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Full text of "Biographical record : this volume contains biographical sketches of leading citizens of Saunders and Sarpy Counties, Nebraska"

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BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



THIS VOLUME CONTAINS 



Biographical Sketches 

OF 

Leading Citizens 

— OF — 

SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES, 

NEBRASKA. 



•Biography Is the only true history."— Emerson. 



BIOGRAPHICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

George Richmond, Pres.; S. Harmer Neff, Sec'y.; C. R. Arnold, Treas. 

Chicago, III. 

(900. 



1,f ooc- : 



PREFACK 



-|^"TAVING brought to a successful termination our labors in Saunders and Sarpy 
Ipl Counties in compiling and editing the sketches herein contained, we desire, 
-*- V_^ in presenting this Biographical Record to our patrons, to make a few 
remarks, necessarily brief, in regard to the value and importance of local works 
of this nature. We agree with Ralph Waldo Emerson that "Biography is the 
only true History," and also are of the opinion that a collection of the biog- 
raphies of the leading men of a nation would give more interesting, as well as 
authentic, history of their country than any other that could be written. The 
value of such a production as this cannot be too highly estimated. With each 
succeeding year the haze of Obscurity removes more and more from our view 
the fast disappearing landmarks of the past, Oblivion sprinkles her dust of forget- 
fulness on men and their deeds, effectually concealing them from the public eye, 
and because of the many living objects which claim our attention, few of those 
who have been removed from the busy world linger long in our memory. Even 
the glorious achievements of the present age may not insure it from being lost in 
the glare of greater things to come, and so it is manifestly a duty to posterity for 
the men of the present time to preserve a record of their lives and a story of 
their progress from low and humble beginnings to great and noble deeds, in order 
that future generations may read the account of their successful struggles, and 
profit by their examples. A local history affords the best means of preserving 
ancestral history, and it also becomes, immediately upon its publication, a ready 
book of reference for those who have occasion to seek biographical data of the 
leading and early settled families. Names, dates and events are not easily 
remembered by the average man, so it behooves the generations now living, who 
wish to live in the memory of their descendants, to write their own records, 
making them full and broad in scope, and minute in detail, and insure their pres- 
ervation by having them put in printed form. We firmly beHeve that in these 
collated personal memoirs will be found as true and as faithful a record of 
Saunders and Sarpy Counties as may be obtained anywhere, for the very sufficient 



PREFACE 



reason that their growth and development are identified with that of the men 
who have made them what they are today — the representative, leading men, 
whose personal sketches it has been a pleasure to us to write and give a place 
in this volume. From the time when the hand of civilized man had not yet 
violated the virgin soil of the rolling prairies with desecrating plough, to the 
present period of activity in all branches of industry, we may read in the his- 
tories of the counties' leading men, and of their ancestors, the steady growth and 
development which has been going on here for over half a century, and bids fair 
to continue for centuries to come. A hundred years from now, whatever records 
of the present time are then extant, having withstood the ravages of time and 
the ceaseless war of the elements, will be viewed with an absorbing interest, 
equalling, if not surpassing, that which is taken to-day in the history of the early 
settlements of America. 

It has been our purpose in the preparation of this work to pass over no 
phase or portion of it slightingly, but to give attention to the smallest points, 
and thus invest it with an air of accuracy, to be obtained in no other way. 
The result has amply justified the care that has been taken, for it is our honest 
belief that no more reliable production, under the circumstances, could have been 
compiled. 

One feature of this work, to which we have given special prominence, and 
which we are sure will prove of extraordinary interest, is the collection of 
portraits of the representative and leading citizens, which appear throughout the 
volume. We have tried to represent the different spheres of industrial and pro- 
fessional activity as well as we might. To those who have been so uniformly 
obliging and have kindly interested themselves in the success of this work, volun- 
teering information and data which have been very helpful to us in preparing 
this Biographical Record of Saunders and Sarpy Counties, we desire to express 
our grateful and profound acknowledgment of their valued services. 

Chicago, III., September, 1900. THE PUBLISHERS 



-NOTE- 



All the biographical sketches published in this volume were 
submitted to their respective subjects, or to the subscribers, from 
whom the facts were primarily obtained, for their approval or 
correction before going to press; and a reasonable time was 
allowed in each case for the return of the type-written copies. 
Most of them were returned to us within the time allotted, or 
before the work was printed, after being corrected or revised; 
and these' may therefore be regarded as reasonably accurate. 

A few, however, were not returned to us; and, as we have 
no means of knowing whether they contain errors or not, we 
cannot vouch for their accuracy. In justice to our readers, and 
to render this work more valuable for reference purposes, we 
have indicated these uncorrected sketches by a small asterisk (*), 
placed immediately after the name of the subject. They will 
all be found on the last pages of the book. 

BIOGRAPHICAL PUBLISHING CO. 



Biographical Record 

saunders and sarpy counties, 

nebraska. 




HON. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN GOOD. 



Biographical Record 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES. 



'ON. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN 
GOOD, judge of the district court of 
'the Fifth Judicial District of Nebras- 
ka, lias been the incumbent of that office since 
January i, 1900, but in that short period, by 
l:is fairness and high sense of justice, he has 
become firmly established in the good will of 
the members of the bar, and of the public in 
general. He is a gentleman well qualified for 
the office, by reason of his natural fitness, his 
superior training and his valuable experience as 
a practitioner. 

Judge Good was born near Bloomfield, Davis 
county, Iowa, April 2, i860, and is a son of 
John Good, who was born in Ireland in 181 3. 
The latter was married in that country in 1849, 
and soon after came to the United States, lo- 
cating in the state of Ohio, for a brief period. 
He tlien spent two years in Wisconsin, living 
near tlie city of Sheboygan, and in 1859, he 
settled in Davis county, Iowa, near the town of 
Bloomfield, where he made his home until his 
death, in 1878. Mrs. Good survives him and 
still lives on the old home property in Davis 



county. They reared the following children : 
Mary, James, John, Benjamin F., Miriam, 
George W., and William H. 

Benjamin Franklin Good was reared on the 
farm, and received his education in the district 
schools, and in the Southern Iowa Normal 
School, at Bloomfield, being a member of the 
class of 1882. In the State University of Iowa 
he pursued a special course in languages and 
history. He then began his preparation for the 
bar, taking a complete course of study in the 
law department of the University of Iowa, 
from which he was graduated June 23, 1885. In 
August of the same year, he located in Wahoo, 
Saunders county, Nebraska, and entered into 
partnership with E. E. Good, the firm name 
being Goed & Good. This firm was known as 
an exceptionally strong combination of legal 
talent and they soon acquired a large, lucrative 
practice and an extended reputation. The part- 
nership continued until Januar}^ i, 1900, 
when the subject hereof took his seat as judge 
of the Fifth Judicial District of Nebraska. 
Judge Good was elected on the Democratic 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



ticket — the party with which he has always 
affihated. He was made a member of the 
faculty of the State University of Nebraska 
in 1892, and each year since that date has de- 
livered a course of lectures on "Limitation of 
Actions." 

On June 11, 1890, Judge Good was joined 
in the bonds of matrimony with Jennie Jessen, 
a daughter of Andrew and Margaret (Martin) 
Jessen. Mrs. Jessen first came to Nebraska, in 
1853, settling on a homestead which she took 
up, adjoining the place of J. Sterling Morton. 
She taught the first school in the state, it being 
held in a little log school house in Nebraska 
City. The first marriage certificate granted in 
Nebraska was for the marriage of Andrew Jes- 
sen to Margaret Martin. Judge Good and his 
wife are the parents of two children, namely : 
Anabel, who was born May 9, 1891, and Paul 
F., born March 16, 1893. Fraternally, the 
Judge was a member of Franklin Lodge, No. 
14, F. & A. M., of Bloomfield, but had his mem- 
bership transferred to Lodge No. 59 at Wahoo, 
Nebraska, and served as master of the latter 
from 1890 to 1891. He is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, being one of the founders 
of the lodge at Wahoo, in 1888, and its first 
chancellor commander. A portrait of Judge 
Good is shown on a preceding page. 



fAMES W. REYNOLDS is a well-to-do 
and up-to-date farmer and a worthy 
representative of one of the early pio- 
neer settlers of Sarpy county, Nebraska, as his 



father, Wilson Reynolds, located within the 
borders of the county when the white men 
there were comparatively few. 

Wilson Reynolds was a son of John Reyn- 
olds, and was born February 11, 1833, '" 
Brown county, Ohio, but was reared in Illi- 
nois. Wilson Reynolds was married Decem- 
ber 3, 1872, to Frances A. Jarvis, a daughter 
of Edward and Mary (Curtis) Jarvis. Edward 
Jarvis died a few years after his marriage, and 
Mrs. Jarvis became the wife of John Miller. 
In 1853, Wilson Reynolds located in Sarpy 
county, Nebraska, where he followed teaming 
between that locality and Denver, Colorado. 
Subsequently he took up a claim near the Sarpy 
Mills, which he sold a few years previous to 
his marriage. He served in the Union army 
throughout the Civil War — belonging to an 
Iowa regiment. Upon his return from the war 
he again spent his time in breaking the barren 
prairie, and in 1871 he traded 160 acres in 
Richland precinct for 120 acres where his fam- 
ily now resides. He set out shade and fruit 
trees, erected a fine barn and corn-cribs, and 
in 1892 built a handsome home. The build- 
ings on the farm are in good condition and the 
land is richly cultivated — all of which is the 
result of his labors. He always kept about 
30 head of cattle and about 60 hogs. His 
two sons, James W. and Albert J., and his 
widow now conduct the farm, and they have 
won a place in the ranks of the best farmers of 
Sarpy county. 

Wilson Reynolds was the father of six chil- 
dren, who were named as follows: James ^^^, 
Catherine N., Albert J., Fannie M., Mattie C, 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



and Mary J., deceased. Mr. Reynolds passed 
from this life September ii, 1897, and his 
death was deeply deplored by both his family, 
who knew him as a kind and loving husband 
and father, and by his many acquaintances 
throughout the county, who esteemed him as a 
good neighbor and a generous and whole- 
souled man. He was a faithful worker in the 
Methodist church, of which he became a mem- 
ber in 1859. In politics he was a Republican 
and served nine years as a school director. 



-|--^ DWARD J. UPJOHN is a prosper- 
R] ous and intelligent farmer residing 

in Laplatte precinct, Sarpy county, 
Nebraska, and is a descendant of one of the 
early pioneer settlers of the county. He was 
born in Plainwell, Michigan, in 1852, where 
he was also reared and schooled, and he is a son 
of Dr. Erastus N. Upjohn. 

Dr. Erastus N. Upjohn was a native of Eng- 
land, and upon his arrival in this country he 
located at Rochester, New York, where he fol- 
lowed his profession for a score of years ; from 
there he went to Michigan, where he spent 
another twenty years, and in 1854 he went to 
Sarpy county, Nebraska. He homesteaded a 
farm near Springfield, in that county, which 
is now owned by J. Forkner, and afterward 
bought 160 acres from John Enoch, and, while 
he pursued his profession, his sons improved 
the farm. He died in 1880, aged seventy-two 
years. His wife was Myra Thompson, a 
daughter of Dr. Thompson. After Mr. Up- 



john's death, she wedded Richard H. Hoge- 
boon, but she is now a widow, residing at La- 
platte. To Dr. Upjohn and his wife were born 
the following children: Erastus N., Edward 
J., "William C, a physician; Eliza J., and Mar- 
cus T. 

Edward J. Upjohn came to Nebraska with 
his parents, and now owns 90 acres of the old 
homestead. He carries on mainly grain rais- 
ing. Upon his farm he has made many im- 
provements, such as putting up a fine house and 
a good barn. He raises from 50 to 60 
bushels of corn to the acre, and from 35 
to 50 bushels of oats. He is a conscientious 
worker, and among his fellow farmers he is 
known as a good, peaceful neighbor and citizen. 
He was joined in marriage with Frances Rob- 
ertson, a daughter of Theodore H. Robertson, 
who was an early settler of Sarpy county, com- 
ing from Ohio. To this happy union five chil- 
dren have been born : Ida, Bertha, Julia, Wil- 
liam and Edward J., Jr. Politically the subject 
of this sketch is a Democrat and has served as 
assessor, road supervisor and member of the 
school board. 



YP^ ICHARD DANIELL is a prominent 
\y\ and representative farmer of Sarpy 
-*- V^-^county, Nebraska, where he has spent 
many years engaged in stock raising, in which 
he has attained a high degree of success. He 
makes a specialty of thoroughbred Shorthorn 
cattle, and is one of the largest cattle raisers 
in his section of the state. It is probable that 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



he brought the first thoroughbred Shorthorn 
cattle into the state of Nebraska which were 
shipped in on cars. He has one of the best farms 
in Sarpy county, which is now in charge of his 
son, Thomas R. Daniell. Richard Daniell's 
success in life is due entirely to his own energy 
and constant, persevering industry, as, when 
he started out in life in this country, he worked 
as a day laborer. He is a good business man, 
and through fair and honest dealing commands 
the respect and confidence of all who know him. 
He is a native of England, having been born in 
Devonshire, in 1830. 

"Uncle Dick," as he is more familiarly 
known, received his early schooling in his na- 
tive town, and his early youth was spent in 
learning the trade of a butcher. This trade he 
followed in Devonshire, until 1852, when he 
came to the United States in the hope of better- 
ing his finances. At first he settled among the 
Germans in Pennsylvania, where prospects 
were anything but bright at the outset. He 
finally secured a position on the railroad with 
the grading gang, of which he soon became 
"boss," and after he had worked in that capac- 
ity nine months he went to Canada, where he 
followed his trade for three years. During 
that short period, by the strictest economy, he 
succeeded in laying aside a portion of his hard 
earned salary. Upon going to Kalamazoo, 
Michigan, he opened a butcher's shop of his 
own, besides devoting much time to the ship- 
ping of cattle. Until 1867 he conducted a prof- 
itable business, but in that year he disposed of 
his business and property there and moved to 
Sarpy county, Nebraska, bringing with him 



some fine thoroughbred Shorthorn cattle, the 
moving of which cost him $1,300. As he was 
undecided as to whether he would locate there 
permanently, he rented a place for the first 
year, but in 1868 he purchased 120 acres, of 
Aaron Alfred, of which only 40 acres had 
been broken. He later bought 160 acres from 
Mr. Smith, which had been pre-empted by R. 
Anderson; 160 acres which was pre-empted by 
Judge Ferguson; 80 acres from Mr. Myers, 
which was pre-empted by Mr. Thompson; and 
160 acres from Mr. J. Watson. All of this 
property is included in one farm, and on it he 
has a fine residence, in which he lives ; a home 
for his son; and mammoth feed stables, gran- 
aries and stock yards. He has a three-acre 
orchard and several acres of second growth 
trees, which resemble a park. He feeds about 
200 cattle for the market each year, and besides 
he sells about 60 thoroughbred Shorthorn 
bulls per year, the price per head ranging from 
$100 to $500. When Mr. Daniell commenced 
feeding cattle he was told by a substantial and 
well-to-do farmer that every bit of grain used 
in feeding cattle was just that much thrown 
away, but the subject hereof has demonstrated 
that cattle raising is one of the most profitable 
enterprises in which a farmer can engage. 

Mr. Daniell's first wife was Harriet Osier, 
who died, aged thirty-five years, and his second 
union was with Mrs. Annie Gladhill, who had 
one son, T. E. Gladhill, a prominent farmer of 
Sarpy county, who was reared and started out 
in life by Mr. Daniell. The second marriage re- 
sulted in the birth of one son, Thomas R., who 
now manages the farm. Thomas R. Daniell 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



married Ruth Gates, by whom he has six chil- 
dren: Mildred, Irene, Gertrude, Isola, Rich- 
ard, and Amos. 



-r fT * FRANCIS E. CALDWELL is the 
R owner and operator of a saw and grist 
mill in Laplatte precinct, Sarpy county, 
Nebraska, and in addition to carrying on a 
profitable business in that line he is also en- 
gaged in farming. Mr. Caldwell is a good 
business man, and his honest and upright busi- 
ness methods have brought trade from points 
many miles away. He is a native of Jefferson 
county, New York, and a son of Roswell and 
Marietta (Watson) Caldwell. His father was 
a leather dealer for many years, in which line 
he was quite successful. 

Francis E. Caldwell was reared and schooled 
in Michigan, and when a lad of seventeen years 
he commenced working around a saw mill, as- 
sisting in cutting the huge timbers that grew 
in that state. In 1855 he crossed the Missouri 
River into the territory of Nebraska and se- 
cured a position in the Larimer Mills, near 
Laplatte. While there he helped to turn out 
the lumber to be used in the building of the first 
capitol of Nebraska, and he also helped to get 
out the lumber to be used in the erection of the 
first church in Omaha. The church stood on 
Ninth street and was of the Catholic denomi- 
nation. In 1866 Mr. Caldwell bought of his 
mother a tract of 80 acres, which was pre- 
empted by her brother, Charles Watson, and 
left to her upon his death, in 1859. Although 



previous to that time he had taken up a claim 
in Cass county, Nebraska, he began to make 
many improvements on the property purchased 
from his mother. He first put out cottonwood 
slips, which in the course of fifteen years grew 
to be trees three feet in diameter. In 1882 
he built a grist mill 30 by 30 feet in dimen- 
sions, which was run by a steam engine of 
II horse power, and, in 1884, he added a 
sawmill 16 by 50 feet in size. Both mills are 
largely patronized, as they are the only ones 
in his vicinity. The grist mill has a capacity 
of 300 bushels per day, but it is very seldom 
that so much grain is received. Mr. Caldwell 
is meeting with deserved success in his present 
business, and is one of the substantial men of 
his community. 

Mr. Caldwell was joined in marriage with 
Eveline Irwin, a daughter of Joseph and Re- 
becca Irwin, of Woodstock, Ohio. No two 
of Sarpy county's pioneers are better preserved 
and retain their early vigor more notably 
than Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell. The subject 
of this sketch is a Republican in politics and 
has served as road supervisor. Socially he is 
a Mason, belonging to Nebraska Lodge, No. i, 
and served ten consecutive years as master. 
He also belongs to BcUevue Chapter, of Omaha. 



T-^HOMAS BERTON HOLMAN, a 
etired citizen of Laplatte, is one of the 
early settlers of Sarpy county, Nebraska, 
within whose borders he has resided since 1859, 
and he has done his share toward developing it 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



from bare prairie into fine fertile fields, so that 
it now ranks among the best agricultural coun- 
ties in the state. Until 1895 he labored con- 
stantly but in that year he retired from active 
life — though he still owns his farm — and he 
is now spending his last days in comfort and 
happiness. He was born in Hannibal, Marion 
county, Missouri, in 1839, and is a son of 
Thomas and Sarah (Musgrove) Holman. 
Thomas Holman was also a farmer. 

Thomas Berton Holman, the subject of this 
sketch, was born and reared on a farm, and in 
1859 he left home to go to Pike's Peak, Col- 
orado, but on arriving at Omaha, Nebraska, in 
the middle of December, he decided to spend 
the winter there. During that winter he 
worked in a shingle mill, and then carried on 
a freighting business from Omaha, Plattsmouth 
and Nebraska City to Denver, Colorado. He 
continued in that occupation until 1866, when 
he bought 160 acres of land in Laplatte pre- 
cinct, in sections 24, 25 and 26. In 1866 
he put up a neat house and planted seed 
for a grove; some of the trees from that seed 
have grown to be 18 inches in diameter. 
Most of them are maple, but the few cotton- 
wood slips he set out have grown to be three 
feet in diameter. In the early days he and Mr. 
S. B. Bachelder bought a saw mill, which they 
moved from the river to Elk Horn, near 
Gretna, and there operated it for nearly two 
years. Upon giving it up, Mr. Holman devoted 
his entire attention to general farming and 
stock raising. He always kept about 80 
head of cattle and about 100 hogs. From 
his orchard, which consisted of about 300 trees, 



he raised a large quantity of choice fruit. Mr. 
Holman was one of the most substantial and 
progressive farmers of his community. 
Throughout the county he has a wide acquaint- 
ance, who know him as a good neighbor and 
loyal citizen — always willing to lend a helping 
hand and always using his influence in behalf 
of worthy enterprises. 

Mr. Holman was joined in marriage with 
Amanda Jane Ingersoll, and they had four 
children, namely: Hallie Thomas, deceased; 
Bertie James, a farmer, who married Emma 
Knolkee and has two children, Mildred and 
Ralph; Lizzie, deceased; and Inez, living at 
home. In 1884 the subject of this sketch served 
as assessor, road supervisor, justice of the 
peace, and on the school board. He and his 
family are Methodists. In 1895 Mr. Holman 
helped to organize the State Farmers Mutual 
Insurance Company, of South Omaha, of which 
he has since served as president, and of which 
B. F. Stauffer is secretary, and Eugene Curtie 
is treasurer. 



(sJY NTON CHAPEK, proprietor of the gen- 
^^ eral merchandise store at Morse Bluff, 
^^ — - Saunders county, Nebraska, was 
born in Bohemia, September 7, 1859. He is a 
son of Matthias Chapek, deceased, and Kather- 
ine (Hurt) Chapek, living in Colfax county, 
Nebraska. Up to his twenty-first year he at- 
tended the public schools, and also learned the 
trade of furniture and cabinet making. 

In 1880 Mr. Chapek came to the United 
States and settled in Cleveland, Ohio, where 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



he worked at his trade two years. He after- 
ward worked in the blast furnaces in Cleve- 
land. On March 19, 18S4, he moved to Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, and rented a farm, 
which he conducted successfully for three years. 
He then sold out, quit farming and engaged 
in the furniture business. At the end of four 
years he again sold out, purchased a farm, and 
followed agricultural pursuits about four years. 
Then he traded the farm for the general mer- 
chandise business which he now conducts. He 
is credited with having the leading general mer- 
chandise store in his section of Saunders 
county. 

In 1886 Mr. Chapek married Josie Vavra, a 
daughter of Frank and Barbara Vavra. They 
have two children, Julia Ann, aged thirteen 
years, and Hobart Anton, aged four years. Mr. 
Chapek is a member of the Lutheran church, 
and belongs to the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 



ILAS SHIRLEY has been one of 
Sarpy county's industrious and en- 
terprising farmers since 1867, in 
which year he bought 40 acres of land in 
Laplatte precinct from Peter Lewis, and he has 
devoted his entire time to the development of 
that tract ever since its purchase. At the time 
he became the possessor of this property, the 
land had been improved but little, and it had 
only a small frame house. He has since remod- 
eled and enlarged the house, besides erecting a 
good barn and several outbuildings, and he has 
also made a wonderful improvement by the cul- 



tivation of the soil. One of the largest yields of 
oats in Sarpy county is the record of 83 bushels 
to the acre, held by our subject; his average 
yield, however, is 50 bushels to the acre. He 
has a fine grove of shade trees around his house 
and has, besides, a good orchard and a vine- 
yard. 

Mr. Shirley was born in Ontario county, 
New York, in 1829, and is a son of Philander 
Shirley, who was a farmer until his death in 
Seneca county, and married Charlotte A., a 
daughter of James M. and Laura R. (Kinney) 
Wilkinson, who moved to Bellevue, Nebraska, 
in 1856. Her father ran a stage formerly and 
was later probate judge in Butler county, Ne- 
braska. He died, aged seventy-three years, 
nine months and one day. His wife was sixty- 
two years, one month and twenty-five days old 
at the time of her death. They were the par- 
ents of the following children: Abbie B., Ma- 
ria S., Charlotte A., Emily N., William, John 
C, and James F. D. Although Silas Shirley 
and his wife are the parents of no children, they 
have nevertheless reared several, and when one 
has grown up and started out to face the world, 
Mr. and Mrs. Shirley were ever ready to make 
a happy home for another. 



EV. DAVID RAMSEY KERR, Ph. 

D., D. D., stands prominently to the 
fore among the well known educators 
of Nebraska. As president of Bellevue College, 
a department of the University of Omaha, he 
has shown exceptional executive ability, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



has assisted materially in placing it on a stable 
foundation, and making it one of the leading 
educational institutions of the West. Its cur- 
riculum has been elevated to a standard equal 
to those of the heavily endowed Eastern uni- 
versities. The college is of a denominational 
character, having been established by the Pres- 
byterian churches of Nebraska, and receives 
the liberal support of that sect. 

At the session of the Presbyterian Synod of 
Nebraska, at Omaha, October lo, 1879, the 
Presbytery of Kearney memorialized the Synod 
on the subject of an institution for higher edu- 
cation, to be controlled by the Synod. A special 
committee was appointed to report at the next 
meeting. This committee reported to the 
Synod, at Brownville, Nebraska, October 14, 
1880, recommending that the Synodical Col- 
lege be located at Bellevue. After full con- 
sideration Bellevue College was established by 
a vote of the Synod October 16, 1880, as the 
Synodical College of Nebraska. The offer of 
the Hon. Henry T. Clarke to donate 264 acres 
of land situated at Bellevue, with a college 
building costing $25,000 erected thereon, was 
accepted, and the cornerstone of Clarke Hall, 
the first college building, was laid July 4, 1883. 
The college was opened for classes September 
10, 1883, with 14 students. Rev. William 
J. Bollman in charge of classes and Rev. F. S. 
Blayney acting president. The Rev. William 
W. Harsha, D.D., LL.D., was elected to the 
presidency of the college October 11, 1883, and 
took charge at the opening of the second year, 
September 9, 1884, when Clarke Hall was dedi- 
cated. Dr. Harsha resigned from the presi- 



dency at the close of the fifth year, June 14, 
1888, and was succeeded by Rev. Francis S. 
Blayney, Ph.D., who became president at the 
opening of the sixth year, September 14, 1888. 
The first class, consisting of three members, 
was graduated June 13, 1889. President Blay- 
ney resigned at the close of the first term of 
the seventh year. The Rev. David R. Kerr, 
Ph.D., D.D., took charge as president January 
2, 1890, taking the oath of office April 27, fol- 
lowing, and becoming the first inaugurated 
president of the college. Lowrie Hall, a very 
attractive home for young ladies, was erected 
at once, and was dedicated June 10, 1890. By 
action of the board of trustees, June 9, 1891, 
which was duly recorded, the corporation of 
Bellevue College was changed to that of the 
University of Omaha. The object of the col- 
lege, as specified in the articles of incorpora- 
tion, is to promote liberal education in Letters, 
Science, Philosophy, Arts, Law, Medicine, 
Theology, and other departments of knowledge. 
The professional departments of the university 
are located at Omaha, Nebraska. Mr. William 
Rankin recently gave to Bellevue College 56 
acres of land and lots in the village, increasing 
the holdings of the institution to 320 acres, 30 
village lots and two dwellings. The land is 
cultivated for the support of the school. In re- 
cent years Philadelphia Hall and Rankin Hall 
have been built, both being modern buildings. 
Rankin Hall is the president's home; Lowrie 
and Philadelphia Halls are used as dormitories 
for girls and boys, and have a capacity of 40 
each. At the present time they are crowded, 
and the college is commencing to build an- 




CHARLKS PERKEV. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Other hall. There are in attendance about loo 
students, and ten instructors are employed. 
The college is located on Elk Hill at an eleva- 
tion of 300 feet above the river level, 
and commands a beautiful view of the valley 
below. The president resides in a handsome 
eight-room cottage, located on Elk Hill, and 
modern in all its conveniences. There are two 
220-foot tubular wells located on the place, 
which supply an abundance of water for the 
large reservoir. In connection with the school 
Mr. Kerr has established an industrial depart- 
ment, in which 20 students can work their way 
through college. 

Rev. David Ramsey Kerr was born at Cadiz, 
Harrison county, Ohio, in 1850, and received 
his education at Franklin College, graduating 
with the class of 1874. He had taught school, 
whereby he secured the means which enabled 
him to obtain an education. He then took a 
theological course in the Presbyterian Semin- 
ary, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and was ordained 
a minister on April 26, 1876. He followed his 
calling at Jamestown, Pennsylvania, for a time, 
and was then located at Mercer, Pennsylvania, 
until 1887. In that year he removed to Omaha, 
where he was pastor of the Southwest Presby- 
terian Church for three years, when he received 
and accepted the call to be president of Bellevue 
College. He was united in marriage with 
Martha S. Hill, of Steubenville, Ohio, and they 
are the parents of the following children : 
Willis Holmes, who graduated from Bellevue 
College with the class of 1900; James Freder- 
ick ; Mary Sherrard ; David Ramsey, Jr. ; Julia 
Carrick; and Robert Hill. 



HARLES PERKEY, who as president 
of the First National Bank of Wahoo, 
Nebraska, is well known throughout 
Saunders county, has been actively identified 
with many public enterprises of that city, and 
has been an important factor in promoting the 
best interests of the community. He is a pub- 
lic spirited citizen, the growth and development 
of Wahoo ever being foremost in his thoughts. 
As a business man he possesses exceptional 
ability, and the First National Bank under his 
skillful direction has become one of the most 
substantial banking institutions of the state 
of Nebraska. 

Mr. Perkey was born at Georgetown, Co- 
lumbia County, Ohio, where he attended the 
public schools. He subsequently took a thor- 
ough course of study in Garfield College, and, 
in 1 86 1, entered the Union army. He enlisted 
in Company H, 7th Regiment, Ohio Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and served fifteen months. In 
the fall of 1862 he re-enlisted at Massillon, 
Ohio, in Company A, 104th Regiment, Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, and served with honor 
until the close of the war, holding the rank of 
first lieutenant at the time he was mustered 
out. In 1866 he went west, to the state of 
Nebraska, locating at Desoto, Washington 
county. In 1868 he removed to Cedar Bluffs, 
Saunders county, and engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, until 1877, when he was made deputy 
county treasurer and moved to Wahoo. He 
served two terms in this office, until the fall of 
1881, when he was elected county treasurer, 
and served as such until i886; he also filled 
various minor offices. In 1886 he was elected 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



vice-president of the Saunders County National 
Bank, and on January ii, 1887, was made pres- 
ident of the First National Bank of Wahoo. 
The last named institution was organized in 
January, 1876, by Henry Anderson as a private 
bank, and was conducted in a small frame 
building, whose dimensions were 18 by 30 feet. 
In February, 1880, John M. Griffith became a 
junior partner, the capital stock was increased 
to $20,000, and they engaged in general bank- 
ing, insurance and land business. The growth 
of the bank was such as to require new quar- 
ters, and in 1881 a handsome brick building 44 
by 70 feet in dimensions and two stories high, 
was built, the first floor being devoted to the 
bank and the second floor to office apartments. 
In addition to the general banking rooms there 
is a room for directors and a large fireproof 
vault, with a time lock. On November 9, 1885, 
the institution was made a national bank, with 
Andrew Blackstead as president, and he was 
succeeded by Charles Perkey, the subject 
hereof. It is the only national bank of 
Saunders county, and has a capital stock of 
$80,000 and a surplus of $10,500. There is 
a real estate and loan department, and L. J. 
Kudrna is the accountant. Mr. Perkey, aside 
from his banking interests, is part owner in 
conjunction with Killian & Straton, of the 
Wahoo Opera House, the finest opera house in 
the county. 

The subject of this sketch was united in 
marriage with Josephine M. Dunn, of Blair, Ne- 
braska, who died leaving two children, Lucille 
and Mildred. He formed a second matrimo- 
nial alliance, wedding Mrs. E. M. Paine, of 



Denver, Colorado. Fraternally Mr. Perkey is 
a member of Lodge 59, A. F. & A. M., of 
Wahoo, of which he is past master. In relig- 
ious views he is liberal. His portrait appears 
on another page in proximity to this. 



HARLES EDWARD SMITH, whose 
long life has been notable for untiring 
industry, marked by many interesting 
episodes, was one of the very first settlers of 
Sarpy county, Nebraska. He located there as 
early as 1854, encountered all the hardships 
incident to pioneer life, and has witnessed the 
wonderful transition from a wild prairie to a 
land of beautiful homes, busy towns and highly 
cultivated farms. He is now eighty-two years 
of age, but with an iron constitution, developed 
by years of early toil, he bears his years in a 
remarkable manner, having the strength and 
agility of a man many years his junior. 

Mr. Smith was born two miles from New- 
port, in the state of Rhode Island. March 13, 
1818, and is a son of Edward Smith. At the 
age of sixteen years he began sailing and made 
four voyages on a whaler in the Atlantic and 
Indian oceans, and one to Australia. In 1849, 
with others, he bought a sailing vessel and 
went around the "Horn" to California, the 
voyage consuming six months. He then fol- 
lowed mining there for a period of two years, 
after which he returned to his home in the East 
on a steamer, going by way of Nicaragua. In 
1853 he went west, and located in council 
Bluffs, Iowa, with the intention of driving 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



cattle from the eastern markets to the moun- 
tains, in company with Mr. Lockwood, Mr. 
Gilmore, and others. They decided to locate 
in Sarpy county, Nebraska, and, beginning at 
the river, laid out their claims. The subject 
of this sketch was the third to locate a claim, 
acquiring the 320 acres on which he 
now resides. He built a log house in 
1864, and set out fruit and shade trees; he 
has now an excellent orchard of three acres. 
Some of his trees have grown to be the largest 
in the county, one cottonwood tree measuring 
four feet in diameter. His land yields 
heavily, averaging 40 bushels of corn and 30 
bushels of oats to the acre. The farm is well 
stocked with cattle, hogs and horses — all of 
high grade. He has met with great success 
during all the years of his active career, and is 
a prosperous man. He is a man of pleasing' 
character and numbers his friends by the score 
throughout the county. Although now living 
in practical retirement he stilloversees his prop- 
erty. 

Mr. Smith was united in marriage with 
Hannah Thurston, who died at the age of 
thirty-five years, and they were the parents of 
four children, as follows : Cassius M. Clay, 
deceased; Charles Sumner, a railroad man, of 
Montana, who married Nellie Douglas ,and has 
four children, — Dougles, Arthur, Park, and 
Walter; Walter, deceased; and William, a 
carpenter, who married Dena Nelson, and has 
four children, — Eddie, Gertrude, Evelyn (de- 
ceased), and Ralph. Mr. Smith married again 
— his second wife being Mrs. Augusta Hotch- 
kiss, widow of Samuel J. Hotchkiss, who died. 



leaving a daughter, Ida M., who became the 
wife of H. S. Smith, by whom she has three 
children — Nellie, Fred, and Mabel. By his 
second marriage the subject hereof is the father 
of four children : Julius Jay, who has charge of 
the home farm; Irving Edward, an insurance 
agent of Salt Lake City, who married Julia 
Cheney, and has one son, — Reuel ; Hannah 
Thurston, station agent and postmistress at 
Avery, Nebraska; and Paul P., a farmer, who 
married Rose B. Ray, and has one son, Owen. 
Religiously, Mr. Smith is an adherent of the 
Baptist faith. Politically, he is a Prohibitionist. 



ILLIAM A. SCHWENCK, one of 
the rising young farmers and stock 
raisers of Sarpy county, Nebraska, 
is a son of David and Mary (Sump) Schwenck. 
David Schwenck was a native of Germany, 
and throughout his early life he was a rope 
maker by trade. Upon coming to this country 
he settled in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1864, at 
which time he was a very poor man, but by 
constant perseverance he succeeded in amassing 
a moderate fortune before his death. The first 
two years he worked as a day laborer, but with 
considerable economy he succeeded in saving 
enough of his money to go into the saloon busi- 
ness, at which he continued three years. In 
1876 he sold out, and from Mr. Hamilton, of 
Omaha, he purchased 320 acres of land in the 
southwest corner of section 30, lacking 
but $1,000 of having enough to pay for his 
place. Two years later he sold 100 acres 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



of this land. There were no improvements 
upon the place, and his first work was to 
erect a house, which stood until 1882, when it 
was destroyed by fire. He afterward built the 
one in which his son, William, now resides, 
and in 1890 he built the handsome home now 
owned by his wife. He was very successful in 
carrying on farming, and soon became the 
owner of a large tract of land. At the time of 
his death, however, he had sold all but 70 
acres, upon which he spent his latter years in 
quiet retirement. He passed from this life in 
1899, aged seventy-one years, and his death 
was deeply deplored by his large circle of 
friends throughout the community. As a re- 
sult of his marriage with Mary Sump, the fol- 
lowing children were born: Dora, who is the 
wife of Edward Custer, of New York City; 
Henry, who is a sheep ranchman in the West; 
Ella, who is the wife of G. A. Massion, of 
Omaha ; William A. ; Carrie, who is the wife 
of J. M. MacMeadows, of Paris, Illinois ; and 
Agnes, who is the wife of J. L. Hines, of Sarpy 
county. 

Mr. Schwenck's early schooling, which he 
received in the primary schools of his native 
town, was later supplemented by a course in the 
Fremont Normal School, from which institu- 
tion he was graduated in 1891. Upon leaving 
school he rented his father's farm until 1897, 
when he bought the north 108 acres. This 
piece of property is under a good state of culti- 
vation as a result of his own and his father's 
work, and no better farm can be found in Sarpy 
county than the one owned and operated by 
the subject of this sketch. He has raised five 



tons of alfalfa to the acre, 75 bushels 
of corn per acre, and 50 bushels of oats per 
acre, all of which goes to prove the excellent 
condition of his land. Stock raising occupies 
much of his attention — as he always has about 
60 head of Hereford cattle, and about 50 
head of Poland-China hogs. For the past ten 
years he has raised fancy-bred chickens, many 
of which proved to be premium winners, but 
at present he has mostly Wyandotte chickens. 
He is undoubtedly one of the most progressive 
and up-to-date farmers of his community, and 
throughout the county he has any number of 
warm friends. 

Mr. Schwenck was joined in marriage with 
Meda Hines, a daughter of John Hines, living 
near Manchester, Iowa. Both he and his wife 
are Presbyterians, though Mr. Schwenck was 
reared a Lutheran. Politically, he is a stanch 
Democrat. 



TTtHARLES L. SHARP, one of the sub- 
l J| stantial and enterprising business men of 

^■"^ — ^Papillion, Nebraska, is proprietor of 
a hotel, restaurant, and confectionery store. 
He was born in Cass county, Nebraska, August 
8, 1869, and is a son of Joseph G. and Amanda 
J. (Rager) Sharp, both of whom are now re- 
siding in Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Mr. Sharp was reared to agricultural pur- 
suits, and until thirteen years of age he at- 
tended the district schools of his native county. 
He then went to work in a livery stable, but 
shortly afterward became a railroad contrac- 
tor, which business he followed thirteen years. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



The following four years he was engaged in 
watermelon farming in Cass county, but at the 
end of that time he sold out to engage in his 
present business. The subject hereof is a popu- 
lar, wide-awake business man, and he is one of 
the leading citizens of Papillion. 

Mr. Sharp was united in marriage in 1888 
with Mollie Betts, a daughter of J. B. and 
Laura (Butts) Betts of Cass county, and they 
have a family of six children, as follows : 
Myrtle May, aged ten years; Charles L., aged 
eight years ; Josie, aged six years ; Earl, aged 
four years^ Pearl, aged two years; and Grace, 
a babe of two months. In politics, Mr. Sharp 
is a strong Democrat, and takes an active part 
in public affairs. 



/-^^^EORGE M. MULLINS is a man 
I [sT whose good judgment, learning and 
^sterling honesty have won for him a 
place among the prominent attorneys of Sarpy 
county, Nebraska. He was born in North 
Londonderry, New Hampshire, February 4, 
1865, and is a son of Simon and Harriet 
(Cheney) Mullins, both now living in North 
Londonderry. 

Mr. Mullins remained at home until he be- 
came of age, attending the public schools and 
fitting himself for college, in the Pinkerton 
Academy at Derry, New Hampshire. He then 
entered the New Hampshire College of Agri- 
culture and Mechanical Arts, from which he 
graduated June 25, 1885. On June 16, 1886, 
he located in Sarpy county, Nebraska, where he 



taught in the public schools four years. From 
1890 to 1893 he was principal of the Millard 
School, in Douglas county, and while occupy- 
ing that position he read law. He was admit- 
ted to practice in 1893, ^^'^ o" August i of that 
year he entered into active practice in the ofifice 
of C. L. Hover, of Papillion. He remained 
with Mr. Hover one year when he established 
an office of his own. He has devoted consider- 
able attention to commercial, real estate and 
probate law, on which he is recognized as an 
authority, and he has made an enviable reputa- 
tion for himself among the leading attorneys 
of Papillion. 

Mr. Mullins was joined in marriage in Octo- 
ber, 1890, with Mary A. Cain, a daughter of 
Richard M. and Frances (Whittington) Cain, 
of Sarpy county, and they have three children, 
namely : Simon Marion, aged eight years ; Ida 
Lucile, aged six years; and Louise Frances, a 
babe. Politically, the subject of this sketch is 
a stanch Democrat. 



ENRY CORDES is one of the thrifty 
and well-to-do farmers of Sarpy county, 
Nebraska, who started out in the 
wide world a comparatively poor boy. The 
success with which he has met is due to his own 
untiring energy and determination to succeed. 
He was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1843, 
and is a son of Peter Cordes. He received his 
early schooling in his native town, and during 
his early life he followed various pursuits; in 
1869 he came to the United States, Upon his 



26 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



arrival he went directly to Sarpy county, where 
he worked as a day laborer on a farm, and 
saved his earnings until he had enough to pur- 
chase 80 acres of land from Isaac Hoff. 
He at once put up a small house, and set out 
a lot of shade trees and about two acres of 
fruit trees. He labored diligently in improv- 
ing his land all he could, and in the course of a 
few years he had as good a farm as could be 
found in Sarpy county. As his efforts were 
being crowned with success his earnings were 
invested in more farming land, and he pur- 
chased an adjoining 40 acres from L. Meyers. 
He has a fine barn 24 by 32 feet in dimen- 
sions, a good granary, and several first-class 
out-buildings. He keeps about 60 head of 
cattle at all times, and several hundred head of 
hogs ; he sometimes raises from 60 to 80 bushels 
of corn to the acre, and has raised 60 bushels 
of oats per acre. Mr. Cordes is a hard and 
thorough worker, and is deserving of the suc- 
cess which he has attained. He is a good 
neighbor and citizen, and has many warm 
friends in Bellevue precint. 

Henry Cordes was joined in wedlock with 
Catherine Petersen, and to them have been 
born the following children : Annie, Hugo, 
Wliliam, Henry, Almina, George, Eddie, Gus- 
tave, Adele, Tena, Harry, and Sophia. The 
eldest daughter, Annie, is the wife of Hans 
Harmsen, and they have three children — 
Theodore, Catherine, and Walter. The subject 
of this sketch has served on the school board, 
and for the past sixteen years he has been 
organist at the Lutheran church, of which he 
and his family are members. 



(^JY NDREW H. FRICKE, the owner of 
rjH several fine farms in Sarpy and Douglas 
^— <;ounties, Nebraska, is now living in 
quiet retirement, having spent many successful 
years in tilling the soil. He is a descendant 
of sturdy German stock, having been born in 
Walldorf, Germany, May 2"], 1853. He is a 
son of Henry and Anna (Steffen) Fricke, the 
former having died while on the way to Ne- 
braska, while the latter now resides with her 
son Andrew H. 

The subject of this sketch was a lad of eleven 
years when his parents came to the United 
States, and settled near Richmond, Jefferson 
county, Ohio, where the father spent two years 
in carrying on agricultural pursuits. In 1867 
they moved to Sarpy county, Nebraska, where 
Henry Fricke homesteaded 80 acres of land, — 
the west half of the northwest quarter of 
section 16, township 14, range 12. On this 
piece of property Andrew H. Fricke now re- 
sides. At first the family lived in a small house 
which Henry Fricke had erected, but they have 
lived in their present fine residence since 1885. 
Stock raising and general farming were Mr. 
Fricke's pursuits for many years, and as his 
efforts met with success his earnings were used 
in the purchase of additional land. He now 
owns the following farms: 160 acres in Doug- 
las county, adjoining the homestead; 160 acres 
described as the southeast quarter of section 
22, townsliip 14., range 12; and 160 acres de- 
scribed as the southeast quarter of section 20, 
township 14, range 12. His farms are in a 
good state of cultivation — the result of his own 
labor — and with the exception of the 40 acres 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



around the homestead he rents all his property. 
In November, 1886, Mr. Fricke was united 
in marriage with Minnie Hemsted, a daughter 
of Charles and Rosa (Gruber) Hemsted, of 
Dubuque, Iowa, both of whom are deceased. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Fricke two children have been 
born, namely: Ida, aged twelve years; and 
Emil, aged nine years. Mr. Fricke is a stanch 
Republican in politics, and his fellow citizens 
have honored him several times with the office 
of precinct assessor and road supervisor. Mrs. 
Fricke is a member of the Methodist church. 



/^^EORGE SCHRAM, a successful 
I [j-p tiller of the soil, is one of the self-made 
men of Sarpy county, Nebraska, as 
through his own industry and thrifty habits 
he has succeeded in acquiring 500 acres of 
choice farming land. He was born in Bavaria 
on January 9, 1855. He is a son of John and 
Katherine (Oppel) Schram. The former also 
lives in Sarpy county, and the latter is deceased. 
Until George Schram was seventeen years of 
age he worked upon his father's farm in 
Bavaria, and at the same time spent his spare 
hours in attending the district schools. In 1871 
he and his sister came to the United States. 
He settled near Waterloo, Iowa, where he 
worked on a farm for five years. He located in 
Sarpy county in 1876, and has become one of 
the most influential and highly respected farm- 
ers within its bounds. He at once purchased a 
farm, and with his earnings he bought more 
land from time to time until he is now the 



owner of 500 acres — 300 acres of which he 
rents out while he cultivates the remainder. He 
devotes considerable attention to stock raising, 
and his farm is one of the best tilled in Sarpy 
county. He has a handsome residence which is 
surrounded by a magnificent orchard of 600 
trees, consisting of apple, cherry, peach and 
plum; the outbuildings o nhis farm are all in 
good condition. 

Mr. Schram was married in 1880 to Mary 
Klench, a daughter of Peter and Katherine 
(Schuetz) Klench — the former being deceased, 
while the latter lives in Los Angeles, California. 
Eight children have been born to this union, 
namely: Katie, aged eighteen years; Maggie, 
aged seventeen years; Peter, aged fourteen 
years ; Nettie, aged eleven years ; George, aged 
eight years ; Leonard, aged seven years ; Joseph- 
ine, aged four years; and Conrad, aged one 
year. Politically, Mr. Schram is a Democrat. 
Religiously, he and his family belong to the 
Roman Catholic church. Mr. Schram has four 
brothers and two sisters residing in Sarpy 
county, namely: Henry, Robert, Valentine, 
Michael, Maggie, the wife of August Kline, 
and Linda, the wife of Louis Fredericks. 



ERMAN A. SANDER, a public 
spirited and popular citizen of Papillion, 
Sarpy county, Nebraska, is the lead- 
ing merchant of his adopted city, and stands 
high in both business and social circles. He was 
born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, February 
27, 1867, and is a son of William (deceased) 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



and Mary (Fecht) Sander — the latter now liv- 
ing in Sarpy county, Nebraska. 

In 1876 the family moved to Papillion, Ne- 
braskay vi^here Herman attended the public 
schools until he was fifteen years of age. Then 
the family moved to Omaha, and at the age of 
eighteen years he began work as clerk, being 
employed in various offices. For twelve years 
he was a trusted employee of the United States 
National Bank of Omaha. In 1897 he went 
to Papillion, Nebraska, embarked in the gen- 
eral merchandise business and is now conduct- 
ing the largest and most popular store in the 
county. 

Mr. Sander is a hustling and wide-awake 
business man, and his courteous manners and 
good business traits commend him to all with 
whom he comes in contact. 

The subject of this brief sketch was married 
in 1894 to Pauline Zimmerman, a daughter of 
Gottlob (deceased) and Katherine (Elsasser) 
Zimmerman, and to them has been born one 
child — Marie, aged three years. Mr. Sander is 
a member of the Sarpy Lodge, I. O. O. F., and 
of the Roval Arcanum. 



■ILLIAM L. WILLIAMS, an ex- 
tensive land owner of Sarpy county, 
'Nebraska, successfully carried on 
farming for many years, but since 1892 he has 
been retired from active life, a respite of which 
he is well deserving after so many years of in- 
cessant labor. He was born September 22, 
1835 — his birthplace being in Delaware county, 



Ohio — and he is a son of David and Elizabeth 
(Lewis) AVilliams, both of whom are now 
deceased. 

Until he was eighteen years of age, the sub- 
ject hereof worked during the summer months 
on his father's farm, while during the winters 
he improved his spare time by attending the 
district schools. After that he started to learn 
the trade of a carpenter, and when he moved 
to Johnson county, Iowa, he followed that 
trade in connection with farming for a period 
of ten years. He then left Iowa, and going to 
Omaha, Nebraska, he there pursued his trade 
for two years, after which he located in Sarpy 
county, and has since become one of its most 
esteemed and respected citizens. At first he 
followed his trade for two years, during which 
time he assisted in putting up the first frame 
house in Papillion, but subsequently he betook 
himself to farming, and purchased 120 acres 
in Fairview precinct. Farming and stock rais- 
ing were his chief pursuits, and, as the country 
was new, he met with considerable difficulty, 
but, by reason of a determination to succeed 
his efforts were eventually crowned with suc- 
cess. He lived in a small house, 16 by 24 feet 
in dimensions, and after dwelling on his first 
purchase for three and one-half years, he traded 
it for 160 acres of land in section 12, township 
13, range 11. Having good success, he was 
afterward enabled to buy 160 acres in section 
13, township 13, range 11, and his home resi- 
dence in section 27, township 14, range 12. 
He has a fine home, and his farms are highly 
improved, as a result of his own toil. He is 
widely known throughout his adopted county 




WAi/iER flp:ming. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



as a conscientious and upright farmer and a 
good citizen. 

April 2, 1873, Mr. Williams was joined 
in marriage with Zoa Jarvis, of Canada, a 
daughter of John Jarvis, and to this union the 
following children have been born : Mary, aged 
twenty-six years ; and Lillie, aged twenty years. 
In 1 89 1 Mr. Williams moved to Papillion, 
where he erected his present fine home, and 
since 1892 he has been enjoying the pleasures 
of a well earned fortune. His present home 
is surrounded by a fine orchard of apple, plum, 
peach and cherry trees. 



1?- 



^ALTER FLEMING, of Morse 
Saunders county, Nebraska, 
'president of the Morse Bluff Bank, 
was born near London, Canada, December 12, 
1842. He is a son of Robert and Christina 
(Beattie) Fleming, the former deceased, the 
latter now living in Saunders county. 

Like most boys of the neighborhood, he 
worked on his father's farm while attending 
the public school. After leaving the district 
schools he took a course in a commercial 
college. He worked on his father's farm until 
1868, when he moved to Saunders county. He 
took up a homestead, entered a quarter section 
of land and immediately engaged in farming. 
Not being overburdened with money, he put 
up a Cottonwood shanty and had a dug-out for a 
barn. Two years afterward he put up a 10 by 12 
foot house, in which he lived until 1883, when 
he built his present residence. He now has one 
of the finest farms and orchards in Saunders 



county. Over 400 apple, pear, and cherry 
trees, now in full bearing, present a beauti- 
ful sight. His property consists of the south 
half of the northeast quarter of section 4, the 
southeast quarter of section 4, the northwest 
quarter of section 10 and the west half of the 
southwest quarter of section 9, — 480 acres 
in all. 

In October, 1872, Mr. Fleming married 
Julia Wheeler, of Iowa. Mrs. Fleming is a 
daughter of William and Sarah (Ballard) 
Wheeler. They have nine children, as follows : 
Ada M., born February 5, 1874; Agnes M. 
(deceased), born October 25, 1875; Thomas 
M., born February 6, 1877; Ethel M. (de- 
ceased), born November 16, 1878; Edna B. 
(deceased), born August 19, 1880; Lizzie A. 
(deceased), born November 23, 1882; Sarah 
E. (deceased), born May 26, 1884; Walter G., 
born April 16, 1887; and Robert H., born No- 
vember 7, 1888. 

Mr. Fleming is a Republican in politics, and 
filled the position of county superintendent of 
schools in 1871 and 1872, and was county com- 
missioner in 1884, 1885 and 1886. He is 
president of the bank at Morse Bluff, and a 
member of Doric Lodge, No. y6, K. of P. A 
portrait of Mr. Fleming, executed from a re- 
cent photograph, is presented on a foregoing 
page. 



rOHN A. BOSTROM, one of the progres- 
I sive citizens of Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, is extensively engaged in farm- 
and stock raising in Mariposa precinct. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Mr. Bostrom was born in Sweden, in 1853, 
and is a son of Olof and Anna (Bruse) Bo- 
strom, who had six children as follows: 
Emma, Peter, Olof E., John A., the subject 
hereof, Gustaf, and Josephine. Emma is the 
wife of Adolph Pollack, lives near Colon, Saun- 
ders county, and has one child, Alma (Larson), 
of Omaha. Peter married Minnie Pollack, 
who died in 1895, leaving three sons and one 
daughter, namely: Herman, Hjalma, Hul- 
dah, and Axel. They all reside with their 
father on his homestead on the north half of 
the southeast quarter of section 24, township 
15, range 6. Olof E., who homesteaded in 
section 18, township 15, range 7, was inter- 
ested in a store at Malmo, and is now deceased. 
John A. is the gentleman whose name heads 
this sketch. Gustaf lives on the old homestead, 
and also owns 40 acres in the southwest quar- 
ter of the southwest quarter of section 19, 
township 15, range 7. He married Hannah 
Peterson, by whom he has seven children: 
Alphine, Edith, Oscar, Alma, Emily, Amy, and 
a small baby. Josephine, deceased, was the 
wife of Gustaf Breddenberg, of Malmo, and 
left two children, Emfrid and Ernest. 

Olof Bostrom, father of the subject hereof, 
came to America with his family in 1868, and 
at an early day located in Saunders county, 
Nebraska. He was entirely without means 
when he began, but grew to be one of the 
most prosperous farmers in his community. 

John A. Bostrom was reared and mentally 
trained in his native country, and came to 
America in 1868, with his parents. His first 
work was upon the farm homesteaded by his 



father in Saunders county, and now owned 
by his brother Gustaf. While still at home, 
he purchased railroad land, the south half of 
the northwest quarter of section 25, township 
15, range 6 — and afterward bought the 40 
acres north of that property. In 1889, he 
purchased the east half of the northeast quar- 
ter of section 26, township 15, range 6. He 
first built a house, 14 by 22 feet, one and a half 
stories, and to this he has since built an addi- 
tion. His first barn, 16 by 26 feet, was built in 
1883. Subsequently a cattle shed was built, 12 
by 16 feet, and a double corn crib, 26 by 40 feet. 
He first planted cottonwood and willow trees 
along the boundary line of the place, and they 
are now full grown. He has a number of 
black walnut trees, and an orchard of about 
200 fruit trees. He has 65 acres in pasture, and 
has been engaged in raising stock, making 
a specialty of Hereford cattle and Poland China 
hogs. He is a firm believer in thoroughbred 
stock, and has none but high grade upon his 
farm. He has a fine thoroughbred bull, weigh- 
ing 1,800 pounds, and has sold several young 
bulls to prominent farmers in his vicinity. 
The water for the place is furnished by a 65- 
foot well, equipped with a windmill. "Mr. 
Bostrom is a modern farmer in every sense of 
the word and what he has gained in the world 
is the result of his individual efforts, as he 
received no assistance whatever in starting life 
on his own account. 

On November 18, 1881, Mr. Bostrom was 
united in marriage with Ida Thobroe, a daugh- 
ter of Olof and Oleanna (Larson) Thobroe, 
who came from Norway with her parents in 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



1869, Mr. Thobroe taking a homestead in 
Pohocco precinct, Saunders county. Mrs. 
Bostrom is one of eight children, as follows : 
Louis, deceased, who was a druggist, of Lara- 
mie City, Wyoming; Margaret, of Laramie 
City, Wyoming; Henry, who is on the board 
of trade at Bloomington, Illinois; Jennie, of 
Omaha; Mary, of San Diego, California; Ida; 
Anna, of Salt Lake City ; and Bertha, of Lara- 
mie City. The subject of this sketch had 
eight children, five of whom are living : Mabel, 
aged seventeen years, Arvid, Annette, Henry, 
and Emma. In politics Mr. Bostrom is a 
Populist. He is a member of the Swedish Cov- 
enant, or Mission, church, whose edifice was 
built about 1875. 



fOHN LARSON, one of the successful 
and highly respected farmers of Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, is a native of 
Sweden, and was born in 1834, a son of Jacob 
Larson. He received his intellectual training 
in his native land, and came to America in 
1868. He settled 100 miles west of Omaha, 
and worked on the Union Pacific Railroad. In 
the spring of 1869 he went to Missouri, where 
he worked for five months. He then took a 
place which had been pre-empted by another, in 
Nebraska, the farm containing 80 acres, 
which was located as follows : Southwest quar- 
ter of northeast quarter, and northwest quarter 
of southeast quarter of section ^2, township 15, 
range 6. His first building was a dug-out, 1 2 
by 14 feet. In 1873 '^c was married to Katie 



Carlson. He set out trees on the west line and 
about the buildings, and, in 1882, built a com- 
fortable house. In 1893 he erected a large 
stable and granary. He has two wells 35 feet 
deep. The creek, which gives a fine supply of 
water, is fringed with heavy timber, which fur- 
nishes plenty of fuel the year round. 

Mr. Larson also bought 80 acres of land 
of the railroad company in 1875 ^t $5 and $6 
per acre. This land is the east half of the 
northwest quarter of section 5, township 14, 
range 6, all of which is extensively cultivated, 
but which contains no buildings. 

Mr. Larson and his wife are the parents of 
three children, namely: Ida, now Mrs. John 
Wallis, who lives with her parents, and has 
two children, Florence and Violet ; and Arthur 
and Dora, who are at home. Mr. Larson is 
a Populist in politics. The family attend the 
Baptist church. The subject of this sketch 
is very well known and is very popular among 
the Swedish people in the community. 



LFRED ANDERSON, one of the earli- 
est settlers of Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, and a highly respected farmer 
of that section, is a native of Sweden, and was 
born in 1833, a son of Andrew Anderson. He 
grew to manhood and received his mental 
training in his native country. In the year 
1868 Mr. Anderson came to America, and after 
spending a few days in Chicago went west, 
where he worked for some time on the B. & 
M. R. R. R. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Mr. Anderson located in Saunders county 
in 1870, where he settled on the south half of 
the northwest quarter of section 30, township 
15, range 6. Six years later he pre-empted the 
80 acres just south of his claim, making his 
present farm 160 acres. His first house was of 
sod, 12 by 14 feet, and the barn was made of 
wood. To the barn he has added consider- 
ably, until it is now 64 by 26 feet. In 1882 
he built a frame house, 26 by 24 feet, and 
in 1888 he lost the same by fire. Subsequently 
he built a smaller, though good, substantial 
house, and in 1898 he built several outbuild- 
ings, such as hog and cow sheds. The farm 
is well fenced in, and as Mr. Anderson is one 
of the best farmers in his section and takes 
great pride in the care and management of his 
farm, giving it all of his attention, he has 
just cause to be proud of the neat and attract- 
ive appearance which it presents. In 1885 he 
set out a fine grove which protects the north 
side of the buildings. He has fine wells and 
a good windmill. Becoming too old to work 
the farm himself, he has rented most of the 
land on shares to Oscar Headlund, who has 
lived in Saunders county since 1888. 

Mr. Anderson was married in 1859, while 
in Sweden, and the children born to 
him in that country were : Theodore, 
born in i860, now living with his family in 
Lincoln, Nebraska ; Albertina, now Mrs. Olson, 
of Wahoo; and Pauline, who married Mr. 
Sampson, a shoemaker of Lincoln. Mr. Ander- 
son was again married in September, 1888, to 
Mary Headlund. Three children came to Mr. 
and Mrs. Anderson, whose names and ages are 



as follows : Wilhelmina, who is eleven years 
old; Gustaf, aged ten years; and Annie, aged 
eight years. The family attend the Lutheran 
church of Malmo, and are in school district 
No. 24. 



§AMES A. REED was born in New Jer- 
sey, in 1853, and is a son of James S. 
and Eleanor (Vorhees) Reed. His 
father was a carpenter by trade and during the 
son's infancy moved to Wisconsin. 

At the age of seven years young Reed ac- 
quired the rudiments of an education in the 
district schools of Winnebago county, Wiscon- 
sin, six miles north of Oshkosh. While going 
to school he employed himself during Satur- 
days and vacations at work on his father's 
farm. Thus he continued to study and work, 
until he attained his majority, which was in 
1874. 

In the same year Mr. Reed was united in 
marriage with Sarah Miracle, of Winnebago 
county. He began farming for himself, and 
cultivated on shares a farm with his father- 
in-law. The cheap, rich farming lands of the 
West had for some time attracted his atten- 
tion. He had a longing to own a farm of 
his own. In that new region he decided to 
cast his fortune. Accordingly, in 1879, he 
moved to Saunders county, Nebraska. There 
he purchased a school lease from M. S. Wollon, 
and afterward bought the land from the state. 
It comprises 80 acres, being the west half of 
the northwest quarter of section 36. 

Mr. Reed has been an active citizen, putting 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



his shoulder to the wheel when any movement 
is in progress calculated to advance the inter- 
ests of the community in which he lives. He 
is a Republican in politics, and, fraternally, a 
membei- of the Modern Woodmen of America. 
Mr. Reed held the office of school director from 
1879 to 1882. 



w 



^ETER NYGREN, a farmer and gen- 
eral business man, well and favorably 
known in Saunders county, is a land 
owner in Mariposa precinct. In all things he 
is practical, never waiting for another to set 
the example, but always taking the lead and 
forcing his way to the front. When he arrived 
at Omaha, upon first coming to this country, 
he was indebted in the sum of $200, but, dis- 
couraging as his circumstances were, he set to 
work with light heart and willing hands, paid 
of? his debts and grew to be one of the most 
prosperous men of his community. 

Mr. Nygren was born in Sweden, in 1844, 
and is a son of Nels and Eleanor Pearson. 
His father had a family of four sons and three 
daughters, all of the sons preceding their par- 
ents to this country, the latter coming in 1881. 
Nels Pearson died in 1884, and his widow 
returned to Sweden, where she died in 1898. 
The following children were born to them: 
Peter, the subject hereof; Nels, who lives in 
Valley county, Nebraska; Annie (Okason), 
who lives in Sweden; Chasty (Johnson), who 
lives in Sweden; Marie (Bankson), who also 
lives in Sweden ; Hans, who was drowned while 



bathing in a pond upon Peter Nygren's prop- 
erty; and John, who is married, and lives at 
Newman Grove. Xo'iGSSl, 

The subject of this sketch has been shifting 
for himself since he was eight years old. 
At the age of seventeen years, he was appren- 
ticed to a millwright named Rosenquist, for 
four years, and being a very apt workman 
became a finished mechanic by the time he 
reached his majority. He changed his name 
to Nygren, the meaning of which is a new 
limb or shoot from a tree. He came to Amer- 
ica in 1868, and immediately located in Omaha, 
Nebraska. Having forgotten his certificate as 
a millwright, and being unable to talk English, 
he found it very difficult to obtain work at his 
trade. He worked in the harvest field and on 
the railroad, and afterward obtained employ- 
ment in railroad shops at $3.50 per day. He 
aided in the construction of the Omaha High 
School, and his expert workmanship was evi- 
denced when engaged in putting the mammoth 
spire of that building in place. He had a force 
of men under him, and under his directions 
was accomplished the difficult task of putting 
in place, 180 feet from the ground, the heavy 
wrought iron spire, whose weight was 800 
pounds. In 1871 he homesteaded the north 
half of the southwest quarter of section 28, 
township 15, range 6, in Saunders county. 
His first building was part frame and part 
dug-out, and he also had a dug-out for horses. 
He made many improvements upon the place, 
and in the fall of 1871 set out a row of walnut 
trees, which are now bearing. In addition to 
his farming he followed his trade to some ex- 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



tent. In 1878 or 1879, while in Colfax county, 
building a mill, his home was burned, and he 
returned to find that his family had saved their 
clothing and the household goods. Leaving 
the family -with a neighbor, he returned to Col- 
fax county, and completed the mill during the 
winter. In the spring he got twelve of his 
neighbors with teams to assist him, and hauled 
twelve loads of lumber from Fremont. 
Although a comparative stranger and having 
no money, the firm of Nye & Colson, of Fre- 
mont, took his word for the bill and let him 
have the lumber. He selected the site of the 
present structures on which to build, it being 
a broad knoll on the north end of his property, 
and there he built an L shaped house, the dimen- 
sions being 14 by 28 feet, 14 by 14 feet, and 14 
feet high. His first frame barn burned in 1887, 
as the result of a cooker exploding. The cow 
sheds and other buildings which were burned 
were rebuilt at the same time. He has a great 
number of hives of bees (having started in 
1882 with only two hives), and sells a large 
amount of honey. He has the only silo in 
use in his community, it being 25 feet deep 
and air tight, keeping fodder fresh and green 
for spring use. He has a particularly fine 
tubular well, 153 feet deep, the water from 
which is drawn by a windmill. Surrounding 
the house is an excellent orchard of three acres 
of fruit trees, consisting mainly of apples, 
plums and cherries. To the west of the house 
is a fine fish pond, abounding in carp. In 1877 
or 1878 he purchased 40 acres of railroad land 
west of his home property at $6 per acre, and 
in 1886 he bought 80 acres just south of the 



homestead of Mr. Rosenburg for $20 per acre. 
He has a herd of cows and heifers, and, as an 
experiment, has them herded out west on 
shares of one-half of the increase. 

In 1865 Mr. Nygren was united in marriage 
with Ellen Olson, a daughter of Olof Rasmus- 
son, and they reared seven children: Emma 
T»I., Emily, Gusta, Hilma, Oscar, Oroph, and 
Axel. Emma M. is the wife of Charles Noreen, 
a farmer of Mariposa precinct, by whom she 
has three children, Elmer, Hilda, and Phemie. 
Emily is the wife of Axel Beam, who lives 
near Wahoo, and has two children, Mabel and 
Robert. Gusta is the wife of G. Anderson, 
of Saunders county, and has two children, 
Roben and Herbert. Hilma is single, and 
lives in Omaha. Oscar is assisting in the 
work upon the farm. Oroph lives at home. 
Axel was but a month old when his mother 
died in 1888. In 1890 the subject of this 
sketch formed a second marriage, wedding Mrs. 
Mary Hokenson, a widow with three children, 
as follows : August, who works in an elevator 
at Malmo; Herman, living in Omaha; and 
Esther, who is at home. Mr. Nygren is a 
stanch Republican, and has served twelve years 
on the school board, the past two years as 
director in district No. 24; he has also been 
road overseer several terms. He is a faithful 
member of the Lutheran church, and an earnest 
temperance advocate. In addition to his farm 
work he has been identified with a number of 
business ventures, and is one of the most enter- 
prising men in his section of the county. He 
is a man of high character and esteemed by 
all. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



37 



(^Tr- NDREW ROSLUND, an able business 
^^ man and farmer of Saunders county, 
^ V«^ Nebraska, is also extensively en- 
gaged in the manufacture of brooms on his 
farm in Mariposa precinct, an enterprise in 
which he has met with great success. He began 
in a very small way, and each year has added 
to his business and increased his output until, 
in 1899, he manufactured as high as 15,000 
brooms, valued at $2.25 per dozen. 

Mr. Roslund was born in Smoland, in south- 
ern Sweden, forty-three (Swedish) miles south 
of Stockholm, in 1835, and is a son of John 
and Carrie (Anderson) Swanson. He is the 
oldest child and had one brother and three 
sisters, as follows : Magdalena, who died in 
Sweden; Swan, a resident of Sweden; Carrie 
(Anderson), of Polk county, Nebraska; and 
Annie, who married, and is living in Kansas. 

The subject hereof was reared in Sweden, 
and there grew to manhood, learning the trade 
of a shoemaker. He came to America with 
his family in 1870, and located in Illinois, where 
he purchased a house for $80. He lived in 
this with his family for six years, and when 
he decided to move to Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, he was offered $35 for it. This he 
refused, but instead tore the building apart, and 
shipped the joists, sills, and floors in the bot- 
tom of a car in which his stock was loaded, 
thereby sa\ing $75 when he built. He pur- 
chased 80 acres of railroad land — the west 
half of the northeast quarter of section 29, 
township 15, range 6 — from the company agent 
at Fremont, for $6 per acre. He built on the 
site of his present residence, the dimensions 



being 20 liy 14 feet, with 12-foot posts. He 
bought 40 acres east, and 80 acres in section 
20 — the east half of the southwest quarter — 
from Henry Safstrom, in 1885. Subsequently 
he bought the south half of the northeast quar- 
ter of section 31, where his son, Henry, now 
lives. He also owns a quarter section of land 
in Oak Creek precinct, between Touhy and 
^''alparaiso. He purchased considerable other 
land, which he disposed of to good advantage. 
When first locating in the county, he followed 
his trade as a shoemaker, and also repaired har- 
ness as well. ITe began raising broom corn, 
which he had handled and cultivated while in 
Illin(.)is, and now has about 20 acres under cul- 
tivation. He began the manufacture of brooms 
in 1889, buying out a man named Carlyle, who 
was in that business, and who continued 
for a time in the employ of Mr. Roslund. From 
a comparatively small beginning has grown 
an extensive and money-making business, the 
output increasing each year until, in 1899, it 
reached the handsome total of 15,000 brooms. 
He buys the handles by the carload, has two 
large buildings devoted to the work, and em- 
ploys two skilled workmen during the season. 
He now rents a portion of his home farm and 
manages the remainder, employing a hand to 
do the work. He set out a fine grove of trees 
surrounding his house, whose dimensions are 
2,2 by 36 feet, with 18-foot posts. It was built 
in 1892, and is one of the finest in that section. 
He also has a good orchard 'of five acres. 
There is a windmill midway between the house 
and shop, which conveys water by means of 
pipes to a large tank for watering cattle, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



everything is most conveniently arranged for 
successfully carrying on business. 

In 1859, while living in Sweden, Mr. Ros- 
lund was united in marriage with Mary Mag- 
nusson, who is now sixty-nine years of age. 
They became the parents of the following chil- 
dren, the first four of whom were born in 
Sweden: Charles, Anna, Emma, Augusta, 
Henry, and Frank. Charles, of Polk county, 
Nebraska, married Anna Caroline Nelson, and 
has two children, Mabel and Gilbert; Anna 
lives at home; Emma (Safstrom) died in Saun- 
ders county, leaving three children, who make 
their home with the subject hereof, namely, — 
Edith, Mamie, and Arthur; Augusta is the 
wife of John Lees, of Polk county; Henry 
married Victoria Ockander, and lives on a 
near-by farm ; Frank is single and lives at home. 
Religiously, the family attends the Baptist 
church. In political affiliations Mr. Roslund 
is a Populist. 



TgTENRY 
IPI Farme 

J-^ ^ Blufi 



WEHNER, cashier of the 
lers & Merchants Bank at Cedar 
Bluffs, Saunders county, Nebraska, 
was born at Pekin, Illinois, in 1861. He is a 
son of John E. and Katherine (Seim) Wehner. 
His father was a distiller, and is engaged with 
the firm of J. & G. Herget Co., Limited, of 
Pekin. 

Henry Wehner is tlie second of a family of 
seven children, who were named, respectively, 
Carrie, Henry, Elizabeth, Fred, Emma, Anna, 
and Mary. He was educated in the public 
and parochial schools in Pekin. He left school 



at the age of sixteen years, and undertook farm 
work, which he followed about one year. He 
then quit the farm and learned the iron-mold- 
ing trade, but his health not permitting a con- 
tinuance in this occupation, he abandoned it 
and moved to Chicago, where he pursued a 
course of study at Bryant & Stratton's Busi- 
ness College. He graduated, and received his 
diploma from that institution in the fall of 
1882. 

Mr. Wehner was now armed with fighting 
implements, and was ready to begin the battle 
of life. He saw in the far distant West oppor- 
tunities for young men with nerve and willing 
disposition. He moved from Chicago to Fre- 
mont, Nebraska, and engaged as bookkeeper 
for Meyer & Sherman, holding the position for 
five years. He afterward went into the grocery 
business at Fremont, and followed it with fair 
success for the next five years. That business 
he sold and moved to Cedar Bluffs in the fall 
of 1892. On the organization of the Farmers 
& Merchants Bank in that city, he was elected 
cashier, which position he still holds. 

Mr. Wehner was married to Marie C. Frahn, 
a native of Schleswig-Holstein. When a child, 
she came to America with her parents, who set- 
tled at Fremont, Nebraska, and engaged in 
farming. Three children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. \\^ehner, whom they named as 
follows : Fred, aged twelve years ; Freda, 
aged nine years ; and Dorothy, aged one year. 

Politically, Mr. Wehner is a Democrat. His 
religious views accord with the doctrines of the 
German Lutheran church. He is a member 
of Fremont Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M. ; of 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



the A. O. U. W., and also of the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He bears the reputa- 
tion of being a cool-headed, far-seeing, con- 
servative banker, unflinchingly honest, charita- 
ble vv^ithal, and kind-hearted to a fault. The 
subject of this sketch is very popular with the 
citizens of the county, and is i-ecognized as one 
of its solid and representative men. 



§C. F. BUSH, M. D., whose portrait is 
shown on the preceding page, is justly 
considered one of the most successful 
and prominent physicians and surgeons in 
Wahoo, Saunders county, Nebraska. Dr. Bush 
was born in Jamestown, Chautauqua county, 
New York. His father, Loren Bush, was a 
native of Connecticut, and in early manhood 
followed teaching as a profession. Subse- 
quently he went west to Jamestown, New York, 
and settled upon a farm in that vicinity, follow- 
ing agricultural pursuits until cut off by death. 

Dr. Bush graduated from the Jamestown 
High School and afterward attended the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, taking both literary and 
medical courses. He then entered the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, from 
which he graduated in 1884. He spent the fol- 
lowing year in the hospital, in order to gain 
a thorough experience. 

Dr. Bush opened an office at Bradford, Penn- 
sylvania, where he remained one year. About 
that time he was called upon to go west and 
take charge of the practice of his brother, Rus- 
sell Bush, at Wahoo, Nebraska, while the latter 



took a business trip east. As the subject hereof 
desired to see the country, he accepted the 
proposition and assumed his brother's practice 
during the latter's absence. In this brief inter- 
val he became widely acquainted with the peo- 
ple of the vicinity, and was favorably im- 
pressed with both the residents of the locality 
and the beauties of the country. As a natural 
result he decided to locate there. 

In September, 1886, Dr. Bush opened an 
office in Wahoo, where he now has, perhaps, 
the largest and best paying practice in the 
county. He has a fine residence in Wahoo. 
His convenient office, parlors and consultation 
rooms are in the Davis Block, on Fifth street. 

Dr. Bush was joined in marriage with Myr- 
tle Garfield. Fraternally he affiliates with the 
Masonic blue lodge and chapter, of Wahoo; 
the K. T., of Fremont; the Mystic Shrine, of 
Lincoln ; the I. O. O. F., of Wahoo, of which he 
is a past grand ; and the Knights of Pythias, of 
Wahoo. 

Dr. Bush is readily recognized as a physician 
of rare ability. He is the architect of his own 
fortune, having made himself what he is by his 
own efforts. He is exceedingly popular, not 
only as a physician but as a whole-souled citi- 
zen. 



^ ' RIC OLSEN. The career of the 

pi gentleman whose name prefaces this 

'^ ■■ sketch presents an example of what 
may be gained by untiring industry, tenacity 
of purpose and careful management. He came 
to this country dependent upon his trade of 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



carpenter, but, by dint of hard work and the 
exercise of a superior business abiHty, he sur- 
mounted the many obstacles that confronted 
him, and is now classed among the substantial 
citizens of Saunders county, Nebraska. He 
owns 751 acres of as fine land as there is in 
the county, all highly improved, and has an at- 
tractive brick residence in Cedar precinct, in 
vv'hich he lives with his family. 

Mr. Olsen was born in Denmark, near Co- 
penhagen, in 1846. His father was a farmer, 
and at the same time a contractor for the gov- 
ernment, supplying the cavalry with most of 
the horses used in that service. His early 
education was acquired in the public schools 
in his district, every second day in the year 
being a school day. On off days he worked 
on his father's farm, and also learned the trade 
of a cabinet maker. After serving his^ppren- 
ticeship and becoming a master workman he 
decided to immigrate to America. He was 
nineteen years of age at that time, and, for two 
years after landing in New York, he worked 
at liis trade. In 1S68 he came to Nebraska 
and settled in Omaha, where he continued in 
the same occupation. Two years of the time 
while thus engaged iie was foreman during 
the building of the Paxton Hotel, a respons- 
ible position, and one which he filled with 
credit to himself and satisfaction to his employ- 
ers. In the meantime he had taken up a home- 
stead of 80 acres, which he still owns. Build- 
ing a house 12 by 16 feet, he commenced 
farming, and was so unfortunate as to be 
burned out shortly afterward. He then built 
a large frame house at a cost of $1,000. Good 



luck did not come all at once. In 1874 his 
entire crop was destroyed by the grasshoppers, 
when just fairly started. By perseverance and 
hard work, however, he got well on his feet, 
and now has one of the finest places in the 
county. He owns twelve large farm build- 
ings, including barns, implement houses, corn 
cribs, etc. His crops are principally corn and 
oats, but he has paid some attention to stock 
raising — having, at times, over 200 head of 
cattle, an equal number of hogs, and always 
from 12 to 15 head of horses. His orchard is 
a feature in itself, and consists of about 600 
apple and plum trees. 

Mr. Olsen was united in marriage, in 1874, 
with Annie Nelson, a native of Sweden, and 
they are the parents of five children, as follows : 
Albert, aged twenty-six years; Jennie, aged 
twenty-four years, who is the wife of Charles 
Williams, Jr.; Emil, aged twenty-one years; 
Charley, aged seventeen years : and Tekla, aged 
fourteen years. The subject of this sketch is 
also the owner of the Cedar Bluffs Opera 
House. Religiously, he is a member of the 
German Lutheran church. 



fOSEPII KRAUS, an agriculturist of 
prominence in Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, is one of the most progressive 
citizens of Cedar precinct, in which he holds 
considerable property. He first located in Saun- 
ders county in 1869, and many were the diffi- 
culties which befell him in his early struggle 
for a start. Never losing heart, however, he 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



closely applied himself to his work, making 
whatever improvements he could, and in the 
end he has succeeded in amassing a fair com- 
petence, and also in possessing one of the finest 
residences in his section of the county. 

Mr. Kraus was born in Germany, March 17, 
1850, and is a son of Alexander and Elizabeth 
(Kopf) Kraus. He was brought to America 
by his parents in 1852, they settling in Mani- 
towoc county, Wisconsin. His father pur- 
chased land and engaged in farming there 
until 1869, when he went to Nebraska and 
took up a homestead of 80 acres. There 
Joseph remained until of age, his father 
and mother both dying in Saunders 
county. He was married in Butler county, 
Nebraska, to Anna Earchlef, a daughter of 
Joseph and Barbara (Blaca) Earchlef. Anna 
Earchlef is a native of Bohemia, and accom- 
panied her parents to America, settling in But- 
ler county, Nebraska, in 1878. Mr. Kraus 
and his wife are the parents of six children, as 
follows: Odolph, seventeen years of age; 
Leopold, sixteen years ; Eleanora, twelve years ; 
Elsa, ten years ; Emma, eight years ; and Annie, 
four years. 

Joseph Kraus mo\ed to Saunders county in 
1869, and settled on the northwest quarter of 
section 30, Cedar precinct. On this prop- 
erty he built a residence, partly of cottonwood 
lumber and partly of lumber obtained at Fre- 
mont. He planted corn, oats and wheat, but 
was very unfortunate during the years 1872, 
1873 and 1874, as the grasshoppers destroyed 
liis crops. Farmers also labored at a disadvan- 
tage in those days because of the crude farm- 



ing implements in use. Harrows were home- 
made, being of the old A-shaped pattern, and 
the other implements were also imperfect in 
construction. The grasshoppers caused a scar- 
city of vegetables, and as a consequence the 
whole community suffered more or less from 
scurvy. In 1899 Mr. Kraus purchased his 
present residence, which is one of the finest in 
the county. He engages quite extensively 
in stock raising, having formerly kept about 
400 head of cattle, 200 hogs, and from 1 5 to 20 
fine horses. He has a good orchard of over 
300 fruit trees, consisting chiefly of cherries, 
apples, plums and peaches. In politics the sub- 
ject of this sketch is a Democrat, while in re- 
ligious faith he is. a member of the Roman 
Catholic church. Mr. Kraus served as school 
director for ten )-ears and as township trustee 
for one year. Fraternally he is a member of 
North Bend Lodge, A. O. U. W. 



fEWIS J. SCHERE, city treasurer of 
Cedar Bluffs, Nebraska, is one of the 
■■^ most enterprising business men of 
tiie town, and conducts the largest general 
store in that part of Saunders county. He is a 
native of Cedar Bluffs, having been born there 
in 1869, one year after his father settled in the 
county. 

Louis Schere, the father of Lewis J., was 
horn in Mecklenburg, Germany, and came to 
the United States in 1864, settling in Illinois, 
where he engaged in agricultural pursuits, an 
occupation wiiicii lie still follows. He re- 



44 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



mained in Illinois for four years, and then 
removed to Saunders county, Nebraska. He 
married Frederica Stark, also a native of Meck- 
lenburg, Germany, and they reared a family 
of eight children, of -whom Lewis J. is the 
third. They are as follows : Herman, John, 
Lewis J., William, Bertha, Emma, Mary and 
Sophia. 

Lewis J. Schere acquired his early educa- 
tional training in the schools of Saunders 
county, Nebraska, after which he took a busi- 
ness and shorthand course in the normal 
school at Fremont, Nebraska, of which insti- 
tution he is a graduate. His first employment 
was as clerk in the general merchandise store 
of H. W. Reints, at Cedar Bluffs, for whom 
he worked one year. At the time of beginning 
he was twenty-two years of age, and one year 
later, in company with Mr. Ranslem, he bought 
out his employer. They continued to carry 
on the business jointly until February, 1900, 
when Mr. Schere purchased the interest of his 
partner and has since conducted the concern 
alone. He carries a comprehensive stock of 
general merchandise and is meeting with great 
success. He has aimed to handle a line of 
goods suitable to meet the demands of the best 
trade, and as a result he has the most thor- 
oughly equipped and most liberally patronized 
store in Cedar Bluffs. 

In October, 1893, Mr. Schere was united in 
marriage with Josephine Soulier, of Saunders 
county, Nebraska, and they are the parents of 
three children : Florence, aged six years ; Mil- 
dred, aged four years; and Lewis, aged two 
years. Mr. Schere served for five years on 



the board of city trustees from 1894 to 1899. 
He was elected city treasurer for the term of 
1 899- 1 900. He is a stanch Democrat in pol- 
itics, and takes an active interest in party 
aflfairs. Fraternally, he is a member of Occi- 
dental Lodge, No. 215, F. & A. M., of the 
Woodmen of the World, and of the Modern 
Woodmen of America. 



ILLIAM SHANAHAN, of Morse 
Bluff, Saunders county, Nebraska, is 
one of the ideal farmers of Nebraska. 
He was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, in 
1855, and is a son of Jeremiah and Ellen 
(Mayher) Shanahan, of the same place. 

William's father came to the United States 
in 1859, and settled in Manitowoc county, Wis- 
consin, where he engaged in general farming. 
After remaining there for twelve years, the 
family moved to Saunders county, Nebraska, 
and took up a homestead of 80 acres. Another 
80 acres was added to this and both tracts were 
devoted to general farming. 

Close application to business, coupled with 
a thorough knowledge of agriculture, soon 
placed William Shanahan in the front rank 
of the successful farmers of the county. His 
land possessions include some of the most pro- 
ductive ground in Saunders county, and are 
as follows: The west half of the southwest 
quarter of section 33; the west half of the 
west half of the northwest quarter of section 
33 ; the northwest quarter of section 4 ; the east 
half of the northeast quarter, and the north half 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



of the southeast quarter of section 5, compris- 
ing in all 440 acres of land, which is in a high 
state of cultivation. Corn is the principal prod- 
uct of his farm, but he manages to devote a con- 
siderable portion of his time to stock raising. 
He has some large farm buildings besides his 
house on the old homestead farm. 

In 1877 Mr. Shanahan married Mary Ann 
Malloy, a daughter of Michael Malloy, a pros- 
perous farmer of the same county. Six chil- 
dren blessed this union: Jeremiah, aged 
twenty-one years; Michael, aged nineteen 
years; Thomas, aged sixteen years; Nellie, 
aged fifteen years ; Maggie, aged thirteen. years ; 
and William, aged eleven years. January 25, 
1899, the subject of this sketch, being a wid- 
ower, was again married. Catherine Healey, a 
resident of Wayne county, Nebraska, became 
his second wife. She is a daughter of Daniel 
and Margaret (Crowley) Healey, both de- 
ceased. Mr. Shanahan is a Democrat polit- 
ically, and religiously a member of the Roman 
Cathlic church. 



§OHN SMITH is a good example of the 
kind of citizens who have been so largely 
instrumental in bringing the resources 
of Saunders county to the fore. When he ar- 
rived in Nebraska the country was practi- 
cally an unbroken prairie, and the early settlers 
had to face great trials and privations before 
even a very small amount of comfort could be 
obtained. In 1872, 1873 and 1874, when the 
grasshopper swarms made their visitations, they 



simply added to the vexations and hardships 
already undergone. It required men of great 
courage and indomitable perseverance to bear 
up under years of successive misfortunes. Men 
of weaker caliber would have given up in abso- 
lute discouragement. To the efforts of such 
men as the subject of this sketch does Saunders 
county now owe her high position among the 
counties of the state of Nebraska. 

Mr. Smith was born near London, Canada, 
on January 9, 1840. His father was William 
Smith, a French Canadian, who was 
drowned in Lake Erie during John's infancy. 
His mother, Katherine (Dehl) Smith, is still 
living near Buffalo, New York. After the 
untimely death of the husband and father, the 
family moved to Erie county. New York, where 
a farm was purchased, on which our subject 
spent his early days. He received his mental 
training in the public schools, and divided his 
time between attending school and working 
upon the farm. For a period of eleven years 
afterward he worked out by the month, and 
at the outbreak of the war enlisted in Company 
H, 136th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteers. He was 
in the command of Gen. Sigel and that of Gen. 
Hooker, participating in the famous battles of 
Gettysburg, Lookout Mountain, Chancellors- 
ville and Fredericksburg. The good constitu- 
tion acquired by his early bringing up stood 
him in good stead during these years of hard- 
ship and privation. 

After being mustered out, Mr. Smith came 
to Nebraska in 1870 and settled in Saunders 
county. There he took up a homestead of 
80 acres and also a soldier's claim of 80 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



acres, proving up on both of them, and devoted 
himself to general farming and stock raising. 
The difficulties encountered in getting a start 
were enormous. Lumber had to be rafted 
across the Platte River, with which to build 
his 12 by 1 6 foot house, which was first put up. 
The barn was one of the early kind, made of 
poles and thatched with straw. In this house, 
with small additions made from time to time, 
he lived for fifteen years, and then built an- 
other house, which is being used today by his 
sons. His property consists of the south 
half of the northwest quarter of section 14, 
and 120 acres in the northeast quarter of sec- 
tion 15. He is now living a retired life. His 
residence, surrounded by a beautiful cedar 
hedge and fruit trees, is one of the hand- 
somest in Cedar Bluffs, and no one can gainsay 
that he is well deserving of the comfort enjoyed 
by him in the afternoon of life. His plot of 
five and a half acres near the house is one of 
the most valuable pieces of land in the district. 

Mr. Smith was married on March 4, 1866, 
to Mary Knab, of Erie county. New York, who 
has borne him five children, of whom three 
are living, namely: Lulu, the wife of O. H. 
Sholtz; Asa O., who married Tillie Gabriel, is 
living on the old homestead ; and Grover Frank- 
lin. Mr. Smith is a Democrat in politics, and 
in religion a member of the Lutheran church. 
He has held the office of road commissioner, 
but has never been an office seeker in any sense 
of the word. He is a member of Occidental 
Lodge, No. 215, F. & A. M. 

Such is a brief sketch of one of the leading 
citizens of Saunders county. No man in the 



district is more deservedly popular. Kind- 
hearted and charitable, strict in his integrity, 
he numbers his friends by the score, and the 
community in which he lives accords him the 
respect which is his due by reason of the quali- 
ties which make him one of the representative 
men of the county and state. 



K V» j„. 



■ILLL\M A. BROKAW, a promi- 
nent druggist of Cedar Bluffs, Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, was born in 
McCordsville, Hancock county, Indiana. 

William P. Brokaw, his father, was a farmer 
by occupation, and a man of influence in his 
community. He served several terms as county 
commissioner, and was re-elected just prior to 
the time of his death, which occurred in 1879. 
His wife was Martha (Cauldwell) Brokaw, 
who is still living. 

Up to the age of thirteen years William A. 
Brokaw attended the district schools, and later 
became a pupil in a graded school. At twenty- 
one years of age he adopted fire insurance as a 
means of livelihood. When working on his 
father's farm he devoted some of his time to 
this line of business. He was a deputy sheriff 
before he had reached manhood. 

On April 21, 1885, Mr. Brokaw entered the 
drug store of M. C. Quigley, of Greenfield, 
Indiana, where he remained seven years. Leav- 
ing that employment, he removed to Nebraska, 
and settled in Cedar Bluffs. He bought out 
the firm of Fleming & Co., and has conducted 
the place ever since. He has today the largest 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



47 



Stock and the best patronized drug store in 
the city. He passed his examination before 
the state board of pharmacy in November, 
1891, and secured his certificate as a registered 
pharmacist. 

On August 23, 1885, Mr. Brokaw married 
Mattie J. Jones, a daughter of Sylvester and 
Tabitha A. (Pauley) Jones, of Fortville, Indi- 
ana. They have one child, aged nine years. 
Mr. Brokaw is a Democrat in politics, and 
fraternally a member of Cedar Bluffs Lodge, 
No. 274, A. O. U. W. 



7T%HARLES A. KILLIAN, a very success- 
ful business man of Morse Bluff, Saun- 



K^' 



ders county, Nebraska, is proprietor 
of an implement house at that place, and does a 
large business with the farmers throughout that 
section of the county. 

Mr. Killian is a native of Bohemia, where 
he was born October 25, 1862. He is a 
son of Thomas and Katy (Mares) Killiftn, 
both deceased. The family came to the United 
States when Charles A. was in infancy, and 
settled in Pennsylvania, where they lived until 
1868, when they moved to Bohemia precinct, 
Saunders county, Nebraska. They were among 
the early settlers of that community, where 
they took up a homestead, and on this property 
Charles A. Killian lived until about six years 
ago. At the age of twenty years he rented 
a farm of 240 acres and went into the stock 
raising business, meeting with success. He 
started in the well and windmill business in 



1888, and the success of his efforts in that line 
encouraged him to enter the implement business 
at Morse Bluff. He now continues in that 
line, carrying a full stock of agricultural imple- 
ments, farming machinery of all kinds, and a 
good supply of wagons, buggies, paints and 
oils, pump fixtures, etc. He handles the latest 
improved machinery, keeping abreast of the 
rapid strides made in its betterment, and en- 
joys the patronage of the leading citizens of 
the community. Mr. Killian possesses some 
fine property at Morse Bluff, consisting of lots 
19, 20, 21 and 22 of block 6, on which are lo- 
cated his handsome home and his business 
establishment. 

On July 26, 1883, Mr. Killian was united 
in matrimonial bonds with Anna Zelezna. a 
daughter of Michael and Anna Zelezna, of 
Omaha, and they are the parents of nine chil- 
dren. Their names and the dates of their 
births are as follows: Thomas J., July 2, 1884; 
Carrie I., December 27, 1885; Raymond C, 
February 15, 1888; Milada, January 24, 1890; 
Anna, November 14, 1891; Leonard, October 
6, 1893; Victor, April 23, 1896; Karl, Febru- 
ary 17, 1898; and Roland, January 9, 1900. 
Religiously, our subject is a member of the 
Roman Catholic church. In politics he is 
independent, but served eleven years as con- 
stable of Bohemia precinct, twelve years as 
overseer of roads, and six years as treasurer of 
schools. He is a firm believer in life insur- 
ance, and carries policies in the following or- 
ganizations : Hope Lodge, No. 25, A. O. U. 
W., $2,000; Morse Bluff Lodge, No. 1476, 
Modern Woodmen, $3,000; W^oodmen of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



World, $2,000; Bankers Life, $2,000; Equita- 
ble Life, paid up, $640; Union Central, paid up, 
$500; and Western Brotherhood, Z. C. B. J., 
$2,000. 



tLFRED HAGSTADT, one of the most 
successful farmers of Chapman precinct, 
<-^ Saunders county, Nebraska, was 
born in Sweden in 1848. He is a son of Swan 
Johnson, but changed his name to Hagstadt 
after coming to this country. 

Swan Johnson was a Swedish farmer, and 
married Miss Stennegret, by whom he had two 
children : Alfred, the subject hereof, and Peter 
August, who is a farmer in Dakota. Swan 
Johnson's wife died in 1853, when Alfred was 
five years old, and her husband died in 1898 at 
an advanced age. 

Alfred Hagstadt was reared and schooled in 
Sweden, leaving for America in 1868 and 
locating in Rockford, Illinois. He worked out, 
at farming, by the month for five years, and 
then bought a team and rented a farm, for five 
years. In 1875 he was married to Tilda Col- 
son, who died of quick consumption soon after 
their marriage. He remained with her parents 
and worked until 1879, and then had a sale 
and went to Saunders county, Nebraska. He 
bought the southwest quarter of section 25, in 
Chapman precinct, in February, 1879, for $307, 
80 acres of which were broken. There was 
a shanty 16 by 18 feet in size, with boards 
running up and down, but there were no barns 
or trees. He returned to Illinois for a time, 
as he could do nothing in the winter. In the 



spring he returned with a span of mares and 
bought a cow. On September 19, 1880, he 
married Sarah E. Honeywell, a daughter of 
Elam Honeywell, who settled on the south- 
west quarter of section 26, in Chapman pre- 
cinct, in March, 1877. Mr. Honeywell married 
Lucinda Ross, and they had seven children: 
Emma Genet (Ketchum), deceased; Eve 
Johanna, who died at the age of six years; 
James S., who married Anna Pika and lives 
in Oklahoma; Sidney Eugene, who married 
Elizabeth Hodge, of Holt county, Nebraska; 
William S., deceased; Mrs. Hagstadt, and 
Mrs. Margaret Merritt, deceased. Mrs. Hag- 
stadt was born and reared in Pennsylvania, 
where she lived until she was fifteen years of 
age. Mr. Hagstadt and his wife lived for six 
years in the shanty on his property, but, in 
1886, built a new and roomy house, a dug-out 
cellar, measuring 12 by 16 feet, and, under the 
addition, 16 by 20 feet, which he bricked and 
cemented. He afterward built a barn, 30 by 40 
feet in dimensions, with 16 foot posts, large 
and roomy ; a cow bam, 24 by 32 feet ; a double 
corn-crib, 24 by 32 feet, and a granary and crib 
24 by 24 feet. There is a fine spring on the 
place, two wells, 91 and 96 feet deep, re- 
spectively, and a windmill, put up in 1888. 
At first Mr. Hagstadt raised wheat and corn, 
but finding that stock would pay better, in 1884 
be began buying cattle and hogs, which 
he continued for five or six years, keeping on 
hand from 75 to 100 hogs. He set out an or- 
chard, including 30 apple trees, in 1878, and 
also considerable shrubbery ; he now has a fine 
orchard. Along the north and south line road 




HON. AIJ-.XANDKR BOLl.lEK. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



lie has an excellent willow fence i6o rods in 
length. He now rents his farm to Christopher 
Lehman for $400 per year. He owns some val- 
uable property in town, having purchased ten 
lots, and also own a valuable property in Lin- 
coln, Nebraska. He has two or three horses and 
a carriage. Mr. Hagstadt has always been in- 
dustrious and energetic, and his efiforts have 
met with unusual success. 



ON. ALEXANDER BOULIER, 
whose portrait is shown herewith, is 
a native of Woodford county, Illi- 
nois. He was born September 20, 1845, ^"^ 
is a son of Henry and Mary Josephine (Sau- 
vage) Boulier. His father was a farmer and 
stock raiser. 

Alexander attended the public schools and 
worked on his father's farm until he attained 
the age of twenty-one years, when he rented a 
farm in Woodford county and engaged in stock 
raising and general farming, until 1884. He 
then moved to Saunders county, Nebraska, and 
rented the west half of the northwest quarter 
of section 10 and the northeast quarter of sec- 
tion 9. Many substantial improvements since 
then, in the way of a house, barn, corn-cribs, 
etc., have been made. 

February 14, 1869, Mr. Boulier was united 
in marriage with Sarah A. Bailey, of Peoria 
county, Illinois. They have eight children : 
William H., aged thirty years, who married 
Annie Woods, of Saunders county; Carrie 
Belle, aged twenty-six years, who is now Mrs. 



Samuel Hoshor; Mary J., aged twenty- four 
years, who married Louis Schere; Luella B., 
aged twenty-three years, who wedded Michael 
J. Rockford; Irvin S., aged twenty-one years; 
Clifford J., aged nineteen years; Ralston H., 
aged sixteen years, and George D., aged thir- 
teen years. 

Mr. Boulier is a Populist in politics. While 
a resident of Illinois Mr. Boulier was township 
clerk of Partridge district for fourteen years 
and school treasurer nine years. He repre- 
sented his district in Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, in the legislature of 1899, and has been 
renominated in 1900. He is at present a mem- 
ber of the school board. Mr. Boulier is a man 
of influence, and his counsel is valued by the 
best citizens of Cedar precinct. 



~r--^ RNEST FRENCH PECK, manager 
K] of the Farmers Co-operative Asso- 

ciation, is a native of Wayne county, 
Pennsylvania. . He was born September 18, 
1858, and is a son of David Horton and Rachael 
Elizabeth (Gaylord) Peck. His parents are 
both dead. His mother died in 1897. His 
father survived her a short time, and died in 
1898. 

The family left Pennsylvania when Ernest 
was six years of age, settled in Rock Island 
county, Illinois, and engaged in farming. The 
subject hereof was given the advantages of a 
public school education. He attended the dis- 
trict schools for ten years, and in 1875 moved 
with his parents to Saunders county, Nebraska. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



The father followed farming, while young Peck 
attended the public schools. Thus he continued 
for one year, and then entered the state uni- 
versity, where he remained three years. On 
leaving that institution he immediately engaged 
in teaching school in the states of Dakota and 
Colorado, and also in Saunders county, Ne- 
braska. He then opened a meat market, and 
conducted a successful business for ten years. 
Selling out this business, he accepted the man- 
agement of the Farmers Co-operative Asso- 
ciation, succeeding J. B. Brainard, a brother of 
Captain David Brainard, one of the members 
of the famous Greely party on its trip to the 
frozen North. 

Mr. Peck was married in July, 1888, to 
Mary Dewey, of Lancaster county, Nebraska. 
They have a charming family — Louise Joyce, 
aged twelve years ; Vincent Willard, aged ten 
years; and last, but not least, the winsome 
twins, Donald Dewey and Dorothy Manila, 
aged four years. Mr. Peck's patriotism may 
be inferred from the names of his twin chil- 
dren. He has a splendid home on Oak street, 
Whitney addition to Cedar Bluffs, and his hap- 
piest hours are spent there. 

Mr. Peck was chairman of the town board 
of trustees for three years, and served as vil- 
lage treasurer four years. During both these 
periods, comprising seven years, he was a jus- 
tice of the peace. He was re-elected chairman 
of the board of trustees in face of the state- 
ment he had made, publicly given out, that he 
was not a candidate and would not serve if 
elected. In spite of his protests, the people 
insisted on electing him. This fully demon- 



strates his popularity. In politics Mr. Peck 
is a straight-out Republican. He is a member 
of the First Baptist church of Lincoln, Ne- 
braska. 



TTtHARLES HENRY ECKERY, one of 
I Jj the most enthusiastic young business 
^ — "^ men of Morse Bluff, Saunders coun- 
ty, Nebraska, is a native of Iowa City, Iowa. 
He was born August 10, 1871, and is a son of 
John and Mary Elizabeth (Glassinger) Eckery. 
His parents are both living on their farm near 
Ashland, Nebraska. 

His father moved from Iowa City to west- 
ern Iowa, near Neola, Pottawattamie county, 
and after a short stay there removed to Perkins 
county, Nebraska. There he owned about 4,000 
acres of land which was used as a stock farm. 
Mr. Eckery was one of the most prominent 
stock raisers in the state. 

In 1896 Charles Henry Eckery received from 
his father 120 acres of land, and for two years 
conducted a general farming and stock raising 
business. In 1898 he traded the farm for 
the grain elevator in Morse Bluff, owned by 
Fleming Bros. He has made a great many 
important improvements in it, carrying on a 
large business in grain and live stock. In 
1899 he handled 150,000 bushels of corn and 
oats. 

In 1898 Mr. Eckery married Honora Calnon, 
a daughter of Michael and Hannah Calnon, 
and they have one child, John Henry, one 
year old. Mr. Eckery is a Republican polit- 
ically, and, religiously, a member of the 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Roman Catholic church. He belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen of America, Camp No. 
1476, Morse Bluff. He has a handsome resi- 
dence and owns lots i, 2 and 3 in block 13, 
Morse Bluff. He also owns lots 14, 15, 16 and 
17 in block 6. 



IT'- 



BRUNING. The gentleman 
here named needs no introduction 
to the citizens of Saunders county, 
Nebraska, for his wonderful success as a prop- 
agator of the red cedar tree has made his name 
a familiar one throughout Nebraska, and, in 
fact, in many other states. What at first appears 
to be only a successful private undertaking 
turns out to be one which results in material 
benefit to the entire public. It has always been 
a recognized fact that the greatest need on the 
western prairies was a protection from the 
winds, but it remained for years practically an 
unsolved problem. It devolved upon Mr. Brun- 
ing and his honored father to illustrate how the 
sturdy red cedar could be cultivated and made 
the best possible wind-break, affording protec- 
tion alike to houses and the tender fruit trees 
of the orchard, whose blossoms are often 
blighted by the cold blasts. He formulated 
plan after plan for raising from the seed, which 
is encased in a hard and horny shell, but for 
eighteen years he worked before attaining the 
desired results. A man with less energy and 
courage would have given up in disgust, but 
with a tenacity born of an indomitable will, 
unweakened by failure, he persevered with re- 
newed energy, and the ultimate success attend- 



ing his efforts is known to every one and has 
gained him the appellation "Nebraska's Wizard 
of Horticulture." 

Mr. Bruning was born, September 13, 1848, 
in Worth county, Missouri, and is a son of 
F. H. and Anna (Vassar ) Bruning, of Kent, 
Iowa. His father is also in the nursery busi- 
ness. His parents moved to Iowa when he was 
three years of age, locating in the southwestern 
part of Union county. He remained at home 
until he arrived at his majority, receiving his 
early mental training in the public schools. 
While attending the public school he was en- 
gaged, at the age of sixteen years, as assistant 
teacher of mathematics in the school, continu- 
ing until he was twenty-one years old. In 
company with his father, he then traveled 
through wild regions and among hostile Indi- 
ans in Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, 
Colorado and Utah. Their object was to study 
red cedar and devise some plan of growing it 
from the seed. He had studied medicine and 
chemistry somewhat, which, together with his 
father's practical knowledge, rendered them 
well equipped for the work. After eighteen 
years of successive failures, they made their first 
success. The following year proved another 
failure, and the succeeding year a success, the 
great discovery being made in 1877. The first 
beds were set out in Kent, Iowa; after a 
temporary stay there, Mr. Bruning moved to 
Saunders county, Nebraska, for his health, and 
also because it was more convenient for the 
business. He now holds 180 acres in Cedar 
precinct, as follows : the northwest quarter 
(fractional) of section 24, the northwest quar- 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



ter of the southeast quarter of section 24, and 
the southwest half of the northeast quarter of 
section 24. The value of the discovery is be- 
yond calculation. As an example of his exem- 
plary persistency, may be pointed out his peach 
tree experiments. For forty-six years he 
planted seeds from a seedling peach, before he 
considered the peach a perfect one, and it is now 
considered one of the very finest grown in the 
world. His cedar nursery runs from 1,000,000 
to 3,000,000 trees, and he has about 200 cherry 
trees, 10 acres of apples (about 800 trees), and 
seven acres of peach trees (about 1,000 trees), 
beside seedling grape and miscellaneous trees. 
Mr. Bruning was united in marriage June 15, 
1873, with Mary Ann Morgan, and he has one 
son, Lewis Andrew, age twenty-five years. 
The latter started farming, but, selling out, ac- 
cepted an interest in his father's business. He 
married Jennie V. Slayton, of Fremont, Ne- 
braska, June 15, 1898. 



-J^^ALPH 
-^ V.-^ Ne 



ALPH C. JOHNSON, a prominent and 
1-to-do farmer of Saunders county, 
Nebraska, is a son of Israel and 
Susan (Colmore) Johnson. He was born near 
Liberty, Maine, May 25, 1852. His father was 
a prosperous farmer, and the son had the ad- 
vantage of good schools and was given a good 
education. In addition, his father carefully 
trained him on his farm and made him a first- 
class farmer. 

At the age of eighteen years Ralph C. John- 
son started out in life for himself, and secured 



employment in railroad mills and shops in 
Massachusetts. In 1868 he came to Nebraska, 
and engaged in the lumber business for a rail- 
road company, supplying ties, piling and tele- 
graph poles. At this work he continued for 
two years, meeting with success, although the 
business was attended with great hardships and 
perilous journeys, necessitating trips that re- 
quired him to swim the Platte River and other 
streams. 

Wishing now to establish a home, Mr. John- 
son moved to Saunders county, Nebraska, hav- 
ing only an ox team with which to make the 
journey. He took up the 80 acres of home- 
stead land on which Cedar Bluffs now stands. 

Mr. Johnson's first enterprise was to buy a 
threshing outfit, which he operated for some 
time. His success in this enterprise enabled 
him to add to his stock of this world's goods. 
He now owns the northwest quarter of section 
34, also the north one-half and the southwest 
quarter of section 27. Stock-raising at pres- 
ent engages much of his time. He has 420 
head of cattle, 200 head of hogs, and 15 head 
of horses. 

In the fall of 1874 Mr. Johnson married 
Maggie Roberts, since deceased, of Saunders 
county, Nebraska. Two children resulted from 
this union: Randall K., aged twenty- four 
years, and Mary, aged twenty-two years. In 
1884 he again married; this marriage was with 
Minnie Wellman, of Buffalo, New York, and 
three children were born to them : Arthur B., 
aged sixteen years; Ida M., aged fourteen 
years ; Clair D., aged eleven years. 

Mr. Johnson has two brothers, John and 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Ambrose, who followed his wise choice, and 
have also sought homes in the new West. 
Ambrose engaged in the lumber business at 
Fort McPherson, while John settled on the 
southwest quarter of section 33, Saunders 
county, Nebraska. 

The subject of this sketch is a Republican 
in politics, and a member of the Baptist Church 
in religion. He was a school director from 
1898 to 1900. He is a member of Occidental 
Lodge, No. 215, F. & A. M. ; of the chapter 
and commandery at Fremont, and the Tangier 
Temple, Mystic Shrine, at Omaha. He is also 
a member of the Modern Woodmen, and of the 
A. O. U. W. 



©LOF NELSON. Within the bound- 
aries of Saunders county, Nebraska, the j 
above named gentleman is known as 
one of the most substantial and progressive 
farmers, and his farm, which is located in 
Chapman precinct, on sections 8, 14 and 6, is 
one of the most highly improved in the county. 
He was born in Gothland. Sweden, in 1847, 
and is a son of Nels and Margaret (Olson") 
Olson. 

Olof Nelson, when twenty-two years of age, 
with his brother Peter, who was aged fifteen 
years, came to the United States in i86g, and in 
1871 his parents located in Saunders county. 
He first located in Kansas, but six months later 
he moved to Missouri, where he spent another 
six months, and then located in Nebraska in 
1870. He went to Saunders county with Mr. 
Jacobson and Mr. Hanson, and at once took 



up a claim on which he built a dug-out, 12 by 16 
feet, in which he lived so as to gain a clear title 
to the land. He later built a farm house and for 
the first few years his experience was discour- 
aging, as the crops were destroyed either by hail 
or grasshoppers. By constant perseverance, 
however, his efiforts have been crowned with 
success. He set out some cottonwood trees, 
which he obtained from Duck Island, in the 
Platte River, for 50 cents per thousand. In 
1875 he bought the east half of the northwest 
quarter of section 17, paying $5 per acre — the 
land being placed on the market by the railroad 
company — and in 1882 he bought 80 acres from 
his brother, which tract lies east of his farm. 
As there were no bridges in those early days, 
the farmers were compelled to ford the streams, 
and many a time has Mr. Nelson made his team 
swim the Platte River. During the first couple 
of years, when he had poor crops, the subject 
hereof worked out by the day. He first built 
a sod barn, which had a straw roof, and the 
material for his first house and barn was hauled 
from Fremont, which is a distance of about 
30 miles. His first barn measured 14 by 16 
feet, but his present one is 32 by 40 feet, and 
he has since built a corn-crib 36 by 24 feet. 
Nearly all of his farm is inclosed by either a 
wire fence or by willow trees, and he has good 
water and a fine windmill on his premises. Mr. 
Nelson has always taken an active interest in 
the developing of his adopted county, and he 
is esteemed by his many acquaintances as a 
good neighbor and a loyal citizen. 

The subject of this sketch was united in mar- 
riage with Sophia Carlson, also a native of 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Sweden. Her parents first settled in Iowa and 
later moved to Omaha, where Mr. Nelson made 
her acquaintance. This union has been blessed 
by three sons, all of whom are single and at 
home, namely: Harmon N., Elmer, and Eddie. 
In politics Mr. Nelson is a Populist, and has 
served as a school director of district 28. 
Religiously, he is a Baptist. He built his large 
and commodious home in 1892. 



RANK KRAUSE moved to Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, in 1869, and took 
up a homestead. By hard work and perse- 
verance he managed to make both ends meet, 
surmounting all difficulties, and today he may 
be classed among the representative citizens of 
the county. He owns considerable property in 
Saunders county, consisting of an extra fine 
orchard and land under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. 

Mr. Krause is a native of Baden Baden, Ger- 
many, where he was born January 18, 1839. 
He passed his boyhood in his own country, and 
in 1854 came to the United States, landing at 
New Orleans. His parents went to Wisconsin, 
where his father settled on a farm, and meeting 
with good results, remained until 1869, when 
they located in Saunders county, Nebraska. 
Frank Krause took up a homestead on the east 
half of the southwest quarter of section 28, 
on which he still resides. He also took up a 
soldier's claim of 80 acres. His holdings now 
include, in addition to the above, 120 acres in 
section 33, and 128 acres in section 22. When 



he started, he had a small house, 12 by 16 
feet, which he built, and a pole and straw barn. 
The land was planted in wheat, but the visita- 
tion of grasshoppers in that section during the 
next few years made it difficult to get a suc- 
cessful start. He worked hard, and with each 
set-back he returned to his task with renewed 
vigor, which in the end was bound to bring 
forth good results. He now has a very fine 
property and Ris orchard, which comprises 
about 2,000 trees (apples and plums predom- 
inating, but with a good selection of cherries, 
peaches and apricots), is undoubtedly the finest 
in the county. 

Mr. Krause enlisted in the Union Army on 
February 14, 1863, in Company K, 27th Regi- 
ment, Wisconsin Volunteers, commanded by 
Colonel Conrad Krez, and was a participant in 
the siege of Vicksburg, the capture of Little 
Rock, Arkansas, the Red River campaign in 
Louisiana, and the siege of Mobile. He was 
mustered out at Brownsville, Texas, August 29, 
1865. 

On May 5, 1869, he was united in marriage 
with Maggie Hutchings, of Manitowoc county, 
Wisconsin, a daughter of Albert Hutchings of 
that section. They have nine children, whose 
names and dates of births follow: Albert E.. 
born August 8, 1870; Elizabeth, born January 
22, 1872; Frank J., born November 8, 1873; 
Lucy A., born July 22, 1876, who married E. J. 
Cullen and has a son one year old, named 
Edgar; Alexander, born June 18. 1879; 
Charles, born July 18. 1881 ; Mabel, born Feb- 
ruary 14, 1884; Henry, born September 28, 
1887; and George, born August 24, 1888. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



57 



The subject of this sketch is a Democrat in 
poHtics, while in his religious views he is a 
Roman Catholic. He is the soldiers' relief 
commissioner for the district, and is a member 
of Sully Post, No. 105, G. A. R. 



§ACOB OCKANDER is a prominent and 
well-to-do farmer residing three and one- 
half miles northwest of Weston, Ne- 
braska, where he owns a fine farm, upon which 
he has put all the improvements. He was born 
in Sweden in 1839 and is a son of Gabriel 
Ockander, who died a few years after his wife's 
death. Jacob is the only son in a family of nine 
children, and four of his sisters accompanied 
him to this country. 

He located in Council Bluffs, Iowa, in 1869, 
and moved to Saunders county, Nebraska, in 
1870, the year following his immigration to this 
country, and from Oscar Boline bought the 
west half of the northeast quarter of section 
6, township 14, range 6, of which only 10 
acres had been broken, and in the middle of the 
farm was a cave, dug preparatory to building 
a house. Mr. Ockander subsequently bought 
80 acres of railroad land — the west half of 
the southeast quarter of section 31, township 
15, range 6, of which 40 acres were owned by 
Mr. Boline. Until his home was completed, 
he lived with a neighbor, Oscar Johnson. His 
house was 14 by 22 feet, and he afterward 
erected a kitchen, 12 by 12. In the slough, a 
few rods back of the house, he built a sod barn 
large enough for a team and a cow, and near 



the barn was a fine spring, which furnished 
an abundant supply of water. In the early 
"seventies" he set out many box elder and 
Cottonwood trees, buying the slips from an 
island near Fremont, where he also obtained 
his lumber. He also devoted about two acres 
to an orchard, consisting of apple, peach, pear 
and cherry trees. In 1888 he built a barn and 
corn-crib, which he greatly enlarged in 1899, 
and also built a new hog and cow shed. He 
carries on general farming and raises about 
60 hogs a year. In 1899 he had a fine apple 
year, and in fact all his crops were good. He 
recently added a room 16 by 18 feet to his 
home, and is constantly making improvements 
upon his farm. He has two windmills, one at 
the barn, which he put up in 1892, and the 
other at the house, which he put up in 1896. 
He has two wells, one 124 feet deep and the 
other 50 feet deep. Mr. Ockander is a pro- 
gressive farmer, and throughout his community 
he enjoys the friendship of hosts of acquaint- 
ances. 

The subject of this sketch was married in 
Sweden to Elizabeth Vestber, who died on 
Christmas day of 1899, and this union was 
blessed by the following children : Ella, Hilma, 
Gabriel and Victoria. Ella, a native of Sweden, 
is the wife of John Carson, a farmer of Mari- 
posa precinct, Saunders county, and they have 
five children ; Hilma, also a native of Sweden, 
the wife of Mr. Egbert, keeps house for her 
father; Gabriel, born in Sweden, possesses 
many of his father's good traits, and practically 
manages his father's farm; Victoria, born in 
Nebraska, is the wife of Henry Roslund, who 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



resides a short distance from Mr. Ockander's 
home. 

In politics Mr. Ockander is a stanch Pop- 
ulist, while in a reHgious connection he attends 
the Baptist church, of which he is a member. 



IRA McCLUHAN, a successful farmer 
and stock raiser of Morse Bluff precinct, 
was born in Warren county, Illinois. He 
is the son of John McCluhan, deceased, and 
Leah (Hogue) McCluhan. His mother still 
lives in Saunders county, Nebraska. John Mc- 
Cluhan located in Saunders county, March i, 
1877, and engaged in farming. He died there 
in November, 1889. 

Ira McCluhan worked on his father's farm 
in the summer season, and attended the public 
school during the winter time. In this way 
he acquired a fair common-school education. 
At an early age he showed an aptitude for 
stock business, and induced his father to engage 
in that industry. The father made his son 
the purchasing agent, and to him was left the 
care of the stock. Since that time the Mc- 
Cluhans have been leaders in the stock raising 
line in Saunders county, and have made a great 
success of it. 

Ira McCluhan owns a quarter section in 
Bohemia precinct, 55 acres in his home place, 
and 200 acres in Dodge county, all of which 
is devoted to the business of stock raising. It 
was not until 1891 that Mr. McCluhan started 
this enterprise in Dodge county. In all of 
his dealings he has the reputation of being so 



scrupulously just and honest that his word can 
be positively relied on. He has the implicit 
confidence of all the stock men, and to this his 
success in a great measure can be attributed. 

In November, 1897, Mr. McCluhan was 
united in marriage with Mary B. Naverkal, of 
Saunders county. They have two sons : John, 
aged eighteen months, and an infant, unnamed. 
Their beautiful home in Morse Bluff is one 
of the finest in the county, situated as it is on 
a knoll immediately overlooking the town and 
with a full view of the Platte River district in 
the distance. Surrounded by fruit trees and 
fringed with a heavy growth of cottonwood, it 
is, indeed, an ideal home. 



-^HARLES W. MOSIER, of Morse 
I Y^ Bluff, Saunders county, Nebraska, was 

vi° ^ born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, June 
21, 1858. He is a son of John W. and Cather- 
ine (Stuart) Mosier, both living on their farm 
in Dakota. The family moved to Montgomery 
county, Iowa, when Charles W. was four years 
old. 

Charles W. Mosier received his intellectual 
training in the public schools, and worked at 
times on his father's farm. Being an am- 
bitious young man, and anxious to do for him- 
self, he rented a farm, which he successfully 
managed for four years, when he moved to 
North Bend, Nebraska, and rented another 
farm. This he cultivated one year, after which 
he ran a grader for one year. Saunders coun- 
ty, Nebraska, was then a "calling card" for 




ODNEY K. lOHNSON. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



parties seeking new homes. The advantages 
of stock raising afforded by that county at- 
tracted the attention of Mr. Hosier, and he 
moved there and engaged in the cattle and 
sheep business, which he followed four years, 
selling out to go into the livery business, in 
which he has continued ever since. 

Mr. Mosier chose for his life companion 
Mary Figgens, of Montgomery county, Iowa. 
Mrs. Mosier was a daughter of Louis and Eliz- 
abeth (Charter) Figgens, both deceased. Mr. 
and Mrs. Mosier have two children : Clemma, 
aged twenty years, and Ira, aged six years. 
Clemma married John Bignall, and has three 
children, Emma, Irwin, and Emphord. 

Mr, Mosier is a Populist in his political con- 
victions. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
church. For the past year he has held the 
office of city marshal and street commissioner. 



tODNEY K. JOHNSON, the leading 
merchant of Valparaiso, Nebraska, 
— ^ whose portrait is shown on the oppo- 
site page, is a gentleman of remarkable business 
ability. Having been located there since the 
very inception of the town, he has always been 
one of its most energetic citizens, devoting 
time and money to the furtherance of its public 
enterprises. No man has done more than he 
toward making Valparaiso the thriving place 
that it now is. He was born in the town of 
Knox, Waldo county, Maine, on December 13, 
1842, and is a son of Andrew and Mary Ann 
(Litle) Johnson. 



Benjamin Johnson, the grandfather of Rod- 
ney K., was a Revolutionary soldier and lived 
in Waldo county, Maine, where he died at the 
advanced age of eighty-six years. Andrew 
Johnson, the father, was a carpenter and joiner 
by trade. He was a native of Waldo county, 
as was his wife, Mary Ann Litle. In 185 1 
they moved west, locating in Delaware county, 
Ohio, but in 1854 they moved to Green county, 
Wisconsin. There they lived until 1865, when 
they moved to Saunders county, Nebraska. 
They reared the following children: Rodney 
K., of whom this sketch treats; Clarence T., 
who lives in Oak Creek precinct, Saunders 
county, and is one of the county commission- 
ers; Ellen M. (Throop), of Oak Creek pre- 
cinct; Olive A. (White), of Lincoln, Nebraska ; 
Charles B., who lives in Oak Creek precinct; 
Edward L., a citizen of Valparaiso; Ermina 
(States), who lives in Lincoln, Nebraska; and 
Albert L., who lives in Crete, Saline county, 
Nebraska. 

When the family first removed to Saunders 
county, Rodney K. Johnson and his father each 
took up a homestead. They began the journey 
from Wisconsin to Nebraska with a single 
horse and wagon, but just before reaching 
Council Bluffs the horse died, and they pro- 
ceeded westward afoot. The town of Valpa- 
raiso had been named and placed upon the map, 
but at that time not a single house marked the 
spot. It had been plotted and staked out in 
lots, but there were no buildings. The John- 
sons wished to locate where they could get 
good farm land and plenty of water, also 



! lOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



within easy reach of a market. After crossing 
the Platte River, which they found to be much 
smaller than they had expected, they started 
for the Oak Creek valley, where each took up a 
homestead, a portion of which is now the site 
of Valparaiso village. Their nearest neighbors 
were at that time eight miles to the sAuth and 
ten miles to the north. The government trail 
was three miles north of them and the old 
Mormon trail about two miles to the southwest. 
They erected frame houses, the material for 
which was hauled from Rock Bluff, Nebraska, 
on the Missouri River, by ox teams. Andrew 
and Rodney K. Johnson made the sashes and 
frames for the first capitol building at Lincoln, 
Nebraska, hewing and sawing them out of the 
rough timber. Andrew was the first postmas- 
ter of Valparaiso, and the first postoffice was in 
his house for several years. He died at the 
age of seventy-five years. His wife still sur- 
vives, making her home with her children. 

Rodney K. Johnson opened a store in his 
house when the Union Pacific Railroad was 
built through Valparaiso, and,, in 1879, he 
built a store building of the size of 25 by 80 feet 
and two stories high. Five years later he 
doubled the capacity of the building, making 
it 48 by 80 feet and two stories high. He has 
conducted a store ever since he first started, 
with the exception of one year, having sold his 
interest in the store and having rebought it a 
year afterward. He carries a fine line of general 
merchandise, and has catered to the best class, 
with remarkable success. He has also been an 
extensive dealer in grain, and, in 1884, he built 
an elevator, with a capacity of 75,000 bushels. 



He organized the first bank of the town and 
operated it for a period of twelve years. He 
built the first brick hotel there and operated 
that for two years, and was for twelve years its 
owner. He owned and published thtValparaiso 
Avalanche for a number of years. He has been 
a great factor in the development of the town, 
and is esteemed by his fellow men as a man of 
great worth to the community. 

In 1870 the subject of this sketch was united 
in marriage with Elvira L. Carter, and they 
are the parents of four children, as follows: 
Harry P., Estella, Emile and Edgar P. Harry 
P., born August 13, 1876, was graduated from 
the Valparaiso High School in 1890, and grad- 
uated from Lincoln Business College in 1892, 
since which time he has been associated in busi- 
ness with his father ; Estella was born Septem- 
ber 5, 1878; Emile was born September 27, 
1881 ; and Edgar P. was born May 22, 1886. 
Mr. Johnson served in the Union army 
throughout the Civil War; he enlisted, in 186 1, 
as a private with Company E, 5th Regiment, 
Wisconsin Vol. Inf., and was with the Army of 
the Potomac. He was wounded in the battle 
of Williamsburg, in 1862, and compelled to 
remain in the hospital for three months. His 
term of enlistment expired in 1864, and he 
re-enlisted in Company E, which was consoli- 
dated with Company B, of the same regiment, 
which served under General Cobb. Mr. John- 
son was successively promoted to be corporal, 
sergeant and second lieutenant. He is a mem- 
ber of Sherman Post, No. 64. G. A. R., and 
has held various offices. He is also a member 
of the Knights of Pythias, having passed 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



through all the chairs. In political affiliations 
he is a Republican and has held a number of 
local offices. 



I. 



W. HARRELL, a representative farm- 
er of Rock Creek precinct, Saunders 
county, Nebraska, was born in 1842, 
in Effingham county, Illinois, and is a son of 
Rev. Jethro and Effie (Noe) Harrell. 

Rev. Jethro Harrell was a licensed minister 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was 
an early settler of Illinois, locating in that 
state in 1841. By his first marriage he had 
five children, one now a resident of Illinois, 
one in Indiana, and three deceased. He sub- 
sequently married Effie Noe, and they became 
parents of six children, as follows : Jacob, 
William, J. W., Sarah J., F. H., and George. 
Jacob owns and lives upon the old homestead 
of 320 acres. William is a farmer of 
Effingham county, Illinois. J. W. is 
the subject hereof. Sarah J. (Parkhurst), 
whose husband is a live stock commissioner 
of South Omaha, has two children living. F. 
H. came with J. W. Harrell to Saunders 
county, Nebraska, and homesteaded in 1870. 
He later sold out and engaged in the hardware 
business at Staplehurst, Seward county, Ne- 
braska. He now lives at Fort Scott, Kansas, 
and has two children — Brick and Pearl. George 
died in Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Harrell both 
died in Illinois. 

J. W. Harrell worked on his father's farm 
until 1864, when he was married. He was 
tlien engaged in farming on his own account 



for five years and in 1869, with his wife, one 
child and his brother, F. H., drove 600 
miles from Illinois to Saunders county, Ne- 
braska. He pitched his tent for a week near 
his present home, and filed a claim on a quarter 
section of land, homesteading the west half 
of the northwest quarter of section 14, town- 
ship 13, range 6. By filing on the entire quarter 
he was enabled to hold one of the 80-acre 
tracts for his brother until he became of age a 
few months later. They built a dug-out some 
distance north of the present home, and then, 
owing to a failure of what he supposed to be 
a spring, built a sod house on the site of the 
present home, using poles for rafters, which 
they obtained from the natural timber along 
Rock Creek, which ran through the south end 
of the farm. A little later he built a straw 
stable south of the house. One of the three 
horses with which he left Illinois was drowned 
in the creek during one of their first nights in 
the county. J. W. and F. H. Harrell broke 
the land and continued together for seven or 
eight years. In 1879 the former purchased 
the 80 acres of the latter, at $5 per acre, the 
latter having previously bought an adjoining 
80 acres. In 1873 J- W. Harrell hauled 
the lumber from .Ashland for his first frame 
house, 14 by 18 feet in dimensions. In 1873 
he set out an orchard north of the house, but 
thinking it destroyed by hail he set out cotton- 
woods on the same ground. The fruit trees 
then began shooting up, and he cut down the 
cottonwoods, and now has a fine orchard of 
two acres, consisting of apples, peaches and 
pears. He set out a row of maples, which are 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



now large trees, and also some pines, in the 
front yard. In 1892 Mr. Harrell built his 
present home, of pretty design, which in size 
is equivalent to 32 feet square, with 18 feet 
posts, at a cost of $2,000. His present spacious 
barn, 40 by 44 feet, with four granaries inside 
and room for 12 horses, was built in 1887, 
together with other outbuildings. He has a 
good tubular well 65 feet deep, and eight acres 
of wild prairie grass near the house. His home 
is finished throughout in hard pine, and, to- 
gether with the beautiful grounds, is one of the 
largest and best farm homes in the precinct. 
He secured the seed for his first crop of wheat 
from Mr. Jamison, and in 1870 also worked 
for R. K. Johnson. He has always been very 
successful in his work and is one of the worthy 
and reliable citizens of the community. 

In 1864 he was united in marriage with 
Clarissa Keefer, a daughter of Benjamin F. 
Keefer. She has a brother, W. G. Keefer, who 
at one time conducted a harness shop in Wahoo. 
W. G. Keefer had six children — Charles, a 
professional musician in Omaha ; Myrtle, a mail 
clerk in the South Omaha postoffice; Susan; 
Forest, deceased; Hallie V., and Earl. The 
subject hereof and his wife have three children 
—Amy v., H. S. and W. O. Amy V. was 
born in Illinois and died in Rock Creek, Ne- 
braska, in 1892. H. S., who has rented his 
father's farm since 1894, married Annie Scan- 
Ion, whose parents are early settlers of Saunders 
county, and now live near Ceresco. W. O., 
who lives one mile east of his father's residence, 
commenced attending the Fremont Normal 
School when seventeen years old, and subse- 



quently graduated from that institution and 
taught school for four years. He married 
Linda V. Kiser, a daughter of Rev. Mr. Kiser, 
and they have two children — Fern and William 
John. The subject of this sketch is a Populist 
in his political affiliations. He and his worthy 
wife are strong advocates of rural free mail 
delivery. He has served thirteen years on the 
school board and has been road supervisor. He 
is a Methodist and assisted in building the 
church near his home. 



^HARLES PERRY, a prominent farmer 
of Cedar Bluffs, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, is a son of Jeremiah and 
Mary Ann (Hobbs) Perry, both deceased. He 
is a native of Bedfordshire, England, and was 
born February 7, 1849. 

Jeremiah Perry was a farmer, and young 
Perry attended the public schools and worked 
on his father's farm. In 1868 he and his 
brother left England and came to the United 
States, settling in Nebraska. The family fol- 
lowed them one year later. His father took 
up a homestead of 80 acres, pre-empted another 
80 acres, and afterward purchased still another 
80 acres. 

Charles Perry worked for his father three 
years, and then bought the southeast quarter 
of section 23 and the south half of the south- 
west quarter of section 24. On his newly 
acquired estate he immediately built a fine 
house, barn, corn cribs, etc. He engaged in 
farming and stock raising, keeping on his farm 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



65 



about 200 head of cattle, 200 head of hogs and 
about 15 horses. 

In 1872 he returned to England, and married 
Annie Hawtin, a resident of Northampton. 
Her father was George Hawtin, who has been 
deceased for fifteen years. Her mother, Mary 
(Hoi well) Hawtin, died about twelve years 
ago. Mrs. Perry has four brothers, William, 
George, Harry, and Fred — all living in Eng- 
land — and three sisters, Mrs. Percy Murray 
and Mrs. Fred Cloud, living in England, and 
Mrs. William Paddock, who resides in Toronto, 
Canada. 

Mr. and Mrs. Perry have one daughter, Flor- 
ence, living, aged twenty-two years, and Mary 
Ann, deceased. In politics Mr. Perry is a 
Republican. Mrs. Perry is a member of the 
Presbyterian church. 



WU^ one of 



ILLIAM BOWEN, deceased, was 
the most respected and up-to- 
date farmers in Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, where he located in 1880, and his death, 
which occurred February 16, 1900, was deeply 
deplored by his many friends and acquaintances 
throughout the county, who knew him to be a 
good neighbor and citizen and a kind and loving 
father and husband. He was born in Caermar- 
thenshire, Wales, in 1835, and there he was 
reared and received his mental training. In 
1880 he came to the United States with his fam- 
ily, located in Saunders county, and bought 
from John Thomas 160 acres of farming land 
at a cost of $15 per acre. The land is 



the southeast quarter of section 18, township 
14, range 6. He also purchased from the 
Union Pacific Railroad Company 80 acres, — 
the west half of the southwest quarter of 
section 17. The 160-acre tract had been home- 
steaded by Mr. Thomas; it contained but few 
improvements. He set out a great many trees, 
especially along the railroad, and near the house 
he planted a large grove of willows and cotton- 
woods. On the premises was a small house, 
which he remodeled into the present handsome 
and commodious structure, which is well fur- 
nished. In place of the old barn, which had a 
straw roof, he built the present substantial 
structure, which is 28 feet square and 16 feet 
high. Across the road he built a cattle barn, in 
1892, which measures 60 feet in length 14 feet 
in width and 12 feet in height. He also built 
a large granary and hog sheds for feeding pur- 
poses. A good well is near the house, and in 
all respects the farm is one of the best improved 
in the county. Mr. Bowen was considered by 
all who knew him as an enterprising and suc- 
cessful farmer. 

Mr. Bowen was joined in marriage with 
Mary Jones, who was also a native of Caermar- 
thcnsl ire, Wales, and to them were born the 
following children : Thomas, Elizabeth, David, 
Esther, Samuel, Hugh, Andrew M., Benjamin 
and Edith. Thomas, the eldest, is a locomo- 
tive engineer on the Santa Fe Railroad 
and lives in New Mexico; he married 
a Miss Rallard, by whom he has two 
children — Leone and William. Elizabeth 
is the wife of J. H. Miller, a brake- 
man on the Santa Fe Railroad, also residing in 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



New Mexico. She has two children — Truman 
and William. David is single, and is an engi- 
neer in the elevator at Weston. Esther is the 
wife of Joseph Edwards, a farmer in Kansas, 
and they have five children — Jonathan, Josie, 
Willie, Marie and Edward. Samuel is a pas- 
senger brakeman on the Santa Fe Railroad in 
New Mexico. Hugh is deceased. Andrew M. 
has been in charge of the homestead since the 
death of his father. Benjamin, aged twenty- 
one years, also works on the farm. Edith, the 
youngest, lives at home. Mr. Bowen was a 
school director in his community and took an 
active part in the promotion of its general wel- 
fare. 



rA. LUNDQUIST, a progressive 
farmer living four miles southwest 
of Valparaiso, Nebraska, was born 
twelve (Swedish) miles from Gothenburg, in 
the southern part of Sweden, in 1833. He is a 
son of Andrus and Mary Johnson, both of 
whom died in Sweden. They had four chil- 
dren, all of whom came to this country, namely : 
F. A., the subject hereof; Calus, who lives in 
Lincoln, Nebraska; Charles, who died at Lin- 
coln in 1872, and Frederick, who died in Cali- 
fornia. The children all took the name of an 
uncle, Mr. Lundquist, upon arriving in this 
country. 

F. A. Lundquist came to the United States 
and located in the state of Nebraska in 1872. 
He worked in Lincoln for some time, and, in 
1873, settled in Saunders county, Nebraska, 
where, in March of the following year, he 



homesteaded the south half of the northwest 
quarter of section 30, township 13, range 5. 
He broke 50 acres and built a small house which 
is still utilized on the place. After making many 
improvements he sold the place, in 1882, to 
Mr. Creathbaum (who still resides there), and 
subsequently purchased the southeast quarter 
of the same section from Mr. Vandermark, who 
had set out a few trees and broken about 50 
acres. This was the extent of the improvements 
upon the place, and, as there was no house, he 
rented a building of Mr. Vandermark for his 
family, who had come on from Lincoln, in May, 
1875. They lived there while his present house 
was being built, the dimensions of the main 
part of which are 16 by 26 feet, with an addition 
16 feet square. At that time he had six horses 
and about fifteen or twenty head of cattle. His 
only neighbors were Mr. Nelson, Mr. Nichol 
and George Lawton. He got along with straw 
sheds for stables up to 1885, when he built his 
present spacious barn. His granary, 22 by 30 
feet, with an 18-foot corn-crib attached, was 
built two years after the erection of his house. 
He has an excellent grove on each side of the 
house, and one and a half acres of orchard, all 
of which are his own improvements. His farm 
is well fenced and in excellent condition 
throughout, bespeaking the enterprising and 
progressive spirit of its owner. Mr. Lundquist 
is extensively engaged in raising stock and 
grain, and is one of the well-to-do men of his 
locality. He is well known and popular, and is 
a very active man for the age of three score 
and seven years. 

The subject of this sketch was united in mar- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



riage with Charlotte Johnson, a daughter of 
John Johnson, and six children were born to 
them in Sweden and two in America, as fol- 
lows: Sanfred, who is married and has two 
daughters; Charles; Clara (Lindholm) ; Emma 
(Pierson), who lives near Raymond, Lancaster 
county, Nebraska; Augusta (Gustang), who 
lives near Malcolm; Hilda, Albert and Annie. 
The three last named are living at home. 
Charles, the second child born to his parents, 
died when an infant. 



CS. LAMBERT, who has been promi- 
nently identified with the growth 
and development of Rock Creek pre- 
cinct for almost a quarter of a century, is a very 
successful farmer in that precinct, in addition 
to which he has served in various schools as 
instructor. He has shown marked ability in 
that line, being well educated and gifted with a 
most valuable talent of imparting knowledge to 
others. 

Mr. Lambert was born near Shellsburg, Ben- 
ton County, Iowa, in 1854, and is a son of 
Sherebiah and Louisa (Smitli) Lambert. His 
father, who was an early settler of Iowa, now 
lives in Washington, his wife having died sev- 
eral years ago. They were parents of five 
children, as follows: Ann (Kesling), whose 
husband is a farmer of Antelope county, Ne- 
braska; G. S., the subject hereof; D. A., who 
also lives in Antelope county, Nebraska; U. M., 
\'dio lives in Oregon, and one who died in in- 
fancy. 



G. S. Lambert worked upon his father's farm 
in Benton county, Iowa, until he was seventeen 
years old, in the meantime obtaining as much 
country schooling as possible. He then spent 
two years in town, at the high school, after 
which he taught there until 1873, when he re- 
moved to Saunders county, Nebraska. He 
taught school in the winter and farmed during 
the summer months, until his marriage, in 
1876. Prior to this he had purchased railroad 
land in Saunders county — the north half of the 
northeast quarter of section 23, township 13, 
range 6 — from Mr. Clay, who had patented 
the same, but had made no improvements. Mr. 
Lambert broke the sod and made many im- 
provements, but did not build upon the land 
until 1885, in the meantime renting various 
houses. In 1883 he bought an adjoining 
tract of 40 acres, making a good farm of 
120 acres. In 1885 he built what is 
now the south part of the house, 14 feet square, 
and later built an addition, 14 by 22 feet, also 
making it a story and a half high. He built a 
barn, 24 by 32 feet, with 12-foot posts, and also 
erected other necessary outbuildings. He has 
a fine grove of ash, elm, box elder and cotton- 
wood trees, and an orchard of over two acres 
of fruit trees of various kinds. For the past 
thirteen years he has farmed during the sum- 
mer and taught school during the winter, his 
services being very much in demand. He is 
ably assisted by two sons on the farm, which, 
including some rented property, now comprises 
;540 acres ; 1 5 acres are in hay, 30 acres in pas- 
ture and the remainder is cultivated, his prin- 
cipal crop being corn. Mr. Lambert began in 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



a very small way and with limited capital, and 
what he possesses today represents the labor of 
an industrious and well-spent life. 

In 1876 the subject of this sketch was united 
in marriage with Nancy Bennett, and they have 
three children, all at home: Nettie, Frank M. 
and John E. In politics Mr. Lambert is a Pop- 
ulist, and serves as a member of the school 
board and as justice of the peace. He served 
two terms as assessor — in 1884 and in 1893. 
He is a really a Baptist in religious faith, hut 
has been associated actively with the Method- 
ists in assisting materially to build the church 
of that denomination near his farm, on section 
22. It was built in 1886, by the voluntary aid 
of the farmers, who expended both labor and 
money to that end, receiving no outside help 
from any church board. It has a seating capac- 
ity of 150. Mr. Lambert has been a Sunday 
school superintendent for the last twenty years. 
He is now president of the county Sunday 
school association. 






NTON POSPISIL is one of the influen- 
tial and well-to-do agriculturists of 
Saunders county, Nebraska, where he 
has resided since 1872. He has always occu- 
pied a prominent place among his fellow citi- 
zens, having served as assessor for the past 
twelve years, and also as justice of the peace. 
He was born in Bohemia, in 1859, and is a son 
of John and Mary (Dolezal) Pospisil, who had 
a family of seven children, of whom the first 
three were born in the northern part of Bohe- 



mia. They were named as follows : John, de- 
ceased; Anton, the subject of this biography; 
Mary; Frank, deceased; Annie, the wife of 
Frank Virgl and the mother of one child, Mary ; 
Fanny, who died in Omaha, Nebraska; and 
John, who is a druggist at Weston, Nebraska. 

John and Mary (Dolezal) Pospisil came to 
this country in 1866, and, for the first three 
years, they lived in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, but 
after that they moved to Omaha, where Mr. 
Pospisil worked in a quarry. In the spring of 
1872, John Pospisil settled in Saunders county, 
Nebraska, where he homesteaded 80 acres in 
Elk precinct, and later bought 40 acres in 
Newman precinct. They first lived in a dug- 
out, which was located just south of their pres- 
ent barn, but when Mr. Pospisil purchased his 
40 acres in Newman precinct he cut from 
the timber enough poles to build a barn large 
enough to shelter a pair of oxen, a cow and a 
calf. In 1885 Mr. Pospisil built the present 
barn, located across the road from his house, 
which he erected in 1883, and which is 16 by 
26 feet. 

The subject of this sketch has resided 
upon the home farm ever since he came to 
Saunders county, with the exception of two 
years, when he was about seventeen years of 
age, and worked out. He carries on general 
farming and stock raising, and is one of the 
up-to-date and progressive farmers of his 
county. 

Anton Pospisil was joined in marriage with 
Mary Virgl, a daughter of Frank Virgl, and 
to them a family of nine children have been 
born, as follows : Mary, Wencel, Carrie, An- 




MR. AM) MRS. JAMES FIEDLER am. FAMILY. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



71 



ton, Fannie, Theodore, Frank, Jacob, and 
Thomas, all of whom are well and living at 
home. Mr. Pospisil, as before mentioned, has 
served as assessor of Elk precinct for the past 
twelve years, and also holds the position of jus- 
tice of the peace. He served several years as a 
member of the board of election and as moder- 
ator of the school district. 



fAMES FIEDLER, a prominent farmer 
who has attained success in Saunders 
county, Nebraska, is now one of the 
largest land owners in Chapman precinct. He 
was born in Bohemia and is a son of Benedict 
and Mary (Kadavy) Fiedler. His father was 
born in 1833 in Bohemia, near the line of Ger- 
many and in the vicinity of Prague. His 
mother is a daughter of Frank Kadavy, another 
prominent farmer of Chapman precinct. 

In 1882 Benedict Fiedler came to America, 
bringing with him $1,300. He went to Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, and purchased 80 acres 
of land from John Swoberty which is in the 
northwest quarter of section 27. James Fied- 
ler's parents still reside upon that farm, al- 
though their son, Paul, now has the manage- 
ment of it. They first built a small sod house, 
measuring 10 by 18 feet on the inside. They 
lived in that house nine years, and then built 
a frame house 16 feet by 30 feet in dimensions 
and 10 feet high. Previous to 1890 they used 
a straw barn, but afterward erected a frame 
barn, its size being 1 8 by 36 by 1 2 feet, with a 
loft for hay. Three children were born to this 



worthy couple, as follows: James (this 
memoir's subject), Paul, and Frank. The last 
named, while still in the old country, married 
Annie Soukup, and they liave three children, 
Mary, Laura, and Frank, Jr. Frank now re- 
sides on a farm in section 22, immediately ad- 
joining the farm of James. 

James Fiedler accompanied his parents to 
Saunders county in 1882, and worked out for 
six years. In 1885, his marriage with Thony 
Novak was consummated. Mrs. Fiedler is a 
daughter of Joseph Novak, who took up a 
homestead claim on School creek, about one 
mile from Weston. Five children were born 
to the subject hereof and his worthy wife. Their 
names are Fannie, Eddie, Annie, Joseph, and 
Emma. The eldest is now about fifteen years 
old, and their ages range down to little Emma, 
who is still a babe. Eddie and Joseph, al- 
though quite young, are very helpful on the 
farm. They can drive teams and do any num- 
ber of small jobs for their father, who will ap- 
preciate their assistance more each year as they 
grow older. Mrs. Fiedler has an uncle, Mr. 
Cadavy, who purchased from Mr. Clement a 
farm near the home of her husband. Like most 
new comers, he first had only a sod house, but 
now has a group of very substantial buildings. 

Mr. Fiedler had $300 from his father to 
begin with. This, together with what money 
he had been able to save from his earnings, 
enabled him to purchase a home. In 1886 he 
bought 80 acres from "Joe" Clement at $20 
an acre. This land included the east half of 
the southeast quarter of section 22. Four years 
later he also bought the 40-acre tract lying just 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



north of his first purchase. This land was also 
bought from Mr. Clement, and upon it he built 
his present comfortable and substantial house, 
barns, outbuildings, windmill, etc. 

In 1894 Mr. Fiedler made an additional 
purchase, the Scharf farm of 80 acres being 
added to his possessions. This farm cost him 
$42 per acre and is the north half of the south- 
west quarter of section 22. In 1900 the 
Hakel farm of 80 acres was also acquired at a 
cost of $42.50 per acre, this being the south 
half of the southwest quarter of section 23. 
Mr. Fiedler is now the possessor of 280 acres 
of improved land, worth from $40 to $45 
an acre. He has numerous orchards, which 
bear a good variety of choice fruit. Both 
he and his family worship at the Catholic 
church which was built at Weston in 1884 and 
is now in charge of Rev. Louis Kline. The 
children attend school in district No. 71. A 
picture of Mr. Fiedler's family is shown in 
connection with this biography, being pre- 
sented on a preceding page. The subject of 
this sketch is a man of admirable character and 
industrious habits. Success has attended his 
every effort, and he is now one of the substan- 
tial men of his county. 



Kt 



\ CRUZAN is a prosperous and 
ighly respected farmer, residing 

near Valparaiso, Oak Creek pre- 
cinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, and he is 
also assessor of his precinct. He was born in 
September, 1854, in Ripley county, Indiana, 



65 miles southeast of Indianapolis, and is a son 
of R. R. and Elizabeth (Sams) Cruzan. He 
is the oldest of seven children, namely: M. 
T., Lucinda, John L., W. J., Rachel M., James 
A., and Mary. Lucinda is the wife of John 
Scott, of Valparaiso, and they have three chil- 
dren: Lillie, James, and Esther. John L. is 
married and engaged in farming near North 
Loup, Nebraska; he has three children: Ira, 
Roy, and Edith. W. J. cultivates a farm six 
miles north of Valparaiso, and has four child- 
ren : Ethel, Arthur, Pearl, and Ora. Rachael M. 
is the wife of O. H.Embree, who is engaged in 
farming just east of Mr. Cruzan's farm ; they 
have three daughters : Myrtle, Cora, and Vena. 
James A. lives at Thompson, Montana, is mar- 
ried and has one child, Alice. Mary, the young- 
est, is now Mrs. Elmer Emery, of Los Angeles, 
California; she has three children: Clarence, 
Olive, and Ray. Mr. Cruzan's father was a 
farmer and a cooper by trade. 

M. T. Cruzan remained under the parental 
roof until he was seventeen years of age, when 
he commenced to earn his own livelihood. He 
spent seven years in Livingston county, Mis- 
souri, and three years in Winneshiek county, 
Iowa, working by the month. In 1878 he set- 
tled in Cass county, Nebraska, driving through 
with a team of horses. He purchased a piece 
of land, on which he made a payment of $48, 
which, with the exception of 50 cents, was the 
extent of his means. He sold his place in 1883, 
and, upon going to Saunders county, he bought 
from S. W. Benepee the southwest quarter of 
section 28, township 13, range 5, which prop- 
erty was originally homesteaded by a Mr. Wil- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



liams. Mr. Benepee had set out seven or eight 
acres of all kinds of trees, erected a small house, 
and broken about 20 acres. The rest of 
the improvements Vi^ere added by Mr. Cruzan. 
He has put out an orchard of two and one-half 
acres, consisting of apple, plum, and cherry 
trees, and, among the beautiful shade trees on 
his farm, one has a diameter of 20 inches. The 
size of the first barn was 16 by 28 feet, but Mr. 
Cruzan enlarged it to 24 by 36 feet. In 1899 he 
added a room, 16 by 22 feet, to the old house. 
Besides raising considerable grain he deals ex- 
tensively in stock, raising Poland-China hogs 
and Shorthorn cattle. 

The subject of this sketch was married, in 
Iowa, in 1878, to Elizabeth B. Vance, and they 
have two children, Calla I. and Jesse V. In 
politics Mr. Cruzan is independent; he is now 
serving his third consecutive term as assessor 
of Oak Creek precinct. He served six years 
as a member of the school board and fourteen 
years as road overseer. Religiously he is a 
member of the Christian church. 



RS. ELLEN M. THROOP, widow 
of H. E. Throop, who died in July, 
1897, owns a large farm in Oak 
Creek precinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, and 
personally superintends the work upon it. She 
possesses excellent judgment and good business 
ability, and success has attended her efforts on 
every hand. 

Mrs. Throop was born in Maine in 1843 ^^^ 
is a daughter of Andrew and Mary A. (Litle) 



Johnson. Her father, familiarly known as 
"Uncle Andy" Johnson, was the first white set- 
tler in Oak Creek precinct, locating just west of 
Valparaiso, on October 5, 1865. He married 
Mary A. Litle, and ten children blessed their 
home, namely : Rodney K., a record of whose 
life appears elsewhere in this work; Ellen 
M., the subject hereof; Olive (White), of Lin- 
coln, Nebraska; Clarence T., who lives near 
Valparaiso, Nebraska, and is at present county 
commissioner ; Charles, a farmer of Oak Creek 
precinct; Edward, who is a clerk for his broth- 
er, R. K. ; Minnie (States); Byron; Jessie 
(Fremont), and Albert Litle, superintendent of 
the Crete Mills, Crete, Nebraska. 

Ellen M. Johnson was married in the spring 
of 1863 at Magnolia, Wisconsin, to H. E. 
Throop, who was born May 26, 1830, and was 
a son of Daniel Throop. He had a brother, 
Simeon Throop, who was an early settler of 
Saunders county, and for many years conducted 
a large nursery business near Valparaiso. Mr. 
and Mrs. Throop lived in Albany, Wisconsin, 
until the fall of 1865, when they removed to 
Geneseo, Henry county, Illinois. The next 
spring they followed her father to Saunders 
county, Nebraska, and, in 1866, secured 160 
acres with college scrip, the northeast quarter 
of section 34, township 13, range 5. Mr. 
Throop homesteaded the 80 acres directly west, 
and then bought a timber claim of 40 acres, 
making 280 acres in all. They had sufficient 
money to last until the first crop was harvested, 
and lived with Mr. Johnson, at Valparaiso, un- 
til Mr. Throop erected a small frame house, 14 
by 18 feet, a little west of the present residence. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



He also built a straw shed and a sod hen house, 
and, during the first summer, broke the sod. 
He also set out large groves of trees, one, of 
cottonwoods, west of the house, and one, of 
maples, to the north. He put out a fine orchard 
of several acres, of a large variety of fruit. A 
very valuable feature of the property is the 
presence of ten or twelve strong springs, fur- 
nishing a bountiful supply of pure water. Some 
of them are located high enough to force water 
by means of pipes to the second story of the 
house, and also to the stable and stock yard. 
The farm has always been devoted to extensive 
stock raising, and, since her husband's death, 
Mrs. Throop has continued the same line of 
operations in a most able manner. She has a 
nephew living with her, who does the work 
upon the farm. The present large and beautiful 
home was erected in 1885, it being full two 
stories high and 30 feet square, besides having 
a comfortable kitchen. 

The subject of this sketch and her husband 
were parents of the following children : Frank 
E., Elmer E., Willard, Nellie and Minnie E. 
Frank E., who is identified with railroad work 
as yardmaster, married Mary Conley, in Chi- 
cago, in 1888, and they have a son, Harold. 
Elmer E., a railroad conductor, of Portland, 
Oregon, was the first male child born in the 
precinct, his birth occurring in a covered 
wagon. He married May McLannahan, of 
Portland, and they have a daughter, Beatrice. 
Willard, a farmer near Valparaiso, married 
Bertha Conley, and they have five children, 
namely : Ellen, Ruth, Howard, Henrietta and 
a small baby. Nellie (Magee), whose husband 



is a clothing merchant at Seneca, Kansas, has 
two children, Harold and Ethel. Minnie E. is 
attending Wesleyan University. In religious 
views Mrs. Throop is a Methodist. Politically 
Mr. Throop was an advocate of the principles 
of the Populist party. 



r"^ RED MILLER, the popular and ac- 
commodating proprietor of the Morse 
Bluff Hotel, is one of the leading citizens 
of Saunders county, Nebraska. He arose from 
a humble beginning to the more affluent walks 
in life, and is now the owner of valuable real 
estate in Omaha and Morse Bluff. 

Mr. Miller is a native of Schleswig-Holstein, 
Germany, and a son of Hans and Annie ( Stul- 
tenburg) Miller, both deceased. When a lad 
of eleven years, Fred left his native land, com- 
ing to the United States. He located at Fort 
Calhoun, Nebraska. There he remained three 
years and then moved to Omaha, where he 
worked in the saloon business three and a half 
years, and then started in the same line for him- 
self. He continued in the saloon business for 
five years, and then sold out to conduct the 
Gettleman Brewing Company's place in Omaha, 
where he stayed three years. 

Mr. Miller then conceived the idea of build- 
ing a hotel, moved to Morse Bluff, and erected 
the present spacious hotel building. He is just 
the man for that line of business. He is polite 
and approachable and his hotel has a reputation 
not only in Saunders county, but with trading 
men all over the state. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Mr. Miller owns lots 9, lo, 11 and 12 in 
block I, Morse Bluff, on which his hotel and 
orchard are situated. He also owns lot 3 in 
Steppers Place, addition to Omaha. He has 
three brothers, John, Henry, and William, and 
one sister, Cecilia, who married Henry Stafen, 
of Washington county. They all reside in 
Nebraska. 

In 1897 Mr. Miller was united in marriage 
with Barbara Pabian. Mrs. Miller is a daugh- 
ter of John and Teresa Pabian, of Omaha. • 



/^ LOF BENGTSON, a native of Sweden, 
L^^^ was born in 1850. He is one of the 

^-"^ best known farmers in Saunders county 
and is known throughout this section of the 
state. He is a man of firm principles, an excel- 
lent citizen and a kind and charitable neighbor. 
His farm is one of the most attractive in the 
county, and its neat and well kept appearance 
speaks emphatically for the thrift and good 
management of its owner. 

Olof Bengtson's father and mother, Bengt 
and Cecelia Olson, had two other sons, one, 
P. B. Olson, a prominent man of Saunders 
county, who was born in 1853, and who owns 
240 acres of land adjoining Mr. Bengtson's 
farm. For many years he was county treasurer 
and has always taken an active part in the 
affairs of the county, having served two terms 
as representative in the state legislature. John, 
the other son, lives in Illinois and is married 
to Tilda Abrahamson. They have two children, 
Eva and Oscar. 



Mr. Bengtson came to America in 1868 and 
spent the first three months in Illinois and the 
following ten in Wisconsin. In the spring of 
1869 he located in Omaha, where he worked for 
some time. In July, 1869, he settled in Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, where he homesteaded 
the south half of the northwest quarter of sec- 
tion 34, township 15, range 6. Mr. Olin, Mr. 
Bengtson's neighbor just south, and Mr. Lund- 
burg came with I\Ir. Bengtson from Omaha. 
The only other house in that section was Nils 
Edlund's. Mr. Bengtson built a small dug-out 
in November, 1869, which stood a little south of 
his present residence. In 1872 he built a frame 
house, 18 by 22 feet. It is one of the oldest 
frame houses in the county, if not the oldest. 
Mr. Bengtson has made many improvements 
since first building it, having reshingled it and 
made it one and a half stories high. In 1880 
he built a barn, granary and cribs, and in 1896 
added several outbuildings. In 1880 he also 
bought 40 acres of railroad land at $8 per acre. 
This is the southea-st quarter of the southwest 
quarter of section 27. Mr. Bengtson has a very 
fine orchard, the first trees being planted in 
1878, and he has added to them ever since. He 
takes great care of the trees and has one of the 
finest orchards in the county. 

In 1876 the subject of this sketch married 
Louise Peterson, a daughter of Frederick Peter- 
son, and they are the parents of four children, 
namely: Hulda, deceased; Albert, deceased; 
Amanda, who is sixteen years old and is at 
home; and Lyman, who also lives at home. 
Mr. Bengtson is a Populist in politics, and the 
family are members of the Lutheran church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Mr. Bengtson takes an active interest in educa- 
tional matters. He was school moderator for 
eight consecutive years, and -was connected 
with the board when the new school was built. 
The family are well known throughout the 
county, and Mr. Bengtson is considered a man 
of the strictest integrity. 



"Y^OUIS LICHTENBERG, now engaged 
IJT in general farming and stock raising in 
''^** ■■ "^ Cedar precinct, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, is a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, Ger- 
many. He was born April 2^, 1842, and is a 
son of Gustav Lichtenberg, who combined the 
occupations of farmer, miller and justice of the 
peace. 

Louis Lichtenberg acquired his early educa- 
tion in his native place. At the age of nineteen 
years he took passage on board the ship "Mar- 
co Polo," which sailed for the United States, 
and landed in New York. He worked on a farm 
for a short time, and subsequently in a brewery, 
the work of which he was familiar with, as in 
the old country he had learned the trade. The 
trade there also included starch making, sugar 
making, and distilling. 

In the dark days of 1862, when the ominous 
clouds of war hovered over the Union, the sub- 
ject hereof, then only twenty years old, showed 
his loyal spirit in the defence of his adopted 
country. He enlisted in the 8th Regiment, 
New York Volunteers, and six months later 
re-enlisted in the 29th Regiment, New York 
Volunteers, named at the time "The Old Gari- 



baldi Guard." He was taken prisoner at Har- 
per's Ferry, and subsequently exchanged and 
sent to Chicago. There he worked in a brew- 
ery five years for Busch & Brand. 

In 1867 Mr. Lichtenberg moved to Nebraska, 
took up a homestead and engaged in general 
farming and stock raising. Most of the time 
his farm is stocked with about 200 cattle, 200 
hogs and about 20 horses. He has a fine grow- 
ing orchard of apple, cherry and plum trees. 
He was married in 1866 to Fredericka Scherer. 
They have reared eleven children, as follows : 
Mary (Ranslam), Gustav, Lena (Becker), 
Sophia (Ranslam), Annie, Rosa (Epsem), 
Lucy (Ranslam), Clara, Carl, Walter and 
Francis. 

Party ties do not bind Mr. Lichtenberg in the 
discharge of his duty on election days. He is 
governed by principle, and supports the candi- 
date who, in his estimation, will serve the peo- 
ple's interests to the best advantage. Mr. Lich- 
tenberg is a member of the German Lutheran 
church. 



^'*-'AYLOR VAIL RUTTER, one of the 
t\ leading agriculturists of Chapman pre- 
cinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, where 
he owns a quarter section of highly improved 
farm land, has lived a most industrious and 
frugal life. Starting at the age of fourteen 
years, entirely without capital, he entered upon 
his work with a vim and energy not to be 
denied. He was always economical, not spend- 
ing his money like other boys, but laying it by, 
and, when enough had accumulated, carefully 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



77 



investing it and increasing it many times over. 
He is a shrewd and discriminating business man 
and has owned considerable property in Saun- 
ders county, which he invariably disposed of to 
good advantage. 

Mr. Rutter was born near Searights, Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1854, and is a son of 
John and Susan (Vail) Rutter. He has two 
sisters and one brother, as follows : Minerva 
(Rader), who lives near Piedmont, Greenwood 
county, Kansas; Eliza (May), who is now a 
widow and lives in Kansas ; and Henry, who is 
married and also lives in Kansas. Mr. Rutter 
worked upon his father's farm in Pennsylvania 
and lived in that state until he was fourteen 
years of age. His father started for Illinois 
in 1855, but met with death by drowning in the 
Allegheny River, shortly after leaving Browns- 
ville. His son, Taylor, was put out to work 
at an early age, and was raised by his grand- 
father until he was fourteen years old, when he 
went to Illinois and hired out to a farmer for 
a few months. He then went to Kansas, where 
his family had all located, his brother having 
first spent three years in Illinois. He was taken 
sick there, and, concluding that the Kansas cli- 
mate did not agree with him, he returned to 
Illinois and hired out for four years. He 
worked hard and saved his earnings, each year 
placing $125 out on interest. In this way he 
got a start and then rented a farm, which he 
operated with considerable success, raising 
three crops. He continued in La Salle county, 
Illinois, for many years, and in 1886 removed 
to Saunders county, Nebraska, having nine 
horses, three sets of harness, a wagon, buggy, 



cultivator and plow, and about $800 in money. 
He first purchased 80 acres in Chapman pre- 
cinct — the south half of the northeast quarter 
of township 14, range 6 — -and set about culti- 
vating and improving the place, erecting build- 
ings, etc. He disposed of it to Joseph Jasa, 
and then purchased 40 acres in section i — the 
northwest quarter of the northeast quarter ; 40 
acres in Mariposa precinct, and 120 acres in 
section 2, township 14, range 6, paying $25 an 
acre for the 200 acres. He greatly improved 
the land, built a barn at a cost of $1,250, a crib 
for $100, a kitchen for $150, and then sold it, 
realizing well out of the transaction. He sold 
the 40 acres in Mariposa precinct to Mr. Peter- 
son, for $32.50 per acre; another 40 acres to 
Mr. Jasa, for $38.50 per acre, and the 120 
acres in section 2 to Mr. Paulson, for $45.75 
per acre. In 1894 he purchased the present 
farm, a quarter section adjoining Weston, at 
$50 per acre, from Mr. Youngstrom, one acre 
of it being occupied by the cemetery. He has 
expended $500 in improvements since, and has 
one of the best improved farms in the county. 
His wells are only 50 feet deep, but the water 
is especially fine, and he has an excellent system 
of waterworks on the farm. His place presents 
an attractive appearance with its handsome 
shade trees surrounding the house. He has 
his land mostly in grain, and is engaged in rais- 
ing fine horses. He is an excellent judge of 
horses and has some very fine animals, both 
draft horses and roadsters. 

In 1877 Mr. Rutter was united in marriage 
with Ethel L. Redman, a daughter of Andrew 
Redman, an early settler of Illinois, and they 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



had seven children, as follows : Nellie, de- 
ceased, who was born in 1882; Minnie, who is 
sixteen years of age; John, deceased; Ross, 
aged twelve years; Eva, aged ten years; Roy, 
aged eight years ; and Clifford, who died in the 
fall of 1893. The two youngest boys are bright 
and active, and assist materially in doing the 
chores about the farm. 



fOHN W. O'KANE, at one time sheriff 
of Saunders county, and for many years 
one of the leading agriculturists of Stock- 
ing precinct, is now leading a retired life at 
Ithaca, Nebraska, where he has an elegant 
residence. 

Mr. O'Kane was born in Ogle county, 
Illinois, in 1841, and is a son of Daniel and 
Lucy (Johnson) Kane. He was reared in that 
county and in 1862 enlisted in the Union army, 
becoming a private in Company E, pad 
Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He 
served for two years and seven months, 
and while serving in Kilpatrick's cavalry at 
Powder Springs, Georgia, three balls struck 
him in the left thigh, thus incapacitating him 
for further duty. He saw much hard service, 
and always conducted himself in a soldierly 
manner, being ready to discharge his full duty, 
and more, when called upon. In 1869 he moved 
to Stocking precinct, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, and homesteaded 80 acres — the west 
half of the southwest quarter of section 24. 
Upon this property was located a small board 
house, 12 by 16 feet in dimensions, and in 1870 



he brought his family of eleven, in all, and 
lived in it until a larger house could be erected. 
He set out an orchard and grove of five acres, 
and greatly improved his property in every 
way. He purchased 80 acres of railroad land, 
adjoining his property on the south, in section 
25, Stocking precinct, at $10 per acre, and 80 
acres on the east. He then erected barns and a 
fine set of other outbuildings, and successfully 
engaged in agricultural pursuits for many 
years. He also bought and improved consider- 
able other property in the county, and had it 
all well stocked. In 1886 he was elected 
sheriff of Saunders county by the Democratic 
party, and served in a manner most satisfactory 
to his constituents for two years. Upon first 
locating in the county he was made school 
treasurer, and was the means of dividing the 
old district into the present four districts. He 
has served on the school board for many years, 
and also as constable, in which capacity he is 
now serving. In 1891 he practically retired 
from active business life, selling some of his 
land and renting the rest of it. He built his 
present large and handsome residence in Ithaca, 
in which he has since resided. He now con- 
ducts a boarding stable, and is quite successful 
in that enterprise. 

Mr. O'Kane was united in marriage with 
Mrs. Esther Dodson, widow of Melvin Dodson, 
by whom she had two children — Clarence, and 
Millie R. Her union with Mr. O'Kane re- 
sulted in the birth of five children : Arthur Els- 
worth, who married Alice Granger, by whom 
he has one child. Hazel ; Frank Wesley ; Agnes, 
the wife of Dr. W. H. Atkinson, and mother of 




MR. AND MRS. G. B. M. WILL and FAMILY. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



81 



one son, Earl ; Edith, the wife of Bert Wills, 
by whom she had had two children, both of 
whom are dead; and Flora, who is unmarried 
and resides at home. 



'B. M. WILL, a prominent and enter- 
prising young business man of Valpa- 
"• raiso, Saunders county, Nebraska, is 
manager of the Searle & Chapin Lumbering 
Company, for which he has worked since 1891. 
He was born in Pomeroy, Ohio, May 30, 1861, 
and is a son of David and Kezia (Wandling) 
Will. He was the only child born of that 
union, and when but two years of age his 
mother died, and he went to live with his 
grandmother. When he was fourteen years 
of age his father married a Miss Radford, and 
the subject hereof returned home and lived 
there until he was twenty-two years old. As 
a result of his father's second union, seven 
children were born, those living being David; 
Maude; Clyde and Oderkirk. 

At twenty years of age Mr. Will began 
teaching school, which he made his occupation 
for three years, but he afterward entered Nor- 
man University, at Lebanon, O., which was 
under the direction of Mr. Holbrook. He grad- 
uated from that institution in 1885 with high 
honors. He went through school without any 
assistance whatever from his father. Upon 
leaving school he went to Sutton, Nebraska, 
and taught four years in Clay and Thayer 
counties. For the following three years he 
was principal of the Liberty schools. As the 
county superintendent of Thayer county, Ne- 



braska, he looked over certain timber lands in 
the interest of several teachers; eighteen of 
them took up claims, but the subject hereof is 
the only one who now holds a deed, as he in- 
vested the necessary capital for improvements. 
His property consists of the southwest quar- 
ter of section 30, township 24, range 56 west, 
and is located in the Sioux valley, four miles 
from the Platte River and a short distance 
from the Burlington & Missouri River Rail- 
road. As that part of the country is being rap- 
idly settled the land bids fair to become very 
valuable. December 19, 1891, Mr. Will lo- 
cated in Valparaiso, Nebraska, where he as- 
sumed the management of the S. K. Martin 
Lumbering Company, and continued to work 
for that company until August, 1899, when 
they sold out to Searle & Chapin, for whom our 
subject now works. He has made consider- 
able investments in real estate in Valparaiso, 
and now owns three blocks, valued at $2,500. 
He is a hustling and wide-awake business man, 
and his upright and honest business methods 
have gained him hosts of friends. 

June 19, 1889, Mr. Will married Sarah K. 
Headrick, the eldest daughter of John Head- 
rick, and they have three children : Mabel, born 
in 1890, and Joseph and Josephine, twins, born 
August 21, 1894. Mrs. Will comes from a 
family of eight children, namely: W. J., who 
is a jeweler at Sterling, Colorado ; Robert L. 
and Joseph B., who are farmers near Alexan- 
dria, Nebraska ; Mary L., who is the wife of 
Charles Bright, a farmer near Alexandria; 
Anna, the wife of Guy Crewdson; Mattie, and 
Hattie. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



In politics, the subject of this sketch is a 
Democrat; rehgiously he is a Methodist. In 
1892 he joined Lodge No. 136, I. O. O. F., in 
which he has held all the chairs and is now 
warden. He was delegated to the grand lodge 
at Lincoln in 1895. He carried $3,000 insur- 
ance in Liberty Lodge No. 932, M. W. A., but 
in 1892 he transferred his membership to Lodge 
No. 145 1. He and his wife carry policies of 
$2,500 each in the National Mutual Life of 
Minneapolis. A picture of Mr. Will's family is 
presented on a preceding page. 



V4 V^^f ■ 



ILLIAM E. DECH was for many 
years one of the leading agriculturists 
'of Wahoo precinct, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, of which he was a very early settler, 
but since 1893 he has been living a retired life 
at Ithaca, Nebraska. He was born in Monroe 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1841, and is a son of 
Elijah and Hannah (Heller) Dech. 

Elijah Dech was a native of Northampton 
county, Pennsylvania, where he lived until 
April, 1857. He then removed to Lee county, 
Illinois, and engaged in farming, although his 
previous occupation had been that of a miller. 
In the spring of 1868 he went west to Ithaca, 
Saunders county, Nebraska, and homesteaded 
80 acres in section 28, Wahoo precinct. He built 
a house 16 by 24 feet in dimensions upon the 
site of the present house of Barney Schroeder. 
Ithaca was laid out upon his farm. He was 
the first postmaster of that town, the postoffice 
being established in his house in 1869. He 



died March 24, 1872, at the age of sixty-nine 
years, his widow surviving until 1892, when 
she passed away at the advanced age of eighty 
years. They were parents of the following 
children: Josiah J., a gentleman whose life- 
history appears elsewhere in this work; John, 
of Antelope, Nebraska; George, of Colorado; 
William E. ; Susan, deceased ; Mary Ann, wife 
of Alfred Eyer ; Martha, wife of R. L. Roberts; 
and Helen, wife of B. Parks. 

William E. Dech was reared and schooled in 
his native state, and in 1861 enlisted in the 
army service. He became a private in Com- 
pany G. loth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, and served three years, ten months, 
and twenty days, in a most creditable manner. 
In October, 1869, he arrived in Wahoo pre- 
cinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, and home- 
steaded the east half of the southwest quarter 
of section 28. He did not favor the idea of 
living in a sod house, so did not immediately 
build. He bought a yoke of oxen, plowed the 
ground and sowed grain. Having harvested 
his crops, he exchanged wheat at 35 cents per 
bushel for lumber, and was thus enabled to 
build a home. It was hard work to get a good 
start, but he managed to make both ends meet, 
and in time became one of the most prosperous 
men in the county. He set out a grove of trees 
and a splendid orchard, and was actively en- 
gaged in general farming and stock raising 
until 1893, when he retired. He built a fine 
residence in Ithaca, in which he still resides. 
In addition to his original farm he purchased 
another 80 acres in section 29, and the 80 acres 
homesteaded by his father, and owns a half sec- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



tion of land in Antelope county, Nebraska, 
which he rents. He owns stock in the Ithaca 
State Bank, and is one of its directors. 

Mr. Dech was united in marriage with Mary 
E. Phelps, a daughter of Samuel T. Phelps, of 
Dixon, Illinois, and they have reared one 
daughter, namely: Amy, who married Robert 
Dech, and has two children; Nina and Lilah. 

The subject of this sketch served sixteen 
years as school director and nine years as road 
supervisor. He is a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and votes the Populist 
ticket. 



TT^HARLES O. JOHNSON, a prominent 
I jy farmer and stock raiser of Stocking 

^* ^precinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, 

owns one of the most productive and beauti- 
fully situated farms in that county. Mr. John- 
son was born in Sweden in 1848. He is a son 
of Olof and Christina (Larson) Johnson. His 
parents came to the United States in 185 1, 
settling in Burlington, Iowa. They lived in 
Jefferson county, in that state, for eight years, 
and then moved to Henderson county, Illinois. 
The elder Mr. Johnson then retired from active 
business pursuits and spent his last years at the 
home of his son, Charles. He died when sixty- 
five years old. His widow still survives him 
and resides in Illinois, at the advanced age of 
eighty-three years. Their family consisted of 
nine children, as follows: Christina, Caroline, 
Charles O., Clara, Louise, Matilda, Peter G., 
and a twin son and daughter, both of whom 
died young. 



Charles O. Johnson left home at an early age 
to make his own way in the world. In 1864 
he enlisted in Company H, 28th Reg. 111. Vol. 
Inf., as a private. He served until the close 
of the war, and saw active service at Spanish 
Fort and Fort Blakeley. 

After the war Mr. Johnson returned to 
Illinois, where he engaged in farming until his 
marriage with Annie Peterson. Mrs. Johnson 
is a daughter of Peter Peterson. Soon after 
marriage the young folk went to Montgomery 
county, Iowa, where they were engaged in 
farming for nine years. Mr. Johnson then 
purchased 80 acres of land in the same county 
and improved it so as to be able to sell to good 
advantage. This he did, and after selling he 
went further west and settled in Stocking pre- 
cinct, Saunders county, Nebraska. In 1883 he 
purchased the Adam Miller farm in section 
16 of Stocking precinct, and, a little later, 
added to it 40 acres of adjoining land, which 
he purchased from J. F. Gilliland. 

The original farm purchased by Mr. Johnson 
contained a house 24 by 32 feet in dimensions. 
This was enlarged into a modern house of 
ample proportions. Mr. Johnson set out more 
shade trees, new orchards, etc. He also built 
new barns, and now has a very choice and well 
improved farm. It is also finely situated; one 
of the grandest views of the county can be ob- 
tained from it toward the west and north. This 
farm is also very productive, and has frequently 
yielded as much as 60 bushels of corn to the 
acre. Mr. Johnson usually puts 100 acres in 
corn, as he feeds about 80 cattle and 60 hogs. 
He also raises many fine draft horses. 



84 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



To Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have been born 
seven children, as follows: Clara, deceased; 
Minnie, Clara, Efifie, Mabel, Daniel O., and 
Russell H. Politically, the subject hereof is 
a Republican. He has served his party as road 
supervisor, school trustee, etc. He favors the 
Lutheran creed, and is a prominent member 
of J. A. Andrus Post, No. 90, G. A. R. 
Mr. Johnson is a man of influence and prom- 
inence in his community. 



tDOLPH SOLAND, a large land owner 
of Wahoo precinct, Saunders county, 
<^ Nebraska, is one of the prosperous 
farmers of that section. He was born in Han- 
cock county, Illinois, November 17, 1855, and 
is a son of Jacob and Susan (Bertchie) Soland. 
Adolph Soland was reared in Illinois, and 
lived there until he was twenty-five years of 
age. In 1880 he moved to Saunders county, 
Nebraska, and purchased of J. W. Knapp 80 
acres in section 32, which had been home- 
steaded by W. H. Uhler. There he has -since re- 
sided, erecting his present handsome residence 
in 1898. In addition to this, in 1885, he pur- 
chased 80 acres of Z. B. Knapp; in 1890, 40 
acres of T. and F. Zingrie; in 1894, 80 acres 
of Mr. Kansanback; and 33^^ acres of J. W. 
Knapp, making in all 313^4 acres in Wahoo 
and Stocking precincts. He has greatly im- 
proved the land, which yields an average of 60 
bushels of corn per acre, and he has been 
equally successful in raising other grain. He 
has set out a large number of shade trees, thus 



greatly beautifying his property, and also a 
fine orchard, consisting chiefly of cherry and 
apple trees. The farm is stocked with an ex- 
ceptionally high grade of animals. He formerly 
raised Hereford cattle, but in recent years has 
raised Shorthorns, and with greater success. 
He raises from 80 to 100 hogs per year, and 
also a number of mules. Mr. Soland as a 
young man was dependent up'bn his own re- 
sources, and what he owns today is the result 
of his individual efforts. He is deemed one 
of the substantial citizens of his community, 
and enjoys the friendship of all with whom he 
comes in contact. 

The subject of this sketch was united in mar- 
riage with Florence Scott, a daughter of John 
Scott, of Illinois. She was born in Kansas, 
and one child has blessed her union with Mr. 
Soland, namely : Gladys. They are very fond 
of children, and in the kindness of their hearts 
they have given a home to four children who 
were taken from the Christian Home, at Council 
Bluffs, Iowa, bestowing upon them the parental 
love which every child craves. Their names 
are as follows : Dorsey Davis, Emerson Davis, 
Robert Bradbury, and Eva Bradbury. 



RS. LUCY J. HENRY, widow of 
the late Solomon Henry, resides upon 
the splendid farm in Stocking pre- 
cinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, where both 
worked in unison for so many years, and where 
the latter died in 1890. 

Solomon Henry was one of the pioneer set- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



tiers of Saunders county. He was born in 
Madison county, New York, March 4, 1824. 
His parents, Elijah and Lucy (Perry) Henry, 
moved to Jefferson county, Wisconsin, with 
their family in 1844. They settled upon a farm 
and followed agricultural pursuits all their 
days. 

Solomon was reared on a farm, and, like his 
father made farming his life work. In 1859 
he married Lucy Jane Groves, the subject here- 
of. Soon after marriage, the young people 
started for Pike's Peak in company with Austin 
and John Smith and their families. They 
traveled in covered wagons from Wisconsin, 
taking all their worldly goods with them. It 
was their intention to engage in mining. Six 
weeks later they reached Plattsmouth, Ne- 
braska, where they met several families who 
were returning without success. Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry proceeded no further on their journey. 
They stopped at Plattsmouth about eighteen 
months, conducted a ranch near Central City 
about four years, after which they took up a 
claim about four miles northwest of Ashland, 
Saunders county, Nebraska. They were the 
seventh family to locate in Saunders county. 
Their claim was directly adjoining that of their 
friends, the Smiths. They settled upon it in 
1863, and lived upon it one year and a half. 
Selling out to advantage, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
sought a new location. 

In 1870 they homesteaded 80 acres in Stock- 
ing township, their land being the southeast 
corner of section 14. With his wife's assistance 
Mr. Henry built a dugout for a house and one 
also for a barn. These were built near the 



location of the present house and barn. 
They broke the sod and sowed grain, 
etc., making improvements as best they 
could. In 1875 the main part of the present 
house was built. This has been greatly en- 
larged since then, and spacious barns, corn- 
cribs, etc., have also been built. About 100 
fruit trees, and a great number of forest trees 
have been planted. About the same time Mr. 
Henry purchased the southwest quarter of sec- 
tion 14, which was directly adjoining his 80 
acres. This gave him a farm of ample propor- 
tions. He added to it, and accumulated land 
until his death, which took place on October 8, 
1890. He left a large estate to be divided 
among his widow and their six children. 

In politics Mr. Henry was an independent 
Republican, and religiously, a consistent mem- 
ber of the Baptist church. He was influential 
and popular, and, on his decease, was deeply 
mourned by all in his community. 

Mrs. Lucy J. Henry, the subject hereof, was 
born June 7, 1842, in eastern Canada. She is 
a daughter of John and Dorcas (Hanson) 
Groves, and was reared and educated in Ver- 
mont and Wisconsin. Her father was a mason 
b) trade, but late in life devoted his time ex- 
clusively to farming. 

Mrs. Henry and her children still conduct 
the farm, where they are very pleasantly situ- 
ated. Two daughters have married and left 
the home nest, as has also Charles, who has a 
ranch in Cheyenne county, Nebraska. THe 
others still reside with Mrs. Henry. The 
children are as follows : George Franklin, Alice, 
Ida, Emma, Galerd, and Charles. Ida married 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Herman Smith. They reside in Alliance, Ne- 
braska, and have three children : Harry, Henry, 
and Olah. Emma married E. S. Owen, and 
resides near Alliance. They have also three 
children, whose names are Ethel, Edna, and 
Lottie. 

Mrs. Henry recalls to mind many interesting 
anecdotes and occurrences connected with her 
early life in Saunders county. She and her 
husband, like many others, experienced many 
hardships and endured many privations before 
they obtained their start. Surrounded as she 
is today by her loved ones, she has but to enjoy 
life and can express no wish which long re- 
mains ungratified. 



--tr^HILANDER P. CHURCH, one of the 
I [pleading citizens of Stocking precinct, 
Saunders county, Nebraska, is exten- 
sively engaged in agricultural pursuits, having 
one of the finest farms and residences in his 
vicinity. 

Mr. Church was born in Ashtabula county, 
Ohio, in 1843. ^I'ld is a son of Lemuel and 
Rutli (Bailey) Churcli. Lemuel Church 
led a retired life after locating in Saun- 
ders county, having been a carpenter and 
farmer in his active days. He died in the 
eighty-first year of his age, and his wife still 
survives him at the age of seventy-nine years, 
living with the subject hereof. 

Philander P. Church learned the trade of a 
carpenter with his father, and followed it until 
he had a small start, when he came west to 



Saunders county, Nebraska, in 1871. He home- 
steaded 80 acres, and timber claimed 80 acres 
of government land, where he now lives, and 
drew lumber from Ashland with which he built 
a small frame house in the center of his farm. 
He added many important improvements to 
the place, and set out a large grove of shade 
trees. In 1875 he moved his house to its pres- 
ent site, and built an addition, and in 1885 he 
erected a fine new house, whose dimensions are 
26 by 26 feet, the other part being 16 by 24 feet. 
He also set out shade trees, shrubbery, and a 
fine orchard, and built cribs. In 1891 he built 
a large barn, 45 by 50 feet in dimensions. He 
has a good water supply on the farm, and a 
windmill which draws water 75 feet, in 
abundance. He has about 20 acres of forest 
land, which he set out in slips, or planted in 
seed, and this supplies him with needed stove- 
wood and posts. His farm is well stocked with 
cattle and hogs, and his principal crops are 
corn and oats. He is a man of excellent busi- 
ness ability, energy and good judgment, and, 
withal, a man of the highest character. He 
has dealt with all men with fairness and 
honesty, and enjoys the highest respect and 
friendship of his fellow citizens. 

Mr. Church was united in marriage with 
Alma Webster, a daughter of Roswell Webster, 
of Ashtabula county, Ohio, and they are the 
parents of two children: Otto, who married 
Estella Linder, and lives at home; and Kate, 
who is also at home. Politically, Mr. Church 
is a Republican, and has served on the school 
board since 1872; also one term as assessor. 
He has been a member of the Saunders County 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Agricultural Society since its organization, 
and is now serving his second term as its vice- 
president. 



UGUST O. EKDAHL, who has one 
lof the most valuable and best conducted 
farms in Mariposa precinct, Saund- 
ers county, Nebraska, is the earliest settler of 
that community. He was born in Ostergotland, 
Sweden, in 1833, and is a son of Olof and 
Sophia Marie (Anderson) Person. 

Coming to America in 1868, Mr. Ekdahl 
located at Omaha, Nebraska, on June 13, where 
he was first employed by the Union Pacific 
Railroad Company on a ferry boat on the Mis- 
souri River. He worked thus but a few days 
when he went 700 miles west, to Laramie City, 
Wyoming, and was there variously employed 
for a period of eleven months, building bridges, 
etc., for the railroad company. He returned 
to Omaha on May 11, 1869, and took a steamer 
down the Missouri River, inspecting Kansas 
land with the object of locating there. Not 
being pleased with the outlook he returned to 
Omaha June 28, 1869, and immediately set 
out for Saunders county with his partner, Oscar 
Johnson, arriving there on July 3. He home- 
steaded 80 acres in Chapman precinct — the 
east half of the northwest quarter of section 6, 
township 14, range 6. He owned two horses, 
and during the first year broke 10 acres for 
himself, 10 acres for Oscar Johnson, and several 
acres for Mr. Nelson and Mr. Ockander. Many 
of the settlers who came after him were poorly 
equipped, and Mr. Ekdahl, being kind of heart 



and always anxious to help those in need of 
assistance, aided them in getting provisions 
and started in their work. John Lee plied a 
skiff back and forth across the Platte River, 
charging $2 to cross, and during the first year 
the subject hereof paid him and another fery- 
man located a mile west of Lee's crossing 
place, about $75 for passage. He hauled 
lumber from Fremont for different per- 
sons, charging $10 per trip, it being a 
very difficult one to make and requiring about 
five days. The heavy rains kept the roads in 
bad condition and frequently washed out the 
bridges, and Mr. Ekdahl was either obliged to 
ford the stream and carry the lumber up the 
opposite bank or to rebuild the bridge sufficient- 
ly to cross. In 1871 he pre-empted the east 
half of the southwest quarter of section 31, 
township 15, range 6, (which soon became 
railroad land), for which he paid $6 per acre, 
and upon this property he now lives. He had 
built a log granary on his original 80 acres, 
and this he subsequently removed to his new 
property, using it as a house for two years. 
Owing to the drouth and the prevalence of 
grasshoppers, it was a very difficult matter to 
get a start and place his farm upon a paying 
basis, but by energy and perseverance and the 
exercise of good judgment he succeeded. In 
1879 he erected a house, 12 by 16 feet, which 
is now used as a shed, on the north side of the 
barn. He built the main part of his present 
house in 1888, and completed it, as it now is, 
in 1896. In 1874 he planted many trees, but 
most of the fruit trees were ruined by stock, 
and he decided not to replant until he could 



88 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



afford to surround the orchard with a fence. 
He now has an excellent orchard of several 
acres of young trees. In 1883 he built the 
main part of his barn, and also other buildings, 
and, five years later, added sheds thereto, the 
dimensions being 11 by 16 and 12 by 16 feet. 
There is a large creek running through his land, 
and in 1879 he dug his first well, which is 56 
feet deep. Of the railroad land, 45 acres is in 
pasture and hog lot, and on the other 35 acres 
are the buildings, orchard, and a part under 
cultivation. The entire 80 acres of his first 
acquisition is under a high state of cultivation 
and is as productive as any in the precinct. 
The farm presents a fine appearance, being well 
fenced, and having a strip of natural timber 
along the creek. 

In 1879 Mr. Ekdahl was united in marriage 
with Anna Christina Olive Frostrom, a 
daughter of John Christian and Christina 
(Lindberg) Frostrom. Her father came to 
America in the spring of 1869, and first did 
construction work on the Union Pacific Rail- 
road eight months in Colorado. He then re- 
turned to Omaha and secured work on the 
bridge at St. Joseph, at which he was employed 
for fifteen months. He then homesteaded the 
east half of the southwest quarter of section 6, 
township 14, range 6, but later sold out to 
James Coleman, and purchased his present 
home near Weston. His family followed him 
to this country in the fall of 1872. A record 
of his children is as follows : Mrs. Ekdahl was 
born September 24, 1862; Jacob, born in 1863, 
married Lena Engvall, a daughter of C. B. 
Engvall, of Moline, Illinois, and they are the 



parents of five children, — Bertha, Edwin, Ju- 
lius, Elvera, and Clifford ; Jacob now conducts 
his father's farm; Johanna Caroline, born in 
1865, married O. Paulson, of Oregon; Hulda 
Augusta, born in 1867, is deceased; Lizzie was 
born in 1874; Amanda was born in 1877, and 
is the wife of R. Juline, of Rock Creek precinct ; 
John Theodore, born in 1878, is deceased. Au- 
gust O. Ekdahl and his wife had eight children, 
of whom four are deceased : August Elim, born 
August 31, 1880, died December 5, 1881 ; Carl 
John Eli, born March 8, 1882, died April 30, 
1884; Milsa Maria Olive was born November 
20, 1883; Japhet Emanuel was born February 
23, 1886; Roland Gotfrid was born November 
7, 1889; Rhoda Amelia, twin with Roland, 
died January 6, 1900; one, born October 31, 
1895, died in infancy; Ruth Josephine was 
born Septpember 7, 1899. The subject of this 
sketch is a Republican, and one of the first 
members of the Independent party. He belongs 
to the Baptist church of Weston. He is a man 
of high character, kind and considerate of 
others, and enjoys the confidence and good 
will of his fellow men to a marked degree. 



fOHN G. SMITH, M. D., a general prac- 
titioner of Wahoo, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, has a pleasant office, waiting par- 
lors and consultation rooms in Block 164, on 
Fifth street. Dr. Smith is a Southerner by 
birth. He was born at McKinney, Collin coun- 
ty, Texas. His father, B. F. Smith, was a na- 
tive of Kentucky and followed farming. 




HON. WILLIAM H. I.)ECH. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



In 1868, when Dr. Smith was eight years 
old, he accompanied his parents to Albany, Mis- 
souri, where he attended public school and sub- 
sequently commenced the study of medicine as 
a student under Dr. Doyle. He afterward 
attended Ensworth Medical College, graduat- 
ing in the class of 1891. After his graduation 
he returned to Albany, where he opened an 
office and practiced for about one year. 

He then located at Hanover, Kansas, where 
he remained for six years, having built up a 
large practice during that period. A change of 
climate was desirable, however, and Dr. Smith 
went to Hamilton, Montana, for a short time. 
Later he located in South Omaha, Nebraska, 
where he also remained but a brief period. In 
1897 he located in Weston, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, and practiced his profession success- 
fully there for two years. Desiring a more cen- 
tral location, Dr. Smith then removed to Wa- 
hoo, where he was enabled to hold his former 
practice in the western part of the county. In 
addition to this, by his ability and skill he has 
won the confidence of the people in other parts 
of that county and in Wahoo, where he now 
enjoys an extensive practice. Dr. Smith is nat- 
urally quite pleased with his change of location, 
as he now has a much broader field of labor. 

The subject of this sketch has been twice 
married. His first union was contracted with 
Miss Orendorff, of Denver, Missouri. She 
died, leaving three children, namely : Freddie L., 
Claude C, and Wave F. Some time afterward 
Dr. Smith was united in marriage to Lillian 
Klotz, of Ashland, Nebraska. He is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity, and also belongs to 



the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen of the 
World, the Star of Jupiter and the Royal 
Neighbors, serving at the present time as med- 
ical examiner of the last two. Dr. Smith is 
rapidly advancing to the front in his profes- 
sion, and his success is well merited. He is 
among the most highly esteemed citizens of 
Stocking precinct. 



ON. WILLIAM H. DECH, a gentle- 
man who has attained distinction in po- 
litical circles through the state of Ne- 
braska by reason of his enthusiastic support of 
the Middle-of-the-Road Populist party, has fre- 
quently been called into public service. He 
served in both bodies of the state legislature 
in a most satisfactory manner, always alert in 
promoting the interests of the district he repre- 
sented and the general welfare of the state. He 
is one of the early settlers of Saunders county, 
and a prominent citizen of Ithaca, where he 
owns a handsome property. 

Mr. Dech was born near Easton, in North- 
ampton county, Pennsylvania, in 1840, and is a 
son of William and Catherine (Rice) Dech. 
His father was born in Northampton county, 
Pennsylvania. William H. Dech enlisted in the 
army at Allentown, Pennsylvania, April 17, 
1 86 1, as a private in Company I, ist Reg. Pa. 
Vol. Inf., and three months later joined the 
54th Reg. Pa. Vol. Inf. He was in the service 
three years, participated in much hard fighting, 
and on July 19, 1864, was wounded in the 
right breast at Snicker's Gap, an injury from 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



which he has never fully recovered. While in 
the hospital he studied medicine, but ill health 
prevented continuous study and he was ad- 
vised to go to the mountains. He accompanied 
an excursion party on the river, from Pitts- 
burg, and during the trip, many of the passen- 
gers were taken sick, and were relieved by the 
treatment Mr. Dech was able to give by reason 
of his knowledge of medicine. He arrived at 
St. Joseph, Mo., where he met Dr. Donoland 
of Plattsmouth, Nebraska, upon whose advice 
he went to the latter city. He there made the 
acquaintance of Dr. Johnson, who told him of 
the wonderful climate of Saunders county. 
Under his influence he went to visit the only 
settler in his locality, T. H. Bissell, an early 
frontiersman and cattle man, who had settled 
in section 33. So favorable was the impression 
made upon him by the land in the valley of 
Wahoo Creek that he immediately took up 80 
acres in the southeast corner of section 20. 
There was no building located upon the prop- 
erty, and as a protection to the flour which he 
bought he drove willow sticks into the ground 
and covered them with shirts. He soon con- 
structed a shanty of limbs and leaves, and, hav- 
ing purchased a yoke of cattle, began to break 
the land. He built a small cabin and then wrote 
to his father, who came on with his family and 
took up the 80 acres on which S. Purbaugh now 
resides. His father improved his farm and car- 
ried on farming the remainder of his life, dying 
in 1890, at the age of seventy-seven years. His 
widow died in 1891, aged seventy-two years. 
They were the parents of the following chil- 
dren : Sabina W. ; William H. ; Lizzie, the wife 



of E. F. Mills; Kate, the wife of Llewellyn 
Warner; Alpheus, who died while serving in 
the Union army; Amelia, the wife of K. Grif- 
fin; Irvin, of Wahoo; and Ida, the wife of P. 
McKinney. 

Mr. Dech's first house was 14 by 18 feet in 
dimensions. He set out an orchard and groves 
and a cottonwood tree which was set out by his 
boys is now over two feet in diameter. In 
1880 he purchased 40 acres of railroad land at 
Ithaca and built his present residence. He set 
out a great variety of large and small fruit, 
and there is none better in the county. In poli- 
tics Mr. Dech supported the Republican ticket 
until the organization of the Middle-of-the 
Road Populists, when he became one of the 
leaders of that party. In 1873 he was elected 
to the lower branch of the state legislature, 
and in 1883 was elected to the state senate. 
In 1890 he was a candidate for lieutenant gov- 
ernor and ran 1,000 votes ahead of the ticket, 
but was defeated. He was a candidate for 
congress in 1894, receiving 12,000 votes in 
his district, and in the campaign of that year 
he spoke in every county in the state, establish- 
ing an enviable reputation as a public speaker. 
He was also the first national committeeman 
of his party for that district. He was state 
elector of the Farmers Alliance, and state 
master workman of the Knights of Labor. 

Mr. Dech was united in marriage with Mary 
Dorraty, a daughter of Nathaniel Dorraty, of 
Keokuk, Iowa, and they are the parents of 
seven children, as follows: Claude, a large 
sheep raiser of Idaho, who married Iva Vale; 
Edward, who died at the age of seventeen 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



years ; Harry, who lives at home ; Robert, who 
married Amy Dech and has two children, — 
Nina and Lilah ; Lloyd, who died at seven years 
of age ; Holmes, whose trade is that of a miller ; 
and Cleon. The subject of this sketch has a 
very valuable residence in Ithaca. A rise of 
ground just north of his residence is a historic 
spot, commanding the finest view of distance 
in the county, as one can see 20 or 25 miles 
north, east or south, and 10 miles west. It is 
the site of an old Indian burying ground which 
the Indians also used as signal ground. When 
Mr. Dech first settled there, droves of hundreds 
of antelope and deer could be seen from that 
point. 

On a preceding page, in proximity to this, 
the publishers of this volume take pleasure in 
presenting a portrait of Mr. Dech. 



LBERT C. KNAPP, an early settler 
^of Saunders county, Nebraska, and for 
many years one of the leading farm- 
ers and stock raisers of Wahoo precinct, is now 
living in retirement at Ithaca, in that county. 
Mr. Knapp was born in Fort Madison, Iowa, 
in 1845, ^nd is a son of William D. and De- 
borah G. (Ketchum) Knapp. William D. 
Knapp was born in Orange county. New York, 
and came west to Chicago at an early day, 
building two houses in that city. He was then 
located in Iowa for some time, after which he 
managed a quarry at Elmira, Illinois, and a 
ferry across the river, for some thirty years. 
In 1886 he removed to Wahoo, Saunders 



county, Nebraska, where he lived in retirement 
until his death in 1895, aged eighty years. His 
wife died in 1891, aged seventy years. They 
were the parents of the following children: 
Seely B. ; Dewitt, deceased ; Henry E., who 
was killed in the army; Albert C. ; Mary E., 
the wife of Edward Wright; Horace P., a 
merchant of Ithaca ; John W., a record of whose 
life is given elsewhere in this work; and Wil- 
liam Dewitt, a citizen of Wahoo. 

Albert C. Knapp followed farming until he 
was fifteen years old, and then took up the trade 
of a blacksmith. In 1864 he enlisted in Com- 
pany E, ii8th Regiment Illinois Mounted In- 
fantry, and served until the close of the Civil 
War. He then returned to his trade, which he 
followed until 1869, when he decided to move 
west. On June i, 1869, he homesteaded 80 
acres in section 32, township 14, range 8, 
Saunders county, going to that county with 
Theodore Zingrie and William H. Uhler. They 
built a sod house, and after buying a yoke of 
oxen broke the ground. While two of the 
party were thus engaged, the third was out 
shooting game, on which they mainly sub- 
sisted. There was an abundance of antelope, 
deer, prairie chickens, badgers, coons, and 
wildcats, and fish were to be had in Wahoo 
Creek. There was a fine grove of elms and 
willows on the west side of the creek which 
had not been devastated by fire, but otherwise 
there was not a tree within sight. Mr. Knapp 
made a dug-out, and carried on his trade as a 
blacksmith, sharpening plow points for all the 
settlers within a radius of 25 miles. Often 
men would carry them that distance on their 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



shoulders while their teams were at home work- 
ing, the trips consuming two or three days. 
As soon as he was in a position to do so, Mr. 
Knapp built a frame house and barns, and sub- 
sequently enlarged the house. He set out fine 
shade groves and an orchard, all of which grew 
nicely, his first cottonwood trees being now two 
feet in diameter. He was extensively engaged 
in grain raising, his land often yielding as many 
as 60 bushels to the acre. He also dealt in 
stock largely, and at one time had as many 
as 40 head of cattle and 600 hogs; he always 
had from 300 to 400 hogs. In addition to 
operating his farm he bought a building in 
Ithaca in 1889, and conducted a butcher shop 
until 1892. In 1900 he purchased a handsome, 
modern residence in Ithaca, and there he has 
since lived in retirement, enjoying the rewards 
of an industrious and well spent life. 

Mr. Knapp was united in marriage with 
Minnie Huebotter, a daughter of Louis and 
Minnie (Erbin) Huebotter. She was born at 
Fort Madison, Iowa, the birthplace of her hus- 
band, but they never knew each other while 
living there. They are the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : Bertie, the wife of Robert 
Railsback, of the well known firm of Railsback 
Brothers; and William D., who died, aged 
four years, three months and seventeen 
days. Mrs. Knapp's parents were na- 
tives of Germany, and upon coming to 
this country located first in Illinois, where 
her father was a farmer and miller. He 
is now living a retired life at Lagrange, Mis- 
souri. They were the parents of seven children : 
Minnie, Lizzie, Louise, Lewis, Henry, and two 



deceased. The subject of this sketch has served 
as school director for many years, and is an 
active member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 



HARLES LOUIS TEGELBERG, who 
one of the best known and most enter- 
prising of the youhger generation of 
farmers of Wahoo precinct, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, is extensively engaged in the pro- 
duction of grain and in stock raising. He is a 
man of untiring energy and good business 
ability, and the success that has thus far at- 
tended his efforts bespeaks a most prosperous 
career to follow. He was born January i, 
1873, ^"d is a son of Lars Tegelberg. 

Lars Tegelberg, who was a son of Per Tegel- 
berg, was born in Sweden April 2, 1838, and at 
the age of fourteen years obtained employment 
as a farm hand. In 1869 he came to America, 
locating in Omaha, Nebraska; the same year 
he homesteaded 80 acres of land in Saunders 
county. In 1870 he and his wife settled upon 
the homestead, and there resided until 1898, 
when he moved to Mead, Nebraska, where he 
still resides. He now owns 160 acres of well 
improved farming and grazing land in Wahoo 
precinct. He was married in 1869 to Mary 
Anderson, and to them were born three child- 
ren : Per August, deceased ; Charles Louis, the 
subject hereof ; and Otto Bernhard. 

The subject of this sketch took advantage 
of the opportunities to obtain an education, and 
made the most of his chances. He assisted his 
father in conducting the homestead farm until 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



that gentleman retired to Mead, when he rented 
the paternal acres, and at this writing rents in 
addition other land adjoining the homestead. 
He has since been engaged in general farming 
and stock raising. 

Mr. Tegelberg was united in marriage with 
Annie Quist, a daughter of Rev. John Quist, 
an early settler of Missouri, and this union has 
been blessed with one child — Carl Bernhard 
Rangner. In religious attachments Mr. Tegel- 
berg is a faithful and consistent member of the 
Mission church. He is a man of upright and 
honorable character, and is very popular among 
his fellow citizens. 



7-^HARLES C. TURNEY, a retired 
I J| farmer living at Ceresco, Saunders 

^ — ^county, Nebraska, is an extensive 
land owner of that county, and all he possesses 
of this world's goods has been obtained by hard 
and persistent work. His present attainment 
is the fruit of an industrious and well spent 
life. Among his boyhood resolutions, one was 
that at the age of sixty years he would either 
have an abundance to retire on or would go to 
the poorhouse. His great and unyielding ambi- 
tion sustained him through the many trials he 
had as an agriculturist in Nebraska and carried 
him successfully through droughts and grass- 
hopper invasions. Now he is enabled to spend 
the remainder of his life in the peace of happy 
retirement. 

Mr. Turney was born in 1840, at Columbus, 
Franklin county, Ohio, and is a son of Daniel 



Turney, whose occupation was that of a farmer. 
As a boy, Charles was obliged to work hard 
upon the farm, but he never objected to work, 
as it came natural to him to employ all of his 
time in one way or another. He applied him- 
self to learning the blacksmith trade, and work- 
ed at that and wagon-ironing for three years. 
He then borrowed sufficient money to start in 
business for himself at Trenton, Iowa, in 1864, 
where he continued until 1874, and then sold 
out. He had heard somewhat of the much- 
talked-of plains of Nebraska, and thinking 
that new territory would be a good place to 
locate in he went thither in 1874, buying 80 
acres in Richland precinct (which had been 
homesteaded by J. Louden) for $3 per acre. 
But little of the land was under cultivation 
and only a small sod house stood on the prop- 
erty, but in September, 1874, he brought his 
family there. He also bought 160 acres in sec- 
tion 21 at $3 per acre, it being railroad land. 
On his home farm he built a house 14 by 22 feet 
in size, to which he added from time to time 
until it was one of the finest places in the 
county. The house is surrounded by a grove of 
shade trees and evergreens, and presents a 
handsome apearance. He set out 41 
acres of fruit trees, including apples, plums, 
pears, and grapes, and has a very fine orchard. 
In 1887 he purchased 80 acres adjoining his 
home place for $1,050, and in 1877 he secured 
160 acres of railroad land in section 29, Rich- 
land precinct, for $1,400. In 1886 he pur- 
chased 80 acres of state land for $400, and 160 
acres in section 2y, Rock Creek precinct, for 
$3,000. His principal product is hay, and he 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



has more and better land adapted to blue grass 
than any other man in his section; he keeps 
about 300 head of cattle, which he feeds 
on the land. In 1899 he bought a village 
lot and small house at Ceresco, a part of the old 
Yates farm. He enlarged the house and barn, 
set out beautiful shade trees, and moved there 
with his family in 1900, where he has since 
lived in retirement. He is a public- 
spirited man and has taken an earnest 
interest in all public enterprises and im- 
provements. He was elected county treasurer 
on the Democratic ticket in 1885, and served 
one term. Fraternally, he is a member of the 
F. & A. M. and encampment of the I. O. O. F. 

Mr. Turney was united in marriage with 
Anna Green, a daughter of James C. Green, of 
Trenton, Iowa, and they became the parents 
of two children : Jennie, who died at the age of 
fifteen months ; and Clark. 

Clark Turney, the surviving child, was born 
June 19, 1867, and was reared on the farm. 
He remained on the farm, farming and stock 
raising with his father, until he was twenty- 
three years old, when he ventured alone. He 
purchased 160 acres of land, the north- 
west quarter of section 29, Richland 
precinct, and, later, bought 80 acres in 
Rock Creek precinct, at present known 
as the Hanline farm. He also purchased other 
property, but has since disposed of it. He was 
extensively engaged in stock dealing with his 
father until 1899, when he built a handsome 
modern residence and barn in Ceresco and re- 
tired from active business. He rents his prop- 
erty and looks after his business interests. He 



was united in marriage with Susie Walters, a 
daughter of Jacob Walters, of Ceresco, and 
they have had two children : Raymond R., and 
Ranee, who died at the age of seven years. In 
politics Clark Turney is an unswerving sup- 
porter of the Democratic party. Fraternally, 
he is a member of Lodge No. 29, F. & A. M. 



^jr^ROFESSOR J. H. FLODMAN, A. 

|p*^M., of Luther Academy, was born in 
Ostergotland, Sweden, September 23, 
1859. At the age of nine years he came to 
the United States, and first located in the state 
of Illinois. In 1872 he moved to Polk county, 
Nebraska, near the town of Stromsburg. He 
attended Augustana College at Rock Island, 
Illinois, and graduated from that institution 
of learning in the spring of 1890. He received 
his master's degree from Augustana College in 
the spring of 1900. 

In the spring of 1890 he received a call as 
assistant teacher by the board of directors of 
Luther Academy, which he accepted, and in the 
fall of 1892 he was called as permanent profes- 
sor at said institution by the Nebraska Con- 
ference, his principal subjects being Latin, 
mathematics, and sciences. He has been a 
student at the University of Nebraska, in all, 
about a year and a half. His ambition to ac- 
quire a greater extent of knowledge has no 
restraint, and his attendance at the University 
of Nebraska was made possible only by his 
securing leave from his college duties at dif- 
ferent periods. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Prof. Flodman is especially interested in 
botany. He has been on two botanical expe- 
ditions with a noted botanist, Dr. P. A. Ryd- 
berg, assistant curator of the Botanical Garden 
of New York. In 1899 the subject of this writ- 
ing was united in marriage with Emma C.John- 
son, daughter of C. M. Johnson, of Paxton, 
Illinois. They are among the most highly 
esteemed and respected citizens of Wahoo, 
Saunders county, Nebraska. 



R. R. D. BUSH, a successful prac- 
|ticing physician of Ceresco, Saunders 
county, Nebraska, is also the proprie- 
tor of the only drug store in the village. This 
store was established by him in 1887, soon 
after his arrival in Ceresco. At that time his 
brother, H. L. Bush, was in partnership with 
jiim. In 1890 the brother retired from the 
firm and since then Dr. Bush has been the sole 
proprietor. He carries a fine stock of drugs, and 
handles paints, oils, wall paper, stationery, 
toilet articles, and the thousand and one things 
to be found in any first-class drug store. In 
1897 the postoffice was located in his store, 
where it still remains. 

Dr. Bush was born in Mayville, Chautauqua 
county. New York, in 1853. His father, Loran 
Bush, was a farmer in the vicinity of May- 
ville. Later in life, however, he purchased a 
farm near Jamestown, in the same county. He 
was killed in a railroad accident in 1885. 

Dr. Bush was reared and educated in James- 
town, New York. After leaving school he took 



up the study of medicine in the office of Dr. 
O. H. Simons, of the same place. Subsequently 
he entered the Detroit Medical College, from 
which he graduated in 1878. Dr. Bush im- 
mediately began the practice of his profession 
in Busti, New York, in his native county. 
Establishing a drug store he proceeded to build 
up a practice. Early in his career he read of the 
wonderful advantages of the West, and from 
a friend he learned that Dr. Stone, of Wahoo, 
Nebraska, desired an assistant who would re- 
lieve him of his long drives. He was also in- 
formed that Dr. Stone wished to retire in a 
short time. 

Dr. Bush considered that a good opening for 
him, and accordingly disposed of his interests 
in the East and went to Wahoo in 1885. Two 
years later he established his present drug store 
in Ceresco, where he enjoys a good practice 
and a fair patronage. He was joined in mar- 
riage with Lettie Garfield, a daughter of Dr. 
Sherman Garfield, of Busti, New York. Two 
children were born to them — Pauline Elvina 
and Fannie Irene. The latter is deceased. 

Dr. Bush is a supporter of the Republican 
party at the present time, but in 1890 he was 
elected coroner upon the Democratic ticket. 
Fraternally, he is a member of the F. & A. M., 
A. O. U. W., Woodmen of the World, and 
Knights of the Maccabees. He is a val- 
ued member of the Nebraska State Med- 
ical Society, also belongs to the American Med- 
ical Association. Dr. Bush is a general practi- 
tioner, and is well and favorably known, not 
only throughout Richland precinct, but in the 
southern part of Saunders county. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



fOHANN FRIEDERICH KOLB, an ex- 
tensive land owner in Marble precinct, 
is one of the pioneer farmers of Saunders 
county, Nebraska. He is a native of Schleswig- 
Holstein, Germany, where his father was also 
born.. He is a son of Christian R. Kolb and 
grandson of Johann Friederich Kolb. 

Christian R. Kolb was born in 1808. Early 
in life he learned the shoemaker's trade and be- 
came a very skilled workman. The subject 
hereof has a pair of fine calfskin boots which 
his father made ; he has worn them for "best," 
for twelve years, and they are still very fine; 
besides these he also has workboots made by 
his father. Christian R. Kolb did elegant work 
up to the time of his death, and left work un- 
finished. He married Weepkee Rathman. In 
1862, with his family, he came to America, set- 
tling in Kankakee county, Illinois. He had 
$1,000 in gold and purchased a fine farm in that 
vicinity. He carried on trade until 1897, when 
he died. He had previously lost his wife, who 
died in 1873, aged fifty-three years. Seven 
children were born to them, as follows : Johann 
Friederich; Juergen, deceased; Mary, wife of 
Charles Thompson; Maggie, wife of Peter 
Fedde; Henry, a resident of Illinois; Christ- 
iana, wife of Peter Reimers; and Weepkee. 

Johann Friederich Kolb was born August 
2^, 1834. He learned the shoemaker's trade 
with his father, serving a three-years ap- 
prenticeship. He then went to sea and became 
a sailor. For three years he sailed on the North 
and Baltic seas. He then crossed the ocean, to 
New York City, and sailed on American ves- 
sels for six years. During this time he sailed 



upon both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, 
making one trip around Cape Horn. He has 
experienced many rough and adventurous voy- 
ages, and has visited many different lands. It 
is a pleasure to Mr. Kolb to relate his many 
experiences. It is a theme which never grows 
old to him. 

Upon the breaking out of the Civil War, Mr. 
Kolb was on an American vessel near France. 
He went home to Germany one year. The fol- 
lowing year, with his parents, he came to 
America, first settling in Chicago, where he 
remained one year. Later, he assisted in break- 
ing soil upon his father's farm, in Kankakee 
county, and also helped to fence it. 

In 1869 Mr. Kolb went west, to Nebraska, 
and took up 80 acres of homestead land in 
Marble precinct, Saunders county. He was 
then a single man, and built a straw-barn and a 
dugout. In this dugout, or hole in the ground, 
he lived alone. He improved and cultivated 
his land and fenced it in. He set out fruit trees 
and shade trees. For seven years he lived 'con- 
tented and alone. Later, he built a small frame 
house. This was replaced in 1893 with the 
present fine large residence. At that time large 
barns, granaries, sheds and corn cribs were also 
built. He also bought 80 acres of adjoining 
land, and 160 acres across the road. He raises 
principally corn and oats, but also keeps some 
very fine stock. 

Mr. Kolb married Mrs. Caroline Paulsen, a 
daughter of Christian Wittei. Mrs. Kolb has 
one son, Henry, by her first marriage. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Kolb have been born four children, 
as follows: Wilhelmina, Christian Friederich, 




WILLIAM J. HARMON. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Johann Mathias, and Wilhelm Otto. Mr. Kolb 
and family are active members of the Lutheran 
church. In politics he supports the Repub- 
lican party. 

Quite worthy of mention are the beautiful 
groves which our subject has on this farm, 
which is among the most attractive and produc- 
tive farms in Saunders county. One grove 
alone contains 600 fine walnut trees. These 
trees were all planted by Mr. Kolb, and now 
have a diameter of about ten inches. Other 
groves contain cottonwoods, and several other 
varieties of trees, which are considered equally 
fine. Mr. Kolb is a genuine self-made man 
and is a citizen of prominence and influence in 
his community. 






■ILLIAM J. HARMON, whose life 
record presents a career of varied 
'business experiences, is among the 
prosperous farmers of Pohocco precinct, Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, where he owns several 
hundred acres of land. 

Mr. Harmon was born in Suffield, Connecti- 
cut, January 30, 1849. He is ,1 son of Julius 
Harmon and Caroline E. (Lane) Harmon, 
who is a daughter of Ashbel Lane, of the 
same place. He first attended the public 
schools of Sufifield, and afterward the Connec- 
ticut Literary Institute in Suffield. He left 
school at the age of twenty years and leariied 
the carpenter's trade, at which he worked until 
he went to Omaha, Nebraska, where he worked 
in the shops of the Union Pacific Railroad Com- 



pany for nineteen months. He then went on a 
government survey, covering Hayes and Chase 
counties, in the southwestern portion of the 
state. The surveyors were on this expedition 
for about six months, when they were driven 
out by the Indians, and were unable to con- 
tinue their work until a guard of cavalry was 
sent along to protect them. Mr. Harmon then 
went to Fremont, and engaged in contracting 
in and near that place. In 1875 he built a 
toll bridg;e over the Platte River, and during 
the next seven years built three other bridges, 
collecting toll from the first bridge during that 
time. He then sold the bridge to the citizens 
of Fremont, who turned it into a free bridge 
in 1882. He then moved to Wahoo, where he 
lived for two years. Having taken a trip of 
five or six months through the mountains, he 
returned in 1884 and located in Saunders 
county, where he has since remained. His 
property now consists of the southwest quar- 
ter of section t,t„ the east half of the southeast 
quarter of section 32, the southeast quarter of 
section 29, the southwest quarter of section 
28, and 68 acres in the northwest quar- 
ter of section 28. Only part of his present 
house was on the property when he acquired it, 
and many are the improvements which have 
since been made. The entire crop consists of 
corn, and he has an excellent orchard of about 
150 trees, including cherries, peaches, apples 
and apricots. He keeps about 400 head of cat- 
tle, 200 hogs and from 12 to 15 good horses. 

In 1879 Mr. Harmon was united in mar- 
riage with Nellie Staats, a daughter of J. F. 
Staats. Mr. Staats is a prominent citizen of 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Saunders county, and is the father of the fol- 
lowing children: Emma (deceased); Nellie; 
Charles; George, and Louis. A child, named 
George, died in infancy. Mr. Harmon and his 
wife are parents of seven children, their names 
and ages being: William F., twenty years; 
Walter, seventeen years; Edward C, fifteen 
years; Adelaide E., thirteen years; Mary Fern, 
eleven years; Charles D., nine years, and Ethel 
C, four years. Mr. Harmon has two brothers 
living, Ashbel C, aged fifty-nine years, and 
Frank S., aged forty-six years. From 1886 
to 1890 the subject of this sketch was a justice 
of the peace of Pohocco precinct, and he served 
as supervisor for six terms — from 1893 to 
1899. He is a Republican in politics. His 
portrait accompanies this sketch, being pre- 
sented on a preceding page. 



BARIUS P. TURNEY, one of the 
prosperous farmers of Richland pre- 
cinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, has 
led an exemplary life. He began his career 
wholly without means, and had got but fairly 
started when he was defrauded of all. This 
served merely as a stimulant; he did not give 
up but applied himself to his work with in- 
creased energy, to the end that he is now owner 
of considerable land, and is one of the leading 
citizens of Richland precinct. 

Mr. Turney was born in Henry county, 
Iowa, in 1845, ^^^ was there reared and 
schooled. In 1861 he enlisted in Company G, 
nth Reg. Iowa Vol. Inf., and served with that 



regiment two years, being promoted to a 
corporalcy. He then re-enlisted and served in 
Sherman's army, and although he was 
wounded twice he never gave up, but remained 
to the end of the war. He then returned home, 
and, with his brother, worked his father's farm 
for three years. Having laid by a small sum he 
went to ^Varren county, Iowa, where he bought 
80 acres of land. He got started in a very suc- 
cessful way, and then found that he had lost all 
by signing a note. He sold out, bought another 
property, and started into business again. At 
the end of thirteen years he owned 220 acres of 
fine land, which was well stocked. This he 
sold, realizing a handsome profit. He then 
moved to Saunders county, Nebraska, Feb- 
ruary 16, 1882, buying 80 acres in the south- 
east quarter of section 19, in Richland precinct. 
It was a wild, rolling piece of railroad land, 
for which he paid $8 per acre, and as there was 
no house upon the place he rented one for the 
time being. He chose a good location on a 
rising piece of ground, and proceeded to build 
a large modern house, and good, substantial 
farm buildings. He set out beautiful ever- 
greens and shade trees, and his handsome res- 
idence presents the finest appearance of any in 
the precinct. In 1889 he purchased an adjoin- 
ing property, consisting of 120 acres, from 
William P. Blackburn, its former owner hav- 
ing been William Garnic, who had erected a 
small house upon it, and set out an orchard 
and shade trees. Mr. Turney built a large 
stock barn, and set out an orchard of 15 acres. 
Around his whole farm is a fine osage orange 
hedge, which he raised from the seed. He has 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



a herd of 230 head of cattle (all high grade and 
thoroughbred Shorthorns), 250 hogs, and 
breeds superior draft horses. 

Mr. Turney was united in marriage with 
Irene Gillaspey, a daughter of William Gillas- 
pey, of Henry county, Iowa, and they are the 
parents of two children : Charles Alvin, who is 
at home; and Josephine, the wife of Edward 
M. Sharrar, of Hooper, Nebraska, by whom 
she has one son, Karl Turney. 






•ILLIAM ROGERS, a retired 
farmer and capitalist of Ceresco, 
■Richland county, Nebraska, is an ex- 
tensive land owner. He is a man of good busi- 
ness ability and sterling character, and may be 
termed in the truest sense of the word a self- 
made man. 

Mr. Rogers was born in County Donegal, 
near Londonderry, Ireland, in 1843, and is a 
son of James and Eleanor (Mathias) Rogers. 
His father was also born there, and became 
a soldier at the age of eighteen years, serv- 
ing in the British army twenty-one years 
and tiiree months. During that time 
he was in foreign service seven years, 
being in Turkey, Palestine, Island of Corfu, 
and other places. In 1849, with his family, he 
located at Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, where 
he worked as gardener, and later as assistant 
to a retired captain. He died in 1855, at the 
age of forty-eight years, and his wife lived to 
reach the advanced age of eighty-five years. 
They were the parents of the following chil- 



dren; James, Catherine, Elizabeth Ann, Wil- 
liam, and John T. 

William Rogers finished his education in 
Toronto Academy, where he studied civil en- 
gineering, and then taught school for four 
years. On September 5, 1869, he went to 
Saunders county, Nebraska, and homesteaded 
80 acres in section 34, Richland precinct. He 
built a sod house with his brother, John T., who 
took up an adjoining 80 acres, but later sold 
out and now lives in Lancaster county, Ne- 
braska. He lived in this sod house, one of the 
best of that day, having clay walls which were 
whitewashed, and a wood roof. In 1871 the 
roof was destroyed by fire and he erected a 
small frame house which was replaced by a 
large one some five years later. In 1871 times 
were very hard and money was scarce, so leav- 
iiig his brother in charge of the farm he walked 
to Plattsmouth in search of work. He met an 
old friend who informed him of a position, 
and with good recommendations he walked to 
Lincoln and engaged with the Burlington & 
Missouri River Railroad Company as a civil 
engineer. He worked six months for that com- 
pany, then returned home for a few years. 
From 1876 to 1883 he served in the capacity 
of civil engineer for the Union Pacific Railroad 
Company. 

When Mr. Rogers and his brother began 
farming in Nebraska, farming implements were 
to a great extent unheard of. They broke the 
ground with oxen, made a harrow with the 
crotch of a tree, and thus fitted the ground for 
the following season. The next year corn was 
put in by plowing a furrow, dropping the corn 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



in it, and then covering by means of their rude 
harrow. They were the first men in this part 
of the country to plant corn in that manner, 
and their example was soon followed by others, 
this being the same method as pursued today 
except that machinery is used instead of hand. 
There were no weeds in the early days and the 
land had a wonderful yield of 75 bushels per 
acre. He furthermore set out many trees, and 
his farm is now one of the best improved in his 
part of the county. Thus the subject hereof 
got his start, and today owns 480 acres of good 
land, the principal crop being hay and corn. 
Since 1888 he has lived a retired life, practi- 
cally, looking after his land and other business 
interests. He owns a fine residence surrounded 
by handsome shade trees, overlooking Ceresco ; 
he also has a fine orchard. 

Mr. Rogers was united in marriage with 
Christina E., a daughter of James Stewart, of 
Perth, Ontario, Canada, and they became the 
parents of one son, James Stewart, who died at 
the age of twenty-one months. In political 
affiliations Mr. Rogers is a strong Republican, 
and has served as county surveyor. Religiously, 
he is an adherent of the Presbyterian faith. 



^r'^'^^ RNEST HURST, who is engaged in 
P farming in Stocking precinct, Saun- 

'^^ "■ 'ders county, Nebraska, is young in 
years, but has displayed unusual energy and 
general business ability in the pursuance of his 
work. He was born in Ohio in 1875 '"''^ is 
a son of John Hurst. 



John Hurst, the father of Ernest, went to 
Saunders county, Nebraska, in 1877, and first 
located one mile south and one and a fourth 
miles east of the present family home, on 80 
acres of land which he purchased in section 23, 
and which is now occupied by "Pete" Robb. 
This property was practically unimproved at 
the time he acquired it, and he set about mak- 
ing improvements in many ways, greatly en- 
hancing its value. He resided with his family 
upon that tract until 1884, when he purchased 
the present family home from Mason Ells- 
worth; it consisted of 160 acres, the northwest 
quarter of section 22. Mr. Ellsworth had home- 
steaded the first 80 acres of this, and after- 
ward purchased the other 80 of Air. White, 
also a homesteader. At the time of its acqui- 
sition by Mr. Hurst, there were on the prop- 
erty some trees, shrubbery, an orchard, and a 
small frame house which is now used as a cob 
house. He greatly added to the general appear- 
ance of the place by putting out new trees and 
shrubbery, improving the orchard, and keeping 
the land in the best possible condition. In 
1893 he built a new and substantial barn, and 
the first house on the place, built of sod by Mr. 
Ellsworth, on the southwest corner of his orig- 
inal 80 acres, was displaced, in 1899, by a 
large new house, comfortable in size and of 
fine appearance. Mr. Hurst died in 1893 at 
the age of forty-four years, and left surviving 
him his wife, whose maiden name was Walters, 
and five children, as follows: Eugene, a ma- 
chinist of Wahoo ; Ernest, to whom this record 
pertains; Owen, who is married and lives in 
Wahoo; Louis, and Oliver. Mrs. Hurst now 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



resides upon the old homestead with her son. 

Ernest Hurst has conducted the farm since 
the demise of his father in a most successful 
manner. He raises thoroughbred stock exclu- 
sively, having Shorthorn and Polled Angus 
cattle and Poland-China hogs. He has met 
vrith unusual success in the cultivation of his 
fruit trees, particularly with apples. Politic- 
ally, he stanchly supports the principles advo- 
cated by the Populist party. Fraternally, he 
is a member of Lodge No. 99, Knights of 
Pythias, of Wahoo; and both of his brothers 
are members of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, of Wahoo. In religious attachments 
the familv are Free Methodists. 



(^JY^'DREW E. STUART, M. D.. enjoys 
rj-A the distinction of being the oldest phy- 
V — -sician and surgeon in years of prac- 
tice in Cedar Bluffs, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska. Dr. Stuart was born in Sandwich, 
Canada, in 1862. He is a son of James A. 
Stuart, a native of Ireland. 

James A. Stuart was a man of high intellect- 
ual attainments. He had the advantage of a 
university course in Dublin, Ireland, with a 
two years' course at Princeton. New Jersey. 
He went to London, Canada, in 1854, and fol- 
lowed the profession of teaching. Two years 
later his marriage with Margaret Farris was 
solemnized, and the following year the young 
folk settled in Sandwich. While residing there 
he served as principal of the Protestant school 
for twelve consecutive years. Later he was 



appointed clerk of the division court, which 
position he filled in an eminently satisfactory 
manner for fifteen years, up to the time of 
his death. During that period he also issued 
marriage licenses. In politics he was a Re- 
former, and always took an active part in 
political contests. 

Dr. Stuart grew to manhood in his native 
place. He entered the University of Trinity 
College, at Toronto, Canada, and passed 
through its medical department. He subse- 
quently entered the Detroit College of Medi- 
cine, from which he graduated, receiving his 
diploma in March, 1886. The same year he 
went west, to Nebraska, and settled in Cedar 
Bluffs, being the first physician to locate in that 
place, which was then comparatively small. 

Soon after his arrival in Cedar Bluffs Dr. 
Stuart opened a drug store there, in partner- 
ship with the late ex-sheriff of Saunders coun- 
ty, W. D. Farris, his uncle. The partnership 
then formed lasted for three years, when the 
business was sold out, and Dr. Stuart devoted 
himself exclusively to the practice of his pro- 
fession, which has occupied his attention ever 
since. 

In 1888 Dr. Stuart was united in marriage 
with Effie Thomas, of Sac City, Iowa. They 
have two children, Margaret, aged eleven years, 
and Augustus L.. aged eight years. Politically 
our subject is a Democrat. In 1894 he was 
admitted to Masonry, and is now a valued 
member of Occidental Lodge, No. 215, F. & 
A. M. He also affiliates with the Modern 
Woodmen of American and the Woodmen of 
the World. Dr. Stuart takes a livelv interest in 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



the affairs of his community, where he has ac- 
quired a large and well paying practice. He was 
appointed postmaster of Cedar Bluffs in 1887, 
and served as such during the remainder of 
Cleveland's administration. He is devoted to 
his profession, and ranks high among the able 
physicians and surgeons of Nebraska. He is a 
prominent member of the Nebraska State Med- 
ical Society. 



E. LILLIBRIDGE, ex-sheriff of Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, is one of the 
best known and enterprising hard- 
ware merchants of Weston. He was born in 
Waterford, Erie County, Pa., in 1846. He 
is a son of Hosea and Henrietta (France) Lilli- 
bridge, of Scotch and German descent respect- 
ively. His father died in 1888, at the age of 
sixty-six years and eight months. His mother 
was born in New York and died in that state 
in 1896, at the age of seventy years. 

In 1873 our subject's parents paid a visit to 
him in Saunders county. They reared a 
family of eight children — seven sons and one 
daughter — as follows: R. L., John; C. E. ; 
Henry A. ; Hosea ; Clarissa ; James, and Wil- 
liam. All are still living, with the exception 
of John. One brother, R. L., went west, to 
Iowa, with the subject hereof, in 1866, and 
another brother followed two years later. 

C. E. Lillibridge learned the carpenter's 
trade in early manhood, and after going west 
spent two years in working at that occupation 
in Delaware county, Iowa. Two years after- 
ward he went still further west, to Nebraska, 



crossing the Missouri River April 6. He first 
went to Raymond, and took charge of a port- 
able saw mill, that summer. The capacity of 
this mill was about 4,000 feet per day. In the 
fall Mr. Lillibridge moved his mill to Green- 
wood, in Cass county, Nebraska, where he ran 
it for one year and a half. He then moved the 
mill upon the Platte River below Yutan, at 
the mouth of Otter Creek. 

Subsequently the subject hereof took up a 
homestead claim of 80 acres one mile south of 
Yutan. Upon this land he built a house, barn 
and outbuildings, and otherwise improved his 
place. In 1884 he sold this property to John 
Schulz, the present owner, who now has a 
fine bearing orchard covering three-quarters of 
an acre. Some of the trees set out by Mr. Lilli- 
bridge in 1872 are 16 and 18 inches in diameter, 
and plenty of wood is being chopped from the 
groves for firewood. 

After selling his farm, Mr. Lillibridge 
located on a farm about two miles west and one 
mile south of Weston. He purchased at that 
time from John Thomas 280 acres of land in 
section 19, which farm he still owns. At that 
times James Kees operated a general store in 
Weston, and Dick Thomas conducted a sim- 
ilar store, while March & Chapman had a hard- 
ware store. The farm purchased from Mr. 
Thomas was improved considerably, in regard 
to house and barn, and 40 acres was fenced 
hog-tight. The south branch of Wahoo Creek' 
affords a fine water supply for the land. 

Mr. Lillibridge lived upon the farm for 
seven of eight years. He cultivated 120 acres 
and also raised considerable stock. The pas- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



ture lands are well sodded with clover and 
blue grass. Mr. Thomas had set out a large 
number of fruit trees, the greater part of which 
died. In 1890 the old orchard was replaced 
by 50 cherry trees and over 100 apple trees, 
besides a large number of plum trees, etc. The 
farm is now rented by Mr. Johnson, who has 
150 acres under cultivation. 

In the spring of 1893 Mr. Lillibridge com- 
menced building county bridges. He continned 
at that business for three years, and then 
bought and sold hogs and cattle for some time. 
In 1897, in partnership with Charles Ficenec, 
he reopened a hardware store in Weston, 
which they still conduct. They carry from $5,- 
000 to $7,000 worth of stock and enjoy a large 
patronage. Mr. Lillibridge has a fine resi- 
dence in Weston, where he purchased land one 
block square. This tract is known as Block 
II in Mock's Second Addition to Weston. He 
has beautiful grounds and stables and not least 
among his possessions is a full-blooded Ken- 
tucky stallion which is a noted runner. 

Mr. Lillibridge married Clysta Harrison, a 
native of Iowa but reared in Wisconsin. Four 
children bless this union, namely : H. W. ; Wil- 
liam; Gladys and Chauncey, all of whom at- 
tend school. In the fall of 1867, when twen- 
ty-one years old, Mr. Lillibridge joined the 
Masonic fraternity at Greeley, Iowa. He now 
affiliates with the Masonic Blue Lodge, of 
Wahoo. In 1882 he also joined the A. O. U. 
W., of the same city (Wahoo). Later his 
membership was transferred to Yutan and Lin- 
coln. He was instrumental in organizing the 
A .0. U. W. lodge at Weston in 1893, of 



which he is a charter member. In 1890 Mr. 
Lillibridge joined Star Lodge No. 9, K. of 
P., of Ashland, Nebraska. In 1882 he was 
elected sheriff of Saunders county on the Inde- 
pendent ticket, and served two years. He has 
also served about six years on the school board 
in Chapman precinct, from 1893 to 1899. Mrs. 
Lillibridge is a member of the Methodist 
church, but her husband has broad and liberal 
ideas on the subject of religion and is a mem- 
ber of no church; he contributes, however, to 
the support of several. 



®TTO OSTENBERG, one of the leading 
business men of Wahoo, Nebraska, was 
born in the Kingdom of Prussia, in 
1843. He came to the United States with his 
father, Charles Ostenberg, when but seven 
years old. They settled in Wisconsin, about 
26 miles from Madison, where Otto spent the 
early part of his life. 

On January 21, 1864, Mr. Ostenberg entered 
the ranks of the Union army, enlisting in Com- 
pany A, nth Regiment, Wisconsin Volun- 
teer Infantry, and served until September 4, 
1865, when he was honorably discharged from 
the service at Mobile, Alabama. He moved 
west in 1874, and bought a farm in Stocking 
precinct, Saunders county, Nebraska. Rural 
pursuits occupied his time for four years, when 
he sold his farm and moved to Fremont and 
engaged in the grain business. When the 
Union Pacific Railroad was built through, Mr. 
Ostenberg returned to Saunders county and 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



engaged in the grain business in Wahoo. He 
has since been established in that city, and is 
now conducting his business under the firm 
name of Ostenberg & Company, grain dealers 
and handlers of all kinds of coal. 

Mr. Ostenberg married Rosa Jones. Three 
children have blessed this union : William, who 
is cashier and a stockholder of the Malmo Bank 
of Malmo, Saunders county; Harvey, who is 
bookkeeper for the J. W. Perry Commission 
Company, of Omaha, Nebraska; and Delia, a 
student of the Wahoo High School. The sub- 
ject of this sketch is a member of the A. O. U. 
W. He is a Democrat of the true type, has 
served many years as a member of the school 
board and is at present serving his first term as 
president of that body. He has officiated also 
in the capacity of secretary and treasurer of 
the board. He was city treasurer two years. 



r^ RANK REHAK is one of the most 
conscientious and up-to-date farmers in 
Saunders county, Nebraska, where he is 
the owner of a highly tilled farm in Elk pre- 
cinct and is known throughout the district as a 
good neighbor and citizen. He was born in 
Jackson county, Iowa, in 1863, and is a son of 
Joseph and Katie (Kabuska) Rehak, who lo- 
cated in Saunders county, in 1870, with their 
family of four children. They are as follows : 
James, who lives near Weston, Nebraska ; John, 
who is a carpenter, residing at Prague, Ne- 
braska; Mary (Fujan), a widow, and Frank, to 
whom this sketch is devoted. Joseph Rehak 



died in 1888, and his widow lives with her son, 
Frank. 

Joseph Rehak homesteaded the south half of 
the southeast quarter of section 10, township 
15, range 5, and his first house was a dug-out, 
12 by 16 feet, his first barn being also a dug- 
out. He at once began to make improvements 
upon his purchase by setting out a row of Cot- 
tonwood trees along the line of the property, 
and, in 1880, he built a frame house 14 by 16 
feet. 

Frank Rehak, who now owns the farm, 
added, in 1896, the main part of the house, 
which is 14 by t^i. At first he erected a frame 
barn, 16 by 28 feet, and later a corn-crib, 28 
feet square, but in the fall of 1899 he put up 
his present fine barn, which is 40 by 28 by 18 
feet. He has a fine farm and is engaged in 
general farming and stock raising. He raises 
Polled Angus cattle and Norman horses. His 
farm is well supplied with good water and he 
has a good windmill. He formerly ran a 
threshing outfit, which he found to be quite 
profitable. 

Mr. Rehak was joined in marriage with 
Mary Sedlacak, a daughter of Anton Sedlacak, 
who was one of the early settlers of Saunders 
county. Mrs. Rehak is one of a family of six 
children, namely: James, who is a farmer in 
Butler county, Nebraska, and is the father of 
six children; Anton J., who is farming in 
Saunders county; Mary, wife of Frank Re- 
hak; Annie, who lives at home; Joseph, who 
is married, and lives at home ; and Fannie, who 
is also at home. The subject of this sketch and 
his wife have two children, James and Willie, 




WARRLN E. AlKLI 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



In politics Mr. Rehak is a Populist, while in 
religious worship he and his family belong to 
the Catholic church. 



■ARREN E. ACKER, a promi- 
nent retail implement dealer of Wahoo, 
Nebraska, whose portrait accompanies 
this sketch of his life, was born in Cayuga 
county, New York, June 27, 1854. He is the 
son of William Acker, a native of the same 
county. 

William Acker followed farming all his life. 
In the fall of i860 he moved to Whiteside 
county, Illinois, and in 1876 to Shelby county, 
Iowa, where he died at the age of fifty-seven 
years. He married Nancy Roberts, who now 
lives in Garfield county, Nebraska. They were 
the parents of thirteen children, the oldest of 
whom died in infancy and the others being 
named : Silas R. ; Andrew B. ; Frances J. ; 
Warren E. ; Catherine (deceased); Calista 
(deceased); Helen; Eva (deceased); Nancy; 
George (deceased), and James. William 
Acker was a Democrat during the early part 
of his life, but later joined the Republicans. 

Warren E. Acker began his business career 
in Ida county, Iowa, as an implement salesman, 
and in 1885 conducted a stock ranch in Stan- 
ton county, Nebraska. He remained on the 
ranch three years, then moved to Platte county, 
Nebraska, where he engaged in tlie implement 
business. After a short time he moved to 
Boone county, Nebraska, and engaged in the 
same business for a short time. The business 



and location there did not suit him, and he 
went on the road as traveling salesman for the 
McCormick Harvesting Machine Company for 
nearly three years, when he engaged with the 
Milwaukee Harvesting Machine Company and 
remained with them one year. He then accepted 
a position with the McCormick Harvesting Ma- 
chine Company, with whom he has been since 
engaged. His first work for the McCormick 
Harvesting Machine Company was in the ca- 
pacity of traveling salesman, but for the past 
few years he has been their general agent for 
the territory of York, Polk, Seward, Butler, 
Saunders and Cass counties. He moved to 
Wahoo in 1897, and since 1898 has conducted 
a retail implement store in Ithaca, the firm 
name of which is Acker & Son. In 1899 they 
established a store in Wahoo, under the firm 
name of W. E. Acker & Co. 

The subject hereof was twice married. His 
first wife was Letitia A. Anderson. They had 
one son, John LeRoy Acker. In 1877 Mr. 
Acker formed a second matrimonial alliance, 
wedding Lucy D. Nichols, and they have one 
child, Zula Acker. Mr. Acker is a member of 
the A. O. U. W. and also of the K. of P. He 
is a strong Republican, and before moving to 
Wahoo served in various county and township 
offices. 



fAMES HANDLIR is an industrious and 
prosperous young farmer residing in 
Newman precinct, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, where he owns 280 acres of good farm- 
ing land. His success in life has been due to his 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



own untiring energy and perseverance. He was 
born in Bohemia, in 1866, and is a son of Frank 
and Fannie (Sanrad) Handlir, who came to 
this country with a family of four children, 
namely: Annie, who is the wife of Mr. Do 
Bruske, a miller and farmer, of Brainard, But- 
ler county, Nebraska, and is the mother of five 
children; Fannie, who is the wife of Mr. 
Mudra, foreman of a wholesale harness-maker's 
establishment at Lincoln, Nebraska ; John, who 
lives in California; and James, whose life is 
herein portrayed. 

Frank Handlir came directly to Saunders 
county, Nebraska, from Bohemia, in 1873, and 
homesteaded 80 acres, comprising the west 
half of the northeast quarter of section 8, town- 
ship 14, range 5, upon which he has most of his 
buildings. In 1875 he purchased 40 acres of 
railroad land in section 5, and later bought 
40 acres of railroad land in section 7, for 
which he paid $4 per acre. In 1876 he bought 
40 acres in section 5. Frank Handlir is prac- 
tically a self-made man, as he had but $270 
when he came to this country, which he earned 
himself, and today he is the owner of consider- 
able farming land in Saunders county. 

In 1889 James Handlir bought 80 acres west 
of the homestead from his half-brother, for a 
consideration of $1,500. He has since purchased 
considerable property in Saunders county, all 
of which he has put into good condition, and 
he successfully carries on general farming and 
stock raising. He is a Republican in politics, 
while in religious views he is in accord with 
the Catholic church. 

Mr. Handlir wedded Fannie Walach, a 



daughter of Jake Walach, and they have five 
children : Fannie, Mary, Emma, Joseph, and 
William. His brother-in-law, Frank Kubalek, 
is the owner of one of the finest farms in Saun- 
ders county, consisting of 400 acres. Mr. 
Kubalek has a large brick barn, 28 by 60 feet 
in dimensions, a cattle shed 1 1 by 60 feet, and 
he also has many outbuildings. His father 
located in Saunders county in 1867 or 
1868 and has three children: Kate, who 
is the wife of J. Mack, a prominent farmer; 
Annie, the wife of F. Novak; and Frank, who 
married Miss Walach, a sister of James Hand- 
lir's wife. Mr. Handlir lends his influence to 
all worthy enterprises, and is especially inter- 
ested in educational matters. For many years 
he served on the school board in his district. 



-J-— ^ RNEST J. TOMES, a successful 
R young farmer of Saunders county, 

. Nebraska, was born in Moravia, 

November 10, 1867, and is a son of Joseph and 
Barbara Tomes, who were engaged in farming 
in the old country. Joseph Tomes came to this 
country in 1871, with his wife and six children, 
at which time Ernest J. was but four years of 
age. His children were named Joe, Mary, 
Frank, Andrew, Ernest J., and Barbara. In 
1 87 1 he homesteaded the east half of the 
northwest quarter of section 12, township 14, 
range 5, and built a small frame house thereon, 
which he covered with slough-grass, but it 
burned down the following year. In 1880 he 
bought 80 acres north of his homesteaded prop- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



erty, from Florin Tomes, for a consideration 
of $2,000. 

Ernest J. Tomes worked at home un- 
til he was twenty-one years old, when 
the homestead was given to him, and, 
as his efforts met with success, in 1895 he pur- 
chased a quarter of section 2, Oak Creek pre- 
cinct, buying it from Frank Hruby. In the fall 
of that year he put up a fine house. He has all 
his property under enclosure, being the owner 
of 320 acres, on which he has made many im- 
provements. He carries on general farming 
and stock raising, and the stock are supplied 
with good water from a well 175 feet deep. 

The subject of this sketch was joined in mar- 
riage with Eleanor Codek, a daughter of 
Thomas Codek, and they have five children — 
Mary, Louie, George, Agnes, and Ernest, Jr. 
Mr. Tomes is a member of the Catholic Church. 



Z^^TTO F. PETERS, prominent among 
l)^^the leading business men of Saunders 

^^ county, Nebraska, is vice-president of 
the Bank of Yutan, and has long been a well 
known public character of that place. He was 
born in Joliet, Illinois, and is a son of John 
Peters, who is now living a retired life in Cal- 
ifornia, but still holds large financial interests 
in Saunders county. 

John Peters was born in Holstein, Germany, 
and came to the United States at the age of 
twenty years, where he learned the trade of a 
carpenter. He first settled in Illinois, but later 
moved to Nebraska in 1869, where he followed 



his trade as a carpenter for a time, assisting in 
building many of the old settlers' houses in 
Saunders county. He was so well pleased with 
the country that he returned to Illinois for his 
family, and in 1870 purchased a tract of 160 
acres in Marble precinct, now owned by Nick 
Heldt. He built a home and other farm build- 
ings, greatly improved the place in every way, 
and successfully engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. He later purchased many different farms 
in Marble and Union precincts, and sold them 
to good advantage when a demand arose. When 
the railroad passed through the county, he, with 
others, established a business center at Yutan, 
at first known as Clear Creek. He built and 
conducted a general store, which has since been 
known by the firm name of John Peters & Son. 
He became interested in banking, and is a large 
stockholder in the German Bank of Millard, 
Nebraska. When the Bank of Yutan was 
established he sold out his stock in the German 
Bank and became a stockholder in the former, 
and since 1893 he has served as its president. 
He is also the owner of large land interests 
in Saunders county. He was first united in 
marriage with Mary Deerson, and had one son, 
John. After her demise, he formed a second 
union by wedding Frederica Messorconi (now 
deceased), by whom he had the following chil- 
dren: Otto F., Herman C, Lizzie, and Em- 
ma. He was united in marriage a third time, 
in this instance marrying Mrs. Lena Thomas. 
Otto F. Peters, the subject of this sketch, 
was reared and schooled in Saunders county, 
where he followed farming until he was twenty 
years of age. He then went into partnership 



114 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



with his father in the store, and continued thus 
for nine years, when he sold his interest and 
became vice-president of the Bank of Yutan. 
This bank was estabHshed in 1889 by John T. 
Dunning and Nelson Hartson, who were suc- 
ceeded in ownership by John Peters & Sons in 
1893, with John Peters as president, Otto F. 
Peters vice-president, and Herman C. Peters 
cashier. It has a capital stock of $10,000, and 
is located in a neat one-story building on Vine 
street, near the corner of Second street. It 
was built for the bank, and is well arranged for 
the business, being equipped with a good fire- 
proof vault. 

Otto F. Peters was united in marriage with 
Elsie Dunning, a daughter of John T. Dunning, 
and they are the parents of three children : Ber- 
nice, Marie, and Rex. Like his father, he is a 
stanch Republican, and has served as clerk of 
the village. He is a member of the Reformed 
church, and belongs to the Modern Woodmen 
of America. He has a fine residence in the 
town of Yutan. 

Herman C. Peters, cashier of the Bank of 
Yutan, and manager of the general store of 
John Peters & Son, is one of the most enterpris- 
ing of the business men of the town. The store 
which he conducts was established in 1878, 
was one of the first there, and was located 
where the drug store of Dr. Murray now stands. 
The title of the firm was John Peters & Son, 
John Peters, Jr., being a partner until 1882, 
when he was succeeded by Otto F. Peters, who, 
in turn, was succeeded by Herman C. Peters. 
In 1882 the location of the store was changed 
to the corner of Vine and Second streets, where 



a larger building was erected, and in 1892 this 
building was still further enlarged. The store 
is spacious and convenient, well stocked, and 
carefully systematized, and is patronized by the 
best class of citizens. It is a general store, with 
a full line of every kind of goods, and has a 
separate wareroom for farming implements. 
The business transacted is extensive, and three 
clerks are required the year around. Mr. Peters 
was born in Saunders county, Nebraska, in 
1872, was reared on a farm, and today owns 
340 acres in Marble precinct, located in sec- 
tions 17, 18 and 20. In section 18 he built him 
a fine home. He manages his entire property 
himself, keeping some 300 graded Shorthorns 
and 300 Duroc-Jersey hogs. He succeeded 
Dunning & Detwater, who established a grain 
warehouse in 1893. He is also a director of the 
Saunders County Bank, of Wahoo. 



(^JY^'^ON B. CHAPEK, county clerk of 
y^i Saunders county, Nebraska, was born 
V,— ^ in Moravia, June 13, 1869. He is a 
son of Frank A. Chapek, a native of Moravia, 
who emigrated to this country in 1881 and now 
resides in Newman precinct, Saunders county. 
Frank A. Chapek was born in 1835. He 
served ten years in the army of his native coun- 
try. His first business experience was that of 
a merchant. He also conducted a farm in con- 
nection with his grocery store. In 1876 he dis- 
posed of his grocery store and devoted his entire 
time to farming and stock raising. When Mr. 
Chapek landed in America, in 1881, his first 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Step was directed by his keen business foresight, 
and he secured 80 acres of vakiable farm 
land in Newman precinct, Saunders county, 
where he now lives, and began at once to build 
his fortune. He now owns 280 acres of land. 
For a time he made a specialty of raising Here- 
ford cattle. Mr. Chapek married Eleanor Cid- 
lik. They have reared four sons and five daugh- 
ters, namely: Eleanor (Tomes), Anton B. (the 
subject hereof), Fannie, Tressia (Bennes), 
Katie (Hakel), Ludwick, Frank J., John, and 
Mary. 

Anton B. Chapek received his elementary 
education in Moravia, and crossed the Atlantic 
with his parents in 1881. He began for him- 
self at the age of thirteen years and worked on 
a farm for four years. In July, 1886, he saw 
a new field of labor open to him. He began 
clerking in the store of R. H. Thomas, in Wes- 
ton, Nebraska, and remained there until the 
following spring, after which time he again 
worked on a farm for four months. In the 
fall of 1887 he went back to the store of Mr. 
Thomas. So well did his business ability and 
good habits please Mr. Thomas that that gen- 
tleman made him a partner in his business. 
This partnership lasted until 1890, when Mr. 
Thomas sold his interest to Mr. Kacirek. In 
the fall of 1 89 1 Mr. Chapek sold his interest in 
the store to the head clerk, James Woita, and 
took a trip west, prospecting, but soon returned. 
On July 4, 1892, he opened a new store at 
Touhy, with Ernest Thomas as a partner. The 
store deals in general merchandise, hardware 
and implements. The interest of the junior 
partner changed several times until Frank 



Hakel became a member of the firm, which 
is known as Chapek & Hakel. 

April 30, 1890, Mr. Chapek was united in 
marriage with Fannie Kacirek, daughter of 
Frank Kacirek, of Weston, Nebraska. They 
have three children — Cirillka, Ladislaw, and 
Henry. Mr. Chapek is a member and secretary 
of both the local and state society of Catholic 
Workmen; is an active worker of the lodge, 
and has started several branches of the order in 
the state. 

Politically Mr. Chapek is a Populist. He has 
served one term as justice of the peace. At the 
fall election of 1897 he was elected county clerk 
of Saunders county, re-elected in 1899, and 
is now serving in that capacity. He still retains 
his interest in the store at Touhy, but moved 
to Wahoo in the spring of 1898. 



HARLES W. BURCH, city marshal of 
Cedar Bluffs, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, was born in Nodaway county, 
Missouri, July 22, 1861. He is a son of Abner 
and Stacy (Carmichael) Burch. His father 
was a farmer. 

Charles W. attended the district schools, and 
worked on his father's farm until he reached 
the age of seventeen years. He then hired out 
by the month as a farm hand on dififerent farms 
in various parts of Missouri. Young Burch 
was of the right kind of mettle, and when op- 
portunity presented itself he opened a livery 
stable in Clearmont, Missouri, which he con- 
ducted successfully for two years. He then 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



sold out to advantage and moved to Thomas 
county, in northwestern Kansas, where he took 
up a claim of i6o acres of land and improved 
upon it. Six years ago he left Kansas and 
moved to Saunders county, Nebraska. He 
rented a farm and followed agricultural pur- 
suits for four years. Mr. Burch is a stock man 
of some prominence and is especially fond of 
fine horses. He is the owner of Tom Payne, 
the noted Percheron stallion, which is con- 
sidered the finest animal in the county. 

On April, 27, 1890, Mr. Burch married 
Amanda Dew, of Clearmont, and has four 
children — Earl, Lucretia, Julia, and Robert, 
aged ten, six, four and one and a half years, re- 
spectively. Mr. Burch is a Democrat in poli- 
tics. His wife is a member of the Missionary 
Baptist church. He was elected city marshal of 
Cedar Blufifs, which office he still holds. 



Y^ARS LARSON, a highly respected 
IJT farmer of Saunders county, Nebraska, 
"^^■-^ succeeded his father upon the home- 
stead farm in Clear Creek precinct. He is a 
son of Andrew and Christina (Christerman) 
Larson. 

Andrew Larson was a native of Sweden. 
With his wife and two children he came to the 
United States in 1867. They were Mormons, 
and were en route to Salt Lake City in com- 
pany with other immigrants. When they left 
111 'inc. all was milk and honey in Salt Lake City, 
but upon their arrival at Nebraska City, Ne- 
braska, they found themselves without money. 



The little band of immigrants were detained 
there for several weeks, waiting for a favorable 
opportunity to finish their journey. It was then 
impossible to cross the plains at all times on 
account of the recent war and trouble with the 
Indians. While waiting, Mr. Larson went to 
Omaha, where he visited some Swedish friends. 
These friends induced him to go out into 
Saunders county and take up a homestead 
claim. 

When Mr. Larson returned to the immi- 
grants' camp for his wife and children, the 
Mormons were very angry, but he was a man 
of excellent judgment, and saw that it would be 
a successful course for him to take up a home- 
stead claim. He went to the northwestern 
corner of Clear Creek precinct, Saunders 
county, Nebraska, where he homesteaded 80 
acres. After working awhile in Omaha to ob- 
tain the necessary money he built a small sod 
house, 16 by 16 feet in size, like those of his 
neighbors. This house had but one window 
and one door. There, in their rude home, hap- 
piness began. He loved to see his children 
happy, and labored hard to get in his grain. 
Little by little he obtained a start. He went 
to the Platte River, a distance of ten miles, and 
carried home on his back small trees, w-hich he 
set out. In that way he secured maple, cotton- 
wood, and box elder groves. He also planted 
a fine orchard and put out small fruits. Many 
of these trees are now more than two feet in 
diameter, and are fine fruit-bearing trees, testi- 
fying to his energy and prudence. After a few 
years Mr. Larson built a small frame house and 
barns, having previously used straw-sheds. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



In after years the present substantial resi- 
dence was built, and was his home until he was 
cut off by death in 1893, at the age of sixty-two 
years. He left a fine estate to be divided be- 
tween his widow, son and daughter. As he 
was an honorable, upright man, he was deeply 
mourned by all. His children were : Lars, the 
subject hereof, and Tilla. The latter became 
the wife of H. M. Clark, who owns a fine farm 
near the home of our subject; they have six 
children, as follows: Jessie, Harry, Arthur, 
Helen, Bernice, and David. 

Lars Larson was born in 1873. He grew to 
manhood upon his father's farm, and, after 
reaching his majority, he still remained at 
home and assisted his father with the farm 
work. Upon the death of that parent, he suc- 
ceeded to the homestead farm, where he still 
resides with his beloved mother. He raises 
large quantities of grain, and devotes much 
time to stock raising. He has the finest grade 
of cattle and horses to be found in his vicinity. 
Like his father, he is a stanch Republican, but 
never aspired to office. In his religious views 
he favors the Lutheran church. 



fSAAC B. HATFIELD, a well known resi- 
dent of Yutan, and one of the pioneer farm- 
ers of Union precinct, Saunders county. 
Neb., is a man of great force of character, en- 
joying the esteem and confidence of his fellow 
citizens to a marked degree. He has been ex- 
ceedingly successful in a business way, although 
for the past forty years he has been seriously 



hindered by his inability to hear. He is, how- 
ever, an adept at understanding from the mo- 
tions of another's lips, and is enabled to con- 
verse in a very fluent manner. 

Mr. Hatfield was born in Fayette county, 
Ohio, in 1835, and is a son of James and Bidy 
(Reddon) Hatfield. The mother died in Ohio, 
and the father, later in life, moved to Illinois 
and lived there one year, when he returned to 
Ohio and there died. The subject hereof was 
reared on a farm, and in early life attended 
school, which he alternated with farm work. 
He followed that vocation in Ohio, Minnesota 
and Illinois, where he was married. After his 
marriage he went with his wife to Grant coun- 
ty, Indiana, where he bought a new farm in a 
heavy timberland county. There he felled 
trees and improved the land generally, putting 
up good buildings for farming purposes and set- 
ting out orchards. After remaining there four 
and a half years he sold to good advantage and 
returned to Illinois, where he lived until 1868. 
Then, with two teams and wagons, containing 
all their worldly effects, he started for Nebraska 
on September 29, 1868, in company with a 
brother-in-law and Isaac Hart, arriving in Cass 
county on October 19 following. He remained 
there fcM- a period of three weeks, until he could 
find a suitable location. Finding a sparsely set- 
tled section in the northeast portion of Saunders 
county, he decided to locate there. He was one 
of the earliest settlers and pre-empted a tract of 
80 acres, which he immediately set to work in 
improving. It was clear and open country, 
abounding in antelope and deer, and the In- 
dians, friendly when given what they wished, 



118 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



were every-day visitors. Mrs. Hatfield was 
rather alarmed at first when the Indians would 
suddenly be found gazing into a window, but, 
being a woman of strong nerve and good judg- 
ment, she showed no fear, and they learned to 
respect her. The subject hereof lived in a log 
house which had been deserted, until he built a 
house, in which one of his sons now lives. He 
set out a large number of trees, both fruit and 
shade, and also hedges. He built his present 
house on the southeast corner of the farm, ad- 
joining the village of Yutan. He subsequently 
purchased 80 acres of railroad land, 40 acres 
settled by T. J. Hefner, and 80 acres settled by 
Mr. Filmore, and he also erected a number of 
houses in the village of Yutan. In early life his 
sense of hearing began to fail, and, for forty 
years, he has conversed with others by watching 
the motions of their lips and also receiving as- 
sistance from his faithful wife. 

Mr. Hatfield was united in marriage with 
Amanda M. Hefner, a daughter of Peter and 
Elizabeth (Probst) Hefner, her father being a 
blacksmith by trade. She was born in Pendle- 
ton county, Virginia, in 1837, and her union 
with Mr. Hatfield resulted in the birth of the 
following children : James P., Samuel W., J. 
P., Hattie C, Edwin E., Effie, and Carrie D. 
James P. and Samuel W. are deceased. J. P. 
is a farmer, who married L. Maggie Steele, and 
has four children : Omer S., Orpha, Ruth, and 
E. Bernice. Hattie C. is the wife of J. F. Mon- 
son, by whom she has the following children : 
Otto Ray (deceased), Guy, Naomi, Earl, Carl- 
ton, and Freeda A. Edwin E., a Methodist min- 
ister, married Delia Thompson, and has four 



children: Arthur, Ethel, Zella, and Elsie. 
Efiie, the wife of D. G. Robinson, has four chil- 
dren : Vera, Vivian, Melton, and Veta. Carrie 
D., wife of Rev. O. L. Barnes, of Blair, Nebras- 
ka, has two children : Robert H. and Oliver W. 
The subject of this sketch is a Republican in 
politics and helped to establish the first post- 
office at Yutan, in 1870. He also had the honor 
of choosing the name of Union precinct. In 
religious belief his family are all Methodists. 



NTON SOUKUP, an extensive farmer 
and stock raiser, of Saunders county, 
Nebraska, is a native of Bohemia. 
He was born January 8, 1850, and is a son of 
Anton and Mary (Beeres) Soukup. 

In 1868 the family came to America, and 
first settled in Chicago, afterward moving to 
Braidwood, Illinois. Anton's father was a 
blacksmith by trade ; he and his son worked in 
the coal mines near Braidwood. In 1871 they 
moved to Saunders county, Nebraska, and each 
of them took up a homestead claim. 

Anton Soukup now owns the east half of the 
northwest quarter of section 32, the west half 
of the southeast quarter of section 29, the west 
half of the west half of the northwest quarter 
of section 29, the southeast quarter of the north- 
west quarter of section 29, and twenty acres of 
pasture land in section 18. The first house 
built by Mr. Soukup was a small dwelling, 12 
by 16 feet, in which he lived for some years. . 
He afterward built the handsome residence in 
which he now lives. He engaged in general 




MK. AM) MRS. SANDKKS P. ROBINSON and FAMILY. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



121 



farming and stock raising and has been uni- 
formly successful. His house is one of the 
finest in the county. It is surrounded by a 
select and flourishing orchard of 150 apple, 
cherry and plum trees. 

In 1873 Ml"- Soukup married Rosa Datel, a 
daughter of Joseph and Anna (lonk) Datel, of 
Saunders county. They have six children : 
Joseph, aged twenty-four years; Millie, aged 
twenty years; Frank, aged seventeen years; 
Libby, aged fifteen years; Annie, aged ten 
years; and Anton, aged eight years. Joseph 
recently married Mary Haufman, and is build- 
ing a residence on his own farm. 

The subject hereof is a Democrat, and served 
as assessor three years, in 1896, 1897 and 1898. 
He carries $2,000 insurance in the Modern 
Woodmen of America, $1,000 in the Wood- 
men of the World, and $1,000 in Z. C. B. J. 



ANDERS P. ROBINSON, a self- 
made man of Marietta precinct, Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, is one of the best 
farmers and makes a specialty of stock raising. 
He was born in Fayette county, Iowa, and is a 
son of William and Sarah (Pence) Robinson. 
His father went west from Iowa to Nebraska, 
where he bought three 80-acre tracts, one in 
section 10 and the other two in section 15. 
After building a house, barn, and other build- 
ings, he sold out, retired from active business 
life, and now makes his home with the subject 
hereof. While he followed farming he was 
known as a very progressive farmer. 



Sanders P. Robinson was reared in Iowa, 
and has followed farming nearly all his life. In 
February, 1 880, he located in Saunders county, 
Nebraska, and purchased 80 acres in Union 
precinct. He sold this property in the fall of 
1882 and purchased a quarter of section 15, in 
the same county. This was railroad land, and 
cost Mr. Robinson $2,080 dollars. Purchas- 
ing an old schoolhouse, he moved it on to his 
farm and converted it into a dwelling house. 
He also built a barn, and otherwise improved 
his place. 

In 1889 Mr. Robinson enlarged his house 
into a fine residence, built corn-cribs, and set 
out fruit and shade trees, having an orchard 
comprising four acres of land. He has sev- 
eral fine wells on his farm. One is operated by 
a windmill, and the finest of water is obtained 
at a depth of },"] feet. Another well on the 
place is 47 feet deep. 

Mr. Robinson makes a specialty of raising 
Red Polled cattle and has 20 head of regis- 
tered stock. He also keeps on an average 1 10 
head of hogs and has some very fine draft 
horses. In addition to this he has devoted much 
time and attention to raising grain, principally 
corn, oats, barley, and wheat. 

In 1895 and 1896 Mr. Robinson rented his 
land and conducted a meat market at Mead, but 
subsequently resumed farming. He was joined 
in marriage with Harriet Nancy Gregory, a 
daughter of Fletcher and Elizabeth (Adams) 
Gregory. In 1870 Mr. Gregory took up a home- 
stead claim in section 14, of Marietta precinct, 
the same now owned by A. Wickland. He 
planted the fine shade trees now standing there, 



122 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



broke the land, and built the present buildings. 
In 1888 he sold it to good advantage and 
moved to Pierce, Nebraska, where he is living 
in retirement. He was a very successful 
farmer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson are the parents of 
seven children : Roy Morton ; Blanche Pearl ; 
Ivan (deceased); Mable Elizabeth; Ethel; 
Fletcher, and Hazel. Mr. Robinson takes a de- 
cided interest in educational affairs and has 
served on the school board for ten years. He 
and his wife are members of the Methodist 
church. By his straightforward methods of 
doing business Mr. Robinson has gained the 
respect of all who deal with him, and has hosts 
of friends. In politics the subject of this 
sketch is a Populist, and, in 1894, was a can- 
didate for county commissioner and came 
within a small vote of being elected. 

A picture of the Robinson family, including 
Mr. and Mrs. Robinson and the six children 
now living, is presented on another page of this 
work in proximity to this. 



OUGLAS R. PHELPS, coal and lum- 
ber dealer, of Wahoo, Saunders coun- 
ty, Nebraska, was born in Wyoming 
county, New York, April 25, 1844. He moved 
west to Fremont, Nebraska, in February, 1868. 
He remained there a short time, then moved to 
Omaha, and in June took up a homestead in 
Cedar precinct, Saunders county, Nebraska. 
He followed farming for four years, then rented 
his farm and returned to Fremont, where he 



worked in the lumber yard until the fall of 
1879, when he moved to Wahoo, and for the 
next ten years operated a lumber yard under 
the firm name of Stratton & Phelps. He sold 
his interest to his partner, Mr. Stratton, and 
bought another yard, which he operates alone, 
handling lumber, coal, etc. He received his 
education in his native county, and is a son of 
Isaac N. Phelps. 

Isaac N. Phelps was born in Washington 
county, New York. He followed agricultural 
pursuits all his life. He moved west and lo- 
cated in Cedar precinct, Nebraska, in 1869. 
His last few years were spent in Wahoo, where 
he died at the ripe age of eighty-seven years. 
He married Mary Perkins, who died at the age 
of thirty-four years, leaving to her husband's 
care and protection their three children — Mary, 
Eugene, and Douglas R. Mr. Phelps contracted 
a second matrimonial alliance, Marietta Tuller 
becoming his wife. One son, Edwin, was born 
to them. Mrs. Phelps resides in Wahoo. 
Isaac N. Phelps was a son of Isaac Phelps, a 
native of Vermont, who settled in Erie county. 
New York, in 18 14, where he lived and died. 

Douglas R. Phelps was a soldier in the civil 
war. In 1862 he enlisted in Company C, ist 
Regiment, New York Dragoons,, and served 
until the close of the war, receiving his dis- 
charge in 1865. He is junior vice-commander 
of John Andrew Post, G. A. R. Fraternally 
he is a member of the I. O. O. F. He is a 
Republican in politics and has served his party 
on the school board and in the city council. 

In 1869 Mr. Phelps married Clara Herring- 
ton, of Genesee county. New York. They have 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



three children — Marion A., Grace, and Mary. 
Marion A. was born in 1871, in Cedar precinct, 
and received his education in the Wahoo city- 
schools. He married Myrtle L. Nichols, and 
is now associated in business with his father. 



|EV. MATTHEW BOR, pastor of the 
Roman Catholic church of Wahoo, 
■ Nebraska, was born in Bohemia, De- 
cember 21, 1863. He received his classical edu- 
cation at Taus, Bohemia, and his theological 
training at Budweis. 

Father Bor came to America in 1887, and 
the same year was ordained as a priest at San 
Francis, Wisconsin. His first appointment was 
as assistant to Father Maly at Wilber, Ne- 
braska. In March, 1889, Father Bor was 
placed in charge of the Wahoo church, but did 
not remain there very long, as he was sent back 
to Wilber, being succeeded by Father Klein in 
October of the same year. In 1 892 Father Bor 
again took charge of the church at Wahoo, and 
has remained there since that time. 

The present membership of this church num- 
bers sixty families. Of these fifty-three are 
Bohemian and seven English. They have a 
number of societies, among which are St. Cyril- 
lus and Methodius, the Knights of St. George, 
and the St. Agnes Young Ladies Society. 

The occasion of the organization of this 
church was the arrival of the first Bohemian 
settlers in Wahoo, in August, 1874. They 
were W. Simodynes, Jacob Novotny, Thomas 
Zimola, Frank Konecky and Frank Noha, who 



came from Moravia. The following year the 
number of Bohemian families was increased to 
ten. In 1876 there was a Bohemian wedding in 
Wahoo, the first of the kind in the history of the 
settlement. The first mass said in the vicinity 
was at the house of Mr. Konecky, two and a 
half miles from Wahoo, in the year 1875. The 
first mass said in Wahoo was in 1876, in the 
school house, on Saturday and Sunday, and in 
the courthouse on Monday. Father Hovorka 
said mass in the courthouse as late as 1877. 

As the congregation grew in numbers and 
became prosperous, they decided to build a 
church, and accordingly work was begun in 
July, 1878, and finished near the close of the 
same year. The building was fifty feet long 
and thirty feet wide. The stout hearts of these 
sturdy Bohemian settlers swelled with pride, 
now that they could gather in a house of wor- 
ship they could call their own. The first mass 
was said in the new church by Father W. Ko- 
carnick at the end of the year 1878. From 
September 28, 1884, Father Jordan Shutz vis- 
ited the congregation every third Sunday in the 
month until October 5, 1885, when Father 
Choka, of Omaha, was assigned to the Wahoo 
charge. He was with the church until Febru- 
ary, 1889. 

Rev. Matthew Bor was with the congrega- 
tion from March 9, 1889, having also the 
charges at Weston and Brainard, with residence 
at Colon. Two months later he moved to 
Wahoo, when a residence was built at a cost of 
$1,000. The house was furnished September 
27, 1889. October, 1889, Rev. Mr. Bor was 
transferred to W'ilber and was succeeded by 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Rev. Alois Klein, who remained until Novem- 
ber, 1 89 1. During his administration the con- 
gregation built a new church, 36 by 70 feet, 
just three blocks from the center of town. It is 
the largest church edifice in Wahoo and has a 
greater amount of wealth centered about it than 
any other. It was erected at a cost of $3,600. 

Rev. E. Bouska had charge of the new church 
during December, 1891, and January, 1892. 
On February 6, 1892, Rev. Matthew Bor be- 
came its pastor again, and transferred his resi- 
dence from Plattsmouth to Wahoo, March 7, 
1892. In January. 1893, the parsonage was 
moved from the old place to the new church, 
and enlarged at a cost of $525. 



YRON F. WHITNEY, registrar of 
deeds for Wahoo, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, was elected to fill that im- 
portant office by the Populists in 1897, for a 
term of four years. Mr. Whitney was born 
December 10, 1840, in Addison county, Ver- 
mont. He is a son of Benjamin F. and Jane 
(Goodale) Whitney. 

Benjamin F. Whitney was a native of Shore- 
ham, Massachusetts. He was a cabinet maker 
by trade and followed that occupation the 
greater part of his active life. Leaving his 
native state, he located in Addison county, Ver- 
mont, where he lived a number of years. Later 
he moved across the line into New York state, 
and still later to Erie county, Pennsylvania. 
In 1867 he went to Michigan and the following 
year (1868) he settled in Marquette county, 



Wisconsin, where the closing years of his life 
were spent in the peaceful occupation of a farm- 
er. He died in 1890, aged eighty- four years. 
Jane Goodale, a daughter of Jared Goodale, of 
Vermont, became his wife. She died at the 
age of fifty-six years, leaving six children, 
whose names are: Caroline E. (Sweeney), 
Edwin J., Charles C, Byron F., the subject 
hereof; Jeannette E. (Ormsby) and Charlotte 
A. (Wilson). 

Byron F. Whitney was educated at Fort 
Henry, New York, and in the schools of Erie 
county, Pennsylvania. He learned the cabinet 
maker's trade most thoroughly, serving appren- 
ticeship under his father, and has followed that 
occupation most of the time since then. In 1872 
Mr. Whitney moved to Furnas county, Ne- 
braska, which was his home until 1882. There 
he followed teaching for some time and was 
elected county superintendent of schools of that 
county, filling that ofiice in a very creditable 
manner. He was afterward engaged in various 
pursuits incident to the life of a frontiersman. 
In 1882 he returned to Ashland, Saunders 
county, which has since been his home. 

In 1862 Mr. Whitney married Mary J. 
Bishop, a daughter of John Bishop, of Erie 
county, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Whitney is a na- 
tive of Delhi, New York. She and her husband 
have reared five children, namely: Helen M., 
Bertha M. (Gross), Earl E., Paul G., and John 
B., who is deputy registrar of deeds. Mr. Whit- 
ney is a man of recognized ability and fitness 
for his present office, which he is filling to the 
evident satisfaction of all. In 1877 he was a 
Greenbacker and voted for Peter Cooper, but 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



since then he has been in sympathy with the 
Populists. He is a lover of justice, and is thor- 
oughly imbued with those broad principles 
which underlie the idea of the brotherhood of 
man. 



§OHN SCHULZ, a gentleman who takes 
rank among the most prosperous and 
progressive citizens of Saunders county, 
Nebraska, is an extensive land owner in that 
county, holding valuable property to the extent 
of 1, 600 acres. AH that he possesses has been 
obtained entirely through his own efforts, as 
he started wholly without means and with 
only two willing hands and a stout heart to 
support him. He has led an exemplary life, 
and his fortune represents years of industry 
and thrift and many privations suffered in early 
life. He is a man of great business ability, and, 
after becoming fairly started, he took advan- 
tage of every opportunity offered for his bet- 
terment, multiplying his wealth many times 
over, and becoming firmly installed as one of 
the stable representatives of his class of citizen* 
in Saunders county. His handsome residence, 
which excels any other in his section, is located 
in Union precinct, about one mile south of Yu- 
tan. Mr. Schulz was born in Handorf, Ger- 
many, in 1848, and is a son of Jurgen (James 
in English) Schulz. 

Jurgen Schulz was also born in Handorf, 
in 1823, and there he married Margaret 
Mather. He followed agricultural pursuits in 
Germany until 1867, when, with his little for- 
tune, accompanied by his family, he came to 



the United States, first locating in Kankakee 
county, Illinois. He then removed to Boone- 
ville, Dallas county, Iowa, where he remained 
until 1 87 1. Thence he went to Saunders coun- 
ty, Nebraska, conveying his family and belong- 
ings with team and wagon. He bought of Mr. 
Cooley 80 acres where J. Storm now lives, 
there being on the tract a small building 14 by 
20 feet, now used for a chicken house, into 
which he moved with his family. He afterward 
bought three 80-acre tracts of railroad land 
and built thereon a large, handsome residence, 
also setting out a good orchard and groves of 
shade trees. The last seven years of his life 
were spent in retirement at Yutan, where he 
owned some property; he died in July, 1897. 
His widow, whose never failing help so mate- 
rially aided him in his success, survives him at 
the age of eighty years, and resides in Yutan, 
where she is known to every one and dearly 
esteemed by all. The following children were 
the result of their union : Augusta, who died 
in Germany ; John, an infant son, and Daniel, 
both of whom died in Germany ; John, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Jurgen (James), who lives 
at Yutan: Weiebke (Annie in English), the 
wife of Hening Heuck, of Yutan; Hans, of 
Union precinct, and Margaret, the wife of J. 
Sei^'er, of Yutan. The father was a Repub- 
lican in politics and a Lutheran in religious 
faith. 

John Schulz, being the oldest living son, as- 
sisted his father on the farm until he was 
twenty-six years of age. He was then married, 
after which he bought a quarter section of land 
from his father, paying for it as he could, hav- 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



ing started without any means whatever. 
When the land was paid for he added to his 
estate from time to time, until he possessed 
1, 600 acres of fine land, located in sections 24, 
25, 26, 28, 29, 33 and 34, in Union precinct, 
and in sections 3 and 10 in Marble precinct. 
He started as poor as could be, with scarcely 
the necessaries to keep house, but, in time, was 
enabled to enlarge his home to the dimensions 
of 54 by 56 feet. He greatly improved his place 
in every way, setting out a good orchard and 
groves. In 1874 he purchased the Jacob Griffin 
farm, in section 34, and in 1876 the Samuel 
Neyle place, in the same section, where he now 
lives. There was but a small house on the 
property, but Mr. Schulz built the largest and 
most modern house in that part of the county, 
and also laid out beautiful grounds surround- 
ing it. He has spacious barns and other farm 
buildings, and keeps about 200 high-grade 
Shorthorns, 200 hogs and fine work-horses and 
roadsters. He has imported many superior 
horses from France, and keeps only the best 
grade of stock. In politics he is a Republican 
and has served many years as a member of the 
school board. Religiously he is a member of 
the Lutheran church. 

The subject of this sketch was united in mar- 
riage with Margaret Seiver, a daughter of 
John and Magdalena (Wick) Seiver. Her 
father died in Germany in 1861, and her mother 
now resides with Mr. Schulz. Mr. Seiver first 
married Catherine Storm, who died young, 
leaving three children — John, Peter, and Anna 
— all of whom died young. By his second mar- 
riage Mr. Seiver had the following children: 



Katherine, Annie, the wife of George Mumm ; 
Marks; Margaret, the wife of Mr. Schulz; 
Franke, the wife of J. Schulz ; and Jacob. The 
subject hereof and his wife became the parents 
of nine children, namely : John, who is living at 
home; George, who married Lizzie C. Nisen; 
Lena, the wife of Henry Heldt; Louis, who 
lives at home; Kate, William, Bertha (de- 
ceased), Lizzie (deceased), and Charles. 



§OHN H. CRAWFORD, clerk of the dis- 
trict court of the Fifth Judicial District 
of Nebraska, was born in Batavia, Mich- 
igan, November 4, 1872. He is a son of John 
S. Crawford, who located with his family in 
Central City, Nebraska, in 1873, and, in 1881, 
removed to Wahoo, where the subject of this 
sketch now resides. 

Mr. Crawford received his education in the 
schools of Central City and Wahoo, graduating 
at the high school of the latter place in 1889. 
The same year he commenced work as clerk in 
the office of the county judge, where he re- 
mained one year. 

From 1890 to 1898 Mr. Crawford was en- 
gaged in different pursuits, being on the road 
as a salesman part of the time. He was made 
deputy district clerk in 1898, and at the fall 
election of 1899 he was elected clerk of the 
district court, which office he now holds. 

On December 26, 1899, Mr. Crawford was 
united in marriage with Theresa M. Wortman. 
In his political views the subject hereof 
espouses the cause of the Populists. He is a 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



127 



member of the K. of P., and has wisely drawn 
around his home the sturdy arm of protection 
afforded by a membership in the A. O. U. W. 



■RANK E. WAY, M. D., of Wahoo, 
Saunders county, Nebraska, has during 
his ten years of practice in that city estab- 
lished an enviable reputation. As a physician 
he is without a peer in the county, and has 
proved competent in caring for the most com- 
plicated cases. He has thoroughly mastered the 
intricacies of the medical profession, and all 
cases coming under his care are given a careful 
diagnosis and treated with a skill which comes 
only from superior training and wide experi- 
ence as a practitioner. He is the only homeop- 
athic physician in Saunders county, and enjoys 
the patronage of its best citizens, often being 
called into adjoining counties. Dr. Way was 
born at Springfield, Vermont, November 7, 
1868, and is a son of James Way, who was for- 
merly of Lempster, New Hampshire. 

James Way is now one of the superintend- 
ents of the Parks & Woolson manufacturing es- 
tablishment, having worked as a machinist for 
over forty years. He married Eliza A. Slack, 
a daughter of John Slack, who was employed 
in the Parks & Woolson establishment as a 
machinist for over fifty years. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
schools of Springfield, Vermont, after which 
he entered the Boston University Med- 
ical School, from which he was graduated in 
June, 1890. Having some business to attend 



to in Bufifalo county, Nebraska, he went west 
and was so well pleased with the existing con- 
ditions favorable to the practice of his profes- 
sion that he at once decided to locate there, after 
visiting different sections of Nebraska. Having 
looked into the progress being made by various 
towns in the state, he decided upon the city of 
Wahoo, Saunders county, with full faith in its 
promise of future growth. He opened an of- 
fice there on November 7, 1890, and was en- 
tirely successful from the very start. There 
were then but three practicing physicians in 
Wahoo, and he soon established a lucrative 
practice, which has ever been on the increase. 
His fifst office was in the old Steen block, but 
he now has handsome quarters in the Steen 
brick block, immediately adjoining the old 
building, located on Linden avenue. Among 
his patients are numbered the best people of the 
county, and, also, of South Bend and North 
Bend, in Dodge county, some thirty miles dis- 
tant. He possesses their confidence to a marked 
degree, and acts not only as a physician in his 
relations with them, but as a true and trusted 
friend as well. Dr. Way was elected coroner, 
on the Populist ticket, in 1891, and was re- 
elected in 1893, serving in a most satisfactory 
manner. He was appointed county physician 
in 1 89 1, and also examiner on the board of 
insanity — receiving the latter appointment from 
Judge S. H. Sornborger in January, 1900. In 
1896 he built a residence in the western part 
■ of the city, but recently sold the premises and 
purchased the Goodell property, on Linden 
avenue. 

Dr. Way was united in marriage with Nellie 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



E. Willard, a daughter of Charles Willard, of 
Charleston, New Hampshire, and they are the 
parents of two sons : Charles Willard and 
James Lawrence. Fraternally the subject of 
this sketch is a member of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, Woodmen of the World, 
Fraternal Union of America, Knights of the 
Maccabees, National Aid Association, Wood- 
man Circle, Tribe of Ben Hur, the Nebraska 
Homeopathic Medical Society, of which he is 
the present secretary, and the American Insti- 
tute of Homeopathy. 



(JT'"^ ' HOMAS W. FARRIS, sheriff of 
J I Saunders county, Nebraska, was born 
in Douglas precinct, Saunders county, 
April 7, 1876. He has the honor of being the 
youngest man ever elected to the ofHce of sheriff 
in the state of Nebraska. He is a son of Wil- 
liam D. Farris, who was sheriff of Saunders 
county at the time of his death. 

William D. Farris was born near London, 
province of Ontario, Canada. He spent his 
early life in his native country, engaged in 
farming and blacksmithing, and in March, 
1870, crossed the "border line" and took up 
his homestead in Douglas precinct, Saunders 
county. He was a successful farmer, and, at 
the time of his death, was the owner of 480 
acres of land. He followed agricultural pur- 
suits actively until June 6, 1898, when he 
moved to Wahoo city to assume the official 
duties of sheriff of Saunders county, to which 
office he was elected in the fall of 1897. He I 



died in Wahoo, March 23, 1899, before his 
term of office was completed, and his son, 
Thomas W. Farris, was appointed to fill the 
vacancy caused by his father's death. 

William D. Farris, aside from being an ideal 
and successful farmer, was a live stock fancier 
and gave much time and care to this branch of 
industry. He also owned a drug store in Cedar 
Bluffs, which he conducted a number of years. 
He made a specialty of cattle raising. He 
served his township as assessor and also served 
on the school board. During Cleveland's ad- 
ministration he was postmaster of Cedar Bluffs. 
He married Christina Fleming, who now lives 
on the homestead. They reared seven children : 
John H., who is a farmer and has a portion of 
the estate left by his father; Robert J., who 
follows agricultural pursuits, having a part of 
the old farm; Charles M., who farms a part of 
the estate; Blanche (Goodill) ; Christina M. 
(McMahan) ; Thomas W., the subject hereof; 
and Thurman A., who lives with his brother, 
Thomas W. 

Thomas W. Farris received his intellectual 
training in the district schools and the Wahoo 
city schools. He remained on the farm until 
January 6, 1898, when he was appointed county 
jailor. This office he filled until November, 
1898, when he was appointed deputy sheriff, 
and discharged the duties of that position until 
his father's death. No fitter man could be 
found for the vacancy thus made than Thomas 
W. Farris, and he was accordingly appointed 
sheriff to complete the term which expired Jan- 
uary I, 1900. As a further proof of his suita- 
bility for this trust, he was duly, elected sheriff 




PETER SAMS. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



at the fall election for the term expiring Janu- 
ary I, 1902. His father was a Democrat and 
he adheres to that party, but was elected sheriff 
on the Fusion ticket. When his father died he 
inherited a portion of the old homestead. He 
and his mother are the joint owners of 260 
acres. She resides on the place, but the subject 
of this sketch superintends the business. On 
December 26, 1899, ^J". Farris was united in 
marriage with Ella A. Frahm. 



ETER SAMS', a retired citizen of 
Marietta precinct, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, whose portrait is shown 
herewith, has been a resident of that county 
since 1 87 1. Mr. Sams' was born in Austria, in 
1833. His father, Powell Sams', died when 
he was twenty-eight years old. 

Peter Sams' came to America in 1855. ^* 
settled in Wisconsin, where he followed rail- 
roading for some time. He then turned his 
attention to farming. In 1871 Mr. Sams' 
went west, to Nebraska, and invested in land. 
He bought 160 acres from William Brellar 
for $8.50 per acre. This tract was formerly 
owned by William P. Burns. In 1872 Mr. 
Sams' also purchased 80 acres in section 5 from 
Q. Clegg. He then busied himself in making 
improvements upon his property. He set out 
groves of shade trees, which now present a 
beautiful spectacle. Some of these trees are 
fifteen feet in circumference. He also has a 
very fine orchard. 

In 1882 Mr. Sams' built a comfortable 



dwelling. Two years later a fine barn was 
added. He afterward enlarged the dwelling 
house into a fine, spacious residence, convenient 
and modern in design. From 40 to 50 head of 
cattle are kept on the farm, and an equal num- 
ber of hogs. Mr. Sams' also raises some fine 
horses. 

He was joined in marriage with Theresa 
Rothauer, also a native of Austria. She 
crossed the ocean to become the wife of Mr. 
Sams'. Two children were born to them, 
namely : Leonore and Joseph. The former mar- 
ried Stephen Johns and is the mother of two 
children, Charlie and Ruth. Joseph is still at 
home and conducts affairs on the farm, which 
is valued at $50 per acre. 

Mr. Sams' is now spending his declining 
years with an exemption from toil which he 
justly deserves. In 1892 he was called upon 
to sustain the loss of his beloved wife, who 
died aged sixty-two years. Since then he 
has lived a retired life, while his son carries 
on the farm work. Although a member of the 
Catholic church, his ideas on the subject of 
religion are liberal. 



^-rp^ETER THULIN, a native of Sweden, 
11^ came to this country practically with- 
out means, and located in Nebraska. 
He homesteaded a piece of property in Saunders 
county, and by earnest and faithful work, to- 
gether with good management, he grew to be 
one of the most prosperous and extensive land 
owners of that county. 



182 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Peter Thulin was born in Christianstad, 
Sweden, in 1844, and is a son of Olof and Ce- 
celia (Person) Thulin. His father was a shoe- 
maker by trade, and followed it in his native 
country until he came to America. He first 
lived with his son for a time and then moved 
to Galesburg, Illinois, where he followed his 
trade until his death, at the age of sixty-seven 
years. He was the father of the following 
children: Nils, John, Peter, Swan, Andrew, 
Olof, and Ellen. 

Peter Thulin was a very bright boy and ob- 
tained a superior educational training in the 
schools of Sweden, after which he became a 
teacher in an academy. He subsequently 
studied civil engineering in the military col- 
lege, and then secured an excellent position 
with the government railroad in his profes- 
sional capacity. He had obtained a good start 
when he was approached by an American land 
agent, who gave exaggerated accounts of the 
United States, and the ease with which wealth 
could be acquired. With high hopes and a 
firm resolve to succeed, he came to this country 
with his young wife, Karin (Nelson). But 
many unlooked for difficulties arose, the most 
serious being his ignorance of the English lan- 
guage, which made it evident that his educa- 
tion would prove of little value to him for 
the time being. He located at Omaha, Ne- 
braska, and worked at any thing he could find 
to do; but his funds soon became exhausted. 
He then took a homestead in 1869, the prop- 
erty on which he now lives, and with his own 
hands built a sod house, the dimensions being 
16 by 16 feet, with one window and a door. It 



was located on the hill near the site of his 
present house. He immediately set to work 
with an energy which was bound to produce 
good results. It was very hard to make both 
ends meet at first, but he plowed up consider- 
able ground and also worked out for others, 
thereby making enough money to carry him 
over until he could realize the benefits of his 
own crops. He got along in a most successful 
manner, and in 1873 built a frame house, which 
is the main part of his residence; this he 
enlarged in 1880. He further enlarged it in 
1887, and in 1896 it was remodeled into a 
handsome home. When he first located he 
built a straw stable, in which he kept his only 
cow and horses, but he now has large and 
spacious farm buildings so necessary to every 
well conducted farm. He possesses a very fine 
orchard, and his place is well supplied with 
fine shade trees. His first property was a tract 
of 80 acres, to which he added 160 acres 
of adjoining railroad land. He then acquired 
the J. Mitchel farm of 80 acres, the J. J. Wood 
farm of 80 acres, 160 acres in Lancaster county, 
160 acres in Mariposa precinct, Saunders 
county, and then another 80-acre tract in Lan- 
caster county, making him one of the large 
land holders of his section. 

Mr. Thulin's first wife died at the age of 
twenty-six years, and their only child, Cecelia, 
died in infancy. He was again married, his sec- 
ond wife being Anna Foster, a daughter of R. 
Foster, of Sweden, and they are the parents of 
nine children, as follows, all of whom have been 
provided with a good education : Amanda, who 
is teaching school ;Tilla, a dressmaker : Herman, 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



133 



a physican and surgeon, of Omaha; Otto, de- 
ceased ; Alexander, a farmer ; Emma, deceased ; 
Anna, a trained nurse; Helen; and Esther. 
The subject of this sketch is a Democrat in 
politics, and has served on the school board 
for twenty years. Religiously, he is a 
Methodist. 



-jT^ROFESSOR SAMUEL M. HILL, 
IN*^ A. M., L. H. D., a gentleman of prom- 
fc. inence as an educator, has been presi- 

dent of Luther Academy, at Wahoo, Saunders 
county, Nebraska, since 1886. Under his direc- 
tion this school has taken high rank among 
similar academies and preparatory schools, hav- 
ing a wide range of studies in its curriculum 
and competent instructors at the head of each 
department. There are three distinct depart- 
ments — the commercial, musical, and normal — 
and there is a large enrollment in each. It is the 
only denominational institution of learning in 
the county, and is located in the northwest part 
of the city of Wahoo, on a lo-acre plot of land 
known as College Hill, which was donated by 
the city. Upon this there are three good build- 
ings — two of frame and one of brick. 

Prof. Hill was born in Sund, Sweden, Janu- 
ary 10, 1 85 1. He came to the United States 
with his parents in 1868, and first located at 
Paxton, Illinois. They then lived in Chariton, 
Iowa, for two years. The subject hereof was 
graduated from Augustana College with the 
class of 1879, after which he was assistant pro- 
fessor in Gustavus Adolphus College, at St. 
Peter, Minnesota, for three years. He was then 



engaged as Lutheran missionary in Utah for 
two years, and, in 1884, became a professor in 
Luther Academy, at Wahoo. He at once won 
favor as an instructor in that institution, and, 
in 1886, was elected its president, which posi- 
tion he has since filled in a most creditable man- 
ner. 

In 1882 Prof. Hill was joined in marriage 
with Julia Johnson, and they became the parents 
of seven children, as follows : Dorothea ; Cor- 
delia; Bernhard, deceased; Vendela; Elvida, 
deceased ; and Vincent and Vivian, twins. 

In 1886 the subject of this sketch received 
the literary degree of A. M., and, in 1900, the 
degree of L. H. D., from his alma mater, 
Augustana College, at Rock Island, Illinois. 



ENRY F. DUERRBAUM, a promi- 
nent farmer of Union precinct, Saunders 
county, Nebraska, is a native of Ger- 
many. He was born in Hofgeismaer, Hessen- 
Nassau, in 1S39. He is a son of John and Wil- 
helmina (Flotho) Duerrbaum. The father of 
Henry F. was a cooper by trade, and the latter 
learned the same trade by working with his 
father. 

In 1864 Mr. Duerrbaum came to America, 
settling in Newark, New Jersey, where he 
worked in a brewery. Subsequently he went 
west to Illinois, and, still later, to Omaha, Ne- 
braska. In 1 87 1 he purchased 80 acres of land 
in Union precinct, Saunders county, Nebraska. 
This is the same farm upon which he still lives. 
Forty acres of it was railroad land, and cost 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



$4 per acre. The other 40 acres had been set- 
tled upon, and cost $5 per acre. Upon this lat- 
ter 40 acres his residence stands. Philip Thom- 
as first owned the land, which was a wild tract 
with no trees or fences. 

Mr. Duerrbaum built a small frame house, 
14 by 26 feet, and a pole and straw barn. In 
1874 he moved upon the place, and has since 
added 80 acres to it. This addition was pur- 
chased from John F. Hayes, and was first set- 
tled by Stephen Lindenfeller. A large number 
of shade trees of all kinds, including apples, 
plums, pears, peaches and cherries, were set 
out by Mr. Duerrbaum. Grapes and small 
fruits were also set out in abundance. 

In 1885 the house was enlarged and remod- 
eled into a handsome modern residence. Two 
years later a large barn, 40 by 48 feet, was built, 
and also corn-cribs and other smaller buildings. 
This fine farm with its many buildings and 
shade trees in the center is a pleasing sight to 
look upon and attracts the eye for many miles. 
All this is but the fruit of the toil of both Mr. 
and Mrs. Duerrbaum. They have 40 head of 
choice cattle and the same number of hogs. 

The subject of this sketch married Julia Mer- 
tens, a daughter of William and Wilhelmina 
(Werths) Mertens. Mrs. Duerrbaum was born 
in Obernau, Germany. Her parents came to 
the United States in 1865. They settled on a 
farm in Cass county, Nebraska. Mr. and Mrs. 
Duerrbaum have two children living, both of 
whom are daughters, namely : Wilhelmina Au- 
gusta, a teacher in the Yutan school, and Julia 
Henrietta, who is still at home. They lost their 
only son in infancy. Mr. Duerrbaum is a 



staunch Republican. He has served two years 
as assessor and about fifteen years as a member 
of the school board. Both he and his wife are 
members of the Reformed church and are 
highly esteemed as citizens. 



Y^T GILKESON, who has attained nota- 
IPI ble success in the practice of law, is 
vi — now serving his second term as 
county attorney of Saunders county, Nebraska. 
He was born in Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, January 14, 1853, and is a son of James 
and grandson of Andrew Gilkeson. 

Andrew Gilkeson, grandfather of the subject 
hereof, spent most of his life as a farmer, in 
Allegheny and Washington counties, Pennsyl- 
vania. James Gilkeson was born in Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, where he was reared and 
educated. He also adopted the occupation of a 
farmer and followed it throughout his life. He 
moved to Saunders county, Nebraska, in 1884, 
where he died in 1897 at the age of eighty- four 
years. 

H. Gilkeson, the gentleman whose name 
heads this sketch, received an excellent educa- 
tional training. He attended a Baptist college 
at Des Moines, Iowa, and, in 1870, went to 
Nebraska. He soon after returned to Des 
Moines and again entered college, but later 
matriculated in the State University of Iowa, 
at Iowa City. He again went to Nebraska, in 
1874, locating in Sarpy county, and there 
taught school until 1879, 3t the same time pur- 
suing the study of law. He was admitted to 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



the bar in 1878, and elected to the office of jus- 
tice of the peace in 1879. In the latter year 
he moved to Saunders county, settling in 
Wahoo, where he has since lived. In 1881 he 
was elected county judge for a term of two 
years and served with satisfaction to all. He 
was elected county attorney in 1896, and in 
1898 was re-elected, being the present incum- 
bent of that office. Politically he is a firm sup- 
porter of the Democratic party, but in his last 
election he was the candidate of the Fusionists. 
Mr. Gilkeson has also served many years as a 
member of the school board. He has filled all 
offices to which he has been chosen with credit 
to himself and honor to his constituents. 

In 1880 the subject of this sketch was united 
in marriage with Alice E. Flor, a daughter of 
John C. Flor, of Fremont, Nebraska. 



TT^HARLES H. ADAMS, an enterprising 
I Jj and progressive citizen of Wahoo, Saun- 

^^— ^ ders county, Nebraska, was appointed 
superintendent of the Wahoo waterworks in 
1890, and has filled that position very credita- 
bly ever since. The Wahoo waterworks were 
built by the American Waterworks & Guarantee 
Company of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, at a cost 
of $65,000, and are still owned by them. 

The Wahoo waterworks are considered 
among the best in the state, and were ready for 
operation in January, 1888. Four streams can 
be thrown at the same time from a one-inch 
nozzle to the height of one hundred feet. The 
main building is a brick structure, 35 feet wide 



by 58 feet long. The adjoining coal shed is 30 
feet wide by 40 feet long. The plant is 
equipped with two 30-horsepower engines and 
two 40-horsepower boilers. 

The supply of water is obtained from wells 
on the bank of the Wahoo Creek, at the south- 
western part of the city. The water is supplied 
to the city by direct pressure. Besides two 
public fountains the city has 41 hydrants, and 
water is furnished to 276 business places and 
residences. The plant is a model of neatness. 

Mr. Adams was born in Rotherham, Eng- 
land. He was reared and schooled in his native 
country, where he remained until he attained 
the age of eighteen years. He then came to the 
United States, landing in New York City, 
where he followed the trade of an architect for 
some time. Subsequently he spent several 
years in the Southern and Western states and 
afterwards returned to England. But America 
possessed charms for him and in the United 
States he again took up his residence. In 
March, 1869, he went to Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, and took up a homestead claim about 
one-half mile from the present site of Wahoo. 
After putting up some buildings and otherwise 
improving his land he sold it. The same farm 
is now owned by Abel Leese. In those early 
days the city of Wahoo was unheard of, and 
Mr. Adams shot antelopes where it is now 
located. 

After he had been engaged in farming in that 
vicinity about eight years, Wahoo was founded, 
and the subject of this sketch removed there, 
erecting a building 24 by 24 feet upon the same 
ground occupied later by the old Opera House. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



In this building Mr. Adams started the first 
furniture store in the place and conducted busi- 
ness there for three years. He then sold out 
and took another trip to Europe, combining 
business with pleasure. Upon his return to 
America he followed farming one year, but 
discontinued that occupation to accept a position 
as assistant cashier in the State Bank with W. 
H. Dickinson. 

Three years later Mr. Adams again estab- 
lished a furniture store, this time on the corner 
of Fourth and Linden streets. He carried on 
a successful business there for three years, and 
then purchased an elevator on the Fremont, 
Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad, and em- 
barked in the grain and live stock business. 
This occupied his time for three years, or until 
1890, when he was appointed to his present im- 
portant position as superintendent of the Wa- 
hoo waterworks. 

Mr. Adams married Mary Jane Dickinson, 
who was a native of England, and was reared 
in the same vicinity where Mr. Adams also 
grew up. Her father was John Dickinson. 
Seven children blessed this union, viz : John C, 
Hubert A., Percy, Wilhelmina, Florence, Mar- 
jorie, and Pauline. The eldest son is an en- 
gineer of the waterworks at Wahoo. He mar- 
ried Annie Hughes. The second son is also an 
engineer, while Florence and Percy both fol- 
low the profession of teaching. 

In politics Mr. Adams is a Republican. He 
unites with his family in worshiping at the Epis- 
copal churcli. He has been active in building 
up the city of Wahoo, and has dealt quite ex- 
tensively in real estate. He has built several 



fine residences, each of which he sold and there- 
by added to his bank account. His present resi- 
dence is a model of neatness and convenience. 
Such citizens as Mr. Adams have not only as- 
sisted the growth of Wahoo, but have made 
Stocking precinct what it is today. 



f"^INCENT L. HAWTHORNE, a 
prosperous attorney-at-law, has been lo- 
cated at Wahoo, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, since June, 1885. He is a general 
favorite in Stocking precinct, and is regarded 
as one of the leading attorneys of the county. 
Mr. Hawthorne is a son of Samuel J. Haw- 
thorne and grandson of William Hawthorne. 
The last named was a native of the north of 
Ireland and was of Scotch-Irish descent. On 
coming to America he settled in Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, about 1784, and was a 
pioneer in that county. In 1809 he went to 
Jefferson county, Ohio, and bought 300 acres 
of forest land in the northwest corner of the 
county. Most of this land he cleared, and made 
additional purchases, including a large brick 
residence. The residence is now owned by 
Oliver Hendon. Upon this farm William 
Hawthorne spent the remainder of his life. 
Samuel J. Hawthorne also spent the greater 
part of his life there. They were both known 
as progressive farmers of their day. Later in 
life Samuel J. Hawthorne moved to Harrison 
county, Ohio, where he died. 

Vincent L. Hawthorne was born forty-one 
years ago in Jefferson county, Ohio. He at- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



tended the public schools of Mount Pleasant, 
and subsequently graduated from Franklin 
College at New Athens, Ohio. Having decided 
to fit himself for the profession of law, he ac- 
cordingly became a student under Hon. Loren- 
zo Danford, of St. Clairsville, Ohio. After 
three years of hard study he was admitted to 
the bar, June 3, 1884. During this time he had 
taken but one vacation, and then he had made 
an extended trip through the Southern and 
Western states. He was so favorably im- 
pressed with various places, especially in the 
West, that he decided to locate in that region 
when he had finished his law studies. 

Soon after his admission to the bar, much to 
the regret of hosts of friends, he packed his 
trunk and started west, not knowing exactly 
where he would settle. He visited various 
places, and finally went to Hastings, Nebraska, 
where he arranged some property afifairs for 
friends in the East. The same business also 
called him to Grand Island, Nebraska. While 
there he met W. H. Stoddard, who was also 
seeking a location. They finally decided to 
settle in Wahoo, Nebraska, which was one of 
the most progressive towns they had visited. 
Opening an office, they began practice together, 
but continued for a short time only, as Mr. 
Stoddard went east and is now in Buffalo, New 
York. 

Mr. Hawthorne continued practice alone and 
in a comparatively short time his ability and 
shrewdness had established for a him a good 
business. His practice has ever been on the 
increase and his winning ways have gained for 
him many friends. He was elected city attor- 



ney of Wahoo, on the Republican ticket, and 
served three years. 

Mr. Hawthorne married Jessie M. Reid, a 
daughter of Rev. David Reid, a Presbyterian 
minister. Mrs. Hawthorne was reared in the 
same vicinity as her husband. They have two 
promising sons — Raymond L. and Herbert R. 
The subject of this sketch is prominently con- 
nected with many fraternal organizations. Be- 
fore leaving St. Clairs\'ille, Ohio, he took de- 
grees in the F. & A. M., R. A. M. and the K. T. 
After locating in the West he obtained a demit 
and his membership was transferred to lodges 
in his own locality. He assisted in instituting 
the chapter in Wahoo, and joined the Knights 
Templar of Fremont, Nebraska. He served 
as high priest of the latter and in various other 
offices. He also affiliates with the Knights of 
Pythias, the Woodmen of the World and the 
A. O. U. W. He has served in minor offices of 
the last named organization. 

Mr. Hawtnorne is also chairman of the coa 
grOBsional committee and is quite a political 
leader. In his profession he is not excelled by 
any one in Saunders county. Among those 
who have studied law in his office are attorneys 
J. Yager and Kert Perkey, both well known as 
men of ability. 



M. BENNETT, a prosperous farmer, 
of Rock Creek precinct, Saunders county, 
•Nebraska, was born July 24, 1848, in 
Ritchie county. West Virginia, and is a son of 
Patrick and Nancy (Smith) Bennett. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Patrick Bennett was from Vermont and after 
his marriage moved to West Virginia. In the 
fall of 1865 he moved with his family to 
Davis county, Iowa, where he was engaged in 
farming until the spring of 1872, when he 
moved to Saunders county, Nebraska. He 
homesteaded 80 acres in section 22, town- 
ship 13, range 6, and afterward bought 
80 acres in section 23, upon 40 acres 
of which Mr. Lambert's home is now 
located. It was Burlington & Missouri River 
Railroad land, and Mrs. Bennett still owns the 
other 40 acres, upon which she lives, but spends 
some months of each year in visiting in the 
East. Mr. Bennett is now deceased. Their 
children were as follows : William, Celestia 
A., Mrs. Lambert, Armeda A. (Beelan), Hen- 
i-ietta (Evans), Euphrasia (Hagerman), Ida 
(Sidwell), John, and F. M. 

William Bennett served in the army 
during the Civil War, went to Saunders 
county, Nebraska, from Davis county, Iowa, 
in 1 87 1, and owns a comfortable home farm in 
the southern part of Rock Creek precinct, which 
was patented by Mr. March. He married 
Sarah E. Ethel, a daughter of Benjamin Ethel, 
and they have seven children : Arthur, a book- 
keeper of Lincoln, who married Ellis Sears; 
Oliver, David F., Marietta (Scanlon), of Cer- 
esco, Nebraska; Lucy E., Estella, and J. E. 
Celestia A. is deceased. Mrs. Lambert's hus- 
band's life is recorded elsewhere in this work. 
Armeda A. is Mrs. Beelan, of Rock Creek pre- 
cinct. Henrietta is the wife of Alfred Evans, 
of Rock Creek precinct. Euphrasia is Mrs. 
Hagerman, of Rock Creek precinct. Ida is 



Mrs. Sidwell, who lives with her father-in-law 
in Iowa. John, deceased, lived in West Vir- 
ginia, and F. M. is the subject of this writing. 

F. M. Bennett worked in a saw mill for some 
years, in Iowa, and in the spring of 1872 moved 
to Saunders county, Nebraska, with his father, 
homesteading the west half of the northeast 
quarter of section 22, where his home is now 
located. He was married in 1879, ^^^ then 
built a small house, 10 by 14 feet, on a knoll 
south of his present house, hauling the lumber 
from Lincoln. He afterward added a larger 
part to it, which is now used as a granary. In 
1883 '1^ built his present house, which is L- 
shaped and has one and a half stories, the main 
part being 14 by 24 feet. In 1898 he built an ad- 
dition, 18 by 12 feet. He used a sod barn for 
one year and then built a barn 24 feet long with 
a thatched roof. In 1894 he built his present 
barn, 32 by 36 feet, and a granary, 10 by 16 
feet, with 8-foot posts, together with other out- 
buildings. His home is surrounded by a four- 
acre grove of willows and cottonwoods, and he 
also has a large orchard. He has a good well 
and wore out one mill, which was replaced re- 
cently by a new one. He is engaged in general 
farming, and raises about 100 hogs yearly, hav- 
ing Poland-China hogs and Shorthorn cattle of 
high grade. He has good horses of English 
Shire stock. His place is highly improved and 
in excellent condition. He is a man of good 
business ability and strict integrity, and is 
everywhere held in the highest esteem. 

In 1879 Mr. Bennett was united in marriage 
with Rachael Miller, a daughter of Sebastian 
Miller, who was an early settler of Saunders 







MR. AND MRS. LAVE IS.'^.ACSON. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



county, and they are the parents of three chil- 
dren : Ada, who went through school and is a 
dressmaker at Wahoo; Mary Alice, who lives 
at home, and Charlie L., who also lives at home. 
Politically the subject of this sketch is a Popu- 
list and serves on the school board. Religiously 
he is a member of the First Baptist church, and 
his oldest daughter is a Methodist. He assists 
in sustaining the Methodist church, whicli is 
located near his father's first farm. 



AVE ISAACSON, who is now living in 
retirement in his beautiful home in 
Malmo, Saunders county, Nebras- 
ka, was the first Swedish settler of that locality 
and was engaged in agricultural pursuits in 
Mariposa precinct for many years. 

Mr. Isaacson was born in Sweden in 1839, 
and is a son of Isaac and Chaste (Laveson) 
Nelson, being the oldest of four children, as 
follows: Lave, the subject hereof; Margaret, 
deceased; Peter, who died at Galesburg, Illi- 
nois; and Ellen, who also died in America. 
Lave Isaacson came to America in 1868, and 
for one year was located at Omaha, Nebraska, 
where he was employed in the Union Pacific 
Railroad shops. On April 5, 1869, he arrived 
in Saunders county and homesteaded the south 
half of the southwest quarter of section 8, 
township 15, range 6. About fifty others filed 
claims at the same time, but he was the first 
of the Swedish settlers to locate there, being 
about three weeks ahead of Mr. Ekdahl. He 
immediately set about breaking the sod and, 



about two years later, erected a large frame 
house, the only frame house at that time for 
many miles around. He hauled the lumber 
for it from Fremont, Nebraska, under great 
difficulties, fording the Platte River or patron- 
izing the ferry, and these trips made the house 
a very expensive one. He lived upon the old 
homestead for thirteen years, and then sold 
out to Peter Hanson, deceased, whose son still 
owns the place. The land was sold at that 
time for $22 per acre. He then purchased 
120 acres of railroad land, including the east 
half of the northwest quarter of section 11, 
township 15, range 6, and the northwest quar- 
ter of the southeast quarter of the same sec- 
tion. It was a slightly improved farm and 
had a few shade trees, and also a good stream 
of running water supplied by springs. He 
greatly improved the farm in every respect, 
setting out an orchard of three acres of all 
kinds of fruit, and building a large and sub- 
stantial eleven-room house. He also built a 
1:)arn. 24 by 40 feet, and other necessary out- 
buildings, including cattle sheds and a granary. 
He left the farm in 1885, and spent the sum- 
mer of that year in the old country, and upon 
returning, he located at Wahoo, and engaged 
in the implement business. There he con- 
tinued for two years, after which he returned 
to his farm and conducted it until 1891. Since 
that time his adopted son has had charge of it. 
Mr. Isaacson is living, virtually, a retired life, 
although he buys and ships some stock. He is 
a good business man and has always handled 
his afifairs in a most successful manner. He 
is a man of many pleasing characteristics, and 



142 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



enjoys the friendship and respect of a large cir- 
cle of acquaintances. 

Mr. Isaacson was united in marriage with 
Anna Sorenson, a daughter of Soren Ander- 
son. Her parents came to America, where 
they remained until their decease. Besides 
Mrs. Isaacson, they had the following chil- 
dren : Hannah (Johnson), who lives in Mari- 
posa precinct, and has two children, John and 
Annie; Andrew, who is deceased; and Nels, 
who is also a resident of Mariposa precinct. 
The subject of this sketch and his wife have 
an adopted son and daughter : Nils and Han- 
nah. Nils Isaacson was joined in marriage 
with Ida Nistrom, and they have two chil- 
dren, Lave and Edna; he is now upon the 
old home farm, and is a very successful busi- 
ness man. Hannah is at home. Lave Isaac- 
son is a Populist, in politics. He is a member 
of the Lutheran church. The town of Malmo, 
where his handsome residence is located, was 
first established in 1888, and Mariposa pre- 
cinct derived its name from Mary Posa, a 
daughter of one of the earliest settlers. A 
picture of Mr. and Mrs. Isaacson is shown on 
a preceding page. 



I ELS J. ANDERSON, the popular and 
leading photographer of Wahoo, Nebras- 
'ka, is an artist of considerable skill. 
His studio is located at the corner of Fifth 
street and Broadway. He has fine parlors and 
operating rooms there, and employs two assist- 
ants. His works are found in most of the 



homes of Wahoo and vicinity. His success 
both in cabinets and enlarged photographs has 
been unqualified, and he has received various 
prizes in contests. All has not been smooth 
sailing for our subject, however, as he has ex- 
perienced his quota of discouragements. But 
he surmounted difficulties and obtained new 
starts, allowing no calamity to dissuade him 
from his determination to be the leading pho- 
tographer of Wahoo. 

Mr. Anderson was born in Onnestad, Swe- 
den. His father, John Anderson, came to 
America and located in Omaha, Nebraska. He 
had formerly followed agricultural pursuits. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Hannah 
Swenson, is still living, and resides in Omaha. 

Nels J. Anderson was joined in marriage 
with Sophia Nelson Carlson, a daughter of 
Nelson P. Carlson, of Kalmar, Sweden. 
Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have three children: 
Hildur J., wife of Ed Killian, of Wahoo; Ar- 
thur L., who is his father's assistant, and Nels 
Rudolph, a student. 

Mr. Anderson attended school in his native 
country. In 1869 he came to America, settling 
in Princeton, Illinois, where he followed farm- 
ing for some time. He then went to Omaha, 
Nebraska, and became a student of photog- 
raphy under E. L. Eaton. In 1879 he went to 
Wahoo and built a studio on Linden street. 
There he began the pursuit of his chosen call- 
ing, and having served under a superior in- 
structor he was soon able to establish a fine 
trade. He was the third artist to locate in 
Wahoo, Mr. Benjon being the first and J. B. 
Sturdevant the second. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



143 



In a short time after settling in Wahoo, Mr. 
Anderson was enabled to purchase the business 
of Mr. Sturdevant, and for some time con- 
ducted two photograph galleries. Later he sold 
one of these to Mrs. Perkey. Soon afterward 
the fire fiend paid him an unwelcome visit. The 
building he occupied was burned to the ground 
and he sustained heavy losses. Although some- 
what discouraged, he did not give up, and was 
soon able to see what course was best to pursue. 
He repurchased the gallery previously sold to 
Mrs. Perkey, which is the same now occupied 
by him. He has enjoyed an excellent patron- 
age ever since, which goes to prove that his 
works possess real merit. 

Mr. Anderson is in sympathy with the Re- 
publican party. He is a member of the I. O. 
O. F. organization, of which he is a past grand. 
He also belongs to the Rebecca encampment 
and to the Modern Woodmen of the World. 
The subject of this sketch has a fine residence, 
which he built on Tenth street. He located in 
Wahoo twenty-one years ago and is among the 
most popular citizens of the place. 



m. 



STILLMAN HILLS, a gentleman 
.who bears an honorable record for 
• service in the Civil War, is a prom- 
inent representative of the agricultural class of 
citizens of Saunders county, Nebraska, owning 
large landed interests in Mariposa precinct. 

Mr. Hills was born near Marengo, Illinois, 
in 1840, and is a son of Calvin and Anisteen V. 
(Mead) Hills. His father was a native of Ver- 



mont and his mother of New York. The sub- 
ject hereof is one of nine children born to his 
parents, as follows: F. M., M. Stillman, E. J., 
Ann Amelia, L. J., Helen E., John F., Walter, 
and Phebe. F. M. married Mary E. Allen and 
lives in Villa Grove, Colorado. He has three 
children, Ina, Izzie, and Calvin; two others 
died. He is a well-to-do ranchman and mining 
expert. M. Stillman is the subject of this 
sketch. E. J., who is interested in mining at 
Poncha Springs Colorado, married Emma 
Sprague and has six children : Willie, Estella, 
Jessie, Helen, Lora, and Everill. Ann Amelia 
married F. L. Dodge, a retired editor of Col- 
grove, California, a suburb of Los Angeles. 
They have two living children: Mrs. Susie 
Bryan, a widow, and Eva Dodge. L. J., living 
at Marengo, Illinois, is a dealer in agricultural 
instruments. He married Anna Pringle, by 
whom he had two children: Roy and Edna 
(deceased). Helen E. married R. G. White, of 
Hanford, California, who is a ranchman and 
also interested in the sale of gasoline engines. 
They adopted a daughter, Margaret. John 
F., of Centralia, Wisconsin, is engaged in farm- 
ing; he married Helma Anderson, and they 
have five children : Harry, Clarence, Helen, 
Clifford, and Gusta. Walter and Phebe died in 
childhood. 

M. Stillman Hills was reared on a farm and 
received his educational training in the district 
schools of Illinois. He was just past twenty- 
one years old when he enlisted, in August, 1862, 
in the 95th Regiment, Illinois Vol. Inf. He 
served three years in the Western Army, being 
under General McPherson, in the 17th Army 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Corps, and under General A. J. Smith, in the 
1 6th Army Corps. He participated in many 
of the most prominent battles fought along the 
Mississippi River, including that of Vicksburg. 
Upon returning home in 1865, he learned the 
harness-maker's trade, at which he worked for 
five years. In June, 1870, he removed to Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, filed a claim, and, one 
year later, homesteaded the south half of the 
north half of section 2, township 15, range 6, 
exercising his soldier's right. E. P. Grover, a 
partner of Mr. Hills, filed a claim on the north 
half of the north half of section 2, and together 
they built a house in the corner of their four 
"eighties." They lived together one year, and 
then Mr. Hills sold out his interest in the house 
and built, on the present site, a house 14 by 20 
feet, the boards of which ran up and down and 
were banked up with sod. When he began 
farming in Nebraska he had but a team of 
horses, an old wagon and $1 25 in money. Dur- 
ing the second year there his best horse was 
killed by lightning. He worked the first fall in 
a grist mill, making $50, and thus had the $100 
necessary to buy lumber at Fremont for erect- 
ing a new house, which his wife papered with 
newspapers. He also built a sod stable and later 
on purchased three 40-acre tracts of the 
Green claim. He set out his first forestry in 
the spring of 1871, and now has an elegant 
grove and a fine row of trees along the west 
front of the farm. In 1872, or 1873, he set out 
50 or 75 fruit trees, which he got at 
Greenwood, and thus started his fine orchard. 
In 1889 he built his present fine home, the main 
part being x6 by 24 feet and 16 feet higli, and 



the wing 14 by 24 feet and 9 feet high, with a 
summer kitchen 8 by 1 2 feet. The barn, which 
is one of the finest in the county, was built in 
1890. Its dimensions are 30 by 50 feet, and it 
is most conveniently arranged and nicely 
painted. The old house is now utilized as a hog 
house. In 1884 he erected a good windmill and 
milkhouse, and he has a good well 80 feet deep. 
A great transition has taken place in the land 
since Mr. Hills located upon it, and what was 
then a wild and bleak prairie is now an ex- 
ceptionally well-improved farm. There were 
formerly many sloughs and springs, but they 
have been dry for the past ten years. The farm 
is devoted to grain and stock raising, and its 
owner has some fine grade Shorthorn cattle. 
He is a very prominent man in his section, and 
has been called upon to serve the public in vari- 
ous capacities. He was elected county commis- 
sioner in the winter of 1880 and served three 
years. He was also township assessor one year, 
and has been on the school board almost con- 
tinuously from the first organization. In poli- 
tics he is a stanch Republican. 

Mr. Hills was united in marriage in 1867 
with Hattie DeGroat, who was born in Illinois 
and is a daughter of Patrick and Lucy (Smith) 
DeGroat. They have one son, Frank J., who 
was born in Illinois in 1868. They adopted an 
infant, Edith Estelle White, when she was three 
months old, and she died at the age of two 
years. Frank J. Hills now owns a part of the 
home farm — the west half of the northeast 
quarter of section 2 — making his home with his 
father. Frank J. married Adele Tawney, who 
was born in Pennsylvania and is a daughter of 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



John E. Tawney. They have three children: 
Alta E., George S., and Ray H. Religiously 
the family are Methodists. 



OHN LINDBLAD, of Oak Creek pre~ 
cinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, in 
which he owns considerable land, is ex- 
tensively engaged in general farming and stock 
raising and in also buying and selling cattle and 
hogs to quite an extent. 

He was born in the southern part of Sweden 
and is a son of Olof and Annie (Gibson) Lind- 
blad. His mother died in Sweden, and his 
father afterward came to this country, locating 
in Bradford, Stark county, Illinois. Olaf Lind- 
blad lived two years in Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, and then returned to Illinois, where he 
died in 1894. He was the father of five children, 
as follows: John, subject of this writing; Nels, 
who died in Sweden when young, being an ex- 
pert painter and having also attained honors 
as an athlete; Ella, who is an artist of recog- 
nized ability, with headquarters in Chicago, 
where she is manager of an institution for chil- 
dren; Andrew, who has a family of five chil- 
dren, and is in the windmill business in Illinois, 
and Olof, a farmer in Illinois, married to an 
American girl. 

John Lindblad spent three years in Sweden 
in learning the tailor's trade. He was con- 
firmed in the Lutheran church at the age of 
fifteen years and then went to Denmark, where 
he spent three years as coachman for one of its 



aristocratic families. He came to America in 
1870 and located at Princeton, Bureau county, 
Illinois, where he worked by the month on 
farms for some years. He then started into 
farming on his own account and continued 
there for a period of four years. He was united 
in marriage with Christina Pearson, a daughter 
of Nels Pearson, an old settler in Illinois, who 
moved to Saunders county, Nebraska, with 
John Lindblad. He located in Saunders county 
in the spring of 1880, and purchased a quarter 
section of land in section 21 from the railroad 
company. He built a house, 16 by 24 feet, erect- 
ed a barn and made other improvements ; he re- 
sided there for one year, when he moved to 
section 27. He purchased the southwest quarter 
of section 27 from Charles Hoover, who is now 
in California, for $18 per acre, and, two years 
later, refused an offer of $40 per acre. He has 
made practically all the improvements on the 
place and still resides there, having one of the 
best improved farms in the county. In addi- 
tion to this he rents a quarter section from 
Fred Olson, of Swedesburg. He tore down 
the first house upon his place and built one 16 
by 24 feet, to which he added 18 by 26 feet in 
the spring of 1892. He built a barn 40 by 46 
feet in 1893, together with a corn-crib and oth- 
er necessary outbuildings. He set out a row of 
trees, making a lane leading in to the house 
from the east. He set out cottonwood trees and 
also an orchard with a large variety of fruit. 
Besides these there are a large number of nat- 
ural trees along Oak Creek, which drains the 
farm. He raises grain and stock, raising about 
100 hogs per year, and buys and feeds both cat- 



146 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



tie and hogs. He has been a very industrious 
man and success has crowned his efforts. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lindblad are parents of three 
children: Nannie, who attended Peru High 
School and has been a teacher for the past four 
years; Ella, who lives at home, and Mabel, 
aged fourteen years. In politics he is a Populist 
and has served on the school board a number 
of years. In religious views he is Lutheran. 
Fraternally he is a member of Valparaiso 
Lodge, No. 1,431, M. W. A. 



T. NELSON, a gentleman who is 
most successfully engaged in general 
' farming and stock raising in Rock 
Creek precinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, 
was born in a district two or three miles north 
of Christianstad, Sweden, in 1853. 

Mr. Nelson is a son of Nels and Sisa (John- 
son) Nelson, who came to America one year 
before their son. They had four children: 
Hannah (Anderson) of Michigan City, Indi- 
ana; Nels, who married and lives in Boone 
county, Iowa; P. T., and Belle (Deal), of 
Kansas. 

P. T. Nelson has worked at farming from 
boyhood, and although he did not receive more 
than three months' schooling he has acquired 
a good practical education. He came to Amer- 
ica June I, 1869, and, having borrowed $14 
from a fellow passenger with which to pay his 
fare, went to Princeton, Illinois. He has since 
roughed it, sometimes successful, and often 
t)ther\vise, but today he takes rank among the 



most prosperous men of Rock Creek precinct. 
He was engaged in farming in Illinois until 
1874, and then went to Boone county, Iowa, 
where he was married. There he continued 
until 1880, when he went west to Kansas, and 
proved up on 160 acres in Jewell county. In 
1886 he went to Saunders county, Nebraska, 
buying 80 acres in section 32, township 14, 
range 6. He shortly afterward traded this for 
a livery barn in Weston, Nebraska, and, later 
still, traded the business to David W. Bowers 
for his present farm of 80 acres, — the west 
half of the northwest quarter of section 5, town- 
ship 13, range 6, valued at $2,500. He has 
made practically all of the fine improvements 
the place contains. To the original house, 14 by 
22 feet, he built in 1890 an addition, 14 by 20 
feet, and in 1889 built his present barn, 24 by 
32 feet. He set out trees and has a fine two-acre 
orchard with fruit of various kinds. The farm 
is well fenced, hog-tight, and the property is 
nicely divided into lots. Mr. Nelson is engaged 
in general farming and stock raising, and has 
been particularly successful in hog raising. He 
took the first prize on a load of hogs at a stock- 
men's exhibit in Omaha — winning a $75 Con- 
cord road-wagon. Besides the property he 
owns, he rents 160 acres of Hon. Thomas B. 
Reed and has 100 acres of it under cultivation. 
Mr. Nelson is a splendid example of thrift and 
enterprise. Overcoming his lack of educa- 
tional advantages, he has risen from the bottom 
to a place among the intelligent and well-to-do 
citizens of the district. 

The subject of this sketch was united in mar- 
riage with Anna Lind, a daughter of Eric Lind, 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



147 



who located in Saunders county, Nebraska, in 
1886, and owns an improved farm near Mr. 
Nelson's property. Mr. Lind is now well ad- 
vanced in years and rents his property. Four 
children blessed this union : Fred, who secured 
a diploma from the Fremont Normal School 
in the spring of 1900; Nettie, Edwin, and Ma- 
bel. Politically Mr. Nelson is independent and 
has served on the school board several years. 
He has been a director three years and was re- 
cently re-elected. He is a member of St. 
George Lodge, No. 95, K. of P., of Weston. In 
religious attachments, the family is Lutheran. 



H. NELSON, one of the representa- 
' tive farmers of Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, is extensively engaged in 
farming and stock raising in Rock Creek pre- 
cinct, where he owns about 480 acres of land. 
He has a beautiful home, located imposingly 
on a large knoll and commanding a fine view 
of the surrounding country. 

Mr. Nelson was born in southern Sweden, in 
1847, ^"<^ is a son of Nels and Hannah (Han- 
son) Pierson. His parents came to America 
in 1864 and located at Moline, Illinois. Both 
of them are deceased. They were parents of six 
children, as follows: P. H., the father of six 
children, is living a retired life in Illinois; El- 
len married a Mr. Nelson, a farmer in the 
southeast quarter of section 8, township 13, 
range 6 ; N. H., the subject hereof ; Anna (Lin- 
gren), of Princeton, Illinois; Andrew W., who 
lives at Marshalltown, Iowa, and has two chil- 



dren ; and Henry, overseer of shops at Pull- 
man, Illinois, who has a family of three chil- 
dren. 

N. H. Nelson was but seventeen years of age 
when his parents came to this country and lo- 
cated at Moline, Illinois, where he worked in 
the fan-mill shops. He moved to Cordova and 
then to Princeton, Illinois, where he was mar- 
ried. He engaged in farming there to some 
extent, and conducted a livery stable and bus 
line with unqualified success, being associated 
in business with Claus Anderson, to whom he 
sold his interest. On February 20, 1880, hav- 
ing about $1,100 in money, he went to Saunders 
county, Nebraska, and first bought a quarter 
section of railroad land, described as the north- 
west quarter of section 11, township 13, range 
6, for which he paid the B. & M. R. R. R. Co. 
$6.50 per acre. He procured lumber from Mr. 
Heaton, in Weston, and built his first house on 
the site of the present one, it being 16 by 24 feet 
and one story and a half. In 1885 he bought the 
southeast quarter of section 1 1 for $2,000, rent- 
ing it for a period of three years. In 1896 he 
bought the southwest quarter of section 12 from 
Mr. Larson, who had secured it from J. Raber. 
He built his present large and commodious 
house in 1893, the west part of it being 16 by 24 
feet and the L 20 by 16 feet, and one and a half 
stories high. In 1890 he built a barn 28 by 34 
feet, with all other necessary outbuildings and 
a windmill. In 1897 he erected a double corn- 
crib with a 12-foot driveway, having 9 feet on 
each side and being 40 feet long. In 1880, his 
first year upon the property, he set out some 
fruit trees, but they died. In 1883 he set out 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



105 trees with far better success, and also a 
catalpa grove of 1,500 trees. The latter were 
set four feet apart and cultivated like corn, and 
when he thinned them out he sold $75 worth — 
most of them going to Wahoo. He ships about 
a carload of fat cattle of his own raising each 
year, and also buys, feeds and sells extensively, 
shipping from Swedeburg • and Weston. He 
has 480 acres of land and is engaged mainly in 
stock raising. He is a very prominent man in 
the county and numbers his friends almost by 
his acquaintances. 

Mr. Nelson was united in marriage with 
Matilda Swedenburg. a daughter of Magnus 
Swedenburg, and they are the parents of nine 
children: Hattie, Henry, Hannah, Walter (de- 
ceased), Irwin, Edna, Oliver, Rosella (de- 
ceased), and one who died in infancy. All of 
those living are still at home. 



F. RUTTMAN, a gentleman who has 
^met with unusual success in the pursu- 
ance of that independent calling, 
farming, is a highly respected citizen of New- 
man precinct, Saunders county, Nebraska. 

Mr. Ruttman was born in Ottawa, La Salle 
county, Illinois, in 1855, and is a son of George 
and Mary (Retz) Ruttman. He is the young- 
est of six children, as follows : Mary, Barbara, 
John, Michael, Lena, and C. F. Mary is the 
wife of Mr. Howe, of Des Moines, Iowa, where 
he follows the trade of a blacksmith. He re- 
sided at Atlantic, Iowa, for some years, and has 
six children : George, Charles, Frank, William, 



Walter, and Lena. Barbara is Mrs. Langley, 
whose husband is a lumberman of Streator, 
Illinois. Her children are : Mary (deceased), 
Ella (Cline), Belle (Harrison), Florence 
(Redman), William, and Minnie. John is a 
farmer and stockman of Oklahoma. His chil- 
dren are: George, Pauline, Clara (deceased), 
and John. Michael and Lena are deceased. 

C. F. Ruttman spent his early life in Illinois 
upon a farm. After his marriage he farmed 
two years, and then followed the trade of a car- 
penter two years in Streator, Illinois. He went 
to Saunders county, Nebraska, in 1886 — taking 
two cows and three horses with him. He pur- 
chased the northwest quarter of section 33, 
township 14, range 5, from William Worley, 
who had homesteaded it — its only improvement 
being a house 16 by 24 feet. Mr. Ruttman as- 
sumed an indebtedness of $1,800, with interest 
at 12 per cent, and this he has paid up in full, 
which is greatly to his credit and indicates his 
general business ability. He built an addition to 
the house and in 1894 erected a barn 28 by 38 
feet, with a shed along one side, 38 by 18 feet, 
for stabling cows. In 1888 he set out many 
trees, including mulberry trees, around the 
north and west sides of the house, which now 
bear profusely. He set out an orchard of ap- 
ples, cherries, peaches, etc., and it is in excellent 
condition. He lias a large pasture of 65 acres 
on the east tract of 80 acres, through the 
entire length of which a living stream of water 
runs. He is engaged in raising grain and stock 
on a large scale, and buys and feeds some. He 
has been exceedingly fortunate in raising hogs, 
as they have suffered but twice from cholera in 




HOX. JOHN O. GOSS. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



fourteen years, which is due mainly to the 
cleanly way in which he cares for them. 

Mr. Ruttman was united in marriage with 
Julia Schoenleber, a daughter of Jacob Schoen- 
leber, who has visited, but never lived in, Saun- 
ders county. Seven children were born of this 
union, namely : Frank, William, Cora E., Nel- 
lie M., Etta (deceased), Carl E., and Hazel 
Marie. In religious views the family is Luth- 
eran, but Mr. Ruttman was raised as a 
"Friend." He is a member of Lodge No. 
151, F. & A. M., of Valparaiso, Nebraska, and 
Lodge No. 1,413, M. W. A., of Valparaiso. 
He and his wife belong to Eastern Star Lodge, 
of Valparaiso. 



YgT ON. JOHN Q. GOSS, whose portrait 
Ipl accompanies this sketch, is one of the 
V—' prominent pioneers who have been 
identified with the town of Bellevue and the 
state of Nebraska since the infancy of both, 
and not only in Sarpy county, but throughout 
this section of the state, he is known to possess 
those noble traits of character, strict integrity, 
manly honor, and generosity of soul, which 
render him a universal favorite. He is now 
the oldest member of the Sarpy county bar, 
and his wide learning and good judgment make 
him the leading man and lawyer of his profes- 
sion in Bellevue. He is a native of Somerset- 
shire, England, his birth having occurred 
March 8, 1827. He is a son of Charles Goss. 
John Q. Goss attended the schools of his 



native town until he was seventeen years of 
age, when he left his native country for the 
United States. Upon his arrival in New York 
City, he immediately went to Geneva, New 
York, where he spent the first two months on a 
farm. He then went to Trumbull county, Ohio, 
where he again attended school ; afterward, he 
spent much time in teaching. It was while 
he was engaged in teaching that he determined 
to take up law, and going to Mansfield, Rich- 
mond county, Ohio, he began studying with the 
law firm of Hartley & Burns. His training in 
that line was completed, however, in the office 
of Isaac Goss, and he was admitted to the bar 
in 1857. His brother. Rev. Charles C. Goss, 
was a Methodist missionary, engaged in estab- 
lishing Sunday schools in Nebraska at that 
time, having located in Bellevue, as early as 
1856, and having continued there until 1859. 
After Mr. Goss had practiced his chosen pro- 
fession, for two years, in Ohio, he joined his 
brother in Bellevue, and, in 1859, as the town 
then gave promise of a good future, he decided 
to make it his headquarters, and has continued 
to live there ever since. At that early date 
three other attorneys were located there, — 
Charles T. Holloway, the first to settle; L. L. 
Bowen, and Silas A. Strickland, all of whom 
are now deceased. When Mr. Goss decided 
to hang out his shingle at Bellevue, he pur- 
chased his present residence from a Mr. Sny- 
der, who was a tinner there, and he has lived 
on the same premises ever since. He is now 
the owner of block 125, and has considerable 
other property throughout the village. Mr. 
Goss has labored constantly and arduously for 



152 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



the upbuilding and advancement of his adopted 
town and state, for which he has won the re- 
spect and confidence of all who know him. 

Mr. Goss has been twice joined in marriage. 
His first union was with Mary Taylor, a daugh- 
ter of Samuel Taylor, who was born in Mercer 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1829. She died in 
1872, having had a family of six children, of 
whom the following three are still living : Mrs. 
Emma S. Thompson, who is the mother of one 
child, Lora; Charles C. ; and John Q., who is 
general agent for the Cebo Coal Company, of 
Montana. Mr. Goss' second union was with 
Rebecca J. Reed, a daughter of James Reed, 
of Clearfield, Pennsylvania. Politically, the 
subject of this sketch is a stanch Democrat, 
and his fellow citizens have honored him on 
more than one occasion. He was a member of 
the legislature in i860, 1861 and 1862, when 
Nebraska was a territory; he served one term 
as county attorney of Sarpy county; he was 
county clerk in 1867- 1868; county school su- 
perintendent, one term; and county examiner 
five terms. Although he had established a lu- 
crative practice, he nevertheless gave it up to 
join the Union army, in 1862, becoming a 
member of Company D, 2nd Regiment Neb. 
Vol. Cav., which served against the Indians 
in Dakota. He enlisted as a private, but came 
out as first lieutenant. He belongs to Dahl- 
gren Post, G. A. R. No. 56; is a member and 
past master of the Omaha Lodge No. i, F. & 
A. M. ; past grand chancellor and supreme rep- 
resentative of the K. of P. ; and past grand of 
the I. O. O. F. He belongs to the Episcopal 
church. 



ILS THOMPSON is one of the progres- 
sive farmers of Mariposa precinct, Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska. He is a na- 
tive of Sweden, where he was born in 1849 
and received his early schooling. His father 
died when Nils was very small, and he was 
raised by another family, being given the name 
of Thompson. 

Mr. Thompson early in life came to America, 
having borrowed sufficient money to make the 
voyage, and on July 4, 1866, he arrived in New 
York City. Having a brother-in-law at Gales- 
burg, Illinois, he immediately made his way to 
that place. During the following seven years 
he worked steadily in a furniture factory for 
W. H. Rankin, at Monmouth, Illinois. He 
then took a trip through Kansas and the Indian 
Territory, but he was not pleased with the coun- 
try and did not locate there. Having laid by a 
snug sum of money from his earnings, he 
moved to Saunders county, Nebraska, in 1876, 
and purchased for $600, from Mr. Truitson, 
who homesteaded it, 80 acres of land — the east 
half of the northwest quarter of section 6, town- 
ship 15, range 6. There was a small dug-out 
on the place, and in this he lived with his wife 
for three years, when he built a new house, 
12 by 20 feet, and also a new barn. Two years 
later he sold the property for $1,100 and imme- 
diately thereafter bought the northwest quarter 
of section 28, township 12, range 6, his present 
farm, for $2,300. There was a little old house, 
16 feet square, upon the property, in which he 
lived for three years, and it now serves the pur- 
pose of a chicken house. The little barn, with- 
out a roof, is still standing. In 1889 he built 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



153 



a large story and a half house, L-shaped — the 
dimensions being 1 6 by 36 feet, and 16 by 28 
feet. He built his new corn-crib in 1894 and 3 
new barn in 1896, having now a complete set of 
farm buildings, all conveniently arranged and 
of a character suitable for successfully carrying 
on his business. He has a fine grove and an or- 
chard of two acres, which he set out in 1886, 
also an acre of walnut, box elder and oak trees- 
using wood therefrom for fuel. A fine stream, 
supplied by springs, runs through the farm, and 
in 1891 he built a windmill and a milk-house. 
He has a tubular well, 112 feet deep, with a 
good vein of water. In 1894 he bought 40 acres 
— the southeast quarter of the northwest quar- 
ter of section 21, township 15, range 6 — paying 
$30 per acre therefor. He has made many and 
great improvements upon the property and it is 
considered one of the most valuable farms in 
the vicinity, the soil being well adapted to grain 
raising. 

Mr. Thompson was united in marriage in 
1874 with Josephine Olson, a native of Sweden, 
who had two sisters who also came to this coun- 
try, namely: Mrs. Swan Johnson, who lives 
in Phillips county, Nebraska, with her two chil- 
dren — Ebdul and Mary; and Mary, who died 
in 1897. Eleven children were born to the sub- 
ject hereof and his wife, as follows: Elvin, 
aged twenty-four years, who lives at home; 
Joseph A., who died in 1899; Minnie, Jennie, 
Fred, Ernest, Ella, Hattie, Edna, Bernice, and 
Jennie Louise, who died young. He has two 
sisters older than himself who live at Gales- 
burg, III. : Mrs. Sissa Stark, who is seventy-five 
years old, and Christine, who is unmarried. 



He was formerly a Republican in politics, but 
is now a strong supporter of the Farmers Alli- 
ance. He attends Mission church, one and a 
half miles north of Malmo, Nebraska. 



B. VAN DRIEL, a Hollander by birth, 
is 'an influential farmer of Mariposa pre- 
cinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, 
where he is a large land-owner. He is a man 
held in the highest esteem by his fellow citizens, 
and always takes an earnest interest in every- 
thing pertaining to the welfare of his commu- 
nity. 

Mr. Van Driel was born in the province of 
Gelderland, Holland, in 1838, and is a son of 
Alexander and Eva (Sterk) Van Driel. His 
father had eight children by his first wife, and 
three sons resulted from his union with Miss 
Sterk, as follows : Henry Van Driel, who died 
in Holland ; R. B. Van Driel, the subject of this 
sketch, and G. Van Driel, who died unmarried 
in Saunders county in 1895, leaving a large 
property. 

R. B. \^'in Driel was reared and schooled in 
Holland, and was engaged in the construction 
of railroads as a boss or contractor for many 
years .\fter his father and mother died he 
came to America in 1868, and after landing in 
New York City immediately went to Mus- 
catine, Iowa. He engaged in farming there for 
three years and in 1871 was married. His fath- 
er-in-law, Mr. Brugman, owned land in Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, and so Mr. Van Driel 
moved there and rented his farm for a year or 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



two. Afterward he bought the northwest quar- 
ter of section 15, township 15, range 6, which 
was railroad land, for which he paid $5 per acre 
with long-time payments. He had borrowed 
$200 to enable him to come from Iowa, and so 
was much indebted when he started. He broke 
70 acres of the raw prairie during the first year, 
and his father-in-law, according to his promise, 
built his first house, which was one story and a 
half high, the dimensions being 28 by 24 feet. 
He also constructed a rude board stable with a 
straw roof, with which they got along for the 
first few years. Other sheds and a granary and 
corn-crib were built in 1876. He erected a large 
barn, 36 by 56 feet, in 1889, which holds 40 
tons of hay, with ample room for horses and 
cattle. The lumber for his first house 
was hauled from Fremont, and as there 
were no bridges and the roads were 
bad, it was a very difficult trip to make. 
In 1 89 1 his present residence was built, the 
main part being 24 by 28 feet, 18 feet high, with 
a wing 22 by 16 feet in dimensions, and 12 
feet high. He planted an osage hedge, which 
was killed by the grasshoppers, and, in 1877, 
he replanted with willows, which he obtained in 
Iowa. He set out a large number of cotton- 
wood trees, obtaining slips from the island near 
Fremont, and planted a large walnut grove 
about his house. In thinning out along the 
lines, he has cut over 25 cords of wood, 
which he used for poles, fire-wood, etc. He has 
two good wells, 70 feet deep, from which 
the water is pumped by windmill. His holdings 
include the following property: three 40-acre 
tracts in the northwest quarter of section 12, 



the southwest quarter of the southwest quarter 
of section i ; 40 acres of school land in the 
southwest quarter of the southwest quarter of 
section 16 ; the east half of the southeast quarter 
of section 9, and the south half of the northwest 
quarter, and the north half of the southwest 
quarter, of section 10. He rents all but the 160 
acres upon which his fine home is located. 

Mr. Van Driel was united in marriage with 
Elizabeth Brugman, a daughter of John Brug- 
man, and they are parents of the following 
children : John A., born in 1873 > Eva T. ; Min- 
nie, deceased ; Lillian ; Henry, deceased ; Julia ; 
Minnie; Gertrude; Agnes; Louie H., and 
Josephine. The subject of this sketch was school 
director for sixteen years, and officiated as such 
in 1892, when the school was built at Malmo. 
He was justice of the peace one term, and pres- 
ident of the bank for several years, retiring in 
1897. He is a member of the Catholic church, 
and attends service at Pilsen, or Sand Creek. 
In politics, he is a Democrat. 



§OHN A. LIND, who has one of the most 
attractive farms in Saunders county, 
Nebraska, has been successfully engaged 
in agricultural pursuits jn Mariposa precinct 
since 1871. He was born in the south central 
part of Sweden in 1844, and is a son of Johan 
and Annie (Breita) Addolphs. His mother 
now lives with him, his father having died in 
Sweden. 

Mr. Lind was reared and mentally trained 
in Sweden, and, in 1869, came to America, hav- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



ing borrowed the money with which he secured 
his passage. He located in Illinois and fol- 
lowed farming for three years, and, in the fall 
of 1 87 1, went west to Omaha, Nebraska, where 
he worked as a car repairer until 1888. His 
brother-in-law, A. G. Larson, moved to 
Saunders county in 1870, and purchased 160 
acres of land, and, in 1871, the subject hereof 
bought the east half of the southeast quarter 
of section 3, township 15, range 6, from him, 
it being railroad land which sold for $4 per 
acre. In 1887, he purchased the 80 acres just 
north of this property, at $25 per acre, making 
him a nice farm of 160 acres. In 1887 he also 
built his house, the main part of which is 20 by 
30 feet, with a wing and kitchen measuring 20 
by 14 feet. He built a barn, 24 by 40 feet, with a 
shed on the west side, 16 feet wide, to shelter 
cattle and machinery. He built a hog shed 30 by 
28 feet in 1895, a separate cattle shed in 1897, 
and a double corn-crib, 30 by 24 feet, in 1899. 
After acquiring his first piece of property, he 
hired a man to break 18 acres, and immediately 
set about its improvement. At the present time 
he has one of the most highly cultivated farms 
in the country. There is a good running stream, 
supplied by springs, whose course is through 
his 40-acre pasture, and he has a bored well 60 
feet deep, with a windmill which he put up in 
1899. He was offered $45 per acre for the land 
in 1891, and he has since made many improve- 
ments at a great cost, thereby greatly enhancing 
its value. There is a fine driveway leading 
from the road through the orchard up to the 
house, and to the north is a grove of box elders 
affording protection to the house and barns 



from the northwest winds, and greatly beautify- 
ing the place. The premises include an orchard 
of one acre, consisting mainly of apples, cher- 
ries, prunes and peaches. The farm is well- 
fenced, and everything about it kept in the best 
of condition, a feature which has never failed 
to attract attention and favorable comment. 
Mr. Lind has managed his affairs well, and is 
now prepared to spend the remainder of his 
days free from the cares and worry of active 
business life, if he so chooses. 

The subject of this sketch was united in 
matrimony with Annie Larson, a sister of A. 
G. Larson, who owns an adjoining farm, and 
they became parents of four children : Annie, 
who lives at home; and Henry, Edward and 
another son, all of whom are deceased. In poli- 
tics Mr. Lind is a Republican, and served on 
the school board, from which he but recently 
resigned. He is a faithful member of the 
Swedish Lutheran church. 



§OHN DOLEZAL is one of the pioneer 
settlers who braved the terrors of the 
grasshopper, other insects, and drouth, 
to make a home in Saunders county, Nebraska, 
and his success is due to his perseverance and 
determination to win. He was born in Bo- 
hemia, in 1845, ^"'^ 's 'I son of James Dolezal, 
deceased. 

Mr. Dolezal located in Saunders county in 
1873, bringing with him his wife and oldest 
son, Joseph ; also his mother-in-law, who died, 
in 1894, aged eighty-four years. He had about 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



$370, which he immediately invested in land, 
buying three 40-acre railroad tracts, which 
lay in the southeast quarter of section 7. 
As he did not have enough money, he was 
obliged to borrow, for which loan he paid a 
heavy interest. In 1880 he took new time at 
$6 per acre, and, with a good crop in 1881, he 
succeeded in paying for one 40-acre piece. 
As his efforts were meeting with success he 
purchased in 1890 three more 40-acre tracts 
north from James Hutchinson's farm, for which 
he paid $37 per acre. In 1895 or 1896 he 
bought three more "forties" of the Cudy land, 
on which his son Frank is now farming. Farm- 
ing and stock raising are his chief pursuits, and 
he has succeeded in putting his farm into a fine 
state of cultivation, though for the first seven 
years his efforts met with poor success. In 
1889 he erected his present house, and in 1892 
he built a new windmill. He also has a fine 
orchard, and is recognized as one of the lead- 
ing and substantial farmers of his community. 
Mr. Dolezal was united in marriage with 
Anna Simrod, who was born in 1848, and had 
three sisters, as follows : Frances, deceased, the 
wife of Mr. Kudrna; Barbara, deceased, the 
wife of John Wondra; and Maggie, the wife 
of John Dibelka, of Omaha. The subject of 
this sketch has a brother and three sisters liv- 
ing : Joseph, who resides in Chicago ; Annie and 
Maggie, who are married and live in Bohemia ; 
and Mary, also a resident of Chicago. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Dolezal were born the following child- 
ren: Joseph, Frank, Charles, Richard, and 
William. Joseph received his schooling at 
Wahoo, Nebraska, and has been teaching school 



ever since he was seventeen years of age. 
Frank, who was born in the spring of 1874, 
married Mary Charf, a daughter of Anton 
Charf, an early settler of Newman precinct; 
they have two sons, Eddie and Emil. Charles 
was born in 1876, and lives at home. Richard 
is deceased. William, aged eighteen years, lives 
at home, assisting in the cultivation of the farm. 
In politics Mr. Dolezal is a Populist. He and 
his family are members of the Catholic church. 



7T^ARL R. GOUCHER, deputy county 
I J| clerk of Saunders county, Nebraska, is 

^ ' regarded as one of the rising young 

business men of that section. He was born in 
Plymouth, Indiana, April 16, 1874. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of 
Nashville, Michigan; Orville, Ohio, and Wa- 
hoo, Nebraska. 

Mr. Goucher sought a home in the West, 
coming to Wahoo in 1890. He has been a use- 
ful and industrious young man, following those 
pursuits which have brought him into constant 
contact with business men, who have justly 
shown their appreciation of his services. 

In 1893 ^t"- Goucher accepted a position as 
cashier in the store of Killian Bros. There his 
business ability and strict integrity won high 
favor, and he remained in their employ six 
years. 

On January i, 1900, Mr. Goucher was ap- 
pointed deputy county clerk of Saunders coun- 
ty, which position he now fills. It is safe to 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



predict that a bright future awaits him, and in 
the near future his services will receive a more 
substantial reward. Politically Mr. Goucher 
is found on the side of the Populist party. In 
his social relations he affiliates with the Knights 
of Pythias. 



rrs-jl ON. JOHN H. BARRY, of Saunders 
county, Nebraska, was born in Rockford, 
Winnebago county, Illinois, October 
7, 1868. He is a son of David Barry, who was a 
native of County Waterford, Ireland, and came 
to America when five or six years old, with his 
parents. They first located in Lawrence, Mas- 
sachusetts. From there they moved to Du- 
buque, Iowa. In that city his parents died. 

David Barry followed steamboating on the 
Missisippi River until 1868. He located in 
Rockford in 1865, and remained there until 
1877, when he moved to Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, and purchased a farm in Center pre- 
cinct. Agricultural pursuits occupied his time 
until January i, 1900, when he rented the farm, 
and now lives a retired life in Wahoo, Nebras- 
ka. He married Ellen Kearney, a native of 
County Kerry, Ireland. They reared three 
sons : John H., the subject hereof ; Frank W., 
now a student in the University of Nebraska 
at Lincoln, and Joseph D., a student in the 
academic department of the University of Ne- 
braska. 

John H. Barry received his primary educa- 
tion in the Wahoo High School, graduating 
with the class of 1890. He then studied law at 
the University of Nebraska, in the class of 1893. 



The same year he was admitted to practice in 
Lancaster county, before the supreme court. 
On August I, 1893, he began practicing his 
profession in Wahoo, and has remained there 
since. He has been uniformly successful in his 
law practice. In the fall of 1897 he was elected 
county judge of Saunders county, and was 
re-elected in the fall of 1899. His first election 
showed a majority of 366 votes, which was 
increased on his second election to 947. This 
incident shows that he is one of the most popu- 
lar men in the county, and it is said that he is 
the best judge the county ever had. He was 
elected by the Populist and Democratic parties. 
On September i, 1897, Judge Barry was 
joined in marriage with Julia L. Murphy, a 
daughter of John and Mary Murphy, of Cedar 
Bluffs, Nebraska. They have one daughter, 
Frances H. 



UST BRUSE, a prominent farmer of 
Mariposa precinct, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, has attained great success in 
pursuing his present occupation. He was pos- 
sessed of no means when he landed in this coun- 
try, but he has worked hard and industriously 
and grown to be one of the prosperous and sub- 
stantial men of his district. 

Mr. Bruse was born in Sweden in 1842, and 
is a son of Olof and Mary (Samuelson) Bruse. 
His father came to this country one year later 
than the son, in 1869, and located in Saunders 
county, Nebraska, where he homesteaded the 
east half of the southeast quarter of section 26, 
township 15, range 6. He had eight children. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Those living are: Gust; Emma, the wife of 
C. Nordhall, who has the farm east adjoining 
that of the subject hereof; Peter, who is mar- 
ried and also lives in Saunders county; and 
Hannah, who married John Person, of Omaha, 
a watchman for the Union Pacific Railroad 
Company, by whom she has four children: 
Amelia, John, Albert, and Vera. 

Gust Bruse came to America in May, 1868, 
and for nearly two years was employed in a 
saw mill in Michigan, after which he went west 
to Omaha. In 1870 he went to Saunders county, 
Nebraska, and homesteaded the north half of 
the northeast quarter of section 34, township 
15, range 6. He built a small house, 12 by 14 
feet, partly frame and partly dug-out, and 
shortly after bought 40 acres— the southeast 
quarter of the southeast quarter of section 27 — 
making a fine farm of 120 acres of well- 
improved land. He first had a sod stable, but 
replaced it with a straw barn, and in 1890 he 
built a new barn, 28 by 36 feet. The old part of 
his present home was built in 1879, and in 1893 
it was remodeled and an addition put on, 28 by 
18 feet, making a very comfortable home. He 
set out many cotton wood trees in 1872 and an 
orchard of about two acres in 1888 or 1889, 
and to-day he has a fine grove and an orchard 
which contains a large variety of fruit. He 
has 20 acres of the farm in pasture and is 
engaged in cattle raising. The farm is supplied 
with good outbuildings, is well fenced, and 
everything about the place bears an appearance 
of progress and prosperity — denoting careful 
management. 

In 1678 Mr. Bruse was united in marriage 



with Kate Nelson, who was born in Sweden 
in 1837 and is a daughter of Nels Abraham- 
son. She has two sisters and one brother, who 
came to this country with her in 1868, namely : 
Mary (Snowgren), who lives at Madrid, Iowa, 
and has four children, — Tilda, Albert, Char- 
lotte, and Aniil ; Anna, the wife of Louis Mat- 
teson, who lives in Minnesota and has three 
children, — Hannah, Mary, and Eric F. ; and 
Henry Nelson, who lives in California, is mar- 
ried and has a large family. The subject of this 
sketch and his wife have two sons living at 
home — Andrew and Charles. Their only 
daughter, Augusta, is deceased. The family 
attends the Mission church, one and a half 
miles north of Malmo. 



-r r" ^ J. SNYDER, of the firm of F. J. Sny- 
R der & Company, dealers in butter and 
• eggs, was born in Northampton county, 
Pennsylvania, May 19, 1837. He is a son of 
Thomas Snyder and grandson of Henry Sny- 
der. 

Henry Snyder was of Pennsylvania Dutch 
ancestry. He lived and died in Northampton 
county, Pennsylvania. His son Thomas Sny- 
der was born in Northampton county, where 
he was reared and educated. He learned the 
tanner's trade and followed it during the early 
part of his life. He married Lavina John, and 
afterward moved to Livingston county. New 
York, where he engaged in farming, and was 
very successful. Death came to him at the ripe 
age of eighty-six years. His wife died when 




THOMAS MADIGAN. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



163 



seventy years old. They reared a large and 
interesting faniil}-, namely : Harrison, Thomas, 
Jr., William, F. J. (the subject hereof), Le 
Grand, Clinton, James, and Charles. 

F. J. Snyder spent the first part of his busi- 
ness life in Livingston and Madison counties, 
New York, engaged in mercantile pursuits. 
In 1 88 1 he moved west to Fremont, Nebraska, 
and became connected with the Fremont Butter 
& Eggs Company. This was a new firm, and 
Mr. Snyder helped to build it up. He remained 
with the concern until 1887, ^vhen he located in 
Wahoo and engaged in business for himself, 
handling butter and eggs. 

In 1890 Mr. Snyder formed a partnership 
with J. C. Gruver, but bought him out two 
years later. H. K. White became a partner in 
Mr. Snyder's business in 1895, since which time 
they have operated under the firm name of F. J. 
Snyder & Company. 

The subject of this sketch was joined in mar- 
riage with Mary E. Cottrell. They have three 
children, named, respectively, Jessie, Arthur E., 
and Floyd W. Mr. Snyder is a strong Repub- 
lican, but not a politician. He has served one 
term as mayor of Wahoo. 



T-^ HOMAS MADIGAN is one of the 
best known farmers and stock dealers in 
the vicinity of Weston, Chapman pre- 
cinct, Saunders county, Nebraska. He was 
born in the state of Illinois, and is a son of John 
and Margaret (Kane) Madigan. His father 
was born in County Clare, Ireland, but, at an 



early day, came to America, where he lived un- 
til his death, in 1890. His family consisted of 
five sons and four daughters, as follows : Mary ; 
Mrs. Clements (deceased), whose husband was 
the proprietor of hotels at Red Cloud, Nebras- 
ka; John, (deceased); Michael; Robert, (de- 
ceased) ; Thomas; Margaret (Rosencrantz), 
of Lancaster county, Nebraska; James; and 
Kate. The two last named reside with their 
mother on the old homestead, — she having 
reached the advanced age of seventy years. 
John Madigan went, with his family, from the 
state of New York, where they had resided for 
some time, to Illinois, in the early "sixties." 
He remained there until 1864 or 1865, and then 
moved to Wheatland, Iowa, where he was em- 
ployed, until 1869, on the Chicago, Rock 
Island & Pacific Railroad, his son, Thomas, 
working with him. The family then went to 
Saunders county, Nebraska, spending the win- 
ter of 1 869- 1 870, at Ashland. John Madigan 
then homesteaded the east half of the south- 
east quarter of section 8, township 14, range 6, 
and his son, Michael, homesteaded the west 
half of the southeast quarter of the same sec- 
tion. 

The family all worked together upon this 
property until 1881, when the subject hereof 
married. He then leased 80 acres of school 
land, the north half of the southwest quarter 
of section 16, township 14, range 6. In 1883 
he bought this tract, at the appraised value of 
$8 per acre. He erected a frame building, with 
dimensions of 14 by 16 feet, and, one year later, 
built an addition of the same size. In 1885 ^^ 
built a barn, measuring 36 by 40 feet, with 14- 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



foot posts. He continued to live in his old 
house for many years, and, in 1896, built the 
first part of his new house, two stories high 
and 18 by 28 feet in dimensions. Two years 
later he entirely removed the old part, built an 
extension of 16 by 24 feet, forming an L, and 
now has one of the finest country homes in 
his section of Saunders county. Near his 
house he has a good four-acre orchard, con- 
sisting chiefly of cherry and apple trees. There 
is a fine running stream on the property, and 
two wells, each 60 feet deep, and each supplied 
with windmills. For some years he devoted his 
efforts to corn and wheat raising, but in more 
recent years he has been feeding, buying and 
shipping stock. Mr. Madigan has engaged in 
this business on an extensive scale, and now 
handles over 500 head of stock per year. In 
addition to his original 80 acres, he purchased 
40 acres of railroad land, described as the 
northeast quarter of the southeast quarter of 
section 17, in 1884. He bought also the south- 
west quarter of the southwest quarter of sec- 
tion 16; and the east half of the northeast 
quarter of section 17. He has 23 acres of pas- 
ture and timber land, having purchased 17 
acres of Mr. Nelson's farm, which had been 
cut off by the railroad. Mr. Madigan also owns 
the greater part of his father's landed estate 
in Chapman precinct, having purchased the in- 
terests of all the heirs except three. When 
the estate is settled it will give Thomas Madi- 
gan, in all, 320 acres. 

Thomas Madigan was united in marriage 
with Maggie East, a daughter of M. G. East, 
who went to Saunders county in 1875, Pur- 



chasing land in section 16, in Chapman pre- 
cinct, which was subsequently sold to J. and 
T. Novak. This union resulted in the birth of 
the following children : John T. ; George M. ; 
Delia ; William ; Ruth ; Mary ; and a child who 
died in 1895, unnamed. Mr. Madigan is a 
Republican, a member of the school board, and 
has been a supervisor for six years. 

Michael Madigan, an elder brother of 
Thomas Madigan, was born in the state of 
New York. He afterward lived in Illinois, and 
in the fall of 1868, moved to Saunders county, 
Nebraska, by wagon, accompanying his father. 
They followed Wahoo Creek, up to Weston, 
where each took up an 80-acre claim, in sec- 
tion 8. Michael's father built a frame house, 
14 by 20 feet in size, hauling the lumber from 
Ashland, where there were but a few stores at 
that time. Michael built a partly log dug-out 
on his property, and set out $50 worth of trees, 
which he purchased at Lincoln; but they did 
not thrive in the baked ground. There has 
been a wonderful change in the ground since 
then, and where a pick was formerly required 
to break it, a spade may now be used. Michael 
Madigan subsequently bought 200 acres of 
land in section 24, township 14, range 5, 120 
acres of which was railroad land, — the remain- 
ing 80 acres having been homesteaded by T. 
E. Cook. Mr. Madigan resided upon this 
property for some years, and, in 1896, sold out, 
and purchased his present home, just south of 
the town of Weston. For the past thirteen 
years he has been in the well-drilling and re- 
pairing business, and also has been engaged in 
house-moving. He employs from five to eight 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



165 



men during the summer months, and has from 
$2,000 to $3,000 invested in tools, pumps, sup- 
plies, etc. He is also conducting a store in 
Weston. 

Michael Madigan was united in marriage 
with Mary Brown, a daughter of John Brown, 
and they have three daughters: Emma (Sa- 
meck), whose husband is cultivating the old 
Sameck estate, in section 15; Nellie, who re- 
mains at home; and Georgia, who is also at 
home with her parents. Fraternally, Mr. Mad- 
igan is a member of the A. O. U. W. He is a 
Republican in politics. 

On preceding pages are shown two pictures 
of interest to readers of this biography ; a view 
of Thomas Madigan's residence, and his por- 
trait, executed from a recent photograph. 



TT^HRISTIAN CHRISTANSON, one of 
the most substantial farmers in Marietta 



\^ 



precinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, 
is of German nativity. He was born in Schles- 
wig-Holstein, Germany, in 1838. He is a son 
of Peter and Mary (Smith) Christanson. He 
was reared in his native country, and when 
twenty-one years old he entered the army, 
where he served four years. He then returned 
home, where he remained for several years. 

In 1867 Mr. Christanson came to the United 
States, settling in Cook county, Illinois, where 
he followed agricultural pursuits. In 1868 he 
purchased from a land agent 80 acres of land 
in section 32, Marietta precinct, Saunders coun- 
ty, Nebraska. One year later (1869) he went 
west, took possession of his land, broke 20 



acres, and built a small frame house near the 
site of his present residence. He set out a great 
many trees, which have grown so rapidly 
that they are now fine timber. Mr. Christan- 
son has cut a great deal of this timber and sold 
it at $4 and $5 per cord. He still has an abun- 
dance left. 

In 1893 the subject hereof built a large, sub- 
stantial residence, at a cost of $1,000. He also 
has extensive orchards of his own planting. He 
added 50 acres to his original farm, and makes 
a business of raising both grain and stock. At 
the present time he has about 33 fine cattle and 
about 70 head of hogs. 

Mr. Christanson was united in marriage with 
Mary Thompson, a daughter of Thomas Jen- 
sen of Fremont, Nebraska. Mr. and Mrs. 
Christanson had five children (four of whom 
are now living), and have lost one daughter — 
Laura. Those living are: Thomas, John, 
Sophia, and Henry. Upon coming to Ameri- 
ca Christian Christanson had but one dollar in 
his pocket. By his good judgment in making 
investments, and by his steady application to 
business, he has risen into prominence, and is 
now regarded as one of the representative farm- 
ers of Marietta precinct. 



K"^RED JOHNSTON, the genial station 
agent on the Union Pacific Railroad, at 
Mead, Saunders county, Nebraska, has 
filled that position of trust since 1898. 

The station at Mead was opened in 1878, 
when the present depot was built. It contains 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



one waiting room and one ticket office, tele- 
graph office, and freight house combined. The 
first postoffice at Mead was opened in this depot, 
being a part of the ticket office. Joseph Stur- 
devant was the first ticket agent at that place. 
Mead is now one of the largest shipping points 
in Saunders county. It has three side tracks, 
running to all the principal elevators. The 
main shipments are grain and live stock. In 
1899 the following shipments were made: 800 
cars of corn, 170 cars of oats, 40 cars of wheat, 
50 cars of cattle, and 125 cars of hogs. Mr. 
Johnston has one assistant — James A. Byrnes. 

Fred Johnston is a native of Omaha, Nebras- 
ka, where he was born in 1875, ^^^ ^s a son of 
Charles Johnston. He was reared and schooled 
in his native city, and in 1888 began to learn tel- 
egraphy in the Western Union office in Omaha. 
From there he went to Kansas City, and later 
became relief agent on the Southern Pacific 
Railroad in Texas. His first regular appoint- 
ment was at Sartartia, and later at San An- 
tonio, where he served as chief clerk and cash- 
ier. He was subsequently appointed telegraph 
operator at Gonzales, Texas. He was trans- 
ferred afterward to Aguas Calientes, Mexico, 
on the Mexican Central Railway. 

Mr. Johnston then returned north and ac- 
cepted a position as operator upon the Chicago, 
Rock Island & Pacific Railway system, at Fair- 
bury, Nebraska. Clay Center, Kansas, was his 
next location, and from there he went to Oma- 
ha, where he worked for some time on the 
Western Union Telegraph line. He was then 
transferred to Lincoln, on tlie B. & M. R. Rail- 
road. There he remained until 1898, when he 



was appointed to fill his present position as 
station agent at Mead. 

The subject of this sketch married Winnie 
Byrnes, a daughter of John Byrnes, mine host 
of the best hotel at Mead. Mr. and Mrs. John- 
ston have one son — Roger Harold. Mr. John- 
ston is a thorough railroad man, and is popular 
as a citizen. 



§ERRY DALEY, a prominent and well- 
to-do farmer of Center precinct, Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, began his career in 
the West entirely without capital. He was born 
in County Cork, Ireland, in 1838. He is a son 
of Daniel and Mary (Driscoll) Daley. His 
father died early in life, leaving his widow 
with six children, as follows : Daniel ; Jerry, 
of whom this sketch treats ; Dennis, Katie, El- 
len, and Mary. The family came to America 
in 1854, landing in Boston. They located for 
a short time at Lowell, Massachusetts, and then 
moved to Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

In 1S56 Jerry Daley began work as a section 
hand on the Detroit & Milwaukee Railroad ; a 
short time later he engaged in teaming. In 
1858 he secured work in a plaster mill, where 
he remained until 1861. He was then engaged 
in farming one year. The following year 
(1862) he went to the Lake Superior region 
and worked in the copper mines until 1867. 
Thence he went to Fremont, Nebraska, and 
spent one season working on the Union Pacific 
Railroad. 

By that time Mr. Daley had saved a small 
sum of money and, in 1868, he went west and 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



pre-empted i6o acres of land in Saunders 
county, Nebraska. This land included the 
southeast corner of section 4, in Center pre- 
cinct. Immediately after his land was staked 
out Mr. Daley went to Fremont and bought 
boards, which he took across the Platte River 
in a boat. He then had them drawn to his land 
and built a small house for his family. Return- 
ing to Fremont, he worked at anything he could 
obtain. He carried the hod, cut wood and did 
various other jobs to support his family. Hav- 
ing no team, he was obliged to hire a team to 
"break" a part of his land. He paid $5 per 
acre and had five acres broken. 

In July, 1869, he walked to Lincoln, Ne- 
braska, borrowed $500, and walked back again. 
This enabled him to prove up on his claim, and 
the land was then his. For two years afterward 
he worked on the Union Pacific Railroad as a 
section hand. At the close of that time he was 
appointed section foreman. Leaving his land as 
it was, he worked hard to save money to im- 
prove it with. In 1884 he returned to his farm 
and built a large house, barns, corn-cribs, etc., 
and began farming in real earnest. Soon after- 
ward Mr. Daley purchased 80 acres in section 
9. This latter tract was settled by Alexander 
Johnston and directly adjoined the farm of Mr. 
Daley. 

In 189 1 Mr. Daley built a large barn, 32 by 
26 by 14 feet. Two years later he enlarged the 
house and built two granaries. He has large 
groves of shade trees and fine fruit orchards, 
and raises a large amount of stock, both cattle 
and hogs. He has been one of the most success- 
ful men in his section with hogs. 



The subject of this sketch married Joanna 
Lynch, daughter of Daniel Lynch, both natives 
of Ireland. Nine children were born to them, 
namely: Mary Ann (deceased), Maggie, Dan- 
iel, Nellie, Jerry, Kate, Josie, Thomas (de- 
ceased), and Timothy. Maggie married Dan- 
iel Hayes. They have three children — Frank, 
Daniel and Jerome. Nellie married Pat Done- 
hue, station agent at Abie, Nebraska. They are 
the parents of four children — Harry, Eugene, 
Lillian, and Mary A. Jerry married Nellie 
Ryan. They also have four children — Eddie, 
Thomas, and twins, whom they call Ruby and 
Ruth. 

Mr. Daley and his family are Catholics. He 
is a firm believer in the Jeffersonian principles 
of Democracy. 



tENAS B. SMITH, one of the early 
settlers and most progressive farmers oi 
Marietta precinct, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, was born in Wyoming county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1825, and comes from good old 
Pennsylvania stock. He is a son of Joseph 
and Lucy (Sturdevant) Smith. 

Mr. Smith grew to manhood in his native 
state, and followed farming as an occupation. 
In 1864 he enlisted as a private in the Union 
army, in Company A, 207th Regiment, Penn- 
sylvania Vol. Inf. He was wounded in the 
left leg in the battle of Petersburg. After re- 
maining five months in the hospital he was able 
to be about again, but never fully recovered 
from the injury. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



In 1871 Mr. Smith purchased 80 acres of 
land from John Cemer, who had previously pre- 
empted the west half of the northwest quarter 
of section 10, in Marietta precinct, where the 
subject hereof now lives. The same year Mr. 
Smith also bought a quarter of section 9 — the 
northeast quarter — but sold the west 80 acres 
of it to O. Olson. This latter tract is now 
owned by W. Johnson. 

Mr. Smith enlarged the house and built a 
barn. In 1875 he set out cottonwood trees 
along both the north and south roads. These 
trees are a grand sight today, many of them 
being over two feet in diameter; some have 
been cut for lumber. In 1880 Mr. Smith set 
out a row of black walnuts, which are now 
beautiful and bearing trees. He also planted 
two acres in orchards of apple, plum, cherry, 
and peach trees. Mr. Smith raises all kinds of 
grain and also devotes much time to raising 
cattle, hogs, etc. He has one of the best wells 
in the vicinity — the purest of water being ob- 
tained at a depth of 81 feet. His broth- 
er, A. M. Smith, was among the early settlers 
of Saunders county, but now has a home in 
Florida. 

In 1898 Mr. Smith built a handsome modern 
residence and a commodious barn, the latter 
being 32 by 40 feet in dimensions. The sub- 
ject hereof has been twice married. He was 
first united with Phoebe Finney, a daughter of 
Ebenezer Finney. She was born in Wyoming 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1834, and in 1880 her 
death occurred. She had four children, all 
daughters. They are: Lucy Josephine (de- 
ceased), Marian Angelina, Estella M., and 



Grace G. Marian Angelina married James G. 
Crinklaw, of Antelope, Nebraska, and they had 
five children whose names are Ida, Howard, 
Nellie (deceased), Walter, and Burton. Es- 
tella M. married Walter F. Crinklaw. They 
have no children. Grace G. is the wife of D. 
Leslie Depew, of Marietta precinct. 

Mr. Smith contracted a second matrimonial 
alliance, wedding Mrs. Caroline Burgess, a sis- 
ter of his first wife and a most estimable lady. 
Mr. Smith is a good Christian, and is charita- 
bly inclined. He is a member of the Baptist 
church and donated the land upon which the 
church was built, and also ground for the cem- 
etery. He stands well in his community, and 
has served five years as supervisor, and about 
seven years as school director. 



§AY FLETCHER ADAMS, a represent- 
ative farmer of Marietta precinct, Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, is a son of Theo- 
dore L. and Susan S. (Bieseccker) Adams, and 
a grandson of David and Deborah (Delivan) 
Adams. 

Theodore L. Adams was born in Susque- 
hanna county, Pennsylvania, December 9, 
1835. While still a young man he went west, 
and settled in Buffalo county, Wisconsin, where 
he met Susan S. Bieseccker, who afterward 
became his wife. This happy event was sol- 
emnized March 3, i860. After their marriage 
Mr. Adams settled upon a farm and followed 
agricultural pursuits until 1866. He then went 
west to Nebraska, and settled on the banks of 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



the Elkhorn River. In September, 1869, he 
went to Saunders county, and purchased rail- 
road land in section 22, Marietta precinct. This 
first purchase included 160 acres, which has 
been added to until he now owns 525 acres, and 
has one of the most productive farms in eastern 
Nebraska. Mr. Adams' success as a farmer 
and his opinion of Nebraska may be obtained 
from the following letter written by him, in 
which he gives his exact ideas on the subject: 

"Mead, Saunders County, Nebraska. — I 
came to Nebraska in 1866, and brought with me 
about $1,500 worth of property, consisting of 
horses, cattle, money, etc. I have now 525 
acres of land in this vicinity, all well improved 
and under a high state of cultivation. Two 
years ago my wheat turned out 37 bushels to the 
acre, and I had 75 acres of it. My corn aver- 
ages over 50 bushels this year. I have raised 
a good sized family, made a good living, started 
my children out in good shape, and have $3,500 
worth of property to live on, all made from 
farming Saunders county land. 

"Out of 29 crops raised, all have been good 
with the exception of four, which have been 
partial failures. I have never seen a country 
anywhere so sure of a crop as eastern Nebraska, 
and I have been around a good deal. 

"T. L. Adams." 

Mr. Adams' opinions on this subject are pre- 
cisely the same as expressed by all the resi- 
dents of Saunders county. On his home farm 
he planted a large grove of shade trees and fine 
orchards, which can be seen from miles away. 
A small house at first accommodated his family, 
but a large residence, barns, corn-cribs, and 



numerous other buildings have since been 
added. Mr. Adams was looked upon as one of 
the exemplary and progressive farmers of his 
day. He is now living a retired life in a fine 
residence, which he built in Mead. Seven chil- 
dren were born to him and his wife — namely : 
Mary E., wife of George Hoagland; Debbie 
C, wife of John Cheney, of Ira ; Mattie ; Jay F., 
the subject hereof ; Hattie M. ; Samuel ; and Ar- 
thur. The two last named are still at home. 
Mattie married William Otto. They have a 
family of five children, as follows : Efifie, Clar- 
ence, Alma, Guy, and Susan. Hattie M. mar- 
ried Edward Robinson. They have one child 
— Melvie. Theodore L. Adams was one of a 
family of eight children — viz. : Ada, Henry, 
Theodore L., Elizabeth, Harriet, Charles D., 
Daniel A. (deceased), and James (deceased). 
Jay Fletcher Adams' mother is a native of Stod- 
dardsville, Luzerne county, Pennsylvania. She 
is a daughter of Reuben and Caroline (Cald- 
well) Bieseccker. 

Jay Fletcher Adams was born in Dodge 
county, Nebraska, June 5, 1869. He was also 
reared and schooled in his native state. Ever 
since he attained the age of twenty years he has 
conducted the homestead farm, where he still 
resides. In addition to this, he rents and culti- 
vates other lands. His farm produces large 
quantities of corn, oats, wheat and hay. He 
also devotes much attention to stock raising, 
and at tlie present time has a splendid lot of 
fine cattle, hogs and draft horses. 

The subject of this sketch was united in mar- 
riage with Iva Elnora Otto, a daughter of 
George B. Otto, an esteemed resident of Mari- 



170 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



etta precinct. Four children bless the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Adams. Their names are : Lot- 
tie Lucinda, Etta Varena, Ernest Alton, and 
Orpha Jane. Mr. Adams has always been de- 
voted to the best interests of his community, 
where he is highly respected and stands among 
the foremost men of Marietta precinct. 



fORMAN E. BLAKESLEE, of Center 
precinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, is 
»— ^an ideal western farmer. He is a 
native of Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, 
where his birth occurred in 1846. He is a son 
of Luke and Anna Holmes (Rogers) Blakes- 
lee. His father was kicked by a horse in 1853 
and died from the injuries received in 1856. 
His mother survived her husband until 1877, 
when she died also. 

Mr. Blakeslee's first manual labor was work- 
ing on a farm in his native county. After- 
ward he worked in Wyoming county, Pennsyl- 
vania, until he reached his majority. About 
that time he accepted a position as collector for 
firms in the Western states, which occupied his 
attention for some time. He liked the West and 
finally followed farming there, also buying and 
selling wheat. He bought on speculation from 
farmers, having them hold the grain till he was 
ready to deliver it. 

In 1882 Mr. Blakeslee purchased 160 acres 
in section 24, Center precinct, Saunders county, 
Nebraska. This land was homesteaded by 
Messrs. Ritchie and Sornborger and was 
afterward sold to Mr. Humes, from 



whom Mr. Blakeslee bought it. It was 
not much improved, and contained only a small 
house 12 by 14 feet in dimensions, and a 
sod barn. Mr. Blakeslee enlarged the house 
enough to li\'e in, and began farming. He also 
set out a large number of fruit trees and a mul- 
titude of shade trees. Today it is a grand 
sight to view his magnificent shade and fruit 
trees and know they were all planted by his 
own hand. His fruit trees number over 200 
and include some of the choicest varieties. 

In 1879 Mr. Blakeslee built a small barn, and 
a few years later a larger one. In 1884 he also 
built a fine, large residence, the same now stand- 
ing upon his farm. Corn-cribs, sheds, and 
numerous other buildings were added, and his 
farm now contains a superior set of buildings. 
He also has a windmill which, at 40 feet, gets 
the best of water ; the old well was only 25 feet 
deep. In March, 1874, he purchased 80 acres 
in section 23. His farm is devoted to both 
grain and stock raising, and he keeps 50 head 
of fine cattle, some of which are Herefords, and 
about 150 head of hogs. 

Mr. Blakeslee married Ella Cooper, a daugh- 
ter of Andrew D. and Rebecca (Ford) Cooper. 
Mrs. Blakeslee's father was of Scotch ancestry. 
Her mother was a native of Dubuque, Iowa. 
Both of her parents died comparatively young, 
and she was left to the care of relatives. She 
accompanied an aunt, Mrs. Mary Cemer, to 
Saunders county, Nebraska, settling in Mari- 
etta precinct. Mrs. Blakeslee finished her edu- 
cation in the Wahoo High School, and af- 
terward taught school until her marriage. Mr. 
and Mrs. Blakeslee have three children — Lura 




Lll \KL1 s MILLl K 
THOMAS |. MILLI-K MRS J-\\ItS Mil 1 KR. 

MAR 1 HA NHLLLK. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



173 



H., Ford M., and Floyd T. The family wor- 
shiped at the M. E. church. The subject of 
this sketch is a stanch Republican. He is one 
of the most esteemed farmers of Center pre- 
cinct. 



TTt HARLES MILLER, an extensive farm- 
l jy er and grain and stock dealer of Saun- 

^* — -^ders county, Nebraska, owns a fine 
large residence at Ashland, in that county, be- 
sides much valuable farming land in Green pre- 
cinct. Mr. Miller was born in Kosciusko coun- 
ty, Indiana, November 22, 1 847. He is the son 
of James Miller. 

James Miller was a native of Lancaster 
county, and moved to Kosciusko county, In- 
diana. He followed farming there until early 
in the "sixties." He then moved to Minnesota, 
where he was one of the pioneer settlers. Some 
time later, in 1870, he was induced to locate in 
Saunders county, Nebraska, where he took up 
a homestead claim adjoining one owned by 
his son, Charles. The trip was made overland, 
with a team of oxen. James Miller subse- 
quently sold his claim, purchasing another one 
from William Lawson. He built a comfortable 
residence, and lived there until cut off by death 
in 1 887, at the age of seventy-one years. 

Charles Miller's mother was, before mar- 
riage, Mary Baker, daughter of Jacob Baker, 
a respected resident of Johnstown, Licking 
county, Ohio. She still survives her husband 
and owns the same farm upon which his last 
days were spent. She is now more than eighty 
years old, and resides near her son, Charles, in 



Ashland. She is the mother of the following 
ten children : Enos, who died in infancy ; John, 
a resident of Ashland; Enoch, deceased; 
Charles, the subject hereof; Elijah, also de- 
ceased; Jemima, wife of Samuel Merriman; 
Mary, wife of George Herron; Oliver, de- 
ceased; Rohama; and Tina, wife of L. T. 
Farmer. These children were reared in the 
Baptist faith, the religion of their parents. 

Although a native of Indiana, Charles Mil- 
ler grew to manhood in Minnesota. He started 
out to seek his own fortune, not knowing just 
where he would locate. He fell in with a man 
who had previously visited Saunders county, 
Nebraska, and was then on his way to take up 
a claim there. Mr. Miller was induced to ac- 
company him. Upon seeing the land he at 
once decided to locate there also, having trav- 
eled a distance of 450 miles, and being three 
weeks on the way. In 1870, Charles Miller 
built a double board-house on the line of two 
homestead tracts, and induced his parents to 
occupy one of these claims. He continued to 
improve and till his land, and in 1881, built a 
fine, large residence, just east of the old house. 
He set out fine orchards and beautiful shade 
trees, and converted the rolling prairie into cul- 
tivated fields. His residence was surrounded 
by spacious lawns, and approached by lovely 
driveways, shaded by the finest trees obtain- 
able. 

Mr. Miller subsequently purchased his fath- 
er's claim and also bought some land from the 
railroad company. His farm now contains 360 
acres, and is considered one of the finest in 
Green precinct. His eldest son now has charge 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



of this farm, but the father still retains the 
management of it. In 1893, Mr. Miller pur- 
chased of Shaler Wells the estate formerly 
owned by Professor King, of Ashland. This 
estate comprises one block of land, a beautiful 
large residence, convenient barn and buildings, 
and is a most desirable home. Thither Mr. 
Miller removed to further the education of his 
children. In June, 1900, Mr. Miller entered 
into partnership with E. J. Rose, under the 
firm name 6i Miller & Rose, for the purpose 
of buying grain, with office and elevator near 
the Burlington & Missouri River Railroad de- 
pot, where they are meeting with success. 

Charles Miller married Hattie Colbert, a 
daughter of John F. and Juliet E. (Iliff) Col- 
bert. John F. Colbert is a son of John Colbert, 
and is a native of Fayette county, Pennsylva- 
nia. He accompanied his parents to Morgan 
county, Ohio, and later to Perry county, in the 
same state. He was practically reared in the 
state of Ohio. In the fall of 1869, with his 
team, he started for Green precinct, Saunders 
county, Nebraska. Upon reaching his desti- 
nation, he took up a homestead claim. He set 
out orchards and otherwise improved his land. 
He continued to reside there until 1900, when 
he returned to Ashland, and made his home 
with Charles Miller. He has voted the Re- 
publican ticket ever since the organization of 
that party, and has been a faithful member of 
the M. E. church, for the past forty-five years. 
He and his wife were blessed with the follow- 
ing children : Hattie, wife of Charles Miller ; 
a son who died in infancy; Saloma, who mar- 
ried William C. Mott, and is now deceased; 



Jane, wife of Nelson Mays, who has a daughter, 
Edith; a daughter who died young; Thomas, 
who married Clara Bentz, and has three chil- 
dren, Chester, Emmett and Alfa; Lizzie, who 
married J. G. Ulstrom, and has three children, 
Herley, Mabel and Frank; and Edna, wife of 
Charles Ulstrom, who has two children, Floyd 
and Lula. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller have four children, 
namely: Thomas J.; Elizabeth M.; Wesley 
I. ; and Charles F. The eldest son has charge 
of the homestead farm in Green precinct. He 
married Clara Bryan, and has one child, 
Martha. Mr. Miller and family worship at 
the M. E. church. Fraternally, he affiliates 
with lodge No. 1 10, F. & A. M., and also with 
the Royal Mystic Legion. The subject of this 
sketch is well known all over the county. He 
is a man of progressive ideas, and has done 
much to develop the natural resources of this 
part of Nebraska. 

On a preceding page, in connection with this 
sketch, is presented a group picture, whose 
members represent four generations of the Mil- 
ler family, namely: Mrs. James Miller (Mary 
Baker); Charles Miller, her son; Thomas J. 
Miller, her grandson; and Martha Miller, her 
great-granddaughter. 



F. WEBSTER, a successful furniture 
dealer and undertaker of Weston, 
Saunders county, Nebraska, is a gen- 
tleman widely known in that section of the 
county, of which he is one of the earliest set- 
tlers. When he arrived in Nebraska, many 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



years ago, he was possessed of very little prop- 
erty and only one dollar in money, but by 
close application to his work and skillful man- 
agement he has obtained a handsome compe- 
tency. 

Mr. Webster was born in Henry county, In- 
diana, September 14, 1829, and is a son of 
Micaiah Webster. In his youth he learned the 
trades of carpenter, cabinet maker and under- 
taker. Early in life he married Rebecca A. 
Shelley, a daughter of Joseph Shelley. She 
was born near Knoxville, Tennessee, and was 
six years of age when her father, a blacksmith 
by trade, moved to Indiana. She proved a 
true helpmeet to her husband during his early 
struggles, and has ever been a faithful com- 
panion and loving wife. During the years 1847 
and 1848 Mr. Webster served with the Fifth 
Regiment, Indiana Volunteers, in the Mexican 
War. In 1856 he moved to Iowa county, Iowa, 
where, with the exception of one year in the 
army during the Civil War, he lived until 1869. 
In 1864 he enlisted in the Fifteenth Regiment, 
Iowa Volunteers, and served until the close of 
the war. In 1869 Mr. Webster started with his 
family overland to Nebraska, the family then 
consisting of his wife and seven children. Ow- 
ing to the sickness of Mrs. Webster ; they spent 
the winter of 1869- 1870 in Andrew county, 
Missouri. He had been to Nebraska in the 
spring of 1869 and staked his claim, and he 
settled upon it in the spring of 1870. At the 
time of his arrival his property consisted of two 
horses and a colt, two yoke of cattle, two milch 
cows, two twin heifers, four chairs, and a small 
quantity of other primitive household furni- 



ture, together with one dollar in money. He 
homesteaded 80 acres of land, it being the west 
half of the northwest quarter of section 8, 
in Chapman precinct, Saunders county. Four 
years later, as a soldier, he acquired the other 
80 acres in that quarter. He built a dugout, 
16 by -24 feet, and in the summer of 1870 ex- 
tended it 12 feet, covering it with poles, brush, 
hay and three feet of earth, and making it water 
tight. It was very hard to get a good start, 
and the price of all the necessar'05 of life was 
very high. Bacon was 25 and 30 cents per- 
pound, and he paid $15 for his first hog— a 
small one at that. Mrs. Webster bought two 
little pigs and paid for them with butter. She 
has the distinction of having been the first 
woman to sell butter in Weston, and she also 
purchased the first calico dress sold there. That 
section was then very sparsely settled, and the 
nearest neighbors were three miles distant, — 
being Peter Campbell and a ranchman named 
Jamison. In 1876 Mr. Webster erected a 
frame building over the dug-out, but as that 
caused the water to run in he changed the site 
and erected a one-story and a half frame house, 
16 by 24 feet, and later built an addition there- 
to. He set out five acres of trees, at that time a 
very large orchard, but it did not prove very 
successful. He also built a commodious frame 
barn upon the premises. In 1870 land there 
was worth from $6 to $8 per acre, and in 1890 
Mr. Webster disposed of his property for 
$4,800 to Mr. Cudna, who has since greatly 
imyroved it. Mr. Webster had been renting 
it for some nine years prior to selling it, as he 
was unable to tend it himself, and so decided to 



176 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



sell. In the early '80s he embarked in the fur- 
niture and undertaking business at Weston, but 
in 1886 closed the store for six months, spend- 
ing that period in California. He then returned 
and again engaged in the same business, which 
he still continues. He is well established, and 
carries a large and varied stock of furniture, 
catering to the highest class of trade. Mr. and 
Mrs. Webster, having lived in the locality so 
many years, are well known to all, and have a 
large circle of friends, by whom they are held 
in the highest esteem. 

The subject of this sketch and his wife are 
the parents of eight children, of Avhom the fol- 
lowing is a record : William P., postmaster at 
Cody, Wyoming, is employed as guide and 
manager of pleasure parties in the National 
Park and other resorts. He married Rachel 
Bird, and they had two children — Elmo and 
Delia. Mrs. Fannie Wheeler lives in Jasper 
county, Iowa, and has three boys and one girl — 
Claude, Clell, Leonard, and May. Melissa 
married Arthur Masterman, of Lincoln, Ne- 
braska, and they have a son — Clyde. Leonard, 
of Rock Springs, Nebraska, is a blacksmith, and 
at present is in the Klondike ; he has three chil- 
dren — Richard, Maggie, and Ruth. Richard 
married Eliza Ledbeter, and they have three 
children — Frederick, Rebecca, and Carl. Mrs. 
Eliza Peterson lives on a farm with her hus- 
band, one and half miles south of Weston. 
Joe Delia (Campbell), whose husband is a 
farmer near Weston, has three children — Ethel, 
Daniel, and Lethe. Claude, who married Mag- 
gie Devine, lives at Sierra City, California. On 
March 10, 1900, Mrs. Webster celebrated her 



sixty-ninth birthday with a party, at which six 
of her children were present. She is hale and 
hearty, enjoying the best of health, and looks 
many years younger than she is. Politically 
the subject of this sketch belongs to the old 
school of Republicans and votes the Democratic 
ticket. 



w- 



ALTER CRINKLAW, a retired 
citizen of Marietta precinct, Saunders 
county, Nebraska, is a pioneer of that 
county, and was a resident of the same precinct 
from May i, 1869, until 1895. Upon first locat- 
ing there he pre-empted 80 acres in section 
20 and built a shanty upon it. Six months 
later he homesteaded 80 acres on the east. His 
son, John A. Crinklaw, lives upon the place 
now. In 1886 Mr. Crinklaw built a fine resi- 
dence upon his land, which is now occupied by 
his son, George L. Crinklaw. 

Walter Crinklaw first found employment 
upon the Union Pacific Railroad, and thus ob- 
tained money with which to improve his farm. 
Afterward he purchased 80 acres additional in 
the same precinct on the south side of his pre- 
emption. Still later he also purchased the 
northeast quarter of section 29. 

Mr. Crinklaw was born in 1825 in Roxbury- 
shire, Scotland, near the home of Sir Walter 
Scott. He is a son of James and Jennie 
(Smith) Crinklaw. His parents came to 
America m 1837, settling upon a farm near 
Westminster, Canada, where they spent their 
declining years. His father died in 1864 at 
the advanced age of eighty-seven years. Two 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



177 



years later (1866) the beloved mother died, 
having passed her seventieth mile-stone. Elev- 
en children were born to them. Their names 
are: Martha, Agnes, George, Georgiana, 
James, Walter, David, Joseph, Robert, Chris- 
tian, and Jeanette. The father of the subject 
of this sketch had five children by a previous 
marriage. Their names are : Margaret, Wil- 
liam, Betsy, John, and Mary. 

Walter Crinklaw was united in marriage 
with Helen Graham, a daughter of James and 
Helen (Brown) Graham, both natives of Glas- 
gow, Scotland. His marriage was sol- 
emnized at London, Canada, whither the bride's 
parents had previously immigrated. Eleven 
children were the result of the union, namely : 
Helen, James G., Anna, Walter F., Jeanette S., 
Emily B., Andrew B., Mary Hattie (deceased), 
John A., George L., and Minnie, who died 
young. 

Helen Crinklaw married A. P. Kempton. 
They have five children, namely: Pearl (de- 
ceased). Myrtle, Mabel, Walter, and Lloyd. 
James G. Crinklaw is now a resident of Ante- 
lope, Nebraska. He married Marian Smith, 
and has five children. Their names are : Ida, 
Howard, Nellie (deceased), Walter, and Bur- 
ton. Anna Crinklaw married George Fletcher. 
They have six children living — David, Lila, 
George, Archie, Harold, and Winifred L. They 
lost a son in infancy. 

Walter F. Crinklaw was born in London, 
Canada, in 1855. He accompanied his parents 
to the vicinity of Belvidere, Illinois, when four 
years old. Subsequently they removed to 
Omaha, and thence went to Saunders county, 



Nebraska. When twenty-three years old, Wal- 
ter F. went to Antelope county, Nebraska, 
where he took up a homestead of 160 acres. 
He improved it and lived upon it for nine years. 
Selling it at a good profit, he returned home 
and was presented with 80 acres by his father. 
This tract included the southwest corner of sec- 
tion 20. On it he has built a handsome resi- 
dence, barns, corn-cribs, etc., and set out or- 
chards and shade trees. He now has one of 
the finest homes in that locality. He married 
Estella M. Smith. 

Jeanette S. Crinklaw married George A. 
Orme, of Colon, Nebraska. Two children bless 
their home — Mabel and Hattie Ruth. Emily B. 
Crinklaw married John Carson. They have four 
children, namely: Hazel, Jessie, Harry, and 
the baby. Andrew B. Crinklaw married Pearl 
Soule. One son, Clark, is the offspring of their 
union. John A. Crinklaw married Nellie Ly- 
bolt, and they have a daughter, Bernice. They 
live upon 80 acres of the homestead farm. 

George L. Crinklaw was born at the old 
homestead in Marietta precinct in 1872. He 
enjoyed exceptional educational advantages. 
He was then presented with 80 acres of his 
father's farm, in addition to which he purchased 
40 acres. He now has one of the finest and 
best improved farms in Marietta precinct. He 
married Eunice Manners, a daughter of Joseph 
Manners, of Wahoo. They have one son — 
Willis Raymond. Mrs. Crinklaw, wife of the 
subject hereof, died November 20, 1892. 

In 1895 the subject hereof withdrew from 
active business pursuits and went to Colon, 
Nebraska, sharing his money and lands with 



178 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



his children. He gave each child 80 acres of 
land, or its equivalent in money. Since then 
he has been living in peaceful retirement, con- 
scious of having performed his duty well. 
"Long may he live" is the wish of his numer- 
ous children, grandchildren, and hosts of 
friends. 






• ILLIAM R. CAMPBELL is post- 
master at Mead, Saunders county, 
Nebraska. He was commissioned to 
his present trust in April, 1898, succeeding 
Katie F. Kane. 

The postoffice at Mead was established in 
1876 and was called Alvin for some time. 
It occupied a part of the ticket ofifice at Saun- 
ders station, as it was then called. There 
proved to be another station in the state called 
Alvin and the one at Saunders station was 
changed to Mead. This change took place 
in 1877. The first postmaster was Joseph 
Sturdevant, who was succeeded by Charles Os- 
tenburg. The latter was relieved by Delos 
Kearns, who in turn was succeeded by Katie 
F. Kane, who was succeeded by Mr. Camp- 
bell. 

Mead has but two mails per day but they are 
large. The present office is located in the Kearns 
building and contains upward of 300 boxes. 
One deputy is allowed and that position is filled 
at the present time by Alvin Jefferson. 

Mr. Campbell was born in Montgomery 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1849. His father, 
James Campbell, removed to Wisconsin when 
William R. was but nine years old, so the 



latter was practically reared in that state 
upon his father's farm. In 1870 he began his 
career in the capacity of a school teacher and 
followed that honorable profession until 1898, 
when he accepted his present position as post- 
master at Mead. Previous to this he had 
taught some time in Colfax and Lancaster 
counties, afterward at Malmo, still later in 
Mariposa precinct, and last in Mead. 

Mr. Campbell married Mary Ostenburg, a 
daughter of C. Ostenburg. C. Ostenburg is 
one of Mead's most esteemed citizens and suc- 
cessful business men. He was born in Ger- 
many in 1 82 1, and is a son of Theodore 
Ostenburg. The younger Ostenburg came to 
America in 1847, settling in Wisconsin, where 
he was engaged in farming for a number of 
years. He subsequently started a store at 
Blue Mounds, which he conducted quite suc- 
cessfully for eight years. He then sold his 
store and went to Mead, Nebraska. In 1877 
he built the first store in Mead. This was 
a small affair on the corner of Mine and Fourth 
streets — its dimensions being 20 by 26 feet. 
In 1883 its length was extended to 60 feet 
and it now contains a large and well-assorted 
stock of general merchandise. In 1890 Mr. 
Ostenburg's son was admitted to partnership. 
The elder Ostenburg built a handsome modern 
residence in 1877 on the opposite corner of 
his land, which was purchased from Mr. Will- 
iams. Mr. Ostenburg married Caroline Jully. 
She died in 1894, aged seventy-six years. 
Twelve children blessed this union, as follows : 
Charles, who died in infancy; Otto, Charles. 
Ernest, Emma, John, Mary, William (de- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



179 



ceased), Thomas, Annie (deceased), George 
(deceased), and Henry. Mr. and Mrs. Camp- 
bell have no children of their own. They are 
well known and esteemed throughout the com- 
munity. 



O. LINDAU is a prosperous and 
representative farmer of Saunders 
'county, Nebraska, and his many ac- 
quaintances throughout the county know him 
to be a man of his word, perfectly honest and 
upright in all his business transactions. He 
has had a lease of the Robert Campbell estate 
ever since 1887 and has put on nearly all the 
improvements. He was born in the southern 
part of Sweden in 1855, and is a son of Olaf 
and Jennie (Streed) Pierson. He is the old- 
est of a family of four children, of whom Olive 
and Lena both live in Sweden, and Mr. Lin- 
dau's brother is known as Pier O. Stearnberg. 
P. 0. Lindau, as well as his father and brother, 
spent many years in the army, and in that 
connection he and his brother changed their 
names because of the many similar ones on 
the rolls. 

Mr. Lindau left Sweden in 1881 and upon 
arriving in the United States he at once went 
to Saunders county, Nebraska, where he spent 
the first three years working out. Li 1884 
he rented the farm owned by Mr. Erikson, 
which is two miles east of his present one, 
but the next two years he rented Mr. Banta's 
farm. In 1887 he leased the Campbell es- 
tate, which was homesteaded by Robert Camp- 
bell, who is a soldier; it is located on the north- 



west quarter of section 26. He erected the 
present barn, planted trees and has made nearly 
all of the improvements. He has good ma- 
chinery and horses and enjoys a reputation 
among his fellow citizens as a good, conscien- 
tious and straightforward neighbor and citi- 
zen. 

The subject of this sketch was united in 
marriage with Annie Pierson, a daughter of 
Pier Okason, and they have a family of seven 
children as follows: Olga, Emma, Arthur, 
Arias, Minnie, Joseph and Mandy. Mr. Lin- 
dau and his family are members of the Swed- 
ish Baptist church of Weston. 



OUIS LAUDENSCHLAGER, who is 
of sturdy German extraction, is numbered 
among the prominent and substantial 
farmers of Saunders county, Nebraska, where 
he is the owner of a fine farm located in Chap- 
man precinct. He was born in Germany in 
1835 ^i^d is a son of Louis and Elizabeth Lau- 
denschlager. 

In 1865 the subject hereof, with his family 
of two children, came to the United States and 
engaged in farming at Pekin, Illinois, for a 
period of ten years. In 1875 he located in Cass 
county, Nebraska, where he continued the same 
independent vocation for nine years. In 1884 
he moved to Saunders county, purchased of Mr. 
Jasper the northwest quarter of section 25 for 
$20 per acre, this property having been home- 
steaded by Mr. Reigenball. The old house is 
now used as a granary, as in 1885 he erected a 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



new house, and in 1894 enlarged it to its pres- 
ent size. In 1896 he put up his present fine 
barn, which is 40 by 44 feet in dimensions, and 
he also made other improvements in the way of 
building corn-cribs. In 1888 he purchased 
80 acres, — the northwest half of the south- 
west quarter of section 24, from Mr. Fletcher, 
and the small buildings on that farm he moved 
to his present place. He has set out a fine or- 
chard and many shade trees, especially on the 
northwest side of the house, which shield it 
from the cold winter winds. He has about 
five acres in an orchard, containing all kinds of 
trees. He has an abundance of pure water, 
having a good well near the house, while near 
the barn there is a fine spring. The subject 
hereof has a wide acquaintance throughout the 
vicinity, and is considered a successful and up- 
to-date farmer. 

Mr. Laudenschlager was united in wedlock 
with Mary Petermann, who is also a native of 
Germany, and they have a family of twelve 
children: Adam, Lizzie, George, William, 
Clara. Louisa, Jake, Annie, John, Lena, 
Ella, and Louie. Adam, born in Ger- 
many, * married Sarah Burnell, and has 
five children — Jessie, Bertha, Lillian, 
Gracie, and Flora. Lizzie, who was also 
born in Germany, is the wife of John Fas- 
spender, of Cass county, Nebraska, and has 
three children — Gertie, Florence, and Leo. 
George, a native of Illinois, lives with his 
brother Adam. William is single and engaged 
in farming six miles east of the home place. 
Clara is the wife of George Baxter, of Omaha, 
Nebraska. Louisa lives in California. Jake 



was born in Cass county, Nebraska. Annie is 
a bright young lady, also a native 0I Cass coun- 
ty. John assists his brother Adam in farming, 
Lena is a native of Saunders county, in which 
Ella and Louie were also born. Mr. Lauden- 
schlager is a solid Democrat in politics, while in 
religious views he belongs to the Lutheran 
church. 



fOHN WOITA, of the firm of Kacirek & 
Woita Bros., general merchants at Wes- 
ton, has been a resident of Saunders coun- 
ty, Nebraska, since 1872, and is justly regarded 
as one of the most enterprising and successful 
business men in the county. 

Mr. Woita was born in Bohemia in 1858. He 
is a son of Andrew and Elizabeth (Havel) 
Woita, and is one of a family of five sons and 
one daughter — namely, Joseph, John, Phoebe, 
Jacob, James, and Charles. Joseph is in the 
saloon business at Weston. He also owns a 
120-acre farm in Saunders county. Phoebe 
married Joseph Maly, and now resides in Okla- 
homa. James is a business partner of John, 
and a brief sketch of his life is included in 
this writing. Jacob owns an 80-acre farm, 
which he cultivates together with Joseph's 
farm. Charles, the youngest son, conducts the 
home farm, upon which, in a separate house of 
their own, the aged parents dwell. The father 
is now seventy-four years old, and the mother 
is aged sixty-five years. 

The Woita family came to America in 1872, 
when John was fourteen years of age. The 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



181 



father homesteaded 80 acres in section 34, 
township 15, range 5, in Saunders county, Ne- 
braska. The first building erected was a dug- 
out with a shingle roof, the shingles having 
been hauled from Lincoln. Soon after build- 
ing this house, a straw barn was made, also a 
sod chicken-house and corn-crib. Two acres 
of land were set out in shade" trees. In 1890 
orchards of apple, cherry and plum trees were 
planted, and grapes and other small fruits were 
set out. 

When the elder Mr. W'oita arrived in Saun- 
ders county he was just sixty-lour dollars in 
debt, and had a family to support. Now he 
and his entire family are well supplied with this 
world's goods. They are rugged and healthy 
people, but in gaining their start were obliged 
to endure many hardships. The father was a 
stonemason, and upon first locating in Saunders 
county he walked to Lincoln and obtained work 
on the penitentiary building, which was then 
in process of erection. He received $5 per day 
for his work. In this way he obtained his start 
in the new country. 

Upon locating in Nebraska, the Woita family 
knew but one man, and that was Peter Kastl. 
Wheat was raised mainly at first, and the land 
yielded from 15 to 23 bushels per acre. The 
nearest market was Fremont, and a toll of 50 
cents per load was demanded before one gained 
entrance to the cit}-. There were no springs 
upon the land where the Woitas settled, water 
being secured by digging shallow wells. Now 
that the soil is cultivated, the surface water is 
constantly used up, and water can only be 
obtained at a depth of 180 feet. When the 



family settled there the nearest postoffice was 
twelve miles distant and was called Linwood. 

In 1877 John Woita purchased 120 acres of 
railroad land at $7 per acre. He still owns 
this farm, which is now valued at $45 an acre. 
He erected suitable and substantial building! 
and planted large orchards. He was joined in 
marriage with Mary Pospisil, whose father 
took up a homestead claim in close proximity 
to the Woita homestead. The Pospisil family 
have li\-ed in America for thirty-six years. Mrs. 
Woita was born in Bohemia in i860 and was 
four years old upon coming to America. Mr. 
and Mrs. Woita have seven children — five 
daughters and two sons. Their names are: 
Mary, Fannie, Agnes, Emma, Frank, Tony, 
and Josie, the baby, all of whom are still at 
home. 

John Woita carried on agricultural pursuits 
until 1895. He then purchased Mr. Hagen- 
buck's interest in the general merchandise store 
of Kacirek, Woita & Co. The firm name was 
then changed to Kacirek & Woita Bros., and 
still continues thus. They carry a stock valued 
at eighteen or twenty thousand dollars, and do 
quite an extensive business. Besides owning 
an interest in the store building, Mr. Woita still 
owns his own farm, which he rents, and has a 
handsome town residence and three lots in 
Weston. 

The subject of this .sketch is a member of the 
Catlinlic Workmen. \\'hile on the farm he 
ser\-e(l as treasurer of the town board for nine 
years. He helped in scraping dirt when the 
town of Weston was laid out. and is now serv- 
ing as secretary of the same town. He is very 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



popular in his locality and is justly proud of his 
own success and that of his family. 

James Kacirek, senior member of the 
firm of Kacirek & Woita Bros., was born in 
Bohemia in i860. He is a son of Frank and 
Catherine (Schejbal) Kacirek, and is the eldest 
of three children. He has one sister, Mrs. An- 
ton Chapek, and one brother, John, who mar- 
ried a Miss Wise and lives in Oklahoma, — he 
has two sons living, having lost a daughter, 
Victoria. 

Mr. Kacirek came to America and went west 
to Saunders county, Nebraska, June 9, 1880. 
He worked out by the month as a farm hand 
for different people in the vicinity of Weston 
for three years. He then worked three months 
on the section. His parents came to America 
in 1 88 1 and bought 80 acres of land in New- 
man precinct, where they are now spending 
their declining years. 

James Kacirek rented a farm near Weston 
in 1884, and remained upon it until 1888. He 
spent the following three years in the lumber 
business, in the employ of Louis Bredford. In 
1 89 1 he went into the general merchandise 
business in partnership with Anton Chapek and 
Willard Hagenbuck. A few months later 
James Woita purchased the interest of Mr. 
Chapek and the firm became Kacirek, Woita & 
Co. In 1896 Mr. Hagenbuck also retired from 
the firm, having sold his interest to John 
Woita. The firm name then became Kacirek & 
Woita Bros., and the partnership then formed 
still exists. Mr. Kacirek was joined in mar- 
riage with Phinnie Fiedler. They have three 
children — Joseph, aged twelve years; Mary, 



aged ten years; and Edward, aged five years. 

Mr. Kacirek is a member of the Roman Caith- 
olic church. He supports the Democratic party. 
He was formerly a member of the town board, 
and is now serving on the school board. He is 
also a member of the Catholic Workmen. 

James J. Woita, junior member of the 
firm of Kacirek & Woita Bros., began his ca- 
reer in 1885 as clerk for James Kean in Weston. 
He then visited the farm for one month. Re- 
turning to W'eston. he engaged as a clerk for 
Frank Hakel, for whom he worked nearly five 
years. He then resigned and accepted a sim- 
ilar but more lucrative situation with Chapek, 
Kacirek & Co. After working there a few 
months, however, he purchased the interest of 
^Ir. Chapek, as before mentioned, and is still 
a member of that enterprising business firm. 

James J. Woita married Tony Peterzelka, a 
daughter of Joseph Peterzelka. She is de- 
ceased and left two children — ^James J., Jr., and 
Helen. Mr. Woita owns two residences, one 
in East Weston, and the other in West Weston, 
where he lives. He is a native of Bohemia, 
where his birth occurred in 1868. He has had 
a great deal of experience at his present busi- 
ness, and adds very materially to the success of 
the firm with which he is connected. 



^tf^ OBERT A. HEATON, proprietor of 
\y\ the Wahoo New Stock Yards, is one 
-^ Vfc^^of the most influential and highly 
esteemed citizens of Wahoo, Saunders county, 
Nebraska. Mr. Heaton is a native of Lisbon, 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



St. Lawrence county, New York, where his 
birth occurred May 3, 1850. He is a son of 
Daniel and Mary Ann (Moore) Heaton. His 
parents moved west, to York county, Nebras- 
ka, where his father followed farming until 
cut off by death in 1894, at the advanced age 
of seventy-one years. 

Robert A. Heaton began his life's labor in 
the capacity of farm hand and subsequently 
followed teaming and lumbering. In 1872 he 
accompanied his parents west to Nebraska, set- 
tling some time later in Washington county, of 
this state. The first year their crops were 
totally destroyed by grasshoppers. Daniel 
Heaton decided at once to leave, but was finally 
persuaded to remain and try his luck again, 
while Robert A. left home in search of work 
to support the family. Crossing the Platte 
River, Mr. Heaton found everything in a flour- 
ishing condition. He soon obtained a situa- 
tion at Blair, Nebraska, where he ran a grain 
elevator. There it was that he obtained his 
start and gained an insight into buying grain. 

In the fall of 1878 he purchased an interest 
in the business of Clark & Son, dealers in grain 
and lumber, at Blair. The new firm was 
known as Clark, Heaton & Company, with 
Fred R. Clark as senior member. In 1880 
the same firm erected an elevator at Weston, 
Nebraska, and continued to carry on a large 
and prosperous business until 1888. Mr. Hea- 
ton was instrumental in also establishing a 
bank at Weston. This bank had a capital 
stock of $12,000 and the subject hereof served 
as its president until 1895. He then sold out 
both his interest in the bank and the grain ele- 



vator and removed at once to Wahoo, intend- 
ing to retire from active business pursuits. Af- 
ter building a fine residence, his natural activ- 
ity of mind and body asserted itself and he 
again engaged in business. 

He purchased 12 acres of the Stocking 
estate, where the old canning factory was for- 
merly located. Upon this site Mr. Heaton es- 
tablished what is now known as the Wahoo 
New Stock Yards. The Union Pacific Rail- 
road put in a spur track, and at the present 
time large shipments of cattle, sheep, hogs, 
grain and coal are made from that point. 

Mr. Heaton was joined in marriage with 
Ellen Maher, a daughter of William Maher, 
of Blair, Nebraska. Three children blessed 
their union, namely: Minnie, William, and 
Helen. Mr. Heaton is virtually a self-made 
man. From a humble beginning he has risen 
to his present affluence. All this has been ac- 
complished by steady and well-directed effort 
on his part. He has served on the school 
board and in the city council. Mr. Heaton 
affiliates with the F. & A. M., Modern Wood- 
men of America, A. O. U. W., and K. of P. 



§OHN L. CHEEVER, a prominent coal 
dealer of Valparaiso, Nebraska, is a son 
of Warren Cheever, and was born in 
Wabash county, Indiana, March 16, 1845. 

Warren Cheever, father of John L., was 
a native of Massachusetts. In early manhood 
he moved to Jasper county, Indiana, and thence 
went to the state of Wisconsin, locating in 



184 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Crawford county, where he Hved for twenty 
years. In 1868 he sought a home in the West, 
locating on a homestead in Oak Creek pre- 
cinct, Saunders county, Nel^raska. There he 
followed farming during the remainder of his 
life, dying at the age of seventy years. 

Warren Cheever's wife was Harriet Vorse. 
She now resides in A'^alparaiso, aged eighty- 
four years. They reared ten children, namely: 
\Varren, Jr. ; Alonzo, who died in the engage- 
ment of Island No. 10: Albertus, Edward 
F., John L., Francis M.. Ellen. Jane, George 
L., and James. Five of the boys served in 
the Civil War. Warren Cheever was an old- 
line \\h\g and cast his vote for Abraham Lin- 
coln. 

John L. Cheever received his educational 
training in the schools of Wisconsin. In 1873 
he moved west and located on a farm in Oak 
Creek precinct. He has made his home in that 
precinct ever since coming to Nebraska, al- 
though, at different times, he has had busi- 
ness interests outside of the state. 

In 1868 ]\Ir. Cheever started a grocery store 
and followed that line of Ijusiness for two 
years, when he engaged in the coal trade, which 
he has pursued ever since. In politics he is 
an out-and-out Prohibitionist. In 1865 Mr. 
Cheever enlisted in the army. He entered 
Company E. 47th Reg. Wis. Vol. Infantry, 
and served until the clo.se of the war. Dur- 
ing his time of service he was stationed in 
Tennessee under General Dudley. 

Mr. Cheever chose for his bride Nellie J. 
^\■ebb. a daughter of Peter Webb, of Craw- 
ford county, Wisconsin. Xine children blessed 



this union. They are: Loren E., who is cap- 
tain of a company in the 36th U. S. Regiment, 
and is now in the Philippines; Nellie M. (Hid- 
den), who has one child, Percy; George L., 
who married Maud Pecnovsky; ]\Iahlon L., 
who married Mary Pike, and has two children, 
E. Dewey and J. Elwin ; Rosa O. ; Daisy ; 
Bertha; Ruth; and Hazel. 



EUTLLE W. STONE, M. D., late 
assistant surgeon of the United States 
.A.rmy, late surgeon of the Union 
Pacific Railroad, late surgeon general of Ne- 
braska, and late superintendent of the Hospital 
for the Insane at Hastings, Nebraska, is with- 
out doubt the oldest practicing physician in 
Wahoo, Saunders county, Nebraska. When 
he located in Wahoo, in January, 1877, there 
were only two physicians there — namely, Dr. 
R. B. Morton, now retired, and Dr. Isaac Soule, 
deceased. The population of Wahoo was then 
only about 300. There were no fences, and 
but few roads. When called upon to attend 
patients, Dr. Stone was frequently obliged to 
follow a trail, and ride long distances, as the 
country round about was practically unsettled. 
Game was abundant, and included antelope, 
coyotes, and gray wolves. The winters were 
exceedingly mild. 

Dr. Stone was born in Delaware, Delaware 
county, Ohio. He is a son of Stephen W. and 
Emily (Moore) Stone. The subject hereof 
attended the public schools of his native city 
until he reached the age of sixteen j'ears. His 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



185 



education was further advanced at Washing- 
ton, Iowa, and at the Wesleyan University, in 
Ohio. He subsequently began the study of 
medicine, commencing at the same time with 
David Kittle, who is now located in Kansas 
City. 

Dr. Stone graduated from the medical de- 
partment of the State University of Iowa in 
March, 1861. In July of the same year he 
responded to his country's call for men and 
enlisted as a private in Company H, Seventh 
Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and was 
promoted to be assistant surgeon of the regi- 
ment during the same year. After passing the 
required examination, he was made assistant 
surgeon in the regular army, serving as such 
from 1864 to 1869. For a time he was with 
General Grant, but was transferred in 1863 to 
the Army of the Cumberland, serving under 
General Rosecrans. He was in active service 
at the battles of Belmont, Fort Donelson, Shi- 
loh, Chickamauga, and participated in the siege 
of Chattanooga. 

After the war was ended. Dr. Stone served 
in a hospital in Tennessee. He was trans- 
ferred afterward to headquarters at Omaha, 
Nebraska. He served in the Fourth United 
States Infantry under General Emery, with 
Colonel McAdi in command, and was sta- 
tioned along the frontier in 1866, 1867, 1868, 
and 1869, during the Red Cloud War. 

Dr. Stone married Margaret Conn, of Keo- 
kuk, Iowa. Her father, John Conn, was a na- 
tive of the north of Ireland. Early in life he 
was an Iri.sh linen weaver, but after coming to 
America he followed the trade of a stonema- 



son. He died in 1885 at the home of Dr. Stone, 
at the age of ninety-nine years and three 
months. Dr. and Mrs. Stone have five children 
— namely, Nina, Edwin W., Maude E., Elmer 
N., and Harry D. Nina Stone was born in 
Clarksville. Tennessee. She married C. W. 
Pierson, of Omaha. Edwin W. Stone was born 
in North Platte, Nebraska, and is now a medi- 
cal student. Maude E. Stone was born in Polk 
county, Nebraska. She married F. J. Tallant, 
of Clarinda, Iowa. Elmer N. Stone was also 
born in Polk county. He is an electrician at 
Wahoo. The youngest son, Harry D. Stone, 
is an accountant in Omaha. 

In 1 87 1 Dr. Stone went to North Platte, Ne- 
braska, and a little later settled on a claim in 
Polk county, where he immediately engaged in 
the stock business and general farming. Before 
six months had elapsed, however, his ability as 
a physician became known, and he was called 
upon to practice medicine again. In January, 
1877, he went to Wahoo, Saunders county, and 
began pratice there. In 1878 he was appointed 
surgeon general of the state of Nebraska, and 
filled that important office for twelve years. In 
1889 he was also appointed superintendent of 
the insane asylum at Flastings, Nebraska, but 
resigned in 1890. In 1868 he was appointed 
surgeon of the Union Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany, serving as such until 1892. when he re- 
signed that position also. 

Dr. Stone today stands at the head of his 
profession and ranks among the ablest phy- 
sicians of his state. He is a valued member 
of the Nebraska State Medical Association, 
(jf whicli lie served as president in 1880 and 



186 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



1 88 1. He is also a Mason of high degree, 
affihatiiig with St. John's Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
of Omaha; Omaha Consistory, A. A. S. R., 
South Jurisdiction; and Sesostris Temple, A. 
A. O. N. M. S. 



§AMES PALLAS, one of the most enter- 
prising and thrifty farmers and stock rais- 
ers of Chapman precinct, Saunders 
county, is a typical self-made man, his world- 
ly possessions being the result of his own un- 
tiring efforts. He was born in Bohemia and 
is a son of Frank and Mary (Trutua) Pallas. 
James Pallas came to the United States in 
1878 and on May 21 of that year he located 
in Saunders county, at which time he had $600 
which he had earned in his native country. 
With his money he bought the east 
half of the northwest quarter of sec- 
tion 23, township 14, range 6. His first 
house was 8 by 12 by 6 feet in dimensions, 
and the barn was only large enough to 
hold a team of horses and one cow. The cow 
hung herself and, in order to earn money to 
buy another, he worked out by the day. In 
1880 he bought the corner "eighty" adjoining 
his farm, a tract described as the west half 
of the northwest quarter of section 23, from 
Mr. Cajka. For this he paid $6 per acre, 
which included a dollar per acre for the break- 
ing of the soil. There is now a fine orchard 
on this property, consisting of 150 apple trees, 
22 pear trees and a number of cherry trees, 
with some grape vines. In 1892 he purchased 



the west half of the southwest quarter of sec- 
tion 14, township 14, range 6, from Charles 
Hadsal, and has about four acres set out in 
trees on this last purchase. In 1885 he built 
an addition to his house and in 1890 he com- 
pleted it to its present size. He got along 
with his straw barn until 1886, when he built 
a substantial frame barn, 18 by 28 feet, and 
a shed along its side 14 feet wide. In 1896 
he built an addition 16 by 32 feet on the south 
side of his barn, and on the west side, in 1898, 
he made another addition 14 by 32 feet. He 
also erected cattle sheds and a granary 18 
by 36 feet in 1888, and later a corn-crib 24 by 
28 feet. His house and outbuildings are in 
the best possible shape and in fact his whole 
farm is in a fine state of cultivation. He has 
a well 171 feet deep which he sank in 1891, 
and he has put up a fine windmill. Formerly 
the slough contained many springs, but all 
have gone dry with the exception of one large 
one which supplies the stock with pure water. 
In 1899 Mr. Pallas put 105 acres into corn 
and raised a crop of about 5,500 bushels. 
General farming and stock raising form his 
chief occupation, in which he is very success- 
ful, being, undoubtedly one of the most pro- 
gressive and up-to-date farmers in Saunders 
county. 

Mr. Pallas married a cousin, Mary Pallas, 
and they have six children, namely: Joseph, 
James, Anton, Charles, Mary and Frances. 
Joseph Pallas is a hustling young man, and 
in partnership with Joseph Punek he owns 
an almost new threshing outfit, which they 
operate every season with considerable sue- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



cess. The subject of this sketch is a mem- 
ber of the Reformed Presbyterian church; in 
poHtics he is a RepubHcan. He belongs to 
the C. S. P. S., a Bohemian fraternity of 

Wahoo. 



F. HAWKINSON, although young in 
years, has had wider experience in a 
-business way than most men who are 
many years his senior, and he now stands in 
the foremost rank of the young business men 
of Saunders county, Nebraska. Shrewd and 
far-sighted, he has never failed to come out suc- 
cessful from whatsoever transaction he may 
have been concerned in. Nevertheless he is 
a man of honor, treating all with fairness and 
never stooping to do a mean act. It is due 
to his careful management, more than any- 
thing else that the Railsback Bros. Elevator, of 
Malmo, is in its present thriving condition. 

Mr. Hawkinson was born at Galesburg, Illi- 
nois, in 1872, and is the oldest son of Olaf 
and Mary (Swanson) Hawkinson. He has 
a brother, Herman, who lives in Omaha, and 
a sister, Esther, living with her mother, now 
Mrs. Peter Nygren. Olaf Hawkinson was 
born in Middle Sweden, in the province of 
Blekinge, in 1835, and died April 23, 1886. 
He learned his trade and secured his certificate 
as a first-class woodworking mechanic and 
wagonmaker before coming to this country. 
His brother, John, who spent one winter visit- 
ing in this country, was the only other member 
of the family who ever came to this country. 



Olaf Hawkinson came to the United States 
in 1868, locating in Illinois. Upon his arrival 
in this country he had but one coin left — a 
Swedish 4-rikson piece of silver, which is now 
carried by A. F. Hawkinson as a souvenir 
pocket-piece. The elder Hawkinson worked 
in the woods in Illinois and soon had the mis- 
fortune to lose his first wife, Hannah, by whom 
he had two children : Swan, of Omaha, and 
Hannah, who lives with A. F. Hawkinson's 
mother. Olaf Hawkinson then married Mary 
Swanson, in Illinois and moved to Saunders 
county, Nebraska, with his family in 1873. 
There he purchased the south half of the south- 
west quarter of section 18, township 15, range 
6, from Mr. Peterson for $7 per acre. He 
subsequently proved up his claim and, in 1875, 
purchased the east half of the northwest quar- 
ter of section 19, and also the northwest quar- 
ter of the northeast quarter of the same sec- 
tion, on a foreclosed mortgage given by Mr. 
Peterson. In 1882 he bought the west half 
of the southeast quarter of section 18. The 
land was in its original state, wholly unim- 
proved, and the first improvements made by 
Mr. Hawkinson were a sod house in the south- 
east corner of his first 80 acres and a straw 
shed for a barn. In 1875 he built the present 
L-shaped house, one and a half stories high, 
the size of the main part being 24 by 26 feet. A 
few years later he erected a substantial frame 
barn, 32 feet square, together with other neces- 
sary outbuildings. He fed and dealt heavily 
in stock, and raised large quantities of broom 
corn, selling some years as much as $4,000 
worth of the latter, the price being from $75 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



to $125 per ton. He made many fine improve- 
ments upon the farm, which has been rented 
since 1886. He accumulated a handsome com- 
petency and traveled considerably during his 
last years. The Wahoo Creek drains this 
property and it is considered one of the best 
pieces of land in the county. 

A. F. Hawkinson and his brother purchased 
280 acres of the estate and later sold 120 acres 
of it to Angblum & Mitchell, of Omaha, for 
$35 per acre, and the balance, 160 acres, for 
$5,000, realizing a handsome margin on the 
sales. Mr. Hawkinson has ably shifted for 
himself since he was twelve years old, when 
he went out to work at farming; but he never 
lost sight of his educational training. He at- 
tended school during the winter months, and 
this was supplemented by several terms of 
study in Luther Academy, at Wahoo. When 
nineteen years old he rented the Bose farm 
northeast of Malmo, and later rented the farm 
of his uncle, Mr. Johnson, on which he con- 
tinued successfully for five years. He was 
subsequently in the employ of several different 
concerns at Omaha and elsewhere, always giv- 
ing the best of satisfaction, meriting and re- 
ceiving strong commendation from his em- 
ployers and associates. He first entered the 
elevator business at Weston in the position of 
manager of the Weston Grain & Stock Com- 
pany, with which he remained until October 10, 
1899, when he purchased the Malmo Grain & 
Stock Company. He was meeting with un- 
qualified success, but, having an opportunity 
to dispdse of the concern at a snug profit, to 
Railsback Brothers, whose headquarters are in 



Ashland, Nebraska, he sold to that firm, in Jan- 
uary, 1900, and has since ably served as their 
manager at Malmo. He is still one of the di- 
rectors of the Weston Grain & Stock Company, 
the six other directors being: John Edwards, 
president ; Oscar Olson, secretary ; A. Pospisil ; 
A. Barry ; Thomas Madigan ; and A. Shabalka. 
Mr. Hawkinson is a business man of sterling 
qualities and a gentleman whose acquaintance 
it is a pleasure to make. 

On April 5/1893, the subject of this sketch 
was united in marriage with Hilma Larson, a 
daughter of A. G. and Caroline (Johnson) 
Larson. Mr. and Mrs. Hawkinson have one 
child, Ruth, born in 1896. Mrs. Hawkinson 
has a brother, Edward, and a sister, Jennie. 
Mr. Larson is a prominent farmer of Mariposa 
precinct. He was born in Middle Sweden, in 
1844, and is a son of Lars and Anna Larson. 
Coming to America in 1867 he engaged in 
farming for a time in Illinois, near the town 
of Geneseo, and moved west to Omaha in 1 870. 
He bought 160 acres of railroad land at $4 
per acre in section 5, township 15, range 6, 
and subsequently sold 80 acres to Mr. Lind, 
his brother-in-law. He hired a man to do some 
brealcing and then returned to his family in 
Omaha, where he lived during the following 
sixteen years. In 1885 he built a medium- 
sized house and barn on his land and, in 1887, 
added to the house and also built a new barn, 
58 by 28 feet in dimensions. This barn was de- 
stroyed by fire in 1 897 and was replaced by one 
whose dimensions are 26 by 36 feet. Mr. Haw- 
kinson has a fine farm of 240 acres with excel- 
lent buildings and a good orchard. He owns 




GEORGE MEINER^ 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



191 



one of the finest new residences in Malmo, a 
Queen Anne cottage, its dimensions being 
27 by 38 feet. 



/^f*^ EORGE MEINERS, one of the most 
I g-p extensive land owners in Center pre- 
^'^^ cinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, began 
without capital, and has made what he has, all 
in Saunders county, in agricultural pursuits. 
Mr. Meiners is a native of the southeastern part 
of Germany. He was born in 1845, ^^^ '^ a 
son of William and Minnie (Heineng) Mein- 
ers. He grew to manhood and was schooled 
in his native country, where he worked as a 
shepherd uutil 1869. He then came to the 
United States, landing in New York City. 

Having a brother in Quincy, Illinois, Mr. 
Meiners proceeded to that place, but shortly 
afterward went farther west, to Nebraska. In 
March, 1870, he purchased 80 acres of land 
in Saunders county, which had previously been 
homesteaded by George Smith. The latter died, 
however, before making any improvements 
upon it. This land is located in Center pre- 
cinct, section 24. Mr. Meiners also purchased 
80 acres in section 25, township 14, range 7, 
making a quarter section in all, which was a 
good-sized farm in those days. 

Soon afterward, Mr. Meiners sent money to 
Lena Wempen, to whom he was affianced, and 
that young lady crossed the ocean from Ger- 
many for the express purpose of sharing the 
fortunes of her betrothed. She is a daughter of 
John Wempen, and married Mr. Meiners soon 



after her arrival in Ashland. Together they 
built a sod house, with one door and two win- 
dows, and began life together with a deter- 
mined will — little dreaming they would ever be 
the proud owners of so many broad acres as 
they have acquired. But, by hard work, they 
succeeded in overcoming all difficulties, where 
many would have failed. 

In 1885 the Porter farm, of 80 acres, was 
added to their possessions, and in 189 1 they also 
bought the Mack farm of 80 acres. About six 
and a half years before, Mr. Meiners had built 
a large house, barns, sheds, corn-cribs, etc., on 
the home place, and set out a great many fruit 
and shade trees. He subsequently purchased 
200 acres in section 21, from H. H. Verrell, and 
80 acres in section 5, Stocking precinct, from 
Mr. Dickoo. He built a house upon the last 
named farm, and otherwise improved it. By 
acquiring all these broad acres he rapidly rose 
to the front rank among the progressive and 
representative farmers of his county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Meiners have been blessed with 
a large family of children. One son died when 
only five days old. Two other children — Wil- 
liam and Mary — also died young. The others 
are Minnie, Anna, Lena, Lizzie, William, Fred, 
Emma, Maggie, and Clara. Minnie married 
F. Behrens, and has five children : Lena, Annie, 
Oscar, Irvin, and Clarence. Anna married 
Herman Keoing, and has one child — Gertie. 
Lena married Christ Neben, and has also one 
child — Martha. Lizzie married Harry Wid- 
man. 

Mr. Meiners and his family are members of 
the Evangelical church. In his political views 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



the subject of this sketch supports the Repub- 
lican party. A portrait of Mr. Meiners accom- 
panies this sketch, being presented on a pre- 
ceding page. 



TTAHARLES HENRY NIGH, owner and 
i jp proprietor of the' Red Cedar Farm, four 

^* ^and one-half miles northwest of 

Mead, Saunders county, has established one 
of the finest thorough-breeding farms in east- 
ern Nebraska. Mr. Nigh was born in Wyom- 
ing county, Pennsylvania, in August, 1851. 
He is a son of William Nigh, who is now re- 
tired and resides with the subject hereof. In 
1877 Charles Henry Nigh bought the north- 
west quarter of section 15, in Marietta pre- 
cinct, Saunders county, Nebraska. This farm 
was previously owned by J. B. Sturdevant. 
It contained at that time a large grove of cot- 
tonwood and other trees about sixteen feet 
high, and a small dwelling house. Immedi- 
ately after acquiring this farm Mr. Nigh busied 
himself in setting out a great many more shade 
trees, fine orchards, etc. The soil is of the 
very best and it is now under a high state of 
cultivation. It is said to be the best improved 
farm in Marietta precinct. As an example of 
the fertility of the soil may be mentioned the 
rapidity with which the trees grow. The first 
grove upon this farm was set out in the early 
"seventies." In 1899 Mr. Nigh cut from this 
grove 19,000 feet of lumber, over 200 feet 
of which was obtained from one log alone, 
sixteen feet long. 



In addition to planting other groves Mr. 
Nigh set out large cedar groves from which 
the farm derives its name. Seed from these 
trees fell and a new growth of trees sprang 
up. Many hundreds of these small trees have 
been taken up and planted upon neighboring 
farms. In 1895 Mr. Nigh decided to make a 
specialty of raising thorough-bred stock and 
wished to give his farm a distinctive name. 
After a brief consideration of the circumstances 
he adopted the "Red Cedar Farm" as an ap- 
propriate name for his home. 

The same year he began raising the Red 
Polled cattle and since then he has raised and 
sold large numbers. One calf commanded the 
price of $170 when eleven months old. Mr. 
Nigh owns bulls named Abelard, Aksarben, 
Captain, Cub, Leland, Snap, Whiskey Dick; 
and females named Abigail, Abilene, Bessie, 
Bounty, Beauty, Ceres, Eulalia, Eulalie, Irene, 
Leona, So, Mistake, Nina, Susie, Welcome's 
Pride, Beauty, Camilla, Iowa Davy, Nancy, 
Choice Girl, Jennett, Madge, Sally, and several 
others. The Red Polls are an English breed 
of cattle, originating in the counties of Norfolk 
and Suffolk, England, where they have been 
successfully bred by reason of their superior 
qualities in milk, butter, and beef for more 
than one hundred and fifty years. Coming 
from these cold and bleak counties, they are 
naturally hardy. They succeed in many places 
where other breeds fail. Six of these cattle 
can be wintered on the feed of five Shorthorns, 
and they can be fed, housed, and handled more 
safely than any horned cattle. They cross well 
on the Shorthorns and other cattle of the coun- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



try, removing horns, improving qualities, and 
transmitting their beautiful red color. These 
characteristics together with gentleness, large 
size, excellent milk and beef qualities and early 
maturity, establish them as the general purpose 
cattle. 

Mr. Nigh has added to his herd by careful 
selections from the best herds in Iowa, and 
both freight and money can be saved by pur- 
chasing from him. Persons desiring to buy 
registered stock of this breed can make a bet- 
ter selection by going to him than to any other 
point in the state. Visitors are always wel- 
come at the Red Cedar Farm, whether they 
come as purchasers or not, and will be met 
at Mead station, if Mr. Nigh is advised of their 
intention of visiting his farm. 

A great many things may be said in favor of 
the Red Polls. This breed is very old and 
well established as one of the best breeds in 
England. Their color is always a deep, beau- 
tiful, dark red, which is transmitted to their 
offspring and even when crossed with breeds 
of a different color 90 per cent of the grades 
will be red. They are absolutely hornless and 
when crossed with horned breeds they impart 
this quality so strongly that out of halfbloods 
not any have horns and only a few have even 
loose knobs. In size they are very good. Most 
of the bulls at maturity weigh from 1,800 to 
2,500 pounds and cows, in proportion, 1,000 
to 1,800 pounds. They mature early, are eas- 
ily kept, and have smooth, fine bone and mus- 
cle. They are very gentle and easy to handle, 
and it is rarely that one of the bulls becomes 
cross. They leave their impression strongly 



on any breed they are crossed with and their 
grade and fullblood steers are as fine, plump, 
bony-built creatures as ever went to market; 
they are quick sellers. They will huddle in a 
shed like sheep and may be loaded and shipped 
with the least possible injury. 

Mr. Nigh also raises thorough-bred Poland 
China hogs and grains of all kinds are raised 
upon his farm, principally, however, corn. In 
1892 he built his present fine residence and, 
in 1899, a large barn, 48 by 74 feet in size. 
Numerous other buildings were also added. 
Gertrude Goodale, a daughter of Alfred Good- 
ale, of Pennsylvania, became the wife of Mr. 
Nigh. Mrs. Nigh grew to womanhood and 
was cared for by her grandparents, David and 
Rebecca Goodale. Mr. and Mrs. Nigh have 
an interesting family of seven children, as fol- 
lows : Nellie M. ; Jennie E. ; Harry E. ; Roxie 
A. ; Fred J. ; June, and a baby girl. The sub- 
ject of this sketch and his estimable wife are 
active members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 



®TTO HECKLANDER. Prominent 
among the successful agriculturists in 
Marietta precinct who have contributed 
largely toward the growth and prosperity of 
Saunders county, Nebraska, is the subject of 
this sketch, who owns a fine large farm in sec- 
tion 32. 

Mr. Hecklander is a native of Sweden. He 
is a son of Swan and Ulrica (Johnson) Swan- 
son. Otto Hecklander came to America in 
1865, locating in Chicago, Illinois. He fol- 



194 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



lowed farming in that vicinity for some time 
and saved $200. 

In 1869 he homesteaded 80 acres of land 
in the south half of the northwest quarter of 
section 32, which is the same farm upon which 
he still resides. An additional purchase was 
made of 52 acres at $11 per acre some 
years later. He first built a sod and board 
house combined, as did most of the early set- 
tlers. In 1875 a small frame house was added, 
and in 1889 the present residence was built. 
He set out large groves of trees, orchards, etc. 
Some of these trees died and, in 1898, 500 
shade trees were set out, and 200 more in 
1900. 

Mr. Hecklander now has one of the finest 
fruit, stock and grain farms in his locality. 
July 16, 1878, Mr. Hecklander married Assa- 
rina Berggren. Two children were born to 
them who are twins, and are called Hilma and 
Hulda by their fond parents. Mrs. Heck- 
lander is a woman of excellent qualities and 
occupies a high place in the estimation of her 
many friends. Both she and her husband are 
members of the Lutheran church. The sub- 
ject of this sketch is well known throughout 
the county as a man of sterling traits and is 
widely respected and esteemed. 



fOHN ALBERT OLSON, a leading 
farmer of Center precinct, Saunders coun- 
ty, Nebraska, has been a land-owner in 
that county since 1888. Mr. Olson was born 
in Knox county, Illinois, in 1855. He is a 



son of Peter P. and Britta (Matson) Olson. 

Peter P. Olson is a native of Sweden. He 
was thrown upon his own resources when only 
eight years old and was compelled to make his 
own way in the world. He went to sea for sev- 
eral years and then embarked on a sailing ves- 
sel bound for America. Going westward on 
his arrival in this country, he found employ- 
ment on a vessel sailing out of Chicago and 
was a sailor on the great lakes for several 
years. Afterward he worked upon a farm in 
Illinois for a time and subsequently purchased 
a farm in Knox county, in that state. After 
making extensive improvements upon this farm 
he sold it and made a handsome profit on his 
investment. In 1877 he went to Saunders 
county, Nebraska, where he purchased 280 
acres of land. This farm contained a beauti- 
ful grove and a small house, 12 by 14 feet in 
dimensions. Mr. Olson enlarged the house 
and built barns and other farm buildings. In 
1890 he removed to Mead, Nebraska, and re- 
tired from farm life. Since the death of his 
wife he has made his home with his sons. His 
wife was Britta Matson, who died in 1898, 
aged sixty-nine years. Their union resulted 
in six children, namely: Mary, wife of An- 
drew Swanson; John Albert, the subject of 
this biography ; Frank O. ; Charles E. ; Minnie, 
wife of A. E. Sutherland ; and Rose. Peter P. 
Olson is a Prohibitionist and a devoted mem- 
ber of the Swedish Mission church. Upon 
his retirement he gave each of his children a 
fine start in life. 

John Albert Olson was reared to farm life. 
In 1878 he purchased 80 acres of land from 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Mr. Nelson, and in 1888 80 acres from D. 
Fraser. A small house was the only building 
on this tract. Mr. Olson immediately began 
improving his land. He built a larger house 
and a barn and set out orchards which now 
rank among the finest in the county. He also 
has groves of grand old trees, which were 
among the earliest improvements. Mr. Olson 
raises both stock and grain. 

The subject of this sketch was joined in 
marriage with Ida C. Hultburg, a native of 
Sweden. Six children blessed this union, as 
follows: Hilda, Esther, Edith, Alice, Ruth 
(deceased), and John. In his political opin- 
ions Mr. Olson is in sympathy with the Popu- 
lists. He entertains broad, liberal views on 
religious subjects and has charity for all. His 
beautiful and productive farm shows what man 
can do to cultivate and improve wild prairie 
land and to convert it into productive farms. 



-r^"^ LLIS V. MENGEL, postmaster at 
R Valparaiso, Saunders county, Nebraska, 
'^ ■ ^was born in Sangamon county, Illi- 
nois, November 22, 1846. He has been en- 
gaged in various business pursuits in which 
he has eminently succeeded. 

Isaac Mengel, his father, was born near 
Reading, Pennsylvania, and was a carpenter 
by trade. At the age of eighteen years he 
journeyed to Ohio, where he remained for 
a short time and then returned to Pennsylva- 
nia. In the early "forties" he located in San- 
gamon county, Illinois. The West held out 



great inducements to parties seeking new 
homes, and in 1868 Mr. Mengel gathered his 
family together and moved to Saunders county, 
Nebraska, where he took up a homestead claim 
about five miles northwest of Valparaiso. He 
was on the homestead six years when he was 
elected county judge of Saunders county and 
moved to Wahoo, where he lived until the 
time of his death. He died aged sixty-eight 
years. After his retirement from the bench, 
he was made justice of the peace, and held 
that office for a number of years. 

Isaac Mengel married Eunice M. Meacham, 
who was among the first white children born 
in Sangamon county, Illinois. She now re- 
sides at Geneva, Nebraska, aged seventy-eight 
years. They had twelve children, five of 
whom survive and have gone from the pa- 
rental roof and built homes for themselves 
and their families in various states. They 
are as follows : Ethan M., residing at Mingo, 
Kansas; Ellis V., the subject hereof; Arminda 
J. (Giffin), of Greenwood, Kansas; Julia D. 
(Stephens), now residing in Akron, Colorado; 
and Hattie B. (Edgscomb), who lives in Ge- 
neva, Nebraska. 

Ellis V. Mengel spent his boyhood days in 
Illinois, and moved to Nebraska with his pa- 
rents in 1868. He began farming for himself 
in 1874 and the grasshoppers took the crop 
that year, so he returned to Illinois, remaining 
there till the spring of 1877, when he returned 
to Saunders county. In 1882 he left the farm 
and moved into the village of Valparaiso. 
From 1882 to 1884 he was in tlie railway mail 
service and later was engaged in the hard- 



196 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



ware business under the firm name of Men- 
gel Bros. This business was disposed of in 
a few years. September, 1897, he received 
the appointment of postmaster at Valparaiso 
and is now installed in that office. He is a 
consistent Republican. Fraternally he belongs 
to the I. O. O. F. and Modern Woodmen of 
America. The subject of this sketch married 
Amanda Dodds in 1879. They have four 
children, named Fern E., Clarence L., and 
Floyd and Lloyd, twins. 



ETER GIBSON, one of the most suc- 
cessful farmers and large land owners 
in Marietta precinct, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, is also a mechanic of no mean ability, 
having spent many years of his life at the 
blacksmith trade. 

Mr. Gibson was born in the southern part 
of Sweden in 1836. He is a son of Jeppa 
Gibson, and at the age of seventeen years he 
came to America, settling in Illinois, where 
he followed farming at $8 per month 
and thought that was high wages. In i860 
he took a mining tour to California, Oregon 
and Idaho, remaining in the far west for six 
years. In 1865 he returned to Knoxville, Illi- 
nois, and followed blacksmithing. That occu- 
pation he pursued for eight years, when he 
was obliged to discontinue it. In the mean- 
time he saved some money with which he then 
went west hoping to invest it more advantage- 
ously than he could in Illinois. 

In 1 87 1 Mr. Gibson bought the southwest 



quarter of section 27, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, which contained a young grove, and he 
builtasmall house, 16 by 28 feet in size. A small 
portion of the land had previously been broken. 
This tract formerly belonged to Mr. Allmen. 
In 1874 the subject hereof purchased lumber 
at Fremont, Nebraska, and built a frame house. 
In 1880 he bought the adjoining 80 acres, 
east, and moved his house to that tract, which 
was formerly owned by Curt Thomas. The 
house is now used as extra granary, as Mr. 
Gibson subsequently built a fine residence, set 
out groves, and planted nearly two acres of 
land in fruit trees. From the early groves 
set out on his place he has cut and given away 
large quantities of wood. 

Peter Gibson married Matilda Johnson, 
daughter of Andrew Frederick Johnson. Mrs. 
Gibson was born in Sweden. Her father came 
to America with his family, settling in Chicago, 
where he died in 1852, aged thirty-seven years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gibson have been blessed with 
a family of ten children, viz. : Esther Cor- 
nelia, Emma, John, Rosella, Lily, Josie, Ernest, 
Alvin, Leroy, and Ruth. The last named died 
at the age of nine months and eighteen days. 
Esther Cornelia married Rev. L. J. Sundquist, 
of Kansas, ^nd they had three children: Mi- 
randa, Victor, and Lawrence. Emma married 
F. O. Johnson, of Pueblo ; three children also 
bless their home : Leroy, Delphia, and Irene. 
John is a hardware merchant, of Mead, Ne- 
bra.ska. Rosella is the wife of E. G. Berg, a 
prosperous harness maker, of Mead. Lily is 
the wife of Carl Thorson, of Marietta pre- 
cinct; thcv have one child, Lillian. The re- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



197 



maining children still brighten the home place. 
Mr. Gibson is greatly respected for his many 
fine qualities and is recognized as one of the 
active and progressive men of his community. 
He has served as a member of the school board 
ever since the district was established, twenty- 
five years ago. He has also filled the offices 
of road supervisor and assessor. In 1886 he 
bought 40 acres of land in section 26, known 
as the Sward property. His farm is devoted 
to both stock and grain. He usually has from 
200 to 300 head of hogs, 40 to 50 head of 
cattle, and raises large quantities of corn, oats, 
barley, and rye. 



fOHN W. KNAPP. From the list of 
the many prosperous farmers of Saunders 
county, Nebraska, the name of John W. 
Knapp, a prominent fruit grower and stock 
raiser of Stocking precinct, must not be omit- 
ted. Mr. Knapp was born in Cook county, Illi- 
nois, 18 miles southwest of Chicago, in 
185 1, but moved to Hancock county, Illinois, 
when a boy. He is a son of William D. and 
Deborah (Griffith) Knapp. His father was 
a farmer and went to Nebraska in 1882, set- 
tling in Stocking precinct. He purchased the 
farm now owned by T. J. Snelling. William 
D. Knapp died when seventy-nine years old, 
and his mother passed away at the age of sev- 
enty-five years. Their children were : Seely B., 
of Omaha; Albert C, of Ithaca, Nebraska; 
Mary, wife of Edward Wright, of St. Louis, 
Mo.; Horace, also of Ithaca; John W., the 



subject hereof; and William D., Jr., of Wahoo. 

John W. Knapp began life for himself in 
Illinois in the spring of 1873 and in 1874 he 
purchased land in Saunders county, Nebraska, 
in section 5, township 13, range 8. The tract 
is now owned by A. Schueneman. Upon this 
farm Mr. Knapp built a house, barns, corn- 
cribs, etc., and set out orchards. He also 
fenced and otherwise improved it. In 1892 
he sold out and purchased 40 acres of land in 
section 16 of Stocking precinct, from Mr. 
Schoelett. He also bought 160 acres located 
in the northwest corner of section 15. These 
tracts are directly adjoining each other, be- 
ing separated only by a road. 

In 1896 Mr. Knapp built a large residence 
of modern design, suitable barns, granaries, 
etc. The same year he sold the 40-acre tract 
in section 16 to C. Beadle. Mr. Knapp has 
a two-acre orchard containing all kinds of fruit. 
Much attention is given to stock raising upon 
this farm, and it is well stocked with thorough- 
bred Shorthorn cattle and Poland-China hogs. 
The farm is situated about one mile from the 
city of Wahoo, in a very choice location. It 
is considered one of the finest farms in Saun- 
ders county. 

Mr. Knapp married Nancy Isabelle Tull, a 
daughter of Josiah Tull, of Hancock county, 
Illinois. Five children blessed this union, all 
of whom were boys. They are: Harry R., 
a farmer; Wirt E., an employee of a com- 
mission house in St. Louis; Roy C, a tele- 
graph operator on the B. & M. R. Railroad ; 
Maurice E., and William J. Mr. Knapp and 
family all worship at the Methodist church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



His political sympathies and support are with 
the Republican party. Fraternally he is a mem- 
ber and past grand of I. O. O. F. Lodge No. 
58, of Wahoo. Mr. Knapp is a self-made man 
in every sense of the word. He has worked 
hard for what he has and his success is well 
deserved. 



■Y^T F. BLUNK. a successful lumber deal- 
Ipl er of Weston, Chapman precinct, is 
Vi— ^another self-made man of Saunders 
county, Nebraska. Mr. Blunk commenced his 
career as a common laborer, without capital, 
and by his own exertions, good judgment and 
business ability he has risen to the ranks of 
the successful business men of his vicinity. 
Mr. Blunk is a native of Holstein, Germany, 
where he remained until 1867. At that time 
he and his brother, C. C. Blunk, came to Amer- 
ica, settling in Davenport, Scott county, Iowa. 
His parents, John Henry and Catherine 
(Ghral) Blunk, were common laboring people. 
Late in the year 1867 they also crossed the 
ocean and settled in Davenport. The beloved 
mother is now deceased and the father has 
made his home with the subject hereof since 
1 886. They reared four sons, as follows : C. 
H., now a retired farmer of Ida county, Iowa; 
H. F., the subject of this biography; C. C, a 
prosperous blacksmith of South Omaha, Ne- 
braska; and M. C, a retired farmer of Ma- 
quoketa, Iowa. 

After remaining about five years in Scott 
county, Iowa, H. F. Blunk went to Fremont, 



Nebraska. That was about 1873 and he fol- 
lowed farming for one year. He then entered 
the lumber business as an employee of Cap- 
tain St. John, with whom he worked for more 
than two years, or until 1876. He afterward 
did similar work three years for Nye, Coleson 
& Co. In 1879 Mr. Blunk went to Wahoo, 
Nebraska, and entered the employ of Anton 
Jansa, with whom he remained until Mr. Jansa 
sold his business to Blackstead Brothers, for 
whom he worked until 1883. From that time 
until 1885 he served as superintendent of the 
county farm. He then moved to Weston and 
started into business for himself. 

At that time Weston was a very small place, 
but Clark, Heaton & Co. were also engaged 
in the lumber business there. Two years later 
they sold out to Louis Bradford. Mr. Blunk 
built a fine residence at Weston, also a fine of- 
fice, scales, lumber sheds, etc. He now has 
sheds measuring 140 feet in length, and carries 
from $7,000 to $9,000 worth of stock. His 
business has more than doubled itself since he 
first located in Weston. 

Mr. Blunk married Mary Hansen, a daugh- 
ter of C. H. Hansen, one of the pioneer settlers 
of Cedar precinct. Two children bless their 
home. They are Henry C. and Minnie C. 
The former is twenty-three years old and is 
now traveling at Cape Nome, Alaska. The 
latter is twelve years of age and attends school. 

Mr. Blunk is independent in politics. He 
has served twelve years as town treasurer and 
six years as treasurer of the school board, of 
which he has been a member for nine years. 
He joined the I. O. O. F. lodge at Fremont, 



/ 




JOHN A. SNELLING. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Nebraska, but his membership was subsequent- 
ly transferred to the Wahoo lodge, with which 
he still affiliates. His religious views are in 
accord with the German Lutheran church, of 
which he is a devout member. Mr. Blunk de- 
serves great credit for the successful manner 
in which he has conducted his business. 



§OHN A. SNELLING, a progressive 
farmer and one of the leading citizens 
of Saunders county, Nebraska, whose 
portrait accompanies this sketch, owns a fine 
estate in section 13, Stocking precinct. He is 
a native of Tuscarawas county, Ohio, where he 
was born in 1832, and is a son of Alexander 
and Agnes (Cray) Snelling. 

The subject hereof was reared on the farm 
and received a good intellectual training in the 
schools of his native county. In early man- 
hood he taught several years, being engaged in 
that capacity two years in Ohio, three years in 
Illinois, one year in Iowa, and one year in In- 
diana. He was well qualified for the work 
and seemed gifted with the power of imparting 
his knowledge to others, which is so often lack- 
ing and is always essential to a competent in- 
structor. At the first call in 1861 for men to 
serve three months in putting down the rebel- 
lion, he enlisted from Ottawa, Illinois, in Com- 
pany H, nth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, but after two months of service was 
sent home because of sickness. In October, 
1861, he re-enlisted in the 53d Illinois Regi- 
ment, and his company was consolidated with 
the 15th Illinois Cavalry. Eighteen months 



afterward Mr. Snelling was appointed to assist 
in organizing the ist Alabama Cavalry, being 
subsequently appointed second lieutenant. With 
that regiment he served until the close of the 
war, receiving high praise for his many gallant 
deeds. Upon returning home from the war he 
again taught school in Iowa. He was shortly 
after married to Mary Elizabeth Shauler, a 
daughter of John A. Shauler, of Ottawa, Illi- 
nois. Mr. Snelling then moved with his wife 
upon her father's farm in Iowa, renting the 
prop^erty. He subsequently took up 80 acres of 
land there, which, after making many improve- 
ments, he sold, and in 1868 removed the Ne- 
liras. He started for the lumber camps in Wy- 
oming, where he remained one season ; upon his 
return he took up a homestead in section 24, 
Stocking precinct, Saunders county. He 
erected a good house, set out groves and an 
orchard, and built a good set of farm buildings. 
In 1890 he disposed of this property and pur- 
chased a quarter section of railroad land, 
wholly unimproved, in section 13. There he has 
built him a large and commodious house, good, 
substantial barns, and other outbuildings. He 
set out shade and fruit trees, which under his 
constant care are in excellent condition, and 
also put all his fields under cultivation, witli 
the exception of 45 acres, which is good pas- 
ture land. He is extensively engaged in grain 
raising of all kinds, and has been unqualifiedly 
successful. He raised as much as 90 bushels 
of corn to the acre one year, and the yield is 
often 75 bushels. A great change has taken 
place in the conditions of Nebraska since he 
has lived there, and Mr. Snelling pleasantly 
recalls the time when there was an abundance 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



of deer and antelope in his section. His place 
is well stocked with hogs, horses of good qual- 
ity and Shorthorn cattle. 

The subject of this sketch and his wife are 
the parents of eight children, as follows: 
Thomas L., John Alexander, George Vincent, 
Mary Eliza, and Rebecca Josephine, all of 
whom are living; and Fanny Alice, Henry F., 
and Florence Agnes, who are deceased. Thomas 
L. Snelling married Mary Keller, by whom 
he has three children, — Charles Henry, Flor- 
ence Louise, and Margaret Elizabeth ; he lives 
on his own farm. John Alexander Snelling 
lives on the parental homestead, and is en- 
gaged in farming and stock raising. George 
Vincent Snelling is engaged in the sheep indus- 
try in Wyoming. In politics Mr. Snelling is a 
Populist, and has served as school director and 
road superintendent. Religiously, he is a faith- 
ful member of the Methodist church. He be- 
longs to the Grand Army of the Republic. 

John Snelling, the great-grandfather of John 
A., served seven years in the Revolutionary 
War. He was a Virginian and fought under 
George Washington. 



AVID ERASER, a substantial farmer 
I of Center precinct, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, has filled the position of 
road supervisor in his precinct for the past 
nineteen years. 

Mr. Eraser is a typical Scotchman. He was 
born in Perth, Scotland, July 14, 1848. His 
father, David Eraser, was a blacksmith and 
farmer. In 1870 he came to America, settling 



in Canada. There his first marriage occurred, 
in 1874. He wedded Charlotte F. Fletcher, a 
daughter of John Fletcher, of East Canada. 
She died in 1896 aged forty-five years. She 
was the mother of four children, namely: 
John, who died in 1886; 'Charles; James; 
and Robert, who died in 1886, when 
six years of age. Quite recently Mr. 
Fraser contracted a second matrimonial 
alliance, the bride being Mrs. Kate Rich- 
ardson, whose maiden name was Tarpening. 
She has six children by her first marriage. 
Their names are : Charles, Olive, Stella, Ver- 
non, Earl, and Delia. 

Mr. Fraser came west in 1874. He pur- 
chased a quarter of section 12, Center precinct, 
Saunders county, Nebraska, from Mr. Vin- 
nage. There was only a combined board and 
sod house on this land. A small grove had 
also been set out. Mr. Fraser built a large 
and handsome residence, commodious barns, 
etc. Soon afterward he bought 40 acres from 
Mr. Hays, and also 80 acres from Mr. Craig. 
He subsequently sold 80 acres to J. A. Olson, 
which had previously been homesteaded by 
Peter Ackerson. Mr. Eraser's present resi- 
dence was built in 1875. It is one of the 
handsomest in Center precinct and has beau- 
tiful surroundings. The principal products of 
this farm are grain and live stock, and oats 
and corn surpass all other crops. About 
75 head of fine cattle are kept, some of 
which are graded Durhams. Mr. Eraser has 
also about 100 head of hogs, and raises only 
the best. Mr. Eraser's son, Charles, who as- 
sists his father on the farm, keeps two thor- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



oughbred stallions, Keota Franklin, a hand- 
some Percheron, weighing 1,700 pounds avoir- 
dupois; and Nexible Boy, a beautiful Hamble- 
tonian of great promise, now three years old. 
Mr. Fraser is quite popular, and takes a great 
deal of pleasure 'in promoting any measure 
which promises real benefit to the community. 
In politics Mr. Fraser is a Populist. 



•OHN A. ANDERSON, one of the enter- 
prising business men of Wahoo, Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, is a member of 
the firm of J. A. & F. W. Anderson, proprie- 
tors of a music store and dealers in real estate. 
He is also postmaster of Wahoo, and has been 
closely identified with the growth and develop- 
ment of that city since he located there. He 
is a man of good business ability, shrewd and 
calculating, and his efforts have been attended 
by the greatest success. 

Mr. Anderson was born in Skaraborg, 
Sweden, in 1856, and is a son of Andreas 
Anderson, who came to the United 
States in 1870. The latter located in Henry 
county, Illinois, for one year and then in Page 
county, Iowa, where he has since been engaged 
in agricultural pursuits. He married Chris- 
tianna Swenson, who departed this life in 1869, 
and their living children are as follows : An- 
drus A.; John A.; Mary Josephine; Frank 
W. ; Claus H., and Minnie W. 

John A. Anderson attended the public 
schools, after which he worked out as a farm 
hand, being employed by his uncle. He re- 



ceived as compensation $10 per month for the 
first year, $12.50 per month for the second 
year, $15 per month for the third year, and 
$18 per month for the fourth year. He 
worked for his father in 1874 and then engaged 
in farming on his own account until 1880. 
Having lived industriously and frugally he laid 
by sufficient money to permit of his entering 
college. He entered the Swedish Augustana 
College, at Rock Island, Illinois, but was 
obliged to give up his study in 1883 because 
of ill health. He was successfully engaged in 
the life insurance business until 1885, when 
with his brother, Frank W. Anderson, he went 
to Mead, Saunders county, Nebraska, and 
opened a furniture and music store. In 1887 
he became connected with the Union Pacific 
Railroad Land Department as traveling agent, 
and real estate has since been a large part of 
the firm business. He was identified with the 
Union Pacific Railroad Land Department 
until 1896, traveling form ocean to 
ocean, and the sum total of his real 
estate deals probably amounts to more 
than that of any other man in the state 
of Nebraska. In 1889 the furniture depart- 
ment of the firm's store was disposed of and 
they removed to Wahoo, Nebraska, and opened 
a music store, which they have since conducted 
in addition to their extensive real estate busi- 
ness. In August, 1898, Mr. Anderson as- 
sumed the duties of postmaster of Wahoo, re- 
lieving J. F. Sherman, and he now continues 
in that capacity. A postoffice was first estab- 
lished in Wahoo by J. M. Lee, who built a 
residence in which the office was located in 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



1869 — the mail then being carried by horse 
over the trail. Today the postoffice is third 
class, and receives and discharges eight mails 
per day, employing three clerks. It is now 
located in the Safranek Building, on Fifth 
street, and its appointments are of the best. 
The subject of this sketch was a member of 
the school board, serving, for the last year, as 
its vice-president, and he takes a deep and earn- 
est interest in educational matters. 

Mr. Anderson was united in marriage with 
Ellen C. Johnson, a daughter of John Johnson, 
of Page county, Iowa, and they are the parents 
of four children, namely : L. Ruth E. C. ; 
Karl A. R. ; J. Paul A., and Ruby Marie Con- 
stancia. At the Nebraska conference of the 
Swedish Lutheran church in 1897 he was 
elected by acclamation a director of Luther 
Academy for a term of three years. 



I.- 



POSPISIL, a prominent young busi- 
ness man of Weston, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, is the proprietor of the only 
drug store in that place. His store is located in 
the Bilan building, which he rents. He carries a 
large and complete assortment of pure drugs, 
and also handles wall paper, paints, and the 
thousand and one articles usually found in an 
up-to-date drug store. 

Mr. Pospisil is a native of Saunders county, 
where he was born in 1871. He is a son of 
John and Mary (Dolezal) Pospisil, both na- 
tives of Bohemia. They came to America 
early in 1864 and took up a homestead in Elk 
precinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, in 1871. 



Their homestead was located in section 27; 
they afterward acquired land in sections 28 and 
33 or 34, making 160 acres in all. Eight chil- 
dren were born to this worthy couple, four of 
whom are still living. Those living are : An- 
ton, Mary, Annie, and J. J., to whom thfs writ- 
ing pertains. Anton married Mary Virgil 
and resides upon the home farm. They have 
nine children. Mary is the wife of John 
Woita, a prominent merchant of Weston. 
Annie married Frank Virgil, of Elk pre- 
cinct, and has one daughter — Mary. 

J. J. Pospisil is the youngest member of his 
father's family. In his youth he worked on 
the parental farm; from 1887 to 1892 he was a 
student at St. Benedict's College, at Atchison, 
Kansas, where for five years he studied Latin, 
Greek and other languages. In the winter of 
1892 and 1893 he taught school in the Kunish 
district ; in 1893 ^"d 1894 he also taught in dis- 
trict 98. 

The following year Mr. Pospisil spent in St. 
Louis, Missouri, where he attended the College 
of Pharmacy. During the winter of 1895 and 
1896 he again taught school in district 98. June 
I, 1896, he started in the drug business at Wes- 
ton, in partnership with Dr. Stockert, who is 
now located at Elmwood, Nebraska. About two 
years later Mr. Pospisil purchased the interest 
of his partner, and since then has continued to 
conduct the business alone. About the same 
time he changed the location of his drug store 
by moving four doors south, into his present 
commodious quarters in the Bilan building. 
His stock is first-class in every respect and is 
estimated to be worth $3,000. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Mr. Pospisil married Josie Jayhawk, a 
daughter of Winslow Jayhawk, a prosperous 
farmer of Chapman precinct. One child blesses 
this union — Bessie — still an infant. Winslow 
Jawhawk, Mr. Pospisil's father-in-law, was 
born in Bohemia in 1845. He is a son of Jo- 
seph and Frances Jayhawk, and came to Amer- 
ica when six years old, locating in Iowa. In 
1872 Mr. Jayhawk went west to Saunders 
county, Nebraska, and took up a homestead 
claim of 160 acres, which is the northeast quar- 
ter of section 26, township 15, range 6, in Elk 
precinct. There he lived in a dug-out, 14 by 
16 feet. In 1880 Mr. Jayhawk sold his farm 
to Mr. Tomchicek, for $1,600. He then pur- 
chased three 40-acre tracts in the northwest 
quarter of section 15, near Weston. He made 
extensive improvements on this land, set out 
large fruit orchards, etc., and engaged in grain 
raising. 

Mr. Jayhawk married Annie Kopetsky, a 
daughter of Frank Kopetsky, who is now de- 
ceased. Eleven children were born to them, 
of whom those living are : Charles, who mar- 
ried Josie Comenda and conducts a livery sta- 
ble at Prague, Nebraska; John, who is still at 
home ; Henry, who married Lena Mattis and is 
associated with his brother, at Prague; Mary, 
wife of Mr. Ficinec, a hardware dealer at Wes- 
ton ; Josie, the wife of Mr. Pospisil ; and Emma, 
Annie and Rosie, all of whom are still at home. 
Mr. Jayhawk enlisted in the Iowa Volunteers 
in 1862 and served until the close of the war. 
He is independent in politics and is a member of 
the G. A. R. of Valparaiso, Nebraska. 

Mr. Pospisil resides in a beautiful home in 



Weston. He belongs to the Roman Catholic 
church, and is a member of the Catholic Work- 
men, of Weston. He is a man widely known 
and esteemed for his integrity, honesty, and 
uprightness, both in social and public life. He 
has served as a member of the town board, 
and is now a member of the school board. In 
politics he is bound to neither party, and votes 
for the best man. His business has been pros- 
perous and his patronage is ever on the increase. 



fOSEPH HILTSHER, a rising young 
farmer of Chapman precinct, Saunders 
county, Nebraska, is a native of Bohemia, 
where his birth, from German parentage, oc- 
curred July 19, 1863. His father, Frank Hilt- 
sher, died in 1870. His brother, Frank, is 
also deceased. 

Mr. Hiltsher went to Saunders county in 
1880. He worked for several different farm- 
ers in the northern part, among them being 
Thomas Lorenz and Jack Peterson. After 
working there for several years he spent one 
year in Kansas. The following year he re- 
turned to Saunders county and rented a farm 
from Mr. Phillips. 

December 12, 1891, he purchased 80 acres 
of the south half of section 29, which is his 
present home. He paid $2,900 for the tract, 
which he soon began to improve, building a 
house, etc., and', one year later, a barn. For 
two years he hauled water but now has a fine 
well 200 feet deep, operated by a windmill. 
Neighbors were not so close together when 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Hiltsher first settled there as they are at the 
present day. Joseph Hihsher carries on gen- 
eral farming, but devotes the greater part of 
his time to stock raising. He was united in 
marriage with Miss Fiedler, a sister of James 
Fiedler. Three children were born of this 
union. They are: Emma, Gertie, and Ida. 
The subject of this sketch is a sturdy and hard- 
working man and is well liked by all who know 
him. He is regarded as one of the most ener- 
getic and progressive of the younger farmers 
of Chapman precinct and his friends unite in 
predicting for him a bright and prosperous fu- 
ture. 



J-^Vl^Nel 



CARPENTER, an enterprising 
md well-known citizen of Weston, 
Nebraska, is a native of Wapello 
county, Iowa, and was born in 1855. He is 
a son of William and Mary (Tinkam) Car- 
penter. His father died when the son was 
but* eighteen months old. 

Mr. Carpenter moved to Saunders county, 
Nebraska, in 1882, and for $20 per acre pur- 
chased of Mr. Morton, who now lives in 
Omaha, the southwest quarter of the south- 
east quarter and the southeast quarter of 
the southwest quarter of section ^2, town- 
ship 15, range 6. Three years later he 
bought of Mr. Morton the west half of the 
northwest quarter of section 32, township 
15, range 6, and sold this land in 1899 to D. 
A. March, of Weston, receiving $30 per acre. 
This latter tract had l)een well improved and 
cultivated, although there were no buildings on 



the land. Mr. Carpenter built a house on the 
west end of his 80 acres and, in 1892, moved 
the building to its present site, on the east end. 
He also built a substantial barn, 32 by 36 feet, 
and these buildings, together with the orchard 
and fine shade trees, make the place an excep- 
tionally attractive one. 

Mr. Carpenter is a very good musician and 
as such is favorably known throughout the vi- 
cinity. He plays the violin and cornet and 
plays those instruments well. Owing to the 
retiring disposition of Mr. Carpenter and his 
modesty in speaking of his accomplishments, 
we have secured the following information 
from one of his personal friends, Mr. Lilli- 
bride : Mr. Carpenter has been the recog- 
nized leader of the Weston band since 1888, 
when he organized it. It contained sixteen in- 
struments, all brass. Since the organization 
he has been the principal factor in holding the 
members together, drilling them without com- 
pensation, and today Weston has a band of 
which any town might justly be proud. One 
or two evenings a week Mr. Carpenter devotes 
to the young members of the association, who 
fill any vacancy which may happen to arise. 
The citizens of Weston greatly appreciate Mr. 
Carpenter's efforts in establishing and main- 
taining a musical feature in the town, and he 
receives praise on all sides for his untiring 
efforts. 

The subject of this sketch married Susan 
Pickering, a daughter of George Pickering, 
who lives in Bureau county, Illinois, and they 
have one son, LeRoy, who is nineteen years 
of age. LeRoy received his education in Wes- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



ton, Wahoo and Lincoln, Nebraska, and, like 
his father, is a fine musician, being able to 
play on any instrument. He is gifted with a 
natural talent for music. Mr. Carpenter is 
a Democrat in politics and takes an active in- 
terest in the progress and development of Wes- 
ton, where he has made many warm friends. 
In religious matters his views are liberal. 



Xg^EORGE W. MEREDITH, M. D., 
I gra popular and skillful physician of Ash- 
land, Saunders county, Nebraska, has, 
perhaps, the most extensive practice there. He 
is frequently obliged to attend patients 25 or 
30 miles distant, besides having a large prac- 
tice in Ashland and its immediate vicinity. Dr. 
Meredith is a native of Bloomingsburg, Fulton 
county, Indiana. His father, Peter Meredith, 
spent the greater part of his life in that vicin- 
ity, engaged in farming, but for the past ten 
years he has made his home with his son, the 
subject of this writing. 

George W. Meredith attended the public 
schools of his native place, after which he took 
a thorough course at the state normal school 
at Terre Haute, Indiana. He then commenced 
the study o£ medicine under Dr. N. J. Clymer, 
of Bloomingsburg. Later he entered the state 
university at Indianapolis and graduated from 
the medical department in the class of 1873. 

In June of the same year he opened an office 
at Union Mills, Laporte county, Indiana, and 
began the practice of his chosen profession. 
He continued his practice there until October, 
1880, when he discontinued it and took a pleas- 



ure trip through the West. On his way east 
from Lincoln, Nebraska, he made the acquaint- 
ance of Dennis Deen. Mr. Deen needs no in- 
troduction to the people of Ashland, as he is one 
of its oldest and most esteemed residents. He 
started a mill in that vicinity before a village 
was even thought of. He has lived there ever 
since and knows everybody. Being a man of 
excellent judgment he recognized in Dr. Mere- 
dith just the kind of physician and surgeon 
needed in his locality. He urged and advised 
him to locate in Ashland, Nebraska. 

After giving the matter serious consideration 
Dr. Meredith finally acted upon Mr. Deen's 
advice, and, December 6, 1882, he opened an 
office in Ashland. Nor has he ever regretted 
his action in this matter, for with his superior 
skill and ability he has won his way into the 
hearts of the people and increased his practice 
to its present extent. 

Dr. Meredith married Clara L. Vail, a 
daughter of H. B. Vail, of Wataga, Illinois. 
She died, leaving the following three children : 
George B., Clara Estelle and Ernest L. George 
B. Meredith graduated from the Ashland High 
School and then took a course at the state uni- 
versity. He is now superintendent of the Mis- 
souri-Kansas Telephone Company, with office 
at Wichita, Kansas. Some time after the death 
of his first wife Dr. Meredith contracted a sec- 
ond matrimonial alliance, this time with Mrs. 
Ellen E. Curtis, of Ashland, Nebraska. 

Dr. Meredith is a very prominent Mason. 
He is a charter member of F. & A. M. Lodge, 
No. no, of Ashland, and is past master of the 
same. He also affiliates with the Knights Tern- 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



plar of Lincoln, Nebraska. He is a member of 
the Mystic Shrine and Rose Croix Scottish 
Rites. He is a member and past grand of the 
1. O. O. F., and is past royal patriarch of the 
encampment. He belongs to the Rebecca 
Lodge, the Knights of Pythias, and is now 
serving as assistant surgeon on the general's 
staff, of the Uniform Rank of the K. of P., 
Nebraska Brigade. He belongs to the Wood- 
men of the World, the Modern Woodmen of 
America and the A. O. U. W. 

Dr. Meredith is also a member of the Ne- 
braska State Medical Society. He purchased 
the Sanford property on Fourth street, in Ash- 
land, and remodeled and enlarged it. He also 
built a convenient office, with reception room, 
waiting parlors and consultation rooms. Every- 
thing is fitted up in the best possible style. In 
his political opinions the subject hereof is a 
true Democrat. He served his party, in 1892, 
as mayor of the city of Ashland, and he will 
be a candidate for state senator of the fifth 
senatorial district of Nebraska at the next elec- 
tion. 



■ ENRY ROGERS, a prominent granger 
of Saunders county, Nebraska, owns a 
fine and well improved farm in Clear 
Creek precinct, about two miles from the town 
of Memphis. Mr. Rogers was born in Fulton 
county, Illinois, in 1858. He is a son of 
Michael and Mary (Kingery) Rogers. 

Michael Rogers was born near Louisville, 
Kentucky. In early manhood he settled near 



St. Peter, Illinois. In 1866 he sold his prop- 
erty there and went west, to Missouri, where 
he remained two years. This location did not 
suit him, and he decided to go to Nebraska. 
The trip covered a period of four weeks, 
and was made in covered wagons or "prairie 
schooners." Mr. Rogers finally arrived in 
Saunders county with only $18.00 left in his 
pocket and with a family of ten children for 
which to provide. He took up a homestead claim 
north of Yutan, a farm now owned by Jonas 
Bender. While his family stopped at the res- 
idence of Joseph McKee, Mr. Rogers proceeded 
to build a sod house 16 by 24 feet in size. There 
they endured many privations, but it was the 
best they could do, and they had hopes of a 
brighter future. They worked hard to keep the 
wolf from the door, and during storms took 
refuge in the sod house, which also had a sod 
roof. Five years later Mr. Rogers built a frame 
house, but was obliged to go to Plattsmouth 
for the lumber. This cottage had the same 
dimensions as the sod house, 16 by 24 feet. It 
was made of plain boards, but was much better 
than the sod house. 

Michael Rogers then sold his farm to his 
son, Henry, and moved to Platte county, where 
he purchased 80 acres of school land. Upon 
that farm he passed his last days, dying in 
1895. His wife was Mary Kingery. a daughter 
of William Kingery. She was born in Harri- 
son county, Indiana, in 183 1, and now resides 
at the home of Henry Rogers. She is a woman 
of extreme fortitude and endurance, and is re- 
markably well preserx'ed for her age. She is 
much beloved by all who know her and 




lAMKS lile; 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



211 



is reverenced by her children. She can 
relate many incidents of her pioneer days, 
when Indians frequently camped at their very 
door. Eleven children were born to her and her 
husband, namely: William, John, George, 
Henry, Lizzie, Sarah, Martha, Sherman, 
Mary, Efifie, and Ada. All are still living ex- 
cept John, Lizzie, Sherman, and Effie. 

Henry Rogers began his career on a farm. 
In early manhood he purchased the homestead 
farm and made many improvements on it. 
Seven years later he sold his interest at a large 
profit. He then went to Kansas, but remained 
only six months, having decided in that short 
space of time that the best place in the world 
was in Saunders county, Nebraska. Returning 
to that county Mr. Rogers rented a farm for 
one year. He then purchased 80 acres from 
Mrs. A. Thulin. This tract was homesteaded 
by J. Woods, and, at the time Mr. Rogers pur- 
chased it, contained a small house. A new house 
was soon built, together with barns, corn cribs, 
hog pens, and a hennery. A little later Mr. 
Rogers built a neat house for his parents. A 
milk-house was also added, and a cob-house, 
and a fine, large windmill was set up. Fruit 
and shade trees were set out in abundance, and 
it is now one of the finest farms in the vicinity 
of Memphis. Upon it various kinds of grain 
and stock are raised. 

Mr. Rogers was joined in marriage with 
Emma Linebaugh, a daughter of Simeon and 
Margaret Linebaugh. Mr. Linebaugh died at 
the early age of thirty-two years, leaving three 
children: Emma, Lewis, and Elizabeth. The 
last named is now deceased. Mrs. Linebaugh 



contracted a second matrimonial alliance, mar- 
rying Peter Kingery, of Saunders county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rogers have three children: 
Ivan Merle, Elsie Fern, and Henry Carl. The 
family worship at the Christian church, and, 
like many of his neighbors, Mr. Rogers votes 
the Populist ticket. 



§AMES LILES, whose portrait is shown 
on the opposite page, is an enterprising 
and up-to-date farmer residing in New- 
man precinct, Saunders county, Nebraska, 
where he is the owner of a fine farm, which 
he has put under a fine state of cultivation. He 
was born in Cambridgeshire, England, in 1836, 
is a son of A. C. and Susan (Challice) Liles, 
and is one of a family of eight children : Sarah ; 
James ; Emma ; Matthew ; Sophia ; Mary Ann ; 
Eliza, and Hattie. Sarah is the wife of 
Mr. Peachey, a farmer, of New York, and 
they have a family of nine children: Luke; 
Becky; James; Thurzy; Sarah J.; Ellen M. ; 
Susie; Florence; and George H. The subject 
hereof was next in age. Emma married a Mr. 
Miller, a farmer in the state of New York, 
and has the following children : E. B. ; David, 
and Mary. Matthew is engaged in farming 
in Monroe county, New York, and is single. 
Sophia (Collins) is a widow. Mary Ann is de- 
ceased. Eliza is the wife of a Mr. Beardsley, 
and they have three children: Fannie; Bertha; 
and Louise. Hattie was wedded to a Mr. 
Reddy and has two children. A. C. Liles died 
in Monroe county. New York, December 5, 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



1892, aged eighty-five years, and his widow 
died there December 24, 1899, aged ninety- 
three years. 

James Liles settled in the state of New York 
in 1849. I" 1885 he moved to IlHnois, where 
he remained only a short time. On March i, 
1885, he went to Saunders county, Nebraska, 
with his wife and four children. From W. H. 
Dickinson he bought the northeast quarter of 
section 29, township 14, range 5, the purchase 
price being $15 per acre. E. M. Willis, the 
first owner of this property, built upon it a 
small house, of the . dimensions of 14 by 
16 feet, which was the only improvement 
made on the land at the time Mr. Liles came 
into possession. He added several rooms to 
the house, making a nice two-story frame; he 
also put up a stable 28 feet square, and adjoin- 
ing the stable he has a granary 12 by 28 feet 
in size. The farm contains an orchard con- 
sisting of 30 cherry trees, 100 apple, and 
various other kinds of fruit. A number of 
shade trees was also put out. In the center 
of the property there is a strong spring, -prob- 
ably the only one in Newman precinct, and it 
sends a stream of water through the farm. In 
the spring of 1893^ Mr. Liles bought 160 acres 
from J. S. Gregory, of Lincoln, Nebraska, upon 
which was a house 16 by 24 feet in dimensions, 
which his son, George H. Liles, now occupies. 
Mr. Liles also purchased, in 1899, the north 
half of the northwest quarter of section 29 
from J. F. Brown, of Orrick, Missouri, and 
the farm is under a fair state of cultivation. He 
is a successful and practical farmer, and he 
taises much grain and Polled Angus cattle 



and Poland-China hogs. He is well known 
throughout the country as a wide-awake busi- 
ness man and a progressive farmer. 

The subject of this sketch wedded Jane 
Amesbury, a daughter of Benjamin and Esther 
Amesbury, of England, and they have the 
following children: Etta, born in the state 
of New York, who is the wife of Earl Collins, 
a farmer of Monroe county, New York ; Addi- 
son J., who married Lucy Hayden, lives in 
Lincoln, and has three children, — Earl, Minnie, 
and Edna; George H., who married Tillie 
Raitt, and has three children, — Ivy, Albert, and 
Luella; and Emma, who is the wife of T. E. 
Titus, of Lincoln, Nebraska, where he is in 
the transfer business; they also have three 
children,— Etta, Oliver, and Louis. 



W farmer of 



ILLIAM C. MOTT, a progressive 
Green precinct, Saunders 
county, Nebraska, is also quite an ex- 
tensive stock raiser, having his farm stocked 
with perhaps the best graded and finest cattle 
in southeastern Nebraska. Mr. Mott was born 
in Adams county, Ohio, in i860. He is a son 
of James and Ellen (Cunningham) Mott. His 
parents formerly lived in Ohio, where all their 
children were born. Later they went west to 
Saunders county, Nebraska, where, in 1882, 
they settled upon a farm and spent their declin- 
ing years in Green precinct. James Mott died 
in 1890, aged eighty years. His widow sur- 
vived him until 1897, when she passed away, 
aged seventy-two years. Both expired at the 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



residence of their son, William C. Nine chil- 
dren were born to them, three of whom died in 
infancy. The others are : Mary E., who is also 
now deceased; John H., whose career will be 
mentioned later herein; William C, the subject 
of this sketch; James D., of Ohio; Emma S., 
wife of E. Gordon, of Saunders county, Ne- 
braska; and Charles R., also deceased. 

John H. Mott is also a prominent farmer and 
stock raiser of Green precinct. He was born 
Tn Adams county, Ohio, in 1858, and was 
reared and schooled in his native state. On 
February 21, 1879, ^^ went west to Saunders 
county, Nebraska, to see the country. After 
working on different farms for several 
years he bought 80 acres of railroad land in 
1880. Upon this land he still resides, but it 
is now a well improved farm instead of being 
new and uncultivated. His first house was 
16 by 24 feet in dimensions, and 12 feet high. 
This was subsequently replaced by the present 
large and comfortable residence. Many other 
new buildings were added, such as barns, gran- 
aries, corn cribs, hog pens, henneries, etc. Fruit 
and shade trees were also planted in abundance, 
and today John H. Mott has 56 fine bearing 
apple trees alone. He devotes all his time to 
raising stock and grain, of which he keeps only 
the best. His marriage with Flora C. Mathe- 
son was the source of two children : Hugh F. 
and James Donald. John H. Mott is a stanch 
Republican in politics. He is a member of the 
Brethren church. Mrs. Mott died at her home 
May I, 1900, aged thirty-nine years. 

William C. Mott was reared and schooled in 
Ohio. He ac-companied his parents to Nebraska. 



In 1890 he purchased 80 acres of land, which 
was known as the Loomis farm. His present 
home, however, is on an adjoining 80 acres, 
known as the Sutton farm. This^ latter farm 
contained a small frame house when Mr. Mott 
purchased it. This was enlarged into a 
spacious modern residence. New barns, 
corn-cribs, sheds, etc., were also added, all of 
which greatly improved the value of his place, 
which is known as one of the best grain and 
stock farms in the vicinity. 

Mr. Mott has 50 head of choice Hereford 
and Shorthorn cattle and 150 head of the best 
kind of hogs. His principal grain product is 
corn. The subject of this sketch was joined in 
marriage with Saloma Colbert, a daughter of 
John Colbert. In 1897 Mr. Mott was called 
upon to mourn the loss of his beloved com- 
panion, who died without issue at the early age 
of thirty-seven years. Like his father and 
brother, Mr. Mott is a Republican. In his re- 
ligious views he favors the M. E. church. 



ILLIAM JEFFERSON BRYAN, 
a retired farmer and real estate dealer, 
of Ashland, Saunders county, Nebras- 
ka, has had a varied career, and has been 
eminently successful in all his undertakings. 
Mr. Bryan was born in Jackson county, Indi- 
ana, in 1828. He is a son of James A. and 
Elizabeth (Shearear) Bryan. His father was 
a farmer by occupation, and in 183 1 he moved 
to Pike, Illinois, where he died in 1844. 

William J. Bryan began working on a farm, 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



while still a boy, for $9 per month. Being the 
oldest child in the family he was thus early in 
life forced to assist his mother in supporting the 
family. Learning the true principles of econ- 
omy he also saved a little money for himself, 
and in 1852 he had $200 of his own. He pur- 
chased 100 acres in St. Clair county, Illinois, 
for $1,000. After building a small house upon 
his land he sold the property in 1857 for $30 
per acre. He then purchased another and larger 
farm. After building on it and otherwise im- 
proving it he sold that also at a large profit. He 
then purchased 180 acres of improved land upon 
which he built a $2,500 house, barn, granary, 
etc. In 1877 Mr. Bryan again sold out, realiz- 
ing quite a handsome profit on his investment. 
Putting $10,000 in the bank, he took the re- 
mainder of his money and went west. In 
October of the same year (1877) he located in 
Mill precinct, Lancaster county, Nebraska, 
upon the northeast corner of section 3, where 
he purchased a half section for $11 per acre. 
Later he purchased an additional quarter sec- 
tion in Green precinct, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska. He built a fine house and barn upon 
the latter tract, and added more land to it, un- 
til he had 1,000 acres. In 1892 he sold the 
homestead place to Mr. Hickle. Since then 
Mr. Bryan has handled many farms — buying 
and selling. 

In the fall of 1887 he moved to Ashland and 
engaged in general merchandising. One year 
later he traded his store for 240 acres of land 
in Cass county. Mr. Bryan subsequently 
bought 20 acres of the Baloo estate, where he 
now lives a peaceful and retired life. He has 



been twice married. His first marriage was 
contracted with Margaret J. Vine. She died in 
1872, leaving the following children to the 
care of a loving husband : Emazetta, Orin S., 
James A., Effie, William O., and Samuel. The 
last named died young. Emazetta married W. 
C. Linley, janitor of the high school at Ash- 
land, and they have four children : Roy, Lonie, 
Vernie, and Arlie. Orin S. is a farmer. He 
married Stella Hubbard, and has three chil- 
dren: Frank, Lee, and Ella. James A. is also 
a farmer. He married Ella Hayes. They have 
been blessed with seven children, three of whom 
are deceased. Their names are: Elmira (de- 
ceased) ; Victor A., Lloyd McKinley, Margaret 
A., Annie E., and Floyd C. and Roland, both 
deceased. Effie married E. P. Putney, a 
farmer. They are the parents of six children, 
two of whom are deceased. Those living 
are: Nora, Lola G., Raymond, and Orfa 
M. They lost a baby son, and a son called 
Claude. William O. is a farmer. He married 
Nellie Cushman. They have three children: 
Horace G., Cecil J., and Daniel. 

After the death of his first wife Mr. Bryan 
married again, being united with Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Good, a daughter of Michael Hanson, who 
was a native of Germany, and came to the 
United States in early manhood, settling in 
Illinois. Elizabeth Hanson first married 
Thomas Good, who died in 1871, leaving two 
children, namely: Lula A. and William T. 
They had also lost one child, called Kate. Lula 
A. Good married P. H. Edwards, of Colorado 
Springs. William T. Good married Margaret 
Bruffy, and they have two children — Lula K. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



and an infant daughter. Mr. Bryan has one 
daughter, Abbie Elizabeth, the result of his 
second marriage. She is a talented young 
lady, still at home. 

William Jefferson Bryan cast his first vote 
for Fremont, and has supported the Republican 
party ever since its organization. He has 
served as justice of the peace, and on the school 
board. He united with the Christian church in 
1854, and has been a member of it ever since. 

Mr. Bryan was instrumental in organizing 
the electric light plant in Ashland, and was 
president of the company for two years. He 
was a director of the national bank at Ash- 
land in 1887 and 1888. He is a public spirited 
and enterprising citizen, and has assisted ma- 
terially in developing the locality of his adop- 
tion. He is still active in both mind and body, 
and is a remarkably well preserved man. 



kOAH WILHELM, a progressive agri- 
'culturist of Clear Creek precinct, Saund- 
-ers county, Nebraska, is one of the 
pioneer farmers of that vicinity. He was born 
in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, in 1841. 
He is a son of Dr. John and Christina (Kahler) 
Wilhelm. His father died in early manhood, 
and when ten years old Noah was bound out 
with a cousin on a farm until he attained the 
age of fourteen years. 

Noah Wilhelm then started out to make his 
own way in the world. He followed farming 
and ore mining in Allegany county, Maryland, 
until 1861. Responding to his country's call 
for men he enlisted in Company B, 34th Reg. 



111. Vol. Infantry. He went out from Dixon, 
Illinois, and served four years, lacking a few 
days. He was in many hard battles, among 
which were Pittsburg Landing, Stony River 
and Chickamauga. Being then, as he still is, a 
large man, of commanding appearance, he 
made a fine looking soldier. 

After the war Mr. Wilhelm returned to 
Maryland and formed a partnership with a 
brother in contracting to get out ties for rail- 
road construction. Subsequently he engaged 
in farming. He then decided to go west. 
Through friends he had heard of the splendid 
prospect in Saunders county, Nebraska, where 
it was but little settled. March 14, 1869, he 
took up a homestead claim of 80 acres in 
Wahoo precinct, the same now owned by Mrs. 
Hinkey. 

Mr. Wilhelm then began to improve his 
farm. He went to Knight Island, on the Platte 
River, where he cut cottonwood trees, hauled 
them to Otto Creek, and had them sawed into 
lumber. He drew these a distance of twelve 
miles to build a cabin, which was 14 by 20 feet 
in dimensions. In this way he started a home. 
He married Mary Eyer, a daughter of Philip 
Eyer, and took her to this rude home to live. 
Together they worked and planned how to 
best improve their farm. They set out orchards 
and groves of shade trees, and also enlarged the 
house. For fifteen years they lived upon that 
farm and then sold out. 

They then purchased an 80-acre farm from 
Colonel Eyer, also 40 acres of Silver Creek bot- 
tom land, and 160 acres from Moses Dodge — 
making in all 280 acres. Mr. Wilhelm set out 



216 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



fine fruit orchards on the home place, which 
is well stocked with cattle, hogs, sheep and 
horses. He also has a large colony of bees. 

Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Wilhelm, as follows: Franklin Leroy, John 
Philip (deceased), Henry Nelson, Charles 
Aden, Margaret Christina, Marcia G. (de- 
ceased), Nellie May (deceased), Izetta, Wil- 
liam Alva, and Archer B. Mrs. Wilhelm is an 
active member and supporter of the Methodist 
church. In his political opinions, the subject 
of this sketch follows the leadership of the 
Republican party. He is but another example 
of the many worthy men who have risen to 
positions of influence and prominence by their 
own exertions. 



TT^HRISTOPHER KEETLE, one of the 
I J| most extensive and prominent farmers 

^ 'in Ashland precinct, is also well 

known as one of the representative farmers of 
Saunders county. Mr. Keetle was born in Cas- 
sel, Germany, in 1838. His parents, Philip and 
Catherine (Schaeffer) Keetle, came to the 
United States in 1846. Philip Keetle settled in 
Ashland county, Ohio, and was a pioneer 
farmer of that state, where he and his wife 
spent the remainder of their lives. The father 
died at the age of seventy-three years and the 
mother when sixty-four yeai's old. One of 
their children died young. They reared Chris- 
topher, the subject of these lines, and William, 
whn reside? on the old liomestead in Ashland. 
Ohio, 



Christopher Keetle was reared in Ohio. In 
his young manhood's days he followed farming 
and threshing; he even worked at plastering 
during the summers. He married Mrs. Ma- 
hala, a daughter of Daniel Fisher. Eight chil- 
dren v.'ere born to them, namely : Minerva, wife 
of R. Rigler, of Saunders county, Nebraska; 
Delia, wife of Charles Alker, of the same 
county, who has one son, Samuel; William, 
who is a collector for the Omaha Sewing Ma- 
chine Company, and who married Lizzie War- 
ren ; John, a farmer ; Edward, who also follows 
agricultural pursuits; Daniel, who married 
Myrtle Russell, lives on a farm and has two 
children, Viola and Asa; Charles, who mar- 
ried Lizzie Rose, and has three children, Don, 
Laota, and Emmet ; and Orville, who is still at 
home. 

When Mr. Keetle had saved, by hard labor, 
sufficient money to invest in a home he looked 
about for a location. Having friends in 
Saunders county, Nebraska, who urged him to 
come there, he acted upon their advice, and 
went to see the country. He was so well pleased 
with it that on April 10, 1880, he purchased of 
L. K. Bell a quarter section of land in Ashland 
precinct, and took his family there. At that 
time there was only a small wooden building 
upon it, which is now used as a cow shed. Mr. 
Keetle built a fine new house, barns, and other 
buildings. He also set out fine orchards of 
fruit and berries, not omitting to plant an 
abundance of shade trees. 

Some time later Mr. Keetle purchased the 
Calhoun farm of 187J4 acres, also the H. C. 
Henry farm of 80 acres, and the S. Bryan 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



217 



farm of 80 acres. These farms all adjoined 
his own, and are beautifully situated. He keeps 
50 head of fine cattle and 100 head of hogs, 
besides which he raises some very fine horses. 
Mr. Keetle is a Republican, and has served 
twelve years as supervisor, and member of the 
school board. He joins his family in worship- 
ing at the M. E. church. He ranks among the 
most progressive farmers of Saunders county. 



fOHN H. MOTT, a standard farmer of 
Green precinct, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, is an Ohioan by birth. He was 
born in Adams county, in that state, in 1858, 
and is a son of James and Ellen (Cunningham) 
Mott. His parents left Ohio in 1882 and went 
west to Saunders county, Nebraska, where 
they followed farming the remainder of their 
lives. His father died in 1890, aged eighty 
years, and his mother died seven years later, 
aged seventy-two years. Nine children were 
born to them, namely : Mary E., deceased ; John 
H., who is the subject hereof; William C, 
whose sketch is also found in this volume; 
James D., a resident of Ohio; Emma S., wife 
of E. Gordon, of Saunders county, Nebraska; 
Charles R., deceased; and three who died in 
infancy. 

William C. Mott was born in Adams county, 
Ohio, in i860. He was reared and schooled in 
his native state and accompanied his parents 
to Nebraska in 1882. He rented dififerent 
farms until 1890, and then purchased 80 acres, 
known as the Loomis farm. Some time later 



he bought an adjoining 80-acre tract, known 
as the Sutton farm, and upon the latter he now 
resides. This farm contained a small frame 
house when purchased by Mr. Mott, who has 
added an elegant new residence, large barns, 
granaries, sheds, corn-cribs, etc. He also has 
improved the land, and now owns one of 
the best grain and stock farms in Saunders 
county. The quality of the grain raised and of 
the stock he has upon his farm is not surpassed 
in the state. He keeps 50 head of choice Here- 
ford and Shorthorn cattle and about 150 head 
of tlie best kind of hogs. His principal grain 
product is corn. He married Saloma Colbert, 
a daughter of John Colbert. Mrs. Mott died 
without issue in 1897, aged thirty-seven years. 
Mr. Mott is a member of the M. E. church, 
and is a Republican in politics. 

John H. Mott, the subject hereof, was reared 
and schooled in his native state while working 
upon his father's farm. On February 21, 1879, 
he went west to Saunders county, Nebraska, 
to see the country. He worked on a farm in 
that county one year and spent the following 
year working in Saline county. In 1880 he 
bought 80 acres of railroad land in Green pre- 
cinct, Saunders county, and upon this tract he 
still lives. This land was then new and un- 
cultivated, but was promising for the future. 
Mr. Mott's experience enabled him to choose 
the best. The first building he erected upon his 
farm was a corn-crib to hold his first year's 
crop. Afterward he built a house 16 by 24 feet 
in dimensions, and 12 feet high. In later 
years he remodeled and enlarged this into a 
fine residence. He also built large barns, ex- 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



tensive corn-cribs and granaries, hog-pens and 
all of the necessary buildings used by a pro- 
gressive farmer of today. 

Mr. Mott did not neglect to plant both fruit 
and shade trees. He now enjoys an abundance 
of fruit — not least among his trees being 56 
fine bearing apple trees. He devotes his whole 
time to raising stock and grain, of which he 
raises only the best. John H. Mott married 
Flora C. Matheson, a daughter of John and 
Marietta Matheson, who reside on a farm in 
Green precinct, Saunders county, Nebraska. 
Mr. and Mrs. Mott have two children, namely : 
Hugh F., and James Donald. Mrs. Mott died 
at her home May i, 1900, aged thirty-nine 
years. Like his father and brother, Mr. Mott 
is a Republican in politics. He is a member 
of the Brethren church. 



(gj^ BRAHAM B. MILLER, one of the 
^^ most prosperous and progressive farm- 
V«^ers and stock raisers in the western 
part of Ashland precinct, is a splendid manager, 
and is looked upon as a model farmer in 
Saunders county. Mr. Miller is the owner of 
one of the most productive and highly culti- 
vated farms in the state of Nebraska. He is a 
native of York county, Pennsylvania, where he 
was born in 1847. He is a son of John S. and 
Maria (Britton) Miller. His father followed 
agricultural pursuits in the Keystone State. 

Abraham B.Miller was reared on his father's 
farm and attended public school until he at- 
tained the age of eighteen years, when he 



started out to make his own way in life. He 
had learned no trade, and only knew what 
belonged to the sturdy farmer's vocation. Hav- 
ing heard of the advantages of the West he 
left home and ventured into the state of Ohio, 
where he worked for some time. 

There it was that he made the acquaintance 
of Sarah Helmley, a daughter of Christian and 
Christiana Helmley, of Adams county, Ohio. 
That young lady afterward became his wife, 
and shared alike his joys and sorrows. They 
started on life's journey together without cap- 
ital, but with sturdy constitutions, a deter- 
mined will and hands that were willing to 
work. They went further west, to Illinois, 
where they accumulated some money, and de- 
termined to go still further west, where they 
could invest their small capital to the best ad- 
vantage. 

In 1879 they located in Saunders county, 
Nebraska, little of which was then under culti- 
vation ; it was, however, very fertile and prom- 
ising. Mr. Miller purchased 160 acres of 
choice land, which was just a little rolling and 
in a favorable location. This claim was taken 
up by Dr. Simongton, but Mr. Miller pur- 
chased it from Samuel Fales, who had 
previously acquired it. The farm con- 
tained only a small house, which is now used 
as a kitchen for the magnificent residence now 
located there. Upon this farm Mr. Miller and 
his faithful wife battled with all their strength, 
and their success is well deserved. Besides put- 
ting his land into a state of high cultivation 
he built the present residence, which is one of 
the most beautiful in Saunders county. He 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



219 



also built new and spacious barns, granaries, 
machine sheds, and other buildings. He set 
out evergreen and other lovely shade trees, 
planted orchards, and improved his farm in 
every conceivable way. Besides carrying on 
general farming he has a large and well as- 
sorted stock of cattle, horses and hogs. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller have two sons living, 
and have lost one son. Their names are : Ray- 
mond, Ernest E. (deceased), and Talmage E. 
Raymond and Talmage E. are a source of great 
pride to their parents. They own in partner- 
ship a fine horse and buggy, in which they drive 
to Ashland, where they both attend high 
school. 

Mr. Miller is not only a model farmer but 
is a model citizen as well. He is strictly a 
temperance man, has served on the school 
board in his district many times, favors the 
Congregational church, and is a member of 
the Woodmen of the World. He is also a 
member of the I. O. O. F. In his political 
views he is in accord with the policies of the 
Republican party. Such men as Mr. Miller 
make any community prosperous. 



fOSIAH J. DECH, one of the early set- 
tlers of Clear Creek precinct, Saunders 
county, Nebraska, where he still tills the 
soil, is also manager of the Railsback Brothers' 
elevator, at Memphis, in the same precinct. 
This elevator was built by Railsback & Mitchell 
in 1888. It then had a capacity of 7,000 bush- 
els. In 1889 it was enlarged to a capacity 



of 14,000 bushels. It was run by horse power 
until 1889, when steam power was put in. In 
1898 a gasoline engine was also added. About 
6,000 bushels of corn are handled per day be- 
sides large quantities of oats and wheat. Mr. 
Dech was born in Monroe county, Pennsyl- 
vania in 1839. He is a son of Elijah H. and 
Hannah (Heller) Dech. 

Elijah H. Dech was a native of Northamp- 
ton county, Pennsylvania. In April, 1857, he 
went to Lee county, Illinois, where he culti- 
vated a farm, having previously been a miller 
by trade. In the spring of the year 1868 he 
went farther west to Ithaca, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, which was then comparatively un- 
settled. He homesteaded So acres, upon which 
he built a house of the dimensions of 16 by 24 
feet, upon the same site now occupied by 
Barney Schroeder's house. Ithaca was after- 
ward laid out on his farm, and in 1869 he also 
built a mill there. He enjoyed the distinction 
of being the first postmaster of Ithaca, the post- 
office being opened in his house in 1869. He 
died in 1870, aged sixty-eight years. He was 
survived by his widow until 1892, when she 
passed away at the advanced age of eighty-two 
years. The following children were born to 
them: Josiah J. (the subject hereof) ; John, ol 
Antelope, Nebraska; George, of Colorado; 
William E., a farmer, of Ithaca; Susan, de- 
ceased; Mary Ann, wife of Alfred Eyer; 
Martha, wife of A. Roberts; and Helen, 
wife of B. Parks. 

At the age of seventeen years Josiah J. Dech 
began to learn the carpenter's trade. In August, 
1 86 1, he enlisted as a private in Company D, 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



34th Reg. 111. Vol. Infantry, and was honor- 
ably discharged from service as a corporal July 
12, 1865. He took active part in the conflicts 
at Shiloh and Stone River, and served through- 
out the Atlanta campaign. Returning from the 
war he spent the following two years drilling 
wells in various parts of Illinois. Later he fol- 
lowed farming in the same state, and in 1866 
went to Clear Creek precinct, Saunders county, 
Nebraska. Upon his arrival there with team, 
wagon and family, he had but $15 in 
money, but was determined to gain a foot- 
hold. He homesteaded 80 acres of land near 
Memphis, which is still his home. Some time 
afterward he added 80 acres to it. There, by 
hard work, and his wife's assistance, he reared 
a large family, and improved his farm. Their 
first house was 1 2 by 20 feet in dimensions, but 
they now have a fine residence, and a good set 
of buildings. Besides raising grain, large num- 
bers of cattle, horses and hogs are raised by Mr. 
Dech every year. 

The subject of this sketch married Margaret 
Eyer, a daughter of Philip Eyer, of Dixon, 
Illinois. Mr. Eyer was among the early set- 
tlers of Clear Creek precinct. He homesteaded 
what is now the Noah Wilhelm place. Nine 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Dech, 
namely: Grace, Cora, Maude, Ora, Norma, 
Frank, Charles, Ralph, and Ida, who died young. 
Grace was born in Illinois, married L. A. Camp, 
of Saunders county, and their children are: 
Ray, Howard, Amy, Flora, Bessie, and Earl. 
Cora married Eli Kiser, of the same county, 
and their children are : Mabel, Zelma and Elma, 
twins, Ira, and Victor. Maude became the 



wife of John Archer, of Pierce county, Ne- 
braska, and they have two children : Roy and 
Pearl. Ora married James Brown, and they 
have two children : Joe, and a baby daughter. 
Norma married O. D. Marks, and has one child, 
Genevieve. Frank married Pearl Marks, and 
they have two children : Elmer and Ruth. 
Charles and Ralph are still at home. 

Mr. Dech was engaged in teaming during 
the first years of his stay in Nebraska. While 
thus occupied he had the distinction of hauling 
the first load of lumber ever drawn from Platts- 
mouth to Saunders county. In politics, he ie a 
Republican. He has served on the school board 
a number of times, also five years as road com- 
missioner, and five terms as constable. Fra- 
ternally, he affiliates with the G. A. R., the K. 
of P., and the Woodmen of the World. His 
ideas on religion are broad and liberal. 



AMUEL MERRIMAN, a highly re- 
spected and retired citizen of Memphis, 
Saunders county, is one of the pioneer 
settlers of Nebraska. He is a native of La- 
grange county, Indiana, where he first saw the 
light of day in 1845. He is a son of William 
and Mary (Smedley) Merriman. His parents 
both died young, and he began working as 
chore-boy on a farm at the early age of nine 
years. 

July 14, 1862, Mr. Merriman enlisted in the 
Union army as a private in Company D, 8th 
Reg. Minn. Vol. Infantry. He enlisted under 
Captain Samuel McLarty, and was honorably 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



discharged July ii, 1865. He participated in 

many different engagements along the frontier, 
among theniBirch Cooley, Butte Hill, and Fort 
Ridgely, and the battle of Redwood Lake, and 
that spot where the Indians surrendered, 1,500 
in number, they named Camp Release. In 
that campaign Mr. Merriman assisted in 
the funeral of 40 women and children mas- 
sacred by the red demons. He afterward, in 
the fall of 1862, assisted in taking 1,500 prison- 
ers to Fort Snelling, Minnesota. One trip 
necessitated going 800 miles on a flat boat 
down the Missouri River under a broiling sun. 
He also saw active service at Antietam and 
Fortress Monroe. 

May 29, 1870, Mr. Merriman married 
Jemima Miller, a daughter of James and Mary 
(Baker) Miller, of Indiana. Soon after mar- 
riage, the young folk went west, and took a 
homestead claim of 160 acres in Oak Creek 
precinct, Butler county, Nebraska. After build- 
ing a sod house he began to till the soil. One 
day while away from home a prairie fire con- 
sumed all their belongings. They built another 
and smaller house, 10 by 12 feet In size, in 
which they lived for three years, enduring 
many privations. 

In those days it was not uncommon to find 
huge rattlesnakes on the floor of their sod 
house when they awoke in the morning. Upon 
one occasion, when Mrs. Merriman was alone, 
she stepped on a rattlesnake but was quick 
enough to avoid being bitten. Reaching for 
her hoe, which was kept handy, she proceeded 
to kill the snake, and afterward killed its mate 
also. She is one of the nervy little women who 



helped to settle Nebraska, and many things 
may be said in her praise. _ 

In 1876 Mr. Merriman purchased a farm in 
Clear Creek precinct, Saunders county. This 
farm was homesteaded by Mr. Chamberlain, 
and contained 80 acres. After living there 
eleven years he sold out and moved to Mem- 
phis, Nebraska, where he followed blacksmith- 
ing for years. He is now practically retired 
from business pursuits. 

Three sons were born to Mr. and Mrs. Mer- 
riman, namely : Eugene "Harvey, James Gar- 
field, and Roy, who died when nine months 
old. The oldest son is manager and purchasing 
agent for Duff's elevator, at Memphis, Ne- 
braska. The younger son works on the county 
grader. Mr. Merriman is a stanch Republican. 
He has served on the school board, and is the 
only Republican ever elected in his precinct to 
the office of road supervisor. He also served 
as constable for two years. Fraternally, he 
affiliates with the G. A. R., the K. of P., and 
the Woodmen of America. 

The subject of this sketch is reaping the just 
rewards of honest toil. He entertains liberal 
ideas on the subject of religion, and is a public- 
spirited citizen in every respect. 



TT^HARLES F. KIRKPATRICK, M. D., 
I J| a promising young physician and surgeon 

^* ^ of Ashland, Saunders county, Ne- 

"braska, is up to date in his profession, and en- 
joys a good practice not only in Saunders 
county but in surrounding counties as well. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Dr. Kirkpatrick was born in Decatur, Ohio, 
where he was also reared and educated. His 
father, Cyrus B. Kirkpatrick, is now a resident 
of Kansas. After leaving school the Doctor 
entered the office of Dr. William K. Coleman, 
of West Union, Ohio, as a medical student. 
Subsequently, he attended Columbus Medical 
College, at Columbus, Ohio, from which he 
graduated in the class of 1882. 

Shortly after receiving his diploma, Dr. 
Kirkpatrick opened an office at Youngsville, 
Ohio, where he practiced his chosen profession 
until April, 1886. He then came west to Ash- 
land, Saunders county, Nebraska, thereby 
choosing a progressive center in which he has 
built up his present large practice. He has a 
fine office, and parlors centrally located on 
Silver street. 

Dr. Kirkpatrick married Eliza Shofstall, 
a daughter of John Shofstall, one of the pioneer 
settlers of southern Ohio. Mrs. Kirkpatrick 
was born and reared in the same neighborhood 
as her husband. They have one child, Louise 
A., who is a promising student. 

Fraternally, our subject is a member of 
Pomegranate Lodge No. no, F. & A. M., 
of Ashland, Nebraska; and of the K. of P., of 
which he is a past chancellor. He is also a 
member of the Nebraska State Medical Society. 
The Doctor is a great student, and keeps 
thoroughly abreast of the times. He is 
well posted upon all the modern methods 
and appliances used in advancing the interests 
of medical science, and thoroughly familiar 
with the best and safest methods of relieving 
pain and treating chronic diseases. Each and 



every case receives his most careful considera- 
tion and attention. Li fact, he studies each 
case closely, and to this fact he attributes his 
unbounded success. As a citizen he is highly 
esteemed by all who know him. 



I" 



OHN C. RAILSBACK, present mayor 
Ashland, Saunders county, Nebraska, 

was first elected to fill that office in 1891, 
re-elected in 1892 and 1893, and again in 1897, 
1898, 1899 and 1900. He is a stanch Repub- 
lican, and has also served the Ashland public in 
the council and as treasurer. Mr. Railsback 
thoroughly appreciates the honors of his pres- 
ent position as mayor of one of the finest busi- 
ness centers in Saunders county. It was at 
Ashland that civilization in the county had its 
beginning, and there the first business places 
were built. The locality contained the only 
ford on Salt Creek, and over this ford all trans- 
portation was carried on. It was a frequent 
camping ground for Indians, and is quite a his- 
toric spot — as many Indians and whites also 
have been slain there. Civilization began in 
the latter part of 1850, when a dam was made 
at the ford and the mill was erected there. 
Stores were also built, and the place was called 
Salem Ford for a short time. Flora City 
sprang afterward into existence. These places 
were subsequently consolidated and called Ash- 
land. In 1879 the county seat was established 
there, but was transferred later to Wahoo, 
which is more centrally located. Although 
much of its glory was taken away, Ashland is 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Still a fine business center, nearly all kinds of 
trade being represented there. The place con- 
tains three hotels, numerous churches and good 
schools. 

John C. Railsback was born in Tazewell 
county, Illinois. His father, J. E. Railsback, 
has been in the grain business in Tazewell 
county since 1869. In the fall of 1882 he went 
to Ashland, Saunders county, Nebraska, and 
purchased an interest in the grain business of 
Railsback, Mitchell & Company. He succeeded 
that company and carried on business there and 
at his home until 1891. At that time his sons, 
John C. and Gifford, succeeded him at Ashland, 
and have since conducted the business there. 

The plant at Ashland was erected in 1872 by 
John P. Palmyston. It was run by horse 
power, and on a small scale. In 1876 James H. 
Snell and N. A. Saunders bought it and, two 
years later, they were succeeded by Mr. Snell, 
who put in steam power. In 1882 the plant 
became the property of J. E. Railsback, father 
of the subject hereof. 

Mr. Railsback enlarged the plant until it had 
a capacity of 25,000 bushels. He also in- 
creased the steam power to 20 horse-power, put 
in a steam corn-sheller and made other im- 
portant improvements. In those early days the 
grain was all drawn to market by horses. 
This was continued until after the railroad was 
built. Elevators were then built at Memphis 
and Ithaca, Nebraska, by Mr. Railsback. He 
also purchased an elevator at Greenwood, Ne- 
braska, which was built by J. N. Brown, and 
one at Malmo, Nebraska, built by a stock com- 
pany. One man is employed at each of these 



places and the grain is all shipped to Ashland, 
where they have a track built to the elevator. 
There the wheat is unloaded and cleaned by 
machinery, and is then shipped to the markets. 
About 300 carloads of grain are shipped from 
Ashland per year. 

John C. Railsback was reared in his native 
place, where he followed the grocery business 
for some time. He subsequently went west, 
locating in Ashland. Since then he and his un- 
married brother have devoted their time and 
attention principally to the grain business. The 
subject of this sketch married Susan Manard, a 
native of Tazewell county, Illinois. They have 
one daughter. Vera. 

Mayor Railsback is an influential man in his 
locality. He fills the mayor's chair with con- 
scientiousness and dignity. The firm of Rails- 
back Brothers, of which he is the senior mem- 
ber, are among the most extensive grain dealers 
in Saunders county. 



fOHN WESLEY HORN, a retired farm- 
er and extensive fruit grower of Yutan, 
Union precinct, is a self-made man, and 
has helped to make Saunders county, Nebraska, 
what it is today. Mr. Horn was born in Knox 
county, Ohio, May 29, 1845. He is a son of 
Martin L. and Julia (Hellman) Horn. His 
parents moved to Fulton county, Illinois, when 
he was nine years old. His father was a farm- 
er, and died in that state, at the advanced age 
of seventy-two years. 

John Wesley Horn was reared on his father's 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



farm near Astoria, Illinois. In early manhood 
he was joined in marriage with Minerva Bias, 
a daughter of Obadiah and Jane (Shields) 
Bias. After marriage, the young folk went to 
Kansas, and looked for a suitable location. 
They did not like that state, however, and re- 
turned. Having friends who praised Saunders 
county, Nebraska, Mr. Horn decided to locate 
there. On March 13, 1872, he went to the lat- 
ter place and rented land for two years. By 
that time he was satisfied to locate there, and 
purchased 80 acres of school land in section 16, 
at $7.50 per acre. He also purchased 80 acres 
of railroad land in section 15, for $11 per acre. 

Mr. Horn then built a house on his farm, 
paying $30 per thousand feet for lumber. He 
also built a straw shed, for use until he could 
do better. In this way he obtained a start, and 
by degrees he fenced in his entire farm and got 
it under cultivation. Among the most notable 
improvements of his property are his shade 
trees and orchards. These trees he set out in 
a large circle, enclosing on three sides, his resi-- 
dence, barn, and several acres of land. By 
this arrangement he secured the finest fruit 
display in his section of Saunders county. He 
has 125 choice apple trees, now bearing; 25 
pecan trees; 800 fine peach trees; 50 grape 
vines; 75 persimmon trees; 100 plum trees, and 
a great variety of pear and cherry trees, besides 
all kinds of berries. Being on a high rise of 
land, his beautiful place can be seen and ad- 
mired for many miles by travelers. 

Mr. Horn's land is of the best kind. He 
raises grain, cattle, horses, hogs, etc. Mr. and 
Mrs. Horn have been blessed with five chil- 



dren, namely: Elza L., a drug clerk; Carl C, 
a jeweler, now deceased ; Blanche M., deceased ; 
James R., deceased; and Lewis M., a student 
of music. 

In 1899 Mr. Horn retired from farming, 
and since then has rented his land. He has 
plenty to do, however, in looking after his 
fruit, berries and a large colony of bees, in 
which there are more than forty hives. In 
his political views Mr. Horn favors the Dem- 
ocratic party. He is a member of the Christian 
church, and belongs to the A. O. U. W. 



(^JY J-EXANDER S. von MANSFELDE, 
^^M. D., one of Saunders county's most 
v^ distinguished citizens, has been lo- 
cated at Ashland since 1878. He has con- 
ducted a sanitarium there, known as "Quality 
Hill," and has established a solid reputation as 
a practitioner, being undoubtedly the most 
prominent member of the medical profession 
in the county. He has made a specialty of the 
treatment of women's diseases, and his success 
has resulted in many calls in consultation at 
distant points. 

Alexander S. von Mansfelde was born in the 
Kingdom of Prussia, Germany, December 21, 
1845. His father was at one time owner of 
large estates there, but meeting with reverses 
he immigrated to America with his family in 
1 86 1, locating first in Chicago, but later at 
Fort Wayne, Indiana, where he died in 1865, 
at the age of fifty years. 

Our subject attended the Friedeberg schools 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



in Germany until he came to America, in 1861. 
In 1863 he accepted a position with H. B. Reed 
& Co., a large wholesale drug house of Fort 
Wayne, Indiana, and won the favor of his em- 
ployers at the start, receiving encouragement 
from them to enter the field of medicine. Dur- 
ing this time, therefore, he read medicine with 
Drs. B. S. Woodworth and A. H. Hunt, of 
the same place, the latter of whom still resides 
at Wooster, Ohio. Although a part of his 
wages went to the support of the family, he 
saved what he could, and in the fall of 1866 
was possessed of sufficient means to' permit of 
his entrance at Rush Medical College, at Chi- 
cago, Illinois. During his years of work with 
the drug house, he made the most of his oppor- 
tunities and studied drugs and medicine in the 
morning before work, and in the evening after 
his work had been completed, and as a result 
he was made a prescription clerk before others 
who had served a longer time than he. He en- 
tered into the work at college with the same 
spirit and energy, — his one object being the 
mastery of the science of medicine. His funds 
became exhausted before he had completed his 
course of study, and upon the advice of some 
of his professors he entered upon a practice, 
attending class during the winter. He was 
very successful and acquired a clientele which 
he was reluctant to leave to complete his course, 
but he returned and was graduated with the 
class of 1872, known as the "fire class," the 
first after the great fire of Chicago. On March 
9, 1875, ^^ was called to Lincoln, Nebraska, 
to perform an operation, and was so delighted 
with the country he decided to locate there. 



He moved to Lincoln in the following Septem- 
ber, and remained there until April 26, 1878, 
when he located in Ashland, Saunders county, ' 
Nebraska. He soon acquired a large practice 
and, soon after locating there, rented the build- 
ing known as the Court House, before the 
county seat was removed to Wahoo, and es- 
tablished a sanitarium. He soon had an es- 
tablished reputation, and the place then called 
the "Hill" became widely known as "Quality 
Hill." He has since purchased the property, 
the county consenting to sell it by a vote of the 
public. He has laid out beautiful grounds, 
with broad drives and walks, and a large green 
lawn, with its shade trees interspersed with 
flowers and shrubbery, together with a flowing 
fountain, the whole presenting a scene of un- 
rivaled beauty. Our subject holds the first 
certificate issued by the board of health in the 
state. He was formerly professor of general 
pathology and histology in the Omaha Med- 
ical College; president of the Nebraska Rail- 
way Surgeon's Association; Nebraska State 
Medical Society; Medical Society of the Mis- 
souri Valley ; Nebraska Academy of Sciences ; 
honorary member of the Lincoln and Omaha 
medical societies; member of the American 
Medical Association, et cet. 

Dr. von Mansfelde was united in marriage 
with Julia Labhart, of Chicago, and they are 
the parents of five children, as follows : Duty, 
who received the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
Nebraska University, is assistant principal of 
the Ashland High School, and teacher of math- 
ematics and German; Johanna, a graduate of 
Nebraska University, with the degree of B. A., 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



served two years as assistant principal of Ash- 
land High School and is now teaching English 
and chemistry in the high school at Omaha; 
Belle, who received the degree of M. A. in the 
State University, is assistant principal of the 
high school at Stromsburg, Polk county, Ne- 
braska ; Charles Herbert, who graduated from 
the State University with the degree of B. A., 
is now in attendance in the law department 
of that institution ; and Alice is now attending 
the Ashland High School. Our subject has 
never taken an active part in politics, but was 
elected one term as mayor of Ashland. He 
refused to be considered for a nomination later. 
He was associate, and later chief editor of the 
Omaha Medical Clinic, the first medical jour- 
nal ever published in Nebraska, and he was for 
thirteen years the permanent secretary of the 
Nebraska State Medical Society, whose trans- 
actions he edited and published during that 
time. 



'UST LARSON, a prosperous farmer 
of Richland precinct, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, is, like most of his neighbors, 
of Swedish nativity. He was born, in 1842, 
in Sweden, and is a son of Lawrence Larson. 
Mr. Larson was reared and educated in 
his native country, and came to the United 
States in 1861. He worked one year in 
car shops in New York City, and subsequently 
followed the same occupation in sixteen other 
states. He last worked in that capacity in 
Omaha, Nebraska. In 1869 he assisted N. J. 
Paul to survey a part of Custer and Keith 



counties, Nebraska. In 1867 he took up a 
homestead claim in Saunders county, Ne- 
braska. This land included the south half of 
the northeast quarter of section 22, and was 
located in township 15, range 9. Only two 
settlers besides Mr. Larson were then located 
in that part of the county. They were John 
Terpen and John Curen. 

Having purchased lumber at Ashland, Mr. 
Larson built a board house on his land. This 
was the first board house in Union precinct. 
After otherwise improving his farm he sold it 
and purchased the east half of the northwest 
quarter of section 16, township 15, range 9. 
Upon this he also built a house, barns, corn- 
cribs, etc., and set out fruit and shade trees. 
In 1892 the same land was sold for $40 per acre. 
It is now owned by Mrs. Bears. Mr. Larson 
afterward purchased from Frank Schup 160 
acres of land in section 20, Richland pre- 
cinct. Again the subject hereof built a large 
house and barns, and improved his farm in 
many ways. He now has one of the finest 
and best situated farms in the southern part 
of Saunders county. He also raises some cat- 
tle, horses and hogs. 

Gust Larson was joined in marriage with 
Ada Miller, a daughter of Nicholas Miller. 
Mrs. Larson is a native of Pennsylvania, but 
was reared in Iowa. Later her parents settled 
in Marietta precinct, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska. Eleven children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Larson. Three of these died young. The 
others are Hulda May, Fred, Ernest C, 
George, Edna B., Albert and Delbert (twins) 
and Gertie. Hulda May married Bert Sprague, 






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"BBI^^" 


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SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



229 



of Colorado, and they ' have four children, 
namely: Pearl, Arthur, Clarence, and one child 
unnamed. 

Mr. Larson is independent in politics. He 
has served as road commissioner and as school 
director. In his religious views he is in ac- 
cord with the Seventh Day Adventists. 



AMUEL H. FRITZINGER. Saund- 
ers county is rich in its beautiful and 
highly cultivated farms, showing her 
citizens to be progressive and enterprising. Par- 
ticularly noticeable and picturesque is the home 
of the gentleman whose name appears above, it 
being located in the extreme southwest corner 
of the county. The commodious residence, with 
other buildings, pleasantly located on a knoll 
of land, together with a magnificent orchard of 
from 300 to 400 trees and a heavy mulberry 
ridge, presents a view most pleasing to the eye. 
We are pleased to be able to present on a fore- 
going page a view of the house and surround- 
ings executed from a recent photograph taken 
in the summer of 1900. 

Mr. Fritzinger was born in Putnam county, 
Illinois, in 1859, ^""^ i^ ^ son of John D. and 
Dorothy Ann (Perry) Fritzinger, who were 
parents of three children, as follows: Samuel 
H.; Ada H. (Kirkaldie), of Washington, 
who has two children, Annie and Nellie, and 
whose husband is captain of a steamer; and 
Ira W., who is overseer of the electric light 
plant at Hoquiam, in the state of Washington. 

Samuel H. Fritzinger was brought up to 



hard work, as his father was always more or 
less of an invalid. He has worked in the field 
from the age of nine years, and the main sup- 
port of the family was devolved upon him from 
the time he was fifteen years old. This was 
indeed a heavy burden for one so young, but 
he bore up under it manfully. In 1882 or 
1883 he went to the then territory of Wash- 
ington and spent a couple of years, when he re- 
turned to Illinois and was married in 1885. He 
then went with his family to Saunders county, 
Nebraska, whither his father had preceded him, 
and had contracted with the railroad company 
for the southwest quarter of section 31, town- 
ship 13, range 5, at $3.50 per acre. Up to that 
time he had paid nothing, and the subject here- 
of assumed the obligation and has since lived 
there. He started with about $600.00 in 
money, and for a time was compelled to strug- 
gle for existence. He broke the sod, sowed 
crops, and planted a number of catalpa trees, 
to begin with, and one needs but to look at his 
well improved farm at the present time to real- 
ize with what success his efforts met. He 
built a house 20 by 24 feet in dimensions, and 
later made it a story and a half high and built 
an addition of 16 by 26 feet. He first had a 
straw shed for a stable, and later built a frame 
barn, which was destroyed by fire. He then 
built his present fine barn in 1894, its dimen- 
sions being 32 by 46 feet. He has a granary 
in the barn, and built other good, substantial 
outbuildings, including a repair shop, and hog 
and cattle sheds. He has a tubular well 240 
feet deep (the water being pumped by a wind- 
mill), and has attempted several flowing wells, 



230 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



but never succeeded in getting the water nearer 
to the surface than five feet. He has dealt ex- 
tensively in hogs for the past fifteen years, and 
has had wonderful luck every year but 1899, 
when he lost some by cholera. Before leav- 
ing Illinois he began the manufacture of sor- 
ghum, and has since continued it. He devotes 
about fifteen acres of the farm to the culture of 
sorghum, and does considerable custom work, 
making about 1,500 gallons per year. He owns 
400 acres of land in all, including five 80-acre 
tracts. Three of these are located in Lancaster 
county. In 1 89 1 he bought the east half of the 
southwest quarter of section 12, in West Oak 
precinct. In 1894 he purchased the west half 
of the northeast quarter, and in 1899 the west 
half of the southwest quarter of the same sec- 
tion. He also owns a lo-acre tract in the 
corporate limits of Valparaiso, upon which 
there is a large house and barn, which he rents. 
He is one of the largest stockholders and a 
director of the Success Creamery Company, of 
Seward county, Nebraska. 

Mr. Fritzinger was united in marriage with 
Mary C. (Kirkaldie) Haines, a widow with 
three children, as follows: William H., who 
makes his home with Mr. Fritzinger ; and Ed- 
ward J. and Albert, of the state of Washington. 
Mrs. Fritzinger was born in La Salle county, 
Illinois, and is a daughter of J. B. and Lamira 
(Smith) Kirkaldie, her father being an old 
settler in Illinois. Six children were born to 
the subject hereof and his wife : Ira S., Frank, 
Fred L., John D., George, and Nellie. In 
political views Mr. Fritzinger is a Populist, and 
takes an active interest in party affairs, having 



been a representative of his precinct at several 
county conventions. He also serves on the 
school board. Religiously, he is a believer in 
the doctrines of the M. E. church. He is past 
master of Valparaiso Lodge, No. 278, A. O. 
U. W. He and his wife are beneficiary mem- 
bers of the Degree of Honor. 



§OHN NORDSTROM, a prominent agri- 
culturist of Saunders county, Nebraska, 
is quite an extensive land-owner in 
Stocking precinct. He is a native of Smaland, 
Sweden, where his birth occurred in 1844. His 
father, Jonas Peter Erickson, was a farmer by 
occupation. 

When fifteen years old Mr. Nordstrom 
learned the trade of a stone and brick mason 
and plasterer. In 1867 he came to America, 
settling in Rockford, Illinois. He followed his 
trade there until 1869. In December of that 
year his brother came here from Sweden, and 
hearing of the fine land to be gotten in Ne- 
braska, Mr. Nordstrom came to this state and 
took a homestead for himself, his brother Carl, 
and several others of the now well-to-do farm- 
ers of Saunders county. At first he employed 
himself in assisting the early settlers to plaster 
their homes and in doing other work in his 
line. Later he began to cultivate his own 
land, and has since devoted his time exclusively 
to farming. He first built a sod house upon 
his land. This was replaced subsequently by 
a small frame house which gave way in a few 
years to a modern, convenient residence. He 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



231 



also built fine barns and other buildings about 
the place, and planted about two acres of his 
land in fruit trees. These orchards now con- 
tain a wide variety of fine fruit. Ornamental 
shrubs and shade trees were also planted and 
the whole farm was in a high state of cultiva- 
tion. In 1882 Mr. Nordstrom sold his farm, 
with other land which he owned, and moved to 
the vicinity of Omaha, where he engaged in 
farming until 1895. During this time he pur- 
chased one-half section of land in Wahoo pre- 
cinct (the northwest quarter of section 21 and 
the southwest quarter of section 16) which has 
been used by renters most of the time. Mr. 
Nordstrom has made many improvements on 
this farm, both in the land and in the buildings. 
In 1895 ^^ purchased from John Moss 240 
acres of section 10 in Stocking precinct, and 
upon this farm he now resides. He built a 
large, handsome residence and other fine build- 
ings, not omitting to set out orchards and shade 
trees. Upon this farm he feeds from 100 to 
150 head of cattle and generally keeps from 
100 to 200 Head of hogs. 

Mr. Nordstrom married Nellie Nelson, a 
daughter of Albert Nelson. Albert Nelson was 
born in Skane, Sweden, and came to America 
in 1855. He first settled in Chicago, Illinois, 
where he became a wagon-maker. Later he 
went to New Orleans where he took large con- 
tracts for clearing timber. From there he trav- 
eled by water to California and engaged in 
erecting buildings in San Francisco. He was 
subsequently engaged in mining for about fif- 
teen years. He then went to Omaha, Ne- 
braska, where he conducted a hotel for some 



time. In 1871 Mr. Nelson returned to Sweden 
to get his family, and upon his return to the 
United States he became a contractor for the 
Chicago & Northwestern Railway, working 
from Omaha to Plattsmouth. Later he settled 
in section 16, in Wahoo precinct, Saunders 
county, Nebraska. He was a public-spirited 
citizen and served four years as county com- 
missioner, after which he retired. His death 
took place in 1894 at the age of seventy-two 
years. He married Ellen Johnson, whose 
death preceded his demise by eleven months. 
She was sixty-nine years old. Two children 
were born to them: Nellie, the wife of Mr. 
Nordstrom, and Jonas, a citizen of Humboldt, 
Nevada. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nordstrom have four sons: 
Jonas Sigfrid, who is engaged in farming; 
Ernst Arvid, who devotes his time to business 
in Omaha, and Carl Fritheof and Berger Theo- 
dore, who are staying at home. 



Y^TENRY EASE, a highly esteemed citi- 
|P j zen and very successful farmer of Rich- 
V^-^land precinct, Sarpy county, Ne- 
braska, was one of the very earliest settlers of 
that locality. He started wholly without 
means, haying borrowed enough money to 
make the voyage from Germany to America, 
but possessing an abundance of energy and 
good business ability, he worked his way grad- 
ually to the front, and is now one of the sub- 
stantial citizens of the county. 

Mr. Fase was born in Germany in 1839, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



is a son of Andrew and Sophia (Fricke) Fase. 
His father died in Germany at the age of thirty- 
three years, and his mother came to America 
with her family in 1857, and died here at the 
age of sixty-five years. Their children were : 
Andrew, Henry, and Christian, who died in 
infancy. 

Henry Fase settled with his mother in Ohio, 
where he followed farming until 1861. He 
then enlisted in a regiment of cavalry from 
Wheeling, West Virginia. He served with 
bravery for a period of three years, and then 
returned to his home, where he remained until 
the following June. He then came to Nebraska 
and worked out as a farm hand until the fall 
of 1865. He had previously purchased a tract 
of 80 acres of wild prairie land where the 
town of Portal is now located. He set out 
a grove in 1869, made many improvements, and 
cultivated the land until 1887, when he dis- 
posed of it. He next bought 240 acres of Ed- 
ward Huff, in section 36, Richland precinct, 
Sarpy county (where he now lives), also pur- 
chasing an adjoining 80 acres of A. Snyder 
in section 35. He erected a fine set of farm 
buildings, remodeled and enlarged his own 
home, and built an adjoining home for his son. 
His farm is in excellent condition and is one 
of the most productive in the precinct, the aver- 
age yield being 55 bushels of corn and 40 
bushels of oats to the acre. He has 75 head of 
cattle and as many hogs, and has met with 
great success in the cultivation of all kinds 
of fruit. 

Mr. Fase was united in marriage in 1867 
with Mary Uhe, a daughter of Andrew and 



Mary (Bomgarten) Uhe, who, upon coming 
to this country from Germany, first located 
in Ohio and then at Omaha, Nebraska. They 
later lived with their son William where Mrs. 
Uhe now lives, at the age of seventy-two years. 
Andrew Uhe died at the age of sixty-nine years. 
They were parents of five children : Dora, 
Elizabeth, Lena, William and Mary. The last 
named, Mr. Faze's wife, was born in Germany 
in 1850 and was two years of age when 
brought to this country. Mr. and Mrs. Fase 
are parents of the following children: Caro- 
line, wife of Jacob Pfluck, by whom she has two 
children, Mattie and Walter; Herman, who 
married Ella Gillette and has three children. 
Grant, Arthur and Earl ; Lydia, wife of John 
Kincade, and William, who married Etta 
Ward. The subject of this sketch served two 
terms as assessor and officiated on the school 
board and as road supervisor for many years. 



fOHN D. GLESMANN, one of the most 
prominent and successful farmers of 
Richland precinct, Sarpy county, Ne- 
braska, is of sturdy German extraction, having 
been born in Holstein, Germany, in 1846. He 
is a son of John D. Glesmann. 

John D. Glesmann, the father, was born in 
1 816 in Holstein, Germany, and his wife, 
Elizabeth Roennau, was also born there, in 
1 81 7. They were the parents of a family of 
nine children, as follows: Elizabeth, the wife 
of j. Roennau; Christina, the wife of C. Witt; 
John D. Jr. ; Henry C. ; Carl, deceased ; Chris- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



tian, deceased; Ernest; Augusta, the wife of 
H. Gottsch ; and Fred, deceased. 

Our subject, with his brother, Henry C, 
came to this country and located in Davenport, 
Iowa, in 1868, but they remained there only 
about nine months, when they left for Council 
Bluffs, Iowa. There they continued to work 
on the farm until they located in Sarpy county, 
Nebraska, where they rented land for five 
years, during which time they succeeded in 
accumulating a small sum of money. Then, 
with the assistance of their father, in 1876 they 
bought a half section, where John D. Gles- 
mann, the son now lives. Being industrious 
and determined to have a fine farm, they began 
making improvements, and in 1877 they set 
out a fine grove consisting of cottonwood, wal- 
nut, and maple trees, some of which have 
grown to be 20 inches in diameter. The sub- 
ject hereof now owns this grove, in the cen- 
ter of which is located his house, which he 
built in 1897. The old barn, which was erected 
in 1876, is now used as a granary and tool 
house. The present fine barn was built in 1897, 
and has a fine basement under it, used for cows. 
Mr. Glesmann keeps about 45 cows and about 
70 hogs, continuously, and on his place he has 
a fine corn-crib and good substantial outbuild- 
ings. As a proof that he has got his land into 
a very fertile condition, he raises as much as 
70 bushels of corn to the acre, and 50 
bushels of oats per acre. He also has a fine 
orchard, which may fee classed among the best 
and most improved within Sarpy county. He 
enjoys a wide circle of friends throughout his 
adopted community, who know him to be a 



good friend and neighbor, an enterprising 
farmer and a loyal citizen. 

Mr. Glesmann was joined in marrige with 
Annie Gottsch, a daughter of Henry Gottsch, 
Henry Gottsch was born in Germany in 1821, 
and is a son of Klaus and Annie (Stuhr) 
Gottsch. He came to this country in 1885. 
He is now living a retired life, after spend- 
ing many years engaged in the grain busi- 
ness, and following his trade as a weaver. He 
married Margaret Kuhl, who died in 1899, 
aged seventy-one years. They had the follow- 
ing children: August, Mary (deceased), 
Henry, Emma, Mary, and Annie, wife of the 
subject hereof. Mr. and Mrs. Glesmann are 
the parents of ten children : John (deceased), 
Herman Henry, William Frederick, August 
Adolph, Elizabeth Pauline, Minnie Lucy, Carl 
Christian, Emma Margaret, Martha Annie, and 
Henry. Mr. Glesmann has served on the school 
board in his district, and as road supervisor. 
In religious views he and his family are Lu- 
therans. 



§OHN M. WARD, a resident of Richland 
precinct, is one of the progressive and rep- 
resentative farmers of Sarpy county, Ne- 
braska, which he has assisted in bringing into 
prominence as one of the best agricultural dis- 
tricts in the West. With the assistance of his 
sons, he carries on farming on a very large 
scale. He was born in Delaware county, Ohio, 
in 1851, and is a son of John and Margaret 
(Jones) Ward. 
John M. Ward was a small child when his 



234 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



father died. In later years his mother was 
wedded to Abraham Snider, a native of the 
state of New York, who came to Nebraska from 
Iowa in 1 874. From Mrs. Thompson, Mr. Sni- 
der bought 1 60 acres of bare prairie — the land 
adjoining John M. Ward's property on the west 
— and today he is now living a retired life, and 
enjoying the benefits of his early toil. His 
entire farm is now being tilled by his sons. He 
made many improvements upon his farm, such 
as putting out shade and fruit trees, and build- 
ing barns, outbuildings and a fine residence. 

John M. Ward was a lad of five years when 
his parents moved to Iowa, where he first at- 
tended the public schools, and afterwards be- 
came a student in the State University of Iowa, 
at Iowa City, and as he was reared to agricul- 
tural pursuits, he decided to make farming his 
life's work. He first bought 40 acres in Johnson 
county, Iowa, and in 1873 he disposed of his 
farm there and purchased of Annie Sheath 160 
acres in section i. Richland precinct, Sarpy 
county, Nebraska. At that time it was raw 
prairie and Mr. Ward built a house having 
dimensions of 14 by 20 feet, on the property, 
and in March, 1876. he enlarged it. In 1880 
he erected a new home on the present site, mov- 
ing the old one to the rear and using it for a 
tool house. In 1899 he built his present fine 
house, which has all the latest improvements. 
During all those years he was steadily making 
improvements upon his farm, in the way of 
cultivating the soil and putting up barns, etc. 
His present barn is 60 by 60 feet in dimensions ; 
his cow shed is 32 by 48 feet, and besides he 
has a buggy shed, and a large corn-crib. In 



1893 he built the first silo in this section of the 
state. It is 20 by 20 feet in size, and has a 
capacity of 144 tons. In 1876 Mr. Ward set 
out an orchard, which under his careful treat- 
ment has produced an abundant quantity of 
fruit; he now has 30 acres in fruit trees. 
He also has a large grove of shade trees, and 
around his beautiful home he has a number of 
evergreens. He has two tubular wells, a depth 
of 115 and 175 feet, respectively, which fur- 
nish a water supply both for his residence and 
his barns and feed lots. The house has all the 
modern conveniences of city property. He also 
has a fish pond which is stocked with German 
carp and catfish. The pond is supplied by a 
natural spring and by the wells. He has pur- 
chased property at different times from the 
earnings of his first farm. He bought 160 
acres from the Hamilton heirs, which was pre- 
empted by E. T. Huff; 160 acres in Platford 
precinct from E. T. Hilton; 160 acres of E. E. 
Moyer, also in Platford precinct, and he owns 
640 acres in Perkins county, Nebraska. On 
each of these farms he has erected new barns, 
new outbuildings and a neat house. He keeps 
from 150 to 200 head of cattle, most of which 
are thouroughbred Shorthorns, and about 150 
hogs. He also devotes much attention to raising 
fine mules, and during his time he has raised 
many premium winners. The subject of this 
sketch is an enterprising and progressive 
farmer, and throughout his community and 
county he enjoys the reputation of being a good 
neighbor and an honest and upright citizen and 
business man. 

Mr. Ward wedded Eliza Evans, a daughter 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



of William Evans, of Adair county, Iowa, and 
to them were born the following children : Wil- 
liam, who married Rena Wilbur, and has one 
child, Ruth; Frank, who wedded Mamie Ken- 
nelly, by whom he has one child, May; Etta, 
who is the wife of William Fase ; Charles and 
Chloe, twins, who are deceased ; Pearl ; Jessie ; 
Maggie ; Mittie ; Lucretia ; and John McKinley. 
In politics Mr. Ward is a stanch Republican, 
and has held the following offices in his commu- 
nity. One term as county commissioner ; three 
terms as assessor; road supervisor and school 
director. Religiously, he is a member of the 
Congregational church. 






ICHAEL DUNN is one of the few 
pioneer farmers who have spent many 
'years in the upbuilding and ad- 
vancement of the state of Nebraska. When 
he pre-empted his first i6o acres there was no 
Sarpy county, but in after years he assisted in 
the surveying of that county. In those early 
days the white people were thinly scattered 
throughout Nebraska territory, but the In- 
dians were plenty, and the forests abounded 
with game, while the rivers and creeks were 
full of fish. By grim determination and per- 
severance Mr. Dunn's efforts were crowned 
with success, and he has transformed his first 
purchase into fine fertile fields, which today 
consist of the best farming land in Sarpy coun- 
ty. He was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, 
in 1828, and is a son of Thomas and Mary 
(O'Mara) Dunn. 



Michael Dunn's father died when in his for- 
ty-ninth year, leaving a wife, six sons and two 
daughters, and Michael was obliged to help in 
making a livelihood for the family. In his 
early youth he was a shepherd, but later on he 
followed lath splitting, which trade he had 
learned from his father. The family subse- 
quently went to England, where the subject 
hereof continued lath splitting, and in 1852 
Michael and his brother Thomas came to the 
United States. Upon landing in New York 
City Mr. Dunn went immediately to Chicago, 
and from there he went to La Salle, Illinois, 
where he worked on the Illinois Central Rail- 
road. He then went west to Omaha, where he 
became a cook for John Painter, a surveyor, 
whom he afterwards assisted in making sur- 
veys. In 1856 he pre-empted 160 acres in Fair- 
view precinct, section 22,, township 13, range 
12, on which was a large forest. On this prop- 
erty was a fine spring which has never failed to 
furnish water. Going to Omaha, he bought 
lumber enough to build a house near the spring. 
He has since erected a fine residence and has 
put up a fine barn and outbuildings. He has a 
good orchard of four and one-half acres, and in 
addition to the raising of grain he raises fine 
cattle. He also owns 640 acres in Greeley 
county and 160 in Cheyenne county. Our sub- 
ject is a good conscientious farmer, and is de- 
serving of the esteem and respect in which he 
is held by his fellow citizens and neighbors. 

Mr. Dunn was joined in marriage with Mary 
McBride, who, with pluck and faithfulness, has 
withstood the hardships of a pioneer life, and 
has done her share toward making a pleasant 



236 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



home for her husband and children. Their 
children numbered eleven — namely : Thomas, 
a printer at Omaha; Samuel, who works on a 
ranch in Cheyenne county; Patrick, also a 
ranchman in Cheyenne county; Ignatius, an 
attorney at Omaha; John, who assists in con- 
ducting the homestead; Cletus, a student at 
Fremont Normal School ; Mary ; Ida, a teacher 
in the grammar schools at Papillion, and Clem- 
ent, Michael, and a babe, who are deceased. 
Mr. Dunn and his family are members of the 
Catholic church. The subject of this sketch 
is a Democrat and has served nine years on the 
school board in his district. 



fONAS BENDER, a prominent farmer 
and stock raiser of Union precinct, is 
one of the many successful men of Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska. Mr. Bender was born 
in Preble county, Ohio, February 6, 1837. 
He is a son of John and Elizabeth (Brown) 
Bender. 

John Bender was born in Adams county, 
Pennsylvania, where his early life was spent. 
Leaving there, he settled in Ohio, when that 
state was in its early stages of progress. His 
sole occupation was farming. He died in 
Ohio. 

Jonas Bender was reared on his father's 
farm. He spent several years in La Salle 
county, Illinois. In 1882 he came west, to 
Nebraska, and purchased land in Union pre- 
cinct, Saunders county. He purchased 427 
acres of land in sections 15 and 10. This land 



was settled by Joseph McKee and "Nick" 
Rogers, and when purchased by Mr. Bender, 
was not fenced in. It contained a house and 
barn. These buildings were enlarged and 
remodeled by Mr. Bender, who now has a 
beautiful residence and a fine set of buildings. 
He also set out fruit and shade trees. 

Mr. Bender married Isabelle Wampler, and 
they are the parents of ten children, namely : 
Lydia A., Effie Jane, John C, Luther E., Eliz- 
abeth I., Rachel I., Emma I., William C, 
James A., and Harry R. Emma I. and Harry 
R. are deceased. Lydia A. is a dressmaker by 
occupation. Effie Jane is a milliner in Nor- 
folk, Nebraska. William C. is a farmer. John 
C, a hardware merchant, married Mat- 
tie Grout, of Rogers, Colfax county, Nebras- 
ka, and they have three children, — Chester, 
Blanche and Hazel. Luther E. is a baker by 
tra^e. Elizabeth I. married W. G. White, of 
Fremont, Nebraska, and they have one child, 
Mildred. Rachel I. married H. Van Deusen, 
of Scribner, Nebraska. They also have one 
child, Dorothy. James A. is a stenographer. 

Mr. Bender is an ardent supporter of the 
Populist platform. He has served his party 
as justice of the peace. He is a member of the 
Lutheran church, and makes liberal donations 
toward the maintenance of that domination. 
The subject of this sketch is a man of sterling 
worth and stands high in his community. His 
farm is among the most productive in the vi- 
cinity. A part of it is situated on the flats 
which border the Platte River, and from his 
residence can be obtained a grand view of the 
fertile valley of the Platte. Mr. Bender keeps 




•HI LIT /WIKBF.I. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



a fine herd of thoroughbred Shorthorns and 
graded stock, and also a large number of hogs. 
In farm products he raises principally grain 
and corn, of which he plants only the best. 
He has calls in the county to serve as auction- 
eer, in which occupation he has had fine suc- 
cess, having followed that business for many 
years. 



HILIP ZWIEBEL, a large land own- 
er and prosperous farmer of Sarpy 
county, Nebraska, is also an old set- 
tler, as he located within the borders of Sarpy 
county in 1856, and since that year he has la- 
bored constantly, pursuing the vocation of a 
farmer. He was born in France, in 1836, and 
is a son of Michael Zwiebel, who moved with 
his family to Ohio, where he carried on farm- 
ing until his death. 

When Philip was a lad of fifteen years, he 
started to learn the trade of a blacksmith, but 
as he did not like it, he went west, in 1856, 
and located in Sarpy county, where he bought 
a pre-emption of 160 acres for $1 50. He after- 
ward bought about 160 acres in sections 
19 and 30, LaPlatte precinct, and 371 
acres from J. F. Payne. All of this property 
is in one farm, upon which Mr. Zwiebel has 
spent much time in putting it in a fine state of 
cultivation. Besides general farming, he raises 
about 200 hogs per year. He has established 
a record for corn raising which is a hard one 
to beat, having raised 100 bushels to the acre, 
and his oats also yield more per acre than the 
average farmer raises. This goes to show 



what a thorough state of cultivation the land 
is in, and accounts for the reputation which 
Mr. Zwiebel bears throughout his community 
as an up-to-date, progressive and conscientious 
farmer. 

Mr. Zwiebel wedded Annie Barbara Elsis, 
of Ohio, and they have seven children, namely : 
George; Frank; Christina; Sophia, wife of 
J. Seefus; Caroline, the wife of W. Jackson; 
Benjamin, deceased; and Tilda. Politically 
the subject of this sketch is a Democrat. He 
lias .served on the school board, and he and 
liis family are members of the Lutheran church. 
A portrait of Mr. Zwiebel, executed from a 
recent photograph, is shown on a preceding 
page. 



§'OHN WEBER, a prosperous farmer of 
Sarpy county, Nebraska, was born in Wur- 
temberg, Germany, in 1847, and is a 
son of John Weber, Sr., who came to this coun- 
try in 1857, with his family, and located in La 
Salle county, Illinois, where he engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. 

John Weber, the son, was reared in La Salle 
county, Illinois, but in 1882, when thirty-five 
years of age, he settled in Sarpy county, Ne- 
braska, where he purchased of Horace Rogers 
and son 160 acres of land in section 9, town- 
ship 13, range 12. A small house stood on the 
farm and but very little of the ground had 
been broken, though there was an orchard of 
two acres, to which the subject hereof has since 
added three acres. He has put his farm into a 
fine state of cultivation, and his record of 



240 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



80 bushels of corn to the acre is a hard one 
to beat by the Sarpy county farmers. Besides 
raising grain, much of his time has been de- 
voted to the raising of live stock, of which 
he has always kept from 30 to 40 head — 
formerly having Holsteins and Jerseys, but 
now breeding mostly Shorthorns. In 1894 
he bought 80 acres of John Seiford, in sec- 
tion 4, but he rents this piece of land. Mr. 
Weber is a practical farmer, having met with 
the best of success in pursuing this vocation, 
and he enjoys the friendship and confidence of 
hosts of acquaintances throughout the county. 
Mr. Weber was married in 1876 to Paulina 
Rinker, a daughter of Christian Rinker, of 
Grand Rapids, and they had four children: 
Elmer, J. Will, Paulina, and Charles, of whom 
the last two are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Weber 
are members of the Lutheran church. In 
politics John Weber is a Republican. 



7T^L.^RENCE E. KEYES is an extensive 
I J| land-owner and a prominent and well-to- 

^*^ ' do farmer of Richland precinct, Sarpy 

county, Nebraska, where he has spent many 
years pursuing his present vocation. When he 
decided to make farming his occupation he had 
no knowledge whatever of it, but by grim de- 
termination he has succeeded admirably. He 
is a native of Massachusetts, having been born 
in Worcester county, in that state, in 1849. He 
is a son of Edward and Rachael (Moore) 
Keyes, who until their death, made their home 
with the subject hereof. The father died aged 



seventy-one years, while the mother lived to be 
seventy-three years old. They were the parents 
of but two children, Clarence E., and Antoin- 
ette, the wife of L. A. Burt, of Connecticut. 
Clarence E. Keyes received a good common 
school education in his native town, and early 
in life obtained a clerkship in a grocery store 
in Boston; he then worked some time in a 
crockery store, and in 1868 moved to Sarpy 
county, Nebraska, where he joined his brother- 
in-law. At that early date he had no thoughts 
of engaging in farming, for he did not know 
the rudiments of that occupation, nor could he 
even harness a horse. Determined to invest 
his savings in Nebraska lands, he bought a 
farm in LaPlatte precinct, with his brother-in- 
law, Mr. McKee. He ran it until 1874, when he 
disposed of it, and then purchased 160 acres in 
section 1 1 , Richland precinct, from the Union 
Pacific Railroad Company. He subsequently 
bought 160 acres of adjoining land from J. J. 
McLain. The property was all raw land, and 
only a small house stood on the farm. He en- 
larged the house, in which he continued to live 
until 1894, when it was destroyed by fire, and 
he afterward put up his present fine residence. 
He has good buildings on his farm — a large 
barn and large cattle sheds— and in 1874 or 
1875 l''^ P"t out a great many shade and fruit 
trees. He first set out 100 fruit trees, but now 
has 680 trees, .and around his house he has some 
fine shrubbery. Mr. Keyes deals extensively 
in cattle, keeping from 50 to 75 thoroughbred 
Holstein cattle and from 100 to 200 hogs. 
He has a good well on his premises 60 feet 
deep, which furnishes plenty of good water. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



241 



Mr. Keyes has done much toward the cuhi- 
vation of the soil, as shown by the fact that he 
has raised 75 bushels of corn, 55 bushels of 
oats, and 30 bushels of wheat to the acre, which 
speaks very highly of the fertility of his farm. 
Mr. Keyes was joined in marriage with An- 
nabell Hodge, a daughter of George H. and 
Elizabeth (Geddis) Hodge. Her father was 
born in Scotland, and during his early life he 
followed railroading at Toronto, Canada, being 
employed on the Grand Trunk Railway. He 
ran as conductor and served as yardmaster at 
North McGregor and South McGregor, Iowa. 
At St. Joseph, Missouri, he met with an acci- 
dent, being crushed between the cars, and he 
never afterward followed railroading. He then 
went to Hot Springs, Utah, where he followed 
farming, but later moved to Springfield, Ne- 
braska, where he died. He left a wife and five 
children : Annabell, Libbie, the wife of J. S. 
Miller ; Jane, the wife of M. B. Jones ; Georgi- 
ana, the wife of D. Barrett, and a son, John, 
who died aged twenty-two years. The subject 
hereof and his wife have been blessed by the 
following children : Nettie, who is the wife 
of J. K. Phelps, and has three children; Lee 
Donald, and a baby; Georgiana, deceased; Ed- 
ward, who is studying medicine at Council 
Bluffs, Iowa, and married Vinnie Sanborn, by 
whom he has one child; Annabell and Idelle, 
both teachers ; Chester ; and Robert. Mr. Keyes 
is a stanch Republican, and in 1893 served as 
a representative in the legislature, and has 
served on the school board in his district. He 
is prominent in that district and enjoys a wide 
acquaintance, which holds him in high esteem. 



m/mer 



ILLIAM A. JAMISON is a worthy 
member of one of the oldest families 
of Saunders county, Nebraska, and he 
is well known throughout the county as an 
enterprising and up-to-date farmer. He was 
born in Illinois, and is a son of Andrew J. and 
Elizabeth (Alexander) Jamison, who were 
born and reared near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
They had seven children, as follows : Martha, 
John, Mary, Lydia E., Eliza A., William A., 
and James. Martha is the wife of a Mr. Cook, 
a mail carrier, and they have the following chil- 
dren: Ralph D., Andrew J., Bertha E., Harry, 
and Bird I., who is railroading. John is a 
druggist at Alvo, Cass county, Nebraska, but 
formerly conducted a store and erected the 
building now^ occupied by C. E. Lillibridge's 
hardware store in Weston; he married Flora 
B. Rogers, by whom he has two children — Dee 
and Max. Mary, deceased, was the wife of 
William Brown, who now cultivates a farm in 
Butler county, Nebraska, but who formerly 
lived in Newman precinct, Saunders county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Brown had a family of six chil- 
dren, namely : Phoebe, the wife of a Mr. Scott. 
of Butler county ; John T. ; James D., deceased ; 
Andrew J., and William and George, who are 
at home. Lydia E. (Baker) lives at Lake 
Charles, Louisiana, where her husband is a 
produce commission merchant, and they have 
four children: Maude. Alice, Goldie, and 
George. Eliza A. (Hedges) of Valparaiso, 
Nebrai^ka, is the mother of six children: Clin- 
ton, Harvey, ^^'i!Iial^, Ethel, Stella, and 
Chester, and her luishand is a well-borer. 
William A. is the subject of this sketch. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



James, the youngest, lives on and cultiva,tes a 
part of the other i6o acres of the original 
homestead, which lie in the southeast quarter 
of section 29; he married Stella Chambers. 
Andrew J. Jamison located in Scott county, 
Iowa, shortly after his marriage, and there he 
operated a grist and saw mill. Thence he 
went to Arkansas, where he spent several years. 
From 1 86 1 to 1865 he lived in Illinois, but in 
the latter year he went to Saunders county, 
Nebraska, where members of his family live 
at the present day. He first located near Wes- 
ton, on the Joseph B. Bartek farm, which land 
he bought from Mr. Barnhill, and which con- 
sisted of 80 acres in section 24, township 14, 
range 5. He was the first settler in that locality, 
his nearest neighbor being some miles distant. 
For years his place was known as the A. J. Jam- 
ison ranch. The family lived there until 1870, 
when Mr. Jamison, the father, bought a quar- 
ter of section 32 and a quarter of section 29, 
township 14, range 5. The land was originally 
taken by land warrants and college scrip. Their 
first house was put up in 1878, and stands on a 
knoll well suited for a house site. Down the 
slope from the house William A. Jamison 
erected a barn in 1898, the dimensions of which 
are 30 by 36 by 16 feet ; he also has good gran- 
aries and outbuildings. His house is sur- 
rounded by nice shade trees and beds of flow- 
ers. The father died November i, 1883, and 
the mother lives with the subject hereof. An- 
drew J. Jamison was a strong Democrat, while 
his son, William A., is a Populist. The old 
homestead was situated on the government road 
from Ashland to Columbus and Fort Kearney. 



Mr. Jamison is located on the northeast quarter 
of section 2)^, while his brother James is located 
on the southeast quarter of section 29. 

The subject of this sketch has held numerous 
offices in his precinct. During the early "nine- 
ties" he served two terms as assessor. In 1898 
and 1899 h^ was road overseer; and at present 
he is school treasurer. He and his mother are 
Presbyterians in religious attachments. 



HOMAS J. PICKETT, who for the 
past five years has been editor and man- 
ager of the "Wahoo Wasp," at Wahoo, 
Saunders county, Nebraska, is a writer of ex- 
ceptional talent, well informed on all matters 
of general interest to the public. He conducts 
a wide-awake paper. Republican in political 
complexion, though devoted to the best inter- 
ests of the community. He is a man of tried 
business ability, and by shrewd management 
has increased the circulation of his paper over 
500 copies since he assumed control. Mr. 
Pickett was born at Peoria, Illinois, December 
27, 1850, and is a son of Thomas J. and Louisa 
(Baily) Pickett. 

Thomas J. Pickett, Sr., who was born March 
17, 1 82 1, was a man of considerable promi- 
nence in newspaper work, his entire business 
life being devoted to that vocation. When he 
was a boy, he worked in the printing office of 
George D. Prentice, and in 1840 located at 
Peoria, Illinois. He had the honor of being 
the first president of the Illinois Press Asso- 
ciation. He was very prominent in Masonic 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



circles and served as grand master, both in 
Illinois and Kentucky. He was one of the or- 
ganizers of the 69th Regiment, Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry, of which he was lieutenant colo- 
nel. At the expiration of the term of service 
of the 69th Regiment, he organized the I32d 
Regiment, and was made its colonel. He was 
among the first to write to Abraham Lincoln 
urging that he accept the presidency, and a fac- 
simile of Mr. Lincoln's reply appears in a 
work devoted to the life of Lincoln. In poli- 
tics, he was originally a Whig, but was a dele- 
gate to the first national convention of the Re- 
publican party at Philadelphia, which nomi- 
nated John C. Fremont for the presidency. He 
was a state senator, for the term beginning in 
i860, from Rock Island, Illinois, where he then 
lived, having located in that city in 1858. At 
the close of the war he removed to Paducah, 
Kentucky, where he served as postmaster and 
also as clerk of the United States district 
court. He remained there until the spring of 
1879, when he removed to Nebraska City, 
where he lived but one year. He then went to 
Lincoln, Nebraska, where he lived until his 
death, which occurred while he was on a visit 
to tlie home of his son at Ashland, Nebraska, 
December 24, 1891. He formed a matrimonial 
alliance with Louisa Baily, a native of Mary- 
land, and she died while visiting relatives in 
Chester county, Pennsylvania. This union 
resulted in the following offspring: Horace 
G., George, Charles, Thomas J., and Mildred 
(Terrell). Mr. Pickett formed a second mar- 
riage, wedding Libby Smith, of Peoria, Illi- 
nois, who now resides in Lincoln, Nebraska. 



They were the parents of three children : Har- 
riet (Guthrie), May (Boswell), and Wil- 
liam L. 

Thomas J. Pickett, the subject hereof, re- 
ceived his early education in public and private 
schools. After working as a printer for sev- 
eral years, he began his journalistic career. In 
1871, with H. F. White, he established the "No- 
komis Gazette," at Nokomis, Illinois, and in 
1872 he was appointed printer expert for the 
state, with office at Springfield, Illinois, sub- 
sequently disposing of his interest in the news- 
paper to Mr. White. He held the state office 
for nearly two years, after which he served as 
editor and manager of the "Fulton Journal," 
at Fulton, Illinois, until 1879. He then estab- 
lished the "Nebraska City Sun," at Nebraska 
City, which he and his father conducted as a 
daily morning paper. One year later he lo- 
cated in Ashland, Saunders county, and pur- 
chased the "Saunders County Reporter," the 
name of which he changed to the "Ashland Ga- 
zette," and its politics from Greenback to Re- 
publican. He continued to edit, manage and 
control the same until 1893, when he sold out 
the property. He served as postmaster for 
eight years under presidents Arthur and Harri- 
son, and in 1888 was elected float senator from 
Saunders and Sarpy counties. In 1895 ^^ 
located in Wahoo, and purchased a controlling 
interest in the "Wahoo Wasp," a Republican 
paper, of which he has since been editor and 
manager. He has been very active in politics, 
and in 1898 served as state central committee- 
man. 

November 2, 1875 Mr. Pickett was united in 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



marriage with Kate C. Snyder, a daughter of 
Dr. W. C. Snyder, of Fulton, IlHnois, and they 
are the parents of four sons, as follows : Stan- 
ley, who is with the Carpenter Paper Company, 
of Omaha, Nebraska; William, with R. G. 
Dun & Co., at Omaha; Henry, who is in the 
freight department of the B. & M. R. R. R. at 
South Omaha, Nebraska; and James, a mem- 
ber of the class of 1900, in the Wahoo High 
School. Fraternally Mr. Pickett is a member 
of Pomegranate Lodge, No. 62, A. F. & A. M., 
of Ashland, Nebraska. 



§OHN JACOB ZEEB, an industrious and 
conscientious farmer of Sarpy county, 
Nebraska, has met with the best success 
in following his present independent vocation, 
and enjoys a reputation throughout his com- 
munity as a good neighbor and citizen. He 
was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1840, 
and is a son of Jacob Zeeb. 

The subject hereof was reared in Germany, 
and served six years in the army. In 1867 he 
came to the United States and at once settled in 
Illinois, where he was engaged in farming four 
years. He subsequently rented a tract of land 
in Sarpy county, but two years later, in 1884, 
he bought of Marion Fish. 80 acres in section 
3, township 13, range 12. At that time there 
was a small house on the farm, and little im- 
provements had been put on tiie land. He 
built a large barn and a granary, erected a new 
house, put out an orchard of 400 trees, consist- 
ing of nearly all kinds of fruit, and also set out 



a vineyard. Besides raising considerable grain, 
he devotes much time to live stock, having 
about 70 hogs the year round, and a large 
number of milch cows, from which he makes 
butter, which sells at all times for 25 cents per 
pound. He has one of the best fruit farms in 
Fairview precinct, and is certainly an honor to 
his chosen occupation. He is economical and 
enterprising, and is esteemed by all who know 
him. 

Mr. Zeeb wedded Lena Gutbrod, by whom 
he had eight children. They are as follows: 
Annie, the wife of J. Lutz ; Mary, the wife of 
Martin Houck; Jacob, who wedded Mary 
Hoehning; William, Lena, Tillie, Amelia, and 
Carrie, who died, aged sixteen months. Mr. 
Zeeb and familv attend the Lutheran church. 



ON. EDGAR HOWARD is a native of 
Osceola, Iowa, where he was born Sep- 
tember 16, 1858. He is a son of 
James D. and Martha J. (Daniel) Howard. 
The former is deceased, while the latter now 
resides in Des Moines, Iowa. 

When Mr, Howard was a lad of seven years, 
his parents moved to Glenwood, Iowa, where 
he attended the public schools, and worked at 
the printing trade until he was eighteen years 
old. He then started out through the coun- 
try, and worked on various papers as printer 
and reporter. During 1881 and 1882 he held 
the position of city editor of the "Herald." at 
Dayton, Ohio. He then located in Omaha, 
where he found employment on the "Repub- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



lican." In 1883 he went to Papillion, Nebras- 
ka, where he took charge of the "Times" for 
the executors of the estate of Henry Carpenter. 
He afterwards purchased the paper and con- 
ducted it for three years, after which he sold 
out to Hancock Brothers, and at Benkelman, 
Nebraska, he estabhshed the "Dundy Demo- 
crat," which he issued for two years. Selhng 
out, he returned to PapilHon, where he again 
purchased the "Times." Having studied law 
in Drake University at Des Moines, Iowa, he 
was admitted to the bar in 1885. In 1894 he 
was nominated by the Democratic convention 
by acclamation as a candidate for representa- 
tive in the Ninth Legislative District, and was 
elected against the votes of Populists and Re- 
publicans. In 1895 1''^ resigned his position in 
the legislature to accept a nomination for coun- 
ty judge. He was elected, and was afterward 
re-elected for a term of two years. As a Dem- 
ocrat, he has always taken an active part in all 
political matters. 

Edgar Howard and Elizabeth Burtch of 
Clarinda, Iowa, were joined in marriage, No- 
vember II, 1884. She is a daughter of Alex- 
ander and Sarah (Bennett) Burtch. To this 
union a family of four children were born, 
namely : Fin, aged fifteen years ; Mary, aged 
twelve years; Martha, aged nine years, and 
Helen, aged seven years. Mr. Howard is a 
member of the following fraternities, in which 
he takes a prominent part: Papillion Lodge 
No. 39, F. & A. M. ; Omaha Chapter No. i, 
R. A. M. ; Omaha Council No. i ; Mt. Calvary 
Commander; Lodge No. 15, I. O. O. F., at Pa- 
pillion ; K. of P. No. 3, at Papillion ; Modem 



Woodmen of America, Camp No. 1791, at Pa- 
pillion; Woodmen of the World, Seymour 
Camp, at Omaha ; Imperial Mystic Legion, Pa- 
pillion Castle; Elks, No. 39, Omaha. 



T^HRIST STUEHM is one of the leading 
I J| and progressive farmers of Richland pre- 
^*^ — ^cinct, Sarpy county, Nebraska. He 
was born in Holstein, Germany, in 1862, and 
is a son of Asmus and Esther (Hapman) 
Stuehm. 

Asmus Stuehm lived in Germany all his life 
and died at an early age. By his union with 
Esther Hapman he had four children, as fol- 
lows: Henry, of Douglas county, Nebraska; 
August, Joseph, and Christ. Mrs. Stuehm 
came to this country, having previously mar- 
ried John Hahan, by whom she has four chil- 
dren : Minnie, John, Annie, and Henry. 

Christ Stuehm came to America and located 
in Nebraska in 1880, where he worked out for 
some time as a farm hand. He later rented a 
farm, and met with such success that he was 
enabled to buy one in 1892. He purchased 
160 acres known as the Jones farm, in section 
36, Richland precinct, Sarpy county, on which 
were located a few small buildings. He re- 
modeled the buildings and enlarged them and 
set out a fine two-acre orchard. His land is 
under a high state of cultivation, and has a 
large average yield in corn, wheat and oats. 
The farm is well stocked, having 25 
head of cattle, 60 hogs, and horses of good 
quality. He has given his entire time and 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



attention to making a success of his farm, and 
the results have exceeded his fondest expecta- 
tions. 

Mr. Stuehm was united in marriage with 
CeceHa Arp, a daughter of Klaus Arp. The 
latter came to this country from Germany and 
followed farming in Sarpy county for a period 
of three years, after which he returned to his 
native land. Six children have blessed this 
union, namely: Laura, August, Annie, Tena, 
Herman, and Lena. Religiously, the subject 
of this sketch is a faithful member of the 
Lutheran church. He is a man of pleasing per- 
sonality, and is held in the highest esteem by 
his fellow citizens. In politics, Mr. Stuehm is 
a Democrat. 



(^J^ W. TRUMBLE is one of the old- 
^^, est settlers of Sarpy county, Ne- 
^ V_^braska, within whose borders he lo- 
cated in 1855, when the white settlers were 
very few. The present position which Sarpy 
county occupies among her sister counties is 
due to such sterling, enterprising and progres- 
sive farmers as the gentleman whose name ap- 
pears at the opening of these lines. He was 
born in Orleans county, New York, in 1830, 
and is a son of Abner Trumble. 

A. W. Trumble was reared upon his father's 
farm, and the mental training he obtained in 
the district schools of his native place was sup- 
plemented by a course of study in Brockport 
Collegiate Institute. He taught school in 
the vicinity for four years, and, after 
visiting many places, he arrived at Belle- 



vue, Nebraska, in 1885. That locality 
seemed to have a very promising future, 
and he accordingly decided to engage 
in agricultural pursuits there and to grow up 
with the West. He took up a claim in 
Fairview precinct, where Richard Kane now 
resides, and there he began to till the soil. In 
1856 he sold that farm and took up 320 acres 
of his present farm. He began to break the 
sod, and one of his first labors was to build 
a small house of cottonwood timber. He also 
set out shade trees, but, about two years later, 
his house was struck by lightning, and he was 
compelled to build another house, which he 
continued to live in until about the year 1866, 
when he changed his location to the present 
site. He built a large house and set out a row 
of maple trees, some of which have grown 
to be about three feet in diameter. He also 
planted a locust grove, with seed brought from 
the state of New York. Besides shade trees, 
he put out a fine orchard, which now bears 
abundantly, and by constant laboring, he soon 
had his farm in a good state of cultivation. 
Mr. Trumble has always been a hard worker, 
and his life has been worthy of imitation. He 
helped to establish a school in his district, in 
which he taught one term, and his early neigh- 
bors speak of him in the highest terms as a 
successful teacher. He owns 720 acres in 
Richland precinct, of which he disposed of 60 
acres for railroad purposes, and for the town 
site of Chalco. He also owns the McLaugh- 
lin farm in La Platte precinct, which consists 
of 400 acres, of which 100 acres is a dense 
forest. He keeps about 25 horses, besides a 




CHARLES REICHERT. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



249 



large number of cattle and hogs. He deals 
extensively in live stock and also raises con- 
siderable grain. In some years he has raised 
70 bushels of corn to the acre; 50 bushels of 
oats, and 20 bushels of wheat. 

Mr. Trumble wedded Cordelia Kingman, of 
Orleans county, New York, and to them were 
born the following children : Fred, a farmer 
in Papillion precinct; Elizabeth, who is the 
wife of J. M. Yates, of Bellevue; Edith, who 
was wedded to Samuel M. Gramlisch; Wil- 
liam; Jesse, a farmer of Gretna, Nebraska; 
Clarence, a railroad contractor and builder; 
Maud, unmarried and living at home ; and two 
sons and a daughter who died in infancy. Mr. 
Trumble has held many public offices of trust, 
having served as sheriff, in 1858- 1859; county 
commissioner, assessor, and superintendent of 
roads. In 1862, 1866 and 1867, he was hon- 
ored with a seat in the legislature, during the 
closing days of Nebraska as a territory, and 
the beginning of her statehood. In 1866- 1867, 
he served on the school board, and has offici- 
ated in that capacity for the past twenty years. 
The subject of this sketch is prominently 
known throughout the county as an up-to-date, 
honest and enterprising farmer, and few of 
the pioneers are more favorably regarded than 
Mr. Trumble. 



TT^HARLES REICHERT, a well-to-do 
I J] farmer of Saunders county, Nebraska, 

^■^ ^ was born in Bavaria, Germany, March 

4, 1834. The family moved to the United States 



when he was eight years of age, and settled in 
Pike county, Ohio. His father was a farmer, 
and Charles worked on the home farm until he 
was twenty-two years of age. His only school- 
ing was acquired during the winter months in 
the district school. At the age of twenty-two 
years he left home, going to Cass county, Ne- 
braska, where he took up a farm and worked 
it for a period of four years. In the fall of 
1 86 1 he went to Saunders county, Nebraska, 
being one of the earliest settlers in the county, 
where he has since continued. Lumber could 
not be procured in those days, so he built 
a log house, in which the family lived for 
several years before he built his present resi- 
dence. He owns the northwest quarter of the 
southwest quarter of section 22, fractional, 
comprising 140 and 85-100 acres, and also 45 
acres in the northwest quarter of section 17. In 
common with the other settlers of that period, 
Mr. Reichert experienced great hardships, but 
could not be deterred from clinging to what, 
at times, notably during the grasshopper inva- 
sion, seemed a hopeless chance. He now owns 
one of the finest farms in the northern part of 
Saunders county. 

In 1856 the subject of this sketch married 
Dora Stellar, and after her demise, in 1867, 
he married her sister, Mary Stellar, a daughter 
of George and Anne Elizabeth Stellar, of Jack- 
son county, Ohio. He is the father of ten 
children, as follows: Philip, born in 1859; 
Mary, born December 20, 1861 ; Kate, born 
May 29, 1868; Rose, born December 22, 1869; 
Annie, born December 25, 1871 ; Henry, born 
in October, 1874; Andrew, born in 1876; 



250 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Charles, born in 1878; Ella, born June 10, 
1882; and Daniel, born August i, 1884. Phil- 
lip married Clara Whitten, and now lives in 
Madison county, Nebraska, with his family of 
seven children, as follows : Theodore, Agnes, 
Charles, Jessie, Ada, Joseph, and Philip. Kate 
married Peter Metz, and with their two chil- 
dren, Ella and Katy, they are living in Fre- 
mont, Dodge county, Nebraska. Annie married 
William Duhardt, and with their three chil- 
dren, Ella, Emma, and Charles, they are living 
in Madison county, Nebraska. The subject of 
this sketch, with J. Richardson, was the first 
road supervisor in the district. Politically he 
is a Populist. A portrait of Mr. Reichert ac- 
companies this sketch. 



jAUL BOOB is one of the most suc- 
cessful and influential farmers of 
Sarpy county, Nebraska, in which he 
owns about 1,200 acres of land. He is extens- 
ively engaged in raising and shipping cattle, 
and his farm is especially adapted to the pursuit 
of that occupation. 

Mr. Boob was born near East St. Louis, in 
Clair county, Illinois, in 1837, and is a son of 
Fred and Catherine (Craemer) Boob. He spent 
his early life on a farm in Illinois, and received 
his mental training in the district schools there. 
In the spring of 1859, at the time of the Pike's 
Peak excitement, he went west with tlie inten- 
tion of digging gold. However, instead of 
mining, he purchased a yoke of oxen and en- 



gaged in freighting across the plains, making 
in all sixteen round trips from the Missouri 
River to Pike's Peak, and one trip to Salt Lake 
City. Having spent eight or nine years in this 
manner, he decided to settle down. In 1868 
he located on his present farm of 160 acres in 
section 30, township 13, range 11, in Sarpy 
county, which had been pre-empted by John 
Drexel, of Omaha, but was unimproved. He 
sold his o.xen and purchased a span of mares 
and a colt, and this was practically all he had 
to start with. His first house was a small 
shanty, which has since been moved from its 
original location, and is now used as a repair 
house for the farm. His property is at the 
head of Buffalo Creek, along which there is 
considerable natural timber, and there he got 
the poles which formed the frame work of his 
first barn, covering these with straw. He 
planted a cottonwood grove, from which he had 
18,000 feet of lumber sawed in 1898, to use 
in the construction of his corn cribs. He still 
has a heavy grove to the north and west of his 
buildings. The first ten or fifteen years of his 
life on the farm he worked very hard. As an 
example of his untiring energy, he was wont to 
start for Omaha, then the only market, in the 
evening, to return the following forenoon, and 
to devote the rest of the day to hard work. He 
put out a small orchard of 40 trees at first, 
but they did not do well, and three or four years 
later he set out an orchard of seven acres, 
which, with some replacing, has thrived and is 
now in excellent condition. His first house 
was 12 by 22 feet in dimensions, and consisted 
of two rooms, and in this he lived until about 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



1880, when he built the first part of his present 
house, to which he has twice added. It is L 
shaped, the main part being 14 by 30 feet in 
dimensions, with an L of equal size. It is fur- 
nished throughout with modern conveniences, 
and has a dining room measuring 20 by 16 feet, 
and a kitchen with dimensions of 12 by 14 feet. 
The house is supplied with water throughout, 
and is provided with a bathroom. Mr. Boob's 
first frame barn was erected in 1887 at a cost of 
$1,100. It has a stone foundation and the 
basement is arranged for the stabling of horses. 
The dimensions of the barn are 38 by 40 feet, 
with 1 6- foot posts above the foundation. To 
this an addition was built, 40 feet wide, which 
is used as a machine shed. The next building 
to the east is a large granary and corn crib, 
with ample buggy shed in the middle. The 
granary, with a capacity of 1,800 bushels of 
small grain, and the double corn-crib, with a 
capacity of 3,000 bushels, are located on the 
west side, and on the other side of the building 
is a shed for calves and colts. This was built 
in 1888. An ice house of the size of 12 by 14 
feet is located near by. Next is the hog house 
and calf shed, 100 feet long and 18 feet wide, 
opening on the east, and the corn-crib, built in 
1893, 80 feet long, 16 feet wide, and 14 feet 
high. The cattle shed, built on the south, mak- 
ing it an L-shaped building, is 16 feet wide and 
80 long. Near by are the scales and a tubular 
well 109 feet deep. The well is supplied with 
a windmill and a tank of lOO-barrel capacity, 
from which the automatic watering trough is 
filled. Mr. Boob raises and ships cattle extens- 
ively, having on hand at all times from 100 



to 150 cattle, and about 100 head of hogs. He 
raises mixed Norman and English Shire draft 
horses, and also has some standard-bred driv- 
ers. He has a pretty herd of white Angora 
goats, numbering about 100 head. 

In 1868 Mr. Boob was united in marriage 
with Julia Hare, while in the west; owing 
to the fact that a minister was a rarity, Jacob 
Fackler, a justice of the peace, performed the 
ceremony. Mrs. Boob was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, and is a daughter of John and Elizabeth 
Hare, her father having located in Sarpy coun- 
ty, Nebraska, in 1859. She has a sister, Mrs. 
George Case, residing near Gretna, in that 
county, and -also a brother within the county 
limits. Her union with Mr. Boob was prolific 
of ten children, as follows: Mary, who lives 
at home; Clara, wife of James McLean, who 
lives near Gretna; John, who is married and 
lives on one of his father's farms; Alfred, who 
lives at home; Mary Jane, deceased, who was 
the wife of F"rank Cunningham, who also lives 
on Mr. Boob's farm ; Annie ( Sandy), who lives 
near by; Thomas, who lives at home; George, 
Minnie, and Paul, an infant. Paul Boob is 
Democratic in politics, and served as school 
treasurer in district 29 for two years. He be- 
longed to the Grange before that order became 
extinct. His family are strict adherents of 
the Lutheran faith. 



§AMES E. JOHNSON carried on farm- 
ing in Sarpy county, Nebraska, for 
many years, being one of the old pioneer 
settlers there, and as a result of his untiring 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



energy and persevering industry he has suc- 
ceeded in accumulating a handsome fortune 
which enables him to spend his latter days in 
quietude and peace. His birth occurred at 
Columbia, Pennsylvania, November 26, 1832, 
and he is a son of Bartus and Mary (Shubert) 
Johnson, to whom were born eleven children, 
of whom three are now living. Those living 
are Angeline, the wife of Oliver H. Kitchen, of 
Berwick, Pennsylvania, who has two children, 
— Frank R. and Jennie E. ; William, who came 
west in 1868, but being of a roving disposition 
and having no permanent abode, spent many 
years in the Dakotas, where he has served as 
state senator; and the subject hereof. James E. 
Johnson's father died in Pennsylvania, while 
the mother passed from this life several years 
after she moved to Sarpy county, Nebraska. 

Mr. Johnson remained under the parental 
roof until he became of age, during which time 
he worked on his father's farm, but on attain- 
ing his majority he began to learn the trade of 
what is known as keeper in the iron works at 
Danville, Pennsylvania, and remained there 
three years. He then followed his trade at 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania, for two years, but in 
the hope of bettering his condition he settled in 
Sarpy county in the spring of 1858. He took 
the train, which then ran as far west as Iowa 
City, Iowa, but from there he was obliged to 
continue his journey by stage, going by way of 
Des Moines. Four other men also took the 
stage at Iowa City, and after they had reached a 
point several miles on the other side of Des 
Moines the stage broke down several times, 
causing considerable delay. Mr. Johnson ar- 



rived in Omaha, Nebraska, on April 26, 1858, 
and at once purchased a land warrant for $165, 
which he holds to this day, and on which are 
no signs of a transfer or mortgage. He walked 
from Omaha to Bellevue, and thence to his 
lantl on the Platte River, the tract being located 
on the north half of the northeast quarter of 
section 31, and the south half of the southeast 
quarter of section 30, both in township 13, 
range 1 2. To comply with the law in regard to 
making improvements, he bought a 12 by 14 
foot house from a neighbor, who had once used 
it, and moved it on his farm. After remaining 
there the necessary time to establish his right, 
he returned to Iowa, where he worked two 
years around a saw mill for Peter A. Sarpy, 
after whom Sarpy county was named. Return- 
ing to Sarpy county, he brought with him a 
horse, but no money. During the first six 
months he worked out at $20 per month, and 
for oay he took a yoke of steers, which were 
then used to break the land. He turned under 
from 10 to 20 acres per year, and used 
hay stables, the frame work consisting of poles. 
He afterward built a log house in which he 
lived until 1882, the dimensions of the house 
being 14 by 16 feet. In the fall of 1882 he 
tore the old cabin down and built a frame house 
24 feet square. In 1891 he put up a frame barn 
24 by 18 feet in dimensions, and on the old 
barn site he erected a cattle and buggy shed 
40 feet in length. As there was no natural 
timber on the place, he set out cottonwood 
trees along the north and east sides of the 
house, the slips being obtained from an island 
in the Platte River. Having no means to haul 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



them to the house he carried them home, often 
carrying from 50 to 100 slips. He has lived 
to see these very sHps grow into trees from one 
foot to four feet in diameter. He recently cut 
50 cords of wood from them. Sometimes after 
setting out the slips he bought five acres of tim- 
ber land for $11 per acre, the tract being an 
island. An abundance of water can be ob- 
tained at a depth of from 20 to 2.2 feet, and 
besides there are two fine springs on the prop- 
erty. Mr. Johnson has an orchard which has 
not proven very successful. In former years 
he devoted the most of his time to the raising 
of grain, but later put in potatoes, which often 
brought $3 and $3.50 per bushel. Still later 
he began to deal more extensively in live stock, 
raising mostly Shorthorn cattle. He has suc- 
cessfully raised Berkshire, Chester White, and 
Poland-China hogs, but he prefers the Chester 
Whites. Mr. Johnson now rents his farm, and 
since the spring of 1900 he has been residmg 
in Springfield, where he bought three lots, upon 
which was a small house, which he has remod- 
eled and enlarged into a comfortable cottage. 
The subject of this sketch has been very suc- 
cessful at farming, and is a thoroughly self- 
made man. He enjoys a wide acquaintance 
throughout the county, and is an honest and 
upright citizen. 

Politically, Mr. Johnson is a standi Demo- 
crat, and he has served as road overseer for a 
score of years. His niece keeps house for 
liim. He took two children to raise. They 
are: Mrs. McDonald, of Richfield, Sarpy 
county, who is the mother of one child. Katie, 
and Everett McMahon. 



w- 



PETERS, who has been a resi- 
dent of Sarpy county, Nebraska, 
since 1856, is successfully engaged 
in agricultural pursuits on his farm in Spring- 
field precinct. 

Mr. Peters was born in Trumbull county, 
Ohio, in 1836, and is a son of John and Esther 
(Walkly) Peters. Eight children blessed this 
union, as follows: Henrietta (Koch), who 
died in Sarpy county; Anna (Wright), also 
deceased, who is survived by two children, 
Mary and Annie; W. H., to whom this record 
pertains ; John, who has always lived at Belle- 
vue, Sarpy county, since first locating there, 
and is the father of four children, Harry, 
Mary, Maggie, and John, the last named be- 
ing in a shoe store at Omaha ; Amos, deceased, 
who was a carpenter by trade, his family being 
in Omaha; Lucetta (Bachelder), of La Platte, 
Nebraska ; James, who was drowned in the 
Missouri River, near Kansas City, in July, 
1899; and Charles, who is a miner in Idaho. 
Mrs. Peters died in August, 1856, and her 
husband died in October of the same year. 

W. H. Peters, when in his twentieth year, 
came to Sarpy county, Nebraska, with his pa- 
rents, in 1856, locating at Bellevue when there 
were only a few houses in the town. His 
father followed wagon and carriage making 
there until his death, and then the subject 
hereof, being the oldest son and also a me- 
chanic, was obliged to support the family. He 
followed the wagon-making business for a pe- 
riod of twenty-five years, with much success, 
and an efifort was made to keep the family of 
nine children together, hut they finally scat- 



254 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



tered, and John is the only one remaining in 
Bellevue. He owned 40 acres of land in Fair- 
view, and in 1879 or 1880 purchased 80 acres 
at $8 per acre, — it being his present home, 
near Springfield. He purchased it of Mr. Sex- 
on, who had begun to break the land, and he 
hired the remainder broken. He located 
upon this property in 1883, building his pres- 
ent house, the main part of which in dimen- 
sions is 22 by 30 feet, and one story high, 
with an L, 14 by 18 feet in size, and one and 
a half stories high. Springfield was then but 
one year old. Mr. Peters set out an ample or- 
chard west of the house, which has been bear- 
ing finely, also many small fruit trees, to 
which ie has added from time to time. He 
has a very pretty house and grounds, located 
near the road, and box elders, elms, maples, 
and a few silver-leafed maples, ornament the 
yard. There is an excellent spring on the 
.south side of the farm, which supplies water 
for the stock. Mr. Peters has a 30-acre pas- 
ture, in which there is also a spring. He got 
the supplies for his first shop at Glen wood and 
Council Bluffs, as there was nothing but gov- 
ernment buildings at Bellevue then. The lat- 
ter town was always filled with people, how- 
ever, and was a very lively place. Mr. Peters 
has often had deer hunts close to Bellevue. 

The subject of this sketch was united in 
marriage at Xenia, Nebraska, with Ellen M, 
Bates, oldest daughter of J. A. Bates, an old 
settler of the county. He was the father of 
seven children: Ellen M., Mary C, deceased; 
Nathalie; William; Henry; Louis, who runs 
a drug store at Springfield ; and Eva, deceased. \ 



Mr. and Mrs. Peters have five children, as 

follows: Mattie, who lives at home, and is 
engaged in school teaching; J. Arthur, who is 
studying medicine in the Omaha Medical Col- 
lege, and has two more years before gradua- 
tion ; Joseph W., who travels out of Omaha 
for a shoe house; Etta, a music teacher 
of recognized ability : and Augustus, who 
is' living at iiome. Mr. Peters was for- 
merly a strong Democrat, but is now a Pro- 
hibitionist. He served as a member of the 
town council and as justice of the peace for 
two years at Bellevue. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



lOYAL G. GLOVER located within the 
borders of Sarpy county, Nebraska, in 
1856, where he has since continued to 
reside. He is now practically retired, as he 
has rented his farm and from choice lives in a 
small house in the woods in section 2, township 
12, range 10. Throughout his adopted county 
he has hosts of friends, and he is regarded as a 
good neighbor and citizen. He was born Octo- 
ber 22, 1846, in Jasper county, Indiana, and is 
a son of John B. and Eliza (Child) Glover. 

John B. Glover was born January 25, 1810, 
in Kentucky. He died in 1894, at Lincoln, 
Nebraska, and now lies buried at Tabor, Iowa. 
With his family he settled in Sarpy county in 
1856, crossing the Missouri River April 17 of 
that year. His family consisted of a wife and 
six children. As each settler took what land 
he wanted, he "squatted" on 320 acres in eec- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



tion 2, township 12, range 10, and as he had 
disposed of his farm in Iowa for $1,600 in gold 
he was better equipped financially than the ma- 
jority of farmers at that early date. He im- 
mediately built a house of rough logs, in which 
the family lived until October, when it was 
turned into a stable, and he hewed out timber 
enough to build another house. The first year 
he broke 22 acres, which he planted in sod- 
corn and pumpkins, the latter being very ac- 
ceptable to eat during the following winter. 
After living in the old log house several years 
the father built a frame house measuring 16 by 
32 feet, with an 8-foot shed along one side. 
The lumber for the house was obtained at a saw 
mill at Forest City. As he drove through from 
Iowa with four horses and twelve or fifteen 
head of cattle, his live stock began to increase 
quite rapidly, so the old hewed log house, 
which was 16 by 20 feet in extent, by 10 logs 
high, was turned into a barn. In those days 
he raised wheat, oats, corn and buckwheat, and, 
as he invested his earnings in farm land, be- 
fore he retired he owned several hundred acres. 
He retired in 1880 to Louisville, Nebraska, 
where he bought a neat little home on the 
Platte River, and there he spends his last days 
in quietude and comfort. His wife, Eliza 
Weld Child, was born November 22, 181 2, in 
Vermont, and she died October 13, 1887, and 
is also buried in Iowa. The old homestead is 
now owned by other parties. They were the 
parents of the following children : Mary E., 
Ezra Child, Henry Clay, Lucy Helen, John V., 
Royal G., Eliza Ann, Sarah P., and Minerva 
Grace. Mary E., born December 27, 1832, is 



the wife of Mr. Lefler of Gordon, Nebraska, 
and they had five sons: Henry C, William, 
Oliver P.. and Millard and Charles, twins. 
Ezra Child is deceased. Henry Clay was of a 
roving disposition, and the last time he was 
heard from he was in Washington. Lucy 
Helen wedded a Mr. Tower, of Ashland, Ne- 
braska, and they had one child, Bertha. John 
V. was killed several years ago at Los Angeles, 
California ; he was a soldier in the Union army 
during the Civil war. Royal G., is the sub- 
ject of this record. Eliza Ann is the wife of a 
Mr. Woods, of Tabor, Iowa. Sarah P. was 
joined in marriage with Mr. Chessington, of 
Lincoln, Nebraska, and they have two children, 
Buel and Aura. Minerva Grace, the youngest, 
is now Mrs. Hilderbrand, of Clearwater, Ne- 
braska, and has two children, Carl and Edna. 
The Glovers formerly lived in Indiana, but in 
1853 the father moved to Iowa, where he 
spent two and one-half years before he entered 
Nebraska. 

Royal G. Glover had few school privileges, 
and remained at home until he became of age. 
He then purchased his present farm in section 
5, township 12, range 11, and all the improve- 
ments upon it are the results of his own work. 
xA.bout the year 1880 he put up nearly all the 
present outbuildings, the barn and the house. 
He has a first-class orchard. For six years he 
kept a store across the road from his house. 
On account of sickness he has been compelled 
to abandon hard labor, and he is now living a 
comfortable life in the woods. He has always 
been very fond of the woods, and during the 
pioneer days he delighted in hunting, as the 



256 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



timberland was full of all kinds of game. 

Mr. Glover was joined in marriage with 
Jane Kennedy, a daughter of James Kennedy, 
and they have had eight children, namely: 
Olive M.. who is the wife of Frank E. Dow- 
ling, of Papillion, and has a daughter, Zella; 
Waldo William, who is deceased; Ralph Rol- 
lins, who owns a farm near where his father 
lives; Kate L., who is deceased ; Birdie, who is 
at home; an infant son, who died when quite 
young, and Perry Clay and Nellie Alice, who 
are at home. In politics the subject hereof is 
a stanch Republican, and has served on the 
school boards in both districts in which he has 
lived. Religiously, he is a Methodist, and as 
he is a carpenter by trade he not only contrib- 
uted in money, but in labor also, for the erection 
of a church. 



OLOMON ZEORIAN, a prosperous 
farmer of Springfield precinct, Sarpy 
county, Nebraska, was born in Switz- 
erland, February 22, 1844, and is a son Of 
Christ Zeorian. 

Christ Zeorian died when Solomon was but 
two years of age. He was the father of seven 
children, of whom nearly all are dead. Solo- 
mon was the only member of the family to 
come to this country. Their names are as fol- 
lows: Christ, Jr.. Mattie, Mary, Barbara, 
Susie, John, and Solomon. 

Solomon Zeorian began work as a boy at 
herding cattle, sheep and goats, as his home 
was in the moutains of Switzerland and not 
much farming is done, except in the valleys. 



When about eighteen years old, he left his 
home for America, in company with two other 
young men. He landed in New York City 
with but little money, and soon located at Alli- 
ance, Ohio, where he engaged in farming for 
three years. He was married at Canton, Ohio, 
and then moved to a small town near St. Jo- 
seph, Missouri, where his wife died. He was 
discouraged and tempted to return to his home 
in Switzerland, but was first persuaded by 
friends in Saunders county, Nebraska, to make 
them a visit. So pleased was he with the farm- 
ing opportunities of that state that he home- 
steaded near Yutan, Saunders county, and in 
the same spring worked for a Mr. Gantz, and 
later for Mr. Schaup in the mill at Papillion. 
He kept the homestead for some time and then 
sold out. He bought his present farm in Sar- 
py county, Nebraska, from Ham Hinkel. It 
consisted of 160 acres, and to this he added 
a tract of 80 acres, making 240 acres of finely 
improved farming land. He also had a timber 
claim in Furnas county, and some land in 
Hamilton county, Nebraska, which he sold. 
He removed to his present home during the 
winter succeeding his purchase, and erected a 
small house and a temporary barn, which were 
shortly after destroyed by fire. Another was 
built on the present site, and from the 80 acres 
which he purchased he moved the small house 
as an addition to it, making it a comfortable 
and roomy home. He subsequently built a 
substantial barn, 28 by 32 feet, in size, with a 
granary and corn crib attached. Previous to 
the purchase of his home, Mr. Zeorian worked 
for J. D. Spearman, being employed in hauling 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



257 



and teaming to and from Omaha. He has 
made all the improvements upon the property, 
which is in as good condition as any in the dis- 
trict. In 1884 he set out cottonwood, maple, 
and ash trees, and has a grove of two acres. 
He has about 18 acres of fruit trees in all, 
consisting of three different orchards, one of 
five acres near the house, another of eight acres 
south of the house, and a third of five acres on 
the 80-acre tract which he last bought. He 
set out three acres of peach trees in the spring 
of 1899, which are growing well and give 
much promise. He has a large pasture of 
50 acres, through which there is a stream of 
running water supplied by a strong spring. 
It was the water supply that induced Mr. 2eo- 
rian to build so far back from the road. The 
spring supplies water for all the stock, and 
there is also a 30-foot well near the house. 
Mr. Zeorian has met with success in raising 
Shorthorn cattle, and Poland-China hogs, 
preferring the latter to any other kind, after 
having given them all a thorough trial. 

Mr. Zeorian formed a second matrimonial 
alliance, in this instance with Florence Rarick, 
a daughter of J. W. and Mary Rarick, of Iowa, 
the latterbeing the parents of five children : Glo- 
riana, who died at the age of twenty years; 
Florence, Mr. Zeorian's wife; Sherman, who 
lives in Iowa; Mattie (Maxwell), of Califor- 
nia ; and Mrs. Frank Orth, of Portland, Ore- 
gon. Two children, Laura and Beulah, are 
deceased. Mrs. Zeorian was reared, mainly, 
in Ohio. She is of English descent, and one 
of her uncles has traced the family history, on 
the mother's side, back to Oliver Cromwell. 



The subject of this sketch and his wife have 
ten children, all living, as follows : Pearl ; El- 
mer; Roy; Mattie B. ; Minnie May; William 
E. ; John \^^ ; Solomon, Jr. ; Ralph Dewey, and 
James Kirk. In politics Mr. Zeorian is a Re- 
publican, while in religious attachments he is 
a member of the Congregational church. 



fOHN PETTY, who has been located in 
Sarpy county, Nebraska, since 1866, 
has a fine farm in Springfield precinct, 
and is extensively engaged in general farming, 
dairying and stock raising. He is one of the 
reliable citizens of that district, and is held 
in the highest esteem. 

Mr. Petty was born in Ontario, Canada, in 
November, 1837, and is a son of John and 
Phebe (Bell) Petty, — his parents being of 
English descent. Seven children were born to 
his parents, as follows: John, the subject of 
this sketch ; Thomas, deceased, who lived in Ne- 
braska for a time; Edmond, of Hot Springs, 
South Dakota; Joseph, a ranchman and spec- 
ulator of the same place, who owned the farm 
on which that town is now located, and also 
started the town ; Anne, who lives in Canada ; 
Phebe, who also lives in Canada ; and one who 
died young. 

John Petty moved to Sarpy county, Nebras- 
ka, from Ontario, Canada, in 1866. The trip 
was made overland by wagon, drawn by two 
horses, and consumed five weeks and two 
days. He settled first in section 11, just north 
of his present home, on supply school land, 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



where he made quite extensive improvements. 
He was later completely burned out. He re- 
built and lived there until 1894, when he pur- 
chased his present fine farm of 120 acres at 
$57 per ^cre. He remodeled and added to 
the house, which is now a double one, 16 by 
20 feet each way, and also built a barn 20 by 
30 feet in dimensions, with corn crib adjoin- 
ing. He built corn cribs, cow sheds, and other 
necessary outbuildings, and the farm is now 
in excellent condition for successfully carry- 
ing on his business. His original farm of 160 
acres he sold to Mr. Shubert. The orchard 
on his present farm was set out in 1883, and 
he has set out a young orchard which prom- 
ises well. His house and the surrounding 
grounds cover five acres and present an at- 
tractive appearance from the road. In early 
days the yield of his land was very heavy, 
and he now plants, principally, corn. He 
is also engaged in dairy, — milking 14 
cows, — and supplies the creamery at Spring- 
field. He has high grade stock, and favors 
Shorthorns. He has a good 100- foot tubular 
well, which is equipped with a windmill. 

Mr. Petty's first wife died in 1880, having 
gi\'en birth to three children in Canada, and 
two in Sarpy county. They are as follows: 
Jennie Correll, of Oxford, Nebraska; John, 
deceased; James, a farmer and ranchman of 
South Dakota; Julia (Cunningham), of Sarpy 
county; and Phebe, who is single, and is 
now visiting in this state. Mrs. Petty's maid- 
en name was Elizabeth Coleman, and she was 
a sister of Thomas Coleman, a prominent 
farmer and ranchman of Sarpy county. Mr. 



Petty subsequently formed a second marriage, 
wedding Dora Barton, of Iowa, and they have 
had nine children, eight of whom are living 
as follows: Annie; Cora; Lucy; Kate; Ray; 
Earl; Mary; and John, Jr. Politically the 
subject of this sketch is a Democrat. 



-r-^^ DWARD E. GOOD, a leading at- 
KJ torney of the Saunders county bar, 

~ 'has been practicing law at Wahoo 
ever since his admission, in 1885, and has met 
with good success. He is one of the most ac- 
tive and enterprising men of the town, and in 
addition to his practice, has been identified 
with a number of public ventures, which have 
been of material benefit to the place. 

Mr. Good was born near Bloomfield, Davis 
county, Iowa, May 13, 1862, and is a son of 
William H. and Mary (McCullough) Good. 
He attended the Southern Iowa State Normal 
School, of Bloomfield, and pursued his legal 
studies at the State University of Iowa, from 
which he graduated with the class of 1885. 
During his college days, he and Hon. B. F. 
Good, the present judge of the Fifth Judicial 
District of Nebraska, were associates, both be- 
ing in the same college class. After graduation, 
together they located at \\''ahoo, form- 
ing a partnership which existed until January 
I, 1900. Edward E. Good has devoted his 
entire time to his practice, and a good paying 
clientage has been his reward. In politics, he 
is a Republican, and takes an active interest in 
the workings of the party. He is a director 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



in the First National Bank of Wahoo, and also 
a director in the Wahoo Building & Loan As- 
sociation, of which he served as president for 
four years. 

Mr. Good was united in marriage with Or- 
pha Gillilan, of Central City, Iowa, in 1885. 
Fraternally, he is a member of the Masonic 
Order, belonging to blue lodge, the chapter, 
comm.andery and the shrine. He is also a 
member of the Knights of Pythias ; the A. O. 
U. W., and the Woodmen of the World. 



V4 V> _~ 



DAVIDSON is one of Ne- 
braska's pioneers, who has been 
ambitious to develop the rich re- 
sources and further the useful enterprises of 
his state, and to that end he has devoted much 
time and labor. He is a prompt and careful 
business man, and by strict integrity and per- 
severing industry, he has amassed a comfort- 
able fortune. He is now the owner of over 
1,500 acres of good farming land, and a num- 
ber of buildings, and is president of the Sarpy 
County State Bank, which is located at Spring- 
field. He was born in Hollidaysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, March 11, 1853, and is the only child 
of James and Sarah J. (Alurphy) Davidson, 
the latter a native of Pennsylvania, while the 
former was born and reared in Ohio, although 
his parents were originally from Pennsylva- 
nia. 

James Davidson crossed the Missouri River 
November i, 1856, and took up a warrant of 



160 acres of land near the Platte River, in 
Sarpy county, located in section 18, township 
12, range 11, 40 acres of which were never 
transferred. In the following spring his wife 
and his son, W. H., joined him. W. H. Dav- 
idson still has a good recollection of the many 
incidents that took place on the boat from St. 
Louis, Missouri, to Bellevue, Nebraska. After 
the father had spent the required five days and 
nights' on his farm, he pre-empted another 
tract of land near the South Bend bridge, on 
the old town site of Platford. This land is 
now owned by J. H. Preston, and Mr. David- 
son was obliged to pay 60 per cent for the 
money he borrowed to pay on the farm. About 
that time an uncle pre-empted a tract of land 
in Sarpy county, but in 1858, he moved to 
Omaha, and from there to Nebraska City, 
where he remained until he enlisted in the 
Union army. He spent three years in the 
army and was mustered out as a captain. W. 
H. Davidson's father built a house on the old 
Platford town site, in which he lived twa 
years, and in the fall of 1859 he moved to the 
present homestead, in section 5, township 12, 
range 11. On the 40 acres west of the present 
buildings, he built a log house and a straw 
stable. Around the house he set out many Cot- 
tonwood shoots, vv'hich were obtained from the 
Platte River. Some of the trees grown from 
them now have a diameter of 32 inches each. 
In 1 86 1, W. H. Davidson set out a twig, which 
broke and caused a large gnarl in the huge tree, 
as it still stands. Five and six yoke of oxen 
were then used in turning the soil. This work 
was hired by James Davidson, and he was 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



obliged to pay $4 and $5 per acre, which was 
more than the land cost. In 1865- 1866, Mr. 
Davidson helped to set out a two and one-half 
acre grove of cottonwood trees, which were 
recently sawed into 17,000 feet of lumber, a 
1 6- foot cut of one tree making 320 feet of lum- 
ber. He also helped to set out an orchard of 
50 trees in 1863, but the trees were all killed 
during the following winter. In 1858 Mr. 
Davidson took the contract for carrying the 
weekly mail from Bellevue to Platford, for 
four years ; he made a trip by horseback every 
week for a short time, when he sold the route, 
and was succeeded by Horace Rogers. For 
many years his produce was marketed at 
Omaha, which city had but few improvements 
at that time. Mr. Davidson has a good recol- 
lection of the road along which he traveled, 
and of the two old wooden bridges across Buf- 
falo and Papillion creeks. Wheat was raised 
extensively by James Davidson, which, after 
being cradled, was threshed either with a flail 
or by allowing the animals to tramp out the 
grain. The first thresher seen in his section of 
Sarpy county was a horse-power machine, in 
1862, and all the neighbors were wont to as- 
sist each other; the threshers each furnished 
one team and charged 8 cents a bushel. The 
subject hereof has spent many a day operating 
the self-raking harvester and helping to bind, 
and he remembers the first wire binder that 
made its appearance, in 1878. The machines 
cost from $300 to $350 each, and James David- 
son bought a half interest in a Piano binder 
for $250. In 1883 twine-binders came into 
use, and at that time, twine was worth 22c 



per pound. The early pioneer knew little of 
screen doors and windows, which came into 
use about 1874. Mr. Davidson had a great 
number of cows, and in 1865 he sold to H. K. 
Clark, of Bellevue, 800 pounds of butter, which 
he had helped to churn by hand. This was 
hauled to Denver, Colorado, by oxen. He also 
had a number of steers, which were then used 
for all farming purposes. An unbroken steer 
cost $45 and $50, while a good pair of oxen 
brought as much as $140. Horses were then 
\ery high-priced, and were considered quite a 
luxury. His first frame barn was built in 1870. 
It still stands, in a good state of preservation, 
and is used for a shed and granary. At that time 
pine shingles cost $4 per thousand, while floor- 
ing lumber cost $50 per thousand. The money 
for building this barn was raised by selling 
wheat, which the subject hereof hauled to 
Omaha, bringing back a load of lumber. W. H. 
Davidson's present residence was built in 1874. 
The main part was 18 by 28 feet in dimensions, 
and a story and a half high, the original build- 
ing being of logs, and consisted of a room 16 
feet square. To the west of the house W. H. 
Davidson assisted his father in setting out a 
walnut grove, containing four long rows. Some 
of the trees have grown to be 50 inches in 
circumference. He also helped put out a 
hedge, which extends about half a mile along 
the road. In 1892 W. H. Davidson's present 
barn was built, which is 32 feet square, with 
1 6- foot posts. Two large cattle sheds and 
corn cribs have also been built. One is 100 
by 20 feet in dimensions, and liolds 5,000 bush- 
els of corn, while the size of the other is 112 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



by 20 feet. In the center of his cattle yard 
is a self-feeder, which holds a large supply of 
corn. James Davidson managed the farm un- 
til 1892, when he retired from active life and 
moved to Springfield, Nebraska, where he 
passed from this life, in 1895. He was one of 
the largest stockholders in the Sarpy County 
State Bank. At the time of his death, he 
owned 1,000 acres of good farming land, all 
of which was in one body, and W. H. David- 
son was the only heir to the same. James 
Davidson was an influential farmer and citi- 
zen of Sarpy county, and his death was deeply 
deplored by his many friends, who knew him 
to be upright and honest in all his transactions. 
W. H. Davidson received his educational 
training in the district school of district 9, which 
extended across the county, and Miss Bates, 
now Mrs. A. V. Rogers, of Springfield, was 
his first teacher. He also attended the Bellevue 
graded school, and the state university at Lin- 
coln. He assisted his father in operating the 
farm, and since 1892 he has managed it alone. 
Since August, 1895, however, he has devoted 
most of his time to the management of the 
bank of which he is president. He owns 32 
of the 36 shares, which are valued at $500 
each, and as he is a man of good financial abil- 
ity, through his exertions the bank is able to 
keep pace with the rapid growth of Sarpy 
county. The Protestant church in the vicinity 
was built, in 1885, by public subscription. For 
many years previous to that time church meet- 
ings were held at the different homes — as elec- 
tions were often held. Before the death of his 
father, W. H. Davidson had purchased 527 



acres of land, all of which is adjoining the 
homestead, with the exception of 120 acres. 
The most of his farms are rented. There arc 
six tenement houses on these farms. From 
the one operated by the subject hereof he 
ships several carloads of cattle each year, 
raised thereon. He has three wells, one 
of which is tubular and 70 feet deep, 
while another is 10 feet in depth, both being 
operated by windmills. The third well is used 
for domestic purposes." In politics Mr. David- 
son is a stanch Republican, and has served on 
the school board. In 1879 he wedded Olive 
Lefler, who came to Sarpy county from In- 
diana, on a visit of a year's duration. They 
have five children: James, assistant cashier 
in the bank ; John, Floyd, Sarah, and Charles. 
The two last named attended school in district 
17, while John and Floyd attend the high school 
in Springfield. Mr. Davidson is widely known 
throughout the county, and regarded as an 
honest, upright and straightforward business 
man, and one who always lends his influence 
to promote the welfare of his community and 
state. 



XSEL SPALDING JUCKETT, one of 
the representative citizens of Saunders 
county, Nebraska, resides upon his 
excellent farm of 160 acres in Pohocco precinct. 
He was born at Whitehall, Washington county. 
New York, and is a son of Daniel and Rachael 
(Wheadon) Juckett, and a grandson of Mi- 
chael Juckett, who settled at the head of Lake 
Champlain shortly after the Revolutionary 
War. Mr. Juckett's parents are both living, 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Mrs. Juckett's maiden name being Wheadon, 
a highly connected family of that period. The 
family consists of four children, all of whom 
are living, as follows : Ansel Spalding, Byron, 
Marsellous, and Martha, the wife of James 
Wilson. With the exception of Ansel, all, with 
their families, livp near their parents at White- 
hall, New York. 

Ansel Spalding Juckett's early life was spent 
on a farm, and influenced by the same condi- 
tions that affected all aHke in his time. Boys 
were taught to swing the ax in the forest and 
assist in earning a livelihood, taking at odd 
times what schooling the community afforded. 
However, through his parents' especial Care, 
and by reason of his own perseverance and 
ambitious disposition, he managed to acquire a 
very good common school education. Upon 
approaching his majority, his younger broth- 
ers having grown up to relieve him of his 
cares and duties at home, he went out on his 
own responsibility. For a short time he 
worked as a farm hand, but finally turned his 
attention to canaling, serving at different 
times both as boat hand and on the tow path. 
It was not long until he got a position in Ami 
Gibbs' company store, at Whitehall, New 
York, and this position he held for some time, 
at last taking almost entire charge of the man- 
agement. It was while there that he formed 
the acquaintance of and married Marge L. 
McConnell, a daughter of Daniel and Lauret- 
ta McConnell, then living at Mooers, Clinton 
county. New York. The succeeding ten years 
were spent in mixed farming, dairying and 
gardening in Washington and Warren coun- 



ties. New York. He then became interested 
in the development of the West, and came to 
Nebraska in the spring of 1876, leaving his 
family to follow a few months later. Through 
the advice of friends familiar with the differ- 
ent portions of the state, he settled in Saun- 
ders county. Although the country was yet 
very new, the real hardships to which earlier 
settlers had been exposed were over. The 
country at this time was just beginning to 
prosper, and to offer assurance of permanent 
homes. The summer of 1876 was spent in 
work upon the construction of the new Lin- 
coln branch of the Union Pacific Railroad, 
from Valley, Douglas county, and Mr. Juck- 
ett, with ox teams, broke the land for the town 
site where Yutan now stands. His family 
having arrived in the fall, he rented a farm in 
Marble precinct, for a home, and continued to 
rent for three successive seasons, when he 
purchased his present home, which had pre- 
viously been homesteaded by Abner Smith. 
This farm of 160 acres is situated in the north- 
east corner of Pohocco precinct, six and one- 
half miles southeast of Fremont, Dodge coun- 
ty, Nebraska. 

Mr. Juckett's family consists of two chil- 
dren : Delbert B., who is engaged in public 
school work ; and Frances, wife of Dr. M. W. 
Page, of Spencer, Clay county, Iowa. They 
were both born in the state of New York. 
The subject of this sketch has been prosperous 
and quite successful, and is loyal to the state 
of Nebraska and her interests. Since leaving 
New York he, with his family, has made three 
visits to his old home and relations. He is a 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



member of the M. E. church, and a Populist 
in politics. He has never held office except 
that of member of the school board, and could 
not be persuaded to enter public life in any 
capacity. 

Delbert Byron Juckett, the only son of An- 
sel S. and Marge L. (McConnell) Juckett, 
was born in Whitehall, Washington county. 
New York, April 28, 1869. At the age of 
eight years, Mr. Juckett came to Nebraska, 
with his parents. From that time his boy- 
hood experiences were molded by conditions 
surrounding a family trying, in a new coun- 
try, to make the best of adverse circumstances 
and to build up a home for the future. His 
attendance at school was consequently more 
or less irregular. However, he managed to 
get what was to be had in the district school, 
and at the age of nineteen years entered the 
Fremont Business College, graduating in one 
year. He then entered the Fremont Normal 
School, from which he was graduated with 
the class of 1894. In the meantime he taught 
school at intervals, and therefore his college 
course was by no means continuous. D. B. 
Juckett has been engaged in active school 
work for some time. As principal of public 
schools, he has filled positions as follows : One 
year at Linwood, Butler county; three years 
at Malmo, Saunders county; and three years 
at Morse Bluff, Saunders county. He is en- 
gaged for the present at Weston, Saunders 
county. 

Taking advantage of summer vacations, Mr. 
Juckett has availed himself of the oppor- 
tunity to see the greater portion of our own 



country, visiting on different occasions, the 
cities along the Atlantic coast, the Pacific 
coast, and portions of Canada and the South. 
In political faith he is a Fusionist, and a great 
admirer of Mr. Bryan. He believes that every 
voter should be a politician, so far at least, 
as his responsibility to government goes. 



w 



E. MILLER is one of the enter- 
pnsmg and prosperous business 
men of Springfield, Sarpy county, 
Nebraska, where he is engaged in the drug busi- 
ness, and he undoubtedly carries a larger line of 
drugs than any druggist in his section of the 
county. He is an active, wide-awake and con- 
scientious business man, and in both business 
and social circles he has many friends. He 
was born in Aylmer, Canada, in 1857, and is a 
son of John H. and Mary (Curtis) Miller, 
who drove through to Sarpy county by wagon. 
John H. Miller bought land three miles north- 
east of Springfield, and at first lived with his 
family in a dug-out. He set out a lo-acre or- 
chard, from which he sold $1,800 worth of 
apples in one year, besides raising considerable 
other fruit. He also built a fine house and sev- 
eral outbuildings. He gave W. E. Miller an 
80-acre tract, which he still owns. John H. Mil- 
ler continued to till the farm there until his 
death, March 20, 1900, and his widow now 
resides on the farm. W. E. Miller has a 
brother and three half-sisters, namely: James 
C, who is now editor of the "Springfield Mon- 
itor," and is also a physician and pharmacist, 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



having operated a store in Springfield before 
the subject hereof opened his store; Mrs. W. 
W. Dowe, who is the wife of a stockman and 
butcher of Springfield, and has one daughter, 
Mrs. George Snyder, of Hooper, Nebraska; 
Mrs. W. L. Williams, who resides at Papil- 
lion, Nebraska; and Mrs. Reynolds, who lives 
in Fairview precinct. 

W. E. Miller was reared on his father's 
farm, and during 1873- 1874 he was a student 
at the state university, but in the following 
year he began to hustle for himself. In 1877 
he started in the drug business, buying out Dr. 
Clark's old stand in Sarpy Center. In 1880 he 
sold his place of business and homesteaded a 
farm in Holt county. When the town of 
Springfield was started, in the fall of 1881, 
Mr. Miller was engaged in various enterprises 
until 1888, when he re-entered the drug busi- 
ness. He continued to conduct that store for 
three years, and then sold out to O. F. Har- 
lan & Brother. Two and one-half years later 
he re-purchased the store, and in 1891 he 
erected his present store building, which is a 
two-story structure, 22 by 40 feet in dimen- 
sions. It is a handsome pressed-brick build- 
ing, and was completed at a cost of $2,500. 
The large stock carried is also worth about 
$2,500. Mr. Miller's wife owns considerable 
real estate in Springfield, while he owns two 
fine farms, one of which consists of 80 acres, 
and is located three and one-half miles west 
of town — the west half of the southeast 
quarter of section 20, township 13, range 11. 
The other farm is located on the east half of 
the southwest quarter of section 8, township 



13, range 12, and situated about three and 
one-half miles northeast of town. Mr. Mil- 
ler's home was erected at a cost of $3,000 in 
1899, and the main part is 24 feet square, to 
which is added an L, 22 by 16 feet in dimen- 
sions. Mr. Miller is popular in both business 
and social circles, and his many friends regard 
him as a good upright business man and loyal 
citizen. 

W. E. Miller was joined in marriage with 
Henriette Miller, of Sarpy county. Her 
father, Louman Miller, was one of the pioneer 
settlers there. He died in i860, and her moth- 
er passed away in 1879. Three children were 
born to this union : Genevieve, deceased ; 
Grey, who is a partner in Mr. Miller's drug 
store ; and John L. The subject of this sketch 
is a strong Democrat in politics, while in a re- 
ligious connection, he is a member of the 
]\Iethodist church, of Springfield, which has an 
enrollment of about 60 members. Fraternally, 
he is a Mason, belonging to the blue lodge No. 
112, of Springfield, and is secretary of the 
Springfield Lodge No. 102, I. O. O. F. 



ENT PETERSON, a retired farmer 
of Gretna, has been a resident of 
Sarpy county, Nebraska, since 1869, 
and is still a land owner in Forest City precinct. 
Mr. Peterson was born in Sweden in 1825, 
and is a son of Peter and Ann Larson. He 
was reared and schooled in that country, and 
there learned the tailor's trade, but did not fol- 
low it long. In 1864 he came to America and 




JOHX. L. COLEMAX. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



located in Utah, where he engaged in farming, 
and also teaming on the railroad until 1869. 
He tlien located at Papillion, Sarpy county, 
Nebraska, where he rented and conducted a 
farm a short time. He homesteaded 80 acres 
of land in Forest City precinct, and on this he 
erected a set of buildings and put out many 
shade and fruit trees. To this tract he later 
added 47>1 acres, and successfully engaged in 
farming, until 1898. He then retired from 
active work, buying a lot at Gretna, on which 
he erected a cottage. He has since made his 
home there, renting his farm. 

Mr. Peterson was united in marriage in 
Denmark with Mary Everson, a daughter of 
Ever and Mary Peterson, by whom he had 
eight children, as follows: Antony, deceased; 
August, deceased; Emily, wife of William 
Morrison, whose biography appears elsewhere 
herein ; Sophia, wife of Swan Akerson ; Annie, 
wife of John Fowler ; Ella, who lives at home ; 
and Benjamin and John, both of whom died in 
their infancy. 



fOHN L. COLEMAN, one of the repre- 
sentative citizens of Saunders county, 
Nebraska, whose portrait is presented on 
the opposite page, is now serving his second 
term as treasurer of that county, to the utmost 
satisfaction of his constituents. He has always 
been a most earnest advocate of Populistic prin- 
ciples, and is active in the workings of that 
party. He was born March 2, 1850, in St. 



Lawrence county. New York, and is a son of 
William, and Margaret (Fay) Coleman. 

William Coleman, Sr., the grandfather of 
John L., was born in the north of Ireland, and 
came to this country in 1820, locating in St. 
Lawrence county, New York. The family 
moved to Bremer county, Iowa, in 1856, where 
he died at the age of eighty-one years. His 
family consisted of four daughters and two 
sons, namely: John, Mary, Esther, Nancy, 
Eliza, and William, Jr. 

William Coleman, Jr., the father of John L., 
was born in St. Lawrence county. New York, 
in 1834, and was reared upon a farm. He fol- 
lowed farming in a very successful manner all 
his life. He died in 1869 from the effects of 
an injury received from a threshing machine. 
He had married Margaret Fay, and they were 
the parents of three children : John L., Levina 
(McKeowan), and James. 

John L. Coleman received his primary educa- 
tion in an old log school house in Bremer 
county, Iowa, where he lived until 1873, the 
year in which he moved to Saunders county, 
Nebraska. Like his father, his vocation was 
that of a farmer, and he located upon a farm 
near Wahoo. He has been engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits all his life, but for a number 
of winters after settling in Nebraska he taught 
school. He is a stanch supporter of the Popu- 
list party, and has been called upon to serve in 
a number of capacities. He served as assessor 
of his precinct for fourteen years, and in the 
fall of 1897 was elected county treasurer, to 
which office he was re-elected in 1899. 

Mr. Coleman was united in marriage in 1879 



268 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



with Miss N. C. Palsey, a daughter of Jacob 
Palsey, of Wahoo, and they are the parents of 
four children : William, Lewis, Ralph, and 
Dora. 



EV. S. J. STEWART is a minister of 
the Gospel, and was born in Steuben 
'county, New York, in 1844. He is 
a son of S. W. and Mary R. Stewart, who 
were the parents of the following children: 
Charles, a resident of Creston, Iowa, who is 
married and has three children, — Mary, Sam- 
uel E., and Andrew, having lost a son. Grant; 
Jane, deceased, who was the wife of John Mc- 
Caddam ; Sarah, who is the wife of B. F. Bear, 
of Iowa, and had five children, of whom three 
are living, Frances, Andrew J. and James; 
Edward, who died in the army during the 
Civil War; Henrietta, who is the wife of H. 
B. Hughes, a farmer in Iowa; William A., 
who was killed in the battle of Shiloh, in 1862; 
Hughie, who died in the state of New York, 
while a mere boy; S. J., and Mary, his twin 
sister, who is the wife of Mr. Clough, a 
farmer and stock raiser in Arkansas, and has 
four children, John, Annie, Perry and Mary; 
Lydia, who is the wife of Robert Higgen- 
bottum, an Iowa farmer, and has two children, 
Edgar and Robert; and Elvaleria, who died 
in the state of New York, when two years of 
age. 

Rev. S. J. Stewart's parents moved to Carroll 
county, Illinois, in 1850, where he attended 
the district schools until he was sixteen years 
of age. The following two years were spent 



at Mount Vernon, Illinois, in attending school. 
Toward the close of the Civil War he enlisted 
in the 142nd Regiment, Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, for a term of nine months. 
After the close of that deadly struggle, in 
1865, the family moved to Hardin county, 
Iowa, near Eldorado, and there S. W. Stewart, 
our subject's father, engaged in farming. 
In 1877, the family moved to Sarpy county, 
Nebraska, where they settled on May 20, and 
S. J. Stewart bought the south half of the 
northwest quarter of section 19, and the north- 
west quarter of the northwest quarter of sec- 
tion 19, township 13, range 12. He had two 
teams of horses and money enough to pay for 
his farms, and he at once put up a rude house, 
16 by 20 feet in dimensions, to which he after- 
ward added 18 by 24 feet. He turned 40 acres 
under, and proceeded to make other improve- 
ments. Upon his return trips from Omaha, 
which was his only marketing place, he 
brought back enough lumber to build a barn. 
At that early date the postoffice was at Sarpy 
Center, but in 1881, the entire village, consist- 
ing of the postoffice, blacksmith shop and a 
shoe and drug store, was moved to Spring- 
field. Rev. Mr. Stewart assisted in the moving 
of all the buildings, with the exception of one 
store. In 1892 Rev. Mr. Stewart erected his 
barn, which was 18 by 22 by 14 feet in dimen- 
sions, and he continued to till the farm until 
1886. In the following year he disposed of all 
his possessions there, and received $40 an acre 
for his land. He was then sent by the Metho- 
dist conference to occupy the pulpit at Peach 
Grove, now known as Gretna. The town re- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



ceived its name in honor of a number of re- 
lated families, who moved to that point from 
Indiana, and all set out peach orchards. He 
was there two years when he was sent to Gos- 
per county, where he had four circuits, but for 
two years made Homerville, Nebraska, his 
headquarters. He then spent two years at 
Hillsdale, Wet Mountain Valley; three years 
at Howard, Pleasant Valley; three years at 
Wathrop; and one year at Pueblo, Colorado. 
In the spring of 1898 he returned to Sarpy 
county, Nebraska, owing to the sickness of his 
son-in-law, and he is now working temporarily 
in Mr. Brawner's store, which that gentleman 
opened at Springfield, December 16, 1881. 

Rev. Mr. Stewart is a Republican in politics, 
and while a resident of Hardin county, Iowa, 
served as constable and deputy sheriff. In 1866, 
Rev. S. J. Stewart was united in marriage 
with Susan Cantonwine, a daughter of Jacob 
Cantonwine, and they have two children, 
namely: Nettie, who is the wife of E. T. 
Hoyt, and resides two and one-half miles from 
Springfield; and Alice R., who is the wife of 
E. L. Wettzler, of Hardin county, Iowa, and 
has four children — Le Roy, Louella, Harris, 
and a baby. 



m 



ARTIN E. BALLOU, a prominent 
farmer of Clear Creek precinct, 
Saunders county, Nebraska, be- 
longs to one of the first families who settled 
in this part of the state. He is a son of Emor 
S. and Susan (Van Buren) Ballon. 



Emor S. Ballon possessed ample means, and 
in 1867 or 1868, with his wife and family, he 
left Ashtabula county, Ohio, to seek a home 
in the West. He found a desirable location in 
Saunders county, Nebraska, and purchased 160 
acres of land in Clear Creek precinct. This 
land immediately adjoins the city of Ashland, 
which at that time contained only a few 
houses and was known as Salem Ford. Mr. 
Ballou at once proceeded to improve and beau- 
tify his place. He built a small house, which 
was moved some time later to Ashland, and is 
now owned by C. Hackney. 

In 1 89 1, with the assistance of his only son,- 
Martin E., he built the present large and beau- 
tiful residence and spacious barns. They are 
said to be the largest house and barn in that 
portion of the county, and can be seen for 
many miles. Together the father and son 
planted orchards and set out shade trees. Mr. 
Ballou sold a part of his land to Orin M. Car- 
ter, who, in 1874, built a flouring mill upon the 
same site now occupied by the electric light 
plant. E. S. Ballou then purchased more land 
adjoining his farm, which he cultivated. In 
1890 he lost his beloved wife, who died at the 
age of sixty-seven years. Five years later he 
followed her to the grave, and it is said that 
their funerals were the largest ever held in 
Clear Creek precinct. They were sincerely 
mourned as prominent and worthy citizens, 
v.hose loss was greatly felt in that community. 
They lived and died happy in the Baptist faith, 
and Mr. Ballou was, during life, a stanch Re- 
publican. He left each of his children a nice 
property. Their names are: Susan H., Henri- 



270 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



etta, Elizabeth, and Martin E., the subject of 
these lines. 

Martin E. Ballou is a native of Ohio, and 
was fourteen years old when his parents moved 
to Nebraska. As before mentioned, he as- 
sisted his father on the farm, and upon the 
death of that beloved parent, he succeeded to 
his portion of the estate. The principal prod- 
ucts of the farm are various kinds of grain, but 
Mr. Ballou also raises a great deal of stock, 
especially cattle, of which he generally has 
200 head. 

Martin E. Ballou married Jessie Bissell, a 
"daughter of James and Sarah Bissell, of Val- 
paraiso, Indiana. Mrs. Ballou's father died 
in the Civil War. Her mother went to Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, where she had rela- 
tives, and finally died there. Mr. and- Mrs. 
Ballou have six children, as follows: Emor 
S., James B., Jessie C, Elizabeth A., Ollie 
M.. and Susie M. The family unite in wor- 
shiping at the Congregational church. Mr. 
Ballou is regarded as one of tlie most pro- 
gressive farmers in Clear Creek precinct. In 
his political views he is a Republican. 



■j^^^ RIC JOHNSON, editor and pro- 
pi prietor of the "Saunders County 
"^^ " ''New Era," and also of "The Com- 
ing New Era," is a gentleman whose promi- 
nence is not confined to the limits of his own 
state. His career has been a varied one, and 
in whatsoever line of business he has ventured, 
his efforts have borne the same fruitful results. 



Besides his connection with many well-known 
newspaper publications in different states, he 
has often been called upon to fill offices of pub- 
lic trust, and always acquitted himself in such 
a manner as to gain the hearty approval of 
the public, regardless of political attachments. 
Mr. Johnson was born in Sweden, July 15, 
1838, and came to America in 1846, with his 
father, Eric Jansson, who was the founder 
of the Bishop Hill Colony, of Henry county, 
Illinois, which remained in existence until 
i860. The subject hereof began farming on 
his own account in Henry county, Illinois, in 
the spring of 1861, but in September of that 
year, he enlisted as a private in Company D, 
57th Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, be- 
ing elected first lieutenant of the company 
upon its organization. He was promoted to be 
captain, after the battle of Shiloh, and served in 
the western army under General Grant. In 
the latter part of 1862 he was compelled to 
resign from the army, on account of sickness, 
and the certificate of the attending surgeon 
bears evidence that this course was necessary 
in order to save his life. After his restora- 
tion to health, he went into the grocery busi- 
ness, in 1863, in Galva, Illinois, and continued 
thus for one year. In the summer of 1864 
he embarked in the newspaper business as 
editor and proprietor of the "Galva Union," 
and, in 1869, he founded at Galva what has 
since become the leading Swedish paper in 
America, now published at Chicago, Illinois, 
the "Svenska Tribunen." He severed his 
connection with that paper in January, 187 1, 
when he was elected journal clerk of the Illi- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



271 



nois House of Representatives. In 1873 he 
moved to Kansas, and laid out the town of 
White City, in Morris county, where he started 
the first store, grain elevator, lumber yard and 
hotel, successfully conducting all these enter- 
prises. He remained there until December, 
1875, when he moved, back to Henry county, 
Illinois, and engaged in the lumber and hard- 
ware business, at Nekoma, until 1879. Then, 
in connection with C. Fr. Peterson, of Chi- 
cago, he compiled, edited and published a his- 
tory of the Swedes of Illinois, a book of over 
500 pages. In 1880 he commenced at Moline, 
Illinois, the publication of a newspaper in the 
interest of the Swedish-American population 
of the West, printed in the English language. 
During the second year of its publication he 
took in as his partner J. E. Osborn, to whom 
he sold his entire interest, in 1882, when he 
accepted a clerkship at Washington, D. C. In 
1885, owing to ill health in his family, he re- 
signed his clerkship, and moved to Stroms- 
burg, Nebraska, where he leased the "Stroms- 
burg Republican" for one year. From there 
he went to Holdredge, Nebraska, where he 
remained in the newspaper business until the 
close of the year 1890. At the election in 
1888 he was elected, as an independent candi- 
date, to the state legislature. Upon the ex- 
piration of his term of office, a handsome gold 
watch and chain and a purse of $60 in money 
were given to him, the watch bearing on the 
inner plate the inscription : "From the people 
of Phelps county to Captain Eric Johnson, for 
honest and faithful work as legislator, in 
1889." In 1 89 1 he was elected chief clerk of 



the Nebraska House of Representatives, and 
at the close of the session, in 1892, became edi- 
tor of the "Progress," at Clay Center, Nebras- 
ka. In 1893 he was re-elected chief clerk of 
the House, securing the unanimous vote of all 
the parties, — an evidence of popular favor 
never before shown to a holder of that office. 
In the early part of 1894, Mr. Johnson went 
to Texas, and engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness at League City, and, December 3, 1896, 
he located in Wahoo, Nebraska, and bought 
the paper known as the "Saunders County 
New Era." In addition to conducting this 
paper, he established, in 1900, the paper called 
"The Coming New Era." These papers are 
both Populistic in principle and both have 
large circulation. Mr. Johnson is a man of 
deep learning, and is well versed in the affairs 
of the world, besides being a clever and versa- 
tile writer. He takes an earnest and active 
part in the affairs of his party, and was chair- 
man of the delegation chosen to represent 
Saunders county at the state convention, in 
1900. He was also chosen as a delegate to the 
National convention at Sioux Falls, South 
Dakota. 

December 31, 1863, the subject of this sketch 
was joined in matrimony with Mary O. Troil, 
(who died in 1890), and their union resulted 
in the following children : Mary, who died in 
1888; Axel T., who resides in Wahoo; Sarah 
O., who died in 1892; Julia C. ; Ernst G., who 
also resides in Wahoo: and Sixtus E., who 
died October 2, 1899. 

Sixtus Eric Johnson, the sixth child of his 
parents, was born at Nekoma, Henry county, 



272 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Illinois, April 30, 1877. Before finishing his 
education at the state university, he entered 
the field of journalism in association with his 
father, being local editor on the "New Era." 
His early life gave great promise of success as a 
newspaper man and writer, but it was willed 
otherwise. As soon as the war with Spain broke 
out, he was eager to go to the front, but yielded 
to the wishes of his father and remained at 
home. When the Third Nebraska Regiment was 
recruited, his burning patriotism was intensified 
by his great admiration for Colonel Bryan, 
and he could no longer restrain his patriotic 
impulses, but enlisted in Company H of that 
regiment upon its organization. His captain 
at once recognized his worth by appointing 
him company clerk, and so painstaking and 
accurate was his work that at the division in- 
spection the inspector general complimented 
him for having the best kept books. When he 
was taken sick, he had been performing the 
duties of first sergeant, as all the sergeants 
were sick or on furlough. He fell a prey to 
typhoid fever at Pablo Beach, Florida, and 
died on Sunday, October 2, 1899. His death 
was the cause of much mourning in the vicin- 
ity of his home, for he was well known and 
very popular, and in him the city lost one of the 
most promising of its young men. 



ENRY MOWINKEL is one of the 
most extensive and most successful 
farmers in Sarpy county, Nebraska, 
and owns a fine property in Richland precinct. 



Mr. Mowinkel was born in Holstein, Ger- 
many, in 1849, ^nd 's ^ son of John and Dor- 
othy (Grell) Mowinkel. His mother died at 
the age of thirty-five years, and his father was 
again married. Our subject was reared in his 
native country and lived there until 1868, when 
he came to the United States. He located in 
Iowa and followed farming until August, 1877, 
when he removed to Sarpy county, Nebraska. 
He purchased 160 acres of Mr. Martin, who 
had broken about 100 acres of it, and built a 
small house. In 1883, he built his present 
modern home, which is large and commodious. 
He set out shade trees and three and one-half 
acres of orchard, which has thrived and is now 
in excellent condition. He later bought 80 acres 
of land in section 21, and adjoining his 
original farm in section 28, he purchased 160 
acres, on which he built a new house, and set 
out three acres of orchard and shade trees. He 
later bought 1 60 acres, the southwest ' quar- 
ter of section 20. His property is well sup- 
plied with wells from 40 to 50 feet deep, but 
formerly water was very scarce, and it was 
almost useless to drill for it. His land yields 
lieavily, his best average being 75 bushels of 
corn and 60 bushels of oats to the acre. 

Mr. Mowinkel was united in marriage with 
Dora Schultz, a daughter of Frederick and 
Christina (Hei) Schujtz, both of whom are 
deceased. Her father went to Davenport, 
Iowa, where he followed the tailoring business. 
Thirteen children blessed the union of the sub- 
ject hereof and his wife, as follows: Chris- 
tina, wife of Marcus Jungjohann, by whom 
she has three children — Raymond, Earl, and 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



273 



Christ; Albert, deceased; Jette, wife of Fritz 
Voss; John, deceased; WilHam, deceased; 
Henry ; Fritz ; Theresa, deceased ; Maggie, de- 
ceased ; George ; Dora ; Lily ; and Luzetta. Mr. 
Mowinkel is a member of the school board, and 
takes an earnest interest in educational affairs. 






ILLIAM K. TITUS, proprietor 
a livery establishment at Ashland, 
' Saunders county, Nebraska, has one 
of the finest liveries in the southeastern part 
of Nebraska. This livery v^'as started by John 
Cregelston. It is a large double barn, situated 
on Sixth street, near Silver, in the business 
center of Ashland. One side is used solely 
for carriages and office purposes. Mr. Titus 
keeps twelve fine roadsters. His stable is finely 
equipped with carriages, hacks, etc. He is in 
a condition to supply the public with the best 
of rigs, and also the best of service, as he 
keeps three of the most competent assistants 
obtainable, and is frequently obliged to hire 
extras. He runs a bus to meet all trains, and 
has built up a large patronage. 

William K. Titus was born in Erie county, 
Pennsylvania, in i860. He is a son of Daniel 
W. and Maria (Langdon) Titus. His father 
was a prosperous farmer in Erie county, where 
William K. was reared. When eighteen years 
old, Mr. Titus took his first trip west. He re- 
turned to the East again, however, and fol- 
lowed farming until 1 882, when he again went 
West. He followed similar pursuits in Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, for some time, and then 



returnetl to Pennsylvania, where he farmed 
until 1897. But the West held out strong in- 
ducements for him, and October i, 1899, he 
bought out the livery business of W. A. Bailey 
at Ashland, Nebraska, which he has conducted 
ever since in a manner satisfactory both to 
himself and to the community in which he 
lives. Mr. Titus married Alta Butler, a daugh- 
ter of R. E. Butler, a popular business man of 
Ashland. 

R. E. Butler was born in Erie county, Penn- 
sylvania. He is a son of Timothy and Caro- 
line Butler, and was reared on a farm. 
His parents went west to Nebraska, locating 
on a farm, where they spent their declining 
years. When Mr. Butler was twenty-one years 
old he left the farm and went into the oil fields 
as an engineer. Later he learned to dress tools 
at Titusville. There his marriage with Char- 
lotte Rockwood took place, and they decided to 
seek a home in the West. In 1881, they went 
to Ashland with $650. They purchased a 
home for $600, and had but $50 left. Mr. 
Butler immediately went to work at the black- 
smith trade for Henry Doudney. He subse- 
quently rented a place, and in company with 
Frank E. Marcy started into business. The 
partnership then formed has been mutually 
agreeable and exists to the present day. Their 
large shop is located on the corner of Sixth and 
Silver streets. From the wielding of the ham- 
mer and dealing in real estate, Mr. Butler has 
accumulated a handsome property. He owns 
two large farms in Saunders county, besides 
considerable real estate in Ashland. He also 
owns a 160-acre farm in Kansas. He and his 



274 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



wife were blessed with three children, namely: 
Alta, Mr. Titus' wife; Eva, wife of J. Aughey; 
and Willis, who married Edna Vanderman. 

Mr. and Mrs. Titus have one daughter, 
Helen. They entertain broad and liberal ideas 
on religious subjects, and politically. Mr. Ti- 
tus is a stanch Republican. Fraternally, he is 
a member and past grand of the I. O. O. F., 
and also a member of Rebecca lodge. Mr. 
Titus is popular, and is considered one of the 
most successful business men of Ashland. 



— f^ ATRICK H. GILLESPIE, a highly 

I N*^respected citizen and a successful farmer 

of Forest City precinct, Sarpy county, 

Nebraska, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, 

in 1833. 

Mr. Gillespie is a son of William and Mary 
(Thomas) Gillespie, who came to this country 
in 1850, locating first in Illinois, and later in 
Iowa. William Gillespie died in Iowa at 
the age of forty-five years. His wife then 
moved to Sarpy county, with her children. 
She was the mother of fourteen children, eight 
of whom grew up. Three brothers, Patrick 
H., William, and Michael J., were all early set- 
tlers of Sarpy county, and are now neighbors 
in Forest City precinct. 

Patrick H. Gillespie, when a young man, 
spent five years in handling freight in Ne- 
braska City, having a good team and wagon 
when he started. He had $5 in money also, 
but in a short time he added two yoke of 
oxen and broke the prairie for his neighbors, 



thus getting his start. In the spring of 1869 he 
bought 80 acres of land in Forest City pre- 
cinct, the east half of the northeast quarter of 
section 24. There he built a sod house, with 
dimensions of 24 by 14 feet, in the corner of 
his present yard. In 1870 he built a small 
frame house, which burned down and was 
replaced in 1887 by a large one. He also 
'erected a good barn and other desirable farm 
buildings. In 1874 he began setting out shade 
trees, and some of his maples and cottonwoods 
have grown to be two feet thick. There was 
at one time a good-sized stream running 
through the farm, but this became smaller 
year after year until it was totally dry in 1896. 
He has a fine supply of water, however, from 
a 25-foot well. He set out four acres of orchard, 
with which he has been quite successful. At 
an earlier period he kept a considerable num- 
ber of hogs and cattle, but now devotes his en- 
tire time to grain raising, sowing his land to 
corn, oats, millet, and wheat. He is a very 
prosperous man, and owns three 80-acre tracts, 
adjoining each other. 

Mr. Gillespie was united in the holy bonds 
of wedlock with Margaret Clancy, a daughter 
of John Clancy. She was born in Massachu- 
setts, reared in Nebraska City, and died in 
1 88 1, aged thirty-eight years. This union 
was the source of the following children: 
Mary, wife of J. Dillon, by whom she has the 
following children — Margaret, Mary, Nellie, 
Patrick H., William J. Bryan, and James; 
Elizabeth, who married George Heffley, and 
has five children — Roy, Sarah, Gertrude, 
Irene and Maggie ; Bridget, who married Arch- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



275 



ibald Morrison, and has two sons — Charles R. 
and Archibald H. ; Ellen, who is the wife of 
Edward Heffley, and has one son, Charles G. ; 
Thomas Francis, who conducts the home farm ; 
Catherine; Alice; Margaret, deceased; and 
Anna, deceased. Mr. Gillespie was one of the 
organizers of the school board, and, beginning 
in 1 87 1, served fourteen years as director. He 
also served as road supervisior for fourteen 
years. 



JERNARD MONAHON, one of the 
earliest settlers of Forest City pre- 
cinct, Sarpy county, Nebraska, first 
located there in 1858, but is now living in prac- 
tical retirement. 

Mr. Monahon was born in County Ferman- 
agh, Ireland, in 1832, and is a son of Bernard 
and Mary (McGuire) Monahon, his mother 
having been born in County Tyrone, Ireland. 
He was reared in Ireland, and at the age of 
sixteen years came to this country and located 
at Newtown Square, Delaware, twelve miles 
from Philadelphia. He served a regular ap- 
'prenticeship to the trade of a tanner, and then 
followed that trade for two years. He then 
went to Cambria county, Pennsylvania, and 
engaged in railroad contracting until the com- 
pletion of the Pennsylvania Railroad, in the 
fall of 1853. He then followed railroad work 
in Alabama for a short time, after which he 
returned to the Pennsylvania Central, in In- 
diana county, Pennsylvania. He next became 
interested in mining at Johnstown. He had a 
friend who crossed the plains to California and 



who wrote to him of the fine country through 
which he had passed. He decided to investi- 
gate and set out for the West. As his wife 
had a brother who was a surveyor in Nebraska, 
he went there and stopped in Sarpy county. 
This was in the year 1858, and but few had yet 
located in that county. He took up 160 acres 
in Forest City precinct, section 35, and later 
added 46 acres to his former purchase. He 
built a log house of natural wood on the farm, 
and this has long since given way to the pres- 
ent fine residence. He built excellent barns 
and corn cribs, and other needed outbuildings, 
and has placed the land under a high state of 
cultivation. He subsequently bought 160 
acres in section 35 and built a set of buildings 
upon the tract, afterward purchasing 160 
acres in section i. He also erected the nec- 
essary buildings on this property, and planted 
a large orchard of all kinds of fruit, including 
apples of many varieties. When he first located 
in this section the streams were well filled with 
water during the entire year, but are now 
dry. Some of his land became so moist in the 
spring it could scarcely be plowed, but it is now 
always dry. Good water may be had at a 
depth of 80 feet. In 1893 Mr. Monahon pur- 
chased the M. Langdon farm, adjoining 
Gretna, which is a fine farm in a highly im- 
proved condition. It is possessed of a fine 
grove, and on it he erected a new house, barns, 
cribs, etc. He was formerly a large stock 
raiser, and made a specialty of Hereford cat- 
tle, but in more recent years he has been living 
in virtual retirement. 

Mr. Monahon was united in marriage with 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Margaret Howe, a daughter of Richard Howe, 
who was born in [reland, and their children 
are as follows : Mary, widow of Charles Wa- 
terman, by whom she had one daughter, Kate, 
who lives with her grandfather; Maggie, who 
died in infancy ; Henry, a farmer, who married 
Theoedate Nelson, and has four children — 
John, Mattie, Laura, and Florence; Maggie, 
wife of Leif Nelson; Kate, wife of Gus Rosen- 
steihl, by whom she has one child, Margaret; 
Annie, wife of Burt Wilbur; and William, who 
conilucts the home farm. Mr. Monahon has 
been deeply interested in educational matters, 
and has taken an active hand in establishing 
and keeping up the schools. For the past 
twenty-seven years he has been treasurer of 
school district lo. In politics he is a Dem- 
ocrat. 



Y. RISHEL, one of the leading 
agriculturists of Sarpy county, Ne- 
'braska, has been located on his 
present farm since the year 1868. He is a man 
of high standing in his community, and enjoys 
the esteem and respect of a host of acquaint- 
ances. 

Mr. Rishel was born in Clearfield county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1841, and is a son of Adam 
and Sarah (Miller) Rishel. His father died 
in Pennsylvania, and his mother in Sarpy 
county. 

M. Y. Rishel learned the trade of a carpen- 
ter at an early age, and went to Omaha in 
1865, and worked at his trade. He continued 



there a few months and in 1866 began farming 
in Sarpy county, leasing, in 1868, the 80 acres 
of land where he now lives. He leased this 
property for two years, and in the fall of 1890 
purchased it. At the time of his settlement 
there his nearest neighbors were H. Schal and 
J. Weath, many miles distant, and the wild 
prairie abounded in deer and antelope. He 
also received daily visits from the Indians. 
The streams of running water, in which there 
were many fish, are now dried up. He broke 
tlie prairie and improved his farm as best he 
could, and it is at the present time under a high 
state of cultivation, yielding as heavily in grain 
as any farm in his section. He built a small 
house near the present site, later added to it, 
and in 1900 took it away and erected a new 
and modern home. In 1868 he set out cotton- 
wood trees, which now measure three feet in 
diameter. He also has an excellent grove of 
maple and walnut trees, and box elders. He has 
three acres of fruit trees, and has been partic- 
ularly successful in raising pears and peaches, 
in which so many have had failures. His 
farm is in excellent condition, and is well 
stocked, having about 20 head of fine cattle 
and 40 hogs. 

Mr. Rishel was united in marriage with Es- 
ther Booze, a daughter of Peter H. and Cath- 
erine (Dresser) Booze. Her father was born 
in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, May 13. 
181 1, and in 1878 located in Sarpy county, 
Nebraska, where he purchased 40 acres of land 
adjoining Gretna. There he built a home and 
resided until his death, in February, 1890. His 
wife, Catherine Dresser, a daughter of John 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



277 



Dresser, was born in Snyder county, Pennsyl- 
vania, February 8, 1817, and now resides on 
the old homestead in Sarpy county. She was 
the mother of fourteen children, eleven of 
whom are now living. Their names are : Wil- 
liam H., Sarah A., C. Elizabeth, Mary Jane, 
Esther, Lydia A., Joseph, Jerome, George, 
Maria, David, Clara, Hannah S., and Alice E. 
The subject of this sketch and his wife became 
the parents of the following children : Louise, 
deceased ; Sarah, wife of William D. Labord ; 
Ida, wife of Daniel Zurbic; Elmer; Edwin; 
Effie Irene, wife of John Warren ; Bert ; Lo- 
raina B. ; Walter ; and three others who died in 
infancy. Mr. Rishel served as road supervisor 
for two terms, and has always taken a deep 
interest in the development of the county. In 
politics, he is a Democrat. 



^ILLIAM MORRISON, who was 
one of the very first settlers of Forest 
' City precinct, Sarpy county, Nebraska, 
has a very fine estate in that county. He en- 
dured ail the hardships of pioneer life and 
often had poverty staring him in the face, but 
with ceaseless energy and willing hands he 
surmounted all obstacles and worked his way 
to success. 

Mr. Morrison was born in County Antrim, 
Ireland, in 1820, and is a son of John and Eliz- 
abeth (Kelly) Morrison. He came to New 
York on May i, 1848, and went to Albany, 
where he worked at gas fitting and plumbing, 
for six years. He then located in Buffalo, 



New York, and later in Illinois, where he 
hunted up a brother. Preferring the East, he 
returned and located at Poughkeepsie, New 
York, and was foreman of the gas company for 
three years and five months. He then fol- 
lowed his trade at New Orleans, Louisiana, 
for a time, after which he went up the Missis- 
sippi River. He settled on Walnut Creek, six- 
teen miles from Leavenworth, Kansas, where 
he bought and improved a claim. During the 
Kansas "border ruffian" days he was forced to 
leave, and as a result lost all he had. On 
April. 18, 1856, he found himself with but $13, 
but in the same year he took up 160 acres in 
section 22, and 120 acres in section 27 of For- 
est City precinct, Sarpy county, Nebraska. He 
immediately set about breaking the land, and 
erected a shanty. In 1858 he rented his land 
and went with the Mormon expedition to Salt 
Lake, as teamster for Major Russell. He 
met with many hair-breadth escapes, and on 
his return home many of the party were frozen 
to death, but his sturdy constitution, seasoned 
by the hardships of years gone by, enabled him 
to hold out. He reached Old Ford Bridge and 
went to herding, but in 1858 he returned to 
Fort Laramie and bought a team and provisions 
enough to last one year and then started for 
Cherry Creek, Colorado. He reached Denver 
in January, 1859, and remained there during 
the summer of that year, when he returned to 
his property in Sarpy county. He built a log 
house, which is still standing on the place, 
and later erected a handsome residence; 
There was a natural forest at the foot of 
the bluffs, which he has preserved, in addition 



278 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



to setting out many trees. He has a good two- 
acre orchard and his land is planted in corn, 
oats, and wheat, the yield being exceedingly 
heavy. He has purchased additional property 
from time to time, and now has an immense 
estate all lying together, with the exception of 
80 acres near South Omaha. When he first 
settled in Sarpy county his nearest neighbors 
were miles away, and Indians were every-day 
visitors. Deer, wolves, and other large and 
small game were plentiful. He has a choice 
herd of graded cattle and hogs, and with the 
assistance of his son conducts most of the 
farming, but rents several of the farms. 

Mr. Morrison was first married to Elizabeth 
McDowell, a daughter of John McDowell. 
She was born in Ireland, and died in 1854, 
leaving one child, Alexander, who has been 
employed in the book binding department of 
the government for sixteen years, and is now 
at the Paris Exposition. He formed a sec- 
ond matrimonial alliance by wedding Emily 
Peterson, a daughter of Bent Peterson, whose 
biography appears elsewhere in this work, and 
they are parents of the following children: 
John K., a graduate of the high school; Wil- 
liam, Daniel, Benjamin, James, and Erin. For 
sixteen years Mr. Morrison served as treasurer 
of the school board. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. 



m 



ILLIAM H. SMITH, after a life 
arduous labor in the vocation of an 
agriculturist. lias liecn living for the 
past fifteen years in quiet retirement in Believue 



precinct, Sarpy county, Nebraska. He was 
born in Fall River, Massachusetts, in 1824, 
and is a son of Edward Smith. 

Mr. Smith received his early schooling in 
his native town and then took up the trade of 
a machinist, which he mastered in the course 
of a few years' training. He then engaged 
with a firm that made machinery for the man- 
ufacture of cloth. In 1853 he and his brother 
Charles came to Nebraska, where they intended 
buying cattle to drive to Denver, Colorado, 
but when they arrived at Council Bluffs, Iowa, 
they found the market quite unfavorable for 
such an undertaking. The subject of this 
writing remained in the West about three 
months, when he returned to the East. In 
1855 he went on with his family to Sarpy 
county, and soon pre-empted 160 acres. The 
two erected a log house on tiie property now 
owned by his brother Charles, and in 1859 
William H. Smith built a house on his present 
farm in section 14, range 13, and at once began 
to make other improvements upon the farm. 
At that early date deer were very plentiful. 
The forests that fringed the water courses were 
filled with game, and the neighbors were mostly 
Indians, who were very peaceable and friendly. 
Mr. Smith continued to make improvements 
upon his farm, which he soon had in a fine 
state of cultivation. General farming and stock 
raising continued to be his chief pursuit for 
many years. He sold 30 acres of his ground 
to the Omaha Hydraulic Pressed Brick Com- 
pany, which now has a large plant there, and 
gives employment to many men. 

Mr. Smith was united in marriage with Em- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



meline F. Brown, of Rhode Island, and they 
had a family of six children, namely: A son 
that died in infancy; Horace B., deceased; 
George H. ; Mary, wife of C. Johnson ; Hattie, 
wife of W. H. Richardson; and Fred, de- 
ceased. The subject of this sketch has always 
taken an active part in promoting the welfare 
of his adopted community, but has never 
sought political positions. For thirty years 
he has served as a director of schools, and of- 
ficiated one year as assessor. Religiously, ; 
is a Baptist. Mr. Smith has a multitude of 
friends throughout Sarpy county, who know 
him as a good, honest and straightforward cit- 
izen and business man. 



TT^ALEB H. ROSE, deceased, was one of 
I J| the early merchants of Ashland, Ne- 

^ 'braska, but later in life was a stock 

dealer and extensively engaged in raising stock. 
He was a large land owner in Saunders and 
Lancaster counties, and was one of the most 
enterprising citizens of Ashland, where he was 
held in the highest esteem and enjoyed the 
confidence and friendship of every one. 

Mr. Rose came of a prominent family in 
Ohio, and was a native of that state, having 
been born on what has for many years been 
knov>n as the Rose farm, in Morgan county. 
His grandfather was Robert Rose, who was 
born in Virginia, but in 1809 settled in Morgan 
county, Ohio, on the Perry county line, being 
one of its earliest settlers. He became the 
owner of large landed interests, and was a very 



prominent man in that section. His son, Jacob, 
the father of Caleb H., was born on the old 
homestead and lived there all his days. He 
served in the Civil War in the 62nd Regiment, 
Ohio Vol. Inf., and bore an honorable record. 
The Rose family, as far back as a record can 
be obtained, has been composed of men of 
good calibre, men who have accomplished their 
aims in life, leaving this world truly better for 
their having lived in it, and the present gener- 
ation of the family can justly point with pride 
to its ancestry. 

Caleb H. Rose was reared on the farm, and 
when eighteen years old went to the front as 
a drummer boy in the 114th Regiment, Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, re-enlisting later in the 
National Guard. During his service he 
contracted a stomach trouble, with which 
he battled the rest of his life, finally 
succumbing to it April 13, 1898, when fifty- 
two years of age. After the close of the war 
he returned home and was shortly^iafterward 
united in marriage with Margaret Adamson, 
a daughter of Rev. Washington Adamson, a 
minister in the Methodist Episcopal church in 
Muskingum county, Ohio. They, with H. Nel- 
son and John Colbert, and their families, 
decided to go overland by team to Kansas, of 
which they had received so many favorable re- 
ports. They started on September 14, i86q, 
with wagons and teams and all their worldly 
effects, leaving behind kindred and friends. 
They wended their way westward, stopping 
only to rest their teams and cook their meals, 
sleeping in the wagons and on the ground. The 
pleasures they anticipated before starting were 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



conspicuous by their absence, and instead of en- 
joyment, they were compelled to endure priva- 
tions and hardships. They met many families 
returning from Kansas, and all were in a pitia- 
ble condition, looking starved and wretched. 
Thereupon the party experienced a change of 
mind and decided to go to Nebraska, where 
they located in Ashland, then called Saline 
Ford, on October 2^, 1869, feeling willing to 
accept anything for a rest. But a house could 
not be found, and so they camped along the 
creek. In getting their meals they used the 
creek water, which seemed to make their coffee 
salty, and upon investigation they found they 
were using water from Salt Creek. In their 
party were twenty-three people, inclusive of 
children and the hired men, and it was dif- 
ficult to secure any kind of accommodations. 
They finally found a small building, 16 by 20 
feet in dimensions, two and a half miles south- 
east of the Ford, but in order to get it they 
were obliged to buy the wheat with which it 
was filled. They managed to get an old stove, 
but they stayed in the house for some time 
without any other furniture, not even a table 
on whiph to eat. Each head of a family imme- 
diately set out with different objects in view: 
one for wood, another for corn, and a third 
went to a mill. Mrs. Rose, having a sister, 
who with her husband, W. J. Weller, had 
previously located in Lancaster county, Ne- 
braska, took her children to their home, while 
her husband went to the land office. He pre- 
empted 160 acres of land in Lancaster county, 
fourteen miles from Ashland, and built a sod 
house on it with dimensions of 30 by 10 feet, 



having a board cover and being lined on the 
inside with the covering of the wagon — black 
oil cloth. There was one door and two windows 
in the house. The next June, Mr. Rose's father 
visited him and declared his son's health would 
not permit him to live thus and advised him to 
move to Ashland, which he did as soon as he 
could pay off his pre-emption indebtedness. He 
bought a small house, where Oscar Hoffman 
now lives, and in 1870 he built a store 
on Main street, at the east end of 
Salt Creek bridge, and opened up a 
general merchandise business. He was 
also appointed express agent, and while servmg 
as such met with some amusing experiences. 
During the temperance crusade two lady lectur- 
ers were in town and one called for express 
and found in the office two kegs of beer await- 
ing the owner. She fumed and raged at the 
idea of having beer come into town through the 
express office, and Mrs. Rose, who was in 
charge on account of the illness of her hus- 
band, could not get rid of her. The temper- 
ance woman seized an ax and broke in the 
heads of the kegs of beer and that seemed to 
satisfy her. Mr. Rose conducted the mercan- 
tile business until 1S83, when his health failed 
him and he was obliged to give it up, but he 
invested in real estate and at the time of his 
death owned his original tract of 160 acres, 
and 460 acres in Clear Creek precinct, on 
which stands an old log house built by Martin 
Swafford in the "sixties." In 1875 Mr. Rose 
bdught land and built the home in which Mrs. 
Rose now lives, and later rebuilt it into a large 
and handsome residence. During his last years 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



he was engaged in stock raising quite exten- 
sively. 

The following children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Rose: Annie, an artist of excep- 
tional talent ; Edgar J., one of the largest stock 
dealers of Ashland; Lizzie, the w-ife of Charles 
Keetle of Cass county, by whom she has two 
children, Don and Leota ; Corwin H., who mar- 
ried Lena Gates, and lives on one of the Rose 
farms; Delia Blanche, the wife of Charles Tay- 
lor, by whom she has three children, Floyd, 
Ernest and Florence; Lola Belle, and Jennie 
Grace. 



AMUEL B. HALL, the efficient and 
accommodating postmaster at Ash- 
land, Saunders county, Nebraska, en- 
joys the distinction of being one of the pioneer 
settlers of this state. When he came to Ne- 
braska the trip was made in a wagon covered 
with canvas and drawn by three horses. This 
wagon contained all his belongings and the trip 
consumed twenty-two days. Their only guide 
was a trail which they followed as best they 
could, no roads having been laid out. When 
night overtook them they camped. One can 
scarcely realize at the present time that most 
of the beautiful county of Saunders was a 
bleak wilderness a little more than half a cen- 
tury ago. 

Samuel B. Hall was born in Hancock, Hills- 
boro county. New Hampshire, September 20, 
1 84 1. His father, William P. Hall, was a 
shoemaker, in early manhood, when footwear 
was all made by hand. Later in life, however. 



he became a painter. He married a Miss Rus- 
sell, who died early in their married life. Will- 
iam P. Hall still resides in his native state, and 
is now eighty-eight years old. 

When but fourteen years old Samuel B. 
Hall left home and went west, to El Paso, Illi- 
nois, in company with Gardner Nay, for whom 
he worked four years. During the summer 
seasons he followed farming, and attended 
school through the winter sessions. Thinking 
his taskmaster was too strict, young Hall left 
him and went to Clinton, Dwight county, Illi- 
nois, where he remained one year. 

In 1861 he enlisted as a private in Company 
F, 41st Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
and served in the Civil War for three years 
and one month. He participated in many 
hard battles, being detailed as color 
bearer. He was wounded while carry- 
ing the colors and was taken prisoner, his 
flag also being captured. This flag was sent 
to Washington and is now in Springfield, Illi- 
nois. Mr. Hall was wounded four times and 
lost his right thumb in the service. 

Having been honorably discharged, our sub- 
ject returned to Clinton, Illinois, and learned 
the butcher's trade. In 1869 he came to Ne- 
braska and took up a homestead claim in 
Ellenwood precinct,. Cass county, where he 
lived until June 18, 1878. He then sold his 
farm to Mr. Travis, who still owns it. Mr. 
Hall removed directly to Ashland, Saunders 
county, and opened a butcher's shop in com- 
pany with S. S. Abbott. The following June 
Mr. Hall purchased his partner's interest and 
conducted the business alone for nine years. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Selling his butcher's shop, he opened a drug 
store on Silver street, and also engaged to some 
extent in the real estate business. He built 
a very handsome residence in 1885, and a short 
time afterward in company with S. G. Bryan 
he also built a large brick double store, which 
they sold later, realizing a neat profit on their 
investment. At the present time Mr. Hall 
owns a third interest in the I. O. O. F. block, 
and his drug store is situated there. May i,* 
1899, he was appointed postmaster at Ashland, 
relieving Mrs. Catherine Debois. He sold his 
drug store, but has a lien on it and still retains 
the management of the business. 

Mr. Hall married Alice Morris, a daughter of 
S. M. Morris, now of Ashland, but formerly of 
Oh'o. Seven children blessed their union, as 
follows : Isa M., Mont B., Harry E. M., Nel- 
lie, Bruce W., Ralph, and Maud, who died at 
the early age of five years. Isa M. Hall is 
the wife of E. D. Johnson, a prosperous butcher 
of Ashland ; they have four children. Mont B. 
Hall is also a butcher by trade. He married 
May Ennis, and has one child. Harry E. M. 
Hall is a druggist. Nellie Hall is a deputy 
postmaster. Ralph Hall is assistant postmaster. 
Bruce W. Hall follows the butcher's trade. 

Mr. Hall is a promient G. A. R. man. He is 
a member of Bob McCook Post, No. 31. He is 
also a member and past grand of I. O. O. F. 
Lodge, No. 17, and has served as grand patri- 
arch of the jurisdiction of Nebraska, being also 
a member of Rebecca Lodge. He furthermore 
affiliates with the Modern Woodmen. The 
subject of this sketch was a member of the city 
council for two years, during which he served 



on various committees. He is well known 
throughout Saunders county, and is esteemed 
by all. He is not only well fitted for his duties 
as postmaster, but is a public spirited citizen as 
well. 



ON. SAMUEL HENRY SORNBOR- 
GER, judge of the -district court of 
the Fifth Judicial District of Ne- 
braska, was born October i, 1847, i"^ Hudson, 
Michigan. He is a son of Hamblin and Sa- 
rah (Hume) Sornborger. 

Hamblin Sornborger was killed by an ex- 
plosion in a saw mill in 1852, being only twen- 
ty-five years old at the time of his death. He 
was survived by his wife and two sons, Sam- 
uel H. and Mills M. 

Samuel Henry Sornborger received his pri- 
mary education in the Hudson schools. In the 
fall of 1 868 he went west to Washington county, 
Nebraska, and in the spring of 1869, he crossed 
the Platte River into Saunders county and 
took up a homestead in Marietta precinct. He 
resided thereon six or seven years, when, in 
the fall of 1875, he went to Wahoo and com- 
menced the study of law, with N. H. Bell. In 
the fall of 1877, he was admitted to the bar of 
Saunders county. He immediately began the 
practice of his profession, and has since been 
one of the leading attorneys of Saunders 
county. He was county attorney of Saunders 
county in 1894 and 1895. 

In the fall of 1899 Mr. Sornborger was 
elected to a judgeship for the Fifth Judicial 
District of Nebraska, for a term of four years. 




JAMES HASSET. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



The Judge fought his poHtical battles under 
the PopuHst banner. He was one of the prime 
factors in the organization of that party. He 
is an active worker and his influence is felt 
throughout the district. 

Judge Sornborger married Ella Chollette in 
1890. They have two children, Walter and 
George. 



■ ON. JAMES HASSETT, an influential 
and distinguished member of the Sarpy 
county bar, whose portrait is shown 
herewith, has practiced his present profession at 
Papillion since the year he was admitted to the 
bar, in 1883, and during his residence in the 
county he has honorably discharged the duties 
of several offices conferred upon him by the peo- 
ple. He was born in Plymouth county, Massa- 
chusetts, February 15, 1858, and is a son of 
John and Mary (Sheehy) Hassett, both of 
whom are now deceased. 

James Hassett's parents located in Whiteside 
county, Illinois, in i860, near the village of 
Morrison, and there he was reared to manhood, 
while his elementary mental training was ob- 
tained in the public school at Round Grove, 
Illinois. He afterward attended the State 
Agricultural College of Iowa, at Ames, and was 
graduated from that institution in 1880. He 
then entered upon the study of law, and in 1883 
he was admitted to practice in Sarpy county, 
Nebraska, where he has since gained consider- 
able distinction as an attorney. He was elected 
county judge for the 1888- 1889 term, and 
county attorney for the years 1899 and 1900. 



The duties of these offices he discharged in such 
a manner as to win the admiration and esteem 
of all. He is now serving his second year as 
county attorney. 

Judge Hassett was united in marriage in 1884 
with Abbie Holloway, a daughter of Charles 
T. and Mary Holloway, of Papillion, Nebraska. 
To them have been born the following chil- 
dren : Lola, aged sixteen years ; Thomas, aged 
fourteen years, and Lester, aged twelve years. 
Judge Hassett is a member of the Papillion 
Lodge, No. 39, F. & A. M., and of the Bellevue 
Lodge No. 3, K. of P. In politics he is an 
uncompromising Republican. 



ANS J. HARDER, a well-to-do farmer 
of Richland precinct, Sa,rpy county, 
Nebraska, is a gentleman of high 
standing in the community. He was born in 
Holstein, Germany, in 1851, and is a son of 
George Harder, also a native of Germany. 

Hans J. Harder was reared and schooled in 
his native country, and came to America in 
1873. He was a poor boy when he landed in 
Omaha, and he immediately set to work at 
farming. He was industrious and economical, 
saving his earnings until 1887, when he was 
enabled to buy 160 acres of unimproved land 
of J. Delf. He broke the soil and set out an 
abundance of shade trees and three-fourths of 
an acre of fruit, also making many other desira- 
ble improvements. He built a house and barn, 
and has one of the best watered farms in the 
surrounding country. A large stream runs 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



through it, and in addition to several springs,' 
there are two wells on the place, one of the 
depth of 28 feet, and the other 12 feet deep. 
Mr. Harder has about 15 head of high grade 
cattle, and 30 hogs, as well as some good 
horses. He is well known throughout his' 
section and has many firm friends. 

The subject of this sketch was united in 
marriage with Mary Ehlers, a daughter of 
Jacob Ehlers, an early settler of Sarpy county, 
and they became parents of the following off- 
spring : Jacob, Celia. Lena, Hans, Mary, John, 
Amanda, and two who died in their infancy. 
Mr. Harder served as road supervisor for two 
years, and as a member of the school board 
three years. Religiously, he and his family 
are faithful members of the Lutheran church. 



Y^OUIS LESIEUR has had a long and suc- 
jJI cessful business career at Papillion, Ne- 
'^^■'^braska, which has given him a large 
number of acquaintances, among whom he is 
known as an honorable, conscientious and up- 
right citizen. At present he is engaged in the 
real estate and insurance business, and is also 
called upon to settle estates. He was born in 
Sannois, France, October i, 1845, ^"d is a son 
of Louis and Stefanie (Guerin), Lesieur, both 
deceased. 

As Louis Lesieur's parents died when he was 
quite young, he was cared for during his early 
years by his grandparents, who came to the 
United States in 1855 and settled in Canton, 
Ohio. They resided there about one year, 



when they moved to Chicago, where Louis at- 
tended the public schools until he was seventeen 
years of age. Though a mere boy, he joined 
the Union army, January 28, 1863, becoming 
a member of Company M, i6th Illinois Vol- 
unteer Cavalry, and until January 3, 1864, he 
participated in many engagements, but on that 
date he was taken prisoner at Jonesville, Vir- 
ginia. He was held a captive sixteen months, 
being set free at Jacksonville, Florida, April 28, 
1865. During the period of his captivity he was 
confined in the prisons of Belle Isle, Anderson- 
ville, Milan and Thomasville. Upon being pa- 
roled, he returned to the city of Chicago, where 
he remained only a short time, and then located 
at Forest City, now Gretna, Sarpy county, 
Nebraska. He has continued to live in that 
county ever since. There he took up a home- 
stead of 80 acres, lying in section 26, township 
13, range 10, and for several years general 
farming was his chief pursuit. Moving to 
Papillion, he conducted the Papillion Hotel un- 
til 1883. In January of that year he entered 
upon the duties of county clerk, to which office 
he had been elected the previous fall. He was 
afterward twice re-elected to the same office. 
Upon going out of office he engaged in his pres- 
ent business, and today he is regarded as one 
of the representative business men of Papillion. 
Mr. Lesieur on February 20, 1876, was 
joined in marriage with Susan Dowd, of Hol- 
landale, Wisconsin, a daughter of Patrick and 
Catherine (Conway) Dowd, both deceased. 
They have a daughter, Susie, born November 
II, 1881. Politically the subject of this sketch 
is a Democrat, while in religious views he is a 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



member of the Roman Catholic church. He 
belongs to the Dahlgren Post, No. 55, G. A. R., 
and the Andersonville Survivors' Association. 






|ATHAN DUNLAP, as proprietor of the 
'Dunlap," the leading hotel of Wahoo, 
Nebraska, has established a wide 
reputation, and the hostelry he conducts enjoys 
the patronage of the better class of the traveling 
public. 

Mr. Dunlap was born in Wayne county, 
Ohio, in 1842, and is a son of William and 
Delila (Fluck) Dunlap, his father being a 
cooper by trade. The son was reared on a 
farm in Illinois. After his marriage he rented 
a farm in Illinois, but later went to Saunders 
county, Nebraska, where he rented a farm near 
Wahoo. He successfully carried on farming 
until 1880, when, deciding that Wahoo af- 
forded a good opening for a restaurant, he 
established one. Such was his success that at 
the end of one year he embarked in the hotel 
business on Fifth street, conducting that estab- 
lishment until 1892. He then went to Clarin- 
da, Iowa, where he operated the Henshaw 
house for one year. As a brick building had 
been erected adjoining his old property in Wa- 
hoo he returned there in 1894 and in it estab- 
lished the Dunlap House, which is widely 
known throttghout the state. It has 45 hand- 
some rooms, 35 of which are bedrooms all 
nicely furnished, and it contains a fine sample 
room. Mr. Dunlap has paid particular atten- 
tion to his table and culinary department, which 



outclasses that of any hotel of equal size in the 
state of Nebraska. He employs ten hands, 
and has a 'bus to meet all trains and carry the 
mail. His enterprise and untiring efforts to 
please his patrons have resulted in deserved suc- 
cess, and he possesses the respect and friendship 
of the citizens of Wahoo to a marked degree. 
The name of the house was changed to the 
"Dunlap" in 1899. 

The subject of this sketch was united in mar- 
riage with Elizabeth Blue, a daughter of John 
H. Blue, a retired farmer, who is now living 
with Mr. Dunlap, being eighty-two years of 
age. This union resulted in three children: 
John W., who died at the age of eighteen years ; 
Bert A., and Frknk. 



fOHN F. SHERMAN, as editor and pro- 
prietor of the "Wahoo Democrat," has 
attained an enviable reputation through- 
out this section of the state. The paper exerts 
a strong influence in the inculcation of Demo- 
cratic principles, and the furtherance of all en- 
terprises and measures tending toward the bet- 
terment of Wahoo and the county at large. As 
a writer Mr. Sherman is versatile and original, 
and has the courage to give expression to the 
convictions of his mind. His management of 
the paper has met with the universal commen- 
dation of its subscribers, who number more 
than a thousand. Mr. Sherman was born in 
New York City, February 10, 1853, and is a 
son of Philip and Caroline (Smith) Sherman. 
Philip Sherman was a native of Frankfort-on- 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



the-Main, Germany, and in early manhood 
came to this country, making his home in New 
York City, although he was a deep sea sailor. 
He served in the Civil War and participated in 
the first battle of Bull Run. His health was 
very badly impaired by the constant exposure 
to which he was subjected, and as a consequence 
he died in 1863, at Xenia, Ohio. He married 
Caroline Smith, a native of New York, and 
she died in i860. Their union was the source 
of three children : Emma J. ( Delamater ) , de- 
ceased; David T., deceased; and John F. 

John F. Sherman became a resident of Xenia, 
Ohio, in 1 86 1, at the age of eight years, and he 
there received his mental training in the pub- 
lic schools. He was left an orphan at the age 
of ten years. His first work was on a farm, at 
which he continued until he was twenty-one 
years old, when he started to learn the trade of 
a printer, with his brother at Seward (then 
Aurora), Nebraska. In 1889 he purchased the 
"Wahoo Democrat," and has been its editor 
and proprietor since that date. He conducts 
the only Democratic paper in the county, and 
has been actively identified with politics since he 
has been located at Wahoo. 

On June 28, 1892, Mr. Sherman was united 
in marriage with Helen R. Negley, a daughter 
of James S. Negley, of Wahoo, Nebraska. 
In April, 1893, ^le was appointed postmaster 
of Wahoo, and served for four years. Mrs. 
Sherman was appointed his deputy, and served 
equally as well in that capacity. In 1899 he 
was elected mayor of the city, his term expir- 
ing May I, 1900. He has served on numerous 
committees, and has been a delegate to various 



conventions. Fraternally, he is a member of 
the following orders: Knights of Pythias, 
Woodmen of the World, Star of Jupiter, and 
Royal Neighbors of America. 



ETER CAMPBELL is a worthy mem- 
ber of one of the oldest and most rep- 
resentative families of Hall and Saun- 
ders counties, Nebraska, which has done its 
share in the development of these two counties. 
He is esteemed as one of the most progressive 
and enterprising farmers of Chapman precinct, 
Saunders county, where he has spent the 
greater part of his life, engaged in tilling the 
soil. He was born in Scotland in 1863, and is 
a son of Peter and Agnes (Rentoul) Campbell. 
Peter Campbell, Sr., was born in Scotland, 
September 22, 1822, and was a son of John 
Campbell, who settled in Hall county, Ne- 
braska in 1835, remaining there until death 
claimed him. John Campbell was the first of 
the family to come to this country; his son 
Peter, with his family, was the last to come to 
the United States, arriving here in 1865. In 
the fall of 1865, Peter Campbell, Sr. located 
on a ranch on the Platte River, near Fort Kear- 
ney, and continued to live there until July 24, 
1867. During his stay there his home was 
visited by the Indians, while all the men were 
in the fields at work. The Indians carried away 
with them four of his children, the oldest of 
whom was nineteen years of age, while the 
youngest was but four years old. They were 
Christina, Jessie, and the twins, Peter and 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Daniel. The children remained in captivity 
about three months, when upon the payment of 
$2,000 they were released by the United States 
peace commissioner. Upon their restoration 
to the family Mr. Campbell at once left for 
Saunders county, settling in Chapman precinct 
in the spring of 1868. He remained there until 
his death, November 15, 1875, at which time 
he was the owner of 240 acres of land. He 
first bought 80 acres, — the south half of the 
northeast quarter of section 10 — and later he 
inherited the northwest quarter of section 10, 
which was homesteaded by his brother Dan, 
who died a bachelor. This brother was killed 
in 1870 by a falling log, and lies buried in the 
cemetery at Wahoo, Saunders county. The 
wife of Peter Campbell, Sr., was Agnes Ren- 
toul, also a native of Scotland, who died at Fort 
Kearney in February, 1866. Peter Campbell, 
Sr., was one of the first to settle in Chapman 
precinct, and he built the first log house, near 
the creek, its dimensions being 14 by 20 feet, 
and its height a story and a half. He 
also built a log barn large enough for two 
teams, and for the first three years he was en- 
gaged in breaking the land. Near the creek 
was a heavy forest, which, with the orchard he 
set out, was destroyed by fire. 

The subject of this sketch has six brothers 
and sisters, namely: Christina, Jessie, John 
R., Agnes, Daniel, and Elizabeth. Christina 
lives in Butler county, Nebraska. Before her 
marriage to James Dunlap he homesteaded the 
north half of the southeast quarter of section 
10, township 14, range 6. She has five chil- 
dren : Nelson, a teacher at Lincoln, Nebraska ; 



Agnes, wife of H. N. Lynn, a school teacher at 
Weston, Nebraska; Christina, Patience, and 
Louis. Jessie wedded a Mr. Land, and died, 
leaving five children. John R., who lives in 
Illinois, married Arietta Hadsell; they had five 
children, namely : Joseph, deceased ; Emma, 
deceased; James, Lila, and Donald. Agnes, 
deceased, was the wife of F. F. Herring, and 
died in 1897, leaving four children : Gertrude, 
Owen, Grace, and Bertha — the last named was 
very small at the time of her mother's death, 
and now lives with a Mr. Griffin, at Eckley, 
Colorado, who is a relative of Mr. Herring. 
In 1897, Daniel, the twin brother of the sub- 
ject hereof, married Emma Stoner, of Illinois, 
and he lives on the farm adjoining the one 
owned by Peter Campbell ; he has two children, 
Josie, aged two years, and John, a babe. 
Elizabeth, the youngest daughter of Peter 
Campbell, Sr., is the wife of O. A. Herring, a 
farmer in Chapman precinct, and they had 
seven children, of whom six are living, namely : 
Ernest, Albert, Harry, Hazel, Myrtle, and 
Ruth; the deceased one was Rachel. All the 
children of Peter Campbell, Sr., were born in 
Fife county, Scotland, 30 miles from Edin- 
burgh. 

The subject of this sketch married Josie 
Webster, a daughter of R. F. Webster, a sketch 
of whom also appears in this work. Mr. and 
Airs. Campbell have three children — Ethel, 
Dan, and Letha. In politics Mr. Campbell is a 
solid Free Silver Democrat. He is a member 
of the K. of P. Lodge, No. 95, of Weston, in 
which he has held several offices; and of the 
A. O. U. W., of Weston, Lodge No. 291. In 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



1893 ^r. Campbell built his present comforta- 
ble home, whose dimensions are 16 by 26 feet, 
and he also built a kitchen 12 by 12 feet in size. 
In 189s he bought the 80 acres owned by his 
brother, John R. Campbell, and moved the 
house standing thereon to his present premises, 
to be used as a barn. He has a 40-foot well, 
and his farm is one of the best improved in 
Chapman precinct. 






"ARVEY CARPENTER HENRY, a 
retired farmer and esteemed resident of 
Ashland, Saunders county, Nebras- 
ka, is one of the early settlers of this state. Mr. 
Henry is a son of William and Eunice (Carpen- 
ter) Henry. His parents were both natives of 
Ohio. They located in Nebraska in their declin- 
ing years and finally died there, the father at 
the age of seventy years, and the beloved 
mother at the age of seventy-nine years. They 
reared seven children, namely: Parker C, 
George W., Nancy J., Harvey C, Charles, Lor- 
ing, and Rachel. 

Harvey C. Henry was born in Athens county, 
Ohio, where he was reared and schooled. In 
1 861 he enlisted as a private in the Union army, 
being a member of Company B, 36th Regiment, 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He served three 
years and was honorably discharged. He imme- 
diately re-enlisted and served until discharged 
as a sergeant in 1865, on the successful termin- 
ation of the war. Among the principal battles 
in which Mr. Henry took active part were 
Chickamauga, Antietam, South Mountain, 



Winchester, and Chattanooga. He was slightly 
wounded at Winchester in the Shenandoah 
Valley, captured, and was held as a prisoner 
for four months. 

Having been mustered out of the service, Mr. 
Henry married Mary D. Miller, a daughter of 
Amos and Louisa (Deterly) Miller, and grand- 
daughter of Abel and Mary (Jones) Miller. 
This happy event took place March 30, 1864. 
Abel Miller was a native of Connecticut. He 
was born at Middlefield April 12, 1772, and 
died April 23, 1827. His wife was a daughter 
of Thomas Jones. She was born at Browns- 
ville, Pennsylvania, July 11, 1778, and died 
May 4, 1827. They were early settlers in Ohio, 
where Mr. Miller was a man of considerable 
importance. He was among the first judges of 
Athens county, in that state, and was highly 
educated. Five children were born to him and 
his wife, as follows: Elijah, Amos, Mary, 
Eliza, and Maria. 

Amos Miller was born July 27, 1807, in Ath- 
ens county, Ohio. He died August 14, 1886. 
He graduated from the state university at 
Athens, Ohio, and afterward became a teacher 
in the preparatory department of the university. 
After a number of years' teaching he estab- 
lished Miller's Academy, and his children were 
all students of that institution. He followed 
the profession of teaching for half a cen- 
tury, and was also engaged in farming. He 
married Louisa Deterly, who was born in 1806, 
and died in 1882. Six children were born to 
them, as follows: Abel D., Charles D., Paul 
D., Michael D., Mary D., the wife of Mr. 
Henry, and Margaret P. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



291 



After marriage Mr. Henry followed farming 
in Ohio until 1875. He then decided to go 
west, and advance himself with the successful 
men of the day. He first went to Lancaster 
county, Nebraska, where he purchased some 
railroad land. Two years later he settled in 
Ashland, and engaged in the grocery business. 
He purchased what is now the Frank Mclntyre 
property. Two years later he also purchased 
160 acres near Memphis, in Clear Creek pre- 
cinct. Subsequently he added 80 acres which 
he purchased from the Union Pacific Railroad 
Company, and which was immediately adjoin- 
ing his 1 1 60 acres. 

Upon this fine farm Mr. Henry lived until 
1898. He made many and extensive improve- 
ments, remodeling buildings and erecting new 
ones. He also set out beautiful shade trees 
and fine orchards. He sold 46 acres of this 
tract, however, to the Armour Company for an 
ice plant. In 1898 Mr. Henry left the farm 
and went to Ashland to spend his declining 
years.. He purchased a corner lot, upon which 
he built a handsome modern residence and a 
convenient barn. Six children were born to 
him and his wife. Their names are: Cora, 
Lena, Frank M., Maggie, Charles G., and Jes- 
sie M. Cora married D. M. Roberts, and died 
at the age of thirty-two years, leaving one 
daughter, Mary E. Lena is a successful teach- 
er in the public schools. Frank M. is a farmer 
by occupation, owning a fine farm in Clear 
Creek precinct. Maggie and Jessie M. are still 
at home, while the youngest son, Charles G., is 
a farmer. 

Mr. Henry is a stanch Republican, and 



served his party as justice of the peace one 
term. He is reaping the reward of honest toil, 
and is spending his declining years in ease, sur- 
rounded by his loved ones. 



K"^RANK HRUBY, a well-to-do and 
upright citizen, and one of the older set- 
tlers of Saunders county, Nebraska, has 
met with excellent success in his present voca- 
tion — farming — having been engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits ever since coming to this 
country. He is a son of Wenzel Hruby, and 
was born July 13, 1854, in Branna, Bohemia, 
a populous village situated near the border of 
Germany. He was educated in the Bohemian 
language and also learned some German. When 
he left Bohemia he parted with his father and 
mother, brother, and a wealthy sister, who was 
married to Vinzens Tost, in Langenau. His 
parents are still alive, and are living with their 
son in Bohemia. 

On the 28th day of April, 1880, Mr. Hruby 
bade good-bye to his relatives and friends in 
Bohemia and set out on his journey for Amer- 
ica, accompanied by his wife, Wilhelmina 
(Scharf), who was born in Hennersdorf, Bo- 
hemia, November 6, 1857, and one son, Joseph, 
who was born in the same village as was his 
father, October 11, 1879. They sailed from 
Bremen, Germany, May 2, on the ship "Salier," 
and arrived in New York City May 15. On 
the same vessel also came his brothers-in-law, 
Wenzel Hakel and Joseph Scharf and their 
families. After a limited stay in New York 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



City Mr. Hruby started for the far West, and 
arrived at Wahoa, Saunders county, May i8. 
From there he took his family to the Bohemian 
settlement near Prague, and until he secured 
a home for them they were guests of Frank 
Ostry, who had a comfortable sod house. After 
looking about him for a suitable location, Mr. 
Hruby bought i6o acres of raw prairie land in 
section 20, near Weston, and on it built his first 
sod house, and at once started in to engage in 
American farming. He had $500 with 
which to commence his operations, and part of 
this he invested in the first payment on his 
farm, which cost $6 per acre. He also pur- 
chased a stove and other necessary household 
articles, a yoke of oxen with which to break the 
prairie land, a cow with a calf, and three hogs. 
By the time he had made his purchases his 
money gave out, and he worked that summer 
for other farmers in order to provide the nec- 
essaries of life for his family. The winter was 
very severe, and the snow had drifted so much 
that it was hard to get anywhere. The neigh- 
bors came and borrowed cornmeal, which was 
a luxury in those times. The third season he 
hauled corn to market in a dry goods box on a 
sled, using a single ox to pull the load. After 
three years of toil, during wliich time he had 
succeeded in putting 50 acres of his land under 
cultivation, he sold the property for $12 per 
acre, and bought 80 acres of land one and a half 
miles southeast of his first purchase for $6 per 
acre. Shortly after this he also bought an- 
other 160-acre tract four miles west of his first 
location. This last mentioned property, which 
is in section 26, Newman precinct, has ever 



since continued to be our subject's home. No 
time was lost in making improvements ; many 
acres of the prairie were broken and put under 
cultivation. There was a sod house on the 
land, which was built by Jacob Soukup ; other 
buildings were added as fast as possible. He 
built a corn-crib and barn, but when the first 
crop was raised and threshed, sparks from a 
Union Pacific Railroad engine set fire to the 
dry grass along the railroad, that runs across 
his property, and brfore the fire was extin- 
guished, his corn-crib, granary with grain, 
lumber and farm implements were destroyed. 
This unfortunate accident happened October 
9, 1885. The railroad company paid $400 
for the damage caused, although the esti- 
mated loss was $912.45. The follovifing 
year he parted with the old sod house 
and built a frame dwelling 26 by 16 feet, 10 
feet high, with an addition. 12 by 14 feet, which 
is used as a kitchen. This is his present resi- 
dence. He also built a barn and corn-crib ; a 
little later he had a tubular well 96 feet deep 
constructed, and a windmill erected which cost 
$300 complete. Afterward he built a gran- 
ary with a capacity of about 2,500 bushels, and 
is now contemplating building a large barn, 40 
by 28 feet and 16 feet high, in modern style. 

In 1892 Mr. Hruby bought 160 acres from 
Frank Prazak, which is well improved and still 
in his possession. He has 80 acres also in But- 
ler county, Nebraska. His second purchase of 
land, 80 acres in extent, he sold to Vaclav Ma- 
lousek for $2,800. In 1894 he bought 160 
acres near Touhy, and also 160 acres adjoining 
his home in section 27, Newman precinct. The 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



1 60 acres near Touhy were sold to Ernest 
Tomes in 1896 for $5,500. This makes the 
total amount of land in Mr. Hruby's possession 
560 acres ; however, he has a plan to exchange 
the 80 acres in Butler county for 160 acres, 
which corners one-half mile from his other 
property. General farming and stock raising 
are oiir subject's chief pursuits, and he enjoys 
an enviable reputation of being a good, con- 
scientious, up-to-date farmer. In 1899 he re- 
ceived from his brother in Bohemia 60 pounds 
of Bohemian rye, on which the freight, cus- 
toms, and other expenses incurred in bringing 
it to him were $7.28. This rye was planted 
and harvested in 1900. Unfortunately on Au- 
gust 1 1 a number of wheat stacks from 20 acres 
of land were struck by lightning and they were 
burnt, along with the rye stack that stood near 
at hand. 

There have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Hruby, since they became residents of Saun- 
ders county, the following children : Frank, 
born June 6, 1881 ; Annie, born March 29, 
1883; Sophie, born May 25, 1885; Stephen, 
born January 26, 1887, who died July 18, 1887 ; 
Marie, born January 20, 1889; Karl, born De- 
cember 5, 1890; Edw^ard, born October 13, 
1892; Adolph, born December 17, 1894; Va-v 
clav, born September 8, 1897; and Emil, born 
August 16, 1899. All the children are receiv- 
ing the benefits of an education in the Bohe- 
mian and English languages; they are all at 
home at present, enjoying the best of health, 
and assisting materially in the labors and duties 
of the farm. Mr. Hruby belongs to the Ro- 
man Catholic church at Weston, of which he 



was elected treasurer for the year 1895. He is 
also a member of the Catholic Workmen and 
Z. C. K. J., a benevolent Catholic society. He 
served six years as a member of the school 
board, as director of district 74, and in 1900 
was elected again for a term of three years. 
For some time Mr. Hruby has been a member 
of the Weston Grain & Stock Company, and 
upon its reorganization he was elected a direc- 
tor ; he was a member of the committee for re- 
buying the old elevator. Our subject is well 
pleased with the success he has achieved, which 
is the result of hard labor and incessant toil 
hy- himself, his wife and members of his 
family. 



IAS B. BACHELDER, a prominent 
and well-to-do pioneer settler of 
Sarpy county, Nebraska, has done his 
share toward developing the rich resources and 
furthering the useful enterprises of his adopted 
county and state. The date of his entering the 
limits of the county is June 9, 1856. He was 
born at Rangemont, Lower Canada, in 1835, 
and is a son of Daniel and Electa (Killem) 
Bachelder. 

Mr. Bachelder's early youth was spent under 
the parental roof, and his mental training was 
obtained in the district school of his native 
place. When he attained his majority he started 
out to go to California. Upon the above men- 
tioned date he reached Sarpy county, Nebraska, 
which then showed signs of a very prosperous 
future. He decided therefore to make it his 
home, and at the Rankin & Lamar mill he 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



obtained his first position. The mill was sit- 
uated two miles east of La Mare City, now 
known as Laplatte. Mr. Bachelder worked 
there two and one-half years, and then, with 
T. B. Holman, he bought the mill, his interest 
being but a third. For his share he traded 
1 60 acres of land, now the property of C. Tut- 
tle, which he took up from the government in 
1857. The farm was located in section 25, 
township 13, range 13. The mill was moved 
to Elkhorn in after years, where it was con- 
ducted until Mr. Bachelder and Levi Kimball 
established a ferry across the river. They con- 
ducted the ferry until the railroad was built, 
and the following fixed prices were allowed by 
legislature : $1 for a team ; 75 cents for a horse 
and buggy ; 30 cents for a horse and man, and 
10 cents for a footman. The ferry was 44 by 
14 feet in size, and was operated by a cable 
2,200 feet long, and had a capacity for three 
teams. Mr. Bachelder also ran a stage line be- 
tween Omaha and Plattsmouth, in partnership 
with Levi Kimball. Five years later he sold 
out and kept a store. His old store building 
is now used for a school house. He then made 
three trips freighting goods to Denver, Col- 
orado, and other points west, after which he 
settled down on his present farm of 130 acres, 
which he purchased of Joseph Brock. He now 
has a walnut grove of five acres, thirty-one 
years old, which he set out himself. The first 
house in which he lived was built of logs, but 
he now has a handsome residence, which is sur- 
rounded by a well kept lawn and fine shade 
trees. He also cultivates 80 acres in the bot- 
toms and 160 acres in Cherry county. He is a 



very successful farmer and ranks among the 
foremost in his community. He is a good 
neighbor and citizen and has many friends 
throughout his adopted county. 

Mr. Bachelder wedded Louetta Peters, of 
Bellevue, Nebraska, and they had the following 
children : Daniel, deceased ; Nellie Lucetta mar- 
ried Allen Frazeus, and they have three chil- 
dren — Leslie, Wilma and Harriet; Harriet is 
the wife of Chester Hamilton, and they have 
three children — ^Olive, Lloyd and Gale; Electa 
is the wife of Albert Mills ; Arthur, Curtis and 
William are deceased; Edith and Hazel de- 
ceased. The subject of this sketch has served 
twenty years as justice of the peace; he has 
served on the school board, as road supervisor, 
and as assessor. Religiously he is a Presby- 
terian. 



ON. ABEL B. FULLER, a prominent 
citizen of Ashland, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, has spent a most eventful 
life on the plains of the West. In his early 
days he, in association with others, was engaged 
in the freight business in Nebraska, and the 
many adventures of this class of workers in 
pioneer days, when wagon trains were the only 
safe way of getting from one point to another, 
would form a most interesting chapter in this 
volume. Mr. Fuller, as a business man, pos- 
sesses exceptional ability, and no man has done 
more to promote the growth and general wel- 
fare of Ashland than has he. He has been 
identified with many public enterprises which 
have made the busy little city it now is, and at 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



295 



the present time he is superintendent of the 
electric light plant. 

Abel B. Fuller was born in Jackson county, 
Michigan, November 26, 1837, ^"d is a son of 
Andrew S. Fuller. The latter was born and 
reared in Vermont, but in 1833 moved to Mich- 
igan, where he followed farming until his death 
at the age of fifty-four years. Abel B. Fuller 
was reared on the farm and received his intel- 
lectual training in the district schools, after 
which he followed farming and school teaching. 
He started out upon a western tour and went to 
St. Joseph, Missouri, where he was persuaded 
by a friend to accompany him to Nebraska. He 
went to Plattsmouth and there, with others, 
was interested in the freight business for about 
eight years, their chief work being for the 
government. They employed teams in haul- 
ing merchandise over the country to various 
small towns. There were no railroads at the 
time, and wagons were exclusively used. No 
less than a hundred wagons would go together, 
as a sufficient force was required for defence 
against the attacks of hostile Indians, which 
were of frequent occurrence. Mr. Fuller passed 
through many highly exciting experiences dur- 
ing this period on the frontier, and he now bears 
scars from arrows, evidencing a condition of 
affairs which will never again exist in this 
country. In 1862 he settled at what is now 
Ashland, and having erected a rude building, 
40 by 20 feet in dimensions, near the old ford, 
conducted, in partnership with Myron Moe, the 
first store in the town. In 1863 he sold his 
interest to Alexander Hinkley. He then spent 
one year in Montana, after which he returned 



and in 1866 went into the real estate business. 
He laid out the city as it is today, its location 
then being at the ford, its name being Saline 
Ford. Lee Warbritton first built where Ash- 
land is located, calling it Parallel City. By an 
act of the legislature in 1866 the two places 
v.ere included in one and called Ashland, the 
iiame being given by Mr. Argyle, an ardent ad- 
mirer of Henry Clay. Mr. Fuller built and 
sold many houses, disposed of many lots, and 
assisted materially in establishing churches and 
schools. He served as deputy of the first clerk of 
Saunders county, and, in 1867, was appointed 
land agent for the B. & M. R. Railroad and the 
U. P. Railroad, doing much to establish good 
homes for the present residents of the county. 
In 1865-1866 he served in the legislature of Ne- 
braska territory, and in 1867 in that of the 
state of Nebraska. In 1873 he built his present 
fine residence at Fifth and Oak streets. He 
then purchased some 500 acres of land and 
raised sheep and cattle on a large scale, until 
1890. In that year an electric plant was built 
by a stock company on Wahoo Creek, and he 
lias since served as superintendent of that con- 
cern. He was also a director of the National 
Bank of Ashland, and helped to establish the 
"Times." He served on the school board, and 
as a trustee of schools. 

On September 28, 1870, Mr. Fuller was 
united in marriage with Violette Laverty, of 
Jackson, Michigan. In religious views he is an 
Episcopalian, and his wife is the only surviving 
resident member who assisted in the organiza- 
tion of the church of that denomination at Ash- 
land, in 1873. Fraternally, he is a charter 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



member of Pomegranate Lodge, No. no, A. F. 
& A. M., of Ashland, and served as master for 
ten years. He was a charter member of Jewel 
Chapter, No. 34, of Ashland, of which he 
served as high priest. He also belongs to Mt. 
Moriah Commandery, of Lincoln. 



,EV. P. F. MASTROM, the beloved 
pastor of the Swedish Mission church of 
Swedesburg, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, is a native of Sweden, where his birth 
occurred in 1848. He is a son of Per Fred- 
erick Mastrom, who came to America and set- 
tled in Swedesburg, Nebraska, where he is now 
living in retirement. 

Rev. Mr. Mastrom was reared and educated 
in his native land, where he also worked in the 
rolling mills. He became a Christian in 1877, 
and felt called upon to preach the Gospel. He 
seemed to receive a Divine call to preach, 
which he did for the love of Christ. But not 
wishing to become a minister, he came to the 
LTnited States, locating in Chicago, Illinois, 
where he worked in the McCormick machine 
shops for some time. There he met many of 
his old acquaintances and was again urged to 
preach the Gospel. This he did in their homes 
and in Sunday schools for a period of five 
years. 

Mr. Mastrom moved to Red River Valley, 
Minnesota, as many Christians were located 
there who had neither church nor minister, and 
they desired him to establish a church there. 
After preaching there for about five years, hold- 



ing meetings in houses, Mr. Mastrom was at 
last enabled to institute a church at that place. 
This church was located in Teien township, 
Kittson county, and was the only mission 
church for a distance of 300 miles. 

December i, 1897, Rev. Mr. Mastrom was 
called to the Mission church at Swedesburg, 
Saunders county, Nebraska. This church was 
founded twenty-five years ago by Rev. Andrew 
Hallner. He was succeeded by Rev. J. E. 
Swanson, and the latter was in turn succeeded 
by the subject hereof. In 1896 the church was 
burned to the ground. Soon afterward a new 
one was built, containing 300 seats. In 1898 
a vestry was added, containing 100 seats. This 
church now has a membership of 140 souls. 

Rev. Mr. Mastrom married Matilda Fors- 
burg while still a resident of Sweden. They 
have four children: Charles F., Ida M., Em- 
ma Y., and Amy C. Ida married H. Nyquist. 
Rev. Mr. Mastrom possesses many Christian 
virtues and is much beloved among his par- 
ishioners. 



F. CALHOUN is a prominent and 
nterprising business man, of Spring- 
field, Nebraska, who has become 
prominent through his ability and persevering 
industry, and all his worldly possessions are 
the result of many years of constant and ardu- 
ous labor. He did not have the advantages 
,that most young men have when they begin the 
struggle of life. When he was but a lad of 
twelve years he was compelled to earn his own 
livelihood, and the success which he has at- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



tained shows that he possessed a notable 
amount of pluck, energy and determination. 
He is a native of Bloomington, Illinois, his 
birth having occurred April 15, 1862, and he is 
a son of William and Sarah J. (Wise) Cal- 
houn. His father located in Sarpy county, 
Nebraska, in 1896, but died two years later. 
C. F. Calhoun's only brother, William F., 
spent nine years in Sarpy county, from 1884 
to 1893, but now lives in Oklahoma. 

Mr. Calhoun was a lad of seventeen years 
when in 1879 he located in Sarpy county, where 
until 1883 he worked upon a farm. In that 
year he entered the dry goods store of J. D. 
Spearman, as a clerk, and while serving in that 
capacity he gained a good insight to the busi- 
ness. Mr. Spearman died January 11, 1891. 
Mr. Calhoun continued work as clerk until 
February, 1886, when he went to Fort Robin- 
son, Nebraska, but in April, 1887, he returned 
to Springfield, and on May 16 he began to ful- 
fil the duties of cashier of the J. D. Spearman 
& Co. Bank. He is now cashier and manager 
of that institution, which position he fills with 
credit to himself and employers. He also deals 
extensively in real estate, and is considered the 
best live stock auctioneer in his community. 
He is a wide-awake and hustling business man, 
always working for the advancement of his 
adopted county and state, and by his many 
friends he is known as a good, upright and 
honest citizen. He has one of the finest homes 
in Springfield, the house being 30 by 40 feet in 
dimensions. It is surrounded by 20 acres of 
land, which is kept in excellent condition, add- 
ing much to the appearance of his home. 



Mr. Calhoun married Etta J. Spearman, a 
daughter of J. D. Spearman, February 20, 
1884, and to this happy union six children have 
been born. They are as follows: Roy S., 
Lina S., Alice E., James W., Kirk, and a baby, 
Charles W. Since 1896 Mr. Calhoun has been 
a strong Democrat, while in religious views his 
family favor the Congregational church, al- 
though his oldest son, Roy, is a Methodist. His 
son is now in the senior class of the Spring- 
field High School, and is very popular among 
his classmates. The subject of this sketch is 
chairman of the town board, and for the past 
seven years he has been a member of the school 
board, of which he is treasurer. He is also 
treasurer of the fair association and driving 
park. 



§ ALFRED FROSTROM, a prominent 
and widely known farmer, residing in 
Chapman precinct, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, was born in Gothland, an island off 
the mainland of Sweden, and he is a son of J. 
P. and Elizabeth (Donaldson) Frostrom. 

J. P. Frostrom married Miss Donaldson, and 
they had four sons : John, who is married and 
in business at Malmo, Nebraska ; Alfred ; Emil, 
who is a farmer, of Banner county, Nebraska, 
and married Eva Helsing; and Nicholas, also 
a farmer of Banner county, who married Emma 
Swanson. J. P. Frostrom borrowed money, 
with which he bought a ticket to the United 
States. At first he worked on the Union Pa- 
cific Railroad, and in Wyoming, and when he 
had earned enough money to bring his family 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



over he sent them the necessary funds. When 
the family arrived in Omaha, Nebraska, in 
1870, they had but $16, and that was paid to 
Nels Edlund, who hauled them to their present 
farm. Mr. Frostrom in 1869 had homesteaded 
the west half of the northwest quarter of sec- 
tion 4, township 14, range 6, and in the center 
of the farm he built a dug-out 12 by 14 feet in 
size, in which he, his wife and four sons lived. 
As they were unable to get any water there 
the father built in 1872 a frame house on the 
present site, the dimensions of which were 14 
by 20 feet. The road then ran across the cor- 
ner of their farm, and the first barn Mr. Fros- 
trom put up was in the slough near the house, 
and it had a straw roof. In those early days 
four farmers — Jacob Hanson, Hans Jacobson, 
John Larson, and J. P. Frostrom — jointly 
owned an ox team, but later two of them sold 
their interests to the other two, who took turns 
in using the team. J. Alfred Frostrom was 
ten years old, and his brother John was then 
twelve years old, and while one drove the other 
held the plow. The first slips set out were 
Cottonwood, and were obtained at Fremont, 
and the present orchard was set out in 1880. 
They have since put out another orchard, and 
around the house many elm and maple trees 
have been planted. In 1884 a barn 24 by 28 
feet in dimensions was built ; a year later a shed 
14 by 24 feet in size was put up; a corn-crib 
24 by 36 feet was next completed ; a machine 
shed and hog house were built measuring 20 by 
40 feet; then a granary 16 by 16 feet, and a 
blacksmith and repair shops were the latest 
addition. J. P. Frostrom made several pur- 



chases, as follows : In 1877 or 1878 he bought 
the east half of the northeast quarter of sec- 
tion 5, just across the road from his house, this 
last piece having been bought by our subject in 
1897. In 1880 he bought the north half of the 
southwest quarter of section 32, township 15, 
range 6, for which he paid $500. He then 
bought the southeast quarter of the northwest 
quarter of section 32, paying therefor $1,000, 
which shows the land had increased in value 
just four times. The two brothers went to 
Banner county, Nebraska, where they home- 
steaded a farm. J. Alfred Frostrom has re- 
sided on the old homestead for the past twelve 
years, and he cultivates about 280 acres every 
year. No better farm in Saunders county can 
be found than the one owned by him, and he is 
recognized as one of the most progressive and 
up-to-date farmers in this section of the state. 
The subject of this sketch was married in 
1 89 1 to Emma Olson, a daughter of John and 
Martha (Johnson) Olson, a homesteader of 
Mariposa precinct, and they have a daughter, 
Ebba Lillian Alfrieda, born in 1899. John 
Olson, Mrs. Frostrom's father, took up the 
north half of the northwest quarter of section 
8, township 15, range 6, and later bought an 
adjoining 40 acres. He sold his farm in 1890 
to J. Frahm, and then moved to Knox county, 
Nebraska. J. Alfred Frostrom's wife is one of 
a family of twelve children. They are as fol- 
lows: Christine, who died in Sweden; Carl 
Gustaf, a well known minister, of Wausa, Knox 
county, Nebraska, who married Jennie Mon- 
son, and has five children: Avoda, Mauritz, 
Ebba, Carl, and Luther ; Beda, who is the wife 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



of John Eklund, of Knox county, Nebraska, 
has three children, — Effie, Theodore, and Wall- 
fred; Toby, who homesteaded a tract of land 
in Boyd county. South Dakota, and married 
Christine Anderson, by whom he has six chil- 
dren, — Arthur, David, Clarence, Ruth, Reu- 
ben Toby and Richard Willoughby; Emma, 
who is the wife of the subject hereof; Hannie, 
who is the wife of John Frostrom, of Malmo, 
Nebraska, has two children — Edith Antonio 
Cordelia and Clarence Alvin; Albin, who is a 
farmer, of Knox county; Otto, who married 
Ella Sunstrom and is farming in Knox county ; 
Lydia, Tena, and David, who are deceased; 
and Joseph, the youngest, who also lives in 
Knox county, Nebraska. 



I EV. S. G. LARSON, who bears a wide 
reputation as a result of many years' 
active work in the church of God, 
was one of the earliest settlers of Wahoo pre- 
cinct, Saunders county, Nebraska. 

Mr. Larson was born in the Province of Kal- 
mar, Sweden, January 20, 1833, being a son of 
Lars Larson. He attended school in his na- 
tive country until he attained the age of twenty- 
five years, when he came to the United States. 
After studying in Springfield, Illinois, and Chi- 
cago, for three years, he resided in Burlington, 
Iowa, two years, when he moved to Knoxville, 
Illinois, where he remained until November 20, 
1868. He was then sent for by the church at 
Omaha to preach, and in that city he found 
many Swedes who had come to this country 



from Sweden and were in search of homes. He, 
together with two other gentlemen, went to 
Lincoln and looked up land for the home- 
steaders, inspecting Saunders county from one 
end to the other. He located many of the early 
Swedish families in this section, and in 1869 he 
himself took a homestead of 80 acres, — the 
west half of the southeast quarter of section 14, 
— where he is now living. For some time he 
preached in a sod house, and then built a church 
on the northeast corner of section 4, which has 
since been moved to Mead. After a few years 
he was called by the Sycamore, Illinois, congre- 
gation to go east, and most of the time since 
he has been a traveling mission minister. He 
spent five years in Worcester, Massachusetts, 
and about the same time in Kansas City, Mo., 
and Pueblo, Colorado. He is a man of noble 
impulses and a devout Christian, and the vast 
good accomplished in his years of active work 
in the cause of Christianity entitles him to 
spend the sunset of life in retirement. In 1900 
he retired to his homestead and has since given 
his attention to its improvement. He has set 
out shade and fruit trees, and remodeled and 
greatly enlarged his house. He is well known 
throughout this section of the state, and en- 
joys the respect and friendship of every one 
with whom he is acquainted. 

Rev. Mr. Larson was united in marriage 
with Johanna C. Lagerstrom, November 17, 
1 86 1, and nine children were born to them: 
David, of Wahoo; Annie Elizabeth, the wife 
of Rev. Dr. E. Nelander, of California; Sam- 
uel, of Wahoo; Cornelius, who has taken the 
name of Cornelius Lenard, and is a practicing 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



physician of Chicago; Huldah (Lindberg), of 
Pueblo, Colorado; Julia P., a graduated physi- 
cian in California; Theodore, a law student; 
Lydia C, and Amalia, of Lincoln, Nebraska. 



LBERT PARSONS BUTTERFIELD 
is a native of Sarpy county, Nebraska, 
where he is engaged in agricultural 
pursuits in Bellevue precinct, being owner of a 
part of the old homestead settled by his father. 
He is a practical and enterprising farmer, and 
enjoys an enviable reputation among his fel- 
low citizens as a good neighbor and honest 
citizen. 

Charles Emerson Butterfield, father of the 
subject of this article, crossed the Missouri 
River January i, 1853. Locating in Bellevue 
precinct, Sarpy county, he took up 144 acres, 
140 acres of which are in section 10, while the 
remainder is in section 11, township 13, range 
13. He built a log house on the site of our sub- 
ject's present residence, and there lived many 
years ; he also erected a fine barn and a number 
of good out-buildings. Farming was not his 
only occupation; he had, before locating in 
Sarpy county, practiced medicine for many 
years, and he never entirely relinquished his 
professional work, being the first and best phy- 
sician in his community. He was among the 
early settlers who experienced a great deal of 
trouble with the Indians, and afterward with 
"claim jumpers." He lived in a time when he 
had to carry his sack of corn many miles to a 
mill to obtain breadstuff. During the first 



eighteen months he lived in Nebraska he had 
but 40 pounds of flour for his family. He ex- 
perienced many troubles and privations in his 
struggle to hold and develop his farm, but he 
finally managed to forge ahead, and his farm- 
ing operations at last became profitable. After 
a few years travel set in for the West, and Mr. 
Butterfield was among the first to shoulder his 
ox whip and start across the plains with pro- 
visions for the new-comers. He had killed the 
first hogs he had raised on his farm, and cured 
the meat; this pork he sold for 50 cents per 
pound. Much of the land he farmed has since 
been sold to the railroad company, and much 
of it is included in lots that lie within the limits 
of the village of Fort Crook. He planted a 
large grove of walnut trees on his farm, and 
these trees are still bearing. During the early 
Indian wars Mr. Butterfield was a commissary 
sergeant fn the army, and held his post until 
his company (Company D, ist Nebraska Vol- 
unteers) was mustered out of service. During 
the last few years of his career he led a retired 
life, but still lived on the old homestead, where 
his death occurred in 1886 at the age of fifty- 
nine years. In early life he married Isabella 
Stebbens, who now lives in Omaha, and to 
them were born twelve children, as follows: 
Frances C, wife of J. C. Monninger; Sarah 
Jane, deceased, was the wife of Orrin Ed- 
wards; Charles A., a carpenter, wedded Sophia 
Julyan; Albert Parsons, our subject; Carrie I., 
wife of W. W. Wood; George E., who married 
Minuette Stover; Polly A., wife of Henry 
Croft; William W. died in 1888 at the age of 
twenty-one years; Mary H. is a telephone op- 




PAUL ERNEST KOERBER. M. U. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



erator ; Clayton and Clinton, twins, died in their 
infancy; and Orilla May, who is a bookkeeper 
and stenographer. 

Albert Parsons Butterfield was reared to 
farming, and his early education was received 
in the school of district 4 and in Bellevue. He 
learned engineering, which he followed with 
good success fourteen years, the last five years 
of which period being spent with the Omaha & 
Grant Smelting Company at Omaha. As his 
health failed him, he was compelled to seek 
open air exercise, and accordingly went back to 
the homestead and to his old occupation as 
a farmer. His agricultural operations have 
been attended with considerable success ; he has 
raised as much as 80 bushels of corn to the 
acre, and now has a crop of oats that will yield 
60 bushels to the acre. Besides cultivating the 
homestead, he rents an adjoining piece of prop- 
erty and devotes his entire time to farming. 

Mr. Butterfield was married to Margaret 
Ferrill, and has one child, Nora Belle. Since 
the village of Fort Crook was incorporated, he 
has served as a trustee of the village; in 1900 
he assisted in the taking of the United States 
Census, being assigned to his immediate vi- 
cinity. 



sAUL ERNEST KOERBER, M. D. 
The subject of this sketch is descended 
from a line of physicians, reaching 
many generations back. He is a physician of 
eminence as well as an author of considerable 
note. He is a son of Adolph and Paulina 
(Schmidt) Koerber, being the second of a 



family of six children : Adolph, Paul, Arthur, 
Viola, Amanda and Elvira. His father is a 
retired physician and still lives in Stuttgart, 
Germany. 

Dr. Paul. E. Koerber was born in Stuttgart, 
Germany, in 1874. His early education was 
acquired in Stuttgart, where he mastered Latin 
and Greek and laid a good foundation for his 
future studies in botany and chemistry. He 
came to the United States at the age of eighteen 
years, and studied medicine at the University 
of Omaha, where he graduated and received 
his diploma. He then returned to Germany 
to study in the University of Munich, where he 
received his degree. An appointment as assis- 
tant in the university hospital for women, was 
tendered him. The position was accepted and 
filled by him until he returned to the United 
States. 

At the earnest solicitation of the faculty of 
the University of Omaha, Dr. Koerber accepted 
the position of instructor in materia medica. 
But as broader fields opened to him, he resigned 
the position and established an office at Yutan, 
where he has since been practicing his profes- 
sion, and where he owns a drug store. He has 
built up a large and lucrative practice, and has 
the unbounded confidence of the community. 
His skill in surgery is noted throughout the 
country, and his services are in constant de- 
mand. 

Dr. Koerber is the author of several works 
of note, one being a microscopic production re- 
lating to Indian corn which will in future be 
of immense value to the corn planters of Ne- 
braska, as well as those of other states. Po- 



304 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



litically, Dr. Koerber advocates the principles 
of Jackson and Jefferson. He is a member of 
the German Lutheran church, and belongs to 
the A. O. U. W., the Modern Woodmen of 
America, and the Woodmen of the World. A 
portrait of Dr. Koerber, executed from a re- 
cent photograph, is shown on a preceding page. 



fOSEPH B. BARTEK is one of the influ- 
ential and substantial farmers of New- 
man precinct, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, where he has resided since July, 1870. 
He has always taken an active part in the wel- 
fare and upbuilding of his adopted country and 
state, and has an extended acquaintance 
throughout the county. As sheriff he officiated 
one term, and is now serving as assessor of 
Newman precinct, which office he has filled a 
number of times before. He was director of 
school district 98 until he moved to district 74, 
of which he now serves as director. He was 
treasurer of the Weston Catholic church, sec- 
retary of the Weston Catholic Cemetery, and 
is director of the Weston Grain & Stock Com- 
pany. In 1890 he was one of the organizers 
of the first independent Bohemian paper in the 
United States, and helped to make it a success 
and keep up interest in the venture by con- 
tributing many independent articles for the 
publication. Its name, Pritel Lidu, meant "The 
People's Friend." It was originally published 
in Wahoo, Saunders county, but its home is 
now in Wilbert, Nebraska. Mr. Bartek is a 
son of John and Veronika (Plutcnar) Bartek, 



and was born in 1857 in Moravia, in the north- 
eastern part of the section known as Upper 
Becva, Wallashko, Beskydi mountains. 

John Bartek came to the United States in 
July, 1870. He had intended coming to Amer- 
ica in 1867, but had not been able to sell his 
two farms, consisting of 30 "mirs" each, one 
known as "Lucinski" and the other as "Janciko- 
vice," until the summer of 1870. For these 
two farms he received 2,800 "zlatek." He 
then set out to follow his friends who had left 
Bohemia for Iowa and Texas between the years 
1850 and 1870. When he reached Bremen, 
intending to take his passage in a boat to Texas 
from that port, he found that the vessel for 
Galveston, which sailed once in two weeks, had 
departed on the preceding day. He then took 
ship for Baltimore, Maryland, with the inten- 
tion of going from there to Tama county, Iowa. 
After having been on board the boat for nins 
weeks, he met some emigrants who were going 
to Saunders county, Nebraska, knowing that 
there was more government land there to be 
occupied. Once again, to meet the exigencies 
of the moment, he changed his plans, and, with- 
out stopping in Iowa, he traveled direct to 
Saunders county. He crossed the Platte River 
at North Bend in the old ferry that then pro- 
vided transportation across that stream, and 
first stopped with a Mr. Killian. Mr. Bartek 
and his family were the first emigrants from 
Wallashko, Moravia, to settle in this part of 
the state. In July, 1870, Peter Kastl took the 
family and household effects by wagon and 
team to the west half of the northeast quarter 
of section 12, township 14, range 5, which John 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



805 



Bartek homesteaded. In 1872 the east half of 
the northeast quarter of section 12 was home- 
steaded by a Mr. FHnt, who at that time was 
teaching in the old sod house of Mr. Venc, on 
the east half of the southwest quarter of sec- 
tion 12, which served for organizing the first 
school. Later districts were formed, which 
now comprise school districts 68, 74, 98, and 
113. John Bartek's first house, to some ex- 
tent, partook of the nature of a dug-out. As 
he was a carpenter by trade, he cut timber from 
section 4 to use in constructing the frame por- 
tion of his residence. Ash poles were used as 
rafters, and the roof was covered with rails, 
slough grass being utilized to thatch it and ren- 
der it impervious to the rain. Ashes mixed 
with red clay served as a whitewash. As he 
did not have much money he worked out for 
the neighboring farmers, to earn enough money 
to buy windows and boards for a door and nec- 
essary household supplies. After the harvest, 
in which cradle scythes were utilized for cut- 
ting the grain, Mr. Bartek went to Omaha on 
foot, wading the Platte River, and worked on 
the foundations of the Union Pacific Railroad 
bridge on the Missouri River. He also had 
enough left with which to buy two cows, these 
animals also serving as his first team in this 
country. In 1876 he built a log house, which 
still stands, though it is sided over now. He 
also filed the south half of the northwest quar- 
ter of section 12, but this property was later 
homesteaded by Mr. Tomes, who had been a 
near neighbor of his in Wallashko, Moravia. 
As the children were getting to be of good size, 
the two older sons — John, Jr., and Joseph B., 



our subject — were hired out to a Mr. Watson, 
and for their year's work Mr. Bartek received 
a yoke of steers. The larger children, the two 
sons just named, and Mary, since deceased, 
were working out for the Americans in the 
eastern part of the county, in order to gain a 
better command and knowledge of the Eng- 
lisli language. Johp Bartek, our subject's 
father, started a grocery and dry goods store 
in Weston in 1880, and continued in business 
there for a number of years, finally selling his 
stock and the good will of the business to L. 
Larson. He then moved to the farm and lived 
there till his death, which occurred December 
29, 1891. John Bartek, Jr., bought the east 
half of the northeast quarter of section 12, 
which was homesteaded by Mr. Flint, and is 
now farming the same. Mr. and Mrs. Bartek 
had a family of eight children, as follows: 
John, Jr., born in 1855, who lives on the home- 
stead, married Mary Stransky, by whom he 
had eight children, — Edward, John, Victoria, 
Louis, Thomas, Philip, Albert, and Matthew; 
Joseph B., our subject; Mary, deceased ; Frank, 
who married Barbara Simanek, lives in Chap- 
man precinct, Saunders county; Lucas, who 
married Victoria Bartek, lives two and one-half 
miles west of Valparaiso on his 240-acre farm, 
which is part of a ranch of C. Dickson ; Phebe, 
wife of Mr. Kabourek, of Brainard, Nebraska; 
Agnes, wife of Mr. Cech, a farmer, of Wahoo, 
Nebraska; and Veronika, wife of Mr. Tomes, 
a farmer of Weston, Nebraska. 

Joseph B. Bartek, our subject, remained at 
home until 1880, when he came into possession 
of 160 acres in section i. Twenty years ago 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



the farm work was done almost without ma- 
chinery ; the grain was bound by hand, and the 
corn was checked in by hand, the rows being 
marked by a marker, constructed at home, 
which required the skilled work of two men to 
operate. He continued to live there until he 
was elected sheriff of Saunders county in 1891. 
In 1888 he purchased the first 80 acres of his 
present home, which consists of the west half of 
the southwest quarter of section 24, township 
14, range 5, for which he paid $1,000. He 
also purchased the John Jamison ranch, for 
which he paid $3,000, on which he was given 
five years' time, the note drawing interest at the 
rate of seven per cent. Five years later he pur- 
chased an adjoining 80 acres, which makes him 
the owner of 480 acres of land. On the farm 
last purchased by him there was an old house, 
its dimensions being 16 by 32 feet, and this 
makes the two north rooms of his present "fine 
house, completed in 1894, which is a two-story 
dwelling, 36 by 32 feet, having an arched wind- 
cave and brick and stone wall cellar. He has a 
good barn, 32 by 34 by 16 feet, with a good 
basement for his horses, and he also has fine 
out-buildings. His farm is well supplied with 
water, for it is situated near the south branch 
of Wahoo Creek, the banks of which are fringed 
with a heavy growth of oak, elm, walnut, ash, 
willow, Cottonwood and box elder trees, of 
which some are upward of a century old, being 
four feet in diameter. He has also a 30-foot 
well, which is pumped by a large wind mill. 
The fine orchard he set out bears fruit of all 
kinds, and his farm is one of the most im- 
proved in his precinct. He carries on general 



farming and stock raising, and also cultivates 
considerable broom corn and sorghum, manu- 
facturing from the latter in his cane mill sor- 
ghum for his neighbors and himself. 

Mr. Bartek was married in 1880 to Mary 
Kovarik, a daughter of John Kovarik, who 
came from Kameny Masti (Stone Bridge), 
Caslav, Bohemia, and settled in Saunders 
county about 1879, and to this union 
twelve children have been born, as follows: 
Jaroslav, born April 2, 1881 ; Joseph, born Au- 
gust 13, 1882; Charles, born January 7, 1884; 
Josie, born March 16, 1885; Emma, born in 
September, 1886; Frank, born January 20, 
1888; Mary, born in April, 1889; Ralph, born 
March 21, 1890; Henry, born in February, 
1892; Phebe, born March 31, 1895; Millie, 
born August 25, 1897, and Willie, born May 
13, 1899. The two older sons, Jaroslav and 
Joseph, attended the Fremont Normal School 
in 1899, and Jaroslav is now a teacher. It is 
Mr. Bartek's intention to give his children the 
benefit of good educations. 

Our subject was a stanch Democrat in pol- 
itics until 1889, since which date he has favored 
the Populist party. 



EV. JOHN TORELL, pastor of the 
Swedish Lutheran church at Swedes- 
burg, Richland precinct, Saunders 
county, Nebraska, was born in Sweden in 1853. 
His father, Andrew Johnson Torell, was a 
shoemaker by trade, and after coming to Amer- 
ica settled in Oakland, Nebraska. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Mr. Torell's education was commenced in his 
native land and completed after reaching this 
country. He attended Augustana College at 
Rock Island, Illinois, entering the junior class 
in 1875. In ^^77 he graduated from that in- 
stitution. He was immediately sent out to 
build up the Swedish congregations all over 
the state of Nebraska. He was located at Sa- 
ronville for two years, and eight years at Oak- 
land, and made trips to various parts of the 
state, either driving or riding horseback. His 
trips varied from 20 to 92 miles in length. 
He held services either on Sundays or week 
days, preaching the gospel in sod houses, log 
houses or in churches. He was an indefatiga- 
ble worker, and held both day and night serv- 
ices until January i, 1888, when he received a 
call as pastor of the Lutheran church at 
Swedesburg, which pulpit he continues to fill 
up to the present time. 

The Swedish church at Swedesburg was 
established in 1870 by Rev. S. G. Larson, who 
built a small frame church after preaching sev- 
eral years in private houses. In 1887 this 
church was enlarged and a basement was put 
under it. It is now one of the largest and best 
churches in the southern part of the county, 
and has a seating capacity of 338. At first a 
small frame house was erected as a parsonage. 
This was replaced in 1899 by a handsome, 
large, modern residence. The church property 
consists of about 40 acres of land, containing 
fine lawns beautifully shaded with handsome 
trees. Convenient horse sheds have also been 
added. 

Rev. Mr. Larson was succeeded by Rev. L. 



P. Ahlquist, who was succeeded by Rev. F. N. 
Swanburg. The last named was succeeded by 
Rev. Mr. Torell, who has made many additions 
to the church property, and is popular among 
members of his congregation. Rev. John Torell 
was joined in marriage with Anna Hakanson, 
a daughter of John Hakanson, of Edgar, Ne- 
braska. Eight children blessed this union, 
namely: Mary, Althea, Emil, Esther, Edith, 
Judith, Harold, and Gerhard. Mary is de- 
ceased; Althea is a teacher in Swedesburg, 
while Emil is attending college at Rock Island, 
Illinois. 



fOSEPH PTACEK has been a resident 
of Saunders county, Nebraska, since 
1885, when he purchased a part of his 
present farm, which lies in Elk precinct, near 
the Butler county line; he is one of the most 
prosperous and enterprising farmers of his 
community. He was born in Bohemia, De- 
cember 8, 1 85 1, and is a son of Joseph and 
Josephine (Kradlubec) Ptacek. 

The parents of the subject of this sketch came 
to this country in 1869, landing in New York 
City July 10, with all the members of their 
immediate family but one. They settled in 
Cleveland, Ohio, where many of them still re- 
side. The children of the family were as fol- 
lows : Joseph, the subject of this biography; 
Mary, wife of Mr. Ptak, of Cleveland, Ohio; 
Vaclav, who is married, and engaged in farm- 
ing on his property in section 18, township 15, 
range 5 ; Annie (Kovar), who is a widow, and 
lives in Cleveland, Ohio; John, who lives in 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Cleveland, Ohio; Frank, who lives in Okla- 
homa territory; and Anton, who resides in 
Bruno, Nebraska. 

Joseph Ptacek, of whom this sketch treats, 
commenced to learn the bricklayer's trade in 
his native country, and mastered his trade in 
Cleveland, Ohio. He is also a master of the 
clarionette. He resided in that city until 1885, 
when he removed to Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, and from Christian F. Peets bought the 
west half of the southeast quarter of section 
19, township 15, range 5. As there were a 
number of buildings on this property, he at 
once took up his residence there and lived on 
the farm until 1891, when he bought 120 acres 
from Mr. Ptak, 80 acres of which are in the 
northeast quarter of section 19. On this last 
mentioned piece of land he has built his house 
and farm buildings. The purchase price for 
this farm of 120 acres was $20 per acre. In 
1887 Mr. Ptacek bought 40 acres more from 
Mr. Ptak, his brother-in-law, who, with Joseph 
Ptacek, Sr., had bought 200 acres in section 
19 and 160 acres in section 18, which they in 
later years divided. Mr. Ptacek has made 
many improvements upon his farm. He built 
a good frame house ; a barn, 28 by 60 by 16 feet 
in dimensions ; a granary measuring 32 by 24 
by 9 feet, and set out a two-acre orchard. He 
has three good wells, 52, 34 and 10 feet deep, 
respectively, the last mentioned being a spring 
well. A windmill and water tank are also 
features of the place. Mr. Ptacek is interested 
in a new threshing machine. 

Joseph Ptacek was married in Cleveland, 
Ohio, to Anna Cerny, a daughter of John Cer- 



ny. In 1886, the year after Mr. Ptacek located 
in Saunders county, Mrs. Ptacek (Anna 
Cerny) died, after a very short illness, leaving 
to mourn her loss a loving husband and four 
children; namely: Edward, Emma, William, 
and Charles. Charles, the last named, being a 
babe at the time of his mother's death, was 
taken care of during his infancy by his grand- 
mother, Mr. Ptacek's mother. The remains 
of Mrs. Ptacek (Anna Cerny) were laid to rest 
in the Plasi cemetery. The eldest of the four 
children, Edward, upon coming to manhood's 
estate, married Martha Rosentrater, and has 
one child, Edward, Jr. In 1887 Mr. Ptacek, 
the subject of this sketch, married Anna Jel- 
inck, of Saunders county, Nebraska, and the 
fruits of their marriage have been three sons 
and two daughters, namely: John; Frank; 
Joseph, Jr. ; Mary, deceased ; and Ludmila. 
Mr. Ptacek, with his family, attends the Cath- 
olic church of Plasi, Saunders county. He is 
treasurer of his school district, and takes a 
prominent part in advancing the welfare and 
growth of his county and home vicinity. 



§OHN HALLNER, who located in Wa- 
hoo procinct, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, in 1870, began in a small way as 
a farmer and blacksmith, won his way to the 
front rank among the leading agriculturists of 
the county, and is now living in practical re- 
tirement. 

Mr. Hallner was born in Sweden, in 1820, 
and is a son of Andrew Olofson, who was a 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



blacksmith by trade. The subject hereof learned 
the trade of a blacksmith and followed it with 
his father, until 1863, when he came to the 
United States. He was located in Iowa for 
one and a half years, and then in Minnesota, 
where he lived until 1870, when he removed 
to Nebraska. He homesteaded the east half of 
the southwest quarter of section 10, in Wahoo 
precinct, Saunders county, and built a sod 
house. He possessed about ten dollars' worth 
of tools, and there he set up a general black- 
smithing and wagon repairing business in 
addition to farming. He later built a frame 
house, with dimensions of 14 by 14 feet, and 
his children assisted him in his farm work. 
He has always followed his trade as a black- 
smith, and today may still be found in his 
little shop upon his property. He is of an in- 
ventive turn of mind and has patented two 
monkey wrenches, and two kinds of barbed 
wire, one yielding him returns amounting to 
$5,000 and the other $20,000. He has erected 
a very handsome residence, and good farm 
buildings, and set out large orchards, shade 
trees and evergreens. He subsequently pur- 
chased 160 acres in section 3, and one half of 
section 15, which he has divided among his chil- 
dren, all of whom are good business men and 
prosperous citizens. 

Mr. Hallner was united in marriage with 
Johanna Erickson while in Sweden, and they 
became parents of the following children: 
Rev. Andrew, a missionary who lives at Kings- 
burg, Fresno county, California, where he owns 
a large fruit farm, married Ida Norman, and 
has the following children, — Anna E., Samuel 



(deceased), Esther I., Judith, Joseph (de- 
ceased), David (deceased), Emanuel, Reuben, 
Elvira (deceased), Agnes and Mabel O. ; 
Mary (deceased), who married John Smith, 
by whom she had six children, — John E., Annie 
D. (deceased), A. Cornelius, David S., Carl 
A. and O. Victoria; Hannah E., who married 
Samuel Rylen,and has three children, — Hann 
E., Carl I. and Joseph N. ; August, who lives 
upon the home farm and is engaged in general 
farming and stock raising; Carl, who resides 
at home, and is traveling agent for the Min- 
nesota Chief Threshing Company; Christine, 
who lives at home; and John, who owns one 
of his father's old farms, and married Anna 
Marie Carlson. The subject of this sketch has 
served as a member of the school board for 
a number of years. In religious faith and fel- 
lowship, he is a Lutheran. In politics he is a 
Populist. 



m 



N. BECKER, Jr., editor and pro- 
prietor of the "Ashland Gazette," 

was born April 16, 1852, in the 
town of Sharon, near Sharon Springs, Scho- 
harie county. New York. In descent he comes 
from the original Dutch settlers who peopled 
the Schoharie and Mohawk valleys ; the earliest 
founder of the family having been Cornelius 
Becker, who settled early in the 17th century 
near where Troy, New York, now stands. 
His father, W. N. Becker, Sr., was a successful 
business man for years, well known in Scho- 
harie and Montgomery counties. New York, 
and later in western Iowa. He died in Mead, 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Nebraska, in 1891. When our subject was two 
years of age he moved with his father's family 
to Esperance, Schoharie county, remaining there 
until he was fourteen years of age, when the 
family moved to the town of Glen, Montgom- 
ery county, New York. One year later his 
father, W. N. Becker, Sr., moved to Burton- 
ville, where he engaged in the general mer- 
chandise business, continuing to be thus oc- 
cupied for four years, the subject of this sketch 
acting as salesman. While a resident of Bur- 
tonville, in 1872, our subject was married to 
Amanda Patterson. In 1875, with his father, 
he moved to West Side, Iowa, where he clerked 
for several years, afterward engaging in the 
job printing business. 

In 1879 W. N. Becker, Jr., located at Mead, 
Saunders county, Nebraska, engaging in the 
general merchandise business in partnership 
with his father, under the firm name of W. N. 
Becker & Son, remaining in that connection 
two years. In 1881, he returned to Iowa, 
and founded the "West Side Dispatch," which 
was continued for four years, when it was 
merged with the "Denison Review," its editor 
returning to Mead to re-engage in the general 
merchandise business, and also establishing the 
"Mead Advocate," in partnership with Peter 
Anderson. In one year from that time his place 
of business and the "Advocate" plant were 
destroyed by fire. Rebuilding his store, he 
continued in the mercantile business until 1889, 
when his store was again destroyed by fire. 

In 1892, the subject of this sketch located 
in Ashland, purchasing the "Ashland Gazette," 
and has continued the publication of that paper. 



He is also quite extensively interested in farm- 
ing, owning three farms in the vicinity of Ash- 
land that he rents. Mr. Becker received his 
education only in the common schools. He 
received a license as a lay preacher in 1878, 
from the Iowa state convention of Universal- 
ists, and under the authority of that denomina- 
tion preached for a number of years in western 
Iowa and eastern Nebraska. He takes a great 
deal of interest in philanthropic and humani- 
tarian work, especially in the Knights of 
Pythias, being chancellor commander of Star 
Lodge, No. 9, of Ashland, Nebraska. 



fOSEPH B. LA CHAPELLE, the popu- 
lar editor of the Saunders County 
Journal, is a highly esteemed resident 
of Ashland, Nebraska. The "Saunders County 
Journal" is one of the brightest papers pub- 
lished in southeastern Nebraska, and is a thor- 
oughly Populist organ. It is a seven-column, 
eight-page, spicy publication, and started with 
a circulation of 700, which has now swelled to 
over 900. 

Mr. LaChapelle was born in St. Albans, Ver- 
mont, December 30, i860. His father, E. La- 
Chapelle, was a native of Paris, France, and at 
the age of sixteen years, having moved to Can- 
ada, served in the War of 1837, which threat- 
ened to overthrow existing conditions in Can- 
ada. He was a cabinet maker by trade. Later 
in life he moved from Canada to the United 
States, settling in Vermont, where he followed 
agricultural pursuits for many years. He sub- 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



sequently moved to Rhode Island, where he 
now lives in retirement. 

Joseph B. LaChapelle was educated in the 
high schools of New England. After his 
graduation he came west to Omaha, Nebraska, 
in 1878, and in 1880 started in that city the 
"Saturday Evening Times." Later, with C. 
T. Bunce he established the"Saturday Budget" 
in Omaha. Some time afterward he sold his 
interests, and moved to Glenwood, Iowa, where 
for some twelve years he ran the "Mills County 
Journal." He also conducted the "Fremont 
County Journal," the "Fremont Courier," the 
"Daily Evening Times," and a number of pa- 
pers in Iowa. At one time he was city editor 
for Charles Collins on the "Sioux City Daily 
Times." His next newspaper venture was to 
establish the "Saunders County Journal," at 
Ashland, Saunders county, Nebraska, which 
paper he still edits. 

Mr. LaChapelle married Rose Lyon, of Glen- 
wood, Iowa, July 2, 1885, and they have two 
children : Robert L. and Harold L. The sub- 
ject of this writing is a thorough journalist 
and is very popular throughout the county. 



-p^^RANK HAKEL. While the race is 
R] not always to the swift, nor the battle 
to the strong, yet the law of destiny 
rarely fails to accord a successful career to a 
man of energy, industry and sterling ability. 
Toil begun in early youth seldom fails of its 
due reward, for "in the sweat of thy brow 
shalt thou earn thy daily bread." 

Frank Hakel was born in Hennersdorf, near 



Hohenelbe, Bohemia, March 3, 1865; there 
were five other children in the family, of whom 
all died in infancy, except a sister, Marie (Me- 
duna), who resides on a farm near Weston, 
Saunders county, Nebraska. His father was 
born April 7, 1839, in Hennersdorf; while 
hunting on his farm near Weston, he was 
accidentally shot close by his sod house (the 
oldest in his section of the county), and died 
March 12, 1900. Anna (Scharf) Hakel, the 
mother of our subject, was born October 11, 
1839, in Hennersdorf, Bohemia, cmd was mar- 
ried to Wenzel Hakel, our subject's father, in 
1862; she is now living in Weston. Both 
Wenzel Hakel and his wife were educated in 
the German schools. Wenzel Hakel was a 
butcher by occupation, but for a number of 
years before coming to this country he was 
engaged in weaving fine linens, towels, hand- 
kerchiefs, etc., which occupation he found quite 
profitable; the work was done by hand, and 
several men were employed to assist in the 
weaving, and these had to be supplied with 
filled spools for shuttles. At the age of five 
years, Frank Hakel commenced to assist in 
the work by filling the spools for the weav- 
ers. From that time on he was busied at that 
work, and in attending school, which was in 
the German language. In his thirteenth year 
he passed a very satisfactory examination in 
the highest grade of the village school, and 
was excused from further obligatory school at- 
tendance when he was fourteen. In August, 
1878, he chose to learn the cabinet-maker's 
trade, which he determined to follow as his 
life work. 



312 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



On April 28, 1880, with His father and 
mother and sister, Marie (now Mrs. Meduna), 
Frank Hakel set out from Bohemia for the 
United States, the reason for such a journey 
being contained in their belief that they could 
make an easier living in the new world than 
they had been accustomed to. On the 2d 
of May the family went on board the steamer 
"Salier" at Bremen; the voyage for a few days 
was very pleasant, and then all began to be 
seasick; finally the vessel ran aground on a 
reef one night and everyone thought that their 
last hour had come, but in the morning a 
start was made and New York City was at 
length reached on May 15. On the 17th of 
the month they arrived in Chicago, and a 
day later saw them in Wahoo, Saunders coun- 
ty, Nebraska. From there they were taken 
to some of their old-country neighbors, who 
had sod houses for homes. The wheat, which 
had been sown, had been carried with the soil 
by the wind over the country and piled up in 
drifts in sheltered places, just as if it had been 
snow. Many acres of the unbroken prairie 
had small drifts of wheat and soil of this na- 
ture, and the scene was one never to be for- 
gotten. In locating, our subject's father bought 
80 acres of land of Frank Klimerit, on which 
one payment was made. Funds were getting 
low, so Frank Hakel, though only fifteen years 
old, at once assumed a place as a man in the 
domestic economy of the home and assisted 
all in his power to help provide the family 
with the necessaries of life. The first car- 
penter work he did in Weston was in the erec- 
tion of the first dwelling built on the south side 



of the railroad track; he also did other jobs 
of carpenter work, such as roofs and the frames 
for sod houses. Later on he secured employ- 
ment in cutting broom corn. After several 
weeks of work he and his father had earned 
enough to make another small payment on their 
farm. Late in the fall, when they began corn 
picking, they experienced the hardest work of 
any they had attempted. The snow fell early 
and the corn had to be husked on the ground ; 
as a team could not be obtained and the weath- 
er continued very cold and severe, the wages 
paid up to Christmas were 50 cents per day, 
without board. Toward the close of the year 
the weather became very stormy, and the snow 
fell in great quantities, so that in drifts it was 
as much as 20 feet deep in places ; the country 
had an unusually level appearance. People had 
all they could do to keep warm, for fuel was 
very scarce; coal was hard to get, and very 
little Avood was used, many keeping warm as 
best they could with fires of corn and corn- 
stalks and tall, heavy weeds. Oxen, instead of 
horses, were used for the farm work and in 
hauling. During January and February, 
i88r, as there was no work that could be done 
then, the subject of this writing attended school, 
in order to become familiar with the English 
language and with the American system of 
education. For three months in the spring 
of 1 88 1 he worked on a nearby farm for $9 
per month ; it was not much, but his parents 
made good use of it in those hard times. 

After working through most of the harvest- 
ing and haying season, R. H. Thomas, a popu- 
lar merchant of Weston, called on him to assist 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



in erecting an addition to his store building; 
when the carpenter work was about completed 
Mr. Thomas offered to engage him as a clerk 
in the store. This proposition was accepted 
without delay, and led to his career as a mer- 
chant. While working for Mr. Thomas his 
wages were gradually increased every year, 
without special requests for such action. All 
of his earnings were turned over to his pa- 
rents, and with these savings a team and farm 
implements were bought, and-payments on the 
land were made. The mutual confidence that 
existed between employer and clerk induced 
Mr. Thomas to take Frank into partnership 
with him, in 1886, thus changing the firm 
name to Thomas & Hakel. This occurred 
when our subject was twenty-one years of age. 
Soon after Mr. Thomas moved to Ogallala, 
Keith county, Nebraska, being successful in his 
search for a new location. This left Mr, Hakel 
to look after all the interests of the firm in 
Weston; his management of the business was 
very successful and satisfactory to both parties 
concerned. In 1890 the partnership was dis- 
continued and the stock divided, Mr. Hakel 
still continuing in business in Weston, and 
Mr. Thomas moving his goods to a new loca- 
tion. Our subject remained in the original 
store structure, purchasing Mr. Thomas' share 
in the building; in 1891 he erected a new two- 
story frame building, which is now occupied 
by a large and complete stock of general mer- 
chandise that is a credit to the town and the 
wiiole surrounding vicinity. In 1892 he em- 
ployed seven clerks, and the total sales for 
the year reached nearly $50,000. Four years 



later dry weather and hot winds made the 
crops very short, which with the money panic 
of 1896 caused a depression in business that 
continued for three or four years. When the 
times improved, business enterprises revived 
again. 

Frank Hakel was married July 7, 1886, to 
Anna Novak, being the second couple to be 
married in the new Catholic church in Weston, 
which was built in 1885. Mrs. Hakel was 
born August 4, 1865, and is a daughter of 
John V. Novak, who died Sept. 30, 1899. 
John V. Novak, and his wife, who died De- 
cember 7, 1877, were among the oldest of the 
Bohemian settlers of Saunders county; Mrs. 
Novak left four small children at her deatli. 
The matrimonial life of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Hakel has been blessed by the birth of two 
children — Freddie, born July 20, 1891, and 
Gertrude, born March 4, 1895. The home is 
a very happy one indeed. Our subject is ar- 
ranging to have his son and daughter educated, 
so that they will follow in the footsteps of their 
parents, and make good, clean records for 
themselves. He is now the pioneer of the busi- 
ness men of Weston, with his hair already 
turning gray, although he is only thirty-five 
years old, and nothing could please him and 
his wife more than to see their hopes and wishes 
in respect to the children gratified. Besides 
his linguistic acquirements — he has a perfect 
knowledge of the Bohemian, German and Eug- 
lish languages — he has excellent business qual- 
ifications and an energy that never tires ; these 
characteristics have enabled him to achieve the 
brilliant success that is his. Adhering sincere- 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



ly to the faith of the Roman Catholic church, 
he is one of the most prominent and generous 
members of St. John's CathoHc church at Wes- 
ton, and a member of the CathoHc Workmen. 
He ranks high in social circles and is greatly 
esteemed in the whole community as a man of 
standing and strict integrity. 



§OHN N. MILLER, a retired farmer of 
Ashland, Saunders county, Nebraska, 
is an esteemed and respected resident 
of that city, and ranks among the self-made 
men of today. Mr. Miller was born in Kos- 
ciusko county, Indiana, in 184 1. He is a son 
of James and Mary (Baker) Miller. 

James Miller was born in Lancaster county, 
Ohio, where he followed farming until early 
in the "sixties." He then went to Minnesota, 
and was one of the pioneer farmers of that 
state. As one of his sons had located in Nebras- 
ka, Mr. Miller was induced to leave Minnesota 
and go there also. In 1870 he took up a home- 
stead adjoining that of his son Charles in Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska. The trip overland was 
made in a covered wagon drawn by a team of 
oxen. Later the elder Mr. Miller sold his 
claim to his son and purchased the William 
Lawson claim, where he lived up to the time 
of his death, in 1887, at the age of seventy- 
one years. Together he and his wife improved 
their farm. They built a handsome residence, 
barns, and other buildings, and set out a great 
many shade and fruit trees. This farm is 
still owned by John N. Miller's mother, who 



is still living. She resides in Ashland in her 
own house, close to that of her son, Charles, 
and is now more than eighty years old. Her 
maiden name was Mary Baker. She is a 
daughter of Jacob Baker, of Johnstown, Lick- 
ing county, Ohio. Ten children were born to 
her and her husband, as follows : Enos, who 
died in infancy; John N., the subject of this 
biography; Enoch, deceased; Charles, a res- 
ident of Ashland; Elijah, deceased ; Jemima, 
wife of Samuel Merriman; Mary, wife of 
George Herron; Oliver, deceased; Rohama, 
and Tina, wife of L. T. Farmer. The parents of 
these children were devout members of the Bap- 
tist church. 

John N. Miller was reared to farm life. In 
1864 he enlisted in Company B, 7th Reg. Min- 
nesota Vol. Inf., and served until the success- 
ful termination of the Civil War. In 1876 he 
decide4 to go to Nebraska, where his father 
and brother Charles had found a beautiful 
country, free to those who chose the oppor- 
tunity. He married Maranda La Barre, a 
daughter of John La Barre, of Olmsted coun- 
ty, Minnesota. This lady possessed rare cour- 
age and was willing to leave home and friends 
and seek a home with her husband in Nebraska. 
Together they went to establish this home, 
promising to the eye, but where hardships and 
privations awaited them. They purchased 
Union Pacific Railroad land for a trifling sum 
of money, and settled on section 15, township 
13. range 8, in Green precinct, Saunders coun- 
ty, Nebraska. This land was a bare rolling 
prairie, with only a few small berry bushes 
along a creek. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



315 



Mr. Miller built a small house, in size 20 
by 16 feet and 8 feet high. He had 160 acres 
of land which he proceeded to cultivate. In a 
comparatively short time Mr. Miller had won 
for himself a prominent place among the pro- 
gressive farmers of Saunders county. He en- 
larged the house and built better barns and 
buildings. His first barn was a small one, 14 
by 16 feet in dimensions. He also set out a 
fine orchard of 260 trees, besides groves, 
hedges, etc. 

Mr. Miller devoted much time and attention 
to stock raising. He started with only one or 
two cows and increased the number to 130 
head of cattle — raising all his own stock. He 
purchased 40 acres of land adjoining his home- 
stead property, and later added 120 acres to it. 
This latter tract was bought from the U. P. 
R. R. Company by Alfred Eyre. In addition 
to this Mr. Miller purchased 40 acres of bot- 
tom land. In 1892 he decided to retire from 
the farm, that he and his wife might spend 
a few years in comfort and ease. He rented 
his farm and purchased land in Ashland, upon 
which he built the handsome modern residence 
in which he now lives. Three children were 
born to him and his wife, namely: Wealthy, 
Jesse, and Ira. The eldest child died at the 
early age of two years. Jesse married Zella 
Hoffman, and resides in Ashland, while Ira is 
still at home. 

Mr. Miller began his political career as a 
Democrat, but later voted the Republican 
ticket, and has supported it ever since. He is 
not a member of any church. Fraternally he 
affiliates with Lodge No. 1 10, F. & A. M., of 



Ashland, of which he is past master. He is 
also a member of G. A. R., Post No. 31. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller have a wide circle of 
acquaintances and friends and enjoy the esteem 
of all. 



fOHN THEEDE, a gentleman engaged 
in agricultural pursuits in a practical 
and successful manner, is well and fa- 
vorably known in Mariposa precinct, Saunders 
county, Nebraska, where he owns about 200 
acres of highly improved farm land. 

Mr. Theede was born in Gerrnany, in 1865, 
and is a son of Jurgen and Anna (Cook) 
Theede, his father being a carpenter by trade. 
The family came to America, in 1873, locating 
in Illinois, where his mother soon afterward 
died. He has two brothers and two sisters; 
the brothers being Henry, who married Minna 
Anthony, and lives on a farm adjoining that 
of John Theede, and who has two children — 
August and Landy ; and Gustav, who married 
Ann Mohr, a daughter of J. M. Mohr. The 
sisters are : Emma, wife of Fred Amhke, who 
resides in Fremont, Nebraska, and has five 
children — Esty, Linda, Otto, Fred and an 
infant; and Anna, wife of William Silk, who 
lives in Grant Park, Illinois. John Theede also 
has a half brother, Claus, who lives in Fremont, 
Nebraska. In 1876, Jurgen Theede, with his 
then young boys, came to Saunders county, 
Nebraska, and bought railroad land in Mari- 
posa precinct, at $5 per acre, acquiring the west 
half of the southeast quarter of section 9, town- 
ship 15, range 6, and the southeast quarter 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



of the southwest quarter of section 9. Owing 
to the prevalence of grasshoppers and the 
drouth, he, Hke many others, lost his land, but 
with firm faith in his ability to eventually 
succeed, and with a perseverance that must 
be admired, he determined to try again. He 
again purchased the same land, in 1879, under a 
new contract, and immediately built a small 
house, with dimensions of 14 by 16 feet, to 
which he added an L in 1887 — the dimen- 
sions being 16 by 24 feet. He had a frame 
shanty for his horses, but subsequently built a 
barn, 32 by 40 feet in size, and still later, added 
a shed to the north side of it. In 1885, he set 
out a fine grove of about two acres, which is 
now in excellent condition. Mr. Theede 
started an orchard in front of the house in 
1882, and has always cared for it himself, rais- 
ing fruits of all kinds. He was particularly 
successful with his peach trees, which he kept 
from freezing, by surrounding and wrapping 
each one with straw — building racks around 
them to keep the straw from being blown away. 
Mr. Theede began in Saunders county, with 
only $5, but at the time of his death, 
in 1889, he was one of the most prosperous 
men in the community. He left no will, and 
the three brothers conducted the farm together 
until 1894, when the property was divided by 
the court — ^John Theede retaining the home 
property. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
schools of Germany before coming to this coun- 
try, and is now a well-read man. He has shown 
good business ability in the management of his 
affairs, and is among the best known of the 



younger class of farmers, in this region. He 
keeps about 200 hogs, 33 head of cattle, and 
enough bees to supply honey for his family's 
use. His' farm is in excellent condition, in 
every respect, and is supplied with an artesian 
well which fills tanks for the stock. Mr. 
Theede was united in matrimony with Miss 
Tassar, and they have five children (who are 
at home and attending school), as follows: 
Henry, John, Mamie, Annie and George. 
Politically, Mr. Theede is a sturdy Republican. 



T^HARLES F. SHEPARD, a well known 
I Jj citizen of Ashland, Saunders county, Ne- 

^■^ ' braska, holds the responsible position 

of roadmaster on the Burlington & Missouri 
River Railroad. 

Mr. Shepard was born in Ashtabula town- 
ship, Ashtabula county, Ohio, February 22, 
1846, and is a son of Captain Charles and 
Plancy (Gifford) Shepard. Peleti^h Shepard, 
the grandfather of Charles F., came from 
Connecticut, and settled in Ashtabula, Ohio, 
in March, 1808. He, together with Anan Har- 
mon, built and equipped the first vessel, the 
"Tempest," at Ashtabula, all of his sons assist- 
ing in the work. He was a sailor all of his life. 

Captain Charles Shepard was born in May, 
1808, being the second white child born in the 
township of Ashtabula, and was the third of 
twelve children — eight sons and four daugh- 
ters. All of the sons became sailors, command- 
ing lake crafts, except George, who, when a 
young man, was drowned from the schooner 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



"Parrott," oft" Ashtabula, in 1835. At the age 
of nineteen years Charles Shepard shipped 
aboard the schooner "Columbus," at Ashtabula, 
and thus commenced- his career as a sailor, 
which extended over a period of thirty years 
during the season of navigation. His industry, 
honesty and good judgment soon secured pro- 
motion for him early in his career, and he was 
placed in command of the schooner "Geauga," 
of Fairport. He was subsequently master of 
the "Atlas," "Reindeer," "Antelope," and mate 
on the steamer "Robert Fulton." He com- 
manded the following schooners: "Atlanta," 
"Huron," "President," "Windham" and "Phi- 
lena Mills." He was then mate, one sea- 
son, on the "Cleveland," after which he 
was captain of the schooner "Raleigh," 
which marked the end of his career on 
the water. During this long period he was 
remarkably fortunate in that he never lost a ves- 
sel or met with a serious mishap, although he 
encountered storms, and met with difficulties 
incident to the early navigation of the lakes 
with inferior craft. In all this time there was 
but one life lost aboard his boats, that of Will- 
iam Shears. In 1852, Captain Shepard left the 
deck, and bought a farm overlooking the beau- 
tiful lake on which his life had been spent. 
There he followed farming until 1866, when 
he received a paralytic stroke. He then moved 
to the city of Geneva, where he died on January 
29, 1872. His wife, who was born in 18 18, died 
in 1882. Their children were as follows: 
Albion E., who owns a large sheep ranch in 
Texas; Isadore M., deceased; Benjamin G., 
living in Ashtabula; and Charles F. 



Charles F. Shepard was reared and schooled 
in Ashtabula township, and assisted on his 
father's farm until January, 1864, when he en- 
listed in the 2d Battery Ohio Light Artillery, 
and served until the close of the war, mostly on 
the Red River Expedition and on Ship Island, 
as guard of the rebel prisoners. He returned 
home at the close of the war, and went on the 
lakes as a sailor before the mast. After a period 
of two years, he left the lakes. He came west, 
in 1867, having married the preceding year 
Susan H. Ballou, a daughter of Emor S. and 
Susan (Van Buren) Ballou, her father also 
being one of the early settlers of Saunders 
county. Mr. Shepard located in Green pre- 
cinct, Saunders county, and then returned for 
his wife, at the same time inducing her father 
to come back with them. They shipped their 
goods to Council Bluffs by railroad, and then 
Mr. Shepard, with a team belonging to his 
wife's father, started with what goods he could 
take, but owing to high water and ice, he only 
got across the Platte River. Learning of the 
condition of affairs at the landing, he and his 
wife left their belongings and walked to their 
new home. It was about seven miles to the 
new Ohio settlement, and there they stopped 
with Mr. Woodbury until Mr. Shepard cut 
trees, hauled them to Ashland (then called 
Saline Ford), had them sawed and constructed 
a rude house. He had a farm of 80 acres 
in section 22, township 13, range 8, Green 
precinct, now owned by Mrs. Moon. After 
cultivating the farm for two years, during 
which time he broke the sod for his neighbors 
in order to get money to live on, he went to 



318 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



work with a shovel, in the spring of 1870, on 
the BurHngton & Missouri River Railroad, 
which was being constructed through that part 
of the county. On August i, 1870, he was 
made section foreman at Waverly, Nebraska, 
and continued thus for five years. After this, 
he ran a construction train on the Eastern 
Division, .from Plattsmouth to Omaha, and to 
Lincoln, until the spring of 1886. He was 
then promoted to be roadmaster for the 
division, from Grand Island to Alliance, Ne- 
braska, a distance of 287 miles, and he lived 
at Ravenna, Nebraska, until July 4, 1890. He 
was then transferred to Ashland, and has the 
division from Lincoln to Schuyler and Colum- 
bus, a distance of 125 miles, with offices at 
Ashland and Lincoln. He has been entirely 
successful in his work, and stands high in the 
esteem of the officials of the road. He owns 
160 acres of land in Hayes county, Nebraska, 
which he rents, and his wife inherited 40 acres 
of her father, it being located in the village. 
In 1892, he erected the handsome residence in 
which he now resides. 

Mr. Shepard and his wife are the parents 
of five children, as follows : Martin E., a con- 
ductor on the Burlington & Missouri River 
Railroad, who married Anna Weythman, by 
whom he has three children, — Pardon B., Er- 
nest W. and Cecil C. ; Charles Ernest, also a 
conductor on the Burlington & Missouri River 
Railroad, who married Irene Ong, by whom 
he has a son, Charles F. ; Susie H., who is the 
wife of D. F. Clark, a freight agent; Pardon 
B., a brakeman, who married Jennie M. Stew- 
art, and has one son, Pardon S. ; and Etta M., 



who married V. A. Clark, their only child, Susie 
P., being deceased. Politically, the subject of 
this sketch is a Cleveland Democrat. In a re- 
ligious connection, he adheres to the faith of 
the Baptist church. Fraternally, he is a member 
of the A. O. U. W. and the G. A. R. 



T-^HOMAS KNIGHT CHAMBER- 
LAIN, a gentleman who for many years 
pursued that independent calling, farm- 
ing, in Clear Creek precinct, Saunders county, 
Nebraska, where he was one of the earliest 
settlers, has been living a retired life, since 
1890. 

Mr. Chamberlain comes of good old New 
England stock, born in Topsham, Vermont, 
in 1833, and is a son of James and Hannah 
(Scribner) Chamberlain. He was reared upon 
his father's farm, one of the finest in that part 
of the state. At about the time he reached 
manhood, some of the most enterprising and 
far sighted citizens of the vicinity were discus- 
sing the advisability of locating in the West, 
and growing up with the then new country. 
He was much taken with the idea, and ques- 
tioned many of his friends who had seen the 
country, and pursuant to their advice, he came 
to Nebraska territory, then a wild and rolling 
prairie. In 1857, he pre-empted a claim of 
80 acres in section 18, and another one in 
section 19, in what is now Clear Creek pre- 
cinct. He built a small house and tilled about 
40 acres of land. In 1859 he went to Colorado, 
where he spent nine years, engaged in cattle 




IKS. loHN STKNniK am. lAMIl.N 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



raising and identified with mining interests. 
His business on the ranch prospered, and upon 
selHng out and returning to Nebraska, he pur- 
chased the tract of 320 acres on which he 
now Hves. He built a house and set out trees 
from the seed, sowing cottonwoods, some of 
which now measure over nine feet in circum- 
ference. He has a fine variety of shade and 
fruit trees, and has erected good, substantial 
farm buildings. 

His land is as good in quality as any in 
the county, and he devoted his efforts to rais- 
ing grain and stock, until 1890, since which 
time he has lived in retirement. After his many 
years of active work, Mr. Chamberlain is now 
enabled to enjoy the sunset of life in the man- 
ner he choses. He occupies much of his time 
in travel, spending the winter months in south- 
ern California. He is a man of high character, 
takes an earnest interest in public affairs, and 
enjoys the respect and friendship of all with 
whom he is acquainted. 

Mr. Chamberlain was united in marriage 
with Hattie Bowley, a daughter of Jacob Bow- 
ley, who was a resident of Vermont. She de- 
parted this life in 1881, leaving one daughter, 
Isabelle. Politically, the subject of this sketch 
is a stanch adherent of the principles of the 
Republican party. He is liberal in his religious 



fOHN STENDER is one of the repre- 
sentative farmers of Richland precinct, 
Sarpy county, Nebraska. Beginning at 
the bottom, he applied himself to his work with 



great diligence and, solely through his own 
individual efforts, grew to be one of the pros- 
perous men of his community. 

Mr. Stender was born in Germany in 1844, 
and is a son of Frederick and Fredericka 
(Hein) Stender. He was reared in that 
country, where he learned the trade of a shoe- 
maker, at an early age, and in 1869, came to 
the United States. He located at Omaha, Ne- 
braska, where he followed his trade one year, 
and then worked out for a like period, as a 
farm hand. After his marriage, he rented a 
farm until 1875, when he purchased his present 
farm of 160 acres of wild prairie, in 
section 35, Richland precinct, Sarpy county. 
He built a small house, which he has 
since greatly enlarged, and set out a grove con- 
sisting of cottonwoods, maples, box elders and 
walnuts ; some of these trees have grown up to 
be two feet in diameter. Mr. Stender also has 
an excellent orchard of three acres, of all kinds 
of fruit. The land is under a high state of cul- 
tivation, and has yielded as much as 60 
bushels of corn, 22 bushels of wheat, 
and 35 bushels of oats, to the acre. He 
has erected a roomy barn, corn crib, and other 
desirable outbuildings, and everything about 
the place bears an air of that prosperity, which 
comes of hard work and careful management. 
He has his farm well stocked with Holstein 
cattle, and horses and hogs of high grade. By 
his hard labor and constant exposure to all 
kinds of weather, he contracted the rheumatism, 
and although it causes him considerable trou- 
ble, he is able to oversee the affairs of the farm. 
Mr. Stender was first united in marriage with 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



Mattie Brock, a daughter of Hans Brock, an 
early settler of Sarpy county. She died at the 
early age of twenty-two years, leaving one son, 
Fred, who lives at home and assists in the work 
on the farm. His second matrimonial alliance 
was with Sophia Lupteen, a daughter of Peter 
Lupteen, and she died in 1891, aged thirty- 
seven years. By this union, he had five chil- 
dren : William, who manages the affairs of the 
farm; Ella, Agnes, John, and a son who died 
in infancy. Mr. Stender served several terms 
as school trustee, on the school board, and as 
road supervisor. A picture of Mr. Stender and 
his family, as it was constituted a number of 
years ago, is shown on a preceding page. 



fACOB FACKLER is a pioneer settler of 
Sarpy county, Nebraska, where he still 
owns considerable farming land; after 
many years of unremitting toil in the occupa- 
tion of a husbandman and a stock raiser, he suc- 
ceeded in accumulating a comfortable compe- 
tency, upon which he is now living in retire- 
ment. He is a typical self-made man, and 
has many friends throughout the county, who 
know him to be an honest and upright citizen, 
whose word is always as good as his bond. He 
was born in Miami county, Ohio, July 18, 1825, 
and is a son of Valentine and Elizabeth (Mill- 
er) Fackler. 

The subject of this writing was practically 
reared in Iowa, for in 1836 his parents moved 
there from Ohio, settling on a farm in Louisa 
county, near the mouth of the Iowa River. 



About two years later they moved to Johnson 
county, Iowa, where Jacob Fackler lived until 
he went to Nebraska, during which time he 
assisted his father in farming and followed his 
trade as a carpenter. In 1855 he purchased 80 
acres of land and two good steers, for which he 
was to pay $100. By hard and steady work he 
succeeded in paying for both. He continued 
farming in Iowa until 1858, when he sold his 
place, and on April 17 of that year started to 
drive to Sarpy county, Nebraska, where he 
arrived on the 8th of May. He first stayed 
with Charles Wilson, who owned a farm in 
township 13, range 11. In a short time he took 
his family to Sarpy county, his family then con- 
sisting of his wife and three children. He 
brought with him to Nebraska a Black Hawk 
warrant, which he secured in Iowa from Mrs. 
Kester, a widow of a soldier of the Black Hawk 
War. From the government Mr. Fackler pur- 
chased 120 acres of land at $1.25 per acre, the 
land being situated in the southwest quarter of 
section 34, township 13, range 1 1. During the 
first summer ihe subject hereof lived on the 
Boyer farm, a mile and a half distant from his 
property. With the coming on of winter he 
returned with his family to Iowa, where another 
child was born. In the spring of 1859 he re- 
turned to his claim, and in the fall of that year 
he bought 120 acres in section 16, township 12, 
range 11, from "Uncle Jimmy" Russell, and also 
entered 40 acres. He also bought at that time 
a quarter section which had been pre-empted by 
Benjamin Driscoll. During the winter of 1864- 
65 he sold the Driscoll farm to Joseph Briscoe, 
and about the same time disposed of 120 acres 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



to Mr. Kerl. He resided upon his first farm un- 
til 1865, and occupied himself in breaking his 
land, and giving the necessary amount of care 
to his initial crops. In 1865 he sold his first 
warrant of land, and bought 120 acres located 
near the Platte River, in section 30, township 
13, range 12, from A. Kingman. Upon this 
farm he took up his residence. A few years later 
he bought an adjoining 160 acres, in section 31, 
and, as he had accumulated a large herd of cat- 
tle, he made cattle raising his chief pursuit, 
carrying on general farming also to a consider- 
able extent. He lived on this farm of 280 acres 
until March, 1898, a period of thirty years, and 
then moved to his present residence in Spring- 
field, Nebraska. He still owns his farm, and no 
small amount of town property. Mr. Fackler 
lived in a rude log house until 1876, when he 
built an elegant stone house, which is 32 feet 
long by 18 feet wide, with an L 20 feet long; 
it is certainly a substantial structure. A.bout 
1876 his barn was struck by lightning and de- 
stroyed, a number of horses perishing in the 
flames, but he immediately set about the con- 
struction of his present barn, which has a large 
basement under it. There is no lack of water 
on the farm, for two springs furnish an abund- 
ance of it, sending a cold stream through the 
milk house, thence through the cattle yards, and 
on out through the pasture. For many years 
Mr. Fackler sold his produce in Omaha, but 
since the town of Springfield was started and 
attained a degree of prosperity, he has used that 
place as his market. He helped to build the 
postoffice at Springfield, bringing tlie lumber 
from Omaha. 



In 1 85 1 Mr. Fackler was married to Eliza- 
beth Nicholson, and they have the following 
children : Samantha Ann, deceased ; Mary A., 
who has four children, and lives in Kansas; 
James A., who is engaged in farming in Idaho; 
John B., a farmer and blacksmith living in 
Kansas ; Alice, the wife of Byron Dill, of South 
Bend, Cass county, Nebraska, and mother of 
eight children living and one deceased ; Zrealda 
A., wife of George T. Burchett, living in Kan- 
sas, who has three children living and one de- 
ceased ; Jacob, Jr., deceased ; Sarah, wife of Mr. 
Heacock, who lives five miles north of her fa- 
ther's farm, and has three children: George, 
who lives in Kansas, 90 miles south of his 
father's farm ; and David, who lives in Spring- 
field, Sarpy county, Nebraska. Politically, Mr. 
Fackler is a Democrat, and has held the office of 
school director and officiated as justice of the 
peace. 



MAGNI 
a re 
— ^pre 



US NELSON GRANQUIST, 
retired farmer of Clear Creek 
precinct, Saunders county, Nebras- 
ka, is a native of Sweden, where he was born 
in 1836. His father was Nelson Granquist 
and died when his son, Magnus, was but seven 
years old. 

In early manhood Mr. Granquist followed 
farming in his native country and was after- 
wards employed in a saw mill. In i860 he 
married Mary Anderson. Accompanied by 
his wife and one daughter he crossed the ocean 
to America, drifting to Omaha in 1869. One 
year later they took a homestead claim upon 



324 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



their present farm. They were entirely with- 
out means, but had strong constitutions. They 
determined to have a home they could call 
their own. Mrs. Granquist was plucky, and 
never failed to do her part. They built a sod 
house having dimensions of lO by 14 feet, 
with one window and one door. Mr. Gran- 
quist made a rude bed, which can be seen at 
the present day, by the side of a shed at his 
home. There they lived one year without mak- 
ing any further improvements. The only 
means by which Mr. Granquist supported his 
family was by working on the B. & M. R. R. 
R. Later he purchased a shed or stable from a 
neighboring farmer and converted it into a 
house 12 by 14 feet in size. There in that 
rude home happiness began, although they used 
boxes for chairs and tables. 

Mr. Granquist subsequently cultivated his 
farm, which in time he was able to improve. 
He built a comfortable residence, barns, stables, 
etc., and set out orchards and shade trees. 
Four children blessed their union, namely: 
IMary, Carl, Emma, and Lewis. The last 
named is now deceased. Mary married 
Charles Eggert, of Kansas. She died leaving 
seven children whose names are: Leslie, Ed- 
na, Elmer, Earl, Harrison, Lily, and Eva. Carl 
tiled in Sweden. Emma married Emery Par- 
rish, and conducts the home farm; they have 
one son, Harley. 

Mr. Granquist follows the leadersliip of the 
Republican party. In his religious views he 
belongs to the Methodist church. May 24, 
1898, he was called upon to mourn the loss of 
his beloved wife, who had stood by him so 



faithfully. She was fifty-eight years old at 
the time of her demise. The subject of this 
sketch is now spending his declining years in 
comfort and ease. He showed true manhood 
and heroism by making a home for his family 
amid such difficulties, and deserves his present 
exemption from toil. 



f 



AT RICK J. HALL, ex-member of the 
legislature from Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, is an 1869 homesteader and 
prominent farmer of Clear Creek precinct. Mr. 
Hall was born in Rockbrook, County Wexford, 
Ireland, in 1838. His father, John Hall, came 
to the United States and soon afterward took 
part in the Mexican War. He was never heard 
from again. His widow, who was Bridget 
Summers before her marriage, took care of the 
children, whom she reared and educated as best 
she could. 

When Patrick was twelve years old he began 
working in a crockery store at $1 per week, 
and boarded at home. Later he obtained a sit- 
uation in the "Boston Transcript" bindery, at 
$10 per month. When sixteen years old he 
accompanied his mother to Lee county, Illinois, 
where he followed farming until 1861. He 
tlien enlisted in the Union army as a private in 
Company D, 34th Regiment, Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, serving three years. 

After his experience in the war, Mr. Hall re- 
turned to Illinois, and rented farms for several 
years. He married Cecelia Becker, a daughter 
of Charles and Mary Becker. They started life 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



325 



together on a farm and in a few years accumu- 
lated a little property, but not enough to buy a 
home in that locality. So they took what they 
had, consisting of $400, their horses, a wagon, 
and one child, Mary, and went west to seek a 
location. 

They took up a homestead claim of 80 acres, 
which is a portion of the same farm where they 
still reside. Mr. Hall built a house 12 by 20 
feet in size, which is a part of their present resi- 
dence, taking the precaution to sod the side for 
winter protection. He subsequently purchased 
160 acres of Union Pacific Railroad land, and 
now has a splendid residence and a fine set of 
buildings on his farm. He also set out a large 
number of fruit and shade trees. He owns the 
only oak grove in his section of Saunders 
county. 

Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Hall — namely : Mary, Harry, and twins, whose 
names are Fred and Paul. Mary married 
Charles Wallen, and they have four children : 
Charles, Ethel, Julia, and Gertie. The others 
are still at home. 

Mr. Hall is a stanch Republican, and has 
served his party in many different ways. Chief 
among these was as member of the legislature, 
to which he was elected in 1885. He also served 
as tax collector in Illinois and as assessor in Ne- 
braska, filling that office in a capable manner for 
ten years. He takes a very decided interest 
in educational matters. He was instrumental 
in establishing a school upon his farm, and has 
been a school director since 1870. He is a past 
commander of the G. A. R?, and has passed all 



the chairs of that organization and of the K. 
of P. 

Mr. Hall can truly be called the architect of 
his own fortunes. Aided only by his beloved 
companion, he has worked his way up from a 
modest beginning to a place of prominence in 
his community, which owes a part of its growth 
and development to him. 



§B. NICHOLSON, a well known and 
successful farmer of Platford pre- 
• cinct, Sarpy county, Nebraska, was 
born in Washington county, Indiana, in 1838, 
and is a son of G. B. and Angeline (McClure) 
Nicholson. He was one of five children: 
Elizabeth, John R., M. G., N. H., and J. B. 
Elizabeth is the wife of Jacob Fackler, a rec- 
ord of whose life appears elsewhere in this 
volume. John R., who is a farmer of Spring- 
field precinct, has seven children, namely : E. 
B.. J. B., and D. H., who have families and 
reside in Springfield; J. R., Jr., who lives in 
Springfield; Thomas and George, who live at 
home; and Emma Jane (Ball), of Louisville. 
M. G., a half brother, is a retired business 
man and former justice of the peace of Spring- 
field; N. H., a half sister, is now Mrs. Dris- 
coil, of Fremont, Nebraska; J. B. is the gen- 
tleman to whose life this sketch is devoted. 

J. B. Nicholson's childhood was spent in 
Indiana; in 1847 lie was taken by his parents 
to a farm near Mt. Vernon, Iowa, where they 
lived until 1858, when they moved to Nebraska. 
He then went with his father to Sarpy county, 



326 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



and located on the bottom land near the river, 
now owned by Mr. Barker. He pre-empted 80 
acres of land, in section 2, and his father pre- 
empted 160 acres in section 2, township 12, 
range 11, paying the government price of $1.25 
per acre. It is now worth $45 per acre. 
After remaining two years, our subject returned 
east and in Iowa was married to Miss War- 
ner. He and his father left two men in charge 
of their claims, but one of them deserted and 
our subject lost his 80 acres. Leaving his 
young wife at Mt. Vernon, Iowa, in 1862, he 
enlisted in Company F, 24th Regiment Iowa 
Vol. Inf., and served three years, or until the 
close of the war. He was in many important 
engagements, including Vicksburg, Champion 
Hill, and Cedar Creek, Va., under generals 
Grant, Sheridan, and Banks. He was taken 
captive at Cedar Creek and held a prisoner 
until the close of the war. Returning to Iowa, 
he and his wife at once started for Nebraska, 
where he began farming in the same section 
in which his original pre-emption was located. 
He settled on school land in section 36, which 
was opened for sale, and remained there for 
two years. About 1870 he sold that property 
and purchased his present home, a farm of 82 
acres, from state "supply" school land, at $7 
per acre. It was raw land and wholly unim- 
proved. He built a frame house, 16 by 24 
feet, hauling the lumber from Papillion, and 
this, with an addition in front of 14 by 24 
feet, still stands and is in good repair. He 
built a large barn at the same time, which 
is also in excellent condition now. He first set 
out Cottonwood trees, and an excellent grove 



now surrounds the buildings. He has a fine 
orchard of one and one-half acres, and a 78 
foot well, with a windmill. He has been most 
successful in his work, having overcome seem- 
ingly insurmountable obstacles confronting 
him, and is now recognized as one of the pros- 
perous men of the community. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholson are the parents of 
ten children, namely: J. H., who is engaged 
in farming in Butler county, Nebraska; Ida L. 
(Byers), of Sarpy county; N. Z. (Hinkel), 
whose husband is in the restaurant business 
at Brock, Nebraska; M. Z. (Foote), of Louis- 
ville, Nebraska; S. P., who lives at home; 
S. E. (Hester), of Louisville, Nebraska; Hen- 
rietta, a daughter living at home; and three 
children who are deceased. Politically, the sub- 
ject of this sketch is a strong Republican. Re- 
ligiously, he holds to the doctrines of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. He is a man of pub- 
lic enterprise and has aided largely in the up- 
building of his neighborhood. 






ILLIAM H. THOMPSON, a well 
known citizen of Sarpy count)'', 
Nebraska, is successfully engaged 
in agricultural pursuits in Richland precinct, 
where he owns a fine property. He is a son of 
John W. and Matilda (Key) Thompson, and 
grandson of Greenville and Malinda (McLain) 
Thompson. His grandfather came to Sarpy 
county, Nebraska, at the time of the War of 
the Rebellion, and lived in retirement until 
his demise. 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



327 



John W. Thompson was born in Nodaway 
county, Missouri, January 23, 1844, and re- 
moved to Sarpy county, Nebraska, in 1864. 
There he was married to Matilda Key, a daugh- 
ter of James and Susanna (Ward) Key, two 
of the earliest settlers of Sarpy county. In 
1872 Mrs. Thompson inherited 80 acres of 
land and money for building a home now owned 
by Alfred Thompson, and upon this tract they 
located. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson built a fine 
home and set out many fruit and shade trees. 
Their efforts met with success from the start 
and they were subsequently enabled to buy an 
adjoining quarter section of land; 80 acres 
on the east of D. O. Tunison's property; 80 
acres of G. Thompson; and 160 acres of new 
land in Papillion precinct. All of this they 
greatly improved and erected many new build- 
ings thereon. They raised 90 bushels of corn 
per acre on the new land, 50 bushels of oats, 
and 25 bushels of wheat. In later years the 
yield decreased to an average of 50 bushels of 
corn, 30 bushels of oats, and 15 bushels of 
wheat. They raised about 50 head of fine 
thoroughbred Shorthorn cattle and fed about 
75 head per year, and from 100 to 200 hogs. 
He divided the property among his sons, and 
then spent two years in South Omaha in the 
livery business, after which he purchased a 
large ranch at Long Pine, Rock county, Ne- 
braska, where, in connection with his sons, 
he has been largely engaged in raising and 
feeding cattle. Beginning at the very bottom 
as a young man, he has forged his way to the 
front and is now a prominent and influential 
citizen. As a result of his union with Matilda 



Key he had twelve children, nine of whom 
are now living. They are as follows : Will- 
iam H., our subject; George E., who is asso- 
ciated with his father, married Mary M. Nich- 
olas; Alfred is engaged in farming and is a 
machine agent for Russell & Company ; Susan- 
na is the wife of John J. Lutz, Jr. ; a son who 
died in infancy; Charles E., who married Mary 
Raymond ; Thomas E. ; Granville, deceased ; 
Mae M. ; John H., deceased; Fred Earl; and 
Avery. 

William H. Thompson was born in Sarpy 
county, Nebraska, November 7, 1866, and 
taught school six terms in the two adjoining 
school districts, in addition to carrying on 
farming. He has an excellent farm in Rich- 
land precinct, which he is conducting in a most 
capable manner, and also has an interest in 
his father's business. He is a man of high 
character, and is held in the highest esteem 
by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. 

Matilda (Key) Thompson, the mother of the 
subject of this biography, was a woman of 
rare judgment and business ability and was 
one of the many brave pioneers, who through 
their untiring efforts in all lines of work, sta- 
bility and uprightness of character, have made 
Sarpy county and Nebraska what they are to- 
day. Of all the gentle and noble women of 
which the state can boast, she has done her 
part from the days when the country was a 
wilderness and the chief inhabitants were 
wolves and ferocious Indian savages, down 
to its present high state of civilization and 
prosperity. Her life work ended December 
31, 1895, ^"d she was laid peacefully to rest 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



on January 5, 1896, in beautiful Papillion cem- 
etery, her bier being followed by representa- 
tives of every family in the neighborhood. 
She vi^as one of whom we may truthfully say: 
"Well done, good and faithful servant, thy 
life work finished, come home to rest." 



IORGNY ANDERSON, M. D., enjoys the 
reputation of being the only Swedish 
physician and surgeon in the city of 
Wahoo, Saunders county, Nebraska. He 
located in Wahoo, in May, 1893, ^^^ from 
the first was successful. His practice at the 
present time is very extensive, and his reputa- 
tion as a skilled physician and surgeon is well 
established. His office and consultation rooms 
are located in the Opera House Block and his 
fine, large residence is on Broadway. 

Dr. Anderson is a native of Stockholm, 
Sweden. He is a son of Nils Anderson. He 
was reared in his native city, and was educated 
in the University of Stockholm. After his 
graduation, he came to America, and entered 
Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois, from 
which institution he was graduated in 1887. 
He then returned to his native country, and 
spent one year in Stockholm. Arriving again 
in America, he located in Chicago, Illinois, 
where he opened an office and practiced his 
chosen profession until November, 1892. 
Leaving Chicago, he went east, and practiced 
as house physician in the Presbyterian Hospi- 
tal, of New York City, until May, 1893. 
Dr. Anderson then came west to Omaha, Ne- 



braska, in quest of a good field for exertions. 
Friends advised him to locate in Wahoo, which 
he did, and has had no reason to regret so 
doing. His success has been greater than he 
anticipated, and he enjoys the patronage of a 
large circle of clients. 

Dr. Anderson has been twice married, and 
twice he has been deprived by death of a be- 
loved wife. Each wife left him one son and 
one daughter. His first wife was Hannah Bro- 
man, of Sweden; his second. Miss Bruce, of 
Saunders county, Nebraska. 

Dr. Anderson is a valued member of the 
Nebraska State Medical Society. He also 
affiliates with the Hollanders, and with the Ben 
Hur, and A. O. U. W. organizations. He is 
favorably known throughout Saunders county 
where he enjoys the confidence of the people. 
In the winter of 1895- 1896, he was elected on 
the Republican ticket, coroner of Saunders 
county, and filled that important office in a very 
creditable manner. 



ILLIAM H. ORME,* senior mem- 
ber of the firm of W. H. Orme & Son, 
hardware and general merchants of 
Colon, Saunders county, Nebraska, is virtually 
the father of Colon. Mr. Orme is a self-made 
man in the truest sense of the term, and the 
progress of the little town of Colon has resulted 
from his efforts. 

Mr. Orme was born at Ashton, England, in 
1836, and is a son of William and Elizabeth 
(Chadwick) Orme. William Orme was killed 



SAUNDERS AKD SARPY COUNTIES 



by an accident in a coal mine before tiie birth 
of his son, William H. His widow, with her 
children, came to America, in 1840. The fam- 
ily located in Paterson, New Jersey, and young 
Orme began work in New Brunswick, New 
Jersey, at the early age of eight years, in a wall- 
paper manufactory. Shortly afterward, his 
mother moved to New Brunswick, New Jer- 
sey, where the subject of this review obtained 
work at 80 cents a week. They next moved to 
Allegheny, Pennsylvania, where William H. 
Orme secured employment in the Arbuckle 
coffee plant at $1 per week. They remained 
there two years, when they returned to New 
Brunswick. From there they moved to 
Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, where William 
H. worked in a cotton mill, and on a farm. 
After one year's residence there, they moved to 
Philadelphia, where the subject hereof worked 
in a millinery store. After living there eight 
months, they moved to Allegheny, Pennsylva- 
nia, where he was employed as a printer's devil 
in the "Pantograph" office for about five 
months, at 75 cents per week. 

Some time afterward, the family moved to 
Chicago, and young Orme sailed on the great 
lakes during the summer season and worked 
at lumber jobs during the winter, for several 
years. He subsequently went to Aurora, Illi- 
nois, and learned the shoemaking and harness- 
making business, but did not like it, and again 
returned to the lumber business at Kewanee, 
IlHnois. His next venture was at railroading. 
He began as fireman and rose to be an engineer. 
He then served as brakeman, and rose to a 
conductorship. Thus far in life, Mr. Orme had 



tried everything that he wanted to undertake, 
in the hope of finding something which exactly 
suited him, but he had not. 

Returning to Aurora, he worked nine and one- 
half years longer at the shoemaking business. 
After his marriage, which took place in 1858, 
he rented a farm one year, after which he again 
returned to shoemaking. In 1862, he followed 
both farming and shoemaking and was able 
to save a little money. Investing what money 
he had, and borrowing $500 to put with it, 
he went into the shoe business in Aurora, in 
1865, and continued thus until 1871. He built 
up quite a large and paying business, and after 
a short time sold out for $5,800. 

Mr. Orme then came west to Saunders 
county, Nebraska, and took up a homestead 
claim in section 26, township 16, range 7, which 
he owns at the present day. He built a board 
house, with dimensions of 8 by 10 feet, set out 
about one and one-half acres in fruit trees, and 
large tracts of shade trees, hedges, etc. Some 
Cottonwood trees of his own planting are now 
three feet in diameter. 

Mr. Orme at first devoted his time to rais- 
ing wheat, but this proved a failure. One 
year alone, his wheat cost him 57 cents 
a bushel, and he sold it for 40 cents. 
After such a dismal failure as that, Mr. Orme 
abandoned the idea of raising wheat and turned 
his attention to corn and cattle. The result has 
been very satisfactory. In 1888, he went to 
Colon, built a store there and opened a hard- 
ware business. In 1890, this was converted 
into a general store and is conducted as such 
at the present time, under the firm name of 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



\V. U. Orme & Son. They carry a fine, large 
stock of everything the community demands, 
including farm inplements. The firm has also 
represented the Farmers and Merchants In- 
surance Company, for the past eight years, and 
is agent for the Columbia Insurance Company, 
of Omaha. 

Mr. Orme was joined in marriage in 1858, 
with Eliza Etta Philip, a daughter of Jacob 
Philip, of Illinois. They have two children — 
George Albert and Lizzie May, the latter resid- 
ing at home. George Albert is postmaster at 
Colon. He married Jennie Crinklaw, and they 
have two children, Mabel and Hattie Ruth. 
He built a fine large residence in Colon, and is 
junior member of the firm of W. H. Orme & 
Son. 

Mr. Otme is a stanch Republican. He has 
served as justice of the peace for sixteen years, 
as assessor, one year, and is also a notary 
public. Upon first locating in Colon, the place 
did not contain a hall or any place where even 
a Sunday school could be held. Mr. Orme 
started a subscription, heading the list with 
his own donation of $50, for a hall, and suc- 
ceeded in raising $830 in three weeks' time A 
committee was appointed to build the hall, as 
the town site company had donated a lot. 
An additional lot was purchased and the hall 
was built. In 1895, Mr. Orme was instru- 
mental in getting tlie village incorporated, 
which meant for its residents many improve- 
ments, such as sidewalks, school money, etc. 
In 1899, a jail was also built, but it is a fact 
worthy of mention that no one was ever put 
into it. The town now has 23 voters, 19 of 
whom are Republican. 



Mr. Orme also built a handsome residence 
and several tenement houses, in Colon. He is 
a public spirited and enterprising citizen, and is 
one of the most highly esteemed residents of 
Center precinct. 



7-^HARLES M. JOHNSON,* one of the 
I J| representative farmers of Richland 
^*- — ^ precinct, Sarpy county, Nebraska, has 
lived an industrious and frugal life, and what 
he possesses today represents years of honest 
toil. 

Mr. Johnson was born in Danmark, Sweden, 
in 1 86 1, and is a son of Jens and Annie (Nel- 
son ) Jenson. His parents came to the United 
States in 1869, and settled in Omaha, Nebraska, 
where his father rented a farm. He later 
bought the one on which Mr. Johnson now 
lives, and built a small house near the road. 
He sold his property and went to Platte 
county, where he bought a farm and 
lived there until 1899. He then retired, 
and. now li^•es in Omaha. His wife died in 
1898, at the age of seventy-six years. Their 
children were as follows: Annie Mary, de- 
ceased ; a son, who died in infancy ; James C. ; 
Nels; John; Charles M. ; and Helena C. 

Charles M. Johnson succeeded his father as 
owner of his present property, in 1884, pay- 
ing all debts, and starting with what money he 
had saved while working by the day. \\'ith 
this small beginning he worked his way to 
the front, and now has 80 acres of well- 
improved farm land. He built a home in 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



1884, and enlarged it in 1888, and also built 
barns, corn-cribs, and other necessary out- 
buildings. He set out a fine orchard and shade 
trees, some of the trees now measuring two 
and a half feet through. The farm is abund- 
antly supplied with running water. His land 
has a good yield, and some years has produced 
60 bushels of corn and 45 bushels of 
oats to the acre. The place is well stocked, 
and he always has from 12 to 15 cattle and 
from 30 to 40 hogs, as well as good horses. 

Mr. Johnson was united in marriage with 
Christina Lund, a daughter of Jacob and Dor- 
othea (Stoll) Lund, of Omaha. She became the 
mother of two children : Leonard Arthur, and 
a daughter who died in infancy. Religiously 
the family are adherents of the Lutheran faith. 



tNTON BARRY* is a prosperous and 
enterprising farmer of Saunders county, 
<i — ^ Nebraska, and his fine farm is located 
two miles northeast of the village of Weston. 
, He was born February 20, 1849, "^ Hallaiid, 

Sweden, near the town of Warberg, and 
he is a son of Swan and Beatta (Bankson) 
Barry. He is the oldest of the family, the 
other five children being as follows : B. E., 
who is a farmer in Sand Creek; Anna, who 
lives in Sweden, and married to a Mr. Larson; 
Swan, who is married and lives in Sand Creek; 
Carl, who lives in Sweden, and has three chil- 
dren; and John, who lives near Colon, Saun- 
ders county, and has four children. 

Anton Barry came to the United States in 



1870, and upon landing in New York City went 
directly to Driftwood, Pennsylvania, and for 
the first six years followed railroading. He 
then went to Watertown, New York, but in 
1 871 he located in Muncy, Pennsylvania. In 
1874 he moved to Larry's Creek, Lycoming 
county, Pennsylvania, and in the following 
year he went to Saunders county, Nebraska, 
where he purchased 160 acres of railroad 
land. His property consisted of the north 
half of the southeast quarter and the east 
half of the northeast quarter of section 
3, township 14, range 6. He paid $7 per acre, 
having five years' time, but as the crops were 
poor he was obliged to make a contract for ten 
years, with interest at six per cent. In the fall 
of 1876 he built a frame house 14 by 22 feet in 
size, also a barn with a straw roof, and with the 
money he had saved while railroading in Penn- 
sylvania he paid $335 for a team of horses, a 
wagon and harness. He set out a fine orchard 
of plums, apples, peaches, and other fruit, and 
also put out shade trees around the house, 
which now make the yard look beautiful. He 
also dug a 50-'foot well, and made many other 
improvements. As fortune favored him, he 
bought, in 1880, 80 acres, comprising the 
northwest quarter of the northeast quarter. 
and the northeast quarter of the northwest 
quarter of section 2 for a consideration of 
$2,500. He has about 100 hogs and 50 cattle, 
with about 46 or 47 acres in pasture and 
meadow. The subject of this sketch is a hard 
worker, and through his determination to get 
ahead he has met with considerable success. 
Mr. Berry and his wife Hannah, whom he 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



married in 1874, have the following children: 
Hilma, who is at Omaha; Sophia, Gustav, 
Emil, Edwin, and Ideal. In politics he is a 
Populist, while in religious views he belongs to 
the Lutheran church. 



K 



ARTIN VAN HORN,* a prosperous 
rnier and extensive fruit grower of 
'Ashland, Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, owns one of the finest and best improved 
farms in Ashland precinct. Mr. Van Horn 
was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, in 1843. 
He is a son of William and Catherine (Rol- 
ler) Van Horn. His father first saw the light 
in 1797 and died in 1844. His mother died 
in 1879, aged sixty-seven years. Four chil- 
dren were born to them, namely : Mary, Henry, 
Aaron, and Martin, of whom this writing is a 
memoir. 

Henry Van Horn was born in Green town- 
ship, Mahoning county, Ohio, in 1833. He 
purchased and settled upon the 80-acre farm 
formerly owned by D. J. Sheldon, in Green 
township. This farm contained a house known 
as the granite, stone and plaster house, as it was 
made mostly from granite. Henry Van Horn 
continued to reside in this granite house from 
the fall of 1872 to the spring of 1876. He 
then built a handsome modern residence and 
also has a fine set of buildings. He still lives 
upon the same farm and devotes his time to 
raising stock and grain. His marriage with 
Mary Miller, a daughter of Simon Miller, of 
Ohio, resulted in three children, as follows: 



Ellen J., wife of D. Miller; William, deceased; 
and Ida, wife of George Wallen. 

Martin Van Horn was reared and educated 
in his native county. On August 11, 1862, he 
enlisted in the Union army as a private in Com- 
pany A, I nth Reg. Ohio Vol. Inf., and served 
until the close of the war. He participated in 
many of the fiercest battles, and endured many 
hardships. He served all through the Atlanta 
campaign, and has a record of being 72 days 
under fire, and 120 days without having his 
shoes off. He had several narrow escapes, the 
most remarkable of which was the removal 
of the skin from his temple by a bullet. 

At the close of the war Mr. Van Horn went 
home and was soon filled with a desire to go 
west. In 1869 he came to Nebraska, where 
he worked out during the busy season for sev- 
eral years. At odd times he looked over the 
country and enjoyed some fine sport in shooting 
and fishing. To this day he is a skilled marks- 
man. 

In 1872 he purchased 80 acres of land which 
had been pre-empted by Emelin Rockwell, now 
residing in Green precinct. Upon this land, 
Mr. Van Horn built a house having dimensions 
of 16 by 24 feet, the lumber of which he bought 
in Ashland, and the studding, which was 
part Cottonwood, on the Elkhorn River. A pole 
and straw barn was also constructed. In 1892 
these buildings were replaced by a handsome 
modern residence and a large, commodious barn 
30 by 50 feet in size. Since then the old house 
has been utilized as a corn-crib. In 1873 Mr. 
Van Horn set out a fine orchard which he 
subsequently greatly enlarged. He now has a 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



great variety of choice fruit-bearing trees. In 
addition to this he has fine groves of ever- 
greens, etc. 

Martin Van Horn married Agnes Wilson, a 
daughter of Nathaniel and Mary Wilson. In 
1894 he was called upon to mourn the loss 
of his beloved companion, who died, aged for- 
ty-eight years. They were not blessed with 
a family of their own, but adopted a daughter, 
whom they called Eva. Eva married Charles 
Weir, and has one daughter, Viola. They re- 
side upon the farm with the subject of this 
sketch, and help to brighten his home. 

Mr. Van Horn is highly esteemed by his 
neighbors. In politics he is independent, and 
he entertains broad, liberal ideas on the sub- 
ject of religion. 



Tf" 



iETER SWANBERG,* a prominent 
irmer living near Malmo, Saunders 
county, Nebraska, is one of the repre- 
sentative citizens of that section, in which he 
owns considerable property. 

Mr. Swanberg is a native of Sweden, and a 
son of Swan and Ingery (Bentson) Nelson, 
both of whom are deceased. He was the second 
of five children, as follows : Nils, who is mar- 
ried, and is a farmer living south of Wahoo, 
Saunders county; Peter; Sigura, who lives in 
Swenden; Hannah, a resident of Saunders 
county; and Charles, who lives in the same sec- 
tion as does Peter, in Mariposa precinct. Peter 
Swanberg came from Sweden to the United 
States and located in the state of Illinois. In 



1873 he -moved west to Omaha, Nebraska, and 
remained there for four years, being a portion 
of the time in the employ of J. P. Poppleton. 
He then located in Saunders county, Nebraska, 
and first bought the north half of the northeast 
quarter of section 21, where his home now is. 
He subsequently leased 80 acres, the north 
half of the southeast quarter of section 16, 
which he purchased some four or five years 
later. He set out a grove and fruit trees, and 
built his first house with dimensions of 12 by 
14 feet, the lumber for which he hauled from 
Fremont. A few years later he erected a good, 
large barn and other substantial outbuildings, 
including a crib and granary. A further ad- 
dition was made to his house in 1885, and in 
1898 another good-sized barn was built to the 
west of the house. He is engaged in grain and 
stock raising on a large scale, making a spe- 
cialty of white-faced cattle and Poland-China 
hogs. A creek runs through the property, fur- 
nishing a fine supply of water for the stock 
nearly the whole year. In 1900 he increased 
his orchard by about 30 or 40 trees, raising a 
large variety of fruit. In addition to the prop- 
erty already mentioned, he purchased 192 acres 
of the Mary Fisher estate, upon which Malmo 
is located, the last purchase being a very desira- 
ble piece of property. He formerly did his 
business at Weston, and also received his mail 
there, but he now trades at Malmo. He is a 
wide-awake and intelligent business man, and 
enjoys the friendship of a host of acquaint- 
ances. 

Mr. Swanberg was united in marriage with 
Anna Swanson, who died in 1897. Their union 



334 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



resulted in the following children: Nettie, 
who died when quite young ; Will ; Henry, de- 
ceased; Nettie; Henry; Otto; Clarence; a 
daughter who is deceased; and Victor. The 
subject of this sketch was again married in 
1898 to Anna Erikson, by whom he has a 
daughter, Manuel. In politics Mr. Swanberg is 
a Republican. He is a faithful member of the 
Lutheran church, of Malmo. 



@SCAR HANSON,* deputy county treas- 
urer of Saunders county, Nebraska, was 
born in Stocking precinct, Saunders 
county, November 9, 1873. He is a son 
of Hans Hanson, who was born in Sweden, 
and came with his wife to the United States 
in 1871. 

Hans Hanson first located in Fremont, Ne- 
braska, where he remained one year. In 1872, 
he settled on a farm in Stocking precinct, and 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. The last few 
years he has not been actively engaged in the 
management of the old homestead, but has 
left this to the care of his son John. There 
were reared six children, as follows : Hans, Jr., 
who conducts a hardware store in Wahoo; 
John, now engaged in the management of the 
homestead ; Nels, who is engaged in the imple- 
ment business in Wahoo; Ernest, a telegraph 
operator; Oscar, the subject hereof, and Aaron. 

Oscar Hanson was educated in the district 
schools, and in Luther Academy, of Wahoo. 
His education was supplemented with a course 
at the Lincoln Normal University. In 1893, 



he went to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he 
held a position as bookkeeper, for one year. 
He then returned to Wahoo, and was engaged 
in the implement business one year. In 1895, 
he became clerk for the county treasurer, B. P. 
Olson, and on January i, 1898, he received the 
appointment of deputy county treasurer, under 
J. L. Coleman, and is now the incumbent of 
that position. 

In 1898, he was married to Nora Ryan, a 
daughter of Mike Ryan of Wahoo. They 
have one son, Lyman. Mr. Hanson is a Pop- 
ulist, but is holding office under the banner 
of,^he Fusionists. He is a very progressive 
young man, and has many admirers of his ster- 
ling worth and business ability. 



§AMES SCHULZ,* an enterprising and 
successful man of Union precinct, Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, has attained con- 
siderable prominence through his large stock 
farm. He makes a specialty of the Percheron 
breed of horses, importing many from France 
and raising others, many of which have been 
sold at very high prices. In addition to con- 
ducting his farm, he is the owner and propri- 
etor of a fine saloon in Yutan, complete in all 
its appointments. 

Mr. Schulz was born in Handorf, Germany, 
in 1 85 1, and is a son of Jurgen and Margaret 
(Mather) Schulz. His father was born in 
Handorf in 1823, where he followed agricul- 
tural pursuits until 1867. In that year he emi- 
grated from Germany to America, first locat- 
ing in Kankakee county, Illinois, and later in 



SAUNDERS AND SARPY COUNTIES 



Booneville, Dallas county, Iowa, where he re- 
mained until 1 87 1. He then removed to Saun- 
ders county, Nebraska, by team and wagon, 
taking his family and all his belongings. He 
purchased 80 acres of land of Mr. Cooley, on 
which there was a small building, with dimen- 
sions of 14 by 20 feet, and into this he moved 
with his family. He afterward bought three 
80-acre tracts of railroad land and established 
a good residence, setting out many trees and 
making other important improvements. He 
owned some property in Yutan, and there he 
spent the last seven years of his life, dying in 
July, 1897. His widow survives him and re- 
sides at Yutan, being eighty years old. The 
following children were born to them : Au- 
gusta, who died in Germany ; John, a record of 
whose life appears elsewhere in this biograph- 
ical record; an infant son and Daniel, both of 
whom died in Germany; James; Anna, the 
wife of Hening Henck, of Yutan; Hans, of 
Union precinct; and Margaret, the wife of J. 
Seiver, of Yutan. He was 'a Republican in 
politics, and in religious faith a Lutheran. 

James Schulz spent his early manhood in 
Illinois and Iowa engaged in farming, and 
came west to Nebraska with his father in 1871. 
They went by wagon and endured all of the 
hardships incident to pioneer life, as he drove 
the cattle, and they were obliged to camp out 
wherever night overtook them. In 1875, after 
his marriage, in consideration for faithful ser- 
vices rendered at home, his father gave him 
160 acres of land in section 33, Union precinct, 
Saunders county, Nebraska. There he erected 
a small frame house and improved the place in 



different ways, setting out an orchard and many 
shade trees. He subsequently erected a fine 
residence, and also built a large barn, as well as 
other needed farm buildings. He afterward 
bought 160 acres of land in section 29, of M. 
White, in 1877. In 1884 he purchased the 
thoroughbred stallion Tobias, a fine Percheron 
horse, and 13 fine brood mares of the same 
stock, and began to raise Percheron horses. In 
1887 he imported seven car loads of horses 
from France, and continued to import horses 
until 1890, when horses had so far depreciated 
in value that there ceased to be any money in 
them. He has sold from his stock farm many 
horses, ranging in price from $250 to $2,000 
each. At one time he was offered $7,000 for 
a horse, which died but a short time after his 
refusal to sell. He has a fine herd of 200 cat- 
tle, and has fed as many as 12,000 head per 
year, marketing in Omaha and Chicago. In 
1899 he opened a saloon in Yutan, which he 
runs in addition to the f^rm, with the assist- 
ance of his son John. 

Mr. Schulz was united in marriage with 
Franke Seiver, a daughter of John and Mag- 
dalena (Wick) Seiver. Her father died in 
Germany in 1861, and his widow resides at 
the home of John Schulz, in Union precinct. 
Ten children were born to them: Etta, the 
wife of Peter Ferguson, by whom she has a 
son, Harry; John; George; Henry; Christ; 
Annie; Lena; Benjamin, and his twin brother 
who died in infancy; and a daughter, who 
died in infancy. Fraternally Mr. Schulz is a 
member of the K. of P. lodge and the A. O. 
U. W. 



INDEX 



JSlograpblcal 



A 

Acker, Warren E Ill 

Adams, Charles H 135 

Adams, Jay Fletcher .... 168 

Anderson, Alfred 33 

Anderson, John A 203 

Anderson, Nels J 142 

Anderson, Torgny, M. D. . . 328 

B 

Bachelder, Sias B 293 

Ballon, Martin E 269 

Barry, Anton 331 

Barry, Hon. John H 157 

Bartek, Joseph B 304 

Becker, W. N.,Jr 309 

Bender, Jonas 238 

Bengtson, Olof 75 

Bennett, F. M 137 

Blakeslee, Norman E. . . . 170 

Blunk, H. F 198 

Boob, Paul 250 

Bor, Rev. Matthew .... 123 

Bostrom, John A. .... . 31 

Boulier, Hon. Alexander . . 51 

Bowen, William 65 

Brokaw, William A 46 

Bruse, Gust 157 

Bruning, W. H 53 

Bryan, William Jefferson . . 213 

Burch, Charles W 115 

Bush, J. C. F., M. D 41 

Bush, Dr. R. D 97 

Butterfield, Albert Parsons . . 300 



C 

Caldwell, Francis E 15 

Calhoun, C. F 296 

Campbell, Peter 288 

Campbell, William R. . . . 178 

Carpenter, R. C 206 

Chamberlain, Thomas Knight . 318 

Chapek, Anton 16 

Chapek, Anton B 114 

Cheever, John L 183 

Christanson, Christian . . . 165 

Church, Philander P. ... 86 

Coleman, John L 267 

Cordes, Henry 25 

Crawford, John H 126 

Crinklaw. Walter 176 

Cruzan, M. T 72 

D 

Daley, Jerry 166 

Daniell, Richard 13 

Davidson, W. H 259 

Dech, Josiah J 219 

Dech, William E 82 

Dech. Hon. William H. . . . 91 

Dolezal, John 155 

Duerrbaum, Henry F. ... 133 

Dunlap, Nathan 287 

Dunn, Michael 235 

E 

Eckery, Charles Henry ... 52 

Ekdahl, August O. '. . . . 87 



F 

Fackler, Jacob 322 

Farris, Thomas W 128 

Ease, Henry 231 

Fiedler, James 71 

Fleming, Walter 31 

Flodman, Professor J. H., A. M. 96 

Fraser, David 202 

Fricke, Andrew H 26 

Fritzinger, Samuel H. . . . 229 

Frostrom, J. Alfred .... 297 

Fuller, Hon. Abel B 294 

G 

Gibson, Peter 196 

Gilkeson, H 134 

Gillespie, Patrick H 274 

Glesmann, John D 232 

Glover, Royal G 254 

Good, Hon. Benjamin Franklin 11 

Good, Edward E. . . " . . 258 

Goss. Hon. John Q 151 

Goucher, Carl R 156 

Granquist, Magnus Nelson . . 323 

H 

Hagstadt, Alfred 48 

Hakel, Frank 311 

Hall, Patrick J 324 

Hall. Samuel B 281 

Hallner, John 308 

Handlir, James Ill 

Hanson, Oscar 334 



Harder. Hans J 285 

Harmon, William J 101 

Harrell, J. W 63 

Hassett, Hon. James .... 285 

Hatfield, Isaac B 117 

Hawkinson, A. F 187 

Hawthorne, Vincent L. . . . 136 

Heaton, Robert A 182 

Hecklander, Otto 193 

Henry, Harvey Carpenter . . 290 

Henry, Mrs. Lucy J 84 

Hill, Professor Samuel M., A. 

M., L. H. D 133 

Hills, M. Stillman .... 143 

Hiltsher, Joseph 206 

Holman, Thomas Berton . . 15 

Horn, John Wesley .... 223 

Howard, Hon. Edgar . . . 244 

Hruby, Frank 291 

Hurst, Ernest 104 

I 

Isaacson, Lave 141 

J 

Jamison, William A 241 

Johnson, Charles M 330 

Johnson, Charles 83 

Johnson, Eric 270 

Johnson, James E 251 

Johnson, Ralph C 54 

Johnson, Rodney K 61 

Johnston, Fred 166 

Juckett, Ansel Spalding . . . 

K 

Keetle, Christopher .... 216 
Kerr, Rev. David Ramsey, Ph. 

D., D. D 17 

Keyes, Clarence E 240 

Killian, Charles A 47 

Kirkpatrick, Charles F., M. D. 221 

Knapp. Albert C 93 

Knapp,JohnW 197 

Koerber, Paul Ernest, M. D. . 303 
Kolb, Johann Friederich . 

Kraus, Joseph 42 

Krause, Frank 

L 
LaChapelle, Joseph B. . . . 

Lambert, G. S 

Larson, Gust 226 



PAGE 

Larson, John 33 

Larson, Lars 116 

Larson, Rev. S. G 299 

Laudenschlagtr, Louis . 179 

Lesieur, Louis 286 

Lichtenberg, Louis .... 76 
Liles, James . . . . . .211 

LiUibridge, C. E 106 

Lind, John A 154 

Lindau, P. 179 

Lindblad, John 145 

Lundquist, F. A 66 

M 

Madigan, Thomas .... 163 

Mastrom, Rev. P. F 296 

McCluhan, Ira 58 

Meiners, George 191 

Mengel, Ellis V 195 

Meredith, George W., M. D. . 207 

Merriman, Samuel .... 220 

Miller, Abraham B 218 

Miller, Charles 173 

Miller, Fred 74 

Miller, John N 314 

Miller, W.E 263 

Monahon, Bernard .... 275 

Morrison, William .... 277 

Mosier, Charles W 58 

Mott, John H 217 

Mott, William C 212 

Mowinkel, Henry 272 

Mullins, George M 25 

N 

Nelson, N. H 147 

Nelson, Olof 65 

Nelson, P. T 146 

Nicholson, J. B 325 

Nigh, Charles Henry .... 192 

Nordstrom, John 230 

Nygren, Peter 35 

O 

Ockander, Jacob 57 

O'Kane, John W 78 

Olsen, Eric 41 

Olson, John Albert .... 194 

Orme, William H 328 

Ostenbcrg, Otto 107 

P 

Pallas, James 1S6 

Peck, Ernest French .... 51 

Perkey, Charles 21 



PAGE 

Perry, Charles 64 

Peters, Otto F 113 

Peters, W. H 253 

Peterson, Bent 264 

Petty, John 257 

Phelps, Douglas R 122 

Pickett, Thomas J 242 

Pospisil, Anton 68 

Pospisil, J. J 204 

Ptacek, Joseph 307 

R 

Railsback, John C 222 

Reed, James A 84 

Rehak, Frank 108 

Reichert, Charles 249 

Reynolds, James W 12 

Rishel, M.Y 276 

Robinson, Sanders P. . . . 121 

Rogers, Henry 208 

Rogers, William 103 

Rose, Caleb H 279 

Roslund, Andrew 37 

Rutter, Taylor Vail .... 76 

Ruttman, C. F 148 

S 

Sams', Peter 131 

Sander, Herman A 27 

Schere, Lewis J 43 

Schram, George 27 

Schulz, James 334 

Schulz, John 125 

Schwenck, William A. ... 23 

Shanahan, William .... 44 

Sharp, Charles L 24 

Shepard, Charles F 316 

Sherman, John F 287 

Shirley, Silas 17 

Smith. Charles Edward ... 22 

Smith, John 45 

Smith, John G., M. D. . . . 88 

Smith, William H 278 

Smith, Zenas B 167 

Snelling, John A 201 

Snyder, F. J 158 

Soland, Adolph 84 

Sornborger, Hon. Samuel Henry 282 

Soukup, Anton 118 

Slender, John 321 

Stevpart, Rev. S. J 268 

Stone, Melville W., M. D. . . 184 

Stuart, Andrew E., M. D. . . 105 



Stuehm, Christ . 
Swanberg, Peter 



Tegelberg, Charles Louis 
Theede, John . 
Thompson, Nils 
Thompson, William H 
Throop, Mrs. Ellen M 
Thulin, Peter . . 
Titus, William K. 
Tomes, Ernest J. . 
Torell, Rev. John 



PAOK 

Trumble, A. W 246 

Turney, Charles C 95 

Turney, Darius P 102 

U 

Upjohn, Edward J 13 

V 

Van Driel, R. B 153 

Van Horn, Martin .... 332 

von Mansfelde,AlexanderS.,M.D. 224 

W 

Ward, John M 233 

Way, Frank E., M. D. ... 127 



Weber, John 239 

Webster, R. F 174 

Wehner, Henry 38 

Whitney, Byron F 124 

Wilhelm, Noah 215 

Will, G. B. M 81 

Williams, William L. ... 28 

Woita, John 180 

Z 

Zeeb, John Jacob 244 

Zeorian, Solomon 256 

Zwiebel. Philip 239 



f^ortraits 



Acker, Warren E 110 

Boulier, Hon. Alexander . . 50 

Bush, J. C. F., M. D. . . . 40 

Coleman, John L 266 

Dech, Hon. William H. . . . 90 
Fiedler, Mr. and Mrs. James, 

and family "0 

Fleming, Walter 30 

Fritzinger, Samuel H., residence 

of 228 

Good, Hon. Benjamin Franklin 10 

Goss, Hon. John Q 150 



PAGE 

Harmon, William J 100 

Hassett, Hon. James .... 284 

Isaacson, Mr. and Mrs. Lave . 140 

Johnson, Rodney K 60 

Koerber, Paul Ernest, M. D. . 302 

Liles, James 210 

Madigan, Thomas .... 161 

Madigan, Thomas, residence of 160 

Meiners, George 190 

Miller, Mrs. James, Charles, 

Thomas J. and Martha . . 172 

Perkey, Charles 20 



Reichert, Charles 248 

Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Sanders 

P., and family 120 

Sams', Peter 130 

Snelling, John A 200 

Stender, Mr. and Mrs. John, and 

family 320 

Will, Mr. and Mrs. G. B. M., 

and family 80 

Zwiebel, Philip 238 




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