Theodore Thornton Munger, D.D., Yale '51, and 
Elizabeth Kuirman (Duncan) Munger, who died in 1883. His father 
was a Congregational minister, having received the degree of D.D. from 
Harvard and Yale, and was a member of the Yale Corporation and of 
the National Institute of Arts and Letters. He is the grandson, on his 
father's side, of Ebenezer Munger, a physician, Yale 1814, and Cynthia 
(Selden) Munger, of Connecticut, and the great-grandson of Eleazar 
May, Yale 1752. On his mother's side he is the grandson of James H. 
Duncan, Harvard 1812, and LL.D. Brown 1861, a lawyer and member 
of Congress, and Mary (Willis) Duncan, both of Massachusetts. He 
has three sisters: Rosanna May Munger; Eleanor Duncan (Munger) 
Wells, wife of Philip P. Wells, Ph.D. '89, of Washington, D. C; and 
Elizabeth Willis (Munger) Adams, wife of Professor John C. Adams, 
Yale '96, of New Haven, assistant professor of English at Yale. 

He was prepared at the New Haven High School and at the Hotchkiss 
School, and graduated from Yale College in 1905, and was active in 
Dwight Hall work. He spent the year of 1905-06 abroad, three months of 
which were devoted to study of forestry in Germany. 

He is unmarried. 

He writes: "On entering the Forest Service, July i, 1908, 
I was assigned to the Section of Silvics and after six weeks in 
Washington I was sent to Oregon to make a study of 'the 
encroachment of Lodgepole pine on western yellow pine on the 
east slope of the Cascades in Oregon.' Upon the completion of 
this study, December i, 1908, I was assigned to the Section 
of Silvics as the chief in the newly established district office 
of the Forest Service in Portland, Ore. This position I have 
since held. My work has consisted in making a large number 
of silvical studies in the National Forests of this region and of 
field work in connection with timber sales and reconnaissance. 
A little over half my time has been spent in Portland and the 
balance in the field in various parts of Oregon and Washington." 

Munger is a Progressive Republican. He is a member of the 
United Church (Congregational) of New Haven. He belongs 
to the Society of American Foresters, the Concatenated Order 
of Hoo-Hoo, the Irvington Tennis Club and University Club, 
both of Portland. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 197 

He has published: The growth and management of Douglas 
fir in the Pacific Northwest, Circ. i/§, U. S. Forest Service; 
Avalanches and forest cover in the northern Cascades, Circ. 1/3, 
U. S. Forest Service. 



Robert L. Rogers 

Care United States Forest Serznce, Washington, D. C. 

Robert Landon Rogers was born October 12, 1883, in Westerly, R. I., 
the son of Frederick Tuttle Rogers, M.D., Union College '80, and Carrie 
(Garitt) Rogers (died June 25, 1900). He has one brother, Fred Alex- 
ander Rogers, Yale '08 S., and one sister, Ruth Louise Rogers. 

He was prepared at the public and private schools at Providence, R. I., 
and in 1906 graduated from Yale College, where he was editor of the 
Yale Banner in 1905 and a member of the Class Hockey Team his 
Senior year, of the French and German clubs and of the Elihu Club. 

He is unmarried. 

Rogers is at present doing editorial work for the United 
States Forest Service with the position of forest examiner. 
Since he has been in the Service he has held successively the 
positions of forest assistant, deputy forest supervisor and forest 
supervisor. He writes : "Entered Forest Service in July, 1908, 
and until December, 1908, was engaged in planting and coop- 
erative examinations in the East and Middle West. From 
December, 1908, to December, 1912, have been in forest and 
district work in Arizona and New Mexico — since December, 
1912, in Washington, D. C. — all the time with Forest Service." 

He is a Progressive in politics. He is a member of the 
Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo. 



Julian E. Rothery 

Business address, 1133 Broadway, New York City 
Home address, Wellesley, Mass. 

Julian Eastman Rothery was born April 13, 1885, in Longwood, Mass., 
the son of John Jay Elmendorf Rothery, who is associated with the 
fire insurance business, real estate and architecture, and Rose (Pentecost) 
Rothery. He has one brother, John Loring Rothery, and three sisters : 
Rosamond Flower (Rothery) Vitale, Agnes Edwards Rothery, Wellesley 
'09, and Margaret Elmendorf Rothery. 



198 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He was prepared at the Wellesley High School and graduated from 
the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale in 1907. 
He is unmarried. 

Rothery is at present junior partner in the firm of Vitale & 
Rothery, landscape architects. He entered upon his present 
position January i, 1912. While in the Service he held first the 
positions of forest assistant and deputy forest supervisor in 
the Cache National Forest, Utah, and later that of supervisor 
of the Idaho National Forest. He writes : "During my stay in 
Utah (two years), I had charge of winter work in the forestry 
department of the State Agricultural College. Promoted July 
I, 19 10, to supervisor of the Idaho National Forest. Fought 
the historical fire of 1910 so that now hell has no terrors for 
me. Had two years as supervisor of the most isolated forest 
in the world and enjoyed it all." 

Concerning his travels, he says: "I have visited most of the 
western states and regions of interest. Spent the winter and 
summer of 1912 exploring in the Labrador Peninsula on 
snowshoes and dog teams." 

He is a member of the Society of American Foresters and of 
the Yale Club of New York City. 

He has written: Ranger courses, For. Quart., June, 1909; 
article in Hunter, Trader, Trapper Mag., April, 1913; also 
articles on the Forest Service in the Townsman. 



Edward B. Starr 

Busines address, Forest Service, Schmitt-Hunt Building, Albany, Ore. 

Cornwall, Conn. 

Edward Burgis Starr was born April 29, 1884, in Northfield, Conn., 
the son of Rev. Edward Comfort Starr, Yale '66, a trustee of the Corn- 
wall School and Library, and Emily Amelia (Shew) Starr. He is the 
grandson, on his father's side, of John Shipman Starr and Lydia A. 
(Lay) Starr, and on his mother's side of Charles Jackson Shew and 
Martha Delia (Winship) Shew. He has one sister, Mabel Emily Starr, 
and one brother, Charles Comfort Starr, Yale '00 S., and M.A. 
Columbia '02. 

He was prepared at the Housatonic Valley Institute, Cornwall, Conn., 
and graduated from Yale College in 1907, where he received a first 
colloquy Junior appointment and was a member of the Baseball Team. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 199 

He was married January 20, 191 1, in Eugene, Ore., to Miss Mary 
Augusta Young, of Eugene, Ore., daughter of Carl Henry Young and 
Mary (Blatchley) Young. They have one daughter, Adelaide Emerson 
Starr, born February 14, 1912, in Albany, Ore. 

Starr is forest assistant in the United States Forest Service 
with headquarters in Albany, Ore. He entered the Service July 
I, 1908, at that time being- stationed in Washington, D. C. 
Since then his appointments have been at Portland, Ore., the 
Cascade National Forest and, at present, the Santiam National 
Forest. 

He is a member of the First Baptist Church of Eugene, Ore. 
He is state fire warden and a deputy game warden. 



Dillon P. Tierney 

Business address, State Capitol, St. Paul, Minn. 
Residence, 699 Lincoln Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Dillon Parnell Tierney was born March 4, 1882, in Farmington, Minn., 
the son of Thomas Tierney and Mary (Sullivan) Tierney. He is of 
Irish ancestry. He has four brothers : Edward, Arthur, Charles and 
Phillip Tierney, and two sisters : Alice and Mayme Tierney. 

He was prepared at the Farmington High School, Farmington, Minn.. 
and at an agricultural school, and in 1906 received the degree of B.Sc.F. 
from the University of Minnesota, where he was a member of Alpha 
Zeta. 

He was married November 15, 1910, in Minneapolis, Minn., to Miss 
Esther A. Day of Owatonna, Minn., daughter of Levi E. Day. They 
have a daughter, Helen Louise Tierney, born February 21, 1912. 

After graduation from the Yale Forest School Tierney 
became forester for the Kaul Lumber Company and was later 
employed in the United States Forest Service. He was then 
appointed instructor in the University of Minnesota, being 
placed in charge of the Forest Experiment Station. Since May 
15, 191 1, he has held the position of assistant state forester of 
Minnesota. 

He writes : "The first organized attempt to carry on forestry 
work in Minnesota was authorized by the passage of the 191 1 
Forest Law. A few months later I undertook to hold down the 
job of assistant state forester. In this position I have had a 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



try at nearly every phase of forestry work that one could 
imagine. 

"Fire protection was of course the first work. At the outset 
we assumed that the majority of fires could be prevented simply 
by having the right kind of men distributed throughout the 
forest district, to remind people of the dangers of fire and also 
point out situations where dangerous fires are liable to occur. 
This naturally led us to the question of handling fires which 
originate from railroad rights-of-way and to the disposal of 
slash following logging operations. 

"The railroads are now working in complete harmony with 
this department, not only to prevent fires being started from 
their locomotives, but also to extinguish any which may start 
near the rights-of-way. They now realize that it is money well 
spent to prevent fires on their rights-of-way, and also — what 
is of more importance to us — that the care of railroad fires rests 
with the companies themselves. 

"Our district rangers have been selected with the greatest 
care, and it is on them we depend for working out the details 
of slash disposal on practically every logging job or woods 
operation in the state. We have of course made it clear to the 
rangers what are the objects of slash disposal, but it is up to 
them to decide on the methods which will fulfill these objects. 
Under certain conditions the slash must be disposed of as log- 
ging proceeds ; under others it must be burned in the early 
spring; or it may be sufficient simply to dispose of the slashings 
for a specified distance on either side of all logging roads and 
on the boundaries of the logged-over tract. 

"We have divided the forested area of the state into fourteen 
large districts, with a ranger in charge of each. Under each 
ranger there are patrolmen, the number of whom varies with 
the necessity of patroling against the spread of fires. Aside 
from this force, each railroad company provides patrolmen 
sufficient to protect their rights-of-way. The lumber and mining 
companies provide patrolmen of their own accord or when 
requested to do so. A number of the townships have also levied 
a special tax, to pay for a township patrolman and provide a 
fire fighting fund. Telephones, trails, cabins and lookout towers 
have been constructed to aid in the fire protection work. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 



"The opportunities for forestry work, I believe, are the best 
in this state of any east of the Rockies. A great quantity of 
timber is still uncut, and its utilization is a field in which the 
forester may help. At present only a small area of land is 
under the exclusive management of this department. The dis- 
posal of three and one-half millions of acres of state school 
lands is provided for in the state constitution, but since a great 
deal of this land is suitable only for growing timber, the consti- 
tution will eventually be changed so that the forest land can be 
handled as such. Aside from this there are millions of acres 
of privately owned land Avhich must in time come back to the 
state and will be used for the growth of timber. We are gath- 
ering data to show the character and extent of all such non- 
agricultural lands and when we have gathered sufficient data 
the matter will be in shape for legislation. We have estimated 
the amount of non-agricultural land in the state which should 
be kept growing timber continuously, at about fifteen million 
acres. To acquire such an amount of land and put it under 
forest management looks like some job for the foresters." 

He is a member of the Roman Catholic church. He is a 
member of the Conservation Association, the American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science and the Knights of 
Columbus. 

Wilford B. Willey 

Saint Maries, Idaho 

Wilford Bennett Willey was born March 21, 1883, in Nunda, N. Y., the 
son of Wilford E. Willey and Clara Adelaide (Bennett) Willey. He is 
of Scotch-Irish ancestry on his father's side and on his mother's of 
English descent. He has a brother, Floyd Arthur Willey, B.M. Ithaca 
Conservatory of Music. 

He was prepared at the Ithaca High School, Ithaca, N. Y., and in 1907 
graduated from Cornell University with the degree of B.A. 

He was married June 16, 1912, in Kooskia, Idaho, to Miss Rhoda 
Margaret Fenn of Kooskia, daughter of Major Frank Alfred Fenn and 
Florence A. Fenn. 

Willey is forest assistant in the United States Forest Service 
with headquarters at Saint Maries, Idaho. He has held this 
position since July i, 1908. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. 



202 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Hubert C. Williams 

Business address, McCall, Idaho 
Home address, Lakezille, Conn. 

Hubert Coffing Williams was born August 22, 1884 in Lakeville, Conn., 
the son of Hubert Williams and Claire Kingman (Coffing) Williams. 
His father held the positions of state representative, president of the 
State Fish and Game Commission, postmaster, president of the Litchfield 
County University Club and president of the County Bar Association. 
He has one sister, Margaret Holly Williams. 

He graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School in 1906, where he 
was a member of Delta Phi. 

He is unmarried. 

Williams is deputy supervisor in the Idaho National Forest. 
From July, 1908, to July, 1910, he was in the employ of the 
Goodman Lumber Company, Goodman, Wis. While in this 
position he was first postmaster of Goodman, Wis. "On May 
8, 191 1," he writes, "left home for Ogden, Utah, with a letter 
from the district forester appointing me forest agent. Upon my 
arrival at McCall was informed that my position was forest 
guard. I was soon made temporary forest assistant and am now 
forest assistant. June 24, 191 1, sent on foot by Supervisor J. E. 
Rothery to Copenhaver Ranger Station to secure Walter Gackel's 
(ranger) oath of office. Distance forty miles over about ten 
miles of crusted snow that hid the trail blazes for long stretches 
on the summits. Streams were all full, making occasional 
long detours necessary to find foot logs. Got into one trap line, 
mistaking blazes for the trail blazes, never having been over the 
route before. Left McCall at 9:30 a. m. on the 24th and had 
oath of office in the supervisor's office in McCall at 8 o'clock, 
June 25th. 

"Mixed it up with a family of bears — an old she and two cubs 
on July 26, 1912, while on timber reconnaissance. Treed the 
cubs and went between them and 'the Mrs.' As she came back 
shot her with a Luger pistol (.30 cal.) and then got one of the 
cubs." 

Concerning his politics, Williams writes : "Not identified with 
any party, voting for the man whom I consider best qualified 
to fill the office for which he is candidate." 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 203 

Graduates holding Certificate but not Degree 
Chester B. Cox 

Business address, Bureau of Forestry, Baguio, P. I. 
Home address, Santa Maria, Calif. 

Chester Boyd Cox was born September 9, 1883, in Santa Maria, Calif., 
the son of Alvin Warner Cox, supervisor of Santa Barbara County, 
mayor of Santa Maria and a pioneer farmer in the Santa Maria Valley, 
and Mary Adelaide (Powers) Cox. On his father's side he is of English 
ancestry through Captain Bradford of Plymouth, and on his mother's 
of Irish and Scotch descent. He has two brothers : Asbury Moses Cox 
and Arthur Elmer Cox. 

He was prepared at the Santa Maria Union High School and attended 
the College of Agriculture at the University of California. 

He was married November 12, 191 1, in Manila, P. I., to Miss Ruby 
Lucy Bryant of Santa Maria, Calif., daughter of Emmett Trott Bryant 
and Laura (Sharpe) Bryant. 

Cox is forester in the Bureau of Forestry, Philippine Islands, 
engaged in the beautification of Baguio. In 1908-09 he held the 
position of forest assistant in the United States Forest Service. 
In 1909 he was sent as forester to the Philippine Islands, where, 
from 1909 to 191 1, he was in charge of Bataan and Arayat forests 
and in 1911-12 in charge of the North Central Luzon District. 
His headquarters have been at Baguio since 1912. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. In politics he was a 
Republican from 1905 to 1911, when he became a Progressive. 
He is a member of the Advisory Board to the Director of For- 
estry, the Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo and the Loyal Order 
of Moose. 

Joseph A. Fitzwater 

Sandpoint, Idaho 

Joseph Albert Fitzwater was bom March 20, 1884, in Phoenixville, Pa., 
the son of Albert Fitzwater and Letitia (Vanderslice) Fitzwater. His 
father is engaged in the carriage and automobile business. He is the 
grandson on his father's side of Joseph Fitzwater and Fannie (Penny- 
packer) Fitzwater and on his mother's side of Addison Vanderslice and 
Caroline (Murray) Vanderslice. He has a sister, Caroline Murray 
Fitzwater, who attended Cornell College, Mt. Vernon, Iowa, for three 
years. 



204 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He attended Juniata College, Huntingdon, Pa., after which he spent a 
year with the Phoenix Iron Works, where he did clerical work. In 1903 
he attended the Yale Summer School and later was student assistant in 
the United States Forest Service. He studied and assisted his father one 
year and the next year attended Ursinus College, Collegeville, Pa. 

He is unmarried 

Fitzwater is supervisor in the United States Forest Service 
with headquarters in Pend Oreille National Forest, which position 
he has held since August, 1912. He writes: Went to Flagstaff, 
Ariz., in July, 1908. Spent one month in reconnaissance work 
on Coconino National Forest. The following month reported to 
Frank Vogel, Denver, Colo. Was on reconnaissance on Pike 
National Forest until November and had charge of a party the 
last month and a half. Upon completion of work had working 
plan report to make — some kind of job, with no data. Reported 
at Missoula, District i, in December. Balance of winter and 
spring (1909) worked out of district office on Kaniksu, Kootenai 
and Pend Oreille forests. In July went to Absaroka as deputy 
supervisor and swung the boundary work; upon its comple- 
tion was called to Missoula again. Had crew up North Fork 
Flathead River estimating Great Northern and St. Paul & Mil- 
waukee rights of way. Work stopped in December and was sent 
to Kaniksu to complete the laying out of the blocks on section 26, 
fidelity sale (made the original contour map of this the previous 
spring). In January, 1910, was called to Missoula and spent 
three months in district office; spent time in volume table work 
and in teaching at the Ranger School, University of Montana. 
In April was sent to Superior National Forest as acting forest 
supervisor and am now supervisor. Have had some good expe- 
riences and some not so good. I've traveled by foot and horse, 
but at present I'm developing web feet." 

In politics he is a Republican. He is director of the Ely Club. 



Francis M. Patton 

Business address, 95 Charlotte Street, Asheville, N. C. 

Francis McLeod Patton was born August 20, 1880, in Asheville, N. C, 
the son of Thomas Walton Patton, captain in the Confederate Army, 
adjutant in the Spanish-American War and mayor of Asheville for three 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 205 

terms, and Martha Bell (Turner) Patton. He is of Scotch and Scotch- 
Irish ancestry. He has a sister, Josie Buel Patton. 

He attended grammar school in Sewanee, Tenn., the Biltmore Forest 
School and the University of North Carolina, where he was a member 
of Beta Theta Pi. For two years before entering the Yale Forest 
School he was employed in the United States Forest Service as student 
assistant. 

He is unmarried. 

Patton has been manager of the Parker & Patton Apple 
Orchards, Asheville, N. C, since November i, 1911. He was in 
the employ of the United States Forest Service as forest assistant 
from July, 1908, to December, 1909, and from January, 1910, 
to September, 191 1, as deputy forest supervisor. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. 



Rutledge Parker 

Business address, Missoula National Forest, Missoula, Mont. 
Residence, 501 Stephens Avenue, Missoula, Mont. 

Rutledge Parker was born September 19, 1877, in Georgetown County, 
S. C, the son of Rutledge Parker and Charlotte Meade (Huger) Parker. 
He is the grandson of Dr. Francis S. Parker and Mary (Taylor) Parker. 
He has a brother, Dr. John E. Parker, B.S. Union College '01 and M.D. 
Yale '06, and two sisters : Mrs. John Cheston Morris and Mariamnie 
Meade Parker. 

He graduated from the Porter Military Academy of Charleston, S. C, 
in 1897 and from that time until January, 1898, worked in the cotton 
business in Charleston. From 1898 to 1900 he planted rice near George- 
town, S. C, and from 1900 to 1905 was employed by the Atlantic Coast 
Lumber Company. 

He was married July 25, 1910, in Elk Horn Ranch, Granite County, 
Mont., to Miss Albertina Brown of Philipsburg, Mont., daughter of 
Frank Dean Brown and Anna Elizabeth (Lenz) Brown. 

Parker writes: "I entered the Yale Forest School July 5, 
1905, and remained until the following spring, taking the Junior 
course. I spent the summer vacation of 1906 in the mountains 
of North Carolina near Asheville recuperating from the stren- 
uous duties at the School. My health was not particularly good 
at that time so thought it unwise to return to the School the fol- 
lowing year. Through the influence and sincere efforts of Mr. 
Henry S. Graves I received an appointment as forest guard on 



2o6 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

the Coconino Forest in Arizona. There were a large number 
of timber sales on the Forest at that time and my work was all 
along that line. After spending a year in this region I returned 
to the School in October, 1907, and completed the Senior course. 
I took the civil service examinations at Silicanzo, Ala., with my 
Class of 1908, during the spring term of the Senior year. At 
that time we were studying lumbering conditions of the Kane 
Lumber Company's holdings. After completing the spring 
term I returned to Charleston, S. C, shortly afterwards received 
an appointment as forest assistant and reported to Washington, 
D. C, July I, 1908. I left on the same day for Thompson Falls, 
Mont., and joined a reconnaissance party on the Cabinet National 
Forest. Our work was principally along the line of timber esti- 
mates, together with a general land classification of odd sections 
included within the primary limits of the Northern Pacific Rail- 
road grant. On November 18, 1908, I was assigned to the 
Coeur d'Alene National Forest as forest assistant. On July 
20, 1909, was transferred to the Kootenai National Forest and 
a few months afterwards was appointed as deputy forest super- 
visor. During March of 191 1 I was again transferred to the 
Missoula National Forest as acting forest supervisor, with 
headquarters at Missoula, Mont. On July i, 1912, received an 
appointment as forest supervisor." 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. He served at one 
time in the militia of the State of South Carolina, later in the 
Territory of Arizona as first sergeant and in Montana as first 
lieutenant. 

NoN Graduates 
*Burgess Dickinson 

Died 1913 

Burgess Dickinson was born December 5, 1884, in Knoxboro, N. Y., 
the son of Rev. Edwin Henry Dickinson, D.D., B.A. Amherst '79. a 
Presbyterian clergyman, and Emma (Carter) Dickinson. He had two 
brothers, one a graduate of Hamilton in 1905, and a sister. An uncle, 
Walter Frederick Carter, was graduated at Yale in 1895. 

During his boyhood his home was successively in McGrawville, Seneca 
Falls, and Buffalo, N. Y., and he was prepared for college at the Master 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 207 

Park High School, Buffalo. He received the degree of Ph.B. at Yale 
in 1907 and attended the Yale Forest School in 1906-07 and 1907-08. 
He was unmarried. 

After leaving the Yale Forest School Dickinson became an 
engineer for the Edison Company in New York City. Recently 
he had decided to devote himself to the study of music, for 
which he had unusual gifts. 

He had been in ill health for some time, and died suddenly 
in New York City, January 28, 1913. He was a member of the 
North Presbyterian Church in Buffalo. 



George E. Gage 

« Business address, Amherst, Mass. 

Home address, Springfield, Mass. 

George Edward Gage was born December 31, 1883, in Springfield, 
Mass., the son of William N. Gage, who was born in Haverhill, Mass., 
and Mary Elizabeth (Lashorn) Gage. He has two sisters: Mary Eliza- 
beth and Ethel Gertrude Gage, and a brother, Charles Alexander Gage. 

He was prepared at the Springfield (Mass.) High School and before 
entering Yale attended Clark University, Worcester, Mass., studying in 
the collegiate department. In 1906, having completed the summer work 
in the Forest School at Milford, Pa., he did some work in the Yale 
Forest School. In 1907 he received the degree of M.A. and in 1909 
the degree of Ph.D. from Yale, his specialty being bacteriology and 
physiological chemistry. 

He is unmarried. 

Since September i, 191 1, Gage has been assistant professor of 
animal pathology at the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
Amherst, Mass. 

He has published articles on bacteriology, comparative pathol- 
ogy and sanitation in scientific and popular scientific journals. 

Walter W. Gleason 

Business and residence address, Munising, Mich. 
Johnsonburg, Pa. 

Walter William Gleason was born June 18, 1886, in Ridgway, Pa., the 
son of William Stone Gleason, postmaster at Johnsonburg, Pa., for six- 
teen years, and Minnie Warner (Service) Gleason. He is the grandson 
on his father's side of William Brown Gleason and Caroline (Stone) 



2o8 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Gleason and the great-grandson of William Gleason, son of Joseph 
Gleason, son of Abner Gleason. On his mother's side he is the grandson 
of Walter Scott Service and Mary (Warner) Service and the great 
grandson of Robert S. Service. 

He was prepared at the Johnsonburg High School, Johnsonburg, Pa., 
and in 1906 received the degree of B.S. at Allegheny College, Meadville, 
Pa., where he was a member of Phi Kappa Psi. 

He was married September 14, 1909, in Harrisburg, Pa., to Miss 
Dorothy Travis Coleman of Scotland, Pa., daughter of Alfred Coleman 
and Jean (Lias) Coleman. They have one daughter, Meribah Coleman 
Gleason, born October 10, 191 1, in Munising, Mich. 

Gleason was at one time appraiser for the United States 
Leather Company of New York City. He then became forester 
for the New York and Pennsylvania Pulp & Paper Company of 
New York City, then forester and woods superintendent for the 
A. Sherman Lumber Company and the Racquette River Paper 
Company of Potsdam, N. Y., and later, assistant director of 
Wyman's School of the Woods, Munising, Mich. Since June 15, 
191 1, he has been professor of logging and engineering at 
Wyman's School of the Woods. He is also city engineer of 
Munising, Mich., deputy county surveyor of Alger County, 
Michigan, and a partner in Wyman, Gleason & Company, forest- 
ers, surveyors and nurserymen of Munising, Mich. 

He attends the Episcopal church. In politics he is a Republi- 
can. He is a member of Elk Lodge, 379, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and of St. Lawrence Chapter, 24, Royal Arch Masons. 

He has written : Surveying-estimating, Manual of Michigan 
Forest Scouts. 

James E. Martin 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Leadville, Colo. 
Residence, Vendome Hotel, Leadville, Colo. 

James Edward Martin was born June 6, 1883, in Brockton, Mass., the 
son of Patrick Martin and Margaret Ann (O'Brien) Martin. He is of 
Irish ancestry. He has three brothers : John F. Martin, William H. 
Martin and Joseph Martin; and two sisters: Rose A. Martin and Alice 
Martin, a graduate of the State Normal School, Bridgewater, Mass. 

He was prepared at the Brockton High School, Brockton, Mass., and 
in 1906 received the degree of B.S. from the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, where he was a member of C.S.C. 

He is unmarried. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 209 

In the summer of 1907 Martin was city forester of Plainfield, 
N. J. After leaving the Yale Forest School in 1907 he went to 
Harvard, where he received the degree of M.F. in 1908. Since 
July I, 1908, he has held the position of forest assistant in the 
United States Forest Service with headquarters in Leadville 
National Forest, Colorado. 

He is a member of the Roman Catholic church. 



Wilfred E. Murchie 

Business address, 80 Broad Street, New York City 
Residence, 1121 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wilfred Eaton Murchie was born June 23, 1885, in South Orange, N. J., 
the son of Horace Beverly Murchie and Annie Kimball (Eaton) Murchie. 
His father is head of the H. B. Murchie Company, lumber dealers. He 
is of Scotch and English ancestry. He has a brother, Howard Murchie, 
and a sister, Lillian Murchie. 

He was prepared at the South Orange High School, South Orange, 
N. J., and at Phillips Andover and in 1907 graduated from the Sheffield 
Scientific School at Yale, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. 

He is unmarried. 

After completing the course at the Yale Forest School, Murchie 
was employed in the Bailey & Ailing Lumber Company of New- 
ark, N. J., and later with the Cross, Austin & Ireland Lumber 
Company of Brooklyn, N. Y. Since February i, 1912, he has 
been secretary and treasurer of Shillito & Murchie, Inc. 

He is a member of the Yale Club of New York City. 



Royal F. Nash 

Grand Rapids, IVis. 

Royal Freeman Nash was born February 22, 1885, in Grand Rapids, 
Wis., the son of Thomas E. Nash and Ella Maria (Hussy) Nash, daugh- 
ter of a Universalist preacher. His father has held the positions n£ 
superintendent of the Railway Mail Service, member of the Wisconsin 
Assembly, director in the Wood County National Bank, president and 
general manager of the Nekoosa Paper Company, president of the Nash 
Lumber Company and president of the Nekoosa-Edwards Paper CompanJ^ 
His father's ancestors were Irish immigrants and his mother's family 
originally settled in New England. He has two sisters: Mrs. William 

14 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



A. Scott. B.A. University of Wisconsin, and Mrs. Mason C. Bramham; 
and three brothers : Guy Nash, B.S. University of Wisconsin, James B. 
Nash, B.S. University of Wisconsin, and Leo Nash, B.A. University of 
Wisconsin. 

He was prepared at the Grand Rapids High School, attended the 
universities of California and Wisconsin, and in 1908 received the 
degree of B.S. from Columbia University. 

He is unmarried. 

Nash has served as forester in the Philippine Bureau of For- 
estry. 

He is a Socialist. 



Herbert S. Nelson 

Business address. Box 37, New London, Conn. 
Home address, 758 Savin Avenue, West Haven, Conn. 

Herbert Stuart Nelson was born January 17, 1885, in New Haven, 
Conn., the son of James Andrew Nelson, a traveling salesman for Price 
& Lee Company, and Martha (Walker) Nelson. 

He was prepared at the Hillhouse High School, New Haven, Conn., 
and in 1905 graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale. 

He is unmarried. 

Nelson is a civil engineer for the New York, New^ Haven & 
Hartford Railroad, which position he has held since October, 
1911. He writes: "From August i, 1905, until January 5, 1906, 
I was employed by the Hartford & Springfield Street Railway 
Company as rodman and draftsman. During this time I resided 
at Windsor Locks, Conn., often taking trips into Massachusetts 
and down to New Haven. I was next connected with the Lacka- 
wanna Railroad from February i, 1906, to October 10, 1906, 
where I was employed as face account man on the construction 
of their Bergen Hill Tunnel under Jersey City. I resided 
during this time in Paterson, N. J. Before going to Lacka- 
wanna, I took a trip through New Jersey and down to Washing- 
ton, D. C. While with this railroad I frequently ran up to New 
Haven and made numerous trips through New Jersey; also 
visited Buffalo and Niagara Falls. On leaving the Lackawanna 
I entered the Yale Forest School, completed one year and spent 
the summer at the camp at Milford, Pa. From September 19, 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 



1907, to October i, 1908, I was in New Haven. On October 26, 

1908, I went to Nevada and worked for two years in the Quar- 
tette Mine at Searchlight, both mine and cyanide mill. Came 
home for a visit in 19 10 and then went back to Nevada, where I 
was employed in the construction of a new layout on the San 
Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad during the year. In 
the fall of 191 1 I came home again, going to work for the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. I also spent some time 
in California, Nebraska and Utah," 

He is a member of the Congregational church. He is a member 
of the Young Men's Republican Club of New Haven and is a 
Mason, 



'- Aretas A. Saunders 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Chouteau, Mont. 
Ho vie address, 40 Crary Avenue, Mt, Vernon, N. Y, 

Aretas Andrews Saunders was born November 15, 1884, in Avon, 
Conn., the son of George Augustus Saunders, Yale '79 S., a business 
man, and Isabel Tyler (Andrews) Saunders. On his father's side he is 
the descendant of early English settlers in and about Newport, R, I., 
and on his mother's of English settlers in northern Connecticut, He 
has two sisters: Winifred Andrews Saunders (Mrs, Donald B, McLane), 
B.A, Mount Holyoke '05, and Dorothea Saunders (Mrs, Thomas B, 
Powell). 

He was prepared at the Boardman Manual Training School, New 
Haven, Conn., and in 1907 graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School 
at Yale, where he was on the 1906 S. and 1907 S. Swimming teams and 
won the plunge at the Y. M. C. A. meet in 1905. 

His engagement has been announced. 

Saunders is forest assistant in the United States Forest Ser- 
vice with headquarters in the Lewis and Clark National Forest, 
Chouteau, Mont., which position he has held since June, 191 1. 
From July, 1908, to August, 1909, he was assigned as forest 
assistant to Gallatin National Forest, Bozeman, Mont.; from 
August, 1909, to October, 1909, to Deerlodge National Forest, 
Anaconda, Mont. ; from October, 1909, to January, 1910, to 
Sioux National Forest, Camp Crook, S. Dak. ; and from January, 
1910, to June, 191 1, to Deerlodge National Forest. He writes: 
"It was in March, 1908, that I left old New Haven to take my last 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



term's work in the pine woods of Alabama. After three months 
in the South, during which I trembHngly tackled the civil service 
examinations, I found myself at Washington, D. C, ready to start 
work with the United States Forest Service. My fate was soon 
dealt out and I was shipped to Bozeman, Mont. Here I remained 
a year and learned to master the wiles of a saddle horse and 
acquired a few other accomplishments. In August, 1909, I was 
transferred to Anaconda, Mont., and in June, 191 1, to Chouteau, 
Mont., which still remains my headquarters. Since graduation I 
have come East once for a visit in December, 1909." 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church. Concerning poli- 
tics he writes : "Am independent of party, but opinions and 
sympathies at present with those of the Progressive Party." 
He is a member of the Cooper Ornithological Club of California 
and an associate of the American Ornithologists Union. 

He has published: Some birds of central Alabama, The Auk, Oct., 
1908; A preliminary list of the birds of Gallatin County, Montana, The 
Auk, Jan., 191 1 ; Bird notes from southwestern Montana, The Condor, 
Nov., 1910, illus. ; A study of the nesting of the cedar waxwing, The 
Auk, July, 1911; Some birds of southwestern Montana, The Condor, 
Jan., 1912. 

John A. Sweigert 

Platfsburg, N. Y. 

John Addison Sweigert was born October 4, 1884, in Holtwood, Pa., 
the son of B. L. Sweigert and Mary Elizabeth (Clark) Sweigert. 
He was prepared at the Lancaster High School, Lancaster, Pa. 
He is unmarried. 

Sweigert is assistant forester for the Delaware & Hudson 
Railroad. He has held this position since November 11, 1912. 



Dean S. Tiffany 

Hop Bottom, Pa. 

Dean Stanley Tiffany was bom in 1883 in Dimoch, Pa. He 
was prepared at Keystone Academy and received the degree of 
B.S. at Keuka College, Keuka Park, N. Y., in 1905. He attended 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1908 213 

the Yale Forest School in 1906-07 and one term in 1907-08, and 
was also registered for work in the graduate department of the 
Sheffield Scientific School. He has not furnished any information 
for this record. 



Ralph B. Wainwright 

Residence, 63 Curtis Street, New Britain, Conn. 

Ralph Bickerton Wainwright was born June 3, 1883, in New Britain, 
Conn., the son of Charles Patterson Wainwright, a selectman, director 
of the Savings & Loan Association and a foreman for the Stanley Works, 
and Ella May (Bickerton) Wainwright. His father's ancestors came to 
this country from England in 1690 and his mother's about 1750. He 
has two sisters: Elizabeth Wainwright and Grace Wainwright and one 
brother, Halsted Wainwright. A relative, H. E. Hart, graduated from 
the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale in 1894. 

He was prepared at the New Britain High School and in 1907 graduated 
from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale, where he played on the 
Foresters' Football Team his Junior year. 

He is unmarried. 

Since July i, 1909, Wainwright has been superintendent of 
Walnut Hill Park in New Britain, Conn. After leaving the Yale 
Forest School he was assistant to the head gardener of the Hart- 
ford public parks and later did private landscape work. During 
the winter of 1908-09 he worked in a factory and in the spring 
again entered upon private landscape work, which he continued 
until his present appointment. He writes: "Am waking up the 
city to the needs of caring for her trees and have had fine success 
so far." 

He is a member of the Eastern Branch of the American Asso- 
ciation of Park Superintendents. 

He has published : Making the home grounds attractive. New 
Britain (Conn.) Herald, March, 191 1 ; and Parks in New Britain, 
New Britain Herald, March, 1912. 



214 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



CLASS OF 1909 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

F. F. Woods Beckman 

Finspong, Sweden 

Fredrik Ferdinand Woods Beckman was born March 26, 1886, in 
Stockholm, Sweden, the son of Ernst Johan Beckman, an editor, author 
and poet and member of the Swedish Senate, and Louise Woods (Baker) 
Beckman of Princeton, N. Y. His father has for many years been a 
member of the Swedish parliament, is a member of the Interparliamentary 
Union and its Council and Executive Committee, city counselor of Stock- 
holm and a member of the School Board. His grandfather on his father's 
side was a bishop in the Lutheran Swedish (State) Church and professor 
at the University of Upsala, and his grandmother was daughter of a 
professor at Upsala. On his mother's side he is the grandson of L 
Woods Baker, a chemical civil engineer of the United States Coast 
Survey, and Sarah S. Tuthill of New Haven, Conn., an authoress and 
daughter of Cornelius L. Tuthill and Loisa C. Hughins. He has six 
brothers and sisters: Anna Sturge of London, England; Albert 
Woods Beckman of Altoona, Pa.; John Woods Beckman, a graduate 
of the Royal Technical Institute of Stockholm and civil engineer at 
Niagara Falls; Loulette Harding of London, England; Astri Woods 
Beckman of Djursholm, Sweden; and Robert Woods Beckman, a student 
at the University of London, England. 

He was prepared at school in Djursholm and graduated at Stockholms 
hogre Reallaroverk, Stockholm, Sweden, in 1905. Before entering the 
Yale Forest School he traveled extensively : in 1900 in Norway, 1901 
in England and Portugal, 1903 in England, 1905 in Norway, Germany, 
Austria, Hungary and Italy, 1906 in Germany, Switzerland and France, 
1907 in Germany, England and the United States. 

He was married October 19, 1910, in Rheydt, Germany, to Miss Frieda 
Dilthey of Rheydt, Rheinland, Prussia, daughter of Gustav Dilthey and 
Clara (Fischer) Dilthey. They have a son, Gunnar Ernst Gustav 
Dilthey Woods Beckman, born November 26, 191 1, in Finspong, Sweden. 

Beckman is assistant forester for the firm Aktiebolaget 
Finspong Styckebruk of Finspong, Sweden, which position he 
has held since July 24, 191 1. Previous to this he was assistant 
to the forester of the "Norrlandsbanken'' in Stockholm, where his 
work consisted of estimating, mapping and making working plans. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1909 215 

In 1909 he traveled in Germany, and in 1910 in Germany, Austria 
and Italy. 

He is a member of the Swedish State Church and in politics 
is a Liberal and a Prohibitionist. He has served in the Swedish 
Field Artillery, Svea artilleri-regemente. He is a member of the 
Liberal Union of Sweden, the "Local Liberal Union, the Swedish 
Forestry Association, the Forestry Association of Soderrnanland 
och Oestergotland, the Swedish Touring Club, the National 
Society against Emigration, and the Swedish "Men's League for 
Woman's Suffrage." At Yale he was a member of Sigma Xi. 

Frederick H. Billard 

* Business address, Berlin, N. H. 

Home address, Meriden, Conn. 

Frederick Howell Billard was born October 18, 1873, in Meriden, Conn., 
the son of John Leander Billard, a coal merchant and financier, and 
Harriet Yale (Merriman) Billard. He had two brothers and one sister: 
H. M. Billard, Walter S. Billard, Yale '93 S., and Mary Billard, all 
deceased. 

He was prepared at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., and graduated 
from Yale in 1896, where he was a member of the Academic Freshman 
Crew in the fall of 1892, of the Sophomore Fall and Spring crews and 
of the Junior Fall Crew. 

He is unmarried. 

Billard is secretary, treasurer and forester of the New Hamp- 
shire Timberland Owners' Association, which position he has 
held since January i, 191 1. Before entering the Forest School 
he was employed for a few years in Chicago by Swift & Com- 
pany, the packers, after which he returned to Meriden and was 
a clerk for Lyon & Billard, coal and lumber dealers. 



John M, Briscoe 

"^ Business address, Orono, Maine 

Home address. The Colonial, Bangor, Maine 

John Manvers Briscoe was born July 22, 1878, in Pottsville, Pa., the 
son of Sidney Bernard Briscoe, director of the Safe Deposit Bank of 
Pottsville, Pa., and receiver of the Pottsville Steel Company, and Sarah 
(Loeser) Briscoe. On his father's side he is the grandson of Robert 



2i6 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Briscoe and on his mother's side of Christopher Loeser and Louisa 
Augusta (Bartle) Loeser. He has two sisters: Louise Briscoe and 
Avalon Briscoe. 

He was prepared at the Pottsville High School, Pottsville, Pa., and 
attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University 
of Pennsylvania. Before entering the Yale Forest School he was a 
member of the engineering corps of the Philadelphia and Reading Coal & 
Iron Company and a merchant. 

He was married June 28, 191 1, in Bryn Mawr, Pa., to Miss Ethel 
Lydia Griscom of Brj^n Mawr, daughter of William Morris Griscom 
and Anna Lydia (Miller) Griscom. They have a son, Sidney Griscom 
Briscoe, born May 7, 1912, in Brewer, Maine. 

In 1909-10 Briscoe was forest assistant in the United States 
Forest Service. Since September i, 1910, he has been professor 
of forestry at the University of Maine and public instructor in 
forestry for the State of Maine. He spent the summer of 191 1 
in a trip of inspection and study of forest regions of the West, 
visiting each forestry district with the exception of districts 
I and 4. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. 

He has published : Article on Forestry Department of University of 
Maine, Am. For.; numerous articles on forestry subjects in the Lewiston 
Journal and Bangor Commercial ; address before Dominion Forestry 
Convention, Quebec, 191 1; (with R. Zon) Eucalyptus in Florida, Bull. 
87, U. S. Forest Service. 



Georges deS. Canavarro 

United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

Georges deS. Canavarro was born January 9, 1885, in Honolulu, 
Hawaii, the son of Antonio deS. Canavarro and Miranda (McElroy) 
deS. Canavarro. His father was captain of the Royal Navy, minister to 
the Kingdom of Hawaii, and also consul general of the Territory of 
Hawaii from 1883 to 1913. His father was from Oporto, North 
Portugal, and his mother from Kentucky, of Scotch descent. 

He spent one year at Cornell and in 1908 received the degree of B.S. 
from the University of Minnesota. At college he was a member of 
Sigma Xi, Alpha Zeta and Delta Upsilon. 

He is unmarried. 

Canavarro is forest assistant in the United States Forest 
Service with headquarters at Washington, D. C. He entered 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1909 217 

upon this position March 21, 1910. In 1912 he spent several 
months on a vacation at his home in the Hawaiian Islands. He 
returned in September and is in charge of the section of compila- 
tion in the Washington office. 



William D. Clark 

25 North Prospect Street, Amherst, Mass. 

William Darrow Clark was born May 27, 1877, in Rahway, N. J., the 
son of Charles H. Clark, a real estate dealer, and Harriett N. (Crowell) 
Clark. He is of English descent. He has one brother, Charles H. Clark, 
and four sisters : Anne Dayton Clark, Cornelia Remsen Clark, Florence 
La Grange Clark and Elizabeth Darrow Clark. 

He was prepared at Phillips Andover, and graduated from Yale 
College in 1904, where he was a member of the Freshman Glee Club. 

He was married March 28, 1912, in Ridley Park, Pa., to Miss Emma A. 
McFeely of Chestertown, Md., daughter of William James McFeely 
and Julia M. (Cunningham) McFeely. 

Before entering the Forest School, Clark spent two years 
traveling commercially and four months as student assistant in 
the United States Forest Service. Between Junior and Senior 
years in the School he was a forest agent in the Service for 
eight months. In September, 1909, he became assistant professor 
of forestry in the Pennsylvania State College at State College, 
Pa. He is now professor of forestry in the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College at Amherst, Mass. He entered upon his present 
position in September, 1912. 

He is a Presbyterian. 

John D. Coffman 

United States Forest Service, Weaverville, Trinity County, Calif. 

John Daniel Coffman was born May 10, 1882, in Allentown, Pa., the 
son of Wilmer Coffman, B.A. Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., and a 
member of Phi Beta Kappa (died in 1908), and Anna Margaret (Evans) 
Coffman. His father was a clergyman and a member of the Philadelphia 
Methodist Episcopal Conference for forty years, retiring from the min- 
istry in 1904. He is the grandson on his father's side of Daniel Coffman, 
a farmer in Chester County, Pa., and Margaret (Patrick) Coffman, and 
on his mother's side of John Evans and Mary Isabella (Horn) Evans 
of Easton, Pa. His mother graduated from the State Normal School 



2i8 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

of Millersville, Pa. He has two sisters: Grace Lydia (Coffman) Roxby 
and Edith James (Coffman) Baker, both graduates of the Philadelphia 
Girls Normal School, and two brothers : Wilmer Evans Coffman, B.A. 
Wesleyan University '95 and B.D. Drew Theological Seminary, and 
Herbert Coffman, B.S. University of Pennsylvania. 

He was prepared at the Central High School, Philadelphia, Pa., and 
was employed by the Alpha Portland Cement Company, Easton, Pa., from 
the fall of 1900 to September, 1905, when he entered the College of Arts 
and Sciences, Cornell University. He remained at college until 1907 and 
was a member of Acacia Fraternity. 

He is unmarried. 

Coffman entered the United States Forest Service in July, 1909, 
as forest assistant in Liyo National Forest, California. In April, 

1910, he was transferred to Shasta National Forest and in June, 

191 1, was appointed deputy forest supervisor of Trinity National 
Forest, California, his present position. 

He is a member of the Congregational church and in politics is 
a Progressive Republican. He is a member of Sigma Xi, Yale 
Chapter, and of the Society of American Foresters. He is also 
a member of Easton Lodge, 152, Free and Accepted Masons, 
and Easton Royal Arch Chapter, 173, Easton, Pa., of Hugh de 
Payens Commandery, 19, Knights Templar, Easton, Pa., and of 
Pyramid Temple, A. A. O. N. Mystic Shrine, Bridgeport, Conn. 



Arthur W. DuBois 

Hallstead, Pa. 

Arthur Wood DuBois was born February 12, 1886, in Washington, 
D. C, the son of James Taylor DuBois, Envoy Extraordinary and 
Minister Plenipotentiary to Columbia and director of several banks, and 
Emma (Pastor) DuBois. On his mother's side he is of French and 
German ancestry. He has a brother, Henry Pastor DuBois, M.E. 
Cornell '07. 

He was prepared at the Friends' Select School, Washington, D. C, 
at the Binghamton High School, Binghamton, N. Y., and at Schmidt's 
Institute, St. Gall, Switzerland, and in 1907 received the degree of B.A. 
from Cornell University, where he served as a cadet. From this time 
until he entered the Yale Forest School he was engaged in farming, 
ranching and traveling. 

He was married September 21, 1912, in Hallstead, Pa., to Miss Rena 
B. Merrell, daughter of Albert F. Merrell and Charlotte Stockholm 
Merrell. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1909 219 

DuBois has been engaged in farming in Hallstead, Pa., since 
June 15, 1912. Previous to this he was secretary to the American 
minister at Bogota, Colombia. He has traveled in Europe, Asia 
(including Persia, Arabia and Turkestan), northern Africa, 
Mexico, the West and East Indies and Colombia. In 191 1 he 
served for a short time in the Mexican Revolution. 

He has published two stories on Persia in The World To-day, 
a political article on Persia in the New York Times (Sunday 
Magazine) and other newspaper articles. 



Herman E. Fegley 

Business address, Pottsville, Pa. 

Home address, Auburn, Pa. 
508 Laurel Street, Pottsville, Pa. 

Herman Edgar Fegley was born April 23, 1880, in Drehersville, Pa., 
the son of Manden S. Fegley, steward of the County Almshouse in 1899- 
1900 and a retired farmer, and Mary Ann (Kershner) Fegley. He is the 
grandson on his father's side of William Fegley and Catherine (Schmick) 
Fegley and on his mother's side of William Kershner and Elizabeth 
(Seltzer) Kershner. He has a brother, Clinton L. Fegley, and a sister, 
Bessie E. (Fegley) Scharadin. Another brother, William L. Fegley, is 
deceased. 

He graduated from Keystone State Normal School, Kutztown, Pa., 
in 1900 and in 1904 received the degree of B.A. from Franklin and 
Marshall College. He taught in the high school at McEwensville, Pa., 
for two terms and part of a term at Conemaugh, Pa. He then received 
a civil service appointment in the Government Printing Office, Washington, 
D. C. 

He is unmarried. 

Since October, 191 1, Fegley has been manager and partner in 
the Acme Knitting Company, manufacturers of ladies' underwear, 
of Pottsville, Pa. He writes : "Entered the United States Forest 
Service July i, 1909, and remained there a year and a half. 
During the summer of 1909 I was engaged in estimating timber 
in the Rocky Mountains on the Helena and Gallatin National 
forests. I was then appointed forest assistant on the Sioux 
National Forest, South Dakota." 

He is a member of the Reformed church and in politics is a 
Progressive Republican. He was a charter member of Acacia 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



Fraternity at Yale and belongs to the Order of Independent 
Americans and to Schuylkill Lodge, 138, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Orwigsburg, Pa. 



Frederick A. Gaylord 

Business address. Conservation Commission, Albany, N. Y. 

Residence, 26 Lancaster Street, Albanj^ N. Y. 

6g South Cliff Street, Ansonia, Conn. 

Frederick Alan Gaylord was born June i, 1885, in Ansonia, Conn., the 
son of Frederick Littlefield Gaylord, postmaster at Ansonia for ten years 
and the member of longest service on the Republican State Control Com- 
mittee, and Mary Emma (Peck) Gaylord. He is the grandson on his 
father's side of Miles Allen Gaylord, and on his mother's side is a direct 
descendant of Elihu Yale. He has one brother, Harold B. Gaylord, 
M.E. Stevens Institute '04. 

He was prepared at the Boardman Manual Training High School, New 
Haven, Conn., at Stevens Institute, Hoboken, N. J., and at Dean Academy, 
Franklin, Mass. In 1908 he graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School 
at Yale, where he received honors in his Freshman and Junior years. He 
was a member of Beta Theta Pi at Stevens Institute. 

He is unmarried. 

Gaylord is state forester of New York State. He received 
this appointment December 6, 1910. He writes: "Entered the 
United States Forest Service July i, 1909. Spent most of my 
time while in the Service on the Northern Pacific estimates and 
general reconnaissance work in western Montana, the panhandle 
of Idaho and eastern Washington. Became connected with the 
Department of Forestry at the Michigan Agricultural College, 
July 15, 1910. On December 6, 1910, I accepted a position with 
the Forest, Fish and Game Commission of Albany, N. Y. This 
commission was later legislated into the Conservation Commis- 
sion. My work in New York consisted of all kinds, from prac- 
tical to educational. In March, 1912, I received an offer to have 
charge of the Syracuse Ranger School of Syracuse University. 
Refused offer carrying increase of 900 per annum." 

In politics he is "Independent, with strong Progressive tenden- 
cies." He is a member of the American Society of Foresters and 
the L^niversity Club of Albany. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1909 



He has published: Penal labor and conservation, Am. For., Feb., 
1912; Are there too many forest schools? Am. For., June, 1912; Shade 
trees, Bull., N. Y. Conservation Com., 1912 ; Forestry and forest re- 
sources, Bull., N. Y. Conservation Com., 1912. 



Belknap C. Goldsmith 

United States Forest Service, Alturas, Calif. 

Belknap Chittenden Goldsmith was born November 25, 1882, in New 
York Cit3% the son of Jay Charlton Goldsmith, for many years editor of 
the New York Herald, and Alice (Westervelt) Goldsmith. He is the 
grandson on his fathers side of William Belknap Goldsmith and Helen 
(Hammond) Goldsmith, and on his mother's side of Ralph Westervelt 
and Cornelia (Campbell) Westervelt. He has two brothers: Paul Gold- 
smith and Goldwin Goldsmith, who received a degree in architecture 
from Columbia University in 1896. 

He was prepared at Oakland High School, Oakland, Calif., and in 1906 
received the degree of B.S. from the University of California. 

He was married June 19, 1912, in Alturas, Calif., to Miss Marion Sarah 
Hawkes of Alturas, daughter of Albert A. Hawkes and Cora Bell 
(Warren) Hawkes. They have a son, born April 25, 1913, in Alturas, 
Calif. 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School Goldsmith 
entered the United States Forest Service as forest assistant. He 
is at present forest assistant on Modoc National Forest, Alturas, 
Calif. 

He is a member of the First Congregational Church of Oak- 
land, Calif., and belongs to the Society of American Foresters. 



Edgar C. Hirst 

Concord, N. H. 

Edgar Clarkson Hirst was born August 30, 1882, in Yellow Springs, 
Ohio, the son of John Janney Hirst, a druggist (deceased), and Mary 
(Bowe) Hirst. His father was educated at Antioch College under Horace 
Mann. He is a descendant of John Hirst, a Presbyterian minister, who 
came from Yorkshire, England, to Philadelphia in 1737 and whose 
descendants married into Philadelphia Friends families. He is the grand- 
son on his mother's side of Erastus Bowe of Rutland, Vt., a pioneer in 
northwestern Ohio, paymaster in the War of 1812 and a member of a 
small detachment which built and held Fort Stephenson against British 
and Indian attacks. 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



He was prepared at Yellow Springs High School and at the Prepara- 
tory School of Antioch College. In 1907 he received the degree of B.A. 
from Ohio State University, where he was a member of Delta Upsilon. 

He is unmarried. 

Since July i, 1909, Hirst has held the position of state forester 
of New Hampshire. 

He is a member of the Unitarian church. Concerning politics 
he writes : "Have always been a Republican. Believe in progres- 
sive principles and increasing the power of the national govern- 
ment." At Yale he was a member of Sigma Xi. He is a Blue 
Lodge Mason. 



Oswald D. Ingall 

99 South Fullerton Avenue, Montclair, N. J. 

Oswald Drew Ingall was born September 10, 1884, in Sault Sainte 
Marie, Ontario, Canada, the son of Elfric Drew Ingall, for thirty years 
a geologist in the Canadian Geological Survey, and Blanche (Plummer) 
Ingall. On his father's side he is the great-grandson of W. T. F. M. 
Ingall of Greenhithe, Kent, England, and Joan Drew of Ireland. On 
his mother's side he is of English ancestry. He has two half brothers 
and two half sisters. 

He was prepared at the Ottawa Collegiate Institute and Montclair 
High School and in 1903 entered Cornell University in the forestry 
course. When the Forest School was discontinued, he entered the 
College of Arts and Sciences at Cornell and received the degree of 
B.A. in 1907. At college he was a member of Bandhu. 

He is unmarried. 

From 1909 to 191 1 Ingall was forest agent in the United States 
Forest Service. He then became forest assistant and later 
entered the British Columbia Forest Service under H. R. 
MacMillan of the Class of 1908. He has recently left the Cana- 
dian Service and is with relatives in Montclair, N. J. He expects 
to remain in the East. He writes : "Worked on third Kentucky 
report during the summer of 1909, on the Illinois report in the 
winter and spring of 1910 and on the Pittsburgh Flood Com- 
mission Report in the winter of 1910. In the spring of 191 1 
went on a trip to California. Worked on examination of land in 
Georgia in the spring of 191 1, in Nantahala Area in the summer 
and fall of 1912." 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1909 223 

He is a member of the Cornell University Club, New York, 
and is a Mason. 

He has published: (With R. C. Hall) Report on forest condi- 
tions in Illinois, 111. Dept. Natural History. 



Henry L. Johnson 

34 Broadway Extension, Boston, Mass. 

Henry Langley Johnson was born November 30, 1882, in Boston, Mass., 
the son of Henry Franklin Johnson, a Civil War veteran, and Ella 
Sands (Langley) Johnson. His father was born in Barre, Vt., the son 
of George S. Johnson and Fidelia (Freeman) Johnson. His mother 
was born in Biddeford, Maine, the daughter of Samuel T. Langley and 
Elizabeth (Sands) Langley. 

He was prepared at the English High School, Boston, Mass., and 
at Ithaca High School, Ithaca, N. Y. In 1907 he received the degree 
of B.A. from Cornell University. 

He is unmarried. , 

In October, 1908, Johnson and C. A. Metzger of Hartford, 
Conn., established the Mount Carmel Forestry & Nursery Com- 
pany. From July i, 1909, to October 20, 1912, he was forest 
assistant in the United States Forest Service. He was granted 
a leave of absence during this time and from April 5, 1912, to 
July 19, 1912, was transitman for Fisher, Bryant & Olmsted, and 
from September i, 1912, to October 11, 1912, was with the W. M. 
Ritter Lumber Company of Mortimer, N. C. He has lately 
reentered the Forest Service and has been stationed in the heart 
of the moonshine region at Blue Ridge, Ga. 

In politics, he is an Independent and a Freetrader. He is a 
member of the Massachusetts Forestry Association and the Con- 
necticut Nurserymen's Association. 



R. Chapin Jones 

Business address. State Board of Forestry, Baltimore, Md. 
Home address, 9 Concord Avenue, Cambridge, Mass. 

Richard Chapin Jones was born September 26, 1885, in Des Moines, 
Iowa, the son of Richard Jones, Ph.D. Heidelberg University and a 
member of Phi Beta Kappa, and Carrie Holmes (Grinnell) Jones. His 



224 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

father has been professor of English at Tufts, Vanderbilt, Syracuse and 
Swarthmore, was at one time on the New York State Board of Regents 
and is the author of "Growth of the Idylls of the King," etc. On his 
father's side he is of Welsh ancestry and is the grandson on his mother's 
side of J. B. Grinnell of Vermont and Julia Ann (Chapin) Grinnell 
of Massachusetts. He has three brothers: Grinnell Jones, B.S. Van- 
derbilt University '03, M.S. '05, M.A. Harvard '05, and Ph.D. '08; Eliot 
Jones, B.A. Vanderbilt '06, and M.A. Harvard '08; and Percival Jones, 
and two sisters : Elaine Jones, who graduated from Tufts College, and 
Beatrice Jones. 

He was prepared at Grinnell College Academy, Iowa, and Syracuse 
High School, Syracuse, N. Y., and in 1904 received the degree of B.A. 
from Vanderbilt University, where he was a member of Sigma Nu. 
He did post-graduate work at Vanderbilt two years, with a fellowship 
in biology one year, and afterward worked for a railroad a year, 
surveying, etc. 

He was married December 26, 1912, in North Conway, N. H., to Miss 
Alice Morrison of North Conway, N. H., daughter of William Hugh 
Morrison, and Linnie Keene Morrison. 

• Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School Jones entered 
the United States Forest Service, where he was employed until 
June 19, 1910, as forest assistant with headquarters principally in 
Gallatin and Lolo National forests in Montana and in Kaniksu 
in Washington. He was then appointed forest assistant for the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company, which position he held until 
January i, 191 1. From this time until September 15, 191 1, he 
traveled in the interests of his father in Florida, New England 
and western Canada. He then took up farming in Massachusetts, 
but left this on April 15, 191 2, to accept a position as field assistant 
with the New Hampshire State Forestry Commission. On 
August I, 1912, he was appointed assistant state forester of 
Maryland, his present position. 

In politics he is a Progressive Democrat. 



Joseph C. Kircher 

United States Forest Service, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Joseph Casimir Kircher was born November 15, 1884, in Bellville, 111., 
the son of Henry A. Kircher, a hardware merchant of the firm of 
Kircher & Son, and Bertha (Engelmann) Kircher (deceased). He is 
of German descent. He has two brothers : Harry B. Kircher, B.S. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1909 225 

Illinois '04, and Theodore E. Kircher, Yale '07 S., LL.B. '10. A cousin, 
Coleman E. Andel, graduated from Yale in 1902. 

He was prepared at Smith Academy, St. Louis, Mo., and graduated 
from Yale College in 1907, where he received a first colloquy Junior 
appointment, was a member of Beta Theta Pi and of the University 
Orchestra. 

He is unmarried. 

Kircher entered the United States Forest Service on July i, 
1909. His first appointment was as forest assistant in the 
Coconino National Forest. This position he held until June i, 
191 1, when he was appointed deputy supervisor, his present 
position. 

He is a member of the Concatenated Order of Hoo-Hoo. 



Aldo Leopold 

Business address. Forest Service, Tres Piedras, N. Mex. 

Home address, loi Clay Street, Burlington, Iowa 

Forest Service, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Aldo Leopold was born January 11, 1886, in Burlington, Iowa, the son 
of Carl Adolph Leopold, manager of the Leopold Desk Company, Bur- 
lington, Iowa, and Clara (Starker) Leopold. He is of German descent, 
both his grandfathers being German university graduates, who came to 
America and engaged in banking and business. He has one sister, Marie 
Leopold, a graduate of the Bennett School, and two brothers : Carl 
Starker Leopold, Yale '11 S., and Frederic Leopold. 

He was prepared at the Burlington High School and the Lawrenceville 
(N. J.) School, and graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School in 
1908. While at Yale he was a member of the Freshman Union (1905-06), 
of the Sheflf Debating Society (executive committee, 1905-07, and secre- 
tary and treasurer, 1907-08), and of the executive committee of the Sheff 
Y. M. C. A. He also had charge of the Yale Extension work for New 
Yale in China (1907-08). 

He was married October 9, 1912, in Santa Fe, N. Mex., to Miss Estella 
Luna Bergere of Santa Fe, N. Mex., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 
M. Bergere. 

Leopold is forest supervisor of the Carson National Forest, in 

New Mexico. When he entered the Service in July, 1909, he 

was appointed forest assistant in the Apache National Forest. 

This position he held until April, 191 1, when he became deputy 

15 



2 26 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

forest supervisor in the Carson National Forest. For a time he 
held a position as acting supervisor in District 3 before being 
appointed to his present position. 
He is a Republican. 



Everett H. MacDaniels 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Sumpter, Ore. 

Home address, 250 East College Street, Oberlin, Ohio 

United States Forest Service, Beck Building, Portland, Ore. 

Everett Herman MacDaniels was born October 3, 1882, in Fremont, 
Ohio, the son of Herman Nye MacDaniels, lieutenant of Company A, the 
I nth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil War, and 
Ellen Woodbury (Fay) MacDaniels. His paternal grandfather was born 
in England and the rest of the family have lived in America since about 
1700, for the most part in eastern Massachusetts. His grandfather on his 
mother's side was a Congregational minister. He has two brothers : 
Frederick K. MacDaniels, who studied at Ohio State University, and 
Laurence H. MacDaniels, B.A. Oberlin College; and two sisters: Alice 
C. (MacDaniels) Fauver, B.A. Oberlin '99, and Anna Woodbury (Mac- 
Daniels) Fauver, B.A. Oberlin '05. 

He was prepared at Oberlin High School and at Oberlin Academy 
and in 1906 received the degree of B.A. from Oberlin College. 

He is unmarried. 

MacDaniels entered the United States Forest Service July i, 
1909, as forest assistant. In 1910 he was appointed deputy forest 
supervisor with headquarters on Whitman National Forest, 
Sumpter, Ore., which position he now holds. 



Rufus S. Maddox 

Quincy, Calif. 

Rufus Sherrell Maddox was born November 19, 1874, in Coldwater, 
Tenn., the son of James Jefferson Maddox and Martha Ann Taylor 
(Sherrell) Maddox. On his father's side he is of Scotch-Irish and on 
his mother's of English ancestry. He has five brothers : John S., Auburn 
A., Solon J., Herman L., and Lofton Maddox, and two sisters : Bessie 
Marvin and Mary Stella Maddox. 

His youth was spent on a farm with intermittent attendance at public 
schools until the age of twenty. He taught for a few years in the 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1909 227 

public schools and then went to Winchester Normal College, where he 
received the degree of B.A. in 1900. He graduated from Yale College in 
1907, having received scholarships, a prize in Latin and an oration Junior 
and Senior appointment. His society was Alpha Delta Phi. 

He was married January 3, 1912, in New York City, to Miss Marie 
Janet Morrow of New York City, daughter of Cornelius Wartendyke 
Morrow and Rosalie Caroline (Lippmann) Morrow. 

Before entering the United States Forest Service Maddox 
served for a time as a technical forester in private forestry. His 
present appointment is that of forest assistant, a position he has 
held since entering the Government Service on February i, 1910. 
Concerning his travels, Maddox says: "Since leaving Yale in 
1909 my travels have been chiefly in New York State, Pennsyl- 
vania, Massachusetts and Connecticut in the East. I have been 
across the United States three times in connection with my pro- 
fession and vacations. My experiences have been chiefly business 
ones in contact with lumbermen and technical men of the Forest 
Service." 

Maddox is a '"Democrat, Progressive in spirit." He is a mem- 
ber of the Society of American Foresters. 

He has published an article, Timbersales on the Plumas 
National Forest, March, 1912. 



Frederick F. Moon 

Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Frederick Franklin Moon was born July 3, 1880, in Easton, Pa., the 
son of William W. Moon, a Quaker, and Ophelia F. (Nightingale) Moon. 
He has a sister, Emelie N. Miller. 

He was prepared at the Easton High School, Easton, Pa., and in 
1901 received the degree of B.A. from Amherst, where he was a member 
of Zeta Psi. He spent two years at the Harvard Medical School and 
four years in business and contracting work. 

He was married June i, 1912, in New York City, to Miss Pearl Brown- 
ing Stetson of Columbus, Ohio, daughter of Matthew Wilson Stetson 
and Mary (Browning) Stetson. 

During the summer of 1909 Moon was employed in the United 
States Forest Service and in 1909-10 held the position of state 
forester of the Forest, Fish and Game Commission. From 1910 
to 1912 he was professor of forestry at the Massachusetts Agri- 



228 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

cultural College, Amherst, Mass., and September i, 191 2, he was 
appointed professor of forest engineering at the New York State 
College of Forestry, Syracuse University, N. Y., his present posi- 
tion. He spent the summer of 1912 studying forestry practice in 
Germany, France and Switzerland. Early in the year 1913 he 
went on a lecture tour in the interests of forestry through the 
counties of Ontario, Yates and Wayne, New York State. In 
this series of talks he discussed the possibilities of reforesting the 
idle lands of the state, the forest conditions of the state in the 
past and the present, the possibilities of improving the farm wood- 
lot and the utilization of waste portions of the farm by the 
planting of forest trees. 

In politics he is a Republican. He is a member of the Society 
of American Foresters. He is Secretary of the Class of 1909, 
Yale Forest School. 

He has published : Report on highlands of Hudson Reservation, N. Y. 
Forest, Fish and Game Rep., 1909, and Forest conditions of Warren 
County, A''. Y. Forest, Fish and Game Rep., 19 10. 



William B. Osborne, Jr. 

Business address, 503 Beck Building, Portland, Ore. 
Residence, 724 East Main Street, Portland, Ore. 

William B. Osborne, Jr., was born November 25, 1884, in Rochester, 
N. Y., the son of William B. Osborne and Laura Virginia (McDonnald) 
Osborne. He is the grandson on his father's side of David H. Osborne 
and Lavinia (Bushnell) Osborne, and on his mother's side of Angus 
McDonnald and Virginia (Dibble) McDonnald. He has a brother, D. 
Henry Osborne, B.A. Williams '05 and B.S. Union '07, and two sisters: 
Elizabeth McDonnald Osborne, B.A. Mount Holyoke '12, and Ruth 
McDonnald Osborne. 

He was prepared at the Victor High School, Victor, N. Y., and in 
1907 received the degree of B.A. from Williams, where he was a 
member of Phi Sigma Kappa. 

He was married June 21, 1909, in Canandaigua, N. Y., to Miss Lura 
Esther Cooley of Canandaigua, N. Y., daughter of A. S. Cooley and 
Harriet Reed Cooley. 

Osborne is forest assistant in the United States Forest Service 
with headquarters in the Oregon National Forest, which position 
he has held since July i, 1909. He writes: "Since leaving Yale 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1909 229 

have been in Forest Service. Work has been principally timber 
reconnaissance, fire fighting, planting and surveying." 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church and in politics is 
a Progressive. He is a Mason. 

Percy J. Paxton 

Business address, Steamboat Springs, Colo. 

Home address, Princeton, Ind. 

United States Forest Service, Denver, Colo. 

Percy Jerauld Paxton was born June 13, 1884, in Princeton, Ind., 
the son of Thomas Rice Paxton, born in Shelbyville, Ky., the son of 
John D. Paxton, D.D., a Presbyterian minister, and Amelia (Jerauld) 
Paxton, daughter of George N. Jerauld and Nancy (Foster) Jerauld. 
He has two sisters : Laura Jerauld Paxton, B.A. Smith '02, and Leonora 
Merrill Paxton, B.A. Smith '00. 

He was prepared at Phillips Exeter Academy and in 1906 received 
the degree of B.A. from Williams College, where he was a member 
of Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduating from the Yale Forest School Paxton has been 
employed in the United States Forest Service as forest assistant. 
His headquarters are at present on Routt National Forest, Steam- 
boat Springs, Colo. He has recently been promoted to the rank 
of forest examiner. 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church. 

Reuben P. Prichard 

Business address. New York State College of Forestry, Syracuse 

University, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Home address, 16 Fremont Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Reuben Parker Prichard was born February 25, 1884, in Somerville, 
Mass., the son of George William Prichard and Mary Louisa (Lane) 
Prichard. On his father's side he is of Welch and on his mother's of 
Irish ancestry. He has a sister, Emma Elizabeth Prichard, and a 
brother, John Augustus Prichard. 

He was prepared at the Somerville English High School, Somerville, 
Mass., and in 1907 received the degree of B.S. from Dartmouth College, 
where he was a member of Kappa Kappa Kappa and the Dragon Society. 

He is unmarried. 



230 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School Prichard was 
appointed forest assistant in the United States Forest Service with 
headquarters in Missoula National Forest, Montana. In the fall 
of 1912 he accepted the position of instructor in the Ranger 
School, New York State College of Forestry, Syracuse, N. Y., 
his present appointment. 

He is a member of the Congregational church and in politics 
is a Progressive. 

Abbott B. Silva 

Forest Service, Missoula, Mont. 

Abbott Beecher Silva was born October 4, 1885, in Thomasville, Ga., 
the son of William Posey Silva, an artist, and Caroline Walker (Beecher) 
Silva. A relative, Harrison D. Burrall, is ex-'o7 Forest School. 

He wsLS prepared at the Chattanooga High School, Chattanooga, Tenn., 
and at the Manor School, Stamford, Conn., and in 1908 graduated from 
the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale, where he was a member of the 
Sheff Debating Society and of the Spanish Club. 

He is unmarried. 

Silva is forest assistant in the United States Forest Service, 
with headquarters at Missoula, Mont. He entered the Service 
July I, 191 o, receiving his present appointment. 



Robert Simmons 

Robert Simmons was born in 1885 in New York City. He attended 
the preparatory and collegiate departments of the College of the City of 
New York and received the degree of B.A. in 1906. 

Simmons entered the United States Forest Service in July, 
1909, but resigned in October of the same year. It has not 
been possible to secure his present address. 



Thomas E. Snyder 

Business address, Bureau of Etitomology, Washington, D. C. 
Home address, 420 West ii6th Street, New York City 

Thomas Elliott Snyder was born February 6, 1885, in New York City, 
the son of Roger Snyder, a physician, and Alice Celinda (Brice) Snyder. 
On his father's side he is of German ancestry and on his mother's Scotch, 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1909 231 

her ancestors having been engaged in farming for several generations in 
Monroe County, western New York. 

He was prepared at Betts Academy, Stamford, Conn., and at the Horace 
Mann High School, New York City, and in 1907 received the degree of 
B.A. from Columbia University. In 1897 he started a systematic collection 
of coleoptera. 

He is unmarried. 

Since July i, 1909, Snyder has been employed as agent and 
expert in the Bureau of Entomology, United States Department 
of Agriculture. He writes : "In October, 1909, investigated the 
dying of the short-lived Norw^ay spruce in District of Columbia, 
New York, Long Island, Connecticut and Pennsylvania, to deter- 
mine whether the death of the trees was due to insects anywhere 
else than in District of Columbia. From May, 1910, to October, 
1910, investigated damage to the bases of chestnut and arbor- 
vitae telephone and telegraph poles by wood-boring insects in 
District of Columbia, Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, New 
York and Pennsylvania. Much time was spent in traveling with 
railroad camp crews. From July to December, 191 1, investigated 
the cause of the dying of the pine in the southern states. Some 
time was spent at Forest Insect Field Station 7, Spartanburg, 
S. C, in educational work and public demonstrations as to the 
methods of controlling the southern pine beetle. From March 
I to date have been engaged in investigating the cause of the 
dying chestnut trees — particularly in the southern states, where the 
chestnut bark disease is not present. My chief individual work 
is working out the biology of termites (termes species) and deter- 
mining methods of preventing damage by them to forest products. 
The life history of the common species will soon be published for 
the first time." 

He is a member of All Souls Protestant Episcopal Church, 
New York City. In politics he is an Independent Republican. 
He is a member of the Entomological Society of Washington, the 
Biological Society of Washington, and is a Mason, a member of 
Lebanon Lodge 7, Kallipolis Grotto 15, M. O. V. P. E. R. 

He has published: Damage to chestnut telephone and telegraph poles 
by wood-boring insects, Bull. 94, part i. Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agric, 
Washington, D. C, Dec, 1910; Damage to telephone and telegraph poles 
by wood-boring insects, Circ. 134, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agric, March 7, 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



1911; Insect damage to mine props and methods of preventing the injury, 
Circ. 156, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agric, July 13, 1912; Record of the 
finding of a true queen of termes flavipes kol., Proc. Ent. Soc, Wash- 
ington, D. C, XIV, 2, pp. 107-08, pi. 3, June, 1912; Fauna telegraph and 
telephone poles, Biological Society, Washington, D. C, February, 191 1; 
Record of the rearing of cupes concolor westw., Proc. Ent. Soc, Wash- 
ington, XV, I ; Notes on the biology of the common species of termites 
of eastern United States, Tech. Ser., U. S., Bur. Ent. 



Willard Springer, Jr. 

Business address, 1009 West Fourth Street, Wilmington, Del. 
Residence, 810 Washington Street, Wilmington, Del. 

Willard Springer, Jr., was born April 8, 1886, in Wilmington, Del., the 
son of Willard Springer, a physician, and Etta (Frist) Springer. He 
has one brother, Harold L. Springer, M.D. University of Pennsylvania, 
and two sisters, Helen and S. Edith Springer. 

He was prepared at the Wilmington High School and at the Wilming- 
ton Friends School, and in 1907 received the degree of C.E. from 
Lafayette, where he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

He is unmarried. 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School Springer became 
forest assistant for the Pennsylvania Railroad and later was made 
assistant forester. Since the fall of 1912 he has been employed 
by Charles Beadenkopf & Company, leather manufacturers. 



Chester H. Wilcox 

Center Moriches, N. Y. 

Chester Harvey Wilcox was born September 17, 1883, in Brookhaven, 
N. Y.. the son of Stephen B. Wilcox and Mary J. Wilcox. He has 
two sisters : Katherine G. Wilcox and Louise S. Wilcox, who is attending 
a school of elocution. 

He was prepared at the Heffley School, Brooklyn, N. Y., and in 1907 
received the degree of C.E. from Lehigh University, where he was a 
member of Alpha Tau Omega. 

He is unmarried. 

From July to October, 1909, Wilcox was employed as forest 
assistant in the United States Forest Service with headquarters 
on Pend Oreille National Forest, Idaho. He was then appointed 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1909 233 

surveyor and forester for the Thompson Brothers Lumber Com- 
pany, Houston, Texas, which position he held until June, 191 1. 
In November, 191 1, he became proprietor of Brookside Poultry 
Farm, where he is engaged in growing Pekin ducks. 

He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and in 
politics is a Republican. He is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, 



Addison W. Williamson 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Residence, 1495 Newton Street, Washington, D. C. 

Addison Wetherald Williamson was born March 7, 1884, in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., the son of Rev. H. R. Williamson and Mary Matilda (Smith) 
Williamson. He has a brother, W. Rulon Williamson, B.A. Wesleyan '09. 

He was prepared at the Lincoln High School, Cleveland, Ohio, and 
in 1907 received the degree of Ph.B. from Wesleyan University, where 
he was a member of the National Commons Club. 

He was married February 19, 1910, in Annapolis, Md., to Miss Mary 
Elizabeth Mjdchreest of Middletown, Conn., daughter of William 
Mylchreest and Anne (Senogles) Mylchreest. 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School Williamson was 
appointed forest assistant in the United States Forest Service, his 
present position. His headquarters are in Washington, D. C, 
where he is in charge of forest management in the East. 

He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



Meyer H. Wolff 

Care United States Forest Service, Newport, Wash. 

Meyer Henry Wolff was born December 27, 1887, in St. Petersburg, 
Russia, the son of Michael Wolff (deceased) and Esther (Kahn) Wolff. 
On his father's side both his grandparents were teachers, and his grand- 
father on his mother's side was a rabbi. He has one sister, Anna I. 
Wolff, B.A. New York State Normal College. Three cousins are Yale 
graduates: Meyer Kirjassoff, '06 S., Max D. Kirjassoff, '10, and Louis 
S. Kirjassoff, '10 S. 

He was prepared at the Waterbury High School, Waterbury, Conn., 
and at the DeWitt Clinton High School, New York City, and in 1908 
graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale. 



234 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He was married June 8, 1912, in Spokane, Wash., to Miss Merle 
Eugenia Jackson of Spokane, Wash., daughter of William H. Jackson 
and Inez E. Jackson. 

Wolff is deputy forest supervisor in the United States Forest 
Service with headquarters at Newport, Wash. He entered the 
Service July i, 1909, as a forest agent. On August 5, 191 1, he 
was appointed forest assistant, which position he held until 
September i, 191 1, when he received his present appointment. He 
writes : "On graduation, left New Haven on Commencement Day 
and arrived via direct route at Anaconda, Mont., July 3, 1909. 
Joined Northern Pacific cooperative estimate crews. Worked on 
Deerlodge, Missoula, Bitterroot and Lolo National forests. Had 
considerable independent work to do on Lolo Forest and later 
assisted in preparation of report on this forest. January, 19 10, 
was transferred to Kaniksu National Forest, with headquarters 
at Newport, Wash. Worked on timber sales and reconnaissance. 
Assumed charge of reconnaissance work in June. That summer 
fought fires and had an exceedingly strenuous time. Spent fall 
of 1910 and winter of 1910-11 on various administrative work; 
started reconnaissance in May, 191 1. Transferred later to timber 
sales and then appointed deputy supervisor. Had temporary 
charge of Kaniksu National Forest, February to June, 1912." 

Politically he is in sympathy with the Progressive party. 



Graduate holding Certificate but not Degree 
Allen H. Hodgson 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Portland, Ore. 
Home address, 119 Fourth Street, Chico, Calif. 

Allen Harrison Hodgson was born February 15, 1884, in Butte City, 
Calif., the son of William H. Hodgson and Mary A. (McDaniel) Hodg- 
son. On his father's side he is of English and Dutch, and on his mother's 
of Scotch and Welsh ancestry. 

His early life was spent on a California wheat ranch. He was pre- 
pared at Santa Rosa High School and in igo6 graduated from the 
California State Normal School. 

He was married June 28, 191 1, in Chico, Calif., to Miss Genevieve F. 
Pratt of Chico, daughter of Perry H. Pratt and Mattie Pratt. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1909 235 

Hodgson entered the United States Forest Service July i, 
1906, as forest guard. After leaving the Yale Forest School he 
was appointed forest assistant with headquarters on Shasta 
National Forest. He was then made forest supervisor of Cali- 
fornia National Forest and later assistant state forester of Cali- 
fornia. He again became forest assistant in the Service with 
headquarters on Klamath National Forest and on July i, 191 1, 
was made deputy forest supervisor of Siskiyou National Forest, 
Oregon. In January, 1913, he was transferred to Ochoco 
National Forest. 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church and in politics is 
a Progressive Republican. 



NoN Graduates 
Oliver E. Baker 

Business address, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, 

D. C. 
Home address, 39 West Perry Street, Tiffin, Ohio 

Oliver Edwin Baker was born September 10, 1883, in Tiffin, Ohio, the 
son of Edwin Baker (deceased), a merchant, born in Yarmouth, Mass., 
and Martha (Thomas) Baker, born in Pittsfield, Vt. Some of his 
ancestors were New England Puritans. He had two half-brothers, 
Frank and Walter Baker, and a half-sister, Nelly Baker, B.A. Heidelberg 
College (Ohio), all deceased. 

In 1903 he received the degree of B.S. from Heidelberg College, Ohio, 
and in 1904 the degree of M.S., and in 1905 the degree of M.A. from 
Columbia University. While pursuing his graduate work he was a news- 
paper manager and teacher. 

He is unmarried. 

After leaving the Yale Forest School Baker did graduate work 
in the College of Agriculture, University of Wisconsin, where he 
worked on soil survey and the history of agriculture under the 
Carnegie Foundation. On July i, 191 2, he was appointed assist- 
ant agriculturist in the office of farm management of the United 
States Department of Agriculture, his present position. He 
writes : "After graduation from college in 1903, I was engaged in 
graduate study, newspaper work and teaching for a couple of 



236 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

years and had a nervous breakdown in 1905. As soon as I gained 
a little strength, I went to the Forest School, but the next year 
abandoned forestry for agricultural study. After four years of 
that, I am now in the office of farm management." 

He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and in 
politics is a Progressive. He is a member of the Farm Man- 
agement Association, the Eugenics Club of the University of 
Wisconsin and of two geographical societies. 

He has published: Forest problem in an Ohio county, For. 
Rev.; and The Climate of Wisconsin and its relation to agricul- 
ture. Bull. 22^, Wis. Agric. Exper. Sta. 



Hugh G. Calkins 

Business address, Box 556, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Residence, 508 West Copper Avenue, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

United States Forest Service, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Hugh Gilman Calkins was born August 21, 1884, in Rockport (now 
Lakewood), Ohio, the son of Carlos G. Calkins, a retired captain of the 
United States Navy, and Caroline (Cathcart) Calkins, daughter of 
Charles W. Cathcart of Ohio. On his father's side he is the descendant 
of early Puritan settlers in New England, who went to Ohio about 1840, 
and on his mother's side he is of English ancestry. He has a brother, 
Frank C. Calkins, B.S. University of California '99 and M.S. University 
of California. 

He was prepared at the Berkeley High School, Berkeley, Calif., and 
at Swarthmore Preparatory School, and in 1906 received the degree of 
B.S. from the University of California. 

He is unmarried. 

Calkins is supervisor of Zuni National Forest with headquar- 
ters in Albuquerque, N. Mex., which position he has held since 
June I, 191 1. During the year 1906-07 he was employed in the 
Service in California and after leaving the Yale Forest School in 
July, 1908, he was appointed forest assistant. In July, 1909, he 
became deputy forest supervisor and remained in this position 
until his present appointment. He writes : "Aside from occasional 
brief trips to the East or the Pacific Coast, my time has been 
spent wholly in work for the United States Forest Service in 
Arizona and New Mexico." 

He is a member of the Society of American Foresters. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1909 237 

William E. Dunham 

Business address, Oliver Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Residence, 321 Coltart Square, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Warren, Pa. 

William Edwin Dunham was born February 15, 1886, in Stoneboro, 
Mercer County, Pa., the son of Omer Edwin Dunham and Florence 
(Burnett) Dunham. On his father's side he is of Irish and Scotch- 
English, and on his mother's of German and English ancestry. He has 
three brothers : Leon Burnett, Donald Albert and John Waldron 
Dunham. 

He was prepared at the high school in Warren, Pa., and in 1908 grad- 
uated from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale, where he was a 
member of Theta Psi. 

He is unmarried. 

From July i, 1910, to February 15, 1912, Dunham was forest 
assistant in the forestry department of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road. He was granted a leave of absence from November 15, 
191 1, to February i, 1912, during which time he estimated timber 
and made timber examinations for the John L. Roper Lumber 
Company of Norfolk, Va. Since March i, 1912, he has held 
the position of forester and Pittsburgh manager for Peters, Byrne 
& Company, foresters and entomologists. 



H. Julian C. Humphrey 

Care of H. C. Humphrey, 42 Broadway, New York City 

Henry Julian Correll Humphrey was born October 17, 1887, in Lon- 
don, England, the son of Frank R. Humphrey and Edith (Learoyd) 
Humphrey. 

He was prepared at Adelphi Academy, Brooklyn, N. Y., and received 
the degree of Ph.B. at Yale in 1908. He was a member of Theta Xi. 
He attended the Yale Forest School during 1907-08 and until the spring 
term in 1908-09. 

In September, 1909, Humphrey went to work for Fisher, Cary 
& Bryant, foresters, Boston, Mass. His present occupation is 
not known as he has sent no information for this record. 



238 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Richard L. Lovell 

Business address, Yale Station, New Haven, Conn. 
Home address, 112 Crescent Avenue, Plainfield, N. J. 

Lovell graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School, Yale 
University, in 1907. He is now studying in the Yale Graduate 
and Divinity schools and working in the city among boys. 



Axel E. T. Moberg 

Axel Erik Teodor Moberg was born in 1880 in Refteled, 
Sweden. He was prepared at Yonkopings hSgre allmonna 
lavoverk and attended Upsala University from 1900 to 1906. 
He studied at the Yale Forest School during a part of 1907-08. 
It is reported that he is in Germany, but it has not been possible 
to secure his present address. 



Ernest C. Wheeler 

Business address, 373 DeKalb Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Residence, 478 Greene Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

6 Arch Street, Norwalk, Conn. 

Ernest Cousins Wheeler was born September 30, 1885, in Norwalk, 
Conn., the son of Arthur Canfield Wheeler and Susan (Cousins) Wheeler. 
He has a brother, Harold Arthur Wheeler, Yale '12 S. 

He was prepared at Norwalk University School and at the Connecticut 
Military Academy and in 1907 received the degree of B.A. from Yale 
University. 

His engagement has been announced. 

Since April, 1912, Wheeler has been assistant sales and adver- 
tising manager of the J. & T. Cousins Company of Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1910 239 



CLASS OF 1910 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. ' 

Walter G. Alpaugh 

Business address^ Inter Ocean Life & Casualty Company, Springfield, 111. 

Willimantic, Conn. 

Walter George Alpaugh was born September 6, 1883, in Willimantic, 
Conn., the son of Charles Walter Alpaugh, agent and treasurer of the 
Holland Manufacturing Company and a director of the Willimantic 
Trust Company, and Estella (Honey) Alpaugh. He is of Dutch and 
English ancestry. 

He received the degree of B.S. at Tufts College in 1908, where he 
was a member of Theta Delta Chi. 

He was married September 11, 1912, in Omena, Mich., to Miss Amy 
Allen Northcott of Springfield, 111., daughter of William Allen Northcott. 

After graduation Alpaugh was engaged in lumbering and for- 
estry with the firm of Stetson & Alpaugh. On October i, 1912, 
he became a clerk for the Inter Ocean Life & Casualty Company, 
insurance, of Springfield, 111. 

He is a Mason. 

William G. Baxter 

Business address, Aspen, Colo. 
Galva, Iowa 

William George Baxter was born January 24, 1885, in Galva, Iowa, 
the son of Robinson George Baxter, an Iowa State representative, and 
Esther (Scanlan) Baxter. Both parents are of Scotch-Irish ancestry. He 
has one sister and four brothers : Lillie Baxter, James R. Baxter, Urban 
S. Baxter, Robert B. Baxter, B.S. A. Iowa State College, and Luke J. 
Baxter, B.S.A. Iowa State College '13. 

He was prepared at the Galva High School, Galva, Iowa, and received 
the degree of B.S.A. at Iowa State College in 1908. 

He is unmarried. 

Baxter has been engaged in reclamation work at Caldwell, 
Idaho, and since April 15, 191 1, has held the position of forest 
assistant in the Service, being located on the Sopris Forest with 
headquarters at Aspen, Colo. 

He is a member of the Crystal City Club of Aspen, Colo. 



240 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

George A. Bright, 2d 

Business address, Care United States Forest Service, Heppner, Ore. 

Home address, 1536 T Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Care United States Forest Service, Portland, Ore. 

George Adams Bright, 2d, was born December 18, 1883, in Winchester, 
Mass., the son of George A. Bright, surgeon of the United States Navy 
from i860 to 1898, and Mary Chapman (Gale) Bright. He has a sister, 
Mary Bright. 

He received the degree of B.S. at Dartmouth in 1908. 

He is unmarried. 

Bright has been engaged as a forest assistant in the United 
States Forest Service since graduation. He is located on the 
Umatilla Forest with headquarters at Heppner, Ore. 

He is a member of the Unitarian church. 



Donald Bruce 

Business address. Forest Service, Missoula, Mont. 
Home address, Easthampton, Mass. 

Donald Bruce was born July 23, 1884, in Newtonville, Mass., the son 
of Wayland Irving Bruce, Yale '82, who died in 1906, and Mary Emily 
(Skinner) Bruce. An uncle, Wallace Bruce, graduated from Yale 
College in '67. 

He was prepared at Williston Academy, Easthampton, Mass., and 
graduated from Yale College in 1906. While at college he was a member 
of the Freshman Union, of the Freshman Banjo and Mandolin clubs, of 
the Apollo Banjo and Mandolin clubs in his Sophomore year, and of 
the University Musical clubs in his Junior and Senior years ; also of 
Kitcat Club, Chi Delta Theta, Psi Upsilon, Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi. 
He was the recipient of the John Bennetto scholarship, of the Thomas 
Glasby Waterman scholarship, of the Barge Mathematical prize in his 
Freshman and Sophomore years and of a philosophical oration in his 
Junior year. 

He is unmarried. 

Bruce is forest assistant in the United States Forest Service 
with headquarters at Missoula, Mont. Before entering the Forest 
Service he spent two years teaching mathematics and physics at 
Williston Seminary, Easthampton, Mass. He entered the Service 
July I, 1910, as forest assistant in the Helena National Forest. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1910 241 

A year later he was transferred to the Coeur d'Alene National 
Forest, and in January, 19 13, received his present assignment. 
Early in 191 1 he wrote: 

"Since the career of mechanical engineer and of naval architect 
had ever seemed, throughout my college course, so equally entic- 
ing that a decision between them was exceedingly difficult, it was 
perhaps only natural that after graduation I should have clutched 
eagerly the birchen rod of the school teacher. For two years I 
was instructor of mathematics and physics at Williston Seminary, 
» Easthampton, Mass. Having thus given myself ample time for 
choosing between the above-mentioned careers, I promptly entered 
the Yale Forest School, where I spent another two years in trying 
not to remember with what contempt I had, as an undergraduate, 
looked upon all members of the graduate departments of the Uni- 
versity. Last March I passed through the ordeal of Civil Service 
examinations with sufficient success to be ordered westward, in 
July. Ever since I have been contentedly busy on the Helena 
National Forest, a very scattered area of some nine hundred 
thousand acres, lying anywhere from one to forty miles from the 
city of Helena, Mont. My work has been as diverse as is usual 
in this line of activity — including timber-estimating, land classifi- 
cation, surveying, mapping, and trying to remember which side 
of a horse it is more orthodox to attempt to ascend — but the 
major part of my time has been devoted to the Boulder Nursery, 
where I serve as chief nursemaid to some four million infant pines 
and firs." 

He is a Republican — "probably progressive." He is a member 
of the Episcopal church. 

He has written : A new method of constructing volume tables, 
For. Quart., June, 1912. 

Charles R. Clark 

Business address, Dillon, Mont. 

Home address, Carthage, 111. 

United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

Charles Rollin Clark was born December 13, 1881, in Carthage, 111., 
the son of Lot Bozarth Clark, who was in the first class graduated at 
the University of Illinois, and Matilda Jane (Jackson) Clark. His father 
16 



242 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

has been president of an independent telephone system in Illinois and 
superintendent of the University of Illinois Experiment Station at 
Carthage, 111. His ancestors came from Ireland in 1670 and lived in 
Virginia until the Civil War. The Jackson family came from Scotland 
about 1720 and settled in Ohio, coming to Illinois about 1840. He has 
five brothers and three sisters, five of whom are graduates of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, two are undergraduates and one is a prospective 
student: Matilda Lenna Clark, B.A. '03; John Ruskin Clark, B.A. '06; 
Richard Wagner Clark, B.A. '09; Faith Angeline Clark, B.A. '10; Wil- 
liam Gladstone Clark, B.S. '12; Chester Arthur Clark, '14; Marshal 
Grant Clark, '16, and June Jackson Clark, '18. 

•He studied at the University of Illinois in 1903-04, and then entered 
the University of Wisconsin, Class of 1907. He received the degree of 
B.A. in 1909. During the summer of 1906 he worked for the United 
States Forest Service. While at the University of Wisconsin he served 
in various positions from private to major of first battalion in the 
cadet corps. 

He was married June 16, 1910, in Ashland, Wis., to Miss Elma Mildred 
Pugh, daughter of Thomas Edward Pugh and Clara Pugh. 

Clark has served as a forest assistant since graduation in 1910. 
He is located at Dillon, Mont., the headquarters for the Beaver- 
head National Forest. 

He is a Progressive in politics. He is a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church and of Scabbard and Blade, an honorary 
military fraternity. 



Guy C. Cleveland 

Business address, The North Jersey Excelsior Company, Butler, N. J. 
Home address, 333 Lincoln Avenue, Orange, N. J. 

Guy Cory Cleveland was born June 25, 1882, in Albany, N. Y., the son 
of George Cleveland, formerly a member of Cleveland's Baking Powder 
Company of New York City, and Susan Lucy (Cory) Cleveland. He is 
of English ancestry. He has one sister, Gertrude (Cleveland) Storrs, 
Vassar '87, wife of Charles Bigelow Storrs, Yale '82, professor of law. 
University of Tokyo. A cousin, Cleveland Ferris, was Yale '03 M. 

He was prepared at the Taft School and in 1908 graduated from Yale 
College, where he was captain of the 1908 Freshman Football Team and a 
member of the Freshman Baseball and College Baseball and Football 
teams. His fraternity was Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

He is unmarried. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1910 243 

After graduating from the Forest School, Cleveland became a 
forester for the New York and Pennsylvania Paper & Pulp Com- 
pany of Johnsonburg, Pa. In 191 1 he became manager of the 
New York office of the R. E. Boyd Company, wholesale lumber 
dealers. On January 24, 1912, in partnership with Walter K. 
Wildes, M.F. 1910, he incorporated the North Jersey Excelsior 
Company at Butler, N. J. He is secretary and treasurer of this 
firm. 

He is a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Orange, 
N. J. He is a Free Mason and a member of the Yale Club of 
New York City. 



Hamilton M. Coan 

Business address, Sumpter, Ore. 
Home address, 27 West Ninety-seventh Street, New York City 

Hamilton Morel Coan was born June 17, 1886, in New York City. 
He was prepared at the Montclair High School, Montclair, N. J., and 
received the degree of B.A. at Princeton University in 1907. 
He is unmarried. 

Coan writes: "Since graduation from the Yale Forest School 
in June, 1910, I have been continuously in the employ of the 
United States Forest Service. For a period of nearly two years 
I was assigned to work on the Chelan National Forest. This 
forest adjoins the main range of the Cascade Mountains (in 
the state of Washington) and has a very rugged topography of 
which I became fully aware before completing the extensive 
reconnaissance of the forest. The unique feature of this forest 
is the long and narrow lake included within its boundaries, which 
is at once a wonderful piece of natural scenery, and an effective 
aid to travel and fire protection. My work on this forest con- 
sisted almost wholly in estimating timber and in managing a 
timber sale. 

'T am at present located upon the Whitman National Forest 
(Oregon), where for the past summer (1912) I have engaged 
in intensive reconnaissance. This work consists in the map- 
ping of topography, the forest types timber cover, and an accu- 
rate examination and classification of the land to determine 



244 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

its value for agricultural purposes. In addition, the value of 
each section (the work thus far has been in surveyed country) 
is determined for grazing and an accurate lo per cent, estimate 
is made by an estimator who works along with the compass — 
or map man. The accuracy of mapping is dependent to a very 
large extent on skilled use of the pocket compass and maintaining 
a consistent pace for all varieties of topography." 



George A. Cromie 

Business address, City Hall, New Haven, Conn. 
Residence, 14 Compton Street, New Haven, Conn. 

George Alexander Cromie was born December 27, 1883, in Scotstown, 
Quebec, Canada, the son of Henry James Cromie and Annie (Guy) 
Cromie. He has three sisters and two brothers : Beatrice Maud, Frances 
R., Flossie Olive, Robert James and Samuel Osborne Cromie. 

He was married April 17, 191 1, in New Haven, Conn., to Miss Anne 
Elizabeth Kavanagh, daughter of James Kavanagh and Alice Cullen 
Kavanagh. They have one son, Leonard James Cromie, born February 2, 
1912. 

In the fall of 1910 Cromie became a forest assistant for the 
Canadian Government, but he returned to New Haven in 191 1 as 
superintendent of trees for the city. 

He is a member of the Independent Order of Foresters and the 
New Haven Republican Club. 

He has published (in collaboration with W. O. Filley, state 
forester) The planting and care of street and highway trees, and 
(in collaboration with Dr. W. E. Britton) The leopard moth. 



Robert E. Dickson 

Business address, Boise, Idaho 
East Lansing, Mich. 

Robert Emmett Dickson was born January 16, 1888, in Akron, Ohio, 
the son of Chalmers McCall Dickson, a city health officer and secretary 
of the State Board of Health, also an expert examiner for United States 
Pensions, and Nancy Belle (Payne) Dickson. He is of Scotch and 
English ancestry. He has one brother, Matthew E. Dickson, who received 
the degree of B.S. at Michigan Agricultural College. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1910 245 

He received the degree of B.S. at Michigan Agricultural College in 
igog, having taken courses in agriculture and forestry. 

He was married April 8, 1912, in Saginaw, Mich., to Miss Eleanor Sybil 
FitzGibbon, daughter of P. E. FitzGibbon and Eleanore FitzGibbon. 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School in 1910 Dick- 
son served for a time as forest assistant, but he has given most 
of his time to teaching. He taught biology and agriculture at 
Highland Park Polytechnical Institute in Chicago, 111., and on 
September i, 191 2, began work along similar lines at the Boise 
High School, Boise, Idaho. He is also director of the Boise 
District State Experiment Station, State Fair Grounds, Boise, 
Idaho. 

He is a Progressive Republican. He is a member of the Roman 
Catholic church and of the Knights of Columbus. 



Richard C. Eggleston 

Business address. Forest Service, Saint Maries, Idaho 
Home address, 236 Buckingham Place, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Richard Cunningham Eggleston was born February 2, 1885, in Brandy, 
Va., the son of Richard Irving Eggleston and Margaret Frances (Cor- 
nick) Eggleston. On his father's side he is of English, and on his 
mother's of English and Scotch descent. He has one brother, Thomas 
Cornick Eggleston, and two sisters, Emily Caldwell Eggleston and Martha 
Macon Eggleston. 

He was prepared at the Central High School, Philadelphia, Pa., and 
studied one year at the University of Pennsylvania before coming to 
Yale. He graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School in 1909, where 
he was a member of Book and Bond and of the Southern Club. 

He is unmarried. 

Eggleston entered the United States Forest Service July i, 

1910, as forest assistant. He remained in this position until July, 

191 1, when he resigned to become a forester for the Consolidation 
Coal Company of Jenkins, Ky. In January, 191 2, he reentered 
the Service, receiving the appointment of forest assistant with 
headquarters at St. Maries, Idaho. 

He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church. 



246 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He has published : Forestry for mining companies, paper read 
before the West Virginia Coal Mining Institute, printed in Coal 
Age and one or two other mining magazines, December, 191 1. 



Robie M. Evans 

Business address. Beck Building, Portland, Ore. 
Home address, Fryeburg, Maine 

Robie Mason Evans was born August 7, 1884, in Fryeburg, Maine, the 
son of Andrew Hill Evans and Huldah (Heath) Evans, who had three 
other children : Francis E. Evans, Alice M. Evans and Virginia W. 
Evans. 

He received the degree of B.A. at Dartmouth College in 1906. The 
two years following he taught science in Kimball Union Academy, New 
Hampshire. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduation Evans has served as forest assistant on the 
Oregon, Wallowa, Deschutes and Malheur National forests, all 
in the state of Oregon, District 6. He is now located at the 
district headquarters in Portland, being assigned to studies in 
silviculture. 

He is Republican in politics. 



Harold Fay 

Residence, Winchester, Mass. 
92 Professor's Row, Tufts College, Mass. 

Harold Fay was born December 10, 1882, in Somerville, Mass., the 
son of Charles E. Fay, professor of romance languages at Tufts College 
and a charter member of the American Alpine Club, and Mary Williams 
(Lincoln) Fay. He is of English descent and a grandson of Cyrus Hyde 
Fay, a Universalist clergyman. He has tv/o sisters: Ethel (Fay) 
Robinson, BA. Tufts '00, and Margaret Fay. 

He received the degree of B.A. at Tufts College in 1904. He was 
a member of Theta Delta Chi. He then taught in the Worthington 
(Mass.) High School one year, was with the Newton Fire Brick Company 
of Albany four months, served a year's apprenticeship in the advertising 
department of the Technical World and six months as western advertising 
representative in Chicago, and business manager of Indoors and Out in 
Boston. The three years before entering the Forest School were spent 
in scaling and as a general laborer in the New Hampshire woods. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1910 247 

He was married December 31, 1912, in Meriden, Conn., to Miss Nina 
Edgerton Thompson, daughter of Edward S. Thompson and Minnie 
(Edgerton) Thompson. 

From June to October, 1910, Fay was consulting forester for 
the Batopilas Mining Company, Batopilas, Chihuahua, Mexico, 
and during the two months following acted as saw boss, scaler 
and skidder for the Madera Company, Ltd., Madera, Chihuahua, 
Mexico. He was an agent for the Connecticut Mutual Life 
Insurance Company in New Haven, January and February, 191 1, 
and from May to June assisted Professor Bryant at the Yale 
Forest School Camp at Trinity, Texas. From July, 191 1, to June, 
1912, he acted as timberman and surveyor for the John L. Roper 
Lumber Company, of Newbern, N. C. He has now purchased 
a farm in Winchester, Mass., and plans to combine scientific 
agriculture and consulting forestry work. 

Max H. Foerster 

Business address. Care Consolidation Coal Company, Jenkins, Letcher 

County, Ky. 
Home address, Sea Clifif, Long Island, N. Y. 

Max Henry Foerster was born November 23, 1889, in New York City, 
the son of John Foerster. 

He was prepared at the public schools at Sea Cliff, Long Island, until 
1901, when he went abroad, remaining seven years. Before entering 
the Yale Forest School he attended Oberrealschule, Marburg, Hessen, 
Germany. He was a member of Book and Bond at Yale. 

He is unmarried. 

Foerster served as a forest assistant in the United States Forest 
Service eighteen months, one year at the Coconino Experiment 
Station and six months on the Coconino National Forest. In 
January, 1912, he accepted a position as forester for the Consoli- 
dation Coal Company of Kentucky. 

William H. Gallaher 

Business address, Care Forest Service, San Francisco, Calif. 
Residence, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

William Hallowell Gallaher was born September 14, 1887, in Santa 
Barbara, Calif., the son of F. M. Gallaher and A. R. (Hallowell) Galla- 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



her. He has one brother, Hugh Gallaher, Harvard '15, and one sister, 
Mary Gallaher. 

He was prepared at the Santa Barbara High School and attended the 
University of California for two years before entering Yale. He gradu- 
ated from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale in 1909. 

He is unmarried. 

Gallaher is forest assistant in the United States Forest Ser- 
vice, and has recently spent eighteen months traveling in Europe 
and India for the purpose of study. He entered the Service in 
July, 1910, and is stationed in the Tahoe National Forest, 
California. 



Harold P. Gilkey 

Business address, Sumpter, Ore. 
Richland, Mich. 

Harold Parker Gilkey was born July 22, 1884, in Richland, Mich., the 
son of P. H. Gilkey and Adella (Parker) Gilkey. He is of Scotch and 
English ancestry. He has one sister, Mary Lovell Gilkey, who attended 
Michigan Seminary. 

He received the degree of B.A. at Harvard in 1909. 

He is unmarried. 

Upon graduation from the School in 1910 Gilkey was assigned 
as a hydrographer in the United States Forest Service on work 
done in cooperation with the Geodetic Survey in the Puget 
Sound region. He held this position from July, 1910, to July, 
191 1, and was then appointed forest assistant on Whitman 
National Forest with headquarters at Sumpter, Ore. 

He is a Mason. 



James L. Goodwin 

Business address, Hartford National Bank Building, Hartford, Conn. 
191 Farmington Avenue, Hartford, Conn. 

James Lippincott Goodwin was born October 10, 1881, in New York 
City, the son of James Junius Goodwin and Josephine Sarah (Lippincott) 
Goodwin. His father has held the positions of trustee of Trinity College, 
Hartford, Conn., director of the Erie Railroad, director of the Con- 
necticut Mutual Life Insurance Company of Hartford, director of the 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1910 249 

Holj'oke Water Power Company of Holyoke, Mass.. and director of the 
Collins Company of Collinsville, Conn. His father's ancestors lived in 
England and came to this country about 1630, settling in Connecticut. 
His mother's immediate ancestors were Quakers, living in Philadelphia, 
where she was born. Her more remote ancestors lived in England, 
coming to this country in 1640. He has two brothers : Walter Lippincott 
Goodwin, Yale '97, and Philip Lippincott Goodwin, Yale '07. He has two 
cousins who are Yale graduates : Charles A. Goodwin, '98, and F. Spencer 
Goodwin, '03. Another cousin, William B. Goodwin, is ex-^g. 

He was prepared at private schools in New York City and at Groton 
School, Groton, Mass. In 1905 he graduated from Yale College, where 
he was a member of the French Club. 

He was married October i, 1912, in Hartford, Conn., to Miss Dorothy 
Wendell Davis, B.A. Smith '07, of Hartford, Conn., daughter of Frederick 
W. Davis, Yale 'TJ, and Mary (Taintor) Davis, and sister of Carl W. 
Davis, Yale '02, and Roger W. Davis, Yale '11 S. 



Before entering the Forest School, Goodwin studied law for 
a year in the Yale Law School, but after traveling in Europe, 
Arizona and California, he became interested in forestry and 
decided to take a course in it. He entered the Harvard Forestry 
School, but after a year there left and entered the Yale Forest 
School. He writes: "Since leaving the Forest School I have 
been engaged in the private practice of engineering and forestry 
and carried on work in Vermont, Connecticut, New York and 
New Jersey. I had an ofifice in New York with W. K. Wildes of 
my Class, but we were not in partnership. This private work 
I carried on until last May, when I came to Hartford and 
entered park work. I have recently been appointed field secretary 
to the Connecticut State Park Commission w^hich was appointed 
in 191 1 by the governor to make a report in 1913 to the legisla- 
ture on the sites available for state park purposes." He has 
recently formed the firm, the James L. Goodwin Associates, 
landscape architects. 

He is an Independent in politics. He is a member of the 
Protestant Episcopal church and of the Yale Club of New York 
City, the Hartford University Club, the Hartford Golf Club, the 
Connecticut Forestry Association and the American Forestry 
Association. 

He has written : A trip to the Lupai Indian Reservation near 
the Grand Canyon, Arizona, Hartford Courant, August, 1907. 



25° YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Lester E. Hitchcock 

Business address. Vernal, Utah 
Forest Service Building, Ogden, Utah 

Lester Eugene Hitchcock was born September 22, 1884, in Chicago, 111., 
the son of Horace Watson Hitchcock and Sarah Jane (Gibbons) Hitch- 
cock. His father's family were originally Scotch-Irish people, who settled 
in the Carolinas, and his grandfather was killed during an engagement 
in the Civil War. He has one sister, Glennai Watson Hitchcock. 

He was prepared at the Sioux Falls (S. Dak.) High School, worked 
one year, attended Yankton College two years, and was graduated at Coe 
College, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in 1907 with the degree of B.S. Before 
entering the Yale Forest School he taught in a high school for one 
year. 

He is unmarried. 

Hitchcock is deputy supervisor on Ashley National Forest. He 
writes: "Since leaving Yale I have been engaged chiefly in 
reconnaissance work in various parts of District 4, with head- 
quarters at Ogden, Utah, going first to the Kaibab Forest, located 
on the northern border of the Grand Canyon, the only scenery 
I have ever seen that I have never grown tired of, as there always 
seemed to be something new about it. 

"Shortly after my summer there I spent a month in the pleasant 
little town of Ogden, whence I was sent as forest assistant to the 
Sawtooth Forest, where I received my only unpleasant experience 
in the Service, a four months' furlough. I got a chance to take 
some cattle to Seattle and so went there and spent a very rainy 
winter, getting some surveying and drafting to do, which kept 
me busy part of the time. For the last year I have done a 
variety of things, from counting sheep to surveying telephone 
lines, to say nothing of a one man reconnaissance, when I was 
my own cook, horse wrangler, packer and did a full day's work 
every day besides." 

He is a member of the Congregational church. 

Crosby A. Hoar 

Business address. Meeker, Colo. 
Home address, West Acton, Mass. 

Crosby Arthur Hoar was born September 9, 1886, in West Acton, Mass., 
the son of John Sherman Hoar and Minnie Rachel (Hart) Hoar. His 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1910 25^ 

mother is of Puritan descent and his father's family have lived in New 
England for several generations. He has two brothers, Carl S. Hoar, 
B.S. Dartmouth '11, and Burton H. Hoar. 

He was prepared in common schools, Lawrence Academy and received 
the degree of B.A. at Dartmouth in igo8. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduation Hoar has been an assistant in the United 
States Forest Service, being assigned to White River Forest, 
with headquarters at Meeker, Colo. He has recently been pro- 
moted to the position of forest examiner. During the spring 
terms of 191 1 and 1912 he was a field assistant at the Yale Forest 
School. 

He is an Independent in politics. 

Stephen V. Klem 

Business address, Box 391, East Lansing, Mich. 
Home address, 15 Lake Place, New Haven, Conn. 

Stephen Vincent Klem was born November 6, 1885, in New Haven, 
Conn., the son of John J. Klem and Teresa S. (Newheim) Klem. He is 
the grandson on his father's side of George J. Klem and Elizabeth 
(Burns) Klem and on his mother's side of Adam Newheim and Mary 
(Healy) Newheim. He has one brother, John J. Klem, Jr., and two 
sisters : Elizabeth G. Klem and Teresa H. Klem. 

He was prepared at the Boardman Manual Training (High) School 
and during the year 1905-06 was engaged as a salesman. In 1909 he 
graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale. 

He was married November 20, 1912, in New Haven, Conn., to Miss 
Marguerite C. Dunlap of New Haven, Conn., daughter of Robert P. 
Dunlap and Eliza Savage Dunlap (deceased). 

Klem writes : 'T spent about four months in office of silvi- 
culture, District 2, at Denver, Colo., about two months on 
winter reconnaissance on the Medicine Bow Forest in Wyoming 
and the remaining time until April, 1912, I had headquarters at 
Custer, S. Dak. (Harney National Forest), where I held the 
position of forest assistant. In April, 1912, I obtained leave of 
absence until January, 191 3, returned to New Haven and did 
special investigation work on the taxation of forest land in Con- 
necticut under the direction of the Connecticut State Forester." 
For a time he was station assistant in the Connecticut Agricultural 
Experiment Station at New Haven. During the past winter he 



252 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

conducted two lecture courses at the Michigan Agricultural 
College. He expects to continue his work there for another year. 
He is a member of the Roman Catholic church. 



Julius A. Larsen 

Business address. Priest River Experiment Station, Priest River, Idaho 
United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

Julius Ansgar Larsen was born December 13, 1877, in Drammen, Nor- 
way, the son of Gustav W. Larsen, a sea captain, and Gorine (Hausen) 
Larsen (deceased). His ancestors on both sides of the family were 
seafaring men. He has one brother : Johannes Larsen, and three sisters : 
Sophie Christine Larsen, Othilie Gustava Larsen and Hermine Katherine 
Larsen. 

He was prepared at East Maine Conference Seminary. Previous to 
this he had spent four years at sea and four years in different manu- 
facturing concerns, among them the Winchester Repeating Arms Com- 
pay. In 1908 he graduated from Yale College, where he received an 
oration appointment and was a member of the Scandinavian Club. 

He was married March 4, 191 1, in Kalispell, Mont., to Miss Jenny 
Barghild Spieckermann of Christiania, Norway, daughter of Frederick 
and Hanna Spieckermann. They have one daughter, Margaret Elaine 
Larsen, born January 30, 191 3. 

Larsen is forest assistant in the United States Forest Service 
with headquarters at Priest River, Idaho. He was in charge of 
lumber reconnaissance, mapping, planting and studies on the 
Blackfoot National Forest, Kalispell, Mont., until April, 1913, 
when he was transferred to the Priest River Experiment Station. 
He entered the Service July i, 1910. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. 

He has written : Forests and Soils of Caldwell Parish, Louisi- 
ana, For. Quart., VHI, No. 4, 191 1. 



Raymond E. Marsh 

Business address, Tres Piedras, N. Mex. 
Home address, Westport, N. H. 

Raymond Eugene Marsh was born January 27, 1885, in Swanzey, N. H., 
the son of Walter Eugene Marsh and Jessie Henrietta (Tottingham) 
Marsh. His paternal grandfather, James Marsh, was descended from 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1910 253 



old Massachusetts settlers, and was the head of James Marsh & Company, 
pail manufactuers of Swanzey, N. H., for fifty years. His wife was 
Candace Aldrich. His maternal ancestors were C. N. Tottingham, a 
carriage maker, descended from early settlers at Plymouth, Mass., and 
Rahie (Titus) Tottingham. He has two sisters, Alice Doris Marsh and 
Marion Elizabeth Marsh. 

He was prepared at the Keene (N. H.) High School and received the 
degree of B.S. at Dartmouth in 1908. 

He is unmarried. 

Marsh entered the United States Forest Service in July, 1910, 
and was first assigned to the Apache National Forest, Springer- 
ville, Ariz. He has since had charge of reconnaissance on the 
Carson Forest in New Mexico and in the fall of 19 12 was 
appointed deputy forest supervisor of this forest, with head- 
quarters at Tres Piedras. 

He is a Republican. He is a member of the Methodist church. 



Frank B. Notestein 

Business address, Manitou, Colo. 
United States Forest Service, Denver, Colo. 

Frank Browning Notestein was born June 26, 1885, in Wooster, Ohio, 
the son of J. O. Notestein, head of the department of Latin, University 
of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, and Margaret Bruce (Wallace) Notestein. 
His father's father was of German descent, the family having come to 
America in 1766, and his mother of English ancestry. His mother is 
the daughter of Benjamin Wallace and Margaret Bruce Wallace, who 
came from Scotland in the thirties. He has three sisters and a brother: 
Mary B., Lucy L., Margaret W., and Wallace Notestein, B.A. University 
of Wooster '00, M.A. Yale '03, Ph.D. '08. 

Before entering the Forest School he camped for seven summers in 
the northern part of Michigan. He spent two summers as a forest 
guard on San Juan National Forest. He had made quite an extensive 
wood collection of the species of Ohio and Michigan. He received the 
degree of Ph.B. at the University of Wooster in 1908. 

He is unmarried. 

Notestein was appointed an assistant in the United States For- 
est Service in July, 1910. He was in charge of the Fremont 
Experiment Station at Manitou in connection with the Pike 
National Forest, but is now forest examiner at the Wagon 



254 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Wheel Gap Experiment Station, Colo. He has been in this 
position since July, 19 12. 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church. 



Mauricio J. Oteyza 

Care Bureau of Forestry, Los Baiios, Lagutia, Philippine Islands 

Mauricio Julian Oteyza was born October 18, 1886, in Binondo, Manila, 
P. I., the son of Mauricio Oteyza y Reyes, a confectioner, son of Isidoro 
Oteyza y Reyes, and Ana Maria (San Juan) Oteyza y Reyes, daughter 
of Leocadio San Juan and Ynocensia (Torres) San Juan. He had two 
brothers Vincente Oteyza y Reyes, deceased, and Leonardo Oteyza y 
Reyes. 

Until 1902 he was a student for a B.A. degree at the Jesuit College, 
Manila. He then spent one year each in a business office, in the Philip- 
pine Normal School and teaching in the Government public school. From 
1905 to 1908 he attended the Kansas State Agricultural College, where 
he received the degree of B.S. in 1910. He was a corporal in the cadet 
band and a recruit in the cadet corps at the latter school. 

He was married August 12, 1912, in San Mateo, Rizal, P. I., to Miss 
Dolores Santamaria, daughter of Celerino Santamaria and Maria 
(Santos) Santamaria. 

Oteyza was appointed assistant forester in the Bureau of 
Forestry, Philippine Islands, in February, 19 10, and was detailed 
to instruct at the School of Forestry, Philippine University, in 
June of the same year. A year later he was appointed instructor 
in silviculture and forest management. 

He is a member of the Philippine Independent Church. He 
is a member of Alpha Beta Literary Society and a local musical 
society. 

Dana Parkinson 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Boise, Idaho 
Home address, 22 Howard Street, Waltham, Mass. 

Dana Parkinson was born June 27, 1885, in Fergus Falls, Minn., the 
son of William Dwight Parkinson, superintendent of schools in Waltham, 
Mass., and Caro North (Bowman) Parkinson, a descendant of Elder 
Brewster of the Mayflower. He has three brothers : Royal Parkinson, 
B.A. Dartmouth '05, Taintor Parkinson, B.A. Dartmouth '09, and Herman 
Parkinson, Dartmouth '13. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1910 255 

He received the degree of B.A. from Dartmouth in 1908. 
He is unmarried. 

Since July i, 1910, Parkinson has been forest assistant in the 
United States Forest Service with headquarters in Boise National 
Forest, Idaho. 



Stuart B. Show 

Sisson, Calif. 

Stuart Bevier Show was born April 9, 1886, in Waco, Neb., the son 
of Arley Barthlow Show, professor of European history at Leland 
Stanford, Jr., University since 1892, and Busephalia (Wolph) Show. He 
is of Scotch-Irish and German descent on his father's side and of 
Scotch-Irish and French Huguenot on his mother's, his ancestors being 
pioneers in Wisconsin and Nebraska. He has three sisters and a brother : 
Esther Winifred (Show) Hopkins, Mary Wolph Show, Ruth Katherin 
Show and Joseph Henry Show. 

He was prepared at the grammar and high schools of Palo Alto, Calif., 
and was graduated with the degree of B.A. at Leland Stanford, Jr., 
University in 1908. 

He was married December 25, 1910, in Everett, Wash., to Miss Mabel 
Jeanet Griffin, daughter of John Luther Griffin and Clara O. Griffin. 

Show has been an assistant in the United States Forest Service 
since July, 1910, being located at Sisson, Calif., headquarters for 
the Shasta National Forest. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. 



William N. Sparhawk 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Emmett, Idaho 
United States Forest Service, Ogden, Utah 

William Norwood Sparhawk was born July 20, 1888, in West Swanzey, 
N. H., the son of John W. Sparhawk, a member of the firm of C. M. 
Norwood & Sons, boxmakers of Keene, N. H., and Nellie Louise (Nor- 
wood) Sparhawk. He is the grandson on his father's side of John H. 
Sparhawk and Martha A. (Watkins) Sparhawk and a descendant of 
Nathaniel Sparhawk of Dedham, England, who settled in Cambridge, 
Mass., in 1638. On his mother's side he is the grandson of Charles 
Norwood and Lydia (BoUes) Norwood. He has one brother, Maurice 
C. Sparhawk, Dartmouth '14. 



2 56 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He was prepared at the public schools in West Swanzey, N. H., and 
at the Keene High School, Keene, N. H. In 1908 he graduated from 
Yale College, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and recipient 
of a high oration Junior appointment. He was also a member of Alpha 
Sigma Phi, of the Hispanic Club, and in 1907 took the part of El Doctor 
in "El Doctor y El Enfermo." 

He was married January 15, 1913, in Newark, N. J., to Miss Hazel 
Charlestine Ladd of Newark, N. J., daughter of Daniel A. Ladd and 
Emma (Staehle) Ladd. 

Sparhawk is forest assistant in the United States Forest Ser- 
vice with headquarters at Emmett, Idaho. He entered the Service 
in July, 19 10, and since then has been stationed at various times 
as forest assistant, in Salmon National Forest, Idaho, the Sevier 
National Forest, Utah, and the Payette National Forest, Idaho. 



Irving G. Stetson 

Business address, 180 Exchange Street, Bangor, Maine 
Residence, 208 French Street, Bangor, Maine 

Irving Gay Stetson was bom November 23, 1885, in Bangor, Maine, 
the son of Isaiah Kidder Stetson, Yale '79 S., and Clara Cooper (Sawyer) 
Stetson. His father is president of the First National Bank, Bangor, 
an ex-treasurer of the University of Maine, has served in both sections 
of the State Legislature and as speaker of the House, and on the staffs 
of two governors. He is the son of George Stetson and of Adeline 
(Hamlin) Stetson, and a descendant in the eighth generation of Robert 
Cornet Stetson, of Plymouth Colony. His mother is the daughter of 
Frederick A. Sawyer, senator from South Carolina after the Civil War, 
and a direct descendant of Roger Conant of Massachusetts. He has 
one sister, Ruth Wolcott (Stetson) Beach. 

He was prepared at Milton Academy (1898-99) and at Phillips Acad- 
emy, Andover, Mass. (1899-03), and received the degree of B A. in 
1907 at Harvard, where he was a member of the Hasty Pudding Club. 

He is unmarried. 

Upon graduation Stetson became a member of the firm of 
Stetson & Alpaugh, lumbermen and foresters, and has been 
engaged in lumbering in spruce and pine and in general forestry 
work. The name of the firm has since been changed to I. G. 
Stetson & Company. In 191 1 he was appointed a director of the 
Penobscot Log Driving Company and a director of the First 
National Bank of Bangor, Maine. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1910 257 

He is a Progressive Republican and a member of the Tarratine 
Club of Bangor. 

He has published two articles in volume 8 of the Forestry 
Quarterly: Suggestions for studying growth, and Comparison 
of log rules. 

Albert O. Vorse 

Business address. Care Peters, Byrne & Company, Ardmore, Pa. 
Home address, Lewisburg, Pa. 

Albert Ogden Vorse was born October 30, 1883, in Lewisburg, Pa., the 
son of Walter Lyon Vorse and Christiana Bowman (Byers) Vorse. 

Before entering the Yale Forest School he attended Bucknell Uni- 
versity, where he received the degree of B.S. in 1905. He was then 
engaged in newspaper work eighteen months and in surveying for a year. 
He received the degree of M.S. at Bucknell University in 1911. 

He was married June 17, 1913, in Ardmore, Pa., to Miss Emma 
Yarnall, daughter of Mrs. Holton Hallowell Yarnall. 

Since graduation Vorse has been employed in the Pennsylvania 
State Forest Service, assistant superintendent of woodlands for 
the Delaware & Hudson Railroad, and since March, 1912, forester 
for Peters, Byrne & Company of Ardmore, Pa. 

He is a Progressive, a Baptist and a member of the Merion 
Cricket Club of Haverford, Pa., the Cape May Yacht Club, 
Cape May, N. J., New York Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution and the Yale Club of New York City. 



Robert S. Wallace 

United States Forest Service, Harrison, Ark. 

Robert Sinclair Wallace was born November 2, 1885, in Wooster, Ohio, 
the son of James Wallace, professor of Greek in the University of Wooster, 
Wooster, Ohio, and president of Macalester College, St. Paul, Minn., 
and Janet (Davis) Wallace. He is of Scotch and English ancestry. He 
has two brothers and two sisters : Helen (Wallace) Davies, B.A. Mac- 
alester College, Benjamin Bruce Wallace, Ph.D., B.A. Macalester and 
post-graduate work at Madison and Oxford, W. R. DeWitt Wallace and 
Miriam Wallace. 

He received the degree of B.A. at Macalester College in 1908. 

He was married September 7, 1912, in Fairmont, Minn., to Miss Nina 
Johnson, daughter of Henry P. Johnson, M.D., and Ruth A. Johnson. 

17 



258 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Wallace has been engaged chiefly in reconnaissance work in 
District 3 since graduation. His first appointment was on the 
Pecos National Forest, New Mexico, followed by reconnaissance 
and experimental sample plot work on the Datil and Arkansas 
National forests. In the winter, 1911-12, he was on the Ozark 
Forest and again since the summer of 19 12, being now occupied 
with timber sale work. His headquarters are at Harrison, Ark. 

He is a Presbyterian. 



Edgar F. White 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Missoula, Mont. 
Home address, Danvers, Mass. 

Edgar Fowler White was born October 28, 1885, in Danvers, Mass., the 
son of Charles H. White, president of the Danvers Savings Bank, and 
Etta Belle (Bucklin) White. He is of Scotch ancestry on his father's 
side. A brother, Cleon B. White, received the degree of B.A. at 
Dartmouth. 

In 1908 he received the degree of B.A. at Dartmouth, where he was a 
member of Phi Gamma Delta. 

He is unmarried. 

White entered the Service in July, 1910, as forest assistant and 
until April, 1912, was assigned to Custer National Forest. The 
following two months he was on Madison Forest and was then 
appointed to the planting department of District i at Missoula, 
where he is now acting chief of planting. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. 



Walter K. Wildes 

Business address, Butler, N. J. 
Residence, Little Falls, Passaic County, N. J. 

Walter Keene Wildes was born June 9, 1881, in Skowhegan, Maine, 
the son of William Henry Wildes, a representative to legislature, on 
the board of selectmen, and a trustee of the Skowhegan Savings Bank, 
and Abby Judith (Keene) Wildes. His father's parents were Asa Waldo 
Wildes and Jane (Patten) Wildes and his mother's Josiah Keene and 
Adeline (Burrill) Keene. He has three brothers, Gordon L., Robert P., 
and William H. Wildes, Jr. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1910 259 

He received the degree of B.A. in 1904 at Bowdoin, where he was a 
member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. Before entering the Yale Forest 
School he was engaged in the manufacture and selling of worsteds. In 
the summer of 1902 he was in the party in charge of W. C. Hodge, 
making valuation surveys on the property of the Great Northern Paper 
Compan}'. During the summer of 1903 he was a member of the party 
in charge of R. L. Marston, studying poplars in the Dead River region 
of Maine. 

He was married January 22, 1907, in London, England, to Miss Ruth 
Madeleine Beattie, daughter of William H. Beattie and Emma G. 
(Hollingshead) Beattie. 

After graduation in 1910 Wildes became assistant state forester 
of Vermont. Since January, 1912, he has been president of the 
North Jersey Excelsior Company, manufacturers of excelsior, at 
Butler, N. J. 

He is Republican in politics. He is a member of the Episcopal 
church, the Yale Club of New York City, is a Free and Accepted 
Mason and a Royal Arch Mason. 

He has published : Forest fires and the fire warden system in Vermont, 
The Vermonter, Dec, 1910; State forests in Vermont, Am. For., May, 
1911, and Forest working plans, Field and Stream, Aug. or Sept., 1911. 



Graduates holding Certificate but not Degree 
B. Frank Heintzleman 

Business address, Sumpter, Ore. 
Home address, Fayetteville, Pa. 

B. Frank Heintzleman was born December 3, 1888, in Fayetteville, Pa., 
the son of Andrew Joshua Heintzleman and Rebecca Jane (Seitz) 
Heintzleman. He is of German descent. 

He received the degree of Bachelor of Forestry at the Pennsylvania 
State Forest Academy in 1907 and was a forester in the Pennsylvania 
department of forestry for nine months prior to entering Yale. 

He is unmarried. 

Since July, 19 10, Heintzleman has been a forest assistant in the 
United States Forest Service. He is at present located on the 
Whitman National Forest with headquarters at Sumpter, Ore. 

He is a Progressive Republican. 



26o YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Sedman W. Wynne 

Hot Springs, Tulare County, Calif. 

Sedman Walter Wynne was born May 24, 1883, in Butte, Mont., the 
son of Ellis Walter Wynne and Nellie Ware (Blood) Wynne. He has 
one sister, Edith Wynne. 

Before entering the Yale Forest School he attended the University of 
California. He was a mining engineer from 1904 to 1908. 

He was married January 20, 191 1, in San Jose, Calif., to Miss Margaret 
Ogier, daughter of John Ogier and Margaret Ogier. 

Wynne was forest assistant in the United States Forest 
Service from July, 1910, to July, 1912, when he was appointed 
deputy forest supervisor of the Sequoia National Forest with 
headquarters at Hot Springs, Tulare County, Calif. 



NoN Graduates 
Edward S. Davey 

Business address, 95 River Street, Hoboken, N. J. 
Residence, 67 Hawthorne Avenue, Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Edward Stiles Davey was born February 14, 1885, in Jersey City, N. J., 
the son of Edmund Howell Davey, chairman of the board of directors 
of the Hudson County Savings Bank, son of William O. Davey, and 
Emma Jane (Stiles) Davey, daughter of Edward Stiles. He has two 
brothers and a sister, Warren Davey, M.E. Stevens Institute of Tech- 
nology, Leigh H. Davey, Stevens Institute of Technology, and Lilian 
E. Davey. An uncle, William A. Stiles, was graduated at Yale in 1859, 
and a cousin, John A. Hartwell, in the Class of '89 S. 

He was prepared at Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and was grad- 
uated with the degree of B.A. in 1908 at Yale College, where he was a 
member of Psi Upsilon. 

He, is unmarried. 

Davey spent two years at the Union Theological Seminary, 
New York City, but did not complete the course. Since July i, 
191 1, he has been engaged in social work, being acting secretary 
of the North American Civic League for Immigrants. 

He is independent in his political views. He is a member of 
the Congregational church. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1910 261 

Ernest G. Dudley 

Business and home address, North Fork, Madera County, Calif. 
Stanford University, Calif. 

Ernest Griswold Dudley was born August 25, 1880, in Guilford, Conn., 
the son of James Austin Dudley (deceased), a farmer, who was state 
representative about 1882 and several times selectman of Guilford town- 
ship and Emaline Wilcox (Griswold) Dudley. He is the grandson on his 
father's side of Samuel William Dudley and Lucy (Chittenden) Dudley 
of North Guilford, Conn., and on his mother's side of Henry B. Griswold. 
He has a brother, Harry Chittenden Dudley, Mn.E. Harvard '02; and 
three sisters: Lillian E. Dudley, Alice Griswold (Dudley) Soper of 
Orland, Maine, and Laura Elliott (Dudley) Shelley of Guilford, Conn., 
who attended Leland Stanford, Jr., University in 1907 and Smith College 
in 1908-09. 

He was prepared at Manzanite Hall, Palo Alto, Calif., and in 1908 
received the degree of B.A. from Leland Stanford, Jr., University, where 
he was a member of Delta Upsilon. After the death of his father in 
1897 he managed the William Lusk farm in Guilford until 1899, when he 
went to Stanford University and lived with his uncle, W. R. Dudley, 
professor of botany. 

He was married July 7, 1909, in Palo Alto, Calif., to Miss Helen 
Annette Lewis of Palo Alto, daughter of James P. Lewis and Annie H. 
(Knight) Lewis. 

Upon entering the United States Forest Service in July, 1909, 
Dudley was appointed forest agent. Since 19 10 he has been for- 
est assistant with headquarters on Sierra National Forest, North 
Fork, Calif. 

In politics he is a Progressive Republican. 



Ben Hershey 

Business address, 608 North Ainsworth Avenue, Tacoma, Wash. 

Home address. Sterling, 111. 

10^6 Henry Building, Seattle, Wash. 

Ben Hershey was born January 17, 1882, in Sterling, III., the son of 
Andrew Henry Hershey, a veteran of the 15th Illinois, 17th Army Corps, 
Army of Tennessee, and Harriet Elizabeth (Bowen) Hershey. He is of 
Swiss origin on his father's side and of Welsh on his mother's. He 
has two sisters, Marie Hershey, B.A. Wellesley '03, and Frances Genevieve 
Hershey, (Mrs. Jesse C. Moore), B.A, Wellesley '96. 



262 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He was prepared at Lake Forest Academy, Lake Forest, 111., and 
received the degree of B.A. in 1906 at Williams, where he was a member 
of Zeta Psi. He also attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
before entering Yale. He was registered at the Forest School during 
1908-10. 

He is unmarried. 

Hershey is engaged in logging for the Angus McDougall Com- 
pany of Tacoma, Wash. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. 



*Thomas Hooker 

Died 1909 

Thomas Hooker was born July 20, 1886, in Hartford, Conn., the son of 
Edward Beecher Hooker, M.D. Boston University 'T7, and Martha Clarke 
(Kilbourne) Hooker. His father is a descendant of Thomas Hooker on 
one side and of Lyman Beecher, Yale 1797, on the other, his parents 
being John Hooker, Yale '2)7, and Isabella (Beecher) Hooker. He has 
practiced medicine since 1878 in Hartford, Conn., and in 1907 was presi- 
dent of the American Institute of Homeopathy. He had two sisters 
Mary Hooker (Mrs. Henry E. Burton) and Alice Hooker (Mrs. John 
C. Day), and a brother, Joseph Kilbourne Hooker, Yale '09. 

He was prepared at the Hartford (Conn.) Public High School and 
received the degree of B.A. in 1908 at Yale, where he was a member of 
Delta Kappa Epsilon and the Yale News board. 

He was unmarried. 

Hooker had completed his first year at the Forest School when 
he was suddenly taken with appendicitis, of which he died at the 
Yale Infirmary, June 20, 1909. He was an excellent student, a 
man of high ideals and of peculiar personal charm. 

He was a member of Center Church, Hartford, and the Hart- 
ford Golf Club. 



James L. Leeper, Jr. 

Business address, 1700 Broadway, New York City 
304 Clinton Avenue, Kingston, N. Y. 

James Luther Leeper, Jr., was born September 2, 1884, ii^ Claysville, 
Pa., the son of James Luther Leeper, D.D., pastor of the Dutch Reformed 
Protestant Church, Kingston, N. Y., a public lecturer and author, and 
Jane (McLaren) Leeper. He has a brother, Harper McLaren Leeper. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1910 263 

He was prepared at the Robert Waller High School, Chicago, and the 
Lake Forest School, Lake Forest, 111. He prepared for Cornell and 
entered the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale in Junior year, receiv- 
ing the degree of Ph.B. in 1909. 

He is unmarried. 

Leeper took courses in the Yale Forest School in connection 
with his work in Sheff. After graduation from the latter school 
he spent two months in forestry work with the Great Northern 
Paper Company of Bangor, Maine. He then spent several 
months in Europe and upon his return went with the Prudential 
Insurance Company of Newark, remaining until November, 
191 1, when he became a bond salesman for Folsom & Adams, 
New York City. On May i, 191 2, he organized J. L. Leeper & 
Company, an automobile brokerage firm of which he- is president. 

He is a member of the Dutch Reformed Protestant Church of 
Kingston, N. Y. 

Samuel B, Locke 

Business address, Hailey, Idaho 
Forest Service Building, Ogden, Utah 

Samuel Barron Locke was born March 10, 1885, in Paris, Maine, the 
son of Samuel Barron Locke, who held several town offices and was a 
member of the state legislature, and Elva Estelle (Libby) Locke. He 
is of English ancestry. He has two sisters: Linda (Locke) Marshall 
and Mary (Locke) Gerrish. 

He was prepared at the Paris and Woodford (Maine) high schools 
and in 1908 received the degree of B.S. at the University of Maine, 
where he was a member of Sigma Chi and a corporal in the cadet 
corps. 

He was married January i, 1912, in South Paris, Maine, to Miss 
Olive Chase Swett, daughter of Benjamin Swett and Imogene Andrews 
Swett. 

Locke is deputy forest supervisor of Sawtooth National Forest 
with headquarters at Hailey, Idaho. He writes : "The summer 
and fall of 1910 I spent on reconnaissance work in the Salmon 
National Forest, Idaho. The winter of 1910-11 in Ogden, Utah, 
oti reconnaissance reports and maps. The spring, summer and 
fall of 191 1 in general work on forest nursery, forest planting, 
surveying, etc., on the Sawtooth National Forest, Idaho. The 



264 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

winter of 1911-12 I was in charge of a correspondence course of 
study for rangers in Ogden. The spring of 1912 was engaged 
on forest nursery work, timber sales, etc., and the summer and 
fall, mapping, etc., on the Sawtooth National Forest." 
He is a Progressive Republican. 



Glenn W. Traer, Jr. 

Business address, 8 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 
Residence, 4363 Oakenwald Avenue, Chicago, III. 

Glenn Wood Traer, Jr., was born April 9, 1889, in Chicago, 111., the son 
of Glenn Wood Traer, chairman of the Illinois mining commission, and 
Ida (Solberg) Traer. He is of Scotch-English and Scandinavian 
ancestry. He has two brothers and two sisters : Charles S. Traer, Yale 
'10 S., Josephine Traer, Morton Traer and Elsa Traer. 

He was prepared at the Harvard School, Chicago, 111., and received 
the degree of Ph.B. at Yale in 1909. He was a member of Chi Phi. 

He is unmarried. 

Traer took the Forestry Course in Sheff and in Senior year 
completed a portion of the Junior Forest School work. In the 
fall of 1909 he entered a law office and also studied at the Kent 
College of Law in Chicago. He entered the coal mining business 
at Danville, 111., in March, 1910, and held various positions, such 
as engineer, clerk, salesman and assistant superintendent, until 
April, 1912, when a strike amongst the miners of Illinois led him 
to give up that occuption temporarily. He is now assistant to 
the sales manager of A. B. Leach & Company, dealers in bonds 
and securities. 

Alvin G. Whitney 

St. Paul Island, Behring Sea, Alaska 

Alvin Goodnow Whitney was born March 2, 1883, in Hamilton, Ont., 
Canada. Before entering the Yale Forest School he studied at Dartmouth 
College. He entered the School in 1908-09 and took the Senior work in 
1909-10 until the spring term and returned in 1911-12 to take certain 
courses. 

He was married July 28, 1912, in Washington, D. C, to Miss Gibson. 

Whitney is located at St. Paul Island, Behring Sea, Alaska. 
He has not furnished any information for this record. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 265 



CLASS OF 191 1 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

Waldo D. Barlow 

Business address, Helena, Mont. 
Home address, South Manchester, Conn. 

Waldo Darius Barlow was born April 10, 1885, in Sturbridge, Mass., 
the son of Darius R. Barlow, a farmer, and Lucy F. (Gilbert) Barlow. 
He is of English ancestry. He has a brother, Harry E. Barlow, B.A. 
Amherst '07, and a sister, Mrs. Henry L. Sweet. 

He was an instructor in agriculture and horticulture in the Kame- 
hameha schools, Honolulu, H. T., from 1905 to 1907, and in 1909 received 
the degree of B.S. from the Massachusetts Agricultural College, where 
he was a member of Phi Sigma Kappa and had two years of military 
training. 

He was married December 18, 1912, in Helena, Mont., to Miss Clorinde 
von Heinrichshofen of Helena, daughter of Mrs. H. von Heinrichshofen. 

Baric writes: "Was appointed forest assistant in the United 
States Forest Service July i, 191 1, and assigned to the Helena 
Forest. Was given charge of the Boulder Nursery at Boulder, 
Mont. On December 12, 191 1, was assigned to the district office 
of District i of the Forest Service to assist in silviculture. 
Returned to Helena Forest in the spring of 1912 to again take 
charge of the Boulder Nursery, where I am at present." 

He is a member of the Unitarian church and in politics is a 
Progressive Republican. 



Oliver F. Bishop 

Business address, Bureau of Forestry, Los Banos, Laguna, Philippine 

Islands 
Home address, 174 Grand Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 

Oliver Frederick Bishop was born October 3, 1888, in New Haven, 
Conn., son of Frederick Foote Bishop, superintendent and treasurer of 
the New Haven Ice Company (died January 21, 1895), and Alice M. 
(Bradley) Bishop. He is of English ancestrj^ the grandson on his 
father's side of Elias Bradley Bishop and Grace C. (Atwater) Bishop, 
and on his mother's side of Oliver S. Bradley and Annie Tyler (Deane) 



266 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Bradley. Two of his great uncles were graduated at Yale: Lyman 
Hotchkiss Atwater, '31, D.D. Princeton '51, LL.D. '73, and Wyllys 
Atwater, '43, and several cousins, among them Hon. William Henry 
Bishop, %y, former United States consul and author, and Lyman Hotch- 
kiss Bagg, '69, author of "Four Years at Yale." He has one sisfeT: 
Lottie G. Bishop, B.A. Mount Holyoke '06. 

He was prepared at the Boardman Manual Training High School, New 
Haven, and received the degree of Ph.B. from the Sheffield Scientific 
School at Yale in 1909. He received general two-year honors in Senior 
year, divided the Belknap Prize in biological studies, was elected to 
Sigma Xi, and a member of Alpha Sigma Phi. 

He is unmarried. 

During- Junior year in the Yale Forest School Bishop con- 
ducted a course in forestry, consisting of lectures and field 
work, at Rhode Island State Agricultural College. He entered 
the Government Service in July, 1910, receiving an appointment 
as forest assistant on the Apache National Forest. In Septem- 
ber he obtained a furlough and returned to the School to com- 
plete his course. In July, 191 1, he resumed his work with an 
assignment to the Carson National Forest, New Mexico, and 
in the winter of that year was transferred to the Ozark and later 
to the Arkansas, both in Arkansas. He spent three months at 
home on sick leave in the spring of 1912, returning in June to 
the Carson. The winter of 1912-13 was spent at Albuquerque 
on inside work. In February he accepted an appointment under 
the Philippine Bureau of Forestry and reached Manila on April 
10. His title is that of forester and he has been engaged in 
cataloguing several thousand volumes and has taken a number 
of trips with groups of students from the University. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. 



Elwood P. Bushnell 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Home address, Bronson, Mich. 

Elwood Perry Bushnell was born January 27, 1885, in Bronson, Mich., 
the son of William B. Bushnell, who has held the position of representa- 
tive in the Michigan legislature and various township and county offices, 
and Sarah Maria (Taggart) Bushnell. He has three brothers: Leland 
D. Bushnell, B.S. Michigan Agricultural College, Clyde E. Bushnell and 
Clesson T. Bushnell. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 267 

Before entering the Forest School he had spent four winters in a 
lumber camp and three summers surveying. In 1910 he received the 
degree of B.S. from the Michigan Agricultural College, where he was a 
member of Phi Delta and of the varsity track team and filled all positions 
up to and including that of major in the cadet school. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduation from the Yale Forest School Bushnell has 
been an assistant in the United States Forest Service with head- 
quarters in Washington, D. C. 

He is a member of the Baptist church and in politics is a Pro- 
gressive. At Yale he was elected to Acacia Fraternity and he is 
also a member of Mystic Lodge, 41, Free and Accepted Masons, 
and of Siroc Chapter, 46, Royal Arch Masons, both of Bronson, 
Mich. 

Norman C. Case 

Business address, Silver City, N. Mex. 

Home address. Highland, Kans. 

Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Norman Curtis Case was born April i, 1885, in Highland, Kans., the 
son of Norman Case, who has held the positions of trustee of Highland 
College, mayor and postmaster of Highland, and Harriet Allice (Moll) 
Case. On his father's side he is of English and Scotch ancestry, being 
the grandson of Edward Case and Ann Walk (Curtis) Case; and on his 
mother's side of German and Swiss descent, the grandson of Eli Moll 
and Elizabeth (Schock) Moll. He has a brother, William Moll Case, 
B.A. Highland College '02, Yale ex-'04, and a graduate of Auburn Theo- 
logical Seminary in 1908; and a sister, Helen Lillian Case, B.A. Highland 
College '10, who also did graduate work at Northwestern University. 

He received the degree of B.S. from Highland College in 1908 and 
afterward did graduate work at Kansas University. 

He is unmarried. 

Case entered the United States Forest Service on July i, 1909, 
as forest agent and from that time until October i, 1909, worked 
on reconnaissance on Helena and Gallatin National forests, Mon- 
tana. From October i to December 31, 1909, he was engaged in 
reconnaissance on Sioux National Forest, North and South 
Dakotas; from January i to April i, 1910, in timber sales on 
Bitterroot National Forest, Montana; and from July i to Sep- 
tember, 1910, in surveying on Flathead National Forest, Montana. 



2 68 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School he was appointed 
forest assistant on timber reconnaissance and from July i to 
November, 191 1, was stationed on Carson National Forest, New 
Mexico; from November to December 31, 191 1, on Ozark Forest, 
Arkansas; from January i to May i, 1912, on Arkansas Forest, 
Arkansas; and since May i on Gila Forest, New Mexico, where 
he is at present. On May i, 1913, he was advanced to the posi- 
tion of forest examiner. 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church and in politics is 
a Progressive Republican. 

Bernard A. Chandler 

Business address, Vermont Forest Service, Burlington, Vt. 
Home address, New Gloucester, Maine 

Bernard Albert Chandler was born December 20, 1884, in New Glou- 
cester, Maine, the son of Andrew Campbell Chandler, a farmer and 
engaged in the mill and lumber business, being a member of the firm of 
Chandler Brothers, and Cora Evelyn (Bean) Chandler. He is the 
grandson on his father's side of Andrew Campbell Chandler and 
Catherine C. (Cunningham) Campbell, and on his mother's of Albert 
F. Bean and Ann J. (Rice) Bean. He has a brother, Robert Flint 
Chandler, B.S. University of Maine '03, and a sister, Sara Archer 
Chandler. 

He was prepared at the Edward Little High School, Auburn, Maine, 
and in 1909 received the degree of B.S. from the University of Maine, 
where he was a member of Phi Kappa Sigma. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduating from the Yale Forest School Chandler has 
held the position of assistant state forester of Vermont with 
headquarters at Burlington. 

He is a member of the Congregational church and in politics is 
a Progressive Republican. He is a member of the Grange. 

Neal T. Childs 

Business address. Care United States Forest Service, Bakersfield, Calif. 

Home address, Bretton Hall, Broadway and Eighty-sixth Street, 

New York City 

Neal Townley Childs was born February 22, 1884, in Nicholson, Pa., 
the son of George W. Childs, vice president and manufacturing manager 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 269 

of the Central Leather Company of New York City, and Florence 
(Moore) Childs, daughter of G. V. Moore. His paternal grandparents 
were Nial Townley Childs and Marilla (Weston) Childs. 

He was prepared at the Ridgway public schools and at Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass., and in 1909 graduated from Yale College. He 
entered Yale with 1908 S., but joined 1909 at the beginning of Sophomore 
year. He was a member of the 1908 S. Class Crew, of the Freshman 
Union and the Yale Union, and received a third TenEyck prize in the 
Junior Exhibition. His society was Psi Upsilon. In 1903 he spent six 
weeks with the Forest Service working on the sand dune problem in 
Michigan. He traveled for six months in Europe in 1903. During the 
summer of 1907 he traveled by canoe through the Canadian National 
Park in northern Ontario. He spent the summer of 1908 in the 
Adirondack forests. 

He was married June 10, 1912, in San Francisco, Calif., to Miss Hazel 
Irene Moise of San Francisco, Calif., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Philip 
H. Moise. 

Childs is forest assistant in the United States Forest Service 
with headquarters at Bakersfield, Calif. He entered the Service 
July I, 191 1. He vi^rites: "Traveled through Yellowstone 
National Park in the summer of 1910. Spent two months in the 
Coast and Cascade forests of Washington and Oregon making 
studies in western hemlock in 1910. Visited the Grand Canyon 
of Arizona in 191 1 and spent two months traveling by horseback 
on main Sierra divide of Kern and Sequoia National forests col- 
lecting herbarium specimens and making a silvical description of 
the former forest." 

He is a Progressive in politics. He is a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. He belongs to the League of American 
Sportsmen and the American Forestry Association. 

Walter J. Damtoft 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Home address, 98 Beechwood Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Walter Julius Damtoft was born November 11, 1890, in Southport, 
Conn., the son of Kund Julius Damtoft and Dagmar Elizabeth (Jacobi) 
Damtoft. He is of Danish descent. He has one brother, Frank V. 
Damtoft. 

He was prepared at the Bridgeport High School and in 1910 graduated 
from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale. 

He is unmarried. 



270 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Danitoft has been a field examiner in the United States Forest 
Service with headquarters at Washington, D. C, since May, 191 2. 
He entered the Service in 191 1 and during that year was 
employed in the Routt and Arapaho National forests. In 1912 
he did Weeks bill work in the southern Appalachians. 

He is a member of the South Congregational Church of 
Bridgeport, Conn. 



Howard deForest 

Business address, Weaverville, Calif. 
Care of J. D. deForest, 25 Broad Street, New York City. 

Howard deForest was born November 2, 1872, in New York City, the 
son of Albert Henry deForest and Jane Amelia (Douglas) deForest. 
He has a brother, John Douglas deForest, and a sister, Edith Beatrice 
deForest. 

He was prepared at H. W. King's School, Stamford, Conn., and in 
1895 received the degree of B.S. from Princeton University. During 
a part of the year 1908-09 he attended the Forest School at the University 
of Michigan. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduating from the Yale Forest School deForest has 
held the position of forest assistant in the United States Forest 
Service with headquarters at Trinity National Forest, Weaver- 
ville, Calif. During the latter part of the academic year of 191 2- 
13 he was acting assistant professor of forestry at the University 
of Missouri. 

In politics he is a Progressive. He is a member of the Holland 
Society of New York and of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion of New York State. 



Theodore W. Dwight 

Business address, Forestry Branch, Ottawa, Canada 
Residence, Y. M. C. A., Ottawa, Canada 

Theodore Woolsey Dwight was born June 30, 1889, in Geneva, 111., the 
son of William Cecil Dwight and Ruth A. (Bristol) Dwight. He is the 
grandson on his father's side of ex-President Timothy Dwight, D.D., 
LL.D., of New Haven, and the great-grandson of the older President 
Dwight of Yale, and on his mother's side the grandson of Almon Bristol 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 27^ 

of Picton, Ont., a descendent of United Empire Loyalist stock. He has 
a brother, Herbert B. Dwight, B.S. McGill University, Montreal, and a 
sister, Edith C. Dwight, B.A. University of Toronto. 

He was prepared in the public schools of Picton, Ontario, and at the 
Toronto High School and in 1910 received the degree of B.S.F. from 
the University of Toronto. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduating from the Yale Forest School Dwight has 
been employed as forester in the Forestry Branch of the Depart- 
ment of the Interior, Canada, where he is connected with the 
main office. 

He is a member of the Congregational church and in politics 
his sympathies are with the Republicans in the United States and 
the Liberals in Canada. 



John H. Fahrenbach 

Business address^ United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Home address, Bernville, Pa. 

John Henry Fahrenbach was born June 19, 1888, in Bernville, Pa., the son 
of George D. Fahrenbach, sheriff of Berks County, and Mary E. 
(Ziebach) Fahrenbach. He is of German ancestry. His father served 
three years in the Civil War in the 55th and 151st Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, was in seventeen engagements and wounded four times. He 
has two sisters : Sallie and Mary R. Fahrenbach, both graduates of 
the Keystone State Normal School ; and two brothers : Frank Fahren- 
bach, a graduate of Stoners Business College, and George W. Fahren- 
bach, M.D. Baltimore Medical College. 

In 1909 he received the degree of B.A. from Franklin and Marshall 
College, where he was a member of the Harbaugh Club. 

He was married June 22, 191 1, in Wernersville, Pa., to Miss Bertha Mae 
Kauffman of Wernersville, daughter of Morris Kauffman and Annie 
(Roether) Kauffman. 

Since June 26, 191 1, Fahrenbach has been forest assistant in 
the United States Forest Service with headquarters at Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

He is a member of the Reformed church. At Yale he was 
elected to Sigma Xi and he is also a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and of Williamson Lodge, 307, Free and 
Accepted Masons. 



272 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Arthur F. Fischer 

Business address. Bureau of Forestry, Manila, P. I. 
Home address, 5918 Ohio Street, Chicago, 111. 

Arthur Frederick Fischer was born February 6, 1888, in Chicago, 
111., the son of Joseph Fischer, engaged in the meat packing business in 
Chicago, and Mary (Ehredt) Fischer. He is of German ancestry. He 
has a sister, Mary L. Zuttermeister, who graduated from a convent, 
and three brothers : H. H. Fischer, George Fischer and Oscar Fischer, 
M.E. Columbia School of Mines. 

He was prepared at Crane Technical School, Chicago, and afterward 
was employed by Rand McNally & Company as map draftsman. He 
worked for the Tennessee Coal Iron & Railroad Company of Birming- 
ham on traces and details and later surveyed coal 'lands in Tennessee. 
In 1909 he received the degree of C.E. from Ohio Northern Univer- 
sity, where he served as private, corporal, sergeant, lieutenant and captain 
in "B" Battery. 

He was married June 21, 191 1, in East Chicago, Ind., to Miss Helen 
Wyly Beall Campbell of Ada, Ohio, daughter of Lawrence William 
Campbell and Ella Meader Campbell. 

Since graduating from the Yale Forest School Fischer has 
been employed as forester in the Bureau of Forestry, Philippine 
Islands. He writes : "Have traveled in and about the Philippines 
on special detail under the director of forestry, not confined to 
district, working mostly along the line of opening up timber 
tracts for large concessions, making rough working plans for 
them and inspecting the large lumber companies in the Islands. 
When not thus occupied have been detailed to the Forest School 
of the University of the Philippines as instructor in forest 
engineering." 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church. 



Charles Goodwin 

Business address. Woodlands Department, Delaware & Hudson Railroad, 

Plattsburg, N. Y. 
Home address, 1070 Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Charles Goodwin was born November 23, 1887, in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
the son of George Bennett Goodwin, a director of the Merchants' Bank 
and president of the George B. Goodwin & Brother Coal Company, and 
Eleanor Eliza (Goodman) Goodwin. On his father's side he is the 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 273 

grandson of Charles Goodwin, editor of the Brooklyn Times, and Hannah 
Goodwin, both English, and on his mother's side of D. Goodman and 
Emma Goodman of Virginia. He has two sisters: Florence W. Goodwin 
and Hannah Goodwin. 

He was prepared at the Polytechnic Preparatory and Pratt High School 
of Brooklyn, N. Y., and in 1910 graduated from the Sheffield Scientific 
School at Yale, where he was a member of Berzelius, Delta Theta, the 
Freshman and Varsity Basketball teams and the Kopper Kettle Klub. 

His engagement has been announced. 

Goodwin is chief of survey for the Delaware & Hudson Rail- 
road Company. He has held this position since graduation from 
the Forest School in June, 191 1. 

He is a Republican and is a member of the Episcopal church. 
He belongs to the Wolf Pond Athletic Club. 



Alfred B. Hastings 

Business address, Orofino, Idaho 
Home address, Hanover, N. H. 

Alfred Bryant Hastings was born February 19, 1882, in Claremont, 
N. H., the son of Lemuel Spencer Hastings, assistant professor of 
English at Dartmouth College and for many years principal of high 
schools, and Laura Maria (Cobb) Hastings. He is the grandson on 
his father's side of Lemuel Hastings, a farmer and cattleman of 
St. Johnsbury, Vt., and on his mother's of Samuel B. Cobb, a merchant 
of Hanover, N. H. He has a brother, Harold R. Hastings, B.A. Dart- 
mouth 'go,' M.A. Harvard '02 and Ph.D. University of Wisconsin '10, 
and a sister, Myra Hastings, B.A. Smith '05. 

He received the degree of B.A. in 1904 from Dartmouth College, where 
he was a member of Delta Tau Delta. He taught mathematics from 
1904 to 1906 at Holderness School, from 1906 to 1907 at Milton Academy 
and from 1907 to 1909 at St. Paul's School. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduating from the Yale Forest School Hastings has 
been employed as forest assistant in the United States Forest 
Service with headquarters in Clearwater National Forest. He 
writes: "From July i, 1911, to June, 1912, I was engaged in 
general office work on the Clearwater National Forest at Orofino, 
Idaho. This work was varied during the spring by my joining 
the telephone construction crew of the forest and by the handling 
of a very small planting operation. From July 10 as far into 



274 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

the fall as the weather permitted was engaged in type mapping 
on a very extensive basis in the watershed of the North Fork of 
the Clearwater River with one assistant or guide, a packer and 
five horses." 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. Concerning politics 
he writes that he believes in tariff for revenue only and in cen- 
tralized government. He is a member of the American Forestry 
Association. 

James O. Hazard 

Business address, Forest Commission, State House, Trenton, N. J. 

Residence, 59 Delaware View Avenue, Trenton, N. J. 

Home address, Westerly, R. I. 

James Ovington Hazard was born October 4, 1884, in Charlestown, R. I., 
the son of Nat Hazard and Harriet Saphia (Warner) Hazard. He is 
of English ancestry. He has a brother, Robert Hazard, and three sis- 
ters : Amey Almira, Natalie Sabra and Beulah Iris Hazard. 

He spent his early life on a farm and attended the public schools, and 
in 1908 received the degree of Ph.B. from Brown University, where he 
was a member of Kappa Sigma. 

He was married June 11, 1913, in Toledo, Ohio, to Miss Emma Eliza- 
beth Backus, daughter of Samuel Reed Backus and Elizabeth Hoagland 
Backus. 

From July to September, 191 1, Hazard was instructor in the 
Yale Forest School. Since September 27, 191 1, he has been 
assistant state forester for the state of New Jersey. 

He is a member of the First Baptist Church. 

Jesse W. Hough 

Claremont, Calif. 

Jesse Winegar Hough was born October 24, 1885, in Santa Barbara, 
Calif., the son of Theodore Holmes Hough, principal and teacher in the 
public schools, Santa Barbara, and Helen Eliza (Clarke) Hough, 
daughter of a New York State merchant. His father is the son of 
J. W. Hough, a Congregational minister, and brother of W. S. Hough, 
a professor at George Washington University. 

He was prepared at Pomona Preparatory School and in 1908 received 
the degree of B.S. from Pomona College, following which he took a year 
of work in natural science at Leland Stanford, Jr., University. 

He is unmarried. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 275 

From July, 191 1, to April, 1912, Hough was forest assistant 
in the United States Forest Service with headquarters on Angeles 
National Forest, California. Since then he has been engaged in 
orange growing in Claremont, Calif., where he owns an orchard. 

He is a member of the Congregational church and in politics is 
a Progressive Republican. 



Dwight S. Jeffers 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Laramie, Wyo. 
Home address, Canon City, Colo. 

Dwight Smithson Jeffers was born May 21, 1883, in Deland, 111., the 
son of E. AI. Jeffers, a clergyman, and Florence (Smithson) Jeffers. 
On his father's side he is of English and Scotch-Irish, and on his mother's 
of English ancestry. He has a brother, L. M. Jeffers, B.S. Illinois 
Wesleyan University. 

He received the degree of B.A. from Illinois Wesleyan University in 
1906. He spent the year of 1907-08 on United States reclamation work 
and during the year of 1909-10 was instructor in Canon City (Colo.) High 
School. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduating from the Yale Forest School Jeffers has 
been forest assistant in the United States Forest Service with 
headquarters at Medicine Bow National Forest, Laramie, Wyo. 

He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



Fred R. Johnson 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Halsey, Neb. 
Home address, 44 North Oak Street, Mt. Carmel, Pa. 

Fred Runk Johnson was bom January 19, 1886, in Mt. Carmel, Pa., the 
son of Lloyd W. Johnson (died April 10, 1892), member of the 17th 
Pennsylvania Cavalry during the War of the Rebellion, 1861-65, and 
Susan (Miller) Johnson. On his father's side he is the grandson of 
Silas Johnson, and on his mother's of Henry Miller. He has three 
brothers: C. W. Johnson, D.D.S. University of Pennsylvania; S. H. 
Johnson, a graduate of Bloomsburg (Pa.) State Normal School; and 
L. W. Johnson, Ph.B. Dickinson College '03, M.A. '05, and M.A. Harvard 
University '07 ; and three sisters : Nellie Johnson, B.A. Bucknell Uni- 
versity, Mabel Johnson, B.A. Bucknell, and Martha Johnson. 



276 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He received the degree of B.S. in 1909 from Dickinson College, where 
he was a member of Phi Kappa Sigma. 
He is unmarried. 

Johnson entered the United States Forest Service July i, 191 1, 
as forest assistant with headquarters in Arapaho National Forest, 
Colorado. On March i, 191 2, he was transferred to Nebraska 
National Forest, his present position. 

In politics he is an Independent. 



Ernest F. Jones 

Business address, Sheridan, Mont. 
Home address, South China, Maine 

Ernest Fuller Jones was born June 10, 1883, in China, Maine, the son 
of Frank Edward Jones and Luella Ermina (Graves) Jones. He has 
a brother, Harold W. Jones, B.A. Haverford College. 

He was prepared at Moses Brown School and in 1907 received the 
degree of B.A. from Haverford College, after which he taught two 
years at Westtown School. 

He is unmarried. 

Upon graduating- from the Yale Forest School Jones entered 
the United States Forest Service as forest assistant. He was later 
employed in the United States Indian Service for a time and 
then returned to the Forest Service, where his present head- 
quarters are in Sheridan, Mont. 

He is a member of the Friends' church. 



Otto Katz 

Business address, 153 West Twenty-third Street, New York City 
Residence, 30 East iigth Street, New York City 

Otto Katz was born December 5, 1889, in New York City, the son of 
Sigmund Katz and Elizabeth (Lederer) Katz, both born in Austria. He 
has a brother, Edwin Katz, and three sisters : Irma, Florence and 
Clara Katz. 

He was prepared in the public schools of New York City and in 1909 
received the degree of B.S. from the College of the City of New York. 

He is unmarried. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 277 

Since July, 191 1, Katz has been general representative for 
the firm of Sigmund Katz, manufacturers of women's outer 
garments. 

Arthur F. Kerr 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Roseburg, Ore. 

Home address, 956 Alder Street, Eugene, Ore. 

United States Forest Service, Portland, Ore. 

Arthur Frederick Kerr was born March 12, 1884, in Rushmore, Minn., 
the son of William Kerr and Margaret (Thorn) Kerr. He is of Scotch 
ancestry. He has a brother, Raymond E. Kerr, Ensign U. S. N. United 
States Naval Academy, and a sister, Winifred Kerr, a graduate of the 
University of Oregon and B.A. Simmons College. 

Before entering the Forest School he spent three summers in the 
mountains of Oregon and two in Washington with the United States 
Coast and Geodetic Survey. He received the degree of B.A. from the 
University of Oregon in 1909. 

He was married December 30, 1912, in Baker, Ore., to Miss Maude 
Service of Baker, Ore., daughter of Robert Service and La Vinne (Cole) 
Service. 

Since graduating from the Yale Forest School Kerr has held 
the position of forest assistant in the United States Forest 
Service with headquarters on Umpqua National Forest, Rose- 
burg, Ore. 

In politics he is a Progressive Republican. He is a Free and 
Accepted Mason and at Yale was elected to Acacia Fraternity. 
He served six years in the Oregon National Guard and held 
a commission as second lieutenant. 



Eugene L. Lindsey 

Business address, Clayton, Ga. 
Home address, Alexandria, Va. 

Eugene Lee Lindsey was born March i, 1890, in Alexandria, Va., the 
son of Noble Lindsey, president of the First National Bank of Alexandria 
and of the firm of N. Lindsey & Company, and Catherine (Aitchison) 
Lindsey. He is of Scotch ancestry, being the grandson on his father's 
side of James Lindsey and on his mother's of John Aitchison of Renfrew, 
Scotland. He has three brothers : Wallace N. Lindsey, a graduate of 
Virginia Military Institute, Douglas and Allan Lindsey; and three sisters: 
Marian Lindsey, a graduate of Mary Baldwin Seminary, Mrs. O. H. Price 



278 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

and Mary E. Lindsey, both graduates of Randolph Macon Woman's 
College. 

He graduated from the Virginia Military Institute in 1909. 

He is unmarried. 

Lindsey writes: ''On July i, 191 1, was appointed field assist- 
ant on Jemez National Forest, New Mexico. On completion of 
Jemez reconnaissance I was transferred to Ozark National For- 
est, November i, 191 1. On February i I obtained leave of 
absence for two months in order to prepare for examination for 
forest assistant in the United States Forest Service. I was reap- 
pointed April I as field assistant (under acquisition of land under 
Weeks bill) at Massanutten Area, Va., and on July i was pro- 
moted to field examiner on the same area." He has received 
an appointment as forest assistant under the new rules and 
will be stationed in the Appalachian Mountains. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. 



Thomas E. McCullough 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Flagstaff, Arts. 
Home address, 124 West Twelfth Street, Davenport, Iowa 

Thomas Edward McCullough was born January 28, 1887, in Davenport, 
Iowa, the son of William J. McCullough, captain on the staflf of the 
governor of Iowa, and Josephine (Mitchell) McCullough. His father 
was born in Bridgeport, Conn., the son of Thomas McCullough, who was 
born in Ireland, and his mother was born in Tennessee, daughter of 
Judge Nathanial Mitchell, whose wife was a cousin of the founder of 
Davenport, Iowa. He has three brothers : Gilbert F. McCullough, B.A. 
University of Notre Dame and M.D. Northwestern University '08; Henry 
M. and Richard Dorney McCullough ; and two sisters : Mary Elizabeth 
and Rose A. McCullough, both graduates of St. Mary's College. 

He was prepared at Davenport (Iowa) High School and in 1909 
received the degree of B.C.E. from Iowa State College, where he was 
a member of Sigma Nu. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduating from the Yale Forest School McCullough 
has been forest assistant in District 3 of the United States 
Forest Service. From July, 191 1, to March, 1912, he was sta- 
tioned in Cloudcroft, N. Mex. ; from March to May, 1912, in 
the district office at Albuquerque, N. Mex., on detail; and from 
May, 1912, to the present time in Flagstaff, Ariz. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 279 

He is a member of the Roman Catholic church and is a member 
of the Knights of Columbus. 



Samuel R. MacDonald 

Business address, R. F. D. i, Wallingford, Conn. 
Home address, 171 Ravine Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Samuel Rowley MacDonald was born May 10, 1886, in Newark, N. J., 
the son of Charles Howard MacDonald of the New York Stock Exchange 
and Fanny Stuart (Rowley) MacDonald. On his father's side he is of 
Scotch, and on his mother's of English ancestry. He has one brother, 
Howard Brenton MacDonald, and a sister, Theodora B. E. McCormick. 

He was prepared at Columbia Institute and Barnard School in New 
York City, at the Yonkers High School, and spent a year in final prepara- 
tion at Cutler School, New York City. In 1909 he graduated from 
the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale, where he was a member of 
Alpha Sigma Phi, of the Gun Club, the Freshman Glee Club, the 
University Orchestra, the Yale Masonic Club and the Orpheus Society. 
He was also a member of the New Haven Oratorio Society. 

He is unmarried. 

MacDonald is at present in the fruit business, having bought a 
peach orchard in Wallingford, Conn. He was formerly engaged 
in private forestry work in New York City. He writes : 
"Although a member of the Forest School Class of 191 1, I did 
not go South until the following spring. In the interim, having 
passed the Civil Service, I received a temporary appointment as 
forest assistant in District i. Leaving the Service, I went to 
Bay Minette, Ala., in November and remained there in private 
forestry work until time to join the 1912 Class at Crossett, Ark." 

In politics he is a Republican. He attends the Protestant 
Episcopal church. He is a member of Acacia, the New York ' 
Consistory, 32°, and subordinate masonic bodies, the Mystic 
Shrine and the Yale Club of New York City. 



A. Fletcher Marsh 

Business address, 1605 McCormick. Building, Chicago, 111. 
Residence, 1207 East Fifty-third Street, Chicago, III. 

Allen Fletcher Marsh was born July 9, 1888, in Chicago, 111., the son 
of Charles A. Marsh, president of the Board of Trustees of the Uni- 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



versity of Chicago Divinity School, and Lida (Shepardson) Marsh 
(deceased). He is the grandson of Professor Fletcher O. Marsh of 
Denison University, Granville, Ohio, and of Professor Daniel Shepardson. 
He has one sister, Helen (Marsh) McClintock. 

He was prepared at the University High School, Chicago, 111., at 
Andover and at Biltmore. In 1910 he graduated from the Sheffield 
Scientific School at Yale, where he was a member of the Freshman Track 
Team, the Sheff Student Council, Junior Reception Committee, Junior 
Fence Committee and Class Day historian. 

He was married May 25, 1912, in New Haven, Conn., to Miss Margaret 
Dean Trowbridge of New Haven, Conn., daughter of Frank Dean 
Trowbridge, Yale '84. 

Marsh is secretary for the Marsh & Truman Lumber Com- 
pany of Chicago, 111. He writes : "Started in business with 
Marsh & Truman Lumber Company just as soon as I could get 
from Trinity, Texas, to Chicago and have been right at the 
desk since that time." 

In politics he is a Progressive. He is a member of the Hyde 
Park Baptist Church of Chicago. 



Seward H. Marsh 

Business Address, United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Home address, Berea, Ky. 

Seward Hankins Marsh was born March 28, 1886, in Pawnee City, Neb., 
the son of Professor Miles Eugene Marsh, dean of the College Depart- 
ment of Berea College, Kentucky, and Katherine (Hankins) Marsh. He 
has a sister and two brothers, Elizabeth, Miles Eugene, Jr., and Wilson 
Marsh. 

He was prepared at Berea Academy and before entering the Forest 
School received in 1909 the degree of B.A. from Berea College, where 
he was a member of the Football Team and of the Phi Delta Literary 
Society. 

He is unmarried. 

On graduation from the Forest School Marsh took a position 
which he still holds as forest assistant with the United States 
Forest Service. His assignment has been in District 2 in the 
Appalachian Forest. 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 281 

Frederick R. Mason 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Missoula, Mont. 
Home address, Bound Brook, N. J. 

Frederick Ramsey Mason was born May 17, 1884, in Somerville, N. J., 
the son of William B. R. Mason and Rachel Manning (Townsend) Mason. 
His father has held the positions of manager and treasurer of the 
Bound Brook Water Company, postmaster of Bound Brook, president 
of the Bound Brook Building Loan Association, treasurer of the Fire- 
men's Relief Association and of the New Jersey Editorial Association 
and editor of the Bound Brook Chronicle. He is of English ancestry. 
He has two brothers : David Townsend Mason, B.S. Rutgers '05, M.F. 
Yale '07 and M.S. Rutgers '08, and H. F. R. Mason. 

In 1905 he received the degree of B.S. from Rutgers College, where he 
was a member of Chi Psi. From July, 1905, to October, 1906, he did 
clerical work in Bound Brook, N. J., and from that time until June, 1908, 
was employed in the American Bank Note Company, New York City. 

He is unmarried. 

From October, 1909, to September, 1910, Mason worked in 
the J. & J. Rogers Company, pulp and paper manufacturers, of 
Au Sable Forks, N. Y. Since July i, 191 1, he has been forest 
assistant in the United States Forest Service with headquarters 
in Missoula, Mont. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. 



George Z. Mason 

Business address and residence, Collbran, Colo. 
1107 Forest Avenue, New York City 

George Zachary Mason was born January 6, 1889, in Kharkov, Russia, 
the son of Aaron Mason and Frieda Leah (Rits) Mason. He has five 
brothers: Morris A. Mason, M.D. New York University; Herman 
Mason, LL.B. New York University; Louis A. Mason, B.S. College 
of City of New York and LL.B. New York University; Ray E. Mason, 
B.A. Normal College of New York; and Gabriel R. Mason, B.S. College 
of City of New York and Ph.D. New York University. 

He was prepared at DeWitt Clinton High School and Townsend Harris 
Hall Preparatory School and in 1909 received the degree of B.S. from 
the College of the City of New York, where he was a member of Omega 
Pi Alpha. 

He is unmarried. 



282 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Since graduating from the Forest School Mason has been 
forest assistant in the United States Forest Service with head- 
quarters on Battlement National Forest, Colorado. 

He is a member of the Jewish synagogue. 



George R. Monell 

Business address, Coos, N. H. 
Home address, 1598 Lexington Avenue, New York City 

George Roy [Gustave] Monell was born February 9, 1889, in New York 
City, the son of Francis Gustave Monell and Amanda (Anderson) Monell. 
On his father's side he is of Swedish and English, and on his mother's 
of Swedish ancestry. 

He received the degree of B.A. in 1909 from the College of the City 
of New York. 

He is unmarried. 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School Monell entered 
the United States Service as forest assistant. Since February, 
1912, he has been assistant forester for the Connecticut Valley 
Lumber Company. 

He is a member of the Unitarian church. 



Albert E. Moss 

Business address, 153 Huntington Street, New Haven, Conn. 
Home address, West Cheshire, Conn. 

Albert Ernest Moss was born May 4, 1885, in Cheshire, Conn., the 
son of Joel William Moss and Julia Stowe (Hyde) Moss. 

He graduated from the Connecticut Agricultural College in 1905. 
He is unmarried. 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School Moss entered 
the United States Service as forest assistant in District 3, work- 
ing first on reconnaissance on Carson National Forest, New 
Mexico, then on sample plots on Jemez and Pecos National for- 
ests. New Mexico, and finally at the planting station, Las Gallinas 
Nursery, on Pecos National Forest. Since October, 1912, he has 
been assistant state forester of Connecticut with headquarters at 
the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 283 

Harold S. Newins 

Business address, Oregon Agricultural College, Corvallis, Ore. 
Home address, Patchogue, N. Y. 

Harold Stephenson Newins was born November 30, 1887, in Patchogue, 
N. Y., the son of Hiram DeWitt Newins, a sea captain, and Geraldine 
(Stephenson) Newins. His father's ancestors were New England farmers 
and his mother is of English descent. He has three brothers : Robert D., 
John Milton and Stanley Frost Newins, and a sister, Geraldine Newins. 

He received the degree of Ph.B. in 1909 from Lafayette College, where 
he was a member of Phi Gamma Delta. 

He is unmarried. 

Since September, 191 1, Newins has been instructor of forestry 
at the Oregon Agricultural College in Corvallis, Ore., and has 
been employed in the United States Forest Service during the 
summer months. He expects to spend next summer in the 
Cascade Mountains. 

He is a member of the Congregational Church of Patchogue, 
N. Y. 



Douglas K. Noyes 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Yreka, Calif. 
Home address, 204 Highland Avenue, Orange, N. J. 

Douglas Keefer Noyes was born June 2, 1884, in New York City, the son 
of James Henry Noyes of Orange, N. J., manager of the Jewelers' 
Security Alliance, 15 Maiden Lane, New York City, and Regina Elizabeth 
(Keefer) Noyes. He is the grandson on his father's side of Gurdon W. 
Noyes, a Congregational minister, and Agnes (MacArthur) Noyes, a 
Scotchwoman. On his mother's side he is of German descent, being 
the grandson of Adam W. Keefer. He has one brother, Herbert Mac- 
Arthur Noyes, Yale '14, and one sister, Ethel Regina Noyes. He has 
three uncles : Rev. Edward M. Noyes, Yale '79, Herbert L. Noyes, 
Yale '84 S., and Ernest C. Noyes, Yale '98. He is a descendant of Joseph 
Noyes, Yale 1709, and of Rev. James Noyes, who was chairman of the 
group of men who founded Yale in 1701. 

He was prepared at Orange High School, Orange, N. J., studied a year 
with a private tutor and in 1907 graduated from Yale College, where he 
received the Pundit prize in his Sophomore year and a tuition scholarship. 

He is unmarried. 



284 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Noyes has been forest assistant in the United States Forest 
Service since graduating from the Forest School. His assign- 
ment has been in the Klamath National Forest, with headquarters 
at Yreka, Calif. 

He is a member of the Congregational church, and in politics 
he is a Progressive Republican. 



Lawrence B. Pagter 

Business address, Care United States Forest Service, Sumpter, Ore. 
Home address, 8 Vernon Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Lawrence Benjamin Pagter was born September 7, 1887, in New Haven, 
Conn., the son of Samuel S. Pagter, a cigar maker, and Florence F. 
(Greenbaum) Pagter. He has three brothers: Samuel S. Pagter, Jr., 
Amos T. Pagter, Yale '11 S., and Charles R. Pagter, Yale '16. 

He was prepared at the Union High School, West Haven, Conn., and 
at the New Haven High School, and in 1909 was graduated from Yale 
College, where he received a high oration Junior and Senior philosophical 
appointment, and was a member of the Baseball Team. 

He is unmarried. 

Pagter is forest assistant in the United States Forest Service, 
with headquarters at Sumpter, Ore. He has been stationed at 
various times as forest assistant on the following National for- 
ests : Snoqualmie, Okanogan and Colville in Washington and 
Whitman in Oregon. He has been in the Government Service 
since July i, 191 1. 



Ernest C. Pegg 

Business address, 109 Hitt Street, Columbia, Mo. 
Home address. Fountain City, Ind. 

Ernest Cecil Pegg was born February 5, 1888, in Fountain City, Ind., 
the son of William Pegg and Keturah Clementine (Shugart) Pegg. On 
his father's side he is of English, and on his mother's of German 
ancestry. He has a brother, Frank E. Pegg, and a sister, Nellie W. 
Pegg. 

He spent three months timber estimating in Tennessee before entering 
the Forest School. He received the degree of B.A. from Wabash College 
in 1909. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 285 

He was married August i, 1912, in Crawfordsville, Ind., to Miss Ruth 
Amanda Hesler of Crawfordsville, daughter of Benton F. Hesler and 
Emma Hesler. 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School Pegg entered 
the United States Forest Service as forest assistant with head- 
quarters in Arizona and New Mexico, where he worked on timber 
sales, both reconnaissance and operation. Since September, 
1912, he has been instructor in forestry at the University of 
Missouri. 

He is a member of the Friends' church. 

He has published: Woodlot for Central Indiana, Proc. Ind. 
Acad, of Sci., 19 10. 



Edward C. M. Richards 

Business address. Care Park Department of Borough of Queens, 

New York City 

Residence, 119 East Seventy-first Street, New York City 

Edward Carrington Mayo Richards was born September 2^,, 1886, in 
Elizabeth, N. J., the son of Howard Richards, a retired lawyer, and 
Harriet (Mayo) Richards. On his father's side he is the grandson of 
Benjamin W. Richards of Philadelphia, Pa., and on his mother's side 
he is the great-grandson of Edward Carrington Mayo, Yale 181 1, of 
Richmond, Va., and later of Elizabeth, N. J., and grandson of William C. 
Mayo, Yale 1852. He has one brother, Howard Richards, Jr., Yale '00 S., 
E.E. Columbia '03, and two sisters, Adeline Mayo and Sarah L. Mayo. 

He was prepared at the Gunnery, Lawrenceville and Salisbury schools, 
and in 1909 graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale, where 
he was a member of the Shefif Debating Society, of the Lawrenceville 
Club, of the University Swimming Team for three years and captain his 
Junior and Senior years, captain of the igio Freshman Swimming and 
Water Polo teams and of the University Water Polo Team his Junior and 
Senior years and president of the Intercollegiate Swimming Association. 

He is unmarried. 

Richards is forester to the Borough of Queens, New York 
City. He entered upon his present position June 10, 1912. After 
graduation he worked for a while with the Cloquet Lumber Com- 
pany, and later was district supervisor with the Pennsylvania 
Chestnut Blight Commission. 

He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church. 



286 YAT-K FORl-:ST SCHOOT. 

Abraham Rosenmond 

Business address, Hornblower & Weeks, 42 Broadway, New York City 
Residence, 7/ Lenox Avenue, Nezc York City 

Abraham Rosenmond was bom March 30, 1889, in Cincinnati, Ohio, the 
son of Samuel Rosenmond and Yetta (Eisner) Rosenmond. He has 
six brothers and sisters : Meyer H., David, Ray, Mollie, Edith and Nellie 
Rosenmond. 

He received the degree of B.S. from the College of the City of New 
York in 1909. 

He is unmarried. 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School Rosenmond 
entered the United States Forest Service as forest assistant. 
Since January 15. 191 2, he has been clerk in the firm of 
Hornblower & Weeks of New York City. 

He is a member of the Jew'ish synagogue. 



Harold L. Russell 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Appalachian Division, 
Washington, D. C. 

Residence. Radnor Avenue, Govans, Baltimore County, Md. 

Harold Louis Russell was born August 24, 1883, in Auburn, Cayuga 
County, N. Y., the son of L. Marcus Russell and Helen Minnis (Spoor) 
Russell. On his father's side he is of English, and on his mother's of 
English and German ancestry. His ancestors on both sides of the 
family were New York State farmers. He has a brother, Howard Wil- 
liam Russell, a graduate of the Y. M. C. A. Training School of Spring- 
field. Mass., now at the Y. M. C. A. in Detroit, Mich., and a sister. 
Bertha Louise Russell, a graduate of the Maryland State Normal School, 
now a teacher in Baltimore, Md. 

He attended the public schools of Baltimore, Md., graduated from the 
Maryland State Normal School in 1901 and from that time until 1004 
taught manual training in Annapolis, Md. From 1902 to 1906 he studied 
mechanical drawing with night classes at the Maryland Institute, Balti- 
more, Md., graduating in 1006; attended the Deichmann College Pre- 
paratory School, Baltimore, from 1904 to 1906; and in 1909 received the 
degree of B.A. from Johns Hopkins University. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduating from the Yale Forest School Russell has 
been employed in the United States Forest Service as forest 
assistant. From June to November, 191 1, he was stationed on 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 287 

Potomac Area; during November and December of 191 1 on 
Natural Bridge Area; from January to April, 1912, on Georgia 
Area; and from May, 1912, to the present time on Shenandoah 
Area, Maryland. 

He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



John W. Spencer 

Business address, Garniers, Fla. 
Home address, Emporia, Kans. 

John William Spencer was born December 4, 1887, in Cawker City, 
Kans., the son of Samuel SchafFer Spencer, a lawyer and formerly 
county attorney of Lyon County, Kansas, and Ida Florence (Zimmerman) 
Spencer. His father is the son of a Methodist minister and was born 
in Columbus, Ohio, being of German and Irish ancestry. His mother 
was born in Springfield, Ohio, and is of German descent. He has three 
sisters : Dorothy Spencer, a graduate of the Kansas State Normal School, 
Ruth and Louise Spencer; and two brothers: Robert and Ober Spencer. 

In 1909 he received the degree of B.A. from the College of Emporia, 
where he was manager of the college paper and annual and was a member 
of the debating team for three years. 

He was married April 28, 1912, in Cawker City, Kans., to Miss Blanche 
Olive Higley of Cawker City, daughter of Curt Mason Higley and Etta 
(Mayer) Higley. 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School Spencer entered 
the United States Forest Service as forest assistant. He writes : 
"Was engaged in cruising timber and surveying on Carson 
National Forest, New Mexico, during the summer and fall of 
191 1. Since then have been permanently assigned as assistant on 
Florida National Forest." 

In politics he is a Progressive Republican. He served two 
years (1906-07) in the Kansas National Guard and is a member 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 



Louis R. Stadtmiller 

Business address. Bureau of Forestry, Manila, P. I. 
Home address, 429 Atlantic Street, Stamford, Conn. 

Louis Roemmer Stadtmiller was born January 29, 1887, in New Haven, 
Conn., the son of Henry Roemer Stadtmiller, who took a special course 
in the Scientific School in 1879-80, a mechanical engineer, and Alice M. 



288 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

(Weckesser) Stadtmiller. He is of German ancestry, being the grandson 
on his father's side of L. R. Stadtmiller and on his mother's of L. 
Weckesser. He has three sisters : Alvina, Dorothy and Henrietta 
Stadtmiller. He has an uncle, Louis W. Stadtmiller who took a special 
course in the Sheffield Scientific School in 1879-80, and a cousin, Karl 
C. Stadtmiller, Yale '09 S. 

He was prepared at the Waterbury High School and in 1910 received 
the degree of Ph.B. from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale, where 
he was a member of Berzelius. 

He is unmarried. 

Stadtmiller is district forester in the United States Forest 
Service with headquarters at Manila, P. L He has held this 
appointment in the More district since August 12, 191 1. 

He is a member of the Army and Navy Club of Zamboanga 
and the Mindanao Club. 



J. Warrington Stokes 

Business address, United States Forest Service, St. Anthony, Idaho 
Home address, Holmesburg, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Joseph Warrington Stokes was born October 20, 1886, in Darlington 
Md., the son of Horace Stokes and Helen (Stokes) Stokes. He is the 
grandson on his father's side of Joseph Stokes and Mary (Warrington) 
Stokes of Morristown, N. J., and on his mother's of Samuel E. Stokes 
and Mary (Kempton) Stokes of Philadelphia, Pa. He has a sister, 
Elizabeth Kempton Stokes. 

He received the degree of B.S. in 1909 from Haverford (Pa.) College. 

He is unmarried. 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School Stokes entered 
the United States Forest Service as forest assistant with head- 
quarters in Ogden, Utah. He has lately been transferred to 
Targhee National Forest, St. Anthony, Idaho. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. 



Myron W. Thompson 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Cody, IVyo. 
Home address, Halifax, Mass. 

Myron Wood Thompson was born March 5, 1887, in Halifax. Mass., 
the son of Jabez P. Thompson, member of the Massachusetts state legis- 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 289 

lature three years and holder of various town offices, and Abbie Parker 
(Wood) Thompson. He has a brother, Clifford B. Thompson, B.S. 
Massachusetts Agricultural College '07, and two sisters : Helen L. 
Thompson, a graduate of Bridgewater (Mass.) Normal School, and 
Bertha A. Thompson. 

He was prepared at the Bridgewater (Mass.) High School and in 1909 
received the degree of B.S. from the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
where he was a member of Phi Sigma Kappa and various clubs and 
had four years of military drill, being adjutant his Senior year. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduating from the Forest School Thompson has been 
forest assistant in the United States Forest Service with head- 
quarters in Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming. He writes: 
"After leaving Texas in June, 191 1, traveled through the Middle 
West, arriving in Denver, Colo., on July i. Then went to Cody, 
Wyo., and have since been traveling over the country adjacent 
to the Yellowstone National Park on the east." 

He is a Progressive Republican. 

Robert E. Thompson 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Robert Elmer Thompson received the degree of B.S. at 
Michigan Agricultural College in 1910. He has not furnished 
any information for this record. 

Sidney H, Thompson 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Home address, 47 Summer Street, St. Johnshiiry, Vt. 

Sidney Hammond Thompson was born March 29, 1887, in Irasburg, 
Vt.. the son of Laforrest Holman Thompson (died in June, 1900) and 
Helen (Kinney) Thompson. His father was state's attorney in 1874-75, 
judge of probate in 1876 and 1881, twice a member of the Vermont 
state legislature, senator from Orleans County, Vt., in 1884, and judge 
of the supreme court from 1891 until his death. On his father's side he 
is of Scotch-Irish ancestry, being the grandson of Rev. Levi S. Thomp- 
son and Irene (Hodgkins) Thompson, and on his mother's side of Welsh 
and Scotch descent, the grandson of Hammond Kinney and Amanda 
(Edson) Kinney. He has two sisters : Margaret (Thompson) Sylvester 
and Helen (Thompson) Smith; and two brothers: Frank Button Thomp- 
19 



290 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

son, a graduate of the Boston Law School in 1899, and Philip Laforrest 
Thompson, B.S. Dartmouth '08, and C.E. '09. 

He received the degree of B.A. in 1909 from Dartmouth College, where 
he was a member of Phi Delta Theta and of Sphinx Senior Society. 

He was married October 3, 1912, in St. Johnsbury, Vt., to Miss Hortense 
Peters of St. Johnsbury, Vt., daughter of Dr. George Frederick Cheney 
and Emma (Smith) Peters Cheney. 

Since July i, 191 1, Thompson has been employed in the United 
States Forest Service as forest assistant with headquarters in 
Washington, D. C. He has been engaged in the examination of 
land under the Weeks law in West Virginia and Virginia. 

In politics he is a National Progressive. 



Charles H. Watzek 

Business address, Crossett Western Lumber Company, Wauna, Ore. 
Home address, 140/ Brady Street, Davenport, Iowa 

Charles Harlan Watzek was born July 3, 1887, in Davenport, Iowa, the 
son of John Wentzel Watzek and Helen Theresa (Harlan) Watzek. On 
his father's side he is of Austrian, and on his mother's of direct Puritan 
descent. He has two brothers : Aubrey Richardson Watzek, Yale '09, 
and John Whittier Watzek, Yale '13 S. 

He was prepared at the high school in Davenport, Iowa, and at 
Andover, and in 1910 graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School at 
Yale, where he was a member of Sigma Xi, of the Executive Board of 
the Sheff Y. M. C. A. and of the City Government Club. He also 
received general honors in his Junior year, was Class Deacon and Presi- 
dent of the Iowa Club and engaged in industrial work. 

His engagement has been announced. 

Watzek held various minor positions in southern yellow pine 
manufacturing lumber plants during 1911-12. He spent three 
months in the summer of 191 1 automobiling through England and 
Continental Europe. Since June i, 1912, he has been connected 
with the Big Creek Logging Company of Portland, Ore., as secre- 
tary and treasurer. In addition to this he has recently become 
secretary and treasurer and assistant manager of the Crossett 
Western Lumber Company of Wauna, Ore. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. He is Secretary 
of the Class of 191 1, Yale Forest School. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 291 

NoN Graduates 
Charles E. Beaumont 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Home address, Rocky Hill, Conn. 

Charles Elliott Beaumont was born September 13, 1886, in Rockville, 
Conn., the son of Charles Beaumont, who is engaged in the real estate 
business, and Ellen (Skinner) Beaumont. On his father's side he is 
of French ancestry, being the grandson of C. G. Beaumont and Mary 
(Pratt) Beaumont. His mother's ancestors came from England about 
1630 and settled in Windsor and Hartford. Her parents were L. T. 
Skinner and Mari (Wolcott) Skinner. He has two brothers: Clayton 
G. and Arthur L. Beaumont, and a sister, Bertha O. Beaumont. 

He was prepared at the New Haven High School and in 1909 received 
the degree of Ph.B. from Yale. 

He is unmarried. 

Beaumont writes : "In the summer of 1910 I had a position as 
field assistant in the United States Forest Service on Stanislaus 
National Forest, California. Was appointed forest assistant on 
the Pike National Forest, Colorado, from July i, 191 1, to Octo- 
ber I, 191 1. I was then transferred to the Appalachians and 
have been examining lands under the Weeks Law in Georgia, 
North and South Carolina." 

He is a member of the Congregational church and in politics 
is a Progressive. 



Roger B. Brig-gs 

Business address. Care New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 

Company, New Haven, Conn. 

Home address, Broad Street, Stratford, Conn. 

Roger Beach Briggs was born September 21, 1889, in Bridgeport, Conn., 
the son of Warren R. Briggs, director of the American Institute of 
Architects and president of the Connecticut Chapter, treasurer of the 
Architectural League of New York and author of "Modern American 
School Buildings," and Eliza (Hawley) Beach. His father's parents 
were E. E. and M. G. Briggs, and his mother's were George E. Beach 
and Mary A. (Edmund) Beach. He has a sister, Marjory Beach Crane. 

He attended the Connecticut Agricultural College in 1909, where he 
took part in athletics. 

He is unmarried. 



292 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

From January, 1910, to June, 1912, Briggs was employed by 
the American Tube & Stamping Company of Bridgeport, Conn, 
He then went to Vermont for three months on account of ill- 
health, at the end of which time he became inspector for the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company, his present 
position. 

He is a member of the Stratford Congregational Church and 
is also a member of the University Club of Bridgeport, Conn., 
and the Cupheag and Housatonic Yacht clubs of Stratford, Conn. 



Sydney F. Brown 

83 Prospect Street, Reading, Mass. 

Sydney Freeman Brown was born February 4, 1888, in Reading, Mass., 
the son of Charles Freeman Brown, formerly member of the Massa- 
chusetts House of Representatives and Senate and chairman of the 
District Republican Committee, and Elizabeth Anna (Harrison) Brown. 
On his father's side he is of English and Scotch, and on his mother's 
of English and Dutch ancestry. He has a sister, Gertrude C. (Brown) 
Pahlow, and a brother, Arthur H. Brown, B.S. Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology '99. 

He was prepared at the public schools in Reading, Mass., and at 
Phillips Andover and in 1910 received the degree of Ph.B. from Yale, 
where he was a member of Chi Phi and of the Andover and Corin- 
thian Yacht clubs. He also rowed on the 191 1 Sophomore Crew and 
in his Senior year was a member of the Sheff Student Council and of 
the Class Book Historian Committee. 

He is unmarried. 

Brown writes : "Worked in a printing house from the summer 
of 1910 to the spring of 191 1 and from this time until the fall of 
1912 with Little, Brown & Company, book publishers. Am now 
with the Oxford County Orcharding Company of South Paris, 
Maine, as treasurer and general manager. We have an apple 
orchard of about one thousand trees, of which five hundred are 
in bearing, and in addition have over a hundred acres of orchard 
land and great possibilities. Expect to be in the apple business 
until demented or otherwise incapacitated." 

Concerning politics he writes : "Am a member of the Republi- 
can party in general, but will vote the Democratic national ticket 
this year." He is ajiiember of the Meadow Brook Golf Club. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 293 

Philip L. Buttrick 

Business address. Care of J. S. Holmes, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Home address, Orange, Conn. 

Philip Laurence Buttrick was born June 25, 1886, in New Haven, Conn., 
the son of Willis Nathan Buttrick, a descendant of William Buttrick of 
England who settled in Concord, Mass., about 1630, and Mary Willian 
(Cannon) Buttrick, descended from French Huguenots who settled in 
America about 1680. He has a brother, Nathan LeGrand Buttrick. 

He was prepared at the New Haven High School, spent two years 
with the Class of '09 S., from 1909 to 191 1 .did special work at the Sheffield 
Scientific School at Yale and in 1910-11 was in the Forest School. He 
worked for a short time before entering the Forest School for the Great 
Northern Paper Company. 

He is unmarried. 

After leaving the Forest School Buttrick became forest assist- 
ant in the United States Forest Service and later was forester 
for the Lanphere Heinrich Company. In June, 1912, he w^as 
appointed field agent for the New Haven Anti-Mosquito Com- 
mittee, Inc. Since November i, 19 12, he has been engaged in 
the commercial and silvicultural survey of the chestnut for the 
State Geological Survey of North Carolina. 

In politics he is "Independent with Democratic leanings." 
He has published: List of birds of New Haven, Section on 
water birds, Publications of the New Haven Bird Club, New 
Haven, May, 1908 ; and Effects of fire on trees and reproduction 
in southern New England, For. Quart., June, 1912. 



Charles H. Edwards 

Business address. Bishop, Calif. 

Home address, 169 Montezuma, Houghton, Mich. 

United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

Charles Herbert Edwards was born August 11, 1885, in Houghton, 
Mich., the son of James P. Edwards and Agnes M. (Mulvey) Edwards. 
On his father's side he is of English, and on his mother's of Irish ances- 
try. He has a brother, Richard J. Edwards, a graduate of Michigan 
Agricultural College and the University of Wisconsin. 

He received the degree of B.S. from the Michigan Agricultural Col- 
lege in 1909. He was registered at the Yale Forest School ia 1910-11. 

He is unmarried. s. 



294 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Edwards entered the United States Forest Service in August, 
1909, as forest guard, and later as forest agent on Kootenai 
National Forest, Libby, Mont., and in April, 1910, was appointed 
assistant ranger. He had charge for a time of a timber reconnais- 
sance crew on Helena National Forest and in 191 1 was a member 
of a similar crew^ on Deerlodge National Forest, Montana. On 
October i, 191 1, he became forest assistant and since 1912 has 
been stationed on Inyo National Forest, California. 

He is a member of the Roman Catholic church and belongs to 
the American Forestry Association. 



W. Irving Gilson 

Business address, East Lansing, Mich. 
Home address, 59 North Main Street, Adrian, Mich. 

W. Irving Gilson was born February 2y, 1888, at Deerfield, Mich., the 
son of William Gilson, a farmer, and Catherine E. (Rowland) Gilson. 
His father's parents were Cornelius Gilson, son of a New York farmer, 
and Esther Gilson, daughter of a Pennsylvania farmer. His mother 
was the daughter of Charles E. Rowland, who studied at Cincinnati 
Medical College, formerly of New York State, and Emily Rowland, 
daughter of a Pennsylvania farmer. Re has a brother, Clarence Gil- 
son, and a sister, Alice Gilson. 

He received the degree of B.S. from Michigan Agricultural College in 
1910. His summers were spent in farming until 1909, after which they 
were spent in the United States Forest Service. Re was registered at 
the Yale Forest School during the fall term, 1910-11. 

Re is unmarried. 

Gilson served as forest assistant in the United States Forest 
Service during the summer of 1910. On January i, 191 1, he 
left the Forest School and became instructor of forestry at the 
Michigan Agricultural College, his present position. He has 
spent his summers as forest assistant in the Forest Service. He 
writes: "During summer of 191 1 was stationed on Jemez 
National Forest, New Mexico, and in September took a trip 
through the Grand Canon. In December, 191 1, went with Sen- 
ior students to the lumber camp at Millville, Ark., and thence to 
New Orleans. Taught a course in field methods at the Forestry 
Summer School, Vanderbilt, Mich., in June, 1912." 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 295 

He is a member of the Methodist church. Concerning- politics 
he writes : "My poHtics are uncertain now, but because of my 
interest in forestry I am in favor of men as poHtical leaders 
who are most interested in conservation policies." He is a member 
of the Masonic Order, the Highland Teachers Club of East 
Lansing, Mich., and of the Athenaeum Literary Society. 



Richard H. Goode 

Business address, 382 Atlantic Avenue, Boston, Mass. 
Home address, 30 Brastow Avenue, Somerville, Mass. 

Richard Henry Goode was born September 11, 1883, in Boston, Mass., 
the son of Richard Young Goode, mana/ger and partner in the firm of 
A. Wheeler & Company, dealers in paints, and Mary Anne Goode. His 
father has held the positions of ward alderman and alderman-at-large of 
Somerville, Mass., vice president of the Somerville Board of Trade, 
master of the American Order of Union Workers and member of the 
official board of the Methodist Episcopal church and is a Mason and an 
Odd Fellow. He has a sister, Eva M. Goode, who attended Dr. Sar- 
gent's Physical Culture School for Girls, and two brothers, W. T. 
Goode, salesman of paints, bronze, etc., and A. J. Goode, wholesale 
jeweller. 

He was prepared at the Somerville (Mass.) Latin School and in 
1907 received the degree of B.A. from Dartmouth College. In 1908 he 
taught grammar school and was tree doctor of Somerville and in 1909 
he was athletic director of Middlebury College and did some tree 
doctoring. He was registered in the Yale Forest School in 1909-10. 

He is unmarried. 

Goode was forest assistant in the United States Forest Service 
for six months in 191 1, after which he resigned. He has since 
held the positions of draftsman for the Northern Contracting 
Company of Atlanta, Ga., consulting forester and land agent in 
Atlanta, lumper and tally-man for the A. T. Stearns Lumber 
Company of Neponset, fire damage reporter for Fisher & Bryant 
of Boston, Mass., and has done rough surveying in Georgia. On 
June 12, 1912, he was appointed assistant supervisor in utilization 
of the Pennsylvania State Chestnut Tree Blight Commission. He 
has lately opened an office in Boston and is prepared to handle 
appraisals, maps, legal rights, operating and market advice, fire 



296 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

damage and forestry work of all kinds. In 1912 he received the 
degree M.S.F. from the Universit}^ of Michigan. 
He has written several newspaper articles. 



Raymond W. Gowdy 

Thompsonville, Conn. 

Raymond Willis Gowdy was born July 20, 1889, in Thompsonville, 
Conn., the son of Willis and Nellie (Peters) Gowdy. 

He was prepared at Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H., and received the 
degree of Ph.B. at Yale in 1910. He attended the Forest School during 
1910-11. 

He is unmarried. 

Gowdy spent the winter of 1912-13 on his grapefruit farm 
at Santa Barbara, Isle of Pines, Cuba. 



James H. Hull 

Business address, Targhee National Forest, St. Anthony, Idaho 
S15 South Main Street, Torrington, Conn. 

James Howard Hull was born September 20, 1881, in Southington, 
Conn., the son of Lewis C. Hull and Frances Reynolds (Hinman) Hull. 
His father is the son of Daniel Hull of Southington, Conn., and a 
descendant of Richard Hull, who settled in New Haven Colony in 1636. 
His mother's family lived in New Haven, Conn. He has seven brothers : 
Albert W. Hull, B.A. Yale '05 and Ph.D. '09, Daniel Raymond Hull, Ph.B. 
Yale '11, Edwin L., Walter H., Caleb S., Thomas G., Yale '13 S., and 
John B. Hull. 

In 1907 he received the degree of B.A. from Yale and was registered 
in the Forest School during 1909-10. 

He is unmarried. 

Hull entered the United States Forest Service in July, 1910, 
as forest guard with headquarters on Nezperce National Forest, 
Idaho. In July, 191 1, he became field assistant and forest ranger 
on Boise National Forest, Idaho, and since July, 1912, he has 
been forest assistant, being stationed at present on Targhee 
National Forest, Idaho. 

Concerning politics he writes : "I try to vote for men of 
good principles and sound judgment, but I don't like to subscribe 
to any political creed now existing. Such creeds are seldom free 
from idiotic derisible fallacies !" He is a Mason. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 297 

John Lautz 

Business address, Munson Steamship Line, 82 Beaver Street, 

New York City 

Home address, 384 DeWolfe Place, Hackensack, N. J. 

John Lautz was born March 3, 1888, in Buffalo, N. Y., the son of 
Martin F. Lautz and Elizabeth Marie (Bank) Lautz. He has a brother, 
Martin W. Lautz, 

He was prepared at the Master Park High School, Buffalo, N. Y., and 
afterwards attended Colgate University. In 1910 he received the degree 
of Ph.B. from Yale, where he was a member of Delta Upsilon. 

He was married July 14, 1910, in Syracuse, N. Y., to Miss Laura Lyon 
Tobin of Syracuse, daughter of William N. Tobin and Teresa Frances 
(Lyon) Tobin. They had a daughter, Laura Lautz, born August 9, 1911, 
in Flemington, N. J., who died December 19, 191 1, in New York City. 

In the year 1910-11 Lautz was engaged in farming and in 191 1 
in selling pottery. Since February i, 19 12, he has been clerk in 
the Cuban department of the Munson Steamship Line, New- 
York City. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church and in politics is Non- 
partisan, against Roosevelt and for free trade. 



Elmer B. Mason 

Business address. Bureau of Entomology, Washington, D. C. 
Residence, 926 B Street, S. W., Washington, D. C. 

Elmer Brown Mason was born September 30, 1880, in Deer Lodge, 
Mont., the son of Captain Roswell Henry Mason, surveyor general of 
Montana, captain in the 72d Illinois in the Civil War and recorder of 
the Illinois Commandery of the Loyal Legion, and Mary (Brown) 
Mason of Rome, N. Y. His grandfather was the Hon. R. B. Mason, 
mayor of Chicago at the time of the Chicago fire and builder of the 
Illinois Central Railroad. He is of French and English ancestry. He 
has a brother, Roy M. Mason, B.A. Yale '02. 

He prepared at the University School in Chicago, and abroad. He 
attended Yale College from 1898 to 1900. He received the degree of B.A. 
from Princeton in 1903 and before entering the Yale Forest School was 
engaged in the real estate business, in literary work and in lumbering. 
He was registered at the Yale Forest School from 1909 to 1910. 

He' is unmarried. 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



Since leaving the Forest School Mason has been entomological 
assistant in the branch of forest insects of the LTnited States 
Bureau of Entomology, in charge of the South Atlantic and Gulf 
states. He writes : "Was in charge of forest insect field station 
at Spartanburg, S. C, from August 20. 191 1, until the closing of 
the station. December 15, 191 1. Went there as last man and came 
away in charge. Since then have been engaged in editorial and 
investigating work in Washington with frequent trips through 
the Scmth and attendance at meetings of various kinds to speak 
on the southern pine beetle." 

In politics Mason is a Democrat. He served in the Spanish 
War as second lieutenant of Company B of Colonel Koch's regi- 
ment of United States Provisional Volunteers. He is a member of 
the Princeton Club and of the Society of Economic Entomology. 

He has published stories in various magazines, sixty-eight arti- 
cles in newspapers, and forty-nine addresses delivered from New 
Orleans to Raleigh, N. C, in lumber journals and newspapers, 
and an address before Forestry Convention at Raleigh, N. C, 
published as bulletin of North Carolina Geological and Economic 
Survey. 



Harry Olin 

Rush City, Minn. 

Harry Olin was horn Ang:ust 21, 1887, in Okemos. Mich., the son 
of John Henry Olin. a merchant, and Eva (Tyler) Olin. His father is 
of Welsh ancestry and has been city treasurer and a member of the 
school board. 

He was prepared at the Okemos (Mich.) High School and in igio 
received the degree of B.S. from Michigan Agricultural College, where 
he was a member of Phi Delta. 

He was married August 21, 191 1, in Lansing. Mich., to Miss Clara 
Mary Brisbin of Lansing, daughter of Frank C. Brisbin (died in 1889). 

Since September, 191 1, Olin has been an instructor in agri- 
culture at the Rush City (Minn.) High School. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church and also of the 
Masonic Order and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 299 

Earl S. Peirce 

Business address, Denver, Colo. 
Home address, Frankfort, Maine 

Earl Stanley Peirce was born Septen'.ber 26, 1887, in Frankfort, Maine, 
the son of George Peirce and Emma (Patten) Peirce. He is of English 
ancestry. He has a brother, Albert Peirce, and two sisters: Ruth Peirce 
and Christine Peirce, B.A. Vassar '07. 

He was prepared at Peekskill (N. Y.) Military Academy and at Phil- 
lips Andover, where he was a member of Phi Delta Sigma, and in igoQ 
received the degree of Ph.B. from Yale, where he was a member of 
Chi Phi. He was registered at the Forest School during 1909-10. 

He is unmarried. 

On July I, 1910, Peirce was appointed forest assistant in the 
United States Forest Service, being stationed on Bighorn 
National Forest, Wyoming. In January, 191 3, he was trans- 
ferred to the district office at Denver as deputy forest supervisor. 
In April he returned to the Bighorn National Forest. 

He is a member of the Unitarian church. 



Archer E. Roberts 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Yreka, Calif. 
97 Fern Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Archer Egbert Roberts was born December 17, 1883, in New York 
City, the son of John Thompson Roberts and Carrie (Egbert) Roberts. 
He has a sister, Mrs. Henry F. Stoll. 

He was prepared at Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn. 

He is unmarried. 

From November, 1910, to May, 191 1, Roberts was a tutor in 
Aiken, S. C. He entered the United States Forest Service in 
July, 191 1, and was located in Sandpoint, Idaho, until October, 
191 1. Since May, 1912, he has been stationed at Yreka, Calif. 



Kurt Roehrs 

Roswell, N. Mex. 

Kurt Roehrs was born January 2, 1885, in Jersey City, N. J., the son 
of Julius Roehrs and Margaret (Schroeder) Roehrs. 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



He was prepared at Stevens School and at Stevens Institute of 
Technologj'^ and in 1910 received the degree of Ph.B. from Yale. 

He w^as married December 18, 1912, in Roswell, N. Mex., to Miss 
Fern Leta Olp of Lake Geneva, Wis., daughter of H. C. Olp. 

Roehrs is at present engaged in agriculture in Roswell, 
N. Mex. 

Robert Stephenson 

22 Bank Street, New York City 

Robert Stephenson was born August 9, 1887, in Tabor, N. J., the son 
of William Pritchard Stephenson and Sarah Anne (Hawks) Stephenson. 
He is of English ancestry and his mother's ancestors were Quakers. 

He attended Rutgers College two years and in 1909 received the degree 
of B.A. from Columbia University, where he was a member of Delta 
Upsilon. He was registered at the Yale Forestry School during 1909-10. 

He is unmarried. 

From June 15, 1910, to April 12, 191 1, Stephenson was field 
assistant in the United States Forest Service and from May i, 
191 1, to February 6, 1912, he was connected with the Laurentide 
Paper Company, forestry division. He was employed by the 
state forester of Connecticut from February 12 to May 21, 191 2, 
and was assistant topographer of the Yale Peruvian Expedition, 
May 13, 191 2, to Febrtiary 13, 191 3. 



Frederick W. Toerner 

758 East i6oth Street, New York City 

Frederick William Toerner was born March 9, 1882, in New 
York City. He received the degree of B.A. from the College 
of the City of New York in 1902 and was an ex-member of the 
class of 1910, Sheffield Scientific School. He attended the Yale 
Forest School in 1909-10. He has furnished no information for 
this record. 

Richard W. Walker 

Glenmore, Pa. 

Richard Washington Walker was born February 22, 1864, in Chester 
County, Pa., the son of Samuel Lafayette Walker and Ann Aurelia 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 191 1 301 

(Strickland) Walker. His father's parents were Richard Walker, son 
of Captain William Walker, and Sarah (Henderson) Walker, and his 
mother's were Jesse C. Strickland, M.D., and Martha (WoUerton) 
Strickland, daughter of William WoUerton and Rebecca (Harvey) Wol- 
lerton. He has a sister, Anna Martha Walker, B.A. Bryn Mawr '95 and 
M.A. Leland Stanford, Jr., University '01. 

He received the degree of C.E. from Lehigh University in 1884 and 
was a graduate student in education at Leland Stanford, Jr., University 
from January 9 to April 18, 1906, and from January to June, 1907. He 
was registered at the Yale Forest School during 1909-11. 

He was married October 3, 1899, in Washington, D. C, to Miss Olivia 
Virginia Durnall, daughter of Milton Durnall, M.A., and Phoebe Ann 
(Baily) Durnall. 

Walker writes : "Was temporary aide for the United States 
Coast and Geodetic Survey during the summers of 1882 and 1883, 
and from June to November, 1884, was employed on primary 
triangulation in Pennsylvania. Was assistant engineer in Guate- 
malan Boundary Survey with Mexico from December i, 1884, to 
May 12, 1896; assistant engineer in Darien Survey under Isth- 
mian Canal Commission from December i, 1899, to June 4, 1900; 
draftsman in United States Coast and Geodetic Survey from 
November 26, 1900, to April, 1901, and magnetic observer after- 
wards in Washington, D. C, until April i, 1903. From May 21, 
1906, to January 13, 1907, served as forest student in the United 
States Forest Service in California and from July to September, 
1908, traveled with my wife in the Yosemite Valley, California. 
Was field assistant on Colorado National Forest from July i 
to September 15, 191 1." 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church and in politics is 
a Republican. He is a member of the National Geographic 
Society. 



3o: VAT.l' F(^R1-:ST SCITOOT. 



CLASS OF K)ij 
Gkaduatks HOLiUNc; ni\;Ki:K of M.F. 

William R. Barbour 

Ihisiitiss luidri-ss, Andrews, N. C. 
Hotnr iiddrcss. ^\) Hydi' Arniuc, Kid^r^vay. /\i. 

William Richard n.ulKuir was Ihmu Jum- o. iSix\ in Ridgway, Pa., the 
son of William Washington Harlu>ur and Helen (.Litt't'^ Harbour. On 
his father's side he is of Scotoh-lrish, and on his mother's of ImirUsIi 
descent. His father was at difVerent times a school teacher, a professor 
of mathematics and a lawyer. He has two brothers: Dana Little Barbour, 
a student at Cornell, and I'arroll Hattlett narbour. and one sister, l.ucy 
Elizabeth Barbour. 

He was prepared at the high school in Riilgway, Pa., and graduated 
from .\ndover Academy in uhv'^. In ion he gr.ulnatcd from the Shet^eld 
Scientific School at Yale. 

He is imm.uried. 

Harlnnir i.s ft>rost assistant in the rnitoil States InM'ost Service 
with heailqiiartors at .\tulre\vs, N. L\ lie has heeii in the Serviee 
since July i. 191 J. lie writes: "Since the etui of spring term of 
school, which was spent at Crossett. .\rk., have hecn workinj:^ 
for the Forest Service in the Smoky Mountains in the extreme 
sonthwestern part of North Carolina, at the head of Nantahala 
River, in llierokeo atul Macoti counties. This area is known as 
'Nantahala.' Am eni;ai;e(.l in reconnaissance work (examination 
of lamls proposed for sale to tlie s^overninent V lliis is a tine 
country, altitude hcins^- from 4.5CXI to 6,000 feet. vcr\ Itealthy. but 
hard to travel. No railroads close, rc^ads poor. The timber is 
mostly virgin, consistitij;- of chestnut, oaks, hickory, popl.ir and 
hemlock. The rej^ion will tnake oi\e of the best reserves in the 
East. About thirty tlu>nsand acres are now taken uj^ by the 
{government." 

He is a member of tlie rrcsbvlerian church. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1912 303 

Victor A. Beede 

Business address, Care Forest Service, Pike National Forest, Denver, 

Colo. 
423 Temple Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Victor Augustus Beede was born December 9, 1886. in East Braintree, 
Mass., the son of Frank Herbert Beede, Yale '83, superintendent of 
public schools. New Haven, Conn., and Caroline May (Coan) Beede. 
On his father's side he is of Welsh, and on his mother's of English 
ancestry. He has one sister, Faustina Knowlton Beede. 

He was prepared at the New Haven High School and at Hopkins 
Grammar School, New Haven, and served one winter in Porto Rico as 
apprentice in the Red "D" steamship office. In 1910 he graduated from 
Tale College, where he was a member of Zeta Psi. 

He was married June 26, 1912, in Woodmont, Conn., to Miss Ella 
Small of New Haven, Conn., daughter of Charles Small and Adeline 
(Kiefer) Small. 

For several months after graduation Beede traveled in Europe 
and in the late fall of 1912 became forester and assistant secretary 
for the Massachusetts Forestry Association. He is now in the 
Government Service, being stationed on the Pike National Forest, 
Denver, Colo. 

He is Secretary of the Class of 1912, Yale Forest School. 



Henry J. Bothfeld 

450 Oznngton Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Henry Julius Bothfeld was born August 30, 1886, in Bay Ridge. N. Y., 
the son of F. Otto Bothfeld, who is in the commission business in New 
York City, and Clara (Heiniglse) Bothfeld. He has a brother and a 
sister: Rudolf Otto Bothfeld and Anna M. M. Bothfeld. 

He was prepared at the Polytechnic Preparatory School, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., and spent four years at the Connecticut Agricultural College, 
receiving the degree of B.S. in 1910. 

He is unmarried. 

From November, 1912, to January, 1913, Bothfeld completed 
the field work for a working plan of the lands of the New Haven 
Water Company under the management of the Forest School. A 
bulletin on this work is to be issued shortly. 



>M YAIK FORVvST SCHOOL 

Lc^ie A. Bull 

Lcs.Uc Aviiixistus Bull WAS N^m .\«g\»st ^4- iJ^ in Carlisle, M«s&. the 
SvM\ of Sidney A, Rull a>\d LuelU Meserve <,C;an«\^ Bull, He has a 
sistifr. Leila Sawyer Bull, and a luvther. Albert Sidney Bull, Dartnwuth 

He rxveiveii the degree ot B.A, in loio frv>m Dartmouth Colleg*, whew 
he was a member of Si^rma Alalia Ep^loa. 
He is unmarrievi. 

Bull is a jxirtHcr in iho t\nn ot Hull ^S: Hitchcock, private 
foresters, of Billerica. Mass. 

Ho is a memlKr of iho Cotis^roiianonal church and in ^x>litics 
is a Republican. 

Clifford Cole 

^41 J East TH'^Hty-^f^-^Hth Strfft. KattSdiS City. M>.\ 

aiffvTnl Cole was b<>m iVK^ber J5. iJ^ in Winona. Minn., the son 
of Harry J. Cole and Abby (Fai'vhild') Cv^le. He is of Faxglish ancestry. 

He rtveiYi\l the de^tree of R..\. in 1010 frvMn Kansas St.ue I'niversity, 
where he \v.is a member of Phi Kapivi Psi. 

He is unmarried. 

Cole entereil the United States Forest Service Aui^iist 10. tot -J, 
as forest assistant on Plumas National Forest. ^Juincy. Calif., 
and remained in this jx'ksition three ttionths. He is at present 
engaged m the red ostaio business in British Columbia. 



.\lc\;n\dor ^^^ Podi^o 

.\lexander William rXxlge was N^rn .Vus^st i. iSi^ in \ .lUuraiso, 
Chile. South .-Vmerioa. the son of the Rev. William F„ Dod,«, pastor of 
Westminster Presbyterian Ch»\rch in Pasadena. Calif., and of I'nion 
Church, \■al^^araiso. Chile, and Julia Harriett C^ """l^"''^ IXnlife, On his 
father's side his STandtather was Alexander W. IXxUre and his srand- 
mother's maiden name was Shatter, l^oth of these jjrandiwrents lived in 
Michigan. He is the grjmdson on his mother's side of David Trujnbull and 
Harriett (.Pit'-'h'* Trumbull of New Haven. Conn. He has two sisters: 
Anita Trumbull Dodge and Elixabeth Trumbull Dod^e. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1912 305 

He was prepared at the Pasadena High School and in 1910 received 
the degree of B.S. from Oregon Agricultural College, where he had 
two years of military drill and was on the non-commissioned staff, color 
sergeant of the First Regiment. 

He is unmarried. 

Dodge is eng-aged in orange-growing in Pasadena. 
He is a member of the Westminster Presbyterian Church of 
Pasadena, CaHf. 



Bruce J. Downey 

Business address, Fosburgh Lumber Company, Vaughn, N. C. 
Home address, Alexandria, Va. 

Bruce Johnson Downey was born December 23, 1888, in Alexandria, 
Va., the son of John Johnson Downey and Rose E. (Hoblitzell) Downey. 

He graduated at the Virginia Military Institute in 1909. He was a 
member of the Lambda Sigma chapter of Theta Nu Epsilon. 

He is unmarried. 

Since July i, 1912, Downey has been forester for the Fosburgh 
Lumber Company at Vaughn, N. C. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. 



Carleton W. Eaton 

Business address, Espanola, N. Mex. 
Home address, Calais, Maine 

Carleton Whidden Eaton was born September 2, 1887, in Calais, Maine, 
the son of Albion Horace Eaton, a lumber and box shook manufacturer, 
and Annie (MacCullough) Whidden. His grandparents were Charles H. 
Eaton and Sarah (Keith) Eaton and Charles R. Whidden and Frances 
(Smith) Whidden. He has two brothers and a sister: Horace Emerson 
Eaton, a graduate of Colgate Academy; Albion Keith Eaton, a graduate 
of Phillips Exeter, now attending Bowdoin; and Frances Eaton, a 
graduate of Burnham School, now attending Smith College. 

He took three years at the Calais (Maine) High School and two 
years at Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H. He entered the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology but only remained one year. In 1910 he received 
the degree of B.A. at Bowdoin College, where he was a member of Psi 
Upsilon. 

He is unmarried. 



3o6 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Since graduation from the Yale Forest School Eaton has 
served as forest guard and forest assistant. He is at present 
in District 3, being located at Espanola, N. Mex. 

He is a Progressive in politics. 



Walter M. Geddes 

Home address, 90 Christopher Street, Montclair, N. J. 

Walter Mackintosh Geddes was born November 13, 1885, in Newark, 
N. J., the son of Alexander Geddes (deceased) and Susan Isabel (Baker) 
Geddes. On his father's side he is of Scotch, and on his mother's of 
English ancestry. His father left the University of Edinburgh when 
twenty years of age to go to Asia Minor as construction engineer for 
the MacAndrews & Forbes Company, manufacturers of licorice, and 
at the close of our Civil War he came to the United States to open an 
American agency for this company. He has one sister, Isabel Mary 
Geddes, M.D. Women's Medical College, and one brother, William 
Lascelles Geddes. He had two other sisters, now deceased, Susan Baker 
Geddes, M.D. Cornell '02, and Rose Geddes. 

He was a student for a year at Stevens Institute of Technology, 
Hoboken, N. J., and before entering Yale spent five years in Saskatche- 
wan, Canada, and Montana, ranching, and in traveling abroad. In 191 1 
he graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale, where he was 
a member of Theta Xi and of the Yale University Club. 

He was married October 13, 1912, in Denver, Colo, to Miss Rebekah 
Virginia Botsford of Denver, Colo., daughter of Edward Pottle Botsford. 

On graduation Geddes became a solicitor for Peters, Byrne & 
Company, tree surgeons of Pittsburgh, Pa. He recently resigned 
this position to go with the MacAndrews & Forbes Company. 
He writes : "I have accepted a position with the MacAndrews & 
Forbes Company, manufacturers of licorice, and former subsi- 
diary company of the American Tobacco Company. I sail in 
about three months for Asia Minor, where I shall be assigned 
to some station in Syria ; probably Aleppo, about 100 miles inland 
from Alexandretta. There I shall endeavor to pick up expe- 
rience that will fit me for the buying and collection of licorice 
root for the western branch of the trade. I expect to be located 
in that part of Asia for at least three years, at the end of which 
time, — should I survive the Terrible Turk and other vermin, — 
I shall in all probability return to the States in the employ of 
the Company here. In a way, I might be called an underground 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1912 307 

forester. The time before I sail will be spent in New York, 
where Mrs. Geddes and I will attempt the study of Arabic. If 
we master that tongue, I shall consider it some conquest : the 
memory I have of the jargon is an impression that resembles the 
footprints of a herd of chickens on a wet day." 

Norton M. Goodyear 

Business address, Crossett Lumber Company, Crossett, Ark. 
Home address, Carlisle, Pa. 

Norton Miller Goodyear was born December 9, 1889, in Carlisle, Pa., 
the son of Jacob M. Goodyear, sheriff of Cumberland County, Pa., and 
Ellen C. (Miller) Goodyear. He is of German ancestry. He has six 
brothers : Samuel M., William H., Fiske, Frank J., John J. and Charles 
A. Goodyear, a graduate of the Damrosch School of Music, New York, 
and two sisters : Mary Anne Goodyear and Carrie C. Goodyear. 

He was prepared at CarHsle (Pa.) High School and received the 
degree of B.S.F. from Pennsylvania State College in 191 1. 

He is unmarried. 

From June, 19 12, to February, 191 3, Goodyear was district 
manager of the Pennsylvania Chestnut Blight Commission with 
headquarters in Oil City, Pa. He is now with the Crossett 
Lumber Company, Crossett, Ark., and expects to follow the 
lumber business in the future. 

He is a member of the Lutheran church and is a Mason. 



Albert W. Hayward 

Business address, Box 84, Dover, Idaho 
Home address, 134 Bridge Avenue, Davenport, Iowa 

Albert Wyman Hayward was born August 30, 1888, in Eagle Mills. Ark., 
the son of Cassius David Hayward, a lumberman, and Emma Louise 
(Wyman) Hayward. He is the grandson on his father's side of Albert 
James Hayward and Mary (Frisbie) Hayward of Willsborough, N. Y., 
and on his mother's side of Daniel Wyman and Anna (Phelps) Wyman. 
He has a brother, Eugene G. Hayward. 

He was prepared at the Davenport (Iowa) High School and in 1910 
received the degree of Ph.B. from Grinnell College. 

He is unmarried. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. At Yale he 
was elected to Book and Bond Fraternity. 



3oS YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Henry J. Hegel 

Business address, Bogalusa, La. 

Home address, 148 Sherman Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 

Box 1843, y^ile Station, Xezv Haven, Conn. 

Henry John Hegel was born February 6, 1889, in New Haven, 
Conn., the son of Henry John Hegel and Caroline Charlotte (Litterest) 
Hegel. He is of German ancestry. He prepared at the Hartford and 
New Haven High schools and in 191 1 graduated from the Sheffield 
Scientific School at Yale, where he was a member of Alpha Sigma Phi. 

He is unmarried. 

Hegel has been in the employ of the Great Southern Lumber 
Company of Bogalusa, La., since June 15, 1912. He has acted 
at different times as edging inspector, green sorter chain foreman, 
timber block assistant foreman, clerk in superintendent's office, 
pond foreman, lumber inspector and checker, and looking up 
shortages for the shipping department. 

He is an Episcopalian. 

Thomas F. Heineman 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Hailey, Idaho 
Home address, Hamburg, Erie County, N. F. 

Thomas Frederick Heineman was born July 22, 1886, in McCune, Kans., 
the son of Fred William Heineman and Martha Ann (Lovelady) Heine- 
man. On his father's side he is of German, and on his mother's of 
English ancestry. He has a brother, William Heineman. 

He received the degree of B.A. from Oberlin College in 1910. 

His engagement has been announced. 

Heineman entered the United States Forest Service August 
20, 1912, as forest assistant with headquarters on Payette 
National Forest, Emmett, Idaho. In 1913 he was transferred 
to Sawtooth National Forest, Hailey, Idaho. 

He" is a member of the First Congregational Church of Oberlin, 
Ohio. 

Charles F. Hitchcock 

Gilbertville, Mass. 

Charles Frederick Hitchcock was born August 30, 1885, in Gilbertville, 
Mass., the son of Frederick Abner Hitchcock, son of Charles Foster, and 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1912 309 

Clara Mary (Packard) Hitchcock, daughter of Otis Packard. He has a 
brother, Harold M. Hitchcock, and a sister, Ruth H. Hitchcock. 

He was prepared at Williston Seminary and in 1910 graduated from 
Dartmouth College with the degree of B.S. 

He is unmarried. 

Hitchcock is a consulting forester in Gilbertville, Mass. 



Jacob S. Kaplan 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Home address, 54 East ii8th Street, New York City 

Jacob Sidney Kaplan was born January 25, 1891, in New York City, 
the son of Herman M. Kaplan and Annie (Freedenberg) Kaplan. He 
has three brothers : Montague L., Manassat and William M. Kaplan ; 
and a sister, Mildred Kaplan. 

He received the degree of B.S. in 1910 from the College of the City 
of New York, where he was a member of Omega Pi Chi. 

He is unmarried. 

Upon graduation from the Yale Forest School Kaplan became 
connected with the Great Southern Lumber Company of Boga- 
lusa, La. In the fall of 1912 he entered the United States Forest 
Service as forest assistant on Nantahala area, his present 
position, with headquarters at Andrews, N. C. 



John H. Keyes 

Business address, Blue Ridge, Ga. 
Home address, 8 Webster Street, Brookline, Mass. 

John Humphrey Keyes was born July 9, 1890, in Keene, N. H., the 
son of Herbert Willis Keyes, manager of the Metropolitan Storage 
Warehouse, Cambridge, Mass., and Harriet Maria (Humphrey) Keyes. 
His father's parents were from New England. He has a sister, Helen 
Agnes Keyes, and a brother, Robert Eugene Keyes, B.S. Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology '07. 

In 191 1 he received the degree of B.A. from Amherst College, where 
he was a member of Phi Kappa Psi and Phi Beta Kappa. 

He is unmarried. 

On July I, 1912, Keyes became forest assistant in the United 
States Forest Service with headquarters at Old Fort, N. C. In 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



April, 1913. he was transferred to the Georg;ia area, with head- 
quarters at Bkie Ridge, Ga. 

He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church and of the 
National Geographic Society. 

Raymond M. Killey 

Business address. Box 105, Traverse City, Mich. 
Home address, Viz'iati. IV. J\i. 

Raymond Marshall Killey was born October 4, iSSg, in Pearisburg, Va., 
the son of Dr. Philip Henry Killey and Eliza Byrnside (Clark) Killey. 
His fathers parents were English and his mother's Virginians. 

His early life was spent in West Virginia and in 1908 he received the 
degree of B.A. from Roanoke College, where he was a member of Pi 
Kappa Alpha and Theta Nu Epsilon. Before entering the Yale Forest 
School he worked a year for the Peerless Coal Company. 

He is unmarried. 

On June 17, 1912. Killey was appointed assistant superintend- 
ent of the Ohio Wood Preserving Company of Orrville, Ohio. 
He is still connected with this firm, but is also interested in a 
company which is to furnish maple, beech, elm and red oak ties 
to the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad. These ties will be 
treated at a plant to be built at Cadillac. ]\Iich. 

He is a member of the Episcopal church. 

Levon H. Kooyunijian 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Boise, Idaho 
Care of Mrs. H. K. Avakian, North Grafton, Mass. 

Levon Hampartzum Kooyumjian was born December 25, 1885. in 
Etchme, Harpoot. Turkey in Asia, the son of Hampartzum B. Kooyum- 
jian, son of Bogos Kooyumjian, and Anzoon (Mandirosian) Kooyumjian. 

In 1909 he received the degree of B.A. from Amherst College, where 
he was a member of Sigma Delta Rho. 

He is unmarried. 

Since June 19, 1912, Kooyumjian has been forest guard in 
the United States Forest Service with headquarters on Boise 
National Forest, Idaho. 

He is a member of the New Britain (Conn.) Congregational 
Church. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1912 



Bruno R. Kudlich 

Business address, Munson-Whittaker Company, Fourth Avenue and 

Twenty-seventh Street, Newr York City 

Residence, 104 West Eighty-seventh Street, New York City 

Bruno Ralph Kudlich was born February 10, 1889, in New York City, 
the son of Dr. Herman F. Kudlich and Roswitha M. L. Kudlich. 
He received the degree of B.A. from Columbia University in 1909. 
He is unmarried. 

Since the fall of 191 2 Kudlich has been assistant for the 
Munson-Whittaker Company, foresters, of New York City. 



Murray McMurray 

Webster City, Iowa 

Murray McMurray was born November 19, 18B8, in Webster City, Iowa, 
the son of Leslie A. McMurray, graduated from Andover in 1871, member 
of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions and of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, and president of Hamilton County 
State Bank for thirty-eight years, and Jessie (Dunham) McMurray, a 
graduate of Whipple Academy, Troy, N. Y., in 1874, and a member of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution. He is the grandson on 
his father's side of John G. McMurray and Antoinette (Warner) Mc- 
Murray, and on his mother's side of T. N. Dunham and Achsol (Cannon) 
Dunham. He has a sister, Jessie Arnold McMurray, B.A. Grinnell 
College '06. 

He was prepared at Webster City (Iowa) High School and in 1910 
received the degree of Ph.B. from Grinnell College. 

His engagement has been announced. 

Since July 15, 1912, McMurray has been clerk in the Hamilton 
County State Bank of Webster City, Iowa. 

He is a member of the Congregational church and in politics is 
an Independent, but inclined towards the Republican party. At 
Yale he was elected to Book and Bond. 



Daniel H. Moon, Jr. 

Care Mrs. C. A. Weyerhaeuser, Little Falls, Minn. 

Daniel H. Moon, Jr., was born March 16, 1883, in St. Paul, Minn. 
He was prepared at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and received 
the degree of Ph.B. at Yale in 1910. He was captain of the Freshman 



31- YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Crew, on the Freshman Football Team, on the winning 191 1 Crew, and 
a member of Delta Phi, University Club, Corinthian Yacht Club and the 
City Government Club. 

He was married March 8, 1912, in Hamilton, Bermuda, to Mary G. La 
Tourette. 

Moon has sent in the maihng address griven above but has 
failed to state what his present business is. 



Willis IMunro 

Business address, United States Bureau of Entomolog}', Providence, R. I. 
61 Erie County Bank Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Willis Munro was born December 3. 1873. in Boston, Alass., the son 
of Josiah Greene Munro and Sarah Keen Healey (Dall) Munro. On his 
father's side he is of Scotch and Welsh ancestry, being the grandson of 
Peter Greene Munro and Sarah Mumford (Willis) Munro and on his 
mother's side of Scotch and English descent, the grandson of the Rev. 
Charles Henry Appleton Dall and Caroline Wells (Healey) Dall. He has 
a brother, Charles Dall Munro. 

He received the degrees of B.A. and LL.B. from Harvard in 1896 
and 1899, respectively. For the next five years he was engaged in 
the practice of law. Owing to ill health, at the end of that time he 
was forced to give up all work for three years. 

He was married October 31, 1907, in New York City, to Miss Marion 
Beach Bogardus of Brooklyn, N. Y., daughter of Leonard Bogardus and 
Julia Keith (Beach) Bogardus. 

On July I. 1912, Munro became field assistant to the state for- 
ester of Connecticut. He is at present assistant in the United 
States Bureau of Entomology, Providence. R. L, working on 
the subject of gypsy moth control. 

He is a member of the L^nitarian church. From January i, 
1902, to August 15, 1903. he was deputy assistant district attorney 
of New York County. N. Y. He served in the INIassachusetts 
Naval Brigade, Fourth Division, from January, 1892, to April, 
1896, and later held the positions of seaman, quartermaster, gun- 
ner's mate, boatswain's mate, chief boatswain's mate and ensign. 
He also served in the New York National Guard and in Squadron 
A Cavalry, Troop 3, and was a private three years, beginning in 
1902. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1912 3]^ 

Robert J. Noyes 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Marion, N. C. 
Home address, Georgetown, Mass. 

Robert Jackman Noyes was born December 6, 1888, in Georgetown, 
Mass., the son of Joseph L. Noyes (died April 7, 1913) and Melvina 
(Sanborn) Noyes. He has one brother, Joseph E. Noyes, and two sisters: 
Marjorie S. Noyes, B.A. Mount Holyoke '06, and Ruth E. Noyes. 

He was prepared at the Perley Free School, Georgetown, Mass., and 
at one time attended the University of Maine. In 191 1 he graduated 
from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale, where he was a member of 
Alpha Tau Omega. 

He is unmarried. 

Noyes is stationed on the Mt. Mitchell Reservation with head- 
quarters at Marion, N. C. He entered the United States Forest 
Service on July i, 1912, and until December i, 1912, when he 
received his present appointment, was forest assistant with head- 
quarters at Gorham, N. H, 



J. Wilbur O'Byrne 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 
Home address, Oxford, Ohio 

Joseph Wilbur O'Byrne was born June 19, 1884, in Springfield, Ind., 
the son of William C. O'Byrne, a farmer, and Ella (McCord) O'Byrne. 
His father's parents were both born in Ireland and came to America 
when young, while his mother's father was of Scotch-Irish ancestry, 
his people having resided in this country for many generations. His 
maternal grandmother was of Pennsylvania Dutch stock. He has two 
brothers and two sisters : W. Clarke O'Byrne, E. Esther O'Byrne, a 
graduate of the normal course at Miami University in 1907, Frank M. 
O'Byrne, B.A. Miami, and Ernest B. O'Byrne. 

He was graduated from high school in 1902 and then entered Miami. 
He remained about two years and then worked in Cincinnati four 
years, returning to Miami in 1908 and receiving the degree of B.A. in 
1910. 

He is unmarried. 

O'Byrne has been in District 3 since entering the United States 
Forest Service in August, 1912. He was forest assistant on 
Coconino National Forest until recently, when he was transferred 



314 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

to Zuni and Manzano forests, with headquarters in Albuquerque, 
N. Mex. He has been engaged in timber sales work. 
He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



William J. Paeth 

Naperville, III. 

William John Paeth was born July 7, 1887, in Naperville, 111., the son 
of Carl August Paeth and Sarah Josephine (Weible) Paeth, both 
deceased. His father was a graduate of Northwestern College and Union 
Biblical Institute, Naperville, 111., and at the time of his death was pro- 
fessor of theology in the German department of the Chicago Theological 
Seminary, Chicago, 111. He is of German ancestry. He has one brother, 
Carl August Paeth, who has studied at Northwestern College Academy 
and Culvers Military Academy. 

He was prepared at Northwestern College Academy, Naperville, 111., 
and spent two years at the University of Illinois. He also traveled two 
years before entering Yale. He graduated from the Sheffield Scientific 
School at Yale in 191 1. 

He is unmarried. 

Paeth was offered a permanent position as forest assistant in 
March, 1913, under the condition that it be accepted immediately. 
This was impossible, and the appointment was declined. He 
plans to enter private business in Chicago. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. 



William B. Rice 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Ogden, Utah 
Home address, 803 Mechanic Street, Emporia, Kans. 

William Benjamin Rice was born May 21, 1888, in Berlin Heights, Ohio, 
the son of John Hale Julian Rice, a graduate of Oberlin (Ohio) Seminary 
and Berea (Ky.) College, minister of the First Congregational Church, 
Emporia, Kans., and Martha (Farrington) Rice. On his father's side 
he is of English and French ancestry, his grandparents having been born 
in Virginia and Ohio, and his mother's side of English and Irish ancestry. 
He has a sister. Amy Rogers Rice. 

He was prepared at Oberlin Academy and in 1910 received the degree 
of B.A. from the College of Emporia. He is a member of Sigma Xi. 

He was married January 29, 1913, in Dodger City, Kans., to Miss 
Gladys Opal Jones of Dodger City, daughter of Daniel H. Jones. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1912 315 

Since graduating from the Yale Forest School Rice has been 
forest assistant in the United States Forest Service. He is 
located at present in Ogden, Utah. 

He is a member of the Congregational church and in politics 
is a Progressive Republican. 



Leroy M. Richardson 

Business address, Care of Continental Paper Bag Company, Rumford, 

Maine 
Home address, 7 Ravenscroft Road, Winchester, Mass. 

Leroy Mowry Richardson was born October i, 1886, in Arlington, 
Mass., the son of Arthur Howard Richardson and Frances Marion 
(Campbell) Richardson. He has a brother, Lawrence E. Richardson. 

He received the degree of B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1909 and 
was employed in the Old Colony Trust Company for a year before 
entering the Yale Forest School. 

He is unmarried. 

Since July 6, 1912, Richardson has been clerk in the shipping 
department of the Continental Paper Bag Company of Rumford, 
Maine. He was lately employed in the United States Forest Ser- 
vice on Deerlodge National Forest with Supervisor Stockdale on 
winter reconnaissance. 

He is a member of the Unitarian church. At Yale he was 
elected to Book and Bond. 



Samuel E. Robison 

Business address, Mechanicsburg, Ohio 
Home address, 73 Elm Street, London, Ohio 

Samuel Edward Robison ,was born August 16, 1888, in London, Ohio, 
the son of Edward John Robison, M.A. Ohio Wesleyan, a druggist, 
deceased, and Sarah K. Robison. He is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. A sis- 
ter, Mrs. W. B. Sisson, spent one year at Hollins Institute and one at 
Ohio Wesleyan, and a brother, Richard H. Robison, studied at Penn- 
sylvania State College two years. 

He attended Ohio State University for a time and received the degree 
of B.S. at Ohio Wesleyan University in 1910. 

He is unmarried. 



3i6 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Robison entered the Forest Service iiiitiiediately upon gradua- 
tion and was tirst assigned to Whitman National Forest with 
headquarters at Sunipter. Ore. In January. 1013. he was trans- 
ferred to the district office. He is now engaged in the retail 
lumber business as a partner in the Sisson-Robison Lumber 
Company at Mechanicsburg. Ohio. 

He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is 
a Republican and a ]\Iason. 

Karl Schmitt 

Business address, Andrews, N. C. 
Home address. 181 St. Marks Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Karl Schmitt was born March j8, 1S87, in Now York City, the son 
of William Schmitt and Margaret (Zaisser) Schmitt. He is of German 
ancestry on his father's side and of German Swiss on his mother's. He 
has three brothers and a half brother : August, John and William 
Schmitt, and Max Waldan. 

He received the degree of B.S. at the College of the City of New York 
in February, 1909. Before entering the forest school he was engaged in 
tree surgery for two summers. 

He is unmarried. 

On graduation from the Yale Forest School Schmitt entered 
the United States Forest Service, being located at Erwin. Tenn. 
He has recently been transferred to Andrews, N. C. as forest 
assistant in the Nantahala area, examining land acquired through 
the Weeks Law. 

He is a Democrat in politics. He is a member of the New 
York Athletic Club. 

Will J. Sproat 

Busi)iess address. United States Forest Service. Bend. Ore. 
Home address. 10^4 Cass AT'eiiue, Grand Raf^ids, Mich. 

Will Jay Sproat was born January 16. 1887, in Grand Rapids, Mich., 
the son of J. C. Sproat. 

He received the degree of B.S. from Michigan Agricultural College in 
191 1. Before entering the Forest School he spent two and a half months 
on Gunnison National Forest, Colo., and for the same length of time 
was stationed on Crater National Forest, Ore. 

He is unmarried. 



GRADUATES CLASS OF 1912 317 

Upon entering the Service Sproat was appointed a field examiner 
in the United States Forest Service, being located on the Whit- 
man National Forest, Sumpter, Ore. He now holds the position 
of forest assistant on Deschutes National Forest, with head- 
quarters at Bend, Ore. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. 



Carl M. Stevens 

Business address, United States Forest Service, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 
Home address, Auburn, Maine 

Carl Mantle Stevens was born October 16, 1888, in Portland, Maine, 
the son of T. J. Stevens and Hattie M. Stevens. He is of English 
ancestry. A brother, Neil Everett Stevens, received the degree of B.A. 
at Bates in 1908, M.A. at Yale in 1909 and Ph.D. in 191 1. 

He received the degree of B.A. at Bates College in 1910. 

He is unmarried. 

Since graduation Stevens has been located in District i. His 
first appointment was as a forest assistant on the Coeur d'Alene 
National Forest, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. In April, 191 3, he was 
transferred to reconnaissance work. 



Clarence E. Taylor 

R. F. D. 2, Granger, Ind. 

Clarence Egbert Taylor was born November 11, 1886, in Scott County, 
Kans., the son of James Arthur Taylor and Melissa Helen (Rupe) Taylor. 
His paternal grandparents were Egbert and Elizabeth Taylor. Egbert 
Taylor was born in what is now Cleveland, Ohio, in 1809, the first white 
child born in that township. His ancestors were English and Scotch and 
his wife's were Scotch-Irish, all coming to this country previous to the 
Revolutionary War. Melissa Helen (Rupe) Taylor's father was born 
in 183 1 in Indiana of German-Huguenot ancestors, who had settled in 
North Carolina before the Revolution, her great-great-grandfather dying 
in that war. Her mother was of Pennsylvania Dutch descent. He has 
two brothers and a sister : Delbert Jacob Taylor, Purdue University, 
Glenn Arthur Taylor, and Susan Mae Taylor. 

He was prepared at the South Bend (Ind.) High School and received 
the degree of B.A. at Wabash College in 1910. He was apprenticed to 
learn the carpenter's trade. 

He is unmarried. 



3i8 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

In August, 1912, Taylor entered the United States Forest Ser- 
vice as forest assistant with headquarters at Quincy, Calif. From 
January until June, 19 13, he was employed by the Pennsylvania 
Chestnut Blight Commission. He then reentered the Service, 
at present being stationed at Pine Mountain, Ga. 



Roscoe B. Weaver 

Business address, 91^/2 Florida Avenue, Tampa, Fla. 
Home address, Colfax, Iowa 

Roscoe Blaine Weaver was born October 9, 1880, in Colfax, Iowa, the 
son of Jacob Forester Weaver (deceased), who served in the Civil 
War as first lieutenant of the 5th Iowa Infantry and Cavalry, and was 
postmaster of Colfax for two years, and Adella Victoria (West) 
Weaver, daughter of Joseph Taylor West and Susanna Seward (Hahn) 
West. He has one sister, Di Etta Weaver. 

He was prepared at Colfax High School and received the degree of 
B.S. at Simpson College, Indianola, Iowa, in 1905. He was a member 
of Alpha Tau Omega. He then taught school and coached the Capital 
High School Football Team, Des Moines, Iowa, for four months. In 
1906 he went to the Philippine Islands as a third lieutenant in the con- 
stabulary, served three years and a half, rising to the rank of first 
Heutenant. Before entering the Yale Forest School he took a year's 
graduate work at Simpson College. 

He is unmarried. 

Since July, 1912, Weaver has been with the Aripeka Saw Mills, 
Tampa, Fla. His work consists chiefly in estimating the com- 
pany's timber and checking up the saw mills and turpentine 
users on the company's land. 

He is a Republican. He is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, is a Mason, and while at Yale was a member of 
the Yale Masonic Club, Acacia Fraternity. 



Edward J. Yeomans 

Business address, Halstead, Kans. 

Edward John Yeomans was born November 11, 1887, in Halstead, 
Kans., the son of Charles H. Yeomans and Mary L. (Razee) Yeomans. 
He is of English and French ancestry. He has three sisters and a 
brother: Blanch H. (Yeomans) McBurney; Chauncy Austin Yeomans, 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1912 319 

B.A. College of Emporia; Irene L. (Yeomans) Eidson, and Grace M. 
Yeomans. 

He received the degree of B.A. at the College of Emporia in 1910. 

His engagement has been announced. 

After orraduation Yeomans took a position with the Pacific 
Portland Cement Company of San Francisco, CaHf. In March, 
1913, he accepted a permanent appointment with the United 
States Forest Service, and was assigned to winter reconnaissance 
on the Pend Oreille National Forest at Sandpoint, Idaho. 

He is a Progressive Republican. He is a member of the Pres- 
byterian church and of Modern Woodmen of America. 



NoN Graduates 
Samuel E. Bower 

Business address. United States Forest Service, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Home address, 1328 West Front Street, Berwick, Pa. 

Orangeville, Pa. 

Samuel Edward Bower was born November 12, 1886, in Fowlerville, 
Pa., the son of Hiram F. Bower, son of Samuel Edward Bower, and Ida 
Elizabeth (Mansteller) Bower, daughter of John and Effie Mansteller. 
He has six sisters : Mary Bessie, Cletta Blanche, Alvaretta Pearl, Ruth 
Irene, Esther Louise and Florence Elizabeth Bower. 

He was prepared at Bloomsburg State Normal School and Gettysburg 
Preparatory School and in 1910 received the degree of B.A. at Pennsyl- 
vania College. 

He was married October 22, 191 1, in Orangeville, Pa., to Miss Mar- 
guerite Lavona Williams, daughter of Warren W. and Lizzie Williams. 

Bower is a forest assistant on the Wasatch National Forest 
with headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah. 

He is a member of the Progressive party. He is a member of 
the Lutheran church. 

Charles F. Evans 

Business address, United States Forest Service, St. Anthony, Idaho 
Home address, Muscoda, Wis. 

Charles Floyd Evans was born February 26, 1885, in Basswood, Wis., 
the son of W^illiam T. Evans and Dora (Booker) Evans. 



320 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

He received the degree of B.A. at the University of Wisconsin in 1909. 
During the year 1909-10 he was principal of the Walworth (Wis.) High 
School. He attended the Yale Forest School during 1910 and 191 1. 

He is unmarried. 

After leaving the Forest School Evans entered the Forest 
Service and was appointed forest assistant on the Boise National 
Forest. In January, 191 3, he was transferred to the Palisade 
Forest with headquarters at St. Anthony. 



Herman de Fremery 

Business address, American Museum of Natural History, Seventy-seventh 

Street and Central Park West, New York City 

Home address, Woodstock, N. Y. 

Columbia University Club, 18 Gramercy Park, New York City 

Herman de Fremery was born December 26, 1880, in Oakland, Calif. 
He was prepared at the Lygee Descartes, Tours, France, University 
of Paris, and Columbia University, New York City. 
He is unmarried. 

After leaving the Yale Forest School de Fremery was employed 
by the Appleton & Sewall Company, of Old Town, Maine, on 
timber estimating, mapping and working plans. On October 21, 
191 2, he entered upon his present position, assistant to the curator 
of the department of woods and forests at the American Museum 
of Natural History, New York City. 

He is a Socialist. He is a member of the Columbia University 
Club and the Liberal Club of New York City. 



Raymond F. Gardner 

Business address, Care Trexler Lumber Company, Kearny, N. J. 
Residence, 172 Grand Street, Jersey City, N. J. 
Chester, N. J. 

Raymond Foster Gardner was born February 10, 1889, in Appleton, 
Wis., the son of Edward Payson Gardner, son of Noah Gardner, and 
Marietta Amanda (Hall) Gardner, daughter of Myron S. Hall. He 
has three sisters and a brother: Mary L. Gardner; Edward Hall Gard- 
ner, B.A. Amherst '05 ; Katherine Gardner, and Marian W. Gardner, 
B.A. Smith. 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1912 



He was prepared at Blair Academy, Blairstown, N. J., and received 
the degree of B.A. at Amherst in 1910. 
He is unmarried. 

Gardner left the Yale Forest School at the beginning of the 
spring term of Junior year and has since been with the Trexler 
Lumber Company, dealers in yellow pine and fir. This company 
handles fifty million feet a year from their Newark yard. 

He is a Progressive. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
church. At present he is living in Whetten House, a social 
settlement in Jersey City. 

Conrad Lambert 

74 South Portland Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Conrad Lambert was born Alay 8, 1885, in Germany. He 
received the degree of B.S. from the Brooklyn Polytechnic Insti- 
tute in 1910 and attended the Yale Forest School during the 
summer and fall terms of 1910-11. 

Davis W. Lusk, Jr. 

Home address, 48 Berkeley Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

Davis Winans Lusk, Jr., was born October 28, 1888, in Newark, N. J., 
the son of Davis W. Lusk, superintendent of the Newark Presbytery 
and president of the Board of Trustees of the Newark Presbyterian 
Hospital, and Martha Louise (Winans) Lusk. He is of Scotch ancestry. 
He has two sisters, Mary Edith Lusk, a graduate of Wheaton Seminary, 
and Mildred L Lusk, a graduate of the Newark Normal School. 

He was prepared at Bordentown Military Institute, graduating in 1906, 
and received the degree of B.A. at Lafayette in 1910. He was a member 
of Chi Phi. 

He is unmarried. 

For a few months after graduation Lusk was employed as 
a field assistant at the Connecticut State Agricultural Experiment 
Station, New Haven. He then worked for State Forester Hirst 
of New Hampshire and completed his work in March. He is 
now connected with the Laurentide Paper Company of Grand 
Mere, Canada. 

He is a member of the Forest Hill Presbyterian Church, 
Newark, and is a Republican. 



322 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

James E. McNeal 

Business address. Care State Forestry Department, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Home address, 235 East New Street, Lancaster, Pa. 

James Earle McNeal was born October 19, 1887, in Lancaster, Pa., 
the son of Andrew Carey Flinn McNeal and Margaret Blanche (Hepting) 
McNeal. His grandparents were Henry Brady McNeal and Emaline 
Rebecca (Schaeffer) McNeal and Charles A. Hepting and Julia Anna 
(Long) Hepting. He has a sister, Hilda McNeal. 

He was prepared at the public schools of Lancaster, Pa., and received 
the degree of Bachelor of Forestry at the Pennsylvania State Forest 
Academy in 1907. 

He is unmarried. 

On September i, 1907, McNeal entered the employ of the 
State Forestry Department of Pennsylvania and has since been 
engaged in the same work except for the time spent at the Yale 
Forest School in 1910-11. He has also been a collaborator in the 
United States Forest Service in the department of products. 

He has published reports and bulletins of the Pennsylvania 
Department of Forestry. 



Jason K. Moyer 

no Centre Street, Taviaqua, Pa. 

Jason Kline Moyer was born July 20, 1885, in Millheim, Pa., the son 
of Joseph Klose Moyer, a lumberman and postmaster, and Mary Eliza- 
beth Moyer. He is of German ancestry. He has two brothers and six 
sisters : John Nevin Moyer, Franklin and Marshall ; Hiram Bruce 
Moyer; Eva Moyer; Florence Moyer; Rebecca Moyer, Allentown Col- 
lege for Women; Elizabeth Moyer, Bloomsburg (Pa.) Normal School; 
Miriam Ruth Moyer, and Sarah Moyer, Bloomsburg (Pa.) Normal School. 

He received the degree of Ph.B. at Franklin and Marshall College in 
1908. The two years succeeding he taught mathematics and coached 
the athletic teams at Massanutten School, Woodstock, W. Va. He was 
a member of Phi Kappa Psi at Franklin and Marshall. 

He is unmarried. 

After leaving the Yale Forest School Moyer spent an excep- 
tionally interesting summer camping in the mountains of eastern 
Kentucky and doing forestry work with a forester from State 
College, one from Biltmore and two from the University of 



NON GRADUATES CLASS OF 1912 323 

Maine. They were employed by Munson-Whitaker Company, 
foresters, New York City, who were doing a large piece of work 
for the International Harvester Company. He is now head sales- 
man and assistant buyer for the Moyer Brothers, flour, grain and 
mill feed merchants. 

He is Independent in politics. He is a member of the Reformed 
church and an Elk. 



William E. Prindle 

Business address. Care Eyster & Son, Halltown, W. Va. 
Box 624, Nezv Haven, Conn. 

William Edwin Prindle was born December 5, 1888, in New Haven, 
Conn., the son of Lucius Henry Prindle, a real estate dealer, and 
Frances Elizabeth (Harrison) Prindle. His grandfather, Francis E. 
Harrison, received his B.A. at Yale in 1849. He has one brother, Harrison 
Prindle, Yale '03 S. 

He was prepared at the New Haven High School and at the Stadt 
Gymnasium, Dresden, Germany, and received the degree of Ph.B. at 
Yale in 191 1. 

He is unmarried. 

Since leaving the Forest School Prindle has been employed 
as a bond salesman for the American Real Estate Company and 
with Eyster & Son, boxboard manufacturers of Halltown, W. Va. 

He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church. 



Keller E. Rockey 

Business address, 1112 Morris Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Home address, Stone Harbor, N. J. 

Keller Emrich Rockey was born September 27, 1887, in Columbia City, 
Ind., the son of Charles H. Rockey, a clergyman, son of Henry Rockey, 
and Florence I. (Emrich) Rockey, daughter of Captain George P. 
Emrich. His brothers are Ordean Rockey, Charles H. Rockey, Jr., 
Walter W. Rockey and John Edward Perry Rockey. 

He was prepared at Mercersburg Academy and in 1909 received the 
degree of B.S. at Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg, Pa. He was a 
member of Sigma Chi and Theta Nu Epsilon. Before entering the 
Forest School he worked in the Forest Service and for the Baltimore 
& Ohio Railroad Company. 

He is unmarried. 



324 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Since September 27, 191 1, Rockey has been in the employ of 
the Pennsylvania Chestnut Blight Commission, having charge 
of the demonstration work. 

He is a Bull Moose. 



Franklin L. Wheeler 

Shelton, Conn. 

Franklin Lyron Wheeler attended the Yale Forest School in 
1910-11. 

Howard W. Wills 

Business address, Chicago Telephone Company, Chicago, 111. 

Residence, 6109 Kimbark Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

S9 Prospect Street, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Howard Wakeman Wills was born August 27, 1889, in Bridgeport, 
Conn., the son of William Edward Wills and Antoinette (Piatt) Wills. 
He is of English ancestry. He has a brother, Robert Henry Wills. 

He was prepared at the Bridgeport (Conn.) Grammar and High schools 
and spent one year at Carleton College, Northfield, Minn., before enter- 
ing the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale. He received the degree of 
Ph.B. in 191 1 and was a member of Alpha Sigma Phi. 

He is unmarried. 

From September, 191 1, to January, 1912, Wills was employed 
by the Illinois Central Railroad. The next four months he was 
in real estate work and in May, 1912, he became assistant manager 
of the traffic department of the Chicago Telephone Company. 

He is a member of the Congregational church and of the 
Wanderers Athletic Club of Chicago. 



Raymond W. Wilson 

64 White Street, Springfield, Mass. 

Raymond Walden Wilson was born September 24, 1886, in 
WilHmantic, Conn. He received the degree of B.S. from Dart- 
mouth College in 1910 and attended the Yale Forest School 
during the summer and fall terms of 1910-11. 



STATISTICS 



STATISTICAL SUMMARIES 



SUMMARY OF OCCUPATIONS. 

The following tabulation of the occupations of 300 graduates, including 
both those holding the degree of M.F. and those holding certificates, 
and eighty-six non-graduates, was compiled by a professor in the Forest 
School, before information concerning all of the non-graduates had 
been received : 

Graduates Non Graduates 

Engaged in U. S. Forest Service 139 21 

" " State Forest Work 18 S 

" " City Forest Work 4 2 

" " Forest Work for other Governments . . 14 i 

" " Private Forest Work 22 4 

" " U. S. Government in departments other 

than forestry 7 4 

" " Educational Work 32 4 

" " Lumbering 24 3 

" " other occupations 35 23 

Occupations not reported 5 19 

300 86 

A somewhat more detailed study of the distribution by occupations 
follows : 

Engaged in U. S. Forest Service Graduates Non Graduates Total 

District Foresters 18 4 22 

Supervisors 22 5 27 

Deputies 14 i 15 

Assistants 78 9 87 

Examiners 3 i 4 

Employed 4 i 5 

Total in U. S. Forest Service 139 21 160 

It is thus seen that of the entire number of men who have attended 
the Forest School, about 42 per cent are still employed by the Forest 
Service. 

Of the men not now engaged with the Forest Service a total of 
eighty-six men were formerly employed by the Service. Of these the 
present occupations are as follows : 



328 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Graduates Non Graduates Total 

Teaching 21 i 22 

State work 10 i 11 

Private forestry 8 8 

Connected with lumbering 11 I 12 

In other U. S. departments 6 i 7 

In other occupations 24 2 26 

Total 80 6 86 

It is thus seen that two-thirds of the men who have left the Forest 
Service have continued in the profession of forestry and more than half 
have left to undertake important work in State forestry, teaching, or 
kindred lines. 

Engaged in State Forest Work Graduates Non Graduates Total 

Foresters 6 3 9 

Assistants 8 2 10 

Employed 4 4 

Total in State work 18 5 23 

The following states employ Yale alumni as State Foresters : Vermont, 
New Hampshire, Maine, Connecticut, Marj'land. Kentucky, North Carolina 
and Kansas. The following additional states employ Yale men as 
assistants : New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Minnesota. In 
Massachusetts the forestry association has two Yale graduates in its 
employ. 

Ettgagcd in City JVork Graduates Non Graduates Total 

Foresters 2 2 4 

Employed 2 2 

Total in City work 4 2 6 

The City foresters of Brooklyn, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, and New 
Britain, Connecticut, are Yale men. 

Engaged in Zi'ork of other Governments Graduates Non Graduates Total 

Hawaii i I 

Canada 7 I 8 

Philippines 5 S 

Africa i I 

Total in other Governments.. 14 i 15 

Yale graduates have organized the forestry work in the Province of 
Quebec and are carrying a large share of the work of organization in 
the Dominion of Canada and the Province of British Columbia. In 



STATISTICAL SUMMARIES 329 

the Philippines a Yale Forester is Chief of the Service under immediate 
direction of Captain Ahern. The work in Hawaii was organized by a 
Yale man. In South Africa two Yale graduates have had much to 
do with the inauguration of educational and administrative work. 

Engaged in other departments of U. S. Graduates Non Graduates Total 

Indian Office 4 4 

Entomology 2 I 3 

Pathology i i 2 

Agriculture i i 

Navy I I 

Total in other departments ..7 4 11 



The forestry work of the Indian Office has been organized by a 
graduate of the Forest School. 

Engaged in educational work Graduates Non Graduates Total 

Chiefs 13 I 14 

Assistants 19 3 22 

Total educational work 32 4 36 



The following forest schools are in charge of graduates of the Yale 
Forest School : Harvard Forest School, University of Washington, 
Michigan Agricultural College, New York State College of Forestry 
at Syracuse, University of Nebraska, Washington Agricultural College, 
New Hampshire Agricultural College, State College of Pennsylvania, 
University of Maine, University of Minnesota, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, University of New Brunswick, and the forest school in South 
Africa. 

In addition the following forest schools have Yale men on their 
faculty: Cornell University, Yale Forest School, University of Missouri, 
Oregon Agricultural College, University of Toronto ; Ranger School, 
Philippine Forest Service; and additional men at Harvard, Minnesota, 
Syracuse, Cornell, University of Washington, Michigan Agricultural 
College, and the University of Missouri. 

Yale Forest School graduates and former students are employed in other 
occupations as follows : 

Lumbering Graduates Non Graduates Total 
With Fire Protective Associa- 
tions — Secretary 2 2 

Independent lumbermen 2 2 

Employed by lumber operators ... 9 2 II 

Employed by Timber Land Brokers i 12 



33° 



YALK FOREST SCHOOL 



Lumber Manufacturing Graduates 

With Associations, Secretary i 

Independent manufacturers 3 

Associated with Lumber companies 3 
Retail Lumber Dealers 3 

Total in Lumbering 24 



Non Graduates Total 
I 

3 
3 
3 

3 27 



Private Forestry 

Land owners i 

Consulting Foresters 11 

Eucalyptus Company i 

Associated with Shade Tree Firms, 

but doing forestry work 4 

Employed by Estates 2 

" " Coal Company i 

" " Railroads 2 

Total in private forestry 22 



I 

14 
I 

4 
2 

I 
3 

26 



Other occupations 
IMercantile . 
Horticulture 
Agriculture . 
Engineering 
Teaching ... 
Finance . . . . 

Law 

Ministry . . . 
Insurance . . 
Medicine .. . 
Real Estate 
Student . . . . 
Science . . . . 



10 
I 
2 

3 
3 



Total in other occupations 



35 



15 
10 

9 
6 

4 
3 
2 
2 
I 
I 
2 
2 
I 

58 



VITAL STATISTICS. 

In the following table are given the number reported married and 
the number of sons and daughters born to these men for each of the 
classes. This table includes the 300 graduates, both those holding the 
degree of M.F. and those holding certificates, and the 102 non-graduates 
recorded in this volume. In this table the asterisk signifies decease as 
elsewhere in this record. When the sex of a child is unreported the 
number is given in parenthesis in the "boys" column. 



STATISTICAL SUMMARIES 



331 



Class Graduates 

1902 9 

1903 17 

1904 31 

1905 29 

1906 17 

1907 28 

1908 29 

1909 30 

1910 33 

1911 43 

1912 34 

300 



Non 
Graduates 


Total 


Married 




Child 


ren 


B( 


ays 


Girls 




9 


5 


(I) 


5*1 


7 


5 


22 


15 




II 


6*1 


5 


36 


25 




15*2 


17*3 


9 


38 


23 




13*2 


8 


17 


34 


19 




5 


12 


9 


37 


18 




6*1 


7 


II 


40 


16 




2 


6 


7 


37 


13 




3 




8 


41 


18 




I 


I 


18 


61 


14 






*i 


13 


47 


6 









102 



402 



172 



(1)61*6 64*5 



Of 402 graduates and non-graduates 172 are reported married and to 
them have been born a total of 137 children, of whom 125 are living. 



ROLL OF THE CLASSES 

In the following roll the permanent address of each man has been used 
whenever it has been given in the biographical account. Degrees received 
in addition to Master of Forestry at Yale have been noted after each 
man's name. The names and addresses of the Class Secretaries of the 
several classes are printed in italics. 



CLASS OF 1902 

Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

Prof. Alfred Akerman, B.A. University of Georgia '98, Athens, Ga. 
Charles S. Chapman, B.Agr. Storrs Agricultural College '98, 719 Yeon 

Building, Portland, Ore. 
Alfred K. Chittenden, Ph.B. Yale '00, Engineering Experiment Station, 

Urbana, 111. 
George E. Clement, B.A. Harvard '00, 275 Warren Street, Boston, Mass. 
C. Temple Emmet, M.E. Stevens Institute of Technology '91, Stony 

Brook, Long Island, N. Y. 
William C. Hodge, Jr., B.A. Yale '99, Forest Service, San Francisco, Calif. 
Ralph S. Hosmer, B.A.S. Harvard '94, Box 207, Honolulu, Hawaii. 
Roy L. Marston, B.A. Bowdoin '99, Skowhegan, Maine. 
George H. Myers, B.A. Yale '98, 1509, 38 West Thirty-second Street, 

New York City. 

Graduates holding Degree of M.F. Class of 1902 9. 

CLASS OF 1903 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

John B. Anderson, Ph.B. Union '96, Black Mountain, N. C. 

Edward A. Braniff, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Prof. George L. Clothier, B.S. Kansas State Agricultural College '92 
and M.S. '99, State College of Washington, Pullman, Wash. 

Albert W. Cooper, B.A. Harvard '01, 4 Akron Street, Boston, Mass. 

Prof. Richard T. Fisher, B.A. Harvard '98, Harvard University, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

*Wesley J. Gardner, B.A. Harvard '00. Died 1906. 

Prof. Austin F. Hawes, B.A. Tufts College '01, Experiment Station, 
Burlington, Vt. 

Wallace I. Hutchinson, B.A. Acadia University '01, Forest Service, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Elers Koch, B.S. Montana State College '01, Forest Service, Missoula, 
Mont. 



ROLL OF THE CLASSES 333 

Francis G. Miller, Ph.B. State University of Iowa 'oo, B.S.A. Iowa State 

College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts 'oi, Wenatchee, Wash. 
Ellie J. S. Moore, B.S. Montana State College 'oi. Route 2, Bozeman, 

Mont. 
J. Girvin Peters, B.A. Johns Hopkins '00, Forest Service, Washington, 

D. C. 
Prof. Samuel N. Spring, B.A. Yale '98, New York State College of 

Agriculture, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 
William D. Sterrett, B.A. George Washington '00 and Harvard '01, 

Pierce Mill Road, Washington, D. C. 
Henry G. Stevens, Ph.B. Yale '02, 615 Stevens Building, Detroit, Mich. 
Harry D. Tiemann, M.E. Stevens Institute of Technology '97, Forest 

Products Laboratory, Madison, Wis. 
Theodore S. Woolsey, Jr., B.A. Yale '01, 250 Church Street, New 

Haven, Conn. 

Graduates holding Degree of M.F. Class of 1903 17 

NoN Graduates 

Carl G. Crawford, B.S. Ohio Wesleyan University '98, 401 West Main 

Street, Louisville, Ky. 
Samuel B. Detwiler, Bala, Pa. 
George Griswold, Lyme, Conn. 

Frank C. Hinckley, 26 Central Street, Bangor, Maine. 
Paymaster Felix R. Holt, Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va. 

CLASS OF 1904 

Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

John Appleton, B.A. Bowdoin '02, Bangor, Maine. 

Robert W. Ayres, Ph.B. Yale '03. Forest Service, San Francisco, Calif. 

Prof. Hugh P. Baker, B.S. Michigan Agricultural College '01, Econ.D. 

University of Munich '10, New York State College of Forestry, 

Syracuse, N. Y. 
William H. vonBayer, B.A. Cornell '04, Indian Office, Washington, D. C. 
Fred W. Besley, B.A. Maryland Agricultural College '92, Johns Hopkins 

University, Baltimore, Md. 
John H. Bridges, B.S. University of Florida '02, Drawer 1607, Tacoma, 

Wash. 
Horatio J. Brown, B.A. Union '01, 414 Lewis Building, Portland, Ore. 
Prof. Edward E. Carter, B.A. Bowdoin '02, Petersham, Mass. 
Prof. Herman H. Chapman, B.Sc. University of Minnesota '96 and B.Agr. 

'99, 360 Prospect Street, New Haven, Conn. 
Horace W. Chittenden, Ph.B. Yale '03, Marine National Bank Building, 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
Harold B. Eastman, B.S. Bowdoin '02, 494 Congress Street, Portland, 

Maine. 



334 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Stuart J. Flintham, B.A. Cornell '04, iii North Normandie, Los Angeles, 

Calif. 
Harold D. Foster, B.A. Williams '02, Forest Service, Medford, Ore. 
William B. Greeley, B.L. University of California '01, Forest Service, 

Washington, D. C. 
Walter B. Hadley, B.S. Pacific College '01, Redlands, Calif. 
Prof. Ralph C. Hawley, B.A. Amherst '01, 360 Prospect Street, New 

Haven, Conn. 
Paul D. Kelleter, B.A. Washington University '02, Deadwood, S. Dak. 
Charles A. Lyford, F.E. Cornell '04, 520-524 Vancouver Block, Van- 
couver, B. C, Canada. 
W^ilbur R. Mattoon, B.A. Wesleyan '99, Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Hamilton G. Merrill, B.A. Amherst '00 and M.A. '05, Forest Service, 

Santa Barbara, Calif. 
Allan B. Patterson, Ph.B. Dartmouth '98, Hot Springs, Tulare County, 

Calif. 
Allan R. Powers, M.D., B.S. University of California '01, M.D. Cooper 

Medical CoHege '12, iii Ellis Street, San Francisco, Calif. 
Paul G. Redington, B.A. Dartmouth '00, Northfork, Madera County, Calif. 
Avery T. Searle, B.A. Pomona College '96, Brownsville, Texas. 
Clinton G. Smith, B.Agr. Storrs Agricultural College '98, Logan, Utah. 
Thomas J. Taylor, B.A. University of Chicago '95. 
Blaine S. Viles, B.A. Bowdoin '03, Augusta, Maine. 
William G. Weigle, Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Robert B. Wilson, B.A. Yale '01, Medford, Ore. 

Graduates holding Degree of M.F. Class of 1904 29 

Graduates holding Certificates 
William H. Kobbe, Shale, Calif. 
Manasseh Smith, Jr., 252 Woodfords Street, Portland, Maine. 

NoN Graduates 
Frank P. Hamilton, B.A. Colby '02, LL.B. Denver University '08, 300 Law 

Exchange Building, Jacksonville, Fla. 
Wilbur F. Henderson, Box 145, Manchester, N. H. 
Yukichi Hokodachi. 
Richard P. Imes, Custer, S. Dak. 

*Louis C. Miller, B.S. Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College '01, 

Died 1 910. 

CLASS OF 190S 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

Prof. J. Fred Baker, B.S. Michigan Agricultural College '02 and M.For. 
'11, E^st Lansing, Mich. 

John E. Barton, B.A. University of Michigan '02, State Forester, Frank- 
fort, Ky. 



ROLL OF THE CLASSES 335 

Anton T. Boisen, B.A. Indiana University '97, Ames, Iowa. 
Harold R. Bristol, F.E. Cornell '04, Box 186, Plattsburgh, N. Y. 
Clarence J. Buck, B.A. Williams '03, 405 Beck Building, Portland, Ore. 
Philip T. Harris, B.A. Bowdoin '03, Forest Service, Tacoma, Wash. 
Janero Lagdameo, B.A. Ateneo de Manila '96, Bureau of Forestry, 

Manila, P. I. 
Jacob J. Levison, B.A. College of the City of New York '02, Prospect 

Park, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
James P. McDonough, B.A. Yale '03, 38 Hallock Street, New Haven, 

Conn. 
William H. Mast, B.Agr. Iowa State College '00, Davenport, Iowa. 
Clayton D. Mell, B.A. Franklin and Marshall College '00, Lebanon, Pa. 
Prof. Walter J. Morrill, B.S. University of Maine '99, University of 

Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 
Harry C. Neal, B.S. Pennsylvania State College '03, Dravosburg, Pa. 
John M. Nelson, Jr., B.A. Johns Hopkins '03, Pottsville, Pa. 
William B. Piper, B.A. Harvard '03, East Tawas, Mich. 
Merritt B. Pratt, B.S. University of Chicago '03, Nevada City, Calif. 
Jeremiah Rebmann, B.S. University of Nebraska '98, 11 14 Marion Street, 

Columbia, S. C. 
Prof. Samuel J. Record, B.A. Wabash College '03 and M.A. '06, 360 

Prospect Street, New Haven, Conn. 
Arthur C. Ringland, Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
William F. Sherfesee, B.A. College of Charleston '03, Bureau of Forestry, 

Manila, P. I. 
Ferdinand A. Silcox, B.S. College of Charleston '03, Forest Service, 

Missoula, Mont. 
Gordon E. Tower, B.S. Michigan Agricultural College '01, Waldo Hills 

Orchard Company, Route 5, Salem, Ore. 
Lage Wernstedt, M.E. Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm) '02, 

Forest Service, Portland, Ore. 
Trueman D. Woodbury, Ph.B. Brown '03, Forest Service, San Francisco, 

Calif. 
Karl W. Woodward, B.A. Cornell '04, Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Theodore C. Zschokke, B.A. Leland Stanford Jr. University '03, Palo 

Alto, Calif. 

Graduates holding Degree of M.F. Class of 1905 26 

Graduates holding Certificates 
Harry M. Hale, Okanogan, Wash. 
John S. Holmes, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Stanton G. Smith, Forest Service, Seattle, Wash. 

NoN Graduates 
James M. Fetherolf, B.A. Muhlenberg College '01, Forest Service, Ogden, 

Utah. 
David G. Kinney, Forest Service, San Diego, Calif. 



336 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Harold D. Langille, 683 Wasco Street, Portland, Ore. 
Chester A. Mathewson, 354 New York Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Ernest A. Sanders, M.A. Ohio State University '03, Westerville, Ohio. 
Herbert O. Stabler, Forest Service, 501 Beck Building, Portland, Ore. 
Gardiner Watkins, B.A. Princeton '03, 317 Broadv^^ay, New York City. 
Arnot W. Whetstone, M.A. Ohio State University '03, Van Buren, Ohio. 
Edmund J. Zavitz, B.A. McMaster University (Toronto) '03, Ontario 
Agricultural College, Guelph, Ont., Canada. 



CLASS OF 1906 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

J. Howard Allison, Ph.B. Yale '05, College of Forestry, University Farm, 

St. Paul, Minn. 
Fred E. Ames, B.A. Harvard '03, Forest Service, 501 Beck Building, 

Portland, Ore. 
Martin L. Erickson, Flandreau, S. Dak. 
Dennis C. A. Galarneau, B.A. Tufts '04, 10 Bayle Street, Montreal, Que., 

Canada. 
John D. Guthrie, Ph.B. Union '02, Forest Service, Springerville, Ariz. 
James A. Howarth, Jr., LL.B. Yale '96, Care of Indian Agent, Cloquet, 

Minn. 
Frederick W. H. Jacombe, B.A. University of Toronto '96 and M.A. '98, 

Forestry Branch, Department of the Interior, Ottawa, Ont., Canada. 
Sydney L. Moore, B.A. Princeton, '04, R. R. Sizer & Company, 15 William 

Street, New York City. 
Andrew E. Oman, B.S. Kansas State Agricultural College '00, Weiser, 

Idaho. 
Arthur D. Read, B.A. College of Emporia '03, Forest Service, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
Prof. Arthur B. Recknagel, B.A. Yale '04, Department of Forestry, 

Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 
Alexander H. D. Ross, B.A. Queen's University '88 and M.A. '89, Uni- 
versity of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada. 
Robert Y. Stuart, B.A. Dickinson '03 and M.A. '06, Forest Service, 

Washington, D. C. 
Horace F. Studley, B.A. Harvard '05, Rockland, Mass. 
W. Hoyt Weber, B.A. Wesleyan '03, 151 Courtland Avenue, Stamford, 

Conn. 
George A. Wilmot, University of the Cape of Good Hope '95, Katwijk, 

Holland, '96, Office of the Jokai Retreat, Union of South Africa. 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. Class of 1906 16 

Graduate holding Certificate 
Rudo L. Fromme, B.S. Ohio State University '05, Olympia, Wash. 



ROLL OF THE CLASSES 337 

NoN Graduates 

Ford D. Bacon, Bucknell '04, Harveyville, Pa. 

*Jacob F. Bitner, Franklin and Marshall College '04. Died 1912, 

Edward G. Cheyney, B.A. Cornell '00, University Farm, St. Paul, Minn. 

Galen S. Cleland, Wells, York County, Maine. 

Walter O. Filley, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New 

Haven, Conn. 
*Gay E. Hills, B.A. Dartmouth '04. Died 191 1. 

Elmer R. Hodson, B.S. Iowa State College '98 and M.S. '00, Forest 

Service, Ogden, Utah. 
J. Osborne Hopwood, B.S. University of Pennsylvania '04, M.S. Yale 

'07, Primos, Delaware County, Pa. 
Thomas P. Ivy, B.A. Harvard '81, Conway Center, N. H. 
John E. Keach, B.A. Yale '00, Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Albert H. Pierson, B.A. Princeton '99, Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
W. Kerr Rainsford, Ridgefield, Conn. 
Jerome H. Ramskill, Delta, Colo. 
Charles A. Scott, B.S.A. Kansas State Agricultural College '01, 311 North 

Eighteenth Street, Manhattan, Kans. 
Alpheus O. Waha, Forest Service, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 
Prof. John P. Wentling, Franklin and Marshall College '02, University 

Farm, St. Paul, Minn. 
Leslie L. White, B.S. Pennsylvania College, Vernal, Utah. 



CLASS OF 1907 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

William B. Barrows, B.A. Columbia '05, Forest Service, Washington, 

D. C. 
Avila Bedard, B.A. Laval University '05, Parliament Buildings, Quebec, 

Que., Canada. 
Prof. John Bentley, Jr., B.S. Wesleyan '04, New York State College of 

Agriculture, Ithaca, N. Y. 
Ovid M. Butler, B.A. Butler College '02, Forest Service, Ogden, Utah. 
Prof. Philip T. Coolidge, B.A. Harvard '05, New York State Ranger 

School, Wanakena, N. Y. 
Lincoln Crowell, B.S. University of Maine '06, Office of Indian Affairs, 

Neopit, Wis. 
Stephen M. Crowell, B.Agr. Connecticut Agricultural College '02 and 

B.S. '05, Middletown, Conn. 
Samuel T. Dana, B.A. Bowdoin '04, Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Raymond Davis, B.A. Bowdoin '05, Yakima Hotel, North Yakima, Wash. 
Nils B. Eckbo, Stenkjar Skogskole (Norway) '04, Forest Service, Ogden, 

Utah. 
Prof. John H. Foster, B.S. Norwich University '03, Durham, N. H. 
22 



338 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Bartle T. Harvey, B.S. University of Maine '05, 46 Maine Street, Orono, 
Maine. 

Charles S. Judd, B.A. Yale '05, Forest Service, Portland, Ore. 

Francis B. Kellogg, B.S. University of California '05, 98 El Camino 
Real, Berkeley, Calif. 

Kingsley R. MacGuffey, B.A. Yale '05, Parkdale, Ore. 

Clyde S. Martin, B.S. DePauw University '05, 304 West Third Street, 
Aberdeen, Wash. 

David T. Mason, B.S. Rutgers '05 and M.S. '08, Forest Service, Missoula, 
Mont. 

Louis S. Murphy, B.S. Tufts '01, 4 Thurston Street, Winter Hill Station, 
Boston, Mass. 

Gustave C. Piche, 64 St. Cyrille Street, Quebec, Que., Canada. 

Colin C. Robertson, Forest Department, Pretoria, South Africa. 

David N. Rogers, B.S. University of Maine '06, Quincy, Calif. 

Robert Rosenbluth, Conservation Commission, Albany, N. Y. 

Alfred Senn, Swiss French College '81, Care Board of Park Commis- 
sioners, Milwaukee, Wis. 

William C. Shepard, F.E. Cornell '07, R. F. D. 59, Berlin, Conn. 

Charles P. Wilber, B.A. Rutgers '05 and M.A. '08, Forest Commission, 
State House, Trenton, N. J. 

Hugo Winkenwerder, B.S. University of Wisconsin '02, 405 North Wash- 
ington Street, Watertown, Wis. 

*Edward S. Woodruff, B.A. Yale '99. Died 1909. 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. Class of 1907 27 



Graduate holding Certificate 
William Winter, 1003 Majestic Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

NoN Graduates 

J. Franklin Bruins, B.A. Beloit College '05, Box 249, Pocatello, Idaho. 

Harrison DeW. Burrall, Forest Service, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Charles H. Flory, B.S. Ohio State University '05, Forest Service, Port- 
land, Ore. 

James L. Grimes, B.S. Princeton 'o<^, Knoxville, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Prof. Burt P. Kirkland, B.A. Cornell '05, University of Washington, 
University Station, Seattle, Wash. 

Robinson M. MacMurray, Montana State Land Exchange, Helena, Mont. 

F. Van Thompson, State Hospital Commission, Albany, N. Y. 

Charles M. Walker, B.S. Massachusetts Agricultural College '99, no 
East Twenty-third Street, New York City. 

E. Le Verne Wood, Barceloneta, Porto Rico. 



ROLL OF THE CLASSES 339 

CLASS OF 1908 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

Raymond W. Allen, B.S. Rutgers '06, Forest Service, Cody, Wyo. 

Prof. Nelson C. Brown, B.A. Yale '06, New York State College of 
Forestry, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Frederick H. Brundage, Ph.B. Yale '07, Forest Service, Albany, Ore. 

Prof. Elias T. Clark, Ph.B. Yale '07, University of Washington, Uni- 
versity Station, Seattle, Wash. 

Ernest D. Clark, Ph.B. Yale '07, R. F. D. i, Litchfield, Conn. 

Robert E. Clark, Ph.B. Yale '07, Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

Arthur M. Cook, B.A. Harvard '06, 135 Academy Street, Laconia, N. H. 

Prof. John A. Ferguson, B.A. Hamilton '96 and M.A. '03, Pennsylvania 
State College, State College, Pa. 

H. Earl French, B.S. University of Iowa '06, Halsey, Neb. 

Jesse R. Hall, B.S. University of California '05, Yreka, Cahf. 

R. Clifford Hall, B.S. Northwestern University '06, Forest Service, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

William C. Latane, B.S. Virginia Polytechnic Institute '05, Libby, Mont. 

Charles A. Lewis, B.A. Trinity '93, 3 West Fifty-fourth Street, New York 
City. 

Forman T. McLean, Ph.B. Yale '07, Ephraim, Utah. 

Harvey R. MacMillan, B.S.A. University of Toronto '06, Forest Branch, 
Victoria, B. C, Canada. 

Willis N. Millar, B.S. University of Pennsylvania '06, Box 1253, Calgary, 
Alta., Canada. 

Robert B. Miller, B.S. Wabash College '96 and M.A. '06, Box 256, Thorn- 
town, Ind. 

Barrington Moore, B.A. Yale '06, Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

Thornton T. Munger, B.A. Yale '05, Forest Service, Portland, Ore. 

Robert L. Rogers, B.A. Yale '06, Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 

Julian E. Rothery, Ph.B. Yale '07, Wellesley, Mass. 

Eidward B. Starr, B.A. Yale '07, Cornwall, Conn. 

Dillon P. Tierney, B.Sc.F. University of Minnesota '06, State Capitol, 
St. Paul, Minn. 

Wilford B. Willey, B.A. Cornell '07, Saint Maries, Idaho. 

Hubert C. Williams, Ph.B. Yale '06, Lakeville, Conn. 

Graduates holding Degree of M.F. Class of 1908 25 

Graduates holding Certificates 

Chester B. Cox, Santa Maria, Calif. 

Joseph A. Fitzwater, Sandpoint, Idaho. 

Francis M. Patton, 95 Charlotte Street, Asheville, N. C. 

Rutledge Parker, Missoula National Forest, Missoula, Mont. 



340 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

NoN Graduates 

*Burgess Dickinson, Ph.B. Yale '07. Died 1913. 

Prof. George E. Gage, M.A. Yale '07 and Ph.D. '09, Amherst, Mass. 
Walter W. Gleason, B.S. Allegheny College '06, Johnsonburg, Pa. 
James E. Martin, B.S. Massachusetts Agricultural College '06, Forest 

Service, Leadville, Colo. 
Wilfred E. Murchie, Ph.B. Yale '07, 80 Broad Street, New York City. 
Royal F. Nash, B.S. Columbia '08, Grand Rapids, Wis. 
Herbert S. Nelson, Ph.B. Yale '05, 758 Savin Avenue, West Haven, Conn. 
Aretas A. Saunders, Ph.B. Yale '07, Forest Service, Chouteau, Mont. 
John A. Sweigert, Plattsburg, N. Y. 
Dean S. Tiffany, Hop Bottom, Pa. 
Ralph B. Wainwright, Ph.B. Yale '07, 63 Curtis Street, New Britain, 

Conn. 



CLASS OF 1909 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

F. F. Woods Beckman, Stockholms Hogre Reallaroverk '05, Finspong, 

Sweden. 
Frederick H. Billard, B.A. Yale '96, Meriden, Conn. 
John M. Briscoe, The Colonial, Bangor, Maine. 
Georges deS. Canavarro, B.S. University of I\Iinnesota '08, Forest Service, 

Washington, D. C. 
Prof. William D. Clark, B.A. Yale '04, 25 North Prospect Street, Amherst, 

Mass. 
John D. Coffman, Forest Service, Weaverville, Calif. 
Arthur W. DuBois, B.A. Cornell '07, Hallstead, Pa. 
Herman E. Fegley, B.A. Franklin and Marshall College '04, 508 Laurel 

Street, Pottsville, Pa. 
Frederick A. Gaylord, Ph.B. Yale '08, 69 South Cliff Street, Ansonia, 

Conn. 
Belknap C. Goldsmith, B.S. University of California '06, Forest Service, 

Alturas, Calif. 
Edgar C. Hirst, B.A. Ohio State University '07, Concord, N. H. 
Oswald D. Ingall, B.A. Cornell '07, 99 South Fullerton Avenue, Mont- 

clair, N. J. 
Henry L. Johnson, B.A. Cornell '07, 54 Broadway Extension, Boston, 

Mass. 
R. Chapin Jones, B.A. Vanderbilt University '04, 9 Concord Avenue, 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Joseph C. Kircher, B.A. Yale '07, Forest Service, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 
Aldo Leopold. Ph.B. Yale '08, Forest Service, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 
Everett H. MacDaniels, B.A. Oberlin '06, Forest Service, Beck Building, 

Portland, Ore. 
Rufus S. Maddox, B.A. Yale '07, Quincy, Calif. 



ROLL OF THE CLASSES 34i 

Prof. Frederick F. Moon, B.A. Amherst 'oi, New York State College of 
Forestry, Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. 

William B. Osborne, Jr., B.A. Williams '07, Forest Service, Beck Build- 
ing, Portland, Ore. 

Percy J. Paxton, B.A. Williams '06, Forest Service, Denver, Colo. 

Reuben P. Prichard, B.S. Dartmouth '07, New York State College of 
Forestry, Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Abbott B. Silva, Ph.B. Yale '08, Forest Service, Missoula, Mont. 

Robert Simmons, B.A. College of City of New York '06. 

Thomas E. Snyder, B.A. Columbia '07, Bureau of Entomology, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Willard Springer, Jr., C.E. Lafayette '07, 810 Washington Street, Wil- 
mington, Del. 

Chester H. Wilcox, C.E. Lehigh '07, Center Moriches, N. Y. 

Addison W. Williamson, Ph.B. Wesleyan '07, Forest Service, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Meyer H. Wolff, Ph.B. Yale '08, Forest Service, Newport, Wash. 

Graduates holding Degree of M.F. Class of 1909 29 

Graduate holding Certificate 
Allen H. Hodgson, 119 Fourth Street, Chico, Calif. 

NoN Graduates 
Oliver E. Baker, B.S. Heidelberg College (Ohio) '03 and M.S. '04, 

M.A. Columbia '05, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 
Hugh G. Calkins, B.S. University of California '06, Forest Service, 

Albuquerque, N. Mex. 
William E. Dunham, Ph.B. Yale '08, Warren, Pa. 
H. Julian C. Humphrey, Ph.B. Yale '08. 

Richard L. Lovell, Ph.B. Yale '07, Yale Station, New Haven, Conn. 
Axel E. T. Moberg. 
Ernest C. Wheeler, B.A. Yale '07, 6 Arch Street, Norwalk, Conn. 



CLASS OF 1910 

Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

Walter G. Alpaugh, B.S. Tufts '08, Willimantic, Conn. 

William G. Baxter, B.S. A. Iowa State College '08, Galva, Iowa. 

George A. Bright, 2d, B.S. Dartmouth '08, Forest Service, Portland, Ore. 

Donald Bruce, B.A. Yale '06, Forest Service, Missoula, Mont. 

Charles R. Clark, B.A. University of Wisconsin '09, Forest Service, 

Washington, D. C. 
Guy C. Cleveland, B.A. Yale '08, The North Jersey Excelsior Company, 

Butler, N. J. 
Hamilton M. Coan, B.A. Princeton '07, Forest Service, Sumpter, Ore. 
George A. Croniie, 14 Compion Street, New Haven, Conn. 



342 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Robert E. Dickson, B.S. Michigan Agricultural College '09, East Lansing, 

Mich. 
Richard C. Eggleston, Ph.B. Yale '09, Forest Service, Saint Maries, Idaho. 
Robie M. Evans, B.A. Dartmouth '06, Fryeburg, Maine. 
Harold Fay, B.A. Tufts '04, 92 Professor's Row, Tufts College, Mass. 
Max H. Foerster, Care Consolidation Coal Company, Jenkins, Ky. 
William H. Gallaher, Ph.B. Yale '09, Santa Barbara, Calif. 
Harold P. Gilkey, B.A. Harvard '09, Richland, Mich. 
James L. Goodwin, B.A. Yale '05, 191 Farmington Avenue, Hartford, 

Conn. 
Lester E. Hitchcock, B.S. Coe College '07, Forest Service, Ogden, Utah. 
Crosby A. Hoar, B.A. Dartmouth '08, Meeker, Colo. 
Stephen V. Klem, Ph.B. Yale '09, 15 Lake Place, New Haven, Conn. 
Julius A. Larsen, B.A. Yale '08, Forest Service, Washington, D. C. 
Raymond E. Marsh, B.S. Dartmouth '08, Westport, N. H. 
Frank B. Notestein, Ph.B. University of Wooster '08, Forest Service, 

Denver, Colo. 
Mauricio J. Oteyza, B.S. Kansas State Agricultural College '10, Los 

Bancs, Laguna, P. L 
Dana Parkinson, B.A. Dartmouth '08, Forest Service, Boise, Idaho. 
Stuart B. Show, B.A. Leland Stanford Jr. University '08, Sisson, Calif. 
William N. Sparhawk, B.A. Yale '08, Forest Service, Ogden, Utah. 
Irving G. Stetson, B.A. Harvard '07, 180 Exchange Street, Bangor, Maine. 
Albert O. Vorse, B.S. Bucknell '05 and M.S. '11, Care Peters, Byrne & 

Company, Ardmore, Pa. 
Robert S. Wallace, B.A. Macalester College "08, Forest Service, Harrison, 

Ark. 
Edgar F. White, B.A. Dartmouth '08, Forest Service, Missoula, Mont. 
Walter K. Wildes, B.A. Bowdoin '04, Little Falls, Passaic County, N. J. 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. Class of 1910 31 

Graduates holding Certificates 

B. Frank Heintzleman, Fayetteville, Pa. 
Sedman W. Wynne, Hot Springs, Calif. 

NoN Graduates 

Edward S. Davey, B.A. Yale '08, 67 Hawthorne Avenue, Glen Ridge, N. J. 
Ernest G. Dudley, B.A. Leland Stanford Jr. University '08, Stanford 

University, Calif. 
Ben Hershey, B.A. Williams '06, 1026 Henry Building, Seattle, Wash. 
♦Thomas Hooker, B.A. Yale '08. Died 1909. 

James L. Leeper, Jr., Ph.B. Yale '09, 304 Clinton Avenue. Kingston, N. Y. 
Samuel B. Locke, B.S. University of Maine '08, Forest Service, Ogden, 

Utah. 
Glenn W. Traer, Jr., Ph.B. Yale '09. 4363 Oakenwald Avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Alvin G. Whitney. 



ROLL OF THE CLASSES 343 

CLASS OF 1911 

Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

Waldo D. Barlow, B.S. Massachusetts Agricultural College '09, Helena, 

Mont. 
Oliver F. Bishop, Ph.B. Yale '09, 174 Grand Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 
Elwood P. Bushnell, B.S. Michigan Agricultural College '10, Bronson, 

Mich. 
Norman C. Case, B.S. Highland College '08, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 
Bernard A. Chandler, B.S. University of Maine '09, Vermont Forest 

Service, Burlington, Vt. 
Neal T. Childs, B.A. Yale '09, Bretton Hall, Broadway and Eighty-sixth 

Street, New York City. 
Walter J. Damtoft, Ph.B. Yale '10, 98 Beechwood Avenue, Bridgeport, 

Conn. 
Howard deForest, B.S. Princeton '95, Care of J. D. deForest, 25 Broad 

Street, New York City. 
Theodore W. Dwight. B.S.F. University of Toronto '10, Forestry Branch, 

Ottawa, Ont., Canada. 
John H. Fahrenbach, B.A. Franklin and Marshall College '09, Bern- 

ville. Pa. 
Arthur F. Fischer, C.E. Ohio Northern University '09, Bureau of For- 
estry, Manila, P. I. 
Charles Goodwin, Ph.B. Yale '10, 1070 Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Alfred B. Hastings, B.A. Dartmouth '04, Orofino, Idaho. 
James O. Hazard, Ph.B. Brown '08, Westerly, R. I. 
Jesse W. Hough, B.S. Pomona College '08, Claremont, Calif. 
Dwight S. Jeffers, B.A. Illinois Wesleyan University '06, Forest Service, 

Laramie, Wyo. 
Fred R. Johnson, B.S. Dickinson '09, 44 North Oak Street, Mt. Carmel, Pa. 
Ernest F. Jones, B.A. Haverford '07, South China, Maine. 
Otto Katz, B.S. College City of New York '09, 30 East 119th Street, New 

York City. 
Arthur F. Kerr, B.A. University of Oregon '09, Forest Service, Port- 
land, Ore. 
Eugene L. Lindsey, Virginia Military Institute '09, Alexandria, Va. 
Thomas E. McCullough, B.C.E. Iowa State College '09, Forest Service, 

Flagstaff, Ariz. 
Samuel R. MacDonald, Ph.B. Yale '09, R. F. D. i, Wallingford, Conn. 
A. Fletcher Marsh, Ph.B. Yale '10, 1207 East Fifty-third Street, Chicago, 

111. 
Seward H. Marsh, B.A. Berea '09, Berea, Ky. 
Frederick R. Mason, B.S. Rutgers '05, Bound Brook, N. J. 
George Z. Mason, B.S. College City of New York '09, 1107 Forest Avenue, 

New York City. 
George R. Monell, B.A. College City of New York '09, 1598 Lexington 

Avenue, New York City. 



344 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Albert E. Moss, Connecticut Agricultural College '05, West Cheshire, 
Conn. 

Harold S. Newins, Ph.B. Lafayette '09, Patchogue, N. Y. 

Douglas K. Noyes, B.A. Yale '07, Forest Service, Yreka, Calif. 

Lawrence B. Pagter, B.A. Yale '09, 8 Vernon Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Ernest C. Pegg, B.A. Wabash '09, Fountain City, Ind. 

Edward C. M. Richards, Ph.B. Yale '09, 119 East Seventy-first Street, 
New York City. 

Abraham Rosenmond, B.S. College City of New York '09, 71 Lenox 
Avenue, New York City. 

Harold L. Russell, B.A. Johns Hopkins '09, Forest Service, Appalachian 
Division, Washington, D. C. 

John W. Spencer, B.A. College of Emporia '09, Emporia, Kans. 

Louis R. Stadtmiller, Ph.B. Yale '10, 429 Atlantic Street, Stamford, Conn. 

J. Warrington Stokes, B.S. Haverford '09, Holmesburg, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Myron W. Thompson, B.S. Massachusetts Agricultural College '09, For- 
est Service, Cody, Wyo. 

Robert E. Thompson, B.S. Michigan Agricultural College '10, Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

Sidney H. Thompson, B.A. Dartmouth '09, 47 Summer Street, St. Johns- 
bury, Vt. 

Charles H. Watzek, Ph.B. Yale '10, 1407 Brady Street, Davenport, Iowa. 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. Class of 1911 43 

NoN Graduates 

Charles E. Beaumont, Ph.B. Yale '09, Rocky Hill, Conn. 

Roger B. Briggs, Connecticut Agricultural College '09, Broad Street, 
Stratford, Conn. 

Sydney F. Brown, Ph.B. Yale '10, 83 Prospect Street, Reading, Mass. 

Philip L. Buttrick, Orange, Conn. 

Charles H. Edwards, B.S. Michigan Agricultural College '09, Forest 
Service, Washington, D. C. 

W. Irving Gilson, B.S. Michigan Agricultural College '10, 59 North Main 
Street, Adrian, Mich. 

Richard H. Goode, B.A. Dartmouth '07, 30 Brastow Avenue, Somerville, 
Mass. 

Raymond W. Gowdy, Ph.B. Yale '10, Thompsonville, Conn. 

James H. Hull, B.A. Yale '07, 315 South Main Street, Torrington, Conn. 

John Lautz, Ph.B. Yale '10, 384 DeWolfe Place, Hackensack, N. J. 

Elmer B. Mason, B.A. Princeton '03, Bureau of Entomology, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Harry Olin, B.S. Michigan Agricultural College '10, Rush City, Minn. 

Earl S. Pierce, Ph.B. Yale '09, Frankfort, Maine. 

Archer E. Roberts, 97 Fern Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Kurt Roehrs, Ph.B. Yale '10, Roswell, N. Mex. 

Robert Stephenson, B.A. Columbia '09, 22 Bank Street, New York City. 



ROLL OF THE CLASSES 345 

Frederick W. Toerner, B.A. College City of New York '02, 758 East 

i6oth Street, New York City. 
Richard W. Walker, C.E. Lehigh University '84, Glenmore, Pa. 



CLASS OF 1912 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. 

William R. Barbour, Ph.B. Yale '11, 420 Hyde Avenue, Ridgway, Pa. 

Victor A. Beede, B.A. Yale '10, 425 Temple Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Henry J. Bothfeld, B.S. Connecticut Agricultural College '10, 450 Oving- 
ton Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Leslie A. Bull, B.A. Dartmouth '10, Billerica, Mass. 

Clifford Cole, B.A. Kansas State University '10, 2412 East Twenty-seventh 
Street, Kansas City, Mo. 

Alexander W. Dodge, B.S. Oregon Agricultural College '10, 877 Wood- 
bury Road, Pasadena, Calif. 

Bruce J. Downey, Virginia Military Institute '09, Fosburgh Lumber 
Company, Vaughn, N. C. 

Carleton W. Eaton, B.A. Bowdoin '10, Calais, Maine. 

Walter M. Geddes, Ph.B. Yale '11, 90 Christopher Street, Montclair, N. J. 

Norton M. Goodyear, B.S.F. Pennsylvania State College '11, Carlisle, Pa. 

Albert W. Hayward, Ph.B. Grinnell College '10, 154 Bridge Avenue, 
Davenport, Iowa. 

Henry J. Hegel, Ph.B. Yale '11, Box 1845, Yale Station, New Haven, 
Conn. 

Thomas F. Heineman, B.A. Oberlin '10, Hamburg, N. Y. 

Charles F. Hitchcock, B.S. Dartmouth '10, Gilbertville, Mass. 

Jacob S. Kaplan, B.S. College City of New York '10, 54 East ii8th 
Street, New York City. 

John H. Keyes, B.A. Amherst '11, 8 Webster Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Raymond M. Killey, B.A. Roanoke College '08, Vivian, W. Va. 

Levon H. Kooyumjian, B.A. Amherst '09, Care of Mrs. H. K. Avakian, 
North Grafton, Mass. 

Bruno R. Kudlich, B.A. Columbia '09, 104 West Eighty-seventh Street, 
New York City. 

Murray McMurray, Ph.B. Grinnell College '10, Webster City, Iowa. 

Daniel H. Moon, Jr., Ph.B. Yale '10, Little Falls, Minn. 

Willis Munro, B.A. Harvard '96 and LL.B. '99, 61 Erie County Bank 
Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Robert J. Noyes, Ph.B. Yale '11, Georgetown, Mass. 

J. Wilbur O'Byrne, B.A. Miami '10, Oxford, Ohio. 

William J. Paeth, Ph.B. Yale 'ir, Naperville, 111. 

WiHiam B. Rice, B.A. College of Emporia '10, Forest Service, Ogden, 
Utah. 

Leroy M. Richardson, B.A. Dartmouth '09, 7 Ravenscroft Road, Win- 
chester, Mass. 



346 YALE FOREST SCHOOL 

Samuel E. Robison, B.S. Ohio Wesleyan 'lo, Mechanicsburg, Ohio. 
Karl Schmitt, B.S. College City of New York '09. 181 St. Mark's Avenue, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Will J. Sproat, B.S. Michigan Agricultural College '11, 1054 Cass Avenue, 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Carl M. Stevens, B.A. Bates '10, Auburn, Maine. 
Clarence E. Taylor, B.A. Wabash '10, R. F. D. 2, Granger, Ind. 
Roscoe B. Weaver, B.S. Simpson College '05, Colfax, Iowa. 
Edward J. Yeomans, B.A. College of Emporia '10, Hallstead, Kans. 
Graduates holding Degree of M.F. Class of 1912 34 

NoN Graduates 

Samuel E. Bower, B.A. Pennsylvania College '10, Orangeville, Pa. 

Charles F. Evans, B.A. University of Wisconsin 'eg, Muscoda, Wis. 

Herman de Fremery, Columbia University Club, 18 Gramercy Park, New 
York City. 

Raymond F. Gardner, B.A. Amherst '10, Chester, N. J. 

Conrad Lambert, B.S. Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute '10, 74 South Port- 
land Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Davis W. Lusk, Jr., B.A. Lafayette '10, 48 Berkeley Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

James E. McNeal, B.F. Pennsylvania State Forest Academy '07, 235 East 
New Street, Lancaster, Pa. 

Jason K. Moyer, Ph.B. Franklin and Marshall College '08, no Centre 
Street, Tamaqua, Pa. 

William E. Prindle, Ph.B. Yale '11, Box 624, New Haven, Conn. 

Keller E. Rockey, B.S. Pennsylvania College '09, 11 12 Morris Building, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Franklin L. Wheeler, Shelton, Conn. 

Howard W. Wills, Ph.B. Yale '11, 59 Prospect Street, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Raymond W. Wilson, B.S. Dartmouth '10, 64 White Street, Springfield, 
Mass. 

Total Graduates holding Degree of M.F. Classes of 
1902 to 1912 7 286 

Total Graduates holding Certificates 14 

Non Graduates recorded in this volume 102 

Total names recorded in this volume 402 



INDEX TO BIOGRAPHIES 



PAGE 

Akerman, A., '02 3S 

Allen, R. VV., '08, 181 

Allison, J. H., '06 122 

Alpaugh, W. G., '10 239 

Ames, F. E., '06 123 

Anderson, J. B., '03 46 

Appleton, J., '04 66 

Ayres, R. W., '04 66 

Bacon, F. D., e;r-'o6 138 

Baker, H. P., '04 67 

Baker, J. F., '05 94 

Baker, O. E., ex-'og 235 

Barbour, W. R., '12 302 

Barlow, W. D., '11 265 

Barrows, W. B., '07 149 

Barton, J. E., '05 94 

Baxter, W. G., '10 239 

vonBayer, W. H., '04 69 

Beaumont, C. E., e;i;-'ii 291 

Beckman, F. F. W., '09 214 

Bedard, A., '07 150 

Beede, V. A., '12 303 

Bentley, J., '07 151 

Besley, F. W., '04 70 

Billard, F. H., '09 215 

Bitner, J. F., «;f-'o6 138 

Bishop, O. F., '11 265 

Boisen, A. T., '05 95 

Bothfeld, H. J., '12 303 

Bower, S. E., ex-'iz 319 

Braniff, E. A., '03 46 

Bridges, J. H., '04 71 

Briggs, R. B., ex-' 11 291 

Bright, G. A., '10 240 

Briscoe, J. M., '09 215 

Bristol, H. R., '05 96 

Brown, H. J., '04 72 

Brown, N. C., '08 181 

Brown, S. F., ex-'ii 292 

Bruce, D., '10 240 

Bruins, J. F., ex-'oy 176 

Brundage, F. H., '08 183 

Buck, C. J., '05 96 

Bull, L. A., '12 304 

Burrall, H. DeW., e^-'o7 177 

Bushnell, E. P., '11 266 

Butler, O. M., '07 151 

Buttrick, P. L., ex-' 11 293 

Calkins, H. G., ^^-'09 236 

Canavarro, G. deS., '09 216 

Carter, E. E., '04 72 



PAGE 

Case, N. C, '11 267 

Chandler, B. A., '11 268 

Chapman, C. S., '02 36 

Chapman, H. H., '04 73 

Cheyney, E. G., «jr-'o6 139 

Childs. N. T., '11 268 

Chittenden, A. K., '02 37 

Chittenden, H. W., '04 73 

Clark, C. R., '10 241 

Clark, E. D., '08 184 

Clark, E. T., '08 183 

Clark, R. E., '08 186 

Clark, W. D., '09 217 

Cleland, G. S., ex-'o6 140 

Clement, G. E., '02 38 

Cleveland, G. C, '10 242 

Clothier, G. L., '03 47 

Coan, H. M., '10 243 

CoflFman, J. D., '09 217 

Cole, C, '12 304 

Cook, A. M., '08 186 

Coolidge, P. T., '07 152 

Cooper, A. W., '03 49 

Cox, C. B., cert. '08 203 

Crawford, C. G., ex-'o3 63 

Cromie, G. A., '10 244 

Crowell, L., '07 153 

Crowell, S. M., '07 153 

Damtoft, W. J., '11 269 

Dana, S. T., '07 154 

Davey, E. S., er-'io 260 

Davis, R., '07 155 

deForest, H., '11 270 

Detwiler, S. B., ex-'os 64 

Dickinson, B., e;tr-'o8 206 

Dickson, R. E., '10 244 

Dodge, A. W., '12 ^04 

Downey, B. J., '12 305 

DuBois, A. W., '09 218 

Dudley, E. G., e^'-'io 261 

Dunham, W. E., ^^-'09 237 

Dwight, T. W., '11 270 

Eastman, H. B., '04 74 

Eaton, C. W., '12 305 

Eckbo, N. B., '07 156 

Edwards, C. H., ex-'ii 293 

Eggleston, R. C, '10 245 

Emmet, C. T., '02 39 

Erickson, M. L., '06 124 

Evans, C. F., ejr-'i2 319 

Evans, R. M., '10 246 



348 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



PAGE 

Fahrenbach, J. H., 'ii 271 

Fay, H., '10 246 

Fegley, H. E., '09 219 

Ferguson, J. A., '08 187 

Fetherolf, J. M., ^^-'05 116 

Filley, W. O., e';r-'o6 140 

Fischer, A. F., '11 272 

Fisher, R. T., '03 49 

Fitzwater, J. A., ceti. '08 203 

Flintham, S. J., '04 75 

Flory, C. H., e;r-'o7 178 

Foerster, M. H., '10 247 

Foster, H. D., '04 76 

Foster, J. H., '07 157 

deFremery, H., ex-'i2 320 

French, H. E., '08 188 

Fromme, R. L., cert. '06 137 

Gage, G. E., e^-'o8 207 

Galarneau, D. C. A., '06 125 

Gallaher, W. H., '10 247 

Gardner, R. F., e;i;-'i2 320 

Gardner, W. J., '03 SO 

Gaylord, F. A., '09 220 

Geddes, W. M., '12 306 

Gilkey, H. P., '10 248 

Gilson, W. I., f;t:-'i I 294 

Gleason, W. W., s;r-'o8 207 

Goldsmith, B. C, '09 221 

Goode, R. H., ex-'i i 295 

Goodwin, C., '11 272 

Goodwin, J. L., '10 248 

Goodyear, N. M., '12 307 

Gowdy, R. W., e*'-'ii 296 

Greeley, W. B., '04 77 

Grimes, J. L., ex-'oy 178 

Griswold, G., ex-'o^ 65 

Guthrie, J. D., '06 125 

Hadley, W. B., '04 78 

Hale, H. M., cert. '05 114 

Hall, J. R., '08 188 

Hall, R. C., '08 189 

Hamilton, F. P., ex-'o\ 91 

Harris, P. T., '05 97 

Harvey, B. T., '07 158 

Hastings, A. B., 'n 273 

Hawcs, A. F., '03 51 

Hawley, R. C., '04 79 

Hayward, A. W., '12 307 

Hazard, J. O., '11 274 

Hegel, H. J., '12 308 

Heincman, T. F., '12 308 

Heintzleman, B. F., cert. '10 259 

Henderson, W. F., ^;r-'o4 92 

Hcrshey, B., ^x-'io 261 

Hills, G. E., ex-'o6 141 

Hinckley, F. C., ex-'oz 65 

Hirst, E. C, '09 221 



PAGE 

Hitchcock, C. F., '12 308 

Hitchcock, L. E., '10 250 

Hoar, C. A., '10 250 

Hodge, W. C., '02 39 

Hodgson, A. H., cert. '09 234 

Hodson, E. R., ejr-'o6 141 

Hokodachi, Y., f.f-'o4 92 

Holmes, J. S., cert. '05 115 

Holt, F. R., ex-'03 65 

Hooker, T., ex-'\o 262 

Hopwood, J. O., ex-'o6 142 

Hosmer, R. S., '02 40 

Hough, J. W., '11 274 

Howarth, J. A., '06 127 

Hull, J. H., e^-'ii 296 

Humphrey, H. J. C, f.r-'o9 237 

Hutchinson, W. I., '03 52 

Imes, R. P., ex-'o^ 92 

Ingall, O. D., '09 222 

Ivy, T. P., ex-'o6 142 

Jacombe, F. W. H., '06 128 

Jeffers, D. S., '11 275 

Johnson, F. R., '11 275 

Johnson, H. L., '09 223 

Jones, E. F., '11 276 

Jones, R. C, '09 223 

Judd, C. S., '07 159 

Kaplan, J. S., '12 309 

Katz, O., '11 276 

Keach, J. E., ex-'o6 143 

Kelleter, P. D., '04 tq 

Kellogg, F. B., '07 162 

Kerr, A. F., '11 277 

Keyes, J. H., '12 309 

Killey, R. M., '12 310 

Kinney, D. G., e^-'os 117 

Kircher, J. C., '09 224 

Kirkland, B. P., ex-'oj 179 

Klem, S. v., '10 251 

Kobbe, W. H., cert. '04 89 

Koch, E., '03 52 

Kooyumjian, L. H., '12 310 

Kudlich, B. R., '12 311 

Lagdameo, J., '05 98 

Lambert, C, ^.r-'i2 321 

Langille, H. D., ex-'os 118 

Larsen, J. A., '10 252 

Lantane, W. C., '08 189 

Lautz, J., e.ir-'ii 297 

Leeper, J. L., ^x-'io 262 

Leopold, A., '09 225 

Levison, J. J., '05 98 

Lewis, C. A., '08 190 

Lindsey, E. L., '11 277 

Locke, S. B., ^;ir-'io 263 

Lovell, R. L., ex-'o^ 238 

Lusk, D. W., ^;r-'i2 321 



INDEX TO BIOGRAPHIES 



349 



PAGE 

Lyford, C. A., '04 80 

McCullough, T. E., '11 278 

MacDaniels, E. H., '09 226 

MacDonald, S. R., '11 279 

McDonough, J. P., '05 100 

MacGuflfey, K. R., '07 163 

McLean, F. T., '08 190 

MacMillan, H. R., '08 191 

McMurray, M., '12 311 

MacMurray, R. M., ex-'oy 180 

McNeal, J. E., e;tr-'i2 322 

Maddox, R. S., '09 226 

Marsh, A. F., 'n 279 

Marsh, R. E., '10 252 

Marsh, S. H., '11 280 

Marston, R. L., '02 42 

Martin, C. S., '07 164 

Martin, J. E., ^;r-'o8 208 

Mason, D. T., '07 165 

Mason, E. B., e;r-'ii 297 

Mason, F. R., '11 281 

Mason, G. Z., 'i i 281 

Mast, W. H., '05 100 

Mathewson, C. A., ex-'os no 

Mattoon, W. R., '04 81 

Mell, C. D., '05 102 

Merrill, H. G., '04 82 

Millar, W. N., '08 193 

Miller, F. G., '03 S3 

Miller, L. C., e:r-'o4 93 

Miller, R. B., '08 193 

Moberg, A. E. T., e;r-'o9 238 

Mbnell. G. R., 'ii 282 

Moon, D. H., '12 311 

Moon, F. F., '09 227 

Moore, B., '08 104 

Moore, E. J. S., '03 54 

Moore, S. L., '06 128 

Morrill, W. J., '05 103 

Moss, A. E., '11 282 

Moyer, J. K., ex-'i2 322 

Munger, T. T., '08 196 

Munro, W., '12 312 

Murchie, W. E., ex-'o8 209 

Murphy, L. S., '07 166 

Myers, G. H., '02 44 

Nash, R. F., ^;i;-'o8 209 

Neal, H. C., '05 1 04 

Nelson, H. S., e:r-'o8 210 

Nelson, J. M.. '05 104 

Newins, H. S., '11 283 

Notestein, F. B., '10 253 

Noyes, D. K., '11 283 

Noyes, R. J., '12 313 

O'Byrne, J. W., '12 313 

Olin, H., eJT-'ii 298 

Oman, A. E., '06 129 



PAGE 

Osborne, W. B., '09 228 

Oteyza, M. J., '10 254 

Paeth, W. J., '12 314 

Pagter, L. B., '11 284 

Parker, R., cert. '08 205 

Parkinson, D., '10 254 

Patterson, A. B., '04 82 

Patton, F. M., cert. '08 204 

Paxton, P. J., '09 229 

Pegg, E. C, '11 284 

Peirce, E. S., «:r-'i i 299 

Peters, J. G., '03 54 

Piche, G. C., '07 168 

Pierson, A. H., e;tr-'o6 144 

Piper, W. B., '05 105 

Powers, A. R., '04 83 

Pratt, M. B., '05 106 

Prichard, R. P., '09 229 

Prindle, W. E., ex-'i2 323 

Rainsford, W. K., e;ir-'o6 144 

Ramskill, J. H., ex-'o6 144 

Read, A. D., '06 130 

Rebmann, J., '05 107 

Recknagel, A. B., '06 131 

Record, S. J., '05 107 

Redington, P. G., '04 84 

Rice, W. B., '12 314 

Richards, E. C. M., 'ii 285 

Richardson, L. M., '12 315 

Ringland, A. C, '05 109 

Roberts, A. E., e;y-'i i 299 

Robertson, C. C, '07 169 

Robison, S. E., '12 315 

Rockey, K. K, ex-'\2 323 

Roehrs, K., e;r-'ii 299 

Rogers, D. N., '07 169 

Rogers, R. L., '08 197 

Rosenbluth, R., '07 170 

Rosenmond, A., '11 286 

Ross, A. H. D., '06 133 

Rothery, J. E., '08 197 

Russell, H. L., '11 286 

Sanders, E. A., ex-'o$ 120 

Saunders, A. A., ex-'o% 211 

Schmitt, K., '12 316 

Scott, C. A., ex-'o6 145 

Searle, A. T., '04 85 

Senn, A., '07 171 

Shepard, W. C., '07 172 

Sherfesee, W. F., '05 109 

Show, S. B., '10 255 

Silcox, F. A., '05 no 

Silva, A. B., '09 230 

Simmons, R., '09 230 

Smith, C. G., '04 8s 

Smith, M., cert. '04 91 

Smith, S. G., cert. '05 115 



35< 



YALE FOREST SCHOOL 



PAGE 

Snyder, T. E., '09 230 

Sparhawk, W. N., '10 2S5 

Spencer, J. W., '11 287 

Spring, S. N., '03 56 

Springer, W., '09 232 

Sproat, VV. J.. '12 316 

Stabler, H. O., ^^-'05 120 

Stadtmiller, L. R., '11 287 

Starr, E. B., '08 198 

Stephenson, R., ejir-'ii 300 

Sterrett, W. D., '03 58 

Stetson, I. G., '10 256 

Stevens, C. M., '12 317 

Stevens, H. G., '03 S9 

Stokes, J. W., 'II 288 

Stuart, R. Y., '06 134 

Studley, H. F., '06 13S 

Sweigert, J. A., ex-'o8 212 

Taylor, C. E. '12 317 

Taylor, T. J., '04 87 

Thompson, M. W., '11 288 

Thompson, R. E., '11 289 

Thompson, S. H., 'ii 289 

Tiemann, H. D., '03 59 

Tierney, D. P., '08 199 

Tiffany, D. S., ff;ir-'o8 21a 

Toerner, F. W., ex-' 11 300 

Tower, G. E., '05 iii 

Traer, G. W., ejr-'io 264 

Van Thompson, F., ex-'o7 180 

Viles, B. S., '04 87 

Vorse, A. O., '10 257 

Waha, A. O., e.r-'o6 146 

Wainwright, R. B., e.r-'oS 213 

Walker, C. M., ex-'o? 180 

Walker, R. W., ex-'ii 300 



PAGE 

Wallace, R. S., '10 257 

Watkins, G., e.r-'o5 121 

Watzek, C. H., '11 290 

Weaver, R. B., '12 318 

Weber, W. H., '06 136 

Weigle, W. G., '04 88 

Wentling, J. P., (?,v-'o6 147 

Wernstedt, L., '05 112 

Wheeler, E. C, ex-'og 238 

Wheeler, F. L., ^.r-'i2 324 

Whetstone, A. W., ^.r-'os 121 

White, E. F., '10 258 

White, L. L., e;r-'o6 148 

Whitney, A. G., e;i;-'io 264 

Wilber, C. P., '07 172 

Wilcox, C. H., '09 212 

Wildes, W. K., '10 258 

Willey, W. B., '08 201 

Williams, H. C., '08 202 

Williamson, A. W., '09 233 

Wills, H. W., ^.r-'i2 324 

Wilmot, G. A., '06 136 

Wilson, R. B., '04 89 

Wilson, R. W., ex-'i2 324 

Winken warder, H., '07 174 

Winter, W., cert. '07 175 

Wolff, M. H., '09 233 

Wood, E. LeV., ^^^-'07 r8o 

Woodbury, T. D., '05 112 

Woodruff, E. S., '07 174 

Woodward, K. W., '05 113 

Woolsey, T. S., '03 61 

Wynne, S. W., cert. '10 260 

Yeomans, E. J., '12 318 

Zavitz, E. J., e.r-'os 121 

Zschokke, T. C, '05 113 



JUN 8 1914